Science.gov

Sample records for abdominal perineal resection

  1. Composite mesh and gluteal fasciocutaneous rotation flap for perineal hernia repair after abdominoperineal resection: a novel technique.

    PubMed

    Papadakis, Marios; Hübner, Gunnar; Bednarek, Marzena; Arafkas, Mohamed

    2017-03-01

    Perineal hernia is an uncommon complication following abdominoperineal rectum resection. Several surgical procedures have been proposed for perineal hernia repair, including perineal, laparoscopic and abdominal approaches. Repair techniques can be classified into primary suture techniques, mesh placements and repairs with autogenous tissue. We report a 68-year-old man with a perineal hernia, who underwent a pelvic floor reconstruction with a transperineal composite mesh and a gluteal fasciocutaneous rotation flap. We conclude that a combined approach with transperineal mesh reconstruction and gluteal fasciocutaneous flap could be an alternative choice in perineal hernia repair after abdominoperineal resection.

  2. Large bowel resection

    MedlinePlus

    ... colectomy; Right hemicolectomy; Left hemicolectomy; Hand assisted bowel surgery; Low anterior resection; Sigmoid colectomy; Subtotal colectomy; Proctocolectomy; Colon resection; Laparoscopic colectomy; Colectomy - partial; Abdominal perineal resection

  3. Perineal colostomy: an alternative to avoid permanent abdominal colostomy: operative technique, results and reflection

    PubMed Central

    da SILVA, Alcino Lázaro; HAYCK, Johnny; DEOTI, Beatriz

    2014-01-01

    Background The most common injury to indicate definitive stoma is rectal cancer. Despite advances in surgical treatment, the abdominoperineal resection is still the most effective operation in radical treatment of malignancies of the distal rectum invading the sphincter and anal canal. Even with all the effort that surgeons have to preserve anal sphincters, abdominoperineal amputation is still indicated, and a definitive abdominal colostomy is necessary. This surgery requires patients to live with a definitive abdominal colostomy, which is a condition that modify body image, is not without morbidity and has great impact on the quality of life. Aim To evaluate the technique of abdominoperineal amputation with perineal colostomy with irrigation as an alternative to permanent abdominal colostomy. Method Retrospective analysis of medical records of 55 patients underwent abdominoperineal resection of the rectum with perineal colostomy in the period 1989-2010. Results The mean age was 58 years, 40 % men and 60 % women. In 94.5% of patients the indication for surgery was for cancer of the rectum. In some patients were made three valves, other two valves and in the remaining no valve at all. Complications were: mucosal prolapse, necrosis of the lowered segment and stenosis. Conclusion The abdominoperineal amputation with perineal colostomy is a good therapeutic option in the armamentarium of the surgical treatment of rectal cancer. PMID:25626931

  4. Salvage abdominoperineal resection and perineal wound healing in local recurrent or persistent anal cancer.

    PubMed

    Ferenschild, Floris T J; Vermaas, Maarten; Hofer, Stefan O; Verhoef, Cornelis; Eggermont, Alexander M M; de Wilt, Johannes H W

    2005-11-01

    The primary treatment for anal cancer is chemoradiation (CRT). Failures after CRT are potentially curable with an abdominoperineal resection (APR). A major problem of surgery in the anal area is poor healing of the perineal wound. Between 1985 and 2000, 129 patients treated for anal cancer were retrospectively reviewed. Of the 24 patients with local failure, 18 patients were treated with an APR. The aim of this study was to review the results and long-term outcome after salvage APR, with special emphasis on perineal wound healing. Mean age at diagnosis was 59 (range: 41-83) years. After a median of 16 months, only 2 patients developed a local recurrence. The 5-year overall survival was 30%. In 11 patients the perineal wound was closed primarily, in 3 patients the perineal wound was left open, and in 4 patients a vertical rectus abdominus musculocutaneous (VRAM) flap was used. Perineal wound breakdown occurred in 5 of the 14 patients (36%) not treated with primary muscle reconstruction. In all patients treated with a VRAM flap the perineal wound healed primarily. In the present study salvage APR in recurrent or persistent anal cancer results in good local control and 5-year overall survival of 30%. When performing an APR a VRAM flap reconstruction should be considered to prevent disabling perineal wound complications.

  5. A comparison of surgical outcomes of perineal urethrostomy plus penile resection and perineal urethrostomy in twelve calves with perineal or prescrotal urethral dilatation

    PubMed Central

    Marzok, M.A.; El-khodery, S.A.

    2013-01-01

    The clinical diagnosis, ultrasonographic findings, surgical management, outcome, and survival rate of perineal or prescrotal urethral dilatation in 12 male calves are described. All calves were crossbred and intact males. The most noticeable clinical presentations were perineal (n= 10) or prescrotal (n= 2) swellings and micturition problems. The main ultrasonographic findings were oval shaped dilatation of the urethra in all animals with dimensions of 40-75 X 30-62 mm. The calves with perineal urethral dilatation were treated by perineal urethrostomy (n= 4) and partial penile transection including the dilated urethra and urethral fistulation (n= 6). Prescrotal urethral dilatations were treated by penile transection proximal to the dilatation site (n= 2). Cystitis and stricture of the urethra were recorded postoperatively for two of the calves that underwent perineal urethrostomy. Nine animals were slaughtered at normal body weight approximately 6-8 months after the surgical treatment. Three animals were slaughtered after approximately three to four months, two of them having gained insufficient body weight. Our study shows that ultrasonography is a useful tool for the diagnosis of urethral dilatation in bovine calves. Our study also shows that the partial penile transection may be a suitable and satisfactory choice of surgical treatment for correcting the urethral dilatation in bovine calves. PMID:26623322

  6. Perineal herniation of an ileal neobladder following radical cystectomy and consecutive rectal resection for recurrent bladder carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, PA; Mehdorn, AS; Puehse, G; Senninger, N; Rijcken, E

    2016-01-01

    Secondary perineal herniation of intraperitoneal contents represents a rare complication following procedures such as abdominoperineal rectal resection or cystectomy. We present a case of a perineal hernia formation with prolapse of an ileum neobladder following radical cystectomy and rectal resection for recurrent bladder cancer. Following consecutive resections in the anterior and posterior compartment of the lesser pelvis, the patient developed problems emptying his neobladder. Clinical examination and computed tomography revealed perineal herniation of his neobladder through the pelvic floor. Through a perineal approach, the hernial sac could be repositioned, and via a combination of absorbable and non-absorbable synthetic mesh grafts, the pelvic floor was stabilised. Follow-up review at one year after hernia fixation showed no signs of recurrence and no symptoms. In cases of extensive surgery in the lesser pelvis with associated weakness of the pelvic compartments, meshes should be considered for closure of the pelvic floor. Development of biological meshes with reduced risk of infection might be an interesting treatment option in these cases. PMID:26985818

  7. Functional outcome after perineal stapled prolapse resection for external rectal prolapse

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background A new surgical technique, the Perineal Stapled Prolapse resection (PSP) for external rectal prolapse was introduced in a feasibility study in 2008. This study now presents the first results of a larger patient group with functional outcome in a mid-term follow-up. Methods From December 2007 to April 2009 PSP was performed by the same surgeon team on patients with external rectal prolapse. The prolapse was completely pulled out and then axially cut open with a linear stapler at three and nine o'clock in lithotomy position. Finally, the prolapse was resected stepwise with the curved Contour® Transtar™ stapler at the prolapse's uptake. Perioperative morbidity and functional outcome were prospectively measured by appropriate scores. Results 32 patients participated in the study; median age was 80 years (range 26-93). No intraoperative complications and 6.3% minor postoperative complications occurred. Median operation time was 30 minutes (15-65), hospital stay 5 days (2-19). Functional outcome data were available in 31 of the patients after a median follow-up of 6 months (4-22). Preoperative severe faecal incontinence disappeared postoperatively in 90% of patients with a reduction of the median Wexner score from 16 (4-20) to 1 (0-14) (P < 0.0001). No new incidence of constipation was reported. Conclusions The PSP is an elegant, fast and safe procedure, with good functional results. Trial registration ISRCTN68491191 PMID:20205956

  8. Modern reconstructive techniques for abdominal wall defects after oncologic resection.

    PubMed

    Khansa, Ibrahim; Janis, Jeffrey E

    2015-04-01

    Resection of abdominal wall tumors often leaves patients with debilitating soft tissue defects. Modern reconstructive techniques can be used to restore abdominal wall integrity. In this article, we present an overview of preoperative patient evaluation, analysis of the defect, surgical planning, and the spectrum of available surgical techniques, ranging from simple to complex. The established clinical evidence in the field of abdominal wall reconstruction is summarized and a case example is provided.

  9. Intra-abdominal drainage following pancreatic resection: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Čečka, Filip; Loveček, Martin; Jon, Bohumil; Skalický, Pavel; Šubrt, Zdeněk; Neoral, Čestmír; Ferko, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To study all the aspects of drain management in pancreatic surgery. METHODS: We conducted a systematic review according to the PRISMA guidelines. We searched the Cochrane Central Registry of Controlled Trials, EMBASE, Web of Science, and PubMed (MEDLINE) for relevant articles on drain management in pancreatic surgery. The reference lists of relevant studies were screened to retrieve any further studies. We included all articles that reported clinical studies on human subjects with elective pancreatic resection and that compared various strategies of intra-abdominal drain management, such as drain vs no drain, selective drain use, early vs late drain extraction, and the use of different types of drains. RESULTS: A total of 19 studies concerned with drain management in pancreatic surgery involving 4194 patients were selected for this systematic review. We included studies analyzing the outcomes of pancreatic resection with and without intra-abdominal drains, studies comparing early vs late drain removal and studies analyzing different types of drains. The majority of the studies reporting equal or superior results for pancreatic resection without drains were retrospective and observational with significant selection bias. One recent randomized trial reported higher postoperative morbidity and mortality with routine omission of intra-abdominal drains. With respect to the timing of drain removal, all of the included studies reported superior results with early drain removal. Regarding the various types of drains, there is insufficient evidence to determine which type of drain is more suitable following pancreatic resection. CONCLUSION: The prophylactic use of drains remains controversial. When drains are used, early removal is recommended. Further trials comparing types of drains are ongoing. PMID:26523110

  10. Perineal evisceration secondary to a bite injury in a dog with an untreated perineal hernia

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Daniel; Lux, Cassie; Seibert, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    Emergency surgery was performed on a 6-year-old castrated male springer spaniel dog with evisceration of most of the small intestinal tract through the perineal region, secondary to a dog attack. This is the first report describing successful treatment of perineal evisceration secondary to dog attack at an untreated perineal hernia, employing abdominal and perineal approaches. PMID:27708442

  11. Perineal evisceration secondary to a bite injury in a dog with an untreated perineal hernia.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Daniel; Lux, Cassie; Seibert, Rachel

    2016-10-01

    Emergency surgery was performed on a 6-year-old castrated male springer spaniel dog with evisceration of most of the small intestinal tract through the perineal region, secondary to a dog attack. This is the first report describing successful treatment of perineal evisceration secondary to dog attack at an untreated perineal hernia, employing abdominal and perineal approaches.

  12. Resection and Abdominal Wall Reconstruction of a Desmoid Tumor with Endometrioma Features

    PubMed Central

    Majors, Jaqueline; Stoikes, Nathaniel F.; Nejati, Reza

    2016-01-01

    Desmoid tumors are rare, musculoaponeurotic mesenchymal origin tumors arising from the proliferation of well-differentiated fibroblasts. Desmoid tumors may arise from any location with the abdominal cavity, abdominal wall and extremity locations being most frequent. We present the case of a 35-year-old female with a history of endometriosis who presented palpable abdominal mass and cyclic abdominal pain. Resection was performed for a presumed desmoid soft tissue tumor. Final pathology demonstrated desmoid histology admixed with abdominal wall endometriosis (endometrioma). This unique pathologic finding has only been rarely reported and is discussed with a brief review of the literature. PMID:27247824

  13. Management of abdominal compartment syndrome after transurethral resection of the prostate.

    PubMed

    Gaut, Megan M; Ortiz, Jaime

    2015-01-01

    Acute abdominal compartment syndrome is most commonly associated with blunt abdominal trauma, although it has been seen after ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm, liver transplantation, pancreatitis, and massive volume resuscitation. Acute abdominal compartment syndrome develops once the intra-abdominal pressure increases to 20-25 mmHg and is characterized by an increase in airway pressures, inadequate ventilation and oxygenation, altered renal function, and hemodynamic instability. This case report details the development of acute abdominal compartment syndrome during transurethral resection of the prostate with extra- and intraperitoneal bladder rupture under general anesthesia. The first signs of acute abdominal compartment syndrome in this patient were high peak airway pressures and difficulty delivering tidal volumes. Management of the compartment syndrome included re-intubation, emergent exploratory laparotomy, and drainage of irrigation fluid. Difficulty with ventilation should alert the anesthesiologist to consider abdominal compartment syndrome high in the list of differential diagnoses during any endoscopic bladder or bowel case.

  14. [Management of abdominal compartment syndrome after transurethral resection of the prostate].

    PubMed

    Gaut, Megan M; Ortiz, Jaime

    2015-01-01

    Acute abdominal compartment syndrome is most commonly associated with blunt abdominal trauma, although it has been seen after ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm, liver transplantation, pancreatitis, and massive volume resuscitation. Acute abdominal compartment syndrome develops once the intra-abdominal pressure increases to 20-25mmHg and is characterized by an increase in airway pressures, inadequate ventilation and oxygenation, altered renal function, and hemodynamic instability. This case report details the development of acute abdominal compartment syndrome during transurethral resection of the prostate with extra- and intraperitoneal bladder rupture under general anesthesia. The first signs of acute abdominal compartment syndrome in this patient were high peak airway pressures and difficulty delivering tidal volumes. Management of the compartment syndrome included re-intubation, emergent exploratory laparotomy, and drainage of irrigation fluid. Difficulty with ventilation should alert the anesthesiologist to consider abdominal compartment syndrome high in the list of differential diagnoses during any endoscopic bladder or bowel case.

  15. Simultaneous resection of left atrial myxoma and esophageal carcinoma via right thoraco-abdominal approach

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Buqing; Lu, Xiaohu; Gong, Qixing

    2016-01-01

    Concomitant occurrence of atrial myxoma and esophageal carcinoma is an extremely rare entity. Here we present two cases of synchronously suffered left atrial myxoma and esophageal carcinoma. Both patients underwent simultaneous resection of two tumors via the right thoraco-abdominal approach and recovered well. PMID:27499990

  16. Rectus abdominis muscle resection and fascial reconstruction for the treatment of uterine leiomyosarcoma invading the abdominal wall: a case report.

    PubMed

    Yoon, B S; Seong, S J; Song, T; Kim, M L; Kim, M K

    2014-01-01

    The authors present a case of intra-abdominal recurrent leiomyosarcoma invading a large area of the abdominal wall. The patient underwent cytoreductive surgery, including resection of the rectus abdominis muscle, followed by reconstruction of the defect using synthetic mesh. The tumor was surgically removed by en bloc resection, including most of the rectus abdominis muscle and ileum. The abdominal wall defect was repaired using synthetic mesh. The patient underwent radiotherapy and chemotherapy after the surgery and was healthy one year later.

  17. Systematic review and meta-analysis of prophylactic abdominal drainage after pancreatic resection

    PubMed Central

    Dou, Chang-Wei; Liu, Zhi-Kui; Jia, Yu-Li; Zheng, Xin; Tu, Kang-Sheng; Yao, Ying-Min; Liu, Qing-Guang

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether prophylactic abdominal drainage is necessary after pancreatic resection. METHODS: PubMed, Web of Science, and the Cochrane Library were systematically searched to obtain relevant articles published before January 2014. Publications were retrieved if they met the selection criteria. The outcomes of interest included: mortality, morbidity, postoperative pancreatic fistula (POPF), clinically relevant pancreatic fistula (CR-PF), abdominal abscess, reoperation rate, the rate of interventional radiology drainage, and the length of hospital stay. Subgroup analyses were also performed for pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD) and for distal pancreatectomy. Begg’s funnel plot and the Egger regression test were employed to assess potential publication bias. RESULTS: Nine eligible studies involving a total of 2794 patients were identified and included in this meta-analysis. Of the included patients, 1373 received prophylactic abdominal drainage. A fixed-effects model meta-analysis showed that placement of prophylactic drainage did not have beneficial effects on clinical outcomes, including morbidity, POPF, CR-PF, reoperation, interventional radiology drainage, and length of hospital stay (Ps > 0.05). In addition, prophylactic drainage did not significantly increase the risk of abdominal abscess. Overall analysis showed that omitting prophylactic abdominal drainage resulted in higher mortality after pancreatectomy (OR = 1.56; 95%CI: 0.93-2.92). Subgroup analysis of PD showed similar results to those in the overall analysis. Elimination of prophylactic abdominal drainage after PD led to a significant increase in mortality (OR = 2.39; 95%CI: 1.22-4.69; P = 0.01). CONCLUSION: Prophylactic abdominal drainage after pancreatic resection is still necessary, though more evidence from randomized controlled trials assessing prophylactic drainage after PD and distal pancreatectomy are needed. PMID:25987799

  18. Perineal care

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Introduction More than 85% of women having a vaginal birth suffer some perineal trauma. Spontaneous tears requiring suturing are estimated to occur in at least one third of women in the UK and US. Perineal trauma can lead to long-term physical and psychological problems. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of different methods and materials for primary repair of first- and second-degree tears and episiotomies? What are the effects of different methods and materials for primary repair of obstetric anal sphincter injuries (third- and fourth-degree tears)? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to November 2013 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 33 studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review, we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: conventional suturing; different methods and materials for primary repair of obstetric anal sphincter injuries; non-suturing of muscle and skin (or perineal skin alone); and sutures (absorbable synthetic sutures, catgut sutures, continuous sutures, interrupted sutures). PMID:25752310

  19. Extralevator abdominoperineal resection in the prone position.

    PubMed

    Flor-Lorente, Blas; Frasson, Matteo; Montilla, Erick

    2014-03-01

    The Miles operation is every day more in the limelight. The abdominoperineal resection compared to anterior resection results in increased rate of circumferential resection margin (CRM) infiltration, increased iatrogenic tumor perforation rate and poorer quality of the mesorectum. These worse results may be caused by excessive dissection between the distal mesorectum and the plane of the levator ani and the consequent "resection waist" or "cone" effect in the specimen. A wider excision of the pelvic floor muscles, known as extraelevator abdominoperineal resection (ELAPE), would provide a "cylindrical" specimen which would hypothetically reduce the risk of tumor perforation and CRM infiltration and local recurrence rate. However, there is insufficient evidence to conclude that the ELAPE is oncologically superior compared to standard abdominoperineal resection. Independently from the surgical technique adopted, another actual point of discussion is the position of the patient during the perineal part of the operation. The position on "prone" provides excellent pelvic exposure, a top-down dissection under direct vision and is very comfortable for the operating surgeons. However, there is no clear scientific evidence of the superiority of prone ELAPE over supine ELAPE in terms of oncologic results, morbidity and mortality. The laparoscopy seems to be the best surgical approach for the abdominal part of the operation, although it has not been validated so far by large prospective studies. Prospective, controlled and randomized trials are necessary to resolve all these issues. The current interest in a more accurate and standardized perineal surgery to obtain a cylindrical specimen, undoubtedly, will improve results.

  20. Giant abdominal osteosarcoma causing intestinal obstruction treated with resection and adjuvant chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Diamantis, Alexandros; Christodoulidis, Grigorios; Vasdeki, Dionysia; Karasavvidou, Foteini; Margonis, Evangelos; Tepetes, Konstantinos

    2017-01-01

    Extraskeletal osteosarcoma (ESOS) is an uncommon tumor that accounts for 1% of all soft tissue sarcomas and 4% of all osteosarcomas. Its presentation may be atypical, while pain has been described as the most common symptom. Radiological findings include a large mass in the soft-tissues with massive calcifications, but no attachment to the adjacent bone or periosteum. We present the case of a 73-year-old gentle man who presented with a palpable, tender abdominal mass and symptoms of bowel obstruction. Computer tomography images revealed a large space-occupying heterogeneous, hyper dense soft tissue mass involving the small intestine. Explorative laparotomy revealed a large mass in the upper mesenteric root of the small intestine, measuring 22 cm × 12 cm × 10 cm in close proximity with the cecum, which was the cause of the bowel obstruction. Pathology confirmed the diagnosis of an ESOS. ESOS is an uncommon malignant soft tissue tumor with poor prognosis and a 5-year survival rate of less than 37%. Regional recurrence and distant metastasis to lungs, regional lymph nodes and liver can occur within the first three years of diagnosis in a high rate (45% and 65% respectively). Wide surgical resection of the mass followed by adjuvant chemotherapy or radiotherapy has been the treatment of choice. PMID:28289512

  1. Abdominal wall reconstruction after resection of an enterocutaneous fistula with an island pedicled anterolateral thigh perforator flap. Case report.

    PubMed

    Ali, F; Safawi, E B; Zakaria, Z; Basiron, N

    2013-01-01

    Entero-cutaneous fistula resulting from a locally invasive large bowel carcinoma is a difficult surgical challenge. En-bloc resection of the involved organs and the entero-cutaneous fistula tract with a healthy tissue margin will result in a composite abdominal wall defect that requires closure. Reconstructive surgical options include primary closure, components separation and the use of local, regional or free flaps with or without prosthetic mesh. We report a case of an abdominal enterocutaneous fistula secondary to a locally invasive sigmoid carcinoma, which was reconstructed with a pedicled antero-lateral thigh perforator (ALT) flap. To our knowledge, this is the first case of a malignant entero-cutaneous fistula, which was reconstructed with an ALT flap.

  2. Complex Perineal Trauma with Anorectal Avulsion

    PubMed Central

    Cruceru, Adelina Maria; Paun, Sorin; Negoi, Ruxandra Irina; Beuran, Mircea

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. The objective of this case report is to illustrate a severe perineal impalement injury, associated with anorectal avulsion and hemorrhagic shock. Results. A 32-year-old male patient was referred to our hospital for an impalement perineal trauma, associated with complex pelvic fracture and massive perineal soft tissue destruction and anorectal avulsion. On arrival, the systolic blood pressure was 85 mm Hg and the hemoglobin was 7.1 g/dL. The patient was transported to the operating room, and perineal lavage, hemostasis, and repacking were performed. After 12 hours in the Intensive Care Unit, the abdominal ultrasonography revealed free peritoneal fluid. We decided emergency laparotomy, and massive hemoperitoneum due to intraperitoneal rupture of pelvic hematoma was confirmed. Pelvic packing controlled the ongoing diffuse bleeding. After 48 hours, the relaparotomy with packs removal and loop sigmoid colostomy was performed. The postoperative course was progressive favorable, with discharge after 70 days and colostomy closure after four months, with no long-term complications. Conclusions. Severe perineal injuries are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Their management in high volume centers, with experience in colorectal and trauma surgery, allocating significant human and material resources, decreases the early mortality and long-term complications, offering the best quality of life for patients. PMID:27891285

  3. Resection of Abdominal Solid Organs Using High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Zderic, Vesna; O’Keefe, Grant E.; Foley, Jessica L.; Vaezy, Shahram

    2009-01-01

    Our objective was to evaluate high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) for minimizing blood loss during surgery by hemodynamically isolating large portions of solid organs before their resection. A high-power HIFU device (in-situ intensity of 9000 W/cm2, frequency of 3.3 MHz) was used to produce a wall of cautery for sealing of blood vessels along the resection line in surgically-exposed solid organs (liver lobes, spleen and kidneys) of eight adult pigs. Following HIFU application, the distal portion of the organ was excised using a scalpel. If any blood vessels were still bleeding, additional HIFU application was used to stop the bleeding. The resection was achieved in 6.0 ± 1.5 min (liver), 3.6 ± 1.1 min (spleen) and 2.8 ± 0.6 min (kidneys) of HIFU treatment time, with no occurrence of bleeding for up to 4 hours (until sacrifice). The coagulated region at the resection line had average width of 3 cm and extended through the whole thickness of the organ (up to 4 cm). Blood vessels of up to 1 cm in size were occluded. This method holds promise for future clinical applications in resection of solid tumors and hemorrhage control from high-grade organ injuries. PMID:17498864

  4. Perineal rectosigmoidectomy for incarcerated rectal prolapse (Altemeier’s procedure)

    PubMed Central

    Sipahi, Mesut; Arslan, Ergin; Börekçi, Hasan; Aytekin, Faruk Önder; Külah, Bahadır; Banlı, Oktay

    2016-01-01

    Perineal procedures have higher recurrence and lower mortality rates than abdominal alternatives for the treatment of rectal prolapse. Presence of incarceration and strangulation also influences treatment choice. Perineal rectosigmoidectomy is one of the treatment options in patients with incarceration and strangulation, with low mortality and acceptable recurrence rates. This operation can be performed especially to avoid general anesthesia in old patients with co-morbidities. We aimed to present perineal rectosigmoidectomy and diverting loop colostomy in a patient with neurological disability due to spinal trauma and incarcerated rectal prolapse. PMID:27528816

  5. Reconstruction of the abdominal wall by using a combination of the human acellular dermal matrix implant and an interpositional omentum flap after extensive tumor resection in patients with abdominal wall neoplasm: A preliminary result

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Yan; Tang, Rui; Gong, Ding-Quan; Qian, Yun-Liang

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To present our trial using a combination of the human acellular dermal matrix (HADM) implant and an interpositional omentum flap to repair giant abdominal wall defects after extensive tumor resection. METHODS: Between February and October of 2007, three patients with giant defects of the abdominal wall after extensive tumor resection underwent reconstruction with a combination of HADM and omentum flap. Postoperative morbidities and signs of herniation were monitored. RESULTS: The abdominal wall reconstruction was successful in these three patients, there was no severe morbidity and no signs of herniation in the follow-up period. CONCLUSION: The combination of HADM and omentum flap offers a new, safe and effective alternative to traditional forms in the repair of giant abdominal wall defects. Further analysis of the long-term outcome and more cases are needed to assess the reliability of this technique. PMID:18205267

  6. [Results of partial splenic resection and transposition to the lateral abdominal wall in portal hypertension in childhood].

    PubMed

    Bennek, J; Tröbs, R B; Mühlig, K; Richter, T

    1996-01-01

    Between 1977 and 1995, 19 children with portal hypertension (nine extrahepatic, ten intrahepatic) were treated by transpositioning the spleen into the left abdominal wall. Among the patients with intrahepatic portal hypertension three died. Two patients underwent secondary diminuition of the transposed spleen due to relapsed hypersplenism. In one of our first patients the transposed spleen atrophied after tangential resection. All surviving patients except one preserved hepatic function. The serum colloid osmotic pressure was stable. Plasma ammonia levels were normal. Serum immunoglobulins (IgG, IgM, IgA and IgG subclasses) and complement components (C3c, C4) were analyzed. After transposition patients had normal or slightly elevated values of these proteins compared with controls.

  7. Postoperative Analgesia in Abdominal Surgery: a Medico-economic Study

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-08-13

    Extended Ileal Resection Under Laparotomy; Total Proctocolectomy Under Laparotomy; Colectomy Left/Right/Total Under Laparotomy; Rectosigmoidal Resection Under Laparotomy; Anterior Resection of Rectum Under Laparotomy; Abdomino-perineal Amputation Under Laparotomy

  8. Treatment of a chronic vesicocutaneous fistula and abdominal wall defect after resection of a soft tissue sarcoma using a bipedicled latissimus dorsi and serratus anterior free flap.

    PubMed

    Ludolph, Ingo; Apel, Hendrik; Horch, Raymund E; Beier, Justus P

    2014-11-01

    We present a surgical treatment for bladder reconstruction in a case of chronic vesicocutaneous radiation-induced fistula and reconstruction of the abdominal wall after resection of a liposarcoma in the rectus abdominis muscle. Fistulas are sequelae after radiotherapy. To regain bladder function and reconstitute abdominal wall stability, a microsurgical flap approach should be considered. A male patient underwent resection of a liposarcoma in the rectus abdominis muscle with adjuvant radiotherapy, suffering from a chronic vesicocutaneous fistula. A bipedicled combined latissimus dorsi and serratus anterior flap was carried out after resection of the fistula for reconstruction of the urine bladder and the abdominal wall. Ascending urethrography 4 weeks postoperatively showed no leakage. In the 4-month follow-up period, no signs of recurrence of the fistula or herniation occurred. A bipedicled flap allowed reconstruction of the urine bladder and the abdominal wall. Using non-irradiated, well-perfused intra-abdominal muscle tissue over the urine bladder prevented recurrence of the fistula.

  9. Prone jackknife position is not necessary to achieve a cylindrical abdominoperineal resection: demonstration of the lithotomy position.

    PubMed

    Keller, Deborah S; Lawrence, Justin K; Delaney, Conor P

    2014-02-01

    This video demonstrates a laparoscopic abdominal perineal resection for a fixed 4.8-cm mass involving the posterior and left rectal walls and left puborectalis, 2 cm from the anal verge (see Video, Supplemental Digital Content 1, http://links.lww.com/DCR/A127). We detail the steps of the procedure, all completed in lithotomy, including lateral-to-medial dissection; identification and protection of the left ureter and presacral nerves; division of the inferior mesenteric artery; medial-to-lateral dissection, with meeting the previous dissection plane; total mesorectal excision and pelvic dissection; perineal dissection and layered closure; and abdominal inspection and colostomy creation. Total operative time was 181 minutes. The specimen total mesorectal excision was complete with a negative circumferential radial margin (greater than 1 cm). Final pathology was T3N2M0.

  10. Giant Perineal Solitary Fibrous Tumor: A Rare Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Yoshino Bonifaci, Ana Maria; Crochik, Fabio da Silva; Murta, Claudio Bovolenta; Claro, Joaquim Francisco de Almeida; Manzano, Joao Padua

    2017-01-01

    Background. Solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) is a fibroblastic mesenchymal tumor that was initially described from the pleura but currently arises at almost every anatomic site. It is usually benign, and surgical resection is curative. SFT involving the perineum is extremely rare. This is the third case report of a perineal SFT in the literature. Case Presentation. We reported an uncommon case of a 64-year-old man presenting with a huge perineal mass that started growing 3 years before his arrival in our service. He was asymptomatic. A contrast-enhanced CT scan revealed a heterogeneous well-circumscribed perineal mass with soft-tissue density. Invasion of the surrounding organs, distal metastasis, and lymph node swelling were absent. The complete resection of mass was done successfully. The specimen was a 23.0 × 14.0 × 8.0 cm encapsulated tumor. Mass weight was 1,170 g. After pathological analysis, we confirmed that the mass was a solitary fibrous tumor. The diagnosis was based on clinical findings and histological morphology and immunohistochemistry study. Conclusion. SFTs are usually indolent tumors with a favorable prognosis. The perineal location is extremely rare. Complete resection of the mass is the treatment of choice. PMID:28352487

  11. Laparoscopic resection of a paraganglioma located on the border of the thoracic and abdominal cavities using a transabdominal-transdiaphragmatic approach.

    PubMed

    Sunose, Yutaka; Hirai, Keitaro; Nakazawa, Seshiru; Yoshinari, Daisuke; Ogawa, Hiroomi; Tsukagoshi, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Norifumi; Yamazaki, Hodaka; Motegi, Yoko; Miyamae, Yohei; Igarashi, Takamichi; Takahashi, Kengo; Katoh, Ryuji; Tanaka, Kazumi; Takeyoshi, Izumi

    2015-05-01

    We treated a 64-year-old woman with high blood pressure. Catecholamine metabolite levels were elevated in the blood and urine. CT revealed a densely stained tumor on the right side of the descending aorta dorsal to the inferior vena cava. PET-CT revealed abnormal accumulation of (18) F-fluorodeoxyglucose, and (123) I-meta-iodo-benzylguanidine uptake was apparent on scintigraphy. The tumor was determined to be a paraganglioma located on the border between the thoracic and abdominal cavities, and laparoscopic tumorectomy was performed. The patient was placed in the left lateral position. The right lobe of the liver was turned over, and we cut the diaphragm to expose the front of the tumor. We resected the straight artery flowing in from the aorta and removed the tumor safely. Herein, we describe the removal of a paravertebral paraganglioma located in the border of the thoracic and abdominal cavities with a laparoscopic transabdominal-transdiaphragmatic approach.

  12. Preoperative Intra-abdominal Sepsis, Not Penetrating Behavior Itself, Is Associated With Worse Postoperative Outcome After Bowel Resection for Crohn Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tenghui; Yang, Jianbo; Ding, Chao; Li, Yi; Gu, Lili; Wei, Yao; Cao, Lei; Gong, Jianfeng; Zhu, Weiming; Li, Ning; Li, Jieshou

    2015-01-01

    Abstract It is generally believed that penetrating behavior is associated with worse surgical outcomes in Crohn disease (CD). We hypothesized that intra-abdominal sepsis (IAS), but not penetrating behavior itself, contributes to postoperative morbidity in patients undergoing bowel resection for CD. Patients who underwent surgery from April 2010 to April 2014 were retrospectively identified from a prospectively maintained database. Demographic information and preoperative and operative data were collected. The outcomes following surgery in patients who had penetrating disease with or without IAS versus nonpenetrating CD were compared. Of 288 patients, 180 had penetrating CD, including 54 who had IAS. Preoperative characteristics were similar between the groups, except for serum albumin, abdominal drainage, and prior bowel resection. Patients with penetrating CD with IAS were more likely to have a stoma, surgical site complications, postoperative IAS complications, and major complications than patients with penetrating CD without IAS or nonpenetrating CD. There were no significant differences between patients with penetrating CD without IAS and nonpenetrating CD. The postoperative outcome was strengthened after propensity-score matching analysis. Moreover, penetrating CD with IAS (odds ratio [OR], 13.034; P = 0.004) is a risk predictor for major postoperative complications, and preoperative serum albumin (OR, 0.095; P = 0.002) and preoperative enteral nutrition (OR, 0.203, P = 0.049) are protective. Penetrating CD without IAS did not adversely affect postoperative outcome after bowel resection compared with penetrating CD with IAS. These results may revise the notion that all patients with penetrating CD have worse postoperative complications. PMID:26559283

  13. Pedicled fasciocutaneous anterolateral thigh flap for the reconstruction of a large postoncologic abdominal wall resection defect: a case report.

    PubMed

    Nthumba, Peter; Barasa, Jack; Cavadas, Pedro C; Landin, Luis

    2012-02-01

    The anterolateral thigh (ALT) flap has been used to cover defects between the proximal third of the leg and lower abdomen, and with modification, may cover epigastric defects. We used the ALT flap to cover a full-thickness defect of over half the anterior abdominal wall. We conclude that abdominal wall defects of large sizes can be successfully reconstructed using an appropriately designed ALT flap; a simple, single-stage effective reconstruction.

  14. Reconstruction of the external genitals and repair of skin defects of the perineal region using three types of lateral groin flap.

    PubMed

    Sun, G C; Zhong, A G; He, W; Du, P; Song, W M; Ma, J G

    1990-04-01

    Three types of lateral groin flap have been applied to reconstruct the external genitals and to repair skin defects in the perineal region. A single lateral groin flap was used to construct a vagina for 2 patients who had congenital absence of vagina. A composite flap containing iliac crest bone was applied to reconstruct the penis in 11 patients: 8 suffered traumatic amputation and 3 had congenital micropenis. A coaxial pedicle flap of the lateral groin and abdominal area was used to repair skin defects of the penis and scrotum after resection of the elephantiasis caused by recurrent erysipelas in 2 patients, and to relieve postburn scar contracture in the perineal region in another. Using this operative technique, 14 flaps survived completely with satisfactory results; 70% of one composite flap was lost as a result of hematoma. In the single-flap group, the distal portion (3 x 5 cm) of one flap necrosed and was resected and resurfaced with a free skin graft; the final result was good.

  15. Management of a giant perineal condylomata acuminata.

    PubMed

    Hemper, Evelyn; Wittau, Mathias; Lemke, Johannes; Kornmann, Marko; Henne-Bruns, Doris

    2016-01-01

    A condylomata acuminata infection is caused by human papillomaviridae (HPV). This sexually transmitted condition most often affects the perineal region. Importantly, infections with types 16 and 18 are associated with an increased risk for anal and cervix cancer. In most cases topical therapy is sufficient for successfully treating condylomata acuminata. Here, we report the case of a 51-year old patient who suffered from a giant perianal located condylomata acuminata which had developed over a period of more than 10 years. Imaging by MRI revealed a possible infiltration of the musculus sphincter ani externus. Because a topical treatment or a radiotherapy was considered unfeasible, a surgical treatment was the only therapeutic option in this unusual case. First, a colostomy was performed and subsequently a resection of the tumor in toto with circular resection of the external portion of the musculus sphincter ani externus was performed. The large skin defect was closed by two gluteus flaps. The rectum wall was reinserted in the remnant of the musculus sphincter ani externus. Postoperatively, parts of the flaps developed necrosis. Therefore, a vacuum sealing therapy was initiated. Subsequently, the remaining skin defects were closed by autologous skin transplantation. Six months later the colostomy could be reversed. To date, one year after first surgery, the patient has still a normal sphincter function and no recurrence of the condylomata acuminata. This case report demonstrates how giant condylomata acuminata can be successfully treated by extended surgical procedures including colostomy and plastic reconstruction of resulting defects upon resection.

  16. Management of a giant perineal condylomata acuminata

    PubMed Central

    Hemper, Evelyn; Wittau, Mathias; Lemke, Johannes; Kornmann, Marko; Henne-Bruns, Doris

    2016-01-01

    A condylomata acuminata infection is caused by human papillomaviridae (HPV). This sexually transmitted condition most often affects the perineal region. Importantly, infections with types 16 and 18 are associated with an increased risk for anal and cervix cancer. In most cases topical therapy is sufficient for successfully treating condylomata acuminata. Here, we report the case of a 51-year old patient who suffered from a giant perianal located condylomata acuminata which had developed over a period of more than 10 years. Imaging by MRI revealed a possible infiltration of the musculus sphincter ani externus. Because a topical treatment or a radiotherapy was considered unfeasible, a surgical treatment was the only therapeutic option in this unusual case. First, a colostomy was performed and subsequently a resection of the tumor in toto with circular resection of the external portion of the musculus sphincter ani externus was performed. The large skin defect was closed by two gluteus flaps. The rectum wall was reinserted in the remnant of the musculus sphincter ani externus. Postoperatively, parts of the flaps developed necrosis. Therefore, a vacuum sealing therapy was initiated. Subsequently, the remaining skin defects were closed by autologous skin transplantation. Six months later the colostomy could be reversed. To date, one year after first surgery, the patient has still a normal sphincter function and no recurrence of the condylomata acuminata. This case report demonstrates how giant condylomata acuminata can be successfully treated by extended surgical procedures including colostomy and plastic reconstruction of resulting defects upon resection. PMID:26814336

  17. A Case of Recto-Vesico-Cutaneous Fistula Following Perineal Injury by Wild Boar

    PubMed Central

    Bhingare, Pravin D.; Bang, Yogesh A.

    2016-01-01

    It is very uncommon for a boar to become aggressive in nature against human unless they are cornered. A wild boar attacked a 24-year-old male from behind in perineal region. At presentation, he had continuous dribbling of urine and fecal matter from perineal wound. On CT-scan, a well defined tract delineated by contrast was seen between postero-lateral aspect of bladder and anterior wall of rectum, and there was contrast extravasation through perineal wound. After resuscitation, fistula was repaired through abdominal approach, and perineal wound was debrided. Emergency physician should be aware of such cases as increasing deforestation and shifting of humans to sub-urban area, have resulted in increased incidences of wild boar attack. Prompt stabilization of patient, treatment of infection with proper antibiotics, prevention of tetanus and rabies infection and emergency surgical interventions are necessary to reduce morbidity and mortality from such trauma. PMID:27437297

  18. Intestinal obstruction following harvest of VRAM-flap for reconstruction of a large perineal defect

    PubMed Central

    Elawa, Sherif; Hallböök, Olof; Myrelid, Pär; Zdolsek, Johann

    2015-01-01

    A patient with locally advanced adenocarcinoma of the rectum was operated with abdominoperineal resection and perineal reconstruction with a vertical rectus abdominis musculocutaneous flap. Six days postoperatively, there was herniation of the small bowel, between the anterior and posterior rectus sheaths, to a subcutaneous location. PMID:27252980

  19. The Role of Postoperative Irradiation in the Treatment of Locally Recurrent Incompletely Resected Extra-Abdominal Desmoid Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Fontanesi, James; Mott, Michael P.; Kraut, Michael J.; Lucas, David P.; Miller, Peter R.

    2004-01-01

    Background: To define the efficacy of postoperative irradiation in patients with recurrent extra-abdominal desmoid tumors in whom surgical intervention has resulted in microscopically or grossly positive surgical margins. Methods: A retrospective analysis was performed on all patients referred to the department of radiation oncology at the Detroit Medical Center with a diagnosis of recurrent extra-abdominal desmoid tumor. This analysis includes all patients seen from 1 January 1990 through 31 December 1999. A total of 11 patients were treated to 13 sites. Ten had microscopically positive margins and three had gross residual disease. Three patients were noted to have multifocal disease at the time of initial representation. Local control, survival, follow-up, and subsequent development of new tumors are measured from the last day of treatment with irradiation. Results: Thirteen sites were treated. Seven patients had received chemotherapy/hormonal therapy prior to surgery and/or irradiation. The most commonly used drug was tamoxifen (n=6). The type of radiation delivered included external beam irradiation alone (n=3), combined external beam irradiation and brachytherapy (n=4), brachytherapy alone (n=3) and 252-Cf neutron brachytherapy alone (n=3). Follow-up has ranged from 29 to 115 months (median=76 months). Three patients have failed locally at 17, 24 and 29 months. One of these was treated for gross residual disease. No patient has died of tumor-related causes. Salvage at the failed sites was possible in twom of three with re-irradiation using external neutrons and/or aggressive surgical intervention and systemic therapy. Complications were most often noted to include decrease range in motion, especially in joint areas, and skin reactions which were normal in presentation. In one site there was development soft tissue necrosis. Conclusion: Based on our experience we recommend postoperative irradiation for all recurrent extra-abdominal desmoid lesions with

  20. Tumor Size on Abdominal MRI Versus Pathologic Specimen in Resected Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma: Implications for Radiation Treatment Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, William A.; Mikell, John L.; Mittal, Pardeep; Colbert, Lauren; Prabhu, Roshan S.; Kooby, David A.; Nickleach, Dana; Hanley, Krisztina; Sarmiento, Juan M.; Ali, Arif N.; Landry, Jerome C.

    2013-05-01

    Purpose: We assessed the accuracy of abdominal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for determining tumor size by comparing the preoperative contrast-enhanced T1-weighted gradient echo (3-dimensional [3D] volumetric interpolated breath-hold [VIBE]) MRI tumor size with pathologic specimen size. Methods and Materials: The records of 92 patients who had both preoperative contrast-enhanced 3D VIBE MRI images and detailed pathologic specimen measurements were available for review. Primary tumor size from the MRI was independently measured by a single diagnostic radiologist (P.M.) who was blinded to the pathology reports. Pathologic tumor measurements from gross specimens were obtained from the pathology reports. The maximum dimensions of tumor measured in any plane on the MRI and the gross specimen were compared. The median difference between the pathology sample and the MRI measurements was calculated. A paired t test was conducted to test for differences between the MRI and pathology measurements. The Pearson correlation coefficient was used to measure the association of disparity between the MRI and pathology sizes with the pathology size. Disparities relative to pathology size were also examined and tested for significance using a 1-sample t test. Results: The median patient age was 64.5 years. The primary site was pancreatic head in 81 patients, body in 4, and tail in 7. Three patients were American Joint Commission on Cancer stage IA, 7 stage IB, 21 stage IIA, 58 stage IIB, and 3 stage III. The 3D VIBE MRI underestimated tumor size by a median difference of 4 mm (range, −34-22 mm). The median largest tumor dimensions on MRI and pathology specimen were 2.65 cm (range, 1.5-9.5 cm) and 3.2 cm (range, 1.3-10 cm), respectively. Conclusions: Contrast-enhanced 3D VIBE MRI underestimates tumor size by 4 mm when compared with pathologic specimen. Advanced abdominal MRI sequences warrant further investigation for radiation therapy planning in pancreatic adenocarcinoma before

  1. Incision for abdominal laparoscopy (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Abdominal laparoscopy is a useful aid in diagnosing disease or trauma in the abdominal cavity with less scarring than ... as liver and pancreatic resections may begin with laparoscopy to exclude the presence of additional tumors (metastatic ...

  2. Abdominal Complications after Severe Burns

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-01

    abdominal compartment syndrome, schemic bowel, biliary disease, peptic ulcer disease and astritis requiring laparotomy, small bowel obstruction, rimary fungal...complications in- luded trauma exploratory laparotomy, abdominal com- artment syndrome, ischemic bowel, biliary disease, peptic lcer disease and gastritis, large...70%); 13 for other compli- ations, such as biliary or perineal conditions (26%); and 4 or feeding access (8%). For the civilians, 2 had trauma

  3. Neurosurgical treatment of perineal neuralgias.

    PubMed

    Robert, R; Labat, J J; Riant, T; Khalfallah, M; Hamel, O

    2007-01-01

    Perineal pain is the basis of presentation to different specialities. This pain is still rather unknown and leads the different teams to inappropriate treatments which may fail. For more than twenty years, we have seen these patients in a multidisciplinary consultation. Our anatomical works have provided a detailed knowledge of the nervous supply of the perineum which allowed us to propose the description of an entrapment syndrome of the pudendal nerve. Other disturbances of different origins were highlighted helping colleagues to a better analysis of this enigmatic painful syndrome. Cadaveric studies have been done to guide treatments by blocks and surgery if necessary according to well defined criteria. A randomized prospective study validated the surgery. The retrospective study concluded that two thirds of the patients improved after treatment. New anatomical concepts are leading us to enlarge the field of this type of surgery, with the hope of improving the success rate.

  4. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy for perineal Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Noyer, C M; Brandt, L J

    1999-02-01

    Perineal lesions are a frequent and troublesome complication of Crohn's disease. Although there are various surgical and medical therapeutic regimens available to treat these lesions, all have significant associated morbidity, mortality, and toxicity. Recently, the beneficial effects of hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) have been described in patients with severe or refractory perineal disease, but the role of HBOT in larger groups or less severely affected patients has not yet been studied, nor has the minimum number of treatments required for initial or complete healing of perineal disease in this population been described. This article reviews the known and theoretical tissue effects of HBOT and discusses its potential role in treating patients with perineal Crohn's disease.

  5. Perineal body length and perineal lacerations during delivery in primigravid patients

    PubMed Central

    Lane, T. Lance; Chung, Christopher P.; Yandell, Paul M.; Kuehl, Thomas J.

    2017-01-01

    This study assessed the relation between perineal body length and the risk of perineal laceration extending into the anal sphincter during vaginal delivery in primigravid patients at an institution with a low utilization of episiotomy. This was a prospective study of primigravid patients in active labor. Primigravid women with singleton pregnancies who were in the first stage of labor at 37 weeks gestation or greater were recruited, and the admitting physician measured the length of the perineal body. The degree of perineal laceration and other delivery characteristics were recorded. Data were analyzed using univariate analyses, receiver-operator curve analyses, and multiple logistic regression for factors associated with increased severity of vaginal lacerations. The perineal body length, duration of second stage of labor, type of delivery, and patient age were associated (P < 0.1) with third- and fourth-degree (severe) perineal lacerations in primigravid women using receiver-operator curve analysis. Using logistic regression, only the duration of second stage of labor and length of the perineal body were significant (P < 0.04) predictors of third- and fourth-degree lacerations, with odds ratios of 32 (1.3 to 807 as 95% CI) and 24 (1.3 to 456), respectively. Both a perineal body length of ≤3.5 cm and a duration of second stage of labor >99 minutes were associated with an increased risk of third- and fourth-degree lacerations in primigravid patients.

  6. Perineal herniorrhaphy: perioperative data from 100 dogs.

    PubMed

    Hosgood, G; Hedlund, C S; Pechman, R D; Dean, P W

    1995-01-01

    One hundred dogs (83 intact males, 15 castrated males, and two intact females) underwent 110 perineal herniorrhaphy procedures. Mixed-breed dogs (n = 32), miniature poodles (n = 14), Boston terriers (n = 11), and Pekingese (n = 9) were represented most frequently. Perineal swelling (n = 48) and a perineal defect on rectal palpation (n = 31) were common clinical signs. Twenty dogs had urinary bladder retroflexion and were significantly more likely to have elevated serum urea nitrogen and creatinine concentrations, hyperkalemia, hyperphosphatemia, and neutrophilic leukocytosis. Only five of 43 dogs evaluated radiographically had prostatomegaly. Of 30 dogs receiving oral barium, all had rectal deviation. The most frequent complications during the hospitalization period were incisional (n = 35), followed by rectal prolapse (n = 9), tenesmus (n = 8), and depression (n = 8). Fifty-six of 70 dogs with follow-up had no complications.

  7. [Perineal Groove: A Rare Congenital Anomaly].

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Manuel; Alves, Nuno; Fontes, Natacha

    2016-10-01

    Perineal groove is a rare congenital anorectal malformation, with incidence yet undetermined. It is almost exclusive to the female newborn and its embryogenic origin remains uncertain. We present a case-report of a newborn girl that was discharged from the nursery without complications. At her first appointment at primary care we noted a wet sulcus connecting the posterior vaginal commissure and the anus. This case report emphasizes the rarity of the perineal groove and the importance of a good quality history and physical examination at primary care.

  8. Perineal recurrence of prostate cancer six years after trans-perineal brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Vijverberg, Peter; Moerland, Rien; Brand, Eric; van der Voort van Zyp, Jochem; Noteboom, Juus; van Vulpen, Marco

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of perineal recurrence of prostate cancer 6 years after low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy for localized prostate cancer. The most common approach to treat such perineal masses, including those occurring after prior biopsy or surgery, is local excision. We report the use of stereotactic radiotherapy with volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) as a novel non-invasive, potentially curative, and patient-friendly alternative to local excision. PMID:25834583

  9. Perineal recurrence of prostate cancer six years after trans-perineal brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Eppinga, Wietse; Vijverberg, Peter; Moerland, Rien; Brand, Eric; van der Voort van Zyp, Jochem; Noteboom, Juus; van Vulpen, Marco

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of perineal recurrence of prostate cancer 6 years after low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy for localized prostate cancer. The most common approach to treat such perineal masses, including those occurring after prior biopsy or surgery, is local excision. We report the use of stereotactic radiotherapy with volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) as a novel non-invasive, potentially curative, and patient-friendly alternative to local excision.

  10. Evaluation of a canine small intestinal submucosal xenograft and polypropylene mesh as bioscaffolds in an abdominal full-thickness resection model of growing rats

    PubMed Central

    Lee, A-Jin; Lee, Sung-Ho; Chung, Wook-Hun; Kim, Dae-Hyun; Chung, Dai-Jung; Do, Sun Hee

    2013-01-01

    We evaluated the biological scaffold properties of canine small intestinal submucosa (SIS) compared to a those of polypropylene mesh in growing rats with full-thickness abdominal defects. SIS is used to repair musculoskeletal tissue while promoting cell migration and supporting tissue regeneration. Polypropylene mesh is a non-resorbable synthetic material that can endure mechanical tension. Canine SIS was obtained from donor German shepherds, and its porous collagen fiber structure was identified using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). A 2.50-cm2 section of canine SIS (SIS group) or mesh (mesh group) was implanted in Sprague-Dawley rats. At 1, 2, 4, 12, and 24 weeks after surgery, the implants were histopathologically examined and tensile load was tested. One month after surgery, CD68+ macrophage numbers in the SIS group were increased, but the number of CD8+ T cells in this group declined more rapidly than that in rats treated with the mesh. In the SIS group, few adhesions and well-developed autologous abdominal muscle infiltration into the SIS collagen fibers were observed. No significant differences in the tensile load test results were found between the SIS and mesh groups at 24 weeks. Canine SIS may therefore be a suitable replacement for artificial biological scaffolds in small animals. PMID:23628657

  11. [Group A streptococcal perineal infection in children].

    PubMed

    Koskas, M; Levy, C; Romain, O; Schlemmer, C; Béchet, S; Bonacorsi, S; Bidet, Ph; Cohen, R

    2014-11-01

    Perineal diseases in children are usually caused by group A streptococcus (GAS). If the natural course of untreated cases is not known, it is well known that symptoms do not resolve spontaneously and can persist often for many months, until appropriate diagnosis and effective treatment are instituted. Furthermore, failures and recurrences after penicillin treatment are frequent. From 2009 to 2014, 165 perineal infections (median age: 48 months, extremes: 0.4-139) were enrolled by 15 pediatricians: 4 balanitis, 29 vulvo-vaginal diseases and 132 perianal infections. Painful defecation, anal fissures and macroscopic blood in stools were significantly more frequent in GAS perianal infections than negative GAS infections (p<0.01). The performance of GAS-rapid antigen test compared to the GAS culture was : sensitivity 97 % [CI 95 %: 89-100 %], specificity 76 % [CI 95 %: 66-84 %], negative predictive value 97 % [CI 95 %: 91-100 %], positive predictive value 71 % [CI 95 %: 60-80 %].

  12. Perineal skin injury: extrinsic environmental risk factors.

    PubMed

    Faria, D T; Shwayder, T; Krull, E A

    1996-08-01

    Little research has been performed to evaluate factors that may exacerbate perineal skin injury in the adult population. But extensive research has been done and knowledge has been gained from studies with diaper dermatitis in infants. Our objectives in writing this article are to define the anatomical area affected, the terms used, and to review the available literature for diaper dermatitis in infants, elucidating the similarities and differences between diaper dermatitis in infants and perineal dermatitis in adults. The six extrinsic environmental factors that have been identified and extensively studied in diaper dermatitis are skin wetness, urine, ammonia, feces, local skin pH and microorganisms. Although the complex interactions of the six factors are still not totally defined, we do know that to prevent perineal skin injury, it is helpful to prevent excessive skin hydration, minimize the interaction of urine and feces, minimize local microorganisms, and maintain skin near its physiologic pH. In general, the six extrinsic factors can be extrapolated and applied to the care of adults. Further research in adult fecal enzymes and pH is still necessary.

  13. S3 Dorsal Root Ganglion/Nerve Root Stimulation for Refractory Postsurgical Perineal Pain: Technical Aspects of Anchorless Sacral Transforaminal Lead Placement

    PubMed Central

    Zuidema, X.; Breel, J.; Wille, F.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic perineal pain limits patients in physical and sexual activities, leading to social and psychological distress. In most cases, this pain develops after surgery in the urogenital area or as a consequence of trauma. Neuromodulation is one of the options in chronic postsurgical perineal pain treatment. We present a case of refractory perineal pain after right sided surgical resection of a Bartholin's cyst which was treated with third sacral nerve root/dorsal root ganglion stimulation using the transforaminal approach. We describe a new anchorless lead placement technique using a unique curved lead delivery sheath. We postulate that this new posterior foraminal technique of lead placement is simple, safe, and reversible and may lower the occurrence of lead related complications. PMID:27123351

  14. Transthoracic versus abdominal-transhiatal resection for treating Siewert type II/III adenocarcinoma of the esophagogastric junction: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Zhi; Cai, Jun; Yin, Jie; Zhang, Jun; Zhang, Zhong-Tao; Wang, Kang-Li

    2015-01-01

    Our study aimed to explore the differences in short and long-term outcomes about the transthoracic (TH) and abdominal-transhiatal (TH) approaches for treating esophagogastric junction (AEG). A systematic review of PubMed, EMbase, Cochrane Library, China National Knowledge Infrastructure and CBMdisc was performed. All original articles comparing TH with TA were included in the study. Meta-analysis was conducted using odd ratios (OR) and weighted mean differences (WMDs).Thirteen studies including 2489 patients with adenocarcinoma of the esophagogastric junction, with 1050 patients underwent TA and 1437 patients underwent TH were pooled for this study. There were no significant difference between two approaches concerning duration of operation, blood loss, anastomotic leakage and positive of proximal incisal margin. Lymph node excised also showed no significant differences between two procedures in RCTs while in TA group of Non-RCTs, the number of lymph node dissection is higher. TH approach was associated with a longer length of hospital stay and had higher incidence of respiratory and cardiovascular complications and early postoperative mortality. Overall analysis of 1, 3, 5-year survival showed no significant difference between two approaches. Based on the study, TA approach had a positive impact than TH for AEG with respect to respiratory and cardiovascular complications, hospital stay and early mortality rates. There were no significant differences between the two approaches for long-term survival. Therefore, two surgical approaches are acceptable, and the elders with poor cardiopulmonary function, we recommended TA approach for treating it. PMID:26770310

  15. [Abdominal approaches and drainages of the abdominal cavity].

    PubMed

    Hagel, C; Schilling, M

    2006-04-01

    Appropriate access to the abdominal cavity is the first and crucial step for successful abdominal surgical intervention. In planning the incision, several variables have to be considered, such as anatomy of the abdominal wall, localization of the target organ, and individual conditions (previous incisions, minimal access surgery, etc). Medial laparotomy is the preferred incision for emergency cases and ill-defined pathologies, allowing access and hence exploration to all quadrants. Transverse laparotomies give superior access to the dorsal and right aspects of the liver and cause less pain in patients unfit for regional anesthetic procedures. Draining of the abdominal cavity is used after various resective and reconstructive procedures, but there is little evidence for its use in a number of operations such as gastric, hepatic, and colorectal resections. Advantages and disadvantages of different abdominal wall incisions and drainages are discussed.

  16. Massive surgical emphysema after perineal proctosigmoidectomy.

    PubMed

    Angehrn, Fiorenzo Valente Ernst Jakob; Däster, Silvio; Antonescu, Marius

    2014-10-07

    An 83-year-old woman underwent an elective perineal proctosigmoidectomy (Altemeier procedure) for a rectal prolapse. On postoperative day 1, the patient presented with impressive subcutaneous emphysema involving the chest, neck and face without any other symptoms. A CT scan showed free air in the retroperitoneum, the intraperitoneal cavity, the mediastinum and a subcutaneous emphysema of the neck and the face. Air was also found around the coloanal anastomosis and an anastomotic leak was proven by rectal contrast agent. In this situation, a rectoscopy followed by a laparoscopy were immediately performed. The leak could not be visualised. Peritoneal lavage and drainage, followed by protective sigmoidostomy were carried out. After surgery, the follow-up was uneventful except a persistent but asymptomatic leak with a presacral cavity. The coloanal dehiscence was later proven in rectoscopy. Although sutured, it is still present and colostomy closure will eventually be possible in a few months.

  17. First case of penile metastasis following abdominoperineal resection with VRAM flap reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Kozan, Andrei A.; Smith, Adrian M.; Ilsley, David W.; Rhodes, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    Penile metastases are rare in colorectal cancer. We report the first case of such a recurrence in a patient who had undergone an extralevator abdominoperineal resection with vertical rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap perineal reconstruction. The patient was treated with curative intent by total penectomy. PMID:27887019

  18. [Hepatic resections].

    PubMed

    Mercado, M A; Paquet, K J

    1990-07-01

    Liver resection are now accepted as a part of the surgical therapeutic armamentarium. In this review the anatomical and technical aspects, as well as the main indications, are discussed. The new image technique have largely contributed to the early detection of lesions that can be resected. The main indication for these procedures are malignant lesions (primary or metastatic) as well as symptomatic benign lesions. The importance to study, diagnose and treat benign lesions are justified by the possibility to detect and resect a potentially curable malignant disease. Major liver resections are contraindicated in patients with liver cirrhosis, because of a high morbimortality. Operative mortality for major liver resection is about 10% in most centers and the survival of patients with malignant disease treated by this modality is better than that of the patients treated with conservative measures. All patients with space-occupying lesions of the liver deserve the benefit of the doubt to be considered for surgical treatment. The individual features of each patient, with a judicious balance between risk and benefit, indicate or contraindicate these procedures.

  19. Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Savarese, R P; Rosenfeld, J C; DeLaurentis, D A

    1986-05-01

    Between January 1976 and December 1982, 181 patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms were treated surgically, and in 13 patients the aneurysms were found to be inflammatory. Inflammatory aneurysms of the abdominal aorta (IAAA) share important characteristics with typical atherosclerotic abdominal aortic aneurysms. Diagnosis and surgical management of IAAA are distinctive which suggests that IAAA should be considered separately, as a varient of typical abdominal aortic aneurysms. IAAA occur predominantly in males. The presenting symptoms are often idiosyncratic and include severe abdominal or back pain, or both, and ureteral obstruction; the diagnosis of IAAA should be considered when these symptoms are present. Although grossly and microscopically, the perianeurysmal fibrosis resembles idiopathic retroperitoneal fibrosis, the two conditions can be differentiated. At the present time, ultrasonography and computed tomography appear to offer reliable means for diagnosing IAAA. The presence of IAAA, whether established preoperatively or discovered unexpectedly at operation, necessitate certain modifications in the surgical approach, in order to avoid injuring the duodenum and the venous structures. Most patients can be successfully treated by resection and graft replacement. Rupture of the aneurysm in IAAA appears to be less frequent than in typical atherosclerotic abdominal aortic aneurysm.

  20. [Reoperations of rectal resection for recurrence after previous resection for rectosigmoid cancer].

    PubMed

    Paineau, J; Letessier, E; Hamy, A; Hamelin, E; Courant, O; Visset, J

    1993-12-01

    From June 1986 to December 1992, 16 patients (12 men and 4 women, 63 years-old [36 to 79]) who underwent a prior sphincter-saving resection for colorectal adenocarcinoma were operated on for locoregional recurrence with a surgical resection. Eight patients had a second anterior resection (5 colorectal, 2 coloanal and 1 ileoanal anastomosis), one a resection without anastomosis, and 7 an abdomino-perineal resection. Nine patients received an intraoperative irradiation (10 to 25 Gy). Excisions of surrounding organs were often necessary. Post-operative complications occurred in most of the patients. Excluding 3 post-operative deaths, 9 patients died of disease in a median of 12.9 months after surgery (range: 3 to 32 months). Four patients are still living 5 to 14 months after the second resection. There is little in the surgical literature dealing with these difficult surgical problem of which results are always uncertain. An earlier diagnosis of the recurrence would result in a more satisfactory procedure, but is difficult because of the limited possibilities of detection after surgical treatment and often external irradiation.

  1. Bladder Neck Rupture Following Perineal Bull Horn Injury: A Surgical Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Padilla-Fernandez, B.; Diaz-Alferez, F.J.; Garcia-Garcia, M.A.; Herrero-Polo, M.; Velasquez-Saldarriaga, J.F.; Lorenzo-Gomez, M.F.

    2012-01-01

    Pelvic-abdominal injuries caused by goring are serious lesions which require rapid diagnosis and urgent treatment in the context of a polytraumatized patient. The simultaneous rupture of both the bladder and the prostatic-membranous urethra occurs in 10%–29% of males with pelvic fractures but bladder neck injuries in adults are rarer. Unstable pelvic fractures, bilateral fractures of the ischiopubic branches (also referred to as fractures from falling astride) and the diastasis of the pubic symphysis are those that have the greatest likelihood of injuring both the posterior urethra and the bladder. We present a case of perineal bull horn injury with muscle laceration, bone fractures, scrotal avulsion and rupture of the bladder neck involving the right ureter which required two operations to be repaired. PMID:23066348

  2. Abdominal ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... Kidney - blood and urine flow Abdominal ultrasound References Chen L. Abdominal ultrasound imaging. In: Sahani DV, Samir ... the Health on the Net Foundation (www.hon.ch). The information provided herein should not be used ...

  3. Abdominal tap

    MedlinePlus

    ... tap; Cirrhosis - abdominal tap; Malignant ascites - abdominal tap Images Digestive system Peritoneal sample References Garcia-Tiso G. ... urac.org). URAC's accreditation program is an independent audit to verify that A.D.A.M. follows ...

  4. Abdominal tumors in children

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Chaeyoun; Youn, Joong Kee; Han, Ji-Won; Kim, Hyun-Young; Jung, Sung-Eun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The use of minimally invasive surgery (MIS) in pediatric patients has been steadily increasing in recent years. However, its use for diagnosing and treating abdominal tumors in children is still limited compared with adults, especially when malignancy is a matter of debate. Here, we describe the experience at our center with pediatric abdominal tumors to show the safety and feasibility of MIS. Based on a retrospective review of patient records, we selected for study those pediatric patients who had undergone diagnostic exploration or curative resection for abdominal tumors at a single center from January 2010 through August 2015. Diagnostic exploration for abdominal tumors was performed in 32 cases and curative resection in 173 cases (205 operations). MIS was performed in 11 cases of diagnostic exploration (34.4%) and 38 cases of curative resection (21.9%). The mean age of the children who underwent MIS was 6.09 ± 5.2 years. With regard to diagnostic exploration, patient characteristics and surgical outcomes were found to be similar for MIS and open surgery. With regard to curative resection, however, the mean age was significantly lower among the patients who underwent open surgery (4.21 ± 4.20 vs 6.02 ± 4.99 for MIS, P = 0.047), and the proportion of malignancies was significantly higher (80% vs 39.4% for MIS, P < 0.001). MIS compared favorably with open surgery with respect to the rate of recurrence (6.7% vs 35.1%, P = 0.035), the rate of intraoperative transfusions (34.2% vs 58.5%, P = 0.01), the median amount of blood transfused (14 vs 22 mL/kg, P = 0.001), and the mean number of hospital days (4.66 ± 2.36 vs 7.21 ± 5.09, P < 0.001). Complication rates did not differ significantly between the MIS and open surgery groups. The operation was converted to open surgery in 3 cases (27.2%) of diagnostic MIS and in 5 cases (13.1%) of curative MIS. MIS was found to be both feasible and effective for the

  5. Abdominal Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... call your doctor. In Spanish— Dolor abdominal en niños menores de 12 años What is recurrent abdominal ... Functional abdominal pain (FAP) typically affects kids ages 4-12, and is quite common, affecting up to ...

  6. Complications associated with perineal urethrostomy in the cat.

    PubMed

    Scavelli, T D

    1989-01-01

    Urethral obstruction is a common problem in male cats. The most prevalent location for the obstruction is the penile urethra. Most male cats with urethral obstruction can be effectively treated without surgery. However, some cats with this condition require a perineal urethrostomy. This surgical procedure involves removing the penile urethra and creating a permanent stoma between the skin and pelvic urethra. A variety of medical and management problems can develop early in the course of urethral obstruction. In addition, there are several potential intraoperative and postoperative complications related to the technique of perineal urethrostomy. Most medical problems and surgical complications respond to appropriate treatment.

  7. Perineal radical prostatectomy in the minimally invasive era.

    PubMed

    Rioja, Jorge; Rincon Mayans, Anibal; Parra, Raul O

    2012-10-01

    Radical prostatectomy is currently the standard of care for localized prostate cancer. In the last decade, the minimally invasive surgery, especially the robotic surgery has been growing and open techniques are less frequent performed. A non-systematic review of the literature is performed, highlighting the current situation of the perineal radical prostatectomy in the minimally invasive era, its indications, and functional and oncological outcomes. Radical perineal prostatectomy, when compared with other surgical approaches, still experience favorable outcomes. Urologist might be abandoning an underused surgical approach.

  8. [Factors related to perineal trauma in normal births in nulliparous].

    PubMed

    Scarabotto, Leila Barreto; Riesco, Maria Luiza Gonzalez

    2006-09-01

    Many studies have been undertaken with the purpose of contributing towards the prevention of perineal trauma in normal birth. The objective of this study was to relate height of the perineum, duration of the second stage of labor, variation of the position of the head detaching, kind of effort, presence of the umbilical cord around the babies' neck, birth weight and vulva's ardor to urinate with the occurrence of perineal laceration. The study was undertaken in 2003 at the Normal Birth Center of the Amparo Maternal, with a sample consisting of 67 women in labor without previous vaginal births. The results demonstrated that there were no significant statistical differences between the variables verified.

  9. Episiotomy and obstetric perineal wound dehiscence: beyond soreness.

    PubMed

    Kamel, A; Khaled, M

    2014-04-01

    Postpartum episiotomy dehiscence is a rare complication of vaginal delivery. Infection rates in episiotomy wounds are surprisingly low; however, it remains the most common cause of wound dehiscence, which may lead to major physical, psychological and social problems if left untreated. Most dehisced perineal wounds are left to heal naturally by secondary intention. This approach often results in a protracted period of significant morbidity for women. There is emerging evidence that early re-suturing closure of broken-down perineal wounds may have a better outcome, but randomised controlled trials are needed to yield evidence-based guidance for this management approach.

  10. Colon resection for ovarian cancer: intraoperative decisions.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Mitchel S; Zervose, Emmanuel

    2008-11-01

    To discuss the benefits and morbidity of and indications for colon resection during cytoreductive operations for ovarian cancer. The history of cytoreductive surgery for ovarian cancer is discussed, with special attention to the incorporation of colon resection. Literature regarding cytoreductive surgery for ovarian cancer is then reviewed, again with attention to the role of colon resection. The focus of the review is directed at broad technical considerations and rationales, for both primary and secondary cytoreduction. Over the past 15 to 20 years the standard cytoreductive operation for ovarian cancer has shifted from an abdominal hysterectomy with bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy and omentectomy to an en bloc radical resection of the pelvic tumor and an omentectomy, and more recently to include increasing use of extensive upper abdominal surgery. En bloc pelvic resection frequently includes rectosigmoid resection, almost always accompanied by a primary anastomosis. Other portions of the colon are at risk for metastatic involvement and sometimes require resection in order to achieve optimal cytoreduction. The data regarding colon resection for the purpose of surgical cytoreduction of ovarian cancer are conflicting (in terms of benefit) and all retrospective. However, the preponderance of information supports a benefit in terms of survival when cytoreduction is clearly optimal. Similar to primary surgery, benefit from secondary cytoreduction of ovarian cancer occurs when only a small volume of disease is left behind. The preponderance of data suggests that colon resection to achieve optimal cytoreduction has a positive impact on survival. In order to better understand the role of colon resection as well as other extensive cytoreductive procedures for ovarian cancer, it will be important to continue to improve our understanding of prognostic variables such as the nuances of metastatic bowel involvement in order to better guide appropriate surgical management.

  11. Normal Vulvovaginal, Perineal, and Pelvic Anatomy with Reconstructive Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Yavagal, Sujata; de Farias, Thais F.; Medina, Carlos A.; Takacs, Peter

    2011-01-01

    A thorough insight into the female genital anatomy is crucial for understanding and performing pelvic reconstructive procedures. The intimate relationship between the genitalia and the muscles, ligaments, and fascia that provide support is complex, but critical to restore during surgery for correction of prolapse or aesthetic reasons. The external female genitalia include the mons pubis, labia majora and minora, clitoris, vestibule with glands, perineal body, and the muscles and fascia surrounding these structures. Through the perineal membrane and the perineal body, these superficial vulvar structures are structurally related to the deep pelvic muscle levator ani with its fascia. The levator ani forms the pelvic floor with the coccygeus muscle and provides vital support to all the pelvic organs and stability to the perineum. The internal female genital organs include the vagina, cervix, uterus, tubes, and ovaries with their visceral fascia. The visceral fascia also called the endopelvic fascia, surrounds the pelvic organs and connects them to the pelvic walls. It is continuous with the paraurethral and paravaginal fascia, which is attached to the perineal membrane. Thus, the internal and external genitalia are closely related to the muscles and fascia, and work as one functioning unit. PMID:22547969

  12. Palliation of Painful Perineal Metastasis Treated with Radiofrequency Thermal Ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Thanos, L. Mylona, S.; Kalioras, V.; Pomoni, M.; Batakis, N.

    2005-04-15

    We report a case of painful perineal metastasis from urinary bladder carcinoma in a 73-years-old woman, treated with CT-guided radiofrequency ablation (RFA). The pain was immediately relieved and follow-up at 1 and 6 months showed total necrosis of the mass. One year later, the patient has no pain and her quality of life is improved.

  13. [Abdominal paracentesis].

    PubMed

    Glauser, Frédéric; Barras, Anne-Catherine; Pache, Isabelle; Monti, Matteo

    2008-10-29

    Abdominal paracentesis is frequently performed in the clinical setting. Every newly developed ascites need to be investigated by abdominal paracentesis. Any clinical or biological deterioration in patients with chronic ascites also requires a new paracentesis. Therapeutically abdominal paracentesis is performed for refractory or symptomatic ascites. As other invasive procedures, it is critical to master its indications, contra-indications and complications. The aim of this article is to review the basics of abdominal paracentesis in order to help physicians to carry out this technical skill.

  14. Resection of gastrinomas.

    PubMed Central

    Deveney, C W; Deveney, K E; Stark, D; Moss, A; Stein, S; Way, L W

    1983-01-01

    Exploratory laparotomy and a search for gastrinomas was performed in 52 patients with the Zollinger-Ellison syndrome (ZES). Gastrinoma tissue was resected in 11 patients (21%), 6 (12%) of whom appear to have been cured. After surgery, serum gastrin levels in these six patients have remained normal from 10 months to 10 years. In the 46 other patients, tumor was unresectable because of metastases or multiple primary tumors (21 patients; 40%) or inability to find the tumor at laparotomy (21 patients; 40%). Multiple pancreatic islet cell adenomata were found in six of seven patients with multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN), indicating that patients with this condition usually have diffuse involvement of the pancreas. The results of CT scans correlated with findings at laparotomy in 13 of 16 patients. The smallest tumor detected by CT scans was 1 cm in diameter. CT technology is more accurate in finding gastrinomas now than in the past and has a useful role in preoperative evaluation. The possibility of resection should be seriously considered in every patient with Zollinger-Ellison syndrome. Abdominal CT scans, transhepatic portal venous sampling, and laparotomy should be used to find the tumor and to determine whether it is resectable. Using presently available methods, it should be possible to cure about 25% of patients with gastrinomas who do not have MEN and over 70% of those without MEN who appear to have a solitary tumor. Total pancreatectomy may be necessary to cure some patients with MEN, but that operation is rarely justified. The morbidity and mortality of surgical attempts at curing this disease have become minimal; we have had no deaths or serious complications following such operations in over 10 yrs. Total gastrectomy and indefinite use of H2-receptor blocking agents are the therapeutic options for patients with unresectable gastrinomas. Because H2-receptor blocking agents fail to control acid secretion in many patients after several yrs of therapy, total

  15. Painful Spastic Hip Dislocation: Proximal Femoral Resection

    PubMed Central

    Albiñana, Javier; Gonzalez-Moran, Gaspar

    2002-01-01

    The dislocated hip in a non-ambulatory child with spastic paresis tends to be a painful interference to sleep, sitting upright, and perineal care. Proximal femoral resection-interposition arthroplasty is one method of treatment for this condition. We reviewed eight hips, two bilateral cases, with a mean follow-up of 30 months. Clinical improvement was observed in all except one case, with respect to pain relief and sitting tolerance. Some proximal migration was observed in three cases, despite routine post-operative skeletal traction in all cases and careful soft tissue interposition. One case showed significant heterotopic ossification which restricted prolonged sitting. This patient needed some occasional medication for pain. PMID:12180614

  16. Perineal Groove: A Rare Congenital Midline Defect of Perineum

    PubMed Central

    Harsono, Mimily; Pourcyrous, Massroor

    2015-01-01

    Perineal groove is a rare congenital malformation that is characterized by an exposed wet sulcus with nonkeratinized mucous membrane that extends from the posterior vaginal fourchette to the anterior ridge of the anal orifice. This condition is one of the uncommon anomalies of urogenital/anogenital region that is unknown to many clinicians. Although, this condition may be self-resolved before the age of 2 years, this nonepithelized mucous membrane can pose the risk of local irritation and infection, urinary tract infection, and the possibility of nonself-resolved condition that eventually needs surgical correction. Only a few reported cases (n = 23) were found in current medical literatures. This lesion could be misdiagnosed as contact dermatitis, trauma, or even sexual abuse. Therefore, recognition of the congenital perineal groove at birth is important for the health care providers to deliver an appropriate parental counseling and appropriate follow-up. PMID:26929866

  17. Abdominal pain

    MedlinePlus

    Stomach pain; Pain - abdomen; Belly ache; Abdominal cramps; Bellyache; Stomachache ... Almost everyone has pain in the abdomen at some point. Most of the time, it is not serious. How bad your pain is ...

  18. [Abdominal pain].

    PubMed

    Gschossmann, J M; Holtmann, G; Netzer, P; Essig, M; Balsiger, B M; Scheurer, U

    2005-10-01

    Abdominal pain can result from a variety of different intra- and extra-abdominal disorders. Given the wide variety of etiological triggers for this pain, the primary task during the first stage of the diagnostic work-up is to determine as soon as possible the underlying cause and the degree of emergency. The aim of this evaluation is to adapt the therapeutic measures which are necessary for a causal treatment to the individual situation. Contrary to somatic causes of abdominal pain, the availability of such a causal therapy for functional bowel disorders is still very limited. Given this dilemma, the therapeutic focus of abdominal pain associated with these functional syndromes has to be placed on symptom-oriented treatment.

  19. Perineal skin care for patients with frequent diarrhea or fecal incontinence.

    PubMed

    Haugen, V

    1997-01-01

    In this article, the author presents an overview of normal skin and a description of perineal skin injury. The focus is to identify the goals for treatment for persons with frequent diarrhea or fecal incontinence as it relates to their perineal skin care. Specific algorithms for acute care and ambulatory settings are defined, and two case studies are presented. The treatment goals include evaluation of and recommendations for reviewing and choosing perineal skin products.

  20. Anatomy and physiology of the female perineal body with relevance to obstetrical injury and repair.

    PubMed

    Woodman, Patrick J; Graney, Daniel O

    2002-08-01

    The female perineal body is a mass of interlocking muscular, fascial, and fibrous components lying between the vagina and anorectum. The perineal body is also an integral attachment point for components of the urinary and fecal continence mechanisms, which are commonly damaged during vaginal childbirth. Repair of injuries to the perineal body caused by spontaneous tears or episiotomy are topics too often neglected in medical education. This review presents the anatomy and physiology of the female perineal body, as well as clinical considerations for pelvic reconstructive surgery.

  1. Serum testosterone and estradiol 17-beta concentrations in 15 dogs with perineal hernia.

    PubMed

    Mann, F A; Boothe, H W; Amoss, M S; Tangner, C H; Puglisi, T A; Hobson, H P

    1989-06-01

    Serum testosterone and estradiol 17-beta concentrations, and serum testosterone-to-estradiol ratio were evaluated in 15 dogs (greater than or equal to 5 years old) with perineal hernia (9 sexually intact males and 6 castrated males) and in 9 clinically normal sexually intact male dogs greater than or equal to 5 years old. There was no significant difference in serum testosterone-to-estradiol ratio between sexually intact male dogs with perineal hernia and clinically normal sexually intact male dogs. In castrated dogs with perineal hernia, serum testosterone concentration and testosterone-to-estradiol ratio were significantly (P less than 0.05) lower, compared with those values in sexually intact dogs with perineal hernia and in clinically normal sexually intact male dogs. There was no significant difference in serum estradiol 17-beta concentration among sexually intact male dogs with perineal hernia, castrated dogs with perineal hernia, and clinically normal sexually intact male dogs. Serum testosterone and estradiol 17-beta concentrations in dogs with perineal hernia did not differ from those values in clinically normal male dogs of the same age. Castration cannot be recommended for the treatment of perineal hernia unless a castration-responsive contributing factor such as prostatomegaly is identified, unless the pelvic diaphragm of dogs with perineal hernia has high sensitivity to normal or low serum testosterone and estradiol 17-beta concentrations, or unless there is documentation that other androgens and/or estrogens are involved.

  2. Cytoreductive strategy for multiple intra-abdominal and abdominal wall desmoid tumors in familial adenomatous polyposis: report of three cases.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Koji; Toiyama, Yuji; Okugawa, Yoshinaga; Hiro, Junichiro; Kawamoto, Aya; Inoue, Yasuhiro; Uchida, Keiichi; Araki, Toshimitsu; Mohri, Yasuhiko; Kusunoki, Masato

    2012-10-01

    Desmoid tumors (DTs) are benign myofibroblastic neoplasms originating from the fascia or muscle aponeurosis, which occur in one-third of patients with familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP). Most FAP-associated DTs occur in the intra-abdominal or abdominal wall region, thus, their infiltrative or expansive growth causes life-threatening organ damage, such as intestinal obstruction, urethral obstruction, and mesenteric infiltration with the involvement of mesenteric vessels. Treatments including surgical resection, cytotoxic chemotherapy, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and anti-estrogen therapy have all been tried with variable success. Here, we report on three patients with FAP who developed multiple intra-abdominal and abdominal wall DTs after total proctocolectomy and ileal pouch-anal anastomosis. Two cases underwent surgical resection of uncontrolled abdominal wall DTs after successful control of intra-abdominal DTs by systemic chemotherapy. The remaining case underwent repeated surgical resections of multiple intra-abdominal and abdominal wall DTs, and consequently had recurrent intra-abdominal DTs, with involvement of the small bowel and ureter. Surgical intervention as tumor volume reduction (cytoreduction) may be useful for cases with medical treatment-refractory or symptomatic FAP-associated abdominal DTs.

  3. Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery in the Treatment of Oncological Perineal and Genital Defects

    PubMed Central

    Brodbeck, Rebekka; Horch, Raymund E.; Arkudas, Andreas; Beier, Justus P.

    2015-01-01

    Defects of the perineum may result from ablative procedures of different malignancies. The evolution of more radical excisional surgery techniques resulted in an increase in large defects of the perineum. The perineogenital region per se has many different functions for urination, bowel evacuation, sexuality, and reproduction. Up-to-date individual and interdisciplinary surgical treatment concepts are necessary to provide optimum oncological as well as quality of life outcome. Not only the reconstructive method but also the timing of the reconstruction is crucial. In cases of postresectional exposition of e.g., pelvic or femoral vessels or intrapelvic and intra-abdominal organs, simultaneous flap procedure is mandatory. In particular, the reconstructive armamentarium of the plastic surgeon should include not only pedicled flaps but also free microsurgical flaps so that no compromise in terms of the extent of the oncological resection has to be accepted. For intra-abdominally and/or pelvic tumors of the rectum, the anus, or the female reproductive system, which were resected through an abdominally and a sacrally surgical access, simultaneous vertical rectus abdominis myocutaneous (VRAM) flap reconstruction is recommendable. In terms of soft tissue sarcoma of the pelvic/caudal abdomen/proximal thigh region, two-stage reconstructions are possible. This review focuses on the treatment of perineum, genitals, and pelvic floor defects after resection of malignant tumors, giving a distinct overview of the different types of defects faced in this region and describing a number of reconstructive techniques, especially VRAM flap and pedicled flaps like antero-lateral thigh flap or free flaps. Finally, this review outlines some considerations concerning timing of the different operative steps. PMID:26500887

  4. Abdominal Sepsis.

    PubMed

    De Waele, Jan J

    2016-08-01

    Abdominal infections are an important challenge for the intensive care physician. In an era of increasing antimicrobial resistance, selecting the appropriate regimen is important and, with new drugs coming to the market, correct use is important more than ever before and abdominal infections are an excellent target for antimicrobial stewardship programs. Biomarkers may be helpful, but their exact role in managing abdominal infections remains incompletely understood. Source control also remains an ongoing conundrum, and evidence is increasing that its importance supersedes the impact of antibiotic therapy. New strategies such as open abdomen management may offer added benefit in severely ill patients, but more data are needed to identify its exact role. The role of fungi and the need for antifungal coverage, on the other hand, have been investigated extensively in recent years, but at this point, it remains unclear who requires empirical as well as directed therapy.

  5. Laparoscopic Resection of Symptomatic Gastric Diverticula

    PubMed Central

    Zelisko, Andrea; Rodriguez, John; El-Hayek, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Gastric diverticula are rare and usually asymptomatic. This report, however, describes two examples of symptomatic gastric diverticula successfully treated by laparoscopic resection. Both patients were male and in their sixth decade of life. One patient was relatively healthy with no past medical history, whereas the other patient had chronic pain issues and at presentation was also undergoing evaluation for hyperaldosteronism. The patients presented with gastrointestinal symptoms, including nausea, emesis, abdominal pain, and change in bowel function. In both cases, a gastric diverticulum was identified by CT scan, and precise anatomic position was determined by upper endoscopy. After discussion with the treating teams, including a gastroenterologist and surgeon, surgical treatment and resection was elected. Successful laparoscopic removal was accomplished in both patients, and they were discharged home after tolerating liquid diets. Both patients reported resolution of their abdominal symptoms at follow-up. PMID:24680154

  6. Abdominal Adhesions

    MedlinePlus

    ... Adhesions 1 Ward BC, Panitch A. Abdominal adhesions: current and novel therapies. Journal of Surgical Research. 2011;165(1):91–111. Seek Help for ... and how to participate, visit the NIH Clinical Research Trials and You website ... Foundation for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders 700 West Virginia ...

  7. Pattern of sensory innervation of the perineal skin in the female rat.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Yolanda; Zempoalteca, René; Angelica Lucio, Rosa; Pacheco, Pablo; Hudson, Robyn; Martínez-Gómez, Margarita

    2004-10-22

    Here we describe the nerves innervating the perineal skin together with their sensory fields in the adult female rat. Electrophysiological recording showed that the lumbosacral and L6-S1 trunks, in part by way of the sacral plexus, transmit sensory information from the perineal skin via four nerves: the viscerocutaneous branch of the pelvic nerve innervating the skin at the midline between the vaginal opening and anus, the sensory branch of the pudendal nerve innervating the clitoral sheath, the distal perineal branch of the pudendal nerve innervating a broad area of skin adjacent to the vaginal opening and anus, and the proximal perineal branch of the sacral plexus innervating a broad area of skin adjacent to the clitoris and vaginal opening. The sensory fields of three of these nerves overlapped to some degree: the viscerocutaneous branch of the pelvic and the distal perineal branch of the pudendal nerves at the midline skin between the vaginal opening and the anus, and the distal perineal branch of the pudendal nerve and the proximal perineal branch of the sacral plexus at the skin lateral to the vaginal opening. Such overlap might provide a safeguard helping to ensure that somatosensory input from the perineal region important for triggering reproductive and nonreproductive reflexes reaches the CNS.

  8. A novel method to determine perineal artery occlusion among male bicyclists.

    PubMed

    Parthiban, Sujeeth; Hotaling, James M; Kathrins, Martin; Baftiri, Amit P; Freels, Sally; Niederberger, Craig S

    2015-01-01

    Background. Perineal pressure due to bicycle riding has been associated with erectile dysfunction. We developed a novel method to measure the occlusive force exerted over the perineal arteries and determined perineal artery occlusion by a variety of seat designs. Methods. Doppler ultrasonography facilitated perineal artery localization and determination of the force required for perineal artery occlusion in 20 healthy men. Flexiforce(®) sensors were affixed over the proximal and distal aspects of the perineal arteries bilaterally. Individuals completed bicycle rides in the road- and stationary-settings with six distinct seat designs, including those with and without an anterior "nose." Results. The occlusion time proportion of the total ride time was calculated for each trial. The overall occlusion time proportion was 0.59 (95% CI [0.45-0.73]) across all seats and settings. The "no-nose" bicycle seat and the stationary-setting demonstrated significantly lower occlusion proportion times than the traditional nose bicycle seat and road-setting, respectively. However, all bicycle seats yielded an occlusion time proportion of 0.41 or greater. Discussion. Our method of real-time, non-invasive force measurement localized to the perineal arteries may be used to validate future bicycle seat design. It also underscores the significant risk of perineal artery insufficiency in men who are avid bicyclists. This risk may be minimized by using newer "no-nose" bicycle seats.

  9. A novel method to determine perineal artery occlusion among male bicyclists

    PubMed Central

    Hotaling, James M.; Kathrins, Martin; Baftiri, Amit P.; Freels, Sally; Niederberger, Craig S.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Perineal pressure due to bicycle riding has been associated with erectile dysfunction. We developed a novel method to measure the occlusive force exerted over the perineal arteries and determined perineal artery occlusion by a variety of seat designs. Methods. Doppler ultrasonography facilitated perineal artery localization and determination of the force required for perineal artery occlusion in 20 healthy men. Flexiforce® sensors were affixed over the proximal and distal aspects of the perineal arteries bilaterally. Individuals completed bicycle rides in the road- and stationary-settings with six distinct seat designs, including those with and without an anterior “nose.” Results. The occlusion time proportion of the total ride time was calculated for each trial. The overall occlusion time proportion was 0.59 (95% CI [0.45–0.73]) across all seats and settings. The “no-nose” bicycle seat and the stationary-setting demonstrated significantly lower occlusion proportion times than the traditional nose bicycle seat and road-setting, respectively. However, all bicycle seats yielded an occlusion time proportion of 0.41 or greater. Discussion. Our method of real-time, non-invasive force measurement localized to the perineal arteries may be used to validate future bicycle seat design. It also underscores the significant risk of perineal artery insufficiency in men who are avid bicyclists. This risk may be minimized by using newer “no-nose” bicycle seats. PMID:26713236

  10. Perineal nodule due to enterobiasis: an aspiration cytologic diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Neeta; Sharma, Prashant; Sachdeva, Ritesh; Jain, Shyama

    2003-01-01

    Subcutaneous swelling due to Enterobious vermicularis infection is rare. Their presence in perineal subcutaneous tissue is unusual and a clinical curiosity. A case of subcutaneous nodule in the perineum due to E. vermicularis infection diagnosed on fine-needle aspiration is described. Tissue reaction was granulomatous with neutrophils and eosinophils. Lack of familiarity with the morphology of parasites or its eggs, degeneration, and inadequate sampling may make the diagnosis difficult. This case report provides the morphologic clues to cytopathologists toward rendering a diagnosis and alerts them to the possibility of parasitic infection in unusual locations.

  11. Perineal Rectosigmoidectomy (Altemeier Procedure) as Treatment of Strangulated Rectal Prolapse.

    PubMed

    Cernuda, Ricardo Baldonedo; Ángel, Janet Pagnozzi; Fernández, Nuria Truan; Sánchez-Farpón, José Herminio; Pérez, Jose Antonio Álvarez

    2016-12-01

    Incarceration of a rectal prolapse is an unusual entity that represents a surgical emergency. Even more rarely, it becomes strangulated, requiring emergency surgery. When surgery becomes inevitable, the choice of procedure varies. A 57-year-old man who presented with strangulated rectal prolapse is described. The patient underwent emergency perineal proctosigmoidectomy, the Altemeier operation, combined with diverting loop sigmoid colostomy. The postoperative course was uneventful. After a 6-month follow-up, there was no recurrence, but the patient continued with fecal incontinence. This case underlines the importance of the Altemeier procedure as treatment in the patient with a strangulated prolapsed rectal segment.

  12. Chylous ascites after resection of giant adrenocortical carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Karakoyun, Rojbin; Demirci, Erkan; Alikanoglu, Arsenal Sezgin

    2016-01-01

    Postoperative chylous ascites (PCA) is a rare clinical state that occurs during abdominal surgery. Despite its rarity, the need to diagnose and treat PCA is increasing in importance with the increased number of wide resections and lymph node dissections being performed and the serious consequences of treatment. Here we describe the PCA complications we observed after resection for treating a case of giant adrenocortical carcinoma and we have the brief review of the PCA complication. PMID:28149812

  13. Abdominosacral resection for locally recurring rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Belli, Filiberto; Gronchi, Alessandro; Corbellini, Carlo; Milione, Massimo; Leo, Ermanno

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate feasibility and outcome of abdominal-sacral resection for treatment of locally recurrent rectal adenocarcinoma. METHODS A population of patients who underwent an abdominal-sacral resection for posterior recurrent adenocarcinoma of the rectum at the National Cancer Institute of Milano, between 2005 and 2013, is considered. Retrospectively collected data includes patient characteristics, treatment and pathology details regarding the primary and the recurrent rectal tumor surgical resection. A clinical and instrumental follow-up was performed. Surgical and oncological outcome were investigated. Furthermore an analytical review of literature was conducted in order to compare our case series with other reported experiences. RESULTS At the time of abdomino-sacral resection, the mean age of patients was 55 (range, 38-64). The median operating time was 380 min (range, 270-480). Sacral resection was performed at S2/S3 level in 3 patients, S3/S4 in 3 patients and S4/S5 in 4 patients. The median operating time was 380 ± 58 min. Mean intraoperative blood loss was 1750 mL (range, 200-680). The median hospital stay was 22 d. Overall morbidity was 80%, mainly type II complication according to the Clavien-Dindo classification. Microscopically negative margins (R0) is obtained in all patients. Overall 5-year survival after first surgical procedure is 60%, with a median survival from the first surgery of 88 ± 56 mo. The most common site of re-recurrence was intrapelvic. CONCLUSION Sacral resection represents a feasible approach to posterior rectal cancer recurrence without evidence of distant spreading. An accurate staging is essential for planning the best therapy. PMID:28070232

  14. Obstetric perineal injury: risk factors and prevalence in a resource-constrained setting.

    PubMed

    Naidoo, T D; Moodley, J

    2015-10-01

    The prevalence of obstetric perineal injuries and risk factors vary between affluent and resource-constrained settings. This prospective observational study reports on the factors associated with perineal lacerations in a cohort of Black African and Indian women delivering at two regional hospitals in South Africa. Binary logistic regression analysis was used to test for associations between independent variables and the dependent variable on multivariate analysis. All variables significant on bivariate analysis (P < 0.05) were included in the multivariate model. There were 202 (16.2%) perineal tears. Variables significant with having a perineal tear on bivariate and multivariate analysis included: Black African race (OR: 2.4; 95% CI: 1.2-4.6); duration of labour ≥6.3h (OR: 1.5; 95% CI: 1.1-2.1); and epidural analgesia (OR: 2.9; 95% CI: 1.9-4.7). Having an episiotomy was protective against perineal tears (OR: 0.06; 95% CI: 0.03-0.1). Obstetric perineal injury commonly occurs in our resourced-constrained setting and the risk factors are similar to those in well-resourced settings. Identification of those at risk may reduce obstetric perineal injury.

  15. [Inflammatory aneurysms of the abdominal aorta].

    PubMed

    Tovar Martín, E; Acea Nebril, B

    1993-01-01

    Approximately 10 per cent of abdominal aneurysms have an excessively thick wall that sometimes involve duodenum, cava or colon by an inflammatory process. Between February 1986 and December 1992, 147 patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) were treated surgically and in 13 (8.8%) the aneurysms were found to be inflammatory. Their mean age was 67.3 years (70.1 years in non inflammatory group) and all were symptomatics initially (abdominal pain in 53%, rupture in 23%, mass in 15%). The operative mortality for elective resection was 37% in patients with inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysms (IAAA) decreasing to 9% in the AAA group without inflammatory involvement. We conclude that surgery is indicated in these patients to prevent rupture and to hasten the subsidense of inflammatory process ever with postoperative morbi-mortality increased.

  16. Abdomino-endoscopic perineal excision of the rectum for benign and malignant pathology: Technique considerations for true transperineal verus transanal total mesorectal excision endoscopic proctectomy

    PubMed Central

    Al Furajii, Hazar; Kennedy, Niall; Cahill, Ronan A.

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: Transanal minimally invasive surgery using single port instrumentation is now well described for the performance of total mesorectal excision with restorative colorectal/anal anastomosis most-often in conjunction with transabdominal multiport assistance. While non-restorative abdomino-endoscopic perineal excision of the anorectum is conceptually similar, it has been less detailed in the literature. METHODS: Consecutive patients undergoing non-restorative ano-proctectomy including a transperineal endoscopic component were analysed. All cases commenced laparoscopically with initial medial to lateral mobilisation of any left colon and upper rectum. The lower anorectal dissection started via an intersphincteric or extrasphincteric incision for benign and malignant pathology, respectively, and following suture closure and circumferential mobilisation of the anorectum, a single port (GelPOINT Path, Applied Medical) was positioned allowing the procedure progress endoscopically in all quadrants up to the cephalad dissection level. Standard laparoscopic instrumentation was used. Specimens were removed perineally. RESULTS: Of the 13 patients (median age 55 years, median BMI 28.75 kg/m2, median follow-up 17 months, 6 males), ten needed completion proctectomy for ulcerative colitis following prior total colectomy (three with concomitant parastomal hernia repair) while three required abdominoperineal resection for locally advanced rectal cancer following neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy. Median operative time was 190 min, median post-operative discharge day was 7. Eleven specimens were of high quality. Four patients developed perineal wound complications (one chronic sinus, two abscesses needing drainage) within median 17-month follow-up. CONCLUSION: Convergence of transabdominal and transanal technology and technique allows accuracy in combination operative performance. Nuanced appreciation of transperineal operative access should allow specified standardisation and

  17. Palliative resection of a primary tumor in patients with unresectable colorectal cancer: could resection type improve survival?

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Hyun Seok; Kim, Chang Hyun; Lee, Soo Young; Kim, Hyeong Rok; Kim, Young Jin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of extended resection of primary tumor on survival outcome in unresectable colorectal cancer (UCRC). Methods A retrospective analysis was conducted for 190 patients undergoing palliative surgery for UCRC between 1998 and 2007 at a single institution. Variables including demographics, histopathological characteristics of tumors, surgical procedures, and course of the disease were examined. Results Kaplan-Meier survival curve indicated a significant increase in survival times in patients undergoing extended resection of the primary tumor (P < 0.001). Multivariate analysis showed that extra-abdominal metastasis (P = 0.03), minimal resection of the primary tumor (P = 0.034), and the absence of multimodality adjuvant therapy (P < 0.001) were significantly associated poor survival outcome. The histological characteristics were significantly associated with survival times. Patients with well to moderate differentiation tumors that were extensively resected had significantly increased survival time (P < 0.001), while those with poor differentiation tumors that were extensively resected did not have increase survival time (P = 0.786). Conclusion Extended resection of primary tumors significantly improved overall survival compared to minimal resection, especially in well to moderately differentiated tumors (survival time: extended resection, 27.8 ± 2.80 months; minimal resection, 16.5 ± 2.19 months; P = 0.002). PMID:27757394

  18. Scroto-perineal hidradenitis suppurativa complicated by giant scrotal elephantiasis.

    PubMed

    Alharbi, Badr; Shlash, Ahmed; Bedaiwi, Khaled; Hooti, Qais Al; Almohaisen, Abdulrahman; Shlash, Saud; Said, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Scrotal elephantiasis has been a recognized complication of inguinal node irradiation, filarial infection, tumor involvement and surgical lymphatic destruction, but has rarely been reported in association with hidradenitis suppurativa (HS). HS, also known as acne inversa, is a chronic and often debilitating disease primarily affecting the axillae, inframammary regions and perineum. The location of the lesions may lead to social embarrassment and failure to seek medical treatment. Scroto-preineal HS complicated by scrotal elephantiasis is a distressing disease. Excisional surgery with reconstruction is the recommended treatment with a high likelihood of good outcome. We present a 38-year-old male patient with long-standing scroto-perineal HS complicated by giant scrotal elephantiasis.

  19. Perineal Bull Gore with Urinary Bladder Perforation and Pneumoperitoneum

    PubMed Central

    R, Santhosh; Barad, Arun Kumar; Ghalige, Hemanth Sureshwara; K, Sridartha; Sharma M, Birkumar

    2013-01-01

    Animal related injuries are frequently reported in India and other countries, where bulls are used for sporting events as well as in places where farming and livestock rearing is practised. The presentation is, many times, atypical and misleading as well. They have unique mechanics of injury. The patterns of the injury are reviewed. An intra-peritoneal urinary bladder injury which is caused by a perineal bull gore with a pneumoperitoneum is unusual and it has not been reported in the literature which was reviewed. We are reporting a successfully treated 25 years old male patient from the slopes of the southern district of Manipur, India, who had presented 40 hours after he was injured. The identification and prompt exploration, keeping in mind the mechanics of bull goring, helps the surgeons to adequately deal such atypical injuries, for optimal outcomes. PMID:23814738

  20. Perineal powder exposure and the risk of ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Cook, L S; Kamb, M L; Weiss, N S

    1997-03-01

    This case-control study evaluated the risk of epithelial ovarian cancer associated with genital exposure to various forms of powder application. Cases included all women aged 20-79 years in three counties of western Washington who were diagnosed with borderline or invasive ovarian cancer from 1986 through 1988; 64.3% of eligible cases were interviewed. A sample of similarly aged women who lived in these counties, identified by random digit dialing, served as controls. The overall response among control women was 68.0%. Information on powder application and other potential risk factors was ascertained during the in-person interview. Overall, ovarian cancer cases (n = 313) were more likely than controls (n = 422) to ever have used powder (age-adjusted relative risk (RR) = 1.5, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.1-2.0). After adjustment for age and other methods of genital powder application (none vs. any), an elevated relative risk of ovarian cancer was noted only for women with a history of perineal dusting (RR = 1.6, 95% CI 1.1-2.3) or use of genital deodorant spray (RR = 1.9, 95% CI 1.1-3.1). These results offer support for the hypothesis, raised by prior epidemiologic studies, that powder exposure from perineal dusting contributes to the development of ovarian cancer, and they suggest that use of genital deodorant sprays may do so as well. Limitations of the present study include the fairly low proportion of eligible women who participated and the potential differential recall of powder usage.

  1. Abdominal tuberculosis.

    PubMed Central

    Kapoor, V. K.

    1998-01-01

    Tuberculosis has staged a global comeback and forms a dangerous combination with AIDS. The abdomen is one of the common sites of extrapulmonary involvement. Patients with abdominal tuberculosis have a wide range and spectrum of symptoms and signs; the disease is therefore a great mimic. Diagnosis, mainly radiological and supported by endoscopy, is difficult to make and laparotomy is required in a large number of patient. Management involves judicious combination of antitubercular therapy and surgery which may be required to treat complications such as intestinal obstruction and perforation. The disease, though potentially curable, carries a significant morbidity and mortality. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 PMID:9926119

  2. Perineal Pain Management with Cryotherapy after Vaginal Delivery: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Morais, Ítalo; Lemos, Andréa; Katz, Leila; Melo, Lorena Fernandes Rosendo de; Maciel, Mariano Maia; Amorim, Melania Maria Ramos de

    2016-07-01

    Introduction Systematic reviews that evaluate the perineal cryotherapy to reduce pain in the vaginal postpartum are inconclusive. Purpose To evaluate clinical effectiveness of cryotherapy in the management of humanized postpartum perineal pain and vaginal edema. Methods A double-bind randomized controlled clinical trial (UTN number: U1111-1131-8433) was conducted in a hospital in Northeastern, Brazil. Women were included following humanized childbirth. All had vaginal deliveries of a single, full-term pregnancy with cephalic presentation. Exclusion criteria included previous perineal lesion, episiotomy during the current delivery, instrumental delivery, uterine curettage and postpartum hemorrhage. In the experimental group, an ice pack was applied six times on the perineum for 20 minutes, reducing the temperature between 10 and 15 ° C, then 60 minutes without exposure to cold. In the non-cryotherapy, a water bag unable to reduce the temperature to this extent was used, compliance with the same application protocol of the first group. Perineal temperature was monitored at zero, 10 and 20 minutes for application in both groups. Evaluations were made immediately before and after the applications and 24 hours after delivery spontaneous, to determine the association between variables. Results A total of 80 women were included in the study, 40 in each group. There was no significant difference in scores of perineal pain and edema between the groups with or without cryotherapy until 24 hours after childbirth. There was no difference between groups when accomplished repeated measures analysis over the 24 hours after delivery, considering the median perineal pain (p = 0.3) and edema (p = 0.9). Perineal cryotherapy did not influence the amount of analgesics used (p = 0.07) and no adverse effect was registered. Conclusion The use of cryotherapy following normal vaginal delivery within the concept of humanized minimally interventionist childbirth had no

  3. Giant Perineal Leiomyoma: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Picon, Antonio I.

    2014-01-01

    We report the case of a 40-year-old woman who presented with a large perineal mass with no rectal or vaginal involvement. Imaging could not rule out malignancy. She underwent wide surgical excision. Histological analysis revealed a large atypical leiomyoma, measuring 24 × 12 × 8 cm. Followup after two years showed no recurrence and she has been asymptomatic since surgery. This is the largest perineal leiomyoma reported so far. PMID:24991446

  4. Laparoscopic partial splenic resection.

    PubMed

    Uranüs, S; Pfeifer, J; Schauer, C; Kronberger, L; Rabl, H; Ranftl, G; Hauser, H; Bahadori, K

    1995-04-01

    Twenty domestic pigs with an average weight of 30 kg were subjected to laparoscopic partial splenic resection with the aim of determining the feasibility, reliability, and safety of this procedure. Unlike the human spleen, the pig spleen is perpendicular to the body's long axis, and it is long and slender. The parenchyma was severed through the middle third, where the organ is thickest. An 18-mm trocar with a 60-mm Endopath linear cutter was used for the resection. The tissue was removed with a 33-mm trocar. The operation was successfully concluded in all animals. No capsule tears occurred as a result of applying the stapler. Optimal hemostasis was achieved on the resected edges in all animals. Although these findings cannot be extended to human surgery without reservations, we suggest that diagnostic partial resection and minor cyst resections are ideal initial indications for this minimally invasive approach.

  5. In Vivo Estimation of Perineal Body Properties Using Ultrasound Quasistatic Elastography in Nulliparous Women

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Luyun; Low, Lisa Kane; DeLancey, John OL; Ashton-Miller, James A

    2015-01-01

    Objective The perineal body must undergo a remarkable transformation during pregnancy to accommodate an estimated stretch ratio of over 3.3 in order to permit vaginal delivery of the fetal head. Yet measurements of perineal body elastic properties are lacking in vivo, whether in the pregnant or non-pregnant state. The objective of this study, therefore, was to develop a method for measuring perineal body elastic modulus and to test its feasibility in young nulliparous women. Methods An UltraSONIX RP500 ultrasound system was equipped with elastography software. Approximately 1 Hz free-hand sinusoidal compression loading of the perineum was used to measure the relative stiffness of the perineal body compared to that of a custom reference standoff pad with a modulus of 36.7 kPa. Measurements were made in 20 healthy nulliparous women. Four subjects were invited back for second and third visits to evaluate within- and between-visit repeatability using the coefficient of variation. Results The mean± SD elastic compression modulus of the perineal body was 28.9 ± 4.7 kPa. Within- and between-visit repeatability averaged 3.4% and 8.3%, respectively. Conclusion Ultrasound elastography using a standoff pad reference provides a valid method for evaluating the elastic modulus of the perineal body in living women. PMID:25801422

  6. Imperforate hymen: a cause of abdominal pain in female adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Lardenoije, Céline; Aardenburg, Robert; Mertens, Helen

    2009-01-01

    A 16-year-old girl presented with primary amenorrhea and had had cyclical abdominal pain for almost a year. At examination we observed a painful mass in the lower abdomen and normal secondary sex characteristics. Perineal examination showed a bluish bulging hymen. Transabdominal ultrasonography revealed a dense mass in the pelvis measuring about 12×11 cm. We diagnosed an imperforate hymen with haematocolpos and haematometra. The hymen was opened surgically and a large quantity of menstrual blood was drained from the vagina and uterus. Postoperative recovery was normal without any pain. The patient now menstruates regularly. An imperforate hymen occurs in 0.05% of women. It is important to be aware of this while examining a female adolescent presenting with cyclical abdominal pain and primary amenorrhea. Late discovery of an imperforate hymen may lead to pain, infections, hydronephrosis and endometriosis with subfertility as a possible consequence. PMID:21686660

  7. Recovery after abdominal wall reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Kristian Kiim

    2017-03-01

    implementation of the pathway. The enhanced recovery after surgery pathway included preoperative high-dose steroid, daily assessment of revised discharge criteria and an aggressive approach to restore bowel function (chewing gum and enema on postoperative day two). Patients who followed the enhanced recovery after surgery pathway reported low scores of pain, nausea and fatigue, and were discharged significantly faster than patients in the control group. A non-significant increase in postoperative readmissions and reoperations was observed after the introduction of the enhanced recovery after surgery pathway. Study III and IV were prospective studies of patients undergoing abdominal wall reconstruction for giant incisional hernia, who were compared to a control group of patients with an intact abdominal wall undergoing colorectal resection for benign or low-grade malignant disease. Patients were examined within a week preoperatively and again one year postoperatively. In study III, the respiratory function and respiratory quality of life were assessed, and the results showed that patients with a giant incisional hernia had a decreased expiratory lung function (peak expiratory flow and maximal expiratory pressure) compared to the predicted values and also compared to patients in the control group. Both parameters increased significantly after abdominal wall reconstruction, while no other significant changes were found in objective or subjective measures at one-year follow-up in both groups of patients. Lastly, study IV examined the abdominal wall- and extremity function, as well as overall and disease specific quality of life. We found that patients with a giant hernia had a significantly decreased relative function of the abdominal wall compared to patients with an intact abdominal wall, and that this deficit was offset at one-year follow-up. Patients in the control group showed a postoperative decrease in abdominal wall function, while no changes were found in extremity function

  8. Perineal Assessment and Repair Longitudinal Study (PEARLS): a matched-pair cluster randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Perineal trauma during childbirth affects millions of women worldwide every year. The aim of the Perineal Assessment and Repair Longitudinal Study (PEARLS) was to improve maternal clinical outcomes following childbirth through an enhanced cascaded multiprofessional training program to support implementation of evidence-based perineal management. Methods This was a pragmatic matched-pair cluster randomized controlled trial (RCT) that enrolled women (n = 3681) sustaining a second-degree perineal tear in one of 22 UK maternity units (clusters), organized in 11 matched pairs. Units in each matched pair were randomized to receive the training intervention either early (group A) or late (group B). Outcomes within each cluster were assessed prior to any training intervention (phase 1), and then after the training intervention was given to group A (phase 2) and group B (phase 3). Focusing on phase 2, the primary outcome was the percentage of women who had pain on sitting or walking at 10 to 12 days post-natal. Secondary outcomes included use of pain relief at 10 to 12 days post-natal, need for suture removal, uptake and duration of exclusive breastfeeding, and perineal wound infection. Practice-based measures included implementation of evidence into practice to promote effective clinical management of perineal trauma. Cluster-level paired t-tests were used to compare groups A and B. Results There was no significant difference between the clusters in phase 2 of the study in the average percentage of women reporting perineal pain on sitting and walking at 10 to 12 days (mean difference 0.7%; 95% CI −10.1% to 11.4%; P = 0.89). The intervention significantly improved overall use of evidence-based practice in the clinical management of perineal trauma. Following the training intervention, group A clusters had a significant reduction in mean percentages of women reporting perineal wound infections and of women needing sutures removed. Conclusion PEARLS is the first

  9. Three-Directional Reconstruction of a Massive Perineal Defect after Wide Local Excision of Extramammary Paget's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Seung Woo; Kwon, Sung Tack

    2016-01-01

    Extramammary Paget's disease (EMPD) is a rare, slow-growing intraepithelial malignancy that mainly involves the genital region, including the vulva, penis, scrotum, perianal, and periurethral areas. Although several treatment options exist, wide local excision with a safe margin is considered the treatment of choice. After resection of the lesion, it is often challenging to reconstruct the defect because defects in the perineal region require adequate volume for protection and are susceptible to infections, which is a particularly significant risk for large defects. We report a case of perivulvar EMPD that was reconstructed with three-directional local flaps after wide excision of the tumor. We covered the defect sequentially using the following 3 flaps: a gracilis myocutaneous flap from the left thigh, a bipedicled V-Y advancement flap from the lower abdomen, and an internal pudendal artery perforator-based island flap from the right buttock. To the best of our knowledge, this report is the first to describe a three-directional approach to extensive perivulvar reconstruction. PMID:27689055

  10. Obesity May Be Protective against Severe Perineal Lacerations

    PubMed Central

    Garretto, Diana; Lin, Brian B.; Syn, Helen L.; Judge, Nancy; Beckerman, Karen; Atallah, Fouad; Friedman, Arnold; Brodman, Michael; Bernstein, Peter S.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To determine if there is an association between BMI and 3rd- or 4th-degree perineal lacerations in normal spontaneous and operative vaginal deliveries. Study Design. We performed a retrospective case control study using a large obstetric quality improvement database over a six-year period. Cases were identified as singleton gestations with third- and fourth-degree lacerations. Controls were obtained randomly from the database of patients without third- or fourth-degree lacerations in a 1 : 1 ratio. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed. Results. Of 32,607 deliveries, 22,011 (67.5%) charts with BMI documented were identified. Third- or fourth-degree lacerations occurred in 2.74% (n = 605) of patients. 37% (n = 223) were identified in operative vaginal deliveries. In the univariate analysis, obesity, older maternal age, non-Asian race, and birth weight <4000 g were all protective against 3rd- and 4th-degree lacerations. After controlling for age, race, mode of vaginal delivery, and birth weight, obesity remained significant. Conclusion. Being obese may protect against third- and fourth-degree lacerations independent of parity, race, birth weight, and mode of delivery. PMID:27274869

  11. Demographic variations and clinical associations of episiotomy and severe perineal lacerations in vaginal delivery.

    PubMed Central

    Ogunyemi, Dotun; Manigat, Brandy; Marquis, Jesse; Bazargan, Mohsen

    2006-01-01

    Primiparity, birthweight, operative delivery and obstetrical complications contribute to episiotomy and severe perineal lacerations. Episiotomy correlates with Hispanics, while African Americans correlate with severe perineal lacerations. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to identify risk factors for both episiotomy and severe perineal lacerations in a large population from a single institution. STUDY DESIGN: This was a review of 66,224 vaginal deliveries of African Americans or Hispanics delivering between 25-44 gestational weeks between 1981-2001. Univariate and multiple regression analysis were done as indicated. RESULTS: Independent predictors of episiotomy were: primiparity eight-fold, forceps delivery seven-fold, vacuum delivery five-fold, shoulder dystocia 3.6-fold, macrosomia 1.8-fold, epidural analgesia 1.6-fold, postdates 1.5-fold, Hispanics 1.4-fold. Independent predictors of severe perineal lacerations were; macrosomia seven-fold, episiotomy 4.5-fold, primiparity 4.4-fold, shoulder dystocia 3.6-fold, average birthweight 3.5-fold, forceps delivery 2.6-fold, vacuum delivery two-fold, epidural analgesia two-fold, African-American 1.5-fold. Nonreassuring fetal heart rate patterns, meconium and cord accidents appeared protective. CONCLUSION: Primiparous women with larger babies undergoing operative delivery with epidural analgesia are at risk for both episiotomy incisions and severe perineal lacerations. Though Hispanics are more likely to have an episiotomy, they are at significantly less risk for severe perineal lacerations compared to African Americans. Even though episiotomy is independently associated with severe perineal laceration, other factors such as macrosomia and primiparity are as important. PMID:17128701

  12. Laparoscopic Colon Resection

    MedlinePlus

    ... inches to complete the procedure. What are the Advantages of Laparoscopic Colon Resection? Results may vary depending ... type of procedure and patient’s overall condition. Common advantages are: Less postoperative pain May shorten hospital stay ...

  13. Prostate resection - minimally invasive

    MedlinePlus

    ... invasive - discharge Transurethral resection of the prostate - discharge Review Date 6/29/2015 Updated by: Jennifer Sobol, ... the Michigan Institute of Urology, West Bloomfield, MI. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by ...

  14. Large bowel resection - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... 26. Read More Colon cancer Colostomy Crohn disease Intestinal obstruction Large bowel resection Ulcerative colitis Patient Instructions Bland ... Diseases Colonic Polyps Colorectal Cancer Diverticulosis and Diverticulitis Intestinal Obstruction Ulcerative Colitis Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A. ...

  15. Small bowel resection - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... chap 26. Read More Colon cancer Crohn disease Intestinal obstruction Small bowel resection Patient Instructions Bland diet Crohn ... Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Intestinal Cancer Intestinal Obstruction Small Intestine Disorders Browse the Encyclopedia A.D. ...

  16. The formation of abdomino-perineal sacs by the fasciae of Scarpa and Colles, and their clinical significance.

    PubMed

    Martin, B F

    1984-06-01

    It has been shown that the membranous layer of the subcutaneous tissue, known as Scarpa's fascia, is confined to an oval area on each side of the abdominal wall. By its attachment to the deep fascia it encloses an obliquely directed oval sac which extends into the perineum by three pocket-like diverticulae. The fascial extension which forms the pockets is known as the fascia of Colles. Medially, the sac blends with the fundiform ligament, so that the sacs do not communicate with each other or with the interfascial space deep to the penile dartos. Laterally, the inferior margin creates the crease-line of the groin by its attachment to the fascia lata. Between these attachments the pockets arise from the sac. The lateral pocket continues into the superficial perineal pouch. The medial pocket, together with the intermediate, occupies the scrotum or labium majus. The intermediate pocket is associated with the spermatic cord or the round ligament of the uterus and blends with their coverings posteriorly. In the male it terminates just above the testis. The significance of the fascial arrangements in relation to urinary extravasation is discussed, and also the relationship of the intermediate pocket to an indirect inguinal hernia.

  17. The formation of abdomino-perineal sacs by the fasciae of Scarpa and Colles, and their clinical significance.

    PubMed Central

    Martin, B F

    1984-01-01

    It has been shown that the membranous layer of the subcutaneous tissue, known as Scarpa's fascia, is confined to an oval area on each side of the abdominal wall. By its attachment to the deep fascia it encloses an obliquely directed oval sac which extends into the perineum by three pocket-like diverticulae. The fascial extension which forms the pockets is known as the fascia of Colles. Medially, the sac blends with the fundiform ligament, so that the sacs do not communicate with each other or with the interfascial space deep to the penile dartos. Laterally, the inferior margin creates the crease-line of the groin by its attachment to the fascia lata. Between these attachments the pockets arise from the sac. The lateral pocket continues into the superficial perineal pouch. The medial pocket, together with the intermediate, occupies the scrotum or labium majus. The intermediate pocket is associated with the spermatic cord or the round ligament of the uterus and blends with their coverings posteriorly. In the male it terminates just above the testis. The significance of the fascial arrangements in relation to urinary extravasation is discussed, and also the relationship of the intermediate pocket to an indirect inguinal hernia. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 Fig. 11 Fig. 12 Fig. 13 Fig. 14 PMID:6235202

  18. [Large abdominal wall reconstruction by free flap after recurrence of a dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans].

    PubMed

    Le Fourn, B; Lejeune, F; Sartre, J Y; Loirat, Y; Pannier, M

    1996-12-01

    Based on a case of recurrence of a dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans of the abdominal wall, the authors discuss the need for initial wide resection of this type of skin tumour and the possibilities of repair of extensive full thickness defects of the abdominal wall by means of a latissimus dorsi myocutaneous free flap.

  19. [The cutaneous groin flap for coverage of a full-thickness abdominal wall defect].

    PubMed

    Doebler, O; Spierer, R

    2010-08-01

    A full-thickness defect of the abdominal wall is rare and may occur as a complication of extended abdominal surgery procedures. We report about a 69-year-old patient who was presented to our department with a full-thickness abdominal wall defect and a fully exposed collagen-mesh for reconstructive wound closure. 13 operations with resections of necrotic parts of the abdominal wall were performed following a complicated intraabdominal infection. After debridement and mesh explantation, closure of the remaining defect of the lower abdominal region was achieved by a cutaneous groin flap.

  20. Partial splenic resection using the TA-stapler.

    PubMed

    Uranüs, S; Kronberger, L; Kraft-Kine, J

    1994-07-01

    Since 1987, we have used the TA-stapler for 15 partial resections of the spleen. The cases included 5 second- to third-degree traumatic ruptures, 4 splenic cysts, 3 injuries resulting from accidents during upper-abdominal surgery, 2 diagnostic resections, and 1 intralienal pancreatic cyst. The TA-55 stapler was used 14 times and the TA-90 once. No patient developed postoperative bleeding or required further surgery. Postoperative laboratory chemistry and scintigraphy findings were within the limits indicative of normal function in all cases. The TA-stapler expands the technical possibilities for organ-conserving splenic surgery.

  1. Segmental ulcerated perineal hemangioma of infancy: a complex case of PELVIS syndrome successfully treated using a multidisciplinary approach.

    PubMed

    Kaushik, Shivani B; Kwatra, Shawn G; McLean, Thomas W; Powers, Alexander; Atala, Anthony J; Yosipovitch, Gil

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of PELVIS (perineal hemangioma, external genital malformations, lipomyelomeningocele, vesicorenal abnormalities, imperforate anus and skin tag) syndrome in which hemangioma in the perineal area was misdiagnosed at birth as diaper rash. Investigations revealed associated vesicorenal and spinal abnormalities. We emphasize careful diagnosis of suspicious lesions at birth and confirm the successful use of propranolol in treating ulcerated segmental hemangiomas.

  2. Female perineal membrane: a study using pelvic floor semiserial sections from elderly nulliparous and multiparous women.

    PubMed

    Kato, Masao; Matsubara, Akio; Murakami, Gen; Abe, Shin-Ichi; Ide, Yoshinobu; Sato, Iwao; Usui, Tsuguru

    2008-12-01

    To describe the architecture and topohistology of the female perineal structures, especially the perineal membrane (PM), we examined frontal sections (one side) and horizontal or transverse sections (another side) of 15 bisectioned pelvic floors. The PM, notably comprising elastic fibers, extended mediolaterally or transversely on the immediately inferior side of the rhabdosphincter area. More posteriorly, the elastic fibers more tilted along the long axis of the vagina and became lining the lateral vaginal wall as a fibrous skeleton. The compressor urethrae and urethrovaginal sphincter were embedded in and interdigitated with the PM. The elastic fiber architecture of the PM was similar to the rectovaginal septum. We hypothesize that the PM plays a role of a shock-absorber at the interface between the levator ani and distalmost vagina. A standard diagram of the female perineal structures is necessary to be revised.

  3. The role of episiotomy in instrumental delivery: is it preventative for severe perineal injury?

    PubMed

    Hudelist, G; Mastoroudes, H; Gorti, M

    2008-07-01

    Third-degree perineal tears are a major complication in vaginal childbirth and are more frequent in vaginal operative deliveries (VOD). Several studies have reported on risk factors associated with severe perineal trauma and its complications, such as faecal and urinary incontinence. Within this, the role performance and type of episiotomy remains controversial, especially if combined with VOD. Although midline and mediolateral episiotomies are commonly performed in combination with VOD, their role for prevention of severe perineal trauma in VOD is still unclear. In order to elucidate the impact of midline and mediolateral episiotomy in conjunction with VOD, the present review focuses on the potential risks and benefits of these episiotomy types and their role in VOD.

  4. SUCCESSFUL DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT OF BILATERAL PERINEAL HERNIAS IN A SKUNK (MEPHITIS MEPHITIS).

    PubMed

    Summa, Noémie; Eshar, David; Reynolds, Debbie; Caines, Deanne; Singh, Ameet

    2015-09-01

    This brief communication describes the diagnosis and surgical treatment of bilateral perineal hernias in a 1-yr-old, intact female, striped skunk (Mephitis mephitis) that was evaluated for chronic intermittent constipation, following early age, bilateral anal sacculectomy for descenting. Complete blood count and biochemistry results were within the reference ranges. Diagnosis was based on history, physical exam, clinical signs, and diagnostic imaging. A two-stage surgical approach for treatment was performed. First, colopexy and cystopexy were performed via celiotomy, which was followed by unilateral perineal herniorrhaphy by using an internal obturator muscle flap augmented with porcine small intestinal submucosa biomaterial. Long-term resolution of clinical signs was achieved without evidence of recurrence. This is the first description of bilateral perineal hernia in a skunk following routine anal sacculectomy for descenting.

  5. Multiparity causes uncoordinated activity of pelvic- and perineal-striated muscles and urodynamic changes in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Gómez, Margarita; Mendoza-Martínez, Germán; Corona-Quintanilla, Dora Luz; Fajardo, Víctor; Rodríguez-Antolín, Jorge; Castelán, Francisco

    2011-12-01

    Temporal and coordinated activation of pelvic- (pubococcygeous) and perineal- (bulbospongiosus and ischiocavernosus) striated muscles occurs during micturition in female rabbits. We have hypothesized that the coordinated activation of pelvic and perineal muscles is modified during the micturition of young multiparous rabbits. Young virgin and multiparous female chinchilla rabbits were used to simultaneously record cystometrograms and electromyograms of the pubococcygeous, ischocavernosus, and bulbospongiosus muscles. Bladder function was assessed using standard urodynamic variables. The temporal coordination of pelvic- and perineal-striated muscle activity was changed in multiparous rabbits. The cystometrogram recordings were different than those obtained from virgin rabbits, as seen in alterations of the threshold volume, the residual volume, the voiding duration, and the maximum pressure. In rabbits, we find that multiparity causes uncoordinated activity of pubococcygeous, ischiocavernosus, and bulbospongiosus muscles and modifies the urodynamics.

  6. Desmoid tumor of the abdominal wall: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Desmoid tumors are rare lesions without any metastatic potential but a strong tendency to invade locally and to recur. These tumors are associated with women of fertile age, especially during and after pregnancy. Case presentation The case of a desmoid tumor of the anterior abdominal wall in a 40-year-old Caucasian man with no relevant family history is presented, describing its appearance on computed tomography and ultrasonography. The patient, who presented with a painless mass in the left anterolateral abdomen, had a history of previous urgent abdominal surgery after a shotgun injury two years earlier. Radical resection of the affected abdominal wall musculature was performed, and the defect was reconstructed with polypropylene mesh. Conclusion The diagnosis of desmoid tumor should be strongly considered even in male patients with an abdominal mass and a history of previous abdominal surgery. The goal of its treatment is complete tumor excision and avoidance of the development of complications such as hernia. PMID:21787413

  7. Minimal Invasive Management of Anastomosis Leakage after Colon Resection

    PubMed Central

    Kabul Gürbulak, Esin; Akgün, İsmail Ethem; Öz, Ayhan; Ömeroğlu, Sinan; Battal, Muharrem; Celayir, Fevzi; Mihmanlı, Mehmet

    2015-01-01

    The gold standard of surgical treatment of colorectal anastomotic leak is abdominal drainage of collected fluid and stoma formation. Conventional laparotomy has been the preferred approach for treatment. However, both laparoscopic surgical techniquesand endoscopic stenting have gained popularity over the past years as minimal invasive approaches, especially in the management and treatment of perforations of the gastrointestinal system. We present here a successful treatment with a minimal invasive management of anastomosis leak in the early postoperative period after colon resection in a 62-year-old female patient who had undergone urgent laparoscopic intra-abdominal lavage and drainage followed by endoscopic stenting. PMID:25861277

  8. Physeal bridge resection.

    PubMed

    Khoshhal, Khalid I; Kiefer, Gerhard N

    2005-01-01

    Growth arrest secondary to physeal bridge formation is an uncommon but well-recognized complication of physeal fractures and other injuries. Regardless of the underlying etiology, physeal bridges may cause angular and/or longitudinal growth disturbances, with progression dependent on the remaining physeal growth potential. Physeal bridge resection and insertion of interposition material releases the tethering effect of the bridge. Physeal bridge resection has become an accepted treatment option for patients with existing or developing deformity and for those with at least 2 years or 2 cm of growth remaining. Current experimental research is focused on the use of gene therapy and other factors that enhance chondrocyte proliferation to improve the management of growth arrest. The use of cartilage and cultured chondrocytes as interposition material after physeal bridge resection is an area of active research.

  9. Laparoscopic anatomic liver resection

    PubMed Central

    Vibert, Eric; Kouider, Ali

    2004-01-01

    Background Liver resection is reputed to be one of the most difficult procedures embraced in laparoscopy. This report shows that with adequate training, anatomical liver resection including major hepatectomies can be performed. Methods This is a retrospective study. Results From 1995 to 2004, among 84 laparoscopic liver resections, 46 (54%) anatomical laparoscopic hepatectomies were performed in our institution by laparoscopy. Nine (20%) patients had benign disease while 37 (80%) had malignant lesions. Among those with malignant lesions, 14 patients had hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), 18 had colorectal metastasis (CRM), while 5 had miscellaneous tumours. For benign disease, minor (two Couinaud's segments or less) and major anatomic hepatectomies were performed in five and four patients, respectively. For malignant lesions, minor and major anatomic hepatectomies were performed in 15 and 22 patients, respectively. Overall, conversion to laparotomy was necessary in 7 (15%) patients. Blood transfusion was required in five (10%) patients. One patient died of cerebral infarction 8 days after a massive peroperative haemorrhage. The overall morbidity rate was 34% whatever the type of resection. Three patients required reoperation, either for haemorrhage (n=1) and/or biliary leak (n=2). For CRM (n=18), overall and disease-free survival at 24 months (mean follow-up of 17 months) were 100% and 56%, respectively. For HCC (n=14), overall and disease-free survival at 36 months (mean follow-up of 29 months) were 91% and 65%, respectively. No port site metastasis occurred in patients with malignancy. Conclusions After a long training with limited liver resection in superficial segments, laparoscopic anatomical minor and major resections are feasible. Short-term carcinological results seem to be similar to those obtained with laparotomy. PMID:18333079

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging of perianal and perineal crohn disease in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Hammer, Matthew R; Dillman, Jonathan R; Smith, Ethan A; Al-Hawary, Mahmoud M

    2013-11-01

    Noninvasive, nonionizing, multiparametric magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the pelvis using a field strength of 3 T now provides a comprehensive assessment of perineal involvement in pediatric Crohn disease. MR imaging accurately evaluates inflammatory disease activity, and allows determination of the number and course of fistula tracts as well as their relationships to vital perianal structures, including the external anal sphincter, helping to guide surgical management and improve outcomes. This article provides an up-to-date review of perineal MR imaging findings of Crohn disease in the pediatric population, including fistulous disease, abscesses, and skin manifestations. Imaging technique is also discussed.

  11. Living donor liver transplantation with abdominal wall reconstruction for hepatocellular carcinoma with needle track seeding

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Horng-Ren; Thorat, Ashok; Gesakis, Kanellos; Li, Ping-Chun; Kiranantawat, Kidakorn; Chen, Hung Chi; Jeng, Long-Bin

    2015-01-01

    Malignant cell seeding in subcutaneous tissues along the needle track and/or percutaneous biliary drainage catheters is rare complication, but pose various technical issues in planning surgical treatment of such patients. If underlying primary hepatic malignancy can be treated, an aggressive resection of subcutaneous tissue bearing cancer cell with subsequent abdominal wall reconstruction has been sporadically reported. But, when hepatic resection is not possible due to underlying advanced cirrhosis, liver transplantation along with abdominal wall resection and subsequent reconstruction remains only feasible option. Herein, we describe our successful experience of living donor liver transplantation for hepatocellular carcinoma with full-thickness abdominal wall resection bearing the tumor seeding followed by reconstruction in single stage surgery. PMID:26722665

  12. Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Professions Site Index A-Z Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA) Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) occurs when atherosclerosis or plaque buildup causes the ... weak and bulge outward like a balloon. An AAA develops slowly over time and has few noticeable ...

  13. Abdominal aortic aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000162.htm Abdominal aortic aneurysm To use the sharing features on this page, ... blood to the abdomen, pelvis, and legs. An abdominal aortic aneurysm occurs when an area of the aorta becomes ...

  14. Paratesticular rhabdomyosarcoma with metastatic encasement of the abdominal aorta.

    PubMed

    Aquino, Michael R; Gibson, Donald P; Bloom, David A

    2011-08-01

    Paratesticular rhabdomyosarcoma is a rare but aggressive malignancy in children and adolescents. Prognosis is related to initial tumor resectability as well as staging of the disease based on tumor invasiveness, tumor bulk, nodal disease and metastases. We report the unusual presentation of paratesticular rhabdomyosarcoma with metastatic extension through the inguinal canal and encasement of the abdominal aorta. These features portend a poor prognosis given their association with a greater stage of disease and unresectable nature at presentation. Delayed surgical resection follows a regimen of chemotherapy and radiation therapy in such cases of extensive disease. Encasement of the abdominal aorta has been shown to increase presurgical risk for intraoperative vascular injury when related to other malignancies, but its role in relation to metastatic paratesticular rhabdomyosarcoma has not been investigated. Also, rhabdomyosarcoma should be considered in the differential diagnoses of tumors that demonstrate encasement of the abdominal aorta.

  15. Simultaneous lung resection via a transdiaphragmatic approach in patients undergoing liver resection for synchronous liver and lung metastases

    PubMed Central

    Mise, Yoshihiro; Mehran, Reza J.; Aloia, Thomas A.; Vauthey, Jean-Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    Background For patients with synchronous liver and lung metastases from colorectal cancer, the invasiveness of adding thoracic to abdominal surgery is an obstacle to concurrent liver and lung metastasectomy. We developed a simple technique to resect lung lesions via a transdiaphragmatic approach without thoracic incision in patients undergoing liver metastasectomy. Methods Sixteen patients with synchronous liver and unilateral lung metastases underwent transdiaphragmatic wedge resection of lung lesions simultaneous with liver metastasectomy. Short-term surgical outcomes were compared with those in 102 patients treated with conventional unilateral wedge resection for colorectal lung metastases. Results Twenty peripheral (<3 cm from the pleura) lung lesions from various locations in the lung were resected via transdiaphragmatic approach. No conversions to conventional approach were required. The median tumor number and size were 1 (range, 1–3) and 8 mm (range, 3–30 mm), respectively. Transdiaphragmatic resection reduced median operative blood loss compared with conventional resection (0 mL vs 50 mL [p<0.001]) and reduced median length of hospital stay compared with staged liver and lung resection (6 days vs 11 days [p<0.001]). Surgical duration and rates of lung-related morbidity and positive surgical margin were similar between the transdiaphragmatic and conventional groups (104 min vs 105 min [p=0.61], 13% vs 4% [p=0.15], and 6% vs 5% [p=0.73], respectively). Conclusions Simultaneous transdiaphragmatic resection of peripheral lung lesions is safe in patients undergoing liver resection. The low-invasive transdiaphragmatic approach facilitates aggressive surgical treatment for synchronous liver and lung metastases. PMID:24953274

  16. [Staphylococcus lugdunensis necrotizing fasciitis after abdominal dermolipectomy: report of two cases and review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Delaunay, F; Pegot, A; Coquerel-Beghin, D; Aktouf, A; Auquit-Auckbur, I

    2014-04-01

    Necrotizing dermohypodermitis is a severe and potential fatal infection of soft tissues. We report two cases of 39- and 41-year-old patients operated of abdominal dermolipectomy and liposculpture after bariatric surgery. Because of a body mass index (BMI) less than 35kg/m(2), and trouble of interpretation of the SFAR recommendations, we have not achieved antibiotics. These patients presented an abdominal necrotizing dermohypodermitis at Staphylococcus lugdunensis, requiring wide excision of necrosis in emergency. The suites have been favorable after surgical and medical care. Perineal proximity, skin and subcutaneous peeling appear to be significant risk factors for this pathology. We suggest if case of abdominal dermolipectomy preventive measures in skin preparation and systematic antibiotics regardless of BMI. Indeed, the risk of a necrotizing dermohypodermitis recalls the importance of rigorous prevention and early diagnosis.

  17. Intestinal adaptation following resection.

    PubMed

    Tappenden, Kelly A

    2014-05-01

    Intestinal adaptation is a natural compensatory process that occurs following extensive intestinal resection, whereby structural and functional changes in the intestine improve nutrient and fluid absorption in the remnant bowel. In animal studies, postresection structural adaptations include bowel lengthening and thickening and increases in villus height and crypt depth. Functional changes include increased nutrient transporter expression, accelerated crypt cell differentiation, and slowed transit time. In adult humans, data regarding adaptive changes are sparse, and the mechanisms underlying intestinal adaptation remain to be fully elucidated. Several factors influence the degree of intestinal adaptation that occurs post resection, including site and extent of resection, luminal stimulation with enteral nutrients, and intestinotrophic factors. Two intestinotrophic growth factors, the glucagon-like peptide 2 analog teduglutide and recombinant growth hormone (somatropin), are now approved for clinical use in patients with short bowel syndrome (SBS). Both agents enhance fluid absorption and decrease requirements for parenteral nutrition (PN) and/or intravenous fluid. Intestinal adaptation has been thought to be limited to the first 1-2 years following resection in humans. However, recent data suggest that a significant proportion of adult patients with SBS can achieve enteral autonomy, even after many years of PN dependence, particularly with trophic stimulation.

  18. Intra-abdominal pulmonary secuestration as an exceptional cause of abdominal mass in the adult☆

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-Sanz, C.; Herrero Bogajo, M.L.; Picazo-Yeste, J.; Morandeira Rivas, A.; Manzanera-Diaz, M.; Sedano-Vizcaino, C.

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Pulmonary sequestration (PS) is an extremely rare malformation defined as a portion of lung tissue isolated from the pulmonary system. PSs are classified into intralobar type and intra-abdominal PS that represents only 2.5% of cases. There are 20 cases of PS reported in adults and only two were managed by laparoscopic approach. We report a case of intra-abdominal PS mimicking a gastroesophageal duplication cyst in an adult. Besides its rarity, this is the first intra-abdominal PS in an adult managed by an anterior laparoscopic approach. PRESENTATION OF CASE A 60-year-old female patient had had epigastric and left upper quadrant pain for several days. Physical examination was normal. Image test were consistent with a gastroesophageal duplication. The patient was taken to the operating room for laparoscopic exploration and resection. The pathological diagnosis was extralobar pulmonary sequestration. DISCUSSION Less than 20 cases of PS have been reported in adults and only two cases were managed by a lateral laparoscopic approach. In contrast to these reports, we used an anterior approach due to the GEJ suspected origin of the mass. CONCLUSION Extralobar intra-abdominal PS is an extremely rare condition during adulthood but this diagnosis should be included in the differential diagnosis of a left-sided suprarenal mass. Due to the difficulty in achieving a definitive preoperative diagnosis, surgery is recommended. Laparoscopic resection is safe and effective but careful preoperative imaging studies are recommended in order to plan the most suitable approach. PMID:24091075

  19. Chylous ascites caused by resection of a choledochal cyst.

    PubMed

    Mizukami, Tatsuzo; Okada, Tadao; Honda, Shohei; Miyagi, Hisayuki; Minato, Masashi; Todo, Satoru

    2012-01-01

    Chylous ascites is a rare complication of abdominal surgery in children. Particularly, reports of postoperative chylous ascites are rare. This report describes the very rare case of a 10-month-old girl complicated by chylous ascites after resection of a choledochal cyst with a Roux-en-Y hepaticojejunostomy, who was successfully treated medically. To date, we have found a few cases of postoperative chylous ascites in the paediatric literature. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of chylous ascites after the resection of a choledochal cyst in a child who was successfully treated solely by no fasting. No fasting might be a therapeutic option of paediatric postoperative chylous ascites after the resection of a choledochal cyst if the outflow volume of chylous ascites is small.

  20. Perineal body anatomy in living women: 3-D analysis using thin-slice magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Kindra A.; Yousuf, Aisha; Lewicky-Gaupp, Christina; Fenner, Dee E.; DeLancey, John O.L.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To describe a framework for visualizing the perineal body's complex anatomy using thin-slice MR imaging. Study Design Two mm-thick MR images were acquired in 11 women with normal pelvic support and no incontinence/prolapse symptoms. Anatomic structures were analyzed in axial, sagittal and coronal slices. 3-D models were generated from these images. Results Three distinct perineal body regions are visible on MRI: (1) a superficial region at the level of the vestibular bulb, (2) a mid region at the proximal end of the superficial transverse perineal muscle, and (3) a deep region at the level of the midurethra and puborectalis muscle. Structures are best visualized on axial scans while cranio-caudal relationships are appreciated on sagittal scans. The 3-D model further clarifies inter-relationships. Conclusion Advances in MR technology allow visualization of perineal body anatomy in living women and development of 3D models which enhance our understanding of its three different regions: superficial, mid and deep. PMID:21055513

  1. Reconstruction of Large Defects in the Perineal Area Using Multiple Perforator Flaps

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Ki Wook; Lee, Won Jai; Yun, In Sik

    2016-01-01

    Background Perineal defects are commonly encountered during the treatment of conditions such as malignancy, infectious disease, and trauma. Covering large defects in the perineal area is challenging due to its complicated anatomy and the need for functional preservation. Methods Fourteen patients who underwent reconstructive surgery with multiple perforator flaps for defects >100 cm2 in the perineal area were included in this retrospective cohort study. Characteristics of the perforator flap operation and postoperative outcomes were reviewed. Results Reconstruction was performed using 2 perforator flaps for 13 patients and 3 perforator flaps for 1 patient. Internal pudendal artery perforator flaps were mainly used for covering the defects. The average defect size was 176.3±61.8 cm2 and the average size of each flap was 95.7±31.9 cm2. Six patients had minor complications, such as wound dehiscence and partial necrosis of the flap margin, which were corrected with simple revision procedures. Conclusions Multiple perforator flaps can be used to achieve successful reconstructions of large perineal defects that are difficult to reconstruct with other coverage methods. PMID:27689052

  2. [Primary posterior perineal hernia. Case report and review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Wong, Ulises

    2014-01-01

    Antecedentes: las hernias perineales pueden aparecer luego de una intervención quirúrgica en esta región o como una lesión primaria. Entre las hernias menos frecuentes están las perineales. Caso clínico: paciente femenina de 42 años de edad, con un tumor perianal a la derecha del orificio anal, de aparición espontánea y de cinco años de evolución, con dimensiones de 6 × 10 cm, blando y reductible por detrás del músculo transverso del periné. Con diagnóstico de hernia perineal posterior primaria se intervino quirúrgicamente por vía perineal y se le colocó una malla de mersilene. Después de 18 meses de seguimiento no hubo recidiva. Conclusiones: la plastia perineal puede ser una buena alternativa para el tratamiento quirúrgico de las hernias perineales primarias porque permite efectuar un cierre mejor, disecar el saco herniario y reducirlo adecuadamente.

  3. Abdominal wall abscesses in patients with Crohn's disease: clinical outcome.

    PubMed

    Neufeld, David; Keidar, Andrei; Gutman, Mordechai; Zissin, Rivka

    2006-03-01

    Abdominal wall abscess due to Crohn's Disease used to be one of the definitive indications for operative treatment. The advent of interventional radiology, the accessibility to percutaneous drainage, and the availability of new medications raised the possibility of nonoperative treatment of this condition. The clinical presentation, treatment, and follow-up of 13 patients with abdominal wall abscesses secondary to Crohn's Disease were retrospectively reviewed. During a 10-year period (1993-2003), 13 patients with abdominal wall abscess were treated. Five patients had an anterolateral abdominal wall abscess and eight had a posterior abscess (psoas). In 11 patients, 17 drainage procedures were performed: 12 percutaneous and 5 operative. Despite initial adequate drainage and resolution of the abscess, all 13 patients eventually needed resection of the offending bowel segment, which was undertaken in 12 patients. The mean time between abscess presentation and definitive operation was 2 months. Percutaneous drainage is an attractive option in most cases of abdominal abscesses. However, in Crohn's Disease patients with an abdominal wall abscess, we found a high failure rate despite initial adequate drainage. We suggest that surgical resection of the diseased bowel segment should be the definitive therapy.

  4. Resection of Celiac Artery Aneurysm with Bypass Grafting to the Splenic and Common Hepatic Arteries

    PubMed Central

    Pattakos, Gregory; Tolpin, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Celiac artery aneurysms are rare and typically warrant surgical treatment. Atherosclerosis is their chief cause. Symptomatic patients usually present with abdominal pain. Surgical resection of celiac artery aneurysms is associated with low morbidity and mortality rates. We report the case of a patient whose 2.2-cm celiac artery aneurysm we resected, with subsequent saphenous vein bypass grafting from the celiac trunk to the splenic and common hepatic arteries. In addition, we briefly discuss other treatment options. PMID:28265220

  5. Transsphincteric tumor resection in case of a pararectal solitary fibrous tumor

    PubMed Central

    Troja, Achim; El-Sourani, Nader; Antolovic, Dalibor; Raab, Hans Rudolf

    2015-01-01

    Transsphincteric resection of rectal tumors was first described about 120 years ago. Nowadays, this approach faded into obscurity due to standardized guidelines and practice in surgical oncology including lymphadenectomy, mesorectal excision and radical dissection of veins. However, transsphincteric resection seems reasonable in some cases, especially if an abdominal approach can be avoided. In the following, we will present and describe the technique of the transsphincteric approach with its variations in rectal surgery in the case of a rare pararectal tumor. PMID:26773876

  6. [Perineal cutaneous metastases from adenocarcinoma after surgery for colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Placer, Carlos; Elósegui, José Luis; Irureta, Idoia; Mujika, José Andrés; Goena, Ignacio; Enríquez Navascués, José M

    2007-07-01

    The development of cutaneous metastases in the context of colorectal cancer is exceptional, especially in the absence of visceral lesions. We present the case of a 50-year-old woman who underwent surgery for a T3N0M0 tumor in the sigmoid colon, with resection of ovarian metastases at 12 months. Reoperation was performed 14 months later for local anastomotic recurrence. Four months after surgery, a nodular ulcerated lesion was observed in the perineum due to metastases from adenocarcinoma. Aggressive local surgery was performed and the patient has presented no recurrences after a 5-year follow-up. We discuss the need for correct management of the rectal or anal stump (through the use of iodine povidone wash solution) during instrumental anastomoses.

  7. Progressive Perineal Urethroplasty for Pelvic Fracture Urethral Distraction Defect in Prepubertal Children: The Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Bipin Chandra; Modi, Pranjal R.; Qadri, Syed Javid Farooq; Modi, Jayesh; Kumar, Suresh; Nagarajan, Ramya; Safee, Yusuf

    2017-01-01

    Background: Urethroplasty in pediatric patients is a challenging task. In this study, we have tried to assess the complexity and evaluate the outcome of progressive perineal anastomotic urethroplasty in prepubertal children. Materials and Methods: Retrospective data of all the prepubertal children who underwent progressive perineal urethroplasty between March 2009 and April 2014 were analyzed. Patients were evaluated with history, examination, essential laboratory investigations, retrograde urethrogram, and voiding cystourethrogram. Before subjecting the patients for definitive surgery, antegrade and retrograde endoscopic assessment was done. The surgery was performed by the transperineal route with the help of ×2.5 magnification. Patients were followed up with uroflowmetry for every 3 months in the 1st year and for every 6 months in the subsequent years. Results: Mean age of the patients was 7.3 (range 5–11) years. Mean urethral distraction defect was 1.7 (range 1–2.5) cm. All the patients were successfully managed by the perineal approach. Crural separation was performed in all the patients while additional inferior pubectomy was required in six patients. Mean operating time was 298 (range 180–400) min. Mean blood loss was 174 (range 100–500) ml. One patient had the left calf hematoma in the immediate postoperative period. Seven out of nine (77.7%) patients had successful urethroplasty. Two patients had failed urethroplasty who were successfully managed by redo-urethroplasty. Transient incontinence was observed in one patient. Erectile function could not be assessed in these patients. Conclusion: This study shows the feasibility of progressive perineal urethroplasty by the perineal route in prepubertal children. An endoscopic assessment should be performed before the definitive surgery. Use of loupe helps in performing better anastomosis and hence yielding a better result. PMID:28082772

  8. Detection of Subpubic Tumor Causing Bladder Outlet Obstruction by 3D Perineal Ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Albrich, S; Steetskamp, J; Rommens, K; Porta, S; Battista, M; Hoffmann, G; Skala, C

    2015-07-01

    This case report shows that 3D perineal ultrasound can be superior to clinical examination and routine 2D perineal ultrasound in the detection of an unusual subpubic tumor. A 73-year-old female patient was referred to our urogynecological outpatient unit complaining of over-active bladder symptoms and voiding dysfunction for 3 years. Gynecological examination found no signs of pelvic organ prolapse or abnormality in the vaginal cavity. Routine 2D perineal ultrasound showed substantial residual urine (ca. 300 ml on catheter) and limited bladder neck mobility, but no signs of pelvic organ prolapse. Use of standardized 3D perineal ultrasound revealed a 24 × 26 × 32 mm spherical, hypoechoic tumor below the pubic symphysis between the distal urethra and the pubic bones. This structure was mistaken for the pubic symphysis in the midline on 2D ultrasound performed earlier. At surgery, the tumor was completely excised through a vaginal incision between the urethra and the pubic symphysis. After an uneventful postoperative recovery the patient developed de-novo stress urinary incontinence, which was corrected successfully by the insertion of a retropubic tension-free suburethral sling after an interval of 8 weeks. After a further follow-up of 8 weeks the patient reported well-being, urinary continence and no voiding dysfunction; no abnormalities were found on examination. In conclusion, 3D perineal ultrasound is a useful additional tool for the diagnostic workup of bladder outlet obstruction.

  9. Radicality of Resection and Survival After Multimodality Treatment is Influenced by Subsite of Locally Recurrent Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kusters, Miranda; Dresen, Raphaela C.; Martijn, Hendrik; Nieuwenhuijzen, Grard A.; Velde, Cornelis J.H. van de; Berg, Hetty A. van den; Beets-Tan, Regina G.H.; Rutten, Harm J.T.

    2009-12-01

    Purpose: To analyze results of multimodality treatment in relation to subsite of locally recurrent rectal cancer (LRRC). Method and Materials: A total of 170 patients with LRRC who underwent treatment between 1994 and 2008 were studied. The basic principle of multimodality treatment was preoperative (chemo)radiotherapy, intended radical surgery, and intraoperative radiotherapy. The subsites of LRRC were classified as presacral, posterolateral, (antero)lateral, anterior, anastomotic, or perineal. Subsites were related to radicality of the resection, local re-recurrence rate, distant metastasis rate, and cancer-specific survival. Results: R0 resections were achieved in 54% of the patients, and 5-year cancer-specific survival was 40.5%. The worst outcomes were seen in presacral LRRC, with only 28% complete resections and 19% 5-year survival (p = 0.03 vs. other subsites). Anastomotic LRRC resulted in the most favorable outcomes, with 77% R0 resections and 60% 5-year survival (p = 0.04). Generally, if a complete resection was achieved, survival improved, except in posterolateral LRRC. Local re-recurrence and metastasis rate were lowest in anastomotic LRRC. Conclusions: Classification of the subsite of LRRC is a predictor of potentially resectable and consequently curable disease. Treatment of posterior LRRC imposes poor results, whereas anastomotic LRRC location shows superior results.

  10. Isolated Abdominal Wall Metastasis of Endometrial Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Simões, Jorge; Gonçalves, Matilde; Matos, Isabel

    2014-01-01

    A woman in her mid-60s presented with a bulky mass on the anterior abdominal wall. She had a previous incidental diagnosis of endometrial adenocarcinoma FIGO stage IB following a vaginal hysterectomy. Physical exam and imaging revealed a well circumscribed bulging tumour at the umbilical region, measuring 10 × 9 × 9 cm, with overlying intact skin and subcutaneous tissue. Surgical resection was undertaken, and histological examination showed features of endometrial carcinoma. She began chemotherapy and is alive with no signs of recurrent disease one year after surgery. This case brings up to light an atypical location of a solitary metastasis of endometrial carcinoma. PMID:25349753

  11. Surgical management of abdominal and retroperitoneal Castleman's disease

    PubMed Central

    Bucher, Pascal; Chassot, Gilles; Zufferey, Guillaume; Ris, Frederic; Huber, Olivier; Morel, Philippe

    2005-01-01

    Background Abdominal and retroperitoneal Castleman's disease could present either as a localized disease or as a systemic disease. Castleman's disease is a lymphoid hyperplasia related to human Herpes virus type 8, which could have an aggressive behavior, similar to that of malignant lymphoid neoplasm mainly with the systemic type, or a benign one in its localized form. Methods The authors report two cases of localized Castleman's disease in the retroperitoneal space and review the current and recent progress in the knowledge of this atypical disease. Cases presentation The two patients were young healthy women presenting with a hyper vascular peri-renal mass suggestive of malignant tumor. Both have been resected in-toto. One of them had an extensive resection with nephrectomy, while the second had a kidney preserving surgery. Pathological examination revealed localized Castleman's disease and surgical margins were free of disease. Postoperative course was uneventful, and after more than 5-years of follow-up no recurrences have been observed. Conclusion Localized Castleman's disease should be considered when facing a solid hypervascular abdominal or retroperitoneal mass. A better knowledge of this disorder and its characteristic would help surgeon to avoid unnecessarily extensive resection for this benign disorder when dealing with abdominal or retroperitoneal tumors. Surgical resection is curative for the localized form, when complete, while splenectomy could be indicated for the systemic form. PMID:15941478

  12. [Surgical correction of infrarenal abdominal aorta aneurysms].

    PubMed

    Khamitov, F F; Matochkin, E A; Vertkina, N V; Kizyma, A G; Lisitskiĭ, D A

    2008-01-01

    The authors compare various surgical strategies of infrarenal abdominal aorta aneurysm (IAAA) repair based on the experience of the Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Urban Clinical Hospital No.81. Total 198 patients underwent aneurysm resection and grafting through conventional (90) or minilaparotomy (108) approaches. Mini-approach was shown to improve significantly both perioperative course and outcomes of IAAA correction. The main advantage of this approach comprised limited invasiveness together with sufficient exposure of abdominal aorta and its branches. Abandoning small bowel evisceration helps to preserve ther-moregulation and achieve volemic homeostasis with less fluid volume. Postoperative period after surgical mini-approach was characterized by shorter period of mechanical ventilation and ICU stay, earlier restoration of bowel motility, conversion to usual nutrition, patient mobilization and discharge. Minimally invasive technology significantly broadens feasibility of radical aortic reconstructions for patients with serious cardio-vascular comorbidities.

  13. Advanced Gastric Cancer Perforation Mimicking Abdominal Wall Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Jinbeom; Park, Ilyoung; Lee, Dosang; Sung, Kiyoung; Baek, Jongmin

    2015-01-01

    Surgeons occasionally encounter a patient with a gastric cancer invading an adjacent organ, such as the pancreas, liver, or transverse colon. Although there is no established guideline for treatment of invasive gastric cancer, combined resection with radical gastrectomy is conventionally performed for curative purposes. We recently treated a patient with a large gastric cancer invading the abdominal wall, which was initially diagnosed as a simple abdominal wall abscess. Computed tomography showed that an abscess had formed adjacent to the greater curvature of the stomach. During surgery, we made an incision on the abdominal wall to drain the abscess, and performed curative total gastrectomy with partial excision of the involved abdominal wall. The patient received intensive treatment and wound management postoperatively with no surgery-related adverse events. However, the patient could not receive adjuvant chemotherapy and expired on the 82nd postoperative day. PMID:26468420

  14. Wandering Ascaris Coming Out Through the Abdominal Wall

    PubMed Central

    Wani, Mohd L; Rather, Ajaz A.; Parray, Fazl Q.; Ahangar, Abdul G.; Bijli, Akram H.; Irshad, Ifat; Nayeem-Ul-Hassan; Khan, Tahir S.

    2013-01-01

    A rare case of ascaris coming out through the anterior abdominal wall is reported here. A 40-year-old female had undergone dilatation and curettage by a quack. On the second day she presented with presented with features of peritonitis. She was explored. Resection anastomosis of the ileum was done for multiple perforations of the ileum. Patient developed a fistula in the anterior abdominal wall which was draining bile-colored fluid. On the 12th postoperative day a 10-cm-long worm was seen coming out through the fistulous tract which was found to be Ascaris lumbricoids. Ascaris lumbricoids can lead to many complications ranging from worm colic to intestinal obstruction, volvulus, peritonitis, pancreatitis, cholangiohepatitis, liver abscess and many more. Worm has been reported to come out through mouth, nostrils, abdominal drains, T-tubes etc. But ascaris coming out through the anterior abdominal wall is very rare hence reported here. PMID:23930192

  15. Wandering ascaris coming out through the abdominal wall.

    PubMed

    Wani, Mohd L; Rather, Ajaz A; Parray, Fazl Q; Ahangar, Abdul G; Bijli, Akram H; Irshad, Ifat; Nayeem-Ul-Hassan; Khan, Tahir S

    2013-06-01

    A rare case of ascaris coming out through the anterior abdominal wall is reported here. A 40-year-old female had undergone dilatation and curettage by a quack. On the second day she presented with presented with features of peritonitis. She was explored. Resection anastomosis of the ileum was done for multiple perforations of the ileum. Patient developed a fistula in the anterior abdominal wall which was draining bile-colored fluid. On the 12(th) postoperative day a 10-cm-long worm was seen coming out through the fistulous tract which was found to be Ascaris lumbricoids. Ascaris lumbricoids can lead to many complications ranging from worm colic to intestinal obstruction, volvulus, peritonitis, pancreatitis, cholangiohepatitis, liver abscess and many more. Worm has been reported to come out through mouth, nostrils, abdominal drains, T-tubes etc. But ascaris coming out through the anterior abdominal wall is very rare hence reported here.

  16. Isolated port-site metastasis of hepatocellular carcinoma after laparoscopic liver resection.

    PubMed

    Kihara, Kyoichi; Endo, Kanenori; Suzuki, Kazunori; Nakamura, Seiichi; Sawata, Takashi; Shimizu, Tetsu; Ikeguchi, Masahide; Tokuyasu, Yusuke; Nakamoto, Shu

    2016-10-17

    Port-site metastasis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is extremely rare, and only one case has been reported in the English-language literature. Contamination with malignant cells along the needle tract during percutaneous biopsy or radiofrequency ablation is a well-recognized cause of HCC recurrence. Here, we describe a case of port-site metastasis after laparoscopic liver resection of HCC. The patient, who had undergone laparoscopic partial resection of the left lateral segment of the liver 18 months earlier, was diagnosed with HCC. CT showed a nodule in the abdominal wall where the laparoscopic port had been inserted during resection. Local excision was performed, and histological examination revealed HCC consistent with recurrence after laparoscopic resection. The experience described in this report highlights the risk of port-site metastasis of HCC. Imaging for oncologic surveillance after laparoscopic resection must include all port sites.

  17. ALOBAR HOLOPROSENCEPHALY, CLEFT LIP/PALATE, URORECTAL SEPTUM MALFORMATION SEQUENCE AND CONGENITAL PERINEAL HERNIA IN A FETUS.

    PubMed

    Girisha, K M; Nayak, S S; Shukla, A; Bhat, S K

    2015-01-01

    We report on a fetus with alobar holoprosencephaly, complete cleft lip and palate, urorectal septum malformation sequence and perineal hernia. To our knowledge this appears to be a novel fetal malformation syndrome.

  18. Resection of Perihilar Cholangiocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hartog, Hermien; Ijzermans, Jan N M; van Gulik, Thomas M; Groot Koerkamp, Bas

    2016-04-01

    Perihilar cholangiocarcinoma presents at the biliary and vascular junction of the hepatic hilum with a tendency to extend longitudinally into segmental bile ducts. Most patients show metastatic or unresectable disease at time of presentation or surgical exploration. In patients eligible for surgical resection, challenges are to achieve negative bile duct margins, adequate liver remnant function, and adequate portal and arterial inflow to the liver remnant. Surgical treatment is characterized by high rates of postoperative morbidity and mortality. This article reviews the various strategies and techniques, the role of staging laparoscopy, intraoperative frozen section, caudate lobectomy, and vascular reconstruction.

  19. [Abdominal pregnancy, institutional experience].

    PubMed

    Bonfante Ramírez, E; Bolaños Ancona, R; Simón Pereyra, L; Juárez García, L; García-Benitez, C Q

    1998-07-01

    Abdominal pregnancy is a rare entity, which has been classified as primary or secondary by Studiford criteria. A retrospective study, between January 1989 and December 1994, realized at Instituto Nacional de Perinatología, found 35,080 pregnancies, from which 149 happened to be ectopic, and 6 of them were abdominal. All patients belonged to a low income society class, age between 24 and 35 years, and average of gestations in 2.6. Gestational age varied from 15 weeks to 32.2 weeks having only one delivery at term with satisfactory postnatal evolution. One patient had a recurrent abdominal pregnancy, with genital Tb as a conditional factor. Time of hospitalization varied from 4 to 5 days, and no further patient complications were reported. Fetal loss was estimated in 83.4%. Abdominal pregnancy is often the sequence of a tubarian ectopic pregnancy an when present, it has a very high maternal mortality reported in world literature, not found in this study. The stated frequency of abdominal pregnancy is from 1 of each 3372, up to 1 in every 10,200 deliveries, reporting in the study 1 abdominal pregnancy in 5846 deliveries. The study had two characteristic entities one, the recurrence and two, the delivery at term of one newborn. Abdominal pregnancy accounts for 4% of all ectopic pregnancies. Clinical findings in abdominal pregnancies are pain, transvaginal bleeding and amenorrea, being the cardinal signs of ectopic pregnancy.

  20. Electromyographical, ultrasonographical and morphological modifications in semitendinous muscle after transposition as ventral perineal muscle flap.

    PubMed

    Mortari, A C; Rahal, S C; Resende, L A L; Dal-pai-silva, M; Mamprim, M J; Corrêa, M A; Antunes, S H S

    2005-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate modifications occurring in semitendinous muscle after transposition as a ventral perineal muscle flap using electromyography, ultrasonography, and morphological studies. Ten male crossbreed dogs of 3-4 year old were used. The left semitendinous muscle was cut close to the popliteus lymph node, rotated and sutured at the perineal region. The contralateral muscle was considered as control. Motor nerve conduction studies of both sciatic-tibial nerves, and electromyographic and ultrasonographic examinations of both semitendinous muscles were performed before surgery and 15, 30, 60, and 90 days postoperatively. Semitendinous muscle samples were collected for morphological analysis 90 days after surgery. No alterations were observed in clinical gait examinations, or in goniometrical and electroneuromyographical studies in pelvic limbs after surgery. Electromyography demonstrated that the transposed muscle was able to contract, but atrophy was detected by ultrasonography and morphological analysis.

  1. Endoscopic resection of esthesioneuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Gallia, Gary L; Reh, Douglas D; Lane, Andrew P; Higgins, Thomas S; Koch, Wayne; Ishii, Masaru

    2012-11-01

    Esthesioneuroblastoma, or olfactory neuroblastoma, is an uncommon malignant tumor arising in the upper nasal cavity. Surgical approaches to this and other sinonasal malignancies involving the anterior skull base have traditionally involved craniofacial resections. Over the past 10 years to 15 years, there have been advances in endoscopic approaches to skull base pathologies, including malignant tumors. In this study, we review our experience with purely endoscopic approaches to esthesioneuroblastomas. Between January 2005 and February 2012, 11 patients (seven men and four women, average age 53.3 years) with esthesioneuroblastoma were treated endoscopically. Nine patients presented with newly diagnosed disease and two were treated for tumor recurrence. The modified Kadish staging was: A, two patients (18.2%); B, two patients (18.2%); C, five patients (45.5%); and D, two patients (18.2%). All patients had a complete resection with negative intraoperative margins. Three patients had 2-deoxy-2-((18)F)fluoro-d-glucose avid neck nodes on their preoperative positron emission tomography-CT scan. These patients underwent neck dissections; two had positive neck nodes. Perioperative complications included an intraoperative hypertensive urgency and pneumocephalus in two different patients. Mean follow-up was over 28 months and all patients were free of disease. This series adds to the growing experience of purely endoscopic surgical approaches in the treatment of skull base tumors including esthesioneuroblastoma. Longer follow-up on larger numbers of patients is required to clarify the utility of purely endoscopic approaches in the management of this malignant tumor.

  2. Multidisciplinary Management of Sexual Dysfunction, Perineal Pain, and Elimination Dysfunction in a Woman with Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Bogliatto, Fabrizio; Bacchio, Leonardo

    2017-01-01

    Background: Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic disease that commonly affects young women and is associated with sexual dysfunction (SD) and lower anourogenital dysfunction, which affect quality of life. We evaluated the importance of an integrated multidisciplinary approach in the Lower Female Ano-Uro-Genital Network (LFAUGN) to manage a variety of complex symptoms. Methods: A 40-year-old woman with MS and primary concerns about perineal pain and SD was treated by a trained midwife from the LFAUGN and a physical therapist after a multidisciplinary diagnostic process that included gynecologic evaluation for perineal pain and SD, physiatric assessment, urologic assessment for bladder retention (BR), and surgical examination for obstructed defecation syndrome (ODS). Physical therapy was integrated with pharmacologic therapy for ODS and with self-catheterization for BR. Results: After 5 months of treatment, the patient reported improvement in functional perineal parameters and perineal pain (visual analogue scale score: 9 at T1 vs. 5 at T2), with resolution of pelvic floor hypertonia. Furthermore, ODS and BR symptoms improved (5-item score: 18 of 20 at T1 vs. 10 of 20 at T2; 1 self-catheterization daily, with postvoid residual volume [PRV] <200 mL at T1 vs. 1 self-catheterization weekly, with PRV <100 mL at T2) and sexual satisfaction increased (Female Sexual Function Index score: 18 of 36 at T1 vs. 23 of 36 at T2). Conclusions: These results suggest that physical therapy, as an integral component of a multidisciplinary approach in a multiprofessional network, may play a pivotal role in improving anourogenital dysfunction and sexual satisfaction. PMID:28243183

  3. Does post-caesarean dyspareunia reflect sexual malfunction, pelvic floor and perineal dysfunction?

    PubMed

    Lal, M; Pattison, H M; Allan, T F; Callender, R

    2011-10-01

    The aim was to define post-caesarean dyspareunia as a sexual and pelvic-perineal symptom. Post-caesarean (80 elective, 104 emergency) and 100 vaginally delivered primiparae had domiciliary interviews at 10 months postpartum. A total of 50 (28% and 27%) post-caesarean and 46 (46%) vaginally delivered, reported dyspareunia. Severely impaired general sexual health occurred in 82 (24% elective, 25% emergency, 35% vaginally delivered) as category 3 (dyspareunia with sexual symptoms) and 27 (10% elective, 7% emergency, 12% vaginally delivered) as category 4 (reduced frequency < 6). The risk of dyspareunia (RR 1.14, CI 0.73, 1.77) or impaired general sexual health (RR 0.93, CI 0.32, 2.74) was similar among those with or without perineal trauma. Both caesarean and perineal scars were associated with sexual malfunction. Primiparae with new incontinence had a lower risk of dyspareunia than impaired general sexual health. Awareness of the associations of post-caesarean dyspareunia and impaired general sexual health with incontinence would facilitate appropriate obstetric decision-making. Further research is indicated.

  4. The Urethral Rhabdosphincter, Levator Ani Muscle, and Perineal Membrane: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Hinata, Nobuyuki; Murakami, Gen

    2014-01-01

    Detailed knowledge of the anatomy of the rhabdosphincter and adjacent tissues is mandatory during urologic surgery to ensure reliable oncologic and functional outcomes. To characterize the levator ani (LA) function for the urethral sphincter, we described connective tissue morphology between the LA and urethral rhabdosphincter. The interface tissue between the LA and rhabdosphincter area in males contained abundant irregularly arrayed elastic fibers and smooth muscles. The male rhabdosphincter was positioned alongside the LA to divide the elevation force and not in-series along the axis of LA contraction. The male perineal membrane was thin but solid and extends along the inferior margin or bottom of the rhabdosphincter area. In contrast, the female rhabdosphincter, including the compressor urethrae and urethrovaginal sphincter muscles, was embedded in the elastic fiber mesh that is continuous with the thick, multilaminar perineal membrane. The inferomedial edge of the female LA was attached to the upper surface of the perineal membrane and not directly attached to the rhabdosphincter. We presented new diagrams showing the gender differences in topographical anatomy of the LA and rhabdosphincter. PMID:24877147

  5. Infrascrotal, Perineal, Femorofemoral Bypass for Arterial Graft Infection at the Groin.

    PubMed

    Illuminati, Giulio; Caliò, Francesco G; D'Urso, Antonio; Giacobbi, Daniela; Papaspyropoulos, Vassilios; Ceccanei, Gianluca

    2004-12-01

    HYPOTHESIS: Infrascrotal, perineal, femorofemoral bypass is an acceptable procedure for treating infection of a prosthetic arterial graft limited to a unilateral groin. DESIGN: A consecutive sample clinical study with a mean follow-up of 29 months. SETTING: The surgical department of an academic tertiary care center and an affiliated secondary care center. PATIENTS: Nineteen patients with a mean age of 68 years with prosthetic graft infection at the outflow anastomosis on a femoral artery at the Scarpa triangle underwent an infrascrotal, perineal, femorofemoral bypass, with excision of the graft material limited at the groin. The recipient artery was the profunda femoris artery in 12 cases, the superficial femoral in 5, and the distal common femoral artery in 2. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Cumulative survival, recurrence of sepsis, primary graft patency, and limb salvage rates expressed by standard life-table analysis. RESULTS: Postoperative mortality rate was 5%. Cumulative (SE) survival rate was 65% (11.6%) at 3 years. Cumulative (SE) rate of freedom from recurrent sepsis was 88% (8.6%) at 3 years. Cumulative (SE) primary patency and limb salvage rates were 86% (9.4%) and 91% (7.9%), respectively, at 3 years. CONCLUSION: Femorofemoral bypass with an infrascrotal perineal approach is a valuable procedure for the treatment of femoral arterial graft infection limited at a unilateral groin.

  6. Comparison of Perineal Sonographically Measured and Functional Urodynamic Urethral Length in Female Urinary Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Janetzki, Nadine; Kennes, Lieven; Stickeler, Elmar; Serno, Julia; Behrendt, Julia

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To detect the anatomical insufficiency of the urethra and to propose perineal ultrasound as a useful, noninvasive tool for the evaluation of incontinence, we compared the anatomical length of the urethra with the urodynamic functional urethral length. We also compared the urethral length between continent and incontinent females. Methods. 149 female patients were enrolled and divided into four groups (stress, urge, or mixed incontinence; control). Sonographically measured urethral length (SUL) and urodynamic functional urethral length (FUL) were analyzed statistically. Standardized and internationally validated incontinence questionnaire ICIQ-SF results were compared between each patient group. Results. Perineal SUL was significantly longer in incontinent compared to continent patients (p < 0.0001). Pairwise comparison of each incontinent type (stress, urge, or mixed incontinence) with the control group showed also a significant difference (p < 0.05). FUL was significantly shorter in incontinent patients than in the control group (p = 0.0112). But pairwise comparison showed only a significant difference for the stress incontinence group compared with the control group (p = 0.0084) and not for the urge or mixed incontinent group. No clear correlation between SUL, FUL, and ICIQ-SF score was found. Conclusions. SUL measured by noninvasive perineal ultrasound is a suitable parameter in the assessment of female incontinence, since incontinent women show a significantly elongated urethra as a sign of tissue insufficiency, independent of the type of incontinence. PMID:27819004

  7. Fear causes tears - Perineal injuries in home birth settings. A Swedish interview study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Perineal injury is a serious complication of vaginal delivery that has a severe impact on the quality of life of healthy women. The prevalence of perineal injuries among women who give birth in hospital has increased over the last decade, while it is lower among women who give birth at home. The aim of this study was to describe the practice of midwives in home birth settings with the focus on the occurrence of perineal injuries. Methods Twenty midwives who had assisted home births for between one and 29 years were interviewed using an interview guide. The midwives also had experience of working in a hospital delivery ward. All the interviews were tape-recorded and transcribed. Content analysis was used. Results The overall theme was "No rushing and tearing about", describing the midwives' focus on the natural process taking its time. The subcategories 1) preparing for the birth; 2) going along with the physiological process; 3) creating a sense of security; 4) the critical moment and 5) midwifery skills illuminate the management of labor as experienced by the midwives when assisting births at home. Conclusions Midwives who assist women who give birth at home take many things into account in order to minimize the risk of complications during birth. Protection of the woman's perineum is an act of awareness that is not limited to the actual moment of the pushing phase but starts earlier, along with the communication between the midwife and the woman. PMID:21244665

  8. Single stage: dorsolateral onlay buccal mucosal urethroplasty for long anterior urethral strictures using perineal route

    PubMed Central

    Prabha, Vikram; Devaraju, Shishir; Vernekar, Ritesh; Hiremath, Murigendra

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective To assess the outcome of single stage dorsolateral onlay buccal mucosal urethroplasty for long anterior urethral strictures (>4cm long) using a perineal incision. Materials and Methods From August 2010 to August 2013, 20 patients underwent BMG urethroplasty. The cause of stricture was Lichen sclerosis in 12 cases (60%), Instrumentation in 5 cases (25%), and unknown in 3 cases (15%). Strictures were approached through a perineal skin incision and penis was invaginated into it to access the entire urethra. All the grafts were placed dorsolaterally, preserving the bulbospongiosus muscle, central tendon of perineum and one-sided attachement of corpus spongiosum. Procedure was considered to be failure if the patient required instrumentation postoperatively. Results Mean stricture length was 8.5cm (range 4 to 12cm). Mean follow-up was 22.7 months (range 12 to 36 months). Overall success rate was 85%. There were 3 failures (meatal stenosis in 1, proximal stricture in 1 and whole length recurrent stricture in 1). Other complications included wound infection, urethrocutaneous fistula, brownish discharge per urethra and scrotal oedema. Conclusion Dorsolateral buccal mucosal urethroplasty for long anterior urethral strictures using a single perineal incision is simple, safe and easily reproducible by urologists with a good outcome. PMID:27286122

  9. Perineal striated muscles: Anatomy, spinal motoneurons, and participation on copulatory behavior in male rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus).

    PubMed

    Zempoalteca, R; Lucio, R A; Eguibar, J R

    2008-09-01

    Despite the importance of rabbits in reproductive studies, little information is available on the anatomy and participation of the striated-perineal muscles in male copulatory behavior. In our study, we describe the gross anatomy of two striated-perineal muscles: the ischiocavernosus (ICm) and the bulbospongiosus (BSm). Both muscles have their origin at the ischiadic arc, but the ICm is inserted into the penile crura and the BSm onto the ligamentum suspensorium of the penis. The motoneurons of both muscles were identified using retrograde labeling with horseradish peroxidase coupled to wheat-germ agglutinin. Motoneurons were dispersed in the lower-lumbar and upper-sacral spinal-cord segments, instead of being aggregated in the neuronal nucleus as in other species: the rat, mouse, gerbil, cat, and man. Bilateral dennervation of the ICm or BSm or both in sexually experienced male rabbits did not affect copulatory variables measured at 10, 20, and 30 days after surgery. However, muscular dennervation produced extravaginal ejaculations in 42% of copulatory tests and no ejaculation in 7% of tests, although male pelvic thrusting occurred. These results suggest the participation of the ICm and BSm perineal muscles in penile orientation during copulation but not in seminal emission as described in other mammalian species.

  10. [Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Ziaja, K; Sedlak, L; Urbanek, T; Kostyra, J; Ludyga, T

    2000-01-01

    The reported incidence of inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm (IAAA) is from 2% to 14% of patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm and the etiology of this disease is still discussed--according to the literature several pathogenic theories have been proposed. From 1992 to 1997 32 patients with IAAA were operated on. The patients were mostly symptomatic--abdominal pain was present in 68.75% cases, back pain in 31.25%, fever in 12.5% and weight loss in 6.25% of the operated patients. In all the patients ultrasound examination was performed, in 4 patients CT and in 3 cases urography. All the patients were operated on and characteristic signs of inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm like: thickened aortic wall, perianeurysmal infiltration or retroperitoneal fibrosis with involvement of retroperitoneal structures were found. In all cases surgery was performed using transperitoneal approach; in three cases intraoperatively contiguous abdominal organs were injured, which was connected with their involvement into periaortic inflammation. In 4 cases clamping of the aorta was done at the level of the diaphragmatic hiatus. 3 patients (9.37%) died (one patient with ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm). Authors present diagnostic procedures and the differences in the surgical tactic, emphasizing the necessity of the surgical therapy in patients with inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm.

  11. Jejunal choristoma: a very rare cause of abdominal pain in children.

    PubMed

    Olajide, T A; Agodirin, S O; Ojewola, R W; Akanbi, O O; Solaja, T O; Odesanya, Johnson Oluremi; Ariyibi, O O

    2014-01-01

    Choristoma is development of a normal tissue in an aberrant location. This report describes jejunal salivary choristoma (JSC) causing recurring episodes of abdominal discomfort in a 5-year-old girl. Exploratory laporatomy revealed a pale yellow subserosal jejunal lesion. Wedge resection of the lesion and repair of the bowel were performed. The child did well postoperatively and has since that time been free of pain at follow-up. Histopathological examination of the resected lesion revealed salivary gland choriostoma. Literature review (PUBMED search engine) revealed no previous report of this rare clinicopathologic entity. We conclude that choriostoma should be considered a possible differential when evaluating abdominal complaint in children.

  12. Carinal resection and sleeve pneumonectomy

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Carinal resection (CR) and sleeve pneumonectomy (SP) are one of the challenging issues in thoracic surgery and performed rarely. In spite of the knowledge of the technique, the incidence of postoperative complications is higher compared to standard resections. Adequate patient selection, improved anesthetic management, surgical technique and better postoperative management might reduce the rate of postoperative morbidity and mortality. PMID:27942410

  13. Abdominal Pain in the Presence of Small Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms: If in Doubt, Cut It Out!

    PubMed

    Georgakarakos, Efstratios; Schoretsanitis, Nikolaos; Koufopoulos, Georgios; Paulou, Konstantinos; Lazarides, Miltos K

    2017-02-03

    Although small (<5 cm) abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) have been associated with symptoms and indication for intervention scarcely, the clinicians should never exclude such potential association especially in the absence of other overt pathological findings. In such cases, a surgical exploration with consequent intervention, if feasible, should be justified to prevent a detrimental evolution in a dubious scenario. In this article, we present 2 cases of patients with small AAA presenting with severe abdominal pain. In the absence of other solid clinical and radiological pathological findings, both patients underwent laparotomy where an inflammatory small AAA was identified and subjected either to resection and restoration with a tube graft or secondary endovascular repair because the periaortic fibrosis precluded the open repair. The characteristics and rationale of treatment modalities are exemplified and discussed.

  14. Pancreatic and multiorgan resection with inferior vena cava reconstruction for retroperitoneal leiomyosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Stauffer, John A; Fakhre, G Peter; Dougherty, Marjorie K; Nakhleh, Raouf E; Maples, William J; Nguyen, Justin H

    2009-01-01

    Background Inferior vena cava (IVC) leiomyosarcoma is a rare tumor of smooth muscle origin. It is often large by the time of diagnosis and may involve adjacent organs. A margin-free resection may be curative, but the resection must involve the tumor en bloc with the affected segment of vena cava and locally involved organs. IVC resection often requires vascular reconstruction, which can be done with prosthetic graft. Case presentation We describe a 39-year-old man with an IVC leiomyosarcoma that involved the adrenal gland, distal pancreas, and blood supply to the spleen and left kidney. Tumor excision involved en bloc resection of all involved organs with reimplantation of the right renal vein and reconstruction of the IVC with a polytetrafluoroethylene graft. The patient recovered without renal insufficiency, graft infection, or other complications. Follow-up abdominal imaging at 1 year showed a patent IVC graft and no locally recurrent tumor. Prosthetic graft provides a sufficient diameter and length for replacement conduit in extensive resection of IVC leiomyosarcoma. Conclusion To our knowledge, this is the first case of resection of an IVC sarcoma with prosthetic graft reconstruction in combination with pancreatic resection. Aggressive surgical resection including vascular reconstruction is warranted for select IVC tumors to achieve a potentially curative outcome. PMID:19126222

  15. [A case of adenocarcinoma occurring at colostomy site 7 years after abdominoperineal resection for rectal cancer resected after preoperative mFOLFOX6 chemotherapy].

    PubMed

    Hata, Tatsuo; Tsuruta, Yoshihiko; Takamori, Shigeru; Shishikura, Yuri

    2012-09-01

    A 78-year-old man had undergone abdominoperineal resection for rectal cancer in 2003. After 7 years, he visited our hospital with complaints of turbid discharge from the stoma. A tumor 11 cm in diameter was shown at the site of the stoma. A partial resected biopsy revealed moderately-differentiated adenocarcinoma. We diagnosed metachronous multiple carcinoma or recurrent cancer at the colostomy site. After loop colostomy of the ascending colon was performed, systemic chemotherapy with mFOLFOX6 was performed. After 5 courses, the tumor revealed a significant reduction in its size. Afterwards, the stoma including the tumor and remaining left-side colon with adjacent abdominal wall was resected, keeping the surgical margin free. In the resected specimen, histological evaluation of the treatment with chemotherapy was assessed to be Grade 1a. As a result of preoperative chemotherapy, we finally were able to resect the minimal area of the adjacent skin and abdominal wall, and succeed in primary closure of the surgical wound. This case suggests that preoperative chemotherapy is a good option for treating cancer occurring at a colostomy site.

  16. Abdominal Pain Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... or cancer Infection of the tubes (salpingitis) Ectopic pregnancy Fibroid tumors of the uterus (womb) Malignant tumors of the uterus or cervix Endometriosis Adhesions (scars) Screening and Diagnosis How is the cause of abdominal pain determined? ...

  17. [The abdominal catastrophe].

    PubMed

    Seiler, Christian A

    2011-08-01

    Patients with an abdominal catastrophe are in urgent need of early, interdisciplinary medical help. The treatment plan should be based on medical priorities and clear leadership. First priority should be given to achieve optimal oxygenation of blood and stabilization of circulation during all treatment-phases. The sicker the patient, the less invasive the (surgical) treatment should to be, which means "damage control only". This short article describes 7 important, pragmatic rules that will help to increase the survival of a patient with an abdominal catastrophe. Preexisting morbidity and risk factors must be included in the overall risk-evaluation for every therapeutic intervention. The challenge in patients with an abdominal catastrophe is to carefully balance the therapeutic stress and the existing resistance of the individual patient. The best way to avoid abdominal disaster, however, is its prevention.

  18. Abdominal ultrasound (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Abdominal ultrasound is a scanning technique used to image the interior of the abdomen. Like the X-ray, MRI, ... it has its place as a diagnostic tool. Ultrasound scans use high frequency sound waves to produce ...

  19. Acute abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Stone, R

    1998-01-01

    Abdominal pain is among the most frequent ailments reported in the office setting and can account for up to 40% of ailments in the ambulatory practice. Also, it is in the top three symptoms of patients presenting to emergency departments (ED) and accounts for 5-10% of all ED primary presenting ailments. There are several common sources for acute abdominal pain and many for subacute and chronic abdominal pain. This article explores the history-taking, initial evaluation, and examination of the patient presenting with acute abdominal pain. The goal of this article is to help differentiate one source of pain from another. Discussion of acute cholecystitis, pancreatitis, appendicitis, ectopic pregnancy, diverticulitis, gastritis, and gastroenteritis are undertaken. Additionally, there is discussion of common laboratory studies, diagnostic studies, and treatment of the patient with the above entities.

  20. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... as ulcerative colitis or Crohn's disease , pancreatitis or liver cirrhosis. cancers of the liver, kidneys, pancreas, ovaries and bladder as well as ... injuries to abdominal organs such as the spleen, liver, kidneys or other internal organs in cases of ...

  1. Abdominal wall surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... the results of abdominoplasty. Many feel a new sense of self-confidence. Alternative Names Cosmetic surgery of the abdomen; Tummy tuck; Abdominoplasty Images Abdominoplasty - series Abdominal muscles References McGrath MH, Pomerantz J. Plastic surgery. In: Townsend ...

  2. Abdominal involvement in tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Neyman, Edward G; Georgiades, Christos S; Fishman, Elliot K

    2002-10-01

    Rising incidence of disseminated and extrapulmonary tuberculosis (TB), especially in immunocompromised hosts and patients with multi-drug-resistant tuberculosis, has resulted in an increase of unusual clinical and radiographic presentations of TB. With CT being a common part of emergency room (ER) evaluation of abdominal pain, it is imperative that radiologists be able to recognize abdominal presentations of TB. We discuss and illustrate typical and less common CT manifestations of tuberculosis in the abdomen to help ER radiologists in this task.

  3. [A case of fixing an anastomotic site to the abdominal wall out of the abdominal cavity for a small intestinal perforation during chemotherapy].

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Kazutaka; Harano, Masao; Kato, Takuya; Yoshida, Kazuhiro; Sato, Daisuke; Choda, Yasuhiro; Tokumoto, Noriaki; Kanazawa, Takashi; Matsukawa, Hiroyoshi; Ojima, Yasutomo; Idani, Hitoshi; Shiozaki, Shigehiro; Okajima, Masazumi; Ninomiya, Motoki

    2014-11-01

    A 53-year-old man presented with a continuous high fever and was diagnosed with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma with metastasis to the lung, spleen, and mesenterium. He was treated with cyclophosphamide and prednisolone followed by administration of cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisolone (CHOP) chemotherapy 20 days later. Two days after initiation of CHOP therapy, the patient complained of severe abdominal pain. Perforative peritonitis was diagnosed using abdominal computed tomography. A perforation of the small intestine approximately 160 cm distal to the Treitz ligament was uncovered during emergency laparotomy. The risk of leakage was considered too high for anastomosis of the small intestine to be performed. Further, construction of an intestinal stoma could result in a high-output syndrome that could lead to difficulty in resuming chemotherapy. Based on these considerations, we fixed the anastomotic region to the abdominal wall using a technique similar to construction of an intestinal stoma. Post-operative anastomotic leakage did not occur. Nine days later, a perineal hernia was noted near the anastomotic site and a second operation was performed. The anastomotic site was placed back into the abdominal cavity during this operation. CHOP therapy was resumed 16 days after the first operation.

  4. [Ruptured aneurysms of the abdominal aorta. A study of their incidence and mortality].

    PubMed

    Acea Nebril, B; Tovar Martín, E; Díaz Pardeiro, P; Fernández Pintos, J; Caamaño Martínez, S

    1993-01-01

    Between 1986 and 1992, 133 patients with abdominal aneurysms presented to our Department of Vascular Surgery. Of these, 97 (73%) were elective cases and 36 (27%) had ruptured. In all these patients resections were undertaken. Postoperative complications occurred in 28 patients (28%) for elective resection and in 17 patients (47%) for ruptured aneurysms (p < 0.05), with mortality rates of 46 and 94%, respectively (p < 0.005). The postoperative mortality for elective resection was 13% and for rupture 44% (p < 0.001).

  5. Laparoscopic vs open abdominoperineal resection in the multimodality management of low rectal cancers

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yu-Wei; Huang, Li-Yong; Song, Cheng-Li; Zhuo, Chang-Hua; Shi, De-Bing; Cai, Guo-Xiang; Xu, Ye; Cai, San-Jun; Li, Xin-Xiang

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the safety and feasibility of laparoscopic abdominoperineal resection compared with the open procedure in multimodality management of rectal cancer. METHODS: A total of 106 rectal cancer patients who underwent open abdominoperineal resection (OAPR) were matched with 106 patients who underwent laparoscopic abdominoperineal resection (LAPR) in a 1 to 1 fashion, between 2009 and 2013 at Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center. Propensity score matching was carried out based on age, gender, pathological staging of the disease and administration of neoadjuvant chemoradiation. Data regarding preoperative staging, surgical technique, pathological results, postoperative recovery and complications were reviewed and compared between the LAPR and OAPR groups. Perineal closure around the stoma and pelvic floor reconstruction were performed only in OAPR, not in LAPR. Therefore, abdominoperineal resection procedure-specific surgical complications including parastomal hernia and perineal wound complications were compared between the open and laparoscopic procedure. Regular surveillance of the two cohorts was carried out to gather prognostic data. Disease-free survival was analyzed using Kaplan-Meier estimate and log-rank test. Subgroup analysis was performed in patients with locally advanced disease treated with preoperative chemoradiation followed by surgical resection. RESULTS: No significant difference was found between the LAPR group and the OAPR group in terms of clinicopathological features. The operation time (180.8 ± 47.8 min vs 172.1 ± 49.2 min, P = 0.190), operative blood loss (93.9 ± 60.0 mL vs 88.4 ± 55.2 mL, P = 0.494), total number of retrieved lymph nodes (12.9 ± 6.9 vs 12.9 ± 5.4, P = 0.974), surgical complications (12.3% vs 15.1%, P = 0.549) and pathological characteristics were comparable between the LAPR and OAPR group, respectively. Compared with OAPR patients, LAPR patients showed significantly shorter postoperative analgesia (2.4 ± 0

  6. Prenatally detected congenital perineal mass using 3D ultrasound which was diagnosed as lipoblastoma combined with anorectal malformation: case report.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Ki Hoon; Boo, Yoon Jung; Seol, Hyun Joo; Park, Hyun Tae; Hong, Soon Cheol; Oh, Min Jeong; Kim, Tak; Kim, Hai Joong; Kim, Young Tae; Kim, Sun Haeng; Lee, Kyu Wan

    2010-07-01

    We report a case of prenatally diagnosed congenital perineal mass which was combined with anorectal malformation. The mass was successfully treated with posterior sagittal anorectoplasty postnatally. On ultrasound examination at a gestational age of 23 weeks the fetal perineal mass were found on the right side. Any other defects were not visible on ultrasonography during whole gestation. Amniocentesis was performed to evaluate the fetal karyotyping and acetylcholinesterase which were also normal. As the fetus grew up, the mass size was slowly increased more and more. At birth, a female neonate had a perineal mass on the right side as expected. During operation, the anal sphincteric displacement was found near the mass and reconstructed through posterior sagittal incision. This is the first reported case of prenatally diagnosed congenital perineal mass, after birth which was diagnosed as lipoblastoma and even combined with anorectal malformation. This case shows that it can be of clinical importance to be aware of this rare fetal perineal mass in prenatal diagnosis and counseling.

  7. [A Case of Abdominal Wall Hernia Rupture during Bevacizumab Treatment].

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Satoshi; Miyazaki, Yasuaki; Hirose, Sou; Michiura, Toshiya; Fujita, Shigeo; Yamabe, Kazuo; Miyazaki, Satoru; Nagaoka, Makio

    2015-11-01

    A 78 -year-old man with rectal cancer underwent abdominoperineal resection of the rectum. In the postoperative period, the patient experienced wound infection, leading to an abdominal wall hernia. Two years following surgery, a rise in the serum CEA level was seen. A metastatic tumor was detected in the right lung on chest CT. VATS right lung inferior lobe segmental resection was performed. After lobectomy, the serum CEA level continued to increase. Another metastatic tumor was detected in the right lung on chest CT. Chemotherapy with capecitabine, oxaliplatin, and bevacizumab was commenced. The erosive part of the abdominal wall scar hernia extended during the nine weeks of chemotherapy. The chemotherapy was then discontinued. In the follow-up CT scan, a right pleural recurrence, local recurrence in the pelvis, and a liver metastasis were detected. Chemotherapy was re-introduced 3 years after surgery. The erosive part of the abdominal wall hernia again began to spread with chemotherapy recommencement. Four months after restarting chemotherapy, the hernia ruptured, with a loop of the small intestine protruding out of it. The patient covered this with a sheet of vinyl and was taken by the ambulance to our hospital. The erosive part of the abdominal wall hernia had split by 10 cm, and a loop of the small intestine was protruding. As ischemia of the small intestine was not observed, we replaced it into the abdominal cavity, and performed a temporary suture repair of the hernia sac. Following this, bevacizumab was discontinued, and the erosive part reduced. We performed a radical operation for abdominal wall scar hernia repair 11 weeks after the discontinuation of bevacizumab.

  8. Transurethral resection of the prostate

    MedlinePlus

    TURP; Prostate resection - transurethral ... used to remove the inside part of your prostate gland using electricity. ... if you have benign prostatic hyperplasia ( BPH ). The prostate gland often grows larger as men get older. ...

  9. Topical tacrolimus may be effective in the treatment of oral and perineal Crohn's disease

    PubMed Central

    Casson, D; Eltumi, M; Tomlin, S; Walker-Smith, J; Murch, S

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Crohn's disease of the mouth or perineum is more common in young people, and notably resistant to treatment. However, there is increasing evidence that topical therapy with tacrolimus (FK506) may be effective in skin diseases resistant to cyclosporin because of its high uptake in inflamed skin and subsequent reduction in keratinocyte chemokine production.
PATIENTS AND METHODS—Tacrolimus ointment was made up inhouse from the intravenous or oral formulation and suspended in appropriate vehicles for perioral or perianal administration at an initial concentration of 0.5 mg/g. This was administered open label to eight children (aged 5-18 years) with treatment resistant oral (three patients) and/or ulcerating perineal (six patients) Crohn's disease.
RESULTS—Marked improvement was seen in 7/8 patients within six weeks and healing within 1-6 months. One child with gross perineal and colonic disease showed little response. Two of the responders showed rebound worsening when tacrolimus was stopped or the dosage reduced rapidly, and one of these eventually required proctectomy. Slower weaning of drug concentration has been successful in 6/8 patients, with four receiving intermittent treatment and two on regular reduced dosage (0.1-0.3 mg/g) with follow up times of six months to 3.5 years. Serum concentrations of tacrolimus were undetectable in all patients.
CONCLUSIONS—Topical tacrolimus at low concentrations (0.5 mg/g) shows promise in the management of childhood perineal and oral Crohn's disease, with no evidence of significant systemic absorption. However, rapid weaning or abrupt cessation of therapy may cause rebound worsening of disease. Further controlled studies are required to assess the efficacy and safety of this treatment.


Keywords: Crohn's disease; tacrolimus; children PMID:10940284

  10. Abdominal emergencies in pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Coca Robinot, D; Liébana de Rojas, C; Aguirre Pascual, E

    2016-05-01

    Abdominal symptoms are among the most common reasons for pediatric emergency department visits, and abdominal pain is the most frequently reported symptom. Thorough history taking and physical examination can often reach the correct diagnosis. Knowing the abdominal conditions that are most common in each age group can help radiologists narrow the differential diagnosis. When imaging tests are indicated, ultrasonography is usually the first-line technique, enabling the diagnosis or adding relevant information with the well-known advantages of this technique. Nowadays, plain-film X-ray studies are reserved for cases in which perforation, bowel obstruction, or foreign body ingestion is suspected. It is also important to remember that abdominal pain can also occur secondary to basal pneumonia. CT is reserved for specific indications and in individual cases, for example, in patients with high clinical suspicion of abdominal disease and inconclusive findings at ultrasonography. We review some of the most common conditions in pediatric emergencies, the different imaging tests indicated in each case, and the imaging signs in each condition.

  11. Fishbone perforation through a Meckel's diverticulum: a rare laparoscopic diagnosis in acute abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Christensen, H

    1999-08-01

    The use of diagnostic laparoscopy in acute abdominal pain, especially when patients have been admitted for acute pain in the lower abdominal quadrants, improves the accuracy of diagnosis and leads to improvements in treatment procedures. A case is reported of a 24-year-old woman admitted under suspicion of appendicitis. The appendix was found to be normal, and a perforation caused by a fishbone was discovered in a Meckel's diverticulum. The diverticulum was resected by a combined laparoscopic and open procedure. Diagnostic laparoscopy should be performed routinely in cases of acute abdominal pain in the lower quadrants of suspected appendiceal origin to avoid overlooking other causes of the symptoms.

  12. Abdominal compartment syndrome after endovascular repair for ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm leads to acute intestinal necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiyang; Zhao, Jichun; Huang, Bin; Yuan, Ding; Yang, Yi; Ma, Yukui

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) after endovascular repair (EVAR) of rupture abdominal aortic aneurysm (rAAA) is a rare emergency situation, which has a high mortality. However, the progression of ACS is rapid and the diagnosis is usually been delayed, which increase the difficulties in treatment and affect the prognosis. We describe a case of a sever complication (acute intestinal necrosis) resulting from ACS after endovascular repair of rAAA. Clinical Finding: An elderly man, 81 years old, complained a sudden lower abdominal and back pain without any predisposing cause. He had a history of hypertension for 20 years without any regular anti-hypertensive therapy. Physical Examination revealed that the blood pressure was 89/54 mmHg, pulse was 120/min, oxygen saturation was 91%. The abdominal ultrasound and the CTA (computed tomography angiography) scan revealed a rAAA. Emergency EVAR under general anesthesia was performed for this patient. Diagnosis: Fourteen hours after endovascular repair, sudden decreased of blood pressure (70/50 mmHg) and oxygen saturation (70%) was observed. ACS or bleeding of retroperitoneal space was diagnosed. Interventions: Abdominal laparotomy was immediately performed. ACS was verified and a severe complication (acute intestinal necrosis) was observed, intestinal resection was performed for this patient. Outcomes: Unfortunately, this patient died after operation because of multi-organ failure in a very short period, which is very rare regarding to this condition. Surgical pathology, diagnosis and management were discussed. Conclusion: ACS was occurred with a severe complication (acute intestinal necrosis) in a very short period, which is very rare regarding to this condition after EVAR, it reminds us the severe result of ACS and more methods to prevent it happened after surgical management. PMID:27893667

  13. [Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Mikami, Y; Kyogoku, M

    1994-08-01

    Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm (IAAA) is a distinct clinicopathological entity, characterized by: (1) clinical presentation, such as back pain, weight loss, and increased ESR, (2) patchy and/or diffuse lymphoplasmacytic infiltration, and (3) marked periaortic fibrosis resulting in thickening of the aneurysmal wall and occasional retroperitoneal fibrosis. Its pathogenesis is unknown, but some authors support the theory that IAAA is a subtype of atherosclerotic abdominal aortic aneurysm because of close relationship between IAAA and atherosclerotic change. In this article, we describe clinical and histological features of IAAA on the basis of the literature and our review of 6 cases of IAAA, emphasizing the similarity and difference between IAAA and atherosclerotic abdominal aortic aneurysm. Our review supports that marked lamellar fibrosis completely replacing the media and adventitia, patchy lymphocytic infiltration (mostly B cells) and endarteritis obliterans are characteristic features of IAAA.

  14. Ingestion of white spirit resulting in perineal skin burns: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Vanhoucke, Joke; Buylaert, Walter; Colpaert, Kirsten; De Paepe, Peter

    2017-03-02

    In the literature, possible systemic effects on health of inhalation or ingestion of white spirit are well described. Only a few case reports discuss the toxic skin effects that can occur following massive ingestion. Ingestion of large amounts of white spirit produces a watery diarrhoea with a high concentration of white spirit, resulting in perineal skin burns when there is prolonged contact. We describe a patient who developed partial thickness perineal skin burns after ingestion of white spirit and review the literature. The present data indicate that conservative therapy of the skin burns is recommended.

  15. [Abdominal actinomycosis with IUD].

    PubMed

    Kamprath, S; Merker, A; Kühne-Heid, R; Schneider, A

    1997-01-01

    We report a case of abdominal actinomycosis in a 54 year old woman using an intrauterine device for a period of 8 years. The most important finding was a tuboovarialabscess at the left pelvic side with involvement of the serosa of the jejunum, ileum, sigma, and omentum majus. Intraoperative exploration showed a solid retroperitoneal infiltration between the pelvic side wall and sigma. Another infiltration was found on the left side of the abdominal wall. The diagnosis was confirmed by histopathological examination and the patient was treated by a combination of Aminopenicillin and Metronidazol. After a period of three months we observed a complete regression of the clinical and the MRI findings.

  16. Resection Interposition Arthroplasty for Failed Distal Ulna Resections

    PubMed Central

    Papatheodorou, Loukia K.; Rubright, James H.; Kokkalis, Zinon T.; Sotereanos, Dean G.

    2013-01-01

    The major complications of distal ulna resection, the Darrach procedure, are radioulnar impingement and instability. High failure rates have been reported despite published modifications of the Darrach procedure. Several surgical techniques have been developed to treat this difficult problem and to mitigate the symptoms associated with painful convergence and impingement. No technique has demonstrated clinical superiority. Recently, implant arthroplasty of the distal ulna has been endorsed as an option for the management of the symptomatic patient with a failed distal ulna resection. However, there are concerns for implant longevity, especially in young, active adults. Resection interposition arthroplasty relies on interposition of an Achilles tendon allograft between the distal radius and the resected distal ulna. Although this technique does not restore normal mechanics of the distal radioulnar joint, it can prevent painful convergence of the radius on the ulna. Achilles allograft interposition arthroplasty is a safe and highly effective alternative for failed distal ulna resections, especially for young, active patients, in whom an implant or alternative procedure may not be appropriate. PMID:24436784

  17. Jejunal perforation after abdominal liposuction, bilateral breast augmentation and facial fat grafting

    PubMed Central

    Coronado-Malagón, Martin; Tauffer-Carrion, Luis Tomas

    2012-01-01

    A 54-year-old woman presented to the emergency department 24 h after undergoing abdominal liposuction, bilateral breast augmentation and facial fat grafting at a private plastic surgery clinic. She presented with the classic evolution of a bowel perforation secondary to abdominal liposuction. A computed tomography (CT) scan found free air in her abdominal cavity. Based on the CT scan and the persistent pain experienced by the patient, an abdominal laparatomy was urgently performed. A jejunum perforation was found and was treated with a resection of the affected segment followed by intestinal anastomosis. The patient had a successful recovery and was discharged seven days later. The present article also reviews the classical presentation of a bowel perforation following abdominal liposuction. PMID:23997589

  18. Jejunal perforation after abdominal liposuction, bilateral breast augmentation and facial fat grafting.

    PubMed

    Coronado-Malagón, Martin; Tauffer-Carrion, Luis Tomas

    2012-01-01

    A 54-year-old woman presented to the emergency department 24 h after undergoing abdominal liposuction, bilateral breast augmentation and facial fat grafting at a private plastic surgery clinic. She presented with the classic evolution of a bowel perforation secondary to abdominal liposuction. A computed tomography (CT) scan found free air in her abdominal cavity. Based on the CT scan and the persistent pain experienced by the patient, an abdominal laparatomy was urgently performed. A jejunum perforation was found and was treated with a resection of the affected segment followed by intestinal anastomosis. The patient had a successful recovery and was discharged seven days later. The present article also reviews the classical presentation of a bowel perforation following abdominal liposuction.

  19. Management of pediatric perineal and genital burns: twenty-year review.

    PubMed

    Alghanem, A A; McCauley, R L; Robson, M C; Rutan, R L; Herndon, D N

    1990-01-01

    Between 1966 and 1986, fifty-seven pediatric patients with partial and/or full-thickness perineal and genital burns with a minimum of 1-year follow-up were identified. Fifty percent of the patients with genital burns and 20% of the patients with perineal and/or buttock burns required skin grafting in the acute stage. No patient required suprapubic cystostomies, diverting colostomies, or local flap coverage of exposed testicles. Burn scar contractures were the most frequent complications. Thirty-two patients (56%) required contracture release of the perineum and coverage with either skin grafts or local skin flaps. In three patients (6%) contracture required release of the penis and scrotum. One patient lost a testicle. Three patients developed rectal prolapse and were treated without surgery. Four patients developed rectal stenosis with fecal incontinence because of burn scar contracture and were treated by anal dilatation, local transposition flaps, and/or excision of the scar and primary closure. Acute management of pediatric patients with such injuries can be conservative. Delayed complications of contractures of the perineum and genitals can be easily corrected with scar excisions, skin grafts, or the use of local skin flaps.

  20. Abdominal exploration - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... anatomy URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100049.htm Abdominal exploration - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Go to slide 1 out of 4 Go to slide 2 ...

  1. Same day arterial embolisation followed by hepatic resection for treatment of giant haemangioma.

    PubMed

    Bailey, James; Di Carlo, Sara; Blackwell, James; Gomez, Dhanny

    2016-02-25

    Cavernous haemangiomas are the most common tumour of the liver; they are benign in nature and have an incidence of up to 7.3% at autopsy. Occasionally, they may cause symptoms necessitating intervention. We report the case of a woman who presented with non-specific abdominal pain and evidence of a giant hepatic haemangioma on abdominal imaging. She underwent selective hepatic arteriography with transcatheter arterial embolisation followed by same-day left hemi-hepatectomy, making an uneventful recovery. We discuss the management of giant hepatic haemangiomas and present same day transcatheter arterial embolisation prior to hepatic resection as a safe and viable treatment strategy in selected cases.

  2. [Myxofibrosarcoma in the abdominal cavity].

    PubMed

    Janů, F

    2016-01-01

    A number of benign and malignant tumors may develop in the abdominal cavity. Sarcomas are rather rare tumors of the abdominal cavity. They are often diagnosed at advanced growth stages as their local growth can cause clinical problems to the patients. The author presents a case report of myxofibrosarcoma in the abdominal cavity.Key words: myxofibrosarcoma.

  3. Rate of Perineal Injuries and Episiotomy in a Sample of Women at Maternity Teaching Hospital in Erbil City

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ali, Huda Juma'a; Zangana, Jwan M. Sabir

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Episiotomy is a surgical incision done during the last stages of labor and delivery to expand the opening of the vagina to prevent tearing of the perineum during the delivery of the baby. The objectives of this study are to estimate episiotomy and perineal injury rate, indication for episiotomy and their association with…

  4. Local resection of ampullary tumors.

    PubMed

    Meneghetti, Adam T; Safadi, Bassem; Stewart, Lygia; Way, Lawrence W

    2005-12-01

    There is no consensus on the appropriateness of local resection for ampullary tumors, because malignant recurrence of what were thought to be benign tumors has been reported. This study examined the role of local resection in the management of ampullary tumors. Thirty patients (mean age 66 years) had transduodenal local resections performed at UCSF-Moffitt Hospital or the San Francisco VA Medical Center (February, 1992 to March, 2004). Mean follow-up time was 5.8 years. Preoperative biopsies (obtained in all patients) showed 18 adenomas, four adenomas with dysplasia, five adenomas with atypia, one adenoma with dysplasia and focal adenocarcinoma, and two tumors seen on endoscopy, whose biopsies showed only duodenal mucosa. In comparison with the final pathology findings, the results of frozen section examinations for malignancy in 20 patients, during the operation, were false-negative in three cases. The final pathologic diagnosis was 23 villous adenomas, six adenocarcinomas, and one paraganglioma. On preoperative biopsies, all patients who had high-grade dysplasia and one of five patients with atypia turned out to have invasive adenocarcinoma when the entire specimen was examined postoperatively. Two (33%) adenocarcinomas recurred at a mean of 4 years; both had negative margins at the initial resection. Among the 23 adenomas, three (13%) recurred (all as adenomas) at a mean of 3.2 years; in only one of these cases was the margin positive at the time of resection. Tumor size did not influence recurrence rate. Ampullary tumors with high-grade dysplasia on preoperative biopsy should be treated by pancreaticoduodenectomy because they usually harbor malignancy. Recurrence is too common and unpredictable after local resection of malignant lesions for this to be considered an acceptable alternative to pancreaticoduodenectomy. Ampullary adenomas can be resected locally with good results, but the recurrence rate was 13%, so endoscopic surveillance is indicated

  5. Necrotizing cellulitis of the abdominal wall, caused by Pediococcus sp., due to rupture of a retroperitoneal stromal cell tumor

    PubMed Central

    Michalopoulos, Nick; Arampatzi, Stergiani; Papavramidis, Theodossis S.; Kotidis, Efstathios; Laskou, Styliani; Papavramidis, Spiros T.

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Soft tissue necrotizing infections are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study is to present a patient with necrotizing infection of abdominal wall resulting from the rupture of a retroperitoneal stromal tumor. PRESENTATION OF CASE We present a 60-year-old Caucasian male patient with necrotizing infection of abdominal wall secondary to the rupture of a retroperitoneal stromal tumor. The patient was initially treated with debridement and fasciotomy of the anterior abdominal wall. Laparotomy revealed purulent peritonitis caused by infiltration and rupture of the splenic flexure by the tumor. Despite prompt intervention the patient died 19 days later. The isolated microorganism causing the infection was the rarely identified as cause of infections in humans Pediococcus sp., a gram-positive, catalase-negative coccus. DISCUSSION Necrotizing infections of abdominal wall are usually secondary either to perineal or to intra-abdominal infections. Gastrointestinal stromal cell tumors could be rarely complicated with perforation and abscess formation. In our case, the infiltrated by the extra-gastrointestinal stromal cell tumor ruptured colon was the source of the infection. The pediococci are rarely isolated as the cause of severe septicemia. CONCLUSION Ruptured retroperitoneal stromal cell tumors are extremely rare cause of necrotizing fasciitis, and before this case, Pediococcus sp. has never been isolated as the responsible agent. PMID:23357010

  6. Ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Sachs, T; Schermerhorn, M

    2010-06-01

    Ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) continues to be one of the most lethal vascular pathologies we encounter. Its management demands prompt and efficient evaluation and repair. Open repair has traditionally been the mainstay of treatment. However, the introduction of endovascular techniques has altered the treatment algorithm for ruptured AAA in most major medical centers. We present recent literature and techniques for ruptured AAA and its surgical management.

  7. The Abdominal Circulatory Pump

    PubMed Central

    Aliverti, Andrea; Bovio, Dario; Fullin, Irene; Dellacà, Raffaele L.; Lo Mauro, Antonella; Pedotti, Antonio; Macklem, Peter T.

    2009-01-01

    Blood in the splanchnic vasculature can be transferred to the extremities. We quantified such blood shifts in normal subjects by measuring trunk volume by optoelectronic plethysmography, simultaneously with changes in body volume by whole body plethysmography during contractions of the diaphragm and abdominal muscles. Trunk volume changes with blood shifts, but body volume does not so that the blood volume shifted between trunk and extremities (Vbs) is the difference between changes in trunk and body volume. This is so because both trunk and body volume change identically with breathing and gas expansion or compression. During tidal breathing Vbs was 50–75 ml with an ejection fraction of 4–6% and an output of 750–1500 ml/min. Step increases in abdominal pressure resulted in rapid emptying presumably from the liver with a time constant of 0.61±0.1SE sec. followed by slower flow from non-hepatic viscera. The filling time constant was 0.57±0.09SE sec. Splanchnic emptying shifted up to 650 ml blood. With emptying, the increased hepatic vein flow increases the blood pressure at its entry into the inferior vena cava (IVC) and abolishes the pressure gradient producing flow between the femoral vein and the IVC inducing blood pooling in the legs. The findings are important for exercise because the larger the Vbs the greater the perfusion of locomotor muscles. During asystolic cardiac arrest we calculate that appropriate timing of abdominal compression could produce an output of 6 L/min. so that the abdominal circulatory pump might act as an auxiliary heart. PMID:19440240

  8. Lateral Abdominal Wall Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Baumann, Donald P.; Butler, Charles E.

    2012-01-01

    Lateral abdominal wall (LAW) defects can manifest as a flank hernias, myofascial laxity/bulges, or full-thickness defects. These defects are quite different from those in the anterior abdominal wall defects and the complexity and limited surgical options make repairing the LAW a challenge for the reconstructive surgeon. LAW reconstruction requires an understanding of the anatomy, physiologic forces, and the impact of deinnervation injury to design and perform successful reconstructions of hernia, bulge, and full-thickness defects. Reconstructive strategies must be tailored to address the inguinal ligament, retroperitoneum, chest wall, and diaphragm. Operative technique must focus on stabilization of the LAW to nonyielding points of fixation at the anatomic borders of the LAW far beyond the musculofascial borders of the defect itself. Thus, hernias, bulges, and full-thickness defects are approached in a similar fashion. Mesh reinforcement is uniformly required in lateral abdominal wall reconstruction. Inlay mesh placement with overlying myofascial coverage is preferred as a first-line option as is the case in anterior abdominal wall reconstruction. However, interposition bridging repairs are often performed as the surrounding myofascial tissue precludes a dual layered closure. The decision to place bioprosthetic or prosthetic mesh depends on surgeon preference, patient comorbidities, and clinical factors of the repair. Regardless of mesh type, the overlying soft tissue must provide stable cutaneous coverage and obliteration of dead space. In cases where the fasciocutaneous flaps surrounding the defect are inadequate for closure, regional pedicled flaps or free flaps are recruited to achieve stable soft tissue coverage. PMID:23372458

  9. [Abdominal catastrophe--surgeon's view].

    PubMed

    Vyhnánek, F

    2010-07-01

    Abdominal catastrophe is a serious clinical condition, usually being a complication arising during treatment of intraabdominal nontraumatic disorders or abdominal injuries. Most commonly, inflamation- secondary peritonitis, is concerned. Abdominal catastrophe also includes secondary signs of sepsis, abdominal compartment syndrome and enterocutaneous fistules. Most septic abdominal disorders which show signs of abdominal catastrophy, require surgical intervention and reinterventions--planned or "on demand" laparotomies. During the postoperative period, the patient requires intensive care management, including steps taken to stabilize his/hers condition, management of sepsis and metabolic and nutritional support measures, as well as adequate indication for reoperations. New technologies aimed at prevention of complications in laparostomies and to improve conditions for final laparotomy closure are used in phase procedures for surgical management of intraabdominal infections. Despite the new technologies, abdominal catastrophe has higher morbidity and lethality risk rates.

  10. Abdominal SPECT imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Van Heertum, R.L.; Brunetti, J.C.; Yudd, A.P.

    1987-07-01

    Over the past several years, abdominal single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging has evolved from a research tool to an important clinical imaging modality that is helpful in the diagnostic assessment of a wide variety of disorders involving the abdominal viscera. Although liver-spleen imaging is the most popular of the abdominal SPECT procedures, blood pool imaging is becoming much more widely utilized for the evaluation of cavernous hemangiomas of the liver as well as other vascular abnormalities in the abdomen. Adjunctive indium leukocyte and gallium SPECT studies are also proving to be of value in the assessment of a variety of infectious and neoplastic diseases. As more experience is acquired in this area, SPECT should become the primary imaging modality for both gallium and indium white blood cells in many institutions. Renal SPECT, on the other hand, has only recently been used as a clinical imaging modality for the assessment of such parameters as renal depth and volume. The exact role of renal SPECT as a clinical tool is, therefore, yet to be determined. 79 references.

  11. Abdominal emergencies during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Bouyou, J; Gaujoux, S; Marcellin, L; Leconte, M; Goffinet, F; Chapron, C; Dousset, B

    2015-12-01

    Abdominal emergencies during pregnancy (excluding obstetrical emergencies) occur in one out of 500-700 pregnancies and may involve gastrointestinal, gynecologic, urologic, vascular and traumatic etiologies; surgery is necessary in 0.2-2% of cases. Since these emergencies are relatively rare, patients should be referred to specialized centers where surgical, obstetrical and neonatal cares are available, particularly because surgical intervention increases the risk of premature labor. Clinical presentations may be atypical and misleading because of pregnancy-associated anatomical and physiologic alterations, which often result in diagnostic uncertainty and therapeutic delay with increased risks of maternal and infant morbidity. The most common abdominal emergencies are acute appendicitis (best treated by laparoscopic appendectomy), acute calculous cholecystitis (best treated by laparoscopic cholecystectomy from the first trimester through the early part of the third trimester) and intestinal obstruction (where medical treatment is the first-line approach, just as in the non-pregnant patient). Acute pancreatitis is rare, usually resulting from trans-ampullary passage of gallstones; it usually resolves with medical treatment but an elevated risk of recurrent episodes justifies laparoscopic cholecystectomy in the 2nd trimester and endoscopic sphincterotomy in the 3rd trimester. The aim of the present work is to review pregnancy-induced anatomical and physiological modifications, to describe the main abdominal emergencies during pregnancy, their specific features and their diagnostic and therapeutic management.

  12. Functional abdominal pain

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, P; Aziz, Q

    2005-01-01

    Functional abdominal pain or functional abdominal pain syndrome (FAPS) is an uncommon functional gut disorder characterised by chronic or recurrent abdominal pain attributed to the gut but poorly related to gut function. It is associated with abnormal illness behaviour and patients show psychological morbidity that is often minimised or denied in an attempt to discover an organic cause for symptoms. Thus the conventional biomedical approach to the management of such patients is unhelpful and a person's symptom experience is more usefully investigated using a biopsychosocial evaluation, which necessarily entails a multidisciplinary system of healthcare provision. Currently the pathophysiology of the disorder is poorly understood but is most likely to involve a dysfunction of central pain mechanisms either in terms of attentional bias, for example, hypervigilance or a failure of central pain modulation/inhibition. Although modern neurophysiological investigation of patients is promising and may provide important insights into the pathophysiology of FAPS, current clinical management relies on an effective physician-patient relationship in which limits on clinical investigation are set and achievable treatment goals tailored to the patient's needs are pursued. PMID:15998821

  13. [Liver resection by water jet].

    PubMed

    Horie, T

    1989-01-01

    Major problem in resecting liver parenchyma is how to control the bleeding. Recently, resection of the liver by water jet has been reported. So, experimental and clinical studies were performed to investigate the usefulness of the water jet equipment. Ten pigs weighing around 17kg were used. The optimal pressure to resect the porcine liver was 7 to 15kg/cm2. By 4 weeks the cut surface was covered with fibrous capsule. Portal angiography showed no abnormality in the resected area. The water jet was also used in 30 human operations. The optimal pressure was 12 to 18kg/cm2 for non cirrhotic liver and 15 to 20kg/cm2 for cirrhotic liver. The surface immediately after jet cutting was more smooth than that of CUSA and histologically there was slight bleeding and necrosis. The volume of blood loss during dissection was not different between water jet group and CUSA group. No significant changes were found in the laboratory data. These results suggest that water jet is as useful as CUSA for cutting the liver parenchyma.

  14. [Medical research through historical resources. Talking objects: a case of a parasitic perineal monstrosity].

    PubMed

    Ottini, Laura; Franza, Annarita; Rizzolo, Piera; Falchetti, Mario; Santi, Raffaella; Nesi, Gabriella

    2013-01-01

    A case of a parasitic perineal monstrosity from the collection of the Pathology Museum of the University of Florence, is described on the basis of the original medical records and illustrations. The surgeon Giorgio Pellizzari (1814-1894) first reported this extraordinary case of sacrococcygeal teratoma containing a rudimentary inferior limb. Reader of Descriptive Anatomy, Pellizzari was a well-known Anatomy Dissector and Curator of the Physiological Museum of the Regio Arcispedale di Santa Maria Nuova in Florence. This report underlines the importance of studying the archive material in order to thoroughly comprehend a single museum talking object. This handling of matters will help to turn anatomical collections into a unique teaching toolfor modern medical practice and a noteworthy documentation of scientific, artistic and historical value. Through analysis of the original catalogue and investigation by means of modern scientific techniques, discovering the story behind the object becomes afeasible challenge.

  15. Transurethral resection of the prostate - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    TURP - discharge; Prostate resection - transurethral - discharge ... You had transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) surgery to treat an enlarged prostate. Your surgeon inserted a tube-like tool called a cystoscope (or endoscope) through your urethra ( ...

  16. Percutaneous Perineal Electrostimulation Induces Erection: Clinical Significance in Patients With Spinal Cord Injury and Erectile Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Shafik, Ahmed; Shafik, Ali A; Shafik, Ismail A; Sibai, Olfat El

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: Approximately one third to one half of the penis is embedded in the pelvis and can be felt through the scrotum and in the perineum. The main arteries and nerves enter the penis through this perineal part of the penis, which seems to represent a highly sensitive area. We investigated the hypothesis that percutaneous perineal stimulation evokes erection in patients with neurogenic erectile dysfunction. Methods: Percutaneous electrostimulation of the perineum (PESP) with synchronous intracorporeal pressure (ICP) recording was performed in 28 healthy volunteers (age 36.3 ± 7.4 y) and 18 patients (age 36.6 ± 6.8 y) with complete neurogenic erectile dysfunction (NED). Current was delivered in a sine wave summation fashion. Average maximal voltages and number of stimulations delivered per session were 15 to 18 volts and 15 to 25 stimulations, respectively. Results: PESP of healthy volunteers effected an ICP increase (P < 0.0001), which returned to the basal value upon stimulation cessation. The latent period recorded was 2.5 ± 0.2 seconds. Results were reproducible on repeated PESP in the same subject but with an increase of the latent period. Patients with NED recorded an ICP increase that was lower (P < 0.05) and a latent period that was longer (P < 0.0001) than those of healthy volunteers. Conclusion: PESP effected ICP increase in the healthy volunteers and patients with NED. The ICP was significantly higher and latent period shorter in the healthy volunteers than in the NED patients. PESP may be of value in the treatment of patients with NED, provided that further studies are performed to reproduce these results. PMID:18533410

  17. Perineal injuries at a large urban trauma center: injury patterns and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Petrone, Patrizio; Inaba, Kenji; Wasserberg, Nir; Teixeira, Pedro G R; Sarkisyan, Grant; Dubose, Joseph J; Fernández, Maura A; Peña, Frida R; Rodríguez, Margarita A; Ortega, Adrian E; Kaufman, Howard S

    2009-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the characteristics of this unique patient population, their clinical presentations, and outcomes. The Los Angeles County and University of Southern California Medical Center Trauma Registry was used to retrospectively identify patients who sustained perineal injuries. Information included gender, age, vital signs, trauma scores, mechanisms of injury, studies performed, surgeries performed, and outcomes. Pediatric patients and injuries related to obstetric trauma were not included. Sixty-nine patients were identified between February 1, 1992 and October 31, 2005. One patient died on arrival; 85 per cent (58 of 68) were males, mean age was 30 +/- 12 years, and there was a penetrating mechanism in 56 per cent. Vital signs on admission were systolic blood pressure 119 +/- 33 mmHg, heart rate 94 +/- 27 beats/minute, and respiratory rate 20 +/- 6 breaths/min. Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) was 13 +/- 3, Revised Trauma Score (RTS) was 7.2 +/- 1.5, and Injury Severity Score (ISS) was 11 +/- 12. CT scan was obtained for 23 (33%) patients. Lower extremity fractures were 35 per cent and pelvic fractures 32 per cent. The most common surgery was débridement and drainage, diversion with colostomy in five patients (7%). Overall mortality was 10 per cent. Mortality group mean scores were: GCS, 6; RTS, 5.74; and ISS, 34. The survival group mean scores were: GCS, 14; RTS, 7.7; and ISS, 8. There was a statistically significant association between mortality and GCS, RTS, and ISS scores (P < 0.001). Most patients with perineal injuries (93%) can be managed without colostomy. Associated injuries are not uncommon, particularly bony fractures. Mortality is mostly the result of exsanguination related to associated injuries.

  18. Over-the-counter treatments and perineal hygiene in postmenopausal women

    PubMed Central

    Erekson, Elisabeth A.; Martin, Deanna K.; Brousseau, E. Christine; Yip, Sallis O.; Fried, Terri R.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The objective of this descriptive study was to quantify the personal hygiene habits/practices and over-the-counter (OTC) products used by postmenopausal women. Specifically, we were interested in any product that would contact the vulva or vagina. Methods We performed a cross-sectional study of postmenopausal women seeking routine gynecologic care. We developed questionnaire of personal hygiene habits/practices and OTC products used by women that would contact the vulva or vagina. We recruited postmenopausal women seeking gynecologic care from two separate gynecology practices. Descriptive statistics were performed as appropriate to characterize the frequency of reported treatments and practices. Results The questionnaire on OTC treatments and perineal hygiene was completed by 114 postmenopausal women. Fifty-eight women (50.9%) reported using at least one OTC vulvovaginal treatment in the last three months, including barrier treatments, topical anesthetics, powders, and antifungals. Women often used more than one OTC product. Thirty-seven women (32.5%) reported the use of two or more OTC products. Powders were used by 34 women (29.8%). Talcum powder was the most commonly used powder (76.5%, n/N = 26/34). Nine (7.9%) postmenopausal women reported douching in the last three months. Conclusions We found that over half of postmenopausal women seeking gynecologic care have used an OTC product for vulvovaginal symptoms in the last three months and 1/3 of women use 2 or more products. Because the use of OTC products is so common, our study highlights the need for detailed history inquiry about OTC product use and perineal hygiene practices. PMID:23880795

  19. [Recurrence of Well Differentiated Intrascrotal Liposarcoma in Retroperitoneum Five Years after Resection : A Case Report].

    PubMed

    Yoshinaga, Mitsuhiro; Sekii, Yosuke; Nakazawa, Shigeaki; Nakagawa, Masahiro; Kishikawa, Hidefumi; Nishimura, Kenji

    2017-01-01

    A 68-year-old man underwent an inguinal orchiectomy for a right testicular tumor and the pathological diagnosis was atypical lipomatous tumor. Nine years later, a resection procedure was performed for local recurrence. Five years after that second surgery, abdominal computed tomography (CT) findings revealed a low density mass 40 mm in size on the back side of the right kidney and enlarged fat in the retroperitoneal space. We performed a laparoscopic tumor resection under a diagnosis of lipoma or liposarcoma recurrence, and the pathological diagnosis was well differentiated liposarcoma. Treatment with pazopanib was started, as a CT examination showed that the tumor remained, after which we performed an open nephroureterectomy and resected the remaining tumor portion. Pazopanib treatment was continued and no obvious signs of recurrence were seen at 8 months after the most recent surgery. Although well differentiated liposarcoma usually recurs in the original tumor region, multicentric recurrence in other parts is possible.

  20. PET/CT detects abdominal wall and port site metastases of colorectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Goshen, E; Davidson, T; Aderka, D; Zwas, S T

    2006-07-01

    Abdominal wall metastases from colorectal cancer (CRC) may be resected with curative results. Such lesions, often indicators of additional intra-abdominal lesions, may appear in surgical scars, stomas and port site metastases after laparoscope-assisted surgery (LAS). Post-operative changes, primarily surgical scars, alter local physical findings making early detection of small lesions challenging. The purpose of this study was to retrospectively evaluate the contribution of PET/CT to the diagnosis of recurrent colorectal cancer in the post-operative abdominal wall. 120 patients were referred for PET/CT with suspected recurrent CRC based on clinical, radiological or laboratory findings. All underwent whole body PET/CT imaging. 12 of these 120 (10%), were found to have abdominal wall lesions. A total of 16 abdominal wall lesions were detected, located to surgical scars, stomas, drain and laparoscope ports. Additional findings on PET/CT in this group included liver metastases, intra-abdominal lesions and retroperitoneal lymph node involvement. In general, the patients in this small group were young with high grade tumours presenting in advanced stages. In conclusion, PET/CT appears to be a sensitive tool for the diagnosis of abdominal wall recurrence of CRC. The accuracy of localization afforded by the fused functional and anatomic images makes PET/CT a likely tool for diagnosing abdominal wall lesions, including port site metastases of other aetiologies.

  1. Endoscopic full-thickness resection for gastric submucosal tumors arising from the muscularis propria layer

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Liu-Ye; Cui, Jun; Lin, Shu-Juan; Zhang, Bo; Wu, Cheng-Rong

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the efficacy, safety and feasibility of endoscopic full-thickness resection (EFR) for the treatment of gastric submucosal tumors (SMTs) arising from the muscularis propria. METHODS: A total of 35 gastric SMTs arising from the muscularis propria layer were resected by EFR between January 2010 and September 2013. EFR consists of five major steps: injecting normal saline into the submucosa; pre-cutting the mucosal and submucosal layers around the lesion; making a circumferential incision as deep as the muscularis propria around the lesion using endoscopic submucosal dissection and an incision into the serosal layer around the lesion with a Hook knife; a full-thickness resection of the tumor, including the serosal layer with a Hook or IT knife; and closing the gastric wall with metallic clips. RESULTS: Of the 35 gastric SMTs, 14 were located at the fundus, and 21 at the corpus. EFR removed all of the SMTs successfully, and the complete resection rate was 100%. The mean operation time was 90 min (60-155 min), the mean hospitalization time was 6.0 d (4-10 d), and the mean tumor size was 2.8 cm (2.0-4.5 cm). Pathological examination confirmed the presence of gastric stromal tumors in 25 patients, leiomyomas in 7 and gastric autonomous nerve tumors in 2. No gastric bleeding, peritonitis or abdominal abscess occurred after EFR. Postoperative contrast roentgenography on the third day detected no contrast extravasation into the abdominal cavity. The mean follow-up period was 6 mo, with no lesion residue or recurrence noted. CONCLUSION: EFR is efficacious, safe and minimally invasive for patients with gastric SMTs arising from the muscularis propria layer. This technique is able to resect deep gastric lesions while providing precise pathological information about the lesion. With the development of EFR, the indications of endoscopic resection might be extended. PMID:25320536

  2. Abdominal perfusion computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Ogul, Hayri; Bayraktutan, Ummugulsum; Kizrak, Yesim; Pirimoglu, Berhan; Yuceler, Zeynep; Sagsoz, M Erdem; Yilmaz, Omer; Aydinli, Bulent; Ozturk, Gurkan; Kantarci, Mecit

    2013-02-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide an up to date review on the spectrum of applications of perfusion computed tomography (CT) in the abdomen. New imaging techniques have been developed with the objective of obtaining a structural and functional analysis of different organs. Recently, perfusion CT has aroused the interest of many researchers who are studying the applicability of imaging modalities in the evaluation of abdominal organs and diseases. Per-fusion CT enables fast, non-invasive imaging of the tumor vascular physiology. Moreover, it can act as an in vivo biomarker of tumor-related angiogenesis.

  3. Abdominal Perfusion Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Ogul, Hayri; Bayraktutan, Ummugulsum; Kizrak, Yesim; Pirimoglu, Berhan; Yuceler, Zeynep; Sagsoz, M. Erdem; Yilmaz, Omer; Aydinli, Bulent; Ozturk, Gurkan; Kantarci, Mecit

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide an up to date review on the spectrum of applications of perfusion computed tomography (CT) in the abdomen. New imaging techniques have been developed with the objective of obtaining a structural and functional analysis of different organs. Recently, perfusion CT has aroused the interest of many researchers who are studying the applicability of imaging modalities in the evaluation of abdominal organs and diseases. Per-fusion CT enables fast, non-invasive imaging of the tumor vascular physiology. Moreover, it can act as an in vivo biomarker of tumor-related angiogenesis. PMID:25610249

  4. [Mechanical ileus in children with no prior history of abdominal surgery].

    PubMed

    van Poll, Daan; de Beer, Sjoerd A; de Jong, Justin R; Heij, Hugo A

    2015-01-01

    In children with no prior history of abdominal surgery and no signs of intussusception or incarcerated inguinal hernia, mechanical ileus may have a congenital cause such as malrotation with volvulus or a persistent omphalomesenteric duct. Acquired causes include sigmoid volvulus. We present two cases of mechanical ileus in children. The first case involved a 6-year-old boy who presented with acute abdominal pain and vomiting. An emergency laparotomy was performed, with resection of the omphalomesenteric duct. Recovery was uneventful. The other case concerned a 9-year-old boy who presented with increasing abdominal pain, bilious vomiting and general clinical deterioration. An emergency laparotomy was performed, revealing malrotation with volvulus and intestinal ischaemia. Children with no prior abdominal history who present with symptoms that may be caused by mechanical obstruction should be managed with a view to surgery and without delay, in order to prevent a catastrophic outcome resulting from a congenital or acquired mechanical obstruction.

  5. Recurrent pneumothorax following abdominal paracentesis.

    PubMed Central

    Stafford, P. J.

    1990-01-01

    A 62 year old man presented with abdominal ascites, without pleural effusion, due to peritoneal mesothelioma. He had chronic obstructive airways disease and a past history of right upper lobectomy for tuberculosis. On two occasions abdominal paracentesis was followed within 72 hours by pneumothorax. This previously unreported complication of abdominal paracentesis may be due to increased diaphragmatic excursion following the procedure and should be considered in patients with preexisting lung disease. PMID:2385561

  6. Abdominal Tuberculosis in Cairo, Egypt

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-01-01

    COW 03 PUBLICATION REPORT 94-30227 * ABDOMINAL TUBERCULOSIS IN CAIRO, BY RWIavni 0. IHibbs6 M. Kuanmm ad Z. Fun .Y .~ ... W I Form ApprovedREPORT...Leave blank) 2. REPORT DATE 3. REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED 8 April 1993 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE S. FUNDING NUMBERS Abdominal Tuberculosis in Cairo...abdominal tuberculosis patients seen at Abbassia Fever Hospital in Cairo, Egypt from January 1990 to August 1992 are described; their mean age was 21.5

  7. Abdominal pregnancy- a case report.

    PubMed

    Okafor, Ii; Ude, Ac; Aderibigbe, Aso; Amu, Oc; Udeh, Pe; Obianyo, Nen; Ani, Coc

    2011-01-01

    A case of abdominal pregnancy in a 39 year old female gravida 4, para 0(+3) is presented. Ultrasonography revealed a viable abdominal pregnancy at 15 weeks gestational age. She was initially managed conservatively. Surgical intervention became necessary at 20 weeks gestational age following Ultrasound detection of foetal demise. The maternal outcome was favourable. This case is presented to highlight the dilemma associated with diagnosis and management of abdominal pregnancy with a review of literature.

  8. Hepatic resection for breast cancer metastases.

    PubMed Central

    Okaro, A. C.; Durkin, D. J.; Layer, G. T.; Kissin, M. W.; Karanjia, N. D.

    2005-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Hepatic resection is an established modality of treatment for colorectal cancer metastases. Resection of breast cancer liver metastases remains controversial, but has been shown to be an effective treatment in selected cases. This study reports the outcome of 8 patients with liver metastases from breast cancer. PATIENTS & METHODS: 8 patients with liver metastases from previously treated breast cancer were referred for hepatic resection between September 1996 and December 2002. Six were eligible for liver resection. The mean age was 45.8 years. The resections performed included 1 segmentectomy and 5 hemihepatectomies of which one was an extended hemihepatectomy. One patient had a repeat hepatectomy 44 months after the first resection. RESULTS: There were no postoperative deaths or major morbidity. The resectability rate was 75%. Follow-up periods range from 6 to 70 months with a median survival of 31 months following resection. There have been 2 deaths, one died of recurrence in the residual liver at 6 months and one died disease-free from a stroke. Of the remaining 4 patients, 1 has had a further liver resection at 44 months following which she is alive and 'disease-free' at 70 months. The one patient with peritoneal recurrence is alive 49 months after her liver resection with 2 patients remaining disease-free. CONCLUSION: Hepatic resection for breast cancer liver metastases is a safe procedure with low morbidity and mortality. PMID:15901375

  9. [Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Siebenmann, R; Schneider, K; von Segesser, L; Turina, M

    1988-06-11

    348 cases of abdominal aortic aneurysm were reviewed for typical features of inflammatory aneurysm (IAAA) (marked thickening of aneurysm wall, retroperitoneal fibrosis and rigid adherence of adjacent structures). IAAA was present in 15 cases (14 male, 1 female). When compared with patients who had ordinary aneurysms, significantly more patients complained of back or abdominal pain (p less than 0.01). Erythrocyte sedimentation rate was highly elevated. Diagnosis was established in 7 of 10 computed tomographies. 2 patients underwent emergency repair for ruptured aneurysm. Unilateral ureteral obstruction was present in 4 cases and bilateral in 1. Repair of IAAA was performed by a modified technique. Histological examination revealed thickening of the aortic wall, mainly of the adventitial layer, infiltrated by plasma cells and lymphocytes. One 71-year-old patient operated on for rupture of IAAA died early, and another 78-year-old patient after 5 1/2 months. Control computed tomographies revealed spontaneous regression of inflammatory infiltration after repair. Equally, hydronephrosis due to ureteral obstruction could be shown to disappear or at least to decrease. IAAA can be diagnosed by computed tomography with high sensitivity. Repair involves low risk, but modification of technique is necessary. The etiology of IAAA remains unclear.

  10. Fertility after abdominal myomectomy.

    PubMed

    Connolly, G; Doyle, M; Barrett, T; Byrne, P; De Mello, M; Harrison, R F

    2000-07-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the morbidity and pregnancy outcome of myomectomy in infertile women with uterine fibroids. This was a cross-sectional study. Records were reviewed for 100 consecutive women in the Rotunda Hospital who underwent myomectomy in the years 1995-1996. A questionnaire regarding subsequent fertility was sent. The study was carried out in the infertility unit at the Rotunda Hospital, Dublin, Ireland. Seventy-five women responded. Multiple myomectomy was performed in 52 (70%). Mean fibroid size was 6.8 cm (range 2-14.5 cm). Nine women (12%) developed complications; five had menstrual problems, two had wound discomfort and two had abdominal discomfort. Twenty-five women (33%) became pregnant. Seven (28%) were IVF pregnancies. Overall six (24%) miscarried. In 19 of 25, pregnancy occurred where fibroids were the only identifiable cause of infertility. We conclude that abdominal myomectomy is associated with a favourable outcome in infertile women particularly if no other confounding variable is present.

  11. [Intra-abdominal mycoses].

    PubMed

    Boos, C; Kujath, P; Bruch, H-P

    2005-01-01

    The incidence of invasive mycoses in patients undergoing abdominal surgery amounts to approximately 8% and shows an upward trend in epidemiological studies. The lethality of these systemic mycoses, which are mostly based on Candida infections constitutes up to 60%. The development of a sytemic mycosis is marked by exogenic, endogenic and iatrogenic risk factors and typically displays tissue invasion after an initial fungal contamination or systemic dissemination via fungal sepsis. Fungal peritonitis is generally a monoinfection with Candida spp., where Candida albicans outweighs in 70% of cases. Aspergillus spp. are only detected abdominally in rare cases. The histological verification of a fungal invasion is regarded as proof of the existence of an invasive mycosis, but typical macroscopic findings with corresponding cultural findings can also confirm the diagnosis. Systemic mycosis requires an early initiation of a consistent antimycotic therapy as well as definitive surgical eradication of the focus in order to reduce high lethal rate. Resistances or incorrect dosages can be validated objectively by means of histological monitoring of the antimycotic therapy, thus affording early recognition of the need to change the substance class.

  12. Rare association in a female DSD case of phallus, accessory phallic urethra, perineal lipoma and anterior ectopic anus.

    PubMed

    Mahalik, Santosh Kumar; Mahajan, Jai Kumar; Sodhi, Kushaljit Singh; Garge, Saurabh; Vaiphei, Kim; Rao, Kattragadda L

    2013-02-01

    Disorders of sex differentiation (DSD) are a heterogeneous and broad spectrum group of diseases with a varied appearance. Presence of an accessory phallus with a phallic urethra in association with a normal vagina in a female is an extremely uncommon anomaly. We present a rare case of a genotypically female child with a normal urethra and vagina in association with a phallus, accessory phallic urethra, perineal lipoma and anterior ectopic anus.

  13. A report of three cases and review of the literature on rectal disruption following abdominal seatbelt trauma

    PubMed Central

    El Kafsi, J; Kraus, R; Guy, R

    2016-01-01

    Seatbelt associated blunt trauma to the rectum is a rare but well recognised injury. The exact mechanism of hollow visceral injury in blunt trauma is unclear. Stress and shear waves generated by abdominal compression may in part account for injury to gas containing structures. A ‘seatbelt sign’ (linear ecchymosis across the abdomen in the distribution of the lap belt) should raise the suspicion of hollow visceral injuries and can be more severe with disruption of the abdominal wall musculature. Three consecutive cases of rectal injury following blunt abdominal trauma, requiring emergency laparotomy and resection, are described. Lumbar spine injury occurred in one case and in the other two cases, there was injury to the iliac wing of the pelvis; all three cases sustained significant abdominal wall contusion or muscle disruption. Abdominal wall reconstruction and closure posed a particular challenge, requiring a multidisciplinary approach. The literature on this topic is reviewed and potential mechanisms of injury are discussed. PMID:26741660

  14. Perineal resuturing versus expectant management following vaginal delivery complicated by a dehisced wound (PREVIEW): a nested qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Dudley, L; Kettle, C; Waterfield, J; Ismail, Khaled M K

    2017-01-01

    Objective To explore women's lived experiences of a dehisced perineal wound following childbirth and how they felt participating in a pilot and feasibility randomised controlled trial (RCT). Design A nested qualitative study using semistructured interviews, underpinned by descriptive phenomenology. Participants and setting A purposive sample of six women at 6–9 months postnatal who participated in the RCT were interviewed in their own homes. Results Following Giorgi's analytical framework the verbatim transcripts were analysed for key themes. Women's lived experiences revealed 4 emerging themes: (1) Physical impact, with sub-themes focusing upon avoiding infection, perineal pain and the impact of the wound dehiscence upon daily activities; (2) Psychosocial impact, with sub-themes of denial, sense of failure or self-blame, fear, isolation and altered body image; (3) Sexual impact; and (4) Satisfaction with wound healing. A fifth theme ‘participating in the RCT’ was ‘a priori’ with sub-themes centred upon understanding the randomisation process, completing the trial questionnaires, attending for hospital appointments and acceptability of the treatment options. Conclusions To the best of our knowledge, this is the first qualitative study to grant women the opportunity to voice their personal experiences of a dehisced perineal wound and their views on the management offered. The powerful testimonies presented disclose the extent of morbidity experienced while also revealing a strong preference for a treatment option. Trial registration number ISRCTN05754020; results. PMID:28188152

  15. [Surgical treatment of rectal prolapse with transanal resection according to Altemeier. Experience and results].

    PubMed

    Carditello, Antonio; Milone, Antonino; Stilo, Francesco; Mollo, Francesco; Basile, Maurizio

    2003-01-01

    In recent years the number of patients with partial or total rectal prolapse has increased. Numerous techniques and surgical approaches have been described for its treatment. In this study we examine the main ones and stress the advantages of the transanal-perineal resection technique according to Altemeier and modified by Prasad, which we have used to treat the condition in the last 15 years. From 1988 to 2002, 269 patients with "haemorrhoidal prolapse" were referred to our department; 146 were females (54%), and the mean age was 58 years. Clinical examination and proctosigmoidoscopy revealed the presence of total rectal prolapse in 41 patients (15%, 32 F, 9 M), complicated in 4 cases by moderate incontinence and associated in 3 cases with post-haemorrhoidectomy stenosis. These 41 patients underwent transanal resection according to Altemeier. Thirty-four of them (83%) were operated on under local anaesthesia with sedation, 5 patients (12%) under peridural anaesthesia and 2 patients (5%) under narcosis. The mean hospital stay was 5 days and depended on the time of the first spontaneous evacuation. Check-ups were performed after 7 days, 1 months and every 3 months for 1 year. There was no postoperative mortality, and only 1 case of postoperative haemorrhage, which did not require reoperation, in a patient with a previous myocardial infarct who spontaneously continued to take salicylates up to 24 h before surgery. Thirty-three patients (80%) had their first postoperative evacuation within 48 h of surgery after taking sorbitol orally in the evening, 6 patients (15%) within 72 h, and 2 patients (5%) on postoperative day 4. No evacuative enemas were performed. We observed clinical healing in all patients 1 month after the operation, and regular, spontaneous evacuations without the use of oral laxatives. Stool or gas incontinence were never observed or reported. During the follow-up, only in 2% of cases did we observe partial recurrence of the prolapse. The choice

  16. Surgical Treatment of a Voluminous Infrarenal Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm with Horseshoe Kidney: Tips and Tricks

    PubMed Central

    Massara, Mafalda; Greco, Michele; Mastrojeni, Claudio; Serra, Raffaele; Salomone, Ignazio; La Spada, Michele

    2015-01-01

    Horseshoe kidney is a common urology anomaly, while its association with infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm represents a very rare condition. Surgical approach remains controversial however, we believe that the left retroperitoneal approach should be preferred in order to avoid isthmus resection with any subsequent renal infarction, urinary tract damage and to facilitate renal arteries reimplantation, when required. We present a case of voluminous infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm associated with horseshoe kidney, successfully treated through a left retroperitoneal approach on the retro-renal space. PMID:26730260

  17. Portal triad clamping or hepatic vascular exclusion for major liver resection. A controlled study.

    PubMed Central

    Belghiti, J; Noun, R; Zante, E; Ballet, T; Sauvanet, A

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The authors compared operative course of patients undergoing major liver resections under portal triad clamping (PTC) or under hepatic vascular exclusion (HVE). SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Reduced blood loss during liver resection is achieved by PTC or HVE. Specific complications and postoperative hepatocellular injury mediated with two procedures have not been compared. METHODS: Fifty-two noncirrhotic patients undergoing major liver resections were included in a prospective randomized study comparing both the intraoperative and postoperative courses under PTC (n = 24) or under HVE (n = 28). RESULTS: The two groups were similar at entry, but eight patients were crossed over to the other group during resection. In the HVE group, hemodynamic intolerance occurred in four (14%) patients. In the PTC group, pedicular clamping was not efficient in four patients, including three with involvement of the cavohepatic intersection and one with persistent bleeding due to tricuspid insufficiency. Intraoperative blood losses and postoperative enzyme level reflecting hepatocellular injury were similar in the two groups. Mean operative duration and mean clampage duration were significantly increased after HVE. Postoperative abdominal collections and pulmonary complications were 2.5-fold higher after HVE but without statistical significance, whereas the mean length of postoperative hospital stay was longer after HVE. CONCLUSIONS: This study shows that both methods of vascular occlusion are equally effective in reducing blood loss in major liver resections. The HVE is associated with unpredictable hemodynamic intolerance, increased postoperative complications with a longer hospital stay, and should be restricted to lesions involving the cavo-hepatic intersection. PMID:8757378

  18. How I Manage Abdominal Injuries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haycock, Christine E.

    1986-01-01

    In sports, abdominal injuries occur most frequently in cycling, horseback riding, and skiing. Most involve children, not adults. Any athlete sustaining a severe blow to the abdomen should be examined. Guidelines are provided for recognizing and treating injuries to the abdominal muscles, kidneys, spleen, and liver. (Author/MT)

  19. CT of abdominal tuberculosis

    SciTech Connect

    Epstein, B.M.; Mann, J.H.

    1982-11-01

    Intraabdominal tuberculosis (TB) presents with a wide variety of clinical and radiologic features. Besides the reported computed tomographic (CT) finding of high-density ascites in tuberculous peritonitis, this report describes additional CT features highly suggestive of abdominal tuberculosis in eight cases: (1) irregular soft-tissue densities in the omental area; (2) low-density masses surrounded by thick solid rims; (3) a disorganized appearance of soft-tissue densities, fluid, and bowel loops forming a poorly defined mass; (4) low-density lymph nodes with a multilocular appearance after intravenous contrast administration; and (5) possibly high-density ascites. The differential diagnosis of these features include lymphoma, various forms of peritonitis, peritoneal carcinomatosis, and peritoneal mesothelioma. It is important that the CT features of intraabdominal tuberculosis be recognized in order that laparotomy be avoided and less invasive procedures (e.g., laparoscopy, biopsy, or a trial of antituberculous therapy) be instituted.

  20. Endovascular pseudoaneurysm repair after distal pancreatectomy with celiac axis resection

    PubMed Central

    Sumiyoshi, Tatsuaki; Shima, Yasuo; Noda, Yoshihiro; Hosoki, Shingo; Hata, Yasuhiro; Okabayashi, Takehiro; Kozuki, Akihito; Nakamura, Toshio

    2013-01-01

    Erosive hemorrhage due to pseudoaneurysm is one of the most life-threatening complications after pancreatectomy. Here, we report an extremely rare case of rupture of a pseudoaneurysm of the common hepatic artery (CHA) stump that developed after distal pancreatectomy with en block celiac axis resection (DP-CAR), and was successfully treated through covered stent placement. The patient is a 66-year-old woman who underwent DP-CAR after adjuvant chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced pancreatic body cancer. She developed an intra-abdominal abscess around the remnant pancreas head 31 d after the surgery, and computed tomography (CT) showed an occluded portal vein due to the spreading inflammation around the abscess. Her general condition improved after CT-guided drainage of the abscess. However, 19 d later, she presented with melena, and CT showed a pseudoaneurysm arising from the CHA stump. Because the CHA had been resected during the DP-CAR, this artery could not be used as the access route for endovascular treatment, and instead, we placed a covered stent via the inferior pancreaticoduodenal artery originating from the superior mesenteric artery. After stent placement, cessation of bleeding and anterograde hepatic artery flow were confirmed, and the patient recovered well without any further complications. CT angiography at the 6-mo follow-up indicated the patency of the covered stent with sustained hepatic artery flow. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of endovascular repair of a pseudoaneurysm that developed after DP-CAR. PMID:24363537

  1. Risk Factors for Complications After Esophageal Cancer Resection

    PubMed Central

    Viklund, Pernilla; Lindblad, Mats; Lu, Ming; Ye, Weimin; Johansson, Jan; Lagergren, Jesper

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To identify risk factors for complications after resection for esophageal or cardia cancer. Summary Background Data: Knowledge of risk factors for complications after esophageal resection for cancer is sparse, and prospective population-based studies are lacking. Methods: A prospective, nationwide, population-based study was conducted in Sweden in April 2, 2001 through December 31, 2003. Details about tumor characteristics and stage, surgical procedures, and complications were collected prospectively from the Swedish Esophageal and Cardia Cancer register. Medical records and specific charts from surgical procedures, histopathology reports, and intensive care units were continuously scrutinized. Multivariable logistic regression analyses were used to estimate relative risks and their 95% confidence intervals. Results: Among 275 patients undergoing surgical resection for esophageal or cardia cancer, 122 (44%) had at least one predefined complication. Operation by low-volume surgeons (<5 operations annually) were followed by more anastomotic leakages than those by surgeons with higher volume (odds ratio, 7.86; 95% confidence interval, 2.13–29.00). Hand-sewn and stapled anastomoses did not differ regarding risk of anastomotic leakage. Among cardia cancer patients, transthoracic approach resulted in more respiratory complications compared with transhiatal (abdominal only) approach (odds ratio, 4.78; 95% confidence interval, 1.66–13.76). Older age, adjuvant oncologic therapy, and higher preoperative bleeding volume nonsignificantly increased the risks of complications, while no influence of sex or tumor stage was found. Conclusions: High-volume esophageal surgeons seem to lower the risk of anastomotic leakage. More large-scale studies are warranted to establish the roles of the other potentially important risk factors suggested in our study. PMID:16432353

  2. [Four resections of metachronous liver metastases and lateral lymph node metastases of a rectal carcinoid tumor - a case report].

    PubMed

    Nakamoto, Takayuki; Koyama, Fumikazu; Nakagawa, Tadashi; Nakamura, Shinji; Ueda, Takeshi; Nishigori, Naoto; Inoue, Takashi; Kawasaki, Keijirou; Obara, Shinsaku; Fujii, Hisao; Nakajima, Yoshiyuki

    2014-11-01

    The authors present a case of rectal carcinoid tumor with lateral lymph node metastases and liver metastases that was successfully treated by 4 resections. A 70-year-old man was diagnosed with a rectal carcinoid tumor (20 mm in diameter) with submucosal (SM) invasion. Radical resection was performed at 25 months, 38 months, and 57 months, when abdominal computed tomography (CT) revealed metachronous liver metastases of the rectal carcinoid tumor. At 50 months, metachronous lateral lymph node metastases were also revealed. Three hepatectomies and a laparoscopic lateral lymph node dissection were performed. The patient is currently free of disease at 25 months after the last intervention.

  3. Perineal talc use and ovarian cancer risk: a case study of scientific standards in environmental epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Huncharek, Michael; Muscat, Joshua

    2011-11-01

    A number of observational studies (largely case-control) conducted over the last two decades suggest an association between use of talc powders on the female perineum and increased risk of ovarian cancer. A subset of these reports shows a roughly 30-60% increased risk of ovarian cancer associated with perineal talc exposure. A number of researchers partly base their conclusions of an association on the '…chemical relationship between talc and asbestos', the latter substance being a known human carcinogen. Although separating causal from noncausal explanations for an observed statistical association is a difficult process, there currently exist commonly accepted guidelines by which such inferences can be made. These scientific approaches include consideration of the strength of the association, the consistency of the finding across studies, and existence of a biological explanation of the observed phenomenon, among others. When applied to the context of a proposed talc/ovarian cancer association, we conclude that the weak statistical associations observed in a number of epidemiological studies do not support a causal association.

  4. Altered perineal microbiome is associated with vulvovaginitis and urinary tract infection in preadolescent girls

    PubMed Central

    Gorbachinsky, Ilya; Sherertz, Robert; Russell, Gregory; Krane, L Spencer

    2014-01-01

    Background: Vulvovaginitis has a known association with urinary tract infections (UTIs) in girls. We hypothesize that vulvovaginitis is a major contributor to UTIs in prepubertal girls by increasing periurethral colonization with uropathogens. Methods: Periurethral swabs and urine specimens were obtained from a total of 101 girls (58 with vulvovaginitis and 43 without vulvovaginitis). Specimens were cultured for bacterial growth. The dominant organism in the periurethral swabs and urine cultures was recorded and antibiotic sensitivity profiles were compared. Results: Periurethral swabs from children with vulvovaginitis were associated with a statistically significant increase in uropathogenic bacteria (79% Enterococcus species or Escherichia coli) as the dominant culture compared with swabs from girls without vaginitis (18%) (p < 0.05). In children with vulvovaginitis, 52% of the urine cultures were positive for UTIs, and the dominant organism in the urine cultures matched the species and antibiotic sensitivity profile of the corresponding periurethral swab. Only 11% of the urine cultures from girls without vulvovaginitis were positive for UTIs. Conclusions: Vulvovaginitis may cause UTIs by altering the perineal biome such that there is increased colonization of uropathogens. PMID:25435916

  5. Using Adhesive Glue to Repair First Degree Perineal Tears: A Prospective Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Maor-Sagie, Esther; Zivi, Einat; Abu-Dia, Mushira; Ben-Meir, Assaf; Sela, Hen Y.; Ezra, Yossef

    2014-01-01

    Our objective was to evaluate the effectiveness of adhesive glue in repairing first degree perineal tears. We conducted a noninferiority prospective, randomized, controlled trial comparing adhesive glue with traditional suturing. Each case was evaluated immediately after birth and after the puerperium. The two-sample t-test and the Mann-Whitney nonparametric test were applied to compare quantitative variables between the treatment groups. The chi-squared test and Fisher's exact test were used to assess the association between qualitative variables. A total of 102 women participated, 28 in the suture arm and 74 in the adhesive glue arm. While cosmetic and functional results of adhesive glue use were not inferior to suturing, the use of adhesive glue was associated with a shorter procedure, less need for local anesthetic, less pain, and greater satisfaction. Our results suggest a novel approach for the repair of common postpartum first degree lacerations. The use of adhesive glue achieves cosmetic and functional results equal to traditional suturing and offers some immediate advantages for the patient. While further clinical trials are needed to validate our results, it is important to inform obstetrician of the possible use of adhesive glue in these very common clinical scenarios. This trial is registered with NCT00746707. PMID:25089271

  6. Using adhesive glue to repair first degree perineal tears: a prospective randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Feigenberg, Tomer; Maor-Sagie, Esther; Zivi, Einat; Abu-Dia, Mushira; Ben-Meir, Assaf; Sela, Hen Y; Ezra, Yossef

    2014-01-01

    Our objective was to evaluate the effectiveness of adhesive glue in repairing first degree perineal tears. We conducted a noninferiority prospective, randomized, controlled trial comparing adhesive glue with traditional suturing. Each case was evaluated immediately after birth and after the puerperium. The two-sample t-test and the Mann-Whitney nonparametric test were applied to compare quantitative variables between the treatment groups. The chi-squared test and Fisher's exact test were used to assess the association between qualitative variables. A total of 102 women participated, 28 in the suture arm and 74 in the adhesive glue arm. While cosmetic and functional results of adhesive glue use were not inferior to suturing, the use of adhesive glue was associated with a shorter procedure, less need for local anesthetic, less pain, and greater satisfaction. Our results suggest a novel approach for the repair of common postpartum first degree lacerations. The use of adhesive glue achieves cosmetic and functional results equal to traditional suturing and offers some immediate advantages for the patient. While further clinical trials are needed to validate our results, it is important to inform obstetrician of the possible use of adhesive glue in these very common clinical scenarios. This trial is registered with NCT00746707.

  7. Visualization of Polypropylene and Polyvinylidene Fluoride Slings in Perineal Ultrasound and Correlation with Clinical Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Najjari, Laila; Hennemann, Julia; Kirschner-Hermanns, Ruth; Maass, Nicolai; Papathemelis, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Introduction and Hypothesis. Complications and malfunctioning after TOT can occur due to several factors, such as the material of the sling. The aim of the present study is to evaluate morphology and functionality of two types of slings (PVDF; polypropylene) in vivo using perineal ultrasound (PUS). Materials. In n = 47 women with TOT four criteria for PUS were taken and checked for possible differences: vertical stability of the sling position during Valsalva manoeuvre and contraction; distance “sling to urethra”; width of the sling and condition of the selvedges. Results. We observed an increased vertical displacement of the PP-slings, a significantly smaller variance to the extent of the displacement in PVDF-slings (P < 0.01), a significantly larger distance between sling and urethra (P < 0.001) in PVDF-slings, and a significantly smaller width of the PP-slings (P < 0.0001). Conclusion. Significant differences were found between the slings according to the four criteria. There was no difference established between the slings in the improvement of continence and no significant influence of the parameters was found for the resulting state of continence. In future studies, PUS may help to link differences in the morphology and functionality of in vivo slings to their material properties. PMID:25126545

  8. Female perineal injuries in children and adolescents presenting to a paediatric emergency department.

    PubMed

    Roland, Damian; Lewis, Gareth; Rowlands, Rachel; Davidson, Emmanuel; Davies, Ffion

    2016-01-01

    This retrospective case series determined documentation quality and likelihood of safeguarding issues in girls  aged 0-15 years with perineal and genital injuries presenting to a paediatric emergency department (ED). During the period between 2002 and 2010, cases were identified and clinical information was recorded. Cases were cross-referenced against the hospital's safeguarding unit's records up to 2011. In total, 181 case notes were available for review with 76.2% of patients discharged home from the ED. Fewer than 50% of case notes contained clear anatomical description of the injuries. In 51 (28.2%) cases, child safeguarding issues were considered, with specific referrals made to safeguarding services in 20 of these (11.0%). Only one case involved subsequent child safeguarding proceedings. Clear documentation of injury patterns by medical staff was poor, but medical and nursing staff should not be anxious about dealing with this cohort of patients as they are no different from other incidental injuries needing diligent levels of child safeguarding awareness.

  9. Unexpectedly ease surgery for a worrisome abdominal mass: Pedunculated GISTs☆

    PubMed Central

    Baskiran, Adil; Otan, Emrah; Aydin, Cemalettin; Kayaalp, Cuneyt

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Discovery of abdominal masses often poses significant diagnostic difficulties. GISTs are mesenchymal masses, with specific histological features. Dimensions may vary from millimeters to giant tumours. We would like to present our case, which had an unexpectedly easy operative course which was easily handled with a simple surgical excision with a short operative duration. PRESENTATION OF CASE A 38 years old female patient was diagnosed to have an abdominal heterogen mass of 15 cm × 12 cm × 10 cm in dimension. Abdominal computed tomography revealed the solid mass between the stomach and pancreas corpus and tail, possibly orginating from the pancreas. With the preoperative diagnosis of locally invasive distal pancreas cancer the patient underwent laparotomy, following the dissection, the mass was observed to be originating from the posterior gastric Wall, extending exophytically with a peduncle of 5 cm in width, without any visual evidence for peritoneal invasion and metastasis. The tumour and the peduncle was resected with stapler device. Total operation time was 30 min. Postoperative course was uneventful. Pathologic diagnosis was gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GIST). DISCUSSION Pedunculated large GISTs are not frequent and they can enlarge as 15 cm in diameter and compress the neighbouring organs. When they were huge, it is difficult to differentiate the origin of the masses. GISTs should be considered in differential diagnosis of giant abdominal masses. CONCLUSION When GISTs are huge and pedunculated, it can be difficult to differentiate the origin of the masses. This case report presents unexpectedly ease surgery for a worrysome abdominal mass. PMID:23999120

  10. Feasibility and Technique for Transvaginal Natural Orifice Transluminal Endoscopic Surgery Liver Resection: A Porcine Model

    PubMed Central

    Katagiri, Toshio; Horgan, Santiago; Sandler, Bryan J.; Jacobsen, Garth R.; Coker, Alisa M.; Tsuchiya, Masaru; Maeda, Tetsuya; Kaneko, Hironori

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) is a challenging minimally invasive procedure. Although laparoscopic techniques for liver resection are gaining acceptance worldwide, few studies have investigated NOTES liver resection. We used a porcine model to assess the feasibility and safety of transvaginal NOTES liver resection (TV NOTES LR). Materials and Methods: Nine female pigs underwent TV NOTES LR. A nonsurvival acute porcine model with general anesthesia was used in all cases. Using hybrid NOTES technique, we placed only 1 umbilical 12-mm umbilical trocar in the abdominal wall, which was used to create pneumoperitoneum. A laparoscope was then advanced to obtain intra-abdominal visualization. A 15-mm vaginal trocar was inserted under direct laparoscopic vision, and a flexible endoscope was introduced through the vaginal trocar. A long, flexible grasper and endocavity retractor were used to stably retract the liver. The liver edge was partially transected using energy devices inserted through the umbilical trocar. To transect the left lateral lobe, a flexible linear stapler was inserted alongside the vaginal trocar. A specimen extraction bag was deployed and extracted transvaginally. Blood loss, bile leakage, operative time, and specimen size were evaluated. Necropsy studies were performed after the procedures. Results: Eighteen transvaginal NOTES partial liver resections and 4 transvaginal NOTES left lateral lobectomies were successfully performed on 9 pigs. Mean operative time was 165.8 minutes, and mean estimated blood loss was 76.6 mL. All TV NOTES LRs were performed without complications or deaths. Necropsy showed no bile leakage from remnant liver. Conclusions: Our porcine model suggests that TV NOTES LR is technically feasible and safe and has the potential for clinical use as a minimally invasive alternative to conventional laparoscopic liver resection. PMID:28030435

  11. Acute appendicitis following endoscopic mucosal resection of cecal adenoma.

    PubMed

    Nemoto, Yukako; Tokuhisa, Junya; Shimada, Nagasato; Gomi, Tatsuya; Maetani, Iruru

    2015-07-21

    Endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) allows the removal of flat or sessile lesions, laterally spreading tumors, and carcinoma of the colon or the rectum limited to the mucosa or the superficial submucosa. Acute appendicitis is the most common abdominal emergency requiring emergency surgery, and it is also a rare complication of diagnostic colonoscopy and therapeutic endoscopy, including EMR. In the case presented here, a 53-year-old female underwent colonoscopy due to a positive fecal occult blood test and was diagnosed with cecal adenoma. She was referred to our hospital and admitted for treatment. The patient had no other symptoms. EMR was performed, and 7 h after the surgery, the patient experienced right -lower abdominal pain. Laboratory tests performed the following day revealed a WBC count of 16000/mm(3), a neutrophil count of 14144/mm(3), and a C-reactive protein level of 2.20 mg/dL, indicating an inflammatory response. Computed tomography also revealed appendiceal wall thickening and swelling, so acute appendicitis following EMR was diagnosed. Antibiotics were initiated leading to total resolution of the symptoms, and the patient was discharged on the sixth post-operative day. Pathological analysis revealed a high-grade cecal tubular adenoma. Such acute appendicitis following EMR is extremely rare, and EMR of the cecum may be a rare cause of acute appendicitis.

  12. Management of strangulated abdominal wall hernias with mesh; early results

    PubMed Central

    Ozbagriacik, Mustafa; Bas, Gurhan; Basak, Fatih; Sisik, Abdullah; Acar, Aylin; Kudas, Ilyas; Yucel, Metin; Ozpek, Adnan; Alimoglu, Orhan

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Surgery for abdominal wall hernias is a common procedure in general surgery practice. The main causes of delay for the operation are comorbid problems and patient unwillingness, which eventually, means that some patients are admitted to emergency clinics with strangulated hernias. In this report, patients who admitted to the emergency department with strangulated adominal wall hernias are presented together with their clinical management. METHODS: Patients who admitted to our clinic between January 2009 and November 2011 and underwent emergency operation were included in the study retrospectively. Demographic characteristics, hernia type, length of hospital stay, surgical treatment and complications were assessed. RESULTS: A total 81 patients (37 female, 44 male) with a mean age of 52.1±17.64 years were included in the study. Inguinal, femoral, umbilical and incisional hernias were detected in 40, 26, 9 and 6 patients respectively. Polypropylene mesh was used in 75 patients for repair. Primary repair without mesh was used in six patients. Small bowel (n=10; 12.34%), omentum (n=19; 23.45%), appendix (n=1; 1.2%) and Meckel’s diverticulum (n=1; 1.2%) were resected. Median length of hospital stay was 2 (1–7) days. Surgical site infection was detected in five (6.2%) patients. No significant difference was detected for length of hospital stay and surgical site infection in patients who had mesh repair (p=0.232 and 0.326 respectively). CONCLUSION: The need for bowel resection is common in strangulated abdominal wall hernias which undergo emergency operation. In the present study, an increase of morbidity was seen in patients who underwent bowel resection. No morbidity was detected related to the usage of prosthetic materials in repair of hernias. Hence, we believe that prosthetic materials can be used safely in emergency cases. PMID:28058336

  13. Risk assessment for pulmonary resection.

    PubMed

    Brunelli, Alessandro

    2010-01-01

    Risk assessment for pulmonary resection must include a preliminary cardiac evaluation. Patients deemed at prohibitive cardiac risk should be evaluated and treated as per American Heart Association/American Society of Cardiology guidelines. Those with low cardiac risk or with optimized treatment can proceed with pulmonary assessment. A systematic measurement of lung carbon monoxide diffusing capacity is recommended. In addition, predicted postoperative forced expiratory volume in 1 second should not be used alone for patient selection because it is not an accurate predictor of complications, particularly in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The use of exercise testing should be emphasized. Low-technology tests, such as stair climbing, can be used whenever a formal cardiopulmonary exercise test is not readily available. However, in case of suboptimal performance (ie, <22 m in the stair-climbing test) patients should be referred to cardiopulmonary exercise testing with measurement of Vo(2max) for a better definition of their aerobic reserve. A Vo(2max) less than 10 mL/kg/min (or <35% of predicted) indicates a high risk for major lung resection.

  14. Awake operative videothoracoscopic pulmonary resections.

    PubMed

    Pompeo, Eugenio; Mineo, Tommaso C

    2008-08-01

    The authors' initial experience with awake videothoracoscopic lung resection suggests that these procedures can be easily and safely performed under sole thoracic epidural anesthesia with no mortality and negligible morbidity. One major concern was that operating on a ventilating lung would render surgical maneuvers more difficult because of the lung movements and lack of a sufficient operating space. Instead, the open pneumothorax created after trocar insertion produces a satisfactory lung collapse that does not hamper surgical maneuvers. These results contradict the accepted assumption that the main prerequisite for allowing successful thoracoscopic lung surgery is general anesthesia with one-lung ventilation. No particular training is necessary to accomplish an awake pulmonary resection for teams experienced in thoracoscopic surgery, and conversions to general anesthesia are mainly caused by the presence of extensive fibrous pleural adhesions or the development of intractable panic attacks. Overall, awake pulmonary resection is easily accepted and well tolerated by patients, as confirmed by the high anesthesia satisfaction score, which was better than in nonawake control patients. Nonetheless, thoracic epidural anesthesia has potential complications, including epidural hematoma, spinal cord injury, and phrenic nerve palsy caused by inadvertently high anesthetic level, but these never occurred in the authors' experience. Further concerns relate to patient participation in operating room conversations or risk for development of perioperative panic attacks. However, the authors have found that reassuring the patient during the procedure, explaining step-by-step what is being performed, and even showing the ongoing procedure on the operating video can greatly improve the perioperative wellness and expectations of patients, particularly if the procedure is performed for oncologic diseases. Panic attacks occurred in few patients and could be usually managed through

  15. Economics of abdominal wall reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Bower, Curtis; Roth, J Scott

    2013-10-01

    The economic aspects of abdominal wall reconstruction are frequently overlooked, although understandings of the financial implications are essential in providing cost-efficient health care. Ventral hernia repairs are frequently performed surgical procedures with significant economic ramifications for employers, insurers, providers, and patients because of the volume of procedures, complication rates, the significant rate of recurrence, and escalating costs. Because biological mesh materials add significant expense to the costs of treating complex abdominal wall hernias, the role of such costly materials needs to be better defined to ensure the most cost-efficient and effective treatments for ventral abdominal wall hernias.

  16. A bizarre abdominal cystic lesion.

    PubMed

    Zucchini, Giorgia; Pezzilli, Raffaele; Ricci, Claudio; Casadei, Riccardo; Santini, Donatella; Calculli, Lucia; Corinaldesi, Roberto

    2010-09-06

    In spite of careful intraoperative precautions and gauze counts, mistakes can still occur during surgery. In the case reported, a retained gauze leaved during a surgical approach for removing a solid-cystic papillary tumor localized in the pancreatic tail, caused both persistent abdominal discomfort and the presence of an abdominal cystic lesion at imaging techniques. When a previous operative history is present, a foreign body should be taken into account in the differential diagnosis of a patient with an intra-abdominal cystic mass. Finally, radio-opaque marker should be routinely used by surgeons in order to reach a correct diagnosis in operated patients having retained gauze.

  17. Acute incarcerated external abdominal hernia

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xue-Fei

    2014-01-01

    External abdominal hernia occurs when abdominal organs or tissues leave their normal anatomic site and protrude outside the skin through the congenital or acquired weakness, defects or holes on the abdominal wall, including inguinal hernia, umbilical hernia, femoral hernia and so on. Acute incarcerated hernia is a common surgical emergency. With advances in minimally invasive devices and techniques, the diagnosis and treatment have witnessed major changes, such as the use of laparoscopic surgery in some cases to achieve minimally invasive treatment. However, strict adherence to the indications and contraindications is still required. PMID:25489584

  18. Laparoscopic management of intra-abdominal infections: Systematic review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Coccolini, Federico; Tranà, Cristian; Sartelli, Massimo; Catena, Fausto; Saverio, Salomone Di; Manfredi, Roberto; Montori, Giulia; Ceresoli, Marco; Falcone, Chiara; Ansaloni, Luca

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the role of laparoscopy in diagnosis and treatment of intra abdominal infections. METHODS: A systematic review of the literature was performed including studies where intra abdominal infections were treated laparoscopically. RESULTS: Early laparoscopic approaches have become the standard surgical technique for treating acute cholecystitis. The laparoscopic appendectomy has been demonstrated to be superior to open surgery in acute appendicitis. In the event of diverticulitis, laparoscopic resections have proven to be safe and effective procedures for experienced laparoscopic surgeons and may be performed without adversely affecting morbidity and mortality rates. However laparoscopic resection has not been accepted by the medical community as the primary treatment of choice. In high-risk patients, laparoscopic approach may be used for exploration or peritoneal lavage and drainage. The successful laparoscopic repair of perforated peptic ulcers for experienced surgeons, is demonstrated to be safe and effective. Regarding small bowel perforations, comparative studies contrasting open and laparoscopic surgeries have not yet been conducted. Successful laparoscopic resections addressing iatrogenic colonic perforation have been reported despite a lack of literature-based evidence supporting such procedures. In post-operative infections, laparoscopic approaches may be useful in preventing diagnostic delay and controlling the source. CONCLUSION: Laparoscopy has a good diagnostic accuracy and enables to better identify the causative pathology; laparoscopy may be recommended for the treatment of many intra-abdominal infections. PMID:26328036

  19. [Penetrating abdominal injuries].

    PubMed

    Nesbakken, A; Pillgram-Larsen, J; Naess, F; Gerner, T; Solheim, K; Stadaas, J O; Gjøra, O

    1990-02-28

    We have reviewed the medical records of 111 patients treated for abdominal stab wounds during the period 1980-87. Our two hospitals serve a catchment area of about 450,000 people. Exploratory laparotomy was performed in 89 patients with suspected peritoneal penetration. In 16 patients the laparotomy was negative, and in 15 patients only minor injuries were noted. There were no serious complications in these 31 patients. Twenty-seven patients had thoracic wounds below the fourth intercostal space, 15 with intraabdominal injuries. The most common injuries were lacerations of the liver, the small bowel and the diaphragm. The mortality in the series was 2%. Stab wounds are infrequent in Norway, and most surgeons have limited experience of such injuries. We discuss whether to employ immediate exploratory laparotomy or selective management when the peritoneum has been penetrated. When there is no evidence of evisceration or omental protrusion, local exploration of the wound should be performed in order to confirm or exclude peritoneal penetration. Injury to the diaphragm and intraabdominal viscera should always be suspected in thoracic stab wounds below the fourth intercostal space.

  20. Abdominal aortic feminism.

    PubMed

    Mortimer, Alice Emily

    2014-11-14

    A 79-year-old woman presented to a private medical practice 2 years previously for an elective ultrasound screening scan. This imaging provided the evidence for a diagnosis of an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) to be made. Despite having a number of recognised risk factors for an AAA, her general practitioner at the time did not follow the guidance set out by the private medical professional, that is, to refer the patient to a vascular specialist to be entered into a surveillance programme and surgically evaluated. The patient became symptomatic with her AAA, was admitted to hospital and found to have a tender, symptomatic, 6 cm leaking AAA. She consented for an emergency open AAA repair within a few hours of being admitted to hospital, despite the 50% perioperative mortality risk. The patient spent 4 days in intensive care where she recovered well. She was discharged after a 12 day hospital stay but unfortunately passed away shortly after her discharge from a previously undiagnosed gastric cancer.

  1. Screening for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    ... signs or symptoms of an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). The final recommendation statement summarizes what the Task ... the potential benefits and harms of screening for AAA: (1) Men ages 65 to 75 who smoke ...

  2. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... not use ionizing radiation, has no known harmful effects, and is particularly valuable for evaluating abdominal, pelvic ... of the reflected sound waves (called the Doppler effect). A computer collects and processes the sounds and ...

  3. Incentive spirometry after abdominal surgery.

    PubMed

    Davis, Suja P

    Patients face various possible complications after abdominal surgery. This article examines best practice in guiding and teaching them how to use an incentive spirometer to facilitate recovery and prevent respiratory complications.

  4. Small-bowel resection for metastatic melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Al-Sheneber, Ibrahim F.; Meterissian, Sarkis H.; Loutfi, Antoine; Watters, A. Kevin; Shibata, Henry R.

    1996-01-01

    Objective To determine whether complete resection of small-bowel metastases from melanoma improves patient survival. Design A computer-aided chart review. Setting Hospitals associated with McGill University. Patients Twenty patients (17 men, 3 women), identified from 1524 patients with melanoma, who underwent surgery to the small bowel for metastases. Patient age and clinical presentation, tumour site and stage were recorded. Intervention Exploratory laparotomy with complete or partial resection of involved small bowel. Main Outcome Measures Operative morbidity, mortality and length of survival related to the extent of small-bowel resection. Results Eleven patients had complete resection, 8 patients had partial resection and 1 patient had a palliative bypass only. Long-term survival (ranging from 2 to 10 years) was 36% in those who had complete resection and 0% in those who had partial resection; operative morbidity and mortality were 20% and 15% respectively. Conclusion Complete resection of small-bowel metastases in patients with metastatic melanoma can result in long-term survival. PMID:8640618

  5. Anaesthetic management in thoracoscopic distal tracheal resection.

    PubMed

    Acosta Martínez, J; Beato López, J; Domínguez Blanco, A; López Romero, J L; López Villalobos, J L

    2017-03-01

    Surgical resection of tracheal tumours, especially distal tracheal tumours, is a challenge for the anaesthesiologists involved, mainly due to difficulties in ensuring adequate control of the airway and ventilation. We report the case of a patient undergoing tracheal resection and anastomosis by VATS, emphasizing the anaesthetic management.

  6. Advances in the Surgical Management of Resectable and Borderline Resectable Pancreas Cancer.

    PubMed

    Helmink, Beth A; Snyder, Rebecca A; Idrees, Kamran; Merchant, Nipun B; Parikh, Alexander A

    2016-04-01

    Successful surgical resection offers the only chance for cure in patients with pancreatic cancer. However, pancreatic resection is feasible in less than 20% of the patients. In this review, the current state of surgical management of pancreatic cancer is discussed. The definition of resectability based on cross-sectional imaging and the technical aspects of surgery, including vascular resection and/or reconstruction, management of aberrant vascular anatomy and extent of lymphadenectomy, are appraised. Furthermore, common pancreatic resection-specific postoperative complications and their management are reviewed.

  7. Common abdominal emergencies in children.

    PubMed

    D'Agostino, James

    2002-02-01

    Because young children often present to EDs with abdominal complaints, emergency physicians must have a high index of suspicion for the common abdominal emergencies that have serious sequelae. At the same time, they must realize that less serious causes of abdominal symptoms (e.g., constipation or gastroenteritis) are also seen. A gentle yet thorough and complete history and physical examination are the most important diagnostic tools for the emergency physician. Repeated examinations and observation are useful tools. Physicians should listen carefully to parents and their children, respect their concerns, and honor their complaints. Ancillary tests are inconsistent in their value in assessing these complaints. Abdominal radiographs can be normal in children with intussusception and even malrotation and early volvulus. Unlike the classic symptoms seen in adults, young children can display only lethargy or poor feeding in cases of appendicitis or can appear happy and playful between paroxysmal bouts of intussusception. The emergency physician therefore, must maintain a high index of suspicion for serious pathology in pediatric patients with abdominal complaints. Eventually, all significant abdominal emergencies reveal their true nature, and if one can be patient with the child and repeat the examinations when the child is quiet, one will be rewarded with the correct diagnosis.

  8. [Perineal electrical stimulation and rehabilitation in urinary incontinence and other symptoms of non-neurologic origin].

    PubMed

    Perrigot, M; Pichon, B; Peskine, A; Vassilev, K

    2008-07-01

    A literature survey of 106 articles shows that standard electrostimulation is an effective treatment of urinary incontinence and urinary disorders with bladder instability. Bladder inhibition is obtained by applying an alternating current at a frequency of between 5 and 25Hz and with a pulse width of between 0.2 and 0.5ms. In 19 articles (including three randomized, placebo-controlled studies), good results were achieved in 60 to 90% of cases, depending on the exact method (i.e. chronic or acute stimulation). Standard electrostimulation is also efficient in stress urinary incontinence. Urethral closure is obtained by applying a 50Hz alternating current with, again, a pulse width of between 0.2 and 0.5ms. In 21 articles (including two randomized, placebo-controlled studies), good results were achieved in 47.5 to 77% of cases. Treatments combining perineal rehabilitation (behavioural education, muscle improvement and biofeed-back) and electrostimulation are reported by 10 authors, with good results in 70 to 80% of cases after 10 to 12 sessions. According to 14 studies, neuromodulation is also an efficient treatment for complex urinary disorders, urgency, pollakiuria and dysuria. The recommended stimulation parameters are a frequency of 10 to 15Hz and a pulse width of 210ms. Good results were found in 34 to 94% of cases (with between 60 and 75% in an international, multicenter study). The overall results different from one study to another because of the need to harmonize stimulation parameters, choice of the study population and treatment follow-up with self-training programs and therapeutic education.

  9. New concepts on functional chronic pelvic and perineal pain: pathophysiology and multidisciplinary management.

    PubMed

    Ploteau, Stéphane; Labat, Jean Jacques; Riant, Thibault; Levesque, Amélie; Robert, Roger; Nizard, Julien

    2015-03-01

    The management of chronic pelvic and perineal pain has been improved by a better understanding of the mechanisms of this pain and an optimized integrated multidisciplinary approach to the patient. The concept of organic lesions responsible for a persistent nociceptive factor has gradually been replaced by that of dysregulation of nociceptive messages derived from the pelvis and perineum. In this setting, painful diseases identified by organ specialists are usually also involved and share several common denominators (triggering factors, predisposing clinical context). These diseases include painful bladder syndrome, irritable bowel syndrome, vulvodynia, and chronic pelvic pain syndrome. The painful symptoms vary from one individual to another and according to his or her capacity to activate pain inhibition/control processes. Although the patient often attributes chronic pain to a particular organ (with the corollary that pain will persist until the organ has been treated), this pain is generally no longer derived from the organ but is expressed via this organ. Several types of clinical presentation of complex pelvic pain have therefore been pragmatically identified to facilitate the management of treatment failures resulting from a purely organ-based approach, which can also reinforce the patient's impression of incurability. These subtypes correspond to neuropathic pain, central sensitization (fibromyalgia), complex regional pain syndrome, and emotional components similar to those observed in post-traumatic stress disorder. These various components are also often associated and self-perpetuating. Consequently, when pelvic pain cannot be explained by an organ disease, this model, using each of these four components associated with their specific mechanisms, can be used to propose personalized treatment options and also to identify patients at high risk of postoperative pelvic pain (multi-operated patients, central sensitization, post-traumatic stress disorder, etc

  10. Gut hormone release after intestinal resection.

    PubMed Central

    Besterman, H S; Adrian, T E; Mallinson, C N; Christofides, N D; Sarson, D L; Pera, A; Lombardo, L; Modigliani, R; Bloom, S R

    1982-01-01

    To investigate the possible role of gut and pancreatic hormones in the adaptive responses to gut resection, plasma concentrations of the circulating hormones were measured, in response to a test breakfast, in patients with either small or large intestinal resection and in healthy control subjects. In 18 patients with partial ileal resection a significant threefold rise was found in basal and postprandial levels of pancreatic polypeptide, a fourfold increase in motilin, and more than a twofold increase in gastrin and enteroglucagon levels compared with healthy controls. In contrast, nine patients with colonic resection had a threefold rise in levels of pancreatic polypeptide only. One or more of these peptides may have a role in stimulating the adaptive changes found after gut resection. PMID:7117905

  11. Laparoscopic resection of duodenal gastrointestinal stromal tumour

    PubMed Central

    Zioni, Tammy; Dizengof, Vitaliy; Kirshtein, Boris

    2017-01-01

    Only a few studies have revealed using laparoscopic technique with limited resection of gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GIST) of the duodenum. A 68-year-old man was admitted to the hospital due to upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. Evaluation revealed an ulcerated, bleeding GI tumour in the second part of the duodenum. After control of bleeding during gastroduodenoscopy, he underwent a laparoscopic wedge resection of the area. During 1.5 years of follow-up, the patient is disease free, eats drinks well, and has regained weight. Surgical resection of duodenal GIST with free margins is the main treatment of this tumour. Various surgical treatment options have been reported. Laparoscopic resection of duodenal GIST is an advanced and challenging procedure requiring experience and good surgical technique. The laparoscopic limited resection of duodenal GIST is feasible and safe, reducing postoperative morbidity without compromising oncologic results. PMID:28281485

  12. Visceral scalloping on abdominal computed tomography due to abdominal tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Vishal; Bhatia, Anmol; Malik, Sarthak; Singh, Navjeet; Rana, Surinder S.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Scalloping of visceral organs is described in pseudomyxoma peritonei, malignant ascites, among other conditions, but not tuberculosis. Methods: We report findings from a retrospective study of patients with abdominal tuberculosis who had visceral scalloping on abdominal computed tomography (CT). Diagnosis of abdominal tuberculosis was made on the basis of combination of clinical, biochemical, radiological and microbiological criteria. The clinical data, hematological and biochemical parameters, and findings of chest X-ray, CT, Mantoux test, and HIV serology were recorded. Results: Of 72 patients with abdominal tuberculosis whose CT scans were included, seven patients had visceral scalloping. The mean age of these patients was 32.14 ± 8.43 years and four were men. While six patients had scalloping of liver, one had splenic scalloping. The patients presented with abdominal pain (all), abdominal distension (five patients), loss of weight or appetite (all), and fever (four patients). Mantoux test was positive in five, while none had HIV infection. The diagnosis was based on fluid (ascitic or collections) evaluation in four patients, ileo-cecal biopsy in one patient, fine needle aspiration from omental thickening in one patient, and sputum positivity for acid fast bacilli (AFB) in one patient. On CT examination, four patients had ascites, five had collections, one had lymphadenopathy, four had peritoneal involvement, three had pleural effusion, and two had ileo-cecal thickening. All except one patient received standard ATT for 6 months or 9 months (one patient). Pigtail drainage for collections was needed for two patients. Discussion: This report is the first description of visceral scalloping of liver and spleen in patients with abdominal tuberculosis. Previously, this finding has been reported primarily with pseudomyxoma peritonei and peritoneal carcinomatosis. Conclusion: Visceral scalloping may not conclusively distinguish peritoneal

  13. The safety of corticosteroid therapy in Crohn's disease with an abdominal mass.

    PubMed

    Felder, J B; Adler, D J; Korelitz, B I

    1991-10-01

    Steroid therapy is often avoided in the Crohn's disease patient with a palpable abdominal mass, for fear of dissemination of infection, should the mass prove to contain an abscess. In the present study, 24 patients with Crohn's disease and a palpable abdominal mass were treated with high dose steroids. In 15, the mass resolved completely and, in another nine, it decreased in size by at least 50%. Fourteen of 24 patients eventually required resection for persistence or recurrence of Crohn's disease activity with or without the abdominal mass, but in all the operation was performed electively. At least eight patients never required resection during a mean follow-up period of 40 months. In 13 patients, the mass was later proved to actually contain an abscess cavity. No complications attributable to steroid therapy were seen in either the operative or nonoperative group. Clinicians should not fear using high dose ACTH/corticosteroids to treat severe Crohn's disease with an abdominal mass, if indicated, as it is both safe and effective whether an abscess cavity is present or not.

  14. Abdominal actinomycosis masquerading as an omental tumor in a 12-year-old female.

    PubMed

    Hirayama, Yutaka; Iinuma, Yasushi; Hashizume, Naoki; Yoshida, Motomu; Iida, Hisataka; Shibuya, Hiroyuki; Naito, Shinichi; Nitta, Koju

    2013-02-01

    We herein report a case of abdominal actinomycosis in a 12-year-old girl in whom an omental primary tumor was suspected before surgery. The patient began to experience intermittent lower left abdominal pain. Abdominal computed tomography (CT) scans were inconclusive at this time, but 6 months later, CT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examinations showed a 7-cm, tumor-like lesion in the left abdominal cavity; malignancy could not be ruled out. The tumor, which originated in the omentum and adhered strongly to the left abdominal wall, was resected along with approximately 90 % of the omentum, the peritoneum in contact with the mass, and the posterior layer of the rectus abdominal sheath, under suspicion of a malignant tumor. However, omental actinomycosis was the final pathological diagnosis. The patient's antibiotic treatment was changed to a penicillin-series oral antibiotic to prevent recurrence of the actinomycosis. The patient was discharged from our hospital 16 days after the first surgery, but she developed three episodes of ileus; the first two required surgery. The patient has had no further recurrences of actinomycosis or postoperative ileus 20 months after discharge.

  15. Internal abdominal hernia: Intestinal obstruction due to trans-mesenteric hernia containing transverse colon

    PubMed Central

    Crispín-Trebejo, Brenda; Robles-Cuadros, María Cristina; Orendo-Velásquez, Edwin; Andrade, Felipe P.

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Internal abdominal hernias are infrequent but an increasing cause of bowel obstruction still often underdiagnosed. Among adults its usual causes are congenital anomalies of intestinal rotation, postsurgical iatrogenic, trauma or infection diseases. PRESENTATION OF CASE We report the case of a 63-year-old woman with history of chronic constipation. The patient was hospitalized for two days with acute abdominal pain, abdominal distension and inability to eliminate flatus. The X-ray and abdominal computerized tomography scan (CT scan) showed signs of intestinal obstruction. Exploratory laparotomy performed revealed a trans-mesenteric hernia containing part of the transverse colon. The intestine was viable and resection was not necessary. Only the hernia was repaired. DISCUSSION Internal trans-mesenteric hernia constitutes a rare type of internal abdominal hernia, corresponding from 0.2 to 0.9% of bowel obstructions. This type carries a high risk of strangulation and even small hernias can be fatal. This complication is specially related to trans-mesenteric hernias as it tends to volvulize. Unfortunately, the clinical diagnosis is rather difficult. CONCLUSION Trans-mesenteric internal abdominal hernia may be asymptomatic for many years because of its nonspecific symptoms. The role of imaging test is relevant but still does not avoid the necessity of exploratory surgery when clinical features are uncertain. PMID:24880799

  16. Resection of Large Metachronous Liver Metastasis with Gastric Origin: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Runcanu, Alexandru; Paun, Sorin; Negoi, Ruxandra Irina; Beuran, Mircea

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Increasing evidence suggests that surgical resection may be offered to a subgroup of patients with liver metastasis of gastric adenocarcinoma. The aim of this case report is to illustrate the surgical resection of a single liver metachronous recurrence twelve months after a radical total gastrectomy for cancer. Case report: A 63-year-old male patient with an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status of 1 was referred to our hospital for a single, large liver metastasis, twelve months after a radical total gastrectomy and DII lymphadenectomy for upper third gastric adenocarcinoma. As the adjuvant treatment, the patient received 12 cycles of FOLFOX chemotherapy. During the present admission, the abdominal computed tomography (CT) revealed a single liver metastasis located in the segments 5 and 6, of 105/85 mm in diameter. Surgical resection by an open approach of liver metastasis was decided. We performed a non-anatomical liver resection, without inflow control due to significant peritoneal adhesions in the liver hilum secondary to the previous lymphadenectomy. The patient was discharged after seven days, with an uneventful recovery. Six months after the second surgical procedure, the patient developed a local liver recurrence. The surgical resection of the liver recurrence was performed, with no postoperative morbidities, and the patient was discharged after eight days. Three months after the latest surgery, the patient is under adjuvant chemotherapy, with no imagistic signs of further recurrences. Conclusions:  Hepatic resection for liver metastasis of gastric origin may offer satisfactory oncological outcomes in a very selected subgroup of patients. PMID:27843732

  17. Effect of aspirin continuation on blood loss and postoperative morbidity in patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy or colorectal cancer resection.

    PubMed

    Ono, Kazumi; Idani, Hitoshi; Hidaka, Hidekuni; Kusudo, Kazuhito; Koyama, Yusuke; Taguchi, Shinya

    2013-02-01

    No consensus exists whether to continue or withdraw aspirin therapy perioperatively in patients undergoing major laparoscopic abdominal surgery. To investigate whether preoperative continuation of aspirin therapy increases blood loss and associated morbidity during laparoscopic cholecystectomy and colorectal cancer resection, we compared duration of surgical procedures, amount of intraoperative blood loss, rate of blood transfusion, length of postoperative stay, rate of conversion to open surgery, and reoperation within 48 hours between patients with and without aspirin therapy preoperatively. Twenty-nine of 270 patients who underwent laparoscopic cholecystectomy and 23 of 218 patients who underwent laparoscopic colorectal cancer resection, respectively, were on aspirin therapy. We found no significant difference in the investigated outcome between groups with the exception of longer surgical duration of laparoscopic cholecystectomy in aspirin-treated patients. Although underpowered, above findings may suggest that aspirin continuation is unlikely to increase blood loss or postoperative morbidity in patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy or colorectal cancer resection.

  18. Laparoscopic Resection of Cholecystocolic Fistula and Subtotal Cholecystectomy by Tri-Staple in a Type V Mirizzi Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Yetişir, Fahri; Şarer, Akgün Ebru; Acar, Hasan Zafer; Parlak, Omer; Basaran, Basar; Yazıcıoğlu, Omer

    2016-01-01

    The Mirizzi syndrome (MS) is an impacted stone in the cystic duct or Hartmann's pouch that mechanically obstructs the common bile duct (CBD). We would like to report laparoscopic subtotal cholecystectomy (SC) and resection of cholecystocolic fistula by the help of Tri-Staple™ in a case with type V MS and cholecystocolic fistula, for first time in the literature. A 24-year-old man was admitted to emergency department with the complaint of abdominal pain, intermittent fever, jaundice, and diarrhea. Two months ago with the same complaint, ERCP was performed. Laparoscopic resection of cholecystocolic fistula and subtotal cholecystectomy were performed by the help of Tri-Staple. At the eight-month follow-up, he was symptom-free with normal liver function tests. In a patient with type V MS and cholecystocolic fistula, laparoscopic resection of cholecystocolic fistula and SC can be performed by using Tri-Staple safely. PMID:26904324

  19. Laparoscopic examination and resection for giant lipoma of the omentum: a case report and review of related literature.

    PubMed

    Shiroshita, Hidefumi; Komori, Yoko; Tajima, Masaaki; Bandoh, Toshio; Arita, Tsuyoshi; Shiraishi, Norio; Kitano, Seigo

    2009-10-01

    We report herein the case of a giant lipoma of the greater omentum that was treated by laparoscopic surgery. A 71-year-old male patient was admitted with a diagnosis of sigmoid colon cancer. During preoperative examination, a gallbladder stone and an intra-abdominal giant lipoma were accidentally diagnosed. Laparoscopic examination revealed a smooth-surfaced, giant yellow tumor at the lower border of the greater omentum that was unattached to the surrounding organs. After laparoscopic resection of the tumor and cholecystectomy, a 10-cm midline incision was made in the lower abdomen to remove the tumor and the gallbladder. We then performed a sigmoidectomy for sigmoid colon cancer through the same laparotomy. The resected tumor measured 29 x 19 x 3 cm and weighed 1250 g, and a histopathologic examination revealed a benign lipoma. Laparoscopic examination and resection of a giant lipoma of the omentum are particularly useful.

  20. Endoscopic en bloc resection of an exophytic gastrointestinal stromal tumor with suction excavation technique.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyuk Soon; Chun, Hoon Jai; Kim, Kyoung-Oh; Kim, Eun Sun; Keum, Bora; Jeen, Yoon-Tae; Lee, Hong Sik; Kim, Chang Duck

    2016-06-21

    Here, we report the first successful endoscopic resection of an exophytic gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) using a novel perforation-free suction excavation technique. A 49-year-old woman presented for further management of a gastric subepithelial tumor on the lesser curvature of the lower body, originally detected via routine upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. Abdominal computed tomography and endoscopic ultrasound showed a 4-cm extraluminally protruding mass originating from the muscularis propria layer. The patient firmly refused surgical resection owing to potential cardiac problems, and informed consent was obtained for endoscopic removal. Careful dissection and suction of the tumor was repeated until successful extraction was achieved without serosal injury. We named this procedure the suction excavation technique. The tumor's dimensions were 3.5 cm × 2.8 cm × 2.5 cm. The tumor was positive for C-KIT and CD34 by immunohistochemical staining. The mitotic count was 6/50 high-power fields. The patient was followed for 5 years without tumor recurrence. This case demonstrated the use of endoscopic resection of an exophytic GIST using the suction excavation technique as a potential therapy without surgical resection.

  1. [A Case of Resected Lymph Node Recurrence of Cancer of the Papilla of Vater].

    PubMed

    Harano, Rina; Kusashio, Kimihiko; Yasutomi, Jun; Matsumoto, Masanari; Suzuki, Masaru; Iida, Ayako; Irabu, Shinichiro; Imamura, Namiko; Shirokane, Daizi; Udagawa, Ikuo

    2015-11-01

    We report the successful resection of lymph node recurrence of cancer of the papilla of Vater after pancreatoduodenectomy (PD). A 67-year-old man had undergone PD for adenocarcinoma of the papilla of Vater, and histopathological examination revealed well differentiated papillotubular adenocarcinoma, ly1, v0, T1, n (0), pStage ⅠB. One year after surgery, abdominal computed tomography revealed a mass at the left side of the residual inferior pancreaticoduodenal artery (IPDA). We resected the mass, which was diagnosed as lymph node recurrence of cancer of the papilla of Vater. The patient remains alive without any evidence of recurrence 5 years since the second operation. We suggest that complete resection of lymph node surrounding the IPDA is an important surgical procedure for cancer of the papilla of Vater. There still is only limited experience with resection for recurrence of cancer of the papilla of Vater, but our case shows that it may provide for long-term survival from recurrence of cancer of the papilla of Vater.

  2. [A Resected Case of Cecal Cancer with Simultaneous Liver, Spleen, and Ovarian Metastasis and Peritoneal Dissemination].

    PubMed

    Nakamoto, Takayuki; Ueda, Takeshi; Koyama, Fumikazu; Nishigori, Naoto; Inoue, Takashi; Kawasaki, Keijirou; Obara, Shinsaku; Sasaki, Yoshiyuki; Nakamura, Yasuyuki; Fujii, Hisao; Nakajima, Yoshiyuki

    2016-11-01

    We herein report the case of a patient with a cecal cancer with simultaneous liver, spleen, and ovarian metastases as well as peritoneal dissemination who achieved a long-term survival. The patient was a 67-year-old female. Ileocecal resection with partial hepatectomy, splenectomy, simple total hysterectomy, bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy, and resection of the peritoneal dissemination were performed. The final diagnosis was Stage IV (T4a, N1, M1b[H1, P3, OTH]). Adjuvant chemotherapy was administered, but abdominal computed tomography(CT)revealed a metachronous liver metastasis 41 months later. We performed partial hepatectomy, and the patient continued adjuvant chemotherapy. The patient is currently alive and disease-free 30 months after the last operation, 72 months after the initial surgery.

  3. Osteoarthritis of the sacroiliac joint complicating resection of the pubic symphysis. Interest of a rehabilitation programme.

    PubMed

    Jellad, A; Bouzaouache, H; Ben Salah, Z; Migaou, H; Sana, S

    2009-07-01

    Sacroiliac joint (SIJ) is an uncommon localisation of osteoarthritis. Instability of this joint is one of rare aetiologies. It can occur after resection of the pubic symphysis for whatever the reason. The biomechanical consequences on the SIJ are increasing shear forces and vertical restrain. This leads to secondary progressive SIJ osteoarthritis. There is no specific rehabilitation programme for this pathology. Here, we report the case of a patient who presents SIJ osteoarthritis 20 years after surgical resection of the pubic symphysis for osteochondroma. We proposed a rehabilitation programme based on the pelvic biomechanical characteristics. It included specific exercises of muscular strengthening (the transversely oriented abdominal muscles and pelvic floor muscles) and muscular stretching (the psoas major muscle). We obtained an improvement of pain and functional capacity in our patient.

  4. Planned ventral hernia. Staged management for acute abdominal wall defects.

    PubMed Central

    Fabian, T C; Croce, M A; Pritchard, F E; Minard, G; Hickerson, W L; Howell, R L; Schurr, M J; Kudsk, K A

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Analysis of a staged management scheme for initial and definitive management of acute abdominal wall defects is provided. METHODS: A four-staged scheme for managing acute abdominal wall defects consists of the following stages: stage I--prosthetic insertion; stage II--2 to 3 weeks after prosthetic insertion and wound granulation, the prosthesis is removed; stage III--2 to 3 days later, planned ventral hernia (split thickness skin graft [STSG] or full-thickness skin and subcutaneous fat); stage IV--6 to 12 months later, definitive reconstruction. Cases were evaluated retrospectively for benefits and risks of the techniques employed. RESULTS: Eighty-eight cases (39 visceral edema, 27 abdominal sepsis, 22 abdominal wall resection) were managed during 8.5 years. Prostheses included polypropylene mesh in 45 cases, polyglactin 910 mesh in 27, polytetrafluorethylene in 10, and plastic in 6. Twenty-four patients died from their initial disease. The fistula rates associated with prosthetic management was 9%; no wound-related mortality occurred. Most wounds had split thickness skin graft applied after prosthetic removal. Definitive reconstruction was undertaken in 21 patients in the authors' institution (prosthetic mesh in 12 and modified components separation in 9). Recurrent hernias developed in 33% of mesh reconstructions and 11% of the components separation technique. CONCLUSIONS: The authors concluded that 1) this staged approach was associated with low morbidity and no technique-related mortality; 2) prostheses placed for edema were removed with fascial approximation accomplished in half of those cases; 3) absorbable mesh provided the advantages of reasonable durability, ease of removal, and relatively low cost--it has become the prosthesis of choice; and 4) the modified components separation technique of reconstruction provided good results in patients with moderate sized defects. Images Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 4. Figure 5. PMID:8203973

  5. Laparoscopic liver resection: Experience based guidelines.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Fabricio Ferreira; Kruger, Jaime Arthur Pirola; Fonseca, Gilton Marques; Araújo, Raphael Leonardo Cunha; Jeismann, Vagner Birk; Perini, Marcos Vinícius; Lupinacci, Renato Micelli; Cecconello, Ivan; Herman, Paulo

    2016-01-27

    Laparoscopic liver resection (LLR) has been progressively developed along the past two decades. Despite initial skepticism, improved operative results made laparoscopic approach incorporated to surgical practice and operations increased in frequency and complexity. Evidence supporting LLR comes from case-series, comparative studies and meta-analysis. Despite lack of level 1 evidence, the body of literature is stronger and existing data confirms the safety, feasibility and benefits of laparoscopic approach when compared to open resection. Indications for LLR do not differ from those for open surgery. They include benign and malignant (both primary and metastatic) tumors and living donor liver harvesting. Currently, resection of lesions located on anterolateral segments and left lateral sectionectomy are performed systematically by laparoscopy in hepatobiliary specialized centers. Resection of lesions located on posterosuperior segments (1, 4a, 7, 8) and major liver resections were shown to be feasible but remain technically demanding procedures, which should be reserved to experienced surgeons. Hand-assisted and laparoscopy-assisted procedures appeared to increase the indications of minimally invasive liver surgery and are useful strategies applied to difficult and major resections. LLR proved to be safe for malignant lesions and offers some short-term advantages over open resection. Oncological results including resection margin status and long-term survival were not inferior to open resection. At present, surgical community expects high quality studies to base the already perceived better outcomes achieved by laparoscopy in major centers' practice. Continuous surgical training, as well as new technologies should augment the application of laparoscopic liver surgery. Future applicability of new technologies such as robot assistance and image-guided surgery is still under investigation.

  6. [Abdominal pregnancy care. Case report].

    PubMed

    Morales Hernández, Sara; Díaz Velázquez, Mary Flor; Puello Tamara, Edgardo; Morales Hernández, Jorge; Basavilvazo Rodríguez, Maria Antonia; Cruz Cruz, Polita del Rocío; Hernández Valencia, Marcelino

    2008-10-01

    Abdominal pregnancies are the implantation of gestation in some of the abdominal structures. This kind of pregnancies represents sevenfold maternal death risk than tubarian ectopic pregnancies, and 90-fold death risk than normal ones. Previous cases have erroneously reported as abscess in Douglas punch, and frequently result in obitus or postnatal deaths. We report a case of a patient with 27 years old, and diagnosis of 25.2 weeks of pregnancy, prior placenta and anhidramnios, referred due to difficult in uterine contour delimitation, easy palpation of fetal parts, cephalic pole in left hypochondrious and presence of mass in hypogastria, no delimitations, pain with mobilization, no transvaginal bleed and fetal movements. Interruption of pregnancy is decided by virtue of severe oligohidramnios, retardation in fetal intrabdominal growth, and recurrent maternal abdominal pain. Surgical intervention was carried out for resolution of the obstetrical event, in which was found ectopic abdominal pregnancy with bed placental in right uterine horn that corresponded to a pregnancy of 30 weeks of gestation. Abdominal pregnancy is still a challenge for obstetrics due to its diagnosis and treatment. Early diagnosis is oriented to prevent an intrabdominal hemorrhage that is the main maternal cause of mortality.

  7. Liver Resections for Metastases from Intraabdominal Leiomyosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Bianca De Lourdes; Brenner, Marcia Cristina Lima; Pereira-Lima, Luiz

    1999-01-01

    This paper discusses liver resection for intraabdominal leiomyosarcoma metastases as a therapy for carefully selected patients. Of the 83 hepatectomies performed from 1992 to 1996, five were resections for liver metastases due to intraabdominal leiomyosarcoma, in 3 patients. The surgical indication was single liver metastases, without any evidence of extrahepatic disease. No mortality occurred during surgery and the longest survival was 38 months. We concluded that liver resection for leiomyosarcoma metastases can be performed, allowing a long term survival in an occasional patient. PMID:10468118

  8. Endoscopic full-thickness resection: Current status

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Arthur; Meier, Benjamin; Caca, Karel

    2015-01-01

    Conventional endoscopic resection techniques such as endoscopic mucosal resection or endoscopic submucosal dissection are powerful tools for treatment of gastrointestinal neoplasms. However, those techniques are restricted to superficial layers of the gastrointestinal wall. Endoscopic full-thickness resection (EFTR) is an evolving technique, which is just about to enter clinical routine. It is not only a powerful tool for diagnostic tissue acquisition but also has the potential to spare surgical therapy in selected patients. This review will give an overview about current EFTR techniques and devices. PMID:26309354

  9. [Tetraplegia, resuscitation and epileptic seizures after partial colon resection in a 41-year-old woman].

    PubMed

    Wagner, W

    2014-01-01

    A 41-year-old woman, suffering from continuous abdominal pain, only presented a non-specific inflammation of the whole colon and an unclaryfied hyponatriaemia; in spite of the only doubtful explanation by an enormous elongation of the colon, it was partially resected. Thereafter, the patient's decline, hypaesthesia, areflexia and tetraparesis required intensive care. Despite immunoglobulin therapy, assuming a Guillain-Barré syndrome, the patient needed resuscitation, followed by signs of severe hypoxia (high level of neuron-specific enolase, hippocampal lesions). The abdominal pain, hyponatriaemia, persistent tachycardia, sensory deficits, tetraplegia, circulation arrest, later epileptic seizures and unusual urine color were finally explained by an acute intermittent porphyria (AIP). Although the symptoms were classic, the disease was recognized only very late. Indeed, it is so rare that most physicians will never be confronted with an AIP or only once or twice.

  10. The Spatial Relationship and Surface Projection of Canine Sciatic Nerve and Sacrotuberous Ligament: A Perineal Hernia Repair Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Khatri-Chhetri, Nabin; Khatri-Chhetri, Rupak; Chung, Cheng-Shu; Chern, Rey-Shyong; Chien, Chi-Hsien

    2016-01-01

    Sciatic nerve entrapment can occur as post-operative complication of perineal hernia repair when sacrotuberous ligament is incorporated during hernia deficit closure. This results in sciatic sensory loss and paralysis of the hind leg. This study investigated the spatial relationship of sciatic nerve and sacrotuberous ligament and their surface topographic projection of 68 cadavers (29 Beagles and 39 Taiwanese mongrels) with various heights (25–56 cm). By gross dissection, the sacrotuberous ligament and sciatic nerve were exposed and their distance in between was measured along four parts (A, B, C, D) of sacrotuberous ligament. The present study revealed that the C was the section of sacrotuberous ligament where the sciatic nerve and the sacrotuberous ligament are closest to each other. Furthermore, a positive correlation was observed between C and height of the dogs. From the present study, we found that the C in smaller dogs has the shortest distance between the sciatic nerve and the sacrotuberous ligament, and thus the most vulnerable to sciatic nerve entrapment, and needs to be avoided or approached cautiously during perineal hernia repair. PMID:27003911

  11. Patterns of Failure for Rhabdomyosarcoma of the Perineal and Perianal Region

    SciTech Connect

    Casey, Dana L.; Wexler, Leonard H.; LaQuaglia, Michael P.; Meyers, Paul A.; Wolden, Suzanne L.

    2014-05-01

    Purpose: To analyze prognostic factors and patterns of failure for rhabdomyosarcoma of the perineal and perianal region (PRMS), with an emphasis on radiation therapy for locoregional control. Methods and Materials: Detailed records of all 14 patients treated for PRMS at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center between 1998 and 2012 were reviewed. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to assess the event-free survival (EFS) and overall survival (OS), and a competing-risks analysis was used to assess the cumulative incidence of local, regional, and distant failures. Results: Median age was 15.8 years (range, 1.1-31.9 years). High-risk features were identified: 9 of 14 patients (64%) had group 3 disease and 3 of 14 (21%) had group 4; 11 of 14 tumors (78%) were alveolar; 12 of 14 tumors (86%) were ≥5 cm; and 9 of 14 patients (64%) had involved lymph nodes (N1). Of those aged ≥10 years at diagnosis, 9 of 10 (90%) had alveolar histology, all had tumors ≥5 cm, and 8 of 10 (80%) presented with N1 disease. The rates of local, regional, and distant failure at 5 years were 17%, 31%, and 52%, respectively. Although 3 of the 4 patients with regional failure received nodal irradiation, only one of the nodal failures occurred in the radiation therapy field. The 5-year EFS was 33%, and OS was 39%. Age ≥10 years was associated with poor outcomes: EFS was 13% in patients aged ≥10 years, compared with 75% in those aged <10 years (P=.04); the OS was 13% in patients aged ≥10 years, compared with 100% in those aged <10 years (P=.04). Conclusions: Patients with PRMS, especially those aged ≥10 years, present with poor prognostic features and continue to have poor outcomes. Given the high incidence of regional node recurrence, we recommend prophylactic ilioinguinal lymph node irradiation for all patients aged ≥10 years. For children aged <10 years, nodal evaluation is essential to determine the role for lymph node irradiation.

  12. Abdominal radiation causes bacterial translocation

    SciTech Connect

    Guzman-Stein, G.; Bonsack, M.; Liberty, J.; Delaney, J.P.

    1989-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if a single dose of radiation to the rat abdomen leads to bacterial translocation into the mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN). A second issue addressed was whether translocation correlates with anatomic damage to the mucosa. The radiated group (1100 cGy) which received anesthesia also was compared with a control group and a third group which received anesthesia alone but no abdominal radiation. Abdominal radiation lead to 100% positive cultures of MLN between 12 hr and 4 days postradiation. Bacterial translocation was almost nonexistent in the control and anesthesia group. Signs of inflammation and ulceration of the intestinal mucosa were not seen until Day 3 postradiation. Mucosal damage was maximal by Day 4. Bacterial translocation onto the MLN after a single dose of abdominal radiation was not apparently dependent on anatomical, histologic damage of the mucosa.

  13. Abdominal fat ratio - a novel parameter for predicting conversion in laparoscopic colorectal surgery.

    PubMed

    Scott, S I; Farid, S; Mann, C; Jones, R; Kang, P; Evans, J

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Laparoscopic surgery has become the standard for colorectal cancer resection in the UK but it can be technically challenging in patients who are obese. Patients whose body fat is mainly inside the abdominal cavity are more challenging than those whose fat is mainly outside the abdominal cavity. Abdominal fat ratio (AFR) is a simple parameter proposed by the authors to aid identification of this subgroup. MATERIALS AND METHODS All 195 patients who underwent elective, laparoscopic colorectal cancer resections from March 2010 to November 2013 were included in the study. For patients who were obese (body mass index greater than 30), preoperative staging computed tomography was used to determine AFR. This was assessed by two different, blinded observers and compared with conversion rate. RESULTS Of the 195 patients, 58 (29.7%) fell into the obese group and 137 (70.3%) into the non-obese group. The median AFR of the obese group that were converted to open surgery was significantly higher at 5.9 compared with those completed laparoscopically (3.3, P = 0.0001, Mann-Whitney). There was no significant difference in conversion rate when looking at body mass index, tumour site or size. DISCUSSION Previous studies have found body mass index, age, gender, previous abdominal surgery, site and locally advanced tumours to be associated with an increased risk of conversion. This study adds AFR to the list of risk factors. CONCLUSION AFR is a simple, reproducible parameter which can help to predict conversion risk in obese patients undergoing colorectal cancer resection.

  14. Abdominal Bloating: Pathophysiology and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Seo, A Young; Oh, Dong Hyun

    2013-01-01

    Abdominal bloating is a very common and troublesome symptom of all ages, but it has not been fully understood to date. Bloating is usually associated with functional gastrointestinal disorders or organic diseases, but it may also appear alone. The pathophysiology of bloating remains ambiguous, although some evidences support the potential mechanisms, including gut hypersensitivity, impaired gas handling, altered gut microbiota, and abnormal abdominal-phrenic reflexes. Owing to the insufficient understanding of these mechanisms, the available therapeutic options are limited. However, medical treatment with some prokinetics, rifaximin, lubiprostone and linaclotide could be considered in the treatment of bloating. In addition, dietary intervention is important in relieving symptom in patients with bloating. PMID:24199004

  15. [Gallstone ileus. Abdominal CT usefulness].

    PubMed

    Sukkarieh, F; Brasseur, P; Bissen, L

    2004-06-01

    The authors report the case of a 93-year old woman referred to the emergency department and presenting with an intestinal obstruction. Abdominal CT reveals a biliary ileus caused by the migration and the impaction of a 3 cm gallstone in the small bowel. Surgical treatment by enterolithotomy was successful. In over 90% of cases, gallstone ileus is a complication of cholelithiasis and accounts for 25% of intestinal obstruction in patients over 65 years. To reduce morbidity and mortality, early diagnosis and prompt treatment are essential. Abdominal CT-scan is the gold standard technique.

  16. Abdominal obesity and metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Després, Jean-Pierre; Lemieux, Isabelle

    2006-12-14

    Metabolic syndrome is associated with abdominal obesity, blood lipid disorders, inflammation, insulin resistance or full-blown diabetes, and increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease. Proposed criteria for identifying patients with metabolic syndrome have contributed greatly to preventive medicine, but the value of metabolic syndrome as a scientific concept remains controversial. The presence of metabolic syndrome alone cannot predict global cardiovascular disease risk. But abdominal obesity - the most prevalent manifestation of metabolic syndrome - is a marker of 'dysfunctional adipose tissue', and is of central importance in clinical diagnosis. Better risk assessment algorithms are needed to quantify diabetes and cardiovascular disease risk on a global scale.

  17. Abdominal surgery in neonatal foals.

    PubMed

    Bryant, James E; Gaughan, Earl M

    2005-08-01

    Abdominal surgery in foals under 30 days old has become more common with improved neonatal care. Early recognition of a foal at risk and better nursing care have increased the survival rates of foals that require neonatal care. The success of improved neonatal care also has increased the need for accurate diagnosis and treatment of gastrointestinal, umbilical, and bladder disorders in these foals. This chapter focuses on the early and accurate diagnosis of specific disorders that require abdominal exploratory surgery and the specific treatment considerations and prognosis for these disorders.

  18. ACR Appropriateness Criteria on Resectable Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Suh, W. Warren; Konski, Andre A.; Mohiuddin, Mohammed; Poggi, Matthew M.; Regine, William F.; Cosman, Bard C.; Saltz, Leonard; Johnstone, Peter A.S.

    2008-04-01

    The American College of Radiology (ACR) Appropriateness Criteria on Resectable Rectal Cancer was updated by the Expert Panel on Radiation Oncology-Rectal/Anal Cancer, based on a literature review completed in 2007.

  19. Optimizing Adjuvant Therapy for Resected Pancreatic Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    In this clinical trial, patients with resected pancreatic head cancer will be randomly assigned to receive either gemcitabine with or without erlotinib for 5 treatment cycles. Patients who do not experience disease progression or recurrence will then be r

  20. Atypical abdominal pain: post-traumatic transverse colon stricture.

    PubMed

    Rotar, Raluca; Uwechue, Raphael; Sasapu, Kishore Kumar

    2013-08-23

    A driver presented to the emergency department 1 day after an accident driving his excavator with abdominal pain and vomiting. He was admitted to the surgical ward 2 days later, after reattending. A CT scan revealed wall thickening and oedema in the transverse colon. This was supported by a subsequent CT virtual colonoscopy which raised the suspicion of neoplasia. A follow-up colonoscopy was not carried further than the transverse colon due to an indurated, tight stricture. Biopsies from that area showed ulceration and inflammatory changes non-specific for ischaemia, drug-induced changes or inflammatory bowel disease. As a consequence of the subocclusive symptoms and the possibility of a neoplastic diagnosis, a laparoscopic-assisted transverse colectomy was performed. The histology of the resected segment revealed post-traumatic inflammation and fibrosis with no evidence of neoplasia.

  1. Cecal Leiomyoma: Can We Attempt Endoscopic Resection?

    PubMed Central

    Badipatla, Kanthi Rekha; Kamireddy, Chandana; Niazi, Masooma; Nayudu, Suresh Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal leiomyomas are smooth muscle tumors arising from the muscularis mucosae, muscularis propriae and possibly from smooth muscle of the vessel wall. Management depends on the size, location and the clinical scenario. Endoscopic snare cauterization with or without saline lift has been described in literature for tumors involving the left colon. To the best of our knowledge, endoscopic resection of right colon leiomyoma was never attempted in the past. We present a case of cecal leiomyoma which was resected endoscopically. PMID:28058080

  2. [Laparoscopic distal resection of the pancreas].

    PubMed

    Gürlich, R; Sixta, B; Oliverius, M; Kment, M; Rusina, R; Spicák, J; Sváb, J

    2005-09-01

    During the last two years, reports on laparoscopic procedures of the pancreas have been on increase. Laparoscopic resection of the pancreatic cauda is indicated, primarily, for benign cystic lesions of the cauda of the pancreas and for neuroendocrine tumors of the pancreas (mainly insulinomas). We have not recorded any report on the above procedure in the Czech literature. Therefore, in our case review, we have described laparoscopic distal resection of the pancreas with splenectomy for a pseudopapillary tumor of the pancreas.

  3. Resection for oesophageal cancer - complications and survival.

    PubMed

    Grøtting, Marie Sæthre; Løberg, Else Marit; Johannessen, Hans-Olaf; Johnson, Egil

    2016-05-01

    BACKGROUND Surgery is considered necessary to achieve a cure for oesophageal cancer. Minimally invasive oesophageal resection is increasingly performed with the aim of reducing the number of complications compared with open surgery. The purpose of this study was to investigate postoperative complications, mortality and long-term survival following hybrid oesophageal resection by laparoscopy and thoracotomy.MATERIAL AND METHOD Patients with oesophageal cancer who underwent hybrid resection with curative intent at Oslo University Hospital Ullevål from 1 November 2007 to 1 June 2013 were included (n = 109). Complications were graded according to the Clavien-Dindo classification and survival figures were recorded.RESULTS Median age was 65 years, 79 % were men. Altogether 118 complications were recorded in 70 patients (64.2 %). Distribution of complications was 1.8 % for stage I, 29.4 % for stage II, 22.1 % for stage III and 11.0 % for stage IV. Anastomotic leakage occurred in 4.6 %. There was no postoperative mortality. The proportion of R0 resections with microscopic radicality was 91 % (n = 100). For the entire patient population, the estimated 5-year survival rate was 48 % (95 % CI 36 - 60 %), for R0 resection 51 % (38 - 63 %) and for R1-2 resection 0 %. Estimated median survival with R0-2, R0 and R1-2 resection was 55, 55 and 10 months (0 - 28 months), respectively. R status and stage had a significant bearing on survival.INTERPRETATION There was a low percentage of serious complications, no mortality and few anastomotic leakages after hybrid resection for oesophageal cancer. The 5-year survival rate was good.

  4. Combined Use of an Anterolateral Thigh Flap and Superficial Inferior Epigastric Artery Flap for Reconstruction of an Extensive Abdominal Wall Defect

    PubMed Central

    Kagaya, Yu; Arikawa, Masaki; Kobayashi, Eisuke

    2016-01-01

    Summary: Reconstruction of large abdominal wall defects is challenging. We herein report the successful reconstruction of an extensive abdominal wall defect using a novel combination of flaps after sarcoma resection. A 74-year-old man presented with a dedifferentiated liposarcoma on his abdominal wall. He underwent excision of the tumor, which resulted in an extensive abdominal wall defect. The defect was reconstructed with a pedicled anterolateral thigh flap with an iliotibial tract and a pedicled superficial inferior epigastric artery flap. No skin graft was necessary. The wounds healed successfully, and no herniation occurred. The combination of an anterolateral thigh flap and a superficial inferior epigastric artery flap is a versatile option for reconstruction of extensive abdominal wall defects. PMID:27975026

  5. LAPAROSCOPIC RESECTION OF GASTROINTESTINAL STROMAL TUMORS (GIST)

    PubMed Central

    LOUREIRO, Marcelo de Paula; de ALMEIDA, Rômulo Augusto Andrade; CLAUS, Christiano Marlo Paggi; BONIN, Eduardo Aimoré; CURY-FILHO,, Antônio Moris; DIMBARRE, Daniellson; da COSTA, Marco Aurélio Raeder; VITAL, Marcílio Lisboa

    2016-01-01

    Background Gastrointestinal mesenchymal or stromal tumors (GIST) are lesions originated on digestive tract walls, which are treated by surgical resection. Several laparoscopic techniques, from gastrectomies to segmental resections, have been used successfully. Aim Describe a single center experience on laparoscopic GIST resection. Method Charts of 15 operated patients were retrospectively reviewed. Thirteen had gastric lesions, of which ten were sub epithelial, ranging from 2-8 cm; and three were pure exofitic growing lesions. The remaining two patients had small bowel lesions. Surgical laparoscopic treatment consisted of two distal gastrectomies, 11 wedge gastric resections and two segmental enterectomies. Mechanical suture was used in the majority of patients except on six, which underwent resection and closure using manual absorbable sutures. There were no conversions to open technique. Results Mean operative time was 1h 29 min±92 (40-420 min). Average lenght of hospital stay was three days (2-6 days). There were no leaks, postoperative bleeding or need for reintervention. Mean postoperative follow-up was 38±17 months (6-60 months). Three patients underwent adjuvant Imatinib treatment, one for recurrence five months postoperatively and two for tumors with moderate risk for recurrence . Conclusion Laparoscopic GIST resection, not only for small lesions but also for tumors above 5 cm, is safe and acceptable technique. PMID:27120729

  6. Liver resection for intermediate hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Peng-Sheng; Zhang, Ming; Zhao, Ji-Tong; Xu, Ming-Qing

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common malignant tumors in China. The Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer (BCLC) staging system is regarded as the gold standard staging system for HCC, classifying HCC as early, intermediate, or advanced. For intermediate HCC, trans-catheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE) is recommended as the optimal strategy by the BCLC guideline. This review investigates whether liver resection is better than TACE for intermediate HCC. Based on published studies, we compare the survival benefits and complications of liver resection and TACE for intermediate HCC. We also compare the survival benefits of liver resection in early and intermediate HCC. We find that liver resection can achieve better or at least comparable survival outcomes compared with TACE for intermediate HCC; however, we do not observe a significant difference between liver resection and TACE in terms of safety and morbidity. We conclude that liver resection may improve the short- and long-term survival of carefully selected intermediate HCC patients, and the procedure may be safely performed in the management of intermediate HCC. PMID:27190577

  7. Functional Abdominal Pain in Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... the child’s mood and emotions, and in turn cause depression and anxiety. Screening/Diagnosis Detailed information regarding the location of abdominal pain, the frequency (number of times per week) and ... about the cause, and will guide further testing. Other important pieces ...

  8. Aesthetic and functional abdominal wall reconstruction after multiple bowel perforations secondary to liposuction.

    PubMed

    Di Candia, Michele; Malata, Charles M

    2011-04-01

    This report describes a case of aesthetic and functional abdominal wall reconstruction performed to salvage a deformed, scarred, and herniated anterior abdomen after severe peritonitis and partial rectus muscle necrosis secondary to multiple bowel perforations sustained during liposuction performed in a cosmetic clinic. The diagnosis of intestinal perforation was missed intraoperatively and in the immediate postoperative period. The patient was admitted 4 days after the surgery to the intensive therapy unit in septicemic shock. After resuscitation and stabilization, she was treated by debridement of the abdominal wall, bowel resection, and temporary jejunostomy and colostomy (reversed 10 months later). She was referred 18 months after liposuction to the Plastic Surgery Service with a large central midline abdominal incisional hernia presenting with thinned out skin (14 × 11 cm) overlying adherent bowel. A components separation technique was successfully used to reconstruct the abdominal wall, with no recurrent herniation 2 years later. Survivors of bowel perforations sustained during abdominal liposuction may later present with challenging aesthetic and functional problems, as described in this report. These long-term sequelae have not been addressed hitherto in the literature.

  9. Paragonimiasis mimicking chest cancer and abdominal wall metastaisis: A case report

    PubMed Central

    ZHOU, RONGXING; ZHANG, MINJIA; CHENG, NANSHENG; ZHOU, YONG

    2016-01-01

    Typical human paragonimiasis demonstrates an elevated eosinophil count, positive immunoblot, nodular shadows of the lung and pleural thickening with pleural effusion, and these symptoms may be confused with chest cancer. In the present case, a rare case of human paragonimiasis mimicking chest cancer and abdominal wall metastasis is described, the 39-year-old male patient was admitted in our hospital for cough, weight loss 5 kg and a firm mass in right upper abdominal wall. The laboratory test showed unremarkable hematology and biochemistry results. Chest X-ray, Plain computed tomography of the chest and abdomen showed right pleural effusion, several nodules in right lower lung and a mass in the right upper abdominal wall. The initial diagnosis was lung or chest cancer with abdominal wall metastasis, and the abdominal wall mass was resected for the final diagnosis. The biopsy revealed eosinophilic granuloma with Charcot-Leyden crystal formation infiltrated in the muscular fibers. Subsequent to assessment of the antibodies against parasites, the final diagnosis of paragonimiasis was made. PMID:27313691

  10. Abdominal Pain (Stomach Pain), Short-Term

    MedlinePlus

    ... myhealthfinder Immunization Schedules Nutrient Shortfall Questionnaire Abdominal Pain (Stomach Pain), Short-termJust about everyone has had a " ... time or another. But sudden severe abdominal pain (stomach pain), also called acute pain, shouldn't be ...

  11. Imaging of gastrointestinal and abdominal tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Vanhoenacker, F M; De Backer, A I; Op de, Beeck B; Maes, M; Van Altena, R; Van Beckevoort, D; Kersemans, P; De Schepper, A M

    2004-03-01

    This article discusses the range of manifestations of tuberculosis (TB) of the abdomen, including involvement of the gastrointestinal tract, the peritoneum, mesentery, omentum, abdominal lymph nodes, solid abdominal organs, the genital system and the abdominal aorta. Abdominal TB is a diagnostic challenge, particularly when pulmonary TB is absent. It may mimic many other abdominal diseases, both clinically and radiologically. An early correct diagnosis, however, is important in order to ensure proper treatment and a favorable outcome. Modern imaging is a cornerstone in the early diagnosis of abdominal TB and may prevent unnecessary morbidity and mortality. Generally, CT appears to be the imaging modality of choice in the detection and assessment of abdominal tuberculosis, other than gastrointestinal TB. Barium studies remain superior for demonstrating mucosal intestinal lesions. Ultrasound may be used for follow-up to monitor therapy response. The diagnosis of abdominal TB should be considered if suggestive imaging findings are found in patients with a high index of suspicion.

  12. Abdominal pain - children under age 12

    MedlinePlus

    Stomach pain in children; Pain - abdomen - children; Abdominal cramps in children; Belly ache in children ... When your child complains of abdominal pain, see if they can describe ... kinds of pain: Generalized pain or pain over more than half ...

  13. [A case of surgical treatment for solitary lymph node recurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma simultaneously developed in the mediastinum and abdominal cavity].

    PubMed

    Uchinami, Hiroshi; Abe, Yuki; Kikuchi, Isao; Yoshioka, Masato; Kume, Makoto; Sato, Tsutomu; Yamamoto, Yuzo

    2009-07-01

    We report a surgically treated case of lymph node recurrence from hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) that occurred simultaneously but individually in the mediastinum and abdominal cavity with no metastasis. A 52-year-old man had undergone left lateral segmentectomy for poorly differentiated HCC. Three months after surgery, abdominal computed tomography revealed an enlarged solitary lymph node along the common hepatic artery. Another isolated mediastinal lymph node was also positive on whole body 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography. Because no other metastatic lesions were identified, we resected these two lymph nodes under a diagnosis of lymph node metastases from HCC. Histopathologically, both of them were classified as poorly differentiated HCC with solid growth. No further recurrence has been found during 20-month follow-up period. Our experience suggested that even though metastatic lymph nodes of HCC were present in the mediastinum and abdominal cavity, resection may provide survival benefit if each metastasis is individually solitary.

  14. Blunt traumatic abdominal wall disruption with evisceration

    PubMed Central

    McDaniel, Ellen; Stawicki, Stanislaw PA; Bahner, David P

    2011-01-01

    Blunt traumatic abdominal wall disruptions associated with evisceration are very rare. The authors describe a case of traumatic abdominal wall disruption with bowel evisceration that occurred after a middle-aged woman sustained direct focal blunt force impact to the lower abdomen. Abdominal exploration and surgical repair of the abdominal wall defect were performed, with good clinical outcome. A brief overview of literature pertinent to this rare trauma scenario is presented. PMID:22229144

  15. A single institution study on patient's self-reporting appraisal and functional outcomes of the first set of men following radical perineal prostatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Słupski, Piotr; Wiśniewski, Przemysław

    2012-01-01

    Introduction This study evaluates the functional outcomes and satisfaction of an initial series of 47 patients after radical perineal prostatectomy performed in our department. Material and methods The first set of 47 consecutive patients underwent perineal prostatectomy during 2008 and 2009. Continence, sexual outcomes, and satisfaction of the treatment were evaluated using a self-reporting questionnaire, which was mailed to all patients after 15 to 33 months of follow-up. 26 patients (55.3%) returned a completed form and participated in the study. Additionally, final outcomes were compared to results reported elsewhere. Results Amid respondents, 91.7% were satisfied with the chosen treatment and 8.3% regret the previous decision. 38.5% patients reported any urine leakage, 15.4% drip up to 100 ml a day, and only one patient (3.8%) was totally incontinent. 76.9% men report a decline in prior sexual function. Six patients (23.1%) patients have any degree of spontaneous erections and undertake sexual activity. However, as erectile outcomes are adjusted to nine nerve-sparing cases, 66.7% have spontaneous erections and 55.5% undertake sexual activity, but only 40% of them describe their sexual function as satisfying. Conclusions Our survey demonstrates that, because of short operating time, fast recovery, low postoperative pain score, early patient mobilization and feeding, and a small (8-10 cm) and inconspicuous skin incision, radical perineal prostatectomy fully deserves to be recognized as a low-morbidity procedure. The perineal approach provides a quality of life and patients satisfaction rate comparable to trendy, highly equipped procedures and emerges as an attractive alternative to them. Even novice “perineal surgeons” may achieve favorable results. PMID:24578947

  16. The MRI of extraadrenal pheochromocytoma in the abdominal cavity.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Huang Sui; Feng, Xu Lin; Yong, Li; Yong, Zhang; Lian, Zhong Jing; Ling, Liang Bi

    2007-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to summarize the MR appearances of extraadrenal pheochromocytoma in the abdominal cavity and evaluate the capabilities of MRI in diagnosis of the tumor. Eleven consecutive patients with an extraadrenal pheochromocytoma in abdominal cavity who underwent preoperative 0.5 T (n=5) or 1.5 T (n=6) superconductor MRI and had a surgical resection were enrolled in the study. The MR scanning protocol included axial T(2)-weighted imaging with or without fat-suppressed sequences, axial and coronal uncontrast and contrast T(1)-weighted sequences with or without fat suppression. The extraadrenal pheochromocytomas were found in retroperitoneum (n=5), the urinary bladder (n=1), the pelvis (n=1), the right prerenal area (n=1), the renal hilus (n=1), the left paramusculus psoas major (n=1) and liver (n=1). The mean maximal diameter of tumors was 55.9 mm (range 17.8-162.2 mm). The high signal intensity was seen on T(2)-weighted imaging in all tumors compared to muscle or liver, especially with fat suppression. The intratumoral septa and capsules were shown in 63.6% and 72.7% of cases, respectively, which had low signal intensity on T(2)-weighted imaging. These relative characteristics may be helpful for qualitative diagnosis of extraadrenal pheochromocytomas with MRI. Other usefulness of MRI was to locate the position, to decide the range of tumors and to show well the relationship between the tumor and near structures.

  17. Multiple ectopic hepatocellular carcinomas arising in the abdominal cavity.

    PubMed

    Miyake, Toru; Hoshino, Seiichiro; Yoshida, Yoichiro; Aisu, Naoya; Tanimura, Syu; Hisano, Satoshi; Kuno, Nobuaki; Sohda, Tetsuro; Sakisaka, Shotaro; Yamashita, Yuichi

    2012-09-01

    Ectopic hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a very rare clinical entity that is defined as HCC arising from extrahepatic liver tissue. This report presents a case of ectopic multiple HCC arising in the abdominal cavity. A 42-year-old otherwise healthy male presented with liver dysfunction at a general health checkup. Both HCV antibody and hepatitis B surface antigen were negative. Laboratory examination showed elevations in serum alpha-fetoprotein and PIVKA-II. Ultrasonography and computed tomography revealed multiple nodular lesions in the abdominal cavity with ascites without a possible primary tumor. Exploratory laparoscopy was performed, which revealed bloody ascites and multiple brown nodular tumors measuring approximately 10 mm in size that were disseminated on the perineum and mesentery. A postoperative PET-CT scan was performed but it did not reveal any evidence of a tumor in the liver. The tumors resected from the peritoneum were diagnosed as HCC. The present case of HCC was thought to have possibly developed from ectopic liver on the peritoneum or mesentery.

  18. Percutaneous catheter drainage of abdominal abscesses associated with perforated viscus.

    PubMed

    Flancbaum, L; Nosher, J L; Brolin, R E

    1990-01-01

    Improvements in radiologic localization have made percutaneous catheter drainage (PCD) the initial procedure of choice for many intra-abdominal abscesses (IAA). During the past seven years 154 patients underwent PCD for treatment of abdominal abscesses. Fourteen of these patients had PCD as the initial treatment for IAA secondary to a perforated viscus and subsequently underwent an elective one-stage operation to treat the underlying disease. Etiologies of the abscesses included perforated appendicitis in six patients, sigmoid diverticulitis in three patients, Crohn's ileitis in two patients, and one case each of perforated gastric ulcer, perforated sigmoid carcinoma, and perforated gallbladder. Initial localization of the abscess was achieved by either CT or ultrasound. Seven abscesses were localized in the right lower quadrant, four were localized in the liver, and one was localized each in the left flank, right flank, subhepatic space, and pelvis. All patients subsequently underwent a definitive elective operation for their primary disease including six interval appendectomies, four sigmoid colectomies, two small-bowel resections, one subtotal gastrectomy and one cholecystectomy. There were no complications due to PCD and no deaths occurred. We conclude that PCD can be successfully performed as the initial treatment for IAA associated with a perforated viscus, obviating the first stage of the traditional two-stage surgical approach.

  19. Resection after preoperative chemotherapy versus synchronous liver resection of colorectal cancer liver metastases

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chan W.; Lee, Jong L.; Yoon, Yong S.; Park, In J.; Lim, Seok-Byung; Yu, Chang S.; Kim, Tae W.; Kim, Jin C.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract This study aimed to determine the prognostic effects of preoperative chemotherapy for colorectal cancer liver metastasis (CLM). We retrospectively evaluated 2 groups of patients between January 2006 and August 2012. A total of 53 patients who had ≥3 hepatic metastases underwent resection after preoperative chemotherapy (preoperative chemotherapy group), whereas 96 patients who had ≥3 hepatic metastases underwent resection with a curative intent before chemotherapy for CLM (primary resection group). A propensity score (PS) model was used to compare the both groups. The 3-year disease-free survival (DFS) rates were 31.7% and 20.4% in the preoperative chemotherapy and primary resection groups, respectively (log-rank = 0.015). Analyzing 32 PS matched pairs, we found that the DFS rate was significantly higher in the preoperative chemotherapy group than in the primary resection group (3-year DFS rates were 34.2% and 16.8%, respectively [log-rank = 0.019]). Preoperative chemotherapy group patients had better DFSs than primary resection group patients in various multivariate analyses, including crude, multivariable, average treatment effect with inverse probability of treatment weighting model and PS matching. Responses to chemotherapy are as important as achieving complete resection in cases of multiple hepatic metastases. Preoperative chemotherapy may therefore be preferentially considered for patients who experience difficulty undergoing complete resection for multiple hepatic metastases. PMID:28207557

  20. Unusually large colon cancer cutaneous and subcutaneous metastases occurring in resection scars.

    PubMed

    Alexandrescu, Doru T; Vaillant, Juan; Yahr, Laura J; Kelemen, Pond; Wiernik, Peter H

    2005-08-01

    Development of cutaneous metastases from colon cancer is a rare event, usually occurring in the setting of diffusely-disseminated disease and commonly carrying a dismal prognosis. Cutaneous and subcutaneous metastases in surgical scars occur extremely rarely, with only a few cases reported. We describe two cases of cutaneous metastases from colon cancer. A 62-year-old woman developed an 11-cm midline abdominal mass that slowly grew on the skin surface. The mass occurred at the scar site of her previous surgery performed 5 years prior for resection of a colon adenocarcinoma. A 46-year-old male presented with a subcutaneous 4.5-cm nodule in midline-abdominal scar, 3 years after resection of the primary colon cancer. These cases illustrate the pathological features and natural history of cutaneous metastases observed until the tumors have reached a very large size. Particular features of cutaneous scar metastases from colon cancer observed in our cases are a superficial pattern of spread, strong positivity for EGFR, low serum carcinoembrionic antigen, and long survival of the patients, possibly contributed to by the use of chemotherapy.

  1. [A Case of Successful Curative Resection Following Downsizing Chemotherapy in Initially Unresectable Locally Advanced Gallbladder Carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Shinmura, Kazuyasu; Kaiho, Takashi; Yanagisawa, Shinji; Okamoto, Ryo; Nishimura, Masaki; Kobayashi, Soichi; Okaniwa, Akira; Mun, Yangi; Tsuchiya, Shunichi; Chiba, Ryoji

    2015-11-01

    A 58-year-old woman was referred to our hospital with high fever and right upper abdominal pain. Abdominal computed tomography (CT) revealed a bulky tumor of the gallbladder with liver invasion, metastases to para-aortic lymph nodes, and extensive infiltration to Glisson's sheath. The tumor was initially considered to be unresectable locally advanced gallbladder carcinoma with inflammation, and she received 6 courses of chemotherapy with gemcitabine plus cisplatin. Subsequently, the inflammation was extinguished, and CT showed the main tumor shrunk and the Glisson's sheath infiltration disappeared; however, a liver metastasis existed in segment 5. Thus, S4a plus S5 hepatic segmentectomy with extrahepatic bile duct resection and regional and para-aortic lymphadenectomy was performed. The pathological diagnosis was pT3a, pN1, pM1 (Hep, LYM), fStage ⅣB. Curative resection was then performed. If selected according to their response to downsizing chemotherapy, conversion therapy might therefore be an effective multidisciplinary treatment for patients with initially unresectable locally advanced gallbladder carcinoma.

  2. Intra-Abdominal Actinomycosis Mimicking Malignant Abdominal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Oguejiofor, Njideka; Al-Abayechi, Sarah; Njoku, Emmanuel

    2017-01-01

    Abdominal actinomycosis is a rare infectious disease, caused by gram positive anaerobic bacteria, that may appear as an abdominal mass and/or abscess (Wagenlehner et al. 2003). This paper presents an unusual case of a hemodynamically stable 80-year-old man who presented to the emergency department with 4 weeks of worsening abdominal pain and swelling. He also complains of a 20-bound weight loss in 2 months. A large tender palpable mass in the right upper quadrant was noted on physical exam. Laboratory studies showed a normal white blood cell count, slightly decreased hemoglobin and hematocrit, and mildly elevated total bilirubin and alkaline phosphatase. A CT with contrast was done and showed a liver mass. Radiology and general surgery suspected malignancy and recommended CT guided biopsy. The sample revealed abundant neutrophils and gram positive rods. Cytology was negative for malignancy and cultures eventually grew actinomyces. High dose IV penicillin therapy was given for 4 weeks and with appropriate response transitioned to oral antibiotic for 9 months with complete resolution of symptoms. PMID:28299215

  3. Murine Ileocolic Bowel Resection with Primary Anastomosis

    PubMed Central

    Perry, Troy; Borowiec, Anna; Dicken, Bryan; Fedorak, Richard; Madsen, Karen

    2014-01-01

    Intestinal resections are frequently required for treatment of diseases involving the gastrointestinal tract, with Crohn’s disease and colon cancer being two common examples. Despite the frequency of these procedures, a significant knowledge gap remains in describing the inherent effects of intestinal resection on host physiology and disease pathophysiology. This article provides detailed instructions for an ileocolic resection with primary end-to-end anastomosis in mice, as well as essential aspects of peri-operative care to maximize post-operative success. When followed closely, this procedure yields a 95% long-term survival rate, no failure to thrive, and minimizes post-operative complications of bowel obstruction and anastomotic leak. The technical challenges of performing the procedure in mice are a barrier to its wide spread use in research. The skills described in this article can be acquired without previous surgical experience. Once mastered, the murine ileocolic resection procedure will provide a reproducible tool for studying the effects of intestinal resection in models of human disease. PMID:25406841

  4. Stress response to laparoscopic liver resection

    PubMed Central

    Ueda, Kazuki; Turner, Patricia

    2004-01-01

    Background: The magnitude of the systemic response is proportional to the degree of surgical trauma. Much has been reported in the literature comparing metabolic and immune responses, analgesia use, or length of hospital stay between laparoscopic and open procedures. In particular, metabolic and immune responses are represented by measuring various chemical mediators as stress responses. Laparoscopic procedures are associated with reduced operative trauma compared with open procedures, resulting in lower systemic response. As a result, laparoscopic procedures are now well accepted for both benign and malignant processes. Laparoscopic liver resection, specifically, is employed for symptomatic and some malignant tumors, following improvements in diagnostic accuracy, laparoscopic devices, and techniques. However, laparoscopic liver resection is still controversial in malignant disease because of complex anatomy, the technical difficulty of the procedure, and questionable indications. There are few reports describing the stress responses associated with laparoscopic liver resection, even though many studies reviewing stress responses have been performed recently in both humans and animal models comparing laparoscopic to conventional open surgery. Although this review examines stress response after laparoscopic liver resection in both an animal and human clinical model, further controlled randomized studies with additional investigations of immunologic parameters are needed to demonstrate the consequences of either minimally invasive surgery or open procedures on perioperative or postoperative stress responses for laparoscopic liver resection. PMID:18333082

  5. Endoscopic Resection of the Tarsal Tunnel Ganglion.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2016-10-01

    The tarsal tunnel ganglion is a cause of posterior tarsal tunnel syndrome. Open resection of the ganglion calls for release of the flexor retinaculum and dissection around the tibial neurovascular bundle. This can induce fibrosis around the tibial nerve. We report the technique of endoscopic resection of the tarsal tunnel ganglion. It is indicated for tarsal tunnel ganglia arising from the adjacent joints or tendon sheaths and compressing the tibial nerve from its deep side. It is contraindicated if there is other pathology of the tarsal tunnel that demands open surgery; if the ganglion compresses the tibial nerve from its superficial side, which calls for a different endoscopic approach using the ganglion portal; or if an intraneural ganglion of the tibial nerve is present. The purpose of this technical note is to describe a minimally invasive approach for endoscopic resection of the tarsal tunnel ganglion.

  6. The difficulty of laparoscopic liver resection.

    PubMed

    Ban, Daisuke; Kudo, Atsushi; Ito, Hiromitsu; Mitsunori, Yusuke; Matsumura, Satoshi; Aihara, Arihiro; Ochiai, Takanori; Tanaka, Shinji; Tanabe, Minoru; Itano, Osamu; Kaneko, Hironori; Wakabayashi, Go

    2015-06-01

    Grading of difficulty is needed for laparoscopic liver resection (LLR). Indications for LLR are expanding worldwide from minor to major resections, particularly in institutions having surgeons with advanced skills. If the degrees of surgical difficulty were defined, it would serve as a useful guide when introducing LLR and stepping up to the more advanced LLR. As no previous study has addressed the degrees of difficulty of various LLR procedures, we devised a practical scoring system for this purpose. We extracted the following five factors from preoperative information to score difficulty levels: (1) tumor location, (2) extent of liver resection, (3) tumor size, (4) proximity to major vessels, and (5) liver function. This difficulty index is comprised of the cumulative score for the five individual factors. There has not yet been a standard definition of difficulty. Our proposed scoring system might be a practical means of assessing the difficulty of LLR procedures. However, this system must be prospectively validated.

  7. A spindle cell anaplastic pancreatic carcinoma with rhabdoid features following curative resection

    PubMed Central

    Abe, Tomoyuki; Amano, Hironobu; Hanada, Keiji; Okazaki, Akihisa; Yonehara, Shuji; Kuranishi, Fumito; Nakahara, Masahiro; Kuroda, Yoshinori; Noriyuki, Toshio

    2016-01-01

    Anaplastic pancreatic carcinoma (ANPC) accounts for ~5% of all pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cases. Due to its rarity, its clinical features and surgical outcomes remain to be clearly understood. A 74-year-old woman was admitted to Onomichi General Hospital (Onomichi, Japan) in April 2015 without any significant past medical history. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) revealed a 9.5×8.0 cm tumor in the body and tail of the pancreas. The patient developed acute abdominal pain 3 weeks later and the CT revealed massive abdominal bleeding caused by tumor rupture. The tumor increased in size and reached 12.0×10.0 cm in maximal diameter. The tumor doubling time was estimated to be 13 days. 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/CT confirmed the absence of distant metastasis since FDG accumulation was detected only in the tumor lesion. Emergency distal pancreatectomy and splenectomy were performed. Histologically, the tumor was classified as a spindle cell ANPC with rhabdoid features. The patient succumbed to mortality 8 months following the surgery while undergoing systemic adjuvant chemotherapy for multiple liver metastases. ANPC is difficult to detect in the early stages due to its progressive nature and atypical radiological findings. Long-term survival can be achieved only by curative resection; therefore, surgical resection must be performed whenever possible, even if the chance of long-term survival following surgery is considered dismal. As the present case suggested, spindle cell ANPC with rhabdoid features is highly aggressive and curative-intent resection must not be delayed. PMID:27446572

  8. Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy in Resected Extrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, John W.; Ghafoori, A. Paiman; Willett, Christopher G.; Tyler, Douglas S.; Pappas, Theodore N.; Clary, Bryan M.; Hurwitz, Herbert I.; Bendell, Johanna C.; Morse, Michael A.; Clough, Robert W.; Czito, Brian G.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma is a rare malignancy. Despite radical resection, survival remains poor, with high rates of local and distant failure. To clarify the role of radiotherapy with chemotherapy, we performed a retrospective analysis of resected patients who had undergone chemoradiotherapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 45 patients (13 with proximal and 32 with distal disease) underwent resection plus radiotherapy (median dose, 50.4 Gy). All but 1 patient received concurrent fluoropyrimidine-based chemotherapy. The median follow-up was 30 months for all patients and 40 months for survivors. Results: Of the 45 patients, 33 underwent adjuvant radiotherapy, and 12 were treated neoadjuvantly. The 5-year actuarial overall survival, disease-free survival, metastasis-free survival, and locoregional control rates were 33%, 37%, 42%, and 78%, respectively. The median survival was 34 months. No patient died perioperatively. Patient age {<=}60 years and perineural involvement adversely affected survival on univariate analysis. Patients undergoing R0 resection had a significantly improved rate of local control but no survival advantage. Despite having more advanced disease at presentation, patients treated neoadjuvantly had a longer survival (5-year survival 53% vs. 23%, p = 0.16) and similar rates of Grade 2-3 surgical morbidity (16% vs. 33%, p = 0.24) compared with those treated in the postoperative setting. Conclusion: These study results suggest a possible local control benefit from chemoradiotherapy combined with surgery in patients with advanced, resected biliary cancer. Furthermore, our results suggest that a treatment strategy that includes preoperative chemoradiotherapy might result in improved tumor resectability with similar surgical morbidity compared with patients treated postoperatively, as well as potentially improved survival outcomes. Distant failure remains a significant failure pattern, suggesting the need for more effective systemic

  9. Right Thoracoabdominal Approach for Retrocardiac Paraganglioma Resection

    PubMed Central

    Laparra-Escareno, Hugo; Anaya-Ayala, Javier E.; Lizola, Rene; Torres-Machorro, Adriana; Gamboa-Domínguez, Armando

    2017-01-01

    Paragangliomas are rare extra-adrenal tumors of sympathetic or parasympathetic paraganglia origin; of these, mediastinal paragangliomas are 2% of all cases. We present the case of a 21-year-old woman with uncontrolled arterial hypertension who had a functioning 6.5 × 6.2-cm retrocardiac paraganglioma firmly attached to the pericardium. The patient underwent tumor resection via a right thoracoabdominal incision; this surgical approach enabled adequate exposure for complete resection without institution of cardiopulmonary bypass or need for cardiac reconstruction or autotransplantation. Ten months postoperatively, the patient was doing well and was no longer hypertensive. PMID:28265216

  10. Huge Lymphangioma of the Esophagus Resected by Endoscopic Piecemeal Mucosal Resection

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Liping; Wu, Weidan; Zheng, Haihong

    2017-01-01

    We present an unusual case of a 41-year-old male patient with a large lymphangioma of the esophagus. Endoscopy revealed that the structure measured 60 × 10 mm in the mucosa and the submucosa and had a heterogenous echo pattern. The esophageal mass was successfully resected by endoscopic piecemeal mucosal resection. However, most esophageal lymphangiomas that are larger than 2 cm in diameter reported in the literature can be removed only through open surgery. Thus far, we know of no reported cases of endoscopic resection as a treatment for this case.

  11. A 15-year-old female with amenorrhea, abdominal distention, and elevated human chorionic gonadotropin: pregnancy, right? Not so fast….

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Arun; Ocon, Anthony J; Nibhanipudi, Kumara

    2012-10-01

    Nongestational choriocarcinoma, a rare ovarian tumor, may present in young women with amenorrhea, abdominal distention, and elevated urine human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), all of which may be mistaken for pregnancy. A 15-year-old Hispanic female, who reported no sexual activity, presented with 6 months of amenorrhea, abdominal pain, and progressive abdominal distension. Initially, suspicion of pregnancy was considered. Physical examination was significant for abdominal distension, but no uterine fundus or fetal anatomy could be palpated, and auscultation did not reveal any fetal heart sounds or bruits. Laboratory values showed elevated urine hCG, cancer antigen 125, and cancer antigen 19.9 levels but normal serum hCG level and was inconsistent with pregnancy. Computed tomographic scans revealed a large abdominal heterogeneous mass and pleural effusions. Salpingo-oophorectomy with total omentectomy and inversion appendectomy removed a 21 × 20.5 × 16.5-cm tumor. Pathological testing determined it to be a nongestational choriocarcinoma. This rare tumor is more common in the pediatric adolescent population than in adults. Surgical resection and chemotherapy often result in a positive prognosis. In female adolescent patients presenting with elevated hCG level, amenorrhea, and abdominal distention, choriocarcinoma should be considered, especially in those with no history of sexual activity or before menarche.

  12. Evidence-Based Abdominal Wall Reconstruction: The Maxi-Mini Approach.

    PubMed

    Janis, Jeffrey E; Khansa, Ibrahim

    2015-12-01

    Complex abdominal wall reconstruction is a high-risk procedure, but it can be performed safely if a systematic approach is followed. In this article, the authors present their evidence-based technique for abdominal wall reconstruction. This approach aims at reducing rates of complications and hernia recurrence, starting with critical patient selection; preoperative patient optimization; adherence to intraoperative principles including preservation of vascular perforators through maintenance of composite tissue with limited undermining; direct supported mesh reinforcement of midline musculofascial reapproximation; use of percutaneous transfascial suture mesh fixation; careful attention to dead space obliteration in any plane; and aggressive soft-tissue resection of marginal, undermined, or tenuous skin and subcutaneous tissue. Postoperative strategies to decrease complications are also used. The authors' surgical technique is described in detail, and pilot data are presented to support the authors' approach.

  13. Desmoid Tumor of the Anterior Abdominal Wall in Female Patients: Comparison with Endometriosis

    PubMed Central

    Krentel, H.; Tchartchian, G.; De Wilde, R. L.

    2012-01-01

    In female patients presenting a tumor of the lower abdominal wall especially after cesarian section, an endometriotic tumor as well as an aggressive desmoid tumor should be considered. Symptoms in correlation with the monthly period can facilitate the presurgical differentiation between endometriosis and fibromatosis. Ultrasound reveals the typical location of both tumors and its remarkable sonographic appearance. In the clinical practice, the desmoid fibromatosis of the lower abdominal wall is a very rare disease. We present a case of a 25-year-old pregnant and discuss diagnostic and therapeutic options by a PubMed literature review. With the knowledge of the prognosis of the desmoid fibromatosis and the respective treatment options including wait and see, complete surgical resection with macroscopically free margins and adjuvant approaches is essential to avoid further interventions and progression of the locally destructive tumor. PMID:22778752

  14. Arthroscopically assisted central physeal bar resection.

    PubMed

    Marsh, James S; Polzhofer, Gert K

    2006-01-01

    Thirty-seven central physeal bars were removed with an arthroscopically assisted technique. Thirty children (32 cases) have been followed to maturity or physeal closure. There were 19 boys and 11 girls, aged 4-14 years (mean, 9.5 years). Site of arrest was distal femur (15), proximal tibia (9), distal tibia (6), and distal radius (2). Mean follow-up was 6.5 years (range, 2-12 years). Adequate longitudinal growth was realized in 21 patients (70%) just after bar resection. Five patients (17%) required osteotomy, lengthening, or epiphysiodesis in addition to bar resection. In 4 patients (13%), bar resection failed. Failures occurred in those patients whose source of growth arrest was infection (3) or degree of physeal trauma approached 50% (1 case). This is the first series that studies and documents the efficacy of the arthroscope in central physeal bar resection. It provides the best visualization with minimal morbidity. The technique is described, including a discussion of technical tips and pitfalls.

  15. Laparoscopic resection of retroperitoneal benign neurilemmoma

    PubMed Central

    Park, Joon Seong; Kang, Chang Moo; Yoon, Dong Sup; Lee, Woo Jung

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to verify that laparoscopic resection for treating retroperitoneal benign neurilemmoma (NL) is expected to be favorable for complete resection of tumor with technical feasibility and safety. Methods We retrospectively analyzed 47 operations for retroperitoneal neurogenic tumor at Yonsei University College of Medicine, Severance Hospital and Gangnam Severance Hospital between January 2005 and September 2015. After excluding 21 patients, the remaining 26 were divided into 2 groups: those who underwent open surgery (OS) and those who underwent laparoscopic surgery (LS). We compared clinicopathological features between the 2 groups. Results There was no significant difference in operation time, estimated blood loss, transfusion, complication, recurrence, or follow-up period between 2 groups. Postoperative hospital stay was significantly shorter in the LS group versus the OS group (OS vs. LS, 7.00 ± 3.43 days vs. 4.50 ± 2.16 days; P = 0.031). Conclusion We suggest that laparoscopic resection of retroperitoneal benign NL is feasible and safe by obtaining complete resection of the tumor. LS for treating retroperitoneal benign NL could be useful with appropriate laparoscopic technique and proper patient selection. PMID:28289669

  16. Resection planning for robotic acoustic neuroma surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBrayer, Kepra L.; Wanna, George B.; Dawant, Benoit M.; Balachandran, Ramya; Labadie, Robert F.; Noble, Jack H.

    2016-03-01

    Acoustic neuroma surgery is a procedure in which a benign mass is removed from the Internal Auditory Canal (IAC). Currently this surgical procedure requires manual drilling of the temporal bone followed by exposure and removal of the acoustic neuroma. This procedure is physically and mentally taxing to the surgeon. Our group is working to develop an Acoustic Neuroma Surgery Robot (ANSR) to perform the initial drilling procedure. Planning the ANSR's drilling region using pre-operative CT requires expertise and around 35 minutes' time. We propose an approach for automatically producing a resection plan for the ANSR that would avoid damage to sensitive ear structures and require minimal editing by the surgeon. We first compute an atlas-based segmentation of the mastoid section of the temporal bone, refine it based on the position of anatomical landmarks, and apply a safety margin to the result to produce the automatic resection plan. In experiments with CTs from 9 subjects, our automated process resulted in a resection plan that was verified to be safe in every case. Approximately 2 minutes were required in each case for the surgeon to verify and edit the plan to permit functional access to the IAC. We measured a mean Dice coefficient of 0.99 and surface error of 0.08 mm between the final and automatically proposed plans. These preliminary results indicate that our approach is a viable method for resection planning for the ANSR and drastically reduces the surgeon's planning effort.

  17. Polyp Resection - Controversial Practices and Unanswered Questions.

    PubMed

    von Renteln, Daniel; Pohl, Heiko

    2017-03-09

    Detection and complete removal of precancerous neoplastic polyps are central to effective colorectal cancer screening. The prevalence of neoplastic polyps in the screening population in the United States is likely >50%. However, most persons with neoplastic polyps are never destined to develop cancer, and do not benefit for finding and removing polyps, and may only be harmed by the procedure. Further 70-80% of polyps are diminutive (≤5 mm) and such polyps almost never contain cancer. Given the questionable benefit, the high-cost and the potential risk changing our approach to the management of diminutive polyps is currently debated. Deemphasizing diminutive polyps and shifting our efforts to detection and complete removal of larger and higher-risk polyps deserves discussion and study. This article explores three controversies, and emerging concepts related to endoscopic polyp resection. First, we discuss challenges of optical resect-and-discard strategy and possible alternatives. Second, we review recent studies that support the use of cold snare resection for ≥5 mm polyps. Thirdly, we examine current evidence for prophylactic clipping after resection of large polyps.

  18. Intraorbital meningioma: resection through modified orbitozygomatic craniotomy.

    PubMed

    Cohen-Gadol, Aaron A

    2012-01-01

    Intraorbital meningiomas are challenging lesions to excise because of their location and the restricted surgical corridor available due to the presence of important neighboring structures. Lesions located in the posterior one-third of the orbit require skull base approaches for their exposure and safe resection. Frontoorbital and modified orbitozygomatic (OZ) craniotomies may facilitate the exposure and resection of masses in the posterior intraorbital space. Specifically, the one-piece modified OZ craniotomy provides many advantages of the "full" OZ craniotomy (which includes a more extensive zygomatic osteotomy). The modified OZ approach minimizes the extent of frontal lobe retraction and provides ample amount of space for the surgeon to exploit all the working angles to resect the tumor. The following video presentation discusses the nuances of technique for resection of an intraorbital meningioma through modified OZ approach and optic nerve decompression. The nuances of technique will be discussed. The video can be found here: http://youtu.be/fP5X2QNr5qk.

  19. An unusual case of a mature teratoma on the left perineal region of a young cat: surgical treatment and pathological description

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    A 10-month-old intact male cat with a clinical history of a large mass in the left perineal region was submitted to the surgery department. The mass had reportedly been present as a small swelling after birth. Cytological evaluation using a fine-needle aspirate showed eosinophilic keratinaceous debris, and was not convincing for the definitive diagnosis. Complete surgical excision was performed. Postoperative function and aesthetics were excellent. Based on gross and histological features the definitive diagnosis of the tumor was mature teratoma with ectodermal and endodermal components. After a follow-up period of 4 months, no signs of recurrence were evident. Surgical excision of the teratoma in our case was considered curative. A perineal location has not been previously reported in the cat and should be considered a rare condition in this species. PMID:23844766

  20. [Dirofilaria in the abdominal cavity].

    PubMed

    Révész, Erzsébet; Markovics, Gabriella; Darabos, Zoltán; Tóth, Ildikó; Fok, Eva

    2008-10-01

    Number of cases of filariasis have been recently reported in the Hungarian medical literature, most of them caused by Dirofilaria repens . Dirofilaria repens is a mosquito-transmitted filarioid worm in the subcutaneous tissue of dogs and cats. Human infection manifests as either subcutaneous nodules or lung parenchymal disease, which may even be asymptomatic. The authors report a human Dirofilaria repens infection of the abdominal cavity in a 61-year-old man,who underwent laparotomy for acute abdomen. Intraoperatively, local peritonitis was detected caused by a white nemathhelminth, measured 8 cm in size. Histocytology confirmed that the infection was caused by Dirofilaria repens.

  1. Technical aspects of abdominal stomas.

    PubMed

    Link, Brian A; Kropp, Bradley; Frimberger, Dominic

    2007-01-01

    Continent urinary diversion has gained increasing popularity in the pediatric population during the last few decades. In adults, continent diversions are usually needed to replace a bladder after cystectomy for invasive carcinoma. Subsequently, the creation of functional and cosmetically hidden urinary and cecal abdominal stomas has become an integral part of many urinary reconstructive procedures. These techniques, originally developed for pediatric urinary reconstruction have gained increasing popularity for adult patients in need of a continence procedure. In the current manuscript, we review the technical aspects of site selection, mucocutaneous anastomosis, cosmetic appearance, and management of associated complications.

  2. Resection Followed by Stereotactic Radiosurgery to Resection Cavity for Intracranial Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Do, Ly Pezner, Richard; Radany, Eric; Liu An; Staud, Cecil; Badie, Benham

    2009-02-01

    Purpose: In patients who undergo resection of central nervous system metastases, whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) is added to reduce the rates of recurrence and neurologic death. However, the risk of late neurotoxicity has led many patients to decline WBRT. We offered adjuvant stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) or stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) as an alternative to select patients with resected brain metastases. Methods and Materials: We performed a retrospective review of patients who underwent brain metastasis resection followed by SRS/SRT. WBRT was administered only as salvage treatment. Patients had one to four brain metastases. The dose was 15-18 Gy for SRS and 22-27.5 Gy in four to six fractions for SRT. Target margins were typically expanded by 1 mm for rigid immobilization and 3 mm for mask immobilization. SRS/SRT involved the use of linear accelerator radiosurgery using the IMRT 21EX or Helical Tomotherapy unit. Results: Between December 1999 and January 2007, 30 patients diagnosed with intracranial metastases were treated with resection followed by SRS or SRT to the resection cavity. Of the 30 patients, 4 (13.3%) developed recurrence in the resection cavity, and 19 (63%) developed recurrences in new intracranial sites. The actuarial 12-month survival rate was 82% for local recurrence-free survival, 31% for freedom from new brain metastases, 67% for neurologic deficit-free survival, and 51% for overall survival. Salvage WBRT was performed in 14 (47%) of the 30 patients. Conclusion: Our results suggest that for patients with newly diagnosed brain metastases treated with surgical resection, postoperative SRS/SRT to the resection cavity is a feasible option. WBRT can be reserved as salvage treatment with acceptable neurologic deficit-free survival.

  3. Abdominal Compartment Syndrome After Hip Arthroscopy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    K. Intra- abdominal compartment syndrome as a complication of ruptured abdomi- nal aortic aneurysm repair. Am Surg 1989;55:396-402. 6. Sugrue M...00-00-2010 to 00-00-2010 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Abdominal Compartment Syndrome After Hip Arthroscopy 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c...unclassified Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 Author’s personal copy Case Report Abdominal Compartment Syndrome After

  4. Optimizing treatment of hepatic metastases from colorectal cancer: Resection or resection plus ablation?

    PubMed

    Chiappa, Antonio; Bertani, Emilio; Zbar, Andrew P; Foschi, Diego; Fazio, Nicola; Zampino, Maria; Belluco, Claudio; Orsi, Franco; Della Vigna, Paolo; Bonomo, Guido; Venturino, Marco; Ferrari, Carlo; Biffi, Roberto

    2016-03-01

    The present study determines the oncologic outcome of the combined resection and ablation strategy for colorectal liver metastases (CRLM). Between January 1994 and December 2014, 360 patients underwent surgery for CRLM. There were 280 patients who underwent hepatic resection only (group 1) and 80 hepatic resection plus ablation (group 2). group 2 patients had a higher incidence of multiple metastases than group 1 cases (100% in group 2 vs. 28.2% in group 1; P<0.001) and bilobar involvement (76.5% in group 2 vs. 12.9% in group 1; P<0.001). Perioperative mortality was nil in either group with a higher postoperative complication rate amongst group 1 vs. group 2 cases (18 vs. 0, respectively). The median follow-up was 90 months (range, 1-180) with a 5-year overall survival for group 1 and group 2 of 49 and 80%, respectively (P=0.193). The median disease-free survival for patients with R0 resection was 50, 43 and 34% at 1, 2 and 3 years, respectively, and remained steadily higher (at 50%) in those patients treated with resection combined with ablation up to 5 years (P=0.069). The only intraoperative ablation failure was for a large lesion (≥5 cm). Our data support the use of intraoperative ablation when complete hepatic resection cannot be achieved.

  5. [Pelvi-perineal venous insufficiency and varicose veins of the lower limbs: duplex Doppler diagnosis and endoluminal treatment in thirty females].

    PubMed

    Lasry, J-L; Coppé, G; Balian, E; Borie, H

    2007-02-01

    Pelvic congestion is the most commonly recognized consequence of pelvi-perineal venous insufficiency (PPVI). The implication of PPVI in the generation of varicoceles and varicose veins of the lower limbs arising from perineal varices has not been studied specifically. We report our duplex-Doppler findings in a series of 150 women seen over a period of 36 months. All patients presented perineal varices and, more specifically, utero-ovarian venous reflux. Thirty women were retained for phlebography then treatment by embolization. All of the left utero-ovarian veins were incontinent, the right utero-ovarian vein could not be explored in one patient, and only three of the eight opacified veins were incontinent. Twenty-two patients presented an associated incontinence of the hypogastric branch (7 left, 15 bilateral). Embolization was performed on 29 left utero-ovarian veins and one right vein with, as complementary treatment, embolization of 15 hypogastric branches, six during a second session. There were no serious complications. At six months (range 2-20 months), no improvement was noted in 10% of the patients, symptoms had improved or the varices had diminished in 59%, and all symptoms had disappeared in 31%. A duplex-Doppler exploration should be performed to search for perineal involvement in all patients presenting varicose veins of the lower limbs. The good preliminary results obtained after embolization of the pelvic veins, and particularly the left utero-ovarian vein, suggests this therapeutic approach should be pursued. The long-term effect should be assessed because of the plexiform nature of recurrent venous disorders.

  6. Partial Resection of the Pancreatic Head and Duodenum for Management of Carcinoma of the Ampulla of Vater: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-Fang; Tang, Kun; Sun, Fu-Bo; Sui, Lu-Lu; Xu, Gang

    2016-03-01

    A 57-year-old woman presented with spontaneous pain in the upper right quadrant of the abdominal region of one year's duration. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging, and magnetic resonance cholangiopancreaticography revealed the presence of a tumour in the periampullary region, gallstones, cholecystitis, and biliary obstruction, as well as atrophy of the pancreas and dense adhesions involving the pancreas, portal vein, and superior mesenteric vein. Duodenoscopy revealed a papillary neoplasm, measuring 2.5×3 cm, in the descending duodenum. Pathological analysis of the duodenoscopic biopsy suggested carcinoma of the ampulla of Vater. Partial resection of the pancreatic head and duodenum, together with lymph node dissection and digestive tract reconstruction, was performed. Postoperatively, the patient recovered well. CT at 14 months postoperatively showed no recurrence or metastasis. This surgical procedure avoids the potential risk of pancreaticoduodenectomy and retains the function of the pancreas as much as possible, while achieving radical tumour resection.

  7. Abdominal Mass Secondary to Human Toxocariasis

    PubMed Central

    Ghoroobi, Javad; Khoddami, Maliheh; Mirshemirani, Alireza; Sadeghian, Naser; Mahdavi, Alireza; Hatefi, Sayeh

    2017-01-01

    Toxocariasis is an extensive helminthic infection that leads to visceral larva migrans in humans. A 2.5-year-old girl referred for abdominal mass. She had history of pharyngitis for two weeks. There were no other symptoms. Abdominal examination revealed an irregular solid mass in right lower quadrant (RLQ). Abdominal ultrasonography revealed an echohetrogenic large mass in RLQ, liver, and retroperitoneal area. Abdominal CT scan showed a huge mass. At laparotomy a large retroperitoneal mass that involved right liver lobe, bladder, ileocecal valve, small and large intestines was found. At histopathology diagnosis of toxocariasis was made. PMID:28164001

  8. [Diagnostic imaging and acute abdominal pain].

    PubMed

    Liljekvist, Mads Svane; Pommergaard, Hans-Christian; Burcharth, Jakob; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2015-01-19

    Acute abdominal pain is a common clinical condition. Clinical signs and symptoms can be difficult to interpret, and diagnostic imaging may help to identify intra-abdominal disease. Conventional X-ray, ultrasound (US) and computed tomography (CT) of the abdomen vary in usability between common surgical causes of acute abdominal pain. Overall, conventional X-ray cannot confidently diagnose or rule out disease. US and CT are equally trustworthy for most diseases. US with subsequent CT may enhance diagnostic precision. Magnetic resonance seems promising for future use in acute abdominal imaging.

  9. Empyema following intra-abdominal sepsis.

    PubMed

    Ballantyne, K C; Sethia, B; Reece, I J; Davidson, K G

    1984-09-01

    Over the past 9 years, ten patients have presented to the Thoracic Unit, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, with 12 empyemas secondary to intra-abdominal sepsis. In eight patients, the presenting signs and symptoms were wrongly attributed to primary intra-thoracic pathology. All were subsequently found to have intra-abdominal sepsis. The presence of empyema after recent abdominal surgery or abdominal pain strongly suggests a diagnosis of ipsilateral subphrenic abscess. Adequate surgical drainage is essential. In our experience, limited thoracotomy with subdiaphragmatic extension offers the best access to both pleural and subphrenic spaces and provides the greatest chance of eradicating infection on both sides of the diaphragm.

  10. Mechanical ventilation in abdominal surgery.

    PubMed

    Futier, E; Godet, T; Millot, A; Constantin, J-M; Jaber, S

    2014-01-01

    One of the key challenges in perioperative care is to reduce postoperative morbidity and mortality. Patients who develop postoperative morbidity but survive to leave hospital have often reduced functional independence and long-term survival. Mechanical ventilation provides a specific example that may help us to shift thinking from treatment to prevention of postoperative complications. Mechanical ventilation in patients undergoing surgery has long been considered only as a modality to ensure gas exchange while allowing maintenance of anesthesia with delivery of inhaled anesthetics. Evidence is accumulating, however, suggesting an association between intraoperative mechanical ventilation strategy and postoperative pulmonary function and clinical outcome in patients undergoing abdominal surgery. Non-protective ventilator settings, especially high tidal volume (VT) (>10-12mL/kg) and the use of very low level of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) (PEEP<5cmH2O) or no PEEP, may cause alveolar overdistension and repetitive tidal recruitment leading to ventilator-associated lung injury in patients with healthy lungs. Stimulated by previous findings in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome, the use of lower tidal volume ventilation is becoming increasingly more common in the operating room. However, lowering tidal volume, though important, is only part of the overall multifaceted approach of lung protective mechanical ventilation. In this review, we aimed at providing the most recent and relevant clinical evidence regarding the use of mechanical ventilation in patients undergoing abdominal surgery.

  11. Perineal swabs reveal effect of super shedders on the transmission of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in commercial feedlots.

    PubMed

    Stephens, T P; McAllister, T A; Stanford, K

    2009-12-01

    Cattle that shed more than 10(4) cfu/g of Escherichia coli O157 in feces have been described as super shedders (SS) and are thought to have major impacts on prevalence and transmission of this organism. Two Southern Alberta commercial feedlots (feedlot X, 7 pens averaging 183 steers; feedlot Y, 5 pens averaging 153 steers) were sampled from May 2007 to January 2008. Background samples [fecal pat (FP) water, ropes] were taken weekly from each pen for 2 wk before collection of samples from individuals [fecal grab (FG); perineal swab] at 2 different times [during spring and summer (S1); immediately before slaughter during fall and winter (S2)]. Immunomagnetic separation and selective media were used for detecting E. coli O157:H7. Positive FG and FP were enumerated by direct plating onto sorbitol MacConkey agar supplemented with 2.5 mg/L of potassium tellurite and 0.05 mg/L of cefixime. Five sorbitol-negative colonies were agglutinated using an anti-O157 latex kit, and the proportion of positive colonies was adjusted for non-E. coli O157:H7. Overall, there were 153 (7.16%) and 10 (0.45%) SS at S1 and S2, respectively. In feedlot X, SS and penmates of SS during S1 were more likely (P < 0.01) to shed E. coli O157:H7 in their feces and have this organism on their perineum than cattle in a pen where no SS were identified. In feedlot Y, SS and penmates of SS during S1 were more likely (P < 0.01) to have E. coli O157:H7 on their perineum than those from a pen where only 1 SS was identified, but steers in only 1 pen with multiple SS were more likely (P < 0.01) to shed this organism in feces. Overall, E. coli O157:H7 was 1.85 times more likely (P < 0.01) to be detected in perineal swabs compared with FG and E. coli O157:H7 was more likely (P < 0.01) to be detected at S1 compared with S2 for all sample types. Super shedders were a larger proportion of shedding cattle in S1 than in S2, but the presence of SS increased (P < 0.01) prevalence of this organism on the perineum of

  12. Latissimus dorsi free flap reconstruction of major abdominal defect in treatment of giant Marjolin’s ulcer: a short report focused on preoperative imaging

    PubMed Central

    Thomassen, Anders; Jensen, Jesper Poul Naested; Soerensen, Jens Ahm

    2014-01-01

    We present a case of a 56-year-old man with a giant carcinoma in the abdominal wall. Based on positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) scan there were FDG-avid lymph nodes in the ipsilateral axillary and groin, suspicious for metastases. At contrast-enhanced CT the parietal peritoneum seemed free of tumor invasion, which was essential to radical surgery planning. The tumor was completely removed with clear margins of resection and no metastasis in the resected lymph nodes. The PET/CT scan was repeated after 4 months, showing no signs of recurrence. PMID:24778800

  13. Comparison between thulium laser resection of prostate and transurethral plasmakinetic resection of prostate or transurethral resection of prostate

    PubMed Central

    DeCao, Hong; Wang, Jia; Huang, Yu; LiangLiu, Ren; JunLei, Hao; Gao, Liang; Tang, Zhuang; YingHu, Chun; Li, Xiang; JiuYuan, Hong; Dong, Qiang; Wei, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is one of the most common diseases in middle-aged and elderly men. In the present study, we aimed to compare the efficacy and safety of thulium laser resection of the prostate (TMLRP) with either transurethral plasmakinetic resection of the prostate (TUPKP) or transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP). A literature search was performed, eventually, 14 studies involving 1587 patients were included. Forest plots were produced by using Revman 5.2.0 software. Our meta-analysis showed that operation time, decrease in hemoglobin level, length of hospital stay, catheterization time, and development of urethral stricture significantly differed, whereas the transitory urge incontinence rate, urinary tract infection rate, and recatheterization rate did not significantly differ between TMLRP and either TURP or TUPKP. The blood transfusion rate was significantly different between TMLRP and TURP, but not between TMLRP and TUPKP. In addition, the retrograde ejaculation rate between TMLRP and TURP did not significantly differ. At 1, 3, 6, and 12 months of postoperative follow-up, the maximum flow rate, post-void residual, quality of life, and International Prostate Symptom Score did not significantly differ among the procedures. Thus, the findings of this study indicate that TMLRP may be a safe and feasible alternative. PMID:26444930

  14. Comparison between thulium laser resection of prostate and transurethral plasmakinetic resection of prostate or transurethral resection of prostate.

    PubMed

    DeCao, Hong; Wang, Jia; Huang, Yu; LiangLiu, Ren; JunLei, Hao; Gao, Liang; Tang, Zhuang; YingHu, Chun; Li, Xiang; JiuYuan, Hong; Dong, Qiang; Wei, Qiang

    2015-10-07

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is one of the most common diseases in middle-aged and elderly men. In the present study, we aimed to compare the efficacy and safety of thulium laser resection of the prostate (TMLRP) with either transurethral plasmakinetic resection of the prostate (TUPKP) or transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP). A literature search was performed, eventually, 14 studies involving 1587 patients were included. Forest plots were produced by using Revman 5.2.0 software. Our meta-analysis showed that operation time, decrease in hemoglobin level, length of hospital stay, catheterization time, and development of urethral stricture significantly differed, whereas the transitory urge incontinence rate, urinary tract infection rate, and recatheterization rate did not significantly differ between TMLRP and either TURP or TUPKP. The blood transfusion rate was significantly different between TMLRP and TURP, but not between TMLRP and TUPKP. In addition, the retrograde ejaculation rate between TMLRP and TURP did not significantly differ. At 1, 3, 6, and 12 months of postoperative follow-up, the maximum flow rate, post-void residual, quality of life, and International Prostate Symptom Score did not significantly differ among the procedures. Thus, the findings of this study indicate that TMLRP may be a safe and feasible alternative.

  15. Laparoscopic Resection of an Adrenal Schwannoma

    PubMed Central

    Konstantinos, Toutouzas G.; Panagiotis, Kekis B.; Nikolaos, Michalopoulos V.; Ioannis, Flessas; Andreas, Manouras; Geogrios, Zografos

    2012-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Schwannomas are tumors originating from Schwann cells of the peripheral nerve sheath (neurilemma) of the neuroectoderm. Rarely, schwannomas can arise from the retroperitoneum and adrenal medulla. We describe a case of a 71-y-old woman who presented with an incidentally discovered adrenal tumor. Methods: Ultrasound and computed tomography scans revealed a lesion with solid and cystic areas originating from the left adrenal gland. The patient underwent complete laparoscopic resection of the tumor and the left adrenal gland. Results: Histopathological examination and immunohistochemical staining of the excised specimen revealed a benign schwannoma measuring 5.5×5×3.7 cm. To our knowledge, few other cases of laparoscopic resection of adrenal schwannomas have been reported. Conclusion: Because preoperative diagnosis of adrenal tumors is inconclusive, complete laparoscopic excision allows for definitive diagnosis with histological evaluation and represents the treatment of choice. PMID:23484583

  16. Computed tomographic appearance of resectable pancreatic carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Itai, Y.; Araki, T.; Tasaka, A.; Maruyama, M.

    1982-06-01

    Thirteen patients with resectable pancreatic carcinoma were examined by computed tomography (CT). Nine had a mass, 2 had dilatation of the main pancreatic duct, 1 appeared to have ductal dilatation, and 1 had no sign of abnormality. Resectable carcinoma was diagnosed retrospectively in 8 cases, based on the following criteria: a mass with a distinct contour, frequently containing a tiny or irregular low-density area and accompanied by dilatation of the caudal portion of the main pancreatic duct without involvement of the large vessels, liver, or lymph nodes. Including unresectable cancer, chronic pancreatitis, and obstructive jaundice from causes other than cancer, the false-positive rate was less than 6%. However, a small cancer without change in pancreatic contour is difficult to detect with CT.

  17. Outcome after rectum or sigmoid resection: a review for gynecologists.

    PubMed

    Ret Dávalos, María Lorena; De Cicco, Carlo; D'Hoore, Andre; De Decker, Bert; Koninckx, Philippe Robert

    2007-01-01

    It remains unclear when to perform a discoid or segmental bowel resection for large endometriotic nodules with intestinal invasion. Moreover, endometriosis series are rather small to fully evaluate functional consequences of bowel resection. We therefore reviewed the incidence of leakage and functional problems after anterior and sigmoid resection as reported in the surgical literature albeit for other indications. Endoscopic resection clearly is feasible but requires an experienced surgeon. The incidence of leakage is not different after hand-sewn or stapled anastomosis, but is higher after a low rectum resection than after a sigmoid resection. Similarly, functional bowel problems are higher after a low rectum resection than after sigmoid resection. Low rectum resection in addition can be associated with functional bladder problems and sexual disturbances as anorgasmia. In conclusion, short- and long-term complications are much higher after a low rectum than after a sigmoid resection. This seems to be important in making the decision to perform a discoid or a segmental bowel resection for severe endometriosis.

  18. Liver Resection in Children with Hepatic Neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Randolph, Judson G.; Altman, R. Peter; Arensman, Robert M.; Matlak, Michael E.; Leikin, Sanford L.

    1978-01-01

    In the past ten years, 28 patients with primary tumors of the liver have been treated. There were 11 benign tumors, including four hamartomas, three patients with focal nodular hyperplasia, and two each with congenital cysts and hemangioma. Hamartomas and masses of focal nodular hyperplasia should be excised when possible, but both are benign lesions; therefore life threatening excisions at the porta hepatis should be avoided. Cysts are often resectable, but when occupying all lobes of the liver, they can be successfully managed by marsupialization into the free peritoneal cavity. If resectable, hemangiomas should be removed; when occupying most of the liver as they often do, patients may be subject to platelet trapping or to cardiac failure. In some instances these lesions have been controlled by steroids, radiation therapy or hepatic artery ligation. Of 17 malignant tumors seen, 12 proved to be hepatoblastomas. Nine of the 12 patients underwent liver resection, of whom four are cured, (33%). There were three children with hepatocellular carcinomas and two with embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma. One child from each of these groups is cured by surgical excision. At present the only known cures in children with primary malignant liver neoplasms have been achieved by operative removal. ImagesFig. 1.Fig. 2.Fig. 3.Fig. 4. PMID:206216

  19. Laparoscopic intersphincteric resection: indications and results.

    PubMed

    Scala, Dario; Niglio, Antonello; Pace, Ugo; Ruffolo, Fulvio; Rega, Daniela; Delrio, Paolo

    2016-03-01

    Surgical treatment of distal rectal cancer has long been based only on abdominoperineal excision, resulting in a permanent stoma and not always offering a definitive local control. Sphincter saving surgery has emerged in the last 20 years and can be offered also to patients with low lying tumours, provided that the external sphincter is not involved by the disease. An intersphincteric resection (ISR) is based on the resection of the rectum with a distal dissection proceeding into the space between the internal and the external anal sphincter. Originally described as an open procedure, it has also been developed with the laparoscopic approach, and also this technically demanding procedure is inscribed among those offered to the patient by a minimally invasive surgery. Indications have to be strict and patient selection is crucial to obtain both oncological and functional optimal results. The level of distal dissection and the extent of internal sphincter resected are chosen according to the distal margin of the tumour and is based on MRI findings: accurate imaging is therefore mandatory to better define the surgical approach. We here present our actual indications for ISR, results in terms of operative time, median hospital stay for ISR in our experience and review the updated literature.

  20. [Resection of intracardiac myxoma. Case report].

    PubMed

    Carmona-Delgado, Víctor Manuel; Deloya-Maldonado, Angélica María; Carranza-Bernal, María Lourdes; Hinojosa-Pérez, Arturo; Farías-Mayene, Leobardo

    2017-01-01

    Myxomas are the most common benign cardiac tumors, which are considered emergency surgery. The resection should not be delayed because 8-9% of affected patients may die due to intracardiac blood flow obstruction. We presente a clinical case of a 47 year old female, history of dyslipidemia. Disease starts with retrosternal oppression feeling, dyspnea on moderate exercise, dizziness, pain in joints hands. Arrhytmic heart sounds, diastolic mitral murmur II/IV, breth sounds present, no lymph. Laboratory: hemoglobin 11.0, leucocyte 9000, glucose 96 mg/dL, chest RX medium arch prominence cardiac silhouette. ECO transthoracic LVEF 60 %, with left atrial intracardiac tumor 13x11 cm, pedicle fixed the interatrial septum, the mitral valve bulges, with mild mitral valve. Half sternotomy is performed intracardiac tumor resection, pericardial placement interatrial with extracorporeal circulation support 65', aortic clamping time of 40'. Intracardiac tumor surgical findings interatrial septum fixed to left side, pedicle, rounded, yellow, multiloculated, soft, 13x10 cm in diameter. Histopathological diagnosis cardiac myxoma. We conclude that the tumor resection was carried in a timely manner with satisfactory evolution.

  1. Esophageal carcinoid tumor treated by endoscopic resection.

    PubMed

    Yagi, Makoto; Abe, Yasuhiko; Sasaki, Yu; Nomura, Eiki; Sato, Takeshi; Iwano, Daisuke; Yoshizawa, Kazuya; Sakuta, Kazuhiro; Kanno, Nana; Nishise, Syouichi; Ueno, Yoshiyuki

    2015-05-01

    The present report describes a rare case of esophageal carcinoid tumor that was treated by endoscopic resection. A 43-year-old woman underwent esophagogastroduodenoscopy at her family clinic for screening of the upper digestive tract and a small lesion resembling a submucosal tumor was detected in the lower esophagus. A biopsy sample from the lesion was diagnosed as esophageal carcinoid tumor and the patient visited our hospital for detailed examination. The tumor was approximately 3 mm in diameter and its surface appeared to be covered with normal squamous epithelium. The tumor had a shiny reddish surface without ulceration or erosion. Magnifying endoscopy with narrow-band imaging showed structures resembling reticular vessels under the epithelium. Endoscopic ultrasonography depicted the tumor as a low-echoic mass within the lamina propria. Computed tomography did not detect the tumor and no metastatic lesions were evident in other organs. With the patient's informed consent, the tumor was resected using endoscopic submucosal dissection, with a sufficient free margin in both the vertical and horizontal directions. Magnifying endoscopic examination showed the resected tumor to have abundant reticular vessels. Finally, the tumor was diagnosed immunopathologically as an esophageal carcinoid tumor (neuroendocrine cell tumor, grade 1), without lymphatic or vascular invasion.

  2. 1.5T MRI-guided trans-perineal laser ablation of locally recurrent prostate adenocarcinoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McPhail, E. Frederick; Mynderse, Lance A.; Callstrom, Matthew R.; Gorny, Krzysztof R.; McNichols, Roger J.; Atwell, Thomas D.; Gettman, Matthew T.; Amrami, Kimberly K.; Kawashima, Akira; Woodrum, David A.

    2010-02-01

    Introduction: Biochemical recurrence of prostate cancer after definitive therapy with radical prostatectomy (RP) is known to occur between 25-30%. We present the first known case of 1.5T MRI guided ablation using laser interstitial thermal therapy (LITT) for locally recurrent prostate cancer following RP. Methods: The patient elected to undergo MRI-guided LITT of the biopsy proven cancer recurrence using an FDAapproved MRI compatible, 980nm, 15-watt laser system with MR thermometry. Under T2-weighted MR(1.5T Siemens) imaging, guidance and targeting of the lesions with trans-perineal placement of laser applicators. Multiple cycles of laser energy were used to ablate the tumor. A MRI-compatible urethral cooling catheter was placed to prevent urethral thermal damage. Results: Intra-procedural temperature mapping allowed continuous monitoring of the ablation zone and permitted ablation control until tumor coverage was achieved. Additionally, the protective cooling effects of the urethral cooling catheter could also be seen with the temperature mapping. Post-ablation gadolinium and T2 weighted MR imaging demonstrated an ablation defect encompassing the recurrent tumor with no residual hyper-enhancing nodules. Three month follow-up shows no residual or recurrent tumor seen on MR imaging. Conclusion: This represents the first known, successful, MRI-guided, LITT procedures at 1.5T for locally recurrent prostate adenocarcinoma following RP.

  3. Abdominal aortic aneurysms in women

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Ruby C.; Schermerhorn, Marc L.

    2015-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) has long been recognized as a condition predominantly afflicting males, with sex-associated differences described for almost every aspect of the disease from pathophysiology and epidemiology to morbidity and mortality. Women are generally spared from AAA formation by the immunomodulating effects of estrogen but once they develop, the natural history of AAAs in women appears to be more aggressive, with more rapid expansion, a higher tendency to rupture at smaller diameters, and higher mortality following rupture. However, simply repairing AAA at smaller diameters in women is a debatable solution, as even elective endovascular AAA repair (EVAR) is fraught with higher morbidity and mortality in women compared to men. The goal of this review is to summarize what is currently known about the effect of gender on AAA presentation, treatment, and outcomes. Additionally, we aim to review current controversies over screening recommendations and threshold for repair in women. PMID:26747679

  4. [Non-standard method of reconstruction of the abdominal aorta for a giant aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Gaibov, A D; Baratov, A K; Sadriev, O N; Gaibova, Z V; Sharipov, Z R

    2016-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysms are encountered predominantly in elderly patients suffering from severe concomitant diseases. Therefore, the rate of various complications associated with resection of aortic aneurysm amounts to 30%, with lethality in separate cohorts of patients reaching 43.7%. According the authors' opinion, in the development of intra- and postoperative complications of special importance is the duration of aortic clamping accompanied by severe haemodynamic alterations in coronary, cerebral and renal vessels. These changes are key moments in the development of fatal outcomes. In order to reduce the duration of aortic clamp the authors suggested a non-standard surgical technique of prosthetic repair of the abdominal aorta. Presented herein is a clinical case report illustrating this technique. The patient operated on according to this technique was discharged in a satisfactory condition with no serious postoperative complications. The proposed non-standard surgical technique makes it possible to reduce the duration of aortic cross-clamping in resection of an aneurysm by 10-12 minutes.

  5. Dynamic reconstruction of full-thickness abdominal wall defects using free innervated vastus lateralis muscle flap combined with free anterolateral thigh flap.

    PubMed

    Iida, Takuya; Mihara, Makoto; Narushima, Mitsunaga; Todokoro, Takeshi; Hara, Hisako; Yoshimatu, Hidehiko; Koshima, Isao; Kadono, Takafumi

    2013-03-01

    Reconstruction of full-thickness abdominal wall defects remains a difficult surgical challenge. Although various reconstructive methods, including artificial mesh, pedicled and free flaps, have been reported, most reported reconstruction of only the fascia layer, leaving the resected rectus abdominis muscle unreconstructed. However, recent studies suggested the importance of dynamic reconstruction with functional muscle in preventing abdominal hernia in the long-term. According to the principle of reconstructive surgery, "replace lost tissue with similar tissue," a functionally and aesthetically ideal reconstruction is to reconstruct all components of the abdominal wall structure, including skin, subcutaneous fat, fascia, and muscle. We present 2 cases with full-thickness abdominal wall defects in the upper abdominal region, which we reconstructed with a free innervated vastus lateralis muscle flap combined with a free anterolateral thigh flap. The motor nerve of the vastus lateralis muscle was sutured with the intercostal nerve, and reinnervation was confirmed by electromyography. This method allows reconstruction of all components of the abdominal wall with a single flap, and dynamic reconstruction is achieved which will reduce the risk of postoperative hernia. We believe this method can be a good option for reconstruction of full-thickness abdominal wall defects with long-term stability.

  6. Pulmonary complications of abdominal wall defects.

    PubMed

    Panitch, Howard B

    2015-01-01

    The abdominal wall is an integral component of the chest wall. Defects in the ventral abdominal wall alter respiratory mechanics and can impair diaphragm function. Congenital abdominal wall defects also are associated with abnormalities in lung growth and development that lead to pulmonary hypoplasia, pulmonary hypertension, and alterations in thoracic cage formation. Although infants with ventral abdominal wall defects can experience life-threatening pulmonary complications, older children typically experience a more benign respiratory course. Studies of lung and chest wall function in older children and adolescents with congenital abdominal wall defects are few; such investigations could provide strategies for improved respiratory performance, avoidance of respiratory morbidity, and enhanced exercise ability for these children.

  7. Gluteal and abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue depots as stroma cell source: gluteal cells display increased adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation potentials.

    PubMed

    Iwen, Karl Alexander; Priewe, Anna-Christin; Winnefeld, Marc; Rose, Christian; Siemers, Frank; Rohwedel, Jürgen; Cakiroglu, Figen; Lehnert, Hendrik; Schepky, Andreas; Klein, Johannes; Kramer, Jan

    2014-06-01

    Human adipose-derived stroma cells (ADSCs) have successfully been employed in explorative therapeutic studies. Current evidence suggests that ADSCs are unevenly distributed in subcutaneous adipose tissue; therefore, the anatomical origin of ADSCs may influence clinical outcomes. This study was designed to investigate proliferation and differentiation capacities of ADSCs from the gluteal and abdominal depot of 8 females. All had normal BMI (22.01 ± 0.39 kg/m(2) ) and waist circumference (81.13 ± 2.33 cm). Examination by physicians and analysis of 31 laboratory parameters did not reveal possibly confounding medical disorders. Gluteal and abdominal adipose tissue was sampled by en bloc resection on day 7 (±1) after the last menses. Histological examination did not reveal significant depot-specific differences. As assessed by BrdU assay, proliferation of cells from both depots was similar after 24 h and analysis of 15 cell surface markers by flow cytometry identified the isolated cells as ADSCs, again without depot-specific differences. ADSCs from both depots differentiated poorly to chondroblasts. Gluteal ADSCs displayed significantly higher adipogenic differentiation potential than abdominal cells. Osteogenic differentiation was most pronounced in gluteal cells, whereas differentiation of abdominal ADSCs was severely impaired. Our data demonstrate a depot-specific difference in ADSC differentiation potential with abdominal cells failing to meet the criteria of multipotent ADSCs. This finding should be taken into account in future explorations of ADSC-derived therapeutic strategies.

  8. Major Pelvic Bleeding Following a Stapled Transanal Rectal Resection: Use of Laparoscopy as a Diagnostic Tool

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Abdul Qayyum; Keane, Sean

    2016-01-01

    Stapled transanal rectal resection (STARR) and stapled hemorrhoidopexy (SH) are well-established techniques for treating rectal prolapse and obstructed defecation syndrome (ODS). Occasionally, they can be associated with severe complications. We describe the case of a 59-year-old woman who underwent STARR for ODS and developed a postoperative pelvic hemorrhage. A computed tomography (CT) scan revealed a vast pelvic, retroperitoneal hematoma and free gas in the abdomen. Laparoscopy ruled out any bowel lesions, but identified a hematoma of the pelvis. Flexible sigmoidoscopy showed a small leakage of the rectal suture. The patient was treated conservatively and recovered completely. Surgeons performing STARR and SH must be aware of the risk of this rare, but severe, complication. If the patient is not progressing after a STARR or SH, a CT scan can be indicated to rule out intra-abdominal and pelvic hemorrhage. Laparoscopy is a diagnostic tool and should be associated with intraluminal exploration with flexible sigmoidoscopy. PMID:27847791

  9. COMBAT WOUNDS OF THE ABDOMINAL ORGANS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    exteriorization of the injured segment as a loop colostomy . A smaller percentage of the colonic injuries required resection of extensive lesions with double...barrel colostomy . Most liver injuries were managed by drainage alone or by suture and drainage. Resection was required in only 15 of the 112 hepatic...solid organs such as the liver, spleen, and kidney. Massive liver injury with hemorrhage and postoperative sepsis, usually after colostomy , were the

  10. [Long-term survival following resection of primary rectal cancer metachronous metastases and salvage surgeries for relapsed lesions after stereotactic body radiotherapy for lung metastases - a case report].

    PubMed

    Yokosuka, Tetsuya; Nakajima, Yasushi; Kobayashi, Toshiko; Takeda, Atsuya; Yasuno, Masamichi

    2014-11-01

    A 66-year-old man underwent abdominoperineal resection for rectal cancer in 2003, followed by liver resection for a solitary liver metastasis in 2005. In 2006, the patient underwent abdominal para-aortic lymph node dissection, which was performed concurrently with partial resections of 3 metastases in the right lung. New metastatic lesions were subsequently diagnosed in S8 of the right lung and S1+2 of the left lung. The patient underwent stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for both lesions. However, the lesions relapsed and salvage surgeries were subsequently performed. These included a partial resection in 2009 for the lesion in the right lung and an upper division segmentectomy in 2010 for the lesion in the left lung. Currently, 11 years after resection of the primary rectal cancer, the patient is asymptomatic, without any signs of recurrence. In this report, we describe the use of SBRT for the treatment of colorectal cancer pulmonary metastases, and the use of salvage surgery for relapsed lesions.

  11. [Retroperitoneal liposarcoma as etiology of abdominal pain. Case report and literature review].

    PubMed

    Pérez-Ponce, Yisvanth; Castellanos-Alejandre, Raúl; Guerrero-Romero, J Francisco; Estrada-León, Felipe; Torres-Lobatón, Alfonso

    2008-01-01

    Soft tissue sarcomas are very uncommon types of tumors, with their embryological origin in the mesoderm and in nerve structures of the neuroectodermic layer. They represent only 1.5% of cases in the National Registry of Malignant Tumors in Mexico. They can be encountered anywhere connective soft tissue is found. Because of their specialized localization, retroperitoneal soft tissue sarcomas have a propensity to remain asymptomatic for long periods of time and reach a large size before being diagnosed. The only accepted treatment is wide surgical excision with clear margins, without a clear benefit for adjuvant treatment. The very uncommon nature of these tumors and their varied histopathology, site and behavior classify them as a difficult entity in terms of treatment. We present here the case of a 66-year-old female with a left-side retroperitoneal tumor, complaining only of vague abdominal pain as the presenting symptom. A CT-guided needle biopsy reported a sarcoma and the patient was subjected to laparatomy with complete resection of the tumor (30 x 13 x 10 cm). Histopathological report demonstrated a low-grade retroperitoneal sarcoma and free macroscopic and microscopic borders, without obvious invasion except for left kidney and ureter. The patient refused adjuvant treatment, and she is disease-free 7 years after treatment. Retroperitoneal sarcomas can cause pain and reach very large sizes. The best treatment available is wide surgical resection with clear margins. The most important prognostic factors are free margins, type of resection, age of patient and tumor histology.

  12. [Early postoperative intestinal motility following abdominal surgery in an animal experiment].

    PubMed

    Schippers, E; Braun, J; Erhardt, W; Schumpelick, V

    1990-01-01

    Gastrointestinal myoelectrical activity was registered in 6 dogs after different surgical procedures such as laparotomy, segmental resection of the jejunum and right hemicolectomy. Animals were studied in the fasted- and fed state and after pharmacological stimulation with Ceruletide. The electrical activity was recorded by means of 6 bipolar electrodes implanted along the intestinal wall. Abdominal surgery abolished normal motility in the stomach and small intestine only for a short period of time. The time for the reappearance of regularly recurring activity fronts varied with the type of the surgical procedure from 3 h after segmental resection of the jejunum to 49 h after colon resection. Severe disturbances of the BER (basic electrical rhythm) in the stomach as tachygastria and tachyarrhythmia persist even after restoration of the MMC (migrating motor complex) in the small intestine. Feeding induced a typical fedpattern but never before restoration of the MMC. Stimulation of the intestine during postoperative ileus with Ceruletide increases segmental myoelectrical activity. The period of postoperative ileus was not reduced.

  13. Automatic abdominal lymph node detection method based on local intensity structure analysis from 3D x-ray CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Yoshihiko; Nimura, Yukitaka; Kitasaka, Takayuki; Mizuno, Shinji; Furukawa, Kazuhiro; Goto, Hidemi; Fujiwara, Michitaka; Misawa, Kazunari; Ito, Masaaki; Nawano, Shigeru; Mori, Kensaku

    2013-03-01

    This paper presents an automated method of abdominal lymph node detection to aid the preoperative diagnosis of abdominal cancer surgery. In abdominal cancer surgery, surgeons must resect not only tumors and metastases but also lymph nodes that might have a metastasis. This procedure is called lymphadenectomy or lymph node dissection. Insufficient lymphadenectomy carries a high risk for relapse. However, excessive resection decreases a patient's quality of life. Therefore, it is important to identify the location and the structure of lymph nodes to make a suitable surgical plan. The proposed method consists of candidate lymph node detection and false positive reduction. Candidate lymph nodes are detected using a multi-scale blob-like enhancement filter based on local intensity structure analysis. To reduce false positives, the proposed method uses a classifier based on support vector machine with the texture and shape information. The experimental results reveal that it detects 70.5% of the lymph nodes with 13.0 false positives per case.

  14. Novel Totally Laparoscopic Endolumenal Rectal Resection With Transanal Natural Orifice Specimen Extraction (NOSE) Without Rectal Stump Opening: A Modification of Our Recently Published Clean Surgical Technique in a Porcine Model.

    PubMed

    Kvasha, Anton; Hadary, Amram; Biswas, Seema; Szvalb, Sergio; Willenz, Udi; Waksman, Igor

    2015-06-01

    Our group has recently described a novel technique for clean endolumenal bowel resection, in which abdominal and transanal approaches were used. In the current study, 2 modifications of this procedure were tested for feasibility in a porcine model. A laparoscopic approach to the peritoneal cavity was employed in rectal mobilization; this was followed by a transanal rectorectal intussusception and pull-through (IPT). IPT was established in a stepwise fashion. First, the proximal margin of resection was attached to the shaft of the anvil of an end-to-end circular stapler with a ligature around the rectum. Second, this complex was pulled transanally to produce IPT. Once IPT was established, a second ligature was placed around the rectum approximating the proximal and distal resection margins. This was followed by a purse string suture through 2 bowel walls, encircling the shaft of the anvil just proximal to the ligatures. The specimen was resected and extracted by making a full-thickness incision through the 2 bowel walls distal to the previously placed purse string suture and ligatures. The anastomosis was achieved by applying the stapler. The technique was found to be feasible. Peritoneal samples, collected after transanal specimen extraction, did not demonstrate bacterial growth. Although, this is a novel and evolving procedure, its minimally invasive nature, as well as aseptic bowel manipulation during endolumenal rectal resection, has the potential to limit the complications associated with abdominal wall incision and surgical site infection.

  15. Intestinal injury mechanisms after blunt abdominal impact.

    PubMed

    Cripps, N P; Cooper, G J

    1997-03-01

    Intestinal injury is frequent after non-penetrating abdominal trauma, particularly after modern, high-energy transfer impacts. Under these circumstances, delay in the diagnosis of perforation is a major contributor to morbidity and mortality. This study establishes patterns of intestinal injury after blunt trauma by non-penetrating projectiles and examines relationships between injury distribution and abdominal wall motion. Projectile impacts of variable momentum were produced in 31 anaesthetised pigs to cause abdominal wall motion of varying magnitude and velocity. No small bowel injury was observed at initial impact velocity of less than 40 m/s despite gross abdominal compression. At higher velocity, injury to the small bowel was frequent, irrespective of the degree of abdominal compression (P = 0.00044). Large bowel injury was observed at all impact velocities and at all degrees of abdominal compression. This study confirms the potential for intestinal injury in high velocity, low momentum impacts which do not greatly compress the abdominal cavity and demonstrates apparent differences in injury mechanisms for the small bowel and colon. Familiarity with injury mechanisms may reduce delays in the diagnosis of intestinal perforation in both military and civilian situations.

  16. Traumatic abdominal hernia complicated by necrotizing fasciitis.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Pérez, Aleix; Garrigós-Ortega, Gonzalo; Gómez-Abril, Segundo Ángel; Martí-Martínez, Eva; Torres-Sánchez, Teresa

    2014-11-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is a critical illness involving skin and soft tissues, which may develop after blunt abdominal trauma causing abdominal wall hernia and representing a great challenge for physicians. A 52-year-old man was brought to the emergency department after a road accident, presenting blunt abdominal trauma with a large non-reducible mass in the lower-right abdomen. A first, CT showed abdominal hernia without signs of complication. Three hours after ICU admission, he developed hemodynamic instability. Therefore, a new CT scan was requested, showing signs of hernia complication. He was moved to the operating room where a complete transversal section of an ileal loop was identified. Five hours after surgery, he presented a new episode of hemodynamic instability with signs of skin and soft tissue infection. Due to the high clinical suspicion of necrotizing fasciitis development, wide debridement was performed. Following traumatic abdominal wall hernia (TAWH), patients can present unsuspected injuries in abdominal organs. Helical CT can be falsely negative in the early moments, leading to misdiagnosis. Necrotizing fasciitis is a potentially fatal infection and, consequently, resuscitation measures, wide-spectrum antibiotics, and early surgical debridement are required. This type of fasciitis can develop after blunt abdominal trauma following wall hernia without skin disruption.

  17. The prognosis of childhood abdominal migraine

    PubMed Central

    Dignan, F; Abu-Arafeh, I; Russell, G

    2001-01-01

    AIMS—To determine the clinical course of childhood abdominal migraine, seven to 10 years after the diagnosis.
METHODS—A total of 54 children with abdominal migraine were studied; 35 were identified from a population survey carried out on Aberdeen schoolchildren between 1991 and 1993, and 19 from outpatient records of children in the same age group who had attended the Royal Aberdeen Children's Hospital. Controls were 54 children who did not have abdominal pain in childhood, matched for age and sex, obtained from either the population survey or the patient administration system. Main outcome measures were presence or resolution of abdominal migraine and past or present history of headache fulfilling the International Headache Society (IHS) criteria for the diagnosis of migraine.
RESULTS—Abdominal migraine had resolved in 31 cases (61%). Seventy per cent of cases with abdominal migraine were either current (52%) or previous (18%) sufferers from headaches that fulfilled the IHS criteria for migraine, compared to 20% of the controls.
CONCLUSIONS—These results support the concept of abdominal migraine as a migraine prodrome, and suggest that our diagnostic criteria for the condition are robust.

 PMID:11316687

  18. Management of intra-abdominal hypertension and abdominal compartment syndrome: a review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Patients in the intensive care unit (ICU) are at risk of developing of intra abdominal hypertension (IAH) and abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS). Aim: This review seeks to define IAH and ACS, identify the aetiology and presentation of IAH and ACS, identify IAP measurement techniques, identify current management and discuss the implications of IAH and ACS for nursing practice. A search of the electronic databases was supervised by a health librarian. The electronic data bases Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL); Medline, EMBASE, and the World Wide Web was undertaken from 1996- January 2011 using MeSH and key words which included but not limited to: abdominal compartment syndrome, intra -abdominal hypertension, intra-abdominal pressure in adult populations met the search criteria and were reviewed by three authors using a critical appraisal tool. Data derived from the retrieved material are discussed under the following themes: (1) etiology of intra-abdominal hypertension; (2) strategies for measuring intra-abdominal pressure (3) the manifestation of abdominal compartment syndrome; and (4) the importance of nursing assessment, observation and interventions. Intra-abdominal pressure (IAP) and abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) have the potential to alter organ perfusion and compromise organ function. PMID:24499574

  19. Torsion of an intra-abdominal testis.

    PubMed

    Lewis; Roller; Parra; Cotlar

    2000-09-01

    To present a case of torsion of a nonneoplastic intra-abdominal testis with an unusual clinical presentation.A 26-year-old active duty Navy Petty Officer presented to the emergency department on 3 occasions over a 5-day period with lower abdominal pain. Physical examination demonstrated acute tenderness in the left lower quadrant with sugestion of a normal spermatic cord and atrophic testis in the left scrotum. Computed tomography scan demonstrated an intra-abdominal lesion near the internal inguinal ring. The patient underwent surgical exploration through an inguinal incision. Torsion of a nonviable intra-abdominal testis was present. The scrotum contained only the vas deferens and cremasteric muscle. An orchiectomy was performed with removal of the vas deferens and other cord structures.The unusual clinical finding of acute torsion of an intra-abdominal testis, associated with an apparent atrophic scrotal testis, presented a confusing clinical picture. Computed tomography scan did not clarify the issue sufficiently to establish a definite preoperative diagnosis. Clinical suspicion prompted early surgical intervention. Review of the current literature produced 60 reported cases of torsion of an intra-abdominal testis. Two thirds of these involved testicular neoplasm, usually seminoma. Although the clinical presentation varied, most patients had recent onset of lower abdominal pain associated with tenderness and, in half the cases, a mass. Patients almost always presented with an absent scrotal testis on the involved side, and not infrequently reported previous surgery thought to be an orchiectomy.Diagnosis of an intra-abdominal testicular torsion is rare, particularly when no neoplasm is present. A high index of suspicion must be maintained whenever there is abdominal pain and undescended testis. The surgical history and imaging studies may not clarify a confusing clinical picture.

  20. Advances in abdominal MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Ferrucci, J T

    1998-01-01

    Major technical advances in MR imaging have led to its wider use in the evaluation of abdominal disease. The principle new pulse sequence is the RARE sequence for T2-weighted imaging. Multishot and breath-hold single-shot RARE techniques are now widely used, and both have performed as well as conventional spin-echo imaging with far shorter acquisition times. The most notable improvements have been in the detection and characterization of hepatic lesions. Two liver-specific contrast agents received FDA approval during 1997: SPIO particles or ferumoxide and mangafodipir trisodium, a hepatocyte-specific agent. Both of these agents provide considerable benefit in the detection and characterization of hepatic lesions. Manganese enhancement has also proved useful in MR imaging of the pancreas, although fat-suppressed T1-weighted imaging with dynamic gadolinium enhancement has also yielded results comparable with those of contrast-enhanced CT. MR hydrography, a generic term for static fluid imaging, is another derivative of RARE fast T2-weighted imaging. MRCP, the best known example of MR hydrography, has been rapidly and widely employed as a primary method for imaging the biliary and pancreatic ducts and has become competitive with ERCP. MR vascular imaging, especially portal venography, has been used for noninvasive imaging of portal venous disease in Budd Chiari disease, before placement of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunts, and for pancreatic cancer staging. Finally, the development of conventional phased-array body coils and endorectal coils has enabled high-quality MR imaging of perirectal disease (including Crohn disease, fistula in ano, and postpartum sphincter dysfunction). Future abdominal applications of MR imaging will involve second-generation MR interventional techniques, including use of open systems, functional or diffusion-weighted imaging exploiting the molecular activity of tissues, and virtual MR endoscopy. Although CT continues to evolve

  1. Intensity modulated radiation-therapy for preoperative posterior abdominal wall irradiation of retroperitoneal liposarcomas

    SciTech Connect

    Bossi, Alberto . E-mail: alberto.bossi@uz.kuleuven.ac.be; De Wever, Ivo; Van Limbergen, Erik; Vanstraelen, Bianca

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Preoperative external-beam radiation therapy (preop RT) in the management of Retroperitoneal Liposarcomas (RPLS) typically involves the delivery of radiation to the entire tumor mass: yet this may not be necessary. The purpose of this study is to evaluate a new strategy of preop RT for RPLS in which the target volume is limited to the contact area between the tumoral mass and the posterior abdominal wall. Methods and Materials: Between June 2000 and Jan 2005, 18 patients with the diagnosis of RPLS have been treated following a pilot protocol of pre-op RT, 50 Gy in 25 fractions of 2 Gy/day. The Clinical Target Volume (CTV) has been limited to the posterior abdominal wall, region at higher risk for local relapse. A Three-Dimensional conformal (3D-CRT) and an Intensity Modulated (IMRT) plan were generated and compared; toxicity was reported following the National Cancer Institute (NCI) Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v3.0. Results: All patients completed the planned treatment and the acute toxicity was tolerable: 2 patients experienced Grade 3 and 1 Grade 2 anorexia while 2 patients developed Grade 2 nausea. IMRT allows a better sparing of the ipsilateral and the contralateral kidney. All tumors were successfully resected without major complications. At a median follow-up of 27 months 2 patients developed a local relapse and 1 lung metastasis. Conclusions: Our strategy of preop RT is feasible and well tolerated: the rate of resectability is not compromised by limiting the preop CTV to the posterior abdominal wall and a better critical-structures sparing is obtained with IMRT.

  2. [A case of curative resection after downsizing chemotherapy in initially unresectable locally advanced intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma].

    PubMed

    Aoki, Yu; Suzuki, Takayuki; Kato, Atsushi; Shimizu, Hiroaki; Ohtsuka, Masayuki; Yoshitomi, Hideyuki; Furukawa, Katsunori; Takayashiki, Tsukasa; Kuboki, Satoshi; Takano, Shigetsugu; Okamura, Daiki; Suzuki, Daisuke; Sakai, Nozomu; Kagawa, Shingo; Miyazaki, Masaru

    2014-11-01

    This case report describes an 83-year-old man with intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma who was referred by a local hospital. Abdominal computed tomography (CT) showed a large tumor in hepatic segments 4, 5, and 8 involving the right hepatic vein and inferior vena cava, which is normally indicative of an unresectable locally advanced tumor. After systemic chemotherapy with gemcitabine and cisplatin, the observed decrease in the level of tumor marker suggested that the cancer was responding to treatment, while radiological findings showed the main tumor shrunk without the presence of distant metastases. Thus, hepatic left trisectionectomy with bile duct resection was performed after portal vein embolization. Pathological examination revealed negative margins (R0). Eighteen months after surgery, the patient is free of disease and shows no signs of recurrence. An initially unresectable, locally advanced biliary tract cancer may be down sized by chemotherapy, which makes radical resection possible, at least in a proportion of patients. This approach provides longer survival and may have a potential for disease eradication as a new multidisciplinary approach for patients with unresectable locally advanced biliary tract cancer.

  3. Liver resection using a water jet.

    PubMed

    Une, Y; Uchino, J; Horie, T; Sato, Y; Ogasawara, K; Kakita, A; Sano, F

    1989-01-01

    The water-jet method has been used during hepatic resection. The instrument cuts the hepatic tissue with the high pressure of the fine water flow, while the exposed elastic intrahepatic vessels are spared injury. A comparative study on the water-jet method with the previously employed conventional methods was undertaken. Hepatic resections were performed on 35 patients using the water-jet method. Cirrhosis of the liver was associated with 10 of the 24 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma. An ordinary saline solution was used as the jet, which was projected at a pressure of between 12 kg/cm2 and 20 kg/cm2 through a 0.15/mm-diameter nozzle. A higher jet pressure was needed to cut the fibrotic hepatic parenchyma. In the case of normal liver, the intrahepatic vessels of more than 0.2 mm were well preserved. In most of the cases, the loss of blood when cutting the hepatic parenchyma can be easily reduced with a jet pressure of 15-16 kg/cm2, thus preserving the fine vessels more than 0.2 mm in diameter without injury. When the same pressure was applied in the cutting of a cirrhotic liver, it took much longer time compared to that of a non-cirrhotic normal liver parenchyma. The cut surface was smooth compared to that after using CUSA, although its disadvantages lie in the formation of air bubbles, which obscure the operative field. The controlled projection of a jet of water under optimal pressure may ensure a safe hepatic resection of both normal and cirrhotic livers. Furthermore, because of its uncomplicated form, a wide range of applications can be expected, while the lower cost will also expedite its large-scale use for economic reasons.

  4. [Laparoscopic abdominal drainage by sterile destructive pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, N A; Rodoman, G V; Shalaeva, T I; Trefilova, O I; Sosikova, N L

    2009-01-01

    90 patients with acute pancreatitis were observed, in 60 of them laparoscopic drainage was performed. The procedure by sterile pancreatonecrosis is indicated only in presence of extent amount of exudate in abdominal cavity. Duration of draining the abdominal cavity should be strictly limited because of the high risk of septic complications. Contraindications for the abdominal drainage by acute necrotic pancreatitis are not only adhesions in the abdomen and shock state of the patient at the moment of procedure necessity, but also unstable hemodynamics in anamnesis and even by the arterial pressure downtrend.

  5. Soft tissue coverage in abdominal wall reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Donald P; Butler, Charles E

    2013-10-01

    Abdominal wall defects requiring soft tissue coverage can be either partial-thickness defects or full-thickness composite defects. Soft tissue flap reconstruction offers significant advantages in defects that cannot be closed primarily. Flap reconstruction is performed in a single-stage procedure obviating chronic wound management. If the defect size exceeds the availability of local soft tissue for coverage, regional pedicled flaps can be delivered into the abdominal wall while maintaining blood supply from their donor site. Microsurgical free tissue transfer increases the capacity to provide soft tissue coverage for abdominal wall defects that are not amenable to either local or regional flap coverage.

  6. Intra-abdominal bleeding in appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Thongprayoon, C; Pasa-Arj, S

    1991-08-01

    A 34-year-old woman, gravida 6 with 10 weeks of gestation was admitted because of abdominal pain and fainting. On physical examination she had hypotension, was pale with abdominal tenderness and guarding. Culdocentesis yielded unclotted blood. Immediate laparotomy was performed, because a diagnosis of ectopic pregnancy was made. About 2,500 ml of fresh blood was found in the abdominal cavity. Appendicular artery tear caused active arterial bleeding. The torn appendicular artery was observed to be the consequence of perforated appendicitis, which, in turn, was caused by a faecalith. Appendectomy was performed and she made a good recovery.

  7. Laparoscopic repair of abdominal incisional hernia

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xue-Fei

    2016-01-01

    Abdominal incisional hernia is a common complication after open abdominal operations. Laparoscopic procedures have obvious mini-invasive advantages for surgical treatment of abdominal incisional hernia, especially to cases with big hernia defect. Laparoscopic repair of incisional hernia has routine mode but the actual operations will be various according to the condition of every hernia. Key points of these operations include design of the position of trocars, closure of defects and fixation of meshes. The details of these issues and experiences of perioperative evaluation and treatment will be talked about in this article. PMID:27761446

  8. Complex osteotomies vertebral column resection and decancellation.

    PubMed

    Obeid, Ibrahim; Bourghli, Anouar; Boissière, Louis; Vital, Jean-Marc; Barrey, Cédric

    2014-07-01

    Pedicle subtraction osteotomy (PSO) is nowadays widely used to treat sagittal imbalance. Some complex malalignment cases cannot be treated by a PSO, whereas the imbalance is coronal or mixed or the sagittal imbalance is major and cannot be treated by a single PSO. The aim of this article was to review these complex situations--coronal imbalance, mixed imbalance, two-level PSO, vertebral column resection, and vertebral column decancellation, and to focus on their specificities. It wills also to evoke the utility of navigation in these complex cases.

  9. Adjuvant therapy of resectable rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Minsky, Bruce D

    2002-08-01

    The two conventional treatments for clinically resectable rectal cancer are surgery followed by postoperative combined modality therapy and preoperative combined modality therapy followed by surgery and postoperative chemotherapy. Preoperative therapy (most commonly combined modality therapy) has gained acceptance as a standard adjuvant therapy. The potential advantages of the preoperative approach include decreased tumor seeding, less acute toxicity, increased radiosensitivity due to more oxygenated cells, and enhanced sphincter preservation. There are a number of new chemotherapeutic agents that have been developed for the treatment of patients with colorectal cancer. Phase I/II trials examining the use of new chemotherapeutic agents in combination with pelvic radiation therapy are in progress.

  10. Harlequin Syndrome Following Resection of Mediastinal Ganglioneuroma

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Yeong Jeong; Son, Jongbae; Cho, Jong Ho

    2017-01-01

    Harlequin syndrome is a rare disorder of the sympathetic nervous system characterized by unilateral facial flushing and sweating. Although its etiology is unknown, this syndrome appears to be a dysfunction of the autonomic nervous system. To the best of our knowledge, thus far, very few reports on perioperative Harlequin syndrome after thoracic surgery have been published in the thoracic surgical literature. Here, we present the case of a 6-year-old patient who developed this unusual syndrome following the resection of a posterior mediastinal mass. PMID:28382275

  11. Retrosigmoid approach for resection of petroclival meningioma.

    PubMed

    Nanda, Anil; Ambekar, Sudheer

    2014-01-01

    This video describes the classic retrosigmoid approach for the resection of petroclival lesions. In this procedure, a careful dissection of the tumor within the arachnoid plane from the neurovascular structures is described. The key steps in the procedure are outlined, and include positioning, tumor devascularization, decompression, dissection from lower cranial nerves, IV, V cranial nerves and the VII-VIII complex and from the brainstem and closure of the dura, bone flap and the incision. The video can be found here: http://youtu.be/DmutL7dBOxI .

  12. Registration-free laparoscope augmentation for intra-operative liver resection planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feuerstein, Marco; Mussack, Thomas; Heining, Sandro M.; Navab, Nassir

    2007-03-01

    In recent years, an increasing number of liver tumor indications were treated by minimally invasive laparoscopic resection. Besides the restricted view, a major issue in laparoscopic liver resection is the enhanced visualization of (hidden) vessels, which supply the tumorous liver segment and thus need to be divided prior to the resection. To navigate the surgeon to these vessels, pre-operative abdominal imaging data can hardly be used due to intraoperative organ deformations mainly caused by appliance of carbon dioxide pneumoperitoneum and respiratory motion. While regular respiratory motion can be gated and synchronized intra-operatively, motion caused by pneumoperitoneum is individual for every patient and difficult to estimate. Therefore, we propose to use an optically tracked mobile C-arm providing cone-beam CT imaging capability intraoperatively. The C-arm is able to visualize soft tissue by means of its new flat panel detector and is calibrated offline to relate its current position and orientation to the coordinate system of a reconstructed volume. Also the laparoscope is optically tracked and calibrated offline, so both laparoscope and C-arm are registered in the same tracking coordinate system. Intra-operatively, after patient positioning, port placement, and carbon dioxide insufflation, the liver vessels are contrasted and scanned during patient exhalation. Immediately, a three-dimensional volume is reconstructed. Without any further need for patient registration, the volume can be directly augmented on the live laparoscope video, visualizing the contrasted vessels. This augmentation provides the surgeon with advanced visual aid for the localization of veins, arteries, and bile ducts to be divided or sealed.

  13. Successful surgical resection of solitary plasmacytoma of the liver mimicking hepatocellular carcinoma. A case report.

    PubMed

    Mirarchi, Mariateresa; De Raffele, Emilio; Bacci, Francesco; Cuicchi, Dajana; Lecce, Ferdinando; Cola, Bruno

    Solitary extramedullary plasmacitomas (SEMP) of the liver are very rare. We report the case of an elderly woman with a huge symptomatic SEMP of the liver mimicking hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The patient was a 89-year-old woman who presented with severe abdominal pain and a huge solid mass in the right hypochondrium. The laboratory data on admission revealed normal liver function tests. A multiphasic computed tomography (CT) showed a huge solid mass of the left hemiliver, hypoattenuating on noncontrast images, dishomogeneously hyperenhancing in the late arterial phase, with washout in the portal venous and equilibrium phases. A 18F-FDG positron emission tomography (18F-FDG PET)-CT scan documented a marked FDG uptake within the lesion, without evidence of extrahepatic metastases. We considered the clinical and radiologic findings consistent with the diagnosis of high-grade HCC with areas of intratumoral necrosis preluding to possible tumour rupture. Surgical resection was ultimately considered feasible with a reasonable risk and the patient underwent left hepatectomy with diaphragmatic resection. Pathological examination exhibited an extramedullary plasmacytoma. At immunohistochemical analysis neoplastic cells were positive for CD45, CD38, IRF4, HTPD52, kappa-chain, but negative for lambda- chain; Mib-1 proliferation index was 50%. Subsequent clinical evaluation excluded any sign of multiple myeloma, so that a diagnosis of truly localized SEMP of the liver was finally established. To our knowledge, this is the first case of a solitary extramedullary plasmacitoma of the liver undergoing successful radical liver resection. The patient is alive and well 5 years after surgery without evidence of local recurrence and of systemic disease.

  14. Risk factors for complications after ileocolonic resection for Crohn’s disease with a major focus on the impact of preoperative immunosuppressive and biologic therapy: A retrospective international multicentre study

    PubMed Central

    Spinelli, Antonino; Suzuki, Yasuo; Saad-Hossne, Rogerio; Teixeira, Fabio Vieira; de Albuquerque, Idblan Carvalho; da Silva, Rodolff Nunes; de Barcelos, Ivan Folchini; Takeuchi, Ken; Yamada, Akihiro; Shimoyama, Takahiro; da Silva Kotze, Lorete Maria; Sacchi, Matteo; Danese, Silvio; Kotze, Paulo Gustavo

    2015-01-01

    Background Author note: TY, AS, YS, FVT and PGK designed the study. All authors did data collection and gave scientific contribution to the study design and discussion. TY, AS and PGK drafted the article. All authors read and approved the final version of the manuscript.In the era of biologic agents, risk factors for complications following resection for Crohn’s disease have not been fully identified. In particular, the association of preoperative use of immunosuppressive and biologic agents with the incidence of complications after resection remains to be elucidated. Aim This retrospective multicentre study aimed to identify risk factors for complications after ileocolonic resection for Crohn’s disease, with a major focus on the impact of preoperative immunosuppressive and biologic therapy. Methods A total of 231 consecutive patients who underwent ileocolonic resections for active Crohn’s disease in seven inflammatory bowel disease referral centres from three countries (Japan, Brazil and Italy) were included. The following variables were investigated as potential risk factors: age at surgery, gender, behaviour of Crohn’s disease (perforating vs. non-perforating disease), smoking, preoperative use (within eight weeks before surgery) of steroids, immunosuppressants and biologic agents, previous resection, blood transfusion, surgical procedure (open vs. laparoscopic approach), and type of anastomosis (side-to-side vs. end-to-end). Postoperative complications occurring within 30 days after surgery were recorded. Results The rates of overall complications, intra-abdominal sepsis, and anastomotic leak were 24%, 12% and 8%, respectively. Neither immunosuppressive nor biologic therapy prior to surgery was significantly associated with the incidence of overall complications, intra-abdominal sepsis or anastomotic leak. In multivariate analysis, blood transfusion, perforating disease and previous resection were significant risk factors for overall complications (odds

  15. Dose optimization in gynecological 3D image based interstitial brachytherapy using martinez universal perineal interstitial template (MUPIT) -an institutional experience

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Pramod Kumar; Sharma, Praveen Kumar; Swamidas, Jamema V; Mahantshetty, Umesh; Deshpande, D. D.; Manjhi, Jayanand; Rai, D V

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the dose optimization in 3D image based gynecological interstitial brachytherapy using Martinez Universal Perineal Interstitial Template (MUPIT). Axial CT image data set of 20 patients of gynecological cancer who underwent external radiotherapy and high dose rate (HDR) interstitial brachytherapy using MUPIT was employed to delineate clinical target volume (CTV) and organs at risk (OARs). Geometrical and graphical optimization were done for optimum CTV coverage and sparing of OARs. Coverage Index (CI), dose homogeneity index (DHI), overdose index (OI), dose non-uniformity ratio (DNR), external volume index (EI), conformity index (COIN) and dose volume parameters recommended by GEC-ESTRO were evaluated. The mean CTV, bladder and rectum volume were 137 ± 47cc, 106 ± 41cc and 50 ± 25cc, respectively. Mean CI, DHI and DNR were 0.86 ± 0.03, 0.69 ± 0.11 and 0.31 ± 0.09, while the mean OI, EI, and COIN were 0.08 ± 0.03, 0.07 ± 0.05 and 0.79 ± 0.05, respectively. The estimated mean CTV D90 was 76 ± 11Gy and D100 was 63 ± 9Gy. The different dosimetric parameters of bladder D2cc, D1cc and D0.1cc were 76 ± 11Gy, 81 ± 14Gy, and 98 ± 21Gy and of rectum/recto-sigmoid were 80 ± 17Gy, 85 ± 13Gy, and 124 ± 37Gy, respectively. Dose optimization yields superior coverage with optimal values of indices. Emerging data on 3D image based brachytherapy with reporting and clinical correlation of DVH parameters outcome is enterprizing and provides definite assistance in improving the quality of brachytherapy implants. DVH parameter for urethra in gynecological implants needs to be defined further. PMID:25190999

  16. [Churg-Strauss abdominal manifestation].

    PubMed

    Suarez-Moreno, Roberto; Ponce-Pérez, Luis Virgilio; Margain-Paredes, Miguel Angel; Garza-de la Llave, Heriberto; Madrazo-Navarro, Mario; Espinosa-Álvarez, Arturo

    2014-01-01

    Antecedentes: la enfermedad de Churg-Strauss es poco común, idiopática, caracterizada por hipereosinofilia en sangre y tejidos, aunada a vasculitis sistémica en pacientes con antecedentes de asma o rinitis alérgica. Las manifestaciones gastrointestinales del síndrome de Churg Strauss se caracterizan por dolor abdominal, seguido de diarrea y hemorragia en 31-45% de los casos. Caso clínico: paciente masculino con antecedente de asma que acudió a consulta por abdomen agudo con probable apendicitis aguda; durante el protocolo de estudio se diagnosticó síndrome de Churg Strauss, con manifestaciones intestinales. Conclusión: el síndrome de Churg Strauss es una vasculitis poco frecuente que puede manifestarse con síntomas intestinales, como en este caso; es importante tenerlo en mente a la hora de los diagnósticos diferenciales. Existen pocos reportes con este síndrome asociado con abdomen agudo, todos ellos con mal pronóstico.

  17. [On the recurrence risk with partial larynx resections (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Flach, M

    1978-06-01

    28 cases of recurrences after 127 vertical and horizontal partial larynx resections (22 per cent) were analysed. Unfavourable preconditions for partial resections are the affliction of the ary cartilage and arrest of vocal chord movility. The hemiresections according to Hautant have the heighest recidivation percentage (40 per cent) judging from the observations available. Radical operations after failured partial resections are uncertain as to their prognoses.

  18. [A case of appendceal cancer with abdominal, intraabdominal, and retroperitoneal abscesses].

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Yasuhiro; Nakajima, Masao; Tomochika, Shinobu; Matoba, Katsuhiro

    2014-11-01

    A 65-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital owing to difficulty walking and an abdominal tumor in the right lower abdomen. An irregular mass with calcification was detected in her cecum, and abdominal, intraabdominal, and retroperitoneal abscess was detected by computed tomography(CT). An irregular mass was diagnosed as Group 5 adenocarcinoma by biopsy. After the inflammation improved by abscess drainage, we conducted ileocecal resection and fenestrated the abscess. Pathological analysis showed well-differentiated tubular adenocarcinoma: dimensions 20 × 20 mm, pSS, stroma: med, INF a, ly1, v0, pPM0 (70 mm), pDM0 (70 mm), pRM0 (8mm), LN(-): #201: (0/9), fStageII. Thepatie nts can now walk, and she remains in good health and has been recurrence-free 8 months after surgery. To our knowledge, colon cancer with an abdominal abscess is comparatively rare, and we discuss this in light of the literature.

  19. Propeller flap reconstruction of abdominal defects: review of the literature and case report.

    PubMed

    Scaglioni, Mario F; Giuseppe, Alberto Di; Chang, Edward I

    2015-01-01

    The abdominal wall is perfused anteriorly by the superior and deep epigastric vessels with a smaller contribution from the superficial system. The lateral abdominal wall is perfused predominantly from perforators arising from the intercostal vessels. Reconstruction of soft tissue defects involving the abdomen presents a difficult challenge for reconstructive surgeons. Pedicle perforator propeller flaps can be used to reconstruct defects of the abdomen, and here we present a thorough review of the literature as well as a case illustrating the perforasome propeller flap concept. A patient underwent resection for dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans resulting in a large defect of the epigastric soft tissue. A propeller flap was designed based on a perforator arising from the superior deep epigastric vessels and was rotated 90° into the defect allowing primary closure of the donor site. The patient healed uneventfully and was without recurrent disease 37 months following reconstruction. Perforator propeller flaps can be used successfully in reconstruction of abdominal defects and should be incorporated into the armamentarium of reconstructive microsurgeons already facile with perforator dissections.

  20. The Feasibility of Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy in Patients with Previous Abdominal Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Diez, J.; Delbene, R.; Ferreres, A.

    1998-01-01

    A retrospective study was carried in 1500 patients submitted to elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy to ascertain its feasibility in patients with previous abdominal surgery. In 411 patients (27.4%) previous infraumbilical intraperitoneal surgery had been performed, and 106 of them (7.06%) had 2 or more operations. Twenty five patients (1.66%) had previous supraumbilical intraperitoneal operations (colonic resection, hydatid liver cysts, gastrectomies, etc.) One of them had been operated 3 times. In this group of 25 patients the first trocar and pneumoperitoneum were performed by open laparoscopy. In 2 patients a Marlex mesh was present from previous surgery for supraumbilical hernias. Previous infraumbilical intraperitoneal surgery did not interfere with laparoscopic cholecystectomy, even in patients with several operations. There was no morbidity from Verres needle or trocars. In the 25 patients with supraumbilical intraperitoneal operations, laparoscopic cholecystectomy was completed in 22. In 3, adhesions prevented the visualization of the gallbladder and these patients were converted to an open procedure. In the 2 patients Marlex mesh prevented laparoscopic cholecystectomy because of adhesions to abdominal organs. We conclude that in most instances previous abdominal operations are no contraindication to laparoscopic cholecystectomy. PMID:9515231

  1. The Tribolium homeotic gene Abdominal is homologous to abdominal-A of the Drosophila bithorax complex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stuart, J. J.; Brown, S. J.; Beeman, R. W.; Denell, R. E.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    The Abdominal gene is a member of the single homeotic complex of the beetle, Tribolium castaneum. An integrated developmental genetic and molecular analysis shows that Abdominal is homologous to the abdominal-A gene of the bithorax complex of Drosophila. abdominal-A mutant embryos display strong homeotic transformations of the anterior abdomen (parasegments 7-9) to PS6, whereas developmental commitments in the posterior abdomen depend primarily on Abdominal-B. In beetle embryos lacking Abdominal function, parasegments throughout the abdomen are transformed to PS6. This observation demonstrates the general functional significance of parasegmental expression among insects and shows that the control of determinative decisions in the posterior abdomen by homeotic selector genes has undergone considerable evolutionary modification.

  2. Local resection of the stomach for gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Kinami, Shinichi; Funaki, Hiroshi; Fujita, Hideto; Nakano, Yasuharu; Ueda, Nobuhiko; Kosaka, Takeo

    2016-06-24

    The local resection of the stomach is an ideal method for preventing postoperative symptoms. There are various procedures for performing local resection, such as the laparoscopic lesion lifting method, non-touch lesion lifting method, endoscopic full-thickness resection, and laparoscopic endoscopic cooperative surgery. After the invention and widespread use of endoscopic submucosal dissection, local resection has become outdated as a curative surgical technique for gastric cancer. Nevertheless, local resection of the stomach in the treatment of gastric cancer in now expected to make a comeback with the clinical use of sentinel node navigation surgery. However, there are many issues associated with local resection for gastric cancer, other than the normal indications. These include gastric deformation, functional impairment, ensuring a safe surgical margin, the possibility of inducing peritoneal dissemination, and the associated increase in the risk of metachronous gastric cancer. In view of these issues, there is a tendency to regard local resection as an investigative treatment, to be applied only in carefully selected cases. The ideal model for local resection of the stomach for gastric cancer would be a combination of endoscopic full-thickness resection of the stomach using an ESD device and hand sutured closure using a laparoscope or a surgical robot, for achieving both oncological safety and preserved functions.

  3. Neuroendoscopic Resection of Intraventricular Tumors: A Systematic Outcomes Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Barber, Sean M.; Baskin, David

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Though traditional microsurgical techniques are the gold standard for intraventricular tumor resection, the morbidity and invasiveness of microsurgical approaches to the ventricular system have galvanized interest in neuroendoscopic resection. We present a systematic review of the literature to provide a better understanding of the virtues and limitations of endoscopic tumor resection. Materials and Methods. 40 articles describing 668 endoscopic tumor resections were selected from the Pubmed database and reviewed. Results. Complete or near-complete resection was achieved in 75.0% of the patients. 9.9% of resected tumors recurred during the follow-up period, and procedure-related complications occurred in 20.8% of the procedures. Tumor size ≤ 2cm (P = 0.00146), the presence of a cystic tumor component (P < 0.0001), and the use of navigation or stereotactic tools during the procedure (P = 0.0003) were each independently associated with a greater likelihood of complete or near-complete tumor resection. Additionally, the complication rate was significantly higher for noncystic masses than for cystic ones (P < 0.0001). Discussion. Neuroendoscopic outcomes for intraventricular tumor resection are significantly better when performed on small, cystic tumors and when neural navigation or stereotaxy is used. Conclusion. Neuroendoscopic resection appears to be a safe and reliable treatment option for patients with intraventricular tumors of a particular morphology. PMID:24191196

  4. Double triangular resection for a widely prolapsed posterior mitral leaflet†

    PubMed Central

    Sawazaki, Masaru; Tomari, Shiro; Tsunekawa, Tomohiro; Izawa, Naoto

    2013-01-01

    A wide and redundant prolapse of the posterior mitral leaflet in active infective endocarditis cannot be easily repaired. A sliding plasty can be attempted, but the range of annular plication is often too large. Chordal replacement is another option, but is prone to long-term degeneration because the redundant leaflet still exists. Here, we describe a simple resection technique that utilizes only two small triangular resections. The resections are sutured with no need to shorten the annulus. The leaflet tissue between the two triangular resections must be preserved to make an appropriately shaped posterior leaflet. PMID:23223672

  5. Treatment of Intravenous Leiomyomatosis with Cardiac Extension following Incomplete Resection

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, Mathew P.; Li, Annette; Villanueva, Claudia I.; Peeceeyen, Sheen C. S.; Cooper, Michael G.; Hanel, Kevin C.; Fermanis, Gary G.; Robertson, Greg

    2015-01-01

    Aim. Intravenous leiomyomatosis (IVL) with cardiac extension (CE) is a rare variant of benign uterine leiomyoma. Incomplete resection has a recurrence rate of over 30%. Different hormonal treatments have been described following incomplete resection; however no standard therapy currently exists. We review the literature for medical treatments options following incomplete resection of IVL with CE. Methods. Electronic databases were searched for all studies reporting IVL with CE. These studies were then searched for reports of patients with inoperable or incomplete resection and any further medical treatments. Our database was searched for patients with medical therapy following incomplete resection of IVL with CE and their results were included. Results. All studies were either case reports or case series. Five literature reviews confirm that surgery is the only treatment to achieve cure. The uses of progesterone, estrogen modulation, gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonism, and aromatase inhibition have been described following incomplete resection. Currently no studies have reviewed the outcomes of these treatments. Conclusions. Complete surgical resection is the only means of cure for IVL with CE, while multiple hormonal therapies have been used with varying results following incomplete resection. Aromatase inhibitors are the only reported treatment to prevent tumor progression or recurrence in patients with incompletely resected IVL with CE. PMID:26783463

  6. Intravenous dihydroergotamine therapy for pediatric abdominal migraines.

    PubMed

    Raina, Madiha; Chelimsky, Gisela; Chelimsky, Thomas

    2013-10-01

    Abdominal migraines present with debilitating symptoms in adolescence. At our institution, the gastroenterology, neurology, and autonomic departments collaborated in treating patients with such presentations. This case series describes 6 patients who were given intravenous dihydroergotamine (DHE) for presumed abdominal migraines. DHE was only used when other agents like amitriptyline, verapamil, topiramate, or depakote had proved ineffective. DHE was started at 0.5 mg dose and on average 7 to 9 mg were given on each hospitalization. Patient ages ranged from 13 to 19 years with the majority being female. One patient did not respond to treatment. One patient was admitted 4 times for symptoms of abdominal migraines resolving with DHE. The average time between symptom relapse was about 5 to 12 months. Five of our 6 patients responded to the infusion without significant side effects. Based on these case series, DHE may be a treatment option in children with intractable abdominal migraine.

  7. Neoadjuvant treatment for resectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wong, John; Solomon, Naveenraj L; Hsueh, Chung-Tsen

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is the fourth leading cause of cancer mortality in the United States in both men and women, with a 5-year survival rate of less than 5%. Surgical resection remains the only curative treatment, but most patients develop systemic recurrence within 2 years of surgery. Adjuvant treatment with chemotherapy or chemoradiotherapy has been shown to improve overall survival, but the delivery of treatment remains problematic with up to 50% of patients not receiving postoperative treatment. Neoadjuvant therapy can provide benefits of eradication of micrometastasis and improved delivery of intended treatment. We have reviewed the findings from completed neoadjuvant clinical trials, and discussed the ongoing studies. Combinational cytotoxic chemotherapy such as fluorouracil, leucovorin, irinotecan, and oxaliplatin and gemcitabine plus nanoparticle albumin-bound (nab)-paclitaxel, active in the metastatic setting, are being studied in the neoadjuvant setting. In addition, novel targeted agents such as inhibitor of immune checkpoint are incorporated with cytotoxic chemotherapy in early-phase clinical trial. Furthermore we have explored the utility of biomarkers which can personalize treatment and select patients for target-driven therapy to improve treatment outcome. The treatment of resectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma requires multidisciplinary approach and novel strategies including innovative trials to make progress. PMID:26862486

  8. Surgical Resectability of Skull Base Meningiomas

    PubMed Central

    GOTO, Takeo; OHATA, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    With recent advances in surgical technology such as preoperative imaging, neuro-monitoring, and surgical instruments, the surgical resectability of intracranial meningiomas has increased over the last two decades. This study reviewed clinical articles regarding the surgical treatment of meningiomas to clarify the role of surgical excision, with a focus on skull base meningiomas. We sub-classified clinical articles about skull base meningiomas into two categories (anterior and middle fossa meningiomas; and posterior fossa meningiomas) and reviewed papers in each category. In cases with anterior and middle fossa meningiomas, surgical resectability has reached a sufficient level to maximize functional preservation. In cases of posterior fossa meningioma, however, surgical respectability remains insufficient even with full use of recent surgical modalities. Continuous refining of operative procedures is required to obtain more satisfactory outcomes, especially for posterior fossa meningioma. In addition, recent long-term outcomes of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) were acceptable for controlling the skull base meningiomas. Therefore, combination with surgical excision and SRS should be considered in complicated skull base meningiomas. PMID:27076382

  9. Hysteroscopic Transcervical Resection of Uterine Septum

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xiaoyan; Hua, Xiangdong; Gu, Xiaoyan; Yang, Dazhen

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To explore the method of diagnosis for uterine septum and the clinical effect of hysteroscopic transcervical resection of the septum. Methods: One-hundred ninety cases of patients with uterine septum who were diagnosed and treated at our hospital during 2007–2011 were selected, and their general information, perioperative status, postoperative recovery treatment, and postoperative pregnancy rates were statistically analyzed. Results: All 190 patients were cured with one surgery, with an average hysteroscopic operating time of 22.60 ± 10.67 minutes and intraoperative blood loss of 15.74 ± 9.64 mL. There were no complications such as uterine perforation, water intoxication, infection, or heavy bleeding. Among the 115 patients that we followed up, 86 became pregnant and delivered infants, 81 of which were born at term and 5 that were born premature. Conclusion: The combination of hysteroscopy and laparoscopy is still the most reliable method for the diagnosis of uterine septum. With a shorter operative time, less blood loss, a significantly increased postoperative pregnancy rate and live birth rate, and a significantly lower spontaneous abortion rate, transcervical resection of the septum was the preferred method for the treatment of uterine septum, and surgical instruments and skills were critical to the prognosis of uterine septum. PMID:24398191

  10. [Late primary abdominal pregnancy. Case report].

    PubMed

    Farías, Emigdio Torres; Gómez, Luis Guillermo Torres; Allegre, René Márquez; Higareda, Salvador Hernández

    2008-09-01

    Abdominal advanced pregnancy is an obstetric complication that put at risk maternal and fetal life. We report a case of advanced abdominal pregnancy with intact ovaries and fallopian tubes, without ureteroperitoneal fistulae and, late prenatal diagnosis, in a multiparous patient without risk factors, with alive newborn, and whose pregnancy was attended at Unidad Medica de Alta Especialidad, Hospital de Gineco-Obstetricia, Centro Medico Nacional de Occidente del IMSS, Guadalajara, Jalisco, México.

  11. Selective Nonoperative Management of Abdominal Stab Wounds.

    PubMed

    Murry, Jason S; Hoang, David M; Ashragian, Sogol; Liou, Doug Z; Barmparas, Galinos; Chung, Rex; Alban, Rodrigo F; Margulies, Daniel R; Ley, Eric J

    2015-10-01

    Stab wounds (SW) to the abdomen traditionally require urgent exploration when associated with shock, evisceration, or peritonitis. Hemodynamically stable patients without evisceration may benefit from serial exams even with peritonitis. We compared patients taken directly to the operating room with abdominal SWs (ED-OR) to those admitted for serial exams (ADMIT). We retrospectively reviewed hemodynamically stable patients presenting with any abdominal SW between January 2000 and December 2012. Exclusions included evidence of evisceration, systolic blood pressure ≤110 mm Hg, or blood transfusion. NON-THER was defined as abdominal exploration without identification of intra-abdominal injury requiring repair. Of 142 patients included, 104 were ED-OR and 38 were ADMIT. When ED-OR was compared with ADMIT, abdominal Abbreviated Injury Score was higher (2.4 vs 2.1; P = 0.01) and hospital length of stay was longer (4.8 vs 3.3 days; P = 0.04). Incidence of NON-THER was higher in ED-OR cohort (71% vs 13%; P ≤ 0.001). In a regression model, ED-OR was a predictor of NON-THER (adjusted odds ratio 16.6; P < 0.001). One patient from ED-OR expired after complications from NON-THER. There were no deaths in the ADMIT group. For those patients with abdominal SWs who present with systolic blood pressure ≥110 mm Hg, no blood product transfusion in the emergency department and lacking evisceration, admission for serial abdominal exams may be preferred regardless of abdominal exam.

  12. Progress in Fully Automated Abdominal CT Interpretation

    PubMed Central

    Summers, Ronald M.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Automated analysis of abdominal CT has advanced markedly over just the last few years. Fully automated assessment of organs, lymph nodes, adipose tissue, muscle, bowel, spine, and tumors are some examples where tremendous progress has been made. Computer-aided detection of lesions has also improved dramatically. CONCLUSION This article reviews the progress and provides insights into what is in store in the near future for automated analysis for abdominal CT, ultimately leading to fully automated interpretation. PMID:27101207

  13. Abdominal apoplexy resulting in small bowel obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Le, Don; Guileyardo, Joseph; Casanova, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Abdominal apoplexy is a rare hemorrhagic condition involving the small arteries or veins within the abdominal cavity. A high degree of clinical suspicion, followed by appropriate diagnostic workup and therapeutic intervention, is critical, as nonoperative mortality approaches 100%. Contrary to most previously reported cases, which were associated with hemoperitoneum, we present a patient in which gastroduodenal artery dissection resulted in an organized retroperitoneal hematoma with local compression of the duodenum and subsequent bowel obstruction, resulting in vomiting, aspiration, and death. PMID:27695177

  14. Cold snare piecemeal resection of colonic and duodenal polyps ≥1 cm

    PubMed Central

    Choksi, Neel; Elmunzer, B. Joseph; Stidham, Ryan W.; Shuster, Dmitry; Piraka, Cyrus

    2015-01-01

    Background: Endoscopic removal of duodenal and colorectal adenomas is currently considered to be the standard of care for prevention of adenocarcinoma. The use of cautery carries a risk of delayed bleeding, post-polypectomy syndrome, and perforation. We examined the safety and feasibility of removing colonic and duodenal polyps ≥ 1 cm using a piecemeal cold snare polypectomy technique. Patients: The study included 15 patients with duodenal polyps ≥ 1 cm and 15 patients with colonic polyps ≥ 1 cm. Main outcome measurements: Bleeding, perforation, abdominal pain, or hospitalization occurring within 2 weeks of polypectomy. Results: Between 24 August 2011 and 29 April 2013, 15 patients had removal of duodenal polyps ≥ 1 cm. Mean patient age was 64 years and 9/15 patients were male. The mean polyp size was 24 mm (10 – 60 mm). All polyps were removed with a cold snare and some required cold biopsy forceps. One patient required hospitalization for gastrointestinal blood loss 7 days post-polypectomy; this patient was using Coumadin. Between 27 February 2012 and 30 May 2013, 15 patients underwent resection of a ≥ 1 cm colonic polyp. Mean patient age was 68 years and 9/15 were male. The mean polyp size was 20 mm (10 – 45 mm). All polyps were primarily removed with a cold snare. None of the patients required hemostatic clips for control of immediate bleeding. One patient presented to the emergency department with abdominal pain 1 day after initial endoscopy. CT scan showed no abnormalities and the patient was discharged. Conclusions: Cold snare polypectomy for large duodenal and colonic polyps is technically feasible and may have a favorable safety profile compared to standard electrocautery-based endoscopic resection. Comparative trials are required to determine the relative safety and efficacy of cold snare techniques for complete and durable resection of large polyps compared to standard hot snare methods. PMID:26528509

  15. Factors associated with abdominal obesity in children

    PubMed Central

    Melzer, Matheus Ribeiro Theodósio Fernandes; Magrini, Isabella Mastrangi; Domene, Semíramis Martins Álvares; Martins, Paula Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To identify the association of dietary, socioeconomic factors, sedentary behaviors and maternal nutritional status with abdominal obesity in children. Methods: A cross-sectional study with household-based survey, in 36 randomly selected census tracts in the city of Santos, SP. 357 families were interviewed and questionnaires and anthropometric measurements were applied in mothers and their 3-10 years-old children. Assessment of abdominal obesity was made by maternal and child's waist circumference measurement; for classification used cut-off points proposed by World Health Organization (1998) and Taylor et al. (2000) were applied. The association between variables was performed by multiple logistic regression analysis. Results: 30.5% of children had abdominal obesity. Associations with children's and maternal nutritional status and high socioeconomic status were shown in the univariate analysis. In the regression model, children's body mass index for age (OR=93.7; 95%CI 39.3-223.3), female gender (OR=4.1; 95%CI 1.8-9.3) and maternal abdominal obesity (OR=2.7; 95%CI 1.2-6.0) were significantly associated with children's abdominal obesity, regardless of the socioeconomic status. Conclusions: Abdominal obesity in children seems to be associated with maternal nutritional status, other indicators of their own nutritional status and female gender. Intervention programs for control of childhood obesity and prevention of metabolic syndrome should consider the interaction of the nutritional status of mothers and their children. PMID:26298655

  16. Abdominal aortic aneurysm: A comprehensive review

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Sourabh; Qamar, Arman; Sharma, Vishal; Sharma, Alka

    2011-01-01

    An arterial aneurysm is defined as a focal dilation of a blood vessel with respect to the original artery. The risk of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) increases dramatically in the presence of the following factors: age older than 60 years, smoking, hypertension and Caucasian ethnicity. The likelihood that an aneurysm will rupture is influenced by the aneurysm size, expansion rate, continued smoking and persistent hypertension. The majority of AAAs are asymptomatic and are detected as an incidental finding on ultrasonography, abdominal computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging performed for other purposes. It can also present with abdominal pain or complications such as thrombosis, embolization and rupture. Approximately 30% of asymptomatic AAAs are discovered as a pulsatile abdominal mass on routine physical examination. Abdominal ultrasonography is considered the screening modality of choice for detecting AAAs because of its high sensitivity and specificity, as well as its safety and relatively lower cost. The decision to screen for AAAs is challenging. The United States Preventive Services Task Force recommended that men between the age of 65 to 75 years who have ever smoked should be screened at least once for AAAs by abdominal ultrasonography. Management options for patients with an asymptomatic AAA include reduction of risk factors such as smoking, hypertension and dyslipidemia; medical therapy with beta-blockers; watchful waiting; endovascular stenting; and surgical repair depending on the size and expansion rate of the aneurysm and underlying comorbidities. PMID:21523201

  17. Transurethral resection of the ejaculatory duct.

    PubMed

    Paick, J S

    2000-05-01

    Complete bilateral ejaculatory duct obstruction has long been recognized as an uncommon, treatable form of male infertility. Partial ejaculatory duct obstruction reflects a disturbance of ejaculation where sperm quality is impaired during transit through the distal vas deferens and ejaculatory ducts. With the advent and increased use of high-resolution transrectal ultrasonography, abnormalities of the distal ejaculatory ducts related to infertility have been well documented. Although there are no pathognomonic findings associated with ejaculatory duct obstruction, several clinical findings are highly suggestive. In an infertile man with oligospermia or azoospermia with low ejaculate volume, normal secondary sexual characteristics, testes and hormonal profile and dilated seminal vesicles, midline cyst, or calcification on transrectal ultrasonography, ejaculatory duct obstruction is suggested. Of course, other causes of infertility may be concomitantly present and need to be searched for and treated as well. In selected cases, transurethral resection has resulted in marked improvement in semen parameters and pregnancies have been achieved. As is the case with all surgical procedures, proper patient selection and surgical experience are necessary to obtain optimal results. However, it appears that the treatments currently available for relief of ejaculatory obstruction are not optimally effective. Only approximately one half of treated patients will have an improvement in semen parameters and only about one quarter of treated patients will contribute to a pregnancy. What remains to be determined is how to manage the additional nearly 50% of patients who do not benefit from transurethral resection of ejaculatory obstruction. Based on my experience, I suggest that transrectal ultrasonography should be the first diagnostic procedure used when infertile men are suspected of having ejaculatory duct obstruction; however, vasography should still be considered for a more

  18. Robotic resection of an ectopic goiter in the mediastinum.

    PubMed

    Bodner, Johannes; Fish, John; Lottersberger, Andreas C; Wetscher, Gerold; Schmid, Thomas

    2005-08-01

    We report the first robotic resection of an ectopic mediastinal thyroid adenoma in a 72-year-old woman. This intervention was part of staged management for excessive bilateral cervical goiter with intrathoracic dispersion. The robotic resection was found to be feasible and safe. The robotic operating system offers better visual control and operative accuracy than does conventional thoracoscopy.

  19. Single incision glove port laparoscopic colorectal cancer resection

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, HMN; Gosselink, MP; Adusumilli, S; Hompes, R; Cunningham, C; Lindsey, I

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The advantages of single port surgery remain controversial. This study was designed to evaluate the safety and feasibility of single incision glove port colon resections using a diathermy hook, reusable ports and standard laparoscopic straight instrumentation. Methods Between June 2012 and February 2014, 70 consecutive patients (30 women) underwent a colonic resection using a wound retractor and glove port. Forty patients underwent a right hemicolectomy through the umbilicus and thirty underwent attempted single port resection via an incision in the right rectus sheath (14 high anterior resection, 13 low anterior resection, 3 abdominoperineal resection). Results Sixty-two procedures (89%) were completed without conversion to open or multiport techniques. Four procedures had to be converted and additional ports were needed in four other patients. The postoperative mortality rate was 0%. Complications occurred in six patients (9%). Two cases were R1 while the remainder were R0 with a median nodal harvest of 20 (range: 9–48). The median length of hospital stay was 5 days (range: 3–25 days) (right hemicolectomy: 5 days (range: 3–12 days), left sided resection: 6 days (range: 4–25 days). At a median follow-up of 14 months, no port site hernias were observed. Conclusions Single incision glove port surgery is an appropriate technique for different colorectal cancer resections and has the advantage of being less expensive than surgery with commercial single incision ports. PMID:26263805

  20. Downstaging Hepatocellular Carcinoma with Yttrium-90 radioembolization: resection or transplantation?

    PubMed

    Ettorre, G M; Laurenzi, A; Vennarecci, G

    2014-06-01

    Trans Arterial Radio Embolization with Yttrium 90 in the treatment of Hepatocellular Carcinoma is becoming a new interesting tool in the treatment of patients that are considered non resectable and non transplantable. A successful downstaging could improve the number of patients that could benefit from a resection or a liver transplantation, but some points still need to be addressed.

  1. Reconstruction of complex abdominal wall defects.

    PubMed

    Leppäniemi, A; Tukiainen, E

    2013-01-01

    Complex abdominal wall defects refer to situations where simple ventral hernia repair is not feasible because the defect is very large, there is a concomitant infection or failed previous re-pair attempt, or if there is not enough original skin to cover the repair. Usually a complex abdominal wall repair is preceded by a period of temporary abdominal closure where the short-term aims include closure of the catabolic drain, protection of the viscera and preventing fistula formation, preventing bowel adherence to the abdominal wall, and enabling future fascial and skin closure. Currently the best way to achieve these goals is the vacuum- and mesh-mediated fascial traction method achieving close to 90% fascial closure rates. The long-term aims of an abdominal closure following a planned hernia strategy include intact skin cover, fascial closure at midline (if possible), good functional outcome with innervated abdominal musculature, no pain and good cosmetic result. The main methods of abdominal wall reconstruction include the use of prosthetic (mesh) or autologous material (tissue flaps). In patients with original skin cover over the fascial defect (simple ventral hernia), the most commonly used method is hernia repair with an artificial mesh. For more complex defects, our first choice of reconstruction is the component separation technique, sometimes combined with a mesh. In contaminated fields where component separation alone is not feasible, a combination with a biological mesh can be used. In large defects with grafted skin, a free TFL flap is the best option, sometimes reinforced with a mesh and enhanced with components separation.

  2. Endoscopic Resection of Gastric Submucosal Tumors: A Comparison of Endoscopic Nontunneling with Tunneling Resection and a Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qiang; Wang, Fei; Wei, Gong; Cai, Jian-Qun; Zhi, Fa-Chao; Bai, Yang

    2017-01-01

    Background/Aim: Endoscopic tunneling resection is a relatively novel endoscopic technology for removing gastric submucosal tumors. Our study aimed to compare the differences between tunneling and nontunneling resection for gastric submucosal tumors. Materials and Methods: Resections of gastric submucosal tumors (n = 97) performed from 2010 to 2015 at our endoscopy center were reviewed, and PubMed was searched for clinical studies on gastric submucosal tumor resection by endoscopic nontunneling and tunneling techniques. Results: At our endoscopy center, nontunneling (Group 1) and tunneling resection (Group 2) were performed for 78 and 19 submucosal tumors, respectively; median tumor diameters were 15 and 20 mm (P = 0.086), median procedural times were 50 and 75 min (P = 0.017), successful resection rates were 94.9% (74/78) and 89.5% (17/19) (P = 0.334), and en bloc resection rates were 95.9% (71/74) and 94.1% (16/17) (P = 0.569) in the Groups 1 and 2, respectively. Postoperative fever, delayed hemorrhage and perforation, hospitalization time, and hospitalization expense were statistically similar between the 2 groups. A literature review on gastric submucosal tumor resection suggested that the en bloc resection rates of the two methods for tumors with a median diameter of 15–30 mm were also high, and there were no relapses during the follow-up period. Conclusions: Both endoscopic nontunneling and tunneling resection seem to be effective and safe methods for removing relatively small gastric submucosal tumors. Compared with endoscopic nontunneling, tunneling resection does not seem to have distinct advantages for gastric submucosal tumors, and has a longer mean operative time. PMID:28139501

  3. Chest wall reconstruction after extended resection

    PubMed Central

    Seder, Christopher W.

    2016-01-01

    Extensive chest wall resection and reconstruction is a challenging procedure that requires a multidisciplinary approach, including input from thoracic surgeons, plastic surgeons, neurosurgeons, and radiation oncologists. The primary goals of any chest wall reconstruction is to obliterate dead space, restore chest wall rigidity, preserve pulmonary mechanics, protect intrathoracic organs, provide soft tissue coverage, minimize deformity, and allow patients to receive adjuvant radiotherapy. Successful chest wall reconstruction requires the re-establishment of skeletal stability to prevent chest wall hernias, avoids thoracoplasty-like contraction of the operated side, protects underlying viscera, and maintain a cosmetically-acceptable appearance. After skeletal stability is established, full tissue coverage can be achieved using direct closure, skin grafts, local advancement flaps, pedicled myocutaneous flaps, or free flaps. This review examines the indications for chest wall reconstruction and describes techniques for establishment of chest wall rigidity and soft tissue coverage. PMID:27942408

  4. Cephalic aura after frontal lobe resection.

    PubMed

    Kakisaka, Yosuke; Jehi, Lara; Alkawadri, Rafeed; Wang, Zhong I; Enatsu, Rei; Mosher, John C; Dubarry, Anne-Sophie; Alexopoulos, Andreas V; Burgess, Richard C

    2014-08-01

    A cephalic aura is a common sensory aura typically seen in frontal lobe epilepsy. The generation mechanism of cephalic aura is not fully understood. It is hypothesized that to generate a cephalic aura extensive cortical areas need to be excited. We report a patient who started to have cephalic aura after right frontal lobe resection. Magnetoencephalography (MEG) showed interictal spike and ictal change during cephalic aura, both of which were distributed in the right frontal region, and the latter involved much more widespread areas than the former on MEG sensors. The peculiar seizure onset pattern may indicate that surgical modification of the epileptic network was related to the appearance of cephalic aura. We hypothesize that generation of cephalic aura may be associated with more extensive cortical involvement of epileptic activity than that of interictal activity, in at least a subset of cases.

  5. Chronic laminitis: strategic hoof wall resection.

    PubMed

    Rucker, Amy

    2010-04-01

    In the chronic-laminitic foot, severe soft-tissue compression and compromised circulation can result in osteitis and sepsis at the margin of the distal phalanx. Resultant inflammation and sepsis may cause the coronary corium to swell, drain, or separate from the hoof capsule, usually within 8 weeks of laminitis onset. Slow-onset cases of soft-tissue impingement can develop secondary to distal phalanx displacement due to lack of wall attachment. With either presentation, partial upper wall resection is required to reverse compression and vascular impingement by the hoof capsule. If the pathology is not overwhelming, the area reepithelializes and grows attached tubular horn. Firm bandaging and restricted exercise until tubular horn has regrown enhances recovery and the return of a strong hoof.

  6. [Short bowel: from resection to transplantation].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Montes, José Antonio

    2014-09-17

    Short bowel syndrome (SBS) is characterized by a significant reduction in the effective intestinal surface by an anatomical or functional loss of the small intestine. It mainly occurs after extensive bowel resection, intestinal intrinsic disease or surgical bypass. The main complications are malabsorption, maldigestion, malnutrition, dehydratation and, potentially, lethal metabolic lesions. The treatment is based on appropiate, individualized nutritional support; however, the most recent outcomes on bowel transplantation (BT) and a great rate of survivors achieving complete digestive autonomy and able to carry out activities according to their age allow for considering BT as the first choice therapy in patients with irreversible intestinal failure in whom poor prognosis with parenteral nutrition is foreseen. In this paper the most outstanding aspects of SBS are revised.

  7. Weekly administration of paclitaxel attenuated rectal stenosis caused by multiple peritoneal recurrence 8 years after the resection of gastric carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Yoichi; Yoshida, Ikuo; Tonomura, Shuhei; Sakai, Wakana; Nakamura, Yasuko; Imazu, Hiroki; Matsubara, Toshiki; Ochiai, Masahiro

    2003-01-01

    We report a patient with rectal stenosis caused by peritoneal recurrence 8 years after a curative resection of advanced stage gastric carcinoma; the recurrence was effectively treated with the weekly administration of paclitaxel. The patient was a 66-year-old Japanese woman who was admitted to our hospital complaining of abdominal pain and frequent bowel movements. She had undergone total gastrectomy, due to advanced-stage gastric carcinoma with extensive lymph node metastasis, 8 years before, and had taken an oral anticancer agent, fluoropyrimidine, for 4 years after the operation. Colonofiberscopy performed on admission revealed circumferential rectal stenosis located 10 cm from the anal verge. Barium enema study demonstrated extensive poor expansion of the upper and lower rectum and irregularity of the descending colon. Abdominal computed tomography (CT) scanning revealed wall thickening in the rectum and descending colon. These findings were compatible with rectal stenosis caused by the peritoneal recurrence of gastric carcinoma. Weekly administration of paclitaxel was started. The abdominal symptoms soon disappeared when the second cycle of paclitaxel was completed, and they have not appeared since then. The rectal stenosis was attenuated, as confirmed by imaging analyses. Weekly paclitaxel has been effective for more than 13 months, suggesting that the patient is in a state of tumor dormancy of recurrent gastric carcinoma.

  8. Abdominal lipomatosis with secondary self-strangulation of masses in an adult rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta).

    PubMed

    Chum, Helen H; Long, C Tyler; McKeon, Gabriel P; Chang, Angela G; Luong, Richard H; Albertelli, Megan A

    2014-10-01

    An 10-y-old, intact male rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) presented for bilateral scrotal swelling and a distended abdomen. A soft mass in the left upper quadrant of the abdomen was palpated. A barium study did not reveal any gastrointestinal abnormalities. Exploratory laparotomy revealed a large (1.25 kg, 15.0 × 13.0 × 9.5 cm), red and tan, soft, circumscribed, spherical mass within the greater omentum and 10 to 20 smaller (diameter, 1 to 4 cm), soft to firm masses in the mesentery and greater omentum. The resected mass was a self-strangulating abdominal lipoma, a pedunculated neoplasm composed of white adipocytes arising from peritoneal adipose tissue undergoing secondary coagulation necrosis after strangulation of the blood supply due to twisting of the mass around the peduncle. The smaller masses were histologically consistent with simple or self-strangulating pedunculated abdominal lipomas. The macaque presented again 9 mo later with a firm, 5.0-cm mass in the midabdomen, with intestinal displacement visible on radiographs. Given this animal's medical history and questionable prognosis, euthanasia was elected. Necropsy revealed numerous, multifocal to coalescing, 1.0- to 15.0-cm, pale tan to yellow, circumscribed, soft to firm, spherical to ellipsoid, pedunculated masses that were scattered throughout the mesentery, greater omentum, lesser omentum, and serosal surfaces of the gastrointestinal tract. All of the masses were pedunculated abdominal lipomas, and most demonstrated coagulation necrosis due to self-strangulation of the blood supply. To our knowledge, this report is the first to describe abdominal lipomatosis with secondary self-strangulation of masses in a rhesus macaque.

  9. Abdominal Lipomatosis with Secondary Self-Strangulation of Masses in an Adult Rhesus Macaque (Macaca mulatta)

    PubMed Central

    Chum, Helen H; Long, C Tyler; McKeon, Gabriel P; Chang, Angela G; Luong, Richard H; Albertelli, Megan A

    2014-01-01

    An 10-y-old, intact male rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) presented for bilateral scrotal swelling and a distended abdomen. A soft mass in the left upper quadrant of the abdomen was palpated. A barium study did not reveal any gastrointestinal abnormalities. Exploratory laparotomy revealed a large (1.25 kg, 15.0 × 13.0 × 9.5 cm), red and tan, soft, circumscribed, spherical mass within the greater omentum and 10 to 20 smaller (diameter, 1 to 4 cm), soft to firm masses in the mesentery and greater omentum. The resected mass was a self-strangulating abdominal lipoma, a pedunculated neoplasm composed of white adipocytes arising from peritoneal adipose tissue undergoing secondary coagulation necrosis after strangulation of the blood supply due to twisting of the mass around the peduncle. The smaller masses were histologically consistent with simple or self-strangulating pedunculated abdominal lipomas. The macaque presented again 9 mo later with a firm, 5.0-cm mass in the midabdomen, with intestinal displacement visible on radiographs. Given this animal's medical history and questionable prognosis, euthanasia was elected. Necropsy revealed numerous, multifocal to coalescing, 1.0- to 15.0-cm, pale tan to yellow, circumscribed, soft to firm, spherical to ellipsoid, pedunculated masses that were scattered throughout the mesentery, greater omentum, lesser omentum, and serosal surfaces of the gastrointestinal tract. All of the masses were pedunculated abdominal lipomas, and most demonstrated coagulation necrosis due to self-strangulation of the blood supply. To our knowledge, this report is the first to describe abdominal lipomatosis with secondary self-strangulation of masses in a rhesus macaque. PMID:25402181

  10. The Effects of Drinking Coffee While Recovering from Colon and Rectal Resection Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Piric, Mirela; Pasic, Fuad; Rifatbegovic, Zijah; Konjic, Ferid

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Resection surgery on the colon and rectum are changing both anatomical and physiological relations within the abdominal cavity. Delayed functions of the gastrointestinal tract, flatulence, failure of peristalsis, prolonged spasms and pain, limited postoperative recovery of these patients increase the overall cost of treatment. Early consumption of coffee instead of tea should lead to faster restoration of normal function of the colon without unwanted negative repercussions. Method: This study is designed as a prospective-retrospective clinical study and was carried out at the Surgery Center Tuzla, during the year 2013/ 2014. Sixty patients were randomized in relation to the type of resection surgery, etiology of disease-malignant benign, and in relation to whether they were coffee users or not. Patients were divided into two groups. The first group of thirty patients was given 100 ml of instant coffee divided into three portions right after removing the nasogastric tube, first postoperative day, while the second group of thirty patients got 100 ml of tea. Monitored parameter was: time of first stool and the second group of monitored parameters was: whether there was returning of nasogastric tube or not, increased use of laxatives, whether there was anastomotic leak, radiologic and clinical dehiscence, audit procedures, or lethal outcomes in the treatment of patients. Results: A total of 61 patients were randomized into two groups of 30 int he group of tea and coffee 29 in the group, two patients were excluded from the study because they did not consume coffee before surgery. Time of getting stool in the postoperative period after elective resection surgery on the colon and rectum is significantly shorter after drinking coffee for about 15h (p <0.01). Also, the length of hospital stay was significantly shorter after drinking coffee (p <0.01). Time of hospitalization in subjects/respondents coffee consumers on average lasted 8.6 days with consumers of tea for 16

  11. Giant serous microcystic adenoma of the pancreas safely resected after preoperative arterial embolization

    PubMed Central

    TAJIMA, HIDEHIRO; OHTA, TETSUO; KITAGAWA, HIROHISA; SHINBASHI, HIROYUKI; HIROSE, ATSUSHI; SAKAI, SEISHO; MAKINO, ISAMU; HAYASHI, HIRONORI; NAKAGAWARA, HISATOSHI; ONISHI, ICHIRO; TAKAMURA, HIROYUKI; NINOMIYA, ITASU; FUSHIDA, SACHIO; TANI, TAKASHI; FUJIMURA, TAKASHI; KAYAHARA, MASATO; KODA, WATARU; MATSUI, OSAMU

    2010-01-01

    Serous microcystic adenomas are rare and account for 1–2% of all exocrine pancreatic tumors and 25% of all pancreatic cystic neoplasms. Recently, with advances in imaging techniques, these adenomas have been identified at an increasing frequency. A 63-year-old woman visited her doctor in 1999 due to a gastric deformity detected by upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. An abdominal computed tomography scan revealed a cystic lesion measuring 6.0 cm in diameter, resulting in a diagnosis of serous microcystic adenoma of the pancreatic head. During follow-up, the tumor increased steadily in size, measuring 6.0 cm in diameter in 1999 and 13.0 cm in 2008, while remaining asymptomatic throughout this period of time. The risk of malignant transformation appears to be low even over the long-term. However, some cases of malignant transformation to serous cystadenocarcinoma have recently been reported. In this case, assessment of the relationship between the tumor and adjacent vascular structures, such as massive drainage vein development on the surface or tumor flow into the portal and superior mesenteric veins and the celiac and superior mesenteric arteries, was critical for determining tumor resectability. The risk of massive intra-operative hemorrhage was felt to be considerable, given the extent of the veins on the surface of the tumor, as well as the size and location of the primary pancreatic mass. Therefore, preoperative embolization of the tumor-feeding arteries arising from the celiac axis (gastroduodenal, splenic and dorsal pancreatic arteries) was performed. Tumor resection with pancreaticoduodenectomy was performed without a blood transfusion, with an estimated blood loss of 570 ml. The final pathology confirmed the diagnosis of serous microcystic adenoma. The patient is currently alive and disease-free. Preoperative partial embolization of the tumor feeding arteries and intra-operative resection of the right gastric and inferior pancreatoduodenal arteries, allowed

  12. [Case of abdominal wall malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor which is difficult to distinguish from a urachal disease].

    PubMed

    Tatenuma, Tomoyuki; Sakata, Ryoko; Sugiura, Shinpei; Tajiri, Takehiro; Gondo, Toshikazu; Kitami, Kazuo

    2013-09-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST) are highly malignant soft tissue sarcomas. It is very rare for MPNST to arise in the abdominal wall. We report a case of abdominal wall MPNST that was difficult to distinguish from a urachal disease. A 72-year-old woman found a mass of the umbilicus in October 2011. She visited a digestive surgery department in November because it gradually enlarged. Diagnostic imaging suggested a urachal tumor. She was then referred to our clinic. Contrast enhanced CT showed that the 5-cm cystic tumor extended from the umbilicus to abdominal wall. The tumor showed low uptake value in PET-CT. We diagnosed her with a urachal cyst, but could not deny urachal carcinoma. Therefore, we performed surgical resection in January 2012. The pathological diagnosis was MPNST. She has not experienced recurrence for 9 months. MPNST mostly occur in the retroperitoneum close to the spine, extremities, head, and neck. It is very rare for them to occur in the abdominal wall. This is the sixth case including overseas reports. In addition, this is the first case in which it was difficult to distinguish from a urachal disease.

  13. Selection and Outcome of Portal Vein Resection in Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nakao, Akimasa

    2010-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer has the worst prognosis of all gastrointestinal neoplasms. Five-year survival of pancreatic cancer after pancreatectomy is very low, and surgical resection is the only option to cure this dismal disease. The standard surgical procedure is pancreatoduodenectomy (PD) for pancreatic head cancer. The morbidity and especially the mortality of PD have been greatly reduced. Portal vein resection in pancreatic cancer surgery is one attempt to increase resectability and radicality, and the procedure has become safe to perform. Clinicohistopathological studies have shown that the most important indication for portal vein resection in patients with pancreatic cancer is the ability to obtain cancer-free surgical margins. Otherwise, portal vein resection is contraindicated. PMID:24281213

  14. Clinical evaluation of an air-capsule technique for the direct measurement of intra-abdominal pressure after elective abdominal surgery

    PubMed Central

    Otto, Jens; Kaemmer, Daniel; Biermann, Andreas; Jansen, Marc; Dembinski, Rolf; Schumpelick, Volker; Schachtrupp, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    Background The gold standard for assessment of intraabdominal pressure (IAP) is via intravesicular pressure measurement (IVP). This accepted technique has some inherent problems, e.g. indirectness. Aim of this clinical study was to assess direct IAP measurement using an air-capsule method (ACM) regarding complications risks and agreement with IVP in patients undergoing abdominal surgery. Methods A prospective cohort study was performed in 30 patients undergoing elective colonic, hepatic, pancreatic and esophageal resection. For ACM a Probe 3 (Spiegelberg®, Germany) was placed on the greater omentum. It was passed through the abdominal wall paralleling routine drainages. To compare ACM with IVP t-testing was performed and mean difference as well as limits of agreement were calculated. Results ACM did not lead to complications particularly with regard to organ lesion or surgical site infection. Mean insertion time of ACM was 4.4 days (min-max: 1–5 days). 168 pairwise measurements were made. Mean ACM value was 7.9 ± 2.7 mmHg while mean IVP was 8.4 ± 3.0 mmHg (n.s). Mean difference was 0.4 mmHg ± 2.2 mmHg. Limits of agreement were -4.1 mmHg to 5.1 mmHg. Conclusion Using ACM, direct IAP measurement is feasible and uncomplicated. Associated with relatively low pressure ranges (<17 mmHg), results are comparable to bladder pressure measurement. PMID:18925973

  15. The long-term results of resection and multiple resections in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Krupnick, A S; Morris, J B

    2000-01-01

    Crohn's disease is a panenteric, transmural inflammatory disease of unknown origin. Although primarily managed medically, 70% to 90% of patients will require surgical intervention. Surgery for small bowel Crohn's is usually necessary for unrelenting stenotic complications of the disease. Fistula, abscess, and perforation can also necessitate surgical intervention. Most patients benefit from resection or strictureplasty with an improved quality of life and remission of disease, but recurrence is common and 33% to 82% of patients will need a second operation, and 22% to 33% will require more than two resections. Short-bowel syndrome is unavoidable in a small percentage of Crohn's patients because of recurrent resection of affected small bowel and inflammatory destruction of the remaining mucosa. Although previously a lethal and unrelenting disease with death caused by malnutrition, patients with short-bowel syndrome today can lead productive lives with maintenance on total parenteral nutrition (TPN). This lifestyle, however, does not come without a price. Severe TPN-related complications, such as sepsis of indwelling central venous catheters and liver failure, do occur. Future developments will focus on more powerful and effective anti-inflammatory medication specifically targeting the immune mechanisms responsible for Crohn's disease. Successful medical management of the disease will alleviate the need for surgical resection and reduce the frequency of short-bowel syndrome. Improving the efficacy of immunosuppression and the understanding of tolerance induction should increase the safety and applicability of small-bowel transplant for those with short gut. Tissue engineering offers the potential to avoid immunosuppression altogether and supplement intestinal length using the patient's own tissues.

  16. Intra-abdominal pressure: an integrative review.

    PubMed

    Milanesi, Rafaela; Caregnato, Rita Catalina Aquino

    2016-01-01

    There is a growing request for measuring intra-abdominal pressure in critically ill patients with acute abdominal pain to be clarified. Summarizing the research results on measurement of vesical intra-abdominal pressure and analyzing the level of evidence were the purposes of this integrative literature review, carried out based on the databases LILACS, MEDLINE and PubMed, from 2005 to July 2012. Twenty articles were identified, in that, 12 literature reviews, 4 descriptive and exploratory studies, 2 expert opinions, one prospective cohort study and one was an experience report. The vesical intra-abdominal pressure measurement was considered gold standard. There are variations in the technique however, but some common points were identified: complete supine position, in absence of abdominal contracture, in the end of expiration and expressed in mmHg. Most research results indicate keeping the transducer zeroed at the level of the mid-axillary line at the iliac crest level, and instill 25mL of sterile saline. Strong evidence must be developed. RESUMO Em pacientes críticos com quadros abdominais agudos a esclarecer é crescente a solicitação da aferição da pressão intra-abdominal. Sintetizar resultados de pesquisas sobre a mensuração da pressão intra-abdominal pela via vesical e analisar o nível de evidência foram os objetivos desta revisão integrativa da literatura, realizada nas bases LILACS, MEDLINE e PubMed, no período de 2005 a julho de 2012. Identificaram-se 20 artigos, sendo 12 revisões de literatura, 4 estudos exploratório-descritivos, 2 opiniões de especialistas, 1 estudo de coorte prospectivo e 1 relato de experiência. O método vesical para mensuração da pressão intra-abdominal foi considerado padrão-ouro. Existem variações na técnica, entretanto pontos em comum foram identificados: posição supina completa, na ausência de contratura abdominal, ao final da expiração e expressa em mmHg. A maioria indica posicionar o ponto zero do

  17. Intra-abdominal pressure: an integrative review

    PubMed Central

    Milanesi, Rafaela; Caregnato, Rita Catalina Aquino

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT There is a growing request for measuring intra-abdominal pressure in critically ill patients with acute abdominal pain to be clarified. Summarizing the research results on measurement of vesical intra-abdominal pressure and analyzing the level of evidence were the purposes of this integrative literature review, carried out based on the databases LILACS, MEDLINE and PubMed, from 2005 to July 2012. Twenty articles were identified, in that, 12 literature reviews, 4 descriptive and exploratory studies, 2 expert opinions, one prospective cohort study and one was an experience report. The vesical intra-abdominal pressure measurement was considered gold standard. There are variations in the technique however, but some common points were identified: complete supine position, in absence of abdominal contracture, in the end of expiration and expressed in mmHg. Most research results indicate keeping the transducer zeroed at the level of the mid-axillary line at the iliac crest level, and instill 25mL of sterile saline. Strong evidence must be developed. PMID:26958978

  18. Imaging the Abdominal Manifestations of Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    McDermott, S.; Chan, V. O.; Ridge, C. A.

    2017-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a multisystem disease with a range of abdominal manifestations including those involving the liver, pancreas, and kidneys. Recent advances in management of the respiratory complications of the disease has led to a greater life expectancy in patients with CF. Subsequently, there is increasing focus on the impact of abdominal disease on quality of life and survival. Liver cirrhosis is the most important extrapulmonary cause of death in CF, yet significant challenges remain in the diagnosis of CF related liver disease. The capacity to predict those patients at risk of developing cirrhosis remains a significant challenge. We review representative abdominal imaging findings in patients with CF selected from the records of two academic health centres, with a view to increasing familiarity with the abdominal manifestations of the disease. We review their presentation and expected imaging findings, with a focus on the challenges facing diagnosis of the hepatic manifestations of the disease. An increased familiarity with these abdominal manifestations will facilitate timely diagnosis and management, which is paramount to further improving outcomes for patients with cystic fibrosis. PMID:28250993

  19. Functional bowel disorders and functional abdominal pain

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, W; Longstreth, G; Drossman, D; Heaton, K; Irvine, E; Muller-Lissner, S

    1999-01-01

    The Rome diagnostic criteria for the functional bowel disorders and functional abdominal pain are used widely in research and practice. A committee consensus approach, including criticism from multinational expert reviewers, was used to revise the diagnostic criteria and update diagnosis and treatment recommendations, based on research results. The terminology was clarified and the diagnostic criteria and management recommendations were revised. A functional bowel disorder (FBD) is diagnosed by characteristic symptoms for at least 12 weeks during the preceding 12 months in the absence of a structural or biochemical explanation. The irritable bowel syndrome, functional abdominal bloating, functional constipation, and functional diarrhea are distinguished by symptom-based diagnostic criteria. Unspecified FBD lacks criteria for the other FBDs. Diagnostic testing is individualized, depending on patient age, primary symptom characteristics, and other clinical and laboratory features. Functional abdominal pain (FAP) is defined as either the FAP syndrome, which requires at least six months of pain with poor relation to gut function and loss of daily activities, or unspecified FAP, which lacks criteria for the FAP syndrome. An organic cause for the pain must be excluded, but aspects of the patient's pain behavior are of primary importance. Treatment of the FBDs relies upon confident diagnosis, explanation, and reassurance. Diet alteration, drug treatment, and psychotherapy may be beneficial, depending on the symptoms and psychological features.


Keywords: functional bowel disorder; functional constipation; functional diarrhea; irritable bowel syndrome; functional abdominal pain; functional abdominal bloating; Rome II PMID:10457044

  20. Creation of Abdominal Adhesions in Mice.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Clement D; Hu, Michael S; Leavitt, Tripp; Barnes, Leandra A; Cheung, Alexander T M; Malhotra, Samir; Lorenz, H Peter; Longaker, Michael T

    2016-08-27

    Abdominal adhesions consist of fibrotic tissue that forms in the peritoneal space in response to an inflammatory insult, typically surgery or intraabdominal infection. The precise mechanisms underlying adhesion formation are poorly understood. Many compounds and physical barriers have been tested for their ability to prevent adhesions after surgery with varying levels of success. The mouse and rat are important models for the study of abdominal adhesions. Several different techniques for the creation of adhesions in the mouse and rat exist in the literature. Here we describe a protocol utilizing abrasion of the cecum with sandpaper and sutures placed in the right abdominal sidewall. The mouse is anesthetized and the abdomen is prepped. A midline laparotomy is created and the cecum is identified. Sandpaper is used to gently abrade the surface of the cecum. Next, several figure-of-eight sutures are placed into the peritoneum of the right abdominal sidewall. The abdominal cavity is irrigated, a small amount of starch is applied, and the incision is closed. We have found that this technique produces the most consistent adhesions with the lowest mortality rate.

  1. Abdominal sarcoidosis: cross-sectional imaging findings

    PubMed Central

    Gezer, Naciye Sinem; Başara, Işıl; Altay, Canan; Harman, Mustafa; Rocher, Laurence; Karabulut, Nevzat; Seçil, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystem inflammatory disease of unknown etiology. The lungs and the lymphoid system are the most commonly involved organs. Extrapulmonary involvement is reported in 30% of patients, and the abdomen is the most common extrapulmonary site with a frequency of 50%–70%. Although intra-abdominal sarcoidosis is usually asymptomatic, its presence may affect the prognosis and treatment options. The lesions are less characteristic and may mimick neoplastic or infectious diseases such as lymphoma, diffuse metastasis, and granulomatous inflammation. The liver and spleen are the most common abdominal sites of involvement. Sarcoidosis of the gastrointestinal system, pancreas, and kidneys are extremely rare. Adenopathy which is most commonly found in the porta hepatis, exudative ascites, and multiple granulomatous nodules studding the peritoneum are the reported manifestations of abdominal sarcoidosis. Since abdominal sarcoidosis is less common and long-standing, unrecognized disease can result in significant morbidity and mortality. Imaging contributes to diagnosis and management of intra-abdominal sarcoidosis. In this report we reviewed the cross-sectional imaging findings of hepatobiliary, gastrointestinal, and genitourinary sarcoidosis. PMID:25512071

  2. Postoperative Immunosuppression After Open and Laparoscopic Liver Resection: Assessment of Cellular Immune Function and Monocytic HLA-DR Expression

    PubMed Central

    Haacke, Nadine; Meisel, Christian; Unterwalder, Nadine; Fikatas, Panagiotis; Schmidt, Sven C.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Major abdominal procedures are strongly associated with postoperative immunosuppression and subsequent increased patient morbidity. It is believed that laparoscopic surgery causes less depletion of the systemic immune function because of the reduced tissue trauma. Various cytokines and monocytic HLA-DR expression have been successfully implemented to assess postoperative immune function. The aim of our study was to show the difference in immunologic profiles after minimally invasive versus conventional liver resection. Methods: Ten animals underwent either laparoscopic or conventional open left lateral liver resection. Flow cytometric characteristics of HLA-DR expression on monocytes and lipopolysaccharide-stimulated cellular secretion of tumor necrosis factor α, interferon γ, interleukin 6, and interleukin 8 were measured and analyzed in ex vivo whole blood samples. Intraoperative and postoperative clinical outcome parameters were also documented and evaluated. Results: All animals survived the procedures. Postoperative complications were fever (n = 3), wound infections (n = 2), and biloma (n = 1). Open surgery showed a morbidity rate of 80% compared with 40% after laparoscopic surgery. Laparoscopic liver resection showed no postoperative immunoparalysis. Major histocompatibility complex class II expression in this group was elevated, whereas the open surgery group showed decreased major histocompatibility complex class II expression on postoperative day 1. Postoperative secretion of tumor necrosis factor α, interleukin 6, and interferon γ was lower in the open surgery group. Elevated transaminase levels after laparoscopy might have resulted from an ischemia/reperfusion injury caused by the capnoperitoneum. Conclusion: Major immunoparalysis depression was not observed in either group. Laparoscopic surgery shows a tendency to improve immunologic recovery after liver resection. PMID:24398205

  3. Surgical outcomes of laparoscopic versus open liver resection for hepatocellular carcinoma for various resection extent

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Junhua; Li, Hongyu; Liu, Fei; Li, Bo; Wei, Yonggang

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Although the number of laparoscopic liver resections (LRRs) has increased, studies of surgical outcomes in comparison with the conventional open approach are limited. The purpose of this study was to analyze the surgical outcomes (safety and efficacy) of LLR versus open liver resection (OLR) for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). We collected data on all patients who received liver resection for HCC between April 2015 and September 2016 in our institution, and retrospectively investigated the demographic and perioperative data, and also surgical outcomes. Laparoscopic liver resection was performed in 225 patients and OLR in 291. In patients who underwent minor hepatectomy, LLR associated with a shorter duration of operation time (200 vs 220 minutes; P < 0.001), less blood loss (100 vs 225 mL; P < 0.001), lower transfusion rate (3.0% vs 12.0%; P = 0.012), and shorter postoperative hospital stay (6 vs 7 days; P < 0.001) compared with OLR. Dietary recovery was relatively fast in the group of LLR, but there were no significant differences in hepatic inflow occlusion rate, complication rate, and transfusion volume. Patients who received major hepatectomy had a longer duration of operation (240 vs 230 minutes; P < 0.001), less blood loss (200 vs 400 mL; P < 0.001), lower transfusion rate (4.8% vs 16.5%; P = 0.002), lower hepatic inflow occlusion rate (68.3% vs 91.7%; P < 0.001), and shorter postoperative hospital stay (6 vs 8 days; P < 0.001). Complication rate (P = 0.366) and transfusion volume (P = 0.308) did not differ between groups. Laparoscopic liver resection is a feasible and safe alternative to OLR for HCC when performed by a surgeon experienced with the relevant surgical techniques, associated with less blood loss, lower transfusion rate, a rapid return to a normal diet, and shorter postoperative hospital stay with no compromise in complications. Further, long-term follow-up should be acquired for

  4. [Duodenal perforation after blunt abdominal trauma].

    PubMed

    Schneider, R; Moebius, C; Thelen, A; Jonas, S

    2009-12-01

    Duodenal perforation after a blunt abdominal trauma is a rare emergency situation that can result in life-threatening complications. We report on a woman who had a perforation of the duodenum after a supposed mild blunt abdominal trauma. Unremarkable at the initial presentation, the patient presented with acute abdominal pain and a retroperitoneal abscess five days after the initial trauma. The duodenal repair was performed with a Roux-Y anastomosis. Difficulties in diagnosis are very common, but the early recognition of the rupture is essential. The contrast-enhanced CT scan is the gold standard for diagnosis. Surgical management depends on the severity of the trauma and must be chosen on an individual basis.

  5. Electromyographic analysis of four popular abdominal exercises.

    PubMed

    Piering, A W; Janowski, A P; Wehrenberg, W B; Moore, M T; Snyder, A C

    1993-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the effects of four specific sit-up exercises on muscular activity of the rectus abdominis. Pairs of surface electrodes were placed unilaterally on four quadrants of the rectus abdominis, delimited by tendinous inscriptions, in four male subjects. Electromyographic (EMG) recordings were taken while the subjects performed four different abdominal exercises. Each abdominal exercise was hypothesized to have a specific effect on one of the four quadrants of the rectus abdominis. The four exercises analyzed were: 1) long lying crunch, 2) bent knee crunch, 3) leg raise, and 4) vertical leg crunch. Analysis of the standardized EMG recordings demonstrated no significant differences in the mean muscle activity between the four different quadrants, in the mean muscle activity between the four different exercises, and in interactions between the exercises and the quadrants of the rectus abdominis. We conclude that none of the four abdominal exercises studied are specific for strengthening individual muscle quadrants of the rectus abdominis.

  6. Resection Margin and Survival in 2368 Patients Undergoing Hepatic Resection for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer: Surgical Technique or Biologic Surrogate?

    PubMed Central

    Sadot, Eran; Koerkamp, Bas Groot; Leal, Julie N.; Shia, Jinru; Gonen, Mithat; Allen, Peter J.; DeMatteo, Ronald P.; Kingham, T. Peter; Kemeny, Nancy; Blumgart, Leslie H.; Jarnagin, William R.; D’Angelica, Michael I.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The impact of margin width on overall survival (OS) in the context of other prognostic factors after resection for colorectal liver metastases (CRLM) is unclear. We evaluated the relationship between resection margin and OS utilizing high-resolution histologic distance measurements. METHODS A single institution prospectively maintained database was queried for all patients who underwent an initial complete resection of CRLM between 1992–2012. R1 resection was defined as tumor cells at the resection margin (0 mm). R0 resection was further divided into 3 groups: 0.1–0.9 mm, 1–9 mm, ≥ 10mm. RESULTS A total of 4915 liver resections were performed at MSKCC between 1992 and 2012, from which 2368 patients were included in the current study. Half of the patients presented with synchronous disease, 43% had solitary metastasis, and the median tumor size was 3.4cm. With a median follow-up for survivors of 55 months, the median OS of the R1, 0.1–0.9 mm, 1–9 mm, and ≥ 10mm groups were 32, 40, 53, and 56 months, respectively (p < 0.001). Compared to R1 resection, all margin widths, including submillimeter margins correlated with prolonged OS (p < 0.05). The association between the margin width and OS remained significant when adjusted for all other clinicopathologic prognostic factors. CONCLUSIONS Resection margin width is independently associated with OS. Wide margins should be attempted whenever possible. However, resection should not be precluded if narrow margins are anticipated, as submillimeter margin clearance is associated with improved survival. The prolonged OS observed with submillimeter margins is likely a microscopic surrogate for the biologic behavior of a tumor rather than the result of surgical technique. PMID:26258316

  7. Metachronous multiple carcinomas arising at a colostomy site 15 years after abdominoperineal resection: a case report and review of Japanese literature.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Norihiro; Maeda, Koutarou; Hanai, Tsunekazu; Sato, Harunobu; Masumori, Kouji; Katsuno, Hidetoshi; Maruta, Morito

    2009-01-01

    Metachronous multiple carcinomas at the site of a stoma is a rare condition after surgery. A 67-year-old man with a second tumor at the stoma site 15 years after abdominoperineal resection for rectal carcinoma is reported herein with a review of the Japanese literature. The patient visited our hospital 20 years after initial surgery, presenting with constipation and increasing tumor size in the stoma. A biopsy specimen of the tumor revealed adenocarcinoma. Block resection of the sigmoid colon and colostomy with the adjacent abdominal wall was performed. Histopathological examination showed a well-differentiated adenocarcinoma in the stoma invading the adjacent skin. A median of 144 months from the initial operation was documented in 23 cases reported.

  8. Decompressive laparotomy for abdominal compartment syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kimball, E.; Malbrain, M.; Nesbitt, I.; Cohen, J.; Kaloiani, V.; Ivatury, R.; Mone, M.; Debergh, D.; Björck, M.

    2016-01-01

    Background The effect of decompressive laparotomy on outcomes in patients with abdominal compartment syndrome has been poorly investigated. The aim of this prospective cohort study was to describe the effect of decompressive laparotomy for abdominal compartment syndrome on organ function and outcomes. Methods This was a prospective cohort study in adult patients who underwent decompressive laparotomy for abdominal compartment syndrome. The primary endpoints were 28‐day and 1‐year all‐cause mortality. Changes in intra‐abdominal pressure (IAP) and organ function, and laparotomy‐related morbidity were secondary endpoints. Results Thirty‐three patients were included in the study (20 men). Twenty‐seven patients were surgical admissions treated for abdominal conditions. The median (i.q.r.) Acute Physiology And Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score was 26 (20–32). Median IAP was 23 (21–27) mmHg before decompressive laparotomy, decreasing to 12 (9–15), 13 (8–17), 12 (9–15) and 12 (9–14) mmHg after 2, 6, 24 and 72 h. Decompressive laparotomy significantly improved oxygenation and urinary output. Survivors showed improvement in organ function scores, but non‐survivors did not. Fourteen complications related to the procedure developed in eight of the 33 patients. The abdomen could be closed primarily in 18 patients. The overall 28‐day mortality rate was 36 per cent (12 of 33), which increased to 55 per cent (18 patients) at 1 year. Non‐survivors were no different from survivors, except that they tended to be older and on mechanical ventilation. Conclusion Decompressive laparotomy reduced IAP and had an immediate effect on organ function. It should be considered in patients with abdominal compartment syndrome. PMID:26891380

  9. Imaging for chronic abdominal pain in adults.

    PubMed

    Mendelson, Richard

    2015-04-01

    Diagnostic imaging is often not indicated in chronic abdominal pain. In particular, undifferentiated abdominal pain is rarely an indication for a CT scan. CT scanning is overused even when imaging is required. Other modalities may be preferable. A normal CT scan does not rule out cancer. Alarm symptoms, including anaemia, blood in the stool, waking at night with gastrointestinal symptoms, and weight loss, should be investigated. The most appropriate modality depends on the symptoms. Clinical information on request forms for CT scans should be specific and include the suspected condition as this helps the radiologist to determine an appropriate imaging protocol.

  10. [Penetrating abdominal wounds. Apropos of 330 cases].

    PubMed

    Nejjar, M; Bennani, S; Zerouali, O N

    1991-01-01

    Penetrating abdominal wounds are frequent and serious. 330 cases have been treated in the Department of Emergencies and visceral Surgery at Averroes Hospital of Casablanca from 1980 to 1990. The predominance of male sex is noted, and these wounds are always the result of aggression by white arm. All patients have been operated, the white laparotomy rate is of 36%. The classic interventionist attitude is still recommended in spite of this high rate, because our present conditions can't permit us a rigorous watching. According to abdominal lesions, the different interventions are reviewed, and their indications are detailed.

  11. Hypovolemic shock in children: abdominal CT manifestations.

    PubMed

    Taylor, G A; Fallat, M E; Eichelberger, M R

    1987-08-01

    The authors describe a "hypoperfusion complex," seen on abdominal computed tomography, which consists of marked, diffuse dilatation of the intestine with fluid; abnormally intense contrast enhancement of the bowel wall, mesentery, kidneys, and/or pancreas; decreased caliber of the abdominal aorta and inferior vena cava; and moderate to large peritoneal fluid collections. This complex was present in three patients less than 2 years of age and was associated with severe injury and a poor outcome. Recognition of this constellation of findings may help direct attention to the patient's serious hemodynamic abnormality as much as to individual organ defects.

  12. [Intraabdominal hypertension and abdominal compartment syndrome].

    PubMed

    Sonne, Morten; Hillingsø, Jens

    2008-02-11

    Intraabdominal hypertension (IAH) and abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) are rare conditions with high mortality. IAH is an intraabdominal pressure (IAP) above 12 mmHg and ACS an IAP above 20 mmHg with evidence of organ dysfunction. IAP is measured indirectly via the bladder or stomach. Various medical and surgical conditions increase the intraabdominal volume. When the content exceeds the compliance of the abdominal wall, the IAP rises. Increased IAP affects the functioning of the brain, lungs, circulation, kidneys, and bowel. The treatment of ACS is a reduction of IAP.

  13. Outcome after a liver resection of benign lesions

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Katrin; Unsinn, Michael; Hinz, Ulf; Weiss, Karl Heinz; Waldburger, Nina; Longerich, Thomas; Radeleff, Boris; Schirmacher, Peter; Büchler, Markus W; Schemmer, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Background Benign liver tumours represent a challenge in clinical management. There is considerable controversy with respect to the indications for surgery as the evidence for surgical treatment is variable. The aim of this retrospective study was to analyse the indication and outcome after resection of benign, solid liver lesions. Methods Data of 79 patients, who underwent liver resection between 2001 and 2012, were analysed for demographic and outcome parameters. Results Thirty-eight patients with focal nodular hyperplasia (48%), 23 patients with haemangioma (29%) and 18 patients with hepatocellular adenoma (23%) underwent a hepatic resection. A major hepatic resection was performed in 23 patients (29%) and a minor resection in 56 patients (71%). The post-operative mortality rate was zero and the 30-day morbidity rate 13.9%. After a median follow-up of 64 months, 75 patients (95%) were alive, and no patient had developed recurrent disease. Fifty-four patients (68%) were pre-operatively symptomatic, of which, 87% had complete or partial relief of symptoms after a liver resection. The incidence of symptoms increased with the lesions' size. Discussion The management of benign liver lesions necessitates an individualized therapy within a multidisciplinary, evidence-based, treatment algorithm. Resection of benign liver lesions can be performed safely in well-selected patients without mortality and low post-operative morbidity. PMID:26456947

  14. Radical resection and enucleation in Chinese adolescents with pancreatic tumors

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Lie; Xie, Zhi-Bo; Jin, Chen; Jiang, Yong-Jian; Li, Ji; Yang, Feng; Lin, Quan-Jun; Fu, De-Liang

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Pancreatic tumors rarely occur in adolescents, and the appropriateness of radical resection for these patients remains controversial. Medical records were retrospectively reviewed for patients younger than 19 years who underwent radical resection or limited resection (enucleation) between 2000 and 2015. Patient demographics, clinical characteristics, operative details, growth, and survival were analyzed. During the study period, 11 adolescents (mean age, 16.18 years; standard deviation, 1.99; interquartile range, 15.0–18.0) underwent radical resection (n = 7) or enucleation (n = 4) to treat solid pseudopapillary tumors (n = 5), pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (n = 5), or pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (n = 1). None of the 7 patients who underwent radical resection experienced recurrence or serious complications, while 3 of 4 patients who underwent enucleation experienced recurrence (P = 0.02). Recurrence-free survival was slightly longer in patients who underwent radical resection, and this procedure did not appear to affect adolescent growth and development. Radical resection might be safe and effective for adolescents with pancreatic tumors. PMID:28328854

  15. [Combined resection of liver and inferior vena cava].

    PubMed

    Sherba, A E; Efimov, D Iu; Rummo, O O

    2014-01-01

    It was analyzed the results of treatment of 8 patients. Combined resection of liver and inferior vena cava was done in all cases. All resections of inferior vena cava were performed in combination with right-sided hemihepatectomy. Circular resection of inferior vena cava was done in 6 cases, tangential-in 2 cases. Allograft of donor inferior vena cava was used in 3 cases for reconstruction of inferior vena cava. Average duration of combined resection of liver and inferior vena cava was 675±189 min, average hemorrhage - 1800±1402 ml. The need for transfusion of packed red blood cells was 270±723 ml, the need for transfusion of fresh frozen plasma was 1105±636 ml. Post-resection liver failure according to criteria ISGLS developed in 3 patients (37.5%). Biliary complications such as biliary fistula and inconsistency of hepatico-jejunal anastomosis developed in 2 patients (25%). Hospital mortality was 12.5%. It is considered that resection of liver with inferior vena cava demands an experience in hepatobiliary surgery and/or liver transplantation. Surgeon must be ready to use total vascular isolation, hypothermic preservation and veno-venous bypass grafting. It allows to dilate an opportunity of resection liver surgery.

  16. Effect of Laparoscopic-Assisted Resection vs Open Resection of Stage II or III Rectal Cancer on Pathologic Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Fleshman, James; Branda, Megan; Sargent, Daniel J.; Boller, Anne Marie; George, Virgilio; Abbas, Maher; Peters, Walter R.; Maun, Dipen; Chang, George; Herline, Alan; Fichera, Alessandro; Mutch, Matthew; Wexner, Steven; Whiteford, Mark; Marks, John; Birnbaum, Elisa; Margolin, David; Larson, David; Marcello, Peter; Posner, Mitchell; Read, Thomas; Monson, John; Wren, Sherry M.; Pisters, Peter W. T.; Nelson, Heidi

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Evidence about the efficacy of laparoscopic resection of rectal cancer is incomplete, particularly for patients with more advanced-stage disease. OBJECTIVE To determine whether laparoscopic resection is noninferior to open resection, as determined by gross pathologic and histologic evaluation of the resected proctectomy specimen. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS A multicenter, balanced, noninferiority, randomized trial enrolled patients between October 2008 and September 2013. The trial was conducted by credentialed surgeons from 35 institutions in the United States and Canada. A total of 486 patients with clinical stage II or III rectal cancer within 12 cm of the anal verge were randomized after completion of neoadjuvant therapy to laparoscopic or open resection. INTERVENTIONS Standard laparoscopic and open approaches were performed by the credentialed surgeons. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES The primary outcome assessing efficacy was a composite of circumferential radial margin greater than 1 mm, distal margin without tumor, and completeness of total mesorectal excision. A 6%noninferiority margin was chosen according to clinical relevance estimation. RESULTS Two hundred forty patients with laparoscopic resection and 222 with open resection were evaluable for analysis of the 486 enrolled. Successful resection occurred in 81.7%of laparoscopic resection cases (95%CI, 76.8%–86.6%) and 86.9%of open resection cases (95%CI, 82.5%–91.4%) and did not support noninferiority (difference, −5.3%; 1-sided 95%CI, −10.8%to ∞; P for noninferiority = .41). Patients underwent low anterior resection (76.7%) or abdominoperineal resection (23.3%). Conversion to open resection occurred in 11.3%of patients. Operative time was significantly longer for laparoscopic resection (mean, 266.2 vs 220.6 minutes; mean difference, 45.5 minutes; 95%CI, 27.7–63.4; P < .001). Length of stay (7.3 vs 7.0 days; mean difference, 0.3 days; 95%CI, −0.6 to 1.1), readmission within 30

  17. Abdominal Migraine in a Middle-aged Woman

    PubMed Central

    Kunishi, Yosuke; Iwata, Yuri; Ota, Mitsuyasu; Kurakami, Yuichi; Matsubayashi, Mao; Kanno, Masatomo; Kuboi, Yoriko; Yoshie, Koichiro; Kato, Yoshio

    2016-01-01

    A 52-year-old woman presented with recurrent, severe abdominal pain. Laboratory tests and imaging were insignificant, and treatment for functional dyspepsia was ineffective. The poorly localized, dull, and severe abdominal pain, associated with anorexia, nausea, and vomiting, was consistent with abdominal migraine. The symptoms were relieved by loxoprofen and lomerizine, which are used in the treatment of migraine. We herein report a case of abdominal migraine in a middle-aged woman. Abdominal migraine should be considered as a cause of abdominal pain as it might easily be relieved by appropriate treatment. PMID:27725538

  18. Intra-abdominal seminoma found incidentally during trauma workup in a man with bilateral cryptorchidism

    PubMed Central

    Velez, Danielle; Zhao, Philip; Mayer, Tina; Singer, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Bilateral cryptorchidism is a rare occurrence and seminoma is the most common germ cell tumor found in undescended testes when they occur. We present the case of a patient with bilateral cryptorchidism who presented to our trauma center after a motor vehicle collision and was found incidentally to have a 17-cm intra-abdominal mass. The mass was subsequently biopsied and proven to be seminoma. The patient completed three cycles of bleomycin/etoposide/cisplatin chemotherapy and successfully underwent a postchemo retroperitoneal lymph node dissection with no viable residual tumor or positive lymph nodes found in the surgical specimen. He also had an orchiopexy of the contralateral testicle. The patient recovered fully and has been found to be recurrence-free four months postoperatively. We highlight the importance of cisplatin-based chemotherapy and extensive tumor resection as the mainstay of initial cancer control. PMID:26692683

  19. Undifferentiated Pleomorphic Sarcoma Presenting as Abdominal Pain with a Pulsatile Mass

    PubMed Central

    Afsharfard, Abolfazl

    2016-01-01

    Malignant fibrous histiocytoma (MFH) is a rare tumor that mostly involves adults aged 50 to 70. The most common anatomic location is the lower extremities. MFH of the retroperitoneum usually manifests late in its course and may be initially mistaken with other more common diagnosis. Here, the authors describe a 60-year-old man that was brought to the emergency department with a chief complaint of periumbilical abdominal pain. Our patient presented with symptoms consistent with a symptomatic aortic aneurysm, but a mass was encountered during surgery. In such circumstances the diagnosis of malignant sarcoma must be kept in mind and attempts at full resection with tumor-free margins are necessary. PMID:27563479

  20. [Reconstruction of an abdominal wall defect with a superior epigastric perforator propeller flap: case report].

    PubMed

    Lepivert, J-C; Alet, J-M; Michot, A; Pélissier, P; Pinsolle, V

    2014-10-01

    Perforators flaps take a special place in reconstructive surgery. These flaps can be dissected and turned as a propeller blade on its pedicule axis. We report the case of a 54-year-old man presenting a recurrence of a dermatofibrosarcoma in the right hypochondrium. Tumor resection caused a large abdominal wall defect taking the anterior aponeurosis of the rectus abdominis. An angioscanner was realized in preoperative to locate the perforators of the deep superior epigastric artery. We realized a propeller flap based on a perforator of the left superior epigastric artery who allowed to cover the wall defect. We set up a patch of Vicryl® to reconstruct the aponeurosis plan at the same operative time. We didn't note any necrosis and complete healing occurred in 2 weeks. The margins were healthy. The cosmetic result and the low morbidity make this flap a good therapeutic option. This flap seems reliable, arteries perforators are constant with good diameter.

  1. [A Case of an Abdominal Desmoplastic Small Round Cell Tumor with Metastasis in the Medulla Oblongata].

    PubMed

    Azami, Ayaka; Takano, Yoshinao; Honda, Michitaka; Todate, Yukitoshi; Tada, Takeshi; Waragai, Mitsuru; Fukushima, Daizo; Suzuki, Nobuyasu; Sato, Atai; Abe, Tsuyoshi; Teranishi, Yasushi; Sakuma, Hideo

    2016-11-01

    A desmoplastic small round cell tumor(DSRCT)is a very rare malignant tumor that mainly occurs in the intra-abdominal cavity in young adults.This neoplasm has an extremely poor prognosis, with a clinical course characterized by rapid progression and metastasis.We present a 31-year-old man who presented with chief complaints of dysphagia, ataxic gait, and hoarseness.He first underwent surgical resection of a tumor in the medulla oblongata; however, the lesion was suspected to be a metastatic neoplasm.Following a thorough medical examination, the patient was diagnosed with retroperitoneal DSRCT with multiple metastatic lesions.He received multidisciplinary treatment including debulking surgery for the primary lesion; radiotherapy for metastatic lesions in the brain, abdomen, and cervical lymph nodes; hepatic artery embolization for liver metastasis; and systemic chemotherapy.The patient died of progressive disease 17 months after the initial diagnosis.

  2. Perineal Massage in Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... with your knees bent. Some women like to lean on pillows for back support. Lubricate your thumbs ... same side-to-side, U- shaped, downward pressure method should be used. Good communication is important— be ...

  3. Lung cancer with chest wall invasion: retrospective analysis comparing en-bloc resection and ‘resection in bird cage’

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Invasion of the chest wall per se is not a contraindication for tumor resection in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), provided there is no mediastinal lymph node or vital structure involvement. Although widely known to Brazilian surgeons, the ‘resection in bird cage’ technique has never been widely studied in terms of patient survival. Thus, the objective of this study was to evaluate the postoperative consequences and overall survival of extra-musculoperiosteal resection compared with en-bloc resection in NSCLC patients with invasion of the endothoracic fascia. Methods Between January 1990 and December 2009, 33 NSCLC patients with invasion of the thoracic wall who underwent pulmonary resection were retrospectively analyzed. Of the 33 patients evaluated, 20 patients underwent en-bloc resection and 13 underwent ‘resection in bird cage.’ For each patient, a retrospective case note review was made. Results The median age at surgery, gender, indication, rate of comorbidities, tumor size and the degree of uptake in the costal margin were similar for both groups. The rate of postoperative complications and the duration of hospitalization did not differ between the groups. Regarding the outcome variables, the disease-free interval, rate of local recurrence, metastasis-free time after surgery, overall mortality rate, mortality rate related to metastatic disease, duration following surgery in which deaths occurred, and overall survival were also similar between groups. The cumulative survival curves between the ‘resection in bird cage’ and en-bloc resection and between stages Ia + Ib and IIb + IIIa + IV were not significantly different (p = 0.68 and p = 0.64, respectively). The cumulative metastasis-free survival curves were not significantly different between the two types of surgery (p = 0.38). Conclusions In NSCLC patients with invasion of the endothoracic fascia, ‘resection in bird cage’ is a less aggressive procedure

  4. National trends in resection of cystic lesions of the pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Reames, Bradley N.; Scally, Christopher P.; Frankel, Timothy L.; Dimick, Justin B.; Nathan, Hari

    2016-01-01

    Background Management of cystic lesions of the pancreas (CLP) is controversial. In this study, we sought to evaluate national changes in the resection of CLP over time, to better understand the impact of evolving guidelines on CLP management. Methods We used Medicare data to examine CLP resection among patients undergoing pancreatic resection between 2001 and 2012. Patients with a diagnosis of CLP were identified and compared to patients with non-CLP indications. We then examined changes over time in patient and hospital characteristics and outcomes among patients with a CLP diagnosis. Results We identified 56,419 Medicare patients undergoing pancreatic resection, of which 2129 had a CLP diagnosis. The annual number of CLP resections, and proportion of all resections performed for CLP increased significantly during the period, from 2.1% (65/3072) resections in 2001, to 4.5% (286/6348) in 2012 (p < 0.001). The proportion of CLP resections with a malignant diagnosis did not change (15.5% in 2001–2003 vs. 13.1% in 2010–2012, p = 0.4). Overall rates of 30-day mortality decreased significantly during the period (9.6% in 2001–2003 vs. 5.5% in 2010–2012, p < 0.001). Discussion CLP resections were performed with increasing frequency in Medicare patients between 2001 and 2012, but this did not correspond to increased diagnosis of malignancy. Additional research is needed to understand the influence of recent guidelines on management of CLP. PMID:27037208

  5. Juxtarenal Mycotic Aneurysm as a Complication of Acute Exacerbation of Chronic Cholecystitis Treated by Resection and Replacement by a Fresh Allograft.

    PubMed

    Grus, Tomáš; Lambert, Lukáš; Rohn, Vilém; Klika, Tomáš; Grusová, Gabriela; Michálek, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of a female patient with infectious (mycotic) juxtarenal abdominal aneurysm with atypical symptoms beginning as acute exacerbation of chronic cholecystitis. Apart from common antibiotic treatment, the patient successfully underwent resection of the diseased segment and replacement by a fresh allograft in order to reduce the risk of infection of the graft, but with the need of subsequent life-long immunosuppressive therapy. Perioperative monitoring of the spinal cord by near infrared spectroscopy was used to identify possible spinal ischemia. The choice of the fresh allograft was based on our experience supported by review of the literature.

  6. Clinical outcome of transthoracic esophagectomy with thoracic duct resection

    PubMed Central

    Matsuda, Satoru; Takeuchi, Hiroya; Kawakubo, Hirofumi; Shimada, Ayako; Fukuda, Kazumasa; Nakamura, Rieko; Takahashi, Tsunehiro; Wada, Norihito; Kameyama, Kaori; Kitagawa, Yuko

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The number of dissected lymph nodes (LNs), surgical outcomes, and postoperative recurrence-free survival (RFS) were compared between thoracic duct (TD)-preserved and TD-resected groups. The distribution of metastasis in LNs around TD (TDLN) was reviewed. Transthoracic esophagectomy (TTE) with TD resection for esophageal cancer patients has been one of the standard procedures. Because the adipose tissue surrounding the TD contains LNs, TD resection might be necessary for radical LN dissection. However, few studies have investigated the oncological outcome of TTE with TD resection. Two hundred fifty-six consecutive patients who underwent TTE between 2004 and 2015 were retrospectively reviewed and classified into TD-preserved or TD-resected groups. The number of dissected LNs for each LN station and surgical outcomes were compared. RFS was analyzed in 155 patients who underwent TTE before December 2012. Since 2013, the TDLN number was prospectively examined, independent of the regional LNs (n = 72). Of these, the TDLN number for each location (TDLN-Ut/Mt/Lt) was investigated and the correlation between TDLN metastasis and clinicopathological factors was analyzed. The TD was preserved in 89 patients and resected in 167 patients. Patients with TD resection showed significant advanced stage. There was no significant difference in the incidence of postoperative complications, including pneumonia, anastomotic leakage, and chylothorax. The number of dissected mediastinal LNs was significantly increased in the TD-resected group. The 5-year RFS rate of cStage I patients was 67.3% in the TD-preserved group against 90.3% in the TD-resected group, showing a tendency towards RFS extension that did not quite reach statistical significance (P = 0.055). The mean TDLN-Ut/Mt/Lt numbers were 0.89/0.56/0.44, respectively. Eight of 72 (11%) patients displayed TDLN metastasis. Metastatic TDLNs were observed on the same or cranial level of the primary lesion in 7 of 8 patients

  7. Laparoscopic lavage versus surgical resection for acute diverticulitis with generalised peritonitis: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Cirocchi, R; Di Saverio, S; Weber, D G; Taboła, R; Abraha, I; Randolph, J; Arezzo, A; Binda, G A

    2017-02-01

    This systematic review and meta-analysis investigates current evidence on the therapeutic role of laparoscopic lavage in the management of diverticular peritonitis. A systematic review of the literature was performed on PubMed until June 2016, according to preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses guidelines. All randomised controlled trials comparing laparoscopic lavage with surgical resection, irrespective of anastomosis or stoma formation, were analysed. After assessment of titles and full text, 3 randomised trials fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Overall the quality of evidence was low because of serious concerns regarding the risk of bias and imprecision. In the laparoscopic lavage group, there was a statistically significant higher rate of postoperative intra-abdominal abscess (RR 2.54, 95% CI 1.34-4.83), a lower rate of postoperative wound infection (RR 0.10, 95% CI 0.02-0.51), and a shorter length of postoperative hospital stay during index admission (WMD = -2.03, 95% CI -2.59 to -1.47). There were no statistically significant differences in terms of postoperative mortality at index admission or within 30 days from intervention in all Hinchey stages and in Hinchey stage III, postoperative mortality at 12 months, surgical reintervention at index admission or within 30-90 days from index intervention, stoma rate at 12 months, or adverse events within 90 days of any Clavien-Dindo grade. The surgical reintervention rate at 12 months from index intervention was significantly lower in the laparoscopic lavage group (RR 0.57, 95% CI 0.38-0.86), but these data included emergency reintervention and planned intervention (stoma reversal). This systematic review and meta-analysis did not demonstrate any significant difference between laparoscopic peritoneal lavage and traditional surgical resection in patients with peritonitis from perforated diverticular disease, in terms of postoperative mortality and early reoperation rate

  8. Comparison of the Effect of Dry Cupping Therapy and Acupressure at BL23 Point on Intensity of Postpartum Perineal Pain Based on the Short Form of McGill Pain Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Akbarzade, Marzieh; Ghaemmaghami, Mehrnoush; Yazdanpanahi, Zahra; Zare, Najaf; Mohagheghzadeh, Abdolali; Azizi, Amir

    2016-01-01

    Background: Perineal pain is a major morbidity in the first few days after delivery. This study aimed to investigate the effect of dry cupping therapy and acupressure at BL23 point on the intensity of postpartum perineal pain based on the short-form of McGill pain questionnaire (SMPQ). Methods: The present clinical trial was conducted on 150 subjects in 3 groups of 50 cases. After at least 4–8 hr of delivery, cupping therapy was performed for 15–20 min up to 3 times a week (once a day) and acupressure was performed for 15–20 min based on clockwise model. The short-form of McGill pain questionnaire was completed both before and after the intervention. The SPSS statistical software was used to analyze the data using repeated measures ANOVA. Besides, p<0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: In the cupping therapy group, mean of the perineal pain intensity reduced from 37.5±6.8 before the intervention to 11.1±6.1, 6.9±4.7, and 3.8±3.6 immediately, 24 hr, and 2 weeks after the intervention, respectively. The results of study showed that the differences between the intervention and control groups were statistically significant (p<0.01). Mean difference of the perineal pain intensity in the acupressure group reached from 35.6±8.1 before the intervention to 10.4±5.5 two weeks after the intervention, so the variation between intervention and control groups was statistically significant. Conclusion: The study findings showed that cupping therapy and acupressure reduced perineal pain. Therefore, they may be considered as effective treatments for reducing pain intensity of allowing delivery. PMID:26962482

  9. Early outcome of transurethral enucleation and resection of the prostate versus transurethral resection of the prostate

    PubMed Central

    Palaniappan, Sundaram; Kuo, Tricia Li Chuen; Cheng, Christopher Wai Sam; Foo, Keong Tatt

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Recurrent prostate adenoma is a long-term complication following transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP). Transurethral enucleation and resection of the prostate (TUERP) is more appealing, since the nodular adenoma can be completely removed through endoscopy. TUERP is also hypothesised to result in a lower frequency of recurrent adenoma. This study aimed to compare the early outcomes of TUERP and TURP, and assess the feasibility and safety of TUERP. METHODS We compared the outcome of 81 patients who underwent TUERP with that of 85 patients who underwent TURP. International prostate symptom score, quality of life score, prostate volume, degree of intravesical prostatic protrusion, maximum flow rate, post-void residual volume and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level were obtained pre- and postoperatively. Complications (e.g. transfusion rate, incontinence, infection and urethral stricture) were analysed. RESULTS Operative time was significantly longer in the TUERP group compared to the TURP group (85.3 minutes vs. 51.6 minutes). After TUERP, the maximum flow rate was significantly higher (21.1 mL/s vs. 17.1 mL/s) and PSA level was significantly lower (1.2 ng/mL vs. 1.9 ng/mL) than after TURP. The rates of infection, transfusion and urethral stricture were similar for both groups, but the TUERP group had a higher rate of temporary incontinence (13.6% vs. 4.7%). CONCLUSION The lower PSA level and better maximum flow rate achieved following TUERP suggest that prostate adenoma removal was more complete with TUERP. Long-term follow-up is required to establish whether TUERP results in fewer resections for recurrent adenoma. PMID:26875682

  10. Abdominal manifestations of actinomycosis in IUD users.

    PubMed

    Asuncion, C M; Cinti, D C; Hawkins, H B

    1984-08-01

    The use of an intrauterine device (IUD) is associated with the presence of actinomyces in the female genital tract. Since IUD use is currently so prevalent, IUD-related pelvic inflammatory disease occasionally spreads to the rest of the abdomen. Two patients with abdominal actinomycosis in association with an IUD illustrate the problem; we review the general problem.

  11. Genetics Home Reference: abdominal wall defect

    MedlinePlus

    ... Aug;6(4):232-6. Citation on PubMed Islam S. Clinical care outcomes in abdominal wall defects. Curr ... Site Map Customer Support Selection Criteria for Links USA.gov Copyright Privacy Accessibility FOIA Viewers & Players U.S. ...

  12. [Albert Einstein and his abdominal aortic aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Cervantes Castro, Jorge

    2011-01-01

    The interesting case of Albert Einstein's abdominal aortic aneurysm is presented. He was operated on at age 69 and, finding that the large aneurysm could not be removed, the surgeon elected to wrap it with cellophane to prevent its growth. However, seven years later the aneurysm ruptured and caused the death of the famous scientist.

  13. Physical activity and abdominal obesity in youth.

    PubMed

    Kim, YoonMyung; Lee, SoJung

    2009-08-01

    Childhood obesity continues to escalate despite considerable efforts to reverse the current trends. Childhood obesity is a leading public health concern because overweight-obese youth suffer from comorbidities such as type 2 diabetes mellitus, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, metabolic syndrome, and cardiovascular disease, conditions once considered limited to adults. This increasing prevalence of chronic health conditions in youth closely parallels the dramatic increase in obesity, in particular abdominal adiposity, in youth. Although mounting evidence in adults demonstrates the benefits of regular physical activity as a treatment strategy for abdominal obesity, the independent role of regular physical activity alone (e.g., without calorie restriction) on abdominal obesity, and in particular visceral fat, is largely unclear in youth. There is some evidence to suggest that, independent of sedentary activity levels (e.g., television watching or playing video games), engaging in higher-intensity physical activity is associated with a lower waist circumference and less visceral fat. Several randomized controlled studies have shown that aerobic types of exercise are protective against age-related increases in visceral adiposity in growing children and adolescents. However, evidence regarding the effect of resistance training alone as a strategy for the treatment of abdominal obesity is lacking and warrants further investigation.

  14. Assessment of the patient with acute abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Cole, Elaine; Lynch, Antonia; Cugnoni, Helen

    Abdominal pain has many causes, from simple to complex presentations. Patients with abdominal pain may have a number of physiological and psychological needs. Nurses have a key role to play in patient assessment, history talking and management.

  15. Talk to Your Doctor about Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    ... español Talk to Your Doctor about Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Browse Sections The Basics Overview What is AAA? ... doctor about getting screened (tested) for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). If AAA isn't found and treated ...

  16. Unilateral primitive hydatid cyst with surgical resection of the scrotum: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Hydatid disease remains a public health problem in many Mediterranean countries. Liver and lung localizations are the most common. Renal hydatid cysts represent 2 percent to 4 percent of the visceral forms of this disease. To the best of our knowledge a scrotal location has only previously been described in five papers in the literature, all being secondary localizations. In this paper, we report a case of a primitive scrotal hydatid cyst. Case presentation A Moroccan man aged 29 years old presented to our facility with scrotal pain. A clinical examination identified a painless scrotal mass. The results of a scrotal ultrasound showed intra-scrotal cystic formations with different sizes associated with scrotal effusion of average abundance. Chest cavity and abdominal computed tomography scans did not reveal any other localizations. Our patient benefited from surgical protruding dome resection. A partial cysto-pericystectomy was realized. The first stage consisted of injecting a scolicide solution; hydrogen peroxide is the most commonly used agent. This is injected into the cystic cavity and retained for 10 minutes. This process allows for sterilization of the cyst while avoiding the risk of rupture and transmission of the hydatid liquid into the circulation. After 10 minutes, the cystic contents are removed by suction. The cyst is then opened, and the endocyst containing the hydatid membrane and daughter vesicles are removed. It is of note that our patient did not receive any additional medical treatment. Our diagnosis was made using an imaging approach and was confirmed during surgery. Conclusions Ultrasound is often the key diagnostic approach for cases of a scrotal hydatid cyst. Treatment is primarily surgical, aiming for resection of the protruding dome via a longitudinal scrotectomy. PMID:23601913

  17. Body Fat Composition Assessment Using Analytic Morphomics Predicts Infectious Complications After Bowel Resection in Crohn's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Waljee, Akbar K.; Day, Nicholas M.; Bergmans, Carrie L.; Zahn, Katelin M.; Higgins, Peter D. R.; Wang, Stewart C.; Su, Grace L.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Decisions between medical and surgical management of Crohn's disease (CD) incorporate risk assessments for potential complications of each therapy. Analytic morphomics is a novel method of image analysis providing quantifiable measurements of body tissue composition, characterizing body fat more comprehensively than body mass index alone. The aim of this study was to determine the risk factors associated with postoperative complications in CD, incorporating fat composition analysis using analytic morphomics. Methods: We performed a retrospective review of adults undergoing bowel resection for CD between 2004 and 2011 at a single center. Computed tomography obtained within 30 days prior to surgery underwent morphomic analysis for fat characterization. Postoperative infectious complications were defined as the need for a postoperative abdominal drain, intravenous antibiotics, or reoperation within 30 days. Bivariate and multivariate analyses using logistic regression were used to generate a prediction model of infectious complications. Results: A total of 269 subjects met selection criteria; 27% incurred postoperative infectious complications. Bivariate analysis showed hemoglobin, albumin, surgical urgency, high-dose prednisone use, and subcutaneous-to-visceral fat volume distribution as predictors of complications. Body mass index, anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha therapies, and immunomodulator use were not predictors of complication. Multivariate modeling demonstrated a c-statistic of 0.77 and a negative predictive value of 81.1% with surgical urgency (odds ratio = 2.78; 95% confidence interval, 1.46–6.02; P = 0.004), subcutaneous-to-visceral fat distribution (odds ratio = 2.01; 95% confidence interval, 1.20–3.19; P = 0.006), and hemoglobin (odds ratio = 0.69; 95% confidence interval, 0.55–0.85; P = 0.001) as predictors of infectious complication. Conclusions: Fat subtype and distribution are predictive of postoperative infectious complications

  18. Unilateral pulmonary edema during laparoscopic resection of adrenal tumor

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Smita; Nayar, Pavan; Virmani, Pooja; Bansal, Shipra; Pawar, Mridula

    2015-01-01

    Despite technological, therapeutic and diagnostic advancements, surgical intervention in pheochromocytoma may result in a life-threatening situation. We report a patient who developed unilateral pulmonary edema during laparoscopic resection of adrenal tumor. PMID:26330724

  19. 3D-printed guiding templates for improved osteosarcoma resection

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Limin; Zhou, Ye; Zhu, Ye; Lin, Zefeng; Wang, Yingjun; Zhang, Yu; Xia, Hong; Mao, Chuanbin

    2016-01-01

    Osteosarcoma resection is challenging due to the variable location of tumors and their proximity with surrounding tissues. It also carries a high risk of postoperative complications. To overcome the challenge in precise osteosarcoma resection, computer-aided design (CAD) was used to design patient-specific guiding templates for osteosarcoma resection on the basis of the computer tomography (CT) scan and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the osteosarcoma of human patients. Then 3D printing technique was used to fabricate the guiding templates. The guiding templates were used to guide the osteosarcoma surgery, leading to more precise resection of the tumorous bone and the implantation of the bone implants, less blood loss, shorter operation time and reduced radiation exposure during the operation. Follow-up studies show that the patients recovered well to reach a mean Musculoskeletal Tumor Society score of 27.125. PMID:26997197

  20. Review: Research Toward Safer Resection of the Cirrhotic Liver

    PubMed Central

    Moser, M. A. J.; Kneteman, N. M.

    2000-01-01

    Despite recent advances in hepatic surgery, resection of the cirrhotic liver continues to be fraught with high morbidity and mortality rates. As a result, for many patients requiring resection of HCC the postoperative course is complicated and the probability of cure is diminished by coexisting cirrhosis. In this review, we discuss the characteristics of the cirrhotic liver which make it poorly tolerant of resection and the most common complications that follow such surgery. The main purpose of this paper is to review recent attempts to identify interventions that might be beneficial to cirrhotic patients undergoing resection. These interventions include assessment of liver reserve, advances in surgical technique, and improvement in liver function and regeneration. PMID:10674743

  1. 3D-printed guiding templates for improved osteosarcoma resection.

    PubMed

    Ma, Limin; Zhou, Ye; Zhu, Ye; Lin, Zefeng; Wang, Yingjun; Zhang, Yu; Xia, Hong; Mao, Chuanbin

    2016-03-21

    Osteosarcoma resection is challenging due to the variable location of tumors and their proximity with surrounding tissues. It also carries a high risk of postoperative complications. To overcome the challenge in precise osteosarcoma resection, computer-aided design (CAD) was used to design patient-specific guiding templates for osteosarcoma resection on the basis of the computer tomography (CT) scan and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the osteosarcoma of human patients. Then 3D printing technique was used to fabricate the guiding templates. The guiding templates were used to guide the osteosarcoma surgery, leading to more precise resection of the tumorous bone and the implantation of the bone implants, less blood loss, shorter operation time and reduced radiation exposure during the operation. Follow-up studies show that the patients recovered well to reach a mean Musculoskeletal Tumor Society score of 27.125.

  2. Computer-Assisted Resection and Reconstruction of Pelvic Tumor Sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Docquier, Pierre-Louis; Paul, Laurent; Cartiaux, Olivier; Delloye, Christian; Banse, Xavier

    2010-01-01

    Pelvic sarcoma is associated with a relatively poor prognosis, due to the difficulty in obtaining an adequate surgical margin given the complex pelvic anatomy. Magnetic resonance imaging and computerized tomography allow valuable surgical resection planning, but intraoperative localization remains hazardous. Surgical navigation systems could be of great benefit in surgical oncology, especially in difficult tumor location; however, no commercial surgical oncology software is currently available. A customized navigation software was developed and used to perform a synovial sarcoma resection and allograft reconstruction. The software permitted preoperative planning with defined target planes and intraoperative navigation with a free-hand saw blade. The allograft was cut according to the same planes. Histological examination revealed tumor-free resection margins. Allograft fitting to the pelvis of the patient was excellent and allowed stable osteosynthesis. We believe this to be the first case of combined computer-assisted tumor resection and reconstruction with an allograft. PMID:21127723

  3. Computer-assisted resection and reconstruction of pelvic tumor sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Docquier, Pierre-Louis; Paul, Laurent; Cartiaux, Olivier; Delloye, Christian; Banse, Xavier

    2010-01-01

    Pelvic sarcoma is associated with a relatively poor prognosis, due to the difficulty in obtaining an adequate surgical margin given the complex pelvic anatomy. Magnetic resonance imaging and computerized tomography allow valuable surgical resection planning, but intraoperative localization remains hazardous. Surgical navigation systems could be of great benefit in surgical oncology, especially in difficult tumor location; however, no commercial surgical oncology software is currently available. A customized navigation software was developed and used to perform a synovial sarcoma resection and allograft reconstruction. The software permitted preoperative planning with defined target planes and intraoperative navigation with a free-hand saw blade. The allograft was cut according to the same planes. Histological examination revealed tumor-free resection margins. Allograft fitting to the pelvis of the patient was excellent and allowed stable osteosynthesis. We believe this to be the first case of combined computer-assisted tumor resection and reconstruction with an allograft.

  4. 3D-printed guiding templates for improved osteosarcoma resection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Limin; Zhou, Ye; Zhu, Ye; Lin, Zefeng; Wang, Yingjun; Zhang, Yu; Xia, Hong; Mao, Chuanbin

    2016-03-01

    Osteosarcoma resection is challenging due to the variable location of tumors and their proximity with surrounding tissues. It also carries a high risk of postoperative complications. To overcome the challenge in precise osteosarcoma resection, computer-aided design (CAD) was used to design patient-specific guiding templates for osteosarcoma resection on the basis of the computer tomography (CT) scan and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the osteosarcoma of human patients. Then 3D printing technique was used to fabricate the guiding templates. The guiding templates were used to guide the osteosarcoma surgery, leading to more precise resection of the tumorous bone and the implantation of the bone implants, less blood loss, shorter operation time and reduced radiation exposure during the operation. Follow-up studies show that the patients recovered well to reach a mean Musculoskeletal Tumor Society score of 27.125.

  5. [Lymphosarcoma of abdominal lymph nodes in children].

    PubMed

    Kvirikashvili, T O

    2006-01-01

    We investigated 79 patients (76.0%) with lymphosarcoma of abdominal lymph nodes among all 104 with general abdominal lymphosarcoma. Ultrasound tomography was used in 98.1 % cases; also, in the urgent cases cancer transcutaneal puncture was performed with the purpose of cytological investigation. In complicated situations computer tomography was considered as a highly informative method of investigation. Surgical intervention and radial therapy is inexpedient in a treatment program of lymphosarcoma of abdominal lymph nodes in children. Besides, it is shown the superiority of intensive program of polychemical therapy OMDV: vincristine (oncovin) -- 1.5 mg/m(2) i/v in the 1 day; metotrexate -- 250 mg/m(2) i/v drop by drop in the I day; dexamethazone 10 mg/m(2) per os 1-5 day; vepesid -- 100 mg/m(2) i/v drop by drop in the 4 and 5 days.) in comparison with the ACOP scheme: adriamicine or rubomicine - 30 mg/m(2) i/v 1 time in week (N 4-6); cyclophosphane -- 600 mg/m(2) i/v 1 time in week (N 4-6); vincristine (oncovin) -- 1.4 mg/m(2) i/v 1 time in week (N 4-6); prednisolone -- 40 mg/m(2) every day 4-6 week quitting gradually) for treatment of lymphosarcoma of abdominal lymph nodes in childhood age. General recovery without recurrence in children with lymphosarcoma of abdominal lymph nodes was occurred in 44.2% cases. In the case of polychemical therapy according to ACOP scheme, recovery was 20% and in the case of polychemical therapy following OMDV scheme, 78.1% of the children recovered.

  6. Combined Gastric and Duodenal Perforation Through Blunt Abdominal Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Adarshpal; Singla, Archan Lal; Kumar, Ashwani; Yadav, Manish

    2015-01-01

    Blunt abdominal traumas are uncommonly encountered despite their high prevalence, and injuries to the organ like duodenum are relatively uncommon (occurring in only 3%-5% of abdominal injuries) because of its retroperitoneal location. Duodenal injury combined with gastric perforation from a single abdominal trauma impact is rarely heard. The aim of this case report is to present a rare case of blunt abdominal trauma with combined gastric and duodenal injuries. PMID:25738037

  7. Abdominal cavity myolipoma presenting as an enlarging incisional hernia.

    PubMed

    Moore, Mark O; Richardson, Michael L; Rubin, Brian P; Baird, Geoffrey S

    2006-01-01

    We present a case of an abdominal cavity myolipoma which herniated through a low transverse abdominal (Pfannenstiel) incision, and presented as an enlarging abdominal wall mass. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) prior to surgery demonstrated an encapsulated solid tumor mass demonstrating fat signal and and increased T2-weighted signal. Postsurgical histological tissue diagnosis was myolipoma. Recognition of the intra- and extraperitoneal location of this abdominal tumor was essential for accurate surgical planning.

  8. [Approaches to the abdominal cavity and closure of the abdominal wall].

    PubMed

    Dittmar, Y; Rauchfuss, F; Ardelt, M; Settmacher, U

    2011-12-01

    Although minimally invasive approaches to the abdominal cavity are becoming increasingly more important, open surgical techniques are still of essential interest and must be mastered by general and visceral surgeons. The choice of the particular approach depends on the specificity and location of the scheduled procedure. The following article is intended to give an overview on the current literature as well as experiences in the field of open surgical approaches to the abdominal cavity.

  9. Lateral abdominal muscle size at rest and during abdominal drawing-in manoeuvre in healthy adolescents.

    PubMed

    Linek, Pawel; Saulicz, Edward; Wolny, Tomasz; Myśliwiec, Andrzej; Kokosz, Mirosław

    2015-02-01

    Lateral abdominal wall muscles in children and adolescents have not been characterised to date. In the present report, we examined the reliability of the ultrasound measurement and thickness of the oblique external muscle (OE), oblique internal muscle (OI) and transverse abdominal muscle (TrA) at rest and during abdominal drawing-in manoeuvre (ADIM) on both sides of the body in healthy adolescents. We also determined possible differences between boys and girls and defined any factors-such as body mass, height and BMI-that may affect the thickness of the abdominal muscles. B-mode ultrasound was used to assess OE, OI and TrA on both sides of the body in the supine position. Ultrasound measurements at rest and during ADIM were reliable in this age group (ICC3,3 > 0.92). OI was always the thickest and TrA the thinnest muscle on both sides of the body. In this group, an identical pattern of the contribution of the individual muscles to the structure of the lateral abdominal wall (OI > OE > TrA) was observed. At rest and during ADIM, no statistically significant side-to-side differences were demonstrated in either gender. The body mass constitutes between 30% and <50% of the thickness differences in all muscles under examination at rest and during ADIM. The structure of lateral abdominal wall in adolescents is similar to that of adults. During ADIM, the abdominal muscles in adolescents react similarly to those in adults. This study provided extensive information regarding the structure of the lateral abdominal wall in healthy adolescents.

  10. Actual 10-Year Survivors Following Resection of Adrenocortical Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Thuy B.; Postlewait, Lauren M.; Maithel, Shishir K.; Prescott, Jason D.; Wang, Tracy S.; Glenn, Jason; Phay, John E.; Keplinger, Kara; Fields, Ryan C.; Jin, Linda X.; Weber, Sharon M.; Salem, Ahmed; Sicklick, Jason K.; Gad, Shady; Yopp, Adam C.; Mansour, John C.; Duh, Quan-Yang; Seiser, Natalie; Solorzano, Carmen C.; Kiernan, Colleen M.; Votanopoulos, Konstantinos I.; Levine, Edward A.; Hatzaras, Ioannis; Shenoy, Rivfka; Pawlik, Timothy M.; Norton, Jeffrey A.; Poultsides, George A.

    2017-01-01

    Background Adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) is a rare and aggressive malignancy with limited therapeutic options beyond surgical resection. The characteristics of actual long-term survivors following surgical resection for ACC have not been previously reported. Method Patients who underwent resection for ACC at one of 13 academic institutions participating in the US Adrenocortical Carcinoma Group from 1993 to 2014 were analyzed. Patients were stratified into four groups: early mortality (died within 2 years), late mortality (died within 2–5 years), actual 5-year survivor (survived at least 5 years), and actual 10-year survivor (survived at least 10 years). Patients with less than 5 years of follow-up were excluded. Results Among the 180 patients available for analysis, there were 49 actual 5-year survivors (27%) and 12 actual 10-year survivors (7%). Patients who experienced early mortality had higher rates of cortisol-secreting tumors, nodal metastasis, synchronous distant metastasis, and R1 or R2 resections (all P < 0.05). The need for multi-visceral resection, perioperative blood transfusion, and adjuvant therapy correlated with early mortality. However, nodal involvement, distant metastasis, and R1 resection did not preclude patients from becoming actual 10-year survivors. Ten of twelve actual 10-year survivors were women, and of the seven 10-year survivors who experienced disease recurrence, five had undergone repeat surgery to resect the recurrence. Conclusion Surgery for ACC can offer a 1 in 4 chance of actual 5-year survival and a 1 in 15 chance of actual 10-year survival. Long-term survival was often achieved with repeat resection for local or distant recurrence, further underscoring the important role of surgery in managing patients with ACC. PMID:27633419

  11. Reconstruction after resection of malignant parapharyngeal space tumor

    PubMed Central

    Umezawa, Hiroki; Nakamizo, Munenaga; Yokoshima, Kazuhiko; Nara, Shimpei; Ogawa, Rei; Hyakusoku, Hiko

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Primary malignant tumor of the parapharyngeal space (PPS) is rare. After surgical resection, primary closure could be considered if the oropharynx mucosa remains. This report describes two patients who underwent reconstruction by free tissue transfer after the resection of PPS tumors. This report was presented at the 56th annual meeting of the Japanese Society of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, 4 April, 2013. PMID:27252950

  12. Blood loss during transurethral resection of the prostate.

    PubMed

    Abrams, P H; Shah, P J; Bryning, K; Gaches, C G; Ashken, M H; Green, N A

    1982-01-01

    Blood loss during operation was measured in 106 patients undergoing transurethral resection of the prostate, using a colorimetric technique. The total blood loss was related to the length of operation and the weight of prostate resected. There was no relationship between blood pressure and the blood loss during operation. However there was a significant reduction in blood loss if the patient received a regional rather than a general anaesthetic. Blood loss was lower in those patients undergoing prostatectomy for carcinomatous disease.

  13. Endoscopic Resection of Lateral Synovial Cyst of the Knee.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2015-12-01

    Synovial cysts on the lateral side of the knee can cause pain, limitation of joint mobility, compression of the neighboring neurovascular structures, rupture leading to compartment syndrome, infection, erosion of adjacent bone, and iliotibial band friction syndrome. Open resection is commonly performed for symptomatic cysts. We describe an alternative, endoscopic approach to cyst resection. This has the advantages of minimally invasive surgery of smaller wounds, better cosmesis, and less surgical trauma.

  14. Perineal resuturing versus expectant management following vaginal delivery complicated by a dehisced wound (PREVIEW): a pilot and feasibility randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Dudley, L; Kettle, C; Thomas, P W; Ismail, K M K

    2017-01-01

    Objective To establish the feasibility of conducting a definitive randomised controlled trial (RCT) comparing the effectiveness of resuturing versus expectant management for dehisced perineal wounds. Design A multicentre pilot and feasibility RCT. Setting Ten UK maternity units from July 2011 to July 2013. Population Eligible women with a dehisced perineal wound within 2 weeks of childbirth. Methods The interventions were resuturing or expectancy. Randomisation was via web or telephone, stratified by participating centre. Blinding was not possible due to the nature of the interventions. Analysis was by intention-to-treat. Outcome The primary outcome measure was wound healing at 6–8 weeks. Results The study revealed a number of feasibility issues, particularly strong patient and clinician preference for treatment options at recruiting centres and the timing of the primary outcome measure. Thirty-four women were randomised (17 in each arm). Data from 33 women were analysed on an intention-to-treat analysis to obtain preliminary estimates of effect size. There was a difference in wound healing at 2 weeks favouring resuturing (OR 20.00, 95% CI 2.04 to 196.37, p=0.004). However, by 6–8 weeks all but one wound in both groups had healed. Conclusions PREVIEW revealed a number of feasibility issues, which impacted on recruitment rate. These will have to be taken into account in the design of any future definitive study. In this feasibility study, resuturing was associated with quicker wound healing and women reported higher satisfaction rates with the outcome at 3 months. Trial registration number ISRCTN05754020. PMID:28188151

  15. Diagnostic yield of oesophagogastroduodenoscopy in children with abdominal pain

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Abdominal pain is the most common indication for OGD in children. However, existing studies examining the diagnostic outcomes of OGD in children with abdominal pain are limited. We conducted the current study to examine the diagnostic yield of OGD with biopsy in the evaluation of abdominal pain and ...

  16. 2013 WSES guidelines for management of intra-abdominal infections

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Despite advances in diagnosis, surgery, and antimicrobial therapy, mortality rates associated with complicated intra-abdominal infections remain exceedingly high. The 2013 update of the World Society of Emergency Surgery (WSES) guidelines for the management of intra-abdominal infections contains evidence-based recommendations for management of patients with intra-abdominal infections. PMID:23294512

  17. Relative Activity of Abdominal Muscles during Commonly Prescribed Strengthening Exercises.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willett, Gilbert M.; Hyde, Jennifer E.; Uhrlaub, Michael B.; Wendel, Cara L.; Karst, Gregory M.

    2001-01-01

    Examined the relative electromyographic (EMG) activity of upper and lower rectus abdominis (LRA) and external oblique (EOA) muscles during five abdominal strengthening exercises. Isometric and dynamic EMG data indicated that abdominal strengthening exercises activated various abdominal muscle groups. For the LRA and EOA muscle groups, there were…

  18. Outcomes of Bowel Resection in Patients with Crohn's Disease.

    PubMed

    Moghadamyeghaneh, Zhobin; Carmichael, Joseph C; Mills, Steven D; Pigazzi, Alessio; Stamos, Michael J

    2015-10-01

    There is limited data regarding outcomes of bowel resection in patients with Crohn's disease. We sought to investigate complications of such patients after bowel resection. The Nationwide Inpatient Sample databases were used to examine the clinical data of Crohn's patients who underwent bowel resection during 2002 to 2012. Multivariate regression analysis was performed to investigate outcomes of such patients. We sampled a total of 443,950 patients admitted with the diagnosis of Crohn's disease. Of these, 20.5 per cent had bowel resection. Among patients who had bowel resection, 51 per cent had small bowel Crohn's disease, 19.4 per cent had large bowel Crohn's disease, and 29.6 per cent had both large and small bowel Crohn's disease. Patients with large bowel disease had higher mortality risk compared with small bowel disease [1.8% vs 1%, adjusted odds ratio (AOR): 2.42, P < 0.01]. Risks of postoperative renal failure (AOR: 1.56, P < 0.01) and respiratory failure (AOR: 1.77, P < 0.01) were higher in colonic disease compared with small bowel disease but postoperative enteric fistula was significantly higher in patients with small bowel Crohn's disease (AOR: 1.90, P < 0.01). Of the patients admitted with the diagnosis of Crohn's disease, 20.5 per cent underwent bowel resection during 2002 to 2012. Although colonic disease has a higher mortality risk, small bowel disease has a higher risk of postoperative fistula.

  19. Validation of a nonrigid registration framework that accommodates tissue resection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Risholm, Petter; Samset, Eigil; Wells, William, III

    2010-03-01

    We present a 3D extension and validation of an intra-operative registration framework that accommodates tissue resection. The framework is based on the bijective Demons method, but instead of regularizing with the traditional Gaussian smoother, we apply an anisotropic diffusion filter with the resection modeled as a diffusion sink. The diffusion sink prevents unwanted Demon forces that originates from the resected area from diffusing into the surrounding area. Another attractive property of the diffusion sink is the resulting continuous deformation field across the diffusion sink boundary, which allows us to move the boundary of the diffusion sink without changing values in the deformation field. The area of resection is estimated by a level-set method evolving in the space of image intensity disagreements in the intra-operative image domain. A product of using the bijective Demons method is that we can also provide an accurate estimate of the resected tissue in the preoperative image space. Validation of the proposed method was performed on a set of 25 synthetic images. Our experiments show a significant improvement in accommodating resection using the proposed method compared to two other Demons based methods.

  20. PHF11 promotes DSB resection, ATR signaling, and HR.

    PubMed

    Gong, Yi; Handa, Naofumi; Kowalczykowski, Stephen C; de Lange, Titia

    2017-01-01

    Resection of double-strand breaks (DSBs) plays a critical role in their detection and appropriate repair. The 3' ssDNA protrusion formed through resection activates the ATR-dependent DNA damage response (DDR) and is required for DSB repair by homologous recombination (HR). Here we report that PHF11 (plant homeodomain finger 11) encodes a previously unknown DDR factor involved in 5' end resection, ATR signaling, and HR. PHF11 was identified based on its association with deprotected telomeres and localized to sites of DNA damage in S phase. Depletion of PHF11 diminished the ATR signaling response to telomere dysfunction and genome-wide DNA damage, reduced end resection at sites of DNA damage, resulted in compromised HR and misrejoining of S-phase DSBs, and increased the sensitivity to DNA-damaging agents. PHF11 interacted with the ssDNA-binding protein RPA and was found in a complex with several nucleases, including the 5' dsDNA exonuclease EXO1. Biochemical experiments demonstrated that PHF11 stimulates EXO1 by overcoming its inhibition by RPA, suggesting that PHF11 acts (in part) by promoting 5' end resection at RPA-bound sites of DNA damage. These findings reveal a role for PHF11 in DSB resection, DNA damage signaling, and DSB repair.