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Sample records for abdominal tumor models

  1. Abdominal wall desmoid tumors: A case report

    PubMed Central

    MA, JIN-HUI; MA, ZHEN-HAI; DONG, XUE-FENG; YIN, HANG; ZHAO, YONG-FU

    2013-01-01

    Desmoid tumors (DTs) are rare lesions that do not possess any metastatic potential. However, they have a strong tendency to invade locally and recur. They constitute 3% of all soft tissue tumors and 0.03% of all neoplasms. Abdominal DTs occur sporadically or are associated with certain familial syndromes, such as familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP). The single form of this neoplasm most frequently occurs in females of reproductive age and during pregnancy. A female patient with a DT of the abdominal wall who had no relevant family history was admitted to hospital. The patient, who presented with a painless mass in the left anterolateral abdomen, had no history of trauma, surgery or childbearing. According to the medical history, physical examination and CT report, the patient was diagnosed with DT. Radical resection of the affected abdominal wall musculature was performed, and the defect was replaced with a polypropylene mesh. The histological diagnosis was of DT. The patient remains in good health and complete remission without any other treatment following surgery. DTs exhibit aggressive growth and have a high rate of recurrence. Surgery is the optimal treatment, and subsequent radiotherapy may decrease the local recurrence rate. Further research into their aetiology is required combined with multicentre clinical trials of new treatments in order to improve management of this disease. This case report provides general knowledge of DT, and may be used as a guidance for diagnosis and treatment. PMID:23833679

  2. Desmoid tumors of the abdominal wall: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Overhaus, Marcus; Decker, Pan; Fischer, Hans Peter; Textor, Hans Jochen; Hirner, Andreas

    2003-01-01

    Background Desmoid tumors are slow growing deep fibromatoses with aggressive infiltration of adjacent tissue but without any metastatic potential. Case Presentation We report on two female patients with desmoid tumor of the abdominal wall who underwent primary resection. Both patients had a history of an earlier abdominal surgery. Preoperative evaluation included abdominal ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography. The histology in both cases revealed a desmoid tumor. Conclusion Complete surgical resection is the first line management of this tumor entity. PMID:12890284

  3. [Desmoid tumor of the abdominal wall].

    PubMed

    Jørgensen, H; Henriksen, L O; Medgyesi, S; Waever, E

    1994-02-07

    Four cases of muscle-aponeurotic fibroadenomatosis (desmoid) of the abdominal wall are reported. The etiological factors, the recurrence rate, the treatment and the pre- and postoperative examinations are discussed.

  4. Harmonic Motion Imaging for Abdominal Tumor Detection and High-intensity Focused Ultrasound Ablation Monitoring: A Feasibility Study in a Transgenic Mouse Model of Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hong; Hou, Gary Y.; Han, Yang; Payen, Thomas; Palermo, Carmine F.; Olive, Kenneth P.; Konofagou, Elisa E.

    2015-01-01

    Harmonic motion imaging (HMI) is a radiation force-based elasticity imaging technique that tracks oscillatory tissue displacements induced by sinusoidal ultrasonic radiation force to assess relative tissue stiffness. The objective of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of HMI in pancreatic tumor detection and high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment monitoring. The HMI system consisted of a focused ultrasound transducer, which generated sinusoidal radiation force to induce oscillatory tissue motion at 50 Hz, and a diagnostic ultrasound transducer, which detected the axial tissue displacements based on acquired radiofrequency signals using a 1D cross-correlation algorithm. For pancreatic tumor detection, HMI images were generated for pancreatic tumors in transgenic mice and normal pancreases in wild-type mice. The obtained HMI images showed a high contrast between normal and malignant pancreases with an average peak-to-peak HMI displacement ratio of 3.2. Histological analysis showed that no tissue damage was associated with HMI when it was used for the sole purpose of elasticity imaging. For pancreatic tumor ablation monitoring, the focused ultrasound transducer was operated with a higher acoustic power and longer pulse length than that used in tumor detection to simultaneously induce HIFU thermal ablation and oscillatory tissue displacements, allowing HMI monitoring without interrupting tumor ablation. HMI monitoring of HIFU ablation found significant decreases in the peak-to-peak HMI displacements before and after HIFU ablation with a reduction rate ranging from 15.8% to 57.0%. The formation of thermal lesions after HIFU exposure was confirmed by histological analysis. This study demonstrated the feasibility of HMI in abdominal tumor detection and HIFU ablation monitoring. PMID:26415128

  5. Harmonic motion imaging for abdominal tumor detection and high-intensity focused ultrasound ablation monitoring: an in vivo feasibility study in a transgenic mouse model of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hong; Hou, Gary Y; Han, Yang; Payen, Thomas; Palermo, Carmine F; Olive, Kenneth P; Konofagou, Elisa E

    2015-09-01

    Harmonic motion imaging (HMI) is a radiationforce- based elasticity imaging technique that tracks oscillatory tissue displacements induced by sinusoidal ultrasonic radiation force to assess the resulting oscillatory displacement denoting the underlying tissue stiffness. The objective of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of HMI in pancreatic tumor detection and high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment monitoring. The HMI system consisted of a focused ultrasound transducer, which generated sinusoidal radiation force to induce oscillatory tissue motion at 50 Hz, and a diagnostic ultrasound transducer, which detected the axial tissue displacements based on acquired radio-frequency signals using a 1-D cross-correlation algorithm. For pancreatic tumor detection, HMI images were generated for pancreatic tumors in transgenic mice and normal pancreases in wild-type mice. The obtained HMI images showed a high contrast between normal and malignant pancreases with an average peak-to-peak HMI displacement ratio of 3.2. Histological analysis showed that no tissue damage was associated with HMI when it was used for the sole purpose of elasticity imaging. For pancreatic tumor ablation monitoring, the focused ultrasound transducer was operated at a higher acoustic power and longer pulse length than that used in tumor detection to simultaneously induce HIFU thermal ablation and oscillatory tissue displacements, allowing HMI monitoring without interrupting tumor ablation. HMI monitoring of HIFU ablation found significant decreases in the peak-to-peak HMI displacements before and after HIFU ablation with a reduction rate ranging from 15.8% to 57.0%. The formation of thermal lesions after HIFU exposure was confirmed by histological analysis. This study demonstrated the feasibility of HMI in abdominal tumor detection and HIFU ablation monitoring.

  6. Primary malignant small bowel tumors: an atypical abdominal emergency.

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, K. J.; Williams, E. S.; Leffall, L. D.

    1995-01-01

    Primary malignant tumors of the small bowel are uncommon in the United States. They comprise less than 1% of all gastrointestinal malignancies, with an incidence of 2200 cases per year. The clinical presentation of small bowel tumors is frequently insidious and often overlooked by physicians. The low incidence and lack of pathognomonic symptoms are the reasons that the early diagnosis of malignant small bowel tumor is uncommon. To better understand the clinical presentation, diagnostic evaluation, management, and outcome, a review of Howard University patients with primary malignant small bowel tumors between 1970 and 1990 was conducted. Our experience concurs with the reported literature and supports the conclusion that a high index of suspicion is necessary. The diagnosis of a malignant small bowel tumor should be considered in patients with vague chronic abdominal complaints. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:7752280

  7. Margins in extra-abdominal desmoid tumors: a comparative analysis.

    PubMed

    Leithner, Andreas; Gapp, Markus; Leithner, Katharina; Radl, Roman; Krippl, Peter; Beham, Alfred; Windhager, Reinhard

    2004-06-01

    The main treatment of extra-abdominal desmoid tumors remains surgery, but recurrence rates up to 80% are reported. The impact of microscopic surgical margin status according to the Enneking classification system is discussed controversially. Therefore, the authors screened the published literature for reliable data on the importance of a wide or radical excision of extra-abdominal desmoid tumors. All studies with more than ten patients, a surgical treatment only, and margin status stated were included. Only 12 out of 49 identified studies fulfilled the inclusion criteria. One hundred fifty-two primary tumors were excised with wide or radical microscopic surgical margins, while in 260 cases a marginal or intralesional excision was performed. In the first group 41 patients (27%) and in the second one 187 patients (72%) developed a recurrence. Therefore, microscopic surgical margin status according to the Enneking classification system is a significant prognostic factor (P < 0.001). The data of this review underline the strategy of a wide or radical local excision as the treatment of choice. Furthermore, as a large number of studies had to be excluded from this analysis, exact microscopic surgical margin status should be provided in future studies in order to allow comparability. . Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. Interfraction variation in lung tumor position with abdominal compression during stereotactic body radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Mampuya, Wambaka Ange; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Matsuo, Yukinori

    2013-09-15

    Purpose: To assess the effect of abdominal compression on the interfraction variation in tumor position in lung stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) in a larger series of patients with large tumor motion amplitude.Methods: Thirty patients with lung tumor motion exceeding 8 mm who underwent SBRT were included in this study. After translational and rotational initial setup error was corrected based on bone anatomy, CBCT images were acquired for each fraction. The residual interfraction variation was defined as the difference between the centroid position of the visualized target in three dimensions derived from CBCT scans and thosemore » derived from averaged intensity projection images. The authors compared the magnitude of the interfraction variation in tumor position between patients treated with [n= 16 (76 fractions)] and without [n= 14 (76 fractions)] abdominal compression.Results: The mean ± standard deviation (SD) of the motion amplitude in the longitudinal direction before abdominal compression was 19.9 ± 7.3 (range, 10–40) mm and was significantly (p < 0.01) reduced to 12.4 ± 5.8 (range, 5–30) mm with compression. The greatest variance of the interfraction variation with abdominal compression was observed in the longitudinal direction, with a mean ± SD of 0.79 ± 3.05 mm, compared to −0.60 ± 2.10 mm without abdominal compression. The absolute values of the 95th percentile of the interfraction variation for one side in each direction were 3.97/6.21 mm (posterior/anterior), 4.16/3.76 mm (caudal/cranial), and 2.90/2.32 mm (right/left) without abdominal compression, and 2.14/5.03 mm (posterior/anterior), 3.93/9.23 mm (caudal/cranial), and 2.37/5.45 mm (right/left) with abdominal compression. An absolute interfraction variation greater than 5 mm was observed in six (9.2%) fractions without and 13 (17.1%) fractions with abdominal compression.Conclusions: Abdominal compression was effective for reducing the

  9. Tissue engineered tumor models.

    PubMed

    Ingram, M; Techy, G B; Ward, B R; Imam, S A; Atkinson, R; Ho, H; Taylor, C R

    2010-08-01

    Many research programs use well-characterized tumor cell lines as tumor models for in vitro studies. Because tumor cells grown as three-dimensional (3-D) structures have been shown to behave more like tumors in vivo than do cells growing in monolayer culture, a growing number of investigators now use tumor cell spheroids as models. Single cell type spheroids, however, do not model the stromal-epithelial interactions that have an important role in controlling tumor growth and development in vivo. We describe here a method for generating, reproducibly, more realistic 3-D tumor models that contain both stromal and malignant epithelial cells with an architecture that closely resembles that of tumor microlesions in vivo. Because they are so tissue-like we refer to them as tumor histoids. They can be generated reproducibly in substantial quantities. The bioreactor developed to generate histoid constructs is described and illustrated. It accommodates disposable culture chambers that have filled volumes of either 10 or 64 ml, each culture yielding on the order of 100 or 600 histoid particles, respectively. Each particle is a few tenths of a millimeter in diameter. Examples of histological sections of tumor histoids representing cancers of breast, prostate, colon, pancreas and urinary bladder are presented. Potential applications of tumor histoids include, but are not limited to, use as surrogate tumors for pre-screening anti-solid tumor pharmaceutical agents, as reference specimens for immunostaining in the surgical pathology laboratory and use in studies of invasive properties of cells or other aspects of tumor development and progression. Histoids containing nonmalignant cells also may have potential as "seeds" in tissue engineering. For drug testing, histoids probably will have to meet certain criteria of size and tumor cell content. Using a COPAS Plus flow cytometer, histoids containing fluorescent tumor cells were analyzed successfully and sorted using such criteria.

  10. Abdominal actinomycosis masquerading as an omental tumor in a 12-year-old female.

    PubMed

    Hirayama, Yutaka; Iinuma, Yasushi; Hashizume, Naoki; Yoshida, Motomu; Iida, Hisataka; Shibuya, Hiroyuki; Naito, Shinichi; Nitta, Koju

    2013-02-01

    We herein report a case of abdominal actinomycosis in a 12-year-old girl in whom an omental primary tumor was suspected before surgery. The patient began to experience intermittent lower left abdominal pain. Abdominal computed tomography (CT) scans were inconclusive at this time, but 6 months later, CT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examinations showed a 7-cm, tumor-like lesion in the left abdominal cavity; malignancy could not be ruled out. The tumor, which originated in the omentum and adhered strongly to the left abdominal wall, was resected along with approximately 90 % of the omentum, the peritoneum in contact with the mass, and the posterior layer of the rectus abdominal sheath, under suspicion of a malignant tumor. However, omental actinomycosis was the final pathological diagnosis. The patient's antibiotic treatment was changed to a penicillin-series oral antibiotic to prevent recurrence of the actinomycosis. The patient was discharged from our hospital 16 days after the first surgery, but she developed three episodes of ileus; the first two required surgery. The patient has had no further recurrences of actinomycosis or postoperative ileus 20 months after discharge.

  11. Perivascular epithelioid cell tumor (PEComa) of abdominal cavity from falciform ligament: a case report.

    PubMed

    Choi, Cheol Woong; Kim, Tae Oh; Kim, Kyung Yeob; Lee, Sun Mi; Kim, Gwang Ha; Kang, Dae Hwan; Song, Geun Am; Kim, Suk; Kim, Dae Hwan

    2009-04-01

    We present a case of perivascular epithelioid cell tumors (PEComas) in the abdominal cavity at the falciform ligament. A 30-yr-old Korean man visited to hospital for the evaluation of a growing, palpable abdominal mass. He had felt the mass growing over 6 months. There was no family or personal history of tuberous sclerosis. The resected specimen showed a mass of 8.0x7.0x5.5 cm in size. Histological examination showed sheets of spindle-to-epithelioid cells with clear-to-eosinophilic cytoplasm. Immunohistochemically, tumor cells were positive for HMB-4 (gp100) and smooth muscle actin. They were also positive for the S-100, which is a marker of neurogenic and melanocytic tumors. Patient was treated with radical resection of tumor without any adjuvant therapy. He is well and on follow-up visits without tumor recurrence.

  12. Perivascular Epithelioid Cell Tumor (PEComa) of Abdominal Cavity from Falciform Ligament: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Cheol Woong; Kim, Kyung Yeob; Lee, Sun Mi; Kim, Gwang Ha; Kang, Dae Hwan; Song, Geun Am; Kim, Suk; Kim, Dae Hwan

    2009-01-01

    We present a case of perivascular epithelioid cell tumors (PEComas) in the abdominal cavity at the falciform ligament. A 30-yr-old Korean man visited to hospital for the evaluation of a growing, palpable abdominal mass. He had felt the mass growing over 6 months. There was no family or personal history of tuberous sclerosis. The resected specimen showed a mass of 8.0×7.0×5.5 cm in size. Histological examination showed sheets of spindle-to-epithelioid cells with clear-to-eosinophilic cytoplasm. Immunohistochemically, tumor cells were positive for HMB-4 (gp100) and smooth muscle actin. They were also positive for the S-100, which is a marker of neurogenic and melanocytic tumors. Patient was treated with radical resection of tumor without any adjuvant therapy. He is well and on follow-up visits without tumor recurrence. PMID:19399284

  13. Primary intra-abdominal malignant fibrous histiocytoma: a highly aggressive tumor.

    PubMed

    Salemis, Nikolaos S; Gourgiotis, Stavros; Tsiambas, Evangelos; Panagiotopoulos, Nikolaos; Karameris, Andreas; Tsohataridis, Efstathios

    2010-12-01

    Malignant fibrous histiocytoma (MFH) is the most common soft-tissue sarcoma of late adult life occurring predominantly in the extremities. Primary intra-abdominal MFH is a very rare occurrence. The aim of this study is to describe a very rare case of an intra-abdominal MFH with a highly aggressive clinical course. A 67-year-old male was referred to our department with a 2-week history of dull lower abdominal pain and a gradually enlarging right lower abdominal mass, which he first noticed 2 months prior to admission. Computed tomography (CT) scan demonstrated a mass in the right iliac fossa. On exploratory laparotomy, a tumor was found in the right iliac fossa attached to the parietal lateral peritoneum without any evidence of invasion into the adjacent structures. Complete excision of the tumor with clear margins was performed. Histological and immunohistochemical examinations showed a MFH. One month after surgery, while on adjuvant chemotherapy, the patient was readmitted with dyspnea and a slightly palpable mass in the area of the previous radical resection. CT scan revealed local tumor recurrence along with multiple pulmonary metastatic deposits. Unfortunately, despite treatment, the patient died of progressive disease 5 weeks later. Primary intra-abdominal MFH is a very rare but aggressive malignancy with a high tendency of local recurrence and metastatic spread. Early detection and complete surgical excision with clear margins is the treatment of choice. In some cases, however, the tumor can exhibit a highly aggressive clinical course despite radical surgery and adjuvant therapy.

  14. Effect of Audio Coaching on Correlation of Abdominal Displacement With Lung Tumor Motion

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Narita, Yuichiro; Matsuo, Yukinori

    2009-10-01

    Purpose: To assess the effect of audio coaching on the time-dependent behavior of the correlation between abdominal motion and lung tumor motion and the corresponding lung tumor position mismatches. Methods and Materials: Six patients who had a lung tumor with a motion range >8 mm were enrolled in the present study. Breathing-synchronized fluoroscopy was performed initially without audio coaching, followed by fluoroscopy with recorded audio coaching for multiple days. Two different measurements, anteroposterior abdominal displacement using the real-time positioning management system and superoinferior (SI) lung tumor motion by X-ray fluoroscopy, were performed simultaneously. Their sequential images were recorded using onemore » display system. The lung tumor position was automatically detected with a template matching technique. The relationship between the abdominal and lung tumor motion was analyzed with and without audio coaching. Results: The mean SI tumor displacement was 10.4 mm without audio coaching and increased to 23.0 mm with audio coaching (p < .01). The correlation coefficients ranged from 0.89 to 0.97 with free breathing. Applying audio coaching, the correlation coefficients improved significantly (range, 0.93-0.99; p < .01), and the SI lung tumor position mismatches became larger in 75% of all sessions. Conclusion: Audio coaching served to increase the degree of correlation and make it more reproducible. In addition, the phase shifts between tumor motion and abdominal displacement were improved; however, all patients breathed more deeply, and the SI lung tumor position mismatches became slightly larger with audio coaching than without audio coaching.« less

  15. Abdominal Tumor Characterization and Recognition Using Superior-Order Cooccurrence Matrices, Based on Ultrasound Images

    PubMed Central

    Mitrea, Delia; Mitrea, Paulina; Nedevschi, Sergiu; Badea, Radu; Lupsor, Monica; Socaciu, Mihai; Golea, Adela; Hagiu, Claudia; Ciobanu, Lidia

    2012-01-01

    The noninvasive diagnosis of the malignant tumors is an important issue in research nowadays. Our purpose is to elaborate computerized, texture-based methods for performing computer-aided characterization and automatic diagnosis of these tumors, using only the information from ultrasound images. In this paper, we considered some of the most frequent abdominal malignant tumors: the hepatocellular carcinoma and the colonic tumors. We compared these structures with the benign tumors and with other visually similar diseases. Besides the textural features that proved in our previous research to be useful in the characterization and recognition of the malignant tumors, we improved our method by using the grey level cooccurrence matrix and the edge orientation cooccurrence matrix of superior order. As resulted from our experiments, the new textural features increased the malignant tumor classification performance, also revealing visual and physical properties of these structures that emphasized the complex, chaotic structure of the corresponding tissue. PMID:22312411

  16. Low-dose dacarbazine-doxorubicin therapy against intra-abdominal desmoid tumors.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Hirofumi; Oshiro, Ryota; Nishimura, Junichi; Uemura, Mamoru; Haraguchi, Naotsugu; Hata, Taishi; Takemasa, Ichiro; Mizushima, Tsunekazu; Sekimoto, Mitsugu; Doki, Yuichiro; Mori, Masaki

    2013-05-01

    Intra-abdominal desmoid tumor is a life-threatening disease. Studies have shown that dacarbazine (DTIC)-doxorubicin (DOX) (D-D) therapy is the most effective treatment. However, myelosuppression is a major problem, and cardiac muscle disorders due to DOX limit the number of administration cycles, whereas it usually requires a long time to achieve tumor shrinkage. To resolve these issues, we introduced low-dose D-D therapy to 3 patients employing 50 mg/m² DOX and 600-700 mg/m² DTIC per cycle, which permits repeated administration cycles up to 10-11 times. Case 1 was a 23-year-old female with a sporadic recurrent mesenterium desmoid tumor located in the pelvis (maximum diameter, 8 cm). Cases 2 and 3 were a 33-year-old female and a 36-year-old male. Both patients had intra-abdominal mesenterium desmoid tumors (maximum diameter 9.6 and 9.0 cm, respectively) that were generated after proctocolectomy due to familial adenomatous polyposis. No severe adverse events occurred during the therapy. With the aid of sulindac and tamoxifen after low-dose D-D therapy, the first two patients achieved a complete response, and the third patient achieved a partial response and awaits further tumor shrinkage. Our experience indicates that low-dose DT-D therapy is a safe and effective regimen for patients with intra-abdominal desmoid tumors.

  17. The immunohistochemistry aspects in two cases of neurofibromatosis-associated abdominal tumors.

    PubMed

    Carşote, Mara; Păun, S; Neamţu, M C; Avramescu, Elena Taina; Iosif, Cristina; Terzea, Dana; Constantinoiu, S; Dănciulescu Miulescu, Ruxandra; Neamţu, Oana Maria; Poiană, Cătălina

    2012-01-01

    Type 1 neurofibromatosis associates various abdominal tumors as gastrointestinal stromal tumors, duodenal or pancreatic carcinoid, and adrenal tumors like pheochromocytoma. We present the immunohistochemistry report in two cases with different profile regarding the evolution. One case is a 7th decade women diagnosed with unilateral pheochromocytoma and GISTs, with a good prognosis after surgery. The other case is a 41-year-old male diagnosed with duodenal metastatic somatostatinoma after an intestinal occlusive syndrome and later the hormonal profile leaded to the diagnosis of pheochromocytoma. The patient had a fulminate evolution within six months from diagnosis.

  18. Gallic Acid Attenuates Postoperative Intra-Abdominal Adhesion by Inhibiting Inflammatory Reaction in a Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Guangbing; Wu, Yunhua; Gao, Qi; Shen, Cong; Chen, Zilu; Wang, Kang; Yu, Junhui

    2018-01-01

    Background Intra-abdominal adhesion is one of the most common complications after abdominal surgery. The efficacy of current treatments for intra-abdominal adhesion is unsatisfactory. In this study, we investigated the effect of gallic acid on the prevention and treatment of intra-abdominal adhesions after abdominal surgery using an intra-abdominal adhesion rat model. Material/Methods The experimental rats were randomly divided into the sham operation group, the control group, the chitosan group, and 3 gallic acid groups of different concentrations. All rats except those in the sham operation group received cecal abrasion to induce adhesion. From the first postoperative day, the rats in the gallic acid groups were administered different concentrations of gallic acid in a 2-ml gavage daily. All rats were sacrificed on postoperative day 7, and the degree of intra-abdominal adhesion was evaluated by the naked eye. The amount of collagen deposited between the injured peritoneal tissues was assessed by Sirius red staining. Serum levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α), and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) were measured by ELISA. Western blot was used to detect the level of NF-κB phosphorylation in the injured peritoneal or adhesion tissues of the rats. Results Compared with the control group, the scores of intra-abdominal adhesions in the rats treated with larger doses of gallic acid were significantly decreased, and the degree of inflammation and fibrosis was also significantly decreased. Gallic acid significantly reduced IL-6, TNF-α, and TGF-β1 serum levels. NF-κB phosphorylation in the higher gallic acid groups was significantly reduced. Conclusions Gallic acid inhibits the formation of postoperative intra-abdominal adhesions in rats by inhibiting the inflammatory reaction and fibrogenesis. Gallic acid is a promising drug for preventing intra-abdominal adhesions. PMID:29429982

  19. Effect of abdominal irradiation on growth in boys treated for a Wilms' tumor

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, W.H.; Shalet, S.M.; Morris-Jones, P.H.

    1990-01-01

    To study the effect of abdominal irradiation on spinal growth in childhood we have measured final height, sitting height, and leg length in 30 male survivors of a Wilms' tumor. Twenty-one patients received whole abdominal irradiation by either megavoltage therapy (MV: n = 11) or orthovoltage therapy (OV: n = 10); the remainder received flank irradiation. To examine the effect of the adolescent growth spurt on the irradiated spine we have followed prospectively seven patients who received whole abdominal irradiation and nine patients who received flank irradiation through puberty. Compared to a normal population there is a modest reduction inmore » median final standing height SDS (H.SDS: -1.15) accompanied by a marked reduction in median final sitting height SDS (S.HT SDS: -2.41) with no apparent effect on median subischial leg length SDS (SILL.SDS: 0.04). This reduction in spinal growth is reflected by a strongly positive disproportion score (DPS; (SILL SDS-S.HT SDS) + 2.81). The incidence of scoliosis after abdominal irradiation has been low (10%). During puberty there is a significant fall in median sitting height SDS after both whole abdominal (median fall: -0.9, P = 0.02) and flank irradiation (median fall: -1.85, P = 0.01), and this is reflected in a significant increase in disproportion (DPS: whole abdominal; median rise +1.4, P = 0.02: flank, median rise +1.34, P = 0.01). After MV irradiation there is a significant correlation between the degree of disproportion and the age at treatment (P less than 0.0005). The younger the patient is at treatment the more severe is the restriction on spinal growth and the shorter and more disproportionate they become as an adult. The estimated eventual loss in potential height from abdominal irradiation at the age of one is 10 cm and at five years is 7 cm.« less

  20. Minimally Invasive, Organ-preserving Surgery for Large Submucosal Tumors in the Abdominal Esophagus.

    PubMed

    Kanehira, Eiji; Tanida, Takashi; Kamei, Aya; Takahashi, Kodai

    2017-06-01

    Surgical resection of submucosal tumors (SMTs) in the abdominal esophagus is not standardized. Enucleation may be a minimally invasive option, whereas its oncological validity is not very clear. Moreover, how to treat the esophageal wall defect after enucleation and necessity of additional antireflux procedure are also undetermined. In 13 patients with a SMT originating the abdominal esophagus laparoscopic enucleation was performed with preserving the integrity of submucosa. When the muscular layer defect was <4 cm it was directly closed by suturing, whereas it was left open in case the defect was larger. Fundoplication was added when the esophagus was dissected posteriorly or the myotomy was not closed. Tumors were resected en-bloc without rupture in all cases. In 5 patients myotomy was closed, whereas in the remaining 8 it was left open. In 11 patients fundoplication was added (Toupet in 5 and Dor in 6). The patients developed neither regurgitation nor stenosis postoperatively. The histopathologic findings revealed leiomyoma in 9 patients, whereas the other 4 were miscellaneous. The average tumor size was 5.5 cm (range, 2.8 to 8.8). Microscopically surgical margin was negative in all cases. Laparoscopic enucleation of SMTs in the abdominal esophagus seems to be safe, reproducible operation enabling preservation of function of the lower esophagus and esophagogastric junction. Even when the muscular defect is not approximated additional fundoplication can minimize the risk of postoperative reflux disease.

  1. Stochastic models for tumoral growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escudero, Carlos

    2006-02-01

    Strong experimental evidence has indicated that tumor growth belongs to the molecular beam epitaxy universality class. This type of growth is characterized by the constraint of cell proliferation to the tumor border and the surface diffusion of cells at the growing edge. Tumor growth is thus conceived as a competition for space between the tumor and the host, and cell diffusion at the tumor border is an optimal strategy adopted for minimizing the pressure and helping tumor development. Two stochastic partial differential equations are reported in this paper in order to correctly model the physical properties of tumoral growth in (1+1) and (2+1) dimensions. The advantage of these models is that they reproduce the correct geometry of the tumor and are defined in terms of polar variables. An analysis of these models allows us to quantitatively estimate the response of the tumor to an unfavorable perturbation during growth.

  2. Cesarean section after abdominal mesh repair for pregnancy-related desmoid tumor: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Ooi, Sara; Ngo, Harry

    2017-01-01

    We report the case of a 32-year-old gravida 2 para 1 woman with a background of partially resected desmoid tumor (DT) arising from the previous cesarean section (CS) scar. This case details the management of her DT by surgical resection and mesh repair and second pregnancy following this. Pregnancy-related DTs are a relatively rare entity, and there is a paucity of literature regarding their management during pregnancy. There are only five reported cases of DTs arising from CS scars. To our knowledge, this is the only report to illustrate that subsequent CS is possible after desmoid resection and abdominal mesh repair. It provides evidence that CS can be safely accomplished following abdominal wall reconstructions and further arguments against elective lower segment CS. PMID:28744163

  3. Cesarean section after abdominal mesh repair for pregnancy-related desmoid tumor: a case report.

    PubMed

    Ooi, Sara; Ngo, Harry

    2017-01-01

    We report the case of a 32-year-old gravida 2 para 1 woman with a background of partially resected desmoid tumor (DT) arising from the previous cesarean section (CS) scar. This case details the management of her DT by surgical resection and mesh repair and second pregnancy following this. Pregnancy-related DTs are a relatively rare entity, and there is a paucity of literature regarding their management during pregnancy. There are only five reported cases of DTs arising from CS scars. To our knowledge, this is the only report to illustrate that subsequent CS is possible after desmoid resection and abdominal mesh repair. It provides evidence that CS can be safely accomplished following abdominal wall reconstructions and further arguments against elective lower segment CS.

  4. High-intensity focused ultrasound treatment for intra-abdominal desmoid tumors: a report of four cases.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yulan; Huang, Yanqin; Zhou, Meiqi; Ying, Xiao; Hu, Xiaoye

    2016-04-01

    Desmoid tumors are rare clonal fibroblastic proliferations that can arise at abdominal or extra-abdominal sites. Complete surgical resection is the primary treatment for resectable desmoid tumors, but a high rate of local recurrence has been reported even after complete resection. For patients with a recurrent tumor, the goals of treatment are to control the recurrence, maintain quality of life, and prolong survival. Radiofrequency ablation, radiotherapy, chemotherapy, and other medical therapies can be used as alternative methods, but there are considerable controversies over the roles of these methods in the management of desmoid tumors. High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is a minimally invasive and effective method for treatment of solid tumors. We used HIFU to treat four patients with intra-abdominal desmoid tumors from June 2011 to September 2013. Post-procedural pain was seen in all patients. One patient had an intra-abdominal abscess and another suffered a slight injury to the femoral nerve. The patients were followed up for 19-46 months (mean 34 months) until April 2015. The tumor in one patient disappeared, and no tumor progression was observed in the other patients.

  5. Planning 4-Dimensional Computed Tomography (4DCT) Cannot Adequately Represent Daily Intrafractional Motion of Abdominal Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Ge, Jiajia; Santanam, Lakshmi; Noel, Camille

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate whether planning 4-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) can adequately represent daily motion of abdominal tumors in regularly fractionated and stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) patients. Methods and Materials: Intrafractional tumor motion of 10 patients with abdominal tumors (4 pancreas-fractionated and 6 liver-stereotactic patients) with implanted fiducials was measured based on daily orthogonal fluoroscopic movies over 38 treatment fractions. The needed internal margin for at least 90% of tumor coverage was calculated based on a 95th and fifth percentile of daily 3-dimensional tumor motion. The planning internal margin was generated by fusing 4DCT motion from all phase bins. The disagreementmore » between needed and planning internal margin was analyzed fraction by fraction in 3 motion axes (superior-inferior [SI], anterior-posterior [AP], and left-right [LR]). The 4DCT margin was considered as an overestimation/underestimation of daily motion when disagreement exceeded at least 3 mm in the SI axis and/or 1.2 mm in the AP and LR axes (4DCT image resolution). The underlying reasons for this disagreement were evaluated based on interfractional and intrafractional breathing variation. Results: The 4DCT overestimated daily 3-dimensional motion in 39% of the fractions in 7 of 10 patients and underestimated it in 53% of the fractions in 8 of 10 patients. Median underestimation was 3.9 mm, 3.0 mm, and 1.7 mm in the SI axis, AP axis, and LR axis, respectively. The 4DCT was found to capture irregular deep breaths in 3 of 10 patients, with 4DCT motion larger than mean daily amplitude by 18 to 21 mm. The breathing pattern varied from breath to breath and day to day. The intrafractional variation of amplitude was significantly larger than intrafractional variation (2.7 mm vs 1.3 mm) in the primary motion axis (ie, SI axis). The SBRT patients showed significantly larger intrafractional amplitude variation than fractionated patients (3.0

  6. [Abdominal wall reconstruction with collagen membrane in an animal model of abdominal hernia. A preliminary report].

    PubMed

    Łukasiewicz, Aleksander; Drewa, Tomasz; Skopińska-Wiśniewska, Joanna; Molski, Stanisław

    2008-01-01

    Abdominal hernia repair is one of the most common surgical procedures. Current data indicate that the best treatment results are achieved with use of synthetic material to reinforce weakened abdominal wall. Prosthetic materials utilized for hernia repair induce adhesions with underlying viscera. They should be therefore separated from them by a layer of peritoneum otherwise adhesions may cause to serious complications such as bowel-skin fistulas. The aim of our work was to determine if implantation of our collagen membrane into abdominal wall defect induce adhesions in rat model of ventral hernia. The collagen film was obtained by acetic acid extraction of rat tail tendons and than casting the soluble fraction onto polyethylene shits. Abdominal wall defect was created in 10 Wistar male rats. Collagen membranes were implanted into the defect using interrupted polypropylene stitches. After 3 months of observation all animals were sacrificed. No adhesions between path structure and bowel developed. In one often rats (10%) adhesion between fixating stitch and omentum was observed. Complete mesothelium lining and vascular ingrowth were microscopically observed within implanted structure. Promising result requires further confirmation in a larger series of animals.

  7. Comparison of Liver Tumor Motion With and Without Abdominal Compression Using Cine-Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Eccles, Cynthia L.; Patel, Ritesh; Simeonov, Anna K.

    2011-02-01

    Purpose: Abdominal compression (AC) can be used to reduce respiratory liver motion in patients undergoing liver stereotactic body radiotherapy. The purpose of the present study was to measure the changes in three-dimensional liver tumor motion with and without compression using cine-magnetic resonance imaging. Patients and Methods: A total of 60 patients treated as a part of an institutional research ethics board-approved liver stereotactic body radiotherapy protocol underwent cine T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging through the tumor centroid in the coronal and sagittal planes. A total of 240 cine-magnetic resonance imaging sequences acquired at one to three images each second for 30-60more » s were evaluated using an in-house-developed template matching tool (based on the coefficient correlation) to measure the magnitude of the tumor motion. The average tumor edge displacements were used to determine the magnitude of changes in the caudal-cranial (CC) and anteroposterior (AP) directions, with and without AC. Results: The mean tumor motion without AC of 11.7 mm (range, 4.8-23.3) in the CC direction was reduced to 9.4 mm (range, 1.6-23.4) with AC. The tumor motion was reduced in both directions (CC and AP) in 52% of the patients and in a single direction (CC or AP) in 90% of the patients. The mean decrease in tumor motion with AC was 2.3 and 0.6 mm in the CC and AP direction, respectively. Increased motion occurred in one or more directions in 28% of patients. Clinically significant (>3 mm) decreases were observed in 40% and increases in <2% of patients in the CC direction. Conclusion: AC can significantly reduce three-dimensional liver tumor motion in most patients, although the magnitude of the reduction was smaller than previously reported.« less

  8. Mechanics, Mechanobiology, and Modeling of Human Abdominal Aorta and Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Humphrey, J.D.; Holzapfel, G.A.

    2011-01-01

    Biomechanical factors play fundamental roles in the natural history of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) and their responses to treatment. Advances during the past two decades have increased our understanding of the mechanics and biology of the human abdominal aorta and AAAs, yet there remains a pressing need for considerable new data and resulting patient-specific computational models that can better describe the current status of a lesion and better predict the evolution of lesion geometry, composition, and material properties and thereby improve interventional planning. In this paper, we briefly review data on the structure and function of the human abdominal aorta and aneurysmal wall, past models of the mechanics, and recent growth and remodeling models. We conclude by identifying open problems that we hope will motivate studies to improve our computational modeling and thus general understanding of AAAs. PMID:22189249

  9. Late orthopedic effects in children with Wilms' tumor treated with abdominal irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Rate, W.R.; Butler, M.S.; Robertson, W.W. Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Between 1970 and 1984, 31 children with biopsy-proven Wilms' tumor received nephrectomy, chemotherapy, and abdominal irradiation and were followed beyond skeletal maturity. Three patients (10%) developed late orthopedic abnormalities requiring intervention. Ten children received orthovoltage irradiation, and all cases requiring orthopedic intervention or developing a scoliotic curve of greater than 20 degrees were confined to this group, for a complication frequency of 50%. Those children who developed a significant late orthopedic abnormality (SLOA) as defined were treated to a higher median dose (2,890 cGy) and a larger field size (150 cm2) than those who did not (2,580 cGy and 120more » cm2). Age at irradiation, sex, and initial stage of disease did not appear to influence the risk of developing an SLOA. No child who received megavoltage irradiation developed an SLOA despite treatment up to 4,000 cGy or to field sizes of 400 cm2. We conclude that modern radiotherapy techniques rarely lead to significant late orthopedic abnormalities previously associated with abdominal irradiation in children with Wilms' tumor.« less

  10. Juvenile granulosa cell tumor arising from intra-abdominal testis in newborn: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Partalis, Nikolaos; Tzardi, Maria; Barbagadakis, Sophia; Sakellaris, George

    2012-05-01

    In the present case, the neonate presented with a left-sided abdominal mass and an empty left scrotum. Abdominal ultrasonography showed well-defined cystic formation, and laparotomy revealed a tumor arising from an intra-abdominal left testis. The carcinoembryonic antigen and neuron-specific enolase levels were within normal limits, and the serum β-human chorionic gonadotropin and α-fetoprotein levels were within age-related normal values. The findings from the immunochemistry tests confirmed the diagnosis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Role of Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drug in Treatment of Extra-abdominal Desmoid Tumors.

    PubMed

    Cho, Ja Young; Gupta, Sanjay; Cho, Hwan Seong; Park, Min Suk; Mok, Su Jung; Han, Ilkyu; Kim, Han-Soo

    2018-06-01

    We retrospectively reviewed the outcomes of patients who had been treated with meloxicam for the extra-abdominal desmoid tumors and evaluated the correlation between clinical outcome and clinic pathological variables. Twenty patients treated with meloxicam were followed up every 3 to 6 months. Meloxicam administration was planned at 15 mg/day orally for 6 months. Of the 20 patients evaluated, according to Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors criteria, there were five patients with partial response (25.0%), eight with stable disease (40.0%), and seven with tumor progression (35.0%). The cumulative probability of dropping out from our nonsurgical strategy using meloxicam was 35.0% at 1 year and 35.0% at 5 years. The present study suggests that conservative treatment would be a primary treatment option for this perplexing disease even though we were not able to determine that the use of a cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor would have an additional influence on the natural course of a desmoid tumor.

  12. SU-G-BRA-07: An Innovative Fiducial-Less Tracking Method for Radiation Treatment of Abdominal Tumors by Diaphragm Disparity Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Dick, D; Zhao, W; Wu, X

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of tracking abdominal tumors without the use of gold fiducial markers Methods: In this simulation study, an abdominal 4DCT dataset, acquired previously and containing 8 phases of the breathing cycle, was used as the testing data. Two sets of DRR images (45 and 135 degrees) were generated for each phase. Three anatomical points along the lung-diaphragm interface on each of the Digital Reconstructed Radiograph(DRR) images were identified by cross-correlation. The gallbladder, which simulates the tumor, was contoured for each phase of the breathing cycle and the corresponding centroid values serve as the measured center ofmore » the tumor. A linear model was created to correlate the diaphragm’s disparity of the three identified anatomical points with the center of the tumor. To verify the established linear model, we sequentially removed one phase of the data (i.e., 3 anatomical points and the corresponding tumor center) and created new linear models with the remaining 7 phases. Then we substituted the eliminated phase data (disparities of the 3 anatomical points) into the corresponding model to compare model-generated tumor center and the measured tumor center. Results: The maximum difference between the modeled and the measured centroid values across the 8 phases were 0.72, 0.29 and 0.30 pixels in the x, y and z directions respectively, which yielded a maximum mean-squared-error value of 0.75 pixels. The outcomes of the verification process, by eliminating each phase, produced mean-squared-errors ranging from 0.41 to 1.28 pixels. Conclusion: Gold fiducial markers, requiring surgical procedures to be implanted, are conventionally used in radiation therapy. The present work shows the feasibility of a fiducial-less tracking method for localizing abdominal tumors. Through developed diaphragm disparity analysis, the established linear model was verified with clinically accepted errors. The tracking method in real time under

  13. [A Case in Which a Patient Was Operated for Intra-Abdominal Desmoid Tumors after Total Colectomy in FAP].

    PubMed

    Hoshi, Minako; Ikeda, Kimimasa; Higashiguchi, Kimiya; Kobayashi, Teruyuki; Sakai, Kenji; Koyama, Taichi; Doi, Takasi; Taniguchi, Hirokazu; Murakami, Masakazu; Kurokawa, Eiji; Nakamichi, Itsuko

    2015-11-01

    The patient was a 22-year-old woman with FAP, who had undergone laparoscopic total colectomy 3 years previously. She presented to our hospital with a high fever and abdominal pain. Large hard tumors were palpated in the right lower abdomen and pelvis. Blood examination showed an inflammatory response. CT scan revealed 17 cm diameter solid tumors. At surgery, 2 tumors arising from the mesentery of the small intestine were found, neither of which invaded any organs. We performed tumor extirpation with partial resection of the duodenum, ileum, right fallopian tube and rectum. A jejunal stoma was formed, leaving a length of remnant intestine of about 120 cm. The histopathological diagnosis was given as desmoid tumor with infection. The patient was discharged from the hospital on the 9th postoperative day. Desmoid tumor is the second most common cause of death in FAP patients. Although desmoids can also occur in the extremities, most FAP patients develop intra-abdominal tumors. Despite being histologically benign, they are locally infiltrative and can cause death through invasion and destruction of adjacent vital structures and organs. Here, we report a case of desmoid tumors with FAP with reference to the literature.

  14. Kilovoltage Imaging of Implanted Fiducials to Monitor Intrafraction Motion With Abdominal Compression During Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Gastrointestinal Tumors.

    PubMed

    Yorke, Ellen; Xiong, Ying; Han, Qian; Zhang, Pengpeng; Mageras, Gikas; Lovelock, Michael; Pham, Hai; Xiong, Jian-Ping; Goodman, Karyn A

    2016-07-01

    To assess intrafraction respiratory motion using a commercial kilovoltage imaging system for abdominal tumor patients with implanted fiducials and breathing constrained by pneumatic compression during stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). A pneumatic compression belt limited respiratory motion in 19 patients with radiopaque fiducials in or near their tumor during SBRT for abdominal tumors. Kilovoltage images were acquired at 5- to 6-second intervals during treatment using a commercial system. Intrafractional fiducial displacements were measured using in-house software. The dosimetric effect of the observed displacements was calculated for 3 sessions for each patient. Intrafraction displacement patterns varied between patients and between individual treatment sessions. Averaged over 19 patients, 73 sessions, 7.6% of craniocaudal displacements exceeded 0.5 cm, and 1.2% exceeded 0.75 cm. The calculated single-session dose to 95% of gross tumor volume differed from planned by an average of -1.2% (range, -11.1% to 4.8%) but only for 4 patients was the total 3-session calculated dose to 95% of gross tumor volume more than 3% different from planned. Our pneumatic compression limited intrafractional abdominal target motion, maintained target position established at setup, and was moderately effective in preserving coverage. Commercially available intrafractional imaging is useful for surveillance but can be made more effective and reliable. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Kilovoltage Imaging of Implanted Fiducials to Monitor Intrafraction Motion With Abdominal Compression During Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Gastrointestinal Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Yorke, Ellen, E-mail: yorke@mskcc.org; Xiong, Ying; Han, Qian

    2016-07-01

    Purpose: To assess intrafraction respiratory motion using a commercial kilovoltage imaging system for abdominal tumor patients with implanted fiducials and breathing constrained by pneumatic compression during stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: A pneumatic compression belt limited respiratory motion in 19 patients with radiopaque fiducials in or near their tumor during SBRT for abdominal tumors. Kilovoltage images were acquired at 5- to 6-second intervals during treatment using a commercial system. Intrafractional fiducial displacements were measured using in-house software. The dosimetric effect of the observed displacements was calculated for 3 sessions for each patient. Results: Intrafraction displacement patterns variedmore » between patients and between individual treatment sessions. Averaged over 19 patients, 73 sessions, 7.6% of craniocaudal displacements exceeded 0.5 cm, and 1.2% exceeded 0.75 cm. The calculated single-session dose to 95% of gross tumor volume differed from planned by an average of −1.2% (range, −11.1% to 4.8%) but only for 4 patients was the total 3-session calculated dose to 95% of gross tumor volume more than 3% different from planned. Conclusions: Our pneumatic compression limited intrafractional abdominal target motion, maintained target position established at setup, and was moderately effective in preserving coverage. Commercially available intrafractional imaging is useful for surveillance but can be made more effective and reliable.« less

  16. Role of Adjuvant Radiation Therapy After Surgery for Abdominal Desmoplastic Small Round Cell Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Atallah, Vincent; Honore, Charles; Orbach, Daniel

    Purpose: To identify the prognostic role of adjuvant abdominal radiation therapy (RT) on oncologic outcomes as a part of multimodal treatment in the management of desmoplastic small round cell tumor (DSRCT) and to determine its impact according to the quality of surgical resection. Methods and Materials: All patients treated for primary abdominal DSRCT in 8 French centers from 1991 to 2014 were included. Patients were retrospectively staged into 3 groups: group A treated with adjuvant RT after cytoreductive surgery, group B without RT after cytoreductive surgery, and group C by exclusive chemotherapy. Peritoneal progression-free survival (PPFS), progression-free survival (PFS), andmore » overall survival (OS) were evaluated. We also performed a direct comparison between groups A and B to evaluate RT after cytoreductive surgery. Radiation therapy was also evaluated according to completeness of surgery: complete cytoreductive surgery (CCS) or incomplete cytoreductive surgery (ICS). Results: Thirty-seven (35.9%), thirty-six (34.9%), and thirty (28.0%) patients were included in groups A, B, and C, respectively. Three-year OS was 61.2% (range, 41.0%-76.0%), 37.6% (22.0%-53.1%), and 17.3% (6.3%-32.8%) for groups A, B, and C, respectively. Overall survival, PPFS, and PFS differed significantly among the 3 groups (P<.001, P<.001, and P<.001, respectively). Overall survival and PPFS were higher in group A (RT group) compared with group B (no RT group) (P=.045 and P=.006, respectively). Three-year PPFS was 23.8% (10.3%-40.4%) for group A and 12.51% (4.0%-26.2%) for group B. After CCS, RT improved PPFS (P=.024), but differences in OS and PFS were not significant (P=.40 and P=.30, respectively). After ICS, RT improved OS (P=.044). A trend of PPFS and PFS increase was observed, but the difference was not statistically significant (P=.073 and P=.076). Conclusions: Adjuvant RT as part of multimodal treatment seems to confer oncologic benefits for patients treated for abdominal

  17. Intraoperative Spillage of Favorable Histology Wilms Tumor Cells: Influence of Irradiation and Chemotherapy Regimens on Abdominal Recurrence. A Report From the National Wilms Tumor Study Group

    SciTech Connect

    Kalapurakal, John A., E-mail: j-kalapurakal@northwestern.ed; Li, Sierra M.; Breslow, Norman E.

    Purpose: We undertook this study to determine (1) the frequency with which spilled tumor cells of favorable histology produced intra-abdominal disease in patients treated with differing chemotherapy regimens and abdominal radiation therapy (RT) and (2) the patterns of relapse and outcomes in such patients. Methods and Materials: The influence of RT dose (0, 10, and 20 Gy), RT fields (flank, whole abdomen), and chemotherapy with dactinomycin and vincristine (2 drugs) vs. added doxorubicin (three drugs) on intra-abdominal tumor recurrence rates was analyzed by logistic regression in 450 patients. Each patient was considered at risk for two types of failure: flankmore » and subdiaphragmatic beyond-flank recurrence, with the correlation between the two outcomes accounted for in the analyses. Results: The crude odds ratio for the risk of recurrence relative to no RT was 0.35 (0.15-0.78) for 10Gy and 0.08 (0.01-0.58) for 20Gy. The odds ratio for the risk of recurrence for doxorubicin to two drugs after adjusting for RT was not significant. For Stage II patients (NWTS-4), the 8-year event rates with and without spillage, respectively, were 79% and 87% for relapse-free survival (p = 0.07) and 90% and 95% for overall survival (p = 0.04). Conclusions: Irradiation (10 Gy or 20 Gy) reduced abdominal tumor recurrence rates after tumor spillage. Tumor spillage in Stage II patients reduced relapse-free survival and overall survival, but only the latter was of statistical significance. These data provide a basis for assessing the risks vs. benefits when considering treatment for children with favorable histology Wilms tumor and surgical spillage.« less

  18. Intravascular application of electrocautery in a rabbit model of abdominal aortic endarterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chuan; Xin, Yi; Li, Na; Li, Diankun; Li, Jingxing; Gu, Chengxiong

    2017-01-01

    Effective therapies for preventing perioperative complications such as thrombosis and inflammation after coronary endarterectomy (CE) are lacking. Electrocoagulation electrotomes have been routinely used in surgery for their cutting, clotting, and hemostatic properties. As strong flattening tools, their electrocautery function may prevent mechanical intimal-adventitial injury to arterial circulation and attenuate stenosis. The present study investigated the effects of intravascular application of electrocautery on ameliorating inflammation and thrombosis in a rabbit model of abdominal aortic endarterectomy. New Zealand rabbits were randomly divided into the sham, control (endarterectomy), and study (endarterectomy + electrocautery) groups with 10 in each group. Abdominal aortas were partially blocked and intima was removed. Electrocautery was performed with an electrocoagulation electrotome through the entire blocked vessel lumen. Vascular ultrasound parameters, molecular biological and histological characteristics of the abdominal aorta including vascular diameter, blood flow velocity, serum interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) levels, and apoptosis rate of vascular endothelial cells (ECs) were evaluated postoperatively by vascular Doppler ultrasound, ELISA, real-time RT-PCR, flow cytometry, and immunofluorescence at various time points. Compared with the endarterectomy + electrocautery group, the isolated endarterectomy group had significantly increased levels and gene expression of TNF-α and IL-6 (P<0.05), and rates of apoptosis of vascular ECs (P<0.05), with gradual vascular stenosis and decreased blood flow velocity. In conclusion, intravascular application of electrocautery has favorable short-term effects on the abdominal aorta and can reduce inflammation in a rabbit model of abdominal aorta endarterectomy. Long-term anti-inflammatory and anti-thrombotic effects on arterial remodeling and the clinical value of electrocautery in CE

  19. Intravascular application of electrocautery in a rabbit model of abdominal aortic endarterectomy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chuan; Xin, Yi; Li, Na; Li, Diankun; Li, Jingxing; Gu, Chengxiong

    2017-07-01

    Effective therapies for preventing perioperative complications such as thrombosis and inflammation after coronary endarterectomy (CE) are lacking. Electrocoagulation electrotomes have been routinely used in surgery for their cutting, clotting, and hemostatic properties. As strong flattening tools, their electrocautery function may prevent mechanical intimal-adventitial injury to arterial circulation and attenuate stenosis. The present study investigated the effects of intravascular application of electrocautery on ameliorating inflammation and thrombosis in a rabbit model of abdominal aortic endarterectomy. New Zealand rabbits were randomly divided into the sham, control (endarterectomy), and study (endarterectomy + electrocautery) groups with 10 in each group. Abdominal aortas were partially blocked and intima was removed. Electrocautery was performed with an electrocoagulation electrotome through the entire blocked vessel lumen. Vascular ultrasound parameters, molecular biological and histological characteristics of the abdominal aorta including vascular diameter, blood flow velocity, serum interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) levels, and apoptosis rate of vascular endothelial cells (ECs) were evaluated postoperatively by vascular Doppler ultrasound, ELISA, real-time RT-PCR, flow cytometry, and immunofluorescence at various time points. Compared with the endarterectomy + electrocautery group, the isolated endarterectomy group had significantly increased levels and gene expression of TNF-α and IL-6 (P<0.05), and rates of apoptosis of vascular ECs (P<0.05), with gradual vascular stenosis and decreased blood flow velocity. In conclusion, intravascular application of electrocautery has favorable short-term effects on the abdominal aorta and can reduce inflammation in a rabbit model of abdominal aorta endarterectomy. Long-term anti-inflammatory and anti-thrombotic effects on arterial remodeling and the clinical value of electrocautery in CE

  20. Complete resection of a rectus abdominis muscle invaded by desmoid tumors and subsequent management with an abdominal binder: a case report.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Tatsuhiko

    2018-02-07

    Desmoid-type fibromatosis is characterized by desmoid tumors, which are benign soft tissue tumors that can be locally aggressive but typically do not metastasize. Desmoid tumors can manifest anywhere in the body, and those in the abdominal cavity account for approximately 30 to 50% of all such tumors. Complete resection with free margins has been the standard treatment, but non-surgical therapies have been implemented recently. However, if tumors are strongly invasive and/or persistently recur, radical surgical resection with free margins remains the primary treatment. Unfortunately, radical resection may cause large abdominal defects and hinder reconstruction. Several reports and recommendations have addressed this issue; however, to the best of our knowledge, few reports have described complete resection and the subsequent reconstruction of the rectus abdominis muscle. A 35-year-old Asian woman presented at our hospital with a chief complaint of abdominal pain. She had abdominal desmoid tumors that required complete resection of her rectus abdominis muscle. Due to necrosis in her own reconstructed tissue, we failed to cover her anterior abdominal wall; thus, we used an abdominal binder as a substitute material to avoid exacerbating the incisional hernia and help her generate intra-abdominal pressure. This case report may be informative and helpful for the treatment of patients with desmoid tumors, as managing desmoid-type fibromatosis is difficult.

  1. Kilovoltage imaging of implanted fiducials to monitor intrafraction motion with abdominal compression during stereotactic body radiotherapy for GI tumors

    PubMed Central

    Yorke, Ellen; Xiong, Ying; Han, Qian; Zhang, Pengpeng; Mageras, Gikas; Lovelock, Michael; Pham, Hai; Xiong, Jian-Ping; Goodman, Karyn A.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose/Objective To assess intrafraction respiratory motion using a commercial kilovoltage imaging system for abdominal tumor patients with implanted fiducials and breathing constrained by pneumatic compression during stereotactic body radiotherapy (sbrt). Methods and Materials A pneumatic compression belt limited respiratory motion in 19 patients with radiopaque fiducials in or near their tumor during sbrt for abdominal tumors. Kilovoltage images were acquired at 5–6 sec intervals during treatment using a commercial system. Intrafractional fiducial displacements were measured using in-house software. The dosimetric effect of the observed displacements was calculated for three sessions for each patient. Results Intrafraction displacement patterns varied between patients and between individual treatment sessions. Averaged over 19 patients, 73 sessions, 7.6% of craniocaudal displacements exceeded 0.5 cm and 1.2% exceeded 0.75 cm. The calculated single session dose to 95% of gross tumor volume (GTVD95) differed from planned by an average of −1.2% (−11.1%−4.8%) but only for 4 patients was total 3-session calculated GTVD95 over 3% different from planned Conclusions Our pneumatic compression limited intrafractional abdominal target motion, maintained target position established at setup, and was moderately effective in preserving coverage. Commercially available intrafractional imaging is useful for surveillance but can be made more effective and reliable. PMID:26797539

  2. Abdominal surgery process modeling framework for simulation using spreadsheets.

    PubMed

    Boshkoska, Biljana Mileva; Damij, Talib; Jelenc, Franc; Damij, Nadja

    2015-08-01

    We provide a continuation of the existing Activity Table Modeling methodology with a modular spreadsheets simulation. The simulation model developed is comprised of 28 modeling elements for the abdominal surgery cycle process. The simulation of a two-week patient flow in an abdominal clinic with 75 beds demonstrates the applicability of the methodology. The simulation does not include macros, thus programming experience is not essential for replication or upgrading the model. Unlike the existing methods, the proposed solution employs a modular approach for modeling the activities that ensures better readability, the possibility of easily upgrading the model with other activities, and its easy extension and connectives with other similar models. We propose a first-in-first-served approach for simulation of servicing multiple patients. The uncertain time duration of the activities is modeled using the function "rand()". The patients movements from one activity to the next one is tracked with nested "if()" functions, thus allowing easy re-creation of the process without the need of complex programming. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  3. The effectiveness of a pneumatic compression belt in reducing respiratory motion of abdominal tumors in patients undergoing stereotactic body radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Lovelock, D Michael; Zatcky, Joan; Goodman, Karyn; Yamada, Yoshiya

    2014-06-01

    Abdominal compression using a pneumatic abdominal compression belt developed in-house has been used to reduce respiratory motion of patients undergoing hypo-fractionated or single fraction stereotactic radio-ablative therapy for abdominal cancers. The clinical objective of belt usage was to reduce the cranial-caudal (CC) respiratory motion of the tumor to 5 mm or less during both CT simulation and treatment. A retrospective analysis was done to determine the effectiveness of the device and associated clinical procedures to reduce the CC respiratory motion of the tumor. 42 patients treated for tumors in the liver (30), adrenal glands (6), pancreas (3) and lymph nodes (3) using high dose hypofractionated radiotherapy between 2004 and the present were eligible for analysis. All patients had 2-3 radiopaque fiducial markers implanted near the tumor prior to simulation, or had clips from prior surgery. Integral to the belt is an inflatable air bladder that is positioned over the abdomen. The pneumatic pressure was set to a level in consultation with the patient. The CC motion was measured fluoroscopically with and without pneumatic pressure. Pneumatic pressure was used at all treatments to reduce to CC motion to that achieved at simulation. The mean CC motion with the belt in place, but no additional air pressure was 11.4 mm with a range of 5-20 mm. With the pressure applied, the mean CC motion was reduced to 4.4 mm with a range of 1-8 mm (P-value < 0.001). The clinical objective of reducing the CC motion of the tumor to a maximum excursion of 5 mm or less was achieved in 93% of cases. The use of a pneumatic compression belt and associated clinical procedures was found to result in a significant and frequently substantial reduction in the CC motion of the tumor.

  4. Virtual modeling of robot-assisted manipulations in abdominal surgery.

    PubMed

    Berelavichus, Stanislav V; Karmazanovsky, Grigory G; Shirokov, Vadim S; Kubyshkin, Valeriy A; Kriger, Andrey G; Kondratyev, Evgeny V; Zakharova, Olga P

    2012-06-27

    To determine the effectiveness of using multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) data in preoperative planning of robot-assisted surgery. Fourteen patients indicated for surgery underwent MDCT using 64 and 256-slice MDCT. Before the examination, a specially constructed navigation net was placed on the patient's anterior abdominal wall. Processing of MDCT data was performed on a Brilliance Workspace 4 (Philips). Virtual vectors that imitate robotic and assistant ports were placed on the anterior abdominal wall of the 3D model of the patient, considering the individual anatomy of the patient and the technical capabilities of robotic arms. Sites for location of the ports were directed by projection on the roentgen-positive tags of the navigation net. There were no complications observed during surgery or in the post-operative period. We were able to reduce robotic arm interference during surgery. The surgical area was optimal for robotic and assistant manipulators without any need for reinstallation of the trocars. This method allows modeling of the main steps in robot-assisted intervention, optimizing operation of the manipulator and lowering the risk of injuries to internal organs.

  5. Animal models in the research of abdominal aortic aneurysms development.

    PubMed

    Patelis, N; Moris, D; Schizas, D; Damaskos, C; Perrea, D; Bakoyiannis, C; Liakakos, T; Georgopoulos, S

    2017-12-20

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a prevalent and potentially life threatening disease. Many animal models have been developed to simulate the natural history of the disease or test preclinical endovascular devices and surgical procedures. The aim of this review is to describe different methods of AAA induction in animal models and report on the effectiveness of the methods described in inducing an analogue of a human AAA. The PubMed database was searched for publications with titles containing the following terms "animal" or "animal model(s)" and keywords "research", "aneurysm(s)", "aorta", "pancreatic elastase", "Angiotensin", "AngII" "calcium chloride" or "CaCl(2)". Starting date for this search was set to 2004, since previously bibliography was already covered by the review of Daugherty and Cassis (2004). We focused on animal studies that reported a model of aneurysm development and progression. A number of different approaches of AAA induction in animal models has been developed, used and combined since the first report in the 1960's. Although specific methods are successful in AAA induction in animal models, it is necessary that these methods and their respective results are in line with the pathophysiology and the mechanisms involved in human AAA development. A researcher should know the advantages/disadvantages of each animal model and choose the appropriate model.

  6. Radiological features of primitive neuroectodermal tumors in intra-abdominal and retroperitoneal regions: A series of 18 cases

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Youming; Xiao, Desheng; Yin, Hongling; Long, Xueying; Li, Li; Zai, Hongyan; Chen, Minfeng; Li, Wenzheng; Sun, Lunquan

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To characterize the imaging and clinicopathological features of primitive neuroectodermal tumors (PNETs) arising in intra-abdominal and retroperitoneal regions. Methods Eighteen patients with histopathologically proven intra-abdominal and retroperitoneal PNET were enrolled; computed tomography was performed for all cases, and magnetic resonance imaging was performed for a single case. Typical computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging findings, including morphology, texture and enhancement features, as well as clinicopathological characteristics and prognosis data were retrospectively analyzed. Results Of eighteen PNET patients, fifteen were male and three were female, with a median age of 36 years (range, 2–65 years). The onset of symptoms was most often nonspecific and insidious. The mean tumor diameter was 7.2 cm (range, 3.0–12.1 cm), with necrosis in fifteen cases, cystic changes in eight, partition structure in five, calcification in five, hemorrhage in two, and mural nodules in one. Contrast enhanced computed tomography showed multiple tiny feeding arteries within the masses in six cases, resulting in a crab-like appearance, and mild ring enhancement pattern in five cases. Eleven cases showed surrounding invasion and metastasis. Of the eighteen PNET cases, nine cases showed smooth, well-defined margins, and nine cases had irregular, ill-defined margins. A median survival was 10.0±1.6 months. However, chemotherapy had efficacy on patients even those with advanced disease. Conclusions Primary intra-abdominal and retroperitoneal PNETs are rare, and imaging features documented here may help the diagnosis of this severe disease. Notably, two signs present in retroperitoneal PNET tumors, including a mild ring enhancement pattern and a crab-like appearance of the tiny feeding arteries, may have the potential to help us improve the ability to make a relatively reliable diagnosis. PMID:28319177

  7. An evaluation of brachytherapy and external beam radiation used with wide-margin surgical resection in the treatment of extra-abdominal desmoid tumors.

    PubMed

    Husain, Zain; Benevenia, Joseph; Uglialoro, Anthony D; Beebe, Kathleen S; Patterson, Francis R; Hameed, Meera R; Cathcart, Charles S

    2011-05-01

    Surgical resection has had control rates of 53% to 77% in the treatment of extra-abdominal desmoid tumors. Surgical excision combined with external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) has had local control rates of up to 83% in some series. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of resection combined with radiotherapy (brachytherapy, EBRT, or both) in the treatment of extra-abdominal desmoid tumors. We retrospectively reviewed the charts of 24 consecutive patients (27 histologically confirmed extra-abdominal desmoid tumors). Patients were included in the study if they had a lesion that was potentially resectable with a wide margin, allowing for limb salvage, and if they did not have a contraindication to radiotherapy. Limb functioning was assessed with the Musculoskeletal Tumor Society (MSTS) scoring system. Seventeen patients (7 men, 10 women) with 19 tumors met the inclusion criteria. Mean age at diagnosis was 23.4 years. Follow-up (mean, 4.28 years) involved serial clinical examinations and magnetic resonance imaging of tumor sites. After surgery, the tumors were treated with brachytherapy (n = 6), EBRT (n = 10), or both (n = 3). Two of the 17 tumors in patients with negative margins of resection recurred locally (local control rate, 88.2%). Mean MSTS score was 29/30 (96.7%). The role of surgery, radiotherapy, chemotherapy, hormone therapy, and other treatments for extra-abdominal desmoid tumors is not well defined. When wide-margin resection and radiotherapy can be performed with limb preservation surgery, local control and complication rates compare favorably with those of other reported methods of treatment. Given the results and limitations of our study, we cannot make a definitive recommendation as to which modality--brachytherapy or EBRT--should be used in the treatment of extra-abdominal desmoid tumors.

  8. Tumor Size on Abdominal MRI Versus Pathologic Specimen in Resected Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma: Implications for Radiation Treatment Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, William A., E-mail: whall4@emory.edu; Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia; Mikell, John L.

    2013-05-01

    Purpose: We assessed the accuracy of abdominal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for determining tumor size by comparing the preoperative contrast-enhanced T1-weighted gradient echo (3-dimensional [3D] volumetric interpolated breath-hold [VIBE]) MRI tumor size with pathologic specimen size. Methods and Materials: The records of 92 patients who had both preoperative contrast-enhanced 3D VIBE MRI images and detailed pathologic specimen measurements were available for review. Primary tumor size from the MRI was independently measured by a single diagnostic radiologist (P.M.) who was blinded to the pathology reports. Pathologic tumor measurements from gross specimens were obtained from the pathology reports. The maximum dimensions ofmore » tumor measured in any plane on the MRI and the gross specimen were compared. The median difference between the pathology sample and the MRI measurements was calculated. A paired t test was conducted to test for differences between the MRI and pathology measurements. The Pearson correlation coefficient was used to measure the association of disparity between the MRI and pathology sizes with the pathology size. Disparities relative to pathology size were also examined and tested for significance using a 1-sample t test. Results: The median patient age was 64.5 years. The primary site was pancreatic head in 81 patients, body in 4, and tail in 7. Three patients were American Joint Commission on Cancer stage IA, 7 stage IB, 21 stage IIA, 58 stage IIB, and 3 stage III. The 3D VIBE MRI underestimated tumor size by a median difference of 4 mm (range, −34-22 mm). The median largest tumor dimensions on MRI and pathology specimen were 2.65 cm (range, 1.5-9.5 cm) and 3.2 cm (range, 1.3-10 cm), respectively. Conclusions: Contrast-enhanced 3D VIBE MRI underestimates tumor size by 4 mm when compared with pathologic specimen. Advanced abdominal MRI sequences warrant further investigation for radiation therapy planning in pancreatic adenocarcinoma

  9. Genetically Engineered Mouse Models of Pituitary Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Cano, David A.; Soto-Moreno, Alfonso; Leal-Cerro, Alfonso

    2014-01-01

    Animal models constitute valuable tools for investigating the pathogenesis of cancer as well as for preclinical testing of novel therapeutics approaches. However, the pathogenic mechanisms of pituitary-tumor formation remain poorly understood, particularly in sporadic adenomas, thus, making it a challenge to model pituitary tumors in mice. Nevertheless, genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs) of pituitary tumors have provided important insight into pituitary tumor biology. In this paper, we review various GEMMs of pituitary tumors, highlighting their contributions and limitations, and discuss opportunities for research in the field. PMID:25136513

  10. Epithelioid inflammatory myofibroblastic sarcoma: An aggressive intra-abdominal variant of inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor with nuclear membrane or perinuclear ALK.

    PubMed

    Mariño-Enríquez, Adrián; Wang, Wei-Lien; Roy, Angshumoy; Lopez-Terrada, Dolores; Lazar, Alexander J F; Fletcher, Christopher D M; Coffin, Cheryl M; Hornick, Jason L

    2011-01-01

    Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor (IMT) is a mesenchymal neoplasm of intermediate biological potential, which may recur and rarely metastasize. Pathologic features do not correlate well with behavior. Approximately 50% of conventional IMTs harbor ALK gene rearrangement and overexpress ALK, most showing diffuse cytoplasmic staining. Rare IMTs with a distinct nuclear membrane or perinuclear pattern of ALK staining and epithelioid or round cell morphology have been reported. These cases pursued an aggressive clinical course, suggesting that such patterns may predict malignant behavior. We describe 11 cases of IMT with epithelioid morphology and a nuclear membrane or perinuclear pattern of immunostaining for ALK. Ten patients were male and 1 was female, ranging from 7 months to 63 years in age (median, 39 y). All tumors were intra-abdominal; most arose in the mesentery or omentum, measuring 8 to 26 cm (median, 15 cm). Six tumors were multifocal at presentation. The tumors were composed predominantly of sheets of round-to-epithelioid cells with vesicular nuclei, large nucleoli, and amphophilic-to-eosinophilic cytoplasm. In all cases, a minor spindle cell component was present. Nine tumors had abundant myxoid stroma. In 7 cases neutrophils were prominent and in 3 cases lymphocytes were prominent. Plasma cells were often absent. Median mitotic rate was 4/10 HPF; 6 tumors had necrosis. By immunohistochemistry, all tumors were positive for ALK, 9 tumors showing a nuclear membrane staining pattern and 2 tumors showing a cytoplasmic pattern with perinuclear accentuation. Other positive markers were desmin (10 of 11), focal smooth muscle actin (4 of 8), and CD30 (8 of 8). All tumors were negative for MYF4, caldesmon, keratins, EMA, and S-100. Fluorescence in situ hybridization was positive for ALK gene rearrangement in 9 cases, and in 3 cases tested, a RANBP2-ALK fusion was detected by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Ten patients underwent surgical resection

  11. In Vitro Model of Tumor Cell Extravasation

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Jessie S.; Zervantonakis, Ioannis K.; Chung, Seok; Kamm, Roger D.; Charest, Joseph L.

    2013-01-01

    Tumor cells that disseminate from the primary tumor and survive the vascular system can eventually extravasate across the endothelium to metastasize at a secondary site. In this study, we developed a microfluidic system to mimic tumor cell extravasation where cancer cells can transmigrate across an endothelial monolayer into a hydrogel that models the extracellular space. The experimental protocol is optimized to ensure the formation of an intact endothelium prior to the introduction of tumor cells and also to observe tumor cell extravasation by having a suitable tumor seeding density. Extravasation is observed for 38.8% of the tumor cells in contact with the endothelium within 1 day after their introduction. Permeability of the EC monolayer as measured by the diffusion of fluorescently-labeled dextran across the monolayer increased 3.8 fold 24 hours after introducing tumor cells, suggesting that the presence of tumor cells increases endothelial permeability. The percent of tumor cells extravasated remained nearly constant from1 to 3 days after tumor seeding, indicating extravasation in our system generally occurs within the first 24 hours of tumor cell contact with the endothelium. PMID:23437268

  12. Congenital intra-abdominal bilateral juvenile granulosa cell tumors of the testis associated with constitutional loss of material from chromosome 4.

    PubMed

    Yu, David C; Pathak, Bhavana; Vargas, Sara O; Javid, Patrick J; Hisama, Fuki M; Wilson, Jay M; Linden, Bradley C

    2011-01-01

    Juvenile granulosa cell tumor (JGCT) is an uncommon gonadal stromal tumor that occurs rarely in the testis. We report a newborn boy with bilateral intra-abdominal JGCT presenting with abdominal distention and respiratory distress at birth. He was taken to the operating room emergently, and 2 large masses connected by gubernacula to the inguinal canals were resected. Associated abnormalities included a constitutional chromosome 4 abnormality, polymicrogyria, and renal cysts. This report describes a rare presentation of JGCT with abdominal compression and expands the literature to include bilateral testicular involvement. Additionally, it is the 1st report of JGCT associated with a chromosome 4 abnormality, highlighting a genetic region that may be important in JGCT development.

  13. Segmenting the thoracic, abdominal and pelvic musculature on CT scans combining atlas-based model and active contour model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Weidong; Liu, Jiamin; Yao, Jianhua; Summers, Ronald M.

    2013-03-01

    Segmentation of the musculature is very important for accurate organ segmentation, analysis of body composition, and localization of tumors in the muscle. In research fields of computer assisted surgery and computer-aided diagnosis (CAD), muscle segmentation in CT images is a necessary pre-processing step. This task is particularly challenging due to the large variability in muscle structure and the overlap in intensity between muscle and internal organs. This problem has not been solved completely, especially for all of thoracic, abdominal and pelvic regions. We propose an automated system to segment the musculature on CT scans. The method combines an atlas-based model, an active contour model and prior segmentation of fat and bones. First, body contour, fat and bones are segmented using existing methods. Second, atlas-based models are pre-defined using anatomic knowledge at multiple key positions in the body to handle the large variability in muscle shape. Third, the atlas model is refined using active contour models (ACM) that are constrained using the pre-segmented bone and fat. Before refining using ACM, the initialized atlas model of next slice is updated using previous atlas. The muscle is segmented using threshold and smoothed in 3D volume space. Thoracic, abdominal and pelvic CT scans were used to evaluate our method, and five key position slices for each case were selected and manually labeled as the reference. Compared with the reference ground truth, the overlap ratio of true positives is 91.1%+/-3.5%, and that of false positives is 5.5%+/-4.2%.

  14. Mechanical Intestinal Obstruction in a Porcine Model: Effects of Intra-Abdominal Hypertension. A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Margallo, F. M.; Latorre, R.; López-Albors, O.; Wise, R.; Malbrain, M. L. N. G.; Castellanos, G.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Mechanical intestinal obstruction is a disorder associated with intra-abdominal hypertension and abdominal compartment syndrome. As the large intestine intraluminal and intra-abdominal pressures are increased, so the patient’s risk for intestinal ischaemia. Previous studies have focused on hypoperfusion and bacterial translocation without considering the concomitant effect of intra-abdominal hypertension. The objective of this study was to design and evaluate a mechanical intestinal obstruction model in pigs similar to the human pathophysiology. Materials and Methods Fifteen pigs were divided into three groups: a control group (n = 5) and two groups of 5 pigs with intra-abdominal hypertension induced by mechanical intestinal obstruction. The intra-abdominal pressures of 20 mmHg were maintained for 2 and 5 hours respectively. Hemodynamic, respiratory and gastric intramucosal pH values, as well as blood tests were recorded every 30 min. Results Significant differences between the control and mechanical intestinal obstruction groups were noted. The mean arterial pressure, cardiac index, dynamic pulmonary compliance and abdominal perfusion pressure decreased. The systemic vascular resistance index, central venous pressure, pulse pressure variation, airway resistance and lactate increased within 2 hours from starting intra-abdominal hypertension (p<0.05). In addition, we observed increased values for the peak and plateau airway pressures, and low values of gastric intramucosal pH in the mechanical intestinal obstruction groups that were significant after 3 hours. Conclusion The mechanical intestinal obstruction model appears to adequately simulate the pathophysiology of intestinal obstruction that occurs in humans. Monitoring abdominal perfusion pressure, dynamic pulmonary compliance, gastric intramucosal pH and lactate values may provide insight in predicting the effects on endorgan function in patients with mechanical intestinal obstruction. PMID

  15. Multi-atlas segmentation for abdominal organs with Gaussian mixture models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, Ryan P.; Xu, Zhoubing; Lee, Christopher P.; Baucom, Rebeccah B.; Poulose, Benjamin K.; Abramson, Richard G.; Landman, Bennett A.

    2015-03-01

    Abdominal organ segmentation with clinically acquired computed tomography (CT) is drawing increasing interest in the medical imaging community. Gaussian mixture models (GMM) have been extensively used through medical segmentation, most notably in the brain for cerebrospinal fluid / gray matter / white matter differentiation. Because abdominal CT exhibit strong localized intensity characteristics, GMM have recently been incorporated in multi-stage abdominal segmentation algorithms. In the context of variable abdominal anatomy and rich algorithms, it is difficult to assess the marginal contribution of GMM. Herein, we characterize the efficacy of an a posteriori framework that integrates GMM of organ-wise intensity likelihood with spatial priors from multiple target-specific registered labels. In our study, we first manually labeled 100 CT images. Then, we assigned 40 images to use as training data for constructing target-specific spatial priors and intensity likelihoods. The remaining 60 images were evaluated as test targets for segmenting 12 abdominal organs. The overlap between the true and the automatic segmentations was measured by Dice similarity coefficient (DSC). A median improvement of 145% was achieved by integrating the GMM intensity likelihood against the specific spatial prior. The proposed framework opens the opportunities for abdominal organ segmentation by efficiently using both the spatial and appearance information from the atlases, and creates a benchmark for large-scale automatic abdominal segmentation.

  16. Removal of an intra-abdominal desmoplastic small round cell tumor by repetitive debulking surgery: A case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Shimazaki, Jiro; Motohashi, Gyo; Nishida, Kiyotaka; Tabuchi, Takanobu; Ubukata, Hideyuki; Tabuchi, Takafumi

    2014-05-01

    In the current study, a case of recurrent desmoplastic small round cell tumor (DSRCT) is presented, which was successfully treated by repetitive debulking surgery. In May 2010, a 39-year-old male, with a history of surgical resection of intra-abdominal DSRCT, visited the Ibaraki Medical Center, Tokyo Medical University Hospital (Ami, Japan) with severe lower abdominal discomfort. Abdominal computed tomography revealed a large tumor in the pouch of Douglas with a small number of nodules in the abdominal cavity. The recurrent DSRCT was diagnosed and removed via lower anterior resection; however, complete resection was impossible due to multiple peritoneal metastases. One year later, the patient developed pain in the right groin due to the growth of metastasized tumor cells in the groin lymph nodes. The affected lymph nodes were removed utilizing an extra-peritoneal approach. At the time of writing, the patient continues to survive without any symptoms 60 months since the initial surgery. In conclusion, surgical debulking is a significant procedure for relieving patient symptoms as well as improving the survival time of patients with metastatic and recurrent DSRCT.

  17. Image-driven, model-based 3D abdominal motion estimation for MR-guided radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Stemkens, Bjorn; Tijssen, Rob H N; de Senneville, Baudouin Denis; Lagendijk, Jan J W; van den Berg, Cornelis A T

    2016-07-21

    Respiratory motion introduces substantial uncertainties in abdominal radiotherapy for which traditionally large margins are used. The MR-Linac will open up the opportunity to acquire high resolution MR images just prior to radiation and during treatment. However, volumetric MRI time series are not able to characterize 3D tumor and organ-at-risk motion with sufficient temporal resolution. In this study we propose a method to estimate 3D deformation vector fields (DVFs) with high spatial and temporal resolution based on fast 2D imaging and a subject-specific motion model based on respiratory correlated MRI. In a pre-beam phase, a retrospectively sorted 4D-MRI is acquired, from which the motion is parameterized using a principal component analysis. This motion model is used in combination with fast 2D cine-MR images, which are acquired during radiation, to generate full field-of-view 3D DVFs with a temporal resolution of 476 ms. The geometrical accuracies of the input data (4D-MRI and 2D multi-slice acquisitions) and the fitting procedure were determined using an MR-compatible motion phantom and found to be 1.0-1.5 mm on average. The framework was tested on seven healthy volunteers for both the pancreas and the kidney. The calculated motion was independently validated using one of the 2D slices, with an average error of 1.45 mm. The calculated 3D DVFs can be used retrospectively for treatment simulations, plan evaluations, or to determine the accumulated dose for both the tumor and organs-at-risk on a subject-specific basis in MR-guided radiotherapy.

  18. Image-driven, model-based 3D abdominal motion estimation for MR-guided radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stemkens, Bjorn; Tijssen, Rob H. N.; de Senneville, Baudouin Denis; Lagendijk, Jan J. W.; van den Berg, Cornelis A. T.

    2016-07-01

    Respiratory motion introduces substantial uncertainties in abdominal radiotherapy for which traditionally large margins are used. The MR-Linac will open up the opportunity to acquire high resolution MR images just prior to radiation and during treatment. However, volumetric MRI time series are not able to characterize 3D tumor and organ-at-risk motion with sufficient temporal resolution. In this study we propose a method to estimate 3D deformation vector fields (DVFs) with high spatial and temporal resolution based on fast 2D imaging and a subject-specific motion model based on respiratory correlated MRI. In a pre-beam phase, a retrospectively sorted 4D-MRI is acquired, from which the motion is parameterized using a principal component analysis. This motion model is used in combination with fast 2D cine-MR images, which are acquired during radiation, to generate full field-of-view 3D DVFs with a temporal resolution of 476 ms. The geometrical accuracies of the input data (4D-MRI and 2D multi-slice acquisitions) and the fitting procedure were determined using an MR-compatible motion phantom and found to be 1.0-1.5 mm on average. The framework was tested on seven healthy volunteers for both the pancreas and the kidney. The calculated motion was independently validated using one of the 2D slices, with an average error of 1.45 mm. The calculated 3D DVFs can be used retrospectively for treatment simulations, plan evaluations, or to determine the accumulated dose for both the tumor and organs-at-risk on a subject-specific basis in MR-guided radiotherapy.

  19. In silico modeling for tumor growth visualization.

    PubMed

    Jeanquartier, Fleur; Jean-Quartier, Claire; Cemernek, David; Holzinger, Andreas

    2016-08-08

    Cancer is a complex disease. Fundamental cellular based studies as well as modeling provides insight into cancer biology and strategies to treatment of the disease. In silico models complement in vivo models. Research on tumor growth involves a plethora of models each emphasizing isolated aspects of benign and malignant neoplasms. Biologists and clinical scientists are often overwhelmed by the mathematical background knowledge necessary to grasp and to apply a model to their own research. We aim to provide a comprehensive and expandable simulation tool to visualizing tumor growth. This novel Web-based application offers the advantage of a user-friendly graphical interface with several manipulable input variables to correlate different aspects of tumor growth. By refining model parameters we highlight the significance of heterogeneous intercellular interactions on tumor progression. Within this paper we present the implementation of the Cellular Potts Model graphically presented through Cytoscape.js within a Web application. The tool is available under the MIT license at https://github.com/davcem/cpm-cytoscape and http://styx.cgv.tugraz.at:8080/cpm-cytoscape/ . In-silico methods overcome the lack of wet experimental possibilities and as dry method succeed in terms of reduction, refinement and replacement of animal experimentation, also known as the 3R principles. Our visualization approach to simulation allows for more flexible usage and easy extension to facilitate understanding and gain novel insight. We believe that biomedical research in general and research on tumor growth in particular will benefit from the systems biology perspective.

  20. Abdominal Wall Endometriosis Mimicking Metastases.

    PubMed

    Nambiar, Rakul; Anoop, T M; Mony, Rari P

    2018-06-01

    Abdominal wall lesions can be broadly divided into nontumorous and tumorous conditions. Nontumorous lesions include congenital lesion, abdominal wall hernia, inflammation and infection, vascular lesions, and miscellaneous conditions like hematoma. Tumorous lesions include benign and malignant neoplasms. Here, we report an unusual case of abdominal wall endometriosis mimicking metastases in a patient with breast carcinoma.

  1. Abdominal Adhesions

    MedlinePlus

    ... Clearinghouse What are abdominal adhesions? Abdominal adhesions are bands of fibrous tissue that can form between abdominal ... Esophagus Stomach Large intestine Adhesion Abdominal adhesions are bands of fibrous tissue that can form between abdominal ...

  2. Abdominal Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Recurrent or Functional Abdominal Pain (RAP or FAP) What is abdominal pain? Abdominal pain , or stomachache, ... recurrent abdominal pain (RAP) or functional abdominal pain (FAP)? If your health care provider has ruled out ...

  3. Augmented reality in a tumor resection model.

    PubMed

    Chauvet, Pauline; Collins, Toby; Debize, Clement; Novais-Gameiro, Lorraine; Pereira, Bruno; Bartoli, Adrien; Canis, Michel; Bourdel, Nicolas

    2018-03-01

    Augmented Reality (AR) guidance is a technology that allows a surgeon to see sub-surface structures, by overlaying pre-operative imaging data on a live laparoscopic video. Our objectives were to evaluate a state-of-the-art AR guidance system in a tumor surgical resection model, comparing the accuracy of the resection with and without the system. Our system has three phases. Phase 1: using the MRI images, the kidney's and pseudotumor's surfaces are segmented to construct a 3D model. Phase 2: the intra-operative 3D model of the kidney is computed. Phase 3: the pre-operative and intra-operative models are registered, and the laparoscopic view is augmented with the pre-operative data. We performed a prospective experimental study on ex vivo porcine kidneys. Alginate was injected into the parenchyma to create pseudotumors measuring 4-10 mm. The kidneys were then analyzed by MRI. Next, the kidneys were placed into pelvictrainers, and the pseudotumors were laparoscopically resected. The AR guidance system allows the surgeon to see tumors and margins using classical laparoscopic instruments, and a classical screen. The resection margins were measured microscopically to evaluate the accuracy of resection. Ninety tumors were segmented: 28 were used to optimize the AR software, and 62 were used to randomly compare surgical resection: 29 tumors were resected using AR and 33 without AR. The analysis of our pathological results showed 4 failures (tumor with positive margins) (13.8%) in the AR group, and 10 (30.3%) in the Non-AR group. There was no complete miss in the AR group, while there were 4 complete misses in the non-AR group. In total, 14 (42.4%) tumors were completely missed or had a positive margin in the non-AR group. Our AR system enhances the accuracy of surgical resection, particularly for small tumors. Crucial information such as resection margins and vascularization could also be displayed.

  4. Antioxidant Vitamin C attenuates experimental abdominal aortic aneurysm development in an elastase-induced rat model.

    PubMed

    Shang, Tao; Liu, Zhao; Liu, Chang-jian

    2014-05-01

    We investigated the hypothesis that an antioxidant, Vitamin C, could attenuate abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) development in a rat model. An AAA model induced by intraluminal infusion was created in 36 male Sprague Dawley rats, which were randomly distributed into three groups: Sham (saline infused, placebo treated), Control (elastase infused, placebo treated), and Vitamin C (elastase infused, vitamin C treated). Vitamin C and placebo were intraperitoneally injected, initiating 1 wk before the infusion and continuing throughout the study. The aortic dilatation ratio was measured, and aortic tissues were further examined using biochemical and histologic techniques. Vitamin C attenuated the development of AAA, decreasing maximal aortic diameter by 25.8% (P < 0.05) and preserving elastin lamellae (P < 0.05). Vitamin C also decreased 8-hydroxyguanine (a marker of oxidative damage to DNA) and 8-isoprostane content (a marker of oxidative stress) in aortic tissues (P < 0.05, respectively). The proteins of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, MMP-9, and interleukin 6 were markedly downregulated (P < 0.05, respectively), accompanied with notably reduced messenger RNA expression of tumor necrosis factor-α, MMP-2/9, and interleukin 1β (P < 0.05, respectively). However, messenger RNA of tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinase-1 and tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinase-2 were both significantly upregulated in Vitamin C group. Vitamin C treatment had no significant effect on systolic blood pressure (P > 0.05). Vitamin C attenuated AAA development in an elastase-induced rat model via crucial protective effect, which was mediated by an increased level of antioxidant in cooperation with preserving elastin lamellae, inhibiting matrix-degrading proteinases and suppressing inflammatory responses. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Effects of osteoprotegerin/TNFRSF11B in two models of abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Vorkapic, Emina; Kunath, Anne; Wågsäter, Dick

    2018-04-27

    Osteoprotegerin (OPG), additionally termed tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily member 11B, is produced by vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and endothelial cells in the vasculature, and its release may be modulated by pro‑inflammatory cytokines, including interleukin‑1β and tumor necrosis factor‑α. The present study investigated the effects of treatment with low‑dose human recombinant OPG on abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) development in mice. Mice were treated with 1 µg human recombinant OPG four times (or vehicle) for 2 weeks prior to inducing AAA. A total of two different models for inducing AAA were used to investigate the hypothesis as to whether OPG is involved in key events of AAA development, using osmotic mini‑pumps with angiotensin II in apolipoprotein‑E (ApoE‑/‑) mice for 28 days or using periaortic application of CaCl2 on the aorta in C57Bl/6J mice for 14 days. OPG was continuously administered during the experimental period. Histological staining using Masson's trichrome, Verhoeff's van‑Gieson and picro‑sirius red, in addition to reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis of various markers, were used to analyze phenotypic alterations. Treatment with OPG had no inhibitory effect on AAA development in the angiotensin II model in ApoE‑/‑ mice, which developed suprarenal aneurysms, although it increased vessel wall thickness of the aorta and total collagen in C57Bl/6J mice using the CaCl2 model that induced infrarenal dilation of the aorta. Treatment with OPG did not inhibit aneurysm development and key events, including inflammation, extracellular matrix or VSMC remodeling, in aortas from OPG‑treated mice with periaortic treatment with CaCl2. The results indicated that mice treated with low levels of human recombinant OPG may have a more stable aneurysmal phenotype due to compensatory production of collagen and increased vessel wall thickness of the aorta, potentially protecting the

  6. DO THE RADIOLOGICAL CRITERIA WITH THE USE OF RISK FACTORS IMPACT THE FORECASTING OF ABDOMINAL NEUROBLASTIC TUMOR RESECTION IN CHILDREN?

    PubMed Central

    PENAZZI, Ana Cláudia Soares; TOSTES, Vivian Siqueira; DUARTE, Alexandre Alberto Barros; LEDERMAN, Henrique Manoel; CARAN, Eliana Maria Monteiro; ABIB, Simone de Campos Vieira

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: The treatment of neuroblastoma is dependent on exquisite staging; is performed postoperatively and is dependent on the surgeon’s expertise. The use of risk factors through imaging on diagnosis appears as predictive of resectability, complications and homogeneity in staging. Aim: To evaluate the traditional resectability criteria with the risk factors for resectability, through the radiological images, in two moments: on diagnosis and in pre-surgical phase. Were analyzed the resectability, surgical complications and relapse rate. Methods: Retrospective study of 27 children with abdominal and pelvic neuroblastoma stage 3 and 4, with tomography and/or resonance on the diagnosis and pre-surgical, identifying the presence of risk factors. Results: The mean age of the children was 2.5 years at diagnosis, where 55.6% were older than 18 months, 51.9% were girls and 66.7% were in stage 4. There was concordance on resectability of the tumor by both methods (INSS and IDRFs) at both moments of the evaluation, at diagnosis (p=0.007) and post-chemotherapy (p=0.019); In this way, all resectable patients by IDRFs in the post-chemotherapy had complete resection, and the unresectable ones, 87.5% incomplete. There was remission in 77.8%, 18.5% relapsed and 33.3% died. Conclusions: Resectability was similar in both methods at both pre-surgical and preoperative chemotherapy; preoperative chemotherapy increased resectability and decreased number of risk factors, where the presence of at least one IDRF was associated with incomplete resections and surgical complications; relapses were irrelevant. PMID:29257841

  7. DO THE RADIOLOGICAL CRITERIA WITH THE USE OF RISK FACTORS IMPACT THE FORECASTING OF ABDOMINAL NEUROBLASTIC TUMOR RESECTION IN CHILDREN?

    PubMed

    Penazzi, Ana Cláudia Soares; Tostes, Vivian Siqueira; Duarte, Alexandre Alberto Barros; Lederman, Henrique Manoel; Caran, Eliana Maria Monteiro; Abib, Simone de Campos Vieira

    2017-01-01

    The treatment of neuroblastoma is dependent on exquisite staging; is performed postoperatively and is dependent on the surgeon's expertise. The use of risk factors through imaging on diagnosis appears as predictive of resectability, complications and homogeneity in staging. To evaluate the traditional resectability criteria with the risk factors for resectability, through the radiological images, in two moments: on diagnosis and in pre-surgical phase. Were analyzed the resectability, surgical complications and relapse rate. Retrospective study of 27 children with abdominal and pelvic neuroblastoma stage 3 and 4, with tomography and/or resonance on the diagnosis and pre-surgical, identifying the presence of risk factors. The mean age of the children was 2.5 years at diagnosis, where 55.6% were older than 18 months, 51.9% were girls and 66.7% were in stage 4. There was concordance on resectability of the tumor by both methods (INSS and IDRFs) at both moments of the evaluation, at diagnosis (p=0.007) and post-chemotherapy (p=0.019); In this way, all resectable patients by IDRFs in the post-chemotherapy had complete resection, and the unresectable ones, 87.5% incomplete. There was remission in 77.8%, 18.5% relapsed and 33.3% died. Resectability was similar in both methods at both pre-surgical and preoperative chemotherapy; preoperative chemotherapy increased resectability and decreased number of risk factors, where the presence of at least one IDRF was associated with incomplete resections and surgical complications; relapses were irrelevant.

  8. Contrast-Enhanced Abdominal Angiographic CT for Intra-abdominal Tumor Embolization: A New Tool for Vessel and Soft Tissue Visualization

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Bernhard Christian, E-mail: bernhard.meyer@charite.de; Frericks, Bernd Benedikt; Albrecht, Thomas

    2007-07-15

    C-Arm cone-beam computed tomography (CACT), is a relatively new technique that uses data acquired with a flat-panel detector C-arm angiography system during an interventional procedure to reconstruct CT-like images. The purpose of this Technical Note is to present the technique, feasibility, and added value of CACT in five patients who underwent abdominal transarterial chemoembolization procedures. Target organs for the chemoembolizations were kidney, liver, and pancreas and a liposarcoma infiltrating the duodenum. The time for patient positioning, C-arm and system preparation, CACT raw data acquisition, and data reconstruction for a single CACT study ranged from 6 to 12 min. The volumemore » data set produced by the workstation was interactively reformatted using maximum intensity projections and multiplanar reconstructions. As part of an angiography system CACT provided essential information on vascular anatomy, therapy endpoints, and immediate follow-up during and immediately after the abdominal interventions without patient transfer. The quality of CACT images was sufficient to influence the course of treatment. This technology has the potential to expedite any interventional procedure that requires three-dimensional information and navigation.« less

  9. Tumor cell culture on collagen-chitosan scaffolds as three-dimensional tumor model: A suitable model for tumor studies.

    PubMed

    Mahmoudzadeh, Aziz; Mohammadpour, Hemn

    2016-07-01

    Tumor cells naturally live in three-dimensional (3D) microenvironments, while common laboratory tests and evaluations are done in two-dimensional (2D) plates. This study examined the impact of cultured 4T1 cancer cells in a 3D collagen-chitosan scaffold compared with 2D plate cultures. Collagen-chitosan scaffolds were provided and passed confirmatory tests. 4T1 tumor cells were cultured on scaffolds and then tumor cells growth rate, resistance to X-ray radiation, and cyclophosphamide as a chemotherapy drug were analyzed. Furthermore, 4T1 cells were extracted from the scaffold model and were injected into the mice. Tumor growth rate, survival rate, and systemic immune responses were evaluated. Our results showed that 4T1 cells infiltrated the scaffolds pores and constructed a 3D microenvironment. Furthermore, 3D cultured tumor cells showed a slower proliferation rate, increased levels of survival to the X-ray irradiation, and enhanced resistance to chemotherapy drugs in comparison with 2D plate cultures. Transfer of extracted cells to the mice caused enhanced tumor volume and decreased life span. This study indicated that collagen-chitosan nanoscaffolds provide a suitable model of tumor that would be appropriate for tumor studies. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Multiscale modeling of fluid transport in tumors.

    PubMed

    Chapman, S Jonathan; Shipley, Rebecca J; Jawad, Rossa

    2008-11-01

    A model for fluid flow through the leaky neovasculature and porous interstitium of a solid tumor is developed. A network of isolated capillaries is analyzed in the limit of small capillary radius, and analytical expressions for the hydraulic conductivities and fractional leakage coefficients derived. This model is then homogenized to give a continuum description in terms of the vascular density. The resulting equations comprise a double porous medium with coupled Darcy flow through the interstitium and vasculature.

  11. A tumor growth model with deformable ECM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sciumè, G.; Santagiuliana, R.; Ferrari, M.; Decuzzi, P.; Schrefler, B. A.

    2014-12-01

    Existing tumor growth models based on fluid analogy for the cells do not generally include the extracellular matrix (ECM), or if present, take it as rigid. The three-fluid model originally proposed by the authors and comprising tumor cells (TC), host cells (HC), interstitial fluid (IF) and an ECM, considered up to now only a rigid ECM in the applications. This limitation is here relaxed and the deformability of the ECM is investigated in detail. The ECM is modeled as a porous solid matrix with Green-elastic and elasto-visco-plastic material behavior within a large strain approach. Jauman and Truesdell objective stress measures are adopted together with the deformation rate tensor. Numerical results are first compared with those of a reference experiment of a multicellular tumor spheroid (MTS) growing in vitro, then three different tumor cases are studied: growth of an MTS in a decellularized ECM, growth of a spheroid in the presence of host cells and growth of a melanoma. The influence of the stiffness of the ECM is evidenced and comparison with the case of a rigid ECM is made. The processes in a deformable ECM are more rapid than in a rigid ECM and the obtained growth pattern differs. The reasons for this are due to the changes in porosity induced by the tumor growth. These changes are inhibited in a rigid ECM. This enhanced computational model emphasizes the importance of properly characterizing the biomechanical behavior of the malignant mass in all its components to correctly predict its temporal and spatial pattern evolution.

  12. Datamining approaches for modeling tumor control probability.

    PubMed

    Naqa, Issam El; Deasy, Joseph O; Mu, Yi; Huang, Ellen; Hope, Andrew J; Lindsay, Patricia E; Apte, Aditya; Alaly, James; Bradley, Jeffrey D

    2010-11-01

    Tumor control probability (TCP) to radiotherapy is determined by complex interactions between tumor biology, tumor microenvironment, radiation dosimetry, and patient-related variables. The complexity of these heterogeneous variable interactions constitutes a challenge for building predictive models for routine clinical practice. We describe a datamining framework that can unravel the higher order relationships among dosimetric dose-volume prognostic variables, interrogate various radiobiological processes, and generalize to unseen data before when applied prospectively. Several datamining approaches are discussed that include dose-volume metrics, equivalent uniform dose, mechanistic Poisson model, and model building methods using statistical regression and machine learning techniques. Institutional datasets of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients are used to demonstrate these methods. The performance of the different methods was evaluated using bivariate Spearman rank correlations (rs). Over-fitting was controlled via resampling methods. Using a dataset of 56 patients with primary NCSLC tumors and 23 candidate variables, we estimated GTV volume and V75 to be the best model parameters for predicting TCP using statistical resampling and a logistic model. Using these variables, the support vector machine (SVM) kernel method provided superior performance for TCP prediction with an rs=0.68 on leave-one-out testing compared to logistic regression (rs=0.4), Poisson-based TCP (rs=0.33), and cell kill equivalent uniform dose model (rs=0.17). The prediction of treatment response can be improved by utilizing datamining approaches, which are able to unravel important non-linear complex interactions among model variables and have the capacity to predict on unseen data for prospective clinical applications.

  13. Abdominal tap

    MedlinePlus

    Peritoneal tap; Paracentesis; Ascites - abdominal tap; Cirrhosis - abdominal tap; Malignant ascites - abdominal tap ... abdominal cavity ( most often cancer of the ovaries ) Cirrhosis of the liver Damaged bowel Heart disease Infection ...

  14. A new ODE tumor growth modeling based on tumor population dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Oroji, Amin; Omar, Mohd bin; Yarahmadian, Shantia

    2015-10-22

    In this paper a new mathematical model for the population of tumor growth treated by radiation is proposed. The cells dynamics population in each state and the dynamics of whole tumor population are studied. Furthermore, a new definition of tumor lifespan is presented. Finally, the effects of two main parameters, treatment parameter (q), and repair mechanism parameter (r) on tumor lifespan are probed, and it is showed that the change in treatment parameter (q) highly affects the tumor lifespan.

  15. Abdominal Pain Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... blood clots to the lungs) Abdominal or chest wall pain: Shingles (herpes zoster infection) Costochondritis (inflammation of ... or tumors), fat (evidence of impaired digestion and absorption of food), and the presence of germs. X- ...

  16. Acquired hypermethylation of the P16INK4A promoter in abdominal paraganglioma: relation to adverse tumor phenotype and predisposing mutation

    PubMed Central

    Kiss, Nimrod B; Muth, Andreas; Andreasson, Adam; Juhlin, C Christofer; Geli, Janos; Bäckdahl, Martin; Höög, Anders; Wängberg, Bo; Nilsson, Ola; Ahlman, Håkan; Larsson, Catharina

    2013-01-01

    Recurrent alterations in promoter methylation of tumor suppressor genes (TSGs) and LINE1 (L1RE1) repeat elements were previously reported in pheochromocytoma and abdominal paraganglioma. This study was undertaken to explore CpG methylation abnormalities in an extended tumor panel and assess possible relationships between metastatic disease and mutation status. CpG methylation was quantified by bisulfite pyrosequencing for selected TSG promoters and LINE1 repeats. Methylation indices above normal reference were observed for DCR2 (TNFRSF10D), CDH1, P16 (CDKN2A), RARB, and RASSF1A. Z-scores for overall TSG, and individual TSG methylation levels, but not LINE1, were significantly correlated with metastatic disease, paraganglioma, disease predisposition, or outcome. Most strikingly, P16 hypermethylation was strongly associated with SDHB mutation as opposed to RET/MEN2, VHL/VHL, or NF1-related disease. Parallel analyses of constitutional, tumor, and metastasis DNA implicate an order of events where constitutional SDHB mutations are followed by TSG hypermethylation and 1p loss in primary tumors, later transferred to metastatic tissue. In the combined material, P16 hypermethylation was prevalent in SDHB-mutated samples and was associated with short disease-related survival. The findings verify the previously reported importance of P16 and other TSG hypermethylation in an independent tumor series. Furthermore, a constitutional SDHB mutation is proposed to predispose for an epigenetic tumor phenotype occurring before the emanation of clinically recognized malignancy. PMID:23154831

  17. Controlled release of ascorbic acid from gelatin hydrogel attenuates abdominal aortic aneurysm formation in rat experimental abdominal aortic aneurysm model.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Akiko; Hasegawa, Tomomi; Morimoto, Keisuke; Bao, Wulan; Yu, Jie; Okita, Yutaka; Tabata, Yasuhiko; Okada, Kenji

    2014-09-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) are associated with oxidative stress and inflammatory response. We investigated the hypothesis that the known antioxidant ascorbic acid, which can also promote elastin and collagen production by smooth muscle cells, would prevent AAA formation in a rat model. An intraluminal elastase and extraluminal calcium chloride-induced rat AAA model was used, and the animals were divided into three groups: control (group C, n = 18), the aorta wrapped with a saline-impregnated gelatin hydrogel sheet (group G, n = 18), and the aorta wrapped with a gelatin hydrogel sheet incorporating ascorbic acid (group A, n = 18). Wrapping of the sheet was completed at the end of treatment for AAA creation. The aortic dilatation ratio was measured, and aortic tissues were further examined for oxidative stress and oxidative DNA damage using biochemical and histologic techniques. Aortic dilatation at both 4 and 8 weeks was inhibited in group A (dilatation ratio [%] at 4 weeks: 186.2 ± 21.8 in group C, 152.3 ± 10.2 in group G, 126.8 ± 11.6 in group A; P < .0001; dilatation ratio [%] at 8 weeks: 219.3 ± 37.5 in group C, 194.0 ± 11.6 in group G, 145.7 ± 8.3 in group A; P = .0002). Elastin and collagen content were significantly preserved in group A (elastin, P = .0015; collagen, P < .0001). The messenger RNA expressions of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9, monocyte chemotactic protein-1, interleukin-1β, and tissue necrosis factor-α (P = .0024, P < .0001, P < .0001, and P < .0001, respectively) were downregulated in group A (P = .0024), whereas tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinase (TIMP)-1 and TIMP-2 were both upregulated in group A (TIMP-1, P = .0014; TIMP-2, P < .0001). Gelatin zymography showed activities of pro-MMP-2, MMP-2, and MMP-9 were significantly suppressed in group C (P < .0001 for each). Reactive oxygen species expression and 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine and cluster of differentiation 68 staining were significantly suppressed in group A (reactive

  18. Angiogenic Signaling in Living Breast Tumor Models

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-01

    A.S. Kamoun-Goldrat and M.F. Le Merrer, "Animal models of osteogenesis imperfecta and related syndromes," J. Bone Miner. Metab. 25, 211-8 (2007...in the tumor reactive stroma. Therefore these optical properties may be useful in studying genetic disorders of collagen, such as in Osteogenesis ... Imperfecta [26]. Acknowledgments This work is supported by Department of Defense grant W81XWH-05-1-0396. We thank Drs. Ania Majewska and Dr. Julie

  19. Angiogenic Signaling in Living Breast Tumor Models

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-01

    Poisson distributed random noise is added in an amount relative to the desired signal to noise ratio. We fit the data using a regressive fitting...AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-05-1-0396 TITLE: Angiogenic Signaling in Living Breast...CONTRACT NUMBER Angiogenic Signaling in Living Breast Tumor Models 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-05-1-0396 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d

  20. SU-F-T-121: Abdominal Compression Effectively Reduces the Interplay Effect and Enables Pencil Beam Scanning Proton Therapy of Liver Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Souris, K; University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA; Glick, A

    Purpose: To study if abdominal compression can reduce breathing motion and mitigate interplay effect in pencil beam scanning proton therapy (PBSPT) treatment of liver tumors in order to better spare healthy liver volumes compared with photon therapy. Methods: Ten patients, six having large tumors initially treated with IMRT and four having small tumors treated with SBRT, were replanned for PBSPT. ITV and beam-specific PTVs based on 4D-CT were used to ensure target coverage in PBSPT. The use of an abdominal compression belt and volumetric repainting was investigated to mitigate the interplay effect between breathing motion and PBSPT dynamic delivery. Anmore » in-house Matlab script has been developed to simulate this interplay effect. The dose is computed on each phase individually by sorting all spots according to their simulated delivery timing. The final dose distribution is then obtained by accumulating all dose maps to a reference phase. Results: For equivalent target coverage PBSPT reduced average healthy liver dose by 9.5% of the prescription dose compared with IMRT/SBRT. Abdominal compression of 113.2±42.2 mmHg was effective for all 10 patients and reduced average motion by 2.25 mm. As a result, the average ITV volume decreased from 128.2% to 123.1% of CTV volume. Similarly, the average beam-specific PTV volume decreased from 193.2% to 183.3%. For 8 of the 10 patients, the average motion was reduced below 5 mm, and up to 3 repainting were sufficient to mitigate interplay. For the other two patients with larger residual motion, 4–5 repainting were needed. Conclusion: We recommend evaluation of the 4DCT motion histogram following simulation and the interplay effect following treatment planning in order to personalize the use of compression and volumetric repainting for each patient. Abdominal compression enables safe and more effective PBS treatment of liver tumors by reduction of motion and interplay effect. Kevin Souris is supported by IBA and Televie

  1. Dynamic characteristics of MR diffusion-weighted imaging in a rabbit liver VX-2 tumor model.

    PubMed

    Yuan, You-Hong; Xiao, En-Hua; He, Zhong; Jin, Ke; Ma, Cong; Xiang, Jun; Xiao, Jian-Hua; Chen, Wei-Jian

    2013-02-01

    To investigate prospectively dynamic characteristics of the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) on MR diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) in a rabbit VX-2 tumor model. Forty New Zealand rabbits were included in the study, and 47 rabbit VX-2 tumor models were developed by direct and intrahepatic implantation after opening the abdominal cavities. DWI was carried out periodically and respectively on days 7, 14 and 21 after implantation. The VX-2 tumor samples were studied by pathology. The distinction of VX-2 tumors on DWI was assessed by their ADC values by analysis of variance (ANOVA) using SPSS12.0 software. The ADC values (mean ± SD) × 10(-3) mm(2)/s of 47 VX-2 tumors in the peripheral and central areas were 2.18 ± 0.29, 1.96 ± 0.33, 1.80 ± 0.35, 2.20 ± 0.29, 2.05 ± 0.30 and 1.96 ± 0.48, respectively, on days 7, 14 and 21 after implantation. ADC values of 47 VX-2 tumors in the area of the tumor periphery, center and normal parenchyma were higher when the b-value was 100 s/mm(2) than those when the b-value was 300 s/mm(2) (F = 17.964, p < 0.001; F = 13.986, p < 0.001; F = 128.681, p < 0.001). ADC values in the area of normal liver parenchyma were higher than those in the area of the VX-2 tumor periphery and center when the b-value was 100 or 300 s/mm(2). ADCs of viable tumor cells in VX-2 tumors were lower on DWI than those in the area of normal liver parenchyma around the tumor, and ADCs of dead tumor cells in VX-2 tumors were unequal, including high, equal and low values, but they were higher than in the area of normal liver parenchyma around tumors after dead tumor cells had been liquefied or had become cystic. ADC is correlated with the tumor histology and degree of malignancy, and DWI has potential value for dynamically monitoring tumors and evaluating the degree of malignancy and therapeutic effect.

  2. [Two compartment model of body composition and abdominal fat area in postmenopausal women - pilot study].

    PubMed

    Milewska, Magdalena; Mioduszewska, Milena; Pańczyk, Mariusz; Kucharska, Alicja; Sińska, Beata; Dąbrowska-Bender, Marta; Michota-Katulska, Ewa; Zegan, Magdalena; Szabla, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Both menopausal period and aging have influence on body composition, increase of total body fat and visceral fat in particular. We should be aware that changes in body composition, mainly fat translocation to abdominal region, can occur without significant changes in body weight. Therefore quantitative abdominal fat assessment should be our aim. Body composition analysis based on two compartment model and abdominal fat area assessment in cross section. Subjects in postmenopausal period (41 women) were recruited for this study and divided into 2 groups: group 1 - women aged 45-56 years and group 2 - women aged 57-79 years. Body composition analysis and abdominal fat area assessment were conducted by using bioelectrical impedance method with BioScan 920 (Maltron int.) accordingly with standardized procedure. Women in early postmenopausal stage (Group 1) had statistically significant lower total body fat percentage in comparison with women in late postmenopausal period (Group 2) (41.09 ± 7.72% vs. 50.7 ± 9.88%, p=0.0021). Also women in group 1 were characterized by significant lower visceral fat area (VAT) as well as subcutaneous fat area (SAT) in comparison with group 2 (respectively VAT 119.25 ± 30.09 cm2 vs. 199.36 ± 87.38 cm2, p=0.0011; SAT 175.19 ±57.67 cm2 vs. 223.4±74.29 cm2, p=0.0336). According to VAT criteria (>120 cm2), 44% of women in group 1 and 80% in group 2 had excess of visceral fat. Both total body fat and intra-abdominal fat increased with age, independently of weight changes.

  3. Continuous Negative Abdominal Pressure Reduces Ventilator-induced Lung Injury in a Porcine Model.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Takeshi; Engelberts, Doreen; Otulakowski, Gail; Katira, Bhushan; Post, Martin; Ferguson, Niall D; Brochard, Laurent; Amato, Marcelo B P; Kavanagh, Brian P

    2018-04-27

    In supine patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome, the lung typically partitions into regions of dorsal atelectasis and ventral aeration ("baby lung"). Positive airway pressure is often used to recruit atelectasis, but often overinflates ventral (already aerated) regions. A novel approach to selective recruitment of dorsal atelectasis is by "continuous negative abdominal pressure." A randomized laboratory study was performed in anesthetized pigs. Lung injury was induced by surfactant lavage followed by 1 h of injurious mechanical ventilation. Randomization (five pigs in each group) was to positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) alone or PEEP with continuous negative abdominal pressure (-5 cm H2O via a plexiglass chamber enclosing hindlimbs, pelvis, and abdomen), followed by 4 h of injurious ventilation (high tidal volume, 20 ml/kg; low expiratory transpulmonary pressure, -3 cm H2O). The level of PEEP at the start was ≈7 (vs. ≈3) cm H2O in the PEEP (vs. PEEP plus continuous negative abdominal pressure) groups. Esophageal pressure, hemodynamics, and electrical impedance tomography were recorded, and injury determined by lung wet/dry weight ratio and interleukin-6 expression. All animals survived, but cardiac output was decreased in the PEEP group. Addition of continuous negative abdominal pressure to PEEP resulted in greater oxygenation (PaO2/fractional inspired oxygen 316 ± 134 vs. 80 ± 24 mmHg at 4 h, P = 0.005), compliance (14.2 ± 3.0 vs. 10.3 ± 2.2 ml/cm H2O, P = 0.049), and homogeneity of ventilation, with less pulmonary edema (≈10% less) and interleukin-6 expression (≈30% less). Continuous negative abdominal pressure added to PEEP reduces ventilator-induced lung injury in a pig model compared with PEEP alone, despite targeting identical expiratory transpulmonary pressure.

  4. Contrast Dose and Radiation Dose Reduction in Abdominal Enhanced Computerized Tomography Scans with Single-phase Dual-energy Spectral Computerized Tomography Mode for Children with Solid Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Tong; Gao, Jun; Liu, Zhi-Min; Zhang, Qi-Feng; Liu, Yong; Jiang, Ling; Peng, Yun

    2017-01-01

    Background: Contrast dose and radiation dose reduction in computerized tomography (CT) scan for adult has been explored successfully, but there have been few studies on the application of low-concentration contrast in pediatric abdominal CT examinations. This was a feasibility study on the use of dual-energy spectral imaging and adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR) for the reduction of radiation dose and iodine contrast dose in pediatric abdominal CT patients with solid tumors. Methods: Forty-five patients with solid tumors who had initial CT (Group B) and follow-up CT (Group A) after chemotherapy were enrolled. The initial diagnostic CT scan (Group B) was performed using the standard two-phase enhanced CT with 320 mgI/ml concentration contrast, and the follow-up scan (Group A) was performed using a single-phase enhanced CT at 45 s after the beginning of the 270 mgI/ml contrast injection using spectral mode. Forty percent ASiR was used for the images in Group B and monochromatic images with energy levels ≥60 keV in Group A. In addition, filtered back-projection (FBP) reconstruction was used for monochromatic images <60 keV in Group A. The total radiation dose, total iodine load, contrast injection speed, and maximum injection pressure were compared between the two groups. The 40 keV and 60 keV spectral CT images of Group A were compared with the images of Group B to evaluate overall image quality. Results: The total radiation dose, total iodine load, injection speed, and maximum injection pressure for Group A were decreased by 19%, 15%, 34.4%, and 18.3%, respectively. The optimal energy level in spectral CT for displaying the abdominal vessels was 40 keV. At this level, the CT values in the abdominal aorta and its three branches, the portal vein and its two branches, and the inferior vena cava were all greater than 340 hounsfield unit (HU). The abdominal organs of Groups A and B had similar degrees of absolute and relative enhancement (t = 0

  5. Contrast Dose and Radiation Dose Reduction in Abdominal Enhanced Computerized Tomography Scans with Single-phase Dual-energy Spectral Computerized Tomography Mode for Children with Solid Tumors.

    PubMed

    Yu, Tong; Gao, Jun; Liu, Zhi-Min; Zhang, Qi-Feng; Liu, Yong; Jiang, Ling; Peng, Yun

    2017-04-05

    Contrast dose and radiation dose reduction in computerized tomography (CT) scan for adult has been explored successfully, but there have been few studies on the application of low-concentration contrast in pediatric abdominal CT examinations. This was a feasibility study on the use of dual-energy spectral imaging and adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR) for the reduction of radiation dose and iodine contrast dose in pediatric abdominal CT patients with solid tumors. Forty-five patients with solid tumors who had initial CT (Group B) and follow-up CT (Group A) after chemotherapy were enrolled. The initial diagnostic CT scan (Group B) was performed using the standard two-phase enhanced CT with 320 mgI/ml concentration contrast, and the follow-up scan (Group A) was performed using a single-phase enhanced CT at 45 s after the beginning of the 270 mgI/ml contrast injection using spectral mode. Forty percent ASiR was used for the images in Group B and monochromatic images with energy levels ≥60 keV in Group A. In addition, filtered back-projection (FBP) reconstruction was used for monochromatic images <60 keV in Group A. The total radiation dose, total iodine load, contrast injection speed, and maximum injection pressure were compared between the two groups. The 40 keV and 60 keV spectral CT images of Group A were compared with the images of Group B to evaluate overall image quality. The total radiation dose, total iodine load, injection speed, and maximum injection pressure for Group A were decreased by 19%, 15%, 34.4%, and 18.3%, respectively. The optimal energy level in spectral CT for displaying the abdominal vessels was 40 keV. At this level, the CT values in the abdominal aorta and its three branches, the portal vein and its two branches, and the inferior vena cava were all greater than 340 hounsfield unit (HU). The abdominal organs of Groups A and B had similar degrees of absolute and relative enhancement (t = 0.36 and -1.716 for liver, -0.153 and

  6. Recurrent abdominal pain as the presentation of tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS) in an Asian girl: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yun-Ju; Yu, Hsin-Hui; Yang, Yao-Hsu; Lau, Yu-Lung; Lee, Wen-I; Chiang, Bor-Luen

    2014-12-01

    Tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS) is characterized by periodic fever, cutaneous rash, conjunctivitis, lymphadenopathy, abdominal pain, myalgia, and arthralgia. It is a rare autosomal dominant disease and strongly associated with heterozygous mutations in the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor super family 1A (TNFRSF1A) gene. It is believed to be more common in Western countries than in Asian countries. Here, we present the case of a 14-year-old girl with periodic fever and abdominal pain with elevation of inflammatory markers for 2 years. After extensive work-up of infectious etiology with negative results, the diagnosis of TRAPS was made although no gene mutations were identified in the TNFRSF1A gene, MVK gene, and NALP3/CIAS1 gene. She had partial clinical response to corticosteroids and immunomodulatory agents. However, the treatment response to TNF-α inhibitor etanercept was dramatic. She has remained symptom free under regular weekly to biweekly etanercept treatment for 2 years. We also reviewed the related literature and summarized the data of 10 Asian cases of TRAPS. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Fertility and Pregnancy Outcome After Abdominal Irradiation That Included or Excluded the Pelvis in Childhood Tumor Survivors

    SciTech Connect

    Sudour, Helene, E-mail: h.sudour@hotmail.f; Chastagner, Pascal; Claude, Line

    Purpose: To evaluate fertility after abdominal and/or pelvic irradiation in long-term female survivors. Methods and Materials: Puberty and pregnancy outcome were analyzed in female survivors of childhood cancer (aged <18 years) treated with abdominal and/or pelvic radiotherapy (RT) at one of two French centers (Nancy and Lyon) between 1975 and 2004. Data were obtained from medical records and questionnaires sent to the women. Results: A total of 84 patients who had received abdominal and/or pelvic RT during childhood and were alive and aged more than 18 years at the time of the study made up the study population. Of themore » 57 female survivors treated with abdominal RT that excluded the pelvis, 52 (91%) progressed normally through puberty and 23 (40%) had at least one recorded pregnancy. Of the 27 patients treated with pelvic RT, only 10 (37%) progressed normally through puberty and 5 (19%) had at least one recorded pregnancy. Twenty-two women (seventeen of whom were treated with pelvic RT) had certain subfertility. A total of 50 births occurred in 28 women, with one baby dying at birth; one miscarriage also occurred. There was a high prevalence of prematurity and low birth weight but not of congenital malformations. Conclusions: Fertility can be preserved in patients who undergo abdominal RT that excludes the pelvis, taking into account the other treatments (e.g., chemotherapy with alkylating agents) are taken into account. When RT includes the pelvis, fertility is frequently impaired and women can have difficulty conceiving. Nevertheless, pregnancies can occur in some of these women. The most important factor that endangers a successful pregnancy after RT is the total dose received by the ovaries and uterus. This radiation dose has to be systematically recorded to improve our ability to follow up patients.« less

  8. Three-dimensional finite volume modelling of blood flow in simulated angular neck abdominal aortic aneurysm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Algabri, Y. A.; Rookkapan, S.; Chatpun, S.

    2017-09-01

    An abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is considered a deadly cardiovascular disease that defined as a focal dilation of blood artery. The healthy aorta size is between 15 and 24 mm based on gender, bodyweight, and age. When the diameter increased to 30 mm or more, the rupture can occur if it is kept growing or untreated. Moreover, the proximal angular neck of aneurysm is categorized as a significant morphological feature with prime harmful effects on endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR). Flow pattern in pathological vessel can influence the vascular intervention. The aim of this study is to investigate the blood flow behaviours in angular neck abdominal aortic aneurysm with simulated geometry based on patient’s information using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). The 3D angular neck AAA models have been designed by using SolidWorks Software. Consequently, CFD tools are used for simulating these 3D models of angular neck AAA in ANSYS FLUENT Software. Eventually, based on the results, we summarized that the CFD techniques have shown high performance in explaining and investigating the flow patterns for angular neck abdominal aortic aneurysm.

  9. Thymoquinone protects end organs from abdominal aorta ischemia/reperfusion injury in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Aydin, Mehmet Salih; Kocarslan, Aydemir; Kocarslan, Sezen; Kucuk, Ahmet; Eser, İrfan; Sezen, Hatice; Buyukfirat, Evren; Hazar, Abdussemet

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that thymoquinone has protective effects against ischemia reperfusion injury to various organs like lungs, kidneys and liver in different experimental models. We aimed to determine whether thymoquinone has favorable effects on lung, renal, heart tissues and oxidative stress in abdominal aorta ischemia-reperfusion injury. Thirty rats were divided into three groups as sham (n=10), control (n=10) and thymoquinone (TQ) treatment group (n=10). Control and TQ-treatment groups underwent abdominal aorta ischemia for 45 minutes followed by a 120-min period of reperfusion. In the TQ-treatment group, thymoquinone was given 5 minutes. before reperfusion at a dose of 20 mg/kg via an intraperitoneal route. Total antioxidant capacity, total oxidative status (TOS), and oxidative stress index (OSI) in blood serum were measured and lung, kidney, and heart tissue histopathology were evaluated with light microscopy. Total oxidative status and oxidative stress index activity in blood samples were statistically higher in the control group compared to the sham and TQ-treatment groups (P<0.001 for TOS and OSI). Control group injury scores were statistically higher compared to sham and TQ-treatment groups (P<0.001 for all comparisons). Thymoquinone administered intraperitoneally was effective in reducing oxidative stress and histopathologic injury in an acute abdominal aorta ischemia-reperfusion rat model.

  10. Tumor propagation model using generalized hidden Markov model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sun Young; Sargent, Dustin

    2017-02-01

    Tumor tracking and progression analysis using medical images is a crucial task for physicians to provide accurate and efficient treatment plans, and monitor treatment response. Tumor progression is tracked by manual measurement of tumor growth performed by radiologists. Several methods have been proposed to automate these measurements with segmentation, but many current algorithms are confounded by attached organs and vessels. To address this problem, we present a new generalized tumor propagation model considering time-series prior images and local anatomical features using a Hierarchical Hidden Markov model (HMM) for tumor tracking. First, we apply the multi-atlas segmentation technique to identify organs/sub-organs using pre-labeled atlases. Second, we apply a semi-automatic direct 3D segmentation method to label the initial boundary between the lesion and neighboring structures. Third, we detect vessels in the ROI surrounding the lesion. Finally, we apply the propagation model with the labeled organs and vessels to accurately segment and measure the target lesion. The algorithm has been designed in a general way to be applicable to various body parts and modalities. In this paper, we evaluate the proposed algorithm on lung and lung nodule segmentation and tracking. We report the algorithm's performance by comparing the longest diameter and nodule volumes using the FDA lung Phantom data and a clinical dataset.

  11. Mechanical and histological characterization of the abdominal muscle. A previous step to modelling hernia surgery.

    PubMed

    Hernández, B; Peña, E; Pascual, G; Rodríguez, M; Calvo, B; Doblaré, M; Bellón, J M

    2011-04-01

    The aims of this study are to experimentally characterize the passive elastic behaviour of the rabbit abdominal wall and to develop a mechanical constitutive law which accurately reproduces the obtained experimental results. For this purpose, tissue samples from New Zealand White rabbits 2150±50 (g) were mechanically tested in vitro. Mechanical tests, consisting of uniaxial loading on tissue samples oriented along the craneo-caudal and the perpendicular directions, respectively, revealed the anisotropic non-linear mechanical behaviour of the abdominal tissues. Experiments were performed considering the composite muscle (including external oblique-EO, internal oblique-IO and transverse abdominis-TA muscle layers), as well as separated muscle layers (i.e., external oblique, and the bilayer formed by internal oblique and transverse abdominis). Both the EO muscle layer and the IO-TA bilayer demonstrated a stiffer behaviour along the transversal direction to muscle fibres than along the longitudinal one. The fibre arrangement was measured by means of a histological study which confirmed that collagen fibres are mainly responsible for the passive mechanical strength and stiffness. Furthermore, the degree of anisotropy of the abdominal composite muscle turned out to be less pronounced than those obtained while studying the EO and IO-TA separately. Moreover, a phenomenological constitutive law was used to capture the measured experimental curves. A Levenberg-Marquardt optimization algorithm was used to fit the model constants to reproduce the experimental curves. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. EF5 and Motexafin Lutetium in Detecting Tumor Cells in Patients With Abdominal or Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-15

    Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Carcinoma of the Appendix; Fallopian Tube Cancer; Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor; Localized Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Localized Gallbladder Cancer; Localized Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Localized Resectable Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Localized Unresectable Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Metastatic Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Ovarian Sarcoma; Ovarian Stromal Cancer; Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Recurrent Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Recurrent Gallbladder Cancer; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Recurrent Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Recurrent Small Intestine Cancer; Recurrent Uterine Sarcoma; Regional Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma; Small Intestine Leiomyosarcoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Stage 0 Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage I Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage I Colon Cancer; Stage I Gastric Cancer; Stage I Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage I Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage I Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage I Pancreatic Cancer; Stage I Rectal Cancer; Stage I Uterine Sarcoma; Stage II Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage II Colon Cancer; Stage II Gastric Cancer; Stage II Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage II Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage II Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage II Pancreatic Cancer; Stage II Rectal Cancer; Stage II Uterine Sarcoma; Stage III Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage III Colon Cancer; Stage III Gastric Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Rectal Cancer; Stage III Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage IV Colon Cancer; Stage

  13. Improved brain tumor segmentation by utilizing tumor growth model in longitudinal brain MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Linmin; Reza, Syed M. S.; Li, Wei; Davatzikos, Christos; Iftekharuddin, Khan M.

    2017-03-01

    In this work, we propose a novel method to improve texture based tumor segmentation by fusing cell density patterns that are generated from tumor growth modeling. To model tumor growth, we solve the reaction-diffusion equation by using Lattice-Boltzmann method (LBM). Computational tumor growth modeling obtains the cell density distribution that potentially indicates the predicted tissue locations in the brain over time. The density patterns is then considered as novel features along with other texture (such as fractal, and multifractal Brownian motion (mBm)), and intensity features in MRI for improved brain tumor segmentation. We evaluate the proposed method with about one hundred longitudinal MRI scans from five patients obtained from public BRATS 2015 data set, validated by the ground truth. The result shows significant improvement of complete tumor segmentation using ANOVA analysis for five patients in longitudinal MR images.

  14. Improved brain tumor segmentation by utilizing tumor growth model in longitudinal brain MRI.

    PubMed

    Pei, Linmin; Reza, Syed M S; Li, Wei; Davatzikos, Christos; Iftekharuddin, Khan M

    2017-02-11

    In this work, we propose a novel method to improve texture based tumor segmentation by fusing cell density patterns that are generated from tumor growth modeling. In order to model tumor growth, we solve the reaction-diffusion equation by using Lattice-Boltzmann method (LBM). Computational tumor growth modeling obtains the cell density distribution that potentially indicates the predicted tissue locations in the brain over time. The density patterns is then considered as novel features along with other texture (such as fractal, and multifractal Brownian motion (mBm)), and intensity features in MRI for improved brain tumor segmentation. We evaluate the proposed method with about one hundred longitudinal MRI scans from five patients obtained from public BRATS 2015 data set, validated by the ground truth. The result shows significant improvement of complete tumor segmentation using ANOVA analysis for five patients in longitudinal MR images.

  15. Angiogenic Signaling in Living Breast Tumor Models

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-01

    culminated  in  this month’s publication of Sullivan K, Sipprell W, Brown E, Brown E.  (2009)  Improved  model  for  multi‐ photon   fluorescence  recovery...tumor  extracellular  matrix  using  second  harmonic  generation  (SHG).  SHG  is  the  nonabsorptive  combination of two excitation  photons  into one...emission  photon , “catalyzed” by a non‐centrosymmetric  medium such as a crystal surface, asymmetrically  labeled membrane, or properly ordered fibers

  16. An integrated model-based software for FUS in moving abdominal organs.

    PubMed

    Schwenke, Michael; Strehlow, Jan; Haase, Sabrina; Jenne, Juergen; Tanner, Christine; Langø, Thomas; Loeve, Arjo J; Karakitsios, Ioannis; Xiao, Xu; Levy, Yoav; Sat, Giora; Bezzi, Mario; Braunewell, Stefan; Guenther, Matthias; Melzer, Andreas; Preusser, Tobias

    2015-05-01

    Focused ultrasound surgery (FUS) is a non-invasive method for tissue ablation that has the potential for complete and controlled local tumour destruction with minimal side effects. The treatment of abdominal organs such as the liver, however, requires particular technological support in order to enable a safe, efficient and effective treatment. As FUS is applied from outside the patient's body, suitable imaging methods, such as magnetic resonance imaging or diagnostic ultrasound, are needed to guide and track the procedure. To facilitate an efficient FUS procedure in the liver, the organ motion during breathing and the partial occlusion by the rib cage need to be taken into account in real time, demanding a continuous patient-specific adaptation of the treatment configuration. Modelling the patient's respiratory motion and combining this with tracking data improves the accuracy of motion predictions. Modelling and simulation of the FUS effects within the body allows the use of treatment planning and has the potential to be used within therapy to increase knowledge about the patient status. This article describes integrated model-based software for patient-specific modelling and prediction for FUS treatments of moving abdominal organs.

  17. Technical Note: Intrafractional changes in time lag relationship between anterior-posterior external and superior-inferior internal motion signals in abdominal tumor sites.

    PubMed

    Regmi, Rajesh; Lovelock, D Michael; Zhang, Pengpeng; Pham, Hai; Xiong, Jianping; Yorke, Ellen D; Goodman, Karyn A; Wu, Abraham J; Mageras, Gig S

    2015-06-01

    To investigate constancy, within a treatment session, of the time lag relationship between implanted markers in abdominal tumors and an external motion surrogate. Six gastroesophageal junction and three pancreatic cancer patients (IRB-approved protocol) received two cone-beam CTs (CBCT), one before and one after treatment. Time between scans was less than 30 min. Each patient had at least one implanted fiducial marker near the tumor. In all scans, abdominal displacement (Varian RPM) was recorded as the external motion signal. Purpose-built software tracked fiducials, representing internal signal, in CBCT projection images. Time lag between superior-inferior (SI) internal and anterior-posterior external signals was found by maximizing the correlation coefficient in each breathing cycle and averaging over all cycles. Time-lag-induced discrepancy between internal SI position and that predicted from the external signal (external prediction error) was also calculated. Mean ± standard deviation time lag, over all scans and patients, was 0.10 ± 0.07 s (range 0.01-0.36 s). External signal lagged the internal in 17/18 scans. Change in time lag between pre- and post-treatment CBCT was 0.06 ± 0.07 s (range 0.01-0.22 s), corresponding to 3.1% ± 3.7% (range 0.6%-10.8%) of gate width (range 1.6-3.1 s). In only one patient, change in time lag exceeded 10% of the gate width. External prediction error over all scans of all patients varied from 0.1 ± 0.1 to 1.6 ± 0.4 mm. Time lag between internal motion along SI and external signals is small compared to the treatment gate width of abdominal patients examined in this study. Change in time lag within a treatment session, inferred from pre- to post-treatment measurements is also small, suggesting that a single measurement of time lag at the session start is adequate. These findings require confirmation in a larger number of patients.

  18. Technical Note: Intrafractional changes in time lag relationship between anterior–posterior external and superior–inferior internal motion signals in abdominal tumor sites

    PubMed Central

    Regmi, Rajesh; Lovelock, D. Michael; Zhang, Pengpeng; Pham, Hai; Xiong, Jianping; Yorke, Ellen D.; Goodman, Karyn A.; Wu, Abraham J.; Mageras, Gig S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate constancy, within a treatment session, of the time lag relationship between implanted markers in abdominal tumors and an external motion surrogate. Methods: Six gastroesophageal junction and three pancreatic cancer patients (IRB-approved protocol) received two cone-beam CTs (CBCT), one before and one after treatment. Time between scans was less than 30 min. Each patient had at least one implanted fiducial marker near the tumor. In all scans, abdominal displacement (Varian RPM) was recorded as the external motion signal. Purpose-built software tracked fiducials, representing internal signal, in CBCT projection images. Time lag between superior–inferior (SI) internal and anterior–posterior external signals was found by maximizing the correlation coefficient in each breathing cycle and averaging over all cycles. Time-lag-induced discrepancy between internal SI position and that predicted from the external signal (external prediction error) was also calculated. Results: Mean ± standard deviation time lag, over all scans and patients, was 0.10 ± 0.07 s (range 0.01–0.36 s). External signal lagged the internal in 17/18 scans. Change in time lag between pre- and post-treatment CBCT was 0.06 ± 0.07 s (range 0.01–0.22 s), corresponding to 3.1% ± 3.7% (range 0.6%–10.8%) of gate width (range 1.6–3.1 s). In only one patient, change in time lag exceeded 10% of the gate width. External prediction error over all scans of all patients varied from 0.1 ± 0.1 to 1.6 ± 0.4 mm. Conclusions: Time lag between internal motion along SI and external signals is small compared to the treatment gate width of abdominal patients examined in this study. Change in time lag within a treatment session, inferred from pre- to post-treatment measurements is also small, suggesting that a single measurement of time lag at the session start is adequate. These findings require confirmation in a larger number of patients. PMID:26127033

  19. Canine parvovirus NS1 protein exhibits anti-tumor activity in a mouse mammary tumor model.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Shishir Kumar; Yadav, Pavan Kumar; Gandham, Ravi Kumar; Sahoo, A P; Harish, D R; Singh, Arvind Kumar; Tiwari, A K

    2016-02-02

    Many viral proteins have the ability to kill tumor cells specifically without harming the normal cells. These proteins, on ectopic expression, cause lysis or induction of apoptosis in the target tumor cells. Parvovirus NS1 is one of such proteins, which is known to kill high proliferating tumor cells. In the present study, we assessed the apoptosis inducing ability of canine parvovirus type 2 NS1 protein (CPV2.NS1) in vitro in 4T1 cells, and found it to cause significant cell death due to induction of apoptosis through intrinsic or mitochondrial pathway. Further, we also evaluated the oncolytic activity of CPV2.NS1 protein in a mouse mammary tumor model. The results suggested that CPV2.NS1 was able to inhibit the growth of 4T1 induced mouse mammary tumor as indicated by significantly reduced tumor volume, mitotic, AgNOR and PCNA indices. Further, inhibition of tumor growth was found to be because of induction of apoptosis in the tumor cells, which was evident by a significant increase in the number of TUNEL positive cells. Further, CPV2.NS1 was also able to stimulate the immune cells against the tumor antigens as indicated by the increased CD4+ and CD8+ counts in the blood of CVP2.NS1 treated mice. Further optimization of the delivery of NS1 protein and use of an adjuvant may further enhance its anti-tumor activity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. A Mouse Tumor Model of Surgical Stress to Explore the Mechanisms of Postoperative Immunosuppression and Evaluate Novel Perioperative Immunotherapies

    PubMed Central

    Tai, Lee-Hwa; Tanese de Souza, Christiano; Sahi, Shalini; Zhang, Jiqing; Alkayyal, Almohanad A; Ananth, Abhirami Anu; Auer, Rebecca A.C.

    2014-01-01

    Surgical resection is an essential treatment for most cancer patients, but surgery induces dysfunction in the immune system and this has been linked to the development of metastatic disease in animal models and in cancer patients. Preclinical work from our group and others has demonstrated a profound suppression of innate immune function, specifically NK cells in the postoperative period and this plays a major role in the enhanced development of metastases following surgery. Relatively few animal studies and clinical trials have focused on characterizing and reversing the detrimental effects of cancer surgery. Using a rigorous animal model of spontaneously metastasizing tumors and surgical stress, the enhancement of cancer surgery on the development of lung metastases was demonstrated. In this model, 4T1 breast cancer cells are implanted in the mouse mammary fat pad. At day 14 post tumor implantation, a complete resection of the primary mammary tumor is performed in all animals. A subset of animals receives additional surgical stress in the form of an abdominal nephrectomy. At day 28, lung tumor nodules are quantified. When immunotherapy was given immediately preoperatively, a profound activation of immune cells which prevented the development of metastases following surgery was detected. While the 4T1 breast tumor surgery model allows for the simulation of the effects of abdominal surgical stress on tumor metastases, its applicability to other tumor types needs to be tested. The current challenge is to identify safe and promising immunotherapies in preclinical mouse models and to translate them into viable perioperative therapies to be given to cancer surgery patients to prevent the recurrence of metastatic disease. PMID:24686980

  1. Computational modeling of brain tumors: discrete, continuum or hybrid?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhihui; Deisboeck, Thomas S.

    In spite of all efforts, patients diagnosed with highly malignant brain tumors (gliomas), continue to face a grim prognosis. Achieving significant therapeutic advances will also require a more detailed quantitative understanding of the dynamic interactions among tumor cells, and between these cells and their biological microenvironment. Data-driven computational brain tumor models have the potential to provide experimental tumor biologists with such quantitative and cost-efficient tools to generate and test hypotheses on tumor progression, and to infer fundamental operating principles governing bidirectional signal propagation in multicellular cancer systems. This review highlights the modeling objectives of and challenges with developing such in silico brain tumor models by outlining two distinct computational approaches: discrete and continuum, each with representative examples. Future directions of this integrative computational neuro-oncology field, such as hybrid multiscale multiresolution modeling are discussed.

  2. Computational modeling of brain tumors: discrete, continuum or hybrid?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhihui; Deisboeck, Thomas S.

    2008-04-01

    In spite of all efforts, patients diagnosed with highly malignant brain tumors (gliomas), continue to face a grim prognosis. Achieving significant therapeutic advances will also require a more detailed quantitative understanding of the dynamic interactions among tumor cells, and between these cells and their biological microenvironment. Data-driven computational brain tumor models have the potential to provide experimental tumor biologists with such quantitative and cost-efficient tools to generate and test hypotheses on tumor progression, and to infer fundamental operating principles governing bidirectional signal propagation in multicellular cancer systems. This review highlights the modeling objectives of and challenges with developing such in silicobrain tumor models by outlining two distinct computational approaches: discrete and continuum, each with representative examples. Future directions of this integrative computational neuro-oncology field, such as hybrid multiscale multiresolution modeling are discussed.

  3. CFD modelling of abdominal aortic aneurysm on hemodynamic loads using a realistic geometry with CT.

    PubMed

    Soudah, Eduardo; Ng, E Y K; Loong, T H; Bordone, Maurizio; Pua, Uei; Narayanan, Sriram

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study is to find a correlation between the abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) geometric parameters, wall stress shear (WSS), abdominal flow patterns, intraluminal thrombus (ILT), and AAA arterial wall rupture using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Real AAA 3D models were created by three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of in vivo acquired computed tomography (CT) images from 5 patients. Based on 3D AAA models, high quality volume meshes were created using an optimal tetrahedral aspect ratio for the whole domain. In order to quantify the WSS and the recirculation inside the AAA, a 3D CFD using finite elements analysis was used. The CFD computation was performed assuming that the arterial wall is rigid and the blood is considered a homogeneous Newtonian fluid with a density of 1050 kg/m(3) and a kinematic viscosity of 4 × 10(-3) Pa·s. Parallelization procedures were used in order to increase the performance of the CFD calculations. A relation between AAA geometric parameters (asymmetry index ( β ), saccular index ( γ ), deformation diameter ratio ( χ ), and tortuosity index ( ε )) and hemodynamic loads was observed, and it could be used as a potential predictor of AAA arterial wall rupture and potential ILT formation.

  4. Small-Incision Laparoscopy-Assisted Surgery Under Abdominal Cavity Irrigation in a Porcine Model

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Takuro; Aoe, Tomohiko; Yu, Wen-Wei; Ebihara, Yuma; Kawahira, Hiroshi; Isono, Shiro; Naya, Yukio

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Laparoscopic and robot-assisted surgeries are performed under carbon dioxide insufflation. Switching from gas to an isotonic irrigant introduces several benefits and avoids some adverse effects of gas insufflation. We developed an irrigating device and apparatus designed for single-incision laparoscopic surgery and tested its advantages and drawbacks during surgery in a porcine model. Materials and Methods: Six pigs underwent surgical procedures under general anesthesia. A 30-cm extracorporeal cistern was placed over a 5–6-cm abdominal incision. The abdomen was irrigated with warm saline that was drained via a suction tube placed near the surgical field and continuously recirculated through a closed circuit equipped with a hemodialyzer as a filter. Irrigant samples from two pigs were cultured to check for bacterial and fungal contamination. Body weight was measured before and after surgery in four pigs that had not received treatments affecting hemodynamics or causing diuresis. Results: One-way flow of irrigant ensured laparoscopic vision by rinsing blood from the surgical field. Through a retroperitoneal approach, cystoprostatectomy was successfully performed in three pigs, nephrectomy in two, renal excision in two, and partial nephrectomy in one, under simultaneous ultrasonographic monitoring. Through a transperitoneal approach, liver excision and hemostasis with a bipolar sealing device were performed in three pigs, and bladder pedicle excision was performed in one pig. Bacterial and fungal contamination of the irrigant was observed on the draining side of the circuit, but the filter captured the contaminants. Body weight increased by a median of 2.1% (range, 1.2–4.4%) of initial weight after 3–5 hours of irrigation. Conclusions: Surgery under irrigation is feasible and practical when performed via a cistern through a small abdominal incision. This method is advantageous, especially in the enabling of continuous and free

  5. P1033Echocardiographic predictive model of new-onset postoperative atrial fibrillation after abdominal surgery.

    PubMed

    Demirevska, L; Gotchev, D

    2016-12-01

    and purpose: Postoperative atrial fibrillation (POAF) is a frequent complication post high-risk abdominal surgery in elderly patients. This study aimed to develop a predictive model of POAF based on preoperative transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) findings in these patients. We conducted a prospective study of 300 consecutive patients, age ≥ 65 years (mean age 72±6 years, 61% men), who underwent high-risk abdominal surgery under general anesthesia. Preoperative TTE was performed in all patients, including tissue Doppler imaging (TDI). We measured the time interval between the onset of the P-wave on ECG and a point of the peak-A wave on TDI from the lateral mitral annulus (PA lateral) and septal mitral annulus (PA septal). Left atrial (LA) dyssynchrony was measured by subtracting the PA septal from PA lateral. Right ventricular systolic pressure was estimated by using the tricuspid regurgitation jet (TRJ) Doppler velocity method. The primary endpoint was the occurance of new-onset POAF. Thirty-seven (12%) patients developed POAF. Multiple echocardiographic parameters were measured and tested in different combinations. The final model included the following variables with cutoff points predictive of POAF: PA lateral > 139 ms (69% sensitivity, 92% specificity), LA dyssynchrony > 35 ms (78% sensitivity, 89% specificity), and TRJ Doppler velocity >2.6 m/s (89% sensitivity, 64% specificity). A value of 0 was assigned when the result was below the cutoff point and a value of 1 if above the cutoff point. Coding of these three variables in the following order: PA lateral- TRJ Doppler- left atrial dyssynchrony can predict the probability of POAF. The model showed a postive predictive value of 79% and a negative predictive value of 95%. A model using three echocardiographic variables: PA lateral, LA dyssynchrony and TRJ Doppler velocity, can predict the incidence of POAF after high-risk abdominal surgery. The model can be used preoperatively to identify high-risk patients

  6. Model construction of nursing service satisfaction in hospitalized tumor patients.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yongyi; Liu, Jingshi; Xiao, Shuiyuan; Liu, Xiangyu; Tang, Xinhui; Zhou, Yujuan

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to construct a satisfaction model on nursing service in hospitalized tumor patients. Using questionnaires, data about hospitalized tumor patients' expectation, quality perception and satisfaction of hospital nursing service were obtained. A satisfaction model of nursing service in hospitalized tumor patients was established through empirical study and by structural equation method. This model was suitable for tumor specialized hospital, with reliability and validity. Patient satisfaction was significantly affected by quality perception and patient expectation. Patient satisfaction and patient loyalty was also affected by disease pressure. Hospital brand was positively correlated with patient satisfaction and patient loyalty, negatively correlated with patient complaint. Patient satisfaction was positively correlated with patient loyalty, patient complaints, and quality perception, and negatively correlated with disease pressure and patient expectation. The satisfaction model on nursing service in hospitalized tumor patients fits well. By this model, the quality of hospital nursing care may be improved.

  7. Model construction of nursing service satisfaction in hospitalized tumor patients

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yongyi; Liu, Jingshi; Xiao, Shuiyuan; Liu, Xiangyu; Tang, Xinhui; Zhou, Yujuan

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to construct a satisfaction model on nursing service in hospitalized tumor patients. Using questionnaires, data about hospitalized tumor patients’ expectation, quality perception and satisfaction of hospital nursing service were obtained. A satisfaction model of nursing service in hospitalized tumor patients was established through empirical study and by structural equation method. This model was suitable for tumor specialized hospital, with reliability and validity. Patient satisfaction was significantly affected by quality perception and patient expectation. Patient satisfaction and patient loyalty was also affected by disease pressure. Hospital brand was positively correlated with patient satisfaction and patient loyalty, negatively correlated with patient complaint. Patient satisfaction was positively correlated with patient loyalty, patient complaints, and quality perception, and negatively correlated with disease pressure and patient expectation. The satisfaction model on nursing service in hospitalized tumor patients fits well. By this model, the quality of hospital nursing care may be improved. PMID:25419410

  8. Tumor heterogeneity and progression: conceptual foundations for modeling.

    PubMed

    Greller, L D; Tobin, F L; Poste, G

    1996-01-01

    A conceptual foundation for modeling tumor progression, growth, and heterogeneity is presented. The purpose of such models is to aid understanding, test ideas, formulate experiments, and to model cancer 'in machina' to address the dynamic features of tumor cell heterogeneity, progression, and growth. The descriptive capabilities of such an approach provides a consistent language for qualitatively reasoning about tumor behavior. This approach provides a schema for building conceptual models that combine three key phenomenological driving elements: growth, progression, and genetic instability. The growth element encompasses processes contributing to changes in tumor bulk and is distinct from progression per se. The progression element subsumes a broad collection of processes underlying phenotypic progression. The genetics elements represents heritable changes which potentially affect tumor character and behavior. Models, conceptual and mathematical, can be built for different tumor situations by drawing upon the interaction of these three distinct driving elements. These models can be used as tools to explore a diversity of hypotheses concerning dynamic changes in cellular populations during tumor progression, including the generation of intratumor heterogeneity. Such models can also serve to guide experimentation and to gain insight into dynamic aspects of complex tumor behavior.

  9. Discrete Event Simulation for Decision Modeling in Health Care: Lessons from Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Screening

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Edmund; Masconi, Katya L.; Sweeting, Michael J.; Thompson, Simon G.; Powell, Janet T.

    2018-01-01

    Markov models are often used to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of new healthcare interventions but they are sometimes not flexible enough to allow accurate modeling or investigation of alternative scenarios and policies. A Markov model previously demonstrated that a one-off invitation to screening for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) for men aged 65 y in the UK and subsequent follow-up of identified AAAs was likely to be highly cost-effective at thresholds commonly adopted in the UK (£20,000 to £30,000 per quality adjusted life-year). However, new evidence has emerged and the decision problem has evolved to include exploration of the circumstances under which AAA screening may be cost-effective, which the Markov model is not easily able to address. A new model to handle this more complex decision problem was needed, and the case of AAA screening thus provides an illustration of the relative merits of Markov models and discrete event simulation (DES) models. An individual-level DES model was built using the R programming language to reflect possible events and pathways of individuals invited to screening v. those not invited. The model was validated against key events and cost-effectiveness, as observed in a large, randomized trial. Different screening protocol scenarios were investigated to demonstrate the flexibility of the DES. The case of AAA screening highlights the benefits of DES, particularly in the context of screening studies.

  10. Model-based segmentation of abdominal aortic aneurysms in CTA images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Bruijne, Marleen; van Ginneken, Bram; Niessen, Wiro J.; Loog, Marco; Viergever, Max A.

    2003-05-01

    Segmentation of thrombus in abdominal aortic aneurysms is complicated by regions of low boundary contrast and by the presence of many neighboring structures in close proximity to the aneurysm wall. We present an automated method that is similar to the well known Active Shape Models (ASM), combining a three-dimensional shape model with a one-dimensional boundary appearance model. Our contribution is twofold: we developed a non-parametric appearance modeling scheme that effectively deals with a highly varying background, and we propose a way of generalizing models of curvilinear structures from small training sets. In contrast with the conventional ASM approach, the new appearance model trains on both true and false examples of boundary profiles. The probability that a given image profile belongs to the boundary is obtained using k nearest neighbor (kNN) probability density estimation. The performance of this scheme is compared to that of original ASMs, which minimize the Mahalanobis distance to the average true profile in the training set. The generalizability of the shape model is improved by modeling the objects axis deformation independent of its cross-sectional deformation. A leave-one-out experiment was performed on 23 datasets. Segmentation using the kNN appearance model significantly outperformed the original ASM scheme; average volume errors were 5.9% and 46% respectively.

  11. The impact of personalized probabilistic wall thickness models on peak wall stress in abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Biehler, J; Wall, W A

    2018-02-01

    If computational models are ever to be used in high-stakes decision making in clinical practice, the use of personalized models and predictive simulation techniques is a must. This entails rigorous quantification of uncertainties as well as harnessing available patient-specific data to the greatest extent possible. Although researchers are beginning to realize that taking uncertainty in model input parameters into account is a necessity, the predominantly used probabilistic description for these uncertain parameters is based on elementary random variable models. In this work, we set out for a comparison of different probabilistic models for uncertain input parameters using the example of an uncertain wall thickness in finite element models of abdominal aortic aneurysms. We provide the first comparison between a random variable and a random field model for the aortic wall and investigate the impact on the probability distribution of the computed peak wall stress. Moreover, we show that the uncertainty about the prevailing peak wall stress can be reduced if noninvasively available, patient-specific data are harnessed for the construction of the probabilistic wall thickness model. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Abdominal Assessment.

    PubMed

    Fritz, Deborah; Weilitz, Pamela Becker

    2016-03-01

    Abdominal pain is one of the most common complaints by patients, and assessment of abdominal pain and associated symptoms can be challenging for home healthcare providers. Reasons for abdominal pain are related to inflammation, organ distention, and ischemia. The history and physical examination are important to narrow the source of acute or chronic problems, identify immediate interventions, and when necessary, facilitate emergency department care.

  13. Anatomo-radiological correlation using 18-FDG-PET in abdominal sepsis model in rats. A preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Azevedo, Ítalo Medeiros; Carvalho, Marília Daniela Ferreira; Nascimento, Rafael Pereira; Macedo, Robson; Aquino, Mônica Raquel de Souza; Medeiros, Aldo Cunha

    2017-03-01

    To examine a correlation of micro-PET images with photographic images of the digestive organs in abdominal sepsis model. Male Wistar rats weighing 265±18g were used. Abdominal sepsis was induced by ligature and cecal puncture. Micro-PET Images from abdominal cavity septic foci were obtained using 18-Fluoro-deoxyglucose, looking for a correlation with photographic images of abdominal cavity organs. Pearson's correlation test was used. The mean standard uptake values (SUV) and lesion areas were 2.58±0.63SUVbwg/ml and 546.87±300.95mm2, respectively. There was a strong positive correlation between the two variables (r=0.863, p=0.137), which resulted in a coefficient of determination r2?0.75, meaning that 75% of SUV variation is explained by the lesion areas of digestive organs. Micro-PET allows high throughput assessment of lesion count and volume in pre-clinical rat model of CPL abdominal sepsis.

  14. A model of tumor architecture and spatial interactions with tumor microenvironment in breast carcinoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben Cheikh, Bassem; Bor-Angelier, Catherine; Racoceanu, Daniel

    2017-03-01

    Breast carcinomas are cancers that arise from the epithelial cells of the breast, which are the cells that line the lobules and the lactiferous ducts. Breast carcinoma is the most common type of breast cancer and can be divided into different subtypes based on architectural features and growth patterns, recognized during a histopathological examination. Tumor microenvironment (TME) is the cellular environment in which tumor cells develop. Being composed of various cell types having different biological roles, TME is recognized as playing an important role in the progression of the disease. The architectural heterogeneity in breast carcinomas and the spatial interactions with TME are, to date, not well understood. Developing a spatial model of tumor architecture and spatial interactions with TME can advance our understanding of tumor heterogeneity. Furthermore, generating histological synthetic datasets can contribute to validating, and comparing analytical methods that are used in digital pathology. In this work, we propose a modeling method that applies to different breast carcinoma subtypes and TME spatial distributions based on mathematical morphology. The model is based on a few morphological parameters that give access to a large spectrum of breast tumor architectures and are able to differentiate in-situ ductal carcinomas (DCIS) and histological subtypes of invasive carcinomas such as ductal (IDC) and lobular carcinoma (ILC). In addition, a part of the parameters of the model controls the spatial distribution of TME relative to the tumor. The validation of the model has been performed by comparing morphological features between real and simulated images.

  15. Critical overview of all available animal models for abdominal wall hernia research.

    PubMed

    Vogels, R R M; Kaufmann, R; van den Hil, L C L; van Steensel, S; Schreinemacher, M H F; Lange, J F; Bouvy, N D

    2017-10-01

    Since the introduction of the first prosthetic mesh for abdominal hernia repair, there has been a search for the "ideal mesh." The use of preclinical or animal models for assessment of necessary characteristics of new and existing meshes is an indispensable part of hernia research. Unfortunately, in our experience there is a lack of consensus among different research groups on which model to use. Therefore, we hypothesized that there is a lack of comparability within published animal research on hernia surgery due to wide range in experimental setup among different research groups. A systematic search of the literature was performed to provide a complete overview of all animal models published between 2000 and 2014. Relevant parameters on model characteristics and outcome measurement were scored on a standardized scoring sheet. Due to the wide range in different animals used, ranging from large animal models like pigs to rodents, we decided to limit the study to 168 articles concerning rat models. Within these rat models, we found wide range of baseline animal characteristics, operation techniques, and outcome measurements. Making reliable comparison of results among these studies is impossible. There is a lack of comparability among experimental hernia research, limiting the impact of this experimental research. We therefore propose the establishment of guidelines for experimental hernia research by the EHS.

  16. Brain tumor modeling: glioma growth and interaction with chemotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banaem, Hossein Y.; Ahmadian, Alireza; Saberi, Hooshangh; Daneshmehr, Alireza; Khodadad, Davood

    2011-10-01

    In last decade increasingly mathematical models of tumor growths have been studied, particularly on solid tumors which growth mainly caused by cellular proliferation. In this paper we propose a modified model to simulate the growth of gliomas in different stages. Glioma growth is modeled by a reaction-advection-diffusion. We begin with a model of untreated gliomas and continue with models of polyclonal glioma following chemotherapy. From relatively simple assumptions involving homogeneous brain tissue bounded by a few gross anatomical landmarks (ventricles and skull) the models have been expanded to include heterogeneous brain tissue with different motilities of glioma cells in grey and white matter. Tumor growth is characterized by a dangerous change in the control mechanisms, which normally maintain a balance between the rate of proliferation and the rate of apoptosis (controlled cell death). Result shows that this model closes to clinical finding and can simulate brain tumor behavior properly.

  17. SU-E-J-133: Evaluation of Inter- and Intra-Fractional Pancreas Tumor Residual Motions with Abdominal Compression

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Y; Shi, F; Tian, Z

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Abdominal compression (AC) has been widely used to reduce pancreas motion due to respiration for pancreatic cancer patients undergoing stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). However, the inter-fractional and intra-fractional patient motions may degrade the treatment. The purpose of this work is to study daily CBCT projections and 4DCT to evaluate the inter-fractional and intra-fractional pancreatic motions. Methods: As a standard of care at our institution, 4D CT scan was performed for treatment planning. At least two CBCT scans were performed for daily treatment. Retrospective studies were performed on patients with implanted internal fiducial markers or surgical clips. The initial motionmore » pattern was obtained by extracting marker positions on every phase of 4D CT images. Daily motions were presented by marker positions on CBCT scan projection images. An adaptive threshold segmentation algorithm was used to extract maker positions. Both marker average positions and motion ranges were compared among three sets of scans, 4D CT, positioning CBCT, and conformal CBCT, for inter-fractional and intra-fractional motion variations. Results: Data from four pancreatic cancer patients were analyzed. These patients had three fiducial markers implanted. All patients were treated by an Elekta Synergy with single fraction SBRT. CBCT projections were acquired by XVI. Markers were successfully detected on most of the projection images. The inter-fractional changes were determined by 4D CT and the first CBCT while the intra-fractional changes were determined by multiple CBCT scans. It is found that the average motion range variations are within 2 mm, however, the average marker positions may drift by 6.5 mm. Conclusion: The patients respiratory motion variation for pancreas SBRT with AC was evaluated by detecting markers from CBCT projections and 4DCT, both the inter-fraction and intra-fraction motion range change is small but the drift of marker positions may be

  18. Engineering cancer microenvironments for in vitro 3-D tumor models

    PubMed Central

    Asghar, Waseem; El Assal, Rami; Shafiee, Hadi; Pitteri, Sharon; Paulmurugan, Ramasamy; Demirci, Utkan

    2017-01-01

    The natural microenvironment of tumors is composed of extracellular matrix (ECM), blood vasculature, and supporting stromal cells. The physical characteristics of ECM as well as the cellular components play a vital role in controlling cancer cell proliferation, apoptosis, metabolism, and differentiation. To mimic the tumor microenvironment outside the human body for drug testing, two-dimensional (2-D) and murine tumor models are routinely used. Although these conventional approaches are employed in preclinical studies, they still present challenges. For example, murine tumor models are expensive and difficult to adopt for routine drug screening. On the other hand, 2-D in vitro models are simple to perform, but they do not recapitulate natural tumor microenvironment, because they do not capture important three-dimensional (3-D) cell–cell, cell–matrix signaling pathways, and multi-cellular heterogeneous components of the tumor microenvironment such as stromal and immune cells. The three-dimensional (3-D) in vitro tumor models aim to closely mimic cancer microenvironments and have emerged as an alternative to routinely used methods for drug screening. Herein, we review recent advances in 3-D tumor model generation and highlight directions for future applications in drug testing. PMID:28458612

  19. A Big Bang model of human colorectal tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Sottoriva, Andrea; Kang, Haeyoun; Ma, Zhicheng; Graham, Trevor A; Salomon, Matthew P; Zhao, Junsong; Marjoram, Paul; Siegmund, Kimberly; Press, Michael F; Shibata, Darryl; Curtis, Christina

    2015-03-01

    What happens in early, still undetectable human malignancies is unknown because direct observations are impractical. Here we present and validate a 'Big Bang' model, whereby tumors grow predominantly as a single expansion producing numerous intermixed subclones that are not subject to stringent selection and where both public (clonal) and most detectable private (subclonal) alterations arise early during growth. Genomic profiling of 349 individual glands from 15 colorectal tumors showed an absence of selective sweeps, uniformly high intratumoral heterogeneity (ITH) and subclone mixing in distant regions, as postulated by our model. We also verified the prediction that most detectable ITH originates from early private alterations and not from later clonal expansions, thus exposing the profile of the primordial tumor. Moreover, some tumors appear 'born to be bad', with subclone mixing indicative of early malignant potential. This new model provides a quantitative framework to interpret tumor growth dynamics and the origins of ITH, with important clinical implications.

  20. MSW Time to Tumor Model and Supporting Documentation

    EPA Science Inventory

    The multistage Weibull (MSW) time-to-tumor model and related documentation were developed principally (but not exclusively) for conducting time-to-tumor analyses to support risk assessments under the IRIS program. These programs and related docum...

  1. Laboratory models for central nervous system tumor stem cell research.

    PubMed

    Khan, Imad Saeed; Ehtesham, Moneeb

    2015-01-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) tumors are complex organ systems comprising of a neoplastic component with associated vasculature, inflammatory cells, and reactive cellular and extracellular components. Research has identified a subset of cells in CNS tumors that portray defining properties of neural stem cells, namely, that of self-renewal and multi-potency. Growing evidence suggests that these tumor stem cells (TSC) play an important role in the maintenance and growth of the tumor. Furthermore, these cells have also been shown to be refractory to conventional therapy and may be crucial for tumor recurrence and metastasis. Current investigations are focusing on isolating these TSC from CNS tumors to investigate their unique biological processes. This understanding will help identify and develop more effective and comprehensive treatment strategies. This chapter provides an overview of some of the most commonly used laboratory models for CNSTSC research.

  2. A multiphase model for three-dimensional tumor growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sciumè, G.; Shelton, S.; Gray, W. G.; Miller, C. T.; Hussain, F.; Ferrari, M.; Decuzzi, P.; Schrefler, B. A.

    2013-01-01

    Several mathematical formulations have analyzed the time-dependent behavior of a tumor mass. However, most of these propose simplifications that compromise the physical soundness of the model. Here, multiphase porous media mechanics is extended to model tumor evolution, using governing equations obtained via the thermodynamically constrained averaging theory. A tumor mass is treated as a multiphase medium composed of an extracellular matrix (ECM); tumor cells (TCs), which may become necrotic depending on the nutrient concentration and tumor phase pressure; healthy cells (HCs); and an interstitial fluid for the transport of nutrients. The equations are solved by a finite element method to predict the growth rate of the tumor mass as a function of the initial tumor-to-healthy cell density ratio, nutrient concentration, mechanical strain, cell adhesion and geometry. Results are shown for three cases of practical biological interest such as multicellular tumor spheroids (MTSs) and tumor cords. First, the model is validated by experimental data for time-dependent growth of an MTS in a culture medium. The tumor growth pattern follows a biphasic behavior: initially, the rapidly growing TCs tend to saturate the volume available without any significant increase in overall tumor size; then, a classical Gompertzian pattern is observed for the MTS radius variation with time. A core with necrotic cells appears for tumor sizes larger than 150 μm, surrounded by a shell of viable TCs whose thickness stays almost constant with time. A formula to estimate the size of the necrotic core is proposed. In the second case, the MTS is confined within a healthy tissue. The growth rate is reduced, as compared to the first case—mostly due to the relative adhesion of the TCs and HCs to the ECM, and the less favorable transport of nutrients. In particular, for HCs adhering less avidly to the ECM, the healthy tissue is progressively displaced as the malignant mass grows, whereas TC

  3. Numerical Modeling of Fluid Flow in Solid Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Soltani, M.; Chen, P.

    2011-01-01

    A mathematical model of interstitial fluid flow is developed, based on the application of the governing equations for fluid flow, i.e., the conservation laws for mass and momentum, to physiological systems containing solid tumors. The discretized form of the governing equations, with appropriate boundary conditions, is developed for a predefined tumor geometry. The interstitial fluid pressure and velocity are calculated using a numerical method, element based finite volume. Simulations of interstitial fluid transport in a homogeneous solid tumor demonstrate that, in a uniformly perfused tumor, i.e., one with no necrotic region, because of the interstitial pressure distribution, the distribution of drug particles is non-uniform. Pressure distribution for different values of necrotic radii is examined and two new parameters, the critical tumor radius and critical necrotic radius, are defined. Simulation results show that: 1) tumor radii have a critical size. Below this size, the maximum interstitial fluid pressure is less than what is generally considered to be effective pressure (a parameter determined by vascular pressure, plasma osmotic pressure, and interstitial osmotic pressure). Above this size, the maximum interstitial fluid pressure is equal to effective pressure. As a consequence, drugs transport to the center of smaller tumors is much easier than transport to the center of a tumor whose radius is greater than the critical tumor radius; 2) there is a critical necrotic radius, below which the interstitial fluid pressure at the tumor center is at its maximum value. If the tumor radius is greater than the critical tumor radius, this maximum pressure is equal to effective pressure. Above this critical necrotic radius, the interstitial fluid pressure at the tumor center is below effective pressure. In specific ranges of these critical sizes, drug amount and therefore therapeutic effects are higher because the opposing force, interstitial fluid pressure, is low in

  4. Whole abdominal wall segmentation using augmented active shape models (AASM) with multi-atlas label fusion and level set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhoubing; Baucom, Rebeccah B.; Abramson, Richard G.; Poulose, Benjamin K.; Landman, Bennett A.

    2016-03-01

    The abdominal wall is an important structure differentiating subcutaneous and visceral compartments and intimately involved with maintaining abdominal structure. Segmentation of the whole abdominal wall on routinely acquired computed tomography (CT) scans remains challenging due to variations and complexities of the wall and surrounding tissues. In this study, we propose a slice-wise augmented active shape model (AASM) approach to robustly segment both the outer and inner surfaces of the abdominal wall. Multi-atlas label fusion (MALF) and level set (LS) techniques are integrated into the traditional ASM framework. The AASM approach globally optimizes the landmark updates in the presence of complicated underlying local anatomical contexts. The proposed approach was validated on 184 axial slices of 20 CT scans. The Hausdorff distance against the manual segmentation was significantly reduced using proposed approach compared to that using ASM, MALF, and LS individually. Our segmentation of the whole abdominal wall enables the subcutaneous and visceral fat measurement, with high correlation to the measurement derived from manual segmentation. This study presents the first generic algorithm that combines ASM, MALF, and LS, and demonstrates practical application for automatically capturing visceral and subcutaneous fat volumes.

  5. Numerical modeling of nanodrug distribution in tumors with heterogeneous vasculature.

    PubMed

    Chou, Cheng-Ying; Chang, Wan-I; Horng, Tzyy-Leng; Lin, Win-Li

    2017-01-01

    The distribution and accumulation of nanoparticle dosage in a tumor are important in evaluating the effectiveness of cancer treatment. The cell survival rate can quantify the therapeutic effect, and the survival rates after multiple treatments are helpful to evaluate the efficacy of a chemotherapy plan. We developed a mathematical tumor model based on the governing equations describing the fluid flow and particle transport to investigate the drug transportation in a tumor and computed the resulting cumulative concentrations. The cell survival rate was calculated based on the cumulative concentration. The model was applied to a subcutaneous tumor with heterogeneous vascular distributions. Various sized dextrans and doxorubicin were respectively chosen as the nanodrug carrier and the traditional chemotherapeutic agent for comparison. The results showed that: 1) the largest nanoparticle drug in the current simulations yielded the highest cumulative concentration in the well vascular region, but second lowest in the surrounding normal tissues, which implies it has the best therapeutic effect to tumor and at the same time little harmful to normal tissue; 2) on the contrary, molecular chemotherapeutic agent produced the second lowest cumulative concentration in the well vascular tumor region, but highest in the surrounding normal tissue; 3) all drugs have very small cumulative concentrations in the tumor necrotic region, where drug transport is solely through diffusion. This might mean that it is hard to kill tumor stem cells hiding in it. The current model indicated that the effectiveness of the anti-tumor drug delivery was determined by the interplay of the vascular density and nanoparticle size, which governs the drug transport properties. The use of nanoparticles as anti-tumor drug carriers is generally a better choice than molecular chemotherapeutic agent because of its high treatment efficiency on tumor cells and less damage to normal tissues.

  6. Local tumor control probability modeling of primary and secondary lung tumors in stereotactic body radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Guckenberger, Matthias; Klement, Rainer J; Allgäuer, Michael; Andratschke, Nicolaus; Blanck, Oliver; Boda-Heggemann, Judit; Dieckmann, Karin; Duma, Marciana; Ernst, Iris; Ganswindt, Ute; Hass, Peter; Henkenberens, Christoph; Holy, Richard; Imhoff, Detlef; Kahl, Henning K; Krempien, Robert; Lohaus, Fabian; Nestle, Ursula; Nevinny-Stickel, Meinhard; Petersen, Cordula; Semrau, Sabine; Streblow, Jan; Wendt, Thomas G; Wittig, Andrea; Flentje, Michael; Sterzing, Florian

    2016-03-01

    To evaluate whether local tumor control probability (TCP) in stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) varies between lung metastases of different primary cancer sites and between primary non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and secondary lung tumors. A retrospective multi-institutional (n=22) database of 399 patients with stage I NSCLC and 397 patients with 525 lung metastases was analyzed. Irradiation doses were converted to biologically effective doses (BED). Logistic regression was used for local tumor control probability (TCP) modeling and the second-order bias corrected Akaike Information Criterion was used for model comparison. After median follow-up of 19 months and 16 months (n.s.), local tumor control was observed in 87.7% and 86.7% of the primary and secondary lung tumors (n.s.), respectively. A strong dose-response relationship was observed in the primary NSCLC and metastatic cohort but dose-response relationships were not significantly different: the TCD90 (dose to achieve 90% TCP; BED of maximum planning target volume dose) estimates were 176 Gy (151-223) and 160 Gy (123-237) (n.s.), respectively. The dose-response relationship was not influenced by the primary cancer site within the metastatic cohort. Dose-response relationships for local tumor control in SBRT were not different between lung metastases of various primary cancer sites and between primary NSCLC and lung metastases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Angiogenic Signaling in Living Breast Tumor Models

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-06-01

    SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON USAMRMC a. REPORT U b. ABSTRACT U c ...convection versus diffusion in transport out of a tumor vessel during steady state conditions. C . Determine relative contribution of convection...on the results of the diffusion/convection measurements. Consequently, implicit in Tasks 1b and c (the use of MPFRAP in vivo) is the establishment

  8. The respiratory pressure-abdominal volume curve in a porcine model.

    PubMed

    Regli, Adrian; De Keulenaer, Bart Leon; Singh, Bhajan; Hockings, Lisen Emma; Noffsinger, Bill; van Heerden, Peter Vernon

    2017-12-01

    Increasing intra-abdominal volume (IAV) can lead to intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH) or abdominal compartment syndrome. Both are associated with raised morbidity and mortality. IAH can increase airway pressures and impair ventilation. The relationship between increasing IAV and airway pressures is not known. We therefore assessed the effect of increasing IAV on airway and intra-abdominal pressures (IAP). Seven pigs (41.4 +/-8.5 kg) received standardized anesthesia and mechanical ventilation. A latex balloon inserted in the peritoneal cavity was inflated in 1-L increments until IAP exceeded 40 cmH 2 O. Peak airway pressure (pP AW ), respiratory compliance, and IAP (bladder pressure) were measured. Abdominal compliance was calculated. Different equations were tested that best described the measured pressure-volume curves. An exponential equation best described the measured pressure-volume curves. Raising IAV increased pP AW and IAP in an exponential manner. Increases in IAP were associated with parallel increases in pP AW with an approximate 40% transmission of IAP to pP AW . The higher the IAP, the greater IAV effected pP AW and IAP. The exponential nature of the effect of IAV on pP AW and IAP implies that, in the presence of high grades of IAH, small reductions in IAV can lead to significant reductions in airway and abdominal pressures. Conversely, in the presence of normal IAP levels, large increases in IAV may not affect airway and abdominal pressures.

  9. Mathematical and Computational Modeling for Tumor Virotherapy with Mediated Immunity.

    PubMed

    Timalsina, Asim; Tian, Jianjun Paul; Wang, Jin

    2017-08-01

    We propose a new mathematical modeling framework based on partial differential equations to study tumor virotherapy with mediated immunity. The model incorporates both innate and adaptive immune responses and represents the complex interaction among tumor cells, oncolytic viruses, and immune systems on a domain with a moving boundary. Using carefully designed computational methods, we conduct extensive numerical simulation to the model. The results allow us to examine tumor development under a wide range of settings and provide insight into several important aspects of the virotherapy, including the dependence of the efficacy on a few key parameters and the delay in the adaptive immunity. Our findings also suggest possible ways to improve the virotherapy for tumor treatment.

  10. Stochastic modelling of wall stresses in abdominal aortic aneurysms treated by a gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Mohand-Kaci, Faïza; Ouni, Anissa Eddhahak; Dai, Jianping; Allaire, Eric; Zidi, Mustapha

    2012-01-01

    A stochastic mechanical model using the membrane theory was used to simulate the in vivo mechanical behaviour of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) in order to compute the wall stresses after stabilisation by gene therapy. For that, both length and diameter of AAAs rats were measured during their expansion. Four groups of animals, control and treated by an endovascular gene therapy during 3 or 28 days were included. The mechanical problem was solved analytically using the geometric parameters and assuming the shape of aneurysms by a 'parabolic-exponential curve'. When compared to controls, stress variations in the wall of AAAs for treated arteries during 28 days decreased, while they were nearly constant at day 3. The measured geometric parameters of AAAs were then investigated using probability density functions (pdf) attributed to every random variable. Different trials were useful to define a reliable confidence region in which the probability to have a realisation is equal to 99%. The results demonstrated that the error in the estimation of the stresses can be greater than 28% when parameters uncertainties are not considered in the modelling. The relevance of the proposed approach for the study of AAA growth may be studied further and extended to other treatments aimed at stabilisation AAAs, using biotherapies and pharmacological approaches.

  11. Selection, calibration, and validation of models of tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Lima, E A B F; Oden, J T; Hormuth, D A; Yankeelov, T E; Almeida, R C

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents general approaches for addressing some of the most important issues in predictive computational oncology concerned with developing classes of predictive models of tumor growth. First, the process of developing mathematical models of vascular tumors evolving in the complex, heterogeneous, macroenvironment of living tissue; second, the selection of the most plausible models among these classes, given relevant observational data; third, the statistical calibration and validation of models in these classes, and finally, the prediction of key Quantities of Interest (QOIs) relevant to patient survival and the effect of various therapies. The most challenging aspects of this endeavor is that all of these issues often involve confounding uncertainties: in observational data, in model parameters, in model selection, and in the features targeted in the prediction. Our approach can be referred to as "model agnostic" in that no single model is advocated; rather, a general approach that explores powerful mixture-theory representations of tissue behavior while accounting for a range of relevant biological factors is presented, which leads to many potentially predictive models. Then representative classes are identified which provide a starting point for the implementation of OPAL, the Occam Plausibility Algorithm (OPAL) which enables the modeler to select the most plausible models (for given data) and to determine if the model is a valid tool for predicting tumor growth and morphology ( in vivo ). All of these approaches account for uncertainties in the model, the observational data, the model parameters, and the target QOI. We demonstrate these processes by comparing a list of models for tumor growth, including reaction-diffusion models, phase-fields models, and models with and without mechanical deformation effects, for glioma growth measured in murine experiments. Examples are provided that exhibit quite acceptable predictions of tumor growth in laboratory

  12. Creation of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms in Sheep by Extrapolation of Rodent Models: Is It Feasible?

    PubMed

    Verbrugghe, Peter; Verhoeven, Jelle; Clijsters, Marnick; Vervoort, Dominique; Coudyzer, Walter; Verbeken, Eric; Meuris, Bart; Herijgers, Paul

    2018-06-07

    Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) are a potentially deathly disease, needing surgical or endovascular treatment. To evaluate potentially new diagnostic tools and treatments, a large animal model, which resembles not only the morphological characteristics but also the pathophysiological background, would be useful. Rodent animal aneurysm models were extrapolated to sheep. Four groups were created: intraluminal infusion with an elastase-collagenase solution (n = 4), infusion with elastase-collagenase solution combined with proximal stenosis (n = 7), aortic xenograft (n = 3), and elastase-collagenase-treated xenograft (n = 4). At fixed time intervals (6, 12, and 24 weeks), computer tomography and autopsy with histological evaluation were performed. The described models had a high perioperative mortality (45%), due to acute aortic thrombosis or fatale hemorrhage. A maximum aortic diameter increase of 30% was obtained in the protease-stenosis group. In the protease-treated groups, some histological features of human AAAs, such as inflammation, thinning of the media, and loss of elastin could be reproduced. In the xenotransplant groups, a pronounced inflammatory reaction was visible at the start. In all models, inflammation decreased and fibrosis occurred at long follow-up, 24 weeks postoperatively. None of the extrapolated small animal aneurysm models could produce an AAA in sheep with similar morphological features as the human disease. Some histological findings of human surgical specimens could be reproduced in the elastase-collagenase-treated groups. Long-term histological evaluation indicated stabilization and healing of the aortic wall months after the initial stimulus. Copyright © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Spatiotemporal distribution modeling of PET tracer uptake in solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Soltani, Madjid; Sefidgar, Mostafa; Bazmara, Hossein; Casey, Michael E; Subramaniam, Rathan M; Wahl, Richard L; Rahmim, Arman

    2017-02-01

    Distribution of PET tracer uptake is elaborately modeled via a general equation used for solute transport modeling. This model can be used to incorporate various transport parameters of a solid tumor such as hydraulic conductivity of the microvessel wall, transvascular permeability as well as interstitial space parameters. This is especially significant because tracer delivery and drug delivery to solid tumors are determined by similar underlying tumor transport phenomena, and quantifying the former can enable enhanced prediction of the latter. We focused on the commonly utilized FDG PET tracer. First, based on a mathematical model of angiogenesis, the capillary network of a solid tumor and normal tissues around it were generated. The coupling mathematical method, which simultaneously solves for blood flow in the capillary network as well as fluid flow in the interstitium, is used to calculate pressure and velocity distributions. Subsequently, a comprehensive spatiotemporal distribution model (SDM) is applied to accurately model distribution of PET tracer uptake, specifically FDG in this work, within solid tumors. The different transport mechanisms, namely convention and diffusion from vessel to tissue and in tissue, are elaborately calculated across the domain of interest and effect of each parameter on tracer distribution is investigated. The results show the convection terms to have negligible effect on tracer transport and the SDM can be solved after eliminating these terms. The proposed framework of spatiotemporal modeling for PET tracers can be utilized to comprehensively assess the impact of various parameters on the spatiotemporal distribution of PET tracers.

  14. Increased visceral tissue perfusion with heated, humidified carbon dioxide insufflation during open abdominal surgery in a rodent model.

    PubMed

    Robson, Jonathan P; Kokhanenko, Pavlo; Marshall, Jean K; Phillips, Anthony R; van der Linden, Jan

    2018-01-01

    Tissue perfusion during surgery is important in reducing surgical site infections and promoting healing. This study aimed to determine if insufflation of the open abdomen with heated, humidified (HH) carbon dioxide (CO2) increased visceral tissue perfusion and core body temperature during open abdominal surgery in a rodent model. Using two different rodent models of open abdominal surgery, visceral perfusion and core temperature were measured. Visceral perfusion was investigated using a repeated measures crossover experiment with rodents receiving the same sequence of two alternating treatments: exposure to ambient air (no insufflation) and insufflation with HH CO2. Core body temperature was measured using an independent experimental design with three treatment groups: ambient air, HH CO2 and cold, dry (CD) CO2. Visceral perfusion was measured by laser speckle contrast analysis (LASCA) and core body temperature was measured with a rectal thermometer. Insufflation with HH CO2 into a rodent open abdominal cavity significantly increased visceral tissue perfusion (2.4 perfusion units (PU)/min (95% CI 1.23-3.58); p<0.0001) compared with ambient air, which significantly reduced visceral blood flow (-5.20 PU/min (95% CI -6.83- -3.58); p<0.0001). Insufflation of HH CO2 into the open abdominal cavity significantly increased core body temperature (+1.15 ± 0.14°C) compared with open cavities exposed to ambient air (-0.65 ± 0.52°C; p = 0.037), or cavities insufflated with CD CO2 (-0.73 ± 0.33°C; p = 0.006). Abdominal visceral temperatures also increased with HH CO2 insufflation compared with ambient air or CD CO2, as shown by infrared thermography. This study reports for the first time the use of LASCA to measure visceral perfusion in open abdominal surgery and shows that insufflation of open abdominal cavities with HH CO2 significantly increases visceral tissue perfusion and core body temperature.

  15. Active behavior of abdominal wall muscles: Experimental results and numerical model formulation.

    PubMed

    Grasa, J; Sierra, M; Lauzeral, N; Muñoz, M J; Miana-Mena, F J; Calvo, B

    2016-08-01

    In the present study a computational finite element technique is proposed to simulate the mechanical response of muscles in the abdominal wall. This technique considers the active behavior of the tissue taking into account both collagen and muscle fiber directions. In an attempt to obtain the computational response as close as possible to real muscles, the parameters needed to adjust the mathematical formulation were determined from in vitro experimental tests. Experiments were conducted on male New Zealand White rabbits (2047±34g) and the active properties of three different muscles: Rectus Abdominis, External Oblique and multi-layered samples formed by three muscles (External Oblique, Internal Oblique, and Transversus Abdominis) were characterized. The parameters obtained for each muscle were incorporated into a finite strain formulation to simulate active behavior of muscles incorporating the anisotropy of the tissue. The results show the potential of the model to predict the anisotropic behavior of the tissue associated to fibers and how this influences on the strain, stress and generated force during an isometric contraction. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. A Big Bang model of human colorectal tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Sottoriva, Andrea; Kang, Haeyoun; Ma, Zhicheng; Graham, Trevor A.; Salomon, Matthew P.; Zhao, Junsong; Marjoram, Paul; Siegmund, Kimberly; Press, Michael F.; Shibata, Darryl; Curtis, Christina

    2015-01-01

    What happens in the early, still undetectable human malignancy is unknown because direct observations are impractical. Here we present and validate a “Big Bang” model, whereby tumors grow predominantly as a single expansion producing numerous intermixed sub-clones that are not subject to stringent selection, and where both public (clonal) and most detectable private (subclonal) alterations arise early during growth. Genomic profiling of 349 individual glands from 15 colorectal tumors revealed the absence of selective sweeps, uniformly high intra-tumor heterogeneity (ITH), and sub-clone mixing in distant regions, as postulated by our model. We also verified the prediction that most detectable ITH originates from early private alterations, and not from later clonal expansions, thus exposing the profile of the primordial tumor. Moreover, some tumors appear born-to-be-bad, with sub-clone mixing indicative of early malignant potential. This new model provides a quantitative framework to interpret tumor growth dynamics and the origins of ITH with significant clinical implications. PMID:25665006

  17. Modeling and predicting tumor response in radioligand therapy.

    PubMed

    Kletting, Peter; Thieme, Anne; Eberhardt, Nina; Rinscheid, Andreas; D'Alessandria, Calogero; Allmann, Jakob; Wester, Hans-Jürgen; Tauber, Robert; Beer, Ambros J; Glatting, Gerhard; Eiber, Matthias

    2018-05-10

    The aim of this work was to develop a theranostic method that allows predicting PSMA-positive tumor volume after radioligand therapy (RLT) based on a pre-therapeutic PET/CT measurement and physiologically based pharmacokinetic/dynamic (PBPK/PD) modeling at the example of RLT using 177 Lu-labeled PSMA for imaging and therapy (PSMA I&T). Methods: A recently developed PBPK model for 177 Lu PSMA I&T RLT was extended to account for tumor (exponential) growth and reduction due to irradiation (linear quadratic model). Data of 13 patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) were retrospectively analyzed. Pharmacokinetic/dynamic parameters were simultaneously fitted in a Bayesian framework to PET/CT activity concentrations, planar scintigraphy data and tumor volumes prior and post (6 weeks) therapy. The method was validated using the leave-one-out Jackknife method. The tumor volume post therapy was predicted based on pre-therapy PET/CT imaging and PBPK/PD modeling. Results: The relative deviation of the predicted and measured tumor volume for PSMA-positive tumor cells (6 weeks post therapy) was 1±40% excluding one patient (PSA negative) from the population. The radiosensitivity for the PSA positive patients was determined to be 0.0172±0.0084 Gy-1. Conclusion: The proposed method is the first attempt to solely use PET/CT and modeling methods to predict the PSMA-positive tumor volume after radioligand therapy. Internal validation shows that this is feasible with an acceptable accuracy. Improvement of the method and external validation of the model is ongoing. Copyright © 2018 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  18. Hypoestoxide inhibits tumor growth in the mouse CT26 colon tumor model

    PubMed Central

    Ojo-Amaize, Emmanuel A; Cottam, Howard B; Oyemade, Olusola A; Okogun, Joseph I; Nchekwube, Emeka J

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the effect of the natural diterpenoid, hypoestoxide (HE) on the growth of established colon cancer in mice. METHODS: The CT26.WT mouse colon carcinoma cell line was grown and expanded in vitro. Following the expansion, BALB/c mice were inoculated s.c. with viable tumor cells. After the tumors had established and developed to about 80-90 mm3, the mice were started on chemotherapy by oral administration of HE, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) or combination. RESULTS: The antiangiogenic HE has previously been shown to inhibit the growth of melanoma in the B16F1 tumor model in C57BL/6 mice. Our results demonstrate that mean volume of tumors in mice treated with oral HE as a single agent or in combination with 5-FU, were significantly smaller (> 60%) than those in vehicle control mice (471.2 mm3 vs 1542.8 mm3, P < 0.01). The significant reductions in tumor burden resulted in pronounced mean survival times (MST) and increased life spans (ILS) in the treated mice. CONCLUSION: These results indicate that HE is an effective chemotherapeutic agent for colorectal cancer in mice and that HE may be used alone or in combination with 5-FU. PMID:17729410

  19. [Abdominal trauma].

    PubMed

    Sido, B; Grenacher, L; Friess, H; Büchler, M W

    2005-09-01

    Blunt abdominal trauma is much more frequent than penetrating abdominal trauma in Europe. As a consequence of improved quality of computed tomography, even complex liver injuries are increasingly being treated conservatively. However, missed hollow viscus injuries still remain a problem, as they considerably increase mortality in multiply injured patients. Laparoscopy decreases the rate of unnecessary laparotomies in perforating abdominal trauma and helps to diagnose injuries of solid organs and the diaphragm. However, the sensitivity in detecting hollow viscus injuries is low and the role of laparoscopy in blunt abdominal injury has not been defined. If intra-abdominal bleeding is difficult to control in hemodynamically unstable patients, damage control surgery with packing of the liver, total splenectomy, and provisional closure of hollow viscus injuries is of importance. Definitive surgical treatment follows hemodynamic stabilization and restoration of hemostasis. Injuries of the duodenum and pancreas after blunt abdominal trauma are often associated with other intra-abdominal injuries and the treatment depends on their location and severity.

  20. Clonal evolution models of tumor heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Shlush, Liran I; Hershkovitz, Dov

    2015-01-01

    Somatic/clonal evolution is the process of sequential acquisition of vertically transmittable genetic/epigenetic elements in multicellular organisms. Cancer is the result of somatic evolution. Understanding the processes that shape the evolution of individual tumors might help us to treat cancer more efficiently. The initiating genetic/epigenetic events occur in functional cells and provide the cell of origin a selective advantage under a changing environment. The initiating genetic events tend to be enriched in specific tissues (and are sometimes specific for those tissues), as different tissues undergo different changes in the environment that will activate selective forces on different cells of origin. For the initial clonal expansion to occur premalignant clones need to have a relative fitness advantage over their competitors. It is estimated that the premalignant phase can take several years. Once the premalignant clonal expansion is established, the premalignant cells will contribute to the changing environment and will start competing among themselves. In late stages of cancer evolution the environmental changes might be similar across different tissues, including a lack of physical space, a shortage of energy, and activation of the immune system, and more and more of the hallmarks of cancer will evolve. In this review we will explore the possible clinical relevance of the heterogeneity that evolves during this long somatic evolution. Above all, it should be stressed that the earlier the clonal expansion is recognized, the less diverse and less fit for survival the cells in the population are.

  1. Effect of Pirfenidone on Vascular Proliferation, Inflammation and Fibrosis in an Abdominal Adhesion Rat Model.

    PubMed

    Hasdemir, Pinar Solmaz; Ozkut, Mahmud; Guvenal, Tevfik; Uner, Melis Aylin; Calik, Esat; Koltan, Semra Oruc; Koyuncu, Faik Mumtaz; Ozbilgin, Kemal

    2017-02-01

    To study the efficacy of pirfenidone for prevention of postoperative adhesion formation in an adhesion rat model. Eighteen female Wistar rats were subjected to right-sided parietal peritoneum and right uterine horn adhesion model. Rats were randomized into three groups: group 1 (control) (closure of midline abdominal incision without any agent administration), group 2 (closure of incision after intraperitoneal administration of pirfenidone), and group 3 (closure of incision and only oral administration of pirfenidone for 14 days). Relaparotomy was performed 14 days after the first surgery. Effect of pirfenidone on adhesion formation was assessed on light microscopy by scoring vascular proliferation, inflammation, fibrosis, and collagen formation in the scarred tissue. Effect of pirfenidone on inflammation was assessed by measurement of transforming growth factor-β and interleukin-17 levels in scarred tissue. The degree of vascular proliferation (1.32 ± 0.39 versus 2.34 ± 0.46, p < 0.001), inflammation (1.60 ± 0.70 versus 2.60 ± 0.52, p < 0.01), and fibrosis (1.50 ± 0.53 versus 2.40 ± 0.52, p < 0.01) were less prominent in group 2 compared to group 1, respectively. Only vascular proliferation was found to be less prominent in group 3 compared to group 1 (1.60 ± 0.42 versus 2.34 ± 0.46, p < 0.01). Intraperitoneal and oral administration of pirfenidone reduced tissue levels of inflammatory markers (TGF-β and IL-17) in parietal and visceral peritoneum compared to control group. Intraperitoneal administration of pirfenidone compared to oral administration was more effective in reducing tissue levels of inflammatory markers. Pirfenidone is an effective agent on the prevention of postoperative vascular proliferation, inflammation and fibrosis in scarred tissue particularly with intraperitoneal administration.

  2. A Mouse Ependymoma Model Provides Molecular Insights into Tumor Formation.

    PubMed

    Pajtler, Kristian W; Pfister, Stefan M

    2018-06-26

    Ozawa et al. present a murine tumor model resembling the most frequent molecular group of human supratentorial ependymoma, ST-EPN-RELA. Their model shows RELA-fusion-based de novo ependymoma tumorigenesis in the forebrain derived from neural stem cells. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Canine mammary tumors as a model for human disease.

    PubMed

    Abdelmegeed, Somaia M; Mohammed, Sulma

    2018-06-01

    Animal models for examining human breast cancer (HBC) carcinogenesis have been extensively studied and proposed. With the recent advent of immunotherapy, significant attention has been focused on the dog as a model for human cancer. Dogs develop mammary tumors and other cancer types spontaneously with an intact immune system, which exhibit a number of clinical and molecular similarities to HBC. In addition to the spontaneous tumor presentation, the clinical similarities between human and canine mammary tumors (CMT) include the age at onset, hormonal etiology and course of the diseases. Furthermore, factors that affect the disease outcome, including tumor size, stage and lymph node invasion, are similar in HBC and CMT. Similarly, the molecular characteristics of steroid receptor, epidermal growth factor, proliferation marker, metalloproteinase and cyclooxygenase expression, and the mutation of the p53 tumor suppressor gene in CMT, mimic HBC. Furthermore, ductal carcinomas in situ in human and canine mammary glands are particularly similar in their pathological, molecular and visual characteristics. These CMT characteristics and their similarities to HBC indicate that the dog could be an excellent model for the study of human disease. These similarities are discussed in detail in the present review, and are compared with the in vitro and other in vivo animal models available.

  4. Modeling the oxygen microheterogeneity of tumors for photodynamic therapy dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogue, Brian W.; Paulsen, Keith D.; O'Hara, Julia A.; Hoopes, P. Jack; Swartz, Harold

    2000-03-01

    Photodynamic theory of tumors uses optical excitation of a sensitizing drug within tissue to produce large deposits of singlet oxygen, which are thought to ultimately cause the tumor destruction. Predicting dose deposition of singlet oxygen in vivo is challenging because measurement of this species in vivo is not easily achieved. But it is possible to follow the concentration of oxygen in vivo, and so measuring the oxygen concentration transients during PDT may provide a viable method of estimating the delivered dose of singlet oxygen. However modeling the microscopic heterogeneity of the oxygen distribution within a tumor is non-trivial, and predicting the microscopic dose deposition requires further study, but this study present the framework and initial calibration needed or modeling oxygen transport in complex geometries. Computational modeling with finite elements provides a versatile structure within which oxygen diffusion and consumption can be modeled within realistic tissue geometries. This study develops the basic tools required to simulate a tumor region, and examines the role of (i) oxygen supply and consumption rates, (ii) inter- capillary spacing, (iii) photosensitizer distribution, and (iv) differences between simulated tumors and those derived directly from histology. The result of these calculations indicate that realistic tumor tissue capillary networks can be simulated using the finite element method, without excessive computational burden for 2D regions near 1 mm2, and 3D regions near 0.1mm3. These simulations can provide fundamental information about tissue and ways to implement appropriate oxygen measurements. These calculations suggest that photodynamic therapy produces the majority of singlet oxygen in and near the blood vessels, because these are the sites of highest oxygen tension. These calculations support the concept that tumor vascular regions are the major targets for PDT dose deposition.

  5. [A simplified model for kinetics of a tumor cells' population].

    PubMed

    Gut, R; Zharinov, G M; Iakubov, E

    2009-01-01

    A mathematical model of solid tumor growth is suggested. The external influence from the tumor-bearing organism is described separately for cell growth and apoptosis. The model is an ordinary differential equation which provides for use of a variety of dependences for both processes. A solution for a specific example of the processes is obtained in the form of a generalized logistic curve. Our results give clues for such experimental phenomena as spontaneous cessation of cell growth, dependence of life duration on insignificant variations in apoptosis, etc.

  6. Angiogenic Signaling in Living Breast Tumor Models

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-01

    harmonic generation imaging of the diseased state osteogenesis imperfecta : experiment and simulation,” Biophys. J. 94(11), 4504–4514 (2008). 3. O...biopsies, mouse models of breast cancer, and dermis from mouse models of Osteogenesis Imperfecta (OIM) [1–5,7]. The F/B ratio revealed the length scale of...interest in discriminating skin with Osteogenesis Imperfecta [2] from normal dermis [2] and SHG F/B ratio measurements have been used to help determine

  7. A murine model of targeted infusion for intracranial tumors.

    PubMed

    Kim, Minhyung; Barone, Tara A; Fedtsova, Natalia; Gleiberman, Anatoli; Wilfong, Chandler D; Alosi, Julie A; Plunkett, Robert J; Gudkov, Andrei; Skitzki, Joseph J

    2016-01-01

    Historically, intra-arterial (IA) drug administration for malignant brain tumors including glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) was performed as an attempt to improve drug delivery. With the advent of percutaneous neuorovascular techniques and modern microcatheters, intracranial drug delivery is readily feasible; however, the question remains whether IA administration is safe and more effective compared to other delivery modalities such as intravenous (IV) or oral administrations. Preclinical large animal models allow for comparisons between treatment routes and to test novel agents, but can be expensive and difficult to generate large numbers and rapid results. Accordingly, we developed a murine model of IA drug delivery for GBM that is reproducible with clear readouts of tumor response and neurotoxicities. Herein, we describe a novel mouse model of IA drug delivery accessing the internal carotid artery to treat ipsilateral implanted GBM tumors that is consistent and reproducible with minimal experience. The intent of establishing this unique platform is to efficiently interrogate targeted anti-tumor agents that may be designed to take advantage of a directed, regional therapy approach for brain tumors.

  8. External validation of a 5-year survival prediction model after elective abdominal aortic aneurysm repair.

    PubMed

    DeMartino, Randall R; Huang, Ying; Mandrekar, Jay; Goodney, Philip P; Oderich, Gustavo S; Kalra, Manju; Bower, Thomas C; Cronenwett, Jack L; Gloviczki, Peter

    2018-01-01

    The benefit of prophylactic repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) is based on the risk of rupture exceeding the risk of death from other comorbidities. The purpose of this study was to validate a 5-year survival prediction model for patients undergoing elective repair of asymptomatic AAA <6.5 cm to assist in optimal selection of patients. All patients undergoing elective repair for asymptomatic AAA <6.5 cm (open or endovascular) from 2002 to 2011 were identified from a single institutional database (validation group). We assessed the ability of a prior published Vascular Study Group of New England (VSGNE) model (derivation group) to predict survival in our cohort. The model was assessed for discrimination (concordance index), calibration (calibration slope and calibration in the large), and goodness of fit (score test). The VSGNE derivation group consisted of 2367 patients (70% endovascular). Major factors associated with survival in the derivation group were age, coronary disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, renal function, and antiplatelet and statin medication use. Our validation group consisted of 1038 patients (59% endovascular). The validation group was slightly older (74 vs 72 years; P < .01) and had a higher proportion of men (76% vs 68%; P < .01). In addition, the derivation group had higher rates of advanced cardiac disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and baseline creatinine concentration (1.2 vs 1.1 mg/dL; P < .01). Despite slight differences in preoperative patient factors, 5-year survival was similar between validation and derivation groups (75% vs 77%; P = .33). The concordance index of the validation group was identical between derivation and validation groups at 0.659 (95% confidence interval, 0.63-0.69). Our validation calibration in the large value was 1.02 (P = .62, closer to 1 indicating better calibration), calibration slope of 0.84 (95% confidence interval, 0.71-0.97), and score test of P = .57 (>.05

  9. High-fat Western diet-induced obesity contributes to increased tumor growth in mouse models of human colon cancer.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Ann Marie; Burrington, Christine M; Gillaspie, Erin A; Lynch, Darin T; Horsman, Melissa J; Greene, Michael W

    2016-12-01

    Strong epidemiologic evidence links colon cancer to obesity. The increasing worldwide incidence of colon cancer has been linked to the spread of the Western lifestyle, and in particular consumption of a high-fat Western diet. In this study, our objectives were to establish mouse models to examine the effects of high-fat Western diet-induced obesity on the growth of human colon cancer tumor xenografts, and to examine potential mechanisms driving obesity-linked human colon cancer tumor growth. We hypothesize that mice rendered insulin resistant due to consumption of a high-fat Western diet will show increased and accelerated tumor growth. Homozygous Rag1 tm1Mom mice were fed either a low-fat Western diet or a high-fat Western diet (HFWD), then human colon cancer xenografts were implanted subcutaneously or orthotopically. Tumors were analyzed to detect changes in receptor tyrosine kinase-mediated signaling and expression of inflammatory-associated genes in epididymal white adipose tissue. In both models, mice fed an HFWD weighed more and had increased intra-abdominal fat, and tumor weight was greater compared with in the low-fat Western diet-fed mice. They also displayed significantly higher levels of leptin; however, there was a negative correlation between leptin levels and tumor size. In the orthotopic model, tumors and adipose tissue from the HFWD group displayed significant increases in both c-Jun N-terminal kinase activation and monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 expression, respectively. In conclusion, this study suggests that human colon cancer growth is accelerated in animals that are obese and insulin resistant due to the consumption of an HFWD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. An integrated fluid-chemical model toward modeling the formation of intra-luminal thrombus in abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Biasetti, Jacopo; Spazzini, Pier Giorgio; Swedenborg, Jesper; Gasser, T Christian

    2012-01-01

    Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms (AAAs) are frequently characterized by the presence of an Intra-Luminal Thrombus (ILT) known to influence their evolution biochemically and biomechanically. The ILT progression mechanism is still unclear and little is known regarding the impact of the chemical species transported by blood flow on this mechanism. Chemical agonists and antagonists of platelets activation, aggregation, and adhesion and the proteins involved in the coagulation cascade (CC) may play an important role in ILT development. Starting from this assumption, the evolution of chemical species involved in the CC, their relation to coherent vortical structures (VSs) and their possible effect on ILT evolution have been studied. To this end a fluid-chemical model that simulates the CC through a series of convection-diffusion-reaction (CDR) equations has been developed. The model involves plasma-phase and surface-bound enzymes and zymogens, and includes both plasma-phase and membrane-phase reactions. Blood is modeled as a non-Newtonian incompressible fluid. VSs convect thrombin in the domain and lead to the high concentration observed in the distal portion of the AAA. This finding is in line with the clinical observations showing that the thickest ILT is usually seen in the distal AAA region. The proposed model, due to its ability to couple the fluid and chemical domains, provides an integrated mechanochemical picture that potentially could help unveil mechanisms of ILT formation and development.

  11. Modeling of Oxygen Transport Across Tumor Multicellular Layers

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Rod D.; Beatty, Alexis L.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose Tumor oxygen level plays a major role in the response of tumors to different treatments. The purpose of this study was to develop a method of determining oxygen transport properties in a recently developed 3-D model of tumor parenchyma, the multicellular layer (MCL). Methods OCM-1 human choroidal melanoma cells were grown as 3-D MCL on collagen-coated culture plate inserts. A recessed-cathode oxygen microelectrode was used to measure oxygen tension (PO2) profiles across 8 different MCL from the free surface to the insert membrane. The profiles were fitted to four different one-dimensional diffusion models: 1-, 2-, and 3-region models with uniform oxygen consumption (q) in each region and a modified 3-region model with a central region where q=0 and PO2=0. Results Depending upon the presence of a central region of anoxia, the PO2 profiles were fitted best by either the two-region model or the modified 3-region model. Consumption of tumor cells near the insert membrane was higher than that of cells close to the free surface (33.1 ± 13.6 x 10−4 vs. 11.8 ± 6.7 x 10−4 mm Hg/μm2, respectively). Conclusions The model is useful for determining oxygenation and consumption in MCL, especially for cell lines that cannot be grown as spheroids. In the future, this model will permit the study of parameters important in tumor oxygenation in vitro. PMID:17196225

  12. A fractional motion diffusion model for grading pediatric brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Karaman, M Muge; Wang, He; Sui, Yi; Engelhard, Herbert H; Li, Yuhua; Zhou, Xiaohong Joe

    2016-01-01

    To demonstrate the feasibility of a novel fractional motion (FM) diffusion model for distinguishing low- versus high-grade pediatric brain tumors; and to investigate its possible advantage over apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and/or a previously reported continuous-time random-walk (CTRW) diffusion model. With approval from the institutional review board and written informed consents from the legal guardians of all participating patients, this study involved 70 children with histopathologically-proven brain tumors (30 low-grade and 40 high-grade). Multi- b -value diffusion images were acquired and analyzed using the FM, CTRW, and mono-exponential diffusion models. The FM parameters, D fm , φ , ψ (non-Gaussian diffusion statistical measures), and the CTRW parameters, D m , α , β (non-Gaussian temporal and spatial diffusion heterogeneity measures) were compared between the low- and high-grade tumor groups by using a Mann-Whitney-Wilcoxon U test. The performance of the FM model for differentiating between low- and high-grade tumors was evaluated and compared with that of the CTRW and the mono-exponential models using a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. The FM parameters were significantly lower ( p  < 0.0001) in the high-grade ( D fm : 0.81 ± 0.26, φ : 1.40 ± 0.10, ψ : 0.42 ± 0.11) than in the low-grade ( D fm : 1.52 ± 0.52, φ : 1.64 ± 0.13, ψ : 0.67 ± 0.13) tumor groups. The ROC analysis showed that the FM parameters offered better specificity (88% versus 73%), sensitivity (90% versus 82%), accuracy (88% versus 78%), and area under the curve (AUC, 93% versus 80%) in discriminating tumor malignancy compared to the conventional ADC. The performance of the FM model was similar to that of the CTRW model. Similar to the CTRW model, the FM model can improve differentiation between low- and high-grade pediatric brain tumors over ADC.

  13. A Porcine Model for Endolaparoscopic Abdominal Aortic Repair and Endoscopic Training

    PubMed Central

    Zarins, Christopher K.; Daunt, David A.; Coleman, Leslie A.; Saenz, Yamil; Fogarty, Thomas J.; Hermann, George D.; Nezhat, Camran R.; Olsen, Eric K.

    2003-01-01

    Objective: The goals of this laboratory model were to evaluate the performance of the surgical team and endolaparoscopic techniques in the porcine model of infrarenal abdominal aortic repair. Methods: Twenty-four pigs underwent full endolaparoscopic aorto-aortic graft implantation with voice-activated computerized robotics. The first group of 10 pigs (acute) was sacrificed while under anesthesia at 0.5 hours (5 animals) and 2 hours (5 animals). The second group of 14 pigs (survival) were recovered from anesthesia and maintained for 7 hours (5 pigs) and 7 days (9 pigs) prior to sacrifice. Survival animals were observed for evidence of hind limb dysfunction. All grafts were visually inspected at autopsy. Results: All animals survived the operation. All grafts were successfully implanted, and all were patent with intact anastomoses at autopsy. Mean aortic clamp time for each group was as follows: acute, 92.9±28.04 minutes; survival, 59.6±13.8 minutes; P=0.0008. Total operative time for each group was as follows: acute, 179±39.6 minutes; survival, 164.6±48 minutes; P=0.44 ns. Estimated blood loss for each group was as follows: acute, 214±437.8 mL; survival 169.2±271 mL; P=0.76 ns. The following outcomes were observed: 1 animal died from respiratory arrest; 1 animal suffered motor sensory dysfunction of the hind limbs (spinal cord ischemia); significant bleeding occurred in 6 of 24 pigs; 8 of the 9 seven-day survivors required minimal pain medication and had normal hind limb function. Conclusions: The reduction in aortic clamp time, total operative time, and blood loss as the study progressed indicate the feasibility of this surgical protocol and the maturation of the learning process, which is paramount in prevention of 2 main sources of morbidity: bleeding and spinal cord ischemia. The reduction in aortic clamp time between the acute and survival groups was dramatic and statistically significant. An intensive formal training program combining dry and live

  14. Building Context with Tumor Growth Modeling Projects in Differential Equations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beier, Julie C.; Gevertz, Jana L.; Howard, Keith E.

    2015-01-01

    The use of modeling projects serves to integrate, reinforce, and extend student knowledge. Here we present two projects related to tumor growth appropriate for a first course in differential equations. They illustrate the use of problem-based learning to reinforce and extend course content via a writing or research experience. Here we discuss…

  15. Computational Model for Tumor Oxygenation Applied to Clinical Data on Breast Tumor Hemoglobin Concentrations Suggests Vascular Dilatation and Compression

    PubMed Central

    Welter, Michael; Fredrich, Thierry; Rinneberg, Herbert; Rieger, Heiko

    2016-01-01

    We present a computational model for trans-vascular oxygen transport in synthetic tumor and host tissue blood vessel networks, aiming at qualitatively explaining published data of optical mammography, which were obtained from 87 breast cancer patients. The data generally show average hemoglobin concentration to be higher in tumors versus host tissue whereas average oxy-to total hemoglobin concentration (vascular segment RBC-volume-weighted blood oxygenation) can be above or below normal. Starting from a synthetic arterio-venous initial network the tumor vasculature was generated by processes involving cooption, angiogenesis, and vessel regression. Calculations of spatially resolved blood flow, hematocrit, oxy- and total hemoglobin concentrations, blood and tissue oxygenation were carried out for ninety tumor and associated normal vessel networks starting from various assumed geometries of feeding arteries and draining veins. Spatial heterogeneity in the extra-vascular partial oxygen pressure distribution can be related to various tumor compartments characterized by varying capillary densities and blood flow characteristics. The reported higher average hemoglobin concentration of tumors is explained by growth and dilatation of tumor blood vessels. Even assuming sixfold metabolic rate of oxygen consumption in tumorous versus host tissue, the predicted oxygen hemoglobin concentrations are above normal. Such tumors are likely associated with high tumor blood flow caused by high-caliber blood vessels crossing the tumor volume and hence oxygen supply exceeding oxygen demand. Tumor oxy- to total hemoglobin concentration below normal could only be achieved by reducing tumor vessel radii during growth by a randomly selected factor, simulating compression caused by intra-tumoral solid stress due to proliferation of cells and extracellular matrix. Since compression of blood vessels will impede chemotherapy we conclude that tumors with oxy- to total hemoglobin concentration

  16. Computational Model for Tumor Oxygenation Applied to Clinical Data on Breast Tumor Hemoglobin Concentrations Suggests Vascular Dilatation and Compression.

    PubMed

    Welter, Michael; Fredrich, Thierry; Rinneberg, Herbert; Rieger, Heiko

    2016-01-01

    We present a computational model for trans-vascular oxygen transport in synthetic tumor and host tissue blood vessel networks, aiming at qualitatively explaining published data of optical mammography, which were obtained from 87 breast cancer patients. The data generally show average hemoglobin concentration to be higher in tumors versus host tissue whereas average oxy-to total hemoglobin concentration (vascular segment RBC-volume-weighted blood oxygenation) can be above or below normal. Starting from a synthetic arterio-venous initial network the tumor vasculature was generated by processes involving cooption, angiogenesis, and vessel regression. Calculations of spatially resolved blood flow, hematocrit, oxy- and total hemoglobin concentrations, blood and tissue oxygenation were carried out for ninety tumor and associated normal vessel networks starting from various assumed geometries of feeding arteries and draining veins. Spatial heterogeneity in the extra-vascular partial oxygen pressure distribution can be related to various tumor compartments characterized by varying capillary densities and blood flow characteristics. The reported higher average hemoglobin concentration of tumors is explained by growth and dilatation of tumor blood vessels. Even assuming sixfold metabolic rate of oxygen consumption in tumorous versus host tissue, the predicted oxygen hemoglobin concentrations are above normal. Such tumors are likely associated with high tumor blood flow caused by high-caliber blood vessels crossing the tumor volume and hence oxygen supply exceeding oxygen demand. Tumor oxy- to total hemoglobin concentration below normal could only be achieved by reducing tumor vessel radii during growth by a randomly selected factor, simulating compression caused by intra-tumoral solid stress due to proliferation of cells and extracellular matrix. Since compression of blood vessels will impede chemotherapy we conclude that tumors with oxy- to total hemoglobin concentration

  17. Intraperitoneal curcumin decreased lung, renal and heart injury in abdominal aorta ischemia/reperfusion model in rat.

    PubMed

    Aydin, Mehmet Salih; Caliskan, Ahmet; Kocarslan, Aydemir; Kocarslan, Sezen; Yildiz, Ali; Günay, Samil; Savik, Emin; Hazar, Abdussemet; Yalcin, Funda

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that curcumin (CUR) has protective effects against ischemia reperfusion injury to various organs. We aimed to determine whether CUR has favorable effects on tissues and oxidative stress in abdominal aorta ischemia-reperfusion injury. Thirty rats were divided into three groups as sham, control and treatment (CUR) group. Control and CUR groups underwent abdominal aorta ischemia for 60 min followed by a 120 min period of reperfusion. In the CUR group, CUR was given 5 min before reperfusion at a dose of 200 mg/kg via an intraperitoneal route. Total antioxidant capacity (TAC), total oxidative status (TOS), and oxidative stress index (OSI) in blood serum were measured, and lung, renal and heart tissue histopathology were evaluated with light microscopy. TOS and OSI activity in blood samples were statistically decreased in sham and CUR groups compared to the control group (p < 0.001 for TOS and OSI). Renal, lung, heart injury scores of sham and CUR groups were statistically decreased compared to control group (p < 0.001 for all comparisons). Histopathological examination revealed less severe lesions in CUR group than in the control group. CUR administered intraperitoneally was effective in reducing oxidative stress and histopathologic injury in an acute abdominal aorta I/R rat model. Copyright © 2014 Surgical Associates Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Abdominal Sepsis.

    PubMed

    De Waele, Jan J

    2016-08-01

    Abdominal infections are an important challenge for the intensive care physician. In an era of increasing antimicrobial resistance, selecting the appropriate regimen is important and, with new drugs coming to the market, correct use is important more than ever before and abdominal infections are an excellent target for antimicrobial stewardship programs. Biomarkers may be helpful, but their exact role in managing abdominal infections remains incompletely understood. Source control also remains an ongoing conundrum, and evidence is increasing that its importance supersedes the impact of antibiotic therapy. New strategies such as open abdomen management may offer added benefit in severely ill patients, but more data are needed to identify its exact role. The role of fungi and the need for antifungal coverage, on the other hand, have been investigated extensively in recent years, but at this point, it remains unclear who requires empirical as well as directed therapy.

  19. Two tumor models of curative adoptive chemoimmunotherapy using tumor-infiltrated spleen cells with potent antitumor cytotoxicity stimulated by antigen-sharing tumors.

    PubMed

    Laude, M; Russo, K L; Mokyr, M B; Dray, S

    1993-07-01

    Previously we have established curative protocols for adoptive chemoimmunotherapy (ACIT) of mice bearing different plasmacytomas that are known to bear cross-reacting antigens: (a) the cure of mice bearing an early-stage, nonpalpable MOPC-315 tumor by a very low dose of cyclophosphamide (10 mg/kg) and cultured MOPC-315-tumor-infiltrated (TI) spleen cells (25 x 10(6)) and (b) the cure of mice bearing a late-stage, relatively drug-resistant, highly metastatic RPC-5 tumor with cyclophosphamide (100 mg/kg) and cultured RPC-5 TI spleen cells (25 x 10(6) - 50 x 10(6)). In both models, the spleen cells were obtained from mice bearing a late-stage tumor and were cultured for 5 days in the presence of polyethyleneglycol 6000 and autochthonous tumor cells as a source of tumor antigen. Here we show that RPC-5 tumor cells could substitute for MOPC-315 tumor cells in the 5-day culture of MOPC-315 TI spleen cells so that they became curative in ACIT for mice bearing an early-stage MOPC-315 tumor. Similarly, MOPC-315 tumor cells could substitute for RPC-5 tumor cells in the 5-day culture of RPC-5 TI spleen cells so that they became curative in ACIT of mice bearing a late-stage RPC-5 tumor. In addition, RPC-5 TI spleen cells cultured with either MOPC-315 or RPC-5 tumor cells were effective in curing all mice bearing an early-stage MOPC-315 tumor by ACIT. However, MOPC-315 TI spleen cells whether cultured with MOPC-315 or RPC-5 tumor cells, were much less effective than cultured RPC-5 TI spleen cells in curing mice bearing a late-stage RPC-5 tumor by ACIT (although the survival of these mice was extended significantly). Interestingly, whereas RPC-5 TI spleen cells cultured with either MOPC-315 or RPC-5 tumor cells were as effective as MOPC-315 TI spleen cells cultured under the same conditions in lysing MOPC-315 tumor cells in vitro, MOPC-315 TI spleen cells that had been cultured with either MOPC-315 or RPC-5 tumor cells exerted a much weaker in vitro cytotoxic T lymphocyte

  20. M-HIFU Inhibits Tumor Growth, Suppresses STAT3 Activity and Enhances Tumor Specific Immunity in a Transplant Tumor Model of Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xiaoyi; Yuan, Fang; Liang, Meihua; Lo, Hui-Wen; Shinohara, Mari L.; Robertson, Cary; Zhong, Pei

    2012-01-01

    Objective In this study, we explored the use of mechanical high intensity focused ultrasound (M-HIFU) as a neo-adjuvant therapy prior to surgical resection of the primary tumor. We also investigated the role of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) in M-HIFU elicited anti-tumor immune response using a transplant tumor model of prostate cancer. Methods RM-9, a mouse prostate cancer cell line with constitutively activated STAT3, was inoculated subcutaneously in C57BL/6J mice. The tumor-bearing mice (with a maximum tumor diameter of 5∼6 mm) were treated by M-HIFU or sham exposure two days before surgical resection of the primary tumor. Following recovery, if no tumor recurrence was observed in 30 days, tumor rechallenge was performed. The growth of the rechallenged tumor, survival rate and anti-tumor immune response of the animal were evaluated. Results No tumor recurrence and distant metastasis were observed in both treatment groups employing M-HIFU + surgery and surgery alone. However, compared to surgery alone, M-HIFU combined with surgery were found to significantly inhibit the growth of rechallenged tumors, down-regulate intra-tumoral STAT3 activities, increase cytotoxic T cells in spleens and tumor draining lymph nodes (TDLNs), and improve the host survival. Furthermore, M-HIFU combined with surgery was found to significantly decrease the level of immunosuppression with concomitantly increased number and activities of dendritic cells, compared to surgery alone. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that M-HIFU can inhibit STAT3 activities, and when combined synergistically with surgery, may provide a novel and promising strategy for the treatment of prostate cancers. PMID:22911830

  1. Modeling of nanotherapeutics delivery based on tumor perfusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Ven, Anne L.; Abdollahi, Behnaz; Martinez, Carlos J.; Burey, Lacey A.; Landis, Melissa D.; Chang, Jenny C.; Ferrari, Mauro; Frieboes, Hermann B.

    2013-05-01

    Heterogeneities in the perfusion of solid tumors prevent optimal delivery of nanotherapeutics. Clinical imaging protocols for obtaining patient-specific data have proven difficult to implement. It is challenging to determine which perfusion features hold greater prognostic value and to relate measurements to vessel structure and function. With the advent of systemically administered nanotherapeutics whose delivery is dependent on overcoming diffusive and convective barriers to transport, such knowledge is increasingly important. We describe a framework for the automated evaluation of vascular perfusion curves measured at the single vessel level. Primary tumor fragments, collected from triple-negative breast cancer patients and grown as xenografts in mice, were injected with fluorescence contrast and monitored using intravital microscopy. The time to arterial peak and venous delay, two features whose probability distributions were measured directly from time-series curves, were analyzed using a fuzzy c-mean supervised classifier in order to rank individual tumors according to their perfusion characteristics. The resulting rankings correlated inversely with experimental nanoparticle accumulation measurements, enabling the modeling of nanotherapeutics delivery without requiring any underlying assumptions about tissue structure or function, or heterogeneities contained therein. With additional calibration, these methodologies may enable the investigation of nanotherapeutics delivery strategies in a variety of tumor models.

  2. A mechanistic compartmental model for total antibody uptake in tumors.

    PubMed

    Thurber, Greg M; Dane Wittrup, K

    2012-12-07

    Antibodies are under development to treat a variety of cancers, such as lymphomas, colon, and breast cancer. A major limitation to greater efficacy for this class of drugs is poor distribution in vivo. Localization of antibodies occurs slowly, often in insufficient therapeutic amounts, and distributes heterogeneously throughout the tumor. While the microdistribution around individual vessels is important for many therapies, the total amount of antibody localized in the tumor is paramount for many applications such as imaging, determining the therapeutic index with antibody drug conjugates, and dosing in radioimmunotherapy. With imaging and pretargeted therapeutic strategies, the time course of uptake is critical in determining when to take an image or deliver a secondary reagent. We present here a simple mechanistic model of antibody uptake and retention that captures the major rates that determine the time course of antibody concentration within a tumor including dose, affinity, plasma clearance, target expression, internalization, permeability, and vascularization. Since many of the parameters are known or can be estimated in vitro, this model can approximate the time course of antibody concentration in tumors to aid in experimental design, data interpretation, and strategies to improve localization. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. A mechanistic compartmental model for total antibody uptake in tumors

    PubMed Central

    Thurber, Greg M.; Dane Wittrup, K.

    2012-01-01

    Antibodies are under development to treat a variety of cancers, such as lymphomas, colon, and breast cancer. A major limitation to greater efficacy for this class of drugs is poor distribution in vivo. Localization of antibodies occurs slowly, often in insufficient therapeutic amounts, and distributes heterogeneously throughout the tumor. While the microdistribution around individual vessels is important for many therapies, the total amount of antibody localized in the tumor is paramount for many applications such as imaging, determining the therapeutic index with antibody drug conjugates, and dosing in radioimmunotherapy. With imaging and pretargeted therapeutic strategies, the time course of uptake is critical in determining when to take an image or deliver a secondary reagent. We present here a simple mechanistic model of antibody uptake and retention that captures the major rates that determine the time course of antibody concentration within a tumor including dose, affinity, plasma clearance, target expression, internalization, permeability, and vascularization. Since many of the parameters are known or can be estimated in vitro, this model can approximate the time course of antibody concentration in tumors to aid in experimental design, data interpretation, and strategies to improve localization. PMID:22974563

  4. Modeling of nanotherapeutics delivery based on tumor perfusion

    PubMed Central

    van de Ven, Anne L.; Abdollahi, Behnaz; Martinez, Carlos J.; Burey, Lacey A.; Landis, Melissa D.; Chang, Jenny C.; Ferrari, Mauro; Frieboes, Hermann B.

    2013-01-01

    Heterogeneities in the perfusion of solid tumors prevent optimal delivery of nanotherapeutics. Clinical imaging protocols to obtain patient-specific data have proven difficult to implement. It is challenging to determine which perfusion features hold greater prognostic value and to relate measurements to vessel structure and function. With the advent of systemically administered nanotherapeutics, whose delivery is dependent on overcoming diffusive and convective barriers to transport, such knowledge is increasingly important. We describe a framework for the automated evaluation of vascular perfusion curves measured at the single vessel level. Primary tumor fragments, collected from triple-negative breast cancer patients and grown as xenografts in mice, were injected with fluorescence contrast and monitored using intravital microscopy. The time to arterial peak and venous delay, two features whose probability distributions were measured directly from time-series curves, were analyzed using a Fuzzy C-mean (FCM) supervised classifier in order to rank individual tumors according to their perfusion characteristics. The resulting rankings correlated inversely with experimental nanoparticle accumulation measurements, enabling modeling of nanotherapeutics delivery without requiring any underlying assumptions about tissue structure or function, or heterogeneities contained within. With additional calibration, these methodologies may enable the study of nanotherapeutics delivery strategies in a variety of tumor models. PMID:24039540

  5. Integrative models of vascular remodeling during tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Rieger, Heiko; Welter, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Malignant solid tumors recruit the blood vessel network of the host tissue for nutrient supply, continuous growth, and gain of metastatic potential. Angiogenesis (the formation of new blood vessels), vessel cooption (the integration of existing blood vessels into the tumor vasculature), and vessel regression remodel the healthy vascular network into a tumor-specific vasculature that is in many respects different from the hierarchically organized arterio-venous blood vessel network of the host tissues. Integrative models based on detailed experimental data and physical laws implement in silico the complex interplay of molecular pathways, cell proliferation, migration, and death, tissue microenvironment, mechanical and hydrodynamic forces, and the fine structure of the host tissue vasculature. With the help of computer simulations high-precision information about blood flow patterns, interstitial fluid flow, drug distribution, oxygen and nutrient distribution can be obtained and a plethora of therapeutic protocols can be tested before clinical trials. In this review, we give an overview over the current status of integrative models describing tumor growth, vascular remodeling, blood and interstitial fluid flow, drug delivery, and concomitant transformations of the microenvironment. © 2015 The Authors. WIREs Systems Biology and Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25808551

  6. Modeling the relationship between fluorodeoxyglucose uptake and tumor radioresistance as a function of the tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Jeho; Deasy, Joseph O

    2014-01-01

    High fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) uptake in tumors has often been correlated with increasing local failure and shorter overall survival, but the radiobiological mechanisms of this uptake are unclear. We explore the relationship between FDG-PET uptake and tumor radioresistance using a mechanistic model that considers cellular status as a function of microenvironmental conditions, including proliferating cells with access to oxygen and glucose, metabolically active cells with access to glucose but not oxygen, and severely hypoxic cells that are starving. However, it is unclear what the precise uptake levels of glucose should be for cells that receive oxygen and glucose versus cells that only receive glucose. Different potential FDG uptake profiles, as a function of the microenvironment, were simulated. Predicted tumor doses for 50% control (TD50) in 2 Gy fractions were estimated for each assumed uptake profile and for various possible cell mixtures. The results support the hypothesis of an increased avidity of FDG for cells in the intermediate stress state (those receiving glucose but not oxygen) compared to well-oxygenated (and proliferating) cells.

  7. Abdominal rigidity

    MedlinePlus

    ... other symptoms do you have at the same time? For example, do you have abdominal pain ? You may have the following tests: Barium studies of the stomach and intestines (such as an upper GI series ) Blood tests Colonoscopy Gastroscopy Peritoneal lavage Stool studies ...

  8. Combination radiotherapy in an orthotopic mouse brain tumor model.

    PubMed

    Kramp, Tamalee R; Camphausen, Kevin

    2012-03-06

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) are the most common and aggressive adult primary brain tumors. In recent years there has been substantial progress in the understanding of the mechanics of tumor invasion, and direct intracerebral inoculation of tumor provides the opportunity of observing the invasive process in a physiologically appropriate environment. As far as human brain tumors are concerned, the orthotopic models currently available are established either by stereotaxic injection of cell suspensions or implantation of a solid piece of tumor through a complicated craniotomy procedure. In our technique we harvest cells from tissue culture to create a cell suspension used to implant directly into the brain. The duration of the surgery is approximately 30 minutes, and as the mouse needs to be in a constant surgical plane, an injectable anesthetic is used. The mouse is placed in a stereotaxic jig made by Stoetling (figure 1). After the surgical area is cleaned and prepared, an incision is made; and the bregma is located to determine the location of the craniotomy. The location of the craniotomy is 2 mm to the right and 1 mm rostral to the bregma. The depth is 3 mm from the surface of the skull, and cells are injected at a rate of 2 μl every 2 minutes. The skin is sutured with 5-0 PDS, and the mouse is allowed to wake up on a heating pad. From our experience, depending on the cell line, treatment can take place from 7-10 days after surgery. Drug delivery is dependent on the drug composition. For radiation treatment the mice are anesthetized, and put into a custom made jig. Lead covers the mouse's body and exposes only the brain of the mouse. The study of tumorigenesis and the evaluation of new therapies for GBM require accurate and reproducible brain tumor animal models. Thus we use this orthotopic brain model to study the interaction of the microenvironment of the brain and the tumor, to test the effectiveness of different therapeutic agents with and without

  9. Drug delivery to solid tumors: the predictive value of the multicellular tumor spheroid model for nanomedicine screening.

    PubMed

    Millard, Marie; Yakavets, Ilya; Zorin, Vladimir; Kulmukhamedova, Aigul; Marchal, Sophie; Bezdetnaya, Lina

    2017-01-01

    The increasing number of publications on the subject shows that nanomedicine is an attractive field for investigations aiming to considerably improve anticancer chemotherapy. Based on selective tumor targeting while sparing healthy tissue, carrier-mediated drug delivery has been expected to provide significant benefits to patients. However, despite reduced systemic toxicity, most nanodrugs approved for clinical use have been less effective than previously anticipated. The gap between experimental results and clinical outcomes demonstrates the necessity to perform comprehensive drug screening by using powerful preclinical models. In this context, in vitro three-dimensional models can provide key information on drug behavior inside the tumor tissue. The multicellular tumor spheroid (MCTS) model closely mimics a small avascular tumor with the presence of proliferative cells surrounding quiescent cells and a necrotic core. Oxygen, pH and nutrient gradients are similar to those of solid tumor. Furthermore, extracellular matrix (ECM) components and stromal cells can be embedded in the most sophisticated spheroid design. All these elements together with the physicochemical properties of nanoparticles (NPs) play a key role in drug transport, and therefore, the MCTS model is appropriate to assess the ability of NP to penetrate the tumor tissue. This review presents recent developments in MCTS models for a better comprehension of the interactions between NPs and tumor components that affect tumor drug delivery. MCTS is particularly suitable for the high-throughput screening of new nanodrugs.

  10. Neutrophils responsive to endogenous IFN-beta regulate tumor angiogenesis and growth in a mouse tumor model.

    PubMed

    Jablonska, Jadwiga; Leschner, Sara; Westphal, Kathrin; Lienenklaus, Stefan; Weiss, Siegfried

    2010-04-01

    Angiogenesis is a hallmark of malignant neoplasias, as the formation of new blood vessels is required for tumors to acquire oxygen and nutrients essential for their continued growth and metastasis. However, the signaling pathways leading to tumor vascularization are not fully understood. Here, using a transplantable mouse tumor model, we have demonstrated that endogenous IFN-beta inhibits tumor angiogenesis through repression of genes encoding proangiogenic and homing factors in tumor-infiltrating neutrophils. We determined that IFN-beta-deficient mice injected with B16F10 melanoma or MCA205 fibrosarcoma cells developed faster-growing tumors with better-developed blood vessels than did syngeneic control mice. These tumors displayed enhanced infiltration by CD11b+Gr1+ neutrophils expressing elevated levels of the genes encoding the proangiogenic factors VEGF and MMP9 and the homing receptor CXCR4. They also expressed higher levels of the transcription factors c-myc and STAT3, known regulators of VEGF, MMP9, and CXCR4. In vitro, treatment of these tumor-infiltrating neutrophils with low levels of IFN-beta restored expression of proangiogenic factors to control levels. Moreover, depletion of these neutrophils inhibited tumor growth in both control and IFN-beta-deficient mice. We therefore suggest that constitutively produced endogenous IFN-beta is an important mediator of innate tumor surveillance. Further, we believe our data help to explain the therapeutic effect of IFN treatment during the early stages of cancer development.

  11. Altered tumor cell growth and tumorigenicity in models of microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamauchi, K.; Taga, M.; Furian, L.; Odle, J.; Sundaresan, A.; Pellis, N.; Andrassy, R.; Kulkarni, A.

    Spaceflight environment and microgravity (MG) causes immune dysfunction and is a major health risk to humans, especially during long-term space missions. The effects of microgravity environment on tumor growth and carcinogenesis are yet unknown. Hence, we investigated the effects of simulated MG (SMG) on tumor growth and tumorigenicity using in vivo and in vitro models. B16 melanoma cells were cultured in static flask (FL) and rotating wall vessel bioreactors (BIO) to measure growth and properties, melanin production and apoptosis. BIO cultures had 50% decreased growth (p<0.01), increased doubling time and a 150% increase in melanin production (p<0.05). Flow cytometric analysis showed increased apoptosis in BIO. When BIO cultured melanoma cells were inoculated sc in mice there was a significant increase in tumorigenicity as compared to FL cells. Thus SMG may have supported &selected highly tumorigenic cells and it is pos sible that in addition to decreased immune function MG may alter tumor cell characteristics and invasiveness. Thus it is important to study effects of microgravity environment and its stressors using experimental tumors and SMG to understand and evaluate carcinogenic responses to true microgravity. Further studies on carcinogenic events and their mechanisms will allow us develop and formulate countermeasures and protect space travelers. Additional results will be presented. (Supported by NASA NCC8-168 grant, ADK)

  12. Fluid, solid and fluid-structure interaction simulations on patient-based abdominal aortic aneurysm models.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Sinead; O'Rourke, Malachy

    2012-04-01

    This article describes the use of fluid, solid and fluid-structure interaction simulations on three patient-based abdominal aortic aneurysm geometries. All simulations were carried out using OpenFOAM, which uses the finite volume method to solve both fluid and solid equations. Initially a fluid-only simulation was carried out on a single patient-based geometry and results from this simulation were compared with experimental results. There was good qualitative and quantitative agreement between the experimental and numerical results, suggesting that OpenFOAM is capable of predicting the main features of unsteady flow through a complex patient-based abdominal aortic aneurysm geometry. The intraluminal thrombus and arterial wall were then included, and solid stress and fluid-structure interaction simulations were performed on this, and two other patient-based abdominal aortic aneurysm geometries. It was found that the solid stress simulations resulted in an under-estimation of the maximum stress by up to 5.9% when compared with the fluid-structure interaction simulations. In the fluid-structure interaction simulations, flow induced pressure within the aneurysm was found to be up to 4.8% higher than the value of peak systolic pressure imposed in the solid stress simulations, which is likely to be the cause of the variation in the stress results. In comparing the results from the initial fluid-only simulation with results from the fluid-structure interaction simulation on the same patient, it was found that wall shear stress values varied by up to 35% between the two simulation methods. It was concluded that solid stress simulations are adequate to predict the maximum stress in an aneurysm wall, while fluid-structure interaction simulations should be performed if accurate prediction of the fluid wall shear stress is necessary. Therefore, the decision to perform fluid-structure interaction simulations should be based on the particular variables of interest in a given

  13. Diagnostic Machine Learning Models for Acute Abdominal Pain: Towards an e-Learning Tool for Medical Students.

    PubMed

    Khumrin, Piyapong; Ryan, Anna; Judd, Terry; Verspoor, Karin

    2017-01-01

    Computer-aided learning systems (e-learning systems) can help medical students gain more experience with diagnostic reasoning and decision making. Within this context, providing feedback that matches students' needs (i.e. personalised feedback) is both critical and challenging. In this paper, we describe the development of a machine learning model to support medical students' diagnostic decisions. Machine learning models were trained on 208 clinical cases presenting with abdominal pain, to predict five diagnoses. We assessed which of these models are likely to be most effective for use in an e-learning tool that allows students to interact with a virtual patient. The broader goal is to utilise these models to generate personalised feedback based on the specific patient information requested by students and their active diagnostic hypotheses.

  14. Abdominal ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... inflammation in pancreas) Spleen enlargement ( splenomegaly ) Portal hypertension Liver tumors Obstruction of bile ... Digestive system Kidney anatomy Ultrasound in pregnancy Kidney - blood and urine flow ...

  15. Is It Possible to Increase Flap Viability by Hydrostatic Dilation?: An Experimental Study in the Rat Abdominal Fasciocutaneous Flap Model.

    PubMed

    Sahin, Cihan; Aysal, Bilge Kagan; Ergun, Ozge

    2016-08-01

    Ergun et al previously demonstrated the efficacy of hydrostatic dilation in a TRAM flap model in an experimental study. We investigated the effect of hydrostatic dilation on a fasciocutaneous flap model. Eighteen female Wistar rats were equally divided into 3 groups, of which 1 served as a control. In the second, the abdominal fasciocutaneous flap surgical delay procedure was performed by division of the left superficial inferior epigastric (SIE) vessels. In the third, hydrostatic dilation was performed on the left SIE artery and vein, with a mean pressure of 300 mm Hg, while elevating the flap on the right-sided SIE pedicle. The groups were compared by microangiography and by the survival ratio of abdominal flaps 7 days after elevation. The mean (SD) flap necrosis rates were as follows: control group, 44.75% (4.31%); delay group, 33.32% (7.11%); and hydrostatic dilation group, 32.51% (5.03%). There was a significant difference between the control group and the other 2 groups (P < 0.05). There was no difference between the delay and hydrostatic dilation groups with respect to surface area necrosis. The microangiographies showed remarkable increased vascularity in the delay and hydrostatic dilation groups. Hydrostatic dilation is a new method of enhancing flap viability that could be used in clinical cases in place of surgical delay once further studies and clinical trials are completed.

  16. Effects of intra-abdominal pressure increase on intestinal ischemia and bacterial translocation in experimental sepsis model.

    PubMed

    Kesici, Ugur; Kesici, Sevgi; Polat, Erdal; Agca, Birol; Turkmen, Ulku A; Ozcan, Deniz; Sari, Musa K

    2011-08-01

    To investigate the safety of laparoscopic intervention for diagnosis and treatment at 8 mm Hg pressure in one-hour period on acute peritonitis related intra-abdominal sepsis model. In this study, we included 32 female Wistar-Albino rats, weighing 250 +/- 20 g, and divided them into 4 groups. This study was conducted in Istanbul University Experimental Medical Research Institution (DETAE) laboratory from April to May 2009. Intra-abdominal sepsis was created with intraperitoneal (i.p.) one mL (109 CFU/mL) Escherichia coli (E. coli) injection, and pneumoperitoneum was formed with CO2 insufflation at 8 mm Hg pressure for one hour i.p. The rats were administered with: Group 1 - one mL i.p. isotonic saline; Group 2 - one mL i.p. isotonic saline + pneumoperitoneum; Group 3 - i.p E. coli; and Group 4 - i.p. E.coli + pneumoperitoneum. Data were analyzed using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences version 15 for Windows (SPSS Inc, Chicago, IL, USA). Fever and leukocyte values were considered high in Groups 3 and 4 compared with Groups 1 and 2 (p=0.001). The administered reproduction ratio of the E. coli strain was determined as 0% in Groups 1 and 2, and 100% in Groups 3 and 4. In this study, as pneumoperitoneum was formed for one hour at 8 mm Hg pressure, in case of intra-abdominal derived sepsis where emergency intervention is needed, we consider that laparoscopic approaches with low pressure may be used safely for diagnosis and treatment.

  17. Evaluation of an iterative model-based reconstruction of pediatric abdominal CT with regard to image quality and radiation dose.

    PubMed

    Aurumskjöld, Marie-Louise; Söderberg, Marcus; Stålhammar, Fredrik; von Steyern, Kristina Vult; Tingberg, Anders; Ydström, Kristina

    2018-06-01

    Background In pediatric patients, computed tomography (CT) is important in the medical chain of diagnosing and monitoring various diseases. Because children are more radiosensitive than adults, they require minimal radiation exposure. One way to achieve this goal is to implement new technical solutions, like iterative reconstruction. Purpose To evaluate the potential of a new, iterative, model-based method for reconstructing (IMR) pediatric abdominal CT at a low radiation dose and determine whether it maintains or improves image quality, compared to the current reconstruction method. Material and Methods Forty pediatric patients underwent abdominal CT. Twenty patients were examined with the standard dose settings and 20 patients were examined with a 32% lower radiation dose. Images from the standard examination were reconstructed with a hybrid iterative reconstruction method (iDose 4 ), and images from the low-dose examinations were reconstructed with both iDose 4 and IMR. Image quality was evaluated subjectively by three observers, according to modified EU image quality criteria, and evaluated objectively based on the noise observed in liver images. Results Visual grading characteristics analyses showed no difference in image quality between the standard dose examination reconstructed with iDose 4 and the low dose examination reconstructed with IMR. IMR showed lower image noise in the liver compared to iDose 4 images. Inter- and intra-observer variance was low: the intraclass coefficient was 0.66 (95% confidence interval = 0.60-0.71) for the three observers. Conclusion IMR provided image quality equivalent or superior to the standard iDose 4 method for evaluating pediatric abdominal CT, even with a 32% dose reduction.

  18. Analysis of a diffuse interface model of multispecies tumor growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Mimi; Feireisl, Eduard; Rocca, Elisabetta; Schimperna, Giulio; Schonbek, Maria E.

    2017-04-01

    We consider a diffuse interface model for tumor growth recently proposed in Chen et al (2014 Int. J. Numer. Methods Biomed. Eng. 30 726-54). In this new approach sharp interfaces are replaced by narrow transition layers arising due to adhesive forces among the cell species. Hence, a continuum thermodynamically consistent model is introduced. The resulting PDE system couples four different types of equations: a Cahn-Hilliard type equation for the tumor cells (which include proliferating and dead cells), a Darcy law for the tissue velocity field, whose divergence may be different from 0 and depend on the other variables, a transport equation for the proliferating (viable) tumor cells, and a quasi-static reaction diffusion equation for the nutrient concentration. We establish existence of weak solutions for the PDE system coupled with suitable initial and boundary conditions. In particular, the proliferation function at the boundary is supposed to be nonnegative on the set where the velocity \\mathbf{u} satisfies \\mathbf{u}\\centerdot ν >0 , where ν is the outer normal to the boundary of the domain.

  19. Simple biophysical model of tumor evasion from immune system control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Onofrio, Alberto; Ciancio, Armando

    2011-09-01

    The competitive nonlinear interplay between a tumor and the host's immune system is not only very complex but is also time-changing. A fundamental aspect of this issue is the ability of the tumor to slowly carry out processes that gradually allow it to become less harmed and less susceptible to recognition by the immune system effectors. Here we propose a simple epigenetic escape mechanism that adaptively depends on the interactions per time unit between cells of the two systems. From a biological point of view, our model is based on the concept that a tumor cell that has survived an encounter with a cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) has an information gain that it transmits to the other cells of the neoplasm. The consequence of this information increase is a decrease in both the probabilities of being killed and of being recognized by a CTL. We show that the mathematical model of this mechanism is formally equal to an evolutionary imitation game dynamics. Numerical simulations of transitory phases complement the theoretical analysis. Implications of the interplay between the above mechanisms and the delivery of immunotherapies are also illustrated.

  20. Interfacial properties in a discrete model for tumor growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moglia, Belén; Guisoni, Nara; Albano, Ezequiel V.

    2013-03-01

    We propose and study, by means of Monte Carlo numerical simulations, a minimal discrete model for avascular tumor growth, which can also be applied for the description of cell cultures in vitro. The interface of the tumor is self-affine and its width can be characterized by the following exponents: (i) the growth exponent β=0.32(2) that governs the early time regime, (ii) the roughness exponent α=0.49(2) related to the fluctuations in the stationary regime, and (iii) the dynamic exponent z=α/β≃1.49(2), which measures the propagation of correlations in the direction parallel to the interface, e.g., ξ∝t1/z, where ξ is the parallel correlation length. Therefore, the interface belongs to the Kardar-Parisi-Zhang universality class, in agreement with recent experiments of cell cultures in vitro. Furthermore, density profiles of the growing cells are rationalized in terms of traveling waves that are solutions of the Fisher-Kolmogorov equation. In this way, we achieved excellent agreement between the simulation results of the discrete model and the continuous description of the growth front of the culture or tumor.

  1. Modeling Tumor Clonal Evolution for Drug Combinations Design.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Boyang; Hemann, Michael T; Lauffenburger, Douglas A

    2016-03-01

    Cancer is a clonal evolutionary process. This presents challenges for effective therapeutic intervention, given the constant selective pressure towards drug resistance. Mathematical modeling from population genetics, evolutionary dynamics, and engineering perspectives are being increasingly employed to study tumor progression, intratumoral heterogeneity, drug resistance, and rational drug scheduling and combinations design. In this review, we discuss promising opportunities these inter-disciplinary approaches hold for advances in cancer biology and treatment. We propose that quantitative modeling perspectives can complement emerging experimental technologies to facilitate enhanced understanding of disease progression and improved capabilities for therapeutic drug regimen designs.

  2. Modeling Tumor Clonal Evolution for Drug Combinations Design

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Boyang; Hemann, Michael T.; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is a clonal evolutionary process. This presents challenges for effective therapeutic intervention, given the constant selective pressure towards drug resistance. Mathematical modeling from population genetics, evolutionary dynamics, and engineering perspectives are being increasingly employed to study tumor progression, intratumoral heterogeneity, drug resistance, and rational drug scheduling and combinations design. In this review, we discuss promising opportunities these inter-disciplinary approaches hold for advances in cancer biology and treatment. We propose that quantitative modeling perspectives can complement emerging experimental technologies to facilitate enhanced understanding of disease progression and improved capabilities for therapeutic drug regimen designs. PMID:28435907

  3. 4D-CT scans reveal reduced magnitude of respiratory liver motion achieved by different abdominal compression plate positions in patients with intrahepatic tumors undergoing helical tomotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Yong, E-mail: hu.yong@zs-hospital.sh.cn; Zhou,

    Purpose: While abdominal compression (AC) can be used to reduce respiratory liver motion in patients receiving helical tomotherapy for hepatocellular carcinoma, the nature and extent of this effect is not well described. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the changes in magnitude of three-dimensional liver motion with abdominal compression using four-dimensional (4D) computed tomography (CT) images of several plate positions. Methods: From January 2012 to October 2015, 72 patients with intrahepatic carcinoma and divided into four groups underwent 4D-CT scans to assess respiratory liver motion. Of the 72 patients, 19 underwent abdominal compression of the cephalic area betweenmore » the subxiphoid and umbilicus (group A), 16 underwent abdominal compression of the caudal region between the subxiphoid area and the umbilicus (group B), 11 patients underwent abdominal compression of the caudal umbilicus (group C), and 26 patients remained free breathing (group D). 4D-CT images were sorted into ten-image series, according to the respiratory phase from the end inspiration to the end expiration, and then transferred to treatment planning software. All liver contours were drawn by a single physician and confirmed by a second physician. Liver relative coordinates were automatically generated to calculate the liver respiratory motion in different axial directions to compile the 10 ten contours into a single composite image. Differences in respiratory liver motion were assessed with a one-way analysis of variance test of significance. Results: The average respiratory liver motion in the Y axial direction was 4.53 ± 1.16, 7.56 ± 1.30, 9.95 ± 2.32, and 9.53 ± 2.62 mm in groups A, B, C, and D, respectively, with a significant change among the four groups (p < 0.001). Abdominal compression was most effective in group A (compression plate on the subxiphoid area), with liver displacement being 2.53 ± 0.93, 4.53 ± 1.16, and 2.14 ± 0.92 mm on the X-, Y-, and Z

  4. Studies of the effect of grasshopper abdominal secretion on wound healing with the use of murine model.

    PubMed

    Buszewska-Forajta, M; Siluk, D; Daghir-Wojtkowiak, E; Sejda, A; Staśkowiak, D; Biernat, W; Kaliszan, R

    2015-12-24

    Grasshopper, belonging to Chorthippus sp., is a widespread insect inhabiting Polish territory. According to folk knowledge and folk tales, the grasshopper abdominal secretion was used by villagers of Central and South-West Poland as a natural drug accelerating the wound healing process. In the reported study the hypothesis about beneficial properties of grasshopper abdominal secretion on hard to heal wounds was verified. The study was carried out with the use of a murine model (mice C57BL/6). In order to verify the beneficial properties of grasshopper abdominal secretion, the wounds of 8mm in diameter were formed on one side of each tested mouse. The influence of ethanolic extract of insects' secretion on healing process was evaluated in comparison to ethanolic solution of allantoin and 30% aqueous solution of ethanol (medium). The observation was carried out over a 14 day period. Finally the statistical analysis (ANOVA) was carried out to highlight the differences in wound healing rate between applied preparations. Moreover, qualitative composition of grasshoppers' secretion was studied with the use of GC/MS technique. During the first three days of observation, wounds treated with allantoin were healed with higher efficiency in comparison to ethanol and insect secretion preparations. The trend of healing changed from the 4th day of observation. Wounds treated with grasshoppers' abdominal secretion were closuring faster than wounds treated with allantoin or ethanol. In this part of observation, in the case of allantoin and ethanol application, the wound healing efficiency was similar. Since the 9th day of experiment the measurement of wounds size was problematic, due to crust formation. Finally at the 14th day of the study, wounds were totally healed. Morphological study enabled to observe all the phases of healing. In the 5th and 8th day, the infiltration of neutrophils and mononuclear cells in dermis was observed, which is characteristic for inflammatory phase

  5. Avoiding Complications in Abdominal Wall Surgery: A Mathematical Model to Predict the Course of the Motor Innervation of the Rectus Abdominis.

    PubMed

    Tessone, Ariel; Nava, Maurizio; Blondeel, Phillip; Spano, Andrea

    2016-02-01

    Ever since its introduction, the transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap has become the mainstay of autologous breast reconstruction. However, concerns regarding donor site morbidity due to the breach of abdominal wall musculature integrity soon followed. Muscle-sparing techniques, eventually eliminating the muscle from the flap all-together with the deep inferior epigastric artery perforator flap, did not eliminate the problem of abdominal wall weakness. This led to the conclusion that motor innervation might be at fault. Studies have shown that even in the presence of an intact rectus abdominis muscle, and an intact anterior rectus sheath, denervation of the rectus abdominis muscle results in significant abdominal wall weakness leading to superior and inferior abdominal bulges, and abdominal herniation. Our aim was to establish a mathematical model to predict the location of the motor innervation to the rectus abdominis muscle, and thus provide surgeons with a tool that will allow them to reduce abdominal morbidity during deep inferior epigastric artery perforator and free muscle-sparing transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous surgery. We dissected 42 cadaveric hemiabdomens and mapped the course of the thoracolumbar nerves. We then standardized and analyzed our findings and presented them as a relative map which can be adjusted to body type and dimensions. Our dissections show that the motor innervation is closely related to the lateral vascular supply. Thus, when possible, we support the preferred utilization of the medial vascular supply, and the preservation of the lateral supply and motor innervation.

  6. Feasibility Study of a Novel Thoraco-abdominal Aortic Hybrid Device (SPIDER-graft) in a Translational Pig Model.

    PubMed

    Debus, Eike S; Kölbel, Tilo; Duprée, Anna; Daum, Günter; Sandhu, Harleen K; Manzoni, Daniel; Wipper, Sabine H

    2018-02-01

    The hybrid SPIDER-graft consists of a proximal descending aortic stent graft and a conventional six branched Dacron graft for open abdominal aortic repair. Technical feasibility with regard to avoiding thoracotomy and extracorporeal circulation (ECC) during thoraco-abdominal aortic hybrid repair and peri-procedural safety of this novel device are unknown. This was a feasibility and safety study in domestic pigs (75-85 kg). The abdominal aorta including iliac bifurcation, left renal artery, and visceral arteries were exposed via retroperitoneal access. The right iliac branch was first temporarily anastomosed end to side to the distal aorta via partial clamping. During inflow reduction and infra-coeliac cross-clamping, the coeliac trunk (CT) was divided and the proximal stent graft portion of the SPIDER-graft was deployed into the descending aorta via the CT ostium. Retrograde visceral and antegrade aorto-iliac blood flow was maintained via the iliac side branch. The visceral, renal, and iliac arteries were sequentially anastomosed, finally replacing the first iliac end to side anastomosis. Technical success, blood flow, periods of ischaemia, and peri-procedural complications were evaluated after intra-operative completion angiography and post-operative computed tomography angiography. Six animals underwent successful thoracic stent graft deployment and distal open reconstruction without peri-operative death. The median thoracic graft implantation time was 4.5 min, and the median ischaemia times before reperfusion were 10 min for the CT, 8 min for the superior mesenteric artery, 13 min for the right renal artery, and 22 min for the left renal artery. Angiography demonstrated appropriate graft implantation and blood flow measurements confirmed sufficient blood flow through all side branches. In this translational pig model, thoraco-abdominal hybrid repair using the novel SPIDER-graft was successful in avoiding thoracotomy and ECC. Technical feasibility and

  7. Mechanism-based model for tumor drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Kuczek, T; Chan, T C

    1992-01-01

    The development of tumor resistance to cytotoxic agents has important implications in the treatment of cancer. If supported by experimental data, mathematical models of resistance can provide useful information on the underlying mechanisms and aid in the design of therapeutic regimens. We report on the development of a model of tumor-growth kinetics based on the assumption that the rates of cell growth in a tumor are normally distributed. We further assumed that the growth rate of each cell is proportional to its rate of total pyrimidine synthesis (de novo plus salvage). Using an ovarian carcinoma cell line (2008) and resistant variants selected for chronic exposure to a pyrimidine antimetabolite, N-phosphonacetyl-L-aspartate (PALA), we derived a simple and specific analytical form describing the growth curves generated in 72 h growth assays. The model assumes that the rate of de novo pyrimidine synthesis, denoted alpha, is shifted down by an amount proportional to the log10 PALA concentration and that cells whose rate of pyrimidine synthesis falls below a critical level, denoted alpha 0, can no longer grow. This is described by the equation: Probability (growth) = probability (alpha 0 less than alpha-constant x log10 [PALA]). This model predicts that when growth curves are plotted on probit paper, they will produce straight lines. This prediction is in agreement with the data we obtained for the 2008 cells. Another prediction of this model is that the same probit plots for the resistant variants should shift to the right in a parallel fashion. Probit plots of the dose-response data obtained for each resistant 2008 line following chronic exposure to PALA again confirmed this prediction. Correlation of the rightward shift of dose responses to uridine transport (r = 0.99) also suggests that salvage metabolism plays a key role in tumor-cell resistance to PALA. Furthermore, the slope of the regression lines enables the detection of synergy such as that observed between

  8. MR Vascular Fingerprinting in Stroke and Brain Tumors Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemasson, B.; Pannetier, N.; Coquery, N.; Boisserand, Ligia S. B.; Collomb, Nora; Schuff, N.; Moseley, M.; Zaharchuk, G.; Barbier, E. L.; Christen, T.

    2016-11-01

    In this study, we evaluated an MRI fingerprinting approach (MRvF) designed to provide high-resolution parametric maps of the microvascular architecture (i.e., blood volume fraction, vessel diameter) and function (blood oxygenation) simultaneously. The method was tested in rats (n = 115), divided in 3 models: brain tumors (9 L, C6, F98), permanent stroke, and a control group of healthy animals. We showed that fingerprinting can robustly distinguish between healthy and pathological brain tissues with different behaviors in tumor and stroke models. In particular, fingerprinting revealed that C6 and F98 glioma models have similar signatures while 9 L present a distinct evolution. We also showed that it is possible to improve the results of MRvF and obtain supplemental information by changing the numerical representation of the vascular network. Finally, good agreement was found between MRvF and conventional MR approaches in healthy tissues and in the C6, F98, and permanent stroke models. For the 9 L glioma model, fingerprinting showed blood oxygenation measurements that contradict results obtained with a quantitative BOLD approach. In conclusion, MR vascular fingerprinting seems to be an efficient technique to study microvascular properties in vivo. Multiple technical improvements are feasible and might improve diagnosis and management of brain diseases.

  9. Cancer drug discovery: recent innovative approaches to tumor modeling.

    PubMed

    Lovitt, Carrie J; Shelper, Todd B; Avery, Vicky M

    2016-09-01

    Cell culture models have been at the heart of anti-cancer drug discovery programs for over half a century. Advancements in cell culture techniques have seen the rapid evolution of more complex in vitro cell culture models investigated for use in drug discovery. Three-dimensional (3D) cell culture research has become a strong focal point, as this technique permits the recapitulation of the tumor microenvironment. Biologically relevant 3D cellular models have demonstrated significant promise in advancing cancer drug discovery, and will continue to play an increasing role in the future. In this review, recent advances in 3D cell culture techniques and their application in tumor modeling and anti-cancer drug discovery programs are discussed. The topics include selection of cancer cells, 3D cell culture assays (associated endpoint measurements and analysis), 3D microfluidic systems and 3D bio-printing. Although advanced cancer cell culture models and techniques are becoming commonplace in many research groups, the use of these approaches has yet to be fully embraced in anti-cancer drug applications. Furthermore, limitations associated with analyzing information-rich biological data remain unaddressed.

  10. MR Vascular Fingerprinting in Stroke and Brain Tumors Models

    PubMed Central

    Lemasson, B.; Pannetier, N.; Coquery, N.; Boisserand, Ligia S. B.; Collomb, Nora; Schuff, N.; Moseley, M.; Zaharchuk, G.; Barbier, E. L.; Christen, T.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we evaluated an MRI fingerprinting approach (MRvF) designed to provide high-resolution parametric maps of the microvascular architecture (i.e., blood volume fraction, vessel diameter) and function (blood oxygenation) simultaneously. The method was tested in rats (n = 115), divided in 3 models: brain tumors (9 L, C6, F98), permanent stroke, and a control group of healthy animals. We showed that fingerprinting can robustly distinguish between healthy and pathological brain tissues with different behaviors in tumor and stroke models. In particular, fingerprinting revealed that C6 and F98 glioma models have similar signatures while 9 L present a distinct evolution. We also showed that it is possible to improve the results of MRvF and obtain supplemental information by changing the numerical representation of the vascular network. Finally, good agreement was found between MRvF and conventional MR approaches in healthy tissues and in the C6, F98, and permanent stroke models. For the 9 L glioma model, fingerprinting showed blood oxygenation measurements that contradict results obtained with a quantitative BOLD approach. In conclusion, MR vascular fingerprinting seems to be an efficient technique to study microvascular properties in vivo. Multiple technical improvements are feasible and might improve diagnosis and management of brain diseases. PMID:27883015

  11. Role of Interleukin-1 Signaling in a Mouse Model of Kawasaki Disease-Associated Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Wakita, Daiko; Kurashima, Yosuke; Crother, Timothy R; Noval Rivas, Magali; Lee, Youngho; Chen, Shuang; Fury, Wen; Bai, Yu; Wagner, Shawn; Li, Debiao; Lehman, Thomas; Fishbein, Michael C; Hoffman, Hal M; Shah, Prediman K; Shimada, Kenichi; Arditi, Moshe

    2016-05-01

    Kawasaki disease (KD) is the most common cause of acquired cardiac disease in US children. In addition to coronary artery abnormalities and aneurysms, it can be associated with systemic arterial aneurysms. We evaluated the development of systemic arterial dilatation and aneurysms, including abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) in the Lactobacillus casei cell-wall extract (LCWE)-induced KD vasculitis mouse model. We discovered that in addition to aortitis, coronary arteritis and myocarditis, the LCWE-induced KD mouse model is also associated with abdominal aorta dilatation and AAA, as well as renal and iliac artery aneurysms. AAA induced in KD mice was exclusively infrarenal, both fusiform and saccular, with intimal proliferation, myofibroblastic proliferation, break in the elastin layer, vascular smooth muscle cell loss, and inflammatory cell accumulation in the media and adventitia. Il1r(-/-), Il1a(-/-), and Il1b(-/-) mice were protected from KD associated AAA. Infiltrating CD11c(+) macrophages produced active caspase-1, and caspase-1 or NLRP3 deficiency inhibited AAA formation. Treatment with interleukin (IL)-1R antagonist (Anakinra), anti-IL-1α, or anti-IL-1β mAb blocked LCWE-induced AAA formation. Similar to clinical KD, the LCWE-induced KD vasculitis mouse model can also be accompanied by AAA formation. Both IL-1α and IL-1β play a key role, and use of an IL-1R blocking agent that inhibits both pathways may be a promising therapeutic target not only for KD coronary arteritis, but also for the other systemic arterial aneurysms including AAA that maybe seen in severe cases of KD. The LCWE-induced vasculitis model may also represent an alternative model for AAA disease. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  12. Mathematical models of tumor heterogeneity and drug resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greene, James

    In this dissertation we develop mathematical models of tumor heterogeneity and drug resistance in cancer chemotherapy. Resistance to chemotherapy is one of the major causes of the failure of cancer treatment. Furthermore, recent experimental evidence suggests that drug resistance is a complex biological phenomena, with many influences that interact nonlinearly. Here we study the influence of such heterogeneity on treatment outcomes, both in general frameworks and under specific mechanisms. We begin by developing a mathematical framework for describing multi-drug resistance to cancer. Heterogeneity is reflected by a continuous parameter, which can either describe a single resistance mechanism (such as the expression of P-gp in the cellular membrane) or can account for the cumulative effect of several mechanisms and factors. The model is written as a system of integro-differential equations, structured by the continuous "trait," and includes density effects as well as mutations. We study the limiting behavior of the model, both analytically and numerically, and apply it to study treatment protocols. We next study a specific mechanism of tumor heterogeneity and its influence on cell growth: the cell-cycle. We derive two novel mathematical models, a stochastic agent-based model and an integro-differential equation model, each of which describes the growth of cancer cells as a dynamic transition between proliferative and quiescent states. By examining the role all parameters play in the evolution of intrinsic tumor heterogeneity, and the sensitivity of the population growth to parameter values, we show that the cell-cycle length has the most significant effect on the growth dynamics. In addition, we demonstrate that the agent-based model can be approximated well by the more computationally efficient integro-differential equations, when the number of cells is large. The model is closely tied to experimental data of cell growth, and includes a novel implementation of

  13. Effect of a High-sucrose Diet on Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Development in a Hypoperfusion-induced Animal Model.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Chie; Kugo, Hirona; Hashimoto, Keisuke; Sawaragi, Ayaka; Zaima, Nobuhiro; Moriyama, Tatsuya

    2018-05-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a vascular disease that results in rupture of the abdominal aorta. The risk factors for the development of AAA include smoking, male sex, hypertension, and age. AAA has a high mortality rate, but therapy for AAA is restricted to surgery in cases of large aneurysms. Clarifying the effect of dietary food on the development of AAA would be helpful for patients with AAAs. However, the relationship between dietary habits and the development of AAA is largely unknown. In our previous study, we demonstrated that adipocytes in vascular wall can induce the rupture of AAA. Therefore, we focused on the diet-induced abnormal triglyceride metabolism, which has the potential to drive AAA development. In this study, we have evaluated the effects of a high-sucrose diet on the development of AAA in a vascular hypoperfusion-induced animal model. A high sucrose diet induced high serum TG level and fatty liver. However, the AAA rupture risk and the AAA diameter were not significantly different between the control and high-sucrose groups. The intergroup differences in the elastin degradation score and collagen-positive area were insignificant. Moreover, matrix metalloproteinases, macrophages, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1-positive areas did not differ significantly between groups. These results suggest that a high-sucrose diet does not affect the appearance of vascular adipocyte and AAA development under the vascular hypoperfusion condition.

  14. Multimodality Tumor Delineation and Predictive Modelling via Fuzzy-Fusion Deformable Models and Biological Potential Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasserman, Richard Marc

    The radiation therapy treatment planning (RTTP) process may be subdivided into three planning stages: gross tumor delineation, clinical target delineation, and modality dependent target definition. The research presented will focus on the first two planning tasks. A gross tumor target delineation methodology is proposed which focuses on the integration of MRI, CT, and PET imaging data towards the generation of a mathematically optimal tumor boundary. The solution to this problem is formulated within a framework integrating concepts from the fields of deformable modelling, region growing, fuzzy logic, and data fusion. The resulting fuzzy fusion algorithm can integrate both edge and region information from multiple medical modalities to delineate optimal regions of pathological tissue content. The subclinical boundaries of an infiltrating neoplasm cannot be determined explicitly via traditional imaging methods and are often defined to extend a fixed distance from the gross tumor boundary. In order to improve the clinical target definition process an estimation technique is proposed via which tumor growth may be modelled and subclinical growth predicted. An in vivo, macroscopic primary brain tumor growth model is presented, which may be fit to each patient undergoing treatment, allowing for the prediction of future growth and consequently the ability to estimate subclinical local invasion. Additionally, the patient specific in vivo tumor model will be of significant utility in multiple diagnostic clinical applications.

  15. Desmoid Fibromatosis of the Lower Abdominal Wall in Irrua Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Awe, Oluwafemi Olasupo; Eluehike, Sylvester

    2018-01-01

    Desmoid fibromatosis (desmoid tumors) is rare tumors. It can occur as intra-abdominal, extraabdominal, or abdominal wall tumor depending on the site. The abdominal wall type is usually sporadic, but few have been associated with familial adenomatous polyposis. They are commonly seen in young females who are pregnant with a history of the previous cesarean section scar or within the 1st year of the last childbirth. There is an association between this tumor, presence of estrogen receptors, and abdominal trauma. We present a 29-year-old Nigerian woman with fungating lower abdominal wall tumor. This tumor is rare, a high index of suspicion will be very important in making the diagnosis. PMID:29643736

  16. Simulation of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) tumor cells using ising model on the Creutz Cellular Automaton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Züleyha, Artuç; Ziya, Merdan; Selçuk, Yeşiltaş; Kemal, Öztürk M.; Mesut, Tez

    2017-11-01

    Computational models for tumors have difficulties due to complexity of tumor nature and capacities of computational tools, however, these models provide visions to understand interactions between tumor and its micro environment. Moreover computational models have potential to develop strategies for individualized treatments for cancer. To observe a solid brain tumor, glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), we present a two dimensional Ising Model applied on Creutz cellular automaton (CCA). The aim of this study is to analyze avascular spherical solid tumor growth, considering transitions between non tumor cells and cancer cells are like phase transitions in physical system. Ising model on CCA algorithm provides a deterministic approach with discrete time steps and local interactions in position space to view tumor growth as a function of time. Our simulation results are given for fixed tumor radius and they are compatible with theoretical and clinic data.

  17. Modeling the Spatiotemporal Evolution of the Melanoma Tumor Microenvironment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Signoriello, Alexandra; Bosenberg, Marcus; Shattuck, Mark; O'Hern, Corey

    The tumor microenvironment, which includes tumor cells, tumor-associated macrophages (TAM), cancer-associated fibroblasts, and endothelial cells, drives the formation and progression of melanoma tumors. Using quantitative analysis of in vivo confocal images of melanoma tumors in three spatial dimensions, we examine the physical properties of the melanoma tumor microenvironment, including the numbers of different cells types, cell size, and morphology. We also compute the nearest neighbor statistics and measure intermediate range spatial correlations between different cell types. We also calculate the step size distribution, mean-square displacement, and non-Gaussian parameter from the spatial trajectories of different cell types in the tumor microenvironment.

  18. The autophagic tumor stroma model of cancer or "battery-operated tumor growth": A simple solution to the autophagy paradox.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E; Whitaker-Menezes, Diana; Pavlides, Stephanos; Chiavarina, Barbara; Bonuccelli, Gloria; Casey, Trimmer; Tsirigos, Aristotelis; Migneco, Gemma; Witkiewicz, Agnieszka; Balliet, Renee; Mercier, Isabelle; Wang, Chengwang; Flomenberg, Neal; Howell, Anthony; Lin, Zhao; Caro, Jaime; Pestell, Richard G; Sotgia, Federica; Lisanti, Michael P

    2010-11-01

    The role of autophagy in tumorigenesis is controversial. Both autophagy inhibitors (chloroquine) and autophagy promoters (rapamycin) block tumorigenesis by unknown mechanism(s). This is called the "Autophagy Paradox". We have recently reported a simple solution to this paradox. We demonstrated that epithelial cancer cells use oxidative stress to induce autophagy in the tumor microenvironment. As a consequence, the autophagic tumor stroma generates recycled nutrients that can then be used as chemical building blocks by anabolic epithelial cancer cells. This model results in a net energy transfer from the tumor stroma to epithelial cancer cells (an energy imbalance), thereby promoting tumor growth. This net energy transfer is both unilateral and vectorial, from the tumor stroma to the epithelial cancer cells, representing a true host-parasite relationship. We have termed this new paradigm "The Autophagic Tumor Stroma Model of Cancer Cell Metabolism" or "Battery-Operated Tumor Growth". In this sense, autophagy in the tumor stroma serves as a "battery" to fuel tumor growth, progression and metastasis, independently of angiogenesis. Using this model, the systemic induction of autophagy will prevent epithelial cancer cells from using recycled nutrients, while the systemic inhibiton of autophagy will prevent stromal cells from producing recycled nutrients-both effectively "starving" cancer cells. We discuss the idea that tumor cells could become resistant to the systemic induction of autophagy, by the upregulation of natural endogenous autophagy inhibitors in cancer cells. Alternatively, tumor cells could also become resistant to the systemic induction of autophagy, by the genetic silencing/deletion of pro-autophagic molecules, such as Beclin1. If autophagy resistance develops in cancer cells, then the systemic inhibition of autophagy would provide a therapeutic solution to this type of drug resistance, as it would still target autophagy in the tumor stroma. As such, an

  19. Repopulation of interacting tumor cells during fractionated radiotherapy: stochastic modeling of the tumor control probability.

    PubMed

    Fakir, Hatim; Hlatky, Lynn; Li, Huamin; Sachs, Rainer

    2013-12-01

    Optimal treatment planning for fractionated external beam radiation therapy requires inputs from radiobiology based on recent thinking about the "five Rs" (repopulation, radiosensitivity, reoxygenation, redistribution, and repair). The need is especially acute for the newer, often individualized, protocols made feasible by progress in image guided radiation therapy and dose conformity. Current stochastic tumor control probability (TCP) models incorporating tumor repopulation effects consider "stem-like cancer cells" (SLCC) to be independent, but the authors here propose that SLCC-SLCC interactions may be significant. The authors present a new stochastic TCP model for repopulating SLCC interacting within microenvironmental niches. Our approach is meant mainly for comparing similar protocols. It aims at practical generalizations of previous mathematical models. The authors consider protocols with complete sublethal damage repair between fractions. The authors use customized open-source software and recent mathematical approaches from stochastic process theory for calculating the time-dependent SLCC number and thereby estimating SLCC eradication probabilities. As specific numerical examples, the authors consider predicted TCP results for a 2 Gy per fraction, 60 Gy protocol compared to 64 Gy protocols involving early or late boosts in a limited volume to some fractions. In sample calculations with linear quadratic parameters α = 0.3 per Gy, α∕β = 10 Gy, boosting is predicted to raise TCP from a dismal 14.5% observed in some older protocols for advanced NSCLC to above 70%. This prediction is robust as regards: (a) the assumed values of parameters other than α and (b) the choice of models for intraniche SLCC-SLCC interactions. However, α = 0.03 per Gy leads to a prediction of almost no improvement when boosting. The predicted efficacy of moderate boosts depends sensitively on α. Presumably, the larger values of α are the ones appropriate for individualized

  20. Protective antitumor immunity induced by tumor cell lysates conjugated with diphtheria toxin and adjuvant epitope in mouse breast tumor models

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ze-Yu; Xing, Yun; Liu, Bin; Lu, Lei; Huang, Xiao; Ge, Chi-Yu; Yao, Wen-Jun; Xu, Mao-Lei; Gao, Zhen-Qiu; Cao, Rong-Yue; Wu, Jie; Li, Tai-Ming

    2012-01-01

    Cancer cell vaccine-based immunotherapy has received increasing interest in many clinical trials involving patients with breast cancer. Combining with appropriate adjuvants can enhance the weak immunogenic properties of tumor cell lysates (TCL). In this study, diphtheria toxin (DT) and two tandem repeats of mycobacterial heat shock protein 70 (mHSP70) fragment 407-426 (M2) were conjugated to TCL with glutaraldehyde, and the constructed cancer cell vaccine was named DT-TCL-M2. Subcutaneous injection of DT-TCL-M2 in mice effectively elicited tumor-specific polyclonal immune responses, including humoral and cellular immune responses. High levels of antibodies against TCL were detected in the serum of immunized mice with ELISA and verified with Western blot analyses. The splenocytes from immunized mice showed potent cytotoxicity on Ehrlich ascites carcinoma cells. Moreover, the protective antitumor immunity induced by DT-TCL-M2 inhibited tumor growth in a mouse breast tumor model. DT-TCL-M2 also attenuated tumor-induced angiogenesis and slowed tumor growth in a mouse intradermal tumor model. These findings demonstrate that TCL conjugated with appropriate adjuvants induced effective antitumor immunity in vivo. Improvements in potency could further make cancer cell vaccines a useful and safe method for preventing cancer recurrence after resection. PMID:22464650

  1. A Model for Precise and Uniform Pelvic- and Limb-Sparing Abdominal Irradiation to Study the Radiation-Induced Gastrointestinal Syndrome in Mice Using Small Animal Irradiation Systems.

    PubMed

    Brodin, N Patrik; Velcich, Anna; Guha, Chandan; Tomé, Wolfgang A

    2017-01-01

    Currently, no readily available mitigators exist for acute abdominal radiation injury. Here, we present an animal model for precise and homogenous limb-sparing abdominal irradiation (LSAIR) to study the radiation-induced gastrointestinal syndrome (RIGS). The LSAIR technique was developed using the small animal radiation research platform (SARRP) with image guidance capabilities. We delivered LSAIR at doses between 14 and 18 Gy on 8- to 10-week-old male C57BL/6 mice. Histological analysis was performed to confirm that the observed mortality was due to acute abdominal radiation injury. A steep dose-response relationship was found for survival, with no deaths seen at doses below 16 Gy and 100% mortality at above 17 Gy. All deaths occurred between 6 and 10 days after irradiation, consistent with the onset of RIGS. This was further confirmed by histological analysis showing clear differences in the number of regenerative intestinal crypts between animals receiving sublethal (14 Gy) and 100% lethal (18 Gy) radiation. The developed LSAIR technique provides uniform dose delivery with a clear dose response, consistent with acute abdominal radiation injury on histological examination. This model can provide a useful tool for researchers investigating the development of mitigators for accidental or clinical high-dose abdominal irradiation.

  2. Enalapril and ASS inhibit tumor growth in a transgenic mouse model of islet cell tumors.

    PubMed

    Fendrich, V; Lopez, C L; Manoharan, J; Maschuw, K; Wichmann, S; Baier, A; Holler, J P; Ramaswamy, A; Bartsch, D K; Waldmann, J

    2014-10-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests a role for angiotensin-converting enzymes involving the angiotensin II-receptor 1 (AT1-R) and the cyclooxygenase pathway in carcinogenesis. The effects of ASS and enalapril were assessed in vitro and in a transgenic mouse model of pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (pNENs). The effects of enalapril and ASS on proliferation and expression of the AGTR1A and its target gene vascular endothelial growth factor (Vegfa) were assessed in the neuroendocrine cell line BON1. Rip1-Tag2 mice were treated daily with either 0.6 mg/kg bodyweight of enalapril i.p., 20 mg/kg bodyweight of ASS i.p., or a vehicle in a prevention (weeks 5-12) and a survival group (week 5 till death). Tumor surface, weight of pancreatic glands, immunostaining for AT1-R and nuclear factor kappa beta (NFKB), and mice survival were analyzed. In addition, sections from human specimens of 20 insulinomas, ten gastrinomas, and 12 non-functional pNENs were evaluated for AT1-R and NFKB (NFKB1) expression and grouped according to the current WHO classification. Proliferation was significantly inhibited by enalapril and ASS in BON1 cells, with the combination being the most effective. Treatment with enalapril and ASS led to significant downregulation of known target genes Vegf and Rela at RNA level. Tumor growth was significantly inhibited by enalapril and ASS in the prevention group displayed by a reduction of tumor size (84%/67%) and number (30%/45%). Furthermore, daily treatment with enalapril and ASS prolonged the overall median survival compared with vehicle-treated Rip1-Tag2 (107 days) mice by 9 and 17 days (P=0.016 and P=0.013). The AT1-R and the inflammatory transcription factor NFKB were abolished completely upon enalapril and ASS treatment. AT1-R and NFKB expressions were observed in 80% of human pNENs. Enalapril and ASS may provide an approach for chemoprevention and treatment of pNENs. © 2014 Society for Endocrinology.

  3. Evaluation of the levels of metalloproteinsase-2 in patients with abdominal aneurysm and abdominal hernias.

    PubMed

    Antoszewska, Magdalena

    2013-05-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysms and abdominal hernias become an important health problems of our times. Abdominal aortic aneurysm and its rupture is one of the most dangerous fact in vascular surgery. There are some theories pointing to a multifactoral genesis of these kinds of diseases, all of them assume the attenuation of abdominal fascia and abdominal aortic wall. The density and continuity of these structures depend on collagen and elastic fibers structure. Reducing the strength of the fibers may be due to changes in the extracellular matrix (ECM) by the proteolytic enzymes-matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) that degrade extracellular matrix proteins. These enzymes play an important role in the development of many disease: malignant tumors (colon, breast, lung, pancreas), cardiovascular disease (myocardial infarction, ischemia-reperfusion injury), connective tissue diseases (Ehler-Danlos Syndrome, Marfan's Syndrome), complications of diabetes (retinopathy, nephropathy). One of the most important is matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2). The aim of the study was an estimation of the MMP-2 blood levels in patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm and primary abdominal hernia, and in patients with only abdominal aortic aneurysm. The study involved 88 patients aged 42 to 89 years, including 75 men and 13 women. Patients were divided into two groups: patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm and primary abdominal hernia (45 persons, representing 51.1% of all group) and patients with only abdominal aortic aneurysm (43 persons, representing 48,9% of all group). It was a statistically significant increase in MMP-2 blood levels in patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm and primary abdominal hernia compared to patients with only abdominal aortic aneurysm. It was a statistically significant increase in the prevalence of POCHP in patients with only abdominal aortic aneurysm compared to patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm and primary abdominal hernia. Statistically significant

  4. JP-8 jet fuel exposure potentiates tumor development in two experimental model systems.

    PubMed

    Harris, D T; Sakiestewa, D; Titone, D; He, X; Hyde, J; Witten, M

    2007-11-01

    The US Air Force has implemented the widespread use of JP-8 jet fuel in its operations, although a thorough understanding of its potential effects upon exposed personnel is unclear. Previous work has reported that JP-8 exposure is immunosuppressive. Exposure of mice to JP-8 for 1 h/day resulted in immediate secretion of two immunosuppressive agents; namely, interleukin-10 (IL-10) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). Thus, it was of interest to determine if jet fuel exposure might promote tumor growth and metastasis. The syngeneic B16 tumor model was used for these studies. Animals were injected intravenously with tumor cells, and lung colonies were enumerated. Animals were also examined for metastatic spread of the tumor. Mice were either exposed to 1000 mg/m3 JP-8 (1 h/ day) for 7 days before tumor injection or were exposed to JP-8 at the time of tumor injection. All animals were killed 17 days after tumor injection. In the present study, JP8 exposure potentiated the growth and metastases of B16 tumors in an animal model. Exposure of mice to JP-8 for 1 h/day before tumor induction resulted in an approximately 8.7-fold increase in tumors, whereas those mice exposed to JP8 at the time of tumor induction had a 5.6-fold increase in tumor numbers. Thus, low concentration JP-8 jet fuel exposures have significant immune suppressive effects on the immune system that can result in increased tumor formation and metastases. We have now extended the observations to an experimental subcutaneous tumor model. JP8 exposure at the time of tumor induction in this model did not affect the growth of the tumor. However, JP8-exposed, tumor-bearing animals died at an accelerated rate as compared with air-exposed, tumor-bearing mice.

  5. PD-1 blockade enhances elotuzumab efficacy in mouse tumor models

    PubMed Central

    Jhatakia, Amy; Kearney, Alper Y.; Brender, Ty; Maurer, Mark; Henning, Karla; Jenkins, Misty R.; Rogers, Amy J.; Neeson, Paul J.; Korman, Alan J.; Robbins, Michael D.; Graziano, Robert F.

    2017-01-01

    Elotuzumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody that binds human signaling lymphocytic activation molecule F7 (hSLAMF7) on myeloma cells, was developed to treat patients with multiple myeloma (MM). Elotuzumab has a dual mechanism of action that includes the direct activation of natural killer (NK) cells and the induction of NK cell–mediated antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity. This study aimed to characterize the effects of elotuzumab on NK cells in vitro and in patients with MM and to determine whether elotuzumab antitumor activity was improved by programmed death receptor-1 (PD-1) blockade. Elotuzumab promoted NK cell activation when added to a coculture of human NK cells and SLAMF7-expressing myeloma cells. An increased frequency of activated NK cells was observed in bone marrow aspirates from elotuzumab-treated patients. In mouse tumor models expressing hSLAMF7, maximal antitumor efficacy of a murine immunoglobulin G2a version of elotuzumab (elotuzumab-g2a) required both Fcγ receptor–expressing NK cells and CD8+ T cells and was significantly enhanced by coadministration of anti–PD-1 antibody. In these mouse models, elotuzumab-g2a and anti–PD-1 combination treatment promoted tumor-infiltrating NK and CD8+ T-cell activation, as well as increased intratumoral cytokine and chemokine release. These observations support the rationale for clinical investigation of elotuzumab/anti–PD-1 combination therapy in patients with MM. PMID:29296719

  6. Isolation of Circulating Tumor Cells in an Orthotopic Mouse Model of Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kochall, Susan; Thepkaysone, May-Linn; García, Sebastián A; Betzler, Alexander M; Weitz, Jürgen; Reissfelder, Christoph; Schölch, Sebastian

    2017-07-18

    Despite the advantages of easy applicability and cost-effectiveness, subcutaneous mouse models have severe limitations and do not accurately simulate tumor biology and tumor cell dissemination. Orthotopic mouse models have been introduced to overcome these limitations; however, such models are technically demanding, especially in hollow organs such as the large bowel. In order to produce uniform tumors which reliably grow and metastasize, standardized techniques of tumor cell preparation and injection are critical. We have developed an orthotopic mouse model of colorectal cancer (CRC) which develops highly uniform tumors and can be used for tumor biology studies as well as therapeutic trials. Tumor cells from either primary tumors, 2-dimensional (2D) cell lines or 3-dimensional (3D) organoids are injected into the cecum and, depending on the metastatic potential of the injected tumor cells, form highly metastatic tumors. In addition, CTCs can be found regularly. We here describe the technique of tumor cell preparation from both 2D cell lines and 3D organoids as well as primary tumor tissue, the surgical and injection techniques as well as the isolation of CTCs from the tumor-bearing mice, and present tips for troubleshooting.

  7. An analytical poroelastic model for ultrasound elastography imaging of tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tauhidul Islam, Md; Chaudhry, Anuj; Unnikrishnan, Ginu; Reddy, J. N.; Righetti, Raffaella

    2018-01-01

    The mechanical behavior of biological tissues has been studied using a number of mechanical models. Due to the relatively high fluid content and mobility, many biological tissues have been modeled as poroelastic materials. Diseases such as cancers are known to alter the poroelastic response of a tissue. Tissue poroelastic properties such as compressibility, interstitial permeability and fluid pressure also play a key role for the assessment of cancer treatments and for improved therapies. At the present time, however, a limited number of poroelastic models for soft tissues are retrievable in the literature, and the ones available are not directly applicable to tumors as they typically refer to uniform tissues. In this paper, we report the analytical poroelastic model for a non-uniform tissue under stress relaxation. Displacement, strain and fluid pressure fields in a cylindrical poroelastic sample containing a cylindrical inclusion during stress relaxation are computed. Finite element simulations are then used to validate the proposed theoretical model. Statistical analysis demonstrates that the proposed analytical model matches the finite element results with less than 0.5% error. The availability of the analytical model and solutions presented in this paper may be useful to estimate diagnostically relevant poroelastic parameters such as interstitial permeability and fluid pressure, and, in general, for a better interpretation of clinically-relevant ultrasound elastography results.

  8. A High-Performance Cellular Automaton Model of Tumor Growth with Dynamically Growing Domains

    PubMed Central

    Poleszczuk, Jan; Enderling, Heiko

    2014-01-01

    Tumor growth from a single transformed cancer cell up to a clinically apparent mass spans many spatial and temporal orders of magnitude. Implementation of cellular automata simulations of such tumor growth can be straightforward but computing performance often counterbalances simplicity. Computationally convenient simulation times can be achieved by choosing appropriate data structures, memory and cell handling as well as domain setup. We propose a cellular automaton model of tumor growth with a domain that expands dynamically as the tumor population increases. We discuss memory access, data structures and implementation techniques that yield high-performance multi-scale Monte Carlo simulations of tumor growth. We discuss tumor properties that favor the proposed high-performance design and present simulation results of the tumor growth model. We estimate to which parameters the model is the most sensitive, and show that tumor volume depends on a number of parameters in a non-monotonic manner. PMID:25346862

  9. Circulating Tumor Cell Analysis in Preclinical Mouse Models of Metastasis.

    PubMed

    Kitz, Jenna; Lowes, Lori E; Goodale, David; Allan, Alison L

    2018-04-28

    The majority of cancer deaths occur because of metastasis since current therapies are largely non-curative in the metastatic setting. The use of in vivo preclinical mouse models for assessing metastasis is, therefore, critical for developing effective new cancer biomarkers and therapies. Although a number of quantitative tools have been previously developed to study in vivo metastasis, the detection and quantification of rare metastatic events has remained challenging. This review will discuss the use of circulating tumor cell (CTC) analysis as an effective means of tracking and characterizing metastatic disease progression in preclinical mouse models of breast and prostate cancer and the resulting lessons learned about CTC and metastasis biology. We will also discuss how the use of clinically-relevant CTC technologies such as the CellSearch ® and Parsortix™ platforms for preclinical CTC studies can serve to enhance the study of cancer biology, new biomarkers, and novel therapies from the bench to the bedside.

  10. Modified model of VX2 tumor overexpressing vascular endothelial growth factor.

    PubMed

    Pascale, Florentina; Ghegediban, Saida-Homayra; Bonneau, Michel; Bedouet, Laurent; Namur, Julien; Verret, Valentin; Schwartz-Cornil, Isabelle; Wassef, Michel; Laurent, Alexandre

    2012-06-01

    To determine whether upregulated expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in VX2 cells can increase vessel density (VD) and reduce tumor necrosis. The VX2 cell line was transfected with expression vectors containing cDNA for rabbit VEGF. Stable clones producing rabbit VEGF (VEGF-VX2) were selected. VEGF-VX2 cells (n = 5 rabbits) or nontransfected VX2 cells (controls; n = 5 rabbits) were implanted into leg muscle of 10 rabbits. The animals were sacrificed at day 21. Tumor volume, percentage of necrosis, VD, and VEGF concentration in tumor protein extract were quantified. Overexpression of VEGF by VX2 cells augmented tumor implantation efficiency 100% and favored cyst formation. The tumor volume was significantly larger for VEGF-VX2 transfected tumors versus controls (P = .0143). Overexpression of VEGF in VX2 cells significantly increased the VD of the tumors (P = .0138). The percentage of necrosis was reduced in VEGF-VX2 tumors versus controls (19.5% vs 38.5 %; P = .002). VEGF concentration in VEGF-VX2 tumors was significantly higher than in control tumors (P = .041) and was correlated with tumor volume (ρ = .883, P = .012). The overexpression of VEGF increased tumor growth and vascularization, favored cyst formation, and reduced tumor necrosis. This new phenotype of the VX2 tumor may offer some advantages over classic models of VX2 tumor for evaluating anticancer therapies. Copyright © 2012 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. A model system for the evaluation of radioimmunoimaging of tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Koizumi, M.; Endo, K.; Sakahara, H.

    1985-05-01

    The authors have developed a simple model system that can be used to evaluate methods of radioimmunoimaging of tumors, using human chorionic gonadropin (hCG) as a model antigen, and a monoclonal antibody against hCG ..beta..-subunit as a model antibody. HCG was coated on a polystylene spherical bead with a quarter inch in diameter, and coated beads were washed extensively with phosphate buffered saline, and glycine acid buffer to remove the easily dissociable antigen. HCG-coated beads were put into the subcutaneous tissue on the back of mice. At 24 hr after the transplantation, when serum hCG was not detectable by themore » conventional RIA, radiolabeled antibodies were injected and its bio-distribution monitored. The %ID/g for the hCG coated beads increased to a maximum of 48 hr after the injection of radioiodinad antibody, whereas the %ID/g for most organs decreased with time. As a nonspecific antigen, beads coated with bovine serum albumin were transplanted and its uptake was as low as about one 50th of hCG-coated ones. The %ID/g of radioiodinated monoclonal antibody against human thyroglobulin (a nonspecific antibody) for hCG-coated beads was also negligible. Thus, the localization index (%ID of specific antibody / %ID of nonspecific antibody) reached to 15.0 at 24 hr, 35.5 at 48 hr and 57.8 at 96 hr after the injection. The biodistribution of In-111 labeled specific monoclonal antibody, prepared through the chelation with DTPA, demonstrated similar results with radioiodinated ones. This mouse model system that did not involve the use of tumors, yielded high localization index and reproducibilities and could be used to evaluate different methods for radiolabelng monoclonal antibodies.« less

  12. Radionuclide-fluorescence Reporter Gene Imaging to Track Tumor Progression in Rodent Tumor Models

    PubMed Central

    Volpe, Alessia; Man, Francis; Lim, Lindsay; Khoshnevisan, Alex; Blower, Julia; Blower, Philip J.; Fruhwirth, Gilbert O.

    2018-01-01

    Metastasis is responsible for most cancer deaths. Despite extensive research, the mechanistic understanding of the complex processes governing metastasis remains incomplete. In vivo models are paramount for metastasis research, but require refinement. Tracking spontaneous metastasis by non-invasive in vivo imaging is now possible, but remains challenging as it requires long-time observation and high sensitivity. We describe a longitudinal combined radionuclide and fluorescence whole-body in vivo imaging approach for tracking tumor progression and spontaneous metastasis. This reporter gene methodology employs the sodium iodide symporter (NIS) fused to a fluorescent protein (FP). Cancer cells are engineered to stably express NIS-FP followed by selection based on fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Corresponding tumor models are established in mice. NIS-FP expressing cancer cells are tracked non-invasively in vivo at the whole-body level by positron emission tomography (PET) using the NIS radiotracer [18F]BF4-. PET is currently the most sensitive in vivo imaging technology available at this scale and enables reliable and absolute quantification. Current methods either rely on large cohorts of animals that are euthanized for metastasis assessment at varying time points, or rely on barely quantifiable 2D imaging. The advantages of the described method are: (i) highly sensitive non-invasive in vivo 3D PET imaging and quantification, (ii) automated PET tracer production, (iii) a significant reduction in required animal numbers due to repeat imaging options, (iv) the acquisition of paired data from subsequent imaging sessions providing better statistical data, and (v) the intrinsic option for ex vivo confirmation of cancer cells in tissues by fluorescence microscopy or cytometry. In this protocol, we describe all steps required for routine NIS-FP-afforded non-invasive in vivo cancer cell tracking using PET/CT and ex vivo confirmation of in vivo results. This protocol has

  13. Reconstruction of the Abdominal Vagus Nerve Using Sural Nerve Grafts in Canine Models

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Fen; Wang, Zhiming; Wang, Yin

    2013-01-01

    Background Recently, vagus nerve preservation or reconstruction of vagus has received increasing attention. The present study aimed to investigate the feasibility of reconstructing the severed vagal trunk using an autologous sural nerve graft. Methods Ten adult Beagle dogs were randomly assigned to two groups of five, the nerve grafting group (TG) and the vagal resection group (VG). The gastric secretion and emptying functions in both groups were assessed using Hollander insulin and acetaminophen tests before surgery and three months after surgery. All dogs underwent laparotomy under general anesthesia. In TG group, latency and conduction velocity of the action potential in a vagal trunk were measured, and then nerves of 4 cm long were cut from the abdominal anterior and posterior vagal trunks. Two segments of autologous sural nerve were collected for performing end-to-end anastomoses with the cut ends of vagal trunk (8–0 nylon suture, 3 sutures for each anastomosis). Dogs in VG group only underwent partial resections of the anterior and posterior vagal trunks. Laparotomy was performed in dogs of TG group, and latency and conduction velocity of the action potential in their vagal trunks were measured. The grafted nerve segment was removed, and stained with anti-neurofilament protein and toluidine blue. Results Latency of the action potential in the vagal trunk was longer after surgery than before surgery in TG group, while the conduction velocity was lower after surgery. The gastric secretion and emptying functions were weaker after surgery in dogs of both groups, but in TG group they were significantly better than in VG group. Anti-neurofilament protein staining and toluidine blue staining showed there were nerve fibers crossing the anastomosis of the vagus and sural nerves in dogs of TG group. Conclusion Reconstruction of the vagus nerve using the sural nerve is technically feasible. PMID:23555604

  14. Genetically mediated Nf1 loss in mice promotes diverse radiation-induced tumors modeling second malignant neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Grace; Huang, Brian; Pinarbasi, Emile; Braunstein, Steve E.; Horvai, Andrew E.; Kogan, Scott; Bhatia, Smita; Faddegon, Bruce; Nakamura, Jean L.

    2013-01-01

    Second malignant neoplasms (SMNs) are therapy-induced malignancies and a growing problem in cancer survivors, particularly survivors of childhood cancers. The lack of experimental models of SMNs has limited understanding of their pathogenesis. It is currently not possible to predict or prevent this devastating late complication. Individuals with Neurofibromatosis I (NF1) are at increased risk of developing therapy-induced cancers for unclear reasons. To model SMNs, we replicated clinical radiotherapy and delivered fractionated abdominal irradiation to Nf1+/− and wildtype mice. Similar to irradiated cancer survivors, irradiated wildtype and Nf1+/− mice developed diverse in-field malignancies. In Nf1+/− mice, fractionated irradiation promoted both classical NF1-associated malignancies and malignancies unassociated with the NF1 syndrome but typical of SMNs. Nf1 heterozygosity potentiated the mutagenic effects of irradiation, as evidenced by the significantly reduced survival after irradiation and tumor development that was often characterized by synchronous primary tumors. Interestingly, diverse radiation-induced tumors arising in wildtype and Nf1+/− mice shared a genetic signature characterized by monoallelic loss of Nf1 and the adjacent Trp53 allele. These findings implicate Nf1 loss as mediating tumorigenesis in a broad range of cell types and organs extending beyond the classical NF1 tumor histologies. Examining clinical SMN samples, we found LOH of NF1 in SMNs from non-NF1 patients. Nf1 heterozygosity confers broad susceptibility to genotoxin-induced tumorigenesis and this paradigm serves as an experimental platform for future studies of SMNs. PMID:23071067

  15. Mitigating Errors in External Respiratory Surrogate-Based Models of Tumor Position

    SciTech Connect

    Malinowski, Kathleen T.; Fischell Department of Bioengineering, University of Maryland, College Park, MD; McAvoy, Thomas J.

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of tumor site, measurement precision, tumor-surrogate correlation, training data selection, model design, and interpatient and interfraction variations on the accuracy of external marker-based models of tumor position. Methods and Materials: Cyberknife Synchrony system log files comprising synchronously acquired positions of external markers and the tumor from 167 treatment fractions were analyzed. The accuracy of Synchrony, ordinary-least-squares regression, and partial-least-squares regression models for predicting the tumor position from the external markers was evaluated. The quantity and timing of the data used to build the predictive model were varied. The effects of tumor-surrogate correlation and the precisionmore » in both the tumor and the external surrogate position measurements were explored by adding noise to the data. Results: The tumor position prediction errors increased during the duration of a fraction. Increasing the training data quantities did not always lead to more accurate models. Adding uncorrelated noise to the external marker-based inputs degraded the tumor-surrogate correlation models by 16% for partial-least-squares and 57% for ordinary-least-squares. External marker and tumor position measurement errors led to tumor position prediction changes 0.3-3.6 times the magnitude of the measurement errors, varying widely with model algorithm. The tumor position prediction errors were significantly associated with the patient index but not with the fraction index or tumor site. Partial-least-squares was as accurate as Synchrony and more accurate than ordinary-least-squares. Conclusions: The accuracy of surrogate-based inferential models of tumor position was affected by all the investigated factors, except for the tumor site and fraction index.« less

  16. Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    ... Kids and Teens Pregnancy and Childbirth Women Men Seniors Your Health Resources Healthcare Management End-of-Life ... familydoctor.org editorial staff Categories: Family Health, Men, Seniors, WomenTags: abdominal aorta, abdominal aortic aneurysm, abdominal pain, ...

  17. Impact of Preoperative Environmental Enrichment on Prevention of Development of Cognitive Impairment following Abdominal Surgery in a Rat Model.

    PubMed

    Kawano, Takashi; Eguchi, Satoru; Iwata, Hideki; Tamura, Takahiko; Kumagai, Naoko; Yokoyama, Masataka

    2015-07-01

    Sustained neuroinflammation may contribute to the pathogenesis of postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD). Here, the authors evaluated the preventive effect of preoperative environmental enrichment (PEE) on the development of neuroinflammation and concomitant POCD in a rat abdominal surgery model. Young and aged rats were assigned to one of four groups using a 2 × 2 experimental design: PEE versus sedentary condition for 14 days, by abdominal surgery versus anesthesia alone (n = 8 in each group). After a 7-day postsurgical recovery period, cognitive function was assessed using a novel object recognition test, followed by measurement of hippocampal levels of proinflammatory cytokines. Under identical conditions, microglia were isolated from the hippocampus for assessment of cytokine response to lipopolysaccharide. In the sedentary group, aged, but not young, rats receiving surgery showed memory deficits (novel object preference during testing phase of 54.6 ± 7.8% vs. 76.9 ± 11.3% in nonsurgery group, P < 0.05) and increased hippocampal levels of cytokines compared with nonsurgical rats. PEE had no effects on novel object preference in nonsurgery animals (78.6 ± 10.7%), whereas it attenuated surgery-induced impairment of novel object preference (70.9 ± 15.0%, P < 0.05 vs. sedentary/surgery group) as well as increase of cytokine levels in hippocampus. Furthermore, upon ex vivo stimulation with lipopolysaccharide, cytokines release from hippocampal microglia isolated from aged rats before intervention was significantly higher in comparison with young rats. PEE resulted in reduction of these age-related microglial phenotypic changes. PEE could prevent the development of neuroinflammation and related POCD in aged rats by reversion of a proinflammatory phenotype of hippocampal microglia.

  18. Improvement of mesh recolonization in abdominal wall reconstruction with adipose vs. bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in a rodent model.

    PubMed

    van Steenberghe, M; Schubert, T; Guiot, Y; Goebbels, R M; Gianello, P

    2017-08-01

    Reconstruction of muscle defects remains a challenge. Our work assessed the potential of an engineered construct made of a human acellular collagen matrix (HACM) seeded with porcine mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to reconstruct abdominal wall muscle defects in a rodent model. This study compared 2 sources of MSCs (bone-marrow, BMSCs, and adipose, ASCs) in vitro and in vivo for parietal defect reconstruction. Cellular viability and growth factor release (VEGF, FGF-Beta, HGF, IGF-1, TGF-Beta) were investigated under normoxic/hypoxic culture conditions. Processed and recellularized HACMs were mechanically assessed. The construct was tested in vivo in full thickness abdominal wall defect treated with HACM alone vs. HACM+ASCs or BMSCs (n=14). Tissue remodeling was studied at day 30 for neo-angiogenesis and muscular reconstruction. A significantly lower secretion of IGF was observed with ASCs vs. BMSCs under hypoxic conditions (-97.6%, p<0.005) whereas significantly higher VEGF/FGF secretions were found with ASCs (+92%, p<0.001 and +72%, p<0.05, respectively). Processing and recellularization did not impair the mechanical properties of the HACM. In vivo, angiogenesis and muscle healing were significantly improved by the HACM+ASCs in comparison to BMSCs (p<0.05) at day 30. A composite graft made of an HACM seeded with ASCs can improve muscle repair by specific growth factor release in hypoxic conditions and by in vivo remodeling (neo-angiogenesis/graft integration) while maintaining mechanical properties. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. A 3-D model of tumor progression based on complex automata driven by particle dynamics.

    PubMed

    Wcisło, Rafał; Dzwinel, Witold; Yuen, David A; Dudek, Arkadiusz Z

    2009-12-01

    The dynamics of a growing tumor involving mechanical remodeling of healthy tissue and vasculature is neglected in most of the existing tumor models. This is due to the lack of efficient computational framework allowing for simulation of mechanical interactions. Meanwhile, just these interactions trigger critical changes in tumor growth dynamics and are responsible for its volumetric and directional progression. We describe here a novel 3-D model of tumor growth, which combines particle dynamics with cellular automata concept. The particles represent both tissue cells and fragments of the vascular network. They interact with their closest neighbors via semi-harmonic central forces simulating mechanical resistance of the cell walls. The particle dynamics is governed by both the Newtonian laws of motion and the cellular automata rules. These rules can represent cell life-cycle and other biological interactions involving smaller spatio-temporal scales. We show that our complex automata, particle based model can reproduce realistic 3-D dynamics of the entire system consisting of the tumor, normal tissue cells, blood vessels and blood flow. It can explain phenomena such as the inward cell motion in avascular tumor, stabilization of tumor growth by the external pressure, tumor vascularization due to the process of angiogenesis, trapping of healthy cells by invading tumor, and influence of external (boundary) conditions on the direction of tumor progression. We conclude that the particle model can serve as a general framework for designing advanced multiscale models of tumor dynamics and it is very competitive to the modeling approaches presented before.

  20. Dynamic magnetic resonance imaging assessment of vascular targeting agent effects in rat intracerebral tumor models

    PubMed Central

    Muldoon, Leslie L.; Gahramanov, Seymur; Li, Xin; Marshall, Deborah J.; Kraemer, Dale F.; Neuwelt, Edward A.

    2011-01-01

    We used dynamic MRI to evaluate the effects of monoclonal antibodies targeting brain tumor vasculature. Female athymic rats with intracerebral human tumor xenografts were untreated or treated with intetumumab, targeting αV-integrins, or bevacizumab, targeting vascular endothelial growth factor (n = 4–6 per group). Prior to treatment and at 1, 3, and 7 days after treatment, we performed standard MRI to assess tumor volume, dynamic susceptibility-contrast MRI with the blood-pool iron oxide nanoparticle ferumoxytol to evaluate relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV), and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI to assess tumor vascular permeability. Tumor rCBV increased by 27 ± 13% over 7 days in untreated rats; intetumumab increased tumor rCBV by 65 ± 10%, whereas bevacizumab reduced tumor rCBV by 31 ± 10% at 7 days (P < .001 for group and day). Similarly, intetumumab increased brain tumor vascular permeability compared with controls at 3 and 7 days after treatment, whereas bevacizumab decreased tumor permeability within 24 hours (P = .0004 for group, P = .0081 for day). All tumors grew over the 7-day assessment period, but bevacizumab slowed the increase in tumor volume on MRI. We conclude that the vascular targeting agents intetumumab and bevacizumab had diametrically opposite effects on dynamic MRI of tumor vasculature in rat brain tumor models. Targeting αV-integrins increased tumor vascular permeability and blood volume, whereas bevacizumab decreased both measures. These findings have implications for chemotherapy delivery and antitumor efficacy. PMID:21123368

  1. Genetically Engineered Cancer Models, But Not Xenografts, Faithfully Predict Anticancer Drug Exposure in Melanoma Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Combest, Austin J.; Roberts, Patrick J.; Dillon, Patrick M.; Sandison, Katie; Hanna, Suzan K.; Ross, Charlene; Habibi, Sohrab; Zamboni, Beth; Müller, Markus; Brunner, Martin; Sharpless, Norman E.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Rodent studies are a vital step in the development of novel anticancer therapeutics and are used in pharmacokinetic (PK), toxicology, and efficacy studies. Traditionally, anticancer drug development has relied on xenograft implantation of human cancer cell lines in immunocompromised mice for efficacy screening of a candidate compound. The usefulness of xenograft models for efficacy testing, however, has been questioned, whereas genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs) and orthotopic syngeneic transplants (OSTs) may offer some advantages for efficacy assessment. A critical factor influencing the predictability of rodent tumor models is drug PKs, but a comprehensive comparison of plasma and tumor PK parameters among xenograft models, OSTs, GEMMs, and human patients has not been performed. Methods. In this work, we evaluated the plasma and tumor dispositions of an antimelanoma agent, carboplatin, in patients with cutaneous melanoma compared with four different murine melanoma models (one GEMM, one human cell line xenograft, and two OSTs). Results. Using microdialysis to sample carboplatin tumor disposition, we found that OSTs and xenografts were poor predictors of drug exposure in human tumors, whereas the GEMM model exhibited PK parameters similar to those seen in human tumors. Conclusions. The tumor PKs of carboplatin in a GEMM of melanoma more closely resembles the tumor disposition in patients with melanoma than transplanted tumor models. GEMMs show promise in becoming an improved prediction model for intratumoral PKs and response in patients with solid tumors. PMID:22993143

  2. Minnelide reduces tumor burden in preclinical models of osteosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Sulagna; Thayanithy, Venugopal; Sangwan, Veena; Mackenzie, Tiffany N; Saluja, Ashok K; Subramanian, Subbaya

    2013-07-28

    Osteosarcoma is the most common bone cancer in children and adolescents with a 5-year survival rate of about 70%. In this study, we have evaluated the preclinical therapeutic efficacy of the novel synthetic drug, Minnelide, a prodrug of triptolide on osteosarcoma. Triptolide was effective in significantly inducing apoptosis in all osteosarcoma cell lines tested but had no significant effect on the human osteoblast cells. Notably, Minnelide treatment significantly reduced tumor burden and lung metastasis in the orthotopic and lung colonization models. Triptolide/Minnelide effectively downregulated the levels of pro-survival proteins such as heat shock proteins, cMYC, survivin and targets the NF-κB pathway. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Salinomycin nanoparticles interfere with tumor cell growth and the tumor microenvironment in an orthotopic model of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Daman, Zahra; Faghihi, Homa; Montazeri, Hamed

    2018-05-02

    Recently, salinomycin (SAL) has been reported to inhibit proliferation and induce apoptosis in various tumors. The aim of this study was to deliver SAL to orthotopic model of pancreatic cancer by the aid of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles (NPs). The NPs were physico-chemically characterized and evaluated for cytotoxicity on luciferase-transduced AsPC-1 cells in vitro as well as implanted orthotopically into the pancreas of nude mice. SAL (3.5 mg/kg every other day) blocked tumor growth by 52% compared to the control group after 3 weeks of therapy. Western blotting of tumor protein extracts indicated that SAL treatment leads to up-regulation of E-cadherin, β-catenin, and transforming growth factor beta receptor (TGFβR) expressions in AsPC-1 orthotopic tumor. Noteworthy, immunofluorescence staining of adjacent tumor sections showed that treatment with SAL NPs cause significant apoptosis in the tumor cells rather than the stroma. Further investigations also revealed that TGFβR2 over-expression was induced in stroma cells after treatment with SAL NPs. These results highlight SAL-loaded PLGA NPs as a promising system for pancreatic cancer treatment, while the mechanistic questions need to be subsequently tested.

  4. Use of regional mechanical properties of abdominal aortic aneurysms to advance finite element modeling of rupture risk.

    PubMed

    Tierney, Áine P; Callanan, Anthony; McGloughlin, Timothy M

    2012-02-01

    To investigate the use of regional variations in the mechanical properties of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) in finite element (FE) modeling of AAA rupture risk, which has heretofore assumed homogeneous mechanical tissue properties. Electrocardiogram-gated computed tomography scans from 3 male patients with known infrarenal AAA were used to characterize the behavior of the aneurysm in 4 different segments (posterior, anterior, and left and right lateral) at maximum diameter and above the infrarenal aorta. The elasticity of the aneurysm (circumferential cyclic strain, compliance, and the Hudetz incremental modulus) was calculated for each segment and the aneurysm as a whole. The FE analysis inclusive of prestress (pre-existing tensile stress) produced a detailed stress pattern on each of the aneurysm models under pressure loading. The 4 largest areas of stress in each region were considered in conjunction with the local regional properties of the segment to define a specific regional prestress rupture index (RPRI). In terms of elasticity, there were average reductions of 68% in circumferential cyclic strain and 63% in compliance, with a >5-fold increase in incremental modulus, between the healthy and the aneurysmal aorta for each patient. There were also regional variations in all elastic properties in each individual patient. The average difference in total stress inclusive of prestress was 59%, 67%, and 15%, respectively, for the 3 patients. Comparing the strain from FE models with the CT scans revealed an average difference in strain of 1.55% for the segmented models and 3.61% for the homogeneous models, which suggests that the segmented models more accurately reflect in vivo behavior. RPRI values were calculated for each segment for all patients. A greater understanding of the local material properties and their use in FE models is essential for greater accuracy in rupture prediction. Quantifying the regional behavior will yield insight into the changes in

  5. Construction of multiple linear regression models using blood biomarkers for selecting against abdominal fat traits in broilers.

    PubMed

    Dong, J Q; Zhang, X Y; Wang, S Z; Jiang, X F; Zhang, K; Ma, G W; Wu, M Q; Li, H; Zhang, H

    2018-01-01

    Plasma very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) can be used to select for low body fat or abdominal fat (AF) in broilers, but its correlation with AF is limited. We investigated whether any other biochemical indicator can be used in combination with VLDL for a better selective effect. Nineteen plasma biochemical indicators were measured in male chickens from the Northeast Agricultural University broiler lines divergently selected for AF content (NEAUHLF) in the fed state at 46 and 48 d of age. The average concentration of every parameter for the 2 d was used for statistical analysis. Levels of these 19 plasma biochemical parameters were compared between the lean and fat lines. The phenotypic correlations between these plasma biochemical indicators and AF traits were analyzed. Then, multiple linear regression models were constructed to select the best model used for selecting against AF content. and the heritabilities of plasma indicators contained in the best models were estimated. The results showed that 11 plasma biochemical indicators (triglycerides, total bile acid, total protein, globulin, albumin/globulin, aspartate transaminase, alanine transaminase, gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase, uric acid, creatinine, and VLDL) differed significantly between the lean and fat lines (P < 0.01), and correlated significantly with AF traits (P < 0.05). The best multiple linear regression models based on albumin/globulin, VLDL, triglycerides, globulin, total bile acid, and uric acid, had higher R2 (0.73) than the model based only on VLDL (0.21). The plasma parameters included in the best models had moderate heritability estimates (0.21 ≤ h2 ≤ 0.43). These results indicate that these multiple linear regression models can be used to select for lean broiler chickens. © 2017 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  6. Engineering 3D Models of Tumors and Bone to Understand Tumor-Induced Bone Disease and Improve Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Kwakwa, Kristin A.; Vanderburgh, Joseph P.; Guelcher, Scott A.

    2018-01-01

    Purpose of Review Bone is a structurally unique microenvironment that presents many challenges for the development of 3D models for studying bone physiology and diseases, including cancer. As researchers continue to investigate the interactions within the bone microenvironment, the development of 3D models of bone has become critical. Recent Findings 3D models have been developed that replicate some properties of bone, but have not fully reproduced the complex structural and cellular composition of the bone microenvironment. This review will discuss 3D models including polyurethane, silk, and collagen scaffolds that have been developed to study tumor-induced bone disease. In addition, we discuss 3D printing techniques used to better replicate the structure of bone. Summary 3D models that better replicate the bone microenvironment will help researchers better understand the dynamic interactions between tumors and the bone microenvironment, ultimately leading to better models for testing therapeutics and predicting patient outcomes. PMID:28646444

  7. Engineering 3D Models of Tumors and Bone to Understand Tumor-Induced Bone Disease and Improve Treatments.

    PubMed

    Kwakwa, Kristin A; Vanderburgh, Joseph P; Guelcher, Scott A; Sterling, Julie A

    2017-08-01

    Bone is a structurally unique microenvironment that presents many challenges for the development of 3D models for studying bone physiology and diseases, including cancer. As researchers continue to investigate the interactions within the bone microenvironment, the development of 3D models of bone has become critical. 3D models have been developed that replicate some properties of bone, but have not fully reproduced the complex structural and cellular composition of the bone microenvironment. This review will discuss 3D models including polyurethane, silk, and collagen scaffolds that have been developed to study tumor-induced bone disease. In addition, we discuss 3D printing techniques used to better replicate the structure of bone. 3D models that better replicate the bone microenvironment will help researchers better understand the dynamic interactions between tumors and the bone microenvironment, ultimately leading to better models for testing therapeutics and predicting patient outcomes.

  8. In Vitro Tumor Models: Advantages, Disadvantages, Variables, and Selecting the Right Platform.

    PubMed

    Katt, Moriah E; Placone, Amanda L; Wong, Andrew D; Xu, Zinnia S; Searson, Peter C

    2016-01-01

    In vitro tumor models have provided important tools for cancer research and serve as low-cost screening platforms for drug therapies; however, cancer recurrence remains largely unchecked due to metastasis, which is the cause of the majority of cancer-related deaths. The need for an improved understanding of the progression and treatment of cancer has pushed for increased accuracy and physiological relevance of in vitro tumor models. As a result, in vitro tumor models have concurrently increased in complexity and their output parameters further diversified, since these models have progressed beyond simple proliferation, invasion, and cytotoxicity screens and have begun recapitulating critical steps in the metastatic cascade, such as intravasation, extravasation, angiogenesis, matrix remodeling, and tumor cell dormancy. Advances in tumor cell biology, 3D cell culture, tissue engineering, biomaterials, microfabrication, and microfluidics have enabled rapid development of new in vitro tumor models that often incorporate multiple cell types, extracellular matrix materials, and spatial and temporal introduction of soluble factors. Other innovations include the incorporation of perfusable microvessels to simulate the tumor vasculature and model intravasation and extravasation. The drive toward precision medicine has increased interest in adapting in vitro tumor models for patient-specific therapies, clinical management, and assessment of metastatic potential. Here, we review the wide range of current in vitro tumor models and summarize their advantages, disadvantages, and suitability in modeling specific aspects of the metastatic cascade and drug treatment.

  9. In Vitro Tumor Models: Advantages, Disadvantages, Variables, and Selecting the Right Platform

    PubMed Central

    Katt, Moriah E.; Placone, Amanda L.; Wong, Andrew D.; Xu, Zinnia S.; Searson, Peter C.

    2016-01-01

    In vitro tumor models have provided important tools for cancer research and serve as low-cost screening platforms for drug therapies; however, cancer recurrence remains largely unchecked due to metastasis, which is the cause of the majority of cancer-related deaths. The need for an improved understanding of the progression and treatment of cancer has pushed for increased accuracy and physiological relevance of in vitro tumor models. As a result, in vitro tumor models have concurrently increased in complexity and their output parameters further diversified, since these models have progressed beyond simple proliferation, invasion, and cytotoxicity screens and have begun recapitulating critical steps in the metastatic cascade, such as intravasation, extravasation, angiogenesis, matrix remodeling, and tumor cell dormancy. Advances in tumor cell biology, 3D cell culture, tissue engineering, biomaterials, microfabrication, and microfluidics have enabled rapid development of new in vitro tumor models that often incorporate multiple cell types, extracellular matrix materials, and spatial and temporal introduction of soluble factors. Other innovations include the incorporation of perfusable microvessels to simulate the tumor vasculature and model intravasation and extravasation. The drive toward precision medicine has increased interest in adapting in vitro tumor models for patient-specific therapies, clinical management, and assessment of metastatic potential. Here, we review the wide range of current in vitro tumor models and summarize their advantages, disadvantages, and suitability in modeling specific aspects of the metastatic cascade and drug treatment. PMID:26904541

  10. ABT-510 induces tumor cell apoptosis and inhibits ovarian tumor growth in an orthotopic, syngeneic model of epithelial ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Greenaway, James; Henkin, Jack; Lawler, Jack; Moorehead, Roger; Petrik, Jim

    2012-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is the fifth most common cancer in women and is characterized by a low 5-year survival rate. One strategy that can potentially improve the overall survival rate in ovarian cancer is the use of antitumor agents such as ABT-510. ABT-510 is a small mimetic peptide of the naturally occurring antiangiogenic compound thrombospondin-1 and has been shown to significantly reduce tumor growth and burden in preclinical mouse models and in naturally occurring tumors in dogs. This is the first evaluation of ABT-510 in a preclinical model of human EOC. Tumorigenic mouse surface epithelial cells were injected into the bursa of C57BL/6 mice that were treated with either 100 mg/kg ABT-510 or an equivalent amount of PBS. ABT-510 caused a significant reduction in tumor size, ascites fluid volume, and secondary lesion dissemination when compared with PBS controls. Analysis of the vasculature of ABT-510-treated mice revealed vascular remodeling with smaller diameter vessels and lower overall area, increased number of mature vessels, and decreased tissue hypoxia. Tumors of ABT-510-treated mice had a significantly higher proportion of apoptotic tumor cells compared with the PBS-treated controls. Immunoblot analysis of cell lysates revealed a reduction in vascular endothelial growth factor, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2, and proliferating cell nuclear antigen protein expression as well as expression of members of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and mitogen-activated protein kinase survival pathways. In vitro, ABT-510 induced tumor cell apoptosis in mouse and human ovarian cancer cells. This study shows ABT-510 as a promising candidate for inhibiting tumor growth and ascites formation in human EOC. PMID:19139114

  11. ABT-510 induces tumor cell apoptosis and inhibits ovarian tumor growth in an orthotopic, syngeneic model of epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Greenaway, James; Henkin, Jack; Lawler, Jack; Moorehead, Roger; Petrik, Jim

    2009-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is the fifth most common cancer in women and is characterized by a low 5-year survival rate. One strategy that can potentially improve the overall survival rate in ovarian cancer is the use of antitumor agents such as ABT-510. ABT-510 is a small mimetic peptide of the naturally occurring antiangiogenic compound thrombospondin-1 and has been shown to significantly reduce tumor growth and burden in preclinical mouse models and in naturally occurring tumors in dogs. This is the first evaluation of ABT-510 in a preclinical model of human EOC. Tumorigenic mouse surface epithelial cells were injected into the bursa of C57BL/6 mice that were treated with either 100 mg/kg ABT-510 or an equivalent amount of PBS. ABT-510 caused a significant reduction in tumor size, ascites fluid volume, and secondary lesion dissemination when compared with PBS controls. Analysis of the vasculature of ABT-510-treated mice revealed vascular remodeling with smaller diameter vessels and lower overall area, increased number of mature vessels, and decreased tissue hypoxia. Tumors of ABT-510-treated mice had a significantly higher proportion of apoptotic tumor cells compared with the PBS-treated controls. Immunoblot analysis of cell lysates revealed a reduction in vascular endothelial growth factor, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2, and proliferating cell nuclear antigen protein expression as well as expression of members of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and mitogen-activated protein kinase survival pathways. In vitro, ABT-510 induced tumor cell apoptosis in mouse and human ovarian cancer cells. This study shows ABT-510 as a promising candidate for inhibiting tumor growth and ascites formation in human EOC.

  12. Combination of PDT and a DNA demethylating agent produces anti-tumor immune response in a mouse tumor model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mroz, Pawel; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2009-06-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms, which involve DNA methylation and histone modifications, result in the heritable silencing of genes without a change in their coding sequence. However, these changes must be actively maintained after each cell division rendering them a promising target for pharmacologic inhibition. DNA methyltransferase inhibitors like 5-aza-deoxycytidine (5-aza-dC) induce and/or up-regulate the expression of MAGE-type antigens in human and mice cancer cells. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been shown to be an effective locally ablative anti-cancer treatment that has the additional advantage of stimulating tumor-directed immune response. We studied the effects of a new therapy that combined the demethylating agent 5-aza-dC with PDT in the breast cancer model 4T1 syngenic to immunocompetent BALB/c mice. PDT was used as a locally ablating tumor treatment that is capable of eliciting strong and tumor directed immune response while 5-aza-dC pretreatment was used promote de novo induction of the expression of P1A.protein. This is the mouse homolog of human MAGE family antigens and is reported to function as a tumor rejection antigen in certain mouse tumors. This strategy led to an increase in PDT-mediated immune response and better treatment outcome. These results strongly suggest that the MAGE family antigens are important target for PDT mediated immune response but that their expression can be silenced by epigenetic mechanisms. Therefore the possibility that PDT can be combined with epigenetic strategies to elicit anti-tumor immunity in MAGE-positive tumor models is highly clinically significant and should be studied in detail.

  13. Predictive modeling of respiratory tumor motion for real-time prediction of baseline shifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasubramanian, A.; Shamsuddin, R.; Prabhakaran, B.; Sawant, A.

    2017-03-01

    Baseline shifts in respiratory patterns can result in significant spatiotemporal changes in patient anatomy (compared to that captured during simulation), in turn, causing geometric and dosimetric errors in the administration of thoracic and abdominal radiotherapy. We propose predictive modeling of the tumor motion trajectories for predicting a baseline shift ahead of its occurrence. The key idea is to use the features of the tumor motion trajectory over a 1 min window, and predict the occurrence of a baseline shift in the 5 s that immediately follow (lookahead window). In this study, we explored a preliminary trend-based analysis with multi-class annotations as well as a more focused binary classification analysis. In both analyses, a number of different inter-fraction and intra-fraction training strategies were studied, both offline as well as online, along with data sufficiency and skew compensation for class imbalances. The performance of different training strategies were compared across multiple machine learning classification algorithms, including nearest neighbor, Naïve Bayes, linear discriminant and ensemble Adaboost. The prediction performance is evaluated using metrics such as accuracy, precision, recall and the area under the curve (AUC) for repeater operating characteristics curve. The key results of the trend-based analysis indicate that (i) intra-fraction training strategies achieve highest prediction accuracies (90.5-91.4%) (ii) the predictive modeling yields lowest accuracies (50-60%) when the training data does not include any information from the test patient; (iii) the prediction latencies are as low as a few hundred milliseconds, and thus conducive for real-time prediction. The binary classification performance is promising, indicated by high AUCs (0.96-0.98). It also confirms the utility of prior data from previous patients, and also the necessity of training the classifier on some initial data from the new patient for reasonable

  14. Predictive modeling of respiratory tumor motion for real-time prediction of baseline shifts

    PubMed Central

    Balasubramanian, A; Shamsuddin, R; Prabhakaran, B; Sawant, A

    2017-01-01

    Baseline shifts in respiratory patterns can result in significant spatiotemporal changes in patient anatomy (compared to that captured during simulation), in turn, causing geometric and dosimetric errors in the administration of thoracic and abdominal radiotherapy. We propose predictive modeling of the tumor motion trajectories for predicting a baseline shift ahead of its occurrence. The key idea is to use the features of the tumor motion trajectory over a 1 min window, and predict the occurrence of a baseline shift in the 5 s that immediately follow (lookahead window). In this study, we explored a preliminary trend-based analysis with multi-class annotations as well as a more focused binary classification analysis. In both analyses, a number of different inter-fraction and intra-fraction training strategies were studied, both offline as well as online, along with data sufficiency and skew compensation for class imbalances. The performance of different training strategies were compared across multiple machine learning classification algorithms, including nearest neighbor, Naïve Bayes, linear discriminant and ensemble Adaboost. The prediction performance is evaluated using metrics such as accuracy, precision, recall and the area under the curve (AUC) for repeater operating characteristics curve. The key results of the trend-based analysis indicate that (i) intra-fraction training strategies achieve highest prediction accuracies (90.5–91.4%); (ii) the predictive modeling yields lowest accuracies (50–60%) when the training data does not include any information from the test patient; (iii) the prediction latencies are as low as a few hundred milliseconds, and thus conducive for real-time prediction. The binary classification performance is promising, indicated by high AUCs (0.96–0.98). It also confirms the utility of prior data from previous patients, and also the necessity of training the classifier on some initial data from the new patient for reasonable

  15. Predictive modeling of respiratory tumor motion for real-time prediction of baseline shifts.

    PubMed

    Balasubramanian, A; Shamsuddin, R; Prabhakaran, B; Sawant, A

    2017-03-07

    Baseline shifts in respiratory patterns can result in significant spatiotemporal changes in patient anatomy (compared to that captured during simulation), in turn, causing geometric and dosimetric errors in the administration of thoracic and abdominal radiotherapy. We propose predictive modeling of the tumor motion trajectories for predicting a baseline shift ahead of its occurrence. The key idea is to use the features of the tumor motion trajectory over a 1 min window, and predict the occurrence of a baseline shift in the 5 s that immediately follow (lookahead window). In this study, we explored a preliminary trend-based analysis with multi-class annotations as well as a more focused binary classification analysis. In both analyses, a number of different inter-fraction and intra-fraction training strategies were studied, both offline as well as online, along with data sufficiency and skew compensation for class imbalances. The performance of different training strategies were compared across multiple machine learning classification algorithms, including nearest neighbor, Naïve Bayes, linear discriminant and ensemble Adaboost. The prediction performance is evaluated using metrics such as accuracy, precision, recall and the area under the curve (AUC) for repeater operating characteristics curve. The key results of the trend-based analysis indicate that (i) intra-fraction training strategies achieve highest prediction accuracies (90.5-91.4%); (ii) the predictive modeling yields lowest accuracies (50-60%) when the training data does not include any information from the test patient; (iii) the prediction latencies are as low as a few hundred milliseconds, and thus conducive for real-time prediction. The binary classification performance is promising, indicated by high AUCs (0.96-0.98). It also confirms the utility of prior data from previous patients, and also the necessity of training the classifier on some initial data from the new patient for reasonable

  16. Breast tumor malignancy modelling using evolutionary neural logic networks.

    PubMed

    Tsakonas, Athanasios; Dounias, Georgios; Panagi, Georgia; Panourgias, Evangelia

    2006-01-01

    The present work proposes a computer assisted methodology for the effective modelling of the diagnostic decision for breast tumor malignancy. The suggested approach is based on innovative hybrid computational intelligence algorithms properly applied in related cytological data contained in past medical records. The experimental data used in this study were gathered in the early 1990s in the University of Wisconsin, based in post diagnostic cytological observations performed by expert medical staff. Data were properly encoded in a computer database and accordingly, various alternative modelling techniques were applied on them, in an attempt to form diagnostic models. Previous methods included standard optimisation techniques, as well as artificial intelligence approaches, in a way that a variety of related publications exists in modern literature on the subject. In this report, a hybrid computational intelligence approach is suggested, which effectively combines modern mathematical logic principles, neural computation and genetic programming in an effective manner. The approach proves promising either in terms of diagnostic accuracy and generalization capabilities, or in terms of comprehensibility and practical importance for the related medical staff.

  17. A voxel-based multiscale model to simulate the radiation response of hypoxic tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Espinoza, I., E-mail: iespinoza@fis.puc.cl; Peschke, P.; Karger, C. P.

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: In radiotherapy, it is important to predict the response of tumors to irradiation prior to the treatment. This is especially important for hypoxic tumors, which are known to be highly radioresistant. Mathematical modeling based on the dose distribution, biological parameters, and medical images may help to improve this prediction and to optimize the treatment plan. Methods: A voxel-based multiscale tumor response model for simulating the radiation response of hypoxic tumors was developed. It considers viable and dead tumor cells, capillary and normal cells, as well as the most relevant biological processes such as (i) proliferation of tumor cells, (ii)more » hypoxia-induced angiogenesis, (iii) spatial exchange of cells leading to tumor growth, (iv) oxygen-dependent cell survival after irradiation, (v) resorption of dead cells, and (vi) spatial exchange of cells leading to tumor shrinkage. Oxygenation is described on a microscopic scale using a previously published tumor oxygenation model, which calculates the oxygen distribution for each voxel using the vascular fraction as the most important input parameter. To demonstrate the capabilities of the model, the dependence of the oxygen distribution on tumor growth and radiation-induced shrinkage is investigated. In addition, the impact of three different reoxygenation processes is compared and tumor control probability (TCP) curves for a squamous cells carcinoma of the head and neck (HNSSC) are simulated under normoxic and hypoxic conditions. Results: The model describes the spatiotemporal behavior of the tumor on three different scales: (i) on the macroscopic scale, it describes tumor growth and shrinkage during radiation treatment, (ii) on a mesoscopic scale, it provides the cell density and vascular fraction for each voxel, and (iii) on the microscopic scale, the oxygen distribution may be obtained in terms of oxygen histograms. With increasing tumor size, the simulated tumors develop a hypoxic core

  18. Optimization of the model of abdominal aortic aneurysm by co-incubation of calcium chloride and collagenase in rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guang; Huang, Ying; Lu, Xin-Wu; Lu, Min; Huang, Xin-Tian; Li, Wei-Min; Jiang, Mi-Er

    2009-08-01

    To optimize the model of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) in rats using calcium chloride (CaCl2) and collagenase together. This study was performed at the 9th People's Hospital, Institute of Traumatic Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, School of Medicine, Shanghai, China from July 2008 to February 2009. Aortas of 55 adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed and incubated for 20 minutes with fresh normal saline solutions supplemented with CaCl2 (0.4 M) and collagenase (4%, w/v) (group A), CaCl2 alone (group B), collagenase alone (group C), or normal saline alone (group D). After 4 weeks, the treated aortas were evaluated by digital measurement, angiography, and histological examination. In group A, there was a mean increase in diameter of 87.86% +/- 69.49% (range, 35.33-299.29%) weeks after surgery. The frequency of AAA in this group was 83.3% (10/12). One (1/13) AAA occurred in group C and none in other groups. Partial endothelial loss, elastin disruption, and abnormal collagen deposition were noted in the AAA tissues in group A, corresponded well to native aneurysms in human. The use of collagenase optimized the established CaCl2-induced rat model, giving a high frequency of AAA in a short period of time.

  19. Molecular Analysis of Medaka Tumors: New Models for Carcinogenicity Tests

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-07-07

    analysis, 5 were reported to have either a 8 cholangiocarcinoma or a hepatocellular carcinoma . Only DNA from the hepatocellular carcinomas were able to... hepatocellular carcinoma were able to induce tumors in nude mice in 3-4 weeks (Table II). In summary, DNA isolated from these tumors had relatively low...DNAs from tumor-bearing livers (cholangiocarcinomas, hepatocellular carcinomas and one mixed type) were able to induce significant numbers of foci

  20. Progress in Fully Automated Abdominal CT Interpretation

    PubMed Central

    Summers, Ronald M.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Automated analysis of abdominal CT has advanced markedly over just the last few years. Fully automated assessment of organs, lymph nodes, adipose tissue, muscle, bowel, spine, and tumors are some examples where tremendous progress has been made. Computer-aided detection of lesions has also improved dramatically. CONCLUSION This article reviews the progress and provides insights into what is in store in the near future for automated analysis for abdominal CT, ultimately leading to fully automated interpretation. PMID:27101207

  1. Effect of Irradiation on Tumor Microenvironment and Bone Marrow Cell Migration in a Preclinical Tumor Model

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, Jonathan L.; Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Health System, Royal Oak, Michigan; Krueger, Sarah A.

    Purpose: To characterize the tumor microenvironment after standard radiation therapy (SRT) and pulsed radiation therapy (PRT) in Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) allografts. Methods and Materials: Subcutaneous LLC tumors were established in C57BL/6 mice. Standard RT or PRT was given at 2 Gy/d for a total dose of 20 Gy using a 5 days on, 2 days off schedule to mimic clinical delivery. Radiation-induced tumor microenvironment changes were examined after treatment using flow cytometry and antibody-specific histopathology. Normal tissue effects were measured using noninvasive {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography after naïve animals were given whole-lung irradiation to 40 Gy in 4 weeks using the same 2-Gy/dmore » regimens. Results: Over the 2 weeks of therapy, PRT was more effective than SRT at reducing tumor growth rate (0.31 ± 0.02 mm{sup 3}/d and 0.55 ± 0.04 mm{sup 3}/d, respectively; P<.007). Histopathology showed a significant comparative reduction in the levels of Ki-67 (14.5% ± 3%), hypoxia (10% ± 3.5%), vascular endothelial growth factor (2.3% ± 1%), and stromal-derived factor-1α (2.5% ± 1.4%), as well as a concomitant decrease in CD45{sup +} bone marrow–derived cell (BMDC) migration (7.8% ± 2.2%) after PRT. The addition of AMD3100 also decreased CD45{sup +} BMDC migration in treated tumors (0.6% ± 0.1%). Higher vessel density was observed in treated tumors. No differences were observed in normal lung tissue after PRT or SRT. Conclusions: Pulsed RT–treated tumors exhibited slower growth and reduced hypoxia. Pulsed RT eliminated initiation of supportive mechanisms utilized by tumors in low oxygen microenvironments, including angiogenesis and recruitment of BMDCs.« less

  2. Establishment of a tumor neovascularization animal model with biomaterials in rabbit corneal pouch.

    PubMed

    Chu, Yu-Ping; Li, Hong-Chuan; Ma, Ling; Xia, Yang

    2018-06-01

    The present animal model of tumor neovascularization most often used by researchers is zebrafish. For studies on human breast cancer cell neovascularization, a new animal model was established to enable a more convenient study of tumor neovascularization. A sodium alginate-gelatin blend gel system was used to design the new animal model. The model was established using rabbit corneal pouch implantation. Then, the animal model was validated by human breast cancer cell lines MCF-7-Kindlin-2 and MCF-7-CMV. The experiment intuitively observed the relationship between tumor and neovascularization, and demonstrated the advantages of this animal model in the study of tumor neovascularization. The use of sodium alginate-gelatin blends to establish tumor neovascularization in a rabbit corneal pouch is a novel and ideal method for the study of neovascularization. It may be a better animal model for expanding the research in this area. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. A stochastic model for tumor geometry evolution during radiation therapy in cervical cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yifang; Lee, Chi-Guhn; Chan, Timothy C. Y., E-mail: tcychan@mie.utoronto.ca

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: To develop mathematical models to predict the evolution of tumor geometry in cervical cancer undergoing radiation therapy. Methods: The authors develop two mathematical models to estimate tumor geometry change: a Markov model and an isomorphic shrinkage model. The Markov model describes tumor evolution by investigating the change in state (either tumor or nontumor) of voxels on the tumor surface. It assumes that the evolution follows a Markov process. Transition probabilities are obtained using maximum likelihood estimation and depend on the states of neighboring voxels. The isomorphic shrinkage model describes tumor shrinkage or growth in terms of layers of voxelsmore » on the tumor surface, instead of modeling individual voxels. The two proposed models were applied to data from 29 cervical cancer patients treated at Princess Margaret Cancer Centre and then compared to a constant volume approach. Model performance was measured using sensitivity and specificity. Results: The Markov model outperformed both the isomorphic shrinkage and constant volume models in terms of the trade-off between sensitivity (target coverage) and specificity (normal tissue sparing). Generally, the Markov model achieved a few percentage points in improvement in either sensitivity or specificity compared to the other models. The isomorphic shrinkage model was comparable to the Markov approach under certain parameter settings. Convex tumor shapes were easier to predict. Conclusions: By modeling tumor geometry change at the voxel level using a probabilistic model, improvements in target coverage and normal tissue sparing are possible. Our Markov model is flexible and has tunable parameters to adjust model performance to meet a range of criteria. Such a model may support the development of an adaptive paradigm for radiation therapy of cervical cancer.« less

  4. Intratumor Heterogeneity in Evolutionary Models of Tumor Progression

    PubMed Central

    Durrett, Rick; Foo, Jasmine; Leder, Kevin; Mayberry, John; Michor, Franziska

    2011-01-01

    With rare exceptions, human tumors arise from single cells that have accumulated the necessary number and types of heritable alterations. Each such cell leads to dysregulated growth and eventually the formation of a tumor. Despite their monoclonal origin, at the time of diagnosis most tumors show a striking amount of intratumor heterogeneity in all measurable phenotypes; such heterogeneity has implications for diagnosis, treatment efficacy, and the identification of drug targets. An understanding of the extent and evolution of intratumor heterogeneity is therefore of direct clinical importance. In this article, we investigate the evolutionary dynamics of heterogeneity arising during exponential expansion of a tumor cell population, in which heritable alterations confer random fitness changes to cells. We obtain analytical estimates for the extent of heterogeneity and quantify the effects of system parameters on this tumor trait. Our work contributes to a mathematical understanding of intratumor heterogeneity and is also applicable to organisms like bacteria, agricultural pests, and other microbes. PMID:21406679

  5. A two-system, single-analysis, fluid-structure interaction technique for modelling abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Kelly, S C; O'Rourke, M J

    2010-01-01

    This work reports on the implementation and validation of a two-system, single-analysis, fluid-structure interaction (FSI) technique that uses the finite volume (FV) method for performing simulations on abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) geometries. This FSI technique, which was implemented in OpenFOAM, included fluid and solid mesh motion and incorporated a non-linear material model to represent AAA tissue. Fully implicit coupling was implemented, ensuring that both the fluid and solid domains reached convergence within each time step. The fluid and solid parts of the FSI code were validated independently through comparison with experimental data, before performing a complete FSI simulation on an idealized AAA geometry. Results from the FSI simulation showed that a vortex formed at the proximal end of the aneurysm during systolic acceleration, and moved towards the distal end of the aneurysm during diastole. Wall shear stress (WSS) values were found to peak at both the proximal and distal ends of the aneurysm and remain low along the centre of the aneurysm. The maximum von Mises stress in the aneurysm wall was found to be 408kPa, and this occurred at the proximal end of the aneurysm, while the maximum displacement of 2.31 mm occurred in the centre of the aneurysm. These results were found to be consistent with results from other FSI studies in the literature.

  6. Emergent Behaviors from a Cellular Automaton Model for Invasive Tumor Growth in Heterogeneous Microenvironments

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Yang; Torquato, Salvatore

    2011-01-01

    Understanding tumor invasion and metastasis is of crucial importance for both fundamental cancer research and clinical practice. In vitro experiments have established that the invasive growth of malignant tumors is characterized by the dendritic invasive branches composed of chains of tumor cells emanating from the primary tumor mass. The preponderance of previous tumor simulations focused on non-invasive (or proliferative) growth. The formation of the invasive cell chains and their interactions with the primary tumor mass and host microenvironment are not well understood. Here, we present a novel cellular automaton (CA) model that enables one to efficiently simulate invasive tumor growth in a heterogeneous host microenvironment. By taking into account a variety of microscopic-scale tumor-host interactions, including the short-range mechanical interactions between tumor cells and tumor stroma, degradation of the extracellular matrix by the invasive cells and oxygen/nutrient gradient driven cell motions, our CA model predicts a rich spectrum of growth dynamics and emergent behaviors of invasive tumors. Besides robustly reproducing the salient features of dendritic invasive growth, such as least-resistance paths of cells and intrabranch homotype attraction, we also predict nontrivial coupling between the growth dynamics of the primary tumor mass and the invasive cells. In addition, we show that the properties of the host microenvironment can significantly affect tumor morphology and growth dynamics, emphasizing the importance of understanding the tumor-host interaction. The capability of our CA model suggests that sophisticated in silico tools could eventually be utilized in clinical situations to predict neoplastic progression and propose individualized optimal treatment strategies. PMID:22215996

  7. Combining two potential causes of metalloproteinase secretion causes abdominal aortic aneurysms in rats: a new experimental model

    PubMed Central

    Mata, Karina M; Prudente, Paula S; Rocha, Fabio S; Prado, Cibele M; Floriano, Elaine M; Elias, Jorge; Rizzi, Elen; Gerlach, Raquel F; Rossi, Marcos A; Ramos, Simone G

    2011-01-01

    Progress in understanding the pathophysiology of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) is dependent in part on the development and application of effective animal models that recapitulate key aspects of the disease. The objective was to produce an experimental model of AAA in rats by combining two potential causes of metalloproteinase (MMP) secretion: inflammation and turbulent blood flow. Male Wistar rats were randomly divided in four groups: Injury, Stenosis, Aneurysm and Control (40/group). The Injury group received a traumatic injury to the external aortic wall. The Stenosis group received an extrinsic stenosis at a corresponding location. The Aneurysm group received both the injury and stenosis simultaneously, and the Control group received a sham operation. Animals were euthanized at days 1, 3, 7 and 15. Aorta and/or aneurysms were collected and the fragments were fixed for morphologic, immunohistochemistry and morphometric analyses or frozen for MMP assays. AAAs had developed by day 3 in 60–70% of the animals, reaching an aortic dilatation ratio of more than 300%, exhibiting intense wall remodelling initiated at the adventitia and characterized by an obvious inflammatory infiltrate, mesenchymal proliferation, neoangiogenesis, elastin degradation and collagen deposition. Immunohistochemistry and zymography studies displayed significantly increased expressions of MMP-2 and MMP-9 in aneurysm walls compared to other groups. The haemo-dynamic alterations caused by the stenosis may have provided additional contribution to the MMPs liberation. This new model illustrated that AAA can be multifactorial and confirmed the key roles of MMP-2 and MMP-9 in this dynamic remodelling process. PMID:21039990

  8. Screening for Wilms tumor and hepatoblastoma in children with Beckwith-Wiedemann syndromes: a cost-effective model.

    PubMed

    McNeil, D E; Brown, M; Ching, A; DeBaun, M R

    2001-10-01

    We undertook a cost-benefit analysis of screening for Wilms tumor and hepatoblastoma in children with Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS), a known cancer predisposition syndrome. The purpose of this analysis was twofold: first, to assess whether screening in children with BWS has the potential to be cost-effective; second, if screening appears to be cost-effective, to determine which parameters would be most important to assess if a screening trial were initiated. We used data from the BWS registry at the National Cancer Institute, the National Wilms Tumor Study (NWTS), and large published series to model events for two hypothetical cohorts of 1,000 infants born with BWS. One hypothetical cohort was screened for cancer until a predetermined age, representing the base case. The other cohort was unscreened. For our base case, we assumed: (a) sonography examinations three times yearly (triannually) from birth until 7 years of age; (b) screening would result in one stage shift downward at diagnosis for Wilms tumor and hepatoblastoma; (c) 100% sensitivity and 95% specificity for detecting clinical stage I Wilms tumor and hepatoblastoma; (d) a 3% discount rate; (e) a false positive result cost of $402. We estimated mortality rates based on published Wilms tumor and hepatoblastoma stage specific survival. Using the base case, screening a child with BWS from birth until 4 years of age results in a cost per life year saved of $9,642 while continuing until 7 years of age results in a cost per life-year saved of $14,740. When variables such as cost of screening examination, discount rate, and effectiveness of screening were varied based on high and low estimates, the incremental cost per life-year saved for screening up until age four remained comparable to acceptable population based cancer screening ranges (< $50,000 per life year saved). Under our model's assumptions, abdominal sonography examinations in children with BWS represent a reasonable strategy for a cancer

  9. B cells promote tumor progression in a mouse model of HPV-mediated cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Tang, Alexandre; Dadaglio, Gilles; Oberkampf, Marine; Di Carlo, Selene; Peduto, Lucie; Laubreton, Daphné; Desrues, Belinda; Sun, Cheng-Ming; Montagutelli, Xavier; Leclerc, Claude

    2016-09-15

    Enhancing anti-tumor immunity and preventing tumor escape are efficient strategies to increase the efficacy of therapeutic cancer vaccines. However, the treatment of advanced tumors remains difficult, mainly due to the immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment. Regulatory T cells and myeloid-derived suppressor cells have been extensively studied, and their role in suppressing tumor immunity is now well established. In contrast, the role of B lymphocytes in tumor immunity remains unclear because B cells can promote tumor immunity or display regulatory functions to control excessive inflammation, mainly through IL-10 secretion. Here, in a mouse model of HPV-related cancer, we demonstrate that B cells accumulated in the draining lymph node of tumor-bearing mice, due to a prolonged survival, and showed a decreased expression of MHC class II and CD86 molecules and an increased expression of Ly6A/E, PD-L1 and CD39, suggesting potential immunoregulatory properties. However, B cells from tumor-bearing mice did not show an increased ability to secrete IL-10 and a deficiency in IL-10 production did not impair tumor growth. In contrast, in B cell-deficient μMT mice, tumor rejection occurred due to a strong T cell-dependent anti-tumor response. Genetic analysis based on single nucleotide polymorphisms identified genetic variants associated with tumor rejection in μMT mice, which could potentially affect reactive oxygen species production and NK cell activity. Our results demonstrate that B cells play a detrimental role in anti-tumor immunity and suggest that targeting B cells could enhance the anti-tumor response and improve the efficacy of therapeutic cancer vaccines. © 2016 UICC.

  10. Targeted Doxorubicin Delivery to Brain Tumors via Minicells: Proof of Principle Using Dogs with Spontaneously Occurring Tumors as a Model

    PubMed Central

    MacDiarmid, Jennifer A.; Langova, Veronika; Bailey, Dale; Pattison, Scott T.; Pattison, Stacey L.; Christensen, Neil; Armstrong, Luke R.; Brahmbhatt, Vatsala N.; Smolarczyk, Katarzyna; Harrison, Matthew T.; Costa, Marylia; Mugridge, Nancy B.; Sedliarou, Ilya; Grimes, Nicholas A.; Kiss, Debra L.; Stillman, Bruce; Hann, Christine L.; Gallia, Gary L.; Graham, Robert M.; Brahmbhatt, Himanshu

    2016-01-01

    Background Cytotoxic chemotherapy can be very effective for the treatment of cancer but toxicity on normal tissues often limits patient tolerance and often causes long-term adverse effects. The objective of this study was to assist in the preclinical development of using modified, non-living bacterially-derived minicells to deliver the potent chemotherapeutic doxorubicin via epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) targeting. Specifically, this study sought to evaluate the safety and efficacy of EGFR targeted, doxorubicin loaded minicells (designated EGFRminicellsDox) to deliver doxorubicin to spontaneous brain tumors in 17 companion dogs; a comparative oncology model of human brain cancers. Methodology/Principle Findings EGFRminicellsDox were administered weekly via intravenous injection to 17 dogs with late-stage brain cancers. Biodistribution was assessed using single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Anti-tumor response was determined using MRI, and blood samples were subject to toxicology (hematology, biochemistry) and inflammatory marker analysis. Targeted, doxorubicin-loaded minicells rapidly localized to the core of brain tumors. Complete resolution or marked tumor regression (>90% reduction in tumor volume) were observed in 23.53% of the cohort, with lasting anti-tumor responses characterized by remission in three dogs for more than two years. The median overall survival was 264 days (range 49 to 973). No adverse clinical, hematological or biochemical effects were observed with repeated administration of EGFRminicellsDox (30 to 98 doses administered in 10 of the 17 dogs). Conclusions/Significance Targeted minicells loaded with doxorubicin were safely administered to dogs with late stage brain cancer and clinical activity was observed. These findings demonstrate the strong potential for clinical applications of targeted, doxorubicin-loaded minicells for the effective treatment of patients with brain cancer. On

  11. Targeted Doxorubicin Delivery to Brain Tumors via Minicells: Proof of Principle Using Dogs with Spontaneously Occurring Tumors as a Model.

    PubMed

    MacDiarmid, Jennifer A; Langova, Veronika; Bailey, Dale; Pattison, Scott T; Pattison, Stacey L; Christensen, Neil; Armstrong, Luke R; Brahmbhatt, Vatsala N; Smolarczyk, Katarzyna; Harrison, Matthew T; Costa, Marylia; Mugridge, Nancy B; Sedliarou, Ilya; Grimes, Nicholas A; Kiss, Debra L; Stillman, Bruce; Hann, Christine L; Gallia, Gary L; Graham, Robert M; Brahmbhatt, Himanshu

    2016-01-01

    Cytotoxic chemotherapy can be very effective for the treatment of cancer but toxicity on normal tissues often limits patient tolerance and often causes long-term adverse effects. The objective of this study was to assist in the preclinical development of using modified, non-living bacterially-derived minicells to deliver the potent chemotherapeutic doxorubicin via epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) targeting. Specifically, this study sought to evaluate the safety and efficacy of EGFR targeted, doxorubicin loaded minicells (designated EGFRminicellsDox) to deliver doxorubicin to spontaneous brain tumors in 17 companion dogs; a comparative oncology model of human brain cancers. EGFRminicellsDox were administered weekly via intravenous injection to 17 dogs with late-stage brain cancers. Biodistribution was assessed using single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Anti-tumor response was determined using MRI, and blood samples were subject to toxicology (hematology, biochemistry) and inflammatory marker analysis. Targeted, doxorubicin-loaded minicells rapidly localized to the core of brain tumors. Complete resolution or marked tumor regression (>90% reduction in tumor volume) were observed in 23.53% of the cohort, with lasting anti-tumor responses characterized by remission in three dogs for more than two years. The median overall survival was 264 days (range 49 to 973). No adverse clinical, hematological or biochemical effects were observed with repeated administration of EGFRminicellsDox (30 to 98 doses administered in 10 of the 17 dogs). Targeted minicells loaded with doxorubicin were safely administered to dogs with late stage brain cancer and clinical activity was observed. These findings demonstrate the strong potential for clinical applications of targeted, doxorubicin-loaded minicells for the effective treatment of patients with brain cancer. On this basis, we have designed a Phase 1 clinical study of EGFR

  12. Multiresolution texture models for brain tumor segmentation in MRI.

    PubMed

    Iftekharuddin, Khan M; Ahmed, Shaheen; Hossen, Jakir

    2011-01-01

    In this study we discuss different types of texture features such as Fractal Dimension (FD) and Multifractional Brownian Motion (mBm) for estimating random structures and varying appearance of brain tissues and tumors in magnetic resonance images (MRI). We use different selection techniques including KullBack - Leibler Divergence (KLD) for ranking different texture and intensity features. We then exploit graph cut, self organizing maps (SOM) and expectation maximization (EM) techniques to fuse selected features for brain tumors segmentation in multimodality T1, T2, and FLAIR MRI. We use different similarity metrics to evaluate quality and robustness of these selected features for tumor segmentation in MRI for real pediatric patients. We also demonstrate a non-patient-specific automated tumor prediction scheme by using improved AdaBoost classification based on these image features.

  13. Predictors of outcome after elective endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair and external validation of a risk prediction model.

    PubMed

    Wisniowski, Brendan; Barnes, Mary; Jenkins, Jason; Boyne, Nicholas; Kruger, Allan; Walker, Philip J

    2011-09-01

    Endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair (EVAR) has been associated with lower operative mortality and morbidity than open surgery but comparable long-term mortality and higher delayed complication and reintervention rates. Attention has therefore been directed to identifying preoperative and operative variables that influence outcomes after EVAR. Risk-prediction models, such as the EVAR Risk Assessment (ERA) model, have also been developed to help surgeons plan EVAR procedures. The aims of this study were (1) to describe outcomes of elective EVAR at the Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital (RBWH), (2) to identify preoperative and operative variables predictive of outcomes after EVAR, and (3) to externally validate the ERA model. All elective EVAR procedures at the RBWH before July 1, 2009, were reviewed. Descriptive analyses were performed to determine the outcomes. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify preoperative and operative variables predictive of outcomes after EVAR. Binomial logistic regression analyses were used to externally validate the ERA model. Before July 1, 2009, 197 patients (172 men), who were a mean age of 72.8 years, underwent elective EVAR at the RBWH. Operative mortality was 1.0%. Survival was 81.1% at 3 years and 63.2% at 5 years. Multivariate analysis showed predictors of survival were age (P = .0126), American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) score (P = .0180), and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (P = .0348) at 3 years and age (P = .0103), ASA score (P = .0006), renal failure (P = .0048), and serum creatinine (P = .0022) at 5 years. Aortic branch vessel score was predictive of initial (30-day) type II endoleak (P = .0015). AAA tortuosity was predictive of midterm type I endoleak (P = .0251). Female sex was associated with lower rates of initial clinical success (P = .0406). The ERA model fitted RBWH data well for early death (C statistic = .906), 3-year survival (C statistic = .735), 5-year

  14. Intrinsic Astrocyte Heterogeneity Influences Tumor Growth in Glioma Mouse Models.

    PubMed

    Irvin, David M; McNeill, Robert S; Bash, Ryan E; Miller, C Ryan

    2017-01-01

    The influence of cellular origin on glioma pathogenesis remains elusive. We previously showed that mutations inactivating Rb and Pten and activating Kras transform astrocytes and induce tumorigenesis throughout the adult mouse brain. However, it remained unclear whether astrocyte subpopulations were susceptible to these mutations. We therefore used genetic lineage tracing and fate mapping in adult conditional, inducible genetically engineered mice to monitor transformation of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and glutamate aspartate transporter (GLAST) astrocytes and immunofluorescence to monitor cellular composition of the tumor microenvironment over time. Because considerable regional heterogeneity exists among astrocytes, we also examined the influence of brain region on tumor growth. GFAP astrocyte transformation induced uniformly rapid, regionally independent tumor growth, but transformation of GLAST astrocytes induced slowly growing tumors with significant regional bias. Transformed GLAST astrocytes had reduced proliferative response in culture and in vivo and malignant progression was delayed in these tumors. Recruited glial cells, including proliferating astrocytes, oligodendrocyte progenitors and microglia, were the majority of GLAST, but not GFAP astrocyte-derived tumors and their abundance dynamically changed over time. These results suggest that intrinsic astrocyte heterogeneity, and perhaps regional brain microenvironment, significantly contributes to glioma pathogenesis. © 2016 International Society of Neuropathology.

  15. Tumor growth model for atlas based registration of pathological brain MR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moualhi, Wafa; Ezzeddine, Zagrouba

    2015-02-01

    The motivation of this work is to register a tumor brain magnetic resonance (MR) image with a normal brain atlas. A normal brain atlas is deformed in order to take account of the presence of a large space occupying tumor. The method use a priori model of tumor growth assuming that the tumor grows in a radial way from a starting point. First, an affine transformation is used in order to bring the patient image and the brain atlas in a global correspondence. Second, the seeding of a synthetic tumor into the brain atlas provides a template for the lesion. Finally, the seeded atlas is deformed combining a method derived from optical flow principles and a model for tumor growth (MTG). Results show that an automatic segmentation method of brain structures in the presence of large deformation can be provided.

  16. Modeling triple-negative breast cancer heterogeneity: effects of stromal macrophages, fibroblasts and tumor vasculature.

    PubMed

    Norton, Kerri-Ann; Jin, Kideok; Popel, Aleksander S

    2018-05-08

    A hallmark of breast tumors is its spatial heterogeneity that includes its distribution of cancer stem cells and progenitor cells, but also heterogeneity in the tumor microenvironment. In this study we focus on the contributions of stromal cells, specifically macrophages, fibroblasts, and endothelial cells on tumor progression. We develop a computational model of triple-negative breast cancer based on our previous work and expand it to include macrophage infiltration, fibroblasts, and angiogenesis. In vitro studies have shown that the secretomes of tumor-educated macrophages and fibroblasts increase both the migration and proliferation rates of triple-negative breast cancer cells. In vivo studies also demonstrated that blocking signaling of selected secreted factors inhibits tumor growth and metastasis in mouse xenograft models. We investigate the influences of increased migration and proliferation rates on tumor growth, the effect of the presence on fibroblasts or macrophages on growth and morphology, and the contributions of macrophage infiltration on tumor growth. We find that while the presence of macrophages increases overall tumor growth, the increase in macrophage infiltration does not substantially increase tumor growth and can even stifle tumor growth at excessive rates. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Abdominal intra-compartment syndrome - a non-hydraulic model of abdominal compartment syndrome due to post-hepatectomy hemorrhage in a man with a localized frozen abdomen due to extensive adhesions: a case report.

    PubMed

    Bressan, Alexsander K; Kirkpatrick, Andrew W; Ball, Chad G

    2016-09-15

    Postoperative hemorrhage is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality following liver resection. It typically presents early within the postoperative period, and conservative management is possible in the majority of cases. We present a case of late post-hepatectomy hemorrhage associated with overt abdominal compartment syndrome resulting from a localized functional compartment within the abdomen. A 68-year-old white man was readmitted with sudden onset of upper abdominal pain, vomiting, and hemodynamic instability 8 days after an uneventful hepatic resection for metachronous colon cancer metastasis. A frozen abdomen with adhesions due to complicated previous abdominal surgeries was encountered at the first intervention, but the surgery itself and initial recovery were otherwise unremarkable. Prompt response to fluid resuscitation at admission was followed by a computed tomography of his abdomen that revealed active arterial hemorrhage in the liver resection site and hemoperitoneum (estimated volume <2 L). Selective arteriography successfully identified and embolized a small bleeding branch of his right hepatic artery. He remained hemodynamically stable, but eventually developed overt abdominal compartment syndrome. Surgical exploration confirmed a small volume of ascites and blood clots (1.2 L) under significant pressure in his supramesocolic region, restricted by his frozen lower abdomen, which we evacuated. Dramatic improvement in his ventilatory pressure was immediate. His abdomen was left open and a negative pressure device was placed for temporary abdominal closure. The fascia was formally closed after 48 hours. He was discharged home at postoperative day 6. Intra-abdominal pressure and radiologic findings of intra-abdominal hemorrhage should be carefully interpreted in patients with extensive intra-abdominal adhesions. A high index of suspicion and detailed understanding of abdominal compartment mechanics are paramount for the timely diagnosis of

  18. The influences of a novel anti-adhesion device, thermally cross-linked gelatin film on peritoneal dissemination of tumor cells: The in vitro and in vivo experiments using murine carcinomatous peritonitis models.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Hiroe; Tsujimoto, Hiroyuki; Horii, Tsunehito; Ozamoto, Yuki; Ueda, Joe; Takagi, Toshitaka; Saitoh, Naoto; Hagiwara, Akeo

    2017-10-10

    To create anti-adhesive materials to be more effective and safer, we developed a thermally cross-linked gelatin film that showed superior anti-adhesive effects with excellent peritoneal regeneration. However, it may act as a convenient scaffold for tumor cell growth, thereby accelerating peritoneal dissemination when used in surgery for abdominal tumors. In this study, we tried to clarify this issue using mouse carcinomatous peritonitis models. First, we examined the in vitro tumor cell growth of mouse B16 melanoma or Colon26 cells on the gelatin film or the conventional hyarulonate/carboxymethylcellulose film. Tumor cell growth on each film was significantly lower than that of the control (no film). Next, we conducted the following in vivo experiments: After the parietal peritoneum was partially removed and covered with each film or without any film, mice were inoculated intraperitoneally with B16 melanoma or Colon26/Nluc cells expressing NanoLuc luciferase gene. At 7 days after the operation, we measured the weight of B16 melanoma tumors or the NanoLuc activity of Colon26/Nluc cells using in vivo imaging at the injured sites. There were no significant differences in the weight of the tumors and the NanoLuc activity among the three groups. We also observed the survival time of mice receiving the same operation and treatments. There was no significant difference in the survival time among the three groups. These results suggest that the gelatin film will likely not accelerate peritoneal dissemination as a convenient scaffold for tumor cell growth when used in surgery for abdominal tumors. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. On a Nonlinear Model for Tumor Growth: Global in Time Weak Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donatelli, Donatella; Trivisa, Konstantina

    2014-07-01

    We investigate the dynamics of a class of tumor growth models known as mixed models. The key characteristic of these type of tumor growth models is that the different populations of cells are continuously present everywhere in the tumor at all times. In this work we focus on the evolution of tumor growth in the presence of proliferating, quiescent and dead cells as well as a nutrient. The system is given by a multi-phase flow model and the tumor is described as a growing continuum Ω with boundary ∂Ω both of which evolve in time. Global-in-time weak solutions are obtained using an approach based on penalization of the boundary behavior, diffusion and viscosity in the weak formulation.

  20. Basic fibroblast growth factor in an animal model of spontaneous mammary tumor progression.

    PubMed

    Kao, Steven; Mo, Jeffrey; Baird, Andrew; Eliceiri, Brian P

    2012-06-01

    Although basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF2) was the first pro-angiogenic molecule discovered, it has numerous activities on the growth and differentiation of non-vascular cell types. FGF2 is both stimulatory and inhibitory, depending on the cell type evaluated, the experimental design used and the context in which it is tested. Here, we investigated the effects of manipulating endogenous FGF2 on the development of mammary cancer to determine whether its endogenous contribution in vivo is pro- or anti-tumorigenic. Specifically, we examined the effects of FGF2 gene dosing in a cross between a spontaneous breast tumor model (PyVT+ mice) and FGF2-/- (FGF KO) mice. Using these mice, the onset and progression of mammary tumors was determined. As predicted, female FGF2 WT mice developed mammary tumors starting around 60 days after birth and by 80 days, 100% of FGF2 WT female mice had mammary tumors. In contrast, 80% of FGF2 KO female mice had no palpable tumors until nearly three weeks later (85 days) at times when 100% of the WT cohort was tumor positive. All FGF KO mice were tumor-bearing by 115 days. When we compared the onset of mammary tumor development and the tumor progression curves between FGF het and FGF KO mice, we observed a difference, which suggested a gene dosing effect. Analysis of the tumors demonstrated that there were significant differences in tumor size depending on FGF2 status. The delay in tumor onset supports a functional role for FGF2 in mammary tumor progression, but argues against an essential role for FGF2 in overall mammary tumor progression.

  1. Modelling gene expression profiles related to prostate tumor progression using binary states

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cancer is a complex disease commonly characterized by the disrupted activity of several cancer-related genes such as oncogenes and tumor-suppressor genes. Previous studies suggest that the process of tumor progression to malignancy is dynamic and can be traced by changes in gene expression. Despite the enormous efforts made for differential expression detection and biomarker discovery, few methods have been designed to model the gene expression level to tumor stage during malignancy progression. Such models could help us understand the dynamics and simplify or reveal the complexity of tumor progression. Methods We have modeled an on-off state of gene activation per sample then per stage to select gene expression profiles associated to tumor progression. The selection is guided by statistical significance of profiles based on random permutated datasets. Results We show that our method identifies expected profiles corresponding to oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes in a prostate tumor progression dataset. Comparisons with other methods support our findings and indicate that a considerable proportion of significant profiles is not found by other statistical tests commonly used to detect differential expression between tumor stages nor found by other tailored methods. Ontology and pathway analysis concurred with these findings. Conclusions Results suggest that our methodology may be a valuable tool to study tumor malignancy progression, which might reveal novel cancer therapies. PMID:23721350

  2. Multifractal modeling, segmentation, prediction, and statistical validation of posterior fossa tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Atiq; Iftekharuddin, Khan M.; Ogg, Robert J.; Laningham, Fred H.; Sivakumar, Bhuvaneswari

    2008-03-01

    In this paper, we characterize the tumor texture in pediatric brain magnetic resonance images (MRIs) and exploit these features for automatic segmentation of posterior fossa (PF) tumors. We focus on PF tumor because of the prevalence of such tumor in pediatric patients. Due to varying appearance in MRI, we propose to model the tumor texture with a multi-fractal process, such as a multi-fractional Brownian motion (mBm). In mBm, the time-varying Holder exponent provides flexibility in modeling irregular tumor texture. We develop a detailed mathematical framework for mBm in two-dimension and propose a novel algorithm to estimate the multi-fractal structure of tissue texture in brain MRI based on wavelet coefficients. This wavelet based multi-fractal feature along with MR image intensity and a regular fractal feature obtained using our existing piecewise-triangular-prism-surface-area (PTPSA) method, are fused in segmenting PF tumor and non-tumor regions in brain T1, T2, and FLAIR MR images respectively. We also demonstrate a non-patient-specific automated tumor prediction scheme based on these image features. We experimentally show the tumor discriminating power of our novel multi-fractal texture along with intensity and fractal features in automated tumor segmentation and statistical prediction. To evaluate the performance of our tumor prediction scheme, we obtain ROCs and demonstrate how sharply the curves reach the specificity of 1.0 sacrificing minimal sensitivity. Experimental results show the effectiveness of our proposed techniques in automatic detection of PF tumors in pediatric MRIs.

  3. Modeling the spatial distribution of chronic tumor hypoxia: implications for experimental and clinical studies.

    PubMed

    Powathil, Gibin; Kohandel, Mohammad; Milosevic, Michael; Sivaloganathan, Siv

    2012-01-01

    Tumor oxygenation status is considered one of the important prognostic markers in cancer since it strongly influences the response of cancer cells to various treatments; in particular, to radiation therapy. Thus, a proper and accurate assessment of tumor oxygen distribution before the treatment may highly affect the outcome of the treatment. The heterogeneous nature of tumor hypoxia, mainly influenced by the complex tumor microenvironment, often makes its quantification very difficult. The usual methods used to measure tumor hypoxia are biomarkers and the polarographic needle electrode. Although these techniques may provide an acceptable assessment of hypoxia, they are invasive and may not always give a spatial distribution of hypoxia, which is very useful for treatment planning. An alternative method to quantify the tumor hypoxia is to use theoretical simulations with the knowledge of tumor vasculature. The purpose of this paper is to model tumor hypoxia using a known spatial distribution of tumor vasculature obtained from image data, to analyze the accuracy of polarographic needle electrode measurements in quantifying hypoxia, to quantify the optimum number of measurements required to satisfactorily evaluate the tumor oxygenation status, and to study the effects of hypoxia on radiation response. Our results indicate that the model successfully generated an accurate oxygenation map for tumor cross-sections with known vascular distribution. The method developed here provides a way to estimate tumor hypoxia and provides guidance in planning accurate and effective therapeutic strategies and invasive estimation techniques. Our results agree with the previous findings that the needle electrode technique gives a good estimate of tumor hypoxia if the sampling is done in a uniform way with 5-6 tracks of 20-30 measurements each. Moreover, the analysis indicates that the accurate measurement of oxygen profile can be very useful in determining right radiation doses to the

  4. Effectivity of pazopanib treatment in orthotopic models of human testicular germ cell tumors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cisplatin (CDDP) resistance in testicular germ cell tumors (GCTs) is still a clinical challenge, and one associated with poor prognosis. The purpose of this work was to test pazopanib, an anti-tumoral and anti-angiogenic multikinase inhibitor, and its combination with lapatinib (an anti-ErbB inhibitor) in mouse orthotopic models of human testicular GCTs. Methods We used two different models of human testicular GCTs orthotopically grown in nude mice; a CDDP-sensitive choriocarcinoma (TGT38) and a new orthotopic model generated from a metastatic GCT refractory to first-line CDDP chemotherapy (TGT44). Nude mice implanted with these orthotopic tumors were treated with the inhibitors and the effect on tumoral growth and angiogenesis was evaluated. Results TGT44 refractory tumor had an immunohistochemical profile similar to the original metastasis, with characteristics of yolk sac tumor. TGT44 did not respond when treated with cisplatin. In contrast, pazopanib had an anti-angiogenic effect and anti-tumor efficacy in this model. Pazopanib in combination with lapatinib in TGT38, an orthotopic model of choriocarcinoma had an additive effect blocking tumor growth. Conclusions We present pazopanib as a possible agent for the alternative treatment of CDDP-sensitive and CDDP-refractory GCT patients, alone or in combination with anti-ErbB therapies. PMID:23937707

  5. Computational Modeling of 3D Tumor Growth and Angiogenesis for Chemotherapy Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Lei; van de Ven, Anne L.; Guo, Dongmin; Andasari, Vivi; Cristini, Vittorio; Li, King C.; Zhou, Xiaobo

    2014-01-01

    Solid tumors develop abnormally at spatial and temporal scales, giving rise to biophysical barriers that impact anti-tumor chemotherapy. This may increase the expenditure and time for conventional drug pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic studies. In order to facilitate drug discovery, we propose a mathematical model that couples three-dimensional tumor growth and angiogenesis to simulate tumor progression for chemotherapy evaluation. This application-oriented model incorporates complex dynamical processes including cell- and vascular-mediated interstitial pressure, mass transport, angiogenesis, cell proliferation, and vessel maturation to model tumor progression through multiple stages including tumor initiation, avascular growth, and transition from avascular to vascular growth. Compared to pure mechanistic models, the proposed empirical methods are not only easy to conduct but can provide realistic predictions and calculations. A series of computational simulations were conducted to demonstrate the advantages of the proposed comprehensive model. The computational simulation results suggest that solid tumor geometry is related to the interstitial pressure, such that tumors with high interstitial pressure are more likely to develop dendritic structures than those with low interstitial pressure. PMID:24404145

  6. Tumor affinity of radiolabeled peanut agglutinin compared with that of Ga-67 citrate in animal models

    SciTech Connect

    Yokoyama, K.; Aburano, T.; Watanabe, N.

    1985-05-01

    Peanut agglutinin (PNA) binds avidly to the immunodominant group of the tumor associated T antigen. The purpose of this study was to evaluate oncodiagnostic potential of radiolabeled PNA in animal models. PNA was labeled with I-125 or I-131 by Iodogen and also with In-111 by cyclic DTPA anhydride. The biological activity of PNA was examined by a hemaglutination titer with a photometer before and after labeling. Animal tumor models used were Lewis Lung Cancer(LLC), B-16 Melanotic Melanoma(MM), Yoshida Sarcoma(YS), Ehrlich Ascites Tumor(EAT and Hepatoma AH109A(HAH). Inflammatory tissue induced by turpentine oil was used as an abscess model. Serial scintigraphic imagesmore » were obtained following IV injections of 100 ..mu..Ci of I-131 or In-111-DTPA-PNA. The tumor affinity of Ga-67 citrate was studied to compare that of radiolabeled PNA. Tissue biodistribution was studied in EAT bearing mice. All of these tumor models except HAH were clearly visible by radiolabeled PNA without subtraction techniques. In the models of LLC and EAT, PNA showed the better accumulation into the tumor tissue than Ga-67 citrate. In YS and MM, PNA represented almost the same accumulation as Ga-67 citrate. The localization of PNA into abscess tissue wasn't found although Ga-67 citrate markedly accumulated into abscess tissue as well as tumor tissue. The clearance of PNA from tumor was slower than those from any other organs. Tumor to muscle ratio was 5.1 at 48hrs. and tumor to blood ratio increased with time to 2.3 at 96hrs. These results suggested that radiolabeled PNA may have a potential in the detection of tumor.« less

  7. Genomic characterization of explant tumorgraft models derived from fresh patient tumor tissue

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background There is resurgence within drug and biomarker development communities for the use of primary tumorgraft models as improved predictors of patient tumor response to novel therapeutic strategies. Despite perceived advantages over cell line derived xenograft models, there is limited data comparing the genotype and phenotype of tumorgrafts to the donor patient tumor, limiting the determination of molecular relevance of the tumorgraft model. This report directly compares the genomic characteristics of patient tumors and the derived tumorgraft models, including gene expression, and oncogenic mutation status. Methods Fresh tumor tissues from 182 cancer patients were implanted subcutaneously into immune-compromised mice for the development of primary patient tumorgraft models. Histological assessment was performed on both patient tumors and the resulting tumorgraft models. Somatic mutations in key oncogenes and gene expression levels of resulting tumorgrafts were compared to the matched patient tumors using the OncoCarta (Sequenom, San Diego, CA) and human gene microarray (Affymetrix, Santa Clara, CA) platforms respectively. The genomic stability of the established tumorgrafts was assessed across serial in vivo generations in a representative subset of models. The genomes of patient tumors that formed tumorgrafts were compared to those that did not to identify the possible molecular basis to successful engraftment or rejection. Results Fresh tumor tissues from 182 cancer patients were implanted into immune-compromised mice with forty-nine tumorgraft models that have been successfully established, exhibiting strong histological and genomic fidelity to the originating patient tumors. Comparison of the transcriptomes and oncogenic mutations between the tumorgrafts and the matched patient tumors were found to be stable across four tumorgraft generations. Not only did the various tumors retain the differentiation pattern, but supporting stromal elements were preserved

  8. EFFECTS OF IRRADIATION ON BRAIN VASCULATURE USING AN IN SITU TUMOR MODEL

    PubMed Central

    Zawaski, Janice A.; Gaber, M. Waleed; Sabek, Omaima M.; Wilson, Christy M.; Duntsch, Christopher D.; Merchant, Thomas E.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Damage to normal tissue is a limiting factor in clinical radiotherapy (RT). We tested the hypothesis that the presence of tumor alters the response of normal tissues to irradiation using a rat in situ brain tumor model. Methods and Materials Intravital microscopy was used with a rat cranial window to assess the in situ effect of rat C6 glioma on peritumoral tissue with and without RT. The RT regimen included 40 Gy at 8 Gy/day starting Day 5 after tumor implant. Endpoints included blood–brain barrier permeability, clearance index, leukocyte-endothelial interactions and staining for vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) glial fibrillary acidic protein, and apoptosis. To characterize the system response to RT, animal survival and tumor surface area and volume were measured. Sham experiments were performed on similar animals implanted with basement membrane matrix absent of tumor cells. Results The presence of tumor alone increases permeability but has little effect on leukocyte–endothelial interactions and astrogliosis. Radiation alone increases tissue permeability, leukocyte-endothelial interactions, and astrogliosis. The highest levels of permeability and cell adhesion were seen in the model that combined tumor and irradiation; however, the presence of tumor appeared to reduce the volume of rolling leukocytes. Unirradiated tumor and peritumoral tissue had poor clearance. Irradiated tumor and peritumoral tissue had a similar clearance index to irradiated and unirradiated sham-implanted animals. Radiation reduces the presence of VEGF in peritumoral normal tissues but did not affect the amount of apoptosis in the normal tissue. Apoptosis was identified in the tumor tissue with and without radiation. Conclusions We developed a novel approach to demonstrate that the presence of the tumor in a rat intracranial model alters the response of normal tissues to irradiation. PMID:22197233

  9. Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA)

    MedlinePlus

    ... plaque buildup causes the walls of the abdominal aorta to become weak and bulge outward like a ... treated? What is an abdominal aortic aneurysm? The aorta, the largest artery in the body, is a ...

  10. 3D microvascular model recapitulates the diffuse large B-cell lymphoma tumor microenvironment in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Mannino, Robert G.; Santiago-Miranda, Adriana N.; Pradhan, Pallab; Qiu, Yongzhi; Mejias, Joscelyn C.; Neelapu, Sattva S.; Roy, Krishnendu; Lam, Wilbur A.

    2017-01-01

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is an aggressive cancer that affects ~22,000 people in the United States yearly. Understanding the complex cellular interactions of the tumor microenvironment is critical to the success and development of DLBCL treatment strategies. In vitro platforms that successfully model the complex tumor microenvironment without introducing the variability of in vivo systems are vital for understanding these interactions. To date, no such in vitro model exists that can accurately recapitulate the interactions that occur between immune cells, cancer cells, and endothelial cells in the tumor microenvironment of DLBCL. To that end, we developed a lymphoma-on-chip model consisting of a hydrogel based tumor model traversed by a vascularized, perfusable, round microchannel that successfully recapitulates key complexities and interactions of the in vivo tumor microenvironment in vitro. We have shown that the perfusion capabilities of this technique allow us to study targeted treatment strategies, as well as to model the diffusion of infused reagents spatiotemporally. Furthermore, this model employs a novel fabrication technique that utilizes common laboratory materials, and allows for the microfabrication of multiplex microvascular environments without the need for advanced microfabrication facilities. Through our facile microfabrication process, we are able to achieve micro vessels within a tumor model that are highly reliable and precise over the length of the vessel. Overall, we have developed a tool that enables researchers from many diverse disciplines to study previously inaccessible aspects of the DLBCL tumor microenvironment, with profound implications for drug delivery and design. PMID:28054086

  11. 3D microvascular model recapitulates the diffuse large B-cell lymphoma tumor microenvironment in vitro.

    PubMed

    Mannino, Robert G; Santiago-Miranda, Adriana N; Pradhan, Pallab; Qiu, Yongzhi; Mejias, Joscelyn C; Neelapu, Sattva S; Roy, Krishnendu; Lam, Wilbur A

    2017-01-31

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is an aggressive cancer that affects ∼22 000 people in the United States yearly. Understanding the complex cellular interactions of the tumor microenvironment is critical to the success and development of DLBCL treatment strategies. In vitro platforms that successfully model the complex tumor microenvironment without introducing the variability of in vivo systems are vital for understanding these interactions. To date, no such in vitro model exists that can accurately recapitulate the interactions that occur between immune cells, cancer cells, and endothelial cells in the tumor microenvironment of DLBCL. To that end, we developed a lymphoma-on-chip model consisting of a hydrogel based tumor model traversed by a vascularized, perfusable, round microchannel that successfully recapitulates key complexities and interactions of the in vivo tumor microenvironment in vitro. We have shown that the perfusion capabilities of this technique allow us to study targeted treatment strategies, as well as to model the diffusion of infused reagents spatiotemporally. Furthermore, this model employs a novel fabrication technique that utilizes common laboratory materials, and allows for the microfabrication of multiplex microvascular environments without the need for advanced microfabrication facilities. Through our facile microfabrication process, we are able to achieve micro vessels within a tumor model that are highly reliable and precise over the length of the vessel. Overall, we have developed a tool that enables researchers from many diverse disciplines to study previously inaccessible aspects of the DLBCL tumor microenvironment, with profound implications for drug delivery and design.

  12. Increased 18F-FDG Uptake Is Predictive of Rupture in a Novel Rat Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Rupture Model

    PubMed Central

    English, Sean J.; Piert, Morand R.; Diaz, Jose A.; Gordon, David; Ghosh, Abhijit; D'Alecy, Louis G.; Whitesall, Steven E.; Sharma, Ashish K.; DeRoo, Elise P.; Watt, Tessa; Su, Gang; Henke, Peter K.; Eliason, Jonathan L.; Ailawadi, Gorav; Upchurch, Gilbert R.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine whether 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) micro–positron emission tomography (micro-PET) can predict abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) rupture. Background An infrarenal AAA model is needed to study inflammatory mechanisms that drive rupture. 18F-FDG PET can detect vascular inflammation in animal models and patients. Methods After exposing Sprague-Dawley rats to intra-aortic porcine pancreatic elastase (PPE) (12 U/mL), AAA rupture was induced by daily, subcutaneous, β-aminopropionitrile (BAPN, 300 mg/kg, N = 24) administration. Negative control AAA animals (N = 15) underwent daily saline subcutaneous injection after PPE exposure. BAPN-exposed animals that did not rupture served as positive controls [nonruptured AAA (NRAAA) 14d, N = 9]. Rupture was witnessed using radiotelemetry. Maximum standard uptakes for 18F-FDG micro-PET studies were determined. Aortic wall PAI-1, uPA, and tPA concentrations were determined by western blot analyses. Interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-10, and MIP-2 were determined by Bio-Plex bead array. Neutrophil and macrophage populations per high-power field were quantified. Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activities were determined by zymography. Results When comparing ruptured AAA (RAAA) to NRAAA 14d animals, increased focal 18F-FDG uptakes were detected at subsequent sites of rupture (P = 0.03). PAI-1 expression was significantly less in RAAA tissue (P = 0.01), with comparable uPA and decreased tPA levels (P = 0.02). IL-1β (P = 0.04), IL-6 (P = 0.001), IL-10 (P = 0.04), and MIP-2 (P = 0.02)expression, neutrophil (P = 0.02) and macrophage presence (P = 0.002), and MMP9 (P < 0.0001) activity were increased in RAAA tissue. Conclusions With this AAA rupture model, increased prerupture 18F-FDG uptake on micro-PET imaging was associated with increased inflammation in the ruptured AAA wall. 18F-FDG PET imaging may be used to monitor inflammatory changes before AAA rupture. PMID:24651130

  13. A deterministic and stochastic model for the system dynamics of tumor-immune responses to chemotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiangdong; Li, Qingze; Pan, Jianxin

    2018-06-01

    Modern medical studies show that chemotherapy can help most cancer patients, especially for those diagnosed early, to stabilize their disease conditions from months to years, which means the population of tumor cells remained nearly unchanged in quite a long time after fighting against immune system and drugs. In order to better understand the dynamics of tumor-immune responses under chemotherapy, deterministic and stochastic differential equation models are constructed to characterize the dynamical change of tumor cells and immune cells in this paper. The basic dynamical properties, such as boundedness, existence and stability of equilibrium points, are investigated in the deterministic model. Extended stochastic models include stochastic differential equations (SDEs) model and continuous-time Markov chain (CTMC) model, which accounts for the variability in cellular reproduction, growth and death, interspecific competitions, and immune response to chemotherapy. The CTMC model is harnessed to estimate the extinction probability of tumor cells. Numerical simulations are performed, which confirms the obtained theoretical results.

  14. Multiple-Tumor Analysis with MS_Combo Model (Use with BMDS Wizard)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Exercises and procedures on setting up and using the MS_Combo Wizard. The MS_Combo model provides BMD and BMDL estimates for the risk of getting one or more tumors for any combination of tumors observed in a single bioassay.

  15. Accessing key steps of human tumor progression in vivo by using an avian embryo model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagedorn, Martin; Javerzat, Sophie; Gilges, Delphine; Meyre, Aurélie; de Lafarge, Benjamin; Eichmann, Anne; Bikfalvi, Andreas

    2005-02-01

    Experimental in vivo tumor models are essential for comprehending the dynamic process of human cancer progression, identifying therapeutic targets, and evaluating antitumor drugs. However, current rodent models are limited by high costs, long experimental duration, variability, restricted accessibility to the tumor, and major ethical concerns. To avoid these shortcomings, we investigated whether tumor growth on the chick chorio-allantoic membrane after human glioblastoma cell grafting would replicate characteristics of the human disease. Avascular tumors consistently formed within 2 days, then progressed through vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2-dependent angiogenesis, associated with hemorrhage, necrosis, and peritumoral edema. Blocking of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 and platelet-derived growth factor receptor signaling pathways by using small-molecule receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors abrogated tumor development. Gene regulation during the angiogenic switch was analyzed by oligonucleotide microarrays. Defined sample selection for gene profiling permitted identification of regulated genes whose functions are associated mainly with tumor vascularization and growth. Furthermore, expression of known tumor progression genes identified in the screen (IL-6 and cysteine-rich angiogenic inducer 61) as well as potential regulators (lumican and F-box-only 6) follow similar patterns in patient glioma. The model reliably simulates key features of human glioma growth in a few days and thus could considerably increase the speed and efficacy of research on human tumor progression and preclinical drug screening. angiogenesis | animal model alternatives | glioblastoma

  16. Advanced Imaging Approaches to Characterize Stromal and Metabolic Changes in In Vivo Mammary Tumor Models

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-02-01

    Optical imaging , metabolism, tumor microenvironment, NADH, FAD, intravital imaging , collagen, metastasis 3.Overall Project Summary Our preliminary...Keely, KW Eliceiri. Novel Intravital Imaging Approaches to Characterize Collagen Alignment in Defined Mammary Tumor Models. Microscopy and...fixturing for intravital FLIM imaging through a rodent mammary imaging window. Stage is raised to accommodate tall 20xW objective. 14     Figure

  17. A non-equilibrium thermodynamic model for tumor extracellular matrix with enzymatic degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Shi-Lei; Li, Bo; Feng, Xi-Qiao; Gao, Huajian

    2017-07-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) of a solid tumor not only affords scaffolding to support tumor architecture and integrity but also plays an essential role in tumor growth, invasion, metastasis, and therapeutics. In this paper, a non-equilibrium thermodynamic theory is established to study the chemo-mechanical behaviors of tumor ECM, which is modeled as a poroelastic polyelectrolyte consisting of a collagen network and proteoglycans. By using the principle of maximum energy dissipation rate, we deduce a set of governing equations for drug transport and mechanosensitive enzymatic degradation in ECM. The results reveal that osmosis is primarily responsible for the compression resistance of ECM. It is suggested that a well-designed ECM degradation can effectively modify the tumor microenvironment for improved efficiency of cancer therapy. The theoretical predictions show a good agreement with relevant experimental observations. This study aimed to deepen our understanding of tumor ECM may be conducive to novel anticancer strategies.

  18. Tailored chemokine receptor modification improves homing of adoptive therapy T cells in a spontaneous tumor model.

    PubMed

    Garetto, Stefano; Sardi, Claudia; Martini, Elisa; Roselli, Giuliana; Morone, Diego; Angioni, Roberta; Cianciotti, Beatrice Claudia; Trovato, Anna Elisa; Franchina, Davide Giuseppe; Castino, Giovanni Francesco; Vignali, Debora; Erreni, Marco; Marchesi, Federica; Rumio, Cristiano; Kallikourdis, Marinos

    2016-07-12

    In recent years, tumor Adoptive Cell Therapy (ACT), using administration of ex vivo-enhanced T cells from the cancer patient, has become a promising therapeutic strategy. However, efficient homing of the anti-tumoral T cells to the tumor or metastatic site still remains a substantial hurdle. Yet the tumor site itself attracts both tumor-promoting and anti-tumoral immune cell populations through the secretion of chemokines. We attempted to identify these chemokines in a model of spontaneous metastasis, in order to "hijack" their function by expressing matching chemokine receptors on the cytotoxic T cells used in ACT, thus allowing us to enhance the recruitment of these therapeutic cells. Here we show that this enabled the modified T cells to preferentially home into spontaneous lymph node metastases in the TRAMP model, as well as in an inducible tumor model, E.G7-OVA. Due to the improved homing, the modified CD8+ T cells displayed an enhanced in vivo protective effect, as seen by a significant delay in E.G7-OVA tumor growth. These results offer a proof of principle for the tailored application of chemokine receptor modification as a means of improving T cell homing to the target tumor, thus enhancing ACT efficacy. Surprisingly, we also uncover that the formation of the peri-tumoral fibrotic capsule, which has been shown to impede T cell access to tumor, is partially dependent on host T cell presence. This finding, which would be impossible to observe in immunodeficient model studies, highlights possible conflicting roles that T cells may play in a therapeutic context.

  19. The development of Wilms tumor: from WT1 and microRNA to animal models.

    PubMed

    Tian, Fang; Yourek, Gregory; Shi, Xiaolei; Yang, Yili

    2014-08-01

    Wilms tumor recapitulates the development of the kidney and represents a unique opportunity to understand the relationship between normal and tumor development. This has been illustrated by the findings that mutations of Wnt/β-catenin pathway-related WT1, β-catenin, and WTX together account for about one-third of Wilms tumor cases. While intense efforts are being made to explore the genetic basis of the other two-thirds of tumor cases, it is worth noting that, epigenetic changes, particularly the loss of imprinting of the DNA region encoding the major fetal growth factor IGF2, which results in its biallelic over-expression, are closely associated with the development of many Wilms tumors. Recent investigations also revealed that mutations of Drosha and Dicer, the RNases required for miRNA generation, and Dis3L2, the 3'-5' exonuclease that normally degrades miRNAs and mRNAs, could cause predisposition to Wilms tumors, demonstrating that miRNA can play a pivotal role in Wilms tumor development. Interestingly, Lin28, a direct target of miRNA let-7 and potent regulator of stem cell self-renewal and differentiation, is significantly elevated in some Wilms tumors, and enforced expression of Lin28 during kidney development could induce Wilms tumor. With the success in establishing mice nephroblastoma models through over-expressing IGF2 and deleting WT1, and advances in understanding the ENU-induced rat model, we are now able to explore the molecular and cellular mechanisms induced by these genetic, epigenetic, and miRNA alterations in animal models to understand the development of Wilms tumor. These animal models may also serve as valuable systems to assess new treatment targets and strategies for Wilms tumor. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. SEREX analysis for tumor antigen identification in a mouse model of adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hampton, T A; Conry, R M; Khazaeli, M B; Shaw, D R; Curiel, D T; LoBuglio, A F; Strong, T V

    2000-03-01

    Evaluation of immunotherapy strategies in mouse models of carcinoma is hampered by the limited number of known murine tumor antigens (Ags). Although tumor Ags can be identified based on cytotoxic T-cell activation, this approach is not readily accomplished for many tumor types. We applied an alternative strategy based on a humoral immune response, SEREX, to the identification of tumor Ags in the murine colon adenocarcinoma cell line MC38. Immunization of syngeneic C57BL/6 mice with MC38 cells by three different methods induced a protective immune response with concomitant production of anti-MC38 antibodies. Immunoscreening of an MC38-derived expression library resulted in the identification of the endogenous ecotropic leukemia virus envelope (env) protein and the murine ATRX protein as candidate tumor Ags. Northern blot analysis demonstrated high levels of expression of the env transcript in MC38 cells and in several other murine tumor cell lines, whereas expression in normal colonic epithelium was absent. ATRX was found to be variably expressed in tumor cell lines and in normal tissue. Further analysis of the expressed env sequence indicated that it represents a nonmutated tumor Ag. Polynucleotide immunization with DNA encoding the env polypeptide resulted in strong and specific antibody responses to this self Ag in all immunized mice. Thus, SEREX offers a rapid means of identifying tumor Ags in murine cancer models.

  1. Molecular Characterization of Growth Hormone-producing Tumors in the GC Rat Model of Acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Martín-Rodríguez, Juan F; Muñoz-Bravo, Jose L; Ibañez-Costa, Alejandro; Fernandez-Maza, Laura; Balcerzyk, Marcin; Leal-Campanario, Rocío; Luque, Raúl M; Castaño, Justo P; Venegas-Moreno, Eva; Soto-Moreno, Alfonso; Leal-Cerro, Alfonso; Cano, David A

    2015-11-09

    Acromegaly is a disorder resulting from excessive production of growth hormone (GH) and consequent increase of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-I), most frequently caused by pituitary adenomas. Elevated GH and IGF-I levels results in wide range of somatic, cardiovascular, endocrine, metabolic, and gastrointestinal morbidities. Subcutaneous implantation of the GH-secreting GC cell line in rats leads to the formation of tumors. GC tumor-bearing rats develop characteristics that resemble human acromegaly including gigantism and visceromegaly. However, GC tumors remain poorly characterized at a molecular level. In the present work, we report a detailed histological and molecular characterization of GC tumors using immunohistochemistry, molecular biology and imaging techniques. GC tumors display histopathological and molecular features of human GH-producing tumors, including hormone production, cell architecture, senescence activation and alterations in cell cycle gene expression. Furthermore, GC tumors cells displayed sensitivity to somatostatin analogues, drugs that are currently used in the treatment of human GH-producing adenomas, thus supporting the GC tumor model as a translational tool to evaluate therapeutic agents. The information obtained would help to maximize the usefulness of the GC rat model for research and preclinical studies in GH-secreting tumors.

  2. Molecular Characterization of Growth Hormone-producing Tumors in the GC Rat Model of Acromegaly

    PubMed Central

    Martín-Rodríguez, Juan F.; Muñoz-Bravo, Jose L.; Ibañez-Costa, Alejandro; Fernandez-Maza, Laura; Balcerzyk, Marcin; Leal-Campanario, Rocío; Luque, Raúl M.; Castaño, Justo P.; Venegas-Moreno, Eva; Soto-Moreno, Alfonso; Leal-Cerro, Alfonso; Cano, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Acromegaly is a disorder resulting from excessive production of growth hormone (GH) and consequent increase of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-I), most frequently caused by pituitary adenomas. Elevated GH and IGF-I levels results in wide range of somatic, cardiovascular, endocrine, metabolic, and gastrointestinal morbidities. Subcutaneous implantation of the GH-secreting GC cell line in rats leads to the formation of tumors. GC tumor-bearing rats develop characteristics that resemble human acromegaly including gigantism and visceromegaly. However, GC tumors remain poorly characterized at a molecular level. In the present work, we report a detailed histological and molecular characterization of GC tumors using immunohistochemistry, molecular biology and imaging techniques. GC tumors display histopathological and molecular features of human GH-producing tumors, including hormone production, cell architecture, senescence activation and alterations in cell cycle gene expression. Furthermore, GC tumors cells displayed sensitivity to somatostatin analogues, drugs that are currently used in the treatment of human GH-producing adenomas, thus supporting the GC tumor model as a translational tool to evaluate therapeutic agents. The information obtained would help to maximize the usefulness of the GC rat model for research and preclinical studies in GH-secreting tumors. PMID:26549306

  3. Abdominal wall fat pad biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    Amyloidosis - abdominal wall fat pad biopsy; Abdominal wall biopsy; Biopsy - abdominal wall fat pad ... most common method of taking an abdominal wall fat pad biopsy . The health care provider cleans the ...

  4. Mathematical modeling of tumor-associated macrophage interactions with the cancer microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Mahlbacher, Grace; Curtis, Louis T; Lowengrub, John; Frieboes, Hermann B

    2018-01-30

    Immuno-oncotherapy has emerged as a promising means to target cancer. In particular, therapeutic manipulation of tumor-associated macrophages holds promise due to their various and sometimes opposing roles in tumor progression. It is established that M1-type macrophages suppress tumor progression while M2-types support it. Recently, Tie2-expressing macrophages (TEM) have been identified as a distinct sub-population influencing tumor angiogenesis and vascular remodeling as well as monocyte differentiation. This study develops a modeling framework to evaluate macrophage interactions with the tumor microenvironment, enabling assessment of how these interactions may affect tumor progression. M1, M2, and Tie2 expressing variants are integrated into a model of tumor growth representing a metastatic lesion in a highly vascularized organ, such as the liver. Behaviors simulated include M1 release of nitric oxide (NO), M2 release of growth-promoting factors, and TEM facilitation of angiogenesis via Angiopoietin-2 and promotion of monocyte differentiation into M2 via IL-10. The results show that M2 presence leads to larger tumor growth regardless of TEM effects, implying that immunotherapeutic strategies that lead to TEM ablation may fail to restrain growth when the M2 represents a sizeable population. As TEM pro-tumor effects are less pronounced and on a longer time scale than M1-driven tumor inhibition, a more nuanced approach to influence monocyte differentiation taking into account the tumor state (e.g., under chemotherapy) may be desirable. The results highlight the dynamic interaction of macrophages within a growing tumor, and, further, establish the initial feasibility of a mathematical framework that could longer term help to optimize cancer immunotherapy.

  5. Establishment and Characterization of a Tumor Stem Cell-Based Glioblastoma Invasion Model.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Stine Skov; Meyer, Morten; Petterson, Stine Asferg; Halle, Bo; Rosager, Ann Mari; Aaberg-Jessen, Charlotte; Thomassen, Mads; Burton, Mark; Kruse, Torben A; Kristensen, Bjarne Winther

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma is the most frequent and malignant brain tumor. Recurrence is inevitable and most likely connected to tumor invasion and presence of therapy resistant stem-like tumor cells. The aim was therefore to establish and characterize a three-dimensional in vivo-like in vitro model taking invasion and tumor stemness into account. Glioblastoma stem cell-like containing spheroid (GSS) cultures derived from three different patients were established and characterized. The spheroids were implanted in vitro into rat brain slice cultures grown in stem cell medium and in vivo into brains of immuno-compromised mice. Invasion was followed in the slice cultures by confocal time-lapse microscopy. Using immunohistochemistry, we compared tumor cell invasion as well as expression of proliferation and stem cell markers between the models. We observed a pronounced invasion into brain slice cultures both by confocal time-lapse microscopy and immunohistochemistry. This invasion closely resembled the invasion in vivo. The Ki-67 proliferation indexes in spheroids implanted into brain slices were lower than in free-floating spheroids. The expression of stem cell markers varied between free-floating spheroids, spheroids implanted into brain slices and tumors in vivo. The established invasion model kept in stem cell medium closely mimics tumor cell invasion into the brain in vivo preserving also to some extent the expression of stem cell markers. The model is feasible and robust and we suggest the model as an in vivo-like model with a great potential in glioma studies and drug discovery.

  6. TumorML: Concept and requirements of an in silico cancer modelling markup language.

    PubMed

    Johnson, David; Cooper, Jonathan; McKeever, Steve

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the initial groundwork carried out as part of the European Commission funded Transatlantic Tumor Model Repositories project, to develop a new markup language for computational cancer modelling, TumorML. In this paper we describe the motivations for such a language, arguing that current state-of-the-art biomodelling languages are not suited to the cancer modelling domain. We go on to describe the work that needs to be done to develop TumorML, the conceptual design, and a description of what existing markup languages will be used to compose the language specification.

  7. Galectin-1 Inhibitor OTX008 Induces Tumor Vessel Normalization and Tumor Growth Inhibition in Human Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma Models.

    PubMed

    Koonce, Nathan A; Griffin, Robert J; Dings, Ruud P M

    2017-12-09

    Galectin-1 is a hypoxia-regulated protein and a prognostic marker in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC). Here we assessed the ability of non-peptidic galectin-1 inhibitor OTX008 to improve tumor oxygenation levels via tumor vessel normalization as well as tumor growth inhibition in two human HNSCC tumor models, the human laryngeal squamous carcinoma SQ20B and the human epithelial type 2 HEp-2. Tumor-bearing mice were treated with OTX008, Anginex, or Avastin and oxygen levels were determined by fiber-optics and molecular marker pimonidazole binding. Immuno-fluorescence was used to determine vessel normalization status. Continued OTX008 treatment caused a transient reoxygenation in SQ20B tumors peaking on day 14, while a steady increase in tumor oxygenation was observed over 21 days in the HEp-2 model. A >50% decrease in immunohistochemical staining for tumor hypoxia verified the oxygenation data measured using a partial pressure of oxygen (pO₂) probe. Additionally, OTX008 induced tumor vessel normalization as tumor pericyte coverage increased by approximately 40% without inducing any toxicity. Moreover, OTX008 inhibited tumor growth as effectively as Anginex and Avastin, except in the HEp-2 model where Avastin was found to suspend tumor growth. Galectin-1 inhibitor OTX008 transiently increased overall tumor oxygenation via vessel normalization to various degrees in both HNSCC models. These findings suggest that targeting galectin-1-e.g., by OTX008-may be an effective approach to treat cancer patients as stand-alone therapy or in combination with other standards of care.

  8. Inorganic nanovehicle targets tumor in an orthotopic breast cancer model.

    PubMed

    Choi, Goeun; Kwon, Oh-Joon; Oh, Yeonji; Yun, Chae-Ok; Choy, Jin-Ho

    2014-03-21

    The clinical efficacy of conventional chemotherapeutic agent, methotrexate (MTX), can be limited by its very short plasma half-life, the drug resistance, and the high dosage required for cancer cell suppression. In this study, a new drug delivery system is proposed to overcome such limitations. To realize such a system, MTX was intercalated into layered double hydroxides (LDHs), inorganic drug delivery vehicle, through a co-precipitation route to produce a MTX-LDH nanohybrid with an average particle size of approximately 130 nm. Biodistribution studies in mice bearing orthotopic human breast tumors revealed that the tumor-to-liver ratio of MTX in the MTX-LDH-treated-group was 6-fold higher than that of MTX-treated-one after drug treatment for 2 hr. Moreover, MTX-LDH exhibited superior targeting effect resulting in high antitumor efficacy inducing a 74.3% reduction in tumor volume compared to MTX alone, and as a consequence, significant survival benefits. Annexin-V and propidium iodine dual staining and TUNEL analysis showed that MTX-LDH induced a greater degree of apoptosis than free MTX. Taken together, our data demonstrate that a new MTX-LDH nanohybrid exhibits a superior efficacy profile and improved distribution compared to MTX alone and has the potential to enhance therapeutic efficacy via inhibition of tumor proliferation and induction of apoptosis.

  9. Inorganic Nanovehicle Targets Tumor in an Orthotopic Breast Cancer Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Goeun; Kwon, Oh-Joon; Oh, Yeonji; Yun, Chae-Ok; Choy, Jin-Ho

    2014-03-01

    The clinical efficacy of conventional chemotherapeutic agent, methotrexate (MTX), can be limited by its very short plasma half-life, the drug resistance, and the high dosage required for cancer cell suppression. In this study, a new drug delivery system is proposed to overcome such limitations. To realize such a system, MTX was intercalated into layered double hydroxides (LDHs), inorganic drug delivery vehicle, through a co-precipitation route to produce a MTX-LDH nanohybrid with an average particle size of approximately 130 nm. Biodistribution studies in mice bearing orthotopic human breast tumors revealed that the tumor-to-liver ratio of MTX in the MTX-LDH-treated-group was 6-fold higher than that of MTX-treated-one after drug treatment for 2 hr. Moreover, MTX-LDH exhibited superior targeting effect resulting in high antitumor efficacy inducing a 74.3% reduction in tumor volume compared to MTX alone, and as a consequence, significant survival benefits. Annexin-V and propidium iodine dual staining and TUNEL analysis showed that MTX-LDH induced a greater degree of apoptosis than free MTX. Taken together, our data demonstrate that a new MTX-LDH nanohybrid exhibits a superior efficacy profile and improved distribution compared to MTX alone and has the potential to enhance therapeutic efficacy via inhibition of tumor proliferation and induction of apoptosis.

  10. Cellular Biochemistry and Cytogenetics in a Rat Lung Tumor Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-10-01

    lung tumor system the specific aims are: 1. To conduct studies of the effect of 3-methylchlanthrene (MCA) on DNA synthesis and cell proliferation in...alkylation of nucleic acids of the rat by N-methyl-N- nitrosourea , dimethylnitrosamine, dimethylsulfate, and methylmethanesulfonate. Biochem. J. 110:39-47

  11. Radiotherapy planning for glioblastoma based on a tumor growth model: improving target volume delineation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unkelbach, Jan; Menze, Bjoern H.; Konukoglu, Ender; Dittmann, Florian; Le, Matthieu; Ayache, Nicholas; Shih, Helen A.

    2014-02-01

    Glioblastoma differ from many other tumors in the sense that they grow infiltratively into the brain tissue instead of forming a solid tumor mass with a defined boundary. Only the part of the tumor with high tumor cell density can be localized through imaging directly. In contrast, brain tissue infiltrated by tumor cells at low density appears normal on current imaging modalities. In current clinical practice, a uniform margin, typically two centimeters, is applied to account for microscopic spread of disease that is not directly assessable through imaging. The current treatment planning procedure can potentially be improved by accounting for the anisotropy of tumor growth, which arises from different factors: anatomical barriers such as the falx cerebri represent boundaries for migrating tumor cells. In addition, tumor cells primarily spread in white matter and infiltrate gray matter at lower rate. We investigate the use of a phenomenological tumor growth model for treatment planning. The model is based on the Fisher-Kolmogorov equation, which formalizes these growth characteristics and estimates the spatial distribution of tumor cells in normal appearing regions of the brain. The target volume for radiotherapy planning can be defined as an isoline of the simulated tumor cell density. This paper analyzes the model with respect to implications for target volume definition and identifies its most critical components. A retrospective study involving ten glioblastoma patients treated at our institution has been performed. To illustrate the main findings of the study, a detailed case study is presented for a glioblastoma located close to the falx. In this situation, the falx represents a boundary for migrating tumor cells, whereas the corpus callosum provides a route for the tumor to spread to the contralateral hemisphere. We further discuss the sensitivity of the model with respect to the input parameters. Correct segmentation of the brain appears to be the most

  12. Radiotherapy planning for glioblastoma based on a tumor growth model: improving target volume delineation.

    PubMed

    Unkelbach, Jan; Menze, Bjoern H; Konukoglu, Ender; Dittmann, Florian; Le, Matthieu; Ayache, Nicholas; Shih, Helen A

    2014-02-07

    Glioblastoma differ from many other tumors in the sense that they grow infiltratively into the brain tissue instead of forming a solid tumor mass with a defined boundary. Only the part of the tumor with high tumor cell density can be localized through imaging directly. In contrast, brain tissue infiltrated by tumor cells at low density appears normal on current imaging modalities. In current clinical practice, a uniform margin, typically two centimeters, is applied to account for microscopic spread of disease that is not directly assessable through imaging. The current treatment planning procedure can potentially be improved by accounting for the anisotropy of tumor growth, which arises from different factors: anatomical barriers such as the falx cerebri represent boundaries for migrating tumor cells. In addition, tumor cells primarily spread in white matter and infiltrate gray matter at lower rate. We investigate the use of a phenomenological tumor growth model for treatment planning. The model is based on the Fisher-Kolmogorov equation, which formalizes these growth characteristics and estimates the spatial distribution of tumor cells in normal appearing regions of the brain. The target volume for radiotherapy planning can be defined as an isoline of the simulated tumor cell density. This paper analyzes the model with respect to implications for target volume definition and identifies its most critical components. A retrospective study involving ten glioblastoma patients treated at our institution has been performed. To illustrate the main findings of the study, a detailed case study is presented for a glioblastoma located close to the falx. In this situation, the falx represents a boundary for migrating tumor cells, whereas the corpus callosum provides a route for the tumor to spread to the contralateral hemisphere. We further discuss the sensitivity of the model with respect to the input parameters. Correct segmentation of the brain appears to be the most

  13. Abdominal Wall Desmoid during Pregnancy: Diagnostic Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Awwad, Johnny; Hammoud, Nadine; Farra, Chantal; Fares, Farah; Abi Saad, George; Ghazeeri, Ghina

    2013-01-01

    Background. Desmoids are benign tumors, with local invasive features and no metastatic potential, which have rarely been described to be pregnancy associated. Case. We described the rapid growth of an anterior abdominal wall mass in a 40-year-old pregnant woman. Due to its close proximity to the enlarged uterus, it was misdiagnosed to be a uterine leiomyoma by ultrasound examination. Final tissue diagnosis and radical resection were done at the time of abdominal delivery. Conclusion. Due to the diagnostic limitations of imaging techniques, desmoids should always be considered when the following manifestations are observed in combination: progressive growth of a solitary abdominal wall mass during pregnancy and well-delineated smooth tumor margins demonstrated by imaging techniques. This case emphasizes the importance of entertaining uncommon medical conditions in the differential diagnosis of seemingly common clinical manifestations. PMID:23346436

  14. Patient-specific model-based segmentation of brain tumors in 3D intraoperative ultrasound images.

    PubMed

    Ilunga-Mbuyamba, Elisee; Avina-Cervantes, Juan Gabriel; Lindner, Dirk; Arlt, Felix; Ituna-Yudonago, Jean Fulbert; Chalopin, Claire

    2018-03-01

    Intraoperative ultrasound (iUS) imaging is commonly used to support brain tumor operation. The tumor segmentation in the iUS images is a difficult task and still under improvement because of the low signal-to-noise ratio. The success of automatic methods is also limited due to the high noise sensibility. Therefore, an alternative brain tumor segmentation method in 3D-iUS data using a tumor model obtained from magnetic resonance (MR) data for local MR-iUS registration is presented in this paper. The aim is to enhance the visualization of the brain tumor contours in iUS. A multistep approach is proposed. First, a region of interest (ROI) based on the specific patient tumor model is defined. Second, hyperechogenic structures, mainly tumor tissues, are extracted from the ROI of both modalities by using automatic thresholding techniques. Third, the registration is performed over the extracted binary sub-volumes using a similarity measure based on gradient values, and rigid and affine transformations. Finally, the tumor model is aligned with the 3D-iUS data, and its contours are represented. Experiments were successfully conducted on a dataset of 33 patients. The method was evaluated by comparing the tumor segmentation with expert manual delineations using two binary metrics: contour mean distance and Dice index. The proposed segmentation method using local and binary registration was compared with two grayscale-based approaches. The outcomes showed that our approach reached better results in terms of computational time and accuracy than the comparative methods. The proposed approach requires limited interaction and reduced computation time, making it relevant for intraoperative use. Experimental results and evaluations were performed offline. The developed tool could be useful for brain tumor resection supporting neurosurgeons to improve tumor border visualization in the iUS volumes.

  15. SU-G-JeP3-13: Use of Volumetric Indices to Study the Viability of Respiratory Gating in Conjunction with Abdominal Compression in the Management of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Tumors Using Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Under the Conditions of Controlled Breathing

    SciTech Connect

    Malhotra, H; Gomez, J

    Purpose: AAPM TG-76 report advises lung patients experiencing tumor motion >5mm to use some form of motion management with even smaller limit for complex/special procedures like SBRT. Generally, either respiratory gating or abdominal compression is used for motion management. In this retrospective study, we are using an innovative index, Volumetric Indices (VI) = (GTVnn AND GTV{sub 50+}Xmm)/(GTVnn) to quantify how much of the tumor remains within 1, 2, and 3mm margins throughout the breathing cycle using GTV{sub 50+}Xmm margin on GTV{sub 50}[nn=0,10,20,…90]. Using appropriate limits, VI can provide tumor motion information and to check if RPM gates could have beenmore » used in conjunction with abdominal compression to better manage tumor motion. Methods: 64 SBRT patients with a total of 67 lung tumors were studied. 4DCT scans were taken, fully capturing tumor motion throughout the 10 phases of the breathing cycle. For each phase, Gross Tumor Volume (GTV) was segmented and appropriates structures were defined to determine VI values. For the 2mm margin, VI values less than 0.95 for peripheral lesions and 0.97 for central lesions indicate tumor movement greater than 4mm. VI values for 1mm and 3mm margins were also analyzed signifying tumor motion of 2mm & 6mm, respectively. Results: Of the 64 patients, 35 (55%) had motion greater than 4mm & could have benefited from respiratory gating. For 5/8 (63%) middle lobe lesions, 21/27 (78%) lower lobe lesions, and 10/32 (31%) upper lobe lesions, gating could have resulted in smaller ITV. 32/55 (58%) peripheral lesions and 4/12 (33%) central lesions could have had gating. Average ITV decreased by 1.25cc (11.43%) and average VI increased by 0.11. Conclusion: Out of 64 patients, 55% exhibited motion greater than 4mm even with abdominal compression. Even with abdominalcompression, lung tumors can move >4mm as the degree of pressure which a patient can tolerate, is patient specific.« less

  16. A mathematical model for IL-6-mediated, stem cell driven tumor growth and targeted treatment

    PubMed Central

    Nör, Jacques Eduardo

    2018-01-01

    Targeting key regulators of the cancer stem cell phenotype to overcome their critical influence on tumor growth is a promising new strategy for cancer treatment. Here we present a modeling framework that operates at both the cellular and molecular levels, for investigating IL-6 mediated, cancer stem cell driven tumor growth and targeted treatment with anti-IL6 antibodies. Our immediate goal is to quantify the influence of IL-6 on cancer stem cell self-renewal and survival, and to characterize the subsequent impact on tumor growth dynamics. By including the molecular details of IL-6 binding, we are able to quantify the temporal changes in fractional occupancies of bound receptors and their influence on tumor volume. There is a strong correlation between the model output and experimental data for primary tumor xenografts. We also used the model to predict tumor response to administration of the humanized IL-6R monoclonal antibody, tocilizumab (TCZ), and we found that as little as 1mg/kg of TCZ administered weekly for 7 weeks is sufficient to result in tumor reduction and a sustained deceleration of tumor growth. PMID:29351275

  17. A switching control law approach for cancer immunotherapy of an evolutionary tumor growth model.

    PubMed

    Doban, Alina I; Lazar, Mircea

    2017-02-01

    We propose a new approach for tumor immunotherapy which is based on a switching control strategy defined on domains of attraction of equilibria of interest. For this, we consider a recently derived model which captures the effects of the tumor cells on the immune system and viceversa, through predator-prey competition terms. Additionally, it incorporates the immune system's mechanism for producing hunting immune cells, which makes the model suitable for immunotherapy strategies analysis and design. For computing domains of attraction for the tumor nonlinear dynamics, and thus, for deriving immunotherapeutic strategies we employ rational Lyapunov functions. Finally, we apply the switching control strategy to destabilize an invasive tumor equilibrium and steer the system trajectories to tumor dormancy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Oncolytic potency and reduced virus tumor-specificity in oncolytic virotherapy. A mathematical modelling approach.

    PubMed

    Mahasa, Khaphetsi Joseph; Eladdadi, Amina; de Pillis, Lisette; Ouifki, Rachid

    2017-01-01

    In the present paper, we address by means of mathematical modeling the following main question: How can oncolytic virus infection of some normal cells in the vicinity of tumor cells enhance oncolytic virotherapy? We formulate a mathematical model describing the interactions between the oncolytic virus, the tumor cells, the normal cells, and the antitumoral and antiviral immune responses. The model consists of a system of delay differential equations with one (discrete) delay. We derive the model's basic reproductive number within tumor and normal cell populations and use their ratio as a metric for virus tumor-specificity. Numerical simulations are performed for different values of the basic reproduction numbers and their ratios to investigate potential trade-offs between tumor reduction and normal cells losses. A fundamental feature unravelled by the model simulations is its great sensitivity to parameters that account for most variation in the early or late stages of oncolytic virotherapy. From a clinical point of view, our findings indicate that designing an oncolytic virus that is not 100% tumor-specific can increase virus particles, which in turn, can further infect tumor cells. Moreover, our findings indicate that when infected tissues can be regenerated, oncolytic viral infection of normal cells could improve cancer treatment.

  19. Immunocompetent syngeneic cotton rat tumor models for the assessment of replication-competent oncolytic adenovirus

    SciTech Connect

    Steel, Jason C.; Morrison, Brian J.; Mannan, Poonam

    Oncolytic adenoviruses as a treatment for cancer have demonstrated limited clinical activity. Contributing to this may be the relevance of preclinical animal models used to study these agents. Syngeneic mouse tumor models are generally non-permissive for adenoviral replication, whereas human tumor xenograft models exhibit attenuated immune responses to the vector. The cotton rat (Sigmodon hispidus) is susceptible to human adenovirus infection, permissive for viral replication and exhibits similar inflammatory pathology to humans with adenovirus replicating in the lungs, respiratory passages and cornea. We evaluated three transplantable tumorigenic cotton rat cell lines, CCRT, LCRT and VCRT as models for the studymore » of oncolytic adenoviruses. All three cells lines were readily infected with adenovirus type-5-based vectors and exhibited high levels of transgene expression. The cell lines supported viral replication demonstrated by the induction of cytopathogenic effect (CPE) in tissue culture, increase in virus particle numbers and assembly of virions seen on transmission electron microscopy. In vivo, LCRT and VCRT tumors demonstrated delayed growth after injection with replicating adenovirus. No in vivo antitumor activity was seen in CCRT tumors despite in vitro oncolysis. Adenovirus was also rapidly cleared from the CCRT tumors compared to LCRT and VCRT tumors. The effect observed with the different cotton rat tumor cell lines mimics the variable results of human clinical trials highlighting the potential relevance of this model for assessing the activity and toxicity of oncolytic adenoviruses.« less

  20. Cancer associated fibroblasts promote tumor growth and metastasis by modulating the tumor immune microenvironment in a 4T1 murine breast cancer model.

    PubMed

    Liao, Debbie; Luo, Yunping; Markowitz, Dorothy; Xiang, Rong; Reisfeld, Ralph A

    2009-11-23

    Local inflammation associated with solid tumors commonly results from factors released by tumor cells and the tumor stroma, and promotes tumor progression. Cancer associated fibroblasts comprise a majority of the cells found in tumor stroma and are appealing targets for cancer therapy. Here, our aim was to determine the efficacy of targeting cancer associated fibroblasts for the treatment of metastatic breast cancer. We demonstrate that cancer associated fibroblasts are key modulators of immune polarization in the tumor microenvironment of a 4T1 murine model of metastatic breast cancer. Elimination of cancer associated fibroblasts in vivo by a DNA vaccine targeted to fibroblast activation protein results in a shift of the immune microenvironment from a Th2 to Th1 polarization. This shift is characterized by increased protein expression of IL-2 and IL-7, suppressed recruitment of tumor-associated macrophages, myeloid derived suppressor cells, T regulatory cells, and decreased tumor angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis. Additionally, the vaccine improved anti-metastatic effects of doxorubicin chemotherapy and enhanced suppression of IL-6 and IL-4 protein expression while increasing recruitment of dendritic cells and CD8(+) T cells. Treatment with the combination therapy also reduced tumor-associated Vegf, Pdgfc, and GM-CSF mRNA and protein expression. Our findings demonstrate that cancer associated fibroblasts promote tumor growth and metastasis through their role as key modulators of immune polarization in the tumor microenvironment and are valid targets for therapy of metastatic breast cancer.

  1. Cytosolic PhospholipaseA2 Inhibition with PLA-695 Radiosensitizes Tumors in Lung Cancer Animal Models

    PubMed Central

    Ferraro, Daniel J.; Kotipatruni, Rama P.; Bhave, Sandeep R.; Jaboin, Jerry J.; Hallahan, Dennis E.

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer remains the leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States and the rest of the world. The advent of molecularly directed therapies holds promise for improvement in therapeutic efficacy. Cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2) is associated with tumor progression and radioresistance in mouse tumor models. Utilizing the cPLA2 specific inhibitor PLA-695, we determined if cPLA2 inhibition radiosensitizes non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells and tumors. Treatment with PLA-695 attenuated radiation induced increases of phospho-ERK and phospho-Akt in endothelial cells. NSCLC cells (LLC and A549) co-cultured with endothelial cells (bEND3 and HUVEC) and pre-treated with PLA-695 showed radiosensitization. PLA-695 in combination with irradiation (IR) significantly reduced migration and proliferation in endothelial cells (HUVEC & bEND3) and induced cell death and attenuated invasion by tumor cells (LLC &A549). In a heterotopic tumor model, the combination of PLA-695 and radiation delayed growth in both LLC and A549 tumors. LLC and A549 tumors treated with a combination of PLA-695 and radiation displayed reduced tumor vasculature. In a dorsal skin fold model of LLC tumors, inhibition of cPLA2 in combination with radiation led to enhanced destruction of tumor blood vessels. The anti-angiogenic effects of PLA-695 and its enhancement of the efficacy of radiotherapy in mouse models of NSCLC suggest that clinical trials for its capacity to improve radiotherapy outcomes are warranted. PMID:23894523

  2. Cytosolic phospholipaseA2 inhibition with PLA-695 radiosensitizes tumors in lung cancer animal models.

    PubMed

    Thotala, Dinesh; Craft, Jeffrey M; Ferraro, Daniel J; Kotipatruni, Rama P; Bhave, Sandeep R; Jaboin, Jerry J; Hallahan, Dennis E

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer remains the leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States and the rest of the world. The advent of molecularly directed therapies holds promise for improvement in therapeutic efficacy. Cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2) is associated with tumor progression and radioresistance in mouse tumor models. Utilizing the cPLA2 specific inhibitor PLA-695, we determined if cPLA2 inhibition radiosensitizes non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells and tumors. Treatment with PLA-695 attenuated radiation induced increases of phospho-ERK and phospho-Akt in endothelial cells. NSCLC cells (LLC and A549) co-cultured with endothelial cells (bEND3 and HUVEC) and pre-treated with PLA-695 showed radiosensitization. PLA-695 in combination with irradiation (IR) significantly reduced migration and proliferation in endothelial cells (HUVEC & bEND3) and induced cell death and attenuated invasion by tumor cells (LLC &A549). In a heterotopic tumor model, the combination of PLA-695 and radiation delayed growth in both LLC and A549 tumors. LLC and A549 tumors treated with a combination of PLA-695 and radiation displayed reduced tumor vasculature. In a dorsal skin fold model of LLC tumors, inhibition of cPLA2 in combination with radiation led to enhanced destruction of tumor blood vessels. The anti-angiogenic effects of PLA-695 and its enhancement of the efficacy of radiotherapy in mouse models of NSCLC suggest that clinical trials for its capacity to improve radiotherapy outcomes are warranted.

  3. Evaluation of Abdominal Computed Tomography Image Quality Using a New Version of Vendor-Specific Model-Based Iterative Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Corey T; Telesmanich, Morgan E; Wagner-Bartak, Nicolaus A; Liu, Xinming; Rong, John; Szklaruk, Janio; Qayyum, Aliya; Wei, Wei; Chandler, Adam G; Tamm, Eric P

    2017-01-01

    To qualitatively and quantitatively compare abdominal computed tomography (CT) images reconstructed with a new version of model-based iterative reconstruction (Veo 3.0; GE Healthcare) to those created with Veo 2.0. This retrospective study was approved by our institutional review board and was Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act compliant. The raw data from 29 consecutive patients who had undergone CT abdomen scanning was used to reconstruct 4 sets of 3.75-mm axial images: Veo 2.0, Veo 3.0 standard, Veo 3.0 5% resolution preference (RP), and Veo 3.0 20% RP. A slice thickness optimization of 3.75 mm and texture feature was selected for Veo 3.0 reconstructions.The images were reviewed by 3 independent readers in a blinded, randomized fashion using a 5-point Likert scale and 5-point comparative scale.Multiple 2-dimensional circular regions of interest were defined for noise and contrast-to-noise ratio measurements. Line profiles were drawn across the 7 lp/cm bar pattern of the CatPhan 600 phantom for spatial resolution evaluation. The Veo 3.0 standard image set was scored better than Veo 2.0 in terms of artifacts (mean difference, 0.43; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 0.25-0.6; P < 0.0001), overall image quality (mean difference, 0.87; 95% CI, 0.62-1.13; P < 0.0001) and qualitative resolution (mean difference, 0.9; 95% CI, 0.69-1.1; P < 0.0001). Although the Veo 3.0 standard and RP05 presets were preferred across most categories, the Veo 3.0 RP20 series ranked best for bone detail. Image noise and spatial resolution increased along a spectrum with Veo 2.0 the lowest and RP20 the highest. Veo 3.0 enhances imaging evaluation relative to Veo 2.0; readers preferred Veo 3.0 image appearance despite the associated mild increases in image noise. These results provide suggested parameters to be used clinically and as a basis for future evaluations, such as focal lesion detection, in the oncology setting.

  4. Evaluation of Abdominal CT Image Quality Using a New Version of Vendor-Specific Model-Based Iterative Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Corey T.; Telesmanich, Morgan E.; Wagner-Bartak, Nicolaus A.; Liu, Xinming; Rong, John; Szklaruk, Janio; Qayyum, Aliya; Wei, Wei; Chandler, Adam G.; Tamm, Eric P.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To qualitatively and quantitatively compare abdominal CT images reconstructed with a new version of model-based iterative reconstruction (Veo 3.0; GE Healthcare) to those created with Veo 2.0. Materials & Methods This retrospective study was approved by our IRB and was HIPPA compliant. The raw data from 29 consecutive patients who had undergone CT abdomen scanning was used to reconstruct 4 sets of 3.75mm axial images: Veo 2.0, Veo 3.0 standard, Veo 3.0 5% resolution preference and Veo 3.0 20% resolution preference. A slice thickness optimization of 3.75 mm and texture feature was selected for Veo 3.0 reconstructions. The images were reviewed by three independent readers in a blinded, randomized fashion using a 5-point Likert scale and 5-point comparative scale. Multiple 2D circular regions of interest were defined for noise and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) measurements. Line profiles were drawn across the 7 lp/cm bar pattern of the CatPhan 600 phantom for spatial resolution evaluation. Results The Veo 3.0 standard image set was scored better than Veo 2.0 in terms of artifacts (mean difference 0.43, 95% CI 0.25-0.6, P<0.0001), overall image quality (mean difference 0.87, 95% CI 0.62-1.13, P<0.0001) and qualitative resolution (mean difference 0.9, 95% CI 0.69-1.1, P<0.0001). While the Veo 3.0 standard and RP05 presets were preferred across most categories, the Veo 3.0 RP20 series ranked best for bone detail. Image noise and spatial resolution increased along a spectrum with Veo 2.0 the lowest and RP20 the highest. Conclusion Veo 3.0 enhances imaging evaluation relative to Veo 2.0; readers preferred Veo 3.0 image appearance despite the associated mild increases in image noise. These results provide suggested parameters to be used clinically and as a basis for future evaluations such as focal lesion detection in the oncology setting. PMID:27529683

  5. A Rigorous Sharp Interface Limit of a Diffuse Interface Model Related to Tumor Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocca, Elisabetta; Scala, Riccardo

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, we study the rigorous sharp interface limit of a diffuse interface model related to the dynamics of tumor growth, when a parameter ɛ, representing the interface thickness between the tumorous and non-tumorous cells, tends to zero. More in particular, we analyze here a gradient-flow-type model arising from a modification of the recently introduced model for tumor growth dynamics in Hawkins-Daruud et al. (Int J Numer Math Biomed Eng 28:3-24, 2011) (cf. also Hilhorst et al. Math Models Methods Appl Sci 25:1011-1043, 2015). Exploiting the techniques related to both gradient flows and gamma convergence, we recover a condition on the interface Γ relating the chemical and double-well potentials, the mean curvature, and the normal velocity.

  6. Cystatin C deficiency suppresses tumor growth in a breast cancer model through decreased proliferation of tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Završnik, Janja; Butinar, Miha; Prebanda, Mojca Trstenjak; Krajnc, Aleksander; Vidmar, Robert; Fonović, Marko; Grubb, Anders; Turk, Vito; Turk, Boris; Vasiljeva, Olga

    2017-09-26

    Cysteine cathepsins are proteases that, in addition to their important physiological functions, have been associated with multiple pathologies, including cancer. Cystatin C (CstC) is a major endogenous inhibitor that regulates the extracellular activity of cysteine cathepsins. We investigated the role of cystatin C in mammary cancer using CstC knockout mice and a mouse model of breast cancer induced by expression of the polyoma middle T oncoprotein (PyMT) in the mammary epithelium. We showed that the ablation of CstC reduced the rate of mammary tumor growth. Notably, a decrease in the proliferation of CstC knockout PyMT tumor cells was demonstrated ex vivo and in vitro , indicating a role for this protease inhibitor in signaling pathways that control cell proliferation. An increase in phosphorylated p-38 was observed in CstC knockout tumors, suggesting a novel function for cystatin C in cancer development, independent of the TGF-β pathway. Moreover, proteomic analysis of the CstC wild-type and knockout PyMT primary cell secretomes revealed a decrease in the levels of 14-3-3 proteins in the secretome of knock-out cells, suggesting a novel link between cysteine cathepsins, cystatin C and 14-3-3 proteins in tumorigenesis, calling for further investigations.

  7. Distributed delays in a hybrid model of tumor-immune system interplay.

    PubMed

    Caravagna, Giulio; Graudenzi, Alex; d'Onofrio, Alberto

    2013-02-01

    A tumor is kinetically characterized by the presence of multiple spatio-temporal scales in which its cells interplay with, for instance, endothelial cells or Immune system effectors, exchanging various chemical signals. By its nature, tumor growth is an ideal object of hybrid modeling where discrete stochastic processes model low-numbers entities, and mean-field equations model abundant chemical signals. Thus, we follow this approach to model tumor cells, effector cells and Interleukin-2, in order to capture the Immune surveillance effect. We here present a hybrid model with a generic delay kernel accounting that, due to many complex phenomena such as chemical transportation and cellular differentiation, the tumor-induced recruitment of effectors exhibits a lag period. This model is a Stochastic Hybrid Automata and its semantics is a Piecewise Deterministic Markov process where a two-dimensional stochastic process is interlinked to a multi-dimensional mean-field system. We instantiate the model with two well-known weak and strong delay kernels and perform simulations by using an algorithm to generate trajectories of this process. Via simulations and parametric sensitivity analysis techniques we (i) relate tumor mass growth with the two kernels, we (ii) measure the strength of the Immune surveillance in terms of probability distribution of the eradication times, and (iii) we prove, in the oscillatory regime, the existence of a stochastic bifurcation resulting in delay-induced tumor eradication.

  8. Dosimetry study of PHOTOFRIN-mediated photodynamic therapy in a mouse tumor model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Haixia; Kim, Michele M.; Penjweini, Rozhin; Zhu, Timothy C.

    2016-03-01

    It is well known in photodynamic therapy (PDT) that there is a large variability between PDT light dose and therapeutic outcomes. An explicit dosimetry model using apparent reacted 1O2 concentration [1O2]rx has been developed as a PDT dosimetric quantity to improve the accuracy of the predicted ability of therapeutic efficacy. In this study, this explicit macroscopic singlet oxygen model was adopted to establish the correlation between calculated reacted [1O2]rx and the tumor growth using Photofrin-mediated PDT in a mouse tumor model. Mice with radiation-induced fibrosarcoma (RIF) tumors were injected with Photofrin at a dose of 5 mg/kg. PDT was performed 24h later with different fluence rates (50, 75 and 150 mW/cm2) and different fluences (50 and 135 J/cm2) using a collimated light applicator coupled to a 630nm laser. The tumor volume was monitored daily after PDT and correlated with the total light fluence and [1O2]rx. Photophysical parameters as well as the singlet oxygen threshold dose for this sensitizer and the RIF tumor model were determined previously. The result showed that tumor growth rate varied greatly with light fluence for different fluence rates while [1O2]rx had a good correlation with the PDT-induced tumor growth rate. This preliminary study indicated that [1O2]rx could serve as a better dosimetric predictor for predicting PDT outcome than PDT light dose.

  9. Protective Effect of Perindopril on Tumor Progression and Angiogenesis in Animal Model of Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Patel, Snehal S; Nakka, Surender

    2017-01-01

    Studies have shown that the renin angiotensin system via angiogenesis is involved in tumor development. Therefore, objective of the present study was to examine the effect of perindopril on tumor growth and angiogenesis in animal models of breast cancer. In the present study, the effect of perindopril on tumor development of mammary gland cancer induced by 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene, mouse tumor xenograft and corneal micropocket model has been investigated. Anti-angiogenic effect by chick yolk sac membrane assay has also been studied. In the present study, it has been found that perindopril produced a significant inhibition of tumor growth, in DMBA induced breast cancer. Treatment also produced significant suppression of cancer biomarkers such as lactate dehydrogenase, gamma glutamyl transferase and inflammatory markers such as C-reactive protein, erythrocyte sedimentation rate. Histopathological analysis also showed that perindopril was able to inhibit tumor development by the inhibition of hyperplastic lesions. Perindopril produced significant inhibition of tumor growth, in a mouse xenograft model and caused inhibition of neovascularization in the corneal micropocket model. In chick yolk sac membrane assay, perindopril showed inhibition of vascular growth and reduced blood vessel formation. Therefore, perindopril is widely used in clinical practice, may represent a neo-adjuvant therapy for treatment of breast cancer. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  10. In-vivo NMR studies of deuterium-labeled photosensitizers in mice tumor model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramaprasad, Subbaraya; Liu, Y. H.; Pandey, R. K.; Shiau, Fuu-Yau; Smith, Kevin M.

    1993-06-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) has emerged as a promising modality for the treatment of cancer. We are using newly synthesized and chemically defined and characterized porphyrin photosensitizers that are specifically labeled with deuterium to perform in vivo NMR studies in a murine tumor model. In vivo magnetic resonance offers the potential for repetitive, safe, noninvasive evaluation of photosensitizers, tumor metabolism, and the effect of PDT on the tumor metabolism. In an effort to monitor noninvasively the photosensitizers in an in vivo tumor model, we are synthesizing several deuterium labeled photosensitizers which absorb red light at or above 630 nm. Development of methods to test these photosensitizers directly in humans is not feasible at this time, since these photosensitizers are new and we do not yet understand the side effects. In addition, we do not understand the potential benefits compared with Photofrin II, the widely used photosensitizer. To perform our in vivo deuterium NMR studies on mouse foot tumors, we have constructed a solenoid coil which operates at 30.7 MHz for the deuterium nucleus. We have been able to detect the deuterium labeled photosensitizer in the tumor after a direct intra-tumor injection. The use of 31P NMR to predict the possible outcome of PDT in these tumors is also discussed.

  11. Tumor Secreted Autocrine Motility Factor (AMF): Causal Role in an Animal Model of Cachexia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-08-01

    AD Award Number: DAMD17-02-1-0586 TITLE: Tumor Secreted Autocrine Motility Factor ( AMF ): Causal Role in an Animal Model of Cachexia PRINCIPAL...5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Tumor Secreted Autocrine Motility Factor ( AMF ): Causal Role in an Animal Model of Cachexia 5b. GRANT NUMBER DAM D1 7-02-1-0586 5c...quality of life and postpone mortality. We proposed that autocrine motility factor ( AMF ) is released into the bloodstream from cancer sites and

  12. An outcome prediction model for exsanguinating patients with blunt abdominal trauma after damage control laparotomy: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shang-Yu; Liao, Chien-Hung; Fu, Chih-Yuan; Kang, Shih-Ching; Ouyang, Chun-Hsiang; Kuo, I-Ming; Lin, Jr-Rung; Hsu, Yu-Pao; Yeh, Chun-Nan; Chen, Shao-Wei

    2014-04-28

    We present a series of patients with blunt abdominal trauma who underwent damage control laparotomy (DCL) and introduce a nomogram that we created to predict survival among these patients. This was a retrospective study. From January 2002 to June 2012, 91 patients underwent DCL for hemorrhagic shock. We excluded patients with the following characteristics: a penetrating abdominal injury, age younger than 18 or older than 65 years, a severe or life-threatening brain injury (Abbreviated Injury Scale [AIS] ≥ 4), emergency department (ED) arrival more than 6 hours after injury, pregnancy, end-stage renal disease, or cirrhosis. In addition, we excluded patients who underwent DCL after ICU admission or later in the course of hospitalization. The overall mortality rate was 61.5%: 35 patients survived and 56 died. We identified independent survival predictors, which included a preoperative Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score < 8 and a base excess (BE) value < -13.9 mEq/L. We created a nomogram for outcome prediction that included four variables: preoperative GCS, initial BE, preoperative diastolic pressure, and preoperative cardiopulmonary cerebral resuscitation (CPCR). DCL is a life-saving procedure performed in critical patients, and devastating clinical outcomes can be expected under such dire circumstances as blunt abdominal trauma with exsanguination. The nomogram presented here may provide ED physicians and trauma surgeons with a tool for early stratification and risk evaluation in critical, exsanguinating patients.

  13. [Study of the immunological mechanism of anti-tumor effects of 5-FU by establishing EL4 tumor-bearing mouse models].

    PubMed

    Li, Mo-Lin; Li, Chuan-Gang; Shu, Xiao-Hong; Li, Ming-Xia; Jia, Yu-Jie; Qin, Zhi-Hai

    2007-11-01

    To investigate the immunological mechanism of anti-tumor effect of 5-FU by establishing lymphoma EL4 tumor-bearing mouse models in wild type C57BL/6 mice and nude C57BL/6 mice, respectively. The mouse lymphoma EL4 cells were inoculated subcutaneously into wild type C57BL/6 mice (immune-competent mice). Twelve days later, 5-FU of different doses was administered intraperitoneally to treat these wild type C57BL/6 tumor-bearing mice. The size of tumors in the wild type C57BL/6 mice was observed and recorded to explore the minimal dose of 5-FU that could cure the tumor-bearing mice. Then the same amount of EL4 tumor cells was inoculated subcutaneously into wild type C57BL/6 mice and nude C57BL/6 mice (T cell-deficient mice) simultaneously, which had the same genetic background of C57BL/6. Twelve days later, 5-FU of the minimal dose was given intraperitoneally to treat both the wild type and nude C57BL/6 tumor-bearing mice. The size of tumors in the two different types of mice was observed and recorded. A single dose of 5-FU (75 mg/kg) cured both the EL4 tumor-bearing wild type C57BL/6 mice and the EL4 tumor-bearing nude C57BL/6 mice in the first week. Two weeks after 5-FU treatment, all of the nude mice died of tumor relapse while most of the wild type C57BL/6 mice were fully recovered. A single dose of 5-FU has marked anti-tumor effects on lymphoma EL4 tumor-bearing C57BL/6 mice with or without T lymphocytes. The relapse of tumors after 5-FU treatment might be related to the function of T lymphocytes.

  14. Inflammatory models drastically alter tumor growth and the immune microenvironment in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Markowitz, Geoffrey J; Michelotti, Gregory A; Diehl, Anna Mae; Wang, Xiao-Fan

    2015-04-01

    Initiation and progression of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is intimately associated with a chronically diseased liver tissue. This diseased liver tissue background is a drastically different microenvironment from the healthy liver, especially with regard to immune cell prevalence and presence of mediators of immune function. To better understand the consequences of liver disease on tumor growth and the interplay with its microenvironment, we utilized two standard methods of fibrosis induction and orthotopic implantation of tumors into the inflamed and fibrotic liver to mimic the liver condition in human HCC patients. Compared to non-diseased controls, tumor growth was significantly enhanced under fibrotic conditions. The immune cells that infiltrated the tumors were also drastically different, with decreased numbers of natural killer cells but greatly increased numbers of immune-suppressive CD11b + Gr1 hi myeloid cells in both models of fibrosis. In addition, there were model-specific differences: Increased numbers of CD11b + myeloid cells and CD4 + CD25 + T cells were found in tumors in the bile duct ligation model but not in the carbon tetrachloride model. Induction of fibrosis altered the cytokine production of implanted tumor cells, which could have farreaching consequences on the immune infiltrate and its functionality. Taken together, this work demonstrates that the combination of fibrosis induction with orthotopic tumor implantation results in a markedly different tumor microenvironment and tumor growth kinetics, emphasizing the necessity for more accurate modeling of HCC progression in mice, which takes into account the drastic changes in the tissue caused by chronic liver disease.

  15. Modeling Brain Dynamics in Brain Tumor Patients Using the Virtual Brain.

    PubMed

    Aerts, Hannelore; Schirner, Michael; Jeurissen, Ben; Van Roost, Dirk; Achten, Eric; Ritter, Petra; Marinazzo, Daniele

    2018-01-01

    Presurgical planning for brain tumor resection aims at delineating eloquent tissue in the vicinity of the lesion to spare during surgery. To this end, noninvasive neuroimaging techniques such as functional MRI and diffusion-weighted imaging fiber tracking are currently employed. However, taking into account this information is often still insufficient, as the complex nonlinear dynamics of the brain impede straightforward prediction of functional outcome after surgical intervention. Large-scale brain network modeling carries the potential to bridge this gap by integrating neuroimaging data with biophysically based models to predict collective brain dynamics. As a first step in this direction, an appropriate computational model has to be selected, after which suitable model parameter values have to be determined. To this end, we simulated large-scale brain dynamics in 25 human brain tumor patients and 11 human control participants using The Virtual Brain, an open-source neuroinformatics platform. Local and global model parameters of the Reduced Wong-Wang model were individually optimized and compared between brain tumor patients and control subjects. In addition, the relationship between model parameters and structural network topology and cognitive performance was assessed. Results showed (1) significantly improved prediction accuracy of individual functional connectivity when using individually optimized model parameters; (2) local model parameters that can differentiate between regions directly affected by a tumor, regions distant from a tumor, and regions in a healthy brain; and (3) interesting associations between individually optimized model parameters and structural network topology and cognitive performance.

  16. Translational models of tumor angiogenesis: A nexus of in silico and in vitro models.

    PubMed

    Soleimani, Shirin; Shamsi, Milad; Ghazani, Mehran Akbarpour; Modarres, Hassan Pezeshgi; Valente, Karolina Papera; Saghafian, Mohsen; Ashani, Mehdi Mohammadi; Akbari, Mohsen; Sanati-Nezhad, Amir

    2018-03-05

    Emerging evidence shows that endothelial cells are not only the building blocks of vascular networks that enable oxygen and nutrient delivery throughout a tissue but also serve as a rich resource of angiocrine factors. Endothelial cells play key roles in determining cancer progression and response to anti-cancer drugs. Furthermore, the endothelium-specific deposition of extracellular matrix is a key modulator of the availability of angiocrine factors to both stromal and cancer cells. Considering tumor vascular network as a decisive factor in cancer pathogenesis and treatment response, these networks need to be an inseparable component of cancer models. Both computational and in vitro experimental models have been extensively developed to model tumor-endothelium interactions. While informative, they have been developed in different communities and do not yet represent a comprehensive platform. In this review, we overview the necessity of incorporating vascular networks for both in vitro and in silico cancer models and discuss recent progresses and challenges of in vitro experimental microfluidic cancer vasculature-on-chip systems and their in silico counterparts. We further highlight how these two approaches can merge together with the aim of presenting a predictive combinatorial platform for studying cancer pathogenesis and testing the efficacy of single or multi-drug therapeutics for cancer treatment. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Oncogenetic tree model of somatic mutations and DNA methylation in colon tumors.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, Carol; Boucher, Kenneth M; Samowitz, Wade S; Wolff, Roger K; Albertsen, Hans; Curtin, Karen; Caan, Bette J; Slattery, Martha L

    2009-01-01

    Our understanding of somatic alterations in colon cancer has evolved from a concept of a series of events taking place in a single sequence to a recognition of multiple pathways. An oncogenetic tree is a model intended to describe the pathways and sequence of somatic alterations in carcinogenesis without assuming that tumors will fall in mutually exclusive categories. We applied this model to data on colon tumor somatic alterations. An oncogenetic tree model was built using data on mutations of TP53, KRAS2, APC, and BRAF genes, methylation at CpG sites of MLH1 and TP16 genes, methylation in tumor (MINT) markers, and microsatellite instability (MSI) for 971 colon tumors from a population-based series. Oncogenetic tree analysis resulted in a reproducible tree with three branches. The model represents methylation of MINT markers as initiating a branch and predisposing to MSI, methylation of MHL1 and TP16, and BRAF mutation. APC mutation is the first alteration in an independent branch and is followed by TP53 mutation. KRAS2 mutation was placed a third independent branch, implying that it neither depends on, nor predisposes to, the other alterations. Individual tumors were observed to have alteration patterns representing every combination of one, two, or all three branches. The oncogenetic tree model assumptions are appropriate for the observed heterogeneity of colon tumors, and the model produces a useful visual schematic of the sequence of events in pathways of colon carcinogenesis.

  18. Lung tumor motion prediction during lung brachytherapy using finite element model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirzadi, Zahra; Sadeghi Naini, Ali; Samani, Abbas

    2012-02-01

    A biomechanical model is proposed to predict deflated lung tumor motion caused by diaphragm respiratory motion. This model can be very useful for targeting the tumor in tumor ablative procedures such as lung brachytherapy. To minimize motion within the target lung, these procedures are performed while the lung is deflated. However, significant amount of tissue deformation still occurs during respiration due to the diaphragm contact forces. In the absence of effective realtime image guidance, biomechanical models can be used to estimate tumor motion as a function of diaphragm's position. To develop this model, Finite Element Method (FEM) was employed. To demonstrate the concept, we conducted an animal study of an ex-vivo porcine deflated lung with a tumor phantom. The lung was deformed by compressing a diaphragm mimicking cylinder against it. Before compression, 3D-CT image of this lung was acquired, which was segmented and turned into FE mesh. The lung tissue was modeled as hyperelastic material with a contact loading to calculate the lung deformation and tumor motion during respiration. To validate the results from FE model, the motion of a small area on the surface close to the tumor was tracked while the lung was being loaded by the cylinder. Good agreement was demonstrated between the experiment results and simulation results. Furthermore, the impact of tissue hyperelastic parameters uncertainties in the FE model was investigated. For this purpose, we performed in-silico simulations with different hyperelastic parameters. This study demonstrated that the FEM was accurate and robust for tumor motion prediction.

  19. Sponge-supported cultures of primary head and neck tumors for an optimized preclinical model.

    PubMed

    Dohmen, Amy J C; Sanders, Joyce; Canisius, Sander; Jordanova, Ekaterina S; Aalbersberg, Else A; van den Brekel, Michiel W M; Neefjes, Jacques; Zuur, Charlotte L

    2018-05-18

    Treatment of advanced head and neck cancer is associated with low survival, high toxicity and a widely divergent individual response. The sponge-gel-supported histoculture model was previously developed to serve as a preclinical model for predicting individual treatment responses. We aimed to optimize the sponge-gel-supported histoculture model and provide more insight in cell specific behaviour by evaluating the tumor and its microenvironment using immunohistochemistry. We collected fresh tumor biopsies from 72 untreated patients and cultured them for 7 days. Biopsies from 57 patients (79%) were successfully cultured and 1451 tumor fragments (95.4%) were evaluated. Fragments were scored for percentage of tumor, tumor viability and proliferation, EGF-receptor expression and presence of T-cells and macrophages. Median tumor percentage increased from 53% at day 0 to 80% at day 7. Viability and proliferation decreased after 7 days, from 90% to 30% and from 30% to 10%, respectively. Addition of EGF, folic acid and hydrocortisone can lead to improved viability and proliferation, however this was not systematically observed. No patient subgroup could be identified with higher culture success rates. Immune cells were still present at day 7, illustrating that the tumor microenvironment is sustained. EGF supplementation did not increase viability and proliferation in patients overexpressing EGF-Receptor.

  20. A novel pre-clinical in vivo mouse model for malignant brain tumor growth and invasion.

    PubMed

    Shelton, Laura M; Mukherjee, Purna; Huysentruyt, Leanne C; Urits, Ivan; Rosenberg, Joshua A; Seyfried, Thomas N

    2010-09-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a rapidly progressive disease of morbidity and mortality and is the most common form of primary brain cancer in adults. Lack of appropriate in vivo models has been a major roadblock to developing effective therapies for GBM. A new highly invasive in vivo GBM model is described that was derived from a spontaneous brain tumor (VM-M3) in the VM mouse strain. Highly invasive tumor cells could be identified histologically on the hemisphere contralateral to the hemisphere implanted with tumor cells or tissue. Tumor cells were highly expressive for the chemokine receptor CXCR4 and the proliferation marker Ki-67 and could be identified invading through the pia mater, the vascular system, the ventricular system, around neurons, and over white matter tracts including the corpus callosum. In addition, the brain tumor cells were labeled with the firefly luciferase gene, allowing for non-invasive detection and quantitation through bioluminescent imaging. The VM-M3 tumor has a short incubation time with mortality occurring in 100% of the animals within approximately 15 days. The VM-M3 brain tumor model therefore can be used in a pre-clinical setting for the rapid evaluation of novel anti-invasive therapies.

  1. Magnetoacoustic Tomography with Magnetic Induction (MAT-MI) for Breast Tumor Imaging: Numerical Modeling and Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Lian; Li, Xu; Zhu, Shanan; He, Bin

    2011-01-01

    Magnetoacoustic tomography with magnetic induction (MAT-MI) was recently introduced as a noninvasive electrical conductivity imaging approach with high spatial resolution close to ultrasound imaging. In the present study, we test the feasibility of the MAT-MI method for breast tumor imaging using numerical modeling and computer simulation. Using the finite element method, we have built three dimensional numerical breast models with varieties of embedded tumors for this simulation study. In order to obtain an accurate and stable forward solution that does not have numerical errors caused by singular MAT-MI acoustic sources at conductivity boundaries, we first derive an integral forward method for calculating MAT-MI acoustic sources over the entire imaging volume. An inverse algorithm for reconstructing the MAT-MI acoustic source is also derived with spherical measurement aperture, which simulates a practical setup for breast imaging. With the numerical breast models, we have conducted computer simulations under different imaging parameter setups and all the results suggest that breast tumors that have large conductivity contrast to its surrounding tissues as reported in literature may be readily detected in the reconstructed MAT-MI images. In addition, our simulations also suggest that the sensitivity of imaging breast tumors using the presented MAT-MI setup depends more on the tumor location and the conductivity contrast between the tumor and its surrounding tissues than on the tumor size. PMID:21364262

  2. Establishment and quantitative imaging of a 3D lung organotypic model of mammary tumor outgrowth.

    PubMed

    Martin, Michelle D; Fingleton, Barbara; Lynch, Conor C; Wells, Sam; McIntyre, J Oliver; Piston, David W; Matrisian, Lynn M

    2008-01-01

    The lung is the second most common site of metastatic spread in breast cancer and experimental evidence has been provided in many systems for the importance of an organ-specific microenvironment in the development of metastasis. To better understand the interaction between tumor and host cells in this important secondary site, we have developed a 3D in vitro organotypic model of breast tumor metastatic growth in the lung. In our model, cells isolated from mouse lungs are placed in a collagen sponge to serve as a scaffold and co-cultured with a green fluorescent protein-labeled polyoma virus middle T antigen (PyVT) mammary tumor cell line. Analysis of the co-culture system was performed using flow cytometry to determine the relative constitution of the co-cultures over time. This analysis determined that the cultures consisted of viable lung and breast cancer cells over a 5-day period. Confocal microscopy was then used to perform live cell imaging of the co-cultures over time. Our studies determined that host lung cells influence the ability of tumor cells to grow, as the presence of lung parenchyma positively affected the proliferation of the mammary tumor cells in culture. In summary, we have developed a novel in vitro model of breast tumor cells in a common metastatic site that can be used to study tumor/host interactions in an important microenvironment.

  3. New mouse tumor model system (RIF-1) for comparison of end-point studies

    SciTech Connect

    Twentyman, P.R.; Brown, J.M.; Gray, J.W.

    1980-03-01

    A new tumor model system (RIF-1) was developed that is very suitable for studies in which clonogenic survival is compared with growth delay and control probability following various forms of treatment. The tumor was a radiation-induced sarcoma in the inbred female C3H/Km mouse. It had a low median tumor dose, had a satisfactory plating efficiency direct from in vivo to in vitro, was nonimmunogenic or minimally immunogenic, and metastasized only at a relatively advanced stage of growth. The cell line grew either as a monolayer on plastic dishes, as tumor spheroids in spinner culture, as lung nodules following injection ofmore » a single-cell suspension into the tall veins of syngeneic mice, or as a solid tumor. Both diploid and tetraploid clonogenic cells were found in monolayer cultures of the RIF-1 line.« less

  4. [RSF model optimization and its application to brain tumor segmentation in MRI].

    PubMed

    Cheng, Zhaoning; Song, Zhijian

    2013-04-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is usually obscure and non-uniform in gray, and the tumors inside are poorly circumscribed, hence the automatic tumor segmentation in MRI is very difficult. Region-scalable fitting (RSF) energy model is a new segmentation approach for some uneven grayscale images. However, the level set formulation (LSF) of RSF model is not suitable for the environment with different grey level distribution inside and outside the intial contour, and the complex intensity environment of MRI always makes it hard to get ideal segmentation results. Therefore, we improved the model by a new LSF and combined it with the mean shift method, which can be helpful for tumor segmentation and has better convergence and target direction. The proposed method has been utilized in a series of studies for real MRI images, and the results showed that it could realize fast, accurate and robust segmentations for brain tumors in MRI, which has great clinical significance.

  5. The Importance of Neighborhood Scheme Selection in Agent-based Tumor Growth Modeling.

    PubMed

    Tzedakis, Georgios; Tzamali, Eleftheria; Marias, Kostas; Sakkalis, Vangelis

    2015-01-01

    Modeling tumor growth has proven a very challenging problem, mainly due to the fact that tumors are highly complex systems that involve dynamic interactions spanning multiple scales both in time and space. The desire to describe interactions in various scales has given rise to modeling approaches that use both continuous and discrete variables, known as hybrid approaches. This work refers to a hybrid model on a 2D square lattice focusing on cell movement dynamics as they play an important role in tumor morphology, invasion and metastasis and are considered as indicators for the stage of malignancy used for early prognosis and effective treatment. Considering various distributions of the microenvironment, we explore how Neumann vs. Moore neighborhood schemes affects tumor growth and morphology. The results indicate that the importance of neighborhood selection is critical under specific conditions that include i) increased hapto/chemo-tactic coefficient, ii) a rugged microenvironment and iii) ECM degradation.

  6. Cancer immunotherapeutic effects of novel CpG ODN in murine tumor model.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hyeon Cheol; Kim, Bo Hwan; Kim, Kyunghoon; Park, Ju Youn; Chang, Jae-Ho; Kim, Soo-Ki

    2008-10-01

    While CpG oligodeoxynucleotides (ODN) are excellent candidates for cancer immunotherapeutics, the numbers of usable CpG ODNs are limited in current clinical settings. To resolve this, we investigated whether novel CpG ODN (KSK-CpG) would be an effective immunotherapeutic in a murine tumor model by affecting in vivo and in vitro parameters, such as survival span, the number of tumor nodules, natural killer (NK) cell and cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) activity and interleukin (IL)-6 or IL-12 cytokine release in splenocytes. We found that KSK-CpG was effective in the murine cancer model by way of prolonging survival span, reducing the number of tumor nodules, augmenting NK cell and CTL cytotoxicity, as well as evoking IL-6 and IL-12 cytokine release in splenocytes. Collectively, these data demonstrate that KSK-CpG is active against the highly malignant B16BL6 and EL4 tumor mouse model via innate immune augmentation.

  7. A novel content-based active contour model for brain tumor segmentation.

    PubMed

    Sachdeva, Jainy; Kumar, Vinod; Gupta, Indra; Khandelwal, Niranjan; Ahuja, Chirag Kamal

    2012-06-01

    Brain tumor segmentation is a crucial step in surgical and treatment planning. Intensity-based active contour models such as gradient vector flow (GVF), magneto static active contour (MAC) and fluid vector flow (FVF) have been proposed to segment homogeneous objects/tumors in medical images. In this study, extensive experiments are done to analyze the performance of intensity-based techniques for homogeneous tumors on brain magnetic resonance (MR) images. The analysis shows that the state-of-art methods fail to segment homogeneous tumors against similar background or when these tumors show partial diversity toward the background. They also have preconvergence problem in case of false edges/saddle points. However, the presence of weak edges and diffused edges (due to edema around the tumor) leads to oversegmentation by intensity-based techniques. Therefore, the proposed method content-based active contour (CBAC) uses both intensity and texture information present within the active contour to overcome above-stated problems capturing large range in an image. It also proposes a novel use of Gray-Level Co-occurrence Matrix to define texture space for tumor segmentation. The effectiveness of this method is tested on two different real data sets (55 patients - more than 600 images) containing five different types of homogeneous, heterogeneous, diffused tumors and synthetic images (non-MR benchmark images). Remarkable results are obtained in segmenting homogeneous tumors of uniform intensity, complex content heterogeneous, diffused tumors on MR images (T1-weighted, postcontrast T1-weighted and T2-weighted) and synthetic images (non-MR benchmark images of varying intensity, texture, noise content and false edges). Further, tumor volume is efficiently extracted from 2-dimensional slices and is named as 2.5-dimensional segmentation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Bioavailability and efficacy of a gap junction enhancer (PQ7) in a mouse mammary tumor model.

    PubMed

    Shishido, Stephanie N; Prasain, Keshar; Beck, Amanda; Nguyen, Thi D T; Hua, Duy H; Nguyen, Thu Annelise

    2013-01-01

    The loss of gap junctional intercellular communication is characteristic of neoplastic cells, suggesting that the restoration with a gap junction enhancer may be a new therapeutic treatment option with less detrimental effects than traditional antineoplastic drugs. A gap junction enhancer, 6-methoxy-8-[(2-furanylmethyl) amino]-4-methyl-5-(3-trifluoromethylphenyloxy) quinoline (PQ7), on the normal tissue was evaluated in healthy C57BL/6J mice in a systemic drug distribution study. Immunoblot analysis of the vital organs indicates a reduction in Cx43 expression in PQ7-treated animals with no observable change in morphology. Next the transgenic strain FVB/N-Tg(MMTV-PyVT) 634Mul/J (also known as PyVT) was used as a spontaneous mammary tumor mouse model to determine the biological and histological effects of PQ7 on tumorigenesis and metastasis at three stages of development: Pre tumor, Early tumor, and Late tumor formation. PQ7 was assessed to have a low toxicity through intraperitoneal administration, with the majority of the compound being detected in the heart, liver, and lungs six hours post injection. The treatment of tumor bearing animals with PQ7 had a 98% reduction in tumor growth, while also decreasing the total tumor burden compared to control mice during the Pre stage of development. PQ7 treatment increased Cx43 expression in the neoplastic tissue during Pre-tumor formation; however, this effect was not observed in Late stage tumor formation. This study shows that the gap junction enhancer, PQ7, has low toxicity to normal tissue in healthy C57BL/6J mice, while having clinical efficacy in the treatment of spontaneous mammary tumors of PyVT mice. Additionally, gap junctional intercellular communication and neoplastic cellular growth are shown to be inversely related, while treatment with PQ7 inhibits tumor growth through targeting gap junction expression.

  9. Preconditioning methods influence tumor property in an orthotopic bladder urothelial carcinoma rat model

    PubMed Central

    MIYAZAKI, KOZO; MORIMOTO, YUJI; NISHIYAMA, NOBUHIRO; SATOH, HIROYUKI; TANAKA, MASAMITSU; SHINOMIYA, NARIYOSHI; ITO, KEIICHI

    2014-01-01

    Urothelial carcinoma (UC) is an extremely common type of cancer that occurs in the bladder. It has a particularly high rate of recurrence. Therefore, preclinical studies using animal models are essential to determine effective forms of treatment. In the present study, in order to establish an orthotopic bladder UC animal model with clinical relevance, the effects of preconditioning methods on properties of the developed tumor were evaluated. The bladder cavity was pretreated with phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), acid-base, trypsin (TRY) or poly (L-lysine) (PLL) and then rat UC cells (AY-27) (4×106 cells) were inoculated. The results demonstrated that, two weeks later, the tumorigenic rate (88%) and tumor count (2.3 per rat) were not significantly different among the preconditioning methods, whereas tumor volume and invasion depth into bladder tissue were significantly different. Average tumor volumes were >50 mm3 in the PBS and acid-base-treated groups and <10 mm3 in the TRY- and PLL-treated groups. The percentage of invasive tumors (T2 or more advanced stage) was ∼75% of total tumors in the PBS- and acid-base-treated groups, whereas the percentages were reduced in the TRY- and PLL-treated groups (58 and 32%, respectively). Non-invasive tumors (Ta or T1) accounted for 54% of tumors in the PLL-treated group, which was 2-5-fold higher than the percentages in the remaining groups. Properties of the developed tumor in the rat orthotopic UC model were different depending on preconditioning methods. Therefore, different animal models suitable for a discrete preclinical examination may be established by using the appropriate preconditioning condition. PMID:24649309

  10. Capturing tumor complexity in vitro: Comparative analysis of 2D and 3D tumor models for drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Stock, Kristin; Estrada, Marta F; Vidic, Suzana; Gjerde, Kjersti; Rudisch, Albin; Santo, Vítor E; Barbier, Michaël; Blom, Sami; Arundkar, Sharath C; Selvam, Irwin; Osswald, Annika; Stein, Yan; Gruenewald, Sylvia; Brito, Catarina; van Weerden, Wytske; Rotter, Varda; Boghaert, Erwin; Oren, Moshe; Sommergruber, Wolfgang; Chong, Yolanda; de Hoogt, Ronald; Graeser, Ralph

    2016-07-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) cell cultures growing on plastic do not recapitulate the three dimensional (3D) architecture and complexity of human tumors. More representative models are required for drug discovery and validation. Here, 2D culture and 3D mono- and stromal co-culture models of increasing complexity have been established and cross-comparisons made using three standard cell carcinoma lines: MCF7, LNCaP, NCI-H1437. Fluorescence-based growth curves, 3D image analysis, immunohistochemistry and treatment responses showed that end points differed according to cell type, stromal co-culture and culture format. The adaptable methodologies described here should guide the choice of appropriate simple and complex in vitro models.

  11. Capturing tumor complexity in vitro: Comparative analysis of 2D and 3D tumor models for drug discovery

    PubMed Central

    Stock, Kristin; Estrada, Marta F.; Vidic, Suzana; Gjerde, Kjersti; Rudisch, Albin; Santo, Vítor E.; Barbier, Michaël; Blom, Sami; Arundkar, Sharath C.; Selvam, Irwin; Osswald, Annika; Stein, Yan; Gruenewald, Sylvia; Brito, Catarina; van Weerden, Wytske; Rotter, Varda; Boghaert, Erwin; Oren, Moshe; Sommergruber, Wolfgang; Chong, Yolanda; de Hoogt, Ronald; Graeser, Ralph

    2016-01-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) cell cultures growing on plastic do not recapitulate the three dimensional (3D) architecture and complexity of human tumors. More representative models are required for drug discovery and validation. Here, 2D culture and 3D mono- and stromal co-culture models of increasing complexity have been established and cross-comparisons made using three standard cell carcinoma lines: MCF7, LNCaP, NCI-H1437. Fluorescence-based growth curves, 3D image analysis, immunohistochemistry and treatment responses showed that end points differed according to cell type, stromal co-culture and culture format. The adaptable methodologies described here should guide the choice of appropriate simple and complex in vitro models. PMID:27364600

  12. Tumor-associated macrophages and stromal TNF-α regulate collagen structure in a breast tumor model as visualized by second harmonic generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, Ryan M.; Madden, Kelley S.; Perry, Seth W.; Zettel, Martha L.; Brown, Edward B.

    2013-08-01

    Collagen fibers can be imaged with second harmonic generation (SHG) and are associated with efficient tumor cell locomotion. Preferential locomotion along these fibers correlates with a more aggressively metastatic phenotype, and changes in SHG emission properties accompany changes in metastatic outcome. We therefore attempted to elucidate the cellular and molecular machinery that influences SHG in order to understand how the microstructure of tumor collagen fibers is regulated. By quantifying SHG and immunofluorescence (IF) from tumors grown in mice with and without stromal tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and in the presence or absence of tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs), we determined that depletion of TAMs alters tumor collagen fibrillar microstructure as quantified by SHG and IF. Furthermore, we determined that abrogation of TNF-α expression by tumor stromal cells also alters fibrillar microstructure and that subsequent depletion of TAMs has no further effect. In each case, metastatic burden correlated with optical readouts of collagen microstructure. Our results implicate TAMs and stromal TNF-α as regulators of breast tumor collagen microstructure and suggest that this regulation plays a role in tumor metastasis. Furthermore, these results indicate that quantification of SHG represents a useful strategy for evaluating the cells and molecular pathways responsible for manipulating fibrillar collagen in breast tumor models.

  13. Predictors of initial weight loss among women with abdominal obesity: a path model using self-efficacy and health-promoting behaviour.

    PubMed

    Choo, Jina; Kang, Hyuncheol

    2015-05-01

    To identify predictors of initial weight loss among women with abdominal obesity by using a path model. Successful weight loss in the initial stages of long-term weight management may promote weight loss maintenance. A longitudinal study design. Study participants were 75 women with abdominal obesity, who were enrolled in a 12-month Community-based Heart and Weight Management Trial and followed until a 6-month assessment. The Weight Efficacy Lifestyle, Exercise Self-Efficacy and Health Promoting Lifestyle Profile-II measured diet self-efficacy, exercise self-efficacy and health-promoting behaviour respectively. All endogenous and exogenous variables used in our path model were change variables from baseline to 6 months. Data were collected between May 2011-May 2012. Based on the path model, increases in both diet and exercise self-efficacy had significant effects on increases in health-promoting behaviour. Increases in diet self-efficacy had a significant indirect effect on initial weight loss via increases in health-promoting behaviour. Increases in health-promoting behaviour had a significant effect on initial weight loss. Among women with abdominal obesity, increased diet self-efficacy and health-promoting behaviour were predictors of initial weight loss. A mechanism by which increased diet self-efficacy predicts initial weight loss may be partially attributable to health-promoting behavioural change. However, more work is still needed to verify causality. Based on the current findings, intensive nursing strategies for increasing self-efficacy for weight control and health-promoting behaviour may be essential components for better weight loss in the initial stage of a weight management intervention. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Antitumor efficacy and intratumoral distribution of SN-38 from polymeric depots in brain tumor model

    PubMed Central

    Vejjasilpa, Ketpat; Manaspon, Chawan; Larbcharoensub, Noppadol; Boongird, Atthaporn; Hongeng, Suradej; Israsena, Nipan

    2015-01-01

    We investigate antitumor efficacy and 2D and 3D intratumoral distribution of 7-ethyl-10-hydroxycamptothecin (SN-38) from polymeric depots inside U-87MG xenograft tumor model in nude mice. Results showed that polymeric depots could be used to administer and controlled release of a large amount of SN-38 directly to the brain tumor model. SN-38 released from depots suppressed tumor growth, where the extent of suppression greatly depended on doses and the number of depot injections. Tumor suppression of SN-38 from depots was three-fold higher in animals which received double injections of depots at high dose (9.7 mg of SN-38) compared to single injection (2.2 mg). H&E staining of tumor sections showed that the area of tumor cell death/survival of the former group was two-fold higher than those of the latter group. Fluorescence imaging based on self-fluorescent property of SN-38 was used to evaluate the intratumoral distribution of this drug compared to histological results. The linear correlation between fluorescence intensity and the amount of SN-38 allowed quantitative determination of SN-38 in tumor tissues. Results clearly showed direct correlation between the amount of SN-38 in tumor sections and cancer cell death. Moreover, 3D reconstruction representing the distribution of SN-38 in tumors was obtained. Results from this study suggest the rationale for intratumoral drug administration and release of drugs inside tumor, which is necessary to design drug delivery systems with efficient antitumor activity. PMID:26080460

  15. Towards an integrative computational model for simulating tumor growth and response to radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrero, Carlos Sosa; Aubert, Vivien; Ciferri, Nicolas; Hernández, Alfredo; de Crevoisier, Renaud; Acosta, Oscar

    2017-11-01

    Understanding the response to irradiation in cancer radiotherapy (RT) may help devising new strategies with improved tumor local control. Computational models may allow to unravel the underlying radiosensitive mechanisms intervening in the dose-response relationship. By using extensive simulations a wide range of parameters may be evaluated providing insights on tumor response thus generating useful data to plan modified treatments. We propose in this paper a computational model of tumor growth and radiation response which allows to simulate a whole RT protocol. Proliferation of tumor cells, cell life-cycle, oxygen diffusion, radiosensitivity, RT response and resorption of killed cells were implemented in a multiscale framework. The model was developed in C++, using the Multi-formalism Modeling and Simulation Library (M2SL). Radiosensitivity parameters extracted from literature enabled us to simulate in a regular grid (voxel-wise) a prostate cell tissue. Histopathological specimens with different aggressiveness levels extracted from patients after prostatectomy were used to initialize in silico simulations. Results on tumor growth exhibit a good agreement with data from in vitro studies. Moreover, standard fractionation of 2 Gy/fraction, with a total dose of 80 Gy as a real RT treatment was applied with varying radiosensitivity and oxygen diffusion parameters. As expected, the high influence of these parameters was observed by measuring the percentage of survival tumor cell after RT. This work paves the way to further models allowing to simulate increased doses in modified hypofractionated schemes and to develop new patient-specific combined therapies.

  16. A nonlinear competitive model of the prostate tumor growth under intermittent androgen suppression.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jing; Zhao, Tong-Jun; Yuan, Chang-Qing; Xie, Jing-Hui; Hao, Fang-Fang

    2016-09-07

    Hormone suppression has been the primary modality of treatment for prostate cancer. However long-term androgen deprivation may induce androgen-independent (AI) recurrence. Intermittent androgen suppression (IAS) is a potential way to delay or avoid the AI relapse. Mathematical models of tumor growth and treatment are simple while they are capable of capturing the essence of complicated interactions. Game theory models have analyzed that tumor cells can enhance their fitness by adopting genetically determined survival strategies. In this paper, we consider the survival strategies as the competitive advantage of tumor cells and propose a new model to mimic the prostate tumor growth in IAS therapy. Then we investigate the competition effect in tumor development by numerical simulations. The results indicate that successfully IAS-controlled states can be achieved even though the net growth rate of AI cells is positive for any androgen level. There is crucial difference between the previous models and the new one in the phase diagram of successful and unsuccessful tumor control by IAS administration, which means that the suggestions from the models for medication can be different. Furthermore we introduce quadratic logistic terms to the competition model to simulate the tumor growth in the environment with a finite carrying capacity considering the nutrients or inhibitors. The simulations show that the tumor growth can reach an equilibrium state or an oscillatory state with the net growth rate of AI cells being androgen independent. Our results suggest that the competition and the restraint of a limited environment can enhance the possibility of relapse prevention. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 3, Mediated Remodeling of the Tumor Microenvironment Results in Enhanced Tumor Drug Delivery in a Mouse Model of Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Nagathihalli, Nagaraj S; Castellanos, Jason A; Shi, Chanjuan; Beesetty, Yugandhar; Reyzer, Michelle L; Caprioli, Richard; Chen, Xi; Walsh, Alex J; Skala, Melissa C; Moses, Harold L; Merchant, Nipun B

    2015-12-01

    A hallmark of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is the presence of a dense desmoplastic reaction (stroma) that impedes drug delivery to the tumor. Attempts to deplete the tumor stroma have resulted in formation of more aggressive tumors. We have identified signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 3 as a biomarker of resistance to cytotoxic and molecularly targeted therapy in PDAC. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of targeting STAT3 on the PDAC stroma and on therapeutic resistance. Activated STAT3 protein expression was determined in human pancreatic tissues and tumor cell lines. In vivo effects of AZD1480, a JAK/STAT3 inhibitor, gemcitabine or the combination were determined in Ptf1a(cre/+);LSL-Kras(G12D/+);Tgfbr2(flox/flox) (PKT) mice and in orthotopic tumor xenografts. Drug delivery was analyzed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization imaging mass spectrometry. Collagen second harmonic generation imaging quantified tumor collagen alignment and density. STAT3 activation correlates with decreased survival and advanced tumor stage in patients with PDAC. STAT3 inhibition combined with gemcitabine significantly inhibits tumor growth in both an orthotopic and the PKT mouse model of PDAC. This combined therapy attenuates in vivo expression of SPARC, increases microvessel density, and enhances drug delivery to the tumor without depletion of stromal collagen or hyaluronan. Instead, the PDAC tumors demonstrate vascular normalization, remodeling of the tumor stroma, and down-regulation of cytidine deaminase. Targeted inhibition of STAT3 combined with gemcitabine enhances in vivo drug delivery and therapeutic response in PDAC. These effects occur through tumor stromal remodeling and down-regulation of cytidine deaminase without depletion of tumor stromal content. Copyright © 2015 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Child with Abdominal Pain.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Rajalakshmi; Nallasamy, Karthi

    2018-01-01

    Abdominal pain is one of the common symptoms reported by children in urgent care clinics. While most children tend to have self-limiting conditions, the treating pediatrician should watch out for underlying serious causes like intestinal obstruction and perforation peritonitis, which require immediate referral to an emergency department (ED). Abdominal pain may be secondary to surgical or non-surgical causes, and will differ as per the age of the child. The common etiologies for abdominal pain presenting to an urgent care clinic are acute gastro-enteritis, constipation and functional abdominal pain; however, a variety of extra-abdominal conditions may also present as abdominal pain. Meticulous history taking and physical examination are the best tools for diagnosis, while investigations have a limited role in treating benign etiologies.

  19. Modeling and Analysis of a Nonlinear Age-Structured Model for Tumor Cell Populations with Quiescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zijian; Chen, Jing; Pang, Jianhua; Bi, Ping; Ruan, Shigui

    2018-05-01

    We present a nonlinear first-order hyperbolic partial differential equation model to describe age-structured tumor cell populations with proliferating and quiescent phases at the avascular stage in vitro. The division rate of the proliferating cells is assumed to be nonlinear due to the limitation of the nutrient and space. The model includes a proportion of newborn cells that enter directly the quiescent phase with age zero. This proportion can reflect the effect of treatment by drugs such as erlotinib. The existence and uniqueness of solutions are established. The local and global stabilities of the trivial steady state are investigated. The existence and local stability of the positive steady state are also analyzed. Numerical simulations are performed to verify the results and to examine the impacts of parameters on the nonlinear dynamics of the model.

  20. Genetically engineered mouse models of craniopharyngioma: an opportunity for therapy development and understanding of tumor biology

    PubMed Central

    Martinez‐Barbera, Juan Pedro

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Adamantinomatous craniopharyngioma (ACP) is the commonest tumor of the sellar region in childhood. Two genetically engineered mouse models have been developed and are giving valuable insights into ACP biology. These models have identified novel pathways activated in tumors, revealed an important function of paracrine signalling and extended conventional theories about the role of organ‐specific stem cells in tumorigenesis. In this review, we summarize these mouse models, what has been learnt, their limitations and open questions for future research. We then discussed how these mouse models may be used to test novel therapeutics against potentially targetable pathways recently identified in human ACP. PMID:28414891

  1. Abdominal exploration - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... ency/presentations/100049.htm Abdominal exploration - series—Normal ... intestine (jejunum and ileum), the large intestine (colon), the liver, the spleen, the gallbladder, the pancreas, the uterus, ...

  2. Emerging Technologies for Cancer Research: towards Personalized Medicine with Microfluidic Platforms and 3D Tumor Models.

    PubMed

    Turetta, Matteo; Ben, Fabio Del; Brisotto, Giulia; Biscontin, Eva; Bulfoni, Michela; Cesselli, Daniela; Colombatti, Alfonso; Scoles, Giacinto; Gigli, Giuseppe; Del Mercato, Loretta L

    2018-06-05

    In the present review, we describe three hot topics in cancer research such as circulating tumor cells, exosomes, and 3D environment models. The first section is dedicated to microfluidic platforms for detecting circulating tumor cells, including both affinity-based methods that take advantage of antibodies and aptamers, and "label-free" approaches, exploiting cancer cells physical features and, more recently, abnormal cancer metabolism. In the second section, we briefly describe biology of exosomes and their role in cancer, as well as conventional techniques for their isolation and innovative microfluidic platforms. In the third section, the importance of tumor microenvironment is highlighted, along with techniques for modeling it in vitro. Finally, we discuss limitations of two-dimensional monolayer methods and describe advantages and disadvantages of different three-dimensional tumor systems for cell-cell interaction analysis and their potential applications in cancer management. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  3. Finding mouse models of human lymphomas and leukemia's using the Jackson laboratory mouse tumor biology database.

    PubMed

    Begley, Dale A; Sundberg, John P; Krupke, Debra M; Neuhauser, Steven B; Bult, Carol J; Eppig, Janan T; Morse, Herbert C; Ward, Jerrold M

    2015-12-01

    Many mouse models have been created to study hematopoietic cancer types. There are over thirty hematopoietic tumor types and subtypes, both human and mouse, with various origins, characteristics and clinical prognoses. Determining the specific type of hematopoietic lesion produced in a mouse model and identifying mouse models that correspond to the human subtypes of these lesions has been a continuing challenge for the scientific community. The Mouse Tumor Biology Database (MTB; http://tumor.informatics.jax.org) is designed to facilitate use of mouse models of human cancer by providing detailed histopathologic and molecular information on lymphoma subtypes, including expertly annotated, on line, whole slide scans, and providing a repository for storing information on and querying these data for specific lymphoma models. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. A filamentous bacteriophage targeted to carcinoembryonic antigen induces tumor regression in mouse models of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Murgas, Paola; Bustamante, Nicolás; Araya, Nicole; Cruz-Gómez, Sebastián; Durán, Eduardo; Gaete, Diana; Oyarce, César; López, Ernesto; Herrada, Andrés Alonso; Ferreira, Nicolás; Pieringer, Hans; Lladser, Alvaro

    2018-02-01

    Colorectal cancer is a deadly disease, which is frequently diagnosed at advanced stages, where conventional treatments are no longer effective. Cancer immunotherapy has emerged as a new form to treat different malignancies by turning-on the immune system against tumors. However, tumors are able to evade antitumor immune responses by promoting an immunosuppressive microenvironment. Single-stranded DNA containing M13 bacteriophages are highly immunogenic and can be specifically targeted to the surface of tumor cells to trigger inflammation and infiltration of activated innate immune cells, overcoming tumor-associated immunosuppression and promoting antitumor immunity. Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) is highly expressed in colorectal cancers and has been shown to promote several malignant features of colorectal cancer cells. In this work, we targeted M13 bacteriophage to CEA, a tumor-associated antigen over-expressed in a high proportion of colorectal cancers but largely absent in normal cells. The CEA-targeted M13 bacteriophage was shown to specifically bind to purified CEA and CEA-expressing tumor cells in vitro. Both intratumoral and systemic administration of CEA-specific bacteriophages significantly reduced tumor growth of mouse models of colorectal cancer, as compared to PBS and control bacteriophage administration. CEA-specific bacteriophages promoted tumor infiltration of neutrophils and macrophages, as well as maturation dendritic cells in tumor-draining lymph nodes, suggesting that antitumor T-cell responses were elicited. Finally, we demonstrated that tumor protection provided by CEA-specific bacteriophage particles is mediated by CD8 + T cells, as depletion of circulating CD8 + T cells completely abrogated antitumor protection. In summary, we demonstrated that CEA-specific M13 bacteriophages represent a potential immunotherapy against colorectal cancer.

  5. Lung tumor promotion by chromium-containing welding particulate matter in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Zeidler-Erdely, Patti C; Meighan, Terence G; Erdely, Aaron; Battelli, Lori A; Kashon, Michael L; Keane, Michael; Antonini, James M

    2013-09-05

    Epidemiology suggests that occupational exposure to welding particulate matter (PM) may increase lung cancer risk. However, animal studies are lacking to conclusively link welding with an increased risk. PM derived from stainless steel (SS) welding contains carcinogenic metals such as hexavalent chromium and nickel. We hypothesized that welding PM may act as a tumor promoter and increase lung tumor multiplicity in vivo. Therefore, the capacity of chromium-containing gas metal arc (GMA)-SS welding PM to promote lung tumors was evaluated using a two-stage (initiation-promotion) model in lung tumor susceptible A/J mice. Male mice (n = 28-30/group) were treated either with the initiator 3-methylcholanthrene (MCA;10 μg/g; IP) or vehicle (corn oil) followed by 5 weekly pharyngeal aspirations of GMA-SS (340 or 680 μg/exposure) or PBS. Lung tumors were enumerated at 30 weeks post-initiation. MCA initiation followed by GMA-SS welding PM exposure promoted tumor multiplicity in both the low (12.1 ± 1.5 tumors/mouse) and high (14.0 ± 1.8 tumors/mouse) exposure groups significantly above MCA/sham (4.77 ± 0.7 tumors/mouse; p = 0.0001). Multiplicity was also highly significant (p < 0.004) across all individual lung regions of GMA-SS-exposed mice. No exposure effects were found in the corn oil groups at 30 weeks. Histopathology confirmed the gross findings and revealed increased inflammation and a greater number of malignant lesions in the MCA/welding PM-exposed groups. GMA-SS welding PM acts as a lung tumor promoter in vivo. Thus, this study provides animal evidence to support the epidemiological data that show welders have an increased lung cancer risk.

  6. Lung tumor promotion by chromium-containing welding particulate matter in a mouse model

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Epidemiology suggests that occupational exposure to welding particulate matter (PM) may increase lung cancer risk. However, animal studies are lacking to conclusively link welding with an increased risk. PM derived from stainless steel (SS) welding contains carcinogenic metals such as hexavalent chromium and nickel. We hypothesized that welding PM may act as a tumor promoter and increase lung tumor multiplicity in vivo. Therefore, the capacity of chromium-containing gas metal arc (GMA)-SS welding PM to promote lung tumors was evaluated using a two-stage (initiation-promotion) model in lung tumor susceptible A/J mice. Methods Male mice (n = 28-30/group) were treated either with the initiator 3-methylcholanthrene (MCA;10 μg/g; IP) or vehicle (corn oil) followed by 5 weekly pharyngeal aspirations of GMA-SS (340 or 680 μg/exposure) or PBS. Lung tumors were enumerated at 30 weeks post-initiation. Results MCA initiation followed by GMA-SS welding PM exposure promoted tumor multiplicity in both the low (12.1 ± 1.5 tumors/mouse) and high (14.0 ± 1.8 tumors/mouse) exposure groups significantly above MCA/sham (4.77 ± 0.7 tumors/mouse; p = 0.0001). Multiplicity was also highly significant (p < 0.004) across all individual lung regions of GMA-SS-exposed mice. No exposure effects were found in the corn oil groups at 30 weeks. Histopathology confirmed the gross findings and revealed increased inflammation and a greater number of malignant lesions in the MCA/welding PM-exposed groups. Conclusions GMA-SS welding PM acts as a lung tumor promoter in vivo. Thus, this study provides animal evidence to support the epidemiological data that show welders have an increased lung cancer risk. PMID:24107379

  7. iPSC-derived cancer stem cells provide a model of tumor vasculature.

    PubMed

    Prieto-Vila, Marta; Yan, Ting; Calle, Anna Sanchez; Nair, Neha; Hurley, Laura; Kasai, Tomonari; Kakuta, Hiroki; Masuda, Junko; Murakami, Hiroshi; Mizutani, Akifumi; Seno, Masaharu

    2016-01-01

    To grow beyond a size of approximately 1-2 mm 3 , tumor cells activate many processes to develop blood vasculature. Growing evidences indicate that the formation of the tumor vascular network is very complex, and is not restricted to angiogenesis. Cancer cell-derived tumor vasculatures have been recently described. Among them, endothelial differentiation of tumor cells have been directly related to cancer stem cells, which are cells within a tumor that possess the capacity to self-renew, and to exhibit multipotential heterogeneous lineages of cancer cells. Vasculogenic mimicry has been described to be formed by cancer cells expressing stemness markers. Thus, cancer stem cells have been proposed to contribute to vasculogenic mimicry, though its relation is yet to be clarified. Here, we analyzed the tumor vasculature by using a model of mouse cancer stem cells, miPS-LLCcm cells, which we have previously established from mouse induced pluripotent stem cells and we introduced the DsRed gene in miPS-LLCcm to trace them in vivo . Various features of vasculature were evaluated in ovo , in vitro , and in vivo . The tumors formed in allograft nude mice exhibited angiogenesis in chick chorioallantoic membrane assay. In those tumors, along with penetrated host endothelial vessels, we detected endothelial differentiation from cancer stem cells and formation of vasculogenic mimicry. The angiogenic factors such as VEGF-A and FGF2 were expressed predominantly in the cancer stem cells subpopulation of miPS-LLCcm cells. Our results suggested that cancer stem cells play key roles in not only the recruitment of host endothelial vessels into tumor, but also in maturation of endothelial linage of cancer stem cell's progenies. Furthermore, the undifferentiated subpopulation of the miPS-LLCcm participates directly in the vasculogenic mimicry formation. Collectively, we show that miPS-LLCcm cells have advantages to further study tumor vasculature and to develop novel targeting strategies

  8. iPSC-derived cancer stem cells provide a model of tumor vasculature

    PubMed Central

    Prieto-Vila, Marta; Yan, Ting; Calle, Anna Sanchez; Nair, Neha; Hurley, Laura; Kasai, Tomonari; Kakuta, Hiroki; Masuda, Junko; Murakami, Hiroshi; Mizutani, Akifumi; Seno, Masaharu

    2016-01-01

    To grow beyond a size of approximately 1-2 mm3, tumor cells activate many processes to develop blood vasculature. Growing evidences indicate that the formation of the tumor vascular network is very complex, and is not restricted to angiogenesis. Cancer cell-derived tumor vasculatures have been recently described. Among them, endothelial differentiation of tumor cells have been directly related to cancer stem cells, which are cells within a tumor that possess the capacity to self-renew, and to exhibit multipotential heterogeneous lineages of cancer cells. Vasculogenic mimicry has been described to be formed by cancer cells expressing stemness markers. Thus, cancer stem cells have been proposed to contribute to vasculogenic mimicry, though its relation is yet to be clarified. Here, we analyzed the tumor vasculature by using a model of mouse cancer stem cells, miPS-LLCcm cells, which we have previously established from mouse induced pluripotent stem cells and we introduced the DsRed gene in miPS-LLCcm to trace them in vivo. Various features of vasculature were evaluated in ovo, in vitro, and in vivo. The tumors formed in allograft nude mice exhibited angiogenesis in chick chorioallantoic membrane assay. In those tumors, along with penetrated host endothelial vessels, we detected endothelial differentiation from cancer stem cells and formation of vasculogenic mimicry. The angiogenic factors such as VEGF-A and FGF2 were expressed predominantly in the cancer stem cells subpopulation of miPS-LLCcm cells. Our results suggested that cancer stem cells play key roles in not only the recruitment of host endothelial vessels into tumor, but also in maturation of endothelial linage of cancer stem cell’s progenies. Furthermore, the undifferentiated subpopulation of the miPS-LLCcm participates directly in the vasculogenic mimicry formation. Collectively, we show that miPS-LLCcm cells have advantages to further study tumor vasculature and to develop novel targeting strategies in

  9. Radiofrequency ablation of liver tumors in combination with local OK-432 injection prolongs survival and suppresses distant tumor growth in the rabbit model with intra- and extrahepatic VX2 tumors.

    PubMed

    Kageyama, Ken; Yamamoto, Akira; Okuma, Tomohisa; Hamamoto, Shinichi; Takeshita, Toru; Sakai, Yukimasa; Nishida, Norifumi; Matsuoka, Toshiyuki; Miki, Yukio

    2013-10-01

    To evaluate survival and distant tumor growth after radiofrequency ablation (RFA) and local OK-432 injection at a single tumor site in a rabbit model with intra- and extrahepatic VX2 tumors and to examine the effect of this combination therapy, which we termed immuno-radiofrequency ablation (immunoRFA), on systemic antitumor immunity in a rechallenge test. Our institutional animal care committee approved all experiments. VX2 tumors were implanted to three sites: two in the liver and one in the left ear. Rabbits were randomized into four groups of seven to receive control, RFA alone, OK-432 alone, and immunoRFA treatments at a single liver tumor at 1 week after implantation. Untreated liver and ear tumor volumes were measured after the treatment. As the rechallenge test, tumors were reimplanted into the right ear of rabbits, which survived the 35 weeks and were followed up without additional treatment. Statistical significance was examined by log-rank test for survival and Student's t test for tumor volume. Survival was significantly prolonged in the immunoRFA group compared to the other three groups (P < 0.05). Untreated liver and ear tumor sizes became significantly smaller after immunoRFA compared to controls (P < 0.05). In the rechallenge test, the reimplanted tumors regressed without further therapy compared to the ear tumors of the control group (P < 0.05). ImmunoRFA led to improved survival and suppression of distant untreated tumor growth. Decreases in size of the distant untreated tumors and reimplanted tumors suggested that systemic antitumor immunity was enhanced by immunoRFA.

  10. Radiofrequency Ablation of Liver Tumors in Combination with Local OK-432 Injection Prolongs Survival and Suppresses Distant Tumor Growth in the Rabbit Model with Intra- and Extrahepatic VX2 Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Kageyama, Ken, E-mail: kageyamaken0112@gmail.com; Yamamoto, Akira, E-mail: loveakirayamamoto@gmail.com; Okuma, Tomohisa, E-mail: o-kuma@msic.med.osaka-cu.ac.jp

    Purpose: To evaluate survival and distant tumor growth after radiofrequency ablation (RFA) and local OK-432 injection at a single tumor site in a rabbit model with intra- and extrahepatic VX2 tumors and to examine the effect of this combination therapy, which we termed immuno-radiofrequency ablation (immunoRFA), on systemic antitumor immunity in a rechallenge test. Methods: Our institutional animal care committee approved all experiments. VX2 tumors were implanted to three sites: two in the liver and one in the left ear. Rabbits were randomized into four groups of seven to receive control, RFA alone, OK-432 alone, and immunoRFA treatments at amore » single liver tumor at 1 week after implantation. Untreated liver and ear tumor volumes were measured after the treatment. As the rechallenge test, tumors were reimplanted into the right ear of rabbits, which survived the 35 weeks and were followed up without additional treatment. Statistical significance was examined by log-rank test for survival and Student's t test for tumor volume. Results: Survival was significantly prolonged in the immunoRFA group compared to the other three groups (P < 0.05). Untreated liver and ear tumor sizes became significantly smaller after immunoRFA compared to controls (P < 0.05). In the rechallenge test, the reimplanted tumors regressed without further therapy compared to the ear tumors of the control group (P < 0.05). Conclusion: ImmunoRFA led to improved survival and suppression of distant untreated tumor growth. Decreases in size of the distant untreated tumors and reimplanted tumors suggested that systemic antitumor immunity was enhanced by immunoRFA.« less

  11. Quantitative Primary Tumor Indocyanine Green Measurements Predict Osteosarcoma Metastatic Lung Burden in a Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Fourman, Mitchell S; Mahjoub, Adel; Mandell, Jon B; Yu, Shibing; Tebbets, Jessica C; Crasto, Jared A; Alexander, Peter E; Weiss, Kurt R

    2018-03-01

    Current preclinical osteosarcoma (OS) models largely focus on quantifying primary tumor burden. However, most fatalities from OS are caused by metastatic disease. The quantification of metastatic OS currently relies on CT, which is limited by motion artifact, requires intravenous contrast, and can be technically demanding in the preclinical setting. We describe the ability for indocyanine green (ICG) fluorescence angiography to quantify primary and metastatic OS in a previously validated orthotopic, immunocompetent mouse model. (1) Can near-infrared ICG fluorescence be used to attach a comparable, quantitative value to the primary OS tumor in our experimental mouse model? (2) Will primary tumor fluorescence differ in mice that go on to develop metastatic lung disease? (3) Does primary tumor fluorescence correlate with tumor volume measured with CT? Six groups of 4- to 6-week-old immunocompetent Balb/c mice (n = 6 per group) received paraphyseal injections into their left hindlimb proximal tibia consisting of variable numbers of K7M2 mouse OS cells. A hindlimb transfemoral amputation was performed 4 weeks after injection with euthanasia and lung extraction performed 10 weeks after injection. Histologic examination of lung and primary tumor specimens confirmed ICG localization only within the tumor bed. Mice with visible or palpable tumor growth had greater hindlimb fluorescence (3.5 ± 2.3 arbitrary perfusion units [APU], defined as the fluorescence pixel return normalized by the detector) compared with those with a negative examination (0.71 ± 0.38 APU, -2.7 ± 0.5 mean difference, 95% confidence interval -3.7 to -1.8, p < 0.001). A strong linear trend (r = 0.81, p < 0.01) was observed between primary tumor and lung fluorescence, suggesting that quantitative ICG tumor fluorescence is directly related to eventual metastatic burden. We did not find a correlation (r = 0.04, p = 0.45) between normalized primary tumor fluorescence and CT volumetric measurements. We

  12. Dynamic Tumor Growth Patterns in a Novel Murine Model of Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Olson, Terrah J. Paul; Hadac, Jamie N.; Sievers, Chelsie K.; Leystra, Alyssa A.; Deming, Dustin A.; Zahm, Christopher D.; Albrecht, Dawn M.; Nomura, Alice; Nettekoven, Laura A.; Plesh, Lauren K.; Clipson, Linda; Sullivan, Ruth; Newton, Michael A.; Schelman, William R.; Halberg, Richard B.

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) often arises from adenomatous colonic polyps. Polyps can grow and progress to cancer, but may also remain static in size, regress, or resolve. Predicting which progress and which remain benign is difficult. We developed a novel long-lived murine model of CRC with tumors that can be followed by colonoscopy. Our aim was to assess whether these tumors have similar growth patterns and histologic fates to human colorectal polyps to identify features to aid in risk-stratification of colonic tumors. Long-lived ApcMin/+ mice were treated with dextran sodium sulfate to promote colonic tumorigenesis. Tumor growth patterns were characterized by serial colonoscopy with biopsies obtained for immunohistochemistry and gene expression profiling. Tumors grew, remained static, regressed, or resolved over time with different relative frequencies. Newly developed tumors demonstrated higher rates of growth and resolution than more established tumors that tended to remain static in size. Colonic tumors were hyperplastic lesions (3%), adenomas (73%), intramucosal carcinomas (20%), or adenocarcinomas (3%). Interestingly, the level of β-catenin was higher in adenomas that became intratumoral carcinomas as compared to those that failed to progress. In addition, differentially expressed genes between adenomas and intramucosal carcinomas were identified. This novel murine model of intestinal tumorigenesis develops colonic tumors that can be monitored by serial colonoscopy, mirror growth patterns seen in human colorectal polyps, and progress to CRC. Further characterization of cellular and molecular features are needed to determine which features can be used to risk-stratify polyps for progression to CRC and potentially guide prevention strategies. PMID:24196829

  13. Impact of MR-guided boiling histotripsy in distinct murine tumor models.

    PubMed

    Hoogenboom, Martijn; Eikelenboom, Dylan C; van den Bijgaart, Renske J E; Heerschap, Arend; Wesseling, Pieter; den Brok, Martijn H; Fütterer, Jurgen J; Adema, Gosse J

    2017-09-01

    Interest in mechanical high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) ablation is rapidly growing. Boiling histotripsy (BH) is applied for mechanical fragmentation of soft tissue into submicron fragments with limited temperature increase using the shock wave and cavitation effects of HIFU. Research on BH has been largely limited to ex vivo experiments. As a consequence, the in vivo pathology after BH treatment and the relation to preexistent tissue characteristics are not well understood. This study reports on in vivo MR guided BH treatment, either with 100 or 200 pulses per focal spot, in three different subcutaneous mouse tumor models: a soft-tissue melanoma (B16OVA), a compact growing thymoma (EL4), and a highly vascularized neuroblastoma (9464D). Extensive treatment evaluation was performed using MR imaging followed by histopathology 2h after treatment. T2 weighted MRI allowed direct in vivo visualization of the BH lesions in all tumor models. The 100-pulse treated area in the B16OVA tumors was larger than the predicted treatment volume (500±10%). For the more compact growing EL4 and 9464D tumors this was 95±13% and 55±33%, respectively. Histopathology after the 100-pulse treatment revealed completely disintegrated lesions in the treated area with sharp borders in the compact EL4 and 9464D tumors, while for B16OVA tumors the lesion contained a mixture of discohesive (partly viable) clusters of cells, micro-vessel remainings, and tumor cell debris. The treatment of B16OVA with 200 pulses increased the fragmentation of tumor tissue. In all tumor types only micro-hemorrhages were detected after ablation (slightly higher after 200-pulse treatment for the highly vascularized 9464D tumors). Collagen staining revealed that the collagen fibers were to a greater or lesser extent still intact and partly clotted together near the lesion border in all tumor models. In conclusion, this study reveals effective mechanical fragmentation of different tumor types using BH without

  14. Detection of high GS risk group prostate tumors by diffusion tensor imaging and logistic regression modelling.

    PubMed

    Ertas, Gokhan

    2018-07-01

    To assess the value of joint evaluation of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) measures by using logistic regression modelling to detect high GS risk group prostate tumors. Fifty tumors imaged using DTI on a 3 T MRI device were analyzed. Regions of interests focusing on the center of tumor foci and noncancerous tissue on the maps of mean diffusivity (MD) and fractional anisotropy (FA) were used to extract the minimum, the maximum and the mean measures. Measure ratio was computed by dividing tumor measure by noncancerous tissue measure. Logistic regression models were fitted for all possible pair combinations of the measures using 5-fold cross validation. Systematic differences are present for all MD measures and also for all FA measures in distinguishing the high risk tumors [GS ≥ 7(4 + 3)] from the low risk tumors [GS ≤ 7(3 + 4)] (P < 0.05). Smaller value for MD measures and larger value for FA measures indicate the high risk. The models enrolling the measures achieve good fits and good classification performances (R 2 adj  = 0.55-0.60, AUC = 0.88-0.91), however the models using the measure ratios perform better (R 2 adj  = 0.59-0.75, AUC = 0.88-0.95). The model that employs the ratios of minimum MD and maximum FA accomplishes the highest sensitivity, specificity and accuracy (Se = 77.8%, Sp = 96.9% and Acc = 90.0%). Joint evaluation of MD and FA diffusion tensor imaging measures is valuable to detect high GS risk group peripheral zone prostate tumors. However, use of the ratios of the measures improves the accuracy of the detections substantially. Logistic regression modelling provides a favorable solution for the joint evaluations easily adoptable in clinical practice. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Efficient induction of anti-tumor immunity by a TAT-CEA fusion protein vaccine with poly(I:C) in a murine colorectal tumor model.

    PubMed

    Park, Jung-Sun; Kim, Hye-Sung; Park, Hye-Mi; Kim, Chang-Hyun; Kim, Tai-Gyu

    2011-11-03

    Protein vaccines may be a useful strategy for cancer immunotherapy because recombinant tumor antigen proteins can be produced on a large scale at relatively low cost and have been shown to be safe for clinical application. However, protein vaccines have historically exhibited poor immunogenicity; thus, an improved strategy is needed for successful induction of immune responses. TAT peptide is a protein transduction domain composed of an 11-amino acid peptide (TAT(47-57): YGRKKRRQRRR). The positive charge of this peptide allows protein antigen fused with it to improve cell penetration. Poly(I:C) is a synthetic double-stranded RNA that is negatively charged and favors interaction with the cationic TAT peptide. Poly(I:C) has been reported on adjuvant role in tumor vaccine through promotion of immune responses. Therefore, we demonstrated that vaccine with a mixture of TAT-CEA fusion protein and poly(I:C) can induce anti-tumor immunity in a murine colorectal tumor model. Splenocytes from mice vaccinated with a mixture of TAT-CEA fusion protein and poly(I:C) effectively induced CEA-specific IFN-γ-producing T cells and showed cytotoxic activity specific for MC-38-cea2 tumor cells expressing CEA. Vaccine with a mixture of TAT-CEA fusion protein and poly(I:C) delayed tumor growth in MC-38-cea-2 tumor-bearing mice. Depletion of CD8(+) T cells and NK cells reversed the inhibition of tumor growth in an MC-38-cea2-bearing mice, indicating that CD8(+) T cells and NK cells are responsible for anti-tumor immunity by vaccine with a mixture of TAT-CEA fusion protein and poly(I:C). Taken together, these results suggest that poly(I:C) could be used as a potent adjuvant to induce the anti-tumor immunity of a TAT-CEA fusion protein vaccine in a murine colorectal tumor model. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Intra-Abdominal Hypertension and Abdominal Compartment Syndrome after Abdominal Wall Reconstruction: Quaternary Syndromes?

    PubMed

    Kirkpatrick, A W; Nickerson, D; Roberts, D J; Rosen, M J; McBeth, P B; Petro, C C; Berrevoet, Frederik; Sugrue, M; Xiao, Jimmy; Ball, C G

    2017-06-01

    Reconstruction with reconstitution of the container function of the abdominal compartment is increasingly being performed in patients with massive ventral hernia previously deemed inoperable. This situation places patients at great risk of severe intra-abdominal hypertension and abdominal compartment syndrome if organ failure ensues. Intra-abdominal hypertension and especially abdominal compartment syndrome may be devastating systemic complications with systematic and progressive organ failure and death. We thus reviewed the pathophysiology and reported clinical experiences with abnormalities of intra-abdominal pressure in the context of abdominal wall reconstruction. Bibliographic databases (1950-2015), websites, textbooks, and the bibliographies of previously recovered articles for reports or data relating to intra-abdominal pressure, intra-abdominal hypertension, and the abdominal compartment syndrome in relation to ventral, incisional, or abdominal hernia repair or abdominal wall reconstruction. Surgeons should thus consider and carefully measure intra-abdominal pressure and its resultant effects on respiratory parameters and function during abdominal wall reconstruction. The intra-abdominal pressure post-operatively will be a result of the new intra-peritoneal volume and the abdominal wall compliance. Strategies surgeons may utilize to ameliorate intra-abdominal pressure rise after abdominal wall reconstruction including temporizing paralysis of the musculature either temporarily or semi-permanently, pre-operative progressive pneumoperitoneum, permanently removing visceral contents, or surgically releasing the musculature to increase the abdominal container volume. In patients without complicating shock and inflammation, and in whom the abdominal wall anatomy has been so functionally adapted to maximize compliance, intra-abdominal hypertension may be transient and tolerable. Intra-abdominal hypertension/abdominal compartment syndrome in the specific setting of

  17. Sensitivity of tumor motion simulation accuracy to lung biomechanical modeling approaches and parameters.

    PubMed

    Tehrani, Joubin Nasehi; Yang, Yin; Werner, Rene; Lu, Wei; Low, Daniel; Guo, Xiaohu; Wang, Jing

    2015-11-21

    Finite element analysis (FEA)-based biomechanical modeling can be used to predict lung respiratory motion. In this technique, elastic models and biomechanical parameters are two important factors that determine modeling accuracy. We systematically evaluated the effects of lung and lung tumor biomechanical modeling approaches and related parameters to improve the accuracy of motion simulation of lung tumor center of mass (TCM) displacements. Experiments were conducted with four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT). A Quasi-Newton FEA was performed to simulate lung and related tumor displacements between end-expiration (phase 50%) and other respiration phases (0%, 10%, 20%, 30%, and 40%). Both linear isotropic and non-linear hyperelastic materials, including the neo-Hookean compressible and uncoupled Mooney-Rivlin models, were used to create a finite element model (FEM) of lung and tumors. Lung surface displacement vector fields (SDVFs) were obtained by registering the 50% phase CT to other respiration phases, using the non-rigid demons registration algorithm. The obtained SDVFs were used as lung surface displacement boundary conditions in FEM. The sensitivity of TCM displacement to lung and tumor biomechanical parameters was assessed in eight patients for all three models. Patient-specific optimal parameters were estimated by minimizing the TCM motion simulation errors between phase 50% and phase 0%. The uncoupled Mooney-Rivlin material model showed the highest TCM motion simulation accuracy. The average TCM motion simulation absolute errors for the Mooney-Rivlin material model along left-right, anterior-posterior, and superior-inferior directions were 0.80 mm, 0.86 mm, and 1.51 mm, respectively. The proposed strategy provides a reliable method to estimate patient-specific biomechanical parameters in FEM for lung tumor motion simulation.

  18. Sensitivity of Tumor Motion Simulation Accuracy to Lung Biomechanical Modeling Approaches and Parameters

    PubMed Central

    Tehrani, Joubin Nasehi; Yang, Yin; Werner, Rene; Lu, Wei; Low, Daniel; Guo, Xiaohu

    2015-01-01

    Finite element analysis (FEA)-based biomechanical modeling can be used to predict lung respiratory motion. In this technique, elastic models and biomechanical parameters are two important factors that determine modeling accuracy. We systematically evaluated the effects of lung and lung tumor biomechanical modeling approaches and related parameters to improve the accuracy of motion simulation of lung tumor center of mass (TCM) displacements. Experiments were conducted with four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT). A Quasi-Newton FEA was performed to simulate lung and related tumor displacements between end-expiration (phase 50%) and other respiration phases (0%, 10%, 20%, 30%, and 40%). Both linear isotropic and non-linear hyperelastic materials, including the Neo-Hookean compressible and uncoupled Mooney-Rivlin models, were used to create a finite element model (FEM) of lung and tumors. Lung surface displacement vector fields (SDVFs) were obtained by registering the 50% phase CT to other respiration phases, using the non-rigid demons registration algorithm. The obtained SDVFs were used as lung surface displacement boundary conditions in FEM. The sensitivity of TCM displacement to lung and tumor biomechanical parameters was assessed in eight patients for all three models. Patient-specific optimal parameters were estimated by minimizing the TCM motion simulation errors between phase 50% and phase 0%. The uncoupled Mooney-Rivlin material model showed the highest TCM motion simulation accuracy. The average TCM motion simulation absolute errors for the Mooney-Rivlin material model along left-right (LR), anterior-posterior (AP), and superior-inferior (SI) directions were 0.80 mm, 0.86 mm, and 1.51 mm, respectively. The proposed strategy provides a reliable method to estimate patient-specific biomechanical parameters in FEM for lung tumor motion simulation. PMID:26531324

  19. Integration of Oncogenes via Sleeping Beauty as a Mouse Model of HPV16+ Oral Tumors and Immunologic Control.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yi-Hsin; Yang, Ming-Chieh; Tseng, Ssu-Hsueh; Jiang, Rosie; Yang, Andrew; Farmer, Emily; Peng, Shiwen; Henkle, Talia; Chang, Yung-Nien; Hung, Chien-Fu; Wu, T-C

    2018-01-23

    Human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) is the etiologic factor for cervical cancer and a subset of oropharyngeal cancers. Although several prophylactic HPV vaccines are available, no effective therapeutic strategies to control active HPV diseases exist. Tumor implantation models are traditionally used to study HPV-associated buccal tumors. However, they fail to address precancerous phases of disease progression and display tumor microenvironments distinct from those observed in patients. Previously, K14-E6/E7 transgenic mouse models have been used to generate spontaneous tumors. However, the rate of tumor formation is inconsistent, and the host often develops immune tolerance to the viral oncoproteins. We developed a preclinical, spontaneous, HPV16 + buccal tumor model using submucosal injection of oncogenic plasmids expressing HPV16-E6/E7, NRas G12V , luciferase, and sleeping beauty (SB) transposase, followed by electroporation in the buccal mucosa. We evaluated responses to immunization with a pNGVL4a-CRT/E7(detox) therapeutic HPV DNA vaccine and tumor cell migration to distant locations. Mice transfected with plasmids encoding HPV16-E6/E7, NRas G12V , luciferase, and SB transposase developed tumors within 3 weeks. We also found transient anti-CD3 administration is required to generate tumors in immunocompetent mice. Bioluminescence signals from luciferase correlated strongly with tumor growth, and tumors expressed HPV16-associated markers. We showed that pNGVL4a-CRT/E7(detox) administration resulted in antitumor immunity in tumor-bearing mice. Lastly, we demonstrated that the generated tumor could migrate to tumor-draining lymph nodes. Our model provides an efficient method to induce spontaneous HPV + tumor formation, which can be used to identify effective therapeutic interventions, analyze tumor migration, and conduct tumor biology research. Cancer Immunol Res; 6(3); 1-15. ©2018 AACR. ©2018 American Association for Cancer Research.

  20. Changes in tumor cell heterogeneity after chemotherapy treatment in a xenograft model of glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Welker, Alessandra M; Jaros, Brian D; An, Min; Beattie, Christine E

    2017-07-25

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is a highly aggressive brain cancer with limited treatments and poor patient survival. GBM tumors are heterogeneous containing a complex mixture of dividing cells, differentiated cells, and cancer stem cells. It is unclear, however, how these different cell populations contribute to tumor growth or whether they exhibit differential responses to chemotherapy. Here we set out to address these questions using a zebrafish xenograft transplant model (Welker et al., 2016). We found that a small population of differentiated vimentin-positive tumor cells, but a majority of Sox2-positive putative cancer stem cells, were dividing during tumor growth. We also observed co-expression of Sox2 and GFAP, another suggested marker of glioma cancer stem cells, indicating that the putative cancer stem cells in GBM9 tumors expressed both of these markers. To determine how these different tumor cell populations responded to chemotherapy, we treated animals with temozolomide (TMZ) and assessed these cell populations immediately after treatment and 5 and 10days after treatment cessation. As expected we found a significant decrease in dividing cells after treatment. We also found a significant decrease in vimentin-positive cells, but not in Sox2 or GFAP-positive cells. However, the Sox2-positive cells significantly increased 5days after TMZ treatment. These data support that putative glioma cancer stem cells are more resistant to TMZ treatment and may contribute to tumor regrowth after chemotherapy. Copyright © 2017 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Histotripsy and metastasis: Assessment in a renal VX-2 rabbit tumor model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Styn, Nicholas R.; Hall, Timothy L.; Fowlkes, J. Brian; Cain, Charles A.; Roberts, William W.

    2012-10-01

    Histotripsy is a non-invasive, pulsed ultrasound technology where controlled cavitation is used to homogenize targeted tissue. We sought to assess the possibility that histotripsy may increase metastatic spread of tumor by quantifying the number of lung metastasis apparent after histotripsy treatment of aggressive renal VX-2 tumor compared to nontreated controls. VX-2 tumor was implanted in the left kidneys of 28 New Zealand White rabbits. Twenty rabbits were treated with histotripsy (day 13 after implantation) while 8 served as controls. All rabbits underwent left nephrectomy (day 14) and then were euthanized (day 19). This study was powered to detect a doubling in metastatic rate. Homogenized tumor was seen in all treated nephrectomy specimens. Whole-mount, coronal lung sections were viewed to calculate number and density of metastases. Viable tumor was present in all 28 lungs examined. Histology confirmed fractionation of tumor in all treatment rabbits. There was not a statistical difference in total lung metastases (88.7 vs. 72.5; p=0.29) or metastatic density (8.9 vs. 7.0 mets/cm2; p=0.22) between treated and control rabbits. Further investigation is planned to validate these results in the VX-2 model and to assess metastatic rates in less aggressive tumors treated with histotripsy.

  2. White Adipose Tissue Cells Are Recruited by Experimental Tumors and Promote Cancer Progression in Mouse Models

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yan; Daquinag, Alexes; Traktuev, Dmitry O.; Amaya-Manzanares, Felipe; Simmons, Paul J.; March, Keith L.; Pasqualini, Renata; Arap, Wadih; Kolonin, Mikhail G.

    2010-01-01

    The connection between obesity and accelerated cancer progression has been established, but the mediating mechanisms are not well understood. We have shown that stromal cells from white adipose tissue (WAT) cooperate with the endothelium to promote blood vessel formation through the secretion of soluble trophic factors. Here, we hypothesize that WAT directly mediates cancer progression by serving as a source of cells that migrate to tumors and promote neovascularization. To test this hypothesis, we have evaluated the recruitment of WAT-derived cells by tumors and the effect of their engraftment on tumor growth by integrating a transgenic mouse strain engineered for expansion of traceable cells with established allograft and xenograft cancer models. Our studies show that entry of adipose stromal and endothelial cells into systemic circulation leads to their homing to and engraftment into tumor stroma and vasculature, respectively. We show that recruitment of adipose stromal cells by tumors is sufficient to promote tumor growth. Finally, we show that migration of stromal and vascular progenitor cells from WAT grafts to tumors is also associated with acceleration of cancer progression. These results provide a biological insight for the clinical association between obesity and cancer, thus outlining potential avenues for preventive and therapeutic strategies. PMID:19491274

  3. Anti-cancer activity of Annexin V in murine melanoma model by suppressing tumor angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuerui; Huo, Lina; Jin, Haibo; Han, Yuheng; Wang, Jie; Zhang, Yanjun; Lai, Xinghuan; Le, Ziwei; Zhang, Jing; Hua, Zichun

    2017-06-27

    Annexin V, a protein with high affinity to phosphatidylserine (PS) in a calcium dependent manner, has been widely used to probe apoptosis. Annexin V in inhibiting engulfment of apoptotic cells by macrophages had been reported to increase the immunogenicity of tumor cells undergoing apoptosis. However, far less is known about its multiple properties, especially in cancer therapies. Here we found that Annexin V had a good anti-tumor activity in murine melanomaxenograft model. Treatment with Annexin V showed significant reduction in tumor size and remarkable tumor necrosis areas. The serum level of VEGF was downregualted by Annexin V both in normal mice and mice bearing tumor, suggesting that its new role on impeding tumor angiogenesis. In Silico analysis using Oncomine database, we also found the negative correlation of AnnexinV and VEGF both in skin and melanoma. The decreased Annexin V expression shows linearity relation with the elevated VEGF expression. These data provided a possibility that Annexin V can be used as a novel angiogenesis inhibitor in tumor therapy.

  4. Novel mouse model for simulating microsurgical tumor excision with facial nerve preservation.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jae H; Boyle, Glen M; Panizza, Benedict

    2016-01-01

    To determine the feasibility of using a mouse tumor model as a microsurgical training tool for otolaryngology-head and neck surgery (OHNS) trainees. Animal study. We injected athymic nude mice with human cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (A431 cell line) deep to the parotid region overlying the masseter muscle. We sacrificed the animals 1 to 3 weeks postinjection, once a visible tumor growth was confirmed. We then asked 10 OHNS trainees to excise the tumor with preservation of the facial nerves under a high-magnification dissecting microscope. The trainees graded the tasks in several areas of specific measures using a visual analogue scale (VAS) including 1) tumor texture, 2) surgical realism, 3) usefulness, and 4) difficulty of the task. Noticeable tumor growth occurred within 5 days following A431 cell injection and reached measureable size (0.5-1.5 cm) within 1 to 3 weeks. The tumor displaced the facial nerve laterally and medially, with few demonstrating infiltration of the nerve. VAS scores (± standard deviation) were 8.1 (± 1.7), 7.7 (± 2.5), 9.0 (± 0.9) and 6.6 (± 1.9) for tumor texture, surgical realism, usefulness, and the difficulty of the task, respectively. We demonstrate a novel, reliable and cost-effective mouse model for simulating tumor extirpation microsurgery with preservation of important neural structures. OHNS trainees have found this simulation model to be realistic, useful, and appropriately challenging. © 2015 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  5. Heterotypic mouse models of canine osteosarcoma recapitulate tumor heterogeneity and biological behavior

    PubMed Central

    Tomiyasu, Hirotaka; Garbe, John R.; Cornax, Ingrid; Amaya, Clarissa; O'Sullivan, M. Gerard; Subramanian, Subbaya

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Osteosarcoma (OS) is a heterogeneous and rare disease with a disproportionate impact because it mainly affects children and adolescents. Lamentably, more than half of patients with OS succumb to metastatic disease. Clarification of the etiology of the disease, development of better strategies to manage progression, and methods to guide personalized treatments are among the unmet health needs for OS patients. Progress in managing the disease has been hindered by the extreme heterogeneity of OS; thus, better models that accurately recapitulate the natural heterogeneity of the disease are needed. For this study, we used cell lines derived from two spontaneous canine OS tumors with distinctly different biological behavior (OS-1 and OS-2) for heterotypic in vivo modeling that recapitulates the heterogeneous biology and behavior of this disease. Both cell lines demonstrated stability of the transcriptome when grown as orthotopic xenografts in athymic nude mice. Consistent with the behavior of the original tumors, OS-2 xenografts grew more rapidly at the primary site and had greater propensity to disseminate to lung and establish microscopic metastasis. Moreover, OS-2 promoted formation of a different tumor-associated stromal environment than OS-1 xenografts. OS-2-derived tumors comprised a larger percentage of the xenograft tumors than OS-1-derived tumors. In addition, a robust pro-inflammatory population dominated the stromal cell infiltrates in OS-2 xenografts, whereas a mesenchymal population with a gene signature reflecting myogenic signaling dominated those in the OS-1 xenografts. Our studies show that canine OS cell lines maintain intrinsic features of the tumors from which they were derived and recapitulate the heterogeneous biology and behavior of bone cancer in mouse models. This system provides a resource to understand essential interactions between tumor cells and the stromal environment that drive the progression and metastatic propensity of OS. PMID

  6. Heterotypic mouse models of canine osteosarcoma recapitulate tumor heterogeneity and biological behavior.

    PubMed

    Scott, Milcah C; Tomiyasu, Hirotaka; Garbe, John R; Cornax, Ingrid; Amaya, Clarissa; O'Sullivan, M Gerard; Subramanian, Subbaya; Bryan, Brad A; Modiano, Jaime F

    2016-12-01

    Osteosarcoma (OS) is a heterogeneous and rare disease with a disproportionate impact because it mainly affects children and adolescents. Lamentably, more than half of patients with OS succumb to metastatic disease. Clarification of the etiology of the disease, development of better strategies to manage progression, and methods to guide personalized treatments are among the unmet health needs for OS patients. Progress in managing the disease has been hindered by the extreme heterogeneity of OS; thus, better models that accurately recapitulate the natural heterogeneity of the disease are needed. For this study, we used cell lines derived from two spontaneous canine OS tumors with distinctly different biological behavior (OS-1 and OS-2) for heterotypic in vivo modeling that recapitulates the heterogeneous biology and behavior of this disease. Both cell lines demonstrated stability of the transcriptome when grown as orthotopic xenografts in athymic nude mice. Consistent with the behavior of the original tumors, OS-2 xenografts grew more rapidly at the primary site and had greater propensity to disseminate to lung and establish microscopic metastasis. Moreover, OS-2 promoted formation of a different tumor-associated stromal environment than OS-1 xenografts. OS-2-derived tumors comprised a larger percentage of the xenograft tumors than OS-1-derived tumors. In addition, a robust pro-inflammatory population dominated the stromal cell infiltrates in OS-2 xenografts, whereas a mesenchymal population with a gene signature reflecting myogenic signaling dominated those in the OS-1 xenografts. Our studies show that canine OS cell lines maintain intrinsic features of the tumors from which they were derived and recapitulate the heterogeneous biology and behavior of bone cancer in mouse models. This system provides a resource to understand essential interactions between tumor cells and the stromal environment that drive the progression and metastatic propensity of OS. © 2016

  7. Classical Mathematical Models for Description and Prediction of Experimental Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Benzekry, Sébastien; Lamont, Clare; Beheshti, Afshin; Tracz, Amanda; Ebos, John M. L.; Hlatky, Lynn; Hahnfeldt, Philip

    2014-01-01

    Despite internal complexity, tumor growth kinetics follow relatively simple laws that can be expressed as mathematical models. To explore this further, quantitative analysis of the most classical of these were performed. The models were assessed against data from two in vivo experimental systems: an ectopic syngeneic tumor (Lewis lung carcinoma) and an orthotopically xenografted human breast carcinoma. The goals were threefold: 1) to determine a statistical model for description of the measurement error, 2) to establish the descriptive power of each model, using several goodness-of-fit metrics and a study of parametric identifiability, and 3) to assess the models' ability to forecast future tumor growth. The models included in the study comprised the exponential, exponential-linear, power law, Gompertz, logistic, generalized logistic, von Bertalanffy and a model with dynamic carrying capacity. For the breast data, the dynamics were best captured by the Gompertz and exponential-linear models. The latter also exhibited the highest predictive power, with excellent prediction scores (≥80%) extending out as far as 12 days in the future. For the lung data, the Gompertz and power law models provided the most parsimonious and parametrically identifiable description. However, not one of the models was able to achieve a substantial prediction rate (≥70%) beyond the next day data point. In this context, adjunction of a priori information on the parameter distribution led to considerable improvement. For instance, forecast success rates went from 14.9% to 62.7% when using the power law model to predict the full future tumor growth curves, using just three data points. These results not only have important implications for biological theories of tumor growth and the use of mathematical modeling in preclinical anti-cancer drug investigations, but also may assist in defining how mathematical models could serve as potential prognostic tools in the clinic. PMID:25167199

  8. Classical mathematical models for description and prediction of experimental tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Benzekry, Sébastien; Lamont, Clare; Beheshti, Afshin; Tracz, Amanda; Ebos, John M L; Hlatky, Lynn; Hahnfeldt, Philip

    2014-08-01

    Despite internal complexity, tumor growth kinetics follow relatively simple laws that can be expressed as mathematical models. To explore this further, quantitative analysis of the most classical of these were performed. The models were assessed against data from two in vivo experimental systems: an ectopic syngeneic tumor (Lewis lung carcinoma) and an orthotopically xenografted human breast carcinoma. The goals were threefold: 1) to determine a statistical model for description of the measurement error, 2) to establish the descriptive power of each model, using several goodness-of-fit metrics and a study of parametric identifiability, and 3) to assess the models' ability to forecast future tumor growth. The models included in the study comprised the exponential, exponential-linear, power law, Gompertz, logistic, generalized logistic, von Bertalanffy and a model with dynamic carrying capacity. For the breast data, the dynamics were best captured by the Gompertz and exponential-linear models. The latter also exhibited the highest predictive power, with excellent prediction scores (≥80%) extending out as far as 12 days in the future. For the lung data, the Gompertz and power law models provided the most parsimonious and parametrically identifiable description. However, not one of the models was able to achieve a substantial prediction rate (≥70%) beyond the next day data point. In this context, adjunction of a priori information on the parameter distribution led to considerable improvement. For instance, forecast success rates went from 14.9% to 62.7% when using the power law model to predict the full future tumor growth curves, using just three data points. These results not only have important implications for biological theories of tumor growth and the use of mathematical modeling in preclinical anti-cancer drug investigations, but also may assist in defining how mathematical models could serve as potential prognostic tools in the clinic.

  9. WE-E-17A-01: Characterization of An Imaging-Based Model of Tumor Angiogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Adhikarla, V; Jeraj, R

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Understanding the transient dynamics of tumor oxygenation is important when evaluating tumor-vasculature response to anti-angiogenic therapies. An imaging-based tumor-vasculature model was used to elucidate factors that affect these dynamics. Methods: Tumor growth depends on its doubling time (Td). Hypoxia increases pro-angiogenic factor (VEGF) concentration which is modeled to reduce vessel perfusion, attributing to its effect of increasing vascular permeability. Perfused vessel recruitment depends on the existing perfused vasculature, VEGF concentration and maximum VEGF concentration (VEGFmax) for vessel dysfunction. A convolution-based algorithm couples the tumor to the normal tissue vessel density (VD-nt). The parameters are benchmarked to published pre-clinical datamore » and a sensitivity study evaluating the changes in the peak and time to peak tumor oxygenation characterizes them. The model is used to simulate changes in hypoxia and proliferation PET imaging data obtained using [Cu- 61]Cu-ATSM and [F-18]FLT respectively. Results: Td and VD-nt were found to be the most influential on peak tumor pO2 while VEGFmax was marginally influential. A +20 % change in Td, VD-nt and VEGFmax resulted in +50%, +25% and +5% increase in peak pO2. In contrast, Td was the most influential on the time to peak oxygenation with VD-nt and VEGFmax playing marginal roles. A +20% change in Td, VD-nt and VEGFmax increased the time to peak pO2 by +50%, +5% and +0%. A −20% change in the above parameters resulted in comparable decreases in the peak and time to peak pO2. Model application to the PET data was able to demonstrate the voxel-specific changes in hypoxia of the imaged tumor. Conclusion: Tumor-specific doubling time and vessel density are important parameters to be considered when evaluating hypoxia transients. While the current model simulates the oxygen dynamics of an untreated tumor, incorporation of therapeutic effects can make the model a potent tool for

  10. Agent-Based Modeling of Cancer Stem Cell Driven Solid Tumor Growth.

    PubMed

    Poleszczuk, Jan; Macklin, Paul; Enderling, Heiko

    2016-01-01

    Computational modeling of tumor growth has become an invaluable tool to simulate complex cell-cell interactions and emerging population-level dynamics. Agent-based models are commonly used to describe the behavior and interaction of individual cells in different environments. Behavioral rules can be informed and calibrated by in vitro assays, and emerging population-level dynamics may be validated with both in vitro and in vivo experiments. Here, we describe the design and implementation of a lattice-based agent-based model of cancer stem cell driven tumor growth.

  11. Continuous Release of Tumor-Derived Factors Improves the Modeling of Cachexia in Muscle Cell Culture.

    PubMed

    Jackman, Robert W; Floro, Jess; Yoshimine, Rei; Zitin, Brian; Eiampikul, Maythita; El-Jack, Kahlid; Seto, Danielle N; Kandarian, Susan C

    2017-01-01

    Cachexia is strongly associated with a poor prognosis in cancer patients but the biological trigger is unknown and therefore no therapeutics exist. The loss of skeletal muscle is the most deleterious aspect of cachexia and it appears to depend on secretions from tumor cells. Models for studying wasting in cell culture consist of experiments where skeletal muscle cells are incubated with medium conditioned by tumor cells. This has led to candidates for cachectic factors but some of the features of cachexia in vivo are not yet well-modeled in cell culture experiments. Mouse myotube atrophy measured by myotube diameter in response to medium conditioned by mouse colon carcinoma cells (C26) is consistently less than what is seen in muscles of mice bearing C26 tumors with moderate to severe cachexia. One possible reason for this discrepancy is that in vivo the C26 tumor and skeletal muscle share a circulatory system exposing the muscle to tumor factors in a constant and increasing way. We have applied Transwell®-adapted cell culture conditions to more closely simulate conditions found in vivo where muscle is exposed to the ongoing kinetics of constant tumor secretion of active factors. C26 cells were incubated on a microporous membrane (a Transwell® insert) that constitutes the upper compartment of wells containing plated myotubes. In this model, myotubes are exposed to a constant supply of cancer cell secretions in the medium but without direct contact with the cancer cells, analogous to a shared circulation of muscle and cancer cells in tumor-bearing animals. The results for myotube diameter support the idea that the use of Transwell® inserts serves as a more physiological model of the muscle wasting associated with cancer cachexia than the bolus addition of cancer cell conditioned medium. The Transwell® model supports the notion that the dose and kinetics of cachectic factor delivery to muscle play a significant role in the extent of pathology.

  12. Abdominal Aortic Dissections

    PubMed Central

    Borioni, Raoul; Garofalo, Mariano; De Paulis, Ruggero; Nardi, Paolo; Scaffa, Raffaele; Chiariello, Luigi

    2005-01-01

    Isolated abdominal aortic dissections are rare events. Their anatomic and clinical features are different from those of atherosclerotic aneurysms. We report 4 cases of isolated abdominal aortic dissection that were successfully treated with surgical or endovascular intervention. The anatomic and clinical features and a review of the literature are also presented. PMID:15902826

  13. Abdominal Trauma Revisited.

    PubMed

    Feliciano, David V

    2017-11-01

    Although abdominal trauma has been described since antiquity, formal laparotomies for trauma were not performed until the 1800s. Even with the introduction of general anesthesia in the United States during the years 1842 to 1846, laparotomies for abdominal trauma were not performed during the Civil War. The first laparotomy for an abdominal gunshot wound in the United States was finally performed in New York City in 1884. An aggressive operative approach to all forms of abdominal trauma till the establishment of formal trauma centers (where data were analyzed) resulted in extraordinarily high rates of nontherapeutic laparotomies from the 1880s to the 1960s. More selective operative approaches to patients with abdominal stab wounds (1960s), blunt trauma (1970s), and gunshot wounds (1990s) were then developed. Current adjuncts to the diagnosis of abdominal trauma when serial physical examinations are unreliable include the following: 1) diagnostic peritoneal tap/lavage, 2) surgeon-performed ultrasound examination; 3) contrast-enhanced CT of the abdomen and pelvis; and 4) diagnostic laparoscopy. Operative techniques for injuries to the liver, spleen, duodenum, and pancreas have been refined considerably since World War II. These need to be emphasized repeatedly in an era when fewer patients undergo laparotomy for abdominal trauma. Finally, abdominal trauma damage control is a valuable operative approach in patients with physiologic exhaustion and multiple injuries.

  14. Study on the tumor-induced angiogenesis using mathematical models.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Takashi; Minerva, Dhisa; Nishiyama, Koichi; Koshikawa, Naohiko; Chaplain, Mark Andrew Joseph

    2018-01-01

    We studied angiogenesis using mathematical models describing the dynamics of tip cells. We reviewed the basic ideas of angiogenesis models and its numerical simulation technique to produce realistic computer graphics images of sprouting angiogenesis. We examined the classical model of Anderson-Chaplain using fundamental concepts of mass transport and chemical reaction with ECM degradation included. We then constructed two types of numerical schemes, model-faithful and model-driven ones, where new techniques of numerical simulation are introduced, such as transient probability, particle velocity, and Boolean variables. © 2017 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  15. Evolution of Antibody-Drug Conjugate Tumor Disposition Model to Predict Preclinical Tumor Pharmacokinetics of Trastuzumab-Emtansine (T-DM1).

    PubMed

    Singh, Aman P; Maass, Katie F; Betts, Alison M; Wittrup, K Dane; Kulkarni, Chethana; King, Lindsay E; Khot, Antari; Shah, Dhaval K

    2016-07-01

    A mathematical model capable of accurately characterizing intracellular disposition of ADCs is essential for a priori predicting unconjugated drug concentrations inside the tumor. Towards this goal, the objectives of this manuscript were to: (1) evolve previously published cellular disposition model of ADC with more intracellular details to characterize the disposition of T-DM1 in different HER2 expressing cell lines, (2) integrate the improved cellular model with the ADC tumor disposition model to a priori predict DM1 concentrations in a preclinical tumor model, and (3) identify prominent pathways and sensitive parameters associated with intracellular activation of ADCs. The cellular disposition model was augmented by incorporating intracellular ADC degradation and passive diffusion of unconjugated drug across tumor cells. Different biomeasures and chemomeasures for T-DM1, quantified in the companion manuscript, were incorporated into the modified model of ADC to characterize in vitro pharmacokinetics of T-DM1 in three HER2+ cell lines. When the cellular model was integrated with the tumor disposition model, the model was able to a priori predict tumor DM1 concentrations in xenograft mice. Pathway analysis suggested different contribution of antigen-mediated and passive diffusion pathways for intracellular unconjugated drug exposure between in vitro and in vivo systems. Global and local sensitivity analyses revealed that non-specific deconjugation and passive diffusion of the drug across tumor cell membrane are key parameters for drug exposure inside a cell. Finally, a systems pharmacokinetic model for intracellular processing of ADCs has been proposed to highlight our current understanding about the determinants of ADC activation inside a cell.

  16. Advantages of a dual-tracer model over reference tissue models for binding potential measurement in tumors

    PubMed Central

    Tichauer, K M; Samkoe, K S; Klubben, W S; Hasan, T; Pogue, B W

    2012-01-01

    The quantification of tumor molecular expression in vivo could have a significant impact for informing and monitoring immerging targeted therapies in oncology. Molecular imaging of targeted tracers can be used to quantify receptor expression in the form of a binding potential (BP) if the arterial input curve or a surrogate of it is also measured. However, the assumptions of the most common approaches (reference tissue models) may not be valid for use in tumors. In this study, the validity of reference tissue models is investigated for use in tumors experimentally and in simulations. Three different tumor lines were grown subcutaneously in athymic mice and the mice were injected with a mixture of an epidermal growth factor receptor- (EGFR-) targeted fluorescent tracer and an untargeted fluorescent tracer. A one-compartment plasma input model demonstrated that the transport kinetics of both tracers were significantly different between tumors and all potential reference tissues, and using the reference tissue model resulted in a theoretical underestimation in BP of 50 ± 37%. On the other hand, the targeted and untargeted tracers demonstrated similar transport kinetics, allowing a dual-tracer approach to be employed to accurately estimate binding potential (with a theoretical error of 0.23 ± 9.07%). These findings highlight the potential for using a dual-tracer approach to quantify receptor expression in tumors with abnormal hemodynamics, possibly to inform the choice or progress of molecular cancer therapies. PMID:23022732

  17. Abdominal CT with model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR): initial results of a prospective trial comparing ultralow-dose with standard-dose imaging.

    PubMed

    Pickhardt, Perry J; Lubner, Meghan G; Kim, David H; Tang, Jie; Ruma, Julie A; del Rio, Alejandro Muñoz; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to report preliminary results of an ongoing prospective trial of ultralow-dose abdominal MDCT. Imaging with standard-dose contrast-enhanced (n = 21) and unenhanced (n = 24) clinical abdominal MDCT protocols was immediately followed by ultralow-dose imaging of a matched series of 45 consecutively registered adults (mean age, 57.9 years; mean body mass index, 28.5). The ultralow-dose images were reconstructed with filtered back projection (FBP), adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR), and model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR). Standard-dose series were reconstructed with FBP (reference standard). Image noise was measured at multiple predefined sites. Two blinded abdominal radiologists interpreted randomly presented ultralow-dose images for multilevel subjective image quality (5-point scale) and depiction of organ-based focal lesions. Mean dose reduction relative to the standard series was 74% (median, 78%; range, 57-88%; mean effective dose, 1.90 mSv). Mean multiorgan image noise for low-dose MBIR was 14.7 ± 2.6 HU, significantly lower than standard-dose FBP (28.9 ± 9.9 HU), low-dose FBP (59.2 ± 23.3 HU), and ASIR (45.6 ± 14.1 HU) (p < 0.001). The mean subjective image quality score for low-dose MBIR (3.0 ± 0.5) was significantly higher than for low-dose FBP (1.6 ± 0.7) and ASIR (1.8 ± 0.7) (p < 0.001). Readers identified 213 focal noncalcific lesions with standard-dose FBP. Pooled lesion detection was higher for low-dose MBIR (79.3% [169/213]) compared with low-dose FBP (66.2% [141/213]) and ASIR (62.0% [132/213]) (p < 0.05). MBIR shows great potential for substantially reducing radiation doses at routine abdominal CT. Both FBP and ASIR are limited in this regard owing to reduced image quality and diagnostic capability. Further investigation is needed to determine the optimal dose level for MBIR that maintains adequate diagnostic performance. In general, objective and subjective image quality measurements do

  18. Combining fisetin and ionizing radiation suppresses the growth of mammalian colorectal cancers in xenograft tumor models.

    PubMed

    Leu, Jyh-Der; Wang, Bo-Shen; Chiu, Shu-Jun; Chang, Chun-Yuan; Chen, Chien-Chih; Chen, Fu-Du; Avirmed, Shiirevnyamba; Lee, Yi-Jang

    2016-12-01

    Fisetin (3,7,3',4'-tetrahydroxyflavone), which belongs to the flavonoid group of polyphenols and is found in a wide range of plants, has been reported to exhibit a number of biological activities in human cancer cells, including antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antiangiogenic, anti-invasive and antiproliferative effects. Although previous in vitro studies have shown that fisetin treatment increases the apoptotic rate and enhances the radiosensitivity of human colorectal cancer cells, the in vivo effects of fisetin on tumor growth remain unclear. In the present study a murine xenograft tumor model was employed to investigate the therapeutic effects of fisetin in combination with radiation on CT-26 colon cancer cells and human HCT116 colorectal cancer cells. This revealed that intratumoral injection of fisetin significantly suppressed the growth of CT-26 tumors compared with the untreated control group, but had little effect on the growth of HCT116 tumors. However, fisetin in combination with 2-Gy radiation enhanced tumor suppressor activity in murine colon and human colorectal xenograft tumors, as compared with 2-Gy fractionated radiation administered alone for 5 days and fisetin alone. Interestingly, fisetin downregulated the expression of the oncoprotein securin in a p53-independent manner. However, securin-null HCT116 tumors showed only moderate sensitivity to fisetin treatment, and the combination of fisetin and radiation did not significantly suppress securin-null HCT116 tumor growth compared with normal HCT116 tumors. Therefore, the role of securin in mediating the effect of fisetin on colorectal cancer growth warrants further investigation. In conclusion, the results of the current study provide important preclinical data for evaluating the efficacy of fisetin and radiation combination treatment as an adjuvant chemoradiotherapy for human colorectal cancers.

  19. Abdominal hernias: Radiological features

    PubMed Central

    Lassandro, Francesco; Iasiello, Francesca; Pizza, Nunzia Luisa; Valente, Tullio; Stefano, Maria Luisa Mangoni di Santo; Grassi, Roberto; Muto, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    Abdominal wall hernias are common diseases of the abdomen with a global incidence approximately 4%-5%. They are distinguished in external, diaphragmatic and internal hernias on the basis of their localisation. Groin hernias are the most common with a prevalence of 75%, followed by femoral (15%) and umbilical (8%). There is a higher prevalence in males (M:F, 8:1). Diagnosis is usually made on physical examination. However, clinical diagnosis may be difficult, especially in patients with obesity, pain or abdominal wall scarring. In these cases, abdominal imaging may be the first clue to the correct diagnosis and to confirm suspected complications. Different imaging modalities are used: conventional radiographs or barium studies, ultrasonography and Computed Tomography. Imaging modalities can aid in the differential diagnosis of palpable abdominal wall masses and can help to define hernial contents such as fatty tissue, bowel, other organs or fluid. This work focuses on the main radiological findings of abdominal herniations. PMID:21860678

  20. ¹H MRS characterization of neurochemical profiles in orthotopic mouse models of human brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Hulsey, Keith M; Mashimo, Tomoyuki; Banerjee, Abhishek; Soesbe, Todd C; Spence, Jeffrey S; Vemireddy, Vamsidhara; Maher, Elizabeth A; Bachoo, Robert M; Choi, Changho

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM), the most common primary brain tumor, is resistant to currently available treatments. The development of mouse models of human GBM has provided a tool for studying mechanisms involved in tumor initiation and growth as well as a platform for preclinical investigation of new drugs. In this study we used (1) H MR spectroscopy to study the neurochemical profile of a human orthotopic tumor (HOT) mouse model of human GBM. The goal of this study was to evaluate differences in metabolite concentrations in the GBM HOT mice when compared with normal mouse brain in order to determine if MRS could reliably differentiate tumor from normal brain. A TE =19 ms PRESS sequence at 9.4 T was used for measuring metabolite levels in 12 GBM mice and 8 healthy mice. Levels for 12 metabolites and for lipids/macromolecules at 0.9 ppm and at 1.3 ppm were reliably detected in all mouse spectra. The tumors had significantly lower concentrations of total creatine, GABA, glutamate, total N-acetylaspartate, aspartate, lipids/macromolecules at 0.9 ppm, and lipids/macromolecules at 1.3 ppm than did the brains of normal mice. The concentrations of glycine and lactate, however, were significantly higher in tumors than in normal brain. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Color-coded Imaging Enables Fluorescence-guided Surgery to Resect the Tumor Along with the Tumor Microenvironment in a Syngeneic Mouse Model of EL-4 Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Kosuke; Suetsugu, Atsushi; Nakamura, Miki; Matsumoto, Takuro; Kunisada, Takahiro; Shimizu, Masahito; Saji, Shigetoyo; Moriwaki, Hisataka; Bouvet, Michael; Hoffman, Robert M

    2016-09-01

    Fluorescence-guided surgery (FGS) of cancer is an emerging technology. We have previously shown the importance of resecting both the tumor and the tumor microenvironment (TME) for curative FGS. We also previously developed a syngeneic model using the mouse lymphoma cell line EL-4, expressing red fluorescent protein (EL-4-RFP), growing in green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgenic mice, which we have used in the present report to develop FGS of the tumor microenvironment. EL-4-RFP lymphoma cells were injected subcutaneously in C57/BL6 GFP transgenic mice. EL-4-RFP cells subsequently formed tumors by 35 days after cell transplantation. Using the portable hand-held Dino-Lite digital imaging system, subcutaneous tumors were resected by FGS. Resected tumor tissues were visualized with the Olympus FV1000 confocal microscope. Using the Dino-Lite, subcutaneous tumors and the tumor microenvironment were clearly visualized and resected. In the resected tumor, host stromal cells, including adipocyte-like cells and blood vessels with lymphocytes, were observed by confocal microscopy in addition to cancer cells by color-coded confocal imaging. The cancer cells and stromal cells in the TME were deeply intermingled in a highly-complex pattern. Color-coded FGS is an effective method to completely resect cancer cells along with the stromal cells in the TME which interact in a highly-complex pattern. Microscopically, cancer cells invade the TME and vice versa. To prevent tumor recurrence, it is necessary to resect the TME along with the tumor. Copyright© 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  2. Perfusion kinetics in human brain tumor with DCE-MRI derived model and CFD analysis.

    PubMed

    Bhandari, A; Bansal, A; Singh, A; Sinha, N

    2017-07-05

    Cancer is one of the leading causes of death all over the world. Among the strategies that are used for cancer treatment, the effectiveness of chemotherapy is often hindered by factors such as irregular and non-uniform uptake of drugs inside tumor. Thus, accurate prediction of drug transport and deposition inside tumor is crucial for increasing the effectiveness of chemotherapeutic treatment. In this study, a computational model of human brain tumor is developed that incorporates dynamic contrast enhanced-magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) data into a voxelized porous media model. The model takes into account realistic transport and perfusion kinetics parameters together with realistic heterogeneous tumor vasculature and accurate arterial input function (AIF), which makes it patient specific. The computational results for interstitial fluid pressure (IFP), interstitial fluid velocity (IFV) and tracer concentration show good agreement with the experimental results. The computational model can be extended further for predicting the deposition of chemotherapeutic drugs in tumor environment as well as selection of the best chemotherapeutic drug for a specific patient. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Comparing the landcapes of common retroviral insertion sites across tumor models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weishaupt, Holger; Čančer, Matko; Engström, Cristopher; Silvestrov, Sergei; Swartling, Fredrik J.

    2017-01-01

    Retroviral tagging represents an important technique, which allows researchers to screen for candidate cancer genes. The technique is based on the integration of retroviral sequences into the genome of a host organism, which might then lead to the artificial inhibition or expression of proximal genetic elements. The identification of potential cancer genes in this framework involves the detection of genomic regions (common insertion sites; CIS) which contain a number of such viral integration sites that is greater than expected by chance. During the last two decades, a number of different methods have been discussed for the identification of such loci and the respective techniques have been applied to a variety of different retroviruses and/or tumor models. We have previously established a retrovirus driven brain tumor model and reported the CISs which were found based on a Monte Carlo statistics derived detection paradigm. In this study, we consider a recently proposed alternative graph theory based method for identifying CISs and compare the resulting CIS landscape in our brain tumor dataset to those obtained when using the Monte Carlo approach. Finally, we also employ the graph-based method to compare the CIS landscape in our brain tumor model with those of other published retroviral tumor models.

  4. Longitudinal measurement of extracellular matrix rigidity in 3D tumor models using particle-tracking microrheology.

    PubMed

    Jones, Dustin P; Hanna, William; El-Hamidi, Hamid; Celli, Jonathan P

    2014-06-10

    The mechanical microenvironment has been shown to act as a crucial regulator of tumor growth behavior and signaling, which is itself remodeled and modified as part of a set of complex, two-way mechanosensitive interactions. While the development of biologically-relevant 3D tumor models have facilitated mechanistic studies on the impact of matrix rheology on tumor growth, the inverse problem of mapping changes in the mechanical environment induced by tumors remains challenging. Here, we describe the implementation of particle-tracking microrheology (PTM) in conjunction with 3D models of pancreatic cancer as part of a robust and viable approach for longitudinally monitoring physical changes in the tumor microenvironment, in situ. The methodology described here integrates a system of preparing in vitro 3D models embedded in a model extracellular matrix (ECM) scaffold of Type I collagen with fluorescently labeled probes uniformly distributed for position- and time-dependent microrheology measurements throughout the specimen. In vitro tumors are plated and probed in parallel conditions using multiwell imaging plates. Drawing on established methods, videos of tracer probe movements are transformed via the Generalized Stokes Einstein Relation (GSER) to report the complex frequency-dependent viscoelastic shear modulus, G*(ω). Because this approach is imaging-based, mechanical characterization is also mapped onto large transmitted-light spatial fields to simultaneously report qualitative changes in 3D tumor size and phenotype. Representative results showing contrasting mechanical response in sub-regions associated with localized invasion-induced matrix degradation as well as system calibration, validation data are presented. Undesirable outcomes from common experimental errors and troubleshooting of these issues are also presented. The 96-well 3D culture plating format implemented in this protocol is conducive to correlation of microrheology measurements with therapeutic

  5. In vitro microfluidic models of tumor microenvironment to screen transport of drugs and nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Ozcelikkale, Altug; Moon, Hye-Ran; Linnes, Michael; Han, Bumsoo

    2017-09-01

    Advances in nanotechnology have enabled numerous types of nanoparticles (NPs) to improve drug delivery to tumors. While many NP systems have been proposed, their clinical translation has been less than anticipated primarily due to failure of current preclinical evaluation techniques to adequately model the complex interactions between the NP and physiological barriers of tumor microenvironment. This review focuses on microfluidic tumor models for characterization of delivery efficacy and toxicity of cancer nanomedicine. Microfluidics offer significant advantages over traditional macroscale cell cultures by enabling recapitulation of tumor microenvironment through precise control of physiological cues such as hydrostatic pressure, shear stress, oxygen, and nutrient gradients. Microfluidic systems have recently started to be adapted for screening of drugs and NPs under physiologically relevant settings. So far the two primary application areas of microfluidics in this area have been high-throughput screening using traditional culture settings such as single cells or multicellular tumor spheroids, and mimicry of tumor microenvironment for study of cancer-related cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. These microfluidic technologies are also useful in modeling specific steps in NP delivery to tumor and characterize NP transport properties and outcomes by systematic variation of physiological conditions. Ultimately, it will be possible to design drug-screening platforms uniquely tailored for individual patient physiology using microfluidics. These in vitro models can contribute to development of precision medicine by enabling rapid and patient-specific evaluation of cancer nanomedicine. WIREs Nanomed Nanobiotechnol 2017, 9:e1460. doi: 10.1002/wnan.1460 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Image-based modeling of tumor shrinkage in head and neck radiation therapy1

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Ming; Xie, Yaoqin; Moros, Eduardo G.; Le, Quynh-Thu; Xing, Lei

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Understanding the kinetics of tumor growth∕shrinkage represents a critical step in quantitative assessment of therapeutics and realization of adaptive radiation therapy. This article presents a novel framework for image-based modeling of tumor change and demonstrates its performance with synthetic images and clinical cases. Methods: Due to significant tumor tissue content changes, similarity-based models are not suitable for describing the process of tumor volume changes. Under the hypothesis that tissue features in a tumor volume or at the boundary region are partially preserved, the kinetic change was modeled in two steps: (1) Autodetection of homologous tissue features shared by two input images using the scale invariance feature transformation (SIFT) method; and (2) establishment of a voxel-to-voxel correspondence between the images for the remaining spatial points by interpolation. The correctness of the tissue feature correspondence was assured by a bidirectional association procedure, where SIFT features were mapped from template to target images and reversely. A series of digital phantom experiments and five head and neck clinical cases were used to assess the performance of the proposed technique. Results: The proposed technique can faithfully identify the known changes introduced when constructing the digital phantoms. The subsequent feature-guided thin plate spline calculation reproduced the “ground truth” with accuracy better than 1.5 mm. For the clinical cases, the new algorithm worked reliably for a volume change as large as 30%. Conclusions: An image-based tumor kinetic algorithm was developed to model the tumor response to radiation therapy. The technique provides a practical framework for future application in adaptive radiation therapy. PMID:20527569

  7. CD133+ tumor initiating cells in a syngenic murine model of pancreatic cancer respond to Minnelide.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Sulagna; Nomura, Alice; Sangwan, Veena; Chugh, Rohit; Dudeja, Vikas; Vickers, Selwyn M; Saluja, Ashok

    2014-05-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is the fourth leading cause for cancer-related mortality with a survival rate of less than 5%. Late diagnosis and lack of effective chemotherapeutic regimen contribute to these grim survival statistics. Relapse of any tumor is largely attributed to the presence of tumor-initiating cells (TIC) or cancer stem cells (CSC). These cells are considered as hurdles to cancer therapy as no known chemotherapeutic compound is reported to target them. Thus, there is an urgent need to develop a TIC-targeted therapy for pancreatic cancer. We isolated CD133(+) cells from a spontaneous pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma mouse model and studied both surface expression, molecular markers of pancreatic TICs. We also studied tumor initiation properties by implanting low numbers of CD133(+) cells in immune competent mice. Effect of Minnelide, a drug currently under phase I clinical trial, was studied on the tumors derived from the CD133(+) cells. Our study showed for the first time that CD133(+) population demonstrated all the molecular markers for pancreatic TIC. These cells initiated tumors in immunocompetent mouse models and showed increased expression of prosurvival and proinvasive proteins compared to the CD133(-) non-TIC population. Our study further showed that Minnelide was very efficient in downregulating both CD133(-) and CD133(+) population in the tumors, resulting in a 60% decrease in tumor volume compared with the untreated ones. As Minnelide is currently under phase I clinical trial, its evaluation in reducing tumor burden by decreasing TIC as well as non-TIC population suggests its potential as an effective therapy. ©2014 AACR.

  8. A neurosurgical simulation of skull base tumors using a 3D printed rapid prototyping model containing mesh structures.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Kosuke; Harada, Naoyuki; Masuda, Hiroyuki; Sugo, Nobuo; Terazono, Sayaka; Okonogi, Shinichi; Sakaeyama, Yuki; Fuchinoue, Yutaka; Ando, Syunpei; Fukushima, Daisuke; Nomoto, Jun; Nemoto, Masaaki

    2016-06-01

    Deep regions are not visible in three-dimensional (3D) printed rapid prototyping (RP) models prepared from opaque materials, which is not the case with translucent images. The objectives of this study were to develop an RP model in which a skull base tumor was simulated using mesh, and to investigate its usefulness for surgical simulations by evaluating the visibility of its deep regions. A 3D printer that employs binder jetting and is mainly used to prepare plaster models was used. RP models containing a solid tumor, no tumor, and a mesh tumor were prepared based on computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and angiographic data for four cases of petroclival tumor. Twelve neurosurgeons graded the three types of RP model into the following four categories: 'clearly visible,' 'visible,' 'difficult to see,' and 'invisible,' based on the visibility of the internal carotid artery, basilar artery, and brain stem through a craniotomy performed via the combined transpetrosal approach. In addition, the 3D positional relationships between these structures and the tumor were assessed. The internal carotid artery, basilar artery, and brain stem and the positional relationships of these structures with the tumor were significantly more visible in the RP models with mesh tumors than in the RP models with solid or no tumors. The deep regions of PR models containing mesh skull base tumors were easy to visualize. This 3D printing-based method might be applicable to various surgical simulations.

  9. Ultimate dynamics of the Kirschner-Panetta model: Tumor eradication and related problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starkov, Konstantin E.; Krishchenko, Alexander P.

    2017-10-01

    In this paper we consider the ultimate dynamics of the Kirschner-Panetta model which was created for studying the immune response to tumors under special types of immunotherapy. New ultimate upper bounds for compact invariant sets of this model are given, as well as sufficient conditions for the existence of a positively invariant polytope. We establish three types of conditions for the nonexistence of compact invariant sets in the domain of the tumor-cell population. Our main results are two types of conditions for global tumor elimination depending on the ratio between the proliferation rate of the immune cells and their mortality rate. These conditions are described in terms of simple algebraic inequalities imposed on model parameters and treatment parameters. Our theoretical studies of ultimate dynamics are complemented by numerical simulation results.

  10. COMPARISON OF ADAPTIVE STATISTICAL ITERATIVE RECONSTRUCTION (ASIR™) AND MODEL-BASED ITERATIVE RECONSTRUCTION (VEO™) FOR PAEDIATRIC ABDOMINAL CT EXAMINATIONS: AN OBSERVER PERFORMANCE STUDY OF DIAGNOSTIC IMAGE QUALITY.

    PubMed

    Hultenmo, Maria; Caisander, Håkan; Mack, Karsten; Thilander-Klang, Anne

    2016-06-01

    The diagnostic image quality of 75 paediatric abdominal computed tomography (CT) examinations reconstructed with two different iterative reconstruction (IR) algorithms-adaptive statistical IR (ASiR™) and model-based IR (Veo™)-was compared. Axial and coronal images were reconstructed with 70 % ASiR with the Soft™ convolution kernel and with the Veo algorithm. The thickness of the reconstructed images was 2.5 or 5 mm depending on the scanning protocol used. Four radiologists graded the delineation of six abdominal structures and the diagnostic usefulness of the image quality. The Veo reconstruction significantly improved the visibility of most of the structures compared with ASiR in all subgroups of images. For coronal images, the Veo reconstruction resulted in significantly improved ratings of the diagnostic use of the image quality compared with the ASiR reconstruction. This was not seen for the axial images. The greatest improvement using Veo reconstruction was observed for the 2.5 mm coronal slices. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Mild elevation of body temperature reduces tumor interstitial fluid pressure and hypoxia and enhances efficacy of radiotherapy in murine tumor models.

    PubMed

    Sen, Arindam; Capitano, Maegan L; Spernyak, Joseph A; Schueckler, John T; Thomas, Seneca; Singh, Anurag K; Evans, Sharon S; Hylander, Bonnie L; Repasky, Elizabeth A

    2011-06-01

    Human and rodent solid tumors often exhibit elevated interstitial fluid pressure (IFP). This condition is recognized as a prognostic indicator for reduced responses to therapy and decreased disease-free survival rate. In the present study, we tested whether induction of a thermoregulatory-mediated increase in tissue blood flow, induced by exposure of mice to mild environmental heat stress, could influence IFP and other vascular parameters within tumors. Using several murine tumor models, we found that heating results in a sustained reduction in tumor IFP correlating with increased tumor vascular perfusion (measured by fluorescent imaging of perfused vessels, laser Doppler flowmetry, and MRI) as well as a sustained reduction in tumor hypoxia. Furthermore, when radiation therapy was administered 24 hours postheating, we observed a significant improvement in efficacy that may be a result of the sustained reduction in tumor hypoxia. These data suggest, for the first time, that environmental manipulation of normal vasomotor function is capable of achieving therapeutically beneficial changes in IFP and microvascular function in the tumor microenvironment.

  12. Deformation Prediction and Geometrical Modeling of Head and Neck Cancer Tumor: A Data Mining Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azimi, Maryam

    Radiation therapy has been used in the treatment of cancer tumors for several years and many cancer patients receive radiotherapy. It may be used as primary therapy or with a combination of surgery or other kinds of therapy such as chemotherapy, hormone therapy or some mixture of the three. The treatment objective is to destroy cancer cells or shrink the tumor by planning an adequate radiation dose to the desired target without damaging the normal tissues. By using the pre-treatment Computer Tomography (CT) images, most of the radiotherapy planning systems design the target and assume that the size of the tumor will not change throughout the treatment course, which takes 5 to 7 weeks. Based on this assumption, the total amount of radiation is planned and fractionated for the daily dose required to be delivered to the patient's body. However, this assumption is flawed because the patients receiving radiotherapy have marked changes in tumor geometry during the treatment period. Therefore, there is a critical need to understand the changes of the tumor shape and size over time during the course of radiotherapy in order to prevent significant effects of inaccuracy in the planning. In this research, a methodology is proposed in order to monitor and predict daily (fraction day) tumor volume and surface changes of head and neck cancer tumors during the entire treatment period. In the proposed method, geometrical modeling and data mining techniques will be used rather than repetitive CT scans data to predict the tumor deformation for radiation planning. Clinical patient data were obtained from the University of Texas-MD Anderson Cancer Center (MDACC). In the first step, by using CT scan data, the tumor's progressive geometric changes during the treatment period are quantified. The next step relates to using regression analysis in order to develop predictive models for tumor geometry based on the geometric analysis results and the patients' selected attributes (age, weight

  13. In Vivo Imaging Reveals Significant Tumor Vascular Dysfunction and Increased Tumor Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1α Expression Induced by High Single-Dose Irradiation in a Pancreatic Tumor Model

    SciTech Connect

    Maeda, Azusa; Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario; Chen, Yonghong

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of high-dose irradiation on pancreatic tumor vasculature and microenvironment using in vivo imaging techniques. Methods and Materials: A BxPC3 pancreatic tumor xenograft was established in a dorsal skinfold window chamber model and a subcutaneous hind leg model. Tumors were irradiated with a single dose of 4, 12, or 24 Gy. The dorsal skinfold window chamber model was used to assess tumor response, vascular function and permeability, platelet and leukocyte adhesion to the vascular endothelium, and tumor hypoxia for up to 14 days after 24-Gy irradiation. The hind leg model was used to monitor tumor size, hypoxia, and vascularitymore » for up to 65 days after 24-Gy irradiation. Tumors were assessed histologically to validate in vivo observations. Results: In vivo fluorescence imaging revealed temporary vascular dysfunction in tumors irradiated with a single dose of 4 to 24 Gy, but most significantly with a single dose of 24 Gy. Vascular functional recovery was observed by 14 days after irradiation in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, irradiation with 24 Gy caused platelet and leukocyte adhesion to the vascular endothelium within hours to days after irradiation. Vascular permeability was significantly higher in irradiated tumors compared with nonirradiated controls 14 days after irradiation. This observation corresponded with increased expression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α in irradiated tumors. In the hind leg model, irradiation with a single dose of 24 Gy led to tumor growth delay, followed by tumor regrowth. Conclusions: Irradiation of the BxPC3 tumors with a single dose of 24 Gy caused transient vascular dysfunction and increased expression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α. Such biological changes may impact tumor response to high single-dose and hypofractionated irradiation, and further investigations are needed to better understand the clinical outcomes of stereotactic body radiation therapy.« less

  14. Oxygen distribution in tumors: a qualitative analysis and modeling study providing a novel Monte Carlo approach.

    PubMed

    Lagerlöf, Jakob H; Kindblom, Jon; Bernhardt, Peter

    2014-09-01

    To construct a Monte Carlo (MC)-based simulation model for analyzing the dependence of tumor oxygen distribution on different variables related to tumor vasculature [blood velocity, vessel-to-vessel proximity (vessel proximity), and inflowing oxygen partial pressure (pO2)]. A voxel-based tissue model containing parallel capillaries with square cross-sections (sides of 10 μm) was constructed. Green's function was used for diffusion calculations and Michaelis-Menten's kinetics to manage oxygen consumption. The model was tuned to approximately reproduce the oxygenational status of a renal carcinoma; the depth oxygenation curves (DOC) were fitted with an analytical expression to facilitate rapid MC simulations of tumor oxygen distribution. DOCs were simulated with three variables at three settings each (blood velocity, vessel proximity, and inflowing pO2), which resulted in 27 combinations of conditions. To create a model that simulated variable oxygen distributions, the oxygen tension at a specific point was randomly sampled with trilinear interpolation in the dataset from the first simulation. Six correlations between blood velocity, vessel proximity, and inflowing pO2 were hypothesized. Variable models with correlated parameters were compared to each other and to a nonvariable, DOC-based model to evaluate the differences in simulated oxygen distributions and tumor radiosensitivities for different tumor sizes. For tumors with radii ranging from 5 to 30 mm, the nonvariable DOC model tended to generate normal or log-normal oxygen distributions, with a cut-off at zero. The pO2 distributions simulated with the six-variable DOC models were quite different from the distributions generated with the nonvariable DOC model; in the former case the variable models simulated oxygen distributions that were more similar to in vivo results found in the literature. For larger tumors, the oxygen distributions became truncated in the lower end, due to anoxia, but smaller tumors showed

  15. Predicting oropharyngeal tumor volume throughout the course of radiation therapy from pretreatment computed tomography data using general linear models.

    PubMed

    Yock, Adam D; Rao, Arvind; Dong, Lei; Beadle, Beth M; Garden, Adam S; Kudchadker, Rajat J; Court, Laurence E

    2014-05-01

    The purpose of this work was to develop and evaluate the accuracy of several predictive models of variation in tumor volume throughout the course of radiation therapy. Nineteen patients with oropharyngeal cancers were imaged daily with CT-on-rails for image-guided alignment per an institutional protocol. The daily volumes of 35 tumors in these 19 patients were determined and used to generate (1) a linear model in which tumor volume changed at a constant rate, (2) a general linear model that utilized the power fit relationship between the daily and initial tumor volumes, and (3) a functional general linear model that identified and exploited the primary modes of variation between time series describing the changing tumor volumes. Primary and nodal tumor volumes were examined separately. The accuracy of these models in predicting daily tumor volumes were compared with those of static and linear reference models using leave-one-out cross-validation. In predicting the daily volume of primary tumors, the general linear model and the functional general linear model were more accurate than the static reference model by 9.9% (range: -11.6%-23.8%) and 14.6% (range: -7.3%-27.5%), respectively, and were more accurate than the linear reference model by 14.2% (range: -6.8%-40.3%) and 13.1% (range: -1.5%-52.5%), respectively. In predicting the daily volume of nodal tumors, only the 14.4% (range: -11.1%-20.5%) improvement in accuracy of the functional general linear model compared to the static reference model was statistically significant. A general linear model and a functional general linear model trained on data from a small population of patients can predict the primary tumor volume throughout the course of radiation therapy with greater accuracy than standard reference models. These more accurate models may increase the prognostic value of information about the tumor garnered from pretreatment computed tomography images and facilitate improved treatment management.

  16. Percutaneous radiofrequency ablation of lung tumors in a large animal model.

    PubMed

    Ahrar, Kamran; Price, Roger E; Wallace, Michael J; Madoff, David C; Gupta, Sanjay; Morello, Frank A; Wright, Kenneth C

    2003-08-01

    Percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is accepted therapy for liver tumors in the appropriate clinical setting, but its use in lung neoplasms remains investigational. We undertook this study to evaluate the feasibility and immediate effectiveness of RFA for treatment of both solitary pulmonary nodules and clusters of lung tumors in a large animal model. Percutaneous RFA of 14 lung tumors in five dogs was performed under CT guidance. Animals were euthanatized 8-48 hours after the procedure. The lungs and adjacent structures were harvested for gross and histopathologic evaluation. Five solitary pulmonary nodules (range, 17-26 mm) and three clusters of three nodules each (range, 7-17 mm per nodule) were treated with RFA. All ablations were technically successful. Perilesional ground-glass opacity and small asymptomatic pneumothoraces (n = 4) were visualized during the RFA sessions. One dog developed a large pneumothorax treated with tube thoracostomy but was euthanatized 8 hours post-RFA for persistent pneumothorax and continued breathing difficulty. Follow-up CT 48 hours post-RFA revealed opacification of the whole lung segment. Gross and histopathologic evaluation showed complete thermal coagulation necrosis of all treated lesions without evidence of any viable tumor. The region of thermal coagulation necrosis typically extended to the lung surface. Small regions of pulmonary hemorrhage and congestion often surrounded the areas of coagulation necrosis. RFA can be used to treat both solitary pulmonary nodules and clusters of tumor nodules in the canine lung tumor model. This model may be useful for development of specific RFA protocols for human lung tumors.

  17. Magnetic fluid-modeled microgravity: a novel way to treat tumor.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jun; Yan, Zhiqiang; Liu, Rongrong; Wang, Nanding; Li, Jing; Wang, Zongren

    2011-12-01

    With the advances of nanotechnology in recent years, our understanding of the therapy of cancers has deepened and the development of new technologies for cancer diseases has emerged. Here, with the recent discoveries of nanomagnetic fluids as well as microgravity effects upon cancerous cells, we suggest an innovative method of treating tumor using magnetic fluid-modeled microgravity. Magnetic fluids are delivered by outside magnetic field to tumor issue either intravenously or through direct injection, and this is followed by application of an uniform external magnetic field that causes microgravity. The modeled microgravity is to inhibit cancerous cells growth and invasion. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. A 3D Poly(ethylene glycol)-based Tumor Angiogenesis Model to Study the Influence of Vascular Cells on Lung Tumor Cell Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roudsari, Laila C.; Jeffs, Sydney E.; Witt, Amber S.; Gill, Bartley J.; West, Jennifer L.

    2016-09-01

    Tumor angiogenesis is critical to tumor growth and metastasis, yet much is unknown about the role vascular cells play in the tumor microenvironment. In vitro models that mimic in vivo tumor neovascularization facilitate exploration of this role. Here we investigated lung adenocarcinoma cancer cells (344SQ) and endothelial and pericyte vascular cells encapsulated in cell-adhesive, proteolytically-degradable poly(ethylene) glycol-based hydrogels. 344SQ in hydrogels formed spheroids and secreted proangiogenic growth factors that significantly increased with exposure to transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1), a potent tumor progression-promoting factor. Vascular cells in hydrogels formed tubule networks with localized activated TGF-β1. To study cancer cell-vascular cell interactions, we engineered a 2-layer hydrogel with 344SQ and vascular cell layers. Large, invasive 344SQ clusters (area > 5,000 μm2, circularity < 0.25) developed at the interface between the layers, and were not evident further from the interface or in control hydrogels without vascular cells. A modified model with spatially restricted 344SQ and vascular cell layers confirmed that observed cluster morphological changes required close proximity to vascular cells. Additionally, TGF-β1 inhibition blocked endothelial cell-driven 344SQ migration. Our findings suggest vascular cells contribute to tumor progression and establish this culture system as a platform for studying tumor vascularization.

  19. A 3D Poly(ethylene glycol)-based Tumor Angiogenesis Model to Study the Influence of Vascular Cells on Lung Tumor Cell Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Roudsari, Laila C.; Jeffs, Sydney E.; Witt, Amber S.; Gill, Bartley J.; West, Jennifer L.

    2016-01-01

    Tumor angiogenesis is critical to tumor growth and metastasis, yet much is unknown about the role vascular cells play in the tumor microenvironment. In vitro models that mimic in vivo tumor neovascularization facilitate exploration of this role. Here we investigated lung adenocarcinoma cancer cells (344SQ) and endothelial and pericyte vascular cells encapsulated in cell-adhesive, proteolytically-degradable poly(ethylene) glycol-based hydrogels. 344SQ in hydrogels formed spheroids and secreted proangiogenic growth factors that significantly increased with exposure to transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1), a potent tumor progression-promoting factor. Vascular cells in hydrogels formed tubule networks with localized activated TGF-β1. To study cancer cell-vascular cell interactions, we engineered a 2-layer hydrogel with 344SQ and vascular cell layers. Large, invasive 344SQ clusters (area > 5,000 μm2, circularity < 0.25) developed at the interface between the layers, and were not evident further from the interface or in control hydrogels without vascular cells. A modified model with spatially restricted 344SQ and vascular cell layers confirmed that observed cluster morphological changes required close proximity to vascular cells. Additionally, TGF-β1 inhibition blocked endothelial cell-driven 344SQ migration. Our findings suggest vascular cells contribute to tumor progression and establish this culture system as a platform for studying tumor vascularization. PMID:27596933

  20. A Mathematical Tumor Model with Immune Resistance and Drug Therapy: An Optimal Control Approach

    DOE PAGES

    De Pillis, L. G.; Radunskaya, A.

    2001-01-01

    We present a competition model of cancer tumor growth that includes both the immune system response and drug therapy. This is a four-population model that includes tumor cells, host cells, immune cells, and drug interaction. We analyze the stability of the drug-free equilibria with respect to the immune response in order to look for target basins of attraction. One of our goals was to simulate qualitatively the asynchronous tumor-drug interaction known as “Jeffs phenomenon.” The model we develop is successful in generating this asynchronous response behavior. Our other goal was to identify treatment protocols that could improve standard pulsed chemotherapymore » regimens. Using optimal control theory with constraints and numerical simulations, we obtain new therapy protocols that we then compare with traditional pulsed periodic treatment. The optimal control generated therapies produce larger oscillations in the tumor population over time. However, by the end of the treatment period, total tumor size is smaller than that achieved through traditional pulsed therapy, and the normal cell population suffers nearly no oscillations.« less

  1. A Mathematical Tumor Model with Immune Resistance and Drug Therapy: An Optimal Control Approach

    SciTech Connect

    De Pillis, L. G.; Radunskaya, A.

    We present a competition model of cancer tumor growth that includes both the immune system response and drug therapy. This is a four-population model that includes tumor cells, host cells, immune cells, and drug interaction. We analyze the stability of the drug-free equilibria with respect to the immune response in order to look for target basins of attraction. One of our goals was to simulate qualitatively the asynchronous tumor-drug interaction known as “Jeffs phenomenon.” The model we develop is successful in generating this asynchronous response behavior. Our other goal was to identify treatment protocols that could improve standard pulsed chemotherapymore » regimens. Using optimal control theory with constraints and numerical simulations, we obtain new therapy protocols that we then compare with traditional pulsed periodic treatment. The optimal control generated therapies produce larger oscillations in the tumor population over time. However, by the end of the treatment period, total tumor size is smaller than that achieved through traditional pulsed therapy, and the normal cell population suffers nearly no oscillations.« less

  2. Adjoint sensitivity analysis of a tumor growth model and its application to spatiotemporal radiotherapy optimization.

    PubMed

    Fujarewicz, Krzysztof; Lakomiec, Krzysztof

    2016-12-01

    We investigate a spatial model of growth of a tumor and its sensitivity to radiotherapy. It is assumed that the radiation dose may vary in time and space, like in intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). The change of the final state of the tumor depends on local differences in the radiation dose and varies with the time and the place of these local changes. This leads to the concept of a tumor's spatiotemporal sensitivity to radiation, which is a function of time and space. We show how adjoint sensitivity analysis may be applied to calculate the spatiotemporal sensitivity of the finite difference scheme resulting from the partial differential equation describing the tumor growth. We demonstrate results of this approach to the tumor proliferation, invasion and response to radiotherapy (PIRT) model and we compare the accuracy and the computational effort of the method to the simple forward finite difference sensitivity analysis. Furthermore, we use the spatiotemporal sensitivity during the gradient-based optimization of the spatiotemporal radiation protocol and present results for different parameters of the model.

  3. Mathematical Modeling of Herpes Simplex Virus Distribution in Solid Tumors: Implications for Cancer Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Mok, Wilson; Stylianopoulos, Triantafyllos; Boucher, Yves; Jain, Rakesh K.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Although oncolytic viral vectors show promise for the treatment of various cancers, ineffective initial distribution and propagation throughout the tumor mass often limit the therapeutic response. A mathematical model is developed to describe the spread of herpes simplex virus from the initial injection site. Experimental Design The tumor is modeled as a sphere of radius R. The model incorporates reversible binding, interstitial diffusion, viral degradation, and internalization and physiologic parameters. Three species are considered as follows: free interstitial virus, virus bound to cell surfaces, and internalized virus. Results This analysis reveals that both rapid binding and internalization as well as hindered diffusion contain the virus to the initial injection volume, with negligible spread to the surrounding tissue. Unfortunately, increasing the dose to saturate receptors and promote diffusion throughout the tumor is not a viable option: the concentration necessary would likely compromise safety. However, targeted modifications to the virus that decrease the binding affinity have the potential to increase the number of infected cells by 1.5-fold or more. An increase in the effective diffusion coefficient can result in similar gains. Conclusions This analysis suggests criteria by which the potential response of a tumor to oncolytic herpes simplex virus therapy can be assessed. Furthermore, it reveals the potential of modifications to the vector delivery method, physicochemical properties of the virus, and tumor extracellular matrix composition to enhance efficacy. PMID:19318482

  4. Stereoscopic virtual reality models for planning tumor resection in the sellar region.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shou-sen; Zhang, Shang-ming; Jing, Jun-jie

    2012-11-28

    It is difficult for neurosurgeons to perceive the complex three-dimensional anatomical relationships in the sellar region. To investigate the value of using a virtual reality system for planning resection of sellar region tumors. The study included 60 patients with sellar tumors. All patients underwent computed tomography angiography, MRI-T1W1, and contrast enhanced MRI-T1W1 image sequence scanning. The CT and MRI scanning data were collected and then imported into a Dextroscope imaging workstation, a virtual reality system that allows structures to be viewed stereoscopically. During preoperative assessment, typical images for each patient were chosen and printed out for use by the surgeons as references during surgery. All sellar tumor models clearly displayed bone, the internal carotid artery, circle of Willis and its branches, the optic nerve and chiasm, ventricular system, tumor, brain, soft tissue and adjacent structures. Depending on the location of the tumors, we simulated the transmononasal sphenoid sinus approach, transpterional approach, and other approaches. Eleven surgeons who used virtual reality models completed a survey questionnaire. Nine of the participants said that the virtual reality images were superior to other images but that other images needed to be used in combination with the virtual reality images. The three-dimensional virtual reality models were helpful for individualized planning of surgery in the sellar region. Virtual reality appears to be promising as a valuable tool for sellar region surgery in the future.

  5. A preoperative mathematic model for computed tomographic guided microwave ablation treatment of hepatic dome tumors.

    PubMed

    Gao, Fei; Wang, Guo-Bao; Xiang, Zhan-Wang; Yang, Bin; Xue, Jing-Bing; Mo, Zhi-Qiang; Zhong, Zhi-Hui; Zhang, Tao; Zhang, Fu-Jun; Fan, Wei-Jun

    2016-05-03

    This study sought to prospectively evaluate the feasibility and safety of a preoperative mathematic model for computed tomographic(CT) guided microwave(MW) ablation treatment of hepatic dome tumors. This mathematic model was a regular cylinder quantifying appropriate puncture routes from the bottom up. A total of 103 patients with hepatic dome tumors were enrolled and randomly divided into 2 groups based on whether this model was used or not: Group A (using the model; n = 43) versus Group B (not using the model; n = 60). All tumors were treated by CT-guided MW ablation and follow-up contrast CT were reviewed. The average number of times for successful puncture, average ablation time, and incidence of right shoulder pain were less in Group A than Group B (1.4 vs. 2.5, P = 0.001; 8.8 vs. 11.1 minutes, P = 0.003; and 4.7% vs. 20%, P = 0.039). The technical success rate was higher in Group A than Group B (97.7% vs. 85.0%, P = 0.032). There were no significant differences between the two groups in primary and secondary technique efficacy rates (97.7% vs. 88.3%, P = 0.081; 90.0% vs. 72.7%, P = 0.314). No major complications occurred in both groups. The mathematic model of regular cylinder is feasible and safe for CT-guided MW ablation in treating hepatic dome tumors.

  6. Radio-photothermal therapy mediated by a single compartment nanoplatform depletes tumor initiating cells and reduces lung metastasis in the orthotopic 4T1 breast tumor model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Min; Zhao, Jun; Tian, Mei; Song, Shaoli; Zhang, Rui; Gupta, Sanjay; Tan, Dongfeng; Shen, Haifa; Ferrari, Mauro; Li, Chun

    2015-11-01

    Tumor Initiating Cells (TICs) are resistant to radiotherapy and chemotherapy, and are believed to be responsible for tumor recurrence and metastasis. Combination therapies can overcome the limitation of conventional cancer treatments, and have demonstrated promising application in the clinic. Here, we show that dual modality radiotherapy (RT) and photothermal therapy (PTT) mediated by a single compartment nanosystem copper-64-labeled copper sulfide nanoparticles ([64Cu]CuS NPs) could suppress breast tumor metastasis through eradication of TICs. Positron electron tomography (PET) imaging and biodistribution studies showed that more than 90% of [64Cu]CuS NPs was retained in subcutaneously grown BT474 breast tumor 24 h after intratumoral (i.t.) injection, indicating the NPs are suitable for the combination therapy. Combined RT/PTT therapy resulted in significant tumor growth delay in the subcutaneous BT474 breast cancer model. Moreover, RT/PTT treatment significantly prolonged the survival of mice bearing orthotopic 4T1 breast tumors compared to no treatment, RT alone, or PTT alone. The RT/PTT combination therapy significantly reduced the number of tumor nodules in the lung and the formation of tumor mammospheres from treated 4T1 tumors. No obvious side effects of the CuS NPs were noted in the treated mice in a pilot toxicity study. Taken together, our data support the feasibility of a therapeutic approach for the suppression of tumor metastasis through localized RT/PTT therapy.Tumor Initiating Cells (TICs) are resistant to radiotherapy and chemotherapy, and are believed to be responsible for tumor recurrence and metastasis. Combination therapies can overcome the limitation of conventional cancer treatments, and have demonstrated promising application in the clinic. Here, we show that dual modality radiotherapy (RT) and photothermal therapy (PTT) mediated by a single compartment nanosystem copper-64-labeled copper sulfide nanoparticles ([64Cu]CuS NPs) could suppress

  7. Supersonic Shear Wave Elastography of Response to Anti-cancer Therapy in a Xenograft Tumor Model.

    PubMed

    Chamming's, Foucauld; Le-Frère-Belda, Marie-Aude; Latorre-Ossa, Heldmuth; Fitoussi, Victor; Redheuil, Alban; Assayag, Franck; Pidial, Laetitia; Gennisson, Jean-Luc; Tanter, Mickael; Cuénod, Charles-André; Fournier, Laure S

    2016-04-01

    Our objective was to determine if supersonic shear wave elastography (SSWE) can detect changes in stiffness of a breast cancer model under therapy. A human invasive carcinoma was implanted in 22 mice. Eleven were treated with an anti-angiogenic therapy and 11 with glucose for 24 d. Tumor volume and stiffness were assessed during 2 wk before treatment and 0, 7, 12, 20 and 24 d after the start of therapy using SSWE. Pathology was assessed after 12 and 24 d of treatment. We found that response to therapy was associated with early softening of treated tumors only, resulting in a significant difference from non-treated tumors after 12 d of treatment (p = 0.03). On pathology, large areas of necrosis were observed at 12 d in treated tumors. Although treatment was still effective, treated tumors subsequently stiffened during a second phase of the treatment (days 12-24), with a small amount of necrosis observed on pathology on day 24. In conclusion, SSWE was able to measure changes in the stiffness of tumors in response to anti-cancer treatment. However, stiffness changes associated with good response to treatment may change over time, and increased stiffness may also reflect therapy efficacy. Copyright © 2016 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Selective uptake of multi-walled carbon nanotubes by tumor macrophages in a murine glioma model.

    PubMed

    VanHandel, Michelle; Alizadeh, Darya; Zhang, Leying; Kateb, Babak; Bronikowski, Michael; Manohara, Harish; Badie, Behnam

    2009-03-31

    Carbon nantotubes (CNTs) are emerging as a new family of nanovectors for drug and gene delivery into biological systems. To evaluate potential application of this technology for brain tumor therapy, we studied uptake and toxicity of multi-walled CNTs (MWCNTs) in the GL261 murine intracranial glioma model. Within 24 h of a single intratumoral injection of labeled MWCNTs (5 microg), nearly 10-20% of total cells demonstrated CNT internalization. Most CNT uptake, however, occurred by tumor-associated macrophages (MP), which accounted for most (75%) MWCNT-positive cells. Within 24 h of injection, nearly 30% of tumor MP became MWCNT-positive. Despite a transient increase in inflammatory cell infiltration into both normal and tumor-bearing brains following MWCNT injection, no significant toxicity was noted in mice, and minor changes in tumor cytokine expression were observed. This study suggests that MWCNTs could potentially be used as a novel and non-toxic vehicle for targeting MP in brain tumors.

  9. Telomerase inhibition improves tumor response to radiotherapy in a murine orthotopic model of human glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Ferrandon, Sylvain; Malleval, Céline; El Hamdani, Badia; Battiston-Montagne, Priscillia; Bolbos, Radu; Langlois, Jean-Baptiste; Manas, Patrick; Gryaznov, Sergei M; Alphonse, Gersende; Honnorat, Jérôme; Rodriguez-Lafrasse, Claire; Poncet, Delphine

    2015-07-17

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most frequent and aggressive type of adult brain tumor. Most GBMs express telomerase; a high level of intra-tumoral telomerase activity (TA) is predictive of poor prognosis. Thus, telomerase inhibitors are promising options to treat GBM. These inhibitors increase the response to radiotherapy (RT), in vitro as well as in vivo. Since typical treatments for GBM include RT, our objective was to evaluate the efficiency of Imetelstat (TA inhibitor) combined with RT. We used a murine orthotopic model of human GBM (N = 8 to11 mice per group) and μMRI imaging to evaluate the efficacy of Imetelstat (delivered by intra-peritoneal injection) alone and combined with RT. Using a clinically established protocol, we demonstrated that Imetelstat significantly: (i) inhibited the TA in the very center of the tumor, (ii) reduced tumor volume as a proportion of TA inhibition, and (iii) increased the response to RT, in terms of tumor volume regression and survival increase. Imetelstat is currently evaluated in refractory brain tumors in young patients (without RT). Our results support its clinical evaluation combined with RT to treat GBM.

  10. A three dimensional micropatterned tumor model for breast cancer cell migration studies.

    PubMed

    Peela, Nitish; Sam, Feba S; Christenson, Wayne; Truong, Danh; Watson, Adam W; Mouneimne, Ghassan; Ros, Robert; Nikkhah, Mehdi

    2016-03-01

    Breast cancer cell invasion is a highly orchestrated process driven by a myriad of complex microenvironmental stimuli, making it difficult to isolate and assess the effects of biochemical or biophysical cues (i.e. tumor architecture, matrix stiffness) on disease progression. In this regard, physiologically relevant tumor models are becoming instrumental to perform studies of cancer cell invasion within well-controlled conditions. Herein, we explored the use of photocrosslinkable hydrogels and a novel, two-step photolithography technique to microengineer a 3D breast tumor model. The microfabrication process enabled precise localization of cell-encapsulated circular constructs adjacent to a low stiffness matrix. To validate the model, breast cancer cell lines (MDA-MB-231, MCF7) and non-tumorigenic mammary epithelial cells (MCF10A) were embedded separately within the tumor model, all of which maintained high viability throughout the experiments. MDA-MB-231 cells exhibited extensive migratory behavior and invaded the surrounding matrix, whereas MCF7 or MCF10A cells formed clusters that stayed confined within the circular tumor regions. Additionally, real-time cell tracking indicated that the speed and persistence of MDA-MB-231 cells were substantially higher within the surrounding matrix compared to the circular constructs. Z-stack imaging of F-actin/α-tubulin cytoskeletal organization revealed unique 3D protrusions in MDA-MB-231 cells and an abundance of 3D clusters formed by MCF7 and MCF10A cells. Our results indicate that gelatin methacrylate (GelMA) hydrogel, integrated with the two-step photolithography technique, has great promise in the development of 3D tumor models with well-defined architecture and tunable stiffness. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Simulating magnetic resonance images based on a model of tumor growth incorporating microenvironment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Pamela R.; Hawkins-Daarud, Andrea; Partridge, Savannah C.; Kinahan, Paul E.; Swanson, Kristin R.

    2018-03-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM), the most aggressive primary brain tumor, is primarily diagnosed and monitored using gadoliniumenhanced T1-weighted and T2-weighted (T2W) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Hyperintensity on T2W images is understood to correspond with vasogenic edema and infiltrating tumor cells. GBM's inherent heterogeneity and resulting non-specific MRI image features complicate assessing treatment response. To better understand treatment response, we propose creating a patient-specific untreated virtual imaging control (UVIC), which represents an individual tumor's growth if it had not been treated, for comparison with actual post-treatment images. We generated a T2W MRI UVIC by combining a patient-specific mathematical model of tumor growth with a multi-compartmental MRI signal equation. GBM growth was mathematically modeled using the previously developed Proliferation-Invasion-Hypoxia-Necrosis- Angiogenesis-Edema (PIHNA-E) model, which simulated tumor as being comprised of three cellular phenotypes: normoxic, hypoxic and necrotic cells interacting with a vasculature species, angiogenic factors and extracellular fluid. Within the PIHNA-E model, both hypoxic and normoxic cells emitted angiogenic factors, which recruited additional vessels and caused the vessels to leak, allowing fluid, or edema, to escape into the extracellular space. The model's output was spatial volume fraction maps for each glioma cell type and edema/extracellular space. Volume fraction maps and corresponding T2 values were then incorporated into a multi-compartmental Bloch signal equation to create simulated T2W images. T2 values for individual compartments were estimated from the literature and a normal volunteer. T2 maps calculated from simulated images had normal white matter, normal gray matter, and tumor tissue T2 values within range of literature values.

  12. Chronic Abdominal Wall Pain.

    PubMed

    Koop, Herbert; Koprdova, Simona; Schürmann, Christine

    2016-01-29

    Chronic abdominal wall pain is a poorly recognized clinical problem despite being an important element in the differential diagnosis of abdominal pain. This review is based on pertinent articles that were retrieved by a selective search in PubMed and EMBASE employing the terms "abdominal wall pain" and "cutaneous nerve entrapment syndrome," as well as on the authors' clinical experience. In 2% to 3% of patients with chronic abdominal pain, the pain arises from the abdominal wall; in patients with previously diagnosed chronic abdominal pain who have no demonstrable pathological abnormality, this likelihood can rise as high as 30% . There have only been a small number of clinical trials of treatment for this condition. The diagnosis is made on clinical grounds, with the aid of Carnett's test. The characteristic clinical feature is strictly localized pain in the anterior abdominal wall, which is often mischaracterized as a "functional" complaint. In one study, injection of local anesthesia combined with steroids into the painful area was found to relieve pain for 4 weeks in 95% of patients. The injection of lidocaine alone brought about improvement in 83-91% of patients. Long-term pain relief ensued after a single lidocaine injection in 20-30% of patients, after repeated injections in 40-50% , and after combined lidocaine and steroid injections in up to 80% . Pain that persists despite these treatments can be treated with surgery (neurectomy). Chronic abdominal wall pain is easily diagnosed on physical examination and can often be rapidly treated. Any physician treating patients with abdominal pain should be aware of this condition. Further comparative treatment trials will be needed before a validated treatment algorithm can be established.

  13. Ecto-5’-Nucleotidase Overexpression Reduces Tumor Growth in a Xenograph Medulloblastoma Model

    PubMed Central

    Cappellari, Angélica R.; Pillat, Micheli M.; Souza, Hellio D. N.; Dietrich, Fabrícia; Oliveira, Francine H.; Figueiró, Fabrício; Abujamra, Ana L.; Roesler, Rafael; Lecka, Joanna; Sévigny, Jean; Battastini, Ana Maria O.; Ulrich, Henning

    2015-01-01

    Background Ecto-5’-nucleotidase/CD73 (ecto-5’-NT) participates in extracellular ATP catabolism by converting adenosine monophosphate (AMP) into adenosine. This enzyme affects the progression and invasiveness of different tumors. Furthermore, the expression of ecto-5’-NT has also been suggested as a favorable prognostic marker, attributing to this enzyme contradictory functions in cancer. Medulloblastoma (MB) is the most common brain tumor of the cerebellum and affects mainly children. Materials and Methods The effects of ecto-5’-NT overexpression on human MB tumor growth were studied in an in vivo model. Balb/c immunodeficient (nude) 6 to 14-week-old mice were used for dorsal subcutaneous xenograph tumor implant. Tumor development was evaluated by pathophysiological analysis. In addition, the expression patterns of adenosine receptors were verified. Results The human MB cell line D283, transfected with ecto-5’-NT (D283hCD73), revealed reduced tumor growth compared to the original cell line transfected with an empty vector. D283hCD73 generated tumors with a reduced proliferative index, lower vascularization, the presence of differentiated cells and increased active caspase-3 expression. Prominent A1 adenosine receptor expression rates were detected in MB cells overexpressing ecto-5’-NT. Conclusion This work suggests that ecto-5’-NT promotes reduced tumor growth to reduce cell proliferation and vascularization, promote higher differentiation rates and initiate apoptosis, supposedly by accumulating adenosine, which then acts through A1 adenosine receptors. Therefore, ecto-5’-NT might be considered an important prognostic marker, being associated with good prognosis and used as a potential target for therapy. PMID:26491983

  14. Simplified realistic human head model for simulating Tumor Treating Fields (TTFields).

    PubMed

    Wenger, Cornelia; Bomzon, Ze'ev; Salvador, Ricardo; Basser, Peter J; Miranda, Pedro C

    2016-08-01

    Tumor Treating Fields (TTFields) are alternating electric fields in the intermediate frequency range (100-300 kHz) of low-intensity (1-3 V/cm). TTFields are an anti-mitotic treatment against solid tumors, which are approved for Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) patients. These electric fields are induced non-invasively by transducer arrays placed directly on the patient's scalp. Cell culture experiments showed that treatment efficacy is dependent on the induced field intensity. In clinical practice, a software called NovoTalTM uses head measurements to estimate the optimal array placement to maximize the electric field delivery to the tumor. Computational studies predict an increase in the tumor's electric field strength when adapting transducer arrays to its location. Ideally, a personalized head model could be created for each patient, to calculate the electric field distribution for the specific situation. Thus, the optimal transducer layout could be inferred from field calculation rather than distance measurements. Nonetheless, creating realistic head models of patients is time-consuming and often needs user interaction, because automated image segmentation is prone to failure. This study presents a first approach to creating simplified head models consisting of convex hulls of the tissue layers. The model is able to account for anisotropic conductivity in the cortical tissues by using a tensor representation estimated from Diffusion Tensor Imaging. The induced electric field distribution is compared in the simplified and realistic head models. The average field intensities in the brain and tumor are generally slightly higher in the realistic head model, with a maximal ratio of 114% for a simplified model with reasonable layer thicknesses. Thus, the present pipeline is a fast and efficient means towards personalized head models with less complexity involved in characterizing tissue interfaces, while enabling accurate predictions of electric field distribution.

  15. [Establishment of EL4 tumor-bearing mouse models and investigation on immunological mechanisms of anti-tumor effect of melphalan].

    PubMed

    Li, Mo-lin; Li, Chuan-gang; Shu, Xiao-hong; Jia, Yu-jie; Qin, Zhi-hai

    2006-03-01

    To establish mouse lymphoma EL4 tumor-bearing mouse models in wild type C57BL/6 mice and nude C57BL/6 mice respectively, and to further investigate the immunological mechanisms of anti-tumor effect of melphalan. Mouse lymphoma EL4 cells were inoculated subcutaneously into wild type C57BL/6 mice (immune-competent mice). Twelve days later, melphalan of different doses were administered intraperitoneally to treat these wild type C57BL/6 tuomr-bearing mice. Tumor sizes were observed and recorded subsequently to find out the minimal dose of melphalan that could cure the tuomr-bearing mice. Then the same amount of EL4 tumor cells were inoculated subcutaneously into wild type C57BL/6 mice and nude C57BL/6 mice (T cell-deficient mice) simultaneously, which had the same genetic background of C57BL/6. Twelve days later, melphalan of the minimal dose was given intraperitoneally to treat both the wild type and nude C57BL/6 tuomr-bearing mice. Tumor sizes were observed and recorded in these two different types of mice subsequently. A single dose of melphalan (7.5 mg/kg) could cure EL4 tumor-bearing wild type C57BL/6 mice, but could not induce tumor regression in EL4 tumor-bearing nude C57BL/6 mice. A single dose of melphalan has obvious anti-tumor effect on mouse lymphoma EL4 tumor-bearing wild type C57BL/6mice, which requires the involvement of T lymphocytes in the host probably related to their killing functions.

  16. In vivo targeting of dead tumor cells in a murine tumor model using a monoclonal antibody specific for the La autoantigen.

    PubMed

    Al-Ejeh, Fares; Darby, Jocelyn M; Pensa, Katherine; Diener, Kerrilyn R; Hayball, John D; Brown, Michael P

    2007-09-15

    To investigate the potential of the La-specific monoclonal antibody (mAb) 3B9 as an in vivo tumor-targeting agent. The murine EL4 lymphoma cell line was used for in vitro studies and the EL4 model in which apoptosis was induced with cyclophosphamide and etoposide was used for in vivo studies. In vitro studies compared 3B9 binding in the EL4 cell with that in its counterpart primary cell type of the thymocyte. For in vivo studies, 3B9 was intrinsically or extrinsically labeled with carbon-14 or 1,4,7,10-tetra-azacylododecane-N,N',N'',N''''-tetraacetic acid-indium-111, respectively, and biodistribution of the radiotracers was investigated in EL4 tumor-bearing mice, which were treated or not with chemotherapy. La-specific 3B9 mAb bound EL4 cells rather than thymocytes, and binding was detergent resistant. 3B9 binding to dead EL4 cells in vitro was specific, rapid, and saturable. Significantly, more 3B9 bound dead EL4 tumor explant cells after host mice were treated with chemotherapy, which suggested that DNA damage induced 3B9 binding. Tumor binding of 3B9 in vivo was antigen specific and increased significantly after chemotherapy. Tumor accumulation of 3B9 peaked at approximately 50% of the injected dose per gram of tumor 72 h after chemotherapy and correlated with increased tumor cell death. Tumor/organ ratios of 3B9 biodistribution, which included the tumor/blood ratio, exceeded unity 48 or more hours after chemotherapy. La-specific mAb selectively targeted dead tumor cells in vivo, and targeting was augmented by cytotoxic chemotherapy. This novel cell death radioligand may be useful both for radioimmunoscintigraphy and radioimmunotherapy.

  17. Periodic and chaotic oscillations in a tumor and immune system interaction model with three delays

    SciTech Connect

    Bi, Pi