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Sample records for abdominal trauma index

  1. [Abdominal trauma].

    PubMed

    Sido, B; Grenacher, L; Friess, H; Büchler, M W

    2005-09-01

    Blunt abdominal trauma is much more frequent than penetrating abdominal trauma in Europe. As a consequence of improved quality of computed tomography, even complex liver injuries are increasingly being treated conservatively. However, missed hollow viscus injuries still remain a problem, as they considerably increase mortality in multiply injured patients. Laparoscopy decreases the rate of unnecessary laparotomies in perforating abdominal trauma and helps to diagnose injuries of solid organs and the diaphragm. However, the sensitivity in detecting hollow viscus injuries is low and the role of laparoscopy in blunt abdominal injury has not been defined. If intra-abdominal bleeding is difficult to control in hemodynamically unstable patients, damage control surgery with packing of the liver, total splenectomy, and provisional closure of hollow viscus injuries is of importance. Definitive surgical treatment follows hemodynamic stabilization and restoration of hemostasis. Injuries of the duodenum and pancreas after blunt abdominal trauma are often associated with other intra-abdominal injuries and the treatment depends on their location and severity.

  2. Abdominal Trauma Revisited.

    PubMed

    Feliciano, David V

    2017-11-01

    Although abdominal trauma has been described since antiquity, formal laparotomies for trauma were not performed until the 1800s. Even with the introduction of general anesthesia in the United States during the years 1842 to 1846, laparotomies for abdominal trauma were not performed during the Civil War. The first laparotomy for an abdominal gunshot wound in the United States was finally performed in New York City in 1884. An aggressive operative approach to all forms of abdominal trauma till the establishment of formal trauma centers (where data were analyzed) resulted in extraordinarily high rates of nontherapeutic laparotomies from the 1880s to the 1960s. More selective operative approaches to patients with abdominal stab wounds (1960s), blunt trauma (1970s), and gunshot wounds (1990s) were then developed. Current adjuncts to the diagnosis of abdominal trauma when serial physical examinations are unreliable include the following: 1) diagnostic peritoneal tap/lavage, 2) surgeon-performed ultrasound examination; 3) contrast-enhanced CT of the abdomen and pelvis; and 4) diagnostic laparoscopy. Operative techniques for injuries to the liver, spleen, duodenum, and pancreas have been refined considerably since World War II. These need to be emphasized repeatedly in an era when fewer patients undergo laparotomy for abdominal trauma. Finally, abdominal trauma damage control is a valuable operative approach in patients with physiologic exhaustion and multiple injuries.

  3. Appendicitis following blunt abdominal trauma.

    PubMed

    Cobb, Travis

    2017-09-01

    Appendicitis is a frequently encountered surgical problem in the Emergency Department (ED). Appendicitis typically results from obstruction of the appendiceal lumen, although trauma has been reported as an infrequent cause of acute appendicitis. Intestinal injury and hollow viscus injury following blunt abdominal trauma are well reported in the literature but traumatic appendicitis is much less common. The pathophysiology is uncertain but likely results from several mechanisms, either in isolation or combination. These include direct compression/crush injury, shearing injury, or from indirect obstruction of the appendiceal lumen by an ileocecal hematoma or traumatic impaction of stool into the appendix. Presentation typically mirrors that of non-traumatic appendicitis with nausea, anorexia, fever, and right lower quadrant abdominal tenderness and/or peritonitis. Evaluation for traumatic appendicitis requires a careful history and physical exam. Imaging with ultrasound or computed tomography is recommended if the history and physical do not reveal an acute surgical indication. Treatment includes intravenous antibiotics and surgical consultation for appendectomy. This case highlights a patient who developed acute appendicitis following blunt trauma to the abdomen sustained during a motor vehicle accident. Appendicitis must be considered as part of the differential diagnosis in any patient who presents to the ED with abdominal pain, including those whose pain begins after sustaining blunt trauma to the abdomen. Because appendicitis following trauma is uncommon, timely diagnosis requires a high index of suspicion. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Penetrating abdominal trauma.

    PubMed

    Henneman, P L

    1989-08-01

    The management of patients with penetrating abdominal trauma is outlined in Figure 1. Patients with hemodynamic instability, evisceration, significant gastrointestinal bleeding, peritoneal signs, gunshot wounds with peritoneal violation, and type 2 and 3 shotgun wounds should undergo emergency laparotomy. The initial ED management of these patients includes airway management, monitoring of cardiac rhythm and vital signs, history, physical examination, and placement of intravenous lines. Blood should be obtained for initial hematocrit, type and cross-matching, electrolytes, and an alcohol level or drug screen as needed. Initial resuscitation should utilize crystalloid fluid replacement. If more than 2 liters of crystalloid are needed to stabilize an adult (less in a child), blood should be given. Group O Rh-negative packed red blood cells should be immediately available for a patient in impending arrest or massive hemorrhage. Type-specific blood should be available within 15 minutes. A patient with penetrating thoracic and high abdominal trauma should receive a portable chest x-ray, and a hemo- or pneumothorax should be treated with tube thoracostomy. An unstable patient with clinical signs consistent with a pneumothorax, however, should receive a tube thoracostomy prior to obtaining roentgenographic confirmation. If time permits, a nasogastric tube and Foley catheter should be placed, and the urine evaluated for blood (these procedures can be performed in the operating room). If kidney involvement is suspected because of hematuria or penetrating trauma in the area of a kidney or ureter in a patient requiring surgery, a single-shot IVP should be performed either in the ED or the operating room. An ECG is important in patients with possible cardiac involvement and in patients over the age of 40 going to the operating room. Tetanus status should be updated, and appropriate antibiotics covering bowel flora should be given. Operative management should rarely be delayed

  5. Blunt abdominal trauma in children.

    PubMed

    Schonfeld, Deborah; Lee, Lois K

    2012-06-01

    This review will examine the current evidence regarding pediatric blunt abdominal trauma and the physical exam findings, laboratory values, and radiographic imaging associated with the diagnosis of intra-abdominal injuries (IAI), as well as review the current literature on pediatric hollow viscus injuries and emergency department disposition after diagnosis. The importance of the seat belt sign on physical examination and screening laboratory data remains controversial, although screening hepatic enzymes are recommended in the evaluation of nonaccidental trauma to identify occult abdominal organ injuries. Focused Assessment with Sonography for Trauma (FAST) has modest sensitivity for hemoperitoneum and IAI in the pediatric trauma patient. Patients with concern for undiagnosed IAI, including bowel injury, may be considered for hospital admission and serial abdominal exams without an increased risk of complications, if an exploratory laparotomy is not performed emergently. Although the FAST exam is not recommended as the sole screening tool to rule out IAI in hemodynamically stable trauma patients, it may be used in conjunction with the physical exam and laboratory findings to identify children at risk for IAI. Children with a normal physical exam and normal abdominal CT may not require routine hospitalization after blunt abdominal trauma.

  6. Staged abdominal re-operation for abdominal trauma.

    PubMed

    Taviloglu, Korhan

    2003-07-01

    To review the current developments in staged abdominal re-operation for abdominal trauma. To overview the steps of damage control laparotomy. The ever increasing importance of the resuscitation phase with current intensive care unit (ICU) support techniques should be emphasized. General surgeons should be familiar to staged abdominal re-operation for abdominal trauma and collaborate with ICU teams, interventional radiologists and several other specialties to overcome this entity.

  7. Prophylactic antibiotics for penetrating abdominal trauma.

    PubMed

    Brand, Martin; Grieve, Andrew

    2013-11-18

    Penetrating abdominal trauma occurs when the peritoneal cavity is breached. Routine laparotomy for penetrating abdominal injuries began in the 1800s, with antibiotics first being used in World War II to combat septic complications associated with these injuries. This practice was marked with a reduction in sepsis-related mortality and morbidity. Whether prophylactic antibiotics are required in the prevention of infective complications following penetrating abdominal trauma is controversial, however, as no randomised placebo controlled trials have been published to date. There has also been debate about the timing of antibiotic prophylaxis. In 1972 Fullen noted a 7% to 11% post-surgical infection rate with pre-operative antibiotics, a 33% to 57% infection rate with intra-operative antibiotic administration and 30% to 70% infection rate with only post-operative antibiotic administration. Current guidelines state there is sufficient class I evidence to support the use of a single pre-operative broad spectrum antibiotic dose, with aerobic and anaerobic cover, and continuation (up to 24 hours) only in the event of a hollow viscus perforation found at exploratory laparotomy. To assess the benefits and harms of prophylactic antibiotics administered for penetrating abdominal injuries for the reduction of the incidence of septic complications, such as septicaemia, intra-abdominal abscesses and wound infections. Searches were not restricted by date, language or publication status. We searched the following electronic databases: the Cochrane Injuries Group Specialised Register, CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library 2013, issue 12 of 12), MEDLINE (OvidSP), Embase (OvidSP), ISI Web of Science: Science Citation Index Expanded (SCI-EXPANDED), ISI Web of Science: Conference Proceedings Citation Index- Science (CPCI-S) and PubMed. Searches were last conducted in January 2013. All randomised controlled trials of antibiotic prophylaxis in patients with penetrating abdominal trauma versus no

  8. Abdominal shotgun trauma: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Toutouzas, Konstantinos G; Larentzakis, Andreas; Drimousis, Panagiotis; Riga, Maria; Theodorou, Dimitrios; Katsaragakis, Stylianos

    2008-01-01

    Introduction One of the most lethal mechanisms of injury is shotgun wound and particularly the abdominal one. Case presentation We report a case of a 45 years old male suffering abdominal shotgun trauma, who survived his injuries. Conclusion The management of the abdominal shotgun wounds is mainly dependent on clinical examination and clinical judgment, while requires advanced surgical skills. PMID:18625076

  9. Modified Multivisceral Transplant After Acute Abdominal Trauma.

    PubMed

    Nikeghbalian, Saman; Alaa Eldin, Ahmed; Aliakbarian, Mohsen; Kazemi, Kourosh; Shamsaeefar, Alireza; Gholami, Siavash; Malekhosseini, Seyed Ali

    2016-04-01

    A 50-year-old man sustained blunt abdominal trauma in a motor vehicle accident. He underwent exploratory laparotomy on the day of trauma, and severe bleeding from the base of the small bowel mesentery was controlled by mass ligation and through-and-through suturing. After transfer to our center, repeat exploratory laparotomy showed ischemic small intestine, ischemic right colon, and severe pancreatic trauma. The severely injured organs were excised including the entire small bowel, pancreas, spleen, stomach, and right hemicolon. The next day, a modified multivisceral transplant was performed including stomach, pancreaticoduodenal complex, and small bowel transplant. Postoperative complications included an intra-abdominal collection that was drained percutaneously with ultrasonographic guidance and severe rejection that was treated with anti-thymocyte globulin. In summary, for select patients who have severe abdominal trauma may be treated with acute multivisceral transplant.

  10. Predictors of abdominal injuries in blunt trauma.

    PubMed

    Farrath, Samiris; Parreira, José Gustavo; Perlingeiro, Jacqueline A G; Solda, Silvia C; Assef, José Cesar

    2012-01-01

    To identify predictors of abdominal injuries in victims of blunt trauma. retrospective analysis of trauma protocols (collected prospectively) of adult victims of blunt trauma in a period of 15 months. Variables were compared between patients with abdominal injuries (AIS>0) detected by computed tomography or/and laparotomy (group I) and others (AIS=0, group II). Student's t, Fisher and qui-square tests were used for statistical analysis, considering p<0.05 as significant. A total of 3783 cases were included, with a mean age of 39.1 ± 17.7 years (14-99), 76.1% being male. Abdominal injuries were detected in 130 patients (3.4%). Patients sustaining abdominal injuries had significantly lower mean age (35.4 + 15.4 vs. 39.2 + 17.7), lower mean systolic blood pressure on admission (114.7 + 32.4 mmHg vs. 129.1 + 21.7 mmHg), lower mean Glasgow coma scale (12.9 + 3.9 vs. 14.3 + 2.0), as well as higher head AIS (0.95 + 1.5 vs. 0.67 + 1.1), higher thorax AIS (1.10 + 1.5 vs. 0.11 + 0.6) and higher extremities AIS (1.70 ± 1.8 vs. 1.03 ± 1.2). Patients sustaining abdominal injuries also presented higher frequency of severe injuries (AIS>3) in head (18.5% vs. 7.9%), thorax (29.2% vs. 2.4%) and extremities (40.0% vs. 13.7%). The highest odds ratios for the diagnosis of abdominal injuries were associated flail chest (21.8) and pelvic fractures (21.0). Abdominal injuries were more frequently observed in patients with hemodynamic instability, changes in Glasgow coma scale and severe lesions to the head, chest and extremities.

  11. Focused abdominal sonography for trauma (FAST) in blunt paediatric abdominal trauma.

    PubMed

    Faruque, Ahmad Vaqas; Qazi, Saqib Hamid; Khan, Muhammad Arif Mateen; Akhtar, Wassem; Majeed, Amina

    2013-03-01

    To evaluate the role of focussed abdominal sonography for trauma in blunt paediatric abdominal trauma patients, and to see if the role of computed tomography scan could be limited to only those cases in which sonography was positive. The retrospective study covered 10 years, from January 1,2000 to December 31,2009, and was conducted at the Department of Radiology and Department of Emergency Medicine, Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi. It comprised cases of 174 children from birth to 14 years who had presented with blunt abdominal trauma and had focussed abdominal sonography for trauma done at the hospital. The findings were correlated with computed tomography scan of the abdomen and clinical follow-up. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value and accuracy of focussed abdominal sonography for trauma were calculated for blunt abdominal trauma. SPSS 17 was used for statistical analysis. Of the total 174 cases, 31 (17.81%) were later confirmed by abdominal scan. Of these 31 children, sonography had been positive in 29 (93.54%) children. In 21 (67.74%) of the 31 children, sonograpy had been true positive; 8 (25%) (8/31) were false positive; and 2 (6%) (2/31) were false negative. There were 6 (19.3%) children in which sonography was positive and converted to laparotomy. There was no significant difference on account of gender (p>0.356). Focussed abdominal sonography for trauma in the study had sensitivity of 91%, specificity of 95%, positive predictive value of 73%, and negative predictive value of 73% with accuracy of 94%. All patients who had negative sonography were discharged later, and had no complication on clinical follow-up. Focussed abdominal sonography for trauma is a fairly reliable mode to assess blunt abdominal trauma in children. It is a useful tool to pick high-grade solid and hollow viscous injury. The results suggest that the role of computed tomography scan can be limited to those cases in which focussed

  12. Incidence, Patterns, and Factors Predicting Mortality of Abdominal Injuries in Trauma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Gad, Mohammad A; Saber, Aly; Farrag, Shereif; Shams, Mohamed E; Ellabban, Goda M

    2012-01-01

    Background: Abdominal trauma is a major public health problem for all nations and all socioeconomic strata. Aim: This study was designed to determine the incidence and patterns of abdominal injuries in trauma patients. Materials and Methods: We classified and identified the incidence and subtype of abdominal injuries and associated trauma, and identified variables related to morbidity and mortality. Results: Abdominal trauma was present in 248 of 300 cases; 172 patients with blunt abdominal trauma and 76 with penetrating. The most frequent type of abdominal trauma was blunt trauma; its most common cause was motor vehicle accident. Among patients with penetrating abdominal trauma, the most common cause was stabbing. Most abdominal trauma patients presented with other injuries, especially patients with blunt abdominal trauma. Mortality was higher among penetrating abdominal trauma patients. Conclusions: Type of abdominal trauma, associated injuries, and Revised Trauma Score are independent risk factors for mortality in abdominal trauma patients. PMID:22454826

  13. Splenic injury after blunt abdominal trauma during a soccer (football) game.

    PubMed

    Padlipsky, Patricia S; Brindis, Seth; Young, Kelly D

    2014-10-01

    The spleen is the most commonly injured abdominal organ in children who sustain blunt abdominal trauma, and pediatric splenic injury may result from minor mechanisms of injury, including sports participation. We present 2 cases of splenic injury in soccer goalies because of blunt abdominal trauma sustained during game play. Although abdominal organ injuries are uncommon in soccer, emergency medicine and primary care physicians must be aware of the possibility. A high index of suspicion and careful physical examination are key in making the diagnosis.

  14. Damage control laparotomy for abdominal trauma in children.

    PubMed

    Polites, Stephanie F; Habermann, Elizabeth B; Glasgow, Amy E; Zielinski, Martin D

    2017-05-01

    Damage control laparotomy (DCL) is not well studied in the pediatric trauma population. The purpose of this study was to develop a surrogate definition of DCL compatible with national and administrative data sources so that the rate and outcomes of DCL in pediatric trauma patients could be determined. Using the 2010-2014 National Trauma Data Bank, children ≤18 with an abdominal AIS ≥ 3 who underwent a laparotomy within 3 h of arrival were identified (n = 2989). DCL was defined as occurring in children who underwent a second laparotomy within 5-48 h from the index laparotomy (n = 360). Children meeting these criteria were compared to those children who had the initial definitive operative management (n = 2174) and those who died prior to 48 h (n = 455). DCL occurred in 12% of children with operative abdominal trauma. Children who underwent DCL had a greater median ISS (25 vs 18) and heart rate (112 vs 100), lower systolic blood pressure (104 vs 113), and GCS (12 vs 13), and were more likely to receive a preoperative blood transfusion (19 vs 11%) than those who had definitive initial operative management (all p < .05). Median length of stay (17 vs 8 days) and mortality (9 vs 2%) were greater following DCL than definitive initial operative management (p < .001). No differences in rate of DCL were seen based on ACS pediatric verification (p = .07). Few children with operative abdominal trauma undergo DCL. DCL was associated with worse physiology rather than anatomic injury severity in this study. As expected, outcomes were worse following DCL.

  15. Laparotomy for blunt abdominal trauma in a civilian trauma service.

    PubMed

    Howes, N; Walker, T; Allorto, N L; Oosthuizen, G V; Clarke, D L

    2012-03-29

    This report looks at the group of patients who required a laparotomy for blunt torso trauma at a busy metropolitan trauma service in South Africa. Methods. A prospective trauma registry is maintained by the surgical services of the Pietermaritzburg metropolitan complex. This registry is interrogated retrospectively. All patients who required admission for blunt torso trauma over the period September 2006 - September 2007 were included for review. Proformas documenting mechanism of injury, age, vital signs, blood gas, delay in presentation, length of hospital stay, intensive care unit stay and operative details were completed. Results. A total of 926 patients were treated for blunt trauma by the Pietermaritzburg metropolitan services during the period under consideration. A cohort of 65 (8%) required a laparotomy for blunt trauma during this period. There were 17 females in this group. The mechanisms of injury were motor vehicle accident (MVA) (27), pedestrian vehicle accident (PVA) (21), assault (5), fall from a height (3), bicycle accident (6), quad bike accident (1) and tractor-related accident (2). The following isolated injuries were discovered at laparotomy: liver (9), spleen (5), diaphragm (1), duodenum (2), small bowel (8), mesentery (8) bladder (10), gallbladder (1), stomach (2), colon/rectum (2) and retrohepatic vena cava (1). The following combined injuries were discovered: liver and diaphragm (2), spleen and pancreas (1), spleen and liver (2), spleen, aorta and diaphragm (1), spleen and bladder (1) and small bowel and bladder (2). Eighteen patients in the series (26%) required relaparotomy. In 10 patients temporary abdominal containment was needed. The mortality rate was 26% (18 patients). There were 6 deaths from massive bleeding, all within 6 hours of operation, and 3 deaths from renal failure; the remaining 9 patients died of multiple organ failure. There were 8 negative laparotomies (7%). In the negative laparotomy group false-positive computed

  16. Gastrointestinal Injuries in Blunt Abdominal Traumas.

    PubMed

    Gönüllü, D; Ilgun, S; Gedik, M L; Demiray, O; Öner, Z; Er, M; Köksoy, F N

    2015-01-01

    To discuss the efficiency of RTS (Revised TraumaScore), ISS (Injury Severity Score), and factors that affect mortality and morbidity in gastrointestinal injuries due to blunt trauma.Method and methods: Patients with gastrointestinal injuries due to blunt trauma operated within the last six years have been studied retrospectively in terms of demographics,injury mechanism and localization, additional injuries, RTS and ISS, operative technique, morbidity, mortality and duration of hospitalization. Of the eighteen cases, cause of injury was a traffic accident for 11 (61.1%), fall from height for 5 (27%) and physical attack for 2 (11%). Among the eighteen patients,there were 21 gastrointestinal injuries (11 intestinal, 6 colon,3 duodenum, 1 stomach). 10 (55.6%) had additional intraabdominal injuries while the number for extra-abdominal injuries were 12 (66.7%). Primary suture (10), segmentary resection (9) and pyloric exclusion (2) were the operations performed for the twenty-one gastrointestinal injuries.Although statistically not significant, 13(72.2%) patients with additional injuries compared with 5 (27.8%) patients with isolated gastrointestinal injuries, were found to have lower RTS (7.087/7.841), higher ISS (19.4/12.2), longer duration of hospitalization (11.5/8.4 day) as well as higher morbidity (7/1) and mortality (2/0) rates. Comparing the RTS (7.059/7.490) of patients who have and have not developed morbidity revealed no significant difference.However, ISS (23.9/12.2) was significantly higher in patients who have developed morbidity (p=0.003). RTS (6.085 7.445) and ISS (39.5/14.6) of patients who have survived were significantly different than patients who have not(p=0.037 and p=0.023, respectively) Additional injuries in patients with gastrointestinal injury due blunt abdominal traumas increases, although not significantly, morbidity, mortality and duration of hospitalization even when operated early. High ISS is significantly related to the risk of both

  17. Focused abdominal sonography for trauma in the clinical evaluation of children with blunt abdominal trauma.

    PubMed

    Ben-Ishay, Offir; Daoud, Mai; Peled, Zvi; Brauner, Eran; Bahouth, Hany; Kluger, Yoram

    2015-01-01

    In pediatric care, the role of focused abdominal sonography in trauma (FAST) remains ill defined. The objective of this study was to assess the sensitivity and specificity of FAST for detecting free peritoneal fluid in children. The trauma registry of a single level I pediatric trauma center was queried for the results of FAST examination of consecutive pediatric (<18 years) blunt trauma patients over a period of 36 months, from January 2010 to December 2012. Demographics, type of injuries, FAST results, computerized tomography (CT) results, and operative findings were reviewed. During the study period, 543 injured pediatric patients (mean age 8.2 ± 5 years) underwent FAST examinations. In 95 (17.5 %) FAST was positive for free peritoneal fluid. CT examination was performed in 219 (40.3 %) children. Positive FAST examination was confirmed by CT scan in 61/73 (83.6 %). CT detected intra-peritoneal fluid in 62/448 (13.8 %) of the patients with negative FAST results. These findings correspond to a sensitivity of 50 %, specificity of 88 %, positive predictive value (PPV) of 84 %, and a negative predictive value (NPV) of 58 %. In patients who had negative FAST results and no CT examination (302), no missed abdominal injury was detected on clinical ground. FAST examination in the young age group (<2 years) yielded lower sensitivity and specificity (36 and 78 % respectively) with a PPV of only 50 %. This study shows that although a positive FAST evaluation does not necessarily correlate with an IAI, a negative one strongly suggests the absence of an IAI, with a high NPV. These findings are emphasized in the analysis of the subgroup of children less than 2 years of age. FAST examination tempered with sound clinical judgment seems to be an effective tool to discriminate injured children in need of further imaging evaluation.

  18. Don't Forget the Abdominal Wall: Imaging Spectrum of Abdominal Wall Injuries after Nonpenetrating Trauma.

    PubMed

    Matalon, Shanna A; Askari, Reza; Gates, Jonathan D; Patel, Ketan; Sodickson, Aaron D; Khurana, Bharti

    2017-01-01

    Abdominal wall injuries occur in nearly one of 10 patients coming to the emergency department after nonpenetrating trauma. Injuries range from minor, such as abdominal wall contusion, to severe, such as abdominal wall rupture with evisceration of abdominal contents. Examples of specific injuries that can be detected at cross-sectional imaging include abdominal muscle strain, tear, or hematoma, including rectus sheath hematoma (RSH); traumatic abdominal wall hernia (TAWH); and Morel-Lavallée lesion (MLL) (closed degloving injury). These injuries are often overlooked clinically because of (a) a lack of findings at physical examination or (b) distraction by more-severe associated injuries. However, these injuries are important to detect because they are highly associated with potentially grave visceral and vascular injuries, such as aortic injury, and because their detection can lead to the diagnosis of these more clinically important grave traumatic injuries. Failure to make a timely diagnosis can result in delayed complications, such as bowel hernia with potential for obstruction or strangulation, or misdiagnosis of an abdominal wall neoplasm. Groin injuries, such as athletic pubalgia, and inferior costochondral injuries should also be considered in patients with abdominal pain after nonpenetrating trauma, because these conditions may manifest with referred abdominal pain and are often included within the field of view at cross-sectional abdominal imaging. Radiologists must recognize and report acute abdominal wall injuries and their associated intra-abdominal pathologic conditions to allow appropriate and timely treatment. © RSNA, 2017.

  19. Total transverse rupture of the duodenum after blunt abdominal trauma.

    PubMed

    Pirozzi, Cesare; Di Marco, Carluccio; Loponte, Margherita; Savino, Grazia

    2014-05-11

    Complete transverse rupture of the duodenum as an isolated lesion in blunt trauma can be considered as exceptional. The aim of this report is to discuss diagnostic procedures and surgical options in such an infrequent presentation. We report on a 37 year old man who had a total transverse rupture of the duodenum after blunt abdominal trauma. Diagnosis was suspected after contrast enhanced CT scan and confirmed at laparotomy; duodenal rupture was repaired by an end to end duodenal-duodenal anastomosis, after Kocher maneuver. The patient had fast and complete recovery. A high index of suspicion is necessary for timely diagnosis. Multi detector contrast enhanced CT scan is the gold standard for that aim. Surgical management must be tailored on an individual basis, since many techniques are available for both reconstruction and duodenum decompression. Kocher maneuver is essential for complete inspection of the pancreatic duodenal block and for appropriate reconstruction. Management of isolated duodenal rupture can be difficult. Contrast enhanced TC scans is essential for timely diagnosis. Primary repair can be achieved by an end to end duodenum anastomosis after Kocher maneuver, although alternative techniques are available for tailored solutions. Complex duodenum decompression techniques are not mandatory.

  20. The Role of Computed Tomography in Blunt Abdominal Trauma.

    PubMed

    Karki, O B

    2015-01-01

    Blunt injury trauma is regularly encountered in the emergency department. Diagnostic tools that help in optimum management of blunt abdominal trauma include; Focussed Assessment Sonography for Trauma scan, Diagnostic peritoneal lavage and Computed Tomography scan. The aim of this study is to determine the validity of CT scan as an accurate diagnostic tool and its role in management of patients with blunt abdominal trauma. A prospective analysis of 80 patients of blunt abdomen trauma who were admitted in Manipal Teaching Hospital, Pokhara, Nepal within a span of 15 months was done. Demographic data, mechanism of trauma, management and outcomes were studied. Organ injuries were graded using the Organ Injury Scale guidelines. Most of the patients in our study were in the age group of 21-40 years with an M: F ratio of 2.3:1. Road traffic accident (47.5%) was the most common mechanism of injury. Spleen (27.5%) was the commonest organ injured. CT scan was superior to FAST scan and had sensitivity of 97.3% specificity 75% positive predictive value 98.6%. FAST scan had sensitivity of 78.9%, specificity 50%, positive predictive value 96% with p- value of 0.0034. 81% of patients were conservatively managed. In conjunction with close clinical monitoring, CT scan is reliable in the evaluation and management of blunt abdominal trauma patients. Our study also shows CT as a superior diagnostic modality compared to FAST scan.

  1. Contemporary Strategies in the Management of Civilian Abdominal Vascular Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Karaolanis, Georgios; Moris, Dimitrios; McCoy, C. Cameron; Tsilimigras, Diamantis I.; Georgopoulos, Sotirios; Bakoyiannis, Chris

    2018-01-01

    The evaluation and management of patients with abdominal vascular trauma or injury requires immediate and effective decision-making in these unfavorable circumstances. The majority of these patients arrive at trauma centers in profound shock, secondary to massive blood loss, which is often unrelenting. Moreover, ischemia, compartment syndrome, thrombosis, and embolization may also be life threatening and require immediate intervention. To minimize the risk of these potentially lethal complications, early understanding of the disease process and emergent therapeutic intervention are necessary. In the literature, the management of acute traumatic vascular injuries is restricted to traditional open surgical techniques. However, in penetrating injuries surgeons often face a potentially contaminated field, which renders the placement of prosthetic grafts inappropriate. Currently, however, there are sparse data on the management of vascular trauma with endovascular techniques. The role of endovascular technique in penetrating abdominal vascular trauma, which is almost always associated with severe active bleeding, is limited. It is worth mentioning that hybrid operating rooms with angiographic radiology capabilities offer more opportunities for the management of this kind of injuries by either temporary control of the devastating bleeding using endovascular balloon tamponade or with embolization and stenting. On the other hand, blunt abdominal injuries are less dangerous and they could be treated at most times by endovascular means. Since surgeons continue to encounter abdominal vascular trauma, open and endovascular techniques will evolve constantly giving us encouraging messages for the near future. PMID:29516005

  2. Determinants of splenectomy in splenic injuries following blunt abdominal trauma.

    PubMed

    Akinkuolie, A A; Lawal, O O; Arowolo, O A; Agbakwuru, E A; Adesunkanmi, A R K

    2010-02-01

    The management of splenic injuries has shifted from splenectomy to splenic preservation owing to the risk of overwhelming post-splenectomy infection (OPSI). This study aimed to identify the factors that determine splenectomy in patients with isolated splenic injuries, with a view to increasing the rate of splenic preservation. Files of 55 patients managed for isolated splenic injuries from blunt abdominal trauma between 1998 and 2007 were retrospectively analysed using a pro forma. Management options were classified into nonoperative, operative salvage and splenectomy. The majority of patients suffered splenic injury as a result of motor vehicle accident (MVA) trauma or falls. Splenectomy was undertaken in 33 (60%) patients, 12 (22%) had non-operative management, and operative salvage was achieved in 10 (18%) patients. Significant determinants of splenectomy were grade of splenic injury, hierarchy of the surgeon, and hierarchy of the assistant. MVA injury and falls accounted for the vast majority of blunt abdominal trauma in this study. The rate and magnitude of energy transferred versus splenic protective mechanisms at the time of blunt abdominal trauma seems to determine the grade of splenic injury. Interest in splenic salvage surgery, availability of technology that enables splenic salvage surgery, and the experience of the surgeon and assistant appear to determine the surgical management. Legislation on vehicle safety and good parental control may reduce the severity of splenic injury in blunt abdominal trauma. When surgery is indicated, salvage surgery should be considered in intermediate isolated splenic injury to reduce the incidence of OPSI.

  3. Low values of central venous oxygen saturation (ScvO2) during surgery and anastomotic leak of abdominal trauma patients.

    PubMed

    Isaza-Restrepo, Andres; Moreno-Mejia, Jose F; Martin-Saavedra, Juan S; Ibañez-Pinilla, Milciades

    2017-01-01

    There is a well known relationship between hypoperfusion and postoperative complications like anastomotic leak. No studies have been done addressing this relationship in the context of abdominal trauma surgery. Central venous oxygen saturation is an important hypoperfusion marker of potential use in abdominal trauma surgery for identifying the risk of anastomotic leak development. The purpose of this study was to identify the relationship between low values of central venous oxygen saturation and anastomotic leak of gastrointestinal sutures in the postoperative period in abdominal trauma surgery. A cross-sectional prospective study was performed. Patients over 14 years old who required surgical gastrointestinal repair secondary to abdominal trauma were included. Anastomotic leak diagnosis was confirmed through clinical manifestations and diagnostic images or secondary surgery when needed. Central venous oxygen blood saturation was measured at the beginning of surgery through a central catheter. Demographic data, trauma mechanism, anatomic site of trauma, hemoglobin levels, abdominal trauma index, and comorbidities were assessed as secondary variables. Patients who developed anastomotic leak showed lower mean central venous oxygen saturation levels (60.0% ± 2.94%) than those who did not (69.89% ± 7.21%) ( p  = 0.010). Central venous oxygen saturation <65% was associated with the development of gastrointestinal leak during postoperative time of patients who underwent surgery secondary to abdominal trauma.

  4. Diagnostic imaging of blunt abdominal trauma in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Miele, Vittorio; Piccolo, Claudia Lucia; Trinci, Margherita; Galluzzo, Michele; Ianniello, Stefania; Brunese, Luca

    2016-05-01

    Trauma is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in childhood, and blunt trauma accounts for 80-90 % of abdominal injuries. The mechanism of trauma is quite similar to that of the adults, but there are important physiologic differences between children and adults in this field, such as the smaller blood vessels and the high vasoconstrictive response, leading to the spreading of a non-operative management. The early imaging of children undergoing a low-energy trauma can be performed by CEUS, a valuable diagnostic tool to demonstrate solid organ injuries with almost the same sensitivity of CT scans; nevertheless, as for as urinary tract injuries, MDCT remains still the technique of choice, because of its high sensitivity and accuracy, helping to discriminate between an intra-peritoneal form a retroperitoneal urinary leakage, requiring two different managements. The liver is the most common organ injured in blunt abdominal trauma followed by the spleen. Renal, pancreatic, and bowel injuries are quite rare. In this review we present various imaging findings of blunt abdominal trauma in children.

  5. Gastrointestinal injuries from blunt abdominal trauma in children.

    PubMed

    Ameh, E A; Nmadu, P T

    2004-04-01

    To determine the pattern, presentation and outcome of gastrointestinal injuries from blunt abdominal trauma in children. A retrospective study. Ahmadu Bello University Teaching Hospital, Zaria, Nigeria. Twenty one children managed for gastrointestinal injuries from blunt trauma from 1984-2002. The pattern, presentation, management and outcome of gastrointestinal injuries from blunt trauma. In the 19 year period, 1984-2002, 92 children were treated for blunt abdominal trauma, 21(23%) of who had injuries to the gastrointestinal tract. Three presenting after 24 hours had evidence of peritonitis. In six children with isolated gastrointestinal tract (GIT) injury who presented within two hours, abdominal signs were vague at initial evaluation but became marked over a few hours at repeated examination. In eight with associated intraabdominal injuries, abdominal signs were marked at initial examination and five presented with shock. Free peritoneal air was present on plain abdominal and chest radiograph in three of ten patients, dilated bowel loops in six and fluid levels in one. Diagnostic peritoneal lavage or paracentesis was positive in four patients with isolated GIT injuries and eight with associated intraabdominal injuries. There were 24 injuries in the 21 patients consisting of 15 perforations, five contusions, two seromuscular tears, and two gangrene from mesenteric injury. The small intestine was involved in 11 patients, colon six, stomach five, duodenum one and rectum one. Seven (35%) patients had associated extraabdominal injuries. Treatment consisted of simple closure of perforations, over sewing of contusions, resection and anastomosis for gangrene and repair with protective stoma for the rectal injury. One patient each developed prolonged ileus, urinary tract infection and chest infection, respectively postoperatively. Mortality was 28%, all of who had associated intraabdominal or extraabdominal injuries. Gastrointestinal injury from blunt abdominal trauma in

  6. Epidemiology of Abusive Abdominal Trauma Hospitalizations in United States Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lane, Wendy Gwirtzman; Dubowitz, Howard; Langenberg, Patricia; Dischinger, Patricia

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: (1) To estimate the incidence of abusive abdominal trauma (AAT) hospitalizations among US children age 0-9 years. (2) To identify demographic characteristics of children at highest risk for AAT. Design: Secondary data analysis of a cross-sectional, national hospitalization database. Setting: Hospitalization data from the 2003 and 2006…

  7. Delayed splenic rupture presenting 70 days following blunt abdominal trauma.

    PubMed

    Resteghini, Nancy; Nielsen, Jonpaul; Hoimes, Matthew L; Karam, Adib R

    2014-01-01

    Delayed splenic rupture following conservative management of splenic injury is an extremely rare complication. We report a case of an adult patient who presented with delayed splenic rupture necessitating splenectomy, 2 months following blunt abdominal trauma. Imaging at the initial presentation demonstrated only minimal splenic contusion and the patient was discharge following 24 hours of observation. © 2014.

  8. Management of complex abdominal wall defects associated with penetrating abdominal trauma.

    PubMed

    Arul, G Suren; Sonka, B J; Lundy, J B; Rickard, R F; Jeffery, S L A

    2015-03-01

    The paradigm of Damage Control Surgery (DCS) has radically improved the management of abdominal trauma, but less well described are the options for managing the abdominal wall itself in an austere environment. This article describes a series of patients with complex abdominal wall problems managed at the UK-led Role 3 Medical Treatment Facility (MTF) in Camp Bastion, Afghanistan. Contemporaneous review of a series of patients with complex abdominal wall injuries who presented to the Role 3 MTF between July and November 2012. Five patients with penetrating abdominal trauma associated with significant damage to the abdominal wall were included. All patients were managed using DCS principles, leaving the abdominal wall open at the end of the first procedure. Subsequent management of the abdominal wall was determined by a multidisciplinary team of general and plastic surgeons, intensivists and specialist nurses. The principles of management identified included minimising tissue loss on initial laparotomy by joining adjacent wounds and marginal debridement of dead tissue; contraction of the abdominal wall was minimised by using topical negative pressure dressing and dermal-holding sutures. Definitive closure was timed to allow oedema to settle and sepsis to be controlled. Closure techniques include delayed primary closure with traction sutures, components separation, and mesh closure with skin grafting. A daily multidisciplinary team discussion was invaluable for optimal decision making regarding the most appropriate means of abdominal closure. Dermal-holding sutures were particularly useful in preventing myostatic contraction of the abdominal wall. A simple flow chart was developed to aid decision making in these patients. This flow chart may prove especially useful in a resource-limited environment in which returning months or years later for closure of a large ventral hernia may not be possible. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use

  9. Mechanical small bowel obstruction following a blunt abdominal trauma: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Zirak-Schmidt, Samira; El-Hussuna, Alaa

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Intestinal obstruction following abdominal trauma has previously been described. However, in most reported cases pathological finding was intestinal stenosis. Presentation of the case A 51-year-old male was admitted after a motor vehicle accident. Initial focused abdominal sonogram for trauma and enhanced computerized tomography were normal, however there was a fracture of the tibia. Three days later, he complained of abdominal pain, constipation, and vomiting. An exploratory laparotomy showed bleeding from the omentum and mechanical small bowel obstruction due to a fibrous band. Discussion The patient had prior abdominal surgery, but clinical and radiological findings indicate that the impact of the motor vehicle accident initiated his condition either by causing rotation of a bowel segment around the fibrous band, or by formation of a fibrous band secondary to minimal bleeding from the omentum. Conclusion High index of suspicion of intestinal obstruction is mandatory in trauma patients presenting with complaints of abdominal pain, vomiting, and constipation despite uneventful CT scan. PMID:26566436

  10. Emergency ultrasound-based algorithms for diagnosing blunt abdominal trauma.

    PubMed

    Stengel, Dirk; Bauwens, Kai; Rademacher, Grit; Ekkernkamp, Axel; Güthoff, Claas

    2013-07-31

    Ultrasonography is regarded as the tool of choice for early diagnostic investigations in patients with suspected blunt abdominal trauma. Although its sensitivity is too low for definite exclusion of abdominal organ injury, proponents of ultrasound argue that ultrasound-based clinical pathways enhance the speed of primary trauma assessment, reduce the number of computed tomography scans and cut costs. To assess the effects of trauma algorithms that include ultrasound examinations in patients with suspected blunt abdominal trauma. We searched the Cochrane Injuries Group's Specialised Register, CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library), MEDLINE (OvidSP), EMBASE (OvidSP), CINAHL (EBSCO), publishers' databases, controlled trials registers and the Internet. Bibliographies of identified articles and conference abstracts were searched for further elligible studies. Trial authors were contacted for further information and individual patient data. The searches were updated in February 2013. randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and quasi-randomised trials (qRCTs). patients with blunt torso, abdominal or multiple trauma undergoing diagnostic investigations for abdominal organ injury. diagnostic algorithms comprising emergency ultrasonography (US). diagnostic algorithms without ultrasound examinations (for example, primary computed tomography [CT] or diagnostic peritoneal lavage [DPL]). mortality, use of CT and DPL, cost-effectiveness, laparotomy and negative laparotomy rates, delayed diagnoses, and quality of life. Two authors independently selected trials for inclusion, assessed methodological quality and extracted data. Where possible, data were pooled and relative risks (RRs), risk differences (RDs) and weighted mean differences, each with 95% confidence intervals (CIs), were calculated by fixed- or random-effects modelling, as appropriate. We identified four studies meeting our inclusion criteria. Overall, trials were of moderate methodological quality. Few trial authors responded to

  11. The utility of focused abdominal ultrasound in blunt abdominal trauma: a reappraisal.

    PubMed

    Helling, Thomas S; Wilson, Jennifer; Augustosky, Kim

    2007-12-01

    Focused assessment with sonography for trauma (FAST) has become commonplace in the management of blunt abdominal trauma. However, newer computed tomography (CT) scanners have decreased imaging time for trauma patients and provide more detailed examination of abdominal contents. It was the aim of the current study to evaluate practice patterns of FAST and abdominal CT in blunt trauma victims. This was a retrospective study of all blunt trauma patients (N = 299) who received at least 1 FAST examination in the emergency department by surgeons and were admitted. Patients were tracked for subsequent CT scanning, disposition from the emergency department, any operative findings, and survival. Twenty-one of 299 patients (7%) had a positive FAST. There were 7 deaths and 14 patients were taken directly to the operating room (OR) for control of abdominal bleeding. Thirty-one of 299 (10%) had equivocal FAST. There were 4 deaths and 8 patients were taken to the OR for control of abdominal bleeding. A total of 247 of the 299 patients had a negative FAST. CT scans were performed in 193: 15 showed a visceral injury. There were 13 deaths and 29 patients were taken to the OR (4 for bleeding). Patients with a positive FAST had a higher mortality than FAST-negative patients (P < .001) and greater likelihood for operation (P < .001). Those with equivocal FAST had a greater likelihood for operation than FAST-negative patients (P < .05). FAST examinations can identify patients at risk for hemorrhage and in whom operation may be needed and, therefore, can guide mobilization of hospital resources. FAST-negative patients can be managed expectantly, using more specific imaging techniques.

  12. 2. Newer aids in the diagnosis of blunt abdominal trauma.

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, B.

    1977-01-01

    The assessment of a case of blunt abdominal trauma can be complicated by many factors, and the resultant inaccurate or delayed diagnoses have contributed to the unacceptable mortality for this type of injury. Recently several useful diagnostic techniques have been developed that, if applied intelligently, may be instrumental in decreasing the high mortality among patients who present with ambiguous abdominal signs after sustaining blunt trauma. Although hematologic investigation and routine radiography have facilitated detection of intraperitoneal injury, peritoneal lavage has become the single most helpful aid. Scanning procedures are sometimes useful in recognizing splenic and hepatic defects especially; these may be confirmed or clarified by angiography. Although ultrasonography may be no more valuable than scintigraphy in outlining splenic and hepatic abnormalities, it is an important technique, especially in the diagnosis of retroperitoneal masses of traumatic origin. Laparoscopy also may be helpful in investigation if surgeons become more familiar with the procedure. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 FIG. 3 FIG. 4 PMID:608158

  13. Isolated gallbladder injury in a case of blunt abdominal trauma.

    PubMed

    Birn, Jeffrey; Jung, Melissa; Dearing, Mark

    2012-04-01

    The diagnosis of blunt injury to the gallbladder may constitute a significant challenge to the diagnostician. There is often a delay in presentation with non-specific clinical symptoms. In the absence of reliable clinical symptoms, diagnostic imaging becomes an invaluable tool in the rapid identification of gallbladder injury. We present a case of isolated gallbladder injury following blunt abdominal trauma which was diagnosed by computed tomography and subsequently confirmed by cholecystectomy.

  14. Isolated rupture of the gallbladder following blunt abdominal trauma: case report

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Marina Gabrielle; da Silva, Dorivaldo Lopes; Elias, Naim Carlos; Sica, Gustavo Tricta Augusto; Fávaro, Murillo de Lima; Ribeiro, Marcelo Augusto Fontenelle

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Gallbladder rupture following blunt abdominal trauma is a rare event recognized on evaluation and treatment of other visceral injuries during laparotomy. Isolated gallbladder rupture secondary to blunt abdominal trauma is even more uncommon. The clinical presentation of gallbladder injury is variable, resulting in a delay in diagnosis and treatment. We report the case of a patient who suffered an isolated gallbladder rupture due to blunt abdominal trauma. PMID:23843066

  15. [Ruptura of the thoracic esophagus due to closed abdominal trauma].

    PubMed

    Cabral Júnior, A S; Furlanetto, G; Silva, P F; Baratella, J R; Safatle, N F

    1990-01-01

    The authors present a rare case of closed abdominal trauma in a five year old girl resulting from a washtub fall on her causing three lacerations in the middle third of the esophagus, identified 48 hours after the trauma. The stitcher surgical treatment of the lacerations associated with gastrostomy and lengthy parenteral nutrition did not prevent the recurrence of the esophagus-pleural fistula, and an esophagectomy plus cervical esophagostomy was required. After a 10-month follow-up, the digestive passage was reconstructed by an esophagocoloplasty. At present, after 5 years of follow-up, the patient is cured. The authors discuss the causes of esophagus rupture in children and its etiopathogeny. They propose that preservativement the esophagus is the best initial treatment, in spite of the foot that this procedure was ineffective in the present case.

  16. Delayed Development of Multiple Pancreaticoduodenal Arcade Pseudoaneurysms after Abdominal Trauma.

    PubMed

    Prosper, Ashley; Saremi, Farhood

    2016-10-01

    This case report demonstrates development and progressive enlargement of multiple pancreaticoduodenal arcade pseudoaneurysms using computed tomography angiographies over a period of 5 weeks after abdominal trauma. The mechanism of pseudoaneurysm formation, as shown by serial imaging, attributed to preexisting celiac axis stenosis by the median arcuate ligament, posttraumatic celiac artery dissection, and secondary occlusion of proper hepatic artery resulting in elevation of pressure and flow in the pancreaticoduodenal arcade and rupture of small arterial branches. Successful pseudoaneurysm occlusion was achieved through arterial embolization. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Computed Tomography (CT) Imaging of Injuries from Blunt Abdominal Trauma: A Pictorial Essay.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Radhiana; Abd Aziz, Azian

    2010-04-01

    Blunt abdominal trauma can cause multiple internal injuries. However, these injuries are often difficult to accurately evaluate, particularly in the presence of more obvious external injuries. Computed tomography (CT) imaging is currently used to assess clinically stable patients with blunt abdominal trauma. CT can provide a rapid and accurate appraisal of the abdominal viscera, retroperitoneum and abdominal wall, as well as a limited assessment of the lower thoracic region and bony pelvis. This paper presents examples of various injuries in trauma patients depicted in abdominal CT images. We hope these images provide a resource for radiologists, surgeons and medical officers, as well as a learning tool for medical students.

  18. Emergency ultrasound-based algorithms for diagnosing blunt abdominal trauma.

    PubMed

    Stengel, Dirk; Rademacher, Grit; Ekkernkamp, Axel; Güthoff, Claas; Mutze, Sven

    2015-09-14

    Ultrasonography (performed by means of a four-quadrant, focused assessment of sonography for trauma (FAST)) is regarded as a key instrument for the initial assessment of patients with suspected blunt abdominal and thoraco-abdominal trauma in the emergency department setting. FAST has a high specificity but low sensitivity in detecting and excluding visceral injuries. Proponents of FAST argue that ultrasound-based clinical pathways enhance the speed of primary trauma assessment, reduce the number of unnecessary multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) scans, and enable quicker triage to surgical and non-surgical care. Given the proven accuracy, increasing availability of, and indication for, MDCT among patients with blunt abdominal and multiple injuries, we aimed to compile the best available evidence of the use of FAST-based assessment compared with other primary trauma assessment protocols. To assess the effects of diagnostic algorithms using ultrasonography including in FAST examinations in the emergency department in relation to the early, late, and overall mortality of patients with suspected blunt abdominal trauma. The most recent search was run on 30th June 2015. We searched the Cochrane Injuries Group Specialised Register, The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE (OvidSP), EMBASE (OvidSP), ISI Web of Science (SCI-EXPANDED, SSCI, CPCI-S, and CPSI-SSH), clinical trials registers, and screened reference lists. Trial authors were contacted for further information and individual patient data. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs). Participants were patients with blunt torso, abdominal, or multiple trauma undergoing diagnostic investigations for abdominal organ injury. The intervention was diagnostic algorithms comprising emergency ultrasonography (US). The control was diagnostic algorithms without US examinations (for example, primary computed tomography (CT) or diagnostic peritoneal lavage (DPL)). Outcomes were mortality, use of CT or invasive procedures (DPL

  19. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) in blunt abdominal trauma

    PubMed Central

    Piccolo, Claudia Lucia; Galluzzo, Michele; Ianniello, Stefania; Sessa, Barbara; Trinci, Margherita

    2016-01-01

    Baseline ultrasound is essential in the early assessment of patients with a huge haemoperitoneum undergoing an immediate abdominal surgery; nevertheless, even with a highly experienced operator, it is not sufficient to exclude parenchymal injuries. More recently, a new ultrasound technique using second generation contrast agents, named contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) has been developed. This technique allows all the vascular phase to be performed in real time, increasing ultrasound capability to detect parenchymal injuries, enhancing some qualitative findings, such as lesion extension, margins and its relationship with capsule and vessels. CEUS has been demonstrated to be almost as sensitive as contrast-enhanced CT in the detection of traumatic injuries in patients with low-energy isolated abdominal trauma, with levels of sensitivity and specificity up to 95%. Several studies demonstrated its ability to detect lesions occurring in the liver, spleen, pancreas and kidneys and also to recognize active bleeding as hyperechoic bands appearing as round or oval spots of variable size. Its role seems to be really relevant in paediatric patients, thus avoiding a routine exposure to ionizing radiation. Nevertheless, CEUS is strongly operator dependent, and it has some limitations, such as the cost of contrast media, lack of panoramicity, the difficulty to explore some deep regions and the poor ability to detect injuries to the urinary tract. On the other hand, it is timesaving, and it has several advantages, such as its portability, the safety of contrast agent, the lack to ionizing radiation exposure and therefore its repeatability, which allows follow-up of those traumas managed conservatively, especially in cases of fertile females and paediatric patients. PMID:26607647

  20. Single Versus Multiple Solid Organ Injuries Following Blunt Abdominal Trauma.

    PubMed

    El-Menyar, Ayman; Abdelrahman, Husham; Al-Hassani, Ammar; Peralta, Ruben; AbdelAziz, Hiba; Latifi, Rifat; Al-Thani, Hassan

    2017-11-01

    We aimed to describe the pattern of solid organ injuries (SOIs) and analyze the characteristics, management and outcomes based on the multiplicity of SOIs. A retrospective study in a Level 1 trauma center was conducted and included patients admitted with blunt abdominal trauma between 2011 and 2014. Data were analyzed and compared for patients with single versus multiple SOIs. A total of 504 patients with SOIs were identified with a mean age of 28 ± 13 years. The most frequently injured organ was liver (45%) followed by spleen (30%) and kidney (18%). One-fifth of patients had multiple SOIs, of that 87% had two injured organs. Patients with multiple SOIs had higher frequency of head injury and injury severity scores (p < 0.05). The majority of SOIs were treated nonoperatively, whereas operative management was required in a quarter of patients, mostly in patients with multiple SOIs (p = 0.01). Blood transfusion, sepsis and hospital stay were greater in multiple than single SOIs (p < 0.05). The overall mortality was 11% which was comparable between the two groups. In patients with single SOIs, the mortality was significantly higher in those who had pancreatic (28.6%) or hepatic injuries (13%) than the other SOIs. SOIs represent one-tenth of trauma admissions in Qatar. Although liver was the most frequently injured organ, the rate of mortality was higher in pancreatic injury. Patients with multiple SOIs had higher morbidity which required frequent operative management. Further prospective studies are needed to develop management algorithm based on the multiplicity of SOIs.

  1. Screening ultrasonography of 2,204 patients with blunt abdominal trauma in the Wenchuan earthquake.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jixiang; Huang, Jiwei; Wu, Hong; Jiang, Hui; Zhang, Heqing; Prasoon, Pankaj; Xu, Yinglong; Bai, Yannan; Qiu, Jianguo; Zeng, Yong

    2012-10-01

    Abdominal injuries constitute a small proportion of all earthquake-related traumas; however, it often resulted in fatal hemorrhage. Ultrasonography has been described as an effective triage tool in the evaluation of blunt abdominal trauma. We aimed to present an overview of the diagnostic accuracy of screening ultrasonography for patients with blunt abdominal trauma admitted to various hospitals during the Wenchuan earthquake in China. We retrospectively analyzed the patients with blunt abdominal trauma who underwent ultrasonography after admission to various hospitals. Ultrasonography findings were considered positive if evidence of free fluid or a parenchymal injury was identified. Ultrasonography findings were compared with the findings of computed tomography, diagnostic peritoneal lavage, repeated ultrasonography, cystography, operation, and/or the clinical course. Findings from 2,204 ultrasonographic examinations were evaluated. Findings of 199 ultrasonographic examinations (9.0%) were considered positive. Of the patients, 12 (0.5%) had a false-negative ultrasonographic findings; of this group, 3 (25%) required exploratory laparotomy. Ultrasonography had a sensitivity of 91.9%, specificity of 96.9%, and an accuracy of 96.6% for detection of abdominal injuries. Positive predictive value was 68.3%, and negative predictive value was 99.4%. Screening ultrasonography is highly reliable in the setting of blunt abdominal trauma after earthquake. It should be used as an initial diagnostic modality in the evaluation of most blunt abdominal trauma. Diagnostic study, level III.

  2. Abdominal injuries in a low trauma volume hospital - a descriptive study from northern Sweden

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Abdominal injuries occur relatively infrequently during trauma, and they rarely require surgical intervention. In this era of non-operative management of abdominal injuries, surgeons are seldom exposed to these patients. Consequently, surgeons may misinterpret the mechanism of injury, underestimate symptoms and radiologic findings, and delay definite treatment. Here, we determined the incidence, diagnosis, and treatment of traumatic abdominal injuries at our hospital to provide a basis for identifying potential hazards in non-operative management of patients with these injuries in a low trauma volume hospital. Methods This retrospective study included prehospital and in-hospital assessments of 110 patients that received 147 abdominal injuries from an isolated abdominal trauma (n = 70 patients) or during multiple trauma (n = 40 patients). Patients were primarily treated at the University Hospital of Umeå from January 2000 to December 2009. Results The median New Injury Severity Score was 9 (range: 1–57) for 147 abdominal injuries. Most patients (94%) received computed tomography (CT), but only 38% of patients with multiple trauma were diagnosed with CT < 60 min after emergency room arrival. Penetrating trauma caused injuries in seven patients. Solid organ injuries constituted 78% of abdominal injuries. Non-operative management succeeded in 82 patients. Surgery was performed for 28 patients, either immediately (n = 17) as result of operative management or later (n = 11), due to non-operative management failure; the latter mainly occurred with hollow viscus injuries. Patients with multiple abdominal injuries, whether associated with multiple trauma or an isolated abdominal trauma, had significantly more non-operative failures than patients with a single abdominal injury. One death occurred within 30 days. Conclusions Non-operative management of patients with abdominal injuries, except for hollow viscus injuries, was highly

  3. Splenic trauma during abdominal wall liposuction: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Harnett, Paul; Koak, Yashwant; Baker, Daryl

    2008-01-01

    Summary A 35-year-old woman collapsed 18 hours after undergoing abdominal wall liposuction. Abdominal CT scan revealed a punctured spleen. She underwent an emergency splenectomy and made an uneventful recovery. PMID:18387911

  4. A patient education tool for nonoperative management of blunt abdominal trauma.

    PubMed

    Budinger, Julie Marie

    2007-01-01

    Blunt trauma is the primary mechanism of injury seen at Charleston Area Medical Center, a rural level I trauma center. Blunt abdominal trauma occurs as a result of various mechanisms. It can be safely managed nonoperatively and is considered to be the standard of care in hemodynamically stable patients. Appropriate patient education before discharge will enable patients to identify complications early and seek appropriate medical care.

  5. Severity and treatment of "occult" intra-abdominal injuries in blunt trauma victims.

    PubMed

    Parreira, José G; Oliari, Camilla B; Malpaga, Juliano M D; Perlingeiro, Jacqueline A G; Soldá, Silvia C; Assef, José C

    2016-01-01

    to assess the severity and treatment of "occult" intra-abdominal injuries in blunt trauma victims. Retrospective analysis of charts and trauma register data of adult blunt trauma victims, admitted without abdominal pain or alterations in the abdominal physical examination, but were subsequently diagnosed with intra-abdominal injuries, in a period of 2 years. The severity was stratified according to RTS, AIS, OIS and ISS. The specific treatment for abdominal injuries and the complications related to them were assessed. Intra-abdominal injuries were diagnosed in 220 (3.8%) out of the 5785 blunt trauma victims and 76 (34.5%) met the inclusion criteria. The RTS and ISS median (lower quartile, upper quartile) were 7.84 (6.05, 7.84) and 25 (16, 34). Sixty seven percent had a GCS≥13 on admission. Injuries were identified in the spleen (34), liver (33), kidneys (9), intestines (4), diaphragm (3), bladder (3) and iliac vessels (1). Abdominal injuries scored AIS≥3 in 67% of patients. Twenty-one patients (28%) underwent laparotomy, 5 of which were nontherapeutic. The surgical procedures performed were splenectomy (8), suturing of the diaphragm (3), intestines (3), bladder (2), kidneys (1), enterectomy/anastomosis (1), ligation of the common iliac vein (1), and revascularization of the common iliac artery (1). Angiography and embolization of liver and/or spleen injuries were performed in 3 cases. Three patients developed abdominal complications, all of which were operatively treated. There were no deaths directly related to the abdominal injuries. Severe "occult" intra-abdominal injuries, requiring specific treatment, may be present in adult blunt trauma patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The Effect of Human-Immunodeficiency Virus Status on Outcomes in Penetrating Abdominal Trauma: An Interim Analysis.

    PubMed

    McPherson, Deidre; Neuhaus, Valentin; Dhar, Rohin; Edu, Sorin; Nicol, Andrew J; Navsaria, Pradeep H

    2018-01-31

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the outcomes of hemodynamically stable patients undergoing exploratory laparotomy for penetrating abdominal trauma differed as a result of their HIV status. This was an observational, prospective study from February 2016 to May 2017. All hemodynamically stable patients with penetrating abdominal trauma requiring a laparotomy were included. The mechanism of injury, the HIV status, age, the penetrating abdominal trauma index (PATI), and the revised trauma score (RTS) were entered into a binary logistic regression model. Outcome parameters were in-hospital death, morbidity, admission to intensive care unit (ICU), relaparotomy within 30 days, and length of stay longer than 30 days. A total of 209 patients, 94% male, with a mean age of 29 ± 10 years were analysed. Twenty-eight patients (13%) were HIV positive. The two groups were comparable. Ten (4.8%) laparotomies were negative. There were two (0.96%) deaths, both in the HIV negative group. The complication rate was 34% (n = 72). Twenty-nine patients (14%) were admitted to the ICU. A higher PATI, older age, and a lower RTS were significant risk factors for ICU admission. After 30 days, 12 patients (5.7%) were still in hospital. Twenty-four patients (11%) underwent a second laparotomy. The PATI score was the single independent predictor for complications, relaparotomy, and hospital stay longer than 30 days. Preliminary results reveal that HIV status does not influence outcomes in patients with penetrating abdominal trauma.

  7. Specific Radiological Findings of Traumatic Gastrointestinal Tract Injuries in Patients With Blunt Chest and Abdominal Trauma.

    PubMed

    Kokabi, Nima; Harmouche, Elie; Xing, Minzhi; Shuaib, Waqas; Mittal, Pardeep K; Wilson, Kenneth; Johnson, Jamlik-Omari; Nicolaou, Savvas; Khosa, Faisal

    2015-05-01

    Gastrointestinal hollow viscus injury after blunt chest and abdominal trauma is uncommon and complicates 0.6%-1.2% of all cases of trauma. Early recognition of such injuries significantly decreases morbidity and mortality. Since physical examination is not accurate in detecting such injuries, contrast-enhanced computed tomography has been the mainstay for diagnosis in many emergency departments. This pictorial essay aims to review the incidence, mechanisms, and signs of gastrointestinal hollow viscus injuries in the setting of blunt chest and abdominal trauma. Copyright © 2015 Canadian Association of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Rupture of a hepatic adenoma in a young woman after an abdominal trauma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Cotta-Pereira, Ricardo Lemos; Valente, Luana Ferreira; De Paula, Daniela Goncalves; Eiras-Araújo, Antônio Luís; Iglesias, Antônio Carlos

    2013-07-21

    Unlike hepatic haemorrhage following blunt abdominal trauma, spontaneous abdomen bleeding is rare, even in the presence of a hepatocellular adenoma (HA) or carcinoma. However, the diagnosis of a tumour underlying a haematoma after liver trauma is unusual, especially when it occurs more after two years after the accident. Here, we report a case of a ruptured HA due to blunt abdominal trauma. A 36-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital with sudden onset of upper abdominal pain. Her medical history revealed a blunt abdominal trauma two years prior. Initial abdominal computed tomography scan revealed a large haematoma measuring more than 16 cm in diameter in the right lobe of the liver. Magnetic resonance imaging showed haemorrhagic areas and some regions with hepatocyte hyperplasia, suggesting HA. The patient underwent right hepatic lobectomy, and a histopathological examination confirmed a diagnosis of HA. In conclusion, it is important to consider that abdominal trauma may hide old, asymptomatic and not previously detected injuries, as in the case reported.

  9. Role of ERCP in pediatric blunt abdominal trauma: a case series at a level one pediatric trauma center.

    PubMed

    Garvey, Erin M; Haakinson, Danielle J; McOmber, Mark; Notrica, David M

    2015-02-01

    There is no consensus regarding the appropriate use of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) in pediatric trauma. We report our experience with ERCP for management of pediatric pancreatic and biliary injury following blunt abdominal trauma. A retrospective chart review was performed for pediatric patients with blunt abdominal trauma from July 2008 through December 2012 at our pediatric trauma center. For patients who underwent ERCP, demographics, injury characteristics, diagnostic details, procedures performed, length of stay, total parenteral nutrition use, and complications were reviewed. There were 532 patients identified: 115 hepatic injuries, 25 pancreatic injuries and one gall bladder injury. Nine patients (mean age 7.8 years) underwent ERCP. Seven (78%) had pancreatic injuries, while two (22%) had bilateral hepatic duct injuries. The median time to diagnosis was one day (range, 0-12). Diagnostic ERCP only was performed in three patients, two of which proceeded to distal pancreatectomy. Five patients had stents placed (two biliary and three pancreatic) and four sphincterotomies were performed. Despite pancreatic stenting, one patient required distal pancreatectomy for persistent leak. Median length of stay was 11 days. Pediatric pancreatic and biliary ductal injuries following blunt abdominal trauma are uncommon. ERCP can safely provide definitive treatment for some patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. [Associated factors to non-operative management failure of hepatic and splenic lesions secondary to blunt abdominal trauma in children].

    PubMed

    Echavarria Medina, Adriana; Morales Uribe, Carlos Hernando; Echavarria R, Luis Guillermo; Vélez Marín, Viviana María; Martínez Montoya, Jorge Alberto; Aguillón, David Fernando

    2017-01-01

    The non operative management (NOM) is the standard management of splenic and liver blunt trauma in pediatric patients.Hemodynamic instability and massive transfusions have been identified as management failures. Few studies evaluate whether there exist factors allowing anticipation of these events. The objective was to identify factors associated with the failure of NOM in splenic and liver injuries for blunt abdominal trauma. Retrospective analysis between 2007-2015 of patients admitted to the pediatric surgery at University Hospital Saint Vincent Foundation with liver trauma and/or closed Spleen. 70 patients were admitted with blunt abdominal trauma, 3 were excluded for immediate surgery (2 hemodynamic instability, 1 peritoneal irritation). Of 67 patients who received NOM, 58 were successful and 9 showed failure (8 hemodynamic instability, 1 hollow viscera injury). We found 3 factors associated with failure NOM: blood pressure (BP) < 90 mmHg at admission (p = 0.0126; RR = 5.19), drop in hemoglobin (Hb) > 2 g/dl in the first 24 hours (p = 0.0009; RR = 15.3), and transfusion of 3 or more units of red blood cells (RBC) (0.00001; RR = 17.1). Mechanism and severity of trauma and Pediatric Trauma Index were not associated with failure NOM. Children with blunted hepatic or splenic trauma respond to NOM. Factors such as BP < 90 mmHg at admission, an Hb fall > 2 g/dl in the first 24 hours and transfusion of 3 or more units of RBC were associated with the failure in NOM.

  11. Analysis of urobilinogen and urine bilirubin for intra-abdominal injury in blunt trauma patients.

    PubMed

    Gorchynski, Julie; Dean, Kevin; Anderson, Craig L

    2009-05-01

    To determine the point prevalence of urine bilirubin, urine hemoglobin and urobilinogen in blunt trauma patients, and to evaluate its utility as a screening tool for intra-abdominal injury. Data analysis of 986 consecutive trauma patients of which 698 were adult blunt trauma patients. Five-hundred sixteen subjects had a urinalysis and a CT scan of the abdomen/pelvis or exploratory laparotomy. We reviewed initial urinalysis results from trauma patients in the emergency department (ED) for the presence of urine hemoglobin, uroblinogen and urine bilirubin. Computed tomography (CT) scan results and operative reports were reviewed from the trauma registry for evidence of liver laceration, spleen laceration, bowel or mesenteric injuries. There were 73 injuries and 57/516 patients (11%) with intra-abdominal injury. Urinalysis was positive for urobilinogen in 28/516 (5.4%) patients, urine bilirubin in 15/516 (2.9%) patients and urine hemoglobin in 313/516 (61%) patients. Nineteen/forty-seven (4%) subjects had liver lacerations, 28/56 (5%) splenic lacerations, and 15/5 (3%) bowel or mesenteric injury. Comparing the proportion of patients that had urobilinogen detected in the group with and without intra-abdominal injury, 8/28 (29%) subjects with urobilinogen, 5/15 (33%) subjects with bilirubin and 47/313 (15%) subjects with urine hemoglobin were found to have liver lacerations, spleen lacerations, or bowel/mesenteric injuries. Preexisting liver or biliary conditions were not statistically associated with elevation of urine bilirubin, urine hemoglobin or urobilinogen on initial urinalysis after blunt abdominal trauma. Point prevalence for urobilinogen, urine bilirubin and urine hemoglobin are 5.43% (28/516), 2.91% (15/516) and 60.7% (313/516) respectively. The utility of the initial routine urinalysis in the ED for adult blunt abdominal trauma patients should not be used as a screening tool for the evaluation of intra-abdominal injury.

  12. Delayed rupture of gallbladder following blunt abdominal trauma.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, Debajyoti; Agarwal, Himanshu; Aggarwal, Krittika; Garg, Pankaj Kumar

    2014-09-01

    A 29-year-old gentleman presented to surgery emergency with severe upper abdominal pain and vomiting. He reported to had been hit in his abdomen by a ball during a cricket match. Computerized tomogram of the abdomen revealed hematoma within the gallbladder lumen, laceration of segment six of liver, and hemoperitoneum. The patient did not agree for laparotomy advised to him, and so, managed conservatively. The patient reported back to us with high grade fever, jaundice, and painful abdominal distension after seven days of discharge from the hospital. His abdominal examination showed features of generalized peritonitis. Surgical abdominal exploration revealed a single perforation in the fundus of gallbladder with frozen calot'striangle. Subtotal cholecystectomy was done. Histopathology of excised gallbladder revealed xanthogranulomatous inflammation. The present case report highlights that early exploration and cholecystectomy should be considered in patients with gallbladder injury to obviate the risk of delayed perforation.

  13. Outcome of Blunt Abdominal Traumas with Stable Hemodynamic and Positive FAST Findings.

    PubMed

    Behboodi, Firooz; Mohtasham-Amiri, Zahra; Masjedi, Navid; Shojaie, Reza; Sadri, Peyman

    2016-01-01

    Focused assessment with sonography for trauma (FAST) is a highly effective first screening tool for initial classification of abdominal trauma patients. The present study was designed to evaluate the outcome of patients with blunt abdominal trauma and positive FAST findings. The present prospective cross-sectional study was done on patients over 7 years old with normal abdominal examination, positive FAST findings, and available abdominopelvic computed tomography (CT) scan findings. The frequency of need for laparotomy as well as its probable risk factors were calculated. 180 patients were enrolled (mean age: 28.0 ± 11.5 years; 76.7% male). FAST findings were confirmed by abdominopelvic CT scan in only 124 (68.9%) cases. Finally, 12 (6.6%) patients needed laparotomy. Mean age of those in need of laparotomy was significantly higher than others (36.75 ± 11.37 versus 27.34 ± 11.37, p = 0.006). Higher grading of spleen (p = 0.001) and hepatic (p = 0.038) ruptures increased the probability of need for laparotomy. 68.9% of the positive FAST findings in patients with blunt abdominal trauma and stable hemodynamics was confirmed by abdominopelvic CT scan and only 6.6% needed laparotomy. Simultaneous presence of free fluid and air in the abdominal area, old age, and higher grading o solid organ injuries were factors that had a significant correlation with need for laparotomy.

  14. Predictors of "occult" intra-abdominal injuries in blunt trauma patients.

    PubMed

    Parreira, José Gustavo; Malpaga, Juliano Mangini Dias; Olliari, Camilla Bilac; Perlingeiro, Jacqueline A G; Soldá, Silvia C; Assef, José Cesar

    2015-01-01

    to assess predictors of intra-abdominal injuries in blunt trauma patients admitted without abdominal pain or abnormalities on the abdomen physical examination. We conducted a retrospective analysis of trauma registry data, including adult blunt trauma patients admitted from 2008 to 2010 who sustained no abdominal pain or abnormalities on physical examination of the abdomen at admission and were submitted to computed tomography of the abdomen and/or exploratory laparotomy. Patients were assigned into: Group 1 (with intra-abdominal injuries) or Group 2 (without intra-abdominal injuries). Variables were compared between groups to identify those significantly associated with the presence of intra-abdominal injuries, adopting p<0.05 as significant. Subsequently, the variables with p<0.20 on bivariate analysis were selected to create a logistic regression model using the forward stepwise method. A total of 268 cases met the inclusion criteria. Patients in Group I were characterized as having significantly (p<0.05) lower mean AIS score for the head segment (1.0 ± 1.4 vs. 1.8 ± 1.9), as well as higher mean AIS thorax score (1.6 ± 1.7 vs. 0.9 ± 1.5) and ISS (25.7 ± 14.5 vs. 17,1 ± 13,1). The rate of abdominal injuries was significantly higher in run-over pedestrians (37.3%) and in motorcyclists (36.0%) (p<0.001). The resultant logistic regression model provided 73.5% accuracy for identifying abdominal injuries. The variables included were: motorcyclist accident as trauma mechanism (p<0.001 - OR 5.51; 95%CI 2.40-12.64), presence of rib fractures (p<0.003 - OR 3.00; 95%CI 1.47-6.14), run-over pedestrian as trauma mechanism (p=0.008 - OR 2.85; 95%CI 1.13-6.22) and abnormal neurological physical exam at admission (p=0.015 - OR 0.44; 95%CI 0.22-0.85). Intra-abdominal injuries were predominantly associated with trauma mechanism and presence of chest injuries.

  15. [Minilaparoscopy in penetrating abdominal trauma emergency room procedure with local anesthesia].

    PubMed

    Ariel, Peralta; Sebastián, Vélez; Sergio, Locicero; Nicolini, Francisco Florez

    2007-01-01

    There are a number of unnecessary laparotomies in penetrating trauma, with a non worthless percentage of complications. When the peritoneal injury is identified, surgical exploration of the abdomen should be evaluated. Evaluate the penetration of the peritoneum, using a diagnose method with direct vision. Hospital de Urgencias de Córdoba. Trauma Hospital. To evidence peritoneum trespassing, laparoscopy was performed with local anaesthesia in patients with penetrating abdominal trauma without signs of abdominal injury in the imaging methods and doubts in the physical examination, in a prospective setting. Patient with penetrating abdominal trauma, treated between May 2004 to January 2005, with doubtful diagnose of peritoneal violation. Under sedation and local anaesthesia, a 5 millimetres laparoscope with 90 degrees vision was placed at umbilicus. The anterior abdominal wall, flanks and diaphragm were exanimate, looking for the peritoneal wound or free fluid. Laparotomy could be avoided in four patients. In the four remaining, laparoscopy or conventional surgery was performed. Two presented hollow viscera injury, one hemoperitoneo and the other, minimum liver damage. There were not complications in both groups. The average hospital stay of the first group was 13 hours. In selected patients, the minilaparoscopy is useful in decreased the percentage of unnecessary laparotomies and general anaesthesia, and its complications.

  16. Gastrointestinal perforations in children: a continuing challenge to nonoperative treatment of blunt abdominal trauma.

    PubMed

    Ulman, I; Avanoğlu, A; Ozcan, C; Demircan, M; Ozok, G; Erdener, A

    1996-07-01

    The present trend towards conservative management of hemodynamically stable pediatric trauma patients may be increasing the risk of delay in the diagnosis of traumatic hollow viscus perforations (HVP). The purpose of this study is to determine whether there is a delay in the diagnosis of HVP because of expectant management. A survey of factors leading to diagnostic delay was also made and the value of current diagnostic tools were reevaluated. In 1,283 trauma admissions between 1980-1994, 34 patients were operated for HVP caused by blunt abdominal trauma. Sites of perforation were; stomach (four), duodenum (five), jejunum (12), ileum (nine), and jejunum/ileum (four). Signs of peritoneal irritation were positive in 32 of 34 patients. There was free air in only six of 24 abdominal roentgenograms. Free peritoneal fluid without solid organ injury was detected in only four out of 13 patients with ultrasound. Peritoneal lavage was diagnostic in eight of nine patients. Time from admission to operating room averaged 24 +/- 4.1 (mean +/- standard deviation) hours. Eleven patients died after the operation mostly because of accompanying head injury. Only two of the deaths were the result of sepsis originating from the perforated bowel. There is an apparent delay in the diagnosis of traumatic HVP in this series. Signs of peritoneal irritation are the most consistent findings of HVP after blunt abdominal trauma in children. Persistence of abdominal signs indicates peritoneal lavage, which has a high diagnostic sensitivity for HVP compared to other diagnostic modalities.

  17. Hollow organ perforation in blunt abdominal trauma: the role of diagnostic peritoneal lavage.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu-Chun; Hsieh, Chi-Hsun; Fu, Chih-Yuan; Yeh, Chun-Chieh; Wu, Shih-Chi; Chen, Ray-Jade

    2012-05-01

    With recent advances in radiologic diagnostic procedures, the use of diagnostic peritoneal lavage (DPL) has markedly declined. In this study, we reviewed data to reevaluate the role of DPL in the diagnosis of hollow organ perforation in patients with blunt abdominal trauma. Adult patients who had sustained blunt abdominal trauma and who were hemodynamically stable after initial resuscitation underwent an abdominal computed tomographic (CT) scan. Diagnostic peritoneal lavage was performed for patients who were indicated to receive nonoperative management and where hollow organ perforation could not be ruled out. During a 60-month period, 64 patients who had received abdominal CT scanning underwent DPL. Nineteen patients were diagnosed as having a positive DPL based on cell count ratio of 1 or higher. There were 4 patients who sustained small bowel perforation. The sensitivity and specificity of the cell count ratio for a hollow organ perforation in this study were 100% and 75%, respectively. No missed hollow organ perforations were detected. For patients with blunt abdominal trauma and hemoperitoneum who plan to receive nonoperative management, DPL is still a useful tool to exclude hollow organ perforation that is undetected by CT. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Biliary stricture due to neuroma after an innocent blunt abdominal trauma.

    PubMed

    Katsinelos, P; Dimiropoulos, S; Galanis, I; Tsolkas, P; Paroutoglu, G; Arvaniti, M; Katsiba, D; Baltaglannis, S; Pilpilidis, I; Papagiannis, A; Vaslliadis, I

    2002-10-01

    A traumatic neuroma of the biliary tract is rarely associated with biliary obstruction. However, when it arises in the common bile duct (CBD) and is associated with obstructive jaundice, it is difficult to distinguish it from bile duct cancer. We describe a patient who developed obstructive jaundice and itching, due to CBD stricture, 8 years after innocent blunt abdominal trauma. The stricture was resected and hepatico-jejunal anastomosis was performed. Histological examination revealed a traumatic neuroma and a fibrous scar around the common bile duct. Symptoms disappeared following surgical removal of the lesion. Blunt abdominal injury may cause the late onset of a fibrous scar and traumatic neuroma in the common bile duct. To our knowledge, a traumatic neuroma of the biliary tract after blunt abdominal trauma has not been reported previously. We review the clinical picture of this relatively rare problem, along with its diagnosis, pathogenesis and treatment.

  19. The Accuracy of Urinalysis in Predicting Intra-Abdominal Injury Following Blunt Traumas.

    PubMed

    Sabzghabaei, Anita; Shojaee, Majid; Safari, Saeed; Hatamabadi, Hamid Reza; Shirvani, Reza

    2016-01-01

    In cases of blunt abdominal traumas, predicting the possible intra-abdominal injuries is still a challenge for the physicians involved with these patients. Therefore, this study was designed, to evaluate the accuracy of urinalysis in predicting intra-abdominal injuries. Patients aged 15 to 65 years with blunt abdominal trauma who were admitted to emergency departments were enrolled. Abdominopelvic computed tomography (CT) scan with intravenous contrast and urinalysis were requested for all the included patients. Demographic data, trauma mechanism, the results of urinalysis, and the results of abdominopelvic CT scan were gathered. Finally, the correlation between the results of abdominopelvic CT scan, and urinalysis was determined. Urinalysis was considered positive in case of at least one positive value in gross appearance, blood in dipstick, or red blood cell count. 325 patients with blunt abdominal trauma were admitted to the emergency departments (83% male with the mean age of 32.63±17.48 years). Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, and positive and negative likelihood ratios of urinalysis, were 77.9% (95% CI: 69.6-84.4), 58.5% (95% CI: 51.2-65.5), 56% (95% CI: 48.5-63.3), 79.6% (95% CI: 71.8-85.7), 1.27% (95% CI: 1.30-1.57), and 0.25% (95% CI: 0.18-0.36), respectively. The diagnostic value of urinalysis in prediction of blunt traumatic intra-abdominal injuries is low and it seems that it should be considered as an adjuvant diagnostic tool, in conjunction with other sources such as clinical findings and imaging.

  20. Penetrating abdominal gunshot wounds caused by high-velocity missiles: a review of 51 military injuries managed at a level-3 trauma center.

    PubMed

    Gorgulu, Semih; Gencosmanoglu, Rasim; Akaoglu, Cuneyt

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to present the outcomes of military penetrating abdominal gunshot injuries, to identify factors that predict morbidity, and to compare the present results with those from two civilian trauma centers. Fifty-one consecutive patients who had suffered high-velocity gunshot wounds to the abdomen were assessed retrospectively. Penetrating abdominal trauma index, the number of injured organs, and the presence of colonic injury were significantly associated with high morbidity by univariate analysis. Multivariate analysis showed that only the number of organs injured and presence of colonic injury were independent predictors of morbidity. Our results showed that military rifle bullets do not cause greater tissue disruption than that found in wounds created by lower-velocity projectiles. The presence of colonic injury and the number of organs injured (more than three) seem to be important predictors of morbidity in penetrating abdominal gunshot wounds caused by high-velocity missiles.

  1. Paediatric blunt abdominal trauma - are we doing too many computed tomography scans?

    PubMed

    Arnold, M; Moore, S W

    2013-02-14

    Blunt abdominal trauma in childhood contributes significantly to both morbidity and mortality. Selective non-operative management of blunt abdominal trauma in children depends on both diagnostic and clinical factors. Computed tomography (CT) scanning is widely used to facilitate better management. Increased availability of CT may, however, result in its overuse in the management of blunt abdominal trauma in children, which carries significant radiation exposure risks. To evaluate the use and value of CT scanning in the overall management and outcome of blunt abdominal trauma in children in the Tygerberg Academic Hospital trauma unit, Parow, Cape Town, South Africa, before and after improved access to CT as a result of installation of a new rapid CT scanner in the trauma management area (previously the scanner had been 4 floors away). Patients aged 0 - 13 years who were referred with blunt abdominal trauma due to vehicle-related accidents before the introduction of the new CT scanner (group 1, n=66, November 2003 - March 2009) were compared with those seen in the 1-year period after the scanner was installed (group 2, n=37, April 2009 - April 2010). Details of clinical presentation, imaging results and their influence on management were retrospectively reviewed. A follow-up group was evaluated after stricter criteria for abdominal CT scanning (viz. prior evaluation by paediatric surgical personnel) were introduced (group 3, n=14, November 2011 - May 2012) to evaluate the impact of this clinical screening on the rate of negative scans. There were 66 patients in group 1 and 37 in group 2. An apparent increase in CT use with increased availability was accompanied by a marked increase in negative CT scans (38.9% compared with 6.2%; p<0.006). Despite a slightly higher prevalence of associated injuries in group 2, as well as a slightly longer length of hospital stay, there was a similar prevalence of intra-abdominal injuries detected in positive scans in the two groups

  2. Fetal head injury from intentional penetrating abdominal trauma in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Shehu, B B; Ismail, N J; Hassan, I; Mahmud, M R; Lasseini, A

    2010-01-01

    A male fetus was extruded from the uterus following multiple lower abdominal stab wounds to the mother. He was brought to the emergency room at 8 hours of age. He had sustained a compound skull fracture with brain contusion. There was no neurological deficit. Debridement and primary wound closure were undertaken. His mother had multiple lacerations to the uterus and a laceration of the fundus of the bladder. Following resuscitation, she had repair of the uterus and bladder and made an uneventful recovery. At 3 years of age, the boy is developing normally.

  3. Predicting hollow viscus injury in blunt abdominal trauma with computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Bhagvan, Savitha; Turai, Matthew; Holden, Andrew; Ng, Alexander; Civil, Ian

    2013-01-01

    Evaluation of blunt abdominal trauma is controversial. Computed tomography (CT) of the abdomen is commonly used but has limitations, especially in excluding hollow viscus injury in the presence of solid organ injury. To determine whether CT reports alone could be used to direct operative treatment in abdominal trauma, this study was undertaken. The trauma database at Auckland City Hospital was accessed for patients who had abdominal CT and subsequent laparotomy during a five-year period. The CT scans were reevaluated by a consultant radiologist who was blinded to operative findings. The CT findings were correlated with the operative findings. Between January 2002 and December 2007, 1,250 patients were evaluated for blunt abdominal injury with CT. A subset of 78 patients underwent laparotomy, and this formed the study group. The sensitivity and specificity of CT scan in predicting hollow viscus injury was 55.33 and 92.06 % respectively. The positive and negative predictive values were 61.53 and 89.23 % respectively. Presence of free fluid in CT scan was sensitive in diagnosing hollow viscus injury (90 %). Specific findings for hollow viscus injuries on CT scan were free intraperitoneal air (93 %), retroperitoneal air (100 %), oral contrast extravasation (100 %), bowel wall defect (98 %), patchy bowel enhancement (97 %), and mesenteric abnormality (94 %). CT alone cannot be used as a screening tool for hollow viscus injury. The decision to operate in hollow viscus injury has to be based on mechanism of injury and clinical findings together with radiological evidence.

  4. FAST for blunt abdominal trauma: Correlation between positive findings and admission acid-base measurement.

    PubMed

    Heidari, Kamran; Taghizadeh, Mehrdad; Mahmoudi, Sadrollah; Panahi, Hamidreza; Ghaffari Shad, Ensieh; Asadollahi, Shadi

    2017-06-01

    This study aimed to determine any association between positive findings in ultrasonography examination and initial BD value with regard to diagnosis of intra-abdominal bleeding following blunt abdominal trauma. A prospective, multi-center study of consecutive adult patients was performed from April to September 2015. Demographics, initial vital signs and arterial BD were evaluated with respect to presence of any association with intra-abdominal bleeding and in-hospital mortality. FAST study was performed to find intra-abdominal bleeding. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves tested the ability of BD to identify patients with intra-abdominal hemorrhage and probable mortality. A total of 879 patients were included in final analysis. The mean (SD) age was 36.68 (15.7) years and 714 patients (81.2%) were male. According to multivariable analysis, statistically significant association was observed between negative admission BD and both intra-abdominal bleeding (OR 3.48, 95% CI 2.06-5.88, p<0.001) and in-hospital mortality (OR 1.55, 95% CI 1.49-1.63, p<0.001). ROC curve analysis demonstrated sensitivity of 92.7% and specificity of 22.1% for the best cut-off value of BD (-8mEq/L) to diagnose internal hemorrhage. Further, a cut-off value of -7mEq/L demonstrated significant predictive performance, 94.8% sensitivity and 53.6% specificity for in-hospital mortality. This study revealed that arterial BD is an early accessible important marker to identify intra-abdominal bleeding, as well as to predict overall in-hospital mortality in patients with blunt abdominal trauma. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. A case report of pancreatic transection by blunt abdominal trauma.

    PubMed

    Braşoveanu, V; Bălescu, I; Anghel, C; Barbu, I; Ionescu, M; Bacalbaşa, N

    2014-01-01

    Posttraumatic pancreatic rupture is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Various management strategies are described, but due to the relative rarity of this pathology no standards exist. We reported a 21 years old male with post traumatic complete rupture of the pancreatic isthmus,devascularization lesion of descending duodenum, right renal artery posttraumatic thrombosis and left lobe of the liver laceration. Laparotomy for hemostasis was initially performed in a different hospital and the patient was then referred to us.Pancreaticoduodenectomy and right nephrectomy were performed. Postoperatively the patient had a pancreaticojejunal anastomosis fistula spontaneously resolved at 45 days.Pancreaticoduodenectomy can in selected cases be a solution in pancreatic trauma. Celsius.

  6. Acute transfusion-related abdominal injury in trauma patients: a case report.

    PubMed

    Michel, P; Wähnert, D; Freistühler, M; Laukoetter, M G; Rehberg, S; Raschke, M J; Garcia, P

    2016-10-19

    Secondary abdominal compartment syndrome is well known as a life-threatening complication in critically ill patients in an intensive care unit. Massive crystalloid fluid resuscitation has been identified as the most important risk factor. The time interval from hospital admittance to the development of manifest abdominal compartment syndrome is usually greater than 24 hours. In the absence of any direct abdominal trauma, we observed a rapidly evolving secondary abdominal compartment syndrome shortly after hospital admittance associated with massive transfusion of blood products and only moderate crystalloid resuscitation. We report the case of an acute secondary abdominal compartment syndrome developing within 3 to 4 hours in a 74-year-old polytraumatized white woman. Although multiple fractures of her extremities and a B-type pelvic ring fracture were diagnosed by a full body computed tomography scan, no intra-abdominal injury could be detected. Hemorrhagic shock with a drop in her hemoglobin level to 5.7 g/dl was treated by massive transfusion of blood products and high doses of catecholamines. Shortly afterwards, her pulmonary gas exchange progressively deteriorated and mechanical ventilation became almost impossible with peak airway pressures of up to 60 cmH 2 O. Her abdomen appeared rigid and tense accompanied by a progressive hemodynamic decompensation necessitating mechanic cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Although preoperative computed tomography scans showed no signs of intra-abdominal fluid, a decompressive laparotomy under cardiopulmonary resuscitation conditions was performed and 2 liters of ascites-like fluid disgorged. Her hemodynamics and pulmonary ventilation improved immediately. This case report describes for the first time acute secondary abdominal compartment syndrome in a trauma patient, evolving in a very short time period. We hypothesize that the massive transfusion of blood products along with high doses of catecholamines triggered the acute

  7. Scanning and War: Utility of FAST and CT in the Assessment of Battlefield Abdominal Trauma.

    PubMed

    Smith, Iain M; Naumann, David N; Marsden, Max E R; Ballard, Mark; Bowley, Douglas M

    2015-08-01

    To determine utilization and accuracy of focused assessment with sonography for trauma (FAST) and computed tomography (CT) in a mature military trauma system to inform service provision for future conflicts. FAST and CT scans undertaken by attending radiologists contribute to surgical decision making for battlefield casualties at the Joint Force, Role 3 Medical Treatment Facility at Camp Bastion (R3), Afghanistan. Registry data for abdominally injured casualties treated at R3 from July to November 2012 were matched to radiological and surgical records to determine diagnostic accuracy for FAST and CT and their influence on casualty management. A total of 468 casualties met inclusion criteria, of whom 85.0% underwent FAST and 86.1% abdominal CT; 159 (34.0%) had abdominal injuries. For detection of intra-abdominal injury, FAST sensitivity (Sn) was 0.56, specificity (Sp) 0.98, positive predictive value (PPV) 0.87, negative predictive value (NPV) 0.90, and accuracy (Acc) 0.89. For CT, Sn was 0.99, Sp 0.99, PPV 0.96, NPV 1.00, and Acc 0.99. Forty-six solid organ injuries were identified in 38 patients by CT; 17 were managed nonoperatively. A further 61 patients avoided laparotomy after CT confirmed extra-abdominal wounds only. The negative laparotomy rate was 3.9%. FAST and CT contribute to triage, guide surgical management, and reduce nontherapeutic laparotomy. When imaging is available, these data challenge current doctrine about inadvisability of nonoperative management of abdominal injury after combat trauma.

  8. Hepatic enzymes have a role in the diagnosis of hepatic injury after blunt abdominal trauma.

    PubMed

    Tan, Ker-Kan; Bang, Shieh-Ling; Vijayan, Appasamy; Chiu, Ming-Terk

    2009-09-01

    Delayed diagnosis of patients with severe liver injuries is associated with an adverse outcome. As computed tomographic (CT) scan is not always available in the management of blunt abdominal trauma worldwide, the present study was undertaken to determine the accuracy of selected haematological markers in predicting the presence of hepatic injury and its severity after blunt abdominal trauma. A retrospective review of all patients with blunt abdominal trauma presented to our institution over a 3-year period was performed. Patients were excluded if they suffered penetrating injuries, died in the emergency department or if the required blood tests were not performed within 24h of the accident. The grading of the hepatic injury was verified using CT scans or surgical findings. Ninety-nine patients with blunt abdominal trauma had the required blood tests performed and were included in the study. The median injury severity score was 24 (range 4-75). Fifty-five patients had hepatic injuries, of which 47.3% were minor (Grades I and II) while 52.7% had major hepatic injuries (Grades III-V). There were no patients with Grade VI injuries. A raised ALT was strongly associated with presence of hepatic injuries (OR, 109.8; 95% CI, 25.81-466.9). This relation was also seen in patients with raised AST>2 times (OR, 21.33; 95% CI, 7.27-62.65). This difference was not seen in both bilirubin and ALP. ALT>2 times normal was associated with major hepatic injuries (OR, 7.15; 95% CI, 1.38-37.14; p=0.012) while patients with simultaneous raised AST>2 times and ALT>2 times had a stronger association for major hepatic injuries (OR, 8.44; 95% CI, 1.64-43.47). Abnormal transaminases levels are associated with hepatic injuries after blunt abdominal trauma. Patients with ALT and AST>2 times normal should be assumed to possess major hepatic trauma and managed accordingly. Patients with normal ALT, AST and LDH are unlikely to have major liver injuries.

  9. Injuries to the colon from blast effect of penetrating extra-peritoneal thoraco-abdominal trauma.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Om P; Oswanski, Michael F; White, Patrick W

    2004-03-01

    Although rare, blast injury to the intestine can result from penetrating thoraco-abdominal extra-peritoneal gunshot (and shotgun) wounds despite the absence of injury to the diaphragm or to the peritoneum. Injuries of the spleen, small intestine and the mesentery by this mechanism have been previously reported in the world literature. This paper reports the first two cases of non-penetrating ballistic trauma to the colon.

  10. THE ROLE OF LAPAROSCOPY IN BLUNT ABDOMINAL TRAUMA: DIAGNOSTIC, THERAPEUTIC OR BOTH?

    PubMed

    Koto, M Z; Mosai, F; Matsevych, O Y

    2017-06-01

    The use of laparoscopy in blunt abdominal trauma is gaining popularity as a useful diagnostic tool to avoid unnecessary laparotomies where there is diagnostic dilemma. But the feasibility of using laparoscopy for therapeutic intervention in these patients has been debated. Even though recent case reports seem to suggest that these patients can be managed using laparoscopy, the practice is not yet wildly adopted. A retrospective analysis of a prospectively collected data was done. All adult patients who presented with abdominal trauma and were offered laparoscopic surgery at Dr George Mukhari Academic Hospital (DGMAH) from 2012 to 2015 were reviewed. Data was retrieved from our departmental database and analysed using descriptive statistics. A total of 318 patients were reviewed and 35 patients had blunt abdominal trauma and were included in the study. All the patients were offered laparoscopy. The median age was 30, with 91% of our patients males. The highest injury severity score calculated was 38. At least 77% of the patients were managed using laparoscopy. This includes 43% who had both diagnostic and therapeutic intervention and 34% who had only diagnostic laparoscopy. Eight patients were converted to open surgery mainly due to active bleeding and complex injuries. We did not have any non-therapeutic laparotomies. There was no documented procedure‑related morbidity and mortality. The positive outcomes seen from the study suggest that laparoscopy can be safe and feasible in both diagnostic and therapeutic interventions in carefully selected blunt abdominal trauma patients. A conversion to open surgery should not be regarded as a failure but rather as a sign of mature and sound clinical judgement acknowledging the limitations of laparoscopy and/or the surgeon.

  11. THE ROLE OF LAPAROSCOPY IN BLUNT ABDOMINAL TRAUMA: DIAGNOSTIC, THERAPEUTIC OR BOTH?

    PubMed

    Mosai, F

    2017-09-01

    The use of laparoscopy in blunt abdominal trauma is gaining popularity as a useful diagnostic tool to avoid unnecessary laparotomies where there is diagnostic dilemma. But the feasibility of using laparoscopy for therapeutic intervention in these patients has been debated. Even though recent case reports seem to suggest that these patients can be managed using laparoscopy, the practice is not yet wildly adopted. A retrospective analysis of a prospectively collected data was done. All adult patients who presented with abdominal trauma and were offered laparoscopic surgery at DGMAH from 2012 to 2015 were reviewed. Data was retrieved from our departmental database and analysed using descriptive statistics. A total of 318 patients were reviewed and 35 patients had blunt abdominal trauma and were included in the study. All the patients were offered laparoscopy. The median age was 30, with 91% of our patients being males. The highest injury severity score calculated was 38. At least 77% of the patients were managed using laparoscopy. This includes 43% who had both diagnostic and therapeutic intervention and 34% had only diagnostic laparoscopy. Eight patients were converted to open surgery mainly due to active bleeding and complex injuries. We did not have any non-therapeutic laparotomies, with no documented procedure related morbidity and mortality. The positive outcomes seen from the study suggest that laparoscopy can be safe and feasible in both diagnostic and therapeutic interventions in carefully selected blunt abdominal trauma patients. A conversion to open surgery should not be regarded as a failure but rather as a sign of mature and sound clinical judgement acknowledging the limitations of laparoscopy and/or the surgeon.

  12. [The mechanisms of formation of liver injuries associated with the blunt abdominal trauma].

    PubMed

    Pigolkin, Iu I; Dubrovina, I A; Dubrovin, I A

    2012-01-01

    The mechanisms of liver damage associated with the blunt abdominal trauma are considered based on the analysis of the literature publications. The general characteristic of these mechanisms and the processes underlying the development of liver injuries is presented. It is argued that the mechanisms underlying the formation of damages to the liver differ depending on the form of the traumatic impact, the injurious factor, and the processes leading to the destruction of the hepatic tissue. The main forms of traumatic impact in the case of a blunt abdominal trauma include the strike (blow), pressure, and concussion of the organ while the major traumatic factors are deformation, displacement, and "shock-resistant effects". The mechanisms underlying tissue destruction are compression and stretching. These two mechanisms are responsible for the formation of different variants of liver destruction. The results of the study suggest the necessity of the search for other mechanisms of degradation of the hepatic tissue following a blunt abdominal trauma for the improvement of forensic medical diagnostics of its cause and the underlying mechanism.

  13. Angiographic embolization in the treatment of intrahepatic arterial bleeding in patients with blunt abdominal trauma.

    PubMed

    Kong, Ya-Lin; Zhang, Hong-Yi; He, Xiao-Jun; Zhao, Gang; Liu, Cheng-Li; Xiao, Mei; Zhen, Yu-Ying

    2014-04-01

    Angiographic embolization (AE) as an adjunct non-operative treatment of intrahepatic arterial bleeding has been widely used. The present study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of selective AE in patients with hepatic trauma. Seventy patients with intrahepatic arterial bleeding after blunt abdominal trauma who had undergone selective AE in 10 years at this institution were retrospectively reviewed. The criteria for selective AE included active extravasation on contrast-enhanced CT, an episode of hypotension or a decrease in hemoglobin level during the non-operative treatment. The data of the patients included demographics, grade of liver injuries, mechanism of blunt abdominal trauma, associated intra-abdominal injuries, indications for AE, angiographic findings, type of AE, and AE-related hepatobiliary complications. In the 70 patients, 32 (45.71%) had high-grade liver injuries. Extravazation during the early arterial phase mainly involved the right hepatic segments. Thirteen (18.57%) patients underwent embolization of intrahepatic branches and the extrahepatic trunk and these patients all developed AE-related hepatobiliary complications. In 19 patients with AE-related complications, 14 received minimally invasive treatment and recovered without severe sequelae. AE is an adjunct treatment for liver injuries. Selective and/or super-selective AE should be advocated to decrease the incidence and severity of AE-related hepatobiliary complications.

  14. Barriers Against Implementing Blunt Abdominal Trauma Guidelines in a Hospital: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Zaboli, Rouhollah; Tofighi, Shahram; Aghighi, Ali; Shokouh, Seyyed Javad Hosaini; Naraghi, Nader; Goodarzi, Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Clinical practice guidelines are structured recommendations that help physicians and patients to make proper decisions when dealing with a specific clinical condition. Because blunt abdominal trauma causes a various range of mild, single-system, and multisystem injuries, early detection will help to reduce mortality and resulting disability. Emergency treatment should be initiated based on CPGs. This study aimed to determine the variables affecting implementing blunt abdominal trauma CPGs in an Iranian hospital. Methods This study was conducted as a qualitative and phenomenology study in the Family Hospital in Tehran (Iran) in 2015. The research population included eight experts and key people in the area of blunt abdominal trauma clinical practice guidelines. Sampling was based on purposive and nonrandom methods. A semistructured interview was done for the data collection. A framework method was applied for the data analysis by using Atlas.ti software. Results After framework analyzing and various reviewing and deleting and combining the codes from 251 codes obtained, 15 families and five super families were extracted, including technical knowledge barriers, economical barriers, barriers related to deployment and monitoring, political will barriers, and managing barriers. Conclusion Structural reform is needed for eliminating the defects available in the healthcare system. As with most of the codes, subconcepts and concepts are classified into the field of human resources; it seems that the education and knowledge will be more important than other resources such as capital and equipment. PMID:27757191

  15. Barriers Against Implementing Blunt Abdominal Trauma Guidelines in a Hospital: A Qualitative Study.

    PubMed

    Zaboli, Rouhollah; Tofighi, Shahram; Aghighi, Ali; Shokouh, Seyyed Javad Hosaini; Naraghi, Nader; Goodarzi, Hassan

    2016-08-01

    Clinical practice guidelines are structured recommendations that help physicians and patients to make proper decisions when dealing with a specific clinical condition. Because blunt abdominal trauma causes a various range of mild, single-system, and multisystem injuries, early detection will help to reduce mortality and resulting disability. Emergency treatment should be initiated based on CPGs. This study aimed to determine the variables affecting implementing blunt abdominal trauma CPGs in an Iranian hospital. This study was conducted as a qualitative and phenomenology study in the Family Hospital in Tehran (Iran) in 2015. The research population included eight experts and key people in the area of blunt abdominal trauma clinical practice guidelines. Sampling was based on purposive and nonrandom methods. A semistructured interview was done for the data collection. A framework method was applied for the data analysis by using Atlas.ti software. After framework analyzing and various reviewing and deleting and combining the codes from 251 codes obtained, 15 families and five super families were extracted, including technical knowledge barriers, economical barriers, barriers related to deployment and monitoring, political will barriers, and managing barriers. Structural reform is needed for eliminating the defects available in the healthcare system. As with most of the codes, subconcepts and concepts are classified into the field of human resources; it seems that the education and knowledge will be more important than other resources such as capital and equipment.

  16. [Spleen-preserving surgery after blunt abdominal trauma with splenic hilum involvement].

    PubMed

    Navas-Cuéllar, José Aurelio; Cañete-Gómez, Jesús; López-Bernal, Francisco; García-Rivera, Carla; Pareja-Ciuró, Felipe; Padillo-Ruiz, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Splenic involvement secondary to blunt abdominal trauma is often treated by performing a splenectomy. The severity of the post-splenectomy syndrome is currently well known (blood loss, sepsis), so there is an increasing tendency to preserve the spleen. The case is presented of splenic preservation after blunt abdominal trauma with hilum involvement, emphasising the role of Floseal as a haemostatic agent, as well as the use of resorbable meshes to preserve the spleen. A 22-year-old woman presenting with a grade IV splenic lesion secondary to a blunt abdominal trauma after a traffic accident. Partial splenic resection was performed and bleeding was controlled with Floseal and use of a reinforcing polyglycolic acid mesh. No postoperative complications occurred, being discharged on day 5. The long-term follow-up has been uneventful. The use of haemostatic agents such as thrombin and the gelatine gel (FloSeal) and the use of polyglycolic acid meshes enable spleen-preserving surgery, making it a feasible and reproducible procedure and an alternative to classical splenectomy. Copyright © 2015 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  17. [Diagnostic management in paediatric blunt abdominal trauma - a systematic review with metaanalysis].

    PubMed

    Schöneberg, C; Tampier, S; Hussmann, B; Lendemans, S; Waydhas, C

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this systematic review was to investigate the diagnostic management in paediatric blunt abdominal injuries. A literature research was performed using following sources: MEDLINE, Embase and Cochrane. Where it was possible a meta-analysis was performed. Furthermore the level of evidence for all publications was assigned. Indicators for intraabdominal injury (IAI) were elevated liver transaminases, abnormal abdominal examinations, low systolic blood pressure, reduced haematocrit and microhematuria. Detecting IAI with focused assessment with sonography for trauma (FAST) had an overall sensitivity of 56.5 %, a specificity of 94.68 %, a positive likelihood ratio of 10.63 and a negative likelihood ratio of 0.46. The accuracy was 84.02 %. Among haemodynamically unstable children the sensitivity and specificity were 100 %. The overall prevalence of IAI and negative CT was 0.19 %. The NPV of abdominal CT for diagnosing IAI was 99.8 %. The laparotomy rate in patients with isolated intraperitoneal fluid (IIF) in one location was 3.48 % and 56.52 % in patients with IIF in more than one location. FAST as an isolated tool in the diagnostics after blunt abdominal injury is very uncertain, because of the modest sensitivity. Discharging children after blunt abdominal trauma with a negative abdominal CT scan seems to be safe. When IIF is detected on CT scan, it depends on the number of locations involved. If IIF is found only in 1 location, IAI is uncommon, while IIF in two or more locations results in a high laparotomy rate. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  18. Seatbelt sign in a case of blunt abdominal trauma; what lies beneath it?

    PubMed

    Vailas, Michail G; Moris, Demetrios; Orfanos, Stamatios; Vergadis, Chrysovalantis; Papalampros, Alexandros

    2015-10-30

    The reported incidence of hollow viscus injuries (HVI) in blunt trauma patients is approximately 1%. The most common site of injury to the intestine in blunt abdominal trauma (BAT) is the small bowel followed by colon, with mesenteric injuries occurring three times more commonly than bowel injuries. Isolated colon injury is a rarely encountered condition. Clinical assessment alone in patients with suspected intestinal or mesenteric injury after blunt trauma is associated with unacceptable diagnostic delays. This is a case of a 31-year-old man, admitted to the emergency department after being the restrained driver, involved in a car accident. After initial resuscitation, focused assessment with sonography for trauma examination (FAST) was performed revealing a subhepatic mass, suspicious for intraperitoneal hematoma. A computed tomography scan (CT) that followed showed a hematoma of the mesocolon of the ascending colon with active extravasation of intravenous contrast material. An exploratory laparotomy was performed, hemoperitomeum was evacuated, and a subserosal hematoma of the cecum and ascending colon with areas of totally disrupted serosal wall was found. Hematoma of the adjacent mesocolon expanding to the root of mesenteric vessels was also noted. A right hemicolectomy along with primary ileocolonic anastomosis was performed. Patient's recovery progressed uneventfully. Identifying an isolated traumatic injury to the bowel or mesentery after BAT can be a clinical challenge because of its subtle and nonspecific clinical findings; meeting that challenge may eventually lead to a delay in diagnosis and treatment with subsequent increase in associated morbidity and mortality. Isolated colon injury is a rare finding after blunt trauma and usually accompanied by other intra-abdominal organ injuries. Abdominal 'seatbelt' sign, ecchymosis of the abdominal wall, increasing abdominal pain and distension are all associated with HVI. However, the accuracy of these findings

  19. New scoring system for intra-abdominal injury diagnosis after blunt trauma.

    PubMed

    Shojaee, Majid; Faridaalaee, Gholamreza; Yousefifard, Mahmoud; Yaseri, Mehdi; Arhami Dolatabadi, Ali; Sabzghabaei, Anita; Malekirastekenari, Ali

    2014-01-01

    An accurate scoring system for intra-abdominal injury (IAI) based on clinical manifestation and examination may decrease unnecessary CT scans, save time, and reduce healthcare cost. This study is designed to provide a new scoring system for a better diagnosis of IAI after blunt trauma. This prospective observational study was performed from April 2011 to October 2012 on patients aged above 18 years and suspected with blunt abdominal trauma (BAT) admitted to the emergency department (ED) of Imam Hussein Hospital and Shohadaye Hafte Tir Hospital. All patients were assessed and treated based on Advanced Trauma Life Support and ED protocol. Diagnosis was done according to CT scan findings, which was considered as the gold standard. Data were gathered based on patient's history, physical exam, ultrasound and CT scan findings by a general practitioner who was not blind to this study. Chi-square test and logistic regression were done. Factors with significant relationship with CT scan were imported in multivariate regression models, where a coefficient (β) was given based on the contribution of each of them. Scoring system was developed based on the obtained total β of each factor. Altogether 261 patients (80.1% male) were enrolled (48 cases of IAI). A 24-point blunt abdominal trauma scoring system (BATSS) was developed. Patients were divided into three groups including low (score<8), moderate (8≤score<12) and high risk (score≥12). In high risk group immediate laparotomy should be done, moderate group needs further assessments, and low risk group should be kept under observation. Low risk patients did not show positive CT-scans (specificity 100%). Conversely, all high risk patients had positive CT-scan findings (sensitivity 100%). The receiver operating characteristic curve indicated a close relationship between the results of CT scan and BATSS (sensitivity=99.3%). The present scoring system furnishes a high precision and reproducible diagnostic tool for BAT

  20. Abdominal injuries in a major Scandinavian trauma center – performance assessment over an 8 year period

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Damage control surgery and damage control resuscitation have reduced mortality in patients with severe abdominal injuries. The shift towards non-operative management in haemodynamically stable patients suffering blunt abdominal trauma has further contributed to the improved results. However, in many countries, low volume of trauma cases and limited exposure to trauma laparotomies constitute a threat to trauma competence. The aim of this study was to evaluate the institutional patient volume and performance for patients with abdominal injuries over an eight-year period. Methods Data from 955 consecutive trauma patients admitted in Oslo University Hospital Ulleval with abdominal injuries during the eight-year period 2002-2009 were retrospectively explored. A separate analysis was performed on all trauma patients undergoing laparotomy during the same period, whether abdominal injuries were identified or not. Variable life-adjusted display (VLAD) was used in order to describe risk-adjusted survival trends throughout the period and the patients admitted before (Period 1) and after (Period 2) the institution of a formal Trauma Service (2005) were compared. Results There was a steady increase in admitted patients with abdominal injuries, while the number of patients undergoing laparotomy was constant exposing the surgical trauma team leaders to an average of 8 trauma laparotomies per year. No increase in missed injuries or failures of non-operative management was detected. Unadjusted mortality rates decreased from period 1 to period 2 for all patients with abdominal injuries as well as for the patients undergoing laparotomy. However, this apparent decrease was not confirmed as significant in TRISS-based analysis of risk-adjusted mortality. VLAD demonstrated a steady performance throughout the study period. Conclusion Even in a high volume trauma center the exposure to abdominal injuries and trauma laparotomies is limited. Due to increasing NOM, an increasing

  1. Stress, abdominal obesity and intrarenal resistive index in essential hypertension.

    PubMed

    Trovato, G M; Pace, P; Martines, G F; Trovato, F M; Pirri, C; Catalano, D

    2012-07-01

    Although it is commonly believed that a strong causal link exists between psychological stress and hypertension, as well with other factors, such as obesity, just what kind of empirical evidence supports this assumption is still controversial. The aim of the study is to investigate if perceived stress have any interference with intrarenal resistance and hence with mechanisms related to Essential Hypertension (EH) and if Anxiety, Depression, Self efficacy and Illness Perception can account for perceived stress. Obesity, insulin resistance (HOMA), Doppler Renal Resistive Index (RRI) and glomerular filtration rate (GFR) are studied along with Psychological Stress Measure (PSM), Illness Perception Questionnaire (IPQ-R), Generalized Self-Efficacy scale (GSE) and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) in 119 hypertensive patients referred for stable lasting EH, and 150 normal controls. Lower salt/lower calories Mediterranean diet, physical activity increase and smoking withdrawal counseling were provided. By Odds Ratios, higher risk of EH is associated with greater perceived stress, older age, lower GFR, obesity, greater RRI and insulin resistance. By Multiple Linear Regression the most significant variable that accounts for higher RRI are abdominal obesity and arterial pulse pressure; the only significant independent psychological variable that accounts for abdominal obesity are PSM and identity IPQ subscale. Self-Efficacy anxiety and Illness perception subscales (IPQr), accounts significantly for 62.0% of the variance to PSM, with possible effects on RRI and on the pathophysiological hypertension cascade. Worst identity and treatment control perceptions of EH, and a lower self-efficacy are the main psychological factors accounting for a greater stress. Interventions aimed to reduce perceived stress can be warranted in EH.

  2. Do we really rely on fast for decision-making in the management of blunt abdominal trauma?

    PubMed

    Carter, Jeffrey W; Falco, Mark H; Chopko, Michael S; Flynn, William J; Wiles Iii, Charles E; Guo, Weidun Alan

    2015-05-01

    The Focused Assessment with Sonography in Trauma examination (FAST) is currently taught and recommended in the ATLS(®), often as an addendum to the primary survey for patients with blunt abdominal trauma. Although it is non-invasive and rapidly performed at bedside, the utility of FAST in blunt abdominal trauma has been questioned. We designed this study to examine our hypothesis that FAST is not an efficacious screening tool for identifying intra-abdominal injuries. We performed a retrospective chart review of all patients with confirmatory diagnosis of blunt abdominal injuries with CT and/or laparotomy for a period of 1.5 years (from 7/2009 to 11/2010). FAST was performed by ED residents and considered positive when free intra-abdominal fluid was visualized. Abdominal CT, or exploratory laparotomy findings were used as confirmation of intra-abdominal injury. A total of 1671 blunt trauma patients were admitted to and evaluated in the Emergency Department during a 1½ year period and 146 patients were confirmed intra-abdominal injuries by CT and/or laparotomy. Intraoperative findings include injuries to the liver, spleen, kidneys, and bowels. In 114 hemodynamically stable patients, FAST was positive in 25 patients, with a sensitivity of 22%. In 32 hemodynamically unstable patients, FAST was positive in 9 patients, with a sensitivity of 28%. A free peritoneal fluid and splenic injury are associated with a positive FAST on univariate analysis, and are the independent predictors for a positive FAST on multiple logistic regression. FAST has a very low sensitivity in detecting blunt intraabdominal injury. In hemodynamically stable patients, a negative FAST without a CT may result in missed intra-abdominal injuries. In hemodynamically unstable blunt trauma patients, with clear physical findings on examination, the decision for exploratory laparotomy should not be distracted by a negative FAST. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Randomized clinical trial of ligasure™ versus conventional splenectomy for injured spleen in blunt abdominal trauma.

    PubMed

    Amirkazem, Vejdan Seyyed; Malihe, Khosravi

    2017-02-01

    Spleen is the most common organ damaged in cases of blunt abdominal trauma and splenectomy and splenorrhaphy are the main surgical procedures that are used in surgical treatment of such cases. In routine open splenectomy cases, after laparotomy, application of sutures in splenic vasculature is the most widely used procedure to cease the bleeding. This clinical trial evaluates the role and benefits of the Ligasure™ system in traumatic splenectomy without using any suture materials and compares the result with conventional method of splenectomy. After making decision for splenectomy secondary to a blunt abdominal trauma, patients in control group (39) underwent splenectomy using conventional method with silk suture ligation of splenic vasculature. In the interventional group (41) a Ligasure™ vascular sealing system was used for ligating of the splenic vein and artery. The results of operation time, volume of intra-operation bleeding and post-operative complications were compared in both groups. The mean operation times in control and interventional group were 21 and 12 min respectively (p < 0.05). The average volume of bleeding in control group during open splenectomy was 280 cc, but in the interventional group decreased significantly to 80 ml (p < 0.05) using the Ligasure system. Post-operative complications such as bleeding were non-existent in both groups. The application of Ligasure™ in blunt abdominal trauma for splenectomy not only can decrease the operation time but also can decrease the volume of bleeding during operation without any additional increase in post-operative complications. This method is recommendable in traumatic splenic injuries that require splenectomy in order to control the bleeding as opposed to use of traditional silk sutures. Copyright © 2016 IJS Publishing Group Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. [Posttraumatic retroperitoneal hematoma in injured persons with severe closed multiple and combined abdominal trauma].

    PubMed

    Rylov, A I; Kravets, N S

    2001-01-01

    The experience of treatment of 69 injured persons with posttraumatic retroperitoneal hematoma suffering severe multiple combined abdominal trauma was analyzed. Application of the classification proposed permits to formulate diagnosis and to choose the tactic of treatment correctly. The intraoperative tactics algorithm was elaborated. It promotes the correct analysis of intraoperative findings and reduction of the diagnostic mistakes frequency as well. In the presence of vast defect, making impossible to suture over the parietal peritoneum, extraperitonization using cerebral dura mater was done. Operative intervention was concluded by drainage with subsequent laserotherapy.

  5. Isolated free intra-abdominal fluid on CT in blunt trauma: The continued diagnostic dilemma.

    PubMed

    Kong, Victor Y; Jeetoo, Damon; Naidoo, Leah C; Oosthuizen, George V; Clarke, Damian L

    2015-01-01

    The clinical significance of isolated free fluid (FF) without solid organ injury on computed to- mography (CT) continues to pose significant dilemma in the management of patients with blunt abdominal trauma (BAT). We reviewed the incidence of FF and the clinical outcome amongst patients with blunt abdominal trauma in a metropolitan trauma service in South Africa. We performed a retrospective study of 121 consecutive CT scans over a period of 12 months to determine the incidence of isolated FF and the clinical outcome of patients managed in a large metropolitan trauma service. Of the 121 CTs, FF was identified in 36 patients (30%). Seven patients (6%) had isolated FF. Of the 29 patients who had free fluid and associated organ injuries, 33 organ injuries were identified. 86% (25/ 29) of all 29 patients had a single organ injury and 14% had multiple organ injuries. There were 26 solid organ injuries and 7 hollow organ injuries. The 33 organs injured were: spleen, 12; liver, 8; kidney, 5; pancreas, 2; small bowel, 4; duodenum, 1. Six (21%) patients required operative management for small bowel perforations in 4 cases and pancreatic tail injury in 2 cases. All 7 patients with isolated FF were initially observed, and 3 (43%) were eventually subjected to operative intervention. They were found to have an intra-peritoneal bladder rupture in 1 case, a non-expanding zone 3 haematoma in 1 case, and a negative laparotomy in 1 case. Four (57%) patients were successfully managed without surgical interventions. Isolated FF is uncommon and the clinical significance remains unclear. Provided that reli- able serial physical examination can be performed by experienced surgeons, an initial non-operative approach should be considered.

  6. Hepatic and splenic blush on computed tomography in children following blunt abdominal trauma: Is intervention necessary?

    PubMed

    Ingram, Martha-Conley E; Siddharthan, Ragavan V; Morris, Andrew D; Hill, Sarah J; Travers, Curtis D; McKracken, Courtney E; Heiss, Kurt F; Raval, Mehul V; Santore, Matthew T

    2016-08-01

    There are no widely accepted guidelines for management of pediatric patients who have evidence of solid organ contrast extravasation ("blush") on computed tomography (CT) scans following blunt abdominal trauma. We report our experience as a Level 1 pediatric trauma center in managing cases with hepatic and splenic blush. All pediatric blunt abdominal trauma cases resulting in liver or splenic injury were queried from 2008 to 2014. Patients were excluded if a CT was unavailable in the medical record. The presence of contrast blush was based on final reports from attending pediatric radiologists. Correlations between incidence of contrast blush and major outcomes of interest were determined using χ and Wilcoxon rank-sum tests for categorical and continuous variables, respectively, evaluating statistical significance at p < 0.05. Of 318 patients with splenic or liver injury after blunt abdominal trauma, we report on 30 patients (9%) with solid organ blush, resulting in 18 cases of hepatic blush and 16 cases of splenic blush (four patients had extravasation from both organs). Blush was not found to correlate significantly with age, gender, or type of injury (liver vs. splenic) but was found to associate with higher grades of solid organ injury (p = 0.002) and higher ISS overall (p < 0.001). Patients with contrast blush on imaging were more likely to be admitted to the intensive care unit (90% vs. 41%, p < 0.001), receive blood products, (50% vs. 12%, p < 0.001), and be considered for an intervention (p < 0.001). Eighty percent of patients with an isolated contrast blush of the spleen or liver did not require an operation. Only 17% of patients with blush required definitive treatment, such as embolization (n = 1), packing (n = 1), or splenectomy (n = 3). Blush had no significant correlation with overall survival (p = 0.13). The finding of a blush on CT from a splenic or liver injury is associated with higher grade of injury. These patients receive intensive medical

  7. The role of follow-up ultrasound and clinical parameters after abdominal MDCT in patients with multiple trauma.

    PubMed

    Geyer, Lucas L; Körner, M; Linsenmaier, U; Wirth, S; Reiser, M F; Meindl, T

    2014-05-01

    Beside its value during the initial trauma work-up (focused assessment with sonography for trauma), ultrasound (US) is recommended for early follow-up examinations of the abdomen in multiple injured patients. However, multidetector CT (MDCT) has proven to reliably diagnose traumatic lesions of abdominal organs, to depict their extent, and to assess their clinical relevance. To evaluate the diagnostic impact of follow-up US studies after MDCT of the abdomen and to identify possible clinical parameters indicating the need of a follow-up US. During a 30-month period, patients with suspected multiple trauma were allocated. Patients with admission to the ICU, an initial abdominal MDCT scan, and an US follow-up examination after 6 and 24 h were included. Two patient cohorts were defined: patients with normal abdominal MDCT (group 1), patients with trauma-related pathologic abdominal MDCT (group 2). In all patients, parameters indicating alteration of vital functions or hemorrhage within the first 24 h were obtained by reviewing the medical charts. Forty-four of 193 patients were included: 24 were categorized in group 1 (mean age, 41.1 years; range, 21-90 years), 20 in group 2 (mean age, 36.6 years; range, 16-71 years). In group 1, US did not provide new information compared to emergency MDCT. In group 2, there were no contradictory 6- and 24-h follow-up US findings. In patients with positive MDCT findings and alterations of clinical parameters, US did not detect progression of a previously diagnosed pathology or any late manifestation of such a lesion. In none of the patients with negative abdominal MDCT and pathological clinical parameters US indicated an abdominal injury. Routine US follow-up does not yield additional information after abdominal trauma. In patients with MDCT-proven organ lesions, follow-up MDCT should be considered if indicated by abnormal clinical and/or laboratory findings.

  8. [Delayed perforation of the cecum and sigmoid colon after blunt abdominal trauma in a patient with multiple injuries].

    PubMed

    Miranda, E; Arroyo, A; Ronda, J M; Muñoz, J L; Alonso, C; Martínez-Peñuelas, F; Martí-Viaño, J L

    2007-01-01

    Blunt abdominal trauma can damage the intestinal vasculature and may occasionally lead to delayed intestinal perforation, associated with a combined rate of morbidity and mortality of 25%. The diagnosis of such complications is hindered by sedation in critical patients, however, and morbimortality in this population is therefore higher. We report the case of a man with multiple injuries admitted to the intensive care unit, where delayed perforations of the sigmoid colon and cecum were diagnosed. The management of blunt abdominal trauma is reviewed and the possible causes, diagnostic approaches, and treatment options for colon injuries are discussed.

  9. Value of diagnostic and therapeutic laparoscopy for patients with blunt abdominal trauma: A 10-year medical center experience

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ying-Da; Chen, Shyr-Chyr

    2018-01-01

    Laparoscopy has been used for the diagnosis and treatment for hemodynamically stable patients with penetrating abdominal trauma. This study evaluated whether diagnostic and therapeutic laparoscopy can be used as effectively in select patients with blunt abdominal trauma. All hemodynamically stable patients undergoing operations for blunt abdominal trauma over a 10-year period (2006–2015) at a tertiary medical center were included. Patients undergoing laparotomy were categorized as group A. Patients who underwent laparoscopy were categorized as group B. The clinical outcomes of the 2 groups were compared. There were 139 patients in group A and 126 patients in group B. Group A patients were more severely injured (mean injury severity score of 23.3 vs. 18.9, P < .001) and had a higher frequency of traumatic brain injuries (25.2% vs. 14.3%, P = .039). The sensitivity and specificity of diagnostic laparoscopy for patients in group B was 99.1% and 100.0%, respectively. No non-therapeutic laparotomies were performed in group B, and the success rate of therapeutic laparoscopy was 92.0% (103/112) for patients with significant intra-abdominal injuries. Patients in the 2 groups had similar perioperative and postoperative outcomes in terms of operation times, blood loss, blood transfusion requirements, mortality, and complications (all, P > .05). Laparoscopy is a feasible and safe tool for the diagnosis and treatment of hemodynamically stable patients with blunt abdominal trauma who require surgery. PMID:29470527

  10. Value of diagnostic and therapeutic laparoscopy for patients with blunt abdominal trauma: A 10-year medical center experience.

    PubMed

    Lin, Heng-Fu; Chen, Ying-Da; Chen, Shyr-Chyr

    2018-01-01

    Laparoscopy has been used for the diagnosis and treatment for hemodynamically stable patients with penetrating abdominal trauma. This study evaluated whether diagnostic and therapeutic laparoscopy can be used as effectively in select patients with blunt abdominal trauma. All hemodynamically stable patients undergoing operations for blunt abdominal trauma over a 10-year period (2006-2015) at a tertiary medical center were included. Patients undergoing laparotomy were categorized as group A. Patients who underwent laparoscopy were categorized as group B. The clinical outcomes of the 2 groups were compared. There were 139 patients in group A and 126 patients in group B. Group A patients were more severely injured (mean injury severity score of 23.3 vs. 18.9, P < .001) and had a higher frequency of traumatic brain injuries (25.2% vs. 14.3%, P = .039). The sensitivity and specificity of diagnostic laparoscopy for patients in group B was 99.1% and 100.0%, respectively. No non-therapeutic laparotomies were performed in group B, and the success rate of therapeutic laparoscopy was 92.0% (103/112) for patients with significant intra-abdominal injuries. Patients in the 2 groups had similar perioperative and postoperative outcomes in terms of operation times, blood loss, blood transfusion requirements, mortality, and complications (all, P > .05). Laparoscopy is a feasible and safe tool for the diagnosis and treatment of hemodynamically stable patients with blunt abdominal trauma who require surgery.

  11. Combined Abdominal and Spine Injuries after High Energy Flexion-Distraction Trauma.

    PubMed

    Woltmann, Alexander; Beisse, Rudolph; Eckardt, Henrik; Potulski, Michael; Bühren, Volker

    2007-10-01

    Combined abdominal (AT) and spine (ST) trauma in the multiply traumatized patient (MT) requires optimal clinical management. At the Traumacenter Murnau, Germany all multiply injured patients (injury severity score ≥ 16) are registered in a large prospective database (DGU-Tramaregister). From 1 January 2002 until 31 December 2004, 731 multiply injured patients (ISS ≥ 16) were admitted to the Trauma Center Murnau. In this population, ST was diagnosed in 287 patients (39%), AT was diagnosed in 100 patients (14%), and in 35 patients (5%) a combined ST and AT was observed. The most frequent injury mechanism in patients with a combined ST and AT was high-energy flexion-distraction trauma caused by motor vehicle accident with seat belt fastened passengers, bicycle accident, and fall from great height. In the cohort group of 35 patients, 29 required either abdominal or spinal operation. In 23 patients the AT and in 18 patients the ST necessitated operation. In 14 patients both the AT and ST called for surgery. The AT was predominately treated with splenectomies, resections and suturing of the intestine. The ST resulted in 14 posterior and four postponed anterior stabilizations of the thoracolumbar and four anterior fusions of the cervical spine. Mean age of these patients was 37 years in comparison to 47 years in the control group (MT without combined AT and ST). ISS of patients with combined AT and ST was 38 points compared to 26 points in the control group, and mortality was 7% in the combined group compared to 14% in the control group. The present study documents that damage control principles applied to patients sustaining the complex combination of AT and ST can result in low mortality rates despite the severity of this injury.

  12. Pediatric FAST and elevated liver transaminases: An effective screening tool in blunt abdominal trauma.

    PubMed

    Sola, Juan E; Cheung, Michael C; Yang, Relin; Koslow, Starr; Lanuti, Emma; Seaver, Chris; Neville, Holly L; Schulman, Carl I

    2009-11-01

    The current standard for the evaluation of children with blunt abdominal trauma (BAT) consists of physical examination, screening lab values, and computed tomography (CT) scan. We sought to determine if the focused assessment with sonography for trauma (FAST) combined with elevated liver transaminases (AST/ALT) could be used as a screening tool for intra-abdominal injury (IAI) in pediatric patients with BAT. Registry data at a level 1 trauma center was retrospectively reviewed from 1991-2007. Data collected on BAT patients under the age of 16 y included demographics, injury mechanism, ISS, GCS, imaging studies, serum ALT and AST levels, and disposition. AST and ALT were considered positive if either one was >100 IU/L. Overall, 3171 cases were identified. A total of 1008 (31.8%) patients received CT scan, 1148 (36.2%) had FAST, and 497 (15.7%) patients received both. Of the 497 patients, 400 (87.1%) also had AST and ALT measured. FAST was 50% sensitive, 91% specific, with a positive predictive value (PPV) of 68%, negative predictive value (NPV) of 83%, and accuracy of 80%. Combining FAST with elevated AST or ALT resulted in a statistically significant increase in all measures (sensitivity 88%, specificity 98%, PPV 94%, NPV 96%, accuracy 96%). FAST combined with AST or ALT > 100 IU/L is an effective screening tool for IAI in children following BAT. Pediatric patients with a negative FAST and liver transaminases < 100 IU/L should be observed rather than subjected to the radiation risk of CT.

  13. Diagnostic accuracy of ultrasonography in detection of blunt abdominal trauma and comparison of early and late ultrasonography 24 hours after trauma.

    PubMed

    Feyzi, Ali; Rad, Masoud Pezeshki; Ahanchi, Navid; Firoozabadi, Jalil

    2015-01-01

    Despite the advantages of ultrasound scan, its use as a screening tool in blunt abdominal trauma is controversial. The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic value of early and late ultrasound in patients with blunt abdominal trauma (BAT). In this study which was performed in a level I trauma center, firstly, 2418 patients with BAT had ultrasound (US) examination by two trauma expert radiologists. Results were compared with the best available gold standards such as laparotomy, CT, repeated ultrasound or clinical course follow-up. Then, 400 patients with BAT were examined by a trained residency student. In the first phase, sensitivity, specificity, negative predictive value, positive predictive value and accuracy of ultrasound were 97%, 98.1%, 99.7%, 83% and 98% respectively. In the second phase, they were 97.3%, 97.2%, 97.7%, 96.8% and 97.3% for the early and 98.5%, 97.6%, 98.5%, 97.5% and 98% for the late ultrasound respectively. Results obtained from this study indicate that negative ultrasound findings associated with negative clinical observation virtually exclude abdominal injury, and confirmation by performing other tests is unnecessary. High sensitivity and negative predictive value is achieved if ultrasound is performed by expert trauma radiologist.

  14. Role of focused assessment with sonography for trauma as a screening tool for blunt abdominal trauma in young children after high energy trauma.

    PubMed

    Tummers, W; van Schuppen, J; Langeveld, H; Wilde, J; Banderker, E; van As, A

    2016-06-01

    The objective of the study was to review the utility of focused assessement with sonography for trauma (FAST) as a screening tool for blunt abdominal trauma (BAT) in children involved in high energy trauma (HET), and to determine whether a FAST could replace computed tomography (CT) in clinical decision-making regarding paediatric BAT. Children presented at the Trauma Unit of the Red Cross War Memorial Children's Hospital, Cape Town, after HET, and underwent both a physical examination and a FAST. The presence of free fluid in the abdomen and pelvis was assessed using a FAST. Sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values (PPV and NPV) for identifying intraabdominal injury were calculated for the physical examination and the FAST, both individually and when combined. Seventy-five patients were included as per the criteria for HET as follows: pedestrian motor vehicle crashes (MVCs) ( n = 46), assault ( n = 14), fall from a height ( n = 9), MVC passenger ( n = 4) and other ( n = 2). The ages of the patients ranged from 3 months to 13 years. The sensitivity of the physical examination was 0.80, specificity 0.83, PPV 0.42 and NPV 0.96. The sensitivity of the FAST was 0.50, specificity 1.00, PPV 1.00 and NPV 0.93. Sensitivity increased to 0.90 when the physical examination was combined with the FAST. Nonoperative management was used in 73 patients. Two underwent an operation. A FAST should be performed in combination with a physical examination on every paediatric patient involved in HET to detect BAT. When both are negative, nonoperative management can be implemented without fear of missing a clinically significant injury. FAST is a safe, effective and easily accessible alternative to CT, which avoids ionising radiation and aids in clinical decision-making.

  15. Arterial Embolization in the Management of Mesenteric Bleeding Secondary to Blunt Abdominal Trauma.

    PubMed

    Ghelfi, Julien; Frandon, Julien; Barbois, Sandrine; Vendrell, Anne; Rodiere, Mathieu; Sengel, Christian; Bricault, Ivan; Arvieux, Catherine; Ferretti, Gilbert; Thony, Frédéric

    2016-05-01

    Mesenteric bleeding is a rare but potentially life-threatening complication of blunt abdominal trauma. It can induce active hemorrhage and a compressive hematoma leading to bowel ischemia. Emergency laparotomy remains the gold standard treatment. We aimed to study the effectiveness and complications of embolization in patients with post-traumatic mesenteric bleeding. The medical records of 7 consecutive patients with active mesenteric bleeding treated by embolization in a level-one trauma center from 2007 to 2014 were retrospectively reviewed. All patients presented with active mesenteric bleeding on CT scans without major signs of intestinal ischemia. We focused on technical success, clinical success, and the complications of embolization. Six endovascular procedures were successful in controlling hemorrhage but 1 patient had surgery to stop associated arterial and venous bleeding. One patient suffered from bowel ischemia, a major complication of embolization, which was confirmed by surgery. No acute renal failure was noted after angiography. For 1 patient we performed combined management as the endovascular approach allowed an easier surgical exploration. In mesenteric trauma with active bleeding, embolization is a valuable alternative to surgery and should be considered, taking into account the risk of bowel ischemia.

  16. Arterial Embolization in the Management of Mesenteric Bleeding Secondary to Blunt Abdominal Trauma

    SciTech Connect

    Ghelfi, Julien, E-mail: JGhelfi@chu-grenoble.fr; Frandon, Julien, E-mail: JFrandon2@chu-grenoble.fr; Barbois, Sandrine, E-mail: SBarbois@chu-grenoble.fr

    IntroductionMesenteric bleeding is a rare but potentially life-threatening complication of blunt abdominal trauma. It can induce active hemorrhage and a compressive hematoma leading to bowel ischemia. Emergency laparotomy remains the gold standard treatment. We aimed to study the effectiveness and complications of embolization in patients with post-traumatic mesenteric bleeding.Materials and MethodsThe medical records of 7 consecutive patients with active mesenteric bleeding treated by embolization in a level-one trauma center from 2007 to 2014 were retrospectively reviewed. All patients presented with active mesenteric bleeding on CT scans without major signs of intestinal ischemia. We focused on technical success, clinical success, andmore » the complications of embolization.ResultsSix endovascular procedures were successful in controlling hemorrhage but 1 patient had surgery to stop associated arterial and venous bleeding. One patient suffered from bowel ischemia, a major complication of embolization, which was confirmed by surgery. No acute renal failure was noted after angiography. For 1 patient we performed combined management as the endovascular approach allowed an easier surgical exploration.ConclusionIn mesenteric trauma with active bleeding, embolization is a valuable alternative to surgery and should be considered, taking into account the risk of bowel ischemia.« less

  17. The focused abdominal sonography for trauma examination can reliably identify patients with significant intra-abdominal hemorrhage in life-threatening pelvic fractures.

    PubMed

    Christian, Nicole Townsend; Burlew, Clay Cothren; Moore, Ernest E; Geddes, Andrea E; Wagenaar, Amy E; Fox, Charles J; Pieracci, Fredric M

    2018-06-01

    The focused abdominal sonography for trauma (FAST) examination has been reported to be unreliable in pelvic fracture patients. Additionally, given the advent of new therapeutic interventions, such as resuscitative endovascular balloon occlusion of the aorta (REBOA), rapid identification of intra-abdominal hemorrhage compared with Zone III hemorrhage may guide different therapeutic strategies. We hypothesized that FAST is reliable for detecting clinically significant intra-abdominal hemorrhage in the face of complex pelvic fractures. Our pelvic fracture database of all hemodynamically unstable patients requiring intervention from January 1, 2005, to July 1, 2015, was reviewed. The FAST examination was compared with operative and computed tomography (CT) scan findings. Confirmatory evaluation for FAST(-) patients was considered positive if therapeutic intervention was required. During the study period, 81 patients in refractory shock with FAST imaging in our emergency department (ED) underwent pelvic packing. Mean age was 45 ± 2 years and Injury Severity Score was 50 ± 1.5. The FAST examination was negative in 53 patients; 52 patients did not require operative intervention for abdominal bleeding while one patient required splenectomy. The FAST examination was positive in 28 patients; 26 had findings confirmed by CT or laparotomy while two patients did not have intra-abdominal hemorrhage on further evaluation. The sensitivity and specificity for FAST in this population was 96% and 96%, respectively, positive predictive value was 93%, and negative predictive value was 98%. The false-negative and -positive rates for FAST were 2% and 7%. Focused abdominal sonography for trauma examination reliably identifies clinically significant hemoperitoneum in life-threatening, pelvic fracture related hemorrhage. The incidence of a false-negative FAST in this unstable pelvic fracture population was 2%. FAST results may be used when determining the role of REBOA in these

  18. Significance of computed tomography finding of intra-abdominal free fluid without solid organ injury after blunt abdominal trauma: time for laparotomy on demand.

    PubMed

    Mahmood, Ismail; Tawfek, Zainab; Abdelrahman, Yassir; Siddiuqqi, Tariq; Abdelrahman, Husham; El-Menyar, Ayman; Al-Hassani, Ammar; Tuma, Mazin; Peralta, Ruben; Zarour, Ahmad; Yakhlef, Sawsan; Hamzawi, Hazim; Al-Thani, Hassan; Latifi, Rifat

    2014-06-01

    Optimal management of patients with intra-abdominal free fluid found on computed tomography (CT) scan without solid organ injury remains controversial. The purpose of this study was to determine the significance of CT scan findings of free fluid in the management of blunt abdominal trauma patients who otherwise have no indications for laparotomy. During the 3-year study period, all patients presenting with blunt abdominal trauma who underwent abdominal CT examination were retrospectively reviewed. All hemodynamically stable patients who presented with abdominal free fluid without solid organ injury on CT scan were analyzed for radiological interpretation, clinical management, operative findings, and outcome. A total of 122 patients were included in the study, 91 % of whom were males. The mean age of the patients was 33 ± 12 years. A total of 34 patients underwent exploratory laparotomy, 31 of whom had therapeutic interventions. Small bowel injuries were found in 12 patients, large bowel injuries in ten, and mesenteric injuries in seven patients. One patient had combined small and large bowel injury, and one had traumatic gangrenous appendix. In the remaining three patients, laparotomy was non-therapeutic. A total of 36 patients had associated pelvic fractures and 33 had multiple lumbar transverse process fractures. Detection of intra-peritoneal fluid by CT scan is inaccurate for prediction of bowel injury or need for surgery. However, the correlation between CT scan findings and clinical course is important for optimal diagnosis of bowel and mesenteric injuries.

  19. The value of endoscopic diagnosis and the treatment of pancreas injuries following blunt abdominal trauma.

    PubMed

    Wolf, A; Bernhardt, J; Patrzyk, M; Heidecke, C-D

    2005-05-01

    Injuries to the pancreas following blunt abdominal trauma are rare due to its protected retroperitoneal position. Many pancreatic lesions remain unnoticed at first and only become apparent when complications arise or during treatment of other injuries. The mortality rate is between 12 and 30%, and if treatment is delayed it is as high as 60%. Using medical records over the past 5 years, we investigated when and in what circumstances endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreaticography (ERCP) was used in the diagnosis and treatment of pancreas injuries after blunt abdominal trauma. Penetrating injuries were not taken into consideration. An ERCP was performed on a total of five patients with suspected injuries to the pancreas after blunt abdominal trauma. No duct participation could be determined in three of the patients with a first degree pancreatic lesion. A 44-year-old woman sustained severe internal and external injuries after a traffic accident. Because of the nature of her injuries, pancreatic left resection with splenectomy was necessary. After the operation, a pancreatic fistula diagnosed. The ductus pancreaticus (DP) was successfully treated by stenting with the use of endoscopic retrograde pancreaticography. A 24-year old woman was kicked in the epigastrium by a horse. On the day after the incident, she complained of increasing pain in the upper abdomen, and she had elevated amylase and lipase levels. Computed tomography scan showed free fluid. Less than 48 h after the accident, ERCP was performed and a leakage in the DP in the head-body region (fourth degree) was identified. We placed a stent, and during the subsequent laparoscopy the omental bursa was flushed out and a drainage laid. After 14 days, the patient was sent home. We removed the drainage 4 weeks after the accident, and the stent after 12 weeks. The major advantage of the prompt retrograde discription of the pancreatobiliary system after an accident in which pancreas involvement is suspected is the

  20. A rare case of hepatic duct injury from blunt abdominal trauma.

    PubMed

    Hasaniya, Nahidh W; Premaratne, Shyamal; Premaratne, Ishani D; McNamara, J Judson

    2013-01-01

    A 25 year-old male was brought to the emergency room following an apparent suicide attempt by jumping from the fourth floor. Patient had a large abdominal laceration in the right upper quadrant (RUQ). CT scan showed a sub-scapular hematoma of the liver. Due to the repeated episodes of hypotension, a laporotomy was performed and the left hepatic artery was ligated while the ductal injury was managed with a Roux-en-Y left hepatic jejunostomy and stent. Bile leakage was resolved post-operatively by day 5 and the patient was discharged home on day 13 after clearance from psychiatry. While non-iatrogenic extrahepatic biliary trauma is rare, a high degree of suspicion is essential, especially in cases like the one discussed in this report. Diagnosis can be difficult in patients undergoing observation.

  1. Injuries of the Portal Vein in Patients With Blunt Abdominal Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Kremer, B.; Lloyd, D. M.; Meyer-Pannwitt, U.

    1993-01-01

    Between January 1987 and September 1991, 68 severely traumatized patients underwent emergency laparotomy because of blunt abdominal trauma. Intraoperatively, 54.4% of the patients had a major injury to one organ, 23.5% had injuries to two organs, 16.2% had injuries to three organs and 5.9% to four or more organs. Additionally, in 11.8% of these cases (n = 8) a major vascular injury (portal vein n = 5, vena cava n = 2, mesenteric root n = 1) was found. Injuries to the portal vein were always associated with complete rupture of the pancreas, requiring distal pancreatic resection in four cases and a duodenum preserving resection of the head of the pancreas in one. In two of these patients the portal vein had to be reconstructed with a Goretex prosthetic graft. Mortality was 14.7% for the whole group (n = 68) and 0% for patients with additional portal venous injuries. PMID:8489966

  2. Computed tomography has an important role in hollow viscus and mesenteric injuries after blunt abdominal trauma.

    PubMed

    Tan, Ker-Kan; Liu, Jody Zhiyang; Go, Tsung-Shyen; Vijayan, Appasamy; Chiu, Ming-Terk

    2010-05-01

    Computed tomographic (CT) scans have become invaluable in the management of patients with blunt abdominal trauma. No clear consensus exists on its role in hollow viscus injuries (HVI) and mesenteric injuries (MI). The aim of this study was to correlate operative findings of HVI and MI to findings on pre-operative CT. All patients treated for blunt abdominal trauma at Tan Tock Seng Hospital from January 2003 to January 2008 were reviewed. CT scans were only performed if the patients were haemodynamically stable and indicated. All scans were performed with intravenous contrast using a 4-slice CT scanner from 2003 to December 2004 and a 64-slice CT scanner from January 2005 onwards. All cases with documented HVI/MI that underwent both CT scans and exploratory laparotomy were analysed. Thirty-one patients formed the study group, with median age of 40 (range, 22-65) years and a significant male (83.9%) predominance. Vehicular-related incidents accounted for 67.7% of the injuries and the median Injury Severity Score (ISS) was 13 (4-50). The 2 commonest findings on CT scans were extra-luminal gas (35.5%) and free fluid without significant solid organ injuries (93.5%). During exploratory laparotomy, perforation of hollow viscus (51.6%) occurred more frequently than suspected from the initial CT findings of extra-luminal gas. Other notable findings included haemoperitoneum (64.5%), and mesenteric tears (67.7%). None of our patients with HVI and MI had a normal pre-operative CT scan. Our study suggests that patients with surgically confirmed HVI and MI found at laparotomy were very likely to have an abnormal pre-operative CT scan. Unexplained free fluid was a very common finding in blunt HVI/MI and is one major indication to consider exploratory laparotomy. (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Abdominal trauma in infants and children: prompt identification and early management of serious and life-threatening injuries. Part II: Specific injuries and ED management.

    PubMed

    Rothrock, S G; Green, S M; Morgan, R

    2000-06-01

    Evaluation of children with suspected abdominal trauma could be a difficult task. Unique anatomic and physiologic features render vital sign assessment and the physical examination less useful than in the adult population. Awareness of injury patterns and associations will improve the early diagnosis of abdominal trauma. Clinicians must have a complete understanding of common and atypical presentations of children with significant abdominal injuries. Knowledge of the utility and limitations of available laboratory and radiologic adjuncts will assist in accurately identifying abdominal injury. While other obvious injuries (eg, facial, cranial, and extremity trauma) can distract physicians from less obvious abdominal trauma, an algorithmic approach to evaluating and managing children with multisystem trauma will improve overall care and help to identify and treat abdominal injuries in a timely fashion. Finally, physicians must be aware of the capabilities of their own facility to handle pediatric trauma. Protocols must be in place for expediting the transfer of children who require a higher level of care. Knowledge of each of these areas will help to improve the overall care and outcome of children with abdominal trauma.

  4. Evaluation of chest and abdominal injuries in trauma patients hospitalized in the surgery ward of poursina teaching hospital, guilan, iran.

    PubMed

    Hemmati, Hossein; Kazemnezhad-Leili, Ehsan; Mohtasham-Amiri, Zahra; Darzi, Ali Asghar; Davoudi-Kiakalayeh, Ali; Dehnadi-Moghaddam, Anoush; Kouchakinejad-Eramsadati, Leila

    2013-01-01

    Trauma, especially chest and abdominal trauma are increasing due to the growing number of vehicles on the roads, which leads to an increased incidence of road accidents. Urbanization, industrialization and additional problems are the other associated factors which accelerate this phenomenon. A better understanding of the etiology and pattern of such injuries can help to improve the management and ultimate the outcomes of these patients. This study aimed to evaluate the patients with chest and abdominal trauma hospitalized in the surgery ward of Poursina teaching hospital, Guilan, Iran. In this cross-sectional study, the data of all chest and abdominal trauma patients hospitalized in the surgery ward of Poursina teaching hospital were collected from March 2011 to March 2012. Information about age, gender, injured areas, type of injury (penetrating or blunt), etiology of the injury, accident location (urban or rural) and patients' discharge outcomes were collected by a questionnaire. In total, 211 patients with a mean age of 34.1 ± 1.68 years was entered into the study. The most common cause of trauma was traffic accidents (51.7%). Among patients with chest trauma, 45 cases (35.4%) had penetrating injuries and 82 cases (64.6%) blunt lesions. The prevalence of chest injuries was 35.5% and rib fractures 26.5%. In chest injuries, the prevalence of hemothorax was 65.3%, pneumothorax 2.7%, lung contusion 4% and emphysema 1.3%, respectively. There were 24 cases (27.9%) with abdominal trauma which had penetrating lesions and 62 cases (72.1%) with blunt lesions. The most common lesions in patients with penetrating abdominal injuries were spleen (24.2%) and liver (12.1%) lesions. The outcomes of the patients were as follow: 95.7% recovery and 4.3% death. The majority of deaths were observed among road traffic victims (77.7%). Considering the fact that road-related accidents are quite predictable and controllable; therefore, the quality promotion of traumatic patients' care

  5. Evaluation of Chest and Abdominal Injuries in Trauma Patients Hospitalized in the Surgery Ward of Poursina Teaching Hospital, Guilan, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Hemmati, Hossein; Kazemnezhad-Leili, Ehsan; Mohtasham-Amiri, Zahra; Darzi, Ali Asghar; Davoudi-Kiakalayeh, Ali; Dehnadi-Moghaddam, Anoush; Kouchakinejad-Eramsadati, Leila

    2013-01-01

    Background Trauma, especially chest and abdominal trauma are increasing due to the growing number of vehicles on the roads, which leads to an increased incidence of road accidents. Urbanization, industrialization and additional problems are the other associated factors which accelerate this phenomenon. A better understanding of the etiology and pattern of such injuries can help to improve the management and ultimate the outcomes of these patients. Objectives This study aimed to evaluate the patients with chest and abdominal trauma hospitalized in the surgery ward of Poursina teaching hospital, Guilan, Iran. Patients and Methods In this cross-sectional study, the data of all chest and abdominal trauma patients hospitalized in the surgery ward of Poursina teaching hospital were collected from March 2011 to March 2012. Information about age, gender, injured areas, type of injury (penetrating or blunt), etiology of the injury, accident location (urban or rural) and patients' discharge outcomes were collected by a questionnaire. Results In total, 211 patients with a mean age of 34.1 ± 1.68 years was entered into the study. The most common cause of trauma was traffic accidents (51.7%). Among patients with chest trauma, 45 cases (35.4%) had penetrating injuries and 82 cases (64.6%) blunt lesions. The prevalence of chest injuries was 35.5% and rib fractures 26.5%. In chest injuries, the prevalence of hemothorax was 65.3%, pneumothorax 2.7%, lung contusion 4% and emphysema 1.3%, respectively. There were 24 cases (27.9%) with abdominal trauma which had penetrating lesions and 62 cases (72.1%) with blunt lesions. The most common lesions in patients with penetrating abdominal injuries were spleen (24.2%) and liver (12.1%) lesions. The outcomes of the patients were as follow: 95.7% recovery and 4.3% death. The majority of deaths were observed among road traffic victims (77.7%). Conclusions Considering the fact that road-related accidents are quite predictable and controllable

  6. A case of thoracic splenosis in a post-splenectomy patient following abdominal trauma: Hello Howell-Jolly.

    PubMed

    Viviers, Petrus J

    2014-08-01

    Seeding of splenic tissue to extra-abdominal sites is a relatively infrequent consequence of open abdominal trauma. Immunological function of these small foci of ectopic splenic tissue is unknown and their use in determining the splenic function may be limited. In this case report, a patient is described who had previously undergone an emergency splenectomy. The absence of Howell-Jolly bodies on the blood smear in a patient who had previously undergone surgical splenectomy raised the suspicion of splenosis. The immunological features as well as non-invasive evaluation of these ill-defined splenic tissue sites are discussed.

  7. Laparoscopic management of retroperitoneal injuries from penetrating abdominal trauma in haemodynamically stable patients.

    PubMed

    Koto, Modise Zacharia; Matsevych, Oleh Y; Mosai, Fusi; Balabyeki, Moses; Aldous, Colleen

    2018-02-27

    Laparoscopy is increasingly utilised in the trauma setting. However, its safety and reliability in evaluating and managing retroperitoneal injuries are not known. The aim of this study was to analyse our experience with laparoscopic management of retroperitoneal injuries due to penetrating abdominal trauma (PAT) and to investigate its feasibility, safety and accuracy in haemodynamically stable patients. Over a 4-year period, patients approached laparoscopically with retroperitoneal injuries were analysed. Mechanism, location and severity of injuries were recorded. Surgical procedures, conversion rate and reasons for conversion and outcomes were described. Of the 284 patients with PAT, 56 patients had involvement of retroperitoneum. Stab wounds accounted 62.5% of patients. The mean Injury Severity Score was 7.4 (4-20). Among retroperitoneal injuries, the colon (27%) was the most commonly involved hollow viscera followed by duodenum (5%). The kidney (5%) and the pancreas (4%) were the injured solid organs. The conversion rate was 19.6% and was mainly due to active bleeding (73%). Significantly more patients with gunshot wound were converted to laparotomy (38% vs. 9%). Therapeutic laparoscopy was performed in 36% of patients. There were no recorded missed injuries or mortality. Five (9%) patients developed the Clavien-Dindo Grade 3 complications, three were managed with reoperation, one with drainage/debridement and one with endovascular technique. Laparoscopic management of retroperitoneal injuries is safe and feasible in haemodynamically stable patients with PAT. However, a high conversion rate indicates difficulties in managing these injuries. The requirements are the dexterity in laparoscopy and readiness to convert in the event of bleeding.

  8. Validating the Western Trauma Association algorithm for managing patients with anterior abdominal stab wounds: a Western Trauma Association multicenter trial.

    PubMed

    Biffl, Walter L; Kaups, Krista L; Pham, Tam N; Rowell, Susan E; Jurkovich, Gregory J; Burlew, Clay Cothren; Elterman, J; Moore, Ernest E

    2011-12-01

    The optimal management of stable patients with anterior abdominal stab wounds (AASWs) remains a matter of debate. A recent Western Trauma Association (WTA) multicenter trial found that exclusion of peritoneal penetration by local wound exploration (LWE) allowed immediate discharge (D/C) of 41% of patients with AASWs. Performance of computed tomography (CT) scanning or diagnostic peritoneal lavage (DPL) did not improve the D/C rate; however, these tests led to nontherapeutic (NONTHER) laparotomy (LAP) in 24% and 31% of cases, respectively. An algorithm was proposed that included LWE, followed by either D/C or admission for serial clinical assessments, without further imaging or invasive testing. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of the algorithm in providing timely interventions for significant injuries. A multicenter, institutional review board-approved study enrolled patients with AASWs. Management was guided by the WTA AASW algorithm. Data on the presentation, evaluation, and clinical course were recorded prospectively. Two hundred twenty-two patients (94% men, age, 34.7 years ± 0.3 years) were enrolled. Sixty-two (28%) had immediate LAP, of which 87% were therapeutic (THER). Three (1%) died and the mean length of stay (LOS) was 6.9 days. One hundred sixty patients were stable and asymptomatic, and 81 of them (51%) were managed entirely per protocol. Twenty (25%) were D/C'ed from the emergency department after (-) LWE, and 11 (14%) were taken to the operating room (OR) for LAP when their clinical condition changed. Two (2%) of the protocol group underwent NONTHER LAP, and no patient experienced morbidity or mortality related to delay in treatment. Seventy-nine (49%) patients had deviations from protocol. There were 47 CT scans, 11 DPLs, and 9 laparoscopic explorations performed. In addition to the laparoscopic procedures, 38 (48%) patients were taken to the OR based on test results rather than a change in the patient's clinical

  9. [Prognostic factors related to non surgical treatment failure of splenic injuries in the abdominal blunt trauma].

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Fábio Henrique de; Romeiro, Paula Christina Marra; Collaço, Iwan Augusto; Baretta, Giorgio Alfredo Pedroso; Freitas, Alexandre Coutinho Teixeira de; Matias, Jorge Eduardo Fouto

    2009-04-01

    Identify prognostic factors related to treatment failure of blunt splenic injuries managed by non surgical treatment (NST). Fifty six adult patients submitted to NST were prospectively studied. The injuries were diagnosed by computed axial tomography scan and classified according to AAST (American Association for Surgery of Trauma) criteria. Patients were divided in success and failure groups. NST failure was defined as the need for laparotomy for any reason. NST failures (19.6%) were due to: abdominal pain (45.4%), hemodinamic instability (36.4%), splenic haematoma associated to a fall in hematocrit (9.1%) and splenic abscess (9.1%). There were no failures in grade I and II of the splenic injuries; failure rate was 17.5% in grade III and IV injuries grouped, and 80% in grade V injuries (p = 0,0008). In the success group, 31.3% patients received red cell transfusions, versus 63.6% patients in the failure group (p = 0,05). Failure rate in patients with ISS = 8 was zero; 15.9% in patients with ISS 9 to 25; and 50% in patients with ISS = 26 (p = 0,05). There were no deaths or missed bowel injuries. ISS and splenic injury grade were related to failure of NST.

  10. An outcome prediction model for exsanguinating patients with blunt abdominal trauma after damage control laparotomy: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shang-Yu; Liao, Chien-Hung; Fu, Chih-Yuan; Kang, Shih-Ching; Ouyang, Chun-Hsiang; Kuo, I-Ming; Lin, Jr-Rung; Hsu, Yu-Pao; Yeh, Chun-Nan; Chen, Shao-Wei

    2014-04-28

    We present a series of patients with blunt abdominal trauma who underwent damage control laparotomy (DCL) and introduce a nomogram that we created to predict survival among these patients. This was a retrospective study. From January 2002 to June 2012, 91 patients underwent DCL for hemorrhagic shock. We excluded patients with the following characteristics: a penetrating abdominal injury, age younger than 18 or older than 65 years, a severe or life-threatening brain injury (Abbreviated Injury Scale [AIS] ≥ 4), emergency department (ED) arrival more than 6 hours after injury, pregnancy, end-stage renal disease, or cirrhosis. In addition, we excluded patients who underwent DCL after ICU admission or later in the course of hospitalization. The overall mortality rate was 61.5%: 35 patients survived and 56 died. We identified independent survival predictors, which included a preoperative Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score < 8 and a base excess (BE) value < -13.9 mEq/L. We created a nomogram for outcome prediction that included four variables: preoperative GCS, initial BE, preoperative diastolic pressure, and preoperative cardiopulmonary cerebral resuscitation (CPCR). DCL is a life-saving procedure performed in critical patients, and devastating clinical outcomes can be expected under such dire circumstances as blunt abdominal trauma with exsanguination. The nomogram presented here may provide ED physicians and trauma surgeons with a tool for early stratification and risk evaluation in critical, exsanguinating patients.

  11. [Diagnosis and treatment of patients with closed injury of abdominal cavity organs in combination with craniocerebral trauma].

    PubMed

    Kravets, A V; Kravets, V P

    2003-07-01

    Results of diagnosis and treatment of 114 injured persons with closed abdominal trauma, combined with craniocerebral trauma were suggested. In 34 (29.8%) observations the injury of two or more organs of peritoneal cavity was diagnosed, the parenchymatous organs trauma--in 35 (30.7%) and the hole organs trauma--in 45 (39.5%). Cerebral concussion was established in 61 (53.5%) of injured persons, cerebral contusion--in 26 (22.8%), cerebral compression on the contusion background--in 16 (14%) and subdural hematoma--in 11 (9.7%). In all the injured persons the operative intervention was performed. In 32 (28%) the blood of their own was transfused. To reduce the endogenous intoxication severity there were performed the forced diuresis, hemosorption--in 10 (8.7%), the blood ultraviolet irradiation--in 41 (35.9%), intravenous laserotherapy--in 40 (35%). After the operation 14 (12.3%) of patients died. High mortality in combined cranioabdominal trauma is caused by the injury severity, the traumatic shock and mutual burden syndrome presence.

  12. Evaluation of abdominal fat index by ultrasonography and its relationship with psoriasis and metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gönül, Müzeyyen; Tatar, İdil; Canpolat, Filiz; Işıl Kurmus, Gökçe; Ergin, Can; Hekimoğlu, Baki

    2017-10-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that psoriasis is associated with obesity and metabolic syndrome. Psoriasis and obesity share similar inflammatory mediators, and obesity may potentiate some inflammatory cytokines seen in psoriasis. Body fat distribution, particularly visceral adipose tissue (VAT), is an important factor in metabolic syndrome and atherosclerotic diseases. An association has been demonstrated between psoriasis and abdominal VAT measured by computed tomography (CT). To measure abdominal VAT noninvasively by ultrasonography (USG) in patients with psoriasis and investigated its relation to psoriasis and metabolic syndrome. The study population consisted of 41 psoriasis patients and 41 control subjects matched for age, sex, and body mass index. The maximal preperitoneal fat thickness (Pmax) at the anterior surface of the liver and the minimal subcutaneous fat thickness (Smin) of the abdomen were measured by USG. The abdominal fat index (AFI = Pmax/Smin ratio) was calculated and the results were compared between groups. The rate of metabolic syndrome was significantly higher in psoriasis patients ( p = 0.0018). The mean AFI was similar in both groups. AFI was not associated with psoriasis in subjects with metabolic syndrome ( p = 0.495) or with Psoriasis Area and Severity Index ( r = 0.123, p = 0.443). This is the first study to evaluate abdominal VAT by USG. Computed tomography may be more reliable than USG, but its high cost and radiation exposure are major disadvantages. Further studies are required to determine the relationships between psoriasis and VAT.

  13. [Epidemiological, clinical and therapeutic aspects of blunt abdominal trauma in patients undergoing surgery at the General Hospital of National Reference of N'Djamena, Chad: about 49 cases].

    PubMed

    Choua, Ouchemi; Rimtebaye, Kimassoum; Yamingue, Ngueidjo; Moussa, Kalli; Kaboro, Mignagnal

    2017-01-01

    Blunt abdominal traumas are common. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 49 patients with blunt abdominal trauma who underwent surgery at the General Hospital of National Reference of N'Djamena, Chad over a period of 5 years. Epidemiological, clinical and therapeutic parameters of patients were studied. The study included 42 men and 7 women, mean age 21.3 years. The causes of blunt abdominal traumas were: road traffic accidents in 61.2% of cases; wall collapses (14.3%); assaults (8.2%). Blunt abdominal traumas were more frequent in August (14.28%) and October (16.32%). The waiting time for admission in hospital was 6-12h in 43% of cases. At discharge, wounded patients used private car in 85.7% of cases. Clinically, patients were often hemodynamically stable (55.1%). Medical imaging was dominated by direct radiography of the abdomen (57.1%). The most observed lesions were those located only in the small intestine (16.32%) or related to that of the bladder (8.16%) and spleen (2.04%). Laparotomy was negative in 6.12% of cases. Morbidity (12.2%) was dominated by abdominal wall abscess. Mortality rate was 6.1%. Road traffic accidents are the leading cause of blunt abdominal traumas. It is important to minimize delays in diagnosis, and treatment. Road safety measures should be implemented to prevent accidents.

  14. Pancreatic trauma.

    PubMed

    Lahiri, R; Bhattacharya, S

    2013-05-01

    Pancreatic trauma occurs in approximately 4% of all patients sustaining abdominal injuries. The pancreas has an intimate relationship with the major upper abdominal vessels, and there is significant morbidity and mortality associated with severe pancreatic injury. Immediate resuscitation and investigations are essential to delineate the nature of the injury, and to plan further management. If main pancreatic duct injuries are identified, specialised input from a tertiary hepatopancreaticobiliary (HPB) team is advised. A comprehensive online literature search was performed using PubMed. Relevant articles from international journals were selected. The search terms used were: 'pancreatic trauma', 'pancreatic duct injury', 'radiology AND pancreas injury', 'diagnosis of pancreatic trauma', and 'management AND surgery'. Articles that were not published in English were excluded. All articles used were selected on relevance to this review and read by both authors. Pancreatic trauma is rare and associated with injury to other upper abdominal viscera. Patients present with non-specific abdominal findings and serum amylase is of little use in diagnosis. Computed tomography is effective in diagnosing pancreatic injury but not duct disruption, which is most easily seen on endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreaticography or operative pancreatography. If pancreatic injury is suspected, inspection of the entire pancreas and duodenum is required to ensure full evaluation at laparotomy. The operative management of pancreatic injury depends on the grade of injury found at laparotomy. The most important prognostic factor is main duct disruption and, if found, reconstructive options should be determined by an experienced HPB surgeon. The diagnosis of pancreatic trauma requires a high index of suspicion and detailed imaging studies. Grading pancreatic injury is important to guide operative management. The most important prognostic factor is pancreatic duct disruption and in these cases

  15. Open abdominal management after damage-control laparotomy for trauma: a prospective observational American Association for the Surgery of Trauma multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Dubose, Joseph J; Scalea, Thomas M; Holcomb, John B; Shrestha, Binod; Okoye, Obi; Inaba, Kenji; Bee, Tiffany K; Fabian, Timothy C; Whelan, James; Ivatury, Rao R

    2013-01-01

    We conducted a prospective observational multi-institutional study to examine the natural history of the open abdomen (OA) after trauma and identify risk factors for failure to achieve definitive primary fascial closure (DPC) after OA use in trauma. Adults requiring OA for trauma were enrolled during a 2-year period. Demographics, presentation, and management variables were used to compare primary fascial closure and non-primary fascial closure patients, with logistic regression used to identify independent risk factors for failure to achieve primary fascial closure. A total of 572 patients from 14 American College of Surgeons-verified Level I trauma centers were enrolled. The majority were male (79%), mean (SD) age 39 (17) years. Injury Severity Score (ISS) was 15 or greater in 85% of patients and 84% had an abdominal Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) score of 3 or greater. Overall mortality was 23%. Initial primary fascial closure with unaltered native fascia was achieved in 379 patients (66%). Patients surviving at least 48 hours were grouped into those achieving DPC and those who did not achieve DPC after OA use. After logistic regression, independent risk factors for failure to achieve DPC included the number of reexplorations required (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 1.3; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.2-1.6; p < 0.001) the development of intra-abdominal abscess/sepsis (AOR, 2.4; 95% CI, 1.2-4.8; p = 0.011) bloodstream infection (AOR, 2.6; 95% CI, 1.2-5.7; p = 0.017), acute renal failure (AOR, 2.3; 95% CI, 1.2-5.7; p = 0.007), enteric fistula (AOR, 6.4; 95% CI, 1.2-32.8; p = 0.010) and ISS of greater than 15 (AOR, 2.5; 95% CI, 1.1-5.9; p = 0.037). Our study identifies independent risk factors associated with failure to achieve primary fascial closure during initial hospitalization after OA use for trauma. Additional study is required to validate appropriate algorithms that optimize the opportunity to achieve primary fascial closure and outcomes in this population

  16. Obesity in trauma patients: correlations of body mass index with outcomes, injury patterns, and complications.

    PubMed

    Evans, David C; Stawicki, Stanislaw P A; Davido, H Tracy; Eiferman, Daniel

    2011-08-01

    Current understanding of the effects of obesity on trauma patients is incomplete. We hypothesized that among older trauma patients, obese patients differ from nonobese patients in injury patterns, complications, and mortality. Patients older than 45 years old presenting to a Level I trauma center were included in this retrospective database analysis (n = 461). Body mass index (BMI) groups were defined as underweight less than 18.5 kg/m(2), normal 18.5 to 24.9 kg/m(2), overweight 25.0 to 29.9 kg/m(2), or obese greater than 30 kg/m(2). Injury patterns, complications, and outcomes were analyzed using univariate analyses, multivariate logistic regression, and Kaplan-Meier survival analysis. Higher BMI is associated with a higher incidence of torso injury and proximal upper extremity injuries in blunt trauma (n = 410). All other injury patterns and complications (except anemia) were similar between BMI groups. The underweight (BMI less than 18.5 kg/m(2)) group had significantly lower 90-day survival than other groups (P < 0.05). BMI is not a predictor of morbidity or mortality in multivariate analysis. Among older blunt trauma patients, increasing BMI is associated with higher rates of torso and proximal upper extremity injuries. Our study suggests that obesity is not an independent risk factor for complications or mortality after trauma in older patients. Conversely, underweight trauma patients had a lower 90-day survival.

  17. Trauma patient adverse outcomes are independently associated with rib cage fracture burden and severity of lung, head, and abdominal injuries.

    PubMed

    Dunham, C Michael; Hileman, Barbara M; Ransom, Kenneth J; Malik, Rema J

    2015-01-01

    We hypothesized that lung injury and rib cage fracture quantification would be associated with adverse outcomes. Consecutive admissions to a trauma center with Injury Severity Score ≥ 9, age 18-75, and blunt trauma. CT scans were reviewed to score rib and sternal fractures and lung infiltrates. Sternum and each anterior, lateral, and posterior rib fracture was scored 1 = non-displaced and 2 = displaced. Rib cage fracture score (RCFS) = total rib fracture score + sternal fracture score + thoracic spine Abbreviated Injury Score (AIS). Four lung regions (right upper/middle, right lower, left upper, and left lower lobes) were each scored for % of infiltrate: 0% = 0; ≤ 20% = 1, ≤ 50% = 2, > 50% = 3; total of 4 scores = lung infiltrate score (LIS). Of 599 patients, 193 (32%) had 854 rib fractures. Rib fracture patients had more abdominal injuries (p < 0.001), hemo/pneumothorax (p < 0.001), lung infiltrates (p < 0.001), thoracic spine injuries (p = 0.001), sternal fractures (p = 0.0028) and death or need for mechanical ventilation ≥ 3 days (Death/Vdays ≥ 3) (p < 0.001). Death/Vdays ≥ 3 was independently associated with RCFS (p < 0.001), LIS (p < 0.001), head AIS (p < 0.001) and abdominal AIS (p < 0.001). Of the 193 rib fracture patients, Glasgow Coma Score 3-12 or head AIS ≥ 2 occurred in 43%. A lung infiltrate or hemo/pneumothorax occurred in 55%. Thoracic spine injury occurred in 23%. RCFS was 6.3 ± 4.4 and Death/Vdays ≥ 3 occurred in 31%. Death/Vdays ≥ 3 rates correlated with RCFS values: 19% for 1-3; 24% for 4-6; 42% for 7-12 and 65% for ≥ 13 (p < 0.001). Death/Vdays ≥ 3 was independently associated with RCFS (p = 0.02), LIS (p = 0.001), head AIS (p < 0.001) and abdominal AIS (p < 0.001). Death/Vdays ≥ 3 association was better for RCFS (p = 0.005) than rib fracture score (p = 0.08) or number of fractured ribs (p = 0.80). Rib fracture patients have increased risk for truncal injuries and adverse outcomes. Adverse outcomes are independently

  18. Validation of the Abdominal Pain Index using a revised scoring method.

    PubMed

    Laird, Kelsey T; Sherman, Amanda L; Smith, Craig A; Walker, Lynn S

    2015-06-01

    Evaluate the psychometric properties of child- and parent-report versions of the four-item Abdominal Pain Index (API) in children with functional abdominal pain (FAP) and healthy controls, using a revised scoring method that facilitates comparisons of scores across samples and time. Pediatric patients aged 8-18 years with FAP and controls completed the API at baseline (N = 1,967); a subset of their parents (N = 290) completed the API regarding the child's pain. Subsets of patients completed follow-up assessments at 2 weeks (N = 231), 3 months (N = 330), and 6 months (N = 107). Subsets of both patients (N = 389) and healthy controls (N = 172) completed a long-term follow-up assessment (mean age at follow-up = 20.21 years, SD = 3.75). The API demonstrated good concurrent, discriminant, and construct validity, as well as good internal consistency. We conclude that the API, using the revised scoring method, is a useful, reliable, and valid measure of abdominal pain severity. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Pediatric Psychology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Validation of the Abdominal Pain Index Using a Revised Scoring Method

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, Amanda L.; Smith, Craig A.; Walker, Lynn S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Evaluate the psychometric properties of child- and parent-report versions of the four-item Abdominal Pain Index (API) in children with functional abdominal pain (FAP) and healthy controls, using a revised scoring method that facilitates comparisons of scores across samples and time. Methods Pediatric patients aged 8–18 years with FAP and controls completed the API at baseline (N = 1,967); a subset of their parents (N = 290) completed the API regarding the child’s pain. Subsets of patients completed follow-up assessments at 2 weeks (N = 231), 3 months (N = 330), and 6 months (N = 107). Subsets of both patients (N = 389) and healthy controls (N = 172) completed a long-term follow-up assessment (mean age at follow-up = 20.21 years, SD = 3.75). Results The API demonstrated good concurrent, discriminant, and construct validity, as well as good internal consistency. Conclusion We conclude that the API, using the revised scoring method, is a useful, reliable, and valid measure of abdominal pain severity. PMID:25617048

  20. Pancreatic trauma

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, S

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Pancreatic trauma occurs in approximately 4% of all patients sustaining abdominal injuries. The pancreas has an intimate relationship with the major upper abdominal vessels, and there is significant morbidity and mortality associated with severe pancreatic injury. Immediate resuscitation and investigations are essential to delineate the nature of the injury, and to plan further management. If main pancreatic duct injuries are identified, specialised input from a tertiary hepatopancreaticobiliary (HPB) team is advised. Methods A comprehensive online literature search was performed using PubMed. Relevant articles from international journals were selected. The search terms used were: ‘pancreatic trauma’, ‘pancreatic duct injury’, ‘radiology AND pancreas injury’, ‘diagnosis of pancreatic trauma’, and ‘management AND surgery’. Articles that were not published in English were excluded. All articles used were selected on relevance to this review and read by both authors. Results Pancreatic trauma is rare and associated with injury to other upper abdominal viscera. Patients present with non-specific abdominal findings and serum amylase is of little use in diagnosis. Computed tomography is effective in diagnosing pancreatic injury but not duct disruption, which is most easily seen on endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreaticography or operative pancreatography. If pancreatic injury is suspected, inspection of the entire pancreas and duodenum is required to ensure full evaluation at laparotomy. The operative management of pancreatic injury depends on the grade of injury found at laparotomy. The most important prognostic factor is main duct disruption and, if found, reconstructive options should be determined by an experienced HPB surgeon. Conclusions The diagnosis of pancreatic trauma requires a high index of suspicion and detailed imaging studies. Grading pancreatic injury is important to guide operative management. The most important

  1. An evaluation of multiple trauma severity indices created by different index development strategies.

    PubMed

    Gustafson, D H; Fryback, D G; Rose, J H; Prokop, C T; Detmer, D E; Rossmeissl, J C; Taylor, C M; Alemi, F; Carnazzo, A J

    1983-07-01

    Evaluation of the effectiveness of emergency trauma care systems is complicated by the need to adjust for the widely variable case mix found in trauma patient populations. Several strategies have been advanced to construct the severity indices that can control for these population differences. This article describes a validity and reliability comparison of trauma severity indices developed under three different approaches: 1) use of a multi-attribute utility (MAU) model; 2) an actuarial approach relying on empirical data bases; and 3) an "ad hoc" approach. Seven criteria were identified to serve as standards of comparison for four different indices. The study's findings indicate that the index developed using the MAU theory approach associates most closely with physician judgments of trauma severity. When correlated with a morbidity outcome measure, the MAU-based index shows higher levels of agreement than the other indices. The index development approach based on the principles of MAU theory has several advantages and it appears to be a powerful tool in the creation of effective severity indices.

  2. Development and evaluation of a novel, real time mobile telesonography system in management of patients with abdominal trauma: study protocol.

    PubMed

    Ogedegbe, Chinwe; Morchel, Herman; Hazelwood, Vikki; Chaplin, William F; Feldman, Joseph

    2012-12-18

    Despite the use of e-FAST in management of patients with abdominal trauma, its utility in prehospital setting is not widely adopted. The goal of this study is to develop a novel portable telesonography (TS) system and evaluate the comparability of the quality of images obtained via this system among healthy volunteers who undergo e-FAST abdominal examination in a moving ambulance and at the ED. We hypothesize that: (1) real-time ultrasound images of acute trauma patients in the pre-hospital setting can be obtained and transmitted to the ED via the novel TS system; and (2) Ultrasound images transmitted to the hospital from the real-time TS system will be comparable in quality to those obtained in the ED. Study participants are three healthy volunteers (one each with normal, overweight and obese BMI category). The ultrasound images will be obtained by two ultrasound-trained physicians The TS is a portable sonogram (by Sonosite) interfaced with a portable broadcast unit (by Live-U). Two UTPs will conduct e-FAST examinations on healthy volunteers in moving ambulances and transmit the images via cellular network to the hospital server, where they are stored. Upon arrival in the ED, the same UTPs will obtain another set of images from the volunteers, which are then compared to those obtained in the moving ambulances by another set of blinded UTPs (evaluators) using a validated image quality scale, the Questionnaire for User Interaction Satisfaction (QUIS). Findings from this study will provide needed data on the validity of the novel TS in transmitting live images from moving ambulances to images obtained in the ED thus providing opportunity to facilitate medical care of a patient located in a remote or austere setting.

  3. Influence of abdominal surgical trauma and intra-operative infusion of glucose on splanchnic glucose metabolism in man.

    PubMed

    Stjernström, H; Jorfeldt, L; Wiklund, L

    1981-10-01

    Abdominal surgery increases blood glucose concentration and peripheral release and splanchnic uptake of gluconeogenic substrates, including alanine. During trauma or sepsis, infusion of glucose fails to depress alanine conversion to glucose. The effect of intra-operative glucose infusion on splanchnic metabolism was examined in the present study. In eight patients undergoing elective cholecystectomy, splanchnic glucose metabolism was investigated before, during and immediately after surgery. Glucose was infused at a constant rate of 1 mmol/min. Splanchnic blood flow and arterio-hepatic venous differences of oxygen, glucose, lactate, glycerol, 3-hydroxybutyrate and alanine were measured. Eight other patients, who received saline instead of glucose, served as a control group. Infusion of glucose resulted in total inhibition of splanchnic glucose release before as well as during and immediately after surgery. This was observed, even before surgery, at an arterial glucose level which was lower than that in the control group at the end of and immediately after surgery, at which no decrease of the splanchnic glucose release was recorded. changes in neuronal and hormonal factors due to the surgical trauma are considered responsible for this difference in glucose homeostasis. Splanchnic alanine uptake increased during surgery in both groups, but tended to be somewhat lower in the glucose group. The arterial glycerol concentration and splanchnic uptake, as well as the arterial concentration and splanchnic release of 3-hydroxybutyrate, were reduced. It is concluded that an intravenous infusion of glucose at the rate of 1 mmol/min during abdominal surgery (a) increases the arterial blood glucose level and abolishes splanchnic glucose release, (b) reduces, but does not totally prevent the increase in splanchnic uptake of gluconeogenic substrates, and (c) diminishes lipolysis and the formation of 3-hydroxybutyrate.

  4. [A Case of Curatively Resected Ascending Colon Cancer after Long-Term Chemotherapy Found in Abdominal Trauma].

    PubMed

    Aomatsu, Naoki; Uchima, Yasutake; Nobori, Chihoko; Kurihara, Shigeaki; Yamakoshi, Yoshihito; Wang, En; Nagashima, Daisuke; Hirakawa, Toshiki; Iwauchi, Takehiko; Morimoto, Junya; Tei, Seika; Nakazawa, Kazunori; Takeuchi, Kazuhiro

    2017-11-01

    A 46-year old man presented with lower right quadrant abdominal pain caused by abdominal trauma. Abscess drainage was performed after the diagnosis of retroperitoneal abscess in the ileocecal portion of the colon. Type 2 advanced cancer was found in the cecum and ascending colon. Surgery was performed after improvement of inflammation. Considering the difficulty of curative resection for retroperitoneal invasion, we first performed ileo-transverse colon anastomosis. After surgery, the patient received FOLFOX with panitumumab(Pmab)as neoadjuvant chemotherapy. After 6 courses of this regimen, contrast enhanced computed tomography revealed shrinkage of the tumor. We performed a second surgery but the tumor was unresectable because of retroperitoneal invasion. After 47 courses of chemotherapy(5-FU plus LV with Pmab), the tumor was stable and we observed no distant metastasis. A third surgery was performed, and we were able to perform ileocecal resection including the retroperitoneum. The pathological diagnosis was pT4b(SI), pN1, ly2, V2, pPM0, pDM0, R0, pStage III a. On histological examination, the efficacy of chemotherapy was evaluated as Grade 1a. The patient received adjuvant chemotherapy with capecitabine and remains healthy without any evidence of recurrence more than 10 months after surgery.

  5. The Hardman index in patients operated on for ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Acosta, Stefan; Ogren, Mats; Bergqvist, David; Lindblad, Bengt; Dencker, Magnus; Zdanowski, Zbigniew

    2006-11-01

    The aims of the present study were to (1) analyze preoperative predictors for outcome suggested by Hardman and surgical mortality after open repair and endovascular repair (EVAR) of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms (rAAA), and (2) further evaluate the Hardman index in a systematic review. Patients operated on for rAAA during a 5-year period between 2000 and 2004 were scored according to Hardman-1 point for either age >76 years, loss of consciousness after presentation, hemoglobin <90 g/L, serum creatinine >190 micromol/L or electrocardiographic (ECG) signs of ischemia-with blinded evaluation of ECGs by a specialist in clinical physiology. The results were included in a systematic review of studies evaluating the Hardman index. In-hospital mortality after operation was 41% (67/162). There was no difference in in-hospital mortality between open repair (n = 106) and EVAR (n = 56), whereas the Hardman index was associated with operative mortality in our institution and in the systematic review of 970 patients (P < .001). Mortality rate in patients with Hardman index > or =3 was 77% in the pooled analysis. A full data set of all five scoring variables was obtained in 94 (58%) of 162 patients in our study, and potential underscoring was thus possible in 68 patients. Of the available ECGs, 12 (8.7%) of 138 were judged nondiagnostic. Five studies did not state their missing data on ECG and hemoglobin and serum creatinine concentrations, nor did they specify the criteria for ECG ischemia. A strong correlation between the Hardman index and mortality was found. A Hardman index > or =3 cannot be used as an absolute limit for denial of surgery. The utility of the Hardman index seems to be impeded by variability in scoring resulting from missing or nondiagnostic data.

  6. [Prevention and treatment of post-traumatic pancreatic necrosis in patients with blunt abdominal trauma].

    PubMed

    Cherdantsev, D V; Pervova, O V; Vinnik, Iu S; Kurbanov, D Sh

    2016-01-01

    High incidence of necrotic and suppurative complications is feature of acute post-traumatic pancreatitis. Severe trauma of the pancreas and post-traumatic pancreatitis lead to depressurization of ductal system that requires adequate drainage of damaged area and retroperitoneal fat. 95 patients in group 1 received standardized treatment. The victims of the 2nd group (44 patients) were treated using immunoreactive therapy (roncoleukin) and octreotide (the dose depended on the severity of pancreatitis) at early stages. The efficacy of treatment was assessed based on clinical, laboratory and instrumental parameters. Regardless severity of pancreatic injury overall mortality in groups 1 and 2 was 41% and 20.5% respectively. The main causes of adverse outcomes are severe destructive pancreatitis, postnecrotic suppurative complications. Adequacy rather radicalism of surgery should be preferred for blunt pancreatic trauma management. Minimally invasive surgical techniques and new methods of biological hemostasis may be applied. Timely use of anti-enzymatic and immunoactive therapy reduces the risk of severe post-traumatic pancreatitis, suppurative complications and improves outcomes in patients with blunt pancreatic trauma.

  7. Effect of Abdominal Ultrasound on Clinical Care, Outcomes, and Resource Use Among Children With Blunt Torso Trauma: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Holmes, James F; Kelley, Kenneth M; Wootton-Gorges, Sandra L; Utter, Garth H; Abramson, Lisa P; Rose, John S; Tancredi, Daniel J; Kuppermann, Nathan

    2017-06-13

    The utility of the focused assessment with sonography for trauma (FAST) examination in children is unknown. To determine if the FAST examination during initial evaluation of injured children improves clinical care. A randomized clinical trial (April 2012-May 2015) that involved 975 hemodynamically stable children and adolescents younger than 18 years treated for blunt torso trauma at the University of California, Davis Medical Center, a level I trauma center. Patients were randomly assigned to a standard trauma evaluation with the FAST examination by the treating ED physician or a standard trauma evaluation alone. Coprimary outcomes were rate of abdominal computed tomographic (CT) scans in the ED, missed intra-abdominal injuries, ED length of stay, and hospital charges. Among the 925 patients who were randomized (mean [SD] age, 9.7 [5.3] years; 575 males [62%]), all completed the study. A total of 50 patients (5.4%, 95% CI, 4.0% to 7.1%) were diagnosed with intra-abdominal injuries, including 40 (80%; 95% CI, 66% to 90%) who had intraperitoneal fluid found on an abdominal CT scan, and 9 patients (0.97%; 95% CI, 0.44% to 1.8%) underwent laparotomy. The proportion of patients with abdominal CT scans was 241 of 460 (52.4%) in the FAST group and 254 of 465 (54.6%) in the standard care-only group (difference, -2.2%; 95% CI, -8.7% to 4.2%). One case of missed intra-abdominal injury occurred in a patient in the FAST group and none in the control group (difference, 0.2%; 95% CI, -0.6% to 1.2%). The mean ED length of stay was 6.03 hours in the FAST group and 6.07 hours in the standard care-only group (difference, -0.04 hours; 95% CI, -0.47 to 0.40 hours). Median hospital charges were $46 415 in the FAST group and $47 759 in the standard care-only group (difference, -$1180; 95% CI, -$6651 to $4291). Among hemodynamically stable children treated in an ED following blunt torso trauma, the use of FAST compared with standard care only did not improve clinical care, including

  8. Use of the Hardman index in predicting mortality in endovascular repair of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Conroy, Daniel M; Altaf, Nishath; Goode, Steve D; Braithwaite, Bruce D; MacSweeney, Shane T; Richards, Toby

    2011-12-01

    The Hardman index is a predictor of 30-day mortality after open ruptured abdominal aneurysm repair through the use of preoperative patient factors. The aim of this study was to assess the Hardman index in patients undergoing endovascular repair of ruptured aortic aneurysms. A retrospective analysis of 95 patients undergoing emergency endovascular repairs of computed tomography-confirmed ruptured aneurysms from 1994 to 2008 in a university hospital was performed. All relevant patient variables, calculations of the Hardman index, and the incidence of 30-day mortality were collected in these patients. Correlation of the relationship between each variable and the overall score with the incidence of 30-day mortality was undertaken. The 24-hour mortality was 16% and 30-day mortality 36%. Increasing scores on the Hardman index showed an increasing mortality rate. Thirty-day mortality in patients with a score of 0 to 2 was 30.5%, and in those with a score of ≥3 was 69.2% (P = .01, risk ratio = 2.26, 95% confidence interval = 0.98 to 5.17). This is lower than predicted in both patient groups based on Hardman index score. Loss of consciousness was the only statistically significant independent predictor of 30-day mortality with a risk ratio of 3.16 (95% confidence interval = 2.00-4.97, P < .001). These data suggest that the Hardman index can predict an increased risk of 30-day mortality from endovascular repairs of ruptured aortic aneurysms. However, mortality from endovascular repair is much lower than would be predicted in open repair and it therefore cannot be used clinically as a tool for exclusion from intervention.

  9. Waist Circumference Adjusted for Body Mass Index and Intra-Abdominal Fat Mass

    PubMed Central

    Berentzen, Tina Landsvig; Ängquist, Lars; Kotronen, Anna; Borra, Ronald; Yki-Järvinen, Hannele; Iozzo, Patricia; Parkkola, Riitta; Nuutila, Pirjo; Ross, Robert; Allison, David B.; Heymsfield, Steven B.; Overvad, Kim; Sørensen, Thorkild I. A.; Jakobsen, Marianne Uhre

    2012-01-01

    Background The association between waist circumference (WC) and mortality is particularly strong and direct when adjusted for body mass index (BMI). One conceivable explanation for this association is that WC adjusted for BMI is a better predictor of the presumably most harmful intra-abdominal fat mass (IAFM) than WC alone. We studied the prediction of abdominal subcutaneous fat mass (ASFM) and IAFM by WC alone and by addition of BMI as an explanatory factor. Methodology/Principal Findings WC, BMI and magnetic resonance imaging data from 742 men and women who participated in clinical studies in Canada and Finland were pooled. Total adjusted squared multiple correlation coefficients (R2) of ASFM and IAFM were calculated from multiple linear regression models with WC and BMI as explanatory variables. Mean BMI and WC of the participants in the pooled sample were 30 kg/m2 and 102 cm, respectively. WC explained 29% of the variance in ASFM and 51% of the variance in IAFM. Addition of BMI to WC added 28% to the variance explained in ASFM, but only 1% to the variance explained in IAFM. Results in subgroups stratified by study center, sex, age, obesity level and type 2 diabetes status were not systematically different. Conclusion/Significance The prediction of IAFM by WC is not improved by addition of BMI. PMID:22384179

  10. Changes in abdominal obesity in Chilean university students stratified by body mass index.

    PubMed

    Cossio-Bolaños, Marco; Vilchez-Avaca, Catalina; Contreras-Mellado, Victor; Andruske, Cynthia Lee; Gómez-Campos, Rossana

    2016-01-13

    Studies based on Body Mass Index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC) are generally used to examine the prevalence and tendency of overweight and obesity. These studies help determine the socioeconomic development of a country and improve public health policies. Therefore, the goal of this research was to determine the trend of change in abdominal obesity of Chilean university students according to the Body Mass Index (BMI) measured in intervals of three and six years. For this study, a total of 1598 students of both sexes ranging in age from 18 to 26 from a Chilean university were evaluated. Students were assessed commencing in 2007 (372 males and 315 females), 2010 (250 males and 330 females), and ending in 2013 (153 males and 178 females). During the three transversal assessments, weight, height, and waist circumference were evaluated. BMI was calculated for both sexes. No significant differences were found in age and BMI during the three years evaluated (2007, 2010, and 2013). In 2013, waist circumference (WC) increased significantly (p < 0.001 for both sexes). Moreover, in 2013, in all the percentiles evaluated, high values of WC were compared in relation to previous years. Furthermore, in 2013, in all four BMI categories (underweight, normal, overweight, and obese), the university students showed significant increases in WC (Females: p = 0.004; Males: p = 0.035) whereas in 2007 and 2010, the values remained relatively stable. BMI remained constant during 2007, 2010, and 2013. However, the university students of both sexes showed greater risk of abdominal obesity as a result of increased WC in 2013.

  11. Usefulness of the Hardman index in predicting outcome after endovascular repair of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Karkos, Christos D; Karamanos, Dimitrios; Papazoglou, Konstantinos O; Kantas, Alexandros S; Theochari, Evangelia G; Kamparoudis, Apostolos G; Gerassimidis, Thomas S

    2008-10-01

    The Hardman index, which has five variables, has been recommended as a predictor of outcome after open repair of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms (RAAAs). It has been reported that the presence of three or more variables is uniformly fatal. The aim of this study was to test the same model in an independent series of RAAA patients undergoing endovascular repair. A consecutive series of 41 patients undergoing endovascular repair for RAAA during an 8-year period was analyzed retrospectively. Thirty-day mortality and patient variables, including the five Hardman risk factors of age >76 years, serum creatinine >190 micromol/L, hemoglobin <9 g/dL, loss of consciousness, and electrocardiographic (ECG) evidence of ischemia, were recorded. The Hardman index and a revised version of the index with four variables (without ECG ischemia) were calculated and related to clinical outcome. Operative mortality was 41% (17 of 41). On univariate analysis, only age >76 years (P = .01) and the use of local anesthesia (P < .0001) were statistically significant. Loss of consciousness (P = .05) showed a trend toward a higher mortality, albeit not statistically significant. On multivariate analysis, the use of local anesthesia was the only significant predictor of survival (odds ratio [OR], 0.03; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.003-0.25, P = .001). Again, loss of consciousness showed an association with a higher chance of dying but did not achieve statistical significance (OR, 6.30; 95% CI, 0.93-42.51, P = .059). The original and revised versions of the Hardman index were both significantly associated with death (P = .02 and P = .001, chi(2) test for trend). The cumulative effect of 0, 1, 2, and >/=3 risk factors on mortality was 0%, 27%, 36%, and 71% for the original index, and 12.5%, 21%, 60%, and 78% for the revised version, respectively. Four and two patients with a score of >/=3 in each version of the index survived endovascular repair. The Hardman index, with or without

  12. Outcome of selective non-operative management of penetrating abdominal injuries from the North American National Trauma Database.

    PubMed

    Zafar, S N; Nabeel Zafar, S; Rushing, A; Haut, E R; Kisat, M T; Villegas, C V; Chi, A; Stevens, K; Efron, D T; Zafar, H; Haider, A H

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate trends in the practice of selective non-operative management (SNOM) for penetrating abdominal injury (PAI) and to determine factors associated with its failure. The National Trauma Data Bank for 2002-2008 was reviewed. Patients with PAI were categorized as those who underwent successful SNOM (operative management not required) and those who failed SNOM (surgery required more than 4 h after admission). Yearly rates of SNOM versus non-therapeutic laparotomy (NTL) were plotted. Multivariable regression analysis was performed to identify factors associated with failed SNOM and mortality. A total of 12 707 patients with abdominal gunshot and 13 030 with stab wounds were identified. Rates of SNOM were 22.2 per cent for gunshot and 33.9 per cent for stab wounds, and increased with time (P < 0.001). There was a strong correlation between the rise in SNOM and the decline in NTL (r = - 0.70). SNOM failed in 20.8 and 15.2 per cent of patients with gunshot and stab wounds respectively. Factors predicting failure included the need for blood transfusion (odds ratio (OR) 1.96, 95 per cent confidence interval 1.11 to 3.46) and a higher injury score. Failed SNOM was independently associated with mortality in both the gunshot (OR 4.48, 2.07 to 9.70) and stab (OR 9.83, 3.44 to 28.00) wound groups. The practice of SNOM is increasing, with an associated decrease in the rate of NTL for PAI. In most instances SNOM is successful; however, its failure is associated with increased mortality. Careful patient selection and adherence to protocols designed to decrease the failure rate of SNOM are recommended. Copyright © 2011 British Journal of Surgery Society Ltd. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. The role of shock index as a predictor of multiple-trauma patients' pathways.

    PubMed

    Toccaceli, Andrea; Giampaoletti, Andrea; Dignani, Lucia; Lucertini, Carla; Petrucci, Cristina; Lancia, Loreto

    2016-03-01

    This research was conducted with the aim of investigating the accuracy of the shock index (SI) in distinguishing which multiple-trauma patients should be admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU) after treatment in an emergency room (ER). The SI is an easily obtained indicator, as it corresponds to an arithmetic ratio between the two parameters that are always measured during the first-aid treatment of multiple-trauma patients: heart rate (HR) and systolic blood pressure (SBP). There are many studies examining the SI in the multiple-trauma patients as a possible predictor of the destination unit. The SI is evaluated both at the trauma scene (pre-hospital SI-pH) and in the emergency room (SI-ER). An observational study with a retrospective approach was conducted on 158 adult patients with multiple trauma. The mean SI-pH and SI-ER values were higher in ICU patients than in-patients discharged or admitted to a normal ward, but the difference between these two patient groups was significant only for the SI-ER. Analysis of the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves confirmed that only the SI-ER is significant as a reliable indicator for ICU admission with a best cut-off of 1·05. However, a threshold value of 0·75 was still able to establish the correct type of destination for multiple-trauma patients, with a sensitivity of 57·3% and a specificity of 62·5%. This research showed that the SI-pH and SI-ER values are correlated, but only the SI-ER has shown statistical significance in terms of distinguishing the type of destination of multiple-trauma patient (ICU, ordinary ward or discharge) after initial treatment in the ER. The results of this study suggest the possibility of using SI in multiple-trauma patients as a triage indicator to assess the patients' care complexity and to guide the choice of proper clinical paths. © 2015 British Association of Critical Care Nurses.

  14. [The organ-preserving surgical treatment of the splenic rupture after the blunt abdominal trauma].

    PubMed

    Alimov, A N; Zubarev, A R; Priamikov, A D; Alimov, V A; Sukiasian, A A; Murashina, I V; Safronov, É P; Kim, Iu E

    2013-01-01

    The outcomes of 383 cases of heavy combined traumas (n=273) and isolated (n=110) closed injuries of the abdomen with spleen damage were analyzed. The overall mortality was 11.74% (n=45), whereas the mortality rate during the first day after admission was 7.83% (n=30). Removal of a spleen was executed at 228 patients. The spleen-preserving operation with ligation of splenic artery, was performed in 155 patients. The optimal level of the splenic artery ligation proved to be in its proximal and median parts. The postoperative CT-angiogarphy and Doppler US scanning together with the three-dimensional reconstruction confirmed that blood supply of the body and tail of the pancreas was satisfactory thanks to the natural collateral blood circulation. The dramatic decrease in lethality and of postoperative complication rates allows to consider spleen-preserving resections to be a good alternative to spleenectomy.

  15. Emergency medicine physicians' and pediatricians' use of computed tomography in the evaluation of pediatric patients with abdominal pain without trauma in a community hospital.

    PubMed

    Grim, Paul Francis

    2014-05-01

    There is a paucity of data regarding emergency department (ED) provider type and computed tomography (CT) scan use in the evaluation of pediatric patients with abdominal pain without trauma. The purpose of this retrospective single community hospital study was to determine if there was a difference in CT use between emergency medicine physicians (EMPs) and pediatricians (PEDs) in all patients younger than 18 years with abdominal pain without trauma who presented to the ED during the study period. The study included 165 patients. EMPs saw 83 patients and used CT in 31 compared with PEDs who saw 82 patients and used CT in 12 (P = .002). EMPs used CT significantly more frequently than PEDs in the designated sample. Economic pressures may cause changes in ED provider type in community and rural hospitals and this study shows that ED provider type may affect medical decision making, including CT use.

  16. Non-operative management of blunt trauma in abdominal solid organ injuries: a prospective study to evaluate the success rate and predictive factors of failure.

    PubMed

    Hashemzadeh, S H; Hashemzadeh, K H; Dehdilani, M; Rezaei, S

    2010-06-01

    Over the past several years, non-operative management (NOM) has increasingly been recommended for the care of selected blunt abdominal solid organ injuries. No prospective study has evaluated the rate of NOM of blunt abdominal trauma in the northwest of Iran. The objective of our study was to evaluate the success rate of this kind of management in patients who do not require emergency surgery. This prospective study was carried out in Imam Khomeini Hospital (as a referral center of trauma) at Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Iran, between 20 March 2004 and 20 March 2007. All trauma patients who had suffered an injury to a solid abdominal organ (kidney, liver, or spleen) were selected for initial analysis, using the Student's t test or the c2 test. During the three years of the study, 98 patients (83 males and 15 females) with blunt trauma were selected to NOM for renal, hepatic and splenic injuries. Mean age was 26.1+/-17.7 years (range, 2 to 89) and mean injury severity score (ISS) was 14.5+/-7.4. The success rate of NOM was 93.8%. Fifty-one patients (43 males, 8 females; mean ISS, 14.2+/-5.8) underwent NOM of splenic trauma; 38 patients (33 males, 5 females; mean ISS, 12.9+/-8.2) hepatic trauma, and nine patients (7 males, 2 females; mean ISS, 22.2+/-7.6) renal trauma. Six patients underwent laparotomy due to the failure of NOM. The success rates of this treatment were 94.1%, 94.7% and 88.8% for the spleen, liver and kidney injuries, respectively. Age, female gender and ISS were significant predictors of the failure of NOM (P<0.05). According to the authors NOM can be successfully performed for the hemodynamically stable patients with solid organ blunt trauma. The study indicates that the rates of NOM vary in relation to the severity of the organ injury. This suggests trauma centers should use this approach.

  17. Abdominal Circumference Versus Body Mass Index as Predictors of Lower Extremity Overuse Injury Risk.

    PubMed

    Nye, Nathaniel S; Kafer, Drew S; Olsen, Cara; Carnahan, David H; Crawford, Paul F

    2018-02-01

    Abdominal circumference (AC) is superior to body mass index (BMI) as a measure of risk for various health outcomes. Our objective was to compare AC and BMI as predictors of lower extremity overuse injury (LEOI) risk. Retrospective review of electronic medical records of 79,868 US Air Force personnel over a 7-year period (2005-2011) for incidence of new LEOI. Subjects were stratified by BMI and AC. Injury risk for BMI/AC subgroups was calculated using Kaplan-Meier curves and Cox proportional-hazards regression. Receiver operating characteristic curves with area under the curve were used to compare each model's predictive value. Cox proportional-hazards regression showed significant risk association between elevated BMI, AC, and all injury types, with hazard ratios ranging 1.230-3.415 for obese versus normal BMI and 1.665-3.893 for high-risk versus low-risk AC (P < .05 for all measures). Receiver operating characteristic curves with area under the curve showed equivalent performance between BMI and AC for predicting all injury types. However, the combined model (AC and BMI) showed improved predictive ability over either model alone for joint injury, overall LEOI, and most strongly for osteoarthritis. Although AC and BMI alone performed similarly well, a combined approach using BMI and AC together improved risk estimation for LEOI.

  18. Analysis of 162 colon injuries in patients with penetrating abdominal trauma: concomitant stomach injury results in a higher rate of infection.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Patricia A; Kirton, Orlando C; Dresner, Lisa S; Tortella, Bartholomew; Kestner, Mark M

    2004-02-01

    Fecal contamination from colon injury has been thought to be the most significant factor for the development of surgical site infection (SSI) after trauma. However, there are increasing data to suggest that other factors may play a role in the development of postinjury infection in patients after colon injury. The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of gastric wounding on the development of SSI and nonsurgical site infection (NSSI) in patients with colon injury. Post hoc analysis was performed on data prospectively collected for 317 patients presenting with penetrating hollow viscus injury. One hundred sixty-two patients with colon injury were subdivided into one of three groups: patients with isolated colon wounds (C), patients with colon and stomach wounds with or without other organ injury (C+S), and patients with colon and other organ injury but no stomach injury (C-S) and assessed for the development of SSI and NSSI. Infection rates were also determined for patients who sustained isolated gastric injury (S) and gastric injury in combination with other injuries other than colon (S-C). Penetrating Abdominal Trauma Index, operative times, and transfusion were assessed. Discrete variables were analyzed by Cochran-Mantel-Haenszel chi2 test and Fisher's exact test. Risk factor analysis was performed by multivariate logistic regression. C+S patients had a higher rate of SSI infection (31%) than C patients (3.6%) (p=0.008) and C-S patients (13%) (p=0.021). Similarly, the incidence of NSSI was also significantly greater in the C+S group (37%) compared with the C patients (7.5%) (p=0.07) and the C-S patients (17%) (p=0.019). There was no difference in the rate of SSI or NSSI between the C and C-S groups (p=0.3 and p=0.24, respectively). The rate of SSI was significantly greater in the C+S patients when compared with the S-C patients (31% vs. 10%, p=0.008), but there was no statistical difference in the rate of NSSI in the C+S group and the S-C group (37

  19. The effect of permissive hypotension in combined traumatic brain injury and blunt abdominal trauma: an experimental study in swines.

    PubMed

    Vrettos, T; Poimenidi, E; Athanasopoulos, P; Balasis, S; Karagiorgos, N; Siklis, T; Gatzounis, G; Fligkou, F

    2016-01-01

    Optimal hemodynamic resuscitation strategy of the trauma patient with uncontrolled hemorrhage and severe head injury in the pre-hospital setting remains a special challenge. Permissive hypotension prior to definite surgical haemostasis promotes coagulation, decreases blood loss and favors survival. However, hypotension is associated with poor outcome in severe head injury. The purpose of this experimental animal study was to assess the impact of permissive hypotension on survival, hemodynamic profile and brain oxygenation parameters before and/or after definite surgical haemostasis. Six-week-old pigs (n=12) underwent general anesthesia and brain injury was produced by the fluid percussion model. Animals were instrumented to measure hemodynamic parameters and cerebral blood flow. All animals (n=12) were subjected to laparotomy and a surgical knot was placed through the abdominal aorta wall. Uncontrolled hemorrhage was simulated by pulling out the intentionally left protruding free ends of the suture (goal MAP=30 mmHg). Animals were randomly divided into two groups; group A (n=6) was subjected to aggressive fluid resuscitation (goal SAP >80 mmHg) and group B (n=6) was left hypotensive (permissive hypotension). Animals who survived one hour of hypotensive shock underwent definite surgical haemostasis and were resuscitated for one hour. We measured survival, hemodynamic and brain oxygenation parameters at different time points before and after surgical haemostasis. All animals from Group A and 50% from Group B died before surgical haemostasis. In surviving animals (Group B, 50%, p=0.033), MAP, CO, rCBF, SjO2 and AVDO2 were restored to pre-procedural levels. Permissive hypotension by delaying fluid resuscitation up to definite surgical haemostasis improves survival, hemodynamics and allows restoration of cerebral oxygenation in severe head injury.

  20. Serum feline-specific pancreatic lipase immunoreactivity concentrations and abdominal ultrasonographic findings in cats with trauma resulting from high-rise syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Elke; Hittmair, Katharina M; Suchodolski, Jan S; Steiner, Jörg M; Tichy, Alexander; Dupré, Gilles

    2013-05-01

    To evaluate serum feline-specific pancreatic lipase immunoreactivity (fPLI) concentrations and abdominal ultrasonographic findings in cats with trauma resulting from high-rise syndrome. Prospective case series. Animals-34 client-owned cats. From cats evaluated because of high-rise syndrome between March and October 2009, a blood sample was obtained for measurement of serum fPLI concentration within 12 hours after the fall and at 24, 48, and 72 hours after the first blood collection. Pancreatitis was diagnosed in cats with an fPLI concentration > 5.4 μg/L. Each cat had abdominal ultrasonography performed twice 48 hours apart, and pancreatic trauma was assessed via detection of pancreatic enlargement, hypoechoic or heteroechoic pancreatic parenchyma, hyperechoic mesentery, and peritoneal effusion. Cats were assigned 1 point for each abnormality present, and a cumulative score ≥ 3 was considered suggestive of traumatic pancreatitis. Traumatic pancreatitis was diagnosed in 9 and 8 cats on the basis of serum fPLI concentration and ultrasonographic findings, respectively. For cats with pancreatitis, fPLI concentration was significantly higher at 12 and 24 hours after the fall than at 48 and 72 hours after the fall, and serum fPLI concentration decreased as time after the fall increased. Significant agreement existed between the use of serum fPLI concentration and abdominal ultrasonography for the diagnosis of traumatic pancreatitis. Cats with high-rise syndrome often had serum fPLI concentrations > 5.4 μg/L within 12 hours after the fall, and concurrent evaluation of those cats via abdominal ultrasonography twice, 48 hours apart, improved detection of traumatic pancreatitis.

  1. A small case series of aortic balloon occlusion in trauma: lessons learned from its use in ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms and a brief review.

    PubMed

    Hörer, T M; Skoog, P; Pirouzram, A; Nilsson, K F; Larzon, T

    2016-10-01

    EndoVascular and Hybrid Trauma Management (EVTM) is an emerging concept for the early treatment of trauma patients using aortic balloon occlusion (ABO), embolization agents and stent grafts to stop ongoing traumatic bleeding. These techniques have previously been implemented successfully in the treatment of ruptured aortic aneurysm. We describe our very recent experience of EVTM using ABO in bleeding patients and lessons learned over the last 20 years from the endovascular treatment of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms (rAAA). We also briefly describe current knowledge of ABO usage in trauma. A small series of educational cases in our hospital is described, where endovascular techniques were used to gain temporary hemorrhage control. The methods used for rAAA and their applicability to EVTM with a multidisciplinary approach are presented. Establishing femoral arterial access immediately on arrival at the emergency room and use of an angiography table in the surgical suite may facilitate EVTM at an early stage. ABO may be an effective method for the temporary stabilization of severely hemodynamically unstable patients with hemorrhagic shock, and may be useful as a bridge to definitive treatment of the bleeding patients. EVTM, including the usage of ABO, can be initiated on patient arrival and is feasible. Further data need to be collected to investigate proper indications for ABO, best clinical usage, results and potential complications. Accordingly, the ABOTrauma Registry has recently been set up. Existing experiences of EVTM and lessons from the endovascular treatment of rAAA may be useful in trauma management.

  2. The Impact of Body Mass Index on Abdominal Wall Reconstruction Outcomes: A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Giordano, Salvatore A; Garvey, Patrick B; Baumann, Donald P; Liu, Jun; Butler, Charles E

    2016-01-01

    Background Obesity and higher body mass index (BMI) may be associated with higher rates of wound healing complications and hernia recurrence rates following complex abdominal wall reconstruction (AWR). We hypothesized that higher BMI’s result in higher rates of postoperative wound healing complications but similar rates of hernia recurrence in AWR patients. Methods We included 511 consecutive patients who underwent AWR with underlay mesh. Patients were divided into three groups on the basis of preoperative BMI: <30 kg/m2 (non-obese), 30–34.9 kg/m2 (class I obesity) and ≥35 kg/m2 (class II/III obesity). We compared postoperative outcomes among these three groups. Results Class I and class II/III obesity patients had higher surgical site occurrence rates than non-obese patients (26.4% vs. 14.9%; p=0.006 and 36.8% vs. 14.9%; p<0.001, respectively) and higher overall complication rates (37.9% vs. 24.7%; p=0.007 and 43.4% vs. 24.7%; p<0.001, respectively). Similarly, obese patients had significantly higher skin dehiscence (19.3% vs 7.2%; p<0.001 and 26.5% vs 7.2%; p<0.001, respectively) and fat necrosis rates (10.0% vs 2.1%; p=0.001 and 11.8% vs 2.1%; p<0.001, respectively) than non-obese patients. Obesity class II/III patients had higher infection and seroma rates than non-obese patients (9.6% vs 4.3%; p=0.041 and 8.1% vs 2.1%; p=0.006, respectively). However, class I and class II/III obesity patients experienced hernia recurrence rates (11.4% vs. 7.7%; p=0.204 and 10.3% vs. 7.7%; p=0.381, respectively) and freedom from hernia recurrence (overall log-rank p=0.41) similar to non-obese patients. Conclusions Hernia recurrence rates do not appear to be affected by obesity on long-term follow-up in AWR. PMID:28445378

  3. Unenhanced Computed Tomography to Visualize Hollow Viscera and/or Mesenteric Injury After Blunt Abdominal Trauma: A Single-Institution Experience.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xu-Yang; Wei, Ming-Tian; Jin, Cheng-Wu; Wang, Meng; Wang, Zi-Qiang

    2016-03-01

    To identify and describe the major features of unenhanced computed tomography (CT) images of blunt hollow viscera and/or mesenteric injury (BHVI/MI) and to determine the value of unenhanced CT in the diagnosis of BHVI/MI. This retrospective study included 151 patients who underwent unenhanced CT before laparotomy for blunt abdominal trauma between January 2011 and December 2013. According to surgical observations, patients were classified as having BHVI/MI (n = 73) or not (n = 78). Sensitivity, specificity, P values, and likelihood ratios were calculated by comparing CT findings between the 2 groups. Six significant CT findings (P < 0.05) for BHVI/MI were identified and their sensitivity and specificity values determined, as follows: bowel wall thickening (39.7%, 96.2%), mesentery thickening (46.6%, 88.5%), mesenteric fat infiltration (12.3%, 98.7%), peritoneal fat infiltration (31.5%, 87.1%), parietal peritoneum thickening (30.1%, 85.9%), and intra- or retro-peritoneal air (34.2%, 96.2%). Unenhanced CT scan was useful as an initial assessment tool for BHVI/MI after blunt abdominal trauma. Six key features on CT were correlated with BHVI/MI.

  4. Understanding Combat-Related PTSD Symptom Expression Through Index Trauma and Military Culture: Case Studies of Filipino Soldiers.

    PubMed

    Dela Cruz Fajarito, Cariñez; De Guzman, Rosalito G

    2017-05-01

    Few studies demonstrate how the index trauma may influence subsequent post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms, especially among soldiers. There is still no consensus on specific trauma types and their corresponding PTSD symptom profiles. Furthermore, varied PTSD symptom manifestations that may yield to PTSD trauma subtypes are yet to be known. Importantly, the significance of the military culture's possible influence on soldiers' PTSD has also been underexplored. And the dominant PTSD construct may possibly be unable to capture the essential aspects of the military context in understanding combat-related PTSD. Hence, this study aims to reach an understanding into how index trauma and military culture may possibly shape participants' PTSD expressions. Case study design was used, wherein multiple sources of data-such as PTSD assessments, and interviews with the participants and key informants-enabled data triangulation. The three case reports are the outcomes of the corroboration of evidences that reveal an enriched and holistic understanding of the phenomenon under study. The Ethics Review Board Committee of the Armed Forces of the Philippines Medical Center approved the study. The participants were three Filipino active duty combat soldiers. Although all participants had similar index traumas, their PTSD symptom expressions are unique from one another, in that they differ in terms of their most incapacitating PTSD symptoms and other symptoms that have been potentially shaped by military culture. Their most incapacitating symptoms: hypervigilance (case 1), negative belief in oneself and negative emotions (case 2), prolonged distress, and marked physiological reactions to trauma-related cues (case 3), may be understood in the light of how they personally experienced different circumstances of their index traumas. The way participants have anchored specific components of their sworn soldier's creed (i.e., not leaving a fallen comrade) into some of their PTSD

  5. Correlation of the association of serum lactate, random blood sugar, and revised trauma score as predictors of outcome in hemodynamically unstable abdominal emergencies.

    PubMed

    Allwell-Brown, E; Afuwape, O O; Ayandipo, O; Alonge, T

    2016-01-01

    Elevated levels of serum lactate and glucose during resuscitation have been demonstrated to be predictors of morbidity and mortality in hemodynamically unstable patients with surgical abdominal conditions. However, the rate of return to normal levels of both lactate and blood glucose may be better predictors of mortality and morbidity. The aims of this study are: (I) To determine the pattern of serum lactate and glucose changes in patients with surgical abdominal conditions requiring resuscitation within 48 hours of presentation. (II) To correlate the predictive capability of these two independent parameters. (III) To correlate the predictive values of these parameters with the revised trauma score (RTS). This is a prospective observational study conducted over three months. The patients admitted by the general surgery division requiring resuscitation from shock was included in this study. Resuscitation was carried out with crystalloids. The estimation of serum lactate and glucose levels was done at presentation (0 hours), 12, 24 and 48 hours after admission. The revised trauma score (RTS) was calculated for each patient at presentation and at 12, 24 and 48 hours subsequently. The patients were followed up four weeks or when death occurred within four weeks of presentation. Forty four patients were recruited in the study. There were seven mortalities. The mean serum levels of Plasma glucose and lactate of all the patients were elevated at presentation in the emergency department. Survival was better with a return to normal serum lactate within 12 hours. On the other hand the random plasma glucose (RPG) levels may not be useful in prognosticating patients. However a combination of serum lactate, RTS (at 24 and 48 hours) and RPG at 48 hours may improve predictive parameters in trauma related cases.

  6. Diagnostic accuracy of contrast enhanced ultrasound in patients with blunt abdominal trauma presenting to the emergency department: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhongheng; Hong, Yucai; Liu, Ning; Chen, Yuhao

    2017-06-30

    We aimed to investigate the diagnostic accuracy of contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) in evaluating blunt abdominal trauma for patients presenting to the emergency department. Electronic search of Scopus and Pubmed was performed from inception to September 2016. Human studies investigating the diagnostic accuracy of CEUS in identifying abdominal solid organ injuries were included. Risk of bias was assessed using the QUADAS tool. A total of 10 studies were included in the study and 9 of them were included for meta-analysis. The log(DOR) values ranged from 3.80 (95% CI: 2.81-4.79) to 8.52 (95% CI: 4.58-12.47) in component studies. The combined log(DOR) was 6.56 (95% CI: 5.66-7.45). The Cochran's Q was 11.265 (p = 0.793 with 16 degrees of freedom), and the Higgins' I 2 was 0%. The CEUS had a sensitivity of 0.981 (95% CI: 0.868-0.950) and a false positive rate of 0.018 (95% CI: 0.010-0.032) for identifying parenchymal injuries, with an AUC of 0.984. CEUS performed at emergency department had good diagnostic accuracy in identifying abdominal solid organ injuries. CEUS can be recommended in monitoring solid organ injuries, especially for patients managed with non-operative strategy.

  7. Trauma center variation in the management of pediatric patients with blunt abdominal solid organ injury: a national trauma data bank analysis.

    PubMed

    Safavi, Arash; Skarsgard, Erik D; Rhee, Peter; Zangbar, Bardiya; Kulvatunyou, Narong; Tang, Andrew; O'Keeffe, Terence; Friese, Randall S; Joseph, Bellal

    2016-03-01

    Nonoperative management of hemodynamically stable children with Solid Organ Injury (SOI) has become standard of care. The aim of this study is to identify differences in management of children with SOI treated at Adult Trauma Centers (ATC) versus Pediatric Trauma Centers (PTC). We hypothesized that patients treated at ATC would undergo more procedures than PTC. Patients younger than 18 years old with isolated SOI (spleen, liver, kidney) who were treated at level I-II ATC or PTC were identified from the 2011-2012 National Trauma Data Bank. The primary outcome measure was the incidence of operative management. Data was analyzed using multivariate logistic regression analysis. Procedures were defined as surgery or transarterial embolization (TAE). 6799 children with SOI (spleen: 2375, liver: 2867, kidney: 1557) were included. Spleen surgery was performed more frequently at ATC than PTC {101 (7.7%) vs. 52 (4.9%); P=0.007}. After adjusting for potential confounders (grade of injury, age, gender and injury severity score), admission at ATC was associated with higher odds of splenic surgery (OR: 1.5, 95% CI: 1.02-2.25; p=0.03). 11 and 8 children underwent kidney and liver operations respectively. TAE was performed in 17 patients with splenic, 34 with liver and 14 with kidney trauma. There was no practice variation between ATC and PTC regarding kidney and liver operations or TAE incidence. Operative management for SOI was more often performed at ATC. The presence of significant disparity in the management of children with splenic injuries justifies efforts to use these surgeries as a reported national quality indicator for trauma programs. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Impact of nulliparous women's body mass index or excessive weight gain in pregnancy on genital tract trauma at birth.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Kelly; Migliaccio, Laura; Rogers, Rebecca G; Leeman, Lawrence; Hervey, Elizabeth; Qualls, Clifford

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the impact of body mass index (BMI) or pregnancy weight gain on the presence, site, and severity of genital tract trauma at childbirth in nulliparous women. The present study is a subanalysis of a prospective cohort of healthy nulliparous women recruited during pregnancy and followed through birth. Weight gain during pregnancy and prepregnancy BMI were recorded. At birth, women underwent detailed mapping of genital tract trauma. For analyses, women were dichotomized into obese (BMI ≥ 30) versus nonobese (BMI < 30) at baseline as well as into those who gained weight as recommended by the Institute of Medicine (IOM) and those who gained more than the recommended amount to determine the impact of obesity or excessive weight gain on rates of genital tract trauma. Data from 445 women were available for analysis. Presence and severity of genital tract trauma did not vary between obese and nonobese women (51% vs 53%, P = .64). Likewise, women who had more than the IOM-recommended weight gain did not have a higher incidence of perineal lacerations (52% versus 53% with perineal lacerations, P = .69). Obese women were more likely to gain in excess of the IOM guidelines during pregnancy (75% vs 50% excessive weight gain in obese vs nonobese women, respectively; P < .001). A woman's BMI or excessive weight gain in pregnancy did not influence her risk of genital tract trauma at birth. © 2014 by the American College of Nurse-Midwives.

  9. Development and validation of an ICD-10-based disability predictive index for patients admitted to hospitals with trauma.

    PubMed

    Wada, Tomoki; Yasunaga, Hideo; Yamana, Hayato; Matsui, Hiroki; Fushimi, Kiyohide; Morimura, Naoto

    2018-03-01

    There was no established disability predictive measurement for patients with trauma that could be used in administrative claims databases. The aim of the present study was to develop and validate a diagnosis-based disability predictive index for severe physical disability at discharge using the International Classification of Diseases, 10th revision (ICD-10) coding. This retrospective observational study used the Diagnosis Procedure Combination database in Japan. Patients who were admitted to hospitals with trauma and discharged alive from 01 April 2010 to 31 March 2015 were included. Pediatric patients under 15 years old were excluded. Data for patients admitted to hospitals from 01 April 2010 to 31 March 2013 was used for development of a disability predictive index (derivation cohort), while data for patients admitted to hospitals from 01 April 2013 to 31 March 2015 was used for the internal validation (validation cohort). The outcome of interest was severe physical disability defined as the Barthel Index score of <60 at discharge. Trauma-related ICD-10 codes were categorized into 36 injury groups with reference to the categorization used in the Global Burden of Diseases study 2013. A multivariable logistic regression analysis was performed for the outcome using the injury groups and patient baseline characteristics including patient age, sex, and Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI) score in the derivation cohort. A score corresponding to a regression coefficient was assigned to each injury group. The disability predictive index for each patient was defined as the sum of the scores. The predictive performance of the index was validated using the receiver operating characteristic curve analysis in the validation cohort. The derivation cohort included 1,475,158 patients, while the validation cohort included 939,659 patients. Of the 939,659 patients, 235,382 (25.0%) were discharged with severe physical disability. The c-statistics of the disability predictive index

  10. Utility of cervical spinal and abdominal computed tomography in diagnosing occult pneumothorax in patients with blunt trauma: Computed tomographic imaging protocol matters.

    PubMed

    Akoglu, Haldun; Akoglu, Ebru Unal; Evman, Serdar; Akoglu, Tayfun; Denizbasi, Arzu; Guneysel, Ozlem; Onur, Ozge; Onur, Ender

    2012-10-01

    Small pneumothoraces (PXs), which are not initially recognized with a chest x-ray film and diagnosed by a thoracic computed tomography (CT), are described as occult PX (OCPX). The objective of this study was to evaluate cervival spine (C-spine) and abdominal CT (ACT) for diagnosing OCPX and overt PX (OVPX). All patients with blunt trauma who presented consecutively to the emergency department during a 26-months period were included. Among all the chest CTs (CCTs) (6,155 patients) conducted during that period, 254 scans were confirmed to have a true PX. The findings in their C-spine CT and ACT were compared with the findings in CCTs. Among these patients, 254 had a diagnosis of PX confirmed with CCT. OCPXs were identified on the chest computed tomographic scan of 128 patients (70.3%), whereas OVPXs were evident in 54 patients (29.7%). Computed tomographic imaging of the C-spine was performed in 74% of patients with OCPX and 66.7% of patients with OVPX trauma. Only 45 (35.2%) cases of OCPX and 42 (77.8%) cases of OVPX were detected by C-spine CT. ACT was performed in almost all patients, and 121 (95.3%) of 127 of these correctly identified an existing OCPX. Sensitivity of C-spine CT and ACT was 35.1% and 96.5%, respectively; specificity was 100% and 100%, respectively. Almost all OCPXs, regardless of intrathoracic location, could be detected by ACT or by combining C-spine and abdominal computed tomographic screening for patients. If the junction of the first and second vertebra is used as the caudad extent, C-spine CT does not have sufficient power to diagnose more than a third of the cases. Diagnostic study, level III.

  11. [Cost and Revenue Relationship in Orthopaedic and Trauma Surgery Patients in Relation to Body Mass Index].

    PubMed

    Schmelz, Helmut A; Geraedts, Max

    2018-06-14

    Growing numbers of patients in orthopaedic and trauma surgery are obese. The risks involved are e.g. surgical complications, higher costs for longer hospital stays or special operating tables. It is a moot point whether revenues in the German DRG system cover the individual costs in relation to patients' body mass index (BMI) and in which area of hospital care potentially higher costs occur. Data related to BMI, individual costs and revenues were extracted from the hospital information system for 13,833 patients of a large hospital who were operated in 2007 to 2010 on their upper or lower extremities. We analysed differences in cost revenue relations dependent on patients' BMI and surgical site, and differences in the distribution of hospital cost areas in relation to patients' BMI by t and U tests. Individual costs of morbidly obese (BMI ≥ 40) and underweight patients (BMI < 18.5) significantly (p < 0.05) exceeded individual DRG revenues. Significantly higher cost revenue relations were detected for all operations on the lower and upper extremities except for ankle joint surgeries in which arthroscopical procedures predominate. Most of the incremental costs resulted from higher spending for nursing care, medication and special appliances. Costs for doctors and medical ancillary staff did not increase in relation to patients' BMI. To avoid BMI related patient discrimination, supplementary fees to cover extra costs for morbidly obese or underweight patients with upper or lower extremities operations should raise DRG revenues. Moreover, hospitals should be organisationally prepared for these patients. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  12. A comparison study of pelvic fractures and associated abdominal injuries between pediatric and adult blunt trauma patients.

    PubMed

    Swaid, Forat; Peleg, Kobi; Alfici, Ricardo; Olsha, Oded; Givon, Adi; Kessel, Boris

    2017-03-01

    Pelvic fractures are a marker of severe injury, mandating a thorough investigation for the presence of associated injuries. Anatomical and physiological differences between adults and children may lead to a different impact of pelvic fractures on these populations. The purpose of this study is to compare pelvic fractures between pediatric and adult blunt trauma victims, mainly regarding their severity and associated intraabdominal injuries. A retrospective study involving blunt trauma patients suffering pelvic fractures, according to the records of the Israeli National Trauma Registry. Patients included children, aged 0-14years, and adults between 15 and 64years. The presence and severity of associated injuries were assessed. Overall, 7621 patients aged 0-64years were identified with pelvic fractures following blunt trauma. The incidence of pelvic fractures in children was (0.8%), as compared to 4.3% in adults, p <0.0001. The most common mechanism of injury was motor vehicle accident (MVA) in adults, and pedestrian hit by car (PHBC) in children. About a quarter of the patients in both groups had an ISS >25. Adults sustained significantly more moderate to severe pelvic fractures (AIS≥3) than children (26.7% vs. 17.4%, p<0.0001). The overall mortality rate was similar among the two groups (5.4% in adults, 5.2% in children, p=0.7554). The only associated injury with statistically significant difference in incidence among the two groups was rectal injury (1.2% among children, 0.2% among adults, p<0.0001). Among adult patients, there was a clear correlation between the severity of pelvic fractures and the severity of concomitant splenic and hepatic injuries (p=0.026, p=0.0004, respectively). Among children, a similar correlation was not demonstrated. Adults involved in blunt trauma are more likely to sustain pelvic fractures, and these are generally more severe fractures, as compared to children suffering from blunt trauma. Nonetheless, mortality rates were found

  13. A Practical Predictive Index for Intra-abdominal Septic Complications After Primary Anastomosis for Crohn's Disease: Change in C-Reactive Protein Level Before Surgery.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Lugen; Li, Yi; Wang, Honggang; Zhu, Weiming; Zhang, Wei; Gong, Jianfeng; Li, Ning; Li, Jieshou

    2015-08-01

    Postoperative intra-abdominal septic complications are difficult to manage in Crohn's disease, which makes prevention especially important. The purpose of this study was to examine the risk factors for intra-abdominal septic complications after primary anastomosis for Crohn's disease and to seek a practical predictive index for intra-abdominal septic complications. This was a retrospective study. The study was conducted in a tertiary referral hospital. Based on a computerized database of 344 patients with Crohn's disease who underwent primary anastomosis between 2004 and 2013, the patients were placed into an intra-abdominal septic complications group and a group without intra-abdominal septic complications. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify risk factors, and the predictive accuracy of possible predictors was assessed using receiver operating characteristic curves. Overall, 39 patients (11.34%) developed intra-abdominal septic complications. Preoperative C-reactive protein level >10 mg/L was found to be an independent risk factor (p < 0.01) for intra-abdominal septic complications. For prediction of intra-abdominal septic complications, receiver operating characteristic curve analysis showed that a C-reactive protein cutoff of 14.50 mg/L provided negative and positive predictive values of 96.84% and 34.07%. In addition, the change in C-reactive protein levels over the 2 weeks before surgery was greater in the intra-abdominal septic complications group than the group with no intra-abdominal septic complications (p < 0.01), and the directions of change were opposite, upward in the former and downward in the latter. Apart from being a risk factor for intra-abdominal septic complications (p < 0.01), receiver operating characteristic curve analysis showed that the change in C-reactive protein levels before surgery had a negative predictive value for intra-abdominal septic complications of 98.66% and a positive predictive value of 76

  14. Copy Number Variations in Candidate Genes and Intergenic Regions Affect Body Mass Index and Abdominal Obesity in Mexican Children

    PubMed Central

    Burguete-García, Ana Isabel; Bonnefond, Amélie; Peralta-Romero, Jesús; Froguel, Philippe

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. Increase in body weight is a gradual process that usually begins in childhood and in adolescence as a result of multiple interactions among environmental and genetic factors. This study aimed to analyze the relationship between copy number variants (CNVs) in five genes and four intergenic regions with obesity in Mexican children. Methods. We studied 1423 children aged 6–12 years. Anthropometric measurements and blood levels of biochemical parameters were obtained. Identification of CNVs was performed by real-time PCR. The effect of CNVs on obesity or body composition was assessed using regression models adjusted for age, gender, and family history of obesity. Results. Gains in copy numbers of LEPR and NEGR1 were associated with decreased body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), and risk of abdominal obesity, whereas gain in ARHGEF4 and CPXCR1 and the intergenic regions 12q15c, 15q21.1a, and 22q11.21d and losses in INS were associated with increased BMI and WC. Conclusion. Our results indicate a possible contribution of CNVs in LEPR, NEGR1, ARHGEF4, and CPXCR1 and the intergenic regions 12q15c, 15q21.1a, and 22q11.21d to the development of obesity, particularly abdominal obesity in Mexican children. PMID:28428959

  15. One Stage Emergency Pancreatoduodenectomy  for Isolated Injury to Pancreatic Head Following Blunt Abdominal Trauma: Case Report and Review of Literature.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Sumanta Kumar

    2013-07-01

    Major pancreatic injury following blunt abdominal trauma by itself is a relatively rare occurrence, and in vast majority of cases (95%) it is associated with injury to adjacent major vessels and organs; thus making isolated major pancreatic injury even rarer. While most pancreatic injuries are managed by simple measures like debridement and drainage, complex proximal injury poses surgical challenge regarding surgical skill and judgement. Disproportionate approach at any stage of management can contribute  to high mortality and morbidity. Emergency pancreatoduodenectomy plays a limited but important role in managing serious trauma to proximal pancreas and duodenum. Author presents a case where isolated injury to head of pancreas required emergency pancreatoduodenectomy. After a bizarre road accident, a middle aged male underwent emergency laparotomy for intraperitoneal bleeding and during exploration a deep transverse laceration with ampullary disruption was found in the head of the organ. Duodenum in all its part was intact and there was no other injury. The nature and site of injury made emergency pancreatoduodenectomy the only viable option. Leaking pancreatojejunostomy enhances infective complications that lead to late mortality. To circumvent this problem there is enthusiasm for staged surgery with resection and tube pancreatostomy in first stage, leaving the difficult anastomosis for a later date, However, if the patient is haemodynamically stable and operated reasonably early, one stage pancreatoduodenectomy gives good result and avoids repeating surgery with inherent problems and reduces hospital stay. For successful management of pancreatic trauma it is essential to make early diagnosis of duct disruption, with sound application of operative skill and judgement by treating surgeon.

  16. Colon injury after blunt abdominal trauma: results of the EAST Multi-Institutional Hollow Viscus Injury Study.

    PubMed

    Williams, Michael D; Watts, Dorraine; Fakhry, Samir

    2003-11-01

    Blunt injury to the colon is rare. Few studies of adequate size and design exist to allow clinically useful conclusions. The Eastern Association for the Surgery of Trauma Multi-institutional Hollow Viscus Injury (HVI) Study presents a unique opportunity to definitively study these injuries. Patients with blunt HVI were identified from the registries of 95 trauma centers over 2 years (1998-1999). Patients with colon injuries (cases) were compared with blunt trauma patient undergoing a negative laparotomy (controls). Data were abstracted by chart review. Of the 227,972 patients represented, 2,632 (1.0%) had an HVI and 798 had a colonic/rectal injury (0.3%). Of patients diagnosed with HVI, 30.2% had a colon injury. No physical findings or imaging modalities were able to discriminate colonic injury. Logistic regression modeling yielded no clinically useful combination of findings that would reliably predict colonic injury. In patients undergoing laparotomy, presence of colon injury was associated with a higher risk of some complications but not mortality. Colon injury was associated with increased hospital (17.4 vs. 13.1, p < 0.001) and intensive care unit (9.7 vs. 6.9, p = 0.003) length of stay. Almost all colon patients (92.0%) underwent laparotomy within 24 hours of injury. Colonic injury after blunt trauma is rare and difficult to diagnose. No diagnostic test or combination of findings reliably excluded blunt colonic injury. Despite the inadequacy of current diagnostic tests, almost all patients with colonic injury were taken to the operating room within 24 hours. Even with relatively prompt surgery, patients with colon injury were at significantly higher risk for serious complications and increased length of stay. In contrast to small bowel perforation, delay in operative intervention appears to be less common but is still associated with serious morbidity.

  17. The Use of CT Scan in Hemodynamically Stable Children with Blunt Abdominal Trauma: Look before You Leap.

    PubMed

    Nellensteijn, David R; Greuter, Marcel J; El Moumni, Moustafa; Hulscher, Jan B

    2016-08-01

    We set out to determine the diagnostic value of computed tomographic (CT) scans in relation to the radiation dose, tumor incidence, and tumor mortality by radiation for hemodynamically stable pediatric patients with blunt abdominal injury. We focused on the changes in management because of new information obtained by CT. CT scans for suspected pediatric abdominal injury performed in our accident and emergency department were retrieved from the radiology registry and analyzed for: injury and hemodynamic parameters, changes in therapy, and radiological interventions. The dose length product (DLP) was used to calculate the effective dose (ED) and with the BEIR VII report we calculated the estimated induced lifetime tumor and mortality risk. Seventy-two patients underwent abdominal CT scanning for suspicion of abdominal injury and eight patients were excluded for hemodynamic instability, leaving 64 hemodynamically stable patients. Four patients died (6%). On the remaining 60 patients, only one laparotomy was performed for suspicion of duodenal perforation. Only in three out of the 64 hemodynamically stable cases (5%), a CT scan brought forward an indication for intervention or change in management. One patient was suspected of a duodenal perforation and underwent a laparotomy. A grade II hepatic laceration, but no duodenal, injury was found. Two patients underwent embolization of the splenic artery. One for an arterial blush caused by splenic laceration as was observed on the contrast enhanced-CT. Patient remained stable and during the angiogram the blush had disappeared. The second patient underwent (prophylactic) selective arterial embolization for having sustained a grade V splenic injury. The median radiation dosage was 11.43 mSv (range 1.19-23.76 mSv) in our patients. The use of the BEIR VII methodology results in an estimated increase in the lifetime tumor incidence of 0.17% (range, 0.05-0.67%) and an estimated increase in lifetime tumor incidence of 0.08% (0

  18. A multi-level modeling approach examining PTSD symptom reduction during prolonged exposure therapy: moderating effects of number of trauma types experienced, having an HIV-related index trauma, and years since HIV diagnosis among HIV-positive adults.

    PubMed

    Junglen, Angela G; Smith, Brian C; Coleman, Jennifer A; Pacella, Maria L; Boarts, Jessica M; Jones, Tracy; Feeny, Norah C; Ciesla, Jeffrey A; Delahanty, Douglas L

    2017-11-01

    People living with HIV (PLWH) have extensive interpersonal trauma histories and higher rates of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) than the general population. Prolonged exposure (PE) therapy is efficacious in reducing PTSD across a variety of trauma samples; however, research has not examined factors that influence how PTSD symptoms change during PE for PLWH. Using multi-level modeling, we examined the potential moderating effect of number of previous trauma types experienced, whether the index trauma was HIV-related or not, and years since HIV diagnosis on PTSD symptom reduction during a 10-session PE protocol in a sample of 51 PLWH. In general, PTSD symptoms decreased linearly throughout the PE sessions. Experiencing more previous types of traumatic events was associated with a slower rate of PTSD symptom change. In addition, LOCF analyses found that participants with a non-HIV-related versus HIV-related index trauma had a slower rate of change for PTSD symptoms over the course of PE. However, analyses of raw data decreased this finding to marginal. Years since HIV diagnosis did not impact PTSD symptom change. These results provide a better understanding of how to tailor PE to individual clients and aid clinicians in approximating the rate of symptom alleviation. Specifically, these findings underscore the importance of accounting for trauma history and index trauma type when implementing a treatment plan for PTSD in PLWH.

  19. Visceral injury in electrical shock trauma: proposed guideline for the management of abdominal electrocution and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Evelyne GSC; Júnior, Gerson A Pereira; Neto, Bruno F Muller; Freitas, Rodrigo A; Yaegashi, Lygia B; Almeida, Carlos E Fagotti; Júnior, Jayme Adriano Farina

    2014-01-01

    Victims of electrical burns account for approximately 5% of admissions to major burn centers. The first case of visceral injury caused by electrical burns was described in 1927 by Simonin, who reported perforation of the small intestine. Other rare cases were reported over the following years. The colon and small intestine were the organs most frequently affected. Less frequently involved organs were the heart, esophagus, stomach, pancreas, liver, gallbladder, lung, and kidney. We highlight the potential fatal visceral injuries after the electrical trauma. This study provides a review on this topic and proposes a management flowchart that should be adopted by the multidisciplinary team to treat these patients. Conclusion: Visceral injuries are rare in electrical burns victims, but it can be severe and are associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality, sometimes requiring a more interventional approach. PMID:24624308

  20. Racial Differences in the Associations of Posttraumatic Stress and Insomnia With Body Mass Index Among Trauma-Exposed Veterans.

    PubMed

    Lee, Aaron A; Gabriele, Jeanne M

    2017-03-21

    Posttraumatic stress is associated with increased body mass index (BMI) and rates of obesity. Black adults are at greater risk for obesity, trauma exposure, development of posttraumatic stress disorder, and comorbid sleep problems compared to White adults. Accordingly, Black adults with a history of trauma exposure may be at greater risk for elevated BMI associated with posttraumatic stress and insomnia. Multiple linear regression was used to examine race as a moderator of the relationship between posttraumatic symptoms and insomnia with BMI in a sample of Black and White trauma-exposed Veterans (N = 171), controlling for age and sex. There was a significant interaction of race with PTSD (p = 0.042) and insomnia symptoms (p = 0.045) on BMI. Simple slopes showed a significant positive association of posttraumatic stress and BMI among Black (p = 0.003), but not White Veterans (p = 0.590). Similarly, insomnia was significantly associated with greater BMI for Black (p = 0.023), but not White Veterans (p = 0.496). Posttraumatic stress and insomnia may play a particularly important role in the development of weight related health problems among Black Veterans. Early identification and treatment of these symptoms may reduce the risk of obesity among this vulnerable population.

  1. Desmoid Fibromatosis of the Lower Abdominal Wall in Irrua Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Awe, Oluwafemi Olasupo; Eluehike, Sylvester

    2018-01-01

    Desmoid fibromatosis (desmoid tumors) is rare tumors. It can occur as intra-abdominal, extraabdominal, or abdominal wall tumor depending on the site. The abdominal wall type is usually sporadic, but few have been associated with familial adenomatous polyposis. They are commonly seen in young females who are pregnant with a history of the previous cesarean section scar or within the 1st year of the last childbirth. There is an association between this tumor, presence of estrogen receptors, and abdominal trauma. We present a 29-year-old Nigerian woman with fungating lower abdominal wall tumor. This tumor is rare, a high index of suspicion will be very important in making the diagnosis. PMID:29643736

  2. Hepatic trauma management in polytraumatised patients.

    PubMed

    Pop, P Axentii; Pop, M; Iovan, C; Boancã, C

    2012-01-01

    The specialty literature of the last decade presents the nonoperative management of the closed abdominal trauma as the treatment of choice. The purpose of this study is to highlight the importance of the optimal management of hepatic lesions considering the clinical, paraclinical and therapeutic approach. Our study is based on the analysis of the clinical and paraclinical data and also on the evaluation of the treatment results in 1671 patients with abdominal trauma affecting multiple organs who were treated at the Clinic of Surgery, County Hospital of Oradea from 2008 to 2011. The non-operative approach of the hepatic trauma, applied in 52% of the patients, was indicated in stable hemodynamic status, non-bleeding hepatic lesions on the abdominal CT, and the absence of other significant abdominal lesions. The remaining 48% were treated surgically. The postoperative evolution was free of complications in 72% of the patients while the rest of 28% presented one or more postoperative complications. CT = Computer Tomography; ISS= Injury Severity Score; AIS = Abbreviated Index of Severity; AAST = American Association for the Surgery of Trauma; ARDS = Adult Respiratory Distress Syndrome. RevistaChirurgia.

  3. Prehospital shock index and pulse pressure/heart rate ratio to predict massive transfusion after severe trauma: Retrospective analysis of a large regional trauma database.

    PubMed

    Pottecher, Julien; Ageron, François-Xavier; Fauché, Clémence; Chemla, Denis; Noll, Eric; Duranteau, Jacques; Chapiteau, Laurent; Payen, Jean-François; Bouzat, Pierre

    2016-10-01

    Early and accurate detection of severe hemorrhage is critical for a timely trigger of massive transfusion (MT). Hemodynamic indices combining heart rate (HR) and either systolic (shock index [SI]) or pulse pressure (PP) (PP/HR ratio) have been shown to track blood loss during hemorrhage. The present study assessed the accuracy of prehospital SI and PP/HR ratio to predict subsequent MT, using the gray-zone approach. This was a retrospective analysis (January 1, 2009, to December 31, 2011) of a prospectively developed trauma registry (TRENAU), in which the triage scheme combines patient severity and hospital facilities. Thresholds for MT were defined as either classic (≥10 red blood cell units within the first 24 hours [MT1]) or critical (≥3 red blood cells within the first hour [MT2]). The receiver operating characteristic curves and gray zones were defined for SI and PP/HR ratio to predict MT1 and MT2 and faced with initial triage scheme. The TRENAU registry included 3,689 trauma patients, of which 2,557 had complete chart recovery and 176 (6.9%) required MT. In the whole population, PP/HR ratio and SI moderately and similarly predicted MT1 (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, 0.77 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 0.70-0.84] and 0.80 [95% CI, 0.74-0.87], respectively, p = 0.064) and MT2 (0.71 [95% CI, 0.67-0.76] and 0.72 [95% CI, 0.68-0.77], respectively, p = 0.48). The proportions of patients in the gray zone for PP/HR ratio and SI were 61% versus 40%, respectively, to predict MT1 (p < 0.001) and 62% versus 71%, respectively, to predict MT2 (p < 0.001). In the least severe patient, both indices had fair accuracy to predict MT1 (0.91 [95% CI, 0.82-1.00] vs. 0.87 [95% CI, 0.79-1.00]; p = 0.638), and PP/HR ratio outperformed SI to predict MT2 (0.72 [95% CI, 0.59-0.84] vs. 0.54 [95% CI, 0.33-0.74]; p < 0.015). In an unselected trauma population, prehospital SI and PP/HR ratio were moderately accurate in predicting MT. In the seemingly least

  4. Abdominal obesity and physical inactivity are associated with erectile dysfunction independent of body mass index.

    PubMed

    Janiszewski, Peter M; Janssen, Ian; Ross, Robert

    2009-07-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) is common among men with an elevated body mass index (BMI). However, a high waist circumference (WC) and low levels of physical activity may predict ED independently of BMI. We investigated the independent relationships between BMI, WC, and physical activity with ED. Subjects consisted of 3,941 adult men (age > or = 20 years) with no history of prostate cancer from the 2001-2004 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Logistic regression analyses were used to examine the relative odds of ED association with categories of BMI, WC, and physical activity. Established thresholds were used to divide subjects into three WC and BMI categories. Physical activity level was divided into active (> or =150 min/week), moderately active (30-149 min/week), and inactive (<30 min/week) categories. A single survey question was used to assess the presence of ED. After control for potential confounders, men with either a high WC or an obese BMI had an approximately 50% higher odds of having ED compared with men with a low WC or a normal BMI, respectively. Further, moderately active or inactive men had an approximately 40-60% greater odds of ED compared with active men. When all three predictors (WC, BMI, and physical activity level) were entered into the same logistic regression model, both a high WC and low physical activity level (moderately active and inactive) were independently associated with a greater odds of ED, whereas BMI level was not. Maintaining a WC level below 102 cm and achieving the recommended amount of moderate-intensity physical activity (>or =150 min/week) is associated with the maintenance of proper erectile function, regardless of BMI level. These findings suggest that the clinical screening for ED risk should include the assessment of WC and physical activity level in addition to BMI.

  5. An Index of Trauma Severity Based on Multiattribute Utility: An Illustration of Complex Utility Modeling.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-10-01

    measure for Central Nervus System is the Glasgow Cons Score (GCS), a scale of brain and spinal cord injury (Langfitt [1978]), and is itself an additive...concerns directly relating to the injury itself were identified. These were: 1. Ventilation Severity 2 Circulation Severity 3. Central Nervous System ...interacting system within which these concerns represent interacting parts. Most trauma involves only one of these systems , but more than one may be

  6. The relationship of body mass index and abdominal fat on the radiation dose received during routine computed tomographic imaging of the abdomen and pelvis.

    PubMed

    Chan, Victoria O; McDermott, Shaunagh; Buckley, Orla; Allen, Sonya; Casey, Michael; O'Laoide, Risteard; Torreggiani, William C

    2012-11-01

    To determine the relationship of increasing body mass index (BMI) and abdominal fat on the effective dose acquired from computed tomography (CT) abdomen and pelvis scans. Over 6 months, dose-length product and total milliamp-seconds (mAs) from routine CT abdomen and pelvis scans of 100 patients were recorded. The scans were performed on a 64-slice CT scanner by using an automatic exposure control system. Effective dose (mSv) based on dose-length product, BMI, periumbilical fat thickness, and intra-abdominal fat were documented for each patient. BMI, periumbilical fat thickness, and intra-abdominal fat were compared with effective dose. Thirty-nine men and 61 women were included in the study (mean age, 56.3 years). The mean BMI was 26.2 kg/m(2). The mean effective dose was 10.3 mSv. The mean periumbilical fat thickness was 2.4 cm. Sixty-five patients had a small amount of intra-abdominal fat, and 35 had a large amount of intra-abdominal fat. The effective dose increased with increasing BMI (P < .001) and increasing amounts of intra-abdominal fat (P < .001). For every kilogram of weight, there is a 0.13 mSv increase in effective dose, which is equal to 6.5 chest radiographs per CT examination. For an increase in BMI by 5 kg/m(2), there is a 1.95 mSv increase in effective dose, which is equal to 97.5 chest radiographs per CT examination. Increasing BMI and abdominal fat significantly increases the effective dose received from CT abdomen and pelvis scans. Copyright © 2012 Canadian Association of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Extending the Rorschach trauma content index and aggression indexes to dream narratives of children exposed to enduring violence: an exploratory study.

    PubMed

    Kamphuis, Jan H; Tuin, Nynke; Timmermans, Marieke; Punamäki, Raija-Leena

    2008-11-01

    In this study, we compared dream narratives of children and adolescents living under conditions of enduring interpersonal violence (n = 220) versus those living in peaceful surroundings (n = 99) on content variables that have been associated with traumatic experiences in Rorschach (Exner, 1995) imagery. As predicted, children and adolescents living in circumstances of enduring violence reported a higher proportion of content scorable by Armstrong and Loewenstein's (1990) Trauma Content Index and a much higher proportion of aggressive objects in their dreams (AgC; Gacono & Meloy, 1994). In support of discriminant validity, no consistent group differences were observed for the relative frequencies of Animal (A), Clothing (Cg), or Cooperative movement (COP) content. The modest association between manifest dream content and psychological symptom scales suggests that the former may alternatively reflect adaptive or psychopathological processes. Our findings suggest that content analysis of dreams may be a valuable adjunct in tapping the psychological state of children traumatized by violence.

  8. The relation of body mass index and abdominal adiposity with dyslipidemia in 27 general populations of the WHO MONICA Project.

    PubMed

    Wietlisbach, V; Marques-Vidal, P; Kuulasmaa, K; Karvanen, J; Paccaud, F

    2013-05-01

    The association between adiposity measures and dyslipidemia has seldom been assessed in a multipopulational setting. 27 populations from Europe, Australia, New Zealand and Canada (WHO MONICA project) using health surveys conducted between 1990 and 1997 in adults aged 35-64 years (n = 40,480). Dyslipidemia was defined as the total/HDL cholesterol ratio >6 (men) and >5 (women). Overall prevalence of dyslipidemia was 25% in men and 23% in women. Logistic regression showed that dyslipidemia was strongly associated with body mass index (BMI) in men and with waist circumference (WC) in women, after adjusting for region, age and smoking. Among normal-weight men and women (BMI<25 kg/m(2)), an increase in the odds for being dyslipidemic was observed between lowest and highest WC quartiles (OR = 3.6, p < 0.001). Among obese men (BMI ≥ 30), the corresponding increase was smaller (OR = 1.2, p = 0.036). A similar weakening was observed among women. Classification tree analysis was performed to assign subjects into classes of risk for dyslipidemia. BMI thresholds (25.4 and 29.2 kg/m(2)) in men and WC thresholds (81.7 and 92.6 cm) in women came out at first stages. High WC (>84.8 cm) in normal-weight men, menopause in women and regular smoking further defined subgroups at increased risk. standard categories of BMI and WC, or their combinations, do not lead to optimal risk stratification for dyslipidemia in middle-age adults. Sex-specific adaptations are necessary, in particular by taking into account abdominal obesity in normal-weight men, post-menopausal age in women and regular smoking in both sexes. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Abdominal Adhesions

    MedlinePlus

    ... Clearinghouse What are abdominal adhesions? Abdominal adhesions are bands of fibrous tissue that can form between abdominal ... Esophagus Stomach Large intestine Adhesion Abdominal adhesions are bands of fibrous tissue that can form between abdominal ...

  10. Abdominal Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Recurrent or Functional Abdominal Pain (RAP or FAP) What is abdominal pain? Abdominal pain , or stomachache, ... recurrent abdominal pain (RAP) or functional abdominal pain (FAP)? If your health care provider has ruled out ...

  11. Core temperature variation is associated with heart rate variability independent of cardiac index: a study of 278 trauma patients.

    PubMed

    Mowery, Nathan T; Morris, John A; Jenkins, Judith M; Ozdas, Asli; Norris, Patrick R

    2011-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine if temperature extremes are associated with reduced heart rate variability (HRV) and "cardiac uncoupling." This was a retrospective, observational cohort study performed on 278 trauma intensive care unit admissions that had continuous HR, cardiac index (CI), and core temperature data from "thermodilution" Swan-Ganz catheter. Dense (captured second-by-second) physiologic data were divided into 5-minute intervals (N = 136 133; 11 344 hours of data). Mean CI, mean temperature, and integer HR SD were computed for each interval. Critically low HRV was defined as HR SD from 0.3 to 0.6 beats per minute. Temperature extremes were defined as less than 36°C or greater than 39°C. Low HRV and CI vary with temperature. Temperature extremes are associated with increased risk for critically low HRV (odds ratio, >1.8). Cardiac index increases with temperature until hyperthermia (>40°C). At temperature extremes, changes in CI were not explained solely by changes in HR. The conclusions of this study are (1) temperature extremes are associated with low HRV, potentially reflecting cardiac autonomic dysfunction; (2) CI increases with temperature; and (3) HRV provides additional physiologic information unobtainable via current invasive cardiac monitoring and current vital signs. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Abdominal tap

    MedlinePlus

    Peritoneal tap; Paracentesis; Ascites - abdominal tap; Cirrhosis - abdominal tap; Malignant ascites - abdominal tap ... abdominal cavity ( most often cancer of the ovaries ) Cirrhosis of the liver Damaged bowel Heart disease Infection ...

  13. Fatal torment--from psychosis-driven index offence to trauma: a case study in forensic psychotherapy, trauma therapy and matricide.

    PubMed

    Kayrouz, Rony; Vrklevski, Lila Petar

    2015-02-01

    This paper presents the case of a forensic inpatient who was found 'Not Guilty by Reason of Mental Illness' for the murder of his mother and illustrates how psychotic symptoms can mask trauma symptoms, leading to neglect in the treatment of trauma in psychotherapy with forensic inpatients. A case study of a forensic inpatient diagnosed with schizophrenia that as part of his rehabilitation program received 19 sessions of therapy (i.e. grief counselling, Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (TF-CBT) and imagery rescripting). The following measures were administered pre- and post-treatment: (a) The Depression Anxiety Stress Scale (DASS), to measure symptoms of depression, anxiety and stress; (b) The Impact of Events Scale-Revised (IES-R), to measure post-traumatic stress symptoms; and (c) The Trauma Attachment and Beliefs Scale (TABS), to measure disruption in beliefs about self and others. At completion of therapy, he showed a reduction in Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), depression, anxiety and stress symptoms. Trauma and PTSD-related symptoms in the forensic inpatient population must be assessed and treated alongside psychotic symptoms, where relevant. TF-CBT was effective in reducing PTSD symptoms in this current case study and should be considered as an intervention in forensic inpatient populations. © The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists 2014.

  14. Urological injuries following trauma.

    PubMed

    Bent, C; Iyngkaran, T; Power, N; Matson, M; Hajdinjak, T; Buchholz, N; Fotheringham, T

    2008-12-01

    Blunt renal trauma is the third most common injury in abdominal trauma following splenic and hepatic injuries, respectively. In the majority, such injuries are associated with other abdominal organ injuries. As urological injuries are not usually life-threatening, and clinical signs and symptoms are non-specific, diagnosis is often delayed. We present a practical approach to the diagnosis and management of these injuries based on our experience in a busy inner city trauma hospital with a review of the current evidence-based practice. Diagnostic imaging signs are illustrated.

  15. Abdominal Complications after Severe Burns

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-01

    abdominal compartment syndrome, schemic bowel, biliary disease, peptic ulcer disease and astritis requiring laparotomy, small bowel obstruction, rimary fungal...abdominal complications was 25%, with Curl- ng’s ulcer the most common malady (54% of the total), ollowed by esophageal lesions (17%), hemorrhagic...complications in- luded trauma exploratory laparotomy, abdominal com- artment syndrome, ischemic bowel, biliary disease, peptic lcer disease and gastritis, large

  16. Management of colorectal trauma: a review.

    PubMed

    Cheong, Ju Yong; Keshava, Anil

    2017-07-01

    Traumatic colorectal injuries are common during times of military conflict, and major improvements in their care have arisen in such periods. Since World War II, many classification systems for colorectal trauma have been proposed, including (i) Flint Grading System; (ii) Penetrating Abdominal Trauma Index; (iii) Colonic/Rectal Injury Scale; and (iv) destructive/non-destructive colonic injuries. The primary goal of these classifications was to aid surgical management and, more particularly, to determine whether a primary repair or faecal diversion should be performed. Primary repair is now the preferred surgical option. Patients who have been identified as having destructive injuries have been found to have higher anastomotic leak rates after a primary repair. Damage control principles need to be adhered to in surgical decision-making. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms of injury, classifications, clinical presentation and current recommendations for the management of colorectal trauma. © 2017 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  17. The impact of first time mother’s body mass index or excessive weight gain in pregnancy on genital tract trauma at birth

    PubMed Central

    Gallagher, Kelly; Migliaccio, Laura; Rogers, Rebecca G; Leeman, Lawrence; Hervey, Elizabeth; Qualls, Clifford

    2013-01-01

    Objective To explore the impact of body mass index BMI or pregnancy weight gain on the presence, site and severity of genital tract trauma at childbirth in nulliparous women. Methods The present study is a sub-analysis of a prospective cohort of healthy nulliparous women recruited during pregnancy and followed through birth. Weight gain during pregnancy and pre-pregnancy BMI were recorded. At birth, women underwent detailed mapping of genital tract trauma. For analyses, women were dichotomized into obese(BMI ≥30) versus non obese(BMI <30) at baseline as well as into those who gained weight as recommended by the Institute of Medicine (IOM) and those who gained more than the recommended amount to determine the impact of obesity or excessive weight gain on rates of genital tract trauma. Results Data from 445 women were available for analysis. Presence and severity of genital tract trauma did not vary between obese and non-obese women (P = NS). Likewise women who gained more than the IOM recommended weight did not have a higher incidence of perineal lacerations (53% vs 51% with perineal lacerations, P= .61). Obese women were more likely to gain in excess of the IOM guidelines during pregnancy (75% vs 50% excessive weight gain, obese vs non-obese women, P<0.001). Conclusion A woman’s BMI or excessive weight gain in pregnancy did not influence her risk of genital tract trauma at birth. PMID:24588877

  18. Anthropometry of height, weight, arm, wrist, abdominal circumference and body mass index, for Bolivian adolescents 12 to 18 years: Bolivian adolescent percentile values from the MESA study.

    PubMed

    Baya Botti, A; Pérez-Cueto, F J A; Vasquez Monllor, P A; Kolsteren, P W

    2009-01-01

    Anthropometry is important as clinical tool for individual follow-up as well as for planning and health policy-making at population level. Recent references of Bolivian Adolescents are not available. The aim of this cross sectional study was to provide age and sex specific centile values and charts of Body Mass Index, height, weight, arm, wrist and abdominal circumference from Bolivian Adolescents. Data from the MEtabolic Syndrome in Adolescents (MESA) study was used. Thirty-two Bolivian clusters from urban and rural areas were selected randomly considering population proportions, 3445 school going adolescents, 12 to 18 y, 45% males; 55% females underwent anthropometric evaluation by trained personnel using standardized protocols for all interviews and examinations. Weight, height, wrist, arm and abdominal circumference data were collected. Body Mass Index was calculated. Smoothed age- and gender specific 3rd, 5th, 10th, 25th, 50th, 75th, 85th, 90th, 95th and 97th Bolivian adolescent percentiles(BAP) and Charts(BAC) where derived using LMS regression. Percentile-based reference data for the antropometrics of for Bolivian Adolescents are presented for the first time.

  19. Comparison of libido, Female Sexual Function Index, and Arizona scores in women who underwent laparoscopic or conventional abdominal hysterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Kayataş, Semra; Özkaya, Enis; Api, Murat; Çıkman, Seyhan; Gürbüz, Ayşen; Eser, Ahmet

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the present study was to compare female sexual function between women who underwent conventional abdominal or laparoscopic hysterectomy. Materials and Methods: Seventy-seven women who were scheduled to undergo hysterectomy without oophorectomy for benign gynecologic conditions were included in the study. The women were assigned to laparoscopic or open abdominal hysterectomy according to the surgeons preference. Women with endometriosis and symptomatic prolapsus were excluded. Female sexual function scores were obtained before and six months after the operation from each participant by using validated questionnaires. Results: Pre- and postoperative scores of three different quationnaires were found as comparable in the group that underwent laparoscopic hysterectomy (p>0.05). Scores were also found as comparable in the group that underwent laparotomic hysterectomy (p>0.05). Pre- and postoperative values were compared between the two groups and revealed similar results with regard to all three scores (p>0.05). Conclusion: Our data showed comparable pre- and the postoperative scores for the two different hysterectomy techniques. The two groups were also found to have similar pre- and postoperative score values. PMID:28913149

  20. Immunoreactive serum opsonic alpha 2 sb glycoprotein as a noninvasive index of RES systemic defense after trauma.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, J E; Saba, T M

    1979-01-01

    Reticuloendothelial system (RES) depression has been correlated with diminished resistance to trauma, shock, and sepsis in man and animals. Previous studies have related the depression of RES hepatic Kupffer cell phagocytic function after trauma to diminished bioassayable opsonic activity. The present study determined if the loss of biological activity and RES alteration correlated with immunoreactive serum opsonic alpha 2 SB glycoprotein levels after trauma. Serum opsonic activity was measured by liver slice bioassay, and immunoreactive opsonic protein was measured by rocket electroimmunoassay. RE function was determined by colloid clearance over a 24-hour post-trauma period. Anesthetized rats (250-300 gm) subjected to sublethal or severe (greater than LD50) whole-body NCD trauma were the shock models investigated. Immunoreactive levels in 63 rats prior to injury were 518 +/- 24 microgram/ml. Neither biological nor immunoreactive levels were altered over 24 hours in anesthetized sham-traumatized controls. Temporal alteration in the initial decrease and recovery pattern of biologically active and immunoreactive opsonic protein levels significantly correlated following both sublethal and severe injury. Moreover, the patterns of immunoreactive levels of the opsonic protein correlated with the functional phagocytic activity of the RES as determined by vascular clearance of a test dose of blood-borne radiolabeled particulates. This glycoprotein falls after trauma, and the magnitude and duration of the decline increases with severity of injury. Immunoreactive opsonic alpha 2 SB glycoprotein appears to be an accurate measurement of circulating opsonic activity and RE Kupffer cell function after trauma, especially with respect to clearance. Thus, immunoreactive opsonic protein warrants clinical consideration as a noninvasive measure of reticuloendothelial systemic defense in patients after trauma and burn.

  1. Association of 25-hydroxy Vitamin D levels with indexes of general and abdominal obesity in Iranian adolescents: The CASPIAN-III study

    PubMed Central

    Jari, Mohsen; Qorbani, Mostafa; Moafi, Mohammad; Motlagh, Mohammad Esmaeil; Keikha, Mojtaba; Ardalan, Gelayol; Kelishadi, Roya

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study aimed to determine the association of serum 25-hydroxy Vitamin D (25(OH)D) levels with measures of general and abdominal obesity in Iranian adolescents. Materials and Methods: This nationwide cross-sectional study was conducted among 1090 students, aged 10-18 years, living in 27 provinces in Iran. Serum concentration of 25(OH)D was analyzed quantitatively by direct competitive immunoassay chemiluminescence method. Body mass index (BMI) and waist-to-height ratio (WHtR) were considered as measures of generalized and abdominal obesity, respectively. Results: Study participants consisted of 1090 adolescents (51.9% boy and 67.1% urban residents) with mean age, BMI, and waist circumference of 14.7 (2.6) years, 19.3 (4.2) kg/m2, and 67.82 (12.23) cm, respectively. The median serum 25(OH)D was 13.0 ng/mL (interquartile range: 20.6). Overall, 40% of participants were Vitamin D deficient, and 39% were Vitamin D insufficient. Serum 25(OH)D level was not associated with BMI and WHtR. Conclusion: We did not document any significant association between serum 25(OH)D level and anthropometric measures in adolescents. This finding may be because of considerably high prevalence of hypovitaminosis D in the study population. PMID:25983762

  2. Association of 25-hydroxy Vitamin D levels with indexes of general and abdominal obesity in Iranian adolescents: The CASPIAN-III study.

    PubMed

    Jari, Mohsen; Qorbani, Mostafa; Moafi, Mohammad; Motlagh, Mohammad Esmaeil; Keikha, Mojtaba; Ardalan, Gelayol; Kelishadi, Roya

    2015-02-01

    This study aimed to determine the association of serum 25-hydroxy Vitamin D (25(OH)D) levels with measures of general and abdominal obesity in Iranian adolescents. This nationwide cross-sectional study was conducted among 1090 students, aged 10-18 years, living in 27 provinces in Iran. Serum concentration of 25(OH)D was analyzed quantitatively by direct competitive immunoassay chemiluminescence method. Body mass index (BMI) and waist-to-height ratio (WHtR) were considered as measures of generalized and abdominal obesity, respectively. Study participants consisted of 1090 adolescents (51.9% boy and 67.1% urban residents) with mean age, BMI, and waist circumference of 14.7 (2.6) years, 19.3 (4.2) kg/m(2), and 67.82 (12.23) cm, respectively. The median serum 25(OH)D was 13.0 ng/mL (interquartile range: 20.6). Overall, 40% of participants were Vitamin D deficient, and 39% were Vitamin D insufficient. Serum 25(OH)D level was not associated with BMI and WHtR. We did not document any significant association between serum 25(OH)D level and anthropometric measures in adolescents. This finding may be because of considerably high prevalence of hypovitaminosis D in the study population.

  3. Surgical versus non-surgical management of abdominal injury.

    PubMed

    Oyo-Ita, Angela; Ugare, Udey G; Ikpeme, Ikpeme A

    2012-11-14

    Injury to the abdomen can be blunt or penetrating. Abdominal injury can damage internal organs such as the liver, spleen, kidneys, and intestine. There are controversies about the best approach to manage abdominal injuries. To assess the effects of surgical and non-surgical interventions in the management of abdominal trauma. We searched the Cochrane Injuries Group's Specialised Register, CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library 2012, issue 1), MEDLINE, PubMed, EMBASE, ISI Web of Science: Science Citation Index Expanded (SCI-EXPANDED), and ISI Web of Science: Conference Proceedings Citation Index-Science (CPCI-S) all until January 2012; CINAHL until January 2009. We also searched the reference lists of all eligible studies and the trial registers www.controlled-trials.com and www.clinicaltrials.gov in January 2012. Randomised controlled trials of surgical and non surgical interventions among patients with abdominal injury who are haemodynamically stable and with no signs of peritonitis. Two review authors independently applied the search criteria. One study involving participants with penetrating abdominal injury met the inclusion criteria. Data were extracted by two authors using a standard data extraction form. One study including 51 participants with moderate risk of bias was included. Participants were randomised to surgery or an observation protocol. There were no deaths among the participants. Seven participants had complications; 5 (18.5%) in the surgical group and 2 (8.3%) in the non-surgical group; the difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.42; Fischer's exact). Among the 27 who had surgery six (22.2%) surgeries were negative laparotomies, and 15 (55.6%) were non-therapeutic. Based on the findings of one study involving 51 participants, which was at moderate risk of bias, there is no evidence to support the use of surgery over observation for people with abdominal trauma.

  4. The effects of body mass index on complications and mortality after emergency abdominal operations: The obesity paradox.

    PubMed

    Benjamin, Elizabeth R; Dilektasli, Evren; Haltmeier, Tobias; Beale, Elizabeth; Inaba, Kenji; Demetriades, Demetrios

    2017-11-01

    Recent literature suggests that obesity is protective in critically illness. This study addresses the effect of BMI on outcomes after emergency abdominal surgery (EAS). Retrospective, ACS-NSQIP analysis. All patients that underwent EAS were included. The study population was divided into five groups based on BMI; regression models were used to evaluate the role of obesity in morbidity and mortality. 101,078 patients underwent EAS; morbidity and mortality were 19.5% and 4.5%, respectively. Adjusted mortality was higher in underweight patients (AOR 1.92), but significantly lower in all obesity groups (AOR's 0.73, 0.66, 0.70, 0.70 respectively). Underweight and class III obesity was associated with increased complications (AOR 1.47 and 1.30), while mild obesity was protective (AOR 0.92). Underweight patients undergoing EAS have increased morbidity and mortality. Although class III obesity is associated with increased morbidity, overweight and class I obesity were protective. All grades of obesity may be protective against mortality after EAS relative to normal weight patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Primary closure in colon trauma.

    PubMed

    Salinas-Aragón, Luis Enrique; Guevara-Torres, Lorenzo; Vaca-Pérez, Enrique; Belmares-Taboada, Jaime Arístides; Ortiz-Castillo, Fátima de Guadalupe; Sánchez-Aguilar, Martín

    2009-01-01

    Primary repair of colon injuries is an accepted therapeutic option; however, controversy persists regarding its safety. Our objective was to report the evolution and presence of complications in patients with colon injury who underwent primary closure and to determine if the time interval (>6 h), degree of injury, contamination, anatomic site injured, PATI (Penetrating Abdominal Trauma Index) >25, and the presence of other injuries in colon trauma are associated with increased morbidity and mortality. This was a prospective, observational, longitudinal and descriptive study conducted at the Central Hospital "Dr. Ignacio Morones Prieto," San Luis Potosí, Mexico, from January 1, 2003 to December 31, 2007. We included patients with abdominal trauma with colon injury subjected to surgical treatment. chi(2) was used for basic statistical analysis. There were 481 patients with abdominal trauma who underwent surgery; 77(16.1%) had colon injury. Ninety percent (n = 69) were treated in the first 6 h; 91% (n = 70) were due to penetrating injuries, and gunshot wound accounted for 48% (n = 37). Transverse colon was the most frequently injured (38%) (n = 29). Grade I and II injuries accounted for 75.3% (n = 58). Procedures included primary repair (76.66 %) (n = 46); resection with anastomosis (8.3%) (n = 5); and colostomy (15%) (n = 9). Associated injuries were present in 76.6% (n = 59). There was some degree of contamination in 85.7% (n = 66); 82.8% (58) had PATI <25. Complications associated with the surgical procedure were observed in 28.57% (n = 22). Reoperation was necessary in 10% (n = 8). Average hospital stay was 11.4 days. Mortality was 3.8% (n = 3); none of these were related to colon injury. Primary repair is a safe procedure for treatment of colon injuries. Patients with primary repair had lower morbidity (p <0.009). Surgery during the first 6 h (p <0.006) and in hemodynamically stable patients (p <0.014) had a lower risk of complications.

  6. The clinical effectiveness of permissive hypotension in blunt abdominal trauma with hemorrhagic shock but without head or spine injuries or burns: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Alsawadi, Abdulrahman

    2012-01-01

    Background Trauma is a major cause of death and disability. The current trend in trauma management is the rapid administration of fluid as per the Advanced Trauma Life Support guidelines, although there is no evidence to support this and even some to suggest it might be harmful. Some guidelines, protocols, and recommendations have been established for the use of permissive hypotension although there is reluctance concerning its application in blunt injuries. Objectives The aim of this review is to determine whether there is evidence of the use of permissive hypotension in the management of hemorrhagic shock in blunt trauma patients. This review also aims to search for any reason for the reluctance to apply permissive hypotension in blunt injuries. Methods This systematic review has followed the steps recommended in the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions. It is also being reported in accordance with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses Statement and checklist. Database searches of MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Centre for Reviews and Dissemination databases and the Cochrane Library were made for eligible studies as well as journal searches. Inclusion criteria included systematic reviews that have similar primary questions to this review and randomized controlled trials where patients with blunt torso injuries and hemorrhagic shock were not excluded. Rapid or early fluid administration was compared with controlled or delayed fluid resuscitation and a significant outcome was obtained. Results No systematic reviews attempting to answer similar questions were found. Two randomized controlled trials with mixed types of injuries in the included patients found no significant difference between the groups used in each study. Data concerning the question of this review was sought after these papers were appraised. Conclusion The limited available data are not conclusive. However, the supportive theoretical concept and laboratory

  7. Trauma care at rural level III trauma centers in a state trauma system.

    PubMed

    Helling, Thomas S

    2007-02-01

    Although much has been written about the benefits of trauma center care, most experiences are urban with large numbers of patients. Little is known about the smaller, rural trauma centers and how they function both independently and as part of a larger trauma system. The state of Missouri has designated three levels of trauma care. The cornerstone of rural trauma care is the state-designated Level III trauma center. These centers are required to have the presence of a trauma team and trauma surgeon but do not require orthopedic or neurosurgical coverage. The purpose of this retrospective study was to determine how Level III trauma centers compared with Level I and Level II centers in the Missouri trauma system and, secondly, how trauma surgeon experience at these centers might shape future educational efforts to optimize rural trauma care. During a 2-year period in 2002 and 2003, the state trauma registry was queried on all trauma admissions for centers in the trauma system. Demographics and patient care outcomes were assessed by level of designation. Trauma admissions to the Level III centers were examined for acuity, severity, and type of injury. The experiences with chest, abdominal, and neurologic trauma were examined in detail. A total of 24,392 patients from 26 trauma centers were examined, including all eight Level III centers. Acuity and severity of injuries were higher at Level I and II centers. A total of 2,910 patients were seen at the 8 Level III centers. Overall deaths were significantly lower at Level III centers (Level I, 4% versus Level II, 4% versus Level III, 2%, p < 0.001). Numbers of patients dying within 24 hours were no different among levels of trauma care (Level I, 37% versus Level II, 30% versus Level III, 32%). Among Level III centers 45 (1.5%) patients were admitted in shock, and 48 (2%) had a Glasgow Coma Scale score <9. Twenty-six patients had a surgical head injury (7 epidural, 19 subdural hematomas). Twenty-eight patients (1%) needed

  8. Preoperative risk factors for in-hospital mortality and validity of the Glasgow aneurysm score and Hardman index in patients with ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Kurc, Erol; Sanioglu, Soner; Ozgen, Ayca; Aka, Serap Aykut; Yekeler, Ibrahim

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the validity of the Glasgow aneurysm score (GAS) and Hardman index in patients operated on because of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (rAAA), and determining preoperative risk factors that affect in-hospital mortality. One hundred one patients operated on to repair a rAAA within the last 10 years were included. The GAS and Hardman index were calculated for each patient separately. The relation between in-hospital mortality and the Hardman index and GAS was analyzed by means of the receiver-operator characteristic (ROC) curve. Univariate and multivariate methods of analyses were used to determine preoperative risk factors. Average age was 69 ± 8, and in-hospital mortality rate was 51.5%. Analysis of the ROC curve showed that the Hardman index had an area under the curve (AUC) = 0.71 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.593-0.800, P = 0.0002) for predicting in-hospital mortality. The GAS had an AUC = 0.77 (95% CI, 0.680-0.851, P < 0.0001). The results of multivariate analysis revealed the presence of the following preoperative risk factors: age more than 63 years (odds ratio [OR], 4.4; 95% CI, 1.17-16.49, P = 0.028); loss of consciousness (OR, 9.33; 95% CI, 1.94-44.86, P = 0.005); creatinine higher than 1.7 mg/dL (OR, 5.52; 95% CI, 1.92-15.85, P = 0.001); and pH lower than 7.31 (OR, 3.77; 95% CI, 1.18-11.99, P = 0.024). In conclusion, the Hardman index and GAS have a significant correlation with in-hospital mortality rates. Nevertheless, a high score does not necessarily correspond with a definite mortality. This is why scoring systems could not be considered as the sole criterion for choosing patients for this study. Clinical experience was still the leading factor in deciding against or in favor of surgery.

  9. Waist-to-height ratio: an accurate anthropometric index of abdominal adiposity and a predictor of high HOMA-IR values in nondialyzed chronic kidney disease patients.

    PubMed

    Silva, Maria Inês Barreto; Lemos, Carla Cavalheiro da Silva; Torres, Márcia Regina Simas Gonçalves; Bregman, Rachel

    2014-03-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated with metabolic disorders, including insulin resistance (IR), mainly when associated with obesity and characterized by high abdominal adiposity (AbAd). Anthropometric measures are recommended for assessing AbAd in clinical settings, but their accuracies need to be evaluated. The aim of this study was to evaluate the precision of different anthropometric measures of AbAd in patients with CKD. We also sought to determine the AbAd association with high homeostasis model assessment index of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) values and the cutoff point for AbAd index to predict high HOMA-IR values. A subset of clinically stable nondialyzed patients with CKD followed at a multidisciplinary outpatient clinic was enrolled in this cross-sectional study. The accuracy of the following anthropometric indices: waist circumference, waist-to-hip ratio, conicity index and waist-to-height ratio (WheiR) to assess AbAd, was evaluated using trunk fat, by dual x-ray absorptiometry (DXA), as a reference method. HOMA-IR was estimated to stratify patients in high and low HOMA-IR groups. The total area under the receiver-operating characteristic curves (AUC-ROC; sensitivity/specificity) was calculated: AbAd with high HOMA-IR values (95% confidence interval [CI]). We studied 134 patients (55% males; 54% overweight/obese, body mass index ≥ 25 kg/m(2), age 64.9 ± 12.5 y, estimated glomerular filtration rate 29.0 ± 12.7 mL/min). Among studied AbAd indices, WheiR was the only one to show correlation with DXA trunk fat after adjusting for confounders (P < 0.0001). Thus, WheiR was used to evaluate the association between AbAd with HOMA-IR values (r = 0.47; P < 0.0001). The cutoff point for WheiR as a predictor for high HOMA-IR values was 0.55 (AUC-ROC = 0.69 ± 0.05; 95% CI, 0.60-0.77; sensitivity/specificity, 68.9/61.9). WheiR is recommended as an effective and precise anthropometric index to assess AbAd and to predict high HOMA-IR values in nondialyzed

  10. A Combined Independent Source Separation and Quality Index Optimization Method for Fetal ECG Extraction from Abdominal Maternal Leads

    PubMed Central

    Billeci, Lucia; Varanini, Maurizio

    2017-01-01

    The non-invasive fetal electrocardiogram (fECG) technique has recently received considerable interest in monitoring fetal health. The aim of our paper is to propose a novel fECG algorithm based on the combination of the criteria of independent source separation and of a quality index optimization (ICAQIO-based). The algorithm was compared with two methods applying the two different criteria independently—the ICA-based and the QIO-based methods—which were previously developed by our group. All three methods were tested on the recently implemented Fetal ECG Synthetic Database (FECGSYNDB). Moreover, the performance of the algorithm was tested on real data from the PhysioNet fetal ECG Challenge 2013 Database. The proposed combined method outperformed the other two algorithms on the FECGSYNDB (ICAQIO-based: 98.78%, QIO-based: 97.77%, ICA-based: 97.61%). Significant differences were obtained in particular in the conditions when uterine contractions and maternal and fetal ectopic beats occurred. On the real data, all three methods obtained very high performances, with the QIO-based method proving slightly better than the other two (ICAQIO-based: 99.38%, QIO-based: 99.76%, ICA-based: 99.37%). The findings from this study suggest that the proposed method could potentially be applied as a novel algorithm for accurate extraction of fECG, especially in critical recording conditions. PMID:28509860

  11. Abdominal Assessment.

    PubMed

    Fritz, Deborah; Weilitz, Pamela Becker

    2016-03-01

    Abdominal pain is one of the most common complaints by patients, and assessment of abdominal pain and associated symptoms can be challenging for home healthcare providers. Reasons for abdominal pain are related to inflammation, organ distention, and ischemia. The history and physical examination are important to narrow the source of acute or chronic problems, identify immediate interventions, and when necessary, facilitate emergency department care.

  12. Management of paediatric liver trauma.

    PubMed

    van As, A B; Millar, Alastair J W

    2017-04-01

    Of all the intra-abdominal solid organs, the liver is the most vulnerable to blunt abdominal trauma. The majority of liver ruptures present in combination with other abdominal or extra-abdominal injuries. Over the last three decades, the management of blunt liver trauma has evolved from obligatory operative to non-operative management in over 90% of cases. Penetrating liver injuries more often require operative intervention and are managed according to adult protocols. The greatest clinical challenge remains the timely identification of the severely damaged liver with immediate and aggressive resuscitation and expedition to laparotomy. The operative management can be taxing and should ideally be performed in a dedicated paediatric surgical centre with experience in dealing with such trauma. Complications can occur early or late and include haemobilia, intrahepatic duct rupture with persistent biliary fistula, bilaemia, intrahepatic haematoma, post-traumatic cysts, vascular outflow obstruction, and gallstones. The prognosis is generally excellent.

  13. JOURNAL CLUB: Quantification of Fetal Dose Reduction if Abdominal CT Is Limited to the Top of the Iliac Crests in Pregnant Patients With Trauma.

    PubMed

    Corwin, Michael T; Seibert, J Anthony; Fananapazir, Ghaneh; Lamba, Ramit; Boone, John M

    2016-04-01

    The purposes of this study were to correlate fetal z-axis location within the maternal abdomen on CT with gestational age and estimate fetal dose reduction of a study limited to the abdomen only, with its lower aspect at the top of the iliac crests, compared with full abdominopelvic CT in pregnant trauma patients. We performed a study of pregnant patients who underwent CT of the abdomen and pelvis for trauma at a single institution over a 10-year period. The inferior aspect of maternal liver, spleen, gallbladder, pancreas, adrenals, and kidneys was recorded as above or below the iliac crests. The distance from the iliac crest to the top of the fetus or gestational sac was determined. The CT images of the limited and full scanning studies were independently reviewed by two blinded radiologists to identify traumatic injuries. Fetal dose profiles, including both scatter and primary radiation, were computed analytically along the central axis of the patient to estimate fetal dose reduction. Linear regression analysis was performed between gestational age and distance of the fetus to the iliac crests. Thirty-five patients were included (mean age, 26.2 years). Gestational age ranged from 5 to 38 weeks, with 5, 19, and 11 gestations in the first, second, and third trimesters, respectively. All solid organs were above the iliac crests in all patients. In three of six patients, traumatic findings in the pelvis would have been missed with the limited study. There was high correlation between gestational age and distance of the fetus to the iliac crests (R(2) = 0.84). The mean gestational age at which the top of the fetus was at the iliac crest was 17.3 weeks. Using the limited scanning study, fetuses at 5, 20, and 40 weeks of gestation would receive an estimated 4.3%, 26.2%, and 59.9% of the dose, respectively, compared with the dose for the full scanning study. In pregnant patients in our series with a history of trauma, CT of the abdomen only was an effective technique to

  14. Comparison of maternal abdominal subcutaneous fat thickness and body mass index as markers for pregnancy outcomes: A stratified cohort study.

    PubMed

    Suresh, Ashwin; Liu, Anthony; Poulton, Alison; Quinton, Ann; Amer, Zara; Mongelli, Max; Martin, Andrew; Benzie, Ronald; Peek, Michael; Nanan, Ralph

    2012-10-01

    Obesity in pregnancy is associated with a number of adverse outcomes. The effects of central versus general obesity in pregnancy have not been well established. To compare subcutaneous fat thickness (SFT) with body mass index (BMI) as a marker for pregnancy outcomes. A stratified retrospective cohort study was performed on 1200 pregnancies, selected from a total of 4862 nulliparous, nonsmoking women between 2006 and 2010. SFT was measured on routine ultrasound at 18-22 weeks gestation. BMI and SFT measurements were compared for estimating risks for obesity-related pregnancy outcomes using logistic regression adjusted for maternal age. The median SFT was 18.2 mm (range 6.3-50.9 mm), the median BMI was 23.8 kg/m(2) (range 15.2-52.5), and the correlation between SFT and BMI was 0.53. For every 5 mm increase in SFT and every 5 kg/m(2) increase in BMI, the odds ratios for developing gestational diabetes mellitus were 1.40 (CI 1.22-1.61, P < 0.001) and 1.16 (CI 0.95-1.40, P = 0.1), for caesarean section 1.28 (CI 1.16-1.40, P < 0.001) and 1.16 (CI 1.05-1.28, P = 0.003), large for gestational age 1.28 (CI 1.16-1.47, P = 0.001) and 1.10 (CI 0.95-1.28, P = 0.16) and cumulative adverse obesity-related pregnancy outcomes 1.16 (CI 1.10-1.28, P = 0.002) and 1.05 (CI 0.95-1.16, P = 0.45), respectively. SFT at 18-22 weeks gestation is better than BMI as a marker for obesity-related pregnancy outcomes. As SFT is considered a surrogate measure for visceral fat, these results suggest that central obesity is a stronger risk factor than general adiposity in pregnancy. © 2012 The Authors ANZJOG © 2012 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  15. Predicting and evaluation the severity in acute pancreatitis using a new modeling built on body mass index and intra-abdominal pressure.

    PubMed

    Fei, Yang; Gao, Kun; Tu, Jianfeng; Wang, Wei; Zong, Guang-Quan; Li, Wei-Qin

    2017-06-03

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) keeps as severe medical diagnosis and treatment problem. Early evaluation for severity and risk stratification in patients with AP is very important. Some scoring system such as acute physiology and chronic health evaluation-II (APACHE-II), the computed tomography severity index (CTSI), Ranson's score and the bedside index of severity of AP (BISAP) have been used, nevertheless, there're a few shortcomings in these methods. The aim of this study was to construct a new modeling including intra-abdominal pressure (IAP) and body mass index (BMI) to evaluate the severity in AP. The study comprised of two independent cohorts of patients with AP, one set was used to develop modeling from Jinling hospital in the period between January 2013 and October 2016, 1073 patients were included in it; another set was used to validate modeling from the 81st hospital in the period between January 2012 and December 2016, 326 patients were included in it. The association between risk factors and severity of AP were assessed by univariable analysis; multivariable modeling was explored through stepwise selection regression. The change in IAP and BMI were combined to generate a regression equation as the new modeling. Statistical indexes were used to evaluate the value of the prediction in the new modeling. Univariable analysis confirmed change in IAP and BMI to be significantly associated with severity of AP. The predict sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value and accuracy by the new modeling for severity of AP were 77.6%, 82.6%, 71.9%, 87.5% and 74.9% respectively in the developing dataset. There were significant differences between the new modeling and other scoring systems in these parameters (P < 0.05). In addition, a comparison of the area under receiver operating characteristic curves of them showed a statistically significant difference (P < 0.05). The same results could be found in the validating dataset. A new

  16. Population distribution of the sagittal abdominal diameter (SAD) from a representative sample of US adults: comparison of SAD, waist circumference and body mass index for identifying dysglycemia.

    PubMed

    Kahn, Henry S; Gu, Qiuping; Bullard, Kai McKeever; Freedman, David S; Ahluwalia, Namanjeet; Ogden, Cynthia L

    2014-01-01

    The sagittal abdominal diameter (SAD) measured in supine position is an alternative adiposity indicator that estimates the quantity of dysfunctional adipose tissue in the visceral depot. However, supine SAD's distribution and its association with health risk at the population level are unknown. Here we describe standardized measurements of SAD, provide the first, national estimates of the SAD distribution among US adults, and test associations of SAD and other adiposity indicators with prevalent dysglycemia. In the 2011-2012 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, supine SAD was measured ("abdominal height") between arms of a sliding-beam caliper at the level of the iliac crests. From 4817 non-pregnant adults (age ≥ 20; response rate 88%) we used sample weights to estimate SAD's population distribution by sex and age groups. SAD's population mean was 22.5 cm [95% confidence interval 22.2-22.8]; median was 21.9 cm [21.6-22.4]. The mean and median values of SAD were greater for men than women. For the subpopulation without diagnosed diabetes, we compared the abilities of SAD, waist circumference (WC), and body mass index (BMI, kg/m(2)) to identify prevalent dysglycemia (HbA1c ≥ 5.7%). For age-adjusted, logistic-regression models in which sex-specific quartiles of SAD were considered simultaneously with quartiles of either WC or BMI, only SAD quartiles 3 (p<0.05 vs quartile 1) and 4 (p<0.001 vs quartile 1) remained associated with increased dysglycemia. Based on continuous adiposity indicators, analyses of the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) indicated that the dysglycemia model fit for SAD (age-adjusted) was 0.734 for men (greater than the AUC for WC, p<0.001) and 0.764 for women (greater than the AUC for WC or BMI, p<0.001). Measured inexpensively by bedside caliper, SAD was associated with dysglycemia independently of WC or BMI. Standardized SAD measurements may enhance assessment of dysfunctional adiposity.

  17. Elevated C-reactive Protein Levels in Women with Bipolar Disorder may be Explained by a History of Childhood Trauma, Especially Sexual Abuse, Body Mass Index and Age.

    PubMed

    Moraes, Juliana Brum; Maes, Michael; Barbosa, Decio Sabbatini; Ferrari, Thais Zagabria; Uehara, Marcela Keikko Spagolla; Carvalho, Andre F; Nunes, Sandra Odebrecht Vargas

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate whether increased levels of high-sensitivity C- reactive protein (hs-CRP) observed in individuals with bipolar disorder (BD) compared to healthy controls (HCs) could be influenced by a previous exposure to early life stress (ELS) independently from other explanatory or background variables, including age, body mass index (BMI), and the presence of cooccurring mental disorders. In this case-control study, we included 142 healthy controls and 92 bipolar I and II patients. The Childhood Trauma Questionnaire was administered in a subset of 30 female patients with BD and 31 female HCs, and plasma hs-CRP was measured in all subjects. Multivariable models adjusted the data for the possible confounding variables. Serum hs-CRP levels were significantly higher in patients with BD compared to HCs. However, after controlling for BMI, these differences were no longer significant. Around 55% of the variance in hs-CRP was explained by cumulative and independent effects of age, BMI and childhood trauma, especially sexual abuse. Our results show that increased hs-CRP levels in BD patients are more related to childhood trauma, especially sexual abuse, age and BMI than to a diagnosis of BD per se. These data suggest that peripheral inflammation may underpin the well-known detrimental effects of childhood maltreatment and obesity in the course of BD. Hs-CRP data are difficult to interpret if they are not adjusted for effects of BMI and age. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  18. The use of laparoscopy in the diagnosis and treatment of blunt and penetrating abdominal injuries: 10-year experience at a level 1 trauma center.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Jeremy J; Garwe, Tabitha; Raines, Alexander R; Thurman, Joseph B; Carter, Sandra; Bender, Jeffrey S; Albrecht, Roxie M

    2013-03-01

    Diagnostic laparoscopy (DL) has decreased the rate of nontherapeutic laparotomy for patients suffering from penetrating injuries. We evaluated whether DL similarly lowers the rate of nontherapeutic laparotomy for patients with blunt injuries. All patients undergoing DL over a 10-year period (ie, 2001-2010) in a single level 1 trauma center were classified by the mechanism of injury. Demographic and perioperative data were compared using the Student t and Fisher exact tests. There were 131 patients included, 22 of whom sustained blunt injuries. Patients suffering from blunt injuries were more severely injured (Injury Severity Score 18.0 vs 7.3, P = .0001). The most common indication for DL after blunt injury was a computed tomographic scan concerning for bowel injury (59.1%). The rate of nontherapeutic laparotomy for patients sustaining penetrating vs blunt injury was 1.8% and nil, respectively. DL, when coupled with computed tomographic findings, is an effective tool for the initial management of patients with blunt injuries. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Correlating Abdominal Wall Thickness and Body Mass Index to Predict Usefulness of Right Lower Quadrant Ultrasound for Evaluation of Pediatric Appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Jeannie K; Trexler, Nowice; Reisch, Joan; Pfeifer, Cory M; Ginos, Jason; Powell, Jerry Allen; Veltkamp, Jennifer; Anene, Alvin; Fernandes, Neil; Chen, Li Ern

    2017-11-06

    To inform selective and efficient use of appendix ultrasound (US) beyond adult parameters of body mass index (BMI) of less than 25 kg/m, we correlate abdominal wall thickness (AWT) with age and BMI to generate parameters for male and female children. Information presented in chart format can aid in the decision to utilize US for the evaluation of appendicitis. In this observational study, 1600 pediatric computed tomography scans of the abdomen and pelvis were analyzed to obtain measurements of AWT in the right lower quadrant. Measurements were correlated by patient age, BMI, and sex. Results and consensus-based recommendations were presented in chart format with color-coded groupings to allow for convenient referencing in the clinical setting. One thousand four hundred eighty-eight computed tomography scans and AWT measurements were included. All age groups with BMI of less than 25 kg/m and all male and female groups younger than 6 years regardless of BMI had median AWT of less than 4 cm resulting in strong recommendation for US. Males older than 6 years and all female age groups with BMI of greater than 30 kg/m and female older than 15 years and BMI of greater than 25 kg/m had AWT of more than 5 cm resulting in low recommendation for US. While the BMI cutoff standard of less than 25 kg/m for usefulness of appendix US holds in the adult population, our data expand the acceptable range in children younger than 9 years regardless of BMI and male children with BMI up to 30 kg/m. Female children younger than 15 years with a BMI up to 30 kg/m may also be amenable to right lower quadrant US based on AWT. These parameters inform selective and efficient use of US for appendix evaluation.

  20. A retrospective investigation of abdominal visceral fat, body mass index (BMI), and active smoking as risk factors for donor site wound healing complications after free DIEP flap breast reconstructions.

    PubMed

    Timmermans, Floyd W; Westland, Pèdrou B; Hummelink, Stefan; Schreurs, Joep; Hameeteman, Marijn; Ulrich, Dietmar J O; Slater, Nicholas J

    2018-06-01

    The deep inferior epigastric artery perforator (DIEP) flap is one of the most common techniques for breast reconstruction. Body mass index (BMI) is considered as an important predictor of donor site healing complications such as wound dehiscence. The use of computed tomography (CT) proved to be a precise and objective method to assess visceral adipose tissue. It remains unclear whether quantification of visceral fat provides more accurate predictions of abdominal wound healing complications than BMI. A total of 97 patients with DIEP flap were retrospectively evaluated. Patients' abdominal visceral fat (AVF) was quantified on CT angiography (CTA). The patients were postoperatively assessed for abdominal wound healing complications. We analyzed for the correlations between AVF, BMI, and dehiscence and established a logistic regression model to assess the potential high-profile predictors in anatomic and patient characteristics such as weight, smoking, and diabetes. We included 97 patients, and of them, 24 patients (24.7%) had some degree of abdominal dehiscence. No significant differences were observed between the dehiscence group and the non-dehiscence group, except for smoking (p = 0.002). We found a significant correlation between AVF and BMI (R = 0.282, p = 0.005), but neither was significant in predicting donor site dehiscence. Smoking greatly increased the likelihood of developing wound dehiscence (OR = 11.4, p = < 0.001). AVF and BMI were not significant predictors of abdominal wound healing complications after DIEP flap reconstruction. This study established active smoking (OR = 11.4, p = < 0.001) as the significant risk factor that contributed to the development of abdominal wound dehiscence in patients with DIEP. Copyright © 2018 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The Shock Index revisited – a fast guide to transfusion requirement? A retrospective analysis on 21,853 patients derived from the TraumaRegister DGU®

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Isolated vital signs (for example, heart rate or systolic blood pressure) have been shown unreliable in the assessment of hypovolemic shock. In contrast, the Shock Index (SI), defined by the ratio of heart rate to systolic blood pressure, has been advocated to better risk-stratify patients for increased transfusion requirements and early mortality. Recently, our group has developed a novel and clinical reliable classification of hypovolemic shock based upon four classes of worsening base deficit (BD). The objective of this study was to correlate this classification to corresponding strata of SI for the rapid assessment of trauma patients in the absence of laboratory parameters. Methods Between 2002 and 2011, data for 21,853 adult trauma patients were retrieved from the TraumaRegister DGU® database and divided into four strata of worsening SI at emergency department arrival (group I, SI <0.6; group II, SI ≥0.6 to <1.0; group III, SI ≥1.0 to <1.4; and group IV, SI ≥1.4) and were assessed for demographics, injury characteristics, transfusion requirements, fluid resuscitation and outcomes. The four strata of worsening SI were compared with our recently suggested BD-based classification of hypovolemic shock. Results Worsening of SI was associated with increasing injury severity scores from 19.3 (± 12) in group I to 37.3 (± 16.8) in group IV, while mortality increased from 10.9% to 39.8%. Increments in SI paralleled increasing fluid resuscitation, vasopressor use and decreasing hemoglobin, platelet counts and Quick’s values. The number of blood units transfused increased from 1.0 (± 4.8) in group I to 21.4 (± 26.2) in group IV patients. Of patients, 31% in group III and 57% in group IV required ≥10 blood units until ICU admission. The four strata of SI discriminated transfusion requirements and massive transfusion rates equally with our recently introduced BD-based classification of hypovolemic shock. Conclusion SI upon emergency department

  2. [Current treatment of hepatic trauma].

    PubMed

    Silvio-Estaba, Leonardo; Madrazo-González, Zoilo; Ramos-Rubio, Emilio

    2008-05-01

    The therapeutic and diagnostic approach of liver trauma injuries (by extension, of abdominal trauma) has evolved remarkably in the last decades. The current non-surgical treatment in the vast majority of liver injuries is supported by the accumulated experience and optimal results in the current series. It is considered that the non-surgical treatment of liver injuries has a current rate of success of 83-100%, with an associated morbidity of 5-42%. The haemodynamic stability of the patient will determine the applicability of the non-surgical treatment. Arteriography with angioembolisation constitutes a key technical tool in the context of liver trauma. Patients with haemodynamic instability will need an urgent operation and can benefit from abdominal packing techniques, damage control and post-operative arteriography. The present review attempts to contribute to the current, global and practical management in the care of liver trauma.

  3. Traumatic abdominal hernia complicated by necrotizing fasciitis.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Pérez, Aleix; Garrigós-Ortega, Gonzalo; Gómez-Abril, Segundo Ángel; Martí-Martínez, Eva; Torres-Sánchez, Teresa

    2014-11-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is a critical illness involving skin and soft tissues, which may develop after blunt abdominal trauma causing abdominal wall hernia and representing a great challenge for physicians. A 52-year-old man was brought to the emergency department after a road accident, presenting blunt abdominal trauma with a large non-reducible mass in the lower-right abdomen. A first, CT showed abdominal hernia without signs of complication. Three hours after ICU admission, he developed hemodynamic instability. Therefore, a new CT scan was requested, showing signs of hernia complication. He was moved to the operating room where a complete transversal section of an ileal loop was identified. Five hours after surgery, he presented a new episode of hemodynamic instability with signs of skin and soft tissue infection. Due to the high clinical suspicion of necrotizing fasciitis development, wide debridement was performed. Following traumatic abdominal wall hernia (TAWH), patients can present unsuspected injuries in abdominal organs. Helical CT can be falsely negative in the early moments, leading to misdiagnosis. Necrotizing fasciitis is a potentially fatal infection and, consequently, resuscitation measures, wide-spectrum antibiotics, and early surgical debridement are required. This type of fasciitis can develop after blunt abdominal trauma following wall hernia without skin disruption.

  4. Surgical versus non-surgical management of abdominal injury.

    PubMed

    Oyo-Ita, Angela; Chinnock, Paul; Ikpeme, Ikpeme A

    2015-11-13

    Injury to the abdomen can be blunt or penetrating. Abdominal injury can damage internal organs such as the liver, spleen, kidneys, intestine, and large blood vessels. There are controversies about the best approach to manage abdominal injuries. To assess the effects of surgical and non-surgical interventions in the management of abdominal trauma in a haemodynamically stable and non-peritonitic abdomen. We searched the Cochrane Injuries Group's Specialised Register, The Cochrane Library, Ovid MEDLINE(R), Ovid MEDLINE(R) In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid MEDLINE(R) Daily and Ovid OLDMEDLINE(R), EMBASE Classic+EMBASE (Ovid), ISI WOS (SCI-EXPANDED, SSCI, CPCI-S & CPSI-SSH), CINAHL Plus (EBSCO), and clinical trials registers, and screened reference lists. We ran the most recent search on 17 September 2015. Randomised controlled trials of surgical interventions and non-surgical interventions involving people with abdominal injury who were haemodynamically stable with no signs of peritonitis. The abdominal injury could be blunt or penetrating. Two review authors independently applied the selection criteria. Data were extracted by two authors using a standard data extraction form, and are reported narratively. Two studies are included, which involved a total of 114 people with penetrating abdominal injuries. Both studies are at moderate risk of bias because the randomisation methods are not fully described, and the original study protocols are no longer available. The studies were undertaken in Finland between 1992 and 2002, by the same two researchers.In one study, 51 people were randomised to surgery or an observation protocol. None of the participants in the study died. Seven people had complications: 5 (18.5%) in the surgical group and 2 (8.3%) in the observation group; the difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.42; Fischer's exact). Among the 27 people who had surgery, 6 (22.2%) surgeries were negative laparotomies, and 15 (55.6%) were non

  5. Multiple trauma in children: critical care overview.

    PubMed

    Wetzel, Randall C; Burns, R Cartland

    2002-11-01

    Multiple trauma is more than the sum of the injuries. Management not only of the physiologic injury but also of the pathophysiologic responses, along with integration of the child's emotional and developmental needs and the child's family, forms the basis of trauma care. Multiple trauma in children also elicits profound psychological responses from the healthcare providers involved with these children. This overview will address the pathophysiology of multiple trauma in children and the general principles of trauma management by an integrated trauma team. Trauma is a systemic disease. Multiple trauma stimulates the release of multiple inflammatory mediators. A lethal triad of hypothermia, acidosis, and coagulopathy is the direct result of trauma and secondary injury from the systemic response to trauma. Controlling and responding to the secondary pathophysiologic sequelae of trauma is the cornerstone of trauma management in the multiply injured, critically ill child. Damage control surgery is a new, rational approach to the child with multiple trauma. The selection of children for damage control surgery depends on the severity of injury. Major abdominal vascular injuries and multiple visceral injuries are best considered for this approach. The effective management of childhood multiple trauma requires a combined team approach, consideration of the child and family, an organized trauma system, and an effective quality assurance and improvement mechanism.

  6. Cumulative trauma disorders in the upper extremities: reliability of the postural and repetitive risk-factors index.

    PubMed

    James, C P; Harburn, K L; Kramer, J F

    1997-08-01

    This study addresses test-retest reliability of the Postural and Repetitive Risk-Factors Index (PRRI) for work-related upper body injuries. This assessment was developed by the present authors. A repeated measures design was used to assess the test-retest reliability of a videotaped work-site assessment of subjects' movements. Ten heavy users of video display terminals (VDTs) from a local banking industry participated in the study. The 10 subjects' movements were videotaped for 2 hours on each of 2 separate days, while working on-site at their VDTs. The videotaped assessment, which utilized known postural risk factors for developing musculoskeletal disorder, pain, and discomfort in heavy VDT users (ie, repetitiveness, awkward and static postures, and contraction time), was called the PRRI. The videotaped movement assessments were subsequently analyzed in 15-minute sessions (five sessions per 2-hour videotape, which produced a total of 10 sessions over the 2 testing days), and each session was chosen randomly from the videotape. The subjects' movements were given a postural risk score according to the criteria in the PRRI. Each subject was therefore tested a total of 10 times (ie, 10 sessions), over two days. The maximum PRRI score for both sides of the body was 216 points. Reliability coefficients (RCs) for the PRRI scores were calculated, and the reliability of any one session met the minimum criterion for excellent reliability, which was .75. A two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) confirmed that there was no statistically significant difference between sessions (p < .05). Calculations using the standard error of measurement (SEM) indicated that an individual tested once, on one day and with a PRRI score of 25, required a change of at least 8 points in order to be confident that a true change in score had occurred. The significant results from the reliability tests indicated that the PRRI was a reliable measurement tool that could be used by occupational health

  7. The impact of patient volume on surgical trauma training in a Scandinavian trauma centre.

    PubMed

    Gaarder, Christine; Skaga, Nils Oddvar; Eken, Torsten; Pillgram-Larsen, Johan; Buanes, Trond; Naess, Paal Aksel

    2005-11-01

    Some of the problems faced in trauma surgery are increasing non-operative management of abdominal injuries, decreasing work hours and increasing sub-specialisation. We wanted to document the experience of trauma team leaders at the largest trauma centre in Norway, hypothesising that the patient volume would be inadequate to secure optimal trauma care. Patients registered in the hospital based Trauma Registry during the 2-year period from 1 August 2000 to 31 July 2002 were included. Of a total of 1667 patients registered, 645 patients (39%) had an Injury Severity Score (ISS)>15. Abdominal injuries were diagnosed in 205 patients with a median ISS of 30. An average trauma team leader assessed a total of 119 trauma cases a year (46 patients with ISS>15) and participated in 10 trauma laparotomies. Although the total number of trauma cases seems adequate, the experience of the trauma team leaders with challenging abdominal injuries is limited. With increasing sub-specialisation and general surgery vanishing, fewer surgical specialties provide operative competence in dealing with complicated torso trauma. A system of additional education and quality assurance measures is a prerequisite of high quality, and has consequently been introduced in our institution.

  8. Abdominal Sepsis.

    PubMed

    De Waele, Jan J

    2016-08-01

    Abdominal infections are an important challenge for the intensive care physician. In an era of increasing antimicrobial resistance, selecting the appropriate regimen is important and, with new drugs coming to the market, correct use is important more than ever before and abdominal infections are an excellent target for antimicrobial stewardship programs. Biomarkers may be helpful, but their exact role in managing abdominal infections remains incompletely understood. Source control also remains an ongoing conundrum, and evidence is increasing that its importance supersedes the impact of antibiotic therapy. New strategies such as open abdomen management may offer added benefit in severely ill patients, but more data are needed to identify its exact role. The role of fungi and the need for antifungal coverage, on the other hand, have been investigated extensively in recent years, but at this point, it remains unclear who requires empirical as well as directed therapy.

  9. Abdominal rigidity

    MedlinePlus

    ... other symptoms do you have at the same time? For example, do you have abdominal pain ? You may have the following tests: Barium studies of the stomach and intestines (such as an upper GI series ) Blood tests Colonoscopy Gastroscopy Peritoneal lavage Stool studies ...

  10. Paediatric trauma care.

    PubMed

    Sebastian van As, A B

    2010-01-01

    Childhood trauma has become a major cause of mortality and morbidity, disability and socio-economic burden and it is expected by the World Health Organization (WHO) that by 2020 it will be the number 1 disease globally. The WHO and UNICEF have published their third World Report on Child Injury Prevention in December 2008. A systematic review was performed on the history and magnitude of paediatric trauma worldwide. Additionally exciting developments and new trends were assessed and summarized. Paediatric trauma is a growing field of clinical expertise. New developments include total body digital imaging of children presenting with polytrauma; targeted management of head injuries; conservative management of abdominal injuries in children and diagnostic laparoscopy, including the laparoscopic management of complications following the conservative management of solid organ injuries. Paediatric trauma has long been neglected by the medical profession. In order to deal with it appropriately, it makes sense to adopt the public health approach, requiring that we view child injuries similarly to any other disease or health problem. The greatest gain in our clinical practice with dealing with child injuries will result from a strong focus on primary (preventing the injury), secondary (dealing with the injury in the most efficient manner) as well as tertiary prevention (making sure that children treated for trauma will be appropriately reintegrated within our society). By actively promoting child safety we will not only achieve a most welcome reduction in medical cost and disability, but also the ever-so-much desired decline of avoidable childhood misery and suffering.

  11. Intestinal injury mechanisms after blunt abdominal impact.

    PubMed

    Cripps, N P; Cooper, G J

    1997-03-01

    Intestinal injury is frequent after non-penetrating abdominal trauma, particularly after modern, high-energy transfer impacts. Under these circumstances, delay in the diagnosis of perforation is a major contributor to morbidity and mortality. This study establishes patterns of intestinal injury after blunt trauma by non-penetrating projectiles and examines relationships between injury distribution and abdominal wall motion. Projectile impacts of variable momentum were produced in 31 anaesthetised pigs to cause abdominal wall motion of varying magnitude and velocity. No small bowel injury was observed at initial impact velocity of less than 40 m/s despite gross abdominal compression. At higher velocity, injury to the small bowel was frequent, irrespective of the degree of abdominal compression (P = 0.00044). Large bowel injury was observed at all impact velocities and at all degrees of abdominal compression. This study confirms the potential for intestinal injury in high velocity, low momentum impacts which do not greatly compress the abdominal cavity and demonstrates apparent differences in injury mechanisms for the small bowel and colon. Familiarity with injury mechanisms may reduce delays in the diagnosis of intestinal perforation in both military and civilian situations.

  12. The value of plain abdominal radiographs in management of abdominal emergencies in Luth.

    PubMed

    Ashindoitiang, J A; Atoyebi, A O; Arogundade, R A

    2008-01-01

    The plain abdominal x-ray is still the first imaging modality in diagnosis of acute abdomen. The aim of this study was to find the value of plain abdominal x-ray in the management of abdominal emergencies seen in Lagos university teaching hospital. The accurate diagnosis of the cause of acute abdominal pain is one of the most challenging undertakings in emergency medicine. This is due to overlapping of clinical presentation and non-specific findings of physical and even laboratory data of the multifarious causes. Plain abdominal radiography is one investigation that can be obtained readily and within a short period of time to help the physician arrive at a correct diagnosis The relevance of plain abdominal radiography was therefore evaluated in the management of abdominal emergencies seen in Lagos over a 12 month period (April 2002 to March 2003). A prospective study of 100 consecutively presenting patients with acute abdominal conditions treated by the general surgical unit of Lagos University Teaching Hospital was undertaken. All patients had supine and erect abdominal x-ray before any therapeutic intervention was undertaken. The diagnostic features of the plain films were compared with final diagnosis to determine the usefulness of the plain x-ray There were 54 males and 46 females (M:F 1.2:1). Twenty-four percent of the patients had intestinal obstruction, 20% perforated typhoid enteritis; gunshot injuries and generalized peritonitis each occurred in 13%, blunt abdominal trauma in 12%, while 8% and 10% had acute appendicitis and perforated peptic ulcer disease respectively. Of 100 patients studied, 54% had plain abdominal radiographs that showed positive diagnostic features. Plain abdominal radiograph showed high sensitivity in patients with intestinal obstruction 100% and perforated peptic ulcer 90% but was less sensitive in patients with perforated typhoid, acute appendicitis, and blunt abdominal trauma and generalized peritonitis. In conclusion, this study

  13. Abdominal injuries in communal crises: The Jos experience

    PubMed Central

    Ojo, Emmanuel Olorundare; Ozoilo, Kenneth N.; Sule, Augustine Z.; Ugwu, Benjamin T.; Misauno, Michael A.; Ismaila, Bashiru O.; Peter, Solomon D.; Adejumo, Adeyinka A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Abdominal injuries contribute significantly to battlefield trauma morbidity and mortality. This study sought to determine the incidence, demographics, clinical features, spectrum, severity, management, and outcome of abdominal trauma during a civilian conflict. Materials and Methods: A prospective analysis of patients treated for abdominal trauma during the Jos civil crises between December 2010 and May 2012 at the Jos University Teaching Hospital. Results: A total of 109 victims of communal conflicts with abdominal injuries were managed during the study period with 89 (81.7%) males and 20 (18.3%) females representing about 12.2% of the total 897 combat related injuries. The peak age incidence was between 21 and 40 years (range: 3–71 years). The most frequently injured intra-abdominal organs were the small intestine 69 (63.3%), colon 48 (44%), and liver 41 (37.6%). Forty-four (40.4%) patients had extra-abdominal injuries involving the chest in 17 (15.6%), musculoskeletal 12 (11%), and the head in 9 (8.3%). The most prevalent weapon injuries were gunshot 76 (69.7%), explosives 12 (11%), stab injuries 11 (10.1%), and blunt abdominal trauma 10 (9.2%). The injury severity score varied from 8 to 52 (mean: 20.8) with a fatality rate of 11 (10.1%) and morbidity rate of 29 (26.6%). Presence of irreversible shock, 3 or more injured intra-abdominal organs, severe head injuries, and delayed presentation were the main factors associated with mortality. Conclusion: Abdominal trauma is major life-threatening injuries during conflicts. Substantial mortality occurred with loss of nearly one in every 10 hospitalized victims despite aggressive emergency room resuscitation. The resources expenditure, propensity for death and expediency of timing reinforce the need for early access to the wounded in a concerted trauma care systems. PMID:26957819

  14. Spectrum and outcome of pancreatic trauma.

    PubMed

    Kantharia, Chetan V; Prabhu, R Y; Dalvi, A N; Raut, Abhijit; Bapat, R D; Supe, Avinash N

    2007-01-01

    Pancreatic trauma is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Diagnosis is often difficult and surgery poses a formidable challenge. Data from 17 patients of pancreatic trauma gathered from a prospectively maintained database were analysed and the following parameters were considered: mode of injury, diagnostic modalities, associated injury, grade of pancreatic trauma and management. Pancreatic trauma was graded from I through IV, as per Modified Lucas Classification. The median age was 39 years (range 19-61). The aetiology of pancreatic trauma was blunt abdominal trauma in 14 patients and penetrating injury in 3. Associated bowel injury was present in 4 cases (3 penetrating injury and 1 blunt trauma) and 1 case had associated vascular injury. 5 patients had grade I, 3 had grade II, 7 had grade III and 2 had grade IV pancreatic trauma. Contrast enhanced computed tomography scan was used to diagnose pancreatic trauma in all patients with blunt abdominal injury. Immediate diagnosis could be reached in only 4 (28.5%) patients. 7 patients responded to conservative treatment. Of the 10 patients who underwent surgery, 6 required it for the pancreas and the duodenum. (distal pancreatectomy with splenectomy-3, pylorus preserving pancreatoduodenectomy-1, debridement with external drainage-1, associated injuries-duodenum-1). Pancreatic fistula, recurrent pancreatitis and pseudocyst formation were seen in 3 (17.05%), 2 (11.7%) and 1 (5.4%) patient respectively. Death occurred in 4 cases (23.5%), 2 each in grades III and IV pancreatic trauma. Contrast enhanced computed tomography scan is a useful modality for diagnosing, grading and following up patients with pancreatic trauma. Although a majority of cases with pancreatic trauma respond to conservative treatment, patients with penetrating trauma, and associated bowel injury and higher grade pancreatic trauma require surgical intervention and are also associated with higher morbidity and mortality.

  15. Systemic trauma.

    PubMed

    Goldsmith, Rachel E; Martin, Christina Gamache; Smith, Carly Parnitzke

    2014-01-01

    Substantial theoretical, empirical, and clinical work examines trauma as it relates to individual victims and perpetrators. As trauma professionals, it is necessary to acknowledge facets of institutions, cultures, and communities that contribute to trauma and subsequent outcomes. Systemic trauma-contextual features of environments and institutions that give rise to trauma, maintain it, and impact posttraumatic responses-provides a framework for considering the full range of traumatic phenomena. The current issue of the Journal of Trauma & Dissociation is composed of articles that incorporate systemic approaches to trauma. This perspective extends conceptualizations of trauma to consider the influence of environments such as schools and universities, churches and other religious institutions, the military, workplace settings, hospitals, jails, and prisons; agencies and systems such as police, foster care, immigration, federal assistance, disaster management, and the media; conflicts involving war, torture, terrorism, and refugees; dynamics of racism, sexism, discrimination, bullying, and homophobia; and issues pertaining to conceptualizations, measurement, methodology, teaching, and intervention. Although it may be challenging to expand psychological and psychiatric paradigms of trauma, a systemic trauma perspective is necessary on both scientific and ethical grounds. Furthermore, a systemic trauma perspective reflects current approaches in the fields of global health, nursing, social work, and human rights. Empirical investigations and intervention science informed by this paradigm have the potential to advance scientific inquiry, lower the incidence of a broader range of traumatic experiences, and help to alleviate personal and societal suffering.

  16. Infrarenal Abdominal Aortic Pseudoaneurysm: Is It a Real Emergency?

    PubMed Central

    Massara, Mafalda; Prunella, Roberto; Gerardi, Pasquale; Lillo, Antonio; De Caridi, Giovanni; Serra, Raffaele; Notarstefano, Stefano; Impedovo, Giovanni

    2017-01-01

    Abdominal aortic pseudoaneurysm is a rare but life-threatening condition that occurs due to penetrating or blunt trauma. Clinical manifestations are variable, and the time interval from the initial trauma to diagnosis is variable. A prompt diagnosis and an aggressive management approach are required to avoid catastrophic complications. Possible treatment options are open surgical repair, endovascular repair, pseudoanerysmal sac thrombosis induction through direct thrombin injection, and coil embolization. Here, we present the case of a 75-year-old man affected by an infrarenal abdominal aortic pseudoaneurysm presenting with abdominal and lumbar pain for 3 days, who was successfully treated with an endograft. PMID:29515707

  17. A review of the management of blunt splenic trauma in England and Wales: have regional trauma networks influenced management strategies and outcomes?

    PubMed

    Yiannoullou, P; Hall, C; Newton, K; Pearce, L; Bouamra, O; Jenks, T; Scrimshire, A B; Hughes, J; Lecky, F; Macdonald, Adh

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The spleen remains one of the most frequently injured organs following blunt abdominal trauma. In 2012, regional trauma networks were launched across England and Wales with the aim of improving outcomes following trauma. This retrospective cohort study investigated the management and outcomes of blunt splenic injuries before and after the establishment of regional trauma networks. METHODS A dataset was drawn from the Trauma Audit Research Network database of all splenic injuries admitted to English and Welsh hospitals from 1 April 2010 to 31 March 2014. Demographic data, injury severity, treatment modalities and outcomes were collected. Management and outcomes were compared before and after the launch of regional trauma networks. RESULTS There were 1457 blunt splenic injuries: 575 between 2010 and 2012 and 882 in 2012-14. Following the introduction of the regional trauma networks, use of splenic artery embolotherapy increased from 3.5% to 7.6% (P = 0.001) and splenectomy rates decreased from 20% to 14.85% (P = 0.012). Significantly more patients with polytrauma and blunt splenic injury were treated with splenic embolotherapy following 2012 (61.2% vs. 30%, P < 0.0001). Increasing age, injury severity score, polytrauma and Charlson Comorbidity Index above 10 were predictors of increased mortality (P < 0.001). Increasing systolic blood pressure (odds ratio, OR, 0.757, 95% confidence interval, CI, 0.716-0.8) and Glasgow Coma Scale (OR 0.988, 95% CI 0.982-0.995) were protective. CONCLUSIONS This study demonstrates a reduction in splenectomy rate and an increased use of splenic artery embolotherapy since the introduction of the regional trauma networks. This may have resulted from improved access to specialist services and reduced practice variation since the establishment of these networks.

  18. A review of the management of blunt splenic trauma in England and Wales: have regional trauma networks influenced management strategies and outcomes?

    PubMed Central

    Hall, C; Pearce, L; Bouamra, O; Jenks, T; Scrimshire, AB; Hughes, J; Lecky, F; Macdonald, ADH

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The spleen remains one of the most frequently injured organs following blunt abdominal trauma. In 2012, regional trauma networks were launched across England and Wales with the aim of improving outcomes following trauma. This retrospective cohort study investigated the management and outcomes of blunt splenic injuries before and after the establishment of regional trauma networks. METHODS A dataset was drawn from the Trauma Audit Research Network database of all splenic injuries admitted to English and Welsh hospitals from 1 April 2010 to 31 March 2014. Demographic data, injury severity, treatment modalities and outcomes were collected. Management and outcomes were compared before and after the launch of regional trauma networks. RESULTS There were 1457 blunt splenic injuries: 575 between 2010 and 2012 and 882 in 2012–14. Following the introduction of the regional trauma networks, use of splenic artery embolotherapy increased from 3.5% to 7.6% (P = 0.001) and splenectomy rates decreased from 20% to 14.85% (P = 0.012). Significantly more patients with polytrauma and blunt splenic injury were treated with splenic embolotherapy following 2012 (61.2% vs. 30%, P < 0.0001). Increasing age, injury severity score, polytrauma and Charlson Comorbidity Index above 10 were predictors of increased mortality (P < 0.001). Increasing systolic blood pressure (odds ratio, OR, 0.757, 95% confidence interval, CI, 0.716–0.8) and Glasgow Coma Scale (OR 0.988, 95% CI 0.982–0.995) were protective. CONCLUSIONS This study demonstrates a reduction in splenectomy rate and an increased use of splenic artery embolotherapy since the introduction of the regional trauma networks. This may have resulted from improved access to specialist services and reduced practice variation since the establishment of these networks. PMID:27791418

  19. Management of pancreatic trauma.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, R C

    1978-01-01

    Since 1950, 300 patients sustaining pancreatic injuries have been managed. Three-fourths of the injuries were due to penetrating trauma with a 20% mortality and one-fourth due to blunt trauma resulting in an 18% mortality. The pancreatic injury was responsible for death in only 3% of patients. Early onset of shock resulted in 38% mortality whereas only 4% of normotensive patients died. No patient died of an isolated pancreatic injury. Sepsis was the second most common cause of death following hemorrhage. Preoperative serum amylase was elevated more frequently following blunt trauma than penetrating trauma, but did not correlate with injury. There has been a tendency toward more frequent use of distal pancreatectomy for simple penetrating injuries without obvious ductal violation which increases operative time, blood loss and possible intra-abdominal abscess since resection usually requires splenectomy. Patients considered for an 80% distal resection are better managed with a Roux-en-Y limb to the distal pancreas since three patients developed diabetes following an 80% or greater resection. A conservative approach consisting of Penrose and sump drainage is adequate for most injuries. PMID:646495

  20. Intra-abdominal solid organ injuries: an enhanced management algorithm.

    PubMed

    Kokabi, Nima; Shuaib, Waqas; Xing, Minzhi; Harmouche, Elie; Wilson, Kenneth; Johnson, Jamlik-Omari; Khosa, Faisal

    2014-11-01

    The organ injury scale grading system proposed by the American Association for the Surgery of Trauma provides guidelines for operative versus nonoperative management in solid organ injuries; however, major shortcomings of the American Association for the Surgery of Trauma injury scale may become apparent with low-grade injuries, in which conservative management may fail. Nonoperative management of common intra-abdominal solid organ injuries relies increasingly on computed tomographic findings and other clinical factors, including patient age, presence of concurrent injuries, and serial clinical assessments. Familiarity with characteristic imaging features is essential for the prompt diagnosis and appropriate treatment of blunt abdominal trauma. In this pictorial essay, the spectrum of the American Association for the Surgery of Trauma organ injury scale grading system is illustrated, and a multidisciplinary management algorithm for common intra-abdominal solid organ injuries is proposed. Copyright © 2014 Canadian Association of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Specific trauma subtypes improve the predictive validity of the Harvard Trauma Questionnaire in Iraqi refugees.

    PubMed

    Arnetz, Bengt B; Broadbridge, Carissa L; Jamil, Hikmet; Lumley, Mark A; Pole, Nnamdi; Barkho, Evone; Fakhouri, Monty; Talia, Yousif Rofa; Arnetz, Judith E

    2014-12-01

    Trauma exposure contributes to poor mental health among refugees, and exposure often is measured using a cumulative index of items from the Harvard Trauma Questionnaire (HTQ). Few studies, however, have asked whether trauma subtypes derived from the HTQ could be superior to this cumulative index in predicting mental health outcomes. A community sample of recently arrived Iraqi refugees (N = 298) completed the HTQ and measures of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression symptoms. Principal components analysis of HTQ items revealed a 5-component subtype model of trauma that accounted for more item variance than a 1-component solution. These trauma subtypes also accounted for more variance in PTSD and depression symptoms (12 and 10%, respectively) than did the cumulative trauma index (7 and 3%, respectively). Trauma subtypes provided more information than cumulative trauma in the prediction of negative mental health outcomes. Therefore, use of these subtypes may enhance the utility of the HTQ when assessing at-risk populations.

  2. Trauma Imaging: A Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Vela, Jason Heath; Wertz, Christopher Ira; Onstott, Kimberly L; Wertz, Joss R

    2017-01-01

    To inform radiologic technologists about which imaging modalities and examinations are best suited for evaluating specific anatomical structures in patients who have sustained a traumatic injury. Two scholarly research databases were searched to identify articles focused on trauma imaging of the head, cervical spine, thorax, abdomen, and pelvis. Articles focused on trauma diagnosis were excluded. Thirty-two articles were selected for analysis. Physical examination and plain-film radiographs typically are used to assess nasal bone fracures. Computed tomography (CT) can be used to assess zygomaticomaxillary complex, mandibular, and temporal bone fractures. Traumatic brain injuries are difficult to assess, and broad classifications are used. Depending on the severity of cervical spine trauma, plain-film radiographs or CT imaging is adequate, with magnetic resonance imaging used as a means for further evaluation. Trauma to the thorax typically is assessed with radiography and CT, and CT is recommended for assesment of abdominal and pelvic trauma. The literature was consistent regarding which examinations to perform to best evaluate suspected injuries to the chest, abdomen, and pelvis. The need for, and correct use of, imaging in evaluating trauma to the head and cervical spine is more controversial. Despite the need for additional research, emergency department care providers should be familiar with the structures most commonly injured during trauma and the role of medical imaging for diagnosis.

  3. [Surgical tactics in duodenal trauma].

    PubMed

    Ivanov, P A; Grishin, A V

    2004-01-01

    Results of surgical treatment of 61 patients with injuries of the duodenum are analyzed. The causes of injuries were stab-incised wounds in 24 patients, missile wound -- in 7, closed abdominal trauma -- in 26, trauma of the duodenum during endoscopic papillosphincterotomy -- in 4. All the patients underwent surgery. Complications were seen in 32 (52.5%) patients, 21 patients died, lethality was 34.4%. Within the first 24 hours since the trauma 7 patients died due to severe combined trauma, blood loss, 54 patients survived acute period of trauma, including 28 patients after open trauma, 26 -- after closed and 4 -- after trauma of the duodenum during endoscopic papillosphincterotomy. Diagnostic and surgical policies are discussed. Results of treatment depending on kind and time of surgery are regarded. It is demonstrated that purulent complications due to retroperitoneal phlegmona, traumatic pancreatitis, pneumonia are the causes of significant number of unfavorable outcomes. Therefore, it is important to adequately incise and drainage infected parts of retroperitoneal fat tissue with two-lumen drainages. Decompression through duodenal tube is the effective procedure for prophylaxis of suture insufficiency and traumatic pancreatitis. Suppression of pancreatic and duodenal secretion with octreotid improves significantly surgical treatment results.

  4. Cardiac Trauma.

    PubMed

    Gosavi, Sucheta; Tyroch, Alan H; Mukherjee, Debabrata

    2016-11-01

    Cardiac trauma is a leading cause of death in the United States and occurs mostly due to motor vehicle accidents. Blunt cardiac trauma and penetrating chest injuries are most common, and both can lead to aortic injuries. Timely diagnosis and early management are the key to improve mortality. Cardiac computed tomography and cardiac ultrasound are the 2 most important diagnostic modalities. Mortality related to cardiac trauma remains high despite improvement in diagnosis and management.

  5. Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    ... Kids and Teens Pregnancy and Childbirth Women Men Seniors Your Health Resources Healthcare Management End-of-Life ... familydoctor.org editorial staff Categories: Family Health, Men, Seniors, WomenTags: abdominal aorta, abdominal aortic aneurysm, abdominal pain, ...

  6. Unstable patients with retroperitoneal vascular trauma: an endovascular approach.

    PubMed

    Boufi, Mourad; Bordon, Sébastien; Dona, Bianca; Hartung, Olivier; Sarran, Anthony; Nadeau, Sébastien; Maurin, Charlotte; Alimi, Yves S

    2011-04-01

    In hemodynamically unstable patients, the management of retroperitoneal vascular trauma is both difficult and challenging. Endovascular techniques have become an alternative to surgery in several trauma centers. Between 2004 and 2006, 16 patients (nine men, mean age: 46 years, range: 19-79 years) with retroperitoneal vascular trauma and hemodynamic instability were treated using an endovascular approach. The mean injury severity score was 30.7 ± 13.1. Mean systolic blood pressure and the shock index were 74 mm Hg and 1.9, respectively. Vasopressor drugs were required in 68.7% of cases (n = 11). Injuries were attributable to road traffic accidents (n = 15) and falls (n = 1). The hemorrhage sites included the internal iliac artery or its branches (n = 12) with bilateral injury in one case, renal artery (n = 2), abdominal aorta (n = 1), and lumbar artery (n = 1). In all, 14 coil embolizations and three stent-grafts were implanted. The technical success rate was 75%, as early re-embolization was necessary in one case and three patients died during the perioperative period. Six patients died during the period of hospitalization (37.5%). No surgical conversion or major morbidity was reported. In comparison with particulates, coil ± stent-graft may provide similar efficacy with regard to survival, and thus may be a valuable solution when particulate embolization is not available or feasible. Copyright © 2011 Annals of Vascular Surgery Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. [Hepatic hemostasis with packing in complex abdominal traumatic lesions: indications and postoperative outcomes].

    PubMed

    Mazilu, O; Cnejevici, S; Stef, D; Istodor, A; Dabelea, C; Fluture, V

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to review our postoperative outcomes with liver packing in complex abdominal trauma. 76 liver trauma were admitted for operative procedures in the Surgical Department of City Hospital Timisoara between April 1994 - September 2009 and 16 cases were identified in our series as requiring liver packing. In all cases, this method was efficient, with no postoperative bleeding. In the same time, there were specific complications such as bile leak or abdominal collections. despite a second procedure for packs removal and the possibility for specific complications, liver packing is an efficient method for severe liver trauma or complex abdominal lesions.

  8. Associated injuries, management, and outcomes of blunt abdominal aortic injury.

    PubMed

    de Mestral, Charles; Dueck, Andrew D; Gomez, David; Haas, Barbara; Nathens, Avery B

    2012-09-01

    Blunt abdominal aortic injury (BAAI) is very rare, and current literature is limited to case series of single-center experience. Through an analysis of the National Trauma Data Bank, the largest aggregation of United States trauma registry data, our aim was to characterize the associated injury pattern, contemporary management, and in-hospital outcomes of patients with BAAI. We used a nested case-control design. The overall cohort consisted of adult patients (age ≥ 16 years) severely injured (Injury Severity Score ≥ 16) after blunt trauma who were treated at a level 1 or 2 trauma center in years 2007 to 2009. Cases were patients with BAAI and were frequency-matched by age group and mechanism to randomly selected controls at a one-to-five ratio. Multivariable matched analysis (conditional logistic regression) was used to derive adjusted measures of association between BAAI and adjacent arterial, intra-abdominal, and bony injuries. We identified 436 patients with BAAI from 180 centers. The mean Injury Severity Score was 35 ± 14, and most patients were injured in motor vehicle crashes (84%). Multivariable analysis showed injury to the thoracic aorta, renal and iliac artery, small bowel, colon, liver, pancreas, and kidney, as well as lumbar spine fractures were independently associated with BAAI. A total of 394 patients (90%) were managed nonoperatively, and 42 (10%) underwent repair. Of these 42 patients, 29 (69%) underwent endovascular repair, with 11 patients undergoing open aortic repair and two extra-anatomic bypasses. Median time from admission to repair was 1 day (interquartile range, 1-2 days). Overall mortality was 29%. A total of 271 (69%) patients managed nonoperatively survived to hospital discharge. The index of suspicion for BAAI should be raised in severely injured patients by the presence of injuries to the lumbar spine, bowel, retroperitoneal organs, and adjacent major arteries. Although endovascular repair is the most common intervention, most

  9. Facial trauma

    MedlinePlus

    ... the face include: Car and motorcycle crashes Wounds Sports injuries Violence Symptoms Symptoms may include: Changes in ... Maxillofacial trauma. In: Flint PW, Haughey BH, Lund V, et al, eds. Cummings Otolaryngology: Head and Neck ...

  10. Management of adult blunt hepatic trauma.

    PubMed

    Kozar, Rosemary A; McNutt, Michelle K

    2010-12-01

    To review the nonoperative and operative management of blunt hepatic injury in the adult trauma population. Although liver injury scale does not predict need for surgical intervention, a high-grade complex liver injury should alert the physician to a patient at increased risk of hepatic complications following nonoperative management. Blunt hepatic injury remains a frequent intraabdominal injury in the adult trauma population. The management of blunt hepatic injury has undergone a major paradigm shift from mandatory operative exploration to nonoperative management. Hemodynamic instability with a positive focused abdominal sonography for trauma and peritonitis are indications for emergent operative intervention. Although surgical intervention for blunt hepatic trauma is not as common as in years past, it is imperative that the current trauma surgeon be familiar with the surgical skill set to manage complex hepatic injuries. This study represents a review of both nonoperative and operative management of blunt hepatic injury.

  11. A rare case of severe third degree friction burns and large Morel-Lavallee lesion of the abdominal wall.

    PubMed

    Brown, Darnell J; Lu, Kuo Jung G; Chang, Kristina; Levin, Jennifer; Schulz, John T; Goverman, Jeremy

    2018-01-01

    Morel-Lavallee lesions (MLLs) are rare internal degloving injuries typically caused by blunt traumatic injuries and most commonly occur around the hips and in association with pelvic or acetabular fractures. MLL is often overlooked in the setting of poly-trauma; therefore, clinicians must maintain a high degree of suspicion and be familiar with the management of such injuries, especially in obese poly-trauma patients. We present a 30-year-old female pedestrian struck by a motor vehicle who sustained multiple long bone fractures, a mesenteric hematoma, and full-thickness abdominal skin friction burn which masked a significant underlying abdominal MLL. The internal degloving caused significant devascularization of the overlying soft tissue and skin which required surgical drainage of hematoma, abdominal wall reconstruction with tangential excision, allografting, negative pressure wound therapy, and ultimately autografting. MLL is a rare, often overlooked, internal degloving injury. Surgeons must maintain a high index of suspicion when dealing with third degree friction burns as they may mask underlying injuries such as MLL, and a delay in diagnosis can lead to increased morbidity.

  12. Facial trauma.

    PubMed

    Peeters, N; Lemkens, P; Leach, R; Gemels B; Schepers, S; Lemmens, W

    Facial trauma. Patients with facial trauma must be assessed in a systematic way so as to avoid missing any injury. Severe and disfiguring facial injuries can be distracting. However, clinicians must first focus on the basics of trauma care, following the Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) system of care. Maxillofacial trauma occurs in a significant number of severely injured patients. Life- and sight-threatening injuries must be excluded during the primary and secondary surveys. Special attention must be paid to sight-threatening injuries in stabilized patients through early referral to an appropriate specialist or the early initiation of emergency care treatment. The gold standard for the radiographic evaluation of facial injuries is computed tomography (CT) imaging. Nasal fractures are the most frequent isolated facial fractures. Isolated nasal fractures are principally diagnosed through history and clinical examination. Closed reduction is the most frequently performed treatment for isolated nasal fractures, with a fractured nasal septum as a predictor of failure. Ear, nose and throat surgeons, maxillofacial surgeons and ophthalmologists must all develop an adequate treatment plan for patients with complex maxillofacial trauma.

  13. [Abdominal traumatic evisceration: reconstruction abdominal wall with biologic mesh and negative pressure therapy].

    PubMed

    Jiménez Gómez, M; Betancor Rivera, N; Lima Sánchez, J; Hernández Hernández, J R

    2016-04-10

    Abdominal traumatic evisceration as a result of high energy trauma is uncommon. Once repaired the possible internal damage, an abdominal wall defect of high complexity may exist, whose reconstruction represents a surgical challenge. Politraumatized male with important abdominal muculocutaneous avulsion and evisceration. After initial repair, the patient developed a big eventration in which we use a porcine dermis-derived mesh (Permacol TM ), a safe and effective alternative in abdominal wall repair, thanks to its seamless integration with other tissues, even when exposed. Negative pressure therapy has been used for the management of wound complications after surgical implantation of PermacolTM mesh. We describe our experience with the use of PermacolTM mesh and negative pressure therapy to aid the wound closure after skin necrosis and exposed mesh.

  14. Complete occlusion after blunt injury to the abdominal aorta.

    PubMed

    Meghoo, Colin A L; Gonzalez, Ernest A; Tyroch, Alan H; Wohltmann, Christopher D

    2003-10-01

    Injury to the abdominal aorta after blunt trauma is uncommon. When this injury results in complete vessel occlusion, the presentation is dramatic. Timely intervention is essential. After a case report, we examined all reported cases of complete occlusion after blunt injury to the abdominal aorta and reviewed the cause, presentation, and management of this injury. Complete vessel occlusion arises from intimal injury. The most frequent mechanism is compression from a seat belt or steering wheel during a motor vehicle crash. Patients present with absent femoral and distal pulses in association with lower extremity neuropathy. Intervention commonly involves bypass grafting of the abdominal aorta. Complete occlusion after blunt trauma to the abdominal aorta is rare. Neurologic deficits most commonly arise from peripheral nerve ischemia. Reperfusion within 6 hours confers a greater chance of limb salvage and neurologic recovery.

  15. [Morbimortality in patients with hepatic trauma].

    PubMed

    Fonseca-Neto, Olival Cirilo Lucena da; Ehrhardt, Rogério; Miranda, Antonio Lopes de

    2013-06-01

    The liver is the intra-abdominal organ more injured in patient victims of trauma. The injury occurs more frequently in the penetrating trauma. The incidence of mortality for injuries of the liver is 10%. To evaluate the mortality of the patients with hepatic trauma, the treatment applied and its evolution. Were analyzed, retrospectively, the charts of all patients with hepatic trauma and surgical indication. Were analyzed: gender, age, ISS (injury severity score), classification of the abdominal trauma type (open or closed), causing instrument of the open traumas, degree of the injury, hepatic segments involved, presence of associated injuries, type of surgical treatment: not-therapeutic laparotomy and therapeutic laparotomy, reoperations, complications, time of hospitalization in days and mortality. One hundred and thirty-seven patients participated. Of these, 124 were men (90.5%). The majority (56.2%) had 20-29 years old. Closed abdominal trauma was most prevalent (67.9%). Of the penetrating traumas, the originated with firearms were in 24.8%. One hundred and three patients had only one injured hepatic segment (75.2%) and 34 (24.8%) two. Grade II injuries were in 66.4%. Of the 137 patients with laparotomy, 89 had been not-therapeutic, while in 48 it was necessary to repair associated injuries. Spleen and diaphragm had been the more frequently injured structures, 30% and 26%, respectively. The ISS varied of eight to 72, being the ISS > 50 (eight patients) associate with fatal evolution (five patients). Biliary fistula and hepatic abscess had been the main complications. Seven deaths had occurred. Concomitant injuries, hepatic and other organs, associated with ISS > 50 presented higher possibility of complications and death.

  16. Evaluation of massive transfusion protocol practices by type of trauma at a level I trauma center.

    PubMed

    Givergis, Roshan; Munnangi, Swapna; Fayaz M Fomani, Katayoun; Boutin, Anthony; Zapata, Luis Carlos; Angus, Ld George

    2018-04-18

    To evaluate massive transfusion protocol practices by trauma type at a level I trauma center. A retrospective analysis was performed on a sample of 76 trauma patients with MTP activation between March 2010 and January 2015 at a regional trauma center. Patient demographics, transfusion practices, and clinical outcomes were compared by type of trauma sustained. Penetrating trauma patients who required MTP activation were significantly younger, had lower injury severity score (ISS), higher probability of survival (POS), decreased mortality, and higher Glasgow Coma scale (GCS) compared to blunt trauma patients. Overall, the mortality rate was 38.16%. The most common injury sustained among blunt trauma patients was head injury (36.21%), whereas the majority of the penetrating trauma patients sustained abdominal injuries (55.56%). Although the admission coagulation parameters and timing of coagulopathy were not significantly different between the two groups of patients, a significantly higher proportion of penetrating trauma patients received high plasma content therapy relative to blunt trauma patients (p < 0.01). Despite the use of the same MTP for all injured patients requiring massive transfusion, significant differences existed between blunt trauma patients and penetrating trauma patients. These differences in transfusion characteristics and outcomes following MTP activation underscore the complexity of implementing MTPs and warrant vigilant transfusion practices to improve outcomes in trauma patients. Copyright © 2018 Daping Hospital and the Research Institute of Surgery of the Third Military Medical University. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. [Diagnostic and therapeutic approach to pancreatic trauma].

    PubMed

    Vidali, Maria; Doulgerakis, George; Condilis, Nicolas; Karmiri, Eleni; Poygouras, Ihon; Papaioannoy, George; Ioannoy, Christos; Pierrakakis, Stefanos; Setakis, Nicolas

    2005-01-01

    The pancreatic trauma is rare, compared with the injuries of the other abdominal organs and occurs in 0.2-6 per cent of the cases of abdominal trauma. The aim of this essay is to demonstrate the Authors' experience in the treatment of five cases of pancreatic injury during the last five years, as well as to retrospect the contemporary bibliography, connected with the diagnostic and curative approach of the pancreatic trauma. The diagnosis of the pancreatic trauma is difficult and many times, late. In their experience of pancreatic trauma, the Authors ascertained the pancreatic injury during the laparotomy which was made in order to treat other abdominal injuries. The surgical techniques were chosen taking into account the extent of the injury, the detection and the existence of accompanying. Marginal resection of pancreas, splenectomy and drainage were applied to three patients, suture of the pancreas and drainage to one patient, drainage alone and treatment of synchronous rupture of the duodenum to one patient. The mortality was 0%. Came whereas the morbidity came basically on the seriousness of the accompanying injuries.

  18. [Chest trauma].

    PubMed

    Freixinet Gilart, Jorge; Ramírez Gil, María Elena; Gallardo Valera, Gregorio; Moreno Casado, Paula

    2011-01-01

    Chest trauma is a frequent problem arising from lesions caused by domestic and occupational activities and especially road traffic accidents. These injuries can be analyzed from distinct points of view, ranging from consideration of the most severe injuries, especially in the context of multiple trauma, to the specific characteristics of blunt and open trauma. In the present article, these injuries are discussed according to the involvement of the various thoracic structures. Rib fractures are the most frequent chest injuries and their diagnosis and treatment is straightforward, although these injuries can be severe if more than three ribs are affected and when there is major associated morbidity. Lung contusion is the most common visceral lesion. These injuries are usually found in severe chest trauma and are often associated with other thoracic and intrathoracic lesions. Treatment is based on general support measures. Pleural complications, such as hemothorax and pneumothorax, are also frequent. Their diagnosis is also straightforward and treatment is based on pleural drainage. This article also analyzes other complex situations, notably airway trauma, which is usually very severe in blunt chest trauma and less severe and even suitable for conservative treatment in iatrogenic injury due to tracheal intubation. Rupture of the diaphragm usually causes a diaphragmatic hernia. Treatment is always surgical. Myocardial contusions should be suspected in anterior chest trauma and in sternal fractures. Treatment is conservative. Other chest injuries, such as those of the great thoracic and esophageal vessels, are less frequent but are especially severe. Copyright © 2011 Sociedad Española de Neumología y Cirugía Torácica. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  19. Management of intra-abdominal hypertension and abdominal compartment syndrome: a review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Patients in the intensive care unit (ICU) are at risk of developing of intra abdominal hypertension (IAH) and abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS). Aim: This review seeks to define IAH and ACS, identify the aetiology and presentation of IAH and ACS, identify IAP measurement techniques, identify current management and discuss the implications of IAH and ACS for nursing practice. A search of the electronic databases was supervised by a health librarian. The electronic data bases Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL); Medline, EMBASE, and the World Wide Web was undertaken from 1996- January 2011 using MeSH and key words which included but not limited to: abdominal compartment syndrome, intra -abdominal hypertension, intra-abdominal pressure in adult populations met the search criteria and were reviewed by three authors using a critical appraisal tool. Data derived from the retrieved material are discussed under the following themes: (1) etiology of intra-abdominal hypertension; (2) strategies for measuring intra-abdominal pressure (3) the manifestation of abdominal compartment syndrome; and (4) the importance of nursing assessment, observation and interventions. Intra-abdominal pressure (IAP) and abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) have the potential to alter organ perfusion and compromise organ function. PMID:24499574

  20. Geriatric trauma.

    PubMed

    Adams, Sasha D; Holcomb, John B

    2015-12-01

    The landscape of trauma is changing due to an aging population. Geriatric patients represent an increasing number and proportion of trauma admissions and deaths. This review explores recent literature on geriatric trauma, including triage criteria, assessment of frailty, fall-related injury, treatment of head injury complicated by coagulopathy, goals of care, and the need for ongoing education of all surgeons in the care of the elderly. Early identification of high-risk geriatric patients is imperative to initiate early resuscitative efforts. Geriatric patients are typically undertriaged because of their baseline frailty being underappreciated; however, centers that see more geriatric patients do better. Rapid reversal of anticoagulation is important in preventing progression of brain injury. Anticipation of difficult disposition necessitates early involvement of physical therapy for rehabilitation and case management for appropriate placement. Optimal care of geriatric trauma patients will be based on the well established tenets of trauma resuscitation and injury repair, but with distinct elements that address the physiological and anatomical challenges presented by geriatric patients.

  1. Thromboprophylaxis for trauma patients.

    PubMed

    Barrera, Luis M; Perel, Pablo; Ker, Katharine; Cirocchi, Roberto; Farinella, Eriberto; Morales Uribe, Carlos Hernando

    2013-03-28

    Trauma is a leading causes of death and disability in young people. Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a principal cause of death. Trauma patients are at high risk of deep vein thrombosis (DVT). The incidence varies according to the method used to measure the DVT and the location of the thrombosis. Due to prolonged rest and coagulation abnormalities, trauma patients are at increased risk of thrombus formation. Thromboprohylaxis, either mechanical or pharmacological, may decrease mortality and morbidity in trauma patients who survive beyond the first day in hospital, by decreasing the risk of VTE in this population.A previous systematic review did not find evidence of effectiveness for either pharmacological or mechanical interventions. However, this systematic review was conducted 10 years ago and most of the included studies were of poor quality. Since then new trials have been conducted. Although current guidelines recommend the use of thromboprophylaxis in trauma patients, there has not been a comprehensive and updated systematic review since the one published. To assess the effects of thromboprophylaxis in trauma patients on mortality and incidence of deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. To compare the effects of different thromboprophylaxis interventions and their effects according to the type of trauma. We searched The Cochrane Injuries Group Specialised Register (searched April 30 2009), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials 2009, issue 2 (The Cochrane Library), MEDLINE (Ovid) 1950 to April (week 3) 2009, EMBASE (Ovid) 1980 to (week 17) April 2009, PubMed (searched 29 April 2009), ISI Web of Science: Science Citation Index Expanded (SCI-EXPANDED) (1970 to April 2009), ISI Web of Science: Conference Proceedings Citation Index-Science (CPCI-S) (1990 to April 2009). Randomized controlled clinical trials involving people of any age with major trauma defined by one or more of the following criteria: physiological: penetrating or blunt trauma with

  2. Trauma Fact Sheet

    MedlinePlus

    ... News & Meetings Science Education About NIGMS NIGMS Home > Science Education > Physical Trauma Physical Trauma Tagline (Optional) Middle/Main Content Area PDF Version (420 KB) Other Fact Sheets What is physical trauma? Physical trauma is ...

  3. Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA)

    MedlinePlus

    ... plaque buildup causes the walls of the abdominal aorta to become weak and bulge outward like a ... treated? What is an abdominal aortic aneurysm? The aorta, the largest artery in the body, is a ...

  4. Ocular trauma.

    PubMed

    Cassen, J H

    1997-10-01

    A review of the literature was conducted to investigate recent articles about ocular trauma. Eye injuries may be divided into blunt and penetrating types. Males are more affected than females. Evaluation of eye injuries should start with visual acuity and continue with prompt referral to an ophthalmologist as indicated. Medlines search/American Academy of Ophthalmology. Ocular trauma is a frequent reason for emergency room visits. Most injuries stem from sports, recreation, military, occupational, or automotive. Patient education is highly recommended, as well as prevention by use of protective polycarbonate eyewear.

  5. Thoracic Trauma.

    PubMed

    Dennis, Bradley M; Bellister, Seth A; Guillamondegui, Oscar D

    2017-10-01

    Management of chest trauma is integral to patient outcomes owing to the vital structures held within the thoracic cavity. Understanding traumatic chest injuries and appropriate management plays a pivotal role in the overall well-being of both blunt and penetrating trauma patients. Whether the injury includes rib fractures, associated pulmonary injuries, or tracheobronchial tree injuries, every facet of management may impact the short- and long-term outcomes, including mortality. This article elucidates the workup and management of the thoracic cage, pulmonary and tracheobronchial injuries. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Blunt splenic trauma: Assessment, management and outcomes.

    PubMed

    El-Matbouly, Moamena; Jabbour, Gaby; El-Menyar, Ayman; Peralta, Ruben; Abdelrahman, Husham; Zarour, Ahmad; Al-Hassani, Ammar; Al-Thani, Hassan

    2016-02-01

    The approach for diagnosis and management of blunt splenic injury (BSI) has been considerably shifted towards non-operative management (NOM). We aimed to review the current practice for the evaluation, diagnosis and management of BSI. A traditional narrative literature review was carried out using PubMed, MEDLINE and Google scholar search engines. We used the keywords "Traumatic Splenic injury", "Blunt splenic trauma", "management" between December 1954 and November 2014. Most of the current guidelines support the NOM or minimally approaches in hemodynamically stable patients. Improvement in the diagnostic modalities guide the surgeons to decide the timely management pathway Though, there is an increasing shift from operative management (OM) to NOM of BSI; NOM of high grade injury is associated with a greater rate of failure, prolonged hospital stay, risk of delayed hemorrhage and transfusion-associated infections. Some cases with high grade BSI could be successfully treated conservatively, if clinically feasible, while some patients with lower grade injury might end-up with delayed splenic rupture. Therefore, the selection of treatment modalities for BSI should be governed by patient clinical presentation, surgeon's experience in addition to radiographic findings. About one-fourth of the blunt abdominal trauma accounted for BSI. A high index of clinical suspicion along with radiological diagnosis helps to identify and characterize splenic injuries with high accuracy and is useful for timely decision-making to choose between OM or NOM. Careful selection of NOM is associated with high success rate with a lower rate of morbidity and mortality. Copyright © 2015 Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh (Scottish charity number SC005317) and Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Abdominal wall fat pad biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    Amyloidosis - abdominal wall fat pad biopsy; Abdominal wall biopsy; Biopsy - abdominal wall fat pad ... most common method of taking an abdominal wall fat pad biopsy . The health care provider cleans the ...

  8. Laparoscopic-assisted management of traumatic abdominal wall hernias in children: case series and a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Talutis, Stephanie D; Muensterer, Oliver J; Pandya, Samir; McBride, Whitney; Stringel, Gustavo

    2015-03-01

    Traumatic abdominal wall hernia (TAWH) is defined as herniation through a disrupted portion of musculature/fascia without skin penetration or history of prior hernia. In children, TAWH is a rare injury. The objectives of this study were to report our experience with different management strategies of TAWH in children and to determine the utility of laparoscopy. A retrospective chart review of all children treated by pediatric surgery at our institution for TAWH in a 5year interval was performed. Data were collected on mechanism of injury, initial patient presentation, surgical management, and outcomes. We present 5 cases of traumatic abdominal wall hernia; 3 were managed using laparoscopic assistance. One patient was managed nonoperatively. All patients recovered without complications and were asymptomatic on follow up. Traumatic abdominal wall hernias require a high index of suspicion in the cases of blunt abdominal trauma. Laparoscopy is useful mainly as a diagnostic modality, both to evaluate the hernia and associated injuries to intraabdominal structures. Its use may facilitate repair through a smaller incision. Conservative management of TAWH may be appropriate in select cases where there is a low risk of bowel strangulation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. [Pancreatic trauma].

    PubMed

    Arvieux, C; Guillon, F; Létoublon, Ch; Oughriss, M

    2003-10-01

    Early diagnosis of pancreatic trauma has always been challenging because of the lack of correlation between the initial clinical symptomatology, radiologic and laboratory findings, and the severity of the injury. Thanks to the improved performance of spiral CT scanning and magnetic resonance pancreatography, it is now often possible to make an early diagnosis of pancreatic contusion, to localize the site of the injury, and (most importantly) to identify injury to the main pancreatic duct which has major implications for the management of the case. When the trauma victim is unstable, radiologic work-up may be impossible and urgent laparotomy is required. Control of hemorrhage is the primary concern here and a damage control approach with packing may be appropriate; if the pancreatic head has been destroyed, a pancreaticoduodenectomy with delayed reconstruction may be required. If the trauma victim is stable, the treatment strategy will be governed by a variety of parameters--age, clinical condition, associated local anatomic findings (pancreatitis, injury to the duodenum or biliary tract), involvement of the pancreatic duct, and localization of the injury within the gland (to right or left of the mesenteric vessels).

  10. Emergency strategies and trends in the management of liver trauma.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hongchi; Wang, Jizhou

    2012-09-01

    The liver is the most frequently injured organ during abdominal trauma. The management of hepatic trauma has undergone a paradigm shift over the past several decades, with mandatory operation giving way to nonoperative treatment. Better understanding of the mechanisms and grade of liver injury aids in the initial assessment and establishment of a management strategy. Hemodynamically unstable patients should undergo focused abdominal sonography for trauma, whereas stable patients may undergo computed tomography, the standard examination protocol. The grade of liver injury alone does not accurately predict the need for operation, and nonoperative management is rapidly becoming popular for high-grade injuries. Hemodynamic instability with positive focused abdominal sonography for trauma and peritonitis is an indicator of the need for emergent operative intervention. The damage control concept is appropriate for the treatment of major liver injuries and is associated with significant survival advantages compared with traditional prolonged surgical techniques. Although surgical intervention for hepatic trauma is not as common now as it was in the past, current trauma surgeons should be familiar with the emergency surgical skills necessary to manage complex hepatic injuries, such as packing, Pringle maneuver, selective vessel ligation, resectional debridement, and parenchymal sutures. The present review presents emergency strategies and trends in the management of liver trauma.

  11. Effect of abdominal negative-pressure wound therapy on the measurement of intra-abdominal pressure.

    PubMed

    García, Alberto Federico; Sánchez, Álvaro Ignacio; Gutiérrez, Álvaro José; Bayona, Juan Gabriel; Naranjo, María Paula; Lago, Sebastián; Puyana, Juan Carlos

    2018-07-01

    In critically ill surgical patients undergoing abdominal negative-pressure wound therapy (NPWT), it remains uncertain whether or not intra-abdominal pressure (IAP) measurements should be obtained when NPWT is activated. We aimed to determine agreement between IAP measured with and without NPWT. In this analytic cross-sectional study, critically ill surgical adults (≥18 y) requiring abdominal NPWT for temporary abdominal closure after a damage control laparotomy were selected. Patients with urinary tract injuries or with pelvic packing were excluded. Paired IAP measures were performed in the same patient, with and without NPWT; two different operators performed the measures unaware of the other's result. Bland-Altman methods assessed the agreement between the two measures. Subgroup analyses (trauma and nontrauma) were performed. There were 198 IAP measures (99 pairs) in 38 patients. Mean IAP with and without NPWT were 8.33 (standard deviation 4.01) and 8.65 (standard deviation 4.04), respectively. Mean IAP difference was -0.323 (95% confidence interval -0.748 to 0.101), and reference range for difference was -4.579 to 3.932 (P = 0.864). From 112 IAP measures (56 pairs) in 21 trauma patients, mean IAP difference was -0.268 (95% confidence interval -0.867 to 0.331), and reference range for the difference was -4.740 to 4.204 (P = 0.427). There was no statistically significant disagreement in IAP measures. IAP could be measured with or without NPWT. In critically ill surgical patients with abdominal NPWT for temporary abdominal closure, monitoring and management of IAP either with or without NPWT is recommended. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Child with Abdominal Pain.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Rajalakshmi; Nallasamy, Karthi

    2018-01-01

    Abdominal pain is one of the common symptoms reported by children in urgent care clinics. While most children tend to have self-limiting conditions, the treating pediatrician should watch out for underlying serious causes like intestinal obstruction and perforation peritonitis, which require immediate referral to an emergency department (ED). Abdominal pain may be secondary to surgical or non-surgical causes, and will differ as per the age of the child. The common etiologies for abdominal pain presenting to an urgent care clinic are acute gastro-enteritis, constipation and functional abdominal pain; however, a variety of extra-abdominal conditions may also present as abdominal pain. Meticulous history taking and physical examination are the best tools for diagnosis, while investigations have a limited role in treating benign etiologies.

  13. Chest trauma in children, single center experience.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Mohamed Fouad; al-Refaie, Reda Ibrahim

    2012-10-01

    Trauma is the leading cause of mortality in children over one year of age in industrialized countries. In this retrospective study we reviewed all chest trauma in pediatric patients admitted to Mansoura University Emergency Hospital from January 1997 to January 2007. Our hospital received 472 patients under the age of 18. Male patients were 374 with a mean age of 9.2±4.9 years. Causes were penetrating trauma (2.1%) and blunt trauma (97.9%). The trauma was pedestrian injuries (38.3%), motor vehicle (28.1%), motorcycle crash (19.9%), falling from height (6.7%), animal trauma (2.9%), and sports injury (1.2%). Type of injury was pulmonary contusions (27.1%) and lacerations (6.9%), rib fractures (23.9%), flail chest (2.5%), hemothorax (18%), hemopneumothorax (11.8%), pneumothorax (23.7%), surgical emphysema (6.1%), tracheobronchial injury (5.3%), and diaphragm injury (2.1%). Associated lesions were head injuries (38.9%), bone fractures (33.5%), and abdominal injuries (16.7%). Management was conservative (29.9%), tube thoracostomy (58.1%), and thoracotomy (12.1%). Mortality rate was 7.2% and multiple trauma was the main cause of death (82.3%) (P<.001). We concluded that blunt trauma is the most common cause of pediatric chest trauma and often due to pedestrian injuries. Rib fractures and pulmonary contusions are the most frequent injuries. Delay in diagnosis and multiple trauma are associated with high incidence of mortality. Copyright © 2011 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  14. Training in Trauma Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Reilly, Patrick M.; Schwab, C William; Haut, Elliott R.; Gracias, Vicente H.; Dabrowski, G Paul; Gupta, Rajan; Pryor, John P.; Kauder, Donald R.

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To describe outcomes from a clinical trauma surgical education program that places the board-eligible/board-certified fellow in the role of the attending surgeon (fellow-in-exception [FIE]) during the latter half of a 2-year trauma/surgical critical care fellowship. Summary Background Data: National discussions have begun to explore the question of optimal methods for postresidency training in surgery. Few objective studies are available to evaluate current training models. Methods: We analyzed provider-specific data from both our trauma registry and performance improvement (PI) databases. In addition, we performed TRISS analysis when all data were available. Registry and PI data were analyzed as 2 groups (faculty trauma surgeons and FIEs) to determine experience, safety, and trends in errors. We also surveyed graduate fellows using a questionnaire that evaluated perceptions of training and experience on a 6-point Likert scale. Results: During a 4-year period 7,769 trauma patients were evaluated, of which 46.3% met criteria to be submitted to the PA Trauma Outcome Study (PTOS, ie, more severe injury). The faculty group saw 5,885 patients (2,720 PTOS); the FIE group saw 1,884 patients (879 PTOS). The groups were similar in respect to mechanism of injury (74% blunt; 26% penetrating both groups) and injury severity (mean ISS faculty 10.0; FIEs 9.5). When indexed to patient contacts, FIEs did more operations than the faculty group (28.4% versus 25.6%; P < 0.05). Death rates were similar between groups (faculty 10.5%; FIEs 10.0%). Analysis of deaths using PI and TRISS data failed to demonstrate differences between the groups. Analysis of provider-specific errors demonstrated a slightly higher rate for FIEs when compared with faculty when indexed to PTOS cases (4.1% versus 2.1%; P < 0.01). For both groups, errors in management were more common than errors in technique. Twenty-one (91%) of twenty-three surveys were returned. Fellows’ feelings of preparedness

  15. Disaster metrics: quantification of acute medical disasters in trauma-related multiple casualty events through modeling of the Acute Medical Severity Index.

    PubMed

    Bayram, Jamil D; Zuabi, Shawki

    2012-04-01

    The interaction between the acute medical consequences of a Multiple Casualty Event (MCE) and the total medical capacity of the community affected determines if the event amounts to an acute medical disaster. There is a need for a comprehensive quantitative model in MCE that would account for both prehospital and hospital-based acute medical systems, leading to the quantification of acute medical disasters. Such a proposed model needs to be flexible enough in its application to accommodate a priori estimation as part of the decision-making process and a posteriori evaluation for total quality management purposes. The concept proposed by de Boer et al in 1989, along with the disaster metrics quantitative models proposed by Bayram et al on hospital surge capacity and prehospital medical response, were used as theoretical frameworks for a new comprehensive model, taking into account both prehospital and hospital systems, in order to quantify acute medical disasters. A quantitative model called the Acute Medical Severity Index (AMSI) was developed. AMSI is the proportion of the Acute Medical Burden (AMB) resulting from the event, compared to the Total Medical Capacity (TMC) of the community affected; AMSI = AMB/TMC. In this model, AMB is defined as the sum of critical (T1) and moderate (T2) casualties caused by the event, while TMC is a function of the Total Hospital Capacity (THC) and the medical rescue factor (R) accounting for the hospital-based and prehospital medical systems, respectively. Qualitatively, the authors define acute medical disaster as "a state after any type of Multiple Casualty Event where the Acute Medical Burden (AMB) exceeds the Total Medical Capacity (TMC) of the community affected." Quantitatively, an acute medical disaster has an AMSI value of more than one (AMB / TMC > 1). An acute medical incident has an AMSI value of less than one, without the need for medical surge. An acute medical emergency has an AMSI value of less than one with

  16. Abdominal exploration - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... ency/presentations/100049.htm Abdominal exploration - series—Normal ... intestine (jejunum and ileum), the large intestine (colon), the liver, the spleen, the gallbladder, the pancreas, the uterus, ...

  17. Review of Pancreaticoduodenal Trauma with a Case Report.

    PubMed

    Poyrazoglu, Yavuz; Duman, Kazim; Harlak, Ali

    2016-06-01

    Complex anatomical relation of the duodenum, pancreas, biliary tract, and major vessels plays to obscure pancreaticoduodenal injuries. Causes of pancreaticoduodenal injuries are blunt trauma (traffic accidents, sport injuries) in 25 % of cases and penetrating abdominal injuries (stab wounds and firearm injuries) in 75 % of cases. Duodenal injuries are reported to occur in 0.5 to 5 % of all abdominal trauma cases and are observed in 11 % of abdominal firearm wounds, 1.6 % of abdominal stab wounds, and 6 % of blunt trauma. Retroperitoneal and deep abdominal localization of duodenum as an organ contribute to the difficulty in diagnosis and treatment. There are three important major points regarding treatment of duodenal injuries: (1) operation timing and decision, (2) Intraoperative detection, and (3) post-operative care. Therefore, it is difficult to diagnose and treat duodenal trauma. We would like to present a 21-year-old male patient with pancreaticoduodenal injury who presented to our emergency service after firearm injury to his abdomen and discuss his treatment with a short review of related literature.

  18. Intra-Abdominal Hypertension and Abdominal Compartment Syndrome after Abdominal Wall Reconstruction: Quaternary Syndromes?

    PubMed

    Kirkpatrick, A W; Nickerson, D; Roberts, D J; Rosen, M J; McBeth, P B; Petro, C C; Berrevoet, Frederik; Sugrue, M; Xiao, Jimmy; Ball, C G

    2017-06-01

    Reconstruction with reconstitution of the container function of the abdominal compartment is increasingly being performed in patients with massive ventral hernia previously deemed inoperable. This situation places patients at great risk of severe intra-abdominal hypertension and abdominal compartment syndrome if organ failure ensues. Intra-abdominal hypertension and especially abdominal compartment syndrome may be devastating systemic complications with systematic and progressive organ failure and death. We thus reviewed the pathophysiology and reported clinical experiences with abnormalities of intra-abdominal pressure in the context of abdominal wall reconstruction. Bibliographic databases (1950-2015), websites, textbooks, and the bibliographies of previously recovered articles for reports or data relating to intra-abdominal pressure, intra-abdominal hypertension, and the abdominal compartment syndrome in relation to ventral, incisional, or abdominal hernia repair or abdominal wall reconstruction. Surgeons should thus consider and carefully measure intra-abdominal pressure and its resultant effects on respiratory parameters and function during abdominal wall reconstruction. The intra-abdominal pressure post-operatively will be a result of the new intra-peritoneal volume and the abdominal wall compliance. Strategies surgeons may utilize to ameliorate intra-abdominal pressure rise after abdominal wall reconstruction including temporizing paralysis of the musculature either temporarily or semi-permanently, pre-operative progressive pneumoperitoneum, permanently removing visceral contents, or surgically releasing the musculature to increase the abdominal container volume. In patients without complicating shock and inflammation, and in whom the abdominal wall anatomy has been so functionally adapted to maximize compliance, intra-abdominal hypertension may be transient and tolerable. Intra-abdominal hypertension/abdominal compartment syndrome in the specific setting of

  19. Epidemiological evaluation of hepatic trauma victims undergoing surgery.

    PubMed

    Kalil, Mitre; Amaral, Isaac Massaud Amim

    2016-02-01

    to evaluate the epidemiological variables and diagnostic and therapeutic modalities related to hepatic trauma patients undergoing laparotomy in a public referral hospital in the metropolitan region of Vitória-ES. we conducted a retrospective study, reviewing charts of trauma patients with liver injuries, whether isolated or in association with other organs, who underwent exploratory laparotomy, from January 2011 to December 2013. We studied 392 patients, 107 of these with liver injury. The male: female ratio was 6.6 : 1 and the mean age was 30.12 years. Penetrating liver trauma occurred in 78.5% of patients, mostly with firearms. Associated injuries occurred in 86% of cases and intra-abdominal injuries were more common in penetrating trauma (p <0.01). The most commonly used operative technique was hepatorrhaphy and damage control surgery was applied in 6.5% of patients. The average amounts of blood products used were 6.07 units of packed red blood cells and 3.01 units of fresh frozen plasma. The incidence of postoperative complications was 29.9%, the most frequent being infectious, including pneumonia, peritonitis and intra-abdominal abscess. The survival rate of patients suffering from blunt trauma was 60%, and penetrating trauma, 87.5% (p <0.05). despite technological advances in diagnosis and treatment, mortality rates in liver trauma remain high, especially in patients suffering from blunt trauma in relation to penetrating one.

  20. Abdominal Aortic Dissections

    PubMed Central

    Borioni, Raoul; Garofalo, Mariano; De Paulis, Ruggero; Nardi, Paolo; Scaffa, Raffaele; Chiariello, Luigi

    2005-01-01

    Isolated abdominal aortic dissections are rare events. Their anatomic and clinical features are different from those of atherosclerotic aneurysms. We report 4 cases of isolated abdominal aortic dissection that were successfully treated with surgical or endovascular intervention. The anatomic and clinical features and a review of the literature are also presented. PMID:15902826

  1. [Hepatic artery pseudoaneurysm following blunt abdominal injury].

    PubMed

    Kargl, S; Breitwieser, J; Gitter, R; Pumberger, W

    2012-12-01

    Posttraumatic hepatic artery pseudoaneurysms are a rare but life-threatening complication of blunt abdominal trauma with liver damage. We report the case of a child who developed a pseudoaneurysm of the right hepatic artery after a bicycle accident with central liver rupture. After an episode of hemodynamically relevant hemobilia due to delayed bleeding, the asymptomatic pseudoaneurysm was diagnosed coincidentally by ultrasound. Because of the progression in size angiographic coiling was performed and led to thrombotic occlusion of the pseudoaneurysm. After a symptom-free period of 1 month the child required surgery because of acute cholecystitis.

  2. Factors associated with abdominal obesity in children

    PubMed Central

    Melzer, Matheus Ribeiro Theodósio Fernandes; Magrini, Isabella Mastrangi; Domene, Semíramis Martins Álvares; Martins, Paula Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To identify the association of dietary, socioeconomic factors, sedentary behaviors and maternal nutritional status with abdominal obesity in children. Methods: A cross-sectional study with household-based survey, in 36 randomly selected census tracts in the city of Santos, SP. 357 families were interviewed and questionnaires and anthropometric measurements were applied in mothers and their 3-10 years-old children. Assessment of abdominal obesity was made by maternal and child's waist circumference measurement; for classification used cut-off points proposed by World Health Organization (1998) and Taylor et al. (2000) were applied. The association between variables was performed by multiple logistic regression analysis. Results: 30.5% of children had abdominal obesity. Associations with children's and maternal nutritional status and high socioeconomic status were shown in the univariate analysis. In the regression model, children's body mass index for age (OR=93.7; 95%CI 39.3-223.3), female gender (OR=4.1; 95%CI 1.8-9.3) and maternal abdominal obesity (OR=2.7; 95%CI 1.2-6.0) were significantly associated with children's abdominal obesity, regardless of the socioeconomic status. Conclusions: Abdominal obesity in children seems to be associated with maternal nutritional status, other indicators of their own nutritional status and female gender. Intervention programs for control of childhood obesity and prevention of metabolic syndrome should consider the interaction of the nutritional status of mothers and their children. PMID:26298655

  3. Abdominal hernias: Radiological features

    PubMed Central

    Lassandro, Francesco; Iasiello, Francesca; Pizza, Nunzia Luisa; Valente, Tullio; Stefano, Maria Luisa Mangoni di Santo; Grassi, Roberto; Muto, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    Abdominal wall hernias are common diseases of the abdomen with a global incidence approximately 4%-5%. They are distinguished in external, diaphragmatic and internal hernias on the basis of their localisation. Groin hernias are the most common with a prevalence of 75%, followed by femoral (15%) and umbilical (8%). There is a higher prevalence in males (M:F, 8:1). Diagnosis is usually made on physical examination. However, clinical diagnosis may be difficult, especially in patients with obesity, pain or abdominal wall scarring. In these cases, abdominal imaging may be the first clue to the correct diagnosis and to confirm suspected complications. Different imaging modalities are used: conventional radiographs or barium studies, ultrasonography and Computed Tomography. Imaging modalities can aid in the differential diagnosis of palpable abdominal wall masses and can help to define hernial contents such as fatty tissue, bowel, other organs or fluid. This work focuses on the main radiological findings of abdominal herniations. PMID:21860678

  4. Specific Trauma Subtypes Improve the Predictive Validity of the Harvard Trauma Questionnaire in Iraqi Refugees

    PubMed Central

    Arnetz, Bengt B.; Broadbridge, Carissa L.; Jamil, Hikmet; Lumley, Mark A.; Pole, Nnamdi; Barkho, Evone; Fakhouri, Monty; Talia, Yousif Rofa; Arnetz, Judith E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Trauma exposure contributes to poor mental health among refugees, and exposure often is measured using a cumulative index of items from the Harvard Trauma Questionnaire (HTQ). Few studies, however, have asked whether trauma subtypes derived from the HTQ could be superior to this cumulative index in predicting mental health outcomes. Methods A community sample of recently arrived Iraqi refugees (N = 298) completed the HTQ and measures of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression symptoms. Results Principal components analysis of HTQ items revealed a 5-component subtype model of trauma that accounted for more item variance than a 1-component solution. These trauma subtypes also accounted for more variance in PTSD and depression symptoms (12% and 10%, respectively) than did the cumulative trauma index (7% and 3%, respectively). Discussion Trauma subtypes provided more information than cumulative trauma in the prediction of negative mental health outcomes. Therefore, use of these subtypes may enhance the utility of the HTQ when assessing at-risk populations. PMID:24549491

  5. Current approach to liver traumas.

    PubMed

    Kaptanoglu, Levent; Kurt, Necmi; Sikar, Hasan Ediz

    2017-03-01

    Liver injuries remain major obstacle for successful treatment, due to size and location of the liver. Requirement for surgery should be determined by clinical factors, most notably hemodynamical state. In this present study we tried to declare our approach to liver traumas. We also tried to emphasize the importance of conservative treatment, since surgeries for liver traumas carry high mortality rates. Patients admitted to the Department of Emergency Surgery at Kartal Research and Education Hospital, due to liver trauma were retrospectively analyzed between 2003 and 2013. Patient demographics, hepatic panel, APTT (activated partial thromboplastin time), PT (prothrombin time), INR (international normalized ratio), fibrinogen, biochemistry panel were recorded. Hemodynamic instability was the most prominent factor for surgery decision, in the lead of current Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) protocols. Operation records and imaging modalities revealed liver injuries according to the Organ Injury Scale of the American Association for the Surgery of Trauma. 300 patients admitted to emergency department were included in our study (187 males and 113 females). Mean age was 47 years (range, 12-87). The overall mortality rate was 13% (40 out of 300). Major factor responsible for mortality rates and outcome was stability of cases on admission. 188 (% 63) patients were counted as stable, whereas 112 (% 37) cases were found unstable (blood pressure ≤ 90, after massive resuscitation). 192 patients were observed conservatively, whereas 108 cases received abdominal surgery. High levels of AST, ALT, LDH, INR, creatinine and low levels of fibrinogen and low platelet counts on admission were found to be associated with mortality and these cases also had Grade 4 and 5 injuries. Hemodynamic instability on admission and the type and grade of injury played major role in mortality rates). Packing was performed in 35 patients, with Grade 4 and 5 injuries. Mortality rate was %13 (40

  6. Chronic Abdominal Wall Pain.

    PubMed

    Koop, Herbert; Koprdova, Simona; Schürmann, Christine

    2016-01-29

    Chronic abdominal wall pain is a poorly recognized clinical problem despite being an important element in the differential diagnosis of abdominal pain. This review is based on pertinent articles that were retrieved by a selective search in PubMed and EMBASE employing the terms "abdominal wall pain" and "cutaneous nerve entrapment syndrome," as well as on the authors' clinical experience. In 2% to 3% of patients with chronic abdominal pain, the pain arises from the abdominal wall; in patients with previously diagnosed chronic abdominal pain who have no demonstrable pathological abnormality, this likelihood can rise as high as 30% . There have only been a small number of clinical trials of treatment for this condition. The diagnosis is made on clinical grounds, with the aid of Carnett's test. The characteristic clinical feature is strictly localized pain in the anterior abdominal wall, which is often mischaracterized as a "functional" complaint. In one study, injection of local anesthesia combined with steroids into the painful area was found to relieve pain for 4 weeks in 95% of patients. The injection of lidocaine alone brought about improvement in 83-91% of patients. Long-term pain relief ensued after a single lidocaine injection in 20-30% of patients, after repeated injections in 40-50% , and after combined lidocaine and steroid injections in up to 80% . Pain that persists despite these treatments can be treated with surgery (neurectomy). Chronic abdominal wall pain is easily diagnosed on physical examination and can often be rapidly treated. Any physician treating patients with abdominal pain should be aware of this condition. Further comparative treatment trials will be needed before a validated treatment algorithm can be established.

  7. RADIOLOGY EDUCATION: A PILOT STUDY TO ASSESS KNOWLEDGE OF MEDICAL STUDENTS REGARDING IMAGING IN TRAUMA.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Saad; Saeed, Muhammad Anwar; Shah, Noreen; Nadeem, Naila

    2015-01-01

    Trauma remains one of the most frequent presentations in emergency departments. Imaging has established role in setting of acute trauma with ability to identify potentially fatal conditions. Adequate knowledge of health professionals regarding trauma imaging is vital for improved healthcare. In this work we try to assess knowledge of medical students regarding imaging in trauma as well as identify most effective way of imparting radiology education. This cross-sectional pilot study was conducted at Aga Khan University Medical College & Khyber Girls Medical College, to assess knowledge of medical students regarding imaging protocols practiced in initial management of trauma patients. Only 40 & 20% respectively were able to identify radiographs included in trauma series. Very few had knowledge of correct indication for Focused abdominal sonography in trauma. Clinical radiology rotation was reported as best way of learning radiology. Change in curricula & restructuring of clinical radiology rotation structure is needed to improve knowledge regarding Trauma imaging.

  8. Abdominal x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    ... are, or may be, pregnant. Alternative Names Abdominal film; X-ray - abdomen; Flat plate; KUB x-ray ... Guidelines Viewers & Players MedlinePlus Connect for EHRs For Developers U.S. National Library of Medicine 8600 Rockville Pike, ...

  9. Abdominal aortic aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    ... this problem include: Smoking High blood pressure Male gender Genetic factors An abdominal aortic aneurysm is most ... body from an aortic aneurysm, you will need surgery right away. If the aneurysm is small and ...

  10. Abdominal CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    Computed tomography scan - abdomen; CT scan - abdomen; CT abdomen and pelvis ... An abdominal CT scan makes detailed pictures of the structures inside your belly very quickly. This test may be used to look ...

  11. Abdominal Pain Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... blood clots to the lungs) Abdominal or chest wall pain: Shingles (herpes zoster infection) Costochondritis (inflammation of ... or tumors), fat (evidence of impaired digestion and absorption of food), and the presence of germs. X- ...

  12. Abdominal ultrasound (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Abdominal ultrasound is a scanning technique used to image the interior of the abdomen. Like the X-ray, MRI, ... it has its place as a diagnostic tool. Ultrasound scans use high frequency sound waves to produce ...

  13. Abdominal cocoon: sonographic features.

    PubMed

    Vijayaraghavan, S Boopathy; Palanivelu, Chinnusamy; Sendhilkumar, Karuppusamy; Parthasarathi, Ramakrishnan

    2003-07-01

    An abdominal cocoon is a rare condition in which the small bowel is encased in a membrane. The diagnosis is usually established at surgery. Here we describe the sonographic features of this condition.

  14. The association between Chance fractures and intra-abdominal injuries revisited: a multicenter review.

    PubMed

    Tyroch, Alan H; McGuire, Emmett L; McLean, Susan F; Kozar, Rosemary A; Gates, Keith A; Kaups, Krista L; Cook, Charles; Cowgill, Sarah M; Griswold, John A; Sue, Larry A; Craun, Michael L; Price, Jan

    2005-05-01

    The association between Chance fractures and intra-abdominal injuries is reported to be as high as 89 per cent. Because prior studies were small series or case reports, we conducted a multicenter review to learn the true association between Chance fractures and intra-abdominal injuries as well as diagnostic trends. Trauma registry data, medical records, and radiology reports from 7 trauma centers were used to characterize 79 trauma patients with Chance fractures. Initial methods of abdominal assessment were computed tomography (CT) scan (79%), clinical examination (16%), and diagnostic peritoneal lavage (DPL) (5%). Twenty-six (33%) patients had intraabdominal injuries of which hollow viscus injuries predominated (22%). Twenty patients (25%) underwent laparotomy. The presence of an abdominal wall contusion and automobile restraint use were highly predictive of intra-abdominal injury and the need for laparotomy. The association between a Chance fracture and intra-abdominal injury is not as high as previously reported. CT scan has become the primary modality to assess the abdominal cavity of patients with Chance fractures, whereas the role of DPL has diminished.

  15. The cardio-respiratory effects of intra-abdominal hypertension: Considerations for critical care nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Martin; Craft, Judy

    2018-02-01

    Intra-abdominal hypertension can be classified as either primary or secondary. Primary intra-abdominal hypertension is often associated through trauma or diseases of the abdominopelvic region such as pancreatitis or abdominal surgery, while secondary intra-abdominal hypertension is the result of extra-abdominal causes such as sepsis or burns. The critically ill patient offers some challenges in monitoring in particular secondary intra-abdominal hypertension because of the effects of fluid resuscitation, the use of inotropes and positive pressure ventilation. Recent work suggests that intensive care unit nurses are often unaware of the secondary effects of intra-abdominal pressure and therefore this is not monitored effectively. Therefore being aware of the cardio-respiratory effects may alert theintensive care nurse nurse to the development of intra-abdominal hypertension. The aim of this paper is to discuss the pathophysiology associated with the cardio-respiratory effects seen with intra-abdominal hypertension in the critically ill. In particular it will discuss how intra-abdominal hypertension can inadvertently be overlooked because of the low flow states that it produces which could be misconstrued as something else. It will also discuss how intra-abdominal hypertension impedes ventilation and respiratory mechanics which can often result in a non-cardiogenic pulmonary oedema. To close, the paper will offer some implications for critical care nursing practice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. An oblique muscle hematoma as a rare cause of severe abdominal pain: a case report.

    PubMed

    Shimodaira, Masanori; Kitano, Tomohiro; Kibata, Minoru; Shirahata, Kumiko

    2013-01-18

    Abdominal wall hematomas are an uncommon cause of acute abdominal pain and are often misdiagnosed. They are more common in elderly individuals, particularly in those under anticoagulant therapy. Most abdominal wall hematomas occur in the rectus sheath, and hematomas within the oblique muscle are very rare and are poorly described in the literature. Here we report the case of an oblique muscle hematoma in a middle-aged patient who was not under anticoagulant therapy. A 42-year-old Japanese man presented with a painful, enlarging, lateral abdominal wall mass, which appeared after playing baseball. Abdominal computed tomography and ultrasonography showed a large soft tissue mass located in the patient's left internal oblique muscle. A diagnosis of a lateral oblique muscle hematoma was made and the patient was treated conservatively. Physicians should consider an oblique muscle hematoma during the initial differential diagnosis of pain in the lateral abdominal wall even in the absence of anticoagulant therapy or trauma.

  17. Athletic injuries of the lateral abdominal wall: review of anatomy and MR imaging appearance.

    PubMed

    Stensby, J Derek; Baker, Jonathan C; Fox, Michael G

    2016-02-01

    The lateral abdominal wall is comprised of three muscles, each with a different function and orientation. The transversus abdominus, internal oblique, and external oblique muscles span the abdominal cavity between the iliocostalis lumborum and quadratus lumborum posteriorly and the rectus abdominis anteriorly. The lateral abdominal wall is bound superiorly by the lower ribs and costal cartilages and inferiorly by the iliac crest and inguinal ligament. The lateral abdominal wall may be acutely or chronically injured in a variety of athletic endeavors, with occasional acute injuries in the setting of high-energy trauma such as motor vehicle collisions. Injuries to the lateral abdominal wall may result in lumbar hernia formation, unique for its high incarceration rate, and also Spigelian hernias. This article will review the anatomy, the magnetic resonance (MR) imaging approach, and the features and complications of lateral abdominal wall injuries.

  18. Independent predictors of morbidity and mortality in blunt colon trauma.

    PubMed

    Ricciardi, R; Paterson, C A; Islam, S; Sweeney, W B; Baker, S P; Counihan, T C

    2004-01-01

    We sought to determine the impact of (1) grade of the colon injury, (2) the formation of an ostomy, and (3) associated injuries on outcomes such as morbidity and mortality after blunt colon injuries. We retrospectively reviewed 16,814 cases of blunt abdominal trauma. Patients with colonic injuries were selected and charts reviewed for demographic, clinical, and outcomes data. Injuries were grouped by the Colon Injury Scale (grades I-V). Independent risk factors of morbidity included spine and lung injuries, as well as increased age. A higher grade of colon injury trended toward a significant association with intra-abdominal complications. Independent risk factors of mortality included liver, heart, and lung injuries, as well as intracerebral blood and female gender. The grade of colon injury, the formation of an ostomy, and management of the colon trauma did not independently predict increased intra-abdominal complications, morbidity, or mortality. These results indicate that patients afflicted with blunt colon trauma experience a high rate of morbidity and mortality from associated injuries and or increased age. Treatment regimens directed at these factors will be most helpful in reducing the high morbidity and mortality after blunt colon trauma. Factors such as ostomy formation and management strategy are not associated with increased morbidity or mortality after blunt colon trauma.

  19. Abdominal wall desmoid tumors: A case report

    PubMed Central

    MA, JIN-HUI; MA, ZHEN-HAI; DONG, XUE-FENG; YIN, HANG; ZHAO, YONG-FU

    2013-01-01

    Desmoid tumors (DTs) are rare lesions that do not possess any metastatic potential. However, they have a strong tendency to invade locally and recur. They constitute 3% of all soft tissue tumors and 0.03% of all neoplasms. Abdominal DTs occur sporadically or are associated with certain familial syndromes, such as familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP). The single form of this neoplasm most frequently occurs in females of reproductive age and during pregnancy. A female patient with a DT of the abdominal wall who had no relevant family history was admitted to hospital. The patient, who presented with a painless mass in the left anterolateral abdomen, had no history of trauma, surgery or childbearing. According to the medical history, physical examination and CT report, the patient was diagnosed with DT. Radical resection of the affected abdominal wall musculature was performed, and the defect was replaced with a polypropylene mesh. The histological diagnosis was of DT. The patient remains in good health and complete remission without any other treatment following surgery. DTs exhibit aggressive growth and have a high rate of recurrence. Surgery is the optimal treatment, and subsequent radiotherapy may decrease the local recurrence rate. Further research into their aetiology is required combined with multicentre clinical trials of new treatments in order to improve management of this disease. This case report provides general knowledge of DT, and may be used as a guidance for diagnosis and treatment. PMID:23833679

  20. Canine tactical field care part three - thoracic and abdominal trauma.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Wesley M

    2010-01-01

    Military and law enforcement agencies have seen a dramatic increase in the utilization of working canines both at home and in foreign deployments. Due to the fact that professional veterinary care is sometimes distant from internal disaster or foreign deployment sites, the military medic, police tactical medic, or other first-response medical care provider may be charged with providing emergency or even basic, non-emergency veterinary care to working canines. (Editor's Note: Military veterinary detachments are collocated next to the major human treatment facilities in a deployment environment. In a deployed environment veterinary care is located in areas where they are most needed or where most of the animals are located.) The medical principles involved in treating canines are essentially the same as those for treating humans, but the human healthcare provider needs basic information on canine anatomy and physiology and common emergency conditions in order to provide good basic veterinary care until a higher level of veterinary care can be obtained. This article represents the third in a series of articles designed to provide condensed, basic veterinary information on the medical care of working canines, to include military working dogs (MWDs), police canines, federal agency employed working canines, and search and rescue dogs, to those who are normally charged with tactical or first responder medical care of human patients. This article provides and overview of the diagnosis and treatment of common traumatic injuries to the thorax and abdomen.

  1. Blunt Force Trauma in Veterinary Forensic Pathology.

    PubMed

    Ressel, L; Hetzel, U; Ricci, E

    2016-09-01

    Veterinary pathologists commonly encounter lesions of blunt trauma. The development of lesions is affected by the object's mass, velocity, size, shape, and angle of impact and by the plasticity and mobility of the impacted organ. Scrape, impact, and pattern abrasions cause localized epidermal loss and sometimes broken hairs and implanted foreign material. Contusions are best identified after reflecting the skin, and must be differentiated from coagulopathies and livor mortis. Lacerations-traumatic tissue tears-may have irregular margins, bridging by more resilient tissue, deviation of the wound tail, crushed hairs, and unilateral abrasion. Hanging or choking can cause circumferential cervical abrasions, contusions and rupture of hairs, hyoid bone fractures, and congestion of the head. Other special forms of blunt trauma include fractured nails, pressure sores, and dog bites. Ocular blunt trauma causes extraocular and intraocular hemorrhages, proptosis, or retinal detachment. The thoracic viscera are relatively protected from blunt trauma but may develop hemorrhages in intercostal muscles, rib fractures, pulmonary or cardiac contusions or lacerations with subsequent hemothorax, pneumothorax, or cardiac arrhythmia. The abdominal wall is resilient and moveable, yet the liver and spleen are susceptible to traumatic laceration or rupture. Whereas extravasation of blood can occur after death, evidence of vital injury includes leukocyte infiltration, erythrophagocytosis, hemosiderin, reparative lesions of fibroblast proliferation, myocyte regeneration in muscle, and callus formation in bone. Understanding these processes aids in the diagnosis of blunt force trauma including estimation of the age of resulting injuries. © The Author(s) 2016.

  2. Tension gastrothorax in a child presenting with abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Hooker, Ross; Claudius, Ilene; Truong, Anh

    2012-02-01

    A 4-year-old girl was brought to our hospital by her parents because of abdominal pain. She had suffered minor trauma after rolling from her standard-height bed 2 days prior. Vital signs were appropriate for age. Physical examination was remarkable for decreased breath sounds to the left side of the chest. A chest radiograph (Figure) demonstrated a large gas-filled structure in the left side of the chest with mediastinal shift.

  3. Abdominal emergencies in pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Coca Robinot, D; Liébana de Rojas, C; Aguirre Pascual, E

    2016-05-01

    Abdominal symptoms are among the most common reasons for pediatric emergency department visits, and abdominal pain is the most frequently reported symptom. Thorough history taking and physical examination can often reach the correct diagnosis. Knowing the abdominal conditions that are most common in each age group can help radiologists narrow the differential diagnosis. When imaging tests are indicated, ultrasonography is usually the first-line technique, enabling the diagnosis or adding relevant information with the well-known advantages of this technique. Nowadays, plain-film X-ray studies are reserved for cases in which perforation, bowel obstruction, or foreign body ingestion is suspected. It is also important to remember that abdominal pain can also occur secondary to basal pneumonia. CT is reserved for specific indications and in individual cases, for example, in patients with high clinical suspicion of abdominal disease and inconclusive findings at ultrasonography. We review some of the most common conditions in pediatric emergencies, the different imaging tests indicated in each case, and the imaging signs in each condition. Copyright © 2016 SERAM. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Abdominal pregnancy - Case presentation.

    PubMed

    Bohiltea, R; Radoi, V; Tufan, C; Horhoianu, I A; Bohiltea, C

    2015-01-01

    Abdominal pregnancy, a rare diagnosis, belongs to the ectopic pregnancy group, the leading cause of pregnancy related exitus. The positive diagnosis is very difficult to establish most often in an acute setting, leading to a staggering percent of feto-maternal morbidity and mortality. We present the case of 26-weeks-old abdominal pregnancy with partial feto-placental detachment in a patient, after hysteroscopy and in vitro fertilization, which until the acute symptoms that led to emergency laparotomy went unrecognized. The patient recovered completely and satisfactorily after surgery and, due to the high risk of uterine rupture with regard to a second pregnancy, opted for a surrogate mother. Abdominal pregnancy can be regarded as a difficult to establish diagnosis, with a greater chance in case of increased awareness. It is compulsory to be well informed in order not to be surprised by the diagnosis and to apply the correct treatment immediately as the morbidity and mortality rate is elevated.

  5. The expediency of peritoneal lavage for blunt trauma in children.

    PubMed

    Drew, R; Perry, J F; Fischer, R P

    1977-12-01

    Two hundred and thirty children, ten years of age or younger, suspected of having blunt abdominal injuries underwent diagnostic peritoneal lavage. Peritoneal lavage was 99.1 per cent accurate in determining the presence or absence of abdominal injuries. One patient had a false-positive peritoneal lavage. Sixty-nine of the 70 patients with blunt abdominal injuries, who underwent peritoneal lavage, had a positive peritoneal lavage; one patient had a false-negative peritoneal levage. Ninety-one per cent of the positive peritoneal lavages were grossly positive for hemoperitoneum. All 11 children with extraperitoneal abdominal injuries had positive peritoneal lavages from associated intraperitoneal injeries. The mortality for children with blunt abdominal injuries was 19.4 per cent. Intra-abdominal injuries were solely responsible for 29 per cent of the deaths and were a major contributing factor in an additional 21 per cent of the deaths. The routine use of diagnostic peritoneal lavage during the initial evaluation of blunt abdominal trauma was, in large part, responsible for the rapid, definitive treatment which -he children with abdominal injuries received. Sixty-five per cent of the children underwent exploratory laparotomy within one hour of admission to the hospital.

  6. Evaluation and Management of Blunt Solid Organ Trauma.

    PubMed

    Martin, Jonathan G; Shah, Jay; Robinson, Craig; Dariushnia, Sean

    2017-12-01

    Trauma is a leading cause of death in patients under the age of 45 and generally associated with a high kinetic energy event such as a motor vehicle accident or fall from extreme elevations. Blunt trauma can affect every organ system and major vascular structure with potentially devastating effect. When we consider abdominal solid organ injury from blunt trauma, we usually think of the liver, spleen, and kidneys. However, all of the abdominal organs, including the pancreas and adrenal glands, may be involved. Blunt hepatic trauma is more commonly associated with venous bleeding rather than arterial injury. Stable venous injury is often managed conservatively; when the patient is hemodynamically unstable from venous hepatic injury, operative management should be first-line therapy. When the injury is arterial, endovascular therapy should be initiated. Blunt trauma to the spleen is the most common cause of traumatic injury to the spleen. Management is controversial. In our institution unstable patients are taken to the operating room, and stable patients with Grades IV-V injuries and patients with active arterial injury are taken for endovascular treatment. Renal injuries are less common, and evidence of arterial injury such as active extravasation or pseudoaneurysm is warranted before endovascular therapy. Pancreatic trauma is uncommon and usually secondary to steering wheel/handlebar mechanism injuries. Adrenal injuries are rare in the absence of megatrauma or underlying adrenal abnormality. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Abdominal paracentesis and thoracocentesis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ser Yee; Pormento, James G; Koong, Heng Nung

    2009-04-01

    Abdominal paracentesis and thoracocentesis are common bedside procedures with diagnostic, therapeutic and palliative roles. We describe a useful and familiar a useful and familiar technique with the use of a multiple lumen catheter commonly used for central venous line insertion for drainage of ascites or moderate to large pleural effusions. The use of a multiple lumen catheter allows easier and more rapid aspiration of fluid with a smaller probability of the side holes being blocked as compared to the standard needle or single catheter methods. This is particularly useful in situations where the dedicated commercial kits for thoracocentesis and abdominal paracentesis are not readily available.

  8. The contribution of laparoscopy in evaluation of penetrating abdominal wounds.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Naveed; Whelan, Jim; Brownlee, John; Chari, Vedantum; Chung, Raphael

    2005-08-01

    Penetrating abdominal wounds are traditionally explored by laparotomy. We investigated prospectively the role of laparoscopy within a defined protocol for management of penetrating abdominal wounds to determine its safety and advantages over traditional operative management. The study inclusion criteria were: stab and gun shot abdominal wounds, including junction zone injuries; stable vital signs; and absence of contraindications for laparoscopy. Diagnostic end points included detection of peritoneum or diaphragm violation, visceral injuries, and other indications for laparotomy. Systematic examination was undertaken using a multiport technique whenever the peritoneum or diaphragm had been violated. All repairs were done by open operation. A total of 40.6% of patients with penetrating trauma fulfilled study criteria (52 patients). Of these, 33% had no peritoneal penetration; 29% had no visceral injuries despite violation of peritoneum or diaphragm; 38% had visceral injuries, of which 40% (mainly liver and omentum) required no intervention. Twelve patients (23% of total) had open repairs. No missed injuries or death occurred in the study. Overall, 77% of penetrating injuries with stable vital signs avoided exploratory laparotomy. Compared with National Trauma Data Bank information for patients with the same Injury Severity Scores, hospitalization was reduced by more than 55% for the entire series. Laparoscopy for penetrating abdominal injuries in a defined set of conditions was safe and accurate, effectively eliminating nontherapeutic laparotomy and shortening hospitalization.

  9. Accuracy of Physical Examination, Ankle-Brachial Index, and Ultrasonography in the Diagnosis of Arterial Injury in Patients With Penetrating Extremity Trauma: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    deSouza, Ian S; Benabbas, Roshanak; McKee, Sean; Zangbar, Bardiya; Jain, Ashika; Paladino, Lorenzo; Boudourakis, Leon; Sinert, Richard

    2017-08-01

    Penetrating Extremity Trauma (PET) may result in arterial injury, a rare but limb- and life-threatening surgical emergency. Timely, accurate diagnosis is essential for potential intervention in order to prevent significant morbidity. Using a systematic review/meta-analytic approach, we determined the utility of physical examination, Ankle-Brachial Index (ABI), and Ultrasonography (US) in the diagnosis of arterial injury in emergency department (ED) patients who have sustained PET. We applied a test-treatment threshold model to determine which evaluations may obviate CT Angiography (CTA). We searched PubMed, Embase, and Scopus from inception to November 2016 for studies of ED patients with PET. We included studies on adult and pediatric subjects. We defined the reference standard to include CTA, catheter angiography, or surgical exploration. When low-risk patients did not undergo the reference standard, trials must have specified that patients were observed for at least 24 hours. We used the Quality Assessment Tool for Diagnostic Accuracy Studies (QUADAS-2) to evaluate bias and applicability of the included studies. We calculated positive and negative likelihood ratios (LR+ and LR-) of physical examination ("hard signs" of vascular injury), US, and ABI. Using established CTA test characteristics (sensitivity = 96.2%, specificity = 99.2%) and applying the Pauker-Kassirer method, we developed a test-treatment threshold model (testing threshold = 0.14%, treatment threshold = 72.9%). We included eight studies (n = 2,161, arterial injury prevalence = 15.5%). Studies had variable quality with most at high risk for partial and double verification bias. Some studies investigated multiple index tests: physical examination (hard signs) in three studies (n = 1,170), ABI in five studies (n = 1,040), and US in four studies (n = 173). Due to high heterogeneity (I 2  > 75%) of the results, we could not calculate LR+ or LR- for hard signs or LR+ for ABI. The weighted

  10. Pediatric trauma at an adult trauma center.

    PubMed

    Siram, Suryanarayana; Oyetunji, Tolulope A; Khoury, Amal L; Walker, Sonya R; Bolorunduro, Oluwaseyi B; Chang, David C; Greene, Wendy R; Cornwell, Edward E; Frederick, Wayne A I

    2010-08-01

    Accidental traumatic injury is the number 1 cause of morbidity and mortality in the pediatric population. In this study, we aim to prove that certain pediatric patients can be treated with good outcomes at an adult level 1 trauma center. Retrospective analysis using the Howard University Hospital trauma registry identified 71 patients treated at Howard University Hospital between the ages of 1 and 17 years old. Specific variables were identified and collected for each patient. The majority of pediatric traumas treated at Howard University Hospital between June 2004 and May 2005 had high survival rates (93%). The patients who did not survive (7%) included 3 patients who were dead on arrival and 2 who died shortly after arrival to the hospital. Certain pediatric populations who present with minor and/or isolated injuries can be treated in an adult level 1 trauma center with similar outcomes to treatment in a pediatric level 1 trauma center.

  11. LIVER TRANSPLANTATION AFTER SEVERE HEPATIC TRAUMA: CURRENT INDICATIONS AND RESULTS

    PubMed Central

    RIBEIRO-JR, Marcelo Augusto Fontenelle; MEDRADO, Melina Botelho; ROSA, Otto Mauro; SILVA, Ana Júlia de Deus; FONTANA, Mariana Prado; CRUVINEL-NETO, José; FONSECA, Alexandre Zanchenko

    2015-01-01

    Background : The liver is the most injured organ in abdominal trauma. Currently, the treatment in most cases is non-operative, but surgery may be necessary in severe abdominal trauma with blunt liver damage, especially those that cause uncontrollable bleeding. Despite the damage control approaches in order to achieve hemodynamic stability, many patients develop hypovolemic shock, acute liver failure, multiple organ failure and death. In this context, liver transplantation appears as the lifesaving last resource Aim : Analyze the use of liver transplantation as a treatment option for severe liver trauma. Methods : Were reviewed 14 articles in the PubMed, Medline and Lilacs databases, selected between 2008-2014 and 10 for this study. Results : Were identified 46 cases undergoing liver transplant after liver trauma; the main trauma mechanism was closed/blunt abdominal trauma in 83%, and severe trauma (>grade IV) in 81 %. The transplant can be done, in this context, performing one-stage procedure (damaged organ removed with immediate transplantation), used in 72% of cases. When the two-stage approach is performed, end-to-side temporary portacaval shunt is provided, until new organ becomes available to be transplanted. If two different periods are considered - from 1980 to 2000 and from 2000 to 2014 - the survival rate increased significantly, from 48% to 76%, while the mortality decreased from 52% to 24%. Conclusion : Despite with quite restricted indications, liver transplantation in hepatic injury is a therapeutic modality viable and feasible today, and can be used in cases when other therapeutic modalities in short and long term, do not provide the patient survival chances. PMID:26734803

  12. [Factors associated with abdominal obesity in children].

    PubMed

    Melzer, Matheus Ribeiro Theodósio Fernandes; Magrini, Isabella Mastrangi; Domene, Semíramis Martins Álvares; Martins, Paula Andrea

    2015-12-01

    To identify the association of dietary, socioeconomic factors, sedentary behaviors and maternal nutritional status with abdominal obesity in children. A cross-sectional study with household-based survey, in 36 randomly selected census tracts in the city of Santos/SP. 357 families were interviewed and questionnaires and anthropometric measurements were applied in mothers and their 3-0 years-old children. Assessment of abdominal obesity was made by maternal and child's waist circumference measurement; for classification used cut-off points proposed by World Health Organization (1998) and Taylor et al. (2000) were applied. The association between variables was performed by multiple logistic regression analysis. 30.5% of children had abdominal obesity. Associations with children's and maternal nutritional status and high socioeconomic status were shown in the univariate analysis. In the regression model, children's body mass index for age (OR=93.7; 95%CI 39.3-223.3), female gender (OR=4.1; 95%CI 1.8-9.3) and maternal abdominal obesity (OR=2.7; 95%CI 1.2-6.0) were significantly associated with children's abdominal obesity, regardless of the socioeconomic status. Abdominal obesity in children seems to be associated with maternal nutritional status, other indicators of their own nutritional status and female gender. Intervention programs for control of childhood obesity and prevention of metabolic syndrome should consider the interaction of the nutritional status of mothers and their children. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade de Pediatria de São Paulo. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  13. Non-operative management of isolated liver trauma.

    PubMed

    Li, Min; Yu, Wen-Kui; Wang, Xin-Bo; Ji, Wu; Li, Jie-Shou; Li, Ning

    2014-10-01

    Liver trauma is the most common abdominal emergency with high morbidity and mortality. Now, non-operative management (NOM) is a selective method for liver trauma. The aim of this study was to determine the success rate, mortality and morbidity of NOM for isolated liver trauma. Medical records of 81 patients with isolated liver trauma in our unit were analyzed retrospectively. The success rate, mortality and morbidity of NOM were evaluated. In this series, 9 patients with grade IV-V liver injuries underwent emergent operation due to hemodynamic instability; 72 patients, 6 with grade V, 18 grade IV, 29 grade III, 15 grade II and 4 grade I, with hemodynamic stability received NOM. The overall success rate of NOM was 97.2% (70/72). The success rates of NOM in the patients with grade I-III, IV and V liver trauma were 100%, 94.4% and 83.3%. The complication rates were 10.0% and 45.5% in the patients who underwent NOM and surgical treatment, respectively. No patient with grade I-II liver trauma had complications. All patients who underwent NOM survived. NOM is the first option for the treatment of liver trauma if the patient is hemodynamically stable. The grade of liver injury and the volume of hemoperitoneum are not suitable criteria for selecting NOM. Hepatic angioembolization associated with the correction of hypothermia, coagulopathy and acidosis is important in the conservative treatment for liver trauma.

  14. Functional abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Grover, Madhusudan; Drossman, Douglas A

    2010-10-01

    Functional abdominal pain syndrome (FAPS) is a relatively less common functional gastrointestinal (GI) disorder defined by the presence of constant or frequently recurring abdominal pain that is not associated with eating, change in bowel habits, or menstrual periods (Drossman Gastroenterology 130:1377-1390, 2006), which points to a more centrally targeted (spinal and supraspinal) basis for the symptoms. However, FAPS is frequently confused with irritable bowel syndrome and other functional GI disorders in which abdominal pain is associated with eating and bowel movements. FAPS also differs from chronic abdominal pain associated with entities such as chronic pancreatitis or chronic inflammatory bowel disease, in which the pain is associated with peripherally acting factors (eg, gut inflammation or injury). Given the central contribution to the pain experience, concomitant psychosocial disturbances are common and strongly influence the clinical expression of FAPS, which also by definition is associated with loss of daily functioning. These factors make it critical to use a biopsychosocial construct to understand and manage FAPS, because gut-directed treatments are usually not successful in managing this condition.

  15. Effect of abdominal resistance exercise on abdominal subcutaneous fat of obese women: a randomized controlled trial using ultrasound imaging assessments.

    PubMed

    Kordi, Ramin; Dehghani, Saeed; Noormohammadpour, Pardis; Rostami, Mohsen; Mansournia, Mohammad Ali

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effect of diet and an abdominal resistance training program to diet alone on abdominal subcutaneous fat thickness and waist circumference of overweight and obese women. This randomized clinical trial included 40 overweight and obese women randomly divided into 2 groups: diet only and diet combined with 12 weeks of abdominal resistance training. Waist and hip circumferences and abdominal skin folds of the subjects were measured at the beginning and 12 weeks after the interventions. In addition, abdominal subcutaneous fat thickness of the subjects was measured using ultrasonography. Percentage body fat and lean body mass of all the subjects were also measured using a bioelectric impedance device. After 12 weeks of intervention, the weight of participants in both groups decreased; but the difference between the 2 groups was not significant (P = .45). Similarly, other variables including abdominal subcutaneous fat, waist circumference, hip circumference, body mass index, body fat percentage, and skin fold thickness were reduced in both groups; but there were no significant differences between the groups. This study found that abdominal resistance training besides diet did not reduce abdominal subcutaneous fat thickness compared to diet alone in overweight or obese women. Copyright © 2015 National University of Health Sciences. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Abdominal Wall Endometriosis Mimicking Metastases.

    PubMed

    Nambiar, Rakul; Anoop, T M; Mony, Rari P

    2018-06-01

    Abdominal wall lesions can be broadly divided into nontumorous and tumorous conditions. Nontumorous lesions include congenital lesion, abdominal wall hernia, inflammation and infection, vascular lesions, and miscellaneous conditions like hematoma. Tumorous lesions include benign and malignant neoplasms. Here, we report an unusual case of abdominal wall endometriosis mimicking metastases in a patient with breast carcinoma.

  17. Management of Complex Abdominal Wall Defects Associated with Penetrating Abdominal Trauma

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-09

    recruitment): a new method of wound closure. Ann Plast Surg 2005;55:660–4. 8 Ramirez OM, Ruas E, Dellon AL. ‘Components separation’ method for closure of...patients with open abdomens closed by either permanent mesh, vicryl mesh or a modification of Ramirez ’ original method of components separation. These

  18. Complications and risk factors for mortality in penetrating abdominal firearm injuries: analysis of 120 cases

    PubMed Central

    Iflazoglu, Nidal; Ureyen, Orhan; Oner, Osman Z; Tusat, Mustafa; Akcal, Mehmet A

    2015-01-01

    Due to the high kinetic energy, of bullets and explosive gun particles, their paths through the abdomen (permanent cavity effect), and the blast effect (temporary cavity effect), firearm injuries (FAI) can produce damage not only in the organ they enter, but in the surrounding tissues as well. Since they change route after entering the body they may cause organ damage in locations other than those at the path of entry. For example, as a result of the crushing onto bone tissues, bullet particles or broken bone fragments may cause further damage outside of the path of travel, For these reasons it is very difficult to predict the possible complications from the size of the actual injury in patients with penetrating abdominal firearm injuries. The factors affecting the mortality and morbidity from firearm injuries have been evaluated in various studies. Insufficient blood transfusion, long duration of time until presenting to a hospital and the presence of colon injuries are common factors that cause the high complication rates and mortality. A total of 120 cases injured in the civil war at Turkey’s southern neighbouring countries were admitted to our hospital and evaluated in terms of: development of complications and factors affecting mortality; age, gender, time of presentation to the hospital, number of injured organs, the type of injuring weapon, the entrance site of the bullet, the presence of accompanying chest trauma, the amount of administered blood, the penetrating abdominal trauma index (PATI) and the injury severity score (ISS) scores were determined and evaluated retrospectively. The most significant factors for the development of complications and mortality include: accompanying clinical shock, high number of injured organs, numerous blood transfusions administered and accompanying thoracic trauma. It has also been observed that the PATI and ISS scoring systems can be used in predicting the complication and mortality rates in firearm injuries

  19. Evaluating trauma nursing education: An integrative literature review.

    PubMed

    Ding, Min; Metcalfe, Helene; Gallagher, Olivia; Hamdorf, Jeffrey M

    2016-09-01

    A review of the current literature evaluating trauma nursing education. A variety of trauma nursing courses exist, to educate nurses working in trauma settings, and to maintain their continuing professional development. Despite an increase in the number of courses delivered, there appears to be a lack of evidence to demonstrate the effectiveness of trauma nursing education and in particular the justification for this resource allocation. Integrative literature review. A search of international literature on trauma nursing education evaluation published in English from 1985 to 2015 was conducted through electronic databases CINAHL Plus, Google Scholar, PubMed, Austhealth, Science Citation Index Expanded (Web of Science), Sciverse Science Direct (Elsevier) & One file (Gale). Only peer reviewed journal articles identifying trauma course and trauma nursing course evaluation have been included in the selection criteria. An integrative review of both quantitative and qualitative literature guided by Whittemore and Knafl's theoretical framework using Bowling's and Pearson's validated appraisal checklists, has been conducted for three months. Only 17 studies met the inclusion criteria, including 14 on trauma course evaluation and 3 on trauma nursing course evaluation. Study findings are presented as two main themes: the historical evolution of trauma nursing education and evaluation of trauma nursing education outcomes. Trauma nursing remains in its infancy and education in this specialty is mainly led by continuing professional development courses. The shortage of evaluation studies on trauma nursing courses reflects the similar status in continuing professional development course evaluation. A trauma nursing course evaluation study will address the gap in this under researched area. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Predictors of Intrathoracic Injury after Blunt Torso Trauma in Children Presenting to an Emergency Department as Trauma Activations.

    PubMed

    McNamara, Caitlin; Mironova, Irina; Lehman, Erik; Olympia, Robert P

    2017-06-01

    Thoracic injuries are a major cause of death associated with blunt trauma in children. Screening for injury with chest x-ray study, compared with chest computed tomography (CT) scan, has been controversial, weighing the benefits of specificity with the detriment of radiation exposure. To identify predictors of thoracic injury in children presenting as trauma activations to a Level I trauma center after blunt torso trauma, and to compare these predictors with those previously reported in the literature. We performed a retrospective chart review of pediatric patients (<18 years of age) who presented to the Emergency Department of a Level I trauma center between June 2010 and June 2013 as a trauma activation after sustaining a blunt torso trauma and who received diagnostic imaging of the chest as part of their initial evaluation. Data analysis was performed on 166 patients. There were 33 patients (20%) with 45 abnormalities detected on diagnostic imaging of the chest, with the most common abnormalities being lung contusion (36%), pneumothorax (22%), and rib fracture (13%). Statistically significant predictors of abnormal diagnostic imaging of the chest included Glasgow Coma Scale score (GCS) < 15 (27% with abnormality vs. 13% without abnormality), hypoxia (22% vs. 5%), syncope/loss of consciousness (55% vs. 35%), cervical spine tenderness (12% vs. 3%), thoraco-lumbar-sacral spine tenderness (41% vs. 17%), and abdominal/pelvic tenderness (12% vs. 3%). Based on our data, predictors of thoracic injury in children after blunt torso trauma include GCS < 15, hypoxia, syncope/dizziness, cervical spine tenderness, thoraco-lumbar-sacral spine tenderness, and abdominal/pelvic tenderness. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Abdominal emergencies during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Bouyou, J; Gaujoux, S; Marcellin, L; Leconte, M; Goffinet, F; Chapron, C; Dousset, B

    2015-12-01

    Abdominal emergencies during pregnancy (excluding obstetrical emergencies) occur in one out of 500-700 pregnancies and may involve gastrointestinal, gynecologic, urologic, vascular and traumatic etiologies; surgery is necessary in 0.2-2% of cases. Since these emergencies are relatively rare, patients should be referred to specialized centers where surgical, obstetrical and neonatal cares are available, particularly because surgical intervention increases the risk of premature labor. Clinical presentations may be atypical and misleading because of pregnancy-associated anatomical and physiologic alterations, which often result in diagnostic uncertainty and therapeutic delay with increased risks of maternal and infant morbidity. The most common abdominal emergencies are acute appendicitis (best treated by laparoscopic appendectomy), acute calculous cholecystitis (best treated by laparoscopic cholecystectomy from the first trimester through the early part of the third trimester) and intestinal obstruction (where medical treatment is the first-line approach, just as in the non-pregnant patient). Acute pancreatitis is rare, usually resulting from trans-ampullary passage of gallstones; it usually resolves with medical treatment but an elevated risk of recurrent episodes justifies laparoscopic cholecystectomy in the 2nd trimester and endoscopic sphincterotomy in the 3rd trimester. The aim of the present work is to review pregnancy-induced anatomical and physiological modifications, to describe the main abdominal emergencies during pregnancy, their specific features and their diagnostic and therapeutic management. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  2. Epidemiology and outcomes of pregnancy and obstetric complications in trauma in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Battaloglu, Emir; McDonnell, Declan; Chu, Justin; Lecky, Fiona; Porter, Keith

    2016-01-01

    To understand the epidemiology of pregnancy and obstetric complications encountered in the management of pregnant trauma patients. Retrospective analysis of national trauma registry for recording of pregnancy status or obstetric complication in cases of trauma. Sub-division of patient cohort by severity of trauma and stage of pregnancy. Comparison of data sets between pregnant trauma patients and age-matched non-pregnant female trauma patients to determine patterns of injury and impact upon clinical outcomes. National registry data for the United Kingdom. For the five year period between 2009 and 2014, a total of 15,140 female patients, aged between 15 years old and 50 years old were identified within the trauma registry. A record of pregnancy was identified in 173 patients (1.14%) from within this cohort. Mechanisms of injury within the cohort of pregnant trauma patients saw increased rate of vehicular collision and interpersonal violence, especially penetrating trauma. Higher abbreviated injury scores were recorded for the abdominal region in pregnancy than in the non-pregnant cohort. Maternal mortality rates were seen to be higher, when compared with the non-pregnant trauma patient. Foetal survival rate from this series was 56% following trauma. Foetal death in pregnant trauma patients most frequently occurred in the 2nd trimester. No cases of isolated foetal survival were recorded following maternal trauma. Trauma to pregnant patients is rare in the United Kingdom, encountered in 1% of female trauma patients of child bearing age. Observations in altered mechanisms of injury and clinical outcomes were recorded. This provides useful information regarding the clinical management of pregnant trauma patients and offers potential areas to investigate to optimise their care, as well as to focus injury prevention measures. IV--Case series. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Influence of socioeconomic status on trauma center performance evaluations in a Canadian trauma system.

    PubMed

    Moore, Lynne; Turgeon, Alexis F; Sirois, Marie-Josée; Murat, Valérie; Lavoie, André

    2011-09-01

    Trauma center performance evaluations generally include adjustment for injury severity, age, and comorbidity. However, disparities across trauma centers may be due to other differences in source populations that are not accounted for, such as socioeconomic status (SES). We aimed to evaluate whether SES influences trauma center performance evaluations in an inclusive trauma system with universal access to health care. The study was based on data collected between 1999 and 2006 in a Canadian trauma system. Patient SES was quantified using an ecologic index of social and material deprivation. Performance evaluations were based on mortality adjusted using the Trauma Risk Adjustment Model. Agreement between performance results with and without additional adjustment for SES was evaluated with correlation coefficients. The study sample comprised a total of 71,784 patients from 48 trauma centers, including 3,828 deaths within 30 days (4.5%) and 5,549 deaths within 6 months (7.7%). The proportion of patients in the highest quintile of social and material deprivation varied from 3% to 43% and from 11% to 90% across hospitals, respectively. The correlation between performance results with or without adjustment for SES was almost perfect (r = 0.997; 95% CI 0.995-0.998) and the same hospital outliers were identified. We observed an important variation in SES across trauma centers but no change in risk-adjusted mortality estimates when SES was added to adjustment models. Results suggest that after adjustment for injury severity, age, comorbidity, and transfer status, disparities in SES across trauma center source populations do not influence trauma center performance evaluations in a system offering universal health coverage. Copyright © 2011 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Combined duodenal and pancreatic major trauma in high risk patients: can a partial reconstruction be safe?

    PubMed

    Toro, A; Li Destri, G; Mannino, M; Arcerito, M C; Ardiri, A; Politi, A; Bertino, G; Di Carlo, I

    2014-04-01

    Pancreatic trauma is an uncommon injury, occurring in only about 0.2% of blunt abdominal injuries, while duodenal injuries represent approximately 4% of all blunt abdominal injuries. When trauma of the pancreas and duodenum do not permit reparation, pancreatoduodenectomy (PD) is mandatory. In the reconstructive phase, the use of ductal ligation as an alternative to standard pancreaticojejunostomy has been reported by some authors. We report a case of polytrauma with pancreatic and duodenal injury in which the initial diagnosis failed to recognize the catastrophic duodenal and pancreatic situation. The patient was submitted for PD and the pancreatic stump was abandoned in the abdominal cavity after main pancreatic ductal ligation. This technique can minimize the morbidity and mortality of PD in patients with other organs or apparatus involved severely and extensively in trauma.

  5. Laparoscopic surgery for trauma: the realm of therapeutic management.

    PubMed

    Zafar, Syed N; Onwugbufor, Michael T; Hughes, Kakra; Greene, Wendy R; Cornwell, Edward E; Fullum, Terrence M; Tran, Daniel D

    2015-04-01

    The use of laparoscopy in trauma is, in general, limited for diagnostic purposes. We aim to evaluate the therapeutic role of laparoscopic surgery in trauma patients. We analyzed the National Trauma Data Bank (2007 to 2010) for all patients undergoing diagnostic laparoscopy. Patients undergoing a therapeutic laparoscopic surgical procedure were identified and tabulated. Mortality and hospital length of stay for patients with isolated abdominal injuries were compared between the open and laparoscopic groups. Of a total of 2,539,818 trauma visits in the National Trauma Data Bank, 4,755 patients underwent a diagnostic laparoscopy at 467 trauma centers. Of these, 916 (19.3%) patients underwent a therapeutic laparoscopic intervention. Common laparoscopic operations included diaphragm repair, bowel repair or resection, and splenectomy. Patients undergoing laparoscopic surgery had a significantly shorter length of stay than the open group (5 vs 6 days; P < .001). Therapeutic laparoscopic surgery for trauma is feasible and may provide better outcomes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Trauma-induced pemphigus: a case series of 36 patients.

    PubMed

    Daneshpazhooh, Maryam; Fatehnejad, Mina; Rahbar, Ziba; Balighi, Kamran; Ghandi, Narges; Ghiasi, Maryam; Abedini, Robabeh; Lajevardi, Vahideh; Chams-Davatchi, Cheyda

    2016-02-01

    Pemphigus is a group of autoimmune diseases characterized by intraepidermal acantholytic blisters. Isomorphic responses, or Koebner phenomenon (KP), defined as the appearance of typical lesions of a disease following trauma are rarely reported in pemphigus. Our aim was to present patients who developed new pemphigus lesions as a result of skin trauma. The medical files of pemphigus patients from the Autoimmune Bullous Diseases Research Center, who had a history of trauma before the onset or flare of their disease, between 1999 and 2013 were reviewed. Thirty-six pemphigus vulgaris (PV) patients had a history of trauma. Thirteen patients developed new-onset PV and the other 23 had previously been diagnosed with PV. Pemphigus lesions developed most often following major surgeries including abdominal, orthopedic, and chest surgeries as well as dental procedures, blunt physical trauma, and skin surgeries. Moreover, post-cataract laser surgery, burns, radiation therapy, and physiotherapy were also shown to induce pemphigus. Mean time between trauma and lesions was 4.7 weeks for recurrent PV and 15.0 weeks for new-onset PV. Unnecessary surgery and blunt trauma should be avoided in pemphigus patients. Furthermore, posttraumatic pemphigus should be suspected in poorly healing surgical wounds and confirmatory biopsies are mandatory. © 2016 Deutsche Dermatologische Gesellschaft (DDG). Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

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  8. Whole-body multislice computed tomography (MSCT) improves trauma care in patients requiring surgery after multiple trauma.

    PubMed

    Wurmb, T E; Quaisser, C; Balling, H; Kredel, M; Muellenbach, R; Kenn, W; Roewer, N; Brederlau, J

    2011-04-01

    Whole-body multislice helical CT becomes increasingly important as a diagnostic tool in patients with multiple injuries. Time gain in multiple-trauma patients who require emergency surgery might improve outcome. The authors hypothesised that whole-body multislice computed tomography (MSCT) (MSCT trauma protocol) as the initial diagnostic tool reduces the interval to start emergency surgery (tOR) if compared to conventional radiography, combined with abdominal ultrasound and organ-focused CT (conventional trauma protocol). The second goal of the study was to investigate whether the diagnostic approach chosen has an impact on outcome. The authors' level 1 trauma centre uses whole-body MSCT for initial radiological diagnostic work-up for patients with suspected multiple trauma. Before the introduction of MSCT in 2004, a conventional approach was used. Group I: data of trauma patients treated with conventional trauma protocol from 2001 to 2003. Group II: data from trauma patients treated with whole-body MSCT trauma protocol from 2004 to 2006. tOR in group I (n=155) was 120 (90-150) min (median and IQR) and 105 (85-133) min (median and IQR) in group II (n=163), respectively (p<0.05). Patients of group II had significantly more serious injuries. No difference in outcome data was found. 14 patients died in both groups within the first 30 days; five of these died within the first 24 h. A whole-body MSCT-based diagnostic approach to multiple trauma shortens the time interval to start emergency surgery in patients with multiple injuries. Mortality remained unchanged in both groups. Patients of group II were more seriously injured; an improvement of outcome might be assumed.

  9. Blunt transection of rectus abdominis following seatbelt related trauma with associated small and large bowel injury.

    PubMed

    Patel, K; Doolin, R; Suggett, N

    2013-01-01

    Closed rupture of rectus abdominis following seatbelt related trauma is rare. We present the case of a 45 year old female who presented with closed rupture of the rectus abdominis in conjunction with damage to small bowel mesentery and infarction of small and large bowel following a high velocity road traffic accident. Multiple intestinal resections were required resulting in short bowel syndrome and abdominal wall reconstruction with a porcine collagen mesh. Post-operative complications included intra-abdominal sepsis and an enterocutaneous fistula. The presence of rupture of rectus abdominis muscle secondary to seatbelt injury should raise the suspicion of intra-abdominal injury. Our case highlights the need for suspicion, investigation and subsequent surgical management of intra-abdominal injury following identification of this rare consequence of seatbelt trauma. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  10. Temporary abdominal closure with zipper-mesh device for management of intra-abdominal sepsis.

    PubMed

    Utiyama, Edivaldo Massazo; Pflug, Adriano Ribeiro Meyer; Damous, Sérgio Henrique Bastos; Rodrigues, Adilson Costa; Montero, Edna Frasson de Souza; Birolini, Claudio Augusto Vianna

    2015-01-01

    to present our experience with scheduled reoperations in 15 patients with intra-abdominal sepsis. we have applied a more effective technique consisting of temporary abdominal closure with a nylon mesh sheet containing a zipper. We performed reoperations in the operating room under general anesthesia at an average interval of 84 hours. The revision consisted of debridement of necrotic material and vigorous lavage of the involved peritoneal area. The mean age of patients was 38.7 years (range, 15 to 72 years); 11 patients were male, and four were female. forty percent of infections were due to necrotizing pancreatitis. Sixty percent were due to perforation of the intestinal viscus secondary to inflammation, vascular occlusion or trauma. We performed a total of 48 reoperations, an average of 3.2 surgeries per patient. The mesh-zipper device was left in place for an average of 13 days. An intestinal ostomy was present adjacent to the zipper in four patients and did not present a problem for patient management. Mortality was 26.6%. No fistulas resulted from this technique. When intra-abdominal disease was under control, the mesh-zipper device was removed, and the fascia was closed in all patients. In three patients, the wound was closed primarily, and in 12 it was allowed to close by secondary intent. Two patients developed hernia; one was incisional and one was in the drain incision. the planned reoperation for manual lavage and debridement of the abdomen through a nylon mesh-zipper combination was rapid, simple, and well-tolerated. It permitted effective management of severe septic peritonitis, easy wound care and primary closure of the abdominal wall.

  11. Patterns of abdominal injuries in frontal and side impacts.

    PubMed

    Yoganandan, N; Pintar, F A; Gennarelli, T A; Maltese, M R

    2000-01-01

    Public awareness for safety and vehicle improvements has contributed to significant reduction in injuries secondary to motor vehicle crashes. The spectrum of trauma has shifted from one region of the body to another with varying consequences. For example, airbags have minimized head and neck injuries for adults while emphasizing the lower regions of the human body. Studies have concentrated on the changing patterns of these injuries in frontal impacts. However, there is almost a paucity of data with regard to the characterization of abdominal injuries. Consequently, this study was conducted to determine the patterns of abdominal injuries in frontal and side impacts with an emphasis on more recent crashes. In particular, the frequency and severity of trauma were investigated with a focus on the various abdominal organs (e.g., spleen and liver). Results indicate that side crashes contribute to a large percentage of injuries to the abdomen. The liver and spleen organs are most vulnerable; therefore, it may be beneficial to apply concerted efforts to focus on injury biomechanics research and prioritization activities in these areas of the abdomen. These data may be of benefit to develop anthropomorphic dummies with improved biofidelity.

  12. Does this adult patient have a blunt intra-abdominal injury?

    PubMed

    Nishijima, Daniel K; Simel, David L; Wisner, David H; Holmes, James F

    2012-04-11

    Blunt abdominal trauma often presents a substantial diagnostic challenge. Well-informed clinical examination can identify patients who require further diagnostic evaluation for intra-abdominal injuries after blunt abdominal trauma. To systematically assess the precision and accuracy of symptoms, signs, laboratory tests, and bedside imaging studies to identify intra-abdominal injuries in patients with blunt abdominal trauma. We conducted a structured search of MEDLINE (1950-January 2012) and EMBASE (1980-January 2012) to identify English-language studies examining the identification of intra-abdominal injuries. A separate, structured search was conducted for studies evaluating bedside ultrasonography. We included studies of diagnostic accuracy for intra-abdominal injury that compared at least 1 finding with a reference standard of abdominal computed tomography, diagnostic peritoneal lavage, laparotomy, autopsy, and/or clinical course for intra-abdominal injury. Twelve studies on clinical findings and 22 studies on bedside ultrasonography met inclusion criteria for data extraction. Critical appraisal and data extraction were independently performed by 2 authors. The prevalence of intra-abdominal injury in adult emergency department patients with blunt abdominal trauma among all evidence level 1 and 2 studies was 13% (95% CI, 10%-17%), with 4.7% (95% CI, 2.5%-8.6%) requiring therapeutic surgery or angiographic embolization of injuries. The presence of a seat belt sign (likelihood ratio [LR] range, 5.6-9.9), rebound tenderness (LR, 6.5; 95% CI, 1.8-24), hypotension (LR, 5.2; 95% CI, 3.5-7.5), abdominal distention (LR, 3.8; 95% CI, 1.9-7.6), or guarding (LR, 3.7; 95% CI, 2.3-5.9) suggest an intra-abdominal injury. The absence of abdominal tenderness to palpation does not rule out an intra-abdominal injury (summary LR, 0.61; 95% CI, 0.46-0.80). The presence of intraperitoneal fluid or organ injury on bedside ultrasound assessment is more accurate than any history and

  13. [Differential diagnosis of abdominal pain].

    PubMed

    Frei, Pascal

    2015-09-02

    Despite the frequency of functional abdominal pain, potentially dangerous causes of abdominal pain need to be excluded. Medical history and clinical examination must focus on red flags and signs for imflammatory or malignant diseases. See the patient twice in the case of severe and acute abdominal pain if lab parameters or radiological examinations are normal. Avoid repeated and useless X-ray exposure whenever possible. In the case of subacute or chronic abdominal pain, lab tests such as fecal calprotectin, helicobacter stool antigen and serological tests for celiac disease are very useful. Elderly patients may show atypical or missing clinical signs. Take care of red herrings and be skeptical whether your initial diagnosis is really correct. Abdominal pain can frequently be an abdominal wall pain.

  14. Abdominal Aortic Emergencies.

    PubMed

    Lech, Christie; Swaminathan, Anand

    2017-11-01

    This article discusses abdominal aortic emergencies. There is a common thread of risk factors and causes of these diseases, including age, male gender, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and connective tissue disorders. The most common presenting symptom of these disorders is pain, usually in the chest, flank, abdomen, or back. Computed tomography scan is the gold standard for diagnosis of pathologic conditions of the aorta in the hemodynamically stable patient. Treatment consists of a combination of blood pressure and heart rate control and, in many cases, emergent surgical intervention. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Evaluation of the effects of laparotomy and laparoscopy on the immune system in intra-abdominal sepsis--a review.

    PubMed

    Karantonis, Fotios-Filippos; Nikiteas, Nikolaos; Perrea, Despina; Vlachou, Antonia; Giamarellos-Bourboulis, Evangelos J; Tsigris, Christos; Kostakis, Alkiviadis

    2008-01-01

    This review portrays the most common experimental models of intra-abdominal sepsis. Additionally, it outlines the facts that distinguish laparotomy from laparoscopy, in respect to the immune response, when comparing these two techniques in experimental models of intra-abdominal sepsis. It describes the consequences of pneumoperitoneum and trauma produced by laparoscopy or laparotomy, respectively, on bacterial translocation and immunity. Furthermore, we report the few efforts that have been made in clinical settings, where surgeons have attempted to utilize laparoscopy as a therapeutic module when treating peritonitis or sepsis of abdominal origin. Certainly there is a need for more research in order to fortify the role of pneumoperitoneum in sepsis of abdominal origin. It seems that minimally invasive surgery will inevitably gain acceptance by surgeons, as evidence points that by inflicting less trauma the healing response is expected to be more efficient, especially in septic patients.

  16. Chronic abdominal wall pain misdiagnosed as functional abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    van Assen, Tijmen; de Jager-Kievit, Jenneke W A J; Scheltinga, Marc R; Roumen, Rudi M H

    2013-01-01

    The abdominal wall is often neglected as a cause of chronic abdominal pain. The aim of this study was to identify chronic abdominal wall pain syndromes, such as anterior cutaneous nerve entrapment syndrome (ACNES), in a patient population diagnosed with functional abdominal pain, including irritable bowel syndrome, using a validated 18-item questionnaire as an identification tool. In this cross-sectional analysis, 4 Dutch primary care practices employing physicians who were unaware of the existence of ACNES were selected. A total of 535 patients ≥18 years old who were registered with a functional abdominal pain diagnosis were approached when they were symptomatic to complete the questionnaire (maximum 18 points). Responders who scored at least the 10-point cutoff value (sensitivity, 0.94; specificity, 0.92) underwent a diagnostic evaluation to establish their final diagnosis. The main outcome was the presence and prevalence of ACNES in a group of symptomatic patients diagnosed with functional abdominal pain. Of 535 patients, 304 (57%) responded; 167 subjects (31%) recently reporting symptoms completed the questionnaire. Of 23 patients who scored above the 10-point cutoff value, 18 were available for a diagnostic evaluation. In half of these subjects (n = 9) functional abdominal pain (including IBS) was confirmed. However, the other 9 patients were suffering from abdominal wall pain syndrome, 6 of whom were diagnosed with ACNES (3.6% prevalence rate of symptomatic subjects; 95% confidence interval, 1.7-7.6), whereas the remaining 3 harbored a painful lipoma, an abdominal herniation, and a painful scar. A clinically relevant portion of patients previously diagnosed with functional abdominal pain syndrome in a primary care environment suffers from an abdominal wall pain syndrome such as ACNES.

  17. Abdominal insufflation for laparoscopy increases intracranial and intrathoracic pressure in human subjects.

    PubMed

    Kamine, Tovy Haber; Elmadhun, Nassrene Y; Kasper, Ekkehard M; Papavassiliou, Efstathios; Schneider, Benjamin E

    2016-09-01

    Laparoscopy has emerged as an alternative to laparotomy in select trauma patients. In animal models, increasing abdominal pressure is associated with an increase in intrathoracic and intracranial pressures. We conducted a prospective trial of human subjects who underwent laparoscopic-assisted ventriculoperitoneal shunt placement (lap VPS) with intraoperative measurement of intrathoracic, intracranial and cerebral perfusion pressures. Ten patients undergoing lap VPS were recruited. Abdominal insufflation was performed using CO2 to 0, 8, 10, 12 and 15 mmHg. ICP was measured through the ventricular catheter simultaneously with insufflation and with desufflation using a manometer. Peak inspiratory pressures (PIP) were measured through the endotracheal tube. Blood pressure was measured using a noninvasive blood pressure cuff. End-tidal CO2 (ETCO2) was measured for each set of abdominal pressure level. Pressure measurements from all points of insufflation were compared using a two-way ANOVA with a post hoc Bonferroni test. Mean changes in pressures were compared using t test. ICP and PIP increased significantly with increasing abdominal pressure (both p < 0.01), whereas cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) and mean arterial pressure did not significantly change with increasing abdominal pressure over the range tested. Higher abdominal pressure values were associated with decreased ETCO2 values. Increased ICP and PIP appear to be a direct result of increasing abdominal pressure, since ETCO2 did not increase. Though CPP did not change over the range tested, the ICP in some patients with 15 mmHg abdominal insufflation reached values as high as 32 cmH2O, which is considered above tolerance, regardless of the CPP. Laparoscopy should be used cautiously, in patients who present with baseline elevated ICP or head trauma as abdominal insufflation affects intracranial pressure.

  18. [Preparation trauma in stomatology].

    PubMed

    Novák, L; Půza, V; Cervinka, M; Kolárová, J

    1997-01-01

    In this paper authors deal with the causes of preparation trauma in stomatology. They have studied effects of high temperature on human cells cultured in vitro. Based both on literature data and on their own experience they summarize basic principles of preparation which prevent preparation trauma. They summarize how to eliminate as much as possible factors that damage hard dental tissues and pulp.

  19. Update on managing diaphragmatic rupture in blunt trauma: a review of 208 consecutive cases

    PubMed Central

    Chughtai, Talat; Ali, Syed; Sharkey, Phillip; Lins, Marcelo; Rizoli, Sandro

    2009-01-01

    Background Blunt diaphragmatic rupture (BDR) is a rare event and represents a diagnostic challenge. The purpose of our study was to review our experience with BDR at the Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre (Sunnybrook), the largest trauma centre in Canada, and to highlight recent changes in the diagnosis and management of the condition. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the cases of patients with BDR who were admitted to Sunnybrook between January 1986 and December 2003 using our trauma registry. We performed Student t and Fisher exact tests to compare our findings on patients with BDR with those on the entire cohort of blunt trauma patients admitted to our centre. Results Most patients with BDR were men (64.4%) with a mean age of 42 years. Left-sided tears were most common (65.0%). Patients with BDR had a very high Injury Severity Score (38) and very high mortality (28.8%). Of those who were injured as a result of motor vehicle collisions (MVCs), a significantly greater percentage of patients in the BDR group than in the entire cohort of blunt trauma patients were drivers or front-seat passengers. Patients with BDR were also significantly less likely to be pedestrians, to have experienced a fall or to be involved in a motorcycle collision. Patients with BDR had a higher chest, abdomen, pelvis and extremity Abbreviated Injury Scale score than all blunt trauma patients in general. Most of our patients underwent laparotomy (93.3%). The most common causes of death among patients with BDR were head injury (25.0%), intra-abdominal bleeding (23.3%) and pelvic hemorrhage (18.3%). Conclusion Blunt diaphragmatic rupture is rare and difficult to diagnose; however, certain MVC characteristics along with severe associated injuries should raise the index of suspicion. These associated injuries include injuries to the head, chest (including the aorta), abdomen and pelvis. Computed tomographic angiography is essential to rule out associated aortic injury and to increase the

  20. Management of abdominal compartment syndrome after transurethral resection of the prostate.

    PubMed

    Gaut, Megan M; Ortiz, Jaime

    2015-01-01

    Acute abdominal compartment syndrome is most commonly associated with blunt abdominal trauma, although it has been seen after ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm, liver transplantation, pancreatitis, and massive volume resuscitation. Acute abdominal compartment syndrome develops once the intra-abdominal pressure increases to 20-25 mmHg and is characterized by an increase in airway pressures, inadequate ventilation and oxygenation, altered renal function, and hemodynamic instability. This case report details the development of acute abdominal compartment syndrome during transurethral resection of the prostate with extra- and intraperitoneal bladder rupture under general anesthesia. The first signs of acute abdominal compartment syndrome in this patient were high peak airway pressures and difficulty delivering tidal volumes. Management of the compartment syndrome included re-intubation, emergent exploratory laparotomy, and drainage of irrigation fluid. Difficulty with ventilation should alert the anesthesiologist to consider abdominal compartment syndrome high in the list of differential diagnoses during any endoscopic bladder or bowel case. Copyright © 2013 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  1. [Management of abdominal compartment syndrome after transurethral resection of the prostate].

    PubMed

    Gaut, Megan M; Ortiz, Jaime

    2015-01-01

    Acute abdominal compartment syndrome is most commonly associated with blunt abdominal trauma, although it has been seen after ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm, liver transplantation, pancreatitis, and massive volume resuscitation. Acute abdominal compartment syndrome develops once the intra-abdominal pressure increases to 20-25mmHg and is characterized by an increase in airway pressures, inadequate ventilation and oxygenation, altered renal function, and hemodynamic instability. This case report details the development of acute abdominal compartment syndrome during transurethral resection of the prostate with extra- and intraperitoneal bladder rupture under general anesthesia. The first signs of acute abdominal compartment syndrome in this patient were high peak airway pressures and difficulty delivering tidal volumes. Management of the compartment syndrome included re-intubation, emergent exploratory laparotomy, and drainage of irrigation fluid. Difficulty with ventilation should alert the anesthesiologist to consider abdominal compartment syndrome high in the list of differential diagnoses during any endoscopic bladder or bowel case. Copyright © 2013 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  2. Are routine pelvic radiographs in major pediatric blunt trauma necessary?

    PubMed

    Lagisetty, Jyothi; Slovis, Thomas; Thomas, Ronald; Knazik, Stephen; Stankovic, Curt

    2012-07-01

    Screening pelvic radiographs to rule out pelvic fractures are routinely used for the initial evaluation of pediatric blunt trauma. Recently, the utility of routine pelvic radiographs in certain subsets of patients with blunt trauma has been questioned. There is a growing amount of evidence that shows the clinical exam is reliable enough to obviate the need for routine screening pelvic radiographs in children. To identify variables that help predict the presence or absence of pelvic fractures in pediatric blunt trauma. We conducted a retrospective study from January 2005 to January 2010 using the trauma registry at a level 1 pediatric trauma center. We analyzed all level 1 and level 2 trauma victims, evaluating history, exam and mechanism of injury for association with the presence or absence of a pelvic fracture. Of 553 level 1 and 2 trauma patients who presented during the study period, 504 were included in the study. Most of these children, 486/504 (96.4%), showed no evidence of a pelvic fracture while 18/504 (3.6%) had a pelvic fracture. No factors were found to be predictive of a pelvic fracture. However, we developed a pelvic fracture screening tool that accurately rules out the presence of a pelvic fracture P = 0.008, NPV 99, sensitivity 96, 8.98 (1.52-52.8). This screening tool combines eight high-risk clinical findings (pelvic tenderness, laceration, ecchymosis, abrasion, GCS <14, positive urinalysis, abdominal pain/tenderness, femur fracture) and five high-risk mechanisms of injury (unrestrained motor vehicle collision [MVC], MVC with ejection, MVC rollover, auto vs. pedestrian, auto vs. bicycle). Pelvic fractures in pediatric major blunt trauma can reliably be ruled out by using our pelvic trauma screening tool. Although no findings accurately identified the presence of a pelvic fracture, the screening tool accurately identified the absence of a fracture, suggesting that pelvic radiographs are not warranted in this subset of patients.

  3. Trauma: the seductive hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Reisner, Steven

    2003-01-01

    In much of contemporary culture, "trauma" signifies not so much terrible experience as a particular context for understanding and responding to a terrible experience. In therapy, in the media, and in international interventions, the traumatized are seen not simply as people who suffer and so are deserving of concern and aid; they are seen also as people who suffer for us, who are given special dispensation. They are treated with awe if they tell a certain kind of trauma story, and are ignored or vilified if they tell another. Trauma has become not simply a story of pain and its treatment, but a host of sub-stories involving the commodification of altruism, the justification of violence and revenge, the entry point into "true experience," and the place where voyeurism and witnessing intersect. Trauma is today the stuff not only of suffering but of fantasy. Historically, trauma theory and treatment have shown a tension, exemplified in the writings of Freud and Janet, between those who view trauma as formative and those who view it as exceptional. The latter view, that trauma confers exceptional status deserving of special privilege, has gained ground in recent years and has helped to shape the way charitable dollars are distributed, how the traumatized are presented in the media, how governments justify and carry out international responses to trauma, and how therapists attend to their traumatized patients. This response to trauma reflects an underlying, unarticulated belief system derived from narcissism; indeed, trauma has increasingly become the venue, in society and in treatment, where narcissism is permitted to prevail.

  4. [First aid for multiple trauma patients: investigative survey in the Firenze-Bologna area].

    PubMed

    Crescioli, G L; Donati, D; Federici, A; Rasero, L

    1999-01-01

    Overall mortality ascribable to multiple traumas, that in Italy is responsible for about 8,000 death/year, is strictly dependent on the function of the so called Trauma Care System. This study reports on an epidemiological survey conducted in the urban area of Florence along a 23-month period (from Jan 97 to Nov 99), with the aim to identify the typology of traumas and the first aid care delivered to the person until hospital admission. These data were compared to those collected in the urban area of Bologna because the composition of the first-aid team is different, being nurses, in Bologna, an integral component of the first aid system. On a total of 118 multiple traumas, 17% was represented by isolated head trauma, while in 72% involvement of other organs was present in addition to the head; 11% of cases were abdominal or thoracic traumas, 1% of lower extremities. In 46% the cause of trauma was a car accident. The complexity of care delivered to the person with trauma was less in the Florence survey, as indicated by the immobilization of patients, performed in only 11% of cases as compared to 47% in Bologna, by the application of the cervical collar, applied in 12% versus 62% of traumas. Although the two samples are not strictly comparable, these data suggest that the presence of nurses in the Trauma Care System can be one of the elements of improvement of the quality of delivered care.

  5. Sarcopenia and frailty in elderly trauma patients.

    PubMed

    Fairchild, Berry; Webb, Travis P; Xiang, Qun; Tarima, Sergey; Brasel, Karen J

    2015-02-01

    Sarcopenia describes a loss of muscle mass and resultant decrease in strength, mobility, and function that can be quantified by CT. We hypothesized that sarcopenia and related frailty characteristics are related to discharge disposition after blunt traumatic injury in the elderly. We reviewed charts of 252 elderly blunt trauma patients who underwent abdominal CT prior to hospital admission. Data for thirteen frailty characteristics were abstracted. Sarcopenia was measured by obtaining skeletal muscle cross-sectional area (CSA) from each patient's psoas major muscle using Slice-O-Matic(®) software. Dispositions were grouped as dependent and independent based on discharge location. χ (2), Fisher's exact, and logistic regression were used to determine factors associated with discharge dependence. Mean age 76 years, 49 % male, median ISS 9.0 (IQR = 8.0-17.0). Discharge destination was independent in 61.5 %, dependent in 29 %, and 9.5 % of patients died. Each 1 cm(2) increase in psoas muscle CSA was associated with a 20 % decrease in dependent living (p < 0.0001). Gender, weakness, hospital complication, and cognitive impairment were also associated with disposition; ISS was not (p = 0.4754). Lower psoas major muscle CSA is related to discharge destination in elderly trauma patients and can be obtained from the admission CT. Lower psoas muscle CSA is related to loss of independence upon discharge in the elderly. The early availability of this variable during the hospitalization of elderly trauma patients may aid in discharge planning and the transition to dependent living.

  6. How I Manage Abdominal Injuries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haycock, Christine E.

    1986-01-01

    In sports, abdominal injuries occur most frequently in cycling, horseback riding, and skiing. Most involve children, not adults. Any athlete sustaining a severe blow to the abdomen should be examined. Guidelines are provided for recognizing and treating injuries to the abdominal muscles, kidneys, spleen, and liver. (Author/MT)

  7. LAPAROSCOPIC MANAGEMENT OF RETROPERITONEAL INJURIES IN PENETRATING ABDOMINAL INJURIES.

    PubMed

    Mosai, F

    2017-09-01

    Laparoscopy in penetrating abdominal injuries is now accepted and practiced in many modern trauma centres. However its role in evaluating and managing retroperitoneal injuries is not yet well established. The aim of this study was to document our experience in using laparoscopy in a setting of penetrating abdominal injuries with suspected retroperitoneal injury in haemodynamically stable patients. A retrospective descriptive study of prospectively collected data from a trauma unit at Dr George Mukhari Academic Hospital (DGMAH) was done. All haemodynamically stable patients with penetrating abdominal injury who were offered laparoscopy from January 2012 to December 2015 were reviewed and those who met the inclusion criteria were analysed. A total of 284 patients with penetrating abdominal injuries were reviewed and 56 met the inclusion criteria and were analysed. The median age was 30.8 years (15-60 years) and males constituted 87.5% of the study population. The most common mechanism of injury was penetrating stab wounds (62.5%). Forty-five patients (80.3%) were managed laparoscopically, of these n=16 (28.5%) had retroperitoneal injuries that required surgical intervention. The most commonly injured organ was the colon (19.6%). The conversion rate was 19.6% with most common indication for conversion been active bleeding (14%). The complication rate was 7.14% (N=4) and were all Clavien-Dindo grade 3. There were no recorded missed injuries and no mortality. The positive outcomes documented in this study with no missed injuries and absence of mortality suggests that laparoscopy is a feasible option in managing stable patients with suspected retroperitoneal injuries.

  8. Infectious complications following duodenal and/or pancreatic trauma.

    PubMed

    Tyburski, J G; Dente, C J; Wilson, R F; Shanti, C; Steffes, C P; Carlin, A

    2001-03-01

    Patients with pancreatic and/or duodenal trauma often have a high incidence of infectious complications. In this study we attempted to find the most important risk factors for these infections. A retrospective review of the records of 167 patients seen over 7 years (1989 through 1996) at an urban Level I trauma center for injury to the duodenum and/or pancreas was performed. Fifty-nine patients (35%) had isolated injury to the duodenum (13 blunt, 46 penetrating), 81 (49%) had isolated pancreatic trauma (18 blunt, 63 penetrating), and 27 (16%) had combined injuries (two blunt, 25 penetrating). The overall mortality rate was 21 per cent and the infectious morbidity rate was 40 per cent. The majority of patients had primary repair and/or drainage as treatment of their injuries. Patients with pancreatic injuries (alone or combined with a duodenal injury) had a much higher infection rate than duodenal injuries. The patients with duodenal injuries had significantly lower penetrating abdominal trauma indices, number of intra-abdominal organ injuries, and incidence of hypothermia. On multivariate analysis independent factors associated with infections included hypothermia and the presence of a pancreatic injury. Although injuries to the pancreas and duodenum often coexist it is the pancreatic injury that contributes most to the infectious morbidity.

  9. CT of abdominal tuberculosis

    SciTech Connect

    Epstein, B.M.; Mann, J.H.

    1982-11-01

    Intraabdominal tuberculosis (TB) presents with a wide variety of clinical and radiologic features. Besides the reported computed tomographic (CT) finding of high-density ascites in tuberculous peritonitis, this report describes additional CT features highly suggestive of abdominal tuberculosis in eight cases: (1) irregular soft-tissue densities in the omental area; (2) low-density masses surrounded by thick solid rims; (3) a disorganized appearance of soft-tissue densities, fluid, and bowel loops forming a poorly defined mass; (4) low-density lymph nodes with a multilocular appearance after intravenous contrast administration; and (5) possibly high-density ascites. The differential diagnosis of these features include lymphoma, various forms ofmore » peritonitis, peritoneal carcinomatosis, and peritoneal mesothelioma. It is important that the CT features of intraabdominal tuberculosis be recognized in order that laparotomy be avoided and less invasive procedures (e.g., laparoscopy, biopsy, or a trial of antituberculous therapy) be instituted.« less

  10. Functional abdominal pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Clouse, Ray E; Mayer, Emeran A; Aziz, Qasim; Drossman, Douglas A; Dumitrascu, Dan L; Mönnikes, Hubert; Naliboff, Bruce D

    2006-04-01

    Functional abdominal pain syndrome (FAPS) differs from the other functional bowel disorders; it is less common, symptoms largely are unrelated to food intake and defecation, and it has higher comorbidity with psychiatric disorders. The etiology and pathophysiology are incompletely understood. Because FAPS likely represents a heterogeneous group of disorders, peripheral neuropathic pain mechanisms, alterations in endogenous pain modulation systems, or both may be involved in any one patient. The diagnosis of FAPS is made on the basis of positive symptom criteria and a longstanding history of symptoms; in the absence of alarm symptoms, an extensive diagnostic evaluation is not required. Management is based on a therapeutic physician-patient relationship and empirical treatment algorithms using various classes of centrally acting drugs, including antidepressants and anticonvulsants. The choice, dose, and combination of drugs are influenced by psychiatric comorbidities. Psychological treatment options include psychotherapy, relaxation techniques, and hypnosis. Refractory FAPS patients may benefit from a multidisciplinary pain clinic approach.

  11. A Case of Pediatric Abdominal Wall Reconstruction: Components Separation within the Austere War Environment

    PubMed Central

    Sabino, Jennifer; Kumar, Anand

    2014-01-01

    Summary: Reconstructive surgeons supporting military operations are required to definitively treat severe pediatric abdominal injuries in austere environments. The safety and efficacy of using a components separation technique to treat large ventral hernias in pediatric patients in this setting remains understudied. Components separation technique was required to achieve definitive closure in a 12-month-old pediatric patient in Kandahar, Afghanistan. Her course was complicated by an anastomotic leak after small bowel resection. Her abdominal was successfully reopened, the leak repaired, and closed primarily without incident on postinjury day 9. Abdominal trauma with a large ventral hernia requiring components separation is extremely rare. A pediatric patient treated with components separation demonstrated minimal complications, avoidance of abdominal compartment syndrome, and no mortality. PMID:25426363

  12. The association between operative repair of bladder injury and improved survival: results from the National Trauma Data Bank.

    PubMed

    Deibert, Christopher M; Spencer, Benjamin A

    2011-07-01

    The bladder is the most commonly injured genitourinary organ from blunt pelvic trauma. In this study we describe traumatic bladder injuries in the United States, their management and association with mortality. We queried the 2002 to 2006 National Trauma Data Bank for all subjects with bladder injury. Demographics, mechanism of injury, coexisting injuries, type of bladder injury, and operative interventions for bladder and other abdominal trauma are described. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to examine the relationship between bladder injury and in-hospital mortality. Of 8,565 subjects with bladder trauma 46% had pelvic fracture and 15% had 2 or more intra-abdominal injuries. Of these subjects 54% underwent bladder surgery, including 76% with intraperitoneal injury and 51% with surgical repair of other abdominal organs. On multivariate analysis operative bladder repair reduced the likelihood of in-hospital mortality by 59%. Greater likelihood of death was seen in African-American and Native American patients, and those with pelvic injuries, triage to higher acuity care, penetrating trauma and multiple abdominal injuries. We demonstrated that surgical repair provides a significant survival advantage for subjects with bladder trauma. With 76% of intraperitoneal bladder injuries being repaired, there appears to be underuse of a lifesaving procedure. Additional studies to refine indications for bladder repair are warranted. Copyright © 2011 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. [Perforation of hollow organs in the abdominal contusion: diagnostic features and prognostic factors of death].

    PubMed

    Nicolau, A E; Merlan, V; Dinescu, G; Crăciun, M; Kitkani, A; Beuran, M

    2012-01-01

    Blunt hollow viscus perforations (HVP) due to abdominal contusions (AC), although rare, are difficult to diagnose early and are associated with a high mortality. Our paper analyses retrospectively data from patients operated for HVP between January 2005 and January 2009, the efficiency of different diagnostic tools, mortality and prognostic factors for death. There were 62 patients operated for HVP, 14 of which had isolated abdominal contusion and 48 were poly trauma patients. There were 9 women and 53 men, the mean age was 41.5 years (SD: +17,9), the mean ISS was 32.94 (SD: +15,94), 23 patients had associated solid viscus injuries (SVI). Clinical examination was irelevant for 16 of the 62 patients, abdominal Xray was false negative for 30 out of 35 patients and abdominal ultrasound was false negative for 16 out of 60 patients. Abdominal CT was initially false negative for 7 out of 38 patients: for 4 of them the abdominal CT was repeated and was positive for HVP, for 3 patients a diagnostic laparoscopy was performed. Direct signs for HVP on abdominal CT were present for 3 out of 38 patients. Diagnostic laparoscopy was performed for 7 patients with suspicion for HVP, and was positive for 6 of them and false negative for a patient with a duodenal perforation. Single organ perforations were present in 55 cases, multi organ perforations were present in 7 cases. There were 15 deaths (15.2%), most of them caused by haemodynamic instability (3 out of 6 patients) and associated lesions: SOL for 9 out of 23 cases, pelvic fracture (PF) for 6 out of 14 patients, craniocerebral trauma (CCT) for 12 out of 33 patients.Multivariate analysis showed that the prognostic factors for death were ISS value (p = 0,023) and associated CCT (odds ratio = 4,95; p = 0,017). The following factors were not confirmed as prognostic factors for death: age, haemodynamic instability, associated SVI, thoracic trauma (TT), pelvic fractures (PF), limbs fractures (LF) and admission-operation interval

  14. Maternal death in the emergency department from trauma.

    PubMed

    Brookfield, Kathleen F; Gonzalez-Quintero, Victor H; Davis, James S; Schulman, Carl I

    2013-09-01

    Trauma during pregnancy is among leading causes of non-pregnancy-related maternal death (MD). This study describes risk factors for MD from trauma during pregnancy in a large urban population. We queried an urban Level One Trauma Center registry for the medical records of pregnant women suffering trauma from 1990 to 2007. Associations were examined between maternal demographics, injury mode details, injury characteristics, and risk of maternal death upon arrival to the emergency room. Overall, 351 patients were identified. Most traumas was caused by motor vehicle collision (71.8 %), accounting for 78.9 % of MD, followed by gun shot wound (10.3 %), stabbing (8.5 %), falls (4.3 %), and assaults (4 %). Abdominal and head injuries were more frequent in cases of MD compared with patients admitted to the hospital (33.3 vs. 25.1 % abdominal, 55.6 vs. 29.4 % head; p < 0.001). A greater proportion of MDs were characterized by lack of restraint use (66.7 %) compared to women admitted to the hospital (47.7 %) and women discharged after observation (43.1 %); p = 0.014. ER deaths had more negative base excess scores than women who were admitted or discharged (-14 vs. -3 vs. -2; p < 0.001), lower blood pH values (6.96 vs. 7.40 vs. 7.44; p < 0.001), greater Injury Severity Scores (ISS) (44.4 vs. 11.49 vs. 2.66; p < 0.001), and lower Revised Trauma Scores (RTS) (0.5 vs. 7.49 vs. 7.83; p < 0.001). Lack of restraint use in the pregnant population is associated with increased MD. Although not validated in the pregnant population, the ISS and RTS were associated with maternal mortality outcomes.

  15. [Selenium metabolism in patients with severe multiple trauma].

    PubMed

    Zaĭnudinov, Z M; Shabanov, A K; Zorin, S N; Kuzovlev, A N; Mal'tsev, G Iu; Azarov, Ia B; Vorozhko, I V; Grebenchikov, O A

    2014-01-01

    To define a relation between the selenium level and the risk of the development of nosocomial pneumonia in patients with severe multiple trauma depending on the trauma severity and the volume of blood loss. We measured serum selenium concentration in 40 patients with severe multiple trauma. The ISS score was used to estimate the trauma severity. Patients were divided into 2 groups: group I--25 patients without pneumonia, group II--15 patients with pneumonia. The volume of blood loss was estimated in each group. The oxidative stress was estimated by means of the antioxidant index. For selected groups the significant difference (P < 0.05) in the volume of blood loss was detected. It was shown the significant decrease of selenium concentration (P < 0.05) in both groups in comparison with control for all testing time points (the 6-12 hrs, 24 hrs, 3 and 5-7 days). The mean of selenium concentration in group II was significantly lower in comparison to the group I. A significant difference of selenium concentrations (P < 0.05) between groups were detected on the 6-12 hrs and day 3 from the trauma onset. The antioxidant index was significantly lower in the group II within the 6-12 hrs, 12-24 hrs and 5-7 days (P < 0.05) in comparison to group I. The severe multiple trauma and severe blood loss lead to a selenium deficiency in the blood serum starting with the first hours from the trauma onset, which leads to the critical level of selenium concentration by the Ist day's end after trauma. It also leads to a pronounced oxidative stress that is reflected in the antioxidant index dynamics. Thus serum selenium concentration may be included in the set of the early prognostic detectors to detect infectious pulmonary complications development at severe multiple trauma, and it could be the basis for the decision to take early prophylaxis using selenium medications.

  16. Teen trauma without the drama: outcomes of adolescents treated at Ohio adult versus pediatric trauma centers.

    PubMed

    Walther, Ashley E; Pritts, Timothy A; Falcone, Richard A; Hanseman, Dennis J; Robinson, Bryce R H

    2014-07-01

    The optimal treatment facility for adolescent trauma patients is controversial. We sought to investigate risk-adjusted outcomes of adolescents treated at adult-only trauma centers (ATCs) versus pediatric-only trauma centers (PTCs) in a state system with legislated American College of Surgeons-verified institutions to determine ideal prehospital referral patterns. The Ohio Trauma Registry was queried for patients 15 years to 19 years with a length of stay (LOS) greater than 1 day at ATC (Level 1) or PTC (Levels 1 and 2) from 2008 to 2012. Race, sex, emergency department vital signs, Injury Severity Score (ISS), computed tomography, and ultrasound imaging were reviewed. Outcomes by mechanism of injury included ventilator days, intensive care unit LOS, hospital LOS, and mortality. Statistical analysis was performed using χ test, t test, and Wilcoxon rank-sum test. Propensity score-based risk adjustment matching was used to compare groups (propensity score within 0.01, ISS within 5). Of 5,793 adolescents examined, (84% blunt, 16% penetrating) 66% were treated at an ATC. In unmatched comparisons, age, ISS, vital signs, and mortality differed significantly between centers (p < 0.01). For adolescents with blunt injury, more males (71.6% vs. 66.3%, p < 0.01) and nonwhites (19.2% vs. 15.8%, p < 0.01) were seen at PTCs. For penetrating trauma, more males (88.6% vs. 50.8%, p < 0.01) and nonwhites (66.4% vs. 34.3%, p < 0.01) were admitted to ATCs. In 873 propensity-matched pairs for blunt trauma and 95 propensity-matched pairs of penetrating injuries, no differences were seen in a priori outcomes. Imaging (blunt, head computed tomography and abdominal ultrasound, p < 0.01; penetrating, abdominal ultrasound, p = 0.02) was more common at ATCs. Major outcome differences for injured adolescents do not exist between ATCs and PTCs, regardless of injury pattern. Imaging remains more prevalent at ATCs. In a state system with mandatory American College of Surgeons-verified centers

  17. [Pediatric multiple trauma].

    PubMed

    Auner, B; Marzi, I

    2014-05-01

    Multiple trauma in children is rare so that even large trauma centers will only treat a small number of cases. Nevertheless, accidents are the most common cause of death in childhood whereby the causes are mostly traffic accidents and falls. Head trauma is the most common form of injury and the degree of severity is mostly decisive for the prognosis. Knowledge on possible causes of injury and injury patterns as well as consideration of anatomical and physiological characteristics are of great importance for treatment. The differences compared to adults are greater the younger the child is. Decompression and stopping bleeding are the main priorities before surgical fracture stabilization. The treatment of a severely injured child should be carried out by an interdisciplinary team in an approved trauma center with expertise in pediatrics. An inadequate primary assessment involves a high risk of early mortality. On the other hand children have a better prognosis than adults with comparable injuries.

  18. Review of pancreatic trauma.

    PubMed Central

    Glancy, K E

    1989-01-01

    In reviewing the literature on pancreatic trauma (1,984 cases), I found that it resulted from penetrating trauma in 73% and blunt trauma in 27% of cases. Associated injuries were common (average 3.0 per patient). Increased mortality was associated with shotgun wounds, an increasing number of associated injuries, the proximity of the injury to the head of the pancreas, preoperative shock, and massive hemorrhage. High mortality was found for total pancreatectomy, duct reanastomosis, and lack of surgical treatment, with lower mortality for Roux-en-Y anastomoses, suture and drainage, distal pancreatectomy, and duodenal exclusion and diverticulization techniques. Most patients required drainage only. The preoperative diagnosis of pancreatic trauma is difficult, with the diagnosis usually made during surgical repair for associated injuries. Blood studies such as amylase levels, diagnostic peritoneal lavage, and plain radiographs are not reliable. Computed tomographic scanning may be superior, but data are limited. PMID:2669347

  19. Management of blunt pancreatic trauma in children: Review of the National Trauma Data Bank☆,☆☆

    PubMed Central

    Englum, Brian R.; Gulack, Brian C.; Rice, Henry E.; Scarborough, John E.; Adibe, Obinna O.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study aims to examine the current management strategies and outcomes after blunt pancreatic trauma in children using a national patient registry. Methods Using the National Trauma Data Bank (NTDB) from 2007–2011, we identified all patients ≤18 years old who suffered blunt pancreatic trauma. Patients were categorized as undergoing nonoperative pancreatic management (no abdominal operation, abdominal operation without pancreatic-specific procedure, or pancreatic drainage alone) or operative pancreatic management (pancreatic resection/repair). Patient characteristics, operative details, clinical outcomes, and factors associated with operative management were examined. Results Of 610,402 pediatric cases in the NTDB, 1653 children (0.3%) had blunt pancreatic injury and 674 had information on specific location of pancreatic injury. Of these 674 cases, 514 (76.3%) underwent nonoperative pancreatic management. The groups were similar in age, gender, and race; however, pancreatic injury grade > 3, moderate to severe injury severity, and bicycle accidents were associated with operative management in multivariable analysis. Children with pancreatic head injuries or GCS motor score < 6 were less likely to undergo pancreatic operation. Overall morbidity and mortality rates were 26.5% and 5.3%, respectively. Most outcomes were similar between treatment groups, including mortality (2.5% vs. 6.7% in operative vs. nonoperative cohorts respectively; p = 0.07). Conclusion Although rare, blunt pancreatic trauma in children continues to be a morbid injury. In the largest analysis of blunt pancreatic trauma in children, we provide data on which to base future prospective studies. Operative management of pancreatic trauma occurs most often in children with distal ductal injuries, suggesting that prospective studies may want to focus on this group. PMID:27577183

  20. Endovascular Therapy in Trauma

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-11-23

    patients. The use of endovascu- lar techniques in trauma can be considered in three broad categories: (1) large-vessel repair (e.g. covered stent repair...covered stent grafts, and coils and other thrombotic adjuncts. Devices from these categories are introduced over a wire at the access site through...technique or some form of distal aortic perfusion [6]. The use of stent grafts to manage tho- racic aortic trauma stemmed from favorable observations

  1. Blunt chest trauma.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Daphne J

    2014-01-01

    Blunt chest trauma is associated with a wide range of injuries, many of which are life threatening. This article is a case study demonstrating a variety of traumatic chest injuries, including pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment. Literature on the diagnosis and treatment was reviewed, including both theoretical and research literature, from a variety of disciplines. The role of the advance practice nurse in trauma is also discussed as it relates to assessment, diagnosis, and treatment of patients with traumatic chest injuries.

  2. Abdominal elephantiasis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Hanna, Dominique; Cloutier, Richard; Lapointe, Roch; Desgagné, Antoine

    2004-01-01

    Elephantiasis is a well-known condition in dermatology usually affecting the legs and external genitalia. It is characterized by chronic inflammation and obstruction of the lymphatic channels and by hypertrophy of the skin and subcutaneous tissues. The etiology is either idiopathic or caused by a variety of conditions such as chronic filarial disease, leprosy, leishmaniasis, and chronic recurrent cellulites. Elephantiasis of the abdominal wall is very rare. A complete review of the English and French literature showed only two cases reported in 1966 and 1973, respectively. We report a third case of abdominal elephantiasis and we briefly review this entity. We present the case of a 51-year-old woman who had progressively developed an enormous pediculated abdominal mass hanging down her knees. The skin was thickened, hyperpigmented, and fissured. She had a history of multiple abdominal cellulites. She underwent an abdominal lipectomy. Histopathology of the specimen confirmed the diagnosis of abdominal elephantiasis. Abdominal elephantiasis is a rare disease that represents end-stage failure of lymph drainage. Lipectomy should be considered in the management of this condition.

  3. Quality of trauma care and trauma registries.

    PubMed

    Pino Sánchez, F I; Ballesteros Sanz, M A; Cordero Lorenzana, L; Guerrero López, F

    2015-03-01

    Traumatic disease is a major public health concern. Monitoring the quality of services provided is essential for the maintenance and improvement thereof. Assessing and monitoring the quality of care in trauma patient through quality indicators would allow identifying opportunities for improvement whose implementation would improve outcomes in hospital mortality, functional outcomes and quality of life of survivors. Many quality indicators have been used in this condition, although very few ones have a solid level of scientific evidence to recommend their routine use. The information contained in the trauma registries, spread around the world in recent decades, is essential to know the current health care reality, identify opportunities for improvement and contribute to the clinical and epidemiological research. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  4. Economics of abdominal wall reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Bower, Curtis; Roth, J Scott

    2013-10-01

    The economic aspects of abdominal wall reconstruction are frequently overlooked, although understandings of the financial implications are essential in providing cost-efficient health care. Ventral hernia repairs are frequently performed surgical procedures with significant economic ramifications for employers, insurers, providers, and patients because of the volume of procedures, complication rates, the significant rate of recurrence, and escalating costs. Because biological mesh materials add significant expense to the costs of treating complex abdominal wall hernias, the role of such costly materials needs to be better defined to ensure the most cost-efficient and effective treatments for ventral abdominal wall hernias. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. A Newborn With Abdominal Pain.

    PubMed

    Alwan, Riham; Drake, Meredith; Gurria Juarez, Juan; Emery, Kathleen H; Shaaban, Aimen F; Szabo, Sara; Sobolewski, Brad

    2017-11-01

    A previously healthy 3-week-old boy presented with 5 hours of marked fussiness, abdominal distention, and poor feeding. He was afebrile and well perfused. His examination was remarkable for localized abdominal tenderness and distention. He was referred to the emergency department in which an abdominal radiograph revealed gaseous distention of the bowel with a paucity of gas in the pelvis. Complete blood cell count and urinalysis were unremarkable. His ongoing fussiness and abnormal physical examination prompted consultation with surgery and radiology. Our combined efforts ultimately established an unexpected diagnosis. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  6. Trauma system in Greece: Quo Vadis?

    PubMed

    Anagnostou, Evangelos; Larentzakis, Andreas; Vassiliu, Pantelis

    2018-05-23

    Implementation of trauma systems has markedly assisted in improving outcomes of the injured patient. However, differences exist internationally as diverse social factors, economic conditions and national particularities are placing obstacles. The purpose of this paper is to critically evaluate the current Greek trauma system, provide a comprehensive review and suggest key actions. An exhaustive search of the - scarce on this subject - English and Greek literature was carried out to analyze all the main components of the Greek trauma system, according to American College of Surgeons' criteria, as well as the WHO Trauma Systems Maturity Index. Regarding prevention, efforts are in the right direction lowering the road traffic incidents-related death rate, however rural and insular regions remain behind. Hellenic Emergency Medical Service (EKAB) has well-defined communications and emergency phone line but faces problems with educating people on how to use it properly. In addition, equal and systematic training of ambulance personnel is a challenge, with the lack of pre-hospital registry and EMS quality assessment posing a question on where the related services are currently standing. Redistribution of facilities' roles with the establishment of the first formal trauma centre in the existing infrastructure would facilitate the development of a national registry and introduction of the trauma surgeon subspecialty with proper training potential. Definite rehabilitation institutional protocols that include both inpatient and outpatient care are needed. Disaster preparedness entails an extensive national plan and regular drills, mainly at the pre-hospital level. The lack, however, of any accompanying quality assurance programs hampers the effort to yield the desirable results. Despite recent economic crisis in Greece, actions solving logistics and organising issues may offer a well-defined, integrated trauma system without uncontrollably raising the costs. Political will is

  7. Repair of pediatric bladder rupture improves survival: results from the National Trauma Data Bank.

    PubMed

    Deibert, Christopher M; Glassberg, Kenneth I; Spencer, Benjamin A

    2012-09-01

    The urinary bladder is the second most commonly injured genitourinary organ. The objective of this study was to describe the management of pediatric traumatic bladder ruptures in the United States and their association with surgical repair and mortality. We searched the 2002-2008 National Trauma Data Bank for all pediatric (<18 years old) subjects with bladder rupture. Demographics, mechanism of injury, coexisting injury severity, and operative interventions for bladder and other abdominal trauma are described. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to examine the relationship between bladder rupture and both bladder surgery and in-hospital mortality. We identified 816 children who sustained bladder trauma. Forty-four percent underwent bladder surgery, including 17% with an intraperitoneal injury. Eighteen percent had 2 intra-abdominal injuries, and 40% underwent surgery to other abdominal organs. In multivariate analysis, operative bladder repair reduced the likelihood of in-hospital mortality by 82%. A greater likelihood of dying was seen among the uninsured and those with more severe injuries and multiple abdominal injuries. After bladder trauma, pediatric patients demonstrate significantly improved survival when the bladder is surgically repaired. With only 67% of intraperitoneal bladder injuries being repaired, there appears to be underuse of a life-saving procedure. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Population-based study of ischemic stroke risk after trauma in children and young adults.

    PubMed

    Fox, Christine K; Hills, Nancy K; Vinson, David R; Numis, Adam L; Dicker, Rochelle A; Sidney, Stephen; Fullerton, Heather J

    2017-12-05

    To quantify the incidence, timing, and risk of ischemic stroke after trauma in a population-based young cohort. We electronically identified trauma patients (<50 years old) from a population enrolled in a Northern Californian integrated health care delivery system (1997-2011). Within this cohort, we identified cases of arterial ischemic stroke within 4 weeks of trauma and 3 controls per case. A physician panel reviewed medical records, confirmed cases, and adjudicated whether the stroke was related to trauma. We calculated the 4-week stroke incidence and estimated stroke odds ratios (OR) by injury location using logistic regression. From 1,308,009 trauma encounters, we confirmed 52 trauma-related ischemic strokes. The 4-week stroke incidence was 4.0 per 100,000 encounters (95% confidence interval [CI] 3.0-5.2). Trauma was multisystem in 26 (50%). In 19 (37%), the stroke occurred on the day of trauma, and all occurred within 15 days. In 7/28 cases with cerebrovascular angiography at the time of trauma, no abnormalities were detected. In unadjusted analyses, head, neck, chest, back, and abdominal injuries increased stroke risk. Only head (OR 4.1, CI 1.1-14.9) and neck (OR 5.6, CI 1.03-30.9) injuries remained associated with stroke after adjusting for demographics and trauma severity markers (multisystem trauma, motor vehicle collision, arrival by ambulance, intubation). Stroke risk is elevated for 2 weeks after trauma. Onset is frequently delayed, providing an opportunity for stroke prevention during this period. However, in one-quarter of stroke cases with cerebrovascular angiography at the time of trauma, no vascular abnormality was detected. © 2017 American Academy of Neurology.

  9. Trauma systems and the costs of trauma care.

    PubMed Central

    Goldfarb, M G; Bazzoli, G J; Coffey, R M

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. This study examines the cost of providing trauma services in trauma centers organized by publicly administered trauma systems, compared to hospitals not part of a formal trauma system. DATA SOURCES AND STUDY SETTING. Secondary administrative discharge abstracts for a national sample of severely injured trauma patients in 44 trauma centers and 60 matched control hospitals for the year 1987 were used. STUDY DESIGN. Retrospective univariate and multivariate analyses were conducted to examine the impact of formal trauma systems and trauma center designation on the costs of treating trauma patients. Key dependent variables included length of stay, charge per day per patient, and charge per hospital stay. Key impact variables were type of trauma system and level of trauma designation. Control variables included patient, hospital, and community characteristics. DATA COLLECTION/EXTRACTION METHODS. Data were selected for hospitals based on (1) a large national hospital discharge database, the Hospital Cost and Utilization Project, 1980-1987 (HCUP-2) and (2) a special survey of trauma systems and trauma designation undertaken by the Hospital Research and Educational Trust of the American Hospital Association. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS. The results show that publicly designated Level I trauma centers, which are the focal point of most trauma systems, have the highest charge per case, the highest average charge per day, and similar or longer average lengths of stay than other hospitals. These findings persist after controlling for patient injury and health status, and for demographic characteristics and hospital and community characteristics. CONCLUSIONS. Prior research shows that severely injured trauma patients have greater chances of survival when treated in specialized trauma centers. However, findings here should be of concern to the many states developing trauma systems since the high costs of Level I centers support limiting the number of centers designated at this

  10. Micromanaging Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Maegdefessel, Lars; Spin, Joshua M.; Adam, Matti; Raaz, Uwe; Toh, Ryuji; Nakagami, Futoshi; Tsao, Philip S.

    2013-01-01

    The contribution of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) disease to human morbidity and mortality has increased in the aging, industrialized world. In response, extraordinary efforts have been launched to determine the molecular and pathophysiological characteristics of the diseased aorta. This work aims to develop novel diagnostic and therapeutic strategies to limit AAA expansion and, ultimately, rupture. Contributions from multiple research groups have uncovered a complex transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulatory milieu, which is believed to be essential for maintaining aortic vascular homeostasis. Recently, novel small noncoding RNAs, called microRNAs, have been identified as important transcriptional and post-transcriptional inhibitors of gene expression. MicroRNAs are thought to “fine tune” the translational output of their target messenger RNAs (mRNAs) by promoting mRNA degradation or inhibiting translation. With the discovery that microRNAs act as powerful regulators in the context of a wide variety of diseases, it is only logical that microRNAs be thoroughly explored as potential therapeutic entities. This current review summarizes interesting findings regarding the intriguing roles and benefits of microRNA expression modulation during AAA initiation and propagation. These studies utilize disease-relevant murine models, as well as human tissue from patients undergoing surgical aortic aneurysm repair. Furthermore, we critically examine future therapeutic strategies with regard to their clinical and translational feasibility. PMID:23852016

  11. Abdominal aortic feminism.

    PubMed

    Mortimer, Alice Emily

    2014-11-14

    A 79-year-old woman presented to a private medical practice 2 years previously for an elective ultrasound screening scan. This imaging provided the evidence for a diagnosis of an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) to be made. Despite having a number of recognised risk factors for an AAA, her general practitioner at the time did not follow the guidance set out by the private medical professional, that is, to refer the patient to a vascular specialist to be entered into a surveillance programme and surgically evaluated. The patient became symptomatic with her AAA, was admitted to hospital and found to have a tender, symptomatic, 6 cm leaking AAA. She consented for an emergency open AAA repair within a few hours of being admitted to hospital, despite the 50% perioperative mortality risk. The patient spent 4 days in intensive care where she recovered well. She was discharged after a 12 day hospital stay but unfortunately passed away shortly after her discharge from a previously undiagnosed gastric cancer. 2014 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  12. Abdominal aortic feminism

    PubMed Central

    Mortimer, Alice Emily

    2014-01-01

    A 79-year-old woman presented to a private medical practice 2 years previously for an elective ultrasound screening scan. This imaging provided the evidence for a diagnosis of an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) to be made. Despite having a number of recognised risk factors for an AAA, her general practitioner at the time did not follow the guidance set out by the private medical professional, that is, to refer the patient to a vascular specialist to be entered into a surveillance programme and surgically evaluated. The patient became symptomatic with her AAA, was admitted to hospital and found to have a tender, symptomatic, 6 cm leaking AAA. She consented for an emergency open AAA repair within a few hours of being admitted to hospital, despite the 50% perioperative mortality risk. The patient spent 4 days in intensive care where she recovered well. She was discharged after a 12 day hospital stay but unfortunately passed away shortly after her discharge from a previously undiagnosed gastric cancer. PMID:25398912

  13. Increased abdominal fat levels measured by bioelectrical impedance are associated with histological lesions of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis.

    PubMed

    Margariti, Aikaterini; Kontogianni, Meropi D; Tileli, Nafsika; Georgoulis, Michael; Deutsch, Melanie; Zafeiropoulou, Rodessa; Tiniakos, Dina; Manios, Yannis; Pectasides, Dimitrios; Papatheodoridis, George V

    2015-08-01

    Abdominal fat is considered to play an important role in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), although it is not adequately studied because abdominal fat levels cannot be estimated easily. In this study, associations between abdominal obesity, as assessed by abdominal bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA), and the characteristics of patients with NAFLD were explored. Seventy-four consecutive NAFLD patients who underwent measurement of abdominal fat levels by BIA were included. Levels of abdominal fat 12.5 or less and more than 12.5 were considered to be average and increased, respectively. The mean±SD BMI was 30±4 kg/m and the mean abdominal fat levels were 16±5, whereas 26% of patients had average abdominal fat levels. Patients with average compared with those with increased abdominal fat levels were more frequently women (50 vs. 12%, P=0.001), had lower BMI (27±3 vs. 31±4 kg/m, P<0.001), lower Homeostasis Model Assessment index (2.6±1.4 vs. 3.9±2.7, P=0.045), and lower median liver stiffness on transient elastography (5.3 vs. 6.8 kPa, P=0.025). In patients with available liver biopsy, steatohepatitis was present more frequently in patients with increased compared with average abdominal fat levels (78 vs. 38%, P=0.030) and in patients with BMI 30 or more compared with less than 30 kg/m (87 vs. 48%, P=0.033), but similar in patients with increased or normal waist circumference (67 vs. 56%, P=0.693). Average levels of abdominal fat, as assessed by abdominal BIA, are mainly present in female patients with NAFLD and are associated with a lower degree of insulin resistance. Increased abdominal fat as assessed by BIA and obesity seem to represent strong risk factors for histological steatohepatitis.

  14. Emergency treatment of violent trauma: clinical cases and surgical treatment of penetrating thoracoabdominal, perineal and anorectal trauma.

    PubMed

    Zuccon, William; Paternollo, Roberto; Del Re, Luca; Cordovana, Andrea; De Murtas, Giovanni; Gaverini, Giacomo; Baffa, Giulia; Lunghi, Claudio

    2013-01-01

    The authors analyse clinical cases of penetrating thoracic, abdominal, perineal and anorectal injury and describe the traumatic event and type of lesion, the principles of surgical treatment, the complication rate and follow up. In the last 24 months, we analyzed 10 consecutive cases of penetrating thoracic and abdominal wounds [stab wound (n=7), with evisceration (n=4), gunshot wound (n=1)], and penetrating perineal and anorectal wounds (impalement n=4). In addition, we report an unusual case of neck injury from a stab wound. All the patients underwent emergency surgery for the lesions reported. In 7 cases of perforating vulnerant thoracoabdominal trauma from stab wounds there was hemoperitoneum due to bleeding from the abdominal wall (n=3), the omentum (n=1), the vena cava (n=1) and the liver (n=2). Evisceration of the omentum was observed in 4 cases. In 2 cases laparoscopy was performed. In one case laparotomy and thoracoscopy was performed. In a patient with an abdominoperineal gunshot wound, exploration was extraperitoneal. The 4 cases of perineal and anorectal impalement were treated with primary reconstruction, while in one case a laparotomy was needed to suture the rectum and fashion a temporary colostomy. In one case of anorectal injury rehabilitation resulted in a gradual improvement of fecal continence, while in the patient with the colostomy follow up at 2 months was scheduled to plan colostomy closure. Based on the our clinical experience and the literature, in penetrating abdominal trauma laparotomy may be required if patients are hemodynamically unstable (or in hemorrhagic shock), in patients with evisceration and peritonitis, or for exploration of penetrating thoracoabdominal and epigastric lesions. In anterior injuries of the abdominal wall from gunshot or stab wounds, laparotomy is indicated when there is peritoneal violation and significant intraperitoneal damage. In patients with actively bleeding wounds of the abdominal wall muscles minimal

  15. History of the Innovation of Damage Control for Management of Trauma Patients: 1902-2016.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Derek J; Ball, Chad G; Feliciano, David V; Moore, Ernest E; Ivatury, Rao R; Lucas, Charles E; Fabian, Timothy C; Zygun, David A; Kirkpatrick, Andrew W; Stelfox, Henry T

    2017-05-01

    To review the history of the innovation of damage control (DC) for management of trauma patients. DC is an important development in trauma care that provides a valuable case study in surgical innovation. We searched bibliographic databases (1950-2015), conference abstracts (2009-2013), Web sites, textbooks, and bibliographies for articles relating to trauma DC. The innovation of DC was then classified according to the Innovation, Development, Exploration, Assessment, and Long-term study model of surgical innovation. The "innovation" of DC originated from the use of therapeutic liver packing, a practice that had previously been abandoned after World War II because of adverse events. It then "developed" into abbreviated laparotomy using "rapid conservative operative techniques." Subsequent "exploration" resulted in the application of DC to increasingly complex abdominal injuries and thoracic, peripheral vascular, and orthopedic injuries. Increasing use of DC laparotomy was followed by growing reports of postinjury abdominal compartment syndrome and prophylactic use of the open abdomen to prevent intra-abdominal hypertension after DC laparotomy. By the year 2000, DC surgery had been widely adopted and was recommended for use in surgical journals, textbooks, and teaching courses ("assessment" stage of innovation). "Long-term study" of DC is raising questions about whether the procedure should be used more selectively in the context of improving resuscitation practices. The history of the innovation of DC illustrates how a previously abandoned surgical technique was adapted and readopted in response to an increased understanding of trauma patient physiology and changing injury patterns and trauma resuscitation practices.

  16. Incentive spirometry after abdominal surgery.

    PubMed

    Davis, Suja P

    Patients face various possible complications after abdominal surgery. This article examines best practice in guiding and teaching them how to use an incentive spirometer to facilitate recovery and prevent respiratory complications.

  17. Screening for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    ... signs or symptoms of an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). The final recommendation statement summarizes what the Task ... the potential benefits and harms of screening for AAA: (1) Men ages 65 to 75 who smoke ...

  18. Abdominal Tuberculosis in Cairo, Egypt

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-01-01

    COW 03 PUBLICATION REPORT 94-30227 * ABDOMINAL TUBERCULOSIS IN CAIRO, BY RWIavni 0. IHibbs6 M. Kuanmm ad Z. Fun .Y .~ ... W I Form ApprovedREPORT...Fever Hospital, Cairo, In the past, abdominal tuberculous ýileocaecal: was Egypt, are prospectively evaluated by the US Naval one of the commonest forms...8217. females of child-bearing age) indicated that 9 of 20 40%, were diagnosed as extrapulmonary tuberculosis. isolates from 91 tuberculous peritonitis

  19. A rare case of blunt thoracoabdominal trauma with small bowel perforation from air bags.

    PubMed

    Liverani, A; Pezzatini, M; Conte, S; Mari, F; Milillo, A; Gasparrini, M; Marino, G; Catracchia, V; -Favi, F

    2009-05-01

    Vehicle collisions represent more than 75% of mechanism of blunt abdominal trauma. In spite of the incomparable improvement of car safety devices, recent studies pointed out that the air bags might cause injuries, specially when it is not associated with seatbelt. In fact, some studies pointed out that crash victims using air bags alone have increased injury severity, hospitalisations, thoracoabdominal procedure, and rehabilitation. Some of the most frequently injured organs reported from air bag deployment are the liver (38%), the spleen (23%) and digestive system (17%). Injury of the hollow viscera are far less common. In particular, blunt abdominal trauma resulting in small bowel perforation is an infrequent lesion. These injuries are difficult to diagnose because specific signs are poor and a delay in treatment increases mortality and morbidity of the patients. We describe a case of thoracoabdominal trauma that occurred during a head-on collision after an air bag deployment without seatbelt use.

  20. Delayed hypersensitivity and neutrophil chemotaxis: effect of trauma.

    PubMed

    Meakins, J L; McLean, A P; Kelly, R; Bubenik, O; Pietsch, J B; MacLean, L D

    1978-04-01

    To investigate alterations in host defense produced by trauma, skin testing with five standard recall antigens was done on admission and weekly on 53 patients with blunt trauma and seven with penetrating missile injuries, who then were classified as normal (N), 2 or more positive responses; relatively anergic (RA), one positive response; or anergic (A), no response. Neutrophil chemotaxis was tested 145 times in 32 patients. Degree of injury was assessed by assigning one point to pelvic fracture, long-bone fracture, head, chest, or abdominal injury, to a maximum of five. The A and RA patients had greater trauma, 3 vs. 1.6 for N, and a significantly increased rate of sepsis (p less than 0.005) and mortality (p less than 0.05). Incidence of anergy depended upon age and extent of trauma. Neutrophil chemotaxis in A and RA patients was significantly (p less than 0.001) worse at 96.7 +/- 2.4 mu and 99.8 +/- 1.7 mu compared to N, 113.2 +/- 1.7 mu, and controls 121 +/- 4 mu. With recovery, chemotaxis returned to normal. It is concluded that failure of delayed hypersensitivity responses follows trauma, is related to the severity of injury and age of patient, and is associated with an abnormality of neutrophil chemotaxis and increased rate of sepsis.

  1. Epidemiology of severe trauma.

    PubMed

    Alberdi, F; García, I; Atutxa, L; Zabarte, M

    2014-12-01

    Major injury is the sixth leading cause of death worldwide. Among those under 35 years of age, it is the leading cause of death and disability. Traffic accidents alone are the main cause, fundamentally in low- and middle-income countries. Patients over 65 years of age are an increasingly affected group. For similar levels of injury, these patients have twice the mortality rate of young individuals, due to the existence of important comorbidities and associated treatments, and are more likely to die of medical complications late during hospital admission. No worldwide, standardized definitions exist for documenting, reporting and comparing data on severely injured trauma patients. The most common trauma scores are the Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS), the Injury Severity Score (ISS) and the Trauma and Injury severity Score (TRISS). Documenting the burden of injury also requires evaluation of the impact of post-trauma impairments, disabilities and handicaps. Trauma epidemiology helps define health service and research priorities, contributes to identify disadvantaged groups, and also facilitates the elaboration of comparable measures for outcome predictions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  2. Male genital trauma

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, G.H.; Gilbert, D.A.

    1988-07-01

    We have attempted to discuss genital trauma in relatively broad terms. In most cases, patients present with relatively minimal trauma. However, because of the complexity of the structures involved, minimal trauma can lead to significant disability later on. The process of erection requires correct functioning of the arterial, neurologic, and venous systems coupled with intact erectile bodies. The penis is composed of structures that are compliant and distensible to the limits of their compliance. These structures therefore tumesce in equal proportion to each other, allowing for straight erection. Relatively minimal trauma can upset this balance of elasticity, leading to disablingmore » chordee. Likewise, relatively minimal injuries to the vascular erectile structures can lead to significantly disabling spongiofibrosis. The urethra is a conduit of paramount importance. Whereas the development of stricture is generally related to the nature of the trauma, the extent of stricture and of attendant complications is clearly a function of the immediate management. Overzealous debridement can greatly complicate subsequent reconstruction. A delicate balance between aggressive initial management and maximal preservation of viable structures must be achieved. 38 references.« less

  3. When Should Abdominal Computed Tomography Be Considered in Patients with Lower Rib Fractures?

    PubMed

    Jeroukhimov, Igor; Hershkovitz, Yehuda; Wiser, Itay; Kessel, Boris; Ayyad, Mohammed; Gatot, Inbar; Shapira, Zahar; Jeoravlev, Svetlana; Halevy, Ariel; Lavy, Ron

    2017-05-01

    Lower rib fractures are considered as a marker of intra-abdominal organ injury. Abdominal computed tomography (CT) is the "gold standard" examination for patients with lower rib fractures. However, the reported incidence of concomitant intra-abdominal injuries (IAI) is 20%-40%. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the incidence of intra-abdominal organ injuries in blunt trauma patients with lower rib fractures. Medical charts and radiology reports of patients with lower rib (from the 8th to 12th rib) fractures admitted to our center during a 6-year period were retrospectively reviewed. Patients were divided into two groups. Group I included patients with intra-abdominal injury (IAI) diagnosed either by CT or on urgent laparotomy, and Group II included those with normal abdominal CT scans. Data included demographics, mechanism of injury, laboratory tests, radiology results including number and location of fractured ribs, and incidence of IAI. Overall 318 patients were included in the study. Fifty-seven patients (17.9%) had 71 IAIs compared with 265 (82.1%) patients with no IAI. Logistic regression identified age younger than 55 years (relative risk [RR] = 7.2; 95% confidence interval [CI] 3.1-16.8; p = 0.001), bilateral rib fractures (RR = 3.9; 95% CI 1.1-13.5; p = 0.03) and decreased levels of hematocrit (RR = 2.4; 95% CI 1.2-4.8; p = 0.016) as independent risk factors for the presence of IAI. Abdominal CT should be considered in blunt trauma patients with lower rib fractures who are younger than 55 years of age and have bilateral rib fractures and decreased levels of hematocrit on admission. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Pseudotumors after primary abdominal lipectomy as a new sequela in patients with abdominal apron.

    PubMed

    Dragu, Adrian; Bach, Alexander D; Polykandriotis, Elias; Kneser, Ulrich; Horch, Raymund E

    2009-11-01

    Malnutrition and overweight is a common problem in modern societies. Primary abdominal lipectomy is a standard surgical tool in patients with these problems. However, unknown secondary problems result from recent advances in obesity surgery. Plication of the anterior musculoaponeurotic wall is a widely and commonly used operative technique during abdominoplasty. Many different plication techniques have been published. So far no common standard and long-term effectiveness is proven. In addition, there is no sufficient literature dealing with the postoperative risks of plication of the musculoaponeurotic wall. Four patients with development of pseudotumors were reviewed. All four patients received 12 months in advance a primary abdominal lipectomy including a vertical plication of the musculoaponeurotic wall. All four patients were females with mean age of 61 years and mean body mass index (BMI) of 37 kg/m(2). All four patients had developed a pseudotumor of the abdomen as a long-term complication more than 12 months after primary abdominal lipectomy including a vertical plication of the anterior rectus sheath. One should be aware of the potential long-term risk of secondary postoperative hematoma formation, with or without partial necrosis of the anterior rectus sheath after vertical plication of the anterior musculoaponeurotic wall. Viewed clinically and radiologically, such sequelas may appear as pseudotumor like masses and require immediate revision.

  5. [Trauma in the elderly].

    PubMed

    de Souza, José Antonio Gomes; Iglesias, Antonio Carlos R G

    2002-01-01

    The populational growth of the elderly, associated to a healthier and more active life, make this group of people more exposed to accidents. In some countries, trauma in the elderly is responsible for a high mortality rate, disproportionately higher than in the adults. This fact consumes a great portion of health care resources and implies in a high social cost. The distinct physiologic characteristics of the elderly and the frequent presence of associated diseases make that these patients behave differently and in a more complex way than patients of other ages. These particularities make that health care to the elderly victims of trauma have to be different. The present revision is about aspects of epidemiology, prevention, physiology, health care and rehabilitation of the elderly victims of trauma.

  6. Assuring optimal trauma care: the role of trauma centre accreditation

    PubMed Central

    Simons, Richard; Kirkpatrick, Andrew

    2002-01-01

    Optimal care of the injured patient requires the delivery of appropriate, definitive care shortly after injury. Over the last 30 to 40 years, civilian trauma systems and trauma centres have been developed in the United States based on experience gained in military conflicts, particularly in Korea and Vietnam. A similar process is evolving in Canada. National trauma committees in the US and Canada have defined optimal resources to meet the goal of rapid, appropriate care in trauma centres. They have introduced programs (verification or accreditation) to externally audit trauma centre performance based on these guidelines. It is generally accepted that implementing trauma systems results in decreased preventable death and improved survival after trauma. What is less clear is the degree to which each facet of trauma system development contributes to this improvement. The relative importance of national performance guidelines and trauma centre audit as integral steps toward improved outcomes following injury are reviewed. Current Trauma Association of Canada guidelines for trauma centres are presented and the process of trauma centre accreditation is discussed. PMID:12174987

  7. Trauma-Focused CBT for Youth who Experience Ongoing Traumas

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Judith A.; Mannarino, Anthony P.; Murray, Laura A.

    2011-01-01

    Many youth experience ongoing trauma exposure, such as domestic or community violence. Clinicians often ask whether evidence-based treatments containing exposure components to reduce learned fear responses to historical trauma are appropriate for these youth. Essentially the question is, if youth are desensitized to their trauma experiences, will this in some way impair their responding to current or ongoing trauma? The paper addresses practical strategies for implementing one evidence-based treatment, Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (TF-CBT) for youth with ongoing traumas. Collaboration with local therapists and families participating in TF-CBT community and international programs elucidated effective strategies for applying TF-CBT with these youth. These strategies included: 1) enhancing safety early in treatment; 2) effectively engaging parents who experience personal ongoing trauma; and 3) during the trauma narrative and processing component focusing on a) increasing parental awareness and acceptance of the extent of the youths’ ongoing trauma experiences; b) addressing youths’ maladaptive cognitions about ongoing traumas; and c) helping youth differentiate between real danger and generalized trauma reminders. Case examples illustrate how to use these strategies in diverse clinical situations. Through these strategies TF-CBT clinicians can effectively improve outcomes for youth experiencing ongoing traumas. PMID:21855140

  8. Trauma-Focused CBT for Youth Who Experience Ongoing Traumas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Judith A.; Mannarino, Anthony P.; Murray, Laura K.

    2011-01-01

    Many youth experience ongoing trauma exposure, such as domestic or community violence. Clinicians often ask whether evidence-based treatments containing exposure components to reduce learned fear responses to historical trauma are appropriate for these youth. Essentially the question is, if youth are desensitized to their trauma experiences, will…

  9. Invading of intrauterine contraceptive device into the sigmoid colon through uterine perforation caused by a blunt trauma.

    PubMed

    Davoodabadi, Abdoulhossein; Mohammadzadeh, Mahdi; Amirbeigi, Mahdieh; Jazayeri, Hoda

    2015-01-01

    Intrauterine contraceptive device (IUCD) is relatively safe but still with some serious risks. Uterus perforation is rare and would be fatal. A case of Cu-7 IUCD invading into the sigmoid colon through uterine perforation caused by a pelvic blunt trauma was presented. Our case showed that uterus perforation by an IUCD could induce utero-sigmoid fistula which is likely to be missed. Imaging is required when the patients with IUCD present abdominal pain, particularly with a history of trauma.

  10. Eye trauma in boxing.

    PubMed

    Corrales, Gustavo; Curreri, Anthony

    2009-10-01

    In boxing, along with a few other sports, trauma is inherent to the nature of the sport; therefore it is considered a high-risk sport for ocular injuries. The long-term morbidity of ocular injuries suffered by boxers is difficult to estimate due to the lack of structured long-term follow-up of these athletes. Complications of blunt ocular trauma may develop years after the athlete has retired from the ring and is no longer considered to be at risk for boxing-related injuries. This article describes the wide range of eye injuries a boxer can sustain, and their immediate and long-term clinical management.

  11. Chylothorax after blunt trauma

    PubMed Central

    Arellano, Jason J.; Takabe, Kazuaki; Barrett, Leonard; Faust, Glenn; Angus, L.D. George

    2012-01-01

    Presented is a 50-year-old female who sustained a rare blunt traumatic chylothorax. Traumatic chylothoracies are usually the result of penetrating trauma and disruption of the thoracic duct. Diagnosis and treatment are discussed. The diagnosis is sometimes difficult in the trauma setting due to the possible presence of an underlying hemothorax or empyema and the usual delayed onset of chylothorax. Increased vigilance will allow physicians to properly diagnose and treat this condition early to avoid having to ligate the thoracic duct. PMID:22754675

  12. Chest Wall Trauma.

    PubMed

    Majercik, Sarah; Pieracci, Fredric M

    2017-05-01

    Chest wall trauma is common, and contributes significantly to morbidity and mortality of trauma patients. Early identification of major chest wall and concomitant intrathoracic injuries is critical. Generalized management of multiple rib fractures and flail chest consists of adequate pain control (including locoregional modalities); management of pulmonary dysfunction by invasive and noninvasive means; and, in some cases, surgical fixation. Multiple studies have shown that patients with flail chest have substantial benefit (decreased ventilator and intensive care unit days, improved pulmonary function, and improved long-term functional outcome) when they undergo surgery compared with nonoperative management. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The importance of surgeon involvement in the evaluation of non-accidental trauma patients.

    PubMed

    Larimer, Emily L; Fallon, Sara C; Westfall, Jaimee; Frost, Mary; Wesson, David E; Naik-Mathuria, Bindi J

    2013-06-01

    Non-Accidental Trauma (NAT) is a significant cause of childhood morbidity and mortality, causing 50% of trauma-related deaths at our institution. Our purpose was to evaluate the necessity of primary surgical evaluation and admission to the trauma service for children presenting with NAT. We reviewed all NAT patients from 2007-2011. Injury types, demographic data, and hospitalization information were collected. Comparisons to accidental trauma (AT) patients were made using Wilcoxon rank sum and Student's t tests. We identified 267 NAT patients presenting with 473 acute injuries. Injuries in NAT patients were more severe than in AT patients, and Injury Severity Scores, ICU admission rates, and mortality were all significantly (p<0.001) higher. The majority suffered from polytrauma. Multiple areas of injury were seen in patients with closed head injuries (72%), extremity fractures (51%), rib fractures (82%), and abdominal/thoracic trauma (80%). Despite these complex injury patterns, only 56% received surgical consults, resulting in potential delays in diagnosis, as 24% of abdominal CT scans were obtained >12 hours after hospitalization. Given the high incidence of polytrauma in NAT patients, prompt surgical evaluation is necessary to determine the scope of injury. Admission to the trauma service and a thorough tertiary survey should be considered for all patients. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Idiopathic sclerosing encapsulating peritonitis (or abdominal cocoon).

    PubMed

    Serafimidis, Costas; Katsarolis, Ioannis; Vernadakis, Spyros; Rallis, George; Giannopoulos, George; Legakis, Nikolaos; Peros, George

    2006-02-13

    Idiopathic sclerosing encapsulating peritonitis (or abdominal cocoon) is a rare cause of small bowel obstruction, especially in adult population. Diagnosis is usually incidental at laparotomy. We discuss one such rare case, outlining the fact that an intra-operative surprise diagnosis could have been facilitated by previous investigations. A 56 year-old man presented in A&E department with small bowel ileus. He had a history of 6 similar episodes of small bowel obstruction in the past 4 years, which resolved with conservative treatment. Pre-operative work-up did not reveal any specific etiology. At laparotomy, a fibrous capsule was revealed, in which small bowel loops were encased, with the presence of interloop adhesions. A diagnosis of abdominal cocoon was established and extensive adhesiolysis was performed. The patient had an uneventful recovery and follow-up. Idiopathic sclerosing encapsulating peritonitis, although rare, may be the cause of a common surgical emergency such as small bowel ileus, especially in cases with attacks of non-strangulating obstruction in the same individual. A high index of clinical suspicion may be generated by the recurrent character of small bowel ileus combined with relevant imaging findings and lack of other plausible etiologies. Clinicians must rigorously pursue a preoperative diagnosis, as it may prevent a "surprise" upon laparotomy and result in proper management.

  15. The influence of injury severity on complication rates after primary closure or colostomy for penetrating colon trauma.

    PubMed Central

    Nelken, N; Lewis, F

    1989-01-01

    The management of penetrating colon injury has been frequently debated in the literature, yet few reports have evaluated primary closure versus diverting colostomy in similarly injured patients. Diverting colostomy is the standard of care when mucosal penetration is present, but primary closure in civilian practice has generally had excellent results, although it has been restricted to less severely injured patients. Because the degree of injury may influence choice of treatment in modern practice, various indices of injury severity have been proposed for assessment of patients with penetrating colon trauma. As yet, however, there has been no cross-comparison of repair type versus injury severity. A retrospective study 76 patients who sustained penetrating colon trauma between January 1, 1979 and December 31, 1985 and who survived for at least 24 hours was conducted. Different preferences among attending surgeons and a more aggressive approach to the use of primary closure during the years of study led to an essentially random use of primary closure and diverting colostomy for moderate levels of colon injury, with mandatory colostomy reserved for the most serious injuries. Primary closure was performed in 37 patients (three having resection and anastomosis), and colostomy was performed in 39 patients. Severity of injury was evaluated by the Injury Severity Score (ISS), Penetrating Abdominal Trauma Index (PATI), and the Flint Colon Injury Score. Complications and outcome were evaluated as a function of severity of injury, and primary closure and colostomy were compared. Demographic profiles of the two groups did not differ regarding age, sex, mechanism of injury, shock, or delay between injury and operation. The mortality rate was 2.6% for each group. Major morbidity, including septic complications, occurred in 11% of the patients of the primary closure group and in 49% of those of the colostomy group. When PATI was less than 25, the Flint score was less than or

  16. Automatic radiation dose monitoring for CT of trauma patients with different protocols: feasibility and accuracy.

    PubMed

    Higashigaito, K; Becker, A S; Sprengel, K; Simmen, H-P; Wanner, G; Alkadhi, H

    2016-09-01

    To demonstrate the feasibility and accuracy of automatic radiation dose monitoring software for computed tomography (CT) of trauma patients in a clinical setting over time, and to evaluate the potential of radiation dose reduction using iterative reconstruction (IR). In a time period of 18 months, data from 378 consecutive thoraco-abdominal CT examinations of trauma patients were extracted using automatic radiation dose monitoring software, and patients were split into three cohorts: cohort 1, 64-section CT with filtered back projection, 200 mAs tube current-time product; cohort 2, 128-section CT with IR and identical imaging protocol; cohort 3, 128-section CT with IR, 150 mAs tube current-time product. Radiation dose parameters from the software were compared with the individual patient protocols. Image noise was measured and image quality was semi-quantitatively determined. Automatic extraction of radiation dose metrics was feasible and accurate in all (100%) patients. All CT examinations were of diagnostic quality. There were no differences between cohorts 1 and 2 regarding volume CT dose index (CTDIvol; p=0.62), dose-length product (DLP), and effective dose (ED, both p=0.95), while noise was significantly lower (chest and abdomen, both -38%, p<0.017). Compared to cohort 1, CTDIvol, DLP, and ED in cohort 3 were significantly lower (all -25%, p<0.017), similar to the noise in the chest (-32%) and abdomen (-27%, both p<0.017). Compared to cohort 2, CTDIvol (-28%), DLP, and ED (both -26%) in cohort 3 was significantly lower (all, p<0.017), while noise in the chest (+9%) and abdomen (+18%) was significantly higher (all, p<0.017). Automatic radiation dose monitoring software is feasible and accurate, and can be implemented in a clinical setting for evaluating the effects of lowering radiation doses of CT protocols over time. Copyright © 2016 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. [Experience in management of trauma-related acute abdomen at the "General Ignacio Zaragoza" Regional Hospital in Mexico City].

    PubMed

    Senado-Lara, Isaac; Castro-Mendoza, Antonio; Palacio-Vélez, Fernando; Vargas-Avila, Arcenio Luis

    2004-01-01

    To know the current state of surgical management of patients with abdominal trauma. We carried out a retrospective, observational, transversal study involving patients with abdominal trauma with clinical files wtih trauma who required surgery during the period of April 1, 1998 through March 30, 2003. There were 72 cases including nine male and 33 female patients. Mechanism of lesion was divided into closed and penetrating trauma, the latter group of patients divided into individuals with blunt wounds or with gunshot wounds. Most frequent early postoperative complication was hemorrhage, while most frequent late postoperative complication was acute renal failure. Causes of death were hypovolemic shock in four patients followed by two cases each with the following pathologies: acute respiratory insufficiency syndrome; myocardial infarct, and septic shock. Abdominal trauma is a frequent pathology in our environment, males the most affected patients, with penetrating trauma main lesion cause. Prolonged surgical time required hemotransfusions, and infectious processes together with processes related with tissular hypoxia are the most common cause of complications and death.

  18. A heuristic approach and heretic view on the technical issues and pitfalls in the management of penetrating abdominal injuries.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Tugba H; Ndofor, Brown C; Smith, Martin D; Degiannis, Elias

    2010-07-14

    There is a general decline in penetrating abdominal trauma throughout the western world. As a result of that, there is a significant loss of expertise in dealing with this type of injury particularly when the patient presents to theatre with physiological instability. A significant percentage of these patients will not be operated by a trauma surgeon but, by the "occasional trauma surgeon", who is usually trained as a general surgeon. Most general surgeons have a general knowledge of operating penetrating trauma, knowledge originating from their training years and possibly enhanced by reading operative surgery textbooks. Unfortunately, the details included in most of these books are not extensive enough to provide them with enough armamentaria to tackle the difficult case. In this scenario, their operative dexterity and knowledge cannot be compared to that of their trauma surgeon colleagues, something that is taken for granted in the trauma textbooks. Techniques that are considered basic and easy by the trauma surgeons can be unfamiliar and difficult to general surgeons. Knowing the danger points and pitfalls that will be encountered in penetrating trauma to the abdomen, will help the occasional trauma surgeons to avoid intraoperative errors and improve patient care. This manuscript provides a heuristic approach from surgeons working in a high volume penetrating trauma centers in South African. Some of the statements could be considered heretic by the "accepted" trauma literature. We believe that this heuristic ("rule of thumb" approach, that originating from "try and error" experience) can help surgical trainees or less experienced in penetrating trauma surgeons to improve their surgical decision making and technique, resulting in better patient outcome.

  19. A heuristic approach and heretic view on the technical issues and pitfalls in the management of penetrating abdominal injuries

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    There is a general decline in penetrating abdominal trauma throughout the western world. As a result of that, there is a significant loss of expertise in dealing with this type of injury particularly when the patient presents to theatre with physiological instability. A significant percentage of these patients will not be operated by a trauma surgeon but, by the "occasional trauma surgeon", who is usually trained as a general surgeon. Most general surgeons have a general knowledge of operating penetrating trauma, knowledge originating from their training years and possibly enhanced by reading operative surgery textbooks. Unfortunately, the details included in most of these books are not extensive enough to provide them with enough armamentaria to tackle the difficult case. In this scenario, their operative dexterity and knowledge cannot be compared to that of their trauma surgeon colleagues, something that is taken for granted in the trauma textbooks. Techniques that are considered basic and easy by the trauma surgeons can be unfamiliar and difficult to general surgeons. Knowing the danger points and pitfalls that will be encountered in penetrating trauma to the abdomen, will help the occasional trauma surgeons to avoid intraoperative errors and improve patient care. This manuscript provides a heuristic approach from surgeons working in a high volume penetrating trauma centers in South African. Some of the statements could be considered heretic by the "accepted" trauma literature. We believe that this heuristic ("rule of thumb" approach, that originating from "try and error" experience) can help surgical trainees or less experienced in penetrating trauma surgeons to improve their surgical decision making and technique, resulting in better patient outcome. PMID:20630100

  20. Extrasensory Perception Experiences and Childhood Trauma: A Rorschach Investigation.

    PubMed

    Scimeca, Giuseppe; Bruno, Antonio; Pandolfo, Gianluca; La Ciura, Giulia; Zoccali, Rocco A; Muscatello, Maria R A

    2015-11-01

    This study investigated whether people who report recurrent extrasensory perception (ESP) experiences (telepathy, clairvoyance, and precognition) have suffered more traumatic experiences and traumatic intrusions. Thirty-one nonclinical participants reporting recurrent ESP experiences were compared with a nonclinical sample of 31 individuals who did not report recurrent ESP phenomena. Past traumatic experiences were assessed via a self-report measure of trauma history (Childhood Trauma Questionnaire); traumatic intrusions were assessed via a performance-based personality measure (Rorschach Traumatic Content Index). Participants also completed the Anomalous Experience Inventory, the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2, the Dissociative Experience Scale, and the Revised Paranormal Belief Scale. The ESP group reported higher levels of emotional abuse, sexual abuse, emotional neglect, physical neglect, and traumatic intrusions. The association between ESP experiences and trauma was partly mediated by the effects of dissociation and emotional distress. Implications for health professionals are discussed. Results also showed the reliability of the twofold method of assessment of trauma.

  1. Obesity in pediatric trauma.

    PubMed

    Witt, Cordelie E; Arbabi, Saman; Nathens, Avery B; Vavilala, Monica S; Rivara, Frederick P

    2017-04-01

    The implications of childhood obesity on pediatric trauma outcomes are not clearly established. Anthropomorphic data were recently added to the National Trauma Data Bank (NTDB) Research Datasets, enabling a large, multicenter evaluation of the effect of obesity on pediatric trauma patients. Children ages 2 to 19years who required hospitalization for traumatic injury were identified in the 2013-2014 NTDB Research Datasets. Age and gender-specific body mass indices (BMI) were calculated. Outcomes included injury patterns, operative procedures, complications, and hospital utilization parameters. Data from 149,817 pediatric patients were analyzed; higher BMI percentiles were associated with significantly more extremity injuries, and fewer injuries to the head, abdomen, thorax and spine (p values <0.001). On multivariable analysis, higher BMI percentiles were associated with significantly increased likelihood of death, deep venous thrombosis, pulmonary embolus and pneumonia; although there was no difference in risk of overall complications. Obese children also had significantly longer lengths of stay and more frequent ventilator requirement. Among children admitted after trauma, increased BMI percentile is associated with increased risk of death and potentially preventable complications. These findings suggest that obese children may require different management than nonobese counterparts to prevent complications. Level III; prognosis study. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Military Sexual Trauma

    MedlinePlus

    ... associated with MST among users of VA health care are depression and other mood disorders, and substance use disorders. Fortunately, people can recover from experiences of trauma, and VA has effective services to help Veterans do ... VA health care system has a designated MST Coordinator who serves ...

  3. Structured Sensory Trauma Interventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steele, William; Kuban, Caelan

    2010-01-01

    This article features the National Institute of Trauma and Loss in Children (TLC), a program that has demonstrated via field testing, exploratory research, time series studies, and evidence-based research studies that its Structured Sensory Intervention for Traumatized Children, Adolescents, and Parents (SITCAP[R]) produces statistically…

  4. When Trauma Hinders Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barr, Donald A.

    2018-01-01

    Many kindergarten teachers have encountered children who enter school lacking the ability to control their behavior, but they may not understand the social and biological processes behind these children's disruptive behavior. The author reviews research into early childhood brain development to explain how trauma and chronic stress can make it…

  5. Early Childhood Trauma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Child Traumatic Stress Network, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Early childhood trauma generally refers to the traumatic experiences that occur to children aged 0-6. Because infants' and young children's reactions may be different from older children's, and because they may not be able to verbalize their reactions to threatening or dangerous events, many people assume that young age protects children from the…

  6. Trauma Aware & Safety Ready

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paterson, Jim

    2017-01-01

    The interwoven issues of trauma and safety have swept through college campuses over the last decade, and they've arrived at doors of admission offices, encouraging officials to think more carefully about those concerns and take a closer look at how they handle them. Experts recommend in this atmosphere that admission offices discuss these topics…

  7. Managing pancreatoduodenal trauma.

    PubMed

    Williamson, J M L; Williamson, R C N

    2012-06-01

    Pancreatoduodenal injuries are an uncommon but important source of morbidity and mortality in the trauma patient. They require a multidisciplinary approach, with a pancreatic surgeon involved at the earliest opportunity. The investigation and management of these injuries are discussed along with the role of operative intervention.

  8. The impact of specialist trauma service on major trauma mortality.

    PubMed

    Wong, Ting Hway; Lumsdaine, William; Hardy, Benjamin M; Lee, Keegan; Balogh, Zsolt J

    2013-03-01

    Trauma services throughout the world have had positive effects on trauma-related mortality. Australian trauma services are generally more consultative in nature rather than the North American model of full trauma admission service. We hypothesized that the introduction of a consultative specialist trauma service in a Level I Australian trauma center would reduce mortality of the severely injured. A 10-year retrospective study (January 1, 2002-December 31, 2011) was performed on all trauma patients admitted with an Injury Severity Score (ISS) > 15. Patients were identified from the trauma registry, and data for age, sex, mechanism of injury, ISS, survival to discharge, and length of stay were collected. Mortality was examined for patients with severe injury (ISS > 15) and patients with critical injury (ISS > 24) and compared for the three periods: 2002-2004 (without trauma specialist), 2005-2007 (with trauma specialist), and 2008-2011 (with specialist trauma service). A total of 3,869 severely injured (ISS > 15) trauma patients were identified during the 10-year period. Of these, 2,826 (73%) were male, 1,513 (39%) were critically injured (ISS > 24), and more than 97% (3,754) were the victim of blunt trauma. Overall mortality decreased from 12.4% to 9.3% (relative risk, 0.75) from period one to period three and from 25.4% to 20.3% (relative risk, 0.80) for patients with critical injury. A 0.46% per year decrease (p = 0.018) in mortality was detected (odds ratio, 0.63; p < 0.001). For critically injured (ISS > 24), the trend was (0.61% per year; odds ratio, 0.68; p = 0.039). The introduction of a specialist trauma service decreased the mortality of patients with severe injury, the model of care should be considered to implement state- and nationwide in Australia. Epidemiologic study, level III.

  9. Educational inequality in the occurrence of abdominal obesity: Pró-Saúde Study

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Ronaldo Fernandes Santos; Faerstein, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To estimate the degree of educational inequality in the occurrence of abdominal obesity in a population of non-faculty civil servants at university campi. METHODS In this cross-sectional study, we used data from 3,117 subjects of both genders aged 24 to 65-years old, regarding the baseline of Pró-Saúde Study, 1999-2001. Abdominal obesity was defined according to abdominal circumference thresholds of 88 cm for women and 102 cm for men. A multi-dimensional, self-administered questionnaire was used to evaluate education levels and demographic variables. Slope and relative indices of inequality, and Chi-squared test for linear trend were used in the data analysis. All analyses were stratified by genders, and the indices of inequality were standardized by age. RESULTS Abdominal obesity was the most prevalent among women (43.5%; 95%CI 41.2;45.9), as compared to men (24.3%; 95%CI 22.1;26.7), in all educational strata and age ranges. The association between education levels and abdominal obesity was an inverse one among women (p < 0.001); it was not statistically significant among men (p = 0.436). The educational inequality regarding abdominal obesity in the female population, in absolute terms (slope index of inequality), was 24.0% (95%CI 15.5;32.6). In relative terms (relative index of inequality), it was 2.8 (95%CI 1.9;4.1), after the age adjustment. CONCLUSIONS Gender inequality in the prevalence of abdominal obesity increases with older age and lower education. The slope and relative indices of inequality summarize the strictly monotonous trend between education levels and abdominal obesity, and it described educational inequality regarding abdominal obesity among women. Such indices provide relevant quantitative estimates for monitoring abdominal obesity and dealing with health inequalities. PMID:26465669

  10. Secondary abdominal appendicular ectopic pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Nama, Vivek; Gyampoh, Bright; Karoshi, Mahantesh; McRae, Reynold; Opemuyi, Isaac

    2007-01-01

    Although the case fatality rate for ectopic pregnancies has decreased to 0.08% in industrialized countries, it still represents 3.8% of maternal mortality in the United States alone. In developing countries, the case fatality rate varies from 3% to 27%. Laparoscopic management of tubal pregnancies is now the standard form of treatment where this technology is available. Abdominal pregnancies are rare, and secondary implantation of tubal ectopic pregnancies is the most common cause of abdominal gestations. We present an interesting case of secondary implantation of a tubal ectopic pregnancy to highlight the appendix as a possible secondary implantation site after a tubal ectopic pregnancy.

  11. Abdominal surgery in neonatal foals.

    PubMed

    Bryant, James E; Gaughan, Earl M

    2005-08-01

    Abdominal surgery in foals under 30 days old has become more common with improved neonatal care. Early recognition of a foal at risk and better nursing care have increased the survival rates of foals that require neonatal care. The success of improved neonatal care also has increased the need for accurate diagnosis and treatment of gastrointestinal, umbilical, and bladder disorders in these foals. This chapter focuses on the early and accurate diagnosis of specific disorders that require abdominal exploratory surgery and the specific treatment considerations and prognosis for these disorders.

  12. Penetrating abdominal injuries: management controversies

    PubMed Central

    Butt, Muhammad U; Zacharias, Nikolaos; Velmahos, George C

    2009-01-01

    Penetrating abdominal injuries have been traditionally managed by routine laparotomy. New understanding of trajectories, potential for organ injury, and correlation with advanced radiographic imaging has allowed a shift towards non-operative management of appropriate cases. Although a selective approach has been established for stab wounds, the management of abdominal gunshot wounds remains a matter of controversy. In this chapter we describe the rationale and methodology of selecting patients for non-operative management. We also discuss additional controversial issues, as related to antibiotic prophylaxis, management of asymptomatic thoracoabdominal injuries, and the use of colostomy vs. primary repair for colon injuries. PMID:19374761

  13. [Occupational exposure to blood in multiple trauma care].

    PubMed

    Wicker, S; Wutzler, S; Schachtrupp, A; Zacharowski, K; Scheller, B

    2015-01-01

    Trauma care personnel are at risk of occupational exposure to blood-borne pathogens. Little is known regarding compliance with standard precautions or occupational exposure to blood and body fluids among multiple trauma care personnel in Germany. Compliance rates of multiple trauma care personnel in applying standard precautions, knowledge about transmission risks of blood-borne pathogens, perceived risks of acquiring hepatitis B, hepatitis C and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and the personal attitude towards testing of the index patient for blood-borne pathogens after a needlestick injury were evaluated. In the context of an advanced multiple trauma training an anonymous questionnaire was administered to the participants. Almost half of the interviewees had sustained a needlestick injury within the last 12 months. Approximately three quarters of the participants were concerned about the risk of HIV and hepatitis. Trauma care personnel had insufficient knowledge of the risk of blood-borne pathogens, overestimated the risk of hepatitis C infection and underused standard precautionary measures. Although there was excellent compliance for using gloves, there was poor compliance in using double gloves (26.4 %), eye protectors (19.7 %) and face masks (15.8 %). The overwhelming majority of multiple trauma care personnel believed it is appropriate to test an index patient for blood-borne pathogens following a needlestick injury. The process of treatment in prehospital settings is less predictable than in other settings in which invasive procedures are performed. Periodic training and awareness programs for trauma care personnel are required to increase the knowledge of occupational infections and the compliance with standard precautions. The legal and ethical aspects of testing an index patient for blood-borne pathogens after a needlestick injury of a healthcare worker have to be clarified in Germany.

  14. Secondary abdominal compartment syndrome after complicated traumatic lower extremity vascular injuries.

    PubMed

    Macedo, F I B; Sciarretta, J D; Otero, C A; Ruiz, G; Ebler, D J; Pizano, L R; Namias, N

    2016-04-01

    Secondary abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) can occur in trauma patients without abdominal injuries. Surgical management of patients presenting with secondary ACS after isolated traumatic lower extremity vascular injury (LEVI) continues to evolve, and associated outcomes remain unknown. From January 2006 to September 2011, 191 adult trauma patients presented to the Ryder Trauma Center, an urban level I trauma center in Miami, Florida with traumatic LEVIs. Among them 10 (5.2 %) patients were diagnosed with secondary ACS. Variables collected included age, gender, mechanism of injury, and clinical status at presentation. Surgical data included vessel injury, technical aspects of repair, associated complications, and outcomes. Mean age was 37.4 ± 18.0 years (range 16-66 years), and the majority of patients were males (8 patients, 80 %). There were 7 (70 %) penetrating injuries (5 gunshot wounds and 2 stab wounds), and 3 blunt injuries with mean Injury Severity Score (ISS) 21.9 ± 14.3 (range 9-50). Surgical management of LEVIs included ligation (4 patients, 40 %), primary repair (1 patient, 10 %), reverse saphenous vein graft (2 patients, 20 %), and PTFE interposition grafting (3 patients, 30 %). The overall mortality rate in this series was 60 %. The association between secondary ACS and lower extremity vascular injuries carries high morbidity and mortality rates. Further research efforts should focus at identifying parameters to accurately determine resuscitation goals, and therefore, prevent such a devastating condition.

  15. Evaluating abdominal oedema during experimental sepsis using an isotope technique.

    PubMed

    Lattuada, Marco; Maripuu, Enn; Segerstad, Carl Hard af; Lundqvist, Hans; Hedenstierna, Göran

    2012-05-01

    Abdominal oedema is common in sepsis. A technique for the study of such oedema may guide in the fluid regime of these patients. We modified a double-isotope technique to evaluate abdominal organ oedema and fluid extravasation in 24 healthy or endotoxin-exposed ('septic') piglets. Two different markers were used: red blood cells (RBC) labelled with Technetium-99m ((99m)Tc) and Transferrin labelled with Indium111 ((111)In). Images were acquired on a dual-head gamma camera. Microscopic evaluation of tissue biopsies was performed to compare data with the isotope technique. No (99m)Tc activity was measured in the plasma fraction in blood sampled after labelling. Similarly, after molecular size gel chromatography, (111)In activity was exclusively found in the high molecular fraction of the plasma. Extravasation of transferrin, indicating the degree of abdominal oedema, was 4·06 times higher in the LPS group compared to the healthy controls (P<0·0001). Abdominal free fluid, studied in 3 animals, had as high (111)In activity as in plasma, but no (99m)Tc activity. Intestinal lymphatic vessel size was higher in LPS (3·7 ± 1·1 μm) compared to control animals (0·6 + 0·2 μm; P<0·001) and oedema correlated to villus diameter (R(2) = 0·918) and lymphatic diameter (R(2) = 0·758). A correlation between a normalized index of oedema formation (NI) and intra-abdominal pressure (IAP) was also found: NI = 0·46*IAP-3·3 (R(2) = 0·56). The technique enables almost continuous recording of abdominal oedema formation and may be a valuable tool in experimental research, with the potential to be applied in the clinic. © 2011 The Authors. Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging © 2011 Scandinavian Society of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine.

  16. Abdominal obesity, ethnicity and gastro‐oesophageal reflux symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Corley, Douglas A; Kubo, Ai; Zhao, Wei

    2007-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the associations between abdominal obesity and gastro‐oesophageal reflux disease (GORD), and their interactions with ethnicity and gender. Design A cross‐sectional study. Participants completed detailed symptom questionnaires and underwent a standardised examination, including anthropometric measurements. Setting A large integrated healthcare system. Patients 80 110 members of the Kaiser Permanente multiphasic health check‐up cohort. Main outcome measures Gastro‐oesophageal reflux‐type symptoms. Results Recent reflux‐type symptoms were present in 11% of the population. The multivariate OR for symptoms with an abdominal diameter (adjusted for body mass index (BMI)) of ⩾26 vs <16.3 cm was 1.85 (95% CI 1.55 to 2.21) for the white population, 0.95 (95% CI 0.61 to 1.48) for the black population and 0.64 (95% CI 0.18 to 2.30) for Asians. The mean abdominal diameter was greater in men (22.0 cm, 95% CI 21.9 to 22.0) than in women (20.1 cm, 95% CI 20.0 to 20.1, p<0.01), but the risk of symptoms for any given diameter did not differ markedly by gender. The association between increasing BMI and symptoms was also much stronger among the white population than among the black population. The association between BMI and reflux‐type symptoms was partially mediated through abdominal diameter. Conclusions There was a consistent association between abdominal diameter (independent of BMI) and reflux‐type symptoms in the white population, but no consistent associations in the black population or Asians. The BMI association was also strongest among the white population. These findings, combined with the increased prevalence of abdominal obesity in male subjects, suggest that an increased obesity may disproportionately increase GORD‐type symptoms in the white population and in male subjects. PMID:17047097

  17. Diagnosis and management of colonic injuries following blunt trauma.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yi-Xiong; Chen, Li; Tao, Si-Feng; Song, Ping; Xu, Shao-Ming

    2007-01-28

    To retrospectively evaluate the preoperative diagnostic approaches and management of colonic injuries following blunt abdominal trauma. A total of 82 patients with colonic injuries caused by blunt trauma between January 1992 and December 2005 were enrolled. Data were collected on clinical presentation, investigations, diagnostic methods, associated injuries, and operative management. Colonic injury-related mortality and abdominal complications were analyzed. Colonic injuries were caused mainly by motor vehicle accidents. Of the 82 patients, 58 (70.3%) had other associated injuries. Laparotomy was performed within 6 h after injury in 69 cases (84.1%), laparoscopy in 3 because of haemodynamic instability. The most commonly injured site was located in the transverse colon. The mean colon injury scale score was 2.8. The degree of faecal contamination was classified as mild in 18 (22.0%), moderate in 42 (51.2%), severe in 14 (17.1%), and unknown in 8 (9.8%) cases. Sixty-seven patients (81.7%) were treated with primary repair or resection and anastomosis. Faecal stream diversion was performed in 15 cases (18.3%). The overall mortality rate was 6.1%. The incidence of colonic injury-related abdominal complications was 20.7%. The only independent predictor of complications was the degree of peritoneal faecal contamination (P = 0.02). Colonic injuries following blunt trauma are especially important because of the severity and complexity of associated injuries. A thorough physical examination and a combination of tests can be used to evaluate the indications for laparotomy. One stage management at the time of initial exploration is most often used for colonic injuries.

  18. Diagnosis and management of colonic injuries following blunt trauma

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yi-Xiong; Chen, Li; Tao, Si-Feng; Song, Ping; Xu, Shao-Ming

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To retrospectively evaluate the preoperative diagnostic approaches and management of colonic injuries following blunt abdominal trauma. METHODS: A total of 82 patients with colonic injuries caused by blunt trauma between January 1992 and December 2005 were enrolled. Data were collected on clinical presentation, investigations, diagnostic methods, associated injuries, and operative management. Colonic injury-related mortality and abdominal complications were analyzed. RESULTS: Colonic injuries were caused mainly by motor vehicle accidents. Of the 82 patients, 58 (70.3%) had other associated injuries. Laparotomy was performed within 6 h after injury in 69 cases (84.1%), laparoscopy in 3 because of haemodynamic instability. The most commonly injured site was located in the transverse colon. The mean colon injury scale score was 2.8. The degree of faecal contamination was classified as mild in 18 (22.0%), moderate in 42 (51.2%), severe in 14 (17.1%), and unknown in 8 (9.8%) cases. Sixty-seven patients (81.7%) were treated with primary repair or resection and anastomosis. Faecal stream diversion was performed in 15 cases (18.3%). The overall mortality rate was 6.1%. The incidence of colonic injury-related abdominal complications was 20.7%. The only independent predictor of complications was the degree of peritoneal faecal contamination (P = 0.02). CONCLUSION: Colonic injuries following blunt trauma are especially important because of the severity and complexity of associated injuries. A thorough physical examination and a combination of tests can be used to evaluate the indications for laparotomy. One stage management at the time of initial exploration is most often used for colonic injuries. PMID:17278234

  19. Trauma indices for prediction of acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Afshar, Majid; Smith, Gordon S; Cooper, Richard S; Murthi, Sarah; Netzer, Giora

    2016-04-01

    A myriad of trauma indices has been validated to predict probability of trauma survival. We aimed to compare the performance of commonly used indices for the development of the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Historic, observational cohort study of 27,385 consecutive patients admitted to a statewide referral trauma center between July 11, 2003 and October 31, 2011. A validated algorithm was adapted to identify patients with ARDS. Each trauma index was evaluated in logistic regression using the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve. The case rate for ARDS development was 5.8% (1594). The receiver operating characteristics for injury severity score (ISS) had the best discrimination and had an area under the curve of 0.88 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.87-0.89). Glasgow coma score (0.71, 95% CI = 0.70-0.73), A Severity Characterization of Trauma (0.86, 95% CI = 0.85-0.87), Revised Trauma Score (0.71, 95% CI = 0.70-0.72) and thorax Abbreviated Injury Score (0.73, 95% CI = 0.72-0.74) performed worse (P < 0.001) and Trauma and Injury Severity Score (0.88, 95% CI = 0.87-0.88) performed equivocally (P = 0.51) in comparison to ISS. Using a cutoff point ISS ≥16, sensitivity and specificity were 84.9% (95% CI = 83.0%-86.6%) and 75.6% (95% CI = 75.1%-76.2%), respectively. Among commonly used trauma indices, ISS has superior or equivocal discriminative ability for development of ARDS. A cutoff point of ISS ≥16 provided good sensitivity and specificity. The use of ISS ≥16 is a simple method to evaluate ARDS in trauma epidemiology and outcomes research. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. [Blunt trauma with bullet-proof vests. Skin lesions are no reliable predictor of injury severity].

    PubMed

    Doll, D; Illert, B; Bohrer, S; Richter, C; Woelfl, C

    2009-04-01

    It is well known that so-called bullet-proof vests offer protection against a wide range of penetrating trauma, but their protection against blunt trauma is less well understood. Fast projectiles may result in hematomas and contusions behind the armour. We report a traffic accident involving a young soldier wearing a ballistic protection vest resulting in a right thoracoabdominal blunt trauma leading to a confined liver compression rupture. As nearly no skin marks were detectable, we point out that every emergency department surgeon should be very suspicious if a patient wore a ballistic vest at the time of the accident--there may be no skin marks despite severe intra-abdominal trauma. Our patient recovered following hypotensive ICU treatment, thrombocyte mobilization, and factor VIIa substitution.

  1. [Prognostic criteria of efficacy of programmed laparoscopic sanitation of the abdominal cavity in peritonitis].

    PubMed

    Salakhov, E K; Vlasov, A P; Bolotskyh, V A

    To define prognostic criteria of efficacy of programmed laparoscopic sanitation of the abdominal cavity in peritonitis. There were 32 patients after programmed laparoscopic sanitation of abdominal cavity for peritonitis due to different acute surgical diseases. Subsequently 12 of them required relaparotomy due to poor effectiveness of laparoscopic sanitation. Comprehensive clinical examination and laboratory assessment of some indexes of homeostasis and oxidative status were conducted. Prognostic clinical and laboratory criteria of efficacy of laparoscopic abdominal sanitation were suggested after analysis of intraoperative data during primary surgery and laboratory values in the 1st postoperative day. The offered prognostic criteria allow to define further management of peritonitis patients after primary laparotomy.

  2. Selective Nonoperative Management of Penetrating Abdominal Solid Organ Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Demetriades, Demetrios; Hadjizacharia, Pantelis; Constantinou, Costas; Brown, Carlos; Inaba, Kenji; Rhee, Peter; Salim, Ali

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To assess the feasibility and safety of selective nonoperative management in penetrating abdominal solid organ injuries. Background: Nonoperative management of blunt abdominal solid organ injuries has become the standard of care. However, routine surgical exploration remains the standard practice for all penetrating solid organ injuries. The present study examines the role of nonoperative management in selected patients with penetrating injuries to abdominal solid organs. Patients and Methods: Prospective, protocol-driven study, which included all penetrating abdominal solid organ (liver, spleen, kidney) injuries admitted to a level I trauma center, over a 20-month period. Patients with hemodynamic instability, peritonitis, or an unevaluable abdomen underwent an immediate laparotomy. Patients who were hemodynamically stable and had no signs of peritonitis were selected for further CT scan evaluation. In the absence of CT scan findings suggestive of hollow viscus injury, the patients were observed with serial clinical examinations, hemoglobin levels, and white cell counts. Patients with left thoracoabdominal injuries underwent elective laparoscopy to rule out diaphragmatic injury. Outcome parameters included survival, complications, need for delayed laparotomy in observed patients, and length of hospital stay. Results: During the study period, there were 152 patients with 185 penetrating solid organ injuries. Gunshot wounds accounted for 70.4% and stab wounds for 29.6% of injuries. Ninety-one patients (59.9%) met the criteria for immediate operation. The remaining 61 (40.1%) patients were selected for CT scan evaluation. Forty-three patients (28.3% of all patients) with 47 solid organ injuries who had no CT scan findings suspicious of hollow viscus injury were selected for clinical observation and additional laparoscopy in 2. Four patients with a “blush” on CT scan underwent angiographic embolization of the liver. Overall, 41 patients (27

  3. New technology in the management of liver trauma

    PubMed Central

    Chatoupis, Konstantinos; Papadopoulou, Glikeria; Kaskarelis, Ioannis

    2013-01-01

    The liver is the second most frequently injured solid organ in patients with blunt abdominal trauma. Hence the diagnosis and clinical assessment of hepatic trauma is of great importance because of the relationship of the liver to high morbidity and mortality. Multi detector-row computed tomography is the main diagnostic modality for the examination of hepatic parenchyma and other associated organ injuries, such as acute or delayed complications. Based on clinical and radiological findings, the majority of patients are managed conservatively, with the most important criterion of surgical therapy being hemodynamic instability. Radiologists must demonstrate a high knowledge of imaging recommendations and standardization of reporting to enable the selection of the appropriate treatment algorithm. Transcatheter embolization therapy is a method of great potential for the management of patients with traumatic hepatic injuries. PMID:24714662

  4. Abdominal pain in adult sickle cell disease patients: a nigerian experience.

    PubMed

    Akingbola, T S; Kolude, B; Aneni, E C; Raji, A A; Iwara, K U; Aken'Ova, Y A; Soyannwo, O A

    2011-12-01

    Abdominal pain is a relatively frequent occurrence in sickle cell disease. The aetiology of abdominal pain in sickle cell disease is often difficult to diagnose clinically. Despite the frequent occurrence, diagnostic dilemma, and the need for an accurate, early diagnosis, abdominal pain in sickle cell disease has not been rigorously studied. We therefore sought to describe the different presentations and patterns of abdominal pain in persons with sickle cell disease. A prospective case series of 20 patients was done in which data was collected on demographic characteristics, hemoglobin electrophoresis patterns, a description of the abdominal pain including sites, severity, and type of pain, packed cell volume and the provisional and final diagnosis. Haemoglobin S patients were 17 in number constituting eightyfive percent (85%) of our study population whilst the rest 3 were Hb S+C. Most patients (70%) had one site of abdominal pain. The pain was mainly colicky or tightening, moderate to severe in nature and, in some cases, associated with vomiting. We did not find any significant difference between the steady state PCV and the PCV during the acute abdominal pain episodes. The final diagnosis showed that only 38.8% of the patients had vasoocclusive crises and the reliability index between the provisional diagnosis and the final diagnosis was 67%. Abdominal pain in sickle cell disease may present in different ways and it is important to recognize that the possible diagnoses are numerous. Not all cases are due to vasoocclusive crises. Early diagnosis and prompt treatment can be life saving.

  5. Two similar cases of elderly women with moderate abdominal pain and pneumoperitoneum of unknown origin: a surgeon's successful conservative management.

    PubMed

    Vinzens, Fabrizio; Zumstein, Valentin; Bieg, Christian; Ackermann, Christoph

    2016-05-26

    Patients presenting with abdominal pain and pneumoperitoneum in radiological examination usually require emergency explorative laparoscopy or laparotomy. Pneumoperitoneum mostly associates with gastrointestinal perforation. There are very few cases where surgery can be avoided. We present 2 cases of pneumoperitoneum with unknown origin and successful conservative treatment. Both patients were elderly women presenting to our emergency unit, with moderate abdominal pain. There was neither medical intervention nor trauma in their medical history. Physical examination revealed mild abdominal tenderness, but no clinical sign of peritonitis. Cardiopulmonary examination remained unremarkable. Blood studies showed only slight abnormalities, in particular, inflammation parameters were not significantly increased. Finally, obtained CTs showed free abdominal gas of unknown origin in both cases. We performed conservative management with nil per os, nasogastric tube, total parenteral nutrition and prophylactic antibiotics. After 2 weeks, both were discharged home. 2016 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  6. Development of a murine model of blunt hepatic trauma.

    PubMed

    Nemzek-Hamlin, Jean A; Hwang, Haejin; Hampel, Joseph A; Yu, Bi; Raghavendran, Krishnan

    2013-10-01

    Despite the prevalence of blunt hepatic trauma in humans, there are few rodent models of blunt trauma that can be used to study the associated inflammatory responses. We present a mouse model of blunt hepatic trauma that was created by using a cortical contusion device. Male mice were anesthetized with ketamine-xylazine-buprenorphine and placed in left lateral recumbency. A position of 2 mm ventral to the posterior axillary line and 5 mm caudal to the costal margin on the right side was targeted for impact. An impact velocity of 6 m/s and a piston depth of 12 mm produced a consistent pattern of hepatic injury with low mortality. All mice that recovered from anesthesia survived without complication for the length of the study. Mice were euthanized at various time points (n = 5 per group) until 7 d after injury for gross examination and collection of blood and peritoneal lavage fluids. Some mice were reanesthetized for serial monitoring of hepatic lesions via MRI. At 2 h after trauma, mice consistently displayed laceration, hematoma, and discoloration of the right lateral and caudate liver lobes, with intraabdominal hemorrhage but no other gross injuries. Blood and peritoneal lavage fluid were collected from all mice for cytokine analysis. At 2 h after trauma, there were significant increases in plasma IL10 as well as peritoneal lavage fluid IL6 and CXCL1/KC; however, these levels decreased within 24 h. At 7 d after trauma, the mice had regained body weight, and the hepatic lesions, which initially had increased in size during the first 48 h, had returned to their original size. In summary, this technique produced a reliable, low mortality, murine model that recreates features of blunt abdominal liver injury in human subjects with similar acute inflammatory response.

  7. Management of blunt and penetrating biliary tract trauma.

    PubMed

    Thomson, Benjamin N J; Nardino, Benson; Gumm, Kellie; Robertson, Amanda J; Knowles, Brett P; Collier, Neil A; Judson, Rodney

    2012-06-01

    Penetrating or blunt injury to the biliary tree remains a rare complication of trauma occurring in 0.1% of trauma admissions. Because of the different presentations, sites of biliary tract injury, and associated organ injury, there are many possible management pathways to be considered. A retrospective analysis of prospectively gathered data was performed for all gallbladder and biliary tract injuries presenting to the trauma service or hepatobiliary unit of the Royal Melbourne Hospital between January 1, 1999, and March 30, 2011. There were 33 biliary injuries in 30 patients (0.1%) among 26,014 trauma admissions. Three of the 30 patients (10%) died. Of 10 gallbladder injuries, 8 were managed with cholecystectomy. There were 23 injuries to the biliary tree. Fourteen patients had injuries to the intrahepatic biliary tree of which seven involved segmental ducts. Of these, four segmental duct injuries required hepatic resection or debridement. Nine patients had injury to the extrahepatic biliary tree of which five required T-tube placement ± bilioenteric anastomosis and one a pancreaticoduodenectomy. Biliary injury is a rare but important consequence of abdominal trauma, and good outcomes are possible when a major trauma center and hepatopancreaticobiliary service coexist. Cholecystectomy remains the gold standard for gallbladder injury. Drainage with or without endoscopic stenting will resolve the majority of intrahepatic and partial biliary injuries. Hepaticojejunostomy remains the gold standard for complete extrahepatic biliary disruption. Hepatic and pancreatic resection are only required in the circumstances of unreconstructable biliary injury. Therapeutic study, level V. Copyright © 2012 by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

  8. Trauma-related Infections in Battlefield Casualties From Iraq

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Kyle; Riddle, Mark S.; Danko, Janine R.; Blazes, David L.; Hayden, Richard; Tasker, Sybil A.; Dunne, James R.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To describe risks for, and microbiology and antimicrobial resistance patterns of, war trauma associated infections from Operation Iraqi Freedom. Background: The invasion of Iraq resulted in casualties from high-velocity gunshot, shrapnel, and blunt trauma injuries as well as burns. Infectious complications of these unique war trauma injuries have not been described since the 1970s. Methods: Retrospective record review of all trauma casualties 5 to 65 years of age evacuated from the Iraqi theatre to U.S. Navy hospital ship, USNS Comfort March to May 2003.War trauma-associated infection was defined by positive culture from a wound or sterile body fluid (ie, blood, cerebrospinal fluid) and at least two of the following infection-associated signs/symptoms: fever, dehiscence, foul smell, peri-wound erythema, hypotension, and leukocytosis. A comparison of mechanisms of injury, demographics, and clinical variables was done using multivariate analysis. Results: Of 211 patients, 56 met criteria for infection. Infections were more common in blast injuries, soft tissue injuries, >3 wound sites, loss of limb, abdominal trauma, and higher Injury Severity Score (ISS). Wound infections accounted for 84% of cases, followed by bloodstream infections (38%). Infected were more likely to have had fever prior to arrival, and had higher probability of ICU admission and more surgical procedures. Acinetobacter species (36%) were the predominant organisms followed by Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas species (14% each). Conclusions: Similar to the Vietnam War experience, gram-negative rods, particularly Acinetobacter species, accounted for the majority of wound infections cared for on USNS Comfort during Operation Iraqi Freedom. Multidrug resistance was common, with the exception of the carbapenem class, limiting antibiotic therapy options. PMID:17457175

  9. Abdominal ultrasound and medical education.

    PubMed

    García de Casasola Sánchez, G; Torres Macho, J; Casas Rojo, J M; Cubo Romano, P; Antón Santos, J M; Villena Garrido, V; Diez Lobato, R

    2014-04-01

    Ultrasound is a very versatile diagnostic modality that permits real-time visualization of multiple internal organs. It is of invaluable help for the physical examination of the patients. To assess if ultrasound can be incorporated into medical education and if the students can perform a basic abdominal ultrasound examination without the necessity of a long period of training. Twelve medical students were trained in basic abdominal ultrasound during a 15-h training program including a 5-h theoretical and practical course and supervised practice in 20 selected patients. Subsequently, we conducted an evaluation test that assessed the ability of students to obtain the ultrasound views and to detect various pathologies in five different patients. The students were able to correctly identify the abdominal views more than 90% of the times. This percentage was only lower (80%) in the right subcostal view to locate the gallbladder. The accuracy or global efficiency of the ultrasound for the diagnosis of relevant pathological findings of the patients was greater than 90% (91.1% gallstones, abdominal aortic aneurysm 100%; splenomegaly 98.3%, ascites 100%; dilated inferior vena cava 100%; acute urinary retention 100%). The ultrasound may be a feasible learning tool in medical education. Ultrasound can help students to improve the physical examination. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  10. Abdominal pain - children under age 12

    MedlinePlus

    Stomach pain in children; Pain - abdomen - children; Abdominal cramps in children; Belly ache in children ... When your child complains of abdominal pain, see if they can describe it to you. Here are different kinds of pain: ...

  11. Trauma Films, Information Processing, and Intrusive Memory Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holmes, Emily A.; Brewin, Chris R.; Hennessy, Richard G.

    2004-01-01

    Three experiments indexed the effect of various concurrent tasks, while watching a traumatic film, on intrusive memory development. Hypotheses were based on the dual-representation theory of posttraumatic stress disorder (C. R. Brewin, T. Dalgleish, & S. Joseph, 1996). Nonclinical participants viewed a trauma film under various encoding conditions…

  12. Embolization of Isolated Lumbar Artery Injuries in Trauma Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Sofocleous, Constantinos T., E-mail: constant@pol.net; Hinrichs, Clay R.; Hubbi, Basil

    Purpose. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the angiographic findings and results of embolotherapy in the management of lumbar artery trauma. Methods. All patients with lumbar artery injury who underwent angiography and percutaneous embolization in a state trauma center within a 10-year period were retrospectively reviewed. Radiological information and procedural reports were reviewed to assess immediate angiographic findings and embolization results. Long-term clinical outcome was obtained by communication with the trauma physicians as well as with chart review. Results. In a 10-year period, 255 trauma patients underwent abdominal aortography. Eleven of these patients (three women and eight men)more » suffered a lumbar artery injury. Angiography demonstrated active extravasation (in nine) and/or pseudoaneurysm (in four). Successful selective embolization of abnormal vessel(s) was performed in all patients. Coils were used in six patients, particles in one and gelfoam in five patients. Complications included one retroperitoneal abscess, which was treated successfully. One patient returned for embolization of an adjacent lumbar artery due to late pseudoaneurysm formation. Conclusions. In hemodynamically stable patients, selective embolization is a safe and effective method for immediate control of active extravasation, as well as to prevent future hemorrhage from an injured lumbar artery.« less

  13. Management and treatment of splenic trauma in children.

    PubMed

    Arslan, Serkan; Guzel, Mahmut; Turan, Cuneyt; Doğanay, Selim; Kopru, Mehmet

    2015-01-01

    To assess types of splenic traumas, accompanying injuries, their management and results. We studied the reports of 90 patients (64 boys, 26 girls) who were treated for splenic injuries as a result of blunt abdominal trauma between 2005-2012. Age, sex, hospitalization time, mechanisms of traumas, accompanying injuries and management methods were recorded. Causes of trauma were falls from height (46 patients, 51%), pedestrian traffic accidents (17 patients, 19%), passenger traffic accidents (11 patients, 12%), bicycle accidents (10 patients, 11%) and falling objects from height (6 patients, 6.6%). Splenic injury alone was observed in 57 patients (63.3%) and other organ injuries together with splenic injury in 33 patients (36.7%). Splenectomy was performed in six patients (6.6%) due to hemodynamic instability and small intestine repair due to small intestine injury in one patient (1.1%). None of these patients died from their injuries. A large proportion of splenic injuries recover with conservative therapy. Some of the advantages of conservative therapy include short hospitalization time, less need for blood transfusion, and less morbidity and mortality. Falls from height and traffic accidents are important factors in etiology. The possibility of other organ injuries together with splenic injuries should be considered.

  14. Substance Abuse and Trauma.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Shannon; Suárez, Liza

    2016-10-01

    There is a strong, bidirectional link between substance abuse and traumatic experiences. Teens with cooccurring substance use disorders (SUDs) and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) have significant functional and psychosocial impairment. Common neurobiological foundations point to the reinforcing cycle of trauma symptoms, substance withdrawal, and substance use. Treatment of teens with these issues should include a systemic and integrated approach to both the SUD and the PTSD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Trauma, Disasters and Recovery

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-06-01

    the development of these studies and recognized their importance to both the military and civilian communities. In particular, we wish to thank Drs...and combat, are an expected part of life. Understanding individual, unit and community responses to traumas and disasters is critical to our developing ...ended questions and standardized psychosocial and psychiatric instruments to assess the amount of stress felt, support obtained and provided, symptoms

  16. Thromboembolic Complications Following Trauma

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-12-01

    subsequent neurologic deficit from these injuries approaches an inci- dence of 20 to 30 percent, the overall rate of stroke in the total trauma...investigating stroke and neurologic outcomes in blunt cerebrovascular injuries (BCVIs). In contrast, few reports of MI or mesenteric thrombosis in the...prohemostatic agents in uncontrolled studies of severely injured patients will only confuse rather than enlighten this area of research. No single paper has

  17. A modern combat trauma.

    PubMed

    Popivanov, Georgi; Mutafchiyski, V M; Belokonski, E I; Parashkevov, A B; Koutin, G L

    2014-03-01

    The world remains plagued by wars and terrorist attacks, and improvised explosive devices (IED) are the main weapons of our current enemies, causing almost two-thirds of all combat injuries. We wished to analyse the pattern of blast trauma on the modern battlefield and to compare it with combat gunshot injuries. Analysis of a consecutive series of combat trauma patients presenting to two Bulgarian combat surgical teams in Afghanistan over 11 months. Demographics, injury patterns and Injury Severity Scores (ISS) were compared between blast and gunshot-injured casualties using Fisher's Exact Test. The blast victims had significantly higher median ISS (20.54 vs 9.23) and higher proportion of ISS>16 (60% vs 33.92%, p=0.008) than gunshot cases. They also had more frequent involvement of three or more body regions (47.22% vs 3.58%, p<0.0001). A significantly higher frequency of head (27.27% vs 3.57%), facial (20% vs 0%) and extremities injuries (85.45% vs 42.86%) and burns (12.72% vs 0%) was noted among the victims of explosion (p<0.0001). Based on clinical examination and diagnostic imaging, primary blast injury was identified in 24/55 (43.6%), secondary blast injury in 37 blast cases (67.3%), tertiary in 15 (27.3%) and quaternary blast injury (all burns) in seven (12.72%). Our results corroborate the 'multidimensional' injury pattern of blast trauma. The complexity of the blast trauma demands a good knowledge and a special training of the military surgeons and hospital personnel before deployment.

  18. Recovery after abdominal wall reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Kristian Kiim

    2017-03-01

    Incisional hernia is a common long-term complication to abdominal surgery, occurring in more than 20% of all patients. Some of these hernias become giant and affect patients in several ways. This patient group often experiences pain, decreased perceived body image, and loss of physical function, which results in a need for surgical repair of the giant hernia, known as abdominal wall reconstruction. In the current thesis, patients with a giant hernia were examined to achieve a better understanding of their physical and psychological function before and after abdominal wall reconstruction. Study I was a systematic review of the existing standardized methods for assessing quality of life after incisional hernia repair. After a systematic search in the electronic databases Embase and PubMed, a total of 26 studies using standardized measures for assessment of quality of life after incisional hernia repair were found. The most commonly used questionnaire was the generic Short-Form 36, which assesses overall health-related quality of life, addressing both physical and mental health. The second-most common questionnaire was the Carolinas Comfort Scale, which is a disease specific questionnaire addressing pain, movement limitation and mesh sensation in relation to a current or previous hernia. In total, eight different questionnaires were used at varying time points in the 26 studies. In conclusion, standardization of timing and method of quality of life assessment after incisional hernia repair was lacking. Study II was a case-control study of the effects of an enhanced recovery after surgery pathway for patients undergoing abdominal wall reconstruction for a giant hernia. Sixteen consecutive patients were included prospectively after the implementation of a new enhanced recovery after surgery pathway at the Digestive Disease Center, Bispebjerg Hospital, and compared to a control group of 16 patients included retrospectively in the period immediately prior to the

  19. Rethinking historical trauma.

    PubMed

    Kirmayer, Laurence J; Gone, Joseph P; Moses, Joshua

    2014-06-01

    Recent years have seen the rise of historical trauma as a construct to describe the impact of colonization, cultural suppression, and historical oppression of Indigenous peoples in North America (e.g., Native Americans in the United States, Aboriginal peoples in Canada). The discourses of psychiatry and psychology contribute to the conflation of disparate forms of violence by emphasizing presumptively universal aspects of trauma response. Many proponents of this construct have made explicit analogies to the Holocaust as a way to understand the transgenerational effects of genocide. However, the social, cultural, and psychological contexts of the Holocaust and of post-colonial Indigenous "survivance" differ in many striking ways. Indeed, the comparison suggests that the persistent suffering of Indigenous peoples in the Americas reflects not so much past trauma as ongoing structural violence. The comparative study of genocide and other forms of massive, organized violence can do much to illuminate both common mechanisms and distinctive features, and trace the looping effects from political processes to individual experience and back again. The ethics and pragmatics of individual and collective healing, restitution, resilience, and recovery can be understood in terms of the self-vindicating loops between politics, structural violence, public discourse, and embodied experience. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  20. Use of a Novel Accounting and Grouping Method for Major Trunk Injury-Analysis of Data from a Statewide Trauma Financial Survey.

    PubMed

    Joubert, Kyla D; Mabry, Charles D; Kalkwarf, Kyle J; Betzold, Richard D; Spencer, Horace J; Spinks, Kara M; Porter, Austin; Karim, Saleema; Robertson, Ronald D; Sutherland, Michael J; Maxson, Robert T

    2016-09-01

    Major trunk trauma is common and costly, but comparisons of costs between trauma centers (TCs) are rare. Understanding cost is essential to improve quality, manage trauma service lines, and to facilitate institutional commitment for trauma. We have used results of a statewide trauma financial survey of Levels I to IV TC to develop a useful grouping method for costs and clinical characteristics of major trunk trauma. The trauma financial survey collected billing and clinical data on 75 per cent of the state trauma registry patients for fiscal year 2012. Cost was calculated by separately accounting for embedded costs of trauma response and verification, and then adjusting reasonable costs from the Medicare cost report for each TC. The cost-to-charge ratios were then recalculated and used to determine uniform cost estimates for each patient. From the 13,215 patients submitted for the survey, we selected 1,094 patients with major trunk trauma: lengths of stay ≥ 48 hours and a maximum injury of AIS ≥3 for either thorax or abdominal trauma. These patients were then divided into three Injury Severity Score (ISS) groups of 9 to 15, 16 to 24, or 25+ to stratify patients into similar injury groups for analysis of cost and cost drivers. For abdominal injury, average total cost for patients with ISS 9 to 15 was $17,429. Total cost and cost per day increased with severity of injury, with $51,585 being the total cost for those with ISS 25. Similar trends existed for thoracic injury. Use of the Medicare cost report and cost-to-charge ratios to compute uniform costs with an innovative grouping method applied to data collected across a statewide trauma system provides unique information regarding cost and outcomes, which affects quality improvement, trauma service line management, and decisions on TC participation.

  1. Abdominal cocoon secondary to disseminated tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Puppala, Radha; Sripathi, Smiti; Kadavigere, Rajagopal; Koteshwar, Prakashini; Singh, Jyoti

    2014-01-01

    Abdominal cocoon, also known as sclerosing encapsulating peritonitis, represents a rare entity where a variable length of the small bowel is enveloped by a fibrocollagenous membrane giving the appearance of a cocoon. It may be asymptomatic and is often diagnosed incidentally at laparotomy. We present a rare case of abdominal cocoon due to abdominal tuberculosis. PMID:25239980

  2. Abdominal cocoon secondary to disseminated tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Puppala, Radha; Sripathi, Smiti; Kadavigere, Rajagopal; Koteshwar, Prakashini; Singh, Jyoti

    2014-09-19

    Abdominal cocoon, also known as sclerosing encapsulating peritonitis, represents a rare entity where a variable length of the small bowel is enveloped by a fibrocollagenous membrane giving the appearance of a cocoon. It may be asymptomatic and is often diagnosed incidentally at laparotomy. We present a rare case of abdominal cocoon due to abdominal tuberculosis. 2014 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  3. False negative pericardial Focused Assessment with Sonography for Trauma examination following cardiac rupture from blunt thoracic trauma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Baker, Laura; Almadani, Ammar; Ball, Chad G

    2015-07-15

    The Focused Assessment with Sonography for Trauma examination is an invaluable tool in the initial assessment of any injured patient. Although highly sensitive and accurate for identifying hemoperitoneum, occasional false negative results do occur in select scenarios. We present a previously unreported case of survival following blunt cardiac rupture with associated negative pericardial window due to a concurrent pericardial wall laceration. A healthy 46-year-old white woman presented to our level 1 trauma center with hemodynamic instability following a motor vehicle collision. Although her abdominal Focused Assessment with Sonography for Trauma windows were positive for fluid, her pericardial window was negative. After immediate transfer to the operating room in the setting of persistent instability, a subsequent thoracotomy identified a blunt cardiac rupture that was draining into the ipsilateral pleural space via an adjacent tear in the pericardium. The cardiac injury was controlled with digital pressure, resuscitation completed, and then repaired using standard cardiorrhaphy techniques. Following repair of her injuries (left ventricle, left atrial appendage, and liver), her postoperative course was uneventful. Evaluation of the pericardial space using Focused Assessment with Sonography for Trauma is an important component in the initial assessment of the severely injured patient. Even in cases of blunt mechanisms however, clinicians must be wary of occasional false negative pericardial ultrasound evaluations secondary to a concomitant pericardial laceration and subsequent decompression of hemorrhage from the cardiac rupture into the ipsilateral pleural space.

  4. RUPTURE OF THE GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT—Dealing with Lesions Caused by Non-Penetrating Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Kirtland, Howard B.

    1953-01-01

    The possibility of rupture of the gastrointestinal tract should be considered in every case of abdominal trauma, and the patient should be carefully observed for a period of 12 to 48 hours. There are many factors that may confuse diagnosis, but in the presence of persistent pain and tenderness, persistent or recurring shock, fever, leukocytosis, roentgen demonstration of free intra-abdominal air, or of other signs of peritonitis, operation should be carried out. The mortality rate is much higher when definitive treatment is delayed more than 12 hours. PMID:13106729

  5. Trauma and PTSD Symptoms: Does Spiritual Struggle Mediate the Link?

    PubMed Central

    Wortmann, Jennifer H.; Park, Crystal L.; Edmondson, Donald

    2010-01-01

    Because exposure to potentially traumatic events is common (Kessler, Sonnega, Bromet, & Hughes, 1995), the mechanisms through which post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms develop is a critical area of investigation (Ozer, Best, Lipsey, & Weiss, 2003). Among the mechanisms that may predict PTSD symptoms is spiritual struggle, a set of negative religious cognitions related to understanding or responding to stressful events. Although prominent theories emphasize cognitive factors in the development and maintenance of PTSD symptoms, they have not explicitly addressed spiritual struggle. The present prospective study tested the role of spiritual struggle in the development and maintenance of PTSD symptoms following trauma. We assessed exposure to trauma and non-trauma events during the first year of college, spiritual struggle due to the most stressful event, and PTSD symptoms resulting from the index event. Spiritual struggle partially mediated the relationship between trauma and PTSD symptoms. Interestingly, some individual subscales of spiritual struggle (specifically, Punishing God Reappraisal, Reappraisal of God’s Powers, and Spiritual Discontent) partially mediated the relationship between trauma and PTSD symptoms; however, reappraisal of the event to evil forces did not relate to PTSD symptoms. These results suggest that spiritual struggle is an important cognitive mechanism for many trauma victims and may have relevance for cognitive therapy for PTSD. PMID:22308201

  6. Military-related trauma is associated with eating disorder symptoms in male veterans.

    PubMed

    Arditte Hall, Kimberly A; Bartlett, Brooke A; Iverson, Katherine M; Mitchell, Karen S

    2017-11-01

    Eating disorders are understudied among male veterans, who may be at increased risk due to the high rates of trauma exposure and experiences of multiple traumatization in this population. This study sought to examine the associations between specific types of trauma (i.e., childhood physical abuse, adult physical assault, childhood sexual abuse, adult sexual assault, and military-related trauma) and eating disorder symptoms in a large, nationally-representative sample of trauma-exposed male veterans. Survey data were collected from N = 642 male veterans. Traumatic experiences in childhood and adulthood were assessed using the Trauma History Screen and the National Stressful Events Survey. Eating disorder symptoms were assessed with the Eating Disorder Diagnostic Scale. Analyses also controlled for age and body mass index. Multiple traumatization was associated with increased eating disorder symptoms. However, military-related trauma was the only trauma type that was uniquely associated with eating disorder symptoms when controlling for other trauma types. Examination of different types of military-related trauma indicated that this association was not driven by exposure to combat. Noncombat, military-related trauma was associated with eating disorder symptom severity in male veterans. Results highlight the need for better assessment of eating disorder symptoms in this population. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Trauma surgeons practice what they preach: The NTDB story on solid organ injury management.

    PubMed

    Hurtuk, Michael; Reed, R Lawrence; Esposito, Thomas J; Davis, Kimberly A; Luchette, Fred A

    2006-08-01

    Recent studies advocate a nonoperative approach for hepatic and splenic trauma. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the literature has impacted surgical practice and, if so, whether or not the overall mortality of these injuries had changed. The American College of Surgeons' National Trauma Data Bank (NTDB 4.0) was analyzed using trauma admission dates ranging from 1994 to 2003. All hepatic and splenic injuries were identified by ICD-9 codes. As renal trauma management has not changed during the study period, renal injuries were included as a control. Nonoperative management (NOM) rates and overall mortality were determined for each organ. Proportions were compared using chi analysis with significance set at p < 0.05. There were 87,237 solid abdominal organ injuries reported and included: 35,767 splenic, 35,510 hepatic, 15,960 renal injuries. There was a significant (p < 0.00000000005) increase in percentage of NOM for hepatic and splenic trauma whereas renal NOM remained stable for the study period. Despite an increase in NOM for splenic and hepatic injuries, mortality has remained unchanged. This study demonstrates that the management of hepatic and splenic injuries has significantly changed in the past 10 years with no appreciable effect on mortality. NOM has become the standard of care for the management of hepatic and splenic trauma. The NTDB can be used to monitor changes in trauma care in response to new knowledge regarding improved outcomes.

  8. Mechanical Intestinal Obstruction in a Porcine Model: Effects of Intra-Abdominal Hypertension. A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Margallo, F. M.; Latorre, R.; López-Albors, O.; Wise, R.; Malbrain, M. L. N. G.; Castellanos, G.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Mechanical intestinal obstruction is a disorder associated with intra-abdominal hypertension and abdominal compartment syndrome. As the large intestine intraluminal and intra-abdominal pressures are increased, so the patient’s risk for intestinal ischaemia. Previous studies have focused on hypoperfusion and bacterial translocation without considering the concomitant effect of intra-abdominal hypertension. The objective of this study was to design and evaluate a mechanical intestinal obstruction model in pigs similar to the human pathophysiology. Materials and Methods Fifteen pigs were divided into three groups: a control group (n = 5) and two groups of 5 pigs with intra-abdominal hypertension induced by mechanical intestinal obstruction. The intra-abdominal pressures of 20 mmHg were maintained for 2 and 5 hours respectively. Hemodynamic, respiratory and gastric intramucosal pH values, as well as blood tests were recorded every 30 min. Results Significant differences between the control and mechanical intestinal obstruction groups were noted. The mean arterial pressure, cardiac index, dynamic pulmonary compliance and abdominal perfusion pressure decreased. The systemic vascular resistance index, central venous pressure, pulse pressure variation, airway resistance and lactate increased within 2 hours from starting intra-abdominal hypertension (p<0.05). In addition, we observed increased values for the peak and plateau airway pressures, and low values of gastric intramucosal pH in the mechanical intestinal obstruction groups that were significant after 3 hours. Conclusion The mechanical intestinal obstruction model appears to adequately simulate the pathophysiology of intestinal obstruction that occurs in humans. Monitoring abdominal perfusion pressure, dynamic pulmonary compliance, gastric intramucosal pH and lactate values may provide insight in predicting the effects on endorgan function in patients with mechanical intestinal obstruction. PMID

  9. Guidelines for the Management of a Pregnant Trauma Patient.

    PubMed

    Jain, Venu; Chari, Radha; Maslovitz, Sharon; Farine, Dan; Bujold, Emmanuel; Gagnon, Robert; Basso, Melanie; Bos, Hayley; Brown, Richard; Cooper, Stephanie; Gouin, Katy; McLeod, N Lynne; Menticoglou, Savas; Mundle, William; Pylypjuk, Christy; Roggensack, Anne; Sanderson, Frank

    2015-06-01

    -C) 2. A nasogastric tube should be inserted in a semiconscious or unconscious injured pregnant woman to prevent aspiration of acidic gastric content. (III-C) 3. Oxygen supplementation should be given to maintain maternal oxygen saturation > 95% to ensure adequate fetal oxygenation. (II-1B) 4. If needed, a thoracostomy tube should be inserted in an injured pregnant woman 1 or 2 intercostal spaces higher than usual. (III-C) 5. Two large bore (14 to 16 gauge) intravenous lines should be placed in a seriously injured pregnant woman. (III-C) 6. Because of their adverse effect on uteroplacental perfusion, vasopressors in pregnant women should be used only for intractable hypotension that is unresponsive to fluid resuscitation. (II-3B) 7. After mid-pregnancy, the gravid uterus should be moved off the inferior vena cava to increase venous return and cardiac output in the acutely injured pregnant woman. This may be achieved by manual displacement of the uterus or left lateral tilt. Care should be taken to secure the spinal cord when using left lateral tilt. (II-1B) 8. To avoid rhesus D (Rh) alloimmunization in Rh-negative mothers, O-negative blood should be transfused when needed until cross-matched blood becomes available. (I-A) 9. The abdominal portion of military anti-shock trousers should not be inflated on a pregnant woman because this may reduce placental perfusion. (II-3B) Transfer to health care facility 10. Transfer or transport to a maternity facility (triage of a labour and delivery unit) is advocated when injuries are neither life- nor limb-threatening and the fetus is viable (≥ 23 weeks), and to the emergency room when the fetus is under 23 weeks' gestational age or considered to be non-viable. When the injury is major, the patient should be transferred or transported to the trauma unit or emergency room, regardless of gestational age. (III-B) 11. When the severity of injury is undetermined or when the gestational age is uncertain, the patient should be evaluated

  10. Childhood trauma and compulsive buying.

    PubMed

    Sansone, Randy A; Chang, Joy; Jewell, Bryan; Rock, Rachel

    2013-02-01

    Childhood trauma has been empirically associated with various types of self-regulatory difficulties in adulthood. However, according to the extant literature, no study has examined relationships between various types of childhood trauma and compulsive buying behavior in adulthood. Using a self-report survey methodology in a cross-sectional consecutive sample of 370 obstetrics/gynecology patients, we examined five types of childhood trauma before the age of 12 years (i.e. witnessing violence, physical neglect, emotional abuse, physical abuse, sexual abuse) in relationship to compulsive buying as assessed by the Compulsive Buying Scale (CBS). All forms of trauma demonstrated statistically significant correlations with the CBS. Using a linear regression analysis, both witnessing violence and emotional abuse significantly contributed to CBS scores. Further analyses indicated that race did not moderate the relationship between childhood trauma and compulsive buying. Findings indicate that various forms of childhood trauma are correlated with compulsive buying behavior, particularly witnessing violence and emotional abuse.

  11. Emergency management of renal and genitourinary trauma: best practices update [digest].

    PubMed

    Bryant, Whitney K; Shewakramani, Sanjay; Zaurova, Milana

    2017-08-22

    In up to 10% of patients who experience abdominal trauma, renal and urogenital systems will be involved. In polytrauma patients with other potentially life-threatening injuries, renal and genitourinary trauma may be overlooked initially, but a delayed or missed diagnosis of these injuries may result in preventable complications. This review provides a best-practice approach to the diagnosis and management of renal and genitourinary injuries, with an emphasis on the systematic approach needed to identify subtle injuries and avoid long-term urinary sequelae such as hypertension, incontinence, erectile dysfunction, chronic kidney disease, and nephrectomy. [Points & Pearls is a digest of Emergency Medicine Practice.].

  12. Arnebia euchroma ointment can reduce abdominal fat thickness and abdominal circumference of overweight women: A randomized controlled study.

    PubMed

    Siavash, Mansour; Naseri, Mohsen; Rahimi, Mojgan

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is a worldwide health problem which is associated with a lot of complications. One of these comorbidities is the metabolic syndrome that is in correlation with abdominal fat thickness and waist circumference. Various methods were used to reduce abdominal fat thickness such as liposuction. A noninvasive method is the topical agent. In this study, we investigated the effectiveness of Arnebia euchroma (AE) ointment on the abdominal fat thickness. This study was a double-blind clinical trial which was done at the endocrinology clinic in Khorshid Hospital, Isfahan, Iran, in 2014. After explaining the procedure and obtaining informed consent, the candidates were randomly divided into the case and control groups. The participants of the case and control groups applied AE ointment or placebo for 6 weeks on their abdominal area. Body mass index, waist and buttock circumference, and abdominal fat thickness were measured in both case and control groups at their first visit and then at the next 2, 4, and 6 weeks. We used t -test for comparing parametric variables between groups, paired t -test for changes from baseline to final, and repeated measure ANOVA for changes at different steps. Sixty female candidates participated in this study (thirty in each group). Ten patients left the study and fifty participants finished the trial. At the end of the study, participants had a significant weight loss (2.96 ± 1.6 kg, P < 0.001) that was slightly more in the case group (3.15 ± 1.5 kg vs. 2.75 ± 1.7, P = 0.375). Abdominal circumference also decreased significantly in the participants (11.3 ± 6.7 cm, P < 0.001), but the changes were more significant in the case group (13.9 vs. 6.5 cm, P = 0.004). Similarly, abdominal fat thickness decreased significantly in the participants (2.3 ± 1.1 cm, P < 0.001), although changes were not significantly different between two groups (2.53 vs. 2.04 cm, P = 0.139). Topical AE ointment can reduce the abdominal fat thickness as well as the

  13. Abdominal compartment syndrome related to noninvasive ventilation.

    PubMed

    De Keulenaer, Bart L; De Backer, Adelard; Schepens, Dirk R; Daelemans, Ronny; Wilmer, Alexander; Malbrain, Manu L N G

    2003-07-01

    To study the effects of noninvasive positive pressure ventilation (NIPPV) on intra-abdominal pressure. Single case report from a tertiary teaching hospital. A 65-year-old man who experienced a sudden respiratory and cardiovascular collapse during NIPPV. This was caused by gastric overdistension due to aerophagia followed by raised intra-abdominal pressure leading to intra-abdominal hypertension and abdominal compartment syndrome. The respiratory and cardiovascular problems resolved immediately after the introduction of a nasogastric tube. This resulted in normalization of IAP. This is the first case reported of an abdominal compartment syndrome related to NIPPV. Clinicians should be aware of this possible complication while using NIPPV.

  14. Trauma and the endocrine system.

    PubMed

    Mesquita, Joana; Varela, Ana; Medina, José Luís

    2010-12-01

    The endocrine system may be the target of different types of trauma with varied consequences. The present article discusses trauma of the hypothalamic-pituitary axes, adrenal glands, gonads, and pancreas. In addition to changes in circulating hormone levels due to direct injury to these structures, there may be an endocrine response in the context of the stress caused by the trauma. Copyright © 2010 SEEN. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  15. Trauma related to falls from trees treated in a specialized trauma centre in Burkina-Faso-one hundred and six cases treated in one year.

    PubMed

    Dakouré, Patrick W H; Diallo, Malick; Traoré, André-Charles V; Gandéma, Salifou; Barro, Sie Drissa; Traoré, Ibrahim Alain; Zaré, Cyprien

    2015-12-01

    Falls from trees related traumas are rarely reported in literature. They are public health problems in developing countries where their frequency is still important. The aim of the study is to describe falls from trees related trauma patterns and to present preventative measures. An annual ongoing prospective study was held in our trauma emergency department (ED) about all the patients who sustained an injury after a recent fall from tree. A questionnaire related to the patient and to the trauma was established. The data were encoded and analysed by a statistical software. One hundred six patients who sustained a fall from tree trauma, out of a total of 139, were studied. Most patients were under 15 years old (76.4 %); they were injured in fruits season (33 %) after a fall from a fruit tree (mango trees, Shea trees, Néré, etc.) and were received late (86 %). Injuries were polymorphic from traumatic brain injuries (51.8 %) and spine injuries (13.2 %) to thoraco-abdominal (21.6 %) and limbs injuries (46.2 %). Three housewives were pregnant at the time of the trauma with secondary abortions. Patients were managed medically (33.9 %), surgically (19.8 %) or by casting (34.9 %) with good outcome in 59 cases. Twelve patients refused medical care and two died. Education programs must focus on picking fruits and leaves in order to make them safe and prevent injuries related to these traditional or professional activities.

  16. The value of trauma registries.

    PubMed

    Moore, Lynne; Clark, David E

    2008-06-01

    Trauma registries are databases that document acute care delivered to patients hospitalised with injuries. They are designed to provide information that can be used to improve the efficiency and quality of trauma care. Indeed, the combination of trauma registry data at regional or national levels can produce very large databases that allow unprecedented opportunities for the evaluation of patient outcomes and inter-hospital comparisons. However, the creation and upkeep of trauma registries requires a substantial investment of money, time and effort, data quality is an important challenge and aggregated trauma data sets rarely represent a population-based sample of trauma. In addition, trauma hospitalisations are already routinely documented in administrative hospital discharge databases. The present review aims to provide evidence that trauma registry data can be used to improve the care dispensed to victims of injury in ways that could not be achieved with information from administrative databases alone. In addition, we will define the structure and purpose of contemporary trauma registries, acknowledge their limitations, and discuss possible ways to make them more useful.

  17. Abdominal obesity and mortality risk among men in nineteenth-century North America.

    PubMed

    Kahn, H S; Williamson, D F

    1994-10-01

    The health consequences of an adverse body-fat distribution (e.g., android, upper-body, visceral) have only recently concerned the medical community. Ninety years ago, however, actuarial study demonstrated the relationship of body-fat distribution to the mortality experience of insured, North American men. Thirty-four insurance companies pooled their data on males issued life policies between 1870 and 1899. Special classes of risk were defined by weight for height at baseline or by the observation that abdominal girth exceeded the girth of the expanded chest (abdominal obesity). The mortality experience of each risk class was compared to an age-stratified, actuarial table of the period. We present new analyses of these historical data relating specifically to the mortality impact of abdominal obesity. Among 163,567 overweight men, the prevalence of abdominal obesity increased with age and with degree of overweight. Among moderately overweight men, those with abdominal obesity experienced 133% of the expected mortality rate compared to 112% of the expected mortality for those who were not abdominally obese. Severely overweight men with abdominal obesity experienced 152% of the expected mortality compared to 135% of the expected mortality for severely overweight men who were not abdominally obese. We believe this nineteenth-century, acturial study of waist and chest girths was the first demonstration that body-fat distribution can influence longevity. These early actuarial findings, taken with more recent reports, establish that abdominal enlargement, but not necessarily an 'upper-body' fat distribution, constitutes a major health hazard. Future research must establish which abdominal-obesity index best predicts disease outcomes.

  18. Biomechanics of penetrating trauma.

    PubMed

    Yoganandan, N; Pintar, F A

    1997-01-01

    It is well known that injuries and deaths due to penetrating projectiles have become a national and an international epidemic in Western society. The application of biomedical engineering to solve day-to-day problems has produced considerable advances in safety and mitigation/prevention of trauma. The study of penetrating trauma has been largely in the military domain where war-time specific applications were advanced with the use of high-velocity weapons. With the velocity and weapon caliber in the civilian population at half or less compared with the military counterpart, wound ballistics is a largely different problem in today's trauma centers. The principal goal of the study of penetrating injuries in the civilian population is secondary prevention and optimized emergency care after occurrence. A thorough understanding of the dynamic biomechanics of penetrating injuries quantifies missile type, caliber, and velocity to hard and soft tissue damage. Such information leads to a comprehensive assessment of the acute and long-term treatment of patients with penetrating injuries. A review of the relevant military research applied to the civilian domain and presentation of new technology in the biomechanical study of these injuries offer foundation to this field. Relevant issues addressed in this review article include introduction of the military literature, the need for secondary prevention, environmental factors including projectile velocity and design, experimental studies with biological tissues and physical models, and mathematical simulations and analyses. Areas of advancement are identified that enables the pursuit of biomechanics research in order to arrive at better secondary prevention strategies.

  19. Trauma-Focused CBT for Youth with Complex Trauma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Judith A.; Mannarino, Anthony P.; Kliethermes, Matthew; Murray, Laura A.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Many youth develop complex trauma, which includes regulation problems in the domains of affect, attachment, behavior, biology, cognition, and perception. Therapists often request strategies for using evidence-based treatments (EBTs) for this population. This article describes practical strategies for applying Trauma-Focused Cognitive…

  20. Trauma-focused CBT for youth with complex trauma

    PubMed Central

    Mannarino, Anthony P.; Kliethermes, Matthew; Murray, Laura A.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Many youth develop complex trauma, which includes regulation problems in the domains of affect, attachment, behavior, biology, cognition, and perception. Therapists often request strategies for using evidence-based treatments (EBTs) for this population. This article describes practical strategies for applying Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (TF-CBT) for youth with complex trauma. Methods TF-CBT treatment phases are described and modifications of timing, proportionality and application are described for youth with complex trauma. Practical applications include a) dedicating proportionally more of the model to the TF-CBT coping skills phase; b) implementing the TF-CBT Safety component early and often as needed throughout treatment; c) titrating gradual exposure more slowly as needed by individual youth; d) incorporating unifying trauma themes throughout treatment; and e) when indicated, extending the TF-CBT treatment consolidation and closure phase to include traumatic grief components and to generalize ongoing safety and trust. Results Recent data from youth with complex trauma support the use of the above TF-CBT strategies to successfully treat these youth. Conclusions The above practical strategies can be incorporated into TF-CBT to effectively treat youth with complex trauma. Practice implications Practical strategies include providing a longer coping skills phase which incorporates safety and appropriate gradual exposure; including relevant unifying themes; and allowing for an adequate treatment closure phase to enhance ongoing trust and safety. Through these strategies therapists can successfully apply TF-CBT for youth with complex trauma. PMID:22749612

  1. Rural Trauma: Is Trauma Designation Associated with Better Hospital Outcomes?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowman, Stephen M.; Zimmerman, Frederick J.; Sharar, Sam R.; Baker, Margaret W.; Martin, Diane P.

    2008-01-01

    Context: While trauma designation has been associated with lower risk of death in large urban settings, relatively little attention has been given to this issue in small rural hospitals. Purpose: To examine factors related to in-hospital mortality and delayed transfer in small rural hospitals with and without trauma designation. Methods: Analysis…

  2. Acute brain trauma

    PubMed Central

    Martin, GT

    2016-01-01

    In the 20th century, the complications of head injuries were controlled but not eliminated. The wars of the 21st century turned attention to blast, the instant of impact and the primary injury of concussion. Computer calculations have established that in the first 5 milliseconds after the impact, four independent injuries on the brain are inflicted: 1) impact and its shockwave, 2) deceleration, 3) rotation and 4) skull deformity with vibration (or resonance). The recovery, pathology and symptoms after acute brain trauma have always been something of a puzzle. The variability of these four modes of injury, along with a variable reserve of neurones, explains some of this problem. PMID:26688392

  3. Pathophysiology of chest trauma.

    PubMed

    Calhoon, J H; Trinkle, J K

    1997-05-01

    Recent information indicates that there is a complex cellular and molecular generic response to injury that can lead to multi-organ failure. For many years, basic physiology and biochemistry were considered to be the systemic mechanisms to injury, but now it is known that subcellular and molecular events are the keys to unlocking the secrets of the body's response to trauma. The interaction of the endothelial cell with neutrophils and platelets to produce cytokines, free radicals, and upregulating adhesion molecules is especially significant.

  4. Postoperative Development of Abdominal Compartment Syndrome among Patients Undergoing Endovascular Aortic Repair for Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Elizabeth; Manzur, Miguel; Han, Sukgu; Ham, Sung Wan; Weaver, Fred A; Rowe, Vincent L

    2018-05-01

    Abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) has a reported incidence of 9%-14% among trauma patients. However, in patients with similar hemodynamic changes, the incidence of ACS remains unclear. Our aim was to determine the incidence of ACS among patients undergoing endovascular aortic repair (EVAR) for ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms (rAAAs) and to identify associated risk factors. A retrospective review was performed for consecutive patients who underwent EVAR for rAAA from March 2010 to November 2016 at our institution. The development of ACS was diagnosed based on a variety of factors, including bladder pressure, laboratory abnormalities, hemodynamic monitoring, and clinical evaluation. Previously validated risk factors for ACS development in trauma and EVAR patients (preoperative hypotension, aggressive fluid resuscitation, postoperative anemia, use of an aorto-uniiliac graft, and placement of an aortic occlusive balloon) were analyzed. Association between patient characteristics and ACS development was analyzed using the Fisher's exact test. During the study period, 25 patients had image-confirmed rAAA and underwent emergent EVAR. Mortality rate was 28% (n = 7), and ACS incidence was 12% (n = 3). Of the analyzed risk factors, hypotension on arrival (P = 0.037), transfusion of 3 or more units of packed red blood cells (P = 0.037), and postoperative anemia (P = 0.02) were all significantly associated with postoperative ACS development. In addition, having greater than 3 of the studied risk factors was associated with increased odds of developing ACS (P = 0.015), and having greater than 4 of the studied risk factors showed the strongest association with ACS development (P = 0.0017). Overresuscitation should be avoided in patients with rAAA. In addition, patients who present with multiple risk factors for ACS should be monitored very closely with serial bladder pressures and may require decompression laparotomy immediately after EVAR. Copyright © 2018

  5. Profile of thoracic trauma victims submitted to chest drainage.

    PubMed

    Broska, Cesar Augusto; Botelho, Adriane Barbosa; Linhares, André DE Castro; DE-Oliveria, Mariana Santos; Veronese, Gabriela; Naufel, Carlos Roberto; Batista, Lislaine Cruz; Diogo, Maria Angélica Kurpel

    2017-01-01

    to describe and compare the variables involved in trauma victims undergoing thoracic drainage. we conducted a retrospective, analytical, descriptive, cross-sectional study, with medical records of patients attended at the Trauma Service of the Curitiba Evangelical University Hospital between February 2011 and January 2014. there were 488 patients undergoing chest drainage, 84.7% men and 15.3% women, with an average age of 38.2 years. Attendances usually occurred at night, without predominance between open or closed mechanism, gender or age group. The majority of patients with thoracic trauma requiring drainage were diagnosed by anamnesis and physical examination (41.1%) and drained in the emergency room (80.8%). Most of the patients (66.2%) had another associated lesion, mostly some abdominal viscera. Complications were present in 16.6% (81 patients), most of them due to drainage positioning error (9.2%). The mean hospital stay was 15 days and drainage lasted for an average of 8.1 days, with no statistical difference between open and closed trauma. The clinical outcome was discharge in most cases. the profile of patients with thoracic trauma is that of young men, attended at night, with some other associated lesion. Although diagnosis and treatment were rapid and most often without the need for complex examinations, the time of drainage, hospitalization and complications were higher than in the literature, which can be explained by the drainage being made at the Emergency Room and the presence of associated injuries. descrever e comparar as variáveis envolvidas nos pacientes vítimas de trauma torácico submetidos à drenagem de tórax. estudo transversal descritivo analítico retrospectivo realizado com prontuários de pacientes atendidos no Serviço de Trauma do Hospital Universitário Evangélico de Curitiba entre fevereiro de 2011 e janeiro de 2014. neste período foram atendidos 488 pacientes, 84,7% homens e 15,3% mulheres, com média de idade de 38,2 anos

  6. Mountain biking injuries requiring trauma center admission: a 10-year regional trauma system experience.

    PubMed

    Kim, Peter T W; Jangra, Dalbhir; Ritchie, Alec H; Lower, Mary Ellen; Kasic, Sharon; Brown, D Ross; Baldwin, Greg A; Simons, Richard K

    2006-02-01

    Mountain biking has become an increasingly popular recreational and competitive sport with increasingly recognized risks. The purpose of this study was to review a population based approach to serious injuries requiring trauma center admission related to mountain biking, identify trends and develop directions for related injury prevention programs. Three trauma centers in the Greater Vancouver area exclusively serve a major mountain bike park and the North Shore Mountains biking trails. The Trauma Registries and the patient charts were reviewed for mountain bike injuries from 1992 to 2002. The data were analyzed according to demographics, distribution, and severity of injuries, and need for operative intervention. Findings were reviewed with injury prevention experts and regional and national mountain-biking stakeholders to provide direction to injury prevention programs. A total of 1,037 patients were identified as having bicycling-related injuries. Of these, 399 patients sustained 1,092 injuries while mountain biking. There was a threefold increase in the incidence of mountain biking injuries over a 10-year period. Young males were most commonly affected. Orthopedic injuries were most common (46.5%) followed by head (12.2%), spine (12%), chest (10.3%), facial (10.2%), abdominal (5.4%), genitourinary (2.2%), and neck injuries (1%). High operative rate was observed: 38% of injuries and 66% of patients required surgery. One patient died from his injuries. Injury prevention programs were developed and successfully engaged the target population. Mountain biking is a growing cause of serious injuries. Young males are principally at risk and serious injuries result from intended activity and despite protective equipment. Injury prevention programs were developed to address these concerns.

  7. Association of Changes in Abdominal Fat and Cardiovascular Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jane J.; Pedley, Alison; Hoffmann, Udo; Massaro, Joseph M.; Fox, Caroline S.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND Subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) and visceral adipose tissue (VAT) are associated with adverse cardiometabolic risk profiles. OBJECTIVES This study explored the degree to which changes in abdominal fat quantity and quality are associated with changes in cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors. METHODS Study participants (n = 1,106; 44.1% women; mean baseline age 45.1 years) were drawn from the Framingham Heart Study Third Generation cohort who participated in the computed tomography (CT) substudy Exams 1 and 2. Participants were followed for 6.1 years on average. Abdominal adipose tissue volume in cm3 and attenuation in Hounsfield units (HU) were determined by CT-acquired abdominal scans. RESULTS The mean fat volume change was an increase of 602 cm3 for SAT and an increase of 703 cm3 for VAT; the mean fat attenuation change was a decrease of 5.5HU for SAT and an increase of 0.07 HU for VAT. An increase in fat volume and decrease in fat attenuation were associated with adverse changes in CVD risk factors. An additional 500 cm3 increase in fat volume was associated with incident hypertension (odds ratio [OR]: 1.21 for SAT; OR: 1.30 for VAT), hypertriglyceridemia (OR: 1.15 for SAT; OR: 1.56 for VAT), and metabolic syndrome (OR: 1.43 for SAT; OR: 1.82 for VAT; all p < 0.05). Similar trends were observed for each additional 5 HU decrease in abdominal adipose tissue attenuation. Most associations remained significant even after further accounting for body mass index change, waist circumference change, or respective abdominal adipose tissue volumes. CONCLUSIONS Increasing accumulation of fat quantity and decreasing fat attenuation are associated with worsening of CVD risk factors beyond the associations with generalized adiposity, central adiposity, or respective adipose tissue volumes. PMID:27687192

  8. Mortality outcomes of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms and rural presentation.

    PubMed

    Munday, Emily; Walker, Stuart

    2016-10-01

    Centralisation of vascular surgery services has coincided with a move towards endovascular repair of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms with the goal to improve patient outcomes. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of rural presentation and transfer times on survival from ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm. A retrospective review. All patients presenting with ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm to public hospitals in Tasmania between July 2006 and April 2013. Demographic data, Glasgow aneurysm score, Hardman index, transfer times, operative technique and 30-day mortality were collected from medical records. Over the study period 127 patients presented to public hospitals in Tasmania with ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm. A total of 27 presented to north west hospitals where no vascular surgery service is provided (NWRH), 23 to a northern hospital where an intermittent vascular surgery service is provided (LGH) and 77 to the state tertiary vascular surgery service (RHH). Of these, 4 (14.8%) died at NWRH, 6 (26.1%) died at LGH and 43 (55.8%) died at RHH without operation. Of the 35 patients transferred from NWRH and LGH to RHH, 5 died without operation. Median time from presentation to theatre at RHH if transferred from NWRH was 6.25 hours, from the LGH 4.75 hours, compared to 2.75 hours when presenting directly to RHH. Open repair was performed in 41 patients and endovascular repair in 23 patients. Overall 30-day mortality in those treated at RHH was 26.6% (39.0% for open repair, 4.3% for endovascular repair). Mortality for intended operative patients initially presenting to non-RHH hospitals was 33.3% vs. 32.3% for those initially presenting to RHH. p Value 0.93. There was no clinical or statistical disadvantage to rural presentation and transfer for patients presenting with ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm in Tasmania. Endovascular repair has a role despite long transfer times. © The Author(s) 2015.

  9. Abdominal Pain, the Adolescent and Altered Brain Structure and Function

    PubMed Central

    Becerra, Lino; Heinz, Nicole; Ludwick, Allison; Rasooly, Tali; Wu, Rina; Johnson, Adriana; Schechter, Neil L.; Borsook, David; Nurko, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a functional gastrointestinal (GI) disorder of unknown etiology. Although relatively common in children, how this condition affects brain structure and function in a pediatric population remains unclear. Here, we investigate brain changes in adolescents with IBS and healthy controls. Imaging was performed with a Siemens 3 Tesla Trio Tim MRI scanner equipped with a 32-channel head coil. A high-resolution T1-weighted anatomical scan was acquired followed by a T2-weighted functional scan. We used a surface-based morphometric approach along with a seed-based resting-state functional connectivity (RS-FC) analysis to determine if groups differed in cortical thickness and whether areas showing structural differences also showed abnormal RS-FC patterns. Patients completed the Abdominal Pain Index and the GI Module of the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory to assess abdominal pain severity and impact of GI symptoms on health-related quality of life (HRQOL). Disease duration and pain intensity were also assessed. Pediatric IBS patients, relative to controls, showed cortical thickening in the posterior cingulate (PCC), whereas cortical thinning in posterior parietal and prefrontal areas were found, including the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). In patients, abdominal pain severity was related to cortical thickening in the intra-abdominal area of the primary somatosensory cortex (SI), whereas HRQOL was associated with insular cortical thinning. Disease severity measures correlated with cortical thickness in bilateral DLPFC and orbitofrontal cortex. Patients also showed reduced anti-correlations between PCC and DLPFC compared to controls, a finding that may reflect aberrant connectivity between default mode and cognitive control networks. We are the first to demonstrate concomitant structural and functional brain changes associated with abdominal pain severity, HRQOL related to GI-specific symptoms, and disease-specific measures in

  10. Abdominal Pain, the Adolescent and Altered Brain Structure and Function.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, Catherine S; Becerra, Lino; Heinz, Nicole; Ludwick, Allison; Rasooly, Tali; Wu, Rina; Johnson, Adriana; Schechter, Neil L; Borsook, David; Nurko, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a functional gastrointestinal (GI) disorder of unknown etiology. Although relatively common in children, how this condition affects brain structure and function in a pediatric population remains unclear. Here, we investigate brain changes in adolescents with IBS and healthy controls. Imaging was performed with a Siemens 3 Tesla Trio Tim MRI scanner equipped with a 32-channel head coil. A high-resolution T1-weighted anatomical scan was acquired followed by a T2-weighted functional scan. We used a surface-based morphometric approach along with a seed-based resting-state functional connectivity (RS-FC) analysis to determine if groups differed in cortical thickness and whether areas showing structural differences also showed abnormal RS-FC patterns. Patients completed the Abdominal Pain Index and the GI Module of the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory to assess abdominal pain severity and impact of GI symptoms on health-related quality of life (HRQOL). Disease duration and pain intensity were also assessed. Pediatric IBS patients, relative to controls, showed cortical thickening in the posterior cingulate (PCC), whereas cortical thinning in posterior parietal and prefrontal areas were found, including the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). In patients, abdominal pain severity was related to cortical thickening in the intra-abdominal area of the primary somatosensory cortex (SI), whereas HRQOL was associated with insular cortical thinning. Disease severity measures correlated with cortical thickness in bilateral DLPFC and orbitofrontal cortex. Patients also showed reduced anti-correlations between PCC and DLPFC compared to controls, a finding that may reflect aberrant connectivity between default mode and cognitive control networks. We are the first to demonstrate concomitant structural and functional brain changes associated with abdominal pain severity, HRQOL related to GI-specific symptoms, and disease-specific measures in

  11. Effect of abdominal insufflation for laparoscopy on intracranial pressure.

    PubMed

    Kamine, Tovy Haber; Papavassiliou, Efstathios; Schneider, Benjamin E

    2014-04-01

    Increased abdominal pressure may have a negative effect on intracranial pressure (ICP). Human data on the effects of laparoscopy on ICP are lacking. We retrospectively reviewed laparoscopic operations for ventriculoperitoneal shunt placement to determine the effect of insufflation on ICP. Nine patients underwent insufflation with carbon dioxide (CO(2)) at pressures ranging from 8 to 15 mm Hg and ICP measured through a ventricular catheter. We used a paired t test to compare ICP with insufflation and desufflation. Linear regression correlated insufflation pressure with ICP. The mean ICP increase with 15-mm Hg insufflation is 7.2 (95% CI, 5.4-9.1 [P < .001]) cm H(2)O. The increase in ICP correlated with increasing insufflation pressure (P = .04). Maximum ICP recorded was 25 cm H(2)O. Intracranial pressure significantly increases with abdominal insufflation and correlates with laparoscopic insufflation pressure. The maximum ICP measured was a potentially dangerous 25 cm H(2)O. Laparoscopy should be used cautiously in patients with a baseline elevated ICP or head trauma.

  12. The influence of the risk factor on the abdominal complications in colon injury management.

    PubMed

    Torba, M; Gjata, A; Buci, S; Bushi, G; Zenelaj, A; Kajo, I; Koceku, S; Kagjini, K; Subashi, K

    2015-01-01

    The management of colon injuries has distinctly evolved over the last three decades. However, trauma surgeons often find themselves in a dilemma, whether to perform a diversion or to perform a primary repair. The purpose of this study is to evaluate risk factors in colon injury management and their influence on abdominal complications. This is a prospective study conducted at a national level I trauma center in Tirana, Albania from January 2009 to December 2012. The data with respect to demographics, physiological risk factors, intraoperative findings, and surgical procedures were collected. Colonic injury-related morbidity and mortality were analyzed. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed by assessing the influence of risk factors on abdominal complications. Of the 157 patients treated with colon injury, was performed a primary repair in 107 (68.15%) of the patients and a diversion in the remaining 50 (31.85%). The mean PATI was 18.6, while 37 (23.6%) of patients had PATI greater than 25. The complications and their frequencies according to the surgical technique used (primay repair vs diversion respectively) includes: wound infections (9.3% vs 50%), anastomotic leak (1.8% vs 8.7%), and intra-abdominal abscess (1.8% vs 6.5%). The multivariate analysis identified two independent risk factors for abdominal complications: transfusions of 4 units of blood within the first 24 hours (OR = 1.2 95% CI (1.03 - 1.57) p =0.02), and diversion (OR = 9.6, 95% CI 4.4 - 21.3, p<0.001). Blood transfusions of more than 4 units within the first 24 hours and diversion during the management of destructive colon injuries are both independent risk factors for abdominal complications. The socioeconomic impact and the need for a subsequent operation in colostomy patients are strong reasons to consider primary repair in the management of colon injuries.

  13. The influence of the risk factor on the abdominal complications in colon injury management

    PubMed Central

    TORBA, M.; GJATA, A.; BUCI, S.; BUSHI, G.; ZENELAJ, A.; KAJO, I.; KOCEKU, S.; KAGJINI, K.; SUBASHI, K.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The management of colon injuries has distinctly evolved over the last three decades. However, trauma surgeons often find themselves in a dilemma, whether to perform a diversion or to perform a primary repair. The purpose of this study is to evaluate risk factors in colon injury management and their influence on abdominal complications. Patients and methods This is a prospective study conducted at a national level I trauma center in Tirana, Albania from January 2009 to December 2012. The data with respect to demographics, physiological risk factors, intraoperative findings, and surgical procedures were collected. Colonic injury-related morbidity and mortality were analyzed. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed by assessing the influence of risk factors on abdominal complications. Results Of the 157 patients treated with colon injury, was performed a primary repair in 107 (68.15%) of the patients and a diversion in the remaining 50 (31.85%). The mean PATI was 18.6, while 37 (23.6%) of patients had PATI greater than 25. The complications and their frequencies according to the surgical technique used (primay repair vs diversion respectively) includes: wound infections (9.3% vs 50%), anastomotic leak (1.8% vs 8.7%), and intra-abdominal abscess (1.8% vs 6.5%). The multivariate analysis identified two independent risk factors for abdominal complications: transfusions of 4 units of blood within the first 24 hours (OR = 1.2 95% CI (1.03 –1.57) p =0.02), and diversion (OR = 9.6, 95% CI 4.4 – 21.3, p<0.001). Conclusion Blood transfusions of more than 4 units within the first 24 hours and diversion during the management of destructive colon injuries are both independent risk factors for abdominal complications. The socioeconomic impact and the need for a subsequent operation in colostomy patients are strong reasons to consider primary repair in the management of colon injuries. PMID:26017103

  14. Family Presence during Resuscitation after Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Leske, Jane S.; McAndrew, Natalie S.; Brasel, Karen J.; Feetham, Suzanne

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The primary aim was to examine the effects of family presence during resuscitation (FPDR) in patients who survived trauma from motor vehicle crashes (MVC) and gunshot wounds (GSW) in the emergency department. Background The ongoing controversy of FPDR, dearth of comparative designs, small sample sizes, and survey methods makes it difficult to come to a definitive conclusion about any benefits of FPDR. Methods The Resiliency Model guided the selection of variables. A multivariate, comparison, prospective design was used. A convenience sample of family members participated within three days of admission to critical care. Family strengths were measured by the Family Crisis Oriented Personal Scale, Family Inventory of Resources for Management, and Family Problem Solving Communication Index. Family outcomes were measured by the State anxiety portion of the State Trait Anxiety Inventory, Acute Stress Disorder Scale, Family Member Well-being Index, and Family Satisfaction in the Intensive Care Unit Scale. Results Family members of 140 trauma patients (MVC n=110; 79%; GSW n=30, 21%) participated. Family members ranged in age from 20–84 years (M=46, SD=15, Mdn=47). The majority were female (n=112, 80%) and related to the patient as spouse (n=46, 33%). Participating in the FPDR option reduced anxiety (t= −2.43, p=.04), reduced stress (t= −2.86, p=.005), and fostered well-being (t=3.46, p=.001) but was not significant for satisfaction with critical care (t= −.28, p=.78). Discussion Results demonstrate the positive initial effects of FPDR on family members of patients surviving trauma injury. Long term effects of FPDR remain unknown. PMID:28272181

  15. [Positive effects of physical exercise on reducing the relationship between subcutaneous abdominal fat and morbility risk].

    PubMed

    González Calvo, G; Hernández Sánchez, S; Pozo Rosado, P; García López, D

    2011-01-01

    The consequences related to the accumulation of abdominal fat above healthy levels create a considerable organic damage. Among the physiological consequences we can highlight heart diseases, hypertension, type-2 diabetes, obesity and metabolic syndrome, which drastically reduce life expectancy and quality. Evidence shows that health improvement is correlated to greater levels of physical activity. However, physical exercise can create oxidative damage on organs and muscular tissue, more relevant in subjects with a high percentage of abdominal fat. This piece of work determines which are the fundamental variables of the exercise program in order to optimize its advantages while minimizing oxidative stress. To know the key variables in the accumulation of abdominal fat above healthy levels, and the role of exercise in prevention and improvement of such issue. SPECIFIC PURPOSES: 1) to identify the key variables in an exercise program aimed at reducing abdominal fat; 2) to understand the relationship between abdominal fat, health and exercise; 3) to review the latest research related to physical exercise and its effect on abdominal adipose tissue. A search and identification of original and reviewed articles will be carried out in indexed impact journals within the main databases. Regular physical exercise, most notably aerobic one, reduces body adipose tissue deposits in general, and abdominal ones in particular, both in obese and overweight subjects.

  16. Relationship of abdominal obesity with cardiovascular disease, diabetes and hyperlipidaemia in Spain.

    PubMed

    Casanueva, Felipe F; Moreno, Basilio; Rodríguez-Azeredo, Rosario; Massien, Christine; Conthe, Pedro; Formiguera, Xavier; Barrios, Vivencio; Balkau, Beberly

    2010-07-01

    To evaluate the relevance of obesity and abdominal obesity in the prevalence of cardiovascular disease (CVD), diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidaemia and hypertension in primary care patients and to ascertain whether waist circumference (WC) measurement should be included in routine clinical practice in addition to body mass index (BMI). As part of the IDEA study, primary care physicians from Spain recruited patients aged 18-80 years. WC and BMI and the presence of CVD, diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidaemia and hypertension were recorded. Finally, 17 980 were analysed. An age-related increase in adiposity was observed. Overall 33% were obese by BMI, and 51% of subjects presented abdominal obesity by the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP-ATPIII) (WC > 102 cm for men and > 88 cm for women). Although there was a correlation between BMI and WC, they presented different distribution patterns. Women, but not men, with a high level of education, professional activity and smoking were associated with a lower WC. Abdominal obesity was significantly associated with CVD. Some subjects with abdominal obesity but lean by BMI, showed an increased prevalence of CVD and diabetes. Furthermore, abdominal obesity was strongly associated with dyslipidaemia and hypertension. Half of the primary care patients studied showed abdominal obesity as measured by WC, whereas one-third was obese by BMI. Abdominal obesity was strongly associated with CVD and diabetes, even in patients lean by BMI. WC should be included in the routine clinical practice in addition to BMI.

  17. Unsupervised quantification of abdominal fat from CT images using Greedy Snakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, Chirag; Dallal, Ahmed H.; Arbabshirani, Mohammad R.; Patel, Aalpen; Moore, Gregory

    2017-02-01

    Adipose tissue has been associated with adverse consequences of obesity. Total adipose tissue (TAT) is divided into subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) and visceral adipose tissue (VAT). Intra-abdominal fat (VAT), located inside the abdominal cavity, is a major factor for the classic obesity related pathologies. Since direct measurement of visceral and subcutaneous fat is not trivial, substitute metrics like waist circumference (WC) and body mass index (BMI) are used in clinical settings to quantify obesity. Abdominal fat can be assessed effectively using CT or MRI, but manual fat segmentation is rather subjective and time-consuming. Hence, an automatic and accurate quantification tool for abdominal fat is needed. The goal of this study is to extract TAT, VAT and SAT fat from abdominal CT in a fully automated unsupervised fashion using energy minimization techniques. We applied a four step framework consisting of 1) initial body contour estimation, 2) approximation of the body contour, 3) estimation of inner abdominal contour using Greedy Snakes algorithm, and 4) voting, to segment the subcutaneous and visceral fat. We validated our algorithm on 952 clinical abdominal CT images (from 476 patients with a very wide BMI range) collected from various radiology departments of Geisinger Health System. To our knowledge, this is the first study of its kind on such a large and diverse clinical dataset. Our algorithm obtained a 3.4% error for VAT segmentation compared to manual segmentation. These personalized and accurate measurements of fat can complement traditional population health driven obesity metrics such as BMI and WC.

  18. Oedema is associated with clinical outcome following emergency abdominal surgery.

    PubMed

    Vaughan-Shaw, P G; Saunders, J; Smith, T; King, A T; Stroud, M A

    2013-09-01

    Oedema is observed frequently following surgery and may be associated with worse outcomes. To date, no study has investigated the role of oedema in the emergency surgical patient. This study assesses the incidence of oedema following emergency abdominal surgery and the value of early postoperative oedema measurement in predicting clinical outcome. A prospective cohort study of patients undergoing emergency abdominal surgery at a university unit over a two-month period was undertaken. Nutritional and clinical outcome data were collected and oedema was measured in the early postoperative period. Predictors of oedema and outcomes associated with postoperative oedema were identified through univariate and multivariate analysis. Overall, 55 patients (median age: 66 years) were included in the study. Postoperative morbidity included ileus (n=22) and sepsis (n=6) with 12 deaths at follow-up. Postoperative oedema was present in 19 patients and was associated with prolonged perioperative fasting (107 vs 30 hours, p=0.009) but not with body mass index (24 kg/m(2) vs 27 kg/m(2), p=0.169) or preadmission weight loss (5% vs 3%, p=0.923). On multivariate analysis, oedema was independently associated with gastrointestinal recovery (B=6.91, p=0.038), artificial nutritional support requirement (odds ratio: 6.91, p=0.037) and overall survival (χ(2) =13.1, df=1, p=0.001). Generalised oedema is common after emergency abdominal surgery and appears to independently predict gastrointestinal recovery, the need for artificial nutritional support and survival. Oedema is not associated with commonly applied markers of nutritional status such as body mass index or recent weight loss. Measurement of oedema offers utility in identifying those at risk of poor clinical outcome or those requiring artificial nutritional support following emergency abdominal