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Sample records for abdominal wall hernias

  1. WSES guidelines for emergency repair of complicated abdominal wall hernias

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Emergency repair of complicated abdominal hernias is associated with poor prognosis and a high rate of post-operative complications. A World Society of Emergency Surgery (WSES) Consensus Conference was held in Bergamo in July 2013, during the 2nd Congress of the World Society of Emergency Surgery with the goal of defining recommendations for emergency repair of abdominal wall hernias in adults. This document represents the executive summary of the consensus conference approved by a WSES expert panel. PMID:24289453

  2. Rare Abdominal Wall Malformation: Case Report of Umbilical Cord Hernia.

    PubMed

    Gliha, Andro; Car, Andrija; Višnjić, Stjepan; Zupancic, Bozidar; Kondza, Karmen; Petracic, Ivan

    The umbilical cord hernia is the rarest form of abdominal wall malformations, anatomically completely different from gastroschisis and omphalocele. It occurs due to the permanent physiological evisceration of abdominal organs into umbilical celom and persistence of a patent umbilical ring. The umbilical cord hernia is often mistaken for omphalocele and called "small omphalocele". Here we present a case of a female newborn with umbilical cord hernia treated in our Hospital. After preoperative examinations surgery was done on the second day of life. The abdominal wall was closed without tension. The aim of this article is to present the importance of the proper diagnose of these three entities and to stimulate academic community for the answer, is this umbilical cord hernia or small omphalocele.

  3. Giant spigelian hernia due to abdominal wall injury: a case report.

    PubMed

    Topal, Ersun; Kaya, Ekrem; Topal, Naile Bolca; Sahin, Ilker

    2007-02-01

    Spigelian hernia is a rare clinical entity. It is difficult to diagnose due to its location. In this article we report the case of a giant spigelian hernia consequent to abdominal wall injury. The neck of the hernia was 10 cm in diameter. We repaired this hernia with a polypropylene mesh.

  4. Mesh abdominal wall hernia surgery is safe and effective-the harm New Zealand media has done.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Steven

    2017-10-06

    Patients in New Zealand have now developed a fear of mesh abdominal wall hernia repair due to inaccurate media reporting. This article outlines the extensive literature that confirms abdominal wall mesh hernia repair is safe and effective. The worsening confidence in the transvaginal mesh prolapse repair should not adversely affect the good results of mesh abdominal wall hernia repair. New Zealand general surgeons are well trained in providing modern hernia surgery.

  5. Contraction of Abdominal Wall Muscles Influences Incisional Hernia Occurrence and Size

    PubMed Central

    Lien, Samuel C.; Hu, Yaxi; Wollstein, Adi; Franz, Michael G.; Patel, Shaun P.; Kuzon, William M.; Urbanchek, Melanie G.

    2015-01-01

    Background Incisional hernias are a complication in 10% of all open abdominal operations and can result in significant morbidity. The purpose of this study is to determine if inhibiting abdominal muscle contraction influences incisional hernia formation during laparotomy healing. We hypothesize that reducing abdominal musculature deformation reduces incisional hernia occurrence and size. Study Design Using an established rat model for incisional hernia, a laparotomy through the linea alba was closed with one mid-incision, fast-absorbing suture. Three groups were compared: a SHAM group (SHAM; n = 6) received no laparotomies while the Saline Hernia (SH; n = 6) and Botox Hernia (BH; n = 6) groups were treated once with equal volume saline or Botulinum Toxin (Botox®, Allergan) before the incomplete laparotomy closure. On post-operative day 14, the abdominal wall was examined for herniation and adhesions and contractile forces were measured for abdominal wall muscles. Results No hernias developed in SHAM rats. Rostral hernias developed in all SH and BH rats. Caudal hernias developed in all SH rats, but in only 50% of the BH rats. Rostral hernias in the BH group were 35% shorter and 43% narrower compared to those in the SH group (p < 0.05). The BH group had weaker abdominal muscles compared to the SHAM and SH groups (p < 0.05). Conclusions In our rat model, partial paralysis of abdominal muscles reduces the number and size of incisional hernias. These results confirm abdominal wall muscle contractions play a significant role in the pathophysiology of incisional hernia formation. PMID:25817097

  6. [Abdominal wall reconstruction with collagen membrane in an animal model of abdominal hernia. A preliminary report].

    PubMed

    Łukasiewicz, Aleksander; Drewa, Tomasz; Skopińska-Wiśniewska, Joanna; Molski, Stanisław

    2008-01-01

    Abdominal hernia repair is one of the most common surgical procedures. Current data indicate that the best treatment results are achieved with use of synthetic material to reinforce weakened abdominal wall. Prosthetic materials utilized for hernia repair induce adhesions with underlying viscera. They should be therefore separated from them by a layer of peritoneum otherwise adhesions may cause to serious complications such as bowel-skin fistulas. The aim of our work was to determine if implantation of our collagen membrane into abdominal wall defect induce adhesions in rat model of ventral hernia. The collagen film was obtained by acetic acid extraction of rat tail tendons and than casting the soluble fraction onto polyethylene shits. Abdominal wall defect was created in 10 Wistar male rats. Collagen membranes were implanted into the defect using interrupted polypropylene stitches. After 3 months of observation all animals were sacrificed. No adhesions between path structure and bowel developed. In one often rats (10%) adhesion between fixating stitch and omentum was observed. Complete mesothelium lining and vascular ingrowth were microscopically observed within implanted structure. Promising result requires further confirmation in a larger series of animals.

  7. [Experience with Clotteau-Prémont's technique in abdominal wall hernias. Preliminary report].

    PubMed

    Soto-Dávalos, Baltazar Alberto; Del Pozzo-Magaña, José Antonio; Luna-Martínez, Javier

    2006-01-01

    Incisional hernias account for at least a third of abdominal wall hernias. There are different techniques of repair that include the use of prosthetic materials, which has lowered the hernia recurrence rate. Nonetheless, its use in case of rejection or infection requires other techniques with local tissue. The use of prosthetic material in a contaminated environment is contraindicated because the risk of infection and recurrence rate is unacceptably high. In order to compare two repair techniques for abdominal wall hernias in terms of complications and recurrence to be used as an alternative for hernia repair in patients with abdominal wall hernias, we conducted, between January 2000 and January 2004, an observational, longitudinal, retrospective, non-randomized matched control case study in patients with abdominal wall hernia. A total of 30 patients were studied and were divided into two groups of 15 patients each. Subjects were matched for sex, age and hernia type (group A, mesh treated and group B, Clotteau-Prémont treated) who had at least a 5-month postoperative follow-up. Complication and recurrence rate was assessed and compared. There were no differences between the two groups in complications or recurrence (p <0.05). The average follow-up time was 18.9 +/- 8 months for group A and 15 +/- 7.9 months for group B. Clotteau-Prémont's technique is a safe and feasible alternative procedure with indications in selected patients.

  8. The use of ultrasound in the diagnosis of abdominal wall hernias.

    PubMed

    Young, J; Gilbert, A I; Graham, M F

    2007-08-01

    The diagnosis of abdominal wall hernias is not always straightforward and may require additional investigative modalities. Real-time ultrasound is accurate, non-invasive, relatively inexpensive, and readily available. The value of ultrasound as an adjunctive tool in the diagnosis of abdominal wall hernias in both pre-operative and post-operative patients was studied. Retrospective analysis of 200 patients treated at the Hernia Institute of Florida was carried out. In these cases, ultrasound had been used to assist with case management. Patients without previous hernia surgery and those with early and late post-herniorrhaphy complaints were studied. Patients with obvious hernias were excluded. Indications for ultrasound examination included patients with abdominal pain without a palpable hernia, a palpable mass of questionable etiology, and patients with inordinate pain or excessive swelling during the early post-operative period. Patients were treated with surgery or conservative therapy depending on the results of the physical examination and ultrasound studies. Cases in which the ultrasound findings influenced the decision-making process by confirming clinical findings or altering the diagnosis and changing the treatment plan are discussed. Of the 200 patients, 144 complained of pain alone and on physical exam no hernia or mass was palpable. Of these 144 patients with pain alone, 21 had a hernia identified on the US examination and were referred for surgery. The 108 that had a negative ultrasound were treated conservatively with rest, heat, and anti-inflammatory drugs, most often with excellent results. Of the 56 remaining patients who had a mass, with or without pain, 22 had hernias identified by means of ultrasound examination. In the other 34, the etiology of the mass was not a hernia. Abdominal wall ultrasound is a valuable tool in the scheme of management of patients in whom the diagnosis of abdominal wall hernia is unclear. Therapeutic decisions can be

  9. Abdominal hernias: Radiological features

    PubMed Central

    Lassandro, Francesco; Iasiello, Francesca; Pizza, Nunzia Luisa; Valente, Tullio; Stefano, Maria Luisa Mangoni di Santo; Grassi, Roberto; Muto, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    Abdominal wall hernias are common diseases of the abdomen with a global incidence approximately 4%-5%. They are distinguished in external, diaphragmatic and internal hernias on the basis of their localisation. Groin hernias are the most common with a prevalence of 75%, followed by femoral (15%) and umbilical (8%). There is a higher prevalence in males (M:F, 8:1). Diagnosis is usually made on physical examination. However, clinical diagnosis may be difficult, especially in patients with obesity, pain or abdominal wall scarring. In these cases, abdominal imaging may be the first clue to the correct diagnosis and to confirm suspected complications. Different imaging modalities are used: conventional radiographs or barium studies, ultrasonography and Computed Tomography. Imaging modalities can aid in the differential diagnosis of palpable abdominal wall masses and can help to define hernial contents such as fatty tissue, bowel, other organs or fluid. This work focuses on the main radiological findings of abdominal herniations. PMID:21860678

  10. Illustrated review of new imaging techniques in the diagnosis of abdominal wall hernias.

    PubMed

    Toms, A P; Dixon, A K; Murphy, J M; Jamieson, N V

    1999-10-01

    The assessment of abdominal wall hernias has long been a clinical skill that only occasionally required the supplementary radiological assistance of herniography. However, with the advent of cross-sectional imaging, a new range of diagnostic tools is now available to help the clinician in difficult cases. This review explores the ability of computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging to demonstrate many of the hernias encountered in the anterior abdominal wall. Also discussed is the role of imaging techniques in the management of a variety of hernias. Cross-sectional imaging techniques are being employed with increasing frequency for the assessment of hernias. Although the anatomical detail can usually be delineated clearly, the accuracy of the various methods and their place in the clinical management of hernias has yet to be fully determined.

  11. 2017 update of the WSES guidelines for emergency repair of complicated abdominal wall hernias.

    PubMed

    Birindelli, Arianna; Sartelli, Massimo; Di Saverio, Salomone; Coccolini, Federico; Ansaloni, Luca; van Ramshorst, Gabrielle H; Campanelli, Giampiero; Khokha, Vladimir; Moore, Ernest E; Peitzman, Andrew; Velmahos, George; Moore, Frederick Alan; Leppaniemi, Ari; Burlew, Clay Cothren; Biffl, Walter L; Koike, Kaoru; Kluger, Yoram; Fraga, Gustavo P; Ordonez, Carlos A; Novello, Matteo; Agresta, Ferdinando; Sakakushev, Boris; Gerych, Igor; Wani, Imtiaz; Kelly, Michael D; Gomes, Carlos Augusto; Faro, Mario Paulo; Tarasconi, Antonio; Demetrashvili, Zaza; Lee, Jae Gil; Vettoretto, Nereo; Guercioni, Gianluca; Persiani, Roberto; Tranà, Cristian; Cui, Yunfeng; Kok, Kenneth Y Y; Ghnnam, Wagih M; Abbas, Ashraf El-Sayed; Sato, Norio; Marwah, Sanjay; Rangarajan, Muthukumaran; Ben-Ishay, Offir; Adesunkanmi, Abdul Rashid K; Lohse, Helmut Alfredo Segovia; Kenig, Jakub; Mandalà, Stefano; Coimbra, Raul; Bhangu, Aneel; Suggett, Nigel; Biondi, Antonio; Portolani, Nazario; Baiocchi, Gianluca; Kirkpatrick, Andrew W; Scibé, Rodolfo; Sugrue, Michael; Chiara, Osvaldo; Catena, Fausto

    2017-01-01

    Emergency repair of complicated abdominal wall hernias may be associated with worsen outcome and a significant rate of postoperative complications. There is no consensus on management of complicated abdominal hernias. The main matter of debate is about the use of mesh in case of intestinal resection and the type of mesh to be used. Wound infection is the most common complication encountered and represents an immense burden especially in the presence of a mesh. The recurrence rate is an important topic that influences the final outcome. A World Society of Emergency Surgery (WSES) Consensus Conference was held in Bergamo in July 2013 with the aim to define recommendations for emergency repair of abdominal wall hernias in adults. This document represents the executive summary of the consensus conference approved by a WSES expert panel. In 2016, the guidelines have been revised and updated according to the most recent available literature.

  12. The management of abdominal wall hernias – in search of consensus

    PubMed Central

    Bury, Kamil; Śmietański, Maciej

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Laparoscopic repair is becoming an increasingly popular alternative in the treatment of abdominal wall hernias. In spite of numerous studies evaluating this technique, indications for laparoscopic surgery have not been established. Similarly, implant selection and fixation techniques have not been unified and are the subject of scientific discussion. Aim To assess whether there is a consensus on the management of the most common ventral abdominal wall hernias among recognised experts. Material and methods Fourteen specialists representing the boards of European surgical societies were surveyed to determine their choice of surgical technique for nine typical primary ventral and incisional hernias. The access method, type of operation, mesh prosthesis and fixation method were evaluated. In addition to the laparoscopic procedures, the number of tackers and their arrangement were assessed. Results In none of the cases presented was a consensus of experts obtained. Laparoscopic and open techniques were used equally often. Especially in the group of large hernias, decisions on repair methods were characterised by high variability. The technique of laparoscopic mesh fixation was a subject of great variability in terms of both method selection and the numbers of tackers and sutures used. Conclusions Recognised experts have not reached a consensus on the management of abdominal wall hernias. Our survey results indicate the need for further research and the inclusion of large cohorts of patients in the dedicated registries to evaluate the results of different surgical methods, which would help in the development of treatment algorithms for surgical education in the future. PMID:25960793

  13. Abdominal Wall Reconstruction with Concomitant Ostomy-Associated Hernia Repair: Outcomes and Propensity Score Analysis.

    PubMed

    Mericli, Alexander F; Garvey, Patrick B; Giordano, Salvatore; Liu, Jun; Baumann, Donald P; Butler, Charles E

    2017-03-01

    The optimal strategy for abdominal wall reconstruction in the presence of a stomal-site hernia is unclear. We hypothesized that the rate of ventral hernia recurrence in patients undergoing a combined ventral hernia repair and stomal-site herniorraphy would not differ clinically from the ventral hernia recurrence rate in patients undergoing an isolated ventral hernia repair. We also hypothesized that bridged ventral hernia repairs result in worse outcomes compared with reinforced repairs, regardless of stomal hernia. We retrospectively reviewed prospectively collected data from consecutive abdominal wall reconstructions performed with acellular dermal matrix (ADM) at a single center between 2000 and 2015. We compared patients who underwent a ventral hernia repair alone (AWR) and those who underwent both a ventral hernia repair and ostomy-associated herniorraphy (AWR+O). We conducted a propensity score matched analysis to compare the outcomes between the 2 groups. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards and logistic regression models were used to study associations between potential predictive or protective reconstructive strategies and surgical outcomes. We included 499 patients (median follow-up 27.2 months; interquartile range [IQR] 12.4 to 46.6 months), 118 AWR+O and 381 AWR. After propensity score matching, 91 pairs were obtained. Ventral hernia recurrence was not statistically associated with ostomy-associated herniorraphy (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] 0.7; 95% CI 0.3 to 1.5; p = 0.34). However, the AWR+O group experienced a significantly higher percentage of surgical site occurrences (34.1%) than the AWR group (18.7%; adjusted odds ratio 2.3; 95% CI 1.4 to 3.7; p < 0.001). In the AWR group, there were significantly fewer ventral hernia recurrences when the repair was reinforced compared with bridged (5.3% vs 38.5%; p < 0.001). There was no statistically significant difference in ventral hernia recurrence between the AWR and AWR+O groups. Bridging was associated

  14. [Prophylactics and treatment of postoperative hernias of the lateral abdominal walls using polypropylene endoprosthesis].

    PubMed

    Sukovatykh, B S; Valuĭskaia, N M; Pravednikova, N V; Netiaga, A A; Kas'ianova, M A; Zhukovskiĭ, V A

    2011-01-01

    An analysis of complex examination and treatment of 151 patients after planned and performed surgical interventions on organs of the retroperitoneal space was made. The patients were divided into 4 groups. The first group (of comparison) included 46 patients who were treated by lumbotomy for different diseases of organs of the urinary system. In 35 patients of the second group (prophylactics) the indications were determined and in 20 patients preventive endoprosthesis of the lateral abdominal wall using polypropylene endoprosthesis was fulfilled. Herniotomy with plasty of the lateral abdominal wall using local tissues was fulfilled in 30 patients. Prosthesing hernioplasty of the lateral abdominal wall was fulfilled in 40 patients of the main group. It was found that preventive endoprosthesis of the lateral abdominal wall allowed prevention of progressing anatomo-functional i/isufficiency and the appearance of postoperative hernias. The application of polypropylene endoprosthesis for the treatment of postoperative hernias allows obtaining 36.4% more good results as compared with the control group, 21.7% decreased number of satisfactory results and no recurrent hernias.

  15. Preoperative progressive pneumoperitoneum in patients with abdominal-wall hernias.

    PubMed

    Mayagoitia, J C; Suárez, D; Arenas, J C; Díaz de León, V

    2006-06-01

    Induction of preoperative progressive pneumoperitoneum is an elective procedure in patients with hernias with loss of domain. A prospective study was carried out from June 2003 to May 2005 at the Hospital de Especialidades, Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social, Leon, Mexico. Preoperative progressive pneumoperitoneum was induced using a double-lumen intraabdominal catheter inserted through a Veress needle and daily insufflation of ambient air. Variables analyzed were age, sex, body mass index, type, location and size of defective hernia, number of previous repairs, number of days pneumoperitoneum was maintained, type of hernioplasty, and incidence of complications. Of 12 patients, 2 were excluded because it was technically impossible to induce pneumoperitoneum. Of the remaining 10 patients, 60% were female and 40% were male. The patients' average age was 51.5 years, average body mass index was 34.7, and evolution time of their hernias ranged from 8 months to 23 years. Nine patients had ventral hernias and one had an inguinal hernia. Pneumoperitoneum was maintained for an average of 9.3 days and there were no serious complications relating to the puncture or the maintenance of the pneumoperitoneum. One patient who previously had undergone a mastectomy experienced minor complications. We were able to perform hernioplasty on all patients, eight with the Rives technique, one with supra-aponeurotic mesh, and one using the Lichtenstein method for inguinal hernia repair. One patient's wound became infected postoperatively. Preoperative progressive pneumoperitoneum is a safe procedure that is easy to perform and that facilitates surgical hernia repair in patients with hernia with loss of domain. Complications are infrequent, patient tolerability is adequate, and the proposed modification to the puncture technique makes the procedure even safer.

  16. Changes in the frequencies of abdominal wall hernias and the preferences for their repair: a multicenter national study from Turkey.

    PubMed

    Seker, Gaye; Kulacoglu, Hakan; Öztuna, Derya; Topgül, Koray; Akyol, Cihangir; Çakmak, Atıl; Karateke, Faruk; Özdoğan, Mehmet; Ersoy, Eren; Gürer, Ahmet; Zerbaliyev, Elbrus; Seker, Duray; Yorgancı, Kaya; Pergel, Ahmet; Aydın, Ibrahim; Ensari, Cemal; Bilecik, Tuna; Kahraman, İzzettin; Reis, Erhan; Kalaycı, Murat; Canda, Aras Emre; Demirağ, Alp; Kesicioğlu, Tuğrul; Malazgirt, Zafer; Gündoğdu, Haldun; Terzi, Cem

    2014-01-01

    Abdominal wall hernias are a common problem in the general population. A Western estimate reveals that the lifetime risk of developing a hernia is about 2%. As a result, hernia repairs likely comprise the most frequent general surgery operations. More than 20 million hernias are estimated to be repaired every year around the world. Numerous repair techniques have been described to date however tension-free mesh repairs are widely used today because of their low hernia recurrence rates. Nevertheless, there are some ongoing debates regarding the ideal approach (open or laparoscopic), the ideal anesthesia (general, local, or regional), and the ideal mesh (standard polypropylene or newer meshes).

  17. Simultaneous Prosthetic Mesh Abdominal Wall Reconstruction with Abdominoplasty for Ventral Hernia and Severe Rectus Diastasis Repairs

    PubMed Central

    Cheesborough, Jennifer E.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Standard abdominoplasty rectus plication techniques may not suffice for severe cases of rectus diastasis. In the authors’ experience, prosthetic mesh facilitates the repair of severe rectus diastasis with or without concomitant ventral hernias. Methods: A retrospective review of all abdominal wall surgery patients treated in the past 8 years by the senior author (G.A.D.) was performed. Patients with abdominoplasty and either rectus diastasis repair with mesh or a combined ventral hernia repair were analyzed. Results: Thirty-two patients, 29 women and three men, underwent mesh-reinforced midline repair with horizontal or vertical abdominoplasty. Patient characteristics included the following: mean age, 53 years; mean body mass index, 26 kg/m2; average width of diastasis or hernia, 6.7 cm; and average surgery time, 151 minutes. There were no surgical-site infections and two surgical-site occurrences—two seromas treated with drainage in the office. After an average of 471 days’ follow-up, none of the patients had recurrence of a bulge or a hernia. Conclusions: For patients with significant rectus diastasis, with or without concomitant hernias, the described mesh repair is both safe and durable. Although this operation requires additional dissection and placement of prosthetic mesh in the retrorectus plane, it may be safely combined with standard horizontal or vertical abdominoplasty skin excision techniques to provide an aesthetically pleasing overall result. CLINICAL QUESTION/LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Therapeutic, IV. PMID:25539311

  18. [Endoprosthetic replacement with lifting of abdominal wall in treatment of umbilical and postoperative ventral hernias].

    PubMed

    Sukhovatykh, B S; Valuyskaya, N M; Gerasimchuk, E V

    2015-01-01

    The results of complex clinical and ultrasonic investigation of abdominal wall and following surgical treatment in 60 women with umbilical and postoperative large ventral hernias combined with abdomen ptosis were analyzed. Patients were divided into 2 groups with 30 people per group. Endoprosthetic replacement of abdominal wall defect using standard polypropylene prosthesis was applied in the 1st group, endoprosthetic replacement with musculoaponeurotic tissues lifting in hypogastric area using original super lightweight polypropylenepolyvinylidenefluoride prosthesis--in the 2nd group. Polypropylene endoprosthesisconsist of main flap 15×15 cm with roundish edges and additional flap 5×40 cm in the form of wide stripe placed at the lower edge of main flap transversely to its direction. It was revealed increased physical health component in 1.8 times, psychic--in 2.5 times in the 2nd group. Thus number of excellent results increased on 33.3% and amount of satisfactory outcomes reduced on 30%.

  19. Stress adapted embroidered meshes with a graded pattern design for abdominal wall hernia repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, J.; Bittrich, L.; Breier, A.; Spickenheuer, A.

    2017-10-01

    Abdominal wall hernias are one of the most relevant injuries of the digestive system with 25 million patients in 2013. Surgery is recommended primarily using allogenic non-absorbable wrap-knitted meshes. These meshes have in common that their stress-strain behaviour is not adapted to the anisotropic behaviour of native abdominal wall tissue. The ideal mesh should possess an adequate mechanical behaviour and a suitable porosity at the same time. An alternative fabrication method to wrap-knitting is the embroidery technology with a high flexibility in pattern design and adaption of mechanical properties. In this study, a pattern generator was created for pattern designs consisting of a base and a reinforcement pattern. The embroidered mesh structures demonstrated different structural and mechanical characteristics. Additionally, the investigation of the mechanical properties exhibited an anisotropic mechanical behaviour for the embroidered meshes. As a result, the investigated pattern generator and the embroidery technology allow the production of stress adapted mesh structures that are a promising approach for hernia reconstruction.

  20. Challenges in the repair of large abdominal wall hernias in Nigeria: review of available options in resource limited environments.

    PubMed

    Ezeome, E R; Nwajiobi, C E

    2010-06-01

    To evaluate the challenges and outcome of management of large abdominal wall hernias in a resource limited environment and highlight the options available to surgeons in similar conditions. A review of prospectively collected data on large abdominal wall hernias managed between 2003 and 2009. University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital, Enugu, Nigeria and surrounding hospitals. Patients with hernias more than 4 cm in their largest diameter, patients with closely sited multiple hernias or failed previous repairs and in whom the surgeon considers direct repair inappropriate. Demographics of patients with large hernias, methods of hernia repair, recurrences, early and late complications following the repair. There were 41 patients, comprising 28 females and 13 males with ages 14 - 73 years. Most (53.7%) were incisional hernias. Gynecological surgeries (66.7%) were the most common initiating surgeries. Fifteen of the patients (36.6%) have had failed previous repairs, 41.5% were obese, five patients presented with intestinal obstruction. Thirty nine of the hernias were repaired with prolene mesh, one with composite mesh and one by danning technique. Most of the patients had extra peritoneal mesh placement. Three patients needed ventilator support. After a mean follow up of 18.6 months, there was a single failed repair. Two post op deaths were related to respiratory distress. There were 12 wound infection and 8 superficial wound dehiscence, all of which except one resolved with dressing. One reoperation was done following mesh infection and extrusion. Large abdominal wall hernia repair in resource limited environments present several challenges with wound infection and respiratory distress being the most notable. Surgeons who embark on it in these environments must be prepared t o secure the proper tissue replacement materials and have adequate ventilation support.

  1. Laparoscopic-assisted management of traumatic abdominal wall hernias in children: case series and a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Talutis, Stephanie D; Muensterer, Oliver J; Pandya, Samir; McBride, Whitney; Stringel, Gustavo

    2015-03-01

    Traumatic abdominal wall hernia (TAWH) is defined as herniation through a disrupted portion of musculature/fascia without skin penetration or history of prior hernia. In children, TAWH is a rare injury. The objectives of this study were to report our experience with different management strategies of TAWH in children and to determine the utility of laparoscopy. A retrospective chart review of all children treated by pediatric surgery at our institution for TAWH in a 5year interval was performed. Data were collected on mechanism of injury, initial patient presentation, surgical management, and outcomes. We present 5 cases of traumatic abdominal wall hernia; 3 were managed using laparoscopic assistance. One patient was managed nonoperatively. All patients recovered without complications and were asymptomatic on follow up. Traumatic abdominal wall hernias require a high index of suspicion in the cases of blunt abdominal trauma. Laparoscopy is useful mainly as a diagnostic modality, both to evaluate the hernia and associated injuries to intraabdominal structures. Its use may facilitate repair through a smaller incision. Conservative management of TAWH may be appropriate in select cases where there is a low risk of bowel strangulation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Changes in the Frequencies of Abdominal Wall Hernias and the Preferences for Their Repair: A Multicenter National Study From Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Şeker, Gaye; Kulacoglu, Hakan; Öztuna, Derya; Topgül, Koray; Akyol, Cihangir; Çakmak, Atıl; Karateke, Faruk; Özdoğan, Mehmet; Ersoy, Eren; Gürer, Ahmet; Zerbaliyev, Elbrus; Seker, Duray; Yorgancı, Kaya; Pergel, Ahmet; Aydın, İbrahim; Ensari, Cemal; Bilecik, Tuna; Kahraman, İzzettin; Reis, Erhan; Kalaycı, Murat; Canda, Aras Emre; Demirağ, Alp; Kesicioğlu, Tuğrul; Malazgirt, Zafer; Gündoğdu, Haldun; Terzi, Cem

    2014-01-01

    Abdominal wall hernias are a common problem in the general population. A Western estimate reveals that the lifetime risk of developing a hernia is about 2%.1–3 As a result, hernia repairs likely comprise the most frequent general surgery operations. More than 20 million hernias are estimated to be repaired every year around the world.4 Numerous repair techniques have been described to date however tension-free mesh repairs are widely used today because of their low hernia recurrence rates. Nevertheless, there are some ongoing debates regarding the ideal approach (open or laparoscopic),5,6 the ideal anesthesia (general, local, or regional),7,8 and the ideal mesh (standard polypropylene or newer meshes).9,10 PMID:25216417

  3. Pilot study on objective measurement of abdominal wall strength in patients with ventral incisional hernia.

    PubMed

    Parker, Michael; Goldberg, Ross F; Dinkins, Maryane M; Asbun, Horacio J; Daniel Smith, C; Preissler, Susanne; Bowers, Steven P

    2011-11-01

    Outcomes after ventral incisional hernia (VIH) repair are measured by recurrence rate and subjective measures. No objective metrics evaluate functional outcomes after abdominal wall reconstruction. This study aimed to develop testing of abdominal wall strength (AWS) that could be validated as a useful metric. Data were prospectively collected during 9 months from 35 patients. A total of 10 patients were evaluated before and after VIH repair, for a total of 45 encounters. The patients were tested simultaneously or in succession by two of three examiners. Data were collected for three tests: double leg lowering (DLL), trunk raising (TR), and supine reaching (SR). Raw data were compared and tested for validity, and continuous data were transformed to categorical data. Agreement was measured using the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) for DLL and using kappa for the ordinal measures. Simultaneous testing yielded the following interobserver reliability: DLL (0.96 and 0.87), TR (1.00 and 0.95), and SR (0.76). Reproducibility was assessed by consecutive tests, with correlation as follows: DLL (0.81), TR (0.81), and RCH (0.21). Due to poor interobserver reliability for the SR test compared with the DLL and TR tests, the SR test was excluded from calculation of an overall score. Based on raw data distribution from the DLL and TR tests, the DLL data were categorized into 10º increments, allowing construction of a 10-point score. The median AWS score was 5 (interquartile range [IQR], 4-7), and there was agreement within 1 point for 42 of the 45 encounters (93%). The findings from this study demonstrate that the 10-point AWS score may measure AWS in an accurate and reproducible fashion, with potential for objective description of abdominal wall function of VIH patients. This score may help to identify patients suited for abdominal wall reconstruction while measuring progress after VIH repair. Further longitudinal outcomes studies are needed.

  4. Isometric abdominal wall muscle strength assessment in individuals with incisional hernia: a prospective reliability study.

    PubMed

    Jensen, K K; Kjaer, M; Jorgensen, L N

    2016-12-01

    To determine the reliability of measurements obtained by the Good Strength dynamometer, determining isometric abdominal wall and back muscle strength in patients with ventral incisional hernia (VIH) and healthy volunteers with an intact abdominal wall. Ten patients with VIH and ten healthy volunteers with an intact abdominal wall were each examined twice with a 1 week interval. Examination included the assessment of truncal flexion and extension as measured with the Good Strength dynamometer, the completion of the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ) and the self-assessment of truncal strength on a visual analogue scale (SATS). The test-retest reliability of truncal flexion and extension was assessed by interclass correlation coefficient (ICC), and Bland and Altman graphs. Finally, correlations between truncal strength, and IPAQ and SATS were examined. Truncal flexion and extension showed excellent test-retest reliability for both patients with VIH (ICC 0.91 and 0.99) and healthy controls (ICC 0.97 and 0.96). Bland and Altman plots showed that no systematic bias was present for neither truncal flexion nor extension when assessing reliability. For patients with VIH, no significant correlations between objective measures of truncal strength and IPAQ or SATS were found. For healthy controls, both truncal flexion (τ 0.58, p = 0.025) and extension (τ 0.58, p = 0.025) correlated significantly with SATS, while no other significant correlation between truncal strength measures and IPAQ was found. The Good Strength dynamometer provided a reliable, low-cost measure of truncal flexion and extension in patients with VIH.

  5. Gasless laparoscopic surgery plus abdominal wall lifting for giant hiatal hernia-our single-center experience.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jiang-Hong; Wu, Ji-Xiang; Yu, Lei; Li, Jian-Ye

    2016-12-01

    Giant hiatal hernia (GHH) comprises 5% of hiatal hernia and is associated with significant complications. The traditional operative procedure, no matter transthoracic or transabdomen repair of giant hiatal hernia, is characteristic of more invasion and more complications. Although laparoscopic repair as a minimally invasive surgery is accepted, a part of patients can not tolerate pneumoperitoneum because of combination with cardiopulmonary diseases or severe posterior mediastinal and neck emphesema during operation. The aim of this article was to analyze our experience in gasless laparoscopic repair with abdominal wall lifting to treat the giant hiatal hernia. We performed a retrospective review of patients undergoing gasless laparoscopic repair of GHH with abdominal wall lifting from 2012 to 2015 at our institution. The GHH was defined as greater than one-third of the stomach in the chest. Gasless laparoscopic repair of GHH with abdominal wall lifting was attempted in 27 patients. Mean age was 67 years. The results showed that there were no conversions to open surgery and no intraoperative deaths. The mean duration of operation was 100 min (range: 90-130 min). One-side pleura was injured in 4 cases (14.8%). The mean postoperative length of stay was 4 days (range: 3-7 days). Median follow- up was 26 months (range: 6-38 months). Transient dysphagia for solid food occurred in three patients (11.1%), and this symptom disappeared within three months. There was one patient with recurrent hiatal hernia who was reoperated on. Two patients still complained of heartburn three months after surgery. Neither reoperation nor endoscopic treatment due to signs of postoperative esophageal stenosis was required in any patient. Totally, satisfactory outcome was reported in 88.9% patients. It was concluded that the gasless laparoscopic approach with abdominal wall lifting to the repair of GHH is feasible, safe, and effective for the patients who cannot tolerate the pneumoperitoneum.

  6. What Do We Know About Component Separation Techniques for Abdominal Wall Hernia Repair?

    PubMed

    Scheuerlein, Hubert; Thiessen, Andreas; Schug-Pass, Christine; Köckerling, Ferdinand

    2018-01-01

    The component separation technique (CST) was introduced to abdominal wall reconstruction to treat large, complex hernias. It is very difficult to compare the published findings because of the vast number of technical modifications to CST as well as the heterogeneity of the patient population operated on with this technique. The main focus of the literature search conducted up to August 2017 in Medline and PubMed was on publications reporting comparative findings as well as on systematic reviews in order to formulate statements regarding the various CSTs. CST without mesh should no longer be performed because of too high recurrence rates. Open anterior CST has too high a surgical site occurrence rate and henceforth should only be conducted as endoscopic and perforator sparing anterior CST. Open posterior CST and posterior CST with transversus abdominis release (TAR) produce better results than open anterior CST. To date, no significant differences have been found between endoscopic anterior, perforator sparing anterior CST and posterior CST with transversus abdominis release. Robot-assisted posterior CST with TAR is the latest, very promising alternative. The systematic use of biologic meshes cannot be recommended for CST. CST should always be performed with mesh as endoscopic or perforator sparing anterior or posterior CST. Robot-assisted posterior CST with TAR is the latest development.

  7. Critical overview of all available animal models for abdominal wall hernia research.

    PubMed

    Vogels, R R M; Kaufmann, R; van den Hil, L C L; van Steensel, S; Schreinemacher, M H F; Lange, J F; Bouvy, N D

    2017-10-01

    Since the introduction of the first prosthetic mesh for abdominal hernia repair, there has been a search for the "ideal mesh." The use of preclinical or animal models for assessment of necessary characteristics of new and existing meshes is an indispensable part of hernia research. Unfortunately, in our experience there is a lack of consensus among different research groups on which model to use. Therefore, we hypothesized that there is a lack of comparability within published animal research on hernia surgery due to wide range in experimental setup among different research groups. A systematic search of the literature was performed to provide a complete overview of all animal models published between 2000 and 2014. Relevant parameters on model characteristics and outcome measurement were scored on a standardized scoring sheet. Due to the wide range in different animals used, ranging from large animal models like pigs to rodents, we decided to limit the study to 168 articles concerning rat models. Within these rat models, we found wide range of baseline animal characteristics, operation techniques, and outcome measurements. Making reliable comparison of results among these studies is impossible. There is a lack of comparability among experimental hernia research, limiting the impact of this experimental research. We therefore propose the establishment of guidelines for experimental hernia research by the EHS.

  8. Abdominal Wall Endometriosis Mimicking Metastases.

    PubMed

    Nambiar, Rakul; Anoop, T M; Mony, Rari P

    2018-06-01

    Abdominal wall lesions can be broadly divided into nontumorous and tumorous conditions. Nontumorous lesions include congenital lesion, abdominal wall hernia, inflammation and infection, vascular lesions, and miscellaneous conditions like hematoma. Tumorous lesions include benign and malignant neoplasms. Here, we report an unusual case of abdominal wall endometriosis mimicking metastases in a patient with breast carcinoma.

  9. Correspondence: Laparoscopic repair of abdominal wall hernia--"How I do it"--synopsis of a seemingly straightforward technique.

    PubMed

    Berney, Christophe R

    2015-08-19

    Abdominal wall hernia repairs are commonly performed worldwide in general surgery. There is still no agreed consensus on the optimal surgical approach. Since the turn of the twenty-first century, minimally invasive techniques have gained in popularity as they combine the advantages of limited abdominal wall dissection, reduced post-operative pain and risk of complications, and shorter hospital stay. Although the added cost incurred by using sophisticated laparoscopic instruments may be quite substantial, it is precisely counterbalanced by an improved morbidity rate, faster discharge home and time to return to work. Laparoscopic abdominal wall hernia repair is often challenging, as it requires good anatomical knowledge, eye-hand coordination and diversified laparoscopic skills. The objective of this article is not to present another set of personal data and to compare it with already published results on this matter, but simply to offer comprehensive guidelines on the practical aspects of this relatively new technique. Some of these steps have already been discussed but most of the time in a scattered way in the surgical literature, while others are the fruit of a personal expertise grasped over the years.

  10. Traumatic abdominal hernia complicated by necrotizing fasciitis.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Pérez, Aleix; Garrigós-Ortega, Gonzalo; Gómez-Abril, Segundo Ángel; Martí-Martínez, Eva; Torres-Sánchez, Teresa

    2014-11-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is a critical illness involving skin and soft tissues, which may develop after blunt abdominal trauma causing abdominal wall hernia and representing a great challenge for physicians. A 52-year-old man was brought to the emergency department after a road accident, presenting blunt abdominal trauma with a large non-reducible mass in the lower-right abdomen. A first, CT showed abdominal hernia without signs of complication. Three hours after ICU admission, he developed hemodynamic instability. Therefore, a new CT scan was requested, showing signs of hernia complication. He was moved to the operating room where a complete transversal section of an ileal loop was identified. Five hours after surgery, he presented a new episode of hemodynamic instability with signs of skin and soft tissue infection. Due to the high clinical suspicion of necrotizing fasciitis development, wide debridement was performed. Following traumatic abdominal wall hernia (TAWH), patients can present unsuspected injuries in abdominal organs. Helical CT can be falsely negative in the early moments, leading to misdiagnosis. Necrotizing fasciitis is a potentially fatal infection and, consequently, resuscitation measures, wide-spectrum antibiotics, and early surgical debridement are required. This type of fasciitis can develop after blunt abdominal trauma following wall hernia without skin disruption.

  11. Economics of abdominal wall reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Bower, Curtis; Roth, J Scott

    2013-10-01

    The economic aspects of abdominal wall reconstruction are frequently overlooked, although understandings of the financial implications are essential in providing cost-efficient health care. Ventral hernia repairs are frequently performed surgical procedures with significant economic ramifications for employers, insurers, providers, and patients because of the volume of procedures, complication rates, the significant rate of recurrence, and escalating costs. Because biological mesh materials add significant expense to the costs of treating complex abdominal wall hernias, the role of such costly materials needs to be better defined to ensure the most cost-efficient and effective treatments for ventral abdominal wall hernias. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Gas gangrene of the abdominal wall due to late-onset enteric fistula after polyester mesh repair of an incisional hernia.

    PubMed

    Moussi, A; Daldoul, S; Bourguiba, B; Othmani, D; Zaouche, A

    2012-04-01

    The occurrence of enteric fistulae after wall repair using a prosthetic mesh is a serious but, fortunately, rare complication. We report the case of a 66-year-old diabetic man who presented with gas gangrene of the abdominal wall due to an intra-abdominal abscess caused by intestinal erosion six years after an incisional hernia repair using a polyester mesh. The aim of this case report is to illustrate the seriousness of enteric fistula after parietal repair using a synthetic material.

  13. Left hepatic lobe herniation through an incisional anterior abdominal wall hernia and right adrenal myelolipoma: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Nuño-Guzmán, Carlos M; Arróniz-Jáuregui, José; Espejo, Ismael; Valle-González, Jesús; Butus, Hernán; Molina-Romo, Alejandro; Orranti-Ortega, Rodrigo I

    2012-01-10

    Herniation of the liver through an anterior abdominal wall hernia defect is rare. To the best of our knowledge, only three cases have been described in the literature. A 70-year-old Mexican woman presented with a one-week history of right upper quadrant abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, and jaundice to our Department of General Surgery. Her medical history included an open cholecystectomy from 20 years earlier and excessive weight. She presented with jaundice, abdominal distension with a midline surgical scar, right upper quadrant tenderness, and a large midline abdominal wall defect with dullness upon percussion and protrusion of a large, tender, and firm mass. The results of laboratory tests were suggestive of cholestasis. Ultrasound revealed choledocholithiasis. A computed tomography scan showed a protrusion of the left hepatic lobe through the anterior abdominal wall defect and a well-defined, soft tissue density lesion in the right adrenal topography. An endoscopic common bile duct stone extraction was unsuccessful. During surgery, the right adrenal tumor was resected first. The hernia was approached through a median supraumbilical incision; the totality of the left lobe was protruding through the abdominal wall defect, and once the lobe was reduced to its normal position, a common bile duct surgical exploration with multiple stone extraction was performed. Finally, the abdominal wall was reconstructed. Histopathology revealed an adrenal myelolipoma. Six months after the operation, our patient remains in good health. The case of liver herniation through an incisional anterior abdominal wall hernia in this report represents, to the best of our knowledge, the fourth such case reported in the literature. The rarity of this medical entity makes it almost impossible to specifically describe predisposing risk factors for liver herniation. Obesity, the right adrenal myelolipoma mass effect, and the previous abdominal surgery are likely to have contributed to

  14. Evaluation of optical data gained by ARAMIS-measurement of abdominal wall movements for an anisotropic pattern design of stress-adapted hernia meshes produced by embroidery technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breier, A.; Bittrich, L.; Hahn, J.; Spickenheuer, A.

    2017-10-01

    For the sustainable repair of abdominal wall hernia the application of hernia meshes is required. One reason for the relapse of hernia after surgery is seen in an inadequate adaption of the mechanical properties of the mesh to the movements of the abdominal wall. Differences in the stiffness of the mesh and the abdominal tissue cause tension, friction and stress resulting in a deficient tissue response and subsequently in a recurrence of a hernia, preferentially in the marginal area of the mesh. Embroidery technology enables a targeted influence on the mechanical properties of the generated textile structure by a directed thread deposition. Textile parameters like stitch density, alignment and angle can be changed easily and locally in the embroidery pattern to generate a space-resolved mesh with mechanical properties adapted to the requirement of the surrounding tissue. To determine those requirements the movements of the abdominal wall and the resulting distortions need to be known. This study was conducted to gain optical data of the abdominal wall movements by non-invasive ARAMIS-measurement on 39 test persons to estimate direction and value of the major strains.

  15. Satisfaction and perceived quality of life results in patients operated on for primary hernia of the abdominal wall.

    PubMed

    de Miguel-Ibáñez, Ricardo; Nahban-Al Saied, Saif Adeen; Alonso-Vallejo, Javier; Escribano Sotos, Francisco

    2015-12-01

    Outpatient surgery is currently the standard procedure in 60-70% of the most prevalent surgical procedures. Minimally invasive models in health care have improved basic aspects such as postoperative pain and hospital stay, but there are few publications related to perceived quality shown by patients, such as the need for informal care at home or delay before surgery. The aim of the study was to determine the global satisfaction perceived by patients undergoing abdominal wall hernia repair. An ad hoc split questionnaire has been completed on satisfaction after a week and postoperative quality a month after intervention by 203 patients operated on for abdominal hernia in a year. Variables included postoperative pain, need for informal care, surgical delay, information supplied, professional management and overall satisfaction. A total of 48.28% of patients needed informal care at home. They were largely attended by women, wives or daughters, for a few days. In 45.81% they were discharged on the same day, and 53.2% in less than 72 h. Overall satisfaction in the program of day surgery and short hospital stay was 94.6%. The overall process of satisfaction was not related to age, sex or educational level of patients, while there was an inverse relationship between satisfaction and days of hospitalization and days of pain that required analgesia at home. Copyright © 2014 AEC. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Laparoscopic intracorporeal rectus aponeuroplasty (LIRA technique): a step forward in minimally invasive abdominal wall reconstruction for ventral hernia repair (LVHR).

    PubMed

    Gómez-Menchero, Julio; Guadalajara Jurado, Juan Francisco; Suárez Grau, Juan Manuel; Bellido Luque, Juan Antonio; García Moreno, Joaquin Luis; Alarcón Del Agua, Isaías; Morales-Conde, Salvador

    2018-01-17

    Closing the defect (CD) during laparoscopic ventral hernia repair began to be performed in order to decrease seroma, to improve the functionality of the abdominal wall, and to decrease the bulging effect. However, tension at the incision after CD in large defects is related to an increased rate of pain and recurrence. We present the preliminary results of a new technique for medium midline hernias as an alternative to conventional CD. A prospective controlled study was conducted from January 2015 to January 2017 to evaluate an elective new procedure (LIRA) performed on patients with midline ventral hernias (4-10 cm width). The posterior rectus aponeurosis was opened lengthwise around the hernia defect using a laparoscopic approach to create two flaps and was then sutured. The size of the flaps was estimated using a mathematical formula. An on-lay mesh was placed intraperitoneal overlapping the fascia defect. The data analyzed included patient demographics, operative parameters, and complications. A computerized tomography was performed preoperatively and postoperatively (1 month and 1 year) to evaluate recurrence, distance between rectus and seroma. Twelve patients were included. Mean width of the defect was 5.5 cm. Average VAS (24 h) was 3.9, 1.1 (1 month), and 0 (1 year). Mean preoperative distance between rectus was 5.5 cm; postoperative was 2.2 cm (1 year). Radiological seroma at first month was detected in 50%. Mean follow-up was 15 months. The LIRA technique could be considered as an alternative to conventional CD or endoscopic component separation for medium defects under 10 cm in width. This technique obtained a "no tension" effect that could be related to a lower rate of postoperative pain with no recurrence or bulging, being a safe, feasible, and reproducible technique.

  17. Open and Laparo-Endoscopic Repair of Incarcerated Abdominal Wall Hernias by the Use of Biological and Biosynthetic Meshes.

    PubMed

    Fortelny, René H; Hofmann, Anna; May, Christopher; Köckerling, Ferdinand

    2016-01-01

    Although recently published guidelines recommend against the use of synthetic non-absorbable materials in cases of potentially contaminated or contaminated surgical fields due to the increased risk of infection (1, 2), the use of bio-prosthetic meshes for abdominal wall or ventral hernia repair is still controversially discussed in such cases. Bio-prosthetic meshes have been recommended due to less susceptibility for infection and the decreased risk of subsequent mesh explantation. The purpose of this review is to elucidate if there are any indications for the use of biological and biosynthetic meshes in incarcerated abdominal wall hernias based on the recently published literature. A literature search of the Medline database using the PubMed search engine, using the keywords returned 486 articles up to June 2015. The full text of 486 articles was assessed and 13 relevant papers were identified including 5 retrospective case cohort studies, 2 case-controlled studies, and 6 case series. The results of Franklin et al. (3-5) included the highest number of biological mesh repairs (Surgisis(®)) by laparoscopic IPOM in infected fields, which demonstrated a very low incidence of infection and recurrence (0.7 and 5.2%). Han et al. (6) reported in his retrospective study, the highest number of treated patients due to incarcerated hernias by open approach using acellular dermal matrix (ADM(®)) with very low rate of infection as well as recurrences (1.6 and 15.9%). Both studies achieved acceptable outcome in a follow-up of at least 3.5 years compared to the use of synthetic mesh in this high-risk population (7). Currently, there is a very limited evidence for the use of biological and biosynthetic meshes in strangulated hernias in either open or laparo-endoscopic repair. Finally, there is an urgent need to start with randomized controlled comparative trials as well as to support registries with data to achieve more knowledge for tailored indication for the use of

  18. Polypropylene-based composite mesh versus standard polypropylene mesh in the reconstruction of complicated large abdominal wall hernias: a prospective randomized study.

    PubMed

    Kassem, M I; El-Haddad, H M

    2016-10-01

    To compare polypropylene mesh positioned onlay supported by omentum and/or peritoneum versus inlay implantation of polypropylene-based composite mesh in patients with complicated wide-defect ventral hernias. This was a prospective randomized study carried out on 60 patients presenting with complicated large ventral hernia in the period from January 2012 to January 2016 in the department of Gastrointestinal Surgery unit and Surgical Emergency of the Main Alexandria University Hospital, Egypt. Large hernia had an abdominal wall defect that could not be closed. Patients were divided into two groups of 30 patients according to the type of mesh used to deal with the large abdominal wall defect. The study included 38 women (63.3 %) and 22 men (37.7 %); their mean age was 46.5 years (range, 25-70). Complicated incisional hernia was the commonest presentation (56.7 %).The operative and mesh fixation times were longer in the polypropylene group. Seven wound infections and two recurrences were encountered in the propylene group. Mean follow-up was 28.7 months (2-48 months). Composite mesh provided, in one session, satisfactory results in patients with complicated large ventral hernia. The procedure is safe and effective in lowering operative time with a trend of low wound complication and recurrence rates.

  19. Component separation of abdominal wall with intraoperative botulinum A presents satisfactory outcomes in large incisional hernias: a case report.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Lucas Torres; Essu, Felipe Futema; de Mesquita, Gustavo Heluani Antunes; Jardim, Yuri Justi; Iuamoto, Leandro Ryuchi; Suguita, Fábio Yuji; Martines, Diego Ramos; Nii, Fernanda; Waisberg, Daniel Reis; Meyer, Alberto; Andraus, Wellington; D'Albuquerque, Luiz Augusto Carneiro

    2017-01-01

    Transplantation patients have a series of associated risk factors that make appearance of incisional hernia (IH) more likely. A number of aspects of the closure of large defects remain controversial. In this manuscript, we present the repair of a large IH following liver transplantation through the technique of posterior components separation combined with the anterior, together with the intraoperative use of botulinum toxin A and the placement of mesh. As a secondary objective, we analyze the incidence of IH following liver transplantation in our service. Between the years 2013 and 2016, 247 patients underwent liver transplantation in the Liver Transplantation Service at the Hospital das Clínicas da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de São Paulo, Brazil. We analyzed the incidence of IH in these patients. One of these cases operated in March 2017 presented a defect in the abdominal wall of 22×16.6×6.4cm in the median and paramedian regions. We present the details of this innovative surgical technique. The total operating time was 470min. During the postoperative phase the patient presented ileus paralysis, without systemic repercussions. Resumption of an oral diet on the fifth postoperative day, without incident. Hospital discharge occurred on the 12th postoperative day, with outpatient follow up. In our service, the incidence of incisional hernias following liver transplantation is 14.5%. We described a successful approach for selected patient group for whom there is no established standard treatment. Given the complexity of such cases, however, more studies are necessary. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  20. The single-staged approach to the surgical management of abdominal wall hernias in contaminated fields.

    PubMed

    Alaedeen, D I; Lipman, J; Medalie, D; Rosen, M J

    2007-02-01

    The surgical treatment of large ventral hernias with accompanying contamination is challenging. We have reviewed our institution's experience with single-staged repair of complex ventral hernias in the setting of contamination. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of all patients who underwent ventral hernia repairs in the setting of a contaminated field. Pertinent details included baseline demographics, reason for contamination, operative technique and details, postoperative morbidity, mortality and recurrence rates. Between December 1999 and January 2006, 19 patients were identified with ventral hernia repairs performed in contaminated fields. There were 6 males and 13 females with a mean age of 61 years (40-82), ASA 3.2 (2-4), and BMI of 34 kg/m(2) (20-65). Fourteen patients had prior mesh: prolene (9), composix (3), goretex (1), and alloderm (1). Reasons for contamination included: mesh infection (14), enterocutaneous fistula (7), concomitant bowel resection (8), chronic non-healing wound (2), and necrotizing fasciitis (1). Operative approaches included primary repair (3), component separation without reinforcement (2), and with prosthetic reinforcement (9). In five patients the fascia could not be reapproximated in the midline and the defect was bridged with surgisis (1), Marlex (1), lightweight polypropylene (1) placed in the retrorectus space, and alloderm (2). Mean operative time was 260 min (90-600). Twelve postoperative complications occurred in nine (47%) patients and included wound infection (6), respiratory failure (1), ileus (2), postoperative hemorrhage (1), renal failure (1), and atrial fibrillation (1). One patient died in this series. During routine follow-up two recurrences were identified by physical exam. This study shows that single-stage treatment of ventral hernias in contaminated fields can be accomplished with a low recurrence rate and acceptable morbidity in these extremely challenging patients.

  1. The effect of TISSEEL fibrin sealant on seroma formation following complex abdominal wall hernia repair: a single institutional review and derived cost analysis.

    PubMed

    Azoury, S C; Rodriguez-Unda, N; Soares, K C; Hicks, C W; Baltodano, P A; Poruk, K E; Hu, Q L; Cooney, C M; Cornell, P; Burce, K; Eckhauser, F E

    2015-12-01

    The authors evaluated the ability of a fibrin sealant (TISSEEL™: Baxter Healthcare Corp, Deerfield, IL, USA) to reduce the incidence of post-operative seroma following abdominal wall hernia repair. We performed a 4-year retrospective review of patients undergoing abdominal wall hernia repair, with and without TISSEEL, by a single surgeon (FEE) at The Johns Hopkins Hospital. Demographics, surgical risk factors, operative data and 30-day outcomes, including wound complications and related interventions, were compared. The quantity and cost of Tisseel per case was reviewed. A total of 250 patients were evaluated: 127 in the TISSEEL group and 123 in the non-TISSEEL control group. The average age for both groups was 56.6 years (P = 0.97). The majority of patients were female (TISSEEL 52.8%, non-TISSEEL 56.1%, P = 0.59) and ASA Class III (TISSEEL 56.7%, non-TISSEEL 58.5%, P = 0.40). There was no difference in the average defect size for both groups (TISSEEL 217 ± 187.6 cm(2), non-TISSEEL 161.3 ± 141.5 cm(2), P = 0.36). Surgical site occurrences occurred in 18.1% of the TISSEEL and 13% of the non-TISSEEL group (P = 0.27). There was a trend towards an increased incidence of seroma in the TISSEEL group (TISSEEL 11%, non-TISSEEL 4.9%, P = 0.07). A total of $124,472.50 was spent on TISSEEL, at an average cost of $995.78 per case. In the largest study to date, TISSEEL™ application offered no advantage for the reduction of post-operative seroma formation following complex abdominal hernia repair. Moreover, the use of this sealant was associated with significant costs.

  2. Recovery after abdominal wall reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Kristian Kiim

    2017-03-01

    Incisional hernia is a common long-term complication to abdominal surgery, occurring in more than 20% of all patients. Some of these hernias become giant and affect patients in several ways. This patient group often experiences pain, decreased perceived body image, and loss of physical function, which results in a need for surgical repair of the giant hernia, known as abdominal wall reconstruction. In the current thesis, patients with a giant hernia were examined to achieve a better understanding of their physical and psychological function before and after abdominal wall reconstruction. Study I was a systematic review of the existing standardized methods for assessing quality of life after incisional hernia repair. After a systematic search in the electronic databases Embase and PubMed, a total of 26 studies using standardized measures for assessment of quality of life after incisional hernia repair were found. The most commonly used questionnaire was the generic Short-Form 36, which assesses overall health-related quality of life, addressing both physical and mental health. The second-most common questionnaire was the Carolinas Comfort Scale, which is a disease specific questionnaire addressing pain, movement limitation and mesh sensation in relation to a current or previous hernia. In total, eight different questionnaires were used at varying time points in the 26 studies. In conclusion, standardization of timing and method of quality of life assessment after incisional hernia repair was lacking. Study II was a case-control study of the effects of an enhanced recovery after surgery pathway for patients undergoing abdominal wall reconstruction for a giant hernia. Sixteen consecutive patients were included prospectively after the implementation of a new enhanced recovery after surgery pathway at the Digestive Disease Center, Bispebjerg Hospital, and compared to a control group of 16 patients included retrospectively in the period immediately prior to the

  3. Hospital readmission following open, single-stage, elective abdominal wall reconstructions using acellular dermal matrix affects long-term hernia recurrence rate.

    PubMed

    Giordano, Salvatore A; Garvey, Patrick B; Baumann, Donald P; Liu, Jun; Butler, Charles E

    2018-02-05

    We evaluated the incidence of and the risk factors for readmission in patients who underwent abdominal wall reconstruction (AWR) using acellular dermal matrix (ADM) and assess whether readmission affects AWR long-term outcomes. A retrospective, single-center study of patients underwent AWR with ADM was conducted. The primary outcome was the incidence of unplanned readmission within 30 days after the initial discharge post-AWR. Secondary outcomes were surgical site occurrence (SSO) and hernia recurrence at follow-up. Of 452 patients (mean age, 59 years; mean follow-up, 35 months), 29 (6.4%) were readmitted within 30 days. Most readmissions were due to SSO (44.8%) or wound infections (12.8%). The hernia recurrence rate was significantly higher in readmitted patients (17.2% vs 9.9%; P = 0.044). Wider defects, prolonged operative time, and coronary artery disease were independent predictors of readmission. Readmission is associated with hernia recurrence on long-term follow-up. SSO is the most common cause for readmission. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Evaluation of the levels of metalloproteinsase-2 in patients with abdominal aneurysm and abdominal hernias.

    PubMed

    Antoszewska, Magdalena

    2013-05-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysms and abdominal hernias become an important health problems of our times. Abdominal aortic aneurysm and its rupture is one of the most dangerous fact in vascular surgery. There are some theories pointing to a multifactoral genesis of these kinds of diseases, all of them assume the attenuation of abdominal fascia and abdominal aortic wall. The density and continuity of these structures depend on collagen and elastic fibers structure. Reducing the strength of the fibers may be due to changes in the extracellular matrix (ECM) by the proteolytic enzymes-matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) that degrade extracellular matrix proteins. These enzymes play an important role in the development of many disease: malignant tumors (colon, breast, lung, pancreas), cardiovascular disease (myocardial infarction, ischemia-reperfusion injury), connective tissue diseases (Ehler-Danlos Syndrome, Marfan's Syndrome), complications of diabetes (retinopathy, nephropathy). One of the most important is matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2). The aim of the study was an estimation of the MMP-2 blood levels in patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm and primary abdominal hernia, and in patients with only abdominal aortic aneurysm. The study involved 88 patients aged 42 to 89 years, including 75 men and 13 women. Patients were divided into two groups: patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm and primary abdominal hernia (45 persons, representing 51.1% of all group) and patients with only abdominal aortic aneurysm (43 persons, representing 48,9% of all group). It was a statistically significant increase in MMP-2 blood levels in patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm and primary abdominal hernia compared to patients with only abdominal aortic aneurysm. It was a statistically significant increase in the prevalence of POCHP in patients with only abdominal aortic aneurysm compared to patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm and primary abdominal hernia. Statistically significant

  5. Intra-Abdominal Hypertension and Abdominal Compartment Syndrome after Abdominal Wall Reconstruction: Quaternary Syndromes?

    PubMed

    Kirkpatrick, A W; Nickerson, D; Roberts, D J; Rosen, M J; McBeth, P B; Petro, C C; Berrevoet, Frederik; Sugrue, M; Xiao, Jimmy; Ball, C G

    2017-06-01

    Reconstruction with reconstitution of the container function of the abdominal compartment is increasingly being performed in patients with massive ventral hernia previously deemed inoperable. This situation places patients at great risk of severe intra-abdominal hypertension and abdominal compartment syndrome if organ failure ensues. Intra-abdominal hypertension and especially abdominal compartment syndrome may be devastating systemic complications with systematic and progressive organ failure and death. We thus reviewed the pathophysiology and reported clinical experiences with abnormalities of intra-abdominal pressure in the context of abdominal wall reconstruction. Bibliographic databases (1950-2015), websites, textbooks, and the bibliographies of previously recovered articles for reports or data relating to intra-abdominal pressure, intra-abdominal hypertension, and the abdominal compartment syndrome in relation to ventral, incisional, or abdominal hernia repair or abdominal wall reconstruction. Surgeons should thus consider and carefully measure intra-abdominal pressure and its resultant effects on respiratory parameters and function during abdominal wall reconstruction. The intra-abdominal pressure post-operatively will be a result of the new intra-peritoneal volume and the abdominal wall compliance. Strategies surgeons may utilize to ameliorate intra-abdominal pressure rise after abdominal wall reconstruction including temporizing paralysis of the musculature either temporarily or semi-permanently, pre-operative progressive pneumoperitoneum, permanently removing visceral contents, or surgically releasing the musculature to increase the abdominal container volume. In patients without complicating shock and inflammation, and in whom the abdominal wall anatomy has been so functionally adapted to maximize compliance, intra-abdominal hypertension may be transient and tolerable. Intra-abdominal hypertension/abdominal compartment syndrome in the specific setting of

  6. Abdominal wall fat pad biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    Amyloidosis - abdominal wall fat pad biopsy; Abdominal wall biopsy; Biopsy - abdominal wall fat pad ... most common method of taking an abdominal wall fat pad biopsy . The health care provider cleans the ...

  7. Don't Forget the Abdominal Wall: Imaging Spectrum of Abdominal Wall Injuries after Nonpenetrating Trauma.

    PubMed

    Matalon, Shanna A; Askari, Reza; Gates, Jonathan D; Patel, Ketan; Sodickson, Aaron D; Khurana, Bharti

    2017-01-01

    Abdominal wall injuries occur in nearly one of 10 patients coming to the emergency department after nonpenetrating trauma. Injuries range from minor, such as abdominal wall contusion, to severe, such as abdominal wall rupture with evisceration of abdominal contents. Examples of specific injuries that can be detected at cross-sectional imaging include abdominal muscle strain, tear, or hematoma, including rectus sheath hematoma (RSH); traumatic abdominal wall hernia (TAWH); and Morel-Lavallée lesion (MLL) (closed degloving injury). These injuries are often overlooked clinically because of (a) a lack of findings at physical examination or (b) distraction by more-severe associated injuries. However, these injuries are important to detect because they are highly associated with potentially grave visceral and vascular injuries, such as aortic injury, and because their detection can lead to the diagnosis of these more clinically important grave traumatic injuries. Failure to make a timely diagnosis can result in delayed complications, such as bowel hernia with potential for obstruction or strangulation, or misdiagnosis of an abdominal wall neoplasm. Groin injuries, such as athletic pubalgia, and inferior costochondral injuries should also be considered in patients with abdominal pain after nonpenetrating trauma, because these conditions may manifest with referred abdominal pain and are often included within the field of view at cross-sectional abdominal imaging. Radiologists must recognize and report acute abdominal wall injuries and their associated intra-abdominal pathologic conditions to allow appropriate and timely treatment. © RSNA, 2017.

  8. Anterior Abdominal Wall Defects, Diaphragmatic Hernia, and Other Major Congenital Malformations of the Musculoskeletal System in Barbados, 1993-2012.

    PubMed

    Singh, Keerti; Kumar, Alok

    2017-06-01

    This study describes the prevalence and patterns of major congenital malformations of the musculoskeletal system and the resulting morbidity and mortality. It is a retrospective population-based study over the period 1993 to 2012. The overall prevalence of major congenital malformations of the musculoskeletal system was 9.02/10,000 live births. The prevalences of omphalocele, gastroschisis, and diaphragmatic hernia were 2.53, 2.22, and 1.42 per 10,000 live births, respectively. The case fatality ratio for the omphalocele, gastroschisis, and diaphragmatic hernia was 12.5, 28.5, and 67%, respectively. In conclusion, the prevalence rate of the major congenital malformations of the musculoskeletal system was higher than those reported in retrospective studies from other countries and remained static during the study period. These defects were associated with a high mortality rate and contributed significantly to the overall neonatal mortality in this country.

  9. Chronic Abdominal Wall Pain.

    PubMed

    Koop, Herbert; Koprdova, Simona; Schürmann, Christine

    2016-01-29

    Chronic abdominal wall pain is a poorly recognized clinical problem despite being an important element in the differential diagnosis of abdominal pain. This review is based on pertinent articles that were retrieved by a selective search in PubMed and EMBASE employing the terms "abdominal wall pain" and "cutaneous nerve entrapment syndrome," as well as on the authors' clinical experience. In 2% to 3% of patients with chronic abdominal pain, the pain arises from the abdominal wall; in patients with previously diagnosed chronic abdominal pain who have no demonstrable pathological abnormality, this likelihood can rise as high as 30% . There have only been a small number of clinical trials of treatment for this condition. The diagnosis is made on clinical grounds, with the aid of Carnett's test. The characteristic clinical feature is strictly localized pain in the anterior abdominal wall, which is often mischaracterized as a "functional" complaint. In one study, injection of local anesthesia combined with steroids into the painful area was found to relieve pain for 4 weeks in 95% of patients. The injection of lidocaine alone brought about improvement in 83-91% of patients. Long-term pain relief ensued after a single lidocaine injection in 20-30% of patients, after repeated injections in 40-50% , and after combined lidocaine and steroid injections in up to 80% . Pain that persists despite these treatments can be treated with surgery (neurectomy). Chronic abdominal wall pain is easily diagnosed on physical examination and can often be rapidly treated. Any physician treating patients with abdominal pain should be aware of this condition. Further comparative treatment trials will be needed before a validated treatment algorithm can be established.

  10. Repair of Postoperative Abdominal Hernia in a Child with Congenital Omphalocele Using Porcine Dermal Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Mylona, E.; Tsakalidis, C.; Spyridakis, I.; Mitsiakos, G.; Karagianni, P.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Incisional hernias are a common complication appearing after abdominal wall defects reconstruction, with omphalocele and gastroschisis being the most common etiologies in children. Abdominal closure of these defects represents a real challenge for pediatric surgeons with many surgical techniques and various prosthetic materials being used for this purpose. Case Report. We present a case of repair of a postoperative ventral hernia occurring after congenital omphalocele reconstruction in a three-and-a-half-year-old child using an acellular, sterile, porcine dermal mesh. Conclusion. Non-cross-linked acellular porcine dermal matrix is an appropriate mesh used for the reconstruction of abdominal wall defects and their postoperative complications like large ventral hernias with success and preventing their recurrence. PMID:27110247

  11. Repair of Postoperative Abdominal Hernia in a Child with Congenital Omphalocele Using Porcine Dermal Matrix.

    PubMed

    Lambropoulos, V; Mylona, E; Mouravas, V; Tsakalidis, C; Spyridakis, I; Mitsiakos, G; Karagianni, P

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Incisional hernias are a common complication appearing after abdominal wall defects reconstruction, with omphalocele and gastroschisis being the most common etiologies in children. Abdominal closure of these defects represents a real challenge for pediatric surgeons with many surgical techniques and various prosthetic materials being used for this purpose. Case Report. We present a case of repair of a postoperative ventral hernia occurring after congenital omphalocele reconstruction in a three-and-a-half-year-old child using an acellular, sterile, porcine dermal mesh. Conclusion. Non-cross-linked acellular porcine dermal matrix is an appropriate mesh used for the reconstruction of abdominal wall defects and their postoperative complications like large ventral hernias with success and preventing their recurrence.

  12. Abdominal musculature abnormalities as a cause of groin pain in athletes. Inguinal hernias and pubalgia.

    PubMed

    Taylor, D C; Meyers, W C; Moylan, J A; Lohnes, J; Bassett, F H; Garrett, W E

    1991-01-01

    There has been increasing interest within the European sports medicine community regarding the etiology and treatment of groin pain in the athlete. Groin pain is most commonly caused by musculotendinous strains of the adductors and other muscles crossing the hip joint, but may also be related to abdominal wall abnormalities. Cases may be termed "pubalgia" if physical examination does not reveal inguinal hernia and there is an absence of other etiology for groin pain. We present nine cases of patients who underwent herniorrhaphies for groin pain. Two patients had groin pain without evidence of a hernia preoperatively (pubalgia). In the remaining seven patients we determined the presence of a hernia by physical examination. At operation, eight patients were found to have inguinal hernias. One patient had no hernia but had partial avulsion of the internal oblique fibers from their insertion at the public tubercle. The average interval from operation to return to full activity was 11 weeks. All patients returned to full activity within 3 months of surgery. One patient had persistent symptoms of mild incisional tenderness, but otherwise there were no recurrences, complications, or persistence of symptoms. Abnormalities of the abdominal wall, including inguinal hernias and microscopic tears or avulsions of the internal oblique muscle, can be an overlooked source of groin pain in the athlete. Operative treatment of this condition with herniorrhaphy can return the athlete to his sport within 3 months.

  13. [Treatment of postoperative abdominal hernias with polypropylene endoprosthesis].

    PubMed

    Chakhvadze, B Iu; Nakashidze, D Kh

    2009-06-01

    The results of the surgical treatment of 82 patients with postoperative abdominal hernias were analysed. All of the patients underwent surgery with polypropylene endoprosthesis. The choice of a hernioplasty method depended on relative volume of postoperative hernia. Middle-sized hernias were indications for reconstructive surgery (complete adaptation of muscular and aponeurotic layers was maintained). The large and gigantic hernias were indications for correcting surgery (specified diastasis of muscular and aponeurotic layers was maintained). In case of lacking of peritoneum (30 patients) greater omentum was used for isolation of the net from intestinal loops. It is concluded that greater omentum provides good extraperitonisation of transplant from intestinal loop and prevents complications due to contact of net with abdominal organs. Postoperative complications mainly were local and seen in 29% cases. There were no lethal outcomes.

  14. Congenital cranial ventral abdominal hernia, peritoneopericardial diaphragmatic hernia and sternal cleft in a 4-year-old multiparous pregnant queen

    PubMed Central

    Bismuth, Camille; Deroy, Claire

    2017-01-01

    Case summary Cranial ventral midline hernias, most often congenital, can be associated with other congenital abnormalities, such as sternal, diaphragmatic or cardiac malformations. A 4-year-old multiparous queen with a substernal hernia was admitted for evaluation of a mammary mass. During CT examination, a bifid sternum, the abdominal hernia containing the intestines, spleen, omentum, three fetuses, a mammary mass and an incidental peritoneopericardial diaphragmatic hernia were identified. Surgery consisted of a standard ovariohysterectomy and repair of the peritoneopericardial hernia. Primary closure of the abdominal hernia was attempted but deemed impossible even after the ovariohysterectomy, splenectomy and a partial omentectomy. An external abdominal oblique muscle flap was used to close with no tension on the cranial part of the hernia. One month postoperatively, the queen had no respiratory abnormalities and the herniorrhaphy was fully healed. Relevance and novel information This case is the first description of a 4-year-old multiparous pregnant queen with complex congenital malformations and surgical correction of a peritoneopericardial hernia and a 6 × 8 cmsubsternal hernia with an external abdominal oblique muscle flap. Life-threatening sequelae associated with large abdominal hernias can be attributed to space-occupying effects known as loss of domain and compartment syndrome, which is why a muscle flap was used in this case. The sternal cleft was not repaired because of the size of the cleft and the age of the cat. PMID:29318024

  15. Takedown of enterocutaneous fistula and complex abdominal wall reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Slade, Dominic Alexander James; Carlson, Gordon Lawrence

    2013-10-01

    Key steps in managing patients with enterocutaneous fistulation and an abdominal wall defect include dealing effectively with abdominal sepsis and providing safe and effective nutritional support and skin care, then assessing intestinal and abdominal anatomy, before undertaking reconstructive surgery. The complexity, cost, and morbidity associated with such cases justifies creation of specialized centers in which gastroenterologic, hernia, and plastic surgical expertise, as well as experienced wound and stoma nursing and nutritional and psychological support, can be made available for patients with these challenging problems. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Athletic injuries of the lateral abdominal wall: review of anatomy and MR imaging appearance.

    PubMed

    Stensby, J Derek; Baker, Jonathan C; Fox, Michael G

    2016-02-01

    The lateral abdominal wall is comprised of three muscles, each with a different function and orientation. The transversus abdominus, internal oblique, and external oblique muscles span the abdominal cavity between the iliocostalis lumborum and quadratus lumborum posteriorly and the rectus abdominis anteriorly. The lateral abdominal wall is bound superiorly by the lower ribs and costal cartilages and inferiorly by the iliac crest and inguinal ligament. The lateral abdominal wall may be acutely or chronically injured in a variety of athletic endeavors, with occasional acute injuries in the setting of high-energy trauma such as motor vehicle collisions. Injuries to the lateral abdominal wall may result in lumbar hernia formation, unique for its high incarceration rate, and also Spigelian hernias. This article will review the anatomy, the magnetic resonance (MR) imaging approach, and the features and complications of lateral abdominal wall injuries.

  17. Management of complex abdominal wall defects associated with penetrating abdominal trauma.

    PubMed

    Arul, G Suren; Sonka, B J; Lundy, J B; Rickard, R F; Jeffery, S L A

    2015-03-01

    The paradigm of Damage Control Surgery (DCS) has radically improved the management of abdominal trauma, but less well described are the options for managing the abdominal wall itself in an austere environment. This article describes a series of patients with complex abdominal wall problems managed at the UK-led Role 3 Medical Treatment Facility (MTF) in Camp Bastion, Afghanistan. Contemporaneous review of a series of patients with complex abdominal wall injuries who presented to the Role 3 MTF between July and November 2012. Five patients with penetrating abdominal trauma associated with significant damage to the abdominal wall were included. All patients were managed using DCS principles, leaving the abdominal wall open at the end of the first procedure. Subsequent management of the abdominal wall was determined by a multidisciplinary team of general and plastic surgeons, intensivists and specialist nurses. The principles of management identified included minimising tissue loss on initial laparotomy by joining adjacent wounds and marginal debridement of dead tissue; contraction of the abdominal wall was minimised by using topical negative pressure dressing and dermal-holding sutures. Definitive closure was timed to allow oedema to settle and sepsis to be controlled. Closure techniques include delayed primary closure with traction sutures, components separation, and mesh closure with skin grafting. A daily multidisciplinary team discussion was invaluable for optimal decision making regarding the most appropriate means of abdominal closure. Dermal-holding sutures were particularly useful in preventing myostatic contraction of the abdominal wall. A simple flow chart was developed to aid decision making in these patients. This flow chart may prove especially useful in a resource-limited environment in which returning months or years later for closure of a large ventral hernia may not be possible. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use

  18. Fetal anterior abdominal wall defects: prenatal imaging by magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Victoria, Teresa; Andronikou, Savvas; Bowen, Diana; Laje, Pablo; Weiss, Dana A; Johnson, Ann M; Peranteau, William H; Canning, Douglas A; Adzick, N Scott

    2018-04-01

    Abdominal wall defects range from the mild umbilical cord hernia to the highly complex limb-body wall syndrome. The most common defects are gastroschisis and omphalocele, and the rarer ones include the exstrophy complex, pentalogy of Cantrell and limb-body wall syndrome. Although all have a common feature of viscera herniation through a defect in the anterior body wall, their imaging features and, more important, postnatal management, differ widely. Correct diagnosis of each entity is imperative in order to achieve appropriate and accurate prenatal counseling and postnatal management. In this paper, we discuss fetal abdominal wall defects and present diagnostic pearls to aid with diagnosis.

  19. Abdominal muscle function and incisional hernia: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Jensen, K K; Kjaer, M; Jorgensen, L N

    2014-08-01

    Although ventral incisional hernia (VIH) repair in patients is often evaluated in terms of hernia recurrence rate and health-related quality of life, there is no clear consensus regarding optimal operative treatment based on these parameters. It was proposed that health-related quality of life depends largely on abdominal muscle function (AMF), and the present review thus evaluates to what extent AMF is influenced by VIH and surgical repair. The PubMed and EMBASE databases were searched for articles following a systematic strategy for inclusion. A total of seven studies described AMF in relation to VIH. Five studies examined AMF using objective isokinetic dynamometers to determine muscle strength, and two studies examined AMF by clinical examination-based muscle tests. Both equipment-related and functional muscle tests exist for use in patients with VIH, but very few studies have evaluated AMF in VIH. There are no randomized controlled studies to describe the impact of VIH repair on AMF, and no optimal surgical treatment in relation to AMF after VIH repair can be advocated for at this time.

  20. Role of tissue expansion in abdominal wall reconstruction: A systematic evidence-based review.

    PubMed

    Wooten, Kimberly E; Ozturk, Cemile Nurdan; Ozturk, Can; Laub, Peter; Aronoff, Nell; Gurunluoglu, Raffi

    2017-06-01

    Tissue expanders (TEs) can be used to assist primary closure of complicated hernias and large abdominal wall defects. However, there is no consensus regarding the optimal technique, use, or associated risk of TE in abdominal wall reconstruction. A systematic search of PubMed and Embase databases was conducted to identify articles reporting abdominal wall reconstruction with TE techniques. English articles published between 1980 and 2016 were included on the basis of the following inclusion criteria: two-stage TE surgical technique, >3 cases, reporting of postoperative complications, hernia recurrence, and patient-based clinical data. Fourteen studies containing 103 patients (85 adults and 18 children) were identified for analysis. Most patients presented with a skin-grafted ventral hernia (n = 86). The etiology of the hernia was from trauma or prior abdominal surgery. The remaining patients had TE placed before organ transplantation (n = 12) or for congenital abdominal wall defects (n = 5). The location for expander placement was subcutaneous (n = 74), between the internal and external obliques (n = 26), posterior to the rectus sheath (n = 2), and intra-peritoneal (n = 1). Postoperative infections and implant-related problems were the most commonly reported complications after Stage I. The most common complication after Stage II was recurrent hernia, which was observed in 12 patients (11.7%). Five patients with TE died. Complications and mortality were more prevalent in children, immunosuppressed patients, and those with chronic illnesses. Tissue expansion for abdominal wall reconstruction can be successfully used for a variety of carefully selected patients with an acceptable complication and risk profile. Copyright © 2017 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Chronic abdominal wall pain misdiagnosed as functional abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    van Assen, Tijmen; de Jager-Kievit, Jenneke W A J; Scheltinga, Marc R; Roumen, Rudi M H

    2013-01-01

    The abdominal wall is often neglected as a cause of chronic abdominal pain. The aim of this study was to identify chronic abdominal wall pain syndromes, such as anterior cutaneous nerve entrapment syndrome (ACNES), in a patient population diagnosed with functional abdominal pain, including irritable bowel syndrome, using a validated 18-item questionnaire as an identification tool. In this cross-sectional analysis, 4 Dutch primary care practices employing physicians who were unaware of the existence of ACNES were selected. A total of 535 patients ≥18 years old who were registered with a functional abdominal pain diagnosis were approached when they were symptomatic to complete the questionnaire (maximum 18 points). Responders who scored at least the 10-point cutoff value (sensitivity, 0.94; specificity, 0.92) underwent a diagnostic evaluation to establish their final diagnosis. The main outcome was the presence and prevalence of ACNES in a group of symptomatic patients diagnosed with functional abdominal pain. Of 535 patients, 304 (57%) responded; 167 subjects (31%) recently reporting symptoms completed the questionnaire. Of 23 patients who scored above the 10-point cutoff value, 18 were available for a diagnostic evaluation. In half of these subjects (n = 9) functional abdominal pain (including IBS) was confirmed. However, the other 9 patients were suffering from abdominal wall pain syndrome, 6 of whom were diagnosed with ACNES (3.6% prevalence rate of symptomatic subjects; 95% confidence interval, 1.7-7.6), whereas the remaining 3 harbored a painful lipoma, an abdominal herniation, and a painful scar. A clinically relevant portion of patients previously diagnosed with functional abdominal pain syndrome in a primary care environment suffers from an abdominal wall pain syndrome such as ACNES.

  2. Resterilized mesh in repair of abdominal wall defects in rats.

    PubMed

    Sucullu, Ilker; Akin, Mehmet Levhi; Yitgin, Selahattin; Filiz, Ali Ilker; Kurt, Yavuz

    2008-01-01

    A variety of negative opinions about repeated usage of relatively expensive resterilized synthetic meshes have been considered. It had been stated that resterilized polypropylene meshes inhibits fibroblastic activity, decreases proliferative activity, and increases apoptosis in human fibroblast culture, in vitro. The purpose of this study is the in vivo evaluation of the resterilized mesh repairs of abdominal hernia defects in rat models of incisional hernia by comparing primer repair and original mesh repairs. The rats (n = 22) were separated into three groups. While the abdominal defect was repaired by primary suture in the control group (CG), the defects were repaired by original mesh (OG) or resterilized mesh (RG) in mesh-repaired groups. After 21 days, the rats were evaluated for tissue tensile strengths, tissue hydroxyproline levels, tissue inflammation, fibrosis, and apoptosis. Although the tensile strengths in OG and RG were significantly higher than those of CG (p < .05 and p < .05), there was no significant difference between two groups. The tissue hydroxyproline levels in OG and RG were also higher than those of CG. The difference was not significant between the two groups. The inflammation and fibrosis indexes in OG and RG were significantly higher than those of CG (p < .0001 for both), but there was no difference between groups. While the apoptosis index in OG and RG was also higher than that of CG (p < .0001 for both), there was no significant difference between OG and RG. The usage of resterilized mesh in abdominal wall repair did not reduce the tissue tensile strength, did not affect the tissue hydroxyproline levels, did not decrease the fibrosis, and did not increase the tissue inflammation and apoptosis. In conclusion, usage of resterilized meshes in abdominal wall defects was as safe as sterilized meshes.

  3. Congenital left paraduodenal hernia causing chronic abdominal pain and abdominal catastrophe.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yan; Felsted, Amy E; Masand, Prakash M; Mothner, Brent A; Nuchtern, Jed G; Rodriguez, J Ruben; Vasudevan, Sanjeev A

    2015-04-01

    Paraduodenal hernias are the most common type of congenital internal hernia. Because of its overall rare incidence, this entity is often overlooked during initial assessment of the patient. Lack of specific diagnostic criteria also makes diagnosis exceedingly difficult, and the resulting diagnostic delays can lead to tragic outcomes for patients. Despite these perceived barriers to timely diagnosis, there may be specific radiographic findings that, when combined with the appropriate constellation of clinical symptoms, would aid in diagnosis. This patient first presented at 8 years of age with vague symptoms of postprandial emesis, chronic abdominal pain, nausea, and syncope. Over the span of 6 years he was evaluated 2 to 3 times a year with similar complaints, all of which quickly resolved spontaneously. He underwent multiple laboratory, imaging, and endoscopic studies, which were nondiagnostic. It was not until he developed signs of a high-grade obstruction and extremis that he was found to have a large left paraduodenal hernia that had volvulized around the superior mesenteric axis. This resulted in the loss of the entire superior mesenteric axis distribution of the small and large intestine and necrosis of the duodenum. In cases of chronic intermittent obstruction without clear etiology, careful attention and consideration should be given to the constellation of symptoms, imaging studies, and potential use of diagnostic laparoscopy. Increased vigilance by primary care and consulting physicians is necessary to detect this rare but readily correctable condition. Copyright © 2015 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  4. Abdominal wall reinforcement: biologic vs. degradable synthetic devices.

    PubMed

    Gruber-Blum, S; Brand, J; Keibl, C; Fortelny, R H; Redl, H; Mayer, F; Petter-Puchner, A H

    2017-04-01

    New biodegradable synthetic and biologic hernia implants have been promoted for rapid integration and tissue reinforcement in challenging repairs, e.g. at the hiatus or in contaminated wound fields. Interestingly, experimental data to support or falsify this assumption is scarce. Synthetic (BioA ® ) and biologic implants (porcine and bovine collagen matrices Strattice ® and Veritas ® ) have been tested in experimental onlay hernia repair in rats in observation periods of 30 and 60 days. The key outcome parameters were mesh integration and reinforcement of the tissue at the implant site over sutured and sealed defects as well as comparison to native abdominal wall. Macroscopic assessment, biomechanical analysis and histology with haematoxylin/eosin staining, collagen staining and van Willebrand factor staining for detection of neovascularization were performed. BioA ® was well integrated. Although the matrices were already fragmented at 60 days follow-up, hernia sites treated with synthetic scaffolds showed a significantly enhanced tissue deflection and resistance to burst force when compared to the native abdominal wall. In porcine and bovine matrices, tissue integration and shrinkage were significantly inferior to BioA ® . Histology revealed a lack of fibroblast ingrowth through mesh interstices in biologic samples, whereas BioA ® was tightly connected to the underlying tissue by reticular collagen fibres. Strattice ® and Veritas ® yielded reduced tissue integration and significant shrinkage, prohibiting further biomechanical tests. The synthetic BioA ® provides little inherent strength but reticular collagen remodelling led to an augmentation of the scar due to significantly higher burst force resistance in comparison to native tissue.

  5. Radiographic and ultrasonographic characteristics of ventral abdominal hernia in pigeons (Columba livia).

    PubMed

    Amer, Mohammed S; Hassan, Elham A; Torad, Faisal A

    2018-02-20

    Five female egg-laying pigeons presented with painless, reducible, ventral abdominal swellings located between the keel and the pubis, or close to the cloaca. Based on clinical, radiographic, and ultrasonographic examination, these pigeons were diagnosed with ventral abdominal hernia requiring surgical interference. Reduction was successfully performed under general anesthesia. Radiographic and ultrasonographic examinations were beneficial for confirming the diagnosis and visualizing the hernial content for surgical planning. Lateral radiographs were more helpful than ventrodorsal radiographs for identification of the hernial content and its continuation with the abdominal muscles. Ultrasonographic examination offered a non-invasive diagnostic tool that allowed for the differentiation of hernia from other abdominal swellings. In addition, it played a beneficial role in identification of the hernial content and follow up after surgical interference. In conclusion, radiographic and ultrasonographic examinations were beneficial in the diagnosis, surgical planning, and follow up after surgical interference of ventral abdominal hernia in pigeons.

  6. [Desmoid tumor of the abdominal wall].

    PubMed

    Jørgensen, H; Henriksen, L O; Medgyesi, S; Waever, E

    1994-02-07

    Four cases of muscle-aponeurotic fibroadenomatosis (desmoid) of the abdominal wall are reported. The etiological factors, the recurrence rate, the treatment and the pre- and postoperative examinations are discussed.

  7. Genetics Home Reference: abdominal wall defect

    MedlinePlus

    ... are two main types of abdominal wall defects: omphalocele and gastroschisis . Omphalocele is an opening in the center of the ... covering the exposed organs in gastroschisis. Fetuses with omphalocele may grow slowly before birth (intrauterine growth retardation) ...

  8. Technical advances for abdominal wall closure after intestinal and multivisceral transplantation.

    PubMed

    Gerlach, Undine A; Pascher, Andreas

    2012-06-01

    Abdominal wall closure after intestinal transplantation (ITX) or multivisceral transplantation (MVTX) is challenging because of the loss of abdominal domain and wall elasticity as a result of previous operations and donor-to-recipient weight and height mismatch. We report on abdominal wall closure management in 30 ITX and MVTX recipients. In 60% of patients (n = 18), a primary abdominal closure (PAC) was achieved, in 40% (n = 12) a staged closure (SAC) was necessary. Patients with PAC had undergone less pretransplant operations and required less posttransplant relaparotomies. They were mainly ITX recipients or more abdominal domain because of a longer intestinal remnant. A literature review revealed different strategies to overcome a failed primary closure. They focus on graft reduction or an enlargement of the abdominal domain. The latter includes temporary coverage with prosthetic materials for SAC. Definite abdominal closure is achieved by skin only closure, or by using acellular dermal matrix, rotational flaps, rectus muscle fascia or abdominal wall grafts. Abdominal wall reconstruction after ITX/MVTX is commonly demanded and can be conducted by different strategies. The technique should be easy to use in a timely manner and should prevent abdominal infections, intestinal fistulation, incisional hernias, and wound dehiscence.

  9. Towards the mechanical characterization of abdominal wall by inverse analysis.

    PubMed

    Simón-Allué, R; Calvo, B; Oberai, A A; Barbone, P E

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study is to characterize the passive mechanical behaviour of abdominal wall in vivo in an animal model using only external cameras and numerical analysis. The main objective lies in defining a methodology that provides in vivo information of a specific patient without altering mechanical properties. It is demonstrated in the mechanical study of abdomen for hernia purposes. Mechanical tests consisted on pneumoperitoneum tests performed on New Zealand rabbits, where inner pressure was varied from 0mmHg to 12mmHg. Changes in the external abdominal surface were recorded and several points were tracked. Based on their coordinates we reconstructed a 3D finite element model of the abdominal wall, considering an incompressible hyperelastic material model defined by two parameters. The spatial distributions of these parameters (shear modulus and non linear parameter) were calculated by inverse analysis, using two different types of regularization: Total Variation Diminishing (TVD) and Tikhonov (H 1 ). After solving the inverse problem, the distribution of the material parameters were obtained along the abdominal surface. Accuracy of the results was evaluated for the last level of pressure. Results revealed a higher value of the shear modulus in a wide stripe along the craneo-caudal direction, associated with the presence of linea alba in conjunction with fascias and rectus abdominis. Non linear parameter distribution was smoother and the location of higher values varied with the regularization type. Both regularizations proved to yield in an accurate predicted displacement field, but H 1 obtained a smoother material parameter distribution while TVD included some discontinuities. The methodology here presented was able to characterize in vivo the passive non linear mechanical response of the abdominal wall. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Texture analysis improves level set segmentation of the anterior abdominal wall

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Zhoubing; Allen, Wade M.; Baucom, Rebeccah B.

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: The treatment of ventral hernias (VH) has been a challenging problem for medical care. Repair of these hernias is fraught with failure; recurrence rates ranging from 24% to 43% have been reported, even with the use of biocompatible mesh. Currently, computed tomography (CT) is used to guide intervention through expert, but qualitative, clinical judgments, notably, quantitative metrics based on image-processing are not used. The authors propose that image segmentation methods to capture the three-dimensional structure of the abdominal wall and its abnormalities will provide a foundation on which to measure geometric properties of hernias and surrounding tissues and, therefore,more » to optimize intervention.Methods: In this study with 20 clinically acquired CT scans on postoperative patients, the authors demonstrated a novel approach to geometric classification of the abdominal. The authors’ approach uses a texture analysis based on Gabor filters to extract feature vectors and follows a fuzzy c-means clustering method to estimate voxelwise probability memberships for eight clusters. The memberships estimated from the texture analysis are helpful to identify anatomical structures with inhomogeneous intensities. The membership was used to guide the level set evolution, as well as to derive an initial start close to the abdominal wall.Results: Segmentation results on abdominal walls were both quantitatively and qualitatively validated with surface errors based on manually labeled ground truth. Using texture, mean surface errors for the outer surface of the abdominal wall were less than 2 mm, with 91% of the outer surface less than 5 mm away from the manual tracings; errors were significantly greater (2–5 mm) for methods that did not use the texture.Conclusions: The authors’ approach establishes a baseline for characterizing the abdominal wall for improving VH care. Inherent texture patterns in CT scans are helpful to the tissue classification, and

  11. What is the evidence for the use of biologic or biosynthetic meshes in abdominal wall reconstruction?

    PubMed

    Köckerling, F; Alam, N N; Antoniou, S A; Daniels, I R; Famiglietti, F; Fortelny, R H; Heiss, M M; Kallinowski, F; Kyle-Leinhase, I; Mayer, F; Miserez, M; Montgomery, A; Morales-Conde, S; Muysoms, F; Narang, S K; Petter-Puchner, A; Reinpold, W; Scheuerlein, H; Smietanski, M; Stechemesser, B; Strey, C; Woeste, G; Smart, N J

    2018-04-01

    Although many surgeons have adopted the use of biologic and biosynthetic meshes in complex abdominal wall hernia repair, others have questioned the use of these products. Criticism is addressed in several review articles on the poor standard of studies reporting on the use of biologic meshes for different abdominal wall repairs. The aim of this consensus review is to conduct an evidence-based analysis of the efficacy of biologic and biosynthetic meshes in predefined clinical situations. A European working group, "BioMesh Study Group", composed of invited surgeons with a special interest in surgical meshes, formulated key questions, and forwarded them for processing in subgroups. In January 2016, a workshop was held in Berlin where the findings were presented, discussed, and voted on for consensus. Findings were set out in writing by the subgroups followed by consensus being reached. For the review, 114 studies and background analyses were used. The cumulative data regarding biologic mesh under contaminated conditions do not support the claim that it is better than synthetic mesh. Biologic mesh use should be avoided when bridging is needed. In inguinal hernia repair biologic and biosynthetic meshes do not have a clear advantage over the synthetic meshes. For prevention of incisional or parastomal hernias, there is no evidence to support the use of biologic/biosynthetic meshes. In complex abdominal wall hernia repairs (incarcerated hernia, parastomal hernia, infected mesh, open abdomen, enterocutaneous fistula, and component separation technique), biologic and biosynthetic meshes do not provide a superior alternative to synthetic meshes. The routine use of biologic and biosynthetic meshes cannot be recommended.

  12. Flank and Lumbar Hernia Repair.

    PubMed

    Beffa, Lucas R; Margiotta, Alyssa L; Carbonell, Alfredo M

    2018-06-01

    Flank and lumbar hernias are challenging because of their rarity and anatomic location. Several challenges exist when approaching these specific abdominal wall defects, including location, innervation of the lateral abdominal wall musculature, and their proximity to bony landmarks. These hernias are confined by the costal margin, spine, and pelvic brim, which makes closure of the defect, including mesh placement, difficult. This article discusses the anatomy of lumbar and flank hernias, the various etiologies for these hernias, and the procedural steps for open and robotic preperitoneal approaches. The available clinical evidence regarding outcomes for various repair techniques is also reviewed. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Bioprosthetic Mesh in Abdominal Wall Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Baumann, Donald P.; Butler, Charles E.

    2012-01-01

    Mesh materials have undergone a considerable evolution over the last several decades. There has been enhancement of biomechanical properties, improvement in manufacturing processes, and development of antiadhesive laminate synthetic meshes. The evolution of bioprosthetic mesh materials has markedly changed our indications and methods for complex abdominal wall reconstruction. The authors review the optimal properties of bioprosthetic mesh materials, their evolution over time, and their indications for use. The techniques to optimize outcomes are described using bioprosthetic mesh for complex abdominal wall reconstruction. Bioprosthetic mesh materials clearly have certain advantages over other implantable mesh materials in select indications. Appropriate patient selection and surgical technique are critical to the successful use of bioprosthetic materials for abdominal wall repair. PMID:23372454

  14. Extraskeletal Ewing sarcoma of the abdominal wall

    PubMed Central

    Farhat, L. Ben; Ghariani, B.; Rabeh, A.; Dali, N.; Said, W.; Hendaoui, L.

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Ewing sarcoma is most commonly a bone tumour which has usually extended into the soft tissues at the time of diagnosis. Exceptionally, this tumour can have an extraskeletal origin. Clinical or imaging findings are non-specific and diagnosis is based on histology. We report a case of an extraskeletal Ewing sarcoma developed in the soft tissues of the abdominal wall in a 35-year-old woman who presented a painful abdominal wall tumefaction. Ultrasongraphy and computed tomography showed a large, well-defined soft tissue mass developed in the left anterolateral muscle group of the abdominal wall. Surgical biopsy was performed and an extraskeletal Ewing sarcoma was identified histologically. PMID:18818133

  15. Does the use of an acellular dermal graft in abdominal closure after rectus flap harvest impact the occurrence of post-operative hernia?

    PubMed

    Saman, Masoud; Kadakia, Sameep; Ducic, Yadranko

    2015-12-01

    Patients with rectus free flap harvest extending below the arcuate line are predisposed to postoperative hernia formation. As such, many authors have advocated the use of closure adjuncts to increase the integrity of the closure and prevent hernia or abdominal wall bulging. Busy level 1 public trauma center in metropolitan Fort Worth, Texas Following harvest of the rectus free flap, 48 patients underwent primary closure; 24 of these patients had defects extending below the arcuate line. Forty patients were closed with an acellular dermal graft; 22 of these patients had defects extending below the arcuate line. Postoperative hernia formation and local infection rate were examined in a minimum follow-up period of 1 year. Regardless of closure method, no hernias were observed in the postoperative period. Using an unpaired t test and an alpha value of 0.05, there was no statistically significant difference in the infection rate between the two groups. Following rectus abdominis myocutaneous free flap harvest, the use of an acellular dermal graft in abdominal wall closure may not be of any further advantage in the prevention of hernia. Retrospective (Level III).

  16. Abdominal wall reconstruction following removal of a chronically infected mid-urethral tape.

    PubMed

    Walker, Helen; Brooker, Thomas; Gelman, Wolf

    2009-10-01

    We report a rare postoperative complication of a mid-urethral tape. The patient presented with a chronic infection resistant to treatment with several weeks of antibiotics, with eventual surgical removal, and the resulting complications of an infected incisional hernia and vesico-cutaneous fistula required reconstruction of the abdominal wall with Permacol and excision of the vesico-cutaneous fistula. We also look briefly at the impact of health tourism on the National Health Service.

  17. Prior Radiotherapy Does Not Affect Abdominal Wall Reconstruction Outcomes: Evidence from Propensity Score Analysis.

    PubMed

    Giordano, Salvatore; Garvey, Patrick B; Baumann, Donald P; Liu, Jun; Butler, Charles E

    2017-03-01

    Prior abdominal wall radiotherapy (XRT) adversely affects wound healing, but data are limited on how prior XRT may affect abdominal wall reconstruction (AWR) outcomes. The purpose of this study was to determine whether prior abdominal wall radiotherapy is associated with a higher incidence of complications following AWR for a hernia or oncologic resection defect. We performed a retrospective study of consecutive patients who underwent complex AWR using acellular dermal matrix (ADM) at a single center. We compared outcomes between patients who underwent prior XRT that directly involved the abdominal wall and those who did not receive XRT. Propensity score match-paired and multivariate analyses were performed. A total of 511 patients (130 [25.4 %] with prior XRT; 381 [74.6 %] without prior XRT) underwent AWR with ADM for repair of a complex hernia or oncologic resection defect. Mean follow-up was 31.4 months, mean XRT dose was 48.9 Gy, and mean time between XRT and reconstruction was 19.2 months. XRT AWR patients underwent more flap reconstructions (14.6 vs. 5.0 %, P < 0.001) but fewer component separations (61.5 vs. 71.4 %; P = 0.036) than non-XRT AWR patients. The two groups had similar rates of hernia recurrence (8.5 vs. 9.4 %; P = 0.737) and surgical site occurrence (25.4 vs. 23.4 %; P = 0.640). In the propensity score-matched subgroups, there were no differences in hernia recurrence, surgical site occurrence, and wound healing complication rates. Prior XRT does not adversely affect outcomes in AWR. However, surgeons should be aware of the higher likelihood of needing a soft tissue flap reconstruction for soft tissue replacement when performing AWR after XRT.

  18. Abdominal Wall Desmoid during Pregnancy: Diagnostic Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Awwad, Johnny; Hammoud, Nadine; Farra, Chantal; Fares, Farah; Abi Saad, George; Ghazeeri, Ghina

    2013-01-01

    Background. Desmoids are benign tumors, with local invasive features and no metastatic potential, which have rarely been described to be pregnancy associated. Case. We described the rapid growth of an anterior abdominal wall mass in a 40-year-old pregnant woman. Due to its close proximity to the enlarged uterus, it was misdiagnosed to be a uterine leiomyoma by ultrasound examination. Final tissue diagnosis and radical resection were done at the time of abdominal delivery. Conclusion. Due to the diagnostic limitations of imaging techniques, desmoids should always be considered when the following manifestations are observed in combination: progressive growth of a solitary abdominal wall mass during pregnancy and well-delineated smooth tumor margins demonstrated by imaging techniques. This case emphasizes the importance of entertaining uncommon medical conditions in the differential diagnosis of seemingly common clinical manifestations. PMID:23346436

  19. Assessment of abdominal muscle function using the Biodex System-4. Validity and reliability in healthy volunteers and patients with giant ventral hernia.

    PubMed

    Gunnarsson, U; Johansson, M; Strigård, K

    2011-08-01

    The decrease in recurrence rates in ventral hernia surgery have led to a redirection of focus towards other important patient-related endpoints. One such endpoint is abdominal wall function. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the reliability and external validity of abdominal wall strength measurement using the Biodex System-4 with a back abdomen unit. Ten healthy volunteers and ten patients with ventral hernias exceeding 10 cm were recruited. Test-retest reliability, both with and without girdle, was evaluated by comparison of measurements at two test occasions 1 week apart. Reliability was calculated by the interclass correlation coefficients (ICC) method. Validity was evaluated by correlation with the well-established International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ) and a self-assessment of abdominal wall strength. One person in the healthy group was excluded after the first test due to neck problems following minor trauma. The reliability was excellent (>0.75), with ICC values between 0.92 and 0.97 for the different modalities tested. No differences were seen between testing with and without a girdle. Validity was also excellent both when calculated as correlation to self-assessment of abdominal wall strength, and to IPAQ, giving Kendall tau values of 0.51 and 0.47, respectively, and corresponding P values of 0.002 and 0.004. Measurement of abdominal muscle function using the Biodex System-4 is a reliable and valid method to assess this important patient-related endpoint. Further investigations will be made to explore the potential of this technique in the evaluation of the results of ventral hernia surgery, and to compare muscle function after different abdominal wall reconstruction techniques.

  20. Prophylactic Mesh Reinforcement versus Sutured Closure to Prevent Incisional Hernias after Open Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair via Midline Laparotomy: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Indrakusuma, Reza; Jalalzadeh, Hamid; van der Meij, Jessica E; Balm, Ron; Koelemay, Mark J W

    2018-04-20

    Incisional hernia is a frequent late complication after open abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair. We aimed to determine whether prophylactic mesh reinforcement of the abdominal wall at open AAA repair via midline laparotomy reduces the rate of incisional hernia compared to standard sutured closure. A systematic review and meta-analysis was carried out in accordance with the PRISMA statement (PROSPERO registration CRD42017072508). Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing prophylactic mesh reinforcement with standard sutured closure were eligible for inclusion. MEDLINE, Embase, and the Cochrane Library were searched. A meta-analysis with a random effects model was carried out to estimate pooled risk ratios (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the incidence of, and re-operation rate for, incisional hernias. Assessments of methodological quality, quality of evidence, and strength of recommendations were done with the Cochrane Collaboration's tool for assessing risk of bias and the GRADE approach. Four RCTs with a total of 388 patients were included in the meta-analysis. Pooled analysis showed that mesh reinforcement significantly reduced the risk of incisional hernia after AAA repair compared with standard sutured closure (RR 0.27, 95% CI 0.11-0.66). The pooled rate of re-operations was not different between groups (RR 0.23, 95% CI 0.11-1.05). Mesh reinforcement did not cause more intra-operative or post-operative complications than sutured closure. The risk of bias in studies was low and the quality of evidence was rated as moderate. Prophylactic mesh reinforcement of the abdominal wall after open AAA repair via midline laparotomy significantly reduces the risk of incisional hernia. However, no significant difference in re-operation for incisional hernia was found. Copyright © 2018 European Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Development and validation of a risk stratification score for ventral incisional hernia after abdominal surgery: hernia expectation rates in intra-abdominal surgery (the HERNIA Project).

    PubMed

    Goodenough, Christopher J; Ko, Tien C; Kao, Lillian S; Nguyen, Mylan T; Holihan, Julie L; Alawadi, Zeinab; Nguyen, Duyen H; Flores, Juan R; Arita, Nestor T; Roth, J Scott; Liang, Mike K

    2015-04-01

    Ventral incisional hernias (VIH) develop in up to 20% of patients after abdominal surgery. No widely applicable preoperative risk-assessment tool exists. We aimed to develop and validate a risk-assessment tool to predict VIH after abdominal surgery. A prospective study of all patients undergoing abdominal surgery was conducted at a single institution from 2008 to 2010. Variables were defined in accordance with the National Surgical Quality Improvement Project, and VIH was determined through clinical and radiographic evaluation. A multivariate Cox proportional hazard model was built from a development cohort (2008 to 2009) to identify predictors of VIH. The HERNIAscore was created by converting the hazards ratios (HR) to points. The predictive accuracy was assessed on the validation cohort (2010) using a receiver operator characteristic curve and calculating the area under the curve (AUC). Of 625 patients followed for a median of 41 months (range 0.3 to 64 months), 93 (13.9%) developed a VIH. The training cohort (n = 428, VIH = 70, 16.4%) identified 4 independent predictors: laparotomy (HR 4.77, 95% CI 2.61 to 8.70) or hand-assisted laparoscopy (HAL, HR 4.00, 95% CI 2.08 to 7.70), COPD (HR 2.35; 95% CI 1.44 to 3.83), and BMI ≥ 25 kg/m(2) (HR1.74; 95% CI 1.04 to 2.91). Factors that were not predictive included age, sex, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) score, albumin, immunosuppression, previous surgery, and suture material or technique. The predictive score had an AUC = 0.77 (95% CI 0.68 to 0.86) using the validation cohort (n = 197, VIH = 23, 11.6%). Using the HERNIAscore: HERNIAscore = 4(∗)Laparotomy+3(∗)HAL+1(∗)COPD+1(∗) BMI ≥ 25, 3 classes stratified the risk of VIH: class I (0 to 3 points),5.2%; class II (4 to 5 points),19.6%; and class III (6 points), 55.0%. The HERNIAscore accurately identifies patients at increased risk for VIH. Although external validation is needed, this provides a starting point to counsel patients and guide

  2. Mesh repair of umbilical hernia without a visible abdominal scar.

    PubMed

    Kurpiewski, Waldemar; Kiliańczyk, Michał; Szynkarczuk, Rafał; Tenderenda, Michał

    2014-02-01

    Experience in the use of Single Incision Laparoscopic Surgery procedures and the persistent urge to improve the cosmetic effect have contributed to the introduction of mesh repair of an umbilical hernia by means of a small incision in the natural position of the umbilicus. The aim of the study was to present the surgical technique and assess its postoperative results. During the period between 24.08.2011 and 01.01.2013, twenty-three umbilical hernia repair operations with the use of a polypropylene mesh by means of a small incision in the natural position of the umbilicus were performed. The synthetic material was placed in the preperitoneal space. The wound was closed and the umbilicus was reconstructed simultaneously, in order to make the scar invisible. Cutaneous stitches were not used. The average duration of the operation was 49 minutes. In one case of an obese patient with coexisting linea alba dehiscence, hernia recurrence was observed. All wounds healed without complications. The cosmetic effect was very good. Based on the presented experience mesh repair of the umbilical hernia by means of a small incision in the natural position of the umbilicus contributes essential benefits, such as a very good cosmetic effect without consecutive increasing costs, as compared to standard treatment by means of an infraumbilical incision.

  3. Mechanical behaviour of synthetic surgical meshes: finite element simulation of the herniated abdominal wall.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Gascón, B; Peña, E; Melero, H; Pascual, G; Doblaré, M; Ginebra, M P; Bellón, J M; Calvo, B

    2011-11-01

    The material properties of meshes used in hernia surgery contribute to the overall mechanical behaviour of the repaired abdominal wall. The mechanical response of a surgical mesh has to be defined since the haphazard orientation of an anisotropic mesh can lead to inconsistent surgical outcomes. This study was designed to characterize the mechanical behaviour of three surgical meshes (Surgipro®, Optilene® and Infinit®) and to describe a mechanical constitutive law that accurately reproduces the experimental results. Finally, through finite element simulation, the behaviour of the abdominal wall was modelled before and after surgical mesh implant. Uniaxial loading of mesh samples in two perpendicular directions revealed the isotropic response of Surgipro® and the anisotropic behaviour of Optilene® and Infinit®. A phenomenological constitutive law was used to reproduce the measured experimental curves. To analyze the mechanical effect of the meshes once implanted in the abdomen, finite element simulation of the healthy and partially herniated repaired rabbit abdominal wall served to reproduce wall behaviour before and after mesh implant. In all cases, maximal displacements were lower and maximal principal stresses higher in the implanted abdomen than the intact wall model. Despite the fact that no mesh showed a behaviour that perfectly matched that of abdominal muscle, the Infinit® mesh was able to best comply with the biomechanics of the abdominal wall. Copyright © 2011 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Abdominal lipectomy and mesh repair of midline periumbilical hernia after bariatric surgery: how to spare the umbilicus.

    PubMed

    Iannelli, Antonio; Bafghi, Abdi; Negri, Chiara; Gugenheim, J

    2007-09-01

    Abdominal lipectomy is becoming an increasingly common surgical procedure in patients with esthetic deformities resulting from massive weight loss induced by bariatric surgery. Sometimes a midline incisional hernia coexists with the pendulus abdomen. Herein presented is a technique to perform a retromuscular mesh repair of the incisional hernia while sparing the umbilicus. The abdominal lipectomy with concomitant retro-muscular mesh repair of a midline incisional hernia is done sparing the vascular supply of the umbilicus on one side only. 5 consecutive women with pendulus abdomen resulting from bariatric surgery-induced massive weight loss and concomitant midline incisional hernia underwent abdominal lipectomy and incisional hernia mesh repair. Mean BMI was 28.6 kg/m2 (range 26-35), one patient was a smoker, and another had type 2 diabetes requiring oral hypoglycemic agents. Two patients had had a previous incisional hernia repair with intraperitoneal mesh. One patient had partial necrosis of the umbilicus and another experienced necrosis of only the epidermis that recovered fully. The umbilicus can be safely spared during abdominal lipectomy with concomitant midline incisional hernia mesh repair. Recurrent incisional hernia and common risk factors for wound healing such as diabetes and obesity increase the risk of umbilical necrosis.

  5. Hernias

    MedlinePlus

    ... induce hernias: obesity or sudden weight gain lifting heavy objects diarrhea or constipation persistent coughing or sneezing ... might include pain when you cough, lift something heavy, or bend over. These types of hernias require ...

  6. A systematic review of synthetic and biologic materials for abdominal wall reinforcement in contaminated fields.

    PubMed

    Lee, Lawrence; Mata, Juan; Landry, Tara; Khwaja, Kosar A; Vassiliou, Melina C; Fried, Gerald M; Feldman, Liane S

    2014-09-01

    Guidelines recommend the use of bioprosthetics for abdominal wall reinforcement in contaminated fields, but the evidence supporting the use of biologic over synthetic non-absorbable prosthetics for this indication is poor. Therefore, the objective was to perform a systematic review of outcomes after synthetic non-absorbable and biologic prosthetics for ventral hernia repair or prophylaxis in contaminated fields. The systematic literature search identified all articles published up to 2013 that reported outcomes after abdominal wall reinforcement using synthetic non-absorbable or biologic prosthetics in contaminated fields. Studies were included if they included at least 10 cases (excluding inguinal and parastomal hernias). Quality assessment was performed using the MINORS instrument. The main outcomes measures were the incidence of wound infection and hernia at follow-up. Weighted pooled proportions were calculated using a random effects model. A total of 32 studies met the inclusion criteria and were included for synthesis. Mean sample size was 41.4 (range 10-190), and duration of follow-up was >1 year in 72 % of studies. Overall quality was low (mean 6.2, range 1-12). Pooled wound infection rates were 31.6 % (95 % CI 14.5-48.7) with biologic and 6.4 % (95 % CI 3.4-9.4) with synthetic non-absorbable prosthetics in clean-contaminated cases, with similar hernia rates. In contaminated and/or dirty fields, wound infection rates were similar, but pooled hernia rates were 27.2 % (95 % CI 9.5-44.9) with biologic and 3.2 % (95 % CI 0.0-11.0) with synthetic non-absorbable. Other outcomes were comparable. The available evidence is limited, but does not support the superiority of biologic over synthetic non-absorbable prosthetics in contaminated fields.

  7. Abdominal wall desmoid tumors: A case report

    PubMed Central

    MA, JIN-HUI; MA, ZHEN-HAI; DONG, XUE-FENG; YIN, HANG; ZHAO, YONG-FU

    2013-01-01

    Desmoid tumors (DTs) are rare lesions that do not possess any metastatic potential. However, they have a strong tendency to invade locally and recur. They constitute 3% of all soft tissue tumors and 0.03% of all neoplasms. Abdominal DTs occur sporadically or are associated with certain familial syndromes, such as familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP). The single form of this neoplasm most frequently occurs in females of reproductive age and during pregnancy. A female patient with a DT of the abdominal wall who had no relevant family history was admitted to hospital. The patient, who presented with a painless mass in the left anterolateral abdomen, had no history of trauma, surgery or childbearing. According to the medical history, physical examination and CT report, the patient was diagnosed with DT. Radical resection of the affected abdominal wall musculature was performed, and the defect was replaced with a polypropylene mesh. The histological diagnosis was of DT. The patient remains in good health and complete remission without any other treatment following surgery. DTs exhibit aggressive growth and have a high rate of recurrence. Surgery is the optimal treatment, and subsequent radiotherapy may decrease the local recurrence rate. Further research into their aetiology is required combined with multicentre clinical trials of new treatments in order to improve management of this disease. This case report provides general knowledge of DT, and may be used as a guidance for diagnosis and treatment. PMID:23833679

  8. Relationship between ventral hernia defect area and intra-abdominal pressure: dynamic in vivo measurement.

    PubMed

    Qandeel, Haitham; O'Dwyer, Patrick J

    2016-04-01

    It is an acceptable concept that the ventral hernia defect area will increase with a rise in intra-abdominal pressure (IAP). The literature lacks the evidence about how much this increase is in vivo. The aim of this study was to objectively measure the change in the ventral hernia defect area with increasing intra-abdominal pressure. In a prospective study of laparoscopic ventral hernia repair, the area of hernia defect was measured from inside the abdomen using a sterile paper ruler. The horizontal (width) and vertical (length) measurements of the defect were taken at two pressure points: (IAP = 8 mmHg) and (IAP = 15 mmHg). The hernia defect area was calculated as an oval shape using a standard formula. Eighteen consecutive patients with a ventral hernia were included in this study (8 males: 10 females). Median age was 60 years (30-81), body mass index (BMI) was 29.9 (22.6-37.6). Changing the IAP significantly, (P < 0.001) changed the values of horizontal and vertical measurements, and the calculated area of the ventral hernia defect. The median calculated defect area, as an oval shape, was 5.6 cm(2) (Q1-Q3 = 3.5-15.5) and 6.9 cm(2) (Q1-Q3 = 4.5-18.7) at 8 and 15 mmHg IAP, respectively. The calculated area of mesh required to cover the defect with a 5 cm overlap increased by a median of 5% (Q1-Q3 = 3-6%). The change in defect area did not differ significantly between obese and non-obese patients (P = 0.5). Dynamic, rather than static, measurements of ventral hernia area during laparoscopy provide a simple way of in vivo objective measurement that helps the surgeon choose the appropriate area of mesh. When choosing mesh area, we support the trend toward a larger overlap of at least 5 cm if less precise methods of measuring defect area are been used.

  9. Splenic trauma during abdominal wall liposuction: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Harnett, Paul; Koak, Yashwant; Baker, Daryl

    2008-01-01

    Summary A 35-year-old woman collapsed 18 hours after undergoing abdominal wall liposuction. Abdominal CT scan revealed a punctured spleen. She underwent an emergency splenectomy and made an uneventful recovery. PMID:18387911

  10. Primary fascial closure with biologic mesh reinforcement results in lesser complication and recurrence rates than bridged biologic mesh repair for abdominal wall reconstruction: A propensity score analysis.

    PubMed

    Giordano, Salvatore; Garvey, Patrick B; Baumann, Donald P; Liu, Jun; Butler, Charles E

    2017-02-01

    Previous studies suggest that bridged mesh repair for abdominal wall reconstruction may result in worse outcomes than mesh-reinforced, primary fascial closure, particularly when acellular dermal matrix is used. We compared our outcomes of bridged versus reinforced repair using ADM in abdominal wall reconstruction procedures. This retrospective study included 535 consecutive patients at our cancer center who underwent abdominal wall reconstruction either for an incisional hernia or for abdominal wall defects left after excision of malignancies involving the abdominal wall with underlay mesh. A total of 484 (90%) patients underwent mesh-reinforced abdominal wall reconstruction and 51 (10%) underwent bridged repair abdominal wall reconstruction. Acellular dermal matrix was used, respectively, in 98% of bridged and 96% of reinforced repairs. We compared outcomes between these 2 groups using propensity score analysis for risk-adjustment in multivariate analysis and for 1-to-1 matching. Bridged repairs had a greater hernia recurrence rate (33.3% vs 6.2%, P < .001), a greater overall complication rate (59% vs 30%, P = .001), and worse freedom from hernia recurrence (log-rank P <.001) than reinforced repairs. Bridged repairs also had a greater rate of wound dehiscence (26% vs 14%, P = .034) and mesh exposure (10% vs 1%, P = .003) than mesh-reinforced abdominal wall reconstruction. When the treatment method was adjusted for propensity score in the propensity-score-matched pairs (n = 100), we found that the rates of hernia recurrence (32% vs 6%, P = .002), overall complications (32% vs 6%, P = .002), and freedom from hernia recurrence (68% vs 32%, P = .001) rates were worse after bridged repair. We did not observe differences in wound healing and mesh complications between the 2 groups. In our population of primarily cancer patients at MD Anderson Cancer Center bridged repair for abdominal wall reconstruction is associated with worse outcomes than mesh

  11. Therapy of umbilical hernia during laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

    PubMed

    Zoricić, Ivan; Vukusić, Darko; Rasić, Zarko; Schwarz, Dragan; Sever, Marko

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study is to show our experience with umbilical hernia herniorrhaphy and laparoscopic cholecystectomy, both in the same act. During last 10 years we operated 89 patients with cholecystitis and pre-existing umbilical hernia. In 61 of them we performed standard laparoscopic cholecystectomy and additional sutures of abdominal wall, and in 28 patients we performed in the same act laparoscopic cholecystectomy and herniorrhaphy of umbilical hernia. We observed incidence of postoperative herniation, and compared patients recovery after herniorrhaphy combined with laparoscopic cholecystectomy in the same act, and patients after standard laparoscopic cholecystectomy and additional sutures of abdominal wall. Patients, who had in the same time umbilical hernia herniorrhaphy and laparoscopic cholecystectomy, shown better postoperative recovery and lower incidence of postoperative umbilical hernias then patients with standard laparoscopic cholecystectomy and additional abdominal wall sutures.

  12. Umbilical Hernia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Prompt diagnosis and treatment can help prevent complications. Causes During pregnancy, the umbilical cord passes through a small opening ... abdominal pressure can cause an umbilical hernia. Possible causes in adults include: ... pregnancies Fluid in the abdominal cavity (ascites) Previous abdominal ...

  13. Use of human and porcine dermal-derived bioprostheses in complex abdominal wall reconstructions: a literature review and case report.

    PubMed

    Baillie, Daniel R; Stawicki, S Peter; Eustance, Nicole; Warsaw, David; Desai, Darius

    2007-05-01

    The goal of abdominal wall reconstruction is to restore and maintain abdominal domain. A PubMed(R) review of the literature (including "old" MEDLINE through February 2007) suggests that bioprosthetic materials are increasingly used to facilitate complex abdominal wall reconstruction. Reported results (eight case reports/series involving 137 patients) are encouraging. The most commonly reported complications are wound seroma (18 patients, 13%), skin dehiscence with graft exposure without herniation (six, 4.4%), superficial and deep wound infections (five, 3.6%), hernia recurrence (four, 2.9%), graft failure with dehiscence (two), hematoma (two), enterocutaneous fistula (one), and flap necrosis (one). Two recent cases are reported herein. In one, a 46-year-old woman required open abdominal management after gastric remnant perforation following a Roux-en-Y gastric bypass procedure. Porcine dermal collagen combined with cutaneous flaps was used for definitive abdominal wall reconstruction. The patient's condition improved postoperatively and she was well 5 months after discharge from the hospital. In the second, a 54-year-old woman underwent repair of an abdominal wall defect following resection of a large leiomyosarcoma. Human acellular dermis combined with myocutaneous flaps was used to reconstruct the abdominal wall defect. The patient's recovery was uncomplicated and 20 weeks following surgery she was doing well with no evidence of recurrence or hernia. The results reported to date and the outcomes presented here suggest that bioprosthetic materials are safe and effective for repair of large abdominal wall defects. Prospective, randomized, controlled studies are needed to compare the safety and efficacy of other reconstructive techniques as well as human and porcine dermal-derived bioprostheses.

  14. Reconstruction of infected abdominal wall defects using latissimus dorsi free flap.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang Wha; Han, Sang Chul; Hwang, Kyu Tae; Ahn, Byung Kyu; Kim, Jeong Tae; Kim, Youn Hwan

    2013-12-01

    Infected abdominal defects are a challenge to surgeons. In this study, we describe 10 cases in which the latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap was used for successful reconstruction of abdominal wall defects severely infected with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Retrospective review of 10 patients with abdominal wall defects that were reconstructed using the latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap between 2002 and 2010. All patients had abdominal defects with hernias, combined with MRSA infections. The sizes of the flaps ranged from 120 to 364 cm(2) . The deep inferior epigastric artery was the recipient vessel in nine patients and the internal mammary vessels were used for one patient. There were no complications relating to the flaps, although there were other minor complications including wound dehiscence, haematoma and fluid correction. After reconstruction, there were no signs of infection during follow-up periods, and the patients were satisfied with the final results. Reconstruction using the latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap, including muscle fascia structures, is a potential treatment option for severely infected large abdominal wall defects. © 2012 The Authors. ANZ Journal of Surgery © 2012 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  15. Elasticity of the living abdominal wall in laparoscopic surgery.

    PubMed

    Song, Chengli; Alijani, Afshin; Frank, Tim; Hanna, George; Cuschieri, Alfred

    2006-01-01

    Laparoscopic surgery requires inflation of the abdominal cavity and this offers a unique opportunity to measure the mechanical properties of the living abdominal wall. We used a motion analysis system to study the abdominal wall motion of 18 patients undergoing laparoscopic surgery, and found that the mean Young's modulus was 27.7+/-4.5 and 21.0+/-3.7 kPa for male and female, respectively. During inflation, the abdominal wall changed from a cylinder to a dome shape. The average expansion in the abdominal wall surface was 20%, and a working space of 1.27 x 10(-3)m(3) was created by expansion, reshaping of the abdominal wall and diaphragmatic movement. For the first time, the elasticity of human abdominal wall was obtained from the patients undergoing laparoscopic surgery, and a 3D simulation model of human abdominal wall has been developed to analyse the motion pattern in laparoscopic surgery. Based on this study, a mechanical abdominal wall lift and a surgical simulator for safe/ergonomic port placements are under development.

  16. Characterization of the anisotropic mechanical behavior of human abdominal wall connective tissues.

    PubMed

    Astruc, Laure; De Meulaere, Maurice; Witz, Jean-François; Nováček, Vit; Turquier, Frédéric; Hoc, Thierry; Brieu, Mathias

    2018-06-01

    Abdominal wall sheathing tissues are commonly involved in hernia formation. However, there is very limited work studying mechanics of all tissues from the same donor which prevents a complete understanding of the abdominal wall behavior and the differences in these tissues. The aim of this study was to investigate the differences between the mechanical properties of the linea alba and the anterior and posterior rectus sheaths from a macroscopic point of view. Eight full-thickness human anterior abdominal walls of both genders were collected and longitudinal and transverse samples were harvested from the three sheathing connective tissues. The total of 398 uniaxial tensile tests was conducted and the mechanical characteristics of the behavior (tangent rigidities for small and large deformations) were determined. Statistical comparisons highlighted heterogeneity and non-linearity in behavior of the three tissues under both small and large deformations. High anisotropy was observed under small and large deformations with higher stress in the transverse direction. Variabilities in the mechanical properties of the linea alba according to the gender and location were also identified. Finally, data dispersion correlated with microstructure revealed that macroscopic characterization is not sufficient to fully describe behavior. Microstructure consideration is needed. These results provide a better understanding of the mechanical behavior of the abdominal wall sheathing tissues as well as the directions for microstructure-based constitutive model. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. [Hybrid repair of postoperative ventral hernia].

    PubMed

    Gogiya, B Sh; Alyautdinov, R R; Karmazanovsky, G G; Chekmareva, I A; Kopyltsov, A A

    2018-01-01

    To develop new technique of abdominal wall repair for postoperative ventral hernia without disadvantages which are intrinsic for open and laparoscopic surgery. Combined open and laparoscopic hernia repair was used in 18 patients with postoperative ventral hernia. Open stage provided safe dissection of abdominal adhesions and defect closure by autoplasty, laparoscopic procedure consisted of prosthesis deployment without separation of abdominal wall layers. Two types of composite endoprostheses with anti-adhesive coating were used for abdominal wall repair. There were no cases of recurrence or infectious complications in long-term period (from 3 to 106 months). Hybrid repair of postoperative ventral hernia is safe and effective procedure. Further studies are necessary to assess cost-effectiveness ratio of this method in view of expensive composite endoprostheses and laparoscopic supplies.

  18. Reconstruction with latissimus dorsi, external abdominal oblique and cranial sartorius muscle flaps for a large defect of abdominal wall in a dog after surgical removal of infiltrative lipoma

    PubMed Central

    FENG, Yu-Ching; CHEN, Kuan-Sheng; CHANG, Shih-Chieh

    2016-01-01

    This animal was presented with a large-sized infiltrative lipoma in the abdominal wall that had been noted for 4 years. This lipoma was confirmed by histological examination from a previous biopsy, and the infiltrative features were identified by a computerized tomography scan. The surgical removal created a large-sized abdominal defect that was closed by a combination of latissimus dorsi and external abdominal oblique muscle flaps in a pedicle pattern. A small dehiscence at the most distal end of the muscle flap resulted in a small-sized abdominal hernia and was repaired with cranial sartorius muscle flap 14 days after surgery. The dog was in good general health with no signs of tumor recurrence after 18 months of follow-up. PMID:27476526

  19. Inguinal hernia repair

    MedlinePlus

    ... through this weakened area. Description During surgery to repair the hernia, the bulging tissue is pushed back in. Your abdominal wall is strengthened and supported with sutures (stitches), and sometimes mesh. This repair can be done with open or laparoscopic surgery. ...

  20. Primary fascial closure with mesh reinforcement is superior to bridged mesh repair for abdominal wall reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Booth, Justin H; Garvey, Patrick B; Baumann, Donald P; Selber, Jesse C; Nguyen, Alexander T; Clemens, Mark W; Liu, Jun; Butler, Charles E

    2013-12-01

    Many surgeons believe that primary fascial closure with mesh reinforcement should be the goal of abdominal wall reconstruction (AWR), yet others have reported acceptable outcomes when mesh is used to bridge the fascial edges. It has not been clearly shown how the outcomes for these techniques differ. We hypothesized that bridged repairs result in higher hernia recurrence rates than mesh-reinforced repairs that achieve fascial coaptation. We retrospectively reviewed prospectively collected data from consecutive patients with 1 year or more of follow-up, who underwent midline AWR between 2000 and 2011 at a single center. We compared surgical outcomes between patients with bridged and mesh-reinforced fascial repairs. The primary outcomes measure was hernia recurrence. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to identify factors predictive of or protective for complications. We included 222 patients (195 mesh-reinforced and 27 bridged repairs) with a mean follow-up of 31.1 ± 14.2 months. The bridged repairs were associated with a significantly higher risk of hernia recurrence (56% vs 8%; hazard ratio [HR] 9.5; p < 0.001) and a higher overall complication rate (74% vs 32%; odds ratio [OR] 3.9; p < 0.001). The interval to recurrence was more than 9 times shorter in the bridged group (HR 9.5; p < 0.001). Multivariate Cox proportional hazard regression analysis identified bridged repair and defect width > 15 cm to be independent predictors of hernia recurrence (HR 7.3; p < 0.001 and HR 2.5; p = 0.028, respectively). Mesh-reinforced AWRs with primary fascial coaptation resulted in fewer hernia recurrences and fewer overall complications than bridged repairs. Surgeons should make every effort to achieve primary fascial coaptation to reduce complications. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Compliance of the abdominal wall during laparoscopic insufflation.

    PubMed

    Becker, Chuck; Plymale, Margaret A; Wennergren, John; Totten, Crystal; Stigall, Kyle; Roth, J Scott

    2017-04-01

    To provide adequate workspace between the viscera and abdominal wall, insufflation with carbon dioxide is a common practice in laparoscopic surgeries. An insufflation pressure of 15 mmHg is considered to be safe in patients, but all insufflation pressures create perioperative and postoperative physiologic effects. As a composition of viscoelastic materials, the abdominal wall should distend in a predictable manner given the pressure of the pneumoperitoneum. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the relationship between degree of abdominal distention and the insufflation pressure, with the goal of determining factors which impact the compliance of the abdominal wall. A prospective, IRB-approved study was conducted to video record the abdomens of patients undergoing insufflation prior to a laparoscopic surgery. Photo samples were taken every 5 s, and the strain of the patient's abdomen in the sagittal plane was determined, as well as the insufflator pressure (stress) at bedside. Patients were insufflated to 15 mmHg. The relationship between the stress and strain was determined in each sample, and compliance of the patient's abdominal wall was calculated. Subcutaneous fat thickness and rectus abdominus muscle thickness were obtained from computed tomography scans. Correlations between abdominal wall compliances and subcutaneous fat and muscle content were determined. Twenty-five patients were evaluated. An increased fat thickness in the abdominal wall had a direct exponential relationship with abdominal wall compliance (R 2  = 0.59, p < 0.05). There was no correlation between muscle and fat thickness. All insufflation pressures create perioperative and postoperative complications. The compliance of patients' abdominal body walls differs, and subcutaneous fat thickness has a direct exponential relationship with abdominal wall compliance. Thus, insufflation pressures can be better tailored per the patient. Future studies are needed to demonstrate the

  2. Medical evacuation for unrecognized abdominal wall pain: a case series.

    PubMed

    Msonda, Hapu T; Laczek, Jeffrey T

    2015-05-01

    Chronic abdominal pain is a frequently encountered complaint in the primary care setting. The abdominal wall is the etiology of this pain in 10 to 30% of all cases of chronic abdominal pain. Abdominal cutaneous nerve entrapment at the lateral border of the rectus abdominis muscle has been attributed as a cause of this pain. In the military health care system, patients with unexplained abdominal pain are often transferred to military treatment facilities via the Military Medical Evacuation (MEDEVAC) system. We present two cases of patients who transferred via MEDEVAC to our facility for evaluation and treatment of chronic abdominal pain. Both patients had previously undergone extensive laboratory evaluation, imaging, and invasive procedures, such as esophagogastroduodenoscopy before transfer. Upon arrival, history and physical examinations suggested an abdominal wall source to their pain, and both patients experienced alleviation of their abdominal wall pain with lidocaine and corticosteroid injection. This case series highlights the need for military physicians to be aware of abdominal wall pain. Early diagnosis of abdominal cutaneous nerve entrapment syndrome by eliciting Carnett's sign will limit symptom chronicity, avoid unnecessary testing, and even prevent medical evacuation. Reprint & Copyright © 2015 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  3. Abdominal Wall Endometriosis Eleven Years After Cesarean Section: Case Report

    PubMed

    Djaković, Ivka; Vuković, Ante; Bolanča, Ivan; Soljačić Vraneš, Hrvojka; Kuna, Krunoslav

    2017-03-01

    Endometriosis is a common chronic disease characterized by growth of the endometrial gland and stroma outside the uterus. Symptoms affect physical, mental and social well-being. Extrapelvic location of endometriosis is very rare. Abdominal wall endometriosis occurs in 0.03%-2% of women with a previous cesarean section or other abdominopelvic operation. The leading symptoms are abdominal nodular mass, pain and cyclic symptomatology. The number of cesarean sections is increasing and so is the incidence of abdominal wall endometriosis as a potential complication of the procedure. There are cases of malignant transformation of abdominal wall endometriosis. Therefore, it is important to recognize this condition and treat it surgically. We report a case of a 37-year-old woman with abdominal wall endometriosis 11 years after cesarean section. She had low abdominal pain related to menstrual cycle, which intensified at the end of menstrual bleeding. A nodule painful to palpation was found in the medial part of previous Pfannenstiel incision. Ultrasound guided biopsy was performed and the diagnosis of endometriosis confirmed. Surgery is the treatment of choice for abdominal wall endometriosis. Excision with histologically proven free surgical margins of 1 cm is mandatory to prevent recurrence. A wide spectrum of mimicking conditions is the main reason for late diagnosis and treatment of abdominal wall endometriosis. In our case, the symptoms lasted for eight years and had intensified in the last six months prior to surgery.

  4. Investigation into the optimal prosthetic material for wound healing of abdominal wall defects

    PubMed Central

    Akcakaya, Adem; Aydogdu, Ibrahim; Citgez, Bulent

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this experimental study is to investigate and compare the effects of prosthetic materials used for wound healing of abdominal wall hernias. A total of 60 rats were divided into five equal groups: Group I, control subjected to laparotomy; group II, abdominal wall defect 3×2 cm+polypropylene (PP) mesh; group III, abdominal wall defect 3×2 cm+PP mesh+hyaluronate and carboxymethylcellulose (H-CMC; Seprafilm®); group IV, abdominal wall defect 3×2 cm+polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE; Composix™); and group V, abdominal wall defect 3×2 cm+polyethylene terephthalate (PET; Dacron®). A total of 14 days after the surgery, rats were sacrificed and the meshes with the surrounding tissue were extracted in block. The breaking strength of the mesh from the fascia was recorded. The healing tissue was examined with the index of histopathology and the hydroxyproline value was analyzed using the Switzer method. Both the breaking strength and histopathological index of the wound healing were significantly improved in groups II and III compared with that in groups IV and V (P<0.001). Hydroxyproline values were the highest in group I (P<0.001). There was also a statistically significant difference between groups II and IV, and group V and the other groups (P<0.001). The present findings demonstrated that PP mesh and PP mesh+H-CMC had a superior breaking strength and improved histopathologic indices compared with PTFE and PET. Furthermore, hydroxyproline values were the lowest in the PET group. In conclusion, wound healing was improved in the PP mesh group and the PP mesh+H-CMC group compared with the PTFE and PET groups according to the present study parameters. PMID:29399133

  5. Recommendations for reporting outcome results in abdominal wall repair: results of a Consensus meeting in Palermo, Italy, 28-30 June 2012.

    PubMed

    Muysoms, F E; Deerenberg, E B; Peeters, E; Agresta, F; Berrevoet, F; Campanelli, G; Ceelen, W; Champault, G G; Corcione, F; Cuccurullo, D; DeBeaux, A C; Dietz, U A; Fitzgibbons, R J; Gillion, J F; Hilgers, R-D; Jeekel, J; Kyle-Leinhase, I; Köckerling, F; Mandala, V; Montgomery, A; Morales-Conde, S; Simmermacher, R K J; Schumpelick, V; Smietański, M; Walgenbach, M; Miserez, M

    2013-08-01

    The literature dealing with abdominal wall surgery is often flawed due to lack of adherence to accepted reporting standards and statistical methodology. The EuraHS Working Group (European Registry of Abdominal Wall Hernias) organised a consensus meeting of surgical experts and researchers with an interest in abdominal wall surgery, including a statistician, the editors of the journal Hernia and scientists experienced in meta-analysis. Detailed discussions took place to identify the basic ground rules necessary to improve the quality of research reports related to abdominal wall reconstruction. A list of recommendations was formulated including more general issues on the scientific methodology and statistical approach. Standards and statements are available, each depending on the type of study that is being reported: the CONSORT statement for the Randomised Controlled Trials, the TREND statement for non randomised interventional studies, the STROBE statement for observational studies, the STARLITE statement for literature searches, the MOOSE statement for metaanalyses of observational studies and the PRISMA statement for systematic reviews and meta-analyses. A number of recommendations were made, including the use of previously published standard definitions and classifications relating to hernia variables and treatment; the use of the validated Clavien-Dindo classification to report complications in hernia surgery; the use of "time-to-event analysis" to report data on "freedom-of-recurrence" rather than the use of recurrence rates, because it is more sensitive and accounts for the patients that are lost to follow-up compared with other reporting methods. A set of recommendations for reporting outcome results of abdominal wall surgery was formulated as guidance for researchers. It is anticipated that the use of these recommendations will increase the quality and meaning of abdominal wall surgery research.

  6. Long-Term Outcomes after Abdominal Wall Reconstruction with Acellular Dermal Matrix.

    PubMed

    Garvey, Patrick B; Giordano, Salvatore A; Baumann, Donald P; Liu, Jun; Butler, Charles E

    2017-03-01

    Long-term outcomes data for hernia recurrence rates after abdominal wall reconstruction (AWR) with acellular dermal matrix (ADM) are lacking. The aim of this study was to assess the long-term durability of AWR using ADM. We studied patients who underwent AWR with ADM at a single center in 2005 to 2015 with a minimum follow-up of 36 months. Hernia recurrence was the primary end point and surgical site occurrence (SSO) was a secondary end point. The recurrence-free survival curves were estimated by Kaplan-Meier product limit method. Univariate and multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression models and logistic regression models were used to evaluate the associations of risk factors at surgery with subsequent risks for hernia recurrence and SSO, respectively. A total of 512 patients underwent AWR with ADM. After excluding those with follow-up less than 36 months, 191 patients were included, with a median follow-up of 52.9 months (range 36 to 104 months). Twenty-six of 191 patients had a hernia recurrence documented in the study. The cumulative recurrence rates were 11.5% at 3 years and 14.6% by 5 years. Factors significantly predictive of hernia recurrence developing included bridged repair, wound skin dehiscence, use of human cadaveric ADM, and coronary disease; component separation was protective. In a subset analysis excluding bridged repairs and human cadaveric ADM patients, cumulative hernia recurrence rates were 6.4% by 3 years and 8.3% by 5 years. The crude rate of SSO was 25.1% (48 of 191). Factors significantly predictive of the incidence of SSO included at least 1 comorbidity, BMI ≥30 kg/m 2 , and defect width >15 cm. Use of ADM for AWR was associated with 11.5% and 14.6% hernia recurrence rates at 3- and 5-years follow-up, respectively. Avoiding bridged repairs and human cadaveric ADM can improve long-term AWR outcomes using ADM. Copyright © 2016 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Desmoid Fibromatosis of the Lower Abdominal Wall in Irrua Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Awe, Oluwafemi Olasupo; Eluehike, Sylvester

    2018-01-01

    Desmoid fibromatosis (desmoid tumors) is rare tumors. It can occur as intra-abdominal, extraabdominal, or abdominal wall tumor depending on the site. The abdominal wall type is usually sporadic, but few have been associated with familial adenomatous polyposis. They are commonly seen in young females who are pregnant with a history of the previous cesarean section scar or within the 1st year of the last childbirth. There is an association between this tumor, presence of estrogen receptors, and abdominal trauma. We present a 29-year-old Nigerian woman with fungating lower abdominal wall tumor. This tumor is rare, a high index of suspicion will be very important in making the diagnosis. PMID:29643736

  8. Comparison of prosthetic materials for abdominal wall reconstruction in the presence of contamination and infection.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, G L; Richardson, J D; Malangoni, M A; Tobin, G R; Ackerman, D; Polk, H C

    1985-01-01

    Abdominal wall defects resulting from trauma, invasive infection, or hernia present a difficult problem for the surgeon. In order to study the problems associated with the prosthetic materials used for abdominal wall reconstruction, an animal model was used to simulate abdominal wall defects in the presence of peritonitis and invasive infection. One hundred guinea pigs were repaired with either polytetrafluorethylene (PTFE) or polypropylene mesh (PPM). Our experiments included intra-operative contamination with Staphylococcus aureus. We found significantly fewer organisms (p less than 0.05) adherent to the PTFE than to the PPM when antibiotics were administered after surgery, as well as when no antibiotics were given. In the presence of peritonitis, we found no real difference in numbers of intraperitoneal bacteria present whether PTFE or PPM was used. In all instances, the PTFE patches produced fewer adhesions and were more easily removed. From these experiments, it appears that PTFE may be associated with fewer problems than PPM in the presence of contamination and infection. Images FIG. 1. PMID:3159353

  9. Desmoid tumors of the abdominal wall: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Overhaus, Marcus; Decker, Pan; Fischer, Hans Peter; Textor, Hans Jochen; Hirner, Andreas

    2003-01-01

    Background Desmoid tumors are slow growing deep fibromatoses with aggressive infiltration of adjacent tissue but without any metastatic potential. Case Presentation We report on two female patients with desmoid tumor of the abdominal wall who underwent primary resection. Both patients had a history of an earlier abdominal surgery. Preoperative evaluation included abdominal ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography. The histology in both cases revealed a desmoid tumor. Conclusion Complete surgical resection is the first line management of this tumor entity. PMID:12890284

  10. Beware of spontaneous reduction "en masse" of inguinal hernia.

    PubMed

    Berney, C R

    2015-12-01

    Reduction 'en masse' of inguinal hernia is a rare entity defined as manual reduction of an external hernia sac back through the abdominal wall but where its content still remains incarcerated or strangulated into a displaced position, most often in the pre-peritoneal space. Small bowel obstruction habitually follows requiring urgent repair, preferentially via a trans-abdominal approach. Pre-operative clinical diagnosis is difficult and abdominal CT-scan imaging is the investigation of choice.

  11. [Umbilical hernia repair in conjunction with abdominoplasty].

    PubMed

    Bai, Ming; Dai, Meng-Hua; Huang, Jiu-Zuo; Qi, Zheng; Lin, Chen; Ding, Wen-Yun; Zhao, Ru

    2012-09-01

    To investigate the feasibility and clinical benefits of umbilical hernia repair in conjunction with abdominoplasty. The incision was designed in accord with abdominoplasty. The skin and subcutaneous tissue was dissected toward the costal arch, and then the anterior sheath of rectus abdominus was exposed. After exposure and dissection of the sac of umbilical hernia, tension-free hernioplasty was performed with polypropylene mesh. After dissecting the redundant skin and subcutaneous tissue, the abdominal wall was tightened. Between May 2008 and May 2011, ten patients were treated in the way mentioned above. The repair of umbilical hernia and the correction of abdominal wall laxity were satisfactory. There was no recurrence of umbilical hernia, hematoma, seroma or fat liquefaction. Through careful selection of patients, repair of umbilical hernia and body contouring could be achieved simultaneously.

  12. Wandering ascaris coming out through the abdominal wall.

    PubMed

    Wani, Mohd L; Rather, Ajaz A; Parray, Fazl Q; Ahangar, Abdul G; Bijli, Akram H; Irshad, Ifat; Nayeem-Ul-Hassan; Khan, Tahir S

    2013-06-01

    A rare case of ascaris coming out through the anterior abdominal wall is reported here. A 40-year-old female had undergone dilatation and curettage by a quack. On the second day she presented with presented with features of peritonitis. She was explored. Resection anastomosis of the ileum was done for multiple perforations of the ileum. Patient developed a fistula in the anterior abdominal wall which was draining bile-colored fluid. On the 12(th) postoperative day a 10-cm-long worm was seen coming out through the fistulous tract which was found to be Ascaris lumbricoids. Ascaris lumbricoids can lead to many complications ranging from worm colic to intestinal obstruction, volvulus, peritonitis, pancreatitis, cholangiohepatitis, liver abscess and many more. Worm has been reported to come out through mouth, nostrils, abdominal drains, T-tubes etc. But ascaris coming out through the anterior abdominal wall is very rare hence reported here.

  13. Wandering Ascaris Coming Out Through the Abdominal Wall

    PubMed Central

    Wani, Mohd L; Rather, Ajaz A.; Parray, Fazl Q.; Ahangar, Abdul G.; Bijli, Akram H.; Irshad, Ifat; Nayeem-Ul-Hassan; Khan, Tahir S.

    2013-01-01

    A rare case of ascaris coming out through the anterior abdominal wall is reported here. A 40-year-old female had undergone dilatation and curettage by a quack. On the second day she presented with presented with features of peritonitis. She was explored. Resection anastomosis of the ileum was done for multiple perforations of the ileum. Patient developed a fistula in the anterior abdominal wall which was draining bile-colored fluid. On the 12th postoperative day a 10-cm-long worm was seen coming out through the fistulous tract which was found to be Ascaris lumbricoids. Ascaris lumbricoids can lead to many complications ranging from worm colic to intestinal obstruction, volvulus, peritonitis, pancreatitis, cholangiohepatitis, liver abscess and many more. Worm has been reported to come out through mouth, nostrils, abdominal drains, T-tubes etc. But ascaris coming out through the anterior abdominal wall is very rare hence reported here. PMID:23930192

  14. Bovine versus porcine acellular dermal matrix for complex abdominal wall reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Clemens, Mark W; Selber, Jesse C; Liu, Jun; Adelman, David M; Baumann, Donald P; Garvey, Patrick B; Butler, Charles E

    2013-01-01

    Abdominal wall reconstruction with bioprosthetic mesh is associated with lower rates of mesh infection, fistula formation, and mesh explantation than reconstruction with synthetic mesh. The authors directly compared commonly used bioprosthetic meshes in terms of clinical outcomes and complications. A database of consecutive patients who underwent abdominal wall reconstruction with porcine or bovine acellular dermal matrix and midline musculofascial closure at their institution between January of 2008 and March of 2011 was reviewed. Surgical outcomes were compared. One hundred twenty patients were identified who underwent a nonbridged, inlay abdominal wall reconstruction with porcine [69 patients (57.5 percent)] or bovine acellular dermal matrix (51 patients (42.5 percent)]. The mean follow-up time was 21.0 ± 9.9 months. The overall complication rate was 36.6 percent; the porcine matrix group had a significantly higher complication rate (44.9 percent) than the bovine matrix group (25.5 percent; p = 0.04) and statistically equivalent surgical complications (29.2 percent versus 21.6 percent; p = 0.34). There were no significant differences in rates of recurrent hernia (2.9 percent versus 3.9 percent; p = 0.99) or bulge (7.2 percent versus 0 percent; p = 0.07). However, the rate of intraoperative adverse events in the porcine matrix group [seven events (10.1 percent)] was significantly higher than that in the bovine matrix group (0 percent; p = 0.02). In patients who undergo complex abdominal wall reconstruction, both bovine and porcine acellular dermal matrix are associated with similar rates of postoperative surgical complications and appear to result in similar outcomes. Porcine acellular dermal matrix may be prone to intraoperative device failure. Therapeutic, III.

  15. Outcomes of abdominal wall reconstruction with acellular dermal matrix are not affected by wound contamination.

    PubMed

    Garvey, Patrick B; Martinez, Roberto A; Baumann, Donald P; Liu, Jun; Butler, Charles E

    2014-11-01

    The optimal type of mesh for complex abdominal wall reconstruction has not been elucidated. We hypothesized that AWRs using acellular dermal matrix (ADM) experience low rates of surgical site occurrence (SSO) and surgical site infection, despite increasing degrees of wound contamination. We retrospectively reviewed prospectively collected data from consecutive abdominal wall reconstructions with ADM over a 9-year period. Outcomes of abdominal wall reconstructions were compared between patients with different CDC wound classifications. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression and Cox proportional hazard regression analyses identified potential associations and predictive/protective factors. The 359 patients had a mean follow-up of 28.3 ± 19.0 months. Reconstruction of clean wounds (n = 171) required fewer reoperations than that of combined contaminated (n = 188) wounds (2.3% vs 11.2%; p = 0.001) and trended toward experiencing fewer SSOs (19.9% vs 28.7%, p = 0.052). There were no significant differences between clean and combined contaminated cases in 30-day SSI (8.8% vs 8.0%), hernia recurrence (9.9% vs 10.1%), and mesh removal (1.2% vs 1.1%) rates. Independent predictors of SSO included body mass index ≥30 kg/m(2) (odds ratio [OR] 3.6; p < 0.001), 1 or more comorbidities (OR 2.5; p = 0.008), and defect width ≥15 cm (OR 1.8; p = 0.02). Complex abdominal wall reconstructions using ADM demonstrated similar rates of complications between the different CDC wound classifications. This is in contradistinction to published outcomes for abdominal wall reconstruction using synthetic mesh that show progressively higher complication rates with increasing degrees of contamination. These data support the use of ADM rather than synthetic mesh for complex abdominal wall reconstruction in the setting of wound contamination. Copyright © 2014 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Laparoscopic bridging vs. anatomic open reconstruction for midline abdominal hernia mesh repair [LABOR]: single-blinded, multicenter, randomized, controlled trial on long-term functional results.

    PubMed

    Stabilini, Cesare; Bracale, Umberto; Pignata, Giusto; Frascio, Marco; Casaccia, Marco; Pelosi, Paolo; Signori, Alessio; Testa, Tommaso; Rosa, Gian Marco; Morelli, Nicola; Fornaro, Rosario; Palombo, Denise; Perotti, Serena; Bruno, Maria Santina; Imperatore, Mikaela; Righetti, Carolina; Pezzato, Stefano; Lazzara, Fabrizio; Gianetta, Ezio

    2013-10-28

    Re-approximation of the rectal muscles along the midline is recommended by some groups as a rule for incisional and ventral hernia repairs. The introduction of laparoscopic repair has generated a debate because it is not aimed at restoring abdominal wall integrity but instead aims just to bridge the defect. Whether restoration of the abdominal integrity has a real impact on patient mobility is questionable, and the available literature provides no definitive answer. The present study aims to compare the functional results of laparoscopic bridging with those of re-approximation of the rectal muscle in the midline as a mesh repair for ventral and incisional abdominal defect through an "open" access. We hypothesized that, for the type of defect suitable for a laparoscopic bridging, the effect of an anatomical reconstruction is near negligible, thus not a fixed rule. The LABOR trial is a multicenter, prospective, two-arm, single-blinded, randomized trial. Patients of more than 60 years of age with a defect of less than 10 cm at its greatest diameter will be randomly submitted to open Rives or laparoscopic defect repair. All the participating patients will have a preoperative evaluation of their abdominal wall strength and mobility along with volumetry, respiratory function test, intraabdominal pressure and quality of life assessment.The primary outcome will be the difference in abdominal wall strength as measured by a double leg-lowering test performed at 12 months postoperatively. The secondary outcomes will be the rate of recurrence and changes in baseline abdominal mobility, respiratory function tests, intraabdominal pressure, CT volumetry and quality of life at 6 and 12 months postoperatively. The study will help to define the most suitable treatment for small-medium incisional and primary hernias in patients older than 60 years. Given a similar mid-term recurrence rate in both groups, if the trial shows no differences among treatments (acceptance of the null

  17. Improving the Efficiency of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Wall Stress Computations

    PubMed Central

    Zelaya, Jaime E.; Goenezen, Sevan; Dargon, Phong T.; Azarbal, Amir-Farzin; Rugonyi, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    An abdominal aortic aneurysm is a pathological dilation of the abdominal aorta, which carries a high mortality rate if ruptured. The most commonly used surrogate marker of rupture risk is the maximal transverse diameter of the aneurysm. More recent studies suggest that wall stress from models of patient-specific aneurysm geometries extracted, for instance, from computed tomography images may be a more accurate predictor of rupture risk and an important factor in AAA size progression. However, quantification of wall stress is typically computationally intensive and time-consuming, mainly due to the nonlinear mechanical behavior of the abdominal aortic aneurysm walls. These difficulties have limited the potential of computational models in clinical practice. To facilitate computation of wall stresses, we propose to use a linear approach that ensures equilibrium of wall stresses in the aneurysms. This proposed linear model approach is easy to implement and eliminates the burden of nonlinear computations. To assess the accuracy of our proposed approach to compute wall stresses, results from idealized and patient-specific model simulations were compared to those obtained using conventional approaches and to those of a hypothetical, reference abdominal aortic aneurysm model. For the reference model, wall mechanical properties and the initial unloaded and unstressed configuration were assumed to be known, and the resulting wall stresses were used as reference for comparison. Our proposed linear approach accurately approximates wall stresses for varying model geometries and wall material properties. Our findings suggest that the proposed linear approach could be used as an effective, efficient, easy-to-use clinical tool to estimate patient-specific wall stresses. PMID:25007052

  18. [Abdominal wall actinomycosis. A report of a case].

    PubMed

    Rojas Pérez-Ezquerra, Beatriz; Guardia-Dodorico, Lorena; Arribas-Marco, Teresa; Ania-Lahuerta, Aldonza; González Ballano, Isabel; Chipana-Salinas, Margot; Carazo-Hernández, Belén

    2015-01-01

    Abdominal wall Actinomycosis is a rare disease associated with the use of intrauterine device and as a complication of abdominal surgery. Diagnosis is difficult because it is unusual and behaves like a malignant neoplasm. A case report is presented of a patient who had used an intrauterine device for four years and developed a stony tumour in the abdominal wall associated with a set of symptoms that, clinically and radiologically, was simulating a peritoneal carcinomatosis associated with paraneoplastic syndrome, even in the course of an exploratory laparotomy. The patient attended our hospital with a two-month history of abdominal pain and symptoms that mimic a paraneoplastic syndrome. The diagnosis of abdominal actinomycosis was suspected by the finding of the microorganism in cervical cytology together with other cultures and Actinomyces negative in pathological studies, confirming the suspicion of a complete cure with empirical treatment with penicillin. Actinomycosis should be considered in patients with pelvic mass or abdominal wall mass that mimics a malignancy. Antibiotic therapy is the first treatment choice and makes a more invasive surgical management unnecessary. Copyright © 2015 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  19. Non-cross-linked porcine acellular dermal matrices for abdominal wall reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Burns, Nadja K; Jaffari, Mona V; Rios, Carmen N; Mathur, Anshu B; Butler, Charles E

    2010-01-01

    Non-cross-linked porcine acellular dermal matrices have been used clinically for abdominal wall repair; however, their biologic and mechanical properties and propensity to form visceral adhesions have not been studied. The authors hypothesized that their use would result in fewer, weaker visceral adhesions than polypropylene mesh when used to repair ventral hernias and form a strong interface with the surrounding musculofascia. Thirty-four guinea pigs underwent inlay repair of surgically created ventral hernias using polypropylene mesh, porcine acellular dermal matrix, or a composite of the two. The animals were killed at 4 weeks, and the adhesion tenacity grade and surface area of the repair site involved by adhesions were measured. Sections of the repair sites, including the implant-musculofascia interface, underwent histologic analysis and uniaxial mechanical testing. The incidence of bowel adhesions to the repair site was significantly lower with the dermal matrix (8 percent, p < 0.01) and the matrix/mesh combination (0 percent, p < 0.001) than with polypropylene mesh alone (70 percent). The repairs made with the matrix or the matrix/mesh combination, compared with the polypropylene mesh repairs, had significantly lower mean adhesion surface areas [12.8 percent (p < 0.001), 9.2 percent (p < 0.001), and 79.9 percent] and grades [0.6 (p < 0.001), 0.6 (p < 0.001), and 2.9]. The dermal matrix underwent robust cellular and vascular infiltration. The ultimate tensile strength at the implant-musculofascia interface was similar in all groups. Porcine acellular dermal matrix becomes incorporated into the host tissue and causes fewer adhesions to repair sites than does polypropylene mesh, with similar implant-musculofascia interface strength. It also inhibits adhesions to adjacent dermal matrix in the combination repairs. It has distinct advantages over polypropylene mesh for complex abdominal wall repairs, particularly when material placement directly over bowel is

  20. Chronic abdominal wall pain and ultrasound-guided abdominal cutaneous nerve infiltration: a case series.

    PubMed

    Kanakarajan, Saravanakumar; High, Kristina; Nagaraja, Ravi

    2011-03-01

    Chronic abdominal wall pain occurs in about 10-30% of patients presenting with chronic abdominal pain. Entrapment of abdominal cutaneous nerves at the lateral border of the rectus abdominis muscle has been attributed as a cause of abdominal wall pain. We report our experience of treating such patients using ultrasound-guided abdominal cutaneous nerve infiltration. We conducted a retrospective audit of abdominal cutaneous nerve infiltration performed in the period between September 2008 to August 2009 in our center. All patients had received local anesthetic and steroid injection under ultrasound guidance. The response to the infiltration was evaluated in the post-procedure telephone review as well as in the follow-up clinic. Brief pain inventory (BPI) and numerical rating scale pain scores were collated from two points: the initial outpatient clinic and the follow up clinic up to 5 months following the injection. Nine patients had abdominal cutaneous nerve injections under ultrasound guidance in the period under review. Six patients reported 50% pain relief or more (responders) while three patients did not. Pain and BPI scores showed a decreasing trend in responders. The median duration of follow-up was 12 weeks. Ultrasound can reliably be used for infiltration of the abdominal cutaneous nerves. This will improve the safety as well as diagnostic utility of the procedure. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Implantation of a cone-shaped double-fixed patch increases abdominal space and prevents recurrence of large defects in congenital diaphragmatic hernia.

    PubMed

    Loff, Steffan; Wirth, Hartmut; Jester, Iwgo; Hosie, Stuart; Wollmann, Carmen; Schaible, Thomas; Ataman, Ozge; Waag, Karl-Ludwig

    2005-11-01

    Large defects in patients with congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) are frequently closed with a polytetrafluoroethylene patch (PTFE). Intraoperative problems include lack of abdominal domain for the reduction of organs and closure of the abdominal wall. Main surgical postoperative complication is the recurrence of the hernia. We suggest a new and easy method of patch implantation, improving these problems, and report first follow-up results. In our clinic, 103 children with CDH were treated, and 87 children underwent reconstruction of the diaphragm in the 5 years between 1998 and 2002. In 52 patients, a patch implantation had to be performed. We have been optimizing our complete pediatric and surgical procedure and present a new standardized technique of preparation and implantation of a PTFE patch. The flat patch is folded to a 90 degrees cone. The cone is fixed in its form with few single stitches. It is implanted with an overlapping border of 1 cm circumferentially. The border is separately fixed with absorbable single stitches to keep from rolling up. The rough side of the patch points toward the rim of the diaphragm to enable ingrowth of the connective tissue. In a 1-year follow-up study, the recurrences in the 3 following groups of PTFE patches were studied: conventional implantation (simple patch without overlapping border), patch with separately fixed overlapping border, and cone-shaped patch with overlapping separately fixed border. Thirty-three patients were included in the study. After conventional PTFE-patch implantation, 6 (46%) of 13 patients developed reherniation. After PTFE-patch implantation with separately fixed overlapping border, 1 (11%) of 9 patients had a recurrent hernia. In the group with the PTFE-cone implantation, 1 (9%) of 11 patients developed a recurrence. Meanwhile, another 20 CDH patients received implantation of a cone-shaped patch, and no further recurrence occurred up to now. With the additional space (20 mL) provided by the

  2. The Impact of Body Mass Index on Abdominal Wall Reconstruction Outcomes: A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Giordano, Salvatore A; Garvey, Patrick B; Baumann, Donald P; Liu, Jun; Butler, Charles E

    2016-01-01

    Background Obesity and higher body mass index (BMI) may be associated with higher rates of wound healing complications and hernia recurrence rates following complex abdominal wall reconstruction (AWR). We hypothesized that higher BMI’s result in higher rates of postoperative wound healing complications but similar rates of hernia recurrence in AWR patients. Methods We included 511 consecutive patients who underwent AWR with underlay mesh. Patients were divided into three groups on the basis of preoperative BMI: <30 kg/m2 (non-obese), 30–34.9 kg/m2 (class I obesity) and ≥35 kg/m2 (class II/III obesity). We compared postoperative outcomes among these three groups. Results Class I and class II/III obesity patients had higher surgical site occurrence rates than non-obese patients (26.4% vs. 14.9%; p=0.006 and 36.8% vs. 14.9%; p<0.001, respectively) and higher overall complication rates (37.9% vs. 24.7%; p=0.007 and 43.4% vs. 24.7%; p<0.001, respectively). Similarly, obese patients had significantly higher skin dehiscence (19.3% vs 7.2%; p<0.001 and 26.5% vs 7.2%; p<0.001, respectively) and fat necrosis rates (10.0% vs 2.1%; p=0.001 and 11.8% vs 2.1%; p<0.001, respectively) than non-obese patients. Obesity class II/III patients had higher infection and seroma rates than non-obese patients (9.6% vs 4.3%; p=0.041 and 8.1% vs 2.1%; p=0.006, respectively). However, class I and class II/III obesity patients experienced hernia recurrence rates (11.4% vs. 7.7%; p=0.204 and 10.3% vs. 7.7%; p=0.381, respectively) and freedom from hernia recurrence (overall log-rank p=0.41) similar to non-obese patients. Conclusions Hernia recurrence rates do not appear to be affected by obesity on long-term follow-up in AWR. PMID:28445378

  3. [Abdominal traumatic evisceration: reconstruction abdominal wall with biologic mesh and negative pressure therapy].

    PubMed

    Jiménez Gómez, M; Betancor Rivera, N; Lima Sánchez, J; Hernández Hernández, J R

    2016-04-10

    Abdominal traumatic evisceration as a result of high energy trauma is uncommon. Once repaired the possible internal damage, an abdominal wall defect of high complexity may exist, whose reconstruction represents a surgical challenge. Politraumatized male with important abdominal muculocutaneous avulsion and evisceration. After initial repair, the patient developed a big eventration in which we use a porcine dermis-derived mesh (Permacol TM ), a safe and effective alternative in abdominal wall repair, thanks to its seamless integration with other tissues, even when exposed. Negative pressure therapy has been used for the management of wound complications after surgical implantation of PermacolTM mesh. We describe our experience with the use of PermacolTM mesh and negative pressure therapy to aid the wound closure after skin necrosis and exposed mesh.

  4. [Umbilical Hernia Complicated by Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor of the Small Intestine - A Case Report].

    PubMed

    Tsukada, Manabu; Ozaki, Akihiko; Ohira, Hiromichi; Sawano, Toyoaki; Nemoto, Tsuyoshi; Kanazawa, Yukio

    2016-11-01

    Intraabdominal tumors can cause umbilical hernia and may lead to serious consequences, such as incarcerated or necrotized intestine. However, little information is available concerning how the location and characteristics of tumors may affect the process of umbilical hernia development. A 46-year-old Japanese man presented at the department of surgery with abdominal pain and abdominal retention, which appeared on the day of presentation and 4 years before the presentation, respectively. Abdominal computed tomography revealed a suspected gastrointestinal stromal tumor(GIST)and an umbilical hernia close to the tumor, both of which were clinically diagnosed. Surgical tumor resection and hernia repair were conducted successfully. The patient was pathologically diagnosed with high-risk GIST. Adjuvant therapy with imatinib was administered with no recurrence as of 1 year post-surgery. This is a case of GIST complicated by umbilical hernia. Small solid tumors may cause umbilical hernia if they are in close proximity to vulnerable parts of the abdominal wall.

  5. Hiatal Hernia

    MedlinePlus

    ... from your stomach into your esophagus is called GERD (gastroesophageal reflux disease). GERD may cause symptoms such as Heartburn Problems swallowing ... hiatal hernia when they are getting tests for GERD, heartburn, chest pain, or abdominal pain. The tests ...

  6. Femoral hernia

    MedlinePlus

    ... or abdominal pain. Your hernia becomes red, purple, dark, or discolored. Call your provider if you ... to the principles of the Health on the Net Foundation (www.hon.ch). The information provided herein ...

  7. Mechanical behavior of surgical meshes for abdominal wall repair: In vivo versus biaxial characterization.

    PubMed

    Simón-Allué, R; Ortillés, A; Calvo, B

    2018-06-01

    Despite the widespread use of synthetic meshes in the surgical treatment of the hernia pathology, the election criteria of a suitable mesh for specific patient continues to be uncertain. Thus, in this work, we propose a methodology to determine in advance potential disadvantages on the use of certain meshes based on the patient-specific abdominal geometry and the mechanical features of the certain meshes. To that purpose, we have first characterized the mechanical behavior of four synthetic meshes through biaxial tests. Secondly, two of these meshes were implanted in several New Zealand rabbits with a total defect previously created on the center of the abdominal wall. After the surgical procedure, specimen were subjected to in vivo pneumoperitoneum tests to determine the immediate post-surgical response of those meshes after implanted in a healthy specimen. Experimental performance was recorded by a stereo rig with the aim of obtaining quantitative information about the pressure-displacement relation of the abdominal wall. Finally, following the procedure presented in prior works (Simón-Allué et al., 2015, 2017), a finite element model was reconstructed from the experimental measurements and tests were computationally reproduced for the healthy and herniated cases. Simulations were compared and validated with the in vivo behavior and results were given along the abdominal wall in terms of displacements, stresses and strain. Mechanical characterization of the meshes revealed Surgipro TM as the most rigid implant and Neomesh SuperSoft® as the softer, while other two meshes (Neomesh Soft®, Neopore®) remained in between. These two meshes were employed in the experimental study and resulted in similar effect in the abdominal wall cavity and both were close to the healthy case. Simulations confirmed this result while showed potential objections in the case of the other two meshes, due to high values in stresses or elongation that may led to discomfort in real

  8. Robotic-assisted Laparoscopic Repair of Scrotal Inguinal Hernias.

    PubMed

    Yheulon, Christopher G; Maxwell, Daniel W; Balla, Fadi M; Patel, Ankit D; Lin, Edward; Stetler, Jamil L; Davis, Steven S

    2018-06-01

    Scrotal inguinal hernias represent a challenging surgical pathology. Although some advanced laparoscopists can repair these hernias through a minimally invasive approach, open repair is considered the technique of choice for most surgeons. The purpose of this study is to show our results of robotic-assisted laparoscopic repair of scrotal inguinal hernias. We reviewed the charts of 14 patients with inguinoscrotal hernias who underwent robotic-assisted transabdominal preperitoneal (TAPP) hernia repair. Mean follow-up was 7 months. The European Registry for Abdominal Wall Hernia Quality of Life score, a 90-point scale, was utilized to quantify patient reported outcomes. Robotic TAPP repair was successful in all 14 patients. Average case duration was 100 minutes (78 to 140 min) for unilateral hernias and 208 minutes (166 to 238 min) for bilateral hernias. Trainees were involved in 93% (13/14) of cases. There were no recurrences. Three patients developed postoperative seromas. The mean European Registry for Abdominal Wall Hernia Quality of Life score was 3.7 (0 to 10). Scrotal hernias can be safely repaired using robotic-assisted TAPP methods with low morbidity and favorable patient reported outcomes.

  9. Giant midline abdominal incisional herniae repair through combined retro-rectus mesh placement and components separation: experience from a single centre.

    PubMed

    Kumar, R; Shrestha, A K; Basu, S

    2014-10-01

    Giant midline abdominal wall incisional herniae require repair/reconstruction to restore the structural and functional continuity of the anterior abdominal wall. We describe here our approach to these demanding cases through a combined retro-rectus mesh placement and components separation and their overall functional outcome. A retrospective analysis of a prospectively collected data was carried out and 28 patients who underwent giant (≥15 cm) midline incisional hernia reconstruction were identified in a large district general hospital between 2007 and 2013 with a median follow-up of 34 (6-76) months. Demographic data of our series include age of 60 (median) (30-87) years with a M:F ratio of 12:16, length of symptomatic hernia 18 (median) (12-36) months, more than two previous laparotomies (15), bowel obstructive symptoms (7) and recurrent herniation (7). BMI recorded was 32 (median) (24-46) and ASA of II (median) (I-III). Co-morbidities included cardiac disease (6), diabetes (6), respiratory disease (4) and systemic immunocompromise (2). Operative and technical details showed operative duration to be 180 (median) min, cranio-caudal rectus sheath defect 21 (median) cm, transverse rectus sheath defect 15 (median) cm, cross-sectional area of fascial defect 300 (median) cm(2) and size of mesh 690 (median) cm(2). Seven (25 %) developed short-term post operative complications: grade I seromata all resolving spontaneously (5); grade II superficial wound infections (2). Twenty-five (89 %) were completely asymptomatic at 34 (median) months' follow-up; 2 (7 %) reported mild pain, but not limiting any activity; 1 (4 %) described pain occasionally limiting activity. There was no clinical recurrence with one patient developing global bulging. Our series is comparable to the literature in patient cohort demographics, co-morbidity and risk factor profile; however, we demonstrate an excellent intermediate term outcome with no clinical recurrence and an improvement

  10. Trocar Port Hernias After Bariatric Surgery.

    PubMed

    Coblijn, Usha K; de Raaff, Christel A L; van Wagensveld, Bart A; van Tets, Willem F; de Castro, Steve M M

    2016-03-01

    Laparoscopic bariatric surgery is increasingly being performed worldwide. It is estimated that trocar port hernias occur more often in obese patients due to their obesity and because the ports are not closed routinely. The aim of the present study was to analyze the incidence, risk factors, and management of patients with trocar port hernias after laparoscopic bariatric surgery. All patients who were operated between 2006 and 2013 were included. During the study period, the trocar ports were not closed routinely. All patients who had any symptomatic abdominal wall hernia during follow-up were included. Overall, 1524 laparoscopic bariatric procedures were performed. There were 1249 female (82 %) and 275 male (18 %) patients. The mean age was 44 years, and median body mass index was 43 kg/m(2). Patients underwent laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB) (n = 859), laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (LAGB) (n = 364), laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) (n = 68), revisional surgery (n = 226), and other procedures (n = 7). Three hundred and one patients (20 %) had one or more postoperative complications and the overall mortality was 0.3 % (four patients). There were 14 patients (0.9 %) with an abdominal wall hernia, of which eight (0.5 %) had a trocar port hernia, three (0.2 %) an incisional hernia from other previous surgery, and three (0.2 %) an umbilical hernia. Gender, age, BMI, smoking, type II diabetes, procedure type, complications, and weight loss were not associated with the occurrence of abdominal wall hernias. Trocar port hernias after bariatric surgery occur seldom if the trocar port is not routinely closed.

  11. A novel nonoperative approach to abdominal compartment syndrome after abdominal wall reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Zeenat R; Sorensen, G Brent

    2013-01-01

    Intraabdominal hypertension and abdominal compartment syndrome have been increasingly recognized as significant causes of morbidity and mortality in both medical and surgical patients. The gold standard remains surgical intervention; however, nonoperative approaches have been investigated less. Here, we describe the successful treatment of a severe acute case by intubation, nasogastric decompression, and paralysis--a novel approach not previously described in the literature. After the patient underwent laparoscopic bilateral component separation and repair of a large recurrent ventral hernia with a 20 30-cm Strattice mesh (LifeCell Corp, Branchburg, NJ), acute renal failure developed within 12 hours postoperatively, and was associated with oliguria, hyperkalemia, and elevated peak airway and bladder pressures. The patient was treated nonoperatively with intubation, nasogastric tube decompression, and paralysis with a vecuronium drip. Rapid reversal was seen, avoiding further surgery. Within 2 hours after intubation and paralysis, our patient's urine output improved dramatically with an initial diuresis of approximately 1 L, his bladder pressures decreased, and within 12 hours his creatinine level had normalized. Although surgical intervention has traditionally been thought of as the most effective--and thus the gold standard--for abdominal compartment syndrome, this preliminary experience demonstrates nonoperative management as highly efficacious, with the added benefit of decreased morbidity. Therefore, nonoperative management could be considered first-line therapy, with laparotomy reserved for refractory cases only. This suggests a more complex pathology than the traditional teaching of congestion and edema alone.

  12. Mechanical and histological characterization of the abdominal muscle. A previous step to modelling hernia surgery.

    PubMed

    Hernández, B; Peña, E; Pascual, G; Rodríguez, M; Calvo, B; Doblaré, M; Bellón, J M

    2011-04-01

    The aims of this study are to experimentally characterize the passive elastic behaviour of the rabbit abdominal wall and to develop a mechanical constitutive law which accurately reproduces the obtained experimental results. For this purpose, tissue samples from New Zealand White rabbits 2150±50 (g) were mechanically tested in vitro. Mechanical tests, consisting of uniaxial loading on tissue samples oriented along the craneo-caudal and the perpendicular directions, respectively, revealed the anisotropic non-linear mechanical behaviour of the abdominal tissues. Experiments were performed considering the composite muscle (including external oblique-EO, internal oblique-IO and transverse abdominis-TA muscle layers), as well as separated muscle layers (i.e., external oblique, and the bilayer formed by internal oblique and transverse abdominis). Both the EO muscle layer and the IO-TA bilayer demonstrated a stiffer behaviour along the transversal direction to muscle fibres than along the longitudinal one. The fibre arrangement was measured by means of a histological study which confirmed that collagen fibres are mainly responsible for the passive mechanical strength and stiffness. Furthermore, the degree of anisotropy of the abdominal composite muscle turned out to be less pronounced than those obtained while studying the EO and IO-TA separately. Moreover, a phenomenological constitutive law was used to capture the measured experimental curves. A Levenberg-Marquardt optimization algorithm was used to fit the model constants to reproduce the experimental curves. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Advanced age does not affect abdominal wall reconstruction outcomes using acellular dermal matrix: A comparative study using propensity score analysis.

    PubMed

    Giordano, Salvatore; Schaverien, Mark; Garvey, Patrick B; Baumann, Donald P; Liu, Jun; Butler, Charles E

    2017-06-01

    We hypothesized that elderly patients (≥65 years) experience worse outcomes following abdominal wall reconstruction (AWR) for hernia or oncologic resection. We included all consecutive patients who underwent complex AWR using acellular dermal matrix (ADM) between 2005 and 2015. Propensity score analysis was performed for risk adjustment in multivariable analysis and for one-to-one matching. The primary outcome was hernia recurrence; the secondary outcomes included surgical site occurrence (SSO) and bulging. Mean follow-up for the 511 patients was 31.4 months; 184 (36%) patients were elderly. The elderly and non-elderly groups had similar rates of hernia recurrence (7.6% vs 10.1%, respectively; p = 0.43) and SSO (24.5% vs 23.5%, respectively; p = 0.82). Bulging occurred significantly more often in elderly patients (6.5% vs 2.8%, respectively; p = 0.04). After adjustment through the propensity score, which included 130 pairs, these results persisted. Contrary to our hypothesis, elderly patients did not have worse outcomes in AWR with ADM. Surgeons should not deny elderly patients AWR solely because of their age. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. A Case of Pediatric Abdominal Wall Reconstruction: Components Separation within the Austere War Environment

    PubMed Central

    Sabino, Jennifer; Kumar, Anand

    2014-01-01

    Summary: Reconstructive surgeons supporting military operations are required to definitively treat severe pediatric abdominal injuries in austere environments. The safety and efficacy of using a components separation technique to treat large ventral hernias in pediatric patients in this setting remains understudied. Components separation technique was required to achieve definitive closure in a 12-month-old pediatric patient in Kandahar, Afghanistan. Her course was complicated by an anastomotic leak after small bowel resection. Her abdominal was successfully reopened, the leak repaired, and closed primarily without incident on postinjury day 9. Abdominal trauma with a large ventral hernia requiring components separation is extremely rare. A pediatric patient treated with components separation demonstrated minimal complications, avoidance of abdominal compartment syndrome, and no mortality. PMID:25426363

  15. Fetal stomach and gallbladder in contact with the bladder wall is a common ultrasound sign of stomach-down left congenital diaphragmatic hernia.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Tara A; Basta, Amaya; Filly, Roy A

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify sonographic (US) findings that can assist in prenatal diagnosis of stomach-down left congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH), specifically related to positioning of the abdominal contents including the stomach, bladder, and gallbladder. All US examinations with a postnatally confirmed diagnosis of stomach-down left CDH over a 13-year period were retrospectively reviewed for abnormal position of the abdominal contents, including whether the fetal stomach was in contact with the urinary bladder. Normal fetuses that underwent comprehensive US surveys were similarly evaluated for comparison in a 2:1 ratio. Twenty-two fetuses with stomach-down left CDH were identified in a cohort of 278 fetuses with left CDH. In 15/22 (68.2%) cases of stomach-down left CDH, the bladder and stomach walls were in contact. Contact of the fetal gallbladder with the fetal bladder wall was also observed and was present even more commonly (17/22 cases [77.3%]). There was no case of either the stomach or gallbladder in contact with the bladder wall in the normal fetal cohort (n = 44). Recognition of the fetal stomach and/or gallbladder in contact with the bladder wall can help in the detection of stomach-down left CDH. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Clin Ultrasound 45:8-13, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Abdominal wall reconstruction using a combination of free tensor fasciae lata and anterolateral thigh myocutaneous flap: a prospective study in 16 patients.

    PubMed

    Lv, Yang; Cao, Dongsheng; Guo, Fangfang; Qian, Yunliang; Wang, Chen; Wang, Danru

    2015-08-01

    Reconstruction of the abdominal wall continues to be a challenging problem for plastic surgeons. Transposition of well-vascularized flap tissue is the most effective way to repair composite abdominal wall defects. We retrospectively reviewed the treatment of such patients and assessed the reconstructive technique using combination of an inlay of bioprosthetic materials and a united thigh flap. A retrospective review of patients' records in the department was carried out. In total, 16 patients who underwent immediate abdominal wall reconstruction between 2000 and 2013 were identified. Patients' health status, defect sizes, and surgical technique were obtained from medical charts. The immediate reconstruction surgery of the abdominal wall was successful in all patients. One patient with dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans experienced recurrences at the former site. One patient died because of liver metastases at 21 months after surgery. No incisional hernia or infection in this series of patients was observed. Full-thickness, giant defects of the complicated abdominal wall can be repaired successfully with relatively minor complications using this reconstructive technique. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Incarcerated giant uterine leiomyoma within an incisional hernia: a case report.

    PubMed

    Exarchos, Georgios; Vlahos, Nikolaos; Dellaportas, Dionysios; Metaxa, Linda; Theodosopoulos, Theodosios

    2017-11-01

    Uterine leiomyomas presenting as incarcerated or strangulated hernias in surgical emergencies are extremely rare and should be considered in the differential diagnosis in patients with known uterine fibroids and an irreducible ventral abdominal wall hernia. Detailed history and multidisciplinary approach optimize the diagnosis and decision making toward surgical treatment.

  18. Bioprosthetic tissue matrices in complex abdominal wall reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Broyles, Justin M; Abt, Nicholas B; Sacks, Justin M; Butler, Charles E

    2013-12-01

    Complex abdominal defects are difficult problems encountered by surgeons in multiple specialties. Although current evidence supports the primary repair of these defects with mesh reinforcement, it is unclear which mesh is superior for any given clinical scenario. The purpose of this review was to explore the characteristics of and clinical relevance behind bioprosthetic tissue matrices in an effort to better clarify their role in abdominal wall reconstruction. We reviewed the peer-reviewed literature on the use of bioprosthetic mesh in human subjects. Basic science articles and large retrospective and prospective reviews were included in author's analysis. The clinical performance and characteristics of 13 bioprosthetic tissue matrices were evaluated. The majority of the products evaluated perform well in contaminated fields, where the risk of wound-healing difficulties is high. Clinical outcomes, which included infection, reherniation, and bulge formation, were variable, and the majority of the studies had a mean follow-up of less than 24 months. Although bioprosthetic matrix has a multitude of indications within the growing field of abdominal wall reconstruction, the functionality, regenerative capacity, and long-term fate of these products have yet to be fully established. Furthermore, the clinical performance, indications, and contraindications for each type of matrix need to be fully evaluated in long-term outcome studies.

  19. Bioprosthetic Tissue Matrices in Complex Abdominal Wall Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Broyles, Justin M.; Abt, Nicholas B.; Sacks, Justin M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Complex abdominal defects are difficult problems encountered by surgeons in multiple specialties. Although current evidence supports the primary repair of these defects with mesh reinforcement, it is unclear which mesh is superior for any given clinical scenario. The purpose of this review was to explore the characteristics of and clinical relevance behind bioprosthetic tissue matrices in an effort to better clarify their role in abdominal wall reconstruction. Methods: We reviewed the peer-reviewed literature on the use of bioprosthetic mesh in human subjects. Basic science articles and large retrospective and prospective reviews were included in author’s analysis. The clinical performance and characteristics of 13 bioprosthetic tissue matrices were evaluated. Results: The majority of the products evaluated perform well in contaminated fields, where the risk of wound-healing difficulties is high. Clinical outcomes, which included infection, reherniation, and bulge formation, were variable, and the majority of the studies had a mean follow-up of less than 24 months. Conclusions: Although bioprosthetic matrix has a multitude of indications within the growing field of abdominal wall reconstruction, the functionality, regenerative capacity, and long-term fate of these products have yet to be fully established. Furthermore, the clinical performance, indications, and contraindications for each type of matrix need to be fully evaluated in long-term outcome studies. PMID:25289285

  20. Traumatic handlebar hernia associated with hepatic herniation: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Talwar, Nikhil; Natrajan, Madhu; Kumar, Surender; Dargan, Puneet

    2007-08-01

    A traumatic abdominal wall hernia (TAWH) is a rare type of hernia that occurs after blunt trauma to the abdomen. TAWH caused by direct trauma from bicycle handlebars is even more rare with fewer than 30 cases having being reported. Recognition of these hernias is important, because they may be associated with significant intrabdominal injuries. Despite an overall increase in incidence of blunt abdominal trauma, cases of TAWH remain rare, probably because of elasticity of the abdominal wall resists the shear forces generated by a traumatic impact. A high level of clinical suspicion is required for diagnosis of TAWH in patients with handlebar injuries. We present the case of a 20-year-old man with a traumatic handlebar hernia associated with herniation of the liver and hepatic ductal injury, which was managed successfully by a delayed repair of the hernia.

  1. Temporary closure of the abdominal wall by use of silicone rubber sheets after operative repair of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Akers, D L; Fowl, R J; Kempczinski, R F; Davis, K; Hurst, J M; Uhl, S

    1991-07-01

    Management of patients after operative repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms can be further complicated if primary closure of the abdominal wall cannot be technically accomplished or is associated with profound increases in intraabdominal and peak inspiratory pressures. We recently treated five patients with ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms and one patient with a ruptured thoracoabdominal aneurysm whose abdominal incisions had to be closed with a Dacron reinforced, silicone sheet. All patients were hemodynamically unstable either at admission to the hospital or became so during operation. Four patients required the insertion of a silicone rubber sheet at the primary operation because of massive retroperitoneal hematoma or edema of the bowel wall or both. Incisions in two patients were closed primarily, but the patients required reexploration and secondary closure with silicone rubber sheets because of the development of marked increases in peak inspiratory pressures, intraabdominal pressures, and decreased urinary output. Four of the six patients subsequently underwent successful removal of the silicone rubber sheets with delayed primary closure of the abdominal wall, and two others died before removal. The patient with the ruptured thoracoabdominal aneurysm died on postoperative day 20 because of pulmonary sepsis but had a healed abdominal incision. The three surviving patients have been discharged. A silicone rubber sheet may be necessary for closure of the abdominal wall after repair of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm in patients where primary abdominal wall closure is impossible or where it results in compromise in respiratory or renal function.

  2. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans pneumonia with chest and abdominal wall involvement.

    PubMed

    Storms, Iris; van den Brand, Marre; Schneeberger, Peter; van 't Hullenaar, Nico

    2017-04-21

    A 54-year-old man presented with a productive cough, chest pain, fever and weight loss. Initial analysis revealed a palpable chest wall mass and consolidation in the left lower lobe and pleural abnormalities on imaging. At that point no infectious cause or malignancy was identified. Microbiological analysis of a needle biopsy from a newly developed abdominal wall mass revealed growth of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans The patient was successfully treated with antibiotic therapy for 1 year. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is a Gram-negative coccobacillus and is part of the normal oral flora. It is capable of causing infections in humans including periodontitis, soft tissue abscesses and systemic invasive infections, most commonly endocarditis. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  3. Necrotizing Fasciitis of the Abdominal Wall Caused by Serratia Marcescens

    PubMed Central

    Lakhani, Naheed A.; Narsinghani, Umesh; Kumar, Ritu

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we present the first case of necrotizing fasciitis affecting the abdominal wall caused by Serratia marcescens and share results of a focused review of S. marcescens induced necrotizing fasciitis. Our patient underwent aorto-femoral bypass grafting for advanced peripheral vascular disease and presented 3 weeks postoperatively with pain, erythema and discharge from the incision site in the left lower abdominal wall and underwent multiple debridement of the affected area. Pathology of debrided tissue indicated extensive necrosis involving the adipose tissue, fascia and skeletal muscle. Wound cultures were positive for Serratia marcescens. She was successfully treated with antibiotics and multiple surgical debridements. Since necrotizing fasciitis is a medical and surgical emergency, it is critical to examine infectivity trends, clinical characteristics in its causative spectrum. Using PubMed we found 17 published cases of necrotizing fasciitis caused by Serratia marcescens, and then analyzed patterns among those cases. Serratia marcescens is prominent in the community and hospital settings, and information on infection presentations, risk factors, characteristics, treatment, course, and complications as provided through this study can help identify cases earlier and mitigate poor outcomes. Patients with positive blood cultures and those patients where surgical intervention was not provided or delayed had a higher mortality. Surgical intervention is a definite way to establish the diagnosis of necrotizing infection and differentiate it from other entities. PMID:26294949

  4. Long-term anisotropic mechanical response of surgical meshes used to repair abdominal wall defects.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Gascón, B; Peña, E; Pascual, G; Rodríguez, M; Bellón, J M; Calvo, B

    2012-01-01

    Routine hernia repair surgery involves the implant of synthetic mesh. However, this type of procedure may give rise to pain and bowel incarceration and strangulation, causing considerable patient disability. The purpose of this study was to compare the long-term behaviour of three commercial meshes used to repair the partially herniated abdomen in New Zealand White rabbits: the heavyweight (HW) mesh, Surgipro(®) and lightweight (LW) mesh, Optilene(®), both made of polypropylene (PP), and a mediumweight (MW) mesh, Infinit(®), made of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE). The implanted meshes were mechanical and histological assessed at 14, 90 and 180 days post-implant. This behaviour was compared to the anisotropic mechanical behaviour of the unrepaired abdominal wall in control non-operated rabbits. Both uniaxial mechanical tests conducted in craneo-caudal and perpendicular directions and histological findings revealed substantial collagen growth over the repaired hernial defects causing stiffness in the repair zone, and thus a change in the original properties of the meshes. The mechanical behaviour of the healthy tissue in the craneo-caudal direction was not reproduced by any of the implanted meshes after 14 days or 90 days of implant, whereas in the perpendicular direction, SUR and OPT achieved similar behaviour. From a mechanical standpoint, the anisotropic PP-lightweight meshes may be considered a good choice in the long run, which correlates with the structure of the regenerated tissue. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Single-Incision Laparoscopic Repair of Spigelian Hernia

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Kim; Zajkowska, Marta; Lam, Vincent; Hawthorne, Wayne J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Spigelian hernias represent only 1% to 2% of all abdominal wall hernias. The treatment, however, remains controversial but depends on institutional expertise. This case series reports the first experience with single-incision laparoscopic totally extraperitoneal (SILTEP) repair of Spigelian hernias with telescopic extraperitoneal dissection in combination with inguinal hernia repair. Methods: From February 2013 to April 2014, all patients referred with inguinal or Spigelian hernias, without histories of extraperitoneal intervention, underwent SILTEP repair with telescopic extraperitoneal dissection. A single-port device, 5.5 mm/52 cm/30° angled laparoscope, and conventional straight dissecting instruments were used for all cases. Extraperitoneal dissection was performed under direct vision with preservation of preperitoneal fascia overlying retroperitoneal nerves. Inguinal herniorrhaphy was performed with lightweight mesh that covered low-lying Spigelian defects. High-lying Spigelian defects were repaired with additional mesh. Results: There were 131 patients with 186 (92 direct) inguinal hernias and 7 patients with 8 Spigelian hernias (6 incidental, including 1 bilateral and 2 preoperatively diagnosed), with a mean age of 51.3 years and a mean body mass index of 25.1 kg/m2. An additional piece of mesh was used for 3 hernias. All Spigelian hernias were associated with direct inguinal hernias, and 8 combined inguinal and Spigelian hernias were successfully repaired with SILTEP repair with telescopic extraperitoneal dissection as day cases. There were no clinical recurrences during a mean follow-up period of 6 months (range, 1–15 months). Conclusions: Combined Spigelian and inguinal hernias can be successfully treated with SILTEP herniorrhaphy with telescopic extraperitoneal dissection. The high incidence of Spigelian hernias associated with direct inguinal hernias suggests a high index of suspicion for Spigelian hernias during laparoscopic inguinal

  6. [The cutaneous groin flap for coverage of a full-thickness abdominal wall defect].

    PubMed

    Doebler, O; Spierer, R

    2010-08-01

    A full-thickness defect of the abdominal wall is rare and may occur as a complication of extended abdominal surgery procedures. We report about a 69-year-old patient who was presented to our department with a full-thickness abdominal wall defect and a fully exposed collagen-mesh for reconstructive wound closure. 13 operations with resections of necrotic parts of the abdominal wall were performed following a complicated intraabdominal infection. After debridement and mesh explantation, closure of the remaining defect of the lower abdominal region was achieved by a cutaneous groin flap. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart New York.

  7. Abdominal Wall Transplantation: Skin as a Sentinel Marker for Rejection.

    PubMed

    Gerlach, U A; Vrakas, G; Sawitzki, B; Macedo, R; Reddy, S; Friend, P J; Giele, H; Vaidya, A

    2016-06-01

    Abdominal wall transplantation (AWTX) has revolutionized difficult abdominal closure after intestinal transplantation (ITX). More important, the skin of the transplanted abdominal wall (AW) may serve as an immunological tool for differential diagnosis of bowel dysfunction after transplant. Between August 2008 and October 2014, 29 small bowel transplantations were performed in 28 patients (16 male, 12 female; aged 41 ± 13 years). Two groups were identified: the solid organ transplant (SOT) group (n = 15; 12 ITX and 3 modified multivisceral transplantation [MMVTX]) and the SOT-AWTX group (n = 14; 12 ITX and 2 MMVTX), with the latter including one ITX-AWTX retransplantation. Two doses of alemtuzumab were used for induction (30 mg, 6 and 24 h after reperfusion), and tacrolimus (trough levels 8-12 ng/mL) was used for maintenance immunosuppression. Patient survival was similar in both groups (67% vs. 61%); however, the SOT-AWTX group showed faster posttransplant recovery, better intestinal graft survival (79% vs. 60%), a lower intestinal rejection rate (7% vs. 27%) and a lower rate of misdiagnoses in which viral infection was mistaken and treated as rejection (14% vs. 33%). The skin component of the AW may serve as an immune modulator and sentinel marker for immunological activity in the host. This can be a vital tool for timely prevention of intestinal graft rejection and, more important, avoidance of overimmunosuppression in cases of bowel dysfunction not related to graft rejection. © Copyright 2015 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  8. Acquired umbilical hernias in four captive polar bears (Ursus maritimus).

    PubMed

    Velguth, Karen E; Rochat, Mark C; Langan, Jennifer N; Backues, Kay

    2009-12-01

    Umbilical hernias are a common occurrence in domestic animals and humans but have not been well documented in polar bears. Surgical reduction and herniorrhaphies were performed to correct acquired hernias in the region of the umbilicus in four adult captive polar bears (Ursus maritimus) housed in North American zoos. Two of the four bears were clinically unaffected by their hernias prior to surgery. One bear showed signs of severe discomfort following acute enlargement of the hernia. In another bear, re-herniation led to acute abdominal pain due to gastric entrapment and strangulation. The hernias in three bears were surgically repaired by debridement of the hernia ring and direct apposition of the abdominal wall, while the large defect in the most severely affected bear was closed using polypropylene mesh to prevent excessive tension. The cases in this series demonstrate that while small hernias may remain clinically inconsequential for long periods of time, enlargement or recurrence of the defect can lead to incarceration and acute abdominal crisis. Umbilical herniation has not been reported in free-ranging polar bears, and it is suspected that factors such as body condition, limited exercise, or enclosure design potentially contribute to the development of umbilical hernias in captive polar bears.

  9. The risk of volvulus in abdominal wall defects.

    PubMed

    Abdelhafeez, Abdelhafeez H; Schultz, Jessica A; Ertl, Allison; Cassidy, Laura D; Wagner, Amy J

    2015-04-01

    Congenital abdominal wall defects are associated with abnormal intestinal rotation and fixation. A Ladd's procedure is not routinely performed in these patients; it is believed intestinal fixation is provided by adhesions that develop post-repair of the defects. However, patients with omphalocele may not have adequately protective postoperative adhesions because of difference in the inflammatory state of the bowel wall and in repair strategy. The aim of this study is to describe the occurrence of midgut volvulus in patients with gastroschisis or omphalocele. A retrospective chart review was performed for all patients managed in a single institution born between 1/1/2000 and 12/31/2008 with a diagnosis of gastroschisis or omphalocele. Patient charts were reviewed through 12/31/2012 for occurrence of midgut volvulus or need for second laparotomy. Of the 206 patients identified with abdominal wall defects, 142 patients (69%) had gastroschisis and 64 patients (31%) had omphalocele. Patients' follow up ranged from 4 years to 13 years. The median gestational age was 36 weeks (26-41 weeks) and the median birth weight was 2.42 kg (0.8-4.87 kg). None of the patients with gastroschisis developed midgut volvulus, however two patients (3%) with omphalocele developed midgut volvulus. No patients with gastroschisis developed midgut volvulus. Therefore, the current practice of not routinely performing a Ladd's procedure is a safe approach during surgical repair of gastroschisis. The two cases of volvulus in patients with omphalocele may be related to less bowel fixation. It is necessary to examine current practice in regards to the need for assessing the risk of volvulus during omphalocele closure and counseling of these patients. This assessment may be achieved via routine examination of the width of the small bowel mesenteric base, whenever feasible; however, the sample size is relatively small to draw any definitive conclusions. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Abdominal wall integrity after open abdomen: long-term results of vacuum-assisted wound closure and mesh-mediated fascial traction (VAWCM).

    PubMed

    Willms, A; Schaaf, S; Schwab, R; Richardsen, I; Bieler, D; Wagner, B; Güsgen, C

    2016-12-01

    The open abdomen has become a standard technique in the management of critically ill patients undergoing surgery for severe intra-abdominal conditions. Negative pressure and mesh-mediated fascial traction are commonly used and achieve low fistula rates and high fascial closure rates. In this study, long-term results of a standardised treatment approach are presented. Fifty-five patients who underwent OA management for different indications at our institution from 2006 to 2013 were enrolled. All patients were treated under a standardised algorithm that uses a combination of vacuum-assisted wound closure and mesh-mediated fascial traction. Structured follow-up assessments were offered to patients and included a medical history, a clinical examination and abdominal ultrasonography. The data obtained were statistically analysed. The fascial closure rate was 74 % in an intention-to-treat analysis and 89 % in a per-protocol analysis. The fistula rate was 1.8 %. Thirty-four patients attended follow-up. The median follow-up was 46 months (range 12-88 months). Incisional hernias developed in 35 %. Patients with hernias needed more operative procedures (10.3 vs 3.4, p = 0.03) than patients without hernia formation. A Patient Observer Scar Assessment Scale (POSAS) of 31.1 was calculated. Patients with symptomatic hernias (NAS of 2-10) had a significantly lower mean POSAS score (p = 0.04). Vacuum-assisted wound closure and mesh-mediated fascial traction (VAWCM) seem to result in low complication rates and high fascial closure rates. Abdominal wall reconstruction, which is a challenging and complex procedure and causes considerable patient discomfort, can thus be avoided in the majority of cases. Available results are based on studies involving only a small number of cases. Multi-centre studies and registry-based data are therefore needed to validate these findings.

  11. Catamenial Pain in Umbilical Hernia with Spontaneous Reduction: An Unusual Presentation of a Rare Entity.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Divya; Sharma, Ritu; Salhan, Sudha

    2015-08-01

    Spontaneous umbilical endometriosis occurring in absence of any previous abdominal or uterine surgery is extremely atypical. Its association with umbilical hernia is very rare and hernia getting spontaneously resolved has not been reported in literature so far. Here we report a case of a patient with spontaneous umbilical endometriosis associated with umbilical hernia which led to spontaneous hernia reduction. This was also associated with multiple uterine fibromyoma and bilateral ovarian endometrioma which were simultaneously treated by total abdominal hysterectomy with bilateral salpingo-oopherectomy along with surgical excision of the endometriotic tissue and repair of the abdominal wall defect. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first described case of spontaneous umbilical hernia reduction due to development of endometriosis.

  12. Atelectasis after free rectus transfer and abdominal wall reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Lo, Jamie O; Weber, Stephen M; Andersen, Peter E; Gross, Neil D; Gosselin, Marc; Wax, Mark K

    2008-10-01

    Atelectasis is commonly encountered in patients undergoing rectus abdominus tissue transfer. Primary closure of the anterior rectus sheath may contribute to this process. Augmentation of the closure with mesh may decrease the incidence of Atelectasis. In this retrospective review 32 patients with preoperative and postoperative augmentation were compared to 23 who had primary closure of the anterior rectus sheath. Augmentation consisted of acellular dermis (25) or mesh (7). Postoperative atelectasis was radiographically detected in: 91% (n=29) of augmented patients versus 83% (n=19) of primary closure patients. Major atelectasis in 41% (n=13) of augmented patients versus 61% (n=14) of primary closure patients p<.05. The incidence of atelectasis was independent of skin flap size and operative times. The use of acellular dermis or mesh to augment the abdominal wall appears to reduce the high incidence of postoperative atelectasis following rectus-free flap harvest. Copyright (c) 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck 2008.

  13. Abdominal Wall Defects in Greenland 1989-2015.

    PubMed

    Bugge, Merete; Drachmann, Gitte; Kern, Peder; Budtz-Jørgensen, Esben; Eiberg, Hans; Olsen, Britta; Tommerup, Niels; Nielsen, Inge-Merete

    2017-07-03

    In the last decades, an increasing rate of gastroschisis but not of omphalocele has been reported worldwide. Greenland is the world's largest island, but 80% is covered by an ice cap, it has a small population of around 56,000 peoples (as of 2016). The occurrence of abdominal wall defects has never been investigated in Greenland. The present study is based on data retrieved from three nationwide and two local registries in the Greenlandic health care system over 27 years (1989-2015). We identified 33 infants with abdominal wall defects born in the study time period. All cases were reclassified to 28 cases of gastroschisis, four cases of omphalocele, and there was 1 infant in the indeterminate group. The point prevalence at birth for gastroschisis increased significantly from 8 to 35 (average 10.7) per 10,000 liveborn and -stillborn infants. Mothers below 20 years of age represented 23% of all cases and the prevalence for this group was 17 per 10,000 liveborn and stillborn. Perinatal mortality for infants with gastroschisis was high (18%), and 1 year survival was 71%. For omphalocele, the prevalence varied from 8 to 11 per 10,000 liveborn and stillborn infants. There was no increasing rate in the period, further highlighting an etiological difference between gastroschisis and omphalocele. This study confirms the increasing prevalence of gastroschisis in Greenland in the period from 1989 to 2015. The average was 10.7 per 10,000 liveborn and -stillborn infants and, to the best of our knowledge, this is the highest prevalence ever reported. Birth Defects Research 109:836-842, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Colonic obstruction secondary to incarcerated Spigelian hernia in a severely obese patient.

    PubMed

    Salemis, Nikolaos S; Kontoravdis, Nikolaos; Gourgiotis, Stavros; Panagiotopoulos, Nikolaos; Gakis, Christos; Dimitrakopoulos, Georgios

    2010-01-01

    Spigelian hernia is a rare hernia of the ventral abdominal wall accounting for 1-2% of all hernias. Incarceration of a Spigelian hernia has been reported in 17-24% of the cases. We herein describe an extremely rare case of a colonic obstruction secondary to an incarcerated Spigelian hernia in a severely obese patient. Physical examination was inconclusive and diagnosis was established by computed tomography scans. The patient underwent an open intraperitoneal mesh repair. A high level of suspicion and awareness is required as clinical findings of a Spigelian hernia are often nonspecific especially in obese patients. Computed tomography scan provides detailed information for the surgical planning. Open mesh repair is safe in the emergent surgical intervention of a complicated Spigelian hernia in severely obese patients.

  15. Colonic obstruction secondary to incarcerated Spigelian hernia in a severely obese patient

    PubMed Central

    Salemis, Nikolaos S.; Kontoravdis, Nikolaos; Gourgiotis, Stavros; Panagiotopoulos, Nikolaos; Gakis, Christos; Dimitrakopoulos, Georgios

    2010-01-01

    Spigelian hernia is a rare hernia of the ventral abdominal wall accounting for 1–2% of all hernias. Incarceration of a Spigelian hernia has been reported in 17–24% of the cases. We herein describe an extremely rare case of a colonic obstruction secondary to an incarcerated Spigelian hernia in a severely obese patient. Physical examination was inconclusive and diagnosis was established by computed tomography scans. The patient underwent an open intraperitoneal mesh repair. A high level of suspicion and awareness is required as clinical findings of a Spigelian hernia are often nonspecific especially in obese patients. Computed tomography scan provides detailed information for the surgical planning. Open mesh repair is safe in the emergent surgical intervention of a complicated Spigelian hernia in severely obese patients. PMID:22096670

  16. Umbilical endometriosis associated with large umbilical hernia. Case report.

    PubMed

    Stojanovic, M; Radojkovic, M; Jeremic, L; Zlatic, A; Stanojevic, G; Janjic, D; Mihajlovic, S; Dimov, I; Kostov, M; Zdravkovic, M; Stojanovic, M

    2014-01-01

    Umbilical endometriosis is a rare condition, usually following laparoscopic and surgical procedures involving the umbilicus.Spontaneous umbilical endometriosis occurring without any previous abdominal or uterine surgery is extremely rare. The maximal depth of penetration of the umbilical endometriosis described is up to fascial level. There have been only two cases of endometriosis reported arising within umbilical hernia. The authors report a case of a patient with spontaneous umbilical endometriosis associated with a large umbilical hernia, treated by surgical excision and mesh repair of the abdominal wall. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first described case of the association of umbilical endometriosis with a large umbilical hernia that requires prosthetic mesh repair of the abdominal wall defect. Celsius.

  17. An Abdominal Aorta Wall Extraction for Liver Cirrhosis Classification Using Ultrasonic Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Takaya; Fujita, Yusuke; Mitani, Yoshihiro; Hamamoto, Yoshihiko; Segawa, Makoto; Terai, Shuji; Sakaida, Isao

    2011-06-01

    We propose a method to extract an abdominal aorta wall from an M-mode image. Furthermore, we propose the use of a Gaussian filter in order to improve image quality. The experimental results show that the Gaussian filter is effective in the abdominal aorta wall extraction.

  18. Chronic abdominal wall pain--a diagnostic challenge for the surgeon.

    PubMed

    Lindsetmo, Rolv-Ole; Stulberg, Jonah

    2009-07-01

    Chronic abdominal wall pain (CAWP) occurs in about 30% of all patients presenting with chronic abdominal pain. The authors review the literature identified in a PubMed search regarding the abdominal wall as the origin of chronic abdominal pain. CAWP is frequently misinterpreted as visceral or functional abdominal pain. Misdiagnosis often leads to a variety of investigational procedures and even abdominal operations with negative results. With a simple clinical test (Carnett's test), >90% of patients with CAWP can be recognized, without risk for missing intra-abdominal pathology. The condition can be confirmed when the injection of local anesthetics in the trigger point(s) relieves the pain. A fasciotomy in the anterior abdominal rectus muscle sheath through the nerve foramina of the affected branch of one of the anterior intercostal nerves heals the pain.

  19. Use of Epidural Analgesia as an Adjunct in Elective Abdominal Wall Reconstruction: A Review of 4983 Cases.

    PubMed

    Karamanos, Efstathios; Dream, Sophie; Falvo, Anthony; Schmoekel, Nathan; Siddiqui, Aamir

    2017-01-01

    Use of epidural analgesia in patients undergoing elective abdominal wall reconstruction is common. To assess the impact of epidural analgesia in patients undergoing abdominal wall reconstruction. All patients who underwent elective ventral hernia repair from 2005 to 2014 were retrospectively identified. Patients were divided into two groups by the postoperative use of epidural analgesics as an adjunct analgesic method. Preoperative comorbidities, American Society of Anesthesiologists status, operative findings, postoperative pain management, and venothromboembolic prophylaxis were extracted from the database. Logistic regressions were performed to assess the impact of epidural use. Severity of pain on postoperative days 1 and 2. During the study period, 4983 patients were identified. Of those, 237 patients (4.8%) had an epidural analgesic placed. After adjustment for differences between groups, use of epidural analgesia was associated with significantly lower rates of 30-day presentation to the Emergency Department (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 0.53, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.32-0.87, adjusted p = 0.01). Use of epidural analgesia resulted in higher odds of abscess development (AOR = 5.89, CI = 2.00-17.34, adjusted p < 0.01) and transfusion requirement (AOR = 2.92, CI = 1.34-6.40, adjusted p < 0.01). Use of epidural analgesia resulted in a significantly lower pain score on postoperative day 1 (3 vs 4, adjusted p < 0.01). Use of epidural analgesia in patients undergoing abdominal wall reconstruction may result in longer hospital stay and higher incidence of complications while having no measurable positive clinical impact on pain control.

  20. Grey Turner's and Cullen's signs induced by spontaneous hemorrhage of the abdominal wall after coughing.

    PubMed

    Fan, Zhe; Zhang, Yingyi

    2017-08-01

    Grey Turner's and Cullen's signs are rare clinical signs, which most appear in patients with severe acute pancreatitis. The present patient complained of abdominal pain after coughing. However, contrast-enhanced CT revealed a hemorrhage of the abdominal wall. Therefore, spontaneous hemorrhage of the abdominal wall was diagnosed. The patient recovered through immobilization and hemostasis therapy. This case report and literature review aims to remind clinicians of manifestations and treatment of spontaneous hemorrhage.

  1. Robotic Transversus Abdominis Release (TAR): is it possible to offer minimally invasive surgery for abdominal wall complex defects?

    PubMed

    Amaral, Maria Vitória França DO; Guimarães, José Ricardo; Volpe, Paula; Oliveira, Flávio Malcher Martins DE; Domene, Carlos Eduardo; Roll, Sérgio; Cavazzola, Leandro Totti

    2017-01-01

    We describe the preliminary national experience and the early results of the use of robotic surgery to perform the posterior separation of abdominal wall components by the Transversus Abdominis Release (TAR) technique for the correction of complex defects of the abdominal wall. We performed the procedures between 04/2/2015 and 06/15/2015 and the follow-up time was up to six months, with a minimum of two months. The mean surgical time was five hours and 40 minutes. Two patients required laparoscopic re-intervention, since one developed hernia by peritoneal migration of the mesh and one had mesh extrusion. The procedure proved to be technically feasible, with a still long surgical time. Considering the potential advantages of robotic surgery and those related to TAR and the results obtained when these two techniques are associated, we conclude that they seem to be a good option for the correction of complex abdominal wall defects. RESUMO Descrevemos a experiência preliminar nacional na utilização da cirurgia robótica para realizar a separação posterior de componentes da parede abdominal pela técnica transversus abdominis release (TAR) na correção de defeitos complexos da parede abdominal e seus resultados precoces. As cirurgias foram realizadas entre 02/04/2015 e 15/06/2015 e o tempo de acompanhamento dos resultados foi de até seis meses, com tempo mínimo de dois meses. O tempo cirúrgico médio foi de cinco horas e 40 minutos. Dois pacientes necessitaram reintervenção por laparoscopia, pois um desenvolveu hérnia por migração peritoneal da tela e um teve escape da tela. A cirurgia provou ser factível do ponto de vista técnico, com um tempo cirúrgico ainda elevado. Tendo em vista as vantagens potenciais da cirurgia robótica e aquelas relacionadas ao TAR e os resultados obtidos ao se associar essas duas técnicas, conclui-se que elas parecem ser uma boa opção para a correção de defeitos complexos da parede abdominal.

  2. Abdominal adiposity is the main determinant of the C-reactive response to injury in subjects undergoing inguinal hernia repair

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Obesity and serum C-reactive protein (CRP) (a sensitive marker of inflammatory activity) are associated with most chronic diseases. Abdominal adiposity along with age is the strongest determinant of baseline CRP levels in healthy subjects. The mechanism of the association of serum CRP with disease is uncertain. We hypothesized that baseline serum CRP is a marker of inflammatory responsiveness to injury and that abdominal adiposity is the main determinant of this responsiveness. We studied the effect of abdominal adiposity, age and other environmental risk factors for chronic disease on the CRP response to a standardised surgical insult, unilateral hernia repair to not only test this hypothesis but to inform the factors which must be taken into account when assessing systemic inflammatory responses to surgery. Methods 102 male subjects aged 24-94 underwent unilateral hernia repair by a single operator. CRP was measured at 0, 6, 24 and 48 hrs. Response was defined as the peak CRP adjusted for baseline CRP. Results Age and waist:hip ratio (WHR) were associated both with basal CRP and CRP response with similar effect sizes after adjustment for a wide-range of covariates. The adjusted proportional difference in CRP response per 10% increase in WHR was 1.50 (1.17-1.91) p = 0.0014 and 1.15(1.00-1.31) p = 0.05 per decade increase in age. There was no evidence of important effects of other environmental cardiovascular risk factors on CRP response. Conclusion Waist:hip ratio and age need to be considered when studying the inflammatory response to surgery. The finding that age and waist:hip ratio influence baseline and post-operative CRP levels to a similar extent suggests that baseline CRP is a measure of inflammatory responsiveness to casual stimuli and that higher age and obesity modulate the generic excitability of the inflammatory system leading to both higher baseline CRP and higher CRP response to surgery. The mechanism for the association of

  3. Conservative management of mesh-site infection in hernia repair surgery: a case series.

    PubMed

    Meagher, H; Clarke Moloney, M; Grace, P A

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study is to assess the outcome of conservative management of infected mesh grafts following abdominal wall hernia repair. This study retrospectively examined the charts of patients who developed mesh-site infection following surgery for abdominal hernia repair to determine how effective conservative management in the form of antibiotics and wound management was on the resolution of infection and wound healing. Over a period of 30 months, 13 patients developed infected mesh grafts post-hernia repair surgery. Twelve patients were successfully treated conservatively with local wound care and antibiotics if clinically indicated. One patient returned to theatre to have the infected mesh removed. Of the patients that healed eleven were treated with negative pressure wound therapy (VAC(®)). This series of case studies indicate that conservative management of abdominal wall-infected hernia mesh cases is likely to be successful.

  4. The impact of personalized probabilistic wall thickness models on peak wall stress in abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Biehler, J; Wall, W A

    2018-02-01

    If computational models are ever to be used in high-stakes decision making in clinical practice, the use of personalized models and predictive simulation techniques is a must. This entails rigorous quantification of uncertainties as well as harnessing available patient-specific data to the greatest extent possible. Although researchers are beginning to realize that taking uncertainty in model input parameters into account is a necessity, the predominantly used probabilistic description for these uncertain parameters is based on elementary random variable models. In this work, we set out for a comparison of different probabilistic models for uncertain input parameters using the example of an uncertain wall thickness in finite element models of abdominal aortic aneurysms. We provide the first comparison between a random variable and a random field model for the aortic wall and investigate the impact on the probability distribution of the computed peak wall stress. Moreover, we show that the uncertainty about the prevailing peak wall stress can be reduced if noninvasively available, patient-specific data are harnessed for the construction of the probabilistic wall thickness model. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. A very simple technique to repair Grynfeltt-Lesshaft hernia.

    PubMed

    Solaini, Leonardo; di Francesco, F; Gourgiotis, S; Solaini, Luciano

    2010-08-01

    A very simple technique to repair a superior lumbar hernia is described. The location of this type of hernia, also known as the Grynfeltt-Lesshaft hernia, is defined by a triangle placed in the lumbar region. An unusual case of a 67-year-old woman with a superior lumbar hernia is reported. The diagnosis was made by physical examination. The defect of the posterior abdominal wall was repaired with a polypropylene dart mesh. The patient had no evidence of recurrence at 11 months follow up. The surgical approach described in this paper is simple and easy to perform, and its result is comparable with other techniques that are much more sophisticated. No cases on the use of dart mesh to repair Grynfeltt-Lesshaft hernia have been reported by surgical journals indexed in PubMed.

  6. Operative correction of abdominal rectus diastasis (ARD) reduces pain and improves abdominal wall muscle strength: A randomized, prospective trial comparing retromuscular mesh repair to double-row, self-retaining sutures.

    PubMed

    Emanuelsson, Peter; Gunnarsson, Ulf; Dahlstrand, Ursula; Strigård, Karin; Stark, Birgit

    2016-11-01

    The primary aim of this prospective, randomized, clinical, 2-armed trial was to evaluate the risk for recurrence using 2 different operative techniques for repair of abdominal rectus diastasis. Secondary aims were comparison of pain, abdominal muscle strength, and quality of life and to compare those outcomes to a control group receiving physical training only. Eighty-six patients were enrolled. Twenty-nine patients were allocated to retromuscular polypropylene mesh and 27 to double-row plication with Quill technology. Thirty-two patients participated in a 3-month training program. Diastasis was evaluated with computed tomography scan and clinically. Pain was assessed using the ventral hernia pain questionnaire, a quality-of-life survey, SF-36, and abdominal muscle strength using the Biodex System-4. One early recurrence occurred in the Quill group, 2 encapsulated seromas in the mesh group, and 3 in the suture group. Significant improvements in perceived pain, the ventral hernia pain questionnaire, and quality of life appeared at the 1-year follow-up with no difference between the 2 operative groups. Significant muscular improvement was obtained in all groups (Biodex System-4). Patient perceived gain in muscle strength assessed with a visual analog scale improved similarly in both operative groups. This improvement was significantly greater than that seen in the training group. Patients in the training group still experienced bodily pain at follow-up. There was no difference between the Quill technique and retromuscular mesh in the effect on abdominal wall stability, with a similar complication rate 1 year after operation. An operation improves functional ability and quality of life. Training strengthens the abdominal muscles, but patients still experience discomfort and pain. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Laparoscopic excision of an epidermoid cyst arising from the deep abdominal wall.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Hajime; Nakai, Takuya; Ueda, Kazuki; Haji, Seiji; Takeyama, Yoshifumi; Ohyanagi, Harumasa

    2009-10-01

    Epidermoid cysts are the most common type of cutaneous cyst. However, their occurrence in the deep abdominal wall has not yet been reported. Here, we present the case of a 60-year-old woman who developed an epidermoid cyst in the deep abdominal wall, which was resected laparoscopically. The patient presented with right upper quadrant abdominal pain on admission to our hospital. Computed tomography revealed cholecystolithiasis and an incidentally identified well-defined hypoattenuating mass (62 x 47 x 65 mm) in the deep abdominal wall on the left side of the navel. We performed laparoscopic complete resection of the abdominal wall tumor followed by cholecystectomy. The excised specimen was a cyst covered with a smooth thin membrane and contained sludge. Histopathologic examination revealed an epidermoid cyst. This is a very rare case with no previous reports on a similar type of epidermoid cyst.

  8. Sports Hernia Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Economopoulos, Kostas J.; Milewski, Matthew D.; Hanks, John B.; Hart, Joseph M.; Diduch, David R.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The minimal repair technique for sports hernias repairs only the weak area of the posterior abdominal wall along with decompressing the genitofemoral nerve. This technique has been shown to return athletes to competition rapidly. This study compares the clinical outcomes of the minimal repair technique with the traditional modified Bassini repair. Hypothesis: Athletes undergoing the minimal repair technique for a sports hernia would return to play more rapidly compared with athletes undergoing the traditional modified Bassini repair. Methods: A retrospective study of 28 patients who underwent sports hernia repair at the authors’ institution was performed. Fourteen patients underwent the modified Bassini repair, and a second group of 14 patients underwent the minimal repair technique. The 2 groups were compared with respect to time to return to sport, return to original level of competition, and clinical outcomes. Results: Patients in the minimal repair group returned to sports at a median of 5.6 weeks (range, 4-8 weeks), which was significantly faster compared with the modified Bassini repair group, with a median return of 25.8 weeks (range, 4-112 weeks; P = 0.002). Thirteen of 14 patients in the minimal repair group returned to sports at their previous level, while 9 of 14 patients in the Bassini group were able to return to their previous level of sport (P = 0.01). Two patients in each group had recurrent groin pain. One patient in the minimal repair group underwent revision hernia surgery for recurrent pain, while 1 patient in the Bassini group underwent hip arthroscopy for symptomatic hip pain. Conclusion: The minimal repair technique allows athletes with sports hernias to return to play faster than patients treated with the modified Bassini. PMID:24427419

  9. Abdominal wall dysfunction in adult bladder exstrophy: a treatable but under-recognized problem.

    PubMed

    Manahan, M A; Campbell, K A; Tufaro, A P

    2016-08-01

    Bladder exstrophy is defined by urogenital and skeletal abnormalities with cosmetic and functional deformity of the lower anterior abdominal wall. The primary management objectives have historically been establishment of urinary continence with renal function preservation, reconstruction of functional and cosmetically acceptable external genitalia, and abdominal wall closure of some variety. The literature has focused on the challenges of neonatal approaches to abdominal wall closure; however, there has been a paucity of long-term followup to identify the presence and severity of abdominal wall defects in adulthood. Our goal was to characterize the adult disease and determine effective therapy. A retrospective review of a consecutive series of six patients was performed. We report and characterize the presence of severe abdominal wall dysfunction in these adult exstrophy patients treated as children. We tailored an abdominal wall and pelvic floor reconstruction with long-term success to highlight a need for awareness of the magnitude of the problem and its solvability. The natural history of abdominal wall laxity and the long-term consequences of cloacal exstrophy closure have gone unexplored and unreported. Evaluation of our series facilitates understanding in this complex area and may be valuable for patients who are living limited lives thinking that no solution is available.

  10. [Gas gangrene of the abdominal wall due to underlying GI pathology: seven cases].

    PubMed

    Monneuse, O; Gruner, L; Barth, X; Malick, P; Timsit, M; Gignoux, B; Tissot, E

    2007-01-01

    Gas gangrene of the abdominal wall is a rare clinical occurrence with high rates of morbidity and mortality. The primary source of the infection is often unknown. To analyze the primary underlying intestinal etiologies and diagnostic approaches of gas gangrene of the abdominal wall, and to highlight specific treatment problems, particularly that of constructing a colostomy exteriorized through a massively infected abdominal wall. Seven cases of abdominal wall gas gangrene due to a gastrointestinal etiology were identified. (Cases arising from proctologic sources or related to recent abdominal surgery were excluded.) During the same period, 39 other patients presenting with abdominal wall gangrene from non-intestinal sources were treated. The etiologies were: perforated sigmoid diverticulitis (n=2), perforated appendicitis (n=1), acute pancreatitis with associated cecal perforation (n=1), and perforated colorectal cancer (n=3). Four of the seven patients died despite treatment (mortality of 57%). The clinical presentations of these seven cases demonstrate that a GI source must be suspected whenever a patient presents with abdominal wall gas gangrene, even when there are no specific GI symptoms. Imaging, particularly with CT scan, is essential both to visualize the extent of tissue necrosis and to reveal underlying primary GI pathology. This optimizes the surgical approach both by allowing for complete debridement and drainage of infected tissue, and by focussing the intervention on correction of the underlying primary GI source of infection.

  11. Definitive Surgical Treatment of Infected or Exposed Ventral Hernia Mesh

    PubMed Central

    Szczerba, Steven R.; Dumanian, Gregory A.

    2003-01-01

    Objective To discuss the difficulties in dealing with infected or exposed ventral hernia mesh, and to illustrate one solution using an autogenous abdominal wall reconstruction technique. Summary Background Data The definitive treatment for any infected prosthetic material in the body is removal and substitution. When ventral hernia mesh becomes exposed or infected, its removal requires a solution to prevent a subsequent hernia or evisceration. Methods Eleven patients with ventral hernia mesh that was exposed, nonincorporated, with chronic drainage, or associated with a spontaneous enterocutaneous fistula were referred by their initial surgeons after failed local wound care for definitive management. The patients were treated with radical en bloc excision of mesh and scarred fascia followed by immediate abdominal wall reconstruction using bilateral sliding rectus abdominis myofascial advancement flaps. Results Four of the 11 patients treated for infected mesh additionally required a bowel resection. Transverse defect size ranged from 8 to 18 cm (average 13 cm). Average procedure duration was 3 hours without bowel repair and 5 hours with bowel repair. Postoperative length of stay was 5 to 7 days without bowel repair and 7 to 9 days with bowel repair. Complications included hernia recurrence in one case and stitch abscesses in two cases. Follow-up ranges from 6 to 54 months (average 24 months). Conclusions Removal of infected mesh and autogenous flap reconstruction is a safe, reliable, and one-step surgical solution to the problem of infected abdominal wall mesh. PMID:12616130

  12. Morphology of the abdominal wall in the bat, Pteronotus parnellii (Microchiroptera: Mormoopidae): implications for biosonar vocalization.

    PubMed

    Lancaster, W C; Henson, O W

    1995-01-01

    We investigated the structure of the abdominal wall of Pteronotus parnellii and made comparisons with eight other species of Microchiroptera and one megachiropteran. Similar to other mammals, the abdominal wall of bats consists of the three flank muscles laterally and the m. rectus abdominis ventrally. In Microchiroptera, flank muscles are mostly confined to dorsal portions of the wall. The mm. transversus abdominis and obliquus internus abdominis form the bulk of the wall; the m. obliquus externus is poorly developed. Ventrolaterally, a large portion of the wall is a dense, bilaminar aponeurosis, composed of collagen, elastin, and fibroblasts. The thicker, superficial lamina derives from the mm. obliquus internus and transversus abdominis. The deep lamina is a continuation of the transversalis fascia. Collagen fibers of the two fused laminae are oriented orthogonally, resulting in a resilient, composite fabric. Fascicles of the flank muscles are oriented along the margins of the aponeurosis so that their forces appear to be concentrated onto the aponeurosis. We suggest that this system is adapted for the regulation and generation of intra-abdominal pressure. The abdominal wall of Pteropus, the one megachiropteran examined, lacks the derived aponeurosis and is similar to other mammals. We consider the abdominal wall of Microchiroptera to be analogous to the diaphragma, in that it functions in the regulation of pressure within body cavities and facilitates biosonar vocalization.

  13. Parastomal hernia and physical activity. Are patients getting the right advice?

    PubMed

    Russell, Sarah

    2017-09-28

    This article draws on a large nationwide survey (2631 respondents) that investigated the physical health and wellbeing of people living with stomas in the UK. It specifically considers the findings relating to parastomal hernia (where additional loops of bowel protrude through the abdominal wall around the stoma, creating a bulge). In this survey, 26% of respondents reported that they had a medically diagnosed parastomal hernia, which is below average when compared with other estimates. The impact of parastomal hernia on physical activity levels was the most significant finding: 32% of those with a medically diagnosed hernia reported being 'much less active' than they were prior to their surgery (compared with 19% without a hernia). This creates a more serious problem for general health-significantly increasing their risk of co-morbidities such as cancer, stroke, diabetes and other chronic conditions related to physical inactivity. Clinical guidelines clearly state that patients should be informed of exercises to strengthen core muscles, as part of hernia prevention, but 88% of patients did not engage in any sort of abdominal or core exercises. When asked, 69% of patients did not realise it was important and 82% of patients could not recall being given advice to do abdominal exercises as part of their recovery. There is a significant gap in the patient care pathway regarding advice on physical activity, core/abdominal exercises and hernia prevention and management after stoma surgery. This is an area that urgently needs more research and education for patients and all health professionals.

  14. Femoral hernia repair

    MedlinePlus

    Dunbar KB, Jeyarajah DR. Abdominal hernias and gastric volvulus. In: Feldman M, Friedman LS, Brandt LJ, eds. Sleisenger and Fordtran's Gastrointestinal and Liver Disease . 10th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap ...

  15. [Morphology of tissue reactions around implants after combined surgical repair of the abdominal wall].

    PubMed

    Vostrikov, O V; Zotov, V A; Nikitenko, E V

    2004-01-01

    Tissue reactions to titanium-nickelide and polypropylen and caprone implants used in surgical treatment of anterior aldomen wall hernias were studied in experiment. Digital density of leukocytes, fibroblasts, vessels, thickness of the capsule were studied. Pronounced inflammatory reaction was observed on day 3 which attenuated on day 14 in case of titanium nickelide and on day 30-60 in case of polypropylene and caprone. Fibroplastic processes start in the first group after 7 days while in the second group only after 30 days of the experiment. Thickness of the capsule around titanium-nickelide was 2-3 times less than around polypropylene and caprone. Thus, titanium-nickelide material is biologically more inert than caprone and polypropylen which are widely used in surgery of hernias.

  16. Abdominal wall sinus due to impacting gallstone during laparoscopic cholecystectomy: an unusual complication.

    PubMed

    Pavlidis, T E; Papaziogas, B T; Koutelidakis, I M; Papaziogas, T B

    2002-02-01

    During laparoscopic cholecystectomy, perforation of the gallbladder can occurs in < or = 20% of cases, while gallstone spillage occurs in < or = 6% of cases. In most cases, there are no consequences. Gallstones can be lost in the abdominal wall as well as the abdomen during extraction of the gallbladder. The fate of such lost gallstones, which can lead to the formation of an abscess, an abdominal wall mass, or a persistent sinus, has not been studied adequately. Herein we report the case of a persistent sinus of the abdominal wall after an emergent laparoscopic cholecystectomy in an 82-year-old woman with gangrenous cholecystitis and perforation of the friable wall in association with an empyema of the gallbladder. The culture of the obtained pus was positive for Escherichia coli. After a small leak of dirty fluid from the wound of the epigastric port site of 4 months' duration, surgical exploration under local anesthesia revealed that the sinus was caused by spilled gallstones impacting into the abdominal wall between the posterior sheath and left rectus abdominalis muscle. The removal of the stones resulted in complete healing. Long-term complications after laparoscopic cholecystectomy involving the abdominal wall are rare but important possible consequences that could be avoided.

  17. Endometrial stromal cell attachment and matrix homeostasis in abdominal wall endometriomas.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Hiroko; Mogami, Haruta; Bou Nemer, Laurice; Word, Larry; Rogers, David; Miller, Rodney; Word, R Ann

    2018-02-01

    How does progesterone alter matrix remodeling in abdominal wall endometriomas compared with normal endometrium? Progesterone may prevent attachment of endometrial cells to the abdominal wall, but does not ameliorate abnormal stromal cell responses of abdominal wall endometriomas. Menstruation is a tightly orchestrated physiologic event in which steroid hormones and inflammatory cells cooperatively initiate shedding of the endometrium. Abdominal wall endometriomas represent a unique form of endometriosis in which endometrial cells inoculate fascia or dermis at the time of obstetrical or gynecologic surgery. Invasion of endometrium into ectopic sites requires matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) for tissue remodeling but endometrium is not shed externally. Observational study in 14 cases and 19 controls. Tissues and stromal cells isolated from 14 abdominal wall endometriomas were compared with 19 normal cycling endometrium using immunohistochemistry, quantitative PCR, gelatin zymography and cell attachment assays. P values < 0.05 were considered significant and experiments were repeated in at least three different cell preps to provide scientific rigor to the conclusions. The results indicate that MMP2 and MMP9 are not increased by TGFβ1 in endometrioma stromal cells. Although progesterone prevents attachment of endometrioma cells to matrix components of the abdominal wall, it does not ameliorate these abnormal stromal cell responses to TGFβ1. N/A. Endometriomas were collected from women identified pre-operatively. Not all endometriomas were collected. Stromal cells from normal endometrium were from different patients, not women undergoing endometrioma resection. This work provides insight into the mechanisms by which progesterone may prevent abdominal wall endometriomas but, once established, are refractory to progesterone treatment. Tissue acquisition was supported by NIH P01HD087150. Authors have no competing interests. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford

  18. Study of Individual Characteristic Abdominal Wall Thickness Based on Magnetic Anchored Surgical Instruments

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Ding-Hui; Liu, Wen-Yan; Feng, Hai-Bo; Fu, Yi-Li; Huang, Shi; Xiang, Jun-Xi; Lyu, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Magnetic anchored surgical instruments (MASI), relying on magnetic force, can break through the limitations of the single port approach in dexterity. Individual characteristic abdominal wall thickness (ICAWT) deeply influences magnetic force that determines the safety of MASI. The purpose of this study was to research the abdominal wall characteristics in MASI applied environment to find ICAWT, and then construct an artful method to predict ICAWT, resulting in better safety and feasibility for MASI. Methods: For MASI, ICAWT is referred to the thickness of thickest point in the applied environment. We determined ICAWT through finding the thickest point in computed tomography scans. We also investigated the traits of abdominal wall thickness to discover the factor that can be used to predict ICAWT. Results: Abdominal wall at C point in the middle third lumbar vertebra plane (L3) is the thickest during chosen points. Fat layer thickness plays a more important role in abdominal wall thickness than muscle layer thickness. “BMI-ICAWT” curve was obtained based on abdominal wall thickness of C point in L3 plane, and the expression was as follow: f(x) = P1 × x2 + P2 × x + P3, where P1 = 0.03916 (0.01776, 0.06056), P2 = 1.098 (0.03197, 2.164), P3 = −18.52 (−31.64, −5.412), R-square: 0.99. Conclusions: Abdominal wall thickness of C point at L3 could be regarded as ICAWT. BMI could be a reliable predictor of ICAWT. In the light of “BMI-ICAWT” curve, we may conveniently predict ICAWT by BMI, resulting a better safety and feasibility for MASI. PMID:26228215

  19. A preclinical evaluation of polypropylene/polylacticacid hybrid meshes for fascial defect repair using a rat abdominal hernia model

    PubMed Central

    Le Teuff, Isabelle; Huberlant, Stephanie; Carteron, Patrick; Letouzey, Vincent; de Tayrac, Renaud

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Synthetic mesh surgery for both abdominal and urogenital hernia repair is often unsatisfactory in the long-term due to postoperative complications. We hypothesized that a semi-degradable mesh hybrid may provide more appropriate biocompatibility with comparable mechanical properties. The aim was to compare its in vivo biocompatibility with a commercial polypropylene (PP) mesh. Methods 72 rats were randomly allocated to either our new composite mesh (monofilament PP mesh knitted with polylactic-acid-fibers (PLA)) or to a commercially available PP mesh that was used as a control. 15, 90, and 180 days after implantation into the rat abdomen mesh tissue complexes were analysed for erosion, contraction, foreign body reaction, tissue integration and biomechanical properties. Results No differences were seen in regard to clinical parameters including erosion, contraction or infection rates between the two groups. Biomechanical properties including breaking load, stiffness and deformation did not show any significant differences between the different materials at any timepoint. Macrophage staining did not reveal any significant differences between the two groups or between timepoints either. In regard to collagen I there was significantly less collagen I in the PP group compared to the PP/ PLA group at day 180. Collagen III did not show any significant differences at any timepoint between the two groups. Conclusion A PP/PLA hybrid mesh, leaving a low amount of PP after PLA degradation seems to have comparable biomechanical properties like PP at 180 days due to enhanced collagen production without significant differences in erosion, contraction, herniation or infection rates. PMID:28598983

  20. Cancer Survivorship: Defining the Incidence of Incisional Hernia After Resection for Intra-Abdominal Malignancy.

    PubMed

    Baucom, Rebeccah B; Ousley, Jenny; Beveridge, Gloria B; Phillips, Sharon E; Pierce, Richard A; Holzman, Michael D; Sharp, Kenneth W; Nealon, William H; Poulose, Benjamin K

    2016-12-01

    Cancer survivorship focuses largely on improving quality of life. We aimed to determine the rate of ventral incisional hernia (VIH) formation after cancer resection, with implications for survivorship. Patients without prior VIH who underwent abdominal malignancy resections at a tertiary center were followed up to 2 years. Patients with a viewable preoperative computed tomography (CT) scan and CT within 2 years postoperatively were included. Primary outcome was postoperative VIH on CT, reviewed by a panel of surgeons uninvolved with the original operation. Factors associated with VIH were determined using Cox proportional hazards regression. 1847 CTs were reviewed among 491 patients (59 % men), with inter-rater reliability 0.85 for the panel. Mean age was 60 ± 12 years; mean follow-up time 13 ± 8 months. VIH occurred in 41 % and differed across diagnoses: urologic/gynecologic (30 %), colorectal (53 %), and all others (56 %) (p < 0.001). Factors associated with VIH (adjusting for stage, age, adjuvant therapy, smoking, and steroid use) included: incision location [flank (ref), midline, hazard ratio (HR) 6.89 (95 %CI 2.43-19.57); periumbilical, HR 6.24 (95 %CI 1.84-21.22); subcostal, HR 4.55 (95 %CI 1.51-13.70)], cancer type [urologic/gynecologic (ref), other {gastrointestinal, pancreatic, hepatobiliary, retroperitoneal, and others} HR 1.86 (95 %CI 1.26-2.73)], laparoscopic-assisted operation [laparoscopic (ref), HR 2.68 (95 %CI 1.44-4.98)], surgical site infection [HR 1.60 (95 %CI 1.08-2.37)], and body mass index [HR 1.06 (95 %CI 1.03-1.08)]. The rate of VIH after abdominal cancer operations is high. VIH may impact cancer survivorship with pain and need for additional operations. Further studies assessing the impact on QOL and prevention efforts are needed.

  1. Learning curves in abdominal wall reconstruction with components separation: one step closer toward improving outcomes and reducing complications.

    PubMed

    Hultman, Charles Scott; Clayton, John L; Kittinger, Benjamin J; Tong, Winnie M

    2014-01-01

    Learning curves are characterized by incremental improvement of a process, through repetition and reduction in variability, but can be disrupted with the emergence of new techniques and technologies. Abdominal wall reconstruction continues to evolve, with the introduction of components separation in the 1990s and biologic mesh in the 2000s. As such, attempts at innovation may impact the success of reconstructive outcomes and yield a changing set of complications. The purpose of this project was to describe the paradigm shift that has occurred in abdominal wall reconstruction during the past 10 years, focusing on the incorporation of new materials and methods. We reviewed 150 consecutive patients who underwent abdominal wall reconstruction of midline defects with components separation, from 2000 to 2010. Both univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to identify risk factors for complications. Patients were stratified into the following periods: early (2000-2003), middle (2004-2006), and late (2007-2010). From 2000 to 2010, we performed 150 abdominal wall reconstructions with components separation [mean age, 50.2 years; body mass index (BMI), 30.4; size of defect, 357 cm; length of stay, 9.6 days; follow-up, 4.4 years]. Primary fascial closure was performed in 120 patients. Mesh was used in 114 patients in the following locations: overlay (n = 28), inlay (n = 30), underlay (n = 54), and unknown (n = 2). Complications occurred in a bimodal distribution, highest in 2001 (introduction of biologic mesh) and 2008 (conversion from underlay to overlay location). Age, sex, history of smoking, defect size, and length of stay were not associated with incidence of complications. Unadjusted risk factors for seroma (16.8%) were elevated BMI, of previous hernia repairs, use of overlay mesh, and late portion of the learning curve, with logistic regression supporting only late portion of the learning curve [odds ratio (OR), 4.3; 95% confidence interval

  2. An evaluation of abdominal wall closure in general surgical and gynecological residents.

    PubMed

    Williams, Z; Williams, S; Easley, H A; Seita, H M; Hope, W W

    2017-12-01

    To evaluate abdominal wall closure knowledge base and technical skills in surgical and OB/GYN residents. Residents consented to participate in a skills laboratory and quiz. The skills portion involved closure of a 10-cm incision on a simulated abdominal wall. Participants were timed, filmed, and graded using a standardized grading system. Thirty surgical and OB/GYN residents participated. All residents reported closing the abdominal wall continuously, 97% preferred slowly absorbing sutures (28/29), 97% preferred taking 1-cm bites (29/30), and 93% spaced bites 1 cm apart (27/29). However, 77% (10/13) of surgery residents identified 4:1 as the ideal suture to wound length ratio; 47% (7/15) of OB/GYN residents believed it to be 2:1, and another 40% (6/15) indicated 3:1 (p < 0.0001). In the simulation, OB/GYN residents used significantly fewer stitches (p = 0.0028), significantly more distance between bites (p < 0.0001), and significantly larger bite size (p < 0.0001) than surgery residents. When graded, there was no significant difference between programs. Despite some knowledge regarding the principles of abdominal wall closure among surgical and OB/GYN residents, more instruction is needed. We identified some differences in knowledge base and techniques for abdominal wall closure among general surgery and OB/GYN residents, which are likely due to differences in educational curriculums.

  3. Segmental liver incarceration through a recurrent incisional lumbar hernia.

    PubMed

    Salemis, Nikolaos S; Nisotakis, Konstantinos; Gourgiotis, Stavros; Tsohataridis, Efstathios

    2007-08-01

    Lumbar hernia is a rare congenital or acquired defect of the posterior abdominal wall. The acquired type is more common and occurs mainly as an incisional defect after flank surgery. Incarceration or strangulation of hernia contents is uncommon. Segmental liver incarceration through a recurrent incisional lumbar defect was diagnosed in a 58 years old woman by magnetic resonance imaging. The patient underwent an open repair of the complicated hernia. An expanded polytetraflouoroethylene (e-PTFE) mesh was fashioned as a sublay prosthesis. She had an uncomplicated postoperative course. Follow-up examinations revealed no evidence of recurrence. Although lumbar hernia rarely results in incarceration or strangulation, early repair is necessary because of the risks of complications and the increasing difficulty in repairment as it enlarges. Surgical repair is often difficult and challenging.

  4. Incisional hernia prevention and use of mesh. A narrative review.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Granados, Pilar; López-Cano, Manuel; Morales-Conde, Salvador; Muysoms, Filip; García-Alamino, Josep; Pereira-Rodríguez, José Antonio

    2018-02-01

    Incisional hernias are a very common problem, with an estimated incidence around 15-20% of all laparotomies. Evisceration is another important problem, with a lower rate (2.5-3%) but severe consequences for patients. Prevention of both complications is an essential objective of correct patient treatment due to the improved quality of life and cost savings. This narrative review intends to provide an update on incisional hernia and evisceration prevention. We analyze the current criteria for proper abdominal wall closure and the possibility to add prosthetic reinforcement in certain cases requiring it. Parastomal, trocar-site hernias and hernias developed after stoma closure are included in this review. Copyright © 2018 AEC. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. Spontaneous posterior rectus sheath hernia: a case report.

    PubMed

    Ng, Chu Woon; Sandstrom, Anna; Lim, Grace

    2018-04-15

    Hernias of the posterior rectus sheath are very rare abdominal wall hernias with only a handful of cases reported in the literature to date. As an uncommon disease, it is important to recognize and report this case in order to enhance scientific knowledge of this disease. This case report presents a spontaneous posterior rectus sheath herniation in a 79-year-old white man with previous abdominal surgery for appendicitis. His herniation was discovered incidentally during an examination for his chief complaints of lower abdominal pain and diarrhea which were later diagnosed as Salmonella-related gastroenteritis. A computed tomography scan of his abdomen and pelvis showed abdominal wall hernia with loops of small bowel extending into his rectus abdominis muscle. In this case, it was decided to leave the situation alone for now due to no evidence of bowel obstruction and the low risk of this hernia getting strangulated, which otherwise would have warranted urgent surgery. This report adds to the limited stock of available literature on this unusual issue and strengthens the evidence base on the best approach to support informed clinical decision making. The significant clinical implication of such case reports is increased identification rate of rare clinical conditions which otherwise often go unnoticed.

  6. Ectodermal Wnt signaling regulates abdominal myogenesis during ventral body wall development.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lingling; Li, Hanjun; Yu, Jian; Cao, Jingjing; Chen, Huihui; Zhao, Haixia; Zhao, Jianzhi; Yao, Yiyun; Cheng, Huihui; Wang, Lifang; Zhou, Rujiang; Yao, Zhengju; Guo, Xizhi

    2014-03-01

    Defects of the ventral body wall are prevalent birth anomalies marked by deficiencies in body wall closure, hypoplasia of the abdominal musculature and multiple malformations across a gamut of organs. However, the mechanisms underlying ventral body wall defects remain elusive. Here, we investigated the role of Wnt signaling in ventral body wall development by inactivating Wls or β-catenin in murine abdominal ectoderm. The loss of Wls in the ventral epithelium, which blocks the secretion of Wnt proteins, resulted in dysgenesis of ventral musculature and genito-urinary tract during embryonic development. Molecular analyses revealed that the dermis and myogenic differentiation in the underlying mesenchymal progenitor cells was perturbed by the loss of ectodermal Wls. The activity of the Wnt-Pitx2 axis was impaired in the ventral mesenchyme of the mutant body wall, which partially accounted for the defects in ventral musculature formation. In contrast, epithelial depletion of β-catenin or Wnt5a did not resemble the body wall defects in the ectodermal Wls mutant. These findings indicate that ectodermal Wnt signaling instructs the underlying mesodermal specification and abdominal musculature formation during ventral body wall development, adding evidence to the theory that ectoderm-mesenchyme signaling is a potential unifying mechanism for the origin of ventral body wall defects. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Biomechanical and histologic evaluation of two application forms of surgical glue for mesh fixation to the abdominal wall.

    PubMed

    Ortillés, Á; Pascual, G; Peña, E; Rodríguez, M; Pérez-Köhler, B; Mesa-Ciller, C; Calvo, B; Bellón, J M

    2017-11-01

    The use of an adhesive for mesh fixation in hernia repair reduces chronic pain and minimizes tissue damage in the patient. This study was designed to assess the adhesive properties of a medium-chain (n-butyl) cyanoacrylate glue applied as drops or as a spray in a biomechanical and histologic study. Both forms of glue application were compared to the use of simple-loose or continuous-running polypropylene sutures for mesh fixation. Eighteen adult New Zealand White rabbits were used. For mechanical tests in an ex vivo and in vivo study, patches of polypropylene mesh were fixed to an excised fragment of healthy abdominal tissue or used to repair a partial abdominal wall defect in the rabbit respectively. Depending on the fixation method used, four groups of 12 implants each or 10 implants each respectively for the ex vivo and in vivo studies were established: Glue-Drops, Glue-Spray, Suture-Simple and Suture-Continuous. Biomechanical resistance in the ex vivo implants was tested five minutes after mesh fixation. In vivo implants for biomechanical and histologic assessment were collected at 14 days postimplant. In the ex vivo study, the continuous suture implants showed the highest failure sample tension, while the implants fixed with glue showed lower failure sample tension values. However, the simple and continuous suture implants returned the highest stretch values. In the in vivo implants, failure sample tension values were similar among groups while the implants fixed with a continuous running suture had the higher stretch values, and the glue-fixed implants the lower stretch values. All meshes showed good tissue integration within the host tissue regardless of the fixation method used. Our histologic study revealed the generation of a denser, more mature repair tissue when the cyanoacrylate glue was applied as a spray rather than as drops. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Posterior rectus sheath hernia causing intermittent small bowel obstruction.

    PubMed

    Lenobel, Scott; Lenobel, Robert; Yu, Joseph

    2014-09-01

    A posterior rectus sheath hernia is an abdominal wall hernia that is rarely encountered. Owing to its rarity, it can be easily overlooked in the setting of a patient presenting with abdominal pain. We report a case of a posterior rectus sheath hernia that caused intermittent small bowel obstruction. The unusual aspects of this case are that the defect was large, measuring 6 cm in the transverse diameter, and that it contained small bowel within a large portion of the rectus sheath. Because the defect was large and affected nearly the entire posterior rectus sheath, it was difficult to discern on computed tomography until a small bowel obstruction developed. In this case, a limited awareness of this clinical entity contributed to the delay in diagnosis.

  9. Posterior Rectus Sheath Hernia Causing Intermittent Small Bowel Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Lenobel, Scott; Lenobel, Robert; Yu, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    A posterior rectus sheath hernia is an abdominal wall hernia that is rarely encountered. Owing to its rarity, it can be easily overlooked in the setting of a patient presenting with abdominal pain. We report a case of a posterior rectus sheath hernia that caused intermittent small bowel obstruction. The unusual aspects of this case are that the defect was large, measuring 6 cm in the transverse diameter, and that it contained small bowel within a large portion of the rectus sheath. Because the defect was large and affected nearly the entire posterior rectus sheath, it was difficult to discern on computed tomography until a small bowel obstruction developed. In this case, a limited awareness of this clinical entity contributed to the delay in diagnosis. PMID:25426248

  10. Abdominal Hernias, Giant Colon Diverticulum, GIST, Intestinal Pneumatosis, Colon Ischemia, Cold Intussusception, Gallstone Ileus, and Foreign Bodies: Our Experience and Literature Review of Incidental Gastrointestinal MDCT Findings

    PubMed Central

    Gatta, G.; Rella, R.; Donatello, D.; Falco, G.; Grassi, R.

    2017-01-01

    Incidental gastrointestinal findings are commonly detected on MDCT exams performed for various medical indications. This review describes the radiological MDCT spectrum of appearances already present in the past literature and in today's experience of several gastrointestinal acute conditions such as abdominal hernia, giant colon diverticulum, GIST, intestinal pneumatosis, colon ischemia, cold intussusception, gallstone ileus, and foreign bodies which can require medical and surgical intervention or clinical follow-up. The clinical presentation of this illness is frequently nonspecific: abdominal pain, distension, nausea, fever, rectal bleeding, vomiting, constipation, or a palpable mass, depending on the disease. A proper differential diagnosis is essential in the assessment of treatment and in this case MDCT exam plays a central rule. We wish that this article will familiarize the radiologist in the diagnosis of this kind of incidental MDCT findings for better orientation of the therapy. PMID:28638830

  11. Abdominal Hernias, Giant Colon Diverticulum, GIST, Intestinal Pneumatosis, Colon Ischemia, Cold Intussusception, Gallstone Ileus, and Foreign Bodies: Our Experience and Literature Review of Incidental Gastrointestinal MDCT Findings.

    PubMed

    Di Grezia, G; Gatta, G; Rella, R; Donatello, D; Falco, G; Grassi, R; Grassi, R

    2017-01-01

    Incidental gastrointestinal findings are commonly detected on MDCT exams performed for various medical indications. This review describes the radiological MDCT spectrum of appearances already present in the past literature and in today's experience of several gastrointestinal acute conditions such as abdominal hernia, giant colon diverticulum, GIST, intestinal pneumatosis, colon ischemia, cold intussusception, gallstone ileus, and foreign bodies which can require medical and surgical intervention or clinical follow-up. The clinical presentation of this illness is frequently nonspecific: abdominal pain, distension, nausea, fever, rectal bleeding, vomiting, constipation, or a palpable mass, depending on the disease. A proper differential diagnosis is essential in the assessment of treatment and in this case MDCT exam plays a central rule. We wish that this article will familiarize the radiologist in the diagnosis of this kind of incidental MDCT findings for better orientation of the therapy.

  12. Abdominal Wall Endometriosis: Myofibroblasts as a Possible Evidence of Metaplasia: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Mohamed Gamal; Delarue, Eleonore; Abesadze, Elene; Haas, Matthias; Sehouli, Jalid; Chiantera, Vito; Mechsner, Sylvia

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we report about a patient with extra-uterine endometriosis (EM) in the abdominal wall muscle with evident metaplasia based on the abundant alpha smooth muscle actin (ASMA)-expressing myofibroblasts. Laparotomy excision of the abdominal wall EM was done following ultrasonographic evidence of a hypodense swelling in the right rectus abdominis, which was confirmed by MRI. Immunohistochemistry staining for ASMA and collagen I was done, with the results confirming that endometriotic stromal cells expressed both. Anterior abdominal wall endometriosis was suspected because of the patient's history of recurrent EM combined with the cyclic nature of symptoms. MRI is useful in determining the extent of the disease. In case of persisting symptoms even under hormonal treatment, surgical excision is mandatory. The expression of both ASMA and collagen I in and around EM lesions supports the notion of the metaplastic process in the course of disease development. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. A case of splenic rupture within an umbilical hernia with loss of domain.

    PubMed

    Fernando, Emil J; Guerron, Alfredo D; Rosen, Michael J

    2015-04-01

    Massive ventral hernia with loss of abdominal domain is a particularly complex disease. We present a case of a massive umbilical hernia with loss of abdominal domain containing the small bowel, colon, and spleen that presented with spontaneous splenic rupture. The patient was an 82-year-old Caucasian female with multiple comorbidities, on anti-coagulation for cardiac dysrhythmia with a congenital umbilical hernia with loss of abdominal domain which had progressed over multiple years. She presented to an outside hospital with history of a left-sided abdominal pain accompanying fatigue and weakness.A CT scan of the abdomen revealed an umbilical hernia with loss of abdominal domain containing the patient's entire small bowel, colon, pancreas, and the spleen. The spleen had ruptured with associated hemorrhage and hematoma in the hernia sac.Management included a multidisciplinary approach with particular attention to comorbidities and hemodynamic monitoring due to splenic rupture. Given the need for lifetime anticoagulation, a splenectomy was planned along with simultaneous abdominal wall reconstruction. The patient underwent an exploratory laparotomy, splenectomy, bilateral posterior component separation with transversus abdominis release, and a retrorectus/preperitoneal placement of heavy weight polypropylene mesh.During the postoperative period, the patient remained intubated initially due to elevated airway pressures before transferring to the regular nursing floor. The remainder of the patient's hospital stay was complicated by a postoperative ileus requiring nasogastric tube decompression and a DVT and PE necessitating anticoagulation. The ileus eventually resolved and diet was slowly advanced. The patient was discharged on POD17. To our knowledge, this is the first report in the literature describing a splenic rupture that occurred within the hernia sac of a congenital umbilical hernia. This report serves to highlight that even with novel cases of massive and

  14. Gastric necrosis secondary to strangulated giant paraesophic hiatal hernia.

    PubMed

    Díez Ares, José Ángel; Peris Tomás, Nuria; Estellés Vidagany, Nuria; Periáñez Gómez, Dolores

    2016-08-01

    Asymptomatic giant hiatal hernia comprises a relatively common disease, mostly presented in women with 50 years onwards. The therapeutic approach remains controversial in recent years. Under the latest SAGES`revision, all the symptomatic hernias must be repaired, but the symptomatic hiatal hernia definition isn`t even now established. We present the case os a A 67 - year old woman with an asymptomatic hiatal hernia, that is admitted to our hospital owing to toracic and abdominal pain. This pain was related with food intake for 6 months. The patient presents a clear worsening in the last 24 hours, with no other asociated symptomatology. Suspecting an incarcerated hiatal hernia with stomach perforation, the patient is taken to theatre for a laparotomy during the early hours. An atypic gastrectomy of the greater curvature with a gastropexy is performed with fixation to the anterior abdominal wall. The surgery is completed with a feeding jejunostomy. The Manegement of giant paraesophagic hernias, still remains as one of the challenge of the esophageal surgeons.

  15. Abdominal wall Hydatid cyst: A review a literature with a case report.

    PubMed

    Salih, Abdulwahid M; Kakamad, F H; Hammood, Zuhair D; Yasin, Bzhwen; Ahmed, Dilshad M

    2017-01-01

    Hydatid cyst (HC) disease is a serious health problem in endemic areas. It is a parasitic infection that commonly involves liver and lungs while muscular HC is rare. HC of abdominal wall was reported only six times. We reported a 39-year-old male presented with HC of the right loin who was managed surgically with brief literature review. HC should be put in the differential diagnosis of the abdominal wall masses. Its pre-operative diagnosis is important to prevent rupture with subsequent anaphylaxis and recurrence. Surgery is the main modality of treatment. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  16. Umbilical hernia in patients with liver cirrhosis: A surgical challenge

    PubMed Central

    Coelho, Julio C U; Claus, Christiano M P; Campos, Antonio C L; Costa, Marco A R; Blum, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    Umbilical hernia occurs in 20% of the patients with liver cirrhosis complicated with ascites. Due to the enormous intraabdominal pressure secondary to the ascites, umbilical hernia in these patients has a tendency to enlarge rapidly and to complicate. The treatment of umbilical hernia in these patients is a surgical challenge. Ascites control is the mainstay to reduce hernia recurrence and postoperative complications, such as wound infection, evisceration, ascites drainage, and peritonitis. Intermittent paracentesis, temporary peritoneal dialysis catheter or transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt may be necessary to control ascites. Hernia repair is indicated in patients in whom medical treatment is effective in controlling ascites. Patients who have a good perspective to be transplanted within 3-6 mo, herniorrhaphy should be performed during transplantation. Hernia repair with mesh is associated with lower recurrence rate, but with higher surgical site infection when compared to hernia correction with conventional fascial suture. There is no consensus on the best abdominal wall layer in which the mesh should be placed: Onlay, sublay, or underlay. Many studies have demonstrated several advantages of the laparoscopic umbilical herniorrhaphy in cirrhotic patients compared with open surgical treatment. PMID:27462389

  17. Umbilical hernia in patients with liver cirrhosis: A surgical challenge.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Julio C U; Claus, Christiano M P; Campos, Antonio C L; Costa, Marco A R; Blum, Caroline

    2016-07-27

    Umbilical hernia occurs in 20% of the patients with liver cirrhosis complicated with ascites. Due to the enormous intraabdominal pressure secondary to the ascites, umbilical hernia in these patients has a tendency to enlarge rapidly and to complicate. The treatment of umbilical hernia in these patients is a surgical challenge. Ascites control is the mainstay to reduce hernia recurrence and postoperative complications, such as wound infection, evisceration, ascites drainage, and peritonitis. Intermittent paracentesis, temporary peritoneal dialysis catheter or transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt may be necessary to control ascites. Hernia repair is indicated in patients in whom medical treatment is effective in controlling ascites. Patients who have a good perspective to be transplanted within 3-6 mo, herniorrhaphy should be performed during transplantation. Hernia repair with mesh is associated with lower recurrence rate, but with higher surgical site infection when compared to hernia correction with conventional fascial suture. There is no consensus on the best abdominal wall layer in which the mesh should be placed: Onlay, sublay, or underlay. Many studies have demonstrated several advantages of the laparoscopic umbilical herniorrhaphy in cirrhotic patients compared with open surgical treatment.

  18. Dura covered with fibrin glue reduces adhesions in abdominal wall defects.

    PubMed

    Schier, F; Srour, N; Waldschmidt, J

    1991-12-01

    Dura can greatly facilitate the closure of abdominal wall defects. However, a main disadvantage of its use are the adhesions which develop between omentum, bowel and dura and may lead to bowel obstructions. In this study various groups of rats had either the anterior wall replaced by untreated dura or by dura covered with fibrin glue prior to implantation. Adhesions were found in 75% of sham operated rats, 100% after untreated dura implantation and 50% after the implantation of fibrin glue treated dura.

  19. [Abdominal catastrophe--abdominal wall defect associated with gastrointestinal fistula--strategy of therapy].

    PubMed

    Chobola, M; Sobotka, L; Ferko, A; Oberreiter, M; Kaska, M; Motycka, V; Páral, J; Mottl, R

    2010-11-01

    Wound dehiscence complicated by gastrointestinal (GI) fistula to belong ,,abdominal catastrophe". Therapy is prolonged and connected with high morbidity and mortality rate. In the period from October 2006 to July 2009 we performed 12 reconstructive surgical procedures on gastrointestinal tract in patients with abdominal catastrophe. Treatment of 12 consecutive patients (9 men, 3 women) was managed according to a standardize protocol. The protocol consists of treatment of septic complications, optimisation of nutritional state, special wound procedures, diagnosis of gastrointestinal fistulas and GI tract, timing of surgical procedures, reconstruction of GI tract and postoperative care. Reconstructive surgery of GI tract was successful on 11 patients. One patient developed recurrence of early GI fistula. In four patients we let open abdomen to heal per secundam. We observed no deaths after operation. With regard to complex character of therapy of abdominal catastrophe there is a need of multidisciplinary approach. Considering long-lasting and expensive therapy there is logical step to concentrate these patients into special centres which are experienced, equipped and their staff is trained in treatment of such a seriously impaired patients.

  20. Cervical lung hernia

    PubMed Central

    Lightwood, Robin G.; Cleland, W. P.

    1974-01-01

    Lightwood, R. G., and Cleland, W. P. (1974).Thorax, 29, 349-351. Cervical lung hernia. Lung hernias occur in the cervical position in about one third of cases. The remainder appear through the chest wall. Some lung hernias are congenital, but trauma is the most common cause. The indications for surgery depend upon the severity of symptoms. Repair by direct suture can be used for small tears in Sibson's (costovertebral) fascia while larger defects have been closed using prosthetic materials. Four patients with cervical lung hernia are described together with an account of their operations. PMID:4850946

  1. Impact of isotropic constitutive descriptions on the predicted peak wall stress in abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Man, V; Polzer, S; Gasser, T C; Novotny, T; Bursa, J

    2018-03-01

    Biomechanics-based assessment of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA) rupture risk has gained considerable scientific and clinical momentum. However, computation of peak wall stress (PWS) using state-of-the-art finite element models is time demanding. This study investigates which features of the constitutive description of AAA wall are decisive for achieving acceptable stress predictions in it. Influence of five different isotropic constitutive descriptions of AAA wall is tested; models reflect realistic non-linear, artificially stiff non-linear, or artificially stiff pseudo-linear constitutive descriptions of AAA wall. Influence of the AAA wall model is tested on idealized (n=4) and patient-specific (n=16) AAA geometries. Wall stress computations consider a (hypothetical) load-free configuration and include residual stresses homogenizing the stresses across the wall. Wall stress differences amongst the different descriptions were statistically analyzed. When the qualitatively similar non-linear response of the AAA wall with low initial stiffness and subsequent strain stiffening was taken into consideration, wall stress (and PWS) predictions did not change significantly. Keeping this non-linear feature when using an artificially stiff wall can save up to 30% of the computational time, without significant change in PWS. In contrast, a stiff pseudo-linear elastic model may underestimate the PWS and is not reliable for AAA wall stress computations. Copyright © 2018 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Rectus sheath block: successful use in the chronic pain management of pediatric abdominal wall pain.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Adam V; Lauder, Gillian R

    2007-12-01

    Seven pediatric patients (aged 11-16 years) with chronic abdominal wall pain are presented who gained significant relief from a rectus sheath block (RSB). We describe the case histories and review the relevant literature for this technique. The etiology of the abdominal wall pain was considered to be abdominal cutaneous nerve entrapment, iatrogenic peripheral nerve injury, myofascial pain syndrome or was unknown. All patients showed significant initial improvement in pain and quality of life. Three patients required only the RSB to enable them to be pain-free and return to normal schooling and physical activities. Two children received complete relief for more than 1 year. In the majority of cases, the procedure was carried out under general anesthesia as a daycase procedure. Local anesthetic and steroids were used. This is the first report of the successful use of this technique in the chronic pain management setting in children.

  3. Clinical evaluation of extraperitoneal colostomy without damaging the muscle layer of the abdominal wall.

    PubMed

    Dong, L-R; Zhu, Y-M; Xu, Q; Cao, C-X; Zhang, B-Z

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated whether extraperitoneal colostomy without damaging the muscle layer of the abdominal wall is an improved surgical procedure compared with conventional sigmoid colostomy in patients undergoing abdominoperineal resection. Patients with rectal cancer undergoing abdominoperineal resection were selected and randomly divided into two groups: the study group received extraperitoneal colostomy without damaging the muscle layer of the abdominal wall and the control group received conventional colostomy. Clinical data from both groups were analysed. A total of 128 patients were included: 66 received extraperitoneal colostomy without damaging the muscle layer of the abdominal wall and 62 received conventional colostomy. Significant differences between the two groups were found in relation to colostomy operating time, defaecation sensation, bowel control and overall stoma-related complications. Duration of postoperative hospital stay was also significantly different between the study groups. Extraperitoneal colostomy without damaging the muscle layer of the abdominal wall was found to be an improved procedure compared with conventional sigmoid colostomy in abdominoperineal resection, and may reduce colostomy-related complications, shorten operating time and postoperative hospital stay, and potentially improve patients' quality of life.

  4. Flood Syndrome: Spontaneous Umbilical Hernia Rupture Leaking Ascitic Fluid—A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Emilie T; Tudtud-Hans, Leah A

    2017-01-01

    Introduction We report a rare case of Flood syndrome, which is a spontaneous rupture of an umbilical hernia. Case Presentation A 42-year-old man with decompensated hepatitis C and alcoholic cirrhosis complicated by ascites and esophageal varices presented with 1 day of ascitic fluid drainage after rupture of a preexisting umbilical hernia associated with diffuse abdominal pain and tenderness. A pigtail drain was placed in the right upper abdominal quadrant to decrease fluid drainage from the abdominal wall defect, allowing it to heal naturally. Discussion The spontaneous rupture of an umbilical hernia in our patient highlights a rare complication with high mortality rates and stresses the challenge of treatment that falls in the area between medical and surgical management. PMID:28678688

  5. Flood Syndrome: Spontaneous Umbilical Hernia Rupture Leaking Ascitic Fluid-A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Emilie T; Tudtud-Hans, Leah A

    2017-01-01

    We report a rare case of Flood syndrome, which is a spontaneous rupture of an umbilical hernia. A 42-year-old man with decompensated hepatitis C and alcoholic cirrhosis complicated by ascites and esophageal varices presented with 1 day of ascitic fluid drainage after rupture of a preexisting umbilical hernia associated with diffuse abdominal pain and tenderness. A pigtail drain was placed in the right upper abdominal quadrant to decrease fluid drainage from the abdominal wall defect, allowing it to heal naturally. The spontaneous rupture of an umbilical hernia in our patient highlights a rare complication with high mortality rates and stresses the challenge of treatment that falls in the area between medical and surgical management.

  6. Biological findings from the PheWAS catalog: focus on connective tissue-related disorders (pelvic floor dysfunction, abdominal hernia, varicose veins and hemorrhoids).

    PubMed

    Salnikova, Lyubov E; Khadzhieva, Maryam B; Kolobkov, Dmitry S

    2016-07-01

    Pelvic floor dysfunction, specifically genital prolapse (GP) and stress urinary inconsistency (SUI) presumably co-occur with other connective tissue disorders such as hernia, hemorrhoids, and varicose veins. Observations on non-random coexistence of these disorders have never been summarized in a meta-analysis. The performed meta-analysis demonstrated that varicose veins and hernia are associated with GP. Disease connections on the molecular level may be partially based on shared genetic susceptibility. A unique opportunity to estimate shared genetic susceptibility to disorders is provided by a PheWAS (phenome-wide association study) designed to utilize GWAS data concurrently to many phenotypes. We searched the PheWAS Catalog, which includes the results of the PheWAS study with P value < 0.05, for genes associated with GP, SUI, abdominal hernia, varicose veins and hemorrhoids. We found pronounced signals for the associations of the SLC2A9 gene with SUI (P = 6.0e-05) and the MYH9 gene with varicose veins of lower extremity (P = 0.0001) and hemorrhoids (P = 0.0007). The comparison of the PheWAS Catalog and the NHGRI Catalog data revealed enrichment of genes associated with bone mineral density in GP and with activated partial thromboplastin time in varicose veins of lower extremity. In cross-phenotype associations, genes responsible for peripheral nerve functions seem to predominate. This study not only established novel biologically plausible associations that may warrant further studies but also exemplified an effective use of the PheWAS Catalog data.

  7. The Relationship Between Surface Curvature and Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Wall Stress.

    PubMed

    de Galarreta, Sergio Ruiz; Cazón, Aitor; Antón, Raúl; Finol, Ender A

    2017-08-01

    The maximum diameter (MD) criterion is the most important factor when predicting risk of rupture of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs). An elevated wall stress has also been linked to a high risk of aneurysm rupture, yet is an uncommon clinical practice to compute AAA wall stress. The purpose of this study is to assess whether other characteristics of the AAA geometry are statistically correlated with wall stress. Using in-house segmentation and meshing algorithms, 30 patient-specific AAA models were generated for finite element analysis (FEA). These models were subsequently used to estimate wall stress and maximum diameter and to evaluate the spatial distributions of wall thickness, cross-sectional diameter, mean curvature, and Gaussian curvature. Data analysis consisted of statistical correlations of the aforementioned geometry metrics with wall stress for the 30 AAA inner and outer wall surfaces. In addition, a linear regression analysis was performed with all the AAA wall surfaces to quantify the relationship of the geometric indices with wall stress. These analyses indicated that while all the geometry metrics have statistically significant correlations with wall stress, the local mean curvature (LMC) exhibits the highest average Pearson's correlation coefficient for both inner and outer wall surfaces. The linear regression analysis revealed coefficients of determination for the outer and inner wall surfaces of 0.712 and 0.516, respectively, with LMC having the largest effect on the linear regression equation with wall stress. This work underscores the importance of evaluating AAA mean wall curvature as a potential surrogate for wall stress.

  8. Catheter enterostomy and patch repair of the abdominal wall for gastroschisis with intestinal atresia: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Koichi; Nakamura, Tetsuro; Azuma, Takashi; Yoshida, Tatsuyuki; Yamada, Hiroto; Hayashi, Hiroaki; Masahata, Kazunori

    2009-01-01

    A male infant, weighing 2177 g, was born with the entire intestine protruding through a defect on the right side of the navel. Intestinal atresia, approximately 70 cm from the Treitz ligament, was also confirmed. Primary anastomosis and abdominal wall repair were impossible because of the intestinal dilation and thick peel, as well as the small abdominal cavity. Thus, we initially performed catheter enterostomy with a 14-F balloon catheter and patch repair of the abdominal wall, to enable the baby to be fed. Secondary anastomosis and abdominal wall repair was safely performed when the baby was 106 days old. The combination of catheter enterostomy and patch repair of the abdominal wall does not require dissection of the intestine and it can be safely performed in low-birth-weight babies. It also enables feeding and weight gain, and the overlying skin prevents contamination of the artificial sheet. We recommend this combination for neonates with both gastroschisis and intestinal atresia.

  9. Made in Italy for hernia: the Italian history of groin hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Negro, Paolo; Gossetti, Francesco; Ceci, Francesca; D'Amore, Linda

    2016-01-01

    The history of groin hernia surgery is as long as the history of surgery. For many centuries doctors, anatomists and surgeons have been devoted to this pathology, afflicting the mankind throughout its evolution. Since ancient times the Italian contribution has been very important with many representative personalities. Authors, investigators and pioneers are really well represented. Every period (the classic period, the Middle Age, the Renaissance and the post-Renaissance) opened new perspectives for a better understanding. During the 18th century, more information about groin anatomy, mainly due to Antonio Scarpa, prepared the Bassini revolution. Edoardo Bassini developed the first modern anatomically based hernia repair. This procedure spread worldwide becoming the most performed surgical technique. After World War II synthetic meshes were introduced and a new era has begun for hernia repair, once again with the support of Italian surgeons, first of all Ermanno Trabucco. But Italian contribution extends also to educational, with the first national school for abdominal wall surgery starting in Rome, and to Italian participation and support in international scientific societies. Authors hereby wish to resume this long history highlighting the "made in Italy" for groin hernia surgery. Bassini, Groin hernia, History, Prosthetic repair.

  10. Financial implications of ventral hernia repair: a hospital cost analysis.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Drew; Davenport, Daniel L; Korosec, Ryan L; Roth, J Scott

    2013-01-01

    Complicated ventral hernias are often referred to tertiary care centers. Hospital costs associated with these repairs include direct costs (mesh materials, supplies, and nonsurgeon labor costs) and indirect costs (facility fees, equipment depreciation, and unallocated labor). Operative supplies represent a significant component of direct costs, especially in an era of proprietary synthetic meshes and biologic grafts. We aim to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of complex abdominal wall hernia repair at a tertiary care referral facility. Cost data on all consecutive open ventral hernia repairs (CPT codes 49560, 49561, 49565, and 49566) performed between 1 July 2008 and 31 May 2011 were analyzed. Cases were analyzed based upon hospital status (inpatient vs. outpatient) and whether the hernia repair was a primary or secondary procedure. We examined median net revenue, direct costs, contribution margin, indirect costs, and net profit/loss. Among primary hernia repairs, cost data were further analyzed based upon mesh utilization (no mesh, synthetic, or biologic). Four-hundred and fifteen patients underwent ventral hernia repair (353 inpatients and 62 outpatients); 173 inpatients underwent ventral hernia repair as the primary procedure; 180 inpatients underwent hernia repair as a secondary procedure. Median net revenue ($17,310 vs. 10,360, p < 0.001) and net losses (3,430 vs. 1,700, p < 0.025) were significantly greater for those who underwent hernia repair as a secondary procedure. Among inpatients undergoing ventral hernia repair as the primary procedure, 46 were repaired without mesh; 79 were repaired with synthetic mesh and 48 with biologic mesh. Median direct costs for cases performed without mesh were $5,432; median direct costs for those using synthetic and biologic mesh were $7,590 and 16,970, respectively (p < .01). Median net losses for repairs without mesh were $500. Median net profit of $60 was observed for synthetic mesh-based repairs. The median

  11. A case report on management of synergistic gangrene following an incisional abdominal hernia repair in an immunocompromised obese patient

    PubMed Central

    Merali, N.; Almeida, R.A.R.; Hussain, A.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction We present a case on conservative management of salvaging the mesh in an immunocompromised morbidly obese patient, who developed a synergistic gangrene infection following a primary open mesh repair of an incisional hernia. Presentation of case Our patient presented with a surgical wound infection, comorbidities were Chronic Lymphoblastic Leukemia (CLL), Body Mass Index (BMI) of 50, hypertension and diet controlled type-2 diabetes. In surgery, wide necrotic wound debridement, early and repetitive wound drainages with the use of a large pore polypropylene mesh and a detailed surgical follow up was required. High dose intravenous broad-spectrum antibiotic treatment and Negative Pressure Wound Therapy (NPWT) was administrated in combination with adopting a multidisciplinary approach was key to our success. Discussion Stoppa Re et al. complied a series of 360 ventral hernia mesh repairs reporting an infection rate of 12% that were managed conservatively. However, our selective case is unique within current literature, being the first to illustrate mesh salvage in a morbid obese patient with CLL. Recent modifications in mesh morphology, such as lower density, wide pores, and lighter weight has led to considerable improvements regarding infection avoidance. Conclusion This case has demonstrated how a planned multidisciplinary action can produce prosperous results in a severely obese immunocompromised patient with an SSI, following an incisional hernia repair. PMID:26322822

  12. A case report on management of synergistic gangrene following an incisional abdominal hernia repair in an immunocompromised obese patient.

    PubMed

    Merali, N; Almeida, R A R; Hussain, A

    2015-01-01

    We present a case on conservative management of salvaging the mesh in an immunocompromised morbidly obese patient, who developed a synergistic gangrene infection following a primary open mesh repair of an incisional hernia. Our patient presented with a surgical wound infection, comorbidities were Chronic Lymphoblastic Leukemia (CLL), Body Mass Index (BMI) of 50, hypertension and diet controlled type-2 diabetes. In surgery, wide necrotic wound debridement, early and repetitive wound drainages with the use of a large pore polypropylene mesh and a detailed surgical follow up was required. High dose intravenous broad-spectrum antibiotic treatment and Negative Pressure Wound Therapy (NPWT) was administrated in combination with adopting a multidisciplinary approach was key to our success. Stoppa Re et al. complied a series of 360 ventral hernia mesh repairs reporting an infection rate of 12% that were managed conservatively. However, our selective case is unique within current literature, being the first to illustrate mesh salvage in a morbid obese patient with CLL. Recent modifications in mesh morphology, such as lower density, wide pores, and lighter weight has led to considerable improvements regarding infection avoidance. This case has demonstrated how a planned multidisciplinary action can produce prosperous results in a severely obese immunocompromised patient with an SSI, following an incisional hernia repair. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  13. Abdominal wall phlebitis due to Prevotella bivia following renal transplantation in a patient with an occluded inferior vena cava.

    PubMed

    Janssen, S; van Donselaar-van der Pant, K A M I; van der Weerd, N C; Develter, W; Bemelman, F J; Grobusch, M P; Idu, M M; Ten Berge, I J M

    2013-02-01

    Pre-existing occlusion of the inferior vena cava may complicate renal transplantation. Suppurative abdominal wall phlebitis following renal transplantation was diagnosed in a patient with pre-existing thrombosis of the inferior vena cava of unknown cause. The phlebitis developed in the subcutaneous collateral veins of the abdominal wall contra-laterally to the renal transplant. Cultures from abdominal wall micro-abscesses yielded Prevotella bivia as the causative agent. This complication has not been described before in the context of renal transplantation. The pathogenesis and management of this serious complication are discussed in this paper.

  14. Desmoid Fibromatosis of the Abdominal Wall: Surgical Resection and Reconstruction with Biological Matrix Egis®

    PubMed Central

    Tropea, Saveria; Mocellin, Simone; Stramare, Roberto; Bonavina, Maria Giuseppina; Rossi, Carlo Riccardo; Rastrelli, Marco

    2017-01-01

    Desmoid tumor is a rare monoclonal fibroblast proliferation that is regarded as benign. The clinical management of desmoid tumors is very complex and requires a multidisciplinary approach because of the unpredictable disease course. For those cases localized in the anterior abdominal wall, symptomatic and unresponsive to medical treatment, radical resection and reconstruction with a prosthetic device are indicated. We present here a case of desmoid fibromatosis of the left anterolateral abdominal wall with a marked increase of the mass that required a large excision followed by reconstruction with biological matrix. The fact that it can be incorporated in patient tissue without a fibrotic response and that it can resist future infections, together with a very competetive price, made the new collagen matrix Egis® our first choice. PMID:28413398

  15. Clostridial Gas Gangrene of the Abdominal Wall After Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy: A Case Report and Review.

    PubMed

    Harmsen, Annelieke M K; van Tol, Erik; Giannakopoulos, Georgios F; de Brauw, L Maurits

    2016-08-01

    Clostridial gas gangrene is a rare, yet severe, complication after laparoscopic cholecystectomy. We present a case report of a 48-year-old man with obesity, coronary artery disease, and diabetes, who developed clostridial gas gangrene of the abdominal wall after an uncomplicated laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Although the diagnosis was missed initially, successful radical surgical debridement was performed and the patient survived. Pathogenesis, symptoms, prognostic factors, and the best treatment are discussed.

  16. Necrotizing Fasciitis of the Abdominal Wall in a Premature Infant: A Case Study.

    PubMed

    Narvey, Michael; Byrne, Paul; Fraser, Debbie

    2017-01-01

    We present a first report of necrotizing fasciitis of the abdominal wall in a 23-day-of-age, former 32-week-gestation premature infant. She was successfully treated with antibiotics without the need for initial debridement. After reviewing the etiology of necrotizing fasciitis, we discuss the unique aspects of this case, including the noninvasive approach to initial treatment, which we consider significantly contributed to her survival.

  17. Complicated acute appendicitis presenting as a rapidly progressive soft tissue infection of the abdominal wall: a case report.

    PubMed

    Beerle, Corinne; Gelpke, Hans; Breitenstein, Stefan; Staerkle, Ralph F

    2016-12-01

    We report a case of a rare complication of acute appendicitis with perforation through the abdominal wall. The case points out that an intraabdominal origin should be considered in patients presenting with rapidly spreading soft tissue infections of the trunk. A 58-year-old European woman presented to our hospital with a 1-week history of severe abdominal pain accompanied by rapidly spreading erythema and emphysema of the lower abdomen. On admission, the patient was in septic shock with leukocytosis and elevation of C-reactive protein. Among other diagnoses, necrotizing fasciitis was suspected. Computed tomography showed a large soft tissue infection with air-fluid levels spreading through the lower abdominal wall. During the operation, we found a perforated appendicitis breaking through the fascia and causing a rapidly progressive soft tissue infection of the abdominal wall. Appendicitis was the origin of the soft tissue infection. The abdominal wall was only secondarily involved. Even though perforated appendicitis as an etiology of a rapidly progressive soft tissue infection of the abdominal wall is very rare, it should be considered in the differential diagnosis of abdominal wall cellulitis. The distinction between rapidly spreading subcutaneous infection with abscess formation and early onset of necrotizing fasciitis is often difficult and can be confirmed only by surgical intervention.

  18. Outcomes of Minimally Invasive Inguinal Hernia Repair at the Time of Robotic Radical Prostatectomy.

    PubMed

    Soto-Palou, Francois G; Sánchez-Ortiz, Ricardo F

    2017-06-01

    Abdominal straining associated with voiding dysfunction or constipation has traditionally been associated with the development of abdominal wall hernias. Thus, classic general surgery dictum recommends that any coexistent bladder outlet obstruction should be addressed by the urologist before patients undergo surgical repair of a hernia. While organ-confined prostate cancer is usually not associated with the development of lower urinary tract symptoms, a modest proportion of patients treated with radical prostatectomy may have coexisting benign prostatic hyperplasia with elevated symptom scores and hernias may be incidentally detected at the time of surgery. Furthermore, dissection of the space of Retzius during retropubic or minimally invasive prostatectomy may result exposure of abdominal wall defects which may have been present, but asymptomatic if plugged with preperitoneal fat. Herein we examine the literature regarding the incidence of postoperative inguinal hernias after prostatectomy, review potential risk factors which could aid in preoperative patient identification, and discuss the published experience regarding concurrent hernia repair at the time of open or minimally invasive radical prostatectomy.

  19. Evaluation of a new composite prosthesis for the repair of abdominal wall defects.

    PubMed

    Losi, Paola; Munaò, Antonella; Spiller, Dario; Briganti, Enrica; Martinelli, Ilaria; Scoccianti, Marco; Soldani, Giorgio

    2007-10-01

    The degree of integration of biomaterials used in the repair of abdominal wall defects seems to depend upon the structure of the prosthesis. The present investigation evaluates the behaviour in terms of adhesion formation and integration of a new composite prosthesis that could be employed in this clinical application. Full-thickness abdominal wall defects (7 x 5 cm) were created in 16 anaesthetized New Zealand white rabbits and the prosthesis were placed in direct contact with the visceral peritoneum during the experiment. The defects were repaired with a composite prosthesis or pure polypropylene mesh to establish two study groups (n = 8 each). The composite device was constituted by a polypropylene mesh physically attached to a poly(ether)urethane-polydimethylsiloxane laminar sheet. Animals were sacrificed 7, 14, 21 and 30 days after implant and prosthesis/surrounding tissue specimens subjected to light and electron microscopy. Firm adhesions were detected in the polypropylene implants, while they were not present in the composite implants. The excellent behaviour of the composite prosthesis shown in this study warrants further investigation on its use for the repair of abdominal wall defects when a prosthetic device needs to be placed in contact with the intestinal loops.

  20. [Plug-technique for umbilical hernia repair in the adult].

    PubMed

    Brancato, G; Privitera, A; Gandolfo, L; Donati, M; Caglià, P

    2002-02-01

    Umbilical hernia represents 6% of all abdominal wall hernias in the adult. Surgical repair should always be carried out due to possible occurrence of complications. Aim of this paper is to evaluate the efficacy of the plug-technique. From October 1995 to April 2000, the authors performed 21 operations for acquired umbilical hernia with a defect smaller than 4 cm. Local anesthesia was used and a light intravenous sedation added in particularly anxious patients. The repair was achieved by insertion of a polypropylene dart plug sutured to the margins of the hernial defect. All patients were up and about straightaway and were discharged within 24 hours of surgery. Postoperative pain was mild and required hospital analgesia in only 19% of cases and domiciliary analgesia in 24%. During a follow-up ranging from 6 to 60 months (mean 30), only one recurrence has been recorded. This tension-free technique allows immediate rehabilitation, with few complications and a low recurrence rate.

  1. Parastomal hernia – current knowledge and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Styliński, Roman; Rudzki, Sławomir

    2018-01-01

    Intestinal stoma creation is one of the most common surgical procedures. The most common long-term complication following stoma creation is parastomal hernia, which according to some authors is practically unavoidable. Statistical differences of its occurrence are mainly due to patient observation time and evaluation criteria. Consequently, primary prevention methods such as placement of prosthetic mesh and newly developed minimally invasive methods of stoma creation are used. It seems that in the light of evidence-based medicine, the best way to treat parastomal hernia is the one that the surgeon undertaking therapy is the most experienced in and is suited to the individuality of each patient, his condition and comorbidities. As a general rule, reinforcing the abdominal wall with a prosthetic mesh is the treatment of choice, with a low rate of complications and relapses over a long period of time. The current trend is to use lightweight, large pore meshes. PMID:29643952

  2. Validation of newly developed physical laparoscopy simulator in transabdominal preperitoneal (TAPP) inguinal hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Nishihara, Yuichi; Isobe, Yoh; Kitagawa, Yuko

    2017-12-01

    A realistic simulator for transabdominal preperitoneal (TAPP) inguinal hernia repair would enhance surgeons' training experience before they enter the operating theater. The purpose of this study was to create a novel physical simulator for TAPP inguinal hernia repair and obtain surgeons' opinions regarding its efficacy. Our novel TAPP inguinal hernia repair simulator consists of a physical laparoscopy simulator and a handmade organ replica model. The physical laparoscopy simulator was created by three-dimensional (3D) printing technology, and it represents the trunk of the human body and the bendability of the abdominal wall under pneumoperitoneal pressure. The organ replica model was manually created by assembling materials. The TAPP inguinal hernia repair simulator allows for the performance of all procedures required in TAPP inguinal hernia repair. Fifteen general surgeons performed TAPP inguinal hernia repair using our simulator. Their opinions were scored on a 5-point Likert scale. All participants strongly agreed that the 3D-printed physical simulator and organ replica model were highly useful for TAPP inguinal hernia repair training (median, 5 points) and TAPP inguinal hernia repair education (median, 5 points). They felt that the simulator would be effective for TAPP inguinal hernia repair training before entering the operating theater. All surgeons considered that this simulator should be introduced in the residency curriculum. We successfully created a physical simulator for TAPP inguinal hernia repair training using 3D printing technology and a handmade organ replica model created with inexpensive, readily accessible materials. Preoperative TAPP inguinal hernia repair training using this simulator and organ replica model may be of benefit in the training of all surgeons. All general surgeons involved in the present study felt that this simulator and organ replica model should be used in their residency curriculum.

  3. Sports hernias: a systematic literature review.

    PubMed

    Caudill, P; Nyland, J; Smith, C; Yerasimides, J; Lach, J

    2008-12-01

    This review summarises the existing knowledge about pathogenesis, differential diagnosis, conservative treatment, surgery and post-surgical rehabilitation of sports hernias. Sports hernias occur more often in men, usually during athletic activities that involve cutting, pivoting, kicking and sharp turns, such as those that occur during soccer, ice hockey or football. Sports hernias generally present an insidious onset, but with focused questioning a specific inciting incident may be identified. The likely causative factor is posterior inguinal wall weakening from excessive or high repetition shear forces applied through the pelvic attachments of poorly balanced hip adductor and abdominal muscle activation. There is currently no consensus as to what specifically constitutes this diagnosis. As it can be difficult to make a definitive diagnosis based on conventional physical examination, other methods, such as MRI and diagnostic ultrasonography are often used, primarily to exclude other conditions. Surgery seems to be more effective than conservative treatment, and laparoscopic techniques generally enable a quicker recovery time than open repair. However, in addition to better descriptions of surgical anatomy and procedures and conservative and post-surgical rehabilitation, well-designed research studies are needed, which include more detailed serial patient outcome measurements in addition to basing success solely on return to sports activity timing. Only with this information will we better understand sports hernia pathogenesis, verify superior surgical approaches, develop evidence-based screening and prevention strategies, and more effectively direct both conservative and post-surgical rehabilitation.

  4. Abdominal wall abscess secondary to spontaneous rupture of pyogenic liver abscess.

    PubMed

    Zizzo, Maurizio; Zaghi, Claudia; Manenti, Antonio; Luppi, Davide; Ugoletti, Lara; Bonilauri, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Pyogenic liver abscess is a rare cause of hospitalization, related to a mortality rate ranging between 15% and 19%. Treatment of choice is represented by image-guided percutaneous drainage in combination with antibiotic therapy but, in some selected cases, surgical treatment is necessary. In extremely rare cases, spontaneous rupture of liver abscess may occur, free in the peritoneal cavity or in neighboring organs, an event which is generally considered a surgical emergency. A 95-years-old woman was hospitalized with fever, upper abdominal pain, mild dyspepsia and massive swelling of the anterior abdominal wall. Computed tomography revealed an oval mass located in the abdominal wall of 12cm×14cm×7cm, in continuity with an abscess of the left hepatic lobe. Because Proteus mirabilis was detected in both the liver abscess and the abdominal wall abscess, the patient was diagnosed with a ruptured pyogenic liver abscess. After spontaneous drainage to the exterior of the hepato-parietal abscess, she was successfully treated with antibiotics alone. Pyogenic liver abscess is a serious and life-threatening illness. Abscess rupture might occur. Many authors consider this complication a surgical emergency, but the site of abscess rupture changes the clinical history of the disease: in case of free rupture into the peritoneum, emergency surgery is mandatory, while a rupture localized in neighboring tissues or organs can be successfully treated by a combination of systemic antibiotics and fine needle aspiration and/or percutaneous drainage of the abscess. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  5. Parastomal Hernia Containing Stomach

    PubMed Central

    Barber-Millet, Sebastian; Pous, Salvador; Navarro, Vicente; Iserte, Jose; García-Granero, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    Parastomal hernia is the most common late stomal complication. Its appearance is usually asymptomatic. We report a parastomal hernia containing stomach. A 69-year-old patient with end colostomy arrived at the emergency room presenting with abdominal pain associated with vomiting and functioning stoma. She had a distended and painful abdomen without signs of peritoneal irritation and pericolostomic eventration in the left iliac fossa. X-ray visualized gastric fornix dilatation without dilated intestine bowels, and computed tomography showed parastomal incarcerated gastric herniation. Gastrografin (Bayer Australia Limited, New South Wales, Australia) was administered, showing no passage to duodenum. She underwent surgery, with stomal transposition and placement of onlay polypropylene mesh around the new stoma. Parastomal hernias are a frequent late complication of colostomy. Only four gastric parastomal hernia cases are reported in the literature. Three of these four cases required surgery. The placement of prosthetic mesh in the moment of stoma elaboration should be considered as a potential preventive measure. PMID:25058773

  6. Progressive preoperative pneumoperitoneum (PPP) as an adjunct for surgery of hernias with loss of domain.

    PubMed

    Oprea, V; Matei, O; Gheorghescu, D; Leuca, D; Buia, F; Rosianu, M; Dinca, M

    2014-01-01

    forced repair of a giant abdominal wall defect end with unsatisfactory results despite development of prosthetics materials. The enlargement of abdominal wall dimensions could be realized altogether other methods with the aid of pneumo-peritoneum. The aim of the study is to evaluate early results of the method used for patients with giant incisional hernias. between june 1998 - june 2013, 17 patients (4 males) with giant abdominal wall defects (incisional and inguinal hernias) were prepaired for radical surgery with pneumoperitoneum. Average age was 64.35 years. We reevaluated the standard constants of the pulmonary function,blood gases, and intra-vesical pressure in 3 moments: before the first gas insuflation, 24 hours before surgery and in the 7th daypost operatively. the method was free of accidents or incidents, no mortality was recorded. The respiratory function was significantly increased and also the intra-abdominal pressure. our results suggest that the method of progressive pneumoperitoneum is safe, costless of choice for creating a clear compatibility between the wall and abdominal content inpatients with giant abdominal wall defects. Also ensures a longterm and stable improvement of the respiratory function in all its components. Celsius.

  7. Hernioscopy: a useful technique for the evaluation of incarcerated hernias that retract under anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Morris-Stiff, G; Hassn, A

    2008-04-01

    The diagnosis of strangulation within an incarcerated abdominal-wall hernia is not always possible preoperatively. In approximately 1% of cases of incarcerated hernias, a strangulated viscus will reduce spontaneously following administration of muscle relaxants during induction of anaesthesia, and the surgeon has to perform an exploratory laparotomy. The aim of this study was to report the use of hernioscopy to inspect intra-abdominal contents and thus prevent unnecessary laparotomy. The case notes of all patients undergoing hernioscopy for incarcerated hernias that reduced spontaneously during induction of anaesthesia, skin incision, or prior to evaluation of sac contents were reviewed. Hernioscopy is performed following insertion of a 10-mm port through the hernia sac. Standard insufflation with carbon dioxide is performed, maintaining an intra-abdominal pressure of 10-12 mmHg following which the laparoscope is inserted and a diagnostic examination performed. Following completion of hernioscopy, the laparoscope is withdrawn, the pneumoperitoneum released, and the hernia repaired in a conventional manner using a tension-free technique. Five patients underwent hernioscopy for the evaluation of incarcerated hernias that had reduced spontaneously prior to inspection of sac contents. There were four men with indirect inguinal hernias and one woman with an incarcerated femoral hernia. The hernioscopy of the four men was unremarkable and they went home the following day. The female patient had blood within the peritoneal cavity arising from the upper abdomen and underwent laparotomy and splenectomy. She made an unremarkable recovery and was discharged on postoperative day 7. Hernioscopy is a simple and useful technique that can be performed by surgeons familiar with laparoscopic procedures such as appendicectomy and cholecystectomy.

  8. Biomechanical analyses of mesh fixation in TAPP and TEP hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Schwab, R; Schumacher, O; Junge, K; Binnebösel, M; Klinge, U; Becker, H P; Schumpelick, V

    2008-03-01

    Reliable laparoscopic fixation of meshes prior to their fibrous incorporation is intended to minimize recurrences following transabdominal preperitoneal hernia repair (TAPP) and totally extraperitoneal repair (TEP) repair of inguinal hernias. However, suture-, tack- and staple-based fixation systems are associated with postoperative chronic inguinal pain. Initial fixation with fibrin sealant offers an atraumatic alternative, but there is little data demonstrating directly whether fibrin-based mesh adhesion provides adequate biomechanical stability for repair of inguinal hernia by TAPP and TEP. Using a newly developed, standardized simulation model for abdominal wall hernias, sublay repairs were performed with six different types of commercially available hernia mesh. The biomechanical stability achieved, and the protection afforded by the mesh-hernia overlap, were compared for three different techniques: nonfixation, point-by-point suture fixation, and fibrin sealant fixation. Mesh dislocation from the repaired hernia defect was consistently seen with nonfixation. This was reliably prevented with all six mesh types when fixed using either sutures or fibrin sealant. The highest stress resistance across the whole abdominal wall was found following superficial fixation with fibrin sealant across the mesh types. There was a highly statistically significant improvement in fixation stability with fibrin sealant versus fixation using eight single sutures (p = 0.008), as assessed by the range of achievable peak pressure stress up to 200 mmHg. To ensure long-term freedom from recurrence, intraoperative mesh-hernia overlap must be retained. This can be achieved with fibrin sealant up to the incorporation of the mesh - without trauma and with biomechanical stability.

  9. Incarceration of a pedunculated uterine fibroid in an umbilical hernia.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mi Ju; Cha, Hyun-Hwa; Seong, Won Joon

    2017-05-01

    Uterine fibroids are common benign tumors that may cause an umbilical hernia in patients with increased intra-abdominal pressure due to pregnancy, obesity, ascites, and intra-abdominal tumors. However, the simultaneous occurrence of uterine fibroids and umbilical hernias, or fibroids and an associated umbilical hernia, during pregnancy has rarely been reported. Here, we present the case of a fibroid presenting as an incarcerated umbilical hernia in a menopausal patient.

  10. Incarceration of a pedunculated uterine fibroid in an umbilical hernia

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mi Ju; Seong, Won Joon

    2017-01-01

    Uterine fibroids are common benign tumors that may cause an umbilical hernia in patients with increased intra-abdominal pressure due to pregnancy, obesity, ascites, and intra-abdominal tumors. However, the simultaneous occurrence of uterine fibroids and umbilical hernias, or fibroids and an associated umbilical hernia, during pregnancy has rarely been reported. Here, we present the case of a fibroid presenting as an incarcerated umbilical hernia in a menopausal patient. PMID:28534020

  11. The continuing challenge of parastomal hernia: failure of a novel polypropylene mesh repair.

    PubMed Central

    Morris-Stiff, G.; Hughes, L. E.

    1998-01-01

    In an attempt to reduce the high recurrence rate after repair of parastomal hernia, a technique was devised in which non-absorbable mesh was used to provide a permanent closure of the gap between the emerging bowel and abdominal wall. Seven patients were treated during the period 1990-1992. Five-year follow-up has given disappointing results, with recurrent hernia in 29% of cases and serious complications, including obstruction and dense adhesions to the intra-abdominal mesh, in 57% and a mesh-related abscess in 15% of cases. This study highlights a dual problem--failure of a carefully sutured mesh to maintain an occlusive position, and complications of the mesh itself. The poor results obtained with this technique together with the disappointing results with other methods described in the literature confirms that parastomal hernia presents a continuing challenge. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:9682640

  12. Risk Assessment of Abdominal Wall Thickness Measured on Pre-Operative Computerized Tomography for Incisional Surgical Site Infection after Abdominal Surgery.

    PubMed

    Tongyoo, Assanee; Chatthamrak, Putipan; Sriussadaporn, Ekkapak; Limpavitayaporn, Palin; Mingmalairak, Chatchai

    2015-07-01

    The surgical site infection (SSI) is a common complication of abdominal operation. It relates to increased hospital stay, increased healthcare cost, and decreased patient's quality of life. Obesity, usually defined by BMI, is known as one of the risks of SSI. However, the thickness of subcutaneous layers of abdominal wall might be an important local factor affecting the rate of SSI after the abdominal operations. The objective of this study is to assess the importance of the abdominal wall thickness on incisional SSI rate. The subjects of the present study were patients who had undergone major abdominal operations at Thammasat University Hospital between June 2013 and May 2014, and had been investigated with CT scans before their operations. The demographic data and clinical information of these patients were recorded. The thickness ofsubcutaneous fatty tissue from skin down to the most superficial layer of abdominal wall muscle at the surgical site was measured on CT images. The wound infectious complication was reviewed and categorized as superficial and deep incisional SSIfollowing the definition from Centersfor Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) guidelines. The significance ofeach potentialfactors on SSI rates was determined separately with student t-test for quantitative data and χ2-test for categorical data. Then all factors, which had p < 0.10, were included into the multivariate logistic regression analysis and were analyzed with significance at p < 0.05. One hundred and thirty-nine patients were included in this study. They all underwent major abdominal surgery and had had pre-operative CTscans. Post-operative SSI was 25.2% (35/139), superficial and deep types in 27 and 8 patients, respectively. The comparison of abdominal wall thickness between patients with and without infection was significantly different (20.0 ± 8.4 mm and 16.0 ± 7.2 mm, respectively). When the thickness at 20 mm was used as the cut-off value, 43 of 139 patients had abdominal wall

  13. A simple, effective and clinically applicable method to compute abdominal aortic aneurysm wall stress.

    PubMed

    Joldes, Grand Roman; Miller, Karol; Wittek, Adam; Doyle, Barry

    2016-05-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a permanent and irreversible dilation of the lower region of the aorta. It is a symptomless condition that if left untreated can expand to the point of rupture. Mechanically-speaking, rupture of an artery occurs when the local wall stress exceeds the local wall strength. It is therefore desirable to be able to non-invasively estimate the AAA wall stress for a given patient, quickly and reliably. In this paper we present an entirely new approach to computing the wall tension (i.e. the stress resultant equal to the integral of the stresses tangent to the wall over the wall thickness) within an AAA that relies on trivial linear elastic finite element computations, which can be performed instantaneously in the clinical environment on the simplest computing hardware. As an input to our calculations we only use information readily available in the clinic: the shape of the aneurysm in-vivo, as seen on a computed tomography (CT) scan, and blood pressure. We demonstrate that tension fields computed with the proposed approach agree well with those obtained using very sophisticated, state-of-the-art non-linear inverse procedures. Using magnetic resonance (MR) images of the same patient, we can approximately measure the local wall thickness and calculate the local wall stress. What is truly exciting about this simple approach is that one does not need any information on material parameters; this supports the development and use of patient-specific modelling (PSM), where uncertainty in material data is recognised as a key limitation. The methods demonstrated in this paper are applicable to other areas of biomechanics where the loads and loaded geometry of the system are known. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Intensity modulated radiation-therapy for preoperative posterior abdominal wall irradiation of retroperitoneal liposarcomas

    SciTech Connect

    Bossi, Alberto; De Wever, Ivo; Van Limbergen, Erik

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Preoperative external-beam radiation therapy (preop RT) in the management of Retroperitoneal Liposarcomas (RPLS) typically involves the delivery of radiation to the entire tumor mass: yet this may not be necessary. The purpose of this study is to evaluate a new strategy of preop RT for RPLS in which the target volume is limited to the contact area between the tumoral mass and the posterior abdominal wall. Methods and Materials: Between June 2000 and Jan 2005, 18 patients with the diagnosis of RPLS have been treated following a pilot protocol of pre-op RT, 50 Gy in 25 fractions of 2more » Gy/day. The Clinical Target Volume (CTV) has been limited to the posterior abdominal wall, region at higher risk for local relapse. A Three-Dimensional conformal (3D-CRT) and an Intensity Modulated (IMRT) plan were generated and compared; toxicity was reported following the National Cancer Institute (NCI) Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v3.0. Results: All patients completed the planned treatment and the acute toxicity was tolerable: 2 patients experienced Grade 3 and 1 Grade 2 anorexia while 2 patients developed Grade 2 nausea. IMRT allows a better sparing of the ipsilateral and the contralateral kidney. All tumors were successfully resected without major complications. At a median follow-up of 27 months 2 patients developed a local relapse and 1 lung metastasis. Conclusions: Our strategy of preop RT is feasible and well tolerated: the rate of resectability is not compromised by limiting the preop CTV to the posterior abdominal wall and a better critical-structures sparing is obtained with IMRT.« less

  15. The effect of abdominal wall morphology on ultrasonic pulse distortion. Part II. Simulations.

    PubMed

    Mast, T D; Hinkelman, L M; Orr, M J; Waag, R C

    1998-12-01

    Wavefront propagation through the abdominal wall was simulated using a finite-difference time-domain implementation of the linearized wave propagation equations for a lossless, inhomogeneous, two-dimensional fluid as well as a simplified straight-ray model for a two-dimensional absorbing medium. Scanned images of six human abdominal wall cross sections provided the data for the propagation media in the simulations. The images were mapped into regions of fat, muscle, and connective tissue, each of which was assigned uniform sound speed, density, and absorption values. Propagation was simulated through each whole specimen as well as through each fat layer and muscle layer individually. Wavefronts computed by the finite-difference method contained arrival time, energy level, and wave shape distortion similar to that in measurements. Straight-ray simulations produced arrival time fluctuations similar to measurements but produced much smaller energy level fluctuations. These simulations confirm that both fat and muscle produce significant wavefront distortion and that distortion produced by fat sections differs from that produced by muscle sections. Spatial correlation of distortion with tissue composition suggests that most major arrival time fluctuations are caused by propagation through large-scale inhomogeneities such as fatty regions within muscle layers, while most amplitude and waveform variations are the result of scattering from smaller inhomogeneities such as septa within the subcutaneous fat. Additional finite-difference simulations performed using uniform-layer models of the abdominal wall indicate that wavefront distortion is primarily caused by tissue structures and inhomogeneities rather than by refraction at layer interfaces or by variations in layer thicknesses.

  16. Wall stress reduction in abdominal aortic aneurysms as a result of polymeric endoaortic paving.

    PubMed

    Ashton, John H; Ayyalasomayajula, Avinash; Simon, Bruce R; Vande Geest, Jonathan P

    2011-06-01

    Polymeric endoaortic paving (PEAP) may improve endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) since it has the potential to treat patients with complex AAA geometries while reducing the incidence of migration and endoleak. Polycaprolactone (PCL)/polyurethane (PU) blends are proposed as PEAP materials due to their range of mechanical properties, thermoformability, and resistance to biodegradation. In this study, the reduction in AAA wall stress that can be achieved using PEAP was estimated and compared to that resulting from stent-grafts. This was accomplished by mechanically modeling the anisotropic response of PCL/PU blends and implementing these results into finite element model (FEM) simulations. We found that at the maximum diameter of the AAA, the 50/50 and 10/90 PCL/PU blends reduced wall stress by 99 and 98%, respectively, while a stent-graft reduced wall stress by 99%. Our results also show that wall stress reduction increases with increasing PEAP thickness and PCL content in the blend ratio. These results indicate that PEAP can reduce AAA wall stress as effectively as a stent-graft. As such, we propose that PEAP may provide an improved treatment alternative for AAA, since many of the limitations of stent-grafts have the potential to be solved using this approach.

  17. Combined in vivo and ex vivo analysis of mesh mechanics in a porcine hernia model.

    PubMed

    Kahan, Lindsey G; Lake, Spencer P; McAllister, Jared M; Tan, Wen Hui; Yu, Jennifer; Thompson, Dominic; Brunt, L Michael; Blatnik, Jeffrey A

    2018-02-01

    Hernia meshes exhibit variability in mechanical properties, and their mechanical match to tissue has not been comprehensively studied. We used an innovative imaging model of in vivo strain tracking and ex vivo mechanical analysis to assess effects of mesh properties on repaired abdominal walls in a porcine model. We hypothesized that meshes with dissimilar mechanical properties compared to native tissue would alter abdominal wall mechanics more than better-matched meshes. Seven mini-pigs underwent ventral hernia creation and subsequent open repair with one of two heavyweight polypropylene meshes. Following mesh implantation with attached radio-opaque beads, fluoroscopic images were taken at insufflation pressures from 5 to 30 mmHg on postoperative days 0, 7, and 28. At 28 days, animals were euthanized and ex vivo mechanical testing performed on full-thickness samples across repaired abdominal walls. Testing was conducted on 13 mini-pig controls, and on meshes separately. Stiffness and anisotropy (the ratio of stiffness in the transverse versus craniocaudal directions) were assessed. 3D reconstructions of repaired abdominal walls showed stretch patterns. As pressure increased, both meshes expanded, with no differences between groups. Over time, meshes contracted 17.65% (Mesh A) and 0.12% (Mesh B; p = 0.06). Mesh mechanics showed that Mesh A deviated from anisotropic native tissue more than Mesh B. Compared to native tissue, Mesh A was stiffer both transversely and craniocaudally. Explanted repaired abdominal walls of both treatment groups were stiffer than native tissue. Repaired tissue became less anisotropic over time, as mesh properties prevailed over native abdominal wall properties. This technique assessed 3D stretch at the mesh level in vivo in a porcine model. While the abdominal wall expanded, mesh-ingrown areas contracted, potentially indicating stresses at mesh edges. Ex vivo mechanics demonstrate that repaired tissue adopts mesh properties, suggesting

  18. Laparoscopic extraperitoneal inguinal hernia repair. A safe approach based on the understanding of rectus sheath anatomy.

    PubMed

    Katkhouda, N; Campos, G M; Mavor, E; Trussler, A; Khalil, M; Stoppa, R

    1999-12-01

    We have devised a reproducible approach to the preperitoneal space for laparoscopic repair of inguinal hernias that is based on an understanding of the abdominal wall anatomy. Laparoscopic totally extraperitoneal herniorrhaphy was performed on 99 hernias in 90 patients at the Los Angeles County-University of Southern California Medical Center, using a standardized approach to the preperitoneal space. Operative times, morbidity, and recurrence rates were recorded prospectively. The median operative time was 37 min (range, 28-60) for unilateral hernias and 46 min (range, 35-73) for bilateral hernias. There were no conversions to open repair, and there was only one conversion to a laparoscopic transabdominal approach. Complications were limited to urinary retention in two patients, pneumoscrotum in one patient, and postoperative pain requiring a large dose of analgesics in one patient. All patients were discharged within 23 h. There were no recurrences or neuralgias on follow-up at 2 years. A standardized approach to the preperitoneal space based on a thorough understanding of the abdominal wall anatomy is essential to a satisfactory outcome in hernia repair.

  19. A new approach to umbilical hernia repair: the circular suture technique for defects less than 2 cm.

    PubMed

    Yıldız, Ihsan; Koca, Yavuz Savas

    2017-01-01

    Umbilical hernia, unlike other abdominal wall hernias, occurs when the umbilical ring opens and expands. Its' symptoms and complications show similarities with other hernias. Although there are various repair techniques, there is not a standard technique yet. This paper investigated the outcomes of double layer circular suture technique as a new approach in the repair of umbilical hernia. A total number of 282 patients comprised of 102 males and 180 females with an age range of 18-89 whose umbilical hernias were repaired between 2002 and 2013, retrospectively studied in two groups group 1 (circular suture technique) and group 2 (open primary suture). The subjects were investigated with regards to age, sex, body mass index (BMI), accompanying disease, anesthesia method, surgical complications, hospital stay, total costs, mortality and recurrence. The study participants were 282 patients with an age average of 49, 09 ± 16, 62 including 182 patients in group 1 (male/female ratio 76/106) and 100 patients in group 2 (26/74). There was a significant difference between the groups in terms of time and recurrence. During the follow-up period, 9 patients in group 1 (4.94%) and 16 patients in group 2 (16%) had a recurrence. This result was statistically significant (p=0.014) CONCLUSION: We believe that the double layer circular suture technique is practical, inexpensive and effective in the repair of umbilical hernia defects, which are smaller than 2 cm diameter. Key words: Hernia, Repair, Umbilical hernia.

  20. Perforator-Guided Drug Injection in the Treatment of Abdominal Wall Pain.

    PubMed

    Weum, Sven; de Weerd, Louis

    2016-07-01

    Pain from the abdominal wall can be caused by nerve entrapment, a condition called abdominal cutaneous nerve entrapment syndrome (ACNES). As an alternative to surgery, ACNES may be treated with injection of local anesthetics, corticosteroids, or botulinum toxin at the point of maximal pain. The point of maximal pain was marked on the abdominal skin. Using color Doppler ultrasound, the corresponding exit point of perforating blood vessels through the anterior fascia of the rectus abdominis muscle was identified. Ultrasound-guided injection of botulinum toxin in close proximity to the perforator's exit point was performed below and above the muscle fascia. The technique was used from 2008 to 2014 on 15 patients in 46 sessions with a total of 128 injections without complications. The injection technique provided safe and accurate administration of the drug in proximity to the affected cutaneous nerves. The effect of botulinum toxin on ACNES is beyond the scope of this article. Perforator-guided injection enables precise drug administration at the location of nerve entrapment in ACNES in contrast to blind injections. © 2015 American Academy of Pain Medicine. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Whole abdominal wall segmentation using augmented active shape models (AASM) with multi-atlas label fusion and level set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhoubing; Baucom, Rebeccah B.; Abramson, Richard G.; Poulose, Benjamin K.; Landman, Bennett A.

    2016-03-01

    The abdominal wall is an important structure differentiating subcutaneous and visceral compartments and intimately involved with maintaining abdominal structure. Segmentation of the whole abdominal wall on routinely acquired computed tomography (CT) scans remains challenging due to variations and complexities of the wall and surrounding tissues. In this study, we propose a slice-wise augmented active shape model (AASM) approach to robustly segment both the outer and inner surfaces of the abdominal wall. Multi-atlas label fusion (MALF) and level set (LS) techniques are integrated into the traditional ASM framework. The AASM approach globally optimizes the landmark updates in the presence of complicated underlying local anatomical contexts. The proposed approach was validated on 184 axial slices of 20 CT scans. The Hausdorff distance against the manual segmentation was significantly reduced using proposed approach compared to that using ASM, MALF, and LS individually. Our segmentation of the whole abdominal wall enables the subcutaneous and visceral fat measurement, with high correlation to the measurement derived from manual segmentation. This study presents the first generic algorithm that combines ASM, MALF, and LS, and demonstrates practical application for automatically capturing visceral and subcutaneous fat volumes.

  2. The risk of midgut volvulus in patients with abdominal wall defects: A multi-institutional study.

    PubMed

    Fawley, Jason A; Abdelhafeez, Abdelhafeez H; Schultz, Jessica A; Ertl, Allison; Cassidy, Laura D; Peter, Shawn St; Wagner, Amy J

    2017-01-01

    The management of malrotation in patients with congenital abdominal wall defects has varied among surgeons. We were interested in investigating the risk of midgut volvulus in patients with gastroschisis and omphalocele to help determine if these patients may benefit from undergoing a Ladd procedure. A retrospective chart review was performed for all patients managed at three institutions born between 1/1/2000 and 12/31/2008 with a diagnosis of gastroschisis or omphalocele. Patient charts were reviewed through 12/31/2012 for occurrence of midgut volvulus or need for second laparotomy. Of the 414 patients identified with abdominal wall defects, 299 patients (72%) had gastroschisis, and 115 patients (28%) had omphalocele. The mean gestational age at birth was 36.1±2.3weeks, and the mean birth weight was 2.57±0.7kg. There were a total of 8 (1.9%) cases of midgut volvulus: 3 (1.0%) patients with gastroschisis compared to 5 patients (4.4%) with omphalocele (p=0.04). Patients with omphalocele have a greater risk of developing midgut volvulus, and a Ladd procedure should be considered during definitive repair to mitigate these risks. III; retrospective comparative study. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. [Case report: Rapidly growing abdominal wall giant desmoid tumour during pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Palacios-Zertuche, Jorge Tadeo; Cardona-Huerta, Servando; Juárez-García, María Luisa; Valdés-Flores, Everardo; Muñoz-Maldonado, Gerardo Enrique

    Desmoid tumours are one of the rarest tumours worldwide, with an estimated yearly incidence of 2-4 new cases per million people. They are soft tissue monoclonal neoplasms that originate from mesenchymal stem cells. It seems that the hormonal and immunological changes occurring during pregnancy may play a role in the severity and course of the disease. The case is presented on 28-year-old female in her fifth week of gestation, in whom an abdominal wall tumour was found attached to left adnexa and uterus while performing a prenatal ultrasound. The patient was followed up under clinical and ultrasonographic surveillance. When she presented with abnormal uterine activity at 38.2 weeks of gestation, she was admitted and obstetrics decided to perform a caesarean section. Tumour biopsy was taken during the procedure. Histopathology reported a desmoid fibromatosis. A contrast enhanced abdominal computed tomography scan was performed, showing a tumour of 26×20.5×18cm, with well-defined borders in contact with the uterus, left adnexa, bladder and abdominal wall, with no evidence of infiltration to adjacent structures. A laparotomy, with tumour resection, hysterectomy and left salpingo-oophorectomy, components separation techniques, polypropylene mesh insertion, and drainage was performed. The final histopathology report was desmoid fibromatosis. There is no evidence of recurrence after 6 months follow-up. Desmoid tumours are locally aggressive and surgical resection with clear margins is the basis for the treatment of this disease, using radiotherapy, chemotherapy and hormone therapy as an adjunct in the treatment. Copyright © 2016 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  4. Aortic Wall Inflammation Predicts Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Expansion, Rupture, and Need for Surgical Repair.

    PubMed

    2017-08-29

    Ultrasmall superparamagnetic particles of iron oxide (USPIO) detect cellular inflammation on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm, we assessed whether USPIO-enhanced MRI can predict aneurysm growth rates and clinical outcomes. In a prospective multicenter open-label cohort study, 342 patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm (diameter ≥40 mm) were classified by the presence of USPIO enhancement and were monitored with serial ultrasound and clinical follow-up for ≥2 years. The primary end point was the composite of aneurysm rupture or repair. Participants (85% male, 73.1±7.2 years) had a baseline aneurysm diameter of 49.6±7.7 mm, and USPIO enhancement was identified in 146 (42.7%) participants, absent in 191 (55.8%), and indeterminant in 5 (1.5%). During follow-up (1005±280 days), 17 (5.0%) abdominal aortic aneurysm ruptures, 126 (36.8%) abdominal aortic aneurysm repairs, and 48 (14.0%) deaths occurred. Compared with those without uptake, patients with USPIO enhancement have increased rates of aneurysm expansion (3.1±2.5 versus 2.5±2.4 mm/year, P =0.0424), although this was not independent of current smoking habit ( P =0.1993). Patients with USPIO enhancement had higher rates of aneurysm rupture or repair (47.3% versus 35.6%; 95% confidence intervals, 1.1-22.2; P =0.0308). This finding was similar for each component of rupture (6.8% versus 3.7%, P =0.1857) or repair (41.8% versus 32.5%, P =0.0782). USPIO enhancement was associated with reduced event-free survival for aneurysm rupture or repair ( P =0.0275), all-cause mortality ( P =0.0635), and aneurysm-related mortality ( P =0.0590). Baseline abdominal aortic aneurysm diameter ( P <0.0001) and current smoking habit ( P =0.0446) also predicted the primary outcome, and the addition of USPIO enhancement to the multivariate model did not improve event prediction (c-statistic, 0.7935-0.7936). USPIO-enhanced MRI is a novel approach to the identification of aortic wall

  5. Aortic Wall Inflammation Predicts Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Expansion, Rupture, and Need for Surgical Repair

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    identification of aortic wall cellular inflammation in patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms and predicts the rate of aneurysm growth and clinical outcome. However, it does not provide independent prediction of aneurysm expansion or clinical outcomes in a model incorporating known clinical risk factors. Clinical Trial Registration: URL: http://www.isrctn.com. Unique identifier: ISRCTN76413758. PMID:28720724

  6. Laparoscopic hernia surgery: an overview.

    PubMed

    Krähenbühl, L; Schäfer, M; Feodorovici, M A; Büchler, M W

    1998-01-01

    Despite the fact that laparoscopic hernia repair was already described in 1979, its value has still not been well defined. The standard treatment for uncomplicated primary hernia repair in Europe is an open anterior approach (i.e. Shouldice), and 'tension-free' mesh plug repair in the USA. At present, posterior mesh insertion is used to repair so-called complicated hernias with a complete myopectineal defect, and recurrent and bilateral hernias. Laparoscopic hernia repair (transabdominally and extraperitoneally) mimics this posterior mesh insertion and is therefore mostly used for treating complicated hernias. Whether or not a transabdominal or extraperitoneal approach is used depends on the type and size of the hernia, the risk to the patient, previous abdominal operations and the surgeon's experience. However, the extraperitoneal approach is now recommended because of its lower complication rate compared to the transabdominal approach. Compared to open surgical procedures the laparoscopic approach shows significant advantages in terms of less postoperative pain, decreased time off work and decreased overall costs. The disadvantages are increased operating time as well as difficulty in performing the procedure itself. A recent large randomized series has for the first time been able to demonstrate the advantages of the laparoscopic approach in a long-term follow-up. However, further studies are needed to define the exact place of laparoscopic hernia repair in the treatment of groin hernias.

  7. Treatment of umbilical hernia and recti muscles diastasis without a periumbilical incision.

    PubMed

    Kulhanek, J; Mestak, O

    2013-08-01

    Postpartum rectus diastasis eventually combined with umbilical hernia is a condition that is frequently treated by plastic surgeons and general surgeons. Standard treatment of this condition is abdominoplasty with a periumbilical incision, which often results in an umbilical incision or an inverted-T scar. Limited incision abdominoplasty differs from traditional abdominoplasty by disconnecting the umbilical stalk from the abdominal wall during flap dissection, thus allowing the resection of excess skin above and under the umbilicus without causing periumbilical scarring. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of women undergoing a limited scar abdominoplasty without a periumbilical incision for the treatment of a separation of the recti muscles and/or an umbilical hernia. We recorded the postoperative complications and patient satisfaction with the results of the treatment. We operated on 50 patients from 2002 to 2010. We followed the patients for 2-8 years. The most common complication, as with other abdominoplasty procedures, was minor dehiscention in the middle part of the wound, which occurred in 16 % (n = 8) of the patients. All of these complications were treated conservatively. No recurrence of diastasis or umbilical hernia was observed. Extended miniabdominoplasty with a low suprapubic incision and umbilical caudalization for treating the diastasis of the abdominal rectus muscles and/or an umbilical hernia is an excellent method that results in a small, hidden scar. This method is especially beneficial for young, slim women with an abdominal wall deformity after pregnancy.

  8. [Long-term follow-up results after open small umbilical hernia repairs].

    PubMed

    Malý, O; Sotona, O

    2014-04-01

    Adult umbilical hernia is a common surgical condition in the fifth and sixth decade of life. Despite the high frequency of umbilical hernia repairs, disappointingly high recurrence rates after simple suture repairs are reported, amounting to 54%. In addition, it is reported that with the rising frequency of recurrences, the size of the hernial sac and gate gradually increases. Therefore we decided to find out the incidence of recurrences after operative repair of an umbilical hernia at our department. Patient data for this retrospective study focusing on the period between 2006 and 2010 were obtained from the electronic hospital database. Patients with umbilical hernia and the abdominal wall defect up to 3 cm who underwent primary elective procedure were included in the study. Patients with incisional hernias were excluded. All patients were contacted at least 3 years after operation to confirm the accuracy of data. A total of 127 patients were included in this study. In the abovementioned period, no mesh was used during primary surgery in any of the patients. Recurrence occurred in a total of 13.4% of patients. Approximately 40% of patients with the first recurrence were re-operated at our department, 30% of patients were re-operated in other hospitals and the rest have not sought medical attention in respect of the recurrence. Patients with recurrence did not differ from the others as regards age, body mass index or surgical site infection development. Due to the high recurrence rates after operative sutures of the umbilical hernias there is a need to thoroughly consider the potential risk factors such as the body mass index and the abdominal wall defect size. Therefore, it is recommended to use the mesh more widely during primary surgery, especially in obese patients with BMI over 30 and the wall defect size exceeding 3 cm. The question remains whether to use the mesh in all overweight patients and with wall defect smaller than 3 cm.

  9. Feasibility of wall stress analysis of abdominal aortic aneurysms using three-dimensional ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Kok, Annette M; Nguyen, V Lai; Speelman, Lambert; Brands, Peter J; Schurink, Geert-Willem H; van de Vosse, Frans N; Lopata, Richard G P

    2015-05-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) are local dilations that can lead to a fatal hemorrhage when ruptured. Wall stress analysis of AAAs is a novel tool that has proven high potential to improve risk stratification. Currently, wall stress analysis of AAAs is based on computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging; however, three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound (US) has great advantages over CT and magnetic resonance imaging in terms of costs, speed, and lack of radiation. In this study, the feasibility of 3D US as input for wall stress analysis is investigated. Second, 3D US-based wall stress analysis was compared with CT-based results. The 3D US and CT data were acquired in 12 patients (diameter, 35-90 mm). US data were segmented manually and compared with automatically acquired CT geometries by calculating the similarity index and Hausdorff distance. Wall stresses were simulated at P = 140 mm Hg and compared between both modalities. The similarity index of US vs CT was 0.75 to 0.91 (n = 12), with a median Hausdorff distance ranging from 4.8 to 13.9 mm, with the higher values found at the proximal and distal sides of the AAA. Wall stresses were in accordance with literature, and a good agreement was found between US- and CT-based median stresses and interquartile stresses, which was confirmed by Bland-Altman and regression analysis (n = 8). Wall stresses based on US were typically higher (+23%), caused by geometric irregularities due to the registration of several 3D volumes and manual segmentation. In future work, an automated US registration and segmentation approach is the essential point of improvement before pursuing large-scale patient studies. This study is a first step toward US-based wall stress analysis, which would be the modality of choice to monitor wall stress development over time because no ionizing radiation and contrast material are involved. Copyright © 2015 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Tension-free repair during extensive radical surgery for cecal cancer with abdominal wall invasion and inguinal lymph node metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Kaiwu; Chen, Zhihui; Song, Xinming

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of cecal cancer with invasion of the abdominal wall and right inguinal lymph node metastasis. This patient had undergone an appendectomy 2 years previously. He underwent extensive radical right hemicolectomy with anastomosis and tension-free repair of the damaged right lower abdominal wall. The surgery progressed successfully, and the vital signs of the patient were stable (approximately 200 mL blood loss). Postoperative diagnosis revealed moderately to poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma of the cecum with invasion of the abdominal wall and metastasis of the inguinal lymph nodes (pT4bN2bM1, IV4a). The patient has remained well post-surgery. PMID:24855366

  11. Functional electrical stimulation to the abdominal wall muscles synchronized with the expiratory flow does not induce muscle fatigue.

    PubMed

    Okuno, Yukako; Takahashi, Ryoichi; Sewa, Yoko; Ohse, Hirotaka; Imura, Shigeyuki; Tomita, Kazuhide

    2017-03-01

    [Purpose] Continuous electrical stimulation of abdominal wall muscles is known to induce mild muscle fatigue. However, it is not clear whether this is also true for functional electrical stimulation delivered only during the expiratory phase of breathing. This study aimed to examine whether or not intermittent electrical stimulation delivered to abdominal wall muscles induces muscle fatigue. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were nine healthy adults. Abdominal electrical stimulation was applied for 1.5 seconds from the start of expiration and then turned off during inspiration. The electrodes were attached to both sides of the abdomen at the lower margin of the 12th rib. Abdominal electrical stimulation was delivered for 15 minutes with the subject in a seated position. Expiratory flow was measured during stimulus. Trunk flexor torque and electromyography activity were measured to evaluate abdominal muscle fatigue. [Results] The mean stimulation on/off ratio was 1:2.3. The declining rate of abdominal muscle torque was 61.1 ± 19.1% before stimulus and 56.5 ± 20.9% after stimulus, not significantly different. The declining rate of mean power frequency was 47.8 ± 11.7% before stimulus and 47.9 ± 10.2% after stimulus, not significantly different. [Conclusion] It was found that intermittent electrical stimulation to abdominal muscles synchronized with the expiratory would not induce muscle fatigue.

  12. Histopathological analysis of cellular localization of cathepsins in abdominal aortic aneurysm wall.

    PubMed

    Lohoefer, Fabian; Reeps, Christian; Lipp, Christina; Rudelius, Martina; Zimmermann, Alexander; Ockert, Stefan; Eckstein, Hans-Henning; Pelisek, Jaroslav

    2012-08-01

    An important feature of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is the destruction of vessel wall, especially elastin and collagen. Besides matrix metalloproteinases, cathepsins are the most potent elastolytic enzymes. The expression of cathepsins with known elastolytic and collagenolytic activities in the individual cells within AAA has not yet been determined. The vessel wall of 32 AAA patients and 10 organ donors was analysed by immunohistochemistry for expression of cathepsins B, D, K, L and S, and cystatin C in all cells localized within AAA. Luminal endothelial cells (ECs) of AAA were positive for cathepsin D and partially for cathepsins B, K and S. Endothelial cells of the neovessels and smooth muscle cells in the media were positive for all cathepsins tested, especially for cathepsin B. In the inflammatory infiltrate all cathepsins were expressed in the following pattern: B > D = S > K = L. Macrophages showed the highest staining intensity for all cathepsins. Furthermore, weak overall expression of cystatin C was observed in all the cells localized in the AAA with the exception of the ECs. There is markedly increased expression of the various cathepsins within the AAA wall compared to healthy aorta. Our data are broadly consistent with a role for cathepsins in AAA; and demonstrate expression of cathepsins D, B and S in phagocytic cells in the inflammatory infiltrate; and also may reveal a role for cathepsin B in lymphocytes. © 2012 The Authors. International Journal of Experimental Pathology © 2012 International Journal of Experimental Pathology.

  13. [Autodermal plastics and transposition of musculus rectus abdominus for giant postoperative hernias].

    PubMed

    Ianov, V N

    2000-01-01

    For reduction of postoperative hernia relapses rate the technique of the autodermal plastics and transposition of musculus rectus abdominalis (MRA) was developed. This technique consists of two-sided transection of the lateral abdominal muscles (oblique and transverse) on the pararectal line, transposition of MRA together with their sheaths medially by autodermal continuous lacing to complete adaptation of the edges. Closing of the lateral muscle-aponeurotic defects was carried out with use of the double autodermal grafts which were prepared by Yanov's technique. This technique is indicated for giant postoperative hernias and pronounced diastase of the MRA in people with well developed abdominal muscles. This technique was used in 11 patients without complications after surgery. Long-term results are available for all the patients. The relapses were absent. The technique, developed by us, provides first of all restoration of physiological function of the MRA, and also closing of the abdominal wall muscle-aponeurotic defect.

  14. Laparoscopic repair of parastomal hernia

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xuefei; He, Kai; Hua, Rong; Shen, Qiwei

    2017-01-01

    Parastomal hernia is one of the most common long-term complications after abdominal ostomy. Surgical treatment for parastomal hernia is the only cure but a fairly difficult field because of the problems of infection, effects, complications and recurrence. Laparoscopic repair operations are good choices for Parastomal hernia because of their mini-invasive nature and confirmed effects. There are several major laparoscopic procedures for parastomal hernioplasty. The indications, technical details and complications of them will be introduced and discussed in this article. PMID:28251124

  15. Obturator hernia: A diagnostic challenge.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Sanjeev R; Punamiya, Aditya R; Naniwadekar, Ramchandra G; Janugade, Hemant B; Chotai, Tejas D; Vimal Singh, T; Natchair, Arafath

    2013-01-01

    Obturator hernia is an extremely rare type of hernia with relatively high mortality and morbidity. Its early diagnosis is challenging since the signs and symptoms are non specific. Here in we present a case of 70 years old women who presented with complaints of intermittent colicky abdominal pain and vomiting. Plain radiograph of abdomen showed acute dilatation of stomach. Ultrasonography showed small bowel obstruction at the mid ileal level with evidence of coiled loops of ileum in pelvis. On exploration, Right Obstructed Obturator hernia was found. The obstructed Intestine was reduced and resected and the obturator foramen was closed with simple sutures. Postoperative period was uneventful. Obturator hernia is a rare pelvic hernia and poses a diagnostic challenge. Obturator hernia occurs when there is protrusion of intra-abdominal contents through the obturator foramen in the pelvis. The signs and symptoms are non specific and generally the diagnosis is made during exploration for the intestinal obstruction, one of the four cardinal features. Others are pain on the medial aspect of thigh called as Howship Rombergs sign, repeated attacks of Intestinal Obstruction and palpable mass on the medial aspect of thigh. Obturator hernia is a rare but significant cause of intestinal obstruction especially in emaciated elderly woman and a diagnostic challenge for the Doctors. CT scan is valuable to establish preoperative diagnosis. Surgery either open or laproscopic, is the only treatment. The need for the awareness is stressed and CT scan can be helpful. Copyright © 2013 Surgical Associates Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Unexpected Abscess Localization of the Anterior Abdominal Wall in an ADPKD Patient Undergoing Hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Sabanis, Nikos; Paschou, Eleni; Gavriilaki, Eleni; Mourounoglou, Maria; Vasileiou, Sotirios

    2015-01-01

    Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease (ADPKD) is one of the most common monogenic disorders and the leading inheritable cause of end-stage renal disease worldwide. Cystic and noncystic extrarenal manifestations are correlated with variable clinical presentations so that an inherited disorder is now considered a systemic disease. Kidney and liver cystic infections are the most common infectious complications in ADPKD patients. Furthermore, it is well known that ADPKD is commonly associated with colonic diverticular disease which recently has been reported to be linked to increased risk of infection on hemodialysis patients. Herein, we present a case of anterior abdominal wall abscess caused by Enterococcus faecalis in a patient with ADPKD undergoing hemodialysis. Although the precise pathway of infection remains uncertain, the previous medical history as well as the clinical course of our patient led us to hypothesize an alternative route of infection from the gastrointestinal tract through an aberrant intestinal barrier into the bloodstream and eventually to an atypical location.

  17. Management of enterocutaneous fistulas and problem stomas with silicone casting of the abdominal wall defect.

    PubMed

    Streza, G A; Laing, B J; Gilsdorf, R B

    1977-12-01

    Silicone casting of abdominal wall defects around enteric fistulas in six patients and problem stomas in three patients proved to be an effective means of controlling the output of the fistulas, reducing wound care time, and reducing or eliminating parenteral nutrition needs. Outpatient management was possible in seven of the nine patients. It is observed that the wounds healed rapidly with this method of fistula control. Epithelialization occurred more rapidly than expected. This method of management may tend to make the fistulas remain open longer than by other means of care, but the significant increase in patient comfort, the financial savings, and the relative safety warrant continued utilization and observation of this method of management.

  18. Spontaneous extraskeletal osteosarcoma with various histological growth patterns in the abdominal wall of an ICR mouse

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Tsuyoshi; Katoh, Yoshitaka; Shimada, Yuko; Ohnuma-Koyama, Aya; Takahashi, Naofumi; Kuwahara, Maki; Harada, Takanori

    2015-01-01

    Extraskeletal osteosarcoma is extremely rare in mice. This case report demonstrates a spontaneous murine extraskeletal osteosarcoma that exhibited various histological growth patterns in an ICR mouse. At necropsy, the tumor mass was located in the abdominal wall and was 45 × 30 × 25 mm in size. Histopathologically, the tumor showed the following four growth patterns: a solid pattern of polygonal cells embedded in an osteoid eosinophilic matrix with calcification, an irregular sheet pattern of short spindle cells accompanying some eosinophilic multinucleated cells, a fascicular pattern of spindle cells and a cystic pattern lined by short spindle cells. Immunohistochemically, most of the tumor cells were positive for vimentin, proliferating cell nuclear antigen and osterix. The multinucleated cells mentioned above were desmin positive and were regarded as regenerative striated muscles but not tumor cells. Since no clear continuity with normal bone tissues was observed, the tumor was diagnosed as an “extraskeletal osteosarcoma.” PMID:26989300

  19. Necrotizing Fasciitis of Thoracic and Abdominal Wall with Emphysematous Pyelonephritis and Retroperitoneal Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Khaladkar, Sanjay Mhalasakant; Jain, Kunaal Mahesh; Kuber, Rajesh; Gandage, Sidappa

    2018-01-01

    Emphysematous pyelonephritis is a life-threatening severe form of pyelonephritis usually occurring in patients with diabetes mellitus with or without obstructive uropathies in whom there is necrotizing infection leading to the gas production of an unclear mechanism involving the renal parenchyma and the collecting system. Necrotizing fasciitis is characterized by progressive necrosis of fat and fascia due to deep-seated infection of subcutaneous tissue. It has a fulminant course with considerable mortality. Diabetes Mellitus is a common predisposing factor. The combined occurrence of emphysematous pyelonephritis and necrotizing fasciitis is extremely unusual. Early recognition and management is mandatory to avoid mortality. We report a case of a 53-year-old female, a known case of Type II diabetes mellitus, who presented with necrotizing fasciitis of thoracic and abdominal wall with emphysematous pyelonephritis in the left kidney with a retroperitoneal abscess. PMID:29541493

  20. An observational study: Effects of tenting of the abdominal wall on peak airway pressure in robotic radical prostatectomy surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kakde, Avinash Sahebarav; Wagh, Harshal D.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Robotic radical prostatectomy (RRP) is associated with various anesthetic challenges due to pneumoperitoneum and deep Trendelenburg position. Tenting of the abdominal wall done in RRP surgery causes decrease in peak airway pressure leading to better ventilation. Herein, we aimed to describe the effects of tenting of the abdominal wall on peak airway pressure in RRP surgery performed in deep Trendelenburg position. Methods: One hundred patients admitted for RRP in Kokilaben Dhirubhai Ambani Hospital of American Society of Anesthesiologists 1 and 2 physical status were included in the study. After undergoing preanesthesia work-up, patients received general anesthesia. Peak airway pressures were recorded after induction of general anesthesia, after insufflation of CO2, after giving Trendelenburg position, and after tenting of the abdominal wall with robotic arms. Results: Mean peak airway pressure recording after induction in supine position was 19.5 ± 2.3 cm of H2O, after insufflation of CO2 in supine position was 26.3 ± 2.6 cm of H2O, after giving steep head low was 34.1 ± 3.4 cm of H2O, and after tenting of the abdominal wall with robotic arms was 29.5 ± 2.5 cm of H2O. P value is highly statistically significant (P = 0.001). Conclusion: Tenting of the abdominal wall during RRP is beneficial as it decreases peak airway pressure and helps in better ventilation and thus reduces the ill effects of raised peak airway pressure and intra-abdominal pressures. PMID:28757826

  1. [Vesico-cutaneous fistula revealing abdominal wall malakoplakia accompanied by Boeck's sarcoidosis].

    PubMed

    Knausz, József; Lipták, József; Andrásovszky, Zsolt; Baranyay, Ferenc

    2010-02-07

    Malakoplakia is an acquired granulomatous disorder first described by Michaelis and Gutmann in 1902. The pathogenesis of malakoplakia is hardly known, but it thought to be secondary to an acquired bactericidal defect in macrophages occurring mostly in immunosuppressed patients. 63-year-old female patient had been treated with methylprednisolone for ten years, because of pulmonary sarcoidosis. For six month, recurrent abdominal abscess and vesico-cutaneous fistula developed. Histological examination proved malakoplakia, and Escherichia coli was detected in the abscess cavity. Hematoxyline eosin staining, periodic acid-Schiff, Berlin-blue and Kossa reactions were performed. Microscopically malakoplakia consists of mainly macrophages, known as von Hansemann cells with scattered targetoid intracytoplasmic inclusions known as Michaelis-Gutmann bodies. In our presented case, after urological-surgical intervention and antibiotic therapy, the patient became free from complaints and symptoms. Malakoplakia has been described in numerous anatomic locations, mainly in the urogenital tract. Malakoplakia may be complicated with fistulas in different locations: vesico-coccygeal, rectoprostatic, anorectal fistulas have been were reported in the literature, while 6 cases of malakoplakia with Boeck's sarcoidosis are published. In the presented case sarcoidosis and the 10-year immunosuppressive treatment with methylprednisolone might have been in the background of abdominal wall malakoplakia, complicated by vesico-cutaneous fistula. The patient was successfully treated with surgery and the followed antibiotic therapy.

  2. Stochastic modelling of wall stresses in abdominal aortic aneurysms treated by a gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Mohand-Kaci, Faïza; Ouni, Anissa Eddhahak; Dai, Jianping; Allaire, Eric; Zidi, Mustapha

    2012-01-01

    A stochastic mechanical model using the membrane theory was used to simulate the in vivo mechanical behaviour of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) in order to compute the wall stresses after stabilisation by gene therapy. For that, both length and diameter of AAAs rats were measured during their expansion. Four groups of animals, control and treated by an endovascular gene therapy during 3 or 28 days were included. The mechanical problem was solved analytically using the geometric parameters and assuming the shape of aneurysms by a 'parabolic-exponential curve'. When compared to controls, stress variations in the wall of AAAs for treated arteries during 28 days decreased, while they were nearly constant at day 3. The measured geometric parameters of AAAs were then investigated using probability density functions (pdf) attributed to every random variable. Different trials were useful to define a reliable confidence region in which the probability to have a realisation is equal to 99%. The results demonstrated that the error in the estimation of the stresses can be greater than 28% when parameters uncertainties are not considered in the modelling. The relevance of the proposed approach for the study of AAA growth may be studied further and extended to other treatments aimed at stabilisation AAAs, using biotherapies and pharmacological approaches.

  3. Umbilical hernia management during liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    de Goede, B; van Kempen, B J H; Polak, W G; de Knegt, R J; Schouten, J N L; Lange, J F; Tilanus, H W; Metselaar, H J; Kazemier, G

    2013-08-01

    Patients with liver cirrhosis scheduled for liver transplantation often present with a concurrent umbilical hernia. Optimal management of these patients is not clear. The objective of this study was to compare the outcomes of patients who underwent umbilical hernia correction during liver transplantation through a separate infra-umbilical incision with those who underwent correction through the same incision used to perform the liver transplantation. In the period between 1990 and 2011, all 27 patients with umbilical hernia and liver cirrhosis who underwent hernia correction during liver transplantation were identified in our hospital database. In 17 cases, umbilical hernia repair was performed through a separate infra-umbilical incision (separate incision group) and 10 were corrected from within the abdominal cavity without a separate incision (same incision group). Six patients died during follow-up; no deaths were attributable to intraoperative umbilical hernia repair. All 21 patients who were alive visited the outpatient clinic to detect recurrent umbilical hernia. One recurrent umbilical hernia was diagnosed in the separate incision group (6 %) and four (40 %) in the same incision group (p = 0.047). Two patients in the same incision group required repair of the recurrent umbilical hernia; one of whom underwent emergency surgery for bowel incarceration. The one recurrent hernia in the separate incision group was corrected electively. In the event of liver transplantation, umbilical hernia repair through a separate infra-umbilical incision is preferred over correction through the same incision used to perform the transplantation.

  4. Umbilical paracentesis for incarcerated umbilical hernia in patients with end-stage liver disease.

    PubMed

    Alonso, S; Donat, M; Carrion, L; Rodriguez, J M; Diego, L; Acin, D; Serrano, A; Perez, E; Pereira, F

    2016-08-01

    Patients with cirrhosis and ascites are prone to abdominal wall complications largely predominate by umbilical hernia. Elective surgery is indicated in select patients but a high morbidity and mortality rate occurs if it is performed in emergency conditions. We present a clinical case of a patient with advanced alcoholic liver disease who came to the emergency room for an acutely incarcerated umbilical hernia. Due to the high surgical risk, we had to discuss other treatment options. The use of umbilical paracentesis for incarcerated hernia reduction in cirrhotic patients with tense ascites is a safe and reproducible technique. Umbilical paracentesis could be considered as an alternative to emergency surgery in these high-risk patients.

  5. Suprascarpal fat pad thickness may predict venous drainage patterns in abdominal wall flaps.

    PubMed

    Bast, John; Pitcher, Austin A; Small, Kevin; Otterburn, David M

    2016-02-01

    Abdominal wall flaps are routinely used in reconstructive procedures. In some patients inadequate venous drainage from the deep vein may cause fat necrosis or flap failure. Occasionally the superficial inferior epigastric vessels (SIEV) are of sufficient size to allow for microvascular revascularization. This study looked at the ratio of the sub- and suprascarpal fat layers, the number of deep system perforators, and SIEV diameter to determine any correlation of the fat topography and SIEV. 50 abdominal/pelvic CT angiograms (100 hemiabdomens) were examined in women aged 34-70 years for number of perforators, SIEV diameter, and fat pad thickness above and below Scarpa's fascia. Data was analyzed using multivariate model. The average suprascarpal and subscarpal layers were 18.6 ± 11.5 mm and 6.2 ± 7.2 mm thick, respectively. The average SIEV diameter was 2.06 ± 0.81 mm and the average number of perforators was 2.09 ± 1.03 per hemiabdomen. Hemiabdomens with suprascarpal thickness>23 mm had greater SIEV diameter [2.69 mm vs. 1.8 mm (P < 0.0001)] The fat layer thickness did not correlate with the number of perforators. Neither subscarpal fat thickness nor suprascarpal-to-subscarpal fat layer thickness correlated significantly with SIEV caliber or number of perforators in multivariate model. Suprascarpal fat pad thicker than 23 mm had larger SIEVs irrespective of the number of deep system perforators. This may indicate a cohort of patients at risk of venous congestion from poor venous drainage if only the deep system is revascularized. We recommend harvesting the SIEV in patients with suprascarpal fat pad >23 mm to aid in superficial drainage. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Efficacy of transversus abdominis plane block with liposomal bupivacaine during open abdominal wall reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Fayezizadeh, Mojtaba; Majumder, Arnab; Neupane, Ruel; Elliott, Heidi L; Novitsky, Yuri W

    2016-09-01

    Transversus abdominis plane block (TAPb) is an analgesic adjunct used for abdominal surgical procedures. Liposomal bupivacaine (LB) demonstrates prolonged analgesic effects, up to 72 hours. We evaluated the analgesic efficacy of TAPb using LB for patients undergoing open abdominal wall reconstruction (AWR). Fifty patients undergoing AWR with TAPb using LB (TAP-group) were compared with a matched historical cohort undergoing AWR without TAPb (control group). Outcome measures included postoperative utilization of morphine equivalents, numerical rating scale pain scores, time to oral narcotics, and length of stay (LOS). Cohorts were matched demographically. No complications were associated with TAPb or LB. TAP-group evidenced significantly reduced narcotic requirements on operative day (9.5 mg vs 16.5 mg, P = .004), postoperative day (POD) 1 (26.7 mg vs 39.5 mg, P = .01) and POD2 (29.6 mg vs 40.7 mg, P = .047) and pain scores on operative day (5.1 vs 7.0, P <.001), POD1 (4.2 vs 5.5, P = .002), and POD2 (3.9 vs 4.8, P = .04). In addition, TAP-group demonstrated significantly shorter time to oral narcotics (2.7 days vs 4.0 days, P <.001) and median LOS (5.2 days vs 6.8 days, P = .004). TAPb with LB demonstrated significant reductions in narcotic consumption and improved pain control. TAPb allowed for earlier discontinuation of intravenous narcotics and shorter LOS. Intraoperative TAPb with LB appears to be an effective adjunct for perioperative analgesia in patients undergoing open AWR. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. A Novel Diagnostic Aid for Detection of Intra-Abdominal Adhesions to the Anterior Abdominal Wall Using Dynamic Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Randall, David; Fenner, John; Gillott, Richard; Ten Broek, Richard; Strik, Chema; Spencer, Paul; Bardhan, Karna Dev

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Abdominal adhesions can cause serious morbidity and complicate subsequent operations. Their diagnosis is often one of exclusion due to a lack of a reliable, non-invasive diagnostic technique. Development and testing of a candidate technique are described below. Method. During respiration, smooth visceral sliding motion occurs between the abdominal contents and the walls of the abdominal cavity. We describe a technique involving image segmentation and registration to calculate shear as an analogue for visceral slide based on the tracking of structures throughout the respiratory cycle. The presence of an adhesion is attributed to a resistance to visceral slide resulting in a discernible reduction in shear. The abdominal movement due to respiration is captured in sagittal dynamic MR images. Results. Clinical images were selected for analysis, including a patient with a surgically confirmed adhesion. Discernible reduction in shear was observed at the location of the adhesion while a consistent, gradually changing shear was observed in the healthy volunteers. Conclusion. The technique and its validation show encouraging results for adhesion detection but a larger study is now required to confirm its potential.

  8. A Novel Diagnostic Aid for Detection of Intra-Abdominal Adhesions to the Anterior Abdominal Wall Using Dynamic Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Randall, David; Fenner, John; Gillott, Richard; ten Broek, Richard; Strik, Chema; Spencer, Paul; Bardhan, Karna Dev

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Abdominal adhesions can cause serious morbidity and complicate subsequent operations. Their diagnosis is often one of exclusion due to a lack of a reliable, non-invasive diagnostic technique. Development and testing of a candidate technique are described below. Method. During respiration, smooth visceral sliding motion occurs between the abdominal contents and the walls of the abdominal cavity. We describe a technique involving image segmentation and registration to calculate shear as an analogue for visceral slide based on the tracking of structures throughout the respiratory cycle. The presence of an adhesion is attributed to a resistance to visceral slide resulting in a discernible reduction in shear. The abdominal movement due to respiration is captured in sagittal dynamic MR images. Results. Clinical images were selected for analysis, including a patient with a surgically confirmed adhesion. Discernible reduction in shear was observed at the location of the adhesion while a consistent, gradually changing shear was observed in the healthy volunteers. Conclusion. The technique and its validation show encouraging results for adhesion detection but a larger study is now required to confirm its potential. PMID:26880884

  9. New injectable elastomeric biomaterials for hernia repair and their biocompatibility.

    PubMed

    Skrobot, J; Zair, L; Ostrowski, M; El Fray, M

    2016-01-01

    Complications associated with implantation of polymeric hernia meshes remain a difficult surgical challenge. We report here on our work, developing for the first time, an injectable viscous material that can be converted to a solid and elastic implant in vivo, thus successfully closing herniated tissue. In this study, long-chain fatty acids were used for the preparation of telechelic macromonomers end-capped with methacrylic functionalities to provide UV curable systems possessing high biocompatibility, good mechanical strength and flexibility. Two different systems, comprising urethane and ester bonds, were synthesized from non-toxic raw materials and then subjected to UV curing after injection of viscous material into the cavity at the abdominal wall during hernioplasty in a rabbit hernia model. No additional fixation or sutures were required. The control group of animals was treated with commercially available polypropylene hernia mesh. The observation period lasted for 28 days. We show here that artificially fabricated defect was healed and no reherniation was observed in the case of the fatty acid derived materials. Importantly, the number of inflammatory cells found in the surrounding tissue was comparable to these found around the standard polypropylene mesh. No inflammatory cells were detected in connective tissues and no sign of necrosis has been observed. Collectively, our results demonstrated that new injectable and photocurable systems can be used for minimally invasive surgical protocols in repair of small hernia defects. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Umbilical hernia alloplastic dual-mesh treatment in cirrhotic patients

    PubMed Central

    Guriță, RE; Popa, F; Bălălău, C; Scăunașu, RV

    2013-01-01

    Rationale. Abdominal wall hernias represent a pathology with an impressive prevalence among the population of patients with cirrhosis complicated by ascites. The aggressive surgical approach of umbilical hernia for patients with cirrhotic background remains a controversial problem, accompanied by anesthetic and surgical risk. Its indication remains fully justified in case of severe symptoms or life threatening complications: strangulation, incarceration, evisceration. Objective. This article evaluates results obtained by using dual-mesh alloplastic materials for surgical treatment of umbilical hernias affecting cirrhotic patients with incipient liver injury. Methods and Results. Our lot consists of twelve patients with ages between 45 and 65 years, diagnosed with hepatic cirrhosis, without other associated comorbidities. All patients were admitted for strangulated umbilical hernia. Among the analyzed lot, no decease was encountered, the morbidity being limited to two cases of parietal suppuration, solved conservatively, without the mesh removal. There were no ascitic fistulas. No recurrences were registered for a 12 months tracking period. Discussion. The presence of cirrhosis implies a high anesthetic and surgical risk, the intervention being grafted by a substantial increase of mortality and morbidity in an emergency setting. The development of new alloplastic materials, together with the modern anesthetic techniques, allows superior results for patients with incipient hepatic injury. PMID:23599831

  11. Umbilical hernia alloplastic dual-mesh treatment in cirrhotic patients.

    PubMed

    Guriță, R E; Popa, F; Bălălău, C; Scăunașu, R V

    2013-03-15

    Abdominal wall hernias represent a pathology with an impressive prevalence among the population of patients with cirrhosis complicated by ascites. The aggressive surgical approach of umbilical hernia for patients with cirrhotic background remains a controversial problem, accompanied by anesthetic and surgical risk. Its indication remains fully justified in case of severe symptoms or life threatening complications: strangulation, incarceration, evisceration. This article evaluates results obtained by using dual-mesh alloplastic materials for surgical treatment of umbilical hernias affecting cirrhotic patients with incipient liver injury. Our lot consists of twelve patients with ages between 45 and 65 years, diagnosed with hepatic cirrhosis, without other associated comorbidities. All patients were admitted for strangulated umbilical hernia. Among the analyzed lot, no decease was encountered, the morbidity being limited to two cases of parietal suppuration, solved conservatively, without the mesh removal. There were no ascitic fistulas. No recurrences were registered for a 12 months tracking period. The presence of cirrhosis implies a high anesthetic and surgical risk, the intervention being grafted by a substantial increase of mortality and morbidity in an emergency setting. The development of new alloplastic materials, together with the modern anesthetic techniques, allows superior results for patients with incipient hepatic injury.

  12. Skeletal muscle derived stem cells microintegrated into a biodegradable elastomer for reconstruction of the abdominal wall.

    PubMed

    Takanari, Keisuke; Hashizume, Ryotaro; Hong, Yi; Amoroso, Nicholas J; Yoshizumi, Tomo; Gharaibeh, Burhan; Yoshida, Osamu; Nonaka, Kazuhiro; Sato, Hideyoshi; Huard, Johnny; Wagner, William R

    2017-01-01

    A variety of techniques have been applied to generate tissue engineered constructs, where cells are combined with degradable scaffolds followed by a period of in vitro culture or direct implantation. In the current study, a cellularized scaffold was generated by concurrent deposition of electrospun biodegradable elastomer (poly(ester urethane)urea, PEUU) and electrosprayed culture medium + skeletal muscle-derived stem cells (MDSCs) or electrosprayed culture medium alone as a control. MDSCs were obtained from green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgenic rats. The created scaffolds were implanted into allogenic strain-matched rats to replace a full thickness abdominal wall defect. Both control and MDSC-integrated scaffolds showed extensive cellular infiltration at 4 and 8 wk. The number of blood vessels was higher, the area of residual scaffold was lower, number of multinucleated giant cells was lower and area of connective tissue was lower in MDSC-integrated scaffolds (p < 0.05). GFP + cells co-stained positive for VEGF. Bi-axial mechanical properties of the MDSC-microintegrated constructs better approximated the anisotropic behavior of the native abdominal wall. GFP + cells were observed throughout the scaffold at ∼5% of the cell population at 4 and 8 wk. RNA expression at 4 wk showed higher expression of early myogenic marker Pax7, and b-FGF in the MDSC group. Also, higher expression of myogenin and VEGF were seen in the MDSC group at both 4 and 8 wk time points. The paracrine effect of donor cells on host cells likely contributed to the differences found in vivo between the groups. This approach for the rapid creation of highly-cellularized constructs with soft tissue like mechanics offers an attractive methodology to impart cell-derived bioactivity into scaffolds providing mechanical support during the healing process and might find application in a variety of settings. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Jarcho-Levin syndrome presenting with diaphragmatic hernia.

    PubMed

    Onay, O S; Kinik, S T; Otgün, Y; Arda, I S; Varan, B

    2008-08-01

    Jarcho-Levin syndrome (spondylothoracic or spondylocostal dysostosis) is an eponym that is used to define individuals with a short neck, short trunk, and short stature and multiple vertebral anomalies. The prognosis is directly related to respiratory complications. Reported findings associated with Jarcho-Levin syndrome include congenital heart defects, abdominal wall malformations, genitourinary malformations, upper limb anomalies, and neural tube defects. We report on a 6-day-old girl who presented with an incomplete form of Jarcho-Levin syndrome with late-presenting congenital diaphragmatic hernia and congenital heart disease.

  14. Umbilical hernia masking primary umbilical endometriosis - a case report.

    PubMed

    Brătilă, Elvira; Ionescu, Oana Maria; Badiu, Dumitru Cristinel; Berceanu, Costin; Vlădăreanu, Simona; Pop, Doina Mihaela; MehedinŢu, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Endometriosis is a gynecologic condition affecting mainly the pelvic organs. However, extrapelvic endometriosis has been reported in almost all parts of the body. Umbilical endometriosis, either primary or secondary, is uncommon and has a documented neoplastic risk. We present the case of a 46-year-old woman with a large umbilical hernia associating primary umbilical endometriosis discovered during surgery and confirmed later by pathological and immunohistochemical exams. The patient underwent omphalectomy and partial omentum resection, alongside with mesh abdominal wall repair. The patient was informed about the recurrence risk and was asymptomatic at follow-up consults.

  15. Long-term outcomes of sandwich ventral hernia repair paired with hybrid vacuum-assisted closure.

    PubMed

    Hicks, Caitlin W; Poruk, Katherine E; Baltodano, Pablo A; Soares, Kevin C; Azoury, Said C; Cooney, Carisa M; Cornell, Peter; Eckhauser, Frederic E

    2016-08-01

    Sandwich ventral hernia repair (SVHR) may reduce ventral hernia recurrence rates, although with an increased risk of surgical site occurrences (SSOs) and surgical site infections (SSIs). Previously, we found that a modified negative pressure wound therapy (hybrid vacuum-assisted closure [HVAC]) system reduced SSOs and SSIs after ventral hernia repair. We aimed to describe our outcomes after SVHR paired with HVAC closure. We conducted a 4-y retrospective review of all complex SVHRs (biologic mesh underlay and synthetic mesh overlay) with HVAC closure performed at our institution by a single surgeon. All patients had fascial defects that could not be reapproximated primarily using anterior component separation. Descriptive statistics were used to report the incidence of postoperative complications and hernia recurrence. A total of 60 patients (59.3 ± 11.4 y, 58.3% male, 75% American Society of Anesthesiologists class ≥3) with complex ventral hernias being underwent sandwich repair with HVAC closure. Major postoperative morbidity (Dindo-Clavien class ≥3) occurred in 14 (23.3%) patients, but incidence of SSO (n = 13, 21.7%) and SSI (n = 4, 6.7%) was low compared with historical reports. Median follow-up time for all patients was 12 mo (interquartile range 5.8-26.5 mo). Hernia recurrence occurred in eight patients (13.3%) after a median time of 20.6 months (interquartile range 16.4- 25.4 months). Use of a dual layer sandwich repair for complex abdominal wall reconstruction is associated with low rates of hernia recurrence at 1 year postoperatively. The addition of the HVAC closure system may reduce the risk of SSOs and SSIs previously reported with this technique and deserves consideration in future prospective studies assessing optimization of ventral hernia repair approaches. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Laparoscopic-guided abdominal wall nerve blocks in the pediatric population: a novel technique with comparison to ultrasound-guided blocks and local wound infiltration alone.

    PubMed

    Landmann, Alessandra; Visoiu, Mihaela; Malek, Marcus M

    2018-03-01

    Abdominal wall nerve blocks have been gaining popularity for the treatment of perioperative pain in children. Our aim was to compare a technique of surgeon-performed, laparoscopic abdominal wall nerve blocks to anesthesia-placed, ultrasound-guided abdominal wall nerve blocks and the current standard of local wound infiltration. After institutional review board approval was obtained, a retrospective chart review was performed of pediatric patients treated at a single institution during a 2-year period. Statistics were calculated using analysis of variance with post-hoc Bonferonni t tests for pair-wise comparisons. Included in this study were 380 patients who received ultrasound-guided abdominal wall nerve blocks (n = 125), laparoscopic-guided abdominal wall nerve blocks (n = 88), and local wound infiltration (n = 117). Groups were well matched for age, sex, and weight. There was no significant difference in pain scores within the first 8 hours or narcotic usage between groups. Local wound infiltration demonstrated the shortest overall time required to perform (P < .0001). Patients who received a surgeon-performed abdominal wall nerve block demonstrated a shorter duration of hospital stay when compared to the other groups (P = .02). Our study has demonstrated that laparoscopic-guided abdominal wall nerve blocks show similar efficacy to ultrasound-guided nerve blocks performed by pain management physicians without increasing time in the operating room. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Selecting criteria for the right prosthesis in defect of the abdominal wall surgery.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, H; Ion, D; Serban, M B; Ciurea, M

    2009-01-01

    The article is debating a theme of great interest for the defect of the abdominal wall surgery--the use of biocompatible prosthesis. The surgeon is often confused by the avalanche of offers made by the mesh producers, making it mandatory for him to know very well the behavior of these alloplastic structures in the tissue environment. From this point of view, we have discussed both the physicochemical properties and the histological reaction brought by the most common type of meshes: polypropylene, polyethylene - tereftalat, polytetrafluorideethylene. This presentation brings out the minimal but mandatory criteria for any mesh to be accepted, but also the criteria that need to be taken into consideration when we try to improve the qualities of the mesh closer to the desideratum of the "ideal mesh". The main conclusion of this review is that we have to change the myth of the "ideal mesh" with "the right chosen mesh", that based on its chemical, physical, structural and biological qualities will adapt perfectly first to the patient's needs and second to the surgeon's needs.

  18. Predicting adverse neonatal outcomes in fetuses with abdominal wall defects using prenatal risk factors.

    PubMed

    Nicholas, Sara S; Stamilio, David M; Dicke, Jeffery M; Gray, Diana L; Macones, George A; Odibo, Anthony O

    2009-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether prenatal variables can predict adverse neonatal outcomes in fetuses with abdominal wall defects. A retrospective cohort study that used ultrasound and neonatal records for all cases of gastroschisis and omphalocele seen over a 16-year period. Cases with adverse neonatal outcomes were compared with noncases for multiple candidate predictive factors. Univariable and multivariable statistical methods were used to develop the prediction models, and effectiveness was evaluated using the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve. Of 80 fetuses with gastroschisis, 29 (36%) had the composite adverse outcome, compared with 15 of 33 (47%) live neonates with omphalocele. Intrauterine growth restriction was the only significant variable in gastroschisis, whereas exteriorized liver was the only predictor in omphalocele. The areas under the curve for the prediction models with gastroschisis and omphalocele are 0.67 and 0.74, respectively. Intrauterine growth restriction and exteriorization of the liver are significant predictors of adverse neonatal outcome with gastroschisis and omphalocele.

  19. Active behavior of abdominal wall muscles: Experimental results and numerical model formulation.

    PubMed

    Grasa, J; Sierra, M; Lauzeral, N; Muñoz, M J; Miana-Mena, F J; Calvo, B

    2016-08-01

    In the present study a computational finite element technique is proposed to simulate the mechanical response of muscles in the abdominal wall. This technique considers the active behavior of the tissue taking into account both collagen and muscle fiber directions. In an attempt to obtain the computational response as close as possible to real muscles, the parameters needed to adjust the mathematical formulation were determined from in vitro experimental tests. Experiments were conducted on male New Zealand White rabbits (2047±34g) and the active properties of three different muscles: Rectus Abdominis, External Oblique and multi-layered samples formed by three muscles (External Oblique, Internal Oblique, and Transversus Abdominis) were characterized. The parameters obtained for each muscle were incorporated into a finite strain formulation to simulate active behavior of muscles incorporating the anisotropy of the tissue. The results show the potential of the model to predict the anisotropic behavior of the tissue associated to fibers and how this influences on the strain, stress and generated force during an isometric contraction. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Port site endometrioma: a rare cause of abdominal wall pain following laparoscopic surgery.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Zohaib A; Husain, Fahd; Siddiqui, Zain; Siddiqui, Midhat

    2017-06-18

    Endometriomas are a rare cause of abdominal wall pain. We report a case of a port site endometrioma presenting with an umbilical swelling. The patient underwent a laparoscopy for pelvic endometriosis 6 months previously and presented with a swelling around her umbilical port site scar associated with cyclical pain during menses. Ultrasound scan reported a well-defined lesion in the umbilicus and MRI scanning excluded other pathology. As she was symptomatic, she underwent an exploration of the scar and excision of the endometrioma with resolution of her symptoms. Precautions should be taken to reduce the risk of endometrial seeding during laparoscopic surgery. All tissues should be removed in an appropriate retrieval bag and the pneumoperitoneum should be deflated completely before removing ports to reduce the chimney effect of tissue being forced through the port site. The diagnosis should be considered in all women of reproductive age presenting with a painful port site scar. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  1. The incidence of incisional hernia after aortic aneurysm is not higher than after benign colorectal interventions: A retrospective control-matched cohort study.

    PubMed

    Wiegering, A; Liebetrau, D; Menzel, S; Bühler, C; Kellersmann, R; Dietz, U A

    2018-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) have most probably an inflammatory origin, whereby the elastica is the layer actually involved. In the past, collagen weackness was supposed to be the shared cause of both, AAA and incisional hernias. Since the development of new techniques of closure of the abdominal wall over the last decade, collagen deficency seems to play only a secondary etiologic role. The aim of the study was to investigate whether the incidence of incisional hernia following laparotomy due to AAA differs from that of colorectal interventions. This was a retrospective control matched cohort study. After screening of 403 patients with colorectal interventions and 96 patients with AAA, 27 and 72 patients, respectively were included. The match criteria for inclusion of patients with colorectal interventions were: age, benign underlying disease and median xiphopubic laparotomy. The primary endpoint was the incidence of an incisional hernia. The secondary endpoints were the risk profile, length of stay in the intensive care unit and postoperative complications. Data analysis was carried in the consecutive collective from 2006 to 2008. In the group with AAA the mean follow-up was 34.5±18.1 months and in the group with colorectal interventions 35.7±21.4 months. The incidence of incisional hernias showed no significant differences between the two groups. In the AAA group 10 patients (13.8%) developed an incisional hernia in contrast to 7 patients in the colorectal intervention group (25.9%). In our collective patients with AAA did not show an increased incidence of incisional hernia in comparison to patients with colorectal interventions with comparable size of the laparotomy access and age. The quality of closure of the abdominal wall seems to be an important factor for the prevention of incisional hernia.

  2. Reconstruction of Abdominal Wall of a Chronically Infected Postoperative Wound with a Rectus Abdominis Myofascial Splitting Flap

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Sung Kyu; Kang, Seok Joo; Kim, Jin Woo; Kim, Young Hwan

    2013-01-01

    Background If a chronically infected abdominal wound develops, complications such as peritonitis and an abdominal wall defect could occur. This could prolong the patient's hospital stay and increase the possibility of re-operation or another infection as well. For this reason, a solution for infection control is necessary. In this study, surgery using a rectus abdominis muscle myofascial splitting flap was performed on an abdominal wall defect. Methods From 2009 to 2012, 5 patients who underwent surgery due to ovarian rupture, cesarean section, or uterine myoma were chosen. In each case, during the first week after operation, the wound showed signs of infection. Surgery was chosen because the wounds did not resolve with dressing. Debridement was performed along the previous operation wound and dissection of the skin was performed to separate the skin and subcutaneous tissue from the attenuated rectus muscle and Scarpa's fascial layers. Once the anterior rectus sheath and muscle were adequately mobilized, the fascia and muscle flap were advanced medially so that the skin defect could be covered for reconstruction. Results Upon 3-week follow-up after a rectus abdominis myofascial splitting flap operation, no major complication occurred. In addition, all of the patients showed satisfaction in terms of function and esthetics at 3 to 6 months post-surgery. Conclusions Using a rectus abdominis myofascial splitting flap has many esthetic and functional benefits over previous methods of abdominal defect treatment, and notably, it enabled infection control by reconstruction using muscle. PMID:23362477

  3. Successful Treatment of Mesenteric Varices After Living Donor Liver Transplantation with Retrograde Transvenous Obliteration Via an Abdominal Wall Vein

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, Osamu, E-mail: osamu-3643ik@do9.enjoy.ne.jp; Tamura, Yoshitaka; Nakasone, Yutaka

    2010-06-15

    Balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration is an established treatment for gastric varices; it has been used more rarely to treat mesenteric varices. We report a 12-year-old girl who had received a living donor liver transplant and suffered melena due to ruptured mesenteric varices. We addressed treatment of the mesenteric varices by retrograde transvenous obliteration of an abdominal wall collateral vein detected by superior mesenteric arteriography.

  4. Evolution of abdominal wall reconstruction: development of a unified algorithm with improved outcomes.

    PubMed

    Koltz, Peter F; Frey, Jordan D; Bell, Derek E; Girotto, John A; Christiano, Jose G; Langstein, Howard N

    2013-11-01

    Ventral hernia repair (VHR) continues to evolve and now frequently includes some form of component separation (CS) for large defects. To determine the optimal technique for VHR, we evaluated our outcomes before and after we refined and simplified our algorithm for repair. One hundred five consecutive patients undergoing VHR for large midline hernias over 9 years were examined. Patients were divided into those operated on after (group 1) and before (group 2) the institution of our simplified algorithm. Our algorithm emphasizes careful patient selection and a stepwise approach including, but not limited to, bilateral CS if appropriate, preservation of large perforators, retrorectus mesh placement as appropriate, linea alba or midline fascial closure, and vertical panniculectomy. Primary outcomes evaluated included wound infection, dehiscence, and hernia recurrence. Seventy-eight (74.3%) patients underwent repair using our algorithm (group 1), whereas 27 (25.7%) underwent repair before utilization of this algorithm (group 2). Ninety-eight (93.3%) underwent CS, whereas 7 (6.7%) underwent another form of VHR. There was no significant difference in patient age or defect size. The mean follow-up period in days for patients in group 1 and group 2 were 184.02 and 526.06, respectively (P < 0.001). Hernia recurrence in group 1 was 2.6% versus 29.6% in group 2 (P < 0.001). The incidence of wound infection in group 1 was 10.3%, whereas that in group 2 was 33.3% (P < 0.001). The rate of wound dehiscence in group 1 was 17.9% versus 25.9% in group 2 (P < 0.001). Simplifying and unifying our algorithm for VHR, notably with utilization of CS, has yielded improved results. Recurrence and wound healing complications using this approach are favorable compared with published outcomes.

  5. Adventitial adipogenic degeneration is an unidentified contributor to aortic wall weakening in the abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Doderer, Stefan A; Gäbel, Gabor; Kokje, Vivianne B C; Northoff, Bernd H; Holdt, Lesca M; Hamming, Jaap F; Lindeman, Jan H N

    2018-06-01

    The processes driving human abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) progression are not fully understood. Although antiinflammatory and proteolytic strategies effectively quench aneurysm progression in preclinical models, so far all clinical interventions failed. These observations hint at an incomplete understanding of the processes involved in AAA progression and rupture. Interestingly, strong clinical and molecular associations exist between popliteal artery aneurysms (PAAs) and AAAs; however, PAAs have an extremely low propensity to rupture. We thus reasoned that differences between these aneurysms may provide clues toward (auxiliary) processes involved in AAA-related wall debilitation. A better understanding of the pathophysiologic processes driving AAA growth can contribute to pharmaceutical treatments in the future. Aneurysmal wall samples were collected during open elective and emergency repair. Control perirenal aorta was obtained during kidney transplantation, and reference popliteal tissue obtained from the anatomy department. This study incorporates various techniques including (immuno)histochemistry, Western Blot, quantitative polymerase chain reaction, microarray, and cell culture. Histologic evaluation of AAAs, PAAs, and control aorta shows extensive medial (PAA) and transmural fibrosis (AAA), and reveals abundant adventitial adipocytes aggregates as an exclusive phenomenon of AAAs (P < .001). Quantitative polymerase chain reaction, immunohistochemistry, Western blotting, and microarray analysis showed enrichment of adipogenic mediators (C/EBP family P = .027; KLF5 P < .000; and peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-γ, P = .032) in AAA tissue. In vitro differentiation tests indicated a sharply increased adipogenic potential of AAA adventitial mesenchymal cells (P < .0001). Observed enrichment of adipocyte-related genes and pathways in ruptured AAA (P < .0003) supports an association between the extent of fatty degeneration and rupture. This

  6. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy using abdominal wall retraction. Hemodynamics and gas exchange, a comparison with conventional pneumoperitoneum.

    PubMed

    Meijer, D W; Rademaker, B P; Schlooz, S; Bemelman, W A; de Wit, L T; Bannenberg, J J; Stijnen, T; Gouma, D F

    1997-06-01

    Disadvantages related to CO2 pneumoperitoneum have led to development of the abdominal wall retractor (AWR), a device designed to facilitate laparoscopic surgery without conventional pneumoperitoneum (15 mmHg CO2). We investigated the effects of the AWR on hemodynamics and gas exchange in humans. We also investigated whether the use of an AWR imposed extra technical difficulties for the surgeon. A pilot study revealed that cholecystectomy without low-pressure pneumoperitoneum was technically impossible. A prospective randomized controlled trial: Twenty patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy were randomly allocated into group 1: AWR with low-pressure pneumoperitoneum (5 mmHg), or group 2: conventional pneumoperitoneum (15 mmHg). Surgery using the AWR lasted longer, 72 +/- 16 min (mean +/- SD) vs 50 +/- 18 min compared with standard laparoscopic cholecystectomy. There were no differences between the groups with respect to hemodynamic parameters, although a small reduction of the cardiac output was observed using conventional pneumoperitoneum (from 3.9 +/- 0.7 to 3. 2 +/- 1.1 l/min) and an increase during AWR (from 4.2 +/- 0.9 to 5.2 +/- 1.5 l/min). Peak inspiratory pressures were significantly higher during conventional pneumoperitoneum compared to AWR. A slight decrease in pH accompanied by an increase in CO2 developed during pneumoperitoneum and during the use of the AWR. In both groups arterial PO2 decreased. The results indicate that the view was impaired during use of the AWR and therefore its use was difficult and time-consuming. Possible advantages of this devices' effects on hemodynamics and ventilatory parameters could not be confirmed in this study.

  7. Meta-analysis of peak wall stress in ruptured, symptomatic and intact abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Khosla, S; Morris, D R; Moxon, J V; Walker, P J; Gasser, T C; Golledge, J

    2014-10-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is an important cause of sudden death; however, there are currently incomplete means to predict the risk of AAA rupture. AAA peak wall stress (PWS) can be estimated using finite element analysis (FEA) methods from computed tomography (CT) scans. The question is whether AAA PWS can predict AAA rupture. The aim of this systematic review was to compare PWS in patients with ruptured and intact AAA. The MEDLINE database was searched on 25 May 2013. Case-control studies assessing PWS in asymptomatic intact, and acutely symptomatic or ruptured AAA from CT scans using FEA were included. Data were extracted independently. A random-effects model was used to calculate standard mean differences (SMDs) for PWS measurements. Nine studies assessing 348 individuals were identified and used in the meta-analysis. Results from 204 asymptomatic intact and 144 symptomatic or ruptured AAAs showed that PWS was significantly greater in the symptomatic/ ruptured AAAs compared with the asymptomatic intact AAAs (SMD 0·95, 95 per cent confidence interval 0·71 to 1·18; P < 0·001). The findings remained significant after adjustment for mean systolic blood pressure, standardized at 120 mmHg (SMD 0·68, 0·39 to 0·96; P < 0·001). Minimal heterogeneity between studies was noted (I(2)  = 0 per cent). This study suggests that PWS is greater in symptomatic or ruptured AAA than in asymptomatic intact AAA. © 2014 BJS Society Ltd. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. The economic burden of incisional ventral hernia repair: a multicentric cost analysis.

    PubMed

    Gillion, J-F; Sanders, D; Miserez, M; Muysoms, F

    2016-12-01

    A systematic review of literature led us to take note that little was known about the costs of incisional ventral hernia repair (IVHR). Therefore we wanted to assess the actual costs of IVHR. The total costs are the sum of direct (hospital costs) and indirect (sick leave) costs. The direct costs were retrieved from a multi-centric cost analysis done among a large panel of 51 French public hospitals, involving 3239 IVHR. One hundred and thirty-two unitary expenditure items were thoroughly evaluated by the accountants of a specialized public agency (ATIH) dedicated to investigate the costs of the French Health Care system. The indirect costs (costs of the post-operative inability to work and loss of profit due to the disruption in the ongoing work) were estimated from the data the Hernia Club registry, involving 790 patients, and over a large panel of different Collective Agreements. The mean total cost for an IVHR in France in 2011 was estimated to be 6451€, ranging from 4731€ for unemployed patients to 10,107€ for employed patients whose indirect costs (5376€) were slightly higher than the direct costs. Reducing the incidence of incisional hernia after abdominal surgery with 5 % for instance by implementation of the European Hernia Society Guidelines on closure of abdominal wall incisions, or maybe even by use of prophylactic mesh augmentation in high risk patients could result in a national cost savings of 4 million Euros.

  9. [The systematization and the etiopathogenicity of diaphragmatic hernias].

    PubMed

    Alecu, L

    2001-01-01

    The author, based on up to date published dates, intends to present the classification and ethiopathogeny of the diaphragmatic hernias, except the aesophagic hiatus oms. This is an interesting chapter of the borderline surgery (abdominal and thorax). They are placed on the second position in frequency (after the hiatal hernias) in the diaphragmatic pathology; they are internal hernias, through congenital or obtained holes which allow to abdominal viscera to pass into thorax. They are--in the most cases, even elderly ones-congenital, result of the abnormalities in the embrionary growth of the diaphragm. A special place' is represented by the traumatic hernias.

  10. Volume rather than flow incentive spirometry is effective in improving chest wall expansion and abdominal displacement using optoelectronic plethysmography.

    PubMed

    Paisani, Denise de Moraes; Lunardi, Adriana Claudia; da Silva, Cibele Cristine Berto Marques; Porras, Desiderio Cano; Tanaka, Clarice; Carvalho, Celso Ricardo Fernandes

    2013-08-01

    Incentive spirometers are widely used in clinical practice and classified as flow-oriented (FIS) and volume-oriented (VIS). Until recently the respiratory inductive plethysmography used to evaluate the effects of incentive spirometry on chest wall mechanics presented limitations, which may explain why the impact of VIS and FIS remains poorly known. To compare the effects of VIS and FIS on thoracoabdominal mechanics and respiratory muscle activity in healthy volunteers. This cross-sectional trial assessed 20 subjects (12 female, ages 20-40 years, body mass index 20-30 kg/m(2)). All subjects performed 8 quiet breaths and 8 deep breaths with FIS and VIS, in a randomized order. We measured thoracoabdominal chest wall, upper and lower rib-cage, and abdominal volumes with optoelectronic plethysmography, and the muscle activity of the sternocleidomastoid and superior and inferior intercostal muscles with electromyography. VIS increased chest wall volume more than did FIS (P = .007) and induced a larger increase in the upper and lower rib-cages and abdomen (156%, 91%, and 151%, respectively, P < .001). By contrast, FIS induced more activity in the accessory muscles of respiration than did VIS (P < .001). VIS promotes a greater increase in chest wall volume, with a larger abdominal contribution and lower respiratory muscle activity, than does FIS in healthy adults.

  11. The Effects of Modified Wall Squat Exercises on Average Adults’ Deep Abdominal Muscle Thickness and Lumbar Stability

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Misuk

    2013-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of bridge exercises applying the abdominal drawing-in method and modified wall squat exercises on deep abdominal muscle thickness and lumbar stability. [Subjects] A total of 30 subjects were equally divided into an experimental group and a control group. [Methods] The experimental group completed modified wall squat exercises, and the control group performed bridge exercises. Both did so for 30 minutes three times per week over a six-week period. Both groups’ transversus abdominis (Tra), internal oblique (IO), and multifidus muscle thickness were measured using ultrasonography, while their static lumbar stability and dynamic lumbar stability were measured using a pressure biofeedback unit. [Results] A comparison of the pre-intervention and post-intervention measures of the experimental group and the control group was made; the Tra and IO thicknesses were significantly different in both groups. [Conclusion] The modified wall squat exercise and bridge exercise affected the thicknesses of the Tra and the IO muscles. While the bridge exercise requirs space and a mattress to lie on, the modified wall squat exercise can be conveniently performed anytime. PMID:24259831

  12. Hiatal hernia

    MedlinePlus

    ... born with it (congenital). It often occurs with gastroesophageal reflux in infants . ... chap 138. Yates RB, Oelschlager BK, Pellegrini CA. Gastroesophageal reflux disease and hiatal hernia. In: Townsend CM Jr, ...

  13. Comparison of the sonographic features of the abdominal wall muscles and connective tissues in individuals with and without lumbopelvic pain.

    PubMed

    Whittaker, Jackie L; Warner, Martin B; Stokes, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Cross-sectional, case-control study. To measure and compare the resting thickness of the 4 abdominal wall muscles, their associated perimuscular connective tissue (PMCT), and interrecti distance (IRD) in persons with and without lumbopelvic pain (LPP), using ultrasound imaging. The muscles and PMCT of the abdominal wall assist in controlling the spine. Functional deficits of the abdominal wall muscles have been detected in populations with LPP. Investigations of the abdominal wall in those with LPP are primarily concerned with muscle, most commonly the transversus abdominis (TrA) and internal oblique (IO). Because the abdominal wall functions as a unit, all 4 abdominal muscles and their associated connective tissues should be considered concurrently. B-mode ultrasound imaging was used to measure the resting thickness of the rectus abdominis (RA), external oblique, IO, and TrA muscles; the PMCT planes; and IRD in 50 male and female subjects, 25 with and 25 without LPP (mean ± SD age, 36.3 ± 9.4 and 46.6 ± 8.0 years, respectively). Univariate correlation analysis was used to identify covariates. Analyses of covariance (ANCOVAs) and the Kruskal-Wallis test (IRD) were used to compare cohorts (α = .05). The LPP cohort had less total abdominal muscle thickness (LPP mean ± SD, 18.9 ± 3.0 mm; control, 20.3 ± 3.0 mm; ANCOVA adjusted for body mass index, P = .03), thicker PMCT (LPP, 5.5 ± 0.2 mm; control, 4.3 ± 0.2 mm; ANCOVA adjusted for body mass index, P = .007), and wider IRD (LPP, 11.5 ± 2.0 mm; control, 8.4 ± 1.8 mm; Kruskal-Wallis, P = .005). Analysis of individual muscle thickness revealed no difference in the external oblique, IO, and TrA, but a thinner RA in the LPP cohort (LPP mean ± SD, 7.8 ± 1.5 mm; control, 9.1 ± 1.2 mm; ANCOVA adjusted for body mass index, P<.001). To our knowledge, this is the first study to investigate the morphological characteristics of all 4 abdominal muscles and PMCT in individuals with LPP. The results suggest that there

  14. A case of incisional hernia repair using Composix mesh prosthesis after antethoracic pedicled jejunal flap reconstruction following an esophagectomy.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Atsushi; Yasuda, Takushi; Kato, Hiroaki; Iwama, Mitsuru; Shiraishi, Osamu; Hiraki, Yoko; Tanaka, Yumiko; Shinkai, Masayuki; Imano, Motohiro; Kimura, Yutaka; Imamoto, Haruhiko

    2017-12-01

    An incisional hernia in a case of antethoracic pedicled jejunal flap esophageal reconstruction after esophagectomy is a very rare occurrence, and this hernia was distinctive in that the reconstructed jejunum had passed through the hernial orifice; a standard surgical treatment for such a presentation has not been established. Herein, we describe a case of repair using mesh prosthesis for an atypical and distinctive incisional hernia after antethoracic pedicled jejunal flap esophageal reconstruction. A 77-year-old woman with a history of subtotal esophagectomy who had undergone antethoracic pedicled jejunal flap reconstruction complained of epigastric prominence and discomfort without pain. On examination, she had an abdominal protrusion between the xiphoid process and the umbilicus that contained the small bowel. Computed tomography showed that the fenestration of the abdominal wall that was intentionally created for jejunum pull-up was dehisced in a region measuring 9 × 15 cm and the small intestine protruded through it into the subcutaneous space without strangulation. Because the hernial orifice was too large and the reconstructed jejunum was passing through the hernial orifice in this case, we applied a parastomal hernia repair method that was modified from the inguinal hernia repair using the Lichtenstein technique. After 3 years and 5 months following surgery, the patient has recovered without hernia recurrence or other complications. We consider this to be the first case of repair using Composix mesh prosthesis for repair of an atypical and distinctive incisional hernia after an antethoracic pedicled jejunal flap reconstruction. This method seems to be useful and could potentially be widely adopted as the surgical treatment for this condition.

  15. Umbilical hernia repair - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... during development penetrate the fetal abdominal wall. Review Date 1/10/2017 Updated by: David A. Lickstein, MD, FACS, specializing in cosmetic and reconstructive plastic surgery, Palm Beach Gardens, FL. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare ...

  16. Minimally Invasive Component Separation Results in Fewer Wound-Healing Complications than Open Component Separation for Large Ventral Hernia Repairs

    PubMed Central

    Ghali, Shadi; Turza, Kristin C; Baumann, Donald P; Butler, Charles E

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Minimally invasive component separation (CS) with inlay bioprosthetic mesh (MICSIB) is a recently developed technique for abdominal wall reconstruction that preserves the rectus abdominis perforators and minimizes subcutaneous dead space using limited-access tunneled incisions. We hypothesized that MICSIB would result in better surgical outcomes than would conventional open CS. STUDY DESIGN All consecutive patients who underwent CS (open or minimally invasive) with inlay bioprosthetic mesh for ventral hernia repair from 2005 to 2010 were included in a retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data. Surgical outcomes including wound-healing complications, hernia recurrences, and abdominal bulge/laxity rates were compared between patient groups based on the type of CS repair: MICSIB or open. RESULTS Fifty-seven patients who underwent MICSIB and 50 who underwent open CS were included. The mean follow-ups were 15.2±7.7 months and 20.7±14.3 months, respectively. The mean fascial defect size was significantly larger in the MICSIB group (405.4±193.6 cm2 vs. 273.8±186.8 cm2; p =0.002). The incidences of skin dehiscence (11% vs. 28%; p=0.011), all wound-healing complications (14% vs. 32%; p=0.026), abdominal wall laxity/bulge (4% vs. 14%; p=0.056), and hernia recurrence (4% vs. 8%; p=0.3) were lower in the MICSIB group than in the open CS group. CONCLUSIONS MICSIB resulted in fewer wound-healing complications than did open CS used for complex abdominal wall reconstructions. These findings are likely attributable to the preservation of paramedian skin vascularity and reduction in subcutaneous dead space with MICSIB. MICSIB should be considered for complex abdominal wall reconstructions, particularly in patients at increased risk of wound-healing complications. PMID:22521439

  17. Tissue-engineering with muscle fiber fragments improves the strength of a weak abdominal wall in rats.

    PubMed

    Jangö, Hanna; Gräs, Søren; Christensen, Lise; Lose, Gunnar

    2017-02-01

    Alternative approaches to reinforce the native tissue in patients with pelvic organ prolapse (POP) are needed to improve surgical outcome. Our aims were to develop a weakened abdominal wall in a rat model to mimic the weakened vaginal wall in women with POP and then evaluate the regenerative potential of a quickly biodegradable synthetic scaffold, methoxypolyethylene glycol polylactic-co-glycolic acid (MPEG-PLGA), seeded with autologous muscle fiber fragments (MFFs) using this model. In an initial pilot study with 15 animals, significant weakening of the abdominal wall and a feasible technique was established by creating a partial defect with removal of one abdominal muscle layer. Subsequently, 18 rats were evenly divided into three groups: (1) unrepaired partial defect; (2) partial defect repaired with MPEG-PLGA; (3) partial defect repaired with MPEG-PLGA and MFFs labeled with PKH26-fluorescence dye. After 8 weeks, we performed histopathological and immunohistochemical testing, fluorescence analysis, and uniaxial biomechanical testing. Both macroscopically and microscopically, the MPEG-PLGA scaffold was fully degraded, with no signs of an inflammatory or foreign-body response. PKH26-positive cells were found in all animals from the group with added MFFs. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) showed a significant difference between groups with respect to load at failure (p = 0.028), and post hoc testing revealed that the group with MPEG-PLGA and MFFs showed a significantly higher strength than the group with MPEG-PLGA alone (p = 0.034). Tissue-engineering with MFFs seeded on a scaffold of biodegradable MPEG-PLGA might be an interesting adjunct to future POP repair.

  18. Sporadic extra abdominal wall desmoid-type fibromatosis: surgical resection can be safely limited to a minority of patients.

    PubMed

    Colombo, C; Miceli, R; Le Péchoux, C; Palassini, E; Honoré, C; Stacchiotti, S; Mir, O; Casali, P G; Dômont, J; Fiore, M; Le Cesne, A; Gronchi, A; Bonvalot, S

    2015-01-01

    To analyse the natural history of extra-abdominal wall desmoid-type fibromatosis (DF) and compare outcome in patients who underwent initial surgery with those who did not. All consecutive patients affected by primary sporadic extra-abdominal wall DF observed between January 1992 and December 2012 were included. Patients were divided into surgical (SG) or non-surgical groups (NSG) according to initial treatment. Relapse free survival was calculated for SG, and crude cumulative incidence (CCI) of switching to surgery or other treatments for NSG. 216 patients were identified, 94 in SG (43%), 122 in NSG (57%). A shift towards a more systematic use of a conservative approach (78% of all comers) was observed in the latter years (2006-2012), although a small proportion of patients (28%) had been offered the conservative strategy even in the early period (1992-2005). Median follow-up (FU) was 49 mo. (interquartile (IQ), 20-89 mo.), 76 months for SG and 39 months for NSG. 5-year relapse-free survival (RFS) for SG was 80% (95% confidence interval (CI), 72-89%). For the NSG, 5-year CCI of switching to surgery was 5% (95% CI: 1.7%, 14%), and 51% to other treatments (95% CI: 41%, 65%). 27 (20%) NSG patients underwent spontaneous regression. A non-surgical approach to extra-abdominal wall DF allowed surgery to be avoided in the majority of patients. This approach can be safely proposed and surgery offered as an option in selected cases. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Immersive Virtual Reality for Visualization of Abdominal CT.

    PubMed

    Lin, Qiufeng; Xu, Zhoubing; Li, Bo; Baucom, Rebeccah; Poulose, Benjamin; Landman, Bennett A; Bodenheimer, Robert E

    2013-03-28

    Immersive virtual environments use a stereoscopic head-mounted display and data glove to create high fidelity virtual experiences in which users can interact with three-dimensional models and perceive relationships at their true scale. This stands in stark contrast to traditional PACS-based infrastructure in which images are viewed as stacks of two-dimensional slices, or, at best, disembodied renderings. Although there has substantial innovation in immersive virtual environments for entertainment and consumer media, these technologies have not been widely applied in clinical applications. Here, we consider potential applications of immersive virtual environments for ventral hernia patients with abdominal computed tomography imaging data. Nearly a half million ventral hernias occur in the United States each year, and hernia repair is the most commonly performed general surgery operation worldwide. A significant problem in these conditions is communicating the urgency, degree of severity, and impact of a hernia (and potential repair) on patient quality of life. Hernias are defined by ruptures in the abdominal wall (i.e., the absence of healthy tissues) rather than a growth (e.g., cancer); therefore, understanding a hernia necessitates understanding the entire abdomen. Our environment allows surgeons and patients to view body scans at scale and interact with these virtual models using a data glove. This visualization and interaction allows users to perceive the relationship between physical structures and medical imaging data. The system provides close integration of PACS-based CT data with immersive virtual environments and creates opportunities to study and optimize interfaces for patient communication, operative planning, and medical education.

  20. Immersive virtual reality for visualization of abdominal CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Qiufeng; Xu, Zhoubing; Li, Bo; Baucom, Rebeccah; Poulose, Benjamin; Landman, Bennett A.; Bodenheimer, Robert E.

    2013-03-01

    Immersive virtual environments use a stereoscopic head-mounted display and data glove to create high fidelity virtual experiences in which users can interact with three-dimensional models and perceive relationships at their true scale. This stands in stark contrast to traditional PACS-based infrastructure in which images are viewed as stacks of two dimensional slices, or, at best, disembodied renderings. Although there has substantial innovation in immersive virtual environments for entertainment and consumer media, these technologies have not been widely applied in clinical applications. Here, we consider potential applications of immersive virtual environments for ventral hernia patients with abdominal computed tomography imaging data. Nearly a half million ventral hernias occur in the United States each year, and hernia repair is the most commonly performed general surgery operation worldwide. A significant problem in these conditions is communicating the urgency, degree of severity, and impact of a hernia (and potential repair) on patient quality of life. Hernias are defined by ruptures in the abdominal wall (i.e., the absence of healthy tissues) rather than a growth (e.g., cancer); therefore, understanding a hernia necessitates understanding the entire abdomen. Our environment allows surgeons and patients to view body scans at scale and interact with these virtual models using a data glove. This visualization and interaction allows users to perceive the relationship between physical structures and medical imaging data. The system provides close integration of PACS-based CT data with immersive virtual environments and creates opportunities to study and optimize interfaces for patient communication, operative planning, and medical education.

  1. Doxycycline alters collagen composition following ventral hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Tharappel, Job C; Harris, Jennifer W; Totten, Crystal; Zwischenberger, Brittany A; Roth, John S

    2017-04-01

    Doxycycline, a nonspecific metalloproteinase (MMP) inhibitor, has been demonstrated to impact the strength of the polypropylene (PP) mesh-repaired hernia with an increase in the deposition of collagen type 1. The impact of doxycycline with porcine acellular dermal matrices (PADM) is unknown; therefore, we evaluated the impact of doxycycline administration upon hernia repair with PP and PADM mesh. Sprague-Dawley rats weighing ~400 g underwent laparotomy with creation of a midline ventral hernia. After a 27-day recovery, animals were randomly assigned to four groups of eight and underwent intraperitoneal underlay hernia repair with either PP or PADM. Groups were assigned to daily normal saline (S) or daily doxycycline in normal saline 10 mg/kg (D) via oral gavage for 8 weeks beginning 24 h preoperatively. Animals were euthanized at 8 weeks and underwent tensiometric testing of the abdominal wall and western blot analyses for collagen subtypes and MMPs. Thirty-two animals underwent successful hernia creation and repair with either PADM or PP. At 8 weeks, 15 of 16 PP-implanted animals survived with only 12 of 16 PADM-implanted animals surviving. There were no differences in the mesh to fascial interface tensiometric strength between groups. Densitometric counts in the PADM-D group demonstrated increased collagen type 1 compared to PP-S (PADM-D [1286.5], PADM-S [906.9], PP-S [700.4], p = 0.037) and decreased collagen type 3 compared to PP-S (PADM-D [7446.9], PADM-S [8507.6], PP-S [11,297.1], p = 0.01). MMP-9 levels were increased in PADM-D (PP-S vs. PADM-D, p = 0.04), while MMP-2 levels were similar between PADM-D and PADM-S, respectively. Collagen type 1 deposition at the mesh to fascial interface is enhanced following administration of doxycycline in ventral hernia repairs with porcine acellular dermal matrices. Doxycycline administration may have implications for enhancing hernia repair outcomes using biologic mesh.

  2. Anaesthetic injection versus ischemic compression for the pain relief of abdominal wall trigger points in women with chronic pelvic pain.

    PubMed

    Montenegro, Mary L L S; Braz, Carolina A; Rosa-e-Silva, Julio C; Candido-dos-Reis, Francisco J; Nogueira, Antonio A; Poli-Neto, Omero B

    2015-12-01

    Chronic pelvic pain is a common condition among women, and 10 to 30 % of causes originate from the abdominal wall, and are associated with trigger points. Although little is known about their pathophysiology, variable methods have been practiced clinically. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of local anaesthetic injections versus ischemic compression via physical therapy for pain relief of abdominal wall trigger points in women with chronic pelvic pain. We conducted a parallel group randomized trial including 30 women with chronic pelvic pain with abdominal wall trigger points. Subjects were randomly assigned to one of two intervention groups. One group received an injection of 2 mL 0.5 % lidocaine without a vasoconstrictor into a trigger point. In the other group, ischemic compression via physical therapy was administered at the trigger points three times, with each session lasting for 60 s, and a rest period of 30 s between applications. Both treatments were administered during one weekly session for four weeks. Our primary outcomes were satisfactory clinical response rates and percentages of pain relief. Our secondary outcomes are pain threshold and tolerance at the trigger points. All subjects were evaluated at baseline and 1, 4, and 12 weeks after the interventions. The study was conducted at a tertiary hospital that was associated with a university providing assistance predominantly to working class women who were treated by the public health system. Clinical response rates and pain relief were significantly better at 1, 4, and 12 weeks for those receiving local anaesthetic injections than ischemic compression via physical therapy. The pain relief of women treated with local anaesthetic injections progressively improved at 1, 4, and 12 weeks after intervention. In contrast, women treated with ischemic compression did not show considerable changes in pain relief after intervention. In the local anaesthetic injection group, pain threshold

  3. Parastomal hernias after radical cystectomy and ileal conduit diversion

    PubMed Central

    Donahue, Timothy F.

    2016-01-01

    Parastomal hernia, defined as an "incisional hernia related to an abdominal wall stoma", is a frequent complication after conduit urinary diversion that can negatively impact quality of life and present a clinically significant problem for many patients. Parastomal hernia (PH) rates may be as high as 65% and while many patients are asymptomatic, in some series up to 30% of patients require surgical intervention due to pain, leakage, ostomy appliance problems, urinary obstruction, and rarely bowel obstruction or strangulation. Local tissue repair, stoma relocation, and mesh repairs have been performed to correct PH, however, long-term results have been disappointing with recurrence rates of 30%–76% reported after these techniques. Due to high recurrence rates and the potential morbidity of PH repair, efforts have been made to prevent PH development at the time of the initial surgery. Randomized trials of circumstomal prophylactic mesh placement at the time of colostomy and ileostomy stoma formation have shown significant reductions in PH rates with acceptably low complication profiles. We have placed prophylactic mesh at the time of ileal conduit creation in patients at high risk for PH development and found it to be safe and effective in reducing the PH rates over the short-term. In this review, we describe the clinical and radiographic definitions of PH, the clinical impact and risk factors associated with its development, and the use of prophylactic mesh placement for patients undergoing ileal conduit urinary diversion with the intent of reducing PH rates. PMID:27437533

  4. Multiparametric evaluation of risk factors associated to seroma formation in abdominal wall surgery.

    PubMed

    Licari, L; Salamone, G; Parinisi, Z; Campanella, S; Sabatino, C; Ciolino, G; De Marco, P; Falco, N; Boventre, S; Gulotta, G

    2017-01-01

    Incisional hernia is one of the main topics in the general surgery since there is not a unanimous consensus concerning to the best surgical methodology to adopt. It seems that prosthetic surgery is the best technique, even if responsible for the development of periprosthetic seroma. The aim of this study is to assess whether the preoperative abnormalities of the bio-humoral parameters may be considered as risk factors for seroma. From July 2016 to July 2017 at the "Policlinico Paolo Giaccone", Palermo, Department of Emergency Surgery, 56 patients included in this study, underwent laparotomic mesh repair. The inclusion criteria were: age > 18 years, incisional hernia W2R0 according to the Chevrel classification and a monoperator technique. The main variables were: sex, age, BMI, smoke, ASA score, and co-morbidities. Among the main serum-blood variables: natraemia, kalaemia, chloraemia, calcaemia, PCR, level of glucose, creatinine, albumin and proteins in the blood. The data were analyzed using SPSS software. Univariate analysis highlighted hypo- and hyper-natraemia, hyper-kalaemia, hypo-chloraemia, high levels of PCR, hyper-glycemia, low level of serum-blood albumin and proteins, as statistically significant variables. Multivariate analysis revealed a p<0.05 for PCR, hypo-albuminemia and total serum-blood-protein level. Alterations of pre-operative bio-humoral parameters could be associated to a greater risk of seroma development. A better understanding of such alterations may lead to more efficient risk stratification methods. This could be essential to better address the medical resources, reducing the post-operative complications and the outpatient controls as well as the risk associated to seroma.

  5. Inguinoscrotal hernia containing the urinary bladder successfully repaired using laparoscopic transabdominal preperitoneal repair technique: A case report.

    PubMed

    Tazaki, Tatsuya; Sasaki, Masaru; Kohyama, Mohei; Sugiyama, Yoichi; Uegami, Shinnosuke; Shintakuya, Ryuta; Imamura, Yuji; Nakamitsu, Atsushi

    2018-05-23

    We report herein a patient with an inguinoscrotal hernia containing the urinary bladder. The hernia was safely repaired using the laparoscopic transabdominal preperitoneal repair technique. A 76-year-old man was admitted to our hospital with abdominal pain, vomiting, and diarrhea. His scrotum was swollen to fist size. Abdominal CT showed herniation of the sigmoid colon and the bladder into the right inguinal region, and his abdominal pain was attributed to incarceration of the sigmoid colon; this was manually reduced. About 1 month later, we performed transabdominal preperitoneal repair. After the direct hernial orifice was identified, the bladder was noted to be sliding from the medial side of the hernia; this was reduced. Peeling on the medial side was carried out to the middle of the abdominal wall, and the myopectineal orifice was covered with mesh. The patient was discharged on postoperative day 1. © 2018 Japan Society for Endoscopic Surgery, Asia Endosurgery Task Force and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  6. A rare case of severe third degree friction burns and large Morel-Lavallee lesion of the abdominal wall.

    PubMed

    Brown, Darnell J; Lu, Kuo Jung G; Chang, Kristina; Levin, Jennifer; Schulz, John T; Goverman, Jeremy

    2018-01-01

    Morel-Lavallee lesions (MLLs) are rare internal degloving injuries typically caused by blunt traumatic injuries and most commonly occur around the hips and in association with pelvic or acetabular fractures. MLL is often overlooked in the setting of poly-trauma; therefore, clinicians must maintain a high degree of suspicion and be familiar with the management of such injuries, especially in obese poly-trauma patients. We present a 30-year-old female pedestrian struck by a motor vehicle who sustained multiple long bone fractures, a mesenteric hematoma, and full-thickness abdominal skin friction burn which masked a significant underlying abdominal MLL. The internal degloving caused significant devascularization of the overlying soft tissue and skin which required surgical drainage of hematoma, abdominal wall reconstruction with tangential excision, allografting, negative pressure wound therapy, and ultimately autografting. MLL is a rare, often overlooked, internal degloving injury. Surgeons must maintain a high index of suspicion when dealing with third degree friction burns as they may mask underlying injuries such as MLL, and a delay in diagnosis can lead to increased morbidity.

  7. Hernia sac of indirect inguinal hernia: invagination, excision, or ligation?

    PubMed

    Othman, I; Hady, H A

    2014-04-01

    This study compares the effect of invaginating excision of hernia sac without ligation with the traditional method of high ligation of the hernia sac on postoperative pain and recurrence. This multicenter prospective randomized study included 152 patients with 167 primary indirect inguinal hernias. In group I (54 hernias), the sac was not opened and was inverted with the finger into the peritoneal cavity. In group E (56 hernias), the sac was excised at the neck without ligation. In group L (57 hernias), the sac was transfixed at the neck and excised in the traditional manner. The repair of the posterior wall of the inguinal canal was done according to Lichtenstein tension-free technique. Mean length of follow-up was 81.50 ± 22.34, 79.35 ± 26.76, and 77.83 ± 21.26 months, respectively. Postoperative seroma occurred in 1 patient (0.60%) in group E and 1 patient (0.60%) in group L. Surgical site infection occurred in 2 patients (1.20%) in group I, 1 patient (0.60%) in group E, and 2 patients (1.20%) in group L. Mean postoperative pain score was 3.04 ± 2.11, 3.98 ± 2.33 and 4.06 ± 2.43, respectively (p: 0.049). Chronic pain occurred in 3 patients in group I (1.80%), 3 patients in group E (1.80%), and 5 patients in group L (3.00%) (p: 0.749). The difference between the complications in three groups was statistically insignificant (p: 0.887). Hernia recurrence occurred in 3 patients (1.80%) in group I, 1 patient (0.60%) in group E, and 1 patient (0.60%) in group L (p: 0.429). Invagination and excision of the hernia sac do not have adverse effects on repair integrity. They limit the dissection and reduce the morbidity and risk of injury to the spermatic cord and surrounded structures. They are safer and more appropriate for repair of sliding hernia. Ligation of the hernia sac in inguinal hernia surgery is not only unnecessary and time consuming but also leads to increased postoperative pain. Recurrence rates are statistically unaffected by not ligating the sac.

  8. Lateral repair of parastomal hernia.

    PubMed Central

    Amin, S. N.; Armitage, N. C.; Abercrombie, J. F.; Scholefield, J. H.

    2001-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Parastomal hernia is a common complication of stoma construction. Although the majority of patients are asymptomatic, about 10% require surgical correction. AIMS: We describe a new surgical approach for the repair of parastomal hernias, which avoids both the need for laparotomy and stoma mobilization. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Nine patients (4 female) with parastomal hernia underwent surgical repair. Median age was 55 years (range 38-73 years). There were 8 para-ileostomy herniae and one paracolostomy hernia. A lateral incision was made approximately 10 cm from the stoma, and carried down to the rectus sheath. The dissection was carried medially towards the stoma, and around the defect in the abdominal musculature. The hernia sac was excised when possible and the fascial defect closed with non-absorbable, monofilament suture. A polyprolene mesh was placed round the stoma by making a slit in the mesh. The skin was closed with subcuticular monofilament absorbable suture. RESULTS: All patients returned to normal diet on the first postoperative day, and were discharged from hospital within 72 h. There were no wound infections, and no recurrences after a median follow up of 6 months (range 3-12 months). DISCUSSION: The technique we describe is simple and avoids the need of laparotomy. The mucocutaneous junction of the stoma is not disturbed, reducing the risk of contamination of the mesh, stenosis or retraction of the stoma. Grooving of the stoma and difficulty in fitting appliances is avoided because the wound is not placed near the mucocutaneous junction. This approach may be superior to other mesh repairs for parastomal hernia. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:11432142

  9. Passive mechanical properties of rat abdominal wall muscles suggest an important role of the extracellular connective tissue matrix.

    PubMed

    Brown, Stephen H M; Carr, John Austin; Ward, Samuel R; Lieber, Richard L

    2012-08-01

    Abdominal wall muscles have a unique morphology suggesting a complex role in generating and transferring force to the spinal column. Studying passive mechanical properties of these muscles may provide insights into their ability to transfer force among structures. Biopsies from rectus abdominis (RA), external oblique (EO), internal oblique (IO), and transverse abdominis (TrA) were harvested from male Sprague-Dawley rats, and single muscle fibers and fiber bundles (4-8 fibers ensheathed in their connective tissue matrix) were isolated and mechanically stretched in a passive state. Slack sarcomere lengths were measured and elastic moduli were calculated from stress-strain data. Titin molecular mass was also measured from single muscle fibers. No significant differences were found among the four abdominal wall muscles in terms of slack sarcomere length or elastic modulus. Interestingly, across all four muscles, slack sarcomere lengths were quite long in individual muscle fibers (>2.4 µm), and demonstrated a significantly longer slack length in comparison to fiber bundles (p < 0.0001). Also, the extracellular connective tissue matrix provided a stiffening effect and enhanced the resistance to lengthening at long muscle lengths. Titin molecular mass was significantly less in TrA compared to each of the other three muscles (p < 0.0009), but this difference did not correspond to hypothesized differences in stiffness. Copyright © 2012 Orthopaedic Research Society.

  10. Carbon nanotubes as VEGF carriers to improve the early vascularization of porcine small intestinal submucosa in abdominal wall defect repair

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhengni; Feng, Xueyi; Wang, Huichun; Ma, Jun; Liu, Wei; Cui, Daxiang; Gu, Yan; Tang, Rui

    2014-01-01

    Insufficient early vascularization in biological meshes, resulting in limited host tissue incorporation, is thought to be the primary cause for the failure of abdominal wall defect repair after implantation. The sustained release of exogenous angiogenic factors from a biocompatible nanomaterial might be a way to overcome this limitation. In the study reported here, multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNT) were functionalized by plasma polymerization to deliver vascular endothelial growth factor165 (VEGF165). The novel VEGF165-controlled released system was incorporated into porcine small intestinal submucosa (PSIS) to construct a composite scaffold. Scaffolds incorporating varying amounts of VEGF165-loaded functionalized MWNT were characterized in vitro. At 5 weight percent MWNT, the scaffolds exhibited optimal properties and were implanted in rats to repair abdominal wall defects. PSIS scaffolds incorporating VEGF165-loaded MWNT (VEGF–MWNT–PSIS) contributed to early vascularization from 2–12 weeks postimplantation and obtained more effective collagen deposition and exhibited improved tensile strength at 24 weeks postimplantation compared to PSIS or PSIS scaffolds, incorporating MWNT without VEGF165 loading (MWNT–PSIS). PMID:24648727

  11. Actinomycotic abscess of the anterior abdominal wall: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Pitot, D; De Moor, V; Demetter, P; Place, S; Gelin, M; El Nakadi, I

    2008-01-01

    Actinomycosis is a rare, chronic, suppurative, pseudotumoral illness caused by an anaerobic gram positive organism usually Actinomyces israelii which can mimick a tumoral pathology leading to a mutilating surgical resection. We report a case of abdominal actinomycosis and a literature review.

  12. Reproducibility of The Abdominal and Chest Wall Position by Voluntary Breath-Hold Technique Using a Laser-Based Monitoring and Visual Feedback System

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Katsumasa; Shioyama, Yoshiyuki; Nomoto, Satoru

    2007-05-01

    Purpose: The voluntary breath-hold (BH) technique is a simple method to control the respiration-related motion of a tumor during irradiation. However, the abdominal and chest wall position may not be accurately reproduced using the BH technique. The purpose of this study was to examine whether visual feedback can reduce the fluctuation in wall motion during BH using a new respiratory monitoring device. Methods and Materials: We developed a laser-based BH monitoring and visual feedback system. For this study, five healthy volunteers were enrolled. The volunteers, practicing abdominal breathing, performed shallow end-expiration BH (SEBH), shallow end-inspiration BH (SIBH), and deep end-inspirationmore » BH (DIBH) with or without visual feedback. The abdominal and chest wall positions were measured at 80-ms intervals during BHs. Results: The fluctuation in the chest wall position was smaller than that of the abdominal wall position. The reproducibility of the wall position was improved by visual feedback. With a monitoring device, visual feedback reduced the mean deviation of the abdominal wall from 2.1 {+-} 1.3 mm to 1.5 {+-} 0.5 mm, 2.5 {+-} 1.9 mm to 1.1 {+-} 0.4 mm, and 6.6 {+-} 2.4 mm to 2.6 {+-} 1.4 mm in SEBH, SIBH, and DIBH, respectively. Conclusions: Volunteers can perform the BH maneuver in a highly reproducible fashion when informed about the position of the wall, although in the case of DIBH, the deviation in the wall position remained substantial.« less

  13. Laparoscopic totally extraperitoneal inguinal hernia repair: lessons learned from 3,100 hernia repairs over 15 years.

    PubMed

    Dulucq, Jean-Louis; Wintringer, Pascal; Mahajna, Ahmad

    2009-03-01

    Two revolutions in inguinal hernia repair surgery have occurred during the last two decades. The first was the introduction of tension-free hernia repair by Liechtenstein in 1989 and the second was the application of laparoscopic surgery to the treatment of inguinal hernia in the early 1990s. The purposes of this study were to assess the safety and effectiveness of laparoscopic totally extraperitoneal (TEP) repair and to discuss the technical changes that we faced on the basis of our accumulative experience. Patients who underwent an elective inguinal hernia repair at the Department of Abdominal Surgery at the Institute of Laparoscopic Surgery (ILS), Bordeaux, between June 1990 and May 2005 were enrolled retrospectively in this study. Patient demographic data, operative and postoperative course, and outpatient follow-up were studied. A total of 3,100 hernia repairs were included in the study. The majority of the hernias were repaired by TEP technique; the repair was done by transabdominal preperitoneal (TAPP) repair in only 3%. Eleven percent of the hernias were recurrences after conventional repair. Mean operative time was 17 min in unilateral hernia and 24 min in bilateral hernia. There were 36 hernias (1.2%) that required conversion: 12 hernias were converted to open anterior Liechtenstein and 24 to laparoscopic TAPP technique. The incidence of intraoperative complications was low. Most of the patients were discharged at the second day of the surgery. The overall postoperative morbidity rate was 2.2%. The incidence of recurrence rate was 0.35%. The recurrence rate for the first 200 repairs was 2.5%, but it decreased to 0.47% for the subsequent 1,254 hernia repairs According to our experience, in the hands of experienced laparoscopic surgeons, laparoscopic hernia repair seems to be the favored approach for most types of inguinal hernias. TEP is preferred over TAPP as the peritoneum is not violated and there are fewer intra-abdominal complications.

  14. Hiatal Hernia

    MedlinePlus

    ... happens. But a hiatal hernia might be caused by: Age-related changes in your diaphragm Injury to the area, for example, after trauma or certain types of surgery Being born with an unusually large hiatus Persistent and intense pressure on the surrounding muscles, such as while coughing , ...

  15. Postoperative-treatment following open incisional hernia repair: A survey and a review of literature.

    PubMed

    Paasch, Christoph; Anders, Stefan; Strik, Martin W

    2018-05-01

    Incisional hernias of the abdominal wall are frequent complication after laparotomy (9-20%). Open incisional hernia repair with sublay mesh placement (SMP) on the posterior rectus sheath is described as being a sufficient method for repairing incisional hernia. In order to ensure wound healing and to therefore prevent recurrence, carrying an abdominal binder (AB) or a pressure dressing (PD) and physical rest for a certain time is the common postoperative recommendation, though the evidence for post-operative treatment is low. Hence, we conducted a survey to reveal the different recommendations given by surgical departments (SD). We conducted a survey among 65 German SDs of the XXX Hospital Group. The SDs were interviewed about the number of open incisional hernia repair with SMP in the time frame of 2013-2014, the known recurrence rate (RR), their recommended prescription of the AB/PD and the time of physical rest. The head physicians of 48 surgical departments answered the questionnaire. The survey revealed 42 different recommendations of postoperative-treatment. The majority of the SDs advices 4 weeks (20,5%) of physical rest and no prescription of the AB (29,5%). No correlation between the known RR and the duration of physical rest was detected. No head physician's prescribes a PD. Due to our findings we assume that a short period of physical rest is a considerable postoperative treatment following an open incisional hernia repair with SMP. By reducing the individual incapacity for work and immobility this would have a social-economic impact. The use of a PD may prevent seroma formation. Further investigations with randomized clinical trials are mandatory to support our hypothesis. Copyright © 2018 IJS Publishing Group Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Minilaparotomy with a gasless laparoscopic-assisted procedure by abdominal wall lifting for ileorectal anastomosis in patients with slow transit constipation.

    PubMed

    Tomita, Ryouichi; Fujisak, Shigeru

    2009-01-01

    Total colectomy with ileorectal anastomosis (IRA) is the most widely adopted procedure. The aim of this study was to introduce a minimally invasive procedure, i.e., minilaparotomy with laparoscopic-assisted procedure, by abdominal wall lifting for IRA in patients with slow transit constipation (STC). Six STC patients (6 women, aged 40-69 years, mean age 56.3 years) underwent minilaparotomy with gasless laparoscopic-assisted approach by abdominal wall lifting for IRA. The present procedure involved a 7-cm lower abdominal median incision made at the beginning of the operation. 12 mm ports were also placed in the right and left upper abdominal quadrant positions. The upper abdominal wall was lifted by a subcutaneous Kirshner wire. The small wound was pulled upward and/or laterally by retractors (abdominal lifting) and conventional surgical instruments were used through the wound. Occasionally laparoscopic assistance was employed. The terminal ileum with total colon was brought out through the small wound and transected, approximately 5 cm from the ileocecal valve. The colon was also resected at the level of promontrium. Then, IRA was performed in the instruments. The total surgical time was 197.7 +/- 33.9 min and the mean estimated blood loss was 176.8 +/- 42.2 ml. There was no surgical mortality. Post-operative hospitalization was 8.1 +/- 2.1 days. Six months after surgery, they defecated 1.8 +/- 2.1 times daily, have no abdominal distension, pain, and incontinence. The patients also take no laxatives. All subjects were satisfied with this procedure. Minilaparotomy with gasless laparoscopic-assisted IRA by abdominal wall lifting could be a safe and efficient technique in the treatment of STC.

  17. Avoiding Complications in Abdominal Wall Surgery: A Mathematical Model to Predict the Course of the Motor Innervation of the Rectus Abdominis.

    PubMed

    Tessone, Ariel; Nava, Maurizio; Blondeel, Phillip; Spano, Andrea

    2016-02-01

    Ever since its introduction, the transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap has become the mainstay of autologous breast reconstruction. However, concerns regarding donor site morbidity due to the breach of abdominal wall musculature integrity soon followed. Muscle-sparing techniques, eventually eliminating the muscle from the flap all-together with the deep inferior epigastric artery perforator flap, did not eliminate the problem of abdominal wall weakness. This led to the conclusion that motor innervation might be at fault. Studies have shown that even in the presence of an intact rectus abdominis muscle, and an intact anterior rectus sheath, denervation of the rectus abdominis muscle results in significant abdominal wall weakness leading to superior and inferior abdominal bulges, and abdominal herniation. Our aim was to establish a mathematical model to predict the location of the motor innervation to the rectus abdominis muscle, and thus provide surgeons with a tool that will allow them to reduce abdominal morbidity during deep inferior epigastric artery perforator and free muscle-sparing transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous surgery. We dissected 42 cadaveric hemiabdomens and mapped the course of the thoracolumbar nerves. We then standardized and analyzed our findings and presented them as a relative map which can be adjusted to body type and dimensions. Our dissections show that the motor innervation is closely related to the lateral vascular supply. Thus, when possible, we support the preferred utilization of the medial vascular supply, and the preservation of the lateral supply and motor innervation.

  18. Transumbilical endoscopic surgery for incarcerated inguinal hernias in infants and children.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xuewu; Peng, Lei; Sha, Yongliang; Song, Daiqiang

    2014-01-01

    To describe transumbilical laparoscopic herniorrhaphy after unsuccessful attempted manual reduction of incarcerated inguinal hernias in infants and children. In our two hospitals, two-trocar transumbilical endoscopic surgery (TUES) is the standard technique used to repair incarcerated inguinal hernias in infants and children. Seventeen patients (aged 8months to 2.5years; median, 15months; 15 boys, 2 girls) with incarcerated inguinal hernias underwent urgent laparoscopy after unsuccessful attempted manual reduction. Two 3- or 5-mm trocars were inserted into the abdomen through two intraumbilical incisions, under laparoscopic guidance. The hernia was reduced by combined external manual pressure and internal pulling with bowel forceps. After inspection of the bowel, a round needle with a 2-0 nonabsorbable suture was introduced into the peritoneal cavity through the anterior abdominal wall near the internal inguinal ring. The hernial orifice was closed with an extraperitoneal purse-string suture around the internal inguinal ring, and tied with an intraperitoneal knot. A similar procedure was performed on the contralateral side if the processus vaginalis was patent. The TUES procedure was successful in all patients. No conversions to open surgery were required. The mean operating time was 30min (range, 25-40min). All patients were discharged on the second postoperative day. No complications such as postoperative bleeding, hydrocele, or scrotal edema were observed. The mean follow-up period was 15months. No cases of testicular atrophy, hypotrophy, or hernia recurrence were reported. Our preliminary experience with using TUES for the treatment of incarcerated inguinal hernias in infants and children had satisfactory outcomes. This technique appeared to be safe, effective, and reliable, and had excellent cosmetic results. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Amyand's hernia: A case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Shaban, Youssef; Elkbuli, Adel; McKenney, Mark; Boneva, Dessy

    2018-05-07

    An Amyand hernia is a rare disease where the appendix is found within an inguinal hernia sac. This rare entity is named after the French born English surgeon, Dr. Claudius Amyand. Inguinal hernias are one of the most common surgeries that a general surgeon performs with more than 20 million inguinal hernia repairs performed yearly worldwide. The incidence of finding an appendix within the hernia sac is rare, occurring in less than 1% of inguinal hernia patients and when complications arise such as inflammation, perforation, or abscess formation it becomes exceptionally rare with an incidence of about 0.1%. A 59-year-old male with a history of a previously reducible right inguinal hernia presented to the Emergency Department with acute abdominal pain, right groin mass. Computed tomography (CT) confirmed a right incarcerated inguinal hernia with herniated loops of bowel within the right inguinal region. Patient was subsequently treated with an appendectomy and tension free hernia repair with mesh with a successful outcome. The current generally accepted treatment algorithm for Amyand's hernia is essentially contingent on the appendix's condition within the hernia sac. Controversy exists regarding the application of mesh in type 2 Amyand's hernia. More research is needed to provide surgeons with evidence-based standardized approaches for dealing with this unique situation. This case report reviews a rare entity known as an Amyand's hernia that presented as an incarcerated hernia that was diagnosed intraoperatively with an inflamed appendix, recognized as a type 2 Amyand's hernia. Copyright © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  20. Tissue factor levels and the fibrinolytic system in thin and thick intraluminal thrombus and underlying walls of abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Siennicka, Aldona; Zuchowski, Marta; Kaczmarczyk, Mariusz; Cnotliwy, Miłosław; Clark, Jeremy Simon; Jastrzębska, Maria

    2018-03-20

    The hemostatic system cooperates with proteolytic degradation in processes allowing abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) formation. In previous studies, it has been suggested that aneurysm rupture depends on intraluminal thrombus (ILT) thickness, which varies across each individual aneurysm. We hypothesized that hemostatic components differentially accumulate in AAA tissue in relation to ILT thickness. Thick (A1) and thin (B1) segments of ILTs and aneurysm wall sections A (adjacent to A1) and B (adjacent to B1) from one aneurysm sac were taken from 35 patients undergoing elective repair. Factor levels were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay of protein extract. Tissue factor (TF) activities were significantly higher in thinner segments of AAA (B1 vs A1, P = .003; B vs A, P < .001; B vs A1, P < .001; B vs B1, P = .001). Significantly higher tissue plasminogen activator was found in thick thrombus-covered wall segments (A) than in B, A1, and B1 (P = .015, P < .001, and P < .001, respectively). Plasminogen concentrations were highest in ILT. Concentrations of α 2 -antiplasmin in thin ILT adjacent walls (B) were higher compared with wall (A) adjacent to thick ILT (P = .021) and thick ILT (A1; P < .001). Significant correlations between levels of different factors were mostly found in thick ILT (A1). However, no correlations were found at B sites, except for a correlation between plasmin and TF activities (r = 0.55; P = .004). These results suggest that higher TF activities are present in thinner AAA regions. These parameters and local fibrinolysis may be part of the processes leading to destruction of the aneurysm wall. Copyright © 2018 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. A Review of the Surgical Management of Perineal Hernias in Dogs.

    PubMed

    Gill, Sukhjit Singh; Barstad, Robert D

    2018-05-14

    Perineal hernia refers to the failure of the muscular pelvic diaphragm to support the rectal wall, resulting in herniation of pelvic and, occasionally, abdominal viscera into the subcutaneous perineal region. The proposed causes of pelvic diaphragm weakness include tenesmus associated with chronic prostatic disease or constipation, myopathy, rectal abnormalities, and gonadal hormonal imbalances. The most common presentation of perineal hernia in dogs is a unilateral or bilateral nonpainful swelling of the perineum. Clinical signs do occur, but not always. Clinical signs may include constipation, obstipation, dyschezia, tenesmus, rectal prolapse, stranguria, or anuria. The definitive diagnosis of perineal hernia is based on clinical signs and findings of weak pelvic diaphragm musculature during a digital rectal examination. In dogs, perineal hernias are mostly treated by surgical intervention. Appositional herniorrhaphy is sometimes difficult to perform as the levator ani and coccygeus muscles are atrophied and unsuitable for use. Internal obturator muscle transposition is the most commonly used technique. Additional techniques include superficial gluteal and semitendinosus muscle transposition, in addition to the use of synthetic implants and biomaterials. Pexy techniques may be used to prevent rectal prolapse and bladder and prostate gland displacement. Postoperative care involves analgesics, antibiotics, a low-residue diet, and stool softeners.

  2. Laparoscopic repair of bilateral and recurrent hernias.

    PubMed

    Frankum, C E; Ramshaw, B J; White, J; Duncan, T D; Wilson, R A; Mason, E M; Lucas, G; Promes, J

    1999-09-01

    The optimal inguinal hernia repair has been controversial for decades. Since the advent of minimally invasive surgery, laparoscopic techniques have added to the controversy. Laparoscopic hernia repair has been advocated by many experts for the repair of bilateral and recurrent inguinal hernias. This study reviews the experience of a single community-based teaching hospital using the total extraperitoneal (TEP)-approach laparoscopic hernia repair for treating patients with bilateral and/or recurrent inguinal hernias. Since the TEP approach was adopted in June 1993, a total of 457 patients were treated for bilateral (322 patients) and/or recurrent (175) inguinal hernias (40 patients had recurrent and bilateral hernias). A total of 779 hernias were repaired with this technique. The average age of this patient group was 47 years, and there were 413 males and 44 females. Operative time averaged 68.3 minutes per patient, and there were 26 (5.7%) minor complications. There were 2 (0.4%) major complications, an enterotomy and a cystotomy, both early in the series and both in patients with previous lower abdominal surgery. There have been no deaths. With an average follow-up of 30 months (range, 1-60 months), there have been three (0.2%) recurrences. These recurrences were due to technical problems (inadequate mesh coverage), and each was repaired with a laparoscopic transabdominal approach or an anterior open approach. The use of the TEP-approach laparoscopic hernia repair is safe and effective in patients with recurrent and/or bilateral inguinal hernias.

  3. Umbilical hernia--a potential donor-site complication of fat injection laryngoplasty.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Feng-Shiang; Lin, Yaoh-Shiang; Chang, Ying-Nan; Lee, Jih-Chin

    2012-11-01

    Injection laryngoplasty with autologous fat appears to be an effective and simple technique for the treatment of patients with glottic insufficiency in comparison with other surgical techniques. Despite of its advantages, associated complications have also been reported, including immediate donor-site morbidity (eg, hematoma and abscess), fat extrusion of the injection site, and delayed manifestation of vocal granuloma or overinjected vocal folds. In this article, a patient suffering from accidental injury to the deep abdominal fascia without peritoneal penetration in the fat harvest procedure is presented. Three months after the fat injection laryngoplasty, an umbilical hernia was proved to occur via the clinical imaging. Several etiologies are supposed to induce the herniation of intraabdominal structures, including surgeon's incaution, abdominal obesity, intense wound inflammation and fibrosis, and the native weak point of the abdominal wall around the umbilicus. This case provides information that overdepth and negligence in fat harvest may injure the deep abdominal fascia, then possibly causing the umbilical hernia as a delayed donor-site complication. Copyright © 2012 The Voice Foundation. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. [Tongue, trachea, abdominal wall, uterus, and penis allografts. More details on some other clinical applications of vascularized composite tissue allotransplantation].

    PubMed

    Petit, F

    2007-10-01

    The first hand and face allografts opened a new era in medicine history: a time when allotransplantation and reconstructive surgery coupled their principles. Their success and their development made composite tissue allotransplantation (CTA) a clinical reality for our speciality. Although still recent and limited, experience from this new surgical practice will widen with feedback from the first clinical cases and with experience gained from more clinical cases, more anatomical areas, more type of allografts, more surgical techniques, more immunosuppressive regimens. Tongue, trachea, abdominal wall, uterus, penis allotransplantations have been performed, contemporarily. Whatever the future and the benefits for the selected patients might have been, reports from these - un- and misknown - cases contribute to a better knowledge of CTA, its therapeutic potential, its limits, its challenges.

  5. A Relation Between Near-Wall Particle-Hemodynamics and Onset of Thrombus Formation in Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Basciano, C.; Kleinstreuer, C.; Hyun, S.; Finol, E. A.

    2014-01-01

    A novel computational particle-hemodynamics analysis of key criteria for the onset of an intraluminal thrombus (ILT) in a patient-specific abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is presented. The focus is on enhanced platelet and white blood cell residence times as well as their elevated surface-shear loads in near-wall regions of the AAA sac. The generalized results support the hypothesis that a patient's AAA geometry and associated particle-hemodynamics have the potential to entrap activated blood particles, which will play a role in the onset of ILT. Although the ILT history of only a single patient was considered, the modeling and simulation methodology provided allow for the development of an efficient computational tool to predict the onset of ILT formation in complex patient-specific cases. PMID:21373952

  6. Silk fibroin hydrogel as physical barrier for prevention of post hernia adhesion.

    PubMed

    Konar, S; Guha, R; Kundu, B; Nandi, S; Ghosh, T K; Kundu, S C; Konar, A; Hazra, S

    2017-02-01

    Adhesion formation remains a major complication following hernia repair surgery. Physical barriers though effective for adhesion prevention in clinical settings are associated with major disadvantages, therefore, needs further investigation. This study evaluates silk fibroin hydrogel as a physical barrier on polypropylene mesh for the prevention of adhesion following ventral hernia repair. Peritoneal explants were cultured on silk fibroin scaffold to evaluate its support for mesothelial cell growth. Full thickness uniform sized defects were created on the ventral abdominal wall of rabbits, and the defects were covered either with silk hydrogel coated polypropylene mesh or with plain polypropylene mesh as a control. The animals were killed after 1 month, and the adhesion formation was graded; healing response of peritoneum was evaluated by immunohistochemistry with calretinin, collagen staining of peritoneal sections, and expression of PCNA, collagen-I, TNFα, IL6 by real time PCR; and its adverse effect if any was determined. Silk fibroin scaffold showed excellent support for peritoneal cell growth in vitro and the cells expressed calretinin. A remarkable prevention of adhesion formation was observed in the animals implanted with silk hydrogel coated mesh compared to the control group; in these animals peritoneal healing was complete and predominantly by mesothelial cells with minimum fibrotic changes. Expression of inflammatory cytokines decreased compared to control animals, histology of abdominal organs, haematological and blood biochemical parameters remained normal. Therefore, silk hydrogel coating of polypropylene mesh can improve peritoneal healing, minimize adhesion formation, is safe and can augment the outcome of hernia surgery.

  7. A novel transperitoneal abdominal wall nerve block for postoperative pain in laparoscopic colorectal surgery.

    PubMed

    Nagata, Jun; Watanabe, Jun; Sawatsubashi, Yusuke; Akiyama, Masaki; Arase, Koichi; Minagawa, Noritaka; Torigoe, Takayuki; Hamada, Kotaro; Nakayama, Yoshifumi; Hirata, Keiji

    2017-04-04

    Although the laparoscopic approach reduces pain associated with abdominal surgery, postoperative pain remains a problem. Ultrasound-guided rectus sheath block and transversus abdominis plane block have become increasingly popular means of providing analgesia for laparoscopic surgery. Ninety patients were enrolled in this study. A laparoscopic puncture needle was inserted via the port, and levobupivacaine was injected into the correct plane through the peritoneum. The patients' postoperative pain intensity was assessed using a numeric rating scale. The effects of laparoscopic nerve block versus percutaneous anesthesia were compared. This novel form of transperitoneal anesthesia did not jeopardize completion of the operative procedures. The percutaneous approach required more time for performance of the procedure than the transperitoneal technique. This new analgesia technique can become an optional postoperative treatment regimen for various laparoscopic abdominal surgeries. What we mainly want to suggest is that the transperitoneal approach has the advantage of a higher completion rate. A percutaneous technique is sometimes difficult with patients who have severe obesity and/or coagulation disorders. Additional studies are required to evaluate its benefits. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Taiwan.

  8. Improvement of mesh recolonization in abdominal wall reconstruction with adipose vs. bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in a rodent model.

    PubMed

    van Steenberghe, M; Schubert, T; Guiot, Y; Goebbels, R M; Gianello, P

    2017-08-01

    Reconstruction of muscle defects remains a challenge. Our work assessed the potential of an engineered construct made of a human acellular collagen matrix (HACM) seeded with porcine mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to reconstruct abdominal wall muscle defects in a rodent model. This study compared 2 sources of MSCs (bone-marrow, BMSCs, and adipose, ASCs) in vitro and in vivo for parietal defect reconstruction. Cellular viability and growth factor release (VEGF, FGF-Beta, HGF, IGF-1, TGF-Beta) were investigated under normoxic/hypoxic culture conditions. Processed and recellularized HACMs were mechanically assessed. The construct was tested in vivo in full thickness abdominal wall defect treated with HACM alone vs. HACM+ASCs or BMSCs (n=14). Tissue remodeling was studied at day 30 for neo-angiogenesis and muscular reconstruction. A significantly lower secretion of IGF was observed with ASCs vs. BMSCs under hypoxic conditions (-97.6%, p<0.005) whereas significantly higher VEGF/FGF secretions were found with ASCs (+92%, p<0.001 and +72%, p<0.05, respectively). Processing and recellularization did not impair the mechanical properties of the HACM. In vivo, angiogenesis and muscle healing were significantly improved by the HACM+ASCs in comparison to BMSCs (p<0.05) at day 30. A composite graft made of an HACM seeded with ASCs can improve muscle repair by specific growth factor release in hypoxic conditions and by in vivo remodeling (neo-angiogenesis/graft integration) while maintaining mechanical properties. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Relationship between intra-abdominal pressure and vaginal wall movements during Valsalva in women with and without pelvic organ prolapse: technique development and early observations.

    PubMed

    Spahlinger, D M; Newcomb, L; Ashton-Miller, J A; DeLancey, J O L; Chen, Luyun

    2014-07-01

    To develop and test a method for measuring the relationship between the rise in intra-abdominal pressure and sagittal plane movements of the anterior and posterior vaginal walls during Valsalva in a pilot sample of women with and without prolapse. Mid-sagittal MRI images were obtained during Valsalva while changes in intra-abdominal pressure were measured via a bladder catheter in 5 women with cystocele, 5 women with rectocele, and 5 controls. The regional compliance of the anterior and posterior vagina wall support systems were estimated from the ratio of displacement (mm) of equidistant points along the anterior and posterior vaginal walls to intra-abdominal pressure rise (mmHg). The compliance of both anterior and posterior vaginal wall support systems varied along different regions of vaginal wall for all three groups, with the highest compliance found near the vaginal apex and the lowest near the introitus. Women with cystocele had more compliant anterior and posterior vaginal wall support systems than women with rectocele. The movement direction differs between cystocele and rectocele. In cystocele, the anterior vaginal wall moves mostly toward the vaginal orifice in the upper vagina, but in a ventral direction in the lower vagina. In rectocele, the direction of the posterior vaginal wall movement is generally toward the vaginal orifice. Movement of the vaginal wall and compliance of its support is quantifiable and was found to vary along the length of the vagina. Compliance was greatest in the upper vagina of all groups. Women with cystocele demonstrated the most compliant vaginal wall support.

  10. Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia (CDH) is defined by the presence of an orifice in the diaphragm, more often left and posterolateral that permits the herniation of abdominal contents into the thorax. The lungs are hypoplastic and have abnormal vessels that cause respiratory insufficiency and persistent pulmonary hypertension with high mortality. About one third of cases have cardiovascular malformations and lesser proportions have skeletal, neural, genitourinary, gastrointestinal or other defects. CDH can be a component of Pallister-Killian, Fryns, Ghersoni-Baruch, WAGR, Denys-Drash, Brachman-De Lange, Donnai-Barrow or Wolf-Hirschhorn syndromes. Some chromosomal anomalies involve CDH as well. The incidence is < 5 in 10,000 live-births. The etiology is unknown although clinical, genetic and experimental evidence points to disturbances in the retinoid-signaling pathway during organogenesis. Antenatal diagnosis is often made and this allows prenatal management (open correction of the hernia in the past and reversible fetoscopic tracheal obstruction nowadays) that may be indicated in cases with severe lung hypoplasia and grim prognosis. Treatment after birth requires all the refinements of critical care including extracorporeal membrane oxygenation prior to surgical correction. The best hospital series report 80% survival but it remains around 50% in population-based studies. Chronic respiratory tract disease, neurodevelopmental problems, neurosensorial hearing loss and gastroesophageal reflux are common problems in survivors. Much more research on several aspects of this severe condition is warranted. PMID:22214468

  11. Incarcerated Pediatric Hernias.

    PubMed

    Abdulhai, Sophia A; Glenn, Ian C; Ponsky, Todd A

    2017-02-01

    Indirect inguinal hernias are the most commonly incarcerated hernias in children, with a higher incidence in low birth weight and premature infants. Contralateral groin exploration to evaluate for a patent processus vaginalis or subclinical hernia is controversial, given that most never progress to clinical hernias. Most indirect inguinal hernias can be reduced nonoperatively. It is recommended to repair them in a timely fashion, even in premature infants. Laparoscopic repair of incarcerated inguinal hernia repair is considered a safe and effective alternative to conventional open herniorrhaphy. Other incarcerated pediatric hernias are extremely rare and may be managed effectively with laparoscopy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Fixation free femoral hernia repair with a 3D dynamic responsive implant. A case series report.

    PubMed

    Amato, G; Romano, G; Agrusa, A; Gordini, L; Gulotta, E; Erdas, E; Calò, P G

    2018-04-23

    To date, no gold standard for the surgical treatment of femoral hernia exists. Pure tissue repair as well as mesh/plug implantation, open or laparoscopic, are the most performed methods. Nevertheless, all these techniques need sutures or mesh fixation. This implies the risk of damaging sensitive structures of the femoral area, along with complications related to tissue tear and postoperative discomfort consequent to poor quality mesh incorporation. The present retrospective multicenter case series highlights the results of femoral hernia repair procedures performed with a 3D dynamic responsive implant in a cohort of 32 patients during a mean follow up of 27 months. Aiming to simplify the surgical procedure and reduce complications, a 3D dynamic responsive implant was delivered for femoral hernia repair, in a patient cohort. After returning the hernia sack to the abdominal cavity, the implant was simply delivered into the hernia defect where it remained, thanks to its inherent centrifugal expansion, obliterating the hernia opening without need of fixation. Postoperative pain assessment was determined using the VAS score system. The use of the 3D prosthetic device allowed for easier and faster surgical repair in a fixation free fashion. None of the typical fixation related complications occurred in the examined patients. Postoperative pain assessment with VAS score showed a very low level of pain, allowing the return of patients to normal activities in extremely reduced times. In the late postoperative period, no discomfort or chronic pain was reported. Femoral hernia repair with the 3D dynamic revealed a quick and safe placement procedure. The reduced pain intensity, as well as the absence of adverse events consequent to sutures or mesh fixation, seems to be a significant benefit of the motile compliance of the device. Furthermore, this 3D prosthesis has already proven to induce an enhanced probiotic response showing ingrowth in the implant of the typical tissue

  13. [Diagnosis of strangulated Spiegel hernia based on CT scan: about a case].

    PubMed

    Akpo, Geraud; Deme, Hamidou; Badji, Nfally; Niang, Fallou; Toure, Mohamadou; Niang, Ibrahima; Diouf, Malick; Niang, El Hadj

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a 86-year old woman with Spiegel hernia complicated by occlusion whose diagnosis was based on CT scan. She was examined in the Emergency Surgery Department for brutal onset of pain in the right iliac fossa associated with vomiting. On physical examination the patient was febrile (38.2° C). It showed hard, sensitive and mobile mass located in the right iliac fossa, with respect to both planes. Abdominal CT scan showed a hernia sac with the neck measuring 13 mm in the right iliac fossa, in front of the aponeurosis of the external oblique muscle. It contained fat and a small bowel loop (curved arrow) with two zones of transition giving a double beak-like appearance at the level of the neck. CT scan showed a lack of enhancement of the wall of the loop after administration of contrast material. The diagnosis of strangulated spiegel hernia associated with sign of arterial ischemia of the digestive wall was retained. Surgery was perfomed with simple postoperative management.

  14. Evaluation of human acellular dermis versus porcine acellular dermis in an in vivo model for incisional hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Ngo, Manh-Dan; Aberman, Harold M; Hawes, Michael L; Choi, Bryan; Gertzman, Arthur A

    2011-05-01

    Incisional hernias commonly occur following abdominal wall surgery. Human acellular dermal matrices (HADM) are widely used in abdominal wall defect repair. Xenograft acellular dermal matrices, particularly those made from porcine tissues (PADM), have recently experienced increased usage. The purpose of this study was to compare the effectiveness of HADM and PADM in the repair of incisional abdominal wall hernias in a rabbit model. A review from earlier work of differences between human allograft acellular dermal matrices (HADM) and porcine xenograft acellular dermal matrices (PADM) demonstrated significant differences (P < 0.05) in mechanical properties: Tensile strength 15.7 MPa vs. 7.7 MPa for HADM and PADM, respectively. Cellular (fibroblast) infiltration was significantly greater for HADM vs. PADM (Armour). The HADM exhibited a more natural, less degraded collagen by electrophoresis as compared to PADM. The rabbit model surgically established an incisional hernia, which was repaired with one of the two acellular dermal matrices 3 weeks after the creation of the abdominal hernia. The animals were euthanized at 4 and 20 weeks and the wounds evaluated. Tissue ingrowth into the implant was significantly faster for the HADM as compared to PADM, 54 vs. 16% at 4 weeks, and 58 vs. 20% for HADM and PADM, respectively at 20 weeks. The original, induced hernia defect (6 cm(2)) was healed to a greater extent for HADM vs. PADM: 2.7 cm(2) unremodeled area for PADM vs. 1.0 cm² for HADM at 20 weeks. The inherent uniformity of tissue ingrowth and remodeling over time was very different for the HADM relative to the PADM. No differences were observed at the 4-week end point. However, the 20-week data exhibited a statistically different level of variability in the remodeling rate with the mean standard deviation of 0.96 for HADM as contrasted to a mean standard deviation of 2.69 for PADM. This was significant with P < 0.05 using a one tail F test for the inherent

  15. Tomodensitometric survey of the distance between thoracic and abdominal vital organs and the wall according to BMI, abdominal diameter and gender: proposition of an indicative chart for the forensic activities.

    PubMed

    Venara, A; Gaudin, A; Lebigot, J; Airagnes, G; Hamel, J F; Jousset, N; Ridereau-Zins, C; Mauillon, D; Rouge-Maillart, C

    2013-06-10

    Forensic doctors are frequently asked by magistrates when dealing principally with knife wounds, about the depth of the blade which may have penetrated the victim's body. Without the use of imaging, it is often difficult to respond to this question, even in an approximate way. Knowledge of the various distances between organs and the skin wall would allow an assessment to be made of the minimum blade length required to obtain the injuries observed. The objective of this study is thus to determine average distances between the vital organs of the thorax and abdomen, and the skin wall, taking into account the person's body mass index (BMI). This is a prospective single-center study, carried out over a 2-month period at University Hospital in Angers. A sample of 200 people was studied. The inclusion criteria were as follows: all patients coming to the radiology department and the emergency department for an abdominal, thoracic or thoraco-abdominal scan with injection. The exclusion criteria included patients presenting a large lymphoma, a large abdominal or retroperitoneal tumor, a tumor in one of the organs targeted by our study and patients presenting ascites. The organs focused on were: the pericardium, pleura, aorta, liver, spleen, kidneys, abdominal aorta and femoral arteries. The shortest distance between the organ and the skin wall was noted. Median distances were calculated according to gender, abdominal diameter and BMI. We associated these values to propose an indicative chart which may be used by doctors in connection with their forensic activities. The problem of the depth of a wound is frequently exposed to the expert. Without a reliable tool, it is difficult to value and a personal interpretation is often done. Even if, in current days, tomodensitometry is frequently done in vivo or after death, measurement can be difficult because of the local conditions. We classified values according to the different factors of fat repartition (BMI, abdominal diameter

  16. Giant Ovarian Tumor Presenting as an Incarcerated Umbilical Hernia: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Aydın, Özgür; Onur, Erdal; Çelik, Nilufer Yiğit; Moray, Gökhan

    2009-01-01

    We report a rare case of a giant ovarian tumor presenting as an incarcerated umbilical hernia. A 61-yr-old woman was admitted to the hospital with severe abdominal pain, an umbilical mass, nausea and vomiting. On examination, a large, irreducible umbilical hernia was found. The woman underwent an urgent operation for a possible strangulated hernia. A large, multilocular tumor was found. The tumor was excised, and a total abdominal hysterectomy and bilateral salphingo-oophorectomy were performed. The woman was discharged 6 days after her admission. This is the first report of incarcerated umbilical hernia containing a giant ovarian tumor within the sac. PMID:19543424

  17. [Life with hiatal hernias and reflux disease. An historical synthesis and an update].

    PubMed

    Rossetti, M

    1993-01-01

    By long experience with the problems on hiatal hernias and reflux the author summarizes and analyzes errors and progress in development, interpretation, diagnostic methods and treatment. After the pioneer work done by Akerlund 1926 the hiatal hernia was a sometimes dangerous surgical target. It remained for a long time a gastroenterological prima donna, responsible of all sorts of symptoms. Thoracal or abdominal approach and repair were high risk procedures with logically bad results. After a long way of mistakes and researches hiatal hernias remain a concomitant factor of reflux disease and an important cause of mechanical complications and anemia by para-oesophageal and mixed forms. The studies about pathogenesis and consequences of the reflux are extensive and important in the second half of our century. The treatment of reflux disease was for a long time preponderantly surgical, since 1970 increasingly pharmacological. By critical review of many methods and technics the author describes the birth of fundoplication 1955, the standard procedure with the anterior wall, and analyzes the actual indications despite the long list of efficient drugs. The mixed or para-oesophageal forms of hiatal hernia remain always a surgical problem. The method of choice is here a double gastropexy with fundoplication after regulated partial closure of the big hiatus communis by abdominal approach. The choice of the surgical procedure and the quality of results depend of the school and competence of the surgeon. The rarity of the indication to surgery (nowadays between conventional and, perhaps, mini invasive possibilities) is a problem for the training-program of the young surgeons of the new generation.

  18. Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA)

    MedlinePlus

    ... plaque buildup causes the walls of the abdominal aorta to become weak and bulge outward like a ... treated? What is an abdominal aortic aneurysm? The aorta, the largest artery in the body, is a ...

  19. Free-breathing black-blood CINE fast-spin echo imaging for measuring abdominal aortic wall distensibility: a feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jyh-Miin; Patterson, Andrew J.; Chao, Tzu-Cheng; Zhu, Chengcheng; Chang, Hing-Chiu; Mendes, Jason; Chung, Hsiao-Wen; Gillard, Jonathan H.; Graves, Martin J.

    2017-05-01

    The paper reports a free-breathing black-blood CINE fast-spin echo (FSE) technique for measuring abdominal aortic wall motion. The free-breathing CINE FSE includes the following MR techniques: (1) variable-density sampling with fast iterative reconstruction; (2) inner-volume imaging; and (3) a blood-suppression preparation pulse. The proposed technique was evaluated in eight healthy subjects. The inner-volume imaging significantly reduced the intraluminal artifacts of respiratory motion (p  =  0.015). The quantitative measurements were a diameter of 16.3  ±  2.8 mm and wall distensibility of 2.0  ±  0.4 mm (12.5  ±  3.4%) and 0.7  ±  0.3 mm (4.1  ±  1.0%) for the anterior and posterior walls, respectively. The cyclic cross-sectional distensibility was 35  ±  15% greater in the systolic phase than in the diastolic phase. In conclusion, we developed a feasible CINE FSE method to measure the motion of the abdominal aortic wall, which will enable clinical scientists to study the elasticity of the abdominal aorta.

  20. Evaluation of the abdominal wall cicatrization of rabbits exposed to nicotine and undergone abdominoplasty using nylon thread or cyanoacrylate.

    PubMed

    Costa, Luciano Assis; Jardim, Paulo dos Reis; Macedo, Pedro Henrique Alvares Paiva; Amaral, Vânia da Fonseca; Silva, Alcino Lázaro da; Barbosa, Cirênio de Almeida

    2012-12-01

    To compare the wound healing of the abdominal wall of rabbits exposed to nicotine and submitted to abdominoplasty using 2-octyl cyanoacrylate or nylon thread for the surgery suture. Thirty two rabbits were used. They were divided in subgroups: A1, A2, B1 e B2. Group A received saline 0.9%; group B received nicotine, both groups for 14 days before surgery. We performed an abdominoplasty with a nylon suture into the A1 and B1 subgroups; as for A2 and B2 groups the suture was performed with cyanoacrylate. The euthanasia happened in the 14th post-operative day. After, we evaluated: swollen process, fibroblast proliferation, collagen, neovascularization, and macroscope and microscope epithelization of the scars. We observed the presence of eosinophils in all scars exposed to the cyanoacrylate, and a significant increase of neovascularization in the subgroup B2 comparing to the A2 one (p=0.037). The other variables haven't showed any statistical difference. Nicotine hasn't influenced the swollen process, the fibroblast proliferation, the presence of collagen, neither the epithelialization. The neovascularization showed cicatricial immaturity when comparing group A2 to group B2. The eosinophils in the scars repaired with glue showed that the substance has acted as an allergen.

  1. Organ culture in 3-dimensional matrix: in vitro model for evaluating biological compliance of synthetic meshes for abdominal wall repair.

    PubMed

    Dasdia, T; Bazzaco, S; Bottero, L; Buffa, R; Ferrero, S; Campanelli, G; Dolfini, E

    1998-01-01

    A new in vitro method to evaluate the early critical interactions between synthetic prosthetic materials and growing tissues is reported. The correct spatial organization and proper cell to cell interaction required to mimic the in vivo environment was obtained in a 3-dimensional (3-D) embryo organ culture. The clot formed by plasma and chick-embryo extract provided a natural 3-D extracellular matrix that was able to support the growth and differentiation of intestinal tissue dissected from 12-day-old chick embryos. Different materials used for the repair of abdominal wall defects were taken as standards; all the prosthetic materials were devoid of any evident cytotoxic potential over a 10-day culture period, so they did not interfere with the organogenesis process. A polyglactin mesh (Vicryl) was fully incorporated into the growing tissue, but early signs of its degradation were detectable. The biologically inert materials polyethylene terephthalate (Mersilene) and polypropylene (Marlex, Prolene, and Herniamesh) retained their structural integrity when incubated with cultured tissue at 37 degrees C, and they did not hinder cellular proliferation or fibroblast migration. However, the outgrowth behavior was very different while the connective tissue invaded the interstices of the polyethylene terephthalate mesh; the explants and the migrating cells were repelled by hydrophobic polypropylene meshes. These findings are in agreement with other reported results in in vivo studies. Therefore, this method can be considered as reliable and predictable for the evaluation of biopolymers.

  2. Access-related complications - an analysis of 6023 consecutive laparoscopic hernia repairs.

    PubMed

    2001-01-01

    In order to investigate incidence rates and types of access-related complications that may occur during laparoscopic hernioplasty, we carried out a systematic analysis of our collected results. The aim was to identify risk factors and to develop useful modifications of the surgical technique and the instrumentation used. Since we first introduced laparoscopic hernioplasty in our clinic, we have carried out standardised, prospective documentation of relevant data from all consecutive operations in an electronic database. We performed a systematic analysis of access-related complications and their possible influencing factors, taking into special account the type of instruments used, port-site and prior intra-abdominal operations. Between April 1993 and March 2000, 4857 consecutive patients received a total of 6023 laparoscopic hernia repairs. In 510 patients three-edged, sharp trocars were used and in 4347 patients conical obturators were used to insert the port. The incidence of access-related complications was 0.9% (44/4857) in the total collection (incision hernias 0.5%, bleeding from abdominal-wall vessels 0.2%, bowel injury 0.06%, wound infections 0.06%). Injuries to intra-abdominal or retroperitoneal vessels were not observed. A differentiated analysis of the various trocar types, taking into consideration the number of inserted ports, showed that for incisions outside the linea alba the incidence of bleeding from abdominal-wall vessels was 12 times higher (0.7%, 7/1020 versus 0.06%, 5/8694). The incidence of incision hernias increased significantly (1.2%, 12/1020 versus 0.02%, 2/8694; p = 0.03) when three-edged trocars were used, as opposed to conical obturators. Our results demonstrate that, outside the linea alba, three-edged trocars should no longer be used for portinsertion. The results of our differentiated analysis of laparoscopic hernia repairs, taking into account the type of obturator, the port-site and number of ports inserted, also can be applied

  3. Reconstruction of the symphysis pubis to repair a complex midline hernia in the setting of congenital bladder exstrophy

    PubMed Central

    Kohler, J. E.; Friedstat, J. S.; Jacobs, M. A.; Voelzke, B. B.; Foy, H. M.; Grady, R. W.; Gruss, J. S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose A 40-year-old man with congenital midline defect and wide pubic symphysis diastasis secondary to bladder exstrophy presented with a massive incisional hernia resulting from complications of multiple prior abdominal repairs. Using a multi-disciplinary team of general, plastic, and urologic surgeons, we performed a complex hernia repair including creation of a pubic symphysis with rib graft for inferior fixation of mesh. Methods The skin graft overlying the peritoneum was excised, and the posterior rectus sheath mobilized, then re-approximated. The previously augmented bladder and urethra were mobilized into the pelvis, after which a rib graft was constructed from the 7th rib and used to create a symphysis pubis using a mortise joint. This rib graft was used to fix the inferior portion of a 20 × 25 cm porcine xenograft mesh in a retro-rectus position. With the defect closed, prior skin scars were excised and the wound closed over multiple drains. Results The patient tolerated the procedure well. His post-operative course was complicated by a vesico-cutaneous fistula and associated urinary tract and wound infections. This resolved by drainage with a urethral catheter and bilateral percutaneous nephrostomies. The patient has subsequently healed well with an intact hernia repair. The increased intra-abdominal pressure from his intact abdominal wall has been associated with increased stress urinary incontinence. Conclusions Although a difficult operation prone to serious complications, reconstruction of the symphysis pubis is an effective means for creating an inferior border to affix mesh in complex hernia repairs associated with bladder exstrophy. PMID:25156539

  4. Is prophylactic embolization of the hepatic falciform artery needed before radioembolization in patients with 99mTc-MAA accumulation in the anterior abdominal wall?

    PubMed

    Ahmadzadehfar, Hojjat; Möhlenbruch, Markus; Sabet, Amir; Meyer, Carsten; Muckle, Marianne; Haslerud, Torjan; Wilhelm, Kai; Schild, Hans Heinz; Biersack, Hans Jürgen; Ezziddin, Samer

    2011-08-01

    While influx of chemoembolic agents into the hepatic falciform artery (HFA) from the hepatic artery can cause supraumbilical skin rash, epigastric pain and even skin necrosis, the significance of a patent HFA in patients undergoing radioembolization is not completely clear. Furthermore, the presence of tracer in the anterior abdominal wall seen in (99m)Tc-macroaggregated albumin ((99m)Tc-MAA) images, which is generally performed prior to radioembolization, has been described as a sign of a patent HFA. The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the incidence and consequences of (99m)Tc-MAA accumulation in the anterior abdominal wall, indicating a patent HFA, in patients undergoing radioembolization of liver tumours. A total of 224 diagnostic hepatic angiograms combined with (99m)Tc-MAA SPECT/CT were acquired in 192 patients with different types of cancer, of whom 142 were treated with a total of 214 radioembolization procedures. All patients received a whole-body scan, and planar and SPECT/CT scans of the abdomen. Only patients with extrahepatic (99m)Tc-MAA accumulation in the anterior abdominal wall were included in this study. Posttreatment bremsstrahlung SPECT/CT and follow-up results for at least 3 months served as reference standards. Tracer accumulation in the anterior abdominal wall was present in pretreatment (99m)Tc-MAA SPECT/CT images of 18 patients (9.3%). The HFA was found and embolized by radiologists before treatment in one patient. In the remaining patients radioembolization was performed without any modification in the treatment plan despite the previously mentioned extrahepatic accumulation. Only one patient experienced abdominal muscle pain above the navel, which started 24 h after treatment and lasted for 48 h without any skin changes. The remaining patients did not experience any relevant side effects during the follow-up period. Side effects after radioembolization in patients with tracer accumulation in the anterior abdominal

  5. Ventral hernia repair

    MedlinePlus

    ... incarcerated) in the hernia and become impossible to push back in. This is usually painful. The blood supply ... you are lying down or that you cannot push back in. Risks The risks of ventral hernia repair ...

  6. Hernias (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... look like inguinal hernias, but are not: A communicating hydrocele is similar to a hernia, except that ... reviewed: September 2016 More on this topic for: Parents Kids Teens Medical Care and Your Newborn Undescended ...

  7. Perforated appendix and periappendicular abscess within an inguinal hernia.

    PubMed

    Salemis, N S; Nisotakis, K; Nazos, K; Stavrinou, P; Tsohataridis, E

    2006-12-01

    We report an extremely rare case of complicated Amyand's hernia. A 61-year-old male patient was admitted with clinical signs of incarcerated right inguinal hernia and localised tenderness in the right iliac fossa. He underwent emergency surgery and the operative findings included perforated appendix and periappendicular abscess within a right inguinal hernia sac. Appendectomy and Shouldice's herniorrhaphy without prosthetic mesh placement were performed. Histology revealed the presence of a villous adenoma near the base of the appendix. We point out that although Amyand's hernia is a very rare clinical entity, it should always be considered in the differential diagnosis in cases with clinical signs of incarcerated right inguinal hernia, especially when there are no pathological findings on the abdominal X-rays.

  8. Modified laparoscopic placement of peritoneal dialysis catheter with intra-abdominal fixation.

    PubMed

    Shen, Quanquan; Jiang, Xinxin; Shen, Xiaogang; Yu, Fangyan; Tu, Qiudi; Chen, Wangfang; Ye, Qing; Behera, Tapas Ranjan; He, Qiang

    2017-08-01

    Peritoneal dialysis (PD) is a commonly accepted method of treating end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Various laparoscopic techniques for the placement of PD catheter have been described. In this study, we developed a novel modified laparoscopic technique for PD catheter placement and evaluated the early results. A straight Tenckhoff PD catheter was placed employing the modified technique in 39 consecutive patients with ESRD from May 2013 to April 2016. The technique is laparoscopically guided intra-abdominal fixation of the PD catheter tip at one point by using suture passer hernia forceps. Individual information including sex, age, primary disease etiology, complications, surgical duration, morbidity, mortality and catheter survival was collected and analyzed. The modified laparoscopic procedure was effectively performed in all patients with a mean operative time of 45 ± 7 min. No conversions from laparoscopy to open surgery of catheter placement occurred. There was one case showing early pericatheter leakage. There were no serious complications, such as bleeding, abdominal wall hernias, distal catheter cuff extrusion and infections of the exit site or tunnel during surgery or the postoperative duration. No mortality was observed in this group of patients. The 6-month follow-up study showed 100% catheter-related complication-free survival. Our modified laparoscopic intra-abdominal fixation technique using suture passer hernia forceps is a simple and safe method for PD catheter placement and is effective in minimizing the risk of catheter migration.

  9. [Diagnosis of diaphragmatic hernia].

    PubMed

    Alecu, L

    2002-01-01

    Diaphragmatic hernias (congenital and traumatic) belongs to thoracoabdominal surgery which is a borderline chapter. Considering frequency, they are on the second place in the diaphragmatic pathology, after hiatal hernias. The author presents the criterias of the clinical examination, based on the bibliographic datas: also by presents the imagistic investigations used for identification of the diaphragmatic hernias, excepting the oesophageal hiatus hernias. There are some particular features appearing in the diagnostical algorithm, too.

  10. Biomimetic collagen/elastin meshes for ventral hernia repair in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Minardi, Silvia; Taraballi, Francesca; Wang, Xin; Cabrera, Fernando J; Van Eps, Jeffrey L; Robbins, Andrew B; Sandri, Monica; Moreno, Michael R; Weiner, Bradley K; Tasciotti, Ennio

    2017-03-01

    Ventral hernia repair remains a major clinical need. Herein, we formulated a type I collagen/elastin crosslinked blend (CollE) for the fabrication of biomimetic meshes for ventral hernia repair. To evaluate the effect of architecture on the performance of the implants, CollE was formulated both as flat sheets (CollE Sheets) and porous scaffolds (CollE Scaffolds). The morphology, hydrophylicity and in vitro degradation were assessed by SEM, water contact angle and differential scanning calorimetry, respectively. The stiffness of the meshes was determined using a constant stretch rate uniaxial tensile test, and compared to that of native tissue. CollE Sheets and Scaffolds were tested in vitro with human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (h-BM-MSC), and finally implanted in a rat ventral hernia model. Neovascularization and tissue regeneration within the implants was evaluated at 6weeks, by histology, immunofluorescence, and q-PCR. It was found that CollE Sheets and Scaffolds were not only biomechanically sturdy enough to provide immediate repair of the hernia defect, but also promoted tissue restoration in only 6weeks. In fact, the presence of elastin enhanced the neovascularization in both sheets and scaffolds. Overall, CollE Scaffolds displayed mechanical properties more closely resembling those of native tissue, and induced higher gene expression of the entire marker genes tested, associated with de novo matrix deposition, angiogenesis, adipogenesis and skeletal muscles, compared to CollE Sheets. Altogether, this data suggests that the improved mechanical properties and bioactivity of CollE Sheets and Scaffolds make them valuable candidates for applications of ventral hernia repair. Due to the elevated annual number of ventral hernia repair in the US, the lack of successful grafts, the design of innovative biomimetic meshes has become a prime focus in tissue engineering, to promote the repair of the abdominal wall, avoid recurrence. Our meshes (Coll

  11. Incarcerated umbilical hernia leading to small bowel ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Lutwak, Nancy; Dill, Curt

    2011-01-01

    A 59-year-old male with history of hepatitis C, refractory ascites requiring multiple paracentesis and transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt placement presented to the emergency department with 2 days of abdominal pain. Physical examination revealed blood pressure of 104/66 and pulse of 94. The abdomen was remarkable for distention and a tender incarcerated umbilical hernia. The skin overlying the hernia was pale with areas of necrosis. The patient immediately underwent laparotomy which was successful. PMID:22679256

  12. Incarcerated umbilical hernia leading to small bowel ischemia.

    PubMed

    Lutwak, Nancy; Dill, Curt

    2011-09-19

    A 59-year-old male with history of hepatitis C, refractory ascites requiring multiple paracentesis and transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt placement presented to the emergency department with 2 days of abdominal pain. Physical examination revealed blood pressure of 104/66 and pulse of 94. The abdomen was remarkable for distention and a tender incarcerated umbilical hernia. The skin overlying the hernia was pale with areas of necrosis. The patient immediately underwent laparotomy which was successful.

  13. Umbilical cord sparing technique for repair of congenital hernia into the cord and small omphalocele.

    PubMed

    Ceccanti, Silvia; Falconi, Ilaria; Frediani, Simone; Boscarelli, Alessandro; Musleh, Layla; Cozzi, Denis A

    2017-01-01

    Current repair of small omphaloceles and hernias into the umbilical cord is a straightforward procedure, whose repair may result in a suboptimal cosmetic outcome. We describe a novel repair technique retaining the umbilical cord elements in an attempt to improve the cosmetic appearance of the umbilicus. Eight neonates were consecutively treated more than a ten-year period. Size of the fascial defects ranged 1 to 3cm (median, 2). Present technique entails incision of the amniotic sac without its detachment from the skin, reduction of the extruded contents under direct vision, and closure of the abdominal wall defect by circumferential suturing of peritoneum and fascia around the base of the amniotic sac. The amniotic sac is then re-approximated and folded to create an umbilical stump, which is trimmed and left to shed naturally. All patients achieved a scarless abdomen with a normal appearing umbilicus in 6. The remaining 2 patients are awaiting surgery for persisting umbilical hernia repair and umbilicoplasty, respectively. Poor esthetic outcome was significantly associated with initial fascial defect ≥2.5cm in size (p=0.03). Present technique is a simple and cosmetically appealing repair for umbilical cord hernias and small omphaloceles, especially effective when the size of the fascial defect is less than 2.5cm. IV (Treatment Study). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Sportsman hernia; the review of current diagnosis and treatment modalities

    PubMed Central

    Paksoy, Melih; Sekmen, Ümit

    2016-01-01

    Groin pain is an important clinical entity that may affect a sportsman’s active sports life. Sportsman’s hernia is a chronic low abdominal and groin pain syndrome. Open and laparoscopic surgical treatment may be chosen in case of conservative treatment failure. Studies on sportsman’s hernia, which is a challenging situation in both diagnosis and treatment, are ongoing in many centers. We reviewed the treatment results of 37 patients diagnosed and treated as sportsman’s hernia at our hospital between 2011–2014, in light of current literature. PMID:27436937

  15. Sportsman hernia; the review of current diagnosis and treatment modalities.

    PubMed

    Paksoy, Melih; Sekmen, Ümit

    2016-01-01

    Groin pain is an important clinical entity that may affect a sportsman's active sports life. Sportsman's hernia is a chronic low abdominal and groin pain syndrome. Open and laparoscopic surgical treatment may be chosen in case of conservative treatment failure. Studies on sportsman's hernia, which is a challenging situation in both diagnosis and treatment, are ongoing in many centers. We reviewed the treatment results of 37 patients diagnosed and treated as sportsman's hernia at our hospital between 2011-2014, in light of current literature.

  16. Spontaneous evisceration of bowel through an umbilical hernia in a patient with refractory ascites

    PubMed Central

    Ogu, Uchechukwu Stanley; Valko, Janice; Wilhelm, Jakub; Dy, Victor

    2013-01-01

    Umbilical hernia in the cirrhotic patient is frequently seen in the setting of refractory ascites. This article reports a rare case of spontaneous rupture of a recurrent umbilical hernia in a patient with persistent ascites, following an acute increase in intra-abdominal pressure, leading to bowel evisceration. This case highlights a potentially fatal complication of umbilical hernia in the setting of chronic ascites, which was successfully managed with prompt surgical intervention. PMID:24964319

  17. Complex inguinal hernia repairs.

    PubMed

    Beitler, J C; Gomes, S M; Coelho, A C J; Manso, J E F

    2009-02-01

    Complex inguinal hernia treatment is a challenge for general surgeons. The gold standard for the repair of inguinal hernias is the Lichtenstein repair (anterior approach). However, when multiple recurrent hernias or giant hernias are present, it is necessary to choose different approaches because the incidence of poor results increases. There are many preperitoneal approaches described in the literature. For example: (a) open procedure-Nyhus and Stoppa (b) laparoscopic technique-transabdominal pre-peritoneal (TAPP) and totally extraperitoneal (TEP). In this study, we show how we repair complicated cases using open access in huge unilateral or bilateral, recurrent, or multiple recurrent inguinal hernias. The present study includes the period from November 1993 through December 2007. One hundred and eighty-eight patients, divided into 121 with unilateral hernias and 67 with bilateral hernias, totaling 255 inguinal hernia repairs, were treated by the Nyhus or Stoppa preperitoneal approach, depending on whether they were unilateral or bilateral. We used progressive preoperative pneumoperitoneum for oversize inguinal hernias in all patients. Orchiectomy was necessary on only two occasions. Despite the repair complexity involved, we had only two known recurrences. The mortality was zero and the morbidity was acceptable. We conclude that an accurate open preperitoneal approach using mesh prosthesis for complex inguinal hernias is safe, with very low recurrent rates and low morbidity. Progressive preoperative pneumoperitoneum for giant hernias was shown to be an important factor in accomplishing good intraoperative and immediate postoperative results.

  18. Abdominal wall surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... Description Your surgery will be done in an operating room in a hospital. You will receive general anesthesia . This will keep you asleep and pain-free during the procedure. The surgery takes 2 to 6 hours. You ...

  19. On the effect of computed tomography resolution to distinguish between abdominal aortic aneurysm wall tissue and calcification: A proof of concept.

    PubMed

    Barrett, H E; Cunnane, E M; O Brien, J M; Moloney, M A; Kavanagh, E G; Walsh, M T

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the optimal target CT spatial resolution for accurately imaging abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) wall characteristics, distinguishing between tissue and calcification components, for an accurate assessment of rupture risk. Ruptured and non-ruptured AAA-wall samples were acquired from eight patients undergoing open surgical aneurysm repair upon institutional review board approval and informed consent was obtained from all patients. Physical measurements of AAA-wall cross-section were made using scanning electron microscopy. Samples were scanned using high resolution micro-CT scanning. A resolution range of 15.5-155μm was used to quantify the influence of decreasing resolution on wall area measurements, in terms of tissue and calcification. A statistical comparison between the reference resolution (15.5μm) and multi-detector CT resolution (744μm) was also made. Electron microscopy examination of ruptured AAAs revealed extremely thin outer tissue structure <200μm in radial distribution which is supporting the aneurysm wall along with large areas of adjacent medial calcifications far greater in area than the tissue layer. The spatial resolution of 155μm is a significant predictor of the reference AAA-wall tissue and calcification area measurements (r=0.850; p<0.001; r=0.999; p<0.001 respectively). The tissue and calcification area at 155μm is correct within 8.8%±1.86 and 26.13%±9.40 respectively with sensitivity of 87.17% when compared to the reference. The inclusion of AAA-wall measurements, through the use of high resolution-CT will elucidate the variations in AAA-wall tissue and calcification distributions across the wall which may help to leverage an improved assessment of AAA rupture risk. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Two patients with spontaneous transomental hernia treated with laparoscopic surgery: a review.

    PubMed

    Inukai, Koichi; Takashima, Nobuhiro; Miyai, Hirotaka; Yamamoto, Minoru; Kobayashi, Kenji; Tanaka, Moritsugu; Hayakawa, Tetsushi

    2018-04-01

    Here, we report two patients with transomental hernia who were successfully treated with laparoscopic surgery. The first patient was a 58-year-old female who presented to our hospital with abdominal pain and vomiting; she had no history of abdominal surgery. Enhanced computed tomography revealed strangulation ileus due to an internal hernia. The second patient was a 36-year-old male who presented to our hospital with abdominal pain and no history of abdominal surgery. Enhanced computed tomography indicated transomental hernia. Emergency laparoscopic surgery in both patients revealed incarcerated bowel loops through defects in the greater omentum. The bowel segments were laparoscopically released, and the patients were uneventfully discharged on postoperative Days 4 and 8. Laparoscopic surgery is useful for the diagnosis and treatment of small bowel obstruction due to transomental hernia through the greater omentum.

  1. Treating and Preventing Sports Hernias

    MedlinePlus

    ... Close ‹ Back to Healthy Living Treating and Preventing Sports Hernias If you play ice hockey, tennis or ... for the most commonly misdiagnosed groin pain—a sports hernia. A sports hernia often results from overuse ...

  2. A rare case of isolated wound implantation of colorectal adenocarcinoma complicating an incisional hernia: case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, Aninda; Lee, Lester; Hossain, Fahad; Johal, Harnaik

    2008-01-01

    Background The reported case illustrates an instance of colonic adenocarcinoma presenting as an isolated tumour 3 1/2 years after open surgery. The presentation was in some respects unique as it was complicated by an incisional hernia and occurred in the anterior abdominal wall. A literature review was performed. Case presentation An 83 year old lady initially underwent an extended right open hemicolectomy for a mid-transverse colonic adenocarcinoma (T4N2M0). No adjacent structures were involved. After adjuvant chemotherapy, she was kept under regular surveillance. A CT scan and colonoscopy at one year were normal. At 18 months investigations including an ultrasound scan of the liver and a radioisotope bone scan were all negative. Over three and half years later the patient presented with an incisional hernia. Repeat CT scan and tumour markers were reported as negative. At operation, a mass was found within the anterior abdominal wall complicating the incisional hernia. This mass was widely resected and a laparotomy performed. Histology confirmed an adenocarcinoma of colonic origin extending to one of the lateral margins. A post-operative PET scan confirmed the absence of intra-abdominal pathology. Conclusion The literature regarding recurrence of colonic tumours after open surgery reports low incidences of this occurring within abdominal incisions. The literature indicates prognosis is poor, but the numbers are small and distinction is often not made between isolated recurrence and those with other sites of tumour recurrence. In order to avoid missing isolated wound implantation, careful consideration should be given to those who present with new pathology related to previous cancer surgery incisions, both clinically and radiologically. PMID:18201386

  3. Anterior transversalis fascia approach versus preperitoneal space approach for inguinal hernia repair in residents in northern China: study protocol for a prospective, multicentre, randomised, controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Qing; Zhang, De-wei; Yang, Da-ye; Li, Hong-wu; Wei, Shi-bo; Yang, Liang; Yang, Fu-quan; Zhang, Shao-jun; Wu, Yao-qiang; An, Wei-de; Dai, Zhong-shu; Jiang, Hui-yong; Wang, Fu-rong; Qiao, Shi-feng; Li, Hang-yu

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Many surgical techniques have been used to repair abdominal wall defects in the inguinal region based on the anatomic characteristics of this region and can be categorised as ‘tension’ repair or ‘tension-free’ repair. Tension-free repair is the preferred technique for inguinal hernia repair. Tension-free repair of inguinal hernia can be performed through either the anterior transversalis fascia approach or the preperitoneal space approach. There are few large sample, randomised controlled trials investigating the curative effects of the anterior transversalis fascia approach versus the preperitoneal space approach for inguinal hernia repair in patients in northern China. Methods and analysis This will be a prospective, large sample, multicentre, randomised, controlled trial. Registration date is 1 December 2016. Actual study start date is 6 February 2017. Estimated study completion date is June 2020. A cohort of over 720 patients with inguinal hernias will be recruited from nine institutions in Liaoning Province, China. Patient randomisation will be stratified by centre to undergo inguinal hernia repair via the anterior transversalis fascia approach or the preperitoneal approach. Primary and secondary outcome assessments will be performed at baseline (prior to surgery), predischarge and at postoperative 1 week, 1 month, 3 months, 1 year and 2 years. The primary outcome is the incidence of postoperative chronic inguinal pain. The secondary outcome is postoperative complications (including rates of wound infection, haematoma, seroma and hernia recurrence). Ethics and dissemination This trial will be conducted in accordance with the Declaration of Helsinki and supervised by the institutional review board of the Fourth Affiliated Hospital of China Medical University (approval number 2015–027). All patients will receive information about the trial in verbal and written forms and will give informed consent before enrolment. The results will

  4. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopic Imaging-Derived Collagen Content and Maturity Correlates with Stress in the Aortic Wall of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Patients.

    PubMed

    Cheheltani, Rabee; Pichamuthu, Joseph E; Rao, Jayashree; Weinbaum, Justin S; Kiani, Mohammad F; Vorp, David A; Pleshko, Nancy

    2017-03-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a degenerative disease of the aorta characterized by severe disruption of the structural integrity of the aortic wall and its major molecular constituents. From the early stages of disease, elastin in the aorta becomes highly degraded and is replaced by collagen. Questions persist as to the contribution of collagen content, quality and maturity to the potential for rupture. Here, using our recently developed Fourier transform infrared imaging spectroscopy (FT-IRIS) method, we quantified collagen content and maturity in the wall of AAA tissues in pairs of specimens with different wall stresses. CT scans of AAAs from 12 patients were used to create finite element models to estimate stress in different regions of tissue. Each patient underwent elective repair of the AAA, and two segments of the AAA tissues from anatomic regions more proximal or distal with different wall stresses were evaluated by histology and FT-IRIS after excision. For each patient, collagen content was generally greater in the tissue location with lower wall stress, which corresponded to the more distal anatomic regions. The wall stress/collagen ratio was greater in the higher stress region compared to the lower stress region (1.01 ± 1.09 vs. 0.55 ± 0.084, p = 0.02). The higher stress region also corresponded to the location with reduced intraluminal thrombus thickness. Further, collagen maturity tended to decrease with increased collagen content (p = 0.068, R = 0.38). Together, these results suggest that an increase in less mature collagen content in AAA patients does not effectively compensate for the loss of elastin in the aortic wall, and results in a reduced capability to endure wall stresses.

  5. Primary undifferentiated small round cell sarcoma of the deep abdominal wall with a novel variant of t(10;19) CIC-DUX4 gene fusion.

    PubMed

    Tsukamoto, Yoshitane; Futani, Hiroyuki; Yoshiya, Shinichi; Watanabe, Takahiro; Kihara, Takako; Matsuo, Shohei; Hirota, Seiichi

    2017-10-01

    We experienced a 38-year-old Japanese male with t(10;19) CIC-DUX4 -positive undifferentiated small round cell sarcoma in the deep abdominal wall. Three months before his first visit to our hospital, he noticed a mass in his right abdominal wall. Computed tomography on admission revealed a solid abdominal tumor 70×53mm in size and multiple small tumors in both lungs. The biopsy of the abdominal tumor revealed undifferentiated small round cell sarcoma, suggestive of Ewing sarcoma. Under the clinical diagnosis of Ewing-like sarcoma of the abdominal wall with multiple lung metastases, several cycles of ICE (ifosfamide, carboplatin and etoposide) therapy were performed. After the chemotherapy, the lung metastases disappeared, while the primary lesion rapidly grew. Additional VDC (vincristine, doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide) therapy was carried out without apparent effect. Although the surgical removal of the primary lesion was done, peritoneal dissemination and a huge metastatic liver tumor appeared thereafter. The patient died of disease progression two months after the surgery. The total clinical course was approximately one year, showing that the tumor was extremely aggressive. The tumor cells of the surgical specimen were positive for CD99, WT1, calretinin, INI1, ERG and Fli1 by immunohistochemistry. Fusion gene analyses using the frozen surgical material revealed negativity for EWSR1-Fli1, EWSR1-ERG and t(4;19) CIC-DUX4 fusions, but positivity for t(10;19) CIC-DUX4 fusion. Thus, we made a final pathological diagnosis of t(10;19) CIC-DUX4-positive undifferentiated small round cell sarcoma. To our knowledge, this is the 13th case of t(10;19) CIC-DUX4 undifferentiated small round cell sarcoma with precise clinicopathological information. Especially in our case, two types of t(10;19) CIC-DUX4 fusion transcripts were observed, both of which are in-frame and novel. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  6. Intestinal blood flow assessment by indocyanine green fluorescence imaging in a patient with the incarcerated umbilical hernia: Report of a case.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Shunjin; Yoshida, Masashi; Ohdaira, Hironori; Tsutsui, Nobuhiro; Suzuki, Norihiko; Ito, Eisaku; Nakajima, Keigo; Yanagisawa, Satoru; Kitajima, Masaki; Suzuki, Yutaka

    2016-06-01

    After reduction of the incarceration during surgery for incarcerated hernia, intestinal blood flow (IBF) and the need for bowel resection must be evaluated. We report the case of a patient with incarcerated umbilical hernia in whom the bowel was preserved after evaluating IBF using indocyanine green (ICG) fluorescence. A woman in her 40s with a chief complaint of abdominal pain visited our hospital, was diagnosed with incarcerated umbilical hernia and underwent surgery. Laparotomy was performed to reduce bowel incarceration. After reducing the incarceration, IBF was observed using ICG fluorescence detected using a brightfield full-color fluorescence camera. The small bowel that had been incarcerated showed deep-red discoloration on gross evaluation, but intravenous injection of ICG revealed uniform fluorescence of the mesentery and bowel wall. This indicated an absence of irreversible ischemic changes of the bowel, so no resection was performed. The patient showed a good postoperative course, including resumption of eating on day 4 and discharge on day 11. In surgery for incarcerated hernia, ICG fluorescence may offer a useful method to evaluate IBF after reducing the incarceration. This case implied that PINPOINT could be used in open conventional surgery.

  7. Association between thoracic aortic disease and inguinal hernia.

    PubMed

    Olsson, Christian; Eriksson, Per; Franco-Cereceda, Anders

    2014-08-21

    The study hypothesis was that thoracic aortic disease (TAD) is associated with a higher-than-expected prevalence of inguinal hernia. Such an association has been reported for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) and hernia. Unlike AAA, TAD is not necessarily detectable with clinical examination or ultrasound, and there are no population-based screening programs for TAD. Therefore, conditions associated with TAD, such as inguinal hernia, are of particular clinical relevance. The prevalence of inguinal hernia in subjects with TAD was determined from nation-wide register data and compared to a non-TAD group (patients with isolated aortic stenosis). Groups were balanced using propensity score matching. Multivariable statistical analysis (logistic regression) was performed to identify variables independently associated with hernia. Hernia prevalence was 110 of 750 (15%) in subjects with TAD versus 29 of 301 (9.6%) in non-TAD, P=0.03. This statistically significant difference remained after propensity score matching: 21 of 159 (13%) in TAD versus 14 of 159 (8.9%) in non-TAD, P<0.001. Variables independently associated with hernia in multivariable analysis were male sex (odds ratio [OR] with 95% confidence interval [95% CI]) 3.4 (2.1 to 5.4), P<0.001; increased age, OR 1.02/year (1.004 to 1.04), P=0.014; and TAD, OR 1.8 (1.1 to 2.8), P=0.015. The prevalence of inguinal hernia (15%) in TAD is higher than expected in a general population and higher in TAD, compared to non-TAD. TAD is independently associated with hernia in multivariable analysis. Presence or history of hernia may be of importance in detecting TAD, and the association warrants further study. © 2014 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  8. Umbilical Hernia Repair and Pregnancy: Before, during, after…

    PubMed Central

    Kulacoglu, Hakan

    2018-01-01

    Umbilical hernias are most common in women than men. Pregnancy may cause herniation or render a preexisting one apparent, because of progressively raised intra-abdominal pressure. The incidence of umbilical hernia among pregnancies is 0.08%. Surgical algorithm for a pregnant woman with a hernia is not thoroughly clear. There is no consensus about the timing of surgery for an umbilical hernia in a woman either who is already pregnant or planning a pregnancy. If the hernia is incarcerated or strangulated at the time of diagnosis, an emergency repair is inevitable. If the hernia is not complicated, but symptomatic an elective repair should be proposed. When the patient has a small and asymptomatic hernia it may be better to postpone the repair until she gives birth. If the hernia is repaired by suture alone, a high risk of recurrence exists during pregnancy. Umbilical hernia repair during pregnancy can be performed with minimal morbidity to the mother and baby. Second trimester is a proper timing for surgery. Asymptomatic hernias can be repaired, following childbirth or at the time of cesarean section (C-section). Elective repair after childbirth is possible as early as postpartum of eighth week. A 1-year interval can give the patient a very smooth convalescence, including hormonal stabilization and return to normal body weight. Moreover, surgery can be postponed for a longer time even after another pregnancy, if the patients would like to have more children. Diastasis recti are very frequent in pregnancy. It may persist in postpartum period. A high recurrence risk is expected in patients with rectus diastasis. This risk is especially high after suture repairs. Mesh repairs should be considered in this situation. PMID:29435451

  9. Umbilical Hernia Repair and Pregnancy: Before, during, after….

    PubMed

    Kulacoglu, Hakan

    2018-01-01

    Umbilical hernias are most common in women than men. Pregnancy may cause herniation or render a preexisting one apparent, because of progressively raised intra-abdominal pressure. The incidence of umbilical hernia among pregnancies is 0.08%. Surgical algorithm for a pregnant woman with a hernia is not thoroughly clear. There is no consensus about the timing of surgery for an umbilical hernia in a woman either who is already pregnant or planning a pregnancy. If the hernia is incarcerated or strangulated at the time of diagnosis, an emergency repair is inevitable. If the hernia is not complicated, but symptomatic an elective repair should be proposed. When the patient has a small and asymptomatic hernia it may be better to postpone the repair until she gives birth. If the hernia is repaired by suture alone, a high risk of recurrence exists during pregnancy. Umbilical hernia repair during pregnancy can be performed with minimal morbidity to the mother and baby. Second trimester is a proper timing for surgery. Asymptomatic hernias can be repaired, following childbirth or at the time of cesarean section (C-section). Elective repair after childbirth is possible as early as postpartum of eighth week. A 1-year interval can give the patient a very smooth convalescence, including hormonal stabilization and return to normal body weight. Moreover, surgery can be postponed for a longer time even after another pregnancy, if the patients would like to have more children. Diastasis recti are very frequent in pregnancy. It may persist in postpartum period. A high recurrence risk is expected in patients with rectus diastasis. This risk is especially high after suture repairs. Mesh repairs should be considered in this situation.

  10. Comparison of ultrasonography and physical examination in the diagnosis of incisional hernia in a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Bloemen, A; van Dooren, P; Huizinga, B F; Hoofwijk, A G M

    2012-02-01

    Incisional hernia is a frequent complication of abdominal surgery (incidence 2-20%). Diagnosis by physical examination is sometimes difficult, especially in small incisional hernias or in obese patients. The additional diagnostic value of standardized ultrasonography was evaluated in this prospective study. A total of 456 patients participating in a randomized trial comparing two suture materials for closure of the abdominal fascia underwent physical examination and ultrasonography at 6-month intervals. Wound complaints and treatment of incisional hernia were also noted. Statistical analysis was performed using the Chi-squared and Fisher's exact tests (SPSS). Interest variability analysis was performed. During a median follow-up of 31 months, 103 incisional hernias were found. A total of 82 incisional hernias were found by physical examination and an additional 21 with ultrasonography. Six of these additional hernias were symptomatic and only one of the additional hernias received operative treatment. The false-negative rates for physical examination and ultrasonography were 25.3 and 24.4%, respectively. Interest variability was low, with a Kappa of 0.697 (P < 0.001). There are no clear diagnostic criteria for incisional hernia available in the literature. Standardized combination of ultrasonography with physical examination during follow-up yields a significant number of, mostly asymptomatic, hernias, which would not be found using physical examination alone. This is especially relevant in research settings.

  11. [Fetal magnetic resonance imaging evaluation of congenital diaphragmatic hernia].

    PubMed

    Sebastià, C; Garcia, R; Gomez, O; Paño, B; Nicolau, C

    2014-01-01

    A diaphragmatic hernia is defined as the protrusion of abdominal viscera into the thoracic cavity through a normal or pathological orifice. The herniated viscera compress the lungs, resulting in pulmonary hypoplasia and secondary pulmonary hypertension, which are the leading causes of neonatal death in patients with congenital diaphragmatic hernia. Congenital diaphragmatic hernia is diagnosed by sonography in routine prenatal screening. Although magnetic resonance imaging is fundamentally used to determine whether the liver is located within the abdomen or has herniated into the thorax, it also can provide useful information about other herniated structures and the degree of pulmonary hypoplasia. The aim of this article is to review the fetal magnetic resonance findings for congenital diaphragmatic hernia and the signs that enable us to establish the neonatal prognosis when evaluating pulmonary hypoplasia. Copyright © 2012 SERAM. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  12. Verification of an optimized stimulation point on the abdominal wall for transcutaneous neuromuscular electrical stimulation for activation of deep lumbar stabilizing muscles.

    PubMed

    Baek, Seung Ok; Cho, Hee Kyung; Jung, Gil Su; Son, Su Min; Cho, Yun Woo; Ahn, Sang Ho

    2014-09-01

    Transcutaneous neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) can stimulate contractions in deep lumbar stabilizing muscles. An optimal protocol has not been devised for the activation of these muscles by NMES, and information is lacking regarding an optimal stimulation point on the abdominal wall. The goal was to determine a single optimized stimulation point on the abdominal wall for transcutaneous NMES for the activation of deep lumbar stabilizing muscles. Ultrasound images of the spinal stabilizing muscles were captured during NMES at three sites on the lateral abdominal wall. After an optimal location for the placement of the electrodes was determined, changes in the thickness of the lumbar multifidus (LM) were measured during NMES. Three stimulation points were investigated using 20 healthy physically active male volunteers. A reference point R, 1 cm superior to the iliac crest along the midaxillary line, was used. Three study points were used: stimulation point S1 was located 2 cm superior and 2 cm medial to the anterior superior iliac spine, stimulation point S3 was 2 cm below the lowest rib along the same sagittal plane as S1, and stimulation point S2 was midway between S1 and S3. Sessions were conducted stimulating at S1, S2, or S3 using R for reference. Real-time ultrasound imaging (RUSI) of the abdominal muscles was captured during each stimulation session. In addition, RUSI images were captured of the LM during stimulation at S1. Thickness, as measured by RUSI, of the transverse abdominis (TrA), obliquus internus, and obliquus externus was greater during NMES than at rest for all three study points (p<.05). Transverse abdominis was significantly stimulated more by NMES at S1 than at the other points (p<.05). The LM thickness was also significantly greater during NMES at S1 than at rest (p<.05). Neuromuscular electrical stimulation at S1 optimally activated deep spinal stabilizing muscles, TrA and LM, as evidenced by RUSI. The authors recommend this

  13. A Rare Case of Giant Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Abdominal Wall: Excision and Immediate Reconstruction with a Pedicled Deep Inferior Epigastric Artery Perforator (DIEP) Flap.

    PubMed

    Di Lorenzo, Sara; Zabbia, Giovanni; Corradino, Bartolo; Tripoli, Massimiliano; Pirrello, Roberto; Cordova, Adriana

    2017-12-04

    BACKGROUND Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) greater than 5 cm in diameter is called giant basal cell carcinoma (GBCC), or super giant basal cell carcinoma if it has a diameter larger than 20 cm. Giant BCC only accounts for 0.5% of BCCs and super giant BCC is exceedingly rare. On account of their rarity, there are no established guidelines for GBCC treatment. CASE REPORT We describe a peculiar case of an 82-year-old woman with a GBCC carcinoma of the lower abdominal wall. The tumor was surgically removed with ipsilateral inguinal lymph nodes and the abdominal wall was reconstructed immediately with a pedicled deep inferior epigastric artery perforator (DIEP) flap. CONCLUSIONS Treatment of giant basal cell carcinoma is often difficult, especially in elderly patients with poor general health and multiple pathologies. The pedicled DIEP flap is rotated to cover the loss of substance without tension, and it is easy to harvest and transfer. This flap allowed a good result without local or systemic complication. We present this report as a reminder of the occasional occurrence of extremely aggressive BCCs. We believe that, especially for rare tumors like these, it is very useful for the entire scientific community to publish these cases and the therapeutic strategies used to treat them.

  14. A Rare Case of Giant Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Abdominal Wall: Excision and Immediate Reconstruction with a Pedicled Deep Inferior Epigastric Artery Perforator (DIEP) Flap

    PubMed Central

    Di Lorenzo, Sara; Zabbia, Giovanni; Corradino, Bartolo; Tripoli, Massimiliano; Pirrello, Roberto; Cordova, Adriana

    2017-01-01

    Patient: Female, 82 Final Diagnosis: Giant basal cell carcinoma Symptoms: Anemia Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Plastic Surgery Objective: Rare disease Background: Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) greater than 5 cm in diameter is called giant basal cell carcinoma (GBCC), or super giant basal cell carcinoma if it has a diameter larger than 20 cm. Giant BCC only accounts for 0.5% of BCCs and super giant BCC is exceedingly rare. On account of their rarity, there are no established guidelines for GBCC treatment. Case Report: We describe a peculiar case of an 82-year-old woman with a GBCC carcinoma of the lower abdominal wall. The tumor was surgically removed with ipsilateral inguinal lymph nodes and the abdominal wall was reconstructed immediately with a pedicled deep inferior epigastric artery perforator (DIEP) flap. Conclusions: Treatment of giant basal cell carcinoma is often difficult, especially in elderly patients with poor general health and multiple pathologies. The pedicled DIEP flap is rotated to cover the loss of substance without tension, and it is easy to harvest and transfer. This flap allowed a good result without local or systemic complication. We present this report as a reminder of the occasional occurrence of extremely aggressive BCCs. We believe that, especially for rare tumors like these, it is very useful for the entire scientific community to publish these cases and the therapeutic strategies used to treat them. PMID:29199268

  15. The hypertrophy of the lateral abdominal wall and quadratus lumborum is sport-specific: an MRI segmental study in professional tennis and soccer players.

    PubMed

    Sanchis-Moysi, Joaquin; Idoate, Fernando; Izquierdo, Mikel; Calbet, Jose A; Dorado, Cecilia

    2013-03-01

    The aim was to determine the volume and degree of asymmetry of quadratus lumborum (QL), obliques, and transversus abdominis; the last two considered conjointly (OT), in tennis and soccer players. The volume of QL and OT was determined using magnetic resonance imaging in professional tennis and soccer players, and in non-active controls (n = 8, 14, and 6, respectively). In tennis players the hypertrophy of OT was limited to proximal segments (cephalic segments), while in soccer players it was similar along longitudinal axis. In tennis players the hypertrophy was asymmetric (18% greater volume in the non-dominant than in the dominant OT, p = 0.001), while in soccer players and controls both sides had similar volumes (p > 0.05). In controls, the non-dominant QL was 15% greater than that of the dominant (p = 0.049). Tennis and soccer players had similar volumes in both sides of QL. Tennis alters the dominant-to-non-dominant balance in the muscle volume of the lateral abdominal wall. In tennis the hypertrophy is limited to proximal segments and is greater in the non-dominant side. Soccer, however, is associated to a symmetric hypertrophy of the lateral abdominal wall. Tennis and soccer elicit an asymmetric hypertrophy of QL.

  16. In vitro fertilization surrogate pregnancy in a patient who underwent radical hysterectomy followed by ovarian transposition, lower abdominal wall radiotherapy, and chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Steigrad, Stephen; Hacker, Neville F; Kolb, Bradford

    2005-05-01

    To describe an IVF surrogate pregnancy from a patient who had a radical hysterectomy followed by excision of a laparoscopic port site implantation with ovarian transposition followed by abdominal wall irradiation and chemotherapy, which resulted in premature ovarian failure from which there was partial recovery. Case report. Tertiary referral university women's hospital in Sydney, Australia and private reproductive medicine clinic in California. A 34-year-old woman who underwent laparoscopy for pelvic pain, shortly afterward followed by radical hysterectomy and pelvic lymph node dissection, who subsequently developed a laparoscopic port site recurrence, which was excised in association with ovarian transposition before abdominal wall irradiation and chemotherapy. Modified IVF treatment, transabdominal oocyte retrieval, embryo cryopreservation in Australia, and transfer to a surrogate mother in the United States. Pregnancy. Miscarriage in the second cycle and a twin pregnancy in the fourth cycle. This is the first case report of ovarian stimulation and oocyte retrieval performed on transposed ovaries after a patient developed premature ovarian failure after radiotherapy and chemotherapy with subsequent partial ovarian recovery.

  17. Hiatal Hernia as a Total Gastrectomy Complication

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Bruna do Nascimento; de Oliveira, Marcos Belotto; Peixoto, Renata D'Alpino

    2016-01-01

    Introduction According to the Brazilian National Institute of Cancer, gastric cancer is the third leading cause of death among men and the fifth among women in Brazil. Surgical resection is the only potentially curative treatment. The most serious complications associated with surgery are fistulas and dehiscence of the jejunal-esophageal anastomosis. Hiatal hernia refers to herniation of elements of the abdominal cavity through the esophageal hiatus of the diaphragm, though this occurrence is rarely reported as a complication in gastrectomy. Case Report A 76-year-old man was diagnosed with intestinal-type gastric adenocarcinoma. He underwent a total laparoscopic-assisted gastrectomy and D2 lymphadenectomy on May 19, 2015. The pathology revealed a pT4pN3 gastric adenocarcinoma. The patient became clinically stable and was discharged 10 days after surgery. He was subsequently started on adjuvant FOLFOX chemotherapy; however, 9 days after the second cycle, he was brought to the emergency room with nausea and severe epigastric pain. A CT scan revealed a hiatal hernia with signs of strangulation. The patient underwent emergent repair of the hernia and suffered no postoperative complications. He was discharged from the hospital 9 days after surgery. Conclusion Hiatal hernia is not well documented, and its occurrence in the context of gastrectomy is an infrequent complication. PMID:27293395

  18. 18F-FDG uptake assessed by PET/CT in abdominal aortic aneurysms is associated with cellular and molecular alterations prefacing wall deterioration and rupture.

    PubMed

    Courtois, Audrey; Nusgens, Betty V; Hustinx, Roland; Namur, Gauthier; Gomez, Pierre; Somja, Joan; Defraigne, Jean-Olivier; Delvenne, Philippe; Michel, Jean-Baptiste; Colige, Alain C; Sakalihasan, Natzi

    2013-10-01

    Rupture of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) leads to a significant morbidity and mortality in aging populations, and its prediction would be most beneficial to public health. Spots positive for uptake of (18)F-FDG detected by PET are found in 12% of AAA patients (PET+), who are most often symptomatic and at high rupture risk. Comparing the (18)F-FDG-positive site with a negative site from the same aneurysm and with samples collected from AAA patients with no (18)F-FDG uptake should allow the discrimination of biologic alterations that would help in identifying markers predictive of rupture. Biopsies of the AAA wall were obtained from patients with no (18)F-FDG uptake (PET0, n = 10) and from PET+ patients (n = 8), both at the site positive for uptake and at a distant negative site of the aneurysmal wall. Samples were analyzed by immunohistochemistry, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, and zymography. The sites of the aneurysmal wall with a positive (18)F-FDG uptake were characterized by a strikingly increased number of adventitial inflammatory cells, highly proliferative, and by a drastic reduction of smooth muscle cells (SMCs) in the media as compared with their negative counterpart and with the PET0 wall. The expression of a series of genes involved in the maintenance and remodeling of the wall was significantly modified in the negative sites of PET+, compared with the PET0 wall, suggesting a systemic alteration of the aneurysmal wall. Furthermore, a striking increase of several matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), notably the MMP1 and MMP13 collagenases, was observed in the positive sites, mainly in the adventitia. Moreover, PET+ patients were characterized by a higher circulating C-reactive protein. Positive (18)F-FDG uptake in the aneurysmal wall is associated with an active inflammatory process characterized by a dense infiltrate of proliferating leukocytes in the adventitia and an increased circulating C-reactive protein. Moreover, a loss of SMC

  19. Inguinal hernia repair in women: is the laparoscopic approach superior?

    PubMed

    Ashfaq, A; McGhan, L J; Chapital, A B; Harold, K L; Johnson, D J

    2014-06-01

    Laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair is associated with reduced post-operative pain and earlier return to work in men. However, the role of laparoscopic hernia repair in women is not well reported. The aim of this study was to review the outcomes of the laparoscopic versus open repair of inguinal hernias in women and to discuss patients' considerations when choosing the approach. A retrospective chart review of all consecutive patients undergoing inguinal hernia repair from January 2005 to December 2009 at a single institution was conducted. Presentation characteristics and outcome measures including recurrence rates, post-operative pain and complications were compared in women undergoing laparoscopic versus open hernia repair. A total of 1,133 patients had an inguinal herniorrhaphy. Of these, 101 patients were female (9 %), with a total of 111 hernias. A laparoscopic approach was chosen in 44 % of patients. The majority of women (56 %) presented with groin pain as the primary symptom. Neither the mode of presentation nor the presenting symptoms significantly influenced the surgical approach. There were no statistically significant differences in hernia recurrence, post-operative neuralgia, seroma/hematoma formation or urinary retention between the two approaches (p < 0.05). A greater proportion of patients with bilateral hernias had a laparoscopic approach rather than an open technique (12 vs. 2 %, p = 0.042). Laparoscopic herniorrhaphy is as safe and efficacious as open repair in women, and should be considered when the diagnosis is in question, for management of bilateral hernias or when concomitant abdominal pathology is being addressed.

  20. Gallbladder carcinoma late metastases and incisional hernia at umbilical port site after laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

    PubMed

    Ciulla, A; Romeo, G; Genova, G; Tomasello, G; Agnello, G; Cstronovo, Gaetano

    2006-05-01

    A potentially serious complication of laparoscopic cholecystectomy is the inadvertent dissemination of unsuspected gallbladder carcinoma. There are increasing reports of seeding of tumor at the trocar sites following laparoscopic cholecystectomy in patients with unexpected or inapparent gallbladder carcinoma. Although the mechanism of the abdominal wall recurrence is still unclear, laparoscopic handling of the tumor, perforation of the gallbladder, and extraction of the specimen without an endobag may be risk factors for the spreading of malignant cells. The Authors report the case of late development of umbilical metastasis after laparoscopic cholecystectomy; the presence of an incisional hernia and the finding of a stone in subcutaneous tissue demonstrate the diffusion of tumor cells into subcutaneous tissue during the extraction of gallbladder. The patient underwent an excision of the metastases. She is disease free two years after surgical treatment.

  1. A case of closed loop small bowel obstruction within a strangulated incisional hernia in association with an acute gastric volvulus.

    PubMed

    Kosai, Nik Ritza; Gendeh, H S; Noorharisman, M; Sutton, Paul Anthony; Das, Srijit

    2014-01-01

    Small bowel obstruction is a common clinical problem presenting with abdominal distention, colicky pain, absolute constipation and bilious vomiting. There are numerous causes, most commonly attributed to an incarcerated hernia, adhesions or obstructing mass secondary to malignancy. Here we present an unusual cause of a small bowel obstruction secondary to an incarcerated incisional hernia in association with an acute organoaxial gastric volvulus.

  2. Abdominal Adhesions

    MedlinePlus

    ... Clearinghouse What are abdominal adhesions? Abdominal adhesions are bands of fibrous tissue that can form between abdominal ... Esophagus Stomach Large intestine Adhesion Abdominal adhesions are bands of fibrous tissue that can form between abdominal ...

  3. Abdominal Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Recurrent or Functional Abdominal Pain (RAP or FAP) What is abdominal pain? Abdominal pain , or stomachache, ... recurrent abdominal pain (RAP) or functional abdominal pain (FAP)? If your health care provider has ruled out ...

  4. Visceral obesity, not elevated BMI, is strongly associated with incisional hernia after colorectal surgery.

    PubMed

    Aquina, Christopher T; Rickles, Aaron S; Probst, Christian P; Kelly, Kristin N; Deeb, Andrew-Paul; Monson, John R T; Fleming, Fergal J

    2015-02-01

    High BMI is often used as a proxy for obesity and has been considered a risk factor for the development of an incisional hernia after abdominal surgery. However, BMI does not accurately reflect fat distribution. The purpose of this work was to investigate the relationship among different obesity measurements and the risk of incisional hernia. This was a retrospective cohort study. The study included a single academic institution in New York from 2003 to 2010. The study consists of 193 patients who underwent colorectal cancer resection. Preoperative CT scans were used to measure visceral fat volume, subcutaneous fat volume, total fat volume, and waist circumference. A diagnosis of incisional hernia was made either through physical examination in medical chart documentation or CT scan. Forty-one patients (21.2%) developed an incisional hernia. The median time to hernia was 12.4 months. After adjusting for patient and surgical characteristics using Cox regression analysis, visceral obesity (HR 2.04, 95% CI 1.07-3.91) and history of an inguinal hernia (HR 2.40, 95% CI 1.09-5.25) were significant risk factors for incisional hernia. Laparoscopic resection using a transverse extraction site led to a >75% reduction in the risk of incisional hernia (HR 0.23, 95% CI 0.07-0.76). BMI > 30 kg/m was not significantly associated with incisional hernia development. Limitations include the retrospective design without standardized follow-up to detect hernias and the small sample size attributed to inadequate or unavailable CT scans. Visceral obesity, history of inguinal hernia, and location of specimen extraction site are significantly associated with the development of an incisional hernia, whereas BMI is poorly associated with hernia development. These findings suggest that a lateral transverse location is the incision site of choice and that new strategies, such as prophylactic mesh placement, should be considered in viscerally obese patients.

  5. Athletic pubalgia (sports hernia).

    PubMed

    Litwin, Demetrius E M; Sneider, Erica B; McEnaney, Patrick M; Busconi, Brian D

    2011-04-01

    Athletic pubalgia or sports hernia is a syndrome of chronic lower abdomen and groin pain that may occur in athletes and nonathletes. Because the differential diagnosis of chronic lower abdomen and groin pain is so broad, only a small number of patients with chronic lower abdomen and groin pain fulfill the diagnostic criteria of athletic pubalgia (sports hernia). The literature published to date regarding the cause, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of sports hernias is confusing. This article summarizes the current information and our present approach to this chronic lower abdomen and groin pain syndrome. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Application of a Silicone Sheet in Negative-Pressure Wound Therapy to Treat an Abdominal Wall Defect after Necrotizing Fasciitis.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jin Su; Choi, Hwan Jun

    2017-01-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis (NF) is an aggressive soft-tissue infection involving the deep fascia and is characterized by extensive deterioration of the surrounding tissue. Immediate diagnosis and intensive treatment, including debridement and systemic antibiotics, represent the most important factors influencing the survival of NF patients. In this report, we present a case of NF in the abdomen due to an infection caused by a perforated small bowel after abdominal liposuction. It was successfully treated using negative-pressure wound therapy, in which a silicone sheet functioned as a barrier between the sponge and internal organs to protect the small bowel.

  7. NON-SURGICAL TREATMENT OF A PROFESSIONAL HOCKEY PLAYER WITH THE SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS OF SPORTS HERNIA: A CASE REPORT

    PubMed Central

    Woodward, J. Scott; Parker, Andrew; MacDonald, Robert M.

    2012-01-01

    Study Design: Case Report Background: Injury or weakness of lower abdominal attachments and the posterior inguinal wall can be symptoms of a “sports hernia” and an underlying source of groin pain. Although several authors note conservative treatment as the initial step in the management of this condition, very little has been written on the specific description of non-surgical measures. Most published articles favoring operative care describe poor results related to conservative management; however they fail to report what treatment techniques comprise non-operative management. Case Presentation: The subject of this case report is a professional ice hockey player who sustained an abdominal injury in a game, which was diagnosed as a sports hernia. Following the injury, structured conservative treatment emphasized core control and stability with progressive peripheral demand challenges. Intrinsic core control emphasis continued throughout the treatment progression and during the functional training prior to return to sport. Outcome: The player completed his recovery with return to full competition seven weeks post injury, and continues to compete in the NHL seven years later. Discussion: Surgical intervention has been shown to be effective in the treatment of the “sports hernia.” However it is the authors' opinion that conservative care emphasizing evaluation of intrinsic core muscular deficits and rehabilitation directed at addressing these deficits is an appropriate option, and should be considered prior to surgical intervention. PMID:22319682

  8. The long-term behavior of lightweight and heavyweight meshes used to repair abdominal wall defects is determined by the host tissue repair process provoked by the mesh.

    PubMed

    Pascual, Gemma; Hernández-Gascón, Belén; Rodríguez, Marta; Sotomayor, Sandra; Peña, Estefania; Calvo, Begoña; Bellón, Juan M

    2012-11-01

    Although heavyweight (HW) or lightweight (LW) polypropylene (PP) meshes are widely used for hernia repair, other alternatives have recently appeared. They have the same large-pore structure yet are composed of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE). This study compares the long-term (3 and 6 months) behavior of meshes of different pore size (HW compared with LW) and composition (PP compared with PTFE). Partial defects were created in the lateral wall of the abdomen in New Zealand White rabbits and then repaired by the use of a HW or LW PP mesh or a new monofilament, large-pore PTFE mesh (Infinit). At 90 and 180 days after implantation, tissue incorporation, gene and protein expression of neocollagens (reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction/immunofluorescence), macrophage response (immunohistochemistry), and biomechanical strength were determined. Shrinkage was measured at 90 days. All three meshes induced good host tissue ingrowth, yet the macrophage response was significantly greater in the PTFE implants (P < .05). Collagen 1/3 mRNA levels failed to vary at 90 days yet in the longer term, the LW meshes showed the reduced genetic expression of both collagens (P < .05) accompanied by increased neocollagen deposition, indicating more efficient mRNA translation. After 90-180 days of implant, tensile strengths and elastic modulus values were similar for all 3 implants (P > .05). Host collagen deposition is mesh pore size dependent whereas the macrophage response induced is composition dependent with a greater response shown by PTFE. In the long term, macroporous meshes show comparable biomechanical behavior regardless of their pore size or composition. Copyright © 2012 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Lymphedema of the Transplanted Kidney and Abdominal Wall with Ipsilateral Pleural Effusion Following Kidney Biopsy in a Patient Treated with Sirolimus: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Rashid-Farokhi, Farin; Afshar, Hale

    2017-01-01

    Patient: Female, 32 Final Diagnosis: Sirolimus induced congestion of kidney and overlying abdominal wall Symptoms: Abdominal pain • abdominal swelling • dyspnea Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Improvement of symptoms with drug withdrawal Specialty: Nephrology Objective: Adverse events of drug therapy Background: Sirolimus is a mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor, which is used in immunosuppressive treatment regimens in organ transplant recipients. Although mTOR inhibitors are well tolerated, their adverse effects have been reported. Sirolimus treatment in transplant recipients has been reported to be associated with lymphedema of the skin and subcutaneous tissues, and with pleural effusion, but edema of internal organs and organomegaly have not been previously reported. A case is presented lymphedema of the transplanted kidney and abdominal wall with ipsilateral pleural effusion following kidney biopsy in a patient treated with sirolimus. Case Report: A 32-year-old woman with a history of end-stage renal disease of unknown etiology had undergone right renal transplantation from an unrelated living donor, eight years previously. She was referred to our hospital with dyspnea, localized abdominal pain, and swelling of the transplanted kidney. The symptoms appeared following a kidney biopsy and the replacement of cyclosporin with sirolimus four months previously. On examination, she had localized swelling of the abdominal wall overlying the transplanted kidney, and a right pleural effusion. Hydronephrosis and nephrotic syndrome were excluded as causes of kidney enlargement. Following the withdrawal of sirolimus therapy her symptoms resolved within three months. Conclusions: A case is described of lymphedema of the transplanted kidney and abdominal wall with ipsilateral pleural effusion following kidney biopsy attributed to her change in anti-rejection therapy to sirolimus. This case report should raise awareness of this unusual complication of

  10. Percutaneous debridement and washout of walled-off abdominal abscess and necrosis using flexible endoscopy: a large single-center experience.

    PubMed

    Mathers, Bradley; Moyer, Matthew; Mathew, Abraham; Dye, Charles; Levenick, John; Gusani, Niraj; Dougherty-Hamod, Brandy; McGarrity, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Direct percutaneous endoscopic necrosectomy has been described as a minimally invasive intervention for the debridement of walled-off pancreatic necrosis (WOPN). In this retrospective cohort study, we aimed to confirm these findings in a US referral center and evaluate the clinical value of this modality in the treatment of pancreatic necrosis as well as other types of intra-abdominal fluid collections and necrosis. Twelve consecutive patients with WOPN or other abdominal abscess requiring debridement and washout underwent computed tomography (CT)-guided drainage catheter placement. Each patient then underwent direct percutaneous endoscopic necrosectomy and washout with repeat debridement performed until complete. Drains were then removed once output fell below 30 mL/day and imaging confirmed resolution. The primary endpoints were time to clinical resolution and sustained resolution at 1-year follow up.  Ten patients were treated for WOPN, one for necrotic hepatic abscesses, and one for omental necrosis. The median time to intervention was 85 days with an average of 2.3 necrosectomies performed. Complete removal of drains was accomplished in 11 patients (92 %). The median time to resolution was 57 days. No serious adverse events occurred; however, one patient developed pancreaticocutaneous fistulas. Ten patients completed 1-year surveillance of which none required drain replacement. No patients required surgery or repeat endoscopy. This series supports the premise that direct percutaneous endoscopic necrosectomy is a safe and effective intervention for intra-abdominal fluid collections and necrosis in appropriately selected patients. Our study demonstrates a high clinical success rate with minimal adverse events. This modality offers several potential advantages over surgical and transgastric approaches including use of improved accessibility, an excellent safety profile, and requirement for only deep or moderate sedation.

  11. A case report of unexpected pathology within an incarcerated ventral hernia.

    PubMed

    Kane, Erica D; Bittner, Katharine R; Bennett, Michelle; Romanelli, John R; Seymour, Neal E; Wu, Jacqueline J

    2017-01-01

    Incidence of hernial appendicitis is 0.008%, most frequently within inguinal and femoral hernias. Up to 2.5% of appendectomy patients are found to have Crohn's disease. Elucidating the etiology of inflammation is essential for directing management. A 51-year-old female with achondroplastic dwarfism, multiple cesarean sections, and subsequent massive incisional hernia, presented with ruptured appendicitis within her incarcerated hernia. She underwent diagnostic laparoscopy, appendectomy, intra-abdominal abscess drainage, and complete reduction of ventral hernia contents. She developed a nonhealing colocutaneous fistula, causing major disruptions to her daily life. She elected to undergo hernia repair with component separation for anticipated lack of domain secondary to her body habitus. Her operative course consisted of open abdominal exploration, adhesiolysis, colocutaneous fistula repair, ileocolic resection and anastomosis, and hernia repair with bioresorbable mesh. She tolerated the procedure well. Unexpectedly, ileocolic pathology demonstrated chronic active ileitis, diagnostic of Crohn's disease. Only two cases of hernial Crohn's appendicitis have been reported, both within Spigelian hernias. Appendiceal inflammation inside a hernia sac may be attributed to ischemia from extraluminal compression of the hernia neck. This case demonstrates a rare presentation of multiple concurrent surgical disease processes, each of which impact the patient's treatment plan. This is the first report of incisional hernia appendicitis with nonhealing colocutaneous fistulas secondary to Crohn's. It is a lesson in developing a differential diagnosis of an inflammatory process within an incarcerated hernia and management of the complications related to laparoscopic hernial appendectomy in a patient with undiagnosed Crohn's disease. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  12. Surgical Management of Hiatal Hernia in Children with Asplenia Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Miyake, Hiromu; Fukumoto, Koji; Yamoto, Masaya; Nouso, Hiroshi; Kaneshiro, Masakatsu; Koyama, Mariko; Urushihara, Naoto

    2017-06-01

    Purpose  Patients with asplenia syndrome (AS) are likely to have upper gastrointestinal tract malformations such as hiatal hernia. This report discusses the treatment of such conditions. Methods  Seventy-five patients with AS underwent initial palliation in our institution between 1997 and 2013. Of these, 10 patients had hiatal hernia. Of the patients with hiatal hernia, 6 had brachyesophagus and 7 had microgastria. Results  Of the 10 patients with hiatal hernia, 9 underwent surgery in infancy (7 before Glenn operation, 2 after Glenn operation). Two underwent typical Toupet fundoplication, and the other 7 underwent atypical repair including reduction of the stomach. Two patients with atypical repair showed recurrence of hernia and required reoperation. Three patients required reoperation due to duodenal obstruction. Duodenal obstruction occurred due to preduodenal portal vein or abnormal vessels compressing the duodenum. Obstructive symptoms were not seen in any cases preoperatively. Conclusions  In patients with hiatal hernia, typical fundoplication is often difficult because most have concomitant brachyesophagus, microgastria, and hypoplasia of the esophageal hiatus. However, we should at least reduce the stomach to the abdominal cavity as early as possible to increase thoracic cavity volume and allow good feeding. Increasing the volume of the thoracic cavity thus makes Glenn and Fontan circulations more stable. Duodenal obstruction secondary to vascular anomalies is also common, so the anatomy in the area near the duodenum should be evaluated pre- and intraoperatively. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  13. The Influence of a Pfannenstiel Scar on Venous Anatomy of the Lower Abdominal Wall and Implications for Deep Inferior Epigastric Artery Perforator Flap Breast Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Kim, So Young; Lee, Kyeong-Tae; Mun, Goo-Hyun

    2017-03-01

    A Pfannenstiel incision involves the obstruction of superficial venous pathways and functional diversion of flow through alternative pathways and adjacent vessels. This study investigated the effect of a prior Pfannenstiel incision on venous anatomy of the lower abdominal wall; specifically, the superficial inferior epigastric vein (SIEV), using computed tomographic angiography. A case-control study was performed of 50 patients with Pfannenstiel scars and 50 age-matched, body mass index-matched control patients without Pfannenstiel scars. The authors compared the number of direct/indirect and total communications between the SIEV and deep inferior epigastric artery perforator (DIEP) venae comitantes, midline crossover, and other SIEV-related anatomical changes by using computed tomographic angiography. Flap-related clinical outcomes and donor-site-related complications were also assessed. The median number of direct and total communications between the SIEV and DIEP venae comitantes in the study group was greater than in the control group. The percentage of SIEVs having more than two branching patterns per hemiabdomen was significantly higher in the study group than in the control group. The study group also showed a significantly lower rate of fat necrosis compared with the control group (p = 0.03). The rate of donor-site seroma was significantly higher in the study group. This study suggests that the presence of a Pfannenstiel scar may promote the development of direct and total communications between the SIEV and DIEP venae comitantes and branching within the SIEV in the lower abdominal wall, which may facilitate venous drainage of adipose tissue in DIEP flap breast reconstruction. Risk, II.

  14. Abdominal Pain Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... blood clots to the lungs) Abdominal or chest wall pain: Shingles (herpes zoster infection) Costochondritis (inflammation of ... or tumors), fat (evidence of impaired digestion and absorption of food), and the presence of germs. X- ...

  15. Minimal Invasive Linea Alba Reconstruction for the Treatment of Umbilical and Epigastric Hernias with Coexisting Rectus Abdominis Diastasis.

    PubMed

    Köhler, Gernot; Fischer, Ines; Kaltenböck, Richard; Schrittwieser, Rudolf

    2018-04-05

    Patients with umbilical or epigastric hernias benefit from mesh- based repairs, and even more so if a concomitant rectus diastasis (RD) is present. The ideal technique is, however, still under debate. In this study we introduce the minimal invasive linea alba reconstruction (MILAR) with the supraaponeurotic placement of a fully absorbable synthetic mesh. Midline reconstruction with anterior rectus sheath repair and mesh augmentation by an open approach is a well-known surgical technique for ventral hernia repair. Between December 1, 2016, and November 30, 2017, 20 patients with symptomatic umbilical and/or epigastric hernias, and coexisting RD underwent a minimally invasive complete reconstruction of the midline through a small access route. The inner part of both incised and medialized anterior rectus sheaths was replaced by a fully absorbable synthetic mesh placed in a supraaponeurotic position. Patients were hospitalized for an average of 4 days and the mean operating time was 79 minutes. The mean hernia defect size was 1.5 cm in diameter and the mean mesh size was recorded as 15.8 cm in length and 5.2 cm in width. Two patients sustained surgical postoperative complications in terms of symptomatic seroma occurrences with successful interventional treatment.The early results (mean follow-up period of 5 months) showed no recurrences and only 1 patient reported occasional pain following exertion without rest. MILAR is a modification of the recently published endoscopic linea alba reconstruction restoring the normal anatomy of the abdominal wall. A new linea alba is formed with augmentation of autologous tissue consisting of the plicated anterior rectus sheaths. Supraaponeurotic placement of a fully absorbable synthetic mesh eliminates potential long-term mesh-associated complications. Regarding MILAR, there is no need for endoscopic equipment due to the uniquely designed flexible lighted retractors, meaning one assistant less is required.

  16. Full-thickness skin graft vs. synthetic mesh in the repair of giant incisional hernia: a randomized controlled multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Clay, L; Stark, B; Gunnarsson, U; Strigård, K

    2018-04-01

    Repair of large incisional hernias includes the implantation of a synthetic mesh, but this may lead to pain, stiffness, infection and enterocutaneous fistulae. Autologous full-thickness skin graft as on-lay reinforcement has been tested in eight high-risk patients in a proof-of-concept study, with satisfactory results. In this multicenter randomized study, the use of skin graft was compared to synthetic mesh in giant ventral hernia repair. Non-smoking patients with a ventral hernia > 10 cm wide were randomized to repair using an on-lay autologous full-thickness skin graft or a synthetic mesh. The primary endpoint was surgical site complications during the first 3 months. A secondary endpoint was patient comfort. Fifty-three patients were included. Clinical evaluation was performed at a 3-month follow-up appointment. There were fewer patients in the skin graft group reporting discomfort: 3 (13%) vs. 12 (43%) (p = 0.016). Skin graft patients had less pain and a better general improvement. No difference was seen regarding seroma; 13 (54%) vs. 13 (46%), or subcutaneous wound infection; 5 (20%) vs. 7 (25%). One recurrence appeared in each group. Three patients in the skin graft group and two in the synthetic mesh group were admitted to the intensive care unit. No difference was seen for the primary endpoint short-term surgical complication. Full-thickness skin graft appears to be a reliable material for ventral hernia repair producing no more complications than when using synthetic mesh. Patients repaired with a skin graft have less subjective abdominal wall symptoms.

  17. Laparoscopic Ventral Hernia Repair

    MedlinePlus

    ... Series SAGES Masters Program Facebook Collaboratives Acute Care Surgery Bariatric Biliary Colorectal Flexible Endoscopy (upper or lower) Foregut Hernia Robotics The SAGES HPB/Solid Organ Program The SAGES ...

  18. Laparoscopic Inguinal Hernia Repair

    MedlinePlus

    ... Series SAGES Masters Program Facebook Collaboratives Acute Care Surgery Bariatric Biliary Colorectal Flexible Endoscopy (upper or lower) Foregut Hernia Robotics The SAGES HPB/Solid Organ Program The SAGES ...

  19. Umbilical hernia repair

    MedlinePlus

    ... painful and stuck in the bulging position. Blood supply to the intestine is affected. The hernia has ... in. This is usually painful. If the blood supply to this area is cut off (strangulation), urgent ...

  20. Giant left paraduodenal hernia

    PubMed Central

    Cundy, Thomas P; Di Marco, Aimee N; Hamady, Mohamad; Darzi, Ara

    2014-01-01

    Left paraduodenal hernia (LPDH) is a retrocolic internal hernia of congenital origin that develops through the fossa of Landzert, and extends into the descending mesocolon and left portion of the transverse mesocolon. It carries significant overall risk of mortality, yet delay in diagnosis is not unusual due to subtle and elusive features. Familiarisation with the embryological and anatomical features of this rare hernia is essential for surgical management. This is especially important with respect to vascular anatomy as major mesenteric vessels form intimate relationships with the ventral rim and anterior portion of the hernia. As an illustrative case, we describe our experience with a striking example of LPDH, particularly focusing on the inherent diagnostic challenges and associated critical vascular anatomy. We advocate the role of diagnostic laparoscopy; however caution that decision to safely proceed with laparoscopic repair must occur only with confident identification of the vascular anatomy involved. PMID:24792018

  1. Umbilical hernia rupture with evisceration of omentum from massive ascites: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction The incidence of hernias is increased in patients with alcoholic liver disease with ascites. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of an acute rise in intra-abdominal pressure from straining for stool as the cause of a ruptured umbilical hernia. Case presentation An 81-year-old Caucasian man with a history of alcoholic liver disease presented to our emergency department with an erythematous umbilical hernia and clear, yellow discharge from the umbilicus. On straining for stool, after initial clinical assessment, our patient noted a gush of fluid and evisceration of omentum from the umbilical hernia. An urgent laparotomy was performed with excision of the umbilicus and devitalized omentum. Conclusion We report the case of a patient with a history of alcoholic liver disease with ascites. Ascites causes a chronic increase in intra-abdominal pressure. A sudden increase in intra-abdominal pressure, such as coughing, vomiting, gastroscopy or, as in this case, straining for stool can cause rupture of an umbilical hernia. The presence of discoloration, ulceration or a rapid increase in size of the umbilical hernia signals impending rupture and should prompt the physician to reduce the intra-abdominal pressure. PMID:21539740

  2. Left Paraduodenal Hernia.

    PubMed

    Martins, Aires; Gonçalves, Álvaro; Almeida, Teresa; Gomes, Rui; Lomba, João; Midões, Alberto

    2018-05-01

    Left paraduodenal hernia is an entrapment of the small bowel into the Landzert fossa, an unusual congenital peritoneal defect behind the descending mesocolon that results from failure of part of the descending mesocolon to fuse with the posterior parietal peritoneum (Doishita et al. in Radiographics, 36(1): 88-106, 2016). This fossa is reported to be present in approximately 2% of autopsy bodies. The authors present a case of a left paraduodenal hernia in a young woman.

  3. Optimizing working space in laparoscopy: CT measurement of the effect of pre-stretching of the abdominal wall in a porcine model.

    PubMed

    Vlot, John; Wijnen, René; Stolker, Robert Jan; Bax, Klaas N

    2014-03-01

    Determinants of working space in minimal access surgery have not been well studied. Using computed tomography (CT) to measure volumes and linear dimensions, we are studying the effect of a number of determinants of CO2 working space in a porcine laparoscopy model. Here we report the effects of pre-stretching of the abdominal wall. Earlier we had noted an increase in CO2 pneumoperitoneum volume at repeat insufflation with an intra-abdominal pressure (IAP) of 5 mmHg after previous stepwise insufflation up to an IAP of 15 mmHg. We reviewed the data of this serendipity group; data of 16 pigs were available. In a new group of eight pigs, we also explored this effect at repeat IAPs of 10 and 15 mmHg. Volumes and linear dimensions of the CO2 pneumoperitoneum were measured on reconstructed CT images and compared between the initial and repeat insufflation runs. Previous stepwise insufflation of the abdomen with CO2 up to 15 mmHg significantly (p < 0.01) increased subsequent working-space volume at a repeat IAP of 5 mmHg by 21 %, 7 % at a repeat IAP of 10 mmHg and 3 % at a repeat IAP of 15 mmHg. The external anteroposterior diameter significantly (p < 0.01) increased by 0.5 cm (14 %) at repeat 5 mmHg. Other linear dimensions showed a much smaller change. There was no statistically significant correlation between the duration of the insufflation run and the volume increase after pre-stretching at all IAP levels. Pre-stretching of the abdominal wall allows for the same surgical-field exposure at lower IAPs, reducing the negative effects of prolonged high-pressure CO2 pneumoperitoneum on the cardiorespiratory system and microcirculation. Pre-stretching has important scientific consequences in studies addressing ways of increasing working space in that its effect may confound the possible effects of other interventions aimed at increasing working space.

  4. Pitfalls in retromuscular mesh repair for incisional hernia: the importance of the "fatty triangle".

    PubMed

    Conze, J; Prescher, A; Klinge, U; Saklak, M; Schumpelick, V

    2004-08-01

    Open retromuscular mesh repair has become a standard procedure in incisional hernia repair. This technique led to a significant decrease of recurrences. Recurrences after this technique typically occur at the upper mesh border and are a result of the technical complexity of reaching the postulated underlay of 5 cm in the region of the linea alba. We performed an anatomical study in human corpses to investigate the abdominal wall with its different structures, with emphasis on the overlap of the mesh under the linea alba. The overlap can be achieved by incision of the posterior lamina of the rectus sheath, on both sides close to the linea alba. The incision opens the preperitoneal space and appears in the shape of a "fatty triangle". The anterior lamina of the rectus sheath above the hernia defect remains intact and facilitates a sufficient thrust bearing for a retromuscular mesh implantation. Knowledge of the anatomy and preparation of the "fatty triangle" enables a mesh positioning according to the principles of retromuscular mesh repair.

  5. Effectiveness of triclosan-coated PDS Plus versus uncoated PDS II sutures for prevention of surgical site infection after abdominal wall closure: the randomised controlled PROUD trial.

    PubMed

    Diener, Markus K; Knebel, Phillip; Kieser, Meinhard; Schüler, Philipp; Schiergens, Tobias S; Atanassov, Vladimir; Neudecker, Jens; Stein, Erwin; Thielemann, Henryk; Kunz, Reiner; von Frankenberg, Moritz; Schernikau, Utz; Bunse, Jörg; Jansen-Winkeln, Boris; Partecke, Lars I; Prechtl, Gerald; Pochhammer, Julius; Bouchard, Ralf; Hodina, René; Beckurts, K Tobias E; Leißner, Lothar; Lemmens, Hans-Peter; Kallinowski, Friedrich; Thomusch, Oliver; Seehofer, Daniel; Simon, Thomas; Hyhlik-Dürr, Alexander; Seiler, Christoph M; Hackert, Thilo; Reissfelder, Christoph; Hennig, René; Doerr-Harim, Colette; Klose, Christina; Ulrich, Alexis; Büchler, Markus W

    2014-07-12

    Postoperative surgical site infections are one of the most frequent complications after open abdominal surgery, and triclosan-coated sutures were developed to reduce their occurrence. The aim of the PROUD trial was to obtain reliable data for the effectiveness of triclosan-coated PDS Plus sutures for abdominal wall closure, compared with non-coated PDS II sutures, in the prevention of surgical site infections. This multicentre, randomised controlled group-sequential superiority trial was done in 24 German hospitals. Adult patients (aged ≥18 years) who underwent elective midline abdominal laparotomy for any reason were eligible for inclusion. Exclusion criteria were impaired mental state, language problems, and participation in another intervention trial that interfered with the intervention or outcome of this trial. A central web-based randomisation tool was used to randomly assign eligible participants by permuted block randomisation with a 1:1 allocation ratio and block size 4 before mass closure to either triclosan-coated sutures (PDS Plus) or uncoated sutures (PDS II) for abdominal fascia closure. The primary endpoint was the occurrence of superficial or deep surgical site infection according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention criteria within 30 days after the operation. Patients, surgeons, and the outcome assessors were masked to group assignment. Interim and final analyses were by modified intention to treat. This trial is registered with the German Clinical Trials Register, number DRKS00000390. Between April 7, 2010, and Oct 19, 2012, 1224 patients were randomly assigned to intervention groups (607 to PDS Plus, and 617 to PDS II), of whom 1185 (587 PDS Plus and 598 PDS II) were analysed by intention to treat. The study groups were well balanced in terms of patient and procedure characteristics. The occurrence of surgical site infections did not differ between the PDS Plus group (87 [14·8%] of 587) and the PDS II group (96 [16·1%] of 598

  6. [The "martin-arm" system for abdominal wall fixation for many applications - experience from its use of gynaecology (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Müller, H G

    1979-01-01

    The "martin-arm"-System meets the demand for optimal fixation of outer edges of the wound cavity and exact positioning of organs in a three dimensional manner at abdominal operations. The four joints of each arm individually connected to the Op-table make this possible. They are fixed in position by a central joint with a lever which can be tightened. An adequate assortment of exchangeable retractors, specula and spatulas offers the possibility of a clear view of the operation. All instruments are ready for use even without the "martin-Arm". This system is especially suitable for emergency surgery, for small gynaecology wards or during staff shortages e.g. at night. The operation setting, according to requirements, remains in position for the duration of the whole operation. In the case of long operations, fatigue symptoms of the assistant are no longer present with this instrumentation.

  7. Adipose tissue-derived stem cells enhance bioprosthetic mesh repair of ventral hernias.

    PubMed

    Altman, Andrew M; Abdul Khalek, Feras J; Alt, Eckhard U; Butler, Charles E

    2010-09-01

    Bioprosthetic mesh used for ventral hernia repair becomes incorporated into the musculofascial edge by cellular infiltration and vascularization. Adipose tissue-derived stem cells promote tissue repair and vascularization and may increase the rate or degree of tissue incorporation. The authors hypothesized that introducing these cells into bioprosthetic mesh would result in adipose tissue-derived stem cell engraftment and proliferation and enhance incorporation of the bioprosthetic mesh. Adipose tissue-derived stem cells were isolated from the subcutaneous adipose tissue of syngeneic Brown Norway rats, expanded in vitro, and labeled with green fluorescent protein. Thirty-six additional rats underwent inlay ventral hernia repair with porcine acellular dermal matrix. Two 12-rat groups had the cells (1.0 x 10(6)) injected directly into the musculofascial/porcine acellular dermal matrix interface after repair or received porcine acellular dermal matrix on which the cells had been preseeded; the 12-rat control group received no stem cells. At 2 weeks, adipose tissue-derived stem cells in both stem cell groups engrafted, survived, migrated, and proliferated. Mean cellular infiltration into porcine acellular dermal matrix at the musculofascial/graft interface was significantly greater in the preseeded and injected stem cell groups than in the control group. Mean vascular infiltration of the porcine acellular dermal matrix was significantly greater in both stem cell groups than in the control group. Preseeded and injected adipose tissue-derived stem cells engraft, migrate, proliferate, and enhance the vascularity of porcine acellular dermal matrix grafts at the musculofascial/graft interface. These cells can thus enhance incorporation of porcine acellular dermal matrix into the abdominal wall after repair of ventral hernias.

  8. Association of umbilical hernia with volume of ascites in liver cirrhosis: a retrospective observational study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ran; Qi, Xingshun; Peng, Ying; Deng, Han; Li, Jing; Ning, Zheng; Dai, Junna; Hou, Feifei; Zhao, Jiancheng; Guo, Xiaozhong

    2016-11-01

    Umbilical hernia is a common abdominal complication in cirrhotic patients with ascites. Our study aimed to evaluate the correlation of umbilical hernia with the volume of ascites. Cirrhotic patients that underwent axial abdominopelvic computed tomography (CT) scans at our hospital between June 2012 and June 2014 were eligible. All CT images were reviewed to confirm the presence of umbilical hernia. The volume of ascites was estimated by five-point method. One hundred and fifty-seven patients were enrolled into this study. Among them, 101 patients had ascites and 6 patients had umbilical hernia. Alkaline phosphatase (AKP) and serum sodium were significantly lower in patients with umbilical hernia (P = 0.008, P = 0.011, respectively). Child-Pugh scores and the volume of ascites were significantly higher in patients with umbilical hernia (P = 0.03, P < 0.0001, respectively). Correlation analysis demonstrated that the volume of ascites, Child-Pugh scores, and blood ammonia had positive correlations with umbilical hernia (r = 0.4579, P < 0.0001; r = 0.175, P = 0.03; r = 0.342, P = 0.001, respectively) and that serum sodium had a negative correlation with umbilical hernia (r = -0.203, P = 0.011). In patients with ascites ≥2000 mL, only AKP was significantly associated with umbilical hernia (P = 0.0497). No variables were significantly associated with umbilical hernia in a subgroup analysis of patients matched according to the volume of ascites. The volume of ascites has a positive correlation with umbilical hernia. However, the factors associated with umbilical hernia in patients with severe ascites remain unclear. © 2016 Chinese Cochrane Center, West China Hospital of Sichuan University and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  9. Internal Hernia Following Laparoscopic Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass: Prevention and Tips for Intra-operative Management.

    PubMed

    Nimeri, Abdelrahman A; Maasher, Ahmed; Al Shaban, Talat; Salim, Elnazeer; Gamaleldin, Maysoon M

    2016-09-01

    Laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB) is considered the golden standard for bariatric surgery. However, the potential risk for internal hernia after LRYGB remains a significant concern to both patients and surgeons. In addition, patients presenting with abdominal pain after LRYGB warrant careful attention to avoid missing or delaying the diagnosis of internal hernia. The aim of this study was to describe our technique to prevent internal hernia after LRYGB, intra-operative findings, and our management strategies for patients with internal hernia after LRYGB. In this video, we review different technical tips and tricks to explore patients with suspected internal hernia after RYGB, how to reduce obstructed small bowel, and effectively close mesenteric defects to prevent internal hernia after LRYGB. A high index of suspicion and evaluation of the CT scan of the patient by an experienced bariatric surgeon is essential to avoid missing cases of internal hernia after LRYGB. In addition, patients presenting with incarcerated small bowel due to an internal hernia are best managed by standing on the left side of the patient with the left arm tucked and starting at the ileocecal valve and running the small bowel backwards towards the ligament of Treitz. Furthermore, patients with bowel obstruction due to internal hernia may need to have a gastrostomy placed at the remnant of the stomach. Recurrent abdominal pain is not uncommon after LRYGB. Systematic closure of mesenteric defects, the use of diagnostic laparoscopy, and high index of suspicion are all necessary to avoid delay in diagnosis.

  10. Case of a strangulated right paraduodenal fossa hernia in a malrotated gut.

    PubMed

    Ong, Michelle; Roberts, Matthew; Perera, Marlon; Pretorius, Casper

    2017-07-24

    We report an unusual case of a strangulated internal hernia resulting from a right paraduodenal fossa hernia (PDH) in the context of bowel malrotation. There are few documented cases of PDHs associated with a concomitant gut malrotation. Emergency laparotomy was performed based on clinical and radiological. Intraoperatively, the proximal jejunum was seen to enter a hernia sac formed by an aberrant duodenojejunal flexure located to the right of the aorta. This was presumed to be a strangulated internal hernia of the paraduodenal recess in a malrotated gut. The hernia neck was widened and the sac obliterated to allow reduction of the contents. On reduction and warming, the insulted small bowel appeared viable and returned to the abdominal cavity without resection. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  11. Sliding myofascial flap of the rectus abdominus muscles for the closure of recurrent ventral hernias.

    PubMed

    DiBello, J N; Moore, J H

    1996-09-01

    Despite a reported incidence of up to 11 percent of incisional/ventral hernias following celiotomies, there is no universally applicable preventive or reconstructive technique in practice. Among patients undergoing repair of ventral incisional herniation, the reported recurrence rates are typically in the 30- to 50-percent range. This study concentrates on the patient with a large, recurrent abdominal incisional hernia in whom conventional surgical repair has failed. We report our recent 4-year experience with the use of "components separation" of the myofascial layers of the abdominal wall for repair of these recurrent herniations. During 4-year period, 35 patients with large, recurrent ventral hernias underwent repair by the same surgeon (J. H. M.) using the method described below. Abdominal defects as large as 875 cm2 were repaired, with a median defect size of 255 cm2. The repair was based on the compound flap of the rectus muscle with its attached internal oblique-transversus abdominus muscle with advancement to the midline to recreate the linea alba. Any repairs that were attenuated were supported with either ePTFE (8.6 percent) or Vicryl mesh (34 percent). The study group consisted of 35 patients, 34 percent male and 66 percent female; mean age was 55 years. Length of follow-up ranged from 1 to 43 months, with a mean follow-up of 22 months. Overall recurrence rate for herniation was 8.5 percent (3/35). Additional complications, namely seroma, wound infection, and hematoma, occurred at rates of 2.8, 5.7, and 5.7 percent, respectively. There were no mortalities. The compound flap of the rectus and internal oblique-transversus can be advanced medially to recreate the linea alba to provide dynamic, stable support for defects as large as 875 cm2. A recurrence rate of 8.5 percent was achieved in a relatively high-risk population with acceptable morbidity and no mortalities. In our 4-year experience, the sliding rectus abdominus myofascial flap has proved to be a

  12. Abdominal tap

    MedlinePlus

    Peritoneal tap; Paracentesis; Ascites - abdominal tap; Cirrhosis - abdominal tap; Malignant ascites - abdominal tap ... abdominal cavity ( most often cancer of the ovaries ) Cirrhosis of the liver Damaged bowel Heart disease Infection ...

  13. [The Open Retromuscular Preperitoneal Mesh Repair of the Incisional Lateral Hernia - Technique and Results of a Prospective Cohort Study].

    PubMed

    Isemer, Friedrich-Eckart; Dietz, Ulrich; Ackermann, Maximilian

    2018-05-18

    Surgical approaches to flank hernias have been poorly standardised. The most demanding issues in intermuscular net insertion are the limited area in the dorsal direction and the difficulties in fixing the net to the costal arch or the iliac crest. This is why many different surgical procedures have been published. From August 2015 to October 2016, nine patients with a primary incisional lateral hernia received open retromuscular preperitoneal mesh repair. In intermuscular mesh placement, the mesh size must be smaller at smaller values of the CPA (costopelvic angle). On the dorsal side of the reference stretch RS of 10 cm between costal arch and iliac crest, fixations are necessary to achieve stability. Retroperitoneal preperitoneal net implantation is unrestricted by the patient's anatomy. The placement of the mesh is similar to the Stoppa procedure and almost any size can be used with little fixation. Remodeling of the abdominal wall can be comfortably achieved. All 9 patients underwent retromuscular preperitoneal mesh repair. The hernia size was 92.85 cm 2 with a corresponding mesh size of 426.22 cm 2 . No adverse side effects or surgical complications were observed; the length of hospital stay was between 3 to 7 days; the follow up was 3 to 18 months, with a mean follow-up of 9.1 months. In a follow-up questionnaire, the patients reported a high satisfaction rate with a grade of 1,2 (school mark); there was no recurrence. The pain level decreased from VAS grade 4 preoperatively to 1.2 postoperatively. 7 patients had no pain at all. In conclusion, adequate overlap of the implanted mesh can be achieved in the preperitoneal retromuscular space even in large hernias. Fixation of the mesh to the costal arch or the iliac crest is not necessary and would only induce postoperative pain. Long-term stability depends on the size of the mesh. Remodeling of the abdominal wall with closure of the fascia above the mesh can be easily achieved. Georg Thieme Verlag KG

  14. Temporary abdominal closure with zipper-mesh device for management of intra-abdominal sepsis.

    PubMed

    Utiyama, Edivaldo Massazo; Pflug, Adriano Ribeiro Meyer; Damous, Sérgio Henrique Bastos; Rodrigues, Adilson Costa; Montero, Edna Frasson de Souza; Birolini, Claudio Augusto Vianna

    2015-01-01

    to present our experience with scheduled reoperations in 15 patients with intra-abdominal sepsis. we have applied a more effective technique consisting of temporary abdominal closure with a nylon mesh sheet containing a zipper. We performed reoperations in the operating room under general anesthesia at an average interval of 84 hours. The revision consisted of debridement of necrotic material and vigorous lavage of the involved peritoneal area. The mean age of patients was 38.7 years (range, 15 to 72 years); 11 patients were male, and four were female. forty percent of infections were due to necrotizing pancreatitis. Sixty percent were due to perforation of the intestinal viscus secondary to inflammation, vascular occlusion or trauma. We performed a total of 48 reoperations, an average of 3.2 surgeries per patient. The mesh-zipper device was left in place for an average of 13 days. An intestinal ostomy was present adjacent to the zipper in four patients and did not present a problem for patient management. Mortality was 26.6%. No fistulas resulted from this technique. When intra-abdominal disease was under control, the mesh-zipper device was removed, and the fascia was closed in all patients. In three patients, the wound was closed primarily, and in 12 it was allowed to close by secondary intent. Two patients developed hernia; one was incisional and one was in the drain incision. the planned reoperation for manual lavage and debridement of the abdomen through a nylon mesh-zipper combination was rapid, simple, and well-tolerated. It permitted effective management of severe septic peritonitis, easy wound care and primary closure of the abdominal wall.

  15. Laparoscopic hernia repair and bladder injury.

    PubMed

    Dalessandri, K M; Bhoyrul, S; Mulvihill, S J

    2001-01-01

    Bladder injury is a complication of laparoscopic surgery with a reported incidence in the general surgery literature of 0.5% and in the gynecology literature of 2%. We describe how to recognize and treat the injury and how to avoid the problem. We report two cases of bladder injury repaired with a General Surgical Interventions (GSI) trocar and a balloon device used for laparoscopic extraperitoneal inguinal hernia repair. One patient had a prior appendectomy; the other had a prior midline incision from a suprapubic prostatectomy. We repaired the bladder injury, and the patients made a good recovery. When using the obturator and balloon device, it is important to stay anterior to the preperitoneal space and bladder. Prior lower abdominal surgery can be considered a relative contraindication to extraperitoneal laparoscopic hernia repair. Signs of gas in the Foley bag or hematuria should alert the surgeon to a bladder injury. A one- or two-layer repair of the bladder injury can be performed either laparoscopically or openly and is recommended for a visible injury. Mesh repair of the hernia can be completed provided no evidence exists of urinary tract infection. A Foley catheter is placed until healing occurs.

  16. [The treatment of inguinofemoral hernias with laparoscopic herniorraphy. Our experience of 1210 transabdominal preperitoneal (TAPP) reconstructions].

    PubMed

    Bátorfi, József

    2005-12-01

    In 11 years (1994-2005) our team has carried out 1210 transabdominal preperitoneal herniorrhaphies in 964 patients. We operated monolateral hernias in 602 (62.4%) patients, bilateral hernias in 246 (25.5%), among these occult contralateral hernias in 96 (10%), femoral hernias 20 (2%). 28% (N=269) of all operations were performed on because of recurrent hernias. In 6 selected patients incarcerated hernias were operated on by surgeons with sufficient experience. In 16 patients with concomitant abdominal disease we performed synchronous laparoscopic operations (15 cholecystectomies, 1 Meckel diverticulum resection). The average operation time was 112 minutes (52-195), in monolateral hernias during the learning curve, this was reduced to 57 minutes (40-125). The only conversion (0.08%) was necessary because of bowel injury, two early reoperations (0.16%) happened because of bowel perforation caused by electrocoagulation (laparotomy) and because of clipped nervus cutaneus femoris (clip laparoscopically removed). Sero-haematoma (86 = 7.1%) which is the most common mild complication did not occur after the introduction of routine pre-peritoneal drainage. Hydrocele, which developed in the remnant of the sac was operated on in 3 (0.25%) patients. This complication develops when the hernia sac could not be lifted laparoscopically into the abdominal cavity. This complication was eliminated when we removed the scrotal sac through a small skin incision at the end of the operation. Mean hospital stay was 3 (2-7) days, the mean return to normal activity 7-10 days. The majority (N=9) of 11 (0.9%) recurrences occurred in the learning curve. Our experience which is similar to what can be found in numerous other articles showed, that LH is beneficial (short hospitalisation, early return to normal activity, more favourable operability in bilateral and recurrent hernias, early recognition of contralateral occult hernias, performance of synchronous laparoscopic operations, small

  17. The impact of a massive transfusion protocol (1:1:1) on major hepatic injuries: does it increase abdominal wall closure rates?

    PubMed

    Ball, Chad G; Dente, Christopher J; Shaz, Beth; Wyrzykowski, Amy D; Nicholas, Jeffrey M; Kirkpatrick, Andrew W; Feliciano, David V

    2013-10-01

    Massive transfusion protocols (MTPs) using high plasma and platelet ratios for exsanguinating trauma patients are increasingly popular. Major liver injuries often require massive resuscitations and immediate hemorrhage control. Current published literature describes outcomes among patients with mixed patterns of injury. We sought to identify the effects of an MTP on patients with major liver trauma. Patients with grade 3, 4 or 5 liver injuries who required a massive blood component transfusion were analyzed. We compared patients with high plasma:red blood cell:platelet ratio (1:1:1) transfusions (2007-2009) with patients injured before the creation of an institutional MTP (2005-2007). Among 60 patients with major hepatic injuries, 35 (58%) underwent resuscitation after the implementation of an MTP. Patient and injury characteristics were similar between cohorts. Implementation of the MTP significantly improved plasma: red blood cell:platelet ratios and decreased crystalloid fluid resuscitation (p = 0.026). Rapid improvement in early acidosis and coagulopathy was superior with an MTP (p = 0.009). More patients in the MTP group also underwent primary abdominal fascial closure during their hospital stay (p = 0.021). This was most evident with grade 4 injuries (89% vs. 14%). The mean time to fascial closure was 4.2 days. The overall survival rate for all major liver injuries was not affected by an MTP (p = 0.61). The implementation of a formal MTP using high plasma and platelet ratios resulted in a substantial increase in abdominal wall approximation. This occurred concurrently to a decrease in the delivered volume of crystalloid fluid.

  18. An Incidental Discovery of Morgagni Hernia in an Elderly Patient Presented with Chronic Dyspepsia.

    PubMed

    Kim, Duk Ki; Moon, Hee Seok; Jung, Hyeon Yong; Sung, Jae Kyu; Gang, Sun Hyeong; Kim, Myeong Hee

    2017-01-25

    A Morgagni hernia was first described in 1761 by Giovanni Morgagni. In adults, it is accompanied by gastrointestinal- or respiratory-type symptoms. Herein, we report an 84-year-old woman presented to our hospital with nausea and vomiting. After hospitalization, an X-ray revealed a right diaphragmatic hernia. Based on the results of abdominal computed tomography, duodenoscopy, and upper gastrointestinography (gastrografin), we concluded that her symptoms were caused by Morgagni hernia. Our patient underwent laparoscopic surgery, and shortly thereafter, her symptoms resolved.

  19. [Giant hernias with loss of domain: what is the best way to prepare patients?].

    PubMed

    Balaphas, Alexandre; Morel, Philippe; Breguet, Romain; Assalino, Michela

    2016-06-15

    Giant hernias with loss of domain induce physiological modifications that impair quality of life and make more complex their surgical management. A good preparation of patients before surgery is the key to an eventless postoperative course. The progressive pre-operative pneumoperitoneum (PPP) is one of the described abdominal augmentation protocols which can help patients to tolerate hernia content reintegration and avoid components separation technique during hernia repair. This article describes the management of these complex patients. We also report the case of a patient who follows successfully a PPP protocol.

  20. CLOSTRIDIAL PARAPROCTITIS WITH GAS GANGRENE OF FRONT-LATERAL ABDOMINAL WALLS AND NECROTIC FASCIO-MYOSITIS (CASE REPORT).

    PubMed

    Didbaridze, N; Lomidze, N; Abuladze, T; Qiliptari, G; Didbaridze, T; Gvasalia, I; Mkervalishvili, Z; Gogokhia, N

    2016-09-01

    Anaerobic clostridial infection is the most severe form of paraproctitis. The incubation period is very short, from 3 to 6 hours, sometimes lasting for 1-2 days. Clostridial infection spreads rapidly and induces gas gangrene, causes destruction of cells and other intermediate substances, and impedes blood circulation. This paper presents a case study of an extremely severe form of anaerobic infection with spontaneous gas gangrene, cellulitis, fasciomyositic necrosis, severe intoxication and septic shock on the abdominal front and lateral surfaces. This patient presented as infected with Clostridium septicum, a rare and highly toxic Gram-positive, spore-forming, obligate anaerobic bacillus that progresses and migrates rapidly, affecting all soft tissues (muscle, fascia), and produces four toxins which cause gas gangrene, intravascular hemolysis, tissue necrosis, and septic shock. The mortality rate is typically 80%. In this case study, a positive clinical outcome was achieved by aggressive identification of the microbe, appropriate and immediate therapy, and vigorous surgical intervention. Specifically, immediate surgery was conducted to ensure a wide excision of damaged tissues, necrectomy, curettage, wide drainage, readjustment, oxygenation through drainages, further additional surgical corrections through CT control with wide bandages in the operating area. Further, the diagnostic workup was thorough, identifying the microbe through a properly constructed diagnostic algorithm, ultrasound and CT studies, infectious agent assessments, and bacteriological monitoring carried out on the 1st-2nd-5th-7th-12th-15th-21st-25th days. Rational antibiotic therapy with permanent susceptibility testing informed the selection of an appropriate agent. Finally, markers for the evaluation of severity (Apache scale) were assessed, as they were for stage of infection (prokalcitonin), inflammation (CRP) and other indicators.

  1. Umbilical hernia repair in pregnant patients: review of the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program.

    PubMed

    Haskins, I N; Rosen, M J; Prabhu, A S; Amdur, R L; Rosenblatt, S; Brody, F; Krpata, D M

    2017-10-01

    Umbilical hernias present commonly during pregnancy secondary to increased intra-abdominal pressure. As a result, umbilical hernia incarceration or strangulation may affect pregnant females. The purpose of this study is to detail the operative management and 30-day outcomes of umbilical hernias in pregnant patients using the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS-NSQIP). All female patients undergoing umbilical hernia repair during pregnancy were identified within the ACS-NSQIP. Preoperative patient variables, intraoperative variables, and 30-day patient morbidity and mortality outcomes were investigated using a variety of statistical tests. A total of 126 pregnant patients underwent umbilical hernia repair from 2005 to 2014; 73 (58%) had incarceration or strangulation at the time of surgical intervention. The majority of patients (95%) underwent open umbilical hernia repair. Superficial surgical site infection was the most common morbidity in patients undergoing open umbilical hernia repair. Based on review of the ACS-NSQIP database, the incidence of umbilical hernia repair during pregnancy is very low; however, the majority of patients required repair for incarceration of strangulation. When symptoms develop, these hernias can be repaired with minimal 30-day morbidity to the mother. Additional studies are needed to determine the long-term recurrence rate of umbilical hernia repairs performed in pregnant patients and the effects of surgical intervention and approach on the fetus.

  2. Congenital asymptomatic diaphragmatic hernias in adults: a case series

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Congenital diaphragmatic hernia is a major malformation occasionally found in newborns and babies. Congenital diaphragmatic hernia is defined by the presence of an orifice in the diaphragm, more often to the left and posterolateral, that permits the herniation of abdominal contents into the thorax. The aim of this case series is to provide information on the presentation, diagnosis and outcome of three patients with late-presenting congenital diaphragmatic hernias. The diagnosis of congenital diaphragmatic hernia is based on clinical investigation and is confirmed by plain X-ray films and computed tomography scans. Case presentations In the present report three cases of asymptomatic abdominal viscera herniation within the thorax are described. The first case concerns herniation of some loops of the large intestine into the left hemi-thorax in a 75-year-old Caucasian Italian woman. The second case concerns a rare type of herniation in the right side of the thorax of the right kidney with a part of the liver parenchyma in a 57-year-old Caucasian Italian woman. The third case concerns herniation of the stomach and bowel into the left side of the chest with compression of the left lung in a 32-year-old Caucasian Italian man. This type of hernia may appear later in life, because of concomitant respiratory or gastrointestinal disease, or it may be an incidental finding in asymptomatic adults, such as in the three cases featured here. Conclusions Patients who present with late diaphragmatic hernias complain of a wide variety of symptoms, and diagnosis may be difficult. Additional investigation and research appear necessary to better explain the development and progression of this type of disease. PMID:23668793

  3. Congenital asymptomatic diaphragmatic hernias in adults: a case series.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, Enrica; Mancini, Paola; De Vito, Stefania; Pompili, Elena; Taurone, Samanta; Guerrisi, Isabella; Guerrisi, Antonino; D'Andrea, Vito; Cantisani, Vito; Artico, Marco

    2013-05-13

    Congenital diaphragmatic hernia is a major malformation occasionally found in newborns and babies. Congenital diaphragmatic hernia is defined by the presence of an orifice in the diaphragm, more often to the left and posterolateral, that permits the herniation of abdominal contents into the thorax. The aim of this case series is to provide information on the presentation, diagnosis and outcome of three patients with late-presenting congenital diaphragmatic hernias. The diagnosis of congenital diaphragmatic hernia is based on clinical investigation and is confirmed by plain X-ray films and computed tomography scans. In the present report three cases of asymptomatic abdominal viscera herniation within the thorax are described. The first case concerns herniation of some loops of the large intestine into the left hemi-thorax in a 75-year-old Caucasian Italian woman. The second case concerns a rare type of herniation in the right side of the thorax of the right kidney with a part of the liver parenchyma in a 57-year-old Caucasian Italian woman. The third case concerns herniation of the stomach and bowel into the left side of the chest with compression of the left lung in a 32-year-old Caucasian Italian man. This type of hernia may appear later in life, because of concomitant respiratory or gastrointestinal disease, or it may be an incidental finding in asymptomatic adults, such as in the three cases featured here. Patients who present with late diaphragmatic hernias complain of a wide variety of symptoms, and diagnosis may be difficult. Additional investigation and research appear necessary to better explain the development and progression of this type of disease.

  4. Myosonographic study of abdominal wall dynamics to assess donor site morbidity after microsurgical breast reconstruction with a DIEP or an ms-2 TRAM flap.

    PubMed

    Seidenstuecker, K; Legler, U; Munder, B; Andree, C; Mahajan, A; Witzel, C

    2016-05-01

    Currently, autologous breast reconstruction with a free tissue transfer from the lower abdomen is considered to be a safe method that provides a stable long-term solution. The DIEP-flap and the ms-2-TRAM-flap reconstructions have helped reduce donor site morbidity. In order to assess the potential differences between these techniques, we carried out myosonographic evaluations that assessed the muscle dynamics pre- and post-operatively. In addition to investigating the properties of the rectus abdominis muscle post-operatively, this prospective study also allowed us to analyse the muscle preoperatively and to investigate the prospects for harvesting a DIEP-flap as opposed to a TRAM-flap. Sixty patients underwent breast reconstruction with 71 (11 bilateral) free abdominal wall flaps (DIEP-: n = 48; ms-2-TRAM-flap: n = 23). Myosonographic examinations were performed preoperatively and at 3 and 6 months post-operatively. The thickness of the muscle at relaxation and maximum contraction and the difference between the muscle thickness measured at the two states were measured. A general-linear-model (GLM) was used for statistical analysis. The main variable was the surgical method, and the co-variables included BMI and patient age. The decision on whether to harvest a DIEP- or ms-2-TRAM-flap was made intra-operatively and based on the dominant perforator. It shows that the patients who underwent breast reconstruction with a DIEP-flap had significantly better muscle function (p < 0.05) in the follow-up. In addition, the analysis revealed that better muscle function before surgery made it more likely that a patient would undergo a DIEP-flap-reconstruction successfully. Patient age also had a highly significant effect on muscle recovery (p < 0.0005). This prospective study used a dynamic ultrasound evaluation of the abdominal wall and showed that the DIEP-flap significantly reduces donor site morbidity compared to the ms-2-TRAM-flap. The study also showed that good

  5. Remodeling characteristics and collagen distribution in synthetic mesh materials explanted from human subjects after abdominal wall reconstruction: an analysis of remodeling characteristics by patient risk factors and surgical site classifications

    PubMed Central

    Cavallo, Jaime A.; Roma, Andres A.; Jasielec, Mateusz S.; Ousley, Jenny; Creamer, Jennifer; Pichert, Matthew D.; Baalman, Sara; Frisella, Margaret M.; Matthews, Brent D.

    2014-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to evaluate the associations between patient characteristics or surgical site classifications and the histologic remodeling scores of synthetic meshes biopsied from their abdominal wall repair sites in the first attempt to generate a multivariable risk prediction model of non-constructive remodeling. Methods Biopsies of the synthetic meshes were obtained from the abdominal wall repair sites of 51 patients during a subsequent abdominal re-exploration. Biopsies were stained with hematoxylin and eosin, and evaluated according to a semi-quantitative scoring system for remodeling characteristics (cell infiltration, cell types, extracellular matrix deposition, inflammation, fibrous encapsulation, and neovascularization) and a mean composite score (CR). Biopsies were also stained with Sirius Red and Fast Green, and analyzed to determine the collagen I:III ratio. Based on univariate analyses between subject clinical characteristics or surgical site classification and the histologic remodeling scores, cohort variables were selected for multivariable regression models using a threshold p value of ≤0.200. Results The model selection process for the extracellular matrix score yielded two variables: subject age at time of mesh implantation, and mesh classification (c-statistic = 0.842). For CR score, the model selection process yielded two variables: subject age at time of mesh implantation and mesh classification (r2 = 0.464). The model selection process for the collagen III area yielded a model with two variables: subject body mass index at time of mesh explantation and pack-year history (r2 = 0.244). Conclusion Host characteristics and surgical site assessments may predict degree of remodeling for synthetic meshes used to reinforce abdominal wall repair sites. These preliminary results constitute the first steps in generating a risk prediction model that predicts the patients and clinical circumstances for which non

  6. Rectus abdominis atrophy after ventral abdominal incisions: midline versus chevron.

    PubMed

    Vigneswaran, Y; Poli, E; Talamonti, M S; Haggerty, S P; Linn, J G; Ujiki, M B

    2017-08-01

    Although many outcomes have been compared between a midline and chevron incision, this is the first study to examine rectus abdominis atrophy after these two types of incisions. Patients undergoing open pancreaticobiliary surgery between 2007 and 2011 at our single institution were included in this study. Rectus abdominis muscle thickness was measured on both preoperative and follow-up computed tomography (CT) scans to calculate percent atrophy of the muscle after surgery. At average follow-up of 24.5 and 19.0 months, respectively, rectus abdominis atrophy was 18.9% greater in the chevron (n = 30) than in the midline (n = 180) group (21.8 vs. 2.9%, p < 0.0001). Half the patients with a chevron incision had >20% atrophy at follow-up compared with 10% with a midline incision [odds ratio (OR) 9.0, p < 0.0001]. No significant difference was observed in incisional hernia rates or wound infections between groups. In this study, chevron incisions resulted in seven times more atrophy of the rectus abdominis compared with midline incisions. The long-term effects of transecting the rectus abdominis and disrupting its innervation creates challenging abdominal wall pathology. Atrophy of the abdominal wall can not be readily fixed with an operation, and this significant side effect of a transverse incision should be factored into the surgeon's decision-making process when choosing a transverse over a midline incision.

  7. An evaluation of hernia education in surgical residency programs.

    PubMed

    Hope, W W; O'Dwyer, B; Adams, A; Hooks, W B; Kotwall, C A; Clancy, T V

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate surgical residents' educational experience related to ventral hernias. A 16-question survey was sent to all program coordinators to distribute to their residents. Consent was obtained following a short introduction of the purpose of the survey. Comparisons based on training level were made using χ(2) test of independence, Fisher's exact, and Fisher's exact with Monte Carlo estimate as appropriate. A p value <0.05 was considered significant. The survey was returned by 183 residents from 250 surgical programs. Resident postgraduate year (PG-Y) level was equivalent among groups. Preferred techniques for open ventral hernia varied; the most common (32 %) was intra-abdominal placement of mesh with defect closure. Twenty-two percent of residents had not heard of the retrorectus technique for hernia repair, 48 % had not performed the operation, and 60 % were somewhat comfortable with and knew the general categories of mesh prosthetics products. Mesh choices, biologic and synthetic, varied among the different products. The most common type of hernia education was teaching in the operating room in 87 %, didactic lecture 69 %, and discussion at journal club 45 %. Number of procedures, comfort level with open and laparoscopic techniques, indications for mesh use and technique, familiarity and use of retrorectus repair, and type of hernia education varied significantly based on resident level (p < 0.05). Exposure to hernia techniques and mesh prosthetics in surgical residency programs appears to vary. Further evaluation is needed and may help in standardizing curriculums for hernia repair for surgical residents.

  8. Prospective evaluation of surgeon physical examination for detection of incisional hernias.

    PubMed

    Baucom, Rebeccah B; Beck, William C; Holzman, Michael D; Sharp, Kenneth W; Nealon, William H; Poulose, Benjamin K

    2014-03-01

    Surgeon physical examination is often used to monitor for hernia recurrence in clinical and research settings, despite a lack of information on its effectiveness. This study aims to compare surgeon-reviewed CT with surgeon physical examination for the detection of incisional hernia. General surgery patients with an earlier abdominal operation and a recent viewable CT scan of the abdomen and pelvis were enrolled prospectively. Patients with a stoma, fistula, or soft-tissue infection were excluded. Surgeon-reviewed CT was treated as the gold standard. Patients were stratified by body mass index into nonobese (body mass index <30) and obese groups. Testing characteristics and real-world performance, including positive predictive value and negative predictive value, were calculated. One hundred and eighty-one patients (mean age 54 years, 68% female) were enrolled. Hernia prevalence was 55%. Mean area of hernias was 44.6 cm(2). Surgeon physical examination had a low sensitivity (77%) and negative predictive value (77%). This difference was more pronounced in obese patients, with sensitivity of 73% and negative predictive value 69%. Surgeon physical examination is inferior to CT for detection of incisional hernia, and fails to detect approximately 23% of hernias. In obese patients, 31% of hernias are missed by surgeon physical examination. This has important implications for clinical follow-up and design of studies evaluating hernia recurrence, as ascertainment of this result must be reliable and accurate. Copyright © 2014 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Meckel's diverticulum incarcerated in a transmesocolic internal hernia

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Si-Yuan; Ho, Meng-Hsing; Hsu, Sheng-Der

    2014-01-01

    Intestinal obstruction is a common complication associated with Meckel’s diverticulum in adults. The diverticulum itself or its fibrous band can lead to an intestinal volvulus, intussusceptions, or closed-loop obstructions, which require surgery. The incarceration of Meckel’s diverticulum in either inguinal or femoral hernia sacs (Littre’s hernia) is another, less common, etiology underlying intestinal obstruction. This case report describes a 45-year-old man who had an obstruction associated with a Meckel’s diverticulum that passed through a congenital defect in the mesocolon into the right subphrenic space. The patient, who had not undergone abdominal surgery previously, came to the emergency room with acute onset of intermittent epigastric pain and abdominal distention. Computed tomography images showed the presence of a segment of the small bowel and a diverticulum in the right subphrenic space and paracolic gutter. The twisted mesentery and the dilated loops of the proximal small bowel were indicative of an intestinal volvulus and obstruction. Meckel’s diverticulum complicated by a transmesocolic internal hernia was diagnosed, and this condition was confirmed during emergency surgery. The patient’s postoperative recovery was uneventful. This case report highlights another presentation of Meckel’s diverticulum, that is, in combination with a transmesocolic internal hernia. This etiology may lead to an intestinal volvulus and necessitate early surgery. PMID:25309093

  10. Laparoscopic transabdominal preperitoneal approach for umbilical hernia with rectus diastasis.

    PubMed

    Capitano, Sante

    2017-08-01

    Rectus diastasis, when coexistent with umbilical hernia, can benefit from mesh-based repair of the midline. Laparoscopic correction of an umbilical hernia involves the placement of a mesh in the peritoneal cavity, but this comes with the risk of bowel complications. However, newly developed dual-sided composite meshes have helped to reduce this risk. Four men and three women with umbilical hernia and rectus diastasis were treated with laparoscopic transabdominal preperitoneal repair. Composite mesh with a hydrophilic 3-D polyester textile on the parietal side and an absorbable collagen barrier on the peritoneal side were placed in the preperitoneal pocket after hernial sac reduction. Mean hernia size was 2.5 cm, and no recurrences were observed during the mean follow-up period of 9.2 months. The laparoscopic transabdominal preperitoneal approach for umbilical hernia and rectus diastasis may be a safe surgical option when trying to avoid potential complications related to intra-abdominal mesh positioning. © 2017 Japan Society for Endoscopic Surgery, Asia Endosurgery Task Force and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  11. Laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Hussein, M K; Khoury, G S; Taha, A M

    1998-01-01

    Open hernia repair is associated with significant postoperative pain and disability resulting in delayed return to full activity. Laparoscopic hernia repair has been advocated as the procedure that combines the benefit of tension-free repair with the preservation of the basic anatomy of the inguinal area. We present our experience with 803 laparoscopic hernia repairs in 517 patients over a period of 66 months (August 92 to February 98). The effects of the learning curve and the refinement of the technique had their impact on earlier results and complications. However, with more experience we found that the laparoscopic preperitoneal approach is safe and efficacious. There was no mortality. Most patients (85%) were discharged home within 24 h of the procedure and returned to full activity within 10 days. Patient satisfaction was excellent. The complication rate decreased and operative time was reduced with experience. This procedure is clearly indicated in patients who have recurrent or bilateral hernias. It is associated with shorter convalescence and a quick return to work.

  12. Complete resection of a rectus abdominis muscle invaded by desmoid tumors and subsequent management with an abdominal binder: a case report.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Tatsuhiko

    2018-02-07

    Desmoid-type fibromatosis is characterized by desmoid tumors, which are benign soft tissue tumors that can be locally aggressive but typically do not metastasize. Desmoid tumors can manifest anywhere in the body, and those in the abdominal cavity account for approximately 30 to 50% of all such tumors. Complete resection with free margins has been the standard treatment, but non-surgical therapies have been implemented recently. However, if tumors are strongly invasive and/or persistently recur, radical surgical resection with free margins remains the primary treatment. Unfortunately, radical resection may cause large abdominal defects and hinder reconstruction. Several reports and recommendations have addressed this issue; however, to the best of our knowledge, few reports have described complete resection and the subsequent reconstruction of the rectus abdominis muscle. A 35-year-old Asian woman presented at our hospital with a chief complaint of abdominal pain. She had abdominal desmoid tumors that required complete resection of her rectus abdominis muscle. Due to necrosis in her own reconstructed tissue, we failed to cover her anterior abdominal wall; thus, we used an abdominal binder as a substitute material to avoid exacerbating the incisional hernia and help her generate intra-abdominal pressure. This case report may be informative and helpful for the treatment of patients with desmoid tumors, as managing desmoid-type fibromatosis is difficult.

  13. [The role of autografts in the treatment of complicated incisional hernias].

    PubMed

    Martis, Gábor; Damjanovich, László

    2016-06-01

    Complicated incisional hernias (at least one time recurrent and/or multilocular and/or infected synthetic mesh) still represent a significant problem. Presentation of operating techniques desribed so far, as well as publication of a novel procedure and results invented by the authors. Between 01/2011 and 09/2015, 41 patients with recurrent and/or infected incisional hernias with or without entero- and subcutaneous fistulas were operated using the method of the s.c. double-layer autologous tension free dermal flap technique. An accurate follow-up method and a continuous registration of the results was conducted in case of every patient. The body mass index (BMI) and presence of diabetes mellitus (DM) were distinguished factors out of the patients' clinical data. Surgical complications, bulking or laxity, recurrence and the patients' satisfactory index - among other things - were recorded considering the procedure. Patients' clinical data and results: Average age was 59.2 years (13 male / 28 female) in the cohort. 1, 2, 3 times recurrent incisional hernias had 12, 23, 6 patients, respectively. Average BMI was 32,1 kg/m2. 12 patients were treated with type II diabetes. 13 patients had entero- or subcutaneous fistulas and/or infected synthetic meshes at the time of operations. Average follow-up time was 32 months (2-58 months). Seroma formation was registered in 13 cases (31.7%). Fistula formation was registered in one case (2.4%). Bulking formation or laxity was observed in 3 patients (7.3%) and recurrence was noticed in 3 patients (7.3%), 13, 17 and 19 months later in the postoperative period. All the entero- and subcutaneous fistulas developed prior to the last procedure were completely healed. There was no lethal outcome. The method developed by the authors is recommended and suitable for the solution to complicated and/or infected incisional abdominal wall hernias especially in cases of obese (BMI ≥ 25 kg/m(2)) and diabetic, high risk patients. After acquiring

  14. Perineal Hernia Is an Unusual Complication Post Perineal Bladder Neck Closure: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Omar, Helmy; Helmy, Tamer E; Hafez, Ashraf T; Dawaba, Mohamed E

    2017-03-01

    Bladder neck closure (BNC) is the ultimate bladder neck reconstruction. If reconstruction fails, closure must be considered as it gives the highest continence rate. The vast majority of BNCs are performed through an abdominal approach (either transvesical or extravesical approach), but perineal approach remains an option for BNC with considerable success rate. Perineal hernia, which is defined as protrusion of abdominal contents through the perineal defect, is a very rare complication after urologic procedures. We report a case of perineal hernia post perineal BNC. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Intrascrotal hernia of the ureter and fatty hernia.

    PubMed

    Giuly, J; François, G F; Giuly, D; Leroux, C; Nguyen-Cat, R R

    2003-03-01

    Intrascrotal hernia of the ureter is a rare event. We describe here one such case. There are two anatomic types of such ureteral hernias. The paraperitoneal type has a peritoneal indirect sac, which pulls the ureter with it. The extraperitoneal ureteral hernia is without a peritoneal sac. In such cases, which are almost always indirect hernias, there is usually a large amount of fat. It is, in fact, retroperitoneal fat, which slides, and pulls the ureter with it by gravity. Such a case is a genuine prolapse of the retroperitoneal structures. This anomaly, which has been rarely studied, is worth knowing about, because the ureter may be damaged during hernia dissection. The surgeon should be cautious when discovering huge fatty hernias, and should avoid the excision of fat and simply return the fatty mass to its normal place after its separation from the cord.

  16. Clinical Conundrum: Killian-Jamieson Diverticulum with Paraesophageal Hernia.

    PubMed

    Bock, Jonathan M; Knabel, Michael J; Lew, Daniel A; Knechtges, Paul M; Gould, Jon C; Massey, Benson T

    2016-08-01

    Killian-Jamieson diverticulum is a outpouching of the lateral cervical esophageal wall adjacent to the insertion of the recurrent laryngeal to the larynx and is much less common in clinical practice than Zenkers Diverticulum. Surgical management of Killian-Jamieson diverticulum requires open transcervical diverticulectomy due to the proximity of the recurrent laryngeal nerve to the base of the pouch. We present a case of a Killian-Jamieson diverticulum associated with a concurrent large type III paraesophageal hernia causing significant solid-food dysphagia, post-prandial regurgitation of solid foods, and chronic cough managed with open transcervical diverticulectomy and laparoscopic paraesophageal hernia repair with Nissen fundoplication.

  17. Prenatal imaging of a fetus with the rare combination of a right congenital diaphragmatic hernia and a giant omphalocele.

    PubMed

    Nonaka, Ayasa; Hidaka, Nobuhiro; Kido, Saki; Fukushima, Kotaro; Kato, Kiyoko

    2014-11-01

    A co-existing right congenital diaphragmatic hernia and omphalocele is rare. We present images of a fetus diagnosed with this rare combination of anomalies. Early neonatal death occurred immediately after full-term birth due to severe respiratory insufficiency. In this case, disturbance of chest wall development due to the omphalocele rather than the diaphragmatic hernia was considered as the main cause of lung hypoplasia. Our experience suggests that caution should be exercised for severe respiratory insufficiency in a neonate with an omphalocele and diaphragmatic hernia, even in the absence of an intra-thoracic liver, one of the indicators of poor outcome for congenital diaphragmatic hernia. © 2014 Japanese Teratology Society.

  18. Abdominal rectus muscle atrophy and midline shift after colostomy creation.

    PubMed

    Timmermans, Lucas; Deerenberg, Eva B; van Dijk, Sven M; Lamme, Bas; Koning, Anton H; Kleinrensink, Gert-Jan; Jeekel, Johannes; Lange, Johan F

    2014-04-01

    Incisional hernia (IH) can be attributed to multiple factors. The presence of a parastomal hernia has shown to be a risk factor for IH after midline laparotomy. Our hypothesis is that this increased risk of IH may be caused by changes in biomechanical forces, such as midline shift to the contralateral side of the colostomy owing to decreased restraining forces at the site of the colostomy, and left abdominal rectus muscle (ARM) atrophy owing to intercostal nerve damage. Patients were selected if they underwent end-colostomy via open operation between 2004 and 2011. Patients were eligible if computed tomography (CT) had been performed postoperatively. If available, preoperative CTs were collected for case-control analyses. Midline shift was measured using V-scope application in the I-space, a CAVE-like virtual reality system. For the ARM atrophy hypothesis, measurements of ARM were performed at the level of colostomy, and 3 and 8 cm cranial and caudal of the colostomy. Postoperative CT were available for 77 patients; of these patients, 30 also had a preoperative CT. Median follow-up was 19 months. A mean shift to the right side was identified after preoperative and postoperative comparison; from -1.3 ± 4.6 to 2.1 ± 9.3 (P = .043). Furthermore, during rectus muscle measurements, a thinner left ARM was observed below the level of colostomy. Creation of a colostomy alters the abdominal wall. Atrophy of the left ARM was seen caudal to the level of the colostomy, and a midline shift to the right side was evident on CT. These changes may explain the increased rate of IH after colostomy creation. Copyright © 2014 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Referral Patterns for Chronic Groin Pain and Athletic Pubalgia/Sports Hernia: Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings, Treatment, and Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Zoland, Mark P; Maeder, Matthew E; Iraci, Joseph C; Klein, Devon A

    Chronic groin pain is a common problem and has been well-described in high-performance athletes. Its presentation in the recreational athlete has been less frequently described. We present the experience of a tertiary group of physicians specializing in groin pain and athletic pubalgia. Dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocol was employed. Surgery was performed in patients failing non-surgical management. A retrospective review was performed. Of 117 mostly non-professional athletes, there were 79 MRI-positive cases of athletic pubalgia (68%). Other common findings were acetabular labral tear (57%) and inguinal hernia (35%). Employment of a dynamic MRI protocol increased sensitivity for certain pathologies. Of positive athletic pubalgia cases, 49% went on to have surgical repair. The satisfaction rate in the surgical group was 90% at follow up. Advances in MRI have increased our ability to characterize and diagnose specific injuries causing groin pain. We present our diagnostic algorithm, including an MRI protocol that not only evaluates the groin, but has increased sensitivity for additional findings such as inguinal hernia and abdominal wall deficiencies. A targeted work-up and subsequent surgical treatment in the appropriate patient, even in the recreational athletic population, has yielded a 90% satisfaction rate.

  20. Epigastric hernia contiguous with the laparoscopic port site after endoscopic robotic total prostatectomy.

    PubMed

    Moriwaki, Yoshihiro; Otani, Jun; Okuda, Junzo; Maemoto, Ryo

    2018-03-23

    Both laparoscopic and endoscopic robotic surgery are widely accepted for many abdominal surgeries. However, the port site for the laparoscope cannot be easily sutured without defect, particularly in the cranial end; this can result in a port-site incisional hernia and trigger the progressive thinning and stretching of the linea alba, leading to epigastric hernia. In the present case, we encountered an epigastric hernia contiguous with an incisional scar at the port site from a previous endoscopic robotic total prostatectomy. Abdominal ultrasound and CT revealed that the width of the linea alba was 30-48 mm. Previous CT images prepared before endoscopic robotic prostatectomy had shown a thinning of the linea alba. We should be aware of the possibility of epigastric hernia after laparoscopic and endoscopic robotic surgery. In laparoscopic and endoscopic robotic surgery for a high-risk patient for epigastric hernia, we should consider additional sutures cranial to the port-site incision to prevent of an epigastric hernia. © 2018 Japan Society for Endoscopic Surgery, Asia Endosurgery Task Force and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  1. Risk factors in congenital abdominal wall defects (omphalocele and gastroschisi): a study in a series of 265,858 consecutive births.

    PubMed

    Stoll, C; Alembik, Y; Dott, B; Roth, M P

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the prevalence at birth of two abdominal wall defects (AWD), omphalocela and gastroschisis and to identify possible etiologic factors. The AWD came from 265,858 consecutive births of known ouome registered in the registry of congenital malformations of Strasbourg for the period 1979 to 1998. Request information on the child, the pregnancy, the parents and the family was obtained for cases and for controls. Hundred five cases with AWD were analysed, 55.2 % were omphalocele and 44.8 % were gastroschisis. The mean prevalence rate for omphalocele was 2.18 per 10,000 and for gastroschisis 1.76 per 10,000. Associated malformations were found in 74.1 % of omphalocele compared with 53.2 % of gastroschisis; 29.3 % of fetuses with omphalocele had an abnormal karyotype, 44,8 % had a recognizable syndrome, association or an unspecified malformation pattern; 51.0 % of fetuses with gastroschisis had additional malformations that were not of chromosomal origin, but 1 case. Antenatal ultrasound examination was able to detect 39 (67.2 %) cases of omphaloceles and 27 (57.4 %) cases of gastroschisis. In 30 (51.7 %) cases of omphalocele and in 7 (14.9 %) cases of gastroschisis parents opted for termination of pregnancy. The overall survival rate was 14 (24.1 %) for omphalocele and 30 (63.8 %) for gastroschisis. Weight, length and head circumference at birth of infants with AWD were less than those of controls. The weight of placenta of infants with AWD was not different from the weight of placenta of controls. Gastroschisis was associated with significantly younger maternal age than omphalocele. Pregnancies with AWD were more often complicated by threatened abortion, oligohydramnios and polyhydramnios. Mothers of children with AWD took more often medication during pregnancy than mothers of controls.

  2. Splanchnic and renal deterioration during and after laparoscopic cholecystectomy: a comparison of the carbon dioxide pneumoperitoneum and the abdominal wall lift method.

    PubMed

    Koivusalo, A M; Kellokumpu, I; Ristkari, S; Lindgren, L

    1997-10-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) pneumoperitoneum together with an increased intraabdominal pressure (IAP) induces a hemodynamic stress response, diminishes urine output, and may compromise splanchnic perfusion. A new retractor method may be less traumatic. Accordingly, 30 ASA physical status I or II patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy were randomly allocated to a CO2 pneumoperitoneum (IAP 12-13 mm Hg) (control) or to a gasless abdominal wall lift method (retractor) group. Anesthesia and intravascular fluids were standardized. Direct mean arterial pressure (MAP), urine output, urine-N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase (U-NAG), arterial blood gases, gastric mucosal PCO2, and intramucosal pH (pHi) were measured. Normoventilation was instituted in all patients. MAP increased (P < 0.001) only with CO2 pneumoperitoneum. Minute volume of ventilation had to be increased by 35% with CO2 insufflation. PaCO2 was significantly higher (P < 0.05) for 3 h postoperatively in the control group. Diuresis was less (P < 0.01) and U-NAG levels (P < 0.01) higher in the control group. The pHi decreased after induction of pneumoperitoneum up to three hours postoperatively and remained intact in the retractor group. We conclude that the retractor method for laparoscopic cholecystectomy ensures stable hemodynamics, prevents respiratory acidosis, and provides protection against biochemical effects, which reveal the renal and splanchic ischemia caused by CO2 insufflation. A mechanical retractor method (gasless) was compared with conventional CO2 pneumoperitoneum for laparoscopic cholestectomy. The gasless method ensured stable hemodynamics, prevented respiratory acidosis, and provided protection against the renal and splanchnic ischemia seen with CO2 pneumoperitoneum.

  3. Correlating Abdominal Wall Thickness and Body Mass Index to Predict Usefulness of Right Lower Quadrant Ultrasound for Evaluation of Pediatric Appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Jeannie K; Trexler, Nowice; Reisch, Joan; Pfeifer, Cory M; Ginos, Jason; Powell, Jerry Allen; Veltkamp, Jennifer; Anene, Alvin; Fernandes, Neil; Chen, Li Ern

    2017-11-06

    To inform selective and efficient use of appendix ultrasound (US) beyond adult parameters of body mass index (BMI) of less than 25 kg/m, we correlate abdominal wall thickness (AWT) with age and BMI to generate parameters for male and female children. Information presented in chart format can aid in the decision to utilize US for the evaluation of appendicitis. In this observational study, 1600 pediatric computed tomography scans of the abdomen and pelvis were analyzed to obtain measurements of AWT in the right lower quadrant. Measurements were correlated by patient age, BMI, and sex. Results and consensus-based recommendations were presented in chart format with color-coded groupings to allow for convenient referencing in the clinical setting. One thousand four hundred eighty-eight computed tomography scans and AWT measurements were included. All age groups with BMI of less than 25 kg/m and all male and female groups younger than 6 years regardless of BMI had median AWT of less than 4 cm resulting in strong recommendation for US. Males older than 6 years and all female age groups with BMI of greater than 30 kg/m and female older than 15 years and BMI of greater than 25 kg/m had AWT of more than 5 cm resulting in low recommendation for US. While the BMI cutoff standard of less than 25 kg/m for usefulness of appendix US holds in the adult population, our data expand the acceptable range in children younger than 9 years regardless of BMI and male children with BMI up to 30 kg/m. Female children younger than 15 years with a BMI up to 30 kg/m may also be amenable to right lower quadrant US based on AWT. These parameters inform selective and efficient use of US for appendix evaluation.

  4. Early biocompatibility of crosslinked and non-crosslinked biologic meshes in a porcine model of ventral hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Melman, L; Jenkins, E D; Hamilton, N A; Bender, L C; Brodt, M D; Deeken, C R; Greco, S C; Frisella, M M; Matthews, B D

    2011-04-01

    Biologic meshes have unique physical properties as a result of manufacturing techniques such as decellularization, crosslinking, and sterilization. The purpose of this study is to directly compare the biocompatibility profiles of five different biologic meshes, AlloDerm(®) (non-crosslinked human dermal matrix), PeriGuard(®) (crosslinked bovine pericardium), Permacol(®) (crosslinked porcine dermal matrix), Strattice(®) (non-crosslinked porcine dermal matrix), and Veritas(®) (non-crosslinked bovine pericardium), using a porcine model of ventral hernia repair. Full-thickness fascial defects were created in 20 Yucatan minipigs and repaired with the retromuscular placement of biologic mesh 3 weeks later. Animals were euthanized at 1 month and the repair sites were subjected to tensile testing and histologic analysis. Samples of unimplanted (de novo) meshes and native porcine abdominal wall were also analyzed for their mechanical properties. There were no significant differences in the biomechanical characteristics between any of the mesh-repaired sites at 1 month postimplantation or between the native porcine abdominal wall without implanted mesh and the mesh-repaired sites (P > 0.05 for all comparisons). Histologically, non-crosslinked materials exhibited greater cellular infiltration, extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition, and neovascularization compared to crosslinked meshes. While crosslinking differentiates biologic meshes with regard to cellular infiltration, ECM deposition, scaffold degradation, and neovascularization, the integrity and strength of the repair site at 1 month is not significantly impacted by crosslinking or by the de novo strength/stiffness of the mesh.

  5. ROBOTIC ASSISTED SINGLE SITE FOR BILATERAL INGUINAL HERNIA REPAIR.

    PubMed

    Bosi, Henrique Rasia; Guimarães, José Ricardo; Cavazzola, Leandro Totti

    2016-01-01

    The inguinal hernia is one of the most frequent surgical diseases, being frequent procedure and surgeon´s everyday practice. To present technical details in making hernioplasty using robotic equipment on bilateral inguinal hernia repair with single port and preliminary results with the method. The bilateral inguinal hernia repair was performed by using the Single-Site(c) Da Vinci Surgical Access Platform to the abdominal cavity and the placement of clamps. This technique proved to be effective for inguinal hernia and have more aesthetic result when compared to other techniques. Inguinal hernia repair robot-assisted with single-trocar is feasible and effective. However, still has higher costs needing surgical team special training. A hérnia inguinal é uma das doenças cirúrgicas mais frequentes, tornando-a procedimento frequente e do cotidiano do cirurgião. Apresentar detalhes da técnica da hernioplastia inguinal bilateral robótica por single-site e resultados preliminares com o método. Foi realizada hernioplastia inguinal bilateral assistida por robô, utilizando-se da Vinci Single-Site(c) Surgical Platform para acesso a cavidade abdominal e colocação das pinças. Esta técnica demonstrou-se efetiva para correção da hérnia inguinal, além de apresentar melhor resultado estético quando comparado às outras técnicas. A hernioplastia inguinal assistida por robô com trocarte único é viável e eficaz. Contudo, ainda apresenta custos mais elevados e necessidade de treinamento especial por parte da equipe cirúrgica.

  6. [Clinical research progress of mesenteric internal hernia after Roux-en-Y reconstruction].

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhengrong; Guo, Wenjun

    2017-03-25

    Postoperative internal hernia is a rare clinical complication which often occurs after digestive tract reconstruction. Roux-en-Y anastomosis is a common type of digestive tract reconstruction. Internal hernia after Roux-en-Y reconstruction, which occurs mainly in the mesenteric defect caused by incomplete closure of mesenteric gaps in the process of digestive tract reconstruction, is systematically called, in our research, as mesenteric internal hernia after Roux-en-Y reconstruction. Such internal hernia can be divided, according to the different structures of mesentric defect, into 3 types: the type of mesenteric defect at the jejunojejunostomy (J type), the type of Petersen's defect (P type), and the type of mesenteric defect in the transverse mesocolon (M type). Because of huge differences in the number of cases and follow-up time among existing research reports, the morbidity of internal hernia after LRYGB fluctuates wildly between 0.2% and 9.0%. Delayed diagnosis and treatment of mesenteric internal hernia after Roux- en-Y reconstruction may result in disastrous consequences such as intestinal necrosis. Clinical manifestations of internal hernia vary from person to person: some, in mild cases, may have no symptoms at all while others in severe cases may experience acute intestinal obstruction. Despite the difference, one common manifestation of internal hernia is abdominal pain. Surgical treatment should be recommended for those diagnosed as internal hernia. A safer and more feasible way to conduct the manual reduction of the incarcerated hernia is to start from the distal normal empty bowel and trace back to the hernia ring mouth, enabling a faster identification of hernia ring and its track. The prevention of mesenteric internal hernia after Roux-en-Y reconstruction is related to the initial surgical approach and the technique of mesenteric closure. Significant controversy remains on whether or not the mesenteric defect should be closed in laparoscopic Roux

  7. Congenital posterolateral diaphragmatic hernia.

    PubMed

    Woolley, M M

    1976-04-01

    The infant who is born with a posterolateral diaphragmatic hernia who becomes symptomatic at or soon after birth requires urgent care. Surgical reduction of the diaphragmatic hernia must be accomplished quickly. Respiratory and metabolic acidosis must be treated appropriately. The parents should be informed of the gravity of their infant's problem and reassurred by appropriate explanation of the nature of the defect and the therapeutic requirements. If the infant dies, the parents are in need of empathy, reassurance, and adequate explanation so that they do not have lingering doubts regarding the etiology of the anomaly and the adequacy of the therapy. If the infant lives, the medical team can share the feeling of a job well done.

  8. Perforated peptic duodenal ulcer in a paraesophageal hernia – a case report of a rare surgical emergency

    PubMed Central

    Ekelund, Mikael; Ribbe, Else; Willner, Julian; Zilling, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    Background Paraesophageal hernias are quite common and sometimes feared due to the risk of incarceration and strangulation of any herniated organ. The hereby reported combination of an incarcerated paraesophageal hernia containing a perforated peptic ulcer is extremely rare. Case presentation An elderly man with multiple medical conditions was admitted due to severe upper abdominal pain. The patient was found to have a paraesophageal hernia and underwent a laparotomy. In the hernia, a perforated benign peptic duodenal ulcer was found. The duodenal defect was over-sewn, the hernial defect was closed and the former hernial cavity was drained by a right-sided chest tube. The patient was discharged one month after surgery and was found to do well at follow-up one month after discharge. Conclusion This is the first report of a patient surviving the extremely rare and life-threatening combination of a perforated peptic duodenal ulcer in a paraesophageal hernia. PMID:16438731

  9. A case of incarcerated umbilical hernia in an adult treated by laparoscopic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Tsushimi, Takaaki; Mori, Hirohito; Nagase, Takashi; Harada, Takasuke; Ikeda, Yoshitaka

    2015-01-01

    A 42-year-old, obese woman was admitted to our hospital 3 h after the sudden development of abdominal pain. Her umbilical region was swollen and she was diagnosed with incarceration of an umbilical hernia by computed tomography. Although we tried, we were unable to reduce the hernia with a manipulative procedure. We decided to perform an emergency laparoscopy. Once general anesthesia was induced, we achieved hernia reduction. From a laparoscopic view, the portion of strangulated small intestine was neither necrotic nor perforated. The size of the hernial orifice was ∼2 × 2 cm, and thus, we selected a 12 × 12 cm composite mesh to cover the hernia defect by at least 5 cm in all directions. The surgical procedure was uneventful and the total operation time was 112 min. The patient recovered uneventfully and was discharged on postoperative day 9. She remains free of recurrence 20 months after surgery. PMID:25672973

  10. Intraperitoneal onlay mesh reinforcement of the abdominal wall: a new surgical option for treatment of anterior cutaneous nerve entrapment syndrome-a retrospective cohort analysis of 30 consecutive patients.

    PubMed

    Stirler, Vincent M A; Raymakers, Johan T F J; Rakic, Srdjan

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the study was to introduce a new surgical treatment for anterior cutaneous nerve entrapment syndrome, a frequently unrecognised disorder in the general population responsible for chronic abdominal wall pain with limited treatment options to date. We hypothesised that intraperitoneal onlay mesh reinforcement could dissipate excessive increases in intra-abdominal pressure and prevent entrapment of the neurovascular bundle. Retrospective cohort analysis was performed between September 2002 and March 2014. All consecutive patients diagnosed with anterior cutaneous nerve entrapment syndrome refractory to conservative treatment (n = 30) underwent laparoscopic intraperitoneal onlay mesh reinforcement of the painful area in the abdominal wall. Planned follow-up took place at 2, 6 and 12 weeks after surgery and at time of analysis (March 2015). Primary outcome was patients' satisfaction after treatment at short and long term (last follow-up) using a verbal rating score as measurement (1 = I am very satisfied; I never experience pain, 2 = I am satisfied; I occasionally experience some pain, 3 = I have improved but experience pain on a regular basis, 4 = I have had no result on this treatment, 5 = my pain is worse after treatment). Scores 1 and 2 were classified as success, and scores 4 and 5 as failure of the treatment. Thirty patients underwent laparoscopic intraperitoneal onlay mesh reinforcement. None were lost to follow-up (mean 54 ± 44 months, range 12-122, median 38). Short- and long-term success rates were 90 and 71 %, respectfully. Intraperitoneal onlay mesh reinforcement of the abdominal wall seems to be a promising option for the treatment of intractable anterior cutaneous nerve entrapment syndrome.

  11. Lymphedema of the Transplanted Kidney and Abdominal Wall with Ipsilateral Pleural Effusion Following Kidney Biopsy in a Patient Treated with Sirolimus: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Rashid-Farokhi, Farin; Afshar, Haleh

    2017-12-22

    BACKGROUND Sirolimus is a mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor, which is used in immunosuppressive treatment regimens in organ transplant recipients. Although mTOR inhibitors are well tolerated, their adverse effects have been reported. Sirolimus treatment in transplant recipients has been reported to be associated with lymphedema of the skin and subcutaneous tissues, and with pleural effusion, but edema of internal organs and organomegaly have not been previously reported. A case is presented lymphedema of the transplanted kidney and abdominal wall with ipsilateral pleural effusion following kidney biopsy in a patient treated with sirolimus. CASE REPORT A 32-year-old woman with a history of end-stage renal disease of unknown etiology had undergone right renal transplantation from an unrelated living donor, eight years previously. She was referred to our hospital with dyspnea, localized abdominal pain, and swelling of the transplanted kidney. The symptoms appeared following a kidney biopsy and the replacement of cyclosporin with sirolimus four months previously. On examination, she had localized swelling of the abdominal wall overlying the transplanted kidney, and a right pleural effusion. Hydronephrosis and nephrotic syndrome were excluded as causes of kidney enlargement. Following the withdrawal of sirolimus therapy her symptoms resolved within three months. CONCLUSIONS A case is described of lymphedema of the transplanted kidney and abdominal wall with ipsilateral pleural effusion following kidney biopsy attributed to her change in anti-rejection therapy to sirolimus. This case report should raise awareness of this unusual complication of sirolimus anti-rejection therapy and its possible effects on the lymphatic system.

  12. Ventral incisional hernia recurrence.

    PubMed

    Clark, J L

    2001-07-01

    During the period October 1993 to December 1996, 31 patients were operated on by the author for primary or recurrent ventral incisional hernia (VIH). Three patients were excluded from analysis because their records were unavailable for review. The median age of the 28 remaining patients at their initial procedure was 57.5 years (range, 37-78 years). The repair was performed with interrupted O-Ethibond sutures in all but 3 cases where Prolene suture was used secondary to noniatrogenic contamination or recurrent hernia. There were no unplanned enterotomies in the entire series and prophylactic intravenous antibiotics were used in all cases. The only significant complications were skin hyperemia after five repairs in 3 patients who were treated empirically with intravenous antibiotics, and 1 patient who had an antibiotic-associated rash. There were no 30-day mortalities. Prolene mesh was used exclusively in all repairs performed with mesh. Seven of these repairs (25%) were for recurrent VIH. Three of these seven patients had previous mesh repairs. Six of these seven patients who presented with rec