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Sample records for abdominal wall motion

  1. Lateral Abdominal Wall Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Baumann, Donald P.; Butler, Charles E.

    2012-01-01

    Lateral abdominal wall (LAW) defects can manifest as a flank hernias, myofascial laxity/bulges, or full-thickness defects. These defects are quite different from those in the anterior abdominal wall defects and the complexity and limited surgical options make repairing the LAW a challenge for the reconstructive surgeon. LAW reconstruction requires an understanding of the anatomy, physiologic forces, and the impact of deinnervation injury to design and perform successful reconstructions of hernia, bulge, and full-thickness defects. Reconstructive strategies must be tailored to address the inguinal ligament, retroperitoneum, chest wall, and diaphragm. Operative technique must focus on stabilization of the LAW to nonyielding points of fixation at the anatomic borders of the LAW far beyond the musculofascial borders of the defect itself. Thus, hernias, bulges, and full-thickness defects are approached in a similar fashion. Mesh reinforcement is uniformly required in lateral abdominal wall reconstruction. Inlay mesh placement with overlying myofascial coverage is preferred as a first-line option as is the case in anterior abdominal wall reconstruction. However, interposition bridging repairs are often performed as the surrounding myofascial tissue precludes a dual layered closure. The decision to place bioprosthetic or prosthetic mesh depends on surgeon preference, patient comorbidities, and clinical factors of the repair. Regardless of mesh type, the overlying soft tissue must provide stable cutaneous coverage and obliteration of dead space. In cases where the fasciocutaneous flaps surrounding the defect are inadequate for closure, regional pedicled flaps or free flaps are recruited to achieve stable soft tissue coverage. PMID:23372458

  2. Economics of abdominal wall reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Bower, Curtis; Roth, J Scott

    2013-10-01

    The economic aspects of abdominal wall reconstruction are frequently overlooked, although understandings of the financial implications are essential in providing cost-efficient health care. Ventral hernia repairs are frequently performed surgical procedures with significant economic ramifications for employers, insurers, providers, and patients because of the volume of procedures, complication rates, the significant rate of recurrence, and escalating costs. Because biological mesh materials add significant expense to the costs of treating complex abdominal wall hernias, the role of such costly materials needs to be better defined to ensure the most cost-efficient and effective treatments for ventral abdominal wall hernias.

  3. Abdominal wall surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... the results of abdominoplasty. Many feel a new sense of self-confidence. Alternative Names Cosmetic surgery of the abdomen; Tummy tuck; Abdominoplasty Images Abdominoplasty - series Abdominal muscles References McGrath MH, Pomerantz J. Plastic surgery. In: Townsend ...

  4. Recovery after abdominal wall reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Kristian Kiim

    2017-03-01

    Incisional hernia is a common long-term complication to abdominal surgery, occurring in more than 20% of all patients. Some of these hernias become giant and affect patients in several ways. This patient group often experiences pain, decreased perceived body image, and loss of physical function, which results in a need for surgical repair of the giant hernia, known as abdominal wall reconstruction. In the current thesis, patients with a giant hernia were examined to achieve a better understanding of their physical and psychological function before and after abdominal wall reconstruction. Study I was a systematic review of the existing standardized methods for assessing quality of life after incisional hernia repair. After a systematic search in the electronic databases Embase and PubMed, a total of 26 studies using standardized measures for assessment of quality of life after incisional hernia repair were found. The most commonly used questionnaire was the generic Short-Form 36, which assesses overall health-related quality of life, addressing both physical and mental health. The second-most common questionnaire was the Carolinas Comfort Scale, which is a disease specific questionnaire addressing pain, movement limitation and mesh sensation in relation to a current or previous hernia. In total, eight different questionnaires were used at varying time points in the 26 studies. In conclusion, standardization of timing and method of quality of life assessment after incisional hernia repair was lacking. Study II was a case-control study of the effects of an enhanced recovery after surgery pathway for patients undergoing abdominal wall reconstruction for a giant hernia. Sixteen consecutive patients were included prospectively after the implementation of a new enhanced recovery after surgery pathway at the Digestive Disease Center, Bispebjerg Hospital, and compared to a control group of 16 patients included retrospectively in the period immediately prior to the

  5. Blunt traumatic abdominal wall disruption with evisceration

    PubMed Central

    McDaniel, Ellen; Stawicki, Stanislaw PA; Bahner, David P

    2011-01-01

    Blunt traumatic abdominal wall disruptions associated with evisceration are very rare. The authors describe a case of traumatic abdominal wall disruption with bowel evisceration that occurred after a middle-aged woman sustained direct focal blunt force impact to the lower abdomen. Abdominal exploration and surgical repair of the abdominal wall defect were performed, with good clinical outcome. A brief overview of literature pertinent to this rare trauma scenario is presented. PMID:22229144

  6. Pulmonary complications of abdominal wall defects.

    PubMed

    Panitch, Howard B

    2015-01-01

    The abdominal wall is an integral component of the chest wall. Defects in the ventral abdominal wall alter respiratory mechanics and can impair diaphragm function. Congenital abdominal wall defects also are associated with abnormalities in lung growth and development that lead to pulmonary hypoplasia, pulmonary hypertension, and alterations in thoracic cage formation. Although infants with ventral abdominal wall defects can experience life-threatening pulmonary complications, older children typically experience a more benign respiratory course. Studies of lung and chest wall function in older children and adolescents with congenital abdominal wall defects are few; such investigations could provide strategies for improved respiratory performance, avoidance of respiratory morbidity, and enhanced exercise ability for these children.

  7. Soft tissue coverage in abdominal wall reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Donald P; Butler, Charles E

    2013-10-01

    Abdominal wall defects requiring soft tissue coverage can be either partial-thickness defects or full-thickness composite defects. Soft tissue flap reconstruction offers significant advantages in defects that cannot be closed primarily. Flap reconstruction is performed in a single-stage procedure obviating chronic wound management. If the defect size exceeds the availability of local soft tissue for coverage, regional pedicled flaps can be delivered into the abdominal wall while maintaining blood supply from their donor site. Microsurgical free tissue transfer increases the capacity to provide soft tissue coverage for abdominal wall defects that are not amenable to either local or regional flap coverage.

  8. Reconstruction of complex abdominal wall defects.

    PubMed

    Leppäniemi, A; Tukiainen, E

    2013-01-01

    Complex abdominal wall defects refer to situations where simple ventral hernia repair is not feasible because the defect is very large, there is a concomitant infection or failed previous re-pair attempt, or if there is not enough original skin to cover the repair. Usually a complex abdominal wall repair is preceded by a period of temporary abdominal closure where the short-term aims include closure of the catabolic drain, protection of the viscera and preventing fistula formation, preventing bowel adherence to the abdominal wall, and enabling future fascial and skin closure. Currently the best way to achieve these goals is the vacuum- and mesh-mediated fascial traction method achieving close to 90% fascial closure rates. The long-term aims of an abdominal closure following a planned hernia strategy include intact skin cover, fascial closure at midline (if possible), good functional outcome with innervated abdominal musculature, no pain and good cosmetic result. The main methods of abdominal wall reconstruction include the use of prosthetic (mesh) or autologous material (tissue flaps). In patients with original skin cover over the fascial defect (simple ventral hernia), the most commonly used method is hernia repair with an artificial mesh. For more complex defects, our first choice of reconstruction is the component separation technique, sometimes combined with a mesh. In contaminated fields where component separation alone is not feasible, a combination with a biological mesh can be used. In large defects with grafted skin, a free TFL flap is the best option, sometimes reinforced with a mesh and enhanced with components separation.

  9. Genetics Home Reference: abdominal wall defect

    MedlinePlus

    ... Aug;6(4):232-6. Citation on PubMed Islam S. Clinical care outcomes in abdominal wall defects. Curr ... Site Map Customer Support Selection Criteria for Links USA.gov Copyright Privacy Accessibility FOIA Viewers & Players U.S. ...

  10. Abdominal wall abscess: more than meets the eye.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Jamish; Gandhi, Natasha

    2010-01-01

    An 83-year-old, mildly demented rest home resident presented to the emergency department with a 2 day history of a right sided abdominal wall mass. He had a mechanical fall 2 days previously and landed on his right side and had attributed the mass to this. He had no symptoms apart from feeling bloated and not being able to pass wind for a day. He had passed a normal bowel motion the day before presentation. On abdominal examination there was an 11 × 4 cm mass in the right lower quadrant. It was firm in consistency, non-fluctuant and non-tender to touch. There was mild erythema over the area but no skin breaks. Chest radiograph was unremarkable. The abdominal film showed dilated small bowel and no large bowel could be seen. A computed tomography (CT) scan showed a thick walled gallbladder with multiple calculi and air present. There was also an extensive air and fluid collection in the layers of the abdominal wall and subcutaneous fat which arose from a perforation of the gallbladder. The patient was not a surgical candidate due to multiple comorbidities. The patient was treated with antibiotics and underwent a CT guided percutaneous cholecystostomy. Despite the radiological intervention and antibiotics the patient progressively deteriorated and died peacefully 5 days after admission.

  11. Mesh Sutured Repairs of Abdominal Wall Defects

    PubMed Central

    Lanier, Steven T.; Jordan, Sumanas W.; Miller, Kyle R.; Ali, Nada A.; Stock, Stuart R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: A new closure technique is introduced, which uses strips of macroporous polypropylene mesh as a suture for closure of abdominal wall defects due to failures of standard sutures and difficulties with planar meshes. Methods: Strips of macroporous polypropylene mesh of 2 cm width were passed through the abdominal wall and tied as simple interrupted sutures. The surgical technique and surgical outcomes are presented. Results: One hundred and seven patients underwent a mesh sutured abdominal wall closure. Seventy-six patients had preoperative hernias, and the mean hernia width by CT scan for those with scans was 9.1 cm. Forty-nine surgical fields were clean-contaminated, contaminated, or dirty. Five patients had infections within the first 30 days. Only one knot was removed as an office procedure. Mean follow-up at 234 days revealed 4 recurrent hernias. Conclusions: Mesh sutured repairs reliably appose tissue under tension using concepts of force distribution and resistance to suture pull-through. The technique reduces the amount of foreign material required in comparison to sheet meshes, and avoids the shortcomings of monofilament sutures. Mesh sutured closures seem to be tolerant of bacterial contamination with low hernia recurrence rates and have replaced our routine use of mesh sheets and bioprosthetic grafts. PMID:27757361

  12. Abdominal Wall Haematoma Complicating Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy

    PubMed Central

    Tate, J. J. T.; Davidson, B. R.; Hobbs, K. E. F.

    1994-01-01

    Of 61 consecutive patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy, 4 (6.25%) developed abdominal wall haematomas. This complication of laparoscopic cholecystectomy may occur more commonly than existing literature suggests, and manifests in the post-operative period (days 2 to 6) by visible bruising, excessive pain or an asymptomatic drop in haematocrit. It is readily confirmed by ultrasonography. While no specific treatment is necessary apart from replacement of significant blood loss, the patient requires reassurance that this apparently alarming complication will rapidly resolve. PMID:8204548

  13. Isolated Abdominal Wall Metastasis of Endometrial Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Simões, Jorge; Gonçalves, Matilde; Matos, Isabel

    2014-01-01

    A woman in her mid-60s presented with a bulky mass on the anterior abdominal wall. She had a previous incidental diagnosis of endometrial adenocarcinoma FIGO stage IB following a vaginal hysterectomy. Physical exam and imaging revealed a well circumscribed bulging tumour at the umbilical region, measuring 10 × 9 × 9 cm, with overlying intact skin and subcutaneous tissue. Surgical resection was undertaken, and histological examination showed features of endometrial carcinoma. She began chemotherapy and is alive with no signs of recurrent disease one year after surgery. This case brings up to light an atypical location of a solitary metastasis of endometrial carcinoma. PMID:25349753

  14. Modern reconstructive techniques for abdominal wall defects after oncologic resection.

    PubMed

    Khansa, Ibrahim; Janis, Jeffrey E

    2015-04-01

    Resection of abdominal wall tumors often leaves patients with debilitating soft tissue defects. Modern reconstructive techniques can be used to restore abdominal wall integrity. In this article, we present an overview of preoperative patient evaluation, analysis of the defect, surgical planning, and the spectrum of available surgical techniques, ranging from simple to complex. The established clinical evidence in the field of abdominal wall reconstruction is summarized and a case example is provided.

  15. Remote revascularization of abdominal wall transplants using the forearm.

    PubMed

    Giele, H; Bendon, C; Reddy, S; Ramcharan, R; Sinha, S; Friend, P; Vaidya, A

    2014-06-01

    Primary abdominal wall closure following small bowel transplantation is frequently impossible due to contraction of the abdominal domain. Although abdominal wall transplantation was reported 10 years ago this, technique has not been widely adopted, partly due to its complexity, but largely because of concerns that storing the abdominal allograft until the end of a prolonged intestinal transplant procedure would cause severe ischemia-reperfusion injury. We report six cases of combined small bowel and abdominal wall transplantation where the ischemic time was minimized by remotely revascularizing the abdominal wall on the forearm vessels, synchronous to the intestinal procedure. When the visceral transplant was complete, the abdominal wall was removed from the forearm and revascularized on the abdomen (n = 4), or used to close the abdomen while still vascularized on the forearm (n = 2). Primary abdominal wall closure was achieved in all. Mean cold ischemia was 305 min (300-330 min), and revascularization on the arm was 50 min (30-60 min). Three patients had proven abdominal wall rejection, all treated successfully. Immediate revascularization of the abdominal wall allograft substantially reduces cold ischemia without imposing constraints on the intestinal transplant. Reducing storage time may also have benefits with respect to ischemia-reperfusion-related graft immunogenicity.

  16. Methods for abdominal respiratory motion tracking.

    PubMed

    Spinczyk, Dominik; Karwan, Adam; Copik, Marcin

    2014-01-01

    Non-invasive surface registration methods have been developed to register and track breathing motions in a patient's abdomen and thorax. We evaluated several different registration methods, including marker tracking using a stereo camera, chessboard image projection, and abdominal point clouds. Our point cloud approach was based on a time-of-flight (ToF) sensor that tracked the abdominal surface. We tested different respiratory phases using additional markers as landmarks for the extension of the non-rigid Iterative Closest Point (ICP) algorithm to improve the matching of irregular meshes. Four variants for retrieving the correspondence data were implemented and compared. Our evaluation involved 9 healthy individuals (3 females and 6 males) with point clouds captured in opposite breathing phases (i.e., inhalation and exhalation). We measured three factors: surface distance, correspondence distance, and marker error. To evaluate different methods for computing the correspondence measurements, we defined the number of correspondences for every target point and the average correspondence assignment error of the points nearest the markers.

  17. Vertically transmitted hypoplasia of the abdominal wall musculature.

    PubMed

    Chan, Yuin-Chew; Bird, Lynne M

    2004-01-01

    The prune belly syndrome (OMIM 100100) is an association of bladder dilation with hypoplasia of the abdominal wall muscles. This malformation sequence is due to early urethral obstruction. We report a family with abdominal wall muscular hypoplasia as an isolated defect, not associated with the urethral obstruction sequence. The proband is a q3-year-old male who presented with abdominal wall laxity and severe constipation. His mother, maternal grandmother and younger brother had varying degrees of abdominal wall muscular deficiency and constipation. His mother's condition was aggravated by her 2 pregnancies. This family shows vertical transmission (compatible with autosomal dominant or mitochondrial inheritance) of the abdominal phenotype of prune belly sequence without any evidence of urinary tract or renal pathology. The expression in the sons may remain incomplete because abdominal distention due to pregnancy will not occur.

  18. Tensor fascia lata musculocutaneous flap for abdominal wall reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Peled, I.J.; Kaplan, H.Y.; Herson, M.; Wexler, M.R.

    1983-08-01

    We report a case of abdominal wall reconstruction following excision of irradiated skin and a ventral hernia. A very large tensor fascia lata musculocutaneous flap was used with good results. The anatomical features of this flap make it an excellent method of abdominal wall reconstruction.

  19. Niche reconstructive techniques for complex abdominal wall reconstruction: a review.

    PubMed

    Sue, Gloria R; Narayan, Deepak

    2014-04-01

    Abdominal wall defects resulting from recurrent hernias, trauma, and radiation necrosis are difficult and challenging to repair given the high rates of recurrence and surgical morbidity. Complex abdominal wall defects often require the transposition of autologous material to bridge the fascial gap. We present a review of niche reconstructive techniques that have been used in complex abdominal wall repair. The specific techniques reviewed include use of delayed and tunneled pedicled tensor fascia lata myofascial flap, de-epithelialized flap closure, free latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap with or without innervation, and abdominal wall transplant. These niche surgical techniques have great potential to reduce recurrence rates when used in the proper setting for complex abdominal wall reconstruction. More studies are needed to evaluate the relative use of these techniques with the more widely established surgical methods of reconstruction.

  20. [Hypogastric abdominal wall reconstruction with a pedicled anterolateral thigh flap].

    PubMed

    Moullot, P; Philandrianos, C; Gonnelli, D; Casanova, D

    2014-10-01

    Looking at a full-thickness abdominal wall defect, it is necessary to use reconstructive surgery techniques. The authors present an original case of reconstruction of the abdominal wall, using an anterolateral thigh flap (ALT) harvested with vascularised fascia lata. We describe the advantages of this technique, which has rarely been used for this indication. An 80-year-old woman presenting a full-thickness abdominal wall defect of 15×18cm was reconstructed by a pedicled ALT flap. Skin wound healing was obtained within 15 days, with no complication. There was no donor site sequela. The pedicled ALT flap appears to be a good solution for hypogastric abdominal wall defect in a one step procedure. Vacularised fascia lata bring with the cutaneous flap is useful to reconstruct the abdominal fascia.

  1. Practical Approaches to Definitive Reconstruction of Complex Abdominal Wall Defects.

    PubMed

    Latifi, Rifat

    2016-04-01

    With advances in abdominal surgery and the management of major trauma, complex abdominal wall defects have become the new surgical disease, and the need for abdominal wall reconstruction has increased dramatically. Subsequently, how to reconstruct these large defects has become a new surgical question. While most surgeons use native abdominal wall whenever possible, evidence suggests that synthetic or biologic mesh needs to be added to large ventral hernia repairs. One particular group of patients who exemplify "complex" are those with contaminated wounds, enterocutaneous fistulas, enteroatmospheric fistulas, and/or stoma(s), where synthetic mesh is to be avoided if at all possible. Most recently, biologic mesh has become the new standard in high-risk patients with contaminated and dirty-infected wounds. While biologic mesh is the most common tissue engineered used in this field of surgery, level I evidence is needed on its indication and long-term outcomes. Various techniques for reconstructing the abdominal wall have been described, however the long-term outcomes for most of these studies, are rarely reported. In this article, I outline current practical approaches to perioperative management and definitive abdominal reconstruction in patients with complex abdominal wall defects, with or without fistulas, as well as those who have lost abdominal domain.

  2. Advanced Gastric Cancer Perforation Mimicking Abdominal Wall Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Jinbeom; Park, Ilyoung; Lee, Dosang; Sung, Kiyoung; Baek, Jongmin

    2015-01-01

    Surgeons occasionally encounter a patient with a gastric cancer invading an adjacent organ, such as the pancreas, liver, or transverse colon. Although there is no established guideline for treatment of invasive gastric cancer, combined resection with radical gastrectomy is conventionally performed for curative purposes. We recently treated a patient with a large gastric cancer invading the abdominal wall, which was initially diagnosed as a simple abdominal wall abscess. Computed tomography showed that an abscess had formed adjacent to the greater curvature of the stomach. During surgery, we made an incision on the abdominal wall to drain the abscess, and performed curative total gastrectomy with partial excision of the involved abdominal wall. The patient received intensive treatment and wound management postoperatively with no surgery-related adverse events. However, the patient could not receive adjuvant chemotherapy and expired on the 82nd postoperative day. PMID:26468420

  3. Prosthetics and Techniques in Repair of Animal's Abdominal Wall

    PubMed Central

    Karrouf, Gamal; Zaghloul, Adel; Abou-Alsaud, Mohamed; Barbour, Elie; Abouelnasr, Khaled

    2016-01-01

    The management of abdominal wall repair continues to present a challenging problem, especially in the repair of major defects. Many abdominal wall defects can be repaired by primary closure; however, if the defect is large and there is a tension on the closure of the wound, the use of prosthetic materials becomes indispensable. Many studies have been performed with various materials and implant techniques, without the comparison of their degrees of success, based on sound meta-analysis and/or inclusive epidemiologic studies. This review covered the effectiveness of recent advances in prosthetic materials and implant procedures used in repair of abdominal wall, based on biomechanical properties and economic aspects of reconstructed large abdominal wall defects and hernias in animals. The presented results in this review helped to reach treatment algorithms that could maximize outcomes and minimize morbidity. PMID:27293982

  4. Prosthetics and Techniques in Repair of Animal's Abdominal Wall.

    PubMed

    Karrouf, Gamal; Zaghloul, Adel; Abou-Alsaud, Mohamed; Barbour, Elie; Abouelnasr, Khaled

    2016-01-01

    The management of abdominal wall repair continues to present a challenging problem, especially in the repair of major defects. Many abdominal wall defects can be repaired by primary closure; however, if the defect is large and there is a tension on the closure of the wound, the use of prosthetic materials becomes indispensable. Many studies have been performed with various materials and implant techniques, without the comparison of their degrees of success, based on sound meta-analysis and/or inclusive epidemiologic studies. This review covered the effectiveness of recent advances in prosthetic materials and implant procedures used in repair of abdominal wall, based on biomechanical properties and economic aspects of reconstructed large abdominal wall defects and hernias in animals. The presented results in this review helped to reach treatment algorithms that could maximize outcomes and minimize morbidity.

  5. Desmoid tumor of the abdominal wall: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Desmoid tumors are rare lesions without any metastatic potential but a strong tendency to invade locally and to recur. These tumors are associated with women of fertile age, especially during and after pregnancy. Case presentation The case of a desmoid tumor of the anterior abdominal wall in a 40-year-old Caucasian man with no relevant family history is presented, describing its appearance on computed tomography and ultrasonography. The patient, who presented with a painless mass in the left anterolateral abdomen, had a history of previous urgent abdominal surgery after a shotgun injury two years earlier. Radical resection of the affected abdominal wall musculature was performed, and the defect was reconstructed with polypropylene mesh. Conclusion The diagnosis of desmoid tumor should be strongly considered even in male patients with an abdominal mass and a history of previous abdominal surgery. The goal of its treatment is complete tumor excision and avoidance of the development of complications such as hernia. PMID:21787413

  6. Effects of posture on chest-wall configuration and motion during tidal breathing in normal men

    PubMed Central

    Takashima, Sachie; Nozoe, Masafumi; Mase, Kyoshi; Kouyama, Yusuke; Matsushita, Kazuhiro; Ando, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to clarify the impact of postural changes during tidal breathing on the configuration and motion of chest-wall in order to further breathing motion evaluation. [Subjects and Methods] Chest-wall configuration and motion in the supine, right lateral, and sitting positions were measured using optoelectronic plethysmography in 15 healthy adult men. [Results] The anteroposterior diameters of the chest wall were significantly lower in the supine position for the pulmonary and abdominal rib cages, whereas the mediolateral diameters in the lateral position were lowest for the abdominal rib cage. Regarding chest-wall motion, both craniocaudal and anteroposterior motions of the anterior surface of the pulmonary and abdominal rib cages were significantly greater in the sitting position. Regarding motion of the left lateral abdominal rib cage, lateral motion was greatest in the lateral position. [Conclusion] Chest-wall configuration and motion changed according to posture in healthy men, particularly in the pulmonary and abdominal rib cages. PMID:28210033

  7. Wandering Ascaris Coming Out Through the Abdominal Wall

    PubMed Central

    Wani, Mohd L; Rather, Ajaz A.; Parray, Fazl Q.; Ahangar, Abdul G.; Bijli, Akram H.; Irshad, Ifat; Nayeem-Ul-Hassan; Khan, Tahir S.

    2013-01-01

    A rare case of ascaris coming out through the anterior abdominal wall is reported here. A 40-year-old female had undergone dilatation and curettage by a quack. On the second day she presented with presented with features of peritonitis. She was explored. Resection anastomosis of the ileum was done for multiple perforations of the ileum. Patient developed a fistula in the anterior abdominal wall which was draining bile-colored fluid. On the 12th postoperative day a 10-cm-long worm was seen coming out through the fistulous tract which was found to be Ascaris lumbricoids. Ascaris lumbricoids can lead to many complications ranging from worm colic to intestinal obstruction, volvulus, peritonitis, pancreatitis, cholangiohepatitis, liver abscess and many more. Worm has been reported to come out through mouth, nostrils, abdominal drains, T-tubes etc. But ascaris coming out through the anterior abdominal wall is very rare hence reported here. PMID:23930192

  8. Wandering ascaris coming out through the abdominal wall.

    PubMed

    Wani, Mohd L; Rather, Ajaz A; Parray, Fazl Q; Ahangar, Abdul G; Bijli, Akram H; Irshad, Ifat; Nayeem-Ul-Hassan; Khan, Tahir S

    2013-06-01

    A rare case of ascaris coming out through the anterior abdominal wall is reported here. A 40-year-old female had undergone dilatation and curettage by a quack. On the second day she presented with presented with features of peritonitis. She was explored. Resection anastomosis of the ileum was done for multiple perforations of the ileum. Patient developed a fistula in the anterior abdominal wall which was draining bile-colored fluid. On the 12(th) postoperative day a 10-cm-long worm was seen coming out through the fistulous tract which was found to be Ascaris lumbricoids. Ascaris lumbricoids can lead to many complications ranging from worm colic to intestinal obstruction, volvulus, peritonitis, pancreatitis, cholangiohepatitis, liver abscess and many more. Worm has been reported to come out through mouth, nostrils, abdominal drains, T-tubes etc. But ascaris coming out through the anterior abdominal wall is very rare hence reported here.

  9. Abdominal wall abscesses in patients with Crohn's disease: clinical outcome.

    PubMed

    Neufeld, David; Keidar, Andrei; Gutman, Mordechai; Zissin, Rivka

    2006-03-01

    Abdominal wall abscess due to Crohn's Disease used to be one of the definitive indications for operative treatment. The advent of interventional radiology, the accessibility to percutaneous drainage, and the availability of new medications raised the possibility of nonoperative treatment of this condition. The clinical presentation, treatment, and follow-up of 13 patients with abdominal wall abscesses secondary to Crohn's Disease were retrospectively reviewed. During a 10-year period (1993-2003), 13 patients with abdominal wall abscess were treated. Five patients had an anterolateral abdominal wall abscess and eight had a posterior abscess (psoas). In 11 patients, 17 drainage procedures were performed: 12 percutaneous and 5 operative. Despite initial adequate drainage and resolution of the abscess, all 13 patients eventually needed resection of the offending bowel segment, which was undertaken in 12 patients. The mean time between abscess presentation and definitive operation was 2 months. Percutaneous drainage is an attractive option in most cases of abdominal abscesses. However, in Crohn's Disease patients with an abdominal wall abscess, we found a high failure rate despite initial adequate drainage. We suggest that surgical resection of the diseased bowel segment should be the definitive therapy.

  10. Synthetic, biological and composite scaffolds for abdominal wall reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Meintjes, Jennifer; Yan, Sheng; Zhou, Lin; Zheng, Shusen; Zheng, Minghao

    2011-03-01

    The reconstruction of abdominal wall defects remains a huge surgical challenge. Tension-free repair is proven to be superior to suture repair in abdominal wall reconstruction. Scaffolds are essential for tension-free repair. They are used to bridge a defect or reinforce the abdominal wall. A huge variety of scaffolds are now commercially available. Most of the synthetic scaffolds are composed of polypropylene. They provide strong tissue reinforcement, but cause a foreign body reaction, which can result in serious complications. Absorbable synthetic scaffolds, such as Dexon™ (polyglycolic acid) and Vicryl™ (polyglactin 910), are not suitable for abdominal wall reconstruction as they usually require subsequent surgeries to repair recurrent hernias. Composite scaffolds combine the strength of nonabsorbable synthetic scaffolds with the antiadhesive properties of the absorbable scaffold, but require long-term follow-up. Biological scaffolds, such as Permacol™, Surgisis(®) and Alloderm(®), are derived from acellular mammalian tissues. Non-cross-linked biological scaffolds show excellent biocompatibility and degrade slowly over time. However, remnant DNA has been found in several products and the degradation leads to recurrence. Randomized controlled trials with long-term follow-up studies are lacking for all of the available scaffolds, particularly those derived from animal tissue. This article provides an overview of the different types of scaffolds available, and presents the key clinical studies of the commercially available synthetic, composite and biological scaffolds for abdominal wall reconstruction.

  11. Improving the efficiency of abdominal aortic aneurysm wall stress computations.

    PubMed

    Zelaya, Jaime E; Goenezen, Sevan; Dargon, Phong T; Azarbal, Amir-Farzin; Rugonyi, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    An abdominal aortic aneurysm is a pathological dilation of the abdominal aorta, which carries a high mortality rate if ruptured. The most commonly used surrogate marker of rupture risk is the maximal transverse diameter of the aneurysm. More recent studies suggest that wall stress from models of patient-specific aneurysm geometries extracted, for instance, from computed tomography images may be a more accurate predictor of rupture risk and an important factor in AAA size progression. However, quantification of wall stress is typically computationally intensive and time-consuming, mainly due to the nonlinear mechanical behavior of the abdominal aortic aneurysm walls. These difficulties have limited the potential of computational models in clinical practice. To facilitate computation of wall stresses, we propose to use a linear approach that ensures equilibrium of wall stresses in the aneurysms. This proposed linear model approach is easy to implement and eliminates the burden of nonlinear computations. To assess the accuracy of our proposed approach to compute wall stresses, results from idealized and patient-specific model simulations were compared to those obtained using conventional approaches and to those of a hypothetical, reference abdominal aortic aneurysm model. For the reference model, wall mechanical properties and the initial unloaded and unstressed configuration were assumed to be known, and the resulting wall stresses were used as reference for comparison. Our proposed linear approach accurately approximates wall stresses for varying model geometries and wall material properties. Our findings suggest that the proposed linear approach could be used as an effective, efficient, easy-to-use clinical tool to estimate patient-specific wall stresses.

  12. Tunnelled tensor fascia lata flap for complex abdominal wall reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Frederick; Buonocore, Samuel; Narayan, Deepak

    2011-01-01

    This study describes the treatment of two patients with recurrent, infected abdominal wall defects using bilateral delayed and tunnelled pedicled tensor fascia lata (TFL) myofascial flaps. TFL flaps were elevated and delayed for 4 weeks in both cases. In the second case, Parietex Composite mesh was positioned underneath the TFL flap and allowed to incorporate. After a delay of 4 weeks, the flaps were harvested and tunnelled subcutaneously to repair the abdominal wall defect. Both patients have stable repairs but had donor site seromas requiring drainage. Cadaver dissection was also performed to identify structures related to TFL flap harvest. We identified a variant of lateral femoral cutaneous nerve that traversed the TFL flap, necessitating meticulous dissection during surgery. In summary, we describe a new technique of incorporating mesh into the TFL prior to flap harvest for reconstruction of complex abdominal wall. PMID:22707661

  13. Abdominal wall closure after a stomal reversal procedure.

    PubMed

    López-Cano, Manuel; Pereira, José Antonio; Villanueva, Borja; Vallribera, Francesc; Espin, Eloy; Armengol Carrasco, Manuel; Arbós Vía, María Antonia; Feliu, Xavier; Morales-Conde, Salvador

    2014-01-01

    The closure of a temporary stoma involves 2 different surgical procedures: the stoma reversal procedure and the abdominal wall reconstruction of the stoma site. The management of the abdominal wall has different areas that should be analyzed such us how to avoid surgical site infection (SSI), the technique to be used in case of a concomitant hernia at the stoma site or to prevent an incisional hernia in the future, how to deal with the incision when the stoma reversal procedure is performed by laparoscopy and how to close the skin at the stoma site. The aim of this paper is to analyze these aspects in relation to abdominal wall reconstruction during a stoma reversal procedure.

  14. Takedown of enterocutaneous fistula and complex abdominal wall reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Slade, Dominic Alexander James; Carlson, Gordon Lawrence

    2013-10-01

    Key steps in managing patients with enterocutaneous fistulation and an abdominal wall defect include dealing effectively with abdominal sepsis and providing safe and effective nutritional support and skin care, then assessing intestinal and abdominal anatomy, before undertaking reconstructive surgery. The complexity, cost, and morbidity associated with such cases justifies creation of specialized centers in which gastroenterologic, hernia, and plastic surgical expertise, as well as experienced wound and stoma nursing and nutritional and psychological support, can be made available for patients with these challenging problems.

  15. Ultrasonography and computed tomography of inflammatory abdominal wall lesions

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, H.C.; Rabinowitz, J.G.

    1982-09-01

    Twenty-four patients with inflammatory lesions of the abdominal wall were examined by ultrasonography. Nine of these patients underwent computed tomographic (CT) scanning as well. Both ultrasonography and CT clearly delineated the exact location and extent of abdominal wall abscesses. Abscesses were easily differentiated from cellulitis or phlegmon with ultrasound. The peritoneal line was more clearly delineated on ultrasonograms than on CT scans; abscesses were also more distinct on the ultrasonograms because of their low echogenicity compared with the surrounding structures. Gas bubbles, fat density with specific low attenuation values, and underlying inflamed bowel loops in obese patients with Crohn's disease were better delineated by CT.

  16. [A Case of Abdominal Wall Hernia Rupture during Bevacizumab Treatment].

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Satoshi; Miyazaki, Yasuaki; Hirose, Sou; Michiura, Toshiya; Fujita, Shigeo; Yamabe, Kazuo; Miyazaki, Satoru; Nagaoka, Makio

    2015-11-01

    A 78 -year-old man with rectal cancer underwent abdominoperineal resection of the rectum. In the postoperative period, the patient experienced wound infection, leading to an abdominal wall hernia. Two years following surgery, a rise in the serum CEA level was seen. A metastatic tumor was detected in the right lung on chest CT. VATS right lung inferior lobe segmental resection was performed. After lobectomy, the serum CEA level continued to increase. Another metastatic tumor was detected in the right lung on chest CT. Chemotherapy with capecitabine, oxaliplatin, and bevacizumab was commenced. The erosive part of the abdominal wall scar hernia extended during the nine weeks of chemotherapy. The chemotherapy was then discontinued. In the follow-up CT scan, a right pleural recurrence, local recurrence in the pelvis, and a liver metastasis were detected. Chemotherapy was re-introduced 3 years after surgery. The erosive part of the abdominal wall hernia again began to spread with chemotherapy recommencement. Four months after restarting chemotherapy, the hernia ruptured, with a loop of the small intestine protruding out of it. The patient covered this with a sheet of vinyl and was taken by the ambulance to our hospital. The erosive part of the abdominal wall hernia had split by 10 cm, and a loop of the small intestine was protruding. As ischemia of the small intestine was not observed, we replaced it into the abdominal cavity, and performed a temporary suture repair of the hernia sac. Following this, bevacizumab was discontinued, and the erosive part reduced. We performed a radical operation for abdominal wall scar hernia repair 11 weeks after the discontinuation of bevacizumab.

  17. Transversus abdominal plane block as a sole anesthetic technique for abdominal wall hematoma drainage.

    PubMed

    Varela, N; Golvano, M; Monedero, P

    2016-10-01

    Transversus abdominal plane (TAP) block is a known and useful technique, widely used for postoperative pain management of abdominal wall incisions. During the past years, and following the expansion of ultrasound guided techniques, its use has even gained more adepts. It is usually used as an adjuvant technique, primarily in order to control postoperative pain and reduce opioids consumption. We report the case of an 82 years old patient admitted for drainage of a postoperative abdominal wall hematoma after correction of a McBurney incisional hernia. The corrective surgery had gone on without incident, under general anesthesia with laryngeal mask. Two weeks later, the patient came back to our emergency department with a clear hematoma of the abdominal wall. Surgery was decided. A sole local anesthetic technique was achieved, using a TAP block. The block was performed under ultrasound guidance, using a subcostal approach. The surgery went on without complications. Therefore, TAP block offers a hemodynamic stability, appropriate intra-operative anesthesia and post-surgical analgesia of the abdominal wall.

  18. Which mesh or graft? Prosthetic devices for abdominal wall reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Abid, Shazia; El-Hayek, Kevin

    2016-03-01

    This article reviews the ever-increasing number of prosthetic devices--both synthetic mesh and biologic grafts--now in use for abdominal wall reconstruction. It also introduces a novel hybrid synthetic/biologic graft (Zenapro) and suture passer device (Novapass).

  19. Extragastrointestinal Stromal Tumour of The Abdominal Wall - A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, A. Sathish Selva; Padmini, R; Veena, G; Murugesan, N

    2013-01-01

    Stromal tumours occurring in areas other than the GastroIntestinal Tract (GIT) are known as Extra GastroIntestinal Stromal Tumours (EGISTs). They usually arise in the mesentery, omentum or retroperitoneum, while EGISTs which occur in the abdominal wall are very rare. Both gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs) and EGISTs are histologically and immunophenotypically similar. We are reporting a case of EGIST, which occurred in the anterior abdominal wall in a twenty five-year-old female patient. The tumour was present in the right loin and imaging studies suggested that it was a desmoid tumour. It was surgically excised by doing an abdominal wall mesh repair. The histological examinations revealed a tumour with spindle cell morphology, with <2 mitoses per 50 High Power Field (HPF) and no necrosis, with tumour free margins. Immunohistochemistry was strongly positive for CD117 and Smooth Muscle Actin (SMA), while it was negative for β-catenin and S100. The patient is well post operatively and is on close follow up. EGISTs should be considered in the differential diagnosis of mesenchymal tumours which occur in the abdominal wall, inspite of their rarity, as the high risk patients may need Imatinib chemotherapy. PMID:24551695

  20. Planned hernia repair and late abdominal wall reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Leppäniemi, Ari; Tukiainen, Erkki

    2012-03-01

    Planned ventral hernia is a management strategy in which the abdominal fascial layer has been left unclosed and the viscera are covered only with original or grafted skin. Leaving the fascia open can be deliberate or unavoidable and most commonly results from staged repair of the abdominal wall due to trauma, peritonitis, pancreatitis, abdominal vascular emergencies, or abdominal compartment syndrome. The abdominal wall defects can be categorized as type I or II defects depending on whether there is intact, stable skin coverage. In defects with intact skin coverage, the most commonly used methods are the components separation technique and a prosthetic repair, sometimes used in combination. The advantages of the components separation technique is the ability to close the linea alba at the midline, creating a better functional result than a repair with inert mesh. Although the reherniation risk seems higher after components separation, the risk of infection is considerably lower. With a type II defect, with absent or unstable skin coverage, fascial repair alone is inadequate. Of the more complex reconstruction techniques, the use of a free tensor fasciae latae (TFL) flap utilizing a saphenous vein arteriovenous loop is the most promising. The advantages of the TFL flap include constant anatomy of the pedicle, a strong fascial layer, large-caliber vessels matching the size of the AV loop, and the ability to use large flaps (up to 20 × 35 cm). Whatever technique is used, the repair of complex abdominal wall defects requires close collaboration with plastic and abdominal surgeons, which is best managed in specialized centers.

  1. Is abdominal wall tenderness a useful sign in the diagnosis of non-specific abdominal pain?

    PubMed Central

    Gray, D. W.; Dixon, J. M.; Seabrook, G.; Collin, J.

    1988-01-01

    Pain arising from the abdominal wall has been implicated as a cause of non-specific abdominal pain (NSAP), and the presence of abdominal wall tenderness (AWT) has been proposed as an accurate diagnostic test for NSAP. One hundred and fifty eight patients admitted to hospital with abdominal pain were tested for the presence of positive AWT. In 53 patients the final diagnosis was appendicitis and positive AWT was found in five. Thirty eight patients were found to have a variety of other recognised pathological diagnoses, none of whom had a positive AWT. In 67 patients a diagnosis of NSAP was made in the absence of other pathological diagnosis, 19 of whom had positive AWT, which was significantly different from the other diagnostic groups. This study confirms the presence of AWT in up to 28% of patients with NSAP, and suggests that testing for AWT is of value in patients with abdominal pain, although a positive AWT is not as accurate a predictor of NSAP as previously reported. PMID:2970820

  2. Domain wall motion by localized temperature gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moretti, Simone; Raposo, Victor; Martinez, Eduardo; Lopez-Diaz, Luis

    2017-02-01

    Magnetic domain wall (DW) motion induced by a localized Gaussian temperature profile is studied in a Permalloy nanostrip within the framework of the stochastic Landau-Lifshitz-Bloch equation. The different contributions to thermally induced DW motion, entropic torque and magnonic spin transfer torque, are isolated and compared. The analysis of magnonic spin transfer torque includes a description of thermally excited magnons in the sample. A third driving force due to a thermally induced dipolar field is found and described. Finally, thermally induced DW motion is studied under realistic conditions by taking into account the edge roughness. The results give quantitative insights into the different mechanisms responsible for domain wall motion in temperature gradients and allow for comparison with experimental results.

  3. Towards the mechanical characterization of abdominal wall by inverse analysis.

    PubMed

    Simón-Allué, R; Calvo, B; Oberai, A A; Barbone, P E

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study is to characterize the passive mechanical behaviour of abdominal wall in vivo in an animal model using only external cameras and numerical analysis. The main objective lies in defining a methodology that provides in vivo information of a specific patient without altering mechanical properties. It is demonstrated in the mechanical study of abdomen for hernia purposes. Mechanical tests consisted on pneumoperitoneum tests performed on New Zealand rabbits, where inner pressure was varied from 0mmHg to 12mmHg. Changes in the external abdominal surface were recorded and several points were tracked. Based on their coordinates we reconstructed a 3D finite element model of the abdominal wall, considering an incompressible hyperelastic material model defined by two parameters. The spatial distributions of these parameters (shear modulus and non linear parameter) were calculated by inverse analysis, using two different types of regularization: Total Variation Diminishing (TVD) and Tikhonov (H(1)). After solving the inverse problem, the distribution of the material parameters were obtained along the abdominal surface. Accuracy of the results was evaluated for the last level of pressure. Results revealed a higher value of the shear modulus in a wide stripe along the craneo-caudal direction, associated with the presence of linea alba in conjunction with fascias and rectus abdominis. Non linear parameter distribution was smoother and the location of higher values varied with the regularization type. Both regularizations proved to yield in an accurate predicted displacement field, but H(1) obtained a smoother material parameter distribution while TVD included some discontinuities. The methodology here presented was able to characterize in vivo the passive non linear mechanical response of the abdominal wall.

  4. Spontaneous abscesses of the abdominal wall, omentum and abdominal cavity caused by group G streptococci: a case report.

    PubMed

    De Brabandere, K; Vanpaemel, G; Verheyen, L

    2008-01-01

    We report the first case, to our knowledge, of spontaneous abscess of the abdominal wall, omentum and abdominal cavity caused by group G streptococci. A 52-year-old diabetic woman presented with abdominal tenderness and weight loss that had persisted for a few weeks. CT scan showed several abscesses of the abdominal wall, omentum and abdominal cavity. The abscesses were drained laparoscopically and antibiotics were given postoperatively. Biopsies and cultures showed group G streptococci. The patient recovered without any complication and left our hospital on the 17th postoperative day.

  5. Quantitative anatomical labeling of the anterior abdominal wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Wade M.; Xu, Zhoubing; Asman, Andrew J.; Poulose, Benjamin K.; Landman, Bennett A.

    2013-03-01

    Ventral hernias (VHs) are abnormal openings in the anterior abdominal wall that are common side effects of surgical intervention. Repair of VHs is the most commonly performed procedure by general surgeons worldwide, but VH repair outcomes are not particularly encouraging (with recurrence rates up to 43%). A variety of open and laparoscopic techniques are available for hernia repair, and the specific technique used is ultimately driven by surgeon preference and experience. Despite routine acquisition of computed tomography (CT) for VH patients, little quantitative information is available on which to guide selection of a particular approach and/or optimize patient-specific treatment. From anecdotal interviews, the success of VH repair procedures correlates with hernia size, location, and involvement of secondary structures. Herein, we propose an image labeling protocol to segment the anterior abdominal area to provide a geometric basis with which to derive biomarkers and evaluate treatment efficacy. Based on routine clinical CT data, we are able to identify inner and outer surfaces of the abdominal walls and the herniated volume. This is the first formal presentation of a protocol to quantify these structures on abdominal CT. The intra- and inter rater reproducibilities of this protocol are evaluated on 4 patients with suspected VH (3 patients were ultimately diagnosed with VH while 1 was not). Mean surfaces distances of less than 2mm were achieved for all structures.

  6. Abdominal wall endometrioma: Our experience in Vladimir, Russia

    PubMed Central

    Gachabayov, Mahir; Horta, Roman; Afanasyev, Dmitriy; Gilyazov, Timur

    2016-01-01

    Background: Endometriosis is defined as an estrogen-dependent, benign inflammatory disease characterized by the presence of ectopic endometrial implants. Abdominal wall endometrioma (AWE) being a rare entity is a benign tumor defined as ectopic functional, endometrial tissue located in the abdominal wall. Subjects and Methods: A retrospective study of 23 female patients treated with AWE in four departments of three centers in Vladimir city, Russia, from January 2010 to December 2014 was performed. Results: In twenty patients (87%), AWE was symptomatic, and in three patients (13%), AWE was asymptomatic. Esquivel triad presented in 17 patients (74%), and modified Esquivel triad existed in 20 patients (87%). All 23 patients were operated, and AWE excision was performed. Recurrence occurred in 4 cases (17.4%) and was associated with postoperative pain and seroma. Conclusion: Postoperative pain for more than 7 days and seroma (on ultrasonography) seem to be associated with recurrence of AWE. PMID:27942100

  7. Management of Complex Abdominal Wall Defects Associated with Penetrating Abdominal Trauma

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-09

    management of the abdominal wall was determined by a multidisciplinary team of general and plastic surgeons, intensivists and specialist nurses . The...otomy is performed when the patient’s physiology has normalised, usually at 12–72 h after the damage control procedure. Closure of the midline... nurse specialist, microbiology, intensive care, the hos- pital medical director and the orthopaedic surgeons if there was concomitant bony or extremity

  8. Planned ventral hernia. Staged management for acute abdominal wall defects.

    PubMed Central

    Fabian, T C; Croce, M A; Pritchard, F E; Minard, G; Hickerson, W L; Howell, R L; Schurr, M J; Kudsk, K A

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Analysis of a staged management scheme for initial and definitive management of acute abdominal wall defects is provided. METHODS: A four-staged scheme for managing acute abdominal wall defects consists of the following stages: stage I--prosthetic insertion; stage II--2 to 3 weeks after prosthetic insertion and wound granulation, the prosthesis is removed; stage III--2 to 3 days later, planned ventral hernia (split thickness skin graft [STSG] or full-thickness skin and subcutaneous fat); stage IV--6 to 12 months later, definitive reconstruction. Cases were evaluated retrospectively for benefits and risks of the techniques employed. RESULTS: Eighty-eight cases (39 visceral edema, 27 abdominal sepsis, 22 abdominal wall resection) were managed during 8.5 years. Prostheses included polypropylene mesh in 45 cases, polyglactin 910 mesh in 27, polytetrafluorethylene in 10, and plastic in 6. Twenty-four patients died from their initial disease. The fistula rates associated with prosthetic management was 9%; no wound-related mortality occurred. Most wounds had split thickness skin graft applied after prosthetic removal. Definitive reconstruction was undertaken in 21 patients in the authors' institution (prosthetic mesh in 12 and modified components separation in 9). Recurrent hernias developed in 33% of mesh reconstructions and 11% of the components separation technique. CONCLUSIONS: The authors concluded that 1) this staged approach was associated with low morbidity and no technique-related mortality; 2) prostheses placed for edema were removed with fascial approximation accomplished in half of those cases; 3) absorbable mesh provided the advantages of reasonable durability, ease of removal, and relatively low cost--it has become the prosthesis of choice; and 4) the modified components separation technique of reconstruction provided good results in patients with moderate sized defects. Images Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 4. Figure 5. PMID:8203973

  9. Distribution of Wall Stress in Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasheras, Juan

    2005-11-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) rupture is believed to occur when the mechanical stress acting on the wall exceeds the strength of the wall tissue. Therefore, knowledge of the AAA wall stress distribution could be useful in assessing its risk of rupture. In our research, a finite element analysis was used to determine the wall stresses both in idealized models and in a real clinical model in which the aorta was considered isotropic with nonlinear material properties and was loaded with a given pressure. In the idealized models, both maximum diameter and asymmetry were found to have substantial influence on the distribution of the wall stress. The thrombus inside the AAA was also found to help protecting the walls from high stresses. Using CT scans of the AAA, the actual geometry of the aneurysm was reconstructed and we found that wall tension increases on the flatter surface (typically corresponds to the posterior surface) and at the inflection points of the bulge. In addition to the static analysis, we also performed simulations of the effect of unsteady pressure wave propagation inside the aneurysm.

  10. Effects of the flexibility of the arterial wall on the wall shear stresses and wall tension in Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salsac, Anne-Virginie; Fernandez, Miguel; Chomaz, Jean-Marc

    2005-11-01

    As an abdominal aortic aneurysm develops, large changes occur in the composition and structure of the arterial wall, which result in its stiffening. So far, most studies, whether experimental or numerical, have been conducted assuming the walls to be rigid. A numerical simulation of the fluid structure interactions is performed in different models of aneurysms in order to analyze the effects that the wall compliance might have on the flow topology. Both symmetric and non-symmetric models of aneurysms are considered, all idealistic in shape. The wall mechanical properties are varied in order to simulate the progressive stiffening of the walls. The spatial and temporal distributions of wall tension are calculated for the different values of the wall elasticity and compared to the results for the rigid walls. In the case of rigid walls, the calculation of the wall shear stresses and pressure compare very well with experimental results.

  11. Cytoreductive strategy for multiple intra-abdominal and abdominal wall desmoid tumors in familial adenomatous polyposis: report of three cases.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Koji; Toiyama, Yuji; Okugawa, Yoshinaga; Hiro, Junichiro; Kawamoto, Aya; Inoue, Yasuhiro; Uchida, Keiichi; Araki, Toshimitsu; Mohri, Yasuhiko; Kusunoki, Masato

    2012-10-01

    Desmoid tumors (DTs) are benign myofibroblastic neoplasms originating from the fascia or muscle aponeurosis, which occur in one-third of patients with familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP). Most FAP-associated DTs occur in the intra-abdominal or abdominal wall region, thus, their infiltrative or expansive growth causes life-threatening organ damage, such as intestinal obstruction, urethral obstruction, and mesenteric infiltration with the involvement of mesenteric vessels. Treatments including surgical resection, cytotoxic chemotherapy, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and anti-estrogen therapy have all been tried with variable success. Here, we report on three patients with FAP who developed multiple intra-abdominal and abdominal wall DTs after total proctocolectomy and ileal pouch-anal anastomosis. Two cases underwent surgical resection of uncontrolled abdominal wall DTs after successful control of intra-abdominal DTs by systemic chemotherapy. The remaining case underwent repeated surgical resections of multiple intra-abdominal and abdominal wall DTs, and consequently had recurrent intra-abdominal DTs, with involvement of the small bowel and ureter. Surgical intervention as tumor volume reduction (cytoreduction) may be useful for cases with medical treatment-refractory or symptomatic FAP-associated abdominal DTs.

  12. Abdominal Wall Transplantation: Skin as a Sentinel Marker for Rejection.

    PubMed

    Gerlach, U A; Vrakas, G; Sawitzki, B; Macedo, R; Reddy, S; Friend, P J; Giele, H; Vaidya, A

    2016-06-01

    Abdominal wall transplantation (AWTX) has revolutionized difficult abdominal closure after intestinal transplantation (ITX). More important, the skin of the transplanted abdominal wall (AW) may serve as an immunological tool for differential diagnosis of bowel dysfunction after transplant. Between August 2008 and October 2014, 29 small bowel transplantations were performed in 28 patients (16 male, 12 female; aged 41 ± 13 years). Two groups were identified: the solid organ transplant (SOT) group (n = 15; 12 ITX and 3 modified multivisceral transplantation [MMVTX]) and the SOT-AWTX group (n = 14; 12 ITX and 2 MMVTX), with the latter including one ITX-AWTX retransplantation. Two doses of alemtuzumab were used for induction (30 mg, 6 and 24 h after reperfusion), and tacrolimus (trough levels 8-12 ng/mL) was used for maintenance immunosuppression. Patient survival was similar in both groups (67% vs. 61%); however, the SOT-AWTX group showed faster posttransplant recovery, better intestinal graft survival (79% vs. 60%), a lower intestinal rejection rate (7% vs. 27%) and a lower rate of misdiagnoses in which viral infection was mistaken and treated as rejection (14% vs. 33%). The skin component of the AW may serve as an immune modulator and sentinel marker for immunological activity in the host. This can be a vital tool for timely prevention of intestinal graft rejection and, more important, avoidance of overimmunosuppression in cases of bowel dysfunction not related to graft rejection.

  13. Bioprosthetic Tissue Matrices in Complex Abdominal Wall Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Broyles, Justin M.; Abt, Nicholas B.; Sacks, Justin M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Complex abdominal defects are difficult problems encountered by surgeons in multiple specialties. Although current evidence supports the primary repair of these defects with mesh reinforcement, it is unclear which mesh is superior for any given clinical scenario. The purpose of this review was to explore the characteristics of and clinical relevance behind bioprosthetic tissue matrices in an effort to better clarify their role in abdominal wall reconstruction. Methods: We reviewed the peer-reviewed literature on the use of bioprosthetic mesh in human subjects. Basic science articles and large retrospective and prospective reviews were included in author’s analysis. The clinical performance and characteristics of 13 bioprosthetic tissue matrices were evaluated. Results: The majority of the products evaluated perform well in contaminated fields, where the risk of wound-healing difficulties is high. Clinical outcomes, which included infection, reherniation, and bulge formation, were variable, and the majority of the studies had a mean follow-up of less than 24 months. Conclusions: Although bioprosthetic matrix has a multitude of indications within the growing field of abdominal wall reconstruction, the functionality, regenerative capacity, and long-term fate of these products have yet to be fully established. Furthermore, the clinical performance, indications, and contraindications for each type of matrix need to be fully evaluated in long-term outcome studies. PMID:25289285

  14. Advances in surgery for abdominal wall defects: gastroschisis and omphalocele.

    PubMed

    Islam, Saleem

    2012-06-01

    Abdominal wall defects (AWDs) are a common congenital surgical problem in fetuses and neonates. The incidence of these defects has steadily increased over the past few decades due to rising numbers of gastroschisis. Most of these anomalies are diagnosed prenatally and then managed at a center with available pediatric surgical, neonatology, and high-risk obstetric support. Omphaloceles and gastroschisis are distinct anomalies that have different management and outcomes. There have been a number of recent advances in the care of patients with AWDs, both in the fetus and the newborn, which will be discussed in this article.

  15. Changes in wall shear stresses in abdominal aortic aneurysms with increasing wall stiffness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salsac, Anne-Virginie; Fernandez, Miguel

    2006-11-01

    During the growth of abdominal aortic aneurysms, local changes occur in the composition and structure of the diseased wall, resulting in its stiffening. A numerical simulation of the fluid structure interactions is performed in idealized models of aneurysms using a finite element method. A full coupling of the equations governing the pulsatile blood flow and the deformation of the compliant wall is undertaken. The effect of the progressive stiffening of the wall is analyzed at various stages in the growth of the aneurysm. Increasing the wall stiffness alters the distribution of wall shear stresses and leads to an increase in their magnitude. The wall compliance is shown to have a more pronounced effect on non-axisymmetric aneurysms, which sustain large displacements. The overall movement of the aneurysm models increases the three-dimensionality of the flow.

  16. [An example of multi-stage reconstruction of a full-thickness abdominal wall defect].

    PubMed

    Kaczmarzyk, Janusz; Elsaftawy, Ahmed; Jabłecki, Jerzy; Kaczmarzyk, Leszek

    2013-01-01

    Abdominal wall reconstruction is a highly complex procedure that may requires a multiple stages surgical operations. The aim of a such reconstruction is to close the abdominal wall defect and to create a support for the internal organs. It's a challenge for both general and reconstructive surgery. An incomplete thickness defects of the abdominal wall are so much easier to challenge than complete ones. Also the size of the primary defect determines the way and stages of the operation. Such defects can occur in necrotizing fasciitis of the abdominal wall, after abdominal walls tumors removal, in traffic accidents or after "open abdomen" procedures (acute severe pancreatitis). In this paper the authors present a case of 62-yo patient which was operated because of large intestine perforation with various complications of which the most serious was the abdominal wall defect.

  17. [The cutaneous groin flap for coverage of a full-thickness abdominal wall defect].

    PubMed

    Doebler, O; Spierer, R

    2010-08-01

    A full-thickness defect of the abdominal wall is rare and may occur as a complication of extended abdominal surgery procedures. We report about a 69-year-old patient who was presented to our department with a full-thickness abdominal wall defect and a fully exposed collagen-mesh for reconstructive wound closure. 13 operations with resections of necrotic parts of the abdominal wall were performed following a complicated intraabdominal infection. After debridement and mesh explantation, closure of the remaining defect of the lower abdominal region was achieved by a cutaneous groin flap.

  18. Necrotizing Fasciitis of the Abdominal Wall Caused by Serratia Marcescens.

    PubMed

    Lakhani, Naheed A; Narsinghani, Umesh; Kumar, Ritu

    2015-04-15

    In this article, we present the first case of necrotizing fasciitis affecting the abdominal wall caused by Serratia marcescens and share results of a focused review of S. marcescens induced necrotizing fasciitis. Our patient underwent aorto-femoral bypass grafting for advanced peripheral vascular disease and presented 3 weeks postoperatively with pain, erythema and discharge from the incision site in the left lower abdominal wall and underwent multiple debridement of the affected area. Pathology of debrided tissue indicated extensive necrosis involving the adipose tissue, fascia and skeletal muscle. Wound cultures were positive for Serratia marcescens. She was successfully treated with antibiotics and multiple surgical debridements. Since necrotizing fasciitis is a medical and surgical emergency, it is critical to examine infectivity trends, clinical characteristics in its causative spectrum. Using PubMed we found 17 published cases of necrotizing fasciitis caused by Serratia marcescens, and then analyzed patterns among those cases. Serratia marcescens is prominent in the community and hospital settings, and information on infection presentations, risk factors, characteristics, treatment, course, and complications as provided through this study can help identify cases earlier and mitigate poor outcomes. Patients with positive blood cultures and those patients where surgical intervention was not provided or delayed had a higher mortality. Surgical intervention is a definite way to establish the diagnosis of necrotizing infection and differentiate it from other entities.

  19. An abdominal wall simulator for testing suprapubic urinary catheters.

    PubMed

    Coveney, V A; Gröver, D

    2001-08-01

    Urinary catheters (drainage tubes) are in widespread use. The most common type of long-term catheter is the Foley, which is made from natural or synthetic rubber. Foley catheters are passed into the bladder via the urethra or the suprapubic puncture channel (through the abdominal wall). A simulator for the abdominal wall has been developed to simulate aspects of the interaction between it and a suprapubic catheter. The simulator is based on a slab of ultrasoft elastomer with tensionable reinforcing polyamide filaments. The behaviour of the simulator has been compared with data published. A soft membrane (contact pressure) transducer (SMT) was used and novel instrumented 'tongs' for lateral indentation of the puncture track giving indentation stiffness. Slab materials were used with shear moduli of 0.1 and 0.021 MPa. Two filament-tensioning methods were used: by clamping to a winding mechanism and by weights. The combination of the softer slab material and tensioning by weights gave good conformity to physiological data; other combinations did not.

  20. Domain wall motion in ferroelectrics: Barkhausen noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shur, V.; Rumyantsev, E.; Kozhevnikov, V.; Nikolaeva, E.; Shishkin, E.

    2002-03-01

    The switching current noise has been recorded during polarization reversal in single-crystalline gadolinium molybdate (GMO) and lithium tantalate (LT). Analysis of Barkhausen noise (BN) data allows to classify the noise types by determination of the critical indexes and fractal dimensions. BN is manifested as the short pulses during the polarization reversal. We have analyzed the BN data recorded in GMO and LT with various types of controlled domain structure. The data treatment in terms of probability distribution of duration, area and energy of individual pulses reveals the critical behavior typical for the fractal records in time. We used the Fourier transform and Hurst's rescaled range analysis for obtaining the Hurst factor, fractal dimension and classifying the noise types. We investigated by computer simulation the mechanism of sideways motion of 180O domain wall by nucleation at the wall taking into account the nuclei-nuclei interaction. It was shown that the moving domain walls display the fractal shape and their motion is accompanied by Flicker noise, which is in accord with experimental data. The research was made possible in part by Programs "Basic Research in Russian Universities" and "Priority Research in High School. Electronics", by Grant No. 01-02-17443 of RFBR, by Award No.REC-005 of CRDF.

  1. Management of strangulated abdominal wall hernias with mesh; early results

    PubMed Central

    Ozbagriacik, Mustafa; Bas, Gurhan; Basak, Fatih; Sisik, Abdullah; Acar, Aylin; Kudas, Ilyas; Yucel, Metin; Ozpek, Adnan; Alimoglu, Orhan

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Surgery for abdominal wall hernias is a common procedure in general surgery practice. The main causes of delay for the operation are comorbid problems and patient unwillingness, which eventually, means that some patients are admitted to emergency clinics with strangulated hernias. In this report, patients who admitted to the emergency department with strangulated adominal wall hernias are presented together with their clinical management. METHODS: Patients who admitted to our clinic between January 2009 and November 2011 and underwent emergency operation were included in the study retrospectively. Demographic characteristics, hernia type, length of hospital stay, surgical treatment and complications were assessed. RESULTS: A total 81 patients (37 female, 44 male) with a mean age of 52.1±17.64 years were included in the study. Inguinal, femoral, umbilical and incisional hernias were detected in 40, 26, 9 and 6 patients respectively. Polypropylene mesh was used in 75 patients for repair. Primary repair without mesh was used in six patients. Small bowel (n=10; 12.34%), omentum (n=19; 23.45%), appendix (n=1; 1.2%) and Meckel’s diverticulum (n=1; 1.2%) were resected. Median length of hospital stay was 2 (1–7) days. Surgical site infection was detected in five (6.2%) patients. No significant difference was detected for length of hospital stay and surgical site infection in patients who had mesh repair (p=0.232 and 0.326 respectively). CONCLUSION: The need for bowel resection is common in strangulated abdominal wall hernias which undergo emergency operation. In the present study, an increase of morbidity was seen in patients who underwent bowel resection. No morbidity was detected related to the usage of prosthetic materials in repair of hernias. Hence, we believe that prosthetic materials can be used safely in emergency cases. PMID:28058336

  2. Athletic injuries of the lateral abdominal wall: review of anatomy and MR imaging appearance.

    PubMed

    Stensby, J Derek; Baker, Jonathan C; Fox, Michael G

    2016-02-01

    The lateral abdominal wall is comprised of three muscles, each with a different function and orientation. The transversus abdominus, internal oblique, and external oblique muscles span the abdominal cavity between the iliocostalis lumborum and quadratus lumborum posteriorly and the rectus abdominis anteriorly. The lateral abdominal wall is bound superiorly by the lower ribs and costal cartilages and inferiorly by the iliac crest and inguinal ligament. The lateral abdominal wall may be acutely or chronically injured in a variety of athletic endeavors, with occasional acute injuries in the setting of high-energy trauma such as motor vehicle collisions. Injuries to the lateral abdominal wall may result in lumbar hernia formation, unique for its high incarceration rate, and also Spigelian hernias. This article will review the anatomy, the magnetic resonance (MR) imaging approach, and the features and complications of lateral abdominal wall injuries.

  3. [Postoperative necrotizing fasciitis of the anterior abdominal wall].

    PubMed

    Fichev, G; Poromanski, I; Marina, M

    1995-01-01

    Postoperative necrotizing fasciitis of the anterior abdominal wall is a serious and life-endangering complication of an acute progressive synergistic infective process. There is an absolute increase in its incidence rate attributable to a number of situations in modern life. Morphological and clinical studies are carried out on personal case material of 28 patients, followed up over a 3-year period. The presence of aerobic-anaerobic mixed polyinfection, consisting of average 3.75 bacterial species of which 1.43 aerobes and 2.32 anaerobes, is demonstrated microbiologically. Of the latter non-spore-bearing obligate anaerobes predominate among which B fragillis is the most common. As shown by the study, the process is characterized by slow initial course with ensuring rapid spreading by neighbourhood. The process reveals all signs of a mixed aerobic-anaerobic polyinfection, thereby necessitating subordination of both antibiotic therapy and surgical tactics to the latter.

  4. Components separation for abdominal wall reconstruction: the Memphis modification.

    PubMed

    DiCocco, Jennifer M; Fabian, Timothy C; Emmett, Katrina P; Magnotti, Louis J; Goldberg, Steven P; Croce, Martin A

    2012-01-01

    Since the advent of damage control surgery, more patients are left with an open abdomen. Surgeons are then left with the challenge of how to restore continuity of the abdominal wall. Many different techniques have been utilized for reconstruction with widely variable recurrence rates, mainly depending on the length of follow-up. A modification of the components separation technique was developed in Memphis, Tennessee at the Presley Memorial Trauma Center. This modification greatly increased the length gained in the midline. Additionally, many patients can be reconstructed without the use of prosthetics, reducing the infectious complications. The purpose of this manuscript is to describe in detail how to perform a modification of the components separation technique that has been shown to have one of the lowest recurrence rates in the literature.

  5. Resection and Abdominal Wall Reconstruction of a Desmoid Tumor with Endometrioma Features

    PubMed Central

    Majors, Jaqueline; Stoikes, Nathaniel F.; Nejati, Reza

    2016-01-01

    Desmoid tumors are rare, musculoaponeurotic mesenchymal origin tumors arising from the proliferation of well-differentiated fibroblasts. Desmoid tumors may arise from any location with the abdominal cavity, abdominal wall and extremity locations being most frequent. We present the case of a 35-year-old female with a history of endometriosis who presented palpable abdominal mass and cyclic abdominal pain. Resection was performed for a presumed desmoid soft tissue tumor. Final pathology demonstrated desmoid histology admixed with abdominal wall endometriosis (endometrioma). This unique pathologic finding has only been rarely reported and is discussed with a brief review of the literature. PMID:27247824

  6. [Large abdominal wall reconstruction by free flap after recurrence of a dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans].

    PubMed

    Le Fourn, B; Lejeune, F; Sartre, J Y; Loirat, Y; Pannier, M

    1996-12-01

    Based on a case of recurrence of a dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans of the abdominal wall, the authors discuss the need for initial wide resection of this type of skin tumour and the possibilities of repair of extensive full thickness defects of the abdominal wall by means of a latissimus dorsi myocutaneous free flap.

  7. An Abdominal Aorta Wall Extraction for Liver Cirrhosis Classification Using Ultrasonic Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Takaya; Fujita, Yusuke; Mitani, Yoshihiro; Hamamoto, Yoshihiko; Segawa, Makoto; Terai, Shuji; Sakaida, Isao

    2011-06-01

    We propose a method to extract an abdominal aorta wall from an M-mode image. Furthermore, we propose the use of a Gaussian filter in order to improve image quality. The experimental results show that the Gaussian filter is effective in the abdominal aorta wall extraction.

  8. Evaluation of residual abdominal tumour motion in carbon ion gated treatments through respiratory motion modelling.

    PubMed

    Meschini, Giorgia; Seregni, Matteo; Pella, Andrea; Ciocca, Mario; Fossati, Piero; Valvo, Francesca; Riboldi, Marco; Baroni, Guido

    2017-02-01

    At the Italian National Centre for Oncologic Hadrontherapy (CNAO) patients with upper-abdominal tumours are being treated with carbon ion therapy, adopting the respiratory gating technique in combination with layered rescanning and abdominal compression to mitigate organ motion. Since online imaging of the irradiated volume is not feasible, this study proposes a modelling approach for the estimation of residual motion of the target within the gating window. The model extracts a priori respiratory motion information from the planning 4DCT using deformable image registration (DIR), then combines such information with the external surrogate signal recorded during dose delivery. This provides estimation of a CT volume corresponding to any given respiratory phase measured during treatment. The method was applied for the retrospective estimation of tumour residual motion during irradiation, considering 16 patients treated at CNAO with the respiratory gating protocol. The estimated tumour displacement, calculated with respect to the reference end-exhale position, was always limited (average displacement is 0.32±0.65mm over all patients) and below the maximum motion defined in the treatment plan. This supports the hypothesis of target position reproducibility, which is the crucial assumption in the gating approach. We also demonstrated the use of the model as a simulation tool to establish a patient-specific relationship between residual motion and the width of the gating window. In conclusion, the implemented method yields an estimation of the repeatability of the internal anatomy configuration during gated treatments, which can be used for further studies concerning the dosimetric impact of the estimated residual organ motion.

  9. Wall motion estimation in intracranial aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Oubel, E; Cebral, J R; De Craene, M; Blanc, R; Blasco, J; Macho, J; Putman, C M; Frangi, A F

    2010-09-01

    The quantification of wall motion in cerebral aneurysms is becoming important owing to its potential connection to rupture, and as a way to incorporate the effects of vascular compliance in computational fluid dynamics simulations. Most of papers report values obtained with experimental phantoms, simulated images or animal models, but the information for real patients is limited. In this paper, we have combined non-rigid registration with signal processing techniques to measure pulsation in real patients from high frame rate digital subtraction angiography. We have obtained physiological meaningful waveforms with amplitudes in the range 0 mm-0.3 mm for a population of 18 patients including ruptured and unruptured aneurysms. Statistically significant differences in pulsation were found according to the rupture status, in agreement with differences in biomechanical properties reported in the literature.

  10. PET/CT detects abdominal wall and port site metastases of colorectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Goshen, E; Davidson, T; Aderka, D; Zwas, S T

    2006-07-01

    Abdominal wall metastases from colorectal cancer (CRC) may be resected with curative results. Such lesions, often indicators of additional intra-abdominal lesions, may appear in surgical scars, stomas and port site metastases after laparoscope-assisted surgery (LAS). Post-operative changes, primarily surgical scars, alter local physical findings making early detection of small lesions challenging. The purpose of this study was to retrospectively evaluate the contribution of PET/CT to the diagnosis of recurrent colorectal cancer in the post-operative abdominal wall. 120 patients were referred for PET/CT with suspected recurrent CRC based on clinical, radiological or laboratory findings. All underwent whole body PET/CT imaging. 12 of these 120 (10%), were found to have abdominal wall lesions. A total of 16 abdominal wall lesions were detected, located to surgical scars, stomas, drain and laparoscope ports. Additional findings on PET/CT in this group included liver metastases, intra-abdominal lesions and retroperitoneal lymph node involvement. In general, the patients in this small group were young with high grade tumours presenting in advanced stages. In conclusion, PET/CT appears to be a sensitive tool for the diagnosis of abdominal wall recurrence of CRC. The accuracy of localization afforded by the fused functional and anatomic images makes PET/CT a likely tool for diagnosing abdominal wall lesions, including port site metastases of other aetiologies.

  11. Reconstruction of abdominal wall musculofascial defects with small intestinal submucosa scaffolds seeded with tenocytes in rats.

    PubMed

    Song, Zhicheng; Peng, Zhiyou; Liu, Zhengni; Yang, Jianjun; Tang, Rui; Gu, Yan

    2013-07-01

    The repair of abdominal wall defects following surgery remains a difficult challenge. Although multiple methods have been described to restore the integrity of the abdominal wall, there is no clear consensus on the ideal material for reconstruction. This study explored the feasibility of in vivo reconstruction of a rat model of an abdominal wall defect with a composite scaffold of tenocytes and porcine small intestinal submucosa (SIS). In the current study, we created a 2×1.5 cm abdominal wall defect in the anterolateral abdominal wall of Sprague-Dawley rats, which were assigned into three groups: the cell-SIS construct group, the cell-free SIS scaffold group, and the abdominal wall defect group. Tenocytes were obtained from the tendons of rat limbs. After isolation and expansion, cells (2×10(7)/mL) were seeded onto the three-layer SIS scaffolds and cultured in vitro for 5 days. Cell-SIS constructs or cell-free constructs were implanted to repair the abdominal wall defects. The results showed that the tenocytes could grow on the SIS scaffold and secreted corresponding matrices. In addition, both scaffolds could repair the abdominal wall defects with no hernia recurrence. In comparison to the cell-free SIS scaffold, the composite scaffold exhibited increased vascular regeneration and mechanical strength. Furthermore, following increased time in vivo, the mechanical strength of the composite scaffold became stronger. The results indicate that the composite scaffold can provide increased mechanical strength that may be suitable for repairing abdominal wall defects.

  12. The use of Surgisis for abdominal wall reconstruction in the separation of omphalopagus conjoined twins.

    PubMed

    Dasgupta, Roshni; Wales, Paul W; Zuker, Ronald M; Fisher, David M; Langer, Jacob C

    2007-09-01

    Abdominal wall reconstruction in omphalopagus twins poses a difficult reconstructive challenge, as separation often results in a large abdominal wall defect. A number of options are available for closure, including tissue flaps, expanders and patches made of foreign material. Surgisis is a new biodegradable small intestine scaffolding substrate that permits tissue in-growth and results in a permanent durable scar. We describe its use in abdominal wall reconstruction after separation of a set of conjoined twins. A set of omphalopagus conjoined twins shared liver and abdominal wall. After separation at 6 months of age, Twin A's abdomen could be closed primarily, but Twin B could not. A 4-ply Surgisis mesh was used in the upper abdominal closure, and a skin flap was created, to completely cover the patch. Both twins survived the operation. A small portion of the skin flap over the Surgisis broke down, healing by secondary intention. In follow up of over 18 months post procedure, there have been no wound infections and the abdominal wall is intact with no evidence of a hernia. Surgisis can be successfully used for the reconstruction of complex abdominal wall defects in the pediatric patient, including reconstruction after separation of conjoined twins.

  13. A Novel Diagnostic Aid for Detection of Intra-Abdominal Adhesions to the Anterior Abdominal Wall Using Dynamic Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Randall, David; Fenner, John; Gillott, Richard; ten Broek, Richard; Strik, Chema; Spencer, Paul; Bardhan, Karna Dev

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Abdominal adhesions can cause serious morbidity and complicate subsequent operations. Their diagnosis is often one of exclusion due to a lack of a reliable, non-invasive diagnostic technique. Development and testing of a candidate technique are described below. Method. During respiration, smooth visceral sliding motion occurs between the abdominal contents and the walls of the abdominal cavity. We describe a technique involving image segmentation and registration to calculate shear as an analogue for visceral slide based on the tracking of structures throughout the respiratory cycle. The presence of an adhesion is attributed to a resistance to visceral slide resulting in a discernible reduction in shear. The abdominal movement due to respiration is captured in sagittal dynamic MR images. Results. Clinical images were selected for analysis, including a patient with a surgically confirmed adhesion. Discernible reduction in shear was observed at the location of the adhesion while a consistent, gradually changing shear was observed in the healthy volunteers. Conclusion. The technique and its validation show encouraging results for adhesion detection but a larger study is now required to confirm its potential. PMID:26880884

  14. Primary Liver Abscess with Anterior Abdominal Wall Extension Caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex

    PubMed Central

    Kandekar, Rahul Vilas; Tiwari, Ajeet Ramamani; Kadam, Rahul; Adhikari, Devbrata Radhikamohan

    2016-01-01

    Tubercular liver abscess is generally secondary to some other primary foci in the body, most notably pulmonary and gastrointestinal system. To find primary tubercular liver abscess is rare, with prevalence of 0.34% in patients with hepatic tuberculosis. Abscess tracking into abdominal wall from spinal and para spinal tuberculosis is known, however primary liver tuberculosis rupturing into anterior abdominal wall has been reported only twice in literature. We report a case of 43-year-old female with direct invasion of the anterior abdominal wall from an isolated tubercular parenchymal liver abscess, caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex, diagnosed primarily on smear for Acid Fast Bacilli (AFB), imaging and isolated by culture and BACTEC MGIT 960 KIT. We discuss here the diagnostic dilemma, management and outcome of primary tubercular liver parenchymal abscess with direct invasion into anterior abdominal wall. PMID:28050433

  15. Thoraco-abdominal wall reconstruction after surgical debulking of a giant retroperitoneal liposarcoma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Colebunders, B; Colpaert, S D M; Mertens, M; Willemsen, P

    2011-01-01

    A case of a patient with a recurrent dedifferentiated retroperitoneal liposarcoma with extensive invasion of the thoraco-abdominal wall including the skin, requiring reconstructive surgery after debulking of the tumor is reported.

  16. [MORPHOLOGICAL PECULIARITIES OF MUSCULO-APONEUROTIC TISSUES OF ANTERIOR ABDOMINAL WALL IN PATIENTS, SUFFERING MORBID OBESITY].

    PubMed

    Usenko, O Yu; Gomolyako, I V; Kondratenko, B M; Moskalenko, V V

    2015-11-01

    Results of morphological investigation of musculo-aponeurotic structures of anterior abdominal wall were presented in the morbid obesity patients. The role of obesity as a primary cause for morphofunctional insufficience of musculo-aponeurotic structures was established.

  17. Severe cellulitis and abdominal wall emphysema following laparoscopic colonic surgery: A case report.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Ryo; Kameyama, Hitoshi; Chida, Tadasu; Kanda, Tatsuo; Kano, Yosuke; Ichikawa, Hiroshi; Hanyu, Takaaki; Ishikawa, Takashi; Kosugi, Shin-Ichi; Wakai, Toshifumi

    2015-05-01

    Abdominal wall emphysema is a common complication of laparoscopic surgery. This condition is usually harmless; however, if an infection occurs, it can develop into a serious condition such as necrotizing fasciitis. We report a case of a 51-year-old woman suffering from severe cellulitis that spread from an area of abdominal wall emphysema after laparoscopic surgery for sigmoid colon cancer. Recognizing this complication, early diagnosis, and prompt treatment are cornerstones for successful management of this potentially fatal disease.

  18. Reproducibility of The Abdominal and Chest Wall Position by Voluntary Breath-Hold Technique Using a Laser-Based Monitoring and Visual Feedback System

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Katsumasa . E-mail: nakam@radiol.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp; Shioyama, Yoshiyuki; Nomoto, Satoru; Ohga, Saiji; Toba, Takashi; Yoshitake, Tadamasa; Anai, Shigeo; Terashima, Hiromi; Honda, Hiroshi

    2007-05-01

    Purpose: The voluntary breath-hold (BH) technique is a simple method to control the respiration-related motion of a tumor during irradiation. However, the abdominal and chest wall position may not be accurately reproduced using the BH technique. The purpose of this study was to examine whether visual feedback can reduce the fluctuation in wall motion during BH using a new respiratory monitoring device. Methods and Materials: We developed a laser-based BH monitoring and visual feedback system. For this study, five healthy volunteers were enrolled. The volunteers, practicing abdominal breathing, performed shallow end-expiration BH (SEBH), shallow end-inspiration BH (SIBH), and deep end-inspiration BH (DIBH) with or without visual feedback. The abdominal and chest wall positions were measured at 80-ms intervals during BHs. Results: The fluctuation in the chest wall position was smaller than that of the abdominal wall position. The reproducibility of the wall position was improved by visual feedback. With a monitoring device, visual feedback reduced the mean deviation of the abdominal wall from 2.1 {+-} 1.3 mm to 1.5 {+-} 0.5 mm, 2.5 {+-} 1.9 mm to 1.1 {+-} 0.4 mm, and 6.6 {+-} 2.4 mm to 2.6 {+-} 1.4 mm in SEBH, SIBH, and DIBH, respectively. Conclusions: Volunteers can perform the BH maneuver in a highly reproducible fashion when informed about the position of the wall, although in the case of DIBH, the deviation in the wall position remained substantial.

  19. Power optimization for domain wall motion in ferromagnetic nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tretiakov, O. A.; Liu, Y.; Abanov, Ar.

    2011-04-01

    The current mediated domain-wall dynamics in a thin ferromagnetic wire is investigated. We derive the effective equations of motion of the domain wall. They are used to study the possibility to optimize the power supplied by electric current for the motion of domain walls in a nanowire. We show that a certain resonant time-dependent current moving a domain wall can significantly reduce the Joule heating in the wire, and thus it can lead to a novel proposal for the most energy efficient memory devices. We discuss how Gilbert damping, nonadiabatic spin transfer torque, and the presence of Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction can effect this power optimization.

  20. The surface landmarks of the abdominal wall: a plea for standardization

    PubMed Central

    Cirocchi, Roberto; Boselli, Carlo; Renzi, Claudio; Cagini, Lucio; Boccolini, Andrea; Noya, Giuseppe; Fingerhut, Abe

    2014-01-01

    Despite centuries of anatomical studies, controversies and contradictions still exist in the literature regarding the definition, anatomical terminology and the limits of the abdominal wall. We conducted a systematic research of books published from 1901 until December 2012 in Google Books. After the index screening, 16 remaining books were further assessed for eligibility. We decided to exclude journals. The aim of the study was to focus on surface landmarks and borders of the abdominal cavity. After this revision of the literature, we propose that the surface landmarks of the abdominal wall should be standardized. PMID:25097589

  1. Magnetization reversal in ferromagnetic spirals via domain wall motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumm, Ryan D.; Kunz, Andrew

    2016-11-01

    Domain wall dynamics have been investigated in a variety of ferromagnetic nanostructures for potential applications in logic, sensing, and recording. We present a combination of analytic and simulated results describing the reliable field driven motion of a domain wall through the arms of a ferromagnetic spiral nanowire. The spiral geometry is capable of taking advantage of the benefits of both straight and circular wires. Measurements of the in-plane components of the spirals' magnetization can be used to determine the angular location of the domain wall, impacting the magnetoresistive applications dependent on the domain wall location. The spirals' magnetization components are found to depend on the spiral parameters: the initial radius and spacing between spiral arms, along with the domain wall location. The magnetization is independent of the parameters of the rotating field used to move the domain wall, and therefore the model is valid for current induced domain wall motion as well. The speed of the domain wall is found to depend on the frequency of the rotating driving field, and the domain wall speeds can be reliably varied over several orders of magnitude. We further demonstrate a technique capable of injecting multiple domain walls and show the reliable and unidirectional motion of domain walls through the arms of the spiral.

  2. Study of Individual Characteristic Abdominal Wall Thickness Based on Magnetic Anchored Surgical Instruments

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Ding-Hui; Liu, Wen-Yan; Feng, Hai-Bo; Fu, Yi-Li; Huang, Shi; Xiang, Jun-Xi; Lyu, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Magnetic anchored surgical instruments (MASI), relying on magnetic force, can break through the limitations of the single port approach in dexterity. Individual characteristic abdominal wall thickness (ICAWT) deeply influences magnetic force that determines the safety of MASI. The purpose of this study was to research the abdominal wall characteristics in MASI applied environment to find ICAWT, and then construct an artful method to predict ICAWT, resulting in better safety and feasibility for MASI. Methods: For MASI, ICAWT is referred to the thickness of thickest point in the applied environment. We determined ICAWT through finding the thickest point in computed tomography scans. We also investigated the traits of abdominal wall thickness to discover the factor that can be used to predict ICAWT. Results: Abdominal wall at C point in the middle third lumbar vertebra plane (L3) is the thickest during chosen points. Fat layer thickness plays a more important role in abdominal wall thickness than muscle layer thickness. “BMI-ICAWT” curve was obtained based on abdominal wall thickness of C point in L3 plane, and the expression was as follow: f(x) = P1 × x2 + P2 × x + P3, where P1 = 0.03916 (0.01776, 0.06056), P2 = 1.098 (0.03197, 2.164), P3 = −18.52 (−31.64, −5.412), R-square: 0.99. Conclusions: Abdominal wall thickness of C point at L3 could be regarded as ICAWT. BMI could be a reliable predictor of ICAWT. In the light of “BMI-ICAWT” curve, we may conveniently predict ICAWT by BMI, resulting a better safety and feasibility for MASI. PMID:26228215

  3. Abdominal and scrotal wall emphysema in a patient with severe ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Manik; Thandassery, Ragesh Babu; Hilli, Shatha Al; Kaabi, Saad Al

    2014-07-01

    Severe ulcerative colitis can be associated with bowel perforation. Bowel perforation rarely leads on to abdominal wall and scrotal wall emphysema. Bowel perforation in such cases can be spontaneous or iatrogenic (colonoscopy-related). We report a rare scenario where a patient presented with abdominal wall and scrotal emphysema after topical corticosteroid enema-induced traumatic rectal perforation. Topical corticosteroids were stopped immediately after identification of rectal perforation. The patient was managed conservatively with intravenous antibiotics. With this report we intend to sensitise clinicians and topical enema manufacturers regarding this rare complication.

  4. [Approaches to the abdominal cavity and closure of the abdominal wall].

    PubMed

    Dittmar, Y; Rauchfuss, F; Ardelt, M; Settmacher, U

    2011-12-01

    Although minimally invasive approaches to the abdominal cavity are becoming increasingly more important, open surgical techniques are still of essential interest and must be mastered by general and visceral surgeons. The choice of the particular approach depends on the specificity and location of the scheduled procedure. The following article is intended to give an overview on the current literature as well as experiences in the field of open surgical approaches to the abdominal cavity.

  5. Primary closure of the abdominal wall after "open abdomen" situation.

    PubMed

    Kääriäinen, M; Kuokkanen, H

    2013-01-01

    "Open abdomen" is a strategy used to avoid or treat abdominal compartment syndrome. It has reduced mortality both in trauma and non-trauma abdominal catastrophes but also has created a challenging clinical problem. Traditionally, open abdomen is closed in two phases; primarily with a free skin graft and later with a flap reconstruction. A modern trend is to close the abdomen within the initial hospitalization. This requires multi-professional co-operation. Temporary abdominal closure methods, e.g. negative pressure wound therapy alone or combined with mesh-mediated traction, have been developed to facilitate direct fascial closure. Components separation technique, mesh reinforcement or bridging of the fascial defect with mesh and perforator saving skin undermining can be utilized in the final closure if needed. These techniques can be combined. Choice of the treatment depends on the condition of the patient and size of the fascia and skin defect, and the state of the abdominal contents. In this paper we review the literature on the closure of an open abdomen and present the policy used in our institution in the open abdomen situations.

  6. Paragonimiasis mimicking chest cancer and abdominal wall metastaisis: A case report

    PubMed Central

    ZHOU, RONGXING; ZHANG, MINJIA; CHENG, NANSHENG; ZHOU, YONG

    2016-01-01

    Typical human paragonimiasis demonstrates an elevated eosinophil count, positive immunoblot, nodular shadows of the lung and pleural thickening with pleural effusion, and these symptoms may be confused with chest cancer. In the present case, a rare case of human paragonimiasis mimicking chest cancer and abdominal wall metastasis is described, the 39-year-old male patient was admitted in our hospital for cough, weight loss 5 kg and a firm mass in right upper abdominal wall. The laboratory test showed unremarkable hematology and biochemistry results. Chest X-ray, Plain computed tomography of the chest and abdomen showed right pleural effusion, several nodules in right lower lung and a mass in the right upper abdominal wall. The initial diagnosis was lung or chest cancer with abdominal wall metastasis, and the abdominal wall mass was resected for the final diagnosis. The biopsy revealed eosinophilic granuloma with Charcot-Leyden crystal formation infiltrated in the muscular fibers. Subsequent to assessment of the antibodies against parasites, the final diagnosis of paragonimiasis was made. PMID:27313691

  7. Testicular Ectopia in the Anterior Abdominal Wall of a Neonate: A Rare Site of Ectopic Testis

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqui, Salman Atiq; Marei, Tamer Ibrahim; Al-Makhaita, Ghada

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 3-day Final Diagnosis: Ectopic right testis in anterior abdominal wall Symptoms: — Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Testicular ultrasound and MRI abdomen Specialty: Radiology Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Abnormal testicular descent can either be undescended or, less commonly, ectopic. Most undescended testes complete the course of descent by the first year of life only if these remain in the normal path of descent. The deviation of the testis may occur to an ectopic location during the transinguinal phase. Of the known ectopic sites, the anterior abdominal wall is the rarest site of testicular ectopia and to our knowledge only 3 cases of this nature have been reported in the available literature to date. Case Report: This rare case of testicular ectopia occurred in a 3-day-old boy in whom the right scrotal sac was empty; on abdominal ultrasound, the right testis was found in the subcutaneous tissues of the right antero-lateral abdominal wall. These findings were confirmed on abdominal MRI, where the right testis was seen beneath the skin between the subcutaneous tissues and external oblique aponeurosis. No aponeurotic or muscular defect was appreciable under the abdominal wall. The neonate underwent orchiopexy at the age of 6 months and remained uneventful postoperatively. Conclusions: Preoperative imaging is recommended to detect and confirm the ectopic site as well as the morphology of testis, thereby increasing the chance of surveillance and preservation of an ectopic testis. Imaging can serve as preoperative road mapping to localize the exact site for surgical exploration of an ectopic testis if there is no apparent or palpable swelling over the anterior abdominal wall. PMID:27411886

  8. Texture analysis improves level set segmentation of the anterior abdominal wall

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhoubing; Allen, Wade M.; Baucom, Rebeccah B.; Poulose, Benjamin K.; Landman, Bennett A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The treatment of ventral hernias (VH) has been a challenging problem for medical care. Repair of these hernias is fraught with failure; recurrence rates ranging from 24% to 43% have been reported, even with the use of biocompatible mesh. Currently, computed tomography (CT) is used to guide intervention through expert, but qualitative, clinical judgments, notably, quantitative metrics based on image-processing are not used. The authors propose that image segmentation methods to capture the three-dimensional structure of the abdominal wall and its abnormalities will provide a foundation on which to measure geometric properties of hernias and surrounding tissues and, therefore, to optimize intervention. Methods: In this study with 20 clinically acquired CT scans on postoperative patients, the authors demonstrated a novel approach to geometric classification of the abdominal. The authors’ approach uses a texture analysis based on Gabor filters to extract feature vectors and follows a fuzzy c-means clustering method to estimate voxelwise probability memberships for eight clusters. The memberships estimated from the texture analysis are helpful to identify anatomical structures with inhomogeneous intensities. The membership was used to guide the level set evolution, as well as to derive an initial start close to the abdominal wall. Results: Segmentation results on abdominal walls were both quantitatively and qualitatively validated with surface errors based on manually labeled ground truth. Using texture, mean surface errors for the outer surface of the abdominal wall were less than 2 mm, with 91% of the outer surface less than 5 mm away from the manual tracings; errors were significantly greater (2–5 mm) for methods that did not use the texture. Conclusions: The authors’ approach establishes a baseline for characterizing the abdominal wall for improving VH care. Inherent texture patterns in CT scans are helpful to the tissue classification, and texture

  9. Texture analysis improves level set segmentation of the anterior abdominal wall

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Zhoubing; Allen, Wade M.; Baucom, Rebeccah B.; Poulose, Benjamin K.; Landman, Bennett A.

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: The treatment of ventral hernias (VH) has been a challenging problem for medical care. Repair of these hernias is fraught with failure; recurrence rates ranging from 24% to 43% have been reported, even with the use of biocompatible mesh. Currently, computed tomography (CT) is used to guide intervention through expert, but qualitative, clinical judgments, notably, quantitative metrics based on image-processing are not used. The authors propose that image segmentation methods to capture the three-dimensional structure of the abdominal wall and its abnormalities will provide a foundation on which to measure geometric properties of hernias and surrounding tissues and, therefore, to optimize intervention.Methods: In this study with 20 clinically acquired CT scans on postoperative patients, the authors demonstrated a novel approach to geometric classification of the abdominal. The authors’ approach uses a texture analysis based on Gabor filters to extract feature vectors and follows a fuzzy c-means clustering method to estimate voxelwise probability memberships for eight clusters. The memberships estimated from the texture analysis are helpful to identify anatomical structures with inhomogeneous intensities. The membership was used to guide the level set evolution, as well as to derive an initial start close to the abdominal wall.Results: Segmentation results on abdominal walls were both quantitatively and qualitatively validated with surface errors based on manually labeled ground truth. Using texture, mean surface errors for the outer surface of the abdominal wall were less than 2 mm, with 91% of the outer surface less than 5 mm away from the manual tracings; errors were significantly greater (2–5 mm) for methods that did not use the texture.Conclusions: The authors’ approach establishes a baseline for characterizing the abdominal wall for improving VH care. Inherent texture patterns in CT scans are helpful to the tissue classification, and texture

  10. Ectodermal Wnt signaling regulates abdominal myogenesis during ventral body wall development.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lingling; Li, Hanjun; Yu, Jian; Cao, Jingjing; Chen, Huihui; Zhao, Haixia; Zhao, Jianzhi; Yao, Yiyun; Cheng, Huihui; Wang, Lifang; Zhou, Rujiang; Yao, Zhengju; Guo, Xizhi

    2014-03-01

    Defects of the ventral body wall are prevalent birth anomalies marked by deficiencies in body wall closure, hypoplasia of the abdominal musculature and multiple malformations across a gamut of organs. However, the mechanisms underlying ventral body wall defects remain elusive. Here, we investigated the role of Wnt signaling in ventral body wall development by inactivating Wls or β-catenin in murine abdominal ectoderm. The loss of Wls in the ventral epithelium, which blocks the secretion of Wnt proteins, resulted in dysgenesis of ventral musculature and genito-urinary tract during embryonic development. Molecular analyses revealed that the dermis and myogenic differentiation in the underlying mesenchymal progenitor cells was perturbed by the loss of ectodermal Wls. The activity of the Wnt-Pitx2 axis was impaired in the ventral mesenchyme of the mutant body wall, which partially accounted for the defects in ventral musculature formation. In contrast, epithelial depletion of β-catenin or Wnt5a did not resemble the body wall defects in the ectodermal Wls mutant. These findings indicate that ectodermal Wnt signaling instructs the underlying mesodermal specification and abdominal musculature formation during ventral body wall development, adding evidence to the theory that ectoderm-mesenchyme signaling is a potential unifying mechanism for the origin of ventral body wall defects.

  11. Use of a hand-held Doppler to avoid abdominal wall vessels in laparoscopic surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Whiteley, M. S.; Laws, S. A.; Wise, M. H.

    1994-01-01

    Laparoscopy in general surgery is becoming a wide-spread technique. Substantial anterior abdominal wall haemorrhage is a recognised complication of the laparoscopic technique. Ten patients were examined with an 8 MHz hand-held Doppler and the anterior abdominal wall vessels were marked on the skin. Colour flow duplex was used to confirm the presence of vessels found in this way. All 40 epigastric arteries were marked accurately and confirmed; 75 other intramural arteries were identified, although the majority were too small for duplex confirmation. The preoperative use of hand-held Doppler is a quick and non-invasive way to identify the epigastric and larger intramural arteries. Routine use of this technique to mark abdominal wall vessels in the areas of trocar insertion should reduce this complication of laparoscopic surgery. PMID:7661918

  12. Abdominal Wall Endometriosis: Myofibroblasts as a Possible Evidence of Metaplasia: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Mohamed Gamal; Delarue, Eleonore; Abesadze, Elene; Haas, Matthias; Sehouli, Jalid; Chiantera, Vito; Mechsner, Sylvia

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we report about a patient with extra-uterine endometriosis (EM) in the abdominal wall muscle with evident metaplasia based on the abundant alpha smooth muscle actin (ASMA)-expressing myofibroblasts. Laparotomy excision of the abdominal wall EM was done following ultrasonographic evidence of a hypodense swelling in the right rectus abdominis, which was confirmed by MRI. Immunohistochemistry staining for ASMA and collagen I was done, with the results confirming that endometriotic stromal cells expressed both. Anterior abdominal wall endometriosis was suspected because of the patient's history of recurrent EM combined with the cyclic nature of symptoms. MRI is useful in determining the extent of the disease. In case of persisting symptoms even under hormonal treatment, surgical excision is mandatory. The expression of both ASMA and collagen I in and around EM lesions supports the notion of the metaplastic process in the course of disease development.

  13. Congenital defects of the abdominal wall. A review of the experience in New Mexico.

    PubMed

    Klein, M D; Kosloske, A M; Hertzler, J H

    1981-04-24

    Omphalocele, umbilical cord hernia, and gastroschisis are surgically correctable defects of the abdominal wall. Each of these defects has a distinct embryologic basis that results in a characteristic clinical picture. Twenty-five infants with congenital defects of the abdominal wall were treated at the University of New Mexico Hospital in the past four years. Six infants had omphalocele, one had umbilical cord hernia, and 18 had gastroschisis. Survival among infants who underwent a corrective operation was as follows: omphalocele, 50%; umbilical cord hernia, 100%; and gastroschisis, 82%. Long-term survival for the entire group was 72% (18/25). Gastroschisis, which had a lower incidence of major associated anomalies, had a better prognosis than omphalocele. The mortality of congenital abdominal wall defects was related to presence of severe associated anomalies and to poor clinical condition on admission. Prompt and informed initial care may increase the chance of survival.

  14. Living donor liver transplantation with abdominal wall reconstruction for hepatocellular carcinoma with needle track seeding

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Horng-Ren; Thorat, Ashok; Gesakis, Kanellos; Li, Ping-Chun; Kiranantawat, Kidakorn; Chen, Hung Chi; Jeng, Long-Bin

    2015-01-01

    Malignant cell seeding in subcutaneous tissues along the needle track and/or percutaneous biliary drainage catheters is rare complication, but pose various technical issues in planning surgical treatment of such patients. If underlying primary hepatic malignancy can be treated, an aggressive resection of subcutaneous tissue bearing cancer cell with subsequent abdominal wall reconstruction has been sporadically reported. But, when hepatic resection is not possible due to underlying advanced cirrhosis, liver transplantation along with abdominal wall resection and subsequent reconstruction remains only feasible option. Herein, we describe our successful experience of living donor liver transplantation for hepatocellular carcinoma with full-thickness abdominal wall resection bearing the tumor seeding followed by reconstruction in single stage surgery. PMID:26722665

  15. Intraventricular flow alterations due to dyssynchronous wall motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pope, Audrey M.; Lai, Hong Kuan; Samaee, Milad; Santhanakrishnan, Arvind

    2015-11-01

    Roughly 30% of patients with systolic heart failure suffer from left ventricular dyssynchrony (LVD), in which mechanical discoordination of the ventricle walls leads to poor hemodynamics and suboptimal cardiac function. There is currently no clear mechanistic understanding of how abnormalities in septal-lateral (SL) wall motion affects left ventricle (LV) function, which is needed to improve the treatment of LVD using cardiac resynchronization therapy. We use an experimental flow phantom with an LV physical model to study mechanistic effects of SL wall motion delay on LV function. To simulate mechanical LVD, two rigid shafts were coupled to two segments (apical and mid sections) along the septal wall of the LV model. Flow through the LV model was driven using a piston pump, and stepper motors coupled to the above shafts were used to locally perturb the septal wall segments relative to the pump motion. 2D PIV was used to examine the intraventricular flow through the LV physical model. Alterations to SL delay results in a reduction in the kinetic energy (KE) of the flow field compared to synchronous SL motion. The effect of varying SL motion delay from 0% (synchronous) to 100% (out-of-phase) on KE and viscous dissipation will be presented. This research was supported by the Oklahoma Center for Advancement of Science and Technology (HR14-022).

  16. Free-breathing black-blood CINE fast-spin echo imaging for measuring abdominal aortic wall distensibility: A feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jyh-Miin; Patterson, Andrew; Chao, Tzu-Cheng; Zhu, Chengcheng; Chang, Hing-Chiu; Mendes, Jason; Chung, Hsiao-Wen; Gillard, Jonathan; Graves, Martin

    2017-03-22

    The paper reports a free-breathing black-blood CINE fast-spin echo (FSE) technique for measuring abdominal aortic wall motion. The free-breathing CINE FSE includes the following MR techniques: 1) variable-density sampling with fast iterative reconstruction; 2) inner-volume imaging; and 3) a blood-suppression preparation pulse. The proposed technique was evaluated in eight healthy subjects. The inner-volume imaging significantly reduced the intraluminal artifacts of respiratory motion (p = 0.015). The quantitative measurements were a diameter of 16.3 ± 2.8 mm and wall distensibility of 2.0 ± 0.4 mm (12.5 ± 3.4%) and 0.7 ± 0.3 mm (4.1 ± 1.0%) for the anterior and posterior walls, respectively. The cyclic cross-sectional distensibility was 35 ± 15% greater in the systolic phase than in the diastolic phase. In conclusion, we developed a feasible CINE FSE method to measure the motion of the abdominal aortic wall, which will enable clinical scientists to study the elasticity of the abdominal aorta.

  17. Inspiratory flow rate, not type of incentive spirometry device, influences chest wall motion in healthy individuals.

    PubMed

    Chang, Angela T; Palmer, Kerry R; McNaught, Jessie; Thomas, Peter J

    2010-08-01

    This study investigated the effect of flow rates and spirometer type on chest wall motion in healthy individuals. Twenty-one healthy volunteers completed breathing trials to either two times tidal volume (2xV(T)) or inspiratory capacity (IC) at high, low, or natural flow rates, using a volume- or flow-oriented spirometer. The proportions of rib cage movement to tidal volume (%RC/V(T)), chest wall diameters, and perceived level of exertion (RPE) were compared. Low and natural flow rates resulted in significantly lower %RC/V(T) compared to high flow rate trials (p=0.001) at 2xV(T). Low flow trials also resulted in significantly less chest wall motion in the upper anteroposterior direction than high and natural flow rates (p<0.001). At IC, significantly greater movement occurred in the abdominal lateral direction during low flow compared to high and natural flow trials (both p<0.003). RPE was lower for the low flow trials compared to high flow trials at IC and 2xV(T) (p<0.01). In healthy individuals, inspiratory flow (not device type) during incentive spirometry determines the resultant breathing pattern. High flow rates result in greater chest wall motion than low flow rates.

  18. A Four-Dimensional Computed Tomography Analysis of Multiorgan Abdominal Motion

    SciTech Connect

    Hallman, Joshua L.; Mori, Shinichiro; Sharp, Gregory C.; Lu, Hsiao-Ming; Hong, Theodore S.; Chen, George T.Y.

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: To characterize and quantify multiorgan respiration-induced motion in the abdomen in liver and pancreatic cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Four-dimensional computed tomography scans were acquired for 18 patients treated for abdominal tumors. Contours of multiple abdominal organs were drawn by the radiation oncologist at one respiratory phase; these contours were propagated to other respiratory phases by deformable registration. Three-dimensional organ models were generated from the resulting contours at each phase. Motions of the bounding box and center of mass were extracted and analyzed for the clinical target volume and organs at risk. Results: On average, the center of mass motion for liver clinical target volumes was 9.7 mm (SD 5 mm) in the superior-inferior direction, with a range of 3 to 18 mm; for pancreatic tumors, the average was 5 mm (SD 1 mm) m with a range of 3 to 7 mm. Abdominal organs move in unison, but with varying amplitudes. Gating near exhale (T40-T60) reduces the range of motion by a factor of {approx}10. Conclusion: We have used deformable registration to calculate the trajectories of abdominal organs in four dimensions, based on center of mass and bounding box motion metrics. Our results are compared with previously reported studies. Possible reasons for differences are discussed.

  19. Abdominal wall reconstruction after extensive abdominal wall necrosis resulting from chevron incision for liver transplant and subsequent Y-shaped incision for re-transplantation--clinical experience and literature review.

    PubMed

    Rieger, Ulrich M; Petschke, Fabian; Djedovic, Gabriel; Engelhardt, Timm O; Biebl, Matthias; Pierer, Gerhard

    2012-03-01

    Extensive Abdominal wall necrosis is a devastating complication. In visceral transplant patients a quick and easy to perform reconstructive technique may be crucial for patient survival. Based on a clinical case a literature review is performed including a thorough analysis of abdominal wall perfusion and surgical options for defect closure are presented and critically appraised.

  20. Aesthetic and functional abdominal wall reconstruction after multiple bowel perforations secondary to liposuction.

    PubMed

    Di Candia, Michele; Malata, Charles M

    2011-04-01

    This report describes a case of aesthetic and functional abdominal wall reconstruction performed to salvage a deformed, scarred, and herniated anterior abdomen after severe peritonitis and partial rectus muscle necrosis secondary to multiple bowel perforations sustained during liposuction performed in a cosmetic clinic. The diagnosis of intestinal perforation was missed intraoperatively and in the immediate postoperative period. The patient was admitted 4 days after the surgery to the intensive therapy unit in septicemic shock. After resuscitation and stabilization, she was treated by debridement of the abdominal wall, bowel resection, and temporary jejunostomy and colostomy (reversed 10 months later). She was referred 18 months after liposuction to the Plastic Surgery Service with a large central midline abdominal incisional hernia presenting with thinned out skin (14 × 11 cm) overlying adherent bowel. A components separation technique was successfully used to reconstruct the abdominal wall, with no recurrent herniation 2 years later. Survivors of bowel perforations sustained during abdominal liposuction may later present with challenging aesthetic and functional problems, as described in this report. These long-term sequelae have not been addressed hitherto in the literature.

  1. Semiautomatic vessel wall detection and quantification of wall thickness in computed tomography images of human abdominal aortic aneurysms

    SciTech Connect

    Shum, Judy; DiMartino, Elena S.; Goldhammer, Adam; Goldman, Daniel H.; Acker, Leah C.; Patel, Gopal; Ng, Julie H.; Martufi, Giampaolo; Finol, Ender A.

    2010-02-15

    Purpose: Quantitative measurements of wall thickness in human abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) may lead to more accurate methods for the evaluation of their biomechanical environment. Methods: The authors describe an algorithm for estimating wall thickness in AAAs based on intensity histograms and neural networks involving segmentation of contrast enhanced abdominal computed tomography images. The algorithm was applied to ten ruptured and ten unruptured AAA image data sets. Two vascular surgeons manually segmented the lumen, inner wall, and outer wall of each data set and a reference standard was defined as the average of their segmentations. Reproducibility was determined by comparing the reference standard to lumen contours generated automatically by the algorithm and a commercially available software package. Repeatability was assessed by comparing the lumen, outer wall, and inner wall contours, as well as wall thickness, made by the two surgeons using the algorithm. Results: There was high correspondence between automatic and manual measurements for the lumen area (r=0.978 and r=0.996 for ruptured and unruptured aneurysms, respectively) and between vascular surgeons (r=0.987 and r=0.992 for ruptured and unruptured aneurysms, respectively). The authors' automatic algorithm showed better results when compared to the reference with an average lumen error of 3.69%, which is less than half the error between the commercially available application Simpleware and the reference (7.53%). Wall thickness measurements also showed good agreement between vascular surgeons with average coefficients of variation of 10.59% (ruptured aneurysms) and 13.02% (unruptured aneurysms). Ruptured aneurysms exhibit significantly thicker walls (1.78{+-}0.39 mm) than unruptured ones (1.48{+-}0.22 mm), p=0.044. Conclusions: While further refinement is needed to fully automate the outer wall segmentation algorithm, these preliminary results demonstrate the method's adequate reproducibility

  2. a Numerical Investigation of Magnetic Domain Wall Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, George Nicholas

    1993-01-01

    Numerical simulation has given new insight into magnetization dynamics in thin films. This thesis reports on a numerical investigation of magnetic domain wall motion in thin iron garnet films. The magnetization is modeled as a continuum field with constant magnitude, subject to exchange, anisotropy, magnetic interactions, and an external drive field. The features of these systems are domains, walls, and lines. A co-moving formulation of the Landau -Lifshitz-Gilbert equation was developed and implemented on the Connection Machine 2. This approach allowed the investigation of large systems for useful length and time scales. This investigation confirms several mechanisms of domain wall motion and reports on one which is new. At low drive fields, the domain wall moves with a constant velocity and time-invariant profile. Beyond a critical field, a single horizontal Bloch line (HBL) is formed and moves through the wall. The HBL reduces the wall mobility and the average wall velocity varies quadratically with the applied field. At larger fields, HBLs are formed in the center of the wall by a local breakdown mechanism, nucleating a pair of HBLs. The HBLs propagate to the surface of the material where they unwind, and the process repeats. The domain wall velocity is a weak function of the external field in this region. The motion of a domain wall in a stripe array is also described and compared with experiment. Simulation results corroborate the features of overshoot and wall oscillation observed in experimental data, and indicate that they are due to the presence of an HBL in the wall. Comparison of the overall time scale indicates that the gyromagnetic ratio is incorrect for this material. This investigation also reports on the statics and dynamics of vertical Bloch line (VBL) pairs. The structure of a domain wall containing two pi VBLs, and a single 2pi VBL has been determined. The VBLs inhibit the formation of HBLs and significantly reduce wall mobility. The 2pi VBL

  3. Mechanical Actuation of Magnetic Domain-Wall Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Se Kwon; Hill, Daniel; Tserkovnyak, Yaroslav

    2016-12-01

    We theoretically study the motion of a magnetic domain wall induced by transverse elastic waves in a one-dimensional magnetic wire, which respects both rotational and translational symmetries. By invoking the conservation of the associated total angular and linear momenta, we are able to derive the torque and the force on the domain wall exerted by the waves. We then show how ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic domain walls can be driven by circularly and linearly polarized waves, respectively. We envision that elastic waves may provide effective means to drive the dynamics of magnetic solitons in insulators.

  4. Domain wall motion in synthetic Co2Si nanowires.

    PubMed

    Liu, Gang; Lin, Yung-Chen; Liao, Lei; Liu, Lixin; Chen, Yu; Liu, Yuan; Weiss, Nathan O; Zhou, Hailong; Huang, Yu; Duan, Xiangfeng

    2012-04-11

    We report the synthesis of single crystalline Co(2)Si nanowires and the electrical transport studies of single Co(2)Si nanowire devices at low temperature. The butterfly shaped magnetoresistance shows interesting ferromagnetic features, including negative magnetoresistance, hysteretic switch fields, and stepwise drops in magnetoresistance. The nonsmooth stepwise magnetoresistance response is attributed to magnetic domain wall pinning and depinning motion in the Co(2)Si nanowires probably at crystal or morphology defects. The temperature dependence of the domain wall depinning field is observed and described by a model based on thermally assisted domain wall depinning over a single energy barrier.

  5. Abdominal wall injuries: rectus abdominis strains, oblique strains, rectus sheath hematoma.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Rob

    2006-04-01

    Abdominal wall injuries are reported to be less common than actually perceived by sports medicine practitioners. National Collegiate Athletic Association injury statistics for 2004-2005 cite a high of 0.71 abdominal muscle injuries per 1000 player-hours in wrestling competition to a low of 0.01 injuries per 1000 player-hours in autumn football practices. British professional soccer clubs reported an incidence of "torso" injuries of up to 7% of all injuries over the course of several seasons. Injury definition is most likely the explanation for this discrepancy. The abdominal wall muscles (rectus abdominis, external and internal obliques, and transverse abdominis) are injured by direct blows to the abdomen or by sudden or repetitive trunk movement, either rotation or flexion/extension. With the exception of the rare rectus sheath hematoma that does not self-tamponade, the treatment for these problems is nonoperative with symptoms guiding rehabilitation and return to play decisions.

  6. QUALITY OF LIFE OF IN PATIENTS SUBMITTED TO ANTERIOR ABDOMINAL WALL LAPAROSCOPIC HERNIOPLASTY

    PubMed Central

    ABDALLA, Ricardo Zugaib; GARCIA, Rodrigo Biscuola; SAID, Danniel Frade; ABDALLA, Beatrice Martinez Zugaib

    2014-01-01

    Background The laparoscopic ventral hernia repair technique made possible surgeries with smaller skin incisions and smaller dissection of the soft tissue around the hernia, therefore with a better wound, a quicker postoperative recovery and a lower complication rate. Aim To evaluate the applicability of a quality of life survey based on the molds of the American Hernia Society, European Hernia Society and Carolinas Equation for Quality of Life, through telephone in patients submitted to laparoscopic hernioplasty by IPOM technique. Methods A retrospective cohort study was made to evaluate the quality of life of 21 patients that underwent anterior abdominal wall laparoscopic hernioplasty by intraperitoneal onlay mesh technique. Questionnaire was applied through telephone. Results Of the 21 patients, 19% felt that the hernia recurred. Also 19% passed through another abdominal wall surgery, and among these, 75% was related to the previously hernia correction. Finally, 81% of patients did not undergo any other abdominal wall surgery. Conclusion It was possible to apply the quality of life questionnary by telephone on patients who underwent an anterior abdominal wall. The results, in its turn, were satisfactory and showed that patients, in general, were satisfied with the surgical procedure. PMID:24676295

  7. Urinary bladder herniation through a caudoventral abdominal wall defect in a mature cat.

    PubMed

    Neville-Towle, Jack; Sakals, Sherisse

    2015-09-01

    A 16-year-old spayed female domestic shorthair cat with no history of trauma was presented to the Western College of Veterinary Medicine for assessment of urinary incontinence. Diagnostic investigation revealed herniation of the urinary bladder through a caudoventral abdominal wall defect. Clinical signs resolved after surgical reduction of the bladder.

  8. Ferroelectric domain wall motion induced by polarized light

    PubMed Central

    Rubio-Marcos, Fernando; Del Campo, Adolfo; Marchet, Pascal; Fernández, Jose F.

    2015-01-01

    Ferroelectric materials exhibit spontaneous and stable polarization, which can usually be reoriented by an applied external electric field. The electrically switchable nature of this polarization is at the core of various ferroelectric devices. The motion of the associated domain walls provides the basis for ferroelectric memory, in which the storage of data bits is achieved by driving domain walls that separate regions with different polarization directions. Here we show the surprising ability to move ferroelectric domain walls of a BaTiO3 single crystal by varying the polarization angle of a coherent light source. This unexpected coupling between polarized light and ferroelectric polarization modifies the stress induced in the BaTiO3 at the domain wall, which is observed using in situ confocal Raman spectroscopy. This effect potentially leads to the non-contact remote control of ferroelectric domain walls by light. PMID:25779918

  9. Rectus abdominis muscle resection and fascial reconstruction for the treatment of uterine leiomyosarcoma invading the abdominal wall: a case report.

    PubMed

    Yoon, B S; Seong, S J; Song, T; Kim, M L; Kim, M K

    2014-01-01

    The authors present a case of intra-abdominal recurrent leiomyosarcoma invading a large area of the abdominal wall. The patient underwent cytoreductive surgery, including resection of the rectus abdominis muscle, followed by reconstruction of the defect using synthetic mesh. The tumor was surgically removed by en bloc resection, including most of the rectus abdominis muscle and ileum. The abdominal wall defect was repaired using synthetic mesh. The patient underwent radiotherapy and chemotherapy after the surgery and was healthy one year later.

  10. Emergency abdominal wall reconstruction with polypropylene mesh: short-term benefits versus long-term complications.

    PubMed Central

    Voyles, C R; Richardson, J D; Bland, K I; Tobin, G R; Flint, L M; Polk, H C

    1981-01-01

    The acute replacement of full-thickness abdominal wall has been facilitated by polypropylene mesh (Marlex) (PPM), allowing debridement of nonviable tissue and restoration of abdominal wall integrity without tension. However, no substantial long-term follow-up has been reported on the definitive wound coverage after the use of PPM in open wounds. Since 1976, we have placed PPM in 31 patients; 25 for infectious complication, three for massive bowel distension preventing abdominal closure, and three for shotgun wounds with extensive tissue loss. In 29 of 31 patients, the mesh was placed in heavily contaminated wounds; extensive fasciitis was present in 23 patients and 21 had intra-abdominal abscesses. Following mesh placement, 23 reoperations were required for continuing complications. No patients eviscerated, despite these multiple procedures. Polypropylene mesh was highly effective in restoring abdominal wall continuity. Despite advantages when PPM was used, significant long-term problems developed. Seven patients died from their primary illness in the postoperative period. Nine wounds were closed by granulation and subsequent split-thickness skin grafts. All nine developed mesh extrusion and/or enteric fistulae. Nine wounds healed by secondary intention, six developed enteric fistulae or continuing mesh extrusion. Full-thickness flap coverage after granulation provided the best means of wound closure. Polypropylene mesh had significant early advantages for providing abdominal wall integrity even in the presence of severe infection. However, long-term problems were common when wounds were closed to skin grafts or secondary intention. If the mesh cannot be completely removed, strong consideration should be given to myocutaneous flaps for coverage after the primary illness has resolved. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. PMID:6455099

  11. Domain wall motion driven by an oscillating magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Kyoung-Woong; Kim, Duck-Ho; Kim, Changsoo; Kim, Dae-Yun; Choe, Sug-Bong; Hwang, Chanyong

    2017-03-01

    The coherent unidirectional motion of magnetic domain walls (DWs) is a key technology used in memory and logic device applications, as demonstrated in magnetic strips by electric current flow as well as in films by oscillation of a tilted magnetic field. Here we introduce a coherent unidirectional motion of DWs in the strip, utilizing an oscillating field, which is described within a previous 1D model. The essential criterion for DW motion in this approach is the oscillating-field-induced modulation of the DW width, which has not been previously considered. This DW motion driven by width modulation sheds light on high frequency domain manipulation in spin devices. A comprehensive inspection of field angle dependence reveals that unidirectional DW motion in this model requires chiral DWs, followed by asymmetric deformation of the domain shape.

  12. Collagenopathies—Implications for Abdominal Wall Reconstruction: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Bridget; Sanniec, Kyle

    2016-01-01

    Background: The etiology of hernia formation is strongly debated and includes mechanical strain, prior surgical intervention, abnormal embryologic development, and increased intraabdominal pressure. Although the most common inciting cause in ventral hernias is previous abdominal surgery, many other factors contribute. We explore this etiology through an examination of the current literature and existing evidence on patients with collagen vascular diseases, such as Ehlers–Danlos syndrome. Methods: A systematic review of the published literature was performed of all available Spanish and English language PubMed and Cochrane articles containing the key words “collagenopathies,” “collagenopathy,” “Ehlers-Danlos,” “ventral hernia,” and “hernia.” Results: Three hundred fifty-two articles were identified in the preliminary search. After review, 61 articles were included in the final review. Conclusions: Multiple authors suggest a qualitative or quantitative defect in collagen formation as a common factor in hernia formation. High-level clinical data clearly linking collagenopathies and hernia formation are lacking. However, a trend in pathologic studies suggests a link between abnormal collagen production and/or processing that is likely associated with hernia development. PMID:27826465

  13. Differences in Otolith and Abdominal Viscera Graviceptor Dynamics: Implications for Motion Sickness and Perceived Body Position

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    vonGierke, Henning E.; Parker, Donald E.

    1993-01-01

    Human graviceptors, located in the trunk by Mittelstaedt probably transduce acceleration by abdominal viscera motion. As demonstrated previously in biodynamic vibration and impact tolerance research the thoraco-abdominal viscera exhibit a resonance at 4 to 6 Hz. Behavioral observations and mechanical models of otolith graviceptor response indicate a phase shift increasing with frequency between 0.01 and O.5 Hz. Consequently the potential exists for intermodality sensory conflict between vestibular and visceral graviceptor signals at least at the mechanical receptor level. The frequency range of this potential conflict corresponds with the primary frequency range for motion sickness incidence in transportation, in subjects rotated about Earth-horizontal axes (barbecue spit stimulation) and in periodic parabolic flight microgravity research and also for erroneous perception of vertical oscillations in helicopters. We discuss the implications of this hypothesis for previous self motion perception research and suggestions for various future studies.

  14. Free tensor fasciae latae flap for abdominal wall reconstruction: overview and new innovation.

    PubMed

    Chalfoun, Charbel T; McConnell, Michael P; Wirth, Garrett A; Brenner, Kevin A; Evans, Gregory R D; Kobayashi, Mark

    2012-03-01

    Extensive abdominal wall defects may result from tumor extirpation, traumatic injury, or soft tissue infections. Extensive traumatic injuries can often disrupt the soft tissue content of the abdomen as well as the bony support provided by the pelvis. Reconstruction of the lower abdomen should aim to recreate dynamic stability. Five patients with extensive lower abdominal wall disruption following traumatic injuries or infection were treated using a novel flap for functional reconstruction. We devised a free neurotized osteomyocutaneous tensor fasciae latae (TFL) flap that would restore bony continuity by providing a vascularized bone graft and simultaneously maintain the integrity of the attachment of the tensor fascia latae muscle to the iliac crest, reestablishing musculofascial continuity. A branch of the superior gluteal nerve was harvested with this composite flap and coapted to an intercostal nerve for reinnervation, thereby creating a dynamic muscle in these patients. All patients underwent successful free tissue reconstruction with 100% flap survival. The lower abdominal wall and bony integrity of the pelvis were successfully reconstructed. Reinnervation has shown clinical signs of maintained dynamic stability. The innervated TFL osteomyocutaneous flap is an ideal option for lower abdominal reconstruction in patients with complex abdominoperineal defects with loss of bony integrity.

  15. Fluid-structure interaction in abdominal aortic aneurysms: effects of asymmetry and wall thickness

    PubMed Central

    Scotti, Christine M; Shkolnik, Alexander D; Muluk, Satish C; Finol, Ender A

    2005-01-01

    Background Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a prevalent disease which is of significant concern because of the morbidity associated with the continuing expansion of the abdominal aorta and its ultimate rupture. The transient interaction between blood flow and the wall contributes to wall stress which, if it exceeds the failure strength of the dilated arterial wall, will lead to aneurysm rupture. Utilizing a computational approach, the biomechanical environment of virtual AAAs can be evaluated to study the affects of asymmetry and wall thickness on this stress, two parameters that contribute to increased risk of aneurysm rupture. Methods Ten virtual aneurysm models were created with five different asymmetry parameters ranging from β = 0.2 to 1.0 and either a uniform or variable wall thickness to study the flow and wall dynamics by means of fully coupled fluid-structure interaction (FSI) analyses. The AAA wall was designed to have a (i) uniform 1.5 mm thickness or (ii) variable thickness ranging from 0.5 – 1.5 mm extruded normally from the boundary surface of the lumen. These models were meshed with linear hexahedral elements, imported into a commercial finite element code and analyzed under transient flow conditions. The method proposed was then compared with traditional computational solid stress techniques on the basis of peak wall stress predictions and cost of computational effort. Results The results provide quantitative predictions of flow patterns and wall mechanics as well as the effects of aneurysm asymmetry and wall thickness heterogeneity on the estimation of peak wall stress. These parameters affect the magnitude and distribution of Von Mises stresses; varying wall thickness increases the maximum Von Mises stress by 4 times its uniform thickness counterpart. A pre-peak systole retrograde flow was observed in the AAA sac for all models, which is due to the elastic energy stored in the compliant arterial wall and the expansion force of the artery

  16. Abdominal wall Type-I complex regional pain syndrome treated effectively with peripheral nerve field stimulation: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Linqiu; Chou, Henry; Holder, Eric

    2017-01-01

    Chronic abdominal wall pain is a well-documented complication of abdominal surgery. However, abdominal wall complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a rare medical condition. We present a case of abdominal wall CRPS and its treatment with peripheral nerve field stimulation (PNfS). A 34-year-old female presented with right periumbilical pain for 2 years. She developed burning, sharp and stabbing pain with allodynia (extremely sensitive to wind and light touch) and erythema or pallor 2 weeks after an exploratory appendectomy. The extensive evaluation ruled out the underlining pathology. After she failed conservative therapies, she underwent a 7-day trial of thoracic spinal cord stimulation (SCS) and abdominal wall PNfS. Thoracic SCS failed to provide pain relief; however, PNfS provided significant relief (>90%) of burning sensation. It has now been 5 years since the PNfS was implanted and she continues to demonstrate substantial pain relief. PMID:28044002

  17. Histological characteristics of the abdominal aortic wall in patients with vascular chronic Q fever

    PubMed Central

    Hagenaars, Julia C J P; Koning, Olivier H J; van den Haak, Ronald F F; Verhoeven, Bart A N; Renders, Nicole H M; Hermans, Mirjam H A; Wever, Peter C; van Suylen, Robert Jan

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe specific histological findings of the Coxiella burnetii-infected aneurysmal abdominal aortic wall. Tissue samples of the aneurysmal abdominal aortic wall from seven patients with chronic Q fever and 15 patients without evidence of Q fever infection were analysed and compared. Chronic Q fever was diagnosed using serology and tissue PCR analysis. Histological sections were stained using haematoxylin and eosin staining, Elastica van Gieson staining and immunohistochemical staining for macrophages (CD68), T lymphocytes (CD3), T lymphocyte subsets (CD4 and CD8) and B lymphocytes (CD20). Samples were scored by one pathologist, blinded for Q fever status, using a standard score form. Seven tissue samples from patients with chronic Q fever and 15 tissue samples from patients without Q fever were collected. Four of seven chronic Q fever samples showed a necrotizing granulomatous response of the vascular wall, which was characterized by necrotic core of the arteriosclerotic plaque (P = 0.005) and a presence of high numbers of macrophages in the adventitia (P = 0.007) distributed in typical palisading formation (P = 0.005) and surrounded by the presence of high numbers of T lymphocytes located diffusely in media and adventitia. Necrotizing granulomas are a histological finding in the C. burnetii-infected aneurysmal abdominal aortic wall. Chronic Q fever should be included in the list of infectious diseases with necrotizing granulomatous response, such as tuberculosis, cat scratch disease and syphilis. PMID:24953727

  18. Pathological Analysis of the Ruptured Vascular Wall of Hypoperfusion-induced Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Animal Model.

    PubMed

    Kugo, Hirona; Zaima, Nobuhiro; Tanaka, Hiroki; Hashimoto, Keisuke; Miyamoto, Chie; Sawaragi, Ayaka; Urano, Tetsumei; Unno, Naoki; Moriyama, Tatsuya

    2017-04-04

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a vascular disease that results in the gradual dilation of the abdominal aorta and has a high rupture-related mortality rate. However, the mechanism of AAA rupture remains unknown. In our previous study, we established a novel AAA animal model (hypoperfusion-induced AAA rat model) with spontaneous AAA rupture. Using the hypoperfusion-induced AAA rat model, we demonstrated that the abnormal appearance of adipocytes in the vascular wall is associated with AAA rupture. However, pathological analysis of the rupture area has not been performed because it is particularly difficult to identify the rupture point. In this study, we succeeded in obtaining samples from the rupture point and performed a histological analysis of the ruptured area in the vascular wall in the hypoperfusion-induced AAA rat model. Adipocytes were observed along the AAA-ruptured area of the vascular wall. In the areas around the adipocytes, macrophage infiltration and protein levels of matrix metalloproteinases 2 and 9 were significantly increased and collagen-positive areas were significantly decreased, as compared with areas without adipocytes. The AAA diameter was correlated with the number of adipocytes in the vascular wall of the hypoperfusion-induced AAA rat model. On the other hand, serum triglyceride levels and serum total cholesterol levels were not correlated with the number of adipocytes in the vascular wall. These results suggest that local adipocyte accumulation in the vascular wall, not serum lipids, has an important role in AAA rupture.

  19. Automated Delineation of Vessel Wall and Thrombus Boundaries of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms Using Multispectral MR Images

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Vila, B.; Tarjuelo-Gutierrez, J.; Sánchez-González, P.; Verbrugghe, P.; Fourneau, I.; Maleux, G.; Herijgers, P.; Gomez, E. J.

    2015-01-01

    A correct patient-specific identification of the abdominal aortic aneurysm is useful for both diagnosis and treatment stages, as it locates the disease and represents its geometry. The actual thickness and shape of the arterial wall and the intraluminal thrombus are of great importance when predicting the rupture of the abdominal aortic aneurysms. The authors describe a novel method for delineating both the internal and external contours of the aortic wall, which allows distinguishing between vessel wall and intraluminal thrombus. The method is based on active shape model and texture statistical information. The method was validated with eight MR patient studies. There was high correspondence between automatic and manual measurements for the vessel wall area. Resulting segmented images presented a mean Dice coefficient with respect to manual segmentations of 0.88 and a mean modified Hausdorff distance of 1.14 mm for the internal face and 0.86 and 1.33 mm for the external face of the arterial wall. Preliminary results of the segmentation show high correspondence between automatic and manual measurements for the vessel wall and thrombus areas. However, since the dataset is small the conclusions cannot be generalized. PMID:26236390

  20. Respiratory kinematics by optoelectronic analysis of chest-wall motion and ultrasonic imaging of the diaphragm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliverti, Andrea; Pedotti, Antonio; Ferrigno, Giancarlo; Macklem, P. T.

    1998-07-01

    Although from a respiratory point of view, compartmental volume change or lack of it is the most crucial variable, it has not been possible to measure the volume of chest wall compartments directly. Recently we developed a new method based on a optoelectronic motion analyzer that can give the three-dimensional location of many markers with the temporal and spatial accuracy required for respiratory measurements. Marker's configuration has been designed specifically to measure the volume of three chest wall compartments, the pulmonary and abdominal rib cage compartments and the abdomen, directly. However, it can not track the exact border between the two rib cage compartments (pulmonary and abdominal) which is determined by the cephalic extremity of the area of apposition of the diaphragm to the inner surface of the rib cage, and which can change systematically as a result of disease processes. The diaphragm displacement can be detected by ultrasonography. In the present study, we propose an integrated system able to investigate the relationships between external (chest wall) and internal (diaphragm) movements of the different respiratory structures by simultaneous external imaging with the optoelectronic system combined with internal kinematic imaging using ultrasounds. 2D digitized points belonging to the lower lung margin, taken from ultrasonographic views, are mapped into the 3D space, where chest wall markers are acquired. Results are shown in terms of accuracy of 3D probe location, relative movement between the probe and the body landmarks, dynamic relationships between chest wall volume and position of the diaphragm during quiet breathing, slow inspirations, relaxations and exercise.

  1. Recurrent tense pneumoperitoneum due to air influx via abdominal wall stoma of a PEG tube.

    PubMed

    Vijayakrishnan, Rajakrishnan; Adhikari, Deep; Anand, Curuchi P

    2010-07-28

    A 70 years old male on ventilatory and circulatory support for sepsis and non ST segment elevation myocardial infarction developed abdominal distension 14 d after placement of a percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube for enteral feeding. Radiography revealed free air in the abdomen and gastrograffin (G) study showed no extravasation into the peritoneum. The G tube was successfully repositioned with mechanical release of air. Imaging showed complete elimination of free air but the patient had a recurrence of pneumoperitoneum. Mechanical release of air with sealing of the abdominal wound was performed. Later, the patient was restarted on tube feeding with no complications. This case demonstrates a late complication of pneumoperitoneum with air leakage from the abdominal wall stoma.

  2. Domain-wall motion in random potential and hysteresis modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Pasquale, M.; Basso, V.; Bertotti, G.; Jiles, D.C.; Bi, Y.

    1998-06-01

    Two different approaches to hysteresis modeling are compared using a common ground based on energy relations, defined in terms of dissipated and stored energy. Using the Preisach model and assuming that magnetization is mainly due to domain-wall motion, one can derive the expression of magnetization along a major loop typical of the Jiles{endash}Atherton model and then extend its validity to cases where mean-field effects and reversible contributions are present. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  3. Experimental Study on Current-Driven Domain Wall Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, T.; Yamaguchi, A.; Tanigawa, H.; Yano, K.; Kasai, S.

    2006-06-01

    Current-driven domain wall (DW) motion for a well-defined single DW in a micro-fabricated magnetic wire with submicron width was investigated by real-space observation with magnetic force microscopy. Magnetic force microscopy visualizes that a single DW introduced in a wire is displaced back and forth by positive and negative pulsed-current, respectively. Effect of the Joule heating, reduction of the threshold current density by shape control, and magnetic ratchet effect are also presented.

  4. Asymmetric angular dependence of domain wall motion in magnetic nanowires.

    PubMed

    Nam, Chunghee

    2013-03-01

    An angular dependence of domain wall (DW) motion is studied in a magnetic wire consisting of a giant-magnetoresistance spin-valve. A DW pinning site is formed by a single notch, where a conventional linear one and a specially designed tilted one are compared. The asymmetric angular dependence was found in the DW depinning behavior with the tilted notch. The geometry control of the pinning site can be useful for DW diode devices using a rotating magnetic field.

  5. Reconstruction of extensive abdominal wall defect using an eccentric perforator-based pedicled anterolateral thigh flap: a case report.

    PubMed

    Jang, Joonchul; Jeong, Seong-Ho; Han, Seung-Kyu; Kim, Woo-Kyung

    2013-09-01

    Reconstruction of extensive abdominal wall defects is a challenge for reconstructive surgeons. In this report, a case of reconstruction of a large abdominal wall defect using an eccentric perforator-based pedicled anterolateral thigh (ALT) flap is presented. A 30-year-old man presented with recurrent desmoid-type fibromatosis in the abdominal wall. The recurrent tumor was radically excised, and the en bloc excision resulted in a full-thickness, large abdominal wall defect (25 cm × 20 cm). An eccentric perforator-based pedicled ALT flap, including wide fascial extension, was transferred to the abdominal defect; fascial portions were sutured to the remnant abdominal fascia. Plication of the fascia along the sutured portion was performed to relieve the skin tension between the flap and the marginal skin of the abdominal defect. Eight months after surgery, the reconstructed abdomen had an acceptable esthetic appearance without tumor recurrence or hernia. The use of an eccentric perforator-based pedicled ALT flap may be an alternative method for the reconstruction of extensive abdominal wall defects.

  6. Laparoscopic drainage of abdominal wall abscess from spilled stones post-cholecystectomy

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Vincent; Ram, Rishi

    2015-01-01

    We present a case on abdominal wall abscess from spilled stones post-cholecystectomy and describe laparoscopic drainage as our choice of management. Mr M is a 75-year-old male who presented on multiple occasions to the hospital with right upper quadrant pain and fever post-laparoscopic cholecystectomy. He also required multiple courses of antibiotics. Subsequent computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging scan confirmed a number of retained stone with signs of chronic inflammation. Hence, 6 months after his initial laparoscopic cholecystectomy, he proceeded to an exploratory laparoscopy. We found an abscess cavity measuring 3 × 4 cm over the anterior abdominal wall. The cavity was de-roofed, drained and washed out. The tissue culture grew Klebsiella pneumoniae. Laparoscopic approach is optimal as the abscess cavity can be clearly identified, stones visualized and removed under direct vision. Patient does not require a laparotomy. PMID:26183574

  7. Abdominal wall defects: prenatal diagnosis, newborn management, and long-term outcomes.

    PubMed

    Gamba, Piergiorgio; Midrio, Paola

    2014-10-01

    Omphalocele and gastroschisis represent the most frequent congenital abdominal wall defects a pediatric surgeon is called to treat. There has been an increased reported incidence in the past 10 years mainly due to the diffuse use of prenatal ultrasound. The early detection of these malformations, and related associated anomalies, allows a multidisciplinary counseling and planning of delivery in a center equipped with high-risk pregnancy assistance, pediatric surgery, and neonatology. At present times, closure of defects, even in multiple stages, is always possible as well as management of most of cardiac-, urinary-, and gastrointestinal-associated malformations. The progress, herein discussed, in the care of newborns with abdominal wall defects assures most of them survive and reach adulthood. Some aspects of transition of medical care will also be considered, including fertility and cosmesis.

  8. Evidence-Based Abdominal Wall Reconstruction: The Maxi-Mini Approach.

    PubMed

    Janis, Jeffrey E; Khansa, Ibrahim

    2015-12-01

    Complex abdominal wall reconstruction is a high-risk procedure, but it can be performed safely if a systematic approach is followed. In this article, the authors present their evidence-based technique for abdominal wall reconstruction. This approach aims at reducing rates of complications and hernia recurrence, starting with critical patient selection; preoperative patient optimization; adherence to intraoperative principles including preservation of vascular perforators through maintenance of composite tissue with limited undermining; direct supported mesh reinforcement of midline musculofascial reapproximation; use of percutaneous transfascial suture mesh fixation; careful attention to dead space obliteration in any plane; and aggressive soft-tissue resection of marginal, undermined, or tenuous skin and subcutaneous tissue. Postoperative strategies to decrease complications are also used. The authors' surgical technique is described in detail, and pilot data are presented to support the authors' approach.

  9. Desmoid Tumor of the Anterior Abdominal Wall in Female Patients: Comparison with Endometriosis

    PubMed Central

    Krentel, H.; Tchartchian, G.; De Wilde, R. L.

    2012-01-01

    In female patients presenting a tumor of the lower abdominal wall especially after cesarian section, an endometriotic tumor as well as an aggressive desmoid tumor should be considered. Symptoms in correlation with the monthly period can facilitate the presurgical differentiation between endometriosis and fibromatosis. Ultrasound reveals the typical location of both tumors and its remarkable sonographic appearance. In the clinical practice, the desmoid fibromatosis of the lower abdominal wall is a very rare disease. We present a case of a 25-year-old pregnant and discuss diagnostic and therapeutic options by a PubMed literature review. With the knowledge of the prognosis of the desmoid fibromatosis and the respective treatment options including wait and see, complete surgical resection with macroscopically free margins and adjuvant approaches is essential to avoid further interventions and progression of the locally destructive tumor. PMID:22778752

  10. Clostridial Gas Gangrene of the Abdominal Wall After Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy: A Case Report and Review.

    PubMed

    Harmsen, Annelieke M K; van Tol, Erik; Giannakopoulos, Georgios F; de Brauw, L Maurits

    2016-08-01

    Clostridial gas gangrene is a rare, yet severe, complication after laparoscopic cholecystectomy. We present a case report of a 48-year-old man with obesity, coronary artery disease, and diabetes, who developed clostridial gas gangrene of the abdominal wall after an uncomplicated laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Although the diagnosis was missed initially, successful radical surgical debridement was performed and the patient survived. Pathogenesis, symptoms, prognostic factors, and the best treatment are discussed.

  11. [Clostridial sepsis and gas gangrene of the abdominal wall after cholecystectomy].

    PubMed

    Lochman, P; Kabelác, K; Pospísil, I; Dobes, D; Cáp, R

    2007-01-01

    Clostridial sepsis is a rare complication after intraabdominal operations, mostly fatal. According to our knowledge only two papers describing clostridial sepsis as postoperative complication in 4 patients were published in the Czech literature, only one of them survived. Authors present a case report of patient operated on for cholecystolithiasis and obstructive icterus where within 48 hours after cholecystectomy the clostridial sepsis and gas gangrene of the abdominal wall developed and that were successfuly managed.

  12. Abdominal Wall Reconstruction Using Retrorectus Self-adhering Mesh: A Novel Approach

    PubMed Central

    Khansa, Ibrahim

    2016-01-01

    Background: In abdominal wall reconstruction, the retrorectus plane offers an ideal location for mesh placement. Mesh fixation in this plane is often achieved using transfascial sutures, which risks entrapping intercostal nerves and causing significant pain, and takes time to place. A novel alternative is the use of sutureless self-adhering mesh. Although the use of this mesh in inguinal hernias has been well described, studies on its use in abdominal wall reconstruction are lacking. Methods: Consecutive patients who underwent ventral hernia repair with retrorectus mesh were reviewed. This included patients who received transfascially sutured mesh and those who received sutureless self-adhering mesh. All patients were followed up for at least 12 months. The amount of narcotics required by each patient postoperatively was calculated. Surgical-site occurrences (SSOs) and hernia recurrence and bulge were measured. Results: Twenty-six patients underwent abdominal wall reconstruction with retrorectus mesh. This included 12 patients with transfascially sutured mesh and 14 patients with self-adhering mesh. Mean follow-up was 600 days. Baseline characteristics were similar between the 2 groups. Patients receiving self-adhering mesh required significantly less narcotics than patients with transfascially sutured mesh. There were no significant differences in the rate of SSOs between the 2 groups. No hernia recurrences, bulges, or chronic pain occurred in either group. Conclusions: This is the first study to compare the outcomes of retrorectus self-adhering mesh and transfascially sutured mesh in abdominal wall reconstruction. Our results show low rates of SSO, recurrence, and bulge with both options, with significantly less acute pain with self-adhering mesh. PMID:27975037

  13. Extragastrointestinal Stromal Tumor (EGIST) in the abdominal wall: Case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Alkhatib, Loiy; Albtoush, Omar; Bataineh, Nesreen; Gharaibeh, Kamal; Matalka, Ismail; Tokuda, Yasuharu

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Gastro Intestinal Stromal Tumor (GIST) is the most common mesenchymal tumor of the gastrointestinal tract (GI). GIST that arises primarily outside the GI tract is termed Extragastrointestinal Stromal Tumor (EGIST). To the best of our knowledge, few cases of EGIST in the abdominal wall were reported. PRESENTATION OF CASE We present a rare case of EGIST in the abdominal wall of a 57 year-old female patient. The asymptomatic tumor was located in the superior aspect of the left rectus abdominis muscle, measured 5.4 × cm 5.3 × cm 6.9 cm and was well circumscribed. Histological examination showed an epithelioid cell morphology. The mitotic count was 7/50 HPFs. Immunohistochemistry showed diffuse strong CD117 positivity, focal positivity for S100. The tumor was excised and the margins were free of malignancy. The patient was doing well postoperatively and was discharged on STI-571 regimen. DISCUSSION Although GIST is the most common mesenchymal tumor of the gastrointestinal tract, a case with EGIST in the abdominal wall is rare. Positive immunohistochemical staining for CD117 is a defining feature of GISTs. A great percentage of EGISTs represent a metastasis from a primary GIST. In our case, the clinical and diagnostic work-up have been proved it to be an EGIST. CONCLUSION The existing data on EGIST is insufficient to make a final conclusion regarding the malignant potential and clinicopathological factors of EGISTs that determine patient prognosis. Thus a follow-up for a long period is required. EGISTs should be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis for patients presenting with solid mass of the abdominal wall. PMID:22096744

  14. Domain Wall Motion in Synthetic Co2Si Nanowires

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Gang; Lin, Yung-Chen; Liao, Lei; Liu, Lixin; Chen, Yu; Liu, Yuan; Weiss, Nathan O.; Zhou, Hailong; Huang, Yu; Duan, Xiangfeng

    2012-01-01

    We report the synthesis of single crystalline Co2Si nanowires, and electrical transport studies of single Co2Si nanowire devices at low temperature. The butterfly-shaped magnetoresistance shows interesting ferromagnetic features including negative magnetoresistance, hysteretic switch fields and step-wise drops in magnetoresistance. The non-smooth step-wise magnetoresistance response is attributed to magnetic domain wall pinning and de-pinning motion in the Co2Si nanowires probably at crystal defects or morphology defects. The temperature dependence of the domain wall de-pinning field is observed and is described by a model based on thermally assisted domain wall de-pinning over a single energy barrier. PMID:22469009

  15. Evolution of the wall shear stresses during the progressive enlargement of symmetric abdominal aortic aneurysms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salsac, A.-V.; Sparks, S. R.; Chomaz, J.-M.; Lasheras, J. C.

    2006-08-01

    The changes in the evolution of the spatial and temporal distribution of the wall shear stresses (WSS) and gradients of wall shear stresses (GWSS) at different stages of the enlargement of an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) are important in understanding the aetiology and progression of this vascular disease since they affect the wall structural integrity, primarily via the changes induced on the shape, functions and metabolism of the endothelial cells. Particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements were performed in in vitro aneurysm models, while changing their geometric parameters systematically. It has been shown that, even at the very early stages of the disease, i.e. increase in the diameter ≤ 50%, the flow separates from the wall and a large vortex ring, usually followed by internal shear layers, is created. These lead to the generation of WSS that drastically differ in mean and fluctuating components from the healthy vessel. Inside the AAA, the mean WSS becomes negative along most of the aneurysmal wall and the magnitude of the WSS can be as low as 26% of the value in a healthy abdominal aorta.

  16. Reconstruction of the abdominal wall by using a combination of the human acellular dermal matrix implant and an interpositional omentum flap after extensive tumor resection in patients with abdominal wall neoplasm: A preliminary result

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Yan; Tang, Rui; Gong, Ding-Quan; Qian, Yun-Liang

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To present our trial using a combination of the human acellular dermal matrix (HADM) implant and an interpositional omentum flap to repair giant abdominal wall defects after extensive tumor resection. METHODS: Between February and October of 2007, three patients with giant defects of the abdominal wall after extensive tumor resection underwent reconstruction with a combination of HADM and omentum flap. Postoperative morbidities and signs of herniation were monitored. RESULTS: The abdominal wall reconstruction was successful in these three patients, there was no severe morbidity and no signs of herniation in the follow-up period. CONCLUSION: The combination of HADM and omentum flap offers a new, safe and effective alternative to traditional forms in the repair of giant abdominal wall defects. Further analysis of the long-term outcome and more cases are needed to assess the reliability of this technique. PMID:18205267

  17. Excision of the urachal remnant using the abdominal wall-lift laparoscopy: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Kosuke; Sasaki, Kazuhito; Iijima, Tatsuo; Yoshimi, Fuyo; Nagai, Hideo

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Here, we report the surgical excision of the urachal remnant using the abdominal wall-lift laparoscopy with a camera port in the umbilicus, combined with a small Pfannenstiel incision to optimally treat the bladder apex. Presentation of case A 21-year-old woman presented with periumbilical discharge and pain on urination. Contrast enhanced CT and MRI showed an abscess in the umbilical region that was connected to the bladder via a long tube-like structure. It was diagnosed as an infected urachal sinus. Partial excision of the umbilical fossa followed by dissection of the urachal remnant was easily performed using the abdominal wall-lift laparoscopy from the umbilicus down to the bladder without pneumoperitoneum or additional trocar placement. A Pfannenstiel incision was made above the pubis to get access to the junction between the urachal remnant and the bladder. Under direct vision, we succeeded in accurately dividing the remnant tract, and we adequately closed the bladder opening with absorbable sutures. This method has the advantage of easily closing peritoneal defects after excision of the urachal remnant with direct sutures under a laparoscopic view from the umbilicus. Cosmetic satisfaction was obtained postoperatively. Discussion and conclusion Urachal sinus excision using the abdominal wall-lift laparoscopy seems to surpass the previously reported methods in term of safety, cosmetics, and adequacy of surgical procedures. PMID:27064744

  18. Value-based Clinical Quality Improvement (CQI) for Patients Undergoing Abdominal Wall Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Stephan, Bradley; Ramshaw, Bruce; Forman, Brandie

    2015-05-01

    Patients with complex ventral/incisional hernias often undergo an abdominal wall reconstruction (AWR). These operations have a high cost of care and often result in a long hospital stay and high complication rates. Using the principles of clinical quality improvement (CQI), several attempts at process improvement were implemented in one hernia program over a 3-year period. For consecutive cases of patients undergoing abdominal wall reconstruction, process improvement attempts included the use of a long-term resorbable synthetic mesh (TIGR® Resorbable Matrix, Novus Scientific, Uppsala, Sweden) in place of a biologic mesh, the use of the transversus abdominis release approach in place of an open or endoscopic component separation (external oblique release) technique, and the use of a preoperative transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block using a long-acting local anesthetic (Exparel®, Pacira Pharmaceutical, Parsippany, NJ) as a part of perioperative multi-modal pain management and an enhanced recovery program. After over 60 cases, improvement in materials costs and postoperative outcomes were documented. No mesh-related complications occurred and no mesh removal was required. In this real-world, value-based application of CQI, several attempts at process improvement led to decreased costs and improved outcomes for patients who underwent abdominal wall reconstruction for complex ventral/incisional hernias. Value-based CQI could be a tool for improved health care value globally.

  19. [New abdominal wall reconstruction technique with a plastic-rehabilitative intent (back pain improvement)].

    PubMed

    Palmieri, Beniamino; Grappolini, Simone; Blandini, Daniele; De-Anna, Dino; Savio, Stefano; Ferrari, Paolo; Ferrari, Giovanni; William, Pillosu; Campanini, Isabella; Guido, Vezzosi; Tenchini, Paolo; Benuzzi, Giorgia; Palmieri, Lucia

    2004-01-01

    Many abdominal wall reconstruction techniques have generally failed to pay attention to a number of anatomical considerations concerning the continuity of the thoraco-lumboabdominal fascia that envelops the dorsal and ventral muscles. We have introduced a new surgical technique (round mesh) developed to improve the abdominal wall weakness or pathology (hernia, laparocele) with the aim of restoring the muscular synergy between the anterior and posterior trunk compartments, thus improving sacroiliac stability, posture, and standing effort endurance. One hundred patients of both sexes were enrolled in this investigation. All were affected by abdominal wall impairment, frank hernia or laparocele, and had been complaining of lumbar and sciatic pain for long periods without any definite intervertebral disk pathology. They underwent pre- and postoperative subjective and objective evaluation and insertion of a prefascial polypropylene mesh with a posterior martingale that passes across the spine and paravertebral muscles, ending in two wider rectangles that are criss-crossed ventrally and finally sutured to the iliopubic brim. All the patients improved either subjectively or objectively with the round mesh procedure. This new technique is particularly useful in cases of reduction or impairment of the recti abdominis, transverse and oblique muscles, because simple suture and plication of these muscles is no guarantee of long-term functional restoration.

  20. Dynamics of magnetic domain wall motion after nucleation: dependence on the wall energy.

    PubMed

    Fukumoto, K; Kuch, W; Vogel, J; Romanens, F; Pizzini, S; Camarero, J; Bonfim, M; Kirschner, J

    2006-03-10

    The dynamics of magnetic domain wall motion in the FeNi layer of a FeNi/Al2O3/Co trilayer has been investigated by a combination of x-ray magnetic circular dichroism, photoelectron emission microscopy, and a stroboscopic pump-probe technique. The nucleation of domains and subsequent expansion by domain wall motion in the FeNi layer during nanosecond-long magnetic field pulses was observed in the viscous regime up to the Walker limit field. We attribute an observed delay of domain expansion to the influence of the domain wall energy that acts against the domain expansion and that plays an important role when domains are small.

  1. Planning 4-Dimensional Computed Tomography (4DCT) Cannot Adequately Represent Daily Intrafractional Motion of Abdominal Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Ge, Jiajia; Santanam, Lakshmi; Noel, Camille; Parikh, Parag J.

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate whether planning 4-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) can adequately represent daily motion of abdominal tumors in regularly fractionated and stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) patients. Methods and Materials: Intrafractional tumor motion of 10 patients with abdominal tumors (4 pancreas-fractionated and 6 liver-stereotactic patients) with implanted fiducials was measured based on daily orthogonal fluoroscopic movies over 38 treatment fractions. The needed internal margin for at least 90% of tumor coverage was calculated based on a 95th and fifth percentile of daily 3-dimensional tumor motion. The planning internal margin was generated by fusing 4DCT motion from all phase bins. The disagreement between needed and planning internal margin was analyzed fraction by fraction in 3 motion axes (superior-inferior [SI], anterior-posterior [AP], and left-right [LR]). The 4DCT margin was considered as an overestimation/underestimation of daily motion when disagreement exceeded at least 3 mm in the SI axis and/or 1.2 mm in the AP and LR axes (4DCT image resolution). The underlying reasons for this disagreement were evaluated based on interfractional and intrafractional breathing variation. Results: The 4DCT overestimated daily 3-dimensional motion in 39% of the fractions in 7 of 10 patients and underestimated it in 53% of the fractions in 8 of 10 patients. Median underestimation was 3.9 mm, 3.0 mm, and 1.7 mm in the SI axis, AP axis, and LR axis, respectively. The 4DCT was found to capture irregular deep breaths in 3 of 10 patients, with 4DCT motion larger than mean daily amplitude by 18 to 21 mm. The breathing pattern varied from breath to breath and day to day. The intrafractional variation of amplitude was significantly larger than intrafractional variation (2.7 mm vs 1.3 mm) in the primary motion axis (ie, SI axis). The SBRT patients showed significantly larger intrafractional amplitude variation than fractionated patients (3.0 mm vs 2

  2. [Indications and results of preventive endoprosthezing of the abdominal wall during operations on organs of the abdominal cavity and retroperitoneal space].

    PubMed

    Sukovatykh, B S; Valuĭskaia, N M; Netiaga, A A; Zhukovskiĭ, V A; Pravednikova, N V; Kas'ianova, M A

    2011-01-01

    Complex examination and treatment of 120 patients with anatomo-functional insufficiency of the abdominal wall was made after operations on organs of the abdominal cavity and retroperitoneal space. In the 1st group (60 patients) the abdominal wall was sutured by traditional methods. In the 2nd group (60 patients) laparotomy was followed by implantation of polypropylene endoprosthesis by over-aponeurotic method, and suturing of the lateral wall--by sub-aponeurotic method. At the long-term postoperative period the postoperative ventral hernias were formed in 21.6% of patients of the 1st group, in the 2nd group of patients hernias were not detected. Physical component of quality of life of the 2nd group was 1.5 times, and mental component 1.7 times higher than in the 1st group.

  3. CLASSICAL AREAS OF PHENOMENOLOGY: Influence of the abdominal wall on the nonlinear propagation of focused therapeutic ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhen-Bo; Fan, Ting-Bo; Zhang, Dong; Gong, Xiu-Fen

    2009-11-01

    This article theoretically studies the influence of inhomogeneous abdominal walls on focused therapeutic ultrasound based on the phase screen model. An inhomogeneous tissue is considered as a combination of a homogeneous medium and a phase aberration screen. Variations of acoustic parameters such as peak positive pressure, peak negative pressure, and acoustic intensity are discussed with respect to the phase screen statistics of human abdominal walls. Results indicate that the abdominal wall can result in energy loss of the sound in the focal plane. For a typical human abdominal wall with correlation length of 7.9 mm and variance of 0.36, the peak acoustic intensity radiated from a 1 MHz transmitter with a radius of 30 mm can be reduced by about 14% at the focal plane.

  4. Pedicled fasciocutaneous anterolateral thigh flap for the reconstruction of a large postoncologic abdominal wall resection defect: a case report.

    PubMed

    Nthumba, Peter; Barasa, Jack; Cavadas, Pedro C; Landin, Luis

    2012-02-01

    The anterolateral thigh (ALT) flap has been used to cover defects between the proximal third of the leg and lower abdomen, and with modification, may cover epigastric defects. We used the ALT flap to cover a full-thickness defect of over half the anterior abdominal wall. We conclude that abdominal wall defects of large sizes can be successfully reconstructed using an appropriately designed ALT flap; a simple, single-stage effective reconstruction.

  5. Local influence of calcifications on the wall mechanics of abdominal aortic aneurysm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Putter, Sander; van de Vosse, Frans N.; Breeuwer, Marcel; Gerritsen, Frans A.

    2006-03-01

    Finite element wall stress simulations on patient-specific models of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) may provide a better rupture risk predictor than the currently used maximum transverse diameter. Calcifications in the wall of AAA lead to a higher maximum wall stress and thus may lead to an elevated rupture risk. The reported material properties for calcifications and the material properties actually used for simulations show great variation. Previous studies have focused on simplified modelling of the calcification shapes within a realistic aneurysm shape. In this study we use an accurate representation of the calcification geometry and a simplified model for the AAA. The objective of this approach is to investigate the influence of the calcification geometry, the material properties and the modelling approach for the computed peak wall stress. For four realistic calcification shapes from standard clinical CT images of AAA, we performed simulations with three distinct modelling approaches, at five distinct elasticity settings. The results show how peak wall stress is sensitive to the material properties of the calcifications. For relatively elastic calcifications, the results from the different modelling approaches agree. Also, for relatively elastic calcifications the computed wall stress in the tissue surrounding the calcifications shows to be insensitive to the exact calcification geometry. For stiffer calcifications the different modelling approaches and the different geometries lead to significantly different results. We conclude that an important challenge for future research is accurately estimating the material properties and the rupture potential of the AAA wall including calcifications.

  6. Near-wall aerodynamics of idealized model foot motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubota, Yoshi; Hall, Joseph; Higuchi, Hiroshi; Sheth, Ritesh; Glauser, Mark; Khalifa, Ezzat

    2006-11-01

    The air quality is affected by amounts and types of contaminant particles suspended in the air. The particulate matter reaches the respiratory system in an indoor environment by fist becoming detached, resupended and then entrained in the human micro-environment. The resuspension phenomena from the floor occur through either a ballistic mechanism, where kinetic energy is transferred to dust particles through direct contact, or an aerodynamic mechanism, where dust particles are resuspended by the flow generated by the body. In this study we focus on the aerodynamic resuspension of particles caused by walking. The foot motion is idealized and is either towards or away from a floor. A circular disk and an elongated plate having the equivalent area to that of a human foot are used. The foot motion is driven vertically by a linear servo motor that controls the velocity, acceleration, stroke and deceleration. The model velocity is based on the real foot motion. In addition to flow visualization, flowfield measurements were conducted with PIV. In the downstroke, results show a vortex impacting the wall creating the strong wall jet. In upstroke, the vortex generated behind the idealized foot exhibits the large magnitude of velocity. Experiment is continuing with a model more closely to simulating shoe geometry as well as incorporating the real foot kinetics. The results will be compared with the numerical simulation and analytical results.

  7. Robust spectral analysis of thoraco-abdominal motion and oxymetry in obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Nino, Cesar L; Rodriguez-Martinez, Carlos E; Gutierrez, Maria J; Singareddi, Ravi; Nino, Gustavo

    2013-01-01

    The diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) relies on polysomnography (PSG), a multidimensional biosignal recording that is conducted in sleep laboratories. Standard PSG montage involves the use of nasal-oral airflow sensors to visualize cyclic episodes of upper airflow interruption, which are considered diagnostic of sleep apnea. Given the high-cost and discomfort associated with in-laboratory PSG, there is an emergent need for novel technology that simplifies OSA screening and diagnosis with less expensive methods. The main goal of this project was to identify novel OSA signatures based on the spectral analysis of thoraco-abdominal motion channels. Our main hypothesis was that proper spectral analysis can detect OSA cycles in adults using simultaneous recording of oxygen saturation (SaO2) and either, chest or abdominal motion. A sample study on 35 individuals was conducted with statistically significant results that suggest a strong relationship between airflow-independent signals and oxygen saturation. The impact of this new approach is that it may allow the design of more comfortable and reliable portable devices for screening, diagnosis and monitoring of OSA, functioning only with oximetry and airflow-independent (abdominal or chest) breathing sensors.

  8. Metastasectomy of Abdominal Wall Lesions due to Prostate Cancer Detected Through PET/CT Gallium 68-PMSA: First Case Report.

    PubMed

    Ochoa, Claudia; Ramirez, Angie; Varela, Rodolfo; Godoy, Fabian; Vargas, Rafael; Forero, Jorge; Rojas, Andres; Roa, Carmen; Céspedes, Carlos; Ramos, Jose; Cabrera, Marino; Calderon, Andres

    2017-05-01

    Introducing the topic of abdominal wall metastasis secondary to prostate cancer with a reminder of the disease's rarity, being the first published case. This article is about a 66 year old patient diagnosed with prostate cancer [cT2aNxMx iPSA: 5,6 ng/ml Gleason 3+3, (Grade 1 Group)], treated with radical prostatectomy as well as accompanied with amplified pelvic lymphadenectomy, who subsequently presented metastatic lesions to the abdominal wall diagnosed with PET/CT Gallium 68-PMSA technique and treated with abdominal metastasectomy with adequate short term results.

  9. Role of entropy in domain wall motion in thermal gradients.

    PubMed

    Schlickeiser, F; Ritzmann, U; Hinzke, D; Nowak, U

    2014-08-29

    Thermally driven domain wall (DW) motion caused solely by magnonic spin currents was forecast theoretically and has been measured recently in a magnetic insulator using magneto-optical Kerr effect microscopy. We present an analytical calculation of the DW velocity as well as the Walker breakdown within the framework of the Landau Lifshitz Bloch equation of motion. The temperature gradient leads to a torque term acting on the magnetization where the DW is mainly driven by the temperature dependence of the exchange stiffness, or--in a more general picture--by the maximization of entropy. The existence of this entropic torque term does not rest on the angular momentum transfer from the magnonic spin current. Hence, even DWs in antiferromagnets or compensated ferrimagnets should move accordingly. We further argue that the entropic torque exceeds that of the magnonic spin current.

  10. Rashba Torque Driven Domain Wall Motion in Magnetic Helices.

    PubMed

    Pylypovskyi, Oleksandr V; Sheka, Denis D; Kravchuk, Volodymyr P; Yershov, Kostiantyn V; Makarov, Denys; Gaididei, Yuri

    2016-03-24

    Manipulation of the domain wall propagation in magnetic wires is a key practical task for a number of devices including racetrack memory and magnetic logic. Recently, curvilinear effects emerged as an efficient mean to impact substantially the statics and dynamics of magnetic textures. Here, we demonstrate that the curvilinear form of the exchange interaction of a magnetic helix results in an effective anisotropy term and Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction with a complete set of Lifshitz invariants for a one-dimensional system. In contrast to their planar counterparts, the geometrically induced modifications of the static magnetic texture of the domain walls in magnetic helices offer unconventional means to control the wall dynamics relying on spin-orbit Rashba torque. The chiral symmetry breaking due to the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction leads to the opposite directions of the domain wall motion in left- or right-handed helices. Furthermore, for the magnetic helices, the emergent effective anisotropy term and Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction can be attributed to the clear geometrical parameters like curvature and torsion offering intuitive understanding of the complex curvilinear effects in magnetism.

  11. Rashba Torque Driven Domain Wall Motion in Magnetic Helices

    PubMed Central

    Pylypovskyi, Oleksandr V.; Sheka, Denis D.; Kravchuk, Volodymyr P.; Yershov, Kostiantyn V.; Makarov, Denys; Gaididei, Yuri

    2016-01-01

    Manipulation of the domain wall propagation in magnetic wires is a key practical task for a number of devices including racetrack memory and magnetic logic. Recently, curvilinear effects emerged as an efficient mean to impact substantially the statics and dynamics of magnetic textures. Here, we demonstrate that the curvilinear form of the exchange interaction of a magnetic helix results in an effective anisotropy term and Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya interaction with a complete set of Lifshitz invariants for a one-dimensional system. In contrast to their planar counterparts, the geometrically induced modifications of the static magnetic texture of the domain walls in magnetic helices offer unconventional means to control the wall dynamics relying on spin-orbit Rashba torque. The chiral symmetry breaking due to the Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya interaction leads to the opposite directions of the domain wall motion in left- or right-handed helices. Furthermore, for the magnetic helices, the emergent effective anisotropy term and Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya interaction can be attributed to the clear geometrical parameters like curvature and torsion offering intuitive understanding of the complex curvilinear effects in magnetism. PMID:27008975

  12. A simulation framework for estimating wall stress distribution of abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Qin, Jing; Zhang, Jing; Chui, Chee-Kong; Huang, Wei-Min; Yang, Tao; Pang, Wai-Man; Sudhakar, Venkatesh; Chang, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) rupture is believed to occur when the mechanical stress acting on the wall exceeds the strength of the wall tissue. In endovascular aneurysm repair, a stent-graft in a catheter is released at the aneurysm site to form a new blood vessel and protect the weakened AAA wall from the pulsatile pressure and, hence, possible rupture. In this paper, we propose a framework to estimate the wall stress distribution of non-stented/stented AAA based on fluid-structure interaction, which is utilized in a surgical simulation system (IRAS). The 3D geometric model of AAA is reconstructed from computed tomography angiographic (CTA) images. Based on our experiments, a combined logarithm and polynomial strain energy equation is applied to model the elastic properties of arterial wall. The blood flow is modeled as laminar, incompressible, and non-Newtonian flow by applying Navier-Stokes equation. The obtained pressure of blood flow is applied as load on the AAA meshes with and without stent-graft and the wall stress distribution is calculated by fluid-structure interaction (FSI) solver equipped in ANSYS. Experiments demonstrate that our analytical results are consistent with clinical observations.

  13. Trace elements in the wall of abdominal aortic aneurysms with and without coexisting iliac artery aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Ziaja, Damian; Chudek, Jerzy; Sznapka, Mariola; Kita, Andrzej; Biolik, Grzegorz; Sieroń-Stołtny, Karolina; Pawlicki, Krzysztof; Domalik, Jolanta; Ziaja, Krzysztof

    2015-06-01

    Iliac artery aneurysms (IAA) and abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) frequently coexist. It remains unknown whether the content of trace elements in AAA walls depends on the coexistence of IAAs. The aim of this study was to compare the content of selected trace elements in AAA walls depending on the coexistence of IAAs. The content of trace elements was assessed in samples of AAA walls harvested intraoperatively in 19 consecutive patients. In the studied group, coexisting IAAs were diagnosed in 11 out of the 19 patients with AAA. The coexistence of IAAs was associated with a slightly lower content of nickel (0.28 (0.15-0.40) vs. 0.32 (0-0.85) mg/g; p = 0.09) and a significantly higher content of cadmium (0.71 (0.26-1.17) vs. 0.25 (0.20-0.31) mg/g; p = 0.04) in AAA walls. The levels of the remaining studied elements, copper, zinc, manganese, magnesium and calcium, were comparable. The elevated levels of cadmium in the walls of AAA coexisting with IAAs may suggest an impact of the accumulation of this trace element on the greater damage of the iliac artery wall.

  14. MR-guided thermotherapy of abdominal organs using a robust PCA-based motion descriptor.

    PubMed

    de Senneville, Baudouin Denis; Ries, Mario; Maclair, Grégory; Moonen, Chrit

    2011-11-01

    Thermotherapies can now be guided in real-time using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This technique is rapidly gaining importance in interventional therapies for abdominal organs such as liver and kidney. An accurate online estimation and characterization of organ displacement is mandatory to prevent misregistration and correct for motion related thermometry artifacts. In addition, when the ablation is performed with an extracorporal heating device such as high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU), the continuous estimation of the organ displacement is the basis for the dynamic adjustment of the focal point position to track the targeted pathological tissue. In this paper, we describe the use of an optimized principal component analysis (PCA)-based motion descriptor to characterize in real-time the complex organ deformation during the therapy. The PCA was used to detect, in a preparative learning step, spatio-temporal coherences in the motion of the targeted organ. During hyperthermia, incoherent motion patterns could be discarded, which enabled improvements in motion estimation robustness, the compensation of motion related errors in thermal maps, and the adjustment of the beam position. The suggested method was evaluated for a moving phantom, and tested in vivo in the kidney and the liver of 12 healthy volunteers under free breathing conditions. The ability to perform a MR-guided thermotherapy in vivo during HIFU intervention was finally demonstrated on a porcine kidney.

  15. Observation of a Flowing Duct in the Abdominal Wall by Using Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Sharon Jiyoon; Kim, Min-Suk; Lee, Jin-Kyu; Kim, Young-Jae; Soh, Kwang-Sup

    2016-01-01

    The primo vascular system (PVS) is being established as a circulatory system that corresponds to acupuncture meridians. There have been two critical questions in making the PVS accepted as a novel liquid flowing system. The first one was directly to show the flow of liquid in PVS and the second one was to explain why it was not observed in the conventional histological study of animal tissues. Flow in the PVS in the abdominal cavity was previously verified by injecting Alcian blue into a primo node. However, the tracing of the dye to other subsystems of the PVS has not been done. In the current work we injected fluorescent nanoparticles (FNPs) into a primo node and traced them along a primo vessel which was inside a fat tissue in the abdominal wall. Linea alba is a white middle line in the abdominal skin of a mammal and a band of fat tissue is located in parallel to the linea alba in the parietal side of the abdominal wall of a rat. In this fat band a primo vessel runs parallel to the prominent blood vessels in the fat band and is located just inside the parietal peritoneum. About the second question on the reason why the PVS was not in conventional histological study the current work provided the answer. Histological analysis with hematoxyline and eosine, Masson’s trichrome, and Toluidine blue could not discriminate the primo vessel even when we knew the location of the PVS by the trace of the FNPs. This clearly explains why the PVS is hard to observe in conventional histology: it is not a matter of resolution but the contrast. The PVS has very similar structure to the connective tissues that surround the PVS. In the current work we propose a method to find the PVS: Observation of mast cell distribution with toluidine blue staining and the PN has a high density of mast cells, while the lymph node has low density. PMID:26937963

  16. Observation of a Flowing Duct in the Abdominal Wall by Using Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Jang, HyunSuk; Yoon, Joohwan; Gil, HyunJi; Jung, Sharon Jiyoon; Kim, Min-Suk; Lee, Jin-Kyu; Kim, Young-Jae; Soh, Kwang-Sup

    2016-01-01

    The primo vascular system (PVS) is being established as a circulatory system that corresponds to acupuncture meridians. There have been two critical questions in making the PVS accepted as a novel liquid flowing system. The first one was directly to show the flow of liquid in PVS and the second one was to explain why it was not observed in the conventional histological study of animal tissues. Flow in the PVS in the abdominal cavity was previously verified by injecting Alcian blue into a primo node. However, the tracing of the dye to other subsystems of the PVS has not been done. In the current work we injected fluorescent nanoparticles (FNPs) into a primo node and traced them along a primo vessel which was inside a fat tissue in the abdominal wall. Linea alba is a white middle line in the abdominal skin of a mammal and a band of fat tissue is located in parallel to the linea alba in the parietal side of the abdominal wall of a rat. In this fat band a primo vessel runs parallel to the prominent blood vessels in the fat band and is located just inside the parietal peritoneum. About the second question on the reason why the PVS was not in conventional histological study the current work provided the answer. Histological analysis with hematoxyline and eosine, Masson's trichrome, and Toluidine blue could not discriminate the primo vessel even when we knew the location of the PVS by the trace of the FNPs. This clearly explains why the PVS is hard to observe in conventional histology: it is not a matter of resolution but the contrast. The PVS has very similar structure to the connective tissues that surround the PVS. In the current work we propose a method to find the PVS: Observation of mast cell distribution with toluidine blue staining and the PN has a high density of mast cells, while the lymph node has low density.

  17. Intensity modulated radiation-therapy for preoperative posterior abdominal wall irradiation of retroperitoneal liposarcomas

    SciTech Connect

    Bossi, Alberto . E-mail: alberto.bossi@uz.kuleuven.ac.be; De Wever, Ivo; Van Limbergen, Erik; Vanstraelen, Bianca

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Preoperative external-beam radiation therapy (preop RT) in the management of Retroperitoneal Liposarcomas (RPLS) typically involves the delivery of radiation to the entire tumor mass: yet this may not be necessary. The purpose of this study is to evaluate a new strategy of preop RT for RPLS in which the target volume is limited to the contact area between the tumoral mass and the posterior abdominal wall. Methods and Materials: Between June 2000 and Jan 2005, 18 patients with the diagnosis of RPLS have been treated following a pilot protocol of pre-op RT, 50 Gy in 25 fractions of 2 Gy/day. The Clinical Target Volume (CTV) has been limited to the posterior abdominal wall, region at higher risk for local relapse. A Three-Dimensional conformal (3D-CRT) and an Intensity Modulated (IMRT) plan were generated and compared; toxicity was reported following the National Cancer Institute (NCI) Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v3.0. Results: All patients completed the planned treatment and the acute toxicity was tolerable: 2 patients experienced Grade 3 and 1 Grade 2 anorexia while 2 patients developed Grade 2 nausea. IMRT allows a better sparing of the ipsilateral and the contralateral kidney. All tumors were successfully resected without major complications. At a median follow-up of 27 months 2 patients developed a local relapse and 1 lung metastasis. Conclusions: Our strategy of preop RT is feasible and well tolerated: the rate of resectability is not compromised by limiting the preop CTV to the posterior abdominal wall and a better critical-structures sparing is obtained with IMRT.

  18. A comparison of prosthetic materials used to repair abdominal wall defects.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, S D; Klamer, T W; Parteka, J J; Condon, R E

    1983-08-01

    A large abdominal wall hernia, not amenable to primary closure, may require insertion of a prosthesis. The ideal prosthesis maintains strength, is incorporated by surrounding tissues, and does not stimulate adhesions. These qualities vary among available synthetic prostheses. We tested tensile strength, bursting strength, and adhesion formation in response to six materials used in repair of abdominal wall hernias. Adult Sprague-Dawley rats (196) were randomly divided into a control group and six experimental groups. A 4 by 4 cm full-thickness resection of abdominal wall was closed with patches of polypropylene mesh (Marlex), polyglactin 910 mesh (Vicryl), expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (Gore-tex), Dacron-reinforced silicone rubber (Silastic), preserved human dura (PHD), or polypropylene mesh overlying gelatin film (Marlex and Gelfilm, respectively). In controls the 4 cm longitudinal full-thickness incisions were closed primarily. Seven rats randomly selected from each group were sacrificed after 1, 2, 4, and 8 weeks; bursting and tensile strength (tensiometer) and adhesion formation were assessed. There were no differences in bursting strength among the experimental groups at each testing period. Although bursting strength increased linearly with time it was significantly weaker than in controls at 1 and 8 weeks (P less than 0.05). Tensiometric data were inconclusive due to wide variability within the experimental groups. Adhesion formation was moderate to maximal at all evaluation periods for Marlex and Gore-tex. Early adhesion formation was minimal to moderate for both PHD and Vicryl, but later increased with PHD and decreased with Vicryl as this prosthesis was absorbed. No adhesions formed with Marlex and Gelfilm until the gelatin dissolved (1 week), after which the adhesion response was similar to that with Marlex alone. No adhesions formed after Silastic implantation, but graft extrusion and evisceration were common (75%). Controls had no adhesions at all

  19. Heavy Metal Bioaccumulation in an Atypical Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor of the Abdominal Wall.

    PubMed

    Roncati, Luca; Gatti, Antonietta Morena; Capitani, Federico; Barbolini, Giuseppe; Maiorana, Antonio; Palmieri, Beniamino

    2015-01-01

    Heavy metals are able to interfere with the function of vital cellular components. Besides in trace heavy metals, which are essential at low concentration for humans, there are heavy metals with a well-known toxic and oncogenic potential. In this study, for the first time in literature, we report the unique adulthood case of an atypical primitive neuroectodermal tumor of the abdominal wall, diagnosed by histology and immunohistochemistry, with the molecular hybridization support. The neoplasia occurred in a patient chronically exposed to a transdermal delivery of heavy metal salts (aluminum and bismuth), whose intracellular bioaccumulation has been revealed by elemental microanalysis.

  20. Comparison of Liver Tumor Motion With and Without Abdominal Compression Using Cine-Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Eccles, Cynthia L.; Patel, Ritesh; Simeonov, Anna K.; Lockwood, Gina; Haider, Masoom; Dawson, Laura A.

    2011-02-01

    Purpose: Abdominal compression (AC) can be used to reduce respiratory liver motion in patients undergoing liver stereotactic body radiotherapy. The purpose of the present study was to measure the changes in three-dimensional liver tumor motion with and without compression using cine-magnetic resonance imaging. Patients and Methods: A total of 60 patients treated as a part of an institutional research ethics board-approved liver stereotactic body radiotherapy protocol underwent cine T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging through the tumor centroid in the coronal and sagittal planes. A total of 240 cine-magnetic resonance imaging sequences acquired at one to three images each second for 30-60 s were evaluated using an in-house-developed template matching tool (based on the coefficient correlation) to measure the magnitude of the tumor motion. The average tumor edge displacements were used to determine the magnitude of changes in the caudal-cranial (CC) and anteroposterior (AP) directions, with and without AC. Results: The mean tumor motion without AC of 11.7 mm (range, 4.8-23.3) in the CC direction was reduced to 9.4 mm (range, 1.6-23.4) with AC. The tumor motion was reduced in both directions (CC and AP) in 52% of the patients and in a single direction (CC or AP) in 90% of the patients. The mean decrease in tumor motion with AC was 2.3 and 0.6 mm in the CC and AP direction, respectively. Increased motion occurred in one or more directions in 28% of patients. Clinically significant (>3 mm) decreases were observed in 40% and increases in <2% of patients in the CC direction. Conclusion: AC can significantly reduce three-dimensional liver tumor motion in most patients, although the magnitude of the reduction was smaller than previously reported.

  1. [Reconstruction of an abdominal wall defect with a superior epigastric perforator propeller flap: case report].

    PubMed

    Lepivert, J-C; Alet, J-M; Michot, A; Pélissier, P; Pinsolle, V

    2014-10-01

    Perforators flaps take a special place in reconstructive surgery. These flaps can be dissected and turned as a propeller blade on its pedicule axis. We report the case of a 54-year-old man presenting a recurrence of a dermatofibrosarcoma in the right hypochondrium. Tumor resection caused a large abdominal wall defect taking the anterior aponeurosis of the rectus abdominis. An angioscanner was realized in preoperative to locate the perforators of the deep superior epigastric artery. We realized a propeller flap based on a perforator of the left superior epigastric artery who allowed to cover the wall defect. We set up a patch of Vicryl® to reconstruct the aponeurosis plan at the same operative time. We didn't note any necrosis and complete healing occurred in 2 weeks. The margins were healthy. The cosmetic result and the low morbidity make this flap a good therapeutic option. This flap seems reliable, arteries perforators are constant with good diameter.

  2. Image-driven, model-based 3D abdominal motion estimation for MR-guided radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stemkens, Bjorn; Tijssen, Rob H. N.; de Senneville, Baudouin Denis; Lagendijk, Jan J. W.; van den Berg, Cornelis A. T.

    2016-07-01

    Respiratory motion introduces substantial uncertainties in abdominal radiotherapy for which traditionally large margins are used. The MR-Linac will open up the opportunity to acquire high resolution MR images just prior to radiation and during treatment. However, volumetric MRI time series are not able to characterize 3D tumor and organ-at-risk motion with sufficient temporal resolution. In this study we propose a method to estimate 3D deformation vector fields (DVFs) with high spatial and temporal resolution based on fast 2D imaging and a subject-specific motion model based on respiratory correlated MRI. In a pre-beam phase, a retrospectively sorted 4D-MRI is acquired, from which the motion is parameterized using a principal component analysis. This motion model is used in combination with fast 2D cine-MR images, which are acquired during radiation, to generate full field-of-view 3D DVFs with a temporal resolution of 476 ms. The geometrical accuracies of the input data (4D-MRI and 2D multi-slice acquisitions) and the fitting procedure were determined using an MR-compatible motion phantom and found to be 1.0-1.5 mm on average. The framework was tested on seven healthy volunteers for both the pancreas and the kidney. The calculated motion was independently validated using one of the 2D slices, with an average error of 1.45 mm. The calculated 3D DVFs can be used retrospectively for treatment simulations, plan evaluations, or to determine the accumulated dose for both the tumor and organs-at-risk on a subject-specific basis in MR-guided radiotherapy.

  3. Whole abdominal wall segmentation using augmented active shape models (AASM) with multi-atlas label fusion and level set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhoubing; Baucom, Rebeccah B.; Abramson, Richard G.; Poulose, Benjamin K.; Landman, Bennett A.

    2016-03-01

    The abdominal wall is an important structure differentiating subcutaneous and visceral compartments and intimately involved with maintaining abdominal structure. Segmentation of the whole abdominal wall on routinely acquired computed tomography (CT) scans remains challenging due to variations and complexities of the wall and surrounding tissues. In this study, we propose a slice-wise augmented active shape model (AASM) approach to robustly segment both the outer and inner surfaces of the abdominal wall. Multi-atlas label fusion (MALF) and level set (LS) techniques are integrated into the traditional ASM framework. The AASM approach globally optimizes the landmark updates in the presence of complicated underlying local anatomical contexts. The proposed approach was validated on 184 axial slices of 20 CT scans. The Hausdorff distance against the manual segmentation was significantly reduced using proposed approach compared to that using ASM, MALF, and LS individually. Our segmentation of the whole abdominal wall enables the subcutaneous and visceral fat measurement, with high correlation to the measurement derived from manual segmentation. This study presents the first generic algorithm that combines ASM, MALF, and LS, and demonstrates practical application for automatically capturing visceral and subcutaneous fat volumes.

  4. Whole Abdominal Wall Segmentation using Augmented Active Shape Models (AASM) with Multi-Atlas Label Fusion and Level Set

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhoubing; Baucom, Rebeccah B.; Abramson, Richard G.; Poulose, Benjamin K.; Landman, Bennett A.

    2016-01-01

    The abdominal wall is an important structure differentiating subcutaneous and visceral compartments and intimately involved with maintaining abdominal structure. Segmentation of the whole abdominal wall on routinely acquired computed tomography (CT) scans remains challenging due to variations and complexities of the wall and surrounding tissues. In this study, we propose a slice-wise augmented active shape model (AASM) approach to robustly segment both the outer and inner surfaces of the abdominal wall. Multi-atlas label fusion (MALF) and level set (LS) techniques are integrated into the traditional ASM framework. The AASM approach globally optimizes the landmark updates in the presence of complicated underlying local anatomical contexts. The proposed approach was validated on 184 axial slices of 20 CT scans. The Hausdorff distance against the manual segmentation was significantly reduced using proposed approach compared to that using ASM, MALF, and LS individually. Our segmentation of the whole abdominal wall enables the subcutaneous and visceral fat measurement, with high correlation to the measurement derived from manual segmentation. This study presents the first generic algorithm that combines ASM, MALF, and LS, and demonstrates practical application for automatically capturing visceral and subcutaneous fat volumes. PMID:27127333

  5. Improved surgical mesh integration into the rat abdominal wall with arginine administration.

    PubMed

    Arbos, M A; Ferrando, J M; Quiles, M T; Vidal, J; López-Cano, M; Gil, J; Manero, J M; Peña, J; Huguet, P; Schwartz-Riera, S; Reventós, J; Armengol, M

    2006-02-01

    Prosthetic meshes are used as the standard of care in abdominal wall hernia repair. However, hernia recurrences and side effects remain unsolved problems. The demand by health care providers for increasingly efficient and cost-effective surgery encourages the development of newer strategies to improve devices and outcomes. Here, we evaluated whether l-arginine administration was able to ameliorate long-term polypropylene prostheses incorporation into the abdominal wall of Sprague-Dawley rats. Meshes were placed on-lay and continuous l-arginine was administered. In vivo biocompatibility was studied at 7, 25 and 30 days post-implantation. Effectively, l-arginine administration in combination with mesh triggered subtle changes in ECM composition that impinged on critical biochemical and structural features. Lastly, tensile strength augmented and stiffness decreased over the control condition. This could help to restructure the mechanical load transfer from the implant to the brittle surrounding tissues, i.e., impact load and fatigue load associated with mechanical tensions could be distributed between the mesh and the restored tissue in a more balanced manner, and ultimately help to reduce the incidence of loosening, recurrences, and local wound complications. Since the newly formed tissue is more mechanically stable, this approach could eventually be introduced to human hernia repair.

  6. Invariant-based anisotropic constitutive models of the healthy and aneurysmal abdominal aortic wall.

    PubMed

    Basciano, C A; Kleinstreuer, C

    2009-02-01

    The arterial wall is a complex fiber-reinforced composite. Pathological conditions, such as aneurysms, significantly alter the mechanical response of the arterial wall, resulting in a loss of elasticity, enhanced anisotropy, and increased chances of mechanical failure. Invariant-based models of the healthy and aneurysmal abdominal aorta were constructed based on first principles and published experimental data with implementations for several numerical cases, as well as comparisons to current healthy and aneurysmal tissue data. Inherent limitations of a traditional invariant-based methodology are also discussed and compared to the models' ability to accurately reproduce experimental trends. The models capture the nonlinear and anisotropic mechanical responses of the two arterial sections and make reasonable predictions regarding the effects of alterations in healthy and diseased tissue histology. Additionally, the new models exhibit convex and anisotropic monotonically increasing energy contours (suggesting numerical stability) but have potentially the inherent limitations of a covariant theoretical framework. Although the traditional invariant framework exhibits significant covariance, the invariant terms utilized in the new models exhibited limited covariance and are able to accurately reproduce experimental trends. A streamlined implementation is also possible for future numerical investigations of fluid-structure interactions in abdominal aortic aneurysms.

  7. Vacuum-assisted abdominal wall lift for minimal-access surgery: a porcine model study.

    PubMed

    Udwadia, T E; Kathrani, B K; Bernie, W; Gadgil, U S; Chariar, V M

    2005-08-01

    Carbon dioxide pneumoperitoneum, although used universally in laparoscopy, has several well-documented complications and disadvantages. The authors describe a simple method of creating vacuum between a rigid shell and the abdominal wall in a porcine model to create adequate operative space for minimal-access surgery, which does not requires carbon dioxide, does not raise intraabdominal pressure, and is safe, cost effective, and feasible. The proposed device and method could be useful wherever basic laparoscopic equipment and a vacuum pump are available, including many parts of the developing world. The study was carried out with three groups using individual porcine models for each study. Group 1 was studied for feasibility of abdominal wall lift, adequacy of intraabdominal space, optimal vacuum levels, and safety and efficacy of the procedure. Group 2 was subjected to laparoscopic cholecystectomy and salpingectomy. Group 3 was studied for 2 days and 8 days after the animals were subjected to prolonged, high-level vacuum and monitored every 24 h to establish long-term effects. In all three groups the safety and efficacy of the proposed method were established, as well as the absence of physiological or histological alterations.

  8. A clinically relevant in vivo model for the assessment of scaffold efficacy in abdominal wall reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Jeffrey CY; Burugapalli, Krishna; Huang, Yi-Shiang; Kelly, John L; Pandit, Abhay

    2016-01-01

    An animal model that allows for assessment of the degree of stretching or contraction of the implant area and the in vivo degradation properties of biological meshes is required to evaluate their performance in vivo. Adult New Zealand rabbits underwent full thickness subtotal unilateral rectus abdominis muscle excision and were reconstructed with the non-biodegradable Peri-Guard®, Prolene® or biodegradable Surgisis® meshes. Following 8 weeks of recovery, the anterior abdominal wall tissue samples were collected for measurement of the implant dimensions. The Peri-Guard and Prolene meshes showed a slight and obvious shrinkage, respectively, whereas the Surgisis mesh showed stretching, resulting in hernia formation. Surgisis meshes showed in vivo biodegradation and increased collagen formation. This surgical rabbit model for abdominal wall defects is advantageous for evaluating the in vivo behaviour of surgical meshes. Implant area stretching and shrinkage were detected corresponding to mesh properties, and histological analysis and stereological methods supported these findings. PMID:28228932

  9. Probabilistic noninvasive prediction of wall properties of abdominal aortic aneurysms using Bayesian regression.

    PubMed

    Biehler, Jonas; Kehl, Sebastian; Gee, Michael W; Schmies, Fadwa; Pelisek, Jaroslav; Maier, Andreas; Reeps, Christian; Eckstein, Hans-Henning; Wall, Wolfgang A

    2017-02-01

    Multiple patient-specific parameters, such as wall thickness, wall strength, and constitutive properties, are required for the computational assessment of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) rupture risk. Unfortunately, many of these quantities are not easily accessible and could only be determined by invasive procedures, rendering a computational rupture risk assessment obsolete. This study investigates two different approaches to predict these quantities using regression models in combination with a multitude of noninvasively accessible, explanatory variables. We have gathered a large dataset comprising tensile tests performed with AAA specimens and supplementary patient information based on blood analysis, the patients medical history, and geometric features of the AAAs. Using this unique database, we harness the capability of state-of-the-art Bayesian regression techniques to infer probabilistic models for multiple quantities of interest. After a brief presentation of our experimental results, we show that we can effectively reduce the predictive uncertainty in the assessment of several patient-specific parameters, most importantly in thickness and failure strength of the AAA wall. Thereby, the more elaborate Bayesian regression approach based on Gaussian processes consistently outperforms standard linear regression. Moreover, our study contains a comparison to a previously proposed model for the wall strength.

  10. Motion of red blood cells near microvessel walls: effects of a porous wall layer

    PubMed Central

    HARIPRASAD, DANIEL S.; SECOMB, TIMOTHY W.

    2013-01-01

    A two-dimensional model is used to simulate the motion and deformation of a single mammalian red blood cell (RBC) flowing close to the wall of a microvessel, taking into account the effects of a porous endothelial surface layer (ESL) lining the vessel wall. Migration of RBCs away from the wall leads to the formation of a cell-depleted layer near the wall, which has a large effect on the resistance to blood flow in microvessels. The objective is to examine the mechanical factors causing this migration, including the effects of the ESL. The vessel is represented as a straight parallel-sided channel. The RBC is represented as a set of interconnected viscoelastic elements, suspended in plasma, a Newtonian fluid. The ESL is represented as a porous medium, and plasma flow in the layer is computed using the Brinkman approximation. It is shown that an initially circular cell positioned close to the ESL in a shear flow is deformed into an asymmetric shape. This breaking of symmetry leads to migration away from the wall. With increasing hydraulic resistivity of the layer, the rate of lateral migration increases. It is concluded that mechanical interactions of RBCs flowing in microvessels with a porous wall layer may reduce the rate of lateral migration and hence reduce the width of the cell-depleted zone external to the ESL, relative to the cell-depleted zone that would be formed if the interface between the ESL and free-flowing plasma were replaced by an impermeable boundary. PMID:23493820

  11. Effect of curvature on domain wall motion in elliptical nanorings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaya, Fikriye Idil; Bickel, Jessica; Aidala, Katherine

    2014-03-01

    Understanding domain wall (DW) motion in ferromagnetic nanostructures is important to realize proposed magnetic data storage and logic devices. We investigate the effect of curvature on DW pinning and motion by studying elliptical rings using micromagnetic simulations. Elliptical rings with constant width have varying curvature, with the lowest curvature at the minor axis, and the greatest curvature at the major axis. DWs can be created at any angular position within the ellipse by the application of an appropriate uniform magnetic field. However, only some of these positions are stable when the field is removed. We study the stability and depinning of the DWs by applying a slowly increasing elliptical magnetic field to determine the magnitude of the field at which the DWs begin to move. By varying the major to minor axis ratio, we examine the effect of curvature on DW pinning. A larger field is required to move DWs in regions of higher curvature (near the major axis) than lower curvature (near the minor axis). Overall, we see that increasing the major to minor axis ratio of elliptical nanorings requires increasing field strength to depin the DWs along the major axis. Work supported in part by NSF DMR-1207924 and NSF CMMI-1025020. Simulations performed at the CNS computational facilities at Harvard University, a member of the NNIN supported by NSF Award No. ECS-0335765.

  12. Aortic root and left atrial wall motion. An echocardiographic study.

    PubMed Central

    Akgün, G; Layton, C

    1977-01-01

    The echocardiographically recorded movement of the aortic root was studied by analysing the relation between posterior aortic wall motion and other intracardiac events. The systolic anterior movement of the aortic root continued beyond aortic valve closure and in cases with mitral regurgitation began significantly earlier than in normal subjects. The diastolic rapid posterior movement began after mitral valve opening but did not occur in patients with mitral stenosis. The total amplitude of aortic root motion was increased in patients with mitral regurgitation, diminished in cases of mitral stenosis, and was normal with aortic regurgitation. In patients with atrioventricular block an abrupt posterior movement followed the P wave of the electrocardiogram irrespective of its timing in diastole. These observations correlate with the expected changes in left atrial volume during the cardiac cycle both in the normal subjects and patients with heart disease. The results support the hypothesis that phasic changes in left atrial dimension are largely responsible for the echocardiographically observed movement of the aortic root and indicate a potential role for echocardiography in the analysis of left atrial events. Images PMID:911559

  13. Effectiveness of laparoscopic gonadectomy using abdominal wall lift method on Turner's syndrome patients with 45, X/46, XY mosaicism.

    PubMed

    Nakano, H; Kawashima, M; Okada, S; Igarashi, T; Nakata, M; Ogino, M

    2001-04-01

    We present a Turner's syndrome patient with a 45, X/46, XY mosaicism who underwent a prophylactic laparoscopic gonadectomy using the abdominal wall lift method. The patient was a 14-year-old phenotypic girl who was referred for an examination of primary amenorrhea. She had already been found to have Turner's syndrome with 45, X/46, XY mosaicism. After an extensive discussion with the patient and her family regarding her high risk for developing a gonadoblastoma, a laparoscopic bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy using the abdominal wall-life method was performed. Laparoscopy using the abdominal wall lift method has an advantage over CO2 pneumoperitoneum method for patients with Turner's syndrome when it is difficult to intubate because of a webbed neck or a shortened trachea.

  14. Functional electrical stimulation to the abdominal wall muscles synchronized with the expiratory flow does not induce muscle fatigue

    PubMed Central

    Okuno, Yukako; Takahashi, Ryoichi; Sewa, Yoko; Ohse, Hirotaka; Imura, Shigeyuki; Tomita, Kazuhide

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] Continuous electrical stimulation of abdominal wall muscles is known to induce mild muscle fatigue. However, it is not clear whether this is also true for functional electrical stimulation delivered only during the expiratory phase of breathing. This study aimed to examine whether or not intermittent electrical stimulation delivered to abdominal wall muscles induces muscle fatigue. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were nine healthy adults. Abdominal electrical stimulation was applied for 1.5 seconds from the start of expiration and then turned off during inspiration. The electrodes were attached to both sides of the abdomen at the lower margin of the 12th rib. Abdominal electrical stimulation was delivered for 15 minutes with the subject in a seated position. Expiratory flow was measured during stimulus. Trunk flexor torque and electromyography activity were measured to evaluate abdominal muscle fatigue. [Results] The mean stimulation on/off ratio was 1:2.3. The declining rate of abdominal muscle torque was 61.1 ± 19.1% before stimulus and 56.5 ± 20.9% after stimulus, not significantly different. The declining rate of mean power frequency was 47.8 ± 11.7% before stimulus and 47.9 ± 10.2% after stimulus, not significantly different. [Conclusion] It was found that intermittent electrical stimulation to abdominal muscles synchronized with the expiratory would not induce muscle fatigue. PMID:28356636

  15. Functional electrical stimulation to the abdominal wall muscles synchronized with the expiratory flow does not induce muscle fatigue.

    PubMed

    Okuno, Yukako; Takahashi, Ryoichi; Sewa, Yoko; Ohse, Hirotaka; Imura, Shigeyuki; Tomita, Kazuhide

    2017-03-01

    [Purpose] Continuous electrical stimulation of abdominal wall muscles is known to induce mild muscle fatigue. However, it is not clear whether this is also true for functional electrical stimulation delivered only during the expiratory phase of breathing. This study aimed to examine whether or not intermittent electrical stimulation delivered to abdominal wall muscles induces muscle fatigue. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were nine healthy adults. Abdominal electrical stimulation was applied for 1.5 seconds from the start of expiration and then turned off during inspiration. The electrodes were attached to both sides of the abdomen at the lower margin of the 12th rib. Abdominal electrical stimulation was delivered for 15 minutes with the subject in a seated position. Expiratory flow was measured during stimulus. Trunk flexor torque and electromyography activity were measured to evaluate abdominal muscle fatigue. [Results] The mean stimulation on/off ratio was 1:2.3. The declining rate of abdominal muscle torque was 61.1 ± 19.1% before stimulus and 56.5 ± 20.9% after stimulus, not significantly different. The declining rate of mean power frequency was 47.8 ± 11.7% before stimulus and 47.9 ± 10.2% after stimulus, not significantly different. [Conclusion] It was found that intermittent electrical stimulation to abdominal muscles synchronized with the expiratory would not induce muscle fatigue.

  16. ACUTE TEARING OF THE OBLIQUE ABDOMINAL WALL INSERTION ONTO THE ILIAC CREST IN AN AUSTRALIAN FOOTBALL PLAYER: A CASE REPORT

    PubMed Central

    Stockden, Marshall; Breidahl, Bill

    2016-01-01

    Background Tears of the abdominal obliques have previously been reported in the vicinity of the lower ribs but they have not been reported in the vicinity of the iliac crest. The purpose of this case report is to describe the mechanism of injury and diagnosis of a distal abdominal oblique tear and subsequent rehabilitation programming. Case Description A 21-year-old male Australian football player experienced acute right-sided abdominal pain during a game while performing a commonly executed rotation skill. He was assessed clinically before being further examined with ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging which revealed a rupture of the abdominal oblique wall at its insertion onto the iliac crest. The player then underwent a structured and graduated rehabilitation program with clear key performance indicators to optimize return to play and prevent recurrence. Outcomes The player was able to return to play at 35 days post injury and had no recurrence or complications at 12 month follow up post injury. Discussion This is the first time an abdominal oblique wall rupture at its insertion onto the iliac crest has been reported. In players with acute abdominal pain following twisting an insertional oblique tear should be considered as a differential diagnosis. A structured rehabilitation program may also help optimize an athlete's return to play after distal abdominal oblique rupture. PMID:27999726

  17. Necrotizing cellulitis of the abdominal wall, caused by Pediococcus sp., due to rupture of a retroperitoneal stromal cell tumor

    PubMed Central

    Michalopoulos, Nick; Arampatzi, Stergiani; Papavramidis, Theodossis S.; Kotidis, Efstathios; Laskou, Styliani; Papavramidis, Spiros T.

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Soft tissue necrotizing infections are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study is to present a patient with necrotizing infection of abdominal wall resulting from the rupture of a retroperitoneal stromal tumor. PRESENTATION OF CASE We present a 60-year-old Caucasian male patient with necrotizing infection of abdominal wall secondary to the rupture of a retroperitoneal stromal tumor. The patient was initially treated with debridement and fasciotomy of the anterior abdominal wall. Laparotomy revealed purulent peritonitis caused by infiltration and rupture of the splenic flexure by the tumor. Despite prompt intervention the patient died 19 days later. The isolated microorganism causing the infection was the rarely identified as cause of infections in humans Pediococcus sp., a gram-positive, catalase-negative coccus. DISCUSSION Necrotizing infections of abdominal wall are usually secondary either to perineal or to intra-abdominal infections. Gastrointestinal stromal cell tumors could be rarely complicated with perforation and abscess formation. In our case, the infiltrated by the extra-gastrointestinal stromal cell tumor ruptured colon was the source of the infection. The pediococci are rarely isolated as the cause of severe septicemia. CONCLUSION Ruptured retroperitoneal stromal cell tumors are extremely rare cause of necrotizing fasciitis, and before this case, Pediococcus sp. has never been isolated as the responsible agent. PMID:23357010

  18. [Intra-abdominal hypertension as a consequence of plasty in the abdominal wall defects, the methods of its determination and prophylaxis].

    PubMed

    Vorovs'kyĭ, O O

    2013-09-01

    The results of various methods of investigation of intraabdominal hypertension (IAH) in 186 patients were analyzed. In 134 (27.1%) patients IAH was measured via bladder, in 46 (8.9%)--the investigation using nasogastric probe was added and in 8 (1.6%), in whom the abdominal wall defect coincided with adhesive disease, the measurement was performed immediately via drainages. In 44 (8.9%) patients the IAH measurement while abdominal wall defect closure was performed, using Stryker Intra Compartmental Pressure Monitor apparatus. The data obtained using this apparatus were considered the most informative. For the IAH prophylaxis it is mandatory to prognosticate the intraabdominal pressure raising, so on the stage of the hernia gates edges approximation it must not be bigger than a second degree level.

  19. A Multidisciplinary Approach to Medical Weight Loss Prior to Complex Abdominal Wall Reconstruction: Is it Feasible?

    PubMed

    Rosen, Michael J; Aydogdu, Kasim; Grafmiller, Kevin; Petro, Clayton C; Faiman, Gregg H; Prabhu, Ajita

    2015-08-01

    Obesity is a major risk factor for perioperative morbidity, especially for patients undergoing complex incisional hernia repair. The feasibility and effectiveness of medical weight loss programs prior to complex abdominal wall reconstruction have not been well characterized. Here, we report our experience collaborating with a medical weight loss specialist utilizing a protein sparing modified fast in order to optimize weight loss prior to complex abdominal wall reconstruction. Morbidly obese patients (body mass index (BMI) > 35 kg/m(2)) evaluated by our medical weight loss specialist prior to complex ventral hernia repair were identified within our prospective database. Our primary outcome measure was the amount of weight lost prior to surgical intervention. Our secondary outcome measure was to determine the maintenance of weight loss during long-term follow-up after the surgical intervention. A total of 25 patients with a BMI > 35 kg/m(2) were evaluated by our medical weight loss specialist prior to undergoing a planned incisional hernia repair. The mean weight of the patients preoperatively was 128 kg ± 25 (range 96-205 kg) (mean ± standard deviation), and the mean BMI was 49 kg/m(2) ± 10 (range 36-85). After completion of the preoperative modified protein sparing fast, the mean preoperative weight loss of the group was 24 kg ± 21 (range 2-80 kg). The overall change in BMI for the group prior to surgery was 9 kg/m(2) ± 8 (0.6 to 33). The percentage of excess BMI loss and total BMI loss preoperatively was 37 % ± 23 (2 to 83) and 18 % ± 12 (1 to 43), respectively. Of the 24 patients that initially lost weight in the program preoperatively, 22 (88 %) successfully maintained their weight loss for the entire study period for an average of 18 months. Collaboration with a medical weight loss specialist and a surgeon with a structured approach using a modified protein sparing fast can successfully result in meaningful weight

  20. Evaluation of porcine dermal collagen (Permacol) used in abdominal wall reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Patrick W; Salgado, Christopher J; Kent, Kathryn; Finnegan, Matthew; Pello, Mark; Simons, Robert; Atabek, Umur; Kann, Brian

    2009-11-01

    Various methods have been employed to reconstruct complex abdominal wall defects. Structural prosthetic materials such as polypropylene mesh and ePTFE (expanded polytetrafluoroethylene) have been widely used to close these large fascial defects, however, complications with infection and adhesions have led to the recent use of more biocompatible implants. Permacol (acellular porcine dermis) is used as a dermal scaffold, which eventually becomes vascularised and remodelled to reconstruct the abdominal wall in these complex patients. A retrospective review was performed of all patients who underwent consecutive abdominal wall reconstruction with Permacol at our institution in the year 2006. Twenty-eight patients were identified and included in our study. Factors evaluated were: body mass index, relevant co-morbidities, aetiology of hernia, hernia defect size based on CT scan and intraoperative measurement, size of Permacol implant, length of hospital stay, and postoperative complications. Surgical technique was standardised among six surgeons and involved a single layer of acellular porcine dermis as a subfascial 'underlay' graft under moderate tension upon maximal hernia reduction. Tissue expanders were not required for skin closure. Out of 28 patients, 12 were male and 16 were female. Mean intraoperative hernia size was 150 cm(2) (range of 10 cm(2) to 600 cm(2)). Mean age was 55 years with an average body mass index (BMI) of 34 (largest BMI of 61.4). Defects were attributed to either a previous laparotomy incision or open abdomen. Mean hospital stay was 9.67 days. At a mean follow-up of sixteen months, there were three recurrent hernias (10.7%) based on physical examination and postoperative CT scan evaluation. One patient developed a superficial wound dehiscence which was successfully treated with local wound care and one patient developed a cellulitis which was successfully treated with antibiotic therapy. Four patients (14.3%) developed a chronic, non

  1. Obesity increases the odds of acquiring and incarcerating noninguinal abdominal wall hernias.

    PubMed

    Lau, Briana; Kim, Hanjoo; Haigh, Philip I; Tejirian, Talar

    2012-10-01

    The current data available describing the relationship of obesity and abdominal wall hernias is sparse. The objective of this study was to investigate the current prevalence of noninguinal abdominal wall hernias and their correlation with body mass index (BMI) and other demographic risk factors. Patients with umbilical, incisional, ventral, epigastric, or Spigelian hernias with or without incarceration were identified using the regional database for 14 hospitals over a 3-year period. Patients were stratified based on their BMI. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to distinguish other significant risk factors associated with the hernias. Of 2,807,414 patients, 26,268 (0.9%) had one of the specified diagnoses. Average age of the patients was 52 years and 61 per cent were male. The majority of patients had nonincarcerated umbilical hernias (74%). Average BMI was 32 kg/m2. Compared with patients with a normal BMI, the odds of having a hernia increased with BMI: BMI of 25 to 29.9 kg/m2 odds ratio (OR) 1.63, BMI of 30 to 39.9 kg/m2 OR 2.62, BMI 40 to 49.9 kg/m2 OR 3.91, BMI 50 to 59.9 kg/m2 OR 4.85, and BMI greater than 60 kg/m2 OR 5.17 (P<0.0001). Age older than 50 years was associated with a higher risk for having a hernia (OR, 2.12; 95% [CI], 2.07 to 2.17), whereas female gender was associated with a lower risk (OR, 0.53; 95% CI, 0.52 to 0.55). Those with incarcerated hernias had a higher average BMI (32 kg/m2 vs 35 kg/m2; P<0.0001). Overall, BMI greater than 40 kg/m2 showed an increased chance of incarceration, and a BMI greater than 60 kg/m2 had the highest chance of incarceration, OR 12.7 (P<0.0001). Age older than 50 years and female gender were also associated with a higher risk of incarceration (OR, 1.28; 95% CI, 1.02 to 1.59 and OR, 1.80; CI, 1.45 to 2.24). Increasing BMI and increasing age are associated with a higher prevalence and an increased risk of incarceration of noninguinal abdominal wall hernias.

  2. Spontaneous extraskeletal osteosarcoma with various histological growth patterns in the abdominal wall of an ICR mouse

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Tsuyoshi; Katoh, Yoshitaka; Shimada, Yuko; Ohnuma-Koyama, Aya; Takahashi, Naofumi; Kuwahara, Maki; Harada, Takanori

    2015-01-01

    Extraskeletal osteosarcoma is extremely rare in mice. This case report demonstrates a spontaneous murine extraskeletal osteosarcoma that exhibited various histological growth patterns in an ICR mouse. At necropsy, the tumor mass was located in the abdominal wall and was 45 × 30 × 25 mm in size. Histopathologically, the tumor showed the following four growth patterns: a solid pattern of polygonal cells embedded in an osteoid eosinophilic matrix with calcification, an irregular sheet pattern of short spindle cells accompanying some eosinophilic multinucleated cells, a fascicular pattern of spindle cells and a cystic pattern lined by short spindle cells. Immunohistochemically, most of the tumor cells were positive for vimentin, proliferating cell nuclear antigen and osterix. The multinucleated cells mentioned above were desmin positive and were regarded as regenerative striated muscles but not tumor cells. Since no clear continuity with normal bone tissues was observed, the tumor was diagnosed as an “extraskeletal osteosarcoma.” PMID:26989300

  3. Elasticity mapping of murine abdominal organs in vivo using harmonic motion imaging (HMI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payen, Thomas; Palermo, Carmine F.; Sastra, Stephen A.; Chen, Hong; Han, Yang; Olive, Kenneth P.; Konofagou, Elisa E.

    2016-08-01

    Recently, ultrasonic imaging of soft tissue mechanics has been increasingly studied to image otherwise undetectable pathologies. However, many underlying mechanisms of tissue stiffening remain unknown, requiring small animal studies and adapted elasticity mapping techniques. Harmonic motion imaging (HMI) assesses tissue viscoelasticity by inducing localized oscillation from a periodic acoustic radiation force. The objective of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of HMI for in vivo elasticity mapping of abdominal organs in small animals. Pathological cases, i.e. chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer, were also studied in vivo to assess the capability of HMI for detection of the change in mechanical properties. A 4.5 MHz focused ultrasound transducer (FUS) generated an amplitude-modulated beam resulting in 50 Hz harmonic tissue oscillations at its focus. Axial tissue displacement was estimated using 1D-cross-correlation of RF signals acquired with a 7.8 MHz diagnostic transducer confocally aligned with the FUS. In vitro results in canine liver and kidney showed the correlation between HMI displacement and Young’s moduli measured by rheometry compression testing. HMI was capable of providing reproducible elasticity maps of the mouse abdominal region in vivo allowing the identification of, from stiffest to softest, the murine kidney, pancreas, liver, and spleen. Finally, pancreata affected by pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer showed HMI displacements 1.7 and 2.2 times lower than in the control case, respectively, indicating higher stiffness. The HMI displacement amplitude was correlated with the extent of fibrosis as well as detecting the very onset of stiffening even before fibrosis could be detected on H&E. This work shows that HMI can produce reliable elasticity maps of mouse abdominal region in vivo, thus providing a potentially critical tool to assess pathologies affecting organ elasticity.

  4. Elasticity mapping of murine abdominal organs in vivo using harmonic motion imaging (HMI).

    PubMed

    Payen, Thomas; Palermo, Carmine F; Sastra, Stephen A; Chen, Hong; Han, Yang; Olive, Kenneth P; Konofagou, Elisa E

    2016-08-07

    Recently, ultrasonic imaging of soft tissue mechanics has been increasingly studied to image otherwise undetectable pathologies. However, many underlying mechanisms of tissue stiffening remain unknown, requiring small animal studies and adapted elasticity mapping techniques. Harmonic motion imaging (HMI) assesses tissue viscoelasticity by inducing localized oscillation from a periodic acoustic radiation force. The objective of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of HMI for in vivo elasticity mapping of abdominal organs in small animals. Pathological cases, i.e. chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer, were also studied in vivo to assess the capability of HMI for detection of the change in mechanical properties. A 4.5 MHz focused ultrasound transducer (FUS) generated an amplitude-modulated beam resulting in 50 Hz harmonic tissue oscillations at its focus. Axial tissue displacement was estimated using 1D-cross-correlation of RF signals acquired with a 7.8 MHz diagnostic transducer confocally aligned with the FUS. In vitro results in canine liver and kidney showed the correlation between HMI displacement and Young's moduli measured by rheometry compression testing. HMI was capable of providing reproducible elasticity maps of the mouse abdominal region in vivo allowing the identification of, from stiffest to softest, the murine kidney, pancreas, liver, and spleen. Finally, pancreata affected by pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer showed HMI displacements 1.7 and 2.2 times lower than in the control case, respectively, indicating higher stiffness. The HMI displacement amplitude was correlated with the extent of fibrosis as well as detecting the very onset of stiffening even before fibrosis could be detected on H&E. This work shows that HMI can produce reliable elasticity maps of mouse abdominal region in vivo, thus providing a potentially critical tool to assess pathologies affecting organ elasticity.

  5. Chest Wall Motion during Speech Production in Patients with Advanced Ankylosing Spondylitis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalliakosta, Georgia; Mandros, Charalampos; Tzelepis, George E.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To test the hypothesis that ankylosing spondylitis (AS) alters the pattern of chest wall motion during speech production. Method: The pattern of chest wall motion during speech was measured with respiratory inductive plethysmography in 6 participants with advanced AS (5 men, 1 woman, age 45 plus or minus 8 years, Schober test 1.45 plus or…

  6. Clinical applications of a quantitative analysis of regional lift ventricular wall motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leighton, R. F.; Rich, J. M.; Pollack, M. E.; Altieri, P. I.

    1975-01-01

    Observations were summarized which may have clinical application. These were obtained from a quantitative analysis of wall motion that was used to detect both hypokinesis and tardokinesis in left ventricular cineangiograms. The method was based on statistical comparisons with normal values for regional wall motion derived from the cineangiograms of patients who were found not to have heart disease.

  7. Segmentation of arterial vessel wall motion to sub-pixel resolution using M-mode ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Fancourt, Craig; Azer, Karim; Ramcharan, Sharmilee L; Bunzel, Michelle; Cambell, Barry R; Sachs, Jeffrey R; Walker, Matthew

    2008-01-01

    We describe a method for segmenting arterial vessel wall motion to sub-pixel resolution, using the returns from M-mode ultrasound. The technique involves measuring the spatial offset between all pairs of scans from their cross-correlation, converting the spatial offsets to relative wall motion through a global optimization, and finally translating from relative to absolute wall motion by interpolation over the M-mode image. The resulting detailed wall distension waveform has the potential to enhance existing vascular biomarkers, such as strain and compliance, as well as enable new ones.

  8. Effects of arterial blood flow on walls of the abdominal aorta: distributions of wall shear stress and oscillatory shear index determined by phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Sughimoto, Koichi; Shimamura, Yoshiaki; Tezuka, Chie; Tsubota, Ken'ichi; Liu, Hao; Okumura, Kenichiro; Masuda, Yoshitada; Haneishi, Hideaki

    2016-07-01

    Although abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) occur mostly inferior to the renal artery, the mechanism of the development of AAA in relation to its specific location is not yet clearly understood. The objective of this study was to evaluate the hypothesis that even healthy volunteers may manifest specific flow characteristics of blood flow and alter wall shear or oscillatory shear stress in the areas where AAAs commonly develop. Eight healthy male volunteers were enrolled in this prospective study, aged from 24 to 27. Phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed with electrocardiographic triggering. Flow-sensitive four-dimensional MR imaging of the abdominal aorta, with three-directional velocity encoding, including simple morphological image acquisition, was performed. Information on specific locations on the aortic wall was applied to the flow encodes to calculate wall shear stress (WSS) and oscillatory shear index (OSI). While time-framed WSS showed the highest peak of 1.14 ± 0.25 Pa in the juxtaposition of the renal artery, the WSS plateaued to 0.61 Pa at the anterior wall of the abdominal aorta. The OSI peaked distal to the renal arteries at the posterior wall of the abdominal aorta of 0.249 ± 0.148, and was constantly elevated in the whole abdominal aorta at more than 0.14. All subjects were found to have elevated OSI in regions where AAAs commonly occur. These findings indicate that areas of constant peaked oscillatory shear stress in the infra-renal aorta may be one of the factors that lead to morphological changes over time, even in healthy individuals.

  9. [Case of abdominal wall malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor which is difficult to distinguish from a urachal disease].

    PubMed

    Tatenuma, Tomoyuki; Sakata, Ryoko; Sugiura, Shinpei; Tajiri, Takehiro; Gondo, Toshikazu; Kitami, Kazuo

    2013-09-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST) are highly malignant soft tissue sarcomas. It is very rare for MPNST to arise in the abdominal wall. We report a case of abdominal wall MPNST that was difficult to distinguish from a urachal disease. A 72-year-old woman found a mass of the umbilicus in October 2011. She visited a digestive surgery department in November because it gradually enlarged. Diagnostic imaging suggested a urachal tumor. She was then referred to our clinic. Contrast enhanced CT showed that the 5-cm cystic tumor extended from the umbilicus to abdominal wall. The tumor showed low uptake value in PET-CT. We diagnosed her with a urachal cyst, but could not deny urachal carcinoma. Therefore, we performed surgical resection in January 2012. The pathological diagnosis was MPNST. She has not experienced recurrence for 9 months. MPNST mostly occur in the retroperitoneum close to the spine, extremities, head, and neck. It is very rare for them to occur in the abdominal wall. This is the sixth case including overseas reports. In addition, this is the first case in which it was difficult to distinguish from a urachal disease.

  10. Isotropic 3D Black Blood MRI of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Wall and Intraluminal Thrombus

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Chengcheng; Haraldsson, Henrik; Faraji, Farshid; Owens, Christopher; Gasper, Warren; Ahn, Sinyeob; Liu, Jing; Laub, Gerhard; Hope, Michael D.; Saloner, David

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The aortic wall and intraluminal thrombus (ILT) have been increasingly studied as potential markers of progressive disease with abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs). Our goal was to develop a high resolution, 3D black blood MR technique for AAA wall and ILT imaging within a clinically acceptable scan time. Methods Twenty two patients with AAAs (maximal diameter 4.3±1.0cm), along with five healthy volunteers, were imaged at 3T with a 3D T1-weighted fast-spin-echo sequence using variable flip angle trains (SPACE) with a preparation pulse (DANTE) for suppressing blood signal. Volunteers and ten patients were also scanned with SPACE alone for comparison purposes. The signal to noise ratio (SNR) and the aortic wall/ILT to lumen contrast to noise ratio (CNR) were measured. Qualitative image scores (1–4 scale) assessing the inner lumen and outer wall boundaries of AAA were performed by two blinded reviewers. In patients with ILT, the ratio of ILT signal intensity (ILTSI) over psoas muscle SI (MuscleSI) was calculated, and the signal heterogeneity of ILT was quantified as standard deviation (SD) over the mean. Results All subjects were imaged successfully with an average scan time of 7.8±0.7 minutes. The DANTE preparation pulse for blood suppression substantially reduced flow artifacts in SPACE with lower lumen SNR (8.8 vs. 21.4, p<0.001) and improved the wall/ILT to lumen CNR (9.9 vs. 6.3, p<0.001) in patients. Qualitative assessment showed improved visualization of lumen boundaries (73% higher scores on average, p=0.01) and comparable visualization of outer wall boundary (p>0.05). ILT was present in ten patients, with relatively high signal and a wide SD (average ILTSI/MuscleSI 1.42±0.48 (range 0.75–2.11) ) and with SD/mean of 27.7%±6.6% (range 19.6% – 39.4%). Conclusion High resolution, 3D black blood MRI of AAAs can be achieved in a clinical accepted scan time with reduction of flow artifacts using the DANTE preparation pulse. Signal characteristics

  11. Abdominal wall reconstruction by a regionally distinct biocomposite of extracellular matrix digest and a biodegradable elastomer.

    PubMed

    Takanari, Keisuke; Hong, Yi; Hashizume, Ryotaro; Huber, Alexander; Amoroso, Nicholas J; D'Amore, Antonio; Badylak, Stephen F; Wagner, William R

    2016-09-01

    Current extracellular matrix (ECM) derived scaffolds offer promising regenerative responses in many settings, however in some applications there may be a desire for more robust and long lasting mechanical properties. A biohybrid composite material that offers both strength and bioactivity for optimal healing towards native tissue behavior may offer a solution to this problem. A regionally distinct biocomposite scaffold composed of a biodegradable elastomer (poly(ester urethane)urea) and porcine dermal ECM gel was generated to meet this need by a concurrent polymer electrospinning/ECM gel electrospraying technique where the electrosprayed component was varied temporally during the processing. A sandwich structure was achieved with polymer fiber rich upper and lower layers for structural support and an ECM-rich inner layer to encourage cell ingrowth. Increasing the upper and lower layer fiber content predictably increased tensile strength. In a rat full thickness abdominal wall defect model, the sandwich scaffold design maintained its thickness whereas control biohybrid scaffolds lacking the upper and lower fiber-rich regions failed at 8 weeks. Sandwich scaffold implants also showed higher collagen content 4 and 8 weeks after implantation, exhibited an increased M2 macrophage phenotype response at later times and developed biaxial mechanical properties better approximating native tissue. By employing a processing approach that creates a sheet-form scaffold with regionally distinct zones, it was possible to improve biological outcomes in body wall repair and provide the means for further tuning scaffold mechanical parameters when targeting other applications. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Combined Use of an Anterolateral Thigh Flap and Superficial Inferior Epigastric Artery Flap for Reconstruction of an Extensive Abdominal Wall Defect

    PubMed Central

    Kagaya, Yu; Arikawa, Masaki; Kobayashi, Eisuke

    2016-01-01

    Summary: Reconstruction of large abdominal wall defects is challenging. We herein report the successful reconstruction of an extensive abdominal wall defect using a novel combination of flaps after sarcoma resection. A 74-year-old man presented with a dedifferentiated liposarcoma on his abdominal wall. He underwent excision of the tumor, which resulted in an extensive abdominal wall defect. The defect was reconstructed with a pedicled anterolateral thigh flap with an iliotibial tract and a pedicled superficial inferior epigastric artery flap. No skin graft was necessary. The wounds healed successfully, and no herniation occurred. The combination of an anterolateral thigh flap and a superficial inferior epigastric artery flap is a versatile option for reconstruction of extensive abdominal wall defects. PMID:27975026

  13. [A case of fixing an anastomotic site to the abdominal wall out of the abdominal cavity for a small intestinal perforation during chemotherapy].

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Kazutaka; Harano, Masao; Kato, Takuya; Yoshida, Kazuhiro; Sato, Daisuke; Choda, Yasuhiro; Tokumoto, Noriaki; Kanazawa, Takashi; Matsukawa, Hiroyoshi; Ojima, Yasutomo; Idani, Hitoshi; Shiozaki, Shigehiro; Okajima, Masazumi; Ninomiya, Motoki

    2014-11-01

    A 53-year-old man presented with a continuous high fever and was diagnosed with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma with metastasis to the lung, spleen, and mesenterium. He was treated with cyclophosphamide and prednisolone followed by administration of cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisolone (CHOP) chemotherapy 20 days later. Two days after initiation of CHOP therapy, the patient complained of severe abdominal pain. Perforative peritonitis was diagnosed using abdominal computed tomography. A perforation of the small intestine approximately 160 cm distal to the Treitz ligament was uncovered during emergency laparotomy. The risk of leakage was considered too high for anastomosis of the small intestine to be performed. Further, construction of an intestinal stoma could result in a high-output syndrome that could lead to difficulty in resuming chemotherapy. Based on these considerations, we fixed the anastomotic region to the abdominal wall using a technique similar to construction of an intestinal stoma. Post-operative anastomotic leakage did not occur. Nine days later, a perineal hernia was noted near the anastomotic site and a second operation was performed. The anastomotic site was placed back into the abdominal cavity during this operation. CHOP therapy was resumed 16 days after the first operation.

  14. Antiferromagnetic domain wall motion driven by spin-orbit torques

    PubMed Central

    Shiino, Takayuki; Oh, Se-Hyeok; Haney, Paul M.; Lee, Seo-Won; Go, Gyungchoon; Park, Byong-Guk; Lee, Kyung-Jin

    2016-01-01

    We theoretically investigate dynamics of antiferromagnetic domain walls driven by spin-orbit torques in antiferromagnet/heavy metal bilayers. We show that spin-orbit torques drive antiferromagnetic domain walls much faster than ferromagnetic domain walls. As the domain wall velocity approaches the maximum spin-wave group velocity, the domain wall undergoes Lorentz contraction and emits spin-waves in the terahertz frequency range. The interplay between spin-orbit torques and the relativistic dynamics of antiferromagnetic domain walls leads to the efficient manipulation of antiferromagnetic spin textures and paves the way for the generation of high frequency signals from antiferromagnets. PMID:27588878

  15. 3-D segmentation and quantitative analysis of inner and outer walls of thrombotic abdominal aortic aneurysms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kyungmoo; Yin, Yin; Wahle, Andreas; Olszewski, Mark E.; Sonka, Milan

    2008-03-01

    An abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is an area of a localized widening of the abdominal aorta, with a frequent presence of thrombus. A ruptured aneurysm can cause death due to severe internal bleeding. AAA thrombus segmentation and quantitative analysis are of paramount importance for diagnosis, risk assessment, and determination of treatment options. Until now, only a small number of methods for thrombus segmentation and analysis have been presented in the literature, either requiring substantial user interaction or exhibiting insufficient performance. We report a novel method offering minimal user interaction and high accuracy. Our thrombus segmentation method is composed of an initial automated luminal surface segmentation, followed by a cost function-based optimal segmentation of the inner and outer surfaces of the aortic wall. The approach utilizes the power and flexibility of the optimal triangle mesh-based 3-D graph search method, in which cost functions for thrombus inner and outer surfaces are based on gradient magnitudes. Sometimes local failures caused by image ambiguity occur, in which case several control points are used to guide the computer segmentation without the need to trace borders manually. Our method was tested in 9 MDCT image datasets (951 image slices). With the exception of a case in which the thrombus was highly eccentric, visually acceptable aortic lumen and thrombus segmentation results were achieved. No user interaction was used in 3 out of 8 datasets, and 7.80 +/- 2.71 mouse clicks per case / 0.083 +/- 0.035 mouse clicks per image slice were required in the remaining 5 datasets.

  16. Biomechanical and morphological study of a new elastic mesh (Ciberlastic) to repair abdominal wall defects.

    PubMed

    Calvo, B; Pascual, G; Peña, E; Pérez-Khöler, B; Rodríguez, M; Bellón, J M

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to conduct a preclinical evaluation of the behaviour of a new type of abdominal LW prosthesis (Ciberlastic), which was designed with a non-absorbable elastic polyurethane monofilament (Assuplus, Assut Europe, Italy) to allow greater adaptability to mechanical area requirements and higher bio-mimicking with the newly formed surrounding tissues. Our hypothesis was that an increase in the elasticity of the mesh filament could improve the benefits of LW prostheses. To verify our hypothesis, we compared the short- and long-term behaviour of Ciberlastic and Optilene(®) elastic commercial meshes by repairing the partially herniated abdomen in New Zealand White rabbits. The implanted meshes were mechanically and histologically assessed at 14 and 180 days post-implant. We mechanically characterized the partially herniated repaired muscle tissue and also determined mesh shrinkage at different post-implant times. This was followed by a histological study in which the tissue incorporation process was analysed over time. The new prosthesis designed by our group achieved good behaviour that was similar to that of Optilene(®), one of the most popular LW prostheses on the market, with the added advantage of its elastic property. The mechanical properties are significantly lower than those of the polypropylene Optilene(®) mesh, and the new elastic mesh meets the basic mechanical requirements for positioning in the abdominal wall, which was also demonstrated by the absence of recurrences after implantation in the experimental model. We found that the growth of a connective tissue rich in collagen over the hernial defect and the proper deposit of the collagen fibres in the regenerated tissue substantially modified the original properties of the mesh, thereby increasing its biomechanical strength and making the whole tissue/mesh stiffer.

  17. Delay in diagnosis and lessons learnt from a case of abdominal wall abscess caused by fishbone perforation.

    PubMed

    Hakeem, A; Shanmugam, V; Badrinath, K; Dube, M; Panto, P

    2015-04-01

    Complications following foreign body (FB) ingestion are an uncommon clinical problem. A 59-year-old man presented with a 4-week history of left iliac fossa pain and 1 episode of dark red blood mixed with stools. Inflammatory markers were elevated, and computed tomography (CT) of the abdomen and pelvis showed an ill defined abdominal wall inflammatory collection in close contact with the small bowel loops. He was treated with antibiotics, and follow-up CT, colonoscopy and small bowel enema were mostly unremarkable. The patient presented again ten months later with left iliac fossa cellulitis and fever. Multiplanar CT (the patient's fourth scan) demonstrated a 10cm abdominal wall collection with a linear hyperdense structure in the collection. The radiologists suspected a FB and on close scrutiny of the previous scans, they noted it to have been present on all of them. A targeted incision led to the removal of a 3cm fishbone from the collection. This case highlights the need to consider the possibility of a FB being the underlying cause in any unexplained intra-abdominal or abdominal wall inflammatory process so that the diagnosis is made in a timely manner.

  18. Echocardiographic quantification of regional left ventricular wall motion with color kinesis.

    PubMed

    Krahwinkel, W; Haltern, G; Gülker, H

    2000-01-15

    Echocardiographic assessment of regional systolic left ventricular function is usually performed qualitatively and depends on investigator experience. In this study, we investigated a new method for quantifying regional systolic wall motion based on color kinesis. In this study, regional systolic wall motion velocity (Vsys) was determined by dividing end-systolic color width by systolic time. High regional wall motion velocity (Vhigh) was determined by dividing the width of the widest color by its duration of 40 ms. First, in vitro measurements with an acrylic glass model were obtained; these demonstrated a high correlation between echocardiographically determined and real "wall motion velocities" (R = 0.99, p<0.001, R2 = 0.99). Then, 17 healthy, young persons were examined, and normal values for each left ventricular wall segment (16-segment model) were determined. The mean Vsys and Vhigh of all 272 wall segments were 2.3+/-0.6 and 7.4+/-1.8 cm/s, respectively. Finally, in 12 patients with coronary artery disease and prior myocardial infarction, Vsys and Vhigh of each left ventricular wall segment were determined and compared with conventional echocardiographic wall motion analysis using the usual 4-grade score system. Analysis of data showed that quantitative color kinesis measurements demonstrated significantly lower velocity values in pathologic than in normal wall segments (Mann-Whitney U test, p<0.05). Measurements discriminated between pathologic and normal wall motion, with an accuracy of 89% for Vsys and 83% for Vhigh (chi-square test, p<0.05). To summarize, in this first study, measurements of regional wall motion velocities with color kinesis demonstrated reliable results for the quantification of regional left ventricular systolic function.

  19. Segmental wall motion abnormalities in dilated cardiomyopathy: hemodynamic characteristics and comparison with thallium-201 myocardial scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Yamaguchi, S.; Tsuiki, K.; Hayasaka, M.; Yasui, S.

    1987-05-01

    This study assessed the hemodynamic characteristics of segmental wall motion abnormality of the left ventricle in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) and its relation to the thallium-201 (TI-201) myocardial scintigraphy (MPI). Left ventriculograms and MPI in 23 patients were analyzed by the use of quantitative indexes of regional wall motion and TI-201 uptake based on a mean and a standard deviation of 13 normal subjects. Relative normokinesis in our definition was more frequently seen in the inferior wall than in the anterior wall (p less than 0.01). In contrast, severe asynergy was more often seen in the anterior wall than in the inferior wall (p less than 0.01). There were 11 patients who had relative normokinesis and asynergy together. By means of the index of wall motion, the DCM patients were divided into two groups, one with segmental wall motion abnormality (SWMA) and another with diffuse wall motion abnormality (DWMA). The DWMA group had higher left ventricular end-diastolic pressures (p less than 0.05) and the tendency of large left ventricular end-diastolic volumes than the SWMA group. There was a rough correlation (r = 0.58) between the quantitative indexes of TI-201 uptake and wall motion at the same region of the left ventricle. Thus, the nonuniformity of the left ventricular wall motion was recognized in the patients with DCM and more increased preload was shown in the patients with DWMA than in the group with SWMA. Further, the regional asynergy may be related to the localized fibrosis within the left ventricle in DCM, considering the result that the worse TI-201 uptake was roughly accompanied by the more severe asynergy.

  20. Large antigenic skin load in total abdominal wall transplants permits chimerism induction.

    PubMed

    Nasir, Serdar; Bozkurt, Mehmet; Klimczak, Aleksandra; Siemionow, Maria

    2008-11-01

    The application of composite tissue allograft (CTA) transplants in clinical reconstruction is parallel with extended knowledge of anatomy, microsurgical skills and development of transplantation immunology. CTAs are composed of multiple tissues, some of which such as skin are highly immunogenic and cause strong immunologic responses. Strong antigenic nature of skin may be related to Langerhans cells, which are powerful antigen-presenting cells. They are leukocytes found in the epidermis as members of immunologic cascade. Large skin components of CTA transplant may cause higher antigenic load as a result of increased surface area of transplanted skin correlating with increased load of Langerhans cells. In clinical abdominal wall transplants, increased rejection episodes were reported compared with other CTA transplant. This complication may correlate to large skin component of these transplants. To evaluate correlation between large skin island flaps and immunologic responses, CTA models with large skin components should be tested in experimental studies. Here we propose a total abdominal wall (TAW) transplant model in rat to test the feasibility of TAW transplantation in 2 groups: the anatomic study and experimental transplantation group. In anatomic study, TAW flaps were elevated bilaterally on superficial epigastric vessels and replaced. The entire TAW skin islands of all flaps were viable at postoperative day 21. Dye study confirmed that TAW flap was supplied by 2 vascular pedicles. Data in this group demonstrated that this flap is composed of the largest skin island when compared with other CTA transplant models such as full face, hemiface, limb, and groin flap. In experimental group, isograft transplantations were performed between Lewis rats (RT1(1)) while allograft transplantations were performed Lewis (RT1(1)) donors and LBN (RT(1+n)) recipients. All TAW transplants showed viable islands at posttransplant day 200 under cyclosporine A monotherapy protocol

  1. Current-induced domain wall motion in Rashba spin-orbit system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obata, Katsunori; Tatara, Gen

    2008-06-01

    Current-induced magnetic domain wall motion, induced by transfer of spin transfer effect due to exchange interaction, is expected to be useful for next generation high-density storages. Here we showed that efficient domain wall manipulation can be achieved by the introduction of Rashba spin-orbit interaction, which induces spin precession of conduction electron and acts as an effective magnetic field. Its effect on domain wall motion depends on the wall configuration. We found that the effect is significant for Bloch wall with the hard axis along the current, since the effective field works as β or fieldlike term and removes the threshold current if in extrinsic pinning is absent. For Néel wall and Bloch wall with easy axis perpendicular to Rashba plane, the effective field induces a step motion of wall corresponding to a rotation of wall plane by the angle of approximately π at current lower than intrinsic threshold. Rashba interaction would therefore be useful to assist efficient motion of domain walls at low current.

  2. Effects of non-invasive ventilation and posture on chest wall volumes and motion in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: a case series

    PubMed Central

    Magalhães, Cristiana M.; Fregonezi, Guilherme A.; Vidigal-Lopes, Mauro; Vieira, Bruna S. P. P.; Vieira, Danielle S. R.; Parreira, Verônica F.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background The effects of non-invasive ventilation (NIV) on the breathing pattern and thoracoabdominal motion of patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) are unknown. Objectives 1) To analyze the influence of NIV on chest wall volumes and motion assessed by optoelectronic plethysmography in ALS patients and 2) to compare these parameters in the supine and sitting positions to those of healthy individuals (without NIV). Method Nine ALS patients were evaluated in the supine position using NIV. In addition, the ALS patients and nine healthy individuals were evaluated in both sitting and supine positions. Statistical analysis was performed using the paired Student t-test or Wilcoxon test and the Student t-test for independent samples or Mann-Whitney U test. Results Chest wall volume increased significantly with NIV, mean volume=0.43 (SD=0.16)L versus 0.57 (SD=0.19)L (p=0.04). No significant changes were observed for the pulmonary rib cage, abdominal rib cage, or abdominal contribution. The index of the shortening velocity of the diaphragmatic muscle, mean=0.15 (SD=0.05)L/s versus 0.21 (SD=0.05)L/s (p<0.01), and abdominal muscles, mean=0.09 (SD=0.02)L/s versus 0.14 (SD=0.06)L/s (p<0.01), increased during NIV. Comparisons between the supine and sitting positions showed similar changes in chest wall motion in both groups. However, the ALS patients presented a significantly lower contribution of the abdomen in the supine position compared with the controls, mean=56 (SD=13) versus 69 (SD=10) (p=0.02). Conclusions NIV improved chest wall volumes without changing the contribution of the chest wall compartment in ALS patients. In the supine position, ALS patients had a lower contribution of the abdomen, which may indicate early diaphragmatic dysfunction. PMID:27556390

  3. A new technique for minimally invasive abdominal wall reconstruction of complex incisional hernias: totally laparoscopic component separation and incisional hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Moazzez, Ashkan; Mason, Rodney J; Katkhouda, Namir

    2010-10-01

    Since Ramirez et al. presented the first case of component separation for abdominal wall hernias in 1990, it has undergone multiple modifications. This technique, which has been mainly used for large hernias where primary closure of the abdominal wall is not feasible, or for staged management of patients with open abdomens, results in multiple wound complications. In 2007, Rosen et al. reported on the laparoscopic approach to component separation that is associated with less subcutaneous dissection and the consequent advantage of a decreased risk of flap necrosis and wound infection. Here we discuss our totally laparoscopic approach to abdominal wall reconstruction. A minimally invasive abdominal wall reconstruction consists of a bilateral component separation, an intra-abdominal adhesiolysis, primary approximation of rectus muscles, and placement of an intraperitoneal mesh for reinforcing the repair, all performed laparoscopically. Patient-selection criteria, detailed operative technique, tips in preventing and managing the potential pitfalls, and postoperative care are discussed.

  4. Analysis of intracranial aneurysm wall motion and its effects on hemodynamic patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oubel, Estanislao; De Craene, Mathieu; Putman, Christopher M.; Cebral, Juan R.; Frangi, Alejandro F.

    2007-03-01

    Hemodynamics, and in particular Wall Shear Stress (WSS), is thought to play a critical role in the progression and rupture of intracranial aneurysms. Wall motion is related to local biomechanical properties of the aneurysm, which in turn are associated with the amount of damage undergone by the tissue. The underlying hypothesis in this work is that injured regions show differential motion with respect to normal ones, allowing a connection between local wall biomechanics and a potential mechanism of wall injury such as elevated WSS. In a previous work, a novel method was presented combining wall motion estimation using image registration techniques with Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations in order to provide realistic intra-aneurysmal flow patterns. It was shown that, when compared to compliant vessels, rigid models tend to overestimate WSS and produce smaller areas of elevated WSS and force concentration, being the observed differences related to the magnitude of the displacements. This work aims to further study the relationships between wall motion, flow patterns and risk of rupture in aneurysms. To this end, four studies containing both 3DRA and DSA studies were analyzed, and an improved version of the method developed previously was applied to cases showing wall motion. A quantification and analysis of the displacement fields and their relationships to flow patterns are presented. This relationship may play an important role in understanding interaction mechanisms between hemodynamics, wall biomechanics, and the effect on aneurysm evolution mechanisms.

  5. Long-term anisotropic mechanical response of surgical meshes used to repair abdominal wall defects.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Gascón, B; Peña, E; Pascual, G; Rodríguez, M; Bellón, J M; Calvo, B

    2012-01-01

    Routine hernia repair surgery involves the implant of synthetic mesh. However, this type of procedure may give rise to pain and bowel incarceration and strangulation, causing considerable patient disability. The purpose of this study was to compare the long-term behaviour of three commercial meshes used to repair the partially herniated abdomen in New Zealand White rabbits: the heavyweight (HW) mesh, Surgipro(®) and lightweight (LW) mesh, Optilene(®), both made of polypropylene (PP), and a mediumweight (MW) mesh, Infinit(®), made of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE). The implanted meshes were mechanical and histological assessed at 14, 90 and 180 days post-implant. This behaviour was compared to the anisotropic mechanical behaviour of the unrepaired abdominal wall in control non-operated rabbits. Both uniaxial mechanical tests conducted in craneo-caudal and perpendicular directions and histological findings revealed substantial collagen growth over the repaired hernial defects causing stiffness in the repair zone, and thus a change in the original properties of the meshes. The mechanical behaviour of the healthy tissue in the craneo-caudal direction was not reproduced by any of the implanted meshes after 14 days or 90 days of implant, whereas in the perpendicular direction, SUR and OPT achieved similar behaviour. From a mechanical standpoint, the anisotropic PP-lightweight meshes may be considered a good choice in the long run, which correlates with the structure of the regenerated tissue.

  6. Urinary Bladder Adenocarcinoma Metastatic to the Abdominal Wall: Report of a Case with Cytohistologic Correlation

    PubMed Central

    Baliga, Mithra

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of adenocarcinoma metastatic to the abdominal wall in a 71-year-old man with a history of primary bladder adenocarcinoma. CT-guided core biopsy was performed; imprints and histologic sections showed malignant glands lined by tumor cells with hyperchromatic nuclei and prominent nucleoli, infiltrating through skeletal muscle. Immunohistochemistry revealed positivity for CK7, membranous/cytoplasmic β-catenin, caudal-type homeobox transcription factor 2 (CDX2), and α-methylacyl coenzyme A racemase and negativity for CK20, p63, prostate-specific antigen (PSA), and prostate-specific acid phosphatase (PSAP). These findings were interpreted as metastatic adenocarcinoma, consistent with bladder primary. Primary bladder adenocarcinoma is a rare malignancy arising within glandular metaplasia and is associated with cystitis cystica and cystitis glandularis. Predisposing factors include bladder exstrophy, schistosomiasis, and other causes of chronic bladder irritation. This tumor is divided into intestinal, clear cell, and signet ring cell subtypes. Treatment involves radical cystectomy with pelvic lymph node dissection, and prognosis is unfavorable. Primary bladder adenocarcinoma should be differentiated from urachal adenocarcinoma, which arises from urachal remnants near the bladder dome, and secondary adenocarcinoma, or vesical involvement by adenocarcinoma from a different primary. CK7, CK20, CDX2, thrombomodulin, and β-catenin can help distinguish primary bladder adenocarcinoma from colonic adenocarcinoma; PSA and PSAP can help distinguish primary bladder adenocarcinoma from prostate adenocarcinoma. PMID:27006847

  7. Case report of traumatic abdominal wall hernia following blunt motorcycle handlebar injury and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Ogundiran, T O; Obamuyide, H A; Adesina, M A; Ademola, A F

    2012-01-01

    A 25-year-old man, riding a motorcycle, rammed into a moving car at a T junction and sustained a blunt lower-right abdominal injury with the handlebar of his motorbike. He developed a swelling at the point of impact for which he presented in hospital 10 days later. Clinical assessment revealed a healthy young man with a soft, nontender reducible swelling over the lateral half of the right inguinal area. A diagnosis of acute traumatic hernia was made. Abdominal ultrasonography revealed a wide-necked defect in the anterior abdominal wall over the right inguinal area with protruding bowel loops beneath an intact skin. He was planned for herniorrhaphy but has defaulted since then.

  8. Pattern recognition of abnormal left ventricle wall motion in cardiac MR.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yingli; Radau, Perry; Connelly, Kim; Dick, Alexander; Wright, Graham

    2009-01-01

    There are four main problems that limit application of pattern recognition techniques for recognition of abnormal cardiac left ventricle (LV) wall motion: (1) Normalization of the LV's size, shape, intensity level and position; (2) defining a spatial correspondence between phases and subjects; (3) extracting features; (4) and discriminating abnormal from normal wall motion. Solving these four problems is required for application of pattern recognition techniques to classify the normal and abnormal LV wall motion. In this work, we introduce a normalization scheme to solve the first and second problems. With this scheme, LVs are normalized to the same position, size, and intensity level. Using the normalized images, we proposed an intra-segment classification criterion based on a correlation measure to solve the third and fourth problems. Application of the method to recognition of abnormal cardiac MR LV wall motion showed promising results.

  9. Patient-specific models of wall stress in abdominal aortic aneurysm: a comparison between MR and CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Putter, Sander; Breeuwer, Marcel; van de Vosse, Frans N.; Kose, Ursula; Gerritsen, Frans A.

    2006-03-01

    Finite element method based patient-specific wall stress in abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) may provide a more accurate rupture risk predictor than the currently used maximum transverse diameter. In this study, we have investigated the sensitivity of the wall stress in AAA with respect to geometrical variations. We have acquired MR and CT images for four patients with AAA. Three individual users have delineated the AAA vessel wall contours on the image slices. These contours were used to generate synthetic feature images for a deformable model based segmentation method. We investigated the reproducibility and the influence of the user variability on the wall stress. For sufficiently smooth models of the AAA wall, the peak wall stress is reproducible for three out of the four AAA geometries. The 0.99 percentiles of the wall stress show excellent reproducibility for all four AAAs. The variations induced by user variability are larger than the errors caused by the segmentation variability. The influence of the user variability appears to be similar for MR and CT. We conclude that the peak wall stress in AAA is sensitive to small geometrical variations. To increase reproducibility it appears to be best not to allow too much geometrical detail in the simulations. This could be achieved either by using a sufficiently smooth geometry representation or by using a more robust statistical parameter derived from the wall stress distribution.

  10. [Changes in left ventricular regional wall motion induced by Verapamil (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Barbieri, E; Allegri, P; Morlino, T; Vincenzi, M

    1980-01-01

    28 subjects with atherosclerotic lesions of coronary arteries were studied by means of cineventriculography both before and after IV administration of verapamil Regional wall motion has been analyzed by means of two different methods. Imporvement of regional wall motion has been demonstrated in about 65% of cases. No significant result has been achieved in segments corresponding to previous infarctions. Such a response does not differ substantially from that evoked by nitroglycerin or other calcium antagonist drugs.

  11. A brief training module improves recognition of echocardiographic wall-motion abnormalities by emergency medicine physicians.

    PubMed

    Kerwin, Chris; Tommaso, Laura; Kulstad, Erik

    2011-01-01

    Objective. Wall-motion abnormality on echocardiogram is more sensitive in detecting cardiac ischemia than the electrocardiogram, but the use of bedside echocardiography by emergency physicians (EPs) for this purpose does not appear to be widespread, apparently due to limited data on proficiency of EPs for this task. We sought to determine the effect of a brief training module on the ability of EPs to recognize wall motion abnormalities on echocardiograms. Methods. We developed a brief training and testing module and presented it to EPs. After baseline testing of 15 echocardiograms, we presented the 30-minute training module, and administered a new test of 15 different echocardiograms. Physicians were asked to interpret the wall motion as normal or abnormal. Results. 35 EPs over two separate sessions showed significant improvement recognition of wall-motion abnormalities after the brief training module. Median score on the baseline test was 67%, interquartile range (IQR) 53% to 80%, while the median score on the posttraining test was 87%, IQR 80% to 87%, P < .001, independent of time in practice or prior training. Conclusion. With only brief training on how to recognize wall motion abnormalities on echocardiograms, EPs showed significant improvement in ability to identify wall motion abnormalities.

  12. Successful Treatment of Mesenteric Varices After Living Donor Liver Transplantation with Retrograde Transvenous Obliteration Via an Abdominal Wall Vein

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, Osamu Tamura, Yoshitaka; Nakasone, Yutaka; Yamashita, Yasuyuki; Okajima, Hideaki; Asonuma, Katsuhiro; Inomata, Yukihiro

    2010-06-15

    Balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration is an established treatment for gastric varices; it has been used more rarely to treat mesenteric varices. We report a 12-year-old girl who had received a living donor liver transplant and suffered melena due to ruptured mesenteric varices. We addressed treatment of the mesenteric varices by retrograde transvenous obliteration of an abdominal wall collateral vein detected by superior mesenteric arteriography.

  13. Gasless laparoscopic surgery plus abdominal wall lifting for giant hiatal hernia-our single-center experience.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jiang-Hong; Wu, Ji-Xiang; Yu, Lei; Li, Jian-Ye

    2016-12-01

    Giant hiatal hernia (GHH) comprises 5% of hiatal hernia and is associated with significant complications. The traditional operative procedure, no matter transthoracic or transabdomen repair of giant hiatal hernia, is characteristic of more invasion and more complications. Although laparoscopic repair as a minimally invasive surgery is accepted, a part of patients can not tolerate pneumoperitoneum because of combination with cardiopulmonary diseases or severe posterior mediastinal and neck emphesema during operation. The aim of this article was to analyze our experience in gasless laparoscopic repair with abdominal wall lifting to treat the giant hiatal hernia. We performed a retrospective review of patients undergoing gasless laparoscopic repair of GHH with abdominal wall lifting from 2012 to 2015 at our institution. The GHH was defined as greater than one-third of the stomach in the chest. Gasless laparoscopic repair of GHH with abdominal wall lifting was attempted in 27 patients. Mean age was 67 years. The results showed that there were no conversions to open surgery and no intraoperative deaths. The mean duration of operation was 100 min (range: 90-130 min). One-side pleura was injured in 4 cases (14.8%). The mean postoperative length of stay was 4 days (range: 3-7 days). Median follow- up was 26 months (range: 6-38 months). Transient dysphagia for solid food occurred in three patients (11.1%), and this symptom disappeared within three months. There was one patient with recurrent hiatal hernia who was reoperated on. Two patients still complained of heartburn three months after surgery. Neither reoperation nor endoscopic treatment due to signs of postoperative esophageal stenosis was required in any patient. Totally, satisfactory outcome was reported in 88.9% patients. It was concluded that the gasless laparoscopic approach with abdominal wall lifting to the repair of GHH is feasible, safe, and effective for the patients who cannot tolerate the pneumoperitoneum.

  14. Deterministic Domain Wall Motion Orthogonal To Current Flow Due To Spin Orbit Torque

    PubMed Central

    Bhowmik, Debanjan; Nowakowski, Mark E.; You, Long; Lee, OukJae; Keating, David; Wong, Mark; Bokor, Jeffrey; Salahuddin, Sayeef

    2015-01-01

    Spin-polarized electrons can move a ferromagnetic domain wall through the transfer of spin angular momentum when current flows in a magnetic nanowire. Such current induced control of a domain wall is of significant interest due to its potential application for low power ultra high-density data storage. In previous reports, it has been observed that the motion of the domain wall always happens parallel to the current flow – either in the same or opposite direction depending on the specific nature of the interaction. In contrast, here we demonstrate deterministic control of a ferromagnetic domain wall orthogonal to current flow by exploiting the spin orbit torque in a perpendicularly polarized Ta/CoFeB/MgO heterostructure in presence of an in-plane magnetic field. Reversing the polarity of either the current flow or the in-plane field is found to reverse the direction of the domain wall motion. Notably, such orthogonal motion with respect to current flow is not possible from traditional spin transfer torque driven domain wall propagation even in presence of an external magnetic field. Therefore the domain wall motion happens purely due to spin orbit torque. These results represent a completely new degree of freedom in current induced control of a ferromagnetic domain wall. PMID:26139349

  15. Spin-wave-driven high-speed domain-wall motions in soft magnetic nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Jaehak; Yoo, Myoung-Woo; Kim, Sang-Koog

    2015-10-28

    We report on a micromagnetic simulation study of interactions between propagating spin waves and a head-to-head domain wall in geometrically confined magnetic nanotubes. We found that incident spin waves of specific frequencies can lead to sufficiently high-speed (on the order of a few hundreds of m/s or higher) domain-wall motions in the same direction as that of the incident spin-waves. The domain-wall motions and their speed vary remarkably with the frequency and the amplitude of the incident spin-waves. High-speed domain-wall motions originate from the transfer torque of spin waves' linear momentum to the domain wall, through the partial or complete reflection of the incident spin waves from the domain wall. This work provides a fundamental understanding of the interaction of the spin waves with a domain wall in the magnetic nanotubes as well as a route to all-magnetic control of domain-wall motions in the magnetic nanoelements.

  16. Current-Induced Generation and Synchronous Motion of Highly Packed Coupled Chiral Domain Walls.

    PubMed

    P Del Real, Rafael; Raposo, Victor; Martinez, Eduardo; Hayashi, Masamitsu

    2017-03-08

    Chiral domain walls of Neel type emerge in heterostructures that include heavy metal (HM) and ferromagnetic metal (FM) layers owing to the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya (DM) interaction at the HM/FM interface. In developing storage class memories based on the current induced motion of chiral domain walls, it remains to be seen how dense such domain walls can be packed together. Here we show that a universal short-range repulsion that scales with the strength of the DM interaction exists among chiral domain walls. The distance between the two walls can be reduced with the application of the out-of-plane field, allowing the formation of coupled domain walls. Surprisingly, the current driven velocity of such coupled walls is independent of the out-of-plane field, enabling manipulation of significantly compressed coupled domain walls using current pulses. Moreover, we find that a single current pulse with optimum amplitude can create a large number of closely spaced domain walls. These features allow current induced generation and synchronous motion of highly packed chiral domain walls, a key feature essential for developing domain wall based storage devices.

  17. Surgically placed abdominal wall catheters on postoperative analgesia and outcomes after living liver donation.

    PubMed

    Khan, James; Katz, Joel; Montbriand, Janice; Ladak, Salima; McCluskey, Stuart; Srinivas, Coimbatore; Ko, Raynauld; Grant, David; Bradbury, Ashleene; LeManach, Yannick; Clarke, Hance

    2015-04-01

    Living donor liver resections are associated with significant postoperative pain. Epidural analgesia is the gold standard for postoperative pain management, although it is often refused or contraindicated. Surgically placed abdominal wall catheters (AWCs) are a novel pain modality that can potentially provide pain relief for those patients who are unable to receive an epidural. A retrospective review was performed at a single center. Patients were categorized according to their postoperative pain modality: intravenous (IV) patient-controlled analgesia (PCA), AWCs with IV PCA, or patient-controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA). Pain scores, opioid consumption, and outcomes were compared for the first 3 postoperative days. Propensity score matches (PSMs) were performed to adjust for covariates and to confirm the primary analysis. The AWC group had significantly lower mean morphine-equivalent consumption on postoperative day 3 [18.1 mg, standard error (SE)=3.1 versus 28.2 mg, SE=3.0; P=0.02] and mean cumulative morphine-equivalent consumption (97.2 mg, SE=7.2 versus 121.0 mg, SE=9.1; P=0.04) in comparison with the IV PCA group; the difference in cumulative-morphine equivalent remained significant in the PSMs. AWC pain scores were higher than those in the PCEA group and were similar to the those in the IV PCA group. The AWC group had a lower incidence of pruritus and a shorter hospital stay in comparison with the PCEA group and had a lower incidence of sedation in comparison with both groups. Time to ambulation, nausea, and vomiting were comparable among all 3 groups. The PSMs confirmed all results except for a decrease in the length of stay in comparison with PCEA. AWCs may be an alternative to epidural analgesia after living donor liver resections. Randomized trials are needed to verify the benefits of AWCs, including the safety and adverse effects.

  18. Sir Ganga Ram Hospital classification of groin and ventral abdominal wall hernias

    PubMed Central

    Chowbey, Pradeep K; Khullar, Rajesh; Mehrotra, Magan; Sharma, Anil; Soni, Vandana; Baijal, Manish

    2006-01-01

    Background: Numerous classifications for groin and ventral hernias have been proposed over the past five to six decades. The old, simple classification of groin hernia in to direct, inguinal and femoral components is no longer adequate to understand the complex pathophysiology and management of these hernias. The most commonly followed classification for ventral hernias divide them into congenital, acquired, incisional and traumatic, which also does not convey any information regarding the predicted level of difficulty. Aim: All the previous classification systems were based on open hernia repairs and have their own fallacies particularly for uncommon hernias that cannot be classified in these systems. With the advent of laparoscopic/ endoscopic approach, surgical access to the hernia as well as the functional anatomy viewed by the surgeon changed. This change in the surgical approach and functional anatomy opened the doors for newer classifications. The authors have thus proposed a classification system based on the expected level of intraoperative difficulty for endoscopic hernia repair. Classification: In the proposed classification higher grades signify increasing levels of expected intraoperative difficulty. This functional classification grades groin hernias according to the: a) Pre -operative predictive level of difficulty of endoscopic surgery, and b) Intraoperative factors that lead to a difficult repair. Pre operative factors include multiple or pantaloon hernias, recurrent hernias, irreducible and incarcerated hernias. Intraoperative factors include reducibility at operation, degree of descent of the hernial sac and previous hernia repairs. Hernial defects greater than 7 cm in diameter are categorized one grade higher. Conclusion: Though there have been several classification systems for groin or inguinal hernias, none have been described for total classification of all ventral hernias of the abdomen. The system proposed by us includes all abdominal wall

  19. Domain wall motion driven by spin Hall effect—Tuning with in-plane magnetic anisotropy

    SciTech Connect

    Rushforth, A. W.

    2014-04-21

    This letter investigates the effects of in-plane magnetic anisotropy on the current induced motion of magnetic domain walls in systems with dominant perpendicular magnetic anisotropy, where accumulated spins from the spin Hall effect in an adjacent heavy metal layer are responsible for driving the domain wall motion. It is found that that the sign and magnitude of the domain wall velocity in the uniform flow regime can be tuned significantly by the in-plane magnetic anisotropy. These effects are sensitive to the ratio of the adiabatic and non-adiabatic spin transfer torque parameters and are robust in the presence of pinning and thermal fluctuations.

  20. A successful early gore-tex reconstruction of an abdominal wall defect in a neonate with Cantrell pentalogy: a case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Divkovic, Dalibor; Kvolik, Slavica; Sipl, Mirna; Sego, Krunoslav; Puseljic, Silvija; Rakipovic-Stojanovic, Andreja; Kovacic, Borna

    2015-01-01

    Key Clinical Message A surgical technique, materials used for abdominal wall reconstruction, and postoperative care are important for patient outcomes. We report the first case of neonate with Cantrell's pentalogy surviving early reconstruction of abdominal, diaphragmal and pericardial defects. Several recent investigations suggest that intraabdominal pressure monitoring may improve outcomes in this patient category. PMID:25678967

  1. Experimental evaluation of a new composite mesh with the selective property of incorporation to the abdominal wall without adhering to the intestines.

    PubMed

    Amid, P K; Shulman, A G; Lichtenstein, I L; Sostrin, S; Young, J; Hakakha, M

    1994-03-01

    This preliminary study examined the possibility of preventing intestinal adhesions to biomaterials while preserving their incorporation with the abdominal wall. White New Zealand rabbits received intraperitoneal implants of different biomaterials for repair of defects created on the abdominal wall. The following biomaterials were used: polypropylene, polyester, expanded polytetraflueroethylene, polypropylene mesh/polypropylene sheeting (polypropylene mesh covered with polypropylene sheeting on the peritoneal side), polypropylene/silastic, polypropylene/polyglactin, polypropylene/polyglycolic acid, and polypropylene/fibrin. All biomaterials evaluated caused adhesions to the intestines except for polypropylene mesh/polypropylene sheeting and polypropylene mesh/silastic composites. Because adhesion of the intestine to the biomaterial is the first stage of biomaterial-related intestinal fistula, its prevention is logical for the elimination of this complication. Composites with the selective property of adhering to the abdominal wall, yet sparing the viscera, would facilitate thoracic and abdominal wall surgeries, as well as intraperitoneal laparoscopic hernioplasties.

  2. Clinical anatomy of the inferior epigastric artery with special relevance to invasive procedures of the anterior abdominal wall

    PubMed Central

    Joy, Praisy; Prithishkumar, Ivan James; Isaac, Bina

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Injury to the inferior epigastric artery (IEA) has been reported following lower abdominal wall surgical incisions, abdominal peritoneocentesis and trocar placements at laparoscopic port sites, resulting in the formation of abdominal wall haematomas that may expand considerably due to lack of tissue resistance. The aim of this study was to localise its course in relation to standard anatomic landmarks and suggest safe areas for performance of invasive procedures. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Sixty IEAs of 30 adult cadavers (male = 19; female = 11) were dissected and the course of the IEA noted in relation to the mid-inguinal point, anterior superior iliac spine (ASIS) and umbilicus. RESULTS: The mean distance of the IEA from the midline was 4.45 ± 1.42 cm at the level of the mid-inguinal point, 4.10 ± 1.15 cm at the level of ASIS and 4.49 ± 1.15 cm at the level of umbilicus. There was an average of 3.3 branches per IEA with more branches arising from its lateral aspect. The IEA was situated within one-third (32%) of the distance between the midline and the sagittal plane through ASIS at all levels. CONCLUSION: To avoid injury to IEA, trocars can be safely inserted 5.5 cm [mean + 1 standard deviation (SD)] away from the midline (or) slightly more than one-third of the distance between the midline and a sagittal plane running through ASIS. These findings may be useful not only for laparoscopic procedures but also for image-guided biopsy, abdominal paracentesis, and placement of abdominal drains. PMID:27251822

  3. Effects of the Transient Blood Flow-Wall Interaction on the Wall Stress Distribution in Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Rubing; Geindreau, Christian; Lasheras, Juan

    2006-11-01

    Our static finite element analysis (FEA) of both idealized and real clinical models has shown that the maximum diameter and asymmetry have substantial influence on the AAA wall stress distribution. The thrombus inside the AAA was also found to reduce the magnitude of the wall stresses. To achieve a better understanding of the wall stress distribution in real AAAs, a dynamic FEA was also performed. We considered models, both symmetric and non-symmetric, in which the aorta is assumed isotropic with nonlinear material properties. For the limiting case of rigid walls, the evolution of the flow pattern and the wall shear stresses due to fluid flow at different stages of cardiac cycle predicted by our simulations are compared with experimental results obtained in in-vitro models. A good agreement is found between both results. Finally, we have extended the analysis to the physiologically correct case of deformable walls and characterized the transient effects on the wall stresses.

  4. Dynamic reconstruction of full-thickness abdominal wall defects using free innervated vastus lateralis muscle flap combined with free anterolateral thigh flap.

    PubMed

    Iida, Takuya; Mihara, Makoto; Narushima, Mitsunaga; Todokoro, Takeshi; Hara, Hisako; Yoshimatu, Hidehiko; Koshima, Isao; Kadono, Takafumi

    2013-03-01

    Reconstruction of full-thickness abdominal wall defects remains a difficult surgical challenge. Although various reconstructive methods, including artificial mesh, pedicled and free flaps, have been reported, most reported reconstruction of only the fascia layer, leaving the resected rectus abdominis muscle unreconstructed. However, recent studies suggested the importance of dynamic reconstruction with functional muscle in preventing abdominal hernia in the long-term. According to the principle of reconstructive surgery, "replace lost tissue with similar tissue," a functionally and aesthetically ideal reconstruction is to reconstruct all components of the abdominal wall structure, including skin, subcutaneous fat, fascia, and muscle. We present 2 cases with full-thickness abdominal wall defects in the upper abdominal region, which we reconstructed with a free innervated vastus lateralis muscle flap combined with a free anterolateral thigh flap. The motor nerve of the vastus lateralis muscle was sutured with the intercostal nerve, and reinnervation was confirmed by electromyography. This method allows reconstruction of all components of the abdominal wall with a single flap, and dynamic reconstruction is achieved which will reduce the risk of postoperative hernia. We believe this method can be a good option for reconstruction of full-thickness abdominal wall defects with long-term stability.

  5. Synchronous precessional motion of multiple domain walls in a ferromagnetic nanowire by perpendicular field pulses.

    PubMed

    Kim, June-Seo; Mawass, Mohamad-Assaad; Bisig, André; Krüger, Benjamin; Reeve, Robert M; Schulz, Tomek; Büttner, Felix; Yoon, Jungbum; You, Chun-Yeol; Weigand, Markus; Stoll, Hermann; Schütz, Gisela; Swagten, Henk J M; Koopmans, Bert; Eisebitt, Stefan; Kläui, Mathias

    2014-03-24

    Magnetic storage and logic devices based on magnetic domain wall motion rely on the precise and synchronous displacement of multiple domain walls. The conventional approach using magnetic fields does not allow for the synchronous motion of multiple domains. As an alternative method, synchronous current-induced domain wall motion was studied, but the required high-current densities prevent widespread use in devices. Here we demonstrate a radically different approach: we use out-of-plane magnetic field pulses to move in-plane domains, thus combining field-induced magnetization dynamics with the ability to move neighbouring domain walls in the same direction. Micromagnetic simulations suggest that synchronous permanent displacement of multiple magnetic walls can be achieved by using transverse domain walls with identical chirality combined with regular pinning sites and an asymmetric pulse. By performing scanning transmission X-ray microscopy, we are able to experimentally demonstrate in-plane magnetized domain wall motion due to out-of-plane magnetic field pulses.

  6. Gas gangrene of the abdominal wall due to late-onset enteric fistula after polyester mesh repair of an incisional hernia.

    PubMed

    Moussi, A; Daldoul, S; Bourguiba, B; Othmani, D; Zaouche, A

    2012-04-01

    The occurrence of enteric fistulae after wall repair using a prosthetic mesh is a serious but, fortunately, rare complication. We report the case of a 66-year-old diabetic man who presented with gas gangrene of the abdominal wall due to an intra-abdominal abscess caused by intestinal erosion six years after an incisional hernia repair using a polyester mesh. The aim of this case report is to illustrate the seriousness of enteric fistula after parietal repair using a synthetic material.

  7. Delayed primary closure of contaminated abdominal wall defects with non-crosslinked porcine acellular dermal matrix compared with conventional staged repair: a retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Synthetic mesh has been used traditionally to repair abdominal wall defects, but its use is limited in the case of bacterial contamination. New biological materials are now being used successfully for delayed primary closure of contaminated abdominal wall defects. The costs of biological materials may prevent surgeons from using them. We compared the conventional staged repair of contaminated abdominal wall defects with a single-stage procedure using a non-crosslinked porcine acellular dermal matrix. Methods A total of 14 cases with Grade 3 contaminated abdominal wall defects underwent delayed primary closure of the abdomen using a non-crosslinked porcine acellular dermal matrix (Strattice™ Reconstructive Tissue Matrix, LifeCell Corp., Branchburg, NJ, USA). The results were compared with a group of 14 patients who had received conventional treatment for the repair of contaminated abdominal wall defects comprising a staged repair during two separate hospital admissions employing synthetic mesh. Treatment modalities, outcomes, and costs were compared. Results In all cases treated with delayed primary closure employing non-crosslinked porcine acellular dermal matrix, there were no complications related to its use. Two patients died due to unrelated events. Although treatment costs were estimated to be similar in the two groups, the patients treated with porcine acellular dermal matrix spent less time as an inpatient than those receiving conventional two-stage repair. Conclusions Delayed primary closure of contaminated abdominal wall defects using a non-crosslinked porcine acellular dermal matrix may be a suitable alternative to conventional staged repair. In our patients, it resulted in early restoration of abdominal wall function and shorter hospitalization. The costs for treating contaminated abdominal wall defects using porcine acellular dermal matrix during a single hospital admission were not higher than costs for conventional two-stage repair

  8. SU-E-J-133: Evaluation of Inter- and Intra-Fractional Pancreas Tumor Residual Motions with Abdominal Compression

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Y; Shi, F; Tian, Z; Jia, X; Meyer, J; Jiang, S; Mao, W

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Abdominal compression (AC) has been widely used to reduce pancreas motion due to respiration for pancreatic cancer patients undergoing stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). However, the inter-fractional and intra-fractional patient motions may degrade the treatment. The purpose of this work is to study daily CBCT projections and 4DCT to evaluate the inter-fractional and intra-fractional pancreatic motions. Methods: As a standard of care at our institution, 4D CT scan was performed for treatment planning. At least two CBCT scans were performed for daily treatment. Retrospective studies were performed on patients with implanted internal fiducial markers or surgical clips. The initial motion pattern was obtained by extracting marker positions on every phase of 4D CT images. Daily motions were presented by marker positions on CBCT scan projection images. An adaptive threshold segmentation algorithm was used to extract maker positions. Both marker average positions and motion ranges were compared among three sets of scans, 4D CT, positioning CBCT, and conformal CBCT, for inter-fractional and intra-fractional motion variations. Results: Data from four pancreatic cancer patients were analyzed. These patients had three fiducial markers implanted. All patients were treated by an Elekta Synergy with single fraction SBRT. CBCT projections were acquired by XVI. Markers were successfully detected on most of the projection images. The inter-fractional changes were determined by 4D CT and the first CBCT while the intra-fractional changes were determined by multiple CBCT scans. It is found that the average motion range variations are within 2 mm, however, the average marker positions may drift by 6.5 mm. Conclusion: The patients respiratory motion variation for pancreas SBRT with AC was evaluated by detecting markers from CBCT projections and 4DCT, both the inter-fraction and intra-fraction motion range change is small but the drift of marker positions may be comparable

  9. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Lorazepam to Reduce Liver Motion in Patients Receiving Upper Abdominal Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Tsang, Derek S.; Voncken, Francine E.M.; Tse, Regina V.; Sykes, Jenna; Wong, Rebecca K.S.; Dinniwell, Rob E.; Kim, John; Ringash, Jolie; Brierley, James D.; Cummings, Bernard J.; Brade, Anthony; Dawson, Laura A.

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: Reduction of respiratory motion is desirable to reduce the volume of normal tissues irradiated, to improve concordance of planned and delivered doses, and to improve image guided radiation therapy (IGRT). We hypothesized that pretreatment lorazepam would lead to a measurable reduction of liver motion. Methods and Materials: Thirty-three patients receiving upper abdominal IGRT were recruited to a double-blinded randomized controlled crossover trial. Patients were randomized to 1 of 2 study arms: arm 1 received lorazepam 2 mg by mouth on day 1, followed by placebo 4 to 8 days later; arm 2 received placebo on day 1, followed by lorazepam 4 to 8 days later. After tablet ingestion and daily radiation therapy, amplitude of liver motion was measured on both study days. The primary outcomes were reduction in craniocaudal (CC) liver motion using 4-dimensional kV cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) and the proportion of patients with liver motion ≤5 mm. Secondary endpoints included motion measured with cine magnetic resonance imaging and kV fluoroscopy. Results: Mean relative and absolute reduction in CC amplitude with lorazepam was 21% and 2.5 mm respectively (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.1-3.9, P=.001), as assessed with CBCT. Reduction in CC amplitude to ≤5 mm residual liver motion was seen in 13% (95% CI 1%-25%) of patients receiving lorazepam (vs 10% receiving placebo, P=NS); 65% (95% CI 48%-81%) had reduction in residual CC liver motion to ≤10 mm (vs 52% with placebo, P=NS). Patients with large respiratory movement and patients who took lorazepam ≥60 minutes before imaging had greater reductions in liver CC motion. Mean reductions in liver CC amplitude on magnetic resonance imaging and fluoroscopy were nonsignificant. Conclusions: Lorazepam reduces liver motion in the CC direction; however, average magnitude of reduction is small, and most patients have residual motion >5 mm.

  10. The effects of modified wall squat exercises on average adults' deep abdominal muscle thickness and lumbar stability.

    PubMed

    Cho, Misuk

    2013-06-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of bridge exercises applying the abdominal drawing-in method and modified wall squat exercises on deep abdominal muscle thickness and lumbar stability. [Subjects] A total of 30 subjects were equally divided into an experimental group and a control group. [Methods] The experimental group completed modified wall squat exercises, and the control group performed bridge exercises. Both did so for 30 minutes three times per week over a six-week period. Both groups' transversus abdominis (Tra), internal oblique (IO), and multifidus muscle thickness were measured using ultrasonography, while their static lumbar stability and dynamic lumbar stability were measured using a pressure biofeedback unit. [Results] A comparison of the pre-intervention and post-intervention measures of the experimental group and the control group was made; the Tra and IO thicknesses were significantly different in both groups. [Conclusion] The modified wall squat exercise and bridge exercise affected the thicknesses of the Tra and the IO muscles. While the bridge exercise requirs space and a mattress to lie on, the modified wall squat exercise can be conveniently performed anytime.

  11. Expression of matrix metalloproteinases, their tissue inhibitors, and osteopontin in the wall of thoracic and abdominal aortas with dilatative pathology.

    PubMed

    Lesauskaite, Vaiva; Epistolato, Maria Carmela; Castagnini, Marta; Urbonavicius, Sigitas; Tanganelli, Piero

    2006-08-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) degrade extracellular matrix and may play a central role in the pathogenesis of aortic aneurysms. We studied 2 groups of patients: 15 with dilatative pathology of the ascending thoracic aorta and 17 with aneurysm of the abdominal aortic wall (AAA). We compared the expression of MMPs, tissue inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinases (TIMPs), and osteopontin in the wall of thoracic and abdominal aneurysms. In AAA, MMP-9 and TIMP-1 expression in inflammatory cells was higher than in smooth muscle cells (SMCs) (median score: 3.5 versus 1, P < .0001; 2 versus 1, P < .04, respectively), whereas MMP-2 demonstrated higher expression in SMCs than in inflammatory cells (median score: 0 versus 4, P < .0001). In ATA, MMP-2, MMP-9, TIMP-1, TIMP-2, TIMP-3, and osteopontin expression in SMCs was higher than in inflammatory cells (median score: 3 versus 0, P < .0001; 4 versus 1, P < .0005; 2 versus 0, P < .001; 5 versus 2, P < .0001; 2 versus 0, P < .005; and 5 versus 1.5, P < .0001, respectively), when both inflammatory cells of the media and the adventitia were considered together. The cellular expression of MMP-9 and their tissue inhibitors TIMP-1, TIMP-2, and TIMP-3 differs in the dilatative pathology of abdominal and thoracic aortas, so the hypothetical model of morphogenesis of AAA cannot completely explain the formation of dilatative pathology of the ascending thoracic aorta.

  12. Critical analysis of Strattice performance in complex abdominal wall reconstruction: intermediate-risk patients and early complications.

    PubMed

    Patel, Ketan M; Albino, Frank P; Nahabedian, Maurice Y; Bhanot, Parag

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the performance of a porcine-derived acellular dermal matrix (Strattice Reconstructive Tissue Matrix) in patients at increased risk for perioperative complications. We reviewed medical records for patients with complex abdominal wall reconstruction (AWR) and Strattice underlay from 2007 to 2010. Intermediate-risk patients were defined as having multiple comorbidities without abdominal infection. Forty-one patients met the inclusion criteria (mean age, 60 years; mean body mass index, 35.5 kg/m(2)). Comorbidities included coronary artery disease (63.4%), diabetes mellitus (36.6%), and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (17.1%). Fascial closure was achieved in 40 patients (97.6%). Average hospitalization was 6.4 days (range, 1-24 days). Complications included seroma (7.3%), wound dehiscence with Strattice exposure (4.9%), cellulitis (2.4%), and hematoma (2.4%). All patients achieved abdominal wall closure with no recurrent hernias or need for Strattice removal. Patients with multiple comorbidities at intermediate risk of postoperative complications can achieve successful, safe AWR with Strattice.

  13. Increased Expression of Lamin A/C Correlate with Regions of High Wall Stress in Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Malkawi, Amir; Pirianov, Grisha; Torsney, Evelyn; Chetter, Ian; Sakalihasan, Natzi; Loftus, Ian M.; Nordon, Ian; Huggins, Christopher; Charolidi, Nicoletta; Thompson, Matt; Xu, Xie Yun; Cockerill, Gillian W.

    2015-01-01

    Background Since aortic diameter is the most ­significant risk factor for rupture, we sought to identify stress-dependent changes in gene expression to illuminate novel molecular processes in aneurysm rupture. Materials and Methods We constructed finite element maps of abdominal computerized tomography scans (CTs) of seven abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) patients to map wall stress. Paired biopsies from high- and low-stress areas were collected at surgery using vascular landmarks as coordinates. Differential gene expression was evaluated by Illumina Array analysis, using the whole genome DNA-mediated, annealing, selection, extension, and ligation (DASL) gene chip (n = 3 paired samples). Results The sole significant candidate from this analysis, Lamin A/C, was validated at the protein level, using western blotting. Lamin A/C expression in the inferior mesenteric vein (IMV) of AAA patients was compared to a control group and in aortic smooth muscle cells in culture in response to physiological pulsatile stretch. ­Areas of high wall stress (n = 7) correlate to those ­regions which have the thinnest walls [778 µm (585–1120 µm)] in comparison to areas of lowest wall stress [1620 µm (962–2919 µm)]. Induced expression of Lamin A/C ­correlated with areas of high wall stress from AAAs but was not significantly induced in the IMV from AAA patients compared to controls (n = 16). Stress-induced expression of Lamin A/C was mimicked by exposing aortic smooth muscle cells to prolonged pulsatile stretch. Conclusion Lamin A/C protein is specifically increased in areas of high wall stress in AAA from patients, but is not increased on other vascular beds of aneurysm patients, suggesting that its elevation may be a compensatory response to the pathobiology leading to aneurysms. PMID:27175366

  14. Manipulating antiferromagnets with magnetic fields: Ratchet motion of multiple domain walls induced by asymmetric field pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomonay, O.; Kläui, M.; Sinova, J.

    2016-10-01

    Future applications of antiferromagnets (AFs) in many spintronics devices rely on the precise manipulation of domain walls. The conventional approach using static magnetic fields is inefficient due to the low susceptibility of AFs. Recently proposed electrical manipulation with spin-orbit torques is restricted to metals with a specific crystal structure. Here, we propose an alternative, broadly applicable approach: using asymmetric magnetic field pulses to induce controlled ratchet motion of AF domain walls. The efficiency of this approach is based on three peculiarities of AF dynamics. First, a time-dependent magnetic field couples with an AF order parameter stronger than a static magnetic field, which leads to higher mobility of the domain walls. Second, the rate of change of the magnetic field couples with the spatial variation of the AF order parameter inside the domain, and this enables a synchronous motion of multiple domain walls with the same structure. Third, tailored asymmetric field pulses in combination with static friction can prevent backward motion of domain walls and thus lead to the desired controlled ratchet effect. The proposed use of an external field, rather than internal spin-orbit torques, avoids any restrictions on size, conductivity, and crystal structure of the AF material. We believe that our approach paves a way for the development of AF-based devices based on the controlled motion of AF domain walls.

  15. Ab initio study of edge effect on relative motion of walls in carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Popov, Andrey M; Lebedeva, Irina V; Knizhnik, Andrey A; Lozovik, Yurii E; Potapkin, Boris V

    2013-01-14

    Interwall interaction energies of double-walled nanotubes with long inner and short outer walls are calculated as functions of coordinates describing relative rotation and displacement of the walls using van der Waals corrected density functional theory. The magnitude of corrugation and the shape of the potential energy relief are found to be very sensitive to changes of the shorter wall length at subnanometer scale and atomic structure of the edges if at least one of the walls is chiral. Threshold forces required to start relative motion of the short walls and temperatures at which the transition between diffusive and free motion of the short walls takes place are estimated. The edges are also shown to provide a considerable contribution to the barrier to relative rotation of commensurate nonchiral walls. For such walls, temperatures of orientational melting, i.e., the crossover from rotational diffusion to free relative rotation, are estimated. The possibility to produce nanotube-based bolt∕nut pairs and nanobearings is discussed.

  16. Abdominal wall reconstruction after resection of an enterocutaneous fistula with an island pedicled anterolateral thigh perforator flap. Case report.

    PubMed

    Ali, F; Safawi, E B; Zakaria, Z; Basiron, N

    2013-01-01

    Entero-cutaneous fistula resulting from a locally invasive large bowel carcinoma is a difficult surgical challenge. En-bloc resection of the involved organs and the entero-cutaneous fistula tract with a healthy tissue margin will result in a composite abdominal wall defect that requires closure. Reconstructive surgical options include primary closure, components separation and the use of local, regional or free flaps with or without prosthetic mesh. We report a case of an abdominal enterocutaneous fistula secondary to a locally invasive sigmoid carcinoma, which was reconstructed with a pedicled antero-lateral thigh perforator (ALT) flap. To our knowledge, this is the first case of a malignant entero-cutaneous fistula, which was reconstructed with an ALT flap.

  17. Fast Magnetic Domain-Wall Motion in a Ring-Shaped Nanowire Driven by a Voltage.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jia-Mian; Yang, Tiannan; Momeni, Kasra; Cheng, Xiaoxing; Chen, Lei; Lei, Shiming; Zhang, Shujun; Trolier-McKinstry, Susan; Gopalan, Venkatraman; Carman, Gregory P; Nan, Ce-Wen; Chen, Long-Qing

    2016-04-13

    Magnetic domain-wall motion driven by a voltage dissipates much less heat than by a current, but none of the existing reports have achieved speeds exceeding 100 m/s. Here phase-field and finite-element simulations were combined to study the dynamics of strain-mediated voltage-driven magnetic domain-wall motion in curved nanowires. Using a ring-shaped, rough-edged magnetic nanowire on top of a piezoelectric disk, we demonstrate a fast voltage-driven magnetic domain-wall motion with average velocity up to 550 m/s, which is comparable to current-driven wall velocity. An analytical theory is derived to describe the strain dependence of average magnetic domain-wall velocity. Moreover, one 180° domain-wall cycle around the ring dissipates an ultrasmall amount of heat, as small as 0.2 fJ, approximately 3 orders of magnitude smaller than those in current-driven cases. These findings suggest a new route toward developing high-speed, low-power-dissipation domain-wall spintronics.

  18. Temperature dependence of the spin torque effect in current-induced domain wall motion.

    PubMed

    Laufenberg, M; Bührer, W; Bedau, D; Melchy, P-E; Kläui, M; Vila, L; Faini, G; Vaz, C A F; Bland, J A C; Rüdiger, U

    2006-07-28

    We present an experimental study of domain wall motion induced by current pulses as well as by conventional magnetic fields at temperatures between 2 and 300 K in a 110 nm wide and 34 nm thick Ni80Fe20 ring. We observe that, in contrast with field-induced domain wall motion, which is a thermally activated process, the critical current density for current-induced domain wall motion increases with increasing temperature, which implies a reduction of the spin torque efficiency. The effect of Joule heating due to the current pulses is measured and taken into account to obtain critical fields and current densities at constant sample temperatures. This allows for a comparison of our results with theory.

  19. Coupled Néel domain wall motion in sandwiched perpendicular magnetic anisotropy nanowires.

    PubMed

    Purnama, I; Kerk, I S; Lim, G J; Lew, W S

    2015-03-04

    The operating performance of a domain wall-based magnetic device relies on the controlled motion of the domain walls within the ferromagnetic nanowires. Here, we report on the dynamics of coupled Néel domain wall in perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) nanowires via micromagnetic simulations. The coupled Néel domain wall is obtained in a sandwich structure, where two PMA nanowires that are separated by an insulating layer are stacked vertically. Under the application of high current density, we found that the Walker breakdown phenomenon is suppressed in the sandwich structure. Consequently, the coupled Néel domain wall of the sandwich structure is able to move faster as compared to individual domain walls in a single PMA nanowire.

  20. Domain Wall Motion by the Magnonic Spin Seebeck Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinzke, D.; Nowak, U.

    2011-07-01

    The recently discovered spin Seebeck effect refers to a spin current induced by a temperature gradient in a ferromagnetic material. It combines spin degrees of freedom with caloric properties, opening the door for the invention of new, spin caloritronic devices. Using spin model simulations as well as an innovative, multiscale micromagnetic framework we show that magnonic spin currents caused by temperature gradients lead to spin transfer torque effects, which can drag a domain wall in a ferromagnetic nanostructure towards the hotter part of the wire. This effect opens new perspectives for the control and manipulation of domain structures.

  1. Domain wall motion by the magnonic spin Seebeck effect.

    PubMed

    Hinzke, D; Nowak, U

    2011-07-08

    The recently discovered spin Seebeck effect refers to a spin current induced by a temperature gradient in a ferromagnetic material. It combines spin degrees of freedom with caloric properties, opening the door for the invention of new, spin caloritronic devices. Using spin model simulations as well as an innovative, multiscale micromagnetic framework we show that magnonic spin currents caused by temperature gradients lead to spin transfer torque effects, which can drag a domain wall in a ferromagnetic nanostructure towards the hotter part of the wire. This effect opens new perspectives for the control and manipulation of domain structures.

  2. Preparation of poly(L-lactic acid)-modified polypropylene mesh and its antiadhesion in experimental abdominal wall defect repair.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhigang; Zhang, Tianzhu; Li, Junsheng; Ji, Zhenling; Zhou, Hemei; Zhou, Xuefeng; Gu, Ning

    2014-01-01

    A new type of polypropylene (PP) hernia mesh, modified with poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA), was developed and used to repair rat abdominal wall defect. The PP mesh was first treated with oxygen plasma and then grafted with PLLA in phosphorus pentachloride (PCl5 ) solution in dichloride methane. The water contact angle changed during the procedure, and the coverage percentage of PLLA on the PP was about 80%. ATR-FTIR spectroscopy measurements showed the existence of carbonyl group absorption peak (1756.9 cm(-1) ), and atomic force microscope and scanning electron microscope morphological observation indicated that the surface of the PP mesh was covered with PLLA graft. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy spectra was used to probe chemical group changes and confirmed that the PLLA was grafted onto the PP. A total of 36 Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into six groups, and they received either modified meshes (experimental groups) or PP meshes (control groups) to repair abdominal wall defects. All animals survived until the end of the experiment. Rats in each group were dissected after the operation (after 1 week, 2 weeks, and 1 month, respectively), and the adhesion effects were evaluated. Sections of the mesh parietal peritoneum overlap were examined histologically and graded for inflammation reaction. Compared with the control groups, the experimental groups showed a better ability to resist peritoneal cavity adhesions (P < 0.05), and there was no increase in inflammation formation (P > 0.05). This new type of PLLA-modified PP mesh displayed an additional property of antiadhesion in animal abdominal wall defect repair.

  3. Domain wall motion in sub-100 nm magnetic wire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddiqui, Saima; Dutta, Sumit; Currivan, Jean Anne; Ross, Caroline; Baldo, Marc

    2015-03-01

    Nonvolatile memory devices such as racetrack memory rely on the manipulation of domain wall (DW) in magnetic nanowires, and scaling of these devices requires an understanding of domain wall behavior as a function of the wire width. Due to the increased importance of edge roughness and magnetostatic interaction, DW pinning increases dramatically as the wire dimensions decrease and stochastic behavior is expected depending on the distribution of pinning sites. We report on the field driven DW statistics in sub-100 nm wide nanowires made from Co films with very small edge roughness. The nanowires were patterned in the form of a set of concentric rings of 10 μm diameter. Two different width nanowires with two different spacings have been studied. The rings were first saturated in plane to produce onion states and then the DWs were translated in the wires using an orthogonal in-plane field. The position of the DWs in the nanowires was determined with magnetic force microscopy. From the positions of the DWs in the nanowires, the strength of the extrinsic pinning sites was identified and they follow two different distributions in two different types of nanowire rings. For the closely spaced wires, magnetostatic interactions led to correlated movement of DWs in neighboring wires. The implications of DW pinning and interaction in nanoscale DW devices will be discussed.

  4. Electric field driven magnetic domain wall motion in ferromagnetic-ferroelectric heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Van de Wiele, Ben; Laurson, Lasse; Franke, Kévin J. A.; Dijken, Sebastiaan van

    2014-01-06

    We investigate magnetic domain wall (MDW) dynamics induced by applied electric fields in ferromagnetic-ferroelectric thin-film heterostructures. In contrast to conventional driving mechanisms where MDW motion is induced directly by magnetic fields or electric currents, MDW motion arises here as a result of strong pinning of MDWs onto ferroelectric domain walls (FDWs) via local strain coupling. By performing extensive micromagnetic simulations, we find several dynamical regimes, including instabilities such as spin wave emission and complex transformations of the MDW structure. In all cases, the time-averaged MDW velocity equals that of the FDW, indicating the absence of Walker breakdown.

  5. Transfer Function Analysis of the Longitudinal Motion of the Common Carotid Artery Wall

    PubMed Central

    Yli-Ollila, Heikki; Tarvainen, Mika P.; Laitinen, Tomi P.; Laitinen, Tiina M.

    2016-01-01

    The longitudinal motion of the carotid wall is a potential new measure of arterial stiffness. Despite the over decade long research on the subject, the driving force and the specific longitudinal kinetics of the carotid wall has remained unclear. In this study, a transfer function analysis with 20 healthy subjects is presented to derive how the energy from the blood pressure moves the innermost arterial wall longitudinally and how the kinetic energy is then transferred to the outermost arterial layer. The power spectrums display that the main kinetic energy of the longitudinal motion is on band 0–3 Hz with a peak on the 1.1 Hz frequency. There is a large variation among the individuals, how the energy from the blood pressure transfers into the longitudinal motion of the arterial wall since the main direction of the longitudinal motion varies individually and because early arterial stiffening potentially has an effect on the time characteristics of the energy transfer. The energy transfer from the innermost to the outermost wall layer is more straightforward: on average, a 17% of the longitudinal amplitude is lost and an 18.9 ms delay is visible on the 1.0 Hz frequency. PMID:28082917

  6. Automatic identification and validation of planar collagen organization in the aorta wall with application to abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Polzer, Stanislav; Gasser, T Christian; Forsell, Caroline; Druckmüllerova, Hana; Tichy, Michal; Staffa, Robert; Vlachovsky, Robert; Bursa, Jiri

    2013-12-01

    Arterial physiology relies on a delicate three-dimensional (3D) organization of cells and extracellular matrix, which is remarkably altered by vascular diseases like abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA). The ability to explore the micro-histology of the aorta wall is important in the study of vascular pathologies and in the development of vascular constitutive models, i.e., mathematical descriptions of biomechanical properties of the wall. The present study reports and validates a fast image processing sequence capable of quantifying collagen fiber organization from histological stains. Powering and re-normalizing the histogram of the classical fast Fourier transformation (FFT) is a key step in the proposed analysis sequence. This modification introduces a powering parameter w, which was calibrated to best fit the reference data obtained using classical FFT and polarized light microscopy (PLM) of stained histological slices of AAA wall samples. The values of w = 3 and 7 give the best correlation (Pearson's correlation coefficient larger than 0.7, R 2 about 0.7) with the classical FFT approach and PLM measurements. A fast and operator independent method to identify collagen organization in the arterial wall was developed and validated. This overcomes severe limitations of currently applied methods like PLM to identify collagen organization in the arterial wall.

  7. Automated classification of wall motion abnormalities by principal component analysis of endocardial shape motion patterns in echocardiograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosch, Johan G.; Nijland, Francisca; Mitchell, Steven C.; Lelieveldt, Boudewijn P. F.; Kamp, Otto; Sonka, Milan; Reiber, Johan H. C.

    2003-05-01

    Principal Component Analysis of sets of temporal shape sequences renders eigenvariations of shape/motion, including typical normal and pathological endocardial contraction patterns. A previously developed Active Appearance Model for time sequences (AAMM) was employed to derive AAMM shape coefficients (ASCs) and we hypothesized these would allow classification of wall motion abnormalities (WMA). A set of stress echocardiograms (single-beat 4-chamber and 2-chamber sequences with expert-verified endocardial contours) of 129 infarct patients was split randomly into training (n=65) and testing (n=64) sets. AAMMs were generated from the training set and for all sequences ASCs were extracted and statistically related to regional/global Visual Wall Motion Scoring (VWMS) and clinical infarct severity and volumetric parameters. Linear regression showed clear correlations between ASCs and VWMS. Infarct severity measures correlated poorly to both ASCs and VWMS. Discriminant analysis showed good prediction from low #ASCs of both segmental (85% correctness) and global WMA (90% correctness). Volumetric parameters correlated poorly to regional VWMS. Conclusions: 1)ASCs show promising accuracy for automated WMA classification. 2)VWMS and endocardial border motion are closely related; with accurate automated border detection, automated WMA classification should be feasible. 3)ASC shape analysis allows contour set evaluation by direct comparison to clinical parameters.

  8. Management of Respiratory Motion in Extracorporeal High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound Treatment in Upper Abdominal Organs: Current Status and Perspectives

    SciTech Connect

    Muller, A.; Petrusca, L.; Auboiroux, V.; Valette, P. J.; Salomir, R.; Cotton, F.

    2013-12-15

    Extracorporeal high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is a minimally invasive therapy considered with increased interest for the ablation of small tumors in deeply located organs while sparing surrounding critical tissues. A multitude of preclinical and clinical studies have showed the feasibility of the method; however, concurrently they showed several obstacles, among which the management of respiratory motion of abdominal organs is at the forefront. The aim of this review is to describe the different methods that have been proposed for managing respiratory motion and to identify their advantages and weaknesses. First, we specify the characteristics of respiratory motion for the liver, kidneys, and pancreas and the problems it causes during HIFU planning, treatment, and monitoring. Second, we make an inventory of the preclinical and clinical approaches used to overcome the problem of organ motion. Third, we analyze their respective benefits and drawbacks to identify the remaining physical, technological, and clinical challenges. We thereby consider the outlook of motion compensation techniques and those that would be the most suitable for clinical use, particularly under magnetic resonance thermometry monitoring.

  9. Vortex motion in wall-bounded viscous flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatski, T. B.

    1985-01-01

    A factor of general interest in a broad class of wall-bounded flows is the dynamic evolution of vortical structures through the flow. The structures are three-dimensional, and an overall mathematical description of such entities has not yet been formulated. One of the objectives of the present investigation is concerned with the establishment of a framework, based on first principles, which may form a basis for more detailed analytical studies. Another aim is related to the establishment of boundary and initial conditions in numerical experiments. The mathematical framework employed involves the method of matched asymptotic expansions, and an inner solution field is constructed which consists of a two-dimensional vortical structure. The outer solution field is taken to be an otherwise undisturbed laminar two-dimensional parallel or self-similar viscous flowfield.

  10. Giant Cutaneous Leiomyosarcoma Originating From the Abdominal Wall: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Eken, Huseyin; Karagul, Servet; Topgül, Koray; Yoruker, Savaş; Ozen, Necati; Gun, Seda; Balci, Mecdi Gurhan; Somuncu, Erkan; Cimen, Orhan; Soyturk, Mehmet; Karavas, Erdal

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 44 Final Diagnosis: Cutaneous Leiomyosarcoma Symptoms: Abdominal mass Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Surgery Specialty: Surgery Objective: Rare disease Background: Leiomyosarcoma, a rare type of tumor, accounts for 5–10% of all soft tissue tumors. Case Report: A 44-year-old male patient was admitted to the emergency service of our medical faculty with the complaints of fatigue and abdominal mass. Conclusions: The pathology result was leiomyosarcoma. Leiomyosarcoma of the skin is rare and our case is the largest such lesion reported in the literature. PMID:26787636

  11. Current-Driven Motion of Magnetic Domain Wall with Many Bloch Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasaki, Junichi; Nagaosa, Naoto

    2015-08-01

    The current-driven motion of a domain wall (DW) in a ferromagnet with many Bloch lines (BLs) via the spin transfer torque is studied theoretically. It is found that the motion of BLs changes the current-velocity (j-v) characteristic considerably. In particular, the critical current density for overcoming the pinning force is even lower than that of a skyrmion by the factor of the Gilbert damping coefficient α. This is in sharp contrast to the case of magnetic-field-driven motion, where the existence of BLs reduces the mobility of the DW.

  12. Effects of abdominal stabilization maneuvers on the control of spine motion and stability against sudden trunk perturbations.

    PubMed

    Vera-Garcia, Francisco J; Elvira, José L L; Brown, Stephen H M; McGill, Stuart M

    2007-10-01

    Much discussion exists about which is the most effective technique to improve spine stability. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of abdominal bracing and abdominal hollowing maneuvers to control spine motion and stability against rapid perturbations. Eleven healthy males were posteriorly loaded in different experimental conditions: resting with no knowledge of the perturbation timing; performing each of the stabilization maneuvers at 10%, 15% and 20% of internal oblique maximum voluntary contraction with no knowledge of the perturbation timing; and naturally coactivating the trunk muscles when perturbation timing was known. An EMG biofeedback system was used to control the pattern and intensity of abdominal coactivation. The muscular preactivation of seven trunk muscles (bilaterally registered), the applied force, and the torso muscular and kinematic responses to loading were measured; and the spine stability and compression were modeled. The hollowing maneuver was not effective for reducing the kinematic response to sudden perturbation. On the contrary, the bracing maneuver fostered torso cocontraction, reduced lumbar displacement, and increased trunk stability, but at the cost of increasing spinal compression. When the timing of the perturbation was known, the participants were able to stabilize the trunk while imposing smaller spine compressive loads.

  13. Theory of Current-Driven Domain Wall Motion: Spin Transfer versus Momentum Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatara, Gen; Kohno, Hiroshi

    2004-02-01

    A self-contained theory of the domain wall dynamics in ferromagnets under finite electric current is presented. The current has two effects: one is momentum transfer, which is proportional to the charge current and wall resistivity (ρw); the other is spin transfer, proportional to spin current. For thick walls, as in metallic wires, the latter dominates and the threshold current for wall motion is determined by the hard-axis magnetic anisotropy, except for the case of very strong pinning. For thin walls, as in nanocontacts and magnetic semiconductors, the momentum-transfer effect dominates, and the threshold current is proportional to V0/ρw, V0 being the pinning potential.

  14. The behavior of different types of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) prostheses in the reparative scarring process of abdominal wall defects.

    PubMed

    Buján, J; Contreras, L A; Carrera-San Martín, A; Bellón, J M

    1997-07-01

    Currently one of the most widely used prosthetic materials in the repair of abdominal wall defects, is expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE). It has been suggested that its behavior with respect to the reparative process may depend on its structure. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of the structure of 3 ePTFE prostheses on the scarring process in an abdominal-wall-defect experimental model. The prostheses employed were the Soft Tissue Patch (STP) which is laminar in structure, Mycro Mesh (MM) which is multilaminar with perforations, and the Dual Mesh (DM) prosthesis which has one non-porous surface. Abdominal wall defects (7 x 5 cm) were created in 36 New Zealand rabbits and repaired using fragments of STP, MM and DM. Follow-up periods were 14, 30, 60 and 90 days post-implant. At these times prostheses were macroscopically examined for the presence of infection and/or rejection and the formation of adhesions to abdominal viscera. Specimens were also taken for microscopic analysis (optical and scanning electron) and for immunohistochemical analysis using the rabbit macrophage-specific monoclonal antibody RAM-11. Labelled macrophage counts were performed at each follow-up session. No cases of infection or rejection were found. Loose adhesions between prosthesis and underlying viscera were observed in 2 of the STP, 4 of the MM and 2 of the DM implants. STP and DM implants were progressively encapsulated by organized connective tissue on both peritoneal and subcutaneous surfaces. Cellular colonization was observed on both STP surfaces and on the porous surface of the DM although no more than a third of the biomaterial was penetrated by cells in either case. Colonization was very slight at prosthesis anchorage points. MM implants differed only in the formation of connective tissue bridges in perforated areas, and cellular infiltration in interlaminar spaces. Macrophage response was similar in the 3 prostheses with a reduction in RAM-11 labelled

  15. Field-driven Domain Wall Motion in Ferromagnetic Nanowires with Bulk Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Zhuo, Fengjun; Sun, Z. Z.

    2016-01-01

    Field-driven domain wall (DW) motion in ferromagnetic nanowires with easy- and hard-axis anisotropies was studied theoretically and numerically in the presence of the bulk Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI) based on the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation. We propose a new trial function and offer an exact solution for DW motion along a uniaxial nanowire driven by an external magnetic field. A new strategy was suggested to speed up DW motion in a uniaxial magnetic nanowire with large DMI parameters. In the presence of hard-axis anisotropy, we find that the breakdown field and velocity of DW motion was strongly affected by the strength and sign of the DMI parameter under external fields. This work may be useful for future magnetic information storage devices based on DW motion. PMID:27118064

  16. Field-driven Domain Wall Motion in Ferromagnetic Nanowires with Bulk Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya Interaction.

    PubMed

    Zhuo, Fengjun; Sun, Z Z

    2016-04-27

    Field-driven domain wall (DW) motion in ferromagnetic nanowires with easy- and hard-axis anisotropies was studied theoretically and numerically in the presence of the bulk Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI) based on the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation. We propose a new trial function and offer an exact solution for DW motion along a uniaxial nanowire driven by an external magnetic field. A new strategy was suggested to speed up DW motion in a uniaxial magnetic nanowire with large DMI parameters. In the presence of hard-axis anisotropy, we find that the breakdown field and velocity of DW motion was strongly affected by the strength and sign of the DMI parameter under external fields. This work may be useful for future magnetic information storage devices based on DW motion.

  17. Field-driven Domain Wall Motion in Ferromagnetic Nanowires with Bulk Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuo, Fengjun; Sun, Z. Z.

    2016-04-01

    Field-driven domain wall (DW) motion in ferromagnetic nanowires with easy- and hard-axis anisotropies was studied theoretically and numerically in the presence of the bulk Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI) based on the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation. We propose a new trial function and offer an exact solution for DW motion along a uniaxial nanowire driven by an external magnetic field. A new strategy was suggested to speed up DW motion in a uniaxial magnetic nanowire with large DMI parameters. In the presence of hard-axis anisotropy, we find that the breakdown field and velocity of DW motion was strongly affected by the strength and sign of the DMI parameter under external fields. This work may be useful for future magnetic information storage devices based on DW motion.

  18. Carbon nanotubes as VEGF carriers to improve the early vascularization of porcine small intestinal submucosa in abdominal wall defect repair

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhengni; Feng, Xueyi; Wang, Huichun; Ma, Jun; Liu, Wei; Cui, Daxiang; Gu, Yan; Tang, Rui

    2014-01-01

    Insufficient early vascularization in biological meshes, resulting in limited host tissue incorporation, is thought to be the primary cause for the failure of abdominal wall defect repair after implantation. The sustained release of exogenous angiogenic factors from a biocompatible nanomaterial might be a way to overcome this limitation. In the study reported here, multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNT) were functionalized by plasma polymerization to deliver vascular endothelial growth factor165 (VEGF165). The novel VEGF165-controlled released system was incorporated into porcine small intestinal submucosa (PSIS) to construct a composite scaffold. Scaffolds incorporating varying amounts of VEGF165-loaded functionalized MWNT were characterized in vitro. At 5 weight percent MWNT, the scaffolds exhibited optimal properties and were implanted in rats to repair abdominal wall defects. PSIS scaffolds incorporating VEGF165-loaded MWNT (VEGF–MWNT–PSIS) contributed to early vascularization from 2–12 weeks postimplantation and obtained more effective collagen deposition and exhibited improved tensile strength at 24 weeks postimplantation compared to PSIS or PSIS scaffolds, incorporating MWNT without VEGF165 loading (MWNT–PSIS). PMID:24648727

  19. Distance-from-the-wall scaling of turbulent motions in wall-bounded flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baidya, R.; Philip, J.; Hutchins, N.; Monty, J. P.; Marusic, I.

    2017-02-01

    An assessment of self-similarity in the inertial sublayer is presented by considering the wall-normal velocity, in addition to the streamwise velocity component. The novelty of the current work lies in the inclusion of the second velocity component, made possible by carefully conducted subminiature ×-probe experiments to minimise the errors in measuring the wall-normal velocity. We show that not all turbulent stress quantities approach the self-similar asymptotic state at an equal rate as the Reynolds number is increased, with the Reynolds shear stress approaching faster than the streamwise normal stress. These trends are explained by the contributions from attached eddies. Furthermore, the Reynolds shear stress cospectra, through its scaling with the distance from the wall, are used to assess the wall-normal limits where self-similarity applies within the wall-bounded flow. The results are found to be consistent with the recent prediction from the work of Wei et al. ["Properties of the mean momentum balance in turbulent boundary layer, pipe and channel flows," J. Fluid Mech. 522, 303-327 (2005)], Klewicki ["Reynolds number dependence, scaling, and dynamics of turbulent boundary layers," J. Fluids Eng. 132, 094001 (2010)], and others that the self-similar region starts and ends at z+˜O (√{δ+}) and O (δ+) , respectively. Below the self-similar region, empirical evidence suggests that eddies responsible for turbulent stresses begin to exhibit distance-from-the-wall scaling at a fixed z+ location; however, they are distorted by viscous forces, which remain a leading order contribution in the mean momentum balance in the region z+≲O (√{δ+}) , and thus result in a departure from self-similarity.

  20. Diagnostic Accuracy of Abdominal wall Ultrasonography and Local Wound Exploration in Predicting the Need for Laparotomy following Stab Wound

    PubMed Central

    Vafaei, Ali; Heidari, Kamran; Saboorizadeh, Afshin; shams akhtari, Amin

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Screening of patients with anterior abdominal penetrating trauma in need for laparotomy is an important issue in management of these cases. This study aimed to compare the accuracy of abdominal wall ultrasonography (AWU) and local wound exploration (LWE) in this regard. Methods: This diagnostic accuracy study was conducted on ≥ 18 year-old patients presenting to emergency department with anterior abdominal stab wound and stable hemodynamics, to compare the characteristics of AWU and LWE in screening of patients in need of laparotomy. Results: 50 cases with the mean age of 28.44 ± 7.14 years were included (80% male). Sensitivity, specificity and area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve of AWU were 70.58 (95% CI: 44.04 – 88.62), 93.33 (95% CI: 76.49 – 98.83), and 81.96 (95% CI: 69.91 – 94.01), respectively. These measures were 88.23 (62.25 – 97.93), 93.33 (76.49 – 98.83), and 90.78 (95% CI: 81.67 – 99.89) for LWE, respectively. The difference in overall accuracy of the two methods was not statistically significant (p = 0.0641). Conclusion: Based on the findings of the present study, AWU and LWE had the same specificity but different sensitivities in screening of anterior abdominal stab wound patients in need of laparotomy. The overall accuracy of LWE was slightly higher (91.48% versus 85.1%). PMID:28286841

  1. Acute myocarditis with normal wall motion detected with 2D speckle tracking echocardiography

    PubMed Central

    Niel, Johannes; Aichinger, Josef; Ebner, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Summary We present the case of a 26-year-old male with acute tonsillitis who was referred for coronary angiography because of chest pain, elevated cardiac biomarkers, and biphasic T waves. The patient had no cardiovascular risk factors. Echocardiography showed no wall motion abnormalities and no pericardial effusion. 2D speckle tracking revealed distinct decreased regional peak longitudinal systolic strain in the lateral and posterior walls. Ischemic disease was extremely unlikely in view of his young age, negative family history regarding coronary artery disease, and lack of regional wall motion abnormalities on the conventional 2D echocardiogram. Coronary angiography was deferred as myocarditis was suspected. To confirm the diagnosis, cardiac magnetic resonance tomography (MRT) was performed, showing subepicardial delayed hyperenhancement in the lateral and posterior walls correlating closely with the strain pattern obtained by 2D speckle tracking echocardiography. With a working diagnosis of acute myocarditis associated with acute tonsillitis, we prescribed antibiotics and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. The patient’s clinical signs resolved along with normalization of serum creatine kinase (CK) levels, and the patient was discharged on the third day after admission. Learning points Acute myocarditis can mimic acute coronary syndromes.Conventional 2D echocardiography lacks specific features for detection of subtle regional wall motion abnormalities.2D speckle tracking expands the scope of echocardiography in identifying myocardial dysfunction derived from edema in acute myocarditis. PMID:27249814

  2. The quasi-static failure properties of the abdominal aortic aneurysm wall estimated by a mixed experimental-numerical approach.

    PubMed

    Forsell, Caroline; Swedenborg, Jesper; Roy, Joy; Gasser, T Christian

    2013-07-01

    Assessing the risk for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) rupture is critical in the management of aneurysm patients and an individual assessment is possible with the biomechanical rupture risk assessment. Such an assessment could potentially be improved by a constitutive AAA wall model that accounts for irreversible damage-related deformations. Because of that the present study estimated the elastic and inelastic properties of the AAA wall through a mixed experimental-numerical approach. Specifically, finite element (FE) models of bone-shaped tensile specimens were used to merge data from failure testing of the AAA wall with their measured collagen orientation distribution. A histo-mechanical constitutive model for collagen fibers was employed, where plastic fibril sliding determined not only remaining deformations but also weakening of the fiber. The developed FE models were able to replicate the experimentally recorded load-displacement property of all 16 AAA wall specimens that were investigated in the study. Tensile testing in longitudinal direction of the AAA defined a Cauchy strength of 569(SD 411) kPa that was reached at a stretch of 1.436(SD 0.118). The stiffness and strength of specimens decreased with the wall thickness and were elevated (p = 0.018; p = 0.030) in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Smoking affected the tissue parameters that were related to the irreversible deformation response, and no correlation with gender and age was found. The observed effects on the biomechanical properties of the AAA wall could have long-term consequences for the management of aneurysm patients, i.e., specifically they might influence future AAA rupture risk assessments. However, in order to design appropriate clinical validation studies our findings should firstly be verified in a larger patient cohort.

  3. Electric-field control of magnetic domain wall motion and local magnetization reversal

    PubMed Central

    Lahtinen, Tuomas H. E.; Franke, Kévin J. A.; van Dijken, Sebastiaan

    2012-01-01

    Spintronic devices currently rely on magnetic switching or controlled motion of domain walls by an external magnetic field or spin-polarized current. Achieving the same degree of magnetic controllability using an electric field has potential advantages including enhanced functionality and low power consumption. Here we report on an approach to electrically control local magnetic properties, including the writing and erasure of regular ferromagnetic domain patterns and the motion of magnetic domain walls, in CoFe-BaTiO3 heterostructures. Our method is based on recurrent strain transfer from ferroelastic domains in ferroelectric media to continuous magnetostrictive films with negligible magnetocrystalline anisotropy. Optical polarization microscopy of both ferromagnetic and ferroelectric domain structures reveals that domain correlations and strong inter-ferroic domain wall pinning persist in an applied electric field. This leads to an unprecedented electric controllability over the ferromagnetic microstructure, an accomplishment that produces giant magnetoelectric coupling effects and opens the way to electric-field driven spintronics. PMID:22355770

  4. Feature extraction and wall motion classification of 2D stress echocardiography with support vector machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chykeyuk, Kiryl; Clifton, David A.; Noble, J. Alison

    2011-03-01

    Stress echocardiography is a common clinical procedure for diagnosing heart disease. Clinically, diagnosis of the heart wall motion depends mostly on visual assessment, which is highly subjective and operator-dependent. Introduction of automated methods for heart function assessment have the potential to minimise the variance in operator assessment. Automated wall motion analysis consists of two main steps: (i) segmentation of heart wall borders, and (ii) classification of heart function as either "normal" or "abnormal" based on the segmentation. This paper considers automated classification of rest and stress echocardiography. Most previous approaches to the classification of heart function have considered rest or stress data separately, and have only considered using features extracted from the two main frames (corresponding to the end-of-diastole and end-of-systole). One previous attempt [1] has been made to combine information from rest and stress sequences utilising a Hidden Markov Model (HMM), which has proven to be the best performing approach to date. Here, we propose a novel alternative feature selection approach using combined information from rest and stress sequences for motion classification of stress echocardiography, utilising a Support Vector Machines (SVM) classifier. We describe how the proposed SVM-based method overcomes difficulties that occur with HMM classification. Overall accuracy with the new method for global wall motion classification using datasets from 173 patients is 92.47%, and the accuracy of local wall motion classification is 87.20%, showing that the proposed method outperforms the current state-of-the-art HMM-based approach (for which global and local classification accuracy is 82.15% and 78.33%, respectively).

  5. Extensive Abdominal Wall Incisional Heterotopic Ossification Reconstructed with Component Separation and Strattice Inlay

    PubMed Central

    Suleiman, Nergis Nina

    2016-01-01

    Summary: Symptomatic heterotopic ossification of abdominal surgical incisions is a rare occurrence. We present a 67-year-old man with severe discomfort caused by heterotopic ossification extending from the xiphoid to the umbilicus. The patient underwent an abdominal aortic aneurysm repair 3 years before our treatment. A 13 × 3.5 cm ossified lesion was excised. The resulting midline defect was closed using component separation and inlay Strattice. Tension-free midline adaptation of the recti muscles was achieved. A computed tomography scan of the abdomen 6 months after the surgery showed no recurrence or hernias. Heterotopic ossification in symptomatic patients has previously been treated with excision and primary closure. We believe that tension-free repair is important to prevent recurrence. Acellular dermal matrix may add to this effect and also compartmentalize the process. PMID:27536495

  6. Domain wall motion and Barkhausen effect in magnetic nanoparticles for EOR applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baig, Mirza Khurram; Soleimani, Hassan; Yahya, Noorhana

    2016-11-01

    The domain wall motion in magnetic nanoparticles is a useful parameter of study. The subject of this research is to study of the phenomenon of discontinuous domain wall motion, or the Barkhausen Effect in magnetic nanoparticles. In this work hematite (Fe2O3) nanoparticles have been synthesized using sol-gel auto-combustion and characterized using X-ray diffraction, Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), Transmission electron microscope (TEM) and Vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) for crystal structure, morphology, shape, size and magnetic properties respectively. The FESEM and TEM results show that the particles are spherical in nature and average size is 60nm that is suitable for domain walls and barkhuasen effect. The VSM results show high coercivity 175 Oe and low saturation magnetization due to domain wall pinning and barkhausen effect. The size and magnetic properties reveals the existence of domain walls in the synthesized sample. The magnetic properties confirm the energy losses due to domain wall pinning, discontinuous domain rotation or barkhausen effect during magnetization which is useful for oil-water interfacial tension reduction and viscosity of oil. The high surface charge of magnetic nanoparticles and adsorption at the rock surface is useful for wettability alteration of rocks.

  7. Avoiding Complications in Abdominal Wall Surgery: A Mathematical Model to Predict the Course of the Motor Innervation of the Rectus Abdominis.

    PubMed

    Tessone, Ariel; Nava, Maurizio; Blondeel, Phillip; Spano, Andrea

    2016-02-01

    Ever since its introduction, the transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap has become the mainstay of autologous breast reconstruction. However, concerns regarding donor site morbidity due to the breach of abdominal wall musculature integrity soon followed. Muscle-sparing techniques, eventually eliminating the muscle from the flap all-together with the deep inferior epigastric artery perforator flap, did not eliminate the problem of abdominal wall weakness. This led to the conclusion that motor innervation might be at fault. Studies have shown that even in the presence of an intact rectus abdominis muscle, and an intact anterior rectus sheath, denervation of the rectus abdominis muscle results in significant abdominal wall weakness leading to superior and inferior abdominal bulges, and abdominal herniation. Our aim was to establish a mathematical model to predict the location of the motor innervation to the rectus abdominis muscle, and thus provide surgeons with a tool that will allow them to reduce abdominal morbidity during deep inferior epigastric artery perforator and free muscle-sparing transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous surgery. We dissected 42 cadaveric hemiabdomens and mapped the course of the thoracolumbar nerves. We then standardized and analyzed our findings and presented them as a relative map which can be adjusted to body type and dimensions. Our dissections show that the motor innervation is closely related to the lateral vascular supply. Thus, when possible, we support the preferred utilization of the medial vascular supply, and the preservation of the lateral supply and motor innervation.

  8. Reconstruction of a four-quadrant full-thickness abdominal wall defect after removal and debridement of an infected mesh hernioplasty.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, C; Schramm, S; Hankiss, J

    2011-02-01

    This case-report shows our experience with a patient, who underwent mesh hernioplasty followed by infection of the mesh and full-thickness loss of the abdominal wall after debridement due to necrosis. The anamnesis included generalised arteriosclerosis, chronic nicotine and alcohol abuse and recurring wound-healing disorders after surgical procedures. The initial infection was treated by radical debridement, targeted antibiotics and V.A.C.(®) Therapy. After this, a staged plastic reconstructive procedure with four pedicled flaps was performed. The functional integrity of the abdominal wall was completely re-established. The patient was able to continue her occupation as a facility manager. Although the use of free flaps is very common in modern plastic and reconstructive surgery, procedures such as pedicled flaps still have their significance for special indications. In this case, a full recovery of the abdominal wall with autologous tissue was successful under difficult vascular conditions by using local flaps.

  9. Reconstruction of Abdominal Wall Defects Using a Pedicled Anterolateral Thigh Flap including the Vastus Lateralis Muscle: A Report of Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    Fujioka, Masaki; Ishiyama, Satoko

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of abdominal wall reconstruction is to prevent hernias and protect the abdominal viscera. In cases involving full-thickness defects of the rectus abdominis muscle, the muscle layer should be repaired. We present 2 cases in which full-thickness lower rectus abdominis muscle defects were reconstructed using vastus lateralis-anterolateral thigh flaps. The pedicled vastus lateralis-anterolateral thigh flap provides skin, fascia, and muscle tissue. Furthermore, it has a long neurovascular pedicle and can reach up to the periumbilical area and cover large defects. We consider that this muscle flap is a good option for repairing full-thickness lower abdominal defects. PMID:28074168

  10. Current-driven vortex domain wall motion in wire-tube nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Espejo, A. P.; Vidal-Silva, N.; López-López, J. A.; Goerlitz, D.; Nielsch, K.; Escrig, J.

    2015-03-30

    We have investigated the current-driven domain wall motion in nanostructures comprised of a pair of nanotube and nanowire segments. Under certain values of external magnetic fields, it is possible to pin a vortex domain wall in the transition zone between the wire and tube segments. We explored the behavior of this domain wall under the action of an electron flow applied in the opposite direction to the magnetic field. Thus, for a fixed magnetic field, it is possible to release a domain wall pinned simply by increasing the intensity of the current density, or conversely, for a fixed current density, it is possible to release the domain wall simply decreasing the magnetic external field. When the domain wall remains pinned due to the competition between the current density and the magnetic external field, it exhibits a oscillation frequency close to 8 GHz. The amplitude of the oscillations increases with the current density and decreases over time. On the other hand, when the domain wall is released and propagated through the tube segment, this shows the standard separation between a steady and a precessional regime. The ability to pin and release a domain wall by varying the geometric parameters, the current density, or the magnetic field transforms these wire-tube nanostructures in an interesting alternative as an on/off switch nano-transistor.

  11. Near and far-wall effects on the three-dimensional motion of bacteria-driven microbeads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Matthew R.; Wright Carlsen, Rika; Sitti, Metin

    2013-04-01

    Bio-hybrid microrobots have been heavily studied due to their potential applications as minimally invasive medical microdevices. Though most researchers have focused on two-dimensional and near-wall motion, this letter uses a defocused optical tracking method to quantify the three-dimensional motion of 5 μm diameter polystyrene beads driven by attached Serratia marcescens bacteria. Away from walls the beads trace out helical trajectories, demonstrating kinematics produced by near-constant forces and torques. Near-wall motion is observed to be more stochastic. The motion of beads driven by single bacteria is analyzed in detail, providing an understanding of the forces and torques on the beads.

  12. Treatment of a chronic vesicocutaneous fistula and abdominal wall defect after resection of a soft tissue sarcoma using a bipedicled latissimus dorsi and serratus anterior free flap.

    PubMed

    Ludolph, Ingo; Apel, Hendrik; Horch, Raymund E; Beier, Justus P

    2014-11-01

    We present a surgical treatment for bladder reconstruction in a case of chronic vesicocutaneous radiation-induced fistula and reconstruction of the abdominal wall after resection of a liposarcoma in the rectus abdominis muscle. Fistulas are sequelae after radiotherapy. To regain bladder function and reconstitute abdominal wall stability, a microsurgical flap approach should be considered. A male patient underwent resection of a liposarcoma in the rectus abdominis muscle with adjuvant radiotherapy, suffering from a chronic vesicocutaneous fistula. A bipedicled combined latissimus dorsi and serratus anterior flap was carried out after resection of the fistula for reconstruction of the urine bladder and the abdominal wall. Ascending urethrography 4 weeks postoperatively showed no leakage. In the 4-month follow-up period, no signs of recurrence of the fistula or herniation occurred. A bipedicled flap allowed reconstruction of the urine bladder and the abdominal wall. Using non-irradiated, well-perfused intra-abdominal muscle tissue over the urine bladder prevented recurrence of the fistula.

  13. Current driven domain wall motion in rare-earth transition metal alloys with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy.

    PubMed

    Li, Songtian; Liu, Xiaoxi; Morisako, Akimistu

    2012-09-01

    The domain wall movement behaviors under current combining with magnetic field in perpendicularly magnetized TbFeCo wire were studied by a polar magneto-optical Kerr effect microscope. The velocity for domain wall creeping along electrons flowing direction was found to be apparently higher than that of domain wall creeping against electrons flowing, which is the signature of the spin transfer torque effect. By employing the modified field-driven creep motion law, a spin transfer efficiency of 2.7 Oe cm2/10(6) A was determined for TbFeCo wire by treating the spin transfer torque as an effective field adding to the external field. The high spin transfer efficiency suggests that perpendicularly magnetized system with sharp domain walls in TbFeCo film shows high superiorities for applications in spin transfer torque based devices compared with in-plane magnetized systems.

  14. Current-driven domain wall motion enhanced by the microwave field

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xi-guang; Guo, Guang-hua Nie, Yao-zhuang; Wang, Dao-wei; Li, Zhi-xiong; Tang, Wei; Zeng, Zhong-ming

    2014-07-14

    The magnetic domain wall (DW) motion driven by a spin-polarized current opens a new concept for memory and logic devices. However, the critical current density required to overcome the intrinsic and/or extrinsic pinning of DW remains too large for practical applications. Here, we show, by using micromagnetic simulations and analytical approaches, that the application of a microwave field offers an effective solution to this problem. When a transverse microwave field is applied, the adiabatic spin-transfer torque (STT) alone can sustain a steady-state DW motion without the sign of Walker breakdown, meaning that the intrinsic pinning disappears. The extrinsic pinning can also be effectively reduced. Moreover, the DW velocity is increased greatly for the microwave-assisted DW motion. This provides a new way to manipulate the DW motion at low current densities.

  15. Analysis of Human's Motions Based on Local Mean Decomposition in Through-wall Radar Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Qi; Liu, Cai; Zeng, Zhaofa; Li, Jing; Zhang, Xuebing

    2016-04-01

    Observation of human motions through a wall is an important issue in security applications and search-and rescue. Radar has advantages in looking through walls where other sensors give low performance or cannot be used at all. Ultrawideband (UWB) radar has high spatial resolution as a result of employment of ultranarrow pulses. It has abilities to distinguish the closely positioned targets and provide time-lapse information of targets. Moreover, the UWB radar shows good performance in wall penetration when the inherently short pulses spread their energy over a broad frequency range. Human's motions show periodic features including respiration, swing arms and legs, fluctuations of the torso. Detection of human targets is based on the fact that there is always periodic motion due to breathing or other body movements like walking. The radar can gain the reflections from each human body parts and add the reflections at each time sample. The periodic movements will cause micro-Doppler modulation in the reflected radar signals. Time-frequency analysis methods are consider as the effective tools to analysis and extract micro-Doppler effects caused by the periodic movements in the reflected radar signal, such as short-time Fourier transform (STFT), wavelet transform (WT), and Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT).The local mean decomposition (LMD), initially developed by Smith (2005), is to decomposed amplitude and frequency modulated signals into a small set of product functions (PFs), each of which is the product of an envelope signal and a frequency modulated signal from which a time-vary instantaneous phase and instantaneous frequency can be derived. As bypassing the Hilbert transform, the LMD has no demodulation error coming from window effect and involves no negative frequency without physical sense. Also, the instantaneous attributes obtained by LMD are more stable and precise than those obtained by the empirical mode decomposition (EMD) because LMD uses smoothed local

  16. Novel superhydrophilic poly(l-lactic acid-co-ε-caprolactone)/fibrinogen electrospun patch for rat abdominal wall reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhang; Li, Shaojie; Su, Ling; Sun, Kang; Wu, Xujun; Wu, Feng; Huang, Weihong; Yang, Li; Tang, Jianxiong; He, Hongbing

    2015-08-01

    A novel superhydrophilic hybrid scaffold was created by electrospinning a mixture of poly(l-lactic acid-co-ε-caprolactone) and formulated fibrinogen. The hybrid scaffolds possess the combined benefits of each individual component, such as moderate mechanical strength and excellent biocompatibility. In vitro studies also revealed that endothelial cells seeded on the hybrid scaffolds achieved a relatively high level of cell attachment after three days of culture and a significant increase in the proliferation rate after seven days of culture, compared with pure fibrinogen or poly(l-lactic acid-co-ε-caprolactone) scaffolds. A comparative study of hybrid and pure poly(l-lactic acid-co-ε-caprolactone) patches was performed in an abdominal wall defect model in rats. In both groups, implants degraded by six months, but muscle reconstruction was only observed in the hybrid patch group.

  17. [Results of partial splenic resection and transposition to the lateral abdominal wall in portal hypertension in childhood].

    PubMed

    Bennek, J; Tröbs, R B; Mühlig, K; Richter, T

    1996-01-01

    Between 1977 and 1995, 19 children with portal hypertension (nine extrahepatic, ten intrahepatic) were treated by transpositioning the spleen into the left abdominal wall. Among the patients with intrahepatic portal hypertension three died. Two patients underwent secondary diminuition of the transposed spleen due to relapsed hypersplenism. In one of our first patients the transposed spleen atrophied after tangential resection. All surviving patients except one preserved hepatic function. The serum colloid osmotic pressure was stable. Plasma ammonia levels were normal. Serum immunoglobulins (IgG, IgM, IgA and IgG subclasses) and complement components (C3c, C4) were analyzed. After transposition patients had normal or slightly elevated values of these proteins compared with controls.

  18. Changes in the Frequencies of Abdominal Wall Hernias and the Preferences for Their Repair: A Multicenter National Study From Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Şeker, Gaye; Kulacoglu, Hakan; Öztuna, Derya; Topgül, Koray; Akyol, Cihangir; Çakmak, Atıl; Karateke, Faruk; Özdoğan, Mehmet; Ersoy, Eren; Gürer, Ahmet; Zerbaliyev, Elbrus; Seker, Duray; Yorgancı, Kaya; Pergel, Ahmet; Aydın, İbrahim; Ensari, Cemal; Bilecik, Tuna; Kahraman, İzzettin; Reis, Erhan; Kalaycı, Murat; Canda, Aras Emre; Demirağ, Alp; Kesicioğlu, Tuğrul; Malazgirt, Zafer; Gündoğdu, Haldun; Terzi, Cem

    2014-01-01

    Abdominal wall hernias are a common problem in the general population. A Western estimate reveals that the lifetime risk of developing a hernia is about 2%.1–3 As a result, hernia repairs likely comprise the most frequent general surgery operations. More than 20 million hernias are estimated to be repaired every year around the world.4 Numerous repair techniques have been described to date however tension-free mesh repairs are widely used today because of their low hernia recurrence rates. Nevertheless, there are some ongoing debates regarding the ideal approach (open or laparoscopic),5,6 the ideal anesthesia (general, local, or regional),7,8 and the ideal mesh (standard polypropylene or newer meshes).9,10 PMID:25216417

  19. Behaviour of a New Composite Mesh for the Repair of Full-Thickness Abdominal Wall Defects in a Rabbit Model

    PubMed Central

    Pascual, Gemma; Sotomayor, Sandra; Rodríguez, Marta; Bayon, Yves; Bellón, Juan M.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Composite biomaterials designed for the repair of abdominal wall defects are composed of a mesh component and a laminar barrier in contact with the visceral peritoneum. This study assesses the behaviour of a new composite mesh by comparing it with two latest-generation composites currently used in clinical practice. Methods Defects (7x5cm) created in the anterior abdominal wall of New Zealand White rabbits were repaired using a polypropylene mesh and the composites: PhysiomeshTM; VentralightTM and a new composite mesh with a three-dimensional macroporous polyester structure and an oxidized collagen/chitosan barrier. Animals were sacrificed on days 14 and 90 postimplant. Specimens were processed to determine host tissue incorporation, gene/protein expression of neo-collagens (RT-PCR/immunofluorescence), macrophage response (RAM-11-immunolabelling) and biomechanical resistance. On postoperative days 7/14, each animal was examined laparoscopically to quantify adhesions between the visceral peritoneum and implant. Results The new composite mesh showed the lowest incidence of seroma in the short term. At each time point, the mesh surface covered with adhesions was greater in controls than composites. By day 14, the implants were fully infiltrated by a loose connective tissue that became denser over time. At 90 days, the peritoneal mesh surface was lined with a stable mesothelium. The new composite mesh induced more rapid tissue maturation than PhysiomeshTM, giving rise to a neoformed tissue containing more type I collagen. In VentralightTM the macrophage reaction was intense and significantly greater than the other composites at both follow-up times. Tensile strengths were similar for each biomaterial. Conclusions All composites showed optimal peritoneal behaviour, inducing good peritoneal regeneration and scarce postoperative adhesion formation. A greater foreign body reaction was observed for VentralightTM. All composites induced good collagen deposition

  20. Echocardiographic evaluation of mitral stenosis using diastolic posterior left ventricular wall motion.

    PubMed

    Wise, J R

    1980-05-01

    The slope of the posterior left ventricular wall motion in diastole (LVDS) was determined by echocardiography in 25 normal subjects and 21 patients with mitral stenosis. Patients with mitral stenosis had reduced LVDS that was related to the degree of mitral stenosis determined by calculated mitral valve area (r = 0.92). The mitral valve area correlated more closely with the LVDS than with the left atrial emptying index derived from the posterior aortic wall motion. Three patients with mitral stenosis had an increased LVDS after mitral valvotomy or mitral valve replacement. One patient with a stenotic mitral valve prosthesis had reduced LVDS. The results of this study suggest that analysis of the LVDS would be useful in predicting the severity of mitral stenosis and may be beneficial in evaluating patients with suspected prosthetic mitral valve malfunction.

  1. Clinical significance of exercise-induced left ventricular wall motion abnormality occurring at a low heart rate

    SciTech Connect

    Kimchi, A.; Rozanski, A.; Fletcher, C.; Maddahi, J.; Swan, H.J.; Berman, D.S.

    1987-10-01

    We studied the relationship between the heart rate at the time of onset of exercise-induced wall motion abnormality and the severity of coronary artery disease in 89 patients who underwent exercise equilibrium radionuclide ventriculography as part of their evaluation for coronary artery disease. Segmental wall motion was scored with a five-point system (3 = normal; -1 = dyskinesis); a decrease of one score defined the onset of wall motion abnormality. The onset of wall motion abnormality at less than or equal to 70% of maximal predicted heart rate had 100% predictive accuracy for coronary artery disease and higher sensitivity than the onset of ischemic ST segment depression at similar heart rate during exercise: 36% (25 of 69 patients with coronary disease) vs 19% (13 of 69 patients), p = 0.01. Wall motion abnormality occurring at less than or equal to 70% of maximal predicted heart rate was present in 49% of patients (23 of 47) with critical stenosis (greater than or equal to 90% luminal diameter narrowing), and in only 5% of patients (2 of 42) without such severe stenosis, p less than 0.001. The sensitivity of exercise-induced wall motion abnormality occurring at a low heart rate for the presence of severe coronary artery disease was similar to that of a deterioration in wall motion by more than two scores during exercise (49% vs 53%) or an absolute decrease of greater than or equal to 5% in exercise left ventricular ejection fraction (49% vs 45%).

  2. SU-E-J-199: Evaluation of Motion Tracking Effects On Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy of Abdominal Targets

    SciTech Connect

    Monterroso, M; Dogan, N; Yang, Y

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effects of respiratory motion on the delivered dose distribution of CyberKnife motion tracking-based stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) of abdominal targets. Methods: Four patients (two pancreas and two liver, and all with 4DCT scans) were retrospectively evaluated. A plan (3D plan) using CyberKnife Synchrony was optimized on the end-exhale phase in the CyberKnife's MultiPlan treatment planning system (TPS), with 40Gy prescribed in 5 fractions. A 4D plan was then created following the 4D planning utility in the MultiPlan TPS, by recalculating dose from the 3D plan beams on all 4DCT phases, with the same prescribed isodose line. The other seven phases of the 4DCT were then deformably registered to the end-exhale phase for 4D dose summation. Doses to the target and organs at risk (OAR) were compared between 3D and 4D plans for each patient. The mean and maximum doses to duodenum, liver, spinal cord and kidneys, and doses to 5cc of duodenum, 700cc of liver, 0.25cc of spinal cord and 200cc of kidneys were used. Results: Target coverage in the 4D plans was about 1% higher for two patients and about 9% lower in the other two. OAR dose differences between 3D and 4D varied among structures, with doses as much as 8.26Gy lower or as much as 5.41Gy higher observed in the 4D plans. Conclusion: The delivered dose can be significantly different from the planned dose for both the target and OAR close to the target, which is caused by the relative geometry change while the beams chase the moving target. Studies will be performed on more patients in the future. The differences of motion tracking versus passive motion management with the use of internal target volumes will also be investigated.

  3. SU-E-T-538: Does Abdominal Compression Through Prone Patient Position Reduce Respiratory Motion in Lung Cancer Radiotherapy?

    SciTech Connect

    Catron, T; Rosu, M; Weiss, E

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: This study assesses the effect of physiological abdominal compression from prone positioning by comparing respiratory-induced tumor movements in supine and prone positions. Methods: 19 lung cancer patients underwent repeated supine and prone free-breathing 4DCT scans. The effect of patient position on motion magnitude was investigated for tumors, lymph nodes (9 cases), and subgroups of central (11 cases), peripheral (8 cases) and small peripheral tumors (5 cases), by evaluating the population average excursions, absolute and relative to a carina-point. Results: Absolute motion analysis: In prone, motion increased by ~20% for tumors and ~25% for lymph nodes. Central tumors moved more compared to peripheral tumors in both supine and prone (~22%, and ~4% respectively). Central tumors movement increased by ~12% in prone. For peripheral tumors the increase in prone position was ~25% (~40% and 29% changes on along RL and AP directions). Motion relative to carina-point analysis: Overall, tumor excursions relative to carina-point increased by ~17% in prone. Lymph node relative magnitudes were lower by ~4%. Likewise, the central tumors moved ~7% less in prone. The subgroup of peripheral tumors exhibited increased amplitudes by ~44%; the small peripheral tumors had even larger relative displacements in prone (~46%). Conclusion: Tumor and lymph node movement in the patient population from this study averaged to be higher in prone than in supine position. Results from carina analysis also suggest that peripheral tissues have more physiologic freedom of motility when placed in the prone position, regardless of size. From these observations we should continue to avoid prone positioning for all types of primary lung tumor, suggesting that patients should receive radiotherapy for primary lung cancer in supine position to minimize target tissue mobility during normal respiratory effort. Further investigation will include more patients with peripheral tumors to validate our

  4. Mechanical analysis of arterial plaques in native geometry with OCT wall motion analysis

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Claire; Heidari, Andrew E.; Chen, Zhongping; George, Steven C.

    2014-01-01

    The mechanical behavior of an atherosclerotic plaque may encode information about the type, composition, and vulnerability to rupture. Human arterial segments with varying plaque burden were analyzed ex vivo with optical coherence tomography (OCT) to determine plaque type and to determine compliance during pulsatile inflation in their native geometry. Calcifications and lipid filled plaques showed markedly different compliance when analyzed with OCT wall motion analysis. There was also a trend towards increased circumferential variation in arterial compliance with increasing plaque burden. PMID:24388166

  5. Mitral Annular Systolic Velocities Predict Left Ventricular Wall Motion Abnormality During Dobutamine Stress Echocardiography

    PubMed Central

    Sharif, Dawod; Sharif-Rasslan, Amal; Shahla, Camilia

    2011-01-01

    Background Longitudinal systolic left ventricular contraction is complementary to the radial performance and can be assessed using tissue Doppler imaging (TDI). This study was performed to evaluate the contribution of mitral annular systolic velocities using TDI after dobutamine stress echocardiography (DSE). Methods and Results Fifty subjects with suspected coronary artery disease and chest pain were examined, using DSE as usual, as well as TDI imaging of the mitral annulus at the septal, lateral, inferior, anterior, posterior regions and the proximal anteroseptal region from the apical views, before and immediately after DSE. In 24 subjects the study was normal, while wall motion abnormality was seen in 26, 9 of them only after DSE. Mitral annular systolic velocity at the 6 locations increased significantly after DSE both in normal subjects and in those with wall motion abnormality (WMA). After DSE mitral annular septal systolic velocity in normals, 19.2 ± 3.8 cm/sec, was higher than in those with WMA, 14.6 ± 2.5 cm/sec, P < 0.0003. Post-DSE mitral systolic velocity was senstive and accurate in predicting WMA. Conclusions Systolic mitral TDI velocities increase after DSE, however to a lesser extent in those with wall motion abnormality, and can differentiate them from normal subjects.

  6. Motion of a particle between two parallel plane walls in low-Reynolds-number Poiseuille flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staben, Michelle E.; Zinchenko, Alexander Z.; Davis, Robert H.

    2003-06-01

    A new boundary-integral algorithm for the motion of a particle between two parallel plane walls in Poiseuille flow at low Reynolds number was developed to study the translational and rotational velocities for a broad range of particle sizes and depths in the channel. Instead of the free-space Green's function more commonly employed in boundary-integral equations, we used the Green's function for the domain between two infinite plane walls [Liron and Mochon, J. Eng. Math. 10, 287 (1976)]. This formulation allows us to directly incorporate the effects of the wall interactions into the stress tensor, without discretizing the bounding walls, and use well-established iterative methods. Our results are in good agreement with previous computations [Ganatos et al., J. Fluid Mech. 99, 755 (1980)] and limiting cases, over their range of application, with additional results obtained for very small particle-wall separations of less than 1% of the particle radius. In addition to the boundary-integral solution in the mobility formulation, we used the resistance formulation to derive the near-field asymptotic forms for the translational and rotational velocities, extending the results to even smaller particle-wall separations. The decrease in translational velocity from the unperturbed fluid velocity increases with particle size and proximity of the particle to one or both of the walls. The rotational velocity exhibits a maximum magnitude between the centerline and either wall, due to the competing influences of wall retardation and the greater fluid velocity gradient near the walls. The average particle velocity for a uniform distribution of particles was generally found to exceed the average fluid velocity, due in large part to exclusion of the particle centers from the region of slowest fluid near the walls. The maximum average particle velocity is 18% greater than the average fluid velocity and occurs for particle diameters that are 42% of the channel height; particles with

  7. Oscillatory motion based measurement method and sensor for measuring wall shear stress due to fluid flow

    DOEpatents

    Armstrong, William D.; Naughton, Jonathan; Lindberg, William R.

    2008-09-02

    A shear stress sensor for measuring fluid wall shear stress on a test surface is provided. The wall shear stress sensor is comprised of an active sensing surface and a sensor body. An elastic mechanism mounted between the active sensing surface and the sensor body allows movement between the active sensing surface and the sensor body. A driving mechanism forces the shear stress sensor to oscillate. A measuring mechanism measures displacement of the active sensing surface relative to the sensor body. The sensor may be operated under periodic excitation where changes in the nature of the fluid properties or the fluid flow over the sensor measurably changes the amplitude or phase of the motion of the active sensing surface, or changes the force and power required from a control system in order to maintain constant motion. The device may be operated under non-periodic excitation where changes in the nature of the fluid properties or the fluid flow over the sensor change the transient motion of the active sensor surface or change the force and power required from a control system to maintain a specified transient motion of the active sensor surface.

  8. Simultaneous effects of slip and wall properties on MHD peristaltic motion of nanofluid with Joule heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayat, T.; Nisar, Z.; Ahmad, B.; Yasmin, H.

    2015-12-01

    This paper is devoted to the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) peristaltic transport of nanofluid in a channel with wall properties. Flow analysis is addressed in the presence of viscous dissipation, partial slip and Joule heating effects. Mathematical modelling also includes the salient features of Brownian motion and thermophoresis. Both analytic and numerical solutions are provided. Comparison between the solutions is shown in a very good agreement. Attention is focused to the Brownian motion parameter, thermophoresis parameter, Hartman number, Eckert number and Prandtl number. Influences of various parameters on skin friction coefficient, Nusselt and Sherwood numbers are also investigated. It is found that both the temperature and nanoparticles concentration are increasing functions of Brownian motion and thermophoresis parameters.

  9. Changes in the wall shear stresses (WSS) during the enlargement of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms (AAA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salsac, Anne-Virginie; Sparks, Steven R.; Chomaz, Jean-Marc; Lasheras, Juan C.

    2004-11-01

    The changes in the evolution of the spatial and temporal distribution of the WSS and gradients of WSS at different stages of the enlargement of AAAs are important to understand the etiology and progression of this vascular disease, since they affect the wall structural integrity, primarily via the changes induced on the shape, functions and metabolism of the endothelial cells. PIV measurements were performed in aneurysm models, while changing systematically their geometric parameters. We show that, even at very early stages of the disease (dilatation > 30%), the flow separates from the wall and the formation of a large vortex ring followed by internal shear layers leads to the generation of WSS that drastically differ from the healthy vessel. Inside the AAA, the mean WSS decreases to zero and the magnitude of the WSS can be as low as 26% of the value in a healthy vessel. Two regions with distinct patterns of WSS were identified. The region of flow detachment, with oscillatory WSS of very low mean, and the region of flow reattachment, located distally, where large, negative WSS and sustained gradients of WSS are produced as a result of the impact of the vortex ring on the wall.

  10. Intestinal injury mechanisms after blunt abdominal impact.

    PubMed

    Cripps, N P; Cooper, G J

    1997-03-01

    Intestinal injury is frequent after non-penetrating abdominal trauma, particularly after modern, high-energy transfer impacts. Under these circumstances, delay in the diagnosis of perforation is a major contributor to morbidity and mortality. This study establishes patterns of intestinal injury after blunt trauma by non-penetrating projectiles and examines relationships between injury distribution and abdominal wall motion. Projectile impacts of variable momentum were produced in 31 anaesthetised pigs to cause abdominal wall motion of varying magnitude and velocity. No small bowel injury was observed at initial impact velocity of less than 40 m/s despite gross abdominal compression. At higher velocity, injury to the small bowel was frequent, irrespective of the degree of abdominal compression (P = 0.00044). Large bowel injury was observed at all impact velocities and at all degrees of abdominal compression. This study confirms the potential for intestinal injury in high velocity, low momentum impacts which do not greatly compress the abdominal cavity and demonstrates apparent differences in injury mechanisms for the small bowel and colon. Familiarity with injury mechanisms may reduce delays in the diagnosis of intestinal perforation in both military and civilian situations.

  11. Antenatal Diagnosis of a Large Immature Abdominal Wall Teratoma by 2D-3D Ultrasound Using HDlive and Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Werner, Heron; Mocarzel, Carolina; Sá, Renato Augusto; Tonni, Gabriele; Novoa Y Novoa, Victoria Arruga; Avvad-Portari, Elyzabeth; Bonasoni, Paola; Araujo Júnior, Edward

    2016-01-01

    We describe the first case of prenatally detected teratoma of the fetal abdomen wall using ultrasound and fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). A heterogeneous mass, partly solid and cystic, originating from the anterior abdominal wall of the fetus close to an omphalocele sac was detected by means of 2D/3D ultrasound and MRI. Amniodrainage was performed and due to sign of impending fetal risk, an emergency Cesarean section was performed. A bulky, crumbly and bleeding tumoral mass was confirmed at delivery. Ligation of the supplying artery to the tumor was complicated by uncontrollable hemorrhage and early neonatal death. Pathology identified the tumor as an immature teratoma of the anterior fetal abdominal wall. 2D/3D ultrasound, especially using HDlive application and MRI demonstrated accurate detection and characterization of this congenital tumor.

  12. An Ultrasound Simulation Model for the Pulsatile Blood Flow Modulated by the Motion of Stenosed Vessel Wall

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yi; Zhang, Kun; Zhang, Kexin; Gao, Lian

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an ultrasound simulation model for pulsatile blood flow, modulated by the motion of a stenosed vessel wall. It aims at generating more realistic ultrasonic signals to provide an environment for evaluating ultrasound signal processing and imaging and a framework for investigating the behaviors of blood flow field modulated by wall motion. This model takes into account fluid-structure interaction, blood pulsatility, stenosis of the vessel, and arterial wall movement caused by surrounding tissue's motion. The axial and radial velocity distributions of blood and the displacement of vessel wall are calculated by solving coupled Navier-Stokes and wall equations. With these obtained values, we made several different phantoms by treating blood and the vessel wall as a group of point scatterers. Then, ultrasound echoed signals from oscillating wall and blood in the axisymmetric stenotic-carotid arteries were computed by ultrasound simulation software, Field II. The results show better consistency with corresponding theoretical values and clinical data and reflect the influence of wall movement on the flow field. It can serve as an effective tool not only for investigating the behavior of blood flow field modulated by wall motion but also for quantitative or qualitative evaluation of new ultrasound imaging technology and estimation method of blood velocity. PMID:27478840

  13. Motion Compensated Abdominal Diffusion Weighted MRI by Simultaneous Image Registration and Model Estimation (SIR-ME).

    PubMed

    Kurugol, Sila; Freiman, Moti; Afacan, Onur; Domachevsky, Liran; Perez-Rossello, Jeannette M; Callahan, Michael J; Warfield, Simon K

    2015-01-01

    Non-invasive characterization of water molecule's mobility variations by quantitative analysis of diffusion-weighted MRI (DW-MRI) signal decay in the abdomen has the potential to serve as a biomarker in gastrointestinal and oncological applications. Accurate and reproducible estimation of the signal decay model parameters is challenging due to the presence of respiratory, cardiac, and peristalsis motion. Independent registration of each b-value image to the b-value=0 s/mm(2) image prior to parameter estimation might be sub-optimal because of the low SNR and contrast difference between images of varying b-value. In this work, we introduce a motion-compensated parameter estimation framework that simultaneously solves image registration and model estimation (SIR-ME) problems by utilizing the interdependence of acquired volumes along the diffusion weighting dimension. We evaluated the improvement in model parameters estimation accuracy using 16 in-vivo DW-MRI data sets of Crohn's disease patients by comparing parameter estimates obtained using the SIR-ME model to the parameter estimates obtained by fitting the signal decay model to the acquired DW-MRI images. The proposed SIR-ME model reduced the average root-mean-square error between the observed signal and the fitted model by more than 50%. Moreover, the SIR-ME model estimates discriminate between normal and abnormal bowel loops better than the standard parameter estimates.

  14. Model tags: direct three-dimensional tracking of heart wall motion from tagged magnetic resonance images.

    PubMed

    Young, A A

    1999-12-01

    Although magnetic resonance tissue tagging is a useful tool for the non-invasive measurement of three-dimensional (3-D) heart wall motion, the clinical utility of current analysis techniques is limited by the prohibitively long time required for image analysis. A method was therefore developed for the reconstruction of 3-D heart wall motion directly from tagged magnetic resonance images, without prior identification of ventricular boundaries or tag stripe locations. The method utilized a finite-element model to describe the shape and motion of the heart. Initially, the model geometry was determined at the time of tag creation by fitting a small number of guide points which were placed interactively on the images. Model tags were then created within the model as material surfaces which defined the location of the magnetic tags. An objective function was derived to measure the degree of match between the model tags and the image stripes. The objective was minimized by allowing the model to deform directly under the influence of the images, utilizing an efficient method for calculating image-derived motion constraints. The model deformation could also be manipulated interactively by guide points. Experiments were performed using clinical images of a normal volunteer, as well as simulated images in which the true motion was specified. The root-mean-squared errors between the known and calculated displacement and strain for the simulated images were similar to those obtained using previous stripe-tracking and model-fitting methods. A significant improvement in analysis time was obtained for the normal volunteer and further improvements may allow the method to be applied in a 'real-time' clinical environment.

  15. Indications and Outcomes of the Components Separation Technique in the Repair of Complex Abdominal Wall Hernias: Experience From the Cambridge Plastic Surgery Department

    PubMed Central

    Adekunle, Shola; Pantelides, Nicholas M.; Hall, Nigel R.; Praseedom, Raaj; Malata, Charles M.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The components separation technique (CST) is a widely described abdominal wall reconstructive technique. There have, however, been no UK reports of its use, prompting the present review. Methods: Between 2008 and 2012, 13 patients who underwent this procedure by a single plastic surgeon (C.M.M.) were retrospectively evaluated. The indications, operative details, and clinical outcomes were recorded. Results: There were 7 women and 6 men in the series with a mean age of 53 years (range: 30-80). Patients were referred from a variety of specialties, often as a last resort. The commonest indication for CST was herniation following abdominal surgery. All operations except 1 were jointly performed with general surgeons (for bowel resection, stoma reversal, and hernia dissection). The operations lasted a mean of 5 hours (range: 3-8 hours). There were no major intra- and postoperative problems, except in 1 patient who developed intra-abdominal compartment syndrome, secondary to massive hemorrhage. All patients were satisfied with the cosmetic improvement in their abdominal contours. None of the patients have developed a clinical recurrence after a mean follow-up of 16 months (range: 3-38 months). Conclusions: The components separation technique is an effective method of treating large recalcitrant hernias but appears to be underutilized in the United Kingdom. The management of large abdominal wall defects requires a multidisciplinary approach, with input across a variety of specialities. Liaison with plastic surgery teams should be encouraged at an early stage and the CST should be more widely considered when presented with seemingly intractable abdominal wall defects. PMID:24058718

  16. Initial experience with the use of porcine acellular dermal matrix (Strattice) for abdominal wall reinforcement after transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap breast reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Cicilioni, Orlando; Araujo, Gerson; Mimbs, Nancy; Cox, Matthew D

    2012-03-01

    Reestablishing anterior rectus fascial integrity remains a clinical challenge after transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous (TRAM) flap breast reconstruction. The main concerns include herniation and bulging due to abdominal weakness. Mesh-assisted closure of the fascial defect has improved bulging and herniation rates but infection, extrusion, and encapsulation are serious concerns with mesh use. Biologic tissue matrices may overcome some of these mesh-related complications. The initial experience of using Strattice for fascial closure after TRAM flap procedure is described in this article. Strattice was in-lain and sutured between the anterior and posterior layers of the rectus fascia, at the rectus muscle donor site. The abdominal wall was closed with progressive tension sutures. Postoperative complications at the donor site were assessed. A total of 16 unilateral and 9 bilateral reconstructions were performed in 25 patients. Length of hospital stay was 2 to 3 days which is shorter than with mesh repair (typically 4-5 days). During a mean follow-up period of 14.0 months, complications occurred in 7 patients (28%): seroma formation (2), minor skin separation (2), superficial skin infection (2), and superficial wound dehiscence (1). Complications were not directly related to Strattice and all, except one (superficial skin infection), were resolved without surgical intervention. In all patients, routine abdominal functions were restored 4 months postoperatively. Strattice is a safe, alternative option to synthetic mesh for fascial repair following TRAM flap breast reconstruction. When used in conjunction with progressive tension suture closure of the abdominal wall, dynamic reconstruction of the abdominal wall with resumption of abdominal function is possible with Strattice.

  17. Superthin Abdominal Wall Glove-Like Flap Combined With Vacuum-Assisted Closure Therapy for Soft Tissue Reconstruction in Severely Burned Hands or With Infection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fei; Liu, Sheng; Qiu, Le; Ma, Ben; Wang, Jian; Wang, Yong-Jie; Peszel, April; Chen, Xu-Lin

    2015-12-01

    Severe burn and infection to hands always involves the deep structures, such as tendons, joints, and bones. These wounds cannot be closed immediately and therefore creates a high risk for complication. We presented 9 cases with deep dermal burns to the dorsal of the hand (6 electrical burns and 3 thermal crush injuries) with wound infections in 2 cases. The vacuum-assisted closure system was used continuously until the flap reconstruction was performed. A random pattern and superthin abdominal wall skin flap-like glove was designed. The flap was transferred to the defected portion of the dorsum of the hand and resected from the abdominal wall about 3 weeks later. The flaps in 8 of the patients treated by this technique survived completely and partial necrosis of the distal flap occurred in 1 patient. The defect resolved after operative treatment and the function of the hands and fingers were successfully salvaged. All patients resulted in having a satisfactory aesthetic outcome with no or minor discomfort at the abdominal donor area. Integration of the vacuum-assisted closure system and the superthin abdominal wall glove-like flap reconstruction appeared to be successful and should be considered in patients with severely burned hands.

  18. Assessment of left ventricular regional wall motion by color kinesis technique: comparison with angiographic findings.

    PubMed

    Vermes, E; Guyon, P; Weingrod, M; Otmani, A; Soussana, C; Halphen, C; Leroy, G; Haïat, R

    2000-08-01

    The analysis of segmental wall motion using two-dimensional (2-D) echocardiography is subjective with high interobserver variability. Color kinesis is a new technique providing a color-encoded map of endocardial motion. We evaluated the accuracy of color kinesis and 2-D for assessment of regional asynergy compared with left ventricular angiography as a reference method. Fifteen patients admitted for myocardial infarction were studied by echocardiography the day before left ventricular angiography. The left ventricle was divided into seven segments. Each segment was classified by two independent observers as normal or abnormal in 2-D and color kinesis. Accuracy of color kinesis and 2-D was evaluated and compared to left ventricular angiography. Color kinesis is significantly superior to 2-D for all seven segments (mean 0.80/0.68, P = 0.05), except for the septum (0.67/0.60, P = NS). Interobserver variability studied by chi-square statistic is lower with color kinesis (0.70) than with 2-D (0.57). We conclude that these data suggest that color kinesis is a useful method for assessing systolic wall motion in all segments, except the septum and for improving the accuracy of segmental ventricular function and interobserver variability.

  19. Phase-sensitive lateral motion estimator for measurement of artery-wall displacement--phantom study.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Hideyuki; Kanai, Hiroshi

    2009-11-01

    Artery-wall motion due to the pulsation of the heart is often measured to evaluate mechanical properties of the arterial wall. Such motion is thought to occur only in the arterial radial direction because the main source of the motion is an increase of blood pressure. However, it has recently been reported that the artery also moves in the longitudinal direction. Therefore, a 2-D motion estimator is required even when the artery is scanned in the longitudinal direction because the arterial wall moves both in the radial (axial) and longitudinal (lateral) directions. Methods based on 2-D correlation of RF echoes are often used to estimate the lateral displacement together with axial displacement. However, these methods require much interpolation of the RF echo or correlation function to achieve a sufficient resolution in the estimation of displacement. To overcome this problem, Jensen et al. modulated the ultrasonic field in the lateral direction at a designed spatial frequency to use the lateral phase for the estimation of lateral motion. This method, namely, the lateral modulation method, generates complex signals whose phases change depending on the lateral motion. Therefore, the lateral displacement can be estimated with a good resolution without interpolation, although special beamformers are required. The present paper describes a method that can be applied to ultrasonic echoes obtained by a conventional beamformer to estimate lateral displacements using the phases of lateral fluctuations of ultrasonic echoes. In the proposed method, complex signals were generated by the Hilbert transform, and the phase shift was estimated by correlation-based estimators. The proposed method was validated using a cylindrical phantom mimicking an artery. The error in the lateral displacement estimated by the proposed method was 13.5% of the true displacement of 0.5 mm with a kernel size used for calculating the correlation function of 0.6 mm in the lateral direction, which was

  20. Assessment of left ventricular wall motion abnormalities with the use of color kinesis: a valuable visual and training aid.

    PubMed

    Lau, Y S; Puryear, J V; Gan, S C; Fowler, M B; Vagelos, R H; Popp, R L; Schnittger, I

    1997-01-01

    Accurate interpretation of left ventricular segmental wall motion by echocardiography is an important yet difficult skill to learn. Color-coded left ventricular wall motion (color kinesis) is a tool that potentially could aid in the interpretation and provide semiquantification. We studied the usefulness of color kinesis in 42 patients with a history of congestive cardiomyopathy who underwent two-dimensional echocardiograms and a color kinesis study. The expert's reading of the two-dimensional wall motion served as a reference for comparison of color kinesis studies interpreted by the expert and a cardiovascular trainee. Correlation between two-dimensional echocardiography and the expert's and trainee's color coded wall motion scores were r = 0.83 and r = 0.67, respectively. Reproducibility between reviewers and between operators was also assessed. Interobserver variability for color-coded wall motion showed a correlation of r = 0.78. Correlation between operators was also good; r = 0.84. Color kinesis is reliable and appears promising as an adjunct in the assessment of wall motion abnormalities by echocardiography. It is both a valuable visual aid, as well as a training aid for the cardiovascular trainee.

  1. Pectoralis Muscle Flap Repair Reduces Paradoxical Motion of the Chest Wall in Complex Sternal Wound Dehiscence

    PubMed Central

    Zeitani, Jacob; Russo, Marco; Pompeo, Eugenio; Sergiacomi, Gian Luigi; Chiariello, Luigi

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of the study was to test the hypothesis that in patients with chronic complex sternum dehiscence, the use of muscle flap repair minimizes the occurrence of paradoxical motion of the chest wall (CWPM) when compared to sternal rewiring, eventually leading to better respiratory function and clinical outcomes during follow-up. Methods In a propensity score matching analysis, out of 94 patients who underwent sternal reconstruction, 20 patients were selected: 10 patients underwent sternal reconstruction with bilateral pectoralis muscle flaps (group 1) and 10 underwent sternal rewiring (group 2). Eligibility criteria included the presence of hemisternum diastases associated with multiple (≥3) bone fractures and radiologic evidence of synchronous chest wall motion (CWSM). We compared radiologically assessed (volumetric computed tomography) ventilatory mechanic indices such as single lung and global vital capacity (VC), diaphragm excursion, synchronous and paradoxical chest wall motion. Results Follow-up was 100% complete (mean 85±24 months). CWPM was inversely correlated with single lung VC (Spearman R=−0.72, p=0.0003), global VC (R=−0.51, p=0.02) and diaphragm excursion (R=−0.80, p=0.0003), whereas it proved directly correlated with dyspnea grade (Spearman R=0.51, p=0.02) and pain (R=0.59, p=0.005). Mean CWPM and single lung VC were both better in group 1, whereas there was no difference in CWSM, diaphragm excursion and global VC. Conclusion Our study suggests that in patients with complex chronic sternal dehiscence, pectoralis muscle flap reconstruction guarantees lower CWPM and greater single-lung VC when compared with sternal rewiring and it is associated with better clinical outcomes with less pain and dyspnea. PMID:27733997

  2. Two-dimensional simulation of red blood cell motion near a wall under a lateral force.

    PubMed

    Hariprasad, Daniel S; Secomb, Timothy W

    2014-11-01

    The motion of a red blood cell suspended in a linear shear flow adjacent to a fixed boundary subject to an applied lateral force directed toward the boundary is simulated. A two-dimensional model is used that represents the viscous and elastic properties of normal red blood cells. Shear rates in the range of 100 to 600 s^{-1} are considered, and the suspending medium viscosity is 1 cP. In the absence of a lateral force, the cell executes a tumbling motion. With increasing lateral force, a transition from tumbling to tank-treading is predicted. The minimum force required to ensure tank-treading increases nonlinearly with the shear rate. Transient swinging motions occur when the force is slightly larger than the transition value. The applied lateral force is balanced by a hydrodynamic lift force resulting from the positive orientation of the long axis of the cell with respect to the wall. In the case of cyclic tumbling motions, the orientation angle takes positive values through most of the cycle, resulting in lift generation. These results are used to predict the motion of a cell close to the outer edge of the cell-rich core region that is generated when blood flows in a narrow tube. In this case, the lateral force is generated by shear-induced dispersion, resulting from cell-cell interactions in a region with a concentration gradient. This force is estimated using previous data on shear-induced dispersion. The cell is predicted to execute tank-treading motions at normal physiological hematocrit levels, with the possibility of tumbling at lower hematocrit levels.

  3. Two-dimensional simulation of red blood cell motion near a wall under a lateral force

    PubMed Central

    Hariprasad, Daniel S.; Secomb, Timothy W.

    2015-01-01

    The motion of a red blood cell suspended in a linear shear flow adjacent to a fixed boundary subject to an applied lateral force directed towards the boundary is simulated. A two-dimensional model is used that represents the viscous and elastic properties of normal red blood cells. Shear rates in the range of 100 s−1 to 600 s−1 are considered, and the suspending medium viscosity is 1 cP. In the absence of a lateral force, the cell executes a tumbling motion. With increasing lateral force, a transition from tumbling to tank-treading is predicted. The minimum force required to ensure tank-treading increases non-linearly with the shear rate. Transient swinging motions occur when the force is slightly larger than the transition value. The applied lateral force is balanced by a hydrodynamic lift force resulting from the positive orientation of the long axis of the cell with respect to the wall. In the case of cyclic tumbling motions, the orientation angle takes positive values through most of the cycle, resulting in lift generation. These results are used to predict the motion of a cell close to the outer edge of the cell-rich core region that is generated when blood flows in a narrow tube. In this case, the lateral force is generated by shear-induced dispersion, resulting from cell-cell interactions in a region with a concentration gradient. This force is estimated using previous data on shear-induced dispersion. The cell is predicted to execute tank-treading motions at normal physiological hematocrit levels, with the possibility of tumbling at lower hematocrit levels. PMID:25493888

  4. Influence of wall motion on particle sedimentation using hybrid LB-IBM scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habte, Mussie A.; Wu, ChuiJie

    2017-03-01

    We integrate the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) and immersed boundary method (IBM) to capture the coupling between a rigid boundary surface and the hydrodynamic response of an enclosed particle laden fluid. We focus on a rigid box filled with a Newtonian fluid where the drag force based on the slip velocity at the wall and settling particles induces the interaction. We impose an external harmonic oscillation on the system boundary and found interesting results in the sedimentation behavior. Our results reveal that the sedimentation and particle locations are sensitive to the boundary walls oscillation amplitude and the subsequent changes on the enclosed flow field. Two different particle distribution analyses were performed and showed the presence of an agglomerate structure of particles. Despite the increase in the amplitude of wall motion, the turbulence level of the flow field and distribution of particles are found to be less in quantity compared to the stationary walls. The integrated LBM-IBM methodology promised the prospect of an efficient and accurate dynamic coupling between a non-compliant bounding surface and flow field in a wide-range of systems. Understanding the dynamics of the fluid-filled box can be particularly important in a simulation of particle deposition within biological systems and other engineering applications.

  5. Switching local magnetization by electric-field-induced domain wall motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakizakai, Haruka; Ando, Fuyuki; Koyama, Tomohiro; Yamada, Kihiro; Kawaguchi, Masashi; Kim, Sanghoon; Kim, Kab-Jin; Moriyama, Takahiro; Chiba, Daichi; Ono, Teruo

    2016-06-01

    Electric field effect on magnetism is an appealing technique for manipulating magnetization at a low energy cost. Here, we show that the local magnetization of an ultrathin Co film can be switched by simply applying a gate electric field without the assistance of any external magnetic field or current flow. The local magnetization switching is explained by nucleation and annihilation of magnetic domains through domain wall motion induced by the electric field. Our results lead to external-field-free and ultralow-energy spintronic applications.

  6. Energy-efficient writing scheme for magnetic domain-wall motion memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kab-Jin; Yoshimura, Yoko; Ham, Woo Seung; Ernst, Rick; Hirata, Yuushou; Li, Tian; Kim, Sanghoon; Moriyama, Takahiro; Nakatani, Yoshinobu; Ono, Teruo

    2017-04-01

    We present an energy-efficient magnetic domain-writing scheme for domain wall (DW) motion-based memory devices. A cross-shaped nanowire is employed to inject a domain into the nanowire through current-induced DW propagation. The energy required for injecting the magnetic domain is more than one order of magnitude lower than that for the conventional field-based writing scheme. The proposed scheme is beneficial for device miniaturization because the threshold current for DW propagation scales with the device size, which cannot be achieved in the conventional field-based technique.

  7. Generalized analysis of thermally activated domain-wall motion in Co/Pt multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emori, Satoru; Umachi, Chinedum K.; Bono, David C.; Beach, Geoffrey S. D.

    2015-03-01

    Thermally activated domain-wall (DW) motion driven by magnetic field and electric current is investigated experimentally in out-of-plane magnetized Pt(Co/Pt)3 multilayers. We directly extract the thermal activation energy barrier for DW motion and observe the dynamic regimes of creep, depinning, and viscous flow. Further analysis reveals that the activation energy must be corrected with a factor dependent on the Curie temperature, and we derive a generalized Arrhenius-like equation governing thermally activated motion. By using this generalized equation, we quantify the efficiency of current-induced spin torque in assisting DW motion. Current produces no effect aside from Joule heating in the multilayer with 7-Å thick Co layers, whereas it generates a finite spin torque on DWs in the multilayer with atomically thin 3-Å Co layers. These findings suggest that conventional spin-transfer torques from in-plane spin-polarized current do not drive DWs in ultrathin Co/Pt multilayers.

  8. Techniques for Abdominal Wall Closure after Damage Control Laparotomy: From Temporary Abdominal Closure to Early/Delayed Fascial Closure—A Review

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Qian; Li, Jieshou; Lau, Wan-yee

    2016-01-01

    Open abdomen (OA) has been an effective treatment for abdominal catastrophes in traumatic and general surgery. However, management of patients with OA remains a formidable task for surgeons. The central goal of OA is closure of fascial defect as early as is clinically feasible without precipitating abdominal compartment syndrome. Historically, techniques such as packing, mesh, and vacuum-assisted closure have been developed to assist temporary abdominal closure, and techniques such as components separation, mesh-mediated traction, bridging fascial defect with permanent synthetic mesh, or biologic mesh have also been attempted to achieve early primary fascial closure, either alone or in combined use. The objective of this review is to present the challenges of these techniques for OA with a goal of early primary fascial closure, when the patient's physiological condition allows. PMID:26819597

  9. Time evolution of domain-wall motion induced by nanosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerasimov, M. V.; Logunov, M. V.; Spirin, A. V.; Nozdrin, Yu. N.; Tokman, I. D.

    2016-07-01

    The time evolution of the magnetization normal component change in a garnet film with a labyrinthine domain structure under the action of circularly and linearly polarized laser pump pulses (the pulse duration is 5 ns; the wavelength is 527 nm) has been studied. The dynamic state of the magnetic film was registered using an induction method with a time resolution of 1 ns. It was found that for the initial state of the magnetic film with an equilibrium domain structure, the form of the photomagnetization pulse reflects the time evolution of a domain-wall motion. The domain-wall motion initiated by the circularly polarized laser pump pulse continues in the same direction for a time more than an order of magnitude exceeding the laser pulse duration. In general, the time evolution of the domain-wall movement occurs in three stages. The separation of the contributions to the photomagnetization from the polarization-dependent and polarization-independent effects was carried out. The photomagnetization pulses that reflect the contributions by the aforementioned effects differ by form, and more than two orders of magnitude by duration. Their form doesn't change under a magnetic bias field change, only the photomagnetization pulse amplitude does: for the polarization-dependent contribution, it's an even function of the field, and for the polarization-independent contribution, it's an odd function. The interconnection between the polarization-dependent and polarization-independent effects, on the one hand, and the domain-wall displacement and the change of the film's saturation magnetization, on the other hand, was identified and described.

  10. A reduced-order model for wall shear stress in abdominal aortic aneurysms by proper orthogonal decomposition.

    PubMed

    Chang, Gary Han; Schirmer, Clemens M; Modarres-Sadeghi, Yahya

    2017-03-21

    In this paper, we introduce a method to construct a Reduced-Order Model (ROM) to study the physiological flow and the Wall Shear Stress (WSS) conditions in Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms (AAA). We start the process by running a training case using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations with time-varying flow parameters, such that these parameters cover the range of parameters that we would like to consider in our ROM. We use the inflow angle as the variable parameter in the current study. Then we use the snapshot Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD) to construct the reduced-order bases, which are subsequently enhanced using a QR-factorization technique to satisfy the relevant fluid boundary conditions. The resulting ROM enables us to study the flow pattern and the WSS distribution over a range of system parameters computationally very efficiently. We have used this method to show how the WSS varies significantly for an AAA with a simplified geometry, over a range of inflow angles usually considered mild in clinical terms. We have validated the ROM results with CFD results. This approach enables comprehensive analysis of the model system across a range of inflow angles and frequencies without the need to re-compute the simulation for small changes.

  11. Reconstruction of large-size abdominal wall defect using biodegradable poly-p-dioxanone mesh: an experimental canine study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Reconstruction of large-size abdominal wall defect (AWDs) is a huge challenge faced in current surgical practice. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of biodegradable poly-p-dioxanone (PDO) mesh for reconstructing large-size AWDs in an experimental canine model. Methods Eighteen experimental canines were randomly and equally divided into three groups, namely, a PDO group, a Marlex group and a control group (n = 6 each). Following the creation of a 6 cm × 5.5 cm AWD, PDO mesh and Marlex mesh were used to reconstruct the defect in the PDO and Marlex groups, respectively. The defect was closed using relaxation sutures alone in the control group. Animals were killed 24 weeks after surgery, and reconstruction outcomes were evaluated using radiography, histology and biomechanical testing. Results All animals except those in the control group survived the experiment. The PDO group showed no wound dehiscence, herniation or infection, whereas the animals in the Marlex group exhibited marked foreign body reactions. The PDO group had less intraabdominal adhesion than the Marlex group. As shown by radiography, histology and biomechanical testing, PDO mesh exhibited complete degradation and favorable biochemical strength at 24 weeks postsurgery. Conclusions PDO mesh implantation is an effective, safe treatment modality for reconstructing large-size AWDs. PMID:24625138

  12. Risk factors associated with early failure in complex abdominal wall reconstruction: a 5 year single surgeon experience.

    PubMed

    Wink, Jason D; Wes, Ari M; Fischer, John P; Nelson, Jonas A; Stranksy, Carrie; Kovach, Stephen J

    2015-04-01

    Complex abdominal wall reconstruction (AWR) is commonly performed, but with a significant rate of surgical complications and hernia recurrence. The aim of this experiential review is to assess risk factors for hernia recurrence after complex AWR. A retrospective review of AWR patients from 2007-2012 was performed. Rates of hernia recurrence were assessed. Univariate analyses and subsequent multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to assess independent predictors of early hernia recurrence. One hundred and thirty-four consecutive cases of AWR were performed over a 5-year period. Hernia recurrence developed in 14 (10.4%) patients. Hernias derived from trauma (OR = 19.76, p = 0.011) and those who experienced postoperative wound infections (OR = 18.81, p = 0.004) were at increased risk for hernia recurrence. In conclusion, increased vigilance must be paid to patients presenting after trauma with massive loss of domain and those who experience postoperative infection, as these cohorts are at added risk for failed reconstruction.

  13. Steady-state domain wall motion driven by adiabatic spin-transfer torque with assistance of microwave field

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xi-guang; Guo, Guang-hua Nie, Yao-zhuang; Xia, Qing-lin; Tang, Wei; Wang, D.; Zeng, Zhong-ming

    2013-12-23

    We have studied the current-induced displacement of a 180° Bloch wall by means of micromagnetic simulation and analytical approach. It is found that the adiabatic spin-transfer torque can sustain a steady-state domain wall (DW) motion in the direction opposite to that of the electron flow without Walker Breakdown when a transverse microwave field is applied. This kind of motion is very sensitive to the microwave frequency and can be resonantly enhanced by exciting the domain wall thickness oscillation mode. A one-dimensional analytical model was established to account for the microwave-assisted wall motion. These findings may be helpful for reducing the critical spin-polarized current density and designing DW-based spintronic devices.

  14. CRITICAL ANALYSIS OF EXPERIMENTAL MODEL FOR STUDY OF ADHESIONS AFTER INCISIONAL HERNIAS INDUCED IN RATS’ AND REPAIR OF ABDOMINAL WALL WITH DIFFERENT BIOMATERIALS

    PubMed Central

    SERIGIOLLE, Leonardo Carvalho; BARBIERI, Renato Lamounier; GOMES, Helbert Minuncio Pereira; RODRIGUES, Daren Athiê Boy; STUDART, Sarah do Valle; LEME, Pedro Luiz Squilacci

    2015-01-01

    Background: Adhesions induced by biomaterials experimentally implanted in the abdominal cavity are basically studied by primary repair of different abdominal wall defects or by the correction of incisional hernias previously performed with no precise definition of the most appropriate model. Aim: To describe the adhesions which occur after the development of incisional hernias, before the prosthesis implantation, in an experimental model to study the changes induced by different meshes. Methods: Incisional hernias were performed in 10 rats with hernia orifices of standardized dimensions, obtained by the median incision of the abdominal wall and eversion of the defect edges. Ten days after the procedure adhesions of abdominal structures were found when hernias were repaired with different meshes. Results: The results showed hernia sac well defined in all rats ten days after the initial procedure. Adhesions of the greater omentum occurred in five animals of which two also showed adhesions of small bowel loops besides the omentum, and another two showed liver adhesions as well as the greater omentum, numbers with statistical significance by Student's t test (p<0.05). Conclusion: Although it reproduces the real clinical situation, the choice of experimental model of incisional hernia repair previously induced implies important adhesions, with possible repercussions in the evaluation of the second operation, when different implants of synthetic materials are used. PMID:26537141

  15. Pedicled full-thickness abdominal flap combined with skin grafting for the reconstruction of anterior chest wall defect following major electrical burn.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing-Chun; Xian, Chun-Jing; Yu, Jia-Ao; Shi, Kai

    2015-02-01

    Successful reconstruction of extensive anterior chest wall defect following major electrical burn represents a very challenging surgery. Herein we report the first case using pedicled full-thickness abdominal flap combined with skin grafting to treat this injury with severe infection and exposure of pericardium and ribs in a Chinese patient. Following the performance of chest debridement to remove necrotic and infected tissues and the injection of broad-spectrum antibiotics to reduce infection, a pedicled full-thickness abdominal flap was used to cover the exposed pericardium and ribs, and skin grafting from the right leg of the patient was done to cover the exposed vital tissues. The patient was followed up for a total of 3·5 years, and satisfactory cosmetic and functional outcomes were obtained without complications. This report provides an effective method for the surgeons who encounter similar cases where reconstruction of extensive anterior chest wall is required.

  16. Effect of Joule heating in current-driven domain wall motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, A.; Nasu, S.; Tanigawa, H.; Ono, T.; Miyake, K.; Mibu, K.; Shinjo, T.

    2005-01-01

    It was found that high current density needed for the current-driven domain wall motion results in the Joule heating of the sample. The sample temperature, when the current-driven domain wall motion occurred, was estimated by measuring the sample resistance during the application of a pulsed current. The sample temperature was 750 K for the threshold current density of 6.7×1011A/m2 in a 10-nm-thick Ni81Fe19 wire with a width of 240 nm on thermally oxidized silicon substrate. The temperature was raised to 830 K for the current density of 7.5×1011A/m2, which is very close to the Curie temperature of bulk Ni81Fe19. When the current density exceeded 7.5×1011A/m2, an appearance of a multidomain structure in the wire was observed by magnetic force microscopy, suggesting that the sample temperature exceeded the Curie temperature.

  17. Reconstruction of the Abdominal Wall in Anatomical Plans. Pre- and Postoperative Keys in Repairing “Cold” Incisional Hernias

    PubMed Central

    POPA, FLORINA; ROSCA, OANA; GEORGESCU, ALEXANDRU; CANNISTRA, CLAUDIO

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims The clinical results of the vertical “vest-over-pants” Mayo repair were evaluated, and the risk factors for incisional hernia recurrence were studied. The purpose of this study is to point out the importance of reducing pre and post operative risk factors in the incisional hernia repair process in order to achieve a physiologically normal abdominal wall. Methods Twenty patients diagnosed with incisional hernia underwent an abdominal reconstruction procedure using the Mayo (Paletot) technique at Bichat Claude Bernard Hospital between 2005 and 2015. All procedures were performed by a single surgeon and all patients were pre-operatively prepared, identifying all coexisting conditions and treating them accordingly before undergoing surgery. Results All patients underwent at least one surgical operation before the hernia repair procedure and a quarter had experienced at least three, prior to this one. Nine patients had a body mass index of >30 kg/m2. Additional risk factors and comorbidities included obesity in 45%, diabetes mellitus in 10%, smoking in 55%, and high blood pressure in 40%. Hernia defect width was from 3 cm (25% F) to 15 cm (5% M) of which nine patients (45%) had a 10 cm defect. Most of the patients had an average hospitalization of 7 days. The patients were carefully monitored and were called on periodic consultations after 3, 6, and 12 months from the moment of the procedure. Patient feedback regarding hernia recurrence and complaints about the scar were noted. Physical examination is essential in determining the hernia recurrence therefore the scar was examined for any abnormalities that may have occurred, which was defined as any palpable or detected fascial defect located within seven centimeters of the hernia repair. Post-operative complications: seroma formation, wound hematoma, superficial and deep wound infection, recurrences and chronic pain were followed and no complications were registered during the follow-up period

  18. Translational Response of Toe-Restrained Retaining Walls to Earthquake Ground Motions Using CorpsWallSlip (CWSlip)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-01

    invert spillway slab (not shown). The translation of the structural wedge is assumed to occur during earthquake shaking. A drop down box entitled...e.g., navigation walls retaining earth, spillway chute walls, spill- way discharge channel walls, approach channel walls to outlet works structures...1.5 Axial load capacity of spillway invert slabs..................................................................... 27 1.6 Background and research

  19. [Influence of mydocalm on the degree of intra-abdominal hypertension and local blood circulation in the intestinal wall in experiment].

    PubMed

    Sapegin, V I; Sapegin, I D; Il'chenko, F N

    2014-01-01

    The effect of mydocalm (tolperison, 5 mg/kg single dose) on the dynamics of intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH), blood circulation regulation, and oxygen balance in the tissues of intestinal wall were studied in acute experiments on rabbits. Using a special stand of original design, the initial IAH level was modeled at 200 mm H2O with the subsequent stopping of further receipt of liquid during 3 hours in an elastic container in the abdominal cavity. During 3-h observation without drug administration, no changes in IAH due to the tone of muscles of the frontal abdominal wall takes place, but there is progressive deceleration of local blood flow (-35.33 + 0.99%, p < 0.01), suppressed dilation (-20.02 + 0.54%, p < 0.01) and constriction (-60.45 + 1.17%, p < 0.01) reactivity of vessels, and decreased oxygen tension (-47.18 + 0.75%, p < 0.01) in the intestinal wall at the end of experiment. The introduction of mydocalm reduces the tone of muscles of the frontal abdominal wall, which leads to a decrease in IAH (maximum effect after 1.5 hours, -20.81 + 0.84%, p < 0.01) and prevents decrease in the local blood flow (-26.77 + 0.41%, p < 0.01), suppression of dilation (-16.51 + 0.34%, p < 0.01) and constriction (-37.85 + 0.61%, p < 0.01) reactivity of vessels, and reduction in oxygen tension (-36.60 + 1.18%, p < 0.01) at the end of experiment. The administration of mydocalm can extend the limits of application of a conservative therapy for patients with IAH and to improve the results.

  20. Observation of hohlraum-wall motion with spectrally selective x-ray imaging at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izumi, N.; Meezan, N. B.; Divol, L.; Hall, G. N.; Barrios, M. A.; Jones, O.; Landen, O. L.; Kroll, J. J.; Vonhof, S. A.; Nikroo, A.; Jaquez, J.; Bailey, C. G.; Hardy, C. M.; Ehrlich, R. B.; Town, R. P. J.; Bradley, D. K.; Hinkel, D. E.; Moody, J. D.

    2016-11-01

    The high fuel capsule compression required for indirect drive inertial confinement fusion requires careful control of the X-ray drive symmetry throughout the laser pulse. When the outer cone beams strike the hohlraum wall, the plasma ablated off the hohlraum wall expands into the hohlraum and can alter both the outer and inner cone beam propagations and hence the X-ray drive symmetry especially at the final stage of the drive pulse. To quantitatively understand the wall motion, we developed a new experimental technique which visualizes the expansion and stagnation of the hohlraum wall plasma. Details of the experiment and the technique of spectrally selective x-ray imaging are discussed.

  1. Effect of microwaves on domain wall motion in thin Ni wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Kimin; Giordano, N.

    1996-03-01

    We report new results on domain wall motion in thin (width and thickness ~ 300 ÅNi wires. The magnetoresistance exhibits discontinuities which we believe are associated with pinning and de-pinning of walls from structural defects, such as variations in the width of the sample. Upon repeated measurement, the de-pinning is found to occur over a narrow range of fields. The distribution of de-pinning fields, P(H), varies with temperature in a manner which suggests that de-pinning occurs via thermal activation at high temperatures, and quantum tunneling at low temperatures, with crossover between these two regimes at T ~ 2 - 6 K. We have also investigated the effect of a 30 GHz microwave field on P(H). In the thermal activation regime, microwaves have no effect on P(H), except through Joule heating. However, in the tunneling regime microwaves cause P(H) to split into several separate peaks. This behavior cannot be explained in terms of Joule heating, but suggests that the energy levels of a domain wall in a pinning well are quantized.

  2. Interventional heart wall motion analysis with cardiac C-arm CT systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Kerstin; Maier, Andreas K.; Zheng, Yefeng; Wang, Yang; Lauritsch, Günter; Schwemmer, Chris; Rohkohl, Christopher; Hornegger, Joachim; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2014-05-01

    Today, quantitative analysis of three-dimensional (3D) dynamics of the left ventricle (LV) cannot be performed directly in the catheter lab using a current angiographic C-arm system, which is the workhorse imaging modality for cardiac interventions. Therefore, myocardial wall analysis is completely based on the 2D angiographic images or pre-interventional 3D/4D imaging. In this paper, we present a complete framework to study the ventricular wall motion in 4D (3D+t) directly in the catheter lab. From the acquired 2D projection images, a dynamic 3D surface model of the LV is generated, which is then used to detect ventricular dyssynchrony. Different quantitative features to evaluate LV dynamics known from other modalities (ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging) are transferred to the C-arm CT data. We use the ejection fraction, the systolic dyssynchrony index a 3D fractional shortening and the phase to maximal contraction (ϕi, max) to determine an indicator of LV dyssynchrony and to discriminate regionally pathological from normal myocardium. The proposed analysis tool was evaluated on simulated phantom LV data with and without pathological wall dysfunctions. The LV data used is publicly available online at https://conrad.stanford.edu/data/heart. In addition, the presented framework was tested on eight clinical patient data sets. The first clinical results demonstrate promising performance of the proposed analysis tool and encourage the application of the presented framework to a larger study in clinical practice.

  3. Color structured light system of chest wall motion measurement for respiratory volume evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Huijun; Cheng, Yuan; Liu, Dongdong; Zhang, Xiaodong; Zhang, Jue; Que, Chengli; Wang, Guangfa; Fang, Jing

    2010-03-01

    We present a structured light system to dynamically measure human chest wall motion for respiratory volume estimation. Based on a projection of an encoded color pattern and a few active markers attached to the trunk, respiratory volumes are obtained by evaluating the 3-D topographic changes of the chest wall in an anatomically consistent measuring region during respiration. Three measuring setups are established: a single-sided illuminating-recording setup for standing posture, an inclined single-sided setup for supine posture, and a double-sided setup for standing posture. Results are compared with the pneumotachography and show good agreement in volume estimations [correlation coefficient: R>0.99 (P<0.001) for all setups]. The isovolume tests present small variations of the obtained volume during the isovolume maneuver (standard deviation<0.085 L for all setups). After validation by the isovolume test, an investigation of a patient with pleural effusion using the proposed method shows pulmonary functional differences between the diseased and the contralateral sides of the thorax, and subsequent improvement of this imbalance after drainage. These results demonstrate the proposed optical method is capable of not only whole respiratory volume evaluation with high accuracy, but also regional pulmonary function assessment in different chest wall behaviors, with the advantage of whole-field measurement.

  4. Enhanced stochasticity of domain wall motion in magnetic racetracks due to dynamic pinning.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xin; Thomas, Luc; Moriya, Rai; Hayashi, Masamitsu; Bergman, Bastiaan; Rettner, Charles; Parkin, Stuart S P

    2010-06-15

    Understanding the details of domain wall (DW) motion along magnetic racetracks has drawn considerable interest in the past few years for their applications in non-volatile memory devices. The propagation of the DW is dictated by the interplay between its driving force, either field or current, and the complex energy landscape of the racetrack. In this study, we use spin-valve nanowires to study field-driven DW motion in real time. By varying the strength of the driving magnetic field, the propagation mode of the DW can be changed from a simple translational mode to a more complex precessional mode. Interestingly, the DW motion becomes much more stochastic at the onset of this propagation mode. We show that this unexpected result is a consequence of an unsustainable gain in Zeeman energy of the DW, as it is driven faster by the magnetic field. As a result, the DW periodically releases energy and thereby becomes more susceptible to pinning by local imperfections in the racetrack.

  5. Magnetic-field-induced domain-wall motion in permalloy nanowires with modified Gilbert damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Thomas A.; Möhrke, Philipp; Heyne, Lutz; Kaldun, Andreas; Kläui, Mathias; Backes, Dirk; Rhensius, Jan; Heyderman, Laura J.; Thiele, Jan-Ulrich; Woltersdorf, Georg; Fraile Rodríguez, Arantxa; Nolting, Frithjof; Menteş, Tevfik O.; Niño, Miguel Á.; Locatelli, Andrea; Potenza, Alessandro; Marchetto, Helder; Cavill, Stuart; Dhesi, Sarnjeet S.

    2010-09-01

    Domain wall (DW) depinning and motion in the viscous regime induced by magnetic fields, are investigated in planar permalloy nanowires in which the Gilbert damping α is tuned in the range 0.008-0.26 by doping with Ho. Real time, spatially resolved magneto-optic Kerr effect measurements yield depinning field distributions and DW mobilities. Depinning occurs at discrete values of the field which are correlated with different metastable DW states and changed by the doping. For α<0.033 , the DW mobilities are smaller than expected while for α≥0.033 , there is agreement between the measured DW mobilities and those predicted by the standard one-dimensional model of field-induced DW motion. Micromagnetic simulations indicate that this is because as α increases, the DW spin structure becomes increasingly rigid. Only when the damping is large can the DW be approximated as a pointlike quasiparticle that exhibits the simple translational motion predicted in the viscous regime. When the damping is small, the DW spin structure undergoes periodic distortions that lead to a velocity reduction. We therefore show that Ho doping of permalloy nanowires enables engineering of the DW depinning and mobility, as well as the extent of the viscous regime.

  6. Examinations of a new long-term degradable electrospun polycaprolactone scaffold in three rat abdominal wall models.

    PubMed

    Jangö, Hanna; Gräs, Søren; Christensen, Lise; Lose, Gunnar

    2017-02-01

    Alternative approaches to reinforce native tissue in reconstructive surgery for pelvic organ prolapse are warranted. Tissue engineering combines the use of a scaffold with the regenerative potential of stem cells and is a promising new concept in urogynecology. Our objective was to evaluate whether a newly developed long-term degradable polycaprolactone scaffold could provide biomechanical reinforcement and function as a scaffold for autologous muscle fiber fragments. We performed a study with three different rat abdominal wall models where the scaffold with or without muscle fiber fragments was placed (1) subcutaneously (minimal load), (2) in a partial defect (partial load), and (3) in a full-thickness defect (heavy load). After 8 weeks, no animals had developed hernia, and the scaffold provided biomechanical reinforcement, even in the models where it was subjected to heavy load. The scaffold was not yet degraded but showed increased thickness in all groups. Histologically, we found a massive foreign body response with numerous large giant cells intermingled with the fibers of the scaffold. Cells from added muscle fiber fragments could not be traced by PKH26 fluorescence or desmin staining. Taken together, the long-term degradable polycaprolactone scaffold provided biomechanical reinforcement by inducing a marked foreign-body response and attracting numerous inflammatory cells to form a strong neo-tissue construct. However, cells from the muscle fiber fragments did not survive in this milieu. Properties of the new neo-tissue construct must be evaluated at the time of full degradation of the scaffold before its possible clinical value in pelvic organ prolapse surgery can be evaluated.

  7. Image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy for refractory bilateral breast cancer in a patient with extensive cutaneous metastasis in the chest and abdominal walls

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yueh-Feng; Lin, Yu-Chin; Chen, Kuo-Hsin; Shueng, Pei-Wei; Yeh, Hsin-Pei; Hsieh, Chen-Hsi

    2016-01-01

    Treatment for bilateral breast cancer with chest wall and abdominal skin invasion normally involves conventional radiotherapy (RT); however, conventional RT provides inadequate target volume coverage and excessive treatment of large volumes of normal tissue. Helical tomotherapy (HT) has the ability to deliver continuous craniocaudal irradiation that suppresses junction problems and provides good conformity of dose distribution. A 47-year-old female with stage IV bilateral breast cancer with chest wall and pectoralis major muscle invasion, lymphadenopathy, bilateral pleural effusion, and multiple bone metastases received chemotherapy and target therapy beginning in January 2014; 4 months after the initiation of chemotherapy, computed tomography revealed progression of chest and abdominal wall invasion. A total dose of 70.2 Gy was delivered to both breasts, the chest wall, the abdominal wall, and the bilateral supraclavicular nodal areas in 39 fractions via HT. The total planning target volume was 4,533.29 cm3. The percent of lung volume receiving at least 20 Gy (V20) was 28%, 22%, and 25% for the right lung, left lung, and whole lung, respectively. The mean dose to the heart was 8.6 Gy. Follow-up computed tomography revealed complete response after the RT course. Grade 1 dysphagia, weight loss, grade 2 neutropenia, and grade 3 dermatitis were noted during the RT course. Pain score decreased from 6 to 1. No cardiac, pulmonary, liver, or intestinal toxicity developed during treatment or follow-up. Concurrent HT with or without systemic treatment could be a safe salvage therapy for chemorefractory locally advanced breast cancer patients with extensive cutaneous metastasis. PMID:27284253

  8. Domain wall motion effect on the anelastic behavior in lead zirconate titanate piezoelectric ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourim, El Mostafa; Tanaka, Hidehiko; Gabbay, Maurice; Fantozzi, Gilbert; Cheng, Bo Lin

    2002-05-01

    Three undoped lead zirconate titanate (PZT) ceramics were prepared with compositions close to the morphotropic phase boundary: Pb(Zr0.50Ti0.50)O3, Pb(Zr0.52Ti0.48)O3, and Pb(Zr0.54Ti0.46)O3. Internal friction Q-1 and shear modulus G were measured versus temperature from 20 °C to 500 °C. Experiments were performed on an inverted torsional pendulum at low frequencies (0.1, 0.3, and 1 Hz). The ferroelectric-paraelectric phase transition results in a peak (P1) of Q-1 correlated with a sharp minimum M1 of G. Moreover the Q-1(T) curves show two relaxation peaks called R1 and R2 respectively, correlated with two shear modulus anomalies called A1 and A2 on the G(T) curves. The main features of the transition P1 peak are studied, they suggest that its behavior is similar to the internal friction peaks associated with martensitic transformation. The relaxation peak, R1 and R2 are both attributed to motion of domain walls (DWs), and can be analyzed by thermal activated process described by Arrhenius law. The R2 peak is demonstrated to be due to the interaction of domain walls and oxygen vacancies because it depends on oxygen vacancy concentration and electrical polarization. However, the R1 peak is more complex; its height is found to be increased as stress amplitude and heating rate increase. It seems that the R1 peak is influenced by three mechanisms: (i) relaxation due to DW-point defects interaction, (ii) variation of domain wall density, and (iii) domain wall depinning from point defect clusters.

  9. The stability of steady motion of magnetic domain wall: Role of higher-order spin-orbit torques

    SciTech Connect

    He, Peng-Bin Yan, Han; Cai, Meng-Qiu; Li, Zai-Dong

    2015-12-14

    The steady motion of magnetic domain wall driven by spin-orbit torques is investigated analytically in the heavy/ferromagnetic metal nanowires for three cases with a current transverse to the in-plane and perpendicular easy axis, and along the in-plane easy axis. By the stability analysis of Walker wall profile, we find that if including the higher-order spin-orbit torques, the Walker breakdown can be avoided in some parameter regions of spin-orbit torques with a current transverse to or along the in-plane easy axis. However, in the case of perpendicular anisotropy, even considering the higher-order spin-orbit torques, the velocity of domain wall cannot be efficiently enhanced by the current. Furthermore, the direction of wall motion is dependent on the configuration and chirality of domain wall with a current along the in-plane easy axis or transverse to the perpendicular one. Especially, the direction of motion can be controlled by the initial chirality of domain wall. So, if only involving the spin-orbit mechanism, it is preferable to adopt the scheme of a current along the in-plane easy axis for enhancing the velocity and controlling the direction of domain wall.

  10. An evaluation of motion compensation strategies and repeatability for abdominal (1)H MR spectroscopy measurements in volunteer studies and clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Germuska, M; Tunariu, N; Leach, M O; Xu, Jian; Payne, G S

    2012-06-01

    Increased expression of choline kinase has frequently been shown in tumours and is thought to be associated with disease progression. Studies using magnetic resonance spectroscopy have shown an increase in total choline-containing metabolites (tCho) in tumour compared with healthy tissue. Subsequent reductions in tCho following successful treatment support the use of tCho as a biomarker of disease and response. However, accurate measurement of tCho using MRS in abdominal tumours is complicated by respiratory motion, blurring the acquisition volume and degrading the lineshape and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of metabolites. Motion compensation using prospectively gated acquisitions or offline correction of phase and frequency distortions can help restore the SNR and linewidth of metabolites. Prospectively gated acquisitions have the advantage of confining the volume of acquisition to the prescribed volume but are constrained by the repetition time (TR) of the respiratory motion. In contrast, data acquired for offline correction may use a shorter repetition time and therefore yield an increased SNR per unit time. In this study abdominal spectra acquired from single-voxel 'free-breathing' measurements in liver of healthy volunteers and in abdominal tumours of cancer patients were compared with those of prospective gating and with an implementation of offline correction. The two motion compensation methodologies were assessed in terms of SNR, linewidth and repeatability. Our experiments show that prospective gating and offline correction result in a 12-22% reduction in median tCho linewidth, while offline correction also provides a significant increase in SNR. The repeatability coefficient (the expected interval for 95% of repeat measurements) for tCho/water ratio was reduced by 37% (prospective gating) and 41% (offline correction). Both methods of motion compensation substantially improved the reproducibility of the tCho/water measurement and the tCho linewidth. While

  11. 4D Blood Flow Reconstruction Over the Entire Ventricle From Wall Motion and Blood Velocity Derived From Ultrasound Data.

    PubMed

    Gomez, Alberto; de Vecchi, Adelaide; Jantsch, Martin; Shi, Wenzhe; Pushparajah, Kuberan; Simpson, John M; Smith, Nicolas P; Rueckert, Daniel; Schaeffter, Tobias; Penney, Graeme P

    2015-11-01

    We demonstrate a new method to recover 4D blood flow over the entire ventricle from partial blood velocity measurements using multiple 3D+t colour Doppler images and ventricular wall motion estimated using 3D+t BMode images. We apply our approach to realistic simulated data to ascertain the ability of the method to deal with incomplete data, as typically happens in clinical practice. Experiments using synthetic data show that the use of wall motion improves velocity reconstruction, shows more accurate flow patterns and improves mean accuracy particularly when coverage of the ventricle is poor. The method was applied to patient data from 6 congenital cases, producing results consistent with the simulations. The use of wall motion produced more plausible flow patterns and reduced the reconstruction error in all patients.

  12. Micromagnetic modeling of domain wall motion in sub-100-nm-wide wires with individual and periodic edge defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, S.; Siddiqui, S. A.; Currivan-Incorvia, J. A.; Ross, C. A.; Baldo, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    Reducing the switching energy of devices that rely on magnetic domain wall motion requires scaling the devices to widths well below 100 nm, where the nanowire line edge roughness (LER) is an inherent source of domain wall pinning. We investigate the effects of periodic and isolated rectangular notches, triangular notches, changes in anisotropy, and roughness measured from images of fabricated wires, in sub-100-nm-wide nanowires with in-plane and perpendicular magnetic anisotropy using micromagnetic modeling. Pinning fields calculated for a model based on discretized images of physical wires are compared to experimental measurements. When the width of the domain wall is smaller than the notch period, the domain wall velocity is modulated as the domain wall propagates along the wire. We find that in sub-30-nm-wide wires, edge defects determine the operating threshold and domain wall dynamics.

  13. WE-G-BRD-01: A Data-Driven 4D-MRI Motion Model to Estimate Full Field-Of-View Abdominal Motion From 2D Image Navigators During MR-Linac Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Stemkens, B; Tijssen, RHN; Denis de Senneville, B Denis; Lagendijk, JJW; Berg, CAT van den

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To estimate full field-of-view abdominal respiratory motion from fast 2D image navigators using a 4D-MRI based motion model. This will allow for radiation dose accumulation mapping during MR-Linac treatment. Methods: Experiments were conducted on a Philips Ingenia 1.5T MRI. First, a retrospectively ordered 4D-MRI was constructed using 3D transient-bSSFP with radial in-plane sampling. Motion fields were calculated through 3D non-rigid registration. From these motion fields a PCA-based abdominal motion model was constructed and used to warp a 3D reference volume to fast 2D cine-MR image navigators that can be used for real-time tracking. To test this procedure, a time-series consisting of two interleaved orthogonal slices (sagittal and coronal), positioned on the pancreas or kidneys, were acquired for 1m38s (dynamic scan-time=0.196ms), during normal, shallow, or deep breathing. The coronal slices were used to update the optimal weights for the first two PCA components, in order to warp the 3D reference image and construct a dynamic 4D-MRI time-series. The interleaved sagittal slices served as an independent measure to test the model’s accuracy and fit. Spatial maps of the root-mean-squared error (RMSE) and histograms of the motion differences within the pancreas and kidneys were used to evaluate the method. Results: Cranio-caudal motion was accurately calculated within the pancreas using the model for normal and shallow breathing with an RMSE of 1.6mm and 1.5mm and a histogram median and standard deviation below 0.2 and 1.7mm, respectively. For deep-breathing an underestimation of the inhale amplitude was observed (RMSE=4.1mm). Respiratory-induced antero-posterior and lateral motion were correctly mapped (RMSE=0.6/0.5mm). Kidney motion demonstrated good motion estimation with RMSE-values of 0.95 and 2.4mm for the right and left kidney, respectively. Conclusion: We have demonstrated a method that can calculate dynamic 3D abdominal motion in a large volume

  14. Evaluation of side effects of radiofrequency capacitive hyperthermia with magnetite on the blood vessel walls of tumor metastatic lesion surrounding the abdominal large vessels: an agar phantom study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Magnetite used in an 8-MHz radiofrequency (RF) capacitive heating device can increase the temperature of a specific site up to 45°C. When treating a metastatic lesion around large abdominal vessels via hyperthermia with magnetite, heating-induced adverse effects on these vessels need to be considered. Therefore, this study examined hyperthermia-induced damage to blood vessel walls in vitro. Methods A large agar phantom with a circulatory system consisting of a swine artery and vein connected to a peristaltic pump was prepared. The blood vessels were placed on the magnetite-containing agar piece. Heating was continued for 30 min at 45°C. After heating, a histological study for injury to the blood vessels was performed. Results The inner membrane temperature did not reach 45°C due to the cooling effect of the blood flow. In the heated vessels, vascular wall collagen degenerated and smooth muscle cells were narrowed; however, no serious changes were noted in the vascular endothelial cells or vascular wall elastic fibers. The heated vessel wall was not severely damaged; this was attributed to cooling by the blood flow. Conclusions Our findings indicate that RF capacitive heating therapy with magnetite may be used for metastatic lesions without injuring the surrounding large abdominal vessels. PMID:25114787

  15. Domain wall motion in ultrathin Co70Fe30/Pd multilayer nanowires with perpendicular anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Zhaoliang; He, Shikun; Qiu, Jinjun; Zhou, Tiejun; Han, Guchang; Teo, Kie-Leong

    2016-02-01

    We report the investigation of spin polarized current induced domain wall (DW) displacement in the perpendicularly magnetized nanowires patterned on ultrathin CoFe/Pd multilayer films by anomalous Hall-effect measurement. We find that DWs can be driven to propagate in the nanowire by the threshold current density (Jth) as low as 5.2 × 1010 A/m2 under a bias field H = 115 Oe. The spin-torque efficiency ɛ = (1.68 ± 0.09) × 10-14 T.m2/A is derived by measuring the effective field (HJ) generated by the pulsed current as well as through the dependency of Jth on H from the DW depinning field experiment. Our result indicates that the current induced DW motion is essentially dominated by the non-adiabatic spin transfer torque effect and the non-adiabaticity factor β is estimated to be as high as 0.96 ± 0.04.

  16. Ring-shaped Racetrack memory based on spin orbit torque driven chiral domain wall motions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yue; Zhang, Xueying; Hu, Jingtong; Nan, Jiang; Zheng, Zhenyi; Zhang, Zhizhong; Zhang, Youguang; Vernier, Nicolas; Ravelosona, Dafine; Zhao, Weisheng

    2016-10-11

    Racetrack memory (RM) has sparked enormous interest thanks to its outstanding potential for low-power, high-density and high-speed data storage. However, since it requires bi-directional domain wall (DW) shifting process for outputting data, the mainstream stripe-shaped concept certainly suffers from the data overflow issue. This geometrical restriction leads to increasing complexity of peripheral circuits or programming as well as undesirable reliability issue. In this work, we propose and study ring-shaped RM, which is based on an alternative mechanism, spin orbit torque (SOT) driven chiral DW motions. Micromagnetic simulations have been carried out to validate its functionality and exhibit its performance advantages. The current flowing through the heavy metal instead of ferromagnetic layer realizes the "end to end" circulation of storage data, which remains all the data in the device even if they are shifted. It blazes a promising path for application of RM in practical memory and logic.

  17. Ring-shaped Racetrack memory based on spin orbit torque driven chiral domain wall motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yue; Zhang, Xueying; Hu, Jingtong; Nan, Jiang; Zheng, Zhenyi; Zhang, Zhizhong; Zhang, Youguang; Vernier, Nicolas; Ravelosona, Dafine; Zhao, Weisheng

    2016-10-01

    Racetrack memory (RM) has sparked enormous interest thanks to its outstanding potential for low-power, high-density and high-speed data storage. However, since it requires bi-directional domain wall (DW) shifting process for outputting data, the mainstream stripe-shaped concept certainly suffers from the data overflow issue. This geometrical restriction leads to increasing complexity of peripheral circuits or programming as well as undesirable reliability issue. In this work, we propose and study ring-shaped RM, which is based on an alternative mechanism, spin orbit torque (SOT) driven chiral DW motions. Micromagnetic simulations have been carried out to validate its functionality and exhibit its performance advantages. The current flowing through the heavy metal instead of ferromagnetic layer realizes the “end to end” circulation of storage data, which remains all the data in the device even if they are shifted. It blazes a promising path for application of RM in practical memory and logic.

  18. Coercivity of domain wall motion in thin films of amorphous rare earth-transition metal alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mansuripur, M.; Giles, R. C.; Patterson, G.

    1991-01-01

    Computer simulations of a two dimensional lattice of magnetic dipoles are performed on the Connection Machine. The lattice is a discrete model for thin films of amorphous rare-earth transition metal alloys, which have application as the storage media in erasable optical data storage systems. In these simulations, the dipoles follow the dynamic Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation under the influence of an effective field arising from local anisotropy, near-neighbor exchange, classical dipole-dipole interactions, and an externally applied field. Various sources of coercivity, such as defects and/or inhomogeneities in the lattice, are introduced and the subsequent motion of domain walls in response to external fields is investigated.

  19. Apical regional wall motion abnormalities reminiscent to Tako-Tsubo cardiomyopathy following consumption of psychoactive fungi.

    PubMed

    Nef, Holger M; Möllmann, Helge; Hilpert, Pirmin; Krause, Nicola; Troidl, Christian; Weber, Michael; Rolf, Andreas; Dill, Thorsten; Hamm, Christian; Elsässer, A

    2009-05-01

    Consumption of natural hallucinogenic substances continues to be a problem. In this case we report from a young male patient presenting with an acute coronary syndrome with significant ST-elevation after the abuse of psychoactive fungi, commonly referred to as "magic mushrooms". Coronary angiography excludes relevant coronary artery disease. In ventriculography contractile dysfunction with hypokinesia in the apical segments could be documented reminiscent to wall motion abnormalities in Tako-Tsubo cardiomyopathy (TTC). Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging showed no pathological signal activity in the late-enhancement sequences ruling out myocardial infarction or inflammatory processes. Ventricular function normalized within several days. The active metabolite of psychoactive fungi psilocybin is known to interact with several different dopaminergic, adrenergic and serotonergic receptors. Thus, the pathomechanisms leading to contractile dysfunction after consumption of psychoactive fungi are reminiscent to those documented in TTC.

  20. Easy moment direction and antiferromagnetic domain wall motion in Mn2Au

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barthem, Vitoria M. T. S.; Colin, Claire V.; Haettel, Richard; Dufeu, Didier; Givord, Dominique

    2016-05-01

    The interest of giving active functions to antiferromagnetic (AFM) materials in spintronics devices has been realized recently. Mn2Au is a high-Néel temperature antiferromagnet with large Mn moment, lying in plane of the tetragonal structure. To determine the direction of the moments in Mn2Au, an original approach is demonstrated, which should be generic to planar AFM materials. It involves the rotation of the granular sample around an axis perpendicular to the applied magnetic field. The family of easy moment directions is <110>. For grains prevented from rotating, the dominant magnetization process is AFM domain wall motion. Textured Mn2Au nanoelements could be introduced in spintronics devices, in which the Mn moments would be switched under modest external excitation.

  1. Ring-shaped Racetrack memory based on spin orbit torque driven chiral domain wall motions

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yue; Zhang, Xueying; Hu, Jingtong; Nan, Jiang; Zheng, Zhenyi; Zhang, Zhizhong; Zhang, Youguang; Vernier, Nicolas; Ravelosona, Dafine; Zhao, Weisheng

    2016-01-01

    Racetrack memory (RM) has sparked enormous interest thanks to its outstanding potential for low-power, high-density and high-speed data storage. However, since it requires bi-directional domain wall (DW) shifting process for outputting data, the mainstream stripe-shaped concept certainly suffers from the data overflow issue. This geometrical restriction leads to increasing complexity of peripheral circuits or programming as well as undesirable reliability issue. In this work, we propose and study ring-shaped RM, which is based on an alternative mechanism, spin orbit torque (SOT) driven chiral DW motions. Micromagnetic simulations have been carried out to validate its functionality and exhibit its performance advantages. The current flowing through the heavy metal instead of ferromagnetic layer realizes the “end to end” circulation of storage data, which remains all the data in the device even if they are shifted. It blazes a promising path for application of RM in practical memory and logic. PMID:27725741

  2. Role of Quantitative Wall Motion Analysis in Patients with Acute Chest Pain at Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyung-Hee; Park, Jin-Sik

    2017-01-01

    Background Evaluation of acute chest pain in emergency department (ED), using limited resource and time, is still very difficult despite recent development of many diagnostic tools. In this study, we tried to determine the applicability of new semi-automated cardiac function analysis tool, velocity vector imaging (VVI), in the evaluation of the patients with acute chest pain in ED. Methods We prospectively enrolled 48 patients, who visited ED with acute chest pain, and store images to analyze VVI from July 2005 to July 2007. Results In 677 of 768 segments (88%), the analysis by VVI was feasible among 48 patients. Peak systolic radial velocity (Vpeak) and strain significantly decreased according to visual regional wall motion abnormality (Vpeak, 3.50 ± 1.34 cm/s for normal vs. 3.46 ± 1.52 cm/s for hypokinesia, 2.51 ± 1.26 for akinesia, p < 0.01; peak systolic radial strain -31.74 ± 9.15% fornormal, -24.33 ± 6.28% for hypokinesia, -20.30 ± 7.78% for akinesia, p < 0.01). However, the velocity vectors at the time of mitral valve opening (MVO) were directed outward in the visually normal myocardium, inward velocity vectors were revealed in the visually akinetic area (VMVO, -0.85 ± 1.65 cm/s for normal vs. 0.10 ± 1.46 cm/s for akinesia, p < 0.001). At coronary angiography, VMVO clearly increased in the ischemic area (VMVO, -0.88+1.56 cm/s for normal vs. 0.70 + 2.04 cm/s for ischemic area, p < 0.01). Conclusion Regional wall motion assessment using VVI showed could be used to detect significant ischemia in the patient with acute chest pain at ED.

  3. Squamous cell carcinoma of unknown primary site presenting with an abdominal wall lesion as the primary symptom: A case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, YINGLI; CHEN, BO; ZHU, JIANQING; CHEN, LU

    2015-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma of unknown primary site (SC CUP) is a rare malignant tumor, and its histogenesis and appropriate treatment are unclear. To the best of our knowledge, this type of carcinoma with abdominal wall lesions as the primary presenting symptom 3 months after laparoscopic surgery, has not been previously described in the literature. In the present study, a postmenopausal 54-year-old female patient was diagnosed with pain from the right abdominal puncture site 3 months after laparoscopic unilateral left salpingo-oophorectomy at a local hospital, at which time the left ovary and Fallopian tube were free of malignant tumor. Computed tomography (CT) imaging showed a subcutaneous nodule with a size of 6.2×3.3 cm. A wide excision of the lesion with safety margins and repair of the abdominal wall was performed, and the histopathological results and various investigations lead to the diagnosis of metastatic well-differentiated SC CUP. The patient underwent three surgeries and eight cycles of Taxol and cisplatin/carboplatin chemotherapy, and received a total of 10.8 Gy palliative radiation. However, the patient succumbed to intestinal bleeding, thrombocytopenia and multiple organ failure with pelvic recurrence and liver metastases at 10 months post-diagnosis. The prognosis of SC CUP, particularly with multiple metastases, is extremely poor. Although chemotherapy, surgery and radiotherapy have a certain role in the treatment, no regimen has been established as a standard therapy and palliative care could be recommended. PMID:26622812

  4. Normal modes of magnetic domain wall motion in a confined stripe domain lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Spreen, J.H.; Argyle, B.E.

    1982-06-01

    We report the observation of standing wave modes in an array of stripe domains confined by a pair of parallel cracks in a Gd, Ga:YIG film. These modes appear in the response spectrum of the confined lattice as shallow minima or maxima at frequencies lower than that of the usual domain wall resonance peak. A simple model, analogous to the forced response of a membrane clamped at the edges, fits the spatial patterns of wall motion observed at the frequencies of the maxima and minima. Experimental frequency-wave vector values, interpreted with guidance from this analogy, provide the first experimental dispersion curve for a stripe domain lattice. We compare this result with recent theoretical calculations. The experimental value of the uniform mode frequency is 41.5 +- 0.2 MHz, with a long wavelength group velocity of 330 +- 50 m/sec. A surprising conclusion from the observed extrema of the spatial patterns is that the damping of the waves is an order of magnitude less than expected from the damping of the uniform mode. The estimated decay length for a propagating wave is 400 ..mu...

  5. Steady motion of skyrmions and domains walls under diffusive spin torques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elías, Ricardo Gabriel; Vidal-Silva, Nicolas; Manchon, Aurélien

    2017-03-01

    We explore the role of the spin diffusion of conducting electrons in two-dimensional magnetic textures (domain walls and skyrmions) with spatial variation of the order of the spin precession length λex. The effect of diffusion reflects in four additional torques that are third order in spatial derivatives of magnetization and bilinear in λex and in the nonadiabatic parameter β'. In order to study the dynamics of the solitons when these diffusive torques are present, we derive the Thiele equation in the limit of steady motion and we compare the results with the nondiffusive limit. When considering a homogenous current these torques increase the longitudinal velocity of transverse domain walls of width Δ by a factor (λex/Δ)2(α/3), α being the magnetic damping constant. In the case of single skyrmions with core radius r0these new contributions tend to increase the Magnus effect in an amount proportional to (λex/r0) 2(1 +2 α β') .

  6. Nanoparticle stochastic motion in the inertial regime and hydrodynamic interactions close to a cylindrical wall

    PubMed Central

    Vitoshkin, Helena; Yu, Hsiu-Yu; Eckmann, David M.; Ayyaswamy, Portonovo S.; Radhakrishnan, Ravi

    2016-01-01

    We have carried out direct numerical simulations (DNS) of the fluctuating Navier-Stokes equation together with the particle equations governing the motion of a nanosized particle or nanoparticle (NP) in a cylindrical tube. The effects of the confining boundary, its curvature, particle size, and particle density variations have all been investigated. To reveal how the nature of the temporal correlations (hydrodynamic memory) in the inertial regime is altered by the full hydrodynamic interaction due to the confining boundaries, we have employed the Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) method to determine the dynamical relaxation of a spherical NP located at various positions in the medium over a wide span of time scales compared to the fluid viscous relaxation time τv = a2/v, where a is the spherical particle radius and v is the kinematic viscosity. The results show that, as compared to the behavior of a particle in regions away from the confining boundary, the velocity autocorrelation function (VACF) for a particle in the lubrication layer initially decays exponentially with a Stokes drag enhanced by a factor that is proportional to the ratio of the particle radius to the gap thickness between the particle and the wall. Independent of the particle location, beyond time scales greater than a2/v, the decay is always algebraic followed by a second exponential decay (attributed to the wall curvature) that is associated with a second time scale D2/v, where D is the vessel diameter. PMID:27830213

  7. Myocardial metabolism, perfusion, wall motion and electrical activity in Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Perloff, J.K.; Henze, E.; Schelbert, H.R.

    1982-01-01

    The cardiomyopathy of Duchenne's muscular dystrophy originates in the posterobasal left ventricle and extends chiefly to the contiguous lateral wall. Ultrastructural abnormalities in these regions precede connective tissue replacement. We postulated that a metabolic fault coincided with or antedated the subcellular abnormality. Accordingly, regional left ventricular metabolism, perfusion and wall motion were studied using positron computed tomography and metabolic isotopes supplemented by thallium perfusion scans, equilibrium radionuclide angiography and M-mode and two-dimensional echocardiography. To complete the assessment, electrocardiograms, vectorcardiograms, 24 hour taped electrocardiograms and chest x-rays were analyzed. Positron computed tomography utilizing F-18 2-fluoro 2-deoxyglucose (FDG) provided the first conclusive evidence supporting the hypothesis of a premorphologic regional metabolic fault. Thus, cardiac involvement in duchenne dystrophy emerges as a unique form of heart disease, genetically targeting specific regions of ventricular myocardium for initial metabolic and subcellular changes. Reported ultrastructural abnormalities of the impulse and conduction systems provide, at least in part, a basis for the clinically observed sinus node, intraatrial, internodal, AV nodal and infranodal disorders.

  8. Spin-Transfer-Torque Driven Domain Wall Motion in (Ga,Mn)(As,P)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vehstedt, E. K.; Zarbo, L. P.; Vyborny, K.; de Ranieri, E.; Katzgraber, H. G.; Wunderlich, J.; Jungwirth, T.; Sinova, J.

    2012-02-01

    Precise control of domain wall (DW) motion in magnetic materials is a prerequisite for the realization of novel non-volatile and down-scalable logic/memory devices which promise to overcome the limitations of current technologies. While magnetic fields are the obvious choice for DW manipulation, in spin-orbit (SO) coupled materials, electric fields provide an additional means of control via current-induced spin torque. We extend the existing theoretical framework used to describe magnetization dynamics in uniform ferromagnets (FM) to dilute FM semiconductors. Analogous to the study of homogeneous systems, we compute the current-induced internal fields (CIF) corresponding to the spin torques and perform a quantitative analysis of the effect of CIFs on DW motion by solving the phenomenological Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equations. Microscopic calculations based on an accurate description of the SO coupling effects are used to estimate the observed anisotropies. Our theoretical efforts are complemented by experimental studies in the SO coupled FM (Ga,Mn)(As,P).

  9. Vagal control of cardiac electrical activity and wall motion during ventricular fibrillation in large animals.

    PubMed

    Naggar, Isaac; Nakase, Ko; Lazar, Jason; Salciccioli, Louis; Selesnick, Ivan; Stewart, Mark

    2014-07-01

    Vagal inputs control pacemaking and conduction systems in the heart. Anatomical evidence suggests a direct ventricular action, but functional evidence that separates direct and indirect (via the conduction system) vagal actions is less well established. We studied vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) during sinus rhythm and ventricular fibrillation (VF) in pigs and sheep to determine: 1) the range of unilateral and bilateral actions (inotropic and chronotropic) and 2) whether VNS alters left ventricular motion and/or electrical activity during VF, a model of abnormal electrical conduction of the left ventricle that excludes sinus and atrioventricular nodal function. Adult pigs (N=8) and sheep (N=10) were anesthetized with urethane and mechanically ventilated. VNS was performed in animals at 1, 2, 5, 10, 20, 50, and 100Hz for 20s. VF was induced with direct current to the ventricles or occlusion of the left anterior descending coronary artery. In 4 pigs and 3 sheep, left ventricular wall motion was assessed from endocardial excursion in epicardial echocardiography. In sheep and pigs, the best frequency among those tested for VNS during sinus rhythm to produce sustained electrical and mechanical ventricular standstill was 50Hz for unilateral or bilateral stimulation. When applied during VF, bilateral VNS increased the variability of the dominant VF frequency, indicating a direct impact on the excitability of ventricular myocytes, and decreased endocardial excursion by more than 50% during VF. We conclude that the vagus nerve directly modulates left ventricular function independently from its effects on the conduction system.

  10. Necrotizing fasciitis: literature review of contemporary strategies for diagnosing and management with three case reports: torso, abdominal wall, upper and lower limbs.

    PubMed

    Roje, Zdravko; Roje, Zeljka; Matić, Dario; Librenjak, Davor; Dokuzović, Stjepan; Varvodić, Josip

    2011-12-23

    Necrotizing fasciitis (NF) is an uncommon soft tissue infection, usually caused by toxin-producing virulent bacteria. It is characterized by widespread fascial necrosis primarily caused by Streptococcus hemolyticus. Shortly after the onset of the disease, patients become colonized with their own aerobic and anaerobic microflora from the gastrointestinal and/or urogenital tracts. Early diagnosis with aggressive multidisciplinary treatment is mandatory. We describe three clinical cases with NF. The first is a 69 years old man with diabetes mellitus type II, who presented with NF on the posterior chest wall, shoulder and arm. He was admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) with a clinical picture of severe sepsis. Outpatient treatment and early surgical debridement of the affected zones (inside 3 hours after admittance) and critical care therapy were performed. The second case is of a 63 years old paraplegic man with diabetes mellitus type I. Pressure sores and perineal abscesses progressed to Fournier's gangrene of the perineum and scrotum. He had NF of the anterior abdominal wall and the right thigh. Outpatient treatment and early surgical debridement of the affected zones (inside 6 hour after admittance) and critical care therapy were performed. The third patient was a 56 year old man who had NF of the anterior abdominal wall, flank and retroperitoneal space. He had an operation of the direct inguinal hernia, which was complicated with a bowel perforation and secondary peritonitis. After establishing the diagnosis of NF of the abdominal wall and retroperitoneal space (RS), he was transferred to the ICU. There he first received intensive care therapy, after which emergency surgical debridement of the abdominal wall, left colectomy, and extensive debridement of the RS were done (72 hours after operation of inquinal hernia). On average, 4 serial debridements were performed in each patient. The median of serial debridement in all three cases was four times. Other

  11. Necrotizing fasciitis: literature review of contemporary strategies for diagnosing and management with three case reports: torso, abdominal wall, upper and lower limbs

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis (NF) is an uncommon soft tissue infection, usually caused by toxin-producing virulent bacteria. It is characterized by widespread fascial necrosis primarily caused by Streptococcus hemolyticus. Shortly after the onset of the disease, patients become colonized with their own aerobic and anaerobic microflora from the gastrointestinal and/or urogenital tracts. Early diagnosis with aggressive multidisciplinary treatment is mandatory. We describe three clinical cases with NF. The first is a 69 years old man with diabetes mellitus type II, who presented with NF on the posterior chest wall, shoulder and arm. He was admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) with a clinical picture of severe sepsis. Outpatient treatment and early surgical debridement of the affected zones (inside 3 hours after admittance) and critical care therapy were performed. The second case is of a 63 years old paraplegic man with diabetes mellitus type I. Pressure sores and perineal abscesses progressed to Fournier's gangrene of the perineum and scrotum. He had NF of the anterior abdominal wall and the right thigh. Outpatient treatment and early surgical debridement of the affected zones (inside 6 hour after admittance) and critical care therapy were performed. The third patient was a 56 year old man who had NF of the anterior abdominal wall, flank and retroperitoneal space. He had an operation of the direct inguinal hernia, which was complicated with a bowel perforation and secondary peritonitis. After establishing the diagnosis of NF of the abdominal wall and retroperitoneal space (RS), he was transferred to the ICU. There he first received intensive care therapy, after which emergency surgical debridement of the abdominal wall, left colectomy, and extensive debridement of the RS were done (72 hours after operation of inquinal hernia). On average, 4 serial debridements were performed in each patient. The median of serial debridement in all three cases was four times. Other

  12. The use of dual vacuum stabilization device to reduce kidney motion for stereotactic radiotherapy planning.

    PubMed

    Pham, Daniel; Kron, Tomas; Styles, Colin; Whitaker, May; Bressel, Mathias; Foroudi, Farshad; Schneider, Michal; Devereux, Thomas; Dang, Kim; Siva, Shankar

    2015-04-01

    Abdominal stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy is aided by motion management strategies to ensure accurate dose delivery as targets such as the kidney are easily influenced by breathing motion. Commercial devices such as compression plates and dual vacuum technology have been demonstrated to reduce the motion of lung and liver tumors. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a dual vacuum system in reducing kidney motion as well to investigate any relationship between abdominal wall motions with kidney motion. Ten healthy volunteers were set up with and without vacuum compression (Elekta BodyFIX(TM)) to simulate free and dampened breathing. Ultrasound imaging was used to visualize kidney motion at the same time an abdominal surface marker was monitored using infrared imaging (Varian, Real Time Position Management). The resulting kidney and abdominal motion tracks were imported into motion analysis (Physmo(TM)) and custom built software (Matlab) to calculate amplitude of motion independent of shifting baselines. Thirty-four kidney datasets were available for analysis, with six datasets unable to be retrieved. With vacuum compression six out of nine participants showed a mean reduction of kidney motion ranging between 1.6 and 8 mm (p < 0.050). One participant showed an increase in motion of 8.2 mm (p < 0.001) with vacuum compression. Two participants showed no significant change (<1 mm) in kidney motion. No relationship was observed for abdominal wall motion and motion changes in the left kidney (r = 0.345, p = 0.402) or right kidney (r = 0.527, p = 0.145). Vacuum compression reduced kidney motion in the majority of participants; however larger breathing motion can also result from its use. No pattern emerged regarding which patients may benefit from vacuum immobilization as abdominal wall motion was not found to be an adequate surrogate for kidney motion.

  13. Theory of domain wall motion mediated magnetoelectric effects in a multiferroic composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, V. M.; Srinivasan, G.

    2014-10-01

    A model is discussed for magnetoelectric (ME) interactions originating from the motion of magnetic domain walls (DWs) in a multiferroic composite of orthoferrites RFeO3 (RFO) with magnetic stripe domains and a piezoelectric such as lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate (PMN-PT). The DWs in RFO can be set in motion with an ac magnetic field up to a critical speed of 20 km/s, the highest for any magnetic system, leading to the excitation of bulk and shear magnetoacoustic waves. Thus, the ME coupling will arise from flexural deformation associated with DW motion (rather than the Joule magnetostriction mediated coupling under a static or quasistatic condition). A c plane orthoferrite with a single Néel-type DW in the bc plane and an ac magnetic field H along the c axis is assumed. The deflection in the bilayer due to DW motion is obtained when the DW velocity is a linear function H and the resulting induced voltage across PMN-PT is estimated. It is shown that a combination of spatial and time harmonics of the bending deformation leads to (i) a linear ME coefficient defined by αE=E/H and (ii) a quadratic ME coefficient αEQ=E/H2. The model is applied to yttrium orthoferrites (YFO) and a PMN-PT bilayer since YFO has one of the highest DW mobility amongst the orthoferrites. The coefficient αE is dependent on the DW position, and it is maximum when the DW equilibrium position is at the center of the sample. In YFO/PMN-PT the estimated low-frequency αE ˜ 30 mV/cm Oe and resonance value is 1.5 V/(cm Oe). Since orthoferrites (and PMN-PT) are transparent in the visible region and have a large Faraday rotation, the DW dynamics and the ME coupling could be studied simultaneously. The theory discussed here is of interest for studies on ME coupling and for applications such as magnetically controlled electro-optic devices.

  14. Spatio-temporal characteristics of large scale motions in a turbulent boundary layer from direct wall shear stress measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pabon, Rommel; Barnard, Casey; Ukeiley, Lawrence; Sheplak, Mark

    2016-11-01

    Particle image velocimetry (PIV) and fluctuating wall shear stress experiments were performed on a flat plate turbulent boundary layer (TBL) under zero pressure gradient conditions. The fluctuating wall shear stress was measured using a microelectromechanical 1mm × 1mm floating element capacitive shear stress sensor (CSSS) developed at the University of Florida. The experiments elucidated the imprint of the organized motions in a TBL on the wall shear stress through its direct measurement. Spatial autocorrelation of the streamwise velocity from the PIV snapshots revealed large scale motions that scale on the order of boundary layer thickness. However, the captured inclination angle was lower than that determined using the classic method by means of wall shear stress and hot-wire anemometry (HWA) temporal cross-correlations and a frozen field hypothesis using a convection velocity. The current study suggests the large size of these motions begins to degrade the applicability of the frozen field hypothesis for the time resolved HWA experiments. The simultaneous PIV and CSSS measurements are also used for spatial reconstruction of the velocity field during conditionally sampled intense wall shear stress events. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship under Grant No. DGE-1315138.

  15. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopic Imaging-Derived Collagen Content and Maturity Correlates with Stress in the Aortic Wall of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Patients.

    PubMed

    Cheheltani, Rabee; Pichamuthu, Joseph E; Rao, Jayashree; Weinbaum, Justin S; Kiani, Mohammad F; Vorp, David A; Pleshko, Nancy

    2017-03-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a degenerative disease of the aorta characterized by severe disruption of the structural integrity of the aortic wall and its major molecular constituents. From the early stages of disease, elastin in the aorta becomes highly degraded and is replaced by collagen. Questions persist as to the contribution of collagen content, quality and maturity to the potential for rupture. Here, using our recently developed Fourier transform infrared imaging spectroscopy (FT-IRIS) method, we quantified collagen content and maturity in the wall of AAA tissues in pairs of specimens with different wall stresses. CT scans of AAAs from 12 patients were used to create finite element models to estimate stress in different regions of tissue. Each patient underwent elective repair of the AAA, and two segments of the AAA tissues from anatomic regions more proximal or distal with different wall stresses were evaluated by histology and FT-IRIS after excision. For each patient, collagen content was generally greater in the tissue location with lower wall stress, which corresponded to the more distal anatomic regions. The wall stress/collagen ratio was greater in the higher stress region compared to the lower stress region (1.01 ± 1.09 vs. 0.55 ± 0.084, p = 0.02). The higher stress region also corresponded to the location with reduced intraluminal thrombus thickness. Further, collagen maturity tended to decrease with increased collagen content (p = 0.068, R = 0.38). Together, these results suggest that an increase in less mature collagen content in AAA patients does not effectively compensate for the loss of elastin in the aortic wall, and results in a reduced capability to endure wall stresses.

  16. Omental infarction and its mimics: imaging features of acute abdominal conditions presenting with fat stranding greater than the degree of bowel wall thickening.

    PubMed

    Tonerini, Michele; Calcagni, Francesca; Lorenzi, Silvia; Scalise, Paola; Grigolini, Alessandro; Bemi, Pietro

    2015-08-01

    The segmental omental infarction is a rare self-limited disorder presenting with aspecific clinical symptoms that may mimic several acute abdominal conditions. Therefore, a correct noninvasive diagnosis is important because treatment approaches range from monitoring to surgery. As omental infarction results in an important fat stranding that is much greater than the degree of bowel wall thickening, it suggests a narrower differential diagnosis: appendicitis, diverticulitis, epiploic appendagitis, and mesenteric panniculitis. In this pictorial essay, we point out the importance of imaging in identifying this typical sign allowing alternate diagnoses such as segmental omental infarction that can be conservatively managed.

  17. Validity of acoustic quantification colour kinesis for detection of left ventricular regional wall motion abnormalities: a transoesophageal echocardiographic study.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, T; Kolev, N; Blaicher, A; Spiss, C; Zimpfer, M

    1997-10-01

    Transoesophageal echocardiography is a sensitive monitor for intraoperative myocardial ischaemia. Colour kinesis is a new technology for echocardiographic assessment of regional wall motion based on acoustic quantification. We have examined the feasibility and accuracy of quantitative segmental analysis of colour kinesis images to provide objective evaluation of systolic regional wall motion during the perioperative period using transoesophageal echocardiography (TOE). Two-dimensional echocardiograms were obtained in the transgastric short-axis and long-axis views in 60 patients with coronary artery disease undergoing noncardiac surgery. End-systolic colour overlays superimposed on the grey scale images were obtained with colour kinesis to colour encode left ventricular endocardial motion throughout systole. These colour-encoded images were divided into segments and compared with corresponding conventional two-dimensional images. Six hundred of a potential 720 left ventricular wall segments were of sufficient resolution for grading by experts; they diagnosed wall motion abnormalities in 61 of these segments by a conventional method. In comparing the conventional TOE method with colour kinesis, there were 60 true positives, 482 true negatives, 57 false positives and 1 false negative result. This yielded a sensitivity of 98%, specificity of 89%, positive predictive value of 51% and negative predictive value of 100%. Translational and rotational movement of the heart and papillary muscle interference were common problems accounting for false positive diagnoses. We conclude that colour kinesis provides a basis for objective and on-line evaluation of left ventricular regional wall motion which is a sensitive but non-specific method. It may be a useful aid for the less experienced because it can potentially direct the anaesthetist's attention towards specific segments.

  18. Ultrawideband through-wall radar for detecting the motion of people in real time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nag, Soumya; Barnes, Mark A.; Payment, Tim; Holladay, Gary

    2002-07-01

    Law enforcement officers and search-and-rescue workers often face the difficult task of determining the locations of people inside a building or obscured by smoke and debris. To address this problem, Time Domain Corporation (TDC) has developed a real-time, hand-held radar to detect the motion of persons in range and azimuth through non-metallic walls. This radar is a time modulated ultra-wide band (TM-UWB) impulse radar that generates a two-dimensional (2D) representation of moving targets in real time. The intentional transmit power emitted from the radar is comparable to the FCC Part 15, Class B limits. It has the following benefits: (1) covertness because of its ultra-low power noise-like signal, (2) high resolution at low radio frequencies for penetrating building materials, (3) reduced range ambiguities and clutter fold-over because of pseudo-random time modulation, and (4) clutter rejection because of the ultra-wide bandwidth of the signal. In this paper, an outline of the key parameters of the TDC prototype radar RadarVision2000 (RV2000) and a brief description of the algorithm that generates a motion map showing the range and direction of the moving people are presented. Some typical radar images of multiple targets for a variety of building materials and cluttered environment obtained using the prototype are shown. Finally, the paper presents some preliminary results for resolving the targets in the elevation plane along with a processing technique for reducing the intensity of multi-path responses in the images.

  19. Domain wall motion and precursor dynamics in PbZrO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puchberger, S.; Soprunyuk, V.; Majchrowski, A.; Roleder, K.; Schranz, W.

    2016-12-01

    Single crystals of PbZrO3 have been studied by dynamic mechanical analysis measurements in the low-frequency range f =0.02 -50 Hz. The complex Young's modulus exhibits a quite rich behavior and depends strongly on the direction of the applied dynamic force. In pseudocubic [100] c direction, we found intrinsic elastic behavior as expected from the Landau theory; at the antiferroelectric transition Tc≈510 K, a downwards cusp anomaly in Y' accompanied by a peak in Y'' points to a quadratic/linear order parameter/strain coupling in the Landau free energy. Both anomalies are increasing with decreasing frequency showing that the measurements are performed in the limit ω τth>1 . Frequency scans around Tc show energy dissipation, which could result from interphase boundary motion and/or heat diffusion. Above Tc, we observe a pronounced precursor softening, quite similar as it was found in other perovskites, which can be perfectly fitted including isotropic order parameter fluctuations. The low-frequency elastic response in [110] c direction is different. Below Tc, we find in addition to the intrinsic anomaly a strong contribution from ferroelastic domains, which leads to an additional softening in Y'. With decreasing temperatures this superelastic softening gradually disappears, due to an increasing relaxation time τDW for domain wall motion, indicating glassy behavior of domain freezing in PbZrO3. In contrast to the [100] c direction, for forces along [110] c, we found a pronounced precursor hardening, starting at about 60 K above Tc. Since this anomaly is of dynamic nature, starting at the same temperature as the observed birefringence and piezoelectric anomalies [Ko et al. Phys. Rev. B 87, 184110 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevB.87.184110], we conclude that it originates from slow dynamic polar clusters, which freeze at T*≈550 K>Tc .

  20. Motion, relaxation dynamics, and diffusion processes in two-dimensional colloidal crystals confined between walls.

    PubMed

    Wilms, Dorothea; Virnau, Peter; Snook, Ian K; Binder, Kurt

    2012-11-01

    The dynamical behavior of single-component two-dimensional colloidal crystals confined in a slit geometry is studied by Langevin dynamics simulation of a simple model. The colloids are modeled as pointlike particles, interacting with the repulsive part of the Lennard-Jones potential, and the fluid molecules in the colloidal suspension are not explicitly considered. Considering a crystalline strip of triangular lattice structure with n=30 rows, the (one-dimensional) walls confining the strip are chosen as two rigidly fixed crystalline rows at each side, commensurate with the lattice structure and, thus, stabilizing long-range order. The case when the spacing between the walls is incommensurate with the ideal triangular lattice is also studied, where (due to a transition in the number of rows, n → n-1) the confined crystal is incommensurate with the confining boundaries, and a soliton staircase forms along the walls. It is shown that mean-square displacements (MSDs) of particles as a function of time show an overshoot and then saturate at a horizontal plateau in the commensurate case, the value of the plateau being largest in the center of the strip. Conversely, when solitons are present, MSDs are largest in the rows containing the solitons, and all MSDs do not settle down at well-defined plateaus in the direction parallel to the boundaries, due to the lack of positional long-range order in ideal two-dimensional crystals. The MSDs of the solitons (which can be treated like quasiparticles at very low temperature) have also been studied and their dynamics are found to be about an order of magnitude slower than that of the colloidal particles themselves. Finally, transport of individual colloidal particles by diffusion processes is studied: both standard vacancy-interstitial pair formation and cooperative ring rotation processes are identified. These processes require thermal activation, with activation energies of the order of 10T(m) (T(m) being the melting

  1. Gating-like Motions and Wall Porosity in a DNA Nanopore Scaffold Revealed by Molecular Simulations.

    PubMed

    Maingi, Vishal; Lelimousin, Mickaël; Howorka, Stefan; Sansom, Mark S P

    2015-11-24

    Recently developed synthetic membrane pores composed of folded DNA enrich the current range of natural and engineered protein pores and of nonbiogenic channels. Here we report all-atom molecular dynamics simulations of a DNA nanotube (DNT) pore scaffold to gain fundamental insight into its atomic structure, dynamics, and interactions with ions and water. Our multiple simulations of models of DNTs that are composed of a six-duplex bundle lead to a coherent description. The central tube lumen adopts a cylindrical shape while the mouth regions at the two DNT openings undergo gating-like motions which provide a possible molecular explanation of a lower conductance state observed in our previous experimental study on a membrane-spanning version of the DNT (ACS Nano 2015, 9, 1117-26). Similarly, the central nanotube lumen is filled with water and ions characterized by bulk diffusion coefficients while the gating regions exhibit temporal fluctuations in their aqueous volume. We furthermore observe that the porous nature of the walls allows lateral leakage of ions and water. This study will benefit rational design of DNA nanopores of enhanced stability of relevance for sensing applications, of nanodevices with tunable gating properties that mimic gated ion channels, or of nanopores featuring defined permeation behavior.

  2. Structure, stability, and motion of dislocations in double-wall carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kai-Wang; Li, Zhong-Qiu; Wu, Jian; Peng, Xiang-Yang; Tan, Xin-Jun; Sun, Li-Zhong; Zhong, Jian-Xin

    2012-10-01

    In this paper, a novel double-wall carbon nanotube (DWCNT) with both edge and screw dislocations is studied by using the molecular dynamics (MD) method. The differences between two adjacent tubule indexes of armchair and zigzag nanotubes are determined to be 5 and 9, respectively, by taking into account the symmetry, integrality, and thermal stability of the composite structures. It is found that melting first occurs near the dislocations, and the melting temperatures of the dislocated armchair and zigzag DWCNTs are around 2600 K—2700 K. At the pre-melting temperatures, the shrink of the dislocation loop, which is comprised of edge and screw dislocations, implies that the composite dislocation in DWCNTs has self-healing ability. The dislocated DWCNTs first fracture at the edge dislocations, which induces the entire break in axial tensile test. The dislocated DWCNTs have a smaller fracture strength compared to the perfect DWCNTs. Our results not only match with the dislocation glide of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in experiments, but also can free from the electron beam radiation under experimental conditions observed by the high resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM), which is deemed to cause the motion of dislocation loop.

  3. Feasibility and Reproducibility of Two-Dimensional Wall Motion Tracking (WMT) in Fetal Echocardiography

    PubMed Central

    Enzensberger, Christian; Achterberg, Friederike; Degenhardt, Jan; Wolter, Aline; Graupner, Oliver; Herrmann, Johannes; Axt-Fliedner, Roland

    2017-01-01

    Objective The primary objective of this study was to determine the feasibility and reproducibility of 2-dimensional speckle tracking imaging based on the wall motion tracking (WMT) technique in fetal echocardiography. The secondary objective was to compare left and right ventricular global and segmental longitudinal peak strain values. Methods A prospective cross-sectional study was performed. Global and segmental longitudinal peak strain values of the left ventricle (LV) and right ventricle (RV) were assessed prospectively. Based on apical 4-chamber views, cine loops were acquired and digitally stored. Strain analysis was performed offline. Intra- and interobserver variabilities were analyzed. Results A total of 29 healthy fetuses with an echocardiogram performed between 19 and 37 weeks of gestation were included. Analysis was performed with a temporal resolution of 60 frames per second (fps). For both examiners, in all cases Cronbach’s alpha was>0.7. The interobserver variability showed a strong agreement in 50% of the segments (ICC 0.71–0.90). The global strain values for LV and RV were −16.34 and −14.65%, respectively. Segmental strain analysis revealed a basis to apex gradient with the lowest strain values in basal segments and the highest strain values in apical segments. Conclusion The assessment of fetal myocardial deformation parameters by 2D WMT is technically feasible with good reproducibility. PMID:28210715

  4. Light effects in the atomic-motion-induced Ramsey narrowing of dark resonances in wall-coated cells

    SciTech Connect

    Breschi, E.; Schori, C.; Di Domenico, G.; Mileti, G.; Kazakov, G.; Litvinov, A.; Matisov, B.

    2010-12-15

    We report on light shift and broadening in the atomic-motion-induced Ramsey narrowing of dark resonances prepared in alkali-metal vapors contained in wall-coated cells without buffer gas. The atomic-motion-induced Ramsey narrowing is due to the free motion of the polarized atomic spins in and out of the optical interaction region before spin relaxation. As a consequence of this effect, we observe a narrowing of the dark resonance linewidth as well as a reduction of the ground states' light shift when the volume of the interaction region decreases at constant optical intensity. The results can be intuitively interpreted as a dilution of the intensity effect similar to a pulsed interrogation due to the atomic motion. Finally the influence of this effect on the performance of compact atomic clocks is discussed.

  5. The hypertrophy of the lateral abdominal wall and quadratus lumborum is sport-specific: an MRI segmental study in professional tennis and soccer players.

    PubMed

    Sanchis-Moysi, Joaquin; Idoate, Fernando; Izquierdo, Mikel; Calbet, Jose A; Dorado, Cecilia

    2013-03-01

    The aim was to determine the volume and degree of asymmetry of quadratus lumborum (QL), obliques, and transversus abdominis; the last two considered conjointly (OT), in tennis and soccer players. The volume of QL and OT was determined using magnetic resonance imaging in professional tennis and soccer players, and in non-active controls (n = 8, 14, and 6, respectively). In tennis players the hypertrophy of OT was limited to proximal segments (cephalic segments), while in soccer players it was similar along longitudinal axis. In tennis players the hypertrophy was asymmetric (18% greater volume in the non-dominant than in the dominant OT, p = 0.001), while in soccer players and controls both sides had similar volumes (p > 0.05). In controls, the non-dominant QL was 15% greater than that of the dominant (p = 0.049). Tennis and soccer players had similar volumes in both sides of QL. Tennis alters the dominant-to-non-dominant balance in the muscle volume of the lateral abdominal wall. In tennis the hypertrophy is limited to proximal segments and is greater in the non-dominant side. Soccer, however, is associated to a symmetric hypertrophy of the lateral abdominal wall. Tennis and soccer elicit an asymmetric hypertrophy of QL.

  6. A cellular scale numerical study of the effect of mechanical properties of erythrocytes on the near-wall motion of platelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jing; Wang, Xiao-Long; Liu, Yun-Qiao; Gong, Xiao-Bo

    2014-04-01

    The effect of mechanical properties of erythrocytes on the near-wall motion of platelets was numerically studied with the immersed boundary method. Cells were modeled as viscous-fluid-filled capsules surrounded by hyper-elastic membranes with negligible thickness. The numerical results show that with the increase of hematocrit, the near-wall approaching of platelets is enhanced, with which platelets exhibit larger deformation and orientation angle of its near-wall tank-treading motion, and the lateral force pushing platelets to the wall is increased with larger fluctuation amplitude. Meanwhile the near-wall approaching is reduced by increasing the stiffness of erythrocytes. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  7. Anomalous switching in Nb/Ru/Sr2RuO4 topological junctions by chiral domain wall motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anwar, M. S.; Nakamura, Taketomo; Yonezawa, S.; Yakabe, M.; Ishiguro, R.; Takayanagi, H.; Maeno, Y.

    2013-08-01

    A spontaneous symmetry breaking in a system often results in domain wall formation. The motion of such domain walls is utilized to realize novel devices like racetrack-memories, in which moving ferromagnetic domain walls store and carry information. Superconductors breaking time reversal symmetry can also form domains with degenerate chirality of their superconducting order parameter. Sr2RuO4 is the leading candidate of a chiral p-wave superconductor, expected to be accompanied by chiral domain structure. Here, we present that Nb/Ru/Sr2RuO4 topological superconducting-junctions, with which the phase winding of order parameter can be effectively probed by making use of real-space topology, exhibit unusual switching between higher and lower critical current states. This switching is well explained by chiral-domain-wall dynamics. The switching can be partly controlled by external parameters such as temperature, magnetic field and current. These results open up a possibility to utilize the superconducting chiral domain wall motion for future novel superconducting devices.

  8. Faster motion of double 360° domain walls system induced by spin-polarized current

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, S. F.; Zhu, Q. Y.; Mu, C. P.; Zheng, Q.; Liu, X. Y.; Liu, Q. F.; Wang, J. B.

    2014-05-07

    By micromagnetic simulation, we investigated a double 360° domain walls system in two parallel nanowires. Two domain walls are coupled to each other via magnetostatic interaction. When a spin-polarized current is applied to only one nanowire or both nanowires with the same direction, the two domain walls propagate along nanowires together. The critical velocity of such system is obviously higher than that of a single 360° domain wall. The interaction between the two domain walls can be modeled as two bodies that connected by a spring, and we analyzed the coupling characteritics of the double 360° domain walls at last.

  9. Changes in dynamic embryonic heart wall motion in response to outflow tract banding measured using video densitometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stovall, Stephanie; Midgett, Madeline; Thornburg, Kent; Rugonyi, Sandra

    2016-11-01

    Abnormal blood flow during early cardiovascular development has been identified as a key factor in the pathogenesis of congenital heart disease; however, the mechanisms by which altered hemodynamics induce cardiac malformations are poorly understood. This study used outflow tract (OFT) banding to model increased afterload, pressure, and blood flow velocities at tubular stages of heart development and characterized the immediate changes in cardiac wall motion due to banding in chicken embryo models with light microscopy-based video densitometry. Optical videos were used to acquire two-dimensional heart image sequences over the cardiac cycle, from which intensity data were extracted along the heart centerline at several locations in the heart ventricle and OFT. While no changes were observed in the synchronous contraction of the ventricle with banding, the peristaltic-like wall motion in the OFT was significantly affected. Our data provide valuable insight into early cardiac biomechanics and its characterization using a simple light microscopy-based imaging modality.

  10. Seismic Structural Considerations for the Stern and Base of Retaining Walls Subjected to Earthquake Ground Motions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-05-01

    Unit 4402JC, entitled “Soil-Structure Interaction for Seismic Evaluation of Earth - Retaining Lock and Cantilever Walls ” for which Dr. Robert M. Ebeling...Introduction Figure 1.3 Earthquake-induced flexural yielding of stem wall and permanent displacement The seismic evaluation of earth retaining wall ...effects depends on the reserve capacity available in the design for static earth pressures. This aspect is investigated for older retaining wall

  11. Seismic Structural Considerations for the Stem and Base of Retaining Walls Subjected to Earthquake Ground Motions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-05-01

    Structure Interaction for Seismic Evaluation of Earth - Retaining Lock and Cantilever Walls " for which Dr. Robert M. Ebeling, Engineering and Informatic...yielding of stem wall and permanent displacement The seismic evaluation of earth retaining wall structures is more complex due to soil-structure...for static earth pressures. This aspect is investigated for older retaining wall systems by examining the margin of safety inherent in the old working 4

  12. Evaluating MRI based vascular wall motion as a biomarker of Fontan hemodynamic performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menon, Prahlad G.; Hong, Haifa

    2015-03-01

    The Fontan procedure for single-ventricle heart disease involves creation of pathways to divert venous blood from the superior & inferior venacavae (SVC, IVC) directly into the pulmonary arteries (PA), bypassing the right ventricle. For optimal surgical outcomes, venous flow energy loss in the resulting vascular construction must be minimized and ensuring close to equal flow distribution from the Fontan conduit connecting IVC to the left & right PA is paramount. This requires patient-specific hemodynamic evaluation using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations which are often time and resource intensive, limiting applicability for real-time patient management in the clinic. In this study, we report preliminary efforts at identifying a new non-invasive imaging based surrogate for CFD simulated hemodynamics. We establish correlations between computed hemodynamic criteria from CFD modeling and cumulative wall displacement characteristics of the Fontan conduit quantified from cine cardiovascular MRI segmentations over time (i.e. 20 cardiac phases gated from the start of ventricular systole), in 5 unique Fontan surgical connections. To focus our attention on diameter variations while discounting side-to-side swaying motion of the Fontan conduit, the difference between its instantaneous regional expansion and inward contraction (averaged across the conduit) was computed and analyzed. Maximum Fontan conduit-average expansion over the cardiac cycle correlated with the anatomy-specific diametric offset between the axis of the IVC and SVC (r2=0.13, p=0.55) - a known factor correlated with Fontan energy loss and IVC-to-PA flow distribution. Investigation in a larger study cohort is needed to establish stronger statistical correlations.

  13. SVM-based classification of LV wall motion in cardiac MRI with the assessment of STE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantilla, Juan; Garreau, Mireille; Bellanger, Jean-Jacques; Paredes, José Luis

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we propose an automated method to classify normal/abnormal wall motion in Left Ventricle (LV) function in cardiac cine-Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), taking as reference, strain information obtained from 2D Speckle Tracking Echocardiography (STE). Without the need of pre-processing and by exploiting all the images acquired during a cardiac cycle, spatio-temporal profiles are extracted from a subset of radial lines from the ventricle centroid to points outside the epicardial border. Classical Support Vector Machines (SVM) are used to classify features extracted from gray levels of the spatio-temporal profile as well as their representations in the Wavelet domain under the assumption that the data may be sparse in that domain. Based on information obtained from radial strain curves in 2D-STE studies, we label all the spatio-temporal profiles that belong to a particular segment as normal if the peak systolic radial strain curve of this segment presents normal kinesis, or abnormal if the peak systolic radial strain curve presents hypokinesis or akinesis. For this study, short-axis cine- MR images are collected from 9 patients with cardiac dyssynchrony for which we have the radial strain tracings at the mid-papilary muscle obtained by 2D STE; and from one control group formed by 9 healthy subjects. The best classification performance is obtained with the gray level information of the spatio-temporal profiles using a RBF kernel with 91.88% of accuracy, 92.75% of sensitivity and 91.52% of specificity.

  14. Usefulness of coronary flow reserve over regional wall motion when added to dual-imaging dipyridamole echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Rigo, Fausto; Richieri, Margherita; Pasanisi, Emilio; Cutaia, Valeria; Zanella, Carlo; Della Valentina, Patrizia; Di Pede, Francesco; Raviele, Antonio; Picano, Eugenio

    2003-02-01

    Vasodilator stress echocardiography allows semi-simultaneous imaging of left anterior descending (LAD) coronary flow and regional wall function. To assess the relative (and additive?) value of regional flow and function for noninvasive identification of angiographically assessed LAD disease in patients with chest pain syndrome, we studied 230 consecutive in-hospital patients (134 men, aged 63.5 +/- 11 years) with chest pain syndrome and normal regional and global left ventricular function. All patients underwent stress echocardiography with dipyridamole (up to 0.84 mg/kg over 10 minutes), including wall motion analysis by 2-dimensional echocardiography and coronary flow reserve (CFR) evaluation of the LAD artery by Doppler, with or without contrast injection. A new regional wall motion abnormality in >or=2 contiguous segments was required for 2-dimensional echocardiographic positivity. CFR was evaluated as the ratio of dipyridamole to peak diastolic coronary blood flow velocity at rest. All patients underwent coronary angiography within 60 days; a quantitatively assessed diameter reduction >50% of the LAD artery was considered significant. Of the 230 patients, 70 had LAD disease. A regional wall motion abnormality in LAD territory was present in 52 patients, and reduced CFR (<1.9) in 62 patients. Sensitivity for detecting LAD disease was 74% for 2-dimensional echocardiography (95% confidence interval [CI] 64% to 84%) and 81% for CFR <1.9 (95% CI 72% to 90%); specificity was 91% (95% CI 87% to 96%) for 2-dimensional echocardiography and 84% for CFR (95% CI 79% to 90%). Accuracy was 86% for 2-dimensional echocardiography (95% CI 82% to 91%) and 83.5% for CFR (95% CI 79% to 88%). When 2-dimensional echocardiography and CFR criteria were considered, sensitivity increased to 93% (95% CI 87% to 99%), with 80.6% specificity (95% CI 74.5% to 86.7%). CFR was assessed during vasodilator stress echocardiography. Its diagnostic accuracy for detecting LAD disease was comparable

  15. Rotational Response of Toe-Restrained Retaining Walls to Earthquake Ground Motions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-12-01

    spillway chute walls, spillway discharge channel walls, approach channel walls to outlet works structures, highway and railway relocation retaining...design criteria for Corps retaining structures..................................................28 1.5 Axial load capacity of spillway invert slabs...158 5.2.3 Structural geometry input

  16. SU-F-BRB-01: How Effective Is Abdominal Compression at Reducing Lung Motion? An Analysis Using Deformable Image Registration Within Different Sub-Regions of the Lung

    SciTech Connect

    Paradiso, D; Pearce, A; Leszczynski, K; Oliver, M

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the effectiveness of employing abdominal compression (AC) in reducing motion for the target region and sub-regions of the lung as part of the planning process for radiation therapy. Methods: Fourteen patients with early lung cancer were scanned with 4DCT and it was determined that target motion exceeded our institutional limit of > 8 mm motion and received a repeat 4DCT with AC. For each 4DCT, deformable image registration (DIR) was used to map the max inhale to the max exhale phase to determine the deformation vector fields (DVF). DIR was performed with Morphons and Demons algorithms. The mean DVF was used to represent that sub-region for each patient. The magnitudes of the mean DVF were quantified for the target and 12 sub-regions in the AP, LR SI directions. The sub-regions were contoured on each lung as (add prefix R or L for lung): Upper-Anterior (UA), Upper-Posterior (UP), Mid-Anterior (MA), Mid-Posterior (MP), Lower-Anterior (LA) and Lower-Posterior (LP). Results: The min/max SI motion for the target on the uncompressed 4DCT was 8mm/24.5 mm. The magnitude of decrease in SI was greatest in the RLP region (3.7±4.0mm) followed by target region (3.3±2.2mm) and finally the LLP region (3.0±3.5mm). The magnitude of decrease in 3D vector followed the same trend; RLP (3.5±2.2mm) then GTV (3.5±2.6mm) then LLP (2.7±3.8mm). 79% of the cases had a SI decrease of >12.5%, 43% had a SI decrease of >25% and 21% had a SI decrease of >50% as compared to the motion on the uncompressed 4DCT. Conclusion: AC is useful in reducing motion with the largest decreases observed in the lower posterior regions of the lungs. However, it should be noted that AC will not greatly decrease motion for all cases as 21% of cases did not reduce SI motion more than 12.5% of initial motion.

  17. Temperature estimation in a ferromagnetic Fe-Ni nanowire involving a current-driven domain wall motion.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, A; Hirohata, A; Ono, T; Miyajima, H

    2012-01-18

    We observed a magnetic domain wall (DW) motion induced by the spin-polarized pulsed current in a nanoscale Fe(19)Ni(81) wire using a magnetic force microscope. High current density, which is of the order of 10(11) A m(-2), was required for the DW motion. A simple method to estimate the temperature of the wire was developed by comparing the wire resistance measured during the DW motion with the temperature dependence of the wire resistance. Using this method, we found the temperature of the wire was proportional to the square of the current density and became just beneath at the threshold Curie temperature. Our experimental data qualitatively support this analytical model that the temperature is proportional to the resistivity, thickness, width of the wire and the square of the current density, and also inversely proportional to the thermal conductivity.

  18. Technical Note: Intrafractional changes in time lag relationship between anterior–posterior external and superior–inferior internal motion signals in abdominal tumor sites

    SciTech Connect

    Regmi, Rajesh; Lovelock, D. Michael; Zhang, Pengpeng; Pham, Hai; Xiong, Jianping; Yorke, Ellen D.; Mageras, Gig S.; Goodman, Karyn A.; Wu, Abraham J.

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate constancy, within a treatment session, of the time lag relationship between implanted markers in abdominal tumors and an external motion surrogate. Methods: Six gastroesophageal junction and three pancreatic cancer patients (IRB-approved protocol) received two cone-beam CTs (CBCT), one before and one after treatment. Time between scans was less than 30 min. Each patient had at least one implanted fiducial marker near the tumor. In all scans, abdominal displacement (Varian RPM) was recorded as the external motion signal. Purpose-built software tracked fiducials, representing internal signal, in CBCT projection images. Time lag between superior–inferior (SI) internal and anterior–posterior external signals was found by maximizing the correlation coefficient in each breathing cycle and averaging over all cycles. Time-lag-induced discrepancy between internal SI position and that predicted from the external signal (external prediction error) was also calculated. Results: Mean ± standard deviation time lag, over all scans and patients, was 0.10 ± 0.07 s (range 0.01–0.36 s). External signal lagged the internal in 17/18 scans. Change in time lag between pre- and post-treatment CBCT was 0.06 ± 0.07 s (range 0.01–0.22 s), corresponding to 3.1% ± 3.7% (range 0.6%–10.8%) of gate width (range 1.6–3.1 s). In only one patient, change in time lag exceeded 10% of the gate width. External prediction error over all scans of all patients varied from 0.1 ± 0.1 to 1.6 ± 0.4 mm. Conclusions: Time lag between internal motion along SI and external signals is small compared to the treatment gate width of abdominal patients examined in this study. Change in time lag within a treatment session, inferred from pre- to post-treatment measurements is also small, suggesting that a single measurement of time lag at the session start is adequate. These findings require confirmation in a larger number of patients.

  19. Technical Note: Intrafractional changes in time lag relationship between anterior–posterior external and superior–inferior internal motion signals in abdominal tumor sites

    PubMed Central

    Regmi, Rajesh; Lovelock, D. Michael; Zhang, Pengpeng; Pham, Hai; Xiong, Jianping; Yorke, Ellen D.; Goodman, Karyn A.; Wu, Abraham J.; Mageras, Gig S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate constancy, within a treatment session, of the time lag relationship between implanted markers in abdominal tumors and an external motion surrogate. Methods: Six gastroesophageal junction and three pancreatic cancer patients (IRB-approved protocol) received two cone-beam CTs (CBCT), one before and one after treatment. Time between scans was less than 30 min. Each patient had at least one implanted fiducial marker near the tumor. In all scans, abdominal displacement (Varian RPM) was recorded as the external motion signal. Purpose-built software tracked fiducials, representing internal signal, in CBCT projection images. Time lag between superior–inferior (SI) internal and anterior–posterior external signals was found by maximizing the correlation coefficient in each breathing cycle and averaging over all cycles. Time-lag-induced discrepancy between internal SI position and that predicted from the external signal (external prediction error) was also calculated. Results: Mean ± standard deviation time lag, over all scans and patients, was 0.10 ± 0.07 s (range 0.01–0.36 s). External signal lagged the internal in 17/18 scans. Change in time lag between pre- and post-treatment CBCT was 0.06 ± 0.07 s (range 0.01–0.22 s), corresponding to 3.1% ± 3.7% (range 0.6%–10.8%) of gate width (range 1.6–3.1 s). In only one patient, change in time lag exceeded 10% of the gate width. External prediction error over all scans of all patients varied from 0.1 ± 0.1 to 1.6 ± 0.4 mm. Conclusions: Time lag between internal motion along SI and external signals is small compared to the treatment gate width of abdominal patients examined in this study. Change in time lag within a treatment session, inferred from pre- to post-treatment measurements is also small, suggesting that a single measurement of time lag at the session start is adequate. These findings require confirmation in a larger number of patients. PMID:26127033

  20. Application of a Silicone Sheet in Negative-Pressure Wound Therapy to Treat an Abdominal Wall Defect after Necrotizing Fasciitis

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Jin Su

    2017-01-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis (NF) is an aggressive soft-tissue infection involving the deep fascia and is characterized by extensive deterioration of the surrounding tissue. Immediate diagnosis and intensive treatment, including debridement and systemic antibiotics, represent the most important factors influencing the survival of NF patients. In this report, we present a case of NF in the abdomen due to an infection caused by a perforated small bowel after abdominal liposuction. It was successfully treated using negative-pressure wound therapy, in which a silicone sheet functioned as a barrier between the sponge and internal organs to protect the small bowel. PMID:28194352

  1. Constitutive activation of ectodermal β-catenin induces ectopic outgrowths at various positions in mouse embryo and affects abdominal ventral body wall closure.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xuming; Huang, Sixia; Zhang, Lingling; Wu, Yumei; Chen, Yingwei; Tao, Yixin; Wang, Yushu; He, Shigang; Shen, Sanbing; Wu, Ji; Li, Baojie; Guo, Xizhi; He, Lin; Ma, Gang

    2014-01-01

    Vertebrate limbs originate from the lateral plate mesoderm (LPM) and the overlying ectoderm. While normal limb formation in defined regions has been well studied, the question of whether other positions retain limb-forming potential has not been fully investigated in mice. By ectopically activating β-catenin in the ectoderm with Msx2-cre, we observed that local tissue outgrowths were induced, which either progressed into limb-like structure within the inter-limb flank or formed extra tissues in other parts of the mouse embryo. In the presumptive abdominal region of severely affected embryos, ectopic limb formation was coupled with impaired abdominal ventral body wall (AVBW) closure, which indicates the existence of a potential counterbalance of limb formation and AVBW closure. At the molecular level, constitutive β-catenin activation was sufficient to trigger, but insufficient to maintain the ectopic expression of a putative limb-inducing factor, Fgf8, in the ectoderm. These findings provide new insight into the mechanism of limb formation and AVBW closure, and the crosstalk between the Wnt/β-catenin pathway and Fgf signal.

  2. Two-barrier stability that allows low-power operation in current-induced domain-wall motion.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kab-Jin; Hiramatsu, Ryo; Koyama, Tomohiro; Ueda, Kohei; Yoshimura, Yoko; Chiba, Daichi; Kobayashi, Kensuke; Nakatani, Yoshinobu; Fukami, Shunsuke; Yamanouchi, Michihiko; Ohno, Hideo; Kohno, Hiroshi; Tatara, Gen; Ono, Teruo

    2013-01-01

    Energy barriers in magnetization reversal dynamics have long been of interest because the barrier height determines the thermal stability of devices as well as the threshold force triggering their dynamics. Especially in memory and logic applications, there is a dilemma between the thermal stability of bit data and the operation power of devices, because larger energy barriers for higher thermal stability inevitably lead to larger magnetic fields (or currents) for operation. Here we show that this is not the case for current-induced magnetic domain-wall motion induced by adiabatic spin-transfer torque. By quantifying domain-wall depinning energy barriers by magnetic field and current, we find that there exist two different pinning barriers, extrinsic and intrinsic energy barriers, which govern the thermal stability and threshold current, respectively. This unique two-barrier system allows low-power operation with high thermal stability, which is impossible in conventional single-barrier systems.

  3. Two-barrier stability that allows low-power operation in current-induced domain-wall motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kab-Jin; Hiramatsu, Ryo; Koyama, Tomohiro; Ueda, Kohei; Yoshimura, Yoko; Chiba, Daichi; Kobayashi, Kensuke; Nakatani, Yoshinobu; Fukami, Shunsuke; Yamanouchi, Michihiko; Ohno, Hideo; Kohno, Hiroshi; Tatara, Gen; Ono, Teruo

    2013-06-01

    Energy barriers in magnetization reversal dynamics have long been of interest because the barrier height determines the thermal stability of devices as well as the threshold force triggering their dynamics. Especially in memory and logic applications, there is a dilemma between the thermal stability of bit data and the operation power of devices, because larger energy barriers for higher thermal stability inevitably lead to larger magnetic fields (or currents) for operation. Here we show that this is not the case for current-induced magnetic domain-wall motion induced by adiabatic spin-transfer torque. By quantifying domain-wall depinning energy barriers by magnetic field and current, we find that there exist two different pinning barriers, extrinsic and intrinsic energy barriers, which govern the thermal stability and threshold current, respectively. This unique two-barrier system allows low-power operation with high thermal stability, which is impossible in conventional single-barrier systems.

  4. Investigation of domain wall motion in RE-TM magnetic wire towards a current driven memory and logic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awano, Hiroyuki

    2015-06-01

    Current driven magnetic domain wall (DW) motions of ferri-magnetic TbFeCo wires have been investigated. In the case of a Si substrate, the critical current density (Jc) of DW motion was successfully reduced to 3×106 A/cm2. Moreover, by using a polycarbonate (PC) substrate with a molding groove of 600 nm width, the Jc was decreased to 6×105 A/cm2. In order to fabricate a logic in memory, a current driven spin logics (AND, OR, NOT) have been proposed and successfully demonstrated under the condition of low Jc. These results indicate that TbFeCo nanowire is an excellent candidate for next generation power saving memory and logic.

  5. Controlling Chaos of Magnetic-Domain-Wall Motion by using Delayed-Feedback-Control with Automatic Gain-Adjustment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utsumi, Takuya; Okuno, Hikaru

    In this research, the chaotic motion of magnetic domain wall is controlled by using Delayed-Feedback-Control (DFC) with automatic gain-adjustment, modified by Nakajima and Ueda in 1995. The method of automatic gain-adjustment is newly applied to Extended-DFC (E-DFC) for more highly performance. It is clearly confirmed that the control-gain was automatically adjusted on each results. But, in this case, the response of E-DFC has not been improved. It is found that the delayed time has strongly influenced on the response. The selective E-DFC is proposed and the response was best.

  6. Collective coordinate models of domain wall motion in perpendicularly magnetized systems under the spin hall effect and longitudinal fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasseri, S. Ali; Moretti, Simone; Martinez, Eduardo; Serpico, Claudio; Durin, Gianfranco

    2017-03-01

    Recent studies on heterostructures of ultrathin ferromagnets sandwiched between a heavy metal layer and an oxide have highlighted the importance of spin-orbit coupling (SOC) and broken inversion symmetry in domain wall (DW) motion. Specifically, chiral DWs are stabilized in these systems due to the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI). SOC can also lead to enhanced current induced DW motion, with the Spin Hall effect (SHE) suggested as the dominant mechanism for this observation. The efficiency of SHE driven DW motion depends on the internal magnetic structure of the DW, which could be controlled using externally applied longitudinal in-plane fields. In this work, micromagnetic simulations and collective coordinate models are used to study current-driven DW motion under longitudinal in-plane fields in perpendicularly magnetized samples with strong DMI. Several extended collective coordinate models are developed to reproduce the micromagnetic results. While these extended models show improvements over traditional models of this kind, there are still discrepancies between them and micromagnetic simulations which require further work.

  7. Recurrent incisional hernia, enterocutaneous fistula and loss of the substance of the abdominal wall: plastic with organic prosthesis, skin graft and VAC therapy. Clinical case.

    PubMed

    Nicodemi, Sara; Corelli, Sergio; Sacchi, Marco; Ricciardi, Edoardo; Costantino, Annarita; Di Legge, Pietro; Ceci, Francesco; Cipriani, Benedetta; Martellucci, Annunziata; Santilli, Mario; Orsini, Silvia; Tudisco, Antonella; Stagnitti, Franco

    2015-01-01

    Surgical wounds dehiscence is a serious post-operatory complication, with an incidence between 0.4% and 3.5%. Mortality is more than 45%. Complex wounds treatment may require a multidisciplinary management. VAC Therapy could be an alternative treatment regarding complex wound. VAC therapy has been recently introduced on skin's graft tissue management reducing skin graft rejection. The use of biological prosthesis has been tested in a contaminated field, better than synthetic meshes, which often need to be removed. The Permacol is more resistant to degradation by proteases due to its cross-links. Surgery is still considered the best treatment for digestive fistula. A 58 years old obese woman come to our attention, she was operated for an abdominal hernia. She had a post-operatory entero-cutaneous fistula. She was submitted to bowel resection, the anastomosis has been tailored and the hernia of the abdominal wall has been repaired with biological mesh for managing such condition. She had a wound dehiscence with loss of substance and the exposure of the biological prosthesis, nearly 20 cm diameter. She was treated first with antibiotic therapy and simple medications. In addiction, antibiotic therapy was necessary late associated to 7 months with advanced medications allowed a small reduction's defect. Because of its, treatment went on for two more months using VAC therapy. Antibiotic's therapy was finally suspended. The VAC therapy allowed the reduction of the gap, between skin and subcutaneous tissue, and the defect's size preparing a suitable ground for the skin graft. The graft, managed with the vac therapy, was necessary to complete the healing process.

  8. CLOSTRIDIAL PARAPROCTITIS WITH GAS GANGRENE OF FRONT-LATERAL ABDOMINAL WALLS AND NECROTIC FASCIO-MYOSITIS (CASE REPORT).

    PubMed

    Didbaridze, N; Lomidze, N; Abuladze, T; Qiliptari, G; Didbaridze, T; Gvasalia, I; Mkervalishvili, Z; Gogokhia, N

    2016-09-01

    Anaerobic clostridial infection is the most severe form of paraproctitis. The incubation period is very short, from 3 to 6 hours, sometimes lasting for 1-2 days. Clostridial infection spreads rapidly and induces gas gangrene, causes destruction of cells and other intermediate substances, and impedes blood circulation. This paper presents a case study of an extremely severe form of anaerobic infection with spontaneous gas gangrene, cellulitis, fasciomyositic necrosis, severe intoxication and septic shock on the abdominal front and lateral surfaces. This patient presented as infected with Clostridium septicum, a rare and highly toxic Gram-positive, spore-forming, obligate anaerobic bacillus that progresses and migrates rapidly, affecting all soft tissues (muscle, fascia), and produces four toxins which cause gas gangrene, intravascular hemolysis, tissue necrosis, and septic shock. The mortality rate is typically 80%. In this case study, a positive clinical outcome was achieved by aggressive identification of the microbe, appropriate and immediate therapy, and vigorous surgical intervention. Specifically, immediate surgery was conducted to ensure a wide excision of damaged tissues, necrectomy, curettage, wide drainage, readjustment, oxygenation through drainages, further additional surgical corrections through CT control with wide bandages in the operating area. Further, the diagnostic workup was thorough, identifying the microbe through a properly constructed diagnostic algorithm, ultrasound and CT studies, infectious agent assessments, and bacteriological monitoring carried out on the 1st-2nd-5th-7th-12th-15th-21st-25th days. Rational antibiotic therapy with permanent susceptibility testing informed the selection of an appropriate agent. Finally, markers for the evaluation of severity (Apache scale) were assessed, as they were for stage of infection (prokalcitonin), inflammation (CRP) and other indicators.

  9. Prior Distributions of Material Parameters for Bayesian Calibration of Growth and Remodeling Computational Model of Abdominal Aortic Wall.

    PubMed

    Seyedsalehi, Sajjad; Zhang, Liangliang; Choi, Jongeun; Baek, Seungik

    2015-10-01

    For the accurate prediction of the vascular disease progression, there is a crucial need for developing a systematic tool aimed toward patient-specific modeling. Considering the interpatient variations, a prior distribution of model parameters has a strong influence on computational results for arterial mechanics. One crucial step toward patient-specific computational modeling is to identify parameters of prior distributions that reflect existing knowledge. In this paper, we present a new systematic method to estimate the prior distribution for the parameters of a constrained mixture model using previous biaxial tests of healthy abdominal aortas (AAs). We investigate the correlation between the estimated parameters for each constituent and the patient's age and gender; however, the results indicate that the parameters are correlated with age only. The parameters are classified into two groups: Group-I in which the parameters ce, ck1, ck2, cm2,Ghc, and ϕe are correlated with age, and Group-II in which the parameters cm1, Ghm, G1e, G2e, and α are not correlated with age. For the parameters in Group-I, we used regression associated with age via linear or inverse relations, in which their prior distributions provide conditional distributions with confidence intervals. For Group-II, the parameter estimated values were subjected to multiple transformations and chosen if the transformed data had a better fit to the normal distribution than the original. This information improves the prior distribution of a subject-specific model by specifying parameters that are correlated with age and their transformed distributions. Therefore, this study is a necessary first step in our group's approach toward a Bayesian calibration of an aortic model. The results from this study will be used as the prior information necessary for the initialization of Bayesian calibration of a computational model for future applications.

  10. An all-metallic logic gate based on current-driven domain wall motion.

    PubMed

    Xu, Peng; Xia, Ke; Gu, Changzhi; Tang, Ling; Yang, Haifang; Li, Junjie

    2008-02-01

    The walls of magnetic domains can become trapped in a ferromagnetic metallic point contact when the thickness of the film and the width of the contact are less than their critical values. The discovery that domain walls can be moved from such constrictions by a sufficiently large current has attracted considerable attention from researchers working on both fundamental research and potential applications. Here we show that Invar nanocontacts fabricated on silica substrates exhibit a sharp drop in resistance with increasing bias voltage at room temperature in the absence of an applied magnetic field. Moreover, when two nanocontacts are combined in an all-metallic comparison circuit, it is possible to perform logical NOT operations. The use of electrical currents rather than applied magnetic fields to control the domain walls also reduces energy consumption and the risk of crosstalk in devices.

  11. Statistical methods for analysis of coordination of chest wall motion using optical reflectance imaging of multiple markers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenyon, C. M.; Ghezzo, R. H.; Cala, S. J.; Ferrigno, Giancarlo; Pedotti, Antonio; Macklem, P. T.; Rochester, D. F.

    1994-07-01

    To analyze coordination of chest wall motion we have used principle component analysis (PCA) and multiple regression analysis (MRA) with respect to spirometry on the displacements of 93 optical reflective markers placed upon the chest wall (CW). Each marker is tracked at 10 Hz with an accuracy of 0.2 mm in each spatial dimension using the ELITE system (IEEE Trans. Biomed. Eng. 11:943-949, 1985). PCA enables the degree of linear coordination between all of the markers to be assessed using the eigenvectors and eigenvalues of the covariance of the matrix of marker displacements in each dimension against time. Thus the number of linear degrees of freedom (DOF) which contribute more than a particular amount to the total variance can be determined and analyzed. MRA with respect to spirometrically measured lung volume changes enables identification of the CW points whose movement correlates best with lung volume. We have used this analysis to compare a quiet breathing sequence with one where tidal volume was increased fourfold involuntarily and show that the number of DOF with eigenvalues accounting for >5% of the covariance increased from 2 to 3. Also the point whose movement correlated best with lung volume changed from halfway down the lower costal margin to a more lateral point at the level of the bottom of the sternum. This quantification of CW coordination may be useful in analysis and staging of many respiratory disorders and is applicable to any nonrigid body motion where points can be tracked.

  12. Planar positron imaging of rubidium-82 for myocardial infarction: A comparison with thallium-201 and regional wall motion

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, K.A.; Ryan, J.W.; Resnekov, L.; Stark, V.; Peterson, E.L.; Gustafson, G.C.; Martin, W.B.; Freier, P.A.; Harper, P.V. )

    1989-09-01

    Rubidium-82 (Rb-82) is a generator-produced, short half-life (76 seconds) positron emitting potassium analog. Using a mobile gamma camera equipped with a rotating tungsten collimator and high-energy shielding, we examined the use of Rb-82 in the coronary care unit and clinical laboratory for detection of perfusion defects due to myocardial infarction. We studied 31 subjects, 10 patients with acute myocardial infarction, 12 with remote myocardial infarction, and nine controls. Rb-82 images were compared with Tl-201 and regional wall motion for detection of infarct-related arteries. Of the 22 patients with myocardial infarction, 16 were identified with Rb-82 and Tl-201. In nine control subjects, eight were normal with each method. Correlation between Rb-82 and Tl-201 defect scores was excellent. Sensitivity and specificity for infarct-related arteries were similar for Rb-82, Tl-201, and wall motion imaging. Thus planar Rb-82 imaging can detect MI reliably in the coronary care unit and in the clinical laboratory.

  13. Remodeling characteristics and collagen distribution in synthetic mesh materials explanted from human subjects after abdominal wall reconstruction: an analysis of remodeling characteristics by patient risk factors and surgical site classifications

    PubMed Central

    Cavallo, Jaime A.; Roma, Andres A.; Jasielec, Mateusz S.; Ousley, Jenny; Creamer, Jennifer; Pichert, Matthew D.; Baalman, Sara; Frisella, Margaret M.; Matthews, Brent D.

    2014-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to evaluate the associations between patient characteristics or surgical site classifications and the histologic remodeling scores of synthetic meshes biopsied from their abdominal wall repair sites in the first attempt to generate a multivariable risk prediction model of non-constructive remodeling. Methods Biopsies of the synthetic meshes were obtained from the abdominal wall repair sites of 51 patients during a subsequent abdominal re-exploration. Biopsies were stained with hematoxylin and eosin, and evaluated according to a semi-quantitative scoring system for remodeling characteristics (cell infiltration, cell types, extracellular matrix deposition, inflammation, fibrous encapsulation, and neovascularization) and a mean composite score (CR). Biopsies were also stained with Sirius Red and Fast Green, and analyzed to determine the collagen I:III ratio. Based on univariate analyses between subject clinical characteristics or surgical site classification and the histologic remodeling scores, cohort variables were selected for multivariable regression models using a threshold p value of ≤0.200. Results The model selection process for the extracellular matrix score yielded two variables: subject age at time of mesh implantation, and mesh classification (c-statistic = 0.842). For CR score, the model selection process yielded two variables: subject age at time of mesh implantation and mesh classification (r2 = 0.464). The model selection process for the collagen III area yielded a model with two variables: subject body mass index at time of mesh explantation and pack-year history (r2 = 0.244). Conclusion Host characteristics and surgical site assessments may predict degree of remodeling for synthetic meshes used to reinforce abdominal wall repair sites. These preliminary results constitute the first steps in generating a risk prediction model that predicts the patients and clinical circumstances for which non

  14. Confinement of ferroelectric domain-wall motion at artificially formed conducting-nanofilaments in epitaxial BiFeO3 thin films.

    PubMed

    Kim, Woo-Hee; Son, Jong Yeog; Jang, Hyun Myung

    2014-05-14

    We report confinement of ferroelectric domain-wall motion at conducting-nanofilament wall in epitaxial BiFeO3 thin film on Nb-doped SrTiO3 substrate. The BiFeO3 film exhibited well-defined ferroelectric response and unipolar resistive switching behavior. We artificially formed conducting-nanofilaments in the BiFeO3 via conducting atomic force microscope techniques. The conducting-nanofilament wall, which does not possess any ferroelectric polarization, is then able to block domain propagation. Consequently, we demonstrate that the domain-wall motion is effectively confined within the conducting-nanofilament wall during polarization switching. This significant new insight potentially gives an opportunity for the artificial manipulation of nanoscale ferroelectric domain.

  15. Magnet Fall inside a Conductive Pipe: Motion and the Role of the Pipe Wall Thickness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donoso, G.; Ladera, C. L.; Martin, P.

    2009-01-01

    Theoretical models and experimental results are presented for the retarded fall of a strong magnet inside a vertical conductive non-magnetic tube. Predictions and experimental results are in good agreement modelling the magnet as a simple magnetic dipole. The effect of varying the pipe wall thickness on the retarding magnetic drag is studied for…

  16. On the receptivity problem for Goertler vortices: Vortex motions induced by wall roughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denier, James P.; Hall, Philip; Seddougui, Sharon

    1990-01-01

    The receptivity problem for Goertler vortices induced by wall roughness is investigated. The roughness is modelled by small amplitude perturbations to the curved wall over which the flow takes place. The amplitude of these perturbations is taken to be sufficiently small for the induced Goertler vortices to be described by linear theory. The roughness is assumed to vary in the spanwise direction on the boundary layer lengthscale, while in the flow direction the corresponding variation is on the lengthscale over which the wall curvature varies. In fact the latter condition can be relaxed to allow for a faster streamwise roughness variation so long as the variation does not become as fast as that in the spanwise direction. The function which describes the roughness is assumed to be such that its spanwise and streamwise dependences can be separated; this enables progress by taking Fourier or Laplace transforms where appropriate. The cases of isolated and distributed roughness elements are investigated and the coupling coefficient which relates the amplitude of the forcing and the induced vortex amplitude is found asymptotically in the small wavelength limit. It is shown that this coefficient is exponentially small in the latter limit so that it is unlikely that this mode can be stimulated directly by wall roughness. The situation at 0(1) wavelengths is quite different and this is investigated numerically for different forcing functions. It is found that an isolated roughness element induces a vortex field which grows within a wedge at a finite distance downstream of the element. However, immediately downstream of the obstacle the disturbed flow produced by the element decays in amplitude. The receptivity problem at larger Goertler numbers appropriate to relatively large wall curvature is discussed in detail.

  17. Automated classification of LV regional wall motion based on spatio-temporal profiles from cardiac cine magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantilla, Juan; Garreau, Mireille; Bellanger, Jean-Jacques; Paredes, José Luis

    2013-11-01

    Assessment of the cardiac Left Ventricle (LV) wall motion is generally based on visual inspection or quantitative analysis of 2D+t sequences acquired in short-axis cardiac cine-Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). Most often, cardiac dynamic is globally analized from two particular phases of the cardiac cycle. In this paper, we propose an automated method to classify regional wall motion in LV function based on spatio-temporal pro les and Support Vector Machines (SVM). This approach allows to obtain a binary classi cation between normal and abnormal motion, without the need of pre-processing and by exploiting all the images of the cardiac cycle. In each short- axis MRI slice level (basal, median, and apical), the spatio-temporal pro les are extracted from the selection of a subset of diametrical lines crossing opposites LV segments. Initialized at end-diastole phase, the pro les are concatenated with their corresponding projections into the succesive temporal phases of the cardiac cycle. These pro les are associated to di erent types of information that derive from the image (gray levels), Fourier, Wavelet or Curvelet domains. The approach has been tested on a set of 14 abnormal and 6 healthy patients by using a leave-one-out cross validation and two kernel functions for SVM classi er. The best classi cation performance is yielded by using four-level db4 wavelet transform and SVM with a linear kernel. At each slice level the results provided a classi cation rate of 87.14% in apical level, 95.48% in median level and 93.65% in basal level.

  18. The streamwise drag-reduction response of a boundary layer subjected to a sudden imposition of transverse oscillatory wall motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lardeau, Sylvain; Leschziner, Michael A.

    2013-07-01

    A direct numerical simulation study is presented, which examines the response of a spatially developing boundary layer to oscillatory spanwise wall motion imposed over a limited streamwise stretch. At the heart of the study is the dependence of the streamwise variations in skin friction and turbulence properties on the period of the oscillatory motion, with particular emphasis placed on the behaviour downstream of the start of the actuation. The friction Reynolds number just upstream of the actuation is Reτ = 520, and the wall-scaled actuation period, T+ = Tuτ2/ν, covers the range 80-200. In contrast to channel flow, the present configuration allows the processes during the transition stretch from the unactuated state to the low-drag state and the recovery from the low-drag state to be studied. Attention focuses primarily on the former. Results are included for the time-averaged turbulent stresses, their budgets and probability-density functions, as well as a range of phase-averaged properties. The study brings out, for low-drag conditions, a number of features and processes that are common with those in actuated channel flow, but suggests that the maximum drag-reduction margins are lower than those in equivalent channel flow, and that the optimum actuation period is significantly shorter. The transition to the low-drag state occurs over about 5 boundary-layer thicknesses, and is characterised by substantial oscillations in all phase-averaged properties. These oscillations, provoked at the start of the spanwise motion, propagate convectively as waves and decay as the low-drag state is approached. The interactions contributing to the oscillations are discussed as part of the analysis of phase-averaged quantities.

  19. Motion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brand, Judith, Ed.

    2002-01-01

    This issue of Exploratorium Magazine focuses on the topic of motion. Contents include: (1) "First Word" (Zach Tobias); (2) "Cosmic Collisions" (Robert Irion); (3) "The Mobile Cell" (Karen E. Kalumuck); (4) "The Paths of Paths" (Steven Vogel); (5) "Fragments" (Pearl Tesler); (6) "Moving Pictures" (Amy Snyder); (7) "Plants on the Go" (Katharine…

  20. Motion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerhart, James B.; Nussbaum, Rudi H.

    This monograph was written for the Conference on the New Instructional Materials in Physics held at the University of Washington in summer, 1965. It is intended for use in an introductory course in college physics. It consists of an extensive qualitative discussion of motion followed by a detailed development of the quantitative methods needed to…

  1. Harmonic Motion Imaging for Abdominal Tumor Detection and High-intensity Focused Ultrasound Ablation Monitoring: A Feasibility Study in a Transgenic Mouse Model of Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hong; Hou, Gary Y.; Han, Yang; Payen, Thomas; Palermo, Carmine F.; Olive, Kenneth P.; Konofagou, Elisa E.

    2015-01-01

    Harmonic motion imaging (HMI) is a radiation force-based elasticity imaging technique that tracks oscillatory tissue displacements induced by sinusoidal ultrasonic radiation force to assess relative tissue stiffness. The objective of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of HMI in pancreatic tumor detection and high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment monitoring. The HMI system consisted of a focused ultrasound transducer, which generated sinusoidal radiation force to induce oscillatory tissue motion at 50 Hz, and a diagnostic ultrasound transducer, which detected the axial tissue displacements based on acquired radiofrequency signals using a 1D cross-correlation algorithm. For pancreatic tumor detection, HMI images were generated for pancreatic tumors in transgenic mice and normal pancreases in wild-type mice. The obtained HMI images showed a high contrast between normal and malignant pancreases with an average peak-to-peak HMI displacement ratio of 3.2. Histological analysis showed that no tissue damage was associated with HMI when it was used for the sole purpose of elasticity imaging. For pancreatic tumor ablation monitoring, the focused ultrasound transducer was operated with a higher acoustic power and longer pulse length than that used in tumor detection to simultaneously induce HIFU thermal ablation and oscillatory tissue displacements, allowing HMI monitoring without interrupting tumor ablation. HMI monitoring of HIFU ablation found significant decreases in the peak-to-peak HMI displacements before and after HIFU ablation with a reduction rate ranging from 15.8% to 57.0%. The formation of thermal lesions after HIFU exposure was confirmed by histological analysis. This study demonstrated the feasibility of HMI in abdominal tumor detection and HIFU ablation monitoring. PMID:26415128

  2. Harmonic motion imaging for abdominal tumor detection and high-intensity focused ultrasound ablation monitoring: an in vivo feasibility study in a transgenic mouse model of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hong; Hou, Gary Y; Han, Yang; Payen, Thomas; Palermo, Carmine F; Olive, Kenneth P; Konofagou, Elisa E

    2015-09-01

    Harmonic motion imaging (HMI) is a radiationforce- based elasticity imaging technique that tracks oscillatory tissue displacements induced by sinusoidal ultrasonic radiation force to assess the resulting oscillatory displacement denoting the underlying tissue stiffness. The objective of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of HMI in pancreatic tumor detection and high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment monitoring. The HMI system consisted of a focused ultrasound transducer, which generated sinusoidal radiation force to induce oscillatory tissue motion at 50 Hz, and a diagnostic ultrasound transducer, which detected the axial tissue displacements based on acquired radio-frequency signals using a 1-D cross-correlation algorithm. For pancreatic tumor detection, HMI images were generated for pancreatic tumors in transgenic mice and normal pancreases in wild-type mice. The obtained HMI images showed a high contrast between normal and malignant pancreases with an average peak-to-peak HMI displacement ratio of 3.2. Histological analysis showed that no tissue damage was associated with HMI when it was used for the sole purpose of elasticity imaging. For pancreatic tumor ablation monitoring, the focused ultrasound transducer was operated at a higher acoustic power and longer pulse length than that used in tumor detection to simultaneously induce HIFU thermal ablation and oscillatory tissue displacements, allowing HMI monitoring without interrupting tumor ablation. HMI monitoring of HIFU ablation found significant decreases in the peak-to-peak HMI displacements before and after HIFU ablation with a reduction rate ranging from 15.8% to 57.0%. The formation of thermal lesions after HIFU exposure was confirmed by histological analysis. This study demonstrated the feasibility of HMI in abdominal tumor detection and HIFU ablation monitoring.

  3. Motion of Domain Walls and the Dynamics of Kinks in the Magnetic Peierls Potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buijnsters, F. J.; Fasolino, A.; Katsnelson, M. I.

    2014-11-01

    We study the dynamics of magnetic domain walls in the Peierls potential due to the discreteness of the crystal lattice. The propagation of a narrow domain wall (comparable to the lattice parameter) under the effect of a magnetic field proceeds through the formation of kinks in its profile. We predict that, despite the discreteness of the system, such kinks can behave like sine-Gordon solitons in thin films of materials such as yttrium iron garnets, and we derive general conditions for other materials. In our simulations, we also observe long-lived breathers. We provide analytical expressions for the effective mass and limiting velocity of the kink in excellent agreement with our numerical results.

  4. Motion of domain walls and the dynamics of kinks in the magnetic Peierls potential.

    PubMed

    Buijnsters, F J; Fasolino, A; Katsnelson, M I

    2014-11-21

    We study the dynamics of magnetic domain walls in the Peierls potential due to the discreteness of the crystal lattice. The propagation of a narrow domain wall (comparable to the lattice parameter) under the effect of a magnetic field proceeds through the formation of kinks in its profile. We predict that, despite the discreteness of the system, such kinks can behave like sine-Gordon solitons in thin films of materials such as yttrium iron garnets, and we derive general conditions for other materials. In our simulations, we also observe long-lived breathers. We provide analytical expressions for the effective mass and limiting velocity of the kink in excellent agreement with our numerical results.

  5. Discrete domain wall positioning due to pinning in current driven motion along nanowires.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xin; Thomas, Luc; Moriya, Rai; Parkin, Stuart S P

    2011-01-12

    Racetrack memory is a novel storage-class memory device in which a series of domain walls (DWs), representing zeros and ones, are shifted to and fro by current pulses along magnetic nanowires. Here we show, by precise measurements of the DW's position using spin-valve nanowires, that these positions take up discrete values. This results from DW relaxation after the end of the current pulse into local energy minima, likely derived from imperfections in the nanowire.

  6. Linear modeling of turbulent skin-friction reduction due to spanwise wall motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duque-Daza, Carlos; Baig, Mirza; Lockerby, Duncan; Chernyshenko, Sergei; Davies, Christopher; University of Warwick Team; Imperial College Team; Cardiff University Team

    2012-11-01

    We present a study on the effect of streamwise-travelling waves of spanwise wall velocity on the growth of near-wall turbulent streaks using a linearized formulation of the Navier-Stokes equations. The changes in streak amplification due to the travelling waves induced by the wall velocity are compared to published results of direct numerical simulation (DNS) predictions of the turbulent skin-friction reduction over a range of parameters; a clear correlation between these two sets of results is observed. Additional linearized simulations but at a much higher Reynolds numbers, more relevant to aerospace applications, produce results that show no marked differences to those obtained at low Reynolds number. It is also observed that a close correlation exists between DNS data of drag reduction and a very simple characteristic of the ``generalized'' Stokes layer generated by the streamwise-travelling waves. Carlos.Duque-Daza@warwick.ac.uk - School of Engineering, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL, UK caduqued@unal.edu.co - Department of Mechanical and Mechatronics Engineering, Universidad Nacional de Colombia.

  7. Electrical probing of magnetic phase transition and domain wall motion in single-crystalline Mn₅Ge₃ nanowire.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jianshi; Wang, Chiu-Yen; Jiang, Wanjun; Chang, Li-Te; Fan, Yabin; Chan, Michael; Wu, Can; Hung, Min-Hsiu; Liu, Pei-Hsuan; Yang, Hong-Jie; Tuan, Hsing-Yu; Chen, Lih-Juann; Wang, Kang L

    2012-12-12

    In this Letter, the magnetic phase transition and domain wall motion in a single-crystalline Mn(5)Ge(3) nanowire were investigated by temperature-dependent magneto-transport measurements. The ferromagnetic Mn(5)Ge(3) nanowire was fabricated by fully germaniding a single-crystalline Ge nanowire through the solid-state reaction with Mn contacts upon thermal annealing at 450 °C. Temperature-dependent four-probe resistance measurements on the Mn(5)Ge(3) nanowire showed a clear slope change near 300 K accompanied by a magnetic phase transition from ferromagnetism to paramagnetism. The transition temperature was able to be controlled by both axial and radial magnetic fields as the external magnetic field helped maintain the magnetization aligned in the Mn(5)Ge(3) nanowire. Near the magnetic phase transition, the critical behavior in the 1D system was characterized by a power-law relation with a critical exponent of α = 0.07 ± 0.01. Besides, another interesting feature was revealed as a cusp at about 67 K in the first-order derivative of the nanowire resistance, which was attributed to a possible magnetic transition between two noncollinear and collinear ferromagnetic states in the Mn(5)Ge(3) lattice. Furthermore, temperature-dependent magneto-transport measurements demonstrated a hysteretic, symmetric, and stepwise axial magnetoresistance of the Mn(5)Ge(3) nanowire. The interesting features of abrupt jumps indicated the presence of multiple domain walls in the Mn(5)Ge(3) nanowire and the annihilation of domain walls driven by the magnetic field. The Kurkijärvi model was used to describe the domain wall depinning as thermally assisted escape from a single energy barrier, and the fitting on the temperature-dependent depinning magnetic fields yielded an energy barrier of 0.166 eV.

  8. Influence of large-scale low- and high-speed structures on the near-wall vortical motions in turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Jinyul; Sung, Hyung Jin

    2016-11-01

    Direct numerical simulation data of turbulent boundary layer (Reτ = 1000) are used to investigate the large-scale influences on the vortical structures in the near-wall region. The streamwise swirling strength (λx) depends on the strength of large-scale streamwise velocity fluctuations (ul) . The amplitude of λx decreases under the negative ul rather than the positive ul , analogous to the amplitude modulation of the velocity fluctuations. The dependence of λxon ul is due to the opposite spanwise motions in the footprints of low- and high-speed structures, which are congregative and dispersive, respectively. Conditionally averaged fields conditioned on λx under the negative- and positive-ul events show that the swirling motions lie within the congregative and dispersive motions. The dispersive motion is more intense than the congregative motion because the sweep of high-momentum fluid under ul > 0 splats on the wall while the spanwise motions under ul < 0 decrease as the flows come close to each other. Due to the strong dispersive motion, the small-scale spanwise velocity fluctuations (ws) are strengthened, whereas ws are relatively weak (attenuated) under ul < 0 . As a result, the wall-normal components are also enhanced under ul > 0 , which contributes to the amplification of λx. This work was supported by the Creative Research Initiatives (No. 2016-004749) program of the National Research Foundation of Korea (MSIP) and partially supported by KISTI under the Strategic Supercomputing Support Program.

  9. [Abdominal actinomycosis with IUD].

    PubMed

    Kamprath, S; Merker, A; Kühne-Heid, R; Schneider, A

    1997-01-01

    We report a case of abdominal actinomycosis in a 54 year old woman using an intrauterine device for a period of 8 years. The most important finding was a tuboovarialabscess at the left pelvic side with involvement of the serosa of the jejunum, ileum, sigma, and omentum majus. Intraoperative exploration showed a solid retroperitoneal infiltration between the pelvic side wall and sigma. Another infiltration was found on the left side of the abdominal wall. The diagnosis was confirmed by histopathological examination and the patient was treated by a combination of Aminopenicillin and Metronidazol. After a period of three months we observed a complete regression of the clinical and the MRI findings.

  10. Domain Wall Motion Across Various Grain Boundaries in Ferroelectric Thin Films

    SciTech Connect

    Marincel, Daniel M.; Zhang, Huairuo; Jesse, Stephen; Belianinov, Alex; Okatan, Mahmut B.; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Rainforth, W. Mark; Reaney, Ian M.; Randall, Clive A.; Trolier-McKinstry, Susan

    2015-03-21

    Domain wall movement at and near engineered 10°, 15°, and 24° tilt and 10° and 30° twist grain boundaries was measured by band excitation piezoresponse force microscopy for Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 films with Zr/Ti ratio of 45/55 and 52/48. A minimum in nonlinear response was observed at the grain boundary for the highest angle twist and tilt grain boundaries, while a maximum in nonlinear response was observed at the 10° tilt grain boundaries. Lastly, the observed nonlinear response was correlated to the domain structure imaged in cross section by transmission electron microscopy.

  11. Domain Wall Motion Across Various Grain Boundaries in Ferroelectric Thin Films

    DOE PAGES

    Marincel, Daniel M.; Zhang, Huairuo; Jesse, Stephen; ...

    2015-03-21

    Domain wall movement at and near engineered 10°, 15°, and 24° tilt and 10° and 30° twist grain boundaries was measured by band excitation piezoresponse force microscopy for Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 films with Zr/Ti ratio of 45/55 and 52/48. A minimum in nonlinear response was observed at the grain boundary for the highest angle twist and tilt grain boundaries, while a maximum in nonlinear response was observed at the 10° tilt grain boundaries. Lastly, the observed nonlinear response was correlated to the domain structure imaged in cross section by transmission electron microscopy.

  12. BOTULINUM TOXIN A INDUCED PARALYSIS OF THE LATERAL ABDOMINAL WALL AFTER DAMAGE CONTROL LAPAROTOMY: A MULTIINSTITUTIONAL, PROSPECTIVE, RANDOMIZED, PLACEBO CONTROLLED PILOT STUDY

    PubMed Central

    Zielinski, Martin D.; Kuntz, Melissa; Zhang, Xiaoming; Zagar, Abigail E.; Khasawneh, Mohammad A.; Zendejas, Benjamin; Polites, Stephanie F.; Ferrara, Michael; Harmsen, William S.; Ballman, Karla S.; Park, Myung S.; Schiller, Henry J.; Dries, David; Jenkins, Donald H.

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Damage control laparotomy (DCL) is a life-saving operation used in critically ill patients; however, interval primary fascial closure remains a challenge. We hypothesized that flaccid paralysis of the lateral abdominal wall musculature induced by Botulinum Toxin A (BTX), would improve of rates of primary fascial closure, decrease duration of hospital stay (LOS), and enhance pain control. METHODS Consenting adults who had undergone a DCL at two institutions were prospectively randomized to receive ultrasound-guided injections of their external oblique, internal oblique, and transversus abdominus muscles with either BTX (150cc, 2units/cc) or placebo (150cc 0.9%NaCl). Patients were excluded if they had a BMI>50, remained unstable or coagulopathic, were home O2 dependent or had an existing neuromuscular disorder. Outcomes were assessed in a double-blinded manner. Univariate and Kaplan Meier estimates of cumulative probability of abdominal closure were performed. RESULTS We randomized 46 patients (24 BTX, 22 placebo). There were no significant differences in demographics, comorbidities, and physiological status. Injections were performed on average 1.8 ± 2.8 days after DCL (range 0-14). The 10-day cumulative probability of primary fascial closure was similar between groups: 96% for BTX (95% CI 72%-99%) and 93% for placebo (95% CI 61%-99%); HR =1.0 (95% CI 0.5-1.8). No difference between BTX and placebo groups was observed for LOS (37 vs 26 days, p=0.30) or intensive care unit stay (17 vs 11 days, p=0.27). There was no difference in median morphine equivalents following DCL. The overall complication rate was similar (63% vs 68%, p=0.69), with 2 deaths in the placebo group and 0 in the BTX group. No BTX or injection procedure complications were observed. CONCLUSION Use of BTX after DCL was safe but did not appear to affect primary fascial closure, LOS, or pain modulation after DCL. Given higher than expected rates of primary fascial closure, type II error

  13. The contribution of 180° domain wall motion to dielectric properties quantified from in situ X-ray diffraction

    DOE PAGES

    Fancher, C. M.; Brewer, S.; Chung, C. C.; ...

    2016-12-27

    Here, the contribution of 180° domain wall motion to polarization and dielectric properties of ferroelectric materials has yet to be determined experimentally. In this paper, an approach for estimating the extent of (180°) domain reversal during application of electric fields is presented. We demonstrate this method by determining the contribution of domain reversal to polarization in soft lead zirconate titanate during application of strong electric fields. At the maximum applied field, domain reversal was determined to account for >80% of the measured macroscopic polarization. We also apply the method to quantify the contribution of domain reversal to the weak-field dielectricmore » permittivity of BaTiO3. The results of this analysis determined that domain reversal accounts for up to ~70% of the macroscopic dielectric permittivity in BaTiO3. These results demonstrate the predominance of domain reversal to high and low-field dielectric response in ferroelectric polycrystalline materials.« less

  14. Clinical utility of a multigated modified anterior projection in the detection of left ventricular inferior and apical wall motion abnormalities

    SciTech Connect

    Polak, J.F.; Bianco, J.A.; Kemper, A.J.; Tow, D.E.

    1982-04-01

    Recent evidence indicates that the left anterior oblique projection (LAO) multigated radionuclide ventriculogram (RVG) underestimates presence and extent of apical and inferior left ventricular (LV) wall motion abnormalities. We investigated, prospectively, the sensitivity and specificity of a modified anterior projection (MAP), which incorporates cephalad tilting. Thirty-three consecutive patients undergoing cardiac catheterization suspected to have coronary artery disease were studied with RVG, using both the MAP and LAO views. LAO views were analyzed using the ejection fraction image (REFI), and the regional ejection fraction (REF) of the inferoapical region. The MAP studies were analyzed using stroke volume image (SVI) to evaluate apical and inferior LV regions. Results were as follows: (Formula: see text), Both intraobserver and interobserver variabilities were comparable to those of conventional angiographic studies used in detection of apical and inferior asynergy. It is concluded that the multigated MAP offers additional information about abnormalities of the LV inferior and apical regions.

  15. Electromechanical actuation with controllable motion based on a single-walled carbon nanotube and natural biopolymer composite.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ying; Chen, Wei; Lu, Luhua; Liu, Jinghai; Chang, Chunrui

    2010-06-22

    This paper reports novel electromechanical behavior for a natural biopolymer film due to the incorporation of a conductive carbon nanotube network. Through simple solution blending and casting, high weight fraction single-walled carbon nanotube-chitosan composite films were fabricated and exhibited electromechanical actuation properties with motion controlled by low alternating voltage stimuli in atmospheric conditions. Of particular interest and importance is that the displacement output imitated perfectly the electrical input signal in terms of frequency (<10 Hz) and waveform. Operational reliability was confirmed by stable vibration testing in air for more than 3000 cycles. Proposed electrothermal mechanism considering the alternating current-induced periodic thermal expansion and contraction of the composite film was discussed. The unique actuation performance of the carbon nanotube-biopolymer composite, coupled with ease of fabrication, low driven voltage, tunable vibration, reliable operation, and good biocompatibility, shows great possibility for implementation of dry actuators in artificial muscle and microsystems for biomimetic applications.

  16. Analytic expression for the temperature of the current-heated nanowire for the current-induced domain wall motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Chun-Yeol; Sung, In Mo; Joe, Byung-Kyu

    2006-11-01

    The authors find a simple analytic expression for the temperature of Joule heated nanowire by current pulse, which is important in the study of the current induced domain wall motion. Since the effect of spin transfer torque depends on the thermal energy of the system, the temperature of the nanowire is a vital information. Even though the numerical solution of the heat conduction equation is well established, not only does it require a lot of numerical effort, but neither does it give any physical insight. With appropriate assumptions and Green's function method, the author derive a simple expression for the temperature of the nanowire as a function of the current density, sample geometry, and thermal properties of the substrate. The authors confirm the validity of their analytic expression by the comparison between the results of a simple expression and a commercial finite element method.

  17. Small-scale deflagration cylinder test with velocimetry wall-motion diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Hooks, Daniel E; Hill, Larry G; Pierce, Timothy H

    2010-01-01

    Predicting the likelihood and effects of outcomes resultant from thermal initiation of explosives remains a significant challenge. For certain explosive formulations, the general outcome can be broadly predicted given knowledge of certain conditions. However, there remain unexplained violent events, and increased statistical understanding of outcomes as a function of many variables, or 'violence categorization,' is needed. Additionally, the development of an equation of state equivalent for deflagration would be very useful in predicting possible detailed event consequences using traditional hydrodynamic detonation moders. For violence categorization, it is desirable that testing be efficient, such that it is possible to statistically define outcomes reliant on the processes of initiation of deflagration, steady state deflagration, and deflagration to detonation transitions. If the test simultaneously acquires information to inform models of violent deflagration events, overall predictive capabilities for event likelihood and consequence might improve remarkably. In this paper we describe an economical scaled deflagration cylinder test. The cyclotetramethylene tetranitramine (HMX) based explosive formu1lation PBX 9501 was tested using different temperature profiles in a thick-walled copper cylindrical confiner. This test is a scaled version of a recently demonstrated deflagration cylinder test, and is similar to several other thermal explosion tests. The primary difference is the passive velocimetry diagnostic, which enables measurement of confinement vessel wall velocities at failure, regardless of the timing and location of ignition.

  18. Field-induced domain wall motion of amorphous [CoSiB/Pt]{sub N} multilayers with perpendicular anisotropy

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Y. H.; Lee, K. J.; Jung, M. H.; Yoon, J. B.; Cho, J. H.; You, C.-Y.; Kim, T. W.

    2014-05-14

    Amorphous CoSiB/Pt multilayer is a perpendicular magnetic anisotropy material to achieve high squareness, low coercivity, strong anisotropy, and smooth domain wall (DW) motion, because of the smoother interface compared with crystalline multilayers. For [CoSiB(6 Å)/Pt (14 Å)]{sub N} multilayers with N = 3, 6, and 9, we studied the field-induced DW dynamics. The effective anisotropy constant K{sub 1}{sup eff} is 1.5 × 10{sup 6} erg/cm{sup 3} for all the N values, and the linear increment of coercive field H{sub c} with N gives constant exchange coupling J. By analyzing the field dependence of DW images at room temperature, a clear creep motion with the exponent μ = 1/4 could be observed. Even though the pinning field H{sub dep} slightly increases with N, the pinning potential energy U{sub c} is constant (=35 k{sub B}T) for all the N values. These results imply that the amorphous [CoSiB/Pt]{sub N} multilayers are inherently homogeneous compared to crystalline multilayers. For N ≤ 6, the pinning site density ρ{sub pin} is less than 1000/μm{sup 2}, which is about 1 pinning site per the typical device junction size of 30 × 30 nm{sup 2}. Also, the exchange stiffness constant A{sub ex} is obtained to be 0.48 × 10{sup −6} erg/cm, and the domain wall width is expected to be smaller than 5.5 nm. These results may be applicable for spin-transfer-torque magnetic random access memory and DW logic device applications.

  19. Domain wall motion in ferromagnetically and antiferromagnetically coupled nanowires (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuteifan, Majd; Fu, Sidi; Mangin, Stephane; Fullerton, Eric E.; Lomakin, Vitaliy

    2016-10-01

    demonstrate that the DW velocity can be significantly increased in antiferomagnetically coupled nanowires. The DW velocity increase is related to the exchange fields and reduction or elimination of the magnetostatic effects, which lead to reduction or elimination of the Walker breakdown. In addition, the reduction of the magnetostatic effects results in the reduction of the effects due to the pinning sites and disorder present in most nanomagnetic systems. The reduction of the pinning site and disorder effects further leads to a steadier DW motion. The study includes an analytical model for explaining how and why the Walker breakdown is overcome as well as numerical study supporting the analytical model and providing insights into the effects of the material and structural disorder. The numerical study is based on micromagnetic simulations solving the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation with continuous spin transfer torque components. The parameter space considered in the models and simulations includes the material properties, various types of disorder, and the exchange coupling in coupled systems. In addition, we discuss various aspects associated with modeling the DW motion in thin nanowires with disorder, including simulation speed, numerical stability, and the simulation model creation.

  20. Characteristic dynamic modes and domain-wall motion in magnetic nanotubes excited by resonant rotating magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jaehak; Kim, Junhoe; Kim, Bosung; Cho, Young-Jun; Lee, Jae-Hyeok; Kim, Sang-Koog

    2016-07-01

    We performed micromagnetic numerical calculations to explore a cylindrical nanotube's magnetization dynamics and domain-wall (DW) motions driven by eigen-circular-rotating magnetic fields of different frequencies. We discovered the presence of two different localized DW oscillations as well as asymmetric ferromagnetic resonance precession and azimuthal spin-wave modes at the corresponding resonant frequencies of the circular-rotating fields. Associated with these intrinsic modes, there exist very contrasting DW motions of different speed and propagation direction for a given DW chirality. The direction and speed of the DW propagation were found to be controllable according to the rotation sense and frequency of noncontact circular-rotating fields. Furthermore, spin-wave emissions from the moving DW were observed at a specific field frequency along with their Doppler effect. This work furthers the fundamental understanding of soft magnetic nanotubes' intrinsic dynamic modes and spin-wave emissions and offers an efficient means of manipulating the speed and direction of their DW propagations.

  1. Comparison of Kalman-filter-based approaches for block matching in arterial wall motion analysis from B-mode ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gastounioti, A.; Golemati, S.; Stoitsis, J.; Nikita, K. S.

    2011-11-01

    Block matching (BM) has been previously used to estimate motion of the carotid artery from B-mode ultrasound image sequences. In this paper, Kalman filtering (KF) was incorporated in this conventional method in two distinct scenarios: (a) as an adaptive strategy, by renewing the reference block and (b) by renewing the displacements estimated by BM or adaptive BM. All methods resulting from combinations of BM and KF with the two scenarios were evaluated on synthetic image sequences by computing the warping index, defined as the mean squared error between the real and estimated displacements. Adaptive BM, followed by an update through the second scenario at the end of tracking, ABM_KF-K2, minimized the warping index and yielded average displacement error reductions of 24% with respect to BM. The same method decreased estimation bias and jitter over varying center frequencies by 30% and 64%, respectively, with respect to BM. These results demonstrated the increased accuracy and robustness of ABM_KF-K2 in motion tracking of the arterial wall from B-mode ultrasound images, which is crucial in the study of mechanical properties of normal and diseased arterial segments.

  2. Analysis of Peristaltic Motion of a Nanofluid with Wall Shear Stress, Microrotation, and Thermal Radiation Effects

    PubMed Central

    Dhanapal, C.; Kamalakkannan, J.; Prakash, J.

    2016-01-01

    This paper analyzes the peristaltic flow of an incompressible micropolar nanofluid in a tapered asymmetric channel in the presence of thermal radiation and heat sources parameters. The rotation of the nanoparticles is incorporated in the flow model. The equations governing the nanofluid flow are modeled and exact solutions are managed under long wavelength and flow Reynolds number and long wavelength approximations. Explicit expressions of axial velocity, stream function, microrotation, nanoparticle temperature, and concentration have been derived. The phenomena of shear stress and trapping have also been discussed. Finally, the influences of various parameters of interest on flow variables have been discussed numerically and explained graphically. Besides, the results obtained in this paper will be helpful to those who are working on the development of various realms like fluid mechanics, the rotation, Brownian motion, thermophoresis, coupling number, micropolar parameter, and the nondimensional geometry parameters. PMID:27688703

  3. A population-level analysis of abdominal wall reconstruction by component separation in the morbidly obese patient: can it be performed safely?

    PubMed

    Nelson, Jonas A; Fischer, John P; Wink, Jason D; Kovach, Stephen J

    2014-10-01

    Morbid obesity is increasing at an alarming rate and a significant portion of patients presenting for complex abdominal wall reconstruction (AWR) and component separation fall into this category, creating added medical and surgical challenges to an already difficult operation. The goal of this study was to utilise the Nationwide 2005-2010 American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement database (ACS-NSQIP) to perform a population level analysis of the role of morbid obesity on 30-day perioperative morbidity with the hope of improving patient care, counselling and risk stratification. Morbidly obese patients (BMI > 40 kg/m(2)) were compared to non-obese patients (BMI < 30 kg/m(2)). Outcome variables assessed included major surgical complications, major medical complications, major renal complications, major wound complications, return to OR (ROR), and venous thromboembolism (VTE). Significant variables in a univariate analysis were included in a multivariate logistic regression controlling for patient characteristics (p < 0.05). In total, 1695 patients undergoing AWR were identified in the ACS-NSQIP database. Of these, 614 patients were non-obese (average BMI = 25.7 ± 3.0 kg/m(2)) and 314 were morbidly obese (average BMI = 45.9 ± 5.8 kg/m(2)). Multivariate analyses determined that morbid obesity did not significantly contribute to major surgical, medical, renal or wound complications. However, it was significantly associated with ROR (OR = 2.8, p < 0.001) and VTE (OR = 5.2, p = 0.04). Morbid obesity is an independent risk factor for ROR and VTE related complications, in the 30 day post-operative period. Additional perioperative care is warranted to decrease such early re-operations and for preventable complications.

  4. Effect of a pinning field on the critical current density for current-induced domain wall motion in perpendicular magnetic anisotropy nanowires.

    PubMed

    Ooba, Ayaka; Fujimura, Yuma; Takahashi, Kota; Komine, Takashi; Sugita, Ryuji

    2012-09-01

    In this study, the effect of a pinning field on the critical current density for current-induced domain wall motion in nanowires with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy was investigated using micromagnetic simulations. In order to estimate the pinning field in notched nanowires, we conducted wall energy calculations for nanowires with various saturation magnetizations. The pinning field increased as the notch size increased. The pinning field decreased as the saturation magnetization decreased. As a result, the decreased in the pinning field causes the reduction of the critical current density. Therefore, a significant reduction of the critical current density can be obtained by decreasing the saturation magnetization, even if wall pinning occurs.

  5. Abdominal ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... Kidney - blood and urine flow Abdominal ultrasound References Chen L. Abdominal ultrasound imaging. In: Sahani DV, Samir ... the Health on the Net Foundation (www.hon.ch). The information provided herein should not be used ...

  6. Abdominal tap

    MedlinePlus

    ... tap; Cirrhosis - abdominal tap; Malignant ascites - abdominal tap Images Digestive system Peritoneal sample References Garcia-Tiso G. ... urac.org). URAC's accreditation program is an independent audit to verify that A.D.A.M. follows ...

  7. Bubble Formation on a Wall in Cross-Flowing Liquid and Surrounding Fluid Motion,With and Without Heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhunia, Avijit; Kamotani, Yasuhiro; Nahra, Henry K.

    2000-01-01

    Application of gas-liquid two-phase flow systems for space-based thermal management and for the HEDS program demands a precise control of bubble size distribution in liquid. The necessity of bulk liquid motion for controlling bubble size and frequency in the space environment has been suggested by recent studies on pool, forced convection boiling and bubble formation in flowing liquid. The present work, consisting of two parts, explores bubble generation at wall in a cross-flowing liquid, i.e., in a forced convection boiling configuration. A schematic is shown. The first part looks into the bubble formation process under isothermal conditions in a reduced gravity environment, by injecting gas through a hole in the wall of a flowing liquid channel. In the latter part with channel wall heating, flow and temperature fields near a single bubble are studied under normal (1-g) and micro-gravity (mu-g) conditions. The objective of the isothermal experiments is to experimentally investigate the effects of liquid cross-flow velocity, gas flow rate, and orifice diameter on bubble formation. Data were taken mainly under reduced gravity conditions but some data were taken in normal gravity for comparison. The reduced gravity experiment was conducted aboard the NASA DC-9 Reduced Gravity Aircraft. The results show that the process of bubble formation and detachment depends on gravity, the orifice diameter (D(sub N)), the gas flow rate (Q(sub g)), and the liquid cross-flow velocity (U(sub L)). The reduced gravity data are shown. The data are analyzed based on a force balance, and two different detachment mechanisms are identified. When the gas momentum is large, the bubble detaches from the injection orifice as the gas momentum overcomes the attaching effects of liquid drag and inertia. The surface tension force is much reduced because a large part of the bubble pinning edge at the orifice is lost as the bubble axis is tilted by the liquid flow. When the gas momentum is small

  8. [Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Ziaja, K; Sedlak, L; Urbanek, T; Kostyra, J; Ludyga, T

    2000-01-01

    The reported incidence of inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm (IAAA) is from 2% to 14% of patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm and the etiology of this disease is still discussed--according to the literature several pathogenic theories have been proposed. From 1992 to 1997 32 patients with IAAA were operated on. The patients were mostly symptomatic--abdominal pain was present in 68.75% cases, back pain in 31.25%, fever in 12.5% and weight loss in 6.25% of the operated patients. In all the patients ultrasound examination was performed, in 4 patients CT and in 3 cases urography. All the patients were operated on and characteristic signs of inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm like: thickened aortic wall, perianeurysmal infiltration or retroperitoneal fibrosis with involvement of retroperitoneal structures were found. In all cases surgery was performed using transperitoneal approach; in three cases intraoperatively contiguous abdominal organs were injured, which was connected with their involvement into periaortic inflammation. In 4 cases clamping of the aorta was done at the level of the diaphragmatic hiatus. 3 patients (9.37%) died (one patient with ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm). Authors present diagnostic procedures and the differences in the surgical tactic, emphasizing the necessity of the surgical therapy in patients with inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm.

  9. Voltage Control of Domain Wall Motion in Perpendicular Magnetic Anisotropy Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Uwe; Emori, Satoru; Beach, Geoffrey S. D.

    2013-03-01

    High-performance solid-state operation of a wide variety of spintronic devices requires efficient electrical control of domain walls (DWs). In this work we examine DW dynamics in ultrathin Co films under the influence of an electric field applied across a gadolinium oxide gate dielectric. By measuring the velocity scaling with temperature, driving field, and gate voltage, we verify domain expansion via thermally-activated creep dynamics. We show that an electric field linearly modulates the activation energy barrier EA that governs DW creep, leading to an exponential dependence of DW velocity on gate voltage. As a consequence, significant voltage-induced velocity enhancement can be achieved in the low-velocity regime, but the efficiency is diminished at high velocities where EA is correspondingly small. We overcome this limitation by engineering novel device structures with significantly larger voltage induced effects on magnetic anisotropy and demonstrate voltage modulation of the DW propagation field by hundreds of Oe. Implementation into magnetic nanowire devices allows us to engineer gate voltage controlled DW traps which are nonvolatile and robustly switchable for many cycles. This work is supported by the National Science Foundation through grant ECCS-1128439

  10. Soliton of Bose-Einstein condensate in a trap with rapidly oscillating walls: I. Multiscale method and analysis of soliton motion in the limit of extremely fast wall oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veretenov, N. A.; Vysotina, N. V.; Nesterov, L. A.; Rosanov, N. N.

    2015-11-01

    Motion of a soliton of Bose-Einstein condensate of atoms captured by a trap with rapidly oscillating walls has been studied. This motion can be described using both the Gross-Pitaevskii equation for a condensate wave function and an approximate equation in the form of the Newton equation for the soliton center coordinate. An analytical approach for solving the Newton equation has been developed. This approach is based on the multiscale method where the solution is sought for in the form of small-parameter expansion. This parameter is a ratio of the frequency of intrinsic slow soliton oscillations around the equilibrium position to the frequency of fast oscillations of the trap walls. In the first part of the study, an approach based on two time scales is described and the case of extremely fast wall oscillations is investigated. The calculation performed within the zero approximation shows a very good coincidence with the numerical solution of the Newton equation with respect to all parameters. A good agreement with the numerical solutions of the Gross-Pitaevskii equation is also demonstrated for calculations of the parameters such as oscillation frequency and shift of the soliton equilibrium position under the action of the wall motion. In the second part, the role of corrections to the obtained solution is analyzed for a decreasing wall-oscillation frequency and the range of applicability of the used analytical approach is discussed.

  11. Motion of a particle near a rough wall in a viscous shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charru, F.; Larrieu, E.; Dupont, J.-B.; Zenit, R.

    The motion of a spherical particle along a rough bed in a simple shear viscous flow is studied experimentally for a wide range of parameters, varying the particle size and density, the fluid viscosity and the shear rate gamma. The instantaneous particle velocity is calculated in the stream, transverse and vertical directions, using a high-speed video imaging system. It is found that the normalized streamwise mean particle velocity U/U_S, where U_S is the Stokes settling velocity, depends only on the dimensionless shear rate mu gamma/(Delta rho g d), this relationship being independent of the particle Reynolds number {Re}_p. This result holds for small {Re}_p, which was the case in our experiments ({Re}_p {<} 10). The characteristic amplitude and frequency of the velocity fluctuations are also given and discussed. A model is then proposed for the mean streamwise velocity, based on ideas of Bagnold (Proc. R. Soc. Lond. A, vol. 332, 1973, p. 473) and calculations of Goldman et al. (Chem. Engng Sci., vol. 22, 1967b, p. 653) for the velocity of a particle close to a smooth plane. From this model an equivalent bed roughness and an effective friction coefficient are deduced.

  12. Abdominal Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... call your doctor. In Spanish— Dolor abdominal en niños menores de 12 años What is recurrent abdominal ... Functional abdominal pain (FAP) typically affects kids ages 4-12, and is quite common, affecting up to ...

  13. A prospective, controlled evaluation of the abdominal reapproximation anchor abdominal wall closure system in combination with VAC therapy compared with VAC alone in the management of an open abdomen.

    PubMed

    Long, Kristin L; Hamilton, David A; Davenport, Daniel L; Bernard, Andrew C; Kearney, Paul A; Chang, Phillip K

    2014-06-01

    Dramatic increases in damage control and decompressive laparotomies and a significant increase in patients with open abdominal cavities have resulted in numerous techniques to facilitate fascial closure. We hypothesized addition of the abdominal reapproximation anchor system (ABRA) to the KCI Abdominal Wound Vac™ (VAC) or KCI ABThera™ would increase successful primary closure rates and reduce operative costs. Fourteen patients with open abdomens were prospectively randomized into a control group using VAC alone (control) or a study group using VAC plus ABRA (VAC-ABRA). All patients underwent regular VAC changes; patients receiving VAC-ABRA also underwent concomitant daily elastomer adjustment of the ABRA system. Primary end points included abdominal closure, number of operating room (OR) visits, and OR time use. Eight patients were included in the VAC-ABRA group and six patients in the control group. Primary closure rates between groups were not statistically different; however, the number of trips to the OR and OR time use were different. Despite higher Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II scores, larger starting wound size, and higher rates of abdominal compartment syndrome, closure rates in the VAC-ABRA group were similar to VAC alone. Importantly, however, fewer OR trips and less OR time were required for the VAC-ABRA group.

  14. Effects of mannequin and walk-by motion on flow and spillage characteristics of wall-mounted and jet-isolated range hoods.

    PubMed

    Huang, Rong Fung; Dai, Guan-Zhong; Chen, Jia-Kun

    2010-08-01

    Laser-assisted flow-visualization experiments and tracer gas concentration tests were conducted for the wall-mounted and jet-isolated range hoods to examine the physical mechanisms and relative magnitudes of hood spillages. The effects of a mannequin standing in front of the test rig and walk-by motions (which are situations always encountered in kitchens) were emphasized. The results showed that a mannequin (or a cook) standing in front of the counter would attract oil fumes toward the mannequin's body, induce large turbulent flows, and cause a significant dispersion of oil fumes into the environment through the front edge of the hood. Very high tracer gas concentrations were detected around the breathing zone of the mannequin. Increasing the suction flow rate did not reduce the spillage levels of the wall-mounted range hood but could moderately lower those of the jet-isolated hood. Serious spillages from both the wall-mounted and jet-isolated range hoods were detected as the simulated walk-by motion was performed. The jet-isolated range hood presented a much lower robustness in resisting the influence of people's walk-bys than did the wall-mounted range hood. In summary, both the wall-mounted and jet-isolated range hoods were vulnerable to the influences of a cook's presence and a cook's walk-by motions. Increasing the suction flow rate might not obtain satisfactorily low spillages of pollutants but might increase noise level and energy consumption.

  15. An in situ diffraction study of domain wall motion contributions to the frequency dispersion of the piezoelectric coefficient in lead zirconate titanate

    SciTech Connect

    Seshadri, Shruti B.; Prewitt, Anderson D.; Jones, Jacob L.; Studer, Andrew J.; Damjanovic, Dragan

    2013-01-28

    The contribution of non-180 Degree-Sign domain wall displacement to the frequency dependence of the longitudinal piezoelectric coefficient has been determined experimentally in lead zirconate titanate using time-resolved, in situ neutron diffraction. Under subcoercive electric fields of low frequencies, approximately 3% to 4% of the volume fraction of non-180 Degree-Sign domains parallel to the field experienced polarization reorientation. This subtle non-180 Degree-Sign domain wall motion directly contributes to 64% to 75% of the magnitude of the piezoelectric coefficient. Moreover, part of the 33 pm/V decrease in piezoelectric coefficient across 2 orders of magnitude in frequency is quantitatively attributed to non-180 Degree-Sign domain wall motion effects.

  16. [Abdominal approaches and drainages of the abdominal cavity].

    PubMed

    Hagel, C; Schilling, M

    2006-04-01

    Appropriate access to the abdominal cavity is the first and crucial step for successful abdominal surgical intervention. In planning the incision, several variables have to be considered, such as anatomy of the abdominal wall, localization of the target organ, and individual conditions (previous incisions, minimal access surgery, etc). Medial laparotomy is the preferred incision for emergency cases and ill-defined pathologies, allowing access and hence exploration to all quadrants. Transverse laparotomies give superior access to the dorsal and right aspects of the liver and cause less pain in patients unfit for regional anesthetic procedures. Draining of the abdominal cavity is used after various resective and reconstructive procedures, but there is little evidence for its use in a number of operations such as gastric, hepatic, and colorectal resections. Advantages and disadvantages of different abdominal wall incisions and drainages are discussed.

  17. Detection of postischemic regional left ventricular delayed outward wall motion or diastolic stunning after exercise-induced ischemia in patients with stable effort angina by using color kinesis.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Katsuhisa; Miwa, Kunihisa; Sakurai, Takahiro; Kataoka, Kazuaki; Imai, Makoto; Kintaka, Aya; Aoyama, Takeshi; Kawanami, Masaki

    2008-04-01

    To determine whether postischemic diastolic stunning could be detected using color kinesis, we evaluated regional left ventricular (LV) diastolic wall motion in 36 patients with stable effort angina and a coronary stenosis (> or = 70% of luminal diameter), and in 30 control subjects. Regional LV filling fraction in the short-axis view during the first 30% of the LV filling time (color kinesis diastolic index) was determined before, 20 minutes, 1 hour, and 24 hours after the treadmill exercise test. In 33 of the 36 patients (92%), new regional LV delayed outward motion during early diastole (color kinesis diastolic index < or = 40%) was detected at 20 minutes after exercise. The regional LV delayed diastolic wall motion showed significant improvement but persisted 1 hour afterward in 20 of 36 patients (56%), and disappeared 24 hours after exercise. Detection of regional stunned myocardium with impaired diastolic function may be a useful tool for the diagnosis of coronary artery disease.

  18. A novel approach to simulate chest wall micro-motion for bio-radar life detection purpose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Qiang; Li, Zhao; Liang, Fulai; Chen, Fuming; Wang, Jianqi

    2016-10-01

    Volunteers are often recruited to serve as the detection targets during the research process of bio-radar life detection technology, in which the experiment results are highly susceptible to the physical status of different individuals (shape, posture, etc.). In order to objectively evaluate the radar system performance and life detection algorithms, a standard detection target is urgently needed. The paper first proposed a parameter quantitatively controllable system to simulate the chest wall micro-motion caused mainly by breathing and heart beating. Then, the paper continued to analyze the material and size selection of the scattering body mounted on the simulation system from the perspective of back scattering energy. The computational electromagnetic method was employed to determine the exact scattering body. Finally, on-site experiments were carried out to verify the reliability of the simulation platform utilizing an IR UWB bioradar. Experimental result shows that the proposed system can simulate a real human target from three aspects: respiration frequency, amplitude and body surface scattering energy. Thus, it can be utilized as a substitute for a human target in radar based non-contact life detection research in various scenarios.

  19. Early Indium-111 antimyosin scintigraphy for assessment of regional wall motion asynergy on discharge after myocardial infarction

    SciTech Connect

    van Vlies, B.; Baas, J.; Visser, C.A.; van Royen, E.; Delemarre, B.J.; Bot, H.; Dunning, A.J. )

    1990-01-01

    To assess the relation between early Indium-111 monoclonal antimyosin antibody scintigraphy and degree of regional asynergy on discharge, 38 patients with a first acute myocardial infarct were studied (18 anterior, 20 inferoposterior infarctions). In 21 patients thrombolytic therapy was administered. On the first day of myocardial infarction, 80 MBq Indium-111 Antimyosin was injected. Planar images, anterior, lateral and left anterior oblique, were made 24 hours later. Localized myocardial uptake was present in 37/38 patients, and was evaluated for Count Density Index (count density of infarct zone/left lung count density) in the left anterior oblique images, which displayed the infarct zone well. Regional asynergy on discharge was evaluated by cross-sectional echocardiography and defined mild (hypokinesia) or severe (akinesia or dyskinesia). Count density index was significantly lower in 15 patients with mild asynergy, compared with 22 patients with severe asynergy (1.61 +/- 0.25 vs. 2.42 +/- 0.40, p less than 0.001). This difference was present in both patient groups treated with or without thrombolysis. We conclude that early count density index, reflecting the amount of local necrosis, is highly correlated to the ultimate degree of wall motion impairment.

  20. Usefulness of color kinesis imaging for evaluation of regional right ventricular wall motion in patients with surgically repaired tetralogy of Fallot.

    PubMed

    Hayabuchi, Y; Matsuoka, S; Kubo, M; Kuroda, Y

    1998-11-15

    We evaluated regional right ventricular wall motion during systole in patients with surgically repaired tetralogy of Fallot (TOF) using color kinesis imaging. Color kinesis images were obtained in a subcostal sagittal view from 19 patients with repaired TOF (TOF group), aged 3 to 5 years, and 20 age-matched normal subjects (control group). For regional wall motion analysis, the endocardial motion distance and the fractional area change (FAC) were calculated for 6 segments obtained from color kinesis images. The endocardial inward excursion distances and the FACs in the upper, middle, and lower posterior segments of the TOF group were significantly greater than those of the control group (p <0.01 for each segment). The upper anterior segment showed significantly reduced inward excursion distance and FAC in the TOF group than in the control group (p <0.01, both). The dyskinetic outward excursion distances of the middle and lower posterior segments were significantly lower in the TOF group than in the control group (p <0.01, both). In the upper and middle anterior segments, the endocardial outward excursion distances were significantly higher in the TOF group than in the control group (p <0.01 and 0.05). Correlation between right ventriculographic and color kinesis measurements was excellent (y = 1.14x - 1.30, r = 0.87 for the endocardial inward excursion, and y = 1.03x +/- 0.56, r = 0.91 for the FAC). In conclusion, color kinesis is a useful method for assessing regional right ventricular wall motion. Segmental analysis of color kinesis images provides accurate, automated, and quantitative diagnosis of regional right ventricular wall motion abnormalities in patients with surgically repaired TOF.

  1. [Abdominal paracentesis].

    PubMed

    Glauser, Frédéric; Barras, Anne-Catherine; Pache, Isabelle; Monti, Matteo

    2008-10-29

    Abdominal paracentesis is frequently performed in the clinical setting. Every newly developed ascites need to be investigated by abdominal paracentesis. Any clinical or biological deterioration in patients with chronic ascites also requires a new paracentesis. Therapeutically abdominal paracentesis is performed for refractory or symptomatic ascites. As other invasive procedures, it is critical to master its indications, contra-indications and complications. The aim of this article is to review the basics of abdominal paracentesis in order to help physicians to carry out this technical skill.

  2. Controlling magnetic domain wall motion in the creep regime in He{sup +}-irradiated CoFeB/MgO films with perpendicular anisotropy

    SciTech Connect

    Herrera Diez, L. García-Sánchez, F.; Adam, J.-P.; Devolder, T.; Eimer, S.; El Hadri, M. S.; Ravelosona, D.; Lamperti, A.; Mantovan, R.; Ocker, B.

    2015-07-20

    This study presents the effective tuning of perpendicular magnetic anisotropy in CoFeB/MgO thin films by He{sup +} ion irradiation and its effect on domain wall motion in a low field regime. Magnetic anisotropy and saturation magnetisation are found to decrease as a function of the irradiation dose which can be related to the observed irradiation-induced changes in stoichiometry at the CoFeB/MgO interface. These changes in the magnetic intrinsic properties of the film are reflected in the domain wall dynamics at low magnetic fields (H) where irradiation is found to induce a significant decrease in domain wall velocity (v). For all irradiation doses, domain wall velocities at low fields are well described by a creep law, where Ln(v) vs. H{sup −1∕4} behaves linearly, up to a maximum field H*, which has been considered as an approximation to the value of the depinning field H{sub dep}. In turn, H* ≈ H{sub dep} is seen to increase as a function of the irradiation dose, indicating an irradiation-induced extension of the creep regime of domain wall motion.

  3. Carotid artery wall motion analysis from B-mode ultrasound using adaptive block matching: in silico evaluation and in vivo application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gastounioti, A.; Golemati, S.; Stoitsis, J. S.; Nikita, K. S.

    2013-12-01

    Valid risk stratification for carotid atherosclerotic plaques represents a crucial public health issue toward preventing fatal cerebrovascular events. Although motion analysis (MA) provides useful information about arterial wall dynamics, the identification of motion-based risk markers remains a significant challenge. Considering that the ability of a motion estimator (ME) to handle changes in the appearance of motion targets has a major effect on accuracy in MA, we investigated the potential of adaptive block matching (ABM) MEs, which consider changes in image intensities over time. To assure the validity in MA, we optimized and evaluated the ABM MEs in the context of a specially designed in silico framework. ABMFIRF2, which takes advantage of the periodicity characterizing the arterial wall motion, was the most effective ABM algorithm, yielding a 47% accuracy increase with respect to the conventional block matching. The in vivo application of ABMFIRF2 revealed five potential risk markers: low movement amplitude of the normal part of the wall adjacent to the plaques in the radial (RMAPWL) and longitudinal (LMAPWL) directions, high radial motion amplitude of the plaque top surface (RMAPTS), and high relative movement, expressed in terms of radial strain (RSIPL) and longitudinal shear strain (LSSIPL), between plaque top and bottom surfaces. The in vivo results were reproduced by OFLK(WLS) and ABMKF-K2, MEs previously proposed by the authors and with remarkable in silico performances, thereby reinforcing the clinical values of the markers and the potential of those MEs. Future in vivo studies will elucidate with confidence the full potential of the markers.

  4. Roles of the magnetic field and electric current in thermally activated domain wall motion in a submicrometer magnetic strip with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy.

    PubMed

    Emori, Satoru; Beach, Geoffrey S D

    2012-01-18

    We have experimentally studied micrometer-scale domain wall (DW) motion driven by a magnetic field and an electric current in a Co/Pt multilayer strip with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. The thermal activation energy for DW motion, along with its scaling with the driving field and current, has been extracted directly from the temperature dependence of the DW velocity. The injection of DC current resulted in an enhancement of the DW velocity independent of the current polarity, but produced no measurable change in the activation energy barrier. Through this analysis, the observed current-induced DW velocity enhancement can be entirely and unambiguously attributed to Joule heating.

  5. [Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Mikami, Y; Kyogoku, M

    1994-08-01

    Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm (IAAA) is a distinct clinicopathological entity, characterized by: (1) clinical presentation, such as back pain, weight loss, and increased ESR, (2) patchy and/or diffuse lymphoplasmacytic infiltration, and (3) marked periaortic fibrosis resulting in thickening of the aneurysmal wall and occasional retroperitoneal fibrosis. Its pathogenesis is unknown, but some authors support the theory that IAAA is a subtype of atherosclerotic abdominal aortic aneurysm because of close relationship between IAAA and atherosclerotic change. In this article, we describe clinical and histological features of IAAA on the basis of the literature and our review of 6 cases of IAAA, emphasizing the similarity and difference between IAAA and atherosclerotic abdominal aortic aneurysm. Our review supports that marked lamellar fibrosis completely replacing the media and adventitia, patchy lymphocytic infiltration (mostly B cells) and endarteritis obliterans are characteristic features of IAAA.

  6. Automated grading of left ventricular segmental wall motion by an artificial neural network using color kinesis images.

    PubMed

    Murta, L O; Ruiz, E E S; Pazin-Filho, A; Schmidt, A; Almeida-Filho, O C; Simões, M V; Marin-Neto, J A; Maciel, B C

    2006-01-01

    The present study describes an auxiliary tool in the diagnosis of left ventricular (LV) segmental wall motion (WM) abnormalities based on color-coded echocardiographic WM images. An artificial neural network (ANN) was developed and validated for grading LV segmental WM using data from color kinesis (CK) images, a technique developed to display the timing and magnitude of global and regional WM in real time. We evaluated 21 normal subjects and 20 patients with LVWM abnormalities revealed by two-dimensional echocardiography. CK images were obtained in two sets of viewing planes. A method was developed to analyze CK images, providing quantitation of fractional area change in each of the 16 LV segments. Two experienced observers analyzed LVWM from two-dimensional images and scored them as: 1) normal, 2) mild hypokinesia, 3) moderate hypokinesia, 4) severe hypokinesia, 5) akinesia, and 6) dyskinesia. Based on expert analysis of 10 normal subjects and 10 patients, we trained a multilayer perceptron ANN using a back-propagation algorithm to provide automated grading of LVWM, and this ANN was then tested in the remaining subjects. Excellent concordance between expert and ANN analysis was shown by ROC curve analysis, with measured area under the curve of 0.975. An excellent correlation was also obtained for global LV segmental WM index by expert and ANN analysis (R2 = 0.99). In conclusion, ANN showed high accuracy for automated semi-quantitative grading of WM based on CK images. This technique can be an important aid, improving diagnostic accuracy and reducing inter-observer variability in scoring segmental LVWM.

  7. Effects of aortic root motion on wall stress in the Marfan aorta before and after personalised aortic root support (PEARS) surgery.

    PubMed

    Singh, S D; Xu, X Y; Pepper, J R; Izgi, C; Treasure, T; Mohiaddin, R H

    2016-07-05

    Aortic root motion was previously identified as a risk factor for aortic dissection due to increased longitudinal stresses in the ascending aorta. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of aortic root motion on wall stress and strain in the ascending aorta and evaluate changes before and after implantation of personalised external aortic root support (PEARS). Finite element (FE) models of the aortic root and thoracic aorta were developed using patient-specific geometries reconstructed from pre- and post-PEARS cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) images in three Marfan patients. The wall and PEARS materials were assumed to be isotropic, incompressible and linearly elastic. A static load on the inner wall corresponding to the patients' pulse pressure was applied. Cardiovascular MR cine images were used to quantify aortic root motion, which was imposed at the aortic root boundary of the FE model, with zero-displacement constraints at the distal ends of the aortic branches and descending aorta. Measurements of the systolic downward motion of the aortic root revealed a significant reduction in the axial displacement in all three patients post-PEARS compared with its pre-PEARS counterparts. Higher longitudinal stresses were observed in the ascending aorta when compared with models without the root motion. Implantation of PEARS reduced the longitudinal stresses in the ascending aorta by up to 52%. In contrast, the circumferential stresses at the interface between the supported and unsupported aorta were increase by up to 82%. However, all peak stresses were less than half the known yield stress for the dilated thoracic aorta.

  8. Relationship of lower extremity alignment during the wall squat and single-leg jump: assessment of single-leg landing using three-dimensional motion analysis

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Manabu; Matsumoto, Takaaki; Ono, Susumu; Koseki, Hirohisa; Watarai, Koji

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between malalignment and lower-extremity injury and to determine the optimal dynamic alignment of the lower extremity with wall squats. [Subjects and Methods] Healthy individuals from one therapy school were enrolled and assigned to a wall squat normal or abnormal group based on their forms during wall squats. The abnormal group was found to be more prone to lower-extremity injury on three-dimensional motion analysis. Eight students from each group were randomly chosen for the study. The effects of single-leg landing movements were assessed using three-dimensional motion analysis. [Results] In the sagittal plane, significant flexion of the hip and knee joints occurred 0.02 and 0.04 seconds after initial foot contact with the ground in the normal and abnormal groups, respectively. In the frontal plane, significant adduction of the hip joint occurred at 0.07 seconds in the abnormal group. [Conclusion] The abnormal group tended to display later flexion of the hip and knee joints and narrower hip, knee, and ankle range of motion than the normal group, suggesting that dynamic alignment of the lower extremity in the abnormal group likely made them susceptible to injury. PMID:27390393

  9. Current-driven domain wall motion due to volume spin transfer torque in Co/Ni multilayer systems on Au underlayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Kwang-Su; Yang, See-Hun; Thomas, Luc; Parkin, Stuart

    2016-09-01

    We have studied the current-induced domain wall (CIDW) dynamics in perpendicularly magnetized Co/Ni multilayers deposited on Au underlayer, where the conventional spin transfer torque governs the domain wall dynamics, by the Kerr microscope. It is found that the DW angle tilting following Oersted field profile plays an important role in domain wall (DW) motion at high current density J by decreasing DW velocity with the increasing J, while distorting its DW morphology. Also we find that the DW pinning becomes pronounced as the anisotropy decreases by increasing number of Co/Ni repeats. Most remarkably, the DW tilting angle changes its sign by inserting ultrathin Pt layer between Au and Co layer, which suggests that the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction and spin Hall effect induces opposite effect in DW tilting. Our findings can be of use for application of CIDW to spintronics with perpendicularly magnetized systems.

  10. Audiovisual biofeedback improves motion prediction accuracy

    PubMed Central

    Pollock, Sean; Lee, Danny; Keall, Paul; Kim, Taeho

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The accuracy of motion prediction, utilized to overcome the system latency of motion management radiotherapy systems, is hampered by irregularities present in the patients’ respiratory pattern. Audiovisual (AV) biofeedback has been shown to reduce respiratory irregularities. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that AV biofeedback improves the accuracy of motion prediction. Methods: An AV biofeedback system combined with real-time respiratory data acquisition and MR images were implemented in this project. One-dimensional respiratory data from (1) the abdominal wall (30 Hz) and (2) the thoracic diaphragm (5 Hz) were obtained from 15 healthy human subjects across 30 studies. The subjects were required to breathe with and without the guidance of AV biofeedback during each study. The obtained respiratory signals were then implemented in a kernel density estimation prediction algorithm. For each of the 30 studies, five different prediction times ranging from 50 to 1400 ms were tested (150 predictions performed). Prediction error was quantified as the root mean square error (RMSE); the RMSE was calculated from the difference between the real and predicted respiratory data. The statistical significance of the prediction results was determined by the Student's t-test. Results: Prediction accuracy was considerably improved by the implementation of AV biofeedback. Of the 150 respiratory predictions performed, prediction accuracy was improved 69% (103/150) of the time for abdominal wall data, and 78% (117/150) of the time for diaphragm data. The average reduction in RMSE due to AV biofeedback over unguided respiration was 26% (p < 0.001) and 29% (p < 0.001) for abdominal wall and diaphragm respiratory motion, respectively. Conclusions: This study was the first to demonstrate that the reduction of respiratory irregularities due to the implementation of AV biofeedback improves prediction accuracy. This would result in increased efficiency of motion

  11. Effect of alpha lipoic acid co-administration on structural and immunohistochemical changes in subcutaneous tissue of anterior abdominal wall of adult male albino rat in response to polypropylene mesh implantation.

    PubMed

    Mazroa, Shireen A; Asker, Samar A; Asker, Waleed; Abd Ellatif, Mohamed

    2015-06-01

    Polypropylene mesh is commonly used in the treatment of abdominal hernia. Different approaches were addressed to improve their tissue integration and consequently reduce long-term complications. This study aimed to investigate the effect of alpha-lipoic acid (ALA) co-administration on structural and immunohistochemical (IHC) changes in the subcutaneous tissues of the anterior abdominal wall of the adult rat in response to polypropylene mesh implantation. Forty adult male albino rats were divided into: group I (control), group II (receiving ALA), group III (polypropylene mesh implantation) and group IV (mesh implantation + ALA co-administration). After 4 weeks, subcutaneous tissue samples were prepared for light microscopy and IHC study of CD34 as a marker for angiogenesis. In groups I and II rats, positive CD34 expression was demonstrated by IHC reaction, localized to endothelial cells lining small blood vessels. Group III showed an excess inflammatory reaction, deposition of both regular and irregularly arranged collagen fibres around mesh pores and few elastic fibres. CD34-positive was detected not only in cells lining small blood vessels but also in other cells scattered in the connective tissue indicating angiogenesis. In group IV, ALA co-administration resulted in less inflammatory reaction, regular collagen deposition, enhanced elastic fibres synthesis and a significant increase in CD34-positive cells and small blood vessels reflecting improved angiogenesis. ALA co-administration with polypropylene mesh implantation controlled the inflammatory reaction, helped regular collagen deposition, enhanced elastic fibres synthesis and improved angiogenesis in the subcutaneous tissue of anterior abdominal wall of adult albino rats, suggesting a possible role of ALA in optimizing mesh integration in subcutaneous tissue.

  12. Effect of alpha lipoic acid co-administration on structural and immunohistochemical changes in subcutaneous tissue of anterior abdominal wall of adult male albino rat in response to polypropylene mesh implantation

    PubMed Central

    Mazroa, Shireen A; Asker, Samar A; Asker, Waleed; Abd Ellatif, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Polypropylene mesh is commonly used in the treatment of abdominal hernia. Different approaches were addressed to improve their tissue integration and consequently reduce long-term complications. This study aimed to investigate the effect of alpha-lipoic acid (ALA) co-administration on structural and immunohistochemical (IHC) changes in the subcutaneous tissues of the anterior abdominal wall of the adult rat in response to polypropylene mesh implantation. Forty adult male albino rats were divided into: group I (control), group II (receiving ALA), group III (polypropylene mesh implantation) and group IV (mesh implantation + ALA co-administration). After 4 weeks, subcutaneous tissue samples were prepared for light microscopy and IHC study of CD34 as a marker for angiogenesis. In groups I and II rats, positive CD34 expression was demonstrated by IHC reaction, localized to endothelial cells lining small blood vessels. Group III showed an excess inflammatory reaction, deposition of both regular and irregularly arranged collagen fibres around mesh pores and few elastic fibres. CD34-positive was detected not only in cells lining small blood vessels but also in other cells scattered in the connective tissue indicating angiogenesis. In group IV, ALA co-administration resulted in less inflammatory reaction, regular collagen deposition, enhanced elastic fibres synthesis and a significant increase in CD34-positive cells and small blood vessels reflecting improved angiogenesis. ALA co-administration with polypropylene mesh implantation controlled the inflammatory reaction, helped regular collagen deposition, enhanced elastic fibres synthesis and improved angiogenesis in the subcutaneous tissue of anterior abdominal wall of adult albino rats, suggesting a possible role of ALA in optimizing mesh integration in subcutaneous tissue. PMID:25891652

  13. Abdominal pain

    MedlinePlus

    Stomach pain; Pain - abdomen; Belly ache; Abdominal cramps; Bellyache; Stomachache ... Almost everyone has pain in the abdomen at some point. Most of the time, it is not serious. How bad your pain is ...

  14. [Abdominal pain].

    PubMed

    Gschossmann, J M; Holtmann, G; Netzer, P; Essig, M; Balsiger, B M; Scheurer, U

    2005-10-01

    Abdominal pain can result from a variety of different intra- and extra-abdominal disorders. Given the wide variety of etiological triggers for this pain, the primary task during the first stage of the diagnostic work-up is to determine as soon as possible the underlying cause and the degree of emergency. The aim of this evaluation is to adapt the therapeutic measures which are necessary for a causal treatment to the individual situation. Contrary to somatic causes of abdominal pain, the availability of such a causal therapy for functional bowel disorders is still very limited. Given this dilemma, the therapeutic focus of abdominal pain associated with these functional syndromes has to be placed on symptom-oriented treatment.

  15. Acute incarcerated external abdominal hernia

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xue-Fei

    2014-01-01

    External abdominal hernia occurs when abdominal organs or tissues leave their normal anatomic site and protrude outside the skin through the congenital or acquired weakness, defects or holes on the abdominal wall, including inguinal hernia, umbilical hernia, femoral hernia and so on. Acute incarcerated hernia is a common surgical emergency. With advances in minimally invasive devices and techniques, the diagnosis and treatment have witnessed major changes, such as the use of laparoscopic surgery in some cases to achieve minimally invasive treatment. However, strict adherence to the indications and contraindications is still required. PMID:25489584

  16. "Abdominal crunch"-induced rhabdomyolysis presenting as right upper quadrant pain.

    PubMed

    Haas, D C; Bohnker, B K

    1999-02-01

    A young, active duty sailor presented with right upper quadrant abdominal pain. History, physical, and laboratory findings initially suggested cholecystitis or related disease. Further evaluation found myoglobinuria and a recently increased exercise program, leading to the diagnosis of exercise-induced right upper abdominal wall rhabdomyolysis. Although not a common cause of abdominal pain, this diagnosis should be considered in the patient with abdominal pain and a recently increased exercise program, particularly exercises of the abdominal wall such as "abdominal crunches."

  17. [The effect of ionizing radiation on the blood plasma and erythrocytes and on the wall of the abdominal aorta of rats].

    PubMed

    Nikulin, A A; Pustovalov, A P; Voronkov, I F

    1988-01-01

    On days 7 and 15 after gamma-irradiation (4 Gy) changes were noted in the temperature dependence of the erythrocyte suspension viscosity coefficient, in the electrolyte composition of the abdominal aorta, plasma, and erythrocytes, in Na, K- and Mg-ATPase activity, and in the intensity of fluorescence of 1.8 ANS of erythrocyte ghost of albino rats. The changes were a function of the stage of radiation sickness and were more pronounced on the 15th day following irradiation.

  18. Abdominal Sepsis.

    PubMed

    De Waele, Jan J

    2016-08-01

    Abdominal infections are an important challenge for the intensive care physician. In an era of increasing antimicrobial resistance, selecting the appropriate regimen is important and, with new drugs coming to the market, correct use is important more than ever before and abdominal infections are an excellent target for antimicrobial stewardship programs. Biomarkers may be helpful, but their exact role in managing abdominal infections remains incompletely understood. Source control also remains an ongoing conundrum, and evidence is increasing that its importance supersedes the impact of antibiotic therapy. New strategies such as open abdomen management may offer added benefit in severely ill patients, but more data are needed to identify its exact role. The role of fungi and the need for antifungal coverage, on the other hand, have been investigated extensively in recent years, but at this point, it remains unclear who requires empirical as well as directed therapy.

  19. Role of resting thallium201 perfusion in predicting coronary anatomy, left ventricular wall motion, and hospital outcome in unstable angina pectoris

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, M.R.; Williams, A.E.; Chisholm, R.J.; Patt, N.L.; Greyson, N.D.; Armstrong, P.W.

    1989-02-01

    We performed quantitative thallium scintigraphy in 66 unstable angina patients, 5.6 +/- 5.1 hours after rest pain, to predict coronary anatomy, left ventricular wall motion, and hospital outcome. Thallium defects and/or washout abnormalities were present in 5 of 10 (50%) patients with coronary stenoses less than 50%, 27 of 33 (82%) patients with coronary stenosis greater than or equal to 50% and no history of previous myocardial infarction, and in 23 of 23 patients (100%) with histories of previous infarction. Defects were uncommon in the territory of vessels with less than 50% (13 of 61, 21%), but significantly more common in the territory of vessels with greater than or equal to 50% stenosis (57 of 137, 42%), p less than 0.005. With the addition of washout abnormalities to defect analysis, sensitivity for detection of coronary stenoses improved to 67% (92 of 137), p less than or equal to 0.005, but specificity fell to 59% (36 of 61), p less than 0.01. Segmental wall motion abnormalities were less common in segments with normal perfusion (21%) or in those with washout abnormalities alone (19%), than in segments with thallium defects (45%, p less than 0.005). Defects in patients with previous infarction were common in both segments, with normal (26 of 66, 40%) or abnormal (24 of 45, 53%) wall motion. Eleven of 18 patients with in-hospital cardiac events, but no history of myocardial infarction, had resting thallium defects, whereas only 8 of 25 patients without cardiac event had thallium defect (p = 0.056).

  20. Evaluation by quantitative 99m-technetium MIBI SPECT and echocardiography of myocardial perfusion and wall motion abnormalities in patients with dobutamine-induced ST-segment elevation.

    PubMed

    Elhendy, A; Geleijnse, M L; Roelandt, J R; van Domburg, R T; Cornel, J H; TenCate, F J; Postma-Tjoa, J; Reijs, A E; el-Said, G M; Fioretti, P M

    1995-09-01

    ST-segment elevation during exercise testing has been attributed to myocardial ischemia and wall motion abnormalities (WMA). However, the functional significance of ST-segment elevation during dobutamine stress testing (DST) has not been evaluated in patients referred for diagnostic evaluation of myocardial ischemia. DST (up to 40 micrograms/kg/min) with simultaneous echocardiography and technetium-99m sestamibi single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) was performed in 229 consecutive patients with suspected myocardial ischemia who were unable to perform an adequate exercise test; 127 (55%) had a previous acute myocardial infarction (AMI). ST elevation was defined as > or = 1 mm new or additional J point elevations with a horizontal or upsloping ST segment lasting 80 ms. Reversible perfusion defects on SPECT and new or worsening WMA during stress on echocardiography were considered diagnostic of ischemia. ST elevation occurred in 40 patients (17%) during the test; 34 of them (85%) had previous AMI. All patients with ST-segment elevation had abnormal scintigrams (fixed or reversible defects, or both) and abnormal wall motion (fixed or transient defect, or both) at peak stress. In patients who had ST elevation and no previous AMI (n = 6), ischemia was detected in all by echocardiography and in 5 (83%) by SPECT. In patients with previous AMI, the prevalence of ischemia was not different with or without ST elevation (53% vs 43% by echocardiography and 53% vs 48% by SPECT, respectively). Baseline regional wall motion score in the infarct zone was higher in patients with ST elevation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. High efficiency of the spin-orbit torques induced domain wall motion in asymmetric interfacial multilayered Tb/Co wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bang, Do; Awano, Hiroyuki

    2015-05-01

    We investigated current-induced DW motion in asymmetric interfacial multilayered Tb/Co wires for various thicknesses of magnetic and Pt-capping layers. It is found that the driving mechanism for the DW motion changes from interfacial to bulk effects at much thick magnetic layer (up to 19.8 nm). In thin wires, linearly depinning field dependence of critical current density and in-plane field dependence of DW velocity suggest that the extrinsic pinning governs field-induced DW motion and injecting current can be regarded as an effective field. It is expected that the high efficiency of spin-orbit torques in thick magnetic multilayers would have important implication for future spintronic devices based on in-plane current induced-DW motion or switching.

  2. High efficiency of the spin-orbit torques induced domain wall motion in asymmetric interfacial multilayered Tb/Co wires

    SciTech Connect

    Bang, Do; Awano, Hiroyuki

    2015-05-07

    We investigated current-induced DW motion in asymmetric interfacial multilayered Tb/Co wires for various thicknesses of magnetic and Pt-capping layers. It is found that the driving mechanism for the DW motion changes from interfacial to bulk effects at much thick magnetic layer (up to 19.8 nm). In thin wires, linearly depinning field dependence of critical current density and in-plane field dependence of DW velocity suggest that the extrinsic pinning governs field-induced DW motion and injecting current can be regarded as an effective field. It is expected that the high efficiency of spin-orbit torques in thick magnetic multilayers would have important implication for future spintronic devices based on in-plane current induced-DW motion or switching.

  3. [Differential surgical treatment of victims with damage to the small and large intestines in a closed abdominal injury combined, depending on the prediction of traumatic disease course and morphological changes of the intestinal wall].

    PubMed

    Zaruts'kyĭ, Ia L; Denysenko, V M; Khomenko, I P; Levkivskyĭ, R H

    2013-08-01

    Use of differentiated surgical approach to the management of surgical treatment, depending on the degree of violation of systemic hemodynamics, the timing and volume of surgical procedures, depending on the prognosis of traumatic disease course of cardiac index, interventions in the small and large intestine depending on morphological changes of the intestinal wall by cardiac and stroke indexes, put method extra-enteric anastomosis in patients with damage to the small intestine and colon combined with closed abdominal injury permitted to reduce the rate of postoperative complications from 22.2 to 10.1%, mortality at 2.1 times in shock period (from 19.3 to 9.2%) and the overall mortality from 33.3 to 21.1%.

  4. Comparative study of the microvascular blood flow in the intestinal wall, wound contraction and fluid evacuation during negative pressure wound therapy in laparostomy using the V.A.C. abdominal dressing and the ABThera open abdomen negative pressure therapy system.

    PubMed

    Lindstedt, Sandra; Malmsjö, Malin; Hlebowicz, Joanna; Ingemansson, Richard

    2015-02-01

    This study aimed to compare the changes in microvascular blood flow in the small intestinal wall, wound contraction and fluid evacuation, using the established V.A.C. abdominal dressing (VAC dressing) and a new abdominal dressing, the ABThera open abdomen negative pressure therapy system (ABThera dressing), in negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT). Midline incisions were made in 12 pigs that were subjected to treatment with NPWT using the VAC or ABThera dressing. The microvascular blood flow in the intestinal wall was measured before and after the application of topical negative pressures of −50, −75 and −125mmHg using laser Doppler velocimetry. Wound contraction and fluid evacuation were also measured. Baseline blood flow was defined as 100% in all settings. The blood flow was significantly reduced to 64·6±6·7% (P <0·05) after the application of −50mmHg using the VAC dressing, and to 65·3±9·6% (P <0·05) after the application of −50mmHg using the ABThera dressing. The blood flow was significantly reduced to 39·6±6·7% (P <0·05) after the application of −125mmHg using VAC and to 40·5±6·2% (P <0·05) after the application of −125mmHg using ABThera. No significant difference in reduction in blood flow could be observed between the two groups. The ABThera system afforded significantly better fluid evacuation from the wound, better drainage of the abdomen and better wound contraction than the VAC dressing.

  5. Abdominal Adhesions

    MedlinePlus

    ... Adhesions 1 Ward BC, Panitch A. Abdominal adhesions: current and novel therapies. Journal of Surgical Research. 2011;165(1):91–111. Seek Help for ... and how to participate, visit the NIH Clinical Research Trials and You website ... Foundation for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders 700 West Virginia ...

  6. Repair of Large Abdominal Wall Defects Using Total Anterior Aponeurotic Flap: Anatomical Feasibility Study and Comparison with Ramirez’s Technique

    PubMed Central

    Assalino, Michela; Morel, Philippe; Fasel, Jean H. D.; Stimec, Bojan V.; Tobalem, Mickael

    2016-01-01

    Summary: In this cadaveric study, we explored the feasibility of a maximal mobilization of the superficial abdominal fascia, in a continuous flap, to achieve a tension-free covering of midline defects. The aponeurosis of the external oblique muscle was incised along the anterior axillary line and then detached up to the anterior rectus sheath. The latter was opened between the external and the internal oblique aponeurosis while keeping the continuity with the external oblique fascia. The obtained flap was solid and uninterrupted. The width gain reached 15 ± 3 cm on each sides, providing tissue advancement 60% longer than Ramirez’s technique (n = 8). The described technique allows large covering with respect to the anatomical planes. Further clinical tests should evaluate the validity of such concept in the repair of giant and asymmetrical hernias.

  7. Use of Echocardiography Reveals Reestablishment of Ventricular Pumping Efficiency and Partial Ventricular Wall Motion Recovery upon Ventricular Cryoinjury in the Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Inês João; Sánchez-Iranzo, Héctor; Jiménez-Borreguero, Luis Jesús; Mercader, Nadia

    2014-01-01

    Aims While zebrafish embryos are amenable to in vivo imaging, allowing the study of morphogenetic processes during development, intravital imaging of adults is hampered by their small size and loss of transparency. The use of adult zebrafish as a vertebrate model of cardiac disease and regeneration is increasing at high speed. It is therefore of great importance to establish appropriate and robust methods to measure cardiac function parameters. Methods and Results Here we describe the use of 2D-echocardiography to study the fractional volume shortening and segmental wall motion of the ventricle. Our data show that 2D-echocardiography can be used to evaluate cardiac injury and also to study recovery of cardiac function. Interestingly, our results show that while global systolic function recovered following cardiac cryoinjury, ventricular wall motion was only partially restored. Conclusion Cryoinjury leads to long-lasting impairment of cardiac contraction, partially mimicking the consequences of myocardial infarction in humans. Functional assessment of heart regeneration by echocardiography allows a deeper understanding of the mechanisms of cardiac regeneration and has the advantage of being easily transferable to other cardiovascular zebrafish disease models. PMID:25532015

  8. Soluble surfactants favorably modify fluid structure and wall shear stress profiles during near-occluding bubble motion in a computational model of intravascular gas embolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swaminathan, T. N.; Ayyaswamy, P. S.; Eckmann, D. M.

    2009-11-01

    Finite sized gas bubble motion in a blood vessel causes temporal and spatial gradients of shear stress at the endothelial cell surface lining the vessel wall as the bubble approaches the cell, moves over it and passes it by. Rapid reversals occur in the sign of the shear stress imparted to the cell surface during this motion. The sign-reversing shear is a potently coupled source of cell surface mechanical stretch, potentiating cell injury. The presence of a suitable soluble surfactant in the bulk medium considerably reduces the level of the shear stress gradients imparted to the cell surface as compared to an equivalent surfactant-free system. The bubble shape and the film thickness between the bubble and the vessel wall are also different. Furthermore, the bubble residence time near the proximity of a cell surface changes in comparison. These results based on our modeling may help explain several phenomena observed in experimental studies related to gas embolism, a significant problem in cardiac surgery and decompression sickness.

  9. Evaluation of Hip Internal and External Rotation Range of Motion as an Injury Risk Factor for Hip, Abdominal and Groin Injuries in Professional Baseball Players

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Richard; Zhou, Hanbing; Thompson, Matthew; Dawson, Courtney; Nguyen, Joseph; Coleman, Struan

    2015-01-01

    Normal hip range of motion (ROM) is essential in running and transfer of energy from lower to upper extremities during overhead throwing. Dysfunctional hip ROM may alter lower extremity kinematics and predispose athletes to hip and groin injuries. The purpose of this study is characterize hip internal/external ROM (Arc) and its effect on the risk of hip, hamstring, and groin injuries in professional baseball players. Bilateral hip internal and external ROM was measured on all baseball players (N=201) in one professional organization (major and minor league) during spring training. Players were organized according to their respective positions. All injuries were documented prospectively for an entire MLB season (2010 to 2011). Data was analyzed according to position and injuries during the season. Total number of players (N=201) with an average age of 24±3.6 (range=17-37). Both pitchers (N=93) and catchers (N=22) had significantly decreased mean hip internal rotation and overall hip arc of motion compared to the positional players (N=86). Players with hip, groin, and hamstring injury also had decreased hip rotation arc when compared to the normal group. Overall, there is a correlation between decreased hip internal rotation and total arc of motion with hip, hamstring, and groin injuries. PMID:26793294

  10. Retrospective analysis of a VACM (vacuum-assisted closure and mesh-mediated fascial traction) treatment manual for temporary abdominal wall closure - results of 58 consecutive patients.

    PubMed

    Beltzer, Christian; Eisenächer, Alexander; Badendieck, Steffen; Doll, Dietrich; Küper, Markus; Lenz, Stefan; Krapohl, Björn Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Einleitung: Das optimale Behandlungskonzept eines temporären Bauchdeckenverschlusses (temporary abdominal closure, TAC) bei kritisch kranken viszeralchirurgischen Patienten mit offenem Abdomen („open abdomen“, OA) ist weiterhin unklar. Durch eine VACM-Therapie (vacuum-assisted closure and mesh-mediated fascial traction) scheinen sich gegenüber anderen Verfahren des TAC höhere Faszienverschlussraten (delayed primary fascial closure rate, FCR) realisieren zu lassen. Material und Methoden: Patienten unserer Klinik (n=58), welche in den Jahren 2005 bis 2008 mittels eines VAC/VACM-Behandlungsmanuals behandelt wurden, wurden retrospektiv analysiert. Ergebnisse: Die FCR aller Patienten betrug insgesamt 48,3% (95%-Konfidenzintervall: 34,95–61,78). Bei Patienten, bei denen im Verlauf ein Vicryl-Netz auf Faszienebene implantiert wurde (VACM-Therapie), konnte eine FCR von 61,3% realisiert werden. Die Letalität der mittels VACM therapierten Patienten betrug 45,2% (95%-KI: 27,32–63,97).Schlussfolgerung: Die Ergebnisse der eigenen Untersuchung bestätigen bisherige Studienergebnisse, die eine akzeptable FCR bei non-trauma-Patienten durch Anwendung der VACM-Therapie zeigen konnten. Die VACM-Therapie scheint aktuell Therapiekonzept der ersten Wahl bei Patienten mit OA und Indikation zum TAC zu sein.

  11. On the motion through a viscous fluid of a spherical particle touching a plane wall: Slip boundary conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, A.M.J.; Kezirian, M.T.; Brenner, H.

    1992-01-01

    Understanding the hydrodynamic forces acting upon immersed particles touching surfaces, is of central importance in clean room technology and a variety of rheological and biological applications. This paper addresses the translation and rotation of a sphere translating and rotating parallel to a nearby plane wall bounding an otherwise quiescent semi-infinite viscous fluid, allowing for slip on the wall and/or the sphere. The motivation for disregarding the classical, no-slip boundary condition on solid surfaces aries from an embarrassing discrepancy between theoretical and observed predictions of the translational velocity of a sphere rolling' under the influence of gravity down an inclined plane bounding an effectively semi-infinite viscous fluid. According to theory the force and torque on a translating and/or rotating sphere moving parallel to the plane wall become logarithmically infinite with the gap width as the gap between the sphere and well goes to zero. As such, the theoretical conclusion is that the sphere cannot translate down the plane, despite the gravity force that acts to animate it. Experiments, however, reveal that the sphere does, in fact, roll down the plane - at a reproducible mean terminal velocity. In the noninertial, small Reynolds number limit, the experimentally observed drag coefficient was found to be about 8.9 times that given by Stokes law for the unbounded case - thereby suggesting a conventional hydrodynamic wall effect, rather than the logarithmically singular behavior predicted by the theory. It was in an attempt to resolve this glaring contradiction that we have elected here to examine the possible effects of slip.

  12. On the motion through a viscous fluid of a spherical particle touching a plane wall: Slip boundary conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, A.M.J.; Kezirian, M.T.; Brenner, H.

    1992-12-31

    Understanding the hydrodynamic forces acting upon immersed particles touching surfaces, is of central importance in clean room technology and a variety of rheological and biological applications. This paper addresses the translation and rotation of a sphere translating and rotating parallel to a nearby plane wall bounding an otherwise quiescent semi-infinite viscous fluid, allowing for slip on the wall and/or the sphere. The motivation for disregarding the classical, no-slip boundary condition on solid surfaces aries from an embarrassing discrepancy between theoretical and observed predictions of the translational velocity of a sphere `rolling` under the influence of gravity down an inclined plane bounding an effectively semi-infinite viscous fluid. According to theory the force and torque on a translating and/or rotating sphere moving parallel to the plane wall become logarithmically infinite with the gap width as the gap between the sphere and well goes to zero. As such, the theoretical conclusion is that the sphere cannot translate down the plane, despite the gravity force that acts to animate it. Experiments, however, reveal that the sphere does, in fact, roll down the plane - at a reproducible mean terminal velocity. In the noninertial, small Reynolds number limit, the experimentally observed drag coefficient was found to be about 8.9 times that given by Stokes law for the unbounded case - thereby suggesting a conventional hydrodynamic wall effect, rather than the logarithmically singular behavior predicted by the theory. It was in an attempt to resolve this glaring contradiction that we have elected here to examine the possible effects of slip.

  13. Analytical solution of the strain-controlled magnetic domain wall motion in bilayer piezoelectric/magnetostrictive nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Consolo, Giancarlo; Valenti, Giovanna

    2017-01-01

    The one-dimensional propagation of magnetic domain walls in an isotropic, linearly elastic, magnetostrictive material is investigated in the framework of the extended Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation where the effects of a spin-polarized current and a rate-independent dry-friction dissipation are taken into account. In our analysis, it is assumed that the ferromagnet is subject to a spatially uniform biaxial in-plain stress generated by a piezoelectric substrate combined with the former in a multiferroic heterostructure. Moreover, a possible connection between the dry-friction mechanism and the piezo-induced strains is conjectured. By adopting the traveling waves ansatz, the effect of such a stress on the domain wall dynamics is explored in both steady and precessional regimes. In particular, it is proved that the magnetoelastic contribution, while it does not formally modify the classical solution, affects both the propagation threshold and the Walker Breakdown conditions involved in the steady regime, in agreement with recent experimental results. In the precessional regime, it is shown that the existence of a correlation between the piezo-induced strains and dry-friction leads to an upward shift of the domain wall velocity.

  14. Real-time ultrasound-tagging to track the 2D motion of the common carotid artery wall in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Zahnd, Guillaume; Salles, Sébastien; Liebgott, Hervé; Vray, Didier; Sérusclat, André; Moulin, Philippe

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: Tracking the motion of biological tissues represents an important issue in the field of medical ultrasound imaging. However, the longitudinal component of the motion (i.e., perpendicular to the beam axis) remains more challenging to extract due to the rather coarse resolution cell of ultrasound scanners along this direction. The aim of this study is to introduce a real-time beamforming strategy dedicated to acquire tagged images featuring a distinct pattern in the objective to ease the tracking. Methods: Under the conditions of the Fraunhofer approximation, a specific apodization function was applied to the received raw channel data, in real-time during image acquisition, in order to introduce a periodic oscillations pattern along the longitudinal direction of the radio frequency signal. Analytic signals were then extracted from the tagged images, and subpixel motion tracking of the intima–media complex was subsequently performed offline, by means of a previously introduced bidimensional analytic phase-based estimator. Results: The authors’ framework was applied in vivo on the common carotid artery from 20 young healthy volunteers and 6 elderly patients with high atherosclerosis risk. Cine-loops of tagged images were acquired during three cardiac cycles. Evaluated against reference trajectories manually generated by three experienced analysts, the mean absolute tracking error was 98 ± 84 μm and 55 ± 44 μm in the longitudinal and axial directions, respectively. These errors corresponded to 28% ± 23% and 13% ± 9% of the longitudinal and axial amplitude of the assessed motion, respectively. Conclusions: The proposed framework enables tagged ultrasound images of in vivo tissues to be acquired in real-time. Such unconventional beamforming strategy contributes to improve tracking accuracy and could potentially benefit to the interpretation and diagnosis of biomedical images.

  15. Feedback effect on the large-scale fluid motion in wall-bounded gas-solid disperse flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mito, Yoichi

    2013-11-01

    Influence of the forces, exerted by dispersed particles, in a channel, in which gas is flowing turbulently, is examined using a direct numerical simulation to calculate the gas velocities seen by the particles and a point force method to calculate the forces exerted by the particles on the gas. Influence of gravity and inter-particle collisions is ignored. Distributions of the mean streamwise body forces, exerted on the fluid by the turbulence and by the particles, are calculated to show the mean large-scale motions of the fluid phase and of the disperse phase. The fluid turbulence forces decrease with increasing volume fraction to accommodate the inter-phase body forces. Thus the large-scale fluid motions, which make a major contribution to the fluid turbulence, are damped. The turbophoretic velocities, which represent the mean drifts, show that mean contribution of each particle to the mean large-scale motion of the disperse phase decreases with increasing volume fraction. This is caused by the decreases in the fluid turbulence and the turbulent transport, with increasing volume fraction.

  16. Effects of the changes in the wall shear stresses (WSS) acting on endothelial cells (EC) during the enlargement of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms (AAA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salsac, Anne-Virginie

    2005-03-01

    The changes in the spatial and temporal distribution of the WSS and gradients of WSS during the enlargement of AAAs are important to understand the etiology and progression of this vascular disease, since they affect the wall structural integrity, primarily via the changes induced on the shape, functions and metabolism of the endothelial cells. PIV measurements were performed in aneurysm models, while changing systematically their size and geometry. Two regions with distinct patterns of WSS were identified. The region of flow detachment extends over the proximal half and is characterized by oscillatory WSS of very low mean. The region of flow reattachment, located distally, is dominated by large, negative WSS and sustained gradients of WSS that result from the impact of the vortex ring on the wall. Cultured EC were subjected to these two types of stimuli in vitro. The permeability of the endothelium was found to be largely increased in the flow detachment region. Endothelium cell-cell adhesion, proliferation and apoptosis were also affected by the high gradients of WSS.

  17. [Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Siebenmann, R; Schneider, K; von Segesser, L; Turina, M

    1988-06-11

    348 cases of abdominal aortic aneurysm were reviewed for typical features of inflammatory aneurysm (IAAA) (marked thickening of aneurysm wall, retroperitoneal fibrosis and rigid adherence of adjacent structures). IAAA was present in 15 cases (14 male, 1 female). When compared with patients who had ordinary aneurysms, significantly more patients complained of back or abdominal pain (p less than 0.01). Erythrocyte sedimentation rate was highly elevated. Diagnosis was established in 7 of 10 computed tomographies. 2 patients underwent emergency repair for ruptured aneurysm. Unilateral ureteral obstruction was present in 4 cases and bilateral in 1. Repair of IAAA was performed by a modified technique. Histological examination revealed thickening of the aortic wall, mainly of the adventitial layer, infiltrated by plasma cells and lymphocytes. One 71-year-old patient operated on for rupture of IAAA died early, and another 78-year-old patient after 5 1/2 months. Control computed tomographies revealed spontaneous regression of inflammatory infiltration after repair. Equally, hydronephrosis due to ureteral obstruction could be shown to disappear or at least to decrease. IAAA can be diagnosed by computed tomography with high sensitivity. Repair involves low risk, but modification of technique is necessary. The etiology of IAAA remains unclear.

  18. Abdominal cavity myolipoma presenting as an enlarging incisional hernia.

    PubMed

    Moore, Mark O; Richardson, Michael L; Rubin, Brian P; Baird, Geoffrey S

    2006-01-01

    We present a case of an abdominal cavity myolipoma which herniated through a low transverse abdominal (Pfannenstiel) incision, and presented as an enlarging abdominal wall mass. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) prior to surgery demonstrated an encapsulated solid tumor mass demonstrating fat signal and and increased T2-weighted signal. Postsurgical histological tissue diagnosis was myolipoma. Recognition of the intra- and extraperitoneal location of this abdominal tumor was essential for accurate surgical planning.

  19. The contribution of 180° domain wall motion to dielectric properties quantified from in situ X-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Fancher, C. M.; Brewer, S.; Chung, C. C.; Rohrig, S.; Rojac, T.; Esteves, G.; Deluca, M.; Bassiri-Gharb, N.; Jones, J. L.

    2016-12-27

    Here, the contribution of 180° domain wall motion to polarization and dielectric properties of ferroelectric materials has yet to be determined experimentally. In this paper, an approach for estimating the extent of (180°) domain reversal during application of electric fields is presented. We demonstrate this method by determining the contribution of domain reversal to polarization in soft lead zirconate titanate during application of strong electric fields. At the maximum applied field, domain reversal was determined to account for >80% of the measured macroscopic polarization. We also apply the method to quantify the contribution of domain reversal to the weak-field dielectric permittivity of BaTiO3. The results of this analysis determined that domain reversal accounts for up to ~70% of the macroscopic dielectric permittivity in BaTiO3. These results demonstrate the predominance of domain reversal to high and low-field dielectric response in ferroelectric polycrystalline materials.

  20. Induced pluripotent stem cell intervention rescues ventricular wall motion disparity, achieving biological cardiac resynchronization post-infarction

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Satsuki; Nelson, Timothy J; Kane, Garvan C; Martinez-Fernandez, Almudena; Crespo-Diaz, Ruben J; Ikeda, Yasuhiro; Perez-Terzic, Carmen; Terzic, Andre

    2013-01-01

    Dyssynchronous myocardial motion aggravates cardiac pump function. Cardiac resynchronization using pacing devices is a standard-of-care in the management of heart failure. Post-infarction, however, scar tissue formation impedes the efficacy of device-based therapy. The present study tests a regenerative approach aimed at targeting the origin of abnormal motion to prevent dyssynchronous organ failure. Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells harbour a reparative potential, and were here bioengineered from somatic fibroblasts reprogrammed with the stemness factors OCT3/4, SOX2, KLF4, and c-MYC. In a murine infarction model, within 30 min of coronary ligation, iPS cells were delivered to mapped infarcted areas. Focal deformation and dysfunction underlying progressive heart failure was resolved prospectively using speckle-tracking imaging. Tracked at high temporal and spatial resolution, regional iPS cell transplantation restored, within 10 days post-infarction, the contractility of targeted infarcted foci and nullified conduction delay in adjacent non-infarcted regions. Local iPS cell therapy, but not delivery of parental fibroblasts or vehicle, prevented or normalized abnormal strain patterns correcting the decrease in peak strain, disparity of time-to-peak strain, and pathological systolic stretch. Focal benefit of iPS cell intervention translated into improved left ventricular conduction and contractility, reduced scar, and reversal of structural remodelling, protecting from organ decompensation. Thus, in ischaemic cardiomyopathy, targeted iPS cell transplantation synchronized failing ventricles, offering a regenerative strategy to achieve biological resynchronization. PMID:23568891

  1. An In Vitro Comparative Study of Intracanal Fluid Motion and Wall Shear Stress Induced by Ultrasonic and Polymer Rotary Finishing Files in a Simulated Root Canal Model

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Jon; Borg, John; Mattson, Abby; Olsen, Kris; Bahcall, James

    2012-01-01

    Objective. This in vitro study compared the flow pattern and shear stress of an irrigant induced by ultrasonic and polymer rotary finishing file activation in an acrylic root canal model. Flow visualization analysis was performed using an acrylic canal filled with a mixture of distilled water and rheoscopic fluid. The ultrasonic and polymer rotary finishing file were separately tested in the canal and activated in a static position and in a cyclical axial motion (up and down). Particle movement in the fluid was captured using a high-speed digital camera and DaVis 7.1 software. The fluid shear stress analysis was performed using hot film anemometry. A hot-wire was placed in an acrylic root canal and the canal was filled with distilled water. The ultrasonic and polymer rotary finishing files were separately tested in a static position and in a cyclical axial motion. Positive needle irrigation was also tested separately for fluid shear stress. The induced wall shear stress was measured using LabVIEW 8.0 software. PMID:22461994

  2. An in vitro comparative study of intracanal fluid motion and wall shear stress induced by ultrasonic and polymer rotary finishing files in a simulated root canal model.

    PubMed

    Koch, Jon; Borg, John; Mattson, Abby; Olsen, Kris; Bahcall, James

    2012-01-01

    Objective. This in vitro study compared the flow pattern and shear stress of an irrigant induced by ultrasonic and polymer rotary finishing file activation in an acrylic root canal model. Flow visualization analysis was performed using an acrylic canal filled with a mixture of distilled water and rheoscopic fluid. The ultrasonic and polymer rotary finishing file were separately tested in the canal and activated in a static position and in a cyclical axial motion (up and down). Particle movement in the fluid was captured using a high-speed digital camera and DaVis 7.1 software. The fluid shear stress analysis was performed using hot film anemometry. A hot-wire was placed in an acrylic root canal and the canal was filled with distilled water. The ultrasonic and polymer rotary finishing files were separately tested in a static position and in a cyclical axial motion. Positive needle irrigation was also tested separately for fluid shear stress. The induced wall shear stress was measured using LabVIEW 8.0 software.

  3. Traumatic abdominal hernia complicated by necrotizing fasciitis.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Pérez, Aleix; Garrigós-Ortega, Gonzalo; Gómez-Abril, Segundo Ángel; Martí-Martínez, Eva; Torres-Sánchez, Teresa

    2014-11-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is a critical illness involving skin and soft tissues, which may develop after blunt abdominal trauma causing abdominal wall hernia and representing a great challenge for physicians. A 52-year-old man was brought to the emergency department after a road accident, presenting blunt abdominal trauma with a large non-reducible mass in the lower-right abdomen. A first, CT showed abdominal hernia without signs of complication. Three hours after ICU admission, he developed hemodynamic instability. Therefore, a new CT scan was requested, showing signs of hernia complication. He was moved to the operating room where a complete transversal section of an ileal loop was identified. Five hours after surgery, he presented a new episode of hemodynamic instability with signs of skin and soft tissue infection. Due to the high clinical suspicion of necrotizing fasciitis development, wide debridement was performed. Following traumatic abdominal wall hernia (TAWH), patients can present unsuspected injuries in abdominal organs. Helical CT can be falsely negative in the early moments, leading to misdiagnosis. Necrotizing fasciitis is a potentially fatal infection and, consequently, resuscitation measures, wide-spectrum antibiotics, and early surgical debridement are required. This type of fasciitis can develop after blunt abdominal trauma following wall hernia without sk