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Sample records for abdominal perineal resection

  1. Anatomical prognostic factors after abdominal perineal resection

    SciTech Connect

    Walz, B.J.; Green, M.R.; Lindstrom, E.R.; Butcher, H.R. Jr.

    1981-04-01

    The natural history of 153 patients with rectosigmoid adenocarcinoma treated by abdominal perineal resection was retrospectively studied with emphasis on survival, clinical signs and symptoms of recurrence distantly and in the pelvis. We analyzed diagnostic factors that might predict tumor stage preoperatively and anatomical factors of the tumor itself that might predict behaviour of the lesion. Age, sex, tumor size, and distance from the anal verge were not useful in predicting stage. Constriction of the lesion tended to occur with high stage, but was not a reliable predictor. The grade or differentiation of the biopsy (when noted) did not correlate with either the grade of the resected specimen or the stage. The highest grade of the resected specimen was quite predictive of subsequent outcome. Seventy-three percent of the poorly differentiated tumors were Stage C or D, though a lower grade specimen did not rule out high stage. The Astler-Coller stage was reliable in predicting the likelihood of survival, pelvic recurrence, and distant metastases. In Stage C patients, the number of positive lymph node metastases strongly affected prognosis: if only one node was positive, survival was intermediate between Stages B and C; if more than seven nodes were positive, no patient survived. Of the evaluable cases, 48% survived clinically free of disease five or more years; 43% failed (died of the rectosigmoid tumor); 22% developed pelvic recurrence (6% pelvis only, 16% pelvis plus distant metastases). Fifty-two percent of the patients failing had tumor in the pelvis. Seven of the 56 failures (13%) occurred at or after five years; six of these seven failed locally, usually with metastases. Patients under age 40 or over age 80 and the same results as the group in general. Sixteen percent of the entire group had major complications, 52% minor. There were eight postoperative deaths (5%); 18 patients (12%) required reoperation.

  2. [Perineal soft-tissue reconstruction with vertical rectus abdominis myocutan (VRAM) flap following extended abdomino-perineal resection for cancer].

    PubMed

    Bognár, Gábor; Novák, András; István, Gábor; Lóderer, Zoltán; Ledniczky, György; Ondrejka, Pál

    2012-10-01

    Perineal wound healing problems following extended abdomino-perineal resection of ano-rectal cancer represent a great challenge to the surgeon. Perineal soft-tissue reconstruction with a myocutan flap was thought to reduce surgical wound healing complications. A review of the relevant literature was carried out on perineal soft-tissue reconstruction with rectus abdominis myocutan (VRAM) flap following extended abdomino-perineal rectal resection for cancer. The more commonly used neoadjuvant chemo- and radiotherapy as well as extended surgical radicality resulted in increased perioperative risks, therefore combined procedures between the colorectal and plastic surgical teams are inevitable. This case report illustrates the above trend. PMID:23086826

  3. Single port-assisted fully laparoscopic abdominoperineal resection (APR) with immediate V-RAM flap reconstruction of the perineal defect.

    PubMed

    Ali, Sayid; Moftah, Mohamed; Ajmal, Nadeem; Cahill, Ronan A

    2012-09-01

    Abdominoperineal resection (APR) of anorectal cancers after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy may incur significant perineal morbidity. While vertical rectus abdominis muscle (V-RAM) flaps can fill the pelvic resection space with health tissue, their use has previously been described predominantly in association with laparotomy. Here, we describe a means of combination laparoscopic APR with V-RAM flap reconstruction that allows structural preservation of the entire abdominal wall throughout the oncological resection and of the deep parietal layers after V-RAM donation. Furthermore, a single port access device used at the end colostomy site allows a second senior surgeon assist with an additional two working instruments for the purpose of improved pelvic tissue retraction, especially useful in obese patients. PMID:22644717

  4. [Primary closure and healing of the perineal wound in abdomino-perineal resection of the rectum for carcinoma (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Delpero, J R; Le Treut, Y P; Boutboul, R; Bricot, R

    1982-05-01

    The results of primary perineal closure after rectal resection for cancer are reported, about a series of 105 patients male and female; to whom this technique was systematically applied. The healing of the wound was primarily obtained in 77.2% of the cases (82.3% in males, 72.2% in females). 86% of the patients left the hospital completely healed within 30 post operative days. The authors stress the influence of the environment on the result and also discuss the practical conditions of the primary suture: hemostasis, fecal contamination, peritonisation, enlarging followed with ablation of the genital tract in women. PMID:7050136

  5. Intra-abdominal sepsis after hepatic resection.

    PubMed Central

    Pace, R F; Blenkharn, J I; Edwards, W J; Orloff, M; Blumgart, L H; Benjamin, I S

    1989-01-01

    One hundred and thirty hepatic resections performed over an 8-year period were reviewed for evidence of postoperative intra-abdominal sepsis. Of 126 patients who survived for more than 24 hours after operation, 36 developed culture positive intra-abdominal collections (28.6%). Significant independent variables associated with the development of intra-abdominal sepsis were diagnoses of trauma or cholangiocarcinoma, and the need for reoperation to control hemorrhage during the postoperative period. Before 1984, infected fluid collections were treated predominantly by operative drainage, but this has largely been replaced by percutaneous methods, which have proven effective in most cases. Eighteen (50%) of the infections were caused by a mixed bacterial culture, with Streptococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli being the most common isolates. Six patients with clinical signs of sepsis had a sterile fluid collection drained with complete relief of symptoms. This review suggests that intra-abdominal sepsis is a frequent complication after hepatic resection, and can often be managed successfully by nonoperative percutaneous drainage. PMID:2493775

  6. Malone Antegrade Continence Enema in Patients with Perineal Colostomy After Rectal Resection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jin-Hai; Xu, Jia-He; Ye, Feng; Xu, Xiang-Ming; Lin, Jian-Jiang; Chen, Wen-Bin

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the value of antegrade continence enema (Malone operation) in abdominoperineal resection (Miles' operation). Between January 2008 and May 2009, five cancer patients (two men and three women) underwent abdominoperineal resection and digestive reconstruction by perineal colostomy and Malone antegrade continence enema in our institution. Their functional results and quality of life were recorded. None of the patients died, but two had wound infections and one experienced urinary retention. Patients performed antegrade enema every 24 h with 2,000 mL of normal saline by themselves. The duration of the enema lasted for an average of approximately 35 min, and fecal contamination was not detected at 24 h. Patient satisfaction was determined to be 88 %. Malone antegrade continence enema associated with abdominoperineal resection and perineal colostomy provided acceptable continence. It preserved the body image of the patients and resulted in a satisfactory quality of life. It is a potential alternative for patients who are not willing to have a permanent colostomy. PMID:26730081

  7. Selective extra levator versus conventional abdomino perineal resection: experience from a tertiary-care center

    PubMed Central

    Pai, Vishwas D.; Engineer, Reena; Patil, Prachi S.; Arya, Supreeta; Desouza, Ashwin L.

    2016-01-01

    Background To compare extra levator abdomino perineal resection (ELAPER) with conventional abdominoperineal resection (APER) in terms of short-term oncological and clinical outcomes. Methods This is a retrospective review of a prospectively maintained database including all the patients of rectal cancer who underwent APER at Tata Memorial Center between July 1, 2013, and January 31, 2015. Short-term oncological parameters evaluated included circumferential resection margin involvement (CRM), tumor site perforation, and number of nodes harvested. Peri operative outcomes included blood loss, length of hospital stay, postoperative perineal wound complications, and 30-day mortality. The χ2-test was used to compare the results between the two groups. Results Forty-two cases of ELAPER and 78 cases of conventional APER were included in the study. Levator involvement was significantly higher in the ELAPER compared with the conventional group; otherwise, the two groups were comparable in all the aspects. CRM involvement was seen in seven patients (8.9%) in the conventional group compared with three patients (7.14%) in the ELAPER group. Median hospital stay was significantly longer with ELAPER. The univariate analysis of the factors influencing CRM positivity did not show any significance. Conclusions ELAPER should be the preferred approach for low rectal tumors with involvement of levators. For those cases in which levators are not involved, as shown in preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), the current evidence is insufficient to recommend ELAPER over conventional APER. This stresses the importance of preoperative MRI in determining the best approach for an individual patient. PMID:27284466

  8. Chronic pelvic pain after laser prostatectomy: treatment by resection of the perineal branches of the pudendal nerve.

    PubMed

    Dellon, A Lee; Wright, E James; Manson, Paul N

    2014-10-01

    Development of chronic pelvic pain after laser resection for benign prostatic hypertrophy has not been described previously (Clavien IIIb complication). The etiology of this chronic pain, which persisted despite medical chronic pain and urologic management for 5 years, was proven to be of pudendal nerve origin by local anesthetic blockade of the pudendal nerves bilaterally at the ischial spines. Surgical treatment was based upon the anatomic proximity of the perineal and dorsal branches of the pudendal nerve to the site of laser therapy on the pelvic side of the urogenital diaphragm. Treatment required resection of the perineal branches of the pudendal nerve bilaterally and neurolysis of the dorsal nerve to the penis bilaterally through incisions overlying the inferior pubic ramus. Relief of perineal pain and pain with micturition occurred in the immediate postoperative period. Pain relief and resumption of all normal activity occurred by 3 months postoperatively and continues 13 months following the surgery. PMID:24535673

  9. A comparison of surgical outcomes of perineal urethrostomy plus penile resection and perineal urethrostomy in twelve calves with perineal or prescrotal urethral dilatation

    PubMed Central

    Marzok, M.A.; El-khodery, S.A.

    2013-01-01

    The clinical diagnosis, ultrasonographic findings, surgical management, outcome, and survival rate of perineal or prescrotal urethral dilatation in 12 male calves are described. All calves were crossbred and intact males. The most noticeable clinical presentations were perineal (n= 10) or prescrotal (n= 2) swellings and micturition problems. The main ultrasonographic findings were oval shaped dilatation of the urethra in all animals with dimensions of 40-75 X 30-62 mm. The calves with perineal urethral dilatation were treated by perineal urethrostomy (n= 4) and partial penile transection including the dilated urethra and urethral fistulation (n= 6). Prescrotal urethral dilatations were treated by penile transection proximal to the dilatation site (n= 2). Cystitis and stricture of the urethra were recorded postoperatively for two of the calves that underwent perineal urethrostomy. Nine animals were slaughtered at normal body weight approximately 6-8 months after the surgical treatment. Three animals were slaughtered after approximately three to four months, two of them having gained insufficient body weight. Our study shows that ultrasonography is a useful tool for the diagnosis of urethral dilatation in bovine calves. Our study also shows that the partial penile transection may be a suitable and satisfactory choice of surgical treatment for correcting the urethral dilatation in bovine calves. PMID:26623322

  10. Perineal herniation of an ileal neobladder following radical cystectomy and consecutive rectal resection for recurrent bladder carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Neumann, P A; Mehdorn, A S; Puehse, G; Senninger, N; Rijcken, E

    2016-04-01

    Secondary perineal herniation of intraperitoneal contents represents a rare complication following procedures such as abdominoperineal rectal resection or cystectomy. We present a case of a perineal hernia formation with prolapse of an ileum neobladder following radical cystectomy and rectal resection for recurrent bladder cancer. Following consecutive resections in the anterior and posterior compartment of the lesser pelvis, the patient developed problems emptying his neobladder. Clinical examination and computed tomography revealed perineal herniation of his neobladder through the pelvic floor. Through a perineal approach, the hernial sac could be repositioned, and via a combination of absorbable and non-absorbable synthetic mesh grafts, the pelvic floor was stabilised. Follow-up review at one year after hernia fixation showed no signs of recurrence and no symptoms. In cases of extensive surgery in the lesser pelvis with associated weakness of the pelvic compartments, meshes should be considered for closure of the pelvic floor. Development of biological meshes with reduced risk of infection might be an interesting treatment option in these cases. PMID:26985818

  11. Abdominoperineal resection without an abdominal incision for rectal cancer has the advantage of no abdominal wound complication and easier stoma care.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Tzu-Chi

    2012-02-01

    Abdominoperineal resection has been used for years for the management of low rectal cancer. However, the abdominal incision is associated with many complications and causes interference of the stoma care. If the abdominal incision can be avoided, it would be beneficial to the patient. The aim of the study is to evaluate the possibility and safety of performing abdominoperineal resection and the oncology result without an abdominal incision. From September 2001 to May 2010, 40 patients with rectal malignancies received excision of the rectum, anus, and perineum through a perineal incision and a skin hole created for stomy. No harmonic scalpel or laser was used during surgery. No laparoscope or hand port was used in the procedure. There were 19 males and 21 females. Age ranged from 31 to 87 years old (average, 62.9 years). There were 39 adenocarcinomas and one malignant gastrointestinal stromal cell tumor. There was no operative mortality. Six patients had postoperative complications; three patients had intestinal obstructions; and one patient each had bleeding, urinary tract infection, and colostomy separation from the skin. The lymph nodes in the specimens ranged from 9 to 33 cm (average, 16.8 cm). The survival is similar to the traditional abdominoperineal resection. This limited experience suggests that an abdominal incision is not necessary for radical resection of the rectum, anus, and perineum in patients with low-lying rectal cancer. It also offers the patient easier care of stoma without interference of the abdominal incision. PMID:22369824

  12. A new technique for surgical treatment of vaginal agenesis using combined abdominal-perineal approach.

    PubMed

    Beksac, Mehmet Sinan; Salman, Mehmet Coskun; Dogan, Nasuh Utku

    2011-01-01

    Optimum therapeutic approach in vaginal agenesis has always been an area of extensive controversies. Although surgical management gained priority due to the evolution of techniques, there is currently no consensus in the literature regarding the best type of surgical approach. The most commonly preferred surgical procedure among gynecologists is McIndoe operation which involves the creation of a space between bladder and rectum, insertion of a mold covered with split-thickness skin graft into that neovaginal space, and use of postoperative vaginal dilation to avoid stenosis. However, many modifications have been introduced in time in an attempt to increase the success rates. In this paper, we describe two cases with vaginal agenesis with functioning uterus who were subjected to surgery by combined abdominal-perineal approach. The surgical technique also included the use of a specially designed vaginal mold made up of polymethyl methacrylate and use of Hyalobarrier gel which is an adhesion-preventing agent. PMID:21577259

  13. [Immediate vaginal reconstruction with a musculocutaneous flap from the gracilis muscle after extended abdomino-perineal resection].

    PubMed

    Sezeur, A; Hautefeuille, P; Trevidic, P

    1995-01-01

    Reconstruction of a functional vagina after radical abdomino-perineal resection is a difficult surgical problem. The use of the gracilis myocutaneous flap provides a satisfactory solution. This article describes the surgical procedure of immediate vaginal reconstruction using the gracilis myocutaneous flap. Unfortunately, this technique is still not widely used by surgical teams. Nevertheless, it is a useful flap because of its low morbidity and the satisfying result of the functional neovaginal cavity. PMID:8526447

  14. [Perineal hernia].

    PubMed

    Mandarano, R; Giorgi, G; Venturini, N; Mancini, E; Natale, A; Tiburzi, C

    1999-01-01

    The authors base this study on a case of perineal hernia referred to their attention. In the light of the scant international literature on this subject, they focus on the topographical anatomy of the pelvic floor in order to gain a clearer understanding of this pathology, as well as their classification into median, lateral, anterior and posterior forms. Above all, the authors draw attention to the importance of the differential diagnosis of perineal hernia from Bartholin cysts or vulvar tumours in relation to anterior perineal hernia, and perianal abscesses in relation to posterior hernia. They underline the value of ultrasonography or TAC during the diagnostic procedure. Lastly, they examine the channels of aggression for this type of hernia which may be abdominal, perianal or combined (abdominal and peri-anal), as well as the repair techniques used, varying from direct suture with non-absorbable material to the use of prolene mesh or flaps if the hernia breech is very large. PMID:10528488

  15. Laparoscopic resection of lower rectal cancer with telescopic anastomosis without abdominal incisions

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shi-Yong; Chen, Gang; Du, Jun-Feng; Chen, Guang; Wei, Xiao-Jun; Cui, Wei; Zuo, Fu-Yi; Yu, Bo; Dong, Xing; Ji, Xi-Qing; Yuan, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To assess laparoscopic radical resection of lower rectal cancer with telescopic anastomosis through transanal resection without abdominal incisions. METHODS: From March 2010 to June 2014, 30 patients (14 men and 16 women, aged 36-78 years, mean age 59.8 years) underwent laparoscopic radical resection of lower rectal cancer with telescopic anastomosis through anus-preserving transanal resection. The tumors were 5-7 cm away from the anal margin in 24 cases, and 4 cm in six cases. In preoperative assessment, there were 21 cases of T1N0M0 and nine of T2N0M0. Through the middle approach, the sigmoid mesentery was freed at the root with an ultrasonic scalpel and the roots of the inferior mesenteric artery and vein were dissected, clamped and cut. Following the total mesorectal excision principle, the rectum was separated until the anorectal ring reached 3-5 cm from the distal end of the tumor. For perineal surgery, a ring incision was made 2 cm above the dentate line, and sharp dissection was performed submucosally towards the superior direction, until the plane of the levator ani muscle, to transect the rectum. The rectum and distal sigmoid colon were removed together from the anus, followed by a telescopic anastomosis between the full thickness of the proximal colon and the mucosa and submucosal tissue of the rectum. RESULTS: For the present cohort of 30 cases, the mean operative time was 178 min, with an average of 13 positive lymph nodes detected. One case of postoperative anastomotic leak was observed, requiring temporary colostomy, which was closed and recovered 3 mo later. The postoperative pathology showed T1-T2N0M0 in 19 cases and T2N1M0 in 11 cases. Twelve months after surgery, 94.4% patients achieved anal function Kirwan grade 1, indicating that their anal function returned to normal. The patients were followed up for 1-36 mo, with an average of 23 mo. There was no local recurrence, and 17 patients survived for > 3 years (with a survival rate of 100

  16. The inferior mesenteric vessels as recipients when performing free tissue transfer for pelvic defects following abdomino-perineal resection. A novel technique and review of intra-peritoneal recipient vessel options for microvascular transfer.

    PubMed

    Petrie, Nicola C; Chan, James K K; Chave, Helen; McGuiness, Caroline N

    2010-12-01

    Successful microvascular transfer of tissue is dependent upon suitable vessels not only of the donor tissue but also at the recipient site. Congenital deformities, previous surgery, infection or irradiation at the recipient site may render vessels less suitable for this purpose. Under such circumstances it becomes desirable to identify suitable recipient vessels remote to the compromised area. In cases where external beam radiotherapy has been delivered, the superficial surface area damaged can be rather extensive precluding the use of even the longest of flap pedicles--a problem potentially addressed by searching for recipient vessels deep to the tissue planes affected. We report one such case where the inferior mesenteric vessels were used as recipient vessels for the microvascular transfer of a free Latissimus Dorsi musculocutaneous flap to reconstruct an extensive perineal defect following abdomino-perineal resection where the vessels would otherwise serve no purpose. Whilst a limited number of intra-peritoneal vessels have previously been reported as recipient vessels for free flap surgery there has not been, to our knowledge, any report of utilising the inferior mesenteric artery (Inf Mes A). Whilst based on a single case report, this article examines the literature describing microvascular transfer of tissue to compromised recipient sites and it reviews previously reported recipient vessel options available when reconstructing the perineum, abdominal wall or trunk with particular emphasis on intra-peritoneal options. PMID:20378437

  17. Prevention of perineal hernia after laparoscopic and robotic abdominoperineal resection: review with illustrative case series of internal hernia through pelvic mesh

    PubMed Central

    Melich, George; Lim, Dae Ro; Hur, Hyuk; Min, Byung Soh; Baik, Seung Hyuk; Arena, Goffredo O.; Gordon, Philip H.; Kim, Nam Kyu

    2016-01-01

    This review is intended to raise awareness of placing a pelvic mesh to prevent perineal hernias in cases of minimally invasive (MIS) abdominoperineal resections (APR) and, in doing so, causing internal hernias through the mesh. In this article, we review the published literature and present an illustrative series of 4 consecutive cases of early internal hernia through a pelvic mesh defect. These meshes were placed to prevent perineal hernias after laparoscopic or robotic APRs. The discussion centres on 3 key questions: Should one be placing a pelvic mesh following an APR? What are some of the technical details pertaining to the initial mesh placement? What are the management options related to internal hernias through such a mesh? PMID:26812410

  18. Resection and Abdominal Wall Reconstruction of a Desmoid Tumor with Endometrioma Features

    PubMed Central

    Majors, Jaqueline; Stoikes, Nathaniel F.; Nejati, Reza

    2016-01-01

    Desmoid tumors are rare, musculoaponeurotic mesenchymal origin tumors arising from the proliferation of well-differentiated fibroblasts. Desmoid tumors may arise from any location with the abdominal cavity, abdominal wall and extremity locations being most frequent. We present the case of a 35-year-old female with a history of endometriosis who presented palpable abdominal mass and cyclic abdominal pain. Resection was performed for a presumed desmoid soft tissue tumor. Final pathology demonstrated desmoid histology admixed with abdominal wall endometriosis (endometrioma). This unique pathologic finding has only been rarely reported and is discussed with a brief review of the literature. PMID:27247824

  19. Resection and Abdominal Wall Reconstruction of a Desmoid Tumor with Endometrioma Features.

    PubMed

    Majors, Jaqueline; Stoikes, Nathaniel F; Nejati, Reza; Deneve, Jeremiah L

    2016-01-01

    Desmoid tumors are rare, musculoaponeurotic mesenchymal origin tumors arising from the proliferation of well-differentiated fibroblasts. Desmoid tumors may arise from any location with the abdominal cavity, abdominal wall and extremity locations being most frequent. We present the case of a 35-year-old female with a history of endometriosis who presented palpable abdominal mass and cyclic abdominal pain. Resection was performed for a presumed desmoid soft tissue tumor. Final pathology demonstrated desmoid histology admixed with abdominal wall endometriosis (endometrioma). This unique pathologic finding has only been rarely reported and is discussed with a brief review of the literature. PMID:27247824

  20. Simple perineal and elaborated perineal posterior urethroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Webster, George D.; Peterson, Andrew C.

    2015-01-01

    A pelvic fracture urethral distraction defect (PFUDD) can present in varying lengths and degrees of complexity. In recent decades the repair of PFUDD has developed into a reliance on a perineal anastomotic approach for all but the most complex cases, which might still require an abdominal transpubic approach, or rarely a staged skin-inlay procedure. There is now controversy about the extent to which the perineal repair needs to be elaborated in individual patients. As originally described, the elaborated perineal approach comprises four steps that are used sequentially, as required, depending on the magnitude of the urethral defect. These steps are urethral mobilisation, corporal body separation, inferior wedge pubectomy and supra-crural urethral re-routing to the anastomosis. We present a review of the progressive repair, its reported use and outcomes and our recommendations for its continued use. PMID:26019973

  1. Fungating carcinoma of the stomach: en bloc multiple organ resection and abdominal wall reconstruction.

    PubMed Central

    Chu, K. M.; Lai, D. T.; Stern, H. S.; Sheldon, D. M.

    1995-01-01

    A patient with carcinoma of the stomach invading multiple adjacent organs and fungating through the anterior abdominal wall was treated by en bloc multiple organ resection and abdominal wall reconstruction. The patient is alive and well at the time of writing, six months after the operation. The rationale for embarking on multiple organ resection for gastric cancer is discussed. However, such an aggressive surgical approach should only be applied to carefully selected patients who are medically fit and have no evidence of widespread systemic metastases. Images Figure PMID:7596940

  2. Colorectal infarction following resection of abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Launer, D P; Miscall, B G; Beil, A R

    1978-01-01

    Infarctions of the colon and rectum (incidences approximately 1 and 0.5 per cent, respectively) are caused by compromised collateral circulation to the colon and rectum, usually as a result of arteriosclerotic disease of the superior and inferior mesenteric arterial systems, as well as the hypogastric arteries. Patients who have colorectal ischemia after operations for abdominal aortic aneurysms have diarrhea (sometimes bloody), abdominal pain, and distention. The diagnosis may be established by sigmoidoscopic examination. Treatment includes surgical removal of the compromised bowel and creation of a temporary or permanent end colostomy. Prevention of this complication is aided by preservation of primary and collateral circulation, avoidance of hypotension, and preoperative bowel preparation. PMID:738176

  3. Simultaneous resection of left atrial myxoma and esophageal carcinoma via right thoraco-abdominal approach.

    PubMed

    Ni, Buqing; Lu, Xiaohu; Gong, Qixing; Shao, Yongfeng

    2016-07-01

    Concomitant occurrence of atrial myxoma and esophageal carcinoma is an extremely rare entity. Here we present two cases of synchronously suffered left atrial myxoma and esophageal carcinoma. Both patients underwent simultaneous resection of two tumors via the right thoraco-abdominal approach and recovered well. PMID:27499990

  4. Simultaneous resection of left atrial myxoma and esophageal carcinoma via right thoraco-abdominal approach

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Buqing; Lu, Xiaohu; Gong, Qixing

    2016-01-01

    Concomitant occurrence of atrial myxoma and esophageal carcinoma is an extremely rare entity. Here we present two cases of synchronously suffered left atrial myxoma and esophageal carcinoma. Both patients underwent simultaneous resection of two tumors via the right thoraco-abdominal approach and recovered well. PMID:27499990

  5. Laparoscopic resection of an intra-abdominal esophageal duplication cyst: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Watanobe, Ikuo; Ito, Yuzuru; Akimoto, Eigo; Sekine, Yuuki; Haruyama, Yurie; Amemiya, Kota; Kawano, Fumihiro; Fujita, Shohei; Omori, Satoshi; Miyano, Shozo; Kosaka, Taijiro; Machida, Michio; Kitabatake, Toshiaki; Kojima, Kuniaki; Sakaguchi, Asumi; Ogura, Kanako; Matsumoto, Toshiharu

    2015-01-01

    Duplication of the alimentary tract is a rare congenital malformation that occurs most often in the abdominal region, whereas esophageal duplication cyst develops typically in the thoracic region but occasionally in the neck and abdominal regions. Esophageal duplication cyst is usually diagnosed in early childhood because of symptoms related to bleeding, infection, and displacement of tissue surrounding the lesion. We recently encountered a rare adult case of esophageal duplication cyst in the abdominal esophagus. A 50-year-old man underwent gastroscopy, endoscopic ultrasonography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging to investigate epigastric pain and dysphagia that started 3 months earlier. Imaging findings suggested esophageal duplication cyst, and the patient underwent laparoscopic resection followed by intraoperative esophagoscopy to reconstruct the esophagus safely and effectively. Histopathological examination of the resected specimen revealed two layers of smooth muscle in the cystic wall, confirming the diagnosis of esophageal duplication cyst. PMID:25883826

  6. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided drainage of an abdominal fluid collection following Whipple's resection.

    PubMed

    Jah, Asif; Jamieson, Neville; Huguet, Emmanuel; Griffiths, William; Carroll, Nicholas; Praseedom, Raaj

    2008-11-28

    Percutaneous aspiration and drainage of post-operative abdominal fluid collections is a well established standard technique. However, some fluid collections are not amenable to percutaneous drainage either due to location or the presence of surrounding visceral structures. Endoscopic Ultrasound (EUS) has been widely used for the drainage of pancreatitis-related abdominal fluid collections. However, there are no reports on the use of this technique in the post-operative setting. We report a case where the EUS-guided technique was used to drain a percutaneously inaccessible post-operative collection which had developed after Whipple's resection. PMID:19058316

  7. Laparoscopic resection of an intra-abdominal cystic mass: a cystic mesothelioma

    PubMed Central

    Birch, Daniel W.; Park, Adrian; Chen, Vicki

    1998-01-01

    The clinical features of a patient with an intra-abdominal cystic mass do not lead to a specific diagnosis. Aspiration is usually ineffective because the mass recurs and cytologic investigation is often non-diagnostic. Conservative management is unsuccessful because symptoms often persist. Surgical management of cystic masses is required for definitive management and pathologic diagnosis. A laparoscopic approach to the diagnosis and treatment can provide essential anatomic information and a complete resection with minimal morbidity. A laparoscopic technique using 3 trocars and maintaining the integrity of the mass allows complete excision and removal of large intra-abdominal cystic masses as reported in a 43-year-old patient with a large intra-abdominal cystic mass identified as a benign cystic mesothelioma. PMID:9576001

  8. Aggressive Angiomyxoma with Perineal Herniation

    PubMed Central

    Narang, Seema; Kohli, Supreethi; Kumar, Vinod; Chandoke, Raj

    2014-01-01

    Aggressive angiomyxoma is a rare mesenchymal tumor involving the pelvic-perineal region. It occurs during the third and fourth decade of life and is predominantly seen in females. It presents clinically as a soft tissue mass in variable locations such as vulva, perianal region, buttock, or pelvis. Assessment of extent of the tumor by radiological evaluation is crucial for surgical planning; however, biopsy is essential to establish diagnosis. We present the radiological and pathological features seen in a 43-year-old female diagnosed with abdominal angiomyxoma with an unusual extension to the perineum. PMID:24987570

  9. Resection of Abdominal Solid Organs Using High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Zderic, Vesna; O’Keefe, Grant E.; Foley, Jessica L.; Vaezy, Shahram

    2009-01-01

    Our objective was to evaluate high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) for minimizing blood loss during surgery by hemodynamically isolating large portions of solid organs before their resection. A high-power HIFU device (in-situ intensity of 9000 W/cm2, frequency of 3.3 MHz) was used to produce a wall of cautery for sealing of blood vessels along the resection line in surgically-exposed solid organs (liver lobes, spleen and kidneys) of eight adult pigs. Following HIFU application, the distal portion of the organ was excised using a scalpel. If any blood vessels were still bleeding, additional HIFU application was used to stop the bleeding. The resection was achieved in 6.0 ± 1.5 min (liver), 3.6 ± 1.1 min (spleen) and 2.8 ± 0.6 min (kidneys) of HIFU treatment time, with no occurrence of bleeding for up to 4 hours (until sacrifice). The coagulated region at the resection line had average width of 3 cm and extended through the whole thickness of the organ (up to 4 cm). Blood vessels of up to 1 cm in size were occluded. This method holds promise for future clinical applications in resection of solid tumors and hemorrhage control from high-grade organ injuries. PMID:17498864

  10. Management of the Perineal Defect after Abdominoperineal Excision.

    PubMed

    Peirce, Colin; Martin, Sean

    2016-06-01

    The optimal management of the perineal defect following abdominoperineal excision for anorectal malignancy remains a source of debate. The repopularization of extralevator resection means colorectal surgeons are confronted with larger perineal wounds. There are several surgical options available-primary perineal closure and drainage, omentoplasty, biological or synthetic mesh placement, musculocutaneous flap repair, and negative wound pressure therapy. These options are discussed along with the potential benefits and complications of each. There remains no consensus on which management strategy is superior; thus, each case must be tailored for each individual patient. Surgical expertise and availability of a multidisciplinary team approach are important considerations. PMID:27247542

  11. Perineal rectosigmoidectomy for incarcerated rectal prolapse (Altemeier’s procedure)

    PubMed Central

    Sipahi, Mesut; Arslan, Ergin; Börekçi, Hasan; Aytekin, Faruk Önder; Külah, Bahadır; Banlı, Oktay

    2016-01-01

    Perineal procedures have higher recurrence and lower mortality rates than abdominal alternatives for the treatment of rectal prolapse. Presence of incarceration and strangulation also influences treatment choice. Perineal rectosigmoidectomy is one of the treatment options in patients with incarceration and strangulation, with low mortality and acceptable recurrence rates. This operation can be performed especially to avoid general anesthesia in old patients with co-morbidities. We aimed to present perineal rectosigmoidectomy and diverting loop colostomy in a patient with neurological disability due to spinal trauma and incarcerated rectal prolapse. PMID:27528816

  12. Uncontrollable intra-abdominal bleeding necessitating low anterior resection of the rectum after stapled hemorrhoidopexy: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Blouhos, Konstantinos; Vasiliadis, Konstantinos; Tsalis, Konstantinos; Botsios, Dimitrios; Vrakas, Xenos

    2007-01-01

    Stapled hemorrhoidopexy (SH) has become a widely accepted surgical procedure for hemorrhoids; however, one of the most serious complications of this technique is severe bleeding. We report a case of extensive hemoperitoneum after SH for third-degree hemorrhoids. On postoperative day (POD) 1, the patient complained of severe abdominal pain and clinical signs of peritonitis soon became evident. Computed tomography (CT) showed blood in the abdomen. We performed an emergency exploratory laparotomy, which revealed extensive hemoperitoneum, and a devitalized, edematous rectum with a tense hematoma, approximately 1 cm above the staple line and extending up to the level of the peritoneal reflection. We also found a small seromuscular laceration in the anterior aspect of the rectum just above the peritoneal reflection. This small laceration was bleeding actively. Thus, we performed a low anterior resection and the patient was discharged from hospital 10 days later. We report this case to raise awareness of the possibility of life-threatening intra-abdominal complications without evidence of typical rectal bleeding. PMID:17342370

  13. Postoperative Analgesia in Abdominal Surgery: a Medico-economic Study

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-08-13

    Extended Ileal Resection Under Laparotomy; Total Proctocolectomy Under Laparotomy; Colectomy Left/Right/Total Under Laparotomy; Rectosigmoidal Resection Under Laparotomy; Anterior Resection of Rectum Under Laparotomy; Abdomino-perineal Amputation Under Laparotomy

  14. Treatment planning for resected abdominal tumors: Differences in organ position between diagnostic and radiation-planning computed tomography scans

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Aileen B.; Mamon, Harvey . E-mail: hmamon@lroc.harvard.edu

    2005-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate whether organ location, determined from preoperative diagnostic computed tomography scans (CTs), accurately reflects organ location when patients are positioned for radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: We identified patients with upper abdominal malignancies treated with surgery and/or radiation therapy. Comparisons of organ position relative to fixed bony landmarks were made among preoperative diagnostic CTs, postoperative diagnostic CTs, and radiation-planning CTs. We studied 18 patients who had CTs differing only in scanning technique, 11 patients who had CTs differing only in operative state, and 7 patients with CTs differing in both scanning technique and operative state. Results: For patients with diagnostic CTs and radiation-planning CTs that were either both preoperative or both postoperative, mean organ position, measured relative to a fixed bony landmark, ranged from 1.9 to 3.2 cm superior on radiation-planning CTs compared with diagnostic CTs (p < 0.0001). Mean organ position ranged from 0.9 to 1.7 cm posterior on radiation-planning CTs compared with diagnostic CTs (p {<=} 0.008). Shifts in the right-left direction were small and variable. For patients with pre- and postoperative diagnostic CTs, organ shifts were variable and not significant. Organ shifts for patients with preoperative diagnostic CTs and postoperative radiation-planning CTs were similar to shifts observed for the first group. Conclusions: Relative to bony landmarks, there are superior and posterior shifts in organ position for radiation-planning CTs compared with diagnostic CTs. These shifts should be considered during treatment planning for resected abdominal tumors.

  15. Prone jackknife position is not necessary to achieve a cylindrical abdominoperineal resection: demonstration of the lithotomy position.

    PubMed

    Keller, Deborah S; Lawrence, Justin K; Delaney, Conor P

    2014-02-01

    This video demonstrates a laparoscopic abdominal perineal resection for a fixed 4.8-cm mass involving the posterior and left rectal walls and left puborectalis, 2 cm from the anal verge (see Video, Supplemental Digital Content 1, http://links.lww.com/DCR/A127). We detail the steps of the procedure, all completed in lithotomy, including lateral-to-medial dissection; identification and protection of the left ureter and presacral nerves; division of the inferior mesenteric artery; medial-to-lateral dissection, with meeting the previous dissection plane; total mesorectal excision and pelvic dissection; perineal dissection and layered closure; and abdominal inspection and colostomy creation. Total operative time was 181 minutes. The specimen total mesorectal excision was complete with a negative circumferential radial margin (greater than 1 cm). Final pathology was T3N2M0. PMID:24401888

  16. Anterior perineal sinus.

    PubMed

    Oliver, G C; Rubin, R J; Salvati, E P; Eisenstat, T E; Lott, J

    1991-09-01

    Each year we treat several patients with an anterior perineal sinus tract. They do not conform to commonly encountered perineal problems such as pilonidal disease, epidermal cysts, hidradenitis, fistulous abscess, or inflammatory bowel disease. In an effort to improve understanding of the problem and its clinical significance, we reviewed our practice records for the period from 1968 through 1988. Fifty-six patients underwent surgery for an anterior perineal sinus tract. In 31 patients, the clinical and pathologic condition defied classical diagnostic categorization. We have termed these lesions "anterior perineal sinuses." Their clinical characteristics, treatment, and pathologic assessment from the body of this report. Male predominance (87 percent) and midlife presentation (average age, 44 years) characterized this group. Local symptoms were present from several weeks to several years prior to treatment. Local anesthesia (74 percent) and limited surgery (100 percent) resulted in complete healing in all patients (average, 7 weeks). A 15 percent recurrence rate was noted. The pathologic evaluation demonstrated acute and chronic dermal and subcutaneous inflammation. The etiology of this process remains uncertain. Its predominance along the median raphe suggests a congenital midline inclusion disorder. PMID:1914743

  17. Perineal Massage in Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... the perineal tissues. Use a lubricant such as vitamin E oil or almond oil, or any vegetable oil used for cooking— like olive oil. You may also try a water-soluble jelly, such as K-Y jelly, or your ...

  18. An unusual perineal plaque.

    PubMed

    Hindocha, Sumeet; Banerjee, Shoma; Lewis, Fiona

    2016-03-01

    We present the case of a 61-year-old male with a long-standing perineal and scrotal lesion. Investigations eventually revealed cutaneous tuberculosis, with complete resolution after appropriate treatment. It highlights the variable presentation of cutaneous tuberculosis and the importance of considering the diagnosis in chronic lesions. PMID:25769885

  19. Perineal Distensibility Using Epi-no in Twin Pregnancies: Comparative Study with Singleton Pregnancies

    PubMed Central

    Kubotani, Juliana Sayuri; Moron, Antonio Fernandes; Zanetti, Miriam Raquel Diniz; Soares, Vanessa Cardoso Marques; Elito Júnior, Julio

    2014-01-01

    The aims of this study were to compare perineal distensibility between women with twin and singleton pregnancies and to correlate these women's perineal distensibility with anthropometric data. This prospective cross-sectional case-control study was conducted among nulliparous women, of whom 20 were pregnant with twins and 23 with a single fetus. Perineal distensibility was evaluated in the third trimester by means of Epi-no, which was introduced into the vagina and inflated up to the maximum tolerable limit. It was then withdrawn while inflated and its circumference was measured. The unpaired Student's t-test was used to compare perineal distensibility in the two groups and Pearson's correlation coefficient (r) was used to correlate the pregnant women's perineal distensibility with their anthropometric data. There was no difference in perineal distensibility between the twin group (16.51 ± 2.05 cm) and singleton group (16.13 ± 1.67 cm) (P = 0.50). There was a positive correlation between perineal distensibility and abdominal circumference (r = 0.36; P = 0.01). The greater the abdominal circumference was, the greater the perineal distensibility was, regardless of whether the pregnancy was twin or singleton. PMID:25006476

  20. Perineal leiomyoma in a postmenopausal woman: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Sui, Yan-Xia; Sun, Chao; Lv, Shu-Lan; Batchu, Nasra; Zou, Jun-Kai; Du, Jiang; Song, Qing; Li, Qi-Ling

    2016-01-01

    Leiomyomas in the female reproductive system are commonly located in the uterus and typically regress following the menopause. Vulval leiomyomas are rare, and to the best of our knowledge, perineal leiomyomas in postmenopausal women have not been previously reported in the literature. The present case describes a 60-year-old Chinese woman who experienced perineal tenderness and lumbosacral radiating pain. The patient, who went through the menopause 12 years previously, had presented with a painful perineal mass for 1 year, which was subsequently diagnosed as a postmenopausal perineal leiomyoma. The mass was locally resected, and histopathological examination of the lesion resulted in a diagnosis of benign epithelioid leiomyoma. Immunohistochemical staining identified that the leiomyoma was positive for estrogen receptor and negative for progesterone receptor expression. The patient was followed up for 1 year and did not experience any pain or recurrence. The symptoms of local and lumbosacral radiating pain are extremely rare and may be induced by peripheral nerve stimulation. The etiology of postmenopausal perineal leiomyoma may be associated with infection, dietary, stress and environmental factors, and the role of estrogen cannot be overemphasized in cases of postmenopausal leiomyoma. PMID:27602136

  1. Enlarging perineal endometrioma developing after colpoperineorrhaphy.

    PubMed

    Strube, Felix Andreas; Niazi, Masooma; Lazarou, George

    2011-10-01

    Although endometriosis is not infrequent, the occurrence of perineal endometriomata is relatively rare and is generally attributed to seeding of endometrial cells to the perineal body during obstetrical trauma. A 45-year-old female with a history of a colpoperineorrhaphy during menses and a remote history of obstetric perineal trauma presented with an enlarging perineal mass. Excision of the mass led to a clinical and histopathologic diagnosis of perineal endometriosis. Elective surgery disrupting the vaginoperineal epithelium performed during menses may facilitate the seeding of endometrial cells to the perineal body and formation of perineal endometriomata. PMID:21431936

  2. 7. Perineal suturing.

    PubMed

    Blease, Megan; Taylor, Kerry

    2016-04-01

    Preceptorship is the 15th series of 'Midwifery basics' targeted at practising midwives. The aim of these articles is to provide information to raise awareness of the impact of the work of midwives on women's experience, and encourage midwives to seek further information through a series of activities relating to the topic. During the transition from student midwife, the newly qualified practitioner (NQM) is required to obtain experience of perineal suturing. With exposure varying from student to student and inconsistency in teaching methods between hospital trusts, the NQM can be left feeling apprehensive and unsupported to learn this skill. Suturing is a major and sometimes traumatic event for childbearing women, whose experience can vary greatly, depending upon many factors, including environment, skill of those suturing, effective analgesia and waiting times. In this penultimate article of the series, Megan Blease and Kerry Taylor address the current issues and provide learning hints and tips for NQMs learning and practising the skill. PMID:27172679

  3. 7-flap perineal urethrostomy

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Daniel C.; Morey, Allen F.

    2015-01-01

    Perineal urethrostomy (PU) has been performed with success for the treatment of refractory and advanced urethral stricture disease for at least the past six decades. Here, we review the indications and outcomes of PU for indications such as complex hypospadias repair and urethral stricture disease resulting from trauma, infection, and failure of prior urethroplasty. We also describe the role of 7-flap PU, a novel alternative to the conventional approach that offers the surgeon added flexibility in tailoring urethrostomy creation based on intraoperative findings. The authors’ updated experience with 7-flap PU demonstrates a comparable 95% success rate in patients with a wide variety of stricture etiology. PU through either a conventional approach or a 7-flap technique is a valuable option for improving the quality of life in patients with debilitating urethral stricture disease. PMID:26816809

  4. Perineal interstital laser of the prostate (PILP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henkel, Thomas O.; Greschner, Martin; Luppold, Tilmann; Rassweiler, Jens; Alken, Peter

    1994-12-01

    The use of thermal energy in order to cause damage to obstructing prostate tissue is a recently introduced alternative to transurethral resection of the prostate (TUR-P). In order to assess the efficacy of perineal interstitial laser treatment, we report on 22 patients (operative high risk category), with a 6 month follow up, who have been treated with the Dornier ITT laser fiber. Treatment protocol designates the perineal approach for side lobe hypertrophy, transurethral approach for middle lobe hypertrophy, and the continuous application of decreasing increments of energy within specific time intervals. Results were evaluated by flow rate, residual urine, symptom score, reduction in prostate size, and cystomanometric studies. The overall success rate was 61%, flow rate improvement > 15 ml/sec in 50%, mean symptom score reduction from 26 to 7, residual urine decrease to < 50 ml within 12 weeks in 40%, and prostate volume decrease in 47%. Interstitial laser coagulation can be considered a safe alternative to TUR-P in a select number of patients, however a larger series of patients must be treated before the efficacy of the method is finally established.

  5. Sequential resection of residual abdominal and thoracic masses after chemotherapy for metastatic non-seminomatous germ cell tumours.

    PubMed Central

    Gerl, A.; Clemm, C.; Schmeller, N.; Dienemann, H.; Weiss, M.; Kriegmair, M.; Löhrs, U.; Wilmanns, W.

    1994-01-01

    Thirty-eight patients with advanced non-seminomatous germ cell tumours (NSGCTs) underwent multiple surgical interventions (two in 33 patients, three in four patients, four in one patient) after cisplatin-based chemotherapy. All patients had normal serum tumour markers but persistent radiographic masses. The larger mass was routinely resected first. Fifteen patients (39%) had dissimilar histological findings at sequential surgical procedures, 12 of whom demonstrated less favourable pathological features during the first operation and three at the second. Patients who underwent both retroperitoneal lymph node dissection (RPLND) and lung resection showed less favourable histological features in the retroperitoneum in nine cases and in the lung in three cases. Eight of 16 patients (50%) without mature teratoma in their primary tumours showed complete necrosis/fibrosis at all surgical interventions, whereas all patients whose primary tumour was classified as malignant teratoma intermediate demonstrated mature teratoma at least at one anatomical site. As histology of post-chemotherapy residual masses cannot be extrapolated from one anatomical site to another, patients usually are properly managed by excision of all residual masses. In particular, in patients with necrosis/fibrosis at lung resection omission of RPLND is not advised. PMID:7524606

  6. Sequential resection of residual abdominal and thoracic masses after chemotherapy for metastatic non-seminomatous germ cell tumours.

    PubMed

    Gerl, A; Clemm, C; Schmeller, N; Dienemann, H; Weiss, M; Kriegmair, M; Löhrs, U; Wilmanns, W

    1994-11-01

    Thirty-eight patients with advanced non-seminomatous germ cell tumours (NSGCTs) underwent multiple surgical interventions (two in 33 patients, three in four patients, four in one patient) after cisplatin-based chemotherapy. All patients had normal serum tumour markers but persistent radiographic masses. The larger mass was routinely resected first. Fifteen patients (39%) had dissimilar histological findings at sequential surgical procedures, 12 of whom demonstrated less favourable pathological features during the first operation and three at the second. Patients who underwent both retroperitoneal lymph node dissection (RPLND) and lung resection showed less favourable histological features in the retroperitoneum in nine cases and in the lung in three cases. Eight of 16 patients (50%) without mature teratoma in their primary tumours showed complete necrosis/fibrosis at all surgical interventions, whereas all patients whose primary tumour was classified as malignant teratoma intermediate demonstrated mature teratoma at least at one anatomical site. As histology of post-chemotherapy residual masses cannot be extrapolated from one anatomical site to another, patients usually are properly managed by excision of all residual masses. In particular, in patients with necrosis/fibrosis at lung resection omission of RPLND is not advised. PMID:7524606

  7. Management of a giant perineal condylomata acuminata.

    PubMed

    Hemper, Evelyn; Wittau, Mathias; Lemke, Johannes; Kornmann, Marko; Henne-Bruns, Doris

    2016-01-01

    A condylomata acuminata infection is caused by human papillomaviridae (HPV). This sexually transmitted condition most often affects the perineal region. Importantly, infections with types 16 and 18 are associated with an increased risk for anal and cervix cancer. In most cases topical therapy is sufficient for successfully treating condylomata acuminata. Here, we report the case of a 51-year old patient who suffered from a giant perianal located condylomata acuminata which had developed over a period of more than 10 years. Imaging by MRI revealed a possible infiltration of the musculus sphincter ani externus. Because a topical treatment or a radiotherapy was considered unfeasible, a surgical treatment was the only therapeutic option in this unusual case. First, a colostomy was performed and subsequently a resection of the tumor in toto with circular resection of the external portion of the musculus sphincter ani externus was performed. The large skin defect was closed by two gluteus flaps. The rectum wall was reinserted in the remnant of the musculus sphincter ani externus. Postoperatively, parts of the flaps developed necrosis. Therefore, a vacuum sealing therapy was initiated. Subsequently, the remaining skin defects were closed by autologous skin transplantation. Six months later the colostomy could be reversed. To date, one year after first surgery, the patient has still a normal sphincter function and no recurrence of the condylomata acuminata. This case report demonstrates how giant condylomata acuminata can be successfully treated by extended surgical procedures including colostomy and plastic reconstruction of resulting defects upon resection. PMID:26814336

  8. Management of a giant perineal condylomata acuminata

    PubMed Central

    Hemper, Evelyn; Wittau, Mathias; Lemke, Johannes; Kornmann, Marko; Henne-Bruns, Doris

    2016-01-01

    A condylomata acuminata infection is caused by human papillomaviridae (HPV). This sexually transmitted condition most often affects the perineal region. Importantly, infections with types 16 and 18 are associated with an increased risk for anal and cervix cancer. In most cases topical therapy is sufficient for successfully treating condylomata acuminata. Here, we report the case of a 51-year old patient who suffered from a giant perianal located condylomata acuminata which had developed over a period of more than 10 years. Imaging by MRI revealed a possible infiltration of the musculus sphincter ani externus. Because a topical treatment or a radiotherapy was considered unfeasible, a surgical treatment was the only therapeutic option in this unusual case. First, a colostomy was performed and subsequently a resection of the tumor in toto with circular resection of the external portion of the musculus sphincter ani externus was performed. The large skin defect was closed by two gluteus flaps. The rectum wall was reinserted in the remnant of the musculus sphincter ani externus. Postoperatively, parts of the flaps developed necrosis. Therefore, a vacuum sealing therapy was initiated. Subsequently, the remaining skin defects were closed by autologous skin transplantation. Six months later the colostomy could be reversed. To date, one year after first surgery, the patient has still a normal sphincter function and no recurrence of the condylomata acuminata. This case report demonstrates how giant condylomata acuminata can be successfully treated by extended surgical procedures including colostomy and plastic reconstruction of resulting defects upon resection. PMID:26814336

  9. A Case of Recto-Vesico-Cutaneous Fistula Following Perineal Injury by Wild Boar

    PubMed Central

    Bhingare, Pravin D.; Bang, Yogesh A.

    2016-01-01

    It is very uncommon for a boar to become aggressive in nature against human unless they are cornered. A wild boar attacked a 24-year-old male from behind in perineal region. At presentation, he had continuous dribbling of urine and fecal matter from perineal wound. On CT-scan, a well defined tract delineated by contrast was seen between postero-lateral aspect of bladder and anterior wall of rectum, and there was contrast extravasation through perineal wound. After resuscitation, fistula was repaired through abdominal approach, and perineal wound was debrided. Emergency physician should be aware of such cases as increasing deforestation and shifting of humans to sub-urban area, have resulted in increased incidences of wild boar attack. Prompt stabilization of patient, treatment of infection with proper antibiotics, prevention of tetanus and rabies infection and emergency surgical interventions are necessary to reduce morbidity and mortality from such trauma. PMID:27437297

  10. A Case of Recto-Vesico-Cutaneous Fistula Following Perineal Injury by Wild Boar.

    PubMed

    Bhingare, Pravin D; Shelke, Umesh Ravikant; Bang, Yogesh A

    2016-05-01

    It is very uncommon for a boar to become aggressive in nature against human unless they are cornered. A wild boar attacked a 24-year-old male from behind in perineal region. At presentation, he had continuous dribbling of urine and fecal matter from perineal wound. On CT-scan, a well defined tract delineated by contrast was seen between postero-lateral aspect of bladder and anterior wall of rectum, and there was contrast extravasation through perineal wound. After resuscitation, fistula was repaired through abdominal approach, and perineal wound was debrided. Emergency physician should be aware of such cases as increasing deforestation and shifting of humans to sub-urban area, have resulted in increased incidences of wild boar attack. Prompt stabilization of patient, treatment of infection with proper antibiotics, prevention of tetanus and rabies infection and emergency surgical interventions are necessary to reduce morbidity and mortality from such trauma. PMID:27437297

  11. 21 CFR 884.5390 - Perineal heater.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Perineal heater. 884.5390 Section 884.5390 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL... Perineal heater. (a) Identification. A perineal heater is a device designed to apply heat directly...

  12. Tumor Size on Abdominal MRI Versus Pathologic Specimen in Resected Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma: Implications for Radiation Treatment Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, William A.; Mikell, John L.; Mittal, Pardeep; Colbert, Lauren; Prabhu, Roshan S.; Kooby, David A.; Nickleach, Dana; Hanley, Krisztina; Sarmiento, Juan M.; Ali, Arif N.; Landry, Jerome C.

    2013-05-01

    Purpose: We assessed the accuracy of abdominal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for determining tumor size by comparing the preoperative contrast-enhanced T1-weighted gradient echo (3-dimensional [3D] volumetric interpolated breath-hold [VIBE]) MRI tumor size with pathologic specimen size. Methods and Materials: The records of 92 patients who had both preoperative contrast-enhanced 3D VIBE MRI images and detailed pathologic specimen measurements were available for review. Primary tumor size from the MRI was independently measured by a single diagnostic radiologist (P.M.) who was blinded to the pathology reports. Pathologic tumor measurements from gross specimens were obtained from the pathology reports. The maximum dimensions of tumor measured in any plane on the MRI and the gross specimen were compared. The median difference between the pathology sample and the MRI measurements was calculated. A paired t test was conducted to test for differences between the MRI and pathology measurements. The Pearson correlation coefficient was used to measure the association of disparity between the MRI and pathology sizes with the pathology size. Disparities relative to pathology size were also examined and tested for significance using a 1-sample t test. Results: The median patient age was 64.5 years. The primary site was pancreatic head in 81 patients, body in 4, and tail in 7. Three patients were American Joint Commission on Cancer stage IA, 7 stage IB, 21 stage IIA, 58 stage IIB, and 3 stage III. The 3D VIBE MRI underestimated tumor size by a median difference of 4 mm (range, −34-22 mm). The median largest tumor dimensions on MRI and pathology specimen were 2.65 cm (range, 1.5-9.5 cm) and 3.2 cm (range, 1.3-10 cm), respectively. Conclusions: Contrast-enhanced 3D VIBE MRI underestimates tumor size by 4 mm when compared with pathologic specimen. Advanced abdominal MRI sequences warrant further investigation for radiation therapy planning in pancreatic adenocarcinoma before

  13. Intestinal obstruction following harvest of VRAM-flap for reconstruction of a large perineal defect

    PubMed Central

    Elawa, Sherif; Hallböök, Olof; Myrelid, Pär; Zdolsek, Johann

    2015-01-01

    A patient with locally advanced adenocarcinoma of the rectum was operated with abdominoperineal resection and perineal reconstruction with a vertical rectus abdominis musculocutaneous flap. Six days postoperatively, there was herniation of the small bowel, between the anterior and posterior rectus sheaths, to a subcutaneous location.

  14. The use of bone anchors for autologous flap fixation in perineal reconstruction: a case report.

    PubMed

    Saad, Adam; Cece, John A; Arvanitis, Michael L; Elkwood, Andrew I

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this case report is to demonstrate the use of bone anchors with an autologous flap in perineal reconstruction. This technique has not been reported before. A 64-year-old female presented to our office with a chief complaint of perineal hernia 1.5 years after abdominoperineal resection. She had a history of recurrent rectal cancer for which she received chemotherapy, radiation and surgery. To repair the hernia, a standard vertical rectus abdominismyocutaneous was harvested and de-epithelialized. It was secured into place in the pelvis utilizing several bone anchors. Mesh was used to repair the donor site defect. At 18 month follow-up, there was good healing of all the wounds and no recurrence of the hernia. She was pain free and able to resume her activities of daily living. Bone anchor fixation is a viable technique for fixation of autologous flaps in perineal reconstruction. PMID:24964462

  15. The use of bone anchors for autologous flap fixation in perineal reconstruction: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Saad, Adam; Cece, John A.; Arvanitis, Michael L.; Elkwood, Andrew I.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this case report is to demonstrate the use of bone anchors with an autologous flap in perineal reconstruction. This technique has not been reported before. A 64-year-old female presented to our office with a chief complaint of perineal hernia 1.5 years after abdominoperineal resection. She had a history of recurrent rectal cancer for which she received chemotherapy, radiation and surgery. To repair the hernia, a standard vertical rectus abdominismyocutaneous was harvested and de-epithelialized. It was secured into place in the pelvis utilizing several bone anchors. Mesh was used to repair the donor site defect. At 18 month follow-up, there was good healing of all the wounds and no recurrence of the hernia. She was pain free and able to resume her activities of daily living. Bone anchor fixation is a viable technique for fixation of autologous flaps in perineal reconstruction. PMID:24964462

  16. Successful treatment of rectal cancer with perineal invasion: Three case reports

    PubMed Central

    KITAHARA, TOMOHIRO; UEMURA, MAMORU; HARAGUCHI, NAOTSUGU; NISHIMURA, JUNICHI; SHINGAI, TATSUSHI; HATA, TAISHI; TAKEMASA, ICHIRO; MIZUSHIMA, TSUNEKAZU; DOKI, YUICHIRO; MORI, MASAKI; YAMAMOTO, HIROFUMI

    2014-01-01

    Rectal cancer occasionally invades adjacent organs. However, rectal cancer with perineal invasion is uncommon and difficult to treat. Locally advanced colorectal cancer may be clinically treated with neoadjuvant therapy, followed by en bloc resection. Skin invasion may lead to tumor dissemination via cutaneous blood flow and lymphatic routes. There is currently no firm evidence regarding the treatment of these significantly advanced rectal cancers. In this study, we report 3 cases of rectal cancer with perineal invasion, successfully managed by multimodality treatment. Case 1 is a 52-year-old man with rectal cancer that had invaded the perineum; case 2 is a 38-year-old man with rectal cancer infiltrating the perineal skin and liver metastasis; and case 3 is a 50-year-old woman with rectal cancer and perineal invasion. All the cases were treated with radical excision. No severe complications were observed in the perioperative period. Case 2, in particular, was confirmed to remain alive 5 years after the surgery. Our experience suggests that multimodality treatment, including extended radical surgery, may be a feasible approach to the treatment of rectal cancer with perineal skin invasion. PMID:24940483

  17. Chemotherapy-induced enterocutaneous fistula after perineal hernia repair using a biological mesh: a case report.

    PubMed

    Eriksen, Mh; Bulut, O

    2014-01-01

    This is the first reported case of an enterocutaneous fistula as a late complication to reconstruction of the pelvic floor with a Permacol™ mesh after a perineal hernia. A 70-year-old man had a reconstruction of the pelvic floor with a biological mesh because of a perineal hernia after laparoscopic abdominoperineal resection. Nine months after the perineal hernia operation, the patient had multiple metastases in both lungs and liver. The patient underwent chemotherapy, including bevacizumab, irinotecan, calcium folinate, and fluorouracil. Six weeks into chemotherapy, the patient developed signs of sepsis and complained of pain from the right buttock. Ultrasound examination revealed an abscess, which was drained, guided by ultrasound. A computed tomography scan showed a subcutaneous abscess cavity located in the right buttock with communication to the small bowel. Operative findings confirmed a perineal fistula from the distal ileum to perineum. A resection of the small bowel with primary anastomosis was performed. The postoperative course was complicated by fluid and electrolyte disturbances, but the patient was stabilized and finally discharged to a hospice for terminal care after 28 days of hospital stay. It seems that hernia repairs with biological meshes have lower erosion and infection rates compared with synthetic meshes, and so far, evidence suggests that biological grafts are safe and effective in the treatment of pelvic floor reconstruction. There have been no reports of enteric fistulas after pelvic reconstruction with biological meshes. However, the development of intestinal fistulas after chemotherapy with bevacizumab has been described in the literature. Our case report supports this association between bevacizumab and fistula formation among rectal cancer patients, as symptoms of a fistula started only 6 weeks into bevacizumab treatment but approximately 12 months after the perineal hernia operation, even after pelvic reconstruction using a

  18. [Scrotal and perineal pain following coitus interruptus].

    PubMed

    Arruza, A; Pertusa, C; Llarena, R; Zabala, J A

    1990-05-01

    A case of perineal-scrotal and hypogastric pain following coitus interruptus in a young male patient is described. The physiopathological mechanisms involved in this condition in normal subjects or those with neuropathic disorders are discussed. PMID:2383051

  19. Acute abdominal aortic thrombosis caused by paroxysmal atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Riccioni, G; Bucciarelli, V; Bisceglia, N; Totaro, G; Scotti, L; Aceto, A; Martini, F; Gallina, S; Bucciarelli, T; Macarini, L

    2013-01-01

    Acute abdominal aortic thrombosis is a rare and potential fatal event, which occurs in adult subjects. We present the case of a 72-year-old-man, who referred to the emergency Department of our hospital because of persistent severe abdominal and perineal pain. Doppler ultrasounds and computerized tomography angiography revealed the acute thrombosis of the abdominal aorta. Immediate revascularization through aortic thrombo-endoarterectomy resolved the disease. PMID:23830410

  20. [Perineal urethrostomy in complex anterior urethral stricture].

    PubMed

    Barbagli, G

    2010-06-01

    Staged urethroplasty is a well-known procedure for urethral reconstruction that had already been described by Russell in 1914 and was later popularized by Johanson, Turner-Warwick, Blandy, and Schreiter. It lends itself to the treatment of complex anterior urethral stricture in combination with lichen sclerosus, failed correction of hypospadias, fistula, via falsa, abscess, carcinoma, or previously unsuccessful urethroplasty. Perineal urethrostomy can be performed as a temporary or definitive measure. Some patients even decline further urethral reconstruction because they perceive subjective satisfaction after perineal urethrostomy that was originally intended to be temporary. PMID:20544335

  1. Accessory Scrotum With Perineal Lipoma: Pathologic Evaluation Including Androgen Receptor Expression

    PubMed Central

    Iida, Keitaro; Mizuno, Kentaro; Nishio, Hidenori; Moritoki, Yoshinobu; Kamisawa, Hideyuki; Kurokawa, Satoshi; Kohri, Kenjiro; Hayashi, Yutaro

    2014-01-01

    Accessory scrotum is an unusual developmental anomaly defined as additional scrotal tissue in addition to a normally developed scrotum. The accessory scrotum arises posterior to the normally located scrotum and does not contain a testis. We report a case of an 18-month-old boy with an accessory scrotum attached to a perineal lipoma. We resected both and determined histologically that they were of the same tissue as the scrotum, including the presence of androgen receptor expression. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case to assess androgen receptor expression in an accessory scrotum using immunostaining. PMID:26958486

  2. Transthoracic versus abdominal-transhiatal resection for treating Siewert type II/III adenocarcinoma of the esophagogastric junction: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Zhi; Cai, Jun; Yin, Jie; Zhang, Jun; Zhang, Zhong-Tao; Wang, Kang-Li

    2015-01-01

    Our study aimed to explore the differences in short and long-term outcomes about the transthoracic (TH) and abdominal-transhiatal (TH) approaches for treating esophagogastric junction (AEG). A systematic review of PubMed, EMbase, Cochrane Library, China National Knowledge Infrastructure and CBMdisc was performed. All original articles comparing TH with TA were included in the study. Meta-analysis was conducted using odd ratios (OR) and weighted mean differences (WMDs).Thirteen studies including 2489 patients with adenocarcinoma of the esophagogastric junction, with 1050 patients underwent TA and 1437 patients underwent TH were pooled for this study. There were no significant difference between two approaches concerning duration of operation, blood loss, anastomotic leakage and positive of proximal incisal margin. Lymph node excised also showed no significant differences between two procedures in RCTs while in TA group of Non-RCTs, the number of lymph node dissection is higher. TH approach was associated with a longer length of hospital stay and had higher incidence of respiratory and cardiovascular complications and early postoperative mortality. Overall analysis of 1, 3, 5-year survival showed no significant difference between two approaches. Based on the study, TA approach had a positive impact than TH for AEG with respect to respiratory and cardiovascular complications, hospital stay and early mortality rates. There were no significant differences between the two approaches for long-term survival. Therefore, two surgical approaches are acceptable, and the elders with poor cardiopulmonary function, we recommended TA approach for treating it. PMID:26770310

  3. Fasciocutaneous flap for vaginal and perineal reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, T.N.; Whetzel, T.; Mathes, S.J.; Vasconez, L.O.

    1987-07-01

    A skin and fascia flap from the medial thigh is proposed for vaginal and perineal reconstruction. Dissection, vascular injection, and radiographs of 20 fresh cadaver limbs uniformly demonstrated the presence of a communicating suprafascial vascular plexus in the medial thigh. Three to four nonaxial vessels were consistently found to enter the proximal plexus from within 5 cm of the perineum. Preservation of these vessels permitted reliable elevation of a 9 X 20 cm fasciocutaneous flap without using the gracilis muscle as a vascular carrier. Fifteen flaps in 13 patients were used for vaginal replacement and coverage of vulvectomy, groin, and ischial defects. Depending on the magnitude of the defect, simultaneous and independent elevation of the gracilis muscle provided additional vascularized coverage as needed. Our experience indicates that the medial thigh fasciocutaneous flap is a durable, less bulky, and potentially sensate alternative to the gracilis musculocutaneous flap for vaginal and perineal reconstruction.

  4. S3 Dorsal Root Ganglion/Nerve Root Stimulation for Refractory Postsurgical Perineal Pain: Technical Aspects of Anchorless Sacral Transforaminal Lead Placement.

    PubMed

    Zuidema, X; Breel, J; Wille, F

    2016-01-01

    Chronic perineal pain limits patients in physical and sexual activities, leading to social and psychological distress. In most cases, this pain develops after surgery in the urogenital area or as a consequence of trauma. Neuromodulation is one of the options in chronic postsurgical perineal pain treatment. We present a case of refractory perineal pain after right sided surgical resection of a Bartholin's cyst which was treated with third sacral nerve root/dorsal root ganglion stimulation using the transforaminal approach. We describe a new anchorless lead placement technique using a unique curved lead delivery sheath. We postulate that this new posterior foraminal technique of lead placement is simple, safe, and reversible and may lower the occurrence of lead related complications. PMID:27123351

  5. S3 Dorsal Root Ganglion/Nerve Root Stimulation for Refractory Postsurgical Perineal Pain: Technical Aspects of Anchorless Sacral Transforaminal Lead Placement

    PubMed Central

    Zuidema, X.; Breel, J.; Wille, F.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic perineal pain limits patients in physical and sexual activities, leading to social and psychological distress. In most cases, this pain develops after surgery in the urogenital area or as a consequence of trauma. Neuromodulation is one of the options in chronic postsurgical perineal pain treatment. We present a case of refractory perineal pain after right sided surgical resection of a Bartholin's cyst which was treated with third sacral nerve root/dorsal root ganglion stimulation using the transforaminal approach. We describe a new anchorless lead placement technique using a unique curved lead delivery sheath. We postulate that this new posterior foraminal technique of lead placement is simple, safe, and reversible and may lower the occurrence of lead related complications. PMID:27123351

  6. Perineal rectosigmoidectomy for gangrenous rectal prolapse.

    PubMed

    Voulimeneas, Ioannis; Antonopoulos, Constantine; Alifierakis, Evangelos; Ioannides, Pavlos

    2010-06-01

    Incarceration rarely complicates the chronically progressive form of the full thickness rectal prolapse. Even more rarely, it becomes strangulated, necessitating emergency surgery. We describe an extremely rare case of incarcerated acute rectal prolapse, without a relevant previous history or symptoms of predisposing pathology. The patient underwent emergency perineal proctosigmoidectomy, the Altemeier operation, combined with diverting loop sigmoid colostomy. The postoperative course was quite uneventful with an excellent final result after colostomy closure. The successful treatment of this patient illustrates the value of the Altemeier procedure in the difficult and unusual case scenario of bowel incarceration. PMID:20518093

  7. [A case of abdominal wall actinomycosis].

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung Hoon; Lee, Jin Soo; Cho, Hyeong Jun; Choi, Seung Bong; Cheung, Dae Young; Kim, Jin Il; Lee, In Kyu

    2015-04-01

    Actinomycosis is a chronic suppurative granulomatous infectious disease caused by actinomyces species that is characterized by formation of characteristic clumps called as sulfur granules. Abdominal actinomycosis is a rare disease and is often difficult to diagnose before operation. Abdominal actinomycosis infiltrating into the abdominal wall and adhering to the colon is even rarer. Most abdominal actinomycosis develops after operation, trauma or inflammatory bowel disease, and is also considered as an opportunistic infection in immunocompromised patient with underlying malignancy, diabetes mellitus, human immunodeficiency virus infection, etc. Actinomycosis is diagnosed based on histologic demonstration of sulfur granules in surgically resected specimen or pus, and treatment consists of long-term penicillin based antibiotics therapy with or without surgical resection. Herein, we report an unusual case of abdominal wall actinomycosis which developed in a patient after acupuncture and presented as abdominal wall mass that was first mistaken for abdominal wall invasion of diverticulum perforation. PMID:25896158

  8. How to alleviate perineal pain following an episiotomy.

    PubMed

    Steen, Mary; Cummins, Bernie

    2016-03-30

    Rationale and key points An episiotomy increases maternal morbidity in the postnatal period. Alleviating perineal pain is an important aspect of maternal health care. ▶ A combination of pain relief methods, systemic and localised, may be required to alleviate perineal pain associated with an episiotomy. ▶ It is important that midwives and doctors advise women on how to alleviate perineal pain, prevent infection and promote healing following an episiotomy. Reflective activity Clinical skills articles can help update your practice and ensure it remains evidence based. Apply this article to your practice. Reflect on and write a short account of: 1. The advice you would give to a woman who has recently given birth to alleviate perineal pain. 2. The short and long-term problems associated with perineal pain. Subscribers can upload their reflective accounts at rcni.com/portfolio . PMID:27027195

  9. Abdominal Adhesions

    MedlinePlus

    ... Abdominal Adhesions 1 Ward BC, Panitch A. Abdominal adhesions: current and novel therapies. Journal of Surgical Research. 2011;165(1):91– ... are abdominal adhesions and intestinal obstructions ... generally do not require treatment. Surgery is the only way to treat abdominal ...

  10. Using an experimental bicycle seat to reduce perineal numbness.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Kenneth S; Richburg, Allen; Wallis, David; Bracker, Mark

    2002-05-01

    Researchers evaluated the effectiveness of an experimental seat that was designed to prevent perineal numbness and possibly erectile dysfunction in male bicyclists. A trial of the device among 15 experienced cyclists measured perineal sensation after a 1-hour stationary cycling session on a standard seat followed several days later by the same exercise protocol on the experimental bike seat. Cyclists reported more numbness with the standard seat than with the experimental seat (79% vs 14%). Sensory testing found greater hypoesthesia with the standard seat. Innovations in bicycle seat design may decrease or eliminate perineal numbness. PMID:20086525

  11. Massive surgical emphysema after perineal proctosigmoidectomy.

    PubMed

    Angehrn, Fiorenzo Valente Ernst Jakob; Däster, Silvio; Antonescu, Marius

    2014-01-01

    An 83-year-old woman underwent an elective perineal proctosigmoidectomy (Altemeier procedure) for a rectal prolapse. On postoperative day 1, the patient presented with impressive subcutaneous emphysema involving the chest, neck and face without any other symptoms. A CT scan showed free air in the retroperitoneum, the intraperitoneal cavity, the mediastinum and a subcutaneous emphysema of the neck and the face. Air was also found around the coloanal anastomosis and an anastomotic leak was proven by rectal contrast agent. In this situation, a rectoscopy followed by a laparoscopy were immediately performed. The leak could not be visualised. Peritoneal lavage and drainage, followed by protective sigmoidostomy were carried out. After surgery, the follow-up was uneventful except a persistent but asymptomatic leak with a presacral cavity. The coloanal dehiscence was later proven in rectoscopy. Although sutured, it is still present and colostomy closure will eventually be possible in a few months. PMID:25293686

  12. Management of Complex Perineal Fistula Disease.

    PubMed

    Akiba, Ricardo Tadayoshi; Rodrigues, Fabio Gontijo; da Silva, Giovanna

    2016-06-01

    Management of complex perineal fistulas such as high perianal, rectovaginal, pouch-vaginal, rectourethral, or pouch-urethral fistulas requires a systematic approach. The first step is to control any sepsis with drainage of abscess and/or seton placement. Patients with large, recurrent, irradiated fistulas benefit from stoma diversion. In patients with Crohn's disease, it is essential to induce remission prior to any repair. There are different approaches to repair complex fistulas, from local repairs to transperineal and transabdominal approaches. Simpler fistulas are amenable to local repair. More complex fistulas, such as those secondary to irradiation, require interposition of healthy, well-vascularized tissue. The most common flap used for this treatment is the gracilis muscle with good outcomes reported. Once healing is confirmed by imaging and endoscopy, the stoma is reversed. PMID:27247533

  13. Abdominal mass

    MedlinePlus

    Several conditions can cause an abdominal mass: Abdominal aortic aneurysm can cause a pulsating mass around the navel. ... This could be a sign of a ruptured aortic aneurysm, which is an emergency condition. Contact your health ...

  14. Abdominal mass

    MedlinePlus

    ... Several conditions can cause an abdominal mass: Abdominal aortic aneurysm can cause a pulsating mass around the navel. ... This could be a sign of a ruptured aortic aneurysm, which is an emergency condition. Contact your health ...

  15. Interstitial therapy of perineal and gynecological malignancies

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, A.; Herstein, P.; Portnuff, J.

    1983-03-01

    Thirty-five patients, 38 to 88 years of age, were treated with 125-Iodine or 192-Iridium interstitial implants at Stanford University Medical Center between July 1974, and December, 1978. There were 25 primary epithelial malignancies, eight extensions from intrapelvic organs and two metastatic tumors (hypernephroma and Hodgkin's disease). The involved sites were: urethra (6 patients); vulva (9 patients); vagina (8 patients); anus (7 patients); cervix (5 patients). Implantation was usually performed to treat evident or microscopic disease in conjunction with external beam pelvic treatment with or without local excision. Computerized implant preplanning was used.125-Iodine seeds were inserted either directly or within absorbable suture Polyglactin 910; 192-Iridium in nylon carriers was placed by suture or transperineal template. Two patients were lost to follow-up leaving 33 patients, 27 of whom are alive and free of local disease from 37 to 76 months. The overall local control rate was 88%, or 29/33 patients. All four local recurrences appeared before 24 months. Minor complications included: 10 patients with transient mucositis, four with superficial ulcers, and one patient with infection at the implanted site. Two major complications occurred: a necrotic rectal ulcer requiring a colostomy and a contracted, painful bladder necessitating a urinary diversion. It is concluded that in selected cases interstitial irradiation provides good local control of perineal and gynecological malignancies with low morbidity in this elderly and quite often fragile group of patients.

  16. Kinematic resection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shevlin, Fergal P.

    1995-01-01

    A new geometric formulation is given for the problem of determining position and orientation of a satellite scanner from error-prone ground control point observations in linear pushbroom imagery. The pushbroom satellite resection problem is significantly more complicated than that of the conventional frame camera because of irregular platform motion throughout the image capture period. Enough ephemeris data are typically available to reconstruct satellite trajectory and hence the interior orientation of the pushbroom imagery. The new approach to resection relies on the use of reconstructed scanner interior orientation to determine the relative orientations of a bundle of image rays. The absolute position and orientation which allows this bundle to minimize its distance from a corresponding set of ground control points may then be found. The interior orientation is represented as a kinematic chain of screw motions, implemented as dual-number quaternions. The motor algebra is used in the analysis since it provides a means of line, point, and motion manipulation. Its moment operator provides a metric of distance between the image ray and the ground control point.

  17. Laparoscopic excision of abdominal wall desmoid tumor.

    PubMed

    Meshikhes, Abdul-Wahed; Al-Zahrani, Hana; Ewies, Tarek

    2016-02-01

    Open surgical resection is the mainstay treatment for desmoid tumors. Laparoscopic resection is rarely used and not well described in the literature. We report a case of a single, 35-year-old woman who presented with palpable abdominal wall desmoid tumor. The patient had had laparoscopic cholecystectomy 2 years earlier, and the tumor was at the insertion site of the right upper quadrant trocar. The diagnosis was made by a Tru-Cut biopsy at another institution, after the lesion had increased in size and caused increased discomfort. The patient underwent successful laparoscopic resection of the tumor. This report aimed to promote laparoscopic resection of abdominal wall desmoid tumors, whenever feasible, and describe the laparoscopic technique. We believe this is the second case of laparoscopic excision of desmoid tumor reported in the English-language literature. PMID:26781534

  18. A rare case of perineal hamartoma associated with cryptorchidism and imperforate anus: case report.

    PubMed

    Yamaçake, Kleiton Gabriel Ribeiro; Giron, Amilcar Martins; Tannuri, Uenis; Srougi, Miguel

    2014-04-01

    A full-term male neonate with anorectal anomaly and external perineal anomalies was referred to our service. Physical examination showed an epithelized perineal mass with cutaneous orifices, which had urine fistulization, hipotrofic perineal musculature, bilateral congenital clubfoot, hipospadic urethra, criptorquidy bilateral with nonpalpable testis and imperforate anus. A colostomy was constructed immediately after birth. The child underwent excision of perineal mass, bilateral orchidopexy, Duplay neourethroplasty and coloanal anastomosis at 3 months of age. The histopathological examination of the perineal mass revealed a hamartoma. PMID:25003932

  19. Abdominal sounds

    MedlinePlus

    ... during sleep. They also occur normally for a short time after the use of certain medicines and after abdominal surgery. Decreased or absent bowel sounds often indicate constipation. Increased ( hyperactive ) bowel sounds ...

  20. Abdominal MRI

    MedlinePlus

    ... provider if you have: Artificial heart valves Brain aneurysm clips Heart defibrillator or pacemaker Inner ear (cochlear) ... which the test may be performed: Abdominal aortic aneurysm Atheroembolic renal disease Carcinoma of the renal pelvis ...

  1. Abdominal pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... threatening conditions, such as colon cancer or early appendicitis , may only cause mild pain or no pain. ... Food poisoning Stomach flu Other possible causes include: Appendicitis Abdominal aortic aneurysm (bulging and weakening of the ...

  2. Abdominal Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... can help the overall situation for the child. Teaching kids self-hypnosis [8] or guided imagery [8a] ... related topics? Functional Abdominal Pain (English, French or Spanish)—from The North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, ...

  3. Painful Spastic Hip Dislocation: Proximal Femoral Resection

    PubMed Central

    Albiñana, Javier; Gonzalez-Moran, Gaspar

    2002-01-01

    The dislocated hip in a non-ambulatory child with spastic paresis tends to be a painful interference to sleep, sitting upright, and perineal care. Proximal femoral resection-interposition arthroplasty is one method of treatment for this condition. We reviewed eight hips, two bilateral cases, with a mean follow-up of 30 months. Clinical improvement was observed in all except one case, with respect to pain relief and sitting tolerance. Some proximal migration was observed in three cases, despite routine post-operative skeletal traction in all cases and careful soft tissue interposition. One case showed significant heterotopic ossification which restricted prolonged sitting. This patient needed some occasional medication for pain. PMID:12180614

  4. Normal Vulvovaginal, Perineal, and Pelvic Anatomy with Reconstructive Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Yavagal, Sujata; de Farias, Thais F.; Medina, Carlos A.; Takacs, Peter

    2011-01-01

    A thorough insight into the female genital anatomy is crucial for understanding and performing pelvic reconstructive procedures. The intimate relationship between the genitalia and the muscles, ligaments, and fascia that provide support is complex, but critical to restore during surgery for correction of prolapse or aesthetic reasons. The external female genitalia include the mons pubis, labia majora and minora, clitoris, vestibule with glands, perineal body, and the muscles and fascia surrounding these structures. Through the perineal membrane and the perineal body, these superficial vulvar structures are structurally related to the deep pelvic muscle levator ani with its fascia. The levator ani forms the pelvic floor with the coccygeus muscle and provides vital support to all the pelvic organs and stability to the perineum. The internal female genital organs include the vagina, cervix, uterus, tubes, and ovaries with their visceral fascia. The visceral fascia also called the endopelvic fascia, surrounds the pelvic organs and connects them to the pelvic walls. It is continuous with the paraurethral and paravaginal fascia, which is attached to the perineal membrane. Thus, the internal and external genitalia are closely related to the muscles and fascia, and work as one functioning unit. PMID:22547969

  5. Selective Episiotomy: Indications, Techinique, and Association with Severe Perineal Lacerations.

    PubMed

    Corrêa Junior, Mário Dias; Passini Júnior, Renato

    2016-06-01

    Introduction Episiotomy is a controversial procedure, especially because the discussion that surrounds it has gone beyond the field of scientific debate, being adopted as an indicator of the "humanization of childbirth". The scientific literature indicates that episiotomy should not be performed routinely, but selectively. Objectives To review the literature in order to assess whether the implementation of selective episiotomy protects against severe perineal lacerations, the indications for the procedure, and the best technique to perform it. Methods A literature search was performed in PubMed using the terms episiotomy or perineal lacerations, and the filter clinical trial. The articles concerning the risk of severe perineal lacerations with or without episiotomy, perineal protection, or episiotomy techniques were selected. Results A total of 141 articles were identified, and 24 of them were included in the review. Out of the 13 studies that evaluated the risk of severe lacerations with and without episiotomy, 5 demonstrated a protective role of selective episiotomy, and 4 showed no significant differences between the groups. Three small studies confirmed the finding that episiotomy should be performed selectively and not routinely, and one study showed that midline episiotomy increased the risk of severe lacerations. The most cited indications were primiparity, fetal weight greater than 4 kg, prolonged second stage, operative delivery, and shoulder dystocia. As for the surgical technique, episiotomies performed with wider angles (> 40°) and earlier in the second stage (before "crowning ") appeared to be more protective. Conclusions Selective episiotomy decreases the risk of severe lacerations when compared with the non-performance or the performance of routine episiotomy. The use of a proper surgical technique is fundamental to obtain better results, especially in relation to the angle of incision, the distance from the vaginal introitus, and the

  6. The use of suprapubic cystoscopy in perineal urethroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Horuz, Rahim; Göktaş, Cemal; Çetinel, Ali Cihangir; Akça, Oktay; Selimoğlu, Ahmet; Albayrak, Selami

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Posterior urethral strictures are difficult cases to treat for urologists. Anastomotic open urethroplasty is the major surgical treatment option, and various modifications/manipulations to the procedure have been recommended in the literature. We aimed to assess the advantages of performing antegrade endoscopy through the suprapubic cystostomy tract during perineal urethroplasty. Material and methods: Thirty-six perineal urethroplasties combined with suprapubic cystoscopy were performed in 33 adult male patients between 2005 and 2011. Pre-and peri-operative records of the patients were evaluated, with a particular focus on suprapubic cystoscopy findings during urethroplasty. Results: The mean patient age was 41 years, and the mean lesion length was 2.6 cm (range 1–10 cm). Lesions were secondary to pelvic trauma in 21 patients, to a history of prostatic surgery in 8 patients, and to other miscellaneous causes in the 4 remaining patients. In 23 cases with normal bladder necks, the anastomosis was created under the guidance of antegrade cystoscopy with fluoroscopy. In 10 cases, stiff guide wires or paddles were used in addition to endoscopic light to identify the correct anastomosis site. In two procedures, fistula openings were identified during endoscopy, and fistula repair was performed along with anastomosis. In one case involving the longest lesion with involvement of the bladder neck, a combined perineal-transpubic urethroplasty was performed. The mean follow up duration was 19 (3–38) months. The overall success rate was 91%, and the re-operation rate was 9%. Conclusion: Suprapubic cystoscopy is an easy-to-perform adjunctive modality in perineal urethroplasty. This method provides the benefits of supplementary endoscopic findings and feasibility of certain maneuvers that facilitate debridement and anastomosis formation concurrent with perineal urethroplasty. PMID:26328118

  7. [Rectal resection with colo-anal anastomosis for ergotamine-induced rectal stenosis].

    PubMed

    Panis, Y; Valleur, P; Kleinmann, P; Willems, G; Hautefeuille, P

    1990-01-01

    Anorectal ulcers due to ergotamine suppositories are extremely rare. We report the first case of rectal stenosis following regular abuse of ergotamine suppositories which required rectal resection and coloanal anastomosis, despite stopping the intoxication 1 year previously. The rectal eversion during the perineal procedure allowed a low anastomosis to be performed, on the dentate line. One year later, the functional result was considered to be good, demonstrating the place of coloanal anastomosis in benign rectal pathology. PMID:2100123

  8. Abdominal Sepsis.

    PubMed

    De Waele, Jan J

    2016-08-01

    Abdominal infections are an important challenge for the intensive care physician. In an era of increasing antimicrobial resistance, selecting the appropriate regimen is important and, with new drugs coming to the market, correct use is important more than ever before and abdominal infections are an excellent target for antimicrobial stewardship programs. Biomarkers may be helpful, but their exact role in managing abdominal infections remains incompletely understood. Source control also remains an ongoing conundrum, and evidence is increasing that its importance supersedes the impact of antibiotic therapy. New strategies such as open abdomen management may offer added benefit in severely ill patients, but more data are needed to identify its exact role. The role of fungi and the need for antifungal coverage, on the other hand, have been investigated extensively in recent years, but at this point, it remains unclear who requires empirical as well as directed therapy. PMID:27363829

  9. Abdominal Compartment Syndrome in a Pediatric Patient With Cloacal Exstrophy.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Caleb E; Kennedy, Alfred P; Smith, D Preston

    2016-07-01

    We present a rare complication of abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) in a child undergoing complex urologic reconstruction. A 10-year-old female born with the abdominal wall defect cloacal exstrophy who had previously undergone multiple abdominal procedures then developed findings consistent with ACS following a complex Mitrofanoff procedure. Although intravesical pressures were not documented because of the nature of her reconstruction, her ACS-type findings were (1) abdominal pain, (2) melena, (3) pulmonary hypoinflation, (4) renal insufficiency, (5) tachycardia, and (6) segmental ischemic small bowel. Management consisted of abdominal decompression, segmental bowel resections, and wound vacuum-assisted-closure management. Patient was eventually discharged home. PMID:26921644

  10. Laparoscopic resection of colonic lipomas: When and why?

    PubMed Central

    Böler, Deniz Eren; Baca, Bilgi; Uras, Cihan

    2013-01-01

    Patient: Male, >60 Final Diagnosis: Colonic lipoma Symptoms: Rectal bleeding • abdominal pain • fatique • abdominal distention Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Laparoscopic resection Specialty: General surgery Objective We aimed to review and discuss the clinical picture and management of 4 patients who underwent laparoscopic colonic resection with a definitive pathology of colonic lipoma Background: Colonic lipomas are rare benign nonepithelial tumors of the colon. They begin to be symptomatic when they reach a certain size, although the presentation can vary. Different endoscopic and surgical treatment strategies have been reported in the literature. Case Reports: Four male patients who underwent laparoscopic colonic resection and had definitive diagnosis of colonic lipoma were included in this report. All patients were over 60 years old. The first case presented with massive rectal bleeding. Obstructive symptoms and intermittent bleeding were prominent in the second and third cases. Abdominal pain and discomfort was present in the forth case. In the first 2 cases, abdominal CTs were suggestive of colonic lipoma and laparoscopic ileocecal resection was performed. However, malignancy could not be ruled out in the other 2 cases due to large size and heterogeneous appearance of the lesions and inconclusive endoscopic biopsies consisted of ulcer with exudate and inflammatory cells. Laparoscopic left and right hemicolectomy was performed in the third and forth cases, respectively. There were no complications in any patients. Conclusions: Laparoscopic resection can be the first choice in treatment of colonic lipomas with various presentations. Wider resections should be considered in cases with uncertain diagnosis. PMID:23901354

  11. Abdominal thrusts

    MedlinePlus

    ... call 911 . If the person loses consciousness, start CPR . If you are not comfortable performing abdominal thrusts, ... American Red Cross. First Aid/CPR/AED Participant's Manual. 2nd ... Red Cross; 2014. Berg RA, Hemphill R, Abella BS, et al. Part 5: ...

  12. Abdominal Adhesions

    MedlinePlus

    ... Adhesions 1 Ward BC, Panitch A. Abdominal adhesions: current and novel therapies. Journal of Surgical Research. 2011;165(1):91–111. Seek Help for ... and how to participate, visit the NIH Clinical Research Trials and You website ... Foundation for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders 700 West Virginia ...

  13. Perineal Groove: A Rare Congenital Midline Defect of Perineum

    PubMed Central

    Harsono, Mimily; Pourcyrous, Massroor

    2015-01-01

    Perineal groove is a rare congenital malformation that is characterized by an exposed wet sulcus with nonkeratinized mucous membrane that extends from the posterior vaginal fourchette to the anterior ridge of the anal orifice. This condition is one of the uncommon anomalies of urogenital/anogenital region that is unknown to many clinicians. Although, this condition may be self-resolved before the age of 2 years, this nonepithelized mucous membrane can pose the risk of local irritation and infection, urinary tract infection, and the possibility of nonself-resolved condition that eventually needs surgical correction. Only a few reported cases (n = 23) were found in current medical literatures. This lesion could be misdiagnosed as contact dermatitis, trauma, or even sexual abuse. Therefore, recognition of the congenital perineal groove at birth is important for the health care providers to deliver an appropriate parental counseling and appropriate follow-up. PMID:26929866

  14. [Factors related to perineal trauma in normal births in nulliparous].

    PubMed

    Scarabotto, Leila Barreto; Riesco, Maria Luiza Gonzalez

    2006-09-01

    Many studies have been undertaken with the purpose of contributing towards the prevention of perineal trauma in normal birth. The objective of this study was to relate height of the perineum, duration of the second stage of labor, variation of the position of the head detaching, kind of effort, presence of the umbilical cord around the babies' neck, birth weight and vulva's ardor to urinate with the occurrence of perineal laceration. The study was undertaken in 2003 at the Normal Birth Center of the Amparo Maternal, with a sample consisting of 67 women in labor without previous vaginal births. The results demonstrated that there were no significant statistical differences between the variables verified. PMID:17094323

  15. Perineal Groove: A Rare Congenital Midline Defect of Perineum.

    PubMed

    Harsono, Mimily; Pourcyrous, Massroor

    2016-03-01

    Perineal groove is a rare congenital malformation that is characterized by an exposed wet sulcus with nonkeratinized mucous membrane that extends from the posterior vaginal fourchette to the anterior ridge of the anal orifice. This condition is one of the uncommon anomalies of urogenital/anogenital region that is unknown to many clinicians. Although, this condition may be self-resolved before the age of 2 years, this nonepithelized mucous membrane can pose the risk of local irritation and infection, urinary tract infection, and the possibility of nonself-resolved condition that eventually needs surgical correction. Only a few reported cases (n = 23) were found in current medical literatures. This lesion could be misdiagnosed as contact dermatitis, trauma, or even sexual abuse. Therefore, recognition of the congenital perineal groove at birth is important for the health care providers to deliver an appropriate parental counseling and appropriate follow-up. PMID:26929866

  16. [Low colorectal anastomosis by the anterior perineal approach. 29 cases].

    PubMed

    Bricot, R; Le Treut, Y P; Kadji, C A; Bardot, J; Rodde, J M

    1985-12-14

    Using the combined abdominoperineal approach to the rectum through the recto-genital space, very low colo-rectal anastomosis can be performed without damaging the anal sphincter. Twenty-nine patients were operated upon by this procedure for malignant or benign disease of the lower two-thirds of the rectum: there was 2 failure; 6 patients developed transient perineal fistula; 27 patients now have normal anal continence. This technique has been considerably facilitated, notably in males, by stapled anastomosis. PMID:2934722

  17. Case for resurgence of radical perineal prostatecomy in Indian subcontinent

    PubMed Central

    Sood, Rajeev; Khattar, Nikhil; Nayyar, Rishi; Kathuria, Sachin; Narang, Vineet; Kaushal, Devashish

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Radical perineal prostatectomy was the first surgery described for prostatic carcinoma (Young, 1904) but it lost its eminent status after Walsh's description in 1982 of anatomic radical retropubic prostatectomy followed by the enthusiasm in laparoscopy and now robotics. It made resurgence after it was realized in early 1990s that the pelvic lymph node dissection is needed only in selected cases. Last decade witnessed over 80 publications addressing the results and advances in the perineal approach. Strangely, centres from the subcontinent have chosen to ignore this resurgence. We describe our early experience with the technique in 35 patients and present the case for its more widespread usage. Patients and Methods: Thirty five patients of clinically localized carcinoma prostate were operated by perineal route in our institution from December 2006 onwards. All patients had serum prostate specific antigen levels less than 10 ng/ml. Results: Operating time was 2 to 3.5 hours (mean 2.5 hours). Rectal injury occurred in three patients but was closed primarily in all and none required a colostomy. Mean duration of hospital stay was four days. The disease was organ confined in 25(71%). Positive margins were seen in 5(14%) patients. Biochemical recurrence occurred in 17% patients at one year. Seventy six percent patients had achieved continence at one year. Conclusions: As the world is taking note of radical perineal prostatectomy again, with a very small learning curve, minimal invasion and good oncological control urologists from Indian subcontinent should also embrace this procedure in view of the relative limited resources available. PMID:23449760

  18. ACOG Committee Opinion No. 647 Summary: Limitations of Perineal Lacerations as an Obstetric Quality Measure.

    PubMed

    2015-11-01

    Perineal lacerations are a common occurrence with vaginal delivery. Although perineal lacerations are tracked easily from coding data, there are a variety of problems with using rates of such tears as a quality measure. The rate of severe perineal lacerations should not be used as a measure of obstetric quality for the following three reasons: 1) third-degree and fourth-degree perineal lacerations may not be defined uniformly; 2) severe perineal lacerations are associated strongly with nonmodifiable risk factors; and 3) diminishing the use of operative vaginal delivery, in an effort to decrease severe perineal lacerations, likely would result in an increased rate of cesarean delivery. Measuring the rate of episiotomy with unassisted vaginal deliveries is an alternative candidate for quality measurement, but it requires validation before widespread implementation. PMID:26488520

  19. ACOG Committee Opinion No. 647: Limitations of Perineal Lacerations as an Obstetric Quality Measure.

    PubMed

    2015-11-01

    Perineal lacerations are a common occurrence with vaginal delivery. Although perineal lacerations are tracked easily from coding data, there are a variety of problems with using rates of such tears as a quality measure. The rate of severe perineal lacerations should not be used as a measure of obstetric quality for the following three reasons: 1) third-degree and fourth-degree perineal lacerations may not be defined uniformly; 2) severe perineal lacerations are associated strongly with nonmodifiable risk factors; and 3) diminishing the use of operative vaginal delivery, in an effort to decrease severe perineal lacerations, likely would result in an increased rate of cesarean delivery. Measuring the rate of episiotomy with unassisted vaginal deliveries is an alternative candidate for quality measurement, but it requires validation before widespread implementation. PMID:26488522

  20. Committee Opinion No. 647 Summary: Limitations of Perineal Lacerations as an Obstetric Quality Measure.

    PubMed

    2016-05-01

    Perineal lacerations are a common occurrence with vaginal delivery. Although perineal lacerations are tracked easily from coding data, there are a variety of problems with using rates of such tears as a quality measure. The rate of severe perineal lacerations should not be used as a measure of obstetric quality for the following three reasons: 1) third-degree and fourth-degree perineal lacerations may not be defined uniformly; 2) severe perineal lacerations are associated strongly with nonmodifiable risk factors; and 3) diminishing the use of operative vaginal delivery, in an effort to decrease severe perineal lacerations, likely would result in an increased rate of cesarean delivery. Measuring the rate of episiotomy with unassisted vaginal deliveries is an alternative candidate for quality measurement, but it requires validation before widespread implementation. PMID:27548419

  1. Committee Opinion No. 647: Limitations of Perineal Lacerations as an Obstetric Quality Measure.

    PubMed

    2016-05-01

    Perineal lacerations are a common occurrence with vaginal delivery. Although perineal lacerations are tracked easily from coding data, there are a variety of problems with using rates of such tears as a quality measure. The rate of severe perineal lacerations should not be used as a measure of obstetric quality for the following three reasons: 1) third-degree and fourth-degree perineal lacerations may not be defined uniformly; 2) severe perineal lacerations are associated strongly with nonmodifiable risk factors; and 3) diminishing the use of operative vaginal delivery, in an effort to decrease severe perineal lacerations, likely would result in an increased rate of cesarean delivery. Measuring the rate of episiotomy with unassisted vaginal deliveries is an alternative candidate for quality measurement, but it requires validation before widespread implementation. PMID:27548421

  2. Direct and reflex responses in perineal muscles on electrical stimulation.

    PubMed Central

    Vodusek, D B; Janko, M; Lokar, J

    1983-01-01

    Responses in the external anal and urethral sphincters as well as in the bulbocavernosus muscle have been evoked by supramaximal electrical stimulation of the penis (or clitoris), perineum and the peri-anal region and recorded electromyographically in 82 male subjects 5 to 73 years old and in nine female subjects 18 to 55 years old, who had no systemic diseases or demonstrable sacral nervous system lesion. On perineal stimulation (including the penis or clitoris) reflex responses with a typical latency of 33 ms and which exhibit no habituation were obtained in all muscles examined. Stimulation of the peri-anal region gave habituating reflex responses with a typical latency of 55 ms in all muscles examined. On perineal, and sometimes also peri-anal stimulation, stable short latency responses with typical latencies of 5 and 13 ms were recorded; both were considered to be direct responses. The different evoked muscle responses obtained by stimulation in the perineal and peri-anal region have to be distinguished when the bulbocavernosus and anal reflexes are recorded for evaluation of sacral nervous system lesions. PMID:6842203

  3. Patient awareness and acceptability of antenatal perineal massage.

    PubMed

    Ismail, S I M F; Emery, S J

    2013-11-01

    Antenatal perineal massage is recommended to reduce perineal trauma at the time of delivery. The practice has been shown to be acceptable to pregnant women taking part in research studies. The aim of this study was to establish its acceptability to pregnant women in day-to-day clinical practice, as well as their awareness of its technique. An anonymous self-construct questionnaire was given to mothers after their first delivery. A total of 113 questionnaires were returned over a 4-month period. With regard to acceptability, 61.4% of respondents indicated that the practice was acceptable, only 25.7% felt the practice was embarrassing and 56.7% were happy for their husband/partner to perform it for them. With respect to awareness, 37.2% of the respondents had heard about the practice, 9.7% knew it should be practised from 34 weeks onwards, 11.5% knew it should be maintained for 5-10 min and 30.1% knew it ought to be performed daily. This showed first time mothers' awareness of antenatal perineal massage to be low, despite the idea being acceptable to them, which calls for action to improve awareness and provide more instruction and encouragement to take up the practice. PMID:24219726

  4. Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms: Treatments

    MedlinePlus

    ... information Membership Directory (SIR login) Interventional Radiology Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms Interventional Radiologists Treat Abdominal Aneurysms Nonsurgically Interventional radiologists ...

  5. Extending the use of the gracilis muscle flap in perineal reconstruction surgery.

    PubMed

    Goldie, Stephen J; Almasharqah, Riyadh; Fogg, Quentin A; Anderson, William

    2016-08-01

    Reconstruction of the perineum is required following oncological resections. Plastic surgical techniques can be used to restore the aesthetics and function of the perineum. The gracilis myocutaneous flap provides a substantial skin paddle, with minimal donor site morbidity. The flap is pedicled on a perforator from the medial circumflex femoral artery, giving it limited reach across the perineum. Tunnelling the flap under the adductor longus muscle may free up more of the arterial pedicle, increasing its reach. On three female cadavers, bilateral gracilis flaps were raised in the standard surgical manner, giving six flaps in total. With the flaps pedicled across the perineum, the distance from the tip of each flap was measured to the anterior superior iliac spine (ASIS). The flaps were then tunnelled under the adductor longus muscle. The distances to the ASIS were measured again. The average pedicle length was greater than 7 cm. Tunnelling the flap under the adductor longus muscle increased the reach by more than 4 cm on average. Cadaveric dissection has shown that tunnelling of the flap in a novel way increase its reach across the perineum. This additional flexibility improves its use clinically and is of benefit to plastic surgeons operating in perineal reconstruction. PMID:27221783

  6. Major hepatic resection. A 25-year experience.

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, H H; Tompkins, R K; Longmire, W P

    1983-01-01

    Major hepatic resections were performed on 138 patients for a variety of conditions. There was one intraoperative death. Including this patient, there were 15 deaths within 30 days of the operation (operative mortality 10.9%). Important postoperative complications were intra-abdominal sepsis (17%), biliary leak (11%), hepatic failure (8%), and hemorrhage (6%). The results of 30 resections for the benign lesions, liver cell adenoma, focal nodular hyperplasia, hemangioma, and cystadenoma showed no operative mortality and low morbidity. Of 26 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma, seven died within a month of operation. The cumulative survival of the 26 at five years was 38%, and of the 19 who survived the procedure, 51%. Poor survival followed resections for cholangiocarcinoma and "mixed tumors." The five-year cumulative survival of 22 patients who had colorectal metastases excised was 31%. Apart from a patient with carcinoid, prolonged survival was rare after resection of other secondaries and after en bloc resections for tumors directly invading the liver. Hepatic resection was of value in the management of some patients with hepatic trauma, Caroli's disease, liver cysts, and intrahepatic stones. PMID:6299217

  7. Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery in the Treatment of Oncological Perineal and Genital Defects

    PubMed Central

    Brodbeck, Rebekka; Horch, Raymund E.; Arkudas, Andreas; Beier, Justus P.

    2015-01-01

    Defects of the perineum may result from ablative procedures of different malignancies. The evolution of more radical excisional surgery techniques resulted in an increase in large defects of the perineum. The perineogenital region per se has many different functions for urination, bowel evacuation, sexuality, and reproduction. Up-to-date individual and interdisciplinary surgical treatment concepts are necessary to provide optimum oncological as well as quality of life outcome. Not only the reconstructive method but also the timing of the reconstruction is crucial. In cases of postresectional exposition of e.g., pelvic or femoral vessels or intrapelvic and intra-abdominal organs, simultaneous flap procedure is mandatory. In particular, the reconstructive armamentarium of the plastic surgeon should include not only pedicled flaps but also free microsurgical flaps so that no compromise in terms of the extent of the oncological resection has to be accepted. For intra-abdominally and/or pelvic tumors of the rectum, the anus, or the female reproductive system, which were resected through an abdominally and a sacrally surgical access, simultaneous vertical rectus abdominis myocutaneous (VRAM) flap reconstruction is recommendable. In terms of soft tissue sarcoma of the pelvic/caudal abdomen/proximal thigh region, two-stage reconstructions are possible. This review focuses on the treatment of perineum, genitals, and pelvic floor defects after resection of malignant tumors, giving a distinct overview of the different types of defects faced in this region and describing a number of reconstructive techniques, especially VRAM flap and pedicled flaps like antero-lateral thigh flap or free flaps. Finally, this review outlines some considerations concerning timing of the different operative steps. PMID:26500887

  8. Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery in the Treatment of Oncological Perineal and Genital Defects.

    PubMed

    Brodbeck, Rebekka; Horch, Raymund E; Arkudas, Andreas; Beier, Justus P

    2015-01-01

    Defects of the perineum may result from ablative procedures of different malignancies. The evolution of more radical excisional surgery techniques resulted in an increase in large defects of the perineum. The perineogenital region per se has many different functions for urination, bowel evacuation, sexuality, and reproduction. Up-to-date individual and interdisciplinary surgical treatment concepts are necessary to provide optimum oncological as well as quality of life outcome. Not only the reconstructive method but also the timing of the reconstruction is crucial. In cases of postresectional exposition of e.g., pelvic or femoral vessels or intrapelvic and intra-abdominal organs, simultaneous flap procedure is mandatory. In particular, the reconstructive armamentarium of the plastic surgeon should include not only pedicled flaps but also free microsurgical flaps so that no compromise in terms of the extent of the oncological resection has to be accepted. For intra-abdominally and/or pelvic tumors of the rectum, the anus, or the female reproductive system, which were resected through an abdominally and a sacrally surgical access, simultaneous vertical rectus abdominis myocutaneous (VRAM) flap reconstruction is recommendable. In terms of soft tissue sarcoma of the pelvic/caudal abdomen/proximal thigh region, two-stage reconstructions are possible. This review focuses on the treatment of perineum, genitals, and pelvic floor defects after resection of malignant tumors, giving a distinct overview of the different types of defects faced in this region and describing a number of reconstructive techniques, especially VRAM flap and pedicled flaps like antero-lateral thigh flap or free flaps. Finally, this review outlines some considerations concerning timing of the different operative steps. PMID:26500887

  9. Laparoscopic duodenum-preserving pancreatic head resection

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jiayu; Zhou, Yucheng; Mou, Yiping; Xia, Tao; Xu, Xiaowu; Jin, Weiwei; Zhang, Renchao; Lu, Chao; Chen, Ronggao

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Solid pseudopapillary neoplasms (SPNs) of the pancreas are uncommon neoplasms and are potentially malignant. Complete resection is advised due to rare recurrence and metastasis. Duodenum-preserving pancreatic head resection (DPPHR) is indicated for SPNs located in the pancreatic head and is only performed using the open approach. To the best of our knowledge, there are no reports describing laparoscopic DPPHR (LDPPHR) for SPNs. Methods: Herein, we report a case of 41-year-old female presented with a 1-week history of epigastric abdominal discomfort, and founded an SPN of the pancreatic head by abdominal computed tomography/magnetic resonance, who was treated by radical LDPPHR without complications, such as pancreatic fistula and bile leakage. Histological examination of the resected specimen confirmed the diagnosis of SPN. Results: The patient was discharged 1 week after surgery following an uneventful postoperative period. She was followed up 3 months without readmission and local recurrence according to abdominal ultrasound. Conclusion: LDPPHR is a safe, feasible, and effective surgical procedure for SPNs. PMID:27512859

  10. Small bowel resection

    MedlinePlus

    Small intestine surgery; Bowel resection - small intestine; Resection of part of the small intestine; Enterectomy ... her hand inside your belly to feel the intestine or remove the diseased segment. Your belly is ...

  11. Internal hernia associated with colostomy after laparoscopic abdominoperineal resection.

    PubMed

    Yokota, Hajime; Hoshino, Isamu; Sugamoto, Yuji; Fukunaga, Toru; Fujimoto, Hajime; Matsubara, Hisahiro; Uno, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    We herein describe a case with an internal hernia that developed after laparoscopic abdominoperineal resection for rectal cancer. The small intestine passed through the space between the sigmoid colon loop of the stoma and the abdominal wall. Internal hernias associated with colostomy are rare; however, the condition is an important complication, because it causes ischemia in both the herniated intestine and the sigmoid colon pulled through the abdominal wall as a stoma. PMID:23601774

  12. Complications Following Carinal Resections and Sleeve Resections.

    PubMed

    Tapias, Luis F; Ott, Harald C; Mathisen, Douglas J

    2015-11-01

    Pulmonary resections with concomitant circumferential airway resection and resection and reconstruction of carina and main stem bronchi remain challenging operations in thoracic surgery. Anastomotic complications range from mucosal sloughing and formation of granulation tissue, anastomotic ischemia promoting scar formation and stricture, to anastomotic breakdown leading to bronchopleural or bronchovascular fistulae or complete dehiscence. Careful attention to patient selection and technical detail results in acceptable morbidity and mortality as well as good long-term survival. In this article, we focus on the technical details of the procedures, how to avoid complications and most importantly how to manage complications when they occur. PMID:26515944

  13. Anterior-only Partial Sacrectomy for en bloc Resection of Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Roldan, Hector; Perez-Orribo, Luis F.; Plata-Bello, Julio M.; Martin-Malagon, Antonio I.; Garcia-Marin, Victor M.

    2014-01-01

    Study Design Case report. Objective The usual procedure for partial sacrectomies in locally advanced rectal cancer combines a transabdominal and a posterior sacral route. The posterior approach is flawed with a high rate of complications, especially infections and wound-healing problems. Anterior-only approaches have indirectly been mentioned within long series of rectal cancer surgery. We describe a case of partial sacrectomy for en bloc resection of a locally advanced rectal cancer with invasion of the low sacrum through a combined transabdominal and perineal approach without any posterior incision. Methods Through a midline laparotomy, the tumor was dissected and the sacral osteotomy was performed. Once the sacrum was mobile, the muscular attachments to its posterior wall were cut through the perineal approach. This latter route was also used to remove the whole specimen. Results The postoperative period was uneventful in terms of infection and wound healing, but the patient developed right foot dorsiflexion paresis that completely disappeared in 1 month. Resection margins were negative. After a follow-up of 18 months, the patient has no local recurrence but presented lung and liver metastases. Conclusion In cases of rectal cancer involving the low sacrum, the combination of a transabdominal and a perineal route to carry out the partial sacrectomy is a feasible approach that avoids changes of surgical positioning and the morbidity related to posterior incisions. This strategy should be considered when deciding on undertaking partial sacrectomy in locally advanced rectal cancer. PMID:25396109

  14. Sacral perineural cyst presenting as chronic perineal pain: a case report.

    PubMed

    Jain, S K; Chopra, S; Bagaria, H; Mathur, P P S

    2002-12-01

    We present an interesting case of sacral perineural cyst which caused chronic perineal pain. Perineural cyst is relatively rare, especially the sacral region. Chronic perineural pain is an often encountered problem that is difficult to evaluate and sacral perineural cyst may be the etiology of chronic perineal pain in many instances. PMID:12577111

  15. A novel method to determine perineal artery occlusion among male bicyclists

    PubMed Central

    Hotaling, James M.; Kathrins, Martin; Baftiri, Amit P.; Freels, Sally; Niederberger, Craig S.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Perineal pressure due to bicycle riding has been associated with erectile dysfunction. We developed a novel method to measure the occlusive force exerted over the perineal arteries and determined perineal artery occlusion by a variety of seat designs. Methods. Doppler ultrasonography facilitated perineal artery localization and determination of the force required for perineal artery occlusion in 20 healthy men. Flexiforce® sensors were affixed over the proximal and distal aspects of the perineal arteries bilaterally. Individuals completed bicycle rides in the road- and stationary-settings with six distinct seat designs, including those with and without an anterior “nose.” Results. The occlusion time proportion of the total ride time was calculated for each trial. The overall occlusion time proportion was 0.59 (95% CI [0.45–0.73]) across all seats and settings. The “no-nose” bicycle seat and the stationary-setting demonstrated significantly lower occlusion proportion times than the traditional nose bicycle seat and road-setting, respectively. However, all bicycle seats yielded an occlusion time proportion of 0.41 or greater. Discussion. Our method of real-time, non-invasive force measurement localized to the perineal arteries may be used to validate future bicycle seat design. It also underscores the significant risk of perineal artery insufficiency in men who are avid bicyclists. This risk may be minimized by using newer “no-nose” bicycle seats. PMID:26713236

  16. A novel method to determine perineal artery occlusion among male bicyclists.

    PubMed

    Parthiban, Sujeeth; Hotaling, James M; Kathrins, Martin; Baftiri, Amit P; Freels, Sally; Niederberger, Craig S

    2015-01-01

    Background. Perineal pressure due to bicycle riding has been associated with erectile dysfunction. We developed a novel method to measure the occlusive force exerted over the perineal arteries and determined perineal artery occlusion by a variety of seat designs. Methods. Doppler ultrasonography facilitated perineal artery localization and determination of the force required for perineal artery occlusion in 20 healthy men. Flexiforce(®) sensors were affixed over the proximal and distal aspects of the perineal arteries bilaterally. Individuals completed bicycle rides in the road- and stationary-settings with six distinct seat designs, including those with and without an anterior "nose." Results. The occlusion time proportion of the total ride time was calculated for each trial. The overall occlusion time proportion was 0.59 (95% CI [0.45-0.73]) across all seats and settings. The "no-nose" bicycle seat and the stationary-setting demonstrated significantly lower occlusion proportion times than the traditional nose bicycle seat and road-setting, respectively. However, all bicycle seats yielded an occlusion time proportion of 0.41 or greater. Discussion. Our method of real-time, non-invasive force measurement localized to the perineal arteries may be used to validate future bicycle seat design. It also underscores the significant risk of perineal artery insufficiency in men who are avid bicyclists. This risk may be minimized by using newer "no-nose" bicycle seats. PMID:26713236

  17. Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA) Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) occurs when atherosclerosis ... aortic aneurysm treated? What is an abdominal aortic aneurysm? The aorta, the largest artery in the body, ...

  18. Abdominal CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... results may also be due to: Abdominal aortic aneurysm Abscesses Appendicitis Bowel wall thickening Retroperitoneal fibrosis Renal ... Livingstone; 2014:chap 4. Read More Abdominal aortic aneurysm Abdominal aortic aneurysm repair - open Abscess Acute cholecystitis ...

  19. The meaning of perineal activity to women: an inner sphinx.

    PubMed

    Burton, A

    1996-01-01

    This paper is an inquiry into the close association of anal and genital functions in women and the background and meaning of that association. Excerpts from the analyses of two women with sexual and intellectual inhibitions illustrate aspects of erotic life deriving from anal-phase development, and the unconscious fantasy of an inner, erotic, and powerful "organ." Along with the lifting of their inhibitions, both analysands achieved integration of anal-sadistic and incorporative wishes with vaginal receptivity. Female anatomy and physiology are so arranged that the action of perineal and sphincter musculature also stimulates the genital. This fosters overlapping mental representations of vagina and rectum which in turn affect body image and unconscious fantasy in women. The experience of perineal contraction acquires complex psychic meanings with both libidinal and aggressive charge. The libidinal aspect is the largely covert erotic sensation that informs the mental representation of the genital and is destined to be integrated into female sexuality. The aggressive component may present as an unconscious fantasy of possessing an inner, powerful, and dangerous organ--a focus for conflict between anal-sadistic wishes and early elements of the superego. PMID:9170065

  20. Perineal talc use and ovarian cancer: a critical review.

    PubMed

    Muscat, Joshua E; Huncharek, Michael S

    2008-04-01

    Talc, like asbestos, is a silicate that has been studied in relation to cancer risk. Several studies conducted over the past 25 years found an association between perineal talc powders and ovarian cancer. The summary relative risk is about 1.3 (95% confidence intervals 1.2-1.5) and these data have been interpreted as supporting a causal role. In this review article, we discuss the chemical and morphological features of talc and asbestos, and explain why despite their similar chemical classification talc does not possess asbestos-like carcinogenic properties. The heterogeneity in the perineal dusting studies has raised important concerns over the validity of the exposure measurements, and the lack of a consistent dose-response effect limits making causal inferences. Perhaps more importantly, whereas it is unknown whether external talc dust enters the female reproductive tract, measures of internal talc exposure such as talc-dusted diaphragms and latex condoms show no relationship with ovarian cancer risk. In addition, the therapeutic use of high dose cosmetic grade talc for pleurodesis has not been shown to cause cancer in patients receiving these treatment modalities. Talc is not genotoxic. Mechanistic, pathology and animal model studies have not found evidence for a carcinogenic effect. In summary, these data collectively do not indicate that cosmetic talc causes ovarian cancer. PMID:18287871

  1. Perineal Talc Use and Ovarian Cancer: A Critical Review

    PubMed Central

    Muscat, Joshua E.; Huncharek, Michael S.

    2013-01-01

    Talc, like asbestos, is a silicate that has been studied in relation to cancer risk. Several studies conducted over the past 25 years found an association between perineal talc powders and ovarian cancer. The summary relative risk is about 1.3 (95 percent confidence intervals 1.2–1.5) and these data have been interpreted as supporting a causal role. In this review article, we discuss the chemical and morphological features of talc and asbestos, and explain why despite their similar chemical classification talc does not possess asbestos like carcinogenic properties. The heterogeneity in the perineal dusting studies has raised important concerns over the validity of the exposure measurements, and the lack of a consistent dose-response effect limits making causal inferences. Perhaps more importantly, whereas it is unknown whether external talc dust enters the female reproductive tract, measures of internal talc exposure such as talc-dusted diaphragms and latex condoms show no relationship with ovarian cancer risk. In addition, the therapeutic use of high dose cosmetic grade talc for pleurodesis has not been shown to cause cancer in patients receiving these treatment modalities. Talc is not genotoxic. Mechanistic, pathology and animal model studies have not found evidence for a carcinogenic effect. In summary, these data collectively do not indicate that cosmetic talc causes ovarian cancer. PMID:18287871

  2. Adjustable perineal male sling using tissue expander as an effective treatment of post-prostatectomy urinary incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Balci, Melih; Tuncel, Altug; Bilgin, Ovunc; Aslan, Yilmaz; Atan, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To report our intermediate experience in treating patients with severe incontinence using an adjustable perineal male sling with a tissue expander. Materials and Methods An adjustable male sling procedure was performed on 21 patients with severe incontinence. The underlying etiology of urinary incontinence was radical prostatectomy in 13 patients, open prostatectomy in 5 patients and transurethral prostate resection in 3 patients. The difference between the classical and the adjustable sling is that in the latter there is a 25 mL tissue expander between the two layers of polypropylene mesh with an injection port. Adjustment of the sling was performed with saline via an inflation port, in case of recurrence or persistence of incontinence. Results The mean age of the patients was 66.2±7.3 (50-79) years and mean pad usage was 6.4±0.6 per day. The mean follow-up time was 40.1±23.2 (6-74) months. The balloon was postoperatively inflated on average with 11.6±5.7 (5-25) mL. After the mean 40.1 months of follow-up, 16 of the 21 patients (76.2%) were dry (11 patients, 0 pads; 5 patients using safety pads), 3 patients (14%) had mild and 2 (9.8%) had moderate degree post-prostatectomy urinary incontinence (PPI). The average maximum urine flow rate of the patients was 15.6±4.7 (10-31) mL/s. No residual urine was found. In 2 patients, all parts of the device were removed due to infection and discomfort, and in 3 patients only the inflation component was removed due to local scrotal infection. Conclusions Our results show that using an adjustable perineal male sling with a tissue expander seems to be an efficient, and safe surgical treatment option in patients with PPI. PMID:26005973

  3. Structure of the Perineal Membrane in Females: Gross and Microscopic Anatomy

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Tamara A.; DeLancey, John O.L.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To re-examine the anatomy of the perineal membrane and its anatomical relationships in whole-pelvis and histological serial section as well as gross anatomical dissection. METHODS Serial trichrome-stained histologic sections of 5 female pelvic specimens (0 to 37 years old) were examined. Specimens included the urethra, perineal membrane, vagina and surrounding structures. Macroscopic whole pelvis sections of 3 adults 28 to 56 years in axial, sagittal and coronal sections were also studied. Dissections of 6 female cadavers 48 to 90 years were also performed. RESULTS The perineal membrane is composed of 2 regions, one dorsal and one ventral. The dorsal portion consists of bilateral transverse fibrous sheets that attach the lateral wall of the vagina and perineal body to the ischiopubic ramus. This portion is devoid of striated muscle. The ventral portion is part of a solid 3-dimensional tissue mass in which several structures are embedded. It is intimately associated with the compressor urethrae and the urethrovaginal sphincter muscle of the distal urethra with the urethra and its surrounding connective. In this region the perineal membrane is continuous with the insertion of the arcus tendineus fascia pelvis. The levator ani muscles are connected with the cranial surface of the perineal membrane. The vestibular bulb and clitoral crus are fused with the membrane's caudal surface. CONCLUSION The structure of the perineal membrane is a complex 3-dimensional structure with two distinctly different dorsal and ventral regions; not a simple trilaminar sheet with perforating viscera. PMID:18310372

  4. Obstetric perineal injury: risk factors and prevalence in a resource-constrained setting.

    PubMed

    Naidoo, T D; Moodley, J

    2015-10-01

    The prevalence of obstetric perineal injuries and risk factors vary between affluent and resource-constrained settings. This prospective observational study reports on the factors associated with perineal lacerations in a cohort of Black African and Indian women delivering at two regional hospitals in South Africa. Binary logistic regression analysis was used to test for associations between independent variables and the dependent variable on multivariate analysis. All variables significant on bivariate analysis (P < 0.05) were included in the multivariate model. There were 202 (16.2%) perineal tears. Variables significant with having a perineal tear on bivariate and multivariate analysis included: Black African race (OR: 2.4; 95% CI: 1.2-4.6); duration of labour ≥6.3h (OR: 1.5; 95% CI: 1.1-2.1); and epidural analgesia (OR: 2.9; 95% CI: 1.9-4.7). Having an episiotomy was protective against perineal tears (OR: 0.06; 95% CI: 0.03-0.1). Obstetric perineal injury commonly occurs in our resourced-constrained setting and the risk factors are similar to those in well-resourced settings. Identification of those at risk may reduce obstetric perineal injury. PMID:26446187

  5. Reconstruction option of abdominal wounds with large tissue defects

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Abdominal wall defects result from trauma, abdominal wall tumors, necrotizing infections or complications of previous abdominal surgeries. Apart from cosmetics, abdominal wall defects have strong negative functional impact on the patients. Many different techniques exist for abdominal wall repair. Most problematic and troublesome are defects, where major part of abdominal wall had to be resected and tissue for transfer or reconstruction is absent. Case presentation Authors of the article present operative technique, in which reconstruction of abdominal wall was managed by composite polypropylene mesh with absorbable collagen film, creation of granulation tissue with use of NPWT (negative pressure wound therapy), and subsequent split skin grafting. Three patients with massive abdominal wall defect were successfully managed and abdominal wall reconstruction was performed by mentioned technique. Functional and cosmetic effect is acceptable and patients have good postoperative quality of life. Conclusions Patients with giant abdominal defects can benefit from described technique. It serves as the only option, with which abdominal wall is fully reconstructed without need for the secondary intervention. PMID:25103782

  6. Borderline resectable pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Hackert, Thilo; Ulrich, Alexis; Büchler, Markus W

    2016-06-01

    Surgery followed by adjuvant chemotherapy remains the only treatment option for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) with the chance of long-term survival. If a radical tumor resection is possible, 5-year survival rates of 20-25% can be achieved. Pancreatic surgery has significantly changed during the past years and resection approaches have been extended beyond standard procedures, including vascular and multivisceral resections. Consequently, borderline resectable pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (BR-PDAC), which has recently been defined by the International Study Group for Pancreatic Surgery (ISGPS), has become a controversial issue with regard to its management in terms of upfront resection vs. neoadjuvant treatment and sequential resection. Preoperative diagnostic accuracy to define resectability of PDAC is a keypoint in this context as well as the surgical and interdisciplinary expertise to perform advanced pancreatic surgery and manage complications. The present mini-review summarizes the current state of definition, management and outcome of BR-PDAC. Furthermore, the topic of ongoing and future studies on neoadjuvant treatment which is closely related to borderline resectability in PDAC is discussed. PMID:26970276

  7. Scroto-perineal hidradenitis suppurativa complicated by giant scrotal elephantiasis

    PubMed Central

    Alharbi, Badr; Shlash, Ahmed; Bedaiwi, Khaled; Hooti, Qais Al; Almohaisen, Abdulrahman; Shlash, Saud; Said, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Scrotal elephantiasis has been a recognized complication of inguinal node irradiation, filarial infection, tumor involvement and surgical lymphatic destruction, but has rarely been reported in association with hidradenitis suppurativa (HS). HS, also known as acne inversa, is a chronic and often debilitating disease primarily affecting the axillae, inframammary regions and perineum. The location of the lesions may lead to social embarrassment and failure to seek medical treatment. Scroto-preineal HS complicated by scrotal elephantiasis is a distressing disease. Excisional surgery with reconstruction is the recommended treatment with a high likelihood of good outcome. We present a 38-year-old male patient with long-standing scroto-perineal HS complicated by giant scrotal elephantiasis. PMID:25837812

  8. Effects of a Gentle, Self-Administered Stimulation of Perineal Skin for Nocturia in Elderly Women: A Randomized, Placebo-Controlled, Double-Blind Crossover Trial

    PubMed Central

    Iimura, Kaori; Watanabe, Nobuhiro; Masunaga, Koichi; Miyazaki, Shogo; Hotta, Harumi; Kim, Hunkyung; Hisajima, Tatsuya; Takahashi, Hidenori; Kasuya, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    Background Somatic afferent nerve stimuli are used for treating an overactive bladder (OAB), a major cause of nocturia in the elderly. Clinical evidence for this treatment is insufficient because of the lack of appropriate control stimuli. Recent studies on anesthetized animals show that gentle stimuli applied to perineal skin with a roller could inhibit micturition contractions depending on the roller’s surface material. We examined the efficacy of gentle skin stimuli for treating nocturia. Methods The study was a cross-over, placebo-controlled, double-blind randomized clinical study using two rollers with different effects on micturition contractions. Participants were elderly women (79–89 years) with nocturia. Active (soft elastomer roller) or placebo (hard polystyrene roller) stimuli were applied to perineal skin by participants for 1 min at bedtime. A 3-day baseline assessment period was followed by 3-day stimulation and 4-day resting periods, after which the participants were subjected to other stimuli for another 3 days. The primary outcome was change in the frequency of nighttime urination, for which charts were maintained during each 3-day period. Results Twenty-four participants were randomized, of which 22 completed all study protocols. One participant discontinued treatment because of an adverse event (abdominal discomfort). In participants with OAB (n = 9), change from baseline in the mean frequency of urination per night during the active stimuli period (mean ± standard deviation, −0.74 ± 0.7 times) was significantly greater than that during placebo stimuli periods (−0.15 ± 0.8 times [p < 0.05]). In contrast, this difference was not observed in participants without OAB (n = 13). Conclusions These results suggest that gentle perineal stimulation with an elastomer roller is effective for treating OAB-associated nocturia in elderly women. Here the limitation was a study period too short to assess changes in the quality of sleep and life. Trial

  9. A day in the life of a specialist perineal care clinic.

    PubMed

    Shore, Cheryl

    2015-01-01

    The specialist perineal care clinic has been running at Rotherham NHS Foundation Trust for over three years. This article tells of a quest to further improve perineal care for women in our care and demonstrates the process from conception to birth of the clinic, as well as the journey taken in order for this service to be set up and run efficiently. Prior to this clinic most women saw different people throughout their care, which was obviously confusing for them, as conflicting advice could be on offer. This clinic has provided consistency and continuity which has improved women's experiences and, in turn, yielded improved outcomes. It has empowered the women to further play a part in their own care from antenatal methods of reducing the chance of perineal trauma to postnatal recovery after perineal breakdown and infection. Both women and staff have benefited from this service as there is always a central point of contact. PMID:26336760

  10. Giant Perineal Leiomyoma: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Picon, Antonio I.

    2014-01-01

    We report the case of a 40-year-old woman who presented with a large perineal mass with no rectal or vaginal involvement. Imaging could not rule out malignancy. She underwent wide surgical excision. Histological analysis revealed a large atypical leiomyoma, measuring 24 × 12 × 8 cm. Followup after two years showed no recurrence and she has been asymptomatic since surgery. This is the largest perineal leiomyoma reported so far. PMID:24991446

  11. Tailgut Cyst and Perineal Hydatid Cyst: A Case Report with Multimodality Imaging Findings

    PubMed Central

    Alghofaily, Khalefa Ali

    2016-01-01

    A tailgut cyst is a rare developmental lesion and usually is located in the retrorectal or presacral space. Extrahepatic hydatid disease has been reported in several locations including the pelvis and it often poses a diagnostic challenge. There are very few reported cases of primary perineal hydatid cysts. We present the multimodality imaging findings of a tailgut cyst and concurrent perineal hydatid disease in a 32-year-old male patient.

  12. Prostate resection - minimally invasive

    MedlinePlus

    ... are: Erection problems (impotence) No symptom improvement Passing semen back into your bladder instead of out through ... Whelan JP, Goeree L. Systematic review and meta-analysis of transurethral resection of the prostate versus minimally ...

  13. Laparoscopic Colon Resection

    MedlinePlus

    ... inches to complete the procedure. What are the Advantages of Laparoscopic Colon Resection? Results may vary depending ... type of procedure and patient’s overall condition. Common advantages are: Less postoperative pain May shorten hospital stay ...

  14. Large bowel resection - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100089.htm Large bowel resection - Series To use the sharing features ... 6 out of 6 Normal anatomy Overview The large bowel [large intestine or the colon] is part ...

  15. [Large abdominal wall reconstruction by free flap after recurrence of a dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans].

    PubMed

    Le Fourn, B; Lejeune, F; Sartre, J Y; Loirat, Y; Pannier, M

    1996-12-01

    Based on a case of recurrence of a dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans of the abdominal wall, the authors discuss the need for initial wide resection of this type of skin tumour and the possibilities of repair of extensive full thickness defects of the abdominal wall by means of a latissimus dorsi myocutaneous free flap. PMID:9768175

  16. Anatomy of Hepatic Resectional Surgery.

    PubMed

    Lowe, Michael C; D'Angelica, Michael I

    2016-04-01

    Liver anatomy can be variable, and understanding of anatomic variations is crucial to performing hepatic resections, particularly parenchymal-sparing resections. Anatomic knowledge is a critical prerequisite for effective hepatic resection with minimal blood loss, parenchymal preservation, and optimal oncologic outcome. Each anatomic resection has pitfalls, about which the operating surgeon should be aware and comfortable managing intraoperatively. PMID:27017858

  17. Laparoscopic Liver Resections: A Feasibility Study in 30 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Cherqui, Daniel; Husson, Emmanuel; Hammoud, Renaud; Malassagne, Benoît; Stéphan, François; Bensaid, Said; Rotman, Nelly; Fagniez, Pierre-Louis

    2000-01-01

    Objective To assess the feasibility and safety of laparoscopic liver resections. Summary Background Data The use of the laparoscopic approach for liver resections has remained limited for technical reasons. Progress in laparoscopic procedures and the development of dedicated technology have made it possible to consider laparoscopic resection in selected patients. Methods A prospective study of laparoscopic liver resections was undertaken in patients with preoperative diagnoses including benign lesion, hepatocellular carcinoma with compensated cirrhosis, and metastasis of noncolorectal origin. Hepatic involvement had to be limited and located in the left or peripheral right segments (segments 2–6), and the tumor had to be 5 cm or smaller. Surgical technique included CO2 pneumoperitoneum and liver transection with a harmonic scalpel, with or without portal triad clamping or hepatic vein control. Portal pedicles and large hepatic veins were stapled. Resected specimens were placed in a bag and removed through a separate incision, without fragmentation. Results From May 1996 to December 1999, 30 of 159 (19%) liver resections were included. There were 18 benign lesions and 12 malignant tumors, including 8 hepatocellular carcinomas in cirrhotic patients. Mean tumor size was 4.25 cm. There were two conversions to laparotomy (6.6%). The resections included 1 left hepatectomy, 8 bisegmentectomies (2 and 3), 9 segmentectomies, and 11 atypical resections. Mean blood loss was 300 mL. Mean surgical time was 214 minutes. There were no deaths. Complications occurred in six patients (20%). Only one cirrhotic patient developed postoperative ascites. No port-site metastases were observed in patients with malignant disease. Conclusion Laparoscopic resections are feasible and safe in selected patients with left-sided and right-peripheral lesions requiring limited resection. Young patients with benign disease clearly benefit from avoiding a major abdominal incision, and cirrhotic

  18. Perineal Assessment and Repair Longitudinal Study (PEARLS): a matched-pair cluster randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Perineal trauma during childbirth affects millions of women worldwide every year. The aim of the Perineal Assessment and Repair Longitudinal Study (PEARLS) was to improve maternal clinical outcomes following childbirth through an enhanced cascaded multiprofessional training program to support implementation of evidence-based perineal management. Methods This was a pragmatic matched-pair cluster randomized controlled trial (RCT) that enrolled women (n = 3681) sustaining a second-degree perineal tear in one of 22 UK maternity units (clusters), organized in 11 matched pairs. Units in each matched pair were randomized to receive the training intervention either early (group A) or late (group B). Outcomes within each cluster were assessed prior to any training intervention (phase 1), and then after the training intervention was given to group A (phase 2) and group B (phase 3). Focusing on phase 2, the primary outcome was the percentage of women who had pain on sitting or walking at 10 to 12 days post-natal. Secondary outcomes included use of pain relief at 10 to 12 days post-natal, need for suture removal, uptake and duration of exclusive breastfeeding, and perineal wound infection. Practice-based measures included implementation of evidence into practice to promote effective clinical management of perineal trauma. Cluster-level paired t-tests were used to compare groups A and B. Results There was no significant difference between the clusters in phase 2 of the study in the average percentage of women reporting perineal pain on sitting and walking at 10 to 12 days (mean difference 0.7%; 95% CI −10.1% to 11.4%; P = 0.89). The intervention significantly improved overall use of evidence-based practice in the clinical management of perineal trauma. Following the training intervention, group A clusters had a significant reduction in mean percentages of women reporting perineal wound infections and of women needing sutures removed. Conclusion PEARLS is the first

  19. Abdominal aortic aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    ... to the abdomen, pelvis, and legs. An abdominal aortic aneurysm occurs when an area of the aorta becomes ... blood pressure Male gender Genetic factors An abdominal aortic aneurysm is most often seen in males over age ...

  20. Abdominal x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    ... More Abdominal aortic aneurysm Abdominal pain Acute cholecystitis Acute kidney failure Addison disease Adenomyosis Annular pancreas Aplastic anemia Appendicitis Ascariasis Atheroembolic renal disease Biliary atresia Blind loop syndrome Cholangitis Chronic ...

  1. Obesity May Be Protective against Severe Perineal Lacerations

    PubMed Central

    Garretto, Diana; Lin, Brian B.; Syn, Helen L.; Judge, Nancy; Beckerman, Karen; Atallah, Fouad; Friedman, Arnold; Brodman, Michael; Bernstein, Peter S.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To determine if there is an association between BMI and 3rd- or 4th-degree perineal lacerations in normal spontaneous and operative vaginal deliveries. Study Design. We performed a retrospective case control study using a large obstetric quality improvement database over a six-year period. Cases were identified as singleton gestations with third- and fourth-degree lacerations. Controls were obtained randomly from the database of patients without third- or fourth-degree lacerations in a 1 : 1 ratio. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed. Results. Of 32,607 deliveries, 22,011 (67.5%) charts with BMI documented were identified. Third- or fourth-degree lacerations occurred in 2.74% (n = 605) of patients. 37% (n = 223) were identified in operative vaginal deliveries. In the univariate analysis, obesity, older maternal age, non-Asian race, and birth weight <4000 g were all protective against 3rd- and 4th-degree lacerations. After controlling for age, race, mode of vaginal delivery, and birth weight, obesity remained significant. Conclusion. Being obese may protect against third- and fourth-degree lacerations independent of parity, race, birth weight, and mode of delivery. PMID:27274869

  2. Obesity May Be Protective against Severe Perineal Lacerations.

    PubMed

    Garretto, Diana; Lin, Brian B; Syn, Helen L; Judge, Nancy; Beckerman, Karen; Atallah, Fouad; Friedman, Arnold; Brodman, Michael; Bernstein, Peter S

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To determine if there is an association between BMI and 3rd- or 4th-degree perineal lacerations in normal spontaneous and operative vaginal deliveries. Study Design. We performed a retrospective case control study using a large obstetric quality improvement database over a six-year period. Cases were identified as singleton gestations with third- and fourth-degree lacerations. Controls were obtained randomly from the database of patients without third- or fourth-degree lacerations in a 1 : 1 ratio. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed. Results. Of 32,607 deliveries, 22,011 (67.5%) charts with BMI documented were identified. Third- or fourth-degree lacerations occurred in 2.74% (n = 605) of patients. 37% (n = 223) were identified in operative vaginal deliveries. In the univariate analysis, obesity, older maternal age, non-Asian race, and birth weight <4000 g were all protective against 3rd- and 4th-degree lacerations. After controlling for age, race, mode of vaginal delivery, and birth weight, obesity remained significant. Conclusion. Being obese may protect against third- and fourth-degree lacerations independent of parity, race, birth weight, and mode of delivery. PMID:27274869

  3. Living donor liver transplantation with abdominal wall reconstruction for hepatocellular carcinoma with needle track seeding

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Horng-Ren; Thorat, Ashok; Gesakis, Kanellos; Li, Ping-Chun; Kiranantawat, Kidakorn; Chen, Hung Chi; Jeng, Long-Bin

    2015-01-01

    Malignant cell seeding in subcutaneous tissues along the needle track and/or percutaneous biliary drainage catheters is rare complication, but pose various technical issues in planning surgical treatment of such patients. If underlying primary hepatic malignancy can be treated, an aggressive resection of subcutaneous tissue bearing cancer cell with subsequent abdominal wall reconstruction has been sporadically reported. But, when hepatic resection is not possible due to underlying advanced cirrhosis, liver transplantation along with abdominal wall resection and subsequent reconstruction remains only feasible option. Herein, we describe our successful experience of living donor liver transplantation for hepatocellular carcinoma with full-thickness abdominal wall resection bearing the tumor seeding followed by reconstruction in single stage surgery. PMID:26722665

  4. [Assessment of resectability of colorectal liver metastases and extended resection].

    PubMed

    Settmacher, U; Scheuerlein, H; Rauchfuss, F

    2014-01-01

    Most patients with colorectal liver metastases are treated within a multimodal therapy regime whereby liver resection is a key point in the curative treatment concept. The achievement of an R0 situation is of vital importance for long-term survival. Besides general operability and the assessment of comorbidities, resection depends on the quality of liver parenchyma (functional resectability) and the anatomical position of the tumor (oncological resectability). The improvement of operation techniques and perioperative medicine nowadays allow complex surgical procedures for metastasis surgery. This article presents the methods for the assessment of resectability and modern strategies of preoperative conditioning as well as approaches for extended liver resection. PMID:24317339

  5. Resection of cervical ependymoma.

    PubMed

    Lanzino, Giuseppe; Morales-Valero, Saul F; Krauss, William E; Campero, Mario; Marsh, W Richard

    2014-09-01

    Intramedullary ependymomas are surgically curable tumors. However, their surgical resection poses several challenges. In this intraoperative video we illustrate the main steps for the surgical resection of a cervical intramedullary ependymoma. These critical steps include: adequate exposure of the entire length of the tumor; use of the intraoperative ultrasound; identification of the posterior median sulcus and separation of the posterior columns; Identification of the plane between the spinal cord and the tumor; mobilization and debulking of the tumor and disconnection of the vascular supply (usually from small anterior spinal artery branches). Following these basic steps a complete resection can be safely achieved in many cases. The video can be found here: http://youtu.be/QMYXC_F4O4U. PMID:25175575

  6. Isolated abdominal wound recurrence after lymph-node dissection for appendiceal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Hironori; Ishimaru, Masahiro; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Yamashita, Hiroharu; Hatanaka, Kazuhito; Uekusa, Toshimasa; Nagawa, Hirokazu

    2010-01-01

    A 47-year-old man with acute abdominal pain in the right lower quadrant underwent an appendectomy via McBurney's incision. Postoperative histology revealed a moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma in the appendix that invaded the submucosa along with lymphatic involvement. Forty-three days later, an ileocecal resection with radical lymph node dissection was performed through a midline incision. Three of the 30 resected lymph nodes were found to have adenocarcinoma metastasis. Five years later, an isolated abdominal wall recurrence occurred within the wound scar of the midline incision. A complete excision of the tumor and the invaded portion of the ileum was performed. To date, the patient has been well, with no evidence of recurrence for 5 years since the resection. The mechanism of abdominal wound recurrence is considered the leakage of carcinoma cells from transected lymph vessels during lymph node dissection, followed by the implantation of these cells into the abdominal wound. PMID:19837396

  7. Abdominal Compartment Hypertension and Abdominal Compartment Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Maluso, Patrick; Olson, Jody; Sarani, Babak

    2016-04-01

    Intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH) and abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) are rare but potentially morbid diagnoses. Clinical index of suspicion for these disorders should be raised following massive resuscitation, abdominal wall reconstruction/injury, and in those with space-occupying disorders in the abdomen. Gold standard for diagnosis involves measurement of bladder pressure, with a pressure greater than 12 mm Hg being consistent with IAH and greater than 25 mm Hg being consistent with ACS. Decompressive laparotomy is definitive therapy but paracentesis can be equally therapeutic in properly selected patients. Left untreated, ACS can lead to multisystem organ failure and death. PMID:27016163

  8. Intra-abdominal pulmonary secuestration as an exceptional cause of abdominal mass in the adult☆

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-Sanz, C.; Herrero Bogajo, M.L.; Picazo-Yeste, J.; Morandeira Rivas, A.; Manzanera-Diaz, M.; Sedano-Vizcaino, C.

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Pulmonary sequestration (PS) is an extremely rare malformation defined as a portion of lung tissue isolated from the pulmonary system. PSs are classified into intralobar type and intra-abdominal PS that represents only 2.5% of cases. There are 20 cases of PS reported in adults and only two were managed by laparoscopic approach. We report a case of intra-abdominal PS mimicking a gastroesophageal duplication cyst in an adult. Besides its rarity, this is the first intra-abdominal PS in an adult managed by an anterior laparoscopic approach. PRESENTATION OF CASE A 60-year-old female patient had had epigastric and left upper quadrant pain for several days. Physical examination was normal. Image test were consistent with a gastroesophageal duplication. The patient was taken to the operating room for laparoscopic exploration and resection. The pathological diagnosis was extralobar pulmonary sequestration. DISCUSSION Less than 20 cases of PS have been reported in adults and only two cases were managed by a lateral laparoscopic approach. In contrast to these reports, we used an anterior approach due to the GEJ suspected origin of the mass. CONCLUSION Extralobar intra-abdominal PS is an extremely rare condition during adulthood but this diagnosis should be included in the differential diagnosis of a left-sided suprarenal mass. Due to the difficulty in achieving a definitive preoperative diagnosis, surgery is recommended. Laparoscopic resection is safe and effective but careful preoperative imaging studies are recommended in order to plan the most suitable approach. PMID:24091075

  9. Electromyography of the perineal striated muscles during cystometry.

    PubMed

    Vereecken, R L; Derluyn, J; Verduyn, H

    1975-01-01

    The electromyographic patterns of the external urethral sphincter, the anal sphincter, and the levator ani during cystometries have been analyzed. Synchronized activity changes occur during abdominal straining. Muscle fatigue is very pronounced. Activity may be less synchronized during bladder filling and micturition, even in normal cystometries. In neurogenic diseases, true dyssynergia between the striated muscles may be observed. PMID:1118953

  10. Incidence of and risk factors for perineal trauma: a prospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Our aim was to describe the range of perineal trauma in women with a singleton vaginal birth and estimate the effect of maternal and obstetric characteristics on the incidence of perineal tears. Methods We conducted a prospective observational study on all women with a planned singleton vaginal delivery between May and September 2006 in one obstetric unit, three freestanding midwifery-led units and home settings in South East England. Data on maternal and obstetric characteristics were collected prospectively and analysed using univariable and multivariable logistic regression. The outcome measures were incidence of perineal trauma, type of perineal trauma and whether it was sutured or not. Results The proportion of women with an intact perineum at delivery was 9.6% (125/1,302) in nulliparae, and 31.2% (453/1,452) in multiparae, with a higher incidence in the community (freestanding midwifery-led units and home settings). Multivariable analysis showed multiparity (OR 0.52; 95% CI: 0.30–0.90) was associated with reduced odds of obstetric anal sphincter injuries (OASIS), whilst forceps (OR 4.43; 95% CI: 2.02–9.71), longer duration of second stage of labour (OR 1.49; 95% CI: 1.13–1.98), and heavier birthweight (OR 1.001; 95% CI: 1.001–1.001), were associated with increased odds. Adjusted ORs for spontaneous perineal truama were: multiparity (OR 0.42; 95% CI: 0.32–0.56); hospital delivery (OR 1.48; 95% CI: 1.01–2.17); forceps delivery (OR 2.61; 95% CI: 1.22–5.56); longer duration of second stage labour (OR 1.45; 95% CI: 1.28–1.63); and heavier birthweight (OR 1.001; 95% CI: 1.000–1.001). Conclusions This large prospective study found no evidence for an association between many factors related to midwifery practice such as use of a birthing pool, digital perineal stretching in the second stage, hands off delivery technique, or maternal birth position with incidence of OASIS or spontaneous perineal trauma. We also found a low overall

  11. Abdominal Circulatory Interactions.

    PubMed

    Dagar, Gaurav; Taneja, Amit; Nanchal, Rahul S

    2016-04-01

    The abdominal compartment is separated from the thoracic compartment by the diaphragm. Under normal circumstances, a large portion of the venous return crosses the splanchnic and nonsplanchnic abdominal regions before entering the thorax and the right side of the heart. Mechanical ventilation may affect abdominal venous return independent of its interactions at the thoracic level. Changes in pressure in the intra-abdominal compartment may have important implications for organ function within the thorax, particularly if there is a sustained rise in intra-abdominal pressure. It is important to understand the consequences of abdominal pressure changes on respiratory and circulatory physiology. This article elucidates important abdominal-respiratory-circulatory interactions and their clinical effects. PMID:27016167

  12. Dual-port laparoscopic abdominoperineal resection using the intended stoma site as the multichannel port.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Takahisa; Homma, Shigenori; Shibasaki, Susumu; Yoshida, Tadashi; Minagawa, Nozomi; Kawamura, Hideki; Takahashi, Norihiko; Taketomi, Akinobu

    2015-12-01

    We describe a novel minimally invasive procedure: dual-port laparoscopic abdominoperineal resection using a SILS port, and report our experience of using this to treat ten patients with lower rectal cancer. A SILS port was placed in the left lower quadrant at the intended colostomy site. A 5-mm trocar was inserted at the umbilicus at the subsequent drain site. Via a standard laparoscopic medial-to-lateral approach, the inferior mesenteric artery and vein were ligated and total mesorectal excision was performed. Via a perineal approach, the specimen was retrieved from the perineal wound, and a sigmoid colostomy was created at the site of the SILS port. Ten consecutive patients with lower rectal cancer at clinical stage T3 or lower underwent the procedure at our institution. The procedure was completed successfully in all patients, without any intraoperative problems and all postoperative outcomes were satisfactory. Thus, dual-port laparoscopic abdominoperineal resection can be performed safely and feasibly in selected patients. PMID:26220049

  13. Simple resection of truncal desmoid tumors: A case series

    PubMed Central

    Nishida, Yoshihiro; Tsukushi, Satoshi; Urakawa, Hiroshi; Hamada, Shunsuke; Kozawa, Eiji; Ikuta, Kunihiro; Ishiguro, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    Desmoid tumors of the extra-abdominal and abdominal wall have been associated with morbidity due to the aggressive nature of the surgery and high recurrence rates. Surgery that does not cause functional impairment is desired for patients with desmoid tumors. In the present study, among patients with desmoid tumors who were prospectively and consecutively treated with identical conservative treatment with meloxicam, a selected patients of patients were treated with less invasive surgery than wide-resection. Out of 60 patients pathologically diagnosed with desmoid tumors, 9 patients with tumors refractory to conservative treatment and 4 patients who refused to receive this type of treatment were treated with planned simple resection. Subsequently, the clinical outcome of the patients and the mutational status of the catenin β-1 (CTNNB1) gene in the tumors were analyzed. The mean age of the 13 patients that underwent planned simple resection was 39 years, and the tumors were located in the abdominal wall in 6 cases, the chest wall in 4 cases and the neck in 3 cases. All excised specimens were evaluated and positive microscopic margins were identified; however, during the mean follow-up period of 30 months, 12/13 cases, 7 of which had T41A mutations and 5 of which had no mutations (wild-type), did not develop recurrence. Only 1 initial case with an S45F mutation in the CTNNB1 gene developed recurrence. The results of the present prospectively treated with simple resection and retrospectively analyzed study suggest that planned simple resection could serve as a therapeutic modality for extraperitoneal desmoid tumors, particularly truncal ones with a wild-type or T41A mutational status. PMID:27446472

  14. A case-control study of borderline ovarian tumors: the influence of perineal exposure to talc.

    PubMed

    Harlow, B L; Weiss, N S

    1989-08-01

    The authors interviewed 116 female residents of western Washington State with serous and mucinous borderline ovarian tumors diagnosed between 1980 and 1985 and questioned them on their use of hygienic powders. A sample of 158 control women from the same counties were identified through random digit dialing and were interviewed as well. Neither the perineal application of baby powder nor the perineal application of cornstarch was associated with an appreciably altered risk of borderline ovarian tumors. However, women who used deodorizing powders alone or in combination with other talc-containing powders had 2.8 times the risk (95% confidence interval 1.1-11.7) of women who had not had perineal exposure to powder. These results suggest that future studies of ovarian tumors in relation to the application of talc-containing powders should consider ascertaining the specific type(s) of powder used. PMID:2750733

  15. SUCCESSFUL DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT OF BILATERAL PERINEAL HERNIAS IN A SKUNK (MEPHITIS MEPHITIS).

    PubMed

    Summa, Noémie; Eshar, David; Reynolds, Debbie; Caines, Deanne; Singh, Ameet

    2015-09-01

    This brief communication describes the diagnosis and surgical treatment of bilateral perineal hernias in a 1-yr-old, intact female, striped skunk (Mephitis mephitis) that was evaluated for chronic intermittent constipation, following early age, bilateral anal sacculectomy for descenting. Complete blood count and biochemistry results were within the reference ranges. Diagnosis was based on history, physical exam, clinical signs, and diagnostic imaging. A two-stage surgical approach for treatment was performed. First, colopexy and cystopexy were performed via celiotomy, which was followed by unilateral perineal herniorrhaphy by using an internal obturator muscle flap augmented with porcine small intestinal submucosa biomaterial. Long-term resolution of clinical signs was achieved without evidence of recurrence. This is the first description of bilateral perineal hernia in a skunk following routine anal sacculectomy for descenting. PMID:26352963

  16. Anal avulsion caused by abdominal crush injury.

    PubMed

    Terrosu, G; Rossetto, A; Kocjancic, E; Rossitti, P; Bresadola, V

    2011-12-01

    We report the case of a pelvic and lower abdomen crushing trauma in 37-year-old male patient. The patient had an open lumbar wound, laceration of the psoas muscle, pelvic fracture, a ruptured urogenital diaphragm, and extensive urogenital lacerations. An emergency laparotomy was performed with debridment, urethral reconstruction, and osteosynthesis of the pubic bone. The mobilization of the patient revealed a deep gap, about 8 × 8 cm, in the perineum, with the anus and rectum displaced from their original site. Anal reimplantation was performed, suturing the median raphe, inserting two pelvic drainage tubes, and fashioning a loop transverse colostomy. Closed rectal traumas account for only 4-11% of all rectal traumas. Crushing of the pelvis causes a sudden reduction in its anteroposterior diameter and a corresponding increase in its latero-lateral diameter, together with an abrupt rise in intra-abdominal pressure. The anus is pushed out of the perineal plane due to the divarication of the levator muscles. As suggested in the literature, the standard treatment is wound debridement with immediate or deferred repair, fashioning a diversion colostomy, and repair of the rectum, wherever possible. PMID:21556880

  17. Women’s experiences following severe perineal trauma: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Literature reports that the psychological impact for women following severe perineal trauma is extensive and complex, however there is a paucity of research reporting on women’s experience and perspective of how they are cared for during this time. The aim of this study was to explore how women experience and make meaning of living with severe perineal trauma. Methods A qualitative interpretive approach using a feminist perspective guided data collection and analysis. Data were collected through semi-structured face to face interviews with twelve women in Sydney, Australia, who had experienced severe perineal trauma during vaginal birth. Thematic analysis was used to analyse the data. Results Three main themes were identified: The Abandoned Mother describes how women feel vulnerable, exposed and disempowered throughout the labour and birth, suturing, and postpartum period and how these feelings are a direct result of the actions of their health care providers. The Fractured Fairytale explores the disconnect between the expectations and reality of the birth experience and immediate postpartum period for women, and how this reality impacts upon their ability to mother their newborn child and the sexual relationship they have with their partner. A Completely Different Normal discusses the emotional pathway women travel as they work to rediscover and redefine a new sense of self following severe perineal trauma. Conclusion How women are cared for during their labour, birth and postnatal period has a direct impact on how they process, understand and rediscover a new sense of self following severe perineal trauma. Women who experience severe perineal trauma and associated postnatal morbidities undergo a transition as their maternal body boundaries shift, and the trauma to their perineum results in an extended physical opening whereby the internal becomes external, and that creates a continual shift between self and other. PMID:24559056

  18. Impact of Bacterial Vaginosis on Perineal Tears during Delivery: A Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Letouzey, Vincent; Bastide, Sophie; Ulrich, Daniela; Beccera, Laurie; Lomma, Mariella; de Tayrac, Renaud; Lavigne, Jean Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Objective Long term effects of perineal tears pose a major worldwide health issue for women during delivery. Since bacterial vaginosis is related to major obstacles in obstetrics the aim of this study was to determine the relationship between bacterial vaginosis and the occurrence of perineal tears during vaginal delivery. Methods Between June 2013 and December 2013 pregnant women delivering after 37 weeks were recruited at one University hospital / tertiary care referral center in the course of this single-center, prospective cohort study. Bacterial vaginosis was assessed according to Nugent score method. Logistic-regression model was used to estimate odds ratios, adjusted for other risk factors to test the relationship between bacterial vaginosis and the occurrence of 1st to 4th degree perineal tears in women undergoing vaginal delivery. Results A total of 728 woman were included, 662 analyzed with a complete Nugent Score of the vaginal swab. The prevalence of 1st to 4th degree perineal tears was 35.8% (95% Confidence Interval (95%CI) = [32.2; 39.6]). The presence of BV was not significantly associated to the incidence of perineal tears neither in the univariate analysis (crude Odds Ratio = 1.43; 95%CI = [0.79; 2.60]; p = 0.235) nor in the multivariate analysis (adjusted Odds Ratio = 1.65; 95%CI = [0.81; 3.36]; p = 0.167). Instrumental delivery was the most important risk factor for perineal lacerations. Conclusions There is no evidence that vaginosis is a risk factor for vaginal tears. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov N° NCT01822782 PMID:26544959

  19. Transsphincteric tumor resection in case of a pararectal solitary fibrous tumor

    PubMed Central

    Troja, Achim; El-Sourani, Nader; Antolovic, Dalibor; Raab, Hans Rudolf

    2015-01-01

    Transsphincteric resection of rectal tumors was first described about 120 years ago. Nowadays, this approach faded into obscurity due to standardized guidelines and practice in surgical oncology including lymphadenectomy, mesorectal excision and radical dissection of veins. However, transsphincteric resection seems reasonable in some cases, especially if an abdominal approach can be avoided. In the following, we will present and describe the technique of the transsphincteric approach with its variations in rectal surgery in the case of a rare pararectal tumor. PMID:26773876

  20. Perineal Pain Management with Cryotherapy after Vaginal Delivery: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Morais, Ítalo; Lemos, Andréa; Katz, Leila; Melo, Lorena Fernandes Rosendo de; Maciel, Mariano Maia; Amorim, Melania Maria Ramos de

    2016-07-01

    Introduction Systematic reviews that evaluate the perineal cryotherapy to reduce pain in the vaginal postpartum are inconclusive. Purpose To evaluate clinical effectiveness of cryotherapy in the management of humanized postpartum perineal pain and vaginal edema. Methods A double-bind randomized controlled clinical trial (UTN number: U1111-1131-8433) was conducted in a hospital in Northeastern, Brazil. Women were included following humanized childbirth. All had vaginal deliveries of a single, full-term pregnancy with cephalic presentation. Exclusion criteria included previous perineal lesion, episiotomy during the current delivery, instrumental delivery, uterine curettage and postpartum hemorrhage. In the experimental group, an ice pack was applied six times on the perineum for 20 minutes, reducing the temperature between 10 and 15 ° C, then 60 minutes without exposure to cold. In the non-cryotherapy, a water bag unable to reduce the temperature to this extent was used, compliance with the same application protocol of the first group. Perineal temperature was monitored at zero, 10 and 20 minutes for application in both groups. Evaluations were made immediately before and after the applications and 24 hours after delivery spontaneous, to determine the association between variables. Results A total of 80 women were included in the study, 40 in each group. There was no significant difference in scores of perineal pain and edema between the groups with or without cryotherapy until 24 hours after childbirth. There was no difference between groups when accomplished repeated measures analysis over the 24 hours after delivery, considering the median perineal pain (p = 0.3) and edema (p = 0.9). Perineal cryotherapy did not influence the amount of analgesics used (p = 0.07) and no adverse effect was registered. Conclusion The use of cryotherapy following normal vaginal delivery within the concept of humanized minimally interventionist childbirth had no

  1. Abdominal CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... tumors, including cancer Infections or injury Kidney stones Appendicitis ... also be due to: Abdominal aortic aneurysm Abscesses Appendicitis Bowel wall thickening Retroperitoneal fibrosis Renal artery stenosis ...

  2. Laparoscopic pancreatic resection.

    PubMed

    Harrell, K N; Kooby, D A

    2015-10-01

    Though initially slow to gain acceptance, the minimally invasive approach to pancreatic resection grew during the last decade and pancreatic operations such as the distal pancreatectomy and pancreatic enucleation are frequently performed laparoscopically. More complex operations such as the pancreaticoduodenectomy may also confer benefits with a minimally invasive approach but are less widely utilized. Though most research to date comparing open and laparoscopic pancreatectomy is retrospective, the current data suggest that compared with open, a laparoscopic procedure may afford postoperative benefits such as less blood loss, shorter hospital stay, and fewer wound complications. Regarding oncologic considerations, despite initial concerns, laparoscopic resection appears to be non-inferior to an open procedure in terms of lymph node retrieval, negative margin rates, and long-term survival. New technologies, such as robotics, are also gaining acceptance. Data show that while the laparoscopic approach incurs higher cost in the operating room, the resulting shorter hospital stay appears to be associated with an equivalent or lower overall cost. The minimally invasive approach to pancreatic resection can be safe and appropriate with significant patient benefits and oncologic non-inferiority based on existing data. PMID:26199025

  3. Abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Keisler, Brian; Carter, Chuck

    2015-04-15

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm refers to abdominal aortic dilation of 3.0 cm or greater. The main risk factors are age older than 65 years, male sex, and smoking history. Other risk factors include a family history of abdominal aortic aneurysm, coronary artery disease, hypertension, peripheral artery disease, and previous myocardial infarction. Diagnosis may be made by physical examination, an incidental finding on imaging, or ultrasonography. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force released updated recommendations for abdominal aortic aneurysm screening in 2014. Men 65 to 75 years of age with a history of smoking should undergo one-time screening with ultrasonography based on evidence that screening will improve abdominal aortic aneurysm-related mortality in this population. Men in this age group without a history of smoking may benefit if they have other risk factors (e.g., family history of abdominal aortic aneurysm, other vascular aneurysms, coronary artery disease). There is inconclusive evidence to recommend screening for abdominal aortic aneurysm in women 65 to 75 years of age with a smoking history. Women without a smoking history should not undergo screening because the harms likely outweigh the benefits. Persons who have a stable abdominal aortic aneurysm should undergo regular surveillance or operative intervention depending on aneurysm size. Surgical intervention by open or endovascular repair is the primary option and is typically reserved for aneurysms 5.5 cm in diameter or greater. There are limited options for medical treatment beyond risk factor modification. Ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm is a medical emergency presenting with hypotension, shooting abdominal or back pain, and a pulsatile abdominal mass. It is associated with high prehospitalization mortality. Emergent surgical intervention is indicated for a rupture but has a high operative mortality rate. PMID:25884861

  4. Radicality of Resection and Survival After Multimodality Treatment is Influenced by Subsite of Locally Recurrent Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kusters, Miranda; Dresen, Raphaela C.; Martijn, Hendrik; Nieuwenhuijzen, Grard A.; Velde, Cornelis J.H. van de; Berg, Hetty A. van den; Beets-Tan, Regina G.H.; Rutten, Harm J.T.

    2009-12-01

    Purpose: To analyze results of multimodality treatment in relation to subsite of locally recurrent rectal cancer (LRRC). Method and Materials: A total of 170 patients with LRRC who underwent treatment between 1994 and 2008 were studied. The basic principle of multimodality treatment was preoperative (chemo)radiotherapy, intended radical surgery, and intraoperative radiotherapy. The subsites of LRRC were classified as presacral, posterolateral, (antero)lateral, anterior, anastomotic, or perineal. Subsites were related to radicality of the resection, local re-recurrence rate, distant metastasis rate, and cancer-specific survival. Results: R0 resections were achieved in 54% of the patients, and 5-year cancer-specific survival was 40.5%. The worst outcomes were seen in presacral LRRC, with only 28% complete resections and 19% 5-year survival (p = 0.03 vs. other subsites). Anastomotic LRRC resulted in the most favorable outcomes, with 77% R0 resections and 60% 5-year survival (p = 0.04). Generally, if a complete resection was achieved, survival improved, except in posterolateral LRRC. Local re-recurrence and metastasis rate were lowest in anastomotic LRRC. Conclusions: Classification of the subsite of LRRC is a predictor of potentially resectable and consequently curable disease. Treatment of posterior LRRC imposes poor results, whereas anastomotic LRRC location shows superior results.

  5. [Abdominal pregnancy, institutional experience].

    PubMed

    Bonfante Ramírez, E; Bolaños Ancona, R; Simón Pereyra, L; Juárez García, L; García-Benitez, C Q

    1998-07-01

    Abdominal pregnancy is a rare entity, which has been classified as primary or secondary by Studiford criteria. A retrospective study, between January 1989 and December 1994, realized at Instituto Nacional de Perinatología, found 35,080 pregnancies, from which 149 happened to be ectopic, and 6 of them were abdominal. All patients belonged to a low income society class, age between 24 and 35 years, and average of gestations in 2.6. Gestational age varied from 15 weeks to 32.2 weeks having only one delivery at term with satisfactory postnatal evolution. One patient had a recurrent abdominal pregnancy, with genital Tb as a conditional factor. Time of hospitalization varied from 4 to 5 days, and no further patient complications were reported. Fetal loss was estimated in 83.4%. Abdominal pregnancy is often the sequence of a tubarian ectopic pregnancy an when present, it has a very high maternal mortality reported in world literature, not found in this study. The stated frequency of abdominal pregnancy is from 1 of each 3372, up to 1 in every 10,200 deliveries, reporting in the study 1 abdominal pregnancy in 5846 deliveries. The study had two characteristic entities one, the recurrence and two, the delivery at term of one newborn. Abdominal pregnancy accounts for 4% of all ectopic pregnancies. Clinical findings in abdominal pregnancies are pain, transvaginal bleeding and amenorrea, being the cardinal signs of ectopic pregnancy. PMID:9737070

  6. Recurrent Abdominal Pain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banez, Gerard A.; Gallagher, Heather M.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide an empirically informed but clinically oriented overview of behavioral treatment of recurrent abdominal pain. The epidemiology and scope of recurrent abdominal pain are presented. Referral process and procedures are discussed, and standardized approaches to assessment are summarized. Treatment protocols…

  7. Perineal body anatomy in living women: 3-D analysis using thin-slice magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Kindra A.; Yousuf, Aisha; Lewicky-Gaupp, Christina; Fenner, Dee E.; DeLancey, John O.L.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To describe a framework for visualizing the perineal body's complex anatomy using thin-slice MR imaging. Study Design Two mm-thick MR images were acquired in 11 women with normal pelvic support and no incontinence/prolapse symptoms. Anatomic structures were analyzed in axial, sagittal and coronal slices. 3-D models were generated from these images. Results Three distinct perineal body regions are visible on MRI: (1) a superficial region at the level of the vestibular bulb, (2) a mid region at the proximal end of the superficial transverse perineal muscle, and (3) a deep region at the level of the midurethra and puborectalis muscle. Structures are best visualized on axial scans while cranio-caudal relationships are appreciated on sagittal scans. The 3-D model further clarifies inter-relationships. Conclusion Advances in MR technology allow visualization of perineal body anatomy in living women and development of 3D models which enhance our understanding of its three different regions: superficial, mid and deep. PMID:21055513

  8. Perineal urethrostomy stenosis repair with buccal mucosa: description of technique and report of four cases.

    PubMed

    Kamat, Nagesh

    2008-11-01

    Perineal urethrostomy stenosis can be a difficult problem to treat, especially in patients with balanitis xerotica obliterans. We have devised a technique of using the buccal mucosa, with the idea of forming a composite stoma comprising skin and buccal mucosa. We describe the technique and short-term results in 4 patients. PMID:18789512

  9. Extended resections for thymic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Wright, Cameron D

    2010-10-01

    Almost all series reporting on the results of resection in thymic tumors indicate that the performance of a complete resection is probably the most important prognostic factor. This issue is not a factor in Masaoka stage I and II tumors that are almost always easily completely resected and have an excellent prognosis. Masaoka stage III tumors that invade the pericardium, lungs, or great vessels have relatively higher incomplete resection rates, significantly higher recurrence rates, and thus a worse prognosis. There are several small reports on the efficacy of resection of the great veins when involved by a thymic malignancy with low morbidity and meaningful long-term survival. Superior vena cava reconstruction is commonly performed by a polytetrafluroethylene, venous, or pericardial graft. These cases can usually be identified preoperatively and, thus, considered for induction therapy. Because these types of cases are almost always of marginal respectability in terms of obtaining a true en bloc resection, there is an increasing enthusiasm for offering induction therapy in an effort to enhance resectability. Preliminary results suggest increased R0 resection rates and improved survival with induction therapy for locally advanced tumors. The optimal induction treatment is unknown. The ultimate extended surgery for advanced thymic tumors is an extrapleural pneumonectomy performed for extensive pleural disease (Masaoka stage IVA). These rarely performed operations are done for IVA disease found at initial presentation and for recurrent disease as a salvage procedure. Again these advanced patients are probably best managed by induction chemotherapy followed by resection. PMID:20859130

  10. Image-Guided Abdominal Surgery and Therapy Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Galloway, Robert L.; Herrell, S. Duke; Miga, Michael I.

    2013-01-01

    Image-Guided Surgery has become the standard of care in intracranial neurosurgery providing more exact resections while minimizing damage to healthy tissue. Moving that process to abdominal organs presents additional challenges in the form of image segmentation, image to physical space registration, organ motion and deformation. In this paper, we present methodologies and results for addressing these challenges in two specific organs: the liver and the kidney. PMID:25077012

  11. Jejunal choristoma: a very rare cause of abdominal pain in children.

    PubMed

    Olajide, T A; Agodirin, S O; Ojewola, R W; Akanbi, O O; Solaja, T O; Odesanya, Johnson Oluremi; Ariyibi, O O

    2014-01-01

    Choristoma is development of a normal tissue in an aberrant location. This report describes jejunal salivary choristoma (JSC) causing recurring episodes of abdominal discomfort in a 5-year-old girl. Exploratory laporatomy revealed a pale yellow subserosal jejunal lesion. Wedge resection of the lesion and repair of the bowel were performed. The child did well postoperatively and has since that time been free of pain at follow-up. Histopathological examination of the resected lesion revealed salivary gland choriostoma. Literature review (PUBMED search engine) revealed no previous report of this rare clinicopathologic entity. We conclude that choriostoma should be considered a possible differential when evaluating abdominal complaint in children. PMID:24511408

  12. Abdominal ultrasound (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Abdominal ultrasound is a scanning technique used to image the interior of the abdomen. Like the X- ... use high frequency sound waves to produce an image and do not expose the individual to radiation. ...

  13. Abdominal ultrasound (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Abdominal ultrasound is a scanning technique used to image the interior of the abdomen. Like the X-ray, MRI, ... it has its place as a diagnostic tool. Ultrasound scans use high frequency sound waves to produce ...

  14. Abdominal exploration - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... surgical exploration of the abdomen, also called an exploratory laparotomy, may be recommended when there is abdominal ... blunt trauma"). Diseases that may be discovered by exploratory laparotomy include: inflammation of the appendix (acute appendicitis) ...

  15. Abdominal aortic aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    ... main blood vessel that supplies blood to the abdomen, pelvis, and legs. An abdominal aortic aneurysm occurs ... dissection). Symptoms of rupture include: Pain in the abdomen or back. The pain may be severe, sudden, ...

  16. Abdominal x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    An abdominal x-ray is an imaging test to look at organs and structures in the abdomen. Organs include the spleen, stomach, and intestines. When the test is done to look at the bladder and kidney structures, ...

  17. Abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Setacci, Francesco; Galzerano, Giuseppe; De Donato, Gianmarco; Benevento, Domenico; Guerrieri, Massimiliano W; Ruzzi, Umberto; Borrelli, Maria P; Setacci, Carlo

    2016-02-01

    Endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms has become a milestone in the treatment of patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm. Technological improvement allows treatment in more and more complex cases. This review summarizes all grafts available on the market. A complete review of most important trial on this topic is provided to the best of our knowledge, and technical tips and tricks for standard cases are also included. PMID:26771730

  18. Perineal Injury During Childbirth Increases Risk of Postpartum Depressive Symptoms and Inflammatory Markers

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, Alexis B.; Paul, Sudeshna; Ware, Laurel Z.; Corwin, Elizabeth J.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Perineal lacerations during childbirth affect more than 65% of women in the United States. Little attention has been given to the long-term biologic consequences associated with perineal lacerations or possible associations with postpartum mental health. In this article we describe the results of a study that explored inflammatory pathways in women who reported perineal lacerations during childbirth and the relationship with stress and depressive symptoms during the first six months postpartum. Methods A repeated measures design was used to explore the relationship between varying degrees of perineal lacerations, inflammatory cytokines, postpartum stress, and depressive symptoms in 153 women over six months. Depressive symptoms were measured using the Edinburg Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) and maternal stress via the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS). Plasma was analyzed for pro (TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β, IFN-γ) and anti-inflammatory (IL-10) cytokines. Levels of cytokines were compared between women with or without varying degrees of injury. Results A relationship was identified between symptoms of depression and a 2nd degree or more severe perineal laceration starting at 1 month postpartum (P=0.04) and continuing through 3 months (P=0.03). Similarly, stress symptoms were higher at 3 months postpartum (P=0.02). Markers of inflammation were significantly higher among this group with IL-6 increased at 2 weeks postpartum (P=0.02), and remaining elevated through 2 months postpartum (P=0.003); there were also significant differences in pro to anti-inflammatory cytokine ratios out to 6 months postpartum. Regression analysis indicated that 2nd degree or more severe lacerations accounted for 5.9% of the variance in EPDS score at one month postpartum (P=0.024, F=2.865, t=2.127), increasing substantially when the 1-month stress score was included as well. Discussion This study suggests that perineal lacerations, inflammation, stress, and depressed mood are

  19. Evaluation of data from 35 dogs pertaining to dehiscence following intestinal resection and anastomosis.

    PubMed

    Mouat, Emily E; Davis, Garrett J; Drobatz, Kenneth J; Wallace, Koranda A

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate blood and abdominal fluid lactate and glucose, fluid cytology, culture, and volume 24 and 48 hr following intestinal resection and anastomosis in dogs with and without closed-suction drains and to correlate findings with survival. Thirty-five client-owned dogs that underwent intestinal resection and anastomosis were prospectively enrolled in the study. Abdominal fluid was submitted for culture at surgery and again 24 hr postoperatively. Twenty-four and 48 hr postoperatively, blood and abdominal fluid glucose and lactate were measured and fluid was submitted for cytology. Abdominal fluid was collected either from a closed-suction drain or by abdominocentesis. Patients were followed either for 14 days or until death. Comparisons were made based on development of dehiscence and presence or absence of a drain. Patients with dehiscence were more likely to have positive cultures at 24 hr and to have had more bowel resected. Surviving patients without drains had significantly smaller differences in blood and fluid glucose and lactate both 24 and 48 hr postoperatively than surviving patients with drains. The significant differences identified between patients with and without drains suggests a need for further research into the effect of drains on abdominal fluid values. PMID:24855087

  20. [Two Cases of Caudal Alcohol Block for Perineal Pain that Occurred in Cancer End-of-Life].

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Masahiro; Takahara, Hiroshi; Wakabayashi, Takanobu

    2016-06-01

    We experienced two cases of end-of-life cancer patients with perineal pain, whose pain was relieved by 5 ml absolute ethanol caudal block. Although the first injection was ineffective, the second injection resulted in significant relief of pain in both cases. Although the indication should be carefully considered, alcohol caudal block is an analgesic method worth considering for the end-of-life cancer patients complaining of perineal pain. PMID:27483665

  1. [LAPAROSCOPIC APPROACH AND SURGICAL CONSIDERATIONS IN RESECTION OF A LARGE EPIPHRENIC ESOPHAGEAL DIVERTICULUM].

    PubMed

    Rudnicki, Yaron; Inbar, Roy; Barkay, Olga; Shpitz, Baruch; Ghinea, Ronen; Avital, Shmuel

    2015-08-01

    Epiphrenic diverticulum of the esophagus is an uncommon finding. Small diverticula are usually asymptomatic in nature. Large diverticula may present with dysphagia, chest or upper abdominal discomfort, vomiting, irritating cough or halitosis. There are a few different surgical approaches to epiphrenic diverticulum resection. It can be performed with an abdominal or a thoracic approach and in an open or a laparoscopic manner. In this case report we present a 70 years old male patient with a giant epiphrenic diverticulum and dysphagia. The patient was operated upon via a laparoscopic abdominal approach with intra-operative endoscopic assistance and underwent a diverticulum resection. We present a review of the different kinds of esophageal diverticula, the mechanism of their formation, and the surgical considerations associated with choosing the appropriate surgical approach. PMID:26480613

  2. Endoscopic resection of subepithelial tumors

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Arthur; Bauder, Markus; Riecken, Bettina; Caca, Karel

    2014-01-01

    Management of subepithelial tumors (SETs) remains challenging. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) has improved differential diagnosis of these tumors but a definitive diagnosis on EUS findings alone can be achieved in the minority of cases. Complete endoscopic resection may provide a reasonable approach for tissue acquisition and may also be therapeutic in case of malignant lesions. Small SET restricted to the submucosa can be removed with established basic resection techniques. However, resection of SET arising from deeper layers of the gastrointestinal wall requires advanced endoscopic methods and harbours the risk of perforation. Innovative techniques such as submucosal tunneling and full thickness resection have expanded the frontiers of endoscopic therapy in the past years. This review will give an overview about endoscopic resection techniques of SET with a focus on novel methods. PMID:25512768

  3. Feasibility of laparoscopic liver resection for giant hemangioma of greater than 6 cm in diameter

    PubMed Central

    Kim, In Sung

    2014-01-01

    Backgrounds/Aims Liver hemangioma, the most common benign liver tumor, can be safely managed by clinical observation. However, surgical treatment should be considered in a subset of patients with giant hemangioma with abdominal symptoms. We reviewed the feasibility of total laparoscopic liver resection for giant hemangioma of >6 cm in diameter. Methods Nine consecutive patients who underwent total laparoscopic liver resection for giant hemangioma between August 2008 to December 2012 were included in this study. Medical records were retrospectively reviewed for demographic data, laboratory findings, and perioperative results. Results The median age of patients was 36 yrs (range, 31-63). Eight females and 1 male were included in the study. The median size of hemangioma was 11 cm in diameter (range, 6-18) and 5 patients had a hemangioma >10 cm. Indications for surgical treatments were abdominal symptoms in 4 patients, increased size in 5 patients, and uncertain diagnosis in 1 patient. The median operation time was 522 minutes for right hepatectomy, 220 minutes for left lateral sectionectomy, and 90 minutes for wedge resection. The median estimated blood loss was 400 ml (range, 50-900). There was no postoperative morbidity, including Clanvien-Dindo grade I. Conclusions The resection of giant hemangioma demands meticulous surgical technique due to high vascularity and the concomitant risk of intraoperative hemorrhage. Laparoscopic liver resection is feasible with minimal operative complication. Therefore, laparoscopic liver resection can be considered as an option for surgical treatment for giant hemangioma. PMID:26155263

  4. Giant adrenal hemangioma: Unusual cause of huge abdominal mass

    PubMed Central

    Tarchouli, Mohamed; Boudhas, Adil; Ratbi, Moulay Brahim; Essarghini, Mohamed; Njoumi, Noureddine; Sair, Khalid; Zentar, Aziz

    2015-01-01

    Adrenal hemangioma is an extremely rare benign and non-functioning neoplasm of the adrenal gland. We report a case of a 71-year-old woman admitted for intermittent abdominal pain and abdominal distension associated with vomiting and chronic constipation for 5 years. Physical examination revealed a large abdominal mass. Both computed tomography scan and magnetic resonance imaging suggested hemangioma in the right lobe of the liver. Laboratory examinations and tumour markers were within normal limits, except for hypochromic microcytic anemia. The mass was removed intact by conventional surgery and histopathology revealed a cavernous hemangioma of the adrenal gland with no signs of malignancy. Surgical resection was curative, with no recurrence at the 2-year follow-up. PMID:26600897

  5. Open pelvic fracture associated with lumbosacral dislocation and extensive perineal injury.

    PubMed

    Rizzi, Luigi; Castelli, Claudio

    2015-12-01

    Open pelvic fractures are caused by high-energy trauma. Injuries to other organs are common and the mortality rate can be as high as 50%. Perineal injury is reported in 5% of open pelvic fractures. We report a case of a 31-year-old man that had an open pelvic injury with Denis zone III fracture of the sacrum, lumbosacral dislocation, symphysis dislocation, bilateral pubic rami fractures and an extensile perineal wound. He underwent an early diverting colostomy in order to prevent pelvic sepsis and subsequent stage reconstruction of the pelvic ring. At a 4-year follow-up a full recovery was present. The aim of this paper is to underline the importance of a safe, approach to manage open pelvic fractures. PMID:26738461

  6. Use of canine small intestinal submucosa allograft for treating perineal hernias in two dogs

    PubMed Central

    Lee, A-Jin; Chung, Wook-Hun; Kim, Dae-Hyun; Lee, Kyung-Pil; Suh, Hyun Jung; Do, Sun Hee; Eom, Ki-dong

    2012-01-01

    Here, we describe two dogs in which canine small intestinal submucosa (SIS) was implanted as a biomaterial scaffold during perineal herniorrhaphy. Both dogs had developed severe muscle weakness, unilaterally herniated rectal protrusions, and heart problems with potential anesthetic risks. Areas affected by the perineal hernia (PH) located between the internal obturator and external anal sphincter muscles were reconstructed with naïve canine SIS sheets. In 12 months, post-operative complications such as wound infections, sciatic paralysis, rectal prolapse, or recurrence of the hernia were not observed. Symptoms of defecatory tenesmus also improved. Neither case showed any signs of rejection or specific immune responses as determined by complete and differential cell counts. Our findings demonstrate that canine SIS can be used as a biomaterial scaffold for PH repair in dogs. PMID:23000591

  7. Pancreatic and multiorgan resection with inferior vena cava reconstruction for retroperitoneal leiomyosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Stauffer, John A; Fakhre, G Peter; Dougherty, Marjorie K; Nakhleh, Raouf E; Maples, William J; Nguyen, Justin H

    2009-01-01

    Background Inferior vena cava (IVC) leiomyosarcoma is a rare tumor of smooth muscle origin. It is often large by the time of diagnosis and may involve adjacent organs. A margin-free resection may be curative, but the resection must involve the tumor en bloc with the affected segment of vena cava and locally involved organs. IVC resection often requires vascular reconstruction, which can be done with prosthetic graft. Case presentation We describe a 39-year-old man with an IVC leiomyosarcoma that involved the adrenal gland, distal pancreas, and blood supply to the spleen and left kidney. Tumor excision involved en bloc resection of all involved organs with reimplantation of the right renal vein and reconstruction of the IVC with a polytetrafluoroethylene graft. The patient recovered without renal insufficiency, graft infection, or other complications. Follow-up abdominal imaging at 1 year showed a patent IVC graft and no locally recurrent tumor. Prosthetic graft provides a sufficient diameter and length for replacement conduit in extensive resection of IVC leiomyosarcoma. Conclusion To our knowledge, this is the first case of resection of an IVC sarcoma with prosthetic graft reconstruction in combination with pancreatic resection. Aggressive surgical resection including vascular reconstruction is warranted for select IVC tumors to achieve a potentially curative outcome. PMID:19126222

  8. Lung Resection Using Transumbilical Incision: An Animal Survival Study

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Shun-Ying; Yen-Chu; Wu, Yi-Cheng; Liu, Chien-Ying; Hsieh, Ming-Ju; Yuan, Hsu-Chia; Ko, Po-Jen

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Transumbilical single-port surgery is a potentially less invasive approach to many types of abdominal surgeries and offers better cosmetic outcomes than conventional 3-port laparoscopic surgery. It avoids the complication of intercostal neuralgia and may reduce the risk of pulmonary complications after video-assisted thoracic surgery. This study evaluated the feasibility of transumbilical lung wedge resection. Methods: Lung resection was performed in 11 beagle dogs weighing 5.9 to 8.5 kg. A 3-cm umbilical incision and one diaphragmatic incision were made, and an endoscopic stapler was used. The diaphragmatic incisions were repaired under video guidance using a V-Loc knotless suturing device (Covidien, Mansfield, Massachusetts). Animals were monitored daily for signs of postoperative infection. White blood cell count, C-reactive protein level, and IL-6 level were measured in all animals. Animals were euthanized 14 days after surgery and underwent necropsy evaluation. Results: Accurate lung resection was achieved in 10 of 11 animals during a median operative time of 98 minutes (range 60–165). In 1 animal, transumbilical lung resection was not possible and was converted to thoracotomy. All animals survived without major postoperative complications. At necropsy, evidence of uneventful healing of the stapled resection margin and diaphragmatic wound were found. There was no evidence of vital organ injury or intrathoracic infection. Conclusion: A transumbilical approach to thoracic cavity exploration and stapled lung resection is technically feasible. Primary suturing of the diaphragmatic incision is a simple and effective means of diaphragmatic wound closure. This may be an alternative to video-assisted thoracic surgery for the management of simple thoracic disease. PMID:25848173

  9. Perineal reconstruction for severe sequela of ecthyma gangrenosum: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Freud, E; Farkash, U; Prieto, F; Janowski, E; Zer, M

    1999-07-01

    Ecthyma gangrenosum is a cutaneous gangrenous disorder which usually follows Pseudomona aeruginosa infection and is found mainly in immunosuppressed children. We describe a case of a five-year-old female with leukemia with a severe perineal ecthyma gangrenosum resulting in a cloaca-like deformity. One year later a perineoplasty with puborectalis interposition and overlapping external anal sphincteroplasty was successfully performed, achieving satisfactory continence. PMID:10411447

  10. Perioperative chemotherapy and hepatic resection for resectable colorectal liver metastases.

    PubMed

    Beppu, Toru; Sakamoto, Yasuo; Hayashi, Hiromitsu; Baba, Hideo

    2015-02-01

    The role of perioperative chemotherapy in the management of initially resectable colorectal liver metastases (CRLM) is still unclear. The EPOC trial [the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) 40983] is an important study that declares perioperative chemotherapy as the standard of care for patients with resectable CRLM, and the strategy is widely accepted in western countries. Compared with surgery alone, perioperative FOLFOX therapy significantly increased progression-free survival (PFS) in eligible patients or those with resected CRLM. Overall survival (OS) data from the EPOC trial were recently published in The Lancet Oncology, 2013. Here, we discussed the findings and recommendations from the EORTC 40983 trial. PMID:25713806

  11. Transgastric Synthetic Mesh Migration, 9 Years after Liver Resection

    PubMed Central

    You, Jae; Onizuka, Neil; Wong, Linda

    2014-01-01

    Complications of synthetic mesh have been described in various hernia procedures including migration and erosion, but no previous report mentions this complication after liver resection. This case describes a patient who had undergone a left hepatic resection with mesh pledgets sutured along the cut edge of the liver. He remained complication-free until nine years later when he presented with weight loss and early satiety, and endoscopy revealed mesh within the lumen of the stomach. While still attached to the liver, the mesh had eroded into the lumen of the stomach and he ultimately required surgery to remove this. The use of synthetic mesh in hepatectomies and other abdominal procedures may require further consideration by surgeons regarding its relatively unknown tendency for migration and erosion. PMID:24839576

  12. A case of gastric hamartomatous inverted polyp resected endoscopically

    PubMed Central

    Dohi, Moyu; Gen, Yasuyuki; Yoshioka, Mika

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of a 55-year-old woman with a tumor in the greater curvature of the upper gastric body. The tumor was incidentally found on an upper gastrointestinal X-ray series performed during a routine medical examination. Whereas endoscopy revealed a gastric submucosal tumor (SMT), endoscopic ultrasonography demonstrated a heterogeneous tumor with small, cystic, hypoechoic spots originating from the second layer. The patient was clinically asymptomatic, with no contributory family history or abnormal laboratory data. The results of a physical examination, abdominal computed tomography, and plain chest radiography were all unremarkable. Although the endoscopic tumor type was determined to be SMT, the tumor was successfully resected by endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) and subsequently diagnosed as a gastric hamartomatous inverted polyp (GHIP). The findings of the present case highlight the importance of considering GHIP as a diagnosis and indicate the utility of en bloc resection of GHIP with ESD. PMID:27556064

  13. Treatment Outcomes of Open Pelvic Fractures Associated with Extensive Perineal Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Hasankhani, Ebrahim Ghayem

    2013-01-01

    Background The main causes of death in patients with open pelviperineal injuries are uncontrollable bleeding and pelvic sepsis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the management outcomes of open pelvic fractures associated with extensive perineal injuries. Methods We retrospectively studied 15 cases with open pelvic fractures associated with extensive perineal injuries (urethral and anal canal laceration) admitted between August 2006 and September 2010. Mechanism of injury, Injury Severity Score, associated injuries, hemodynamic status on arrival, resuscitation and transfusion requirements, operative techniques, intra- and postoperative complications, length of intensive care unit and hospital stay, and mortality were recorded in a computerised database for further evaluation and analysis. Results The male to female ratio was 12:3 with an average age of 38.6 years (ranged, 11 to 65 years). The average packed red blood cell units used were 8 units (ranged, 4 to 21 units). All patients were initially transferred to the operating room for colostomy, radical debridement and fixation of the pelvic fracture by an external fixator. One patient had acute renal failure, which improved with medical treatment and 2 patients (13.3%) died, one with type III anteroposterior compression fracture due to hemorrhagic shock and the other due to septicemia. Conclusions Open pelvic fractures with extensive perineal injuries are associated with high mortality rates. Early diagnosis and appropriate treatment, including reanimation, colostomy, cystostomy, vigorous and repeated irrigation and debridement, and fixation by an external fixator can improve the outcomes and reduce the mortality rate. PMID:24340145

  14. Multielectrode array recordings of bladder and perineal primary afferent activity from the sacral dorsal root ganglia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruns, Tim M.; Gaunt, Robert A.; Weber, Douglas J.

    2011-10-01

    The development of bladder and bowel neuroprostheses may benefit from the use of sensory feedback. We evaluated the use of high-density penetrating microelectrode arrays in sacral dorsal root ganglia (DRG) for recording bladder and perineal afferent activity. Arrays were inserted in S1 and S2 DRG in three anesthetized cats. Neural signals were recorded while the bladder volume was modulated and mechanical stimuli were applied to the perineal region. In two experiments, 48 units were observed that tracked bladder pressure with their firing rates (79% from S2). At least 50 additional units in each of the three experiments (274 total; 60% from S2) had a significant change in their firing rates during one or more perineal stimulation trials. This study shows the feasibility of obtaining bladder-state information and other feedback signals from the pelvic region with a sacral DRG electrode interface located in a single level. This natural source of feedback would be valuable for providing closed-loop control of bladder or other pelvic neuroprostheses.

  15. The Urethral Rhabdosphincter, Levator Ani Muscle, and Perineal Membrane: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Hinata, Nobuyuki; Murakami, Gen

    2014-01-01

    Detailed knowledge of the anatomy of the rhabdosphincter and adjacent tissues is mandatory during urologic surgery to ensure reliable oncologic and functional outcomes. To characterize the levator ani (LA) function for the urethral sphincter, we described connective tissue morphology between the LA and urethral rhabdosphincter. The interface tissue between the LA and rhabdosphincter area in males contained abundant irregularly arrayed elastic fibers and smooth muscles. The male rhabdosphincter was positioned alongside the LA to divide the elevation force and not in-series along the axis of LA contraction. The male perineal membrane was thin but solid and extends along the inferior margin or bottom of the rhabdosphincter area. In contrast, the female rhabdosphincter, including the compressor urethrae and urethrovaginal sphincter muscles, was embedded in the elastic fiber mesh that is continuous with the thick, multilaminar perineal membrane. The inferomedial edge of the female LA was attached to the upper surface of the perineal membrane and not directly attached to the rhabdosphincter. We presented new diagrams showing the gender differences in topographical anatomy of the LA and rhabdosphincter. PMID:24877147

  16. Infrascrotal, Perineal, Femorofemoral Bypass for Arterial Graft Infection at the Groin.

    PubMed

    Illuminati, Giulio; Caliò, Francesco G; D'Urso, Antonio; Giacobbi, Daniela; Papaspyropoulos, Vassilios; Ceccanei, Gianluca

    2004-12-01

    HYPOTHESIS: Infrascrotal, perineal, femorofemoral bypass is an acceptable procedure for treating infection of a prosthetic arterial graft limited to a unilateral groin. DESIGN: A consecutive sample clinical study with a mean follow-up of 29 months. SETTING: The surgical department of an academic tertiary care center and an affiliated secondary care center. PATIENTS: Nineteen patients with a mean age of 68 years with prosthetic graft infection at the outflow anastomosis on a femoral artery at the Scarpa triangle underwent an infrascrotal, perineal, femorofemoral bypass, with excision of the graft material limited at the groin. The recipient artery was the profunda femoris artery in 12 cases, the superficial femoral in 5, and the distal common femoral artery in 2. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Cumulative survival, recurrence of sepsis, primary graft patency, and limb salvage rates expressed by standard life-table analysis. RESULTS: Postoperative mortality rate was 5%. Cumulative (SE) survival rate was 65% (11.6%) at 3 years. Cumulative (SE) rate of freedom from recurrent sepsis was 88% (8.6%) at 3 years. Cumulative (SE) primary patency and limb salvage rates were 86% (9.4%) and 91% (7.9%), respectively, at 3 years. CONCLUSION: Femorofemoral bypass with an infrascrotal perineal approach is a valuable procedure for the treatment of femoral arterial graft infection limited at a unilateral groin. PMID:15613291

  17. Perineal striated muscles: Anatomy, spinal motoneurons, and participation on copulatory behavior in male rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus).

    PubMed

    Zempoalteca, R; Lucio, R A; Eguibar, J R

    2008-09-01

    Despite the importance of rabbits in reproductive studies, little information is available on the anatomy and participation of the striated-perineal muscles in male copulatory behavior. In our study, we describe the gross anatomy of two striated-perineal muscles: the ischiocavernosus (ICm) and the bulbospongiosus (BSm). Both muscles have their origin at the ischiadic arc, but the ICm is inserted into the penile crura and the BSm onto the ligamentum suspensorium of the penis. The motoneurons of both muscles were identified using retrograde labeling with horseradish peroxidase coupled to wheat-germ agglutinin. Motoneurons were dispersed in the lower-lumbar and upper-sacral spinal-cord segments, instead of being aggregated in the neuronal nucleus as in other species: the rat, mouse, gerbil, cat, and man. Bilateral dennervation of the ICm or BSm or both in sexually experienced male rabbits did not affect copulatory variables measured at 10, 20, and 30 days after surgery. However, muscular dennervation produced extravaginal ejaculations in 42% of copulatory tests and no ejaculation in 7% of tests, although male pelvic thrusting occurred. These results suggest the participation of the ICm and BSm perineal muscles in penile orientation during copulation but not in seminal emission as described in other mammalian species. PMID:18563835

  18. Single stage: dorsolateral onlay buccal mucosal urethroplasty for long anterior urethral strictures using perineal route

    PubMed Central

    Prabha, Vikram; Devaraju, Shishir; Vernekar, Ritesh; Hiremath, Murigendra

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective To assess the outcome of single stage dorsolateral onlay buccal mucosal urethroplasty for long anterior urethral strictures (>4cm long) using a perineal incision. Materials and Methods From August 2010 to August 2013, 20 patients underwent BMG urethroplasty. The cause of stricture was Lichen sclerosis in 12 cases (60%), Instrumentation in 5 cases (25%), and unknown in 3 cases (15%). Strictures were approached through a perineal skin incision and penis was invaginated into it to access the entire urethra. All the grafts were placed dorsolaterally, preserving the bulbospongiosus muscle, central tendon of perineum and one-sided attachement of corpus spongiosum. Procedure was considered to be failure if the patient required instrumentation postoperatively. Results Mean stricture length was 8.5cm (range 4 to 12cm). Mean follow-up was 22.7 months (range 12 to 36 months). Overall success rate was 85%. There were 3 failures (meatal stenosis in 1, proximal stricture in 1 and whole length recurrent stricture in 1). Other complications included wound infection, urethrocutaneous fistula, brownish discharge per urethra and scrotal oedema. Conclusion Dorsolateral buccal mucosal urethroplasty for long anterior urethral strictures using a single perineal incision is simple, safe and easily reproducible by urologists with a good outcome. PMID:27286122

  19. Fear causes tears - Perineal injuries in home birth settings. A Swedish interview study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Perineal injury is a serious complication of vaginal delivery that has a severe impact on the quality of life of healthy women. The prevalence of perineal injuries among women who give birth in hospital has increased over the last decade, while it is lower among women who give birth at home. The aim of this study was to describe the practice of midwives in home birth settings with the focus on the occurrence of perineal injuries. Methods Twenty midwives who had assisted home births for between one and 29 years were interviewed using an interview guide. The midwives also had experience of working in a hospital delivery ward. All the interviews were tape-recorded and transcribed. Content analysis was used. Results The overall theme was "No rushing and tearing about", describing the midwives' focus on the natural process taking its time. The subcategories 1) preparing for the birth; 2) going along with the physiological process; 3) creating a sense of security; 4) the critical moment and 5) midwifery skills illuminate the management of labor as experienced by the midwives when assisting births at home. Conclusions Midwives who assist women who give birth at home take many things into account in order to minimize the risk of complications during birth. Protection of the woman's perineum is an act of awareness that is not limited to the actual moment of the pushing phase but starts earlier, along with the communication between the midwife and the woman. PMID:21244665

  20. Abdominal Dual Energy Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sommer, F. Graham; Brody, William R.; Cassel, Douglas M.; Macovski, Albert

    1981-11-01

    Dual energy scanned projection radiography of the abdomen has been performed using an experimental line-scanned radiographic system. Digital images simultaneously obtained at 85 and 135 kVp are combined, using photoelectric/Compton decomposition algorithms to create images from which selected materials are cancelled. Soft tissue cancellation images have proved most useful in various abdominal imaging applications, largely due to the elimination of obscuring high-contrast bowel gas shadows. These techniques have been successfully applied to intravenous pyelography, oral cholecystography, intravenous abdominal arteriog-raphy and the imaging of renal calculi.

  1. The Acute Abdominal Aorta.

    PubMed

    Mellnick, Vincent M; Heiken, Jay P

    2015-11-01

    Acute disorders of the abdominal aorta are potentially lethal conditions that require prompt evaluation and treatment. Computed tomography (CT) is the primary imaging method for evaluating these conditions because of its availability and speed. Volumetric CT acquisition with multiplanar reconstruction and three-dimensional analysis is now the standard technique for evaluating the aorta. MR imaging may be useful for select applications in stable patients in whom rupture has been excluded. Imaging is indispensable for diagnosis and treatment planning, because management has shifted toward endoluminal repair. Acute abdominal aortic conditions most commonly are complications of aneurysms and atherosclerosis. PMID:26526434

  2. Abdominal Vascular Catastrophes.

    PubMed

    Singh, Manpreet; Koyfman, Alex; Martinez, Joseph P

    2016-05-01

    Abdominal vascular catastrophes are among the most challenging and time sensitive for emergency practitioners to recognize. Mesenteric ischemia remains a highly lethal entity for which the history and physical examination can be misleading. Laboratory tests are often unhelpful, and appropriate imaging must be quickly obtained. A multidisciplinary approach is required to have a positive impact on mortality rates. Ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm likewise may present in a cryptic fashion. A specific type of ruptured aneurysm, the aortoenteric fistula, often masquerades as the more common routine gastrointestinal bleed. The astute clinician recognizes that this is a more lethal variant of gastrointestinal hemorrhage. PMID:27133247

  3. Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Fortner, George; Johansen, Kaj

    1984-01-01

    Aneurysms are common in our increasingly elderly population, and are a major threat to life and limb. Until the advent of vascular reconstructive techniques, aneurysm patients were subject to an overwhelming risk of death from exsanguination. The first successful repair of an abdominal aortic aneurysm using an interposed arterial homograft was reported by Dubost in 1952. A milestone in the evolution of vascular surgery, this event and subsequent diagnostic, operative and prosthetic graft refinements have permitted patients with an unruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm to enjoy a better prognosis than patients with almost any other form of major systemic illness. Images PMID:6702193

  4. Laparoscopic vs open abdominoperineal resection in the multimodality management of low rectal cancers

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yu-Wei; Huang, Li-Yong; Song, Cheng-Li; Zhuo, Chang-Hua; Shi, De-Bing; Cai, Guo-Xiang; Xu, Ye; Cai, San-Jun; Li, Xin-Xiang

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the safety and feasibility of laparoscopic abdominoperineal resection compared with the open procedure in multimodality management of rectal cancer. METHODS: A total of 106 rectal cancer patients who underwent open abdominoperineal resection (OAPR) were matched with 106 patients who underwent laparoscopic abdominoperineal resection (LAPR) in a 1 to 1 fashion, between 2009 and 2013 at Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center. Propensity score matching was carried out based on age, gender, pathological staging of the disease and administration of neoadjuvant chemoradiation. Data regarding preoperative staging, surgical technique, pathological results, postoperative recovery and complications were reviewed and compared between the LAPR and OAPR groups. Perineal closure around the stoma and pelvic floor reconstruction were performed only in OAPR, not in LAPR. Therefore, abdominoperineal resection procedure-specific surgical complications including parastomal hernia and perineal wound complications were compared between the open and laparoscopic procedure. Regular surveillance of the two cohorts was carried out to gather prognostic data. Disease-free survival was analyzed using Kaplan-Meier estimate and log-rank test. Subgroup analysis was performed in patients with locally advanced disease treated with preoperative chemoradiation followed by surgical resection. RESULTS: No significant difference was found between the LAPR group and the OAPR group in terms of clinicopathological features. The operation time (180.8 ± 47.8 min vs 172.1 ± 49.2 min, P = 0.190), operative blood loss (93.9 ± 60.0 mL vs 88.4 ± 55.2 mL, P = 0.494), total number of retrieved lymph nodes (12.9 ± 6.9 vs 12.9 ± 5.4, P = 0.974), surgical complications (12.3% vs 15.1%, P = 0.549) and pathological characteristics were comparable between the LAPR and OAPR group, respectively. Compared with OAPR patients, LAPR patients showed significantly shorter postoperative analgesia (2.4 ± 0

  5. Hemivaginal septum resection in a patient with a rare variant of Herlyn-Werner-Wunderlich syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Nigel; Anderson, Sharon H; Verrecchio, Elizabeth S; Brown, M Allyson; Glassner, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    Herlyn-Werner-Wunderlich syndrome is characterized by a triad of uterine didelphys, obstructed hemivagina, and ipsilateral renal agenesis. The syndrome should be suspected in any young woman with abdominal pain or cyclic dysmenorrhea, and radiologic evidence of müllerian duct and renal anomalies. Herein is presented the case of a 25-year-old woman with a rare variant of Herlyn-Werner-Wunderlich syndrome, characterized by an anomalous connection between the 2 endocervical canals, who underwent hemivaginal septum resection to relieve progressively worsening dysmenorrhea. The right hemivaginal septum was resected medially from the left cervix and laterally off the right vaginal wall. Hydrodissection between the hemivaginal septum and right cervix facilitated surgical resection. After resection of the hemivaginal septum there was complete resolution of dysmenorrhea and no recurrence of hematometra or hematocolpos. PMID:24858986

  6. Acute Limb Ischemia from Sudden Thrombosis of an Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Subram, Aswath N.; Duncan, J. Michael

    1982-01-01

    Thrombosis of a previously undiagnosed aneurysm of the abdominal aorta in a 64-year-old woman resulted in acute and severe ischemia in both legs. Prompt surgical resection of the aneurysm and restoration of aortic continuity with a fabric graft brought about complete resolution of her symptoms, with excellent functional results one year after the operation. Images PMID:15226820

  7. Jejunal perforation after abdominal liposuction, bilateral breast augmentation and facial fat grafting.

    PubMed

    Coronado-Malagón, Martin; Tauffer-Carrion, Luis Tomas

    2012-01-01

    A 54-year-old woman presented to the emergency department 24 h after undergoing abdominal liposuction, bilateral breast augmentation and facial fat grafting at a private plastic surgery clinic. She presented with the classic evolution of a bowel perforation secondary to abdominal liposuction. A computed tomography (CT) scan found free air in her abdominal cavity. Based on the CT scan and the persistent pain experienced by the patient, an abdominal laparatomy was urgently performed. A jejunum perforation was found and was treated with a resection of the affected segment followed by intestinal anastomosis. The patient had a successful recovery and was discharged seven days later. The present article also reviews the classical presentation of a bowel perforation following abdominal liposuction. PMID:23997589

  8. Jejunal perforation after abdominal liposuction, bilateral breast augmentation and facial fat grafting

    PubMed Central

    Coronado-Malagón, Martin; Tauffer-Carrion, Luis Tomas

    2012-01-01

    A 54-year-old woman presented to the emergency department 24 h after undergoing abdominal liposuction, bilateral breast augmentation and facial fat grafting at a private plastic surgery clinic. She presented with the classic evolution of a bowel perforation secondary to abdominal liposuction. A computed tomography (CT) scan found free air in her abdominal cavity. Based on the CT scan and the persistent pain experienced by the patient, an abdominal laparatomy was urgently performed. A jejunum perforation was found and was treated with a resection of the affected segment followed by intestinal anastomosis. The patient had a successful recovery and was discharged seven days later. The present article also reviews the classical presentation of a bowel perforation following abdominal liposuction. PMID:23997589

  9. [Laparoscopic rectal resection technique].

    PubMed

    Anthuber, M; Kriening, B; Schrempf, M; Geißler, B; Märkl, B; Rüth, S

    2016-07-01

    The quality of radical oncological operations for patients with rectal cancer determines the rate of local recurrence and long-term survival. Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced tumors, a standardized surgical procedure for rectal tumors less than 12 cm from the anus with total mesorectal excision (TME) and preservation of the autonomous nerve system for sexual and bladder function have significantly improved the oncological results and quality of life of patients. The TME procedure for rectal resection has been performed laparoscopically in Germany for almost 20 years; however, no reliable data are available on the frequency of laparoscopic procedures in rectal cancer patients in Germany. The rate of minimally invasive procedures is estimated to be less than 20 %. A prerequisite for using the laparoscopic approach is implicit adherence to the described standards of open surgery. Available data from prospective randomized trials, systematic reviews and meta-analyses indicate that in the early postoperative phase the generally well-known positive effects of the minimally invasive approach to the benefit of patients can be realized without any long-term negative impact on the oncological results; however, the results of many of these studies are difficult to interpret because it could not be confirmed whether the hospitals and surgeons involved had successfully completed the learning curve. In this article we would like to present our technique, which we have developed over the past 17 years in more than 1000 patients. Based on our experiences the laparoscopic approach can be highly recommended as a suitable alternative to the open procedure. PMID:27277556

  10. Laparoscopic Management of Abdominal Pregnancy with Local Injection of Vasopressin Solution: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Hishikawa, Kenji; Fukuda, Takanori; Inoue, Hiromi; Kohata, Yutaka; Monma, Mika; Ochiai, Naomi; Kubo, Yuina; Watanabe, Remi; Ako, Shiho; Aihara, Yuri; Kusaka, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Laparoscopic treatments of abdominal pregnancy have been reported; however, resection of an implanted gestational sac could lead to massive bleeding and treatment failure. Hemostasis of the resected stump is critical for the success of laparoscopic treatment. CASE REPORT A 32-year-old woman presented to the emergency department with severe abdominal pain. We suspected a ruptured ectopic pregnancy and performed urgent diagnostic laparoscopy. The gestational sac was implanted in the posterior wall of the uterus near the left uterosacral ligament, and bleeding from the gestational sac was noticed. We injected 3 ml of diluted vasopressin solution (0.4 U/ml) directly into the gestational sac and into the posterior uterine wall around the gestational sac. Thereafter, we could resect the gestational product using an ultrasonically activated scalpel. Additional hemostasis in the resected stump was not required. CONCLUSIONS We believe that a local injection of a diluted vasopressin solution helps in maintaining the hemostasis after the laparoscopic resection of the implanted gestational sac in cases of abdominal pregnancy. PMID:27587187

  11. Abdominal Pain, Long-Term

    MedlinePlus

    MENU Return to Web version Abdominal Pain, Long-term See complete list of charts. Ongoing or recurrent abdominal pain, also called chronic pain, may be difficult to diagnose, causing frustration for ...

  12. Screening for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    Understanding Task Force Recommendations Screening for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (Task Force) ... final recommendation statement on Screening for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm. This final recommendation statement applies to adults ages ...

  13. Metachronous carcinoma of rectum with reconstruction of a full-thickness abdominal wall defect using a pedicled anterolateral thigh flap

    PubMed Central

    Kok, Amy Siu Yan

    2016-01-01

    Reconstruction of large, complex defects of the abdominal wall after resection of malignant tumors can be challenging. The transfer of an anterolateral thigh (ALT) flap is a feasible and effective option. However, no report has been published on the use of ALT flap after metachronous colonic tumor resection so far. We present an original case of resection of metachronous carcinoma of rectum with reconstruction of the abdominal wall defect using an ALT flap harvested with its aponeurosis. The postoperative course was uncomplicated. Functional and esthetic results were satisfactory. There was no postoperative incisional hernia or tumor recurrence. We conclude that abdominal wall defects of large sizes can be successfully reconstructed using an appropriately designed ALT flap; a simple, single-stage effective reconstruction. PMID:27161142

  14. The Free-style Gluteal Perforator Flap in the Thinning and Delay Process for Perineal Reconstruction After Necrotizing Fasciitis.

    PubMed

    Horta, Ricardo; Nascimento, Ricardo; Silva, Alvaro; Amarante, Jose

    2016-06-01

    Perineal wounds present a special challenge for reconstructive surgeons. The vacuum-assisted closure device is useful as a temporizing measure or for wounds too large or contaminated for immediate reconstruction. Compared to traditional myocutaneous flaps, perforator flaps provide thinner fasciocutaneous flaps for perineal reconstruction with favorable results and fewer donor site morbidities. The upper and lower gluteal regions are rich in perforators, which allow for more versatile flap design according to the defect. The authors combined the principles of free-style perforator flaps, flap delay, and thinning of perforator flaps to restore perineal function and aesthetics. The procedure was undertaken in a 72-year-old female who was obese with the diagnosis of necrotizing fasciitis secondary to perineal abscess. After 3 months, the flap achieved adequate and durable reconstruction with acceptable aesthetic contour and patient satisfaction; there was no loss of function at donor sites. Clinical applications and technical refinements of freestyle pedicled perforator flaps can be extended to the perineal region. Because of its many advantages and its versatility, freestyle pedicled perforator flaps constitute a valued reconstructive option and, when indicated, an alternative to pedicled axial flaps or even free flaps, in addition to vacuum therapy, to simplify the reconstructive procedure. PMID:27434419

  15. Outcome following Resection of Biliary Cystadenoma: A Single Centre Experience and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Pitchaimuthu, M.; Aidoo-Micah, G.; Coldham, C.; Sutcliffe, R.; Roberts, J. K.; Muiesan, P.; Isaac, J.; Mirza, D.; Marudanayagam, R.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Biliary cystadenomas (BCAs) are rare, benign, potentially malignant cystic lesions of the liver, accounting for less than 5% of cystic liver tumours. We report the outcome following resection of biliary cystadenoma from a single tertiary centre. Methods. Data of patients who had resection of BCA between January 1993 and July 2014 were obtained from liver surgical database. Patient demographics, clinicopathological characteristics, operative data, and postoperative outcome were analysed. Results. 29 patients had surgery for BCA. Male : female ratio was 1 : 28. Clinical presentation was abdominal pain (74%), jaundice (20%), abdominal mass (14%), and deranged liver function tests (3%). Cyst characteristics included septations (48%), wall thickening (31%), wall irregularity (38%), papillary projections (10%), and mural nodule (3%). Surgical procedures included atypical liver resection (52%), left hemihepatectomy (34%), right hemihepatectomy (10%), and left lateral segmentectomy (3%). Median length of stay was 7 (IQ 6.5–8.5) days. Two patients developed postoperative bile leak. No patients had malignancy on final histology. Median follow-up was 13 (IQ 6.5–15.7) years. One patient developed delayed biliary stricture and one died of cholangiocarcinoma 11 years later. Conclusion. Biliary cystadenomas can be resected safely with significantly low morbidity. Malignant transformation and recurrence are rare. Complete surgical resection provides a cure. PMID:26839708

  16. Resection interposition arthroplasty for failed distal ulna resections.

    PubMed

    Papatheodorou, Loukia K; Rubright, James H; Kokkalis, Zinon T; Sotereanos, Dean G

    2013-02-01

    The major complications of distal ulna resection, the Darrach procedure, are radioulnar impingement and instability. High failure rates have been reported despite published modifications of the Darrach procedure. Several surgical techniques have been developed to treat this difficult problem and to mitigate the symptoms associated with painful convergence and impingement. No technique has demonstrated clinical superiority. Recently, implant arthroplasty of the distal ulna has been endorsed as an option for the management of the symptomatic patient with a failed distal ulna resection. However, there are concerns for implant longevity, especially in young, active adults. Resection interposition arthroplasty relies on interposition of an Achilles tendon allograft between the distal radius and the resected distal ulna. Although this technique does not restore normal mechanics of the distal radioulnar joint, it can prevent painful convergence of the radius on the ulna. Achilles allograft interposition arthroplasty is a safe and highly effective alternative for failed distal ulna resections, especially for young, active patients, in whom an implant or alternative procedure may not be appropriate. PMID:24436784

  17. ADULT ABDOMINAL WALL HERNIA IN IBADAN

    PubMed Central

    Ayandipo, O.O; Afuwape, O.O; Irabor, D.O; Abdurrazzaaq, A.I.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Abdominal wall hernias are very common diseases encountered in surgical practice. Groin hernia is the commonest type of abdominal wall hernias. There are several methods of hernia repair but tension-free repair (usually with mesh) offers the least recurrent rate. Aim: To describe the clinical profile of anterior abdominal wall hernias and our experience in the surgical management of identified hernias Method: The project was a retrospective study of all patients with abdominal wall hernia presenting into surgical divisions of University College Hospital Ibadan during a 6 year period (January 2008 to December 2013). Relevant information was retrieved from their case notes and analysed. Results: The case records of 1215 (84.7%) patients out of 1435 were retrieved. Elective surgery was done in 981(80.7%) patients while 234 (19.3%) patients had emergency surgery. There were 922 (84.8%) groin hernias and post-operative incisional hernia accounted for 9.1% (111) of the patients. About half (49.1%) of those with incisional hernia were post obstetric and gynaecologic procedure followed by post laparotomy incisional hernias 16 (14%) and others (23.5%). The ratio of inguinal hernia to other types in this study is 3:1. Hollow viscus resection and emergency surgery were predictors of wound infection statistically significant in predicting wound infection (P < 0.001). Peri-operative morbidity/mortality at 28 days post operation was documented in 113 patients (12.1%). One year recurrence rate of groin hernia was 2.1%. Conclusion: The pattern of presentation and management of anterior wall hernias are still the same compared with the earlier study in this hospital. New modality of treatment should be adopted as the standard choice of care. Abdominal wall hernias are very common clinical presentation. Modified Bassini repair was the preferred method of repair due to its simplicity. Mesh repair is becoming more common in recent time but high cost and initial non

  18. Liver resection for hemoperitoneum caused by spontaneous rupture of unrecognized hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Casciaro, G E; Spaziani, E; Costantino, A; Ceci, F; Di Grazia, C; Martellucci, A; Pecchia, M; Cipriani, B; De Angelis, F; Corelli, S; Napoleoni, A; Stefanelli, F; Salvadori, C; Parisella, M; Nicodemi, S; Stagnitti, F

    2012-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is an increasingly common form of cancer. Although its spontaneous rupture is rare in Western countries, it constitutes a surgical emergency and is associated with high mortality. There is a lack of consensus as to the best approach and what parameters to use in choosing it. The three main approaches are conservative, endovascular and resection - the treatment of choice for acute abdominal bleeding. We report a case of hemoperitoneum following the spontaneous rupture of an unrecognized HCV-related HCC in a patient with no history of liver disease. The patient was successfully treated by emergency surgery, with resection of two segments of the left liver. PMID:22958803

  19. Component separation in abdominal trauma.

    PubMed

    Rawstorne, Edward; Smart, Christopher J; Fallis, Simon A; Suggett, Nigel

    2014-01-01

    Component separation is established for complex hernia repairs. This case presents early component separation and release of the anterior and posterior sheath to facilitate closure of the abdominal wall following emergency laparotomy, reinforcing the repair with a biological mesh. On Day 11 following an emergency laparotomy for penetrating trauma, this patient underwent component separation and release of the anterior and posterior sheath. An intra-abdominal biological mesh was secured, and the fascia and skin closed successfully. Primary abdominal closure can be achieved in patients with penetrating abdominal trauma with the use of component separation and insertion of intra-abdominal biological mesh, where standard closure is not possible. PMID:24876334

  20. Abdominal compartment syndrome – the prevention and treatment of possible lethal complications following hip arthroscopy: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Intra-abdominal hypertension and abdominal compartment syndrome have been increasingly recognized as a hip arthroscopy complication over the past decade. In the absence of consensus definitions and treatment guidelines, the diagnosis and management of intra-abdominal hypertension and abdominal compartment syndrome remains variable from institution to institution. Case presentation We report the occurrence of the extravasation of fluid into the abdomen during arthroscopic treatment of femoroacetabular impingement combined with resection of trochanteric bursa and our management of the condition in a 55-year old Caucasian woman. Conclusions We present an algorithm of treatment of abdominal compartment syndrome, as a hip arthroscopy complication, according to the consensus definitions and recommendations of the World Society of the Abdominal Compartment Syndrome. In the algorithm options, we have included paracentesis and percutaneous catheter decompression as the main point of treatment. Our algorithm will have a broader clinical impact on orthopedic surgery, anesthesiology and emergency medicine. PMID:25394557

  1. Complex rectal and anal canal injuries secondary to unusual blunt perineal trauma.

    PubMed

    El Lakis, Mustapha A; Rida, Khaled; Nakhle, Ram; Abi Saad, George

    2014-01-01

    A 27-year-old woman sustained a trauma to her perineal area when she was ejected from a jet ski while riding on water at high speed. The patient presented to the emergency department with blood streaking from her anal canal. Imaging revealed pneumoperitoneum. Surgical intervention showed complex anal canal and rectal injuries. Primary repair of the injuries was performed. Postoperatively the patient did well and was followed up with no evidence of residual symptoms and with a continent anal sphincter. PMID:25352384

  2. [Role of pelvi-perineal rehabilitation in the treatment of cavernous venous leakage].

    PubMed

    Schouman, M; Lacroix, P

    1991-01-01

    The pathophysiological mechanisms, investigation and treatment of erectile dysfunction related to venous leakage are highly controversial. Although surgery appears to be the most logical treatment, the results obtained are very uncertain, regardless of the technique, and long-term improvements are rare. In this study, the authors propose an original management based on classical pelvi-perineal rehabilitation techniques combined with low-dose intracavernous injections. The preliminary results appear encouraging with about 50% improvement (improved or cured patients) in the various treated groups with a lasting result. The mechanism of action of rehabilitation is unclear, but this non-invasive technique should be considered prior to more aggressive management. PMID:2064366

  3. Secondary repair of severe chronic fourth-degree perineal tear due to obstetric trauma

    PubMed Central

    Weledji, Elroy P.; Elong, Adolphe; Verla, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    Obstetric injury is the commonest cause of anal incontinence. We report a case of anal incontinence as a result of severe chronic fourth-degree perineal tear secondary to birthing with complete disruption of the perineum. Secondary repair consisting of an anterior sphincter repair and levatorplasty in a poor resourced area rendered excellent immediate clinical result. The outcome of anterior sphincter repair following obstetric trauma is good but long-term follow-up is required because of the underlying complexity of obstetric injury. As prevention is not always possible, immediate recognition and adequate primary treatment is of importance. PMID:24876506

  4. High flow priapism after blunt perineal trauma: resolution with bucrylate embolization.

    PubMed

    Alvarez Gonzalez, E; Pamplona, M; Rodriguez, A; Garcia-Hidalgo, E; Nunez, V; Leiva, O

    1994-02-01

    We report on 2 patients (ages 21 and 33 years) with high flow priapism secondary to arteriocavernous fistula produced by perineal injury. Both cases were satisfactorily resolved by super-selective embolization of the fistula with bucrylate. Diagnosis was based on the results of gasometry in cavernous blood, color Doppler ultrasound and arteriography. Erectile function after 24 and 30 months of treatment, respectively, was normal in both patients. Review of the literature revealed that only 13 patients have been managed with arterial embolization. To our knowledge our report represents the first in which intracavernous bucrylate embolization produced detumescence with preservation of erectile function. PMID:8283545

  5. Abdominal trauma by ostrich

    PubMed Central

    Usurelu, Sergiu; Bettencourt, Vanessa; Melo, Gina

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Ostriches typically avoid humans in the wild, since they correctly assess humans as potential predators, and, if approached, often run away. However, ostriches may turn aggressive rather than run when threatened, especially when cornered, and may also attack when they feel the need to defend their offspring or territories. Presentation of case A 71-year-old male patient presented with intra abdominal injury sustained from being kicked in the abdominal wall by an ostrich. During laparotomy, were found free peritoneal effusion and perforation of the small intestine. Discussion The clinical history and physical examination are extremely important for diagnostic and therapeutic decision making. CT-scan is the most accurate exam for making diagnosis. Surgery is the treatment of choice, and is always indicated when there is injury to the hollow viscera. In general it is possible to suture the defect. Conclusion In cases of blunt abdominal trauma by animals is necessary to have a low threshold of suspicion for acute abdomen. PMID:25685344

  6. Occurrence and surgical repair of third degree perineal lacerations in adult female camels (Camelus dromedarius) by one-stage (Goetz) technique

    PubMed Central

    Anwar, S.; Purohit, G.N.

    2013-01-01

    Retrospective analysis of third degree perineal lacerations in 7 female camels (6-17 yrs of age) that were surgically corrected by one stage repair (Goetz technique) is presented. Majority (3/7) of the camels was primiparous and all parturitions had a history of calving assistance. Six (6/7) camels recovered by first intention of healing. Dehiscence of perineal structure occurred in only one camel due to infection and healed by second intention. Subsequent matings resulted in pregnancy in four camels and one camel died due to unrelated causes. We conclude that perineal lacerations can occur in primiparous camels with difficult assisted deliveries and that one stage repair of perineal lacerations in camels improves the perineal conformation and such camels may easily regain normal fertility. PMID:26623316

  7. Retroperitoneal cavernous hemangioma resected by a pylorus preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy

    PubMed Central

    Hanaoka, Marie; Hashimoto, Masaji; Sasaki, Kazunari; Matsuda, Masamichi; Fujii, Takeshi; Ohashi, Kenichi; Watanabe, Goro

    2013-01-01

    A retroperitoneal hemangioma is a rare disease. We report on the diagnosis and treatment of a retroperitoneal hemangioma which had uncommonly invaded into both the pancreas and duodenum, thus requiring a pylorus preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy (PpPD). A 36-year-old man presented to our hospital with abdominal pain. An enhanced computed tomography scan without contrast enhancement revealed a 12 cm × 9 cm mass between the pancreas head and right kidney. Given the high rate of malignancy associated with retroperitoneal tumors, surgical resection was performed. Intraoperatively, the tumor was inseparable from both the duodenum and pancreas and PpPD was performed due to the invasive behavior. Although malignancy was suspected, pathological diagnosis identified the tumor as a retroperitoneal cavernous hemangioma for which surgical resection was the proper diagnostic and therapeutic procedure. Reteoperitoneal cavernous hemangioma is unique in that it is typically separated from the surrounding organs. However, clinicians need to be aware of the possibility of a case, such as this, which has invaded into the surrounding organs despite its benign etiology. From this case, we recommend that combined resection of inseparable organs should be performed if the mass has invaded into other tissues due to the hazardous nature of local recurrence. In summary, this report is the first to describe a case of retroperitoneal hemangioma that had uniquely invaded into surrounding organs and was treated with PpPD. PMID:23901241

  8. Endoscopic Resection of a Large Colonic Lipoma: Case Report and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Geraci, Girolamo; Pisello, Franco; Arnone, Enrico; Sciuto, Antonio; Modica, Giuseppe; Sciumè, Carmelo

    2010-01-01

    Colonic lipomas are uncommon, benign, submucosal adipose tumors that are usually asymptomatic. Large lipomas can cause symptoms such as constipation, abdominal pain, rectal bleeding and intussusception. We report the case of a 60-year-old man with a history of lower abdominal pain and pseudoobstructive symptoms. Colonoscopy revealed a large polypoid sessile lesion in the sigma. We used a standardized technique of polypectomy, preceded by submucosal injection of dilute 5 ml polygelin with epinephrine 1:10,000 solution, to fully resect large colonic lipomas. The lipoma size was 3.5 cm. No bleeding or perforation developed. Histology showed the polyp to be a submucosul lipoma. On follow-up, there was no residual lesion. Colonic lipomas larger than 2 cm can be safely and efficaciously removed using electrosurgical snare polypectomy technique. The technique of submucosal injection before resection and using an electrocautery snare appears to be safe and reduces the risk of perforation reported in the literature. PMID:21103220

  9. Single-incision laparoscopic-assisted ileal resection for adult intussusception

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hong; Wu, Shuodong; Zhu, Renzhong; Yu, Xiaopeng

    2016-01-01

    Adult intussusception is rare and laparotomy is required in most of the cases due to the potential pathologic underlying reasons. Although it is technically challenging, single-incision laparoscopic surgery can work as an alternative to laparotomy. Here we report the case of a 45-year-old man with intermittent right lower quadrant abdominal pain for 1 month. Abdominal enhanced computed tomography (CT) scan was performed and ileo-ileal intussusception was found, with lipoma as a likely leading point. Ileal resection was performed using the single-incision laparoscopic-assisted technique. Multiple trocars in the umbilical incision technique and conventional instruments were used. After identification of the ileo-ileal intussusception, the involved small bowel was extracted from the umbilical incision, and resection and anastomosis were performed extracoporeally. The operation time was 65 min and the post-operative hospital stay was 2 days. The patient recovered uneventfully, with better cosmetic results. PMID:27073316

  10. Rectal arteriovenous fistula resected laparoscopically after laparoscopic sigmoidectomy: a case report.

    PubMed

    Ushigome, Hajime; Hayakawa, Tetsushi; Morimoto, Mamoru; Kitagami, Hidehiko; Tanaka, Moritsugu

    2014-01-01

    We report a very rare case of rectal arteriovenous fistula following sigmoidectomy and discuss this case in the context of the existing literature. In April 2011, the patient, a man in his 60s, underwent laparoscopic sigmoidectomy with lymph node dissection for sigmoid colon cancer. Beginning in February 2012, he experienced frequent diarrhea. Abdominal contrast-enhanced CT revealed local thickening of the rectal wall and rectal arteriovenous fistula near the anastomosis site. Rectitis from the rectal arteriovenous fistula was diagnosed. No improvement was seen with conservative treatment. Therefore, surgical resection was performed laparoscopically and the site of the lesion was confirmed by intraoperative angiography. The arteriovenous fistula was identified and resected. Postoperatively, diarrhea symptoms resolved, and improvement in rectal wall thickening was seen on abdominal CT. No recurrence has been seen as of 1 year postoperatively. PMID:24450345

  11. A Glasgow Tipple—transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt insertion prior to Whipple resection

    PubMed Central

    Jabbar, Salman A.A.; Jamieson, Nigel B.; Morris, Andrew J.; Oien, Karin A.; Duthie, Fraser; McKay, Colin J.; Carter, Christopher R.; Dickson, Euan J.

    2016-01-01

    Abdominal surgery performed in patients with significant liver disease and portal hypertension is associated with high mortality rates, with even poorer outcomes associated with complex pancreaticobiliary operations. We report on a patient requiring portal decompression via transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) prior to a pancreaticoduodenectomy. The 49-year-old patient presented with pain, jaundice and weight loss. At ERCP an edematous ampulla was biopsied, revealing high-grade dysplasia within a distal bile duct adenoma. Liver biopsy was performed to investigate portal hypertension, confirming congenital hepatic fibrosis (CHF). A TIPS was performed to enable a pancreaticoduodenectomy. Prophylactic TIPS can be performed for preoperative portal decompression for patients requiring pancreatic resection. A potentially curative resection was performed when abdominal surgery was initially thought impossible. Notably, CHF has been associated with the development of cholangiocarcinoma in only four previous instances, with this case being only the second reported distal bile duct cholangiocarcinoma. PMID:27177892

  12. Sporadic intra-abdominal desmoid tumor: a unusual presentation.

    PubMed

    Lasseur, Antoinette; Pasquer, Arnaud; Feugier, Patrick; Poncet, Gilles

    2016-01-01

    Desmoid tumors are rare potentially aggressive benign tumors. Various etiologies and recurrent factors have been presented and discussed. A case of an abdominal desmoid tumor with vascular mesenteric invasion in a 32-year-old female, over 2 years after pregnancy is presented. Pre-operative biopsy was not contributive, diagnosis was made after surgery. Resection required two vascular bypasses. Desmoid tumors appear frequently in women of child-bearing age (during or after pregnancy), hormonal signaling is probably involved, but pathways remain unknown. Multiple predictive factors of recurrence are discussed but not strongly identified due to underpowered studies: resection margins, age, sex, tumor's size and location. Recent development is in favor of a non-aggressive treatment such as 'wait and see' procedures. Without radical treatment, these tumors could generate bowel compression or perforation. Due to their location and high risk of complication, surgery is the most fitted option. PMID:27150282

  13. Sporadic intra-abdominal desmoid tumor: a unusual presentation

    PubMed Central

    Lasseur, Antoinette; Pasquer, Arnaud; Feugier, Patrick; Poncet, Gilles

    2016-01-01

    Desmoid tumors are rare potentially aggressive benign tumors. Various etiologies and recurrent factors have been presented and discussed. A case of an abdominal desmoid tumor with vascular mesenteric invasion in a 32-year-old female, over 2 years after pregnancy is presented. Pre-operative biopsy was not contributive, diagnosis was made after surgery. Resection required two vascular bypasses. Desmoid tumors appear frequently in women of child-bearing age (during or after pregnancy), hormonal signaling is probably involved, but pathways remain unknown. Multiple predictive factors of recurrence are discussed but not strongly identified due to underpowered studies: resection margins, age, sex, tumor’s size and location. Recent development is in favor of a non-aggressive treatment such as ‘wait and see’ procedures. Without radical treatment, these tumors could generate bowel compression or perforation. Due to their location and high risk of complication, surgery is the most fitted option. PMID:27150282

  14. Radical Hysterectomy and Total Abdominal Vaginectomy for Primary Vaginal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Ozgul, Nejat; Basaran, Derman; Boyraz, Gokhan; Salman, Coskun; Yuce, Kunter

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this surgical video is to demonstrate en bloc radical removal of uterus and vagina in a patient with clinical early-stage vaginal cancer. Surgical treatment was offered to our patient for clinical early-stage primary vaginal cancer. An en bloc radical hysterectomy, systematic pelvic lymphadenectomy, and total abdominal vaginectomy were performed. Postoperative adjuvant radiation or chemotherapy was not recommended for completely resected pathologic stage I disease with no lymph node involvement and negative surgical margins. Radical surgery can be a treatment option for selected patients with primary vaginal cancer. PMID:26825828

  15. [Differential diagnosis of abdominal pain].

    PubMed

    Frei, Pascal

    2015-09-01

    Despite the frequency of functional abdominal pain, potentially dangerous causes of abdominal pain need to be excluded. Medical history and clinical examination must focus on red flags and signs for imflammatory or malignant diseases. See the patient twice in the case of severe and acute abdominal pain if lab parameters or radiological examinations are normal. Avoid repeated and useless X-ray exposure whenever possible. In the case of subacute or chronic abdominal pain, lab tests such as fecal calprotectin, helicobacter stool antigen and serological tests for celiac disease are very useful. Elderly patients may show atypical or missing clinical signs. Take care of red herrings and be skeptical whether your initial diagnosis is really correct. Abdominal pain can frequently be an abdominal wall pain. PMID:26331201

  16. Abdominal imaging: An introduction

    SciTech Connect

    Frick, M.P.; Feinberg, S.B.

    1986-01-01

    This nine-chapter book gives an overview of the integrated approach to abdominal imaging. Chapter 1 provides an introduction to the physics used in medical imaging; chapter 2 is on the selection of imaging modalities. These are followed by four chapters that deal, respectively, with plain radiography, computed tomographic scanning, sonography, and nuclear imaging, as applied to the abdomen. Two chapters then cover contrast material-enhanced studies of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract: one focusing on technical considerations; the other, on radiologic study of disease processes. The final chapter is a brief account of different interventional procedures.

  17. Lower Abdominal Pain.

    PubMed

    Carlberg, David J; Lee, Stephen D; Dubin, Jeffrey S

    2016-05-01

    Although most frequently presenting with lower abdominal pain, appendicitis, colitis, and diverticulitis can cause pain throughout the abdomen and can cause peritoneal and retroperitoneal symptoms. Evaluation and management of lower intestinal disease requires a nuanced approach by the emergency physician, sometimes requiring computed tomography, ultrasonography, MRI, layered imaging, shared decision making, serial examination, and/or close follow-up. Once a presumed or confirmed diagnosis is made, appropriate treatment is initiated, and may include surgery, antibiotics, and/or steroids. Appendicitis patients should be admitted. Diverticulitis and inflammatory bowel disease can frequently be managed on an outpatient basis, but may require admission and surgical consultation. PMID:27133242

  18. Novel technique of endoscopic full-thickness resection for superficial nonampullary duodenal neoplasms to avoid intraperitoneal tumor dissemination

    PubMed Central

    Ohata, Ken; Nonaka, Kouichi; Sakai, Eiji; Minato, Yohei; Satodate, Hitoshi; Watanabe, Kazuteru; Matsuhashi, Nobuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Recently, laparoscopic and/or endoscopic full-thickness resection (FTR) has been reported to be a useful technique for the treatment of superficial duodenal neoplasms (SDNs). In the current study, we evaluated clinical outcomes in 5 consecutive patients who underwent resection of nonampullary SDNs using laparoscopy-assisted endoscopic full-thickness resection with ligation Device (LAEFTR-L), which is an alternative FTR method developed to avoid peritoneal dissemination. Using a snare technique with a ligation band, the duodenal lesions were easily resected. The provisional and additional sutures for the resected site prevented delayed perforation and bleeding and they also protected the abdominal cavity from direct exposure to malignant cells. Complete resection could be achieved and FTR was histologically confirmed in all cases. The mean operation time was 173 minutes (range 138 – 217 minutes). Mean diameter of the resected specimen was 24 mm (range 18 – 32 mm). No adverse events (AEs) were observed. LAEFTR-L, which can achieve complete resection of nonampullary SDNs without severe AEs and peritoneal dissemination, could be a useful technique for the treatment of such lesions. PMID:27556096

  19. Abdominal Kaposiform Hemangioendothelioma Associated With Lymphangiomatosis Involving Mesentery and Ileum

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Aisheng; Zhang, Ling; Wang, Yang; He, Tianlin; Zuo, Changjing

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Kaposiform hemangioendothelioma (KH) is a rare vascular tumor of intermediate malignancy that occurs mainly in the childhood. Adult patients with KH are rare. Imaging findings of KH have rarely been reported before. We present magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography (CT), and fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/CT findings in an adult patient with KH associated with lymphangiomatosis involving mesentery and ileum. A 22-year-old female complained of a 9-month history of intermittent melena, weakness, and palpitation. Laboratory tests revealed anemia and hypoproteinemia. Fecal occult blood test was positive. Abdominal enhanced MRI and CT showed a large abdominal mass involving mesentery and ileum. On enhanced MRI, there were many hypervascular nodules in the mass. On FDG PET/CT, the mass and the nodules showed slight FDG uptake. Small bowel capsule endoscopy showed numerous grape-shaped red nodules in the luminal wall of the involved ileum. The patient underwent resection of the abdominal mass and a segment of the ileum invaded by the abdominal mass. KH arising within lymphangiomatosis involving mesentery and ileum was confirmed by pathology. After surgery, the patient's symptoms improved. This is the first case of KH associated with lymphangiomatosis involving mesentery and ileum. In this case, the lymphangiomatosis overshadowed the small tumor nodules resulting in unusual imaging findings. Familiarity with these imaging findings is helpful for diagnosis and differential diagnosis of KH. PMID:26871848

  20. Malignant Schwannoma of Anterior Abdominal Wall: Report of a Case

    PubMed Central

    Khorgami, Zhamak; Nasiri, Shirzad; Rezakhanlu, Freshteh; Sodagari, Nassim

    2009-01-01

    Malignant schwannoma of the anterior abdominal wall nerves is extremely rare. Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST) represent approximately 10% of all soft tissue sarcomas and it is found in 4% of patients with neurofibromatosis 1. We present a case of malignant schwannoma in a 28-year-old female patient with neurofibromatosis 1. She presented with a painful mass in the right upper quadrant of her abdomen. The tumor location was in the abdominal wall in explorative laparatomy and malignant schwannoma was diagnosed in pathologic assessment. The tumor recurred in 3 months and computed tomography showed two masses in the right side of abdominopelvic cavity. Thereafter, second complete surgical resection was performed and pathologic finding was the same. In spite of administering chemotherapy after second surgery,the tumor recurred and magnetic resonance imaging finding showed a huge heterogeneously enhancing mass with adhesion to the inner side of the abdominal wall. The patient died because of acute respiratory failure due to multiple bilateral pulmonary metastases. Tumor location and rapid recurrence was unique in our patient. Keywords Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor; Malignant schwannoma; Abdominal wall PMID:22461875

  1. Hypnosis for functional abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Gottsegen, David

    2011-07-01

    Chronic abdominal pain is a common pediatric condition affecting 20% of the pediatric population worldwide. Most children with this disorder are found to have no specific organic etiology and are given the diagnosis of functional abdominal pain. Well-designed clinical trials have found hypnotherapy and guided imagery to be the most efficacious treatments for this condition. Hypnotic techniques used for other somatic symptoms are easily adaptable for use with functional abdominal pain. The author discusses 2 contrasting hypnotic approaches to functional abdominal pain and provides implications for further research. These approaches may provide new insights into this common and complex disorder. PMID:21922712

  2. Percutaneous limited internal fixation combined with external fixation to treat open pelvic fractures concomitant with perineal lacerations.

    PubMed

    Chen, Linwei; Zhang, Guoyou; Wu, Yaoshen; Guo, Xiaoshan; Yuan, Wen

    2011-12-01

    External fixation combined with colostomy is a traditional management of the pelvic fractures associated with perineal lacerations. However, malunion and dysfunction caused by malreduction and loss of reduction are common. One-stage definitive fixation without soft tissue harassment is requisite for the treatment. The purpose of this study was to assess the outcome of 1-stage definitive fixation by combining percutaneous limited internal fixation and external fixation in the treatment of pelvic fractures with perineal lacerations. Eighteen adults with high-energy unstable pelvic ring fractures associated with perineal lacerations were admitted between June 2003 and December 2010. Mean follow-up was 28 months. After wound closure and colostomy, 10 patients received external fixation and percutaneous screw fixation, and 8 patients underwent external fixation. Demographics, wound and fracture classification, and Injury Severity Score were comparable between the groups (P>.05). Initial reduction quality was comparable between the groups (P=.14), but the loss of reduction during follow-up was more significant in the external fixation group (P=.004). Combined fixation achieved better functional results than external fixation (P=.02). There were 2 cases of superficial wound infection in each group (P=1.0). By combining debridement, wound closure, colostomy, percutaneous limited internal fixation, and external fixation, we improved pelvic fracture recovery while reducing the risk of infection. One-stage definitive fixation is a better choice than external fixation in the treatment of open pelvic fracture concomitant with perineal wound. PMID:22146197

  3. Successful surgical resection of advanced gastrointestinal stromal tumor post neoadjuvent therapy.

    PubMed

    Kamil, Sm; Biswas, M; Imran, Ak; Islam, R; Mukhtar, Aa; Joshi, Sc

    2009-01-01

    We report a case of a 48-year-old Indian male who presented with swelling and firmness in his left upper part of the abdomen of one month duration with anorexia and weight loss. Initial examination revealed an intra abdominal mass of around 16.8x11.0x24.5cm with minimal left sided pleural effusion. A biopsy from the mass confirmed the diagnosis of gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GISTs) as supported by immmunohistochemistry results which showed strong positivity for c-kit while stains for smooth muscle actin, desmin, myoglobin, S100 Protein and cytokerstin remained negative. The patient was not suitable for surgical intervention in view of advanced tumor, and Imatinib Mesylate 400mg daily was started with the aim of making the tumor operable. Such therapy lasted for twenty months and was tolerated well by the patient. It then resulted in gradual tumor regression, following which the patient underwent successful tumor resection. Post surgical resection patient had no radiological evidence of intra abdominal tumor but mild left sided pleural effusion with left lower lobe atelectasis. The patient had uneventful post operative recovery and he is currently on Imatinib mesylate and tolerating treatment well with mild skin rash. The experience with preoperative imatinib on surgical resection rates and post operative outcomes is limited especially with primary locally advanced GISTs. In our case successful surgical resection was possible for a huge locally advanced GIST with unusually prolonged treatment of twenty months with imatinib preoperatively. PMID:21483516

  4. Robotic-assisted laparoscopic wedge resection of a gastric leiomyoma with intraoperative ultrasound localization.

    PubMed

    Abdel Khalek, Mohamed; Joshi, Virendra; Kandil, Emad

    2011-12-01

    Gastric leiomyoma is a rare gastric neoplasm that traditionally has been resected for negative margins using an open approach. The laparoscopic approach may also treat various gastric tumors without opening the gastric cavity. Robotic surgery was developed in response to the limitations and drawbacks of laparoscopic surgery. Herein, we describe a case of robotic-assisted laparoscopic wedge resection of a gastric leiomyoma. A 63-year-old male complaining of abdominal pain was found to have an incidental 3 cm antral mass on an abdominal CT. Endoscopy with endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) confirmed a submucosal mass. Biopsy of the lesion was consistent with a leiomyoma. The DaVinci robotic system was used for partial gastrectomy and reconstruction, with the addition of intraoperative ultrasound to localize the lesion intraoperatively. Pathological examination of the resected mass confirmed a diagnosis of leiomyoma with negative margins. There were no intraoperative or postoperative complications. The patient was discharged home on the second postoperative day. Intraoperative endoscopic ultrasound is a safe technique that may improve the success rate of surgery by confirming the location of the lesion. Robotic assistance in gastric resection offers an easy minimally invasive approach to such tumors. This approach can achieve adequate surgical margins and lead to short hospital stays. PMID:21919811

  5. Ileal Intussusception Due to Metastasis from Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lung Resected 12 Years Previously.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Tomoki; Chino, Osamu; Tajima, Takayuki; Tanaka, Yoichi; Yokoyama, Daiki; Hanashi, Tomoko; Sadahiro, Sotaro; Makuuchi, Hiroyasu

    2015-12-01

    An 88-year-old woman, with a history of resection of stage IIA lung cancer in 1998, was referred to our hospital in August 2010 complaining of upper abdominal pain, vomiting, and dark brown stools. After endoscopic examination, she was admitted with a diagnosis of Mallory-Weiss syndrome. Vomiting occurred when food intake was resumed after fasting. Intestinal obstruction was suspected on abdominal radiography, and complete small bowel obstruction was confirmed by contrast-enhanced imaging after placement of an ileus tube. A small intestinal tumor with intussusception was detected by computed tomography. At laparotomy, there was no ascites. Intussusception was found due to an ileal tumor located approximately 50 cm from the ileocecal valve, and we performed partial small bowel resection. The resected small intestine contained a submucosal tumor approximately 40 mm in diameter that had penetrated the bowel wall to reach the serosa. Pathological examination revealed a submucosal tumor that showed poor continuity with the surrounding mucosa, while the histology was squamous cell carcinoma. Immunohistochemistry showed that the tumor was CK7 positive, CK20 negative, TTF-1 negative, and CK10 positive. Based on these findings, we made a diagnosis of small intestinal metastasis at 12 years after radical resection of squamous cell carcinoma of the lung. PMID:26662663

  6. Combined laparoscopic abdominoperineal resection and robotic-assisted prostatectomy for synchronous double cancer of the rectum and the prostate.

    PubMed

    Kamiyama, Hirohiko; Sakamoto, Kazuhiro; China, Toshiyuki; Aoki, Jun; Niwa, Koichiro; Ishiyama, Shun; Takahashi, Makoto; Kojima, Yutaka; Goto, Michitoshi; Tomiki, Yuichi; Horie, Shigeo

    2016-05-01

    Here we report a combined laparoscopic abdominoperineal resection and robotic-assisted prostatectomy. A 74-year-old man was diagnosed with T4b low rectal and prostate cancer. The operation was performed after neoadjuvant chemotherapy for the rectal cancer. The procedure used eight ports in total, five for laparoscopic abdominoperineal resection and six for robotic-assisted prostatectomy. First, laparoscopic total mesorectal excision including division of the inferior mesenteric artery was performed, and then, robotic dissection of the prostate was performed. The en bloc specimen was removed through the perineal wound. Then, robotic urethrovesical anastomosis was performed. An extraperitoneal end colostomy was created to finish the operation. The operating time was 545 min, and blood loss was 170 mL. The postoperative course was uneventful, and the patient discharged on postoperative day 17. The combined laparoscopic abdominoperineal resection and robotic-assisted prostatectomy were performed safely without any additional technical difficulty, as both procedures shared port settings and patient positions. PMID:27117964

  7. Hepatic Parenchymal Preservation Surgery: Decreasing Morbidity and Mortality Rates in 4,152 Resections for Malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Kingham, T Peter; Correa-Gallego, Camilo; D'Angelica, Michael I; Gönen, Mithat; DeMatteo, Ronald P; Fong, Yuman; Allen, Peter J; Blumgart, Leslie H; Jarnagin, William R

    2015-01-01

    Background Liver resection is used to treat primary and secondary malignancies. Historically, these procedures were associated with significant complications, which may affect cancer-specific outcome. This study analyzes the changes in morbidity and mortality after hepatic resection over time. Study Design Records of all patients undergoing liver resection for a malignant diagnosis from 1993 to 2012 at Memorial Sloan Kettering were analyzed. Patients were divided into early (1993-1999), middle (2000-2006), and recent (2007-2012) eras. Major hepatectomy was defined as resection of 3 or more segments. Univariate and multivariate analyses were made with t-tests or Mann-Whitney tests. Results 3,875 patients underwent 4,152 resections for malignancy. The most common diagnosis was metastatic colorectal cancer (n=2,476, 64% of patients). Over the study period, 90-day mortality rate decreased from 5% to 1.6% (p<0.001). Perioperative morbidity decreased from 53% to 20% (p<0.001). The percentage of major hepatectomies decreased from 66% to 36% (p<0.001). The rate of perioperative transfusion decreased from 51% to 21% (p<0.001). The spectrum of perioperative morbidity changed markedly over time, with abdominal infections (43% of complications) overtaking cardiopulmonary complications (22% of complications). Peak postoperative bilirubin (OR 1.1, p<0.001), blood loss (OR 1.5, p=0.001), major hepatectomy (OR 1.3, p=0.031), and concurrent partial colectomy (OR 2.4, p<0.001) were independent predictors of perioperative morbidity. The mortality associated with trisectionectomy (6%) and right hepatectomy (3%) remained unchanged over time. Conclusions Morbidity and mortality rates after partial hepatectomy for cancer have decreased substantially as the major hepatectomy rate dropped. Encouraging parenchymal preservation and preventing abdominal infections are vital for continued improvement of liver resection outcomes. PMID:25667141

  8. How I Manage Abdominal Injuries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haycock, Christine E.

    1986-01-01

    In sports, abdominal injuries occur most frequently in cycling, horseback riding, and skiing. Most involve children, not adults. Any athlete sustaining a severe blow to the abdomen should be examined. Guidelines are provided for recognizing and treating injuries to the abdominal muscles, kidneys, spleen, and liver. (Author/MT)

  9. Functional Abdominal Pain in Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... dominalPa in inCh ildre n What is functional abdominal pain, and why does it happen? Most otherwise-healthy ... stomachaches for two months or more have functional abdominal pain. The term “functional” refers to the fact that ...

  10. A report of three cases and review of the literature on rectal disruption following abdominal seatbelt trauma.

    PubMed

    El Kafsi, J; Kraus, R; Guy, R

    2016-02-01

    Seatbelt associated blunt trauma to the rectum is a rare but well recognised injury. The exact mechanism of hollow visceral injury in blunt trauma is unclear. Stress and shear waves generated by abdominal compression may in part account for injury to gas containing structures. A 'seatbelt sign' (linear ecchymosis across the abdomen in the distribution of the lap belt) should raise the suspicion of hollow visceral injuries and can be more severe with disruption of the abdominal wall musculature. Three consecutive cases of rectal injury following blunt abdominal trauma, requiring emergency laparotomy and resection, are described. Lumbar spine injury occurred in one case and in the other two cases, there was injury to the iliac wing of the pelvis; all three cases sustained significant abdominal wall contusion or muscle disruption. Abdominal wall reconstruction and closure posed a particular challenge, requiring a multidisciplinary approach. The literature on this topic is reviewed and potential mechanisms of injury are discussed. PMID:26741660

  11. Obstetric and gynecological outcome in a patient with traumatic pelvic fracture and perineal injuries.

    PubMed

    Goswami, Deepti; Kochhar, Puneet Kaur; Suri, Tarun; Zutshi, Vijay; Batra, Swaraj

    2012-08-01

    A 19-year-old woman presented with pelvic trauma following a road accident. She was hemodynamically stable. Examination revealed perineal injuries and type C pelvic fracture, which was stabilized with an external fixator. The broken ends of the pubic bone were brought together by an orthopedic wire. The detached vaginal wall and torn anal sphincter were surgically repaired after making a diverting colostomy. The postoperative period was uneventful. Colostomy was reversed after 3 months. Postoperatively the patient developed a cystocele, dyspareunia and vaginal pain. She conceived spontaneously and was planned for an elective cesarean at 37 weeks gestation; however, she presented in labor at 36 weeks and had a normal vaginal delivery. Pelvic fractures may be associated with genitourinary and anal sphincter injuries, which require management by a multidisciplinary team. On recovery the patient may develop prolapse, dyspareunia and persistent local pain. Spontaneous conception and normal vaginal delivery are nevertheless possible. PMID:22540310

  12. Abdominal migraine in the differential diagnosis of acute abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Cervellin, Gianfranco; Lippi, Giuseppe

    2015-06-01

    Although traditionally regarded as a specific pediatric disease, abdominal migraine may also be observed in adults. Unfortunately, however, this condition is frequently overlooked in the differential diagnosis of abdominal pain in the emergency department (ED). A 30-year-old woman presented to our ED complaining of abdominal pain and vomiting, lasting for 12 hours. The pain was periumbilical, continuous, and not associated with fever or diarrhea. The physical examination and the results of conventional blood tests were normal. The patient was treated with intravenous ketoprofen, metoclopramide, and ranitidine, obtaining a prompt relief of symptoms. She had a history of similar episodes in the last 15 years, with several ED visits, blood test examinations, ultrasonography of the abdomen, and upper gastrointestinal endoscopies. Celiac disease, porphyry, sickle cell disease, and inflammatory bowel disease were all excluded. In July 2012, she became pregnant, and she delivered a healthy baby on April 2013. Until November 2014, she has remained asymptomatic. Based on the clinical characteristics of the abdominal pain episodes, the exclusion of any alternative diagnosis, and the relief of symptoms during and after pregnancy, a final diagnosis of abdominal migraine could be established. A skilled emergency physician should always consider abdominal migraine in the differential diagnosis of patients admitted to the ED with abdominal pain, especially when the attacks are recurrent and no alternative diagnosis can be clearly established. PMID:25616589

  13. Unusual Presentations of Actinomycosis; Anterior Abdominal Wall and Appendix: Report of Three Cases

    PubMed Central

    Karateke, Faruk; Özyazıcı, Sefa; Menekşe, Ebru; Daş, Koray; Özdoğan, Mehmet

    2013-01-01

    Background: Primary actinomycosis of the anterior abdominal wall and appendix are very rare clinical entities. An accurate diagnosis is generally obtained by histological examination, and treatment often requires surgical resection. Case Report: In this study we presented two cases of primary actinomycosis involving the anterior abdominal wall and a third one located in the appendix. Conclusion: Actinomyces Israelii can involve all anatomic structures of the abdomen. Although preoperative diagnosis is difficult, the combination of surgery and antibiotic treatment results in complete treatment in the majority of cases. PMID:25207127

  14. Small bowel intussusception with the Meckel's diverticulum after blunt abdominal trauma: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Benjelloun, El Bachir; Ousadden, Abdelmalek; Ibnmajdoub, Karim; Mazaz, Khalid; Taleb, Khalid Ait

    2009-01-01

    Intussusception with the Meckel's diverticulum is a rare but well-known cause of small bowel obstruction in the adult. After blunt abdominal trauma, intussusception is exceedingly rare and has been reported previously only in few cases. We present a case of a previously healthy 28-year-old man developing four days after blunt abdominal trauma signs of small bowel obstruction. Ileo-ileal intussusception was suggested by computed tomography. Exploration revealed ileo-ileal intussusception with Meckel's diverticulum. A diverticulectomy with small bowel resection was performed. PMID:19419572

  15. Surgical Treatment of a Voluminous Infrarenal Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm with Horseshoe Kidney: Tips and Tricks.

    PubMed

    De Caridi, Giovanni; Massara, Mafalda; Greco, Michele; Mastrojeni, Claudio; Serra, Raffaele; Salomone, Ignazio; La Spada, Michele

    2015-01-01

    Horseshoe kidney is a common urology anomaly, while its association with infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm represents a very rare condition. Surgical approach remains controversial however, we believe that the left retroperitoneal approach should be preferred in order to avoid isthmus resection with any subsequent renal infarction, urinary tract damage and to facilitate renal arteries reimplantation, when required. We present a case of voluminous infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm associated with horseshoe kidney, successfully treated through a left retroperitoneal approach on the retro-renal space. PMID:26730260

  16. Surgical Treatment of a Voluminous Infrarenal Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm with Horseshoe Kidney: Tips and Tricks

    PubMed Central

    Massara, Mafalda; Greco, Michele; Mastrojeni, Claudio; Serra, Raffaele; Salomone, Ignazio; La Spada, Michele

    2015-01-01

    Horseshoe kidney is a common urology anomaly, while its association with infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm represents a very rare condition. Surgical approach remains controversial however, we believe that the left retroperitoneal approach should be preferred in order to avoid isthmus resection with any subsequent renal infarction, urinary tract damage and to facilitate renal arteries reimplantation, when required. We present a case of voluminous infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm associated with horseshoe kidney, successfully treated through a left retroperitoneal approach on the retro-renal space. PMID:26730260

  17. Over-the-counter treatments and perineal hygiene in postmenopausal women

    PubMed Central

    Erekson, Elisabeth A.; Martin, Deanna K.; Brousseau, E. Christine; Yip, Sallis O.; Fried, Terri R.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The objective of this descriptive study was to quantify the personal hygiene habits/practices and over-the-counter (OTC) products used by postmenopausal women. Specifically, we were interested in any product that would contact the vulva or vagina. Methods We performed a cross-sectional study of postmenopausal women seeking routine gynecologic care. We developed questionnaire of personal hygiene habits/practices and OTC products used by women that would contact the vulva or vagina. We recruited postmenopausal women seeking gynecologic care from two separate gynecology practices. Descriptive statistics were performed as appropriate to characterize the frequency of reported treatments and practices. Results The questionnaire on OTC treatments and perineal hygiene was completed by 114 postmenopausal women. Fifty-eight women (50.9%) reported using at least one OTC vulvovaginal treatment in the last three months, including barrier treatments, topical anesthetics, powders, and antifungals. Women often used more than one OTC product. Thirty-seven women (32.5%) reported the use of two or more OTC products. Powders were used by 34 women (29.8%). Talcum powder was the most commonly used powder (76.5%, n/N = 26/34). Nine (7.9%) postmenopausal women reported douching in the last three months. Conclusions We found that over half of postmenopausal women seeking gynecologic care have used an OTC product for vulvovaginal symptoms in the last three months and 1/3 of women use 2 or more products. Because the use of OTC products is so common, our study highlights the need for detailed history inquiry about OTC product use and perineal hygiene practices. PMID:23880795

  18. Negative predictive value of preoperative computed tomography in determining pathologic local invasion, nodal disease, and abdominal metastases in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kagedan, D.J.; Frankul, F.; El-Sedfy, A.; McGregor, C.; Elmi, M.; Zagorski, B.; Dixon, M.E.; Mahar, A.L.; Vasilevska-Ristovska, J.; Helyer, L.; Rowsell, C.; Swallow, C.J.; Law, C.H.; Coburn, N.G.

    2016-01-01

    Background Before undergoing curative-intent resection of gastric adenocarcinoma (ga), most patients undergo abdominal computed tomography (ct) imaging to determine contraindications to resection (local invasion, distant metastases). However, the ability to detect contraindications is variable, and the literature is limited to single-institution studies. We sought to assess, on a population level, the clinical relevance of preoperative ct in evaluating the resectability of ga tumours in patients undergoing surgery. Methods In a provincial cancer registry, 2414 patients with ga diagnosed during 2005–2008 at 116 institutions were identified, and a primary chart review of radiology, operative, and pathology reports was performed for all patients. Preoperative abdominal ct reports were compared with intraoperative findings and final pathology reports (reference standard) to determine the negative predictive value (npv) of ct in assessing local invasion, nodal involvement, and intra-abdominal metastases. Results Among patients undergoing gastrectomy, the npv of ct imaging in detecting local invasion was 86.9% (n = 536). For nodal metastasis, the npv of ct was 43.3% (n = 450). Among patients undergoing surgical exploration, the npv of ct for intra-abdominal metastases was 52.3% (n = 407). Conclusions Preoperative abdominal ct imaging reported as negative is most accurate in determining local invasion and least accurate in nodal assessment. The poor npv of ct should be taken into account when selecting patients for staging laparoscopy. PMID:27536178

  19. Unexpectedly ease surgery for a worrisome abdominal mass: Pedunculated GISTs☆

    PubMed Central

    Baskiran, Adil; Otan, Emrah; Aydin, Cemalettin; Kayaalp, Cuneyt

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Discovery of abdominal masses often poses significant diagnostic difficulties. GISTs are mesenchymal masses, with specific histological features. Dimensions may vary from millimeters to giant tumours. We would like to present our case, which had an unexpectedly easy operative course which was easily handled with a simple surgical excision with a short operative duration. PRESENTATION OF CASE A 38 years old female patient was diagnosed to have an abdominal heterogen mass of 15 cm × 12 cm × 10 cm in dimension. Abdominal computed tomography revealed the solid mass between the stomach and pancreas corpus and tail, possibly orginating from the pancreas. With the preoperative diagnosis of locally invasive distal pancreas cancer the patient underwent laparotomy, following the dissection, the mass was observed to be originating from the posterior gastric Wall, extending exophytically with a peduncle of 5 cm in width, without any visual evidence for peritoneal invasion and metastasis. The tumour and the peduncle was resected with stapler device. Total operation time was 30 min. Postoperative course was uneventful. Pathologic diagnosis was gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GIST). DISCUSSION Pedunculated large GISTs are not frequent and they can enlarge as 15 cm in diameter and compress the neighbouring organs. When they were huge, it is difficult to differentiate the origin of the masses. GISTs should be considered in differential diagnosis of giant abdominal masses. CONCLUSION When GISTs are huge and pedunculated, it can be difficult to differentiate the origin of the masses. This case report presents unexpectedly ease surgery for a worrysome abdominal mass. PMID:23999120

  20. Penetrating abdominal trauma.

    PubMed

    Henneman, P L

    1989-08-01

    The management of patients with penetrating abdominal trauma is outlined in Figure 1. Patients with hemodynamic instability, evisceration, significant gastrointestinal bleeding, peritoneal signs, gunshot wounds with peritoneal violation, and type 2 and 3 shotgun wounds should undergo emergency laparotomy. The initial ED management of these patients includes airway management, monitoring of cardiac rhythm and vital signs, history, physical examination, and placement of intravenous lines. Blood should be obtained for initial hematocrit, type and cross-matching, electrolytes, and an alcohol level or drug screen as needed. Initial resuscitation should utilize crystalloid fluid replacement. If more than 2 liters of crystalloid are needed to stabilize an adult (less in a child), blood should be given. Group O Rh-negative packed red blood cells should be immediately available for a patient in impending arrest or massive hemorrhage. Type-specific blood should be available within 15 minutes. A patient with penetrating thoracic and high abdominal trauma should receive a portable chest x-ray, and a hemo- or pneumothorax should be treated with tube thoracostomy. An unstable patient with clinical signs consistent with a pneumothorax, however, should receive a tube thoracostomy prior to obtaining roentgenographic confirmation. If time permits, a nasogastric tube and Foley catheter should be placed, and the urine evaluated for blood (these procedures can be performed in the operating room). If kidney involvement is suspected because of hematuria or penetrating trauma in the area of a kidney or ureter in a patient requiring surgery, a single-shot IVP should be performed either in the ED or the operating room. An ECG is important in patients with possible cardiac involvement and in patients over the age of 40 going to the operating room. Tetanus status should be updated, and appropriate antibiotics covering bowel flora should be given. Operative management should rarely be delayed

  1. Economics of abdominal wall reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Bower, Curtis; Roth, J Scott

    2013-10-01

    The economic aspects of abdominal wall reconstruction are frequently overlooked, although understandings of the financial implications are essential in providing cost-efficient health care. Ventral hernia repairs are frequently performed surgical procedures with significant economic ramifications for employers, insurers, providers, and patients because of the volume of procedures, complication rates, the significant rate of recurrence, and escalating costs. Because biological mesh materials add significant expense to the costs of treating complex abdominal wall hernias, the role of such costly materials needs to be better defined to ensure the most cost-efficient and effective treatments for ventral abdominal wall hernias. PMID:24035086

  2. Acute incarcerated external abdominal hernia

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xue-Fei

    2014-01-01

    External abdominal hernia occurs when abdominal organs or tissues leave their normal anatomic site and protrude outside the skin through the congenital or acquired weakness, defects or holes on the abdominal wall, including inguinal hernia, umbilical hernia, femoral hernia and so on. Acute incarcerated hernia is a common surgical emergency. With advances in minimally invasive devices and techniques, the diagnosis and treatment have witnessed major changes, such as the use of laparoscopic surgery in some cases to achieve minimally invasive treatment. However, strict adherence to the indications and contraindications is still required. PMID:25489584

  3. Micromanaging abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Maegdefessel, Lars; Spin, Joshua M; Adam, Matti; Raaz, Uwe; Toh, Ryuji; Nakagami, Futoshi; Tsao, Philip S

    2013-01-01

    The contribution of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) disease to human morbidity and mortality has increased in the aging, industrialized world. In response, extraordinary efforts have been launched to determine the molecular and pathophysiological characteristics of the diseased aorta. This work aims to develop novel diagnostic and therapeutic strategies to limit AAA expansion and, ultimately, rupture. Contributions from multiple research groups have uncovered a complex transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulatory milieu, which is believed to be essential for maintaining aortic vascular homeostasis. Recently, novel small noncoding RNAs, called microRNAs, have been identified as important transcriptional and post-transcriptional inhibitors of gene expression. MicroRNAs are thought to "fine tune" the translational output of their target messenger RNAs (mRNAs) by promoting mRNA degradation or inhibiting translation. With the discovery that microRNAs act as powerful regulators in the context of a wide variety of diseases, it is only logical that microRNAs be thoroughly explored as potential therapeutic entities. This current review summarizes interesting findings regarding the intriguing roles and benefits of microRNA expression modulation during AAA initiation and propagation. These studies utilize disease-relevant murine models, as well as human tissue from patients undergoing surgical aortic aneurysm repair. Furthermore, we critically examine future therapeutic strategies with regard to their clinical and translational feasibility. PMID:23852016

  4. Abdominal aortic feminism.

    PubMed

    Mortimer, Alice Emily

    2014-01-01

    A 79-year-old woman presented to a private medical practice 2 years previously for an elective ultrasound screening scan. This imaging provided the evidence for a diagnosis of an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) to be made. Despite having a number of recognised risk factors for an AAA, her general practitioner at the time did not follow the guidance set out by the private medical professional, that is, to refer the patient to a vascular specialist to be entered into a surveillance programme and surgically evaluated. The patient became symptomatic with her AAA, was admitted to hospital and found to have a tender, symptomatic, 6 cm leaking AAA. She consented for an emergency open AAA repair within a few hours of being admitted to hospital, despite the 50% perioperative mortality risk. The patient spent 4 days in intensive care where she recovered well. She was discharged after a 12 day hospital stay but unfortunately passed away shortly after her discharge from a previously undiagnosed gastric cancer. PMID:25398912

  5. Acute Abdominal Pain Caused by an Infected Mesenteric Cyst in a 24-Year-Old Female

    PubMed Central

    Ponten, Joep B.; Zijta, Frank M.

    2016-01-01

    A mesenteric cyst is a rare cause for abdominal pain. This umbrella term includes cystic entities which reside in the mesentery. We present a case of an infected false mesenteric cyst in a 24-year-old female patient without prior surgery or known trauma. Mainstay of treatment involves surgical resection, although less invasive treatments have been described. Prognosis depends on the origin of the cyst. PMID:27190668

  6. Direct Arthroscopic Distal Clavicle Resection

    PubMed Central

    Lervick, Gregory N

    2005-01-01

    Degenerative change involving the acromioclavicular (AC) is frequently seen as part of a normal aging process. Occasionally, this results in a painful clinical condition. Although AC joint symptoms commonly occur in conjunction with other shoulder pathology, they may occur in isolation. Treatment of isolated AC joint osteoarthritis is initially non-surgical. When such treatment fails to provide lasting relief, surgical treatment is warranted. Direct (superior) arthroscopic resection of the distal (lateral) end of the clavicle is a successful method of treating the condition, as well as other isolated conditions of the AC joint. The following article reviews appropriate patient evaluation, surgical indications and technique. PMID:16089089

  7. JAMA Patient Page: Abdominal Hernia

    MedlinePlus

    ... an operation. Umbilical hernia Abdominal wall Intestinal loop Peritoneum Skin Peritoneum Umbilical annulus SYMPTOMS The first symptom of a ... vomiting, or constipation. Inguinal hernia Indirect inguinal hernia Peritoneum Deep inguinal ring Inguinal canal Superficial inguinal ring ...

  8. Functional Abdominal Pain in Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... At low doses, these medicines can be excellent pain relievers for some children. A fearful, anxious, or depressed child however should be fully assessed by a psychiatrist or psychologist. Some psychological treatments that help children cope with functional abdominal pain ...

  9. Acute appendicitis following endoscopic mucosal resection of cecal adenoma.

    PubMed

    Nemoto, Yukako; Tokuhisa, Junya; Shimada, Nagasato; Gomi, Tatsuya; Maetani, Iruru

    2015-07-21

    Endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) allows the removal of flat or sessile lesions, laterally spreading tumors, and carcinoma of the colon or the rectum limited to the mucosa or the superficial submucosa. Acute appendicitis is the most common abdominal emergency requiring emergency surgery, and it is also a rare complication of diagnostic colonoscopy and therapeutic endoscopy, including EMR. In the case presented here, a 53-year-old female underwent colonoscopy due to a positive fecal occult blood test and was diagnosed with cecal adenoma. She was referred to our hospital and admitted for treatment. The patient had no other symptoms. EMR was performed, and 7 h after the surgery, the patient experienced right -lower abdominal pain. Laboratory tests performed the following day revealed a WBC count of 16000/mm(3), a neutrophil count of 14144/mm(3), and a C-reactive protein level of 2.20 mg/dL, indicating an inflammatory response. Computed tomography also revealed appendiceal wall thickening and swelling, so acute appendicitis following EMR was diagnosed. Antibiotics were initiated leading to total resolution of the symptoms, and the patient was discharged on the sixth post-operative day. Pathological analysis revealed a high-grade cecal tubular adenoma. Such acute appendicitis following EMR is extremely rare, and EMR of the cecum may be a rare cause of acute appendicitis. PMID:26217100

  10. Acute appendicitis following endoscopic mucosal resection of cecal adenoma

    PubMed Central

    Nemoto, Yukako; Tokuhisa, Junya; Shimada, Nagasato; Gomi, Tatsuya; Maetani, Iruru

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) allows the removal of flat or sessile lesions, laterally spreading tumors, and carcinoma of the colon or the rectum limited to the mucosa or the superficial submucosa. Acute appendicitis is the most common abdominal emergency requiring emergency surgery, and it is also a rare complication of diagnostic colonoscopy and therapeutic endoscopy, including EMR. In the case presented here, a 53-year-old female underwent colonoscopy due to a positive fecal occult blood test and was diagnosed with cecal adenoma. She was referred to our hospital and admitted for treatment. The patient had no other symptoms. EMR was performed, and 7 h after the surgery, the patient experienced right -lower abdominal pain. Laboratory tests performed the following day revealed a WBC count of 16000/mm3, a neutrophil count of 14144/mm3, and a C-reactive protein level of 2.20 mg/dL, indicating an inflammatory response. Computed tomography also revealed appendiceal wall thickening and swelling, so acute appendicitis following EMR was diagnosed. Antibiotics were initiated leading to total resolution of the symptoms, and the patient was discharged on the sixth post-operative day. Pathological analysis revealed a high-grade cecal tubular adenoma. Such acute appendicitis following EMR is extremely rare, and EMR of the cecum may be a rare cause of acute appendicitis. PMID:26217100

  11. Chest wall resection for extrapulmonary tumor.

    PubMed

    Long, W P; Kline, R; Levine, E A

    1997-09-01

    Despite progress in early detection of breast cancer, a minority of women continue to present with extensive disease which may necessitate chest wall resection. Between 1992 and 1996, 14 patients were treated by surgical resection of the chest wall and reconstruction by the LSU Sections of Surgical Oncology and Plastic Surgery. Indications included resection of primary tumor, resection of recurrent tumor, and resection of radiation therapy induced damage to the chest wall. We report chest wall excision and reconstruction with no operative mortality and minor surgical morbidity in 21% of cases. Local control was achieved in 13 of 14 cases. Additionally we report uniform success in the palliation of ulcerating, painful, or infected chest wall lesions. Approximately 25% of patients treated for breast cancer and followed up for more than 6 months have remained free of disease. Chest wall resection is a useful modality in selected patients with extensive disease. PMID:9316348

  12. Laparoscopic management of intra-abdominal infections: Systematic review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Coccolini, Federico; Tranà, Cristian; Sartelli, Massimo; Catena, Fausto; Saverio, Salomone Di; Manfredi, Roberto; Montori, Giulia; Ceresoli, Marco; Falcone, Chiara; Ansaloni, Luca

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the role of laparoscopy in diagnosis and treatment of intra abdominal infections. METHODS: A systematic review of the literature was performed including studies where intra abdominal infections were treated laparoscopically. RESULTS: Early laparoscopic approaches have become the standard surgical technique for treating acute cholecystitis. The laparoscopic appendectomy has been demonstrated to be superior to open surgery in acute appendicitis. In the event of diverticulitis, laparoscopic resections have proven to be safe and effective procedures for experienced laparoscopic surgeons and may be performed without adversely affecting morbidity and mortality rates. However laparoscopic resection has not been accepted by the medical community as the primary treatment of choice. In high-risk patients, laparoscopic approach may be used for exploration or peritoneal lavage and drainage. The successful laparoscopic repair of perforated peptic ulcers for experienced surgeons, is demonstrated to be safe and effective. Regarding small bowel perforations, comparative studies contrasting open and laparoscopic surgeries have not yet been conducted. Successful laparoscopic resections addressing iatrogenic colonic perforation have been reported despite a lack of literature-based evidence supporting such procedures. In post-operative infections, laparoscopic approaches may be useful in preventing diagnostic delay and controlling the source. CONCLUSION: Laparoscopy has a good diagnostic accuracy and enables to better identify the causative pathology; laparoscopy may be recommended for the treatment of many intra-abdominal infections. PMID:26328036

  13. The Feline Dorsal Nerve of the Penis Arises from the Deep Perineal Nerve and Not the Sensory Afferent Branch

    PubMed Central

    Mariano, T. Y.; Boger, A. S.; Gustafson, K. J.

    2012-01-01

    Summary The cat has been used extensively as an animal model for urogenital studies involving the pudendal nerve. However, discrepancies persist in the literature regarding the origin of the dorsal nerve of the penis (DNP). This study used gross dissections and serial histological cross sections to demonstrate that the DNP arises from the deep perineal nerve and not the sensory afferent branch as previously reported. This finding indicates a better than previously appreciated neuroanatomical homology between the cat and human. PMID:18479311

  14. Abdominal emergencies in the geriatric patient

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Abdominal pain is one of the most frequent reasons that elderly people visit the emergency department (ED). In this article, we review the deadliest causes of abdominal pain in this population, including mesenteric ischemia, abdominal aortic aneurysm, and appendicitis and potentially lethal non-abdominal causes. We also highlight the pitfalls in diagnosing, or rather misdiagnosing, these clinical entities. PMID:25635203

  15. Abdominal intrauterine vacuum aspiration.

    PubMed

    Tjalma, W A A

    2014-01-01

    Evaluating and "cleaning" of the uterine cavity is probably the most performed operation in women. It is done for several reasons: abortion, evaluation of irregular bleeding in premenopausal period, and postmenopausal bleeding. Abortion is undoubtedly the number one procedure with more than 44 million pregnancies terminated every year. This procedure should not be underestimated and a careful preoperative evaluation is needed. Ideally a sensitive pregnancy test should be done together with an ultrasound in order to confirm a uterine pregnancy, excluding extra-uterine pregnancy, and to detect genital and/or uterine malformations. Three out of four abortions are performed by surgical methods. Surgical methods include a sharp, blunt, and suction curettage. Suction curettage or vacuum aspiration is the preferred method. Despite the fact that it is a relative safe procedure with major complications in less than one percent of cases, it is still responsible for 13% of all maternal deaths. All the figures have not declined in the last decade. Trauma, perforation, and bleeding are a danger triage. When there is a perforation, a laparoscopy should be performed immediately, in order to detect intra-abdominal lacerations and bleeding. The bleeding should be stopped as soon as possible in order to not destabilize the patient. When there is a perforation in the uterus, this "entrance" can be used to perform the curettage. This is particularly useful if there is trauma of the isthmus and uterine wall, and it is difficult to identify the uterine canal. A curettage is a frequent performed procedure, which should not be underestimated. If there is a perforation in the uterus, then this opening can safely be used for vacuum aspiration. PMID:25134300

  16. Vaginoscopic resection of vaginal septum.

    PubMed

    Nassif, Joseph; Al Chami, Ali; Abu Musa, Antoine; Nassar, Anwar H; Kurdi, Ahmad; Ghulmiyyah, Labib

    2012-12-01

    We report the resection of a vaginal septum while preserving the virginity of a 12-year-old girl with Herlyn-Werner-Wunderlich Syndrome (HWWS) having a didelphys uterus, obstructed hemivagina, and an ipsilateral renal agenesis with follow-up at 18 months. Successful resection of the vaginal septum with conservation of the hymenal ring and complete drainage of both the hematocolpos and the hematometra were achieved. Cyclic dysmenorrhea and pelvic pain were completely resolved on follow-up visits at 4, 6, and 18 months. Office hysteroscopy performed during the last follow-up visit revealed a patent vaginal vault without evidence of adenosis or recurrence of the vaginal septum. Vaginoscopy is a safe, convenient, and efficient diagnostic and therapeutic modality that can be used in the management of patients with an obstructed hemivagina. It maintains the patient's virginity and it is useful in patients with a restrictive vaginal opening or narrow vaginal canal. Furthermore, the hysteroscopic excision of the vaginal septum offers minimal risk of recurrence of the septal defect. PMID:23315718

  17. Endoscopic resection of sinonasal malignancies.

    PubMed

    Nicolai, Piero; Castelnuovo, Paolo; Bolzoni Villaret, Andrea

    2011-04-01

    Malignant tumors of the sinonasal tract are rare, accounting for only 1% of all malignancies. Although they are associated with substantial histological heterogeneity, surgery plays a key role in their management. This review addresses the evolution of current treatments in view of the introduction of endoscopic resection techniques. The absence of facial incisions and osteotomies, decreased hospitalization time, better control of bleeding, improved visualization of tumor borders, and reduced morbidity and mortality rate are the major advantages of endoscopic techniques in comparison to traditional external approaches. The major criticisms focus on oncologic results in view of the short/intermediate follow-up of large series, which have commonly grouped together several histologies that may be associated with different prognoses. Since prospective studies contrasting the results of endoscopic and craniofacial resections are difficult to carry out given the rarity of the disease together with ethical issues, the creation of a large database would favor the analysis of several variables related to the patient, tumor, and treatment on survival performed on a large number of patients. PMID:21243539

  18. Minilaparoscopic Colorectal Resections: Technical Note

    PubMed Central

    Bona, S.; Molteni, M.; Montorsi, M.

    2012-01-01

    Laparoscopic colorectal resections have been shown to provide short-term advantages in terms of postoperative pain, general morbidity, recovery, and quality of life. To date, long-term results have been proved to be comparable to open surgery irrefutably only for colon cancer. Recently, new trends keep arising in the direction of minimal invasiveness to reduce surgical trauma after colorectal surgery in order to improve morbidity and cosmetic results. The few reports available in the literature on single-port technique show promising results. Natural orifices endoscopic techniques still have very limited application. We focused our efforts in standardising a minilaparoscopic technique (using 3 to 5 mm instruments) for colorectal resections since it can provide excellent cosmetic results without changing the laparoscopic approach significantly. Thus, there is no need for a new learning curve as minilaparoscopy maintains the principle of instrument triangulation. This determines an undoubted advantage in terms of feasibility and reproducibility of the procedure without increasing operative time. Some preliminary experiences confirm that minilaparoscopic colorectal surgery provides acceptable results, comparable to those reported for laparoscopic surgery with regard to operative time, morbidity, and hospital stay. Randomized controlled studies should be conducted to confirm these early encouraging results. PMID:22548166

  19. Arthroscopic resection of wrist ganglia.

    PubMed

    Mathoulin, C; Hoyos, A; Pelaez, J

    2004-12-01

    The arthroscopic resection of synovial cysts of the wrist is a simple technique which is comfortable for the patient. We report on a series of 96 patients with dorsal synovial cysts (75 women, 21 men). All patients had undergone preliminary treatment which had been unsuccessful. We operated on 32 patients with a volar cyst (27 women, five men). All the patients were operated on as outpatients under local regional anaesthesia. For the dorsal cysts, after having precisely located the cyst, it is then resected after having inserted a shaver directly through the wall of the cyst starting with the capsule. For the volar cysts the arthroscope was inserted through a 3-4 portal and the shaver was inserted through a 1-2 radiocarpal portal. In all cases, there was no immobilisation and a range of motion was started the same day. For the dorsal cysts, our average follow-up was 34 months (range 12-46 months). There were no complications. We had four recurrences. For the palmar cysts, our average follow-up was 26 months (range 12-39 months). There have been no recurrences to date. PMID:15810100

  20. Perioperative Therapy for Surgically Resectable Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Du, Lingling; DeFoe, Melissa; Ruzinova, Marianna B; Olsen, Jeffrey R; Wang-Gillam, Andrea

    2015-08-01

    It is estimated that 10% to 20% of patients with pancreatic cancer present with resectable disease. Although surgery offers curative intent, the median survival after curative resection is less than 2 years. To improve clinical outcomes in this patient population, clinical studies have investigated the role of perioperative therapy, including neoadjuvant and adjuvant treatment in resectable pancreatic cancer. The role of adjuvant therapy has been well established by large randomized phase III studies, whereas benefit of the neoadjuvant approach remains inconclusive. Here, we review various treatment modalities and their clinical benefits in resectable pancreatic cancer. PMID:26226906

  1. Awake operative videothoracoscopic pulmonary resections.

    PubMed

    Pompeo, Eugenio; Mineo, Tommaso C

    2008-08-01

    The authors' initial experience with awake videothoracoscopic lung resection suggests that these procedures can be easily and safely performed under sole thoracic epidural anesthesia with no mortality and negligible morbidity. One major concern was that operating on a ventilating lung would render surgical maneuvers more difficult because of the lung movements and lack of a sufficient operating space. Instead, the open pneumothorax created after trocar insertion produces a satisfactory lung collapse that does not hamper surgical maneuvers. These results contradict the accepted assumption that the main prerequisite for allowing successful thoracoscopic lung surgery is general anesthesia with one-lung ventilation. No particular training is necessary to accomplish an awake pulmonary resection for teams experienced in thoracoscopic surgery, and conversions to general anesthesia are mainly caused by the presence of extensive fibrous pleural adhesions or the development of intractable panic attacks. Overall, awake pulmonary resection is easily accepted and well tolerated by patients, as confirmed by the high anesthesia satisfaction score, which was better than in nonawake control patients. Nonetheless, thoracic epidural anesthesia has potential complications, including epidural hematoma, spinal cord injury, and phrenic nerve palsy caused by inadvertently high anesthetic level, but these never occurred in the authors' experience. Further concerns relate to patient participation in operating room conversations or risk for development of perioperative panic attacks. However, the authors have found that reassuring the patient during the procedure, explaining step-by-step what is being performed, and even showing the ongoing procedure on the operating video can greatly improve the perioperative wellness and expectations of patients, particularly if the procedure is performed for oncologic diseases. Panic attacks occurred in few patients and could be usually managed through

  2. Perineal raphe with special reference to its extension to the anus: a histological study using human fetuses.

    PubMed

    Jin, Zhe Wu; Jin, Yu; Li, Xiang Wu; Murakami, Gen; Rodríguez-Vázquez, José Francisco; Wilting, Joerg

    2016-06-01

    The raphe of the human penis and scrotum is considered to develop secondarily after disappearance of the initial midline seam by fusion of the bilateral genital folds. However, the fetal development was still obscure. We examined histological sections of 30 fetuses (17 males and 13 females) at 10-15 weeks. In male fetuses, the scrotum was not yet clearly identified because of no descent of testis. The perineal raphe was thin and wavy at 10 weeks, and it was continuous with and took a direction same as the inferior wall of the closed penile urethra after physiological hypospadias. Depending on growth of the bulbospongiosus muscle and corpus spongiosus penis, the midline intermuscular septum obtained a connection to the subcutaneous wavy raphe and made the latter thick and straight at 12-15 weeks. Notably, the perineal raphe extended posteriorly to attach to the external anal sphincter. In female fetuses, an epithelial fusion occurred along a short distance at the posterior end of the vestibule. However, in front of the external anal sphincter, a large midline mesenchymal tissue from the urorectal septum did not contain a raphe-like structure. Moreover, since the bilateral bulbospongiosus muscles were separated widely by the vestibule, they did not provide a midline septum. Fetal development of the perineal raphe was accelerated by reinforcement from the muscular septum. In contrast, without such a muscular support, the female raphe could not maintain its growth even if the seed appeared at the posterior end of the vestibule. PMID:27382513

  3. Perineal raphe with special reference to its extension to the anus: a histological study using human fetuses

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Yu; Li, Xiang Wu; Murakami, Gen; Rodríguez-Vázquez, José Francisco; Wilting, Joerg

    2016-01-01

    The raphe of the human penis and scrotum is considered to develop secondarily after disappearance of the initial midline seam by fusion of the bilateral genital folds. However, the fetal development was still obscure. We examined histological sections of 30 fetuses (17 males and 13 females) at 10–15 weeks. In male fetuses, the scrotum was not yet clearly identified because of no descent of testis. The perineal raphe was thin and wavy at 10 weeks, and it was continuous with and took a direction same as the inferior wall of the closed penile urethra after physiological hypospadias. Depending on growth of the bulbospongiosus muscle and corpus spongiosus penis, the midline intermuscular septum obtained a connection to the subcutaneous wavy raphe and made the latter thick and straight at 12–15 weeks. Notably, the perineal raphe extended posteriorly to attach to the external anal sphincter. In female fetuses, an epithelial fusion occurred along a short distance at the posterior end of the vestibule. However, in front of the external anal sphincter, a large midline mesenchymal tissue from the urorectal septum did not contain a raphe-like structure. Moreover, since the bilateral bulbospongiosus muscles were separated widely by the vestibule, they did not provide a midline septum. Fetal development of the perineal raphe was accelerated by reinforcement from the muscular septum. In contrast, without such a muscular support, the female raphe could not maintain its growth even if the seed appeared at the posterior end of the vestibule. PMID:27382513

  4. Management of fourth degree obstetric perineal tear without colostomy using non - stimulated gracilis - our experience over eleven years

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Jiten; Patil, Anuradha J.; Musande, Bhaskar; Bhamare, Abhishek B.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Although gracilis muscle transposition for faecal incontinence has been well-described method, its literature for use in obstetric perineal tear without colostomy is sparse. In this study, we have tried to analyse its use in fourth-degree obstetric perineal tears. Patients and Methods: A total of 30 patients with recto-vaginal fistula with faecal incontinence secondary to obstetric perineal tear were retrospectively studied between February 2003 and May 2014. The recto-vaginal fistula was explored, dissected and identification of sphincters was done using muscle stimulator. Fistula closure was done followed by sphincter repair, vaginal tightening procedure and single gracilis transposition. None of the patients had covering colostomy. Faecal incontinence was assessed pre- and post-operatively by digital rectal examination (single examiner), Park's score and Corman's score in all cases and using barium hold and transperineal ultrasonography, manometric studies in a few cases. The outcome was measured at an average follow-up of 8.8 months (7–24 months). Results: As per Park's score 26 patients had Grade I continence, two had Grade II and two patients had Grade III continence. Corman's score improved from fair to excellent in 26 patients. The patients in whom manometry was performed showed a remarkable rise in both resting and squeeze pressures. Two patients developed post-operative infections in upper 1/3 thigh incision site and three patients at gluteal region scar site. Conclusion: Satisfactory continence following gracilis muscle could be achieved. PMID:27274119

  5. Internal abdominal hernia: Intestinal obstruction due to trans-mesenteric hernia containing transverse colon

    PubMed Central

    Crispín-Trebejo, Brenda; Robles-Cuadros, María Cristina; Orendo-Velásquez, Edwin; Andrade, Felipe P.

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Internal abdominal hernias are infrequent but an increasing cause of bowel obstruction still often underdiagnosed. Among adults its usual causes are congenital anomalies of intestinal rotation, postsurgical iatrogenic, trauma or infection diseases. PRESENTATION OF CASE We report the case of a 63-year-old woman with history of chronic constipation. The patient was hospitalized for two days with acute abdominal pain, abdominal distension and inability to eliminate flatus. The X-ray and abdominal computerized tomography scan (CT scan) showed signs of intestinal obstruction. Exploratory laparotomy performed revealed a trans-mesenteric hernia containing part of the transverse colon. The intestine was viable and resection was not necessary. Only the hernia was repaired. DISCUSSION Internal trans-mesenteric hernia constitutes a rare type of internal abdominal hernia, corresponding from 0.2 to 0.9% of bowel obstructions. This type carries a high risk of strangulation and even small hernias can be fatal. This complication is specially related to trans-mesenteric hernias as it tends to volvulize. Unfortunately, the clinical diagnosis is rather difficult. CONCLUSION Trans-mesenteric internal abdominal hernia may be asymptomatic for many years because of its nonspecific symptoms. The role of imaging test is relevant but still does not avoid the necessity of exploratory surgery when clinical features are uncertain. PMID:24880799

  6. Traumatic rupture of a Meckel’s diverticulum due to blunt abdominal trauma in a soccer game: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Tummers, W.S.; van der Vorst, J.R.; Swank, D.J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction a Meckel’s diverticulum is one of the most common congenital anomalies of the digestive tract. The reported lifetime complication rate is 4%, mostly due to hemorrhage, obstruction, perforation or inflammation. A symptomatic Meckel’s diverticulum due to rupture after blunt abdominal trauma is very rare. We believe this case report is the first reporting a rupture of a Meckel’s diverticulum after a low velocity blunt abdominal trauma and outlining the importance of a thorough and complete examination of the patient after blunt abdominal trauma. Presentation of case a 17-year-old male presented with abdominal pain after blunt abdominal trauma during a soccer game. Physical examination showed signs of peritonitis in all quadrants of the abdomen. During admission the patient deteriorated with decreasing blood pressure and raising pulse rate. A CT-scan showed free abdominal fluid. Our patient was scheduled for an emergent laparotomy where a perforated Meckel’s diverticulum with fecal spill was found. A segmental ileal resection was performed. Post-operative, patient developed a pneumonia and also intra-abdominal abscesses treated with percutaneous drainage. After an admission period of 17-days the patient was discharged. Conclusion perforation of a Meckel’s diverticulum is rarely suspected as a cause of acute deterioration following blunt abdominal trauma. This case shows the importance of awareness of this kind of injury especially in male patients. PMID:26701844

  7. The use of gentamicin-PMMA chains in abdominal surgery: a pilot study of prophylaxis against wound infection.

    PubMed

    Aubrey, D A; Jenkins, N H; Morgan, W P; Thomas, M

    1986-01-01

    A prospective study was carried out to examine the effectiveness of gentamicin-impregnated polymethylmethacrylate beads in the prevention of wound sepsis after gastro-intestinal surgery. The beads were laid in the abdominal and perineal incisions (61 wounds) of 55 patients at the end of the operative procedures, and were withdrawn in stages from the fifth post-operative day. This method of administration results in a sustained high antibiotic concentration in the wound with low serum and urine concentrations, thus eliminating the dangers of gentamicin toxicity. Wound infection occurred in only 1 instance, a favourable result when compared to historical controls. It is suggested that further controlled studies of this method of topical prophylactic antibiotic administration are indicated. PMID:3714759

  8. Abdominal Wall Endometriosis on the Right Port Site After Laparoscopy: Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Cozzolino, Mauro; Magnolfi, Stefania; Corioni, Serena; Moncini, Daniela; Mattei, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Background Endometriosis can be intrapelvic or, rarely, extrapelvic. Endometriosis involving the rectus abdominis muscle on the trocar port site is a rare event; until now, only 16 cases have been reported in the literature. The majority of cases were associated with previous abdominal surgery such as diagnostic laparoscopy, cyst excision, appendectomy, myomectomy, or cholecystectomy. We review all the reported cases of this unusual form of extrapelvic endometriosis. Case Report We report a new case of abdominal wall endometriosis at the trocar port site in the rectus abdominis muscle in a woman who had undergone 2 laparoscopies for endometriosis in the 3 years before coming to our attention. The diagnosis was made by sonography. We performed a surgical resection of the lesion with a free macroscopic margin of 5-10 mm. Conclusion Endometriosis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of any abdominal swelling. In our experience, surgery is the treatment of choice. PMID:26412997

  9. Huge Perineal Tumour: A Rare Presentation of Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumour of Rectum.

    PubMed

    Nahar, K; Salahuddin, G M; Islam, M R; Islam, M S; Quddus, M A; Islam, M A; Debnath, B C

    2016-04-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GIST) is a relatively rare neoplasm of gastrointestinal tract of which Rectal GIST is uncommon. It produces symptoms of per rectal bleeding or change in bowel habit. Recurrences following curative resection are predominantly intraabdominal, hepatic metastasis occurring at a median 20-25 months following the primary surgery. A 42 years old male presented a huge mass in hypogastrium, the size of which was reduced ofter neoadjuvant therapy for period of 1.5 years. He underwent abdominoperineal resection. He developed recurrences in perineum three times and in thigh at short intervals after primary resection. He also developed liver metastasis. He died two and half years after primary diagnosis. Rectal GIST should be included in differential diagnosis of intraabdominal mass and preoperative diagnosis based on histopathological as well as the immunohistochemical feature of the CD(117) and CD(34). Although complete surgical resection with negative tumour margin is the principal curative procedure for primary and non metastatic tumours, further studies are still needed for the determination of the most effective treatment strategy for patients of rectal GIST. PMID:27277373

  10. Perineal talc use and ovarian cancer risk: a case study of scientific standards in environmental epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Huncharek, Michael; Muscat, Joshua

    2011-11-01

    A number of observational studies (largely case-control) conducted over the last two decades suggest an association between use of talc powders on the female perineum and increased risk of ovarian cancer. A subset of these reports shows a roughly 30-60% increased risk of ovarian cancer associated with perineal talc exposure. A number of researchers partly base their conclusions of an association on the '…chemical relationship between talc and asbestos', the latter substance being a known human carcinogen. Although separating causal from noncausal explanations for an observed statistical association is a difficult process, there currently exist commonly accepted guidelines by which such inferences can be made. These scientific approaches include consideration of the strength of the association, the consistency of the finding across studies, and existence of a biological explanation of the observed phenomenon, among others. When applied to the context of a proposed talc/ovarian cancer association, we conclude that the weak statistical associations observed in a number of epidemiological studies do not support a causal association. PMID:21712717

  11. Impact of obesity on functional and oncological outcomes in radical perineal prostatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Altay, Bulent; Erkurt, Bulent; Guzelburc, Vahit; Kiremit, Murat Can; Boz, Mustafa Yucel; Albayrak, Selami

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: We evaluated the impact of obesity on perioperative morbidity, functional, and oncological outcomes after radical perineal prostatectomy (RPP). Methods: A total of 298 consecutive patients underwent RPP at our institution. Patients were categorized into 3 groups based on their body mass index (BMI): Normal weight <25 kg/m2 (Group 1), overweight 25 to <30 kg/m2 (Group 2), and obese ≥30 kg/m2 (Group 3). We compared the groups with respect to perioperative data, postoperative oncologic, and functional outcomes. Evaluation of urinary continence and erectile function was performed using a patient-reported questionnaire and the International Index of Erectile Function-5 questionnaire, respectively, administered preoperatively and at 3, 6, and 12 months. Limitations included short follow-up time, retrospective design and lack of a morbidly obese group. Results: No significant differences were found among the 3 groups with regard to operative time, estimated blood loss, length of hospital stay, catheter removal time, positive surgical margin, and complication rates. At 12 months, 94.7%, 95% and 95% of normal, overweight and obese patients, respectively, were continent (free of pad use) (p = 0.81). At 12 months, 30.6%, 29.8% and 30.4% of patients had spontaneous erections and were able to penetrate and complete intercourse in Group 1, Group 2, and Group 3, respectively (p = 0.63). Conclusions: In this cohort of patients, no clinically relevant risks were associated with increasing BMI. PMID:26600881

  12. Advances in the Surgical Management of Resectable and Borderline Resectable Pancreas Cancer.

    PubMed

    Helmink, Beth A; Snyder, Rebecca A; Idrees, Kamran; Merchant, Nipun B; Parikh, Alexander A

    2016-04-01

    Successful surgical resection offers the only chance for cure in patients with pancreatic cancer. However, pancreatic resection is feasible in less than 20% of the patients. In this review, the current state of surgical management of pancreatic cancer is discussed. The definition of resectability based on cross-sectional imaging and the technical aspects of surgery, including vascular resection and/or reconstruction, management of aberrant vascular anatomy and extent of lymphadenectomy, are appraised. Furthermore, common pancreatic resection-specific postoperative complications and their management are reviewed. PMID:27013365

  13. High-intensity focused ultrasound treatment for intra-abdominal desmoid tumors: a report of four cases.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yulan; Huang, Yanqin; Zhou, Meiqi; Ying, Xiao; Hu, Xiaoye

    2016-04-01

    Desmoid tumors are rare clonal fibroblastic proliferations that can arise at abdominal or extra-abdominal sites. Complete surgical resection is the primary treatment for resectable desmoid tumors, but a high rate of local recurrence has been reported even after complete resection. For patients with a recurrent tumor, the goals of treatment are to control the recurrence, maintain quality of life, and prolong survival. Radiofrequency ablation, radiotherapy, chemotherapy, and other medical therapies can be used as alternative methods, but there are considerable controversies over the roles of these methods in the management of desmoid tumors. High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is a minimally invasive and effective method for treatment of solid tumors. We used HIFU to treat four patients with intra-abdominal desmoid tumors from June 2011 to September 2013. Post-procedural pain was seen in all patients. One patient had an intra-abdominal abscess and another suffered a slight injury to the femoral nerve. The patients were followed up for 19-46 months (mean 34 months) until April 2015. The tumor in one patient disappeared, and no tumor progression was observed in the other patients. PMID:27033872

  14. [A Case of an Unresectable Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer with Surrounding Organ Invasion Successfully Resected after Chemotherapy with mFOLFOX6 plus Cetuximab].

    PubMed

    Takagi, Hironori; Ariake, Kyohei; Takemura, Shinichi; Doi, Takashi

    2016-03-01

    A 63-year-old man visited our hospital with pain on micturition and was found to have a large rectal tumor with urinary bladder invasion on enhanced abdominal computed tomography (CT). The tumor appeared to be unresectable at presentation; thus, sigmoid colostomy was performed and chemotherapy was initiated. The tumor was found to be EGFR-positive and contained a wild-type KRAS. The mFOLFOX6 plus cetuximab (c-mab) regimen was initiated. The follow-up CT scan showed good tumor shrinkage after 4 courses of chemotherapy; 4 additional courses were administered. The tumor eventually regressed by more than 60% and was judged to be resectable. High anterior resection of the rectum with partial resection of the bladder was performed. Abdominal wall metastasis was detected 8 months after surgery, and additional resection was performed. The patient remained well with no other recurrence 8 months after the high anterior resection. Although chemoradiotherapy is the standard preoperative treatment of locally advanced rectal cancer, systemic therapy is effective in certain cases such as substantial tumor invasion of adjacent organs or metastasis. Here, we present a case of rectal cancer that became curatively resectable after preoperative chemotherapy with mFOLFOX6 plus c-mab. PMID:27067860

  15. Pure Laparoscopic Liver Resection for Malignant Liver Tumor: Anatomic Resection Versus Nonanatomic Resection

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ya-Xi; Xiu, Dian-Rong; Yuan, Chun-Hui; Jiang, Bin; Ma, Zhao-Lai

    2016-01-01

    Background: Laparoscopic liver resection (LLR) has been considered to be safe and feasible. However, few studies focused on the comparison between the anatomic and nonanatomic LLR. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to compare the perioperative factors and outcomes of the anatomic and nonanatomic LLR, especially the area of liver parenchymal transection and blood loss per unit area. Methods: In this study, surgical and oncological data of patients underwent pure LLR procedures for malignant liver tumor were prospectively collected. Blood loss per unit area of liver parenchymal transection was measured and considered as an important parameter. All procedures were conducted by a single surgeon. Results: During nearly 5 years, 84 patients with malignant liver tumor received a pure LLR procedure were included. Among them, 34 patients received anatomic LLR and 50 received nonanatomic LLR, respectively. Patients of the two groups were similar in terms of demographic features and tumor characteristics, despite the tumor size was significantly larger in the anatomic LLR group than that in the nonanatomic LLR group (4.77 ± 2.57 vs. 2.87 ± 2.10 cm, P = 0.001). Patients who underwent anatomic resection had longer operation time (364.09 ± 131.22 vs. 252.00 ± 135.21 min, P < 0.001) but less blood loss per unit area (7.85 ± 7.17 vs. 14.17 ± 10.43 ml/cm2, P = 0.018). Nonanatomic LLR was associated with more blood loss when the area of parenchymal transection was equal to the anatomic LLR. No mortality occurred during the hospital stay and 30 days after the operation. Moreover, there was no difference in the incidence of postoperative complications. The disease-free and overall survival rates showed no significant differences between the anatomic LLR and nonanatomic LLR groups. Conclusions: Both anatomic and nonanatomic pure LLR are safe and feasible. Measuring the area of parenchymal transection is a simple and effective method to estimate the outcomes of the liver

  16. Abdominal radiation causes bacterial translocation

    SciTech Connect

    Guzman-Stein, G.; Bonsack, M.; Liberty, J.; Delaney, J.P.

    1989-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if a single dose of radiation to the rat abdomen leads to bacterial translocation into the mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN). A second issue addressed was whether translocation correlates with anatomic damage to the mucosa. The radiated group (1100 cGy) which received anesthesia also was compared with a control group and a third group which received anesthesia alone but no abdominal radiation. Abdominal radiation lead to 100% positive cultures of MLN between 12 hr and 4 days postradiation. Bacterial translocation was almost nonexistent in the control and anesthesia group. Signs of inflammation and ulceration of the intestinal mucosa were not seen until Day 3 postradiation. Mucosal damage was maximal by Day 4. Bacterial translocation onto the MLN after a single dose of abdominal radiation was not apparently dependent on anatomical, histologic damage of the mucosa.

  17. Repeated resections for liver metastasis from primary adrenocortical carcinoma: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Nakano, Ryosuke; Satoh, Daisuke; Nakajima, Hirochika; Yoshimura, Yuri; Miyoshi, Hisanobu; Yoshida, Kazuhiro; Matsukawa, Hiroyoshi; Shiozaki, Shigehiro; Ichimura, Kouichi; Okajima, Masazumi; Ninomiya, Motoki

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Adrenal cortical carcinoma (ACC) is a very rare type of tumor that generally has a poor prognosis. Little has been reported on repeated liver resections with recurrent metastasis still confined to the liver. In this report, we describe a case of functioning ACC in a 65-year-old woman with 2 liver metastases of the ACC (at 1.5 and 4 years) after the right adrenalectomy. Presentation of case A 65-year-old woman was referred to our hospital based on a suspicion of hyperaldosteronism. Abdominal computed tomography revealed a lesion at the right adrenal gland; therefore, we performed right adrenalectomy and subsequently diagnosed the lesion as ACC. However, follow-up computed tomography at 1.5 and 4 years after the right adrenalectomy revealed liver metastasis of ACC; liver resection was performed for both metastases. Discussion Complete surgical resection is the established approach for the treatment of ACC. The prognosis of ACC is usually dismal, and recurrence rates of up to 85% have been reported. However, the appropriate treatment for recurrent ACC is not well established, and the effectiveness of other modalities, such as chemotherapy and radiotherapy, is not proven. Therefore, surgical resection may currently be the most appropriate treatment modality, as the patient achieved a disease-free interval of 2.5 years after the first liver resection. Conclusion In selected patients with recurrent or metastatic ACC, resection is likely to be associated with prolonged survival. However, a full cure is generally not achievable, and a multidisciplinary approach is likely needed to achieve long-term disease-free status and survival. PMID:25765741

  18. Abdominal bloating: pathophysiology and treatment.

    PubMed

    Seo, A Young; Kim, Nayoung; Oh, Dong Hyun

    2013-10-01

    Abdominal bloating is a very common and troublesome symptom of all ages, but it has not been fully understood to date. Bloating is usually associated with functional gastrointestinal disorders or organic diseases, but it may also appear alone. The pathophysiology of bloating remains ambiguous, although some evidences support the potential mechanisms, including gut hypersensitivity, impaired gas handling, altered gut microbiota, and abnormal abdominal-phrenic reflexes. Owing to the insufficient understanding of these mechanisms, the available therapeutic options are limited. However, medical treatment with some prokinetics, rifaximin, lubiprostone and linaclotide could be considered in the treatment of bloating. In addition, dietary intervention is important in relieving symptom in patients with bloating. PMID:24199004

  19. Abdominal pain with a twist

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Malrotation in children is due to either an incomplete or non-rotation of the foetal mid-gut during perinatal development. Presentation is usually in the first few weeks of life, often with life-threatening volvulus and ischaemia. However, it can be a rare cause of abdominal pain in older children and young adults. We present such a case, as a reminder to emergency physicians that malrotation should be considered in the differential diagnosis of recurrent or chronic abdominal pain not only in children but also in adolescents. PMID:21635723

  20. Ultrasonographic diagnosis in abdominal tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Sheikh, M; Moosa, I; Hussein, F M; Qurttom, M A; Behbehani, A I

    1999-05-01

    Sonographic findings were retrospectively analysed in 39 patients with proven abdominal tuberculosis (TB). The patients were treated over 15 years at a major teaching hospital, Mubarak Al-Kabber Hospital, in Kuwait. The findings included clear or complex ascites with fine strands, loculations and debris. The other findings were lymphadenopathy, bowel wall thickening, omental mass, focal lesions in the liver and spleen and psoas abscess. The sonographic findings in abdominal TB are not specific but may give valuable information to prevent unnecessary laparotomy. PMID:10901897

  1. Recurrent abdominal pain in children.

    PubMed

    Buch, Niyaz A; Ahmad, Sheikh Mushtaq; Ahmed, S Zubair; Ali, Syed Wazid; Charoo, B A; Hassan, Masood Ul

    2002-09-01

    Eighty five children with recurrent abdominal pain(RAP) were studied. Organic cause was noticed in 70 cases and non-organic in 15 cases. Giardiasis was the commonest organic cause in 57 (67.0 percent), either alone or with other parasitic infestations. Other organic causes include gallstones (4.7 percent), urinary infections (4.7 percent), esophagitis/gastritis (3.5 percent) and abdominal tuberculosis (2.3 percent). Single parent, school phobia, sibling rivalry, RAP in other family members and nocturnal enuresis are significant factors associated with nonorganic causes PMID:12368527

  2. Secondary abdominal appendicular ectopic pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Nama, Vivek; Gyampoh, Bright; Karoshi, Mahantesh; McRae, Reynold; Opemuyi, Isaac

    2007-01-01

    Although the case fatality rate for ectopic pregnancies has decreased to 0.08% in industrialized countries, it still represents 3.8% of maternal mortality in the United States alone. In developing countries, the case fatality rate varies from 3% to 27%. Laparoscopic management of tubal pregnancies is now the standard form of treatment where this technology is available. Abdominal pregnancies are rare, and secondary implantation of tubal ectopic pregnancies is the most common cause of abdominal gestations. We present an interesting case of secondary implantation of a tubal ectopic pregnancy to highlight the appendix as a possible secondary implantation site after a tubal ectopic pregnancy. PMID:17630175

  3. Complete Surgical Resection of a Leiomyosarcoma Arising from the Inferior Vena Cava

    PubMed Central

    Sonoda, Hirofumi; Minamimura, Keisuke; Endo, Yuhei; Irie, Shoichi; Hirata, Toru; Kobayashi, Takashi; Mafune, Ken-ichi; Mori, Masaya

    2015-01-01

    A 76-year-old Japanese man was referred to our hospital with chief complaint of right hypochondoralgia. Abdominal ultrasound showed a retroperitoneal tumor in the suprarenal region of the right kidney. Computed tomography revealed an enhanced lobular tumor with irregular, circumscribed, and indistinct border. Ultrasound-guided biopsy was performed. The tumor consisted of spindle-shaped cells with a giant nucleus and multinuclear cells. The diagnosis was leiomyosarcoma by immunohistochemical staining. The patient underwent surgery accessed by a right eighth intercostal thoracoabdominal incision. The tumor was completely resected, accompanied by removal of the posterosuperior segment of the right hepatic lobe, right adrenal gland, and a portion of the inferior vena cava (IVC). The histopathologic diagnosis was leiomyosarcoma arising from the IVC. We present a rare case of a successfully managed leiomyosarcoma of the IVC. This case suggests the importance of curative surgical resection of the tumor due to low efficacy of adjuvant chemotherapy for leiomyosarcoma. PMID:26167180

  4. Laparoscopic resection of synchronous gastric cancer and primary small intestinal lymphoma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ding-Wei; Pan, Yu; Yan, Jia-Fei; Mou, Yi-Ping

    2014-05-28

    Synchronous gastric cancer and primary small intestinal lymphoma are extremely rare. A 49-year-old woman was referred to our hospital with a history of upper abdominal pain for two weeks and was diagnosed with synchronous cancer. During hospitalization, the patient underwent laparoscopic distal gastrectomy + resection of bilateral ovaries + partial resection of both small intestine and descending colon. Pathological examination revealed a synchronous cancer consisting of early gastric cancer with poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma located in mucosa, with lymph node metastasis (3+/29) (T1N1M0, stage IB); and diffuse large B cell lymphoma of small intestine involving descending colon and bilateral ovaries, with lymph node metastasis (2+/5) (Ann Arbor IIE). The patient recovered well, without any obvious complications and was discharged on post-operative day 7. The patient received six cycles of chemotherapy after operation. She has been doing well with no evidence of recurrence for 13 mo. PMID:24876758

  5. Pathological evidence of the cause of spontaneous regression in a case of resected hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Matsuoka, Shunichi; Tamura, Akinori; Moriyama, Mitsuhiko; Fujikawa, Hirotoshi; Mimatsu, Kenji; Oida, Takatsugu; Sugitani, Masahiko

    2015-01-01

    A 67-year-old man presented for an evaluation after experiencing right hypochondrial pain lasting for two months. Abdominal ultrasonography showed a hepatic tumor in the right liver and extremely mild hepatic steatosis. The imaging findings indicated that the tumor (43 mm in size) was ischemic, and the lesion was surgically resected and examined. The histopathological findings demonstrated 95% necrosis with moderately differentiated hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The diagnosis was HCC with spontaneous regression. There was also pathological evidence of thrombus formation in the peripheral arteries and portal veins. In addition, the non-cancerous regions of the liver were diagnosed as exhibiting non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. The pathological findings obtained after resection of the HCC lesion showed spontaneous regression. PMID:25742889

  6. Delayed tumor resection in a 5-year-old child with bilateral Wilms tumor.

    PubMed

    Carmichael, Samuel P; Pulliam, Joseph F; D'Orazio, John A

    2013-01-01

    We describe the case of a 5-year-old girl whose abdominal pain and distension were caused by Wilms tumor of the kidney. Because of the bilateral nature of her disease, she was spared biopsy or initial nephrectomy as part of her treatment course. Rather, she was treated presumptively for Wilms tumor based primarily on radiologic findings. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy consisting of vincristine, dactinomycin and doxorubicin was given to facilitate nephron-sparing surgery for tumor resection. Her initial chemotherapeutic course was complicated by tumor lysis syndrome manifested by elevated serum uric acid and was treated effectively with hyperhydration and alkalization of intravenous fluids. The patient's disease responded well to chemotherapy, and she underwent successful tumor excision after 12 weeks of chemotherapy. The resected tumor was identified as anaplastic Wilms tumor, illustrating that pathologic identification of Wilms tumor is possible even after multiple cycles of neoadjuvant chemotherapy and marked tumor shrinkage. PMID:24964423

  7. Laparoscopic Resection of Cholecystocolic Fistula and Subtotal Cholecystectomy by Tri-Staple in a Type V Mirizzi Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Yetişir, Fahri; Şarer, Akgün Ebru; Acar, Hasan Zafer; Parlak, Omer; Basaran, Basar; Yazıcıoğlu, Omer

    2016-01-01

    The Mirizzi syndrome (MS) is an impacted stone in the cystic duct or Hartmann's pouch that mechanically obstructs the common bile duct (CBD). We would like to report laparoscopic subtotal cholecystectomy (SC) and resection of cholecystocolic fistula by the help of Tri-Staple™ in a case with type V MS and cholecystocolic fistula, for first time in the literature. A 24-year-old man was admitted to emergency department with the complaint of abdominal pain, intermittent fever, jaundice, and diarrhea. Two months ago with the same complaint, ERCP was performed. Laparoscopic resection of cholecystocolic fistula and subtotal cholecystectomy were performed by the help of Tri-Staple. At the eight-month follow-up, he was symptom-free with normal liver function tests. In a patient with type V MS and cholecystocolic fistula, laparoscopic resection of cholecystocolic fistula and SC can be performed by using Tri-Staple safely. PMID:26904324

  8. Endoscopic en bloc resection of an exophytic gastrointestinal stromal tumor with suction excavation technique.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyuk Soon; Chun, Hoon Jai; Kim, Kyoung-Oh; Kim, Eun Sun; Keum, Bora; Jeen, Yoon-Tae; Lee, Hong Sik; Kim, Chang Duck

    2016-06-21

    Here, we report the first successful endoscopic resection of an exophytic gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) using a novel perforation-free suction excavation technique. A 49-year-old woman presented for further management of a gastric subepithelial tumor on the lesser curvature of the lower body, originally detected via routine upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. Abdominal computed tomography and endoscopic ultrasound showed a 4-cm extraluminally protruding mass originating from the muscularis propria layer. The patient firmly refused surgical resection owing to potential cardiac problems, and informed consent was obtained for endoscopic removal. Careful dissection and suction of the tumor was repeated until successful extraction was achieved without serosal injury. We named this procedure the suction excavation technique. The tumor's dimensions were 3.5 cm × 2.8 cm × 2.5 cm. The tumor was positive for C-KIT and CD34 by immunohistochemical staining. The mitotic count was 6/50 high-power fields. The patient was followed for 5 years without tumor recurrence. This case demonstrated the use of endoscopic resection of an exophytic GIST using the suction excavation technique as a potential therapy without surgical resection. PMID:27340363

  9. Endoscopic en bloc resection of an exophytic gastrointestinal stromal tumor with suction excavation technique

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hyuk Soon; Chun, Hoon Jai; Kim, Kyoung-Oh; Kim, Eun Sun; Keum, Bora; Jeen, Yoon-Tae; Lee, Hong Sik; Kim, Chang Duck

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the first successful endoscopic resection of an exophytic gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) using a novel perforation-free suction excavation technique. A 49-year-old woman presented for further management of a gastric subepithelial tumor on the lesser curvature of the lower body, originally detected via routine upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. Abdominal computed tomography and endoscopic ultrasound showed a 4-cm extraluminally protruding mass originating from the muscularis propria layer. The patient firmly refused surgical resection owing to potential cardiac problems, and informed consent was obtained for endoscopic removal. Careful dissection and suction of the tumor was repeated until successful extraction was achieved without serosal injury. We named this procedure the suction excavation technique. The tumor’s dimensions were 3.5 cm × 2.8 cm × 2.5 cm. The tumor was positive for C-KIT and CD34 by immunohistochemical staining. The mitotic count was 6/50 high-power fields. The patient was followed for 5 years without tumor recurrence. This case demonstrated the use of endoscopic resection of an exophytic GIST using the suction excavation technique as a potential therapy without surgical resection. PMID:27340363

  10. Outcomes following resection of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Tabrizian, Parissa; Jibara, Ghalib; Hechtman, Jaclyn F; Franssen, Bernardo; Labow, Daniel M; Schwartz, Myron E; Thung, Swan N; Sarpel, Umut

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this analysis was to examine prognostic features and outcomes in patients undergoing resection for intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC). Methods A retrospective chart review was performed in all patients who underwent R0 or R1 resection for primary ICC between 1995 and 2011. Clinical data were abstracted and statistical analyses were conducted in the standard fashion. Results A total of 82 patients underwent curative hepatectomy for primary ICC; 51 patients in this cohort developed recurrence. The median follow-up of survivors was 27 months (range: 1–116 months). Recurrences were intrahepatic (65%), associated with multiple tumours (54%) and occurred during the first 2 years after hepatectomy (86%). The main factor associated with recurrence after resection was the presence of satellite lesions. Overall 5-year disease-free survival after primary resection was 16%. Factors associated with poor survival were transfusion and perineural invasion. Treatment of recurrence was undertaken in 89% of patients and repeat surgical resection was performed in 15 patients. The 3-year survival rate after recurrence was 25%. Prolonged survival after recurrence was associated with a solitary tumour recurrence. Conclusions Despite curative resection of ICC, recurrence can be expected to occur in 79% of patients at 5 years. Predictors of survival and recurrence after resection vary in the literature. In patients with recurrence, selection of the optimal treatment remains challenging. PMID:25395176

  11. A case of extraperitoneal stoma-associated internal hernia after abdominoperineal resection

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Published reports concerning internal hernias after extraperitoneal stoma construction are scarce. In our present report, we describe the case of a 56-year-old man who was referred to our hospital for the treatment of rectal cancer. He underwent abdominoperineal resection of the rectum with sigmoidostomy using an extraperitoneal route. On the ninth postoperative day, the patient experienced sudden and intense abdominal pain and was diagnosed with strangulation of the small intestine due to a stoma-associated internal hernia. Therefore, an emergency laparotomy was performed. The surgical findings showed that the small intestine protruded through the space between the sigmoid colon loop and the abdominal wall in a cranial-to-caudal direction. The strangulated portion of the small intestine was recovered, and the orifice of herniation was closed. No recurrence of internal herniation was observed during the follow-up period. PMID:24886644

  12. A case of extraperitoneal stoma-associated internal hernia after abdominoperineal resection.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Yuichiro; Kawai, Kazushige; Kazama, Shinsuke; Yoneyama, Satomi; Tanaka, Junichiro; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Kiyomatsu, Tomomichi; Nozawa, Hiroaki; Kanazawa, Takamitsu; Yamaguchi, Hironori; Ishihara, Soichiro; Sunami, Eiji; Kitayama, Joji; Watanabe, Toshiaki

    2014-01-01

    Published reports concerning internal hernias after extraperitoneal stoma construction are scarce. In our present report, we describe the case of a 56-year-old man who was referred to our hospital for the treatment of rectal cancer. He underwent abdominoperineal resection of the rectum with sigmoidostomy using an extraperitoneal route. On the ninth postoperative day, the patient experienced sudden and intense abdominal pain and was diagnosed with strangulation of the small intestine due to a stoma-associated internal hernia. Therefore, an emergency laparotomy was performed. The surgical findings showed that the small intestine protruded through the space between the sigmoid colon loop and the abdominal wall in a cranial-to-caudal direction. The strangulated portion of the small intestine was recovered, and the orifice of herniation was closed. No recurrence of internal herniation was observed during the follow-up period. PMID:24886644

  13. Abdominal pain as initial presentation of lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Eisa, Naseem; Alhafez, Bishr; Alraiyes, Abdul Hamid; Alraies, M Chadi

    2014-01-01

    Isolated spleen metastasis (ISM) in general is very rare with a reported incidence of 2.3–7.1% for all solid cancers. Lung cancers rarely metastasise to the spleen. It is very atypical for ISM to be the initial presentation of lung cancer as well. In our case, a 55-year-old woman presented with a 3-week history of left-sided abdominal fullness and dull pain. Workup was remarkable for splenic mass that turns out to be adenocarcinoma with unknown primary tumour. Biopsy of the mass with immunohistochemistry and whole body position emission tomography scan was able to identify lung cancer as the primary tumour. The patient underwent splenectomy, wedge resection of the lung mass along with short-course of chemotherapy. She never had any recurrences since then. PMID:24835801

  14. Laparoscopic liver resection: Experience based guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Coelho, Fabricio Ferreira; Kruger, Jaime Arthur Pirola; Fonseca, Gilton Marques; Araújo, Raphael Leonardo Cunha; Jeismann, Vagner Birk; Perini, Marcos Vinícius; Lupinacci, Renato Micelli; Cecconello, Ivan; Herman, Paulo

    2016-01-01

    Laparoscopic liver resection (LLR) has been progressively developed along the past two decades. Despite initial skepticism, improved operative results made laparoscopic approach incorporated to surgical practice and operations increased in frequency and complexity. Evidence supporting LLR comes from case-series, comparative studies and meta-analysis. Despite lack of level 1 evidence, the body of literature is stronger and existing data confirms the safety, feasibility and benefits of laparoscopic approach when compared to open resection. Indications for LLR do not differ from those for open surgery. They include benign and malignant (both primary and metastatic) tumors and living donor liver harvesting. Currently, resection of lesions located on anterolateral segments and left lateral sectionectomy are performed systematically by laparoscopy in hepatobiliary specialized centers. Resection of lesions located on posterosuperior segments (1, 4a, 7, 8) and major liver resections were shown to be feasible but remain technically demanding procedures, which should be reserved to experienced surgeons. Hand-assisted and laparoscopy-assisted procedures appeared to increase the indications of minimally invasive liver surgery and are useful strategies applied to difficult and major resections. LLR proved to be safe for malignant lesions and offers some short-term advantages over open resection. Oncological results including resection margin status and long-term survival were not inferior to open resection. At present, surgical community expects high quality studies to base the already perceived better outcomes achieved by laparoscopy in major centers’ practice. Continuous surgical training, as well as new technologies should augment the application of laparoscopic liver surgery. Future applicability of new technologies such as robot assistance and image-guided surgery is still under investigation. PMID:26843910

  15. Presacral schwannoma: laparoscopic resection, a viable option.

    PubMed

    Jatal, Sudhir; Pai, Vishwas D; Rakhi, Bharat; Saklani, Avanish P

    2016-05-01

    Schwannomas are benign nerve sheath tumours arising from Schwann cells. Presacral schwannomas are rare with only case report and short case series being reported in literature. Complete surgical resection is the treatment of choice for these rare tumours. Approach to surgical resection depends on the type of the tumour. Type 3 tumours have conventionally been treated with open intra or extra peritoneal approach. With improvement in the laparoscopic surgical skills, more and more complex surgical procedures have been attempted via this approach. We are presenting a case of presacral schwannoma in an overweight lady treated by laparoscopic resection. PMID:27275489

  16. Endoscopic full-thickness resection: Current status

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Arthur; Meier, Benjamin; Caca, Karel

    2015-01-01

    Conventional endoscopic resection techniques such as endoscopic mucosal resection or endoscopic submucosal dissection are powerful tools for treatment of gastrointestinal neoplasms. However, those techniques are restricted to superficial layers of the gastrointestinal wall. Endoscopic full-thickness resection (EFTR) is an evolving technique, which is just about to enter clinical routine. It is not only a powerful tool for diagnostic tissue acquisition but also has the potential to spare surgical therapy in selected patients. This review will give an overview about current EFTR techniques and devices. PMID:26309354

  17. Presacral schwannoma: laparoscopic resection, a viable option

    PubMed Central

    Jatal, Sudhir; Pai, Vishwas D.; Rakhi, Bharat

    2016-01-01

    Schwannomas are benign nerve sheath tumours arising from Schwann cells. Presacral schwannomas are rare with only case report and short case series being reported in literature. Complete surgical resection is the treatment of choice for these rare tumours. Approach to surgical resection depends on the type of the tumour. Type 3 tumours have conventionally been treated with open intra or extra peritoneal approach. With improvement in the laparoscopic surgical skills, more and more complex surgical procedures have been attempted via this approach. We are presenting a case of presacral schwannoma in an overweight lady treated by laparoscopic resection. PMID:27275489

  18. Endoscopic full-thickness resection: Current status.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Arthur; Meier, Benjamin; Caca, Karel

    2015-08-21

    Conventional endoscopic resection techniques such as endoscopic mucosal resection or endoscopic submucosal dissection are powerful tools for treatment of gastrointestinal neoplasms. However, those techniques are restricted to superficial layers of the gastrointestinal wall. Endoscopic full-thickness resection (EFTR) is an evolving technique, which is just about to enter clinical routine. It is not only a powerful tool for diagnostic tissue acquisition but also has the potential to spare surgical therapy in selected patients. This review will give an overview about current EFTR techniques and devices. PMID:26309354

  19. Oncoprotein stability after tumour resection.

    PubMed Central

    Ong, G.; Gullick, W.; Sikora, K.

    1990-01-01

    The means by which oncogenes and their products activate malignant transformation are currently under intense investigation. However, published papers on experiments using human tumour material do not always report in detail their methods of collection or storage of the specimens. In order to assess the stability of oncogene encoded proteins following collection or storage of human tumour biopsies, we have examined the rate of decay of the c-myc, neu and EGF-receptor proteins. Solid tumours, containing amplified copies of each oncogene, were established in nude mice and the stability of the oncogene protein in portions of each tumour, left in phosphate buffered saline at room temperature for varying time intervals, was examined by immunoblotting. Intact EGF-receptor and neu oncoproteins were present even after 24 h under these conditions while the c-myc protein was apparently rapidly degraded after 20 min. These data demonstrate that oncogene products decay at different rates after tumour resection and that collection of human biopsies should take this into account in order to provide the basis for consistent measurements of protein expression. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:2139576

  20. Karydakis flap for post-proctectomy perineal sinus: A case series and review

    PubMed Central

    Au, S.; Moyes, L.H.; Telfer, J.R.C.; Anderson, J.H.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Persistent perineal sinus (PPS) may occur in up to 38% of patients undergoing proctectomy. The available therapeutic options range from simple but ineffective to relatively successful but complex. The Karydakis procedure is a straightforward day-case operation, commonly performed by general surgeons in the treatment of pilonidal disease, a not dissimilar pathology to PPS. This report is the first in the literature describing the use of Karydakis procedure in patients who developed PPS after proctectomy for Crohn’s disease. Presentation of case Two patients, both of whom suffered from Crohn’s disease and a PPS, underwent a Karydakis procedure as first-line treatment for PPS. Case 1 had a relatively superficial PPS while Case 2 had a deeper, more complex and longstanding PPS. Both patients had no post-operative complications and were discharged on the same day. They achieved complete healing in eight weeks and eight months respectively. The follow up range was 8–16 months. Discussion Various techniques, including complex myocutaneous flap reconstruction, have been described in the literature to treat PPS. In contrast to these complex techniques, Karydakis operation is a simple day case procedure that was successful in treating PPS in our patients. While there is robust data regarding low recurrence rates following a Karydakis flap for pilonidal disease, there is no existing data for the indication outlined in this report. Conclusion While it requires further assessment, the Karydakis operation has potential as a simple, safe and effective first-line treatment in selected patients with PPS while not precluding more complex operative options in the future. PMID:27138449

  1. A novel perineal shield for low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, David; Safdieh, Joseph; Polubarov, Alex; Telivala, Tejas; Worth, Matthew; Schreiber, David

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To study the impact on radiation exposure to staff through the use of an original perineal shield during low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy. Material and methods We designed a 1 mm thick stainless steel shield that duplicates and is able to slide directly over a standard commercialized prostate brachytherapy grid. We then analyzed the post-procedure exposure in 15 consecutive patients who underwent Iodine-125 seed placement. Measurements were performed with and without the shield in place at fixed locations relative to the grid template. Endpoints were analyzed using the paired two-sample t-test, with statistical significance defined as a p-value < 0.05. Results The exposure at the midline grid template ranged from 0.144-0.768 mSv/hr without the shield, and 0.038-0.144 mSv/hr with the shield (p < 0.0001). The exposure 10 cm left of the grid template was 0.134-0.576 mSv/hr without the shield, and 0.001-0.012 mSv/hr with the shield (p < 0.0001). The exposure 10 cm right of the grid template was 0.125-0.576 mSv/hr without the shield, and 0.001-0.012 mSv/hr with the shield (p < 0.0001). The median reduction of exposure at the grid was 76% midline, 98.5% left, and 99% right. Similarly, each individual dose rate was recorded at 25 cm from the perineum, both with and without shield. The median reduction of exposure 25 cm from the perineum was 73.7% midline, 77.7% left and 81.6% right (p < 0.0001). Conclusions Our novel shield took seconds to install and was non-restrictive during the procedure, and provided at least a four-fold reduction in radiation exposure to the brachytherapist. PMID:26207107

  2. Is Radical Perineal Prostatectomy a Viable Therapeutic Option for Intermediate- and High-risk Prostate Cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hye Won; Jeon, Hwang Gyun; Jeong, Byong Chang; Seo, Seong Il; Jeon, Seong Soo; Lee, Hyun Moo

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate a single-institution experience with radical perineal prostatectomy (RPP), radical retropubic prostatectomy (RRP) and minimally invasive radical prostatectomy (MIRP) with respect to onco-surgical outcomes in patients with intermediate-risk (IR; PSA 10-20 ng/mL, biopsy Gleason score bGS 7 or cT2b-2c) and high-risk (HR; PSA >20 ng/mL, bGS ≥8, or ≥cT3) prostate cancer (PCa). We retrospectively reviewed data from 2,581 men who underwent radical prostatectomy for IR and HR PCa (RPP, n = 689; RRP, n = 402; MIRP, n = 1,490 [laparoscopic, n = 206; robot-assisted laparoscopic, n = 1,284]). The proportion of HR PCa was 40.3%, 46.8%, and 49.5% in RPP, RRP, and MIRP (P < 0.001), respectively. The positive surgical margin rate was 23.8%, 26.1%, and 18.7% (P = 0.002) overall, 17.5%, 17.8%, and 8.8% (P < 0.001) for pT2 disease and 41.9%, 44.4%, and 40.0% (P = 0.55) for pT3 disease in men undergoing RPP, RRP, and MIRP, respectively. Biochemical recurrence-free survival rates among RPP, RRP, and MIRP were 73.0%, 70.1%, and 76.8%, respectively, at 5 yr (RPP vs. RPP, P = 0.02; RPP vs. MIRP, P = 0.23). Furthermore, comparable 5-yr metastases-free survival rates were demonstrated for specific surgical approaches (RPP vs. RPP, P = 0.26; RPP vs. MIRP, P = 0.06). RPP achieved acceptable oncological control for IR and HR PCa. PMID:26539008

  3. Is Radical Perineal Prostatectomy a Viable Therapeutic Option for Intermediate- and High-risk Prostate Cancer?

    PubMed

    Lee, Hye Won; Jeon, Hwang Gyun; Jeong, Byong Chang; Seo, Seong Il; Jeon, Seong Soo; Lee, Hyun Moo; Choi, Han Yong

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate a single-institution experience with radical perineal prostatectomy (RPP), radical retropubic prostatectomy (RRP) and minimally invasive radical prostatectomy (MIRP) with respect to onco-surgical outcomes in patients with intermediate-risk (IR; PSA 10-20 ng/mL, biopsy Gleason score bGS 7 or cT2b-2c) and high-risk (HR; PSA > 20 ng/mL, bGS ≥ 8, or ≥ cT3) prostate cancer (PCa). We retrospectively reviewed data from 2,581 men who underwent radical prostatectomy for IR and HR PCa (RPP, n = 689; RRP, n = 402; MIRP, n = 1,490 [laparoscopic, n = 206; robot-assisted laparoscopic, n = 1,284]). The proportion of HR PCa was 40.3%, 46.8%, and 49.5% in RPP, RRP, and MIRP (P < 0.001), respectively. The positive surgical margin rate was 23.8%, 26.1%, and 18.7% (P = 0.002) overall, 17.5%, 17.8%, and 8.8% (P < 0.001) for pT2 disease and 41.9%, 44.4%, and 40.0% (P = 0.55) for pT3 disease in men undergoing RPP, RRP, and MIRP, respectively. Biochemical recurrence-free survival rates among RPP, RRP, and MIRP were 73.0%, 70.1%, and 76.8%, respectively, at 5 yr (RPP vs. RPP, P = 0.02; RPP vs. MIRP, P = 0.23). Furthermore, comparable 5-yr metastases-free survival rates were demonstrated for specific surgical approaches (RPP vs. RPP, P = 0.26; RPP vs. MIRP, P = 0.06). RPP achieved acceptable oncological control for IR and HR PCa. PMID:26539008

  4. Abdominal pain - children under age 12

    MedlinePlus

    Stomach pain in children; Pain - abdomen - children; Abdominal cramps in children; Belly ache in children ... When your child complains of abdominal pain, see if they can describe it to you. Here are different kinds of pain: ...

  5. Rare case of an abdominal mass: Reactive nodular fibrous pseudotumor of the stomach encroaching on multiple abdominal organs

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Xiao-Jiang; Chen, Chuang-Qi; Li, Yin; Ma, Jin-Ping; Li, Zhi-Xun; Cai, Shi-Rong; He, Yu-Long

    2014-01-01

    Reactive nodular fibrous pseudotumor (RNFP), which presents abdominal clinical manifestations and malignant radiographic results, usually requires radical resection as the treatment. However, RNFP has been recently described as an extremely rare benign post-inflammatory lesion of a reactive nature, which typically arises from the sub-serosal layer of the digestive tract or within the surrounding mesentery in association with local injury or inflammation. In addition, a postoperative diagnosis is necessary to differentiate it from the other reactive processes of the abdomen. Furthermore, RNFP shows a good prognosis without signs of recurrence or metastasis. A 16-year-old girl presented with a 3-mo history of epigastric discomfort, and auxiliary examinations suggested a malignant tumor originating from the stomach; postoperative pathology confirmed RNFP, and after a 2-year follow-up period, the patient did not display any signs of recurrence. This case highlights the importance of preoperative pathology for surgeons who may encounter similar cases. PMID:24749124

  6. A comparison of the effect of chlorhexidine antisepsis, soap and antibiotics on bacteriuria, perineal colonization and environmental contamination in spinally injured patients.

    PubMed

    Sanderson, P J; Weissler, S

    1990-04-01

    The effect of chlorhexidine antisepsis on bacteriuria, perineal colonization by coliforms and environmental contamination by these organisms was investigated in spinally injured patients treated by intermittent catheterization. Patients were body washed daily in chlorhexidine and chlorhexidine cream was applied to the glans penis after each catheterization. Urine cultures were obtained each day. A statistically significant reduction in bacteriuria was achieved by antisepsis in male patients not receiving antibiotics, from 74% of urine cultures in patients receiving soap to 60% with antisepsis (P less than 0.01). No effect of antisepsis was found on perineal coliform colonization, nor on contamination of bed sheets or the environment by these organisms. There was a significant reduction in perineal coliforms by antibiotics. PMID:1971630

  7. Paragonimiasis mimicking chest cancer and abdominal wall metastaisis: A case report

    PubMed Central

    ZHOU, RONGXING; ZHANG, MINJIA; CHENG, NANSHENG; ZHOU, YONG

    2016-01-01

    Typical human paragonimiasis demonstrates an elevated eosinophil count, positive immunoblot, nodular shadows of the lung and pleural thickening with pleural effusion, and these symptoms may be confused with chest cancer. In the present case, a rare case of human paragonimiasis mimicking chest cancer and abdominal wall metastasis is described, the 39-year-old male patient was admitted in our hospital for cough, weight loss 5 kg and a firm mass in right upper abdominal wall. The laboratory test showed unremarkable hematology and biochemistry results. Chest X-ray, Plain computed tomography of the chest and abdomen showed right pleural effusion, several nodules in right lower lung and a mass in the right upper abdominal wall. The initial diagnosis was lung or chest cancer with abdominal wall metastasis, and the abdominal wall mass was resected for the final diagnosis. The biopsy revealed eosinophilic granuloma with Charcot-Leyden crystal formation infiltrated in the muscular fibers. Subsequent to assessment of the antibodies against parasites, the final diagnosis of paragonimiasis was made. PMID:27313691

  8. Major abdominal evisceration injuries in dogs and cats: 12 cases (1998-2008).

    PubMed

    Gower, Sara B; Weisse, Chick W; Brown, Dorothy C

    2009-06-15

    OBJECTIVE- To describe the clinical characteristics, treatment, complications, and outcome of dogs and cats treated surgically for major abdominal evisceration. DESIGN- Retrospective case series. ANIMALS- 8 dogs and 4 cats. PROCEDURES- Medical records from January 1998 through March 2008 were reviewed to identify animals that underwent surgery for major abdominal evisceration. Data regarding cause of evisceration, signalment, physiologic variables, and hematologic variables were collected. Details of treatment, duration of hospitalization, and outcome were recorded. Linear regression analysis was performed to evaluate the association of signalment, physiologic variables, and hematologic variables on the number of days of hospitalization. RESULTS- Major abdominal evisceration was secondary to a traumatic event in 4 animals and to postsurgical dehiscence in 8 animals. All animals had evisceration of the intestines and gross contamination with dirt, leaves, or litter. Two animals eviscerated the spleen, and 1 animal had a perforated colon and was leaking feces into the peritoneal cavity. All animals underwent exploratory abdominal surgery. Surgical procedures performed included resection of compromised intestine, body wall repair, diaphragmatic hernia repair, nephrectomy, splenectomy, and primary colonic repair. All animals survived to discharge from the hospital. Median duration of hospitalization was 4 days (range, 1 to 7 days). Factors associated with an increase in duration of hospitalization included evisceration secondary to trauma, high lactate concentration at time of admission, and small body size. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE- Despite the dramatic appearance of major abdominal evisceration in cats and dogs, prompt and aggressive medical and surgical intervention can provide a favorable outcome. PMID:19527132

  9. Optimizing Adjuvant Therapy for Resected Pancreatic Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    In this clinical trial, patients with resected pancreatic head cancer will be randomly assigned to receive either gemcitabine with or without erlotinib for 5 treatment cycles. Patients who do not experience disease progression or recurrence will then be r

  10. Liver resection for colorectal cancer metastases

    PubMed Central

    Gallinger, S.; Biagi, J.J.; Fletcher, G.G.; Nhan, C.; Ruo, L.; McLeod, R.S.

    2013-01-01

    Questions Should surgery be considered for colorectal cancer (crc) patients who have liver metastases plus (a) pulmonary metastases, (b) portal nodal disease, or (c) other extrahepatic metastases (ehms)? What is the role of chemotherapy in the surgical management of crc with liver metastases in (a) patients with resectable disease in the liver, or (b) patients with initially unresectable disease in the liver that is downsized with chemotherapy (“conversion”)? What is the role of liver resection when one or more crc liver metastases have radiographic complete response (rcr) after chemotherapy? Perspectives Advances in chemotherapy have improved survival in crc patients with liver metastases. The 5-year survival with chemotherapy alone is typically less than 1%, although two recent studies with folfox or folfoxiri (or both) reported rates of 5%–10%. However, liver resection is the treatment that is most effective in achieving long-term survival and offering the possibility of a cure in stage iv crc patients with liver metastases. This guideline deals with the role of chemotherapy with surgery, and the role of surgery when there are liver metastases plus ehms. Because only a proportion of patients with crc metastatic disease are considered for liver resection, and because management of this patient population is complex, multidisciplinary management is required. Methodology Recommendations in the present guideline were formulated based on a prepublication version of a recent systematic review on this topic. The draft methodology experts, and external review by clinical practitioners. Feedback was incorporated into the final version of the guideline. Practice Guideline These recommendations apply to patients with liver metastases from crc who have had or will have a complete (R0) resection of the primary cancer and who are being considered for resection of the liver, or liver plus specific and limited ehms, with curative intent. 1(a). Patients with liver and lung

  11. LAPAROSCOPIC RESECTION OF GASTROINTESTINAL STROMAL TUMORS (GIST)

    PubMed Central

    LOUREIRO, Marcelo de Paula; de ALMEIDA, Rômulo Augusto Andrade; CLAUS, Christiano Marlo Paggi; BONIN, Eduardo Aimoré; CURY-FILHO,, Antônio Moris; DIMBARRE, Daniellson; da COSTA, Marco Aurélio Raeder; VITAL, Marcílio Lisboa

    2016-01-01

    Background Gastrointestinal mesenchymal or stromal tumors (GIST) are lesions originated on digestive tract walls, which are treated by surgical resection. Several laparoscopic techniques, from gastrectomies to segmental resections, have been used successfully. Aim Describe a single center experience on laparoscopic GIST resection. Method Charts of 15 operated patients were retrospectively reviewed. Thirteen had gastric lesions, of which ten were sub epithelial, ranging from 2-8 cm; and three were pure exofitic growing lesions. The remaining two patients had small bowel lesions. Surgical laparoscopic treatment consisted of two distal gastrectomies, 11 wedge gastric resections and two segmental enterectomies. Mechanical suture was used in the majority of patients except on six, which underwent resection and closure using manual absorbable sutures. There were no conversions to open technique. Results Mean operative time was 1h 29 min±92 (40-420 min). Average lenght of hospital stay was three days (2-6 days). There were no leaks, postoperative bleeding or need for reintervention. Mean postoperative follow-up was 38±17 months (6-60 months). Three patients underwent adjuvant Imatinib treatment, one for recurrence five months postoperatively and two for tumors with moderate risk for recurrence . Conclusion Laparoscopic GIST resection, not only for small lesions but also for tumors above 5 cm, is safe and acceptable technique. PMID:27120729

  12. Management of resectable colorectal lung metastases.

    PubMed

    Moorcraft, Sing Yu; Ladas, George; Bowcock, Anne; Chau, Ian

    2016-03-01

    Lung metastases occur in 10-20 % of patients with colorectal cancer. The biology of colorectal lung metastases is poorly understood, however lung metastases are more common in patients with rectal cancer and in patients with RAS mutations. Although the majority of patients have extrapulmonary disease, a small proportion of patients with lung metastases are suitable for lung metastasectomy and surgical resection has become a standard of care, based on data from retrospective series demonstrating a 5-year overall survival of 40-68 %. However, there remains uncertainty regarding the optimal management approach for these patients due to the lack of evidence from randomized controlled trials and current practice varies between institutions. For example, the role for neoadjuvant and adjuvant chemotherapy is not yet defined and there are no randomized trials comparing surgery with alternative treatment options such as radiofrequency ablation and stereotactic ablative radiotherapy. Further research is needed to improve the selection of patients for surgery, but favourable prognostic factors include a normal pre-operative CEA, solitary metastasis, complete resection and a long disease-free interval. There is also evidence that patients with resectable liver and lung metastases may benefit from resection of both sites of disease, and that re-resection may be of benefit in selected patients who relapse with resectable lung metastases. This article summarizes the biology of colorectal lung metastases and discusses the management of patients with lung metastases. PMID:26659389

  13. Liver resection for intermediate hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Peng-Sheng; Zhang, Ming; Zhao, Ji-Tong; Xu, Ming-Qing

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common malignant tumors in China. The Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer (BCLC) staging system is regarded as the gold standard staging system for HCC, classifying HCC as early, intermediate, or advanced. For intermediate HCC, trans-catheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE) is recommended as the optimal strategy by the BCLC guideline. This review investigates whether liver resection is better than TACE for intermediate HCC. Based on published studies, we compare the survival benefits and complications of liver resection and TACE for intermediate HCC. We also compare the survival benefits of liver resection in early and intermediate HCC. We find that liver resection can achieve better or at least comparable survival outcomes compared with TACE for intermediate HCC; however, we do not observe a significant difference between liver resection and TACE in terms of safety and morbidity. We conclude that liver resection may improve the short- and long-term survival of carefully selected intermediate HCC patients, and the procedure may be safely performed in the management of intermediate HCC. PMID:27190577

  14. New technique for treating abdominal surgical site infection using CT woundgraphy and NPWT: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Eisaku; Yoshida, Masashi; Nakashima, Keigo; Suzuki, Norihiko; Imakita, Tomonori; Tsutsui, Nobuhiro; Ohdaira, Hironori; Kitajima, Masaki; Suzuki, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) for abdominal surgical site infection (SSI) is becoming increasingly common, although enterocutaneous fistula (ECF) has been reported as a complication. To avoid ECF, we used computed tomography (CT) woundgraphy to evaluate the relationship between the wound and the intestine, and then safely treated the abdominal SSI with NPWT. Case presentation Following a laparoscopic intersphincteric resection for low rectal neuroendocrine tumor and covering ileostomy, a 59-year-old woman underwent stoma closure. Six days after surgery, we diagnosed SSI. We suspected ECF, because the wound was deep and the pus resembled enteric fluid. However, CT woundgraphy showed that the wound was separated from the abdominal cavity and the intestine by the abdominal rectus muscle. Accordingly, we performed NPWT. SSI was cured and the wound was well granulated. Twenty-three days after surgery, the patient was discharged. Eventually, the wound was completely epithelialized. Discussion Although successful NPWT has been reported for open abdominal wounds, ECF is a common complication. ECF can be prevented by separating the wound from the intestine by the omentum or muscle fascia, protecting the intestinal serosa during surgery, and applying low vacuum pressure. The relationships among the wound, the fascia, and the intestine must be evaluated before abdominal SSI treatment. One good method is CT woundgraphy, which evaluates wound extent and depth, closure of muscle fascia, and the relationship between the wound and the intestine. Conclusion We report a case of CT woundgraphy before NPWT for abdominal SSI. CT woundgraphy is a good candidate for evaluating wound condition. PMID:27002290

  15. Abdominal Distension and Vascular Collapse.

    PubMed

    Cosentino, Gina; Uwaifo, Gabriel I

    2016-04-01

    We present the case of a 43-year-old gentleman who presented to the emergency room with acute abdominal distension, confusion and vascular collapse. The emergent radiologic imaging obtained showed massive bilateral adrenal enlargement, but despite the initial clinical suspicion of possible overwhelming sepsis and/or massive abdominal/intralesional hemorrhage, lab tests based obtained rapidly confirmed the diagnosis of acute Addisonian crisis which responded dramatically to adrenocorticoid hormone replacement therapy and aggressive fluid resuscitation. The patient's established history of metastatic lung cancer confirmed this as a case of metastatic massive bilateral adrenal metastases with an initial presentation of acute adrenal insufficiency which is uncommon in the setting of metastatic carcinomatosis but more typically associated with lymphomas. Recognition of this clinical possibility is vital to enable rapid diagnosis and consequent life saving therapy. PMID:27328473

  16. [Abdominal bruit associated with hypertension].

    PubMed

    Fontseré, N; Bonet, J; Bonal, J; Romero, R

    2004-01-01

    First cause of secondary hypertension is renovascular hypertension which presents abdominal bruit in 16 to 20% of cases. This clinical sign is also associated with other vascular disease of the abdomen such as celiac trunk stenosis and/or aneurysms located on the pancreaticoduodenal or gastroduodenal arcs level, with little representation among aneurysm. They usually appear on a context of digestive complications like neoplasias, chronic pancreatitis or gastric obstructions possibly with obstructive icterus, hemorrhage and acute abdomen episodes. Its presentation in other contexts is rare and constitutes a diagnostic challenge. Diagnosis is made by abdominal arteriography which is the best method because you can locate the problem as well as intervene therapeutically with embolization of the aneurysme. We would like to emphasize the importance of a quick diagnosis due to the risk of rupture and the high morbi-mortality associated. PMID:15219082

  17. [INTESTINAL NON-ROTATION AS CAUSE OF RECURRENT ABDOMINAL PAIN:REPORT OF A CASE AND LITERATURE REVIEW

    PubMed

    García Barrionuevo, Alcides; Castro De La Mata Guerra, Rodrigo; García; Rodríguez Castro, Manuel; Ganoza Arenas, Carmela

    2000-01-01

    A 32 years old male patient with recurrent abdominal pain was admitted to the hospital with the clinical picture of intestinal obstruction. An emergency laparotomy was performed and the diagnosis of intestinal non-rotation and cecum volvulus was done. Right hemicolectomy and terminoterminal ileocolic anastomosis was performed. Pathology showed ischemia and necrosis in the resected segment. Clinical presentation, diagnosis methods and therapeutic options of intestinal malrotation and non-rotation are discussed. PMID:12140578

  18. A case of primary adenocarcinoma of the third portion of the duodenum resected by laparoscopic and endoscopic cooperating surgery

    PubMed Central

    Tamaki, Ichiro; Obama, Kazutaka; Matsuo, Koichi; Kami, Kazuhiro; Uemoto, Yusuke; Sato, Teruyuki; Ito, Tetsuo; Tamaki, Nobuyuki; Kubota, Keiko; Inoue, Hidenobu; Yamamoto, Eiji; Morimoto, Taisuke

    2015-01-01

    Introduction We report a case of primary adenocarcinoma in the third portion of the duodenum (D3) curatively resected by laparoscopic and endoscopic cooperating surgery (LECS). Presentation of case A 65-year-old woman had a routine visit to our hospital for a follow-up of rectal cancer resected curatively 2 years ago. A routine screening gastroduodenal endoscopy revealed an elevated lesion of 20 mm in diameter in the D3. The preoperative diagnosis was adenoma with high-grade dysplasia; however, suspicion about potential adenocarcinoma was undeniable. Curative resection was performed by LECS. Pathological examination revealed intramucosal adenocarcinoma arising from normal duodenal mucosa. The tumor was stage I (T1/N0/M0) in terms of the tumor, nodes, metastasis (TNM) classification. LECS for duodenal tumor has seldom been reported previously, and this is the first report of LECS for primary adenocarcinoma in the D3. The transverse mesocolon was removed from the head of pancreas to expose the duodenum, and the accessory right colic vein was cut; this was followed by the Kocher maneuver for mobilization of the lesion site. Discussion LECS enabled en bloc resection with adequate surgical margins and secure intra-abdominal suturing. Thorough mobilization of the mesocolon and pancreas head is essential for this procedure because it facilitates correct resection and suturing. Conclusion LECS is a feasible treatment option for duodenal neoplasms, including intramucosal adenocarcinoma, even though it exists in the D3. PMID:25723745

  19. Management of voluminous abdominal incisional hernia.

    PubMed

    Bouillot, J-L; Poghosyan, T; Pogoshian, T; Corigliano, N; Canard, G; Veyrie, N

    2012-10-01

    Incisional hernia is one of the classic complications after abdominal surgery. The chronic, gradual increase in size of some of these hernias is such that the hernia ring widens to a point where there is a loss of substance in the abdominal wall, herniated organs can become incarcerated or strangulated while poor abdominal motility can alter respiratory function. The surgical treatment of small (<5 cm) incisional hernias is safe and straightforward, by either laparotomy or laparoscopy. For large hernias, surgical repair is often difficult. After reintegration of herniated viscera into the abdominal cavity, the abdominal wall defect must be closed anatomically in order to restore the function to the abdominal wall. Prosthetic reinforcement of the abdominal wall is mandatory for long-term successful repair. There are multiple techniques for prosthetic hernia repair, but placement of Dacron mesh in the retromuscular plane is our preference. PMID:23137643

  20. The Spatial Relationship and Surface Projection of Canine Sciatic Nerve and Sacrotuberous Ligament: A Perineal Hernia Repair Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Khatri-Chhetri, Nabin; Khatri-Chhetri, Rupak; Chung, Cheng-Shu; Chern, Rey-Shyong; Chien, Chi-Hsien

    2016-01-01

    Sciatic nerve entrapment can occur as post-operative complication of perineal hernia repair when sacrotuberous ligament is incorporated during hernia deficit closure. This results in sciatic sensory loss and paralysis of the hind leg. This study investigated the spatial relationship of sciatic nerve and sacrotuberous ligament and their surface topographic projection of 68 cadavers (29 Beagles and 39 Taiwanese mongrels) with various heights (25–56 cm). By gross dissection, the sacrotuberous ligament and sciatic nerve were exposed and their distance in between was measured along four parts (A, B, C, D) of sacrotuberous ligament. The present study revealed that the C was the section of sacrotuberous ligament where the sciatic nerve and the sacrotuberous ligament are closest to each other. Furthermore, a positive correlation was observed between C and height of the dogs. From the present study, we found that the C in smaller dogs has the shortest distance between the sciatic nerve and the sacrotuberous ligament, and thus the most vulnerable to sciatic nerve entrapment, and needs to be avoided or approached cautiously during perineal hernia repair. PMID:27003911

  1. Acute Abdominal Pain in Children.

    PubMed

    Reust, Carin E; Williams, Amy

    2016-05-15

    Acute abdominal pain accounts for approximately 9% of childhood primary care office visits. Symptoms and signs that increase the likelihood of a surgical cause for pain include fever, bilious vomiting, bloody diarrhea, absent bowel sounds, voluntary guarding, rigidity, and rebound tenderness. The age of the child can help focus the differential diagnosis. In infants and toddlers, clinicians should consider congenital anomalies and other causes, including malrotation, hernias, Meckel diverticulum, or intussusception. In school-aged children, constipation and infectious causes of pain, such as gastroenteritis, colitis, respiratory infections, and urinary tract infections, are more common. In female adolescents, clinicians should consider pelvic inflammatory disease, pregnancy, ruptured ovarian cysts, or ovarian torsion. Initial laboratory tests include complete blood count, erythrocyte sedimentation rate or C-reactive protein, urinalysis, and a pregnancy test. Abdominal radiography can be used to diagnose constipation or obstruction. Ultrasonography is the initial choice in children for the diagnosis of cholecystitis, pancreatitis, ovarian cyst, ovarian or testicular torsion, pelvic inflammatory disease, pregnancy-related pathology, and appendicitis. Appendicitis is the most common cause of acute abdominal pain requiring surgery, with a peak incidence during adolescence. When the appendix is not clearly visible on ultrasonography, computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging can be used to confirm the diagnosis. PMID:27175718

  2. Patterns of Failure for Rhabdomyosarcoma of the Perineal and Perianal Region

    SciTech Connect

    Casey, Dana L.; Wexler, Leonard H.; LaQuaglia, Michael P.; Meyers, Paul A.; Wolden, Suzanne L.

    2014-05-01

    Purpose: To analyze prognostic factors and patterns of failure for rhabdomyosarcoma of the perineal and perianal region (PRMS), with an emphasis on radiation therapy for locoregional control. Methods and Materials: Detailed records of all 14 patients treated for PRMS at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center between 1998 and 2012 were reviewed. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to assess the event-free survival (EFS) and overall survival (OS), and a competing-risks analysis was used to assess the cumulative incidence of local, regional, and distant failures. Results: Median age was 15.8 years (range, 1.1-31.9 years). High-risk features were identified: 9 of 14 patients (64%) had group 3 disease and 3 of 14 (21%) had group 4; 11 of 14 tumors (78%) were alveolar; 12 of 14 tumors (86%) were ≥5 cm; and 9 of 14 patients (64%) had involved lymph nodes (N1). Of those aged ≥10 years at diagnosis, 9 of 10 (90%) had alveolar histology, all had tumors ≥5 cm, and 8 of 10 (80%) presented with N1 disease. The rates of local, regional, and distant failure at 5 years were 17%, 31%, and 52%, respectively. Although 3 of the 4 patients with regional failure received nodal irradiation, only one of the nodal failures occurred in the radiation therapy field. The 5-year EFS was 33%, and OS was 39%. Age ≥10 years was associated with poor outcomes: EFS was 13% in patients aged ≥10 years, compared with 75% in those aged <10 years (P=.04); the OS was 13% in patients aged ≥10 years, compared with 100% in those aged <10 years (P=.04). Conclusions: Patients with PRMS, especially those aged ≥10 years, present with poor prognostic features and continue to have poor outcomes. Given the high incidence of regional node recurrence, we recommend prophylactic ilioinguinal lymph node irradiation for all patients aged ≥10 years. For children aged <10 years, nodal evaluation is essential to determine the role for lymph node irradiation.

  3. [A Case of Successful Curative Resection Following Downsizing Chemotherapy in Initially Unresectable Locally Advanced Gallbladder Carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Shinmura, Kazuyasu; Kaiho, Takashi; Yanagisawa, Shinji; Okamoto, Ryo; Nishimura, Masaki; Kobayashi, Soichi; Okaniwa, Akira; Mun, Yangi; Tsuchiya, Shunichi; Chiba, Ryoji

    2015-11-01

    A 58-year-old woman was referred to our hospital with high fever and right upper abdominal pain. Abdominal computed tomography (CT) revealed a bulky tumor of the gallbladder with liver invasion, metastases to para-aortic lymph nodes, and extensive infiltration to Glisson's sheath. The tumor was initially considered to be unresectable locally advanced gallbladder carcinoma with inflammation, and she received 6 courses of chemotherapy with gemcitabine plus cisplatin. Subsequently, the inflammation was extinguished, and CT showed the main tumor shrunk and the Glisson's sheath infiltration disappeared; however, a liver metastasis existed in segment 5. Thus, S4a plus S5 hepatic segmentectomy with extrahepatic bile duct resection and regional and para-aortic lymphadenectomy was performed. The pathological diagnosis was pT3a, pN1, pM1 (Hep, LYM), fStage ⅣB. Curative resection was then performed. If selected according to their response to downsizing chemotherapy, conversion therapy might therefore be an effective multidisciplinary treatment for patients with initially unresectable locally advanced gallbladder carcinoma. PMID:26805152

  4. Pure bronchoplastic resections of the bronchus without pulmonary resection for endobronchial carcinoid tumours†

    PubMed Central

    Nowak, Kai; Karenovics, Wolfram; Nicholson, Andrew G.; Jordan, Simon; Dusmet, Michael

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Bronchopulmonary carcinoid tumours are relatively uncommon primary lung neoplasms. A small proportion of these lesions are predominantly endobronchial and do not extend beyond the bronchial wall. Endoscopic resection can be performed, but carries around a one in three risk of local recurrence and, therefore, mandates long-term surveillance. An alternative is complete surgical resection via bronchoplastic resection. We present our experience of surgical resection in patients with endobronchial carcinoids. METHODS From 2000 to 2010, 13 patients (age 45 ± 16 years, 10 males) underwent pure bronchoplastic resection, including systematic nodal dissection, for endobronchial carcinoid tumours, without the resection of lung parenchyma. RESULTS There was no significant operative morbidity or mortality. This is a retrospective review of a consecutive case series. The last follow-up for all patients was obtained in 2011. The mean maximum tumour size was 18 ± 8 mm. No lymph node invasion was observed. The median follow-up was 6.3 ± 3.3 years, with no regional recurrence. In 1 case, a tumourlet was identified at 5 years in the contralateral airway and viewed as a metachronous new lesion. CONCLUSIONS Bronchial sleeve resection is a safe procedure for suitably located endobronchial carcinoid tumours. Endoscopic resection should be reserved for patients who decline, or are unfit, for surgery. PMID:23628650

  5. Recurrence after thymoma resection according to the extent of the resection

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Complete resection of the thymus is considered appropriate for a thymoma resection because any remaining thymic tissue can lead to local recurrence. However, there are few studies concerning the extent of thymus resection. Therefore, we conducted a retrospective study to investigate whether recurrence following thymoma resection correlated to the extent of resection. Methods Between 1986 and 2011, a total of 491 patients underwent resection of thymic epithelial tumors with curative intent. Of those, we excluded patients with an undetermined World Health Organization (WHO) histologic type, patients with type C thymoma, and patients who underwent incomplete resection (n = 21). The remaining 342 patients were reviewed retrospectively and compared recurrence according to the extent of resection. Results Extended thymectomy was performed in 239 patients (69.9%) and limited thymectomy was performed 103 patients (30.1%). In the extended thymectomy group, 29 recurrences occurred, and in the limited thymectomy group, 10 recurrences occurred. Comparing rates of freedom from recurrence between two groups, there was no significant statistical difference in total recurrence (p =0.472) or local recurrence (p =0.798). After matching patients by stage and tumor size, there was no significant difference in freedom from recurrence between the two groups (p = 0.162). Additionally, after adjusting for histologic type and MG, there was also no significant difference (p = 0.125) between groups. Conclusions No difference in the rate of recurrence was observed in patients following limited thymectomy compared with extended thymectomy. PMID:24646138

  6. Endoscopic resection of gastric and esophageal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Balmadrid, Bryan; Hwang, Joo Ha

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) and endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) techniques have reduced the need for surgery in early esophageal and gastric cancers and thus has lessened morbidity and mortality in these diseases. ESD is a relatively new technique in western countries and requires rigorous training to reproduce the proficiency of Asian countries, such as Korea and Japan, which have very high complete (en bloc) resection rates and low complication rates. EMR plays a valuable role in early esophageal cancers. ESD has shown better en bloc resection rates but it is easier to master and maintain proficiency in EMR; it also requires less procedural time. For early esophageal adenocarcinoma arising from Barrett’s, ESD and EMR techniques are usually combined with other ablative modalities, the most common being radiofrequency ablation because it has the largest dataset to prove its success. The EMR techniques have been used with some success in early gastric cancers but ESD is currently preferred for most of these lesions. ESD has the added advantage of resecting into the submucosa and thus allowing for endoscopic resection of more aggressive (deeper) early gastric cancer. PMID:26510452

  7. Laparoscopic Colorectal Resection in Octogenarian Patients

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Minghao; Qin, Huabo; Luo, Qianxin; He, Xiaosheng; Lan, Ping; Lian, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The population older than 80 years has been increasing. A significant proportion of colorectal diseases that require colorectal resection occur in very elderly patients. However, the benefits of laparoscopy remain controversial in octogenarians. A systematic review and meta-analysis of observational study was performed to compare clinical outcomes between laparoscopic versus open colorectal resection in octogenarians. The PubMed, EMBASE, Ovid, Web of Science, and Cochrane databases from the years 1990 to 2015 were searched for studies that compare surgical outcomes between laparoscopic and open colorectal resection in octogenarians (≥80 years old). Seven eligible studies including 528 laparoscopic and 484 open colorectal resections were identified. Laparoscopic approach was associated with lower rate of mortality (odds ratio [OR] 0.48, P = 0.03), overall complications (OR 0.54, P < 0.001), and prolonged ileus (OR 0.56, P = 0.009), quicker bowel function return (standardized mean difference [SMD] −0.50, P < 0.001), and shorter length of hospital stay (SMD −0.47, P = 0.007). No differences were found in anastomotic leak (OR 1.16, P = 0.72), respiratory complication (OR 0.60, P = 0.07), and reoperation (OR 0.85, P = 0.69). Laparoscopic colorectal resection is as safe as open approach, and the short-term outcomes appear to be more favorable in octogenarians. PMID:26496302

  8. A spindle cell anaplastic pancreatic carcinoma with rhabdoid features following curative resection

    PubMed Central

    Abe, Tomoyuki; Amano, Hironobu; Hanada, Keiji; Okazaki, Akihisa; Yonehara, Shuji; Kuranishi, Fumito; Nakahara, Masahiro; Kuroda, Yoshinori; Noriyuki, Toshio

    2016-01-01

    Anaplastic pancreatic carcinoma (ANPC) accounts for ~5% of all pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cases. Due to its rarity, its clinical features and surgical outcomes remain to be clearly understood. A 74-year-old woman was admitted to Onomichi General Hospital (Onomichi, Japan) in April 2015 without any significant past medical history. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) revealed a 9.5×8.0 cm tumor in the body and tail of the pancreas. The patient developed acute abdominal pain 3 weeks later and the CT revealed massive abdominal bleeding caused by tumor rupture. The tumor increased in size and reached 12.0×10.0 cm in maximal diameter. The tumor doubling time was estimated to be 13 days. 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/CT confirmed the absence of distant metastasis since FDG accumulation was detected only in the tumor lesion. Emergency distal pancreatectomy and splenectomy were performed. Histologically, the tumor was classified as a spindle cell ANPC with rhabdoid features. The patient succumbed to mortality 8 months following the surgery while undergoing systemic adjuvant chemotherapy for multiple liver metastases. ANPC is difficult to detect in the early stages due to its progressive nature and atypical radiological findings. Long-term survival can be achieved only by curative resection; therefore, surgical resection must be performed whenever possible, even if the chance of long-term survival following surgery is considered dismal. As the present case suggested, spindle cell ANPC with rhabdoid features is highly aggressive and curative-intent resection must not be delayed. PMID:27446572

  9. [Surgical treatment of benign, premalignant and low-risk tumors of the pancreas : Standard resection or parenchyma preserving, local extirpation].

    PubMed

    Beger, H G

    2016-07-01

    Cystic neoplasms and neuroendocrine adenomas of the pancreas are detected increasingly more frequently and in up to 50 % as asymptomatic tumors. Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms, mucinous cystic neoplasms and solid pseudopapillary neoplasms are considered to be premalignant lesions with different rates of malignant transformation. The most frequent neuroendocrine adenomas are insulinomas. Neuroendocrine adenomas are considered to be potentially malignant, inherent to the lesion and development is unpredictable. Standard surgical treatment for pancreatic tumors are the Kausch-Whipple resection, left hemipancreatectomy and total pancreatectomy depending on the location; however, the application of standard surgical procedures, which are usually multiorgan resections for benign, premalignant and low-risk cancers of the pancreas have to be balanced against the risk for early postoperative morbidity, hospital mortality of 1.5-7 % and loss of endocrine and exocrine pancreatic functions in 12-30 %. Tumor enucleation, pancreatic middle segment resection and duodenum-preserving total pancreatic head (DPPHR-T/S) resection are parenchyma-preserving, local resection procedures, which are associated with a low early postoperative rate of severe complications, hospital mortality up to 1.3 % and maintenance of exocrine and endocrine pancreatic functions in more than 90 %. Tumor enucleation bears the risk of pancreatic fistulas (<33 %) and a limitation is proximity to the pancreatic main duct. The main risk for pancreatic middle segment resection is early postoperative pancreatic fistulas (up to 40 %), early postoperative intra-abdominal hemorrhage and a reintervention frequency up to 15 %. The DPPHR-T/S resection is applied for cystic neoplastic lesions in 90 %, severe postoperative complications are below 15 % and the 90-day hospital mortality is 0.5 %. Pancreatic fistulas are observed in less than 20 % with a recurrence rate of <1 %. These

  10. Hepatic Resection Using a Water Jet Dissector

    PubMed Central

    Stain, S. C.; Guastella, T.; Maddern, G. J.; Blumgart, L. H.

    1993-01-01

    The mortality and morbidity in major hepatic resection is often related to hemorrhage. A high pressure, high velocity water jet has been developed and has been utilized to assist in hepatic parenchymal transection. Sixty-seven major hepatic resections were performed for solid hepatic tumors. The tissue fracture technique was used in 51 patients (76%), and the water jet dissector was used predominantly in 16 patients (24%). The extent of hepatic resection using each technique was similar. The results showed no difference in operative duration (p = .499). The mean estimated blood loss using the water jet was 1386 ml, and tissue fracture technique 2450 ml (p = .217). Transfusion requirements were less in the water jet group (mean 2.0 units) compared to the tissue fracture group (mean 5.2 units); (p = .023). Results obtained with the new water dissector are encouraging. The preliminary results suggest that blood loss may be diminished. PMID:8387808

  11. Management of borderline resectable pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Lal, Alysandra; Christians, Kathleen; Evans, Douglas B

    2010-04-01

    Borderline resectable pancreatic cancer is an emerging stage of disease defined by computed tomogrpahy criteria, patient (Katz type B), or disease characteristics (Katz type C). These patients are particularly well suited to a surgery-last strategy with induction therapy consisting of chemotherapy (gemcitabine alone or in combination) followed by chemoradiation. With appropriate selection and preoperative planning, many patients with borderline resectable disease derive clinical benefit from multimodality therapy. The use of a standardized system for the staging of localized pancreatic cancer avoids indecision and allows for the optimal treatment of all patients guided by the extent of their disease. In this article, 2 case reports are presented, and the term borderline resectable pancreatic cancer is discussed. The advantages of neoadjuvant therapy and surgery are also discussed. PMID:20159519

  12. Major venous resection and reconstruction using a minimally invasive approach during laparoscopic pancreaticoduodenectomy: One step forward.

    PubMed

    Palanisamy, Senthilnathan; Deuri, Biswajit; Naidu, Subrahmaneswara Babu; Vaiyapurigoundar Palanisamy, Nalankilli; Natesan, Anand Vijay; Palanivelu, Praveen Raj; Parthasarathy, Ramakrishnan; Palanivelu, Chinnusamy

    2015-11-01

    In the current era of technological advancement, the feasibility of laparoscopic pancreaticoduodenectomy has been established. However, major venous resection and reconstruction along with laparoscopic pancreaticoduodenectomy is still considered a complex procedure. A 47-year-old woman presented with obstructive jaundice secondary to carcinoma in the pancreatic head. Triphasic abdominal CT revealed a 2.7 × 3.0-cm heterogenous mass in the pancreatic head with peripancreatic lymphadenopathy without vascular involvement. The patient was scheduled for laparoscopic pancreaticoduodenectomy. During mobilization, the tumor was found adherent to the superior mesenteric vein. Therefore, vascular resection and reconstruction was accomplished laparoscopically along with pancreaticoduodenectomy. The duration of superior mesenteric vein occlusion was 45 min. The patient had an uneventful recovery and was discharged on postoperative day 10. Major venous resection and reconstruction during laparoscopic pancreaticoduodenectomy using a minimally invasive approach is feasible in selected patients. Adequate experience in complex laparoscopic pancreatic surgery is required before attempting this procedure. PMID:26708588

  13. Abdominal Wall Metastasis of Uterine Papillary Serous Carcinoma in a Post-Menopausal Woman: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jung-Woo

    2014-01-01

    Uterine papillary serous carcinoma (UPSC) is an aggressive form of endometrial cancer characterized by a high recurrence rate and poor prognosis. We report a case of a 58-year-old post-menopausal woman with an abdominal wall metastasis in stage IA UPSC. After surgical staging, she did not receive additional adjuvant therapy. An egg sized palpable mass developed in the right lower abdomen after 8 months. Both Abdominopelvic computed tomography (CT) and positron emission tomography (PET)-CT revealed a metastatic lesion in the abdominal wall. Hence, surgical excision was performed. The pathological findings showed metastatic UPSC with clear resection margin. After the diagnosis of UPSC metastasis in the abdominal wall, she received chemotherapy utilizing paclitaxel and carboplatin. After 3 years, no evidence of recurrence was found. Therefore, we suggest that even when UPSC is confined to the endometrium without lymph node metastasis and without lymphovascular invasion, chemotherapy should be considered as a postoperative adjuvant therapy. PMID:25371890

  14. Abdominal wall metastasis of uterine papillary serous carcinoma in a post-menopausal woman: a case report.

    PubMed

    Park, Jung-Woo; Hwang, Sung-Ook

    2014-04-01

    Uterine papillary serous carcinoma (UPSC) is an aggressive form of endometrial cancer characterized by a high recurrence rate and poor prognosis. We report a case of a 58-year-old post-menopausal woman with an abdominal wall metastasis in stage IA UPSC. After surgical staging, she did not receive additional adjuvant therapy. An egg sized palpable mass developed in the right lower abdomen after 8 months. Both Abdominopelvic computed tomography (CT) and positron emission tomography (PET)-CT revealed a metastatic lesion in the abdominal wall. Hence, surgical excision was performed. The pathological findings showed metastatic UPSC with clear resection margin. After the diagnosis of UPSC metastasis in the abdominal wall, she received chemotherapy utilizing paclitaxel and carboplatin. After 3 years, no evidence of recurrence was found. Therefore, we suggest that even when UPSC is confined to the endometrium without lymph node metastasis and without lymphovascular invasion, chemotherapy should be considered as a postoperative adjuvant therapy. PMID:25371890

  15. Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy in Resected Extrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, John W.; Ghafoori, A. Paiman; Willett, Christopher G.; Tyler, Douglas S.; Pappas, Theodore N.; Clary, Bryan M.; Hurwitz, Herbert I.; Bendell, Johanna C.; Morse, Michael A.; Clough, Robert W.; Czito, Brian G.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma is a rare malignancy. Despite radical resection, survival remains poor, with high rates of local and distant failure. To clarify the role of radiotherapy with chemotherapy, we performed a retrospective analysis of resected patients who had undergone chemoradiotherapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 45 patients (13 with proximal and 32 with distal disease) underwent resection plus radiotherapy (median dose, 50.4 Gy). All but 1 patient received concurrent fluoropyrimidine-based chemotherapy. The median follow-up was 30 months for all patients and 40 months for survivors. Results: Of the 45 patients, 33 underwent adjuvant radiotherapy, and 12 were treated neoadjuvantly. The 5-year actuarial overall survival, disease-free survival, metastasis-free survival, and locoregional control rates were 33%, 37%, 42%, and 78%, respectively. The median survival was 34 months. No patient died perioperatively. Patient age {<=}60 years and perineural involvement adversely affected survival on univariate analysis. Patients undergoing R0 resection had a significantly improved rate of local control but no survival advantage. Despite having more advanced disease at presentation, patients treated neoadjuvantly had a longer survival (5-year survival 53% vs. 23%, p = 0.16) and similar rates of Grade 2-3 surgical morbidity (16% vs. 33%, p = 0.24) compared with those treated in the postoperative setting. Conclusion: These study results suggest a possible local control benefit from chemoradiotherapy combined with surgery in patients with advanced, resected biliary cancer. Furthermore, our results suggest that a treatment strategy that includes preoperative chemoradiotherapy might result in improved tumor resectability with similar surgical morbidity compared with patients treated postoperatively, as well as potentially improved survival outcomes. Distant failure remains a significant failure pattern, suggesting the need for more effective systemic

  16. Desmoid tumor of the anterior abdominal wall in female patients: comparison with endometriosis.

    PubMed

    Krentel, H; Tchartchian, G; De Wilde, R L

    2012-01-01

    In female patients presenting a tumor of the lower abdominal wall especially after cesarian section, an endometriotic tumor as well as an aggressive desmoid tumor should be considered. Symptoms in correlation with the monthly period can facilitate the presurgical differentiation between endometriosis and fibromatosis. Ultrasound reveals the typical location of both tumors and its remarkable sonographic appearance. In the clinical practice, the desmoid fibromatosis of the lower abdominal wall is a very rare disease. We present a case of a 25-year-old pregnant and discuss diagnostic and therapeutic options by a PubMed literature review. With the knowledge of the prognosis of the desmoid fibromatosis and the respective treatment options including wait and see, complete surgical resection with macroscopically free margins and adjuvant approaches is essential to avoid further interventions and progression of the locally destructive tumor. PMID:22778752

  17. Desmoid Tumor of the Anterior Abdominal Wall in Female Patients: Comparison with Endometriosis

    PubMed Central

    Krentel, H.; Tchartchian, G.; De Wilde, R. L.

    2012-01-01

    In female patients presenting a tumor of the lower abdominal wall especially after cesarian section, an endometriotic tumor as well as an aggressive desmoid tumor should be considered. Symptoms in correlation with the monthly period can facilitate the presurgical differentiation between endometriosis and fibromatosis. Ultrasound reveals the typical location of both tumors and its remarkable sonographic appearance. In the clinical practice, the desmoid fibromatosis of the lower abdominal wall is a very rare disease. We present a case of a 25-year-old pregnant and discuss diagnostic and therapeutic options by a PubMed literature review. With the knowledge of the prognosis of the desmoid fibromatosis and the respective treatment options including wait and see, complete surgical resection with macroscopically free margins and adjuvant approaches is essential to avoid further interventions and progression of the locally destructive tumor. PMID:22778752

  18. A Low-Grade Fibromyxoid Sarcoma of the Internal Abdominal Oblique Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Masakazu; Koide, Kei; Arita, Michinori; Kawaguchi, Koji; Mikuriya, Yoshihiro; Iwata, Jun; Iwamoto, Toshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    A low-grade fibromyxoid sarcoma (LGFMS) is a rare tumor, with a benign histologic appearance but malignant behavior. This report describes a 74-year-old man with an internal abdominal oblique muscle mass. The tumor appeared as a well-defined ovoid mass on computed tomography, with mild uptake on fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron-emission tomography images. Radical resection with wide safe margins was performed. Histologically, the tumor was composed of spindle-shaped cells in a whorled growth pattern, with alternating fibrous and myxoid stroma. MUC4 expression, a highly sensitive and specific immunohistochemical marker for LGFMS, was detected. Therefore, we diagnosed the tumor as LGFMS. At the 3-month follow-up, there was no sign of recurrence or metastasis. We report the first case of LGFMS arising from the internal abdominal oblique muscle. PMID:27247823

  19. Intramedullary spinal cord ganglioglioma presenting with abnormal abdominal wall movement. Case report.

    PubMed

    Aslanabadi, Saeid; Azhough, Ramin; Motlagh, Parviz Samad; Hadidchi, Shahram; Tabrizi, Ali Dastranj; Zonouzy, Keivan Kashy

    2004-10-15

    The authors present a case of intramedullary ganglioglioma in a 6-year-old girl. Since the age of 4 months the patient had experienced a spontaneous wavy undulating movement of her anterior abdominal wall resembling a severe peristalsis. The movement was continuous even during sleep, and this symptom was named "belly dance." Magnetic resonance images revealed an intramedullary tumor with ill-defined borders, and the lesion was partially resected. The patient made a good recovery, although 4 years postsurgery her scoliosis had progressed. PMID:15633994

  20. Large Abdominal Wall Endometrioma Following Laparoscopic Hysterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Borncamp, Erik; Mehaffey, Philip; Rotman, Carlos

    2011-01-01

    Background: Endometriosis is a common condition in women that affects up to 45% of patients in the reproductive age group by causing pelvic pain. It is characterized by the presence of endometrial tissue outside the uterine cavity and is rarely found subcutaneously or in abdominal incisions, causing it to be overlooked in patients with abdominal pain. Methods: A 45-year-old woman presented with lower abdominal pain 2 years following a laparoscopic supracervical hysterectomy. She was found to have incidental cholelithiasis and a large abdominal mass suggestive of a significant ventral hernia on CT scan. Results: Due to the peculiar presentation, surgical intervention took place that revealed a large 9cm×7.6cm×6.2cm abdominal wall endometrioma. Conclusion: Although extrapelvic endometriosis is rare, it should be entertained in the differential diagnosis for the female patient who presents with an abdominal mass and pain and has a previous surgical history. PMID:21902990

  1. Blunt abdominal trauma in children.

    PubMed

    Tepas, J J

    1993-06-01

    The growing popularity of nonoperative treatment of children with splenic injuries has seduced some physicians into a false sense of security regarding care of the injured child. Although it has been established that hemodynamically stable children with splenic, hepatic, and even renal injuries can safely be treated "expectantly," this concept cannot be applied indiscriminately. Accurate diagnosis and effective care of the child with blunt abdominal trauma is an exercise of clinical precision that demands attention to detail and thorough evaluation. This review addresses this process in light of recent advances in diagnostic imaging and in consideration of recent reports analyzing different protocols for therapeutic decision making. PMID:8374651

  2. BIOMECHANICS OF ABDOMINAL AORTIC ANEURYSM

    PubMed Central

    Vorp, David A.

    2009-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a condition whereby the terminal aorta permanently dilates to dangerous proportions, risking rupture. The biomechanics of AAA has been studied with great interest since aneurysm rupture is a mechanical failure of the degenerated aortic wall and is a significant cause of death in developed countries. In this review article, the importance of considering the biomechanics of AAA is discussed, and then the history and the state-of-the-art of this field is reviewed - including investigations into the biomechanical behavior of AAA tissues, modeling AAA wall stress and factors which influence it, and the potential clinical utility of these estimates in predicting AAA rupture. PMID:17254589

  3. [Abdominal pain, constipation and anemia].

    PubMed

    Barresi, Fabio; Kunz Caflish, Isabel; Bayly-Schinzel, Leena; Dressel, Holger

    2016-03-30

    We present the case of a 42-year old man who went to the emergency department because of spasmodic abdominal pain. The abdomen was soft. A gastroscopy and a colonoscopy were without pathological findings. The laboratory analyses indicated anemia. The differential blood count showed basophilic granules in the red blood cells. The blood lead level was elevated. A lead poisoning was diagnosed. The cause was the oral intake of an ayurvedic medication which the patient had received in Bangladesh to treat his vitiligo. PMID:27005735

  4. Microsurgical resection of intramedullary spinal cord hemangioblastoma.

    PubMed

    McCormick, Paul C

    2014-09-01

    Spinal cord hemangioblastomas account for about 10% of spinal cord tumors. They usually arise from the dorsolateral pia mater and are characterized by their significant vascularity. The principles and techniques of safe resection are different than those employed for the more commonly occurring intramedullary glial tumors (e.g. ependymoma, astrocytoma) and consist of circumferential detachment of the tumor margin from the surrounding normal pia. This video demonstrates the microsurgical techniques of resection of a thoracic spinal cord hemangioblastoma. The video can be found here: http://youtu.be/yT5KLi4VyAo. PMID:25175571

  5. Laparoscopic Resection of Unruptured Rudimentary Horn Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Deepti; Usha, M G; Gaikwad, Ramesh; Sudha, S

    2011-01-01

    A non-communicating rudimentary horn is an uncommon site for ectopic pregnancy. Rudimentary horn pregnancy (RHP) is a rare entity but associated with grave clinical consequences. Majority of these cases if not detected timely end up in uterine rupture and present as an obstetrical emergency. We present this case of a 32-year-old, third gravida with a 12 weeks live gestation in the right rudimentary horn, which was successfully managed with laparoscopic resection. Early diagnosis is the key stone in the management of such cases. Laparoscopic resection is a safe and viable option in the surgical management of unruptured RHP. PMID:26085754

  6. Major hepatic resections in infancy and childhood

    PubMed Central

    Howat, J. M.

    1971-01-01

    Nineteen infants and children who had hepatic lobectomy or segmental resection of the liver for tumours are described. Fourteen had lobectomy for malignant tumours but only three survived for more than a year. Four of the five patients who had resections for hamartomas have survived for 18 months or more. The main problem encountered at operation was haemorrhage, which was responsible for the entire operative mortality of 31%. A transient disturbance of liver function occurred after operation in both patients who had preoperative radiotherapy. ImagesFig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4 PMID:4324038

  7. Underwater endoscopic mucosal resection: The third way for en bloc resection of colonic lesions?

    PubMed Central

    Radaelli, Franco; Spinzi, Giancarlo

    2015-01-01

    Background Underwater endoscopic mucosal resection without submucosal injection has been described for removing large flat colorectal lesions. Objective We aim to evaluate the reproducibility of this technique in terms of ease of implementation, safety and efficacy. Methods A prospective observational study of consecutive underwater endoscopic mucosal resection in a community hospital was performed. Results From September 2014 to April 2015, 25 flat or sessile colorectal lesions (median size 22.8 mm, range 10–50 mm; 18 placed in the right colon) were removed in 25 patients. Two of the lesions were adenomatous recurrences on scar of prior resection and one was a recurrence on a surgical anastomosis. The resection was performed en bloc in 76% of the cases. At the pathological examination, 14 lesions (56%) had advanced histology and seven (28%) were sessile serrated adenomas (two with high-grade dysplasia). Complete resection was observed in all the lesions removed en bloc. Intra-procedural bleeding was observed in two cases; both were managed endoscopically and were uneventful. No major adverse events occurred. Conclusion Underwater endoscopic mucosal resection appears to be an easy, safe and effective technique in a community setting. Further studies evaluating the efficacy of the technique (early and late recurrence), as well as comparing it with traditional mucosal resection, are warranted. PMID:27536370

  8. Abdominal wall reconstruction with implantable meshes.

    PubMed

    Masden, Derek; Felder, John M; Iorio, Matthew L; Bhanot, Parag; Attinger, Christopher E

    2011-01-01

    Abdominal wall defects present a difficult problem for the reconstructive surgeon. Over the years, numerous implantable materials have becomes available to aid the surgeon in recreating the abdominal wall. This spectrum of implants includes permanent synthetic meshes, absorbable meshes, composite meshes and biomaterials. This review includes the pros and cons for the commercially available abdominal wall implants as well as a review of the literature regarding outcomes for each material. This review will provide the surgeon with current evidence-based information on implantable abdominal materials to be able to make a more informed decision about which implant to use. PMID:21663579

  9. Removal of an intra-abdominal desmoplastic small round cell tumor by repetitive debulking surgery: A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    SHIMAZAKI, JIRO; MOTOHASHI, GYO; NISHIDA, KIYOTAKA; TABUCHI, TAKANOBU; UBUKATA, HIDEYUKI; TABUCHI, TAKAFUMI

    2014-01-01

    In the current study, a case of recurrent desmoplastic small round cell tumor (DSRCT) is presented, which was successfully treated by repetitive debulking surgery. In May 2010, a 39-year-old male, with a history of surgical resection of intra-abdominal DSRCT, visited the Ibaraki Medical Center, Tokyo Medical University Hospital (Ami, Japan) with severe lower abdominal discomfort. Abdominal computed tomography revealed a large tumor in the pouch of Douglas with a small number of nodules in the abdominal cavity. The recurrent DSRCT was diagnosed and removed via lower anterior resection; however, complete resection was impossible due to multiple peritoneal metastases. One year later, the patient developed pain in the right groin due to the growth of metastasized tumor cells in the groin lymph nodes. The affected lymph nodes were removed utilizing an extra-peritoneal approach. At the time of writing, the patient continues to survive without any symptoms 60 months since the initial surgery. In conclusion, surgical debulking is a significant procedure for relieving patient symptoms as well as improving the survival time of patients with metastatic and recurrent DSRCT. PMID:24765157

  10. The role of chemoradiation for patients with resectable or potentially resectable pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Kimple, Randall J; Russo, Suzanne; Monjazeb, Arta; Blackstock, A William

    2012-04-01

    Conflicting data and substantial controversy exist regarding optimal adjuvant treatment for those patients with resectable or potentially resectable adenocarcinoma of the pancreas. Despite improvements in short-term surgical outcomes, the use of newer chemotherapeutic agents, development of targeted agents and more precise delivery of radiation, the 5-year survival rates for early-stage patients remains less than 25%. This article critically reviews the existing data for various adjuvant treatment approaches for patients with surgically resectable pancreatic cancer. Our review confirms that despite several randomized clinical trials, the optimal adjuvant treatment approach for these patients remains unclear. PMID:22500684

  11. Clinical results of sublobar resection versus lobectomy or more extensive resection for lung cancer patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Seok; Sim, Hee Je; Lee, Geun Dong; Hwang, Su Kyung; Choi, Sehoon; Kim, Hyeong Ryul; Kim, Yong-Hee; Park, Seung-Il

    2016-01-01

    Background Lung cancer patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) are at a high risk of requiring lung resection. The optimal surgical strategy for these patients remains unclear. This study aimed to compare the clinical results of a sublobar resection versus a lobectomy or more extensive resection for lung cancer in patients with IPF. Methods From January 1995 to December 2012, 80 patients with simultaneous non-small cell lung cancer and IPF were treated surgically at Asan Medical Center. Predictors of recurrence-free survival and overall survival were evaluated in the series. Results Lobectomy or more extensive resection of the lung (lobar resection group) was performed in 65 patients and sublobar resection (sublobar resection group) was carried out in 15 patients. The sublobar resection group showed fewer in-hospital mortalities than the lobar resection group (6.7% vs. 15.4%; P=0.68). For late mortality after lung resection, cancer-related deaths were not significantly different in incidence between the two groups (55.6% vs. 30.6%; P=0.18). Recurrence-free survival after lung resection was significantly greater in the lobar than in the sublobar resection group (P=0.01). However, overall survival after lung resection was not significantly different between the two groups (P=0.05). Sublobar resection was not a significant predictive factor for overall survival (hazard ratio =0.50; 95% CI: 0.21–1.15; P=0.10). Conclusions Although not statistically significant, a sublobar resection results in less in-hospital mortality than a lobar resection for lung cancer patients with IPF. There is no significant difference in overall survival compared with lobar resection. A sublobar resection may be another therapeutic option for lung cancer patients with IPF. PMID:27162674

  12. Perineal nodular indurations ("accessory testicles") in cyclists. Fine needle aspiration cytologic and pathologic findings in two cases.

    PubMed

    Vuong, P N; Camuzard, P; Schoonaert, M F

    1988-01-01

    The cytologic and histologic findings from two cases of perineal nodular indurations observed in two cyclists are reported. These lesions, also referred to as "accessory testicles" or "third testicle" or "ischial hygromas" of cyclists, consist of a localized aseptic area of necrosis with pseudocyst formation involving connective tissue in the superficial fascia of the perineum. These histologic findings, which were seen in the subsequent surgical specimens in these two cases, were reflected in the fine needle aspiration findings. The aspirates contained few cellular elements, mainly a few vacuolated histiocytes, against a background of fibrinous material. These indurations, which develop as a result of repeated, chronic microtrauma to the perineum impressed by the vibration of the saddle of the bicycle, constitute an authentic handicap for the professional cyclist and are a contraindication to cycling for amateur cyclists. PMID:3336958

  13. Surgical treatment of a retroperitoneal benign tumor surrounding important blood vessels by fractionated resection: A case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    WAN, ZHILI; YIN, TIANSHENG; CHEN, HONGWEI; LI, DEWEI

    2016-01-01

    Retroperitoneal tumors are lesions with diverse pathological subtypes that originate from the retroperitoneal space; ~40% of these tumors are benign. Due to such lesions often surrounding and associating with vital abdominal blood vessels, a complete surgical resection is difficult. The current study presents a novel surgical approach, known as fractionation, through which a benign retroperitoneal tumor surrounding important abdominal blood vessels was completely resected. A 21-year-old man was admitted to The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University (Chongqing, China), presenting with a ~7.5×7.2-cm tumor that was located in the retroperitoneal pancreatic head region and the first hepatic hilum. The tumor completely surrounded the celiac axis and the splenic, common hepatic and superior mesenteric arteries, and was closely associated with the abdominal aorta and the portal, splenic, superior mesenteric and left renal veins. A pre-operative computed tomography scan and intraoperative frozen biopsy indicated that the lesion was a benign tumor. A fractionation approach was subsequently adopted, with fractionation of the lesion being performed according to the location of the tumor itself and the direction of the surrounding abdominal blood vessels. In this manner, a complete tumor resection was conducted. Post-operative pathological examination confirmed the diagnosis of a retroperitoneal ganglioneuroma. The patient was followed up for a year and a half, with no evidence of tumor recurrence. In the present case, a fractionation approach for the complete resection of the retroperitoneal benign tumor achieved a positive outcome and demonstrated the feasibility of the technique. PMID:27123100

  14. Hand-assisted laparoscopic hepatic resection.

    PubMed

    Teramoto, K; Kawamura, T; Sanada, T; Kumashiro, Y; Okamoto, H; Nakamura, N; Arii, S

    2002-09-01

    Thanks to recent advances, performance of liver resection is now possible using laparoscopic procedures. However, still there are some difficulties to overcome. The hand-assisted method lends safety and reliability to the laparoscopic procedure. A 54-year-old man diagnosed with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) was referred for hepatectomy. Angiography with computed tomography (CT) scans revealed a 2-cm hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) at segment V, close to the gallbladder. A hand-assisted laparoscopic hepatic resection was performed. Four 10-mm trocars, one for wall lifting and three for working, were placed in the upper abdomen. A small incision was added at the right side of umbilicus, and the operator's left hand was inserted through it. A microwave tissue coagulator and laparoscopic ultrasonic dissector were used for liver resection. Total operation time was 162 min; blood loss was 20 g. The postoperative course was uneventful, and the postoperative hospital stay was 7 days. We thus demonstrated that laparoscopic liver resection is safer and easier when the hand of the operator can be inserted into the abdomen. The small incision does not greatly diminish the benefits that accrue from minimally invasive laparoscopic surgery. The hand-assisted procedure allows better access to the tumor. In addition, hand assistance restores the sense of touch to the operator and is an effective means of controlling sudden and unexpected bleeding. PMID:12235510

  15. Resection planning for robotic acoustic neuroma surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBrayer, Kepra L.; Wanna, George B.; Dawant, Benoit M.; Balachandran, Ramya; Labadie, Robert F.; Noble, Jack H.

    2016-03-01

    Acoustic neuroma surgery is a procedure in which a benign mass is removed from the Internal Auditory Canal (IAC). Currently this surgical procedure requires manual drilling of the temporal bone followed by exposure and removal of the acoustic neuroma. This procedure is physically and mentally taxing to the surgeon. Our group is working to develop an Acoustic Neuroma Surgery Robot (ANSR) to perform the initial drilling procedure. Planning the ANSR's drilling region using pre-operative CT requires expertise and around 35 minutes' time. We propose an approach for automatically producing a resection plan for the ANSR that would avoid damage to sensitive ear structures and require minimal editing by the surgeon. We first compute an atlas-based segmentation of the mastoid section of the temporal bone, refine it based on the position of anatomical landmarks, and apply a safety margin to the result to produce the automatic resection plan. In experiments with CTs from 9 subjects, our automated process resulted in a resection plan that was verified to be safe in every case. Approximately 2 minutes were required in each case for the surgeon to verify and edit the plan to permit functional access to the IAC. We measured a mean Dice coefficient of 0.99 and surface error of 0.08 mm between the final and automatically proposed plans. These preliminary results indicate that our approach is a viable method for resection planning for the ANSR and drastically reduces the surgeon's planning effort.

  16. Radical Carinal Resection for a Glomic Tumor.

    PubMed

    Bellier, Jocelyn; Sage, Edouard; Gonin, François; Longchampt, Elisabeth; Chapelier, Alain

    2016-08-01

    We report the case of a 33-year-old woman who presented with increasing dyspnea secondary to a tumor arising from the carina. After desobstruction by bronchoscopy, the pathologic analysis revealed a glomic tumor. Carinal resection and reconstruction were performed with venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation support. The patient's postoperative course was uneventful, and the long-term result was excellent. PMID:27449451

  17. Laparoscopic resection of splenic flexure tumors.

    PubMed

    Carlini, Massimo; Spoletini, Domenico; Castaldi, Fabio; Giovannini, Cristiano; Passaro, Umberto

    2016-03-01

    In this paper a single institution experience in laparoscopic treatment of splenic flexure tumors (SFT) is reported. Low incidence of these tumors and complexity of the procedure make the laparoscopic resection not diffuse and not well standardized. Since 2004, in a specific database, we prospectively record clinicopathological features and outcome of all patients submitted to laparoscopic colorectal resection. From January 2004 to October 2015, out of 567 cases of minimally invasive colorectal procedures, we performed 20 laparoscopic resection of SFT, 11 with extracorporeal anastomosis and 9 totally laparoscopic. Twelve patients had an advanced disease. Conversion rate was null. The mean operative time was 105' (range 70'-135'). Comparing extracorporeal and intracorporeal anastomoses, we did not find any significant difference in mean duration of surgery. Mean distal margin was 9.4 ± 3.1 cm (mean ± DS), mean proximal margin 8.9 ± 2.7 cm. The mean number of harvested lymph nodes was 17.8 ± 5.6. Evaluating surgical short-term and oncological mid-term outcomes, laparoscopic resection of splenic flexure for tumors, even if challenging, resulted technically feasible and oncologically safe and it seems to be advisable. PMID:27040272

  18. Perineal analgesia and hemodynamic effects of the epidural administration of meperidine or hyperbaric bupivacaine in conscious horses

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Epidural administration of bupivacaine and meperidine produces analgesia in several animal species and in humans. A prospective randomized study was conducted in 18 healthy horses to compare the effect of these 2 drugs administered by the epidural route. Animals were divided into 3 treatment groups of 6 animals each. All drugs were injected by the epidural route in all animals between the 1st and 2nd coccygeal vertebrae. Treatment 1 (BUP) — 0.06 mg/kg of body weight of 0.5% hyperbaric bupivacaine; treatment 2 (MEP) — 0.6 mg/kg of body weight of 5% meperidine; treatment 3 (SS) — 0.9% saline solution (control group). Heart rate, arterial pressure, respiratory rate, rectal temperature, analgesia, sedation, and motor-blocking were determined before drug administration (baseline values); at 5, 10, 15, and 30 minutes after drug administration, and then at 30-minute intervals thereafter. Both hyperbaric bupivacaine and meperidine administered epidurally produced complete bilateral perineal analgesia in all horses. The onset of analgesia was 6, s = 2.6 minutes after injection of bupivacaine, as opposed to 9, s = 2 minutes after meperidine. The duration of analgesia was 240, s = 57 minutes for meperidine and 320, s = 30 minutes for bupivacaine. Heart and respiratory rates, arterial pressure, and rectal temperature did not change (P < 0.05) significantly from basal values after the epidural administration of bupivacaine, meperidine, or saline solution. To conclude, both bupivacaine and meperidine induced long-lasting perineal analgesia, with minimal cardiovascular effects. Analgesia was induced faster and lasted longer with bupivacaine. PMID:14992253

  19. Clamp–crush technique vs. radiofrequency-assisted liver resection for primary and metastatic liver neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Delis, Spiros; Bakoyiannis, Andreas; Tassopoulos, Nikos; Athanassiou, Kostas; Papailiou, John; Brountzos, Elisa N; Madariaga, Juan; Papakostas, Pavlos; Dervenis, Christos

    2009-01-01

    Background: Several techniques for liver resection have been developed. We compared radiofrequency-assisted (RF) and clamp–crush (CC) liver resection (LR) in terms of blood loss, operating time and short-term outcomes in primary and metastatic tumour resection. Methods: From 2002 to 2007, 196 consecutive patients with primary or metastatic hepatic tumours underwent RF-LR (n= 109; group 1) or CC-LR (n= 87; group 2) in our unit. Primary endpoints were intraoperative blood loss (and blood transfusion requirements) and total operative time. Secondary endpoints included postoperative complications, mortality and intensive care unit (ICU) and hospital stay. Data were collected retrospectively on all patients with primary or secondary liver lesions. Results: Blood loss was similar (P= 0.09) between the two groups of patients with the exception of high MELD score (>9) cirrhotic patients, in whom blood loss was lower when RF-LR was used (P < 0.001). Total operative time and transection time were shorter in the CC-LR group (P= 0.04 and P= 0.01, respectively), except for high MELD score (>9) cirrhotic patients, in whom total operation and transection times were shorter when RF-LR was used (P= 0.04). Rates of bile leak and abdominal abscess formation were higher after RF-LR (P= 0.04 for both). Conclusions: Clamp–crush LR is reliable and results in the same amount of blood loss and a shorter operating time compared with RF-LR. Radiofrequency-assisted LR is a unique, simple and safe method of resection, which may be indicated in cirrhotic patients with high MELD scores. PMID:19718362

  20. Pediatric Abdominal Pain: An Emergency Medicine Perspective.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jeremiah; Fox, Sean M

    2016-05-01

    Abdominal pain is a common complaint that leads to pediatric patients seeking emergency care. The emergency care provider has the arduous task of determining which child likely has a benign cause and not missing the devastating condition that needs emergent attention. This article reviews common benign causes of abdominal pain as well as some of the cannot-miss emergent causes. PMID:27133248

  1. Hypoxia inhibits abdominal expiratory nerve activity.

    PubMed

    Fregosi, R F; Knuth, S L; Ward, D K; Bartlett, D

    1987-07-01

    Our purpose was to examine the influence of steady-state changes in chemical stimuli, as well as discrete peripheral chemoreceptor stimulation, on abdominal expiratory motor activity. In decerebrate, paralyzed, vagotomized, and ventilated cats that had bilateral pneumothoraces, we recorded efferent activity from a phrenic nerve and from an abdominal nerve (cranial iliohypogastric nerve, L1). All cats showed phasic expiratory abdominal nerve discharge at normocapnia [end-tidal PCO2 38 +/- 2 Torr], but small doses (2-6 mg/kg) of pentobarbital sodium markedly depressed this activity. Hyperoxic hypercapnia consistently enhanced abdominal expiratory activity and shortened the burst duration. Isocapnic hypoxia caused inhibition of abdominal nerve discharge in 11 of 13 cats. Carotid sinus nerve denervation (3 cats) exacerbated the hypoxic depression of abdominal nerve activity and depressed phrenic motor output. Stimulation of peripheral chemoreceptors with NaCN increased abdominal nerve discharge in 7 of 10 cats, although 2 cats exhibited marked inhibition. Four cats with intact neuraxis, but anesthetized with ketamine, yielded qualitatively similar results. We conclude that when cats are subjected to steady-state chemical stimuli in isolation (no interference from proprioceptive inputs), hypercapnia potentiates, but hypoxia attenuates, abdominal expiratory nerve activity. Mechanisms to explain the selective inhibition of expiratory motor activity by hypoxia are proposed, and physiological implications are discussed. PMID:3624126

  2. [Case of small bowel angioectasia in which the resection site was angiographically detected using intraoperative dye infusion].

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Kenta; Kumada, Takashi; Kiriyama, Seiki; Tanikawa, Makoto; Hisanaga, Yasuhiro; Toyoda, Hidenori; Kanamori, Akira; Tada, Toshifumi; Kitabatake, Syusuke; Sone, Yasuhiro

    2014-04-01

    A 37-year-old Japanese man undergoing treatment for dilated cardiomyopathy was presented with weakness and melena. He had conjunctival pallor and difficulty in standing;his blood pressure was 81/62 mmHg. Abdominal computed tomography revealed contrast dye leakage into the small intestine. He was diagnosed with hemorrhagic shock secondary to intestinal bleeding;we administered large volumes of intravenous fluid along with performing a blood transfusion. We then performed angiography to determine the site of bleeding angioectasia and placed a catheter into the affected artery. We identified the resection site using an intraoperative dye infusion via the catheter, and successfully performed small bowel resection. He was subsequently discharged without complications. PMID:24769467

  3. Can immediate second resection be an alternative to standardized second transurethral resection of bladder tumors?

    PubMed

    Doğantekin, Engin; Girgin, Cengiz; Görgel, Sacit Nuri; Soylemez, Haluk; Dinçel, Çetin

    2016-03-01

    This study analyzed the impact of an immediate second transurethral resection of bladder tumor (TURBT) protocol on residual tumor status at the initial TURBT session and the recurrence rate in the primary resection area. We prospectively evaluated and randomized 47 consecutive patients who underwent TURBT sessions for bladder cancer. In accordance with the inclusion criteria, of the 47 consecutive patients, 19 (Group I) underwent immediate second resection of the tumor bed after complete TUR and 28 (Group II) did not. After standard TURBT, Group I underwent a second cystoscopy and resection of the bed of the tumor or an ignored tumor, which was performed by a different urologist. After 4-6 weeks, delayed second TURB was performed, and all pathological results were evaluated. Tumors were detected in two patients during the immediate second resection. Of these, one was a misdiagnosed tumor, whereas the other was diagnosed at the bed of the tumor by pathological examination. Tumors were detected in nine patients at the delayed second TURB, of which only one was part of Group I, while the others were part of Group II (p = 0.04). The results of this study demonstrated that residual tumors may remain after initial TURB, either in the tumor bed or in a different location within the bladder. Although this was a pilot study enrolling only a small number of patients, our initial results supported the assertion that immediate second resection can be an alternative to standard second TURBT. PMID:27106005

  4. An innovative procedure of laparoscope combined with endoscopy for gastrointestinal stromal tumor resection and cholecystectomy: A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    YAN, YE; LI, FENG; GAI, YONG-HAO; LIU, QING-WEI

    2016-01-01

    The present study reports a novel approach to laparoscopic and endoscopic cooperative surgery for gastric gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) resection and cholecystectomy, and conducts a review of the associated literature. The novel surgical procedure was performed on one patient who was diagnosed with a GIST and cholecystic polypus. The GIST was resected using an insulation-tipped diathermic electrosurgical knife under the guide of an endoscope. Subsequently, a cholecystectomy was performed by inserting two more 5-mm trocars and instruments transumbilically, guided using an endoscope. The tumor and the gallbladder were exteriorized using a peroral approach and the incision lining of the stomach was sutured laparoscopically. The procedure was successfully performed and the patient experienced no discomfort during the 5-year follow-up. In conclusion, the present study demonstrates that laparoscopic and endoscopic cooperative surgery is feasible and would be an ideal choice for invisible abdominal scar surgery, in particular for multi-visceral resection. PMID:27073455

  5. Autotransfusion utilization in abdominal trauma.

    PubMed

    Smith, L A; Barker, D E; Burns, R P

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to investigate the utility of autotransfusion in trauma patients in the past 3 years. A retrospective review was conducted of the charts for whom the Haemonetics Cell Saver autotransfusion device (Haemonetics Corp., Natick, MA) was utilized between January 1, 1993, and December 31, 1995. The estimated blood loss and quantity of blood transfused were noted for abdominal trauma patients. Costs of autotransfusion were then compared to estimated blood bank costs for this group. The Haemonetics Cell Saver autotransfusion device was requested for 592 cases from January 1, 1993, to December 31, 1995. Nonorthopedic trauma cases comprised 25 per cent of all autotransfusion cases. One hundred twenty-six patients had isolated abdominal trauma and had a mean estimated blood loss of 4864 +/- 6070 cc. The average volume of intraoperatively salvaged autologous blood transfused (autotransfusion) per patient was 1547 +/- 2359 cc, or a bank blood equivalent of 6.9 units of packed red blood cells. The total cost of autotransfusion in these patients was $63,252.00. Had bank blood been used instead of salvaged autologous blood, the cost would have been $114,523.00; thus, autotransfusion resulted in a savings of $51,271.00. The use of salvaged autologous blood comprised 45 per cent of total blood transfused. On a case-by-case basis, 75 per cent of cases were cost-effective compared to blood bank costs for an equivalent transfusion. Transfusion of intraoperatively salvaged autologous blood (autotransfusion) is a cost-effective, efficient way to provide blood products to operative trauma patients. PMID:8985070

  6. A case report of surgical resections with local and systemic chemotherapy for three recurrences of colon cancer occurring ten years after colectomy.

    PubMed

    Miki, Hisanori; Tsunemi, Kozo; Toyoda, Masao; Senzaki, Hideto; Yonemura, Yutaka; Tsubura, Airo

    2012-05-01

    A 56-year-old Japanese woman who underwent a curative resection of ascending colon cancer at 43 years of age was found to have a tumor in her lower left abdominal cavity by computed tomography at 53 years of age. The tumor in the omentum was resected and identified as an adenocarcinoma compatible with metastasis from the primary ascending colon cancer. Although the patient received adjuvant chemotherapy with tegafur uracil and calcium folinate, liver metastasis was detected 9 months after the first recurrence. A segmentectomy and hepatectomy was performed, and histopathological findings indicated metastasis from the primary colon cancer. A third recurrence was detected in the right abdominal cavity 7 months after the second surgery. The patient received 5 cycles of combination chemotherapy consisting of folinic acid, fluorouracil and irinotecan before the third operation. The metastatic tumor resection together with intraperitoneal chemotherapy was performed, and histopathological findings indicated metastasis from the primary colon cancer. After the third surgery, the patient received adjuvant chemotherapy consisting of 5 cycles of folinic acid, fluorouracil and oxaliplatin. The patient is well with no evidence of recurrence 12 months after the third recurrence. This case suggests that colon cancer can be dormant for over 10 years and that long-term follow-up is required after curative resection. Aggressive local as well as systemic chemotherapy may be required for the management of colon cancer recurrence. PMID:23525503

  7. Comparison between thulium laser resection of prostate and transurethral plasmakinetic resection of prostate or transurethral resection of prostate.

    PubMed

    DeCao, Hong; Wang, Jia; Huang, Yu; LiangLiu, Ren; JunLei, Hao; Gao, Liang; Tang, Zhuang; YingHu, Chun; Li, Xiang; JiuYuan, Hong; Dong, Qiang; Wei, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is one of the most common diseases in middle-aged and elderly men. In the present study, we aimed to compare the efficacy and safety of thulium laser resection of the prostate (TMLRP) with either transurethral plasmakinetic resection of the prostate (TUPKP) or transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP). A literature search was performed, eventually, 14 studies involving 1587 patients were included. Forest plots were produced by using Revman 5.2.0 software. Our meta-analysis showed that operation time, decrease in hemoglobin level, length of hospital stay, catheterization time, and development of urethral stricture significantly differed, whereas the transitory urge incontinence rate, urinary tract infection rate, and recatheterization rate did not significantly differ between TMLRP and either TURP or TUPKP. The blood transfusion rate was significantly different between TMLRP and TURP, but not between TMLRP and TUPKP. In addition, the retrograde ejaculation rate between TMLRP and TURP did not significantly differ. At 1, 3, 6, and 12 months of postoperative follow-up, the maximum flow rate, post-void residual, quality of life, and International Prostate Symptom Score did not significantly differ among the procedures. Thus, the findings of this study indicate that TMLRP may be a safe and feasible alternative. PMID:26444930

  8. Comparison between thulium laser resection of prostate and transurethral plasmakinetic resection of prostate or transurethral resection of prostate

    PubMed Central

    DeCao, Hong; Wang, Jia; Huang, Yu; LiangLiu, Ren; JunLei, Hao; Gao, Liang; Tang, Zhuang; YingHu, Chun; Li, Xiang; JiuYuan, Hong; Dong, Qiang; Wei, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is one of the most common diseases in middle-aged and elderly men. In the present study, we aimed to compare the efficacy and safety of thulium laser resection of the prostate (TMLRP) with either transurethral plasmakinetic resection of the prostate (TUPKP) or transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP). A literature search was performed, eventually, 14 studies involving 1587 patients were included. Forest plots were produced by using Revman 5.2.0 software. Our meta-analysis showed that operation time, decrease in hemoglobin level, length of hospital stay, catheterization time, and development of urethral stricture significantly differed, whereas the transitory urge incontinence rate, urinary tract infection rate, and recatheterization rate did not significantly differ between TMLRP and either TURP or TUPKP. The blood transfusion rate was significantly different between TMLRP and TURP, but not between TMLRP and TUPKP. In addition, the retrograde ejaculation rate between TMLRP and TURP did not significantly differ. At 1, 3, 6, and 12 months of postoperative follow-up, the maximum flow rate, post-void residual, quality of life, and International Prostate Symptom Score did not significantly differ among the procedures. Thus, the findings of this study indicate that TMLRP may be a safe and feasible alternative. PMID:26444930

  9. [Sphincterial conservation in surgery of carcinoma of the rectum (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Carabalona, M P; Berard, M P; Bricot, R; Edelmann, G; Loygue, J; Toupet, A

    1981-02-01

    The present study reports the results of several methods used to perform abdominal resection (with anastomosis fastened by means of sutures and clip-gun) abdomino-transanal method designed to preserve sphincter function (Babcok,, Toupet, Duhamel), anterior abdomino-perineal resection and tumorectomy. The indications of these different surgical techniques are discussed and the authors point out the necessity to do not give up the carcinologic needs to the sphincteral preservation. PMID:7188562

  10. Alterations in coagulation following major liver resection.

    PubMed

    Mallett, S V; Sugavanam, A; Krzanicki, D A; Patel, S; Broomhead, R H; Davidson, B R; Riddell, A; Gatt, A; Chowdary, P

    2016-06-01

    The international normalised ratio is frequently raised in patients who have undergone major liver resection, and is assumed to represent a potential bleeding risk. However, these patients have an increased risk of venous thromboembolic events, despite conventional coagulation tests indicating hypocoagulability. This prospective, observational study of patients undergoing major hepatic resection analysed the serial changes in coagulation in the early postoperative period. Thrombin generation parameters and viscoelastic tests of coagulation (thromboelastometry) remained within normal ranges throughout the study period. Levels of the procoagulant factors II, V, VII and X initially fell, but V and X returned to or exceeded normal range by postoperative day five. Levels of factor VIII and Von Willebrand factor were significantly elevated from postoperative day one (p < 0.01). Levels of the anticoagulants, protein C and antithrombin remained significantly depressed on postoperative day five (p = 0.01). Overall, the imbalance between pro- and anticoagulant factors suggested a prothrombotic environment in the early postoperative period. PMID:27030945

  11. Acute Shingles after Resection of Thoracic Schwannoma

    PubMed Central

    Muesse, Jason L.; Blackmon, Shanda H.; Harris, Richard L.; Kim, Min P.

    2012-01-01

    Herpes zoster is relatively uncommon after surgery in immunocompetent patients. To our knowledge, there have been no reports of herpes zoster after the resection of a thoracic schwannoma. We report the case of a 48-year-old woman in whom acute shingles developed after the video-assisted thoracic surgical resection of a posterior mediastinal schwannoma adjacent to the 4th thoracic vertebral body. The patient recovered after receiving timely antiviral therapy. Rash and pain are common in patients who have wound infections and contact dermatitis after surgery, so the possible reactivation of varicella virus might not be prominent in the surgeon's mind. This case serves as a reminder that viral infections such as shingles should be considered in the differential diagnosis of postoperative erythema and pain. PMID:22740749

  12. Resection arthroplasty for comminuted olecranon fractures.

    PubMed

    Compton, R; Bucknell, A

    1989-02-01

    Five cases of comminuted olecranon fractures treated by resection of the proximal fragments are reviewed. The patients' average age was 56 years and all were radiographically osteopenic. The triceps was advanced and attached to the distal olecranon with the elbow flexed at 90 degrees. A standard postoperative regimen was used with immobilization for three weeks in plaster at 45 to 60 degrees of flexion followed by progression to cautious active range of motion exercises. Follow-up of from 18 to 54 months shows an average active range of motion of 10 degrees flexion to 120 degrees flexion. There were no complaints or clinical evidence of instability and minimal degenerative changes were seen on radiography. We conclude that resection arthroplasty of comminuted olecranon fractures yields excellent clinical and functional results in elderly patients. PMID:2927958

  13. Endoscopic Resection of the Bicipitoradial Bursa.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing; Sit, Yan Kit; Pan, Xiao Hua

    2016-03-01

    The bicipitoradial bursa lies at the insertion of the biceps tendon on the radial tuberosity. It is an unusual site for chronic bursitis. It can be treated conservatively with aspiration and steroid injection. Surgical excision of the bursa is indicated in case of infection cause, failed conservative treatment with recurrence of the enlarged bursa and pain after aspiration, the presence of nerve compression with neurological impairment, mechanical limitation to flexion and extension of the elbow or biceps tendon degeneration, and/or functional impairment. Open resection through the anterior approach requires extensive dissection to expose the radial tuberosity and the radial neck, which increases the risk of neurovascular injury. Endoscopic resection is possible through distal biceps tendoscopy and endoscopy around the radial neck. It is technically demanding and should be reserved to the experienced elbow arthroscopist. PMID:26752772

  14. Endoscopic resection of superficial gastrointestinal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Marc, Giovannini; Lopes, Cesar Vivian

    2008-01-01

    Therapeutic endoscopy plays a major role in the management of gastrointestinal (GI) neoplasia. Its indications can be generalized into four broad categories; to remove or obliterate neoplastic lesion, to palliate malignant obstruction, or to treat bleeding. Only endoscopic resection allows complete histological staging of the cancer, which is critical as it allows stratification and refinement for further treatment. Although other endoscopic techniques, such as ablation therapy, may also cure early GI cancer, they can not provide a definitive pathological specimen. Early stage lesions reveal low frequency of lymph node metastasis which allows for less invasive treatments and thereby improving the quality of life when compared to surgery. Endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) and endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) are now accepted worldwide as treatment modalities for early cancers of the GI tract. PMID:18698673

  15. Personal experience with 411 hepatic resections.

    PubMed Central

    Iwatsuki, S; Starzl, T E

    1988-01-01

    Over a 24-year period, 411 partial hepatic resections were performed: 142 right or left trisegmentectomies, 158 lobectomies, 25 segmentectomies, and 86 local excisions. The operations were performed for benign lesions in 182 patients, for primary hepatic malignancies in 106, and for hepatic metastases in 123, including 90 from colorectal cancers. The 30-day (operative) mortality rate was 3.2%, and there were an additional six late deaths (1.5%) due to hepatic failure caused by the resection. The highest operative mortality rate (6.3%) resulted from the trisegmentectomies, but this merely reflected the extent of the disease being treated. A mortality rate of 8.5% for patients with primary hepatic malignancy was associated not only with the extensiveness of lesions, but also with cirrhosis in the remaining liver fragment. There was no mortality for 123 patients with metastatic disease, 100 patients with cavernous hemangioma, 22 with liver cell adenoma, 17 with focal nodular hyperplasia, 16 with congenital cystic disease, and five with hydatid cysts. Trauma, pre-existing iatrogenic injury, and cirrhosis were the only conditions that had lethal portent in patients with benign disease. Furthermore, patients with benign disease who survived operation had minimal liability from recurrence of their original disease and none from the resection per se. By contrast, tumor recurrence dominated the actuarial survival rates for cancer patients, which at 1 and 5 years were 68.5% and 31.9%, respectively, after resection for primary hepatic malignancy, and 84.2% and 29.5%, respectively, for hepatic metastases. In this report, the expanding role of partial hepatectomy in the treatment of liver disease was emphasized, as well as the need for considering, in some cases, the alternative of total hepatectomy and liver replacement. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 9. PMID:3178330

  16. Microsurgical resection of giant intraventricular meningioma.

    PubMed

    Liu, James K

    2013-01-01

    Intraventricular meningiomas are rare tumors, accounting for approximately 0.5 to 3% of all intracranial meningiomas. The majority arise in the atrium of the lateral ventricle. The surgical management of these tumors remains a considerable challenge because of their deep location and proximity to critical structures. Complete resection, if safely possible, should be the goal of surgery since this results in the best rates of local control. Although various approaches exist to access the lateral ventricular system, selection of the optimal approach should be individualized to the patient based upon the location of the tumor within the ventricle, the tumor size, the origin of the vascular supply to the tumor, and the relationship to neighboring neurovascular structures at risk. In this operative video manuscript, the author demonstrates an illustrative step-by-step technique for microsurgical resection of a giant intraventricular meningioma of the left atrium via a transcortical parieto-occipital approach. The patient illustrated in this video presented with a large recurrent meningioma (> 5 cm) approximately 10 years after the initial resection. The tumor had grown around a pre-existing shunt catheter and resulted in loculated hydrocephalus. A complete resection and shunt revision were both performed at the same sitting. The operative technique and surgical nuances, including the surgical approach, intradural tumor removal, closure, and management of hydrocephalus are illustrated in this video atlas. The video can be found here: http://youtu.be/vpdmZ1ccWSM. (http://thejns.org/doi/abs/10.3171/2013.V1.FOCUS12352) PMID:23282155

  17. Use of Amiodarone after Major Lung Resection

    PubMed Central

    Berry, Mark F.; D’Amico, Thomas A.; Onaitis, Mark W.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND We evaluated the association of respiratory complications and amiodarone use in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) after major lung resection. METHODS Outcomes of patients who had postoperative AF treated with or without amiodarone after lobectomy, bilobectomy, or pneumonectomy at a single institution between 2003 and 2010 were evaluated using multivariable logistic modeling. RESULTS Of 1412 patients who underwent lobectomy, bilobectomy, or pneumonectomy, AF occurred in 232 (16%). AF developed after a respiratory complication in 31 patients, who were excluded from subsequent analysis. The remaining 201 patients that had AF without an antecedent respiratory complication had similar mortality (3.0% [6/201] versus 2.5% [30 /1180], p=0.6) and respiratory morbidity (10% [20/201] versus 9% [101/1180], p=0.5) but longer hospital stays (5 [4,7] versus 4 days [3,6], p<0.0001) compared to the 1180 patients that did not have AF. Amiodarone was used in 101 (50%) of these 201 patients, including 5 patients who had a pneumonectomy. Age, pulmonary function, and operative resection were similar between the patients treated with/without amiodarone. Amiodarone use was not associated with a significant difference in the incidence of subsequent respiratory complications [12% (12/101 amiodarone patients) versus 8% (8/100 non-amiodarone patients), p=0.5)]. CONCLUSIONS AF that occurs without an antecedent respiratory complication in patients after major lung resection results in longer hospital stay but not increased mortality or respiratory morbidity. Using amiodarone to treat atrial fibrillation after major lung resection is not associated with an increased incidence of respiratory complications. PMID:25106684

  18. Sexual dysfunction following proctocolectomy and abdominoperineal resection.

    PubMed

    Yeager, E S; Van Heerden, J A

    1980-02-01

    Sexual dysfunction after rectal excision was studied in 45 male patients who were less than 50 years of age. Of 25 patients having had proctocolectomy, one (4%) was impotent, while three (15%) of 20 patients having had abdominoperineal resection were impotent. Two patients in the abdominoperineal group reported no ejaculation with normal potency and sensation of orgasm. The age of the patient and the extent of dissection seemed to be the two main factors concerned with sexual dysfunction after rectal excision. PMID:7362286

  19. [Trans-sphincteric resection of the rectum].

    PubMed

    Kopecký, J; Kovárová, A; Kopecká, P; Klus, I

    1997-01-01

    On the base of long time watching of 16 patients treated by transsphincteric resection of the rectum authors believe that this operation has even nowadays still its justification among operations preserving continention. They have dominant position namely in indications for benign disease, where only a small part of patients require a more extent performance. On the contrary, at rectum carcinoma the operating performance is highly elective. PMID:10103148

  20. Laparoscopic intersphincteric resection: indications and results.

    PubMed

    Scala, Dario; Niglio, Antonello; Pace, Ugo; Ruffolo, Fulvio; Rega, Daniela; Delrio, Paolo

    2016-03-01

    Surgical treatment of distal rectal cancer has long been based only on abdominoperineal excision, resulting in a permanent stoma and not always offering a definitive local control. Sphincter saving surgery has emerged in the last 20 years and can be offered also to patients with low lying tumours, provided that the external sphincter is not involved by the disease. An intersphincteric resection (ISR) is based on the resection of the rectum with a distal dissection proceeding into the space between the internal and the external anal sphincter. Originally described as an open procedure, it has also been developed with the laparoscopic approach, and also this technically demanding procedure is inscribed among those offered to the patient by a minimally invasive surgery. Indications have to be strict and patient selection is crucial to obtain both oncological and functional optimal results. The level of distal dissection and the extent of internal sphincter resected are chosen according to the distal margin of the tumour and is based on MRI findings: accurate imaging is therefore mandatory to better define the surgical approach. We here present our actual indications for ISR, results in terms of operative time, median hospital stay for ISR in our experience and review the updated literature. PMID:27022927

  1. Liver Resection in Children with Hepatic Neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Randolph, Judson G.; Altman, R. Peter; Arensman, Robert M.; Matlak, Michael E.; Leikin, Sanford L.

    1978-01-01

    In the past ten years, 28 patients with primary tumors of the liver have been treated. There were 11 benign tumors, including four hamartomas, three patients with focal nodular hyperplasia, and two each with congenital cysts and hemangioma. Hamartomas and masses of focal nodular hyperplasia should be excised when possible, but both are benign lesions; therefore life threatening excisions at the porta hepatis should be avoided. Cysts are often resectable, but when occupying all lobes of the liver, they can be successfully managed by marsupialization into the free peritoneal cavity. If resectable, hemangiomas should be removed; when occupying most of the liver as they often do, patients may be subject to platelet trapping or to cardiac failure. In some instances these lesions have been controlled by steroids, radiation therapy or hepatic artery ligation. Of 17 malignant tumors seen, 12 proved to be hepatoblastomas. Nine of the 12 patients underwent liver resection, of whom four are cured, (33%). There were three children with hepatocellular carcinomas and two with embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma. One child from each of these groups is cured by surgical excision. At present the only known cures in children with primary malignant liver neoplasms have been achieved by operative removal. ImagesFig. 1.Fig. 2.Fig. 3.Fig. 4. PMID:206216

  2. Speaking without Broca's area after tumor resection.

    PubMed

    Plaza, Monique; Gatignol, Peggy; Leroy, Marianne; Duffau, Hugues

    2009-08-01

    We present the case of a right-handed patient who received surgical treatment for a left frontal WHO grade II glioma invading the left inferior and middle frontal gyri, the head of the caudate nucleus, the anterior limb of the internal capsule and the anterior insula, in direct contact also with the anterior-superior part of the lentiform nucleus. The tumor resection was guided by direct electrical stimulation on brain areas, while the patient was awake. Adding a narrative production task to the neuropsychological assessment, we compared pre-, peri- and post-surgical language skills in order to analyze the effects of the tumor infiltration and the consequences of the left IFG resection, an area known to be involved in various language and cognitive processes. We showed that the tumor infiltration and its resection did not lead to the severe impairments predicted by the localization models assigning a significant role in language processing to the left frontal lobe, notably Broca's area. We showed that slow tumor evolution - the patient had been symptom-free for a long time - enabled compensatory mechanisms to process most language functions endangered by the tumor infiltration. However, a subtle fragility was observed in two language devices, i.e., reported speech and relative clauses, related to minor working memory deficits. This case study of a patient speaking without Broca's area illustrates the efficiency of brain plasticity, and shows the necessity to broaden pre-, peri-, post-surgery language and cognitive assessments. PMID:19274574

  3. Favorable perioperative outcomes after resection of borderline resectable pancreatic cancer treated with neoadjuvant stereotactic radiation and chemotherapy compared with upfront pancreatectomy for resectable cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mellon, Eric A.; Strom, Tobin J.; Hoffe, Sarah E.; Frakes, Jessica M.; Springett, Gregory M.; Hodul, Pamela J.; Malafa, Mokenge P.; Chuong, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Background Neoadjuvant multi-agent chemotherapy and stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) are utilized to increase margin negative (R0) resection rates in borderline resectable pancreatic cancer (BRPC) or locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) patients. Concerns persist that these neoadjuvant therapies may worsen perioperative morbidities and mortality. Methods Upfront resection patients (n=241) underwent resection without neoadjuvant treatment for resectable disease. They were compared to BRPC or LAPC patients (n=61) who underwent resection after chemotherapy and 5 fraction SBRT. Group comparisons were performed by Mann-Whitney U or Fisher’s exact test. Overall Survival (OS) was estimated by Kaplan-Meier and compared by log-rank methods. Results In the neoadjuvant therapy group, there was significantly higher T classification, N classification, and vascular resection/repair rate. Surgical positive margin rate was lower after neoadjuvant therapy (3.3% vs. 16.2%, P=0.006). Post-operative morbidities (39.3% vs. 31.1%, P=0.226) and 90-day mortality (2% vs. 4%, P=0.693) were similar between the groups. Median OS was 33.5 months in the neoadjuvant therapy group compared to 23.1 months in upfront resection patients who received adjuvant treatment (P=0.057). Conclusions Patients with BRPC or LAPC and sufficient response to neoadjuvant multi-agent chemotherapy and SBRT have similar or improved peri-operative and long-term survival outcomes compared to upfront resection patients. PMID:27563444

  4. [The patient with intra-abdominal hypertension].

    PubMed

    Sakka, Samir G

    2016-01-01

    An intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH) defined as a pathological increase in intra-abdominal pressure (IAP) is commonly found on ICU admission or during the ICU stay. Several studies confirmed that an IAH is an independent predictor for mortality of critically ill patients. The abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) which is defined as a sustained IAP>20 mmHg (with or without an abdominal perfusion pressure [APP]<60mmHg) that is associated with new organ dysfunction or failure has a mortality of up to 60%. In general, an IAH may be induced by several intra-abdominal as well as extra-abdominal conditions. Reduced abdominal wall compliance, intra-abdominal pathologies (either of the peritoneal space or parenchymateous organs) may lead to an IAH. Most commonly, intra-abdominal infections and/or sepsis and severe trauma or burns are predisposing for an IAH. An early sign may be a decrease in urinary output. The effects of an increased IAP on cardiovascular function are well recognized and include negative effects on preload, afterload and contractility. However, all other compartments of the body may be affected by an IAH. Thus, by an increase of the respective compartment pressure, e.g. intracranial pressure, a poly-compartment syndrome may result. Adequate prevention, a forward-looking strategy, and objective techniques for measurement of IAP are required to avoid or early detect an IAH or ACS. Finally, an immediate and consequent interdisciplinary management using conservative, interventional and operative options are necessary to solve an IAH or ACS. PMID:26863642

  5. Robot-assisted segmental resection for intralobar pulmonary sequestration

    PubMed Central

    Konecna, J.; Karenovics, W.; Veronesi, G.; Triponez, F.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Pulmonary sequestration is a rare congenital malformation found most frequently as intralobar sequestration in the left lower lobe. Complete surgical resection is considered the treatment of choice. Presentation We present the case of a 29- year-old woman with intralobar pulmonary sequestration (ILS) diagnosed on chest CT. The sequestration was located in the left lower basal segments (segments 9 and 10) and was treated successfully by robot-assisted segmental resection without complication. Discussion Recently, robot- assisted thoracoscopic lobar resections started to be performed for ILS. The sublobar, segmental resection are reserved mainly for the resection of pulmonary nodules. We report a first case of robot-assisted anatomical segmental resection for ILS. Conclusion We highlight the role of robotic technology offering three-dimensional view and excellent dexterity enhancing the surgical performance and getting the surgical procedure more precise and safer. This could be useful especially in case of challenging sublobar resections. PMID:27061483

  6. Abdominal Pain in the Geriatric Patient.

    PubMed

    Leuthauser, Amy; McVane, Benjamin

    2016-05-01

    Abdominal pain in the elderly can be a challenging and difficult condition to diagnose and treat. The geriatric population has significant comorbidities and often takes polypharmacy that can mask symptoms. The presentation of common conditions can be different than that in the younger population, often lacking the traditional indicators of disease, making it of pivotal importance for the clinician to consider a wide differential during their workup. It is also important to consider extra-abdominal abnormality that may manifest as abdominal pain. PMID:27133249

  7. Chylous Ascites after Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    PubMed Central

    Ohki, Shinichi; Kurumisawa, Soki

    2015-01-01

    A 73-year-old man was transferred for treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysm. He had no history of abdominal surgeries. Grafting between the infra-renal abdominal aorta and the bilateral common iliac arteries was performed. Proximal and distal cross clamps were applied for grafting. He developed chylous ascites on the 5th post-operative day, 2 days after initiation of oral intake. Fortunately, he responded to treatment with total parenteral hyper-alimentation for 10 days, followed by a low-fat diet. There was no recurrence of ascites. PMID:27087873

  8. Chylous Ascites after Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair.

    PubMed

    Ohki, Shinichi; Kurumisawa, Soki; Misawa, Yoshio

    2016-01-01

    A 73-year-old man was transferred for treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysm. He had no history of abdominal surgeries. Grafting between the infra-renal abdominal aorta and the bilateral common iliac arteries was performed. Proximal and distal cross clamps were applied for grafting. He developed chylous ascites on the 5th post-operative day, 2 days after initiation of oral intake. Fortunately, he responded to treatment with total parenteral hyper-alimentation for 10 days, followed by a low-fat diet. There was no recurrence of ascites. PMID:27087873

  9. [Diagnostic laparocentesis in closed abdominal injury].

    PubMed

    Berkutov, A N; Deriabin, I I; Zakurdaev, V E

    1976-09-01

    To improve the diagnosis of closed abdominal trauma since 1966 the authors have been widely employing laparocentesis. The results of using abdominal punctures an 260 patients are reported. The method proved to be reliable in 97.7%. The use of laparocentesis enabled the authors to reduce the number of errors by 7.3 times, to shorten the terms of establishing the diagnosis by 4 times as compared with the control group of patients (190 subjects in whom the recognition of abdominal injuries is based on common clinical symptoms). PMID:136785

  10. Combined subcutaneous, intrathoracic and abdominal splenosis.

    PubMed

    Javadrashid, Reza; Paak, Neda; Salehi, Ahad

    2010-09-01

    We report a case of combined subcutaneous, intrathoracic, and abdominal splenosis who presented with attacks of flushing, tachycardia and vague abdominal pain. The patient's past medical history included a splenectomy due to abdominal trauma and years later, a lung lobectomy due to recurrent pneumonia. An enhancing solid mass adjacent to the upper pole of the left kidney and nodular pleural based lesions in the left hemi-thorax along with nodular lesions in subcutaneous tissue of the left chest wall suggested possible adrenal malignancy with multiple metastases. Histopathologic examination demonstrated benign lesions of ectopic splenic tissue. PMID:20804314

  11. Automatic abdominal lymph node detection method based on local intensity structure analysis from 3D x-ray CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Yoshihiko; Nimura, Yukitaka; Kitasaka, Takayuki; Mizuno, Shinji; Furukawa, Kazuhiro; Goto, Hidemi; Fujiwara, Michitaka; Misawa, Kazunari; Ito, Masaaki; Nawano, Shigeru; Mori, Kensaku

    2013-03-01

    This paper presents an automated method of abdominal lymph node detection to aid the preoperative diagnosis of abdominal cancer surgery. In abdominal cancer surgery, surgeons must resect not only tumors and metastases but also lymph nodes that might have a metastasis. This procedure is called lymphadenectomy or lymph node dissection. Insufficient lymphadenectomy carries a high risk for relapse. However, excessive resection decreases a patient's quality of life. Therefore, it is important to identify the location and the structure of lymph nodes to make a suitable surgical plan. The proposed method consists of candidate lymph node detection and false positive reduction. Candidate lymph nodes are detected using a multi-scale blob-like enhancement filter based on local intensity structure analysis. To reduce false positives, the proposed method uses a classifier based on support vector machine with the texture and shape information. The experimental results reveal that it detects 70.5% of the lymph nodes with 13.0 false positives per case.

  12. Superior mesenteric artery syndrome after resection of an arteriovenous malformation in the cervical cord.

    PubMed

    Balmaseda, M T; Gordon, C; Cunningham, M L; Clairmont, A C

    1987-09-01

    Any disease process decreasing the angle between the superior mesenteric artery and the abdominal aorta can result in the external compression of the duodenum and subsequent intestinal obstruction. This unusual type of intestinal obstruction known as superior mesenteric artery syndrome is a well-recognized clinical entity. It is diagnosed radiologically by an abrupt, vertical cutoff of barium flow in the third portion of the duodenum. The management is primarily medical but occasionally surgical correction is required. Herein, the diagnosis of superior mesenteric artery syndrome was made in an incomplete quadriplegic woman who had recently undergone surgical resection of an arteriovenous malformation in the cervical cord. This case was managed successfully with gastrointestinal decompression, proper positioning in the side-lying position, and adequate nutrition. PMID:3631039

  13. Single-port access laparoscopic abdominoperineal resection through the colostomy site: a case report.

    PubMed

    Lauritsen, M L; Bulut, O

    2012-04-01

    Single-port access (SPA) laparoscopic surgery is emerging as an alternative to conventional laparoscopic and open surgery, although its benefits still have to be determined. We present the case of a 87-year-old woman who underwent abdominoperineal resection (APR) with SPA. The abdominal part of the operation was performed with a SILS port inserted through the marked colostomy site, and the specimen was removed through the perineum after intersphincteric dissection. Operating time was 317 min. Bleeding was negligible. The specimen measured 26 cm in length. Thirteen lymph nodes were found, 2 with metastasis. The patient recovered bowel function on the first postoperative day, was discharged on the 7th day and immediately resumed her to normal activities. Laparoscopic APR through SPA can be an alternative option for selected patients but requires advanced laparoscopic skills. PMID:21667132

  14. EXTRA-ABDOMINAL DESMOID TUMOR: LOCAL RECURRENCE AND TREATMENT OPTIONS

    PubMed Central

    TEIXEIRA, LUIZ EDUARDO MOREIRA; ARANTES, EUGÊNIO COSTA; VILLELA, RAFAEL FREITAS; SOARES, CLAUDIO BELING GONÇALVES; COSTA, ROBERTO BITARÃES DE CARVALHO; ANDRADE, MARCO ANTÔNIO PERCOPE DE

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate the rate of local recurrence of extra-abdominal desmoid tumor and compare the outcomes of surgical treatment and conservative treatment. Methods: Twenty one patients (14 women and seven men), mean age 33.0±8.7 years old, with a diagnosis of desmoid tumor were evaluated. The mean follow-up period was 58.5±29.0 months. Fourteen cases involved the lower limbs, four cases involved the upper limbs, and three cases involved the trunk. The average tumor size was 12.7±7.5 cm. Of the 21 patients, 14 did not undergo previous treatment and seven patients relapsed before the initial evaluation. Surgical treatment was performed in 16 patients and conservative treatment was performed in five patients. Results: Recurrence occurred in seven patients (33%) and six of them relapsed within the first 18 months. No significant difference was observed between conservative and surgical treatment. However, a significant difference was observed among patients undergoing wide resection and who experienced improved local control. Conclusion: The recurrence rate of desmoid tumor was 33.3%. There was no difference in recurrence between conservative and surgical treatment. In surgical treatment, wide margins showed better results for recurrence control. Level of Evidence III. Retrospective Observational Study. PMID:27217816

  15. Imaging of abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Sparks, Amy R; Johnson, Philip L; Meyer, Mark C

    2002-04-15

    Given the high rate of morbidity and mortality associated with abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs), accurate diagnosis and preoperative evaluation are essential for improved patient outcomes. Ultrasonography is the standard method of screening and monitoring AAAs that have not ruptured. In the past, aortography was commonly used for preoperative planning in the repair of AAAs. More recently, computed tomography (CT) has largely replaced older, more invasive methods. Recent advances in CT imaging technology, such as helical CT and CT angiography, offer significant advantages over traditional CT. These methods allow for more rapid scans and can produce three-dimensional images of the AAA and important adjacent vascular structures. Use of endovascular stent grafts has increased recently and is less invasive for the repair of AAAs in selected cases. Aortography and CT angiography can precisely determine the size and surrounding anatomy of the AAA to identify appropriate candidates for the use of endovascular stent grafts. Helical CT and CT angiography represent an exciting future in the preoperative evaluation of AAAs. However, this technology is not the standard of care because of the lack of widespread availability, the cost associated with obtaining new equipment, and the lack of universal protocols necessary for acquisition and reconstruction of these images. PMID:11989632

  16. Intensity modulated radiation-therapy for preoperative posterior abdominal wall irradiation of retroperitoneal liposarcomas

    SciTech Connect

    Bossi, Alberto . E-mail: alberto.bossi@uz.kuleuven.ac.be; De Wever, Ivo; Van Limbergen, Erik; Vanstraelen, Bianca

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Preoperative external-beam radiation therapy (preop RT) in the management of Retroperitoneal Liposarcomas (RPLS) typically involves the delivery of radiation to the entire tumor mass: yet this may not be necessary. The purpose of this study is to evaluate a new strategy of preop RT for RPLS in which the target volume is limited to the contact area between the tumoral mass and the posterior abdominal wall. Methods and Materials: Between June 2000 and Jan 2005, 18 patients with the diagnosis of RPLS have been treated following a pilot protocol of pre-op RT, 50 Gy in 25 fractions of 2 Gy/day. The Clinical Target Volume (CTV) has been limited to the posterior abdominal wall, region at higher risk for local relapse. A Three-Dimensional conformal (3D-CRT) and an Intensity Modulated (IMRT) plan were generated and compared; toxicity was reported following the National Cancer Institute (NCI) Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v3.0. Results: All patients completed the planned treatment and the acute toxicity was tolerable: 2 patients experienced Grade 3 and 1 Grade 2 anorexia while 2 patients developed Grade 2 nausea. IMRT allows a better sparing of the ipsilateral and the contralateral kidney. All tumors were successfully resected without major complications. At a median follow-up of 27 months 2 patients developed a local relapse and 1 lung metastasis. Conclusions: Our strategy of preop RT is feasible and well tolerated: the rate of resectability is not compromised by limiting the preop CTV to the posterior abdominal wall and a better critical-structures sparing is obtained with IMRT.

  17. [R0 Resection by Distal Pancreatectomy with En Bloc Celiac Axis Resection after Down-Staging by FOLFIRINOX Therapy in a Case of Pancreas Cancer--Report of a Case].

    PubMed

    Makino, Hironobu; Kametaka, Hisashi; Fukada, Tadaomi; Seike, Kazuhiro; Koyama, Takashi; Hasegawa, Akio

    2015-11-01

    The patient, a 55-year-old man, was diagnosed elsewhere as having cancer of the tail of the pancreas and was referred to our hospital. Abdominal computed tomography (CT) revealed a remarkably large tumor, 90 mm in diameter, in the tail of the pancreas, with invasion of the adjacent spleen, stomach, left adrenal gland, diaphragm, and celiac artery; metastasis to the liver; and peritoneal dissemination. The serum levels of the tumor markers CEA and CA19-9 were elevated (21.2 ng/mL and 9,530 U/mL, respectively). Since surgery was not considered to be feasible in this condition, the patient was started on FOLFIRINOX therapy. Adverse events, including Grade 3 decreased neutrophil count, anorexia, diarrhea, and hyperkalemia occurred; however, the patient was able to receive 10 cycles of therapy with downward adjustments of the dosage. In response to the therapy, the tumor marker levels fell rapidly, and on CT, the tumor shrank to 40 mm in diameter; however, resection was still scheduled because positron emission tomography (PET)-CT revealed suspected remnants of the disease in the pancreatic tail. After preoperative transcatheter embolization of the common hepatic artery and the left gastric artery, distal pancreatectomy with en bloc celiac axis resection (DP-CAR) was performed. Intraoperative ultrasonography revealed no metastatic lesions in the liver. Histopathologically, the resected sites were found to be almost totally replaced with fibrous scar tissue, and only trace evidence of moderately differentiated tubular adenocarcinoma components were seen in the pancreatic tail, gastric submucosa, and left adrenal gland. Therefore, R0 resection had been achieved. The patient remains alive, showing no signs of recurrence at 18 months after the initial treatment and 11 months after the tumor resection. The results in this case suggest that FOLFIRINOX therapy can increase the radical curability of pancreatic cancer via down-staging and eventually improve the prognosis. PMID

  18. The Tribolium homeotic gene Abdominal is homologous to abdominal-A of the Drosophila bithorax complex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stuart, J. J.; Brown, S. J.; Beeman, R. W.; Denell, R. E.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    The Abdominal gene is a member of the single homeotic complex of the beetle, Tribolium castaneum. An integrated developmental genetic and molecular analysis shows that Abdominal is homologous to the abdominal-A gene of the bithorax complex of Drosophila. abdominal-A mutant embryos display strong homeotic transformations of the anterior abdomen (parasegments 7-9) to PS6, whereas developmental commitments in the posterior abdomen depend primarily on Abdominal-B. In beetle embryos lacking Abdominal function, parasegments throughout the abdomen are transformed to PS6. This observation demonstrates the general functional significance of parasegmental expression among insects and shows that the control of determinative decisions in the posterior abdomen by homeotic selector genes has undergone considerable evolutionary modification.

  19. Genetics Home Reference: abdominal wall defect

    MedlinePlus

    ... size and can usually be diagnosed early in fetal development, typically between the tenth and fourteenth weeks of ... organs at the abdominal wall opening late in fetal development may also contribute to organ injury. Intestinal damage ...

  20. Abdominal pain - children under age 12

    MedlinePlus

    Stomach pain in children; Pain - abdomen - children; Abdominal cramps in children; Belly ache in children ... this kind of pain when they have a stomach virus, indigestion, gas, or when they become constipated. ...

  1. Familial abdominal chemodectomas with associated cutaneous angiolipomas.

    PubMed

    Lee, S P; Nicholson, G I; Hitchcock, G

    1977-04-01

    The occurrence of cutaneous angiolipomas and intra-abdominal retroperitoneal chemodectomas in two brothers is described. Both died from malignant dissemination of the chemodectomas. It is possible but speculative that two other brothers suffered from the same syndrome. PMID:195258

  2. Correlation between intra-abdominal pressure and pulmonary volumes after superior and inferior abdominal surgery

    PubMed Central

    de Cleva, Roberto; de Assumpção, Marianna Siqueira; Sasaya, Flavia; Chaves, Natalia Zuniaga; Santo, Marco Aurelio; Fló, Claudia; Lunardi, Adriana C.; Filho, Wilson Jacob

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Patients undergoing abdominal surgery are at risk for pulmonary complications. The principal cause of postoperative pulmonary complications is a significant reduction in pulmonary volumes (FEV1 and FVC) to approximately 65-70% of the predicted value. Another frequent occurrence after abdominal surgery is increased intra-abdominal pressure. The aim of this study was to correlate changes in pulmonary volumes with the values of intra-abdominal pressure after abdominal surgery, according to the surgical incision in the abdomen (superior or inferior). METHODS: We prospectively evaluated 60 patients who underwent elective open abdominal surgery with a surgical time greater than 240 minutes. Patients were evaluated before surgery and on the 3rd postoperative day. Spirometry was assessed by maximal respiratory maneuvers and flow-volume curves. Intra-abdominal pressure was measured in the postoperative period using the bladder technique. RESULTS: The mean age of the patients was 56±13 years, and 41.6% 25 were female; 50 patients (83.3%) had malignant disease. The patients were divided into two groups according to the surgical incision (superior or inferior). The lung volumes in the preoperative period showed no abnormalities. After surgery, there was a significant reduction in both FEV1 (1.6±0.6 L) and FVC (2.0±0.7 L) with maintenance of FEV1/FVC of 0.8±0.2 in both groups. The maximum intra-abdominal pressure values were similar (p = 0.59) for the two groups. There was no association between pulmonary volumes and intra-abdominal pressure measured in any of the groups analyzed. CONCLUSIONS: Our results show that superior and inferior abdominal surgery determines hypoventilation, unrelated to increased intra-abdominal pressure. Patients at high risk of pulmonary complications should receive respiratory care even if undergoing inferior abdominal surgery. PMID:25029580

  3. Laparoscopic right-sided colonic resection with transluminal colonoscopic specimen extraction

    PubMed Central

    Kayaalp, Cuneyt; Kutluturk, Koray; Yagci, Mehmet Ali; Ates, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To study the transcolonic extraction of the proximally resected colonic specimens by colonoscopic assistance at laparoscopic colonic surgery. METHODS: The diagnoses of our patients were Crohn’s disease, carcinoid of appendix and adenocarcinoma of cecum. We preferred laparoscopic total mesocolic resections. Colon and terminal ileum were divided with endoscopic staplers. A colonoscope was placed per anal and moved proximally in the colon till to reach the colonic closed end under the laparoscopic guidance. The stump of the colon was opened with laparoscopic scissors. A snare of colonoscope was released and the intraperitoneal complete free colonic specimen was grasped. Specimen was moved in to the colon with the help of the laparoscopic graspers and pulled gently through the large bowel and extracted through the anus. The open end of the colon was closed again and the ileal limb and the colon were anastomosed intracorporeally with a 60-mm laparoscopic stapler. The common enterotomy orifice was closed in two layers with a running intracorporeal suture. RESULTS: There were three patients with laparoscopic right-sided colonic resections and their specimens were intended to remove through the remnant colon by colonoscopy but the procedure failed in one patient (adenocarcinoma) due to a bulky mass and the specimen extraction was converted to transvaginal route. All the patients had prior abdominal surgeries and had related adhesions. The operating times were 210, 300 and 500 min. The lengths of the specimens were 13, 17 and 27 cm. In our cases, there were no superficial or deep surgical site infections or any other complications. The patients were discharged uneventfully within 4-5 d and they were asymptomatic after a mean 7.6 mo follow-up (ranged 4-12). As far as we know, there were only 12 cases reported yet on transcolonic extraction of the proximal colonic specimens by colonoscopic assistance after laparoscopic resections. With our cases, success rate of the

  4. Progress in Fully Automated Abdominal CT Interpretation

    PubMed Central

    Summers, Ronald M.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Automated analysis of abdominal CT has advanced markedly over just the last few years. Fully automated assessment of organs, lymph nodes, adipose tissue, muscle, bowel, spine, and tumors are some examples where tremendous progress has been made. Computer-aided detection of lesions has also improved dramatically. CONCLUSION This article reviews the progress and provides insights into what is in store in the near future for automated analysis for abdominal CT, ultimately leading to fully automated interpretation. PMID:27101207

  5. Using abdominal massage in bowel management.

    PubMed

    Connor, Michelle; Hunt, Catherine; Lindley, Alison; Adams, John

    2014-07-15

    This article describes the introduction of abdominal massage techniques by a community team as part of a total bowel management programme for people with learning disabilities. A trust-wide audit of prescribed laxative use by this client group raised concerns, and led to a more systematic approach to managing constipation in people with learning disabilities. An education programme for carers proved to be successful. Some reported that adopting abdominal massage provided further opportunity to develop the therapeutic relationship. PMID:25005415

  6. Traumatic pseudoaneurysm of the abdominal aorta.

    PubMed

    Barchiche, R; Bové, T; Demanet, H; Goldstein, J P; Deuvaert, F E

    1999-08-01

    A traumatic pseudoaneurysm of the abdominal aorta is a rare entity, occurring as the result of a missed aortic lesion at the time of the initial injury. Therefore, clinical suspicion and careful abdominal exploration at first laparotomy is mandatory to prevent aortic pseudoaneurysm formation and its risk of delayed rupture. We present a case of successful surgical treatment of a suprarenal aortic false aneurysm, presenting 4 weeks after a life-threatening gunshot wound in a 13-year-old child. PMID:10499389

  7. A focus on intra-abdominal infections

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Complicated intra-abdominal infections are an important cause of morbidity and are frequently associated with poor prognosis, particularly in higher risk patients. Well defined evidence-based recommendations for intra-abdominal infections treatment are partially lacking because of the limited number of randomized-controlled trials. Factors consistently associated with poor outcomes in patients with intra-abdominal infections include increased illness severity, failed source control, inadequate empiric antimicrobial therapy and healthcare-acquired infection. Early prognostic evaluation of complicated intra-abdominal infections is important to select high-risk patients for more aggressive therapeutic procedures. The cornerstones in the management of complicated intra-abdominal infections are both source control and antibiotic therapy. The timing and the adequacy of source control are the most important issues in the management of intra-abdominal infections, because inadequate and late control of septic source may have a negative effect on the outcomes. Recent advances in interventional and more aggressive techniques could significantly decrease the morbidity and mortality of physiologically severe complicated intra-abdominal infections, even if these are still being debated and are yet not validated by limited prospective trials. Empiric antimicrobial therapy is nevertheless important in the overall management of intra-abdominal infections. Inappropriate antibiotic therapy may result in poor patient outcomes and in the appearance of bacterial resistance. Antimicrobial management is generally standardised and many regimens, either with monotherapy or combination therapy, have proven their efficacy. Routine coverage especially against Enterococci and candida spp is not always recommended, but can be useful in particular clinical conditions. A de escalation approach may be recommended in patients with specific risk factors for multidrug resistant infections such as

  8. Imaging in resectable colorectal liver metastasis patients with or without preoperative chemotherapy: results of the PROMETEO-01 study

    PubMed Central

    Rojas Llimpe, F L; Di Fabio, F; Ercolani, G; Giampalma, E; Cappelli, A; Serra, C; Castellucci, P; D'Errico, A; Golfieri, R; Pinna, A D; Pinto, C

    2014-01-01

    Background: The aim of the PROMETEO-01 Study was to define the diagnostic accuracy of imaging techniques in colorectal cancer liver metastasis (CRCLM) patients. Methods: Patients referred to Bologna S. Orsola-Malpighi Hospital performed a computed-tomography scan (CT), magnetic resonance (MR), 18F-FDG-PET/CTscan (PET/CT) and liver contrast-enhanced-ultrasound (CEUS); CEUS was also performed intraoperatively (i-CEUS). Every pathological lesion was compared with imaging data. Results: From December 2007 to August 2010, 84 patients were enrolled. A total of 51 (60.71%) resected patients were eligible for analysis. In the lesion-by-lesion analysis 175 resected lesions were evaluated: 67(38.3%) belonged to upfront resected patients (group-A) and 108 (61.7%) to chemotherapy-pretreated patients (group-B). In all patients the sensitivity of MR proved better than CT (91% vs 82% P=0.002), CEUS (91 vs 81% P=0.008) and PET/CT (91% vs 60% P=0.000), whereas PET/CT showed the lowest sensitivity. In group-A the sensitivity of i-CEUS, MR, CT, CEUS and PET/CT was 98%, 94%, 91%, 84% and 78%, respectively. In group-B the i-CEUS proved equivalent in sensitivity to MR (95% and 90%, respectively, P=0.227) and both were significantly more sensitive than other procedures. The CT sensitivity in group-B was lower than in group-A (77% vs 91%, P=0.024). Conclusions: A thoraco-abdominal CT provides an adequate baseline evaluation and guides judgment as to the resectability of CRCLM patients. In the subset of candidates for induction chemotherapy to increase the chance of liver resection, the most rational approach is to add MR for the staging and restaging of CRCLM. PMID:24983362

  9. Ex-vivo Resection and Small-Bowel Auto-transplantation for the Treatment of Tumors at the Root of the Mesentery

    PubMed Central

    Nikeghbalian, S.; Aliakbarian, M.; Kazemi, K.; Shamsaeefar, A. R.; Mehdi, S. H.; Bahreini, A.; Malek-Hosseini, S. A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Tumors involving the root of the mesentery are generally regarded as “unresectable” with conventional surgical techniques. Resection with conventional surgery may end in life-threatening complications in these patients. Ex-vivo resection and auto-transplantation avoids excessive bleeding and prevents ischemic related damage to the small intestine and other organs. Objective: To share our experience of ex-vivo resection of the tumors with involvement of small bowel mesentery followed by small bowel auto-transplantation. Methods: In this study, medical records of all the patients who underwent ex-vivo resection and auto-transplantation at our center were retrospectively analyzed. Results: The most common indication for the procedure in our series was locally advanced pancreatic carcinoma. Our survival rate was 50% with a mean±SD follow-up of 10.1±9.8 (range: 0–26) months. Causes of early in-hospital mortality were multi-organ failure, sepsis, and cerebrovascular accident. Recurrence of disease was noted in one patient while one patient developed hepatic metastasis after 20 months of surgery. Conclusion: Ex-vivo resection of the tumor and auto-transplantation is the surgical treatment of choice for the locally advanced abdominal tumors involving the root of the mesentery. PMID:25184032

  10. Extra-abdominal desmoid fibromatosis: A review of management, current guidance and unanswered questions.

    PubMed

    Eastley, N; McCulloch, T; Esler, C; Hennig, I; Fairbairn, J; Gronchi, A; Ashford, R

    2016-07-01

    Extra abdominal desmoid fibromatosis is a complex condition with many recognised treatments including active observation, hormonal therapy, chemotherapy, radiotherapy and surgical resection. There is large variation in the natural history of individual desmoid tumours, with some cases progressing aggressively and others regressing spontaneously when observed alone. This combined with an absence of accurate clinical predictors of a desmoid tumour's behaviour has led to difficulties in identifying which patients would benefit most from aggressive treatment, and which could be adequately managed with a policy of active observation alone. This review explores the aetiology and common presentation of extra-abdominal desmoid fibromatosis including the condition's histopathological, clinical and radiological characteristics. The current evidence for potential predictors of desmoid tumour behaviour is also reviewed, along with the indications and evidence for the multitude of treatments available. We also summarise the published guidelines that are currently available for oncologists and surgeons managing extra-abdominal desmoid fibromatosis, and highlight some of the unanswered questions that need to be addressed to optimise the management of this condition. PMID:26965303

  11. [A Case of Intra-Abdominal Desmoid Tumor with Abacterial Peritonitis].

    PubMed

    Sumiyama, Fusao; Inada, Ryo; Nakamura, Fumiko; Ryota, Hironori; Miki, Hirokazu; Oishi, Masaharu; Matsumoto, Tomoko; Iwamoto, Shigeyoshi; Mukaide, Yumi; Ozaki, Takeshi; Michiura, Taku; Inoue, Kentaro; Kon, Masanori; Miyasaka, Chika; Uemura, Yoshiko; Hamada, Madoka

    2016-03-01

    A woman in her 50s visited our hospital in February 2015 with a complaint of dull abdominal pain in the right lower quadrant. She had a medical history of appendectomy for appendicitis in her 20s. Computed tomography(CT)revealed a tumor 90 mm in diameter near the ileocecum. Elective surgery was planned under the suspicion of gastrointestinal tumor, malignant lymphoma, or ileal cancer. She was emergently hospitalized 1 day earlier than scheduled because of high fever and severe abdominal pain. CT revealed that the tumor had increased to 120 mm in diameter without free air. Her white blood cell count was not elevated, and her symptoms improved readily with medical treatment. Thus, we performed the operation as scheduled. A tumor with a dark red recess on the surface had invaded the transverse colon intraoperatively, and a small amount of purulent ascites was present at the pouch of Douglas. We performed ileocecal resection with partial transverse colectomy. Histopathological examination led to the diagnosis of desmoid tumor in the mesentery of the terminal ileum. The surgical margins were negative for tumor cells. The tumor surface around the recess showed peritonitis, and the ascites showed no bacteria or tumor cells. The patient had been doing well without recurrence after discharge. Some cases of desmoid tumor with peritonitis have been reported, but most were caused by tumor penetration into the intestinal tract. We report herein a rare case of intra-abdominal desmoid tumor with abacterial peritonitis. PMID:27067862

  12. Arthroscopic resection of the dorsal ganglia of the wrist.

    PubMed

    Bienz, T; Raphael, J S

    1999-08-01

    Arthroscopic ganglion resection provides a means by which dorsal wrist ganglia may be safely resected while avoiding the requisite scar accompanying open resection. Use of the arthroscope provides a much more complete examination of the wrist, allowing assessment of the cause of the ganglion as well as associated intra-articular problems. In a previous pilot study, 50% of patients demonstrated visible intra-articular abnormalities, including SL ligament laxity and perforations, TFCC tears, or chondral degeneration at the radial and triquetral-hamate joints. Use of the shaver within the joint allows the surgeon to directly address the ganglion's site of capsular origin, ensuring that the "one-way valve" mechanism is resected. The authors' initial experience was that the recurrence rate after arthroscopic resection was equal to or lower than after open resection. There is now some suggestion that resection of only the ganglion stalk, without removal of the sac, is feasible, but may yield slightly higher recurrence rates than formal open resection of the sac and stalk. This may be attributed to cases in which the capsular attachment to the SL ligament is debrided without identification and removal of a true stalk. The recurrence rate of a ganglion that has previously recurred also appears to be higher than that of primary resection. The authors look forward to publishing their completed results of an on-going follow-up study comparing open, arthroscopic, and recurrent ganglion resections. PMID:10451818

  13. Factors associated with abdominal obesity in children

    PubMed Central

    Melzer, Matheus Ribeiro Theodósio Fernandes; Magrini, Isabella Mastrangi; Domene, Semíramis Martins Álvares; Martins, Paula Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To identify the association of dietary, socioeconomic factors, sedentary behaviors and maternal nutritional status with abdominal obesity in children. Methods: A cross-sectional study with household-based survey, in 36 randomly selected census tracts in the city of Santos, SP. 357 families were interviewed and questionnaires and anthropometric measurements were applied in mothers and their 3-10 years-old children. Assessment of abdominal obesity was made by maternal and child's waist circumference measurement; for classification used cut-off points proposed by World Health Organization (1998) and Taylor et al. (2000) were applied. The association between variables was performed by multiple logistic regression analysis. Results: 30.5% of children had abdominal obesity. Associations with children's and maternal nutritional status and high socioeconomic status were shown in the univariate analysis. In the regression model, children's body mass index for age (OR=93.7; 95%CI 39.3-223.3), female gender (OR=4.1; 95%CI 1.8-9.3) and maternal abdominal obesity (OR=2.7; 95%CI 1.2-6.0) were significantly associated with children's abdominal obesity, regardless of the socioeconomic status. Conclusions: Abdominal obesity in children seems to be associated with maternal nutritional status, other indicators of their own nutritional status and female gender. Intervention programs for control of childhood obesity and prevention of metabolic syndrome should consider the interaction of the nutritional status of mothers and their children. PMID:26298655

  14. Genes and Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Hinterseher, Irene; Tromp, Gerard; Kuivaniemi, Helena

    2010-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a multifactorial disease with a strong genetic component. Since first candidate gene studies were published 20 years ago, nearly 100 genetic association studies using single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in biologically relevant genes have been reported on AAA. The studies investigated SNPs in genes of the extracellular matrix, the cardiovascular system, the immune system, and signaling pathways. Very few studies were large enough to draw firm conclusions and very few results could be replicated in another sample set. The more recent unbiased approaches are family-based DNA linkage studies and genome-wide genetic association studies, which have the potential of identifying the genetic basis for AAA, if appropriately powered and well-characterized large AAA cohorts are used. SNPs associated with AAA have already been identified in these large multicenter studies. One significant association was of a variant in a gene called CNTN3 which is located on chromosome 3p12.3. Two follow-up studies, however, could not replicate the association. Two other SNPs, which are located on chromosome 9p21 and 9q33 were replicated in other samples. The two genes with the strongest supporting evidence of contribution to the genetic risk for AAA are the CDKN2BAS gene, also known as ANRIL, which encodes an antisense RNA that regulates expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors CDKN2A and CDKN2B, and DAB2IP, which encodes an inhibitor of cell growth and survival. Functional studies are now needed to establish the mechanisms by which these genes contribute to AAA pathogenesis. PMID:21146954

  15. Phase grouping-based needle segmentation in 3-D trans-rectal ultrasound-guided prostate trans-perineal therapy.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Wu; Yuchi, Ming; Ding, Mingyue

    2014-04-01

    A robust and efficient needle segmentation method used to localize and track the needle in 3-D trans-rectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided prostate therapy is proposed. The algorithmic procedure begins by cropping the 3-D US image containing a needle; then all voxels in the cropped 3-D image are grouped into different line support regions (LSRs) based on the outer product of the adjacent voxels' gradient vector. Two different needle axis extraction methods in the candidate LSR are presented: least-squares fitting and 3-D randomized Hough transform. Subsequent local optimization refines the position of the needle axis. Finally, the needle endpoint is localized by finding an intensity drop along the needle axis. The proposed methods were validated with 3-D TRUS tissue-mimicking agar phantom images, chicken breast phantom images and patient images obtained during prostate cryotherapy. The results of the in vivo test indicate that our method can localize the needle accurately and robustly with a needle endpoint localization accuracy <1.43 mm and detection accuracy >84%, which are favorable for 3-D TRUS-guided prostate trans-perineal therapy. PMID:24462163

  16. 1.5T MRI-guided trans-perineal laser ablation of locally recurrent prostate adenocarcinoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McPhail, E. Frederick; Mynderse, Lance A.; Callstrom, Matthew R.; Gorny, Krzysztof R.; McNichols, Roger J.; Atwell, Thomas D.; Gettman, Matthew T.; Amrami, Kimberly K.; Kawashima, Akira; Woodrum, David A.

    2010-02-01

    Introduction: Biochemical recurrence of prostate cancer after definitive therapy with radical prostatectomy (RP) is known to occur between 25-30%. We present the first known case of 1.5T MRI guided ablation using laser interstitial thermal therapy (LITT) for locally recurrent prostate cancer following RP. Methods: The patient elected to undergo MRI-guided LITT of the biopsy proven cancer recurrence using an FDAapproved MRI compatible, 980nm, 15-watt laser system with MR thermometry. Under T2-weighted MR(1.5T Siemens) imaging, guidance and targeting of the lesions with trans-perineal placement of laser applicators. Multiple cycles of laser energy were used to ablate the tumor. A MRI-compatible urethral cooling catheter was placed to prevent urethral thermal damage. Results: Intra-procedural temperature mapping allowed continuous monitoring of the ablation zone and permitted ablation control until tumor coverage was achieved. Additionally, the protective cooling effects of the urethral cooling catheter could also be seen with the temperature mapping. Post-ablation gadolinium and T2 weighted MR imaging demonstrated an ablation defect encompassing the recurrent tumor with no residual hyper-enhancing nodules. Three month follow-up shows no residual or recurrent tumor seen on MR imaging. Conclusion: This represents the first known, successful, MRI-guided, LITT procedures at 1.5T for locally recurrent prostate adenocarcinoma following RP.

  17. Endoscopic resection of colorectal granular cell tumors

    PubMed Central

    Take, Iri; Shi, Qiang; Qi, Zhi-Peng; Cai, Shi-Lun; Yao, Li-Qing; Zhou, Ping-Hong; Zhong, Yun-Shi

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To determine the feasibility and effectiveness of endoscopic resection for the treatment of colorectal granular cell tumors (GCTs). METHODS: This was a retrospective study performed at a single institution. From January 2008 to April 2015, we examined a total of 11 lesions in 11 patients who were treated by an endoscopic procedure for colorectal GCTs in the Endoscopy Center, Zhongshan Hospital of Fudan University, Shanghai, China. Either endoscopic mucosal resection or endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) was performed by three surgeons with expertise in endoscopic treatment. The pre- and post-operative condition and follow-up of these patients were evaluated by colonoscopy and endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS). RESULTS: Of these 11 lesions, 2 were located in the cecum, 3 were in the ileocecal junction, 5 were in the ascending colon, and 1 was in the rectum. The median maximum diameter of the tumors was 0.81 cm (range 0.4-1.2 cm). The en bloc rate was 100%, and the complete resection rate was 90.9% (10/11). Post-operative pathology in one patient showed a tumor at the cauterization margin. However, during ESD, this lesion was removed en bloc, and no tumor tissue was seen in the wound. No perforations or delayed perforations were observed and emergency surgery was not required for complications. All patients were followed up to May 2015, and none had recurrence, metastasis, or complaints of discomfort. CONCLUSION: Endoscopic treatment performed by endoscopists with sufficient experience appears to be feasible and effective for colorectal GCTs. PMID:26730166

  18. Combined portal vein resection for hilar cholangiocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Tao; Chen, Jie; Xie, Zhi-Bo; Ma, Liang; Liu, Jun-Jie; Zhu, Shao-Liang; Wu, Fei-Xiang; Li, Le-Qun

    2015-01-01

    Background: Surgery is the only curative therapy for patients with hilar cholangiocarcinoma (HCCA). Combined portal vein resection (PVR) could achieve negative resection margins in HCCA patients with portal vein invasion. This systematic review aimed to analysis the efficiency of combined PVR for HCCA. Methods: MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, the Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure database, and clinical trial registries were searched through April 2015. Risk ratios (RRs), and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated. Results: The analysis included 21 retrospective studies, altogether involving 2403 patients (patients with PVR, n=637; patients without PVR, n=1766). Patients with PVR were likely to have more advanced HCCA (lymphatic invasion: RR=1.14, 95% CI 1.02 to 1.28; perineural invasion: RR=1.31, 95% CI 1.05 to 1.63) and suffered less curative resections (RR=0.89, 95% CI 0.75 to 0.99). Postoperative morbidity was similar between patients with or without PVR (RR=1.06, 95% CI 0.94 to 1.02). Patients with PVR suffered higher mortality rate (RR=1.52, 95% CI 1.06 to 2.18), and worse 5-year survival rate (RR=0.67, 95% CI 0.49 to 0.91). Conclusion: Combined PVR for HCCA patients would not increase postoperative morbidity rate. However, ascribed to PVR group concluded more advanced HCCA patients; patients with PVR had increased postoperative mortality rate and worse survival rate. The results still need further high quality trails for validation. PMID:26885035

  19. Transurethral resection and degeneration of bladder tumour

    PubMed Central

    Li, Aihua; Fang, Wei; Zhang, Feng; Li, Weiwu; Lu, Honghai; Liu, Sikuan; Wang, Hui; Zhang, Binghui

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: We evaluate the efficacy and safety of transurethral resection and degeneration of bladder tumour (TURD-Bt). Methods: In total, 56 patients with bladder tumour were treated by TURD-Bt. The results in these patients were compared with 32 patients treated by current transurethral resection of bladder tumour (TUR-Bt). Patients with or without disease progressive factors were respectively compared between the 2 groups. The factors included recurrent tumour, multiple tumours, tumour ≥3 cm in diameter, clinical stage T2, histological grade 3, adenocarcinoma, and ureteral obstruction or hydronephrosis. Results: Follow-up time was 48.55 ± 23.74 months in TURD-Bt group and 56.28 ± 17.61 months in the TUR-Bt group (p > 0.05). In patients without progressive factors, no tumour recurrence was found and overall survival was 14 (100%) in the TURD-Bt group; 3 (37.50%) patients had recurrence and overall survival was 5 (62.5%) in the TUR-Bt group. In patients with progressive factors, 8 (19.05%) patients had tumour recurrence, overall survival was 32 (76.19%) and cancer death was 3 (7.14%) in TURD-Bt group; 18 (75.00%) patients had tumour recurrence (p < 0.05), overall survival was 12 (50.00%) (p < 0.01) and cancer death was 8 (33.33%) (p < 0.05) in TUR-Bt group. No significant complication was found in TURD-Bt group. Conclusion: This study suggests that complete resection and degeneration of bladder tumour can be expected by TURD-Bt. The surgical procedure is safe and efficacious, and could be predictable and controllable before and during surgery. We would conclude that for bladder cancers without lymph node metastasis and distal metastasis, TURD-Bt could be performed to replace radical TUR-Bt and preserve the bladder. PMID:24475002

  20. Microsurgical resection of intramedullary spinal cord ependymoma.

    PubMed

    McCormick, Paul C

    2014-09-01

    Ependymomas are the most commonly occurring intramedullary spinal cord tumor in adults. With few exceptions these tumors are histologically benign, although they exhibit some biologic variability with respect to growth rate. While unencapsulated, spinal ependymomas are non-infiltrative and present a clear margin of demarcation from the surrounding spinal cord that serves as an effective dissection plane. This video demonstrates the technique of microsurgical resection of an intramedullary ependymoma through a posterior midline myelotomy. The video can be found here: http://youtu.be/lcHhymSvSqU. PMID:25175587

  1. Bursal synovial chondromatosis formation following osteochondroma resection.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yu-Ching; Goldsmith, Jeffrey D; Gebhardt, Mark G; Wu, Jim S

    2014-07-01

    Osteochondroma is a common tumor of the bone and can be complicated by adventitial bursa formation and malignant transformation of the cartilaginous cap. Synovial chondromatosis formation within these bursae is extremely rare and can be confused with malignant transformation of the osteochondroma cap to a chondrosarcoma. We describe a case of extra-articular synovial chondromatosis formation several years following osteochondroma resection. Cartilage nodule formation within the bursal synovial lining and proliferation of cartilage debris shed from the cartilaginous cap during surgery or biopsy are potential etiologies of this rare complication of osteochondromas. PMID:24453028

  2. [Preoperative assessment for extended hepatic resection].

    PubMed

    Martin, David; Roulin, Didier; Takamune, Yamaguchi; Demartines, Nicolas; Halkic, Nermin

    2016-06-15

    The number of major hepatectomy performed for the treatment of primary or secondary liver cancer has increased over the past two decades. By definition, a major hepatectomy includes the resection of at least three liversegments. Advances in anesthesiology, surgical and radiological techniques and perioperative management allowed a broad patient selection with increased security. Every case must be discussed in multidisciplinary tumor board, and preoperative assessment should include biological, volumetric and functional hepatic parameters. In case of preoperative insufficient liver volume, portal vein embolization allows increasing the size of liver remnant. This paper aims describing preoperative work-up. PMID:27487623

  3. COMPLETE RESECTION OF A PRIMARY CARDIAC RHABDOMYOSARCOMA

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Judy E.; Schwartz, Gary P.; Judson, Preston L.; Seibel, John E.; Trumbull, Horace R.

    1979-01-01

    A case of primary cardiac rhabdomyosarcoma in a 23-year-old white man was managed by complete excision and combination chemotherapy. The pathologic features of the tumor are described. Based on a review of the English literature, the natural history of this tumor is discussed and a plan of therapy is proposed, which consists of (1) resection of the tumor if feasible, (2) chemotherapy with Actinomycin D, vincristine sulfate, and cyclophosphamide, and (3) cardiac radiation for residual unresected or locally recurrent tumor. Images PMID:15216294

  4. Holmium: YAG laser resection of the prostate.

    PubMed

    Bukala, B; Denstedt, J D

    1999-04-01

    The holmium laser is a relatively new multipurpose medical laser that recently became available for use in urology. There has been considerable interest in this device, as it seems to combine the cutting properties of the carbon dioxide laser with the coagulating properties of the neodymium:YAG laser, making it particularly appealing for many surgical applications. The last decade has seen enthusiasm for the use of laser energy for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia. In this article, we review the technique of Ho:YAG laser resection of the prostate, including the essential equipment and perioperative patient care. PMID:10360503

  5. Surgical Resection of a Giant Coronary Aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Mehall, John R; Verlare, Jordan L

    2015-06-01

    Coronary aneurysms are quite uncommon, and those qualifying as giant aneurysms are even more so. Currently, no standardized treatment protocol exists. We report the case of a 46-year-old man presenting with clinical signs and symptoms of acute myocardial infarction who was found to have a giant coronary aneurysm. The patient was initially evaluated with a computed tomography angiogram, which revealed a 9-cm aneurysm of the left circumflex coronary artery. Surgical resection of the aneurysm, ligation of the proximal circumflex artery, and bypass using the left internal mammary artery to vascularize the proximal circumflex artery was performed. PMID:26046882

  6. Abducens nerve palsy after schwannoma resection.

    PubMed

    Bobbio, Antonio; Hamelin-Canny, Emelyne; Roche, Nicolas; Taillia, Herve; Alifano, Marco

    2015-02-01

    Tumors of the posterior mediastinum are mostly neurogenic and could involve the intervertebral foramen and the medullary canal. We describe the case of a patient who underwent surgery for a nerve sheet tumor originating at the level of the right second neural root. Resection was associated with an incidental dural tear and cerebrospinal fluid leak that was promptly repaired. One week after surgery, horizontal diplopia occurred. A palsy of the left abducens nerve secondary to intracranial hypotension was diagnosed. We present the pathogenic cascade leading to this ocular complication after posterior mediastinal surgery. The surgical techniques to prevent this complication are discussed. PMID:25639411

  7. Registration-free laparoscope augmentation for intra-operative liver resection planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feuerstein, Marco; Mussack, Thomas; Heining, Sandro M.; Navab, Nassir

    2007-03-01

    In recent years, an increasing number of liver tumor indications were treated by minimally invasive laparoscopic resection. Besides the restricted view, a major issue in laparoscopic liver resection is the enhanced visualization of (hidden) vessels, which supply the tumorous liver segment and thus need to be divided prior to the resection. To navigate the surgeon to these vessels, pre-operative abdominal imaging data can hardly be used due to intraoperative organ deformations mainly caused by appliance of carbon dioxide pneumoperitoneum and respiratory motion. While regular respiratory motion can be gated and synchronized intra-operatively, motion caused by pneumoperitoneum is individual for every patient and difficult to estimate. Therefore, we propose to use an optically tracked mobile C-arm providing cone-beam CT imaging capability intraoperatively. The C-arm is able to visualize soft tissue by means of its new flat panel detector and is calibrated offline to relate its current position and orientation to the coordinate system of a reconstructed volume. Also the laparoscope is optically tracked and calibrated offline, so both laparoscope and C-arm are registered in the same tracking coordinate system. Intra-operatively, after patient positioning, port placement, and carbon dioxide insufflation, the liver vessels are contrasted and scanned during patient exhalation. Immediately, a three-dimensional volume is reconstructed. Without any further need for patient registration, the volume can be directly augmented on the live laparoscope video, visualizing the contrasted vessels. This augmentation provides the surgeon with advanced visual aid for the localization of veins, arteries, and bile ducts to be divided or sealed.

  8. Clinical outcomes of tissue expanders on adjuvant radiotherapy of resected retroperitoneal sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jeong Il; Lim, Do Hoon; Park, Hee Chul; Nam, Heerim; Kim, Bo Kyoung; Kim, Sung-Joo; Park, Jae Berm

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We investigated the efficacy and safety of a tissue expander (TE) for adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) of resected retroperitoneal sarcoma (RPS). This study was conducted with 37 patients with RPS who received resection with or without TE insertion followed by RT from August 2006 to June 2012 at Samsung Medical Center. Among the 37 patients, TE was inserted in 19. The quality of TE insertion was evaluated according to the correlation of clinical target volume and retroperitoneal surface volume covered by TE and was defined as follows: excellent, ≥85%; good, 70% to 85%; fair, 50% to 70%; and poor, <50%. The median follow-up period after surgery was 47.9 months (range, 5.5–85.5 months). The quality of TE insertion was excellent in 7 (36.8%), good in 5 (26.3%), fair in 4 (21.0%), and poor in 3 (16.7%) patients. A significantly higher biologically equivalent dose (BED, α/β = 10) was used in patients who had TE insertion (median, 64.8 vs. 60.0 Gy, P = 0.01). Local control was 39.7%, and overall survival was 76.4% at 5 years. Local control was significantly higher in patients who received ≥65 Gy of BED, 100.0% in contrast to 22.8% (P = 0.01). One patient with a history of multiple tumor resections showed abdominal infection with duodenal perforation of uncertain cause but had the potential of being related to TE and/or RT. Otherwise there were no ≥grade III acute or late toxicities. TE for adjuvant RT in RPS is feasible for delivering a higher RT dose with acceptable toxicity. PMID:27428199

  9. [Resection of Advanced Intrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma after an Effective Response to S-1 and Gemcitabine Combination Therapy].

    PubMed

    Kuga, Yoshio; Moriya, Takashi; Fukuda, Saburo; Nishida, Toshihiro

    2016-06-01

    We report curative resection of an advanced intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma that responded well to combined S-1 and gemcitabine chemotherapy(GS therapy). A 67-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital in July 2011 for upper right abdominal pain. She was diagnosed with intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma with abdominal para-aortic lymph node metastasis on the basis of the computed tomography (CT) findings. She was treated with GS therapy. One course of S-1(80 mg/m(3)) consisted of the administration of the drug for 14 days, followed by 14 days of rest; GEM(1,000 mg/m(3)) was administered on days 1 and 15 after initiating S-1. After 2 courses of treatment, the sizes of the primary tumor and the lymph node metastasis were observed to be reduced on CT. In September, partial hepatectomy and regional lymph node dissection were performed. The patient subsequently received 22 postoperative courses of GS therapy. The patient's postoperative course was uneventful, and she remains free of recurrence 49 months since diagnosis. Therefore, GS therapy is a possible option for the management of advanced intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma. PMID:27306819

  10. Implementation of the fast track surgery in patients undergoing the colonic resection: own experience.

    PubMed

    Morończyk, Daniel Antoni F; Krasnodębski, Ireneusz Wojciech

    2011-09-01

    A perioperative care in the colorectal surgery has been considerably changed recently. The fast track surgery decreases complications rate, shortens length of stay, improves quality of life and leads to cost reduction. It is achieved by: resignation of a mechanical bowel preparation before and a nasogastric tube insertion after operation, optimal pain and intravenous fluid management, an early rehabilitation, enteral nutrition and removal of a vesical catheter and abdominal drain if used.The aim of the study was to compare the results of an implementation the fast track surgery protocol with results achieving in the conventional care regimen.Material and methods. Two groups of patients undergoing colonic resection have been compared. The study group was formed by patients treated with fast track concept, the control group - by patients who were dealt with hitherto regimen. Procedures needed stoma performing, rectal and laparoscopic surgery were excluded. The perioperative period was investigated by telephone call to patient or his family.Results. Statistical significant reduction was reached in a favour of the fast track group in the following parameters: the length of hospital stay (2.5 days shorter), duration of an abdominal cavity and vesicle drainage (3 and 2 days shorter respectively), postoperative day on which oral diet was implemented (2,5 days faster) and finally extended (1.5 days faster). There were no statistical difference in mortality, morbidity neither reoperation rate between two groups.Conclusion. The fast track surgery is a safe strategy and may improve a perioperative care. PMID:22166736

  11. Treatment Strategy after Incomplete Endoscopic Resection of Early Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sang Gyun

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic resection of early gastric cancer is defined as incomplete when tumor cells are found at the resection margin upon histopathological examination. However, a tumor-positive resection margin does not always indicate residual tumor; it can also be caused by tissue contraction during fixation, by the cautery effect during endoscopic resection, or by incorrect histopathological mapping. Cases of highly suspicious residual tumor require additional endoscopic or surgical resection. For inoperable patients, argon plasma coagulation can be used as an alternative endoscopic treatment. Immediately after the incomplete resection or residual tumor has been confirmed by the pathologist, clinicians should also decide upon any additional treatment to be carried out during the follow-up period. PMID:27435699

  12. Treatment Strategy after Incomplete Endoscopic Resection of Early Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang Gyun

    2016-07-01

    Endoscopic resection of early gastric cancer is defined as incomplete when tumor cells are found at the resection margin upon histopathological examination. However, a tumor-positive resection margin does not always indicate residual tumor; it can also be caused by tissue contraction during fixation, by the cautery effect during endoscopic resection, or by incorrect histopathological mapping. Cases of highly suspicious residual tumor require additional endoscopic or surgical resection. For inoperable patients, argon plasma coagulation can be used as an alternative endoscopic treatment. Immediately after the incomplete resection or residual tumor has been confirmed by the pathologist, clinicians should also decide upon any additional treatment to be carried out during the follow-up period. PMID:27435699

  13. Elevator Muscle Anterior Resection: A New Technique for Blepharoptosis.

    PubMed

    Zigiotti, Gian Luigi; Delia, Gabriele; Grenga, Pierluigi; Pichi, Francesco; Rechichi, Miguel; Jaroudi, Mahmoud O; d'Alcontres, Francesco Stagno; Lupo, Flavia; Meduri, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Blepharoptosis is a condition of inadequate upper eyelid position, with a downward displacement of the upper eyelid margin resulting in obstruction of the superior visual field. Levator resection is an effective technique that is routinely used to correct aponeurotic ptosis. The anterior levator resection is the procedure of choice in moderate blepharoptosis when there is moderate to good levator muscle function, furthermore, with an anterior approach, a greater resection can be achieved than by a conjunctival approach. The authors describe a modification in the Putterman technique with a resection done over a plicated elevator, plication that was suggested by Mustardè. The technique has been named as elevator muscle anterior resection. The elevator muscle anterior resection inspires from the Fasanella-Servat operation by the use of a clamp, making the operation simple and predictable. PMID:26703054

  14. Laparoscopic liver resection: wedge resections to living donor hepatectomy, are we heading in the right direction?

    PubMed

    Cherian, P Thomas; Mishra, Ashish Kumar; Kumar, Palaniappen; Sachan, Vijayant Kumar; Bharathan, Anand; Srikanth, Gadiyaram; Senadhipan, Baiju; Rela, Mohamad S

    2014-10-01

    Despite inception over 15 years ago and over 3000 completed procedures, laparoscopic liver resection has remained mainly in the domain of selected centers and enthusiasts. Requirement of extensive open liver resection (OLR) experience, in-depth understanding of anatomy and considerable laparoscopic technical expertise may have delayed wide application. However healthy scepticism of its actual benefits and presence of a potential publication bias; concern about its safety and technical learning curve, are probably equally responsible. Given that a large proportion of our work, at least in transplantation is still OLR, we have attempted to provide an entirely unbiased, mature opinion of its pros and cons in the current invited review. We have divided this review into two sections as we believe they merit separate attention on technical and ethical grounds. The first part deals with laparoscopic liver resection (LLR) in patients who present with benign or malignant liver pathology, wherein we have discussed its overall outcomes; its feasibility based on type of pathology and type of resection and included a small section on application of LLR in special scenarios like cirrhosis. The second part deals with the laparoscopic living donor hepatectomy (LDH) experience to date, including its potential impact on transplantation in general. Donor safety, graft outcomes after LDH and criterion to select ideal donors for LLR are discussed. Within each section we have provided practical points to improve safety in LLR and attempted to reach reasonable recommendations on the utilization of LLR for units that wish to develop such a service. PMID:25309070

  15. Laparoscopic liver resection: Wedge resections to living donor hepatectomy, are we heading in the right direction?

    PubMed Central

    Cherian, P Thomas; Mishra, Ashish Kumar; Kumar, Palaniappen; Sachan, Vijayant Kumar; Bharathan, Anand; Srikanth, Gadiyaram; Senadhipan, Baiju; Rela, Mohamad S

    2014-01-01

    Despite inception over 15 years ago and over 3000 completed procedures, laparoscopic liver resection has remained mainly in the domain of selected centers and enthusiasts. Requirement of extensive open liver resection (OLR) experience, in-depth understanding of anatomy and considerable laparoscopic technical expertise may have delayed wide application. However healthy scepticism of its actual benefits and presence of a potential publication bias; concern about its safety and technical learning curve, are probably equally responsible. Given that a large proportion of our work, at least in transplantation is still OLR, we have attempted to provide an entirely unbiased, mature opinion of its pros and cons in the current invited review. We have divided this review into two sections as we believe they merit separate attention on technical and ethical grounds. The first part deals with laparoscopic liver resection (LLR) in patients who present with benign or malignant liver pathology, wherein we have discussed its overall outcomes; its feasibility based on type of pathology and type of resection and included a small section on application of LLR in special scenarios like cirrhosis. The second part deals with the laparoscopic living donor hepatectomy (LDH) experience to date, including its potential impact on transplantation in general. Donor safety, graft outcomes after LDH and criterion to select ideal donors for LLR are discussed. Within each section we have provided practical points to improve safety in LLR and attempted to reach reasonable recommendations on the utilization of LLR for units that wish to develop such a service. PMID:25309070

  16. Use of Vacuum-assisted closure in management of open abdominal wound with multiple enterocutaneous fistulae during chemotherapy: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Fujino, Shiki; Miyoshi, Norikatsu; Ohue, Masayuki; Noura, Shingo; Fukata, Tadafumi; Yagi, Toshiya; Fujiwara, Yoshiyuki; Yano, Masahiko

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) is useful for treating complex wounds because it promotes granulation. In the present report, a successful case of VAC used for an open abdominal wound with enterocutaneous fistulae after multiple intestinal perforations during chemotherapy is described. Presentation of case A 73-year-old man was admitted to our hospital with severe abdominal pain. He underwent surgical resection for ascending colon cancer 4 years ago and was administered chemotherapy with bevacizumab for recurrence. Physical examination and computed tomography revealed perforation of the intestine, and an emergency operation was performed. Following this procedure, other intestinal perforations occurred, resulting in an open abdominal wound at postoperative day (POD) 10. To isolate enteric contents and promote granulation, VAC was applied to the abdominal wound with enterocutaneous fistulae. Oral intake started at POD 21 and the wound size became smaller. Further, an ostomy bag was directly attached to the most oral perforation site. The patient recovered from life-threatening events without severe infection and was transferred to another hospital close to his home at POD 180. Discussion Gastrointestinal perforation is known to be one of the fatal adverse events of bevacizumab. In this case four gastrointestinal perforations were observed. Isolation of enteric contents is important to heal the wound and VAC is an effective therapy for the management of open abdominal wounds even with enterocutaneous fistulae. Conclusion Innovative VAC use for the management of open abdominal wounds can improve the nutritional status and overall wound healing of the patient. PMID:26599504

  17. Thoracoscopic anatomical resection of congenital lung malformations in adults

    PubMed Central

    Macias, Lidia; Ojanguren, Amaia; Dahdah, Julien

    2015-01-01

    Congenital lung malformations (CLM) are a heterogeneous group of disorders that may require surgical resection to prevent complications. Thoracoscopic resection of CLM has been reported in infants. Our goal was to state whether it can also be a viable option in adults. Between 2007 and 2014, 11 patients had a thoracoscopic resection of a CLM (six lobectomies and five anatomic segmentectomies) with satisfactory results. Although being more challenging in adults due to infectious sequellae, this approach is safe. PMID:25922729

  18. Postherpetic pseudohernia: delayed onset of paresis of abdominal muscles due to herpes zoster causing an ipsilateral abdominal bulge.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Shunsuke; Togawa, Yasuhiro; Chiku, Tsuyoshi; Sano, Wataru

    2016-01-01

    Postherpetic pseudohernia causes an abdominal bulge as well as an abdominal wall herniation. This disease is one of the neurological complications of herpes zoster and essentially consists of paresis of ipsilateral abdominal muscles. Postherpetic pseudohernia may be mistaken for abdominal wall herniation because it is not well known. We describe two cases presenting an abdominal bulge. The ipsilateral abdominal bulge appeared after recovery from abdominal zoster. Abdominal CT showed no evidence of a herniation or mass. We diagnosed a postherpetic pseudohernia. One of the patients recovered spontaneously 4 months after the onset, and the other partially recovered after 2 months. This disease can be expected to disappear spontaneously, unlike abdominal herniation requiring surgery. It has been reported that 79.3% of patients eventually recovered spontaneously. For surgeons and general practitioners, it is beneficial to keep this disease in mind when examining a patient presenting an abdominal bulge. PMID:27229900

  19. Tissue Remodelling following Resection of Porcine Liver

    PubMed Central

    Nygård, Ingvild Engdal; Mortensen, Kim Erlend; Hedegaard, Jakob; Conley, Lene Nagstrup; Bendixen, Christian; Sveinbjørnsson, Baldur; Revhaug, Arthur

    2015-01-01

    Aim. To study genes regulating the extracellular matrix (ECM) and investigate the tissue remodelling following liver resection in porcine. Methods. Four pigs with 60% partial hepatectomy- (PHx-) induced liver regeneration were studied over six weeks. Four pigs underwent sham surgery and another four pigs were used as controls of the normal liver growth. Liver biopsies were taken upon laparotomy, after three and six weeks. Gene expression profiles were obtained using porcine-specific oligonucleotide microarrays. Immunohistochemical staining was performed and a proliferative index was assessed. Results. More differentially expressed genes were associated with the regulation of ECM in the resection group compared to the sham and control groups. Secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine (SPARC) and collagen 1, alpha 2 (COL1A2) were both upregulated in the early phase of liver regeneration, validated by immunopositive cells during the remodelling phase of liver regeneration. A broadened connective tissue was demonstrated by Masson's Trichrome staining, and an immunohistochemical staining against pan-Cytokeratin (pan-CK) demonstrated a distinct pattern of migrating cells, followed by proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) positive nuclei. Conclusions. The present study demonstrates both a distinct pattern of PCNA positive nuclei and a deposition of ECM proteins in the remodelling phase of liver regeneration. PMID:26240819

  20. Hysteroscopic Transcervical Resection of Uterine Septum

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xiaoyan; Hua, Xiangdong; Gu, Xiaoyan; Yang, Dazhen

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To explore the method of diagnosis for uterine septum and the clinical effect of hysteroscopic transcervical resection of the septum. Methods: One-hundred ninety cases of patients with uterine septum who were diagnosed and treated at our hospital during 2007–2011 were selected, and their general information, perioperative status, postoperative recovery treatment, and postoperative pregnancy rates were statistically analyzed. Results: All 190 patients were cured with one surgery, with an average hysteroscopic operating time of 22.60 ± 10.67 minutes and intraoperative blood loss of 15.74 ± 9.64 mL. There were no complications such as uterine perforation, water intoxication, infection, or heavy bleeding. Among the 115 patients that we followed up, 86 became pregnant and delivered infants, 81 of which were born at term and 5 that were born premature. Conclusion: The combination of hysteroscopy and laparoscopy is still the most reliable method for the diagnosis of uterine septum. With a shorter operative time, less blood loss, a significantly increased postoperative pregnancy rate and live birth rate, and a significantly lower spontaneous abortion rate, transcervical resection of the septum was the preferred method for the treatment of uterine septum, and surgical instruments and skills were critical to the prognosis of uterine septum. PMID:24398191

  1. Neoadjuvant treatment for resectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wong, John; Solomon, Naveenraj L; Hsueh, Chung-Tsen

    2016-02-10

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is the fourth leading cause of cancer mortality in the United States in both men and women, with a 5-year survival rate of less than 5%. Surgical resection remains the only curative treatment, but most patients develop systemic recurrence within 2 years of surgery. Adjuvant treatment with chemotherapy or chemoradiotherapy has been shown to improve overall survival, but the delivery of treatment remains problematic with up to 50% of patients not receiving postoperative treatment. Neoadjuvant therapy can provide benefits of eradication of micrometastasis and improved delivery of intended treatment. We have reviewed the findings from completed neoadjuvant clinical trials, and discussed the ongoing studies. Combinational cytotoxic chemotherapy such as fluorouracil, leucovorin, irinotecan, and oxaliplatin and gemcitabine plus nanoparticle albumin-bound (nab)-paclitaxel, active in the metastatic setting, are being studied in the neoadjuvant setting. In addition, novel targeted agents such as inhibitor of immune checkpoint are incorporated with cytotoxic chemotherapy in early-phase clinical trial. Furthermore we have explored the utility of biomarkers which can personalize treatment and select patients for target-driven therapy to improve treatment outcome. The treatment of resectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma requires multidisciplinary approach and novel strategies including innovative trials to make progress. PMID:26862486

  2. Sessile serrated adenoma: from identification to resection.

    PubMed

    Bordaçahar, Benoît; Barret, Maximilien; Terris, Benoît; Dhooge, Marion; Dreanic, Johann; Prat, Frédéric; Coriat, Romain; Chaussade, Stanislas

    2015-02-01

    Until the past two decades, almost all colorectal polyps were divided into two main groups: hyperplastic polyps and adenomas. Sessile serrated adenomas presented endoscopic, pathological and molecular profiles distinct from others polyps. Previously under-diagnosed, physicians now identified sessile serrated adenomas. The serrated neoplastic pathway is accounting for up to one-third of all sporadic colorectal cancers and sessile serrated adenomas have been identified as the main precursor lesions in serrated carcinogenesis. By analogy with the adenoma-adenocarcinoma sequence, the sessile serrated adenomas-adenocarcinoma sequence, has been identified. The development of endoscopic resection techniques permits the consideration of a non-surgical approach as the first option regardless of the size of the lesion. Sessile serrated adenoma warrants the watchfulness of physicians and requires an optimal quality of the colonoscopy procedure, a thorough evaluation of the lesion, an adequate endoscopic resection and follow-up colonoscopies in accordance with sessile serrated adenomas guidelines. We herein present a review on sessile serrated adenomas focusing on their pathological specificities, epidemiology, treatment modalities and follow-up. PMID:25445408

  3. Surgical Resectability of Skull Base Meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Goto, Takeo; Ohata, Kenji

    2016-07-15

    With recent advances in surgical technology such as preoperative imaging, neuro-monitoring, and surgical instruments, the surgical resectability of intracranial meningiomas has increased over the last two decades. This study reviewed clinical articles regarding the surgical treatment of meningiomas to clarify the role of surgical excision, with a focus on skull base meningiomas. We sub-classified clinical articles about skull base meningiomas into two categories (anterior and middle fossa meningiomas; and posterior fossa meningiomas) and reviewed papers in each category. In cases with anterior and middle fossa meningiomas, surgical resectability has reached a sufficient level to maximize functional preservation. In cases of posterior fossa meningioma, however, surgical respectability remains insufficient even with full use of recent surgical modalities. Continuous refining of operative procedures is required to obtain more satisfactory outcomes, especially for posterior fossa meningioma. In addition, recent long-term outcomes of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) were acceptable for controlling the skull base meningiomas. Therefore, combination with surgical excision and SRS should be considered in complicated skull base meningiomas. PMID:27076382

  4. Intestinal adaptation after massive intestinal resection

    PubMed Central

    Weale, A; Edwards, A; Bailey, M; Lear, P

    2005-01-01

    Patients with short bowel syndrome require long term parenteral nutrition support. However, after massive intestinal resection the intestine undergoes adaptation and nutritional autonomy may be obtained. Given that the complications of parenteral nutrition may be life threatening or result in treatment failure and the need for intestinal transplantation, a more attractive option is to wean patients off nutrition support by optimising the adaptive process. The article examines the evidence that after extensive small bowel resection adaptation occurs in humans and focuses on the factors that influence adaptation and the strategies that have been used to optimise this process. The review is based on an English language Medline search with secondary references obtained from key articles. There is evidence that adaptation occurs in humans. Adaptation is a complex process that results in response to nutrient and non-nutrient stimuli. Successful and reproducible strategies to improve adaptation remain elusive despite an abundance of experimental data. Nevertheless given the low patient survival and quality of life associated with other treatments for irreversible intestinal failure it is imperative that clinical research continues into the optimisation of the adaptation. PMID:15749794

  5. Surgical Resectability of Skull Base Meningiomas

    PubMed Central

    GOTO, Takeo; OHATA, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    With recent advances in surgical technology such as preoperative imaging, neuro-monitoring, and surgical instruments, the surgical resectability of intracranial meningiomas has increased over the last two decades. This study reviewed clinical articles regarding the surgical treatment of meningiomas to clarify the role of surgical excision, with a focus on skull base meningiomas. We sub-classified clinical articles about skull base meningiomas into two categories (anterior and middle fossa meningiomas; and posterior fossa meningiomas) and reviewed papers in each category. In cases with anterior and middle fossa meningiomas, surgical resectability has reached a sufficient level to maximize functional preservation. In cases of posterior fossa meningioma, however, surgical respectability remains insufficient even with full use of recent surgical modalities. Continuous refining of operative procedures is required to obtain more satisfactory outcomes, especially for posterior fossa meningioma. In addition, recent long-term outcomes of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) were acceptable for controlling the skull base meningiomas. Therefore, combination with surgical excision and SRS should be considered in complicated skull base meningiomas. PMID:27076382

  6. [Preoperative chemoradiotherapy for resectable lower rectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Takase, Shiro; Kamigaki, Takashi; Yamashita, Kimihiro; Nakamura, Tetsu; Nishimura, Hideki; Sasaki, Ryohei

    2009-11-01

    To suppress local recurrence and preserve sphincter function, we performed preoperative chemoradiotherapy( CRT) of rectal cancer. Sixteen patients with lower advanced rectal cancer received tegafur/uracil/calcium folinate+RT followed by curative resection with lateral lymph node dissection 2-8 weeks later. The male/female ratio was found to be 11:5 (41-75 years old) and the CRT was feasible for all patients. There were 11-PR and 5-SD according to RECIST criteria, and lower isotope accumulation was observed for all primary tumors in FDG-PET study. After CRT, all patients received R0 curative resection (11 APR, 2 LAR, 1 Hartmann and 1 ISR). On pathological study, 3 patients showed complete response. Surgical complications including pelvic infection, delayed a wound healing and deep venous thrombosis, etc. In conclusion, preoperative CRT of advanced rectal cancer could potentially be useful for local control and sphincter saving, however, it is necessary to manage specific surgical complications due to radiation. PMID:20037306

  7. Holmium laser resection of the prostate.

    PubMed

    Matsuoka, K; Iida, S; Tomiyasu, K; Shimada, A; Suekane, S; Noda, S

    1998-06-01

    A total of 35 patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) were treated with the Ho: YAG laser using a new technique termed holmium laser resection of the prostate or HoLRP. The laser energy was applied directly to prostatic tissue exclusively through the use of a standard 550 micron end-firing fiber. A high-powered holmium laser was used and was set at 2.4 J per pulse at 25 pulses per second for an average power of 60 W. The mean preoperative AUA Symptom Score was 24. Postoperatively, the score dropped to 10.9, 8.2, 5.2, and 4.6 at 1 week, 1 month, 3 months, and 6 months, respectively. The peak urine flow rate improved from 6.3 mL/sec preoperatively to 15.1, 15.3 and 16 mL/sec at 1 week, 1 month, 3 months, and 6 months. A foley catheter was removed within 24 hours of completion of the operation in 31 patients (89%), and voiding was improved. The HoLRP technique was bloodless, and the short-term results were satisfactory. Most importantly, the defect produced by HoLRP is identical to that of a conventional transurethral resection. These initial results demonstrate that HoLRP is a useful surgical alternative in the treatment of patients with obstructive BPH. PMID:9658303

  8. Neoadjuvant treatment for resectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wong, John; Solomon, Naveenraj L; Hsueh, Chung-Tsen

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is the fourth leading cause of cancer mortality in the United States in both men and women, with a 5-year survival rate of less than 5%. Surgical resection remains the only curative treatment, but most patients develop systemic recurrence within 2 years of surgery. Adjuvant treatment with chemotherapy or chemoradiotherapy has been shown to improve overall survival, but the delivery of treatment remains problematic with up to 50% of patients not receiving postoperative treatment. Neoadjuvant therapy can provide benefits of eradication of micrometastasis and improved delivery of intended treatment. We have reviewed the findings from completed neoadjuvant clinical trials, and discussed the ongoing studies. Combinational cytotoxic chemotherapy such as fluorouracil, leucovorin, irinotecan, and oxaliplatin and gemcitabine plus nanoparticle albumin-bound (nab)-paclitaxel, active in the metastatic setting, are being studied in the neoadjuvant setting. In addition, novel targeted agents such as inhibitor of immune checkpoint are incorporated with cytotoxic chemotherapy in early-phase clinical trial. Furthermore we have explored the utility of biomarkers which can personalize treatment and select patients for target-driven therapy to improve treatment outcome. The treatment of resectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma requires multidisciplinary approach and novel strategies including innovative trials to make progress. PMID:26862486

  9. TOTALLY LAPAROSCOPIC LIVER RESECTION: NEW BRAZILIAN EXPERIENCE

    PubMed Central

    LACERDA, Croider Franco; BERTULUCCI, Paulo Anderson; de OLIVEIRA, Antônio Talvane Torres

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite the increasing number of laparoscopic hepatectomy, there is little published experience. Aim To evaluate the results of a series of hepatectomy completely done with laparoscopic approach. Methods This is a retrospective study of 61 laparoscopic liver resections. Were studied conversion to open technique; mean age; gender, mortality; complications; type of hepatectomy; surgical techniques applied; and simultaneous operations. Results The conversion to open technique was necessary in one case (1.6%). The mean age was 54.7 years (17-84), 34 were men. Three patients (4.9%) had complications. One died postoperatively (mortality 1.6%) and no deaths occurred intraoperatively. The most frequent type was right hepatectomy (37.7%), followed by bisegmentectomy (segments II-III and VI-VII). Were not used hemi-Pringle maneuvers or assisted technic. Six patients (8.1%) underwent simultaneous procedures (hepatectomy and colectomy). Conclusion Laparoscopic hepatectomy is feasible procedure and can be considered the gold standard for various conditions requiring liver resections for both benign to malignant diseases. PMID:25184770

  10. Laparoscopic liver resection for malignancy: A review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Alkhalili, Eyas; Berber, Eren

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To review the published literature about laparoscopic liver resection for malignancy. METHODS: A PubMed search was performed for original published studies until June 2013 and original series containing at least 30 patients were reviewed. RESULTS: All forms of hepatic resections have been described ranging from simple wedge resections to extended right or left hepatectomies. The usual approach is pure laparoscopic, but hand-assisted, as well as robotic approaches have been described. Most studies showed comparable results to open resection in terms of operative blood loss, postoperative morbidity and mortality. Many of them showed decreased postoperative pain, shorter hospital stays, and even lower costs. Oncological results including resection margin status and long-term survival were not inferior to open resection. CONCLUSION: In the hands of experienced surgeons, laparoscopic liver resection for malignant lesions is safe and offers some short-term advantages over open resection. Oncologically, similar survival rates have been observed in patients treated with the laparoscopic approach when compared to their open resection counterparts. PMID:25309091

  11. Treatment of Intravenous Leiomyomatosis with Cardiac Extension following Incomplete Resection.

    PubMed

    Doyle, Mathew P; Li, Annette; Villanueva, Claudia I; Peeceeyen, Sheen C S; Cooper, Michael G; Hanel, Kevin C; Fermanis, Gary G; Robertson, Greg

    2015-01-01

    Aim. Intravenous leiomyomatosis (IVL) with cardiac extension (CE) is a rare variant of benign uterine leiomyoma. Incomplete resection has a recurrence rate of over 30%. Different hormonal treatments have been described following incomplete resection; however no standard therapy currently exists. We review the literature for medical treatments options following incomplete resection of IVL with CE. Methods. Electronic databases were searched for all studies reporting IVL with CE. These studies were then searched for reports of patients with inoperable or incomplete resection and any further medical treatments. Our database was searched for patients with medical therapy following incomplete resection of IVL with CE and their results were included. Results. All studies were either case reports or case series. Five literature reviews confirm that surgery is the only treatment to achieve cure. The uses of progesterone, estrogen modulation, gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonism, and aromatase inhibition have been described following incomplete resection. Currently no studies have reviewed the outcomes of these treatments. Conclusions. Complete surgical resection is the only means of cure for IVL with CE, while multiple hormonal therapies have been used with varying results following incomplete resection. Aromatase inhibitors are the only reported treatment to prevent tumor progression or recurrence in patients with incompletely resected IVL with CE. PMID:26783463

  12. Treatment of Intravenous Leiomyomatosis with Cardiac Extension following Incomplete Resection

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, Mathew P.; Li, Annette; Villanueva, Claudia I.; Peeceeyen, Sheen C. S.; Cooper, Michael G.; Hanel, Kevin C.; Fermanis, Gary G.; Robertson, Greg

    2015-01-01

    Aim. Intravenous leiomyomatosis (IVL) with cardiac extension (CE) is a rare variant of benign uterine leiomyoma. Incomplete resection has a recurrence rate of over 30%. Different hormonal treatments have been described following incomplete resection; however no standard therapy currently exists. We review the literature for medical treatments options following incomplete resection of IVL with CE. Methods. Electronic databases were searched for all studies reporting IVL with CE. These studies were then searched for reports of patients with inoperable or incomplete resection and any further medical treatments. Our database was searched for patients with medical therapy following incomplete resection of IVL with CE and their results were included. Results. All studies were either case reports or case series. Five literature reviews confirm that surgery is the only treatment to achieve cure. The uses of progesterone, estrogen modulation, gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonism, and aromatase inhibition have been described following incomplete resection. Currently no studies have reviewed the outcomes of these treatments. Conclusions. Complete surgical resection is the only means of cure for IVL with CE, while multiple hormonal therapies have been used with varying results following incomplete resection. Aromatase inhibitors are the only reported treatment to prevent tumor progression or recurrence in patients with incompletely resected IVL with CE. PMID:26783463

  13. Resection of hepatic metastases from colorectal carcinoma. The registry data.

    PubMed

    Asbun, H J; Tsao, J I; Hughes, K S

    1994-01-01

    When liver metastases from colorectal carcinoma are detected, the surgeon must decide whether or not the patient is a candidate for resection. Even though long-term survival after resection is far from optimal, the relegation of patients to nonresective treatment means denying them the only chance for cure currently available. Better understanding of liver anatomy and improvement in resection techniques have decreased the morbidity and mortality. The RHM and the GITSG reports have better defined the prognostic factors for resections of colorectal liver metastases and allowed for a better understanding of the indications for resection. During the last decades, liver resection has been extended to older patients, patients with multiple liver lesions, and patients with larger solitary metastases. At the same time, anatomic rather than wedge resections are more common, and it is preferable to perform the colon and liver resection at different stages. The end result has been a marked increase in the number of hepatic resections performed for colorectal liver metastases during the last two decades. PMID:8031663

  14. General Considerations of Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm: Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chung Won; Bae, Miju; Chung, Sung Woon

    2015-01-01

    Although development of surgical technique and critical care, ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm still carries a high mortality. In order to obtain good results, various efforts have been attempted. This paper reviews initial management of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm and discuss the key point open surgical repair and endovascular aneurysm repair. PMID:25705591

  15. Malignant peritoneal mesothelioma in a patient with intestinal fistula, incisional hernia and abdominal infection: A case report

    PubMed Central

    HONG, SEN; BI, MIAO-MIAO; ZHAO, PING-WEI; WANG, XU; KONG, QING-YANG; WANG, YONG-TAO; WANG, LEI

    2016-01-01

    Malignant mesothelioma is a rare type of cancer, most commonly associated with exposure to asbestos. Mesothelioma of the peritoneum, the membrane lining the abdominal cavity, is extremely rare. The current study reports the case of a 60-year-old female who presented with intestinal fistula, recurrent incisional hernia and abdominal infection, with no history of asbestos exposure, and was diagnosed with clear cell MPM. Computed tomography scans of the abdomen revealed extensive small bowel adhesions and massive peritoneal effusion. Histological examination of biopsy specimens indicated a diagnosis of malignant peritoneal mesothelioma with clear cell morphology. A laparotomy was performed, with subsequent resection of the bowel with fistula. Follow-up examination performed at 1-year post-surgery revealed that the patient was alive and in generally good health. PMID:26998119

  16. [FIRST EXPERIENCE OF APPLICATION OF TECHNOLOGY OF A TWO-STREAM LOW-FREQUENCY ULTRASOUND TECHNOLOGY IN ABDOMINAL SURGERY].

    PubMed

    Lifshits, Yu Z; Babayev, E; Afremov, M; Valetskiy, V L; Grigoruk, A V; Omelchenko, A N

    2015-09-01

    Biophysical peculiarities of action on tissues of a two-strem low-frequency ultrasound (TSLFU) technology, elaborated by "Arobella Medical LLC" (USA) firm, were studied. Capacity of ultrasound to separate a pathologically-changed and healthy tissues, to divide the structures in accordance to their bioacoustical parameters constitutes the technology peculiarities. The presence of such a biophysical effect permits to achieve high resectability (R0) in patients with oncological diseases. Antibacterial effect and stimulation of intraorgan microcirculation with ultrasound irradiation were noted. Biophysical peculiarities of TSLFU were successfully applied in surgical treatment of 48 patients, suffering inflammatory and oncological diseases of the abdominal cavity organs. PMID:26817081

  17. Complete regression of a symptomatic, mycotic juxtarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm after treatment with fenestrated endovascular aneurysm repair.

    PubMed

    Durgin, Jonathan M; Arous, Edward J; Kumar, Shivani; Robinson, William P; Simons, Jessica P; Schanzer, Andres

    2016-09-01

    Mycotic abdominal aortic aneurysms are rare and present unique challenges when potential treatment options are considered. Although aortic resection with in situ grafting techniques or extra-anatomic reconstruction are the treatments of choice, endovascular aortic repair has emerged as a suitable alternative in critically ill patients. We report the successful endovascular repair of a symptomatic, mycotic juxtarenal aortic aneurysm using a physician-modified fenestrated endograft. In this patient, with >6 months of follow-up, the aneurysm has completely regressed, illustrating that in select patients with complex mycotic aneurysms, endovascular repair combined with appropriate medical management is a viable treatment strategy. PMID:26747681

  18. [Hepatic Resection of Multiple Liver Metastases from Gastric Cancer after Molecular Targeted Chemotherapy(S-1 plus Cisplatin plus Trastuzumab)].

    PubMed

    Kim, Yongkook; Hosoda, Yohei; Nishino, Masaya; Okano, Miho; Kawada, Junji; Yamasaki, Masaru; Nagai, Ken-ichi; Yasui, Masayosi; Okuyama, Masaki; Tsujinaka, Toshimasa

    2015-11-01

    A 62-year-old man was diagnosed with gastric cancer and underwent distal gastrectomy, and D1+b lymph node dissection. He was diagnosed postoperatively with T1b (sm2) N0M0, StageⅠA gastric adenocarcinoma and did not receive any adjuvant chemotherapy after surgery. One year and 6 months after gastrectomy, blood analysis indicated high levels of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA 262.1 ng/mL) while abdominal computed tomography (CT) revealed multiple liver tumors (S7: 15 mm, S7/8: 20 mm). The patient was diagnosed with metachronous multiple liver metastases from gastric cancer. Chemotherapy, combined with molecular targeted therapy (S-1 plus cisplatin [CDDP] plus trastuzumab), was administered because of overexpression of the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) protein in the primary tumor as assessed by immunohistochemistry, the CEA levels decreased immediately after 2 cycles of the chemotherapy, and the liver metastases shrank markedly with no evidence of new lesions on abdominal CT. However, after treatment, Grade 3 neutropenia and diarrhea were observed. Chemotherapy was suspended and hepatic resection was performed. After hepatic resection, the liver tumors were histologically evaluated as Grade 2 metastatic gastric adenocarcinoma, and the HER2 expression of remnant carcinoma cells was established. The patient has been in good health and remained free of recurrences in the 2 years and 3 months after the liver resection. Surgery with preoperative chemotherapy (S-1 plus CDDP plus trastuzumab) can be an effective treatment for liver metastasis from HER2-positive gastric cancer. PMID:26805121

  19. Abdominal Lipomatosis with Secondary Self-Strangulation of Masses in an Adult Rhesus Macaque (Macaca mulatta)

    PubMed Central

    Chum, Helen H; Long, C Tyler; McKeon, Gabriel P; Chang, Angela G; Luong, Richard H; Albertelli, Megan A

    2014-01-01

    An 10-y-old, intact male rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) presented for bilateral scrotal swelling and a distended abdomen. A soft mass in the left upper quadrant of the abdomen was palpated. A barium study did not reveal any gastrointestinal abnormalities. Exploratory laparotomy revealed a large (1.25 kg, 15.0 × 13.0 × 9.5 cm), red and tan, soft, circumscribed, spherical mass within the greater omentum and 10 to 20 smaller (diameter, 1 to 4 cm), soft to firm masses in the mesentery and greater omentum. The resected mass was a self-strangulating abdominal lipoma, a pedunculated neoplasm composed of white adipocytes arising from peritoneal adipose tissue undergoing secondary coagulation necrosis after strangulation of the blood supply due to twisting of the mass around the peduncle. The smaller masses were histologically consistent with simple or self-strangulating pedunculated abdominal lipomas. The macaque presented again 9 mo later with a firm, 5.0-cm mass in the midabdomen, with intestinal displacement visible on radiographs. Given this animal's medical history and questionable prognosis, euthanasia was elected. Necropsy revealed numerous, multifocal to coalescing, 1.0- to 15.0-cm, pale tan to yellow, circumscribed, soft to firm, spherical to ellipsoid, pedunculated masses that were scattered throughout the mesentery, greater omentum, lesser omentum, and serosal surfaces of the gastrointestinal tract. All of the masses were pedunculated abdominal lipomas, and most demonstrated coagulation necrosis due to self-strangulation of the blood supply. To our knowledge, this report is the first to describe abdominal lipomatosis with secondary self-strangulation of masses in a rhesus macaque. PMID:25402181

  20. Abdominal lipomatosis with secondary self-strangulation of masses in an adult rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta).

    PubMed

    Chum, Helen H; Long, C Tyler; McKeon, Gabriel P; Chang, Angela G; Luong, Richard H; Albertelli, Megan A

    2014-10-01

    An 10-y-old, intact male rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) presented for bilateral scrotal swelling and a distended abdomen. A soft mass in the left upper quadrant of the abdomen was palpated. A barium study did not reveal any gastrointestinal abnormalities. Exploratory laparotomy revealed a large (1.25 kg, 15.0 × 13.0 × 9.5 cm), red and tan, soft, circumscribed, spherical mass within the greater omentum and 10 to 20 smaller (diameter, 1 to 4 cm), soft to firm masses in the mesentery and greater omentum. The resected mass was a self-strangulating abdominal lipoma, a pedunculated neoplasm composed of white adipocytes arising from peritoneal adipose tissue undergoing secondary coagulation necrosis after strangulation of the blood supply due to twisting of the mass around the peduncle. The smaller masses were histologically consistent with simple or self-strangulating pedunculated abdominal lipomas. The macaque presented again 9 mo later with a firm, 5.0-cm mass in the midabdomen, with intestinal displacement visible on radiographs. Given this animal's medical history and questionable prognosis, euthanasia was elected. Necropsy revealed numerous, multifocal to coalescing, 1.0- to 15.0-cm, pale tan to yellow, circumscribed, soft to firm, spherical to ellipsoid, pedunculated masses that were scattered throughout the mesentery, greater omentum, lesser omentum, and serosal surfaces of the gastrointestinal tract. All of the masses were pedunculated abdominal lipomas, and most demonstrated coagulation necrosis due to self-strangulation of the blood supply. To our knowledge, this report is the first to describe abdominal lipomatosis with secondary self-strangulation of masses in a rhesus macaque. PMID:25402181

  1. Functional bowel disorders and functional abdominal pain

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, W; Longstreth, G; Drossman, D; Heaton, K; Irvine, E; Muller-Lissner, S

    1999-01-01

    The Rome diagnostic criteria for the functional bowel disorders and functional abdominal pain are used widely in research and practice. A committee consensus approach, including criticism from multinational expert reviewers, was used to revise the diagnostic criteria and update diagnosis and treatment recommendations, based on research results. The terminology was clarified and the diagnostic criteria and management recommendations were revised. A functional bowel disorder (FBD) is diagnosed by characteristic symptoms for at least 12 weeks during the preceding 12 months in the absence of a structural or biochemical explanation. The irritable bowel syndrome, functional abdominal bloating, functional constipation, and functional diarrhea are distinguished by symptom-based diagnostic criteria. Unspecified FBD lacks criteria for the other FBDs. Diagnostic testing is individualized, depending on patient age, primary symptom characteristics, and other clinical and laboratory features. Functional abdominal pain (FAP) is defined as either the FAP syndrome, which requires at least six months of pain with poor relation to gut function and loss of daily activities, or unspecified FAP, which lacks criteria for the FAP syndrome. An organic cause for the pain must be excluded, but aspects of the patient's pain behavior are of primary importance. Treatment of the FBDs relies upon confident diagnosis, explanation, and reassurance. Diet alteration, drug treatment, and psychotherapy may be beneficial, depending on the symptoms and psychological features.


Keywords: functional bowel disorder; functional constipation; functional diarrhea; irritable bowel syndrome; functional abdominal pain; functional abdominal bloating; Rome II PMID:10457044

  2. The influence of lesion volume, perilesion resection volume, and completeness of resection on seizure outcome after resective epilepsy surgery for cortical dysplasia in children.

    PubMed

    Oluigbo, Chima O; Wang, Jichuan; Whitehead, Matthew T; Magge, Suresh; Myseros, John S; Yaun, Amanda; Depositario-Cabacar, Dewi; Gaillard, William D; Keating, Robert

    2015-06-01

    OBJECT Focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) is one of the most common causes of intractable epilepsy leading to surgery in children. The predictors of seizure freedom after surgical management for FCD are still unclear. The objective of this study was to perform a volumetric analysis of factors shown on the preresection and postresection brain MRI scans of patients who had undergone resective epilepsy surgery for cortical dysplasia and to determine the influence of these factors on seizure outcome. METHODS The authors reviewed the medical records and brain images of 43 consecutive patients with focal MRI-documented abnormalities and a pathological diagnosis of FCD who had undergone surgical treatment for refractory epilepsy. Preoperative lesion volume and postoperative resection volume were calculated by manual segmentation using OsiriX PRO software. RESULTS Forty-three patients underwent first-time surgery for resection of an FCD. The age range of these patients at the time of surgery ranged from 2 months to 21.8 years (mean age 7.3 years). The median duration of follow-up was 20 months. The mean age at onset was 31.6 months (range 1 day to 168 months). Complete resection of the area of an FCD, as adjudged from the postoperative brain MR images, was significantly associated with seizure control (p = 0.0005). The odds of having good seizure control among those who underwent complete resection were about 6 times higher than those among the patients who did not undergo complete resection. Seizure control was not significantly associated with lesion volume (p = 0.46) or perilesion resection volume (p = 0.86). CONCLUSIONS The completeness of FCD resection in children is a significant predictor of seizure freedom. Neither lesion volume nor the further resection of perilesional tissue is predictive of seizure freedom. PMID:26030332

  3. A giant adrenal lipoma presenting in a woman with chronic mild postprandial abdominal pain: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Adrenal lipomas are rare, small, benign, non-functioning tumors, which must be histopathologically differentiated from other tumors such as myelolipomas or liposarcomas. They are usually identified incidentally during autopsy, imaging, or laparotomy. Occasionally, they may present acutely due to complications such as abdominal pain from retroperitoneal bleeding, or systemic symptoms of infection. We report a giant adrenal lipoma (to the best of our knowledge, the second largest in the literature) clinically presenting with chronic mild postprandial pain. Case presentation A 54-year-old Caucasian woman presented several times over a period of 10 years to various emergency departments complaining of long-term mild postprandial abdominal pain. Although clinical examinations were unrevealing, an abdominal computed tomography scan performed at her most recent presentation led to the identification of a large lipoma of the left adrenal gland, which occupied most of the retroperitoneal space. Myelolipoma was ruled out due to the absence of megakaryocytes, immature leukocytes, or erythrocytes. Liposarcoma was ruled out due to the absence of lipoblasts. The size of the lipoma (16 × 14 × 7 cm) is, to the best of our knowledge, the second largest reported to date. After surgical resection, our patient was relieved of her symptoms and remains healthy six years postoperatively. Conclusion Physicians should be aware that differential diagnosis of mild chronic abdominal pain in patients presenting in emergency rooms may include large adrenal lipomas. When initial diagnostic investigation is not revealing, out-patient specialist evaluation should be planned to enable appropriate further investigations. PMID:21466677

  4. Pediatric Radical Abdominal Trachelectomy for Anaplastic Embryonal Rhabdomyosarcoma of the Uterine Cervix: An Alternative to Radical Hysterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Kayton, Mark L.; Wexler, Leonard H.; Lewin, Sharyn N.; Park, Kay J.; La Quaglia, Michael P.; Abu-Rustum, Nadeem R.

    2016-01-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma arising in the female genital tract carries five-year survival in excess of 80%, but lifelong infertility may be a consequence of local control strategies. We present the technique and outcome for a fertility-sparing, radical abdominal trachelectomy in a 12-year-old girl with anaplastic, embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma involving the uterine cervix. The patient had presented to our center following the piecemeal resection of a uterine cervical mass; because of concern about microscopic residual disease, we classified her as group II-A according to the International Rhabdomyosarcoma Study (IRS) system. Staging studies excluded the presence of distant disease. The patient received four cycles of multiagent chemotherapy and then underwent radical abdominal trachelectomy, with removal of the uterine cervix, parametria, vaginal cuff, and regional lymph nodes. Microscopically, the specimen showed treatment effect and no residual tumor. Regional nodes were negative. Radical abdominal trachelectomy, which has not been previously reported for rhabdomyosarcoma, has appeared to secure local disease control in this case, while preserving the patient’s future fertility potential. In properly selected cases of rhabdomyosarcoma of the uterine cervix, where involvement of the uterus proper is not present, radical abdominal trachelectomy may be an attractive fertility-sparing alternative to radical hysterectomy. PMID:19361657

  5. Successful Re-Repeat Resection of Primary Left Atrial Sarcoma After Previous Tumor Resection and Cardiac Autotransplant Procedures.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Syed T; Sepulveda, Edgardo; Desai, Milind Y; Pettersson, Gosta B; Gillinov, A Marc

    2016-09-01

    Primary cardiac sarcomas are rare but aggressive tumors and can present a technical challenge with regard to surgical approach and resection. Complete surgical resection, when feasible, remains crucial for palliation of symptoms and for its role as the mainstay of cardiac sarcoma therapy. Surgical resection of recurrent cardiac sarcomas, though formidable, is technically feasible and may provide reasonable survival, especially when the recurrence is local and the metastatic load is limited. In this case report, we describe a successful third cardiac sarcoma resection procedure in a young patient with previous cardiac autotransplantation and excision of left atrial sarcoma. PMID:27549550

  6. Limits of Surgical Resection for Bile Duct Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bartsch, Fabian; Heinrich, Stefan; Lang, Hauke

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Perihilar cholangiocarcinoma is the most frequent cholangiocarcinoma and poses difficulties in preoperative evaluation. For its therapy, often major hepatic resections as well as resection and reconstruction of the hepatic artery or the portal vein are necessary. In the last decades, great advances were made in both the surgical procedures and the perioperative anesthetic management. In this article, we describe from our point of view which facts represent the limits for curative (R0) resection in perihilar cholangiocarcinoma. Methods Retrospective data of a 6-year period (2008-2014) was collected in an SPSS 22 database and further analyzed with focus on the surgical approach and the postoperative as well as histological results. Results Out of 96 patients in total we were able to intend a curative resection in 73 patients (76%). In 58/73 (79.5%) resections an R0 situation could be reached (R1 n = 14; R2 n = 1). 23 patients were irresectable because of peritoneal carcinosis (n = 8), broad infiltration of major blood vessels (n = 8), bilateral advanced tumor growth to the intrahepatic bile ducts (n = 3), infiltration of the complete liver hilum (n = 2), infiltration of the gallbladder (n = 1), and liver cirrhosis (n = 1). Patients with a T4 stadium were treated with curative intention twice, and in each case an R1 resection was achieved. Most patients with irresectable tumors can be suspected to have a T4 stadium as well. In a T3 situation (n = 6) we could establish five R0 resections and one R1 resection. Conclusion The limit of surgical resection for bile duct cancer is the advanced tumor stage (T stadium). While in a T3 stadium an R0 resection is possible in most cases, we were not able to perform an R0 resection in a T4 stadium. From our point of view, early T stadium cannot usually be estimated through expanded diagnostics but only through surgical exploration. PMID:26468314

  7. Local recurrence after curative resection for rectal carcinoma: The role of surgical resection.

    PubMed

    Yun, Jung-A; Huh, Jung Wook; Kim, Hee Cheol; Park, Yoon Ah; Cho, Yong Beom; Yun, Seong Hyeon; Lee, Woo Yong; Chun, Ho-Kyung

    2016-07-01

    Local recurrence of rectal cancer is difficult to treat, may cause severe and disabling symptoms, and usually has a fatal outcome. The aim of this study was to document the clinical nature of locally recurrent rectal cancer and to determine the effect of surgical resection on long-term survival.A retrospective review was conducted of the prospectively collected medical records of 2485 patients with primary rectal adenocarcinoma who underwent radical resection between September 1994 and December 2008.In total, 147 (5.9%) patients exhibited local recurrence. The most common type of local recurrence was lateral recurrence, whereas anastomotic recurrence was the most common type in patients without preoperative concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT). Tumor location with respect to the anal verge significantly affected the local recurrence rate (P < 0.001), whereas preoperative CCRT did not affect the local recurrence rate (P = 0.433). Predictive factors for surgical resection of recurrent rectal cancer included less advanced tumor stage (P = 0.017, RR = 3.840, 95% CI = 1.271-11.597), axial recurrence (P < 0.001, RR = 5.772, 95% CI = 2.281-14.609), and isolated local recurrence (P = 0.006, RR = 8.679, 95% CI = 1.846-40.815). Overall survival after diagnosis of local recurrence was negatively influenced by advanced pathologic tumor stage (P = 0.040, RR = 1.867, 95% CI = 1.028-3.389), positive CRM (P = 0.001, RR = 12.939, 95% CI = 2.906-57.604), combined distant metastases (P = 0.001, RR = 2.086, 95% CI = 1.352-3.218), and nonsurgical resection of recurrent tumor (P < 0.001, RR = 4.865, 95% CI = 2.586-9.153).In conclusion, the clinical outcomes of local recurrence after curative resection of rectal cancer are diverse. Surgical resection of locally recurrent rectal cancer should be considered as an initial treatment, especially in patients with less advanced tumors and axial recurrence. PMID:27399067

  8. Thoracic and abdominal blastomycosis in a horse.

    PubMed

    Toribio, R E; Kohn, C W; Lawrence, A E; Hardy, J; Hutt, J A

    1999-05-01

    A 5-year-old Quarter Horse mare was examined because of lethargy, fever, and weight loss of 1 month's duration. Thoracic auscultation revealed decreased lung sounds cranioventrally. Thoracic ultrasonography revealed bilateral anechoic areas with hyperechoic strands, consistent with pleural effusion and fibrin tags. A large amount of free fluid was evident during abdominal ultrasonography. Abnormalities included anemia, hyperproteinemia, hyperglobulinemia, hyperfibrinogenemia, and hypoalbuminemia. Thoracic radiography revealed alveolar infiltrates in the cranial and caudoventral lung fields. A cavitary mass, consistent with an abscess, could be seen caudodorsal to the crura of the diaphragm. Ultrasonographic evaluation of this area revealed a hypoechoic mass with septations. Bilateral thoracocentesis was performed. Bacterial culture of the pleural fluid did not yield growth, but Blastomyces dermatitidis was isolated from pleural fluid, abdominal fluid, and an aspirate of the abscess. The mare was euthanatized, and a diagnosis of thoracic and abdominal blastomycosis was confirmed at necropsy. PMID:10319179

  9. [Differential diagnosis of abdominal cysts in children].

    PubMed

    Józsa, Gergő; Mohay, Gabriella; Pintér, András; Vástyán, Attila

    2015-09-13

    19 children were diagnosed with abdominal cysts of different origin in the Surgical Unit of the Department of Pediatrics, Medical University of Pécs, Hungary between 2010 and 2013. The authors discuss the details of representative cases of a parovarial cyst, an intestinal duplication, and an omental cyst with emphasis on the clinical symptoms, diagnostic tools, and surgical interventions. The authors conclude that abdominal cysts often cause mild symptoms only, and they are discovered accidentally by ultrasound imaging performed for other reasons. In some cases, the cyst can cause severe complaints or even acute abdomen requiring emergency surgery. Laporoscopy may be a valuable method both in diagnosis and surgical therapy. Abdominal CT or MRI are not required in the majority of the patients. PMID:26552027

  10. [Abdominal splenosis: an often underdiagnosed entity].

    PubMed

    Vercher-Conejero, J L; Bello-Arqués, P; Pelegrí-Martínez, L; Hervás-Benito, I; Loaiza-Góngora, J L; Falgas-Lacueva, M; Ruiz-Llorca, C; Pérez-Velasco, R; Mateo-Navarro, A

    2011-01-01

    Splenosis is defined as the heterotopic autotransplantation of splenic tissue because of a ruptured spleen due to trauma or surgery. It is a benign and incidental finding, although imaging tests may sometimes orient toward malignancy simulating renal tumors, abdominal lymphomas, endometriosis, among other. We report the case of a 42-year old male in whom a MRI was performed after a study due to abdominal pain. Multiple enlarged lymph nodes were observed in the abdomen, suggestive of lymphoproliferative disease. As an important background, splenectomy was carried out due to abdominal trauma at age 9. After several studies, it was decided to perform a (99m)Tc-labeled heat-damaged red blood cell scintigraphy that showed multiple pathological deposits distributed throughout the abdomen, and even the pelvis, being consistent with splenosis. PMID:20570413

  11. [Abdominal aortic aneurysm and renovascular disease].

    PubMed

    Riambau, Vicente; Guerrero, Francisco; Montañá, Xavier; Gilabert, Rosa

    2007-06-01

    Recent technological advances in the diagnosis and therapy of abdominal aortic aneurysm and renovascular disease are continuing to bring about changes in the way patients suffering from these conditions are treated. The prevalence of both these conditions is increasing. This is due to greater life-expectancy in patients with arteriosclerosis, a pathogenetic factor underlying both conditions. The application of diagnostic imaging techniques to non-vascular conditions has led to the early diagnosis of abdominal aortic aneurysm. Clinical suspicion of reno-vascular disease can be confirmed easily using high-resolution diagnostic imaging modalities such as CT angiography and magnetic resonance angiography. Endovascular intervention is successfully replacing conventional surgical repair techniques, with the result that it may be possible to improve outcome in both conditions using effective and minimally invasive approaches. Future technological developments will enable these endovascular techniques to be applied in the large majority of patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm or renovascular disease. PMID:17580053

  12. Bioprosthetic Mesh in Abdominal Wall Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Baumann, Donald P.; Butler, Charles E.

    2012-01-01

    Mesh materials have undergone a considerable evolution over the last several decades. There has been enhancement of biomechanical properties, improvement in manufacturing processes, and development of antiadhesive laminate synthetic meshes. The evolution of bioprosthetic mesh materials has markedly changed our indications and methods for complex abdominal wall reconstruction. The authors review the optimal properties of bioprosthetic mesh materials, their evolution over time, and their indications for use. The techniques to optimize outcomes are described using bioprosthetic mesh for complex abdominal wall reconstruction. Bioprosthetic mesh materials clearly have certain advantages over other implantable mesh materials in select indications. Appropriate patient selection and surgical technique are critical to the successful use of bioprosthetic materials for abdominal wall repair. PMID:23372454

  13. Flap Coverage of Anterior Abdominal Wall Defects

    PubMed Central

    Sacks, Justin M.; Broyles, Justin M.; Baumann, Donald P.

    2012-01-01

    Reconstruction of complex defects of the anterior abdomen is both challenging and technically demanding for reconstructive surgeons. Advancements in the use of pedicle and free tissue transfer along with the use of bioprosthetic and synthetic meshes have provided for novel approaches to these complex defects. Accordingly, detailed knowledge of abdominal wall and lower extremity anatomy in combination with insight into the design, implementation, and limitations of various flaps is essential to solve these complex clinical problems. Although these defects can be attributed to a myriad of etiologic factors, the objectives in abdominal wall reconstruction are consistent and include the restoration of abdominal wall integrity, protection of intraabdominal viscera, and the prevention of herniation. In this article, the authors review pertinent anatomy and the various local, regional, and distant flaps that can be utilized in the reconstruction of these complex clinical cases of the anterior abdomen. PMID:23372457

  14. Abdominal aortic aneurysm--the forgotten diagnosis?

    PubMed Central

    Contini, S.; McMaster, P.

    1980-01-01

    A review of all cases of abdominal aortic aneurysm presenting to Addenbrooke's Hospital, Cambridge, in a 4-year period revealed that there were 118 such patients and confirmed the relatively low operative mortality for elective aneurysmal surgery (6.6%) compared with the high mortality (66.6%) for ruptured or leaking abdominal aneurysm. In only 50% of the cases was the correct diagnosis made during the lifetime of the patient; nor was the correct diagnosis always made after admission to hospital. The need for an early and accurate diagnosis of abdominal aneurysms is stressed and an increased awareness of this condition, based on well established clinical features, would undoubtedly reduce the overall mortality. Images Fig. 1 PMID:7393787

  15. [Pediatric Abdominal Pain – Harmless or Harmful?].

    PubMed

    Furlano, Raoul Ivano

    2016-04-27

    Abdominal pain is a very common pediatric complaint. In the majority of cases there is no life-threatening pathology behind this symptom, but a functional disease. However, all-day activities of children and adolescents are often limited, frequent absences from school, and general physician/ pediatrician office visits with often unnecessary diagnostic and therapies are registered. Once an organic etiology of the abdominal pain is excluded by a thoroughly medical history taking and physical examination, the first steps for a successful alleviation of the pain is the reassurance of the patients and their family that there is no life-threatening pathology. There is evidence that cognitive-behavioral therapy may be useful in improving pain and disability outcome in the short term. There is no evidence for pharmacological, dietetic, or complementary intervention in the treatment of chronic functional abdominal pain. PMID:27120211

  16. Dose optimization in gynecological 3D image based interstitial brachytherapy using martinez universal perineal interstitial template (MUPIT) -an institutional experience

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Pramod Kumar; Sharma, Praveen Kumar; Swamidas, Jamema V; Mahantshetty, Umesh; Deshpande, D. D.; Manjhi, Jayanand; Rai, D V

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the dose optimization in 3D image based gynecological interstitial brachytherapy using Martinez Universal Perineal Interstitial Template (MUPIT). Axial CT image data set of 20 patients of gynecological cancer who underwent external radiotherapy and high dose rate (HDR) interstitial brachytherapy using MUPIT was employed to delineate clinical target volume (CTV) and organs at risk (OARs). Geometrical and graphical optimization were done for optimum CTV coverage and sparing of OARs. Coverage Index (CI), dose homogeneity index (DHI), overdose index (OI), dose non-uniformity ratio (DNR), external volume index (EI), conformity index (COIN) and dose volume parameters recommended by GEC-ESTRO were evaluated. The mean CTV, bladder and rectum volume were 137 ± 47cc, 106 ± 41cc and 50 ± 25cc, respectively. Mean CI, DHI and DNR were 0.86 ± 0.03, 0.69 ± 0.11 and 0.31 ± 0.09, while the mean OI, EI, and COIN were 0.08 ± 0.03, 0.07 ± 0.05 and 0.79 ± 0.05, respectively. The estimated mean CTV D90 was 76 ± 11Gy and D100 was 63 ± 9Gy. The different dosimetric parameters of bladder D2cc, D1cc and D0.1cc were 76 ± 11Gy, 81 ± 14Gy, and 98 ± 21Gy and of rectum/recto-sigmoid were 80 ± 17Gy, 85 ± 13Gy, and 124 ± 37Gy, respectively. Dose optimization yields superior coverage with optimal values of indices. Emerging data on 3D image based brachytherapy with reporting and clinical correlation of DVH parameters outcome is enterprizing and provides definite assistance in improving the quality of brachytherapy implants. DVH parameter for urethra in gynecological implants needs to be defined further. PMID:25190999

  17. Tracheal resection and reconstruction for malignant disease

    PubMed Central

    Zuin, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Malignant tracheal neoplasms are rare diseases, mostly represented by squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC). Symptoms presentation is often misleading and diagnosis may be delayed for months or years, so clinical suspicion plays a fundamental role. Corner stones in the diagnostic pathway are represented by rigid endoscopy and computed tomography (CT) scan, necessary to correctly stage the patients and identify the optimal surgical candidate. When appropriate, surgical resection and reconstruction is still the best opportunity to achieve a long-term survival with a good quality of life, but this kind of surgery is always a very challenging procedure and a wide experience with an in-depth knowledge of every technical detail, from selection of patient, to choice of surgical approach to reconstruction techniques, are needed and recommended. PMID:26981265

  18. [Drainage for Subcutaneous Emphysema after Pulmonary Resection].

    PubMed

    Funakoshi, Yasunobu; Ohmori, Kenichi; Takeda, Shinichi

    2016-05-01

    Severe subcutaneous emphysema sometimes develops after pulmonary resection. We report our management of ten patients who were treated with subcutaneous Penrose drainage. Water seal test at chest closure showed no air leakage in 5, and a small amount in 5. Chest X-ray at the progression of massive subcutaneous emphysema showed no obvious pneumothorax in 2, and slight apical pneumothorax in 8. Subcutaneous emphysema developed after removal of chest tubes in 6, and before removal in 4. Subcutaneous drains were inserted at the midclavicular line or the side chest in 8, and both in 2. Subcutaneous emphysema improved immediately after subcutaneous Penrose drainage with active compressive massage. Subcutaneous penrose drainage is easy and useful for relieving massive subcutaneous emphysema. PMID:27220920

  19. Robotic Pancreatic Resections: Feasibility and Advantages.

    PubMed

    Croner, Roland S

    2015-10-01

    The robot is an innovative tool to perform complex pancreatic resections. It upgrades conventional laparoscopy by adding specific ergonomic technical details (e.g., EndoWrist). Robotic complex pancreatic operations such as pancreaticoduodenectomy can be carried out safe with equal oncological results, morbidity, and mortality compared to open procedures. The patients benefit from less blood loss, decreased hospitalization, and all other benefits of minimally invasive surgery. Nevertheless, the robot has some limitations like missing haptic feedback and the high costs. It has to find its indications beneath conventional laparoscopic procedures, which is currently extensively discussed. But the available technology is certainly convincing, and a further improvement can be expected which will increase its widespread in the future. PMID:26722208

  20. Cephalic aura after frontal lobe resection.

    PubMed

    Kakisaka, Yosuke; Jehi, Lara; Alkawadri, Rafeed; Wang, Zhong I; Enatsu, Rei; Mosher, John C; Dubarry, Anne-Sophie; Alexopoulos, Andreas V; Burgess, Richard C

    2014-08-01

    A cephalic aura is a common sensory aura typically seen in frontal lobe epilepsy. The generation mechanism of cephalic aura is not fully understood. It is hypothesized that to generate a cephalic aura extensive cortical areas need to be excited. We report a patient who started to have cephalic aura after right frontal lobe resection. Magnetoencephalography (MEG) showed interictal spike and ictal change during cephalic aura, both of which were distributed in the right frontal region, and the latter involved much more widespread areas than the former on MEG sensors. The peculiar seizure onset pattern may indicate that surgical modification of the epileptic network was related to the appearance of cephalic aura. We hypothesize that generation of cephalic aura may be associated with more extensive cortical involvement of epileptic activity than that of interictal activity, in at least a subset of cases. PMID:24613491