Science.gov

Sample records for abdominal wall surgery

  1. Abdominal wall surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... the results of abdominoplasty. Many feel a new sense of self-confidence. Alternative Names Cosmetic surgery of the abdomen; Tummy tuck; Abdominoplasty Images Abdominoplasty - series Abdominal muscles References McGrath MH, Pomerantz J. Plastic surgery. In: Townsend ...

  2. Severe cellulitis and abdominal wall emphysema following laparoscopic colonic surgery: A case report.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Ryo; Kameyama, Hitoshi; Chida, Tadasu; Kanda, Tatsuo; Kano, Yosuke; Ichikawa, Hiroshi; Hanyu, Takaaki; Ishikawa, Takashi; Kosugi, Shin-Ichi; Wakai, Toshifumi

    2015-05-01

    Abdominal wall emphysema is a common complication of laparoscopic surgery. This condition is usually harmless; however, if an infection occurs, it can develop into a serious condition such as necrotizing fasciitis. We report a case of a 51-year-old woman suffering from severe cellulitis that spread from an area of abdominal wall emphysema after laparoscopic surgery for sigmoid colon cancer. Recognizing this complication, early diagnosis, and prompt treatment are cornerstones for successful management of this potentially fatal disease.

  3. Advances in surgery for abdominal wall defects: gastroschisis and omphalocele.

    PubMed

    Islam, Saleem

    2012-06-01

    Abdominal wall defects (AWDs) are a common congenital surgical problem in fetuses and neonates. The incidence of these defects has steadily increased over the past few decades due to rising numbers of gastroschisis. Most of these anomalies are diagnosed prenatally and then managed at a center with available pediatric surgical, neonatology, and high-risk obstetric support. Omphaloceles and gastroschisis are distinct anomalies that have different management and outcomes. There have been a number of recent advances in the care of patients with AWDs, both in the fetus and the newborn, which will be discussed in this article.

  4. Use of a hand-held Doppler to avoid abdominal wall vessels in laparoscopic surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Whiteley, M. S.; Laws, S. A.; Wise, M. H.

    1994-01-01

    Laparoscopy in general surgery is becoming a wide-spread technique. Substantial anterior abdominal wall haemorrhage is a recognised complication of the laparoscopic technique. Ten patients were examined with an 8 MHz hand-held Doppler and the anterior abdominal wall vessels were marked on the skin. Colour flow duplex was used to confirm the presence of vessels found in this way. All 40 epigastric arteries were marked accurately and confirmed; 75 other intramural arteries were identified, although the majority were too small for duplex confirmation. The preoperative use of hand-held Doppler is a quick and non-invasive way to identify the epigastric and larger intramural arteries. Routine use of this technique to mark abdominal wall vessels in the areas of trocar insertion should reduce this complication of laparoscopic surgery. PMID:7661918

  5. Vacuum-assisted abdominal wall lift for minimal-access surgery: a porcine model study.

    PubMed

    Udwadia, T E; Kathrani, B K; Bernie, W; Gadgil, U S; Chariar, V M

    2005-08-01

    Carbon dioxide pneumoperitoneum, although used universally in laparoscopy, has several well-documented complications and disadvantages. The authors describe a simple method of creating vacuum between a rigid shell and the abdominal wall in a porcine model to create adequate operative space for minimal-access surgery, which does not requires carbon dioxide, does not raise intraabdominal pressure, and is safe, cost effective, and feasible. The proposed device and method could be useful wherever basic laparoscopic equipment and a vacuum pump are available, including many parts of the developing world. The study was carried out with three groups using individual porcine models for each study. Group 1 was studied for feasibility of abdominal wall lift, adequacy of intraabdominal space, optimal vacuum levels, and safety and efficacy of the procedure. Group 2 was subjected to laparoscopic cholecystectomy and salpingectomy. Group 3 was studied for 2 days and 8 days after the animals were subjected to prolonged, high-level vacuum and monitored every 24 h to establish long-term effects. In all three groups the safety and efficacy of the proposed method were established, as well as the absence of physiological or histological alterations.

  6. Gasless laparoscopic surgery plus abdominal wall lifting for giant hiatal hernia-our single-center experience.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jiang-Hong; Wu, Ji-Xiang; Yu, Lei; Li, Jian-Ye

    2016-12-01

    Giant hiatal hernia (GHH) comprises 5% of hiatal hernia and is associated with significant complications. The traditional operative procedure, no matter transthoracic or transabdomen repair of giant hiatal hernia, is characteristic of more invasion and more complications. Although laparoscopic repair as a minimally invasive surgery is accepted, a part of patients can not tolerate pneumoperitoneum because of combination with cardiopulmonary diseases or severe posterior mediastinal and neck emphesema during operation. The aim of this article was to analyze our experience in gasless laparoscopic repair with abdominal wall lifting to treat the giant hiatal hernia. We performed a retrospective review of patients undergoing gasless laparoscopic repair of GHH with abdominal wall lifting from 2012 to 2015 at our institution. The GHH was defined as greater than one-third of the stomach in the chest. Gasless laparoscopic repair of GHH with abdominal wall lifting was attempted in 27 patients. Mean age was 67 years. The results showed that there were no conversions to open surgery and no intraoperative deaths. The mean duration of operation was 100 min (range: 90-130 min). One-side pleura was injured in 4 cases (14.8%). The mean postoperative length of stay was 4 days (range: 3-7 days). Median follow- up was 26 months (range: 6-38 months). Transient dysphagia for solid food occurred in three patients (11.1%), and this symptom disappeared within three months. There was one patient with recurrent hiatal hernia who was reoperated on. Two patients still complained of heartburn three months after surgery. Neither reoperation nor endoscopic treatment due to signs of postoperative esophageal stenosis was required in any patient. Totally, satisfactory outcome was reported in 88.9% patients. It was concluded that the gasless laparoscopic approach with abdominal wall lifting to the repair of GHH is feasible, safe, and effective for the patients who cannot tolerate the pneumoperitoneum.

  7. Recovery after abdominal wall reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Kristian Kiim

    2017-03-01

    Incisional hernia is a common long-term complication to abdominal surgery, occurring in more than 20% of all patients. Some of these hernias become giant and affect patients in several ways. This patient group often experiences pain, decreased perceived body image, and loss of physical function, which results in a need for surgical repair of the giant hernia, known as abdominal wall reconstruction. In the current thesis, patients with a giant hernia were examined to achieve a better understanding of their physical and psychological function before and after abdominal wall reconstruction. Study I was a systematic review of the existing standardized methods for assessing quality of life after incisional hernia repair. After a systematic search in the electronic databases Embase and PubMed, a total of 26 studies using standardized measures for assessment of quality of life after incisional hernia repair were found. The most commonly used questionnaire was the generic Short-Form 36, which assesses overall health-related quality of life, addressing both physical and mental health. The second-most common questionnaire was the Carolinas Comfort Scale, which is a disease specific questionnaire addressing pain, movement limitation and mesh sensation in relation to a current or previous hernia. In total, eight different questionnaires were used at varying time points in the 26 studies. In conclusion, standardization of timing and method of quality of life assessment after incisional hernia repair was lacking. Study II was a case-control study of the effects of an enhanced recovery after surgery pathway for patients undergoing abdominal wall reconstruction for a giant hernia. Sixteen consecutive patients were included prospectively after the implementation of a new enhanced recovery after surgery pathway at the Digestive Disease Center, Bispebjerg Hospital, and compared to a control group of 16 patients included retrospectively in the period immediately prior to the

  8. Lateral Abdominal Wall Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Baumann, Donald P.; Butler, Charles E.

    2012-01-01

    Lateral abdominal wall (LAW) defects can manifest as a flank hernias, myofascial laxity/bulges, or full-thickness defects. These defects are quite different from those in the anterior abdominal wall defects and the complexity and limited surgical options make repairing the LAW a challenge for the reconstructive surgeon. LAW reconstruction requires an understanding of the anatomy, physiologic forces, and the impact of deinnervation injury to design and perform successful reconstructions of hernia, bulge, and full-thickness defects. Reconstructive strategies must be tailored to address the inguinal ligament, retroperitoneum, chest wall, and diaphragm. Operative technique must focus on stabilization of the LAW to nonyielding points of fixation at the anatomic borders of the LAW far beyond the musculofascial borders of the defect itself. Thus, hernias, bulges, and full-thickness defects are approached in a similar fashion. Mesh reinforcement is uniformly required in lateral abdominal wall reconstruction. Inlay mesh placement with overlying myofascial coverage is preferred as a first-line option as is the case in anterior abdominal wall reconstruction. However, interposition bridging repairs are often performed as the surrounding myofascial tissue precludes a dual layered closure. The decision to place bioprosthetic or prosthetic mesh depends on surgeon preference, patient comorbidities, and clinical factors of the repair. Regardless of mesh type, the overlying soft tissue must provide stable cutaneous coverage and obliteration of dead space. In cases where the fasciocutaneous flaps surrounding the defect are inadequate for closure, regional pedicled flaps or free flaps are recruited to achieve stable soft tissue coverage. PMID:23372458

  9. Avoiding Complications in Abdominal Wall Surgery: A Mathematical Model to Predict the Course of the Motor Innervation of the Rectus Abdominis.

    PubMed

    Tessone, Ariel; Nava, Maurizio; Blondeel, Phillip; Spano, Andrea

    2016-02-01

    Ever since its introduction, the transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap has become the mainstay of autologous breast reconstruction. However, concerns regarding donor site morbidity due to the breach of abdominal wall musculature integrity soon followed. Muscle-sparing techniques, eventually eliminating the muscle from the flap all-together with the deep inferior epigastric artery perforator flap, did not eliminate the problem of abdominal wall weakness. This led to the conclusion that motor innervation might be at fault. Studies have shown that even in the presence of an intact rectus abdominis muscle, and an intact anterior rectus sheath, denervation of the rectus abdominis muscle results in significant abdominal wall weakness leading to superior and inferior abdominal bulges, and abdominal herniation. Our aim was to establish a mathematical model to predict the location of the motor innervation to the rectus abdominis muscle, and thus provide surgeons with a tool that will allow them to reduce abdominal morbidity during deep inferior epigastric artery perforator and free muscle-sparing transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous surgery. We dissected 42 cadaveric hemiabdomens and mapped the course of the thoracolumbar nerves. We then standardized and analyzed our findings and presented them as a relative map which can be adjusted to body type and dimensions. Our dissections show that the motor innervation is closely related to the lateral vascular supply. Thus, when possible, we support the preferred utilization of the medial vascular supply, and the preservation of the lateral supply and motor innervation.

  10. Economics of abdominal wall reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Bower, Curtis; Roth, J Scott

    2013-10-01

    The economic aspects of abdominal wall reconstruction are frequently overlooked, although understandings of the financial implications are essential in providing cost-efficient health care. Ventral hernia repairs are frequently performed surgical procedures with significant economic ramifications for employers, insurers, providers, and patients because of the volume of procedures, complication rates, the significant rate of recurrence, and escalating costs. Because biological mesh materials add significant expense to the costs of treating complex abdominal wall hernias, the role of such costly materials needs to be better defined to ensure the most cost-efficient and effective treatments for ventral abdominal wall hernias.

  11. Indications and Outcomes of the Components Separation Technique in the Repair of Complex Abdominal Wall Hernias: Experience From the Cambridge Plastic Surgery Department

    PubMed Central

    Adekunle, Shola; Pantelides, Nicholas M.; Hall, Nigel R.; Praseedom, Raaj; Malata, Charles M.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The components separation technique (CST) is a widely described abdominal wall reconstructive technique. There have, however, been no UK reports of its use, prompting the present review. Methods: Between 2008 and 2012, 13 patients who underwent this procedure by a single plastic surgeon (C.M.M.) were retrospectively evaluated. The indications, operative details, and clinical outcomes were recorded. Results: There were 7 women and 6 men in the series with a mean age of 53 years (range: 30-80). Patients were referred from a variety of specialties, often as a last resort. The commonest indication for CST was herniation following abdominal surgery. All operations except 1 were jointly performed with general surgeons (for bowel resection, stoma reversal, and hernia dissection). The operations lasted a mean of 5 hours (range: 3-8 hours). There were no major intra- and postoperative problems, except in 1 patient who developed intra-abdominal compartment syndrome, secondary to massive hemorrhage. All patients were satisfied with the cosmetic improvement in their abdominal contours. None of the patients have developed a clinical recurrence after a mean follow-up of 16 months (range: 3-38 months). Conclusions: The components separation technique is an effective method of treating large recalcitrant hernias but appears to be underutilized in the United Kingdom. The management of large abdominal wall defects requires a multidisciplinary approach, with input across a variety of specialities. Liaison with plastic surgery teams should be encouraged at an early stage and the CST should be more widely considered when presented with seemingly intractable abdominal wall defects. PMID:24058718

  12. Incentive spirometry after abdominal surgery.

    PubMed

    Davis, Suja P

    Patients face various possible complications after abdominal surgery. This article examines best practice in guiding and teaching them how to use an incentive spirometer to facilitate recovery and prevent respiratory complications.

  13. Abdominal surgery in neonatal foals.

    PubMed

    Bryant, James E; Gaughan, Earl M

    2005-08-01

    Abdominal surgery in foals under 30 days old has become more common with improved neonatal care. Early recognition of a foal at risk and better nursing care have increased the survival rates of foals that require neonatal care. The success of improved neonatal care also has increased the need for accurate diagnosis and treatment of gastrointestinal, umbilical, and bladder disorders in these foals. This chapter focuses on the early and accurate diagnosis of specific disorders that require abdominal exploratory surgery and the specific treatment considerations and prognosis for these disorders.

  14. [What do general, abdominal and vascular surgeons need to know on plastic surgery - aspects of plastic surgery in the field of general, abdominal and vascular surgery].

    PubMed

    Damert, H G; Altmann, S; Stübs, P; Infanger, M; Meyer, F

    2015-02-01

    There is overlap between general, abdominal and vascular surgery on one hand and plastic surgery on the other hand, e.g., in hernia surgery, in particular, recurrent hernia, reconstruction of the abdominal wall or defect closure after abdominal or vascular surgery. Bariatric operations involve both special fields too. Plastic surgeons sometimes use skin and muscle compartments of the abdominal wall for reconstruction at other regions of the body. This article aims to i) give an overview about functional, anatomic and clinical aspects as well as the potential of surgical interventions in plastic surgery. General/abdominal/vascular surgeons can benefit from this in their surgical planning and competent execution of their own surgical interventions with limited morbidity/lethality and an optimal, in particular, functional as well as aesthetic outcome, ii) support the interdisciplinary work of general/abdominal/vascular and plastic surgery, and iii) provide a better understanding of plastic surgery and its profile of surgical interventions and options.

  15. Blunt traumatic abdominal wall disruption with evisceration

    PubMed Central

    McDaniel, Ellen; Stawicki, Stanislaw PA; Bahner, David P

    2011-01-01

    Blunt traumatic abdominal wall disruptions associated with evisceration are very rare. The authors describe a case of traumatic abdominal wall disruption with bowel evisceration that occurred after a middle-aged woman sustained direct focal blunt force impact to the lower abdomen. Abdominal exploration and surgical repair of the abdominal wall defect were performed, with good clinical outcome. A brief overview of literature pertinent to this rare trauma scenario is presented. PMID:22229144

  16. Advanced Gastric Cancer Perforation Mimicking Abdominal Wall Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Jinbeom; Park, Ilyoung; Lee, Dosang; Sung, Kiyoung; Baek, Jongmin

    2015-01-01

    Surgeons occasionally encounter a patient with a gastric cancer invading an adjacent organ, such as the pancreas, liver, or transverse colon. Although there is no established guideline for treatment of invasive gastric cancer, combined resection with radical gastrectomy is conventionally performed for curative purposes. We recently treated a patient with a large gastric cancer invading the abdominal wall, which was initially diagnosed as a simple abdominal wall abscess. Computed tomography showed that an abscess had formed adjacent to the greater curvature of the stomach. During surgery, we made an incision on the abdominal wall to drain the abscess, and performed curative total gastrectomy with partial excision of the involved abdominal wall. The patient received intensive treatment and wound management postoperatively with no surgery-related adverse events. However, the patient could not receive adjuvant chemotherapy and expired on the 82nd postoperative day. PMID:26468420

  17. Isolated Abdominal Wall Metastasis of Endometrial Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Simões, Jorge; Gonçalves, Matilde; Matos, Isabel

    2014-01-01

    A woman in her mid-60s presented with a bulky mass on the anterior abdominal wall. She had a previous incidental diagnosis of endometrial adenocarcinoma FIGO stage IB following a vaginal hysterectomy. Physical exam and imaging revealed a well circumscribed bulging tumour at the umbilical region, measuring 10 × 9 × 9 cm, with overlying intact skin and subcutaneous tissue. Surgical resection was undertaken, and histological examination showed features of endometrial carcinoma. She began chemotherapy and is alive with no signs of recurrent disease one year after surgery. This case brings up to light an atypical location of a solitary metastasis of endometrial carcinoma. PMID:25349753

  18. [Hypogastric abdominal wall reconstruction with a pedicled anterolateral thigh flap].

    PubMed

    Moullot, P; Philandrianos, C; Gonnelli, D; Casanova, D

    2014-10-01

    Looking at a full-thickness abdominal wall defect, it is necessary to use reconstructive surgery techniques. The authors present an original case of reconstruction of the abdominal wall, using an anterolateral thigh flap (ALT) harvested with vascularised fascia lata. We describe the advantages of this technique, which has rarely been used for this indication. An 80-year-old woman presenting a full-thickness abdominal wall defect of 15×18cm was reconstructed by a pedicled ALT flap. Skin wound healing was obtained within 15 days, with no complication. There was no donor site sequela. The pedicled ALT flap appears to be a good solution for hypogastric abdominal wall defect in a one step procedure. Vacularised fascia lata bring with the cutaneous flap is useful to reconstruct the abdominal fascia.

  19. Practical Approaches to Definitive Reconstruction of Complex Abdominal Wall Defects.

    PubMed

    Latifi, Rifat

    2016-04-01

    With advances in abdominal surgery and the management of major trauma, complex abdominal wall defects have become the new surgical disease, and the need for abdominal wall reconstruction has increased dramatically. Subsequently, how to reconstruct these large defects has become a new surgical question. While most surgeons use native abdominal wall whenever possible, evidence suggests that synthetic or biologic mesh needs to be added to large ventral hernia repairs. One particular group of patients who exemplify "complex" are those with contaminated wounds, enterocutaneous fistulas, enteroatmospheric fistulas, and/or stoma(s), where synthetic mesh is to be avoided if at all possible. Most recently, biologic mesh has become the new standard in high-risk patients with contaminated and dirty-infected wounds. While biologic mesh is the most common tissue engineered used in this field of surgery, level I evidence is needed on its indication and long-term outcomes. Various techniques for reconstructing the abdominal wall have been described, however the long-term outcomes for most of these studies, are rarely reported. In this article, I outline current practical approaches to perioperative management and definitive abdominal reconstruction in patients with complex abdominal wall defects, with or without fistulas, as well as those who have lost abdominal domain.

  20. Desmoid tumor of the abdominal wall: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Desmoid tumors are rare lesions without any metastatic potential but a strong tendency to invade locally and to recur. These tumors are associated with women of fertile age, especially during and after pregnancy. Case presentation The case of a desmoid tumor of the anterior abdominal wall in a 40-year-old Caucasian man with no relevant family history is presented, describing its appearance on computed tomography and ultrasonography. The patient, who presented with a painless mass in the left anterolateral abdomen, had a history of previous urgent abdominal surgery after a shotgun injury two years earlier. Radical resection of the affected abdominal wall musculature was performed, and the defect was reconstructed with polypropylene mesh. Conclusion The diagnosis of desmoid tumor should be strongly considered even in male patients with an abdominal mass and a history of previous abdominal surgery. The goal of its treatment is complete tumor excision and avoidance of the development of complications such as hernia. PMID:21787413

  1. Mechanical ventilation in abdominal surgery.

    PubMed

    Futier, E; Godet, T; Millot, A; Constantin, J-M; Jaber, S

    2014-01-01

    One of the key challenges in perioperative care is to reduce postoperative morbidity and mortality. Patients who develop postoperative morbidity but survive to leave hospital have often reduced functional independence and long-term survival. Mechanical ventilation provides a specific example that may help us to shift thinking from treatment to prevention of postoperative complications. Mechanical ventilation in patients undergoing surgery has long been considered only as a modality to ensure gas exchange while allowing maintenance of anesthesia with delivery of inhaled anesthetics. Evidence is accumulating, however, suggesting an association between intraoperative mechanical ventilation strategy and postoperative pulmonary function and clinical outcome in patients undergoing abdominal surgery. Non-protective ventilator settings, especially high tidal volume (VT) (>10-12mL/kg) and the use of very low level of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) (PEEP<5cmH2O) or no PEEP, may cause alveolar overdistension and repetitive tidal recruitment leading to ventilator-associated lung injury in patients with healthy lungs. Stimulated by previous findings in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome, the use of lower tidal volume ventilation is becoming increasingly more common in the operating room. However, lowering tidal volume, though important, is only part of the overall multifaceted approach of lung protective mechanical ventilation. In this review, we aimed at providing the most recent and relevant clinical evidence regarding the use of mechanical ventilation in patients undergoing abdominal surgery.

  2. Pulmonary complications of abdominal wall defects.

    PubMed

    Panitch, Howard B

    2015-01-01

    The abdominal wall is an integral component of the chest wall. Defects in the ventral abdominal wall alter respiratory mechanics and can impair diaphragm function. Congenital abdominal wall defects also are associated with abnormalities in lung growth and development that lead to pulmonary hypoplasia, pulmonary hypertension, and alterations in thoracic cage formation. Although infants with ventral abdominal wall defects can experience life-threatening pulmonary complications, older children typically experience a more benign respiratory course. Studies of lung and chest wall function in older children and adolescents with congenital abdominal wall defects are few; such investigations could provide strategies for improved respiratory performance, avoidance of respiratory morbidity, and enhanced exercise ability for these children.

  3. Soft tissue coverage in abdominal wall reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Donald P; Butler, Charles E

    2013-10-01

    Abdominal wall defects requiring soft tissue coverage can be either partial-thickness defects or full-thickness composite defects. Soft tissue flap reconstruction offers significant advantages in defects that cannot be closed primarily. Flap reconstruction is performed in a single-stage procedure obviating chronic wound management. If the defect size exceeds the availability of local soft tissue for coverage, regional pedicled flaps can be delivered into the abdominal wall while maintaining blood supply from their donor site. Microsurgical free tissue transfer increases the capacity to provide soft tissue coverage for abdominal wall defects that are not amenable to either local or regional flap coverage.

  4. Transversus abdominal plane block as a sole anesthetic technique for abdominal wall hematoma drainage.

    PubMed

    Varela, N; Golvano, M; Monedero, P

    2016-10-01

    Transversus abdominal plane (TAP) block is a known and useful technique, widely used for postoperative pain management of abdominal wall incisions. During the past years, and following the expansion of ultrasound guided techniques, its use has even gained more adepts. It is usually used as an adjuvant technique, primarily in order to control postoperative pain and reduce opioids consumption. We report the case of an 82 years old patient admitted for drainage of a postoperative abdominal wall hematoma after correction of a McBurney incisional hernia. The corrective surgery had gone on without incident, under general anesthesia with laryngeal mask. Two weeks later, the patient came back to our emergency department with a clear hematoma of the abdominal wall. Surgery was decided. A sole local anesthetic technique was achieved, using a TAP block. The block was performed under ultrasound guidance, using a subcostal approach. The surgery went on without complications. Therefore, TAP block offers a hemodynamic stability, appropriate intra-operative anesthesia and post-surgical analgesia of the abdominal wall.

  5. Takedown of enterocutaneous fistula and complex abdominal wall reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Slade, Dominic Alexander James; Carlson, Gordon Lawrence

    2013-10-01

    Key steps in managing patients with enterocutaneous fistulation and an abdominal wall defect include dealing effectively with abdominal sepsis and providing safe and effective nutritional support and skin care, then assessing intestinal and abdominal anatomy, before undertaking reconstructive surgery. The complexity, cost, and morbidity associated with such cases justifies creation of specialized centers in which gastroenterologic, hernia, and plastic surgical expertise, as well as experienced wound and stoma nursing and nutritional and psychological support, can be made available for patients with these challenging problems.

  6. Tunnelled tensor fascia lata flap for complex abdominal wall reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Frederick; Buonocore, Samuel; Narayan, Deepak

    2011-01-01

    This study describes the treatment of two patients with recurrent, infected abdominal wall defects using bilateral delayed and tunnelled pedicled tensor fascia lata (TFL) myofascial flaps. TFL flaps were elevated and delayed for 4 weeks in both cases. In the second case, Parietex Composite mesh was positioned underneath the TFL flap and allowed to incorporate. After a delay of 4 weeks, the flaps were harvested and tunnelled subcutaneously to repair the abdominal wall defect. Both patients have stable repairs but had donor site seromas requiring drainage. Cadaver dissection was also performed to identify structures related to TFL flap harvest. We identified a variant of lateral femoral cutaneous nerve that traversed the TFL flap, necessitating meticulous dissection during surgery. In summary, we describe a new technique of incorporating mesh into the TFL prior to flap harvest for reconstruction of complex abdominal wall. PMID:22707661

  7. Synthetic, biological and composite scaffolds for abdominal wall reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Meintjes, Jennifer; Yan, Sheng; Zhou, Lin; Zheng, Shusen; Zheng, Minghao

    2011-03-01

    The reconstruction of abdominal wall defects remains a huge surgical challenge. Tension-free repair is proven to be superior to suture repair in abdominal wall reconstruction. Scaffolds are essential for tension-free repair. They are used to bridge a defect or reinforce the abdominal wall. A huge variety of scaffolds are now commercially available. Most of the synthetic scaffolds are composed of polypropylene. They provide strong tissue reinforcement, but cause a foreign body reaction, which can result in serious complications. Absorbable synthetic scaffolds, such as Dexon™ (polyglycolic acid) and Vicryl™ (polyglactin 910), are not suitable for abdominal wall reconstruction as they usually require subsequent surgeries to repair recurrent hernias. Composite scaffolds combine the strength of nonabsorbable synthetic scaffolds with the antiadhesive properties of the absorbable scaffold, but require long-term follow-up. Biological scaffolds, such as Permacol™, Surgisis(®) and Alloderm(®), are derived from acellular mammalian tissues. Non-cross-linked biological scaffolds show excellent biocompatibility and degrade slowly over time. However, remnant DNA has been found in several products and the degradation leads to recurrence. Randomized controlled trials with long-term follow-up studies are lacking for all of the available scaffolds, particularly those derived from animal tissue. This article provides an overview of the different types of scaffolds available, and presents the key clinical studies of the commercially available synthetic, composite and biological scaffolds for abdominal wall reconstruction.

  8. [The cutaneous groin flap for coverage of a full-thickness abdominal wall defect].

    PubMed

    Doebler, O; Spierer, R

    2010-08-01

    A full-thickness defect of the abdominal wall is rare and may occur as a complication of extended abdominal surgery procedures. We report about a 69-year-old patient who was presented to our department with a full-thickness abdominal wall defect and a fully exposed collagen-mesh for reconstructive wound closure. 13 operations with resections of necrotic parts of the abdominal wall were performed following a complicated intraabdominal infection. After debridement and mesh explantation, closure of the remaining defect of the lower abdominal region was achieved by a cutaneous groin flap.

  9. [A Case of Abdominal Wall Hernia Rupture during Bevacizumab Treatment].

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Satoshi; Miyazaki, Yasuaki; Hirose, Sou; Michiura, Toshiya; Fujita, Shigeo; Yamabe, Kazuo; Miyazaki, Satoru; Nagaoka, Makio

    2015-11-01

    A 78 -year-old man with rectal cancer underwent abdominoperineal resection of the rectum. In the postoperative period, the patient experienced wound infection, leading to an abdominal wall hernia. Two years following surgery, a rise in the serum CEA level was seen. A metastatic tumor was detected in the right lung on chest CT. VATS right lung inferior lobe segmental resection was performed. After lobectomy, the serum CEA level continued to increase. Another metastatic tumor was detected in the right lung on chest CT. Chemotherapy with capecitabine, oxaliplatin, and bevacizumab was commenced. The erosive part of the abdominal wall scar hernia extended during the nine weeks of chemotherapy. The chemotherapy was then discontinued. In the follow-up CT scan, a right pleural recurrence, local recurrence in the pelvis, and a liver metastasis were detected. Chemotherapy was re-introduced 3 years after surgery. The erosive part of the abdominal wall hernia again began to spread with chemotherapy recommencement. Four months after restarting chemotherapy, the hernia ruptured, with a loop of the small intestine protruding out of it. The patient covered this with a sheet of vinyl and was taken by the ambulance to our hospital. The erosive part of the abdominal wall hernia had split by 10 cm, and a loop of the small intestine was protruding. As ischemia of the small intestine was not observed, we replaced it into the abdominal cavity, and performed a temporary suture repair of the hernia sac. Following this, bevacizumab was discontinued, and the erosive part reduced. We performed a radical operation for abdominal wall scar hernia repair 11 weeks after the discontinuation of bevacizumab.

  10. [An example of multi-stage reconstruction of a full-thickness abdominal wall defect].

    PubMed

    Kaczmarzyk, Janusz; Elsaftawy, Ahmed; Jabłecki, Jerzy; Kaczmarzyk, Leszek

    2013-01-01

    Abdominal wall reconstruction is a highly complex procedure that may requires a multiple stages surgical operations. The aim of a such reconstruction is to close the abdominal wall defect and to create a support for the internal organs. It's a challenge for both general and reconstructive surgery. An incomplete thickness defects of the abdominal wall are so much easier to challenge than complete ones. Also the size of the primary defect determines the way and stages of the operation. Such defects can occur in necrotizing fasciitis of the abdominal wall, after abdominal walls tumors removal, in traffic accidents or after "open abdomen" procedures (acute severe pancreatitis). In this paper the authors present a case of 62-yo patient which was operated because of large intestine perforation with various complications of which the most serious was the abdominal wall defect.

  11. Reconstruction of complex abdominal wall defects.

    PubMed

    Leppäniemi, A; Tukiainen, E

    2013-01-01

    Complex abdominal wall defects refer to situations where simple ventral hernia repair is not feasible because the defect is very large, there is a concomitant infection or failed previous re-pair attempt, or if there is not enough original skin to cover the repair. Usually a complex abdominal wall repair is preceded by a period of temporary abdominal closure where the short-term aims include closure of the catabolic drain, protection of the viscera and preventing fistula formation, preventing bowel adherence to the abdominal wall, and enabling future fascial and skin closure. Currently the best way to achieve these goals is the vacuum- and mesh-mediated fascial traction method achieving close to 90% fascial closure rates. The long-term aims of an abdominal closure following a planned hernia strategy include intact skin cover, fascial closure at midline (if possible), good functional outcome with innervated abdominal musculature, no pain and good cosmetic result. The main methods of abdominal wall reconstruction include the use of prosthetic (mesh) or autologous material (tissue flaps). In patients with original skin cover over the fascial defect (simple ventral hernia), the most commonly used method is hernia repair with an artificial mesh. For more complex defects, our first choice of reconstruction is the component separation technique, sometimes combined with a mesh. In contaminated fields where component separation alone is not feasible, a combination with a biological mesh can be used. In large defects with grafted skin, a free TFL flap is the best option, sometimes reinforced with a mesh and enhanced with components separation.

  12. Thoraco-abdominal wall reconstruction after surgical debulking of a giant retroperitoneal liposarcoma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Colebunders, B; Colpaert, S D M; Mertens, M; Willemsen, P

    2011-01-01

    A case of a patient with a recurrent dedifferentiated retroperitoneal liposarcoma with extensive invasion of the thoraco-abdominal wall including the skin, requiring reconstructive surgery after debulking of the tumor is reported.

  13. Genetics Home Reference: abdominal wall defect

    MedlinePlus

    ... Aug;6(4):232-6. Citation on PubMed Islam S. Clinical care outcomes in abdominal wall defects. Curr ... Site Map Customer Support Selection Criteria for Links USA.gov Copyright Privacy Accessibility FOIA Viewers & Players U.S. ...

  14. Constipation Risk in Patients Undergoing Abdominal Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Celik, Sevim; Atar, Nurdan Yalcin; Ozturk, Nilgun; Mendes, Guler; Kuytak, Figen; Bakar, Esra; Dalgiran, Duygu; Ergin, Sumeyra

    2015-01-01

    Background: Problems regarding bowel elimination are quite common in patients undergoing abdominal surgery. Objectives: To determine constipation risk before the surgery, bowel elimination during postoperative period, and the factors affecting bowel elimination. Patients and Methods: This is a cross-sectional study. It was conducted in a general surgery ward of a university hospital in Zonguldak, Turkey between January 2013 and May 2013. A total of 107 patients were included in the study, who were selected by convenience sampling. Constipation Risk Assessment Scale (CRAS), patient information form, medical and nursing records were used in the study. Results: The mean age of the patients was found to be 55.97 ± 15.74 (year). Most of the patients have undergone colon (37.4%) and stomach surgeries (21.5%). Open surgical intervention (83.2%) was performed on almost all patients (96.3%) under general anesthesia. Patients were at moderate risk for constipation with average scores of 11.71 before the surgery. A total of 77 patients (72%) did not have bowel elimination problem during postoperative period. The type of the surgery (P < 0.05), starting time for oral feeding after the surgery (P < 0.05), and mobilization (P < 0.05) were effective on postoperative bowel elimination. Conclusions: There is a risk for constipation after abdominal surgery. Postoperative practices are effective on the risk of constipation. PMID:26380107

  15. Standing diagnostic and therapeutic equine abdominal surgery.

    PubMed

    Graham, Sarah; Freeman, David

    2014-04-01

    The widespread use of laparoscopy in equine surgery has increased interest in the standing approach to a wide range of procedures typically regarded as feasible only through a ventral midline incision. Although a commonly cited benefit of standing surgery relates to avoiding costs of general anesthesia and risks associated with it, some procedures and horses are not suitable candidates for standing abdominal procedures. Some procedures, such as nephrectomy, colostomy, and closure of the nephrosplenic space, are not only suitable for standing surgery but are performed more easily and more safely through this approach than with general anesthesia.

  16. Mesh Sutured Repairs of Abdominal Wall Defects

    PubMed Central

    Lanier, Steven T.; Jordan, Sumanas W.; Miller, Kyle R.; Ali, Nada A.; Stock, Stuart R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: A new closure technique is introduced, which uses strips of macroporous polypropylene mesh as a suture for closure of abdominal wall defects due to failures of standard sutures and difficulties with planar meshes. Methods: Strips of macroporous polypropylene mesh of 2 cm width were passed through the abdominal wall and tied as simple interrupted sutures. The surgical technique and surgical outcomes are presented. Results: One hundred and seven patients underwent a mesh sutured abdominal wall closure. Seventy-six patients had preoperative hernias, and the mean hernia width by CT scan for those with scans was 9.1 cm. Forty-nine surgical fields were clean-contaminated, contaminated, or dirty. Five patients had infections within the first 30 days. Only one knot was removed as an office procedure. Mean follow-up at 234 days revealed 4 recurrent hernias. Conclusions: Mesh sutured repairs reliably appose tissue under tension using concepts of force distribution and resistance to suture pull-through. The technique reduces the amount of foreign material required in comparison to sheet meshes, and avoids the shortcomings of monofilament sutures. Mesh sutured closures seem to be tolerant of bacterial contamination with low hernia recurrence rates and have replaced our routine use of mesh sheets and bioprosthetic grafts. PMID:27757361

  17. Effect of laparoscopic abdominal surgery on splanchnic circulation: historical developments.

    PubMed

    Hatipoglu, Sinan; Akbulut, Sami; Hatipoglu, Filiz; Abdullayev, Ruslan

    2014-12-28

    With the developments in medical technology and increased surgical experience, advanced laparoscopic surgical procedures are performed successfully. Laparoscopic abdominal surgery is one of the best examples of advanced laparoscopic surgery (LS). Today, laparoscopic abdominal surgery in general surgery clinics is the basis of all abdominal surgical interventions. Laparoscopic abdominal surgery is associated with systemic and splanchnic hemodynamic alterations. Inadequate splanchnic perfusion in critically ill patients is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. The underlying pathophysiological mechanisms are still not well understood. With experience and with an increase in the number and diversity of the resulting data, the pathophysiology of laparoscopic abdominal surgery is now better understood. The normal physiology and pathophysiology of local and systemic effects of laparoscopic abdominal surgery is extremely important for safe and effective LS. Future research projects should focus on the interplay between the physiological regulatory mechanisms in the splanchnic circulation (SC), organs, and diseases. In this review, we discuss the effects of laparoscopic abdominal surgery on the SC.

  18. Rectus abdominis muscle resection and fascial reconstruction for the treatment of uterine leiomyosarcoma invading the abdominal wall: a case report.

    PubMed

    Yoon, B S; Seong, S J; Song, T; Kim, M L; Kim, M K

    2014-01-01

    The authors present a case of intra-abdominal recurrent leiomyosarcoma invading a large area of the abdominal wall. The patient underwent cytoreductive surgery, including resection of the rectus abdominis muscle, followed by reconstruction of the defect using synthetic mesh. The tumor was surgically removed by en bloc resection, including most of the rectus abdominis muscle and ileum. The abdominal wall defect was repaired using synthetic mesh. The patient underwent radiotherapy and chemotherapy after the surgery and was healthy one year later.

  19. Virtual modeling of robot-assisted manipulations in abdominal surgery

    PubMed Central

    Berelavichus, Stanislav V; Karmazanovsky, Grigory G; Shirokov, Vadim S; Kubyshkin, Valeriy A; Kriger, Andrey G; Kondratyev, Evgeny V; Zakharova, Olga P

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To determine the effectiveness of using multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) data in preoperative planning of robot-assisted surgery. METHODS: Fourteen patients indicated for surgery underwent MDCT using 64 and 256-slice MDCT. Before the examination, a specially constructed navigation net was placed on the patient’s anterior abdominal wall. Processing of MDCT data was performed on a Brilliance Workspace 4 (Philips). Virtual vectors that imitate robotic and assistant ports were placed on the anterior abdominal wall of the 3D model of the patient, considering the individual anatomy of the patient and the technical capabilities of robotic arms. Sites for location of the ports were directed by projection on the roentgen-positive tags of the navigation net. RESULTS: There were no complications observed during surgery or in the post-operative period. We were able to reduce robotic arm interference during surgery. The surgical area was optimal for robotic and assistant manipulators without any need for reinstallation of the trocars. CONCLUSION: This method allows modeling of the main steps in robot-assisted intervention, optimizing operation of the manipulator and lowering the risk of injuries to internal organs. PMID:22816028

  20. Abdominal Wall Haematoma Complicating Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy

    PubMed Central

    Tate, J. J. T.; Davidson, B. R.; Hobbs, K. E. F.

    1994-01-01

    Of 61 consecutive patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy, 4 (6.25%) developed abdominal wall haematomas. This complication of laparoscopic cholecystectomy may occur more commonly than existing literature suggests, and manifests in the post-operative period (days 2 to 6) by visible bruising, excessive pain or an asymptomatic drop in haematocrit. It is readily confirmed by ultrasonography. While no specific treatment is necessary apart from replacement of significant blood loss, the patient requires reassurance that this apparently alarming complication will rapidly resolve. PMID:8204548

  1. Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy following previous abdominal surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Stellato, T A; Gauderer, M W; Ponsky, J L

    1984-01-01

    During a 36-month period, 89 patients have undergone percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy without mortality. Of these patients, 25 (13 infants and children, 12 adults) had prior abdominal procedures that increased their risk for the endoscopic procedure. With two exceptions, all gastrostomies were performed utilizing local anesthesia. There was one major complication, a gastrocolic fistula, which was successfully managed by repeating the endoscopic gastrostomy procedure at a location more cephalad in the stomach. Twenty-two of the gastrostomies were placed for feeding purposes and all of these patients were able to leave the hospital with alimentation accomplished via the tube. Three of the endoscopically placed gastrostomies were for gastrointestinal tract decompression. A total of 255 patient months have been accumulated in these patients with the endoscopically placed gastrostomy in situ. The technique can be safely performed in patients with prior abdominal surgery and in the majority of cases is the technique of choice for establishing a tube gastrostomy. PMID:6428334

  2. Modern reconstructive techniques for abdominal wall defects after oncologic resection.

    PubMed

    Khansa, Ibrahim; Janis, Jeffrey E

    2015-04-01

    Resection of abdominal wall tumors often leaves patients with debilitating soft tissue defects. Modern reconstructive techniques can be used to restore abdominal wall integrity. In this article, we present an overview of preoperative patient evaluation, analysis of the defect, surgical planning, and the spectrum of available surgical techniques, ranging from simple to complex. The established clinical evidence in the field of abdominal wall reconstruction is summarized and a case example is provided.

  3. Remote revascularization of abdominal wall transplants using the forearm.

    PubMed

    Giele, H; Bendon, C; Reddy, S; Ramcharan, R; Sinha, S; Friend, P; Vaidya, A

    2014-06-01

    Primary abdominal wall closure following small bowel transplantation is frequently impossible due to contraction of the abdominal domain. Although abdominal wall transplantation was reported 10 years ago this, technique has not been widely adopted, partly due to its complexity, but largely because of concerns that storing the abdominal allograft until the end of a prolonged intestinal transplant procedure would cause severe ischemia-reperfusion injury. We report six cases of combined small bowel and abdominal wall transplantation where the ischemic time was minimized by remotely revascularizing the abdominal wall on the forearm vessels, synchronous to the intestinal procedure. When the visceral transplant was complete, the abdominal wall was removed from the forearm and revascularized on the abdomen (n = 4), or used to close the abdomen while still vascularized on the forearm (n = 2). Primary abdominal wall closure was achieved in all. Mean cold ischemia was 305 min (300-330 min), and revascularization on the arm was 50 min (30-60 min). Three patients had proven abdominal wall rejection, all treated successfully. Immediate revascularization of the abdominal wall allograft substantially reduces cold ischemia without imposing constraints on the intestinal transplant. Reducing storage time may also have benefits with respect to ischemia-reperfusion-related graft immunogenicity.

  4. PET/CT detects abdominal wall and port site metastases of colorectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Goshen, E; Davidson, T; Aderka, D; Zwas, S T

    2006-07-01

    Abdominal wall metastases from colorectal cancer (CRC) may be resected with curative results. Such lesions, often indicators of additional intra-abdominal lesions, may appear in surgical scars, stomas and port site metastases after laparoscope-assisted surgery (LAS). Post-operative changes, primarily surgical scars, alter local physical findings making early detection of small lesions challenging. The purpose of this study was to retrospectively evaluate the contribution of PET/CT to the diagnosis of recurrent colorectal cancer in the post-operative abdominal wall. 120 patients were referred for PET/CT with suspected recurrent CRC based on clinical, radiological or laboratory findings. All underwent whole body PET/CT imaging. 12 of these 120 (10%), were found to have abdominal wall lesions. A total of 16 abdominal wall lesions were detected, located to surgical scars, stomas, drain and laparoscope ports. Additional findings on PET/CT in this group included liver metastases, intra-abdominal lesions and retroperitoneal lymph node involvement. In general, the patients in this small group were young with high grade tumours presenting in advanced stages. In conclusion, PET/CT appears to be a sensitive tool for the diagnosis of abdominal wall recurrence of CRC. The accuracy of localization afforded by the fused functional and anatomic images makes PET/CT a likely tool for diagnosing abdominal wall lesions, including port site metastases of other aetiologies.

  5. Abdominal sling surgery--artificial sacro-uterine ligament.

    PubMed

    Draca, Petar; Miljković, Stamenko; Jakovljević, Branislava

    2002-01-01

    Abdominal sling surgery is defined as attachment of either the connective tissue graft (fascia lata) or some synthetic material (Mersilene) to the anterior wall of the exposed vaginal vault following total hysterectomy or to the posterior wall of the uterine cervix in total and subtotal uterine prolapse, whereas the other end is attached to the anterior longitudinal ligament extending along the anterior surface of the vertebrae. Our analysis comprised 45 operations: 20 cases of vaginal vault prolapse following vaginal hysterectomy; 7 cases of vaginal vault prolapse following HTA: 2 cases of prolapse following subtotal hysterectomy; 3 cases of nondefined TH; 2 cases following Burch operation; 1 following Kocher; 1 following Manchester, 1 following Neugebauer-Le Fort operation in which HTA was performed 2 times. Abdominal sling operation was associated with the following surgical procedures: sling in 13 cases, sling + douglasorrhaphy in 16 cases, sling + douglasorrhaphy + colpoperineoplastics in 6 cases, sling + colpoperineoplastics in 9 cases and sling + marshall marcetti in 1 case. Recurrence of enterocele was recorded in 5 patients in whom closure of the douglas pouch had not been performed. This procedure was therefore later included into our approach to the operation. The abdominal sling operation has been a logical and physiologic approach to surgical therapy of genital prolapse, particularly of the vaginal vault prolapse following total hysterectomy. This operation ensures subsequent normal sexual relations.

  6. Reconstruction of abdominal wall musculofascial defects with small intestinal submucosa scaffolds seeded with tenocytes in rats.

    PubMed

    Song, Zhicheng; Peng, Zhiyou; Liu, Zhengni; Yang, Jianjun; Tang, Rui; Gu, Yan

    2013-07-01

    The repair of abdominal wall defects following surgery remains a difficult challenge. Although multiple methods have been described to restore the integrity of the abdominal wall, there is no clear consensus on the ideal material for reconstruction. This study explored the feasibility of in vivo reconstruction of a rat model of an abdominal wall defect with a composite scaffold of tenocytes and porcine small intestinal submucosa (SIS). In the current study, we created a 2×1.5 cm abdominal wall defect in the anterolateral abdominal wall of Sprague-Dawley rats, which were assigned into three groups: the cell-SIS construct group, the cell-free SIS scaffold group, and the abdominal wall defect group. Tenocytes were obtained from the tendons of rat limbs. After isolation and expansion, cells (2×10(7)/mL) were seeded onto the three-layer SIS scaffolds and cultured in vitro for 5 days. Cell-SIS constructs or cell-free constructs were implanted to repair the abdominal wall defects. The results showed that the tenocytes could grow on the SIS scaffold and secreted corresponding matrices. In addition, both scaffolds could repair the abdominal wall defects with no hernia recurrence. In comparison to the cell-free SIS scaffold, the composite scaffold exhibited increased vascular regeneration and mechanical strength. Furthermore, following increased time in vivo, the mechanical strength of the composite scaffold became stronger. The results indicate that the composite scaffold can provide increased mechanical strength that may be suitable for repairing abdominal wall defects.

  7. Vertically transmitted hypoplasia of the abdominal wall musculature.

    PubMed

    Chan, Yuin-Chew; Bird, Lynne M

    2004-01-01

    The prune belly syndrome (OMIM 100100) is an association of bladder dilation with hypoplasia of the abdominal wall muscles. This malformation sequence is due to early urethral obstruction. We report a family with abdominal wall muscular hypoplasia as an isolated defect, not associated with the urethral obstruction sequence. The proband is a q3-year-old male who presented with abdominal wall laxity and severe constipation. His mother, maternal grandmother and younger brother had varying degrees of abdominal wall muscular deficiency and constipation. His mother's condition was aggravated by her 2 pregnancies. This family shows vertical transmission (compatible with autosomal dominant or mitochondrial inheritance) of the abdominal phenotype of prune belly sequence without any evidence of urinary tract or renal pathology. The expression in the sons may remain incomplete because abdominal distention due to pregnancy will not occur.

  8. Tensor fascia lata musculocutaneous flap for abdominal wall reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Peled, I.J.; Kaplan, H.Y.; Herson, M.; Wexler, M.R.

    1983-08-01

    We report a case of abdominal wall reconstruction following excision of irradiated skin and a ventral hernia. A very large tensor fascia lata musculocutaneous flap was used with good results. The anatomical features of this flap make it an excellent method of abdominal wall reconstruction.

  9. Management of strangulated abdominal wall hernias with mesh; early results

    PubMed Central

    Ozbagriacik, Mustafa; Bas, Gurhan; Basak, Fatih; Sisik, Abdullah; Acar, Aylin; Kudas, Ilyas; Yucel, Metin; Ozpek, Adnan; Alimoglu, Orhan

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Surgery for abdominal wall hernias is a common procedure in general surgery practice. The main causes of delay for the operation are comorbid problems and patient unwillingness, which eventually, means that some patients are admitted to emergency clinics with strangulated hernias. In this report, patients who admitted to the emergency department with strangulated adominal wall hernias are presented together with their clinical management. METHODS: Patients who admitted to our clinic between January 2009 and November 2011 and underwent emergency operation were included in the study retrospectively. Demographic characteristics, hernia type, length of hospital stay, surgical treatment and complications were assessed. RESULTS: A total 81 patients (37 female, 44 male) with a mean age of 52.1±17.64 years were included in the study. Inguinal, femoral, umbilical and incisional hernias were detected in 40, 26, 9 and 6 patients respectively. Polypropylene mesh was used in 75 patients for repair. Primary repair without mesh was used in six patients. Small bowel (n=10; 12.34%), omentum (n=19; 23.45%), appendix (n=1; 1.2%) and Meckel’s diverticulum (n=1; 1.2%) were resected. Median length of hospital stay was 2 (1–7) days. Surgical site infection was detected in five (6.2%) patients. No significant difference was detected for length of hospital stay and surgical site infection in patients who had mesh repair (p=0.232 and 0.326 respectively). CONCLUSION: The need for bowel resection is common in strangulated abdominal wall hernias which undergo emergency operation. In the present study, an increase of morbidity was seen in patients who underwent bowel resection. No morbidity was detected related to the usage of prosthetic materials in repair of hernias. Hence, we believe that prosthetic materials can be used safely in emergency cases. PMID:28058336

  10. Niche reconstructive techniques for complex abdominal wall reconstruction: a review.

    PubMed

    Sue, Gloria R; Narayan, Deepak

    2014-04-01

    Abdominal wall defects resulting from recurrent hernias, trauma, and radiation necrosis are difficult and challenging to repair given the high rates of recurrence and surgical morbidity. Complex abdominal wall defects often require the transposition of autologous material to bridge the fascial gap. We present a review of niche reconstructive techniques that have been used in complex abdominal wall repair. The specific techniques reviewed include use of delayed and tunneled pedicled tensor fascia lata myofascial flap, de-epithelialized flap closure, free latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap with or without innervation, and abdominal wall transplant. These niche surgical techniques have great potential to reduce recurrence rates when used in the proper setting for complex abdominal wall reconstruction. More studies are needed to evaluate the relative use of these techniques with the more widely established surgical methods of reconstruction.

  11. Unexpectedly ease surgery for a worrisome abdominal mass: Pedunculated GISTs☆

    PubMed Central

    Baskiran, Adil; Otan, Emrah; Aydin, Cemalettin; Kayaalp, Cuneyt

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Discovery of abdominal masses often poses significant diagnostic difficulties. GISTs are mesenchymal masses, with specific histological features. Dimensions may vary from millimeters to giant tumours. We would like to present our case, which had an unexpectedly easy operative course which was easily handled with a simple surgical excision with a short operative duration. PRESENTATION OF CASE A 38 years old female patient was diagnosed to have an abdominal heterogen mass of 15 cm × 12 cm × 10 cm in dimension. Abdominal computed tomography revealed the solid mass between the stomach and pancreas corpus and tail, possibly orginating from the pancreas. With the preoperative diagnosis of locally invasive distal pancreas cancer the patient underwent laparotomy, following the dissection, the mass was observed to be originating from the posterior gastric Wall, extending exophytically with a peduncle of 5 cm in width, without any visual evidence for peritoneal invasion and metastasis. The tumour and the peduncle was resected with stapler device. Total operation time was 30 min. Postoperative course was uneventful. Pathologic diagnosis was gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GIST). DISCUSSION Pedunculated large GISTs are not frequent and they can enlarge as 15 cm in diameter and compress the neighbouring organs. When they were huge, it is difficult to differentiate the origin of the masses. GISTs should be considered in differential diagnosis of giant abdominal masses. CONCLUSION When GISTs are huge and pedunculated, it can be difficult to differentiate the origin of the masses. This case report presents unexpectedly ease surgery for a worrysome abdominal mass. PMID:23999120

  12. Components separation for abdominal wall reconstruction: the Memphis modification.

    PubMed

    DiCocco, Jennifer M; Fabian, Timothy C; Emmett, Katrina P; Magnotti, Louis J; Goldberg, Steven P; Croce, Martin A

    2012-01-01

    Since the advent of damage control surgery, more patients are left with an open abdomen. Surgeons are then left with the challenge of how to restore continuity of the abdominal wall. Many different techniques have been utilized for reconstruction with widely variable recurrence rates, mainly depending on the length of follow-up. A modification of the components separation technique was developed in Memphis, Tennessee at the Presley Memorial Trauma Center. This modification greatly increased the length gained in the midline. Additionally, many patients can be reconstructed without the use of prosthetics, reducing the infectious complications. The purpose of this manuscript is to describe in detail how to perform a modification of the components separation technique that has been shown to have one of the lowest recurrence rates in the literature.

  13. Prosthetics and Techniques in Repair of Animal's Abdominal Wall

    PubMed Central

    Karrouf, Gamal; Zaghloul, Adel; Abou-Alsaud, Mohamed; Barbour, Elie; Abouelnasr, Khaled

    2016-01-01

    The management of abdominal wall repair continues to present a challenging problem, especially in the repair of major defects. Many abdominal wall defects can be repaired by primary closure; however, if the defect is large and there is a tension on the closure of the wound, the use of prosthetic materials becomes indispensable. Many studies have been performed with various materials and implant techniques, without the comparison of their degrees of success, based on sound meta-analysis and/or inclusive epidemiologic studies. This review covered the effectiveness of recent advances in prosthetic materials and implant procedures used in repair of abdominal wall, based on biomechanical properties and economic aspects of reconstructed large abdominal wall defects and hernias in animals. The presented results in this review helped to reach treatment algorithms that could maximize outcomes and minimize morbidity. PMID:27293982

  14. Prosthetics and Techniques in Repair of Animal's Abdominal Wall.

    PubMed

    Karrouf, Gamal; Zaghloul, Adel; Abou-Alsaud, Mohamed; Barbour, Elie; Abouelnasr, Khaled

    2016-01-01

    The management of abdominal wall repair continues to present a challenging problem, especially in the repair of major defects. Many abdominal wall defects can be repaired by primary closure; however, if the defect is large and there is a tension on the closure of the wound, the use of prosthetic materials becomes indispensable. Many studies have been performed with various materials and implant techniques, without the comparison of their degrees of success, based on sound meta-analysis and/or inclusive epidemiologic studies. This review covered the effectiveness of recent advances in prosthetic materials and implant procedures used in repair of abdominal wall, based on biomechanical properties and economic aspects of reconstructed large abdominal wall defects and hernias in animals. The presented results in this review helped to reach treatment algorithms that could maximize outcomes and minimize morbidity.

  15. QUALITY OF LIFE OF IN PATIENTS SUBMITTED TO ANTERIOR ABDOMINAL WALL LAPAROSCOPIC HERNIOPLASTY

    PubMed Central

    ABDALLA, Ricardo Zugaib; GARCIA, Rodrigo Biscuola; SAID, Danniel Frade; ABDALLA, Beatrice Martinez Zugaib

    2014-01-01

    Background The laparoscopic ventral hernia repair technique made possible surgeries with smaller skin incisions and smaller dissection of the soft tissue around the hernia, therefore with a better wound, a quicker postoperative recovery and a lower complication rate. Aim To evaluate the applicability of a quality of life survey based on the molds of the American Hernia Society, European Hernia Society and Carolinas Equation for Quality of Life, through telephone in patients submitted to laparoscopic hernioplasty by IPOM technique. Methods A retrospective cohort study was made to evaluate the quality of life of 21 patients that underwent anterior abdominal wall laparoscopic hernioplasty by intraperitoneal onlay mesh technique. Questionnaire was applied through telephone. Results Of the 21 patients, 19% felt that the hernia recurred. Also 19% passed through another abdominal wall surgery, and among these, 75% was related to the previously hernia correction. Finally, 81% of patients did not undergo any other abdominal wall surgery. Conclusion It was possible to apply the quality of life questionnary by telephone on patients who underwent an anterior abdominal wall. The results, in its turn, were satisfactory and showed that patients, in general, were satisfied with the surgical procedure. PMID:24676295

  16. Living donor liver transplantation with abdominal wall reconstruction for hepatocellular carcinoma with needle track seeding

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Horng-Ren; Thorat, Ashok; Gesakis, Kanellos; Li, Ping-Chun; Kiranantawat, Kidakorn; Chen, Hung Chi; Jeng, Long-Bin

    2015-01-01

    Malignant cell seeding in subcutaneous tissues along the needle track and/or percutaneous biliary drainage catheters is rare complication, but pose various technical issues in planning surgical treatment of such patients. If underlying primary hepatic malignancy can be treated, an aggressive resection of subcutaneous tissue bearing cancer cell with subsequent abdominal wall reconstruction has been sporadically reported. But, when hepatic resection is not possible due to underlying advanced cirrhosis, liver transplantation along with abdominal wall resection and subsequent reconstruction remains only feasible option. Herein, we describe our successful experience of living donor liver transplantation for hepatocellular carcinoma with full-thickness abdominal wall resection bearing the tumor seeding followed by reconstruction in single stage surgery. PMID:26722665

  17. Wandering Ascaris Coming Out Through the Abdominal Wall

    PubMed Central

    Wani, Mohd L; Rather, Ajaz A.; Parray, Fazl Q.; Ahangar, Abdul G.; Bijli, Akram H.; Irshad, Ifat; Nayeem-Ul-Hassan; Khan, Tahir S.

    2013-01-01

    A rare case of ascaris coming out through the anterior abdominal wall is reported here. A 40-year-old female had undergone dilatation and curettage by a quack. On the second day she presented with presented with features of peritonitis. She was explored. Resection anastomosis of the ileum was done for multiple perforations of the ileum. Patient developed a fistula in the anterior abdominal wall which was draining bile-colored fluid. On the 12th postoperative day a 10-cm-long worm was seen coming out through the fistulous tract which was found to be Ascaris lumbricoids. Ascaris lumbricoids can lead to many complications ranging from worm colic to intestinal obstruction, volvulus, peritonitis, pancreatitis, cholangiohepatitis, liver abscess and many more. Worm has been reported to come out through mouth, nostrils, abdominal drains, T-tubes etc. But ascaris coming out through the anterior abdominal wall is very rare hence reported here. PMID:23930192

  18. Wandering ascaris coming out through the abdominal wall.

    PubMed

    Wani, Mohd L; Rather, Ajaz A; Parray, Fazl Q; Ahangar, Abdul G; Bijli, Akram H; Irshad, Ifat; Nayeem-Ul-Hassan; Khan, Tahir S

    2013-06-01

    A rare case of ascaris coming out through the anterior abdominal wall is reported here. A 40-year-old female had undergone dilatation and curettage by a quack. On the second day she presented with presented with features of peritonitis. She was explored. Resection anastomosis of the ileum was done for multiple perforations of the ileum. Patient developed a fistula in the anterior abdominal wall which was draining bile-colored fluid. On the 12(th) postoperative day a 10-cm-long worm was seen coming out through the fistulous tract which was found to be Ascaris lumbricoids. Ascaris lumbricoids can lead to many complications ranging from worm colic to intestinal obstruction, volvulus, peritonitis, pancreatitis, cholangiohepatitis, liver abscess and many more. Worm has been reported to come out through mouth, nostrils, abdominal drains, T-tubes etc. But ascaris coming out through the anterior abdominal wall is very rare hence reported here.

  19. Abdominal wall abscesses in patients with Crohn's disease: clinical outcome.

    PubMed

    Neufeld, David; Keidar, Andrei; Gutman, Mordechai; Zissin, Rivka

    2006-03-01

    Abdominal wall abscess due to Crohn's Disease used to be one of the definitive indications for operative treatment. The advent of interventional radiology, the accessibility to percutaneous drainage, and the availability of new medications raised the possibility of nonoperative treatment of this condition. The clinical presentation, treatment, and follow-up of 13 patients with abdominal wall abscesses secondary to Crohn's Disease were retrospectively reviewed. During a 10-year period (1993-2003), 13 patients with abdominal wall abscess were treated. Five patients had an anterolateral abdominal wall abscess and eight had a posterior abscess (psoas). In 11 patients, 17 drainage procedures were performed: 12 percutaneous and 5 operative. Despite initial adequate drainage and resolution of the abscess, all 13 patients eventually needed resection of the offending bowel segment, which was undertaken in 12 patients. The mean time between abscess presentation and definitive operation was 2 months. Percutaneous drainage is an attractive option in most cases of abdominal abscesses. However, in Crohn's Disease patients with an abdominal wall abscess, we found a high failure rate despite initial adequate drainage. We suggest that surgical resection of the diseased bowel segment should be the definitive therapy.

  20. Abdominal wall Type-I complex regional pain syndrome treated effectively with peripheral nerve field stimulation: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Linqiu; Chou, Henry; Holder, Eric

    2017-01-01

    Chronic abdominal wall pain is a well-documented complication of abdominal surgery. However, abdominal wall complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a rare medical condition. We present a case of abdominal wall CRPS and its treatment with peripheral nerve field stimulation (PNfS). A 34-year-old female presented with right periumbilical pain for 2 years. She developed burning, sharp and stabbing pain with allodynia (extremely sensitive to wind and light touch) and erythema or pallor 2 weeks after an exploratory appendectomy. The extensive evaluation ruled out the underlining pathology. After she failed conservative therapies, she underwent a 7-day trial of thoracic spinal cord stimulation (SCS) and abdominal wall PNfS. Thoracic SCS failed to provide pain relief; however, PNfS provided significant relief (>90%) of burning sensation. It has now been 5 years since the PNfS was implanted and she continues to demonstrate substantial pain relief. PMID:28044002

  1. Clinical Evaluation of Hepatic Portal Venous Gas after Abdominal Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Okada, Satomi; Azuma, Takashi; Kawashita, Yujo; Matsuo, Shigetoshi; Eguchi, Susumu

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic portal venous gas (HPVG) is induced by various abdominal diseases. Since HPVG is accompanied by bowel ischemia, intestinal infection and hypovolemia, various modes of critical management are needed to treat the underlying conditions. HPVG associated with abdominal complications after surgery has rarely been reported. We present 4 patients with HPVG after abdominal surgery: 2 of the 4 patients died of multiple organ failure, and the other 2 recovered with solely conservative therapy. Although postoperative HPVG is a severe and life-threatening condition, early detection and systemic treatment lead to a better patient outcome. PMID:27403110

  2. Aesthetic and functional abdominal wall reconstruction after multiple bowel perforations secondary to liposuction.

    PubMed

    Di Candia, Michele; Malata, Charles M

    2011-04-01

    This report describes a case of aesthetic and functional abdominal wall reconstruction performed to salvage a deformed, scarred, and herniated anterior abdomen after severe peritonitis and partial rectus muscle necrosis secondary to multiple bowel perforations sustained during liposuction performed in a cosmetic clinic. The diagnosis of intestinal perforation was missed intraoperatively and in the immediate postoperative period. The patient was admitted 4 days after the surgery to the intensive therapy unit in septicemic shock. After resuscitation and stabilization, she was treated by debridement of the abdominal wall, bowel resection, and temporary jejunostomy and colostomy (reversed 10 months later). She was referred 18 months after liposuction to the Plastic Surgery Service with a large central midline abdominal incisional hernia presenting with thinned out skin (14 × 11 cm) overlying adherent bowel. A components separation technique was successfully used to reconstruct the abdominal wall, with no recurrent herniation 2 years later. Survivors of bowel perforations sustained during abdominal liposuction may later present with challenging aesthetic and functional problems, as described in this report. These long-term sequelae have not been addressed hitherto in the literature.

  3. The process of informed consent for urgent abdominal surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kay, R; Siriwardena, A

    2001-01-01

    Objectives—To assess perceptions of the informed consent process in patients undergoing urgent abdominal surgery. Design—A prospective observational study was carried out using structured questionnaire-based interviews. Patients who had undergone urgent abdominal surgery were interviewed in the postoperative period to ascertain their perceptions of the informed consent process. Replies were compared to responses obtained from a control group undergoing elective surgery, to identify factors common to the surgical process and those specific to urgent surgery. Patients' perceptions of received information were also compared to the information perceived to have been provided by the consent obtainers. Setting—Gastrointestinal surgical service of a university teaching hospital. Patients—Seventy-four consecutive patients undergoing urgent abdominal surgery and 80 control patients undergoing elective surgery. Main measurements—Principal outcome measures were patients' perceptions of factors interfering with the ability to give informed consent, assessment of the quality of informed consent and the degree of discussion of the expected outcomes. Results—Forty-nine of the seventy-four (66%) patients undergoing urgent surgery perceived that pain did not affect their ability to give informed consent. Twenty-seven reported an adverse effect of analgesia on the ability to give informed consent. Only 22% of patients undergoing urgent surgery perceived that there had been any discussion of potential side effects and complications of surgery. Conclusion–The majority of patients in this series with acute intra-abdominal surgical conditions perceive that they retain the ability to give informed consent for surgery. There is a need for improved discussion of therapeutic options and likely outcomes. Key Words: Informed consent • urgent abdominal surgery PMID:11417021

  4. Improving the efficiency of abdominal aortic aneurysm wall stress computations.

    PubMed

    Zelaya, Jaime E; Goenezen, Sevan; Dargon, Phong T; Azarbal, Amir-Farzin; Rugonyi, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    An abdominal aortic aneurysm is a pathological dilation of the abdominal aorta, which carries a high mortality rate if ruptured. The most commonly used surrogate marker of rupture risk is the maximal transverse diameter of the aneurysm. More recent studies suggest that wall stress from models of patient-specific aneurysm geometries extracted, for instance, from computed tomography images may be a more accurate predictor of rupture risk and an important factor in AAA size progression. However, quantification of wall stress is typically computationally intensive and time-consuming, mainly due to the nonlinear mechanical behavior of the abdominal aortic aneurysm walls. These difficulties have limited the potential of computational models in clinical practice. To facilitate computation of wall stresses, we propose to use a linear approach that ensures equilibrium of wall stresses in the aneurysms. This proposed linear model approach is easy to implement and eliminates the burden of nonlinear computations. To assess the accuracy of our proposed approach to compute wall stresses, results from idealized and patient-specific model simulations were compared to those obtained using conventional approaches and to those of a hypothetical, reference abdominal aortic aneurysm model. For the reference model, wall mechanical properties and the initial unloaded and unstressed configuration were assumed to be known, and the resulting wall stresses were used as reference for comparison. Our proposed linear approach accurately approximates wall stresses for varying model geometries and wall material properties. Our findings suggest that the proposed linear approach could be used as an effective, efficient, easy-to-use clinical tool to estimate patient-specific wall stresses.

  5. Abdominal wall closure after a stomal reversal procedure.

    PubMed

    López-Cano, Manuel; Pereira, José Antonio; Villanueva, Borja; Vallribera, Francesc; Espin, Eloy; Armengol Carrasco, Manuel; Arbós Vía, María Antonia; Feliu, Xavier; Morales-Conde, Salvador

    2014-01-01

    The closure of a temporary stoma involves 2 different surgical procedures: the stoma reversal procedure and the abdominal wall reconstruction of the stoma site. The management of the abdominal wall has different areas that should be analyzed such us how to avoid surgical site infection (SSI), the technique to be used in case of a concomitant hernia at the stoma site or to prevent an incisional hernia in the future, how to deal with the incision when the stoma reversal procedure is performed by laparoscopy and how to close the skin at the stoma site. The aim of this paper is to analyze these aspects in relation to abdominal wall reconstruction during a stoma reversal procedure.

  6. Ultrasonography and computed tomography of inflammatory abdominal wall lesions

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, H.C.; Rabinowitz, J.G.

    1982-09-01

    Twenty-four patients with inflammatory lesions of the abdominal wall were examined by ultrasonography. Nine of these patients underwent computed tomographic (CT) scanning as well. Both ultrasonography and CT clearly delineated the exact location and extent of abdominal wall abscesses. Abscesses were easily differentiated from cellulitis or phlegmon with ultrasound. The peritoneal line was more clearly delineated on ultrasonograms than on CT scans; abscesses were also more distinct on the ultrasonograms because of their low echogenicity compared with the surrounding structures. Gas bubbles, fat density with specific low attenuation values, and underlying inflamed bowel loops in obese patients with Crohn's disease were better delineated by CT.

  7. [Perioperative pain management for abdominal and thoracic surgery].

    PubMed

    Englbrecht, J S; Pogatzki-Zahn, E M

    2014-06-01

    Abdominal and thoracic surgical procedures can result in significant acute postoperative pain. Present evidence shows that postoperative pain management remains inadequate especially after "minor" surgical procedures. Various therapeutic options including regional anesthesia techniques and systemic pharmacotherapy are available for effective treatment of postoperative pain. This work summarizes the pathophysiological background of postoperative pain after abdominal and thoracic surgery and discusses the indication, effectiveness, risks, and benefits of the different therapeutic options. Special focus is given to the controversial debate about the indication for epidural analgesia, as well as various alternative therapeutic options, including transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block, paravertebral block (PVB), wound infiltration with local anesthetics, and intravenous lidocaine. In additional, indications and contraindications of nonopioid analgesics after abdominal and thoracic surgery are discussed and recommendations based on scientific evidence and individual risk and benefit analysis are made. All therapeutic options discussed are eligible for clinical use and may contribute to improve postoperative pain outcome after abdominal and thoracic surgical procedures.

  8. [The role of laparoscopy in emergency abdominal surgery].

    PubMed

    Balén, E; Herrera, J; Miranda, C; Tarifa, A; Zazpe, C; Lera, J M

    2005-01-01

    Abdominal emergencies can also be operated on through the laparoscopic approach: the approach can be diagnostic laparoscopy, surgery assisted by laparoscopy or laparotomy directed according to the findings of the laparoscopy. The general contraindications refer above all to the state of haemodynamic instability of the patient and to seriously ill patients (ASA IV). In the absence of any specific counter-indications for the specific laparoscopic procedure to be carried out, many abdominal diseases requiring emergency surgery can be performed with the laparoscopic approach. The most frequent indications are appendicitis, acute colecistitis, gastroduodenal perforation, occlusion of the small intestine, and some abdominal traumas. With a correct selection of patients and the appropriate experience of the surgeon, the results are excellent and better than open surgery (less infection of the wound, complications, hospital stay and postoperative pain). A detailed explanation is given of the basic aspects of the surgical technique in the most frequent procedures of emergency laparoscopy.

  9. Reconstruction of extensive abdominal wall defect using an eccentric perforator-based pedicled anterolateral thigh flap: a case report.

    PubMed

    Jang, Joonchul; Jeong, Seong-Ho; Han, Seung-Kyu; Kim, Woo-Kyung

    2013-09-01

    Reconstruction of extensive abdominal wall defects is a challenge for reconstructive surgeons. In this report, a case of reconstruction of a large abdominal wall defect using an eccentric perforator-based pedicled anterolateral thigh (ALT) flap is presented. A 30-year-old man presented with recurrent desmoid-type fibromatosis in the abdominal wall. The recurrent tumor was radically excised, and the en bloc excision resulted in a full-thickness, large abdominal wall defect (25 cm × 20 cm). An eccentric perforator-based pedicled ALT flap, including wide fascial extension, was transferred to the abdominal defect; fascial portions were sutured to the remnant abdominal fascia. Plication of the fascia along the sutured portion was performed to relieve the skin tension between the flap and the marginal skin of the abdominal defect. Eight months after surgery, the reconstructed abdomen had an acceptable esthetic appearance without tumor recurrence or hernia. The use of an eccentric perforator-based pedicled ALT flap may be an alternative method for the reconstruction of extensive abdominal wall defects.

  10. Which mesh or graft? Prosthetic devices for abdominal wall reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Abid, Shazia; El-Hayek, Kevin

    2016-03-01

    This article reviews the ever-increasing number of prosthetic devices--both synthetic mesh and biologic grafts--now in use for abdominal wall reconstruction. It also introduces a novel hybrid synthetic/biologic graft (Zenapro) and suture passer device (Novapass).

  11. Extragastrointestinal Stromal Tumour of The Abdominal Wall - A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, A. Sathish Selva; Padmini, R; Veena, G; Murugesan, N

    2013-01-01

    Stromal tumours occurring in areas other than the GastroIntestinal Tract (GIT) are known as Extra GastroIntestinal Stromal Tumours (EGISTs). They usually arise in the mesentery, omentum or retroperitoneum, while EGISTs which occur in the abdominal wall are very rare. Both gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs) and EGISTs are histologically and immunophenotypically similar. We are reporting a case of EGIST, which occurred in the anterior abdominal wall in a twenty five-year-old female patient. The tumour was present in the right loin and imaging studies suggested that it was a desmoid tumour. It was surgically excised by doing an abdominal wall mesh repair. The histological examinations revealed a tumour with spindle cell morphology, with <2 mitoses per 50 High Power Field (HPF) and no necrosis, with tumour free margins. Immunohistochemistry was strongly positive for CD117 and Smooth Muscle Actin (SMA), while it was negative for β-catenin and S100. The patient is well post operatively and is on close follow up. EGISTs should be considered in the differential diagnosis of mesenchymal tumours which occur in the abdominal wall, inspite of their rarity, as the high risk patients may need Imatinib chemotherapy. PMID:24551695

  12. Planned hernia repair and late abdominal wall reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Leppäniemi, Ari; Tukiainen, Erkki

    2012-03-01

    Planned ventral hernia is a management strategy in which the abdominal fascial layer has been left unclosed and the viscera are covered only with original or grafted skin. Leaving the fascia open can be deliberate or unavoidable and most commonly results from staged repair of the abdominal wall due to trauma, peritonitis, pancreatitis, abdominal vascular emergencies, or abdominal compartment syndrome. The abdominal wall defects can be categorized as type I or II defects depending on whether there is intact, stable skin coverage. In defects with intact skin coverage, the most commonly used methods are the components separation technique and a prosthetic repair, sometimes used in combination. The advantages of the components separation technique is the ability to close the linea alba at the midline, creating a better functional result than a repair with inert mesh. Although the reherniation risk seems higher after components separation, the risk of infection is considerably lower. With a type II defect, with absent or unstable skin coverage, fascial repair alone is inadequate. Of the more complex reconstruction techniques, the use of a free tensor fasciae latae (TFL) flap utilizing a saphenous vein arteriovenous loop is the most promising. The advantages of the TFL flap include constant anatomy of the pedicle, a strong fascial layer, large-caliber vessels matching the size of the AV loop, and the ability to use large flaps (up to 20 × 35 cm). Whatever technique is used, the repair of complex abdominal wall defects requires close collaboration with plastic and abdominal surgeons, which is best managed in specialized centers.

  13. Outcomes of abdominal surgery in patients with liver cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Delgado, Juan C; Ballus, Josep; Esteve, Francisco; Betancur-Zambrano, Nelson L; Corral-Velez, Vicente; Mañez, Rafael; Betbese, Antoni J; Roncal, Joan A; Javierre, Casimiro

    2016-01-01

    Patients suffering from liver cirrhosis (LC) frequently require non-hepatic abdominal surgery, even before liver transplantation. LC is an important risk factor itself for surgery, due to the higher than average associated morbidity and mortality. This high surgical risk occurs because of the pathophysiology of liver disease itself and to the presence of contributing factors, such as coagulopathy, poor nutritional status, adaptive immune dysfunction, cirrhotic cardiomyopathy, and renal and pulmonary dysfunction, which all lead to poor outcomes. Careful evaluation of these factors and the degree of liver disease can help to reduce the development of complications both during and after abdominal surgery. In the emergency setting, with the presence of decompensated LC, alcoholic hepatitis, severe/advanced LC, and significant extrahepatic organ dysfunction conservative management is preferred. A multidisciplinary, individualized, and specialized approach can improve outcomes; preoperative optimization after risk stratification and careful management are mandatory before surgery. Laparoscopic techniques can also improve outcomes. We review the impact of LC on surgical outcome in non-hepatic abdominal surgeries required in this cirrhotic population before, during, and after surgery. PMID:26973406

  14. Outcomes of abdominal surgery in patients with liver cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Delgado, Juan C; Ballus, Josep; Esteve, Francisco; Betancur-Zambrano, Nelson L; Corral-Velez, Vicente; Mañez, Rafael; Betbese, Antoni J; Roncal, Joan A; Javierre, Casimiro

    2016-03-07

    Patients suffering from liver cirrhosis (LC) frequently require non-hepatic abdominal surgery, even before liver transplantation. LC is an important risk factor itself for surgery, due to the higher than average associated morbidity and mortality. This high surgical risk occurs because of the pathophysiology of liver disease itself and to the presence of contributing factors, such as coagulopathy, poor nutritional status, adaptive immune dysfunction, cirrhotic cardiomyopathy, and renal and pulmonary dysfunction, which all lead to poor outcomes. Careful evaluation of these factors and the degree of liver disease can help to reduce the development of complications both during and after abdominal surgery. In the emergency setting, with the presence of decompensated LC, alcoholic hepatitis, severe/advanced LC, and significant extrahepatic organ dysfunction conservative management is preferred. A multidisciplinary, individualized, and specialized approach can improve outcomes; preoperative optimization after risk stratification and careful management are mandatory before surgery. Laparoscopic techniques can also improve outcomes. We review the impact of LC on surgical outcome in non-hepatic abdominal surgeries required in this cirrhotic population before, during, and after surgery.

  15. Continuous bilateral TAP block in patient with prior abdominal surgery.

    PubMed

    Lima, Isabel Flor de; Linda, Filipe; dos Santos, Ângela; Lages, Neusa; Correia, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    We present as an option for epidural analgesia and intravenous opioid infusion a clinical case of transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block, with bilateral placement of catheter for postoperative analgesia after exploratory laparotomy performed in a patient with previous abdominal surgery and heart, kidney and liver failure.

  16. Progressive Muscle Relaxation and Pain Perception in Abdominal Surgery Patients

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-05-01

    subjects (36%) had cholecystectomies, one subject (9%) had an appendectomy, one subject (9%) had a hysterectomy, four subjects (36%) had tubal ligations ...hysterectomies, three subjects (30%) had tubal ligations or fulgarations, five subjects (50%) had diagnostic laparoscopies, and one subject (10%) was classified...muscle relaxation could decrease pain perception, analgesic use, and anxiety in post -operative abdominal surgery patients. Review of demographic data

  17. Acute rectal ischaemia following emergency abdominal aortic aneurysm surgery

    PubMed Central

    Mosley, Frances R.; Akhtar, Sobia; George, Rina; Pillay, Woolagasen R.

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of isolated rectal ischaemia, a rare complication after emergency surgery for a ruptured abdominal aneurysm. We discuss the possible aetiology of this condition and how this rare condition may be missed unless care is taken at the time of reoperation. PMID:28344761

  18. Abdominal wall abscess: more than meets the eye.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Jamish; Gandhi, Natasha

    2010-01-01

    An 83-year-old, mildly demented rest home resident presented to the emergency department with a 2 day history of a right sided abdominal wall mass. He had a mechanical fall 2 days previously and landed on his right side and had attributed the mass to this. He had no symptoms apart from feeling bloated and not being able to pass wind for a day. He had passed a normal bowel motion the day before presentation. On abdominal examination there was an 11 × 4 cm mass in the right lower quadrant. It was firm in consistency, non-fluctuant and non-tender to touch. There was mild erythema over the area but no skin breaks. Chest radiograph was unremarkable. The abdominal film showed dilated small bowel and no large bowel could be seen. A computed tomography (CT) scan showed a thick walled gallbladder with multiple calculi and air present. There was also an extensive air and fluid collection in the layers of the abdominal wall and subcutaneous fat which arose from a perforation of the gallbladder. The patient was not a surgical candidate due to multiple comorbidities. The patient was treated with antibiotics and underwent a CT guided percutaneous cholecystostomy. Despite the radiological intervention and antibiotics the patient progressively deteriorated and died peacefully 5 days after admission.

  19. Is abdominal wall tenderness a useful sign in the diagnosis of non-specific abdominal pain?

    PubMed Central

    Gray, D. W.; Dixon, J. M.; Seabrook, G.; Collin, J.

    1988-01-01

    Pain arising from the abdominal wall has been implicated as a cause of non-specific abdominal pain (NSAP), and the presence of abdominal wall tenderness (AWT) has been proposed as an accurate diagnostic test for NSAP. One hundred and fifty eight patients admitted to hospital with abdominal pain were tested for the presence of positive AWT. In 53 patients the final diagnosis was appendicitis and positive AWT was found in five. Thirty eight patients were found to have a variety of other recognised pathological diagnoses, none of whom had a positive AWT. In 67 patients a diagnosis of NSAP was made in the absence of other pathological diagnosis, 19 of whom had positive AWT, which was significantly different from the other diagnostic groups. This study confirms the presence of AWT in up to 28% of patients with NSAP, and suggests that testing for AWT is of value in patients with abdominal pain, although a positive AWT is not as accurate a predictor of NSAP as previously reported. PMID:2970820

  20. Abdominal wall defects: prenatal diagnosis, newborn management, and long-term outcomes.

    PubMed

    Gamba, Piergiorgio; Midrio, Paola

    2014-10-01

    Omphalocele and gastroschisis represent the most frequent congenital abdominal wall defects a pediatric surgeon is called to treat. There has been an increased reported incidence in the past 10 years mainly due to the diffuse use of prenatal ultrasound. The early detection of these malformations, and related associated anomalies, allows a multidisciplinary counseling and planning of delivery in a center equipped with high-risk pregnancy assistance, pediatric surgery, and neonatology. At present times, closure of defects, even in multiple stages, is always possible as well as management of most of cardiac-, urinary-, and gastrointestinal-associated malformations. The progress, herein discussed, in the care of newborns with abdominal wall defects assures most of them survive and reach adulthood. Some aspects of transition of medical care will also be considered, including fertility and cosmesis.

  1. Towards the mechanical characterization of abdominal wall by inverse analysis.

    PubMed

    Simón-Allué, R; Calvo, B; Oberai, A A; Barbone, P E

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study is to characterize the passive mechanical behaviour of abdominal wall in vivo in an animal model using only external cameras and numerical analysis. The main objective lies in defining a methodology that provides in vivo information of a specific patient without altering mechanical properties. It is demonstrated in the mechanical study of abdomen for hernia purposes. Mechanical tests consisted on pneumoperitoneum tests performed on New Zealand rabbits, where inner pressure was varied from 0mmHg to 12mmHg. Changes in the external abdominal surface were recorded and several points were tracked. Based on their coordinates we reconstructed a 3D finite element model of the abdominal wall, considering an incompressible hyperelastic material model defined by two parameters. The spatial distributions of these parameters (shear modulus and non linear parameter) were calculated by inverse analysis, using two different types of regularization: Total Variation Diminishing (TVD) and Tikhonov (H(1)). After solving the inverse problem, the distribution of the material parameters were obtained along the abdominal surface. Accuracy of the results was evaluated for the last level of pressure. Results revealed a higher value of the shear modulus in a wide stripe along the craneo-caudal direction, associated with the presence of linea alba in conjunction with fascias and rectus abdominis. Non linear parameter distribution was smoother and the location of higher values varied with the regularization type. Both regularizations proved to yield in an accurate predicted displacement field, but H(1) obtained a smoother material parameter distribution while TVD included some discontinuities. The methodology here presented was able to characterize in vivo the passive non linear mechanical response of the abdominal wall.

  2. Spontaneous abscesses of the abdominal wall, omentum and abdominal cavity caused by group G streptococci: a case report.

    PubMed

    De Brabandere, K; Vanpaemel, G; Verheyen, L

    2008-01-01

    We report the first case, to our knowledge, of spontaneous abscess of the abdominal wall, omentum and abdominal cavity caused by group G streptococci. A 52-year-old diabetic woman presented with abdominal tenderness and weight loss that had persisted for a few weeks. CT scan showed several abscesses of the abdominal wall, omentum and abdominal cavity. The abscesses were drained laparoscopically and antibiotics were given postoperatively. Biopsies and cultures showed group G streptococci. The patient recovered without any complication and left our hospital on the 17th postoperative day.

  3. Quantitative anatomical labeling of the anterior abdominal wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Wade M.; Xu, Zhoubing; Asman, Andrew J.; Poulose, Benjamin K.; Landman, Bennett A.

    2013-03-01

    Ventral hernias (VHs) are abnormal openings in the anterior abdominal wall that are common side effects of surgical intervention. Repair of VHs is the most commonly performed procedure by general surgeons worldwide, but VH repair outcomes are not particularly encouraging (with recurrence rates up to 43%). A variety of open and laparoscopic techniques are available for hernia repair, and the specific technique used is ultimately driven by surgeon preference and experience. Despite routine acquisition of computed tomography (CT) for VH patients, little quantitative information is available on which to guide selection of a particular approach and/or optimize patient-specific treatment. From anecdotal interviews, the success of VH repair procedures correlates with hernia size, location, and involvement of secondary structures. Herein, we propose an image labeling protocol to segment the anterior abdominal area to provide a geometric basis with which to derive biomarkers and evaluate treatment efficacy. Based on routine clinical CT data, we are able to identify inner and outer surfaces of the abdominal walls and the herniated volume. This is the first formal presentation of a protocol to quantify these structures on abdominal CT. The intra- and inter rater reproducibilities of this protocol are evaluated on 4 patients with suspected VH (3 patients were ultimately diagnosed with VH while 1 was not). Mean surfaces distances of less than 2mm were achieved for all structures.

  4. Abdominal wall endometrioma: Our experience in Vladimir, Russia

    PubMed Central

    Gachabayov, Mahir; Horta, Roman; Afanasyev, Dmitriy; Gilyazov, Timur

    2016-01-01

    Background: Endometriosis is defined as an estrogen-dependent, benign inflammatory disease characterized by the presence of ectopic endometrial implants. Abdominal wall endometrioma (AWE) being a rare entity is a benign tumor defined as ectopic functional, endometrial tissue located in the abdominal wall. Subjects and Methods: A retrospective study of 23 female patients treated with AWE in four departments of three centers in Vladimir city, Russia, from January 2010 to December 2014 was performed. Results: In twenty patients (87%), AWE was symptomatic, and in three patients (13%), AWE was asymptomatic. Esquivel triad presented in 17 patients (74%), and modified Esquivel triad existed in 20 patients (87%). All 23 patients were operated, and AWE excision was performed. Recurrence occurred in 4 cases (17.4%) and was associated with postoperative pain and seroma. Conclusion: Postoperative pain for more than 7 days and seroma (on ultrasonography) seem to be associated with recurrence of AWE. PMID:27942100

  5. Management of Complex Abdominal Wall Defects Associated with Penetrating Abdominal Trauma

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-09

    management of the abdominal wall was determined by a multidisciplinary team of general and plastic surgeons, intensivists and specialist nurses . The...otomy is performed when the patient’s physiology has normalised, usually at 12–72 h after the damage control procedure. Closure of the midline... nurse specialist, microbiology, intensive care, the hos- pital medical director and the orthopaedic surgeons if there was concomitant bony or extremity

  6. Planned ventral hernia. Staged management for acute abdominal wall defects.

    PubMed Central

    Fabian, T C; Croce, M A; Pritchard, F E; Minard, G; Hickerson, W L; Howell, R L; Schurr, M J; Kudsk, K A

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Analysis of a staged management scheme for initial and definitive management of acute abdominal wall defects is provided. METHODS: A four-staged scheme for managing acute abdominal wall defects consists of the following stages: stage I--prosthetic insertion; stage II--2 to 3 weeks after prosthetic insertion and wound granulation, the prosthesis is removed; stage III--2 to 3 days later, planned ventral hernia (split thickness skin graft [STSG] or full-thickness skin and subcutaneous fat); stage IV--6 to 12 months later, definitive reconstruction. Cases were evaluated retrospectively for benefits and risks of the techniques employed. RESULTS: Eighty-eight cases (39 visceral edema, 27 abdominal sepsis, 22 abdominal wall resection) were managed during 8.5 years. Prostheses included polypropylene mesh in 45 cases, polyglactin 910 mesh in 27, polytetrafluorethylene in 10, and plastic in 6. Twenty-four patients died from their initial disease. The fistula rates associated with prosthetic management was 9%; no wound-related mortality occurred. Most wounds had split thickness skin graft applied after prosthetic removal. Definitive reconstruction was undertaken in 21 patients in the authors' institution (prosthetic mesh in 12 and modified components separation in 9). Recurrent hernias developed in 33% of mesh reconstructions and 11% of the components separation technique. CONCLUSIONS: The authors concluded that 1) this staged approach was associated with low morbidity and no technique-related mortality; 2) prostheses placed for edema were removed with fascial approximation accomplished in half of those cases; 3) absorbable mesh provided the advantages of reasonable durability, ease of removal, and relatively low cost--it has become the prosthesis of choice; and 4) the modified components separation technique of reconstruction provided good results in patients with moderate sized defects. Images Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 4. Figure 5. PMID:8203973

  7. Restrictive and liberal fluid administration in major abdominal surgery

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Qianyun; Liu, Hongliang; Chen, Bo; Jiang, Yan

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: To determine whether perioperative fluid restrictive administration can reduce specific postoperative complications in adults undergoing major abdominal surgery. Methods: We searched the MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Google scholar, and article reference lists (up to December 2015) for studies that assessed fluid therapy and morbidity or mortality in patients undergoing major abdominal surgeries. The quality of the trials was assessed using the Jadad scoring system, and a meta-analysis of the included randomized, controlled trials was conducted using Review Manager software, version 5.2. Results: Ten studies with a total of 1160 patients undergoing major abdominal surgeries were included. We found that perioperative restrictive fluid therapy could reduce the risk of postoperative infectious complications (odds ratio [OR]=0.54, 95% confidence interval [CI]:0.39-0.74, p=0.0001, I2=37%), pulmonary complications (OR=0.49, 95% CI: 0.26-0.93, p=0.03, I2=50%), and cardiac complications (OR=0.45, 95% CI: 0.29-0.69, p=0.0003, I2=48%), but had no effect on the risk of gastrointestinal complications (OR=0.87, 95% CI: 0.51-1.46, p=0.59, I2=0%), renal complications (OR=0.76, 95% CI: 0.43-1.34, p=0.35, I2=0%), and postoperative mortality (OR=0.62, 95% CI: 0.25-1.50, p=0.29, I2=0%). Conclusion: Perioperative restrictive fluid administration was superior to liberal fluid administration in reducing the infectious, pulmonary and cardiac complications after major abdominal surgeries. PMID:28133683

  8. Distribution of Wall Stress in Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasheras, Juan

    2005-11-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) rupture is believed to occur when the mechanical stress acting on the wall exceeds the strength of the wall tissue. Therefore, knowledge of the AAA wall stress distribution could be useful in assessing its risk of rupture. In our research, a finite element analysis was used to determine the wall stresses both in idealized models and in a real clinical model in which the aorta was considered isotropic with nonlinear material properties and was loaded with a given pressure. In the idealized models, both maximum diameter and asymmetry were found to have substantial influence on the distribution of the wall stress. The thrombus inside the AAA was also found to help protecting the walls from high stresses. Using CT scans of the AAA, the actual geometry of the aneurysm was reconstructed and we found that wall tension increases on the flatter surface (typically corresponds to the posterior surface) and at the inflection points of the bulge. In addition to the static analysis, we also performed simulations of the effect of unsteady pressure wave propagation inside the aneurysm.

  9. Effects of the flexibility of the arterial wall on the wall shear stresses and wall tension in Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salsac, Anne-Virginie; Fernandez, Miguel; Chomaz, Jean-Marc

    2005-11-01

    As an abdominal aortic aneurysm develops, large changes occur in the composition and structure of the arterial wall, which result in its stiffening. So far, most studies, whether experimental or numerical, have been conducted assuming the walls to be rigid. A numerical simulation of the fluid structure interactions is performed in different models of aneurysms in order to analyze the effects that the wall compliance might have on the flow topology. Both symmetric and non-symmetric models of aneurysms are considered, all idealistic in shape. The wall mechanical properties are varied in order to simulate the progressive stiffening of the walls. The spatial and temporal distributions of wall tension are calculated for the different values of the wall elasticity and compared to the results for the rigid walls. In the case of rigid walls, the calculation of the wall shear stresses and pressure compare very well with experimental results.

  10. Cytoreductive strategy for multiple intra-abdominal and abdominal wall desmoid tumors in familial adenomatous polyposis: report of three cases.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Koji; Toiyama, Yuji; Okugawa, Yoshinaga; Hiro, Junichiro; Kawamoto, Aya; Inoue, Yasuhiro; Uchida, Keiichi; Araki, Toshimitsu; Mohri, Yasuhiko; Kusunoki, Masato

    2012-10-01

    Desmoid tumors (DTs) are benign myofibroblastic neoplasms originating from the fascia or muscle aponeurosis, which occur in one-third of patients with familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP). Most FAP-associated DTs occur in the intra-abdominal or abdominal wall region, thus, their infiltrative or expansive growth causes life-threatening organ damage, such as intestinal obstruction, urethral obstruction, and mesenteric infiltration with the involvement of mesenteric vessels. Treatments including surgical resection, cytotoxic chemotherapy, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and anti-estrogen therapy have all been tried with variable success. Here, we report on three patients with FAP who developed multiple intra-abdominal and abdominal wall DTs after total proctocolectomy and ileal pouch-anal anastomosis. Two cases underwent surgical resection of uncontrolled abdominal wall DTs after successful control of intra-abdominal DTs by systemic chemotherapy. The remaining case underwent repeated surgical resections of multiple intra-abdominal and abdominal wall DTs, and consequently had recurrent intra-abdominal DTs, with involvement of the small bowel and ureter. Surgical intervention as tumor volume reduction (cytoreduction) may be useful for cases with medical treatment-refractory or symptomatic FAP-associated abdominal DTs.

  11. Abdominal Wall Transplantation: Skin as a Sentinel Marker for Rejection.

    PubMed

    Gerlach, U A; Vrakas, G; Sawitzki, B; Macedo, R; Reddy, S; Friend, P J; Giele, H; Vaidya, A

    2016-06-01

    Abdominal wall transplantation (AWTX) has revolutionized difficult abdominal closure after intestinal transplantation (ITX). More important, the skin of the transplanted abdominal wall (AW) may serve as an immunological tool for differential diagnosis of bowel dysfunction after transplant. Between August 2008 and October 2014, 29 small bowel transplantations were performed in 28 patients (16 male, 12 female; aged 41 ± 13 years). Two groups were identified: the solid organ transplant (SOT) group (n = 15; 12 ITX and 3 modified multivisceral transplantation [MMVTX]) and the SOT-AWTX group (n = 14; 12 ITX and 2 MMVTX), with the latter including one ITX-AWTX retransplantation. Two doses of alemtuzumab were used for induction (30 mg, 6 and 24 h after reperfusion), and tacrolimus (trough levels 8-12 ng/mL) was used for maintenance immunosuppression. Patient survival was similar in both groups (67% vs. 61%); however, the SOT-AWTX group showed faster posttransplant recovery, better intestinal graft survival (79% vs. 60%), a lower intestinal rejection rate (7% vs. 27%) and a lower rate of misdiagnoses in which viral infection was mistaken and treated as rejection (14% vs. 33%). The skin component of the AW may serve as an immune modulator and sentinel marker for immunological activity in the host. This can be a vital tool for timely prevention of intestinal graft rejection and, more important, avoidance of overimmunosuppression in cases of bowel dysfunction not related to graft rejection.

  12. Bioprosthetic Tissue Matrices in Complex Abdominal Wall Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Broyles, Justin M.; Abt, Nicholas B.; Sacks, Justin M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Complex abdominal defects are difficult problems encountered by surgeons in multiple specialties. Although current evidence supports the primary repair of these defects with mesh reinforcement, it is unclear which mesh is superior for any given clinical scenario. The purpose of this review was to explore the characteristics of and clinical relevance behind bioprosthetic tissue matrices in an effort to better clarify their role in abdominal wall reconstruction. Methods: We reviewed the peer-reviewed literature on the use of bioprosthetic mesh in human subjects. Basic science articles and large retrospective and prospective reviews were included in author’s analysis. The clinical performance and characteristics of 13 bioprosthetic tissue matrices were evaluated. Results: The majority of the products evaluated perform well in contaminated fields, where the risk of wound-healing difficulties is high. Clinical outcomes, which included infection, reherniation, and bulge formation, were variable, and the majority of the studies had a mean follow-up of less than 24 months. Conclusions: Although bioprosthetic matrix has a multitude of indications within the growing field of abdominal wall reconstruction, the functionality, regenerative capacity, and long-term fate of these products have yet to be fully established. Furthermore, the clinical performance, indications, and contraindications for each type of matrix need to be fully evaluated in long-term outcome studies. PMID:25289285

  13. Changes in wall shear stresses in abdominal aortic aneurysms with increasing wall stiffness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salsac, Anne-Virginie; Fernandez, Miguel

    2006-11-01

    During the growth of abdominal aortic aneurysms, local changes occur in the composition and structure of the diseased wall, resulting in its stiffening. A numerical simulation of the fluid structure interactions is performed in idealized models of aneurysms using a finite element method. A full coupling of the equations governing the pulsatile blood flow and the deformation of the compliant wall is undertaken. The effect of the progressive stiffening of the wall is analyzed at various stages in the growth of the aneurysm. Increasing the wall stiffness alters the distribution of wall shear stresses and leads to an increase in their magnitude. The wall compliance is shown to have a more pronounced effect on non-axisymmetric aneurysms, which sustain large displacements. The overall movement of the aneurysm models increases the three-dimensionality of the flow.

  14. Necrotizing Fasciitis of the Abdominal Wall Caused by Serratia Marcescens.

    PubMed

    Lakhani, Naheed A; Narsinghani, Umesh; Kumar, Ritu

    2015-04-15

    In this article, we present the first case of necrotizing fasciitis affecting the abdominal wall caused by Serratia marcescens and share results of a focused review of S. marcescens induced necrotizing fasciitis. Our patient underwent aorto-femoral bypass grafting for advanced peripheral vascular disease and presented 3 weeks postoperatively with pain, erythema and discharge from the incision site in the left lower abdominal wall and underwent multiple debridement of the affected area. Pathology of debrided tissue indicated extensive necrosis involving the adipose tissue, fascia and skeletal muscle. Wound cultures were positive for Serratia marcescens. She was successfully treated with antibiotics and multiple surgical debridements. Since necrotizing fasciitis is a medical and surgical emergency, it is critical to examine infectivity trends, clinical characteristics in its causative spectrum. Using PubMed we found 17 published cases of necrotizing fasciitis caused by Serratia marcescens, and then analyzed patterns among those cases. Serratia marcescens is prominent in the community and hospital settings, and information on infection presentations, risk factors, characteristics, treatment, course, and complications as provided through this study can help identify cases earlier and mitigate poor outcomes. Patients with positive blood cultures and those patients where surgical intervention was not provided or delayed had a higher mortality. Surgical intervention is a definite way to establish the diagnosis of necrotizing infection and differentiate it from other entities.

  15. An abdominal wall simulator for testing suprapubic urinary catheters.

    PubMed

    Coveney, V A; Gröver, D

    2001-08-01

    Urinary catheters (drainage tubes) are in widespread use. The most common type of long-term catheter is the Foley, which is made from natural or synthetic rubber. Foley catheters are passed into the bladder via the urethra or the suprapubic puncture channel (through the abdominal wall). A simulator for the abdominal wall has been developed to simulate aspects of the interaction between it and a suprapubic catheter. The simulator is based on a slab of ultrasoft elastomer with tensionable reinforcing polyamide filaments. The behaviour of the simulator has been compared with data published. A soft membrane (contact pressure) transducer (SMT) was used and novel instrumented 'tongs' for lateral indentation of the puncture track giving indentation stiffness. Slab materials were used with shear moduli of 0.1 and 0.021 MPa. Two filament-tensioning methods were used: by clamping to a winding mechanism and by weights. The combination of the softer slab material and tensioning by weights gave good conformity to physiological data; other combinations did not.

  16. Incentive spirometry decreases respiratory complications following major abdominal surgery.

    PubMed

    Westwood, K; Griffin, M; Roberts, K; Williams, M; Yoong, K; Digger, T

    2007-12-01

    Pulmonary complications are the leading cause of morbidity and mortality following major abdominal surgery. Chest physiotherapy aims to decrease the likelihood of these complications and hasten recovery. Exercises aimed at maximising inspiratory effort are the most beneficial for the patients. The incentive spirometer is a handheld device that patients use to achieve effective inspiration. In a nonrandomised pilot study of 263 patients we have found that the addition of the incentive spirometer, as part of an intensive post-operative physiotherapy programme, decreased the occurrence of pulmonary complications (6 vs 17%, p = 0.01) and length of stay on the surgical high dependency unit (3.1 vs 4 days p = 0.03). The two groups were comparable when age, sex, smoking history, the need for emergency surgery and post-operative analgesia were compared.

  17. CT evaluation of complications of abdominal aortic surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Mark, A.; Moss, A.A.; Lusby, R.; Kaiser, J.A.

    1982-11-01

    The authors conducted a retrospective analysis of the CT findings in 29 consecutive patients being studied to detect complications of aortofemoral bypass surgery. Presenting symptoms included fever in 22 (76%), gastrointestinal bleeding in 2 (7%), a pulsating mass in 3 (10%), jaundice in 1 (3%), and back pain in 1 (3%). The complications observed most frequently were groin infection in 7 (24%), abdominal perigraft abscess in 11 (38%), pseudoaneurysm in 6 (21%), aorto-enteric fistula in 3 (10%), and lymphocystic hematoma in 3 (10%). There were no false negatives, and overall accuracy and sensitivity of CT in detecting complications was 100%. The authors recommend that CT be performed prior to angiography or surgery whenever an abscess, pseudoaneurysm, or aorto-enteric fistula is suspected.

  18. [Reconstruction of an abdominal wall defect with a superior epigastric perforator propeller flap: case report].

    PubMed

    Lepivert, J-C; Alet, J-M; Michot, A; Pélissier, P; Pinsolle, V

    2014-10-01

    Perforators flaps take a special place in reconstructive surgery. These flaps can be dissected and turned as a propeller blade on its pedicule axis. We report the case of a 54-year-old man presenting a recurrence of a dermatofibrosarcoma in the right hypochondrium. Tumor resection caused a large abdominal wall defect taking the anterior aponeurosis of the rectus abdominis. An angioscanner was realized in preoperative to locate the perforators of the deep superior epigastric artery. We realized a propeller flap based on a perforator of the left superior epigastric artery who allowed to cover the wall defect. We set up a patch of Vicryl® to reconstruct the aponeurosis plan at the same operative time. We didn't note any necrosis and complete healing occurred in 2 weeks. The margins were healthy. The cosmetic result and the low morbidity make this flap a good therapeutic option. This flap seems reliable, arteries perforators are constant with good diameter.

  19. Athletic injuries of the lateral abdominal wall: review of anatomy and MR imaging appearance.

    PubMed

    Stensby, J Derek; Baker, Jonathan C; Fox, Michael G

    2016-02-01

    The lateral abdominal wall is comprised of three muscles, each with a different function and orientation. The transversus abdominus, internal oblique, and external oblique muscles span the abdominal cavity between the iliocostalis lumborum and quadratus lumborum posteriorly and the rectus abdominis anteriorly. The lateral abdominal wall is bound superiorly by the lower ribs and costal cartilages and inferiorly by the iliac crest and inguinal ligament. The lateral abdominal wall may be acutely or chronically injured in a variety of athletic endeavors, with occasional acute injuries in the setting of high-energy trauma such as motor vehicle collisions. Injuries to the lateral abdominal wall may result in lumbar hernia formation, unique for its high incarceration rate, and also Spigelian hernias. This article will review the anatomy, the magnetic resonance (MR) imaging approach, and the features and complications of lateral abdominal wall injuries.

  20. [Abdominal aortic aneurysm treated by endovascular surgery: a case report].

    PubMed

    Alconero-Camarero, Ana Rosa; Cobo-Sánchez, José Luis; Casaus-Pérez, María; García-Campo, María Elena; García-Zarrabeitia, María José; Calvo-Diez, Marta; Mirones-Valdeolivas, Luz Elena

    2008-01-01

    An aneurysm is an abnormal dilation or irreversible convex of a portion of an artery. The most common site of aneurysms is the abdominal aorta and their appearance is often due to degeneration of the arterial wall, associated with atherosclerosis and favored by risk factors such as smoking and hypertension, among others. Left untreated, aneurysm of the abdominal aorta usually leads to rupture. Treatment is surgical, consisting of the introduction of a prosthesis, composed basically of a stent and an introducer, into the aorta. We report the case of a person diagnosed with abdominal aortic aneurysm in a routine examination who was admitted for ambulatory surgical treatment. We designed a nursing care plan, following Virginia Henderson's conceptual model. The care plan was divided into 2 parts, a first preoperative phase and a second postimplantation or monitoring phase. The care plan contained the principal nursing diagnoses, based on the taxonomies of the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association (NANDA), nursing interventions classification (NIC) and nursing outcomes classifications (NOC), and collaboration problems/potential complications. The patient was discharged to home after contact was made with his reference nurse in the primary health center, since during the hospital phase, some NOC indicators remained unresolved.

  1. Experimental evaluation of a new composite mesh with the selective property of incorporation to the abdominal wall without adhering to the intestines.

    PubMed

    Amid, P K; Shulman, A G; Lichtenstein, I L; Sostrin, S; Young, J; Hakakha, M

    1994-03-01

    This preliminary study examined the possibility of preventing intestinal adhesions to biomaterials while preserving their incorporation with the abdominal wall. White New Zealand rabbits received intraperitoneal implants of different biomaterials for repair of defects created on the abdominal wall. The following biomaterials were used: polypropylene, polyester, expanded polytetraflueroethylene, polypropylene mesh/polypropylene sheeting (polypropylene mesh covered with polypropylene sheeting on the peritoneal side), polypropylene/silastic, polypropylene/polyglactin, polypropylene/polyglycolic acid, and polypropylene/fibrin. All biomaterials evaluated caused adhesions to the intestines except for polypropylene mesh/polypropylene sheeting and polypropylene mesh/silastic composites. Because adhesion of the intestine to the biomaterial is the first stage of biomaterial-related intestinal fistula, its prevention is logical for the elimination of this complication. Composites with the selective property of adhering to the abdominal wall, yet sparing the viscera, would facilitate thoracic and abdominal wall surgeries, as well as intraperitoneal laparoscopic hernioplasties.

  2. [Postoperative necrotizing fasciitis of the anterior abdominal wall].

    PubMed

    Fichev, G; Poromanski, I; Marina, M

    1995-01-01

    Postoperative necrotizing fasciitis of the anterior abdominal wall is a serious and life-endangering complication of an acute progressive synergistic infective process. There is an absolute increase in its incidence rate attributable to a number of situations in modern life. Morphological and clinical studies are carried out on personal case material of 28 patients, followed up over a 3-year period. The presence of aerobic-anaerobic mixed polyinfection, consisting of average 3.75 bacterial species of which 1.43 aerobes and 2.32 anaerobes, is demonstrated microbiologically. Of the latter non-spore-bearing obligate anaerobes predominate among which B fragillis is the most common. As shown by the study, the process is characterized by slow initial course with ensuring rapid spreading by neighbourhood. The process reveals all signs of a mixed aerobic-anaerobic polyinfection, thereby necessitating subordination of both antibiotic therapy and surgical tactics to the latter.

  3. Resection and Abdominal Wall Reconstruction of a Desmoid Tumor with Endometrioma Features

    PubMed Central

    Majors, Jaqueline; Stoikes, Nathaniel F.; Nejati, Reza

    2016-01-01

    Desmoid tumors are rare, musculoaponeurotic mesenchymal origin tumors arising from the proliferation of well-differentiated fibroblasts. Desmoid tumors may arise from any location with the abdominal cavity, abdominal wall and extremity locations being most frequent. We present the case of a 35-year-old female with a history of endometriosis who presented palpable abdominal mass and cyclic abdominal pain. Resection was performed for a presumed desmoid soft tissue tumor. Final pathology demonstrated desmoid histology admixed with abdominal wall endometriosis (endometrioma). This unique pathologic finding has only been rarely reported and is discussed with a brief review of the literature. PMID:27247824

  4. [Large abdominal wall reconstruction by free flap after recurrence of a dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans].

    PubMed

    Le Fourn, B; Lejeune, F; Sartre, J Y; Loirat, Y; Pannier, M

    1996-12-01

    Based on a case of recurrence of a dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans of the abdominal wall, the authors discuss the need for initial wide resection of this type of skin tumour and the possibilities of repair of extensive full thickness defects of the abdominal wall by means of a latissimus dorsi myocutaneous free flap.

  5. An Abdominal Aorta Wall Extraction for Liver Cirrhosis Classification Using Ultrasonic Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Takaya; Fujita, Yusuke; Mitani, Yoshihiro; Hamamoto, Yoshihiko; Segawa, Makoto; Terai, Shuji; Sakaida, Isao

    2011-06-01

    We propose a method to extract an abdominal aorta wall from an M-mode image. Furthermore, we propose the use of a Gaussian filter in order to improve image quality. The experimental results show that the Gaussian filter is effective in the abdominal aorta wall extraction.

  6. [Case of abdominal wall malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor which is difficult to distinguish from a urachal disease].

    PubMed

    Tatenuma, Tomoyuki; Sakata, Ryoko; Sugiura, Shinpei; Tajiri, Takehiro; Gondo, Toshikazu; Kitami, Kazuo

    2013-09-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST) are highly malignant soft tissue sarcomas. It is very rare for MPNST to arise in the abdominal wall. We report a case of abdominal wall MPNST that was difficult to distinguish from a urachal disease. A 72-year-old woman found a mass of the umbilicus in October 2011. She visited a digestive surgery department in November because it gradually enlarged. Diagnostic imaging suggested a urachal tumor. She was then referred to our clinic. Contrast enhanced CT showed that the 5-cm cystic tumor extended from the umbilicus to abdominal wall. The tumor showed low uptake value in PET-CT. We diagnosed her with a urachal cyst, but could not deny urachal carcinoma. Therefore, we performed surgical resection in January 2012. The pathological diagnosis was MPNST. She has not experienced recurrence for 9 months. MPNST mostly occur in the retroperitoneum close to the spine, extremities, head, and neck. It is very rare for them to occur in the abdominal wall. This is the sixth case including overseas reports. In addition, this is the first case in which it was difficult to distinguish from a urachal disease.

  7. Abdominal surgery process modeling framework for simulation using spreadsheets.

    PubMed

    Boshkoska, Biljana Mileva; Damij, Talib; Jelenc, Franc; Damij, Nadja

    2015-08-01

    We provide a continuation of the existing Activity Table Modeling methodology with a modular spreadsheets simulation. The simulation model developed is comprised of 28 modeling elements for the abdominal surgery cycle process. The simulation of a two-week patient flow in an abdominal clinic with 75 beds demonstrates the applicability of the methodology. The simulation does not include macros, thus programming experience is not essential for replication or upgrading the model. Unlike the existing methods, the proposed solution employs a modular approach for modeling the activities that ensures better readability, the possibility of easily upgrading the model with other activities, and its easy extension and connectives with other similar models. We propose a first-in-first-served approach for simulation of servicing multiple patients. The uncertain time duration of the activities is modeled using the function "rand()". The patients movements from one activity to the next one is tracked with nested "if()" functions, thus allowing easy re-creation of the process without the need of complex programming.

  8. Improved surgical mesh integration into the rat abdominal wall with arginine administration.

    PubMed

    Arbos, M A; Ferrando, J M; Quiles, M T; Vidal, J; López-Cano, M; Gil, J; Manero, J M; Peña, J; Huguet, P; Schwartz-Riera, S; Reventós, J; Armengol, M

    2006-02-01

    Prosthetic meshes are used as the standard of care in abdominal wall hernia repair. However, hernia recurrences and side effects remain unsolved problems. The demand by health care providers for increasingly efficient and cost-effective surgery encourages the development of newer strategies to improve devices and outcomes. Here, we evaluated whether l-arginine administration was able to ameliorate long-term polypropylene prostheses incorporation into the abdominal wall of Sprague-Dawley rats. Meshes were placed on-lay and continuous l-arginine was administered. In vivo biocompatibility was studied at 7, 25 and 30 days post-implantation. Effectively, l-arginine administration in combination with mesh triggered subtle changes in ECM composition that impinged on critical biochemical and structural features. Lastly, tensile strength augmented and stiffness decreased over the control condition. This could help to restructure the mechanical load transfer from the implant to the brittle surrounding tissues, i.e., impact load and fatigue load associated with mechanical tensions could be distributed between the mesh and the restored tissue in a more balanced manner, and ultimately help to reduce the incidence of loosening, recurrences, and local wound complications. Since the newly formed tissue is more mechanically stable, this approach could eventually be introduced to human hernia repair.

  9. Dynamic reconstruction of full-thickness abdominal wall defects using free innervated vastus lateralis muscle flap combined with free anterolateral thigh flap.

    PubMed

    Iida, Takuya; Mihara, Makoto; Narushima, Mitsunaga; Todokoro, Takeshi; Hara, Hisako; Yoshimatu, Hidehiko; Koshima, Isao; Kadono, Takafumi

    2013-03-01

    Reconstruction of full-thickness abdominal wall defects remains a difficult surgical challenge. Although various reconstructive methods, including artificial mesh, pedicled and free flaps, have been reported, most reported reconstruction of only the fascia layer, leaving the resected rectus abdominis muscle unreconstructed. However, recent studies suggested the importance of dynamic reconstruction with functional muscle in preventing abdominal hernia in the long-term. According to the principle of reconstructive surgery, "replace lost tissue with similar tissue," a functionally and aesthetically ideal reconstruction is to reconstruct all components of the abdominal wall structure, including skin, subcutaneous fat, fascia, and muscle. We present 2 cases with full-thickness abdominal wall defects in the upper abdominal region, which we reconstructed with a free innervated vastus lateralis muscle flap combined with a free anterolateral thigh flap. The motor nerve of the vastus lateralis muscle was sutured with the intercostal nerve, and reinnervation was confirmed by electromyography. This method allows reconstruction of all components of the abdominal wall with a single flap, and dynamic reconstruction is achieved which will reduce the risk of postoperative hernia. We believe this method can be a good option for reconstruction of full-thickness abdominal wall defects with long-term stability.

  10. Collagenopathies—Implications for Abdominal Wall Reconstruction: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Bridget; Sanniec, Kyle

    2016-01-01

    Background: The etiology of hernia formation is strongly debated and includes mechanical strain, prior surgical intervention, abnormal embryologic development, and increased intraabdominal pressure. Although the most common inciting cause in ventral hernias is previous abdominal surgery, many other factors contribute. We explore this etiology through an examination of the current literature and existing evidence on patients with collagen vascular diseases, such as Ehlers–Danlos syndrome. Methods: A systematic review of the published literature was performed of all available Spanish and English language PubMed and Cochrane articles containing the key words “collagenopathies,” “collagenopathy,” “Ehlers-Danlos,” “ventral hernia,” and “hernia.” Results: Three hundred fifty-two articles were identified in the preliminary search. After review, 61 articles were included in the final review. Conclusions: Multiple authors suggest a qualitative or quantitative defect in collagen formation as a common factor in hernia formation. High-level clinical data clearly linking collagenopathies and hernia formation are lacking. However, a trend in pathologic studies suggests a link between abnormal collagen production and/or processing that is likely associated with hernia development. PMID:27826465

  11. The use of Surgisis for abdominal wall reconstruction in the separation of omphalopagus conjoined twins.

    PubMed

    Dasgupta, Roshni; Wales, Paul W; Zuker, Ronald M; Fisher, David M; Langer, Jacob C

    2007-09-01

    Abdominal wall reconstruction in omphalopagus twins poses a difficult reconstructive challenge, as separation often results in a large abdominal wall defect. A number of options are available for closure, including tissue flaps, expanders and patches made of foreign material. Surgisis is a new biodegradable small intestine scaffolding substrate that permits tissue in-growth and results in a permanent durable scar. We describe its use in abdominal wall reconstruction after separation of a set of conjoined twins. A set of omphalopagus conjoined twins shared liver and abdominal wall. After separation at 6 months of age, Twin A's abdomen could be closed primarily, but Twin B could not. A 4-ply Surgisis mesh was used in the upper abdominal closure, and a skin flap was created, to completely cover the patch. Both twins survived the operation. A small portion of the skin flap over the Surgisis broke down, healing by secondary intention. In follow up of over 18 months post procedure, there have been no wound infections and the abdominal wall is intact with no evidence of a hernia. Surgisis can be successfully used for the reconstruction of complex abdominal wall defects in the pediatric patient, including reconstruction after separation of conjoined twins.

  12. Does previous abdominal surgery effect the feasibility of total laparoscopic hysterectomy?

    PubMed Central

    Çelik, Cem; Abalı, Remzi; Taşdemir, Nicel; Aksu, Erson; Akkuş, Didem; Gül, Abdülaziz

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The primary aim of this study is to evaluate the effects of previous abdominal surgery on the feasibility of performing and the safety of total laparoscopic hysterectomy (TLH). Material and Methods: In this retrospective study, we analysed 62 laparoscopic hysterectomies which were performed at our institute between February 2011 and January 2013. We chose to perform laparoscopic surgery for all patients, including those who had previously undergone abdominal surgery. The patients were classified into two groups: Group 1 included patients with a history of abdominal surgery (n=24) and Group 2 included patients without a history of abdominal surgery (n=38). Results: The operating period was compared in both groups: 184.43±51.0 min. for Group 1 and 195.41±64.1 min. for Group 2 (p=0.471). Postoperative hospital stay and blood loss was also compared. There was just 1 conversion from TLH to a laparotomy in both groups. None of the patients in Group 1 needed a blood transfusion, whereas 1 in Group 2 did. Conclusion: We found that operation time, postoperative hospital stay, blood loss, rate of operative complications or conversion rate to open surgery between patients with and without a history of abdominal surgery were comparable. Therefore, it appears that a history of abdominal surgery does not adversely affect the safety of TLH. PMID:24592078

  13. Primary Liver Abscess with Anterior Abdominal Wall Extension Caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex

    PubMed Central

    Kandekar, Rahul Vilas; Tiwari, Ajeet Ramamani; Kadam, Rahul; Adhikari, Devbrata Radhikamohan

    2016-01-01

    Tubercular liver abscess is generally secondary to some other primary foci in the body, most notably pulmonary and gastrointestinal system. To find primary tubercular liver abscess is rare, with prevalence of 0.34% in patients with hepatic tuberculosis. Abscess tracking into abdominal wall from spinal and para spinal tuberculosis is known, however primary liver tuberculosis rupturing into anterior abdominal wall has been reported only twice in literature. We report a case of 43-year-old female with direct invasion of the anterior abdominal wall from an isolated tubercular parenchymal liver abscess, caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex, diagnosed primarily on smear for Acid Fast Bacilli (AFB), imaging and isolated by culture and BACTEC MGIT 960 KIT. We discuss here the diagnostic dilemma, management and outcome of primary tubercular liver parenchymal abscess with direct invasion into anterior abdominal wall. PMID:28050433

  14. [MORPHOLOGICAL PECULIARITIES OF MUSCULO-APONEUROTIC TISSUES OF ANTERIOR ABDOMINAL WALL IN PATIENTS, SUFFERING MORBID OBESITY].

    PubMed

    Usenko, O Yu; Gomolyako, I V; Kondratenko, B M; Moskalenko, V V

    2015-11-01

    Results of morphological investigation of musculo-aponeurotic structures of anterior abdominal wall were presented in the morbid obesity patients. The role of obesity as a primary cause for morphofunctional insufficience of musculo-aponeurotic structures was established.

  15. The Effect of Abdominal Support on Functional Outcomes in Patients Following Major Abdominal Surgery: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Cheifetz, Oren; Overend, Tom J.; Crowe, Jean

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: Immobility and pain are modifiable risk factors for development of venous thromboembolism and pulmonary morbidity after major abdominal surgery (MAS). The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of abdominal incision support with an elasticized abdominal binder on postoperative walk performance (mobility), perceived distress, pain, and pulmonary function in patients following MAS. Methods: Seventy-five patients scheduled to undergo MAS via laparotomy were randomized to experimental (binder) or control (no binder) groups. Sixty (33 male, 27 female; mean age 58±14.9 years) completed the study. Preoperative measurements of 6-minute walk test (6MWT) distance, perceived distress, pain, and pulmonary function were repeated 1, 3, and 5 days after surgery. Results: Surgery was associated with marked postoperative reductions (p<0.001) in walk distance (∼75–78%, day 3) and forced vital capacity (35%, all days) for both groups. Improved 6MWT distance by day 5 was greater (p<0.05) for patients wearing a binder (80%) than for the control group (48%). Pain and symptom-associated distress remained unchanged following surgery with binder usage, increasing significantly (p<0.05) only in the no binder group. Conclusion: Elasticized abdominal binders provide a non-invasive intervention for enhancing recovery of walk performance, controlling pain and distress, and improving patients' experience following MAS. PMID:21629603

  16. A Multidisciplinary Approach to Medical Weight Loss Prior to Complex Abdominal Wall Reconstruction: Is it Feasible?

    PubMed

    Rosen, Michael J; Aydogdu, Kasim; Grafmiller, Kevin; Petro, Clayton C; Faiman, Gregg H; Prabhu, Ajita

    2015-08-01

    Obesity is a major risk factor for perioperative morbidity, especially for patients undergoing complex incisional hernia repair. The feasibility and effectiveness of medical weight loss programs prior to complex abdominal wall reconstruction have not been well characterized. Here, we report our experience collaborating with a medical weight loss specialist utilizing a protein sparing modified fast in order to optimize weight loss prior to complex abdominal wall reconstruction. Morbidly obese patients (body mass index (BMI) > 35 kg/m(2)) evaluated by our medical weight loss specialist prior to complex ventral hernia repair were identified within our prospective database. Our primary outcome measure was the amount of weight lost prior to surgical intervention. Our secondary outcome measure was to determine the maintenance of weight loss during long-term follow-up after the surgical intervention. A total of 25 patients with a BMI > 35 kg/m(2) were evaluated by our medical weight loss specialist prior to undergoing a planned incisional hernia repair. The mean weight of the patients preoperatively was 128 kg ± 25 (range 96-205 kg) (mean ± standard deviation), and the mean BMI was 49 kg/m(2) ± 10 (range 36-85). After completion of the preoperative modified protein sparing fast, the mean preoperative weight loss of the group was 24 kg ± 21 (range 2-80 kg). The overall change in BMI for the group prior to surgery was 9 kg/m(2) ± 8 (0.6 to 33). The percentage of excess BMI loss and total BMI loss preoperatively was 37 % ± 23 (2 to 83) and 18 % ± 12 (1 to 43), respectively. Of the 24 patients that initially lost weight in the program preoperatively, 22 (88 %) successfully maintained their weight loss for the entire study period for an average of 18 months. Collaboration with a medical weight loss specialist and a surgeon with a structured approach using a modified protein sparing fast can successfully result in meaningful weight

  17. The surface landmarks of the abdominal wall: a plea for standardization

    PubMed Central

    Cirocchi, Roberto; Boselli, Carlo; Renzi, Claudio; Cagini, Lucio; Boccolini, Andrea; Noya, Giuseppe; Fingerhut, Abe

    2014-01-01

    Despite centuries of anatomical studies, controversies and contradictions still exist in the literature regarding the definition, anatomical terminology and the limits of the abdominal wall. We conducted a systematic research of books published from 1901 until December 2012 in Google Books. After the index screening, 16 remaining books were further assessed for eligibility. We decided to exclude journals. The aim of the study was to focus on surface landmarks and borders of the abdominal cavity. After this revision of the literature, we propose that the surface landmarks of the abdominal wall should be standardized. PMID:25097589

  18. Albumin Kinetics in Patients Undergoing Major Abdominal Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Norberg, Åke; Rooyackers, Olav; Segersvärd, Ralf; Wernerman, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Background The drop in plasma albumin concentration following surgical trauma is well known, but the temporal pattern of the detailed mechanisms behind are less well described. The aim of this explorative study was to assess changes in albumin synthesis and transcapillary escape rate (TER) following major surgical trauma, at the time of peak elevations in two well-recognized markers of inflammation. Methods This was a clinical trial of radiolabeled human serum albumin for the study of TER and plasma volume. Ten patients were studied immediately preoperatively and on the 2nd postoperative day after major pancreatic surgery. Albumin synthesis rate was measured by the flooding dose technique employing incorporation of isotopically labelled phenylalanine. Results Fractional synthesis rate of albumin increased from 11.7 (95% CI: 8.9, 14.5) to 15.0 (11.7, 18.4) %/day (p = 0.027), whereas the corresponding absolute synthesis rate was unchanged, 175 (138, 212) versus 150 (107, 192) mg/kg/day (p = 0.21). TER was unchanged, 4.9 (3.1, 6.8) %/hour versus 5.5 (3.9, 7.2) (p = 0.63). Plasma volume was unchanged but plasma albumin decreased from 33.5 (30.9, 36.2) to 22.1 (19.8, 24.3) g/L. (p<0.001). Conclusion Two days after major abdominal surgery, at the time-point when two biomarkers of generalised inflammation were at their peak and the plasma albumin concentration had decreased by 33%, we were unable to show any difference in the absolute synthesis rate of albumin, TER and plasma volume as compared with values obtained immediately pre-operatively. This suggests that capillary leakage, if elevated postoperatively, had ceased at that time-point. The temporal relations between albumin kinetics, capillary leakage and generalised inflammation need to be further explored. Trial Registration clinicaltrialsregister.eu: EudraCT 2010-08529-21 ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01194492 PMID:26313170

  19. Reconstruction of a four-quadrant full-thickness abdominal wall defect after removal and debridement of an infected mesh hernioplasty.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, C; Schramm, S; Hankiss, J

    2011-02-01

    This case-report shows our experience with a patient, who underwent mesh hernioplasty followed by infection of the mesh and full-thickness loss of the abdominal wall after debridement due to necrosis. The anamnesis included generalised arteriosclerosis, chronic nicotine and alcohol abuse and recurring wound-healing disorders after surgical procedures. The initial infection was treated by radical debridement, targeted antibiotics and V.A.C.(®) Therapy. After this, a staged plastic reconstructive procedure with four pedicled flaps was performed. The functional integrity of the abdominal wall was completely re-established. The patient was able to continue her occupation as a facility manager. Although the use of free flaps is very common in modern plastic and reconstructive surgery, procedures such as pedicled flaps still have their significance for special indications. In this case, a full recovery of the abdominal wall with autologous tissue was successful under difficult vascular conditions by using local flaps.

  20. Evolution of transversus abdominis plane infiltration techniques for postsurgical analgesia following abdominal surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Gadsden, Jeffrey; Ayad, Sabry; Gonzales, Jeffrey J; Mehta, Jaideep; Boublik, Jan; Hutchins, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    Transversus abdominis plane (TAP) infiltration is a regional anesthesia technique that has been demonstrated to be effective for management of postsurgical pain after abdominal surgery. There are several different clinical variations in the approaches used for achieving analgesia via TAP infiltration, and methods for identification of the TAP have evolved considerably since the landmark-guided technique was first described in 2001. There are many factors that impact the analgesic outcomes following TAP infiltration, and the various nuances of this technique have led to debate regarding procedural classification of TAP infiltration. Based on our current understanding of fascial and neuronal anatomy of the anterior abdominal wall, as well as available evidence from studies assessing local anesthetic spread and cutaneous sensory block following TAP infiltration, it is clear that TAP infiltration techniques are appropriately classified as field blocks. While the objective of peripheral nerve block and TAP infiltration are similar in that both approaches block sensory response in order to achieve analgesia, the technical components of the two procedures are different. Unlike peripheral nerve block, which involves identification or stimulation of a specific nerve or nerve plexus, followed by administration of a local anesthetic in close proximity, TAP infiltration involves administration and spread of local anesthetic within an anatomical plane of the surgical site. PMID:26677342

  1. Study of Individual Characteristic Abdominal Wall Thickness Based on Magnetic Anchored Surgical Instruments

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Ding-Hui; Liu, Wen-Yan; Feng, Hai-Bo; Fu, Yi-Li; Huang, Shi; Xiang, Jun-Xi; Lyu, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Magnetic anchored surgical instruments (MASI), relying on magnetic force, can break through the limitations of the single port approach in dexterity. Individual characteristic abdominal wall thickness (ICAWT) deeply influences magnetic force that determines the safety of MASI. The purpose of this study was to research the abdominal wall characteristics in MASI applied environment to find ICAWT, and then construct an artful method to predict ICAWT, resulting in better safety and feasibility for MASI. Methods: For MASI, ICAWT is referred to the thickness of thickest point in the applied environment. We determined ICAWT through finding the thickest point in computed tomography scans. We also investigated the traits of abdominal wall thickness to discover the factor that can be used to predict ICAWT. Results: Abdominal wall at C point in the middle third lumbar vertebra plane (L3) is the thickest during chosen points. Fat layer thickness plays a more important role in abdominal wall thickness than muscle layer thickness. “BMI-ICAWT” curve was obtained based on abdominal wall thickness of C point in L3 plane, and the expression was as follow: f(x) = P1 × x2 + P2 × x + P3, where P1 = 0.03916 (0.01776, 0.06056), P2 = 1.098 (0.03197, 2.164), P3 = −18.52 (−31.64, −5.412), R-square: 0.99. Conclusions: Abdominal wall thickness of C point at L3 could be regarded as ICAWT. BMI could be a reliable predictor of ICAWT. In the light of “BMI-ICAWT” curve, we may conveniently predict ICAWT by BMI, resulting a better safety and feasibility for MASI. PMID:26228215

  2. Abdominal and scrotal wall emphysema in a patient with severe ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Manik; Thandassery, Ragesh Babu; Hilli, Shatha Al; Kaabi, Saad Al

    2014-07-01

    Severe ulcerative colitis can be associated with bowel perforation. Bowel perforation rarely leads on to abdominal wall and scrotal wall emphysema. Bowel perforation in such cases can be spontaneous or iatrogenic (colonoscopy-related). We report a rare scenario where a patient presented with abdominal wall and scrotal emphysema after topical corticosteroid enema-induced traumatic rectal perforation. Topical corticosteroids were stopped immediately after identification of rectal perforation. The patient was managed conservatively with intravenous antibiotics. With this report we intend to sensitise clinicians and topical enema manufacturers regarding this rare complication.

  3. [Approaches to the abdominal cavity and closure of the abdominal wall].

    PubMed

    Dittmar, Y; Rauchfuss, F; Ardelt, M; Settmacher, U

    2011-12-01

    Although minimally invasive approaches to the abdominal cavity are becoming increasingly more important, open surgical techniques are still of essential interest and must be mastered by general and visceral surgeons. The choice of the particular approach depends on the specificity and location of the scheduled procedure. The following article is intended to give an overview on the current literature as well as experiences in the field of open surgical approaches to the abdominal cavity.

  4. Primary closure of the abdominal wall after "open abdomen" situation.

    PubMed

    Kääriäinen, M; Kuokkanen, H

    2013-01-01

    "Open abdomen" is a strategy used to avoid or treat abdominal compartment syndrome. It has reduced mortality both in trauma and non-trauma abdominal catastrophes but also has created a challenging clinical problem. Traditionally, open abdomen is closed in two phases; primarily with a free skin graft and later with a flap reconstruction. A modern trend is to close the abdomen within the initial hospitalization. This requires multi-professional co-operation. Temporary abdominal closure methods, e.g. negative pressure wound therapy alone or combined with mesh-mediated traction, have been developed to facilitate direct fascial closure. Components separation technique, mesh reinforcement or bridging of the fascial defect with mesh and perforator saving skin undermining can be utilized in the final closure if needed. These techniques can be combined. Choice of the treatment depends on the condition of the patient and size of the fascia and skin defect, and the state of the abdominal contents. In this paper we review the literature on the closure of an open abdomen and present the policy used in our institution in the open abdomen situations.

  5. Paragonimiasis mimicking chest cancer and abdominal wall metastaisis: A case report

    PubMed Central

    ZHOU, RONGXING; ZHANG, MINJIA; CHENG, NANSHENG; ZHOU, YONG

    2016-01-01

    Typical human paragonimiasis demonstrates an elevated eosinophil count, positive immunoblot, nodular shadows of the lung and pleural thickening with pleural effusion, and these symptoms may be confused with chest cancer. In the present case, a rare case of human paragonimiasis mimicking chest cancer and abdominal wall metastasis is described, the 39-year-old male patient was admitted in our hospital for cough, weight loss 5 kg and a firm mass in right upper abdominal wall. The laboratory test showed unremarkable hematology and biochemistry results. Chest X-ray, Plain computed tomography of the chest and abdomen showed right pleural effusion, several nodules in right lower lung and a mass in the right upper abdominal wall. The initial diagnosis was lung or chest cancer with abdominal wall metastasis, and the abdominal wall mass was resected for the final diagnosis. The biopsy revealed eosinophilic granuloma with Charcot-Leyden crystal formation infiltrated in the muscular fibers. Subsequent to assessment of the antibodies against parasites, the final diagnosis of paragonimiasis was made. PMID:27313691

  6. Comparing a non-invasive hemodynamic monitor with minimally invasive monitoring during major open abdominal surgery

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Lawrence; Liu, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Abstract As part of the enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) protocol, the goal-directed fluid management with hemodynamic monitoring can effectively guide perioperative fluid use and significantly improve the outcomes in high-risk patients undergoing major surgeries. Several minimally invasive and non-invasive monitoring devices are commercially available for clinical use. As part of an internal evaluation, we reported the results from three different hemodynamic monitoring devices used in a patient undergoing a major abdominal surgery. PMID:25050116

  7. Testicular Ectopia in the Anterior Abdominal Wall of a Neonate: A Rare Site of Ectopic Testis

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqui, Salman Atiq; Marei, Tamer Ibrahim; Al-Makhaita, Ghada

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 3-day Final Diagnosis: Ectopic right testis in anterior abdominal wall Symptoms: — Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Testicular ultrasound and MRI abdomen Specialty: Radiology Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Abnormal testicular descent can either be undescended or, less commonly, ectopic. Most undescended testes complete the course of descent by the first year of life only if these remain in the normal path of descent. The deviation of the testis may occur to an ectopic location during the transinguinal phase. Of the known ectopic sites, the anterior abdominal wall is the rarest site of testicular ectopia and to our knowledge only 3 cases of this nature have been reported in the available literature to date. Case Report: This rare case of testicular ectopia occurred in a 3-day-old boy in whom the right scrotal sac was empty; on abdominal ultrasound, the right testis was found in the subcutaneous tissues of the right antero-lateral abdominal wall. These findings were confirmed on abdominal MRI, where the right testis was seen beneath the skin between the subcutaneous tissues and external oblique aponeurosis. No aponeurotic or muscular defect was appreciable under the abdominal wall. The neonate underwent orchiopexy at the age of 6 months and remained uneventful postoperatively. Conclusions: Preoperative imaging is recommended to detect and confirm the ectopic site as well as the morphology of testis, thereby increasing the chance of surveillance and preservation of an ectopic testis. Imaging can serve as preoperative road mapping to localize the exact site for surgical exploration of an ectopic testis if there is no apparent or palpable swelling over the anterior abdominal wall. PMID:27411886

  8. Texture analysis improves level set segmentation of the anterior abdominal wall

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhoubing; Allen, Wade M.; Baucom, Rebeccah B.; Poulose, Benjamin K.; Landman, Bennett A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The treatment of ventral hernias (VH) has been a challenging problem for medical care. Repair of these hernias is fraught with failure; recurrence rates ranging from 24% to 43% have been reported, even with the use of biocompatible mesh. Currently, computed tomography (CT) is used to guide intervention through expert, but qualitative, clinical judgments, notably, quantitative metrics based on image-processing are not used. The authors propose that image segmentation methods to capture the three-dimensional structure of the abdominal wall and its abnormalities will provide a foundation on which to measure geometric properties of hernias and surrounding tissues and, therefore, to optimize intervention. Methods: In this study with 20 clinically acquired CT scans on postoperative patients, the authors demonstrated a novel approach to geometric classification of the abdominal. The authors’ approach uses a texture analysis based on Gabor filters to extract feature vectors and follows a fuzzy c-means clustering method to estimate voxelwise probability memberships for eight clusters. The memberships estimated from the texture analysis are helpful to identify anatomical structures with inhomogeneous intensities. The membership was used to guide the level set evolution, as well as to derive an initial start close to the abdominal wall. Results: Segmentation results on abdominal walls were both quantitatively and qualitatively validated with surface errors based on manually labeled ground truth. Using texture, mean surface errors for the outer surface of the abdominal wall were less than 2 mm, with 91% of the outer surface less than 5 mm away from the manual tracings; errors were significantly greater (2–5 mm) for methods that did not use the texture. Conclusions: The authors’ approach establishes a baseline for characterizing the abdominal wall for improving VH care. Inherent texture patterns in CT scans are helpful to the tissue classification, and texture

  9. Texture analysis improves level set segmentation of the anterior abdominal wall

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Zhoubing; Allen, Wade M.; Baucom, Rebeccah B.; Poulose, Benjamin K.; Landman, Bennett A.

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: The treatment of ventral hernias (VH) has been a challenging problem for medical care. Repair of these hernias is fraught with failure; recurrence rates ranging from 24% to 43% have been reported, even with the use of biocompatible mesh. Currently, computed tomography (CT) is used to guide intervention through expert, but qualitative, clinical judgments, notably, quantitative metrics based on image-processing are not used. The authors propose that image segmentation methods to capture the three-dimensional structure of the abdominal wall and its abnormalities will provide a foundation on which to measure geometric properties of hernias and surrounding tissues and, therefore, to optimize intervention.Methods: In this study with 20 clinically acquired CT scans on postoperative patients, the authors demonstrated a novel approach to geometric classification of the abdominal. The authors’ approach uses a texture analysis based on Gabor filters to extract feature vectors and follows a fuzzy c-means clustering method to estimate voxelwise probability memberships for eight clusters. The memberships estimated from the texture analysis are helpful to identify anatomical structures with inhomogeneous intensities. The membership was used to guide the level set evolution, as well as to derive an initial start close to the abdominal wall.Results: Segmentation results on abdominal walls were both quantitatively and qualitatively validated with surface errors based on manually labeled ground truth. Using texture, mean surface errors for the outer surface of the abdominal wall were less than 2 mm, with 91% of the outer surface less than 5 mm away from the manual tracings; errors were significantly greater (2–5 mm) for methods that did not use the texture.Conclusions: The authors’ approach establishes a baseline for characterizing the abdominal wall for improving VH care. Inherent texture patterns in CT scans are helpful to the tissue classification, and texture

  10. Giant Cutaneous Leiomyosarcoma Originating From the Abdominal Wall: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Eken, Huseyin; Karagul, Servet; Topgül, Koray; Yoruker, Savaş; Ozen, Necati; Gun, Seda; Balci, Mecdi Gurhan; Somuncu, Erkan; Cimen, Orhan; Soyturk, Mehmet; Karavas, Erdal

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 44 Final Diagnosis: Cutaneous Leiomyosarcoma Symptoms: Abdominal mass Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Surgery Specialty: Surgery Objective: Rare disease Background: Leiomyosarcoma, a rare type of tumor, accounts for 5–10% of all soft tissue tumors. Case Report: A 44-year-old male patient was admitted to the emergency service of our medical faculty with the complaints of fatigue and abdominal mass. Conclusions: The pathology result was leiomyosarcoma. Leiomyosarcoma of the skin is rare and our case is the largest such lesion reported in the literature. PMID:26787636

  11. Ectodermal Wnt signaling regulates abdominal myogenesis during ventral body wall development.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lingling; Li, Hanjun; Yu, Jian; Cao, Jingjing; Chen, Huihui; Zhao, Haixia; Zhao, Jianzhi; Yao, Yiyun; Cheng, Huihui; Wang, Lifang; Zhou, Rujiang; Yao, Zhengju; Guo, Xizhi

    2014-03-01

    Defects of the ventral body wall are prevalent birth anomalies marked by deficiencies in body wall closure, hypoplasia of the abdominal musculature and multiple malformations across a gamut of organs. However, the mechanisms underlying ventral body wall defects remain elusive. Here, we investigated the role of Wnt signaling in ventral body wall development by inactivating Wls or β-catenin in murine abdominal ectoderm. The loss of Wls in the ventral epithelium, which blocks the secretion of Wnt proteins, resulted in dysgenesis of ventral musculature and genito-urinary tract during embryonic development. Molecular analyses revealed that the dermis and myogenic differentiation in the underlying mesenchymal progenitor cells was perturbed by the loss of ectodermal Wls. The activity of the Wnt-Pitx2 axis was impaired in the ventral mesenchyme of the mutant body wall, which partially accounted for the defects in ventral musculature formation. In contrast, epithelial depletion of β-catenin or Wnt5a did not resemble the body wall defects in the ectodermal Wls mutant. These findings indicate that ectodermal Wnt signaling instructs the underlying mesodermal specification and abdominal musculature formation during ventral body wall development, adding evidence to the theory that ectoderm-mesenchyme signaling is a potential unifying mechanism for the origin of ventral body wall defects.

  12. Abdominal Wall Endometriosis: Myofibroblasts as a Possible Evidence of Metaplasia: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Mohamed Gamal; Delarue, Eleonore; Abesadze, Elene; Haas, Matthias; Sehouli, Jalid; Chiantera, Vito; Mechsner, Sylvia

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we report about a patient with extra-uterine endometriosis (EM) in the abdominal wall muscle with evident metaplasia based on the abundant alpha smooth muscle actin (ASMA)-expressing myofibroblasts. Laparotomy excision of the abdominal wall EM was done following ultrasonographic evidence of a hypodense swelling in the right rectus abdominis, which was confirmed by MRI. Immunohistochemistry staining for ASMA and collagen I was done, with the results confirming that endometriotic stromal cells expressed both. Anterior abdominal wall endometriosis was suspected because of the patient's history of recurrent EM combined with the cyclic nature of symptoms. MRI is useful in determining the extent of the disease. In case of persisting symptoms even under hormonal treatment, surgical excision is mandatory. The expression of both ASMA and collagen I in and around EM lesions supports the notion of the metaplastic process in the course of disease development.

  13. Congenital defects of the abdominal wall. A review of the experience in New Mexico.

    PubMed

    Klein, M D; Kosloske, A M; Hertzler, J H

    1981-04-24

    Omphalocele, umbilical cord hernia, and gastroschisis are surgically correctable defects of the abdominal wall. Each of these defects has a distinct embryologic basis that results in a characteristic clinical picture. Twenty-five infants with congenital defects of the abdominal wall were treated at the University of New Mexico Hospital in the past four years. Six infants had omphalocele, one had umbilical cord hernia, and 18 had gastroschisis. Survival among infants who underwent a corrective operation was as follows: omphalocele, 50%; umbilical cord hernia, 100%; and gastroschisis, 82%. Long-term survival for the entire group was 72% (18/25). Gastroschisis, which had a lower incidence of major associated anomalies, had a better prognosis than omphalocele. The mortality of congenital abdominal wall defects was related to presence of severe associated anomalies and to poor clinical condition on admission. Prompt and informed initial care may increase the chance of survival.

  14. [Mechanical ileus in children with no prior history of abdominal surgery].

    PubMed

    van Poll, Daan; de Beer, Sjoerd A; de Jong, Justin R; Heij, Hugo A

    2015-01-01

    In children with no prior history of abdominal surgery and no signs of intussusception or incarcerated inguinal hernia, mechanical ileus may have a congenital cause such as malrotation with volvulus or a persistent omphalomesenteric duct. Acquired causes include sigmoid volvulus. We present two cases of mechanical ileus in children. The first case involved a 6-year-old boy who presented with acute abdominal pain and vomiting. An emergency laparotomy was performed, with resection of the omphalomesenteric duct. Recovery was uneventful. The other case concerned a 9-year-old boy who presented with increasing abdominal pain, bilious vomiting and general clinical deterioration. An emergency laparotomy was performed, revealing malrotation with volvulus and intestinal ischaemia. Children with no prior abdominal history who present with symptoms that may be caused by mechanical obstruction should be managed with a view to surgery and without delay, in order to prevent a catastrophic outcome resulting from a congenital or acquired mechanical obstruction.

  15. Long-term anisotropic mechanical response of surgical meshes used to repair abdominal wall defects.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Gascón, B; Peña, E; Pascual, G; Rodríguez, M; Bellón, J M; Calvo, B

    2012-01-01

    Routine hernia repair surgery involves the implant of synthetic mesh. However, this type of procedure may give rise to pain and bowel incarceration and strangulation, causing considerable patient disability. The purpose of this study was to compare the long-term behaviour of three commercial meshes used to repair the partially herniated abdomen in New Zealand White rabbits: the heavyweight (HW) mesh, Surgipro(®) and lightweight (LW) mesh, Optilene(®), both made of polypropylene (PP), and a mediumweight (MW) mesh, Infinit(®), made of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE). The implanted meshes were mechanical and histological assessed at 14, 90 and 180 days post-implant. This behaviour was compared to the anisotropic mechanical behaviour of the unrepaired abdominal wall in control non-operated rabbits. Both uniaxial mechanical tests conducted in craneo-caudal and perpendicular directions and histological findings revealed substantial collagen growth over the repaired hernial defects causing stiffness in the repair zone, and thus a change in the original properties of the meshes. The mechanical behaviour of the healthy tissue in the craneo-caudal direction was not reproduced by any of the implanted meshes after 14 days or 90 days of implant, whereas in the perpendicular direction, SUR and OPT achieved similar behaviour. From a mechanical standpoint, the anisotropic PP-lightweight meshes may be considered a good choice in the long run, which correlates with the structure of the regenerated tissue.

  16. Increased Expression of Lamin A/C Correlate with Regions of High Wall Stress in Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Malkawi, Amir; Pirianov, Grisha; Torsney, Evelyn; Chetter, Ian; Sakalihasan, Natzi; Loftus, Ian M.; Nordon, Ian; Huggins, Christopher; Charolidi, Nicoletta; Thompson, Matt; Xu, Xie Yun; Cockerill, Gillian W.

    2015-01-01

    Background Since aortic diameter is the most ­significant risk factor for rupture, we sought to identify stress-dependent changes in gene expression to illuminate novel molecular processes in aneurysm rupture. Materials and Methods We constructed finite element maps of abdominal computerized tomography scans (CTs) of seven abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) patients to map wall stress. Paired biopsies from high- and low-stress areas were collected at surgery using vascular landmarks as coordinates. Differential gene expression was evaluated by Illumina Array analysis, using the whole genome DNA-mediated, annealing, selection, extension, and ligation (DASL) gene chip (n = 3 paired samples). Results The sole significant candidate from this analysis, Lamin A/C, was validated at the protein level, using western blotting. Lamin A/C expression in the inferior mesenteric vein (IMV) of AAA patients was compared to a control group and in aortic smooth muscle cells in culture in response to physiological pulsatile stretch. ­Areas of high wall stress (n = 7) correlate to those ­regions which have the thinnest walls [778 µm (585–1120 µm)] in comparison to areas of lowest wall stress [1620 µm (962–2919 µm)]. Induced expression of Lamin A/C ­correlated with areas of high wall stress from AAAs but was not significantly induced in the IMV from AAA patients compared to controls (n = 16). Stress-induced expression of Lamin A/C was mimicked by exposing aortic smooth muscle cells to prolonged pulsatile stretch. Conclusion Lamin A/C protein is specifically increased in areas of high wall stress in AAA from patients, but is not increased on other vascular beds of aneurysm patients, suggesting that its elevation may be a compensatory response to the pathobiology leading to aneurysms. PMID:27175366

  17. Predictors of Mortality Up to One Year After Emergent Major Abdominal Surgery in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Zara; Mitchell, Susan L.; Gorges, Rebecca J.; Rosenthal, Ronnie A.; Lipsitz, Stuart R.; Kelley, Amy S.

    2015-01-01

    Background The number of older patients who undergo emergent major abdominal procedures is expected to increase yet little is known about mortality beyond 30 days after surgery. Objective Identify factors associated with mortality among older patients at 30, 180 and 365 days after emergency major abdominal surgery. Design A retrospective study of the Health and Retirement Study (HRS) linked to Medicare Claims from 2000-2010. Setting N/A Participants Medicare beneficiaries > 65.5 years enrolled in the Health and Retirement Study (HRS) from 2000-2010, with at least one urgent/emergent major abdominal surgery and a core interview from the HRS within 3 years prior to surgery. Main Outcomes and Measures Survival analysis was used to describe all-cause mortality at 30, 180 and 365 days after surgery. Complementary log-log regression was used to identify patient characteristics and postoperative events associated with worse survival. Results 400 patients had one of the urgent/emergent surgeries of interest. Of these 24% were > 85 years; 50% had coronary artery disease, 48% had cancer, and 33% had congestive heart failure; and 37% experienced a postoperative complication. Postoperative mortality was 20%, 31% and 34% at 30, 180 days and 365 days. Among those > 85 years, 50% were dead one year after surgery. After multivariate adjustment including postoperative complications, dementia (Hazard ratio (HR) 2.02, 95%CI 1.24-3.31), hospitalization within 6 months before surgery (HR 1.63, 95% CI 1.12-2.28) and complications (HR 3.45, 95%CI (2.32-5.13) were independently associated with worse one-year survival. Conclusion Overall mortality is high up to one year after surgery in many older patients undergoing emergency major abdominal surgery. The occurrence of a complication is the clinical factor most strongly associated with worse survival. PMID:26661929

  18. [Pseudomembranous colitis after surgery for a ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Lozano Sánchez, F; Sánchez Fernández, J; Palacios, E; Fernández, M; Ingelmo Morin, A; Gómez Alonso, A

    1993-01-01

    We present a rare postoperative complication after surgical procedures for rupture of abdominal aortic aneurysms. The disease, a pseudomembranous colitis, was early recognized (by evidence of clostridium difficile after a coprocultive) and satisfactorily treated with vancomycin. From the literature review we found only a similar case but results were absolutely different from our case.

  19. [Effect of anaesthesia on incidence of postoperative delirium after major abdominal surgery in elderly patients].

    PubMed

    Zabolotskikh, I B; Trembach, N V

    2013-01-01

    Delirium can be caused by haemodynamics abnormalities during anaesthesia. The main role in delirium appearance is given to decreasing of cerebral perfusion pressure. Especially it can happen in patients with underlying intracranial hypertension. Anaesthetics effects on intracranial pressure are different therefore cerebral hypoperfusion can happens in these patients even without systemic hypotension. Purpose of the study was to define an effect of cerebral perfusion pressure decreasing during different technics of anaesthesia on frequency of delirium in elderly patients after major abdominal surgery. The article deals with results of study of 182 patients (medium age 69 y.o.) underwent elective major abdominal surgery. Delirium frequency was 11%, continuing of delirium was 3 days. The frequency of delirium was higher in patients who had got anaesthesia based on sevoflurane. Additionally these patients had higher frequency of cerebral perfusion pressure decreasing. Conclusions; Anaesthesia based on sevoflurane is characterized by higher frequency of postoperative delirium in elderly patients after major abdominal surgery.

  20. [Intra-abdominal pressure as a surgery predictor in patients with acute abdominal pain].

    PubMed

    Campos-Muñoz, Manuel Alejandro; Villarreal-Ríos, Enrique; Chimal-Torres, Mariano; Pozas-Medina, Josué Atila

    2016-01-01

    Introducción: la presión intraabdominal es el estado de equilibrio de la presión de la cavidad abdominal en reposo y puede presentar cambios durante la ventilación mecánica o espontánea. El objetivo fue determinar la presión intraabdominal como predictor de cirugía en el paciente con dolor abdominal agudo. Métodos: se llevó a cabo un estudio de casos y controles anidado en una cohorte de pacientes con dolor abdominal agudo en el servicio de urgencias de un hospital de segundo nivel, en el periodo comprendido entre abril y diciembre de 2013. Se incluyeron 37 pacientes, todos fueron intervenidos quirúrgicamente con previa toma de la presión intraabdominal. Se formaron los grupos con el resultado del estudio anatomopatológico: con evidencia de proceso inflamatorio abdominal agudo (n = 28) y sin evidencia de proceso inflamatorio abdominal agudo (n = 9). Resultados: en los casos el 100 % presentó presión intraabdominal alta con una p = 0.01, RM: 5 (IC 95 %: 2.578-9.699). En los casos la media de la presión intraabdominal fue de 11.46 y en los controles de 9.2 (p = 0.183). Conclusiones: el dolor abdominal que requiere cirugía para su resolución tiene relación directa con una presión intraabdominal > 5 mmHg.

  1. Abdominal wall reconstruction after extensive abdominal wall necrosis resulting from chevron incision for liver transplant and subsequent Y-shaped incision for re-transplantation--clinical experience and literature review.

    PubMed

    Rieger, Ulrich M; Petschke, Fabian; Djedovic, Gabriel; Engelhardt, Timm O; Biebl, Matthias; Pierer, Gerhard

    2012-03-01

    Extensive Abdominal wall necrosis is a devastating complication. In visceral transplant patients a quick and easy to perform reconstructive technique may be crucial for patient survival. Based on a clinical case a literature review is performed including a thorough analysis of abdominal wall perfusion and surgical options for defect closure are presented and critically appraised.

  2. Semiautomatic vessel wall detection and quantification of wall thickness in computed tomography images of human abdominal aortic aneurysms

    SciTech Connect

    Shum, Judy; DiMartino, Elena S.; Goldhammer, Adam; Goldman, Daniel H.; Acker, Leah C.; Patel, Gopal; Ng, Julie H.; Martufi, Giampaolo; Finol, Ender A.

    2010-02-15

    Purpose: Quantitative measurements of wall thickness in human abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) may lead to more accurate methods for the evaluation of their biomechanical environment. Methods: The authors describe an algorithm for estimating wall thickness in AAAs based on intensity histograms and neural networks involving segmentation of contrast enhanced abdominal computed tomography images. The algorithm was applied to ten ruptured and ten unruptured AAA image data sets. Two vascular surgeons manually segmented the lumen, inner wall, and outer wall of each data set and a reference standard was defined as the average of their segmentations. Reproducibility was determined by comparing the reference standard to lumen contours generated automatically by the algorithm and a commercially available software package. Repeatability was assessed by comparing the lumen, outer wall, and inner wall contours, as well as wall thickness, made by the two surgeons using the algorithm. Results: There was high correspondence between automatic and manual measurements for the lumen area (r=0.978 and r=0.996 for ruptured and unruptured aneurysms, respectively) and between vascular surgeons (r=0.987 and r=0.992 for ruptured and unruptured aneurysms, respectively). The authors' automatic algorithm showed better results when compared to the reference with an average lumen error of 3.69%, which is less than half the error between the commercially available application Simpleware and the reference (7.53%). Wall thickness measurements also showed good agreement between vascular surgeons with average coefficients of variation of 10.59% (ruptured aneurysms) and 13.02% (unruptured aneurysms). Ruptured aneurysms exhibit significantly thicker walls (1.78{+-}0.39 mm) than unruptured ones (1.48{+-}0.22 mm), p=0.044. Conclusions: While further refinement is needed to fully automate the outer wall segmentation algorithm, these preliminary results demonstrate the method's adequate reproducibility

  3. Surgery and diagnostic imaging in abdominal Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Botti, Fiorenzo; Caprioli, Flavio; Pettinari, Diego; Carrara, Alberto; Magarotto, Andrea; Contessini Avesani, Ettore

    2015-03-01

    Surgery is well-established option for the treatment of Crohn's disease that is refractory to medical therapy and for complications of the disease, including strictures, fistulas, abscesses, bleeding that cannot be controlled endoscopically, and neoplastic degeneration. For a condition like Crohn's disease, where medical management is the rule, other indications for surgery are considered controversial, because the therapeutic effects of surgery are limited to the resolution of complications and the rate of recurrence is high, especially at sites of the surgical anastomosis. In the authors' opinion, however, surgery should not be considered a last-resort treatment: in a variety of situations, it should be regarded as an appropriate solution for managing this disease. Based on a review of the literature and their own experience, the authors examine some of the possibilities for surgical interventions in Crohn's disease and the roles played in these cases by diagnostic imaging modalities.

  4. [Early postoperative intestinal motility following abdominal surgery in an animal experiment].

    PubMed

    Schippers, E; Braun, J; Erhardt, W; Schumpelick, V

    1990-01-01

    Gastrointestinal myoelectrical activity was registered in 6 dogs after different surgical procedures such as laparotomy, segmental resection of the jejunum and right hemicolectomy. Animals were studied in the fasted- and fed state and after pharmacological stimulation with Ceruletide. The electrical activity was recorded by means of 6 bipolar electrodes implanted along the intestinal wall. Abdominal surgery abolished normal motility in the stomach and small intestine only for a short period of time. The time for the reappearance of regularly recurring activity fronts varied with the type of the surgical procedure from 3 h after segmental resection of the jejunum to 49 h after colon resection. Severe disturbances of the BER (basic electrical rhythm) in the stomach as tachygastria and tachyarrhythmia persist even after restoration of the MMC (migrating motor complex) in the small intestine. Feeding induced a typical fedpattern but never before restoration of the MMC. Stimulation of the intestine during postoperative ileus with Ceruletide increases segmental myoelectrical activity. The period of postoperative ileus was not reduced.

  5. Abdominal wall injuries: rectus abdominis strains, oblique strains, rectus sheath hematoma.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Rob

    2006-04-01

    Abdominal wall injuries are reported to be less common than actually perceived by sports medicine practitioners. National Collegiate Athletic Association injury statistics for 2004-2005 cite a high of 0.71 abdominal muscle injuries per 1000 player-hours in wrestling competition to a low of 0.01 injuries per 1000 player-hours in autumn football practices. British professional soccer clubs reported an incidence of "torso" injuries of up to 7% of all injuries over the course of several seasons. Injury definition is most likely the explanation for this discrepancy. The abdominal wall muscles (rectus abdominis, external and internal obliques, and transverse abdominis) are injured by direct blows to the abdomen or by sudden or repetitive trunk movement, either rotation or flexion/extension. With the exception of the rare rectus sheath hematoma that does not self-tamponade, the treatment for these problems is nonoperative with symptoms guiding rehabilitation and return to play decisions.

  6. Forceps insertion supporting system in laparoscopic surgery: image projection onto the abdominal surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koishi, Takeshi; Ushiki, Suguru; Nakaguchi, Toshiya; Hayashi, Hideki; Tsumura, Norimichi; Miyake, Yoichi

    2007-03-01

    Laparoscopic surgery without ventrotomy has been widely used in recent years for quick recovery and out of pain of patients. However, surgeons are required to accumulate various experiences for this surgery since the difficulty in perceiving the positions of tissues by the limited field of view (FOV) of laparoscopes and the operational difficulties of forceps. In this paper, we propose a new laparoscopic surgery supporting system using projected images. The image of the FOV of a laparoscope is projected directly onto the abdominal surface of a patient. The shape distortion of the projected images produced by the unevenness of the abdominal surface is corrected by grating projection. The distortion due to the viewing angle of the surgeon is also corrected by using an electromagnetic tracking sensor. It is shown that the proposed system is significant to laparoscopic surgery, particularly for forceps insertion, by experiments using a model of the abdomen made with a dry box.

  7. Urinary bladder herniation through a caudoventral abdominal wall defect in a mature cat.

    PubMed

    Neville-Towle, Jack; Sakals, Sherisse

    2015-09-01

    A 16-year-old spayed female domestic shorthair cat with no history of trauma was presented to the Western College of Veterinary Medicine for assessment of urinary incontinence. Diagnostic investigation revealed herniation of the urinary bladder through a caudoventral abdominal wall defect. Clinical signs resolved after surgical reduction of the bladder.

  8. Emergency abdominal wall reconstruction with polypropylene mesh: short-term benefits versus long-term complications.

    PubMed Central

    Voyles, C R; Richardson, J D; Bland, K I; Tobin, G R; Flint, L M; Polk, H C

    1981-01-01

    The acute replacement of full-thickness abdominal wall has been facilitated by polypropylene mesh (Marlex) (PPM), allowing debridement of nonviable tissue and restoration of abdominal wall integrity without tension. However, no substantial long-term follow-up has been reported on the definitive wound coverage after the use of PPM in open wounds. Since 1976, we have placed PPM in 31 patients; 25 for infectious complication, three for massive bowel distension preventing abdominal closure, and three for shotgun wounds with extensive tissue loss. In 29 of 31 patients, the mesh was placed in heavily contaminated wounds; extensive fasciitis was present in 23 patients and 21 had intra-abdominal abscesses. Following mesh placement, 23 reoperations were required for continuing complications. No patients eviscerated, despite these multiple procedures. Polypropylene mesh was highly effective in restoring abdominal wall continuity. Despite advantages when PPM was used, significant long-term problems developed. Seven patients died from their primary illness in the postoperative period. Nine wounds were closed by granulation and subsequent split-thickness skin grafts. All nine developed mesh extrusion and/or enteric fistulae. Nine wounds healed by secondary intention, six developed enteric fistulae or continuing mesh extrusion. Full-thickness flap coverage after granulation provided the best means of wound closure. Polypropylene mesh had significant early advantages for providing abdominal wall integrity even in the presence of severe infection. However, long-term problems were common when wounds were closed to skin grafts or secondary intention. If the mesh cannot be completely removed, strong consideration should be given to myocutaneous flaps for coverage after the primary illness has resolved. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. PMID:6455099

  9. Wall Street's growing influence on plastic surgery.

    PubMed

    Krieger, L M; Shaw, W W

    2000-04-01

    The advent of managed care has unleashed market forces on the health care system. One result of these new pressures is a shift from nonprofit to Wall Street-based financing. This report quantifies these trends by comparing health organizations' financial structures in the 1980s and now. The reasons behind this shift and the function of the stock market are examined. A review of Wall Street's key financial measures confirms that health care has shifted to the stock market as its principal means of financing. The stock market works by assigning a current price to a company's stock based on estimates for future earnings. Thus, companies desire predictability in their costs, revenues, and profits. Plastic surgeons can master this system by meeting the challenges imposed by Wall Street financing. Important steps include continuously measuring costs and outcomes of procedures, demanding cost data from hospitals and payers, using these data to improve costs and outcomes, and taking advantage of the system's openness to innovation and easier access to capital. As they seek to protect their role as medical decision makers under the new free-market system, plastic surgeons can benefit from understanding the mechanisms of the stock market.

  10. Past, Present, and Future of Minimally Invasive Abdominal Surgery.

    PubMed

    Antoniou, Stavros A; Antoniou, George A; Antoniou, Athanasios I; Granderath, Frank-Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Laparoscopic surgery has generated a revolution in operative medicine during the past few decades. Although strongly criticized during its early years, minimization of surgical trauma and the benefits of minimization to the patient have been brought to our attention through the efforts and vision of a few pioneers in the recent history of medicine. The German gynecologist Kurt Semm (1927-2003) transformed the use of laparoscopy for diagnostic purposes into a modern therapeutic surgical concept, having performed the first laparoscopic appendectomy, inspiring Erich Mühe and many other surgeons around the world to perform a wide spectrum of procedures by minimally invasive means. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy soon became the gold standard, and various laparoscopic procedures are now preferred over open approaches, in the light of emerging evidence that demonstrates less operative stress, reduced pain, and shorter convalescence. Natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) and single-incision laparoscopic surgery (SILS) may be considered further steps toward minimization of surgical trauma, although these methods have not yet been standardized. Laparoscopic surgery with the use of a robotic platform constitutes a promising field of investigation. New technologies are to be considered under the prism of the history of surgery; they seem to be a step toward further minimization of surgical trauma, but not definite therapeutic modalities. Patient safety and medical ethics must be the cornerstone of future investigation and implementation of new techniques.

  11. [Inefficacy of theophylline in preventing hypoxemia in abdominal surgery].

    PubMed

    Crenesse, D; Berre, A; Ardisson, J L; Blaive, B

    1988-12-01

    It would be very useful to prevent post surgery ventilatory and gazometric insufficiencies that represent a significant risk factor. Ten patients have received proper doses of theophyllin in order to maintain accurate plasmatic concentration immediately after surgery. During the next 24 hours, their respiratory frequency, tidal volume, ventilation per minute, PaO2 and PaCO2 have been recorded. Those data have been compared with a test group (N = 10) having received injections of placebo. No relevant discrepancy exists in the ventilation parameters nor any increase of PaO2. The significant factor is a substantial decrease of PaCO2. It appears that theophyllin has no significatory efficiency for controlling the post surgery hypoventilation and hypoxemia.

  12. [Drainage and lavage in abdominal surgery: bacteriologic aspects].

    PubMed

    Auckenthaler, R

    1979-12-01

    The efficiency of draining a purulent collection in the thoracic or abdominal cavity is well known. The actuel knowledge about opsonisation and phagocytosis of pathogenic bacterias offer a new and attractive explanation for this phenomenon. The prophylactic drainage of an uninfected cavity on the other hand has the advantage of eliminating blood and other materials promoting infection. However, the drainage has the inherent risk of a foreign body, obstruction and introduction of an artificial fistula. Therefore it should be inserted for a period as short as possible.

  13. Clinical evaluation of an air-capsule technique for the direct measurement of intra-abdominal pressure after elective abdominal surgery

    PubMed Central

    Otto, Jens; Kaemmer, Daniel; Biermann, Andreas; Jansen, Marc; Dembinski, Rolf; Schumpelick, Volker; Schachtrupp, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    Background The gold standard for assessment of intraabdominal pressure (IAP) is via intravesicular pressure measurement (IVP). This accepted technique has some inherent problems, e.g. indirectness. Aim of this clinical study was to assess direct IAP measurement using an air-capsule method (ACM) regarding complications risks and agreement with IVP in patients undergoing abdominal surgery. Methods A prospective cohort study was performed in 30 patients undergoing elective colonic, hepatic, pancreatic and esophageal resection. For ACM a Probe 3 (Spiegelberg®, Germany) was placed on the greater omentum. It was passed through the abdominal wall paralleling routine drainages. To compare ACM with IVP t-testing was performed and mean difference as well as limits of agreement were calculated. Results ACM did not lead to complications particularly with regard to organ lesion or surgical site infection. Mean insertion time of ACM was 4.4 days (min-max: 1–5 days). 168 pairwise measurements were made. Mean ACM value was 7.9 ± 2.7 mmHg while mean IVP was 8.4 ± 3.0 mmHg (n.s). Mean difference was 0.4 mmHg ± 2.2 mmHg. Limits of agreement were -4.1 mmHg to 5.1 mmHg. Conclusion Using ACM, direct IAP measurement is feasible and uncomplicated. Associated with relatively low pressure ranges (<17 mmHg), results are comparable to bladder pressure measurement. PMID:18925973

  14. Laparoscopic repair of abdominal wall hernia: one-year experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavic, Michael S.

    1993-05-01

    In this study, 101 consecutive laparoscopic transabdominal preperitoneal hernia repairs (LTPR) were performed in 62 patients by a single surgeon. The series was begun in April 1991, and involved repair of 49 direct, 41 indirect, 4 femoral, 3 umbilical, 3 sliding, and 1 incisional hernias. Twelve cases were bilateral, eleven hernias were incarcerated, and fifteen hernias were recurrent. There were no intraoperative complications, and none of the procedures required conversion to open surgery. Patients experienced the following postoperative complications: transient testicular pain (1), transient anterior thigh paresthesias (2), urinary retention requiring TURP (1), and hernia recurrences (2). Follow up has ranged from 4 - 15 months and initial results have been encouraging.

  15. Electromagnetic tracking for abdominal interventions in computer aided surgery.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Banovac, Filip; Lin, Ralph; Glossop, Neil; Wood, Bradford J; Lindisch, David; Levy, Elliot; Cleary, Kevin

    2006-05-01

    Electromagnetic tracking has great potential for assisting physicians in precision placement of instruments during minimally invasive interventions in the abdomen, since electromagnetic tracking is not limited by the line-of-sight restrictions of optical tracking. A new generation of electromagnetic tracking has recently become available, with sensors small enough to be included in the tips of instruments. To fully exploit the potential of this technology, our research group has been developing a computer aided, image-guided system that uses electromagnetic tracking for visualization of the internal anatomy during abdominal interventions. As registration is a critical component in developing an accurate image-guided system, we present three registration techniques: 1) enhanced paired-point registration (time-stamp match registration and dynamic registration); 2) orientation-based registration; and 3) needle shape-based registration. Respiration compensation is another important issue, particularly in the abdomen, where respiratory motion can make precise targeting difficult. To address this problem, we propose reference tracking and affine transformation methods. Finally, we present our prototype navigation system, which integrates the registration, segmentation, path-planning and navigation functions to provide real-time image guidance in the clinical environment. The methods presented here have been tested with a respiratory phantom specially designed by our group and in swine animal studies under approved protocols. Based on these tests, we conclude that our system can provide quick and accurate localization of tracked instruments in abdominal interventions, and that it offers a user-friendly display for the physician.

  16. Free tensor fasciae latae flap for abdominal wall reconstruction: overview and new innovation.

    PubMed

    Chalfoun, Charbel T; McConnell, Michael P; Wirth, Garrett A; Brenner, Kevin A; Evans, Gregory R D; Kobayashi, Mark

    2012-03-01

    Extensive abdominal wall defects may result from tumor extirpation, traumatic injury, or soft tissue infections. Extensive traumatic injuries can often disrupt the soft tissue content of the abdomen as well as the bony support provided by the pelvis. Reconstruction of the lower abdomen should aim to recreate dynamic stability. Five patients with extensive lower abdominal wall disruption following traumatic injuries or infection were treated using a novel flap for functional reconstruction. We devised a free neurotized osteomyocutaneous tensor fasciae latae (TFL) flap that would restore bony continuity by providing a vascularized bone graft and simultaneously maintain the integrity of the attachment of the tensor fascia latae muscle to the iliac crest, reestablishing musculofascial continuity. A branch of the superior gluteal nerve was harvested with this composite flap and coapted to an intercostal nerve for reinnervation, thereby creating a dynamic muscle in these patients. All patients underwent successful free tissue reconstruction with 100% flap survival. The lower abdominal wall and bony integrity of the pelvis were successfully reconstructed. Reinnervation has shown clinical signs of maintained dynamic stability. The innervated TFL osteomyocutaneous flap is an ideal option for lower abdominal reconstruction in patients with complex abdominoperineal defects with loss of bony integrity.

  17. Pulmonary complications after abdominal surgery in patients with mild-to-moderate chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae Hoon; Lee, Jae Seung; Lee, Sei Won; Oh, Yeon-Mok

    2016-01-01

    Postoperative pulmonary complications (PPCs) are one of the most important causes of postoperative morbidity and mortality after abdominal surgery. Although chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) has been considered a risk factor for PPCs, it remains unclear whether mild-to-moderate COPD is a risk factor. This retrospective cohort study included 387 subjects who underwent abdominal surgery with general anesthesia in a tertiary referral hospital. PPCs included pneumonia, pulmonary edema, pulmonary thromboembolism, atelectasis, and acute exacerbation of COPD. Among the 387 subjects, PPCs developed in 14 (12.0%) of 117 patients with mild-to-moderate COPD and in 13 (15.1%) of 86 control patients. Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that mild-to-moderate COPD was not a significant risk factor for PPCs (odds ratio [OR] =0.79; 95% confidence interval [CI] =0.31–2.03; P=0.628). However, previous hospitalization for respiratory problems (OR =4.20; 95% CI =1.52–11.59), emergency surgery (OR =3.93; 95% CI =1.75–8.82), increased amount of red blood cell (RBC) transfusion (OR =1.09; 95% CI =1.05–1.14 for one pack increase of RBC transfusion), and laparoscopic surgery (OR =0.41; 95% CI =0.18–0.93) were independent predictors of PPCs. These findings suggested that mild-to-moderate COPD may not be a significant risk factor for PPCs after abdominal surgery. PMID:27877032

  18. Fluid-structure interaction in abdominal aortic aneurysms: effects of asymmetry and wall thickness

    PubMed Central

    Scotti, Christine M; Shkolnik, Alexander D; Muluk, Satish C; Finol, Ender A

    2005-01-01

    Background Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a prevalent disease which is of significant concern because of the morbidity associated with the continuing expansion of the abdominal aorta and its ultimate rupture. The transient interaction between blood flow and the wall contributes to wall stress which, if it exceeds the failure strength of the dilated arterial wall, will lead to aneurysm rupture. Utilizing a computational approach, the biomechanical environment of virtual AAAs can be evaluated to study the affects of asymmetry and wall thickness on this stress, two parameters that contribute to increased risk of aneurysm rupture. Methods Ten virtual aneurysm models were created with five different asymmetry parameters ranging from β = 0.2 to 1.0 and either a uniform or variable wall thickness to study the flow and wall dynamics by means of fully coupled fluid-structure interaction (FSI) analyses. The AAA wall was designed to have a (i) uniform 1.5 mm thickness or (ii) variable thickness ranging from 0.5 – 1.5 mm extruded normally from the boundary surface of the lumen. These models were meshed with linear hexahedral elements, imported into a commercial finite element code and analyzed under transient flow conditions. The method proposed was then compared with traditional computational solid stress techniques on the basis of peak wall stress predictions and cost of computational effort. Results The results provide quantitative predictions of flow patterns and wall mechanics as well as the effects of aneurysm asymmetry and wall thickness heterogeneity on the estimation of peak wall stress. These parameters affect the magnitude and distribution of Von Mises stresses; varying wall thickness increases the maximum Von Mises stress by 4 times its uniform thickness counterpart. A pre-peak systole retrograde flow was observed in the AAA sac for all models, which is due to the elastic energy stored in the compliant arterial wall and the expansion force of the artery

  19. Perioperative nutrition in abdominal surgery: recommendations and reality.

    PubMed

    Cerantola, Yannick; Grass, Fabian; Cristaudi, Alessandra; Demartines, Nicolas; Schäfer, Markus; Hübner, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Introduction. Preoperative malnutrition is a major risk factor for increased postoperative morbidity and mortality. Definition and diagnosis of malnutrition and its treatment is still subject for controversy. Furthermore, practical implementation of nutrition-related guidelines is unknown. Methods. A review of the available literature and of current guidelines on perioperative nutrition was conducted. We focused on nutritional screening and perioperative nutrition in patients undergoing digestive surgery, and we assessed translation of recent guidelines in clinical practice. Results and Conclusions. Malnutrition is a well-recognized risk factor for poor postoperative outcome. The prevalence of malnutrition depends largely on its definition; about 40% of patients undergoing major surgery fulfil current diagnostic criteria of being at nutritional risk. The Nutritional Risk Score is a pragmatic and validated tool to identify patients who should benefit from nutritional support. Adequate nutritional intervention entails reduced (infectious) complications, hospital stay, and costs. Preoperative oral supplementation of a minimum of five days is preferable; depending on the patient and the type of surgery, immune-enhancing formulas are recommended. However, surgeons' compliance with evidence-based guidelines remains poor and efforts are necessary to implement routine nutritional screening and nutritional support.

  20. Sir Ganga Ram Hospital classification of groin and ventral abdominal wall hernias

    PubMed Central

    Chowbey, Pradeep K; Khullar, Rajesh; Mehrotra, Magan; Sharma, Anil; Soni, Vandana; Baijal, Manish

    2006-01-01

    Background: Numerous classifications for groin and ventral hernias have been proposed over the past five to six decades. The old, simple classification of groin hernia in to direct, inguinal and femoral components is no longer adequate to understand the complex pathophysiology and management of these hernias. The most commonly followed classification for ventral hernias divide them into congenital, acquired, incisional and traumatic, which also does not convey any information regarding the predicted level of difficulty. Aim: All the previous classification systems were based on open hernia repairs and have their own fallacies particularly for uncommon hernias that cannot be classified in these systems. With the advent of laparoscopic/ endoscopic approach, surgical access to the hernia as well as the functional anatomy viewed by the surgeon changed. This change in the surgical approach and functional anatomy opened the doors for newer classifications. The authors have thus proposed a classification system based on the expected level of intraoperative difficulty for endoscopic hernia repair. Classification: In the proposed classification higher grades signify increasing levels of expected intraoperative difficulty. This functional classification grades groin hernias according to the: a) Pre -operative predictive level of difficulty of endoscopic surgery, and b) Intraoperative factors that lead to a difficult repair. Pre operative factors include multiple or pantaloon hernias, recurrent hernias, irreducible and incarcerated hernias. Intraoperative factors include reducibility at operation, degree of descent of the hernial sac and previous hernia repairs. Hernial defects greater than 7 cm in diameter are categorized one grade higher. Conclusion: Though there have been several classification systems for groin or inguinal hernias, none have been described for total classification of all ventral hernias of the abdomen. The system proposed by us includes all abdominal wall

  1. Squamous cell carcinoma of unknown primary site presenting with an abdominal wall lesion as the primary symptom: A case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, YINGLI; CHEN, BO; ZHU, JIANQING; CHEN, LU

    2015-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma of unknown primary site (SC CUP) is a rare malignant tumor, and its histogenesis and appropriate treatment are unclear. To the best of our knowledge, this type of carcinoma with abdominal wall lesions as the primary presenting symptom 3 months after laparoscopic surgery, has not been previously described in the literature. In the present study, a postmenopausal 54-year-old female patient was diagnosed with pain from the right abdominal puncture site 3 months after laparoscopic unilateral left salpingo-oophorectomy at a local hospital, at which time the left ovary and Fallopian tube were free of malignant tumor. Computed tomography (CT) imaging showed a subcutaneous nodule with a size of 6.2×3.3 cm. A wide excision of the lesion with safety margins and repair of the abdominal wall was performed, and the histopathological results and various investigations lead to the diagnosis of metastatic well-differentiated SC CUP. The patient underwent three surgeries and eight cycles of Taxol and cisplatin/carboplatin chemotherapy, and received a total of 10.8 Gy palliative radiation. However, the patient succumbed to intestinal bleeding, thrombocytopenia and multiple organ failure with pelvic recurrence and liver metastases at 10 months post-diagnosis. The prognosis of SC CUP, particularly with multiple metastases, is extremely poor. Although chemotherapy, surgery and radiotherapy have a certain role in the treatment, no regimen has been established as a standard therapy and palliative care could be recommended. PMID:26622812

  2. Subarachnoid block for lower abdominal and lower limb surgery: UITH experience.

    PubMed

    Kolawole, I K; Bolaji, B O

    2002-01-01

    The use of subarachnoid block has become an established and reliable method of providing anaesthesia for lower abdominal and lower limb surgery. Unfortunately, it remains largely unappealing to a large number of our patients who sometimes associate it with paralysis. The aim of this study was to assess the efficiency and safety of subarachnoid block for lower abdominal and lower limb surgery in the University of Ilorin Teaching Hospital. This prospective study was carried out between January 1998 and August 2000 the University of Ilorin Teaching Hospital, Ilorin, Nigeria. One hundred and ten (110) consenting adult patients had subarachnoid block for lower abdominal and lower limb surgery over a period of two years and eight months Patients were assessed in the theatre as well as in the postanaesthetic recovery room and daily in the ward for five days. All complications related to anaesthesia were recorded and analysed. There were 75 (68%) male and 35 (32%) female patients. Ninety-six (87%) were elective and 14 (13%) were emergency cases. The specialty distribution of cases included 66 (60%) patients for Orthopaedic surgery, 16 (14.5%) for General Surgery and 13 (11.8%) for Urology. Intravenous ketamine and pentazocine were used to supplement anaesthesia in 12 (11%) of cases due to varying degrees of discomfort experienced by the patients. There was no case of total failure. Intra-operative complications included hypotension in 9(8.18%) patients which responded to saline infusion in 5 and vasoconstrictor in 4 cases, hypertension in 9 (8.18%) patients which responded to reassurance and midazolam sedation, and a brief episode of shivering in 9 (8.18%) patients treated by additional drape cover. The incidence of post-spinal headache was 2.7% in this study. Subarachnoid block still remains a very effective and safe anaesthetic technique for lower abdominal and lower limb surgery. The technique is cheap and effort should be made to increase patient awareness and its

  3. Factors associated with surgery in patients with intra-abdominal fistulizing Crohn's disease

    PubMed Central

    Yaari, Shaul; Benson, Ariel; Aviran, Eyal; Lev Cohain, Naama; Oren, Ran; Sosna, Jacob; Israeli, Eran

    2016-01-01

    AIM To characterize radiological and clinical factors associated with subsequent surgical intervention in Crohn’s disease (CD) patients with intra-abdominal fistulae. METHODS From a cohort of 1244 CD patients seen over an eight year period (2006 to 2014), 126 patients were identified as having intra-abdominal fistulae, and included in the study. Baseline patient information was collected from the medical records. Imaging studies were assessed for: anatomic type and number of fistulae; diameter of the inflammatory conglomerate; length of diseased bowel; presence of a stricture with pre-stenotic dilatation; presence of an abscess; lymphadenopathy; and the degree of bowel enhancement. Multivariate analysis for the prediction of abdominal surgery was calculated via Generalized Linear Models. RESULTS In total, there were 193 fistulae in 132 patients, the majority (52%) being entero-enteric. Fifty-nine (47%) patients underwent surgery within one year of the imaging study, of which 36 (29%) underwent surgery within one month. Radiologic features that were associated with subsequent surgery included: multiple fistulae (P = 0.009), presence of stricture (P = 0.02), and an entero-vesical fistula (P = 0.01). Evidence of an abscess, lymphadenopathy, or intense bowel enhancement as well as C-reactive protein levels was not associated with an increased rate of surgery. Patients who were treated after the imaging study with combination immunomodulatory and anti-TNF therapy had significantly lower rates of surgery (P = 0.01). In the multivariate analysis, presence of a stricture [RR 4.5 (1.23-16.3), P = 0.02] was the only factor that increased surgery rate. CONCLUSION A bowel stricture is the only factor predicting an increased rate of surgery. Radiological parameters may guide in selecting treatment options in patients with fistulizing CD. PMID:28058018

  4. Changes in the Frequencies of Abdominal Wall Hernias and the Preferences for Their Repair: A Multicenter National Study From Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Şeker, Gaye; Kulacoglu, Hakan; Öztuna, Derya; Topgül, Koray; Akyol, Cihangir; Çakmak, Atıl; Karateke, Faruk; Özdoğan, Mehmet; Ersoy, Eren; Gürer, Ahmet; Zerbaliyev, Elbrus; Seker, Duray; Yorgancı, Kaya; Pergel, Ahmet; Aydın, İbrahim; Ensari, Cemal; Bilecik, Tuna; Kahraman, İzzettin; Reis, Erhan; Kalaycı, Murat; Canda, Aras Emre; Demirağ, Alp; Kesicioğlu, Tuğrul; Malazgirt, Zafer; Gündoğdu, Haldun; Terzi, Cem

    2014-01-01

    Abdominal wall hernias are a common problem in the general population. A Western estimate reveals that the lifetime risk of developing a hernia is about 2%.1–3 As a result, hernia repairs likely comprise the most frequent general surgery operations. More than 20 million hernias are estimated to be repaired every year around the world.4 Numerous repair techniques have been described to date however tension-free mesh repairs are widely used today because of their low hernia recurrence rates. Nevertheless, there are some ongoing debates regarding the ideal approach (open or laparoscopic),5,6 the ideal anesthesia (general, local, or regional),7,8 and the ideal mesh (standard polypropylene or newer meshes).9,10 PMID:25216417

  5. Histological characteristics of the abdominal aortic wall in patients with vascular chronic Q fever

    PubMed Central

    Hagenaars, Julia C J P; Koning, Olivier H J; van den Haak, Ronald F F; Verhoeven, Bart A N; Renders, Nicole H M; Hermans, Mirjam H A; Wever, Peter C; van Suylen, Robert Jan

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe specific histological findings of the Coxiella burnetii-infected aneurysmal abdominal aortic wall. Tissue samples of the aneurysmal abdominal aortic wall from seven patients with chronic Q fever and 15 patients without evidence of Q fever infection were analysed and compared. Chronic Q fever was diagnosed using serology and tissue PCR analysis. Histological sections were stained using haematoxylin and eosin staining, Elastica van Gieson staining and immunohistochemical staining for macrophages (CD68), T lymphocytes (CD3), T lymphocyte subsets (CD4 and CD8) and B lymphocytes (CD20). Samples were scored by one pathologist, blinded for Q fever status, using a standard score form. Seven tissue samples from patients with chronic Q fever and 15 tissue samples from patients without Q fever were collected. Four of seven chronic Q fever samples showed a necrotizing granulomatous response of the vascular wall, which was characterized by necrotic core of the arteriosclerotic plaque (P = 0.005) and a presence of high numbers of macrophages in the adventitia (P = 0.007) distributed in typical palisading formation (P = 0.005) and surrounded by the presence of high numbers of T lymphocytes located diffusely in media and adventitia. Necrotizing granulomas are a histological finding in the C. burnetii-infected aneurysmal abdominal aortic wall. Chronic Q fever should be included in the list of infectious diseases with necrotizing granulomatous response, such as tuberculosis, cat scratch disease and syphilis. PMID:24953727

  6. Pathological Analysis of the Ruptured Vascular Wall of Hypoperfusion-induced Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Animal Model.

    PubMed

    Kugo, Hirona; Zaima, Nobuhiro; Tanaka, Hiroki; Hashimoto, Keisuke; Miyamoto, Chie; Sawaragi, Ayaka; Urano, Tetsumei; Unno, Naoki; Moriyama, Tatsuya

    2017-04-04

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a vascular disease that results in the gradual dilation of the abdominal aorta and has a high rupture-related mortality rate. However, the mechanism of AAA rupture remains unknown. In our previous study, we established a novel AAA animal model (hypoperfusion-induced AAA rat model) with spontaneous AAA rupture. Using the hypoperfusion-induced AAA rat model, we demonstrated that the abnormal appearance of adipocytes in the vascular wall is associated with AAA rupture. However, pathological analysis of the rupture area has not been performed because it is particularly difficult to identify the rupture point. In this study, we succeeded in obtaining samples from the rupture point and performed a histological analysis of the ruptured area in the vascular wall in the hypoperfusion-induced AAA rat model. Adipocytes were observed along the AAA-ruptured area of the vascular wall. In the areas around the adipocytes, macrophage infiltration and protein levels of matrix metalloproteinases 2 and 9 were significantly increased and collagen-positive areas were significantly decreased, as compared with areas without adipocytes. The AAA diameter was correlated with the number of adipocytes in the vascular wall of the hypoperfusion-induced AAA rat model. On the other hand, serum triglyceride levels and serum total cholesterol levels were not correlated with the number of adipocytes in the vascular wall. These results suggest that local adipocyte accumulation in the vascular wall, not serum lipids, has an important role in AAA rupture.

  7. Automated Delineation of Vessel Wall and Thrombus Boundaries of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms Using Multispectral MR Images

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Vila, B.; Tarjuelo-Gutierrez, J.; Sánchez-González, P.; Verbrugghe, P.; Fourneau, I.; Maleux, G.; Herijgers, P.; Gomez, E. J.

    2015-01-01

    A correct patient-specific identification of the abdominal aortic aneurysm is useful for both diagnosis and treatment stages, as it locates the disease and represents its geometry. The actual thickness and shape of the arterial wall and the intraluminal thrombus are of great importance when predicting the rupture of the abdominal aortic aneurysms. The authors describe a novel method for delineating both the internal and external contours of the aortic wall, which allows distinguishing between vessel wall and intraluminal thrombus. The method is based on active shape model and texture statistical information. The method was validated with eight MR patient studies. There was high correspondence between automatic and manual measurements for the vessel wall area. Resulting segmented images presented a mean Dice coefficient with respect to manual segmentations of 0.88 and a mean modified Hausdorff distance of 1.14 mm for the internal face and 0.86 and 1.33 mm for the external face of the arterial wall. Preliminary results of the segmentation show high correspondence between automatic and manual measurements for the vessel wall and thrombus areas. However, since the dataset is small the conclusions cannot be generalized. PMID:26236390

  8. Recurrent tense pneumoperitoneum due to air influx via abdominal wall stoma of a PEG tube.

    PubMed

    Vijayakrishnan, Rajakrishnan; Adhikari, Deep; Anand, Curuchi P

    2010-07-28

    A 70 years old male on ventilatory and circulatory support for sepsis and non ST segment elevation myocardial infarction developed abdominal distension 14 d after placement of a percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube for enteral feeding. Radiography revealed free air in the abdomen and gastrograffin (G) study showed no extravasation into the peritoneum. The G tube was successfully repositioned with mechanical release of air. Imaging showed complete elimination of free air but the patient had a recurrence of pneumoperitoneum. Mechanical release of air with sealing of the abdominal wound was performed. Later, the patient was restarted on tube feeding with no complications. This case demonstrates a late complication of pneumoperitoneum with air leakage from the abdominal wall stoma.

  9. Pedicled full-thickness abdominal flap combined with skin grafting for the reconstruction of anterior chest wall defect following major electrical burn.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing-Chun; Xian, Chun-Jing; Yu, Jia-Ao; Shi, Kai

    2015-02-01

    Successful reconstruction of extensive anterior chest wall defect following major electrical burn represents a very challenging surgery. Herein we report the first case using pedicled full-thickness abdominal flap combined with skin grafting to treat this injury with severe infection and exposure of pericardium and ribs in a Chinese patient. Following the performance of chest debridement to remove necrotic and infected tissues and the injection of broad-spectrum antibiotics to reduce infection, a pedicled full-thickness abdominal flap was used to cover the exposed pericardium and ribs, and skin grafting from the right leg of the patient was done to cover the exposed vital tissues. The patient was followed up for a total of 3·5 years, and satisfactory cosmetic and functional outcomes were obtained without complications. This report provides an effective method for the surgeons who encounter similar cases where reconstruction of extensive anterior chest wall is required.

  10. Transdermal Buprenorphine Patches for Postoperative Pain Control in Abdominal Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Santosh; Singh, Prithvi Kumar; Verma, Reetu; Chandra, Girish; Bhatia, Vinod Kumar; Singh, Dinesh; Bogra, Jaishri

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Buprenorphine is a semi-synthetic derivative of thebaine; its low concentration is sufficient to provide effective pain relief. Aim To evaluate the efficacy of transdermal buprenorphine patch in postoperative pain management. Materials and Methods After ethical approval and taking informed consent from the patients, they were randomized into three groups (n=30 in each group) using a computer generated random number table. Group A: placebo patch; Group B: buprenorphine (10mg) patch and Group C: buprenorphine (20mg) patch. Haemodynamic and analgesic effects were compared by using analysis of variance (ANOVA) followed by Turkey’s post hoc test. The proportion of side effects was compared using the Chi-square test. Results Haemodynamic changes were not statistically different in all the three groups A, B and C, whereas at the end of surgery VAS score of Group A subjects was significantly higher (4.93±0.98) as compared to Group B (1.73±0.64) and Group C (1.40±0.50). On 2nd postoperative day, no pain was reported by the Group C patients and on 4th day after surgery, no pain was reported by Group B patients. Conclusion The transdermal buprenorphine patch (20mg) was effective in attenuating postoperative pain, maintaining haemodynamic stability requiring no rescue analgesia, with fewer postoperative rescue analgesic requirements in low dose of buprenorphine patch (10mg) group. PMID:27504383

  11. The comparative study of epidural levobupivacaine and bupivacaine in major abdominal surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Uzuner, Ali; Saracoglu, Kemal Tolga; Saracoglu, Ayten; Erdemli, Ozcan

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Opioid and local anesthetic infusion by an epidural catheter is widely used as a postoperative pain management method after major abdominal surgeries. There are several agents nowadays to provide sufficient analgesia. The agents which cause less side effects but better quality of analgesia are more valuable. We aimed to postoperatively compare the analgesic, hemodynamic and arrhythmogenic effects of epidural levobupivacaine-fentanyl and bupivacaine-fentanyl solutions. METHODS: Fifty patients were scheduled to undergo major abdominal surgery in this clinical trial. The parameters were recorded pre- and post-operatively. In Group I (n=25), bupivacaine with fentanyl solution and in Group II (n=25), levobupivacaine with fentanyl solution was infused via epidural patient-controlled analgesia (PCA). According to the preoperative and postoperative holter recording reports, the arrhythmogenic effects were examined in four catagories: ventricular arrhythmia (VA), supraventricular arrhythmia (SVA), atrioventricular conduction abnormalities and pauses longer than two seconds. RESULTS: Mean visual analog scale (VAS) values of groups did not differ at all time. They were 6 at the end of the surgery (0. Min, p = 0.622). The scores were 5 in Group I and 4 in Group II in 30. min (p = 0.301). The frequency of SVA was higher in bupivacaine group. CONCLUSIONS: The results of our study suggest that same concentration of epidural levobupivacaine and bupivacaine with fentanyl provide stable postoperative analgesia and both were found safe for the patients undergoing major abdominal surgery. PMID:22973384

  12. The Feasibility of Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy in Patients with Previous Abdominal Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Diez, J.; Delbene, R.; Ferreres, A.

    1998-01-01

    A retrospective study was carried in 1500 patients submitted to elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy to ascertain its feasibility in patients with previous abdominal surgery. In 411 patients (27.4%) previous infraumbilical intraperitoneal surgery had been performed, and 106 of them (7.06%) had 2 or more operations. Twenty five patients (1.66%) had previous supraumbilical intraperitoneal operations (colonic resection, hydatid liver cysts, gastrectomies, etc.) One of them had been operated 3 times. In this group of 25 patients the first trocar and pneumoperitoneum were performed by open laparoscopy. In 2 patients a Marlex mesh was present from previous surgery for supraumbilical hernias. Previous infraumbilical intraperitoneal surgery did not interfere with laparoscopic cholecystectomy, even in patients with several operations. There was no morbidity from Verres needle or trocars. In the 25 patients with supraumbilical intraperitoneal operations, laparoscopic cholecystectomy was completed in 22. In 3, adhesions prevented the visualization of the gallbladder and these patients were converted to an open procedure. In the 2 patients Marlex mesh prevented laparoscopic cholecystectomy because of adhesions to abdominal organs. We conclude that in most instances previous abdominal operations are no contraindication to laparoscopic cholecystectomy. PMID:9515231

  13. Laparoscopic drainage of abdominal wall abscess from spilled stones post-cholecystectomy

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Vincent; Ram, Rishi

    2015-01-01

    We present a case on abdominal wall abscess from spilled stones post-cholecystectomy and describe laparoscopic drainage as our choice of management. Mr M is a 75-year-old male who presented on multiple occasions to the hospital with right upper quadrant pain and fever post-laparoscopic cholecystectomy. He also required multiple courses of antibiotics. Subsequent computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging scan confirmed a number of retained stone with signs of chronic inflammation. Hence, 6 months after his initial laparoscopic cholecystectomy, he proceeded to an exploratory laparoscopy. We found an abscess cavity measuring 3 × 4 cm over the anterior abdominal wall. The cavity was de-roofed, drained and washed out. The tissue culture grew Klebsiella pneumoniae. Laparoscopic approach is optimal as the abscess cavity can be clearly identified, stones visualized and removed under direct vision. Patient does not require a laparotomy. PMID:26183574

  14. Evidence-Based Abdominal Wall Reconstruction: The Maxi-Mini Approach.

    PubMed

    Janis, Jeffrey E; Khansa, Ibrahim

    2015-12-01

    Complex abdominal wall reconstruction is a high-risk procedure, but it can be performed safely if a systematic approach is followed. In this article, the authors present their evidence-based technique for abdominal wall reconstruction. This approach aims at reducing rates of complications and hernia recurrence, starting with critical patient selection; preoperative patient optimization; adherence to intraoperative principles including preservation of vascular perforators through maintenance of composite tissue with limited undermining; direct supported mesh reinforcement of midline musculofascial reapproximation; use of percutaneous transfascial suture mesh fixation; careful attention to dead space obliteration in any plane; and aggressive soft-tissue resection of marginal, undermined, or tenuous skin and subcutaneous tissue. Postoperative strategies to decrease complications are also used. The authors' surgical technique is described in detail, and pilot data are presented to support the authors' approach.

  15. Desmoid Tumor of the Anterior Abdominal Wall in Female Patients: Comparison with Endometriosis

    PubMed Central

    Krentel, H.; Tchartchian, G.; De Wilde, R. L.

    2012-01-01

    In female patients presenting a tumor of the lower abdominal wall especially after cesarian section, an endometriotic tumor as well as an aggressive desmoid tumor should be considered. Symptoms in correlation with the monthly period can facilitate the presurgical differentiation between endometriosis and fibromatosis. Ultrasound reveals the typical location of both tumors and its remarkable sonographic appearance. In the clinical practice, the desmoid fibromatosis of the lower abdominal wall is a very rare disease. We present a case of a 25-year-old pregnant and discuss diagnostic and therapeutic options by a PubMed literature review. With the knowledge of the prognosis of the desmoid fibromatosis and the respective treatment options including wait and see, complete surgical resection with macroscopically free margins and adjuvant approaches is essential to avoid further interventions and progression of the locally destructive tumor. PMID:22778752

  16. The effects of two analgesic regimes on behavior after abdominal surgery in Steller sea lions.

    PubMed

    Walker, Kristen A; Horning, Markus; Mellish, Jo-Ann E; Weary, Daniel M

    2011-10-01

    This study examined the effects of two non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) treatment protocols on the behavioral responses of juvenile Steller sea lions after abdominal surgery. Sea lions were randomly assigned to one of two treatments designed to control post-operative pain. The flunixin group (n=6) received flunixin meglumine (1mg/kg) administered as a single intramuscular (IM) injection before extubation from surgery. The carprofen group (n=5) received carprofen (4.4 mg/kg) as an IM injection before extubation, then orally at 24, 48 and 72 h after surgery. Seven behaviors related to post-operative pain were monitored by observers, blinded to treatment, for a total of 10 days (3 days pre-, day of surgery, and 6 days post-surgery). All seven behaviors changed after surgery regardless of NSAID treatment, two of which returned to baseline within 6 days of surgery. Only one behavior was mildly affected by analgesic treatment: sea lions in the carprofen group tended to spend less time lying down in Days 1-3 following surgery (i.e., the days which they received oral carprofen). These results suggested that neither treatment, at the dose administered, was effective in controlling pain in the days following this surgery.

  17. Clostridial Gas Gangrene of the Abdominal Wall After Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy: A Case Report and Review.

    PubMed

    Harmsen, Annelieke M K; van Tol, Erik; Giannakopoulos, Georgios F; de Brauw, L Maurits

    2016-08-01

    Clostridial gas gangrene is a rare, yet severe, complication after laparoscopic cholecystectomy. We present a case report of a 48-year-old man with obesity, coronary artery disease, and diabetes, who developed clostridial gas gangrene of the abdominal wall after an uncomplicated laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Although the diagnosis was missed initially, successful radical surgical debridement was performed and the patient survived. Pathogenesis, symptoms, prognostic factors, and the best treatment are discussed.

  18. [Clostridial sepsis and gas gangrene of the abdominal wall after cholecystectomy].

    PubMed

    Lochman, P; Kabelác, K; Pospísil, I; Dobes, D; Cáp, R

    2007-01-01

    Clostridial sepsis is a rare complication after intraabdominal operations, mostly fatal. According to our knowledge only two papers describing clostridial sepsis as postoperative complication in 4 patients were published in the Czech literature, only one of them survived. Authors present a case report of patient operated on for cholecystolithiasis and obstructive icterus where within 48 hours after cholecystectomy the clostridial sepsis and gas gangrene of the abdominal wall developed and that were successfuly managed.

  19. Abdominal Wall Reconstruction Using Retrorectus Self-adhering Mesh: A Novel Approach

    PubMed Central

    Khansa, Ibrahim

    2016-01-01

    Background: In abdominal wall reconstruction, the retrorectus plane offers an ideal location for mesh placement. Mesh fixation in this plane is often achieved using transfascial sutures, which risks entrapping intercostal nerves and causing significant pain, and takes time to place. A novel alternative is the use of sutureless self-adhering mesh. Although the use of this mesh in inguinal hernias has been well described, studies on its use in abdominal wall reconstruction are lacking. Methods: Consecutive patients who underwent ventral hernia repair with retrorectus mesh were reviewed. This included patients who received transfascially sutured mesh and those who received sutureless self-adhering mesh. All patients were followed up for at least 12 months. The amount of narcotics required by each patient postoperatively was calculated. Surgical-site occurrences (SSOs) and hernia recurrence and bulge were measured. Results: Twenty-six patients underwent abdominal wall reconstruction with retrorectus mesh. This included 12 patients with transfascially sutured mesh and 14 patients with self-adhering mesh. Mean follow-up was 600 days. Baseline characteristics were similar between the 2 groups. Patients receiving self-adhering mesh required significantly less narcotics than patients with transfascially sutured mesh. There were no significant differences in the rate of SSOs between the 2 groups. No hernia recurrences, bulges, or chronic pain occurred in either group. Conclusions: This is the first study to compare the outcomes of retrorectus self-adhering mesh and transfascially sutured mesh in abdominal wall reconstruction. Our results show low rates of SSO, recurrence, and bulge with both options, with significantly less acute pain with self-adhering mesh. PMID:27975037

  20. Extragastrointestinal Stromal Tumor (EGIST) in the abdominal wall: Case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Alkhatib, Loiy; Albtoush, Omar; Bataineh, Nesreen; Gharaibeh, Kamal; Matalka, Ismail; Tokuda, Yasuharu

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Gastro Intestinal Stromal Tumor (GIST) is the most common mesenchymal tumor of the gastrointestinal tract (GI). GIST that arises primarily outside the GI tract is termed Extragastrointestinal Stromal Tumor (EGIST). To the best of our knowledge, few cases of EGIST in the abdominal wall were reported. PRESENTATION OF CASE We present a rare case of EGIST in the abdominal wall of a 57 year-old female patient. The asymptomatic tumor was located in the superior aspect of the left rectus abdominis muscle, measured 5.4 × cm 5.3 × cm 6.9 cm and was well circumscribed. Histological examination showed an epithelioid cell morphology. The mitotic count was 7/50 HPFs. Immunohistochemistry showed diffuse strong CD117 positivity, focal positivity for S100. The tumor was excised and the margins were free of malignancy. The patient was doing well postoperatively and was discharged on STI-571 regimen. DISCUSSION Although GIST is the most common mesenchymal tumor of the gastrointestinal tract, a case with EGIST in the abdominal wall is rare. Positive immunohistochemical staining for CD117 is a defining feature of GISTs. A great percentage of EGISTs represent a metastasis from a primary GIST. In our case, the clinical and diagnostic work-up have been proved it to be an EGIST. CONCLUSION The existing data on EGIST is insufficient to make a final conclusion regarding the malignant potential and clinicopathological factors of EGISTs that determine patient prognosis. Thus a follow-up for a long period is required. EGISTs should be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis for patients presenting with solid mass of the abdominal wall. PMID:22096744

  1. Evolution of the wall shear stresses during the progressive enlargement of symmetric abdominal aortic aneurysms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salsac, A.-V.; Sparks, S. R.; Chomaz, J.-M.; Lasheras, J. C.

    2006-08-01

    The changes in the evolution of the spatial and temporal distribution of the wall shear stresses (WSS) and gradients of wall shear stresses (GWSS) at different stages of the enlargement of an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) are important in understanding the aetiology and progression of this vascular disease since they affect the wall structural integrity, primarily via the changes induced on the shape, functions and metabolism of the endothelial cells. Particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements were performed in in vitro aneurysm models, while changing their geometric parameters systematically. It has been shown that, even at the very early stages of the disease, i.e. increase in the diameter ≤ 50%, the flow separates from the wall and a large vortex ring, usually followed by internal shear layers, is created. These lead to the generation of WSS that drastically differ in mean and fluctuating components from the healthy vessel. Inside the AAA, the mean WSS becomes negative along most of the aneurysmal wall and the magnitude of the WSS can be as low as 26% of the value in a healthy abdominal aorta.

  2. Reconstruction of the abdominal wall by using a combination of the human acellular dermal matrix implant and an interpositional omentum flap after extensive tumor resection in patients with abdominal wall neoplasm: A preliminary result

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Yan; Tang, Rui; Gong, Ding-Quan; Qian, Yun-Liang

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To present our trial using a combination of the human acellular dermal matrix (HADM) implant and an interpositional omentum flap to repair giant abdominal wall defects after extensive tumor resection. METHODS: Between February and October of 2007, three patients with giant defects of the abdominal wall after extensive tumor resection underwent reconstruction with a combination of HADM and omentum flap. Postoperative morbidities and signs of herniation were monitored. RESULTS: The abdominal wall reconstruction was successful in these three patients, there was no severe morbidity and no signs of herniation in the follow-up period. CONCLUSION: The combination of HADM and omentum flap offers a new, safe and effective alternative to traditional forms in the repair of giant abdominal wall defects. Further analysis of the long-term outcome and more cases are needed to assess the reliability of this technique. PMID:18205267

  3. Excision of the urachal remnant using the abdominal wall-lift laparoscopy: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Kosuke; Sasaki, Kazuhito; Iijima, Tatsuo; Yoshimi, Fuyo; Nagai, Hideo

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Here, we report the surgical excision of the urachal remnant using the abdominal wall-lift laparoscopy with a camera port in the umbilicus, combined with a small Pfannenstiel incision to optimally treat the bladder apex. Presentation of case A 21-year-old woman presented with periumbilical discharge and pain on urination. Contrast enhanced CT and MRI showed an abscess in the umbilical region that was connected to the bladder via a long tube-like structure. It was diagnosed as an infected urachal sinus. Partial excision of the umbilical fossa followed by dissection of the urachal remnant was easily performed using the abdominal wall-lift laparoscopy from the umbilicus down to the bladder without pneumoperitoneum or additional trocar placement. A Pfannenstiel incision was made above the pubis to get access to the junction between the urachal remnant and the bladder. Under direct vision, we succeeded in accurately dividing the remnant tract, and we adequately closed the bladder opening with absorbable sutures. This method has the advantage of easily closing peritoneal defects after excision of the urachal remnant with direct sutures under a laparoscopic view from the umbilicus. Cosmetic satisfaction was obtained postoperatively. Discussion and conclusion Urachal sinus excision using the abdominal wall-lift laparoscopy seems to surpass the previously reported methods in term of safety, cosmetics, and adequacy of surgical procedures. PMID:27064744

  4. Value-based Clinical Quality Improvement (CQI) for Patients Undergoing Abdominal Wall Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Stephan, Bradley; Ramshaw, Bruce; Forman, Brandie

    2015-05-01

    Patients with complex ventral/incisional hernias often undergo an abdominal wall reconstruction (AWR). These operations have a high cost of care and often result in a long hospital stay and high complication rates. Using the principles of clinical quality improvement (CQI), several attempts at process improvement were implemented in one hernia program over a 3-year period. For consecutive cases of patients undergoing abdominal wall reconstruction, process improvement attempts included the use of a long-term resorbable synthetic mesh (TIGR® Resorbable Matrix, Novus Scientific, Uppsala, Sweden) in place of a biologic mesh, the use of the transversus abdominis release approach in place of an open or endoscopic component separation (external oblique release) technique, and the use of a preoperative transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block using a long-acting local anesthetic (Exparel®, Pacira Pharmaceutical, Parsippany, NJ) as a part of perioperative multi-modal pain management and an enhanced recovery program. After over 60 cases, improvement in materials costs and postoperative outcomes were documented. No mesh-related complications occurred and no mesh removal was required. In this real-world, value-based application of CQI, several attempts at process improvement led to decreased costs and improved outcomes for patients who underwent abdominal wall reconstruction for complex ventral/incisional hernias. Value-based CQI could be a tool for improved health care value globally.

  5. [New abdominal wall reconstruction technique with a plastic-rehabilitative intent (back pain improvement)].

    PubMed

    Palmieri, Beniamino; Grappolini, Simone; Blandini, Daniele; De-Anna, Dino; Savio, Stefano; Ferrari, Paolo; Ferrari, Giovanni; William, Pillosu; Campanini, Isabella; Guido, Vezzosi; Tenchini, Paolo; Benuzzi, Giorgia; Palmieri, Lucia

    2004-01-01

    Many abdominal wall reconstruction techniques have generally failed to pay attention to a number of anatomical considerations concerning the continuity of the thoraco-lumboabdominal fascia that envelops the dorsal and ventral muscles. We have introduced a new surgical technique (round mesh) developed to improve the abdominal wall weakness or pathology (hernia, laparocele) with the aim of restoring the muscular synergy between the anterior and posterior trunk compartments, thus improving sacroiliac stability, posture, and standing effort endurance. One hundred patients of both sexes were enrolled in this investigation. All were affected by abdominal wall impairment, frank hernia or laparocele, and had been complaining of lumbar and sciatic pain for long periods without any definite intervertebral disk pathology. They underwent pre- and postoperative subjective and objective evaluation and insertion of a prefascial polypropylene mesh with a posterior martingale that passes across the spine and paravertebral muscles, ending in two wider rectangles that are criss-crossed ventrally and finally sutured to the iliopubic brim. All the patients improved either subjectively or objectively with the round mesh procedure. This new technique is particularly useful in cases of reduction or impairment of the recti abdominis, transverse and oblique muscles, because simple suture and plication of these muscles is no guarantee of long-term functional restoration.

  6. Free intra-abdominal hemorrhage after open-heart surgery: an unusual gastrointestinal complication.

    PubMed

    Iriz, Erkan; Ereren, Emrah; Yuksel, Osman; Kalaycioglu, Sedat

    2006-01-01

    Gastrointestinal complications after open-heart surgery are rare. Many preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative factors may predispose patients to these complications or cause them. Our patient was a 64-year-old woman who underwent aortic valve replacement due to aortic stenosis. Free intra-abdominal hemorrhage occurred on the 2nd postoperative day. During exploratory laparotomy, it was determined that the hemorrhage was from a vein near the falciform ligament of the liver and from a bleeding laceration of the splenic capsule. The complication was repaired surgically. To our knowledge, intra-abdominal hemorrhage of both liver and spleen after open-heart surgery has never been reported before, even in large patient series. We report the case and present our ideas regarding the cause of the bleeding.

  7. Does chewing gum improve recovery after an abdominal surgery?--First update.

    PubMed

    Rada, Gabriel; Viñuela, José

    2015-06-18

    This Living FRISBEE (Living FRIendly Summary of the Body of Evidence using Epistemonikos) is an update of the summary published in November 2014, based on four new systematic reviews published since then. Postoperative ileus is common condition that delays recovery after an abdominal surgery. Early use of sham feeding with chewing gum stimulates peristalsis and would allow an earlier nutrition. Searching in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening 30 databases, we identified 18 systematic reviews including 81 randomized trials. We combined the evidence using meta-analysis and generated a summary of findings following the GRADE approach. We concluded that chewing gum probably reduces the length of hospital stay after an abdominal surgery.

  8. Incentive spirometry versus routine chest physiotherapy for prevention of pulmonary complications after abdominal surgery.

    PubMed

    Hall, J C; Tarala, R; Harris, J; Tapper, J; Christiansen, K

    1991-04-20

    We entered 876 patients into a clinical trial aimed at preventing pulmonary complications after abdominal surgery. Patients either received conventional chest physiotherapy or were encouraged to perform maximal inspiratory manoeuvres for 5 min during each hour while awake, using an incentive spirometer. The incidence of pulmonary complications did not differ significantly between the groups: incentive spirometry 68 of 431 (15.8%, 95% CI 14.0-17.6%), and chest physiotherapy 68 of 445 (15.3%, CI 13.6-17.0%). Nor was there a difference between the groups in the incidence of positive clinical signs, pyrexia, abnormal chest radiographs, pathogens in sputum, respiratory failure (PO2 less than 60 mm Hg), or length of stay in hospital. We conclude that prophylactic incentive spirometry and chest physiotherapy are of equivalent clinical efficacy in the general management of patients undergoing abdominal surgery.

  9. [Indications and results of preventive endoprosthezing of the abdominal wall during operations on organs of the abdominal cavity and retroperitoneal space].

    PubMed

    Sukovatykh, B S; Valuĭskaia, N M; Netiaga, A A; Zhukovskiĭ, V A; Pravednikova, N V; Kas'ianova, M A

    2011-01-01

    Complex examination and treatment of 120 patients with anatomo-functional insufficiency of the abdominal wall was made after operations on organs of the abdominal cavity and retroperitoneal space. In the 1st group (60 patients) the abdominal wall was sutured by traditional methods. In the 2nd group (60 patients) laparotomy was followed by implantation of polypropylene endoprosthesis by over-aponeurotic method, and suturing of the lateral wall--by sub-aponeurotic method. At the long-term postoperative period the postoperative ventral hernias were formed in 21.6% of patients of the 1st group, in the 2nd group of patients hernias were not detected. Physical component of quality of life of the 2nd group was 1.5 times, and mental component 1.7 times higher than in the 1st group.

  10. CLASSICAL AREAS OF PHENOMENOLOGY: Influence of the abdominal wall on the nonlinear propagation of focused therapeutic ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhen-Bo; Fan, Ting-Bo; Zhang, Dong; Gong, Xiu-Fen

    2009-11-01

    This article theoretically studies the influence of inhomogeneous abdominal walls on focused therapeutic ultrasound based on the phase screen model. An inhomogeneous tissue is considered as a combination of a homogeneous medium and a phase aberration screen. Variations of acoustic parameters such as peak positive pressure, peak negative pressure, and acoustic intensity are discussed with respect to the phase screen statistics of human abdominal walls. Results indicate that the abdominal wall can result in energy loss of the sound in the focal plane. For a typical human abdominal wall with correlation length of 7.9 mm and variance of 0.36, the peak acoustic intensity radiated from a 1 MHz transmitter with a radius of 30 mm can be reduced by about 14% at the focal plane.

  11. Predictive value of C-reactive protein in critically ill patients after abdominal surgery

    PubMed Central

    Sapin, Frédéric; Biston, Patrick; Piagnerelli, Michael

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The development of sepsis after abdominal surgery is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Due to inflammation, it may be difficult to diagnose infection when it occurs, but measurement of C-reactive protein could facilitate this diagnosis. In the present study, we evaluated the predictive value and time course of C-reactive protein in relation to outcome in patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) after abdominal surgery. METHODS: We included patients admitted to the ICU after abdominal surgery over a period of two years. The patients were divided into two groups according to their outcome: favorable (F; left the ICU alive, without modification of the antibiotic regimen) and unfavorable (D; death in the ICU, surgical revision with or without modification of the antibiotic regimen or just modification of the regimen). We then compared the highest C-reactive protein level on the first day of admission between the two groups. RESULTS: A total of 308 patients were included: 86 patients had an unfavorable outcome (group D) and 222 had a favorable outcome (group F). The groups were similar in terms of leukocytosis, neutrophilia, and platelet count. C-reactive protein was significantly higher at admission in group D and was the best predictor of an unfavorable outcome, with a sensitivity of 74% and a specificity of 72% for a threshold of 41 mg/L. No changes in C-reactive protein, as assessed based on the delta C-reactive protein, especially at days 4 and 5, were associated with a poor prognosis. CONCLUSIONS: A C-reactive protein cut-off of 41 mg/L during the first day of ICU admission after abdominal surgery was a predictor of an adverse outcome. However, no changes in the C-reactive protein concentration, especially by day 4 or 5, could identify patients at risk of death. PMID:28226029

  12. Pedicled fasciocutaneous anterolateral thigh flap for the reconstruction of a large postoncologic abdominal wall resection defect: a case report.

    PubMed

    Nthumba, Peter; Barasa, Jack; Cavadas, Pedro C; Landin, Luis

    2012-02-01

    The anterolateral thigh (ALT) flap has been used to cover defects between the proximal third of the leg and lower abdomen, and with modification, may cover epigastric defects. We used the ALT flap to cover a full-thickness defect of over half the anterior abdominal wall. We conclude that abdominal wall defects of large sizes can be successfully reconstructed using an appropriately designed ALT flap; a simple, single-stage effective reconstruction.

  13. Local influence of calcifications on the wall mechanics of abdominal aortic aneurysm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Putter, Sander; van de Vosse, Frans N.; Breeuwer, Marcel; Gerritsen, Frans A.

    2006-03-01

    Finite element wall stress simulations on patient-specific models of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) may provide a better rupture risk predictor than the currently used maximum transverse diameter. Calcifications in the wall of AAA lead to a higher maximum wall stress and thus may lead to an elevated rupture risk. The reported material properties for calcifications and the material properties actually used for simulations show great variation. Previous studies have focused on simplified modelling of the calcification shapes within a realistic aneurysm shape. In this study we use an accurate representation of the calcification geometry and a simplified model for the AAA. The objective of this approach is to investigate the influence of the calcification geometry, the material properties and the modelling approach for the computed peak wall stress. For four realistic calcification shapes from standard clinical CT images of AAA, we performed simulations with three distinct modelling approaches, at five distinct elasticity settings. The results show how peak wall stress is sensitive to the material properties of the calcifications. For relatively elastic calcifications, the results from the different modelling approaches agree. Also, for relatively elastic calcifications the computed wall stress in the tissue surrounding the calcifications shows to be insensitive to the exact calcification geometry. For stiffer calcifications the different modelling approaches and the different geometries lead to significantly different results. We conclude that an important challenge for future research is accurately estimating the material properties and the rupture potential of the AAA wall including calcifications.

  14. Small-Incision Laparoscopy-Assisted Surgery Under Abdominal Cavity Irrigation in a Porcine Model

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Takuro; Aoe, Tomohiko; Yu, Wen-Wei; Ebihara, Yuma; Kawahira, Hiroshi; Isono, Shiro; Naya, Yukio

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Laparoscopic and robot-assisted surgeries are performed under carbon dioxide insufflation. Switching from gas to an isotonic irrigant introduces several benefits and avoids some adverse effects of gas insufflation. We developed an irrigating device and apparatus designed for single-incision laparoscopic surgery and tested its advantages and drawbacks during surgery in a porcine model. Materials and Methods: Six pigs underwent surgical procedures under general anesthesia. A 30-cm extracorporeal cistern was placed over a 5–6-cm abdominal incision. The abdomen was irrigated with warm saline that was drained via a suction tube placed near the surgical field and continuously recirculated through a closed circuit equipped with a hemodialyzer as a filter. Irrigant samples from two pigs were cultured to check for bacterial and fungal contamination. Body weight was measured before and after surgery in four pigs that had not received treatments affecting hemodynamics or causing diuresis. Results: One-way flow of irrigant ensured laparoscopic vision by rinsing blood from the surgical field. Through a retroperitoneal approach, cystoprostatectomy was successfully performed in three pigs, nephrectomy in two, renal excision in two, and partial nephrectomy in one, under simultaneous ultrasonographic monitoring. Through a transperitoneal approach, liver excision and hemostasis with a bipolar sealing device were performed in three pigs, and bladder pedicle excision was performed in one pig. Bacterial and fungal contamination of the irrigant was observed on the draining side of the circuit, but the filter captured the contaminants. Body weight increased by a median of 2.1% (range, 1.2–4.4%) of initial weight after 3–5 hours of irrigation. Conclusions: Surgery under irrigation is feasible and practical when performed via a cistern through a small abdominal incision. This method is advantageous, especially in the enabling of continuous and free

  15. Extensive Abdominal Wall Incisional Heterotopic Ossification Reconstructed with Component Separation and Strattice Inlay

    PubMed Central

    Suleiman, Nergis Nina

    2016-01-01

    Summary: Symptomatic heterotopic ossification of abdominal surgical incisions is a rare occurrence. We present a 67-year-old man with severe discomfort caused by heterotopic ossification extending from the xiphoid to the umbilicus. The patient underwent an abdominal aortic aneurysm repair 3 years before our treatment. A 13 × 3.5 cm ossified lesion was excised. The resulting midline defect was closed using component separation and inlay Strattice. Tension-free midline adaptation of the recti muscles was achieved. A computed tomography scan of the abdomen 6 months after the surgery showed no recurrence or hernias. Heterotopic ossification in symptomatic patients has previously been treated with excision and primary closure. We believe that tension-free repair is important to prevent recurrence. Acellular dermal matrix may add to this effect and also compartmentalize the process. PMID:27536495

  16. Metastasectomy of Abdominal Wall Lesions due to Prostate Cancer Detected Through PET/CT Gallium 68-PMSA: First Case Report.

    PubMed

    Ochoa, Claudia; Ramirez, Angie; Varela, Rodolfo; Godoy, Fabian; Vargas, Rafael; Forero, Jorge; Rojas, Andres; Roa, Carmen; Céspedes, Carlos; Ramos, Jose; Cabrera, Marino; Calderon, Andres

    2017-05-01

    Introducing the topic of abdominal wall metastasis secondary to prostate cancer with a reminder of the disease's rarity, being the first published case. This article is about a 66 year old patient diagnosed with prostate cancer [cT2aNxMx iPSA: 5,6 ng/ml Gleason 3+3, (Grade 1 Group)], treated with radical prostatectomy as well as accompanied with amplified pelvic lymphadenectomy, who subsequently presented metastatic lesions to the abdominal wall diagnosed with PET/CT Gallium 68-PMSA technique and treated with abdominal metastasectomy with adequate short term results.

  17. Effect of abdominal surgery on the intestinal absorption of lipophilic drugs: possible role of the lymphatic transport.

    PubMed

    Gershkovich, Pavel; Itin, Constantin; Yacovan, Avihai; Amselem, Shimon; Hoffman, Amnon

    2009-06-01

    Although abdominal surgery is a routine procedure in clinical practice and in preclinical investigation, little is known regarding its effect on the intestinal absorption of drugs. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of abdominal surgery on the intestinal absorption of highly lipophilic compounds with different absorption mechanisms following oral administration. The 2 compounds that were tested were biopharmaceutical classification system (BCS) class 2 model lipophilic cannabinoid derivatives, dexanabinol and PRS-211,220. Although dexanabinol is mostly absorbed via passive diffusion to the portal blood, PRS-211,220 is absorbed mostly via lymphatic transport. In this work, we compared the absorption of these compounds after abdominal surgery in rat with the absorption data obtained from naïve animals. The outcomes of this investigation showed that the abdominal surgery mostly affected the absorption process on the preenterocyte level, as indicated by the 2-fold increase in the extent of intestinal absorption of dexanabinol, which is a compound with a low degree of intestinal lymphatic transport. However, the lymphatic transport was not affected by the surgical procedure as evident by the absence of change in the extent of absorption of PRS-211,220, which is transported to the systemic circulation mainly by intestinal lymphatics. In conclusion, abdominal surgery can significantly affect the intestinal absorption of lipophilic drugs; however, intestinal lymphatic transport seems to be less affected by the abdominal surgery.

  18. Abdominal fat ratio - a novel parameter for predicting conversion in laparoscopic colorectal surgery.

    PubMed

    Scott, S I; Farid, S; Mann, C; Jones, R; Kang, P; Evans, J

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Laparoscopic surgery has become the standard for colorectal cancer resection in the UK but it can be technically challenging in patients who are obese. Patients whose body fat is mainly inside the abdominal cavity are more challenging than those whose fat is mainly outside the abdominal cavity. Abdominal fat ratio (AFR) is a simple parameter proposed by the authors to aid identification of this subgroup. MATERIALS AND METHODS All 195 patients who underwent elective, laparoscopic colorectal cancer resections from March 2010 to November 2013 were included in the study. For patients who were obese (body mass index greater than 30), preoperative staging computed tomography was used to determine AFR. This was assessed by two different, blinded observers and compared with conversion rate. RESULTS Of the 195 patients, 58 (29.7%) fell into the obese group and 137 (70.3%) into the non-obese group. The median AFR of the obese group that were converted to open surgery was significantly higher at 5.9 compared with those completed laparoscopically (3.3, P = 0.0001, Mann-Whitney). There was no significant difference in conversion rate when looking at body mass index, tumour site or size. DISCUSSION Previous studies have found body mass index, age, gender, previous abdominal surgery, site and locally advanced tumours to be associated with an increased risk of conversion. This study adds AFR to the list of risk factors. CONCLUSION AFR is a simple, reproducible parameter which can help to predict conversion risk in obese patients undergoing colorectal cancer resection.

  19. A simulation framework for estimating wall stress distribution of abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Qin, Jing; Zhang, Jing; Chui, Chee-Kong; Huang, Wei-Min; Yang, Tao; Pang, Wai-Man; Sudhakar, Venkatesh; Chang, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) rupture is believed to occur when the mechanical stress acting on the wall exceeds the strength of the wall tissue. In endovascular aneurysm repair, a stent-graft in a catheter is released at the aneurysm site to form a new blood vessel and protect the weakened AAA wall from the pulsatile pressure and, hence, possible rupture. In this paper, we propose a framework to estimate the wall stress distribution of non-stented/stented AAA based on fluid-structure interaction, which is utilized in a surgical simulation system (IRAS). The 3D geometric model of AAA is reconstructed from computed tomography angiographic (CTA) images. Based on our experiments, a combined logarithm and polynomial strain energy equation is applied to model the elastic properties of arterial wall. The blood flow is modeled as laminar, incompressible, and non-Newtonian flow by applying Navier-Stokes equation. The obtained pressure of blood flow is applied as load on the AAA meshes with and without stent-graft and the wall stress distribution is calculated by fluid-structure interaction (FSI) solver equipped in ANSYS. Experiments demonstrate that our analytical results are consistent with clinical observations.

  20. Trace elements in the wall of abdominal aortic aneurysms with and without coexisting iliac artery aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Ziaja, Damian; Chudek, Jerzy; Sznapka, Mariola; Kita, Andrzej; Biolik, Grzegorz; Sieroń-Stołtny, Karolina; Pawlicki, Krzysztof; Domalik, Jolanta; Ziaja, Krzysztof

    2015-06-01

    Iliac artery aneurysms (IAA) and abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) frequently coexist. It remains unknown whether the content of trace elements in AAA walls depends on the coexistence of IAAs. The aim of this study was to compare the content of selected trace elements in AAA walls depending on the coexistence of IAAs. The content of trace elements was assessed in samples of AAA walls harvested intraoperatively in 19 consecutive patients. In the studied group, coexisting IAAs were diagnosed in 11 out of the 19 patients with AAA. The coexistence of IAAs was associated with a slightly lower content of nickel (0.28 (0.15-0.40) vs. 0.32 (0-0.85) mg/g; p = 0.09) and a significantly higher content of cadmium (0.71 (0.26-1.17) vs. 0.25 (0.20-0.31) mg/g; p = 0.04) in AAA walls. The levels of the remaining studied elements, copper, zinc, manganese, magnesium and calcium, were comparable. The elevated levels of cadmium in the walls of AAA coexisting with IAAs may suggest an impact of the accumulation of this trace element on the greater damage of the iliac artery wall.

  1. Omental infarction and its mimics: imaging features of acute abdominal conditions presenting with fat stranding greater than the degree of bowel wall thickening.

    PubMed

    Tonerini, Michele; Calcagni, Francesca; Lorenzi, Silvia; Scalise, Paola; Grigolini, Alessandro; Bemi, Pietro

    2015-08-01

    The segmental omental infarction is a rare self-limited disorder presenting with aspecific clinical symptoms that may mimic several acute abdominal conditions. Therefore, a correct noninvasive diagnosis is important because treatment approaches range from monitoring to surgery. As omental infarction results in an important fat stranding that is much greater than the degree of bowel wall thickening, it suggests a narrower differential diagnosis: appendicitis, diverticulitis, epiploic appendagitis, and mesenteric panniculitis. In this pictorial essay, we point out the importance of imaging in identifying this typical sign allowing alternate diagnoses such as segmental omental infarction that can be conservatively managed.

  2. Pre-operative respiratory evaluation and management of patients for upper abdominal surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Davies, J. M.

    1991-01-01

    Patients presenting for surgery, be it on an elective or emergency basis, do so in the hope that the anesthetic will be without risk. Yet complications which arise are not always due to anesthesia. More often, the surgical process and factors intrinsic to the patient are major determinants of outcome. Pre-operative assessment allows review of the patient and the proposed surgery, and formation of a plan of management for the pre-, intra-, and post-operative anesthetic care. This paper provides an overview of the pre-operative assessment and management of patients who are to undergo upper abdominal surgery, with the aim of minimizing their risk of post-operative pulmonary complications. In particular, factors which contribute to the development of post-operative respiratory problems are described. PMID:1814053

  3. Observation of a Flowing Duct in the Abdominal Wall by Using Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Sharon Jiyoon; Kim, Min-Suk; Lee, Jin-Kyu; Kim, Young-Jae; Soh, Kwang-Sup

    2016-01-01

    The primo vascular system (PVS) is being established as a circulatory system that corresponds to acupuncture meridians. There have been two critical questions in making the PVS accepted as a novel liquid flowing system. The first one was directly to show the flow of liquid in PVS and the second one was to explain why it was not observed in the conventional histological study of animal tissues. Flow in the PVS in the abdominal cavity was previously verified by injecting Alcian blue into a primo node. However, the tracing of the dye to other subsystems of the PVS has not been done. In the current work we injected fluorescent nanoparticles (FNPs) into a primo node and traced them along a primo vessel which was inside a fat tissue in the abdominal wall. Linea alba is a white middle line in the abdominal skin of a mammal and a band of fat tissue is located in parallel to the linea alba in the parietal side of the abdominal wall of a rat. In this fat band a primo vessel runs parallel to the prominent blood vessels in the fat band and is located just inside the parietal peritoneum. About the second question on the reason why the PVS was not in conventional histological study the current work provided the answer. Histological analysis with hematoxyline and eosine, Masson’s trichrome, and Toluidine blue could not discriminate the primo vessel even when we knew the location of the PVS by the trace of the FNPs. This clearly explains why the PVS is hard to observe in conventional histology: it is not a matter of resolution but the contrast. The PVS has very similar structure to the connective tissues that surround the PVS. In the current work we propose a method to find the PVS: Observation of mast cell distribution with toluidine blue staining and the PN has a high density of mast cells, while the lymph node has low density. PMID:26937963

  4. Observation of a Flowing Duct in the Abdominal Wall by Using Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Jang, HyunSuk; Yoon, Joohwan; Gil, HyunJi; Jung, Sharon Jiyoon; Kim, Min-Suk; Lee, Jin-Kyu; Kim, Young-Jae; Soh, Kwang-Sup

    2016-01-01

    The primo vascular system (PVS) is being established as a circulatory system that corresponds to acupuncture meridians. There have been two critical questions in making the PVS accepted as a novel liquid flowing system. The first one was directly to show the flow of liquid in PVS and the second one was to explain why it was not observed in the conventional histological study of animal tissues. Flow in the PVS in the abdominal cavity was previously verified by injecting Alcian blue into a primo node. However, the tracing of the dye to other subsystems of the PVS has not been done. In the current work we injected fluorescent nanoparticles (FNPs) into a primo node and traced them along a primo vessel which was inside a fat tissue in the abdominal wall. Linea alba is a white middle line in the abdominal skin of a mammal and a band of fat tissue is located in parallel to the linea alba in the parietal side of the abdominal wall of a rat. In this fat band a primo vessel runs parallel to the prominent blood vessels in the fat band and is located just inside the parietal peritoneum. About the second question on the reason why the PVS was not in conventional histological study the current work provided the answer. Histological analysis with hematoxyline and eosine, Masson's trichrome, and Toluidine blue could not discriminate the primo vessel even when we knew the location of the PVS by the trace of the FNPs. This clearly explains why the PVS is hard to observe in conventional histology: it is not a matter of resolution but the contrast. The PVS has very similar structure to the connective tissues that surround the PVS. In the current work we propose a method to find the PVS: Observation of mast cell distribution with toluidine blue staining and the PN has a high density of mast cells, while the lymph node has low density.

  5. The impact of adverse events on health care costs for older adults undergoing nonelective abdominal surgery

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Jonathan G.; Davis, Philip J.B.; Levy, Adrian R.; Molinari, Michele; Johnson, Paul M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Postoperative complications have been identified as an important and potentially preventable cause of increased hospital costs. While older adults are at increased risk of experiencing complications and other adverse events, very little research has specifically examined how these events impact inpatient costs. We sought to examine the association between postoperative complications, hospital mortality and loss of independence and direct inpatient health care costs in patients 70 years or older who underwent nonelective abdominal surgery. Methods We prospectively enrolled consecutive patients 70 years or older who underwent nonelective abdominal surgery between July 1, 2011, and Sept. 30, 2012. Detailed patient-level data were collected regarding demographics, diagnosis, treatment and outcomes. Patient-level resource tracking was used to calculate direct hospital costs (2012 $CDN). We examined the association between complications, hospital mortality and loss of independence cost using multiple linear regression. Results During the study period 212 patients underwent surgery. Overall, 51.9% of patients experienced a nonfatal complication (32.5% minor and 19.4% major), 6.6% died in hospital and 22.6% experienced a loss of independence. On multivariate analysis nonfatal complications (p < 0.001), hospital mortality (p = 0.021) and loss of independence at discharge (p < 0.001) were independently associated with health care costs. These adverse events respectively accounted for 30%, 4% and 10% of the total costs of hospital care. Conclusion Adverse events were common after abdominal surgery in older adults and accounted for 44% of overall costs. This represents a substantial opportunity for better patient outcomes and cost savings with quality improvement strategies tailored to the needs of this high-risk surgical population. PMID:26999476

  6. Impact of respiratory therapy in vital capacity and functionality of patients undergoing abdominal surgery

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Shanlley Cristina da Silva; dos Santos, Rafaella Souza; Giovanetti, Erica Albanez; Taniguchi, Corinne; Silva, Cilene Saghabi de Medeiros; Eid, Raquel Afonso Caserta; Timenetsky, Karina Tavares; Carnieli-Cazati, Denise

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective To evaluate the vital capacity after two chest therapy techniques in patients undergoing abdominal surgical. Methods A prospective randomized study carried out with patients admitted to the Intensive Care Unit after abdominal surgery. We checked vital capacity, muscular strength using the Medical Research Council scale, and functionality with the Functional Independence Measure the first time the patient was breathing spontaneously (D1), and also upon discharge from the Intensive Care Unit (Ddis). Between D1 and Ddis, respiratory therapy was carried out according to the randomized group. Results We included 38 patients, 20 randomized to Positive Intermittent Pressure Group and 18 to Volumetric Incentive Spirometer Group. There was no significant gain related to vital capacity of D1 and Ddis of Positive Intermittent Pressure Group (mean 1,410mL±547.2 versus 1,809mL±692.3; p=0.979), as in the Volumetric Incentive Spirometer Group (1,408.3mL±419.1 versus 1,838.8mL±621.3; p=0.889). We observed a significant improvement in vital capacity in D1 (p<0.001) and Ddis (p<0.001) and in the Functional Independence Measure (p<0.001) after respiratory therapy. The vital capacity improvement was not associated with gain of muscle strength. Conclusion Chest therapy, with positive pressure and volumetric incentive spirometer, was effective in improving vital capacity of patients submitted to abdominal surgery. PMID:27462894

  7. The association between frequent alcohol drinking and opioid consumption after abdominal surgery: A retrospective analysis

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Hsin-I; Cheng, Chih-Wen; Lin, Ta-Wei; Chen, Chien-Chuan; Lin, Chia-Shiang

    2017-01-01

    Aims It is perceived that patients with a history of frequent alcohol consumption require more opioids for postoperative pain control and experience less postoperative nausea and vomiting than patients without such a history. However, there is scarce evidence supporting this notion. The aim of this study was to assess association between frequent alcohol consumption and opioid requirement for postoperative pain control and occurrence of postoperative nausea and vomiting. Methods The medical records for 4143 patients using intravenous patient-control analgesia with opioids after abdominal surgery between January 2010 and September 2013 were obtained, and associations were sought between the cumulative opioid consumption (in intravenous morphine equivalence) per body weight (mg/kg) in the first 2 days after abdominal operation and several demographic and clinical variables by multiple regression analysis. The association between the occurrence of postoperative nausea and vomiting and several demographic and clinical variables was also sought by multiple logistic regression analysis. Results Frequent alcohol drinking, among other previously reported factors, was associated with increased opioid consumption for postoperative pain control (p < 0.001). The estimate effect of frequent alcohol drinking was 0.117 mg/kg. Frequent alcohol drinking was also associated with decreased risks of postoperative nausea (odds ratio = 0.59, p = 0.003) and vomiting (odds ratio = 0.49, p = 0.026). Conclusions Frequent alcohol drinking was associated with increased opioid consumption for postoperative pain control and decreased risks of postoperative nausea and vomiting after abdominal surgery. PMID:28301483

  8. Intensity modulated radiation-therapy for preoperative posterior abdominal wall irradiation of retroperitoneal liposarcomas

    SciTech Connect

    Bossi, Alberto . E-mail: alberto.bossi@uz.kuleuven.ac.be; De Wever, Ivo; Van Limbergen, Erik; Vanstraelen, Bianca

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Preoperative external-beam radiation therapy (preop RT) in the management of Retroperitoneal Liposarcomas (RPLS) typically involves the delivery of radiation to the entire tumor mass: yet this may not be necessary. The purpose of this study is to evaluate a new strategy of preop RT for RPLS in which the target volume is limited to the contact area between the tumoral mass and the posterior abdominal wall. Methods and Materials: Between June 2000 and Jan 2005, 18 patients with the diagnosis of RPLS have been treated following a pilot protocol of pre-op RT, 50 Gy in 25 fractions of 2 Gy/day. The Clinical Target Volume (CTV) has been limited to the posterior abdominal wall, region at higher risk for local relapse. A Three-Dimensional conformal (3D-CRT) and an Intensity Modulated (IMRT) plan were generated and compared; toxicity was reported following the National Cancer Institute (NCI) Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v3.0. Results: All patients completed the planned treatment and the acute toxicity was tolerable: 2 patients experienced Grade 3 and 1 Grade 2 anorexia while 2 patients developed Grade 2 nausea. IMRT allows a better sparing of the ipsilateral and the contralateral kidney. All tumors were successfully resected without major complications. At a median follow-up of 27 months 2 patients developed a local relapse and 1 lung metastasis. Conclusions: Our strategy of preop RT is feasible and well tolerated: the rate of resectability is not compromised by limiting the preop CTV to the posterior abdominal wall and a better critical-structures sparing is obtained with IMRT.

  9. A comparison of prosthetic materials used to repair abdominal wall defects.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, S D; Klamer, T W; Parteka, J J; Condon, R E

    1983-08-01

    A large abdominal wall hernia, not amenable to primary closure, may require insertion of a prosthesis. The ideal prosthesis maintains strength, is incorporated by surrounding tissues, and does not stimulate adhesions. These qualities vary among available synthetic prostheses. We tested tensile strength, bursting strength, and adhesion formation in response to six materials used in repair of abdominal wall hernias. Adult Sprague-Dawley rats (196) were randomly divided into a control group and six experimental groups. A 4 by 4 cm full-thickness resection of abdominal wall was closed with patches of polypropylene mesh (Marlex), polyglactin 910 mesh (Vicryl), expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (Gore-tex), Dacron-reinforced silicone rubber (Silastic), preserved human dura (PHD), or polypropylene mesh overlying gelatin film (Marlex and Gelfilm, respectively). In controls the 4 cm longitudinal full-thickness incisions were closed primarily. Seven rats randomly selected from each group were sacrificed after 1, 2, 4, and 8 weeks; bursting and tensile strength (tensiometer) and adhesion formation were assessed. There were no differences in bursting strength among the experimental groups at each testing period. Although bursting strength increased linearly with time it was significantly weaker than in controls at 1 and 8 weeks (P less than 0.05). Tensiometric data were inconclusive due to wide variability within the experimental groups. Adhesion formation was moderate to maximal at all evaluation periods for Marlex and Gore-tex. Early adhesion formation was minimal to moderate for both PHD and Vicryl, but later increased with PHD and decreased with Vicryl as this prosthesis was absorbed. No adhesions formed with Marlex and Gelfilm until the gelatin dissolved (1 week), after which the adhesion response was similar to that with Marlex alone. No adhesions formed after Silastic implantation, but graft extrusion and evisceration were common (75%). Controls had no adhesions at all

  10. Heavy Metal Bioaccumulation in an Atypical Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor of the Abdominal Wall.

    PubMed

    Roncati, Luca; Gatti, Antonietta Morena; Capitani, Federico; Barbolini, Giuseppe; Maiorana, Antonio; Palmieri, Beniamino

    2015-01-01

    Heavy metals are able to interfere with the function of vital cellular components. Besides in trace heavy metals, which are essential at low concentration for humans, there are heavy metals with a well-known toxic and oncogenic potential. In this study, for the first time in literature, we report the unique adulthood case of an atypical primitive neuroectodermal tumor of the abdominal wall, diagnosed by histology and immunohistochemistry, with the molecular hybridization support. The neoplasia occurred in a patient chronically exposed to a transdermal delivery of heavy metal salts (aluminum and bismuth), whose intracellular bioaccumulation has been revealed by elemental microanalysis.

  11. Short-term outcomes after laparoscopic colorectal surgery in patients with previous abdominal surgery: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Figueiredo, Marleny Novaes; Campos, Fabio Guilherme; D’Albuquerque, Luiz Augusto; Nahas, Sergio Carlos; Cecconello, Ivan; Panis, Yves

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To perform a systematic review focusing on short-term outcomes after colorectal surgery in patients with previous abdominal open surgery (PAOS). METHODS: A broad literature search was performed with the terms “colorectal”, “colectomy”, “PAOS”, “previous surgery” and “PAOS”. Studies were included if their topic was laparoscopic colorectal surgery in patients with PAOS, whether descriptive or comparative. Endpoints of interest were conversion rates, inadvertent enterotomy and morbidity. Analysis of articles was made according to Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses. RESULTS: From a total of 394 citations, 13 full-texts achieved selection criteria to be included in the study. Twelve of them compared patients with and without PAOS. All studies were retrospective and comparative and two were case-matched. The selected studies comprised a total of 5005 patients, 1865 with PAOS. Among the later, only 294 (16%) had history of a midline incision for previous gastrointestinal surgery. Conversion rates were significantly higher in 3 of 12 studies and inadvertent enterotomy during laparoscopy was more prevalent in 3 of 5 studies that disclosed this event. Morbidity was similar in the majority of studies. A quantitative analysis (meta-analysis) could not be performed due to heterogeneity of the studies. CONCLUSION: Conversion rates were slightly higher in PAOS groups, although not statistical significant in most studies. History of PAOS did not implicate in higher morbidity rates. PMID:27462396

  12. Pneumocephalus Following Thoracic Surgery with Posterior Chest Wall Resection.

    PubMed

    Müller, Ina; Tönnies, Mario; Pfannschmidt, Joachim; Kaiser, Dirk

    2015-12-01

    Pneumocephalus can be seen after head injury with fracture of the skull-base or in cerebral neoplasm, infection, or after intracranial or spinal surgery. We report on a 69-year-old male patient with pneumocephalus after right-sided lobectomy and en bloc resection of the chest wall for non-small-cell lung cancer. Postoperatively, the patient showed a reduced vigilance level with no response to pain stimuli and anisocoria. The CCT scan revealed an extensive pneumocephalus; following which, the patient underwent neurosurgery with laminectomy and ligature of the transected nerve roots. After operation the patient returned to his baseline mental status.

  13. Cardiopulmonary Effects of Constant-Rate Infusion of Lidocaine for Anesthesia during Abdominal Surgery in Goats.

    PubMed

    Malavasi, Lais M; Greene, Stephen A; Gay, John M; Grubb, Tammy L

    2016-01-01

    Lidocaine is commonly used in ruminants but has an anecdotal history of being toxic to goats. To evaluate lidocaine's effects on selected cardiopulmonary parameters. Isoflurane-anesthetized adult goats (n = 24) undergoing abdominal surgery received a loading dose of lidocaine (2.5 mg/kg) over 20 min followed by constant-rate infusion of lidocaine (100 μg/kg/min); control animals received saline instead of lidocaine. Data collected at predetermined time points during the 60-min surgery included heart rate, mean arterial blood pressure, pO2, and pCO2. According to Welch 2-sample t tests, cardiopulmonary variables did not differ between groups. For example, after administration of the loading dose, goats in the lidocaine group had a mean heart rate of 88 ± 28 bpm, mean arterial blood pressure of 70 ± 19 mm Hg, pCO2 of 65 ± 13 mm Hg, and pO2 of 212 ± 99 mm Hg; in the saline group, these values were 90 ± 16 bpm, 76 ± 12 mm Hg, 61 ± 9 mm Hg, and 209 ± 83 mm Hg, respectively. One goat in the saline group required an additional dose of butorphanol. Overall our findings indicate that, at the dose provided, intravenous lidocaine did not cause adverse cardiopulmonary effects in adult goats undergoing abdominal surgery. Adding lidocaine infusion during general anesthesia is an option for enhancing transoperative analgesia in goats.

  14. Cardiopulmonary Effects of Constant-Rate Infusion of Lidocaine for Anesthesia during Abdominal Surgery in Goats

    PubMed Central

    Malavasi, Lais M; Greene, Stephen A; Gay, John M; Grubb, Tammy L

    2016-01-01

    Lidocaine is commonly used in ruminants but has an anecdotal history of being toxic to goats. To evaluate lidocaine's effects on selected cardiopulmonary parameters. Isoflurane-anesthetized adult goats (n = 24) undergoing abdominal surgery received a loading dose of lidocaine (2.5 mg/kg) over 20 min followed by constant-rate infusion of lidocaine (100 μg/kg/min); control animals received saline instead of lidocaine. Data collected at predetermined time points during the 60-min surgery included heart rate, mean arterial blood pressure, pO2, and pCO2. According to Welch 2-sample t tests, cardiopulmonary variables did not differ between groups. For example, after administration of the loading dose, goats in the lidocaine group had a mean heart rate of 88 ± 28 bpm, mean arterial blood pressure of 70 ± 19 mm Hg, pCO2 of 65 ± 13 mm Hg, and pO2 of 212 ± 99 mm Hg; in the saline group, these values were 90 ± 16 bpm, 76 ± 12 mm Hg, 61 ± 9 mm Hg, and 209 ± 83 mm Hg, respectively. One goat in the saline group required an additional dose of butorphanol. Overall our findings indicate that, at the dose provided, intravenous lidocaine did not cause adverse cardiopulmonary effects in adult goats undergoing abdominal surgery. Adding lidocaine infusion during general anesthesia is an option for enhancing transoperative analgesia in goats. PMID:27423150

  15. Postoperative analgesic efficacy of epidural tramadol as adjutant to ropivacaine in adult upper abdominal surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Anil P.; Singh, Dharmraj; Singh, Yashpal; Jain, Gaurav

    2015-01-01

    Background: Postoperative pain control after major abdominal surgery is the prime concern of anesthesiologist. Among various methodologies, epidural analgesia is the most preferred technique because of the excellent quality of analgesia with minimum side-effects. Aim: The present study was designated to compare postoperative analgesic efficacy and safety of epidural tramadol as adjuvant to ropivacaine (0.2%) in adult upper abdominal surgery. Settings and Design: Prospective, randomized-controlled, double-blinded trial. Materials and Methods: Ninety patients planned for upper abdominal surgery under general anesthesia were randomized into three equal groups to receive epidural drug via epidural catheter at start of incisional wound closure: Group R to receive ropivacaine (0.2%); Group RT1 to receive tramadol 1 mg/kg with ropivacaine (0.2%); and RT2 to receive tramadol 2 mg/kg with ropivacaine (0.2%). Duration and quality of analgesia (visual analog scale [VAS] score), hemodynamic parameters, and adverse event were recorded and statistically analyzed. Statistical Analysis: One-way analysis of variance test, Fisher's exact test/Chi-square test, whichever appropriate. A P < 0.05 was considered significant. Results: Mean duration of analgesia after epidural bolus drug was significantly higher in Group RT2 (584 ± 58 min) when compared with RT1 (394 ± 46 min) or R Group (283 ± 35 min). VAS score was always lower in RT2 Group in comparison to other group during the study. Hemodynamic parameter remained stable in all three groups. Conclusion: We conclude that tramadol 2 mg/kg with ropivacaine (0.2%) provides more effective and longer-duration analgesia than tramadol 1 mg/kg with ropivacaine (0.2%). PMID:26712976

  16. Efficacy of postoperative continuous wound infiltration with local anesthetic after major abdominal surgery.

    PubMed

    Abadir, Adel R; Nicolas, Fred; Gharabawy, Ramiz; Shah, Trusha; Michael, Rafik

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the analgesic efficacy, safety, opioid sparing effects and improvement of respiratory function when using 0.2% ropivacaine continuous wound infiltration after major intra-abdominal surgery. Forty patients undergoing major intra-abdominal surgery requiring a midline incision of > or = 20 cm were enrolled into this IRB-approved, randomized, prospective controlled study. Group 1: 20 patients, parenteral analgesia (control group). Group II: 20 patients, with local anesthetic wound infiltration (pain pump group). At the end of the procedure, in the pain pump group of patients, a multi hole, 20-gauge catheter was inserted percutaneously, above the fascia. An initial dose of 10 ml of 0.2% ropivacaine was injected in the wound through the catheter. A device provided continuous delivery of 0.2% ropivacaine; the infusion was initiated at 6 ml/h for the following two days. The total "rescue" morphine and oxycodone/acetaminophen tablets administered were significantly lower in the pain pump group. At all time intervals, resting pain scores were significantly lower in the pain pump group when compared with the control group. However, at the 4-48 and 12-48 hours pain scores generated after leg raise and coughing, respectively, were significantly lower in group II. The patient vital capacities were insignificantly higher in group II. We conclude that after major abdominal surgery, infiltration and continuous wound instillation with 0.2% ropivacaine decreases postoperative pain, opioid requirements and oral analgesia. Early patient rehabilitation, hastening convalescence, and preventing respiratory complications are expected outcomes of this approach.

  17. Clinical application of navigation surgery using augmented reality in the abdominal field.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Tomoyoshi; Onda, Shinji; Yanaga, Katsuhiko; Suzuki, Naoki; Hattori, Asaki

    2015-04-01

    This article presents general principles and recent advancements in the clinical application of augmented reality-based navigation surgery (AR based NS) for abdominal procedures and includes a description of our clinical trial and subsequent outcomes. Moreover, current problems and future aspects are discussed. The development of AR-based NS in the abdomen is delayed compared with another field because of the problem of intraoperative organ deformations or the existence of established modalities. Although there are a few reports on the clinical use of AR-based NS for digestive surgery, sophisticated technologies in urology have often been reported. However, the rapid widespread use of video- or robot assisted surgeries requires this technology. We have worked to develop a system of AR-based NS for hepatobiliary and pancreatic surgery. Then we developed a short rigid scope that enables surgeons to obtain 3D view. We recently focused on pancreatic surgery, because intraoperative organ shifting is minimal. The position of each organ in overlaid image almost corresponded with that of the actual organ with about 5 mm of mean registration errors. Intraoperative information generated from this system provided us with useful navigation. However, AR-based NS has several problems to overcome such as organ deformity, evaluation of utility, portability or cost.

  18. Whole abdominal wall segmentation using augmented active shape models (AASM) with multi-atlas label fusion and level set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhoubing; Baucom, Rebeccah B.; Abramson, Richard G.; Poulose, Benjamin K.; Landman, Bennett A.

    2016-03-01

    The abdominal wall is an important structure differentiating subcutaneous and visceral compartments and intimately involved with maintaining abdominal structure. Segmentation of the whole abdominal wall on routinely acquired computed tomography (CT) scans remains challenging due to variations and complexities of the wall and surrounding tissues. In this study, we propose a slice-wise augmented active shape model (AASM) approach to robustly segment both the outer and inner surfaces of the abdominal wall. Multi-atlas label fusion (MALF) and level set (LS) techniques are integrated into the traditional ASM framework. The AASM approach globally optimizes the landmark updates in the presence of complicated underlying local anatomical contexts. The proposed approach was validated on 184 axial slices of 20 CT scans. The Hausdorff distance against the manual segmentation was significantly reduced using proposed approach compared to that using ASM, MALF, and LS individually. Our segmentation of the whole abdominal wall enables the subcutaneous and visceral fat measurement, with high correlation to the measurement derived from manual segmentation. This study presents the first generic algorithm that combines ASM, MALF, and LS, and demonstrates practical application for automatically capturing visceral and subcutaneous fat volumes.

  19. Whole Abdominal Wall Segmentation using Augmented Active Shape Models (AASM) with Multi-Atlas Label Fusion and Level Set

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhoubing; Baucom, Rebeccah B.; Abramson, Richard G.; Poulose, Benjamin K.; Landman, Bennett A.

    2016-01-01

    The abdominal wall is an important structure differentiating subcutaneous and visceral compartments and intimately involved with maintaining abdominal structure. Segmentation of the whole abdominal wall on routinely acquired computed tomography (CT) scans remains challenging due to variations and complexities of the wall and surrounding tissues. In this study, we propose a slice-wise augmented active shape model (AASM) approach to robustly segment both the outer and inner surfaces of the abdominal wall. Multi-atlas label fusion (MALF) and level set (LS) techniques are integrated into the traditional ASM framework. The AASM approach globally optimizes the landmark updates in the presence of complicated underlying local anatomical contexts. The proposed approach was validated on 184 axial slices of 20 CT scans. The Hausdorff distance against the manual segmentation was significantly reduced using proposed approach compared to that using ASM, MALF, and LS individually. Our segmentation of the whole abdominal wall enables the subcutaneous and visceral fat measurement, with high correlation to the measurement derived from manual segmentation. This study presents the first generic algorithm that combines ASM, MALF, and LS, and demonstrates practical application for automatically capturing visceral and subcutaneous fat volumes. PMID:27127333

  20. Invariant-based anisotropic constitutive models of the healthy and aneurysmal abdominal aortic wall.

    PubMed

    Basciano, C A; Kleinstreuer, C

    2009-02-01

    The arterial wall is a complex fiber-reinforced composite. Pathological conditions, such as aneurysms, significantly alter the mechanical response of the arterial wall, resulting in a loss of elasticity, enhanced anisotropy, and increased chances of mechanical failure. Invariant-based models of the healthy and aneurysmal abdominal aorta were constructed based on first principles and published experimental data with implementations for several numerical cases, as well as comparisons to current healthy and aneurysmal tissue data. Inherent limitations of a traditional invariant-based methodology are also discussed and compared to the models' ability to accurately reproduce experimental trends. The models capture the nonlinear and anisotropic mechanical responses of the two arterial sections and make reasonable predictions regarding the effects of alterations in healthy and diseased tissue histology. Additionally, the new models exhibit convex and anisotropic monotonically increasing energy contours (suggesting numerical stability) but have potentially the inherent limitations of a covariant theoretical framework. Although the traditional invariant framework exhibits significant covariance, the invariant terms utilized in the new models exhibited limited covariance and are able to accurately reproduce experimental trends. A streamlined implementation is also possible for future numerical investigations of fluid-structure interactions in abdominal aortic aneurysms.

  1. A clinically relevant in vivo model for the assessment of scaffold efficacy in abdominal wall reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Jeffrey CY; Burugapalli, Krishna; Huang, Yi-Shiang; Kelly, John L; Pandit, Abhay

    2016-01-01

    An animal model that allows for assessment of the degree of stretching or contraction of the implant area and the in vivo degradation properties of biological meshes is required to evaluate their performance in vivo. Adult New Zealand rabbits underwent full thickness subtotal unilateral rectus abdominis muscle excision and were reconstructed with the non-biodegradable Peri-Guard®, Prolene® or biodegradable Surgisis® meshes. Following 8 weeks of recovery, the anterior abdominal wall tissue samples were collected for measurement of the implant dimensions. The Peri-Guard and Prolene meshes showed a slight and obvious shrinkage, respectively, whereas the Surgisis mesh showed stretching, resulting in hernia formation. Surgisis meshes showed in vivo biodegradation and increased collagen formation. This surgical rabbit model for abdominal wall defects is advantageous for evaluating the in vivo behaviour of surgical meshes. Implant area stretching and shrinkage were detected corresponding to mesh properties, and histological analysis and stereological methods supported these findings. PMID:28228932

  2. Probabilistic noninvasive prediction of wall properties of abdominal aortic aneurysms using Bayesian regression.

    PubMed

    Biehler, Jonas; Kehl, Sebastian; Gee, Michael W; Schmies, Fadwa; Pelisek, Jaroslav; Maier, Andreas; Reeps, Christian; Eckstein, Hans-Henning; Wall, Wolfgang A

    2017-02-01

    Multiple patient-specific parameters, such as wall thickness, wall strength, and constitutive properties, are required for the computational assessment of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) rupture risk. Unfortunately, many of these quantities are not easily accessible and could only be determined by invasive procedures, rendering a computational rupture risk assessment obsolete. This study investigates two different approaches to predict these quantities using regression models in combination with a multitude of noninvasively accessible, explanatory variables. We have gathered a large dataset comprising tensile tests performed with AAA specimens and supplementary patient information based on blood analysis, the patients medical history, and geometric features of the AAAs. Using this unique database, we harness the capability of state-of-the-art Bayesian regression techniques to infer probabilistic models for multiple quantities of interest. After a brief presentation of our experimental results, we show that we can effectively reduce the predictive uncertainty in the assessment of several patient-specific parameters, most importantly in thickness and failure strength of the AAA wall. Thereby, the more elaborate Bayesian regression approach based on Gaussian processes consistently outperforms standard linear regression. Moreover, our study contains a comparison to a previously proposed model for the wall strength.

  3. Major Abdominal Surgery Increases Plasma Levels of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor

    PubMed Central

    Belizon, Avraham; Balik, Emre; Feingold, Daniel L.; Bessler, Marc; Arnell, Tracey D.; Forde, Kenneth A.; Horst, Patrick K.; Jain, Suvinit; Cekic, Vesna; Kirman, Irena; Whelan, Richard L.

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a potent inducer of angiogenesis that is necessary for wound healing and also promotes tumor growth. It is anticipated that plasma levels would increase after major surgery and that such elevations may facilitate tumor growth. This study's purpose was to determine plasma VEGF levels before and early after major open and minimally invasive abdominal surgery. Methods: Colorectal resection for cancer (n = 139) or benign pathology (n = 48) and gastric bypass for morbid obesity (n = 40) were assessed. Similar numbers of open and laparoscopic patients were studied for each indication. Plasma samples were obtained preoperatively and on postoperative days (POD) 1 and 3. VEGF levels were determined via ELISA. The following statistical methods were used: Fisher exact test, unmatched Student t test, Wilcoxon's matched pairs test, and the Mann Whitney U Test with P < 0.05 considered significant. Results: The mean preoperative VEGF level of the cancer patients was significantly higher than baseline level of benign colon patients. Regardless of indication or surgical method, on POD3, significantly elevated mean VEGF levels were noted for each subgroup. In addition, on POD1, open surgery patients for all 3 indications had significantly elevated VEGF levels; no POD1 differences were noted for the closed surgery patients. At each postoperative time point for each procedure and indication, the open group's VEGF levels were significantly higher than that of the matching laparoscopic group. VEGF elevations correlated with incision length for each indication. Conclusion: As a group colon cancer patients prior to surgery have significantly higher mean VEGF levels than patients without tumors. Also, both open and closed colorectal resection and gastric bypass are associated with significantly elevated plasma VEGF levels early after surgery. This elevation is significantly greater and occurs earlier in open surgery patients. The

  4. Techniques for Abdominal Wall Closure after Damage Control Laparotomy: From Temporary Abdominal Closure to Early/Delayed Fascial Closure—A Review

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Qian; Li, Jieshou; Lau, Wan-yee

    2016-01-01

    Open abdomen (OA) has been an effective treatment for abdominal catastrophes in traumatic and general surgery. However, management of patients with OA remains a formidable task for surgeons. The central goal of OA is closure of fascial defect as early as is clinically feasible without precipitating abdominal compartment syndrome. Historically, techniques such as packing, mesh, and vacuum-assisted closure have been developed to assist temporary abdominal closure, and techniques such as components separation, mesh-mediated traction, bridging fascial defect with permanent synthetic mesh, or biologic mesh have also been attempted to achieve early primary fascial closure, either alone or in combined use. The objective of this review is to present the challenges of these techniques for OA with a goal of early primary fascial closure, when the patient's physiological condition allows. PMID:26819597

  5. Nuclear cardiac ejection fraction and cardiac index in abdominal aortic surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Fiser, W.P.; Thompson, B.W.; Thompson, A.R.; Eason, C.; Read, R.C.

    1983-11-01

    Since atherosclerotic heart disease results in more than half of the perioperative deaths that follow abdominal aortic surgery, a prospective protocol was designed for preoperative evaluation and intraoperative hemodynamic monitoring. Twenty men who were prepared to undergo elective operation for aortoiliac occlusive disease (12 patients) and abdominal aortic aneurysm (eight patients) were evaluated with a cardiac scan and right heart catheterization. The night prior to operation, each patient received volume loading with crystalloid based upon ventricular performance curves. At the time of the operation, all patients were anesthetized with narcotics and nitrous oxide, and hemodynamic parameters were recorded throughout the operation. Aortic crossclamping resulted in a marked depression in CI in all patients. CI remained depressed after unclamping in the majority of patients. There were two perioperative deaths, both from myocardial infarction or failure. Both patients had ejection fractions less than 30% and initial CIs less than 2 L/M2, while the survivors' mean ejection fraction was 63% +/- 1 and their mean CI was 3.2 L/M2 +/- 0.6. The authors conclude that preoperative evaluation of ejection fraction can select those patients at a high risk of cardiac death from abdominal aortic operation. These patients should receive intensive preoperative monitoring with enhancement of ventricular performance.

  6. Effectiveness of laparoscopic gonadectomy using abdominal wall lift method on Turner's syndrome patients with 45, X/46, XY mosaicism.

    PubMed

    Nakano, H; Kawashima, M; Okada, S; Igarashi, T; Nakata, M; Ogino, M

    2001-04-01

    We present a Turner's syndrome patient with a 45, X/46, XY mosaicism who underwent a prophylactic laparoscopic gonadectomy using the abdominal wall lift method. The patient was a 14-year-old phenotypic girl who was referred for an examination of primary amenorrhea. She had already been found to have Turner's syndrome with 45, X/46, XY mosaicism. After an extensive discussion with the patient and her family regarding her high risk for developing a gonadoblastoma, a laparoscopic bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy using the abdominal wall-life method was performed. Laparoscopy using the abdominal wall lift method has an advantage over CO2 pneumoperitoneum method for patients with Turner's syndrome when it is difficult to intubate because of a webbed neck or a shortened trachea.

  7. Functional electrical stimulation to the abdominal wall muscles synchronized with the expiratory flow does not induce muscle fatigue

    PubMed Central

    Okuno, Yukako; Takahashi, Ryoichi; Sewa, Yoko; Ohse, Hirotaka; Imura, Shigeyuki; Tomita, Kazuhide

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] Continuous electrical stimulation of abdominal wall muscles is known to induce mild muscle fatigue. However, it is not clear whether this is also true for functional electrical stimulation delivered only during the expiratory phase of breathing. This study aimed to examine whether or not intermittent electrical stimulation delivered to abdominal wall muscles induces muscle fatigue. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were nine healthy adults. Abdominal electrical stimulation was applied for 1.5 seconds from the start of expiration and then turned off during inspiration. The electrodes were attached to both sides of the abdomen at the lower margin of the 12th rib. Abdominal electrical stimulation was delivered for 15 minutes with the subject in a seated position. Expiratory flow was measured during stimulus. Trunk flexor torque and electromyography activity were measured to evaluate abdominal muscle fatigue. [Results] The mean stimulation on/off ratio was 1:2.3. The declining rate of abdominal muscle torque was 61.1 ± 19.1% before stimulus and 56.5 ± 20.9% after stimulus, not significantly different. The declining rate of mean power frequency was 47.8 ± 11.7% before stimulus and 47.9 ± 10.2% after stimulus, not significantly different. [Conclusion] It was found that intermittent electrical stimulation to abdominal muscles synchronized with the expiratory would not induce muscle fatigue. PMID:28356636

  8. Functional electrical stimulation to the abdominal wall muscles synchronized with the expiratory flow does not induce muscle fatigue.

    PubMed

    Okuno, Yukako; Takahashi, Ryoichi; Sewa, Yoko; Ohse, Hirotaka; Imura, Shigeyuki; Tomita, Kazuhide

    2017-03-01

    [Purpose] Continuous electrical stimulation of abdominal wall muscles is known to induce mild muscle fatigue. However, it is not clear whether this is also true for functional electrical stimulation delivered only during the expiratory phase of breathing. This study aimed to examine whether or not intermittent electrical stimulation delivered to abdominal wall muscles induces muscle fatigue. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were nine healthy adults. Abdominal electrical stimulation was applied for 1.5 seconds from the start of expiration and then turned off during inspiration. The electrodes were attached to both sides of the abdomen at the lower margin of the 12th rib. Abdominal electrical stimulation was delivered for 15 minutes with the subject in a seated position. Expiratory flow was measured during stimulus. Trunk flexor torque and electromyography activity were measured to evaluate abdominal muscle fatigue. [Results] The mean stimulation on/off ratio was 1:2.3. The declining rate of abdominal muscle torque was 61.1 ± 19.1% before stimulus and 56.5 ± 20.9% after stimulus, not significantly different. The declining rate of mean power frequency was 47.8 ± 11.7% before stimulus and 47.9 ± 10.2% after stimulus, not significantly different. [Conclusion] It was found that intermittent electrical stimulation to abdominal muscles synchronized with the expiratory would not induce muscle fatigue.

  9. ACUTE TEARING OF THE OBLIQUE ABDOMINAL WALL INSERTION ONTO THE ILIAC CREST IN AN AUSTRALIAN FOOTBALL PLAYER: A CASE REPORT

    PubMed Central

    Stockden, Marshall; Breidahl, Bill

    2016-01-01

    Background Tears of the abdominal obliques have previously been reported in the vicinity of the lower ribs but they have not been reported in the vicinity of the iliac crest. The purpose of this case report is to describe the mechanism of injury and diagnosis of a distal abdominal oblique tear and subsequent rehabilitation programming. Case Description A 21-year-old male Australian football player experienced acute right-sided abdominal pain during a game while performing a commonly executed rotation skill. He was assessed clinically before being further examined with ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging which revealed a rupture of the abdominal oblique wall at its insertion onto the iliac crest. The player then underwent a structured and graduated rehabilitation program with clear key performance indicators to optimize return to play and prevent recurrence. Outcomes The player was able to return to play at 35 days post injury and had no recurrence or complications at 12 month follow up post injury. Discussion This is the first time an abdominal oblique wall rupture at its insertion onto the iliac crest has been reported. In players with acute abdominal pain following twisting an insertional oblique tear should be considered as a differential diagnosis. A structured rehabilitation program may also help optimize an athlete's return to play after distal abdominal oblique rupture. PMID:27999726

  10. Improving the provision of driving advice on discharge after abdominal surgery.

    PubMed

    Buss, Imogen; Gould, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Ensuring the safety of patients is a vital duty of a doctor. It is their responsibility to advise patients about activity limitations on discharge from hospital. This study aims to assess the current provision of driving advice for patients after abdominal surgery and institute improvements to this provision of information in North Bristol NHS Trust. A preliminary questionnaire ascertained current doctor's knowledge regarding limitations of driving postoperatively and whether information was communicated to patients. Baseline retrospective data were collected from electronic discharge summaries to determine documentation of advice provision. Educational interventions were introduced, followed by data collection after each intervention. Initial questionnaires demonstrated poor knowledge amongst doctors and a lack of provision of driving advice postoperatively. After multiple educational interventions, the provision of driving advice on electronic discharge summaries increased from 0% (0) at baseline to 75% (9). Initially, the provision of driving advice postoperatively was poorly documented for inpatients undergoing abdominal surgery; following multiple educational interventions, the provision of written advice improved. Future plans include the introduction of prewritten sentences onto the electronic discharge summaries to facilitate ease of information provision and a reaudit in 12 months.

  11. A randomized-clinical trial examining a neoprene abdominal binder in gynecologic surgery patients

    PubMed Central

    Szender, J.B.; Hall, K.L.; Kost, E.R.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Purpose of Investigation Pain control and early ambulation are two important postoperative goals. Strategies that decrease morphine use while increasing ambulation have the potential to decrease postoperative complications. In this study the authors sought to determine the effect of an abdominopelvic binder on postoperative morphine use, pain, and ambulation in the first day after surgery. Materials and Methods The authors randomly assigned 75 patients undergoing abdominal gynecologic surgery to either binder or not after surgery. Demographic data and surgical characteristics were collected. Outcome variables included morphine use, pain score, time to ambulation, and number of ambulations. Results A group at high risk for decreased mobility was identified and the binder increased the number of ambulatory events by 300%, 260%, and 240% in patients with vertical incisions, age over 50 years, and complex surgeries, respectively. Morphine use and pain scores were not significantly different. Conclusion The binder increased ambulations in the subset of patients at the highest risk for postoperative complications: elderly, cancer patients, and vertical incisions. Routine use of the binder may benefit particularly high-risk gynecologic surgical patients. PMID:25864252

  12. Necrotizing cellulitis of the abdominal wall, caused by Pediococcus sp., due to rupture of a retroperitoneal stromal cell tumor

    PubMed Central

    Michalopoulos, Nick; Arampatzi, Stergiani; Papavramidis, Theodossis S.; Kotidis, Efstathios; Laskou, Styliani; Papavramidis, Spiros T.

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Soft tissue necrotizing infections are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study is to present a patient with necrotizing infection of abdominal wall resulting from the rupture of a retroperitoneal stromal tumor. PRESENTATION OF CASE We present a 60-year-old Caucasian male patient with necrotizing infection of abdominal wall secondary to the rupture of a retroperitoneal stromal tumor. The patient was initially treated with debridement and fasciotomy of the anterior abdominal wall. Laparotomy revealed purulent peritonitis caused by infiltration and rupture of the splenic flexure by the tumor. Despite prompt intervention the patient died 19 days later. The isolated microorganism causing the infection was the rarely identified as cause of infections in humans Pediococcus sp., a gram-positive, catalase-negative coccus. DISCUSSION Necrotizing infections of abdominal wall are usually secondary either to perineal or to intra-abdominal infections. Gastrointestinal stromal cell tumors could be rarely complicated with perforation and abscess formation. In our case, the infiltrated by the extra-gastrointestinal stromal cell tumor ruptured colon was the source of the infection. The pediococci are rarely isolated as the cause of severe septicemia. CONCLUSION Ruptured retroperitoneal stromal cell tumors are extremely rare cause of necrotizing fasciitis, and before this case, Pediococcus sp. has never been isolated as the responsible agent. PMID:23357010

  13. Women's sexual behavior, body image and satisfaction with surgical outcomes after hysterectomy: a comparison of vaginal and abdominal surgery.

    PubMed

    Gütl, P; Greimel, E R; Roth, R; Winter, R

    2002-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of vaginal and abdominal hysterectomy on women's sexual behavior, sexual dysfunction, body image and satisfaction with surgery. A prospective study was conducted on 90 women to evaluate the outcomes of hysterectomy. Data were collected prior to surgery, three months and two years after surgery, using self-report questionnaires. The results showed significant differences in women's sexual behavior and sexual dysfunction before and after hysterectomy, independent of the surgical procedure performed. Women in both groups reported improvements in sexual desire, sexual activity and sexual intercourse three months and two years after surgery. Sexual dysfunction such as dyspareunia, vaginismus, lack of orgasm and loss of sexual interest diminished significantly after surgery. Regression analyses revealed that postmenopausal status, severity of gynecological complaints and frequency of sexual intercourse were the most important factors for improved sexual outcomes. Women in the abdominal group were dissatisfied with their body image because of the abdominal scar, experienced more pain and had a longer period of recovery from surgery compared to women in the vaginal group. According to the results, sexual behavior alone is not an important factor in choosing vaginal or abdominal hysterectomy. However, sexual behavior was important in both groups when evaluating outcomes after hysterectomy.

  14. Reconstruction of large-size abdominal wall defect using biodegradable poly-p-dioxanone mesh: an experimental canine study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Reconstruction of large-size abdominal wall defect (AWDs) is a huge challenge faced in current surgical practice. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of biodegradable poly-p-dioxanone (PDO) mesh for reconstructing large-size AWDs in an experimental canine model. Methods Eighteen experimental canines were randomly and equally divided into three groups, namely, a PDO group, a Marlex group and a control group (n = 6 each). Following the creation of a 6 cm × 5.5 cm AWD, PDO mesh and Marlex mesh were used to reconstruct the defect in the PDO and Marlex groups, respectively. The defect was closed using relaxation sutures alone in the control group. Animals were killed 24 weeks after surgery, and reconstruction outcomes were evaluated using radiography, histology and biomechanical testing. Results All animals except those in the control group survived the experiment. The PDO group showed no wound dehiscence, herniation or infection, whereas the animals in the Marlex group exhibited marked foreign body reactions. The PDO group had less intraabdominal adhesion than the Marlex group. As shown by radiography, histology and biomechanical testing, PDO mesh exhibited complete degradation and favorable biochemical strength at 24 weeks postsurgery. Conclusions PDO mesh implantation is an effective, safe treatment modality for reconstructing large-size AWDs. PMID:24625138

  15. [Intra-abdominal hypertension as a consequence of plasty in the abdominal wall defects, the methods of its determination and prophylaxis].

    PubMed

    Vorovs'kyĭ, O O

    2013-09-01

    The results of various methods of investigation of intraabdominal hypertension (IAH) in 186 patients were analyzed. In 134 (27.1%) patients IAH was measured via bladder, in 46 (8.9%)--the investigation using nasogastric probe was added and in 8 (1.6%), in whom the abdominal wall defect coincided with adhesive disease, the measurement was performed immediately via drainages. In 44 (8.9%) patients the IAH measurement while abdominal wall defect closure was performed, using Stryker Intra Compartmental Pressure Monitor apparatus. The data obtained using this apparatus were considered the most informative. For the IAH prophylaxis it is mandatory to prognosticate the intraabdominal pressure raising, so on the stage of the hernia gates edges approximation it must not be bigger than a second degree level.

  16. Evaluation of porcine dermal collagen (Permacol) used in abdominal wall reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Patrick W; Salgado, Christopher J; Kent, Kathryn; Finnegan, Matthew; Pello, Mark; Simons, Robert; Atabek, Umur; Kann, Brian

    2009-11-01

    Various methods have been employed to reconstruct complex abdominal wall defects. Structural prosthetic materials such as polypropylene mesh and ePTFE (expanded polytetrafluoroethylene) have been widely used to close these large fascial defects, however, complications with infection and adhesions have led to the recent use of more biocompatible implants. Permacol (acellular porcine dermis) is used as a dermal scaffold, which eventually becomes vascularised and remodelled to reconstruct the abdominal wall in these complex patients. A retrospective review was performed of all patients who underwent consecutive abdominal wall reconstruction with Permacol at our institution in the year 2006. Twenty-eight patients were identified and included in our study. Factors evaluated were: body mass index, relevant co-morbidities, aetiology of hernia, hernia defect size based on CT scan and intraoperative measurement, size of Permacol implant, length of hospital stay, and postoperative complications. Surgical technique was standardised among six surgeons and involved a single layer of acellular porcine dermis as a subfascial 'underlay' graft under moderate tension upon maximal hernia reduction. Tissue expanders were not required for skin closure. Out of 28 patients, 12 were male and 16 were female. Mean intraoperative hernia size was 150 cm(2) (range of 10 cm(2) to 600 cm(2)). Mean age was 55 years with an average body mass index (BMI) of 34 (largest BMI of 61.4). Defects were attributed to either a previous laparotomy incision or open abdomen. Mean hospital stay was 9.67 days. At a mean follow-up of sixteen months, there were three recurrent hernias (10.7%) based on physical examination and postoperative CT scan evaluation. One patient developed a superficial wound dehiscence which was successfully treated with local wound care and one patient developed a cellulitis which was successfully treated with antibiotic therapy. Four patients (14.3%) developed a chronic, non

  17. Obesity increases the odds of acquiring and incarcerating noninguinal abdominal wall hernias.

    PubMed

    Lau, Briana; Kim, Hanjoo; Haigh, Philip I; Tejirian, Talar

    2012-10-01

    The current data available describing the relationship of obesity and abdominal wall hernias is sparse. The objective of this study was to investigate the current prevalence of noninguinal abdominal wall hernias and their correlation with body mass index (BMI) and other demographic risk factors. Patients with umbilical, incisional, ventral, epigastric, or Spigelian hernias with or without incarceration were identified using the regional database for 14 hospitals over a 3-year period. Patients were stratified based on their BMI. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to distinguish other significant risk factors associated with the hernias. Of 2,807,414 patients, 26,268 (0.9%) had one of the specified diagnoses. Average age of the patients was 52 years and 61 per cent were male. The majority of patients had nonincarcerated umbilical hernias (74%). Average BMI was 32 kg/m2. Compared with patients with a normal BMI, the odds of having a hernia increased with BMI: BMI of 25 to 29.9 kg/m2 odds ratio (OR) 1.63, BMI of 30 to 39.9 kg/m2 OR 2.62, BMI 40 to 49.9 kg/m2 OR 3.91, BMI 50 to 59.9 kg/m2 OR 4.85, and BMI greater than 60 kg/m2 OR 5.17 (P<0.0001). Age older than 50 years was associated with a higher risk for having a hernia (OR, 2.12; 95% [CI], 2.07 to 2.17), whereas female gender was associated with a lower risk (OR, 0.53; 95% CI, 0.52 to 0.55). Those with incarcerated hernias had a higher average BMI (32 kg/m2 vs 35 kg/m2; P<0.0001). Overall, BMI greater than 40 kg/m2 showed an increased chance of incarceration, and a BMI greater than 60 kg/m2 had the highest chance of incarceration, OR 12.7 (P<0.0001). Age older than 50 years and female gender were also associated with a higher risk of incarceration (OR, 1.28; 95% CI, 1.02 to 1.59 and OR, 1.80; CI, 1.45 to 2.24). Increasing BMI and increasing age are associated with a higher prevalence and an increased risk of incarceration of noninguinal abdominal wall hernias.

  18. Evaluation of the harmonic scalpel in open surgery for abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zeyu; Chen, Zhe; Peng, Lin

    2012-03-01

    The harmonic scalpel is a hemostatic device primarily designed for use in laparoscopic surgery. During the last few years, many surgeons have begun to use the harmonic scalpel in open surgery. Several papers have cited the benefits of the device compared with conventional knot-tying techniques; however, no evidence showing the advantages of using the harmonic scalpel in complicated abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) surgery has been presented. The aim of the present study is to determine the value of the harmonic scalpel in open operation for AAA. A total of 153 patients who underwent open surgery for AAA at the Department of Vascular Surgery of Guangdong General Hospital, China between January 2001 and December 2010, were retrospectively analyzed. Open surgery performed with the harmonic scalpel on 105 patients was compared with open operation using conventional knot-tying techniques on 48 patients. The operative time, intraoperative blood loss, total postoperative drainage fluid volumes, hospital stay, and postoperative complications between the two groups were compared. The harmonic scalpel group was associated with a shorter operation time (113.2 ± 23.6 min vs. 232.1 ± 39.2 min, P < 0.01) and lower intraoperative blood loss (126.1 ± 96.6 ml vs. 592.1 ± 207.2 ml, P < 0.01). Postoperative drainage fluid volumes were greater in the conventional surgery group than in the harmonic scalpel group (702.1 ± 192.8 ml vs. 198.5 ± 97.4 ml, P < 0.01). The hospital stay was shorter for the harmonic scalpel group than for the conventional surgery group (10.7 ± 3.3 d vs. 16.5 ± 4.7 d, P < 0.05). No differences between the postoperative complications or hospital mortality of the two groups were found. The harmonic scalpel is a safe and minimally invasive tool in open surgery for AAA and is associated with shorter operative time, shorter hospital stay, and lower intraoperative blood loss and postoperative drainage fluid volumes compared with conventional knot

  19. Perioperative intravenous lidocaine infusion on postoperative pain relief in patients undergoing upper abdominal surgery.

    PubMed

    Baral, B K; Bhattarai, B K; Rahman, T R; Singh, S N; Regmi, R

    2010-12-01

    Due to unpleasant nature and physiological consequences of postoperative pain, search of safe and effective modalities for its management has remained a subject of interest to clinical researchers. Analgesic action of lidocaine infusion in patients with chronic neuropathic pain is well known but its place in relieving postoperative pain is yet to be established. The study aimed to assess the effectiveness of perioperative intravenous lidocaine infusion on postoperative pain intensity and analgesic requirement. Sixty patients undergoing major upper abdominal surgery were recruited in this randomized double blinded study. Thirty patients received lidocaine 2.0% (intravenous bolus 1.5 mg/kg followed by an infusion of 1.5 mg/kg/h), and 30 patients received normal saline according to randomization. The infusion started 30 min before skin incision and stopped 1 h after the end of surgery. Postoperative pain intensity and analgesic (diclofenac) requirement were assessed at the interval 15 minutes for 1 hour then 4 hourly up to 24 hours. The pain intensity at rest and movement as well as the total postoperative analgesic (diclofenac) requirement were significantly lower (142.50 +/- 37.80 mg vs.185.00 +/- 41.31 mg, P<0.001) in lidocaine group. The extubation time was significantly longer in lidocaine group (14.43 +/- 3.50 minutes vs. 6.73 +/- 1.76 minutes, P<0.001). The time for the first dose of analgesic requirement was longer in lidocaine group (60.97 +/- 18.05 minutes vs.15.73 +/- 7.46 minutes, P<0.001). It can be concluded that perioperative infusion of low dose of lidocaine decreases the intensity of postoperative pain, reduces the postoperative analgesic consumption, without causing significant adverse effects in patients undergoing upper abdominal surgery.

  20. Comparison of clonidine and fentanyl as adjuvant to ropivacaine in spinal anesthesia in lower abdominal surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Sharan, Radhe; Verma, Rajan; Dhawan, Akshay; Kumar, Jugal

    2016-01-01

    Background: Ropivacaine, a newer local anesthetic, is gaining increased acceptance due to its improved safety profile over bupivacaine and lignocaine. Analgesic adjuvants have proved to be valuable in improving the quality of anesthesia and duration of analgesia. Aim: To compare the efficacy of clonidine and fentanyl as adjuvants to ropivacaine in spinal anesthesia in lower abdominal surgeries. Materials and Methods: A randomized, double-blind control study was carried out in 100 patients who were randomly divided into two groups. Ropivacaine-clonidine group (RC) received 30 μg of clonidine with 18.75 mg of 0.75% isobaric ropivacaine, Ropivacaine-fentanyl group (RF) received 25 μg of fentanyl with 18.75 mg of 0.75% isobaric ropivacaine intrathecally. The onset and duration of sensory and motor block, hemodynamic parameters, quality of surgical analgesia, total analgesia time, sedation score, and side effects were statistically analyzed using SPSS statistical package, paired and unpaired t-tests and Chi-square test. Results: The duration of sensory block in RC (240.00 ± 20.99), RF (196.80 ± 18.34), and motor block in RC (192.20 ± 17.36), RF (139.20 ± 17.93) outlasted the duration of surgery. In clonidine group, there was significant prolongation of sensory block, motor block and the total analgesia time. Hypotension and bradycardia occurred more commonly in RC group, whereas pruritus was more in RF group. Conclusion: Ropivacaine when combined with either clonidine or fentanyl provided an adequate subarachnoid block for lower abdominal surgeries. As an adjuvant, clonidine has advantage over fentanyl as it increased the duration of the subarachnoid block and the postoperative analgesia. PMID:27746546

  1. Examinations of a new long-term degradable electrospun polycaprolactone scaffold in three rat abdominal wall models.

    PubMed

    Jangö, Hanna; Gräs, Søren; Christensen, Lise; Lose, Gunnar

    2017-02-01

    Alternative approaches to reinforce native tissue in reconstructive surgery for pelvic organ prolapse are warranted. Tissue engineering combines the use of a scaffold with the regenerative potential of stem cells and is a promising new concept in urogynecology. Our objective was to evaluate whether a newly developed long-term degradable polycaprolactone scaffold could provide biomechanical reinforcement and function as a scaffold for autologous muscle fiber fragments. We performed a study with three different rat abdominal wall models where the scaffold with or without muscle fiber fragments was placed (1) subcutaneously (minimal load), (2) in a partial defect (partial load), and (3) in a full-thickness defect (heavy load). After 8 weeks, no animals had developed hernia, and the scaffold provided biomechanical reinforcement, even in the models where it was subjected to heavy load. The scaffold was not yet degraded but showed increased thickness in all groups. Histologically, we found a massive foreign body response with numerous large giant cells intermingled with the fibers of the scaffold. Cells from added muscle fiber fragments could not be traced by PKH26 fluorescence or desmin staining. Taken together, the long-term degradable polycaprolactone scaffold provided biomechanical reinforcement by inducing a marked foreign-body response and attracting numerous inflammatory cells to form a strong neo-tissue construct. However, cells from the muscle fiber fragments did not survive in this milieu. Properties of the new neo-tissue construct must be evaluated at the time of full degradation of the scaffold before its possible clinical value in pelvic organ prolapse surgery can be evaluated.

  2. Reconstruction of the Abdominal Wall in Anatomical Plans. Pre- and Postoperative Keys in Repairing “Cold” Incisional Hernias

    PubMed Central

    POPA, FLORINA; ROSCA, OANA; GEORGESCU, ALEXANDRU; CANNISTRA, CLAUDIO

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims The clinical results of the vertical “vest-over-pants” Mayo repair were evaluated, and the risk factors for incisional hernia recurrence were studied. The purpose of this study is to point out the importance of reducing pre and post operative risk factors in the incisional hernia repair process in order to achieve a physiologically normal abdominal wall. Methods Twenty patients diagnosed with incisional hernia underwent an abdominal reconstruction procedure using the Mayo (Paletot) technique at Bichat Claude Bernard Hospital between 2005 and 2015. All procedures were performed by a single surgeon and all patients were pre-operatively prepared, identifying all coexisting conditions and treating them accordingly before undergoing surgery. Results All patients underwent at least one surgical operation before the hernia repair procedure and a quarter had experienced at least three, prior to this one. Nine patients had a body mass index of >30 kg/m2. Additional risk factors and comorbidities included obesity in 45%, diabetes mellitus in 10%, smoking in 55%, and high blood pressure in 40%. Hernia defect width was from 3 cm (25% F) to 15 cm (5% M) of which nine patients (45%) had a 10 cm defect. Most of the patients had an average hospitalization of 7 days. The patients were carefully monitored and were called on periodic consultations after 3, 6, and 12 months from the moment of the procedure. Patient feedback regarding hernia recurrence and complaints about the scar were noted. Physical examination is essential in determining the hernia recurrence therefore the scar was examined for any abnormalities that may have occurred, which was defined as any palpable or detected fascial defect located within seven centimeters of the hernia repair. Post-operative complications: seroma formation, wound hematoma, superficial and deep wound infection, recurrences and chronic pain were followed and no complications were registered during the follow-up period

  3. Spontaneous extraskeletal osteosarcoma with various histological growth patterns in the abdominal wall of an ICR mouse

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Tsuyoshi; Katoh, Yoshitaka; Shimada, Yuko; Ohnuma-Koyama, Aya; Takahashi, Naofumi; Kuwahara, Maki; Harada, Takanori

    2015-01-01

    Extraskeletal osteosarcoma is extremely rare in mice. This case report demonstrates a spontaneous murine extraskeletal osteosarcoma that exhibited various histological growth patterns in an ICR mouse. At necropsy, the tumor mass was located in the abdominal wall and was 45 × 30 × 25 mm in size. Histopathologically, the tumor showed the following four growth patterns: a solid pattern of polygonal cells embedded in an osteoid eosinophilic matrix with calcification, an irregular sheet pattern of short spindle cells accompanying some eosinophilic multinucleated cells, a fascicular pattern of spindle cells and a cystic pattern lined by short spindle cells. Immunohistochemically, most of the tumor cells were positive for vimentin, proliferating cell nuclear antigen and osterix. The multinucleated cells mentioned above were desmin positive and were regarded as regenerative striated muscles but not tumor cells. Since no clear continuity with normal bone tissues was observed, the tumor was diagnosed as an “extraskeletal osteosarcoma.” PMID:26989300

  4. Effects of arterial blood flow on walls of the abdominal aorta: distributions of wall shear stress and oscillatory shear index determined by phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Sughimoto, Koichi; Shimamura, Yoshiaki; Tezuka, Chie; Tsubota, Ken'ichi; Liu, Hao; Okumura, Kenichiro; Masuda, Yoshitada; Haneishi, Hideaki

    2016-07-01

    Although abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) occur mostly inferior to the renal artery, the mechanism of the development of AAA in relation to its specific location is not yet clearly understood. The objective of this study was to evaluate the hypothesis that even healthy volunteers may manifest specific flow characteristics of blood flow and alter wall shear or oscillatory shear stress in the areas where AAAs commonly develop. Eight healthy male volunteers were enrolled in this prospective study, aged from 24 to 27. Phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed with electrocardiographic triggering. Flow-sensitive four-dimensional MR imaging of the abdominal aorta, with three-directional velocity encoding, including simple morphological image acquisition, was performed. Information on specific locations on the aortic wall was applied to the flow encodes to calculate wall shear stress (WSS) and oscillatory shear index (OSI). While time-framed WSS showed the highest peak of 1.14 ± 0.25 Pa in the juxtaposition of the renal artery, the WSS plateaued to 0.61 Pa at the anterior wall of the abdominal aorta. The OSI peaked distal to the renal arteries at the posterior wall of the abdominal aorta of 0.249 ± 0.148, and was constantly elevated in the whole abdominal aorta at more than 0.14. All subjects were found to have elevated OSI in regions where AAAs commonly occur. These findings indicate that areas of constant peaked oscillatory shear stress in the infra-renal aorta may be one of the factors that lead to morphological changes over time, even in healthy individuals.

  5. Isotropic 3D Black Blood MRI of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Wall and Intraluminal Thrombus

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Chengcheng; Haraldsson, Henrik; Faraji, Farshid; Owens, Christopher; Gasper, Warren; Ahn, Sinyeob; Liu, Jing; Laub, Gerhard; Hope, Michael D.; Saloner, David

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The aortic wall and intraluminal thrombus (ILT) have been increasingly studied as potential markers of progressive disease with abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs). Our goal was to develop a high resolution, 3D black blood MR technique for AAA wall and ILT imaging within a clinically acceptable scan time. Methods Twenty two patients with AAAs (maximal diameter 4.3±1.0cm), along with five healthy volunteers, were imaged at 3T with a 3D T1-weighted fast-spin-echo sequence using variable flip angle trains (SPACE) with a preparation pulse (DANTE) for suppressing blood signal. Volunteers and ten patients were also scanned with SPACE alone for comparison purposes. The signal to noise ratio (SNR) and the aortic wall/ILT to lumen contrast to noise ratio (CNR) were measured. Qualitative image scores (1–4 scale) assessing the inner lumen and outer wall boundaries of AAA were performed by two blinded reviewers. In patients with ILT, the ratio of ILT signal intensity (ILTSI) over psoas muscle SI (MuscleSI) was calculated, and the signal heterogeneity of ILT was quantified as standard deviation (SD) over the mean. Results All subjects were imaged successfully with an average scan time of 7.8±0.7 minutes. The DANTE preparation pulse for blood suppression substantially reduced flow artifacts in SPACE with lower lumen SNR (8.8 vs. 21.4, p<0.001) and improved the wall/ILT to lumen CNR (9.9 vs. 6.3, p<0.001) in patients. Qualitative assessment showed improved visualization of lumen boundaries (73% higher scores on average, p=0.01) and comparable visualization of outer wall boundary (p>0.05). ILT was present in ten patients, with relatively high signal and a wide SD (average ILTSI/MuscleSI 1.42±0.48 (range 0.75–2.11) ) and with SD/mean of 27.7%±6.6% (range 19.6% – 39.4%). Conclusion High resolution, 3D black blood MRI of AAAs can be achieved in a clinical accepted scan time with reduction of flow artifacts using the DANTE preparation pulse. Signal characteristics

  6. [Prevention of surgical site infection in abdominal surgery. A critical review of the evidence].

    PubMed

    Ruiz Tovar, Jaime; Badia, Josep M

    2014-04-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) is associated with prolonged hospital stay, increased morbidity, mortality and sanitary costs, and reduced patients quality of life. Many hospitals have adopted guidelines of scientifically-validated processes for prevention of surgical site and central-line catheter infections and sepsis. Most of these guidelines have resulted in an improvement in postoperative results. A review of the best available evidence on these measures in abdominal surgery is presented. The best measures are: avoidance of hair removal from the surgical field, skin decontamination with alcoholic antiseptic, correct use of antibiotic prophylaxis (administration within 30-60 min before incision, use of 1(st) or 2(nd) generation cephalosporins, single preoperative dosis, dosage adjustments based on body weight and renal function, intraoperative re-dosing if the duration of the procedure exceeds 2 half-lives of the drug or there is excessive blood loss), prevention of hypothermia, control of perioperative glucose levels, avoid blood transfusion and restrict intraoperative liquid infusion.

  7. Music intervention study in abdominal surgery patients: challenges of an intervention study in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Vaajoki, Anne; Pietilä, Anna-Maija; Kankkunen, Päivi; Vehviläinen-Julkunen, Katri

    2013-04-01

    Evidence-based nursing requires carefully designed interventions. This paper discusses methodological issues and explores practical solutions in the use of music intervention in pain management among adults after major abdominal surgery. There is a need to study nursing interventions that develop and test the effects of interventions to advanced clinical nursing knowledge and practice. There are challenges in carrying out intervention studies in clinical settings because of several interacting components and the length and complexity of the causal chains linking intervention with outcome. Intervention study is time-consuming and requires both researchers and participants' commitment to the study. Interdisciplinary and multiprofessional collaboration is also paramount. In this study, patients were allocated into the music group, in which patients listened to music 30 minutes at a time, or the control group, in which patients did not listen to any music during the same period.

  8. Damage control surgery in patient with delayed rupture of pseudoaneurysm after blunt abdominal trauma

    PubMed Central

    Park, Chan Yong; Ju, Jae Kyun

    2012-01-01

    Delayed rupture of post-traumatic pseudoaneurysms of the visceral arteries, especially the pancreaticoduodenal artery, is uncommon. Here, we describe a 55-year-old man hemorrhaging from a pseudoaneurysm of the inferior pancreaticoduodenal artery (IPDA). Computed tomography of the abdomen showed active bleeding in the IPDA and large amounts of hemoperitoneum and hemoretroperitoneum. Selective mesenteric angiography showed that the pseudoaneurysm arose from the IPDA, and treatment by angioembolization failed because the involved artery was too tortuous to fit with a catheter. Damage control surgery with surgical ligation and pad packing was successfully performed. The patient had an uncomplicated postoperative course and was discharged 19 days after the operation. To our knowledge, this is the first report of ruptured pseudoaneurysm of an IPDA after blunt abdominal trauma from Korea. PMID:22880189

  9. Damage control surgery in patient with delayed rupture of pseudoaneurysm after blunt abdominal trauma.

    PubMed

    Park, Chan Yong; Ju, Jae Kyun; Kim, Jung Chul

    2012-08-01

    Delayed rupture of post-traumatic pseudoaneurysms of the visceral arteries, especially the pancreaticoduodenal artery, is uncommon. Here, we describe a 55-year-old man hemorrhaging from a pseudoaneurysm of the inferior pancreaticoduodenal artery (IPDA). Computed tomography of the abdomen showed active bleeding in the IPDA and large amounts of hemoperitoneum and hemoretroperitoneum. Selective mesenteric angiography showed that the pseudoaneurysm arose from the IPDA, and treatment by angioembolization failed because the involved artery was too tortuous to fit with a catheter. Damage control surgery with surgical ligation and pad packing was successfully performed. The patient had an uncomplicated postoperative course and was discharged 19 days after the operation. To our knowledge, this is the first report of ruptured pseudoaneurysm of an IPDA after blunt abdominal trauma from Korea.

  10. Role of blood transfusion in organ system failure following major abdominal surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Maetani, S; Nishikawa, T; Tobe, T; Hirakawa, A

    1986-01-01

    Using multivariate probit analysis, the data of 565 patients who underwent major abdominal surgery were retrospectively analyzed, and the etiologic role of blood transfusion in organ system failure (OSF), which includes respiratory failure, gastrointestinal stress bleeding, renal failure, nonobstructive, nonhepatitic jaundice, and coagulopathy, was studied. Apart from the amount of blood transfusion, the following factors were included in the analysis as possible contributors to OSF: age, preoperative hematocrit, organ failure risk (diffuse peritonitis, obstructive cholangitis, liver cirrhosis, terminal cancer, and hemorrhagic shock), operative time, blood loss, and postoperative highest hematocrit. The results showed that, except for preoperative hematocrit, all the factors are statistically significant contributors, blood transfusion being the most significant. There was no statistically significant interaction between blood transfusion and organ failure risk. It is concluded that blood transfusion is an important, independent factor contributing to OSF, and its contribution cannot be attributed to the underlying conditions that require blood transfusion. PMID:3485412

  11. Abdominal wall reconstruction by a regionally distinct biocomposite of extracellular matrix digest and a biodegradable elastomer.

    PubMed

    Takanari, Keisuke; Hong, Yi; Hashizume, Ryotaro; Huber, Alexander; Amoroso, Nicholas J; D'Amore, Antonio; Badylak, Stephen F; Wagner, William R

    2016-09-01

    Current extracellular matrix (ECM) derived scaffolds offer promising regenerative responses in many settings, however in some applications there may be a desire for more robust and long lasting mechanical properties. A biohybrid composite material that offers both strength and bioactivity for optimal healing towards native tissue behavior may offer a solution to this problem. A regionally distinct biocomposite scaffold composed of a biodegradable elastomer (poly(ester urethane)urea) and porcine dermal ECM gel was generated to meet this need by a concurrent polymer electrospinning/ECM gel electrospraying technique where the electrosprayed component was varied temporally during the processing. A sandwich structure was achieved with polymer fiber rich upper and lower layers for structural support and an ECM-rich inner layer to encourage cell ingrowth. Increasing the upper and lower layer fiber content predictably increased tensile strength. In a rat full thickness abdominal wall defect model, the sandwich scaffold design maintained its thickness whereas control biohybrid scaffolds lacking the upper and lower fiber-rich regions failed at 8 weeks. Sandwich scaffold implants also showed higher collagen content 4 and 8 weeks after implantation, exhibited an increased M2 macrophage phenotype response at later times and developed biaxial mechanical properties better approximating native tissue. By employing a processing approach that creates a sheet-form scaffold with regionally distinct zones, it was possible to improve biological outcomes in body wall repair and provide the means for further tuning scaffold mechanical parameters when targeting other applications. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Combined Use of an Anterolateral Thigh Flap and Superficial Inferior Epigastric Artery Flap for Reconstruction of an Extensive Abdominal Wall Defect

    PubMed Central

    Kagaya, Yu; Arikawa, Masaki; Kobayashi, Eisuke

    2016-01-01

    Summary: Reconstruction of large abdominal wall defects is challenging. We herein report the successful reconstruction of an extensive abdominal wall defect using a novel combination of flaps after sarcoma resection. A 74-year-old man presented with a dedifferentiated liposarcoma on his abdominal wall. He underwent excision of the tumor, which resulted in an extensive abdominal wall defect. The defect was reconstructed with a pedicled anterolateral thigh flap with an iliotibial tract and a pedicled superficial inferior epigastric artery flap. No skin graft was necessary. The wounds healed successfully, and no herniation occurred. The combination of an anterolateral thigh flap and a superficial inferior epigastric artery flap is a versatile option for reconstruction of extensive abdominal wall defects. PMID:27975026

  13. Electrical Impedance Tomography-guided PEEP Titration in Patients Undergoing Laparoscopic Abdominal Surgery

    PubMed Central

    He, Xingying; Jiang, Jingjing; Liu, Yuli; Xu, Haitao; Zhou, Shuangqiong; Yang, Shibo; Shi, Xueyin; Yuan, Hongbin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the study is to utilize electrical impedance tomography (EIT) to guide positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) and to optimize oxygenation in patients undergoing laparoscopic abdominal surgery. Fifty patients were randomly assigned to the control (C) group and the EIT (E) group (n = 25 each). We set the fraction of inspired oxygen (FiO2) at 0.30. The PEEP was titrated and increased in a 2-cm H2O stepwise manner, from 6 to 14 cm H2O. Hemodynamic variables, respiratory mechanics, EIT images, analysis of blood gas, and regional cerebral oxygen saturation were recorded. The postoperative pulmonary complications within the first 5 days were also observed. We chose 10 cm H2O and 8 cm H2O as the “ideal” PEEP for the C and the E groups, respectively. EIT-guided PEEP titration led to a more dorsal shift of ventilation. The PaO2/FiO2 ratio in the E group was superior to that in the C group in the pneumoperitoneum period, though the difference was not significant (330 ± 10 vs 305.56 ± 4 mm Hg; P = 0.09). The C group patients experienced 8.7% postoperative pulmonary complications versus 5.3% among the E group patients (relative risk 1.27, 95% confidence interval 0.31–5.3, P = 0.75). Electrical impedance tomography represents a new promising technique that could enable anesthesiologists to assess regional ventilation of the lungs and optimize global oxygenation for patients undergoing laparoscopic abdominal surgery. PMID:27057904

  14. Surgical Site Infiltration for Abdominal Surgery: A Novel Neuroanatomical-based Approach

    PubMed Central

    Janis, Jeffrey E.; Haas, Eric M.; Ramshaw, Bruce J.; Nihira, Mikio A.; Dunkin, Brian J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Provision of optimal postoperative analgesia should facilitate postoperative ambulation and rehabilitation. An optimal multimodal analgesia technique would include the use of nonopioid analgesics, including local/regional analgesic techniques such as surgical site local anesthetic infiltration. This article presents a novel approach to surgical site infiltration techniques for abdominal surgery based upon neuroanatomy. Methods: Literature searches were conducted for studies reporting the neuroanatomical sources of pain after abdominal surgery. Also, studies identified by preceding search were reviewed for relevant publications and manually retrieved. Results: Based on neuroanatomy, an optimal surgical site infiltration technique would consist of systematic, extensive, meticulous administration of local anesthetic into the peritoneum (or preperitoneum), subfascial, and subdermal tissue planes. The volume of local anesthetic would depend on the size of the incision such that 1 to 1.5 mL is injected every 1 to 2 cm of surgical incision per layer. It is best to infiltrate with a 22-gauge, 1.5-inch needle. The needle is inserted approximately 0.5 to 1 cm into the tissue plane, and local anesthetic solution is injected while slowly withdrawing the needle, which should reduce the risk of intravascular injection. Conclusions: Meticulous, systematic, and extensive surgical site local anesthetic infiltration in the various tissue planes including the peritoneal, musculofascial, and subdermal tissues, where pain foci originate, provides excellent postoperative pain relief. This approach should be combined with use of other nonopioid analgesics with opioids reserved for rescue. Further well-designed studies are necessary to assess the analgesic efficacy of the proposed infiltration technique. PMID:28293525

  15. Impact of obesity on recovery and pulmonary functions of obese women undergoing major abdominal gynecological surgeries.

    PubMed

    Moustafa, Ahmed A M; Abdelazim, Ibrahim A

    2016-06-01

    To determine impact of obesity on recovery parameters and pulmonary functions of women undergoing major abdominal gynecological surgeries. Eighty women undergoing major gynecological surgeries were included in this study. Anesthesia was induced by remifentanil bolus, followed by propofol and cisatracurium to facilitate oro-tracheal intubation and was maintained by balanced anesthesia of remifentanil intravenous infusion and sevoflurane in oxygen and air. Time from discontinuation of maintenance anesthesia to fully awake were recorded at 1-min intervals and time from discontinuation of anesthesia until patient was transferred to post-anesthesia care unit (PACU) and discharged from PACU was also recorded. Pulmonary function tests were performed before surgery and repeated 4 h, days 1, 2 and 3 post-operative for evaluation of forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in 1 s and peak expiratory flow rate. Occurrence of post-operative complications, re-admission to ICU, hospital stay and morbidities were also recorded. Induction of anesthesia using remifentanil bolus injection resulted in significant decrease of heart rate and arterial pressures compared to pre-operative and pre-induction values. Recovery times were significantly shorter in obese compared to morbidly obese women. Post-operative pulmonary function tests showed significant deterioration compared to pre-operative measures but showed progressive improvement through first 3 post-operative days. Hospital stay was significantly shorter for obese compared to morbid obese women. Obesity delays recovery from general anesthesia, adversely affects pulmonary functions and increases post-operative complications. Remifentanil infusion and sevoflurane could be appropriate combination for obese and morbidly obese women undergoing major surgeries.

  16. [Abdominal approaches and drainages of the abdominal cavity].

    PubMed

    Hagel, C; Schilling, M

    2006-04-01

    Appropriate access to the abdominal cavity is the first and crucial step for successful abdominal surgical intervention. In planning the incision, several variables have to be considered, such as anatomy of the abdominal wall, localization of the target organ, and individual conditions (previous incisions, minimal access surgery, etc). Medial laparotomy is the preferred incision for emergency cases and ill-defined pathologies, allowing access and hence exploration to all quadrants. Transverse laparotomies give superior access to the dorsal and right aspects of the liver and cause less pain in patients unfit for regional anesthetic procedures. Draining of the abdominal cavity is used after various resective and reconstructive procedures, but there is little evidence for its use in a number of operations such as gastric, hepatic, and colorectal resections. Advantages and disadvantages of different abdominal wall incisions and drainages are discussed.

  17. [A case of fixing an anastomotic site to the abdominal wall out of the abdominal cavity for a small intestinal perforation during chemotherapy].

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Kazutaka; Harano, Masao; Kato, Takuya; Yoshida, Kazuhiro; Sato, Daisuke; Choda, Yasuhiro; Tokumoto, Noriaki; Kanazawa, Takashi; Matsukawa, Hiroyoshi; Ojima, Yasutomo; Idani, Hitoshi; Shiozaki, Shigehiro; Okajima, Masazumi; Ninomiya, Motoki

    2014-11-01

    A 53-year-old man presented with a continuous high fever and was diagnosed with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma with metastasis to the lung, spleen, and mesenterium. He was treated with cyclophosphamide and prednisolone followed by administration of cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisolone (CHOP) chemotherapy 20 days later. Two days after initiation of CHOP therapy, the patient complained of severe abdominal pain. Perforative peritonitis was diagnosed using abdominal computed tomography. A perforation of the small intestine approximately 160 cm distal to the Treitz ligament was uncovered during emergency laparotomy. The risk of leakage was considered too high for anastomosis of the small intestine to be performed. Further, construction of an intestinal stoma could result in a high-output syndrome that could lead to difficulty in resuming chemotherapy. Based on these considerations, we fixed the anastomotic region to the abdominal wall using a technique similar to construction of an intestinal stoma. Post-operative anastomotic leakage did not occur. Nine days later, a perineal hernia was noted near the anastomotic site and a second operation was performed. The anastomotic site was placed back into the abdominal cavity during this operation. CHOP therapy was resumed 16 days after the first operation.

  18. A Novel Diagnostic Aid for Detection of Intra-Abdominal Adhesions to the Anterior Abdominal Wall Using Dynamic Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Randall, David; Fenner, John; Gillott, Richard; ten Broek, Richard; Strik, Chema; Spencer, Paul; Bardhan, Karna Dev

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Abdominal adhesions can cause serious morbidity and complicate subsequent operations. Their diagnosis is often one of exclusion due to a lack of a reliable, non-invasive diagnostic technique. Development and testing of a candidate technique are described below. Method. During respiration, smooth visceral sliding motion occurs between the abdominal contents and the walls of the abdominal cavity. We describe a technique involving image segmentation and registration to calculate shear as an analogue for visceral slide based on the tracking of structures throughout the respiratory cycle. The presence of an adhesion is attributed to a resistance to visceral slide resulting in a discernible reduction in shear. The abdominal movement due to respiration is captured in sagittal dynamic MR images. Results. Clinical images were selected for analysis, including a patient with a surgically confirmed adhesion. Discernible reduction in shear was observed at the location of the adhesion while a consistent, gradually changing shear was observed in the healthy volunteers. Conclusion. The technique and its validation show encouraging results for adhesion detection but a larger study is now required to confirm its potential. PMID:26880884

  19. Management of postoperative pain in abdominal surgery in Spain. A multicentre drug utilization study

    PubMed Central

    Vallano, Antonio; Aguilera, Cristina; Arnau, Josep Maria; Baños, Josep-Eladi; Laporte, Joan-Ramon

    1999-01-01

    Participating centres: Hospital Universitario San Juan, Alicante: Maria Jesús Olaso, Javier Agulló, Clara Faura. Hospital Torrecárdenas, Almería: Carmen Fernández Sánchez, Miguel Lorenzo Campos, Juan Manuel Rodríguez Alonso. Hospital Quirúrgic Adriano, Barcelona: Carmen Alerany Pardo, Paquita Alvarez González, Teresa Martín Benito. Hospital Universitari del Mar-IMIM, Barcelona: Magí Farré, Maite Terán. Corporació Sanitària Parc Taulí, Sabadell: Montserrat Cañellas, Sergio Zavala, Josep Planell. Hospital Universitari de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau: Gonzalo Calvo, Rosa Morros, Silvia Mateo. Hospital General Vall d’Hebron, Barcelona: Carmen Bosch, María José Martínez. Hospital Universitario Virgen de la Victoria, Málaga: Maribel Lucena, José Antonio González, Gabriel Carranque. Hospital Clínico Universitario San Carlos, Madrid: Emilio Vargas, Amparo Gil López-Oliva, Míriam García Mateos. Hospital Universitario Marqués de Valdecilla, Santander: Mario González, Antonio Cuadrado. Hospital Universitario Virgen de la Macarena, Sevilla: Juan Antonio Durán, Pilar Máyquez, María Isabel Serrano. Hospital Universitario Virgen del Rocío, Sevilla: Jaume Torelló, Juan Ramón Castillo, María de las Nieves Merino. Aims Postoperative pain is common in hospital-admitted patients. Its management is determined by different therapeutic traditions and by the attitudes of health professionals in each hospital. The aim of this study was to describe the patterns of prescription and administration of analgesic drugs used for postoperative pain after abdominal surgery in Spanish hospitals, to know the prevalence and the severity of postoperative pain, and to determine the extent of variability in the management of postoperative pain among the participating centres. Methods The study was a multicentre descriptive cross-sectional drug utilization study in 12 Spanish hospitals. The subjects were an unselected sample of consecutive patients undergoing abdominal

  20. Abdominal cavity myolipoma presenting as an enlarging incisional hernia.

    PubMed

    Moore, Mark O; Richardson, Michael L; Rubin, Brian P; Baird, Geoffrey S

    2006-01-01

    We present a case of an abdominal cavity myolipoma which herniated through a low transverse abdominal (Pfannenstiel) incision, and presented as an enlarging abdominal wall mass. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) prior to surgery demonstrated an encapsulated solid tumor mass demonstrating fat signal and and increased T2-weighted signal. Postsurgical histological tissue diagnosis was myolipoma. Recognition of the intra- and extraperitoneal location of this abdominal tumor was essential for accurate surgical planning.

  1. 3-D segmentation and quantitative analysis of inner and outer walls of thrombotic abdominal aortic aneurysms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kyungmoo; Yin, Yin; Wahle, Andreas; Olszewski, Mark E.; Sonka, Milan

    2008-03-01

    An abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is an area of a localized widening of the abdominal aorta, with a frequent presence of thrombus. A ruptured aneurysm can cause death due to severe internal bleeding. AAA thrombus segmentation and quantitative analysis are of paramount importance for diagnosis, risk assessment, and determination of treatment options. Until now, only a small number of methods for thrombus segmentation and analysis have been presented in the literature, either requiring substantial user interaction or exhibiting insufficient performance. We report a novel method offering minimal user interaction and high accuracy. Our thrombus segmentation method is composed of an initial automated luminal surface segmentation, followed by a cost function-based optimal segmentation of the inner and outer surfaces of the aortic wall. The approach utilizes the power and flexibility of the optimal triangle mesh-based 3-D graph search method, in which cost functions for thrombus inner and outer surfaces are based on gradient magnitudes. Sometimes local failures caused by image ambiguity occur, in which case several control points are used to guide the computer segmentation without the need to trace borders manually. Our method was tested in 9 MDCT image datasets (951 image slices). With the exception of a case in which the thrombus was highly eccentric, visually acceptable aortic lumen and thrombus segmentation results were achieved. No user interaction was used in 3 out of 8 datasets, and 7.80 +/- 2.71 mouse clicks per case / 0.083 +/- 0.035 mouse clicks per image slice were required in the remaining 5 datasets.

  2. Biomechanical and morphological study of a new elastic mesh (Ciberlastic) to repair abdominal wall defects.

    PubMed

    Calvo, B; Pascual, G; Peña, E; Pérez-Khöler, B; Rodríguez, M; Bellón, J M

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to conduct a preclinical evaluation of the behaviour of a new type of abdominal LW prosthesis (Ciberlastic), which was designed with a non-absorbable elastic polyurethane monofilament (Assuplus, Assut Europe, Italy) to allow greater adaptability to mechanical area requirements and higher bio-mimicking with the newly formed surrounding tissues. Our hypothesis was that an increase in the elasticity of the mesh filament could improve the benefits of LW prostheses. To verify our hypothesis, we compared the short- and long-term behaviour of Ciberlastic and Optilene(®) elastic commercial meshes by repairing the partially herniated abdomen in New Zealand White rabbits. The implanted meshes were mechanically and histologically assessed at 14 and 180 days post-implant. We mechanically characterized the partially herniated repaired muscle tissue and also determined mesh shrinkage at different post-implant times. This was followed by a histological study in which the tissue incorporation process was analysed over time. The new prosthesis designed by our group achieved good behaviour that was similar to that of Optilene(®), one of the most popular LW prostheses on the market, with the added advantage of its elastic property. The mechanical properties are significantly lower than those of the polypropylene Optilene(®) mesh, and the new elastic mesh meets the basic mechanical requirements for positioning in the abdominal wall, which was also demonstrated by the absence of recurrences after implantation in the experimental model. We found that the growth of a connective tissue rich in collagen over the hernial defect and the proper deposit of the collagen fibres in the regenerated tissue substantially modified the original properties of the mesh, thereby increasing its biomechanical strength and making the whole tissue/mesh stiffer.

  3. Laparoscopic surgery for colon cancer: a review of the fascial composition of the abdominal cavity.

    PubMed

    Mike, Makio; Kano, Nobuyasu

    2015-02-01

    Laparoscopic surgery has generally been performed for digestive diseases. Many patients with colon cancer undergo laparoscopic procedures. The outcomes of laparoscopic colectomy and open colectomy are the same in terms of the long-time survival. It is important to dissect the embryological plane to harvest the lymph nodes and to avoid bleeding during colon cancer surgery. To date, descriptions of the anatomy of the fascial composition have mainly involved observations unrelated to fundamental embryological concepts, causing confusion regarding the explanations of the surgical procedures, with various vocabularies used without definitions. We therefore examined the fascia of the abdominal space using a fascia concept based on clinical anatomy and embryology. Mobilization of the bilateral sides of the colon involves dissection between the fusion fascia of Toldt and the deep subperitoneal fascia. It is important to understand that the right fusion fascia of Toldt is divided into the posterior pancreatic fascia of Treitz dorsally and the anterior pancreatic fascia ventrally at the second portion of the duodenum. A comprehensive understanding of fascia composition between the stomach and transverse colon is necessary for dissecting the splenic flexure of the colon. As a result of these considerations of the fascia, more accurate surgical procedures can be performed for the excision of colon cancer.

  4. Recruitment Maneuver in Elderly Patients with Different Peripheral Chemoreflex Sensitivity during Major Abdominal Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Zabolotskikh, Igor

    2016-01-01

    The goal of the study was to evaluate the effect of a recruitment maneuver on respiratory biomechanics, oxygenation, and hemodynamics in patients suffering from chronic heart failure with different peripheral chemoreflex sensitivity. The study was conducted in 115 elderly patients which underwent major abdominal surgery under general/epidural surgery. Peripheral chemoreflex sensitivity (PCS) was evaluated with breath-holding duration (BHD) during breath-holding test. All patients were divided into two groups: group H had a high PCS (BHD = 38 seconds or less, n = 49); Group M had a middle PCS (BHD more than 38 seconds, n = 66). Recruitment maneuver improved oxygenation and respiratory biomechanics in all cases. However, cardiac output decreased by an average of 18%–31% in group H compared to 18%–28% in group M. SVR either remained unchanged or decreased by up to 14% of the initial value in group H, while, in group M, it had a tendency to increase, which was 24% of the initial value. So, recruitment maneuver is an effective method to improve oxygenation and biomechanical properties of the respiratory system but in patients with increased peripheral chemoreflex sensitivity it associates with the risk of hemodynamic disturbances. PMID:28070507

  5. Recruitment Maneuver in Elderly Patients with Different Peripheral Chemoreflex Sensitivity during Major Abdominal Surgery.

    PubMed

    Trembach, Nikita; Zabolotskikh, Igor

    2016-01-01

    The goal of the study was to evaluate the effect of a recruitment maneuver on respiratory biomechanics, oxygenation, and hemodynamics in patients suffering from chronic heart failure with different peripheral chemoreflex sensitivity. The study was conducted in 115 elderly patients which underwent major abdominal surgery under general/epidural surgery. Peripheral chemoreflex sensitivity (PCS) was evaluated with breath-holding duration (BHD) during breath-holding test. All patients were divided into two groups: group H had a high PCS (BHD = 38 seconds or less, n = 49); Group M had a middle PCS (BHD more than 38 seconds, n = 66). Recruitment maneuver improved oxygenation and respiratory biomechanics in all cases. However, cardiac output decreased by an average of 18%-31% in group H compared to 18%-28% in group M. SVR either remained unchanged or decreased by up to 14% of the initial value in group H, while, in group M, it had a tendency to increase, which was 24% of the initial value. So, recruitment maneuver is an effective method to improve oxygenation and biomechanical properties of the respiratory system but in patients with increased peripheral chemoreflex sensitivity it associates with the risk of hemodynamic disturbances.

  6. [Surgery of the descending thoracic and thoraco-abdominal arteries. Report of 105 cases].

    PubMed

    Zanetti, P P; Rosa, G; Sorisio, V; Cavanenghi, D; Amerio, G M; Stillo, R; Zappa, A; Cardellino, S; Franco, M; Muncinelli, M

    1997-07-01

    The Authors show their casistic of about 105 cases of thoracic descending and thoraco-abdominal aorta pathologies between 1.1.1993 and 30.12.1995. After a short introduction about the improvements in anesthesia and reanimation of these pathologies as well as the good reliability of diagnostic and currently available instruments, mortality and mobility parameters are taken into account, the last one referring to paraplegia and ARF. The casistic is evaluated splitting the cases into 2 groups, urgent surgery and election surgery, and differentiating the aneurysm type from the dissection type. Besides, the mortality and mobility are reported for any pathology, with a discussion of the parameters which drove the choice of the most suitable methodology to be adopted (ECC femoro-subclavian shunt, simple clamping). The results achieved show a mortality of 40% in urgency, between 5 and 15% in election, with a rate of paraplegia around 8-10% and a ARF between 5 and 15%. These data match the literature statistics and support the quality of the adopted methodologies.

  7. Effects of postoperative parenteral nutrition with different lipid emulsions in patients undergoing major abdominal surgery

    PubMed Central

    Demirer, Seher; Sapmaz, Ali; Kepenekci, Ilknur; Aydintug, Semih; Balci, Deniz; Sonyurek, Pinar; Kose, Kenan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study was designed to investigate the effects of total parenteral nutrition (PN) using different lipid emulsions in patients undergoing major abdominal surgery. Methods Fifty-two patients were randomized to receive soybean oil + medium chain triglycerides (MCT) (group I), soybean oil + olive oil (group II), soybean oil + olive oil + fish oil (group III) as a lipid source. PN was started on postoperative day 1 and patients were maintained on PN for a minimum period of 4 days. Laboratory variables (CRP, prealbumin, transferrin) were measured before surgery and on postoperative days. Results Three treatment groups were included in the study. Patients in group I received long chain triglycerides (LCT) + LCT/MCT emulsion (%75 LCT + %25 LCT/MCT); Patients in group II received olive oil based emulsion (80% olive oil + 20% soybean oil, ClinOleic); Patients in group III received fish oil in addition to olive oil based emulsion (%85 ClinOleic + %15 Omegaven; Fresenius Kabi). The following 14 parameters were assessed: body weight, CRP, prealbumin, transferrin, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6, total antioxidant status, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, oxidized low density lipoprotein-2, complete blood cell, international normalized ratio, D-dimer, activated partially thromboplastin time, prothrombin time. All other parameters showed no differences among the groups. Conclusion The results of our trial demonstrate a potential beneficial effect of soybean oil/olive oil based lipid emulsions for use in PN regarding inflammatory response and oxidant capacity in the treatment of patients. PMID:27904853

  8. Delay in diagnosis and lessons learnt from a case of abdominal wall abscess caused by fishbone perforation.

    PubMed

    Hakeem, A; Shanmugam, V; Badrinath, K; Dube, M; Panto, P

    2015-04-01

    Complications following foreign body (FB) ingestion are an uncommon clinical problem. A 59-year-old man presented with a 4-week history of left iliac fossa pain and 1 episode of dark red blood mixed with stools. Inflammatory markers were elevated, and computed tomography (CT) of the abdomen and pelvis showed an ill defined abdominal wall inflammatory collection in close contact with the small bowel loops. He was treated with antibiotics, and follow-up CT, colonoscopy and small bowel enema were mostly unremarkable. The patient presented again ten months later with left iliac fossa cellulitis and fever. Multiplanar CT (the patient's fourth scan) demonstrated a 10cm abdominal wall collection with a linear hyperdense structure in the collection. The radiologists suspected a FB and on close scrutiny of the previous scans, they noted it to have been present on all of them. A targeted incision led to the removal of a 3cm fishbone from the collection. This case highlights the need to consider the possibility of a FB being the underlying cause in any unexplained intra-abdominal or abdominal wall inflammatory process so that the diagnosis is made in a timely manner.

  9. Large antigenic skin load in total abdominal wall transplants permits chimerism induction.

    PubMed

    Nasir, Serdar; Bozkurt, Mehmet; Klimczak, Aleksandra; Siemionow, Maria

    2008-11-01

    The application of composite tissue allograft (CTA) transplants in clinical reconstruction is parallel with extended knowledge of anatomy, microsurgical skills and development of transplantation immunology. CTAs are composed of multiple tissues, some of which such as skin are highly immunogenic and cause strong immunologic responses. Strong antigenic nature of skin may be related to Langerhans cells, which are powerful antigen-presenting cells. They are leukocytes found in the epidermis as members of immunologic cascade. Large skin components of CTA transplant may cause higher antigenic load as a result of increased surface area of transplanted skin correlating with increased load of Langerhans cells. In clinical abdominal wall transplants, increased rejection episodes were reported compared with other CTA transplant. This complication may correlate to large skin component of these transplants. To evaluate correlation between large skin island flaps and immunologic responses, CTA models with large skin components should be tested in experimental studies. Here we propose a total abdominal wall (TAW) transplant model in rat to test the feasibility of TAW transplantation in 2 groups: the anatomic study and experimental transplantation group. In anatomic study, TAW flaps were elevated bilaterally on superficial epigastric vessels and replaced. The entire TAW skin islands of all flaps were viable at postoperative day 21. Dye study confirmed that TAW flap was supplied by 2 vascular pedicles. Data in this group demonstrated that this flap is composed of the largest skin island when compared with other CTA transplant models such as full face, hemiface, limb, and groin flap. In experimental group, isograft transplantations were performed between Lewis rats (RT1(1)) while allograft transplantations were performed Lewis (RT1(1)) donors and LBN (RT(1+n)) recipients. All TAW transplants showed viable islands at posttransplant day 200 under cyclosporine A monotherapy protocol

  10. A new technique for minimally invasive abdominal wall reconstruction of complex incisional hernias: totally laparoscopic component separation and incisional hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Moazzez, Ashkan; Mason, Rodney J; Katkhouda, Namir

    2010-10-01

    Since Ramirez et al. presented the first case of component separation for abdominal wall hernias in 1990, it has undergone multiple modifications. This technique, which has been mainly used for large hernias where primary closure of the abdominal wall is not feasible, or for staged management of patients with open abdomens, results in multiple wound complications. In 2007, Rosen et al. reported on the laparoscopic approach to component separation that is associated with less subcutaneous dissection and the consequent advantage of a decreased risk of flap necrosis and wound infection. Here we discuss our totally laparoscopic approach to abdominal wall reconstruction. A minimally invasive abdominal wall reconstruction consists of a bilateral component separation, an intra-abdominal adhesiolysis, primary approximation of rectus muscles, and placement of an intraperitoneal mesh for reinforcing the repair, all performed laparoscopically. Patient-selection criteria, detailed operative technique, tips in preventing and managing the potential pitfalls, and postoperative care are discussed.

  11. Urinary Bladder Adenocarcinoma Metastatic to the Abdominal Wall: Report of a Case with Cytohistologic Correlation

    PubMed Central

    Baliga, Mithra

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of adenocarcinoma metastatic to the abdominal wall in a 71-year-old man with a history of primary bladder adenocarcinoma. CT-guided core biopsy was performed; imprints and histologic sections showed malignant glands lined by tumor cells with hyperchromatic nuclei and prominent nucleoli, infiltrating through skeletal muscle. Immunohistochemistry revealed positivity for CK7, membranous/cytoplasmic β-catenin, caudal-type homeobox transcription factor 2 (CDX2), and α-methylacyl coenzyme A racemase and negativity for CK20, p63, prostate-specific antigen (PSA), and prostate-specific acid phosphatase (PSAP). These findings were interpreted as metastatic adenocarcinoma, consistent with bladder primary. Primary bladder adenocarcinoma is a rare malignancy arising within glandular metaplasia and is associated with cystitis cystica and cystitis glandularis. Predisposing factors include bladder exstrophy, schistosomiasis, and other causes of chronic bladder irritation. This tumor is divided into intestinal, clear cell, and signet ring cell subtypes. Treatment involves radical cystectomy with pelvic lymph node dissection, and prognosis is unfavorable. Primary bladder adenocarcinoma should be differentiated from urachal adenocarcinoma, which arises from urachal remnants near the bladder dome, and secondary adenocarcinoma, or vesical involvement by adenocarcinoma from a different primary. CK7, CK20, CDX2, thrombomodulin, and β-catenin can help distinguish primary bladder adenocarcinoma from colonic adenocarcinoma; PSA and PSAP can help distinguish primary bladder adenocarcinoma from prostate adenocarcinoma. PMID:27006847

  12. Management of Accidental Finding of Ascaris Lumbricoides During Emergent Abdominal Surgery: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Esfehani, Maryam Hassan; Jahanshahi, Abdolhadi; Karimi, Amirhossein

    2016-01-01

    Ascariasis lumbricoides is the most common soil-transmitted helminth worldwide and most often is asymptomatic, although it can present with abdominal pain, malabsorption and growth failure, complete or partial obstraction in small bowel and biliary system and etc. Accidental encounters with ascaris during emergent abdominal surgeries are very rare and have been reported in less than a handful of papers. In this report, we describe this rare event from a country with low prevalence of this infection, and then review the literatures and clarify the possible challenges for surgeons during operation and postoperative follow-up.

  13. Case report of traumatic abdominal wall hernia following blunt motorcycle handlebar injury and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Ogundiran, T O; Obamuyide, H A; Adesina, M A; Ademola, A F

    2012-01-01

    A 25-year-old man, riding a motorcycle, rammed into a moving car at a T junction and sustained a blunt lower-right abdominal injury with the handlebar of his motorbike. He developed a swelling at the point of impact for which he presented in hospital 10 days later. Clinical assessment revealed a healthy young man with a soft, nontender reducible swelling over the lateral half of the right inguinal area. A diagnosis of acute traumatic hernia was made. Abdominal ultrasonography revealed a wide-necked defect in the anterior abdominal wall over the right inguinal area with protruding bowel loops beneath an intact skin. He was planned for herniorrhaphy but has defaulted since then.

  14. Percutaneous transhepatic drainage of inaccessible abdominal abscesses following abdominal surgery under real-time CT-fluoroscopic guidance.

    PubMed

    Yamakado, Koichiro; Takaki, Haruyuki; Nakatsuka, Atsuhiro; Kashima, Masataka; Uraki, Junji; Yamanaka, Takashi; Takeda, Kan

    2010-02-01

    This study evaluated the safety, feasibility, and clinical utility of transhepatic drainage of inaccessible abdominal abscesses retrospectively under real-time computed tomographic (CT) guidance. For abdominal abscesses, 12 consecutive patients received percutaneous transhepatic drainage. Abscesses were considered inaccessible using the usual access route because they were surrounded by the liver and other organs. The maximum diameters of abscesses were 4.6-9.5 cm (mean, 6.7 +/- 1.4 cm). An 8-Fr catheter was advanced into the abscess cavity through the liver parenchyma using real-time CT fluoroscopic guidance. Safety, feasibility, procedure time, and clinical utility were evaluated. Drainage catheters were placed with no complications in abscess cavities through the liver parenchyma in all patients. The mean procedure time was 18.8 +/- 9.2 min (range, 12-41 min). All abscesses were drained. They shrank immediately after catheter placement. In conclusions, this transhepatic approach under real-time CT fluoroscopic guidance is a safe, feasible, and useful technique for use of drainage of inaccessible abdominal abscesses.

  15. Patient-specific models of wall stress in abdominal aortic aneurysm: a comparison between MR and CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Putter, Sander; Breeuwer, Marcel; van de Vosse, Frans N.; Kose, Ursula; Gerritsen, Frans A.

    2006-03-01

    Finite element method based patient-specific wall stress in abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) may provide a more accurate rupture risk predictor than the currently used maximum transverse diameter. In this study, we have investigated the sensitivity of the wall stress in AAA with respect to geometrical variations. We have acquired MR and CT images for four patients with AAA. Three individual users have delineated the AAA vessel wall contours on the image slices. These contours were used to generate synthetic feature images for a deformable model based segmentation method. We investigated the reproducibility and the influence of the user variability on the wall stress. For sufficiently smooth models of the AAA wall, the peak wall stress is reproducible for three out of the four AAA geometries. The 0.99 percentiles of the wall stress show excellent reproducibility for all four AAAs. The variations induced by user variability are larger than the errors caused by the segmentation variability. The influence of the user variability appears to be similar for MR and CT. We conclude that the peak wall stress in AAA is sensitive to small geometrical variations. To increase reproducibility it appears to be best not to allow too much geometrical detail in the simulations. This could be achieved either by using a sufficiently smooth geometry representation or by using a more robust statistical parameter derived from the wall stress distribution.

  16. Single-Incision Multiport/Single Port Laparoscopic Abdominal Surgery (SILAP): A Prospective Multicenter Observational Quality Study

    PubMed Central

    Diener, Markus; Kropf, Siegfried; Otto, Ronny; Manger, Thomas; Vestweber, Boris; Mirow, Lutz; Winde, Günther; Lippert, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Background Increasing experience with minimally invasive surgery and the development of new instruments has resulted in a tendency toward reducing the number of abdominal skin incisions. Retrospective and randomized prospective studies could show the feasibility of single-incision surgery without any increased risk to the patient. However, large prospective multicenter observational datasets do not currently exist. Objective This prospective multicenter observational quality study will provide a relevant dataset reflecting the feasibility and safety of single-incision surgery. This study focuses on external validity, clinical relevance, and the patients’ perspective. Accordingly, the single-incision multiport/single port laparoscopic abdominal surgery (SILAP) study will supplement the existing evidence, which does not currently allow evidence-based surgical decision making. Methods The SILAP study is an international prospective multicenter observational quality study. Mortality, morbidity, complications during surgery, complications postoperatively, patient characteristics, and technical aspects will be monitored. We expect more than 100 surgical centers to participate with 5000 patients with abdominal single-incision surgery during the study period. Results Funding was obtained in 2012. Enrollment began on January 01, 2013, and will be completed on December 31, 2018. As of January 2016, 2119 patients have been included, 106 German centers are registered, and 27 centers are very active (>5 patients per year). Conclusions This prospective multicenter observational quality study will provide a relevant dataset reflecting the feasibility and safety of single-incision surgery. An international enlargement and recruitment of centers outside of Germany is meaningful. Trial Registration German Clinical Trials Register: DRKS00004594; https://drks-neu.uniklinik-freiburg.de/drks_web/navigate.do?navigationId=trial.HTML&TRIAL_ID=DRKS00004594 (Archived by WebCite at http

  17. Reporting individual surgeon outcomes does not lead to risk aversion in abdominal aortic aneurysm surgery.

    PubMed

    Saratzis, A; Thatcher, A; Bath, M F; Sidloff, D A; Bown, M J; Shakespeare, J; Sayers, R D; Imray, C

    2017-02-01

    INTRODUCTION Reporting surgeons' outcomes has recently been introduced in the UK. This has the potential to result in surgeons becoming risk averse. The aim of this study was to investigate whether reporting outcomes for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) surgery impacts on the number and risk profile (level of fitness) of patients offered elective treatment. METHODS Publically available National Vascular Registry data were used to compare the number of AAAs treated in those centres across the UK that reported outcomes for the periods 2008-2012, 2009-2013 and 2010-2014. Furthermore, the number and characteristics of patients referred for consideration of elective AAA repair at a single tertiary unit were analysed yearly between 2010 and 2014. Clinic, casualty and theatre event codes were searched to obtain all AAAs treated. The results of cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) were assessed. RESULTS For the 85 centres that reported outcomes in all three five-year periods, the median number of AAAs treated per unit increased between the periods 2008-2012 and 2010-2014 from 192 to 214 per year (p=0.006). In the single centre cohort study, the proportion of patients offered elective AAA repair increased from 74% in 2009-2010 to 81% in 2013-2014, with a maximum of 84% in 2012-2013. The age, aneurysm size and CPET results (anaerobic threshold levels) for those eventually offered elective treatment did not differ significantly between 2010 and 2014. CONCLUSIONS The results do not support the assumption that reporting individual surgeon outcomes is associated with a risk averse strategy regarding patient selection in aneurysm surgery at present.

  18. Successful Treatment of Mesenteric Varices After Living Donor Liver Transplantation with Retrograde Transvenous Obliteration Via an Abdominal Wall Vein

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, Osamu Tamura, Yoshitaka; Nakasone, Yutaka; Yamashita, Yasuyuki; Okajima, Hideaki; Asonuma, Katsuhiro; Inomata, Yukihiro

    2010-06-15

    Balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration is an established treatment for gastric varices; it has been used more rarely to treat mesenteric varices. We report a 12-year-old girl who had received a living donor liver transplant and suffered melena due to ruptured mesenteric varices. We addressed treatment of the mesenteric varices by retrograde transvenous obliteration of an abdominal wall collateral vein detected by superior mesenteric arteriography.

  19. Acute incarcerated external abdominal hernia

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xue-Fei

    2014-01-01

    External abdominal hernia occurs when abdominal organs or tissues leave their normal anatomic site and protrude outside the skin through the congenital or acquired weakness, defects or holes on the abdominal wall, including inguinal hernia, umbilical hernia, femoral hernia and so on. Acute incarcerated hernia is a common surgical emergency. With advances in minimally invasive devices and techniques, the diagnosis and treatment have witnessed major changes, such as the use of laparoscopic surgery in some cases to achieve minimally invasive treatment. However, strict adherence to the indications and contraindications is still required. PMID:25489584

  20. Sunken Eye Induced by Superior Orbital Wall Defect After Craniofacial Surgery.

    PubMed

    Joo, Sung-Pil; Kim, Sung-Hyun; Park, Hong-Ju; Jung, Seunggon; Han, Jeong Joon; Kim, Tae-Sun

    2016-10-01

    Enophthalmos after a ventriculo-peritoneal (V-P) shunt placement is very rare. Previous defects of the orbital wall with intracranial hypotension can cause enophthalmos after V-P shunting. The authors present 2 patients of enophthalmos with orbital wall defects resulting from anterior clinoidectomy that was performed during previous aneurysmal surgery. Both patients received a V-P shunt for hydrocephalus after subarachnoid hemorrhage. Although the hydrocephalus was improved by V-P shunts in both patients, sunken eyes were observed. The patients received reconstructive surgery of the superior orbital wall using titanium mesh and recovered after surgery without any neurological deficits. Here, the authors present 2 patients of enophthalmos with orbital wall defects treated by orbital wall reconstruction.

  1. Sunken Eye Induced by Superior Orbital Wall Defect After Craniofacial Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Sung-Pil; Kim, Sung-Hyun; Park, Hong-Ju; Jung, Seunggon; Han, Jeong Joon; Kim, Tae-Sun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Enophthalmos after a ventriculo-peritoneal (V-P) shunt placement is very rare. Previous defects of the orbital wall with intracranial hypotension can cause enophthalmos after V-P shunting. The authors present 2 patients of enophthalmos with orbital wall defects resulting from anterior clinoidectomy that was performed during previous aneurysmal surgery. Both patients received a V-P shunt for hydrocephalus after subarachnoid hemorrhage. Although the hydrocephalus was improved by V-P shunts in both patients, sunken eyes were observed. The patients received reconstructive surgery of the superior orbital wall using titanium mesh and recovered after surgery without any neurological deficits. Here, the authors present 2 patients of enophthalmos with orbital wall defects treated by orbital wall reconstruction. PMID:27483101

  2. Diagnostic laparoscopy and adhesiolysis: does it help with complex abdominal and pelvic pain syndrome (CAPPS) in general surgery?

    PubMed

    McClain, Gregory D; Redan, Jay A; McCarus, Steven D; Caceres, Aileen; Kim, John

    2011-01-01

    Abdominal pains secondary to adhesions are a common complaint, but most surgeons do not perform surgery for this complaint unless the patient suffers from a bowel obstruction. The purpose of this evaluation was to determine if lysis of bowel adhesions has a role in the surgical management of adhesions for helping treat abdominal pain. The database of our patients with complex abdominal and pelvic pain syndrome (CAPPS) was reviewed to identify patients who underwent a laparoscopic lysis of adhesion without any organ removal and observe if they had a decrease in the amount of abdominal pain after this procedure. Thirty-one patients completed follow-up at 3, 6, 9, and 12 months. At 6, 9, and 12 months postoperation, there were statistically significant decreases in patients' analog pain scores. We concluded that laparoscopic lysis of adhesions can help decrease adhesion-related pain. The pain from adhesions may involve a more complex pathway toward pain resolution than a simple cutting of scar tissue, such as "phantom pain" following amputation, which takes time to resolve after this type of surgery.

  3. Surgically placed abdominal wall catheters on postoperative analgesia and outcomes after living liver donation.

    PubMed

    Khan, James; Katz, Joel; Montbriand, Janice; Ladak, Salima; McCluskey, Stuart; Srinivas, Coimbatore; Ko, Raynauld; Grant, David; Bradbury, Ashleene; LeManach, Yannick; Clarke, Hance

    2015-04-01

    Living donor liver resections are associated with significant postoperative pain. Epidural analgesia is the gold standard for postoperative pain management, although it is often refused or contraindicated. Surgically placed abdominal wall catheters (AWCs) are a novel pain modality that can potentially provide pain relief for those patients who are unable to receive an epidural. A retrospective review was performed at a single center. Patients were categorized according to their postoperative pain modality: intravenous (IV) patient-controlled analgesia (PCA), AWCs with IV PCA, or patient-controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA). Pain scores, opioid consumption, and outcomes were compared for the first 3 postoperative days. Propensity score matches (PSMs) were performed to adjust for covariates and to confirm the primary analysis. The AWC group had significantly lower mean morphine-equivalent consumption on postoperative day 3 [18.1 mg, standard error (SE)=3.1 versus 28.2 mg, SE=3.0; P=0.02] and mean cumulative morphine-equivalent consumption (97.2 mg, SE=7.2 versus 121.0 mg, SE=9.1; P=0.04) in comparison with the IV PCA group; the difference in cumulative-morphine equivalent remained significant in the PSMs. AWC pain scores were higher than those in the PCEA group and were similar to the those in the IV PCA group. The AWC group had a lower incidence of pruritus and a shorter hospital stay in comparison with the PCEA group and had a lower incidence of sedation in comparison with both groups. Time to ambulation, nausea, and vomiting were comparable among all 3 groups. The PSMs confirmed all results except for a decrease in the length of stay in comparison with PCEA. AWCs may be an alternative to epidural analgesia after living donor liver resections. Randomized trials are needed to verify the benefits of AWCs, including the safety and adverse effects.

  4. Chronic pain after lower abdominal surgery: do catechol-O-methyl transferase/opioid receptor μ-1 polymorphisms contribute?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Preoperative pain, type of operation and anesthesia, severity of acute postoperative pain, and psychosocial factors have been identified as risk factors for chronic postsurgical pain (CPP). Recently, it has been suggested that genetic factors also contribute to CPP. In this study, we aimed to determine whether the catechol-O-methyl transferase (COMT) and opioid receptor μ-1 (OPRM1) common functional polymorphisms rs4680 and rs1799971 were associated with the incidence, intensity, or duration of CPP in patients after lower abdominal surgery. Methods One hundred and two patients with American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) physical status I/II underwent either abdominal radical prostatectomy (n = 45) or hysterectomy (n = 57). The incidences of CPP in the pelvic and scar areas were evaluated in all patients three months after surgery. Results Thirty-five (34.3%) patients experienced CPP after lower abdominal surgery. Within this group, six (17.1%) patients demonstrated symptoms of neuropathic pain. For COMT rs4680, 22 (21.6%) patients had Met158Met, 55 (53.9%) patients had Val158Met, and 25 (24.5%) patients had Val158Val. No association was found between CPP phenotypes (incidence, intensity, and duration) and different rs4680 genotypes. For OPRM1 rs1799971, only CPP patients carrying at least one copy of the G allele had higher pain intensity than A118A carriers (p=0.02). No associations with other phenotypes were found. No combined effect of COMT/OPRM1 polymorphisms on CPP phenotypes was observed. Conclusions OPRM1 genotype influences CPP following lower abdominal surgery. COMT didn’t affect CPP, suggesting its potential modality-specific effects on human pain. PMID:23566343

  5. Changes in total plasma and serum N-glycome composition and patient-controlled analgesia after major abdominal surgery

    PubMed Central

    Gudelj, Ivan; Baciarello, Marco; Ugrina, Ivo; De Gregori, Manuela; Napolioni, Valerio; Ingelmo, Pablo M.; Bugada, Dario; De Gregori, Simona; Đerek, Lovorka; Pučić-Baković, Maja; Novokmet, Mislav; Gornik, Olga; Saccani Jotti, Gloria; Meschi, Tiziana; Lauc, Gordan; Allegri, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Systemic inflammation participates to the complex healing process occurring after major surgery, thus directly affecting the surgical outcome and patient recovery. Total plasma N-glycome might be an indicator of inflammation after major surgery, as well as an anti-inflammatory therapy response marker, since protein glycosylation plays an essential role in the inflammatory cascade. Therefore, we assessed the effects of surgery on the total plasma N-glycome and the association with self-administration of postoperative morphine in two cohorts of patients that underwent major abdominal surgery. We found that plasma N-glycome undergoes significant changes one day after surgery and intensifies one day later, thus indicating a systemic physiological response. In particular, we observed the increase of bisialylated biantennary glycan, A2G2S[3,6]2, 12 hours after surgery, which progressively increased until 48 postoperative hours. Most changes occurred 24 hours after surgery with the decrease of most core-fucosylated biantennary structures, as well as the increase in sialylated tetraantennary and FA3G3S[3,3,3]3 structures. Moreover, we observed a progressive increase of sialylated triantennary and tetraantennary structures two days after surgery, with a concomitant decrease of the structures containing bisecting N-acetylglucosamine along with bi- and trisialylated triantennary glycans. We did not find any statistically significant association between morphine consumption and plasma N-glycome. PMID:27501865

  6. Changes in total plasma and serum N-glycome composition and patient-controlled analgesia after major abdominal surgery.

    PubMed

    Gudelj, Ivan; Baciarello, Marco; Ugrina, Ivo; De Gregori, Manuela; Napolioni, Valerio; Ingelmo, Pablo M; Bugada, Dario; De Gregori, Simona; Đerek, Lovorka; Pučić-Baković, Maja; Novokmet, Mislav; Gornik, Olga; Saccani Jotti, Gloria; Meschi, Tiziana; Lauc, Gordan; Allegri, Massimo

    2016-08-09

    Systemic inflammation participates to the complex healing process occurring after major surgery, thus directly affecting the surgical outcome and patient recovery. Total plasma N-glycome might be an indicator of inflammation after major surgery, as well as an anti-inflammatory therapy response marker, since protein glycosylation plays an essential role in the inflammatory cascade. Therefore, we assessed the effects of surgery on the total plasma N-glycome and the association with self-administration of postoperative morphine in two cohorts of patients that underwent major abdominal surgery. We found that plasma N-glycome undergoes significant changes one day after surgery and intensifies one day later, thus indicating a systemic physiological response. In particular, we observed the increase of bisialylated biantennary glycan, A2G2S[3,6]2, 12 hours after surgery, which progressively increased until 48 postoperative hours. Most changes occurred 24 hours after surgery with the decrease of most core-fucosylated biantennary structures, as well as the increase in sialylated tetraantennary and FA3G3S[3,3,3]3 structures. Moreover, we observed a progressive increase of sialylated triantennary and tetraantennary structures two days after surgery, with a concomitant decrease of the structures containing bisecting N-acetylglucosamine along with bi- and trisialylated triantennary glycans. We did not find any statistically significant association between morphine consumption and plasma N-glycome.

  7. A successful early gore-tex reconstruction of an abdominal wall defect in a neonate with Cantrell pentalogy: a case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Divkovic, Dalibor; Kvolik, Slavica; Sipl, Mirna; Sego, Krunoslav; Puseljic, Silvija; Rakipovic-Stojanovic, Andreja; Kovacic, Borna

    2015-01-01

    Key Clinical Message A surgical technique, materials used for abdominal wall reconstruction, and postoperative care are important for patient outcomes. We report the first case of neonate with Cantrell's pentalogy surviving early reconstruction of abdominal, diaphragmal and pericardial defects. Several recent investigations suggest that intraabdominal pressure monitoring may improve outcomes in this patient category. PMID:25678967

  8. Clinical anatomy of the inferior epigastric artery with special relevance to invasive procedures of the anterior abdominal wall

    PubMed Central

    Joy, Praisy; Prithishkumar, Ivan James; Isaac, Bina

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Injury to the inferior epigastric artery (IEA) has been reported following lower abdominal wall surgical incisions, abdominal peritoneocentesis and trocar placements at laparoscopic port sites, resulting in the formation of abdominal wall haematomas that may expand considerably due to lack of tissue resistance. The aim of this study was to localise its course in relation to standard anatomic landmarks and suggest safe areas for performance of invasive procedures. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Sixty IEAs of 30 adult cadavers (male = 19; female = 11) were dissected and the course of the IEA noted in relation to the mid-inguinal point, anterior superior iliac spine (ASIS) and umbilicus. RESULTS: The mean distance of the IEA from the midline was 4.45 ± 1.42 cm at the level of the mid-inguinal point, 4.10 ± 1.15 cm at the level of ASIS and 4.49 ± 1.15 cm at the level of umbilicus. There was an average of 3.3 branches per IEA with more branches arising from its lateral aspect. The IEA was situated within one-third (32%) of the distance between the midline and the sagittal plane through ASIS at all levels. CONCLUSION: To avoid injury to IEA, trocars can be safely inserted 5.5 cm [mean + 1 standard deviation (SD)] away from the midline (or) slightly more than one-third of the distance between the midline and a sagittal plane running through ASIS. These findings may be useful not only for laparoscopic procedures but also for image-guided biopsy, abdominal paracentesis, and placement of abdominal drains. PMID:27251822

  9. Effects of the Transient Blood Flow-Wall Interaction on the Wall Stress Distribution in Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Rubing; Geindreau, Christian; Lasheras, Juan

    2006-11-01

    Our static finite element analysis (FEA) of both idealized and real clinical models has shown that the maximum diameter and asymmetry have substantial influence on the AAA wall stress distribution. The thrombus inside the AAA was also found to reduce the magnitude of the wall stresses. To achieve a better understanding of the wall stress distribution in real AAAs, a dynamic FEA was also performed. We considered models, both symmetric and non-symmetric, in which the aorta is assumed isotropic with nonlinear material properties. For the limiting case of rigid walls, the evolution of the flow pattern and the wall shear stresses due to fluid flow at different stages of cardiac cycle predicted by our simulations are compared with experimental results obtained in in-vitro models. A good agreement is found between both results. Finally, we have extended the analysis to the physiologically correct case of deformable walls and characterized the transient effects on the wall stresses.

  10. Gas gangrene of the abdominal wall due to late-onset enteric fistula after polyester mesh repair of an incisional hernia.

    PubMed

    Moussi, A; Daldoul, S; Bourguiba, B; Othmani, D; Zaouche, A

    2012-04-01

    The occurrence of enteric fistulae after wall repair using a prosthetic mesh is a serious but, fortunately, rare complication. We report the case of a 66-year-old diabetic man who presented with gas gangrene of the abdominal wall due to an intra-abdominal abscess caused by intestinal erosion six years after an incisional hernia repair using a polyester mesh. The aim of this case report is to illustrate the seriousness of enteric fistula after parietal repair using a synthetic material.

  11. Delayed primary closure of contaminated abdominal wall defects with non-crosslinked porcine acellular dermal matrix compared with conventional staged repair: a retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Synthetic mesh has been used traditionally to repair abdominal wall defects, but its use is limited in the case of bacterial contamination. New biological materials are now being used successfully for delayed primary closure of contaminated abdominal wall defects. The costs of biological materials may prevent surgeons from using them. We compared the conventional staged repair of contaminated abdominal wall defects with a single-stage procedure using a non-crosslinked porcine acellular dermal matrix. Methods A total of 14 cases with Grade 3 contaminated abdominal wall defects underwent delayed primary closure of the abdomen using a non-crosslinked porcine acellular dermal matrix (Strattice™ Reconstructive Tissue Matrix, LifeCell Corp., Branchburg, NJ, USA). The results were compared with a group of 14 patients who had received conventional treatment for the repair of contaminated abdominal wall defects comprising a staged repair during two separate hospital admissions employing synthetic mesh. Treatment modalities, outcomes, and costs were compared. Results In all cases treated with delayed primary closure employing non-crosslinked porcine acellular dermal matrix, there were no complications related to its use. Two patients died due to unrelated events. Although treatment costs were estimated to be similar in the two groups, the patients treated with porcine acellular dermal matrix spent less time as an inpatient than those receiving conventional two-stage repair. Conclusions Delayed primary closure of contaminated abdominal wall defects using a non-crosslinked porcine acellular dermal matrix may be a suitable alternative to conventional staged repair. In our patients, it resulted in early restoration of abdominal wall function and shorter hospitalization. The costs for treating contaminated abdominal wall defects using porcine acellular dermal matrix during a single hospital admission were not higher than costs for conventional two-stage repair

  12. [Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Ziaja, K; Sedlak, L; Urbanek, T; Kostyra, J; Ludyga, T

    2000-01-01

    The reported incidence of inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm (IAAA) is from 2% to 14% of patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm and the etiology of this disease is still discussed--according to the literature several pathogenic theories have been proposed. From 1992 to 1997 32 patients with IAAA were operated on. The patients were mostly symptomatic--abdominal pain was present in 68.75% cases, back pain in 31.25%, fever in 12.5% and weight loss in 6.25% of the operated patients. In all the patients ultrasound examination was performed, in 4 patients CT and in 3 cases urography. All the patients were operated on and characteristic signs of inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm like: thickened aortic wall, perianeurysmal infiltration or retroperitoneal fibrosis with involvement of retroperitoneal structures were found. In all cases surgery was performed using transperitoneal approach; in three cases intraoperatively contiguous abdominal organs were injured, which was connected with their involvement into periaortic inflammation. In 4 cases clamping of the aorta was done at the level of the diaphragmatic hiatus. 3 patients (9.37%) died (one patient with ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm). Authors present diagnostic procedures and the differences in the surgical tactic, emphasizing the necessity of the surgical therapy in patients with inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm.

  13. The effects of modified wall squat exercises on average adults' deep abdominal muscle thickness and lumbar stability.

    PubMed

    Cho, Misuk

    2013-06-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of bridge exercises applying the abdominal drawing-in method and modified wall squat exercises on deep abdominal muscle thickness and lumbar stability. [Subjects] A total of 30 subjects were equally divided into an experimental group and a control group. [Methods] The experimental group completed modified wall squat exercises, and the control group performed bridge exercises. Both did so for 30 minutes three times per week over a six-week period. Both groups' transversus abdominis (Tra), internal oblique (IO), and multifidus muscle thickness were measured using ultrasonography, while their static lumbar stability and dynamic lumbar stability were measured using a pressure biofeedback unit. [Results] A comparison of the pre-intervention and post-intervention measures of the experimental group and the control group was made; the Tra and IO thicknesses were significantly different in both groups. [Conclusion] The modified wall squat exercise and bridge exercise affected the thicknesses of the Tra and the IO muscles. While the bridge exercise requirs space and a mattress to lie on, the modified wall squat exercise can be conveniently performed anytime.

  14. Expression of matrix metalloproteinases, their tissue inhibitors, and osteopontin in the wall of thoracic and abdominal aortas with dilatative pathology.

    PubMed

    Lesauskaite, Vaiva; Epistolato, Maria Carmela; Castagnini, Marta; Urbonavicius, Sigitas; Tanganelli, Piero

    2006-08-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) degrade extracellular matrix and may play a central role in the pathogenesis of aortic aneurysms. We studied 2 groups of patients: 15 with dilatative pathology of the ascending thoracic aorta and 17 with aneurysm of the abdominal aortic wall (AAA). We compared the expression of MMPs, tissue inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinases (TIMPs), and osteopontin in the wall of thoracic and abdominal aneurysms. In AAA, MMP-9 and TIMP-1 expression in inflammatory cells was higher than in smooth muscle cells (SMCs) (median score: 3.5 versus 1, P < .0001; 2 versus 1, P < .04, respectively), whereas MMP-2 demonstrated higher expression in SMCs than in inflammatory cells (median score: 0 versus 4, P < .0001). In ATA, MMP-2, MMP-9, TIMP-1, TIMP-2, TIMP-3, and osteopontin expression in SMCs was higher than in inflammatory cells (median score: 3 versus 0, P < .0001; 4 versus 1, P < .0005; 2 versus 0, P < .001; 5 versus 2, P < .0001; 2 versus 0, P < .005; and 5 versus 1.5, P < .0001, respectively), when both inflammatory cells of the media and the adventitia were considered together. The cellular expression of MMP-9 and their tissue inhibitors TIMP-1, TIMP-2, and TIMP-3 differs in the dilatative pathology of abdominal and thoracic aortas, so the hypothetical model of morphogenesis of AAA cannot completely explain the formation of dilatative pathology of the ascending thoracic aorta.

  15. Critical analysis of Strattice performance in complex abdominal wall reconstruction: intermediate-risk patients and early complications.

    PubMed

    Patel, Ketan M; Albino, Frank P; Nahabedian, Maurice Y; Bhanot, Parag

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the performance of a porcine-derived acellular dermal matrix (Strattice Reconstructive Tissue Matrix) in patients at increased risk for perioperative complications. We reviewed medical records for patients with complex abdominal wall reconstruction (AWR) and Strattice underlay from 2007 to 2010. Intermediate-risk patients were defined as having multiple comorbidities without abdominal infection. Forty-one patients met the inclusion criteria (mean age, 60 years; mean body mass index, 35.5 kg/m(2)). Comorbidities included coronary artery disease (63.4%), diabetes mellitus (36.6%), and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (17.1%). Fascial closure was achieved in 40 patients (97.6%). Average hospitalization was 6.4 days (range, 1-24 days). Complications included seroma (7.3%), wound dehiscence with Strattice exposure (4.9%), cellulitis (2.4%), and hematoma (2.4%). All patients achieved abdominal wall closure with no recurrent hernias or need for Strattice removal. Patients with multiple comorbidities at intermediate risk of postoperative complications can achieve successful, safe AWR with Strattice.

  16. The water method is effective in difficult colonoscopy - it enhances cecal intubation in unsedated patients with a history of abdominal surgery

    PubMed Central

    Mann, Surinder K; Leung, Joseph W; Siao-Salera, Rodelei M; Guy, Jackson

    2011-01-01

    Background Colonoscopy in unsedated patients in the US is considered to be difficult. Success rate of cecal intubation is limited by discomfort. Colonoscopy in patients with a history of abdominal surgery is also considered to be difficult due to adhesion-related bowel angulations. The water method has been shown to significantly reduce pain during colonoscopy. Objective To test the hypothesis that the water method enhances the completion of colonoscopy in unsedated patients with a history of abdominal surgery. Design The data bases of two parallel RCT were combined and analyzed. Setting Two Veterans Affairs endoscopy units. Patient and Methods The water and air methods were compared in these two parallel RCT examining unsedated patients. Those with a history of abdominal surgery were selected for evaluation. Main Outcome Measurements Completion of unsedated colonoscopy. Results Among patients with a history of abdominal surgery, the proportion completing unsedated colonoscopy in the water group (19 of 22) was significantly higher than that (11 of 22) in the air group (p=0.0217, Fisher's exact test). Limitations Small number of predominantly male veterans, unblinded colonoscopists, not all types of abdominal surgery (e.g. hysterectomy, gastrectomy) predisposing to difficult colonoscopy were represented. Conclusion This proof-of-principle assessment confirms that in patients with a history of abdominal surgery the water method significantly increases the proportion able to complete unsedated colonoscopy. The water method deserves to be evaluated in patients with other factors associated with difficult colonoscopy. PMID:22586531

  17. Restrictive versus liberal fluid therapy in major abdominal surgery (RELIEF): rationale and design for a multicentre randomised trial

    PubMed Central

    Myles, Paul; Bellomo, Rinaldo; Corcoran, Tomas; Forbes, Andrew; Wallace, Sophie; Peyton, Philip; Christophi, Chris; Story, David; Leslie, Kate; Serpell, Jonathan; McGuinness, Shay; Parke, Rachel

    2017-01-01

    Introduction The optimal intravenous fluid regimen for patients undergoing major abdominal surgery is unclear. However, results from many small studies suggest a restrictive regimen may lead to better outcomes. A large, definitive clinical trial evaluating perioperative fluid replacement in major abdominal surgery, therefore, is required. Methods/analysis We designed a pragmatic, multicentre, randomised, controlled trial (the RELIEF trial). A total of 3000 patients were enrolled in this study and randomly allocated to a restrictive or liberal fluid regimen in a 1:1 ratio, stratified by centre and planned critical care admission. The expected fluid volumes in the first 24 hour from the start of surgery in restrictive and liberal groups were ≤3.0 L and ≥5.4 L, respectively. Patient enrolment is complete, and follow-up for the primary end point is ongoing. The primary outcome is disability-free survival at 1 year after surgery, with disability defined as a persistent (at least 6 months) reduction in functional status using the 12-item version of the World Health Organisation Disability Assessment Schedule. Ethics/dissemination The RELIEF trial has been approved by the responsible ethics committees of all participating sites. Participant recruitment began in March 2013 and was completed in August 2016, and 1-year follow-up will conclude in August 2017. Publication of the results of the RELIEF trial is anticipated in early 2018. Trial registration number ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT01424150. PMID:28259855

  18. Abdominal wall reconstruction after resection of an enterocutaneous fistula with an island pedicled anterolateral thigh perforator flap. Case report.

    PubMed

    Ali, F; Safawi, E B; Zakaria, Z; Basiron, N

    2013-01-01

    Entero-cutaneous fistula resulting from a locally invasive large bowel carcinoma is a difficult surgical challenge. En-bloc resection of the involved organs and the entero-cutaneous fistula tract with a healthy tissue margin will result in a composite abdominal wall defect that requires closure. Reconstructive surgical options include primary closure, components separation and the use of local, regional or free flaps with or without prosthetic mesh. We report a case of an abdominal enterocutaneous fistula secondary to a locally invasive sigmoid carcinoma, which was reconstructed with a pedicled antero-lateral thigh perforator (ALT) flap. To our knowledge, this is the first case of a malignant entero-cutaneous fistula, which was reconstructed with an ALT flap.

  19. Tympanomastoidectomy: Comparison between canal wall-down and canal wall-up techniques in surgery for chronic otitis media

    PubMed Central

    Azevedo, Alexandre Fernandes de; Soares, Anna Bárbara de Castro; Garchet, Henrique Queiroz Correa; Sousa, Nicodemos José Alves de

    2013-01-01

    Summary Introduction: Chronic otitis media (COM) is an inflammatory condition associated with otorrhea as well as large and persistent perforations of the tympanic membrane in some cases. COM can also lead to cholesteatoma. Surgical treatment with canal wall-down and canal wall-up tympanomastoidectomy is considered for both types of illness. The choice of technique is controversial and is dependent on several factors, including the extent of disease. Objective: We aimed to evaluate surgical outcomes in COM patients with and without cholesteatoma treated with canal wall-down and canal wall-up tympanomastoidectomy. Disease eradication and post-operative auditory thresholds were assessed. Method: Patient records from the otorhinolaryngology department of a tertiary hospital were assessed retrospectively. Results: Patients who underwent canal wall-up tympanomastoidectomy had a higher rate of revision surgery, especially those with cholesteatoma. However, there were no statistically significant differences in post-operative hearing thresholds between the two techniques. Conclusion: The canal wall-down technique is superior to the canal wall-up technique, especially for patients with cholesteatoma. PMID:25992020

  20. Preparation of poly(L-lactic acid)-modified polypropylene mesh and its antiadhesion in experimental abdominal wall defect repair.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhigang; Zhang, Tianzhu; Li, Junsheng; Ji, Zhenling; Zhou, Hemei; Zhou, Xuefeng; Gu, Ning

    2014-01-01

    A new type of polypropylene (PP) hernia mesh, modified with poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA), was developed and used to repair rat abdominal wall defect. The PP mesh was first treated with oxygen plasma and then grafted with PLLA in phosphorus pentachloride (PCl5 ) solution in dichloride methane. The water contact angle changed during the procedure, and the coverage percentage of PLLA on the PP was about 80%. ATR-FTIR spectroscopy measurements showed the existence of carbonyl group absorption peak (1756.9 cm(-1) ), and atomic force microscope and scanning electron microscope morphological observation indicated that the surface of the PP mesh was covered with PLLA graft. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy spectra was used to probe chemical group changes and confirmed that the PLLA was grafted onto the PP. A total of 36 Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into six groups, and they received either modified meshes (experimental groups) or PP meshes (control groups) to repair abdominal wall defects. All animals survived until the end of the experiment. Rats in each group were dissected after the operation (after 1 week, 2 weeks, and 1 month, respectively), and the adhesion effects were evaluated. Sections of the mesh parietal peritoneum overlap were examined histologically and graded for inflammation reaction. Compared with the control groups, the experimental groups showed a better ability to resist peritoneal cavity adhesions (P < 0.05), and there was no increase in inflammation formation (P > 0.05). This new type of PLLA-modified PP mesh displayed an additional property of antiadhesion in animal abdominal wall defect repair.

  1. Helicobacter pylori Eradication Therapy for Thrombocytopenia after Surgery for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm with Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation

    PubMed Central

    Akiyama, Daichi; Okada, Hiroshi; Date, Kazuma; Furukawa, Hiroshi; Takeda, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is known to be rarely accompanied by disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). We report a case of AAA with DIC. An 81-year-old man with abdominal pain referred to our hospital. Computed tomography demonstrated an AAA (maximum diameter: 90 mm). The patient underwent a laparotomy, and an abdominal aorta replacement was performed. At the 3-month follow-up, the patient underwent Helicobacter pylori eradication treatment for 1 week. After treatment, the platelet count dramatically increased. The mechanism by which H. pylori eradication therapy improves hematological parameters has not been elucidated; however, this noninvasive treatment effectively resolved DIC associated with AAA. PMID:28018509

  2. Automatic identification and validation of planar collagen organization in the aorta wall with application to abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Polzer, Stanislav; Gasser, T Christian; Forsell, Caroline; Druckmüllerova, Hana; Tichy, Michal; Staffa, Robert; Vlachovsky, Robert; Bursa, Jiri

    2013-12-01

    Arterial physiology relies on a delicate three-dimensional (3D) organization of cells and extracellular matrix, which is remarkably altered by vascular diseases like abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA). The ability to explore the micro-histology of the aorta wall is important in the study of vascular pathologies and in the development of vascular constitutive models, i.e., mathematical descriptions of biomechanical properties of the wall. The present study reports and validates a fast image processing sequence capable of quantifying collagen fiber organization from histological stains. Powering and re-normalizing the histogram of the classical fast Fourier transformation (FFT) is a key step in the proposed analysis sequence. This modification introduces a powering parameter w, which was calibrated to best fit the reference data obtained using classical FFT and polarized light microscopy (PLM) of stained histological slices of AAA wall samples. The values of w = 3 and 7 give the best correlation (Pearson's correlation coefficient larger than 0.7, R 2 about 0.7) with the classical FFT approach and PLM measurements. A fast and operator independent method to identify collagen organization in the arterial wall was developed and validated. This overcomes severe limitations of currently applied methods like PLM to identify collagen organization in the arterial wall.

  3. Protein-sparing therapy after major abdominal surgery: lack of clinical effects. Protein-Sparing Therapy Study Group.

    PubMed Central

    Doglietto, G B; Gallitelli, L; Pacelli, F; Bellantone, R; Malerba, M; Sgadari, A; Crucitti, F

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: A prospective multicenter randomized trial was designed to evaluate the clinical efficacy of postoperative protein-sparing therapy. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: The metabolic effect of postoperative protein-sparing therapy has been shown by several studies, but the clinical utility of this treatment has not been investigated by large prospective trials. METHODS: Six hundred seventy-eight patients undergoing major elective abdominal surgery were randomly assigned to receive either protein-sparing therapy after surgery (protein-sparing therapy group) or conventional therapy (control group). The patients were monitored for postoperative complications and mortality. RESULTS: The rate of major postoperative complications was similar in both groups (protein-sparing therapy group, 19.5%; control group, 20.9%; p=0.66) as were the overall postoperative mortality rates (4.7% and 3.5%, respectively; p=0.43). CONCLUSIONS: The present study indicates that routine protein-sparing therapy for patients normonourished or mildly malnourished undergoing major abdominal surgery is not clinically justified. PMID:8633913

  4. Aminophylline partially prevents the decrease of body temperature during laparoscopic abdominal surgery.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dae Woo; Lee, Jung Ah; Jung, Hong Soo; Joo, Jin Deok; In, Jang Hyeok; Jeon, Yeon Soo; Chun, Ga Young; Choi, Jin Woo

    2014-08-01

    Aminophylline can elicit thermogenesis in rats or increase metabolic rate during cold stress in lambs. We tested the hypothesis that aminophylline would reduce the change in core body temperature during laparoscopic abdominal surgery requiring pneumoperitoneum. Fifty patients were randomly divided into an aminophylline group (n=25) and a saline control group (n=25). Esophageal temperature, index finger temperature, and hemodynamic variables, such as mean blood pressure and heart rate, were measured every 15 min during sevoflurane anesthesia. In the aminophylline group, esophageal temperatures at T45 (36.1±0.38 vs. 35.7±0.29, P=0.024), T60 (36.0±0.39 vs. 35.6±0.28, P=0.053), T75 (35.9±0.34 vs. 35.5±0.28, P=0.025), T90 (35.8±0.35 vs. 35.3±0.33, P=0.011), and T105 (35.8±0.36 vs. 35.1±0.53, P=0.017) and index finger temperatures at T15 (35.8±0.46 vs. 34.9±0.33, P<0.001), T30 (35.7±0.36 vs. 35.0±0.58, P=0.029), T45 (35.8±0.34 vs. 35.2±0.42, P=0.020), T60 (35.7±0.33 vs. 34.9±0.47, P=0.010), T75 (35.6±0.36 vs. 34.8±0.67, P=0.028), T90 (35.4±0.55 vs. 34.4±0.89, P=0.042), and T105 (34.9±0.53 vs. 33.9±0.85, P=0.024) were significantly higher than in the saline control group. Aminophylline is effective in maintaining the core temperature through a thermogenic effect, despite reduced peripheral thermoregulatory vasoconstriction.

  5. Efficacy of extended thrombo-prophylaxis in major abdominal surgery: what does the evidence show? A meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Bottaro, Federico Jorge; Elizondo, Maria Cristina; Doti, Carlos; Bruetman, Julio Enrique; Perez Moreno, Pablo Diego; Bullorsky, Eduardo Oscar; Ceresetto, Jose Manuel

    2008-06-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a frequent complication following major abdominal surgery. The use of low-molecular-weight heparins (LMWH) to prevent thrombotic events in these patients is a common and well documented practice. However, there is some controversy surrounding the duration of the prophylaxis, as it has been suggested that the risk persists for several weeks after surgery. The objective of this meta-analysis is to systematically review the clinical studies that compared safety and efficacy of extended use of LMWH (for three to four weeks after surgery) versus conventional in-hospital prophylaxis. An electronic data base search was performed. Only randomized, controlled studies were eligible. Data on the incidence of deep vein thrombosis (DVT), VTE and bleeding were extracted. Only three studies fulfilled the inclusion criteria. The indication for surgery was neoplastic disease in 70.6% (780/1104) of patients. The administration of extended LMWH prophylaxis significantly reduced the incidence of VTE, 5.93% (23/388) versus 13.6% (55/405), RR 0.44 (CI 95% 0.28 - 0.7); DVT 5.93% (23/388) versus 12.9% (52/402), RR 0.46 (CI 95% 0.29 - 0.74); proximal DVT 1% (4/388) versus 4.72% (19/402), RR 0.24 (CI 95% 0.09 - 0.67). We found no significant difference in major or minor bleeding between the two groups: 3.85% (21/545) in the extended thrombo-prophylaxis (ETP) group versus 3.48% (19/559) in the conventional prophylaxis group; RR 1.12 (CI 95% 0.61 - 2.06). There was no heterogeneity between the studies. We conclude that ETP with LMWH should be considered as a safe and useful strategy to prevent VTE in high-risk major abdominal surgery.

  6. Acute kidney injury, long-term renal function and mortality in patients undergoing major abdominal surgery: a cohort analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gameiro, Joana; Neves, Joana Briosa; Rodrigues, Natacha; Bekerman, Catarina; Melo, Maria João; Pereira, Marta; Teixeira, Catarina; Mendes, Inês; Jorge, Sofia; Rosa, Rosário; Lopes, José António

    2016-01-01

    Background Acute kidney injury (AKI) is frequent during hospitalization and may contribute to adverse consequences. We aimed to evaluate long-term adverse renal function and mortality after postoperative AKI in a cohort of patients undergoing major abdominal surgery. Methods We performed a retrospective analysis of adult patients who underwent major non-vascular abdominal surgery between January 2010 and February 2011 at the Department of Surgery II of Hospital de Santa Maria–Centro Hospitalar Lisboa Norte, Portugal. Exclusion criteria were as follows: chronic kidney disease on renal replacement therapy, undergoing renal replacement therapy the week before surgery, death before discharge and loss to follow-up through January 2014. Patients were categorized according to the development of postoperative AKI in the first 48 h after surgery using the Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes classification. AKI was defined by an increase in absolute serum creatinine (SCr) ≥0.3 mg/dL or by a percentage increase in SCr ≥50% and/or by a decrease in urine output to <0.5 mL/kg/h for >6 h. Adverse renal outcomes (need for long-term dialysis and/or a 25% decrease in estimated glomerular filtration rate after hospital discharge) and mortality after discharge were evaluated. Cumulative mortality was analysed with the Kaplan–Meier method and log-rank test and outcome predictive factors with the Cox regression. Significance was set at P < 0.05. Results Of 390 selected patients, 72 (18.5%) developed postoperative AKI. The median follow-up was 38 months. Adverse renal outcomes and death after hospital discharge were more frequent among AKI patients (47.2 versus 22.0%, P < 0.0001; and 47.2 versus 20.5%, P < 0.0001, respectively). The 4 year cumulative probability of death was 44.4% for AKI patients, while it was 19.8% for patients with no AKI (log-rank test, P < 0.0001). In multivariate analysis, AKI was a risk factor for adverse renal outcomes (adjusted hazard ratio 1.6, P

  7. Planning for operating room efficiency and faster anesthesia wake-up time in open major upper abdominal surgery

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Hou-Chuan; Chan, Shun-Ming; Lu, Chueng-He; Wong, Chih-Shung; Cherng, Chen-Hwan; Wu, Zhi-Fu

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Reducing anesthesia-controlled time (ACT) may improve operation room (OR) efficiency result from different anesthetic techniques. However, the information about the difference in ACT between desflurane (DES) anesthesia and propofol-based total intravenous anesthesia (TIVA) techniques for open major upper abdominal surgery under general anesthesia (GA) is not available in the literature. This retrospective study uses our hospital database to analyze the ACT of open major upper abdominal surgery without liver resection after either desflurane/fentanyl-based anesthesia or TIVA via target-controlled infusion with fentanyl/propofol from January 2010 to December 2011. The various time intervals including waiting for anesthesia time, anesthesia time, surgical time, extubation time, exit from OR after extubation, total OR time, and postanesthetic care unit (PACU) stay time and percentage of prolonged extubation (≥15 minutes) were compared between these 2 anesthetic techniques. We included data from 343 patients, with 159 patients receiving TIVA and 184 patients receiving DES. The only significant difference is extubation time, TIVA was faster than the DES group (8.5 ± 3.8 vs 9.4 ± 3.7 minutes; P = 0.04). The factors contributed to prolonged extubation were age, gender, body mass index, DES anesthesia, and anesthesia time. In our hospital, propofol-based TIVA by target-controlled infusion provides faster emergence compared with DES anesthesia; however, it did not improve OR efficiency in open major abdominal surgery. Older, male gender, higher body mass index, DES anesthesia, and lengthy anesthesia time were factors that contribute to extubation time. PMID:28207547

  8. Effects of glutamine on markers of intestinal inflammatory response and mucosal permeability in abdominal surgery patients: A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Xiao-Liang; Yu, Ting-Ting; Kang, Kai; Zhao, Jian

    2016-01-01

    The present meta-analysis was carried out to determine whether supplementation with glutamine (Gln) would reduce the intestinal inflammatory response and mucosal permeability in patients undergoing abdominal surgery. The PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Science, and The Cochrane Library databases were searched for randomized controlled trials on the effects of supplementation with Gln, and published from August, 1966 to June 2014. Inclusion criteria for the meta-analysis were: i) Study design was a randomized controlled trial, ii) study included patients undergoing abdominal surgery, iii) study patients received a supplementation with Gln peptide (Ala-Gln or Gly-Gln) whereas control patients did not use any supplements, and iv) study outcomes included inflammatory markers [C-reactive protein (CRP), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and interleukin (IL)-6, and IL-2 receptor] and markers of intestinal permeability [lactulose/mannitol, diamine oxidase, D(−)lactic acid, and endotoxin]. Qualities of controlled trials were assessed using the Jadad score. Meta-analyses were performed with fixed- or random-effect models depending on the heterogeneity of studies. There were 21 trials meeting the inclusion criteria. The meta-analysis revealed that the levels of CRP, TNF-α, and IL-6 in patients supplemented with Gln were significantly lower than those in control patients, whereas the levels of IL-2 receptor were increased by Gln supplementation. Gln also significantly decreased the lactulose/mannitol ratio, the levels of diamine oxidase and endotoxin, and tended to decrease the levels of cyclic D-lactic acid. In conclusion, Gln appears to effectively reduce the inflammatory response and intestinal mucosal permeability in patients after abdominal surgery. PMID:28105083

  9. Low pre-operative heart rate variability and complexity are associated with hypotension after anesthesia induction in major abdominal surgery.

    PubMed

    Padley, James R; Ben-Menachem, Erez

    2017-03-14

    Significant hypotension after induction of general anesthesia is common and has the potential for serious complications. This study aimed to determine if pre-operative heart rate variability (HRV) was associated with post-induction hypotension in patients undergoing major abdominal surgery. Patients undergoing semi-elective major abdominal surgery were consecutively recruited during pre-admission clinic assessment. Exclusion criteria included cardiac conduction disease, arrhythmias or severe liver or renal disease. Ten minutes of electrocardiogram at 1024 Hz were recorded a median of 3 days pre-operatively. Pre-operative HRV parameters were compared in patients who experienced significant hypotension (fall in systolic and mean arterial pressure (MAP) >30% baseline and MAP ≤60 mmHg) versus those who remained haemodynamically stable after induction of general anesthesia with propofol and fentanyl. Patients who experienced hypotension after general anesthesia induction had significantly lower pre-operative HRV (SDNN 16 vs. 37 ms, p < 0.001), reduced spectral power (total power 262 vs. 1236 ms(2), p = 0.002) and reduced correlation dimension, a measure of signal complexity (0.11 vs. 2.13, p < 0.001). Hypotension occurred relatively frequently in our cohort and was associated with a higher ASA grade (36 vs. 6% ASA 3, p = 0.036), hence post-induction hypotension and lower HRV may be associated with severity of illness or poor physiological reserve. Pre-operative HRV was a useful screening tool in identifying patients undergoing major abdominal surgery who were at risk of haemodynamic instability after anesthesia induction.

  10. Perioperative lung-protective ventilation strategy reduces postoperative pulmonary complications in patients undergoing thoracic and major abdominal surgery

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The occurrence of postoperative pulmonary complications is strongly associated with increased hospital mortality and prolonged postoperative hospital stays. Although protective lung ventilation is commonly used in the intensive care unit, low tidal volume ventilation in the operating room is not a routine strategy. Low tidal volume ventilation, moderate positive end-expiratory pressure, and repeated recruitment maneuvers, particularly for high-risk patients undergoing major abdominal surgery, can reduce postoperative pulmonary complications. Facilitating perioperative bundle care by combining prophylactic and postoperative positive-pressure ventilation with intraoperative lung-protective ventilation may be helpful to reduce postoperative pulmonary complications. PMID:26885294

  11. Bilateral Pseudomonas aeruginosa endogenous endophthalmitis in an immune-competent patient with nosocomial urosepsis following abdominal surgery.

    PubMed

    Degoricija, Vesna; Skerk, Vedrana; Vatavuk, Zoran; Knezević, Tamara; Sefer, Sinisa; Vućicević, Zeljko

    2011-06-01

    Endogenous endophthalmitis is a vision-threatening condition that results from hematogenous spread of infection to the eye, originating from a distant primary focus. It is considered as a rare entity that predominantly occurs in immune-compromised patients. We present a case of a critically ill immune-competent patient who underwent abdominal surgery later followed by nosocomial urosepsis complicated with bilateral Pseudomonas aeruginosa endogenous endophthalmitis that resulted in blindness. This case is clinically important because of the absence of predisposing factors for this kind of eye infection.

  12. The behavior of different types of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) prostheses in the reparative scarring process of abdominal wall defects.

    PubMed

    Buján, J; Contreras, L A; Carrera-San Martín, A; Bellón, J M

    1997-07-01

    Currently one of the most widely used prosthetic materials in the repair of abdominal wall defects, is expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE). It has been suggested that its behavior with respect to the reparative process may depend on its structure. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of the structure of 3 ePTFE prostheses on the scarring process in an abdominal-wall-defect experimental model. The prostheses employed were the Soft Tissue Patch (STP) which is laminar in structure, Mycro Mesh (MM) which is multilaminar with perforations, and the Dual Mesh (DM) prosthesis which has one non-porous surface. Abdominal wall defects (7 x 5 cm) were created in 36 New Zealand rabbits and repaired using fragments of STP, MM and DM. Follow-up periods were 14, 30, 60 and 90 days post-implant. At these times prostheses were macroscopically examined for the presence of infection and/or rejection and the formation of adhesions to abdominal viscera. Specimens were also taken for microscopic analysis (optical and scanning electron) and for immunohistochemical analysis using the rabbit macrophage-specific monoclonal antibody RAM-11. Labelled macrophage counts were performed at each follow-up session. No cases of infection or rejection were found. Loose adhesions between prosthesis and underlying viscera were observed in 2 of the STP, 4 of the MM and 2 of the DM implants. STP and DM implants were progressively encapsulated by organized connective tissue on both peritoneal and subcutaneous surfaces. Cellular colonization was observed on both STP surfaces and on the porous surface of the DM although no more than a third of the biomaterial was penetrated by cells in either case. Colonization was very slight at prosthesis anchorage points. MM implants differed only in the formation of connective tissue bridges in perforated areas, and cellular infiltration in interlaminar spaces. Macrophage response was similar in the 3 prostheses with a reduction in RAM-11 labelled

  13. Carbon nanotubes as VEGF carriers to improve the early vascularization of porcine small intestinal submucosa in abdominal wall defect repair

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhengni; Feng, Xueyi; Wang, Huichun; Ma, Jun; Liu, Wei; Cui, Daxiang; Gu, Yan; Tang, Rui

    2014-01-01

    Insufficient early vascularization in biological meshes, resulting in limited host tissue incorporation, is thought to be the primary cause for the failure of abdominal wall defect repair after implantation. The sustained release of exogenous angiogenic factors from a biocompatible nanomaterial might be a way to overcome this limitation. In the study reported here, multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNT) were functionalized by plasma polymerization to deliver vascular endothelial growth factor165 (VEGF165). The novel VEGF165-controlled released system was incorporated into porcine small intestinal submucosa (PSIS) to construct a composite scaffold. Scaffolds incorporating varying amounts of VEGF165-loaded functionalized MWNT were characterized in vitro. At 5 weight percent MWNT, the scaffolds exhibited optimal properties and were implanted in rats to repair abdominal wall defects. PSIS scaffolds incorporating VEGF165-loaded MWNT (VEGF–MWNT–PSIS) contributed to early vascularization from 2–12 weeks postimplantation and obtained more effective collagen deposition and exhibited improved tensile strength at 24 weeks postimplantation compared to PSIS or PSIS scaffolds, incorporating MWNT without VEGF165 loading (MWNT–PSIS). PMID:24648727

  14. Diagnostic Accuracy of Abdominal wall Ultrasonography and Local Wound Exploration in Predicting the Need for Laparotomy following Stab Wound

    PubMed Central

    Vafaei, Ali; Heidari, Kamran; Saboorizadeh, Afshin; shams akhtari, Amin

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Screening of patients with anterior abdominal penetrating trauma in need for laparotomy is an important issue in management of these cases. This study aimed to compare the accuracy of abdominal wall ultrasonography (AWU) and local wound exploration (LWE) in this regard. Methods: This diagnostic accuracy study was conducted on ≥ 18 year-old patients presenting to emergency department with anterior abdominal stab wound and stable hemodynamics, to compare the characteristics of AWU and LWE in screening of patients in need of laparotomy. Results: 50 cases with the mean age of 28.44 ± 7.14 years were included (80% male). Sensitivity, specificity and area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve of AWU were 70.58 (95% CI: 44.04 – 88.62), 93.33 (95% CI: 76.49 – 98.83), and 81.96 (95% CI: 69.91 – 94.01), respectively. These measures were 88.23 (62.25 – 97.93), 93.33 (76.49 – 98.83), and 90.78 (95% CI: 81.67 – 99.89) for LWE, respectively. The difference in overall accuracy of the two methods was not statistically significant (p = 0.0641). Conclusion: Based on the findings of the present study, AWU and LWE had the same specificity but different sensitivities in screening of anterior abdominal stab wound patients in need of laparotomy. The overall accuracy of LWE was slightly higher (91.48% versus 85.1%). PMID:28286841

  15. Reproducibility of The Abdominal and Chest Wall Position by Voluntary Breath-Hold Technique Using a Laser-Based Monitoring and Visual Feedback System

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Katsumasa . E-mail: nakam@radiol.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp; Shioyama, Yoshiyuki; Nomoto, Satoru; Ohga, Saiji; Toba, Takashi; Yoshitake, Tadamasa; Anai, Shigeo; Terashima, Hiromi; Honda, Hiroshi

    2007-05-01

    Purpose: The voluntary breath-hold (BH) technique is a simple method to control the respiration-related motion of a tumor during irradiation. However, the abdominal and chest wall position may not be accurately reproduced using the BH technique. The purpose of this study was to examine whether visual feedback can reduce the fluctuation in wall motion during BH using a new respiratory monitoring device. Methods and Materials: We developed a laser-based BH monitoring and visual feedback system. For this study, five healthy volunteers were enrolled. The volunteers, practicing abdominal breathing, performed shallow end-expiration BH (SEBH), shallow end-inspiration BH (SIBH), and deep end-inspiration BH (DIBH) with or without visual feedback. The abdominal and chest wall positions were measured at 80-ms intervals during BHs. Results: The fluctuation in the chest wall position was smaller than that of the abdominal wall position. The reproducibility of the wall position was improved by visual feedback. With a monitoring device, visual feedback reduced the mean deviation of the abdominal wall from 2.1 {+-} 1.3 mm to 1.5 {+-} 0.5 mm, 2.5 {+-} 1.9 mm to 1.1 {+-} 0.4 mm, and 6.6 {+-} 2.4 mm to 2.6 {+-} 1.4 mm in SEBH, SIBH, and DIBH, respectively. Conclusions: Volunteers can perform the BH maneuver in a highly reproducible fashion when informed about the position of the wall, although in the case of DIBH, the deviation in the wall position remained substantial.

  16. Wound Edge Protectors in Open Abdominal Surgery to Reduce Surgical Site Infections: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Mihaljevic, André L.; Müller, Tara C.; Kehl, Victoria; Friess, Helmut; Kleeff, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    Importance Surgical site infections remain one of the most frequent complications following abdominal surgery and cause substantial costs, morbidity and mortality. Objective To assess the effectiveness of wound edge protectors in open abdominal surgery in reducing surgical site infections. Evidence Review A systematic literature search was conducted according to a prespecified review protocol in a variety of data-bases combined with hand-searches for randomized controlled trials on wound edge protectors in patients undergoing laparotomy. A qualitative and quantitative analysis of included trials was conducted. Findings We identified 16 randomized controlled trials including 3695 patients investigating wound edge protectors published between 1972 and 2014. Critical appraisal uncovered a number of methodological flaws, predominantly in the older trials. Wound edge protectors significantly reduced the rate of surgical site infections (risk ratio 0.65; 95%CI, 0.51–0.83; p = 0.0007; I2 = 52%). The results were robust in a number of sensitivity analyses. A similar effect size was found in the subgroup of patients undergoing colorectal surgery (risk ratio 0.65; 95%CI, 0.44–0.97; p = 0.04; I2 = 56%). Of the two common types of wound protectors double ring devices were found to exhibit a greater protective effect (risk ratio 0.29; 95%CI, 0.15–0.55) than single-ring devices (risk ratio 0.71; 95%CI, 0.54–0.92), but this might largely be due to the lower quality of available data for double-ring devices. Exploratory subgroup analyses for the degree of contamination showed a larger protective effect in contaminated cases (0.44; 95%CI, 0.28–0.67; p = 0.0002, I2 = 23%) than in clean-contaminated surgeries (0.72, 95%CI, 0.57–0.91; p = 0.005; I2 = 46%) and a strong effect on the reduction of superficial surgical site infections (risk ratio 0.45; 95%CI, 0.24–0.82; p = 0.001; I2 = 72%). Conclusions and Relevance Wound edge protectors significantly reduce the rate of

  17. Decreased monocyte class II MHC expression following major abdominal surgery in children is related to operative stress.

    PubMed

    McHoney, M; Klein, N J; Eaton, S; Pierro, A

    2006-04-01

    Monocyte class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) expression is necessary for antigen presentation and stimulation of T-cells. The aim of this study was to correlate monocyte class II MHC response to operative stress in children and the possible influence of cytokines in the postoperative period. We studied 21 children undergoing elective abdominal surgery. Operative stress score (OSS) was calculated. Monocyte class II MHC expression was measured preoperatively, immediately after surgery, 24 and 48 h postoperatively, using flow cytometry. Class II MHC is expressed as mean fluorescence intensity (MFI) of monocytes expressing MHC (mean +/- SD). Cytokine levels (interleukins 1ra, 6, and 10, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha) were also measured. Data between time points were compared using repeated measures ANOVA. There was an immediate postoperative decrease in class II MHC expression, with lowest levels 24 h postoperatively (preoperative 50 +/- 23.6, 24 h 18.2 +/- 9.4, P < 0.0001 vs. preoperative). At 48 h there was partial recovery in class II MHC, but levels were still significantly lower than preoperative (23.9 +/- 11.1, P < 0.001). The degree of monocyte depression was related to the magnitude of operative stress. Patients who had OSS <10 displayed some recovery in expression at 48 h 25.5 +/- 11.1), whereas in patients with OSS > or = 10 (severe surgical stress), expression further decreased at 48 h (MFI 14.0 +/- 0.1). There was an elevation of interleukin-1ra in the immediate postoperative period in both groups. There was no elevation in the other cytokines. Abdominal surgery in children decreases monocyte MHC expression. Class II MHC depression was related to magnitude of surgical trauma, implying that more severe immuneparesis follows surgery of greater magnitude. This may predispose to postoperative infection.

  18. The quasi-static failure properties of the abdominal aortic aneurysm wall estimated by a mixed experimental-numerical approach.

    PubMed

    Forsell, Caroline; Swedenborg, Jesper; Roy, Joy; Gasser, T Christian

    2013-07-01

    Assessing the risk for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) rupture is critical in the management of aneurysm patients and an individual assessment is possible with the biomechanical rupture risk assessment. Such an assessment could potentially be improved by a constitutive AAA wall model that accounts for irreversible damage-related deformations. Because of that the present study estimated the elastic and inelastic properties of the AAA wall through a mixed experimental-numerical approach. Specifically, finite element (FE) models of bone-shaped tensile specimens were used to merge data from failure testing of the AAA wall with their measured collagen orientation distribution. A histo-mechanical constitutive model for collagen fibers was employed, where plastic fibril sliding determined not only remaining deformations but also weakening of the fiber. The developed FE models were able to replicate the experimentally recorded load-displacement property of all 16 AAA wall specimens that were investigated in the study. Tensile testing in longitudinal direction of the AAA defined a Cauchy strength of 569(SD 411) kPa that was reached at a stretch of 1.436(SD 0.118). The stiffness and strength of specimens decreased with the wall thickness and were elevated (p = 0.018; p = 0.030) in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Smoking affected the tissue parameters that were related to the irreversible deformation response, and no correlation with gender and age was found. The observed effects on the biomechanical properties of the AAA wall could have long-term consequences for the management of aneurysm patients, i.e., specifically they might influence future AAA rupture risk assessments. However, in order to design appropriate clinical validation studies our findings should firstly be verified in a larger patient cohort.

  19. Recurrent incisional hernia, enterocutaneous fistula and loss of the substance of the abdominal wall: plastic with organic prosthesis, skin graft and VAC therapy. Clinical case.

    PubMed

    Nicodemi, Sara; Corelli, Sergio; Sacchi, Marco; Ricciardi, Edoardo; Costantino, Annarita; Di Legge, Pietro; Ceci, Francesco; Cipriani, Benedetta; Martellucci, Annunziata; Santilli, Mario; Orsini, Silvia; Tudisco, Antonella; Stagnitti, Franco

    2015-01-01

    Surgical wounds dehiscence is a serious post-operatory complication, with an incidence between 0.4% and 3.5%. Mortality is more than 45%. Complex wounds treatment may require a multidisciplinary management. VAC Therapy could be an alternative treatment regarding complex wound. VAC therapy has been recently introduced on skin's graft tissue management reducing skin graft rejection. The use of biological prosthesis has been tested in a contaminated field, better than synthetic meshes, which often need to be removed. The Permacol is more resistant to degradation by proteases due to its cross-links. Surgery is still considered the best treatment for digestive fistula. A 58 years old obese woman come to our attention, she was operated for an abdominal hernia. She had a post-operatory entero-cutaneous fistula. She was submitted to bowel resection, the anastomosis has been tailored and the hernia of the abdominal wall has been repaired with biological mesh for managing such condition. She had a wound dehiscence with loss of substance and the exposure of the biological prosthesis, nearly 20 cm diameter. She was treated first with antibiotic therapy and simple medications. In addiction, antibiotic therapy was necessary late associated to 7 months with advanced medications allowed a small reduction's defect. Because of its, treatment went on for two more months using VAC therapy. Antibiotic's therapy was finally suspended. The VAC therapy allowed the reduction of the gap, between skin and subcutaneous tissue, and the defect's size preparing a suitable ground for the skin graft. The graft, managed with the vac therapy, was necessary to complete the healing process.

  20. The safe use of epidural anesthesia after subcutaneous injection of low-dose heparin in general abdominal surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kassis, Jeannine; Fugère, François; Dubé, Serge

    2000-01-01

    Objective To determine if epidural anesthesia after the subcutaneous injection of low-dose unfractionated heparin (LDUH) in patients who undergo elective bowel surgery is safe with respect to hemorrhagic complications. Design A prospective cohort study. Setting Two hospitals affiliated with the Université de Montréal. Patients Fifty patients scheduled for elective bowel surgery. Intervention Subcutaneous injection of 5000 units of LDUH and elective surgery for colonic carcinoma, chronic diverticulosis or inflammatory bowel disease. Main outcome measures Activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), anti-IIa and anti-Xa heparin levels measured before and 2 and 4 hours after injection of LDUH. Results In no case was the heparin anti-IIa or anti-Xa level higher than 0.20 U/mL, which is considered a significant detectable level of heparin. Conclusion LDUH given subcutaneously is not associated with significant detectable heparin levels, so epidural anesthesia should be safe when performed 2 hours after LDUH injection in patients who undergo general abdominal surgery in the absence of any other impairment of hemostasis. PMID:10948690

  1. Reconstruction of Abdominal Wall Defects Using a Pedicled Anterolateral Thigh Flap including the Vastus Lateralis Muscle: A Report of Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    Fujioka, Masaki; Ishiyama, Satoko

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of abdominal wall reconstruction is to prevent hernias and protect the abdominal viscera. In cases involving full-thickness defects of the rectus abdominis muscle, the muscle layer should be repaired. We present 2 cases in which full-thickness lower rectus abdominis muscle defects were reconstructed using vastus lateralis-anterolateral thigh flaps. The pedicled vastus lateralis-anterolateral thigh flap provides skin, fascia, and muscle tissue. Furthermore, it has a long neurovascular pedicle and can reach up to the periumbilical area and cover large defects. We consider that this muscle flap is a good option for repairing full-thickness lower abdominal defects. PMID:28074168

  2. Treatment of a chronic vesicocutaneous fistula and abdominal wall defect after resection of a soft tissue sarcoma using a bipedicled latissimus dorsi and serratus anterior free flap.

    PubMed

    Ludolph, Ingo; Apel, Hendrik; Horch, Raymund E; Beier, Justus P

    2014-11-01

    We present a surgical treatment for bladder reconstruction in a case of chronic vesicocutaneous radiation-induced fistula and reconstruction of the abdominal wall after resection of a liposarcoma in the rectus abdominis muscle. Fistulas are sequelae after radiotherapy. To regain bladder function and reconstitute abdominal wall stability, a microsurgical flap approach should be considered. A male patient underwent resection of a liposarcoma in the rectus abdominis muscle with adjuvant radiotherapy, suffering from a chronic vesicocutaneous fistula. A bipedicled combined latissimus dorsi and serratus anterior flap was carried out after resection of the fistula for reconstruction of the urine bladder and the abdominal wall. Ascending urethrography 4 weeks postoperatively showed no leakage. In the 4-month follow-up period, no signs of recurrence of the fistula or herniation occurred. A bipedicled flap allowed reconstruction of the urine bladder and the abdominal wall. Using non-irradiated, well-perfused intra-abdominal muscle tissue over the urine bladder prevented recurrence of the fistula.

  3. Obesity and the Risk for Surgical Site Infection in Abdominal Surgery.

    PubMed

    Winfield, Robert D; Reese, Stacey; Bochicchio, Kelly; Mazuski, John E; Bochicchio, Grant V

    2016-04-01

    Obesity is a risk factor for surgical site infection (SSI) after abdominal procedures; however, data characterizing the risk of SSI in obese patients during abdominal procedures are lacking. We hypothesized that obesity is an independent risk factor for SSI across wound classes. We analyzed American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS-NSQIP) data for 2011. We calculated body mass index (BMI), classifying patients according to National Institute of Health (NIH) BMI groups. We excluded records in which height/weight was not recorded and patients with BMI less than 18.5. We examined patients undergoing open abdominal procedures, performing univariate and multivariate analyses to assess the relative contribution of obesity to SSI. Study criteria were met by 89,148 patients. Obese and morbidly obese patients had significantly greater SSI rates in clean and clean-contaminated cases but not contaminated or dirty/infected cases. Logistic regression confirmed obesity and morbid obesity as being independently associated with the overall SSI development, specifically in clean [Obesity odds ratio (OR) = 1.757, morbid obesity OR = 2.544, P < 0.001] and clean-contaminated (obesity OR = 1.239, morbid obesity OR = 1.287, P < 0.001) cases. Obesity is associated with increased risk of SSI overall, specifically in clean and clean-contaminated abdominal procedures; this is independent of diabetes mellitus. Novel techniques are needed to reduce SSI in this high-risk patient population.

  4. Paravertebral block in paediatric abdominal surgery-a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized trials.

    PubMed

    Page, E A; Taylor, K L

    2017-02-01

    The increased popularity of paravertebral block (PVB) can be attributed to its relative safety and comparable efficacy when compared with epidural analgesia. It has thus been recommended for open cholecystectomy and other less painful surgeries such as inguinal herniorraphy and appendectomy. We performed a systematic review of PVB in paediatric abdominal conditions to assess its clinical efficacy and side effects compared with other analgesic therapies.A search of Medline, Embase, and Web of Science and hand-searching references from inception date to May 2016 was done. Relevant studies were randomized clinical trials in patients 0-18 years old comparing PVB (single shot or continuous catheter) with any comparator and analgesic medication. Pain scores, rescue analgesia and adverse events were compared.The systematic reviews identified six trials enrolling 358 paediatric patients. PVB medications included bupivacaine, ropivacaine, lidocaine, and fentanyl. Surgical procedures included inguinal herniorraphy, cholecystectomy, and appendectomy. The standardized mean difference in early pain scores favoured PVB: 0.85 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.12-1.58] at 4-6 h and 0.64 (95% CI 0.28-1.00) at 24 h. One study reported a reduced length of stay. Parental [odds ratio (OR) 5.12 (95% CI 2.59-10.1)] and surgeon [OR 6.05 (95% CI 2.25-16.3)] satisfaction were higher in those receiving a PVB. No major complications occurred with a PVB.PVB resulted in minimally improved pain scores for up to 24 h after surgery, reduced rescue analgesia requirements, and increased surgeon and parental satisfaction. PVB is a good alternative to caudal and ilioinguinal block in paediatric abdominal surgery.

  5. Nutritional Risk in Major Abdominal Surgery: Protocol of a Prospective Observational Trial to Evaluate the Prognostic Value of Different Nutritional Scores in Pancreatic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Probst, Pascal; Haller, Sebastian; Dörr-Harim, Colette; Bruckner, Thomas; Ulrich, Alexis; Hackert, Thilo; Diener, Markus K

    2015-01-01

    Background The influence of patients’ preoperative nutritional status on their clinical outcome has already been proven. Therefore, patients with malnutrition are in need of additional therapeutic efforts. However, for pancreatic surgery, evidence suggesting the adequacy of existing nutritional assessment scores to estimate malnutrition associated with postoperative outcome is limited. Objective The aim of the observational trial “Nutritional Risk in Major Abdominal Surgery (NURIMAS) Pancreas” is to prospectively assess and analyze different nutritional assessment scores for their prognostic value on postoperative complications in patients undergoing pancreatic surgery. Methods All patients scheduled to receive elective pancreatic surgery at the University Hospital of Heidelberg will be screened for eligibility. Preoperatively, 12 nutritional assessment scores will be collected and patients will be assigned either at risk or not at risk for malnutrition. The postoperative course will be followed prospectively and complications according to the Clavien-Dindo classification will be recorded. The prognostic value for complications will be evaluated for every score in a univariable and multivariable analysis corrected for known risk factors in pancreatic surgery. Results Final data analysis is expected to be available during Spring 2016. Conclusions The NURIMAS Pancreas trial is a monocentric, prospective, observational trial aiming to find the most predictive clinical nutritional assessment score for postoperative complications. Using the results of this protocol as a knowledge base, it is possible to conduct nutritional risk-guided intervention trials to prevent postoperative complications in the pancreatic surgical population. Trial Registration germanctr.de: DRKS00006340; https://drks-neu.uniklinik-freiburg.de/drks_web/navigate.do?navigationId=trial.HTML&TRIAL_ID=DRKS00006340 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6bzXWSRYZ) PMID:26573991

  6. Novel superhydrophilic poly(l-lactic acid-co-ε-caprolactone)/fibrinogen electrospun patch for rat abdominal wall reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhang; Li, Shaojie; Su, Ling; Sun, Kang; Wu, Xujun; Wu, Feng; Huang, Weihong; Yang, Li; Tang, Jianxiong; He, Hongbing

    2015-08-01

    A novel superhydrophilic hybrid scaffold was created by electrospinning a mixture of poly(l-lactic acid-co-ε-caprolactone) and formulated fibrinogen. The hybrid scaffolds possess the combined benefits of each individual component, such as moderate mechanical strength and excellent biocompatibility. In vitro studies also revealed that endothelial cells seeded on the hybrid scaffolds achieved a relatively high level of cell attachment after three days of culture and a significant increase in the proliferation rate after seven days of culture, compared with pure fibrinogen or poly(l-lactic acid-co-ε-caprolactone) scaffolds. A comparative study of hybrid and pure poly(l-lactic acid-co-ε-caprolactone) patches was performed in an abdominal wall defect model in rats. In both groups, implants degraded by six months, but muscle reconstruction was only observed in the hybrid patch group.

  7. [Results of partial splenic resection and transposition to the lateral abdominal wall in portal hypertension in childhood].

    PubMed

    Bennek, J; Tröbs, R B; Mühlig, K; Richter, T

    1996-01-01

    Between 1977 and 1995, 19 children with portal hypertension (nine extrahepatic, ten intrahepatic) were treated by transpositioning the spleen into the left abdominal wall. Among the patients with intrahepatic portal hypertension three died. Two patients underwent secondary diminuition of the transposed spleen due to relapsed hypersplenism. In one of our first patients the transposed spleen atrophied after tangential resection. All surviving patients except one preserved hepatic function. The serum colloid osmotic pressure was stable. Plasma ammonia levels were normal. Serum immunoglobulins (IgG, IgM, IgA and IgG subclasses) and complement components (C3c, C4) were analyzed. After transposition patients had normal or slightly elevated values of these proteins compared with controls.

  8. Behaviour of a New Composite Mesh for the Repair of Full-Thickness Abdominal Wall Defects in a Rabbit Model

    PubMed Central

    Pascual, Gemma; Sotomayor, Sandra; Rodríguez, Marta; Bayon, Yves; Bellón, Juan M.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Composite biomaterials designed for the repair of abdominal wall defects are composed of a mesh component and a laminar barrier in contact with the visceral peritoneum. This study assesses the behaviour of a new composite mesh by comparing it with two latest-generation composites currently used in clinical practice. Methods Defects (7x5cm) created in the anterior abdominal wall of New Zealand White rabbits were repaired using a polypropylene mesh and the composites: PhysiomeshTM; VentralightTM and a new composite mesh with a three-dimensional macroporous polyester structure and an oxidized collagen/chitosan barrier. Animals were sacrificed on days 14 and 90 postimplant. Specimens were processed to determine host tissue incorporation, gene/protein expression of neo-collagens (RT-PCR/immunofluorescence), macrophage response (RAM-11-immunolabelling) and biomechanical resistance. On postoperative days 7/14, each animal was examined laparoscopically to quantify adhesions between the visceral peritoneum and implant. Results The new composite mesh showed the lowest incidence of seroma in the short term. At each time point, the mesh surface covered with adhesions was greater in controls than composites. By day 14, the implants were fully infiltrated by a loose connective tissue that became denser over time. At 90 days, the peritoneal mesh surface was lined with a stable mesothelium. The new composite mesh induced more rapid tissue maturation than PhysiomeshTM, giving rise to a neoformed tissue containing more type I collagen. In VentralightTM the macrophage reaction was intense and significantly greater than the other composites at both follow-up times. Tensile strengths were similar for each biomaterial. Conclusions All composites showed optimal peritoneal behaviour, inducing good peritoneal regeneration and scarce postoperative adhesion formation. A greater foreign body reaction was observed for VentralightTM. All composites induced good collagen deposition

  9. [Types of abdominal war injuries in relation to colonic injuries analyzed during 2 war years of treatment at the Clinic for Abdominal Surgery in Sarajevo].

    PubMed

    Tanović, Haris

    2003-01-01

    The basic characteristics of war in Sarajevo are occasional shelling, sniper fire, unexpected shelling and a lack of a front line in the classic sense of the word. The extent of the wound is the key factor in deciding how the patient is to be treated. A primary contamination of this kind of wound has all the conditions to turn into a manifest infection. The abdomen wounds, because of their severity and direct threat to life, are among the most dangerous wounds altogether. They make up on average 10% of all war wounds and the mortality of these patients by today's literature is high, about 6%. The aims of this paper are to show which organs in the abdomen are wounded and what is their relationship to the wounding of the colon, and to show what is the relation between multiple and isolated wounding of the abdomen. During the years 1992 and 1993, 1106 patients with war wounds were treated at the clinic for the abdominal surgery. From that number 71 patients were treated with explorative laparotomy. The large intestine was injured in 274 patients while 221 patients had injuries of the small intestine. An injury of the liver was found in 165 cases. The gall bladder was injured in 18 cases. The stomach was injured in 324 patients. The pancreas was damaged in 72 patients. There were 94 cases of injured spleens. The kidneys were wounded in 30 cases. In 40 cases there was bleeding from the retroperitoncum. Treatment of the omentumen was carried out in 753 patients. The number of patients who did not survive is 135 of which 44 had an injury of the large intestine. A retrospective analysis data shows that the number of multiple wounds makes up over 98% of all wounds. Isolated wounds of abdominal organs are found in less than 2% of all cases. The increase mortality in our research can be explained greater energy of the projectiles which amplify the acceleration at asphalt surfaces which product the greater destructions of the tissue and the massiveness of the injuries.

  10. Mastoid Obliteration with Autologous Bone in Mastoidectomy Canal Wall Down Surgery: a Literature Overview

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Ricardo Dourado; Cabral Junior, Francisco; Fonseca, Anna Carolina de Oliveira; Bento, Ricardo Ferreira

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The objectives of mastoidectomy in cholesteatoma are a disease-free and dry ear, the prevention of recurrent disease, and the maintenance of hearing or the possibility to reconstruct an affected hearing mechanism. Canal wall down mastoidectomy has been traditionally used to achieve those goals with greater or lesser degrees of success. However, canal wall down is an aggressive approach, as it involves creating an open cavity and changing the anatomy and physiology of the middle ear and mastoid. A canal wall up technique eliminates the need to destroy the middle ear and mastoid, but is associated with a higher rate of residual cholesteatoma. The obliteration technics arise as an effort to avoid the disadvantages of both techniques. Objectives Evaluate the effectiveness of the mastoid obliteration with autologous bone in mastoidectomy surgery with canal wall down for chronic otitis, with or without cholesteatoma. Data Synthesis We analyzed nine studies of case series comprehending similar surgery techniques on 1017 total cases of operated ears in both adults and children, with at least 12 months follow-up. Conclusion Mastoid Obliteration with autologous bone has been utilized for many years to present date, and it seems to be safe, low-cost, with low recurrence rates - similar to traditional canal wall down procedures and with greater water resistance and quality of life improvements. PMID:26722350

  11. Mastoid Obliteration with Autologous Bone in Mastoidectomy Canal Wall Down Surgery: a Literature Overview.

    PubMed

    Alves, Ricardo Dourado; Cabral Junior, Francisco; Fonseca, Anna Carolina de Oliveira; Bento, Ricardo Ferreira

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The objectives of mastoidectomy in cholesteatoma are a disease-free and dry ear, the prevention of recurrent disease, and the maintenance of hearing or the possibility to reconstruct an affected hearing mechanism. Canal wall down mastoidectomy has been traditionally used to achieve those goals with greater or lesser degrees of success. However, canal wall down is an aggressive approach, as it involves creating an open cavity and changing the anatomy and physiology of the middle ear and mastoid. A canal wall up technique eliminates the need to destroy the middle ear and mastoid, but is associated with a higher rate of residual cholesteatoma. The obliteration technics arise as an effort to avoid the disadvantages of both techniques. Objectives Evaluate the effectiveness of the mastoid obliteration with autologous bone in mastoidectomy surgery with canal wall down for chronic otitis, with or without cholesteatoma. Data Synthesis We analyzed nine studies of case series comprehending similar surgery techniques on 1017 total cases of operated ears in both adults and children, with at least 12 months follow-up. Conclusion Mastoid Obliteration with autologous bone has been utilized for many years to present date, and it seems to be safe, low-cost, with low recurrence rates - similar to traditional canal wall down procedures and with greater water resistance and quality of life improvements.

  12. Can postoperative pulmonary conditions be improved by treatment with the Bartlett-Edwards incentive spirometer after upper abdominal surgery?

    PubMed

    Lyager, S; Wernberg, M; Rajani, N; Bøggild-Madsen, B; Nielsen, L; Nielsen, H C; Andersen, M; Møller, J; Silberschmid, M

    1979-08-01

    During the immediate postoperative course after upper abdominal surgery, pulmonary complications often occur, caused, inter alia, by reduced regional ventilation and by atelectases as a result of: (1) narrowing of the small peripheral bronchi, and (2) impaired respiratory function. Based on these pathophysiological mechanisms, an instrument (Bartlett-Edwards Incentive Spirometer) has been devised, which aims at giving the patient an opportunity of sustained maximal inspiration under standardized and controlled conditions. The use of this instrument has been followed by reports of a considerable reduction in postoperative pulmonary complications. In a controlled clinical investigation of the pre- and postoperative condition of the lungs, we were unable to show any beneficial effect of the instrument. In general, we have a low frequency of severe postoperative pulmonary complications, as compared with the results reported in the literature. We ascribe this to our very effective pre- and postoperative respiratory therapy.

  13. Investigation of the relationship between heat loss and nitrogen excretion in elderly patients undergoing major abdominal surgery under general anaesthetic.

    PubMed

    Carli, F; Clark, M M; Woollen, J W

    1982-10-01

    An attempt was made to reduce heat loss in elderly patients undergoing major abdominal surgery. Two groups were studied. In one group, efforts were made to minimize heat loss by using a hot-water humidifier in the anaesthetic circuit, a hot-water circulating mattress under the patient and warming all i.v. fluids. Otherwise, the surgical and anaesthetic techniques were comparable. The same anaesthetic technique of nitrous oxide, oxygen, pancuronium and fentanyl with intermittent positive pressure ventilation was used in all cases. Nitrogen loss was measured in urine collected over 48 h from an indwelling urinary catheter inserted soon after induction of anaesthesia. Prevention of heat loss during anaesthesia and postoperative recovery caused a significant reduction in nitrogen loss.

  14. Blockade of metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 activation inhibits mechanical hypersensitivity following abdominal surgery.

    PubMed

    Dolan, Sharron; Nolan, Andrea Mary

    2007-08-01

    This study used the metabotropic glutamate 5 (mGlu5) receptor subtype-selective antagonist 2-methyl-6-(phenylethynyl)pyridine (MPEP) to characterise the contribution of mGlu5 receptor activity to pain and hypersensitivity in an animal model of post-surgical pain. Adult female Wistar rats (200-250g) were anaesthetised with isoflurane (2%) and underwent a midline laparotomy with gentle manipulation of the viscera, and the effects of pre- (30min) or post- (5h) operative treatment with MPEP (1, 3 or 10mgkg(-1); i.p.) or drug-vehicle on hindpaw withdrawal latency (in seconds) to thermal stimulation (Hargreave's Test) and response threshold (in grams) to mechanical stimulation (using a dynamic plantar aesthesiometer) were measured. Animals that underwent surgery displayed significant hypersensitivity to mechanical stimulation of the hindpaws. Hypersensitivity was maximum at 6h post-surgery (44.5+/-2.4% decrease; p<0.01 vs. anaesthesia only controls) and persisted for 48h. Surgery had no effect on thermal withdrawal latency. Both pre-operative and post-operative administration of 10mgkg(-1)MPEP blocked mechanical hypersensitivity induced by surgery (p<0.01 vs. vehicle treatment). MPEP had no effect on acute nociceptive thresholds in naïve animals. These data suggest that activity at mGlu5 receptors contributes to development of pain and hypersensitivity following surgery.

  15. Changes in the wall shear stresses (WSS) during the enlargement of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms (AAA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salsac, Anne-Virginie; Sparks, Steven R.; Chomaz, Jean-Marc; Lasheras, Juan C.

    2004-11-01

    The changes in the evolution of the spatial and temporal distribution of the WSS and gradients of WSS at different stages of the enlargement of AAAs are important to understand the etiology and progression of this vascular disease, since they affect the wall structural integrity, primarily via the changes induced on the shape, functions and metabolism of the endothelial cells. PIV measurements were performed in aneurysm models, while changing systematically their geometric parameters. We show that, even at very early stages of the disease (dilatation > 30%), the flow separates from the wall and the formation of a large vortex ring followed by internal shear layers leads to the generation of WSS that drastically differ from the healthy vessel. Inside the AAA, the mean WSS decreases to zero and the magnitude of the WSS can be as low as 26% of the value in a healthy vessel. Two regions with distinct patterns of WSS were identified. The region of flow detachment, with oscillatory WSS of very low mean, and the region of flow reattachment, located distally, where large, negative WSS and sustained gradients of WSS are produced as a result of the impact of the vortex ring on the wall.

  16. Traumatic abdominal hernia complicated by necrotizing fasciitis.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Pérez, Aleix; Garrigós-Ortega, Gonzalo; Gómez-Abril, Segundo Ángel; Martí-Martínez, Eva; Torres-Sánchez, Teresa

    2014-11-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is a critical illness involving skin and soft tissues, which may develop after blunt abdominal trauma causing abdominal wall hernia and representing a great challenge for physicians. A 52-year-old man was brought to the emergency department after a road accident, presenting blunt abdominal trauma with a large non-reducible mass in the lower-right abdomen. A first, CT showed abdominal hernia without signs of complication. Three hours after ICU admission, he developed hemodynamic instability. Therefore, a new CT scan was requested, showing signs of hernia complication. He was moved to the operating room where a complete transversal section of an ileal loop was identified. Five hours after surgery, he presented a new episode of hemodynamic instability with signs of skin and soft tissue infection. Due to the high clinical suspicion of necrotizing fasciitis development, wide debridement was performed. Following traumatic abdominal wall hernia (TAWH), patients can present unsuspected injuries in abdominal organs. Helical CT can be falsely negative in the early moments, leading to misdiagnosis. Necrotizing fasciitis is a potentially fatal infection and, consequently, resuscitation measures, wide-spectrum antibiotics, and early surgical debridement are required. This type of fasciitis can develop after blunt abdominal trauma following wall hernia without skin disruption.

  17. The Effect of Structured Preadmission Preoperative Teaching on Patient Outcomes After Abdominal Surgery

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-01-01

    booklet: Information About Your Admission Day Surgery ............. 86 * B. Preoperative patient education program ....... 96 C. Nomograms for inspiratory...been established in most hospitals so that patient education may be viewed as a cost to the hospital (Cook, 1985; Devine & Cook, 1983). Surgical...Impediments mean that most patients have inadequate preoperative education. Patient education and psychological support are integral components of nursing

  18. Antenatal Diagnosis of a Large Immature Abdominal Wall Teratoma by 2D-3D Ultrasound Using HDlive and Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Werner, Heron; Mocarzel, Carolina; Sá, Renato Augusto; Tonni, Gabriele; Novoa Y Novoa, Victoria Arruga; Avvad-Portari, Elyzabeth; Bonasoni, Paola; Araujo Júnior, Edward

    2016-01-01

    We describe the first case of prenatally detected teratoma of the fetal abdomen wall using ultrasound and fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). A heterogeneous mass, partly solid and cystic, originating from the anterior abdominal wall of the fetus close to an omphalocele sac was detected by means of 2D/3D ultrasound and MRI. Amniodrainage was performed and due to sign of impending fetal risk, an emergency Cesarean section was performed. A bulky, crumbly and bleeding tumoral mass was confirmed at delivery. Ligation of the supplying artery to the tumor was complicated by uncontrollable hemorrhage and early neonatal death. Pathology identified the tumor as an immature teratoma of the anterior fetal abdominal wall. 2D/3D ultrasound, especially using HDlive application and MRI demonstrated accurate detection and characterization of this congenital tumor.

  19. [Application of biologically active suture materials in emergency surgery of abdominal cavity organs].

    PubMed

    Mokhov, E M; Chumakov, R Iu; Sergeev, A N

    2012-01-01

    An investigation of specific course of the wound process and near results of operations on 398 patients with emergency abdominal surgical pathology has revealed advantages of using new biologically active suture materials "Nikant" (with doxicyclin) and "Nikant-P" (with doxicyclin and stimulator of regeneration from the group of hermanium-containing organic compounds) in performing surgical interventions. Total number of patients with complications at the early postoperative period, operated using threads "Nikant" (38-29.9%) and "Nikant-P" (30-23.8%) proved to be reliably less than in patients of the control group (71-48.9%). The results of operations improved at the expense of considerable reduction of the number of postoperative local pyo-inflammatory processes.

  20. Effects of music therapy under general anesthesia in patients undergoing abdominal surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kahloul, Mohamed; Mhamdi, Salah; Nakhli, Mohamed Said; Sfeyhi, Ahmed Nadhir; Azzaza, Mohamed; Chaouch, Ajmi; Naija, Walid

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Music therapy, an innovative approach that has proven effectiveness in many medical conditions, seems beneficial also in managing surgical patients. The aim of this study is to evaluate its effects, under general anesthesia, on perioperative patient satisfaction, stress, pain, and awareness. Methods: This is a prospective, randomized, double-blind study conducted in the operating theatre of visceral surgery at Sahloul Teaching Hospital over a period of 4 months. Patients aged more than 18 undergoing a scheduled surgery under general anesthesia were included. Patients undergoing urgent surgery or presenting hearing or cognitive disorders were excluded. Before induction, patients wore headphones linked to an MP3 player. They were randomly allocated into 2 groups: Group M (with music during surgery) and group C (without music). Hemodynamic parameters, quality of arousal, pain experienced, patient’s satisfaction, and awareness incidence during anesthesia were recorded. Results: One hundred and forty patients were included and allocated into 2 groups that were comparable in demographic characteristics, surgical intervention type and anesthesia duration. Comparison of these two groups regarding the hemodynamic profile found more stability in group M for systolic arterial blood pressure. A calm recovery was more often noted in group M (77.1% versus 44%, p < 10–3). The average Visual Analog Scale (VAS) score was lower in the intervention group (33.8 ± 13.63 versus 45.1 ± 16.2; p < 10–3). The satisfaction rate was significantly higher among the experimental group (81.4% versus 51.4%; p < 10–3). The incidence of intraoperative awareness was higher in group C (8 cases versus 3 cases) but the difference was not statistically significant. Conclusion: Music therapy is a non-pharmacological, inexpensive, and non-invasive technique that can significantly enhance patient satisfaction and decrease patients’ embarrassing experiences related

  1. Initial experience with the use of porcine acellular dermal matrix (Strattice) for abdominal wall reinforcement after transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap breast reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Cicilioni, Orlando; Araujo, Gerson; Mimbs, Nancy; Cox, Matthew D

    2012-03-01

    Reestablishing anterior rectus fascial integrity remains a clinical challenge after transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous (TRAM) flap breast reconstruction. The main concerns include herniation and bulging due to abdominal weakness. Mesh-assisted closure of the fascial defect has improved bulging and herniation rates but infection, extrusion, and encapsulation are serious concerns with mesh use. Biologic tissue matrices may overcome some of these mesh-related complications. The initial experience of using Strattice for fascial closure after TRAM flap procedure is described in this article. Strattice was in-lain and sutured between the anterior and posterior layers of the rectus fascia, at the rectus muscle donor site. The abdominal wall was closed with progressive tension sutures. Postoperative complications at the donor site were assessed. A total of 16 unilateral and 9 bilateral reconstructions were performed in 25 patients. Length of hospital stay was 2 to 3 days which is shorter than with mesh repair (typically 4-5 days). During a mean follow-up period of 14.0 months, complications occurred in 7 patients (28%): seroma formation (2), minor skin separation (2), superficial skin infection (2), and superficial wound dehiscence (1). Complications were not directly related to Strattice and all, except one (superficial skin infection), were resolved without surgical intervention. In all patients, routine abdominal functions were restored 4 months postoperatively. Strattice is a safe, alternative option to synthetic mesh for fascial repair following TRAM flap breast reconstruction. When used in conjunction with progressive tension suture closure of the abdominal wall, dynamic reconstruction of the abdominal wall with resumption of abdominal function is possible with Strattice.

  2. Superthin Abdominal Wall Glove-Like Flap Combined With Vacuum-Assisted Closure Therapy for Soft Tissue Reconstruction in Severely Burned Hands or With Infection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fei; Liu, Sheng; Qiu, Le; Ma, Ben; Wang, Jian; Wang, Yong-Jie; Peszel, April; Chen, Xu-Lin

    2015-12-01

    Severe burn and infection to hands always involves the deep structures, such as tendons, joints, and bones. These wounds cannot be closed immediately and therefore creates a high risk for complication. We presented 9 cases with deep dermal burns to the dorsal of the hand (6 electrical burns and 3 thermal crush injuries) with wound infections in 2 cases. The vacuum-assisted closure system was used continuously until the flap reconstruction was performed. A random pattern and superthin abdominal wall skin flap-like glove was designed. The flap was transferred to the defected portion of the dorsum of the hand and resected from the abdominal wall about 3 weeks later. The flaps in 8 of the patients treated by this technique survived completely and partial necrosis of the distal flap occurred in 1 patient. The defect resolved after operative treatment and the function of the hands and fingers were successfully salvaged. All patients resulted in having a satisfactory aesthetic outcome with no or minor discomfort at the abdominal donor area. Integration of the vacuum-assisted closure system and the superthin abdominal wall glove-like flap reconstruction appeared to be successful and should be considered in patients with severely burned hands.

  3. Morphine Plus Bupivacaine Vs. Morphine Peridural Analgesia in Abdominal Surgery: The Effects on Postoperative Course in Major Hepatobiliary Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Barzoi, G.; Carluccio, S.; Bianchi, B.; Vassia, S.; Colucci, G.

    2000-01-01

    Anaesthesia and surgical procedures lead to a reduction of intestinal motility, and opioids may produce a postoperative ileus, that might delay postoperative feeding. The aim of this prospective randomised study is to test whether or not different kinds of epidural analgesia (Group A: morphine 0.00 17 mg/kg/h and bupivacaine 0.125% – 0.058 mg/kg/h; Group B: morphine alone 0.035mg/kg/12h in the postoperative period) allow earlier postoperative enteral feeding, enhance intestinal motility a passage of flatus and help avoid complications, such as nausea, vomiting, ileus, diarrhoea, pneumonia or other infective diseases. We included in the study 60 patients (28 males and 32 females) with a mean age of 61.2 years (range 50–70) and with an ASA score of 2 or 3. All patients had hepato–biliary-pancreatic neoplasm and were candidates for major surgery. We compared two different pharmacological approaches, i.e., morphine plus bupivacaine (30 patients, Group A)versus morphine alone (30 patients, Group B). Each medication was administered by means of a thoracic epidural catheter for the control of postoperative pain. In the postoperative course we recorded every 6 hours peristaltic activity. We also noted morbidity (pneumonia, wound sepsis) and mortality. Effective peristalsis was present in all patients in Group A within the first six postoperative hours; in Group B, after 30 hours. Six patients in Group A had bowel motions in the first postoperative day, 11 in the second day, 10 in the third day and 3 in fourth day, while in Group B none in the first day, two in the second, 7 in the third, 15 in the fourth, and 6 in the fifth: the difference between the two groups was significant (P<0.05 in 1st, 2nd, 4th and 5th days). Pneumonia occurred in 2 patients of Group A, and in 10 of Group B (P<0.05). We conclude that epidural analgesia with morphine plus bupivacaine allowed a move rapid return to normal gut activity and early enteral nutrition compared with epidural analgesia

  4. Free-breathing black-blood CINE fast-spin echo imaging for measuring abdominal aortic wall distensibility: A feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jyh-Miin; Patterson, Andrew; Chao, Tzu-Cheng; Zhu, Chengcheng; Chang, Hing-Chiu; Mendes, Jason; Chung, Hsiao-Wen; Gillard, Jonathan; Graves, Martin

    2017-03-22

    The paper reports a free-breathing black-blood CINE fast-spin echo (FSE) technique for measuring abdominal aortic wall motion. The free-breathing CINE FSE includes the following MR techniques: 1) variable-density sampling with fast iterative reconstruction; 2) inner-volume imaging; and 3) a blood-suppression preparation pulse. The proposed technique was evaluated in eight healthy subjects. The inner-volume imaging significantly reduced the intraluminal artifacts of respiratory motion (p = 0.015). The quantitative measurements were a diameter of 16.3 ± 2.8 mm and wall distensibility of 2.0 ± 0.4 mm (12.5 ± 3.4%) and 0.7 ± 0.3 mm (4.1 ± 1.0%) for the anterior and posterior walls, respectively. The cyclic cross-sectional distensibility was 35 ± 15% greater in the systolic phase than in the diastolic phase. In conclusion, we developed a feasible CINE FSE method to measure the motion of the abdominal aortic wall, which will enable clinical scientists to study the elasticity of the abdominal aorta.

  5. Intensity-Modulated Whole Abdominal Radiotherapy After Surgery and Carboplatin/Taxane Chemotherapy for Advanced Ovarian Cancer: Phase I Study

    SciTech Connect

    Rochet, Nathalie; Sterzing, Florian; Jensen, Alexandra D.; Dinkel, Julien; Herfarth, Klaus K.; Schubert, Kai; Eichbaum, Michael H.; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Sohn, Christof; Debus, Juergen; Harms, Wolfgang

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: To assess the feasibility and toxicity of consolidative intensity-modulated whole abdominal radiotherapy (WAR) after surgery and chemotherapy in high-risk patients with advanced ovarian cancer. Methods and Materials: Ten patients with optimally debulked ovarian cancer International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics Stage IIIc were treated in a Phase I study with intensity-modulated WAR up to a total dose of 30 Gy in 1.5-Gy fractions as consolidation therapy after adjuvant carboplatin/taxane chemotherapy. Treatment was delivered using intensity-modulated radiotherapy in a step-and-shoot technique (n = 3) or a helical tomotherapy technique (n = 7). The planning target volume included the entire peritoneal cavity and the pelvic and para-aortal node regions. Organs at risk were kidneys, liver, heart, vertebral bodies, and pelvic bones. Results: Intensity-modulated WAR resulted in an excellent coverage of the planning target volume and an effective sparing of the organs at risk. The treatment was well tolerated, and no severe Grade 4 acute side effects occurred. Common Toxicity Criteria Grade III toxicities were as follows: diarrhea (n = 1), thrombocytopenia (n = 1), and leukopenia (n = 3). Radiotherapy could be completed by all the patients without any toxicity-related interruption. Median follow-up was 23 months, and 4 patients had tumor recurrence (intraperitoneal progression, n = 3; hepatic metastasis, n = 1). Small bowel obstruction caused by adhesions occurred in 3 patients. Conclusions: The results of this Phase I study showed for the first time, to our knowledge, the clinical feasibility of intensity-modulated whole abdominal radiotherapy, which could offer a new therapeutic option for consolidation treatment of advanced ovarian carcinoma after adjuvant chemotherapy in selected subgroups of patients. We initiated a Phase II study to further evaluate the toxicity of this intensive multimodal treatment.

  6. Comparison of streamlined liner of the pharynx airway (SLIPA™) with the laryngeal mask airway Proseal™ for lower abdominal laparoscopic surgeries in paralyzed, anesthetized patients

    PubMed Central

    Abdellatif, Ashraf Abualhassan; Ali, Monaz Abdulrahman

    2011-01-01

    Context: Supraglottic airway devices have been used as an alternative to tracheal intubation during laparoscopic surgery. Aims: The study was designed to compare the efficacy of Streamlined Liner of the Pharynx Airway (SLIPA) for positive pressure ventilation and postoperative complications with the Laryngeal Mask Airway ProSeal (PLMA) for patients undergoing lower abdominal laparoscopies under general anesthesia with controlled ventilation. Settings and Design: Prospective, crossover randomized controlled trial performed on patients undergoing lower abdominal laparoscopic surgeries. Methods: A total of 120 patients undergoing lower abdominal laparoscopic surgeries were randomly allocated into two equal groups; PLMA and SLIPA groups. Number of intubation attempts, insertion time, ease of insertion, and fiberoptic bronchoscopic view were recorded. Lung mechanics data were collected 5 minutes after securing the airway, then after abdominal insufflation. Blood traces and regurgitation were checked for; postoperative sore throat and other complications were recorded. Statistical Analysis: Arithmetic mean and standard deviation values were calculated and statistical analyses were performed for each group. Independent sample t-test was used to compare continuous variables exhibiting normal distribution, and Chi-squared test for noncontinuous variables. P value <0.05 was considered significant. Results: Insertion time, first insertion success rate, and ease of insertion were comparable in both groups. Fiberoptic bronchoscopic view was significantly better and epiglottic downfolding was significantly lower in SLIPA group. Sealing pressure and lung mechanics were similar. Gastric distension was not observed in both groups. Postoperative sore throat was significantly higher in PACU in PLMA group. Blood traces on the device were significantly more in SLIPA group. Conclusions: SLIPA can be used as a useful alternative to PLMA in patients undergoing lower abdominal laparoscopic

  7. Defining High Risk: Cost-effectiveness of Extended Duration Thromboprophylaxis Following Major Oncologic Abdominal Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Iannuzzi, James C.; Rickles, Aaron S.; Kelly, Kristin N.; Fleming, Fergal J.; Dolan, James G.; Monson, John R. T.; Noyes, Katia

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Extended duration thromboprophylaxis (EDTPPX) is the practice of prescribing antithrombotic therapy for 21 days after discharge, commonly used in surgical patients who are at high risk for venothromboembolism (VTE). While guidelines recommend EDTPPX, criteria are vague due to a paucity of data. The criteria can be further informed by cost-effectiveness thresholds. This study sought to determine the VTE incidence threshold for the cost-effectiveness EDTPPX compared to inpatient prophylaxis. Methods A decision tree was used to compare EDTPPX for 21 days after discharge to 7-days of inpatient-prophylaxis with base case assumptions based on an abdominal oncologic resection without complications in an otherwise healthy individual. Willingness to pay was set at $50,000/QALY. Sensitivity analyses were performed to assess uncertainty within the model, with particular interest in the threshold for costeffectiveness based on VTE incidence. Results EDTPPX was the dominant strategy when VTE probability exceeds 2.39%. Given a willingness to pay threshold of $50,000/QALY, EDTPPX was the preferred strategy when VTE incidence exceeded 1.22% and 0.88% when using brand name or generic medication costs respectively. Conclusions EDTPPX should be recommended whenever VTE incidence exceeds 2.39%. When post-discharge estimated VTE risk is 0.88%–2.39% patient preferences about self-injections and medication costs should be considered. PMID:24101450

  8. A reduced-order model for wall shear stress in abdominal aortic aneurysms by proper orthogonal decomposition.

    PubMed

    Chang, Gary Han; Schirmer, Clemens M; Modarres-Sadeghi, Yahya

    2017-03-21

    In this paper, we introduce a method to construct a Reduced-Order Model (ROM) to study the physiological flow and the Wall Shear Stress (WSS) conditions in Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms (AAA). We start the process by running a training case using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations with time-varying flow parameters, such that these parameters cover the range of parameters that we would like to consider in our ROM. We use the inflow angle as the variable parameter in the current study. Then we use the snapshot Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD) to construct the reduced-order bases, which are subsequently enhanced using a QR-factorization technique to satisfy the relevant fluid boundary conditions. The resulting ROM enables us to study the flow pattern and the WSS distribution over a range of system parameters computationally very efficiently. We have used this method to show how the WSS varies significantly for an AAA with a simplified geometry, over a range of inflow angles usually considered mild in clinical terms. We have validated the ROM results with CFD results. This approach enables comprehensive analysis of the model system across a range of inflow angles and frequencies without the need to re-compute the simulation for small changes.

  9. Risk factors associated with early failure in complex abdominal wall reconstruction: a 5 year single surgeon experience.

    PubMed

    Wink, Jason D; Wes, Ari M; Fischer, John P; Nelson, Jonas A; Stranksy, Carrie; Kovach, Stephen J

    2015-04-01

    Complex abdominal wall reconstruction (AWR) is commonly performed, but with a significant rate of surgical complications and hernia recurrence. The aim of this experiential review is to assess risk factors for hernia recurrence after complex AWR. A retrospective review of AWR patients from 2007-2012 was performed. Rates of hernia recurrence were assessed. Univariate analyses and subsequent multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to assess independent predictors of early hernia recurrence. One hundred and thirty-four consecutive cases of AWR were performed over a 5-year period. Hernia recurrence developed in 14 (10.4%) patients. Hernias derived from trauma (OR = 19.76, p = 0.011) and those who experienced postoperative wound infections (OR = 18.81, p = 0.004) were at increased risk for hernia recurrence. In conclusion, increased vigilance must be paid to patients presenting after trauma with massive loss of domain and those who experience postoperative infection, as these cohorts are at added risk for failed reconstruction.

  10. CRITICAL ANALYSIS OF EXPERIMENTAL MODEL FOR STUDY OF ADHESIONS AFTER INCISIONAL HERNIAS INDUCED IN RATS’ AND REPAIR OF ABDOMINAL WALL WITH DIFFERENT BIOMATERIALS

    PubMed Central

    SERIGIOLLE, Leonardo Carvalho; BARBIERI, Renato Lamounier; GOMES, Helbert Minuncio Pereira; RODRIGUES, Daren Athiê Boy; STUDART, Sarah do Valle; LEME, Pedro Luiz Squilacci

    2015-01-01

    Background: Adhesions induced by biomaterials experimentally implanted in the abdominal cavity are basically studied by primary repair of different abdominal wall defects or by the correction of incisional hernias previously performed with no precise definition of the most appropriate model. Aim: To describe the adhesions which occur after the development of incisional hernias, before the prosthesis implantation, in an experimental model to study the changes induced by different meshes. Methods: Incisional hernias were performed in 10 rats with hernia orifices of standardized dimensions, obtained by the median incision of the abdominal wall and eversion of the defect edges. Ten days after the procedure adhesions of abdominal structures were found when hernias were repaired with different meshes. Results: The results showed hernia sac well defined in all rats ten days after the initial procedure. Adhesions of the greater omentum occurred in five animals of which two also showed adhesions of small bowel loops besides the omentum, and another two showed liver adhesions as well as the greater omentum, numbers with statistical significance by Student's t test (p<0.05). Conclusion: Although it reproduces the real clinical situation, the choice of experimental model of incisional hernia repair previously induced implies important adhesions, with possible repercussions in the evaluation of the second operation, when different implants of synthetic materials are used. PMID:26537141

  11. Mesh Surgery for Anterior Vaginal Wall Prolapse: A Meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Juliato, Cássia Raquel Teatin; Santos Júnior, Luiz Carlos do; Haddad, Jorge Milhem; Castro, Rodrigo Aquino; Lima, Marcelo; Castro, Edilson Benedito de

    2016-07-01

    Purpose Pelvic organ prolapse (POP) is a major health issue worldwide, affecting 6-8% of women. The most affected site is the anterior vaginal wall. Multiple procedures and surgical techniques have been used, with or without the use of vaginal meshes, due to common treatment failure, reoperations, and complication rates in some studies. Methods Systematic review of the literature and meta-analysis regarding the use of vaginal mesh in anterior vaginal wall prolapse was performed. A total of 115 papers were retrieved after using the medical subject headings (MESH) terms: 'anterior pelvic organ prolapse OR cystocele AND surgery AND (mesh or colporrhaphy)' in the PubMed database. Exclusion criteria were: follow-up shorter than 1 year, use of biological or absorbable meshes, and inclusion of other vaginal wall prolapses. Studies were put in a data chart by two independent editors; results found in at least two studies were grouped for analysis. Results After the review of the titles by two independent editors, 70 studies were discarded, and after abstract assessment, 18 trials were eligible for full text screening. For final screening and meta-analysis, after applying the Jadad score (> 2), 12 studies were included. Objective cure was greater in the mesh surgery group (odds ratio [OR] = 1,28 [1,07-1,53]), which also had greater blood loss (mean deviation [MD] = 45,98 [9,72-82,25]), longer surgery time (MD = 15,08 [0,48-29,67]), but less prolapse recurrence (OR = 0,22 [01,3-0,38]). Dyspareunia, symptom resolution and reoperation rates were not statistically different between groups. Quality of life (QOL) assessment through the pelvic organ prolapse/urinary incontinence sexual questionnaire (PISQ-12), the pelvic floor distress inventory (PFDI-20), the pelvic floor impact questionnaire (PFIQ-7), and the perceived quality of life scale (PQOL) was not significantly different. Conclusions Anterior vaginal prolapse mesh surgery has greater anatomic

  12. [Influence of mydocalm on the degree of intra-abdominal hypertension and local blood circulation in the intestinal wall in experiment].

    PubMed

    Sapegin, V I; Sapegin, I D; Il'chenko, F N

    2014-01-01

    The effect of mydocalm (tolperison, 5 mg/kg single dose) on the dynamics of intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH), blood circulation regulation, and oxygen balance in the tissues of intestinal wall were studied in acute experiments on rabbits. Using a special stand of original design, the initial IAH level was modeled at 200 mm H2O with the subsequent stopping of further receipt of liquid during 3 hours in an elastic container in the abdominal cavity. During 3-h observation without drug administration, no changes in IAH due to the tone of muscles of the frontal abdominal wall takes place, but there is progressive deceleration of local blood flow (-35.33 + 0.99%, p < 0.01), suppressed dilation (-20.02 + 0.54%, p < 0.01) and constriction (-60.45 + 1.17%, p < 0.01) reactivity of vessels, and decreased oxygen tension (-47.18 + 0.75%, p < 0.01) in the intestinal wall at the end of experiment. The introduction of mydocalm reduces the tone of muscles of the frontal abdominal wall, which leads to a decrease in IAH (maximum effect after 1.5 hours, -20.81 + 0.84%, p < 0.01) and prevents decrease in the local blood flow (-26.77 + 0.41%, p < 0.01), suppression of dilation (-16.51 + 0.34%, p < 0.01) and constriction (-37.85 + 0.61%, p < 0.01) reactivity of vessels, and reduction in oxygen tension (-36.60 + 1.18%, p < 0.01) at the end of experiment. The administration of mydocalm can extend the limits of application of a conservative therapy for patients with IAH and to improve the results.

  13. The association of pre-operative physical fitness and physical activity with outcome after scheduled major abdominal surgery.

    PubMed

    Dronkers, J J; Chorus, A M J; van Meeteren, N L U; Hopman-Rock, M

    2013-01-01

    We studied whether reported physical activity and measurements of fitness (hand, leg and inspiration) were associated with postoperative in-hospital mortality, length of stay and discharge destination in 169 patients after major oncological abdominal surgery. In multivariate analysis, adequate activity level (OR 5.5, 95% CI 1.4-21.9) and inspiratory muscle endurance (OR 5.2, 95% CI 1.4-19.1) were independently associated with short-term mortality, whereas conventional factors, such as age and heart disease, were not. Adequate activity level (OR 6.7, 95% CI 1.4-3.0) was also independently associated with discharge destination. The factors that were independently associated with a shorter length of hospital stay were as follows: absence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (HR 0.6, 95% CI 0.3-1.1); adequate activity level (HR 0.6, 95% CI 0.4-0.8); and inspiratory muscle strength (HR 0.6, 95% CI 0.5-0.9). For all postoperative outcomes physical activity and fitness significantly improved the predictive value compared with known risk factors, such as age and comorbidities. We conclude that pre-operative questionnaires of physical activity and measurements of fitness contribute to the prediction of postoperative outcomes.

  14. Effects of Low-Flow Sevoflurane Anesthesia on Pulmonary Functions in Patients Undergoing Laparoscopic Abdominal Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Doger, Cihan; Kahveci, Kadriye; Ornek, Dilsen; But, Abdulkadir; Aksoy, Mustafa; Gokcinar, Derya; Katar, Didem

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this prospective, randomized study was to investigate the effects of low-flow sevoflurane anesthesia on the pulmonary functions in patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Methods. Sixty American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) physical status classes I and II patients scheduled for elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy were included in the study. Patients were randomly allocated to two study groups: high-flow sevoflurane anesthesia group (Group H, n = 30) and low-flow sevoflurane anesthesia group (Group L, n = 30). The fresh gas flow rate was of 4 L/min in high-flow sevoflurane anesthesia group and 1 L/min in low-flow sevoflurane anesthesia group. Heart rate (HR), mean arterial blood pressure (MABP), peripheral oxygen saturation (SpO2), and end-tidal carbon dioxide concentration (ETCO2) were recorded. Pulmonary function tests were performed before and 2, 8, and 24 hours after surgery. Results. There was no significant difference between the two groups in terms of HR, MABP, SpO2, and ETCO2. Pulmonary function test results were similar in both groups at all measurement times. Conclusions. The effects of low-flow sevoflurane anesthesia on pulmonary functions are comparable to high-flow sevoflurane anesthesia in patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy. PMID:27413741

  15. Effects of Low-Flow Sevoflurane Anesthesia on Pulmonary Functions in Patients Undergoing Laparoscopic Abdominal Surgery.

    PubMed

    Doger, Cihan; Kahveci, Kadriye; Ornek, Dilsen; But, Abdulkadir; Aksoy, Mustafa; Gokcinar, Derya; Katar, Didem

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this prospective, randomized study was to investigate the effects of low-flow sevoflurane anesthesia on the pulmonary functions in patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Methods. Sixty American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) physical status classes I and II patients scheduled for elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy were included in the study. Patients were randomly allocated to two study groups: high-flow sevoflurane anesthesia group (Group H, n = 30) and low-flow sevoflurane anesthesia group (Group L, n = 30). The fresh gas flow rate was of 4 L/min in high-flow sevoflurane anesthesia group and 1 L/min in low-flow sevoflurane anesthesia group. Heart rate (HR), mean arterial blood pressure (MABP), peripheral oxygen saturation (SpO2), and end-tidal carbon dioxide concentration (ETCO2) were recorded. Pulmonary function tests were performed before and 2, 8, and 24 hours after surgery. Results. There was no significant difference between the two groups in terms of HR, MABP, SpO2, and ETCO2. Pulmonary function test results were similar in both groups at all measurement times. Conclusions. The effects of low-flow sevoflurane anesthesia on pulmonary functions are comparable to high-flow sevoflurane anesthesia in patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

  16. CLOSTRIDIAL PARAPROCTITIS WITH GAS GANGRENE OF FRONT-LATERAL ABDOMINAL WALLS AND NECROTIC FASCIO-MYOSITIS (CASE REPORT).

    PubMed

    Didbaridze, N; Lomidze, N; Abuladze, T; Qiliptari, G; Didbaridze, T; Gvasalia, I; Mkervalishvili, Z; Gogokhia, N

    2016-09-01

    Anaerobic clostridial infection is the most severe form of paraproctitis. The incubation period is very short, from 3 to 6 hours, sometimes lasting for 1-2 days. Clostridial infection spreads rapidly and induces gas gangrene, causes destruction of cells and other intermediate substances, and impedes blood circulation. This paper presents a case study of an extremely severe form of anaerobic infection with spontaneous gas gangrene, cellulitis, fasciomyositic necrosis, severe intoxication and septic shock on the abdominal front and lateral surfaces. This patient presented as infected with Clostridium septicum, a rare and highly toxic Gram-positive, spore-forming, obligate anaerobic bacillus that progresses and migrates rapidly, affecting all soft tissues (muscle, fascia), and produces four toxins which cause gas gangrene, intravascular hemolysis, tissue necrosis, and septic shock. The mortality rate is typically 80%. In this case study, a positive clinical outcome was achieved by aggressive identification of the microbe, appropriate and immediate therapy, and vigorous surgical intervention. Specifically, immediate surgery was conducted to ensure a wide excision of damaged tissues, necrectomy, curettage, wide drainage, readjustment, oxygenation through drainages, further additional surgical corrections through CT control with wide bandages in the operating area. Further, the diagnostic workup was thorough, identifying the microbe through a properly constructed diagnostic algorithm, ultrasound and CT studies, infectious agent assessments, and bacteriological monitoring carried out on the 1st-2nd-5th-7th-12th-15th-21st-25th days. Rational antibiotic therapy with permanent susceptibility testing informed the selection of an appropriate agent. Finally, markers for the evaluation of severity (Apache scale) were assessed, as they were for stage of infection (prokalcitonin), inflammation (CRP) and other indicators.

  17. Exchange of best practices within the European Union: surgery standardization of abdominal organ retrieval.

    PubMed

    de Graauw, J A; Mihály, S; Deme, O; Hofker, H S; Baranski, A G; Gobée, O P; Krikke, C; Fehérvari, I; Langer, R M; Ploeg, R J; Marazuela, R; Domínguez-Gil, B; Haase-Kromwijk, B J J M; Font-Sala, C

    2014-01-01

    Considering the growing organ demand worldwide, it is crucial to optimize organ retrieval and training of surgeons to reduce the risk of injury during the procedure and increase the quality of organs to be transplanted. In the Netherlands, a national complete trajectory from training of surgeons in procurement surgery to the quality assessment of the procured organs was implemented in 2010. This mandatory trajectory comprises training and certification modules: E-learning, training on the job, and a practical session. Thanks to the ACCORD (Achieving Comprehensive Coordination in Organ Donation) Joint Action coordinated by Spain and co-funded under the European Commission Health Programme, 3 twinning activities (led by France) were set to exchange best practices between countries. The Dutch trajectory is being adapted and implemented in Hungary as one of these twinning activities. The E-learning platform was modified, tested by a panel of Hungarian and UK surgeons, and was awarded in July 2013 by the European Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education of the European Union of Medical Specialists. As a pilot phase for future national training, 6 Hungarian surgeons from Semmelweis University are being trained; E-learning platform was fulfilled, and practical sessions, training-on-the-job activities, and evaluations of technical skills are ongoing. The first national practical session was recently organized in Budapest, and the new series of nationwide selected candidates completed the E-learning platform before the practical. There is great potential for sharing best practices and for direct transfer of expertise at the European level, and especially to export this standardized training in organ retrieval to other European countries and even broader. The final goal was to not only provide a national training to all countries lacking such a program but also to improve the quality and safety criteria of organs to be transplanted.

  18. Optimal Dose of Intrathecal Dexmedetomidine in Lower Abdominal Surgeries in Average Indian Adult

    PubMed Central

    Bandey, Jahanara; Ozair, Erum; Asghar, Adil

    2016-01-01

    Background Dexmedetomidine, a selective alpha2 adrenoceptor agonist, has been used as adjuvant to spinal anaesthesia. Aim To find out the optimum dose of dexmedetomidine to be used in lower abdomen surgery intrathecally. Materials and Methods This was a randomized, controlled, double blinded study which included adult ASA I and II patients. They were allocated into five groups (n=20). Patients allergic to drugs to be used in the study and those with co-existing neurological disorders, coagulopathies, cardiac diseases, obesity and hypertension were excluded. Groups were designed as 2.5ml hyperbaric bupivacaine with 0.5ml saline (Control) or 0.5ml dexmedetomidine: 5mcg (D1), 10mcg (D2), 15 mcg (D3) and 20mcg (D4). Data were collected for 10 point VRS for pain, Bromage motor block, Ramsay sedation score, haemodynamics, time of first rescue analgesia (TRA) and any adverse effects and groups were analysed using one way analysis of variance (ANOVA) by SPSS16.0 (p-value <0.05 significant). Results The mean duration of analgesia and need of first rescue analgesics are 201.5±29.1 mins in control group but in D1 group 259.1±15.2 mins, D2 310.7±48.1mins, D3 540.3±51.6 mins and D4 702.4±52 mins. p=0.003. The mean highest VRS score along with analgesic requirements were significantly reduced in dexemeditomidine groups, but D3 and D4 had hypotension which needed correction. Conclusion Weighing the prolongation of anesthesia and analgesia and side effects we conclude that 10 mcg of dexmedetomidine is optimum intrathecal dose. PMID:27190922

  19. Value of a step-up diagnosis plan: CRP and CT-scan to diagnose and manage postoperative complications after major abdominal surgery.

    PubMed

    Straatman, Jennifer; Cuesta, Miguel A; Gisbertz, Suzanne S; Van der Peet, Donald L

    2014-12-01

    Postoperative complications frequently follow major abdominal surgery and are associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Early diagnosis and treatment of complications is associated with improved patient outcome. In this study we assessed the value of a step-up diagnosis plan by C-reactive protein and CT-scan (computed tomography-scan) imaging for detection of postoperative complications following major abdominal surgery.An observational cohort study was conducted of 399 consecutivepatients undergoing major abdominal surgery between January 2009 and January 2011. Indication for operation, type of surgery, postoperative morbidity, complications according to the Clavien-Dindo classification and mortality were recorded. Clinical parameters were recorded until 14 days postoperatively or until discharge. Regular C-reactive protein (CPR) measurements in peripheral blood and on indication -enhanced CT-scans were performed.Eighty-three out of 399 (20.6 %) patients developed a major complication in the postoperative course after a median of seven days (IQR 4-9 days). One hundred and thirty two patients received additional examination consisting of enhanced CT-scan imaging, and treatment by surgical reintervention or intensive care observation. CRP levels were significantly higher in patients with postoperative complications. On the second postoperative dayCRP levels were on average 197.4 mg/L in the uncomplicated group, 220.9 mg/L in patients with a minor complication and 280.1 mg/L in patients with major complications (p < 0,001).CT-scan imaging showed a sensitivity of 91.7 % and specificity of 100 % in diagnosis of major complications. Based on clinical deterioration and the increase of CRP, an additional enhanced CT-scan offered clear discrimination between patients with major abdominal complications and uncomplicated patients. Adequate treatment could then be accomplished.

  20. [Inflammatory aneurysms of the abdominal aorta].

    PubMed

    Tovar Martín, E; Acea Nebril, B

    1993-01-01

    Approximately 10 per cent of abdominal aneurysms have an excessively thick wall that sometimes involve duodenum, cava or colon by an inflammatory process. Between February 1986 and December 1992, 147 patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) were treated surgically and in 13 (8.8%) the aneurysms were found to be inflammatory. Their mean age was 67.3 years (70.1 years in non inflammatory group) and all were symptomatics initially (abdominal pain in 53%, rupture in 23%, mass in 15%). The operative mortality for elective resection was 37% in patients with inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysms (IAAA) decreasing to 9% in the AAA group without inflammatory involvement. We conclude that surgery is indicated in these patients to prevent rupture and to hasten the subsidense of inflammatory process ever with postoperative morbi-mortality increased.

  1. Image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy for refractory bilateral breast cancer in a patient with extensive cutaneous metastasis in the chest and abdominal walls

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yueh-Feng; Lin, Yu-Chin; Chen, Kuo-Hsin; Shueng, Pei-Wei; Yeh, Hsin-Pei; Hsieh, Chen-Hsi

    2016-01-01

    Treatment for bilateral breast cancer with chest wall and abdominal skin invasion normally involves conventional radiotherapy (RT); however, conventional RT provides inadequate target volume coverage and excessive treatment of large volumes of normal tissue. Helical tomotherapy (HT) has the ability to deliver continuous craniocaudal irradiation that suppresses junction problems and provides good conformity of dose distribution. A 47-year-old female with stage IV bilateral breast cancer with chest wall and pectoralis major muscle invasion, lymphadenopathy, bilateral pleural effusion, and multiple bone metastases received chemotherapy and target therapy beginning in January 2014; 4 months after the initiation of chemotherapy, computed tomography revealed progression of chest and abdominal wall invasion. A total dose of 70.2 Gy was delivered to both breasts, the chest wall, the abdominal wall, and the bilateral supraclavicular nodal areas in 39 fractions via HT. The total planning target volume was 4,533.29 cm3. The percent of lung volume receiving at least 20 Gy (V20) was 28%, 22%, and 25% for the right lung, left lung, and whole lung, respectively. The mean dose to the heart was 8.6 Gy. Follow-up computed tomography revealed complete response after the RT course. Grade 1 dysphagia, weight loss, grade 2 neutropenia, and grade 3 dermatitis were noted during the RT course. Pain score decreased from 6 to 1. No cardiac, pulmonary, liver, or intestinal toxicity developed during treatment or follow-up. Concurrent HT with or without systemic treatment could be a safe salvage therapy for chemorefractory locally advanced breast cancer patients with extensive cutaneous metastasis. PMID:27284253

  2. Evaluation of side effects of radiofrequency capacitive hyperthermia with magnetite on the blood vessel walls of tumor metastatic lesion surrounding the abdominal large vessels: an agar phantom study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Magnetite used in an 8-MHz radiofrequency (RF) capacitive heating device can increase the temperature of a specific site up to 45°C. When treating a metastatic lesion around large abdominal vessels via hyperthermia with magnetite, heating-induced adverse effects on these vessels need to be considered. Therefore, this study examined hyperthermia-induced damage to blood vessel walls in vitro. Methods A large agar phantom with a circulatory system consisting of a swine artery and vein connected to a peristaltic pump was prepared. The blood vessels were placed on the magnetite-containing agar piece. Heating was continued for 30 min at 45°C. After heating, a histological study for injury to the blood vessels was performed. Results The inner membrane temperature did not reach 45°C due to the cooling effect of the blood flow. In the heated vessels, vascular wall collagen degenerated and smooth muscle cells were narrowed; however, no serious changes were noted in the vascular endothelial cells or vascular wall elastic fibers. The heated vessel wall was not severely damaged; this was attributed to cooling by the blood flow. Conclusions Our findings indicate that RF capacitive heating therapy with magnetite may be used for metastatic lesions without injuring the surrounding large abdominal vessels. PMID:25114787

  3. Epidural ropivacaine with dexmedetomidine reduces propofol requirement based on bispectral index in patients undergoing lower extremity and abdominal surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Joy, Renu; Pujari, Vinayak Seenappa; Chadalawada, Mohan V. R.; Cheruvathoor, Ajish Varghese; Bevinguddaiah, Yatish; Sheshagiri, Nirmal

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aim: To assess the amount of propofol required for induction based on bispectral index (BIS) after administering epidural anesthesia with ropivacaine alone and ropivacaine with dexmedetomidine in patients undergoing lower extremities and abdominal surgeries. Subjects and Methods: A double-blinded randomized clinical trial was carried out in 60 patients over a period of 2 years in a tertiary care hospital. American Society of Anaesthesiologists I or II in age group 18–65 years were included in the study. Group R received epidural anesthesia with ropivacaine alone, and Group D received ropivacaine and dexmedetomidine. General anesthesia was induced with propofol under BIS monitoring after 15 min. Onset of sensory and motor block, time for loss of consciousness and total amount of propofol used during induction to achieve the BIS value < 55 were recorded. Student's t-test and Chi-square test were used to find the significance of study parameters. Results: Time of onset of sensory block (Group R 11.30 ± 1.64/Group D 8.27 ± 0.83 min), motor block (Group R 14.16 ± 1.33/Group D 12.63 ± 1.22 min), time for loss of consciousness (Group R 90.57 ± 11.05/Group D 73.67 ± 16.34 s), and total amount of propofol (Group R 129.83 ± 22.38/Group D 92.13 ± 12.93 s) were reduced in Group D which was statistically significant with P < 0.001. Conclusion: Epidural ropivacaine with dexmedetomidine significantly reduces the total propofol dose required for induction of anesthesia. Also, it decreases the onset time of sensory and motor block and provides good hemodynamic stability. PMID:26957689

  4. Necrotizing fasciitis: literature review of contemporary strategies for diagnosing and management with three case reports: torso, abdominal wall, upper and lower limbs.

    PubMed

    Roje, Zdravko; Roje, Zeljka; Matić, Dario; Librenjak, Davor; Dokuzović, Stjepan; Varvodić, Josip

    2011-12-23

    Necrotizing fasciitis (NF) is an uncommon soft tissue infection, usually caused by toxin-producing virulent bacteria. It is characterized by widespread fascial necrosis primarily caused by Streptococcus hemolyticus. Shortly after the onset of the disease, patients become colonized with their own aerobic and anaerobic microflora from the gastrointestinal and/or urogenital tracts. Early diagnosis with aggressive multidisciplinary treatment is mandatory. We describe three clinical cases with NF. The first is a 69 years old man with diabetes mellitus type II, who presented with NF on the posterior chest wall, shoulder and arm. He was admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) with a clinical picture of severe sepsis. Outpatient treatment and early surgical debridement of the affected zones (inside 3 hours after admittance) and critical care therapy were performed. The second case is of a 63 years old paraplegic man with diabetes mellitus type I. Pressure sores and perineal abscesses progressed to Fournier's gangrene of the perineum and scrotum. He had NF of the anterior abdominal wall and the right thigh. Outpatient treatment and early surgical debridement of the affected zones (inside 6 hour after admittance) and critical care therapy were performed. The third patient was a 56 year old man who had NF of the anterior abdominal wall, flank and retroperitoneal space. He had an operation of the direct inguinal hernia, which was complicated with a bowel perforation and secondary peritonitis. After establishing the diagnosis of NF of the abdominal wall and retroperitoneal space (RS), he was transferred to the ICU. There he first received intensive care therapy, after which emergency surgical debridement of the abdominal wall, left colectomy, and extensive debridement of the RS were done (72 hours after operation of inquinal hernia). On average, 4 serial debridements were performed in each patient. The median of serial debridement in all three cases was four times. Other

  5. Necrotizing fasciitis: literature review of contemporary strategies for diagnosing and management with three case reports: torso, abdominal wall, upper and lower limbs

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis (NF) is an uncommon soft tissue infection, usually caused by toxin-producing virulent bacteria. It is characterized by widespread fascial necrosis primarily caused by Streptococcus hemolyticus. Shortly after the onset of the disease, patients become colonized with their own aerobic and anaerobic microflora from the gastrointestinal and/or urogenital tracts. Early diagnosis with aggressive multidisciplinary treatment is mandatory. We describe three clinical cases with NF. The first is a 69 years old man with diabetes mellitus type II, who presented with NF on the posterior chest wall, shoulder and arm. He was admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) with a clinical picture of severe sepsis. Outpatient treatment and early surgical debridement of the affected zones (inside 3 hours after admittance) and critical care therapy were performed. The second case is of a 63 years old paraplegic man with diabetes mellitus type I. Pressure sores and perineal abscesses progressed to Fournier's gangrene of the perineum and scrotum. He had NF of the anterior abdominal wall and the right thigh. Outpatient treatment and early surgical debridement of the affected zones (inside 6 hour after admittance) and critical care therapy were performed. The third patient was a 56 year old man who had NF of the anterior abdominal wall, flank and retroperitoneal space. He had an operation of the direct inguinal hernia, which was complicated with a bowel perforation and secondary peritonitis. After establishing the diagnosis of NF of the abdominal wall and retroperitoneal space (RS), he was transferred to the ICU. There he first received intensive care therapy, after which emergency surgical debridement of the abdominal wall, left colectomy, and extensive debridement of the RS were done (72 hours after operation of inquinal hernia). On average, 4 serial debridements were performed in each patient. The median of serial debridement in all three cases was four times. Other

  6. Nutritional Risk Screening 2002 as a Predictor of Postoperative Outcomes in Patients Undergoing Abdominal Surgery: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Prospective Cohort Studies

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zhen; Kong, Xin-Juan; Jing, Xue; Deng, Run-Jun; Tian, Zi-Bin

    2015-01-01

    Background The nutritional risk screening (NRS 2002) has been applied increasingly in patients who underwent abdominal surgery for nutritional risk assessment. However, the usefulness of the NRS 2002 for predicting is controversial. This meta-analysis was to examine whether a preoperative evaluation of nutritional risk by NRS 2002 provided prediction of postoperative outcomes in patients undergoing abdominal surgery. Methods A systematic literature search for published papers was conducted using the following online databases: MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane library, EBSCO, CRD databases, Cinahl, PsycInfo and BIOSIS previews. The pooled odds ratio (OR) or weight mean difference (WMD) was calculated using a random-effect model or a fix-effect model. Results Eleven studies with a total of 3527 patients included in this study. Postoperative overall complications were more frequent in nutritional risk patients versus patients without nutritional risk (the pooled OR 3.13 [2.51, 3.90] p<0.00001). The pooled OR of mortality for the nutritional risk group and non-nutritional risk group was 3.61 [1.38, 9.47] (p = 0.009). Furthermore, the postoperative hospital stay was significant longer in the preoperative nutritional risk group than in the nutritional normal group (WMD 5.58 [4.21, 6.95] p<0.00001). Conclusions The present study has demonstrated that patients at preoperative nutritional risk have increased complication rates, high mortality and prolonged hospital stay after surgery. However, NRS 2002 needs to be validated in larger samples of patients undergoing abdominal surgery by better reference method. PMID:26172830

  7. Meatoplasty in Canal wall down Surgery: Our Experience and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Memari, Faramarz; Maleki Delarestaghi, Mojtaba; Mir, Parisa; GolMohammadi, Mohammad; Shams Koushki, Ehsan

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Meatoplasty is the final and essential step in performing effective canal wall down surgery for chronic otitis media. In this article we review some previous techniques and discuss our preferred method. Materials and Methods: In this observational case series study, we used this technique in 53 patients (28 male and 25 female) between January 2005 and January 2008. Our survey was completed in 31 patients. Results: Twenty-six patients (83.9%) said their ear appeared normal after the procedure, but five patients (16.1%) complained of some minor change in the shape of their ear. Twenty-nine patients (93.5%) had a completely wide ear canal. The ear canal had some degree of stenosis in two patients (6.5%) post-operatively. Conclusion: This technique offers good functional and cosmetic results with minimal manipulation and minimal anatomic disruption. PMID:28229057

  8. Comparison of Flow and Volume Incentive Spirometry on Pulmonary Function and Exercise Tolerance in Open Abdominal Surgery: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Amaravadi Sampath; Augustine, Alfred Joseph; Pazhyaottayil, Zulfeequer Chundaanveetil; Ramakrishna, Anand; Krishnakumar, Shyam Krishnan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Surgical procedures in abdominal area lead to changes in pulmonary function, respiratory mechanics and impaired physical capacity leading to postoperative pulmonary complications, which can affect up to 80% of upper abdominal surgery. Aim To evaluate the effects of flow and volume incentive spirometry on pulmonary function and exercise tolerance in patients undergoing open abdominal surgery. Materials and Methods A randomized clinical trial was conducted in a hospital of Mangalore city in Southern India. Thirty-seven males and thirteen females who were undergoing abdominal surgeries were included and allocated into flow and volume incentive spirometry groups by block randomization. All subjects underwent evaluations of pulmonary function with measurement of Forced Vital Capacity (FVC), Forced Expiratory Volume in the first second (FEV1), Peak Expiratory Flow (PEF). Preoperative and postoperative measurements were taken up to day 5 for both groups. Exercise tolerance measured by Six- Minute Walk Test during preoperative period and measured again at the time of discharge for both groups. Pulmonary function was analysed by post-hoc analysis and carried out using Bonferroni’s ‘t’-test. Exercise tolerance was analysed by Paired ‘T’-test. Results Pulmonary function (FVC, FEV1, and PEFR) was found to be significantly decreased in 1st, 2nd and 3rd postoperative day when compared with preoperative day. On 4th and 5th postoperative day the pulmonary function (FVC, FEV1, and PEFR) was found to be better preserved in both flow and volume incentive spirometry groups. The Six-Minute Walk Test showed a statistically significant improvement in pulmonary function on the day of discharge than in the preoperative period. In terms of distance covered, the volume- incentive spirometry group showed a greater statistically significant improvement from the preoperative period to the time of discharge than was exhibited by the flow incentive spirometry group

  9. Antral bony wall erosion, trigeminal nerve injury, and enophthalmos after root canal surgery

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Eduardo; Antunes, Luís; Dinis, Paulo Borges

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The frequently used irrigant in dental surgery, sodium hypochlorite, is occasionally the cause of minor, usually circumscribed, adverse effects. Severe, extensive complications, with lasting sequelae, however, also can occur, as in the case we report herein. Case Report: A 55-year-old woman underwent an endodontic procedure on a maxillary molar, whose roots, unknown to the surgeon, were protruding into the maxillary sinus. After sodium hypochlorite root canal irrigation, the patient immediately developed intense facial pain, facial edema, and periorbital cellulitis. An emergency department evaluation diagnosed an intense inflammatory disease of the maxillary sinus, with significant destruction of its bony walls, accompanied by midface paraesthesia due to infraorbital nerve injury. In the following weeks, the patient slowly developed enophthalmos due to bone erosion of the orbit floor. Treatment, besides prolonged oral steroids, required the endoscopic endonasal opening of the maxillary sinus for profuse irrigation. Two years later, the patient maintained a complete loss of function of the maxillary sinus, anesthesia-paraesthesia of the midface, and inferior dystonia of the eye with an enophthalmos. Conclusion: Dentists, maxillofacial surgeons, and otorhinolaryngologists should all be aware of the whole spectrum of complications of even the simplest dental work. Sodium hypochlorite irrigations should be used cautiously in root canal surgery, with the full awareness of its potential for causing soft-tissue damage. PMID:27465790

  10. [Surgery for soft-tissue sarcomas of the limbs and trunk wall].

    PubMed

    Stoeckle, E; Michot, A; Henriques, B; Sargos, P; Honoré, C; Ferron, G; Meeus, P; Babre, F; Bonvalot, S

    2016-10-01

    Soft-tissue sarcoma of the limbs or the trunk wall determine a heterogeneous group of tumours that tends to receive a more individualized approach. The surgeon in charge with soft-tissue sarcoma has to be familiar with these tumours in order to deliver an adequate treatment. Most important is the initial diagnostic procedure, comprising imaging with MRI, a core needle biopsy, and in France, referral to a centre of expertise within the clinical network NETSARC. Prior to surgery, a multidisciplinary conference determines its moment and the extent of surgical resection within the frame of a multidisciplinary approach, and also plans reconstructive surgery, when needed. A standardized operative report summarizes items necessary to describe the resection quality (i.e. tumour seen, tumour infiltrated?). In multidisciplinary staff meetings, they are compared to margins measured by the pathologist on the operative specimen. Hence, resection quality is determined collegially and defined by resection type R (R0, R1, R2) as a qualitative result. The quality of resection directly determines the 5-year risk of local recurrence, estimated between 10 and 20% in specialized centres, with the objective to attain 10%. Early rehabilitation favours better functional outcome. The surgeon's experience with soft-tissue sarcoma, as part of a multidisciplinary treatment, is key in achieving the best adequacy between oncological resection and favourable functional outcome. In France, a specific university course for soft-tissue sarcoma will be set-up.

  11. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopic Imaging-Derived Collagen Content and Maturity Correlates with Stress in the Aortic Wall of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Patients.

    PubMed

    Cheheltani, Rabee; Pichamuthu, Joseph E; Rao, Jayashree; Weinbaum, Justin S; Kiani, Mohammad F; Vorp, David A; Pleshko, Nancy

    2017-03-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a degenerative disease of the aorta characterized by severe disruption of the structural integrity of the aortic wall and its major molecular constituents. From the early stages of disease, elastin in the aorta becomes highly degraded and is replaced by collagen. Questions persist as to the contribution of collagen content, quality and maturity to the potential for rupture. Here, using our recently developed Fourier transform infrared imaging spectroscopy (FT-IRIS) method, we quantified collagen content and maturity in the wall of AAA tissues in pairs of specimens with different wall stresses. CT scans of AAAs from 12 patients were used to create finite element models to estimate stress in different regions of tissue. Each patient underwent elective repair of the AAA, and two segments of the AAA tissues from anatomic regions more proximal or distal with different wall stresses were evaluated by histology and FT-IRIS after excision. For each patient, collagen content was generally greater in the tissue location with lower wall stress, which corresponded to the more distal anatomic regions. The wall stress/collagen ratio was greater in the higher stress region compared to the lower stress region (1.01 ± 1.09 vs. 0.55 ± 0.084, p = 0.02). The higher stress region also corresponded to the location with reduced intraluminal thrombus thickness. Further, collagen maturity tended to decrease with increased collagen content (p = 0.068, R = 0.38). Together, these results suggest that an increase in less mature collagen content in AAA patients does not effectively compensate for the loss of elastin in the aortic wall, and results in a reduced capability to endure wall stresses.

  12. The effects of chrysin, a Passiflora incarnata extract, on natural killer cell activity in male Sprague-Dawley rats undergoing abdominal surgery.

    PubMed

    Beaumont, Denise M; Mark, Terrence M; Hills, Reginald; Dixon, Patricia; Veit, Bruce; Garrett, Normalynn

    2008-04-01

    Chrysin, a passion flower extract, may be beneficial because of its potential to attenuate surgical suppression of natural killer (NK) cell activity. We divided 37 male Sprague-Dawley rats into 3 treatment groups: (1) rats undergoing abdominal surgery and administered isoflurane and a 5% solution of dimethyl sulfoxide in saline (vehicle), (2) rats undergoing abdominal surgery and administered isoflurane and chrysin solubilized in 5% dimethyl sulfoxide, and (3) rats not undergoing surgery but administered isoflurane and chrysin. Natural killer cell activity was measured before and 24 hours after the experiment. Analysis of covariance, with preoperative NK cell activity as the covariate, was used to compare differences in NK cell activity among groups. The Scheffe procedure was used to make post hoc comparisons. Analysis revealed a significant difference (P = .006) such that group 2 had significantly less NK cell suppression compared with groups 1 and 3. These findings suggest that chrysin may attenuate surgical suppression of NK cell activity, thereby minimizing metastatic spread of cancer.

  13. Music as a nursing intervention: effects of music listening on blood pressure, heart rate, and respiratory rate in abdominal surgery patients.

    PubMed

    Vaajoki, Anne; Kankkunen, Päivi; Pietilä, Anna-Maija; Vehviläinen-Julkunen, Katri

    2011-12-01

    Contradictory results have been presented on how music listening affects patients' blood pressure, heart rate, and respiratory rate. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of music listening on blood pressure, heart rate, and respiratory rate on operation day, and on the first, second, and third postoperative days in abdominal surgery patients. Using a quasi-experimental pretest-post-test design, 168 abdominal surgery patients were assigned every second week to the music group (n=83) or to the control group (n=85) for 25 months. In the music group, the respiratory rate was significantly lower after intervention on both the first and second postoperative days compared with the control group. A significant reduction in systolic blood pressure was demonstrated in the group that received music compared with the control group on both the first and second postoperative days. Evaluation of the long-term effects of music on physiological factors showed that the respiratory rate in the music group was significantly lower compared with the control group. Nurses should offer music listening to surgery patients because of its potential benefit.

  14. Lesson learned from early and long-term results of 327 cases of coexisting surgical abdominal diseases and aortic aneurysms treated in open and endovascular surgery.

    PubMed

    Bonardelli, Stefano; Cervi, Edoardo; Nodari, Franco; Guadrini, Cristina; Zanotti, Camilla; Giulini, Stefano Maria

    2012-06-01

    Patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) frequently have other abdominal pathologies of surgical interest (other diseases, OD). Out of 1,375 elective open aortic replacements for AAA, 315 cases with OD were subdivided in Group 1 (82 patients with "clean wound" OD) and Group 2 (233 patients with "clean-contaminated wound" OD). The results of the sub-groups in which OD was treated at the same time as AAA were analysed (1a, 66 cases and 2a, 86 cases) and compared with OD not treated at the same time as AAA (1b, 16 cases and 2b, 147 cases). EVAR was done in 12 patients with a infrarenal AAA and concomitant abdominal disease. In this group post-operative complications occurred in two patients (endoleaks) and no sign of endograft infection was developed. Mean follow-up was 36 months. Mortality was 0% in Group 1a, 1b, 2b and 5.8% in Group 2a. In Group 1a there were one haemoperitoneum, one ischaemic colitis and one graft infection. In Group 1b there were 4 nefrectomies for renal carcinoma and three emergency hernia repairs within 18 months from AAA operation. In Group 2a the follow-up was uneventful. In Group 2b there was no acute complication of OD and 57.2% of patients were subsequently operated for OD. In the EVAR group the 30-day and late mortality rates were 0 and 25%, respectively and all deaths were cancer-related. Contemporary correction of OD in open surgery for AAA should be performed in clean wound cases, while clean-contaminated operations can be done only in selected cases. EVAR is a valid alternative technique to open vascular surgery for the concomitant treatment of aortic aneurysms and abdominal pathologies.

  15. Intra-Operative Tissue Oxygen Tension Is Increased by Local Insufflation of Humidified-Warm CO2 during Open Abdominal Surgery in a Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Jean K.; Lindner, Pernilla; Tait, Noel; Maddocks, Tracy; Riepsamen, Angelique; van der Linden, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Maintenance of high tissue oxygenation (PtO2) is recommended during surgery because PtO2 is highly predictive of surgical site infection and colonic anastomotic leakage. However, surgical site perfusion is often sub-optimal, creating an obstructive hurdle for traditional, systemically applied therapies to maintain or increase surgical site PtO2. This research tested the hypothesis that insufflation of humidified-warm CO2 into the abdominal cavity would increase sub-peritoneal PtO2 during open abdominal surgery. Materials and Methods 15 Wistar rats underwent laparotomy under general anesthesia. Three sets of randomized cross-over experiments were conducted in which the abdominal cavity was subjected to alternating exposure to 1) humidified-warm CO2 & ambient air; 2) humidified-warm CO2 & dry-cold CO2; and 3) dry-cold CO2 & ambient air. Sub-peritoneal PtO2 and tissue temperature were measured with a polarographic oxygen probe. Results Upon insufflation of humidified-warm CO2, PtO2 increased by 29.8 mmHg (SD 13.3; p<0.001), or 96.6% (SD 51.9), and tissue temperature by 3.0°C (SD 1.7 p<0.001), in comparison with exposure to ambient air. Smaller, but significant, increases in PtO2 were seen in experiments 2 and 3. Tissue temperature decreased upon exposure to dry-cold CO2 compared with ambient air (-1.4°C, SD 0.5, p = 0.001). Conclusions In a rat model, insufflation of humidified-warm CO2 into the abdominal cavity during open abdominal surgery causes an immediate and potentially clinically significant increase in PtO2. The effect is an additive result of the delivery of CO2 and avoidance of evaporative cooling via the delivery of the CO2 gas humidified at body temperature. PMID:25835954

  16. The hypertrophy of the lateral abdominal wall and quadratus lumborum is sport-specific: an MRI segmental study in professional tennis and soccer players.

    PubMed

    Sanchis-Moysi, Joaquin; Idoate, Fernando; Izquierdo, Mikel; Calbet, Jose A; Dorado, Cecilia

    2013-03-01

    The aim was to determine the volume and degree of asymmetry of quadratus lumborum (QL), obliques, and transversus abdominis; the last two considered conjointly (OT), in tennis and soccer players. The volume of QL and OT was determined using magnetic resonance imaging in professional tennis and soccer players, and in non-active controls (n = 8, 14, and 6, respectively). In tennis players the hypertrophy of OT was limited to proximal segments (cephalic segments), while in soccer players it was similar along longitudinal axis. In tennis players the hypertrophy was asymmetric (18% greater volume in the non-dominant than in the dominant OT, p = 0.001), while in soccer players and controls both sides had similar volumes (p > 0.05). In controls, the non-dominant QL was 15% greater than that of the dominant (p = 0.049). Tennis and soccer players had similar volumes in both sides of QL. Tennis alters the dominant-to-non-dominant balance in the muscle volume of the lateral abdominal wall. In tennis the hypertrophy is limited to proximal segments and is greater in the non-dominant side. Soccer, however, is associated to a symmetric hypertrophy of the lateral abdominal wall. Tennis and soccer elicit an asymmetric hypertrophy of QL.

  17. A Double-Blind Randomized Controlled Trial Comparing Epidural Clonidine vs Bupivacaine for Pain Control During and After Lower Abdominal Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Abd-Elsayed, Alaa A.; Guirguis, Maged; DeWood, Mark S.; Zaky, Sherif S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Alpha-2 adrenergic agonists produce safe and effective analgesia, but most investigations studying the analgesic effect of alpha-2 adrenoceptor agonists postoperatively included previous or concomitant administration of other analgesics. Because clonidine potentiates the effect of these drugs, its own intrinsic analgesic effect has been difficult to establish. This study was designed to compare the intraoperative and postoperative effects of epidural clonidine vs bupivacaine for patients undergoing lower abdominal surgery. Methods This randomized controlled trial included 40 patients aged 18-50 who were scheduled for elective lower abdominal surgery. Patients were randomly divided into 2 groups. Group I (n=20) received epidural clonidine; Group II (n=20) received epidural bupivacaine. Intraoperative and postoperative hemodynamics, pain scores, and complications were monitored. Results Mean pain scores were significantly lower in Group I compared to Group II (1.5 ± 0.5 compared to 3.4 ± 1.0, respectively) in the first 12 hours after surgery. Sedation was more prominent in Group I until 9 hours after surgery. Opioid requirements were significantly lower in Group I. Respiratory rate was similar in the 2 groups. Group I had larger decreases from baseline in systolic blood pressure and diastolic blood pressure than Group II. Heart rate in Group I was reduced from baseline, while it was increased in Group II. Less postoperative nausea and vomiting, urinary retention, pruritus, and shivering were observed in Group I. Conclusion Compared to bupivacaine, epidural clonidine provided effective intraoperative and postoperative analgesia in selected patients, resulting in a decreased intravenous pain medication requirement and prolonged duration of analgesia after epidural infusion was discontinued. PMID:26130975

  18. Conservative Management and Planned Surgery for Periviable Advanced Extrauterine Abdominal Pregnancy with Favorable Outcome: Report of Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    Harirah, Hassan M.; Smith, J. Michael; Dixon, C. Luke; Hankins, Gary D. V.

    2016-01-01

    Advanced abdominal pregnancy is an extremely rare condition that poses diagnostic and management challenges. A high index of suspicion and careful assessment of the patient's symptoms, supplemented with obstetric ultrasound, and magnetic resonance imaging, are crucial for timely diagnosis and management to prevent life-threatening complications. The presence of periviable fetuses in advanced abdominal pregnancies increases the challenge to achieve a balance between maternal and fetal benefits and risks. Early diagnosis and management decisions via a multidisciplinary approach and planned delivery are of paramount importance to minimize complications and achieve favorable maternal and fetal outcomes. Even in the setting of oligohydramnios and suspected preterm premature rupture of membranes, in-patient conservative management and an individualized planned surgical approach that includes removing or leaving the placenta in place are appropriate for managing the periviable abdominal pregnancy. PMID:27595049

  19. Comparison of intrathecal clonidine and fentanyl in hyperbaric bupivacaine for spinal anesthesia and postoperative analgesia in patients undergoing lower abdominal surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Bajwa, Baljit Singh; Singh, Arwinder Pal; Rekhi, Angelina K

    2017-01-01

    Background: There are many adjuvant used along with bupivacaine for subarachnoid block, but fentanyl and clonidine are commonly used as adjuvant to intrathecal bupivacaine for prolonging both sensory and motor blockade as well as postoperative analgesia in patients undergoing lower abdominal surgeries. Objective: There is a paucity of studies comparing the efficacy of fentanyl and clonidine as adjuvant to intrathecal bupivacaine for improving intraoperative effect and postoperative analgesia in lower abdominal surgeries instigated us compare the effect of these drugs. Methods: This prospective, randomized study is conducted on 100 American Society of Anesthesiologists I or II patients between 18 and 65 years of age divided into two groups of 50 each. The patients were given 2.5 ml of 0.5% hyperbaric bupivacaine with either 50 μg of clonidine (BC Group) or 25 μg of fentanyl (BF Group) intrathecally. The onset and duration of sensory and motor block, sedation score, hemodynamic parameters, total analgesia time, and potential side effects were recorded and compared. Results: Both the groups were comparable in demographic data, onset and duration of sensory and motor blockade, hemodynamic parameters, but the duration of analgesia is significantly longer in clonidine group when compared with fentanyl group. Sedation score is more in clonidine group. Conclusion: Addition of clonidine to intrathecal bupivacaine offers longer duration of postoperative analgesia than fentanyl but with higher sedation. PMID:28217051

  20. Coma from wall suction-induced CSF leak complicating spinal surgery.

    PubMed

    Fehnel, Corey R; Razmara, Ali; Feske, Steven K

    2014-03-12

    A 72-year-old woman was admitted for elective L4/L5 laminectomy. The operative procedure was extradural, and a Jackson-Pratt (JP) drain was placed in the tissue bed and set to wall suction during skin closure. During closure, the patient developed a 15 s period of asystole. The patient was haemodynamically stable, but was comatose for 3 days postoperatively. Cardiac enzymes and EEG were unrevealing. Head CT showed traces of subarachnoid haemorrhage and signs suggestive of cerebral anoxia. JP drain at the incision produced 170-210 mL/day of fluid, positive for β-2 transferrin, indicating cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). The patient fully returned to baseline on hospital day 10. MRI on hospital day 8 normalised. The reversible coma and radiographic findings were most consistent with acute intracranial hypotension relating to acute loss of CSF. Because radiographic findings can mimic hypoxic-ischaemic injury, acute intracranial hypotension should be considered in the differential diagnosis of postoperative coma after cranial or spinal surgery.

  1. Virtual wall-based haptic-guided teleoperated surgical robotic system for single-port brain tumor removal surgery.

    PubMed

    Seung, Sungmin; Choi, Hongseok; Jang, Jongseong; Kim, Young Soo; Park, Jong-Oh; Park, Sukho; Ko, Seong Young

    2017-01-01

    This article presents a haptic-guided teleoperation for a tumor removal surgical robotic system, so-called a SIROMAN system. The system was developed in our previous work to make it possible to access tumor tissue, even those that seat deeply inside the brain, and to remove the tissue with full maneuverability. For a safe and accurate operation to remove only tumor tissue completely while minimizing damage to the normal tissue, a virtual wall-based haptic guidance together with a medical image-guided control is proposed and developed. The virtual wall is extracted from preoperative medical images, and the robot is controlled to restrict its motion within the virtual wall using haptic feedback. Coordinate transformation between sub-systems, a collision detection algorithm, and a haptic-guided teleoperation using a virtual wall are described in the context of using SIROMAN. A series of experiments using a simplified virtual wall are performed to evaluate the performance of virtual wall-based haptic-guided teleoperation. With haptic guidance, the accuracy of the robotic manipulator's trajectory is improved by 57% compared to one without. The tissue removal performance is also improved by 21% ( p < 0.05). The experiments show that virtual wall-based haptic guidance provides safer and more accurate tissue removal for single-port brain surgery.

  2. Ultrasound-guided rectus sheath and transversus abdominis plane blocks for perioperative analgesia in upper abdominal surgery: A randomized controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Abdelsalam, Khaled; Mohamdin, OW

    2016-01-01

    Background: Regional anesthetic techniques can be used to alleviate postoperative pain in patients undergoing major upper abdominal surgery. Our aim was to evaluate the efficacy of bilateral ultrasound (US)-guided rectus sheath (RS) and transversus abdominis plane (TAP) blocks for better perioperative analgesia. Patients and Methods: It is a prospective, observer-blinded, randomized clinical study. 40 eligible patients undergoing elective liver resection or Whipple procedure were included. All patients received a standardized anesthetic technique. Group 1 (n = 20) received preincisional US-guided bilateral RS and TAP blocks using 20 ml volume of bupivacaine 0.25% for each, and group 2 (n = 20) received local wound infiltration at end of surgery with 40 ml of bupivacaine 0.25%. A standardized postoperative analgesic regimen composed of intravenous paracetamol and a morphine patient-controlled analgesia (PCA). The use of intraoperative fentanyl and recovery room morphine boluses, PCA-administered morphine, pain scores as well as number of patients’ experienced postoperative nausea and vomiting in the ward at 6 and 24 h were recorded. Results: Group 1 patients received a significantly lower cumulative intraoperative fentanyl, significantly lesser boluses of morphine in postanesthesia care unit, as well, significantly lower cumulative 24 h postoperative morphine dosage than the group 2 patients. Pain visual analog scale scores were significantly lower at both 6 and 24 h postoperatively in TAP group when compared with the no-TAP group. There were no complications related to the TAP block procedures. No signs or symptoms of local anesthetic systemic toxicity were detected. Conclusion: The combination of bilateral US-guided RS and TAP blocks provides excellent perioperative analgesia for major upper abdominal surgery. PMID:26955306

  3. Application of a Silicone Sheet in Negative-Pressure Wound Therapy to Treat an Abdominal Wall Defect after Necrotizing Fasciitis

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Jin Su

    2017-01-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis (NF) is an aggressive soft-tissue infection involving the deep fascia and is characterized by extensive deterioration of the surrounding tissue. Immediate diagnosis and intensive treatment, including debridement and systemic antibiotics, represent the most important factors influencing the survival of NF patients. In this report, we present a case of NF in the abdomen due to an infection caused by a perforated small bowel after abdominal liposuction. It was successfully treated using negative-pressure wound therapy, in which a silicone sheet functioned as a barrier between the sponge and internal organs to protect the small bowel. PMID:28194352

  4. Constitutive activation of ectodermal β-catenin induces ectopic outgrowths at various positions in mouse embryo and affects abdominal ventral body wall closure.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xuming; Huang, Sixia; Zhang, Lingling; Wu, Yumei; Chen, Yingwei; Tao, Yixin; Wang, Yushu; He, Shigang; Shen, Sanbing; Wu, Ji; Li, Baojie; Guo, Xizhi; He, Lin; Ma, Gang

    2014-01-01

    Vertebrate limbs originate from the lateral plate mesoderm (LPM) and the overlying ectoderm. While normal limb formation in defined regions has been well studied, the question of whether other positions retain limb-forming potential has not been fully investigated in mice. By ectopically activating β-catenin in the ectoderm with Msx2-cre, we observed that local tissue outgrowths were induced, which either progressed into limb-like structure within the inter-limb flank or formed extra tissues in other parts of the mouse embryo. In the presumptive abdominal region of severely affected embryos, ectopic limb formation was coupled with impaired abdominal ventral body wall (AVBW) closure, which indicates the existence of a potential counterbalance of limb formation and AVBW closure. At the molecular level, constitutive β-catenin activation was sufficient to trigger, but insufficient to maintain the ectopic expression of a putative limb-inducing factor, Fgf8, in the ectoderm. These findings provide new insight into the mechanism of limb formation and AVBW closure, and the crosstalk between the Wnt/β-catenin pathway and Fgf signal.

  5. [Parenteral nutrition "à la carte" in major abdominal surgery with mixtures of Totamine concentrate and Vintène. A clinical study based on nitrogen balance].

    PubMed

    Vanden Bavière, H; De Roose, J; Derom, F; Anné, T

    1981-01-01

    The authors present a series of thirty patients who underwent major abdominal surgery. Each patient received preoperative total parenteral nutrition (TPN) during bowel preparation. After the operation the TPN was continued immediately, even if reanimation was necessary. The dosages of nitrogen and calories were individually adapted in function of the daily calculated nitrogen-balances. So the authors were able to administer a TPN "à la carte" using eight solutions mixed in a single bag, containing amino-acids (varying between 6 and 20 g of nitrogen), glucose (ad 150 Kcal/gN) lipids (constituting 40% of the calorie-intake), ions, vitamins and oligoelements. With a follow-up of minimum 10 days, the study proves the possibility of creating positive nitrogen-balances in 87% of the cases and an acceptable deviation in the daily measured glycemia and plasma-ionograms.

  6. Diagnosis of VTE postdischarge for major abdominal and pelvic oncologic surgery: implications for a change in practice

    PubMed Central

    Alsubaie, Hamad; Leggett, Carly; Lambert, Pascal; Park, Jason; Hochman, David; Wirtzfeld, Debrah; McKay, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Background Extended thromboprophylaxis after hospital discharge following cancer surgery has been shown to reduce the incidence of venous thromboembolism (VTE); however, this practice has not been universally adopted. We conducted a population-based analysis to determine the proportion of patients with symptomatic VTE diagnosed within 90 days after initial discharge following major abdominopelvic cancer surgery who might have benefited from extended thromboprophylaxis. Methods We used the Manitoba Cancer Registry to identify patients who underwent major abdominopelvic cancer surgery between 2004 and 2009. The proportion in whom VTE was diagnosed during the initial hospital stay was determined by accessing the Hospital Separations Abstracts. The proportion in whom VTE was diagnosed after discharge was determined by examining repeat admissions within 90 days and by accessing Drug Programs Information Network records for newly prescribed anticoagulants. Detailed tumour and treatment-specific data allowed calculation of VTE predictors. Results Of 6612 patients identified, 106 (1.60%) had VTE diagnosed during the initial stay and 96 (1.45%) presented with VTE after discharge. Among patients in whom VTE developed after discharge, 33.3% had a pulmonary embolus, 24% had deep vein thrombosis, and 6.3% had both. Predictors of presenting with VTE after discharge within 90 days of surgery included advanced disease, presence of other complications, increased hospital resource utilization, primary tumours of noncolorectal gastrointestinal origin and age younger than 45 years. The development of VTE was an independent predictor of decreased 5-year overall survival. Conclusion The cumulative incidence of VTE within 90 days of major abdominopelvic oncologic surgery was 3.01%, with about half (1.45%) having been diagnosed within 90 days after discharge. PMID:26204144

  7. TextWithSurgeryPatients - A Research Hypothesis in Enhancing Education and Physical Assessment for Abdominal Surgical Patients.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Margaret

    2016-01-01

    Medical surgical nurses may not have the time or resources to provide effective pre- and post-operative instructions for patients in today's healthcare system. And, making timely physical assessments following discharge from the hospital is not always straightforward. Therefore, the risk for readmission associated with post-surgical complications is a concern. At present, mobile healthcare technologies and patient care are precipitously evolving and may serve as a resource to enhance communication between the healthcare provider and patient. A mobile telephone text message (short message service [SMS]) intervention for abdominal surgical patients may foster effective education (communication) and timely self-reported physical assessment in the home environment hence preventing deleterious outcomes. The aim of this research proposal is to identify the feasibility of using a SMS intervention via smart phones to improve health outcomes via timely communication, reach large numbers of at-risk surgical patients and, establish and sustain uniform protocols in a cost-efficient manner.

  8. Demographic factors, outcomes, and complications in abdominal contouring surgery after massive weight loss in a developing country.

    PubMed

    Iglesias, Martín; Ortega-Rojo, Andrea; Garcia-Alvarez, Miriam N; Vargas-Vorackova, Florencia; Gonzalez-Chavez, Alberto M; Gonzalez-Chavez, Mario A; Butron, Patricia; Pineda-Solis, Karen

    2012-07-01

    Few reports about body contouring surgery after massive weight loss (MWL) have been produced in the developing countries. As Mexico is considered a developing country, we performed a retrospective analysis of medical records of patients who underwent this type of surgery to evaluate their demographic characteristics as well as their outcomes and complications. Results from 684 patients with MWL, 69 (10%) had abdominoplasty; the type of abdominoplasty influenced the operative time, bleeding, and complications (P < 0.05); the body mass index influenced the weight of resected tissue (P < 0.000) and hospital stay (P < 0.020), but did not affect the type of abdominoplasty performed, surgical time, complications, reoperation, or transfusion rates. In contrast with the developed countries, in these procedures, operating time was higher and the patients had more surgical bleeding with higher rates of transfusion and a longer hospital stay, but with the same clinical results and percentage of complications.

  9. Prior Distributions of Material Parameters for Bayesian Calibration of Growth and Remodeling Computational Model of Abdominal Aortic Wall.

    PubMed

    Seyedsalehi, Sajjad; Zhang, Liangliang; Choi, Jongeun; Baek, Seungik

    2015-10-01

    For the accurate prediction of the vascular disease progression, there is a crucial need for developing a systematic tool aimed toward patient-specific modeling. Considering the interpatient variations, a prior distribution of model parameters has a strong influence on computational results for arterial mechanics. One crucial step toward patient-specific computational modeling is to identify parameters of prior distributions that reflect existing knowledge. In this paper, we present a new systematic method to estimate the prior distribution for the parameters of a constrained mixture model using previous biaxial tests of healthy abdominal aortas (AAs). We investigate the correlation between the estimated parameters for each constituent and the patient's age and gender; however, the results indicate that the parameters are correlated with age only. The parameters are classified into two groups: Group-I in which the parameters ce, ck1, ck2, cm2,Ghc, and ϕe are correlated with age, and Group-II in which the parameters cm1, Ghm, G1e, G2e, and α are not correlated with age. For the parameters in Group-I, we used regression associated with age via linear or inverse relations, in which their prior distributions provide conditional distributions with confidence intervals. For Group-II, the parameter estimated values were subjected to multiple transformations and chosen if the transformed data had a better fit to the normal distribution than the original. This information improves the prior distribution of a subject-specific model by specifying parameters that are correlated with age and their transformed distributions. Therefore, this study is a necessary first step in our group's approach toward a Bayesian calibration of an aortic model. The results from this study will be used as the prior information necessary for the initialization of Bayesian calibration of a computational model for future applications.

  10. Influence of different fat emulsions with 10 or 20% MCT/LCT or LCT on lipoproteins in plasma of patients after abdominal surgery.

    PubMed

    Hailer, S; Jauch, K W; Wolfram, G

    1998-01-01

    In patients after elective abdominal surgery, different fat emulsions were used to compare their efficacy in total parenteral nutrition and in normalizing plasma lipoprotein levels. In five different groups with 5 patients each, half of the nonprotein calories were given as medium-chain triglycerides/long-chain triglycerides (1:1) or as long-chain triglycerides alone in 10 or 20% fat emulsions or as glucose alone in a control group for 7 days. After surgery, an initial decrease of all plasma lipoprotein components was followed by a different behavior of glyceride-glycerol, cholesterol, phospholipids, and apolipoproteins. Glyceride-glycerol in very-low-density lipoproteins and high-density lipoproteins is increasing during infusion of fat emulsions and decreasing during overnight interruption of infusions. After the 7-day infusion period, there was no significant difference in very-low-density lipoprotein glyceride-glycerol as compared with the values before different infusions. Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol is reaching and exceeding preoperative concentrations between the 4th and the 7th day, most during infusion of 10% fat emulsion and especially due to an increase of free cholesterol. High-density lipoprotein cholesterol and apolipoprotein A-I reach preoperative levels during infusion of fat emulsions but not with glucose alone. Higher than preoperative values are reached in phospholipids with all fat infusions already on day 4. Abnormal lipoprotein X occurred least with the medium-chain/long-chain triglyceride 20% fat-infusion. This fat emulsion is suggested as having the best normalizing effect on plasma lipoproteins and best tolerance in patients after surgery.

  11. Abdominal tuberculosis.

    PubMed Central

    Kapoor, V. K.

    1998-01-01

    Tuberculosis has staged a global comeback and forms a dangerous combination with AIDS. The abdomen is one of the common sites of extrapulmonary involvement. Patients with abdominal tuberculosis have a wide range and spectrum of symptoms and signs; the disease is therefore a great mimic. Diagnosis, mainly radiological and supported by endoscopy, is difficult to make and laparotomy is required in a large number of patient. Management involves judicious combination of antitubercular therapy and surgery which may be required to treat complications such as intestinal obstruction and perforation. The disease, though potentially curable, carries a significant morbidity and mortality. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 PMID:9926119

  12. Remodeling characteristics and collagen distribution in synthetic mesh materials explanted from human subjects after abdominal wall reconstruction: an analysis of remodeling characteristics by patient risk factors and surgical site classifications

    PubMed Central

    Cavallo, Jaime A.; Roma, Andres A.; Jasielec, Mateusz S.; Ousley, Jenny; Creamer, Jennifer; Pichert, Matthew D.; Baalman, Sara; Frisella, Margaret M.; Matthews, Brent D.

    2014-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to evaluate the associations between patient characteristics or surgical site classifications and the histologic remodeling scores of synthetic meshes biopsied from their abdominal wall repair sites in the first attempt to generate a multivariable risk prediction model of non-constructive remodeling. Methods Biopsies of the synthetic meshes were obtained from the abdominal wall repair sites of 51 patients during a subsequent abdominal re-exploration. Biopsies were stained with hematoxylin and eosin, and evaluated according to a semi-quantitative scoring system for remodeling characteristics (cell infiltration, cell types, extracellular matrix deposition, inflammation, fibrous encapsulation, and neovascularization) and a mean composite score (CR). Biopsies were also stained with Sirius Red and Fast Green, and analyzed to determine the collagen I:III ratio. Based on univariate analyses between subject clinical characteristics or surgical site classification and the histologic remodeling scores, cohort variables were selected for multivariable regression models using a threshold p value of ≤0.200. Results The model selection process for the extracellular matrix score yielded two variables: subject age at time of mesh implantation, and mesh classification (c-statistic = 0.842). For CR score, the model selection process yielded two variables: subject age at time of mesh implantation and mesh classification (r2 = 0.464). The model selection process for the collagen III area yielded a model with two variables: subject body mass index at time of mesh explantation and pack-year history (r2 = 0.244). Conclusion Host characteristics and surgical site assessments may predict degree of remodeling for synthetic meshes used to reinforce abdominal wall repair sites. These preliminary results constitute the first steps in generating a risk prediction model that predicts the patients and clinical circumstances for which non

  13. Guidelines for laparoscopic treatment of ventral and incisional abdominal wall hernias (International Endohernia Society (IEHS)-part 1.

    PubMed

    Bittner, R; Bingener-Casey, J; Dietz, U; Fabian, M; Ferzli, G S; Fortelny, R H; Köckerling, F; Kukleta, J; Leblanc, K; Lomanto, D; Misra, M C; Bansal, V K; Morales-Conde, S; Ramshaw, B; Reinpold, W; Rim, S; Rohr, M; Schrittwieser, R; Simon, Th; Smietanski, M; Stechemesser, B; Timoney, M; Chowbey, P

    2014-01-01

    Guidelines are increasingly determining the decision process in day-to-day clinical work. Guidelines describe the current best possible standard in diagnostics and therapy. They should be developed by an international panel of experts, whereby alongside individual experience, above all, the results of comparative studies are decisive. According to the results of high-ranking scientific studies published in peer-reviewed journals, statements and recommendations are formulated, and these are graded strictly according to the criteria of evidence-based medicine. Guidelines can therefore be valuable in helping particularly the young surgeon in his or her day-to-day work to find the best decision for the patient when confronted with a wide and confusing range of options. However, even experienced surgeons benefit because by virtue of a heavy workload and commitment, they often find it difficult to keep up with the ever-increasing published literature. All guidelines require regular updating, usually every 3 years, in line with progress in the field. The current Guidelines focus on technique and perioperative management of laparoscopic ventral hernia repair and constitute the first comprehensive guidelines on this topic. In this issue of Surgical Endoscopy, the first part of the Guidelines is published including sections on basics, indication for surgery, perioperative management, and key points of technique. The next part (Part 2) of the Guidelines will address complications and comparisons between open and laparoscopic techniques. Part 3 will cover mesh technology, hernia prophylaxis, technique-related issues, new technologic developments, lumbar and other unusual hernias, and training/education.

  14. Laparoscopic Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... surgeon’s perspective, laparoscopic surgery may allow for easier dissection of abdominal scar tissue (adhesions), less surgical trauma, ... on Facebook About ACG ACG Store ACG Patient Education & Resource Center Home GI Health and Disease Recursos ...

  15. [Abdominal actinomycosis with IUD].

    PubMed

    Kamprath, S; Merker, A; Kühne-Heid, R; Schneider, A

    1997-01-01

    We report a case of abdominal actinomycosis in a 54 year old woman using an intrauterine device for a period of 8 years. The most important finding was a tuboovarialabscess at the left pelvic side with involvement of the serosa of the jejunum, ileum, sigma, and omentum majus. Intraoperative exploration showed a solid retroperitoneal infiltration between the pelvic side wall and sigma. Another infiltration was found on the left side of the abdominal wall. The diagnosis was confirmed by histopathological examination and the patient was treated by a combination of Aminopenicillin and Metronidazol. After a period of three months we observed a complete regression of the clinical and the MRI findings.

  16. Results after En Bloc Lateral Wall Decompression Surgery with Orbital Fat Resection in 111 Patients with Graves' Orbitopathy

    PubMed Central

    Fichter, Nicole; Guthoff, Rudolf F.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the effect of en bloc lateral wall decompression with additional orbital fat resection in terms of exophthalmos reduction and complications. Methods. A retrospective, noncomparative case series study from 1999 to 2011 (chart review) in Graves' orbitopathy (GO) patients. The standardized surgical technique involved removal of the lateral orbital wall including the orbital rim via a lid crease approach combined with additional orbital fat resection. Exophthalmos, diplopia, retrobulbar pressure sensation, and complications were analyzed pre- and postoperatively. Results. A total of 111 patients (164 orbits) with follow-up >3 months were analysed. Mean exophthalmos reduction was 3.05mm and preoperative orbital pressure sensation resolved or improved in all patients. Visual acuity improved significantly in patients undergoing surgery for rehabilitative or vision threatening purposes. Preoperative diplopia improved in 10 patients (9.0%) but worsened in 5 patients (4.5%), necessitating surgical correction in 3 patients. There were no significant complications; however, one patient had slight hollowing of the temporalis muscle around the scar that did not necessitate revision, and another patient with a circumscribed retraction of the scar itself underwent surgical correction. Conclusions. The study confirms the efficiency of en bloc lateral wall decompression in GO in a large series of patients, highlighting the low risk of disturbance of binocular functions and of cosmetic blemish in the temporal midface region. PMID:26221142

  17. Randomized Trial of the Effect of Magnesium Sulfate Continuous Infusion on IL-6 and CRP Serum Levels Following Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Mojtahedzadeh, Mojtaba; chelkeba, Legese; Ranjvar- Shahrivar, Mona; Najafi, Atabak; Moini, Majid; Najmeddin, Farhad; Sadeghi, Kourosh; Barkhordari, Khosro; Gheymati, Azin; Ahmadi, Arezoo

    2016-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is widely considered as the disease of elderly white men. Inflammation is one of the most well-known mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of AAA. Magnesium is one of the most important minerals in the body with established anti-inflammatory effects. In this study, we aimed to investigate the impact of Mg loading following AAA surgery on two inflammation markers, IL-6 and CRP, as well as patientʼs outcome. This study was conducted as a randomized clinical trial on 18 patients (divided into two groups) after surgical correction of Acute Aortic Aneurysm (AAA). All the patients admitted in ICU ward of Sina Hospital. In intervention group, 10 g of MgSO4 has been infused through 12 h. The control group has not received the intervention. IL-6 and CRP were measured and compared at times 0, 12, 24 and 36 h. The patients were monitored for 36 h. After intervention, the differences of heart rate and APACHE II score were not statistically significant between intervention and control groups (P = 0.097 and P = 0.472, respectively). IL-6 levels decreased consistently in both groups after inclusion in the study. However, IL-6 level was significantly less in intervention group early after the end of MgSO4 infusion comparing with control group (P = 0.01). Likewise, the CRP level decreased significantly after inclusion in the study (P = 0.005). However, these changes were not significant between intervention and control groups (P = 0.297). According to the results of this study, continuous infusion of MgSO4 after AAA surgery may provide IL-6 suppression. PMID:28243294

  18. The use of platelet indices, plateletcrit, mean platelet volume and platelet distribution width in emergency non-traumatic abdominal surgery: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Budak, Yasemin Ustundag; Polat, Murat; Huysal, Kagan

    2016-01-01

    Platelet indices (PI) — plateletcrit, mean platelet volume (MPV) and platelet distribution width (PDW) — are a group of derived platelet parameters obtained as a part of the automatic complete blood count. Emerging evidence suggests that PIs may have diagnostic and prognostic value in certain diseases. This study aimed to summarize the current scientific knowledge on the potential role of PIs as a diagnostic and prognostic marker in patients having emergency, non-traumatic abdominal surgery. In December 2015, we searched Medline/PubMed, Scopus and Google Scholar to identify all articles on PIs. Overall, considerable evidence suggests that PIs are altered with acute appendicitis. Although the role of PI in the differential diagnosis of acute abdomen remains uncertain, low MPV might be useful in acute appendicitis and acute mesenteric ischemia, with high MPV predicting poor prognosis in acute mesenteric ischemia. The current lack of consistency and technical standards in studies involving PIs should be regarded as a serious limitation to comparing these studies. Further large, multicentre prospective studies concurrently collecting data from different ethnicities and genders are needed before they can be used in routine clinical practice. PMID:27346963

  19. Peptide-based enteral formula improves tolerance and clinical outcomes in abdominal surgery patients relative to a whole protein enteral formula

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ming-Yi; Tang, Hsiu-Chih; Hu, Shu-Hui; Chang, Sue-Joan

    2016-01-01

    AIM To compare a dipeptide- and tripeptide-based enteral formula with a standard enteral formula for tolerance and nutritional outcomes in abdominal surgery patients. METHODS A retrospective study was performed to assess the differences between a whole-protein formula (WPF) and a dipeptide- and tripeptide-based formula (PEF) in clinical outcomes. Seventy-two adult intensive care unit (ICU) patients with serum albumin concentrations less than 3.0 g/dL were enrolled in this study. Patients were divided into two groups (WPF group = 40 patients, PEF group = 32 patients). The study patients were fed for at least 7 d, with ≥ 1000 mL of enteral formula infused on at least 3 of the days. RESULTS The mean serum albumin level on postoperative day (POD) 10, prealbumin levels on POD-5 and POD-10, and total lymphocyte count on POD-5 were significantly higher in the PEF group compared to those in the WPF group (P < 0.05). The average maximum gastric residual volume of the PEF patients during their ICU stays was significantly lower than that for WPF patients. CONCLUSION Dipeptide- and tripeptide-based enteral formulas are more efficacious and better tolerated than whole-protein formulas. PMID:27830042

  20. BOTULINUM TOXIN A INDUCED PARALYSIS OF THE LATERAL ABDOMINAL WALL AFTER DAMAGE CONTROL LAPAROTOMY: A MULTIINSTITUTIONAL, PROSPECTIVE, RANDOMIZED, PLACEBO CONTROLLED PILOT STUDY

    PubMed Central

    Zielinski, Martin D.; Kuntz, Melissa; Zhang, Xiaoming; Zagar, Abigail E.; Khasawneh, Mohammad A.; Zendejas, Benjamin; Polites, Stephanie F.; Ferrara, Michael; Harmsen, William S.; Ballman, Karla S.; Park, Myung S.; Schiller, Henry J.; Dries, David; Jenkins, Donald H.

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Damage control laparotomy (DCL) is a life-saving operation used in critically ill patients; however, interval primary fascial closure remains a challenge. We hypothesized that flaccid paralysis of the lateral abdominal wall musculature induced by Botulinum Toxin A (BTX), would improve of rates of primary fascial closure, decrease duration of hospital stay (LOS), and enhance pain control. METHODS Consenting adults who had undergone a DCL at two institutions were prospectively randomized to receive ultrasound-guided injections of their external oblique, internal oblique, and transversus abdominus muscles with either BTX (150cc, 2units/cc) or placebo (150cc 0.9%NaCl). Patients were excluded if they had a BMI>50, remained unstable or coagulopathic, were home O2 dependent or had an existing neuromuscular disorder. Outcomes were assessed in a double-blinded manner. Univariate and Kaplan Meier estimates of cumulative probability of abdominal closure were performed. RESULTS We randomized 46 patients (24 BTX, 22 placebo). There were no significant differences in demographics, comorbidities, and physiological status. Injections were performed on average 1.8 ± 2.8 days after DCL (range 0-14). The 10-day cumulative probability of primary fascial closure was similar between groups: 96% for BTX (95% CI 72%-99%) and 93% for placebo (95% CI 61%-99%); HR =1.0 (95% CI 0.5-1.8). No difference between BTX and placebo groups was observed for LOS (37 vs 26 days, p=0.30) or intensive care unit stay (17 vs 11 days, p=0.27). There was no difference in median morphine equivalents following DCL. The overall complication rate was similar (63% vs 68%, p=0.69), with 2 deaths in the placebo group and 0 in the BTX group. No BTX or injection procedure complications were observed. CONCLUSION Use of BTX after DCL was safe but did not appear to affect primary fascial closure, LOS, or pain modulation after DCL. Given higher than expected rates of primary fascial closure, type II error

  1. [Systematic Readability Analysis of Medical Texts on Websites of German University Clinics for General and Abdominal Surgery].

    PubMed

    Esfahani, B Janghorban; Faron, A; Roth, K S; Grimminger, P P; Luers, J C

    2016-12-01

    Background: Besides the function as one of the main contact points, websites of hospitals serve as medical information portals. As medical information texts should be understood by any patients independent of the literacy skills and educational level, online texts should have an appropriate structure to ease understandability. Materials and Methods: Patient information texts on websites of clinics for general surgery at German university hospitals (n = 36) were systematically analysed. For 9 different surgical topics representative medical information texts were extracted from each website. Using common readability tools and 5 different readability indices the texts were analysed concerning their readability and structure. The analysis was furthermore stratified in relation to geographical regions in Germany. Results: For the definite analysis the texts of 196 internet websites could be used. On average the texts consisted of 25 sentences and 368 words. The reading analysis tools congruously showed that all texts showed a rather low readability demanding a high literacy level from the readers. Conclusion: Patient information texts on German university hospital websites are difficult to understand for most patients. To fulfill the ambition of informing the general population in an adequate way about medical issues, a revision of most medical texts on websites of German surgical hospitals is recommended.

  2. A retrospective analysis of the impact of diastolic dysfunction on one-year mortality after transjugular intrahepatic porto-systemic shunt, liver transplantation and non-transplant abdominal surgery in patients with cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Shounak, Majumder; Vimal, Rabdiya; Colin, Swales; David I, Silverman

    2015-01-01

    Background The incidence of diastolic dysfunction (DD) approaches 40% in patients with cirrhosis. However, the clinical impact of DD remains a subject of considerable debate. Surgery in patients with cirrhosis is innately hazardous. Diastolic heart failure has been linked to increased mortality after transjugular intrahepatic porto-systemic shunt surgery (TIPSS). To date, none of the commonly accepted preoperative risk assessment models applied to patients with liver disease incorporates DD. We aimed to examine the relationship between DD and postoperative outcomes in patients with cirrhosis undergoing abdominal surgery. Methods Patients with cirrhosis who underwent abdominal surgery between January 2000 and December 2011 were included if they had preoperative echocardiography done within 3 months of surgery. The echocardiographic images were reviewed using flow and tissue Doppler techniques to identify the presence of DD. Outcomes analyzed included one-year mortality and postoperative complications. Results A total of 140 patients were included in the study of which 63 patients (45%) met pre-established criteria for DD. Those with DD were older (P < 0.005) and less likely to have an isolated viral etiology of cirrhosis (P<0.05). The one-year mortality rate was 22.2% (14/63) in patients with DD and 20.8% (16/77) in those without DD (P=0.42). Postoperative complications were not statistically different in the two groups. Conclusion DD is common in patients with cirrhosis. In patients with cirrhosis undergoing TIPS and/or abdominal surgery, the presence of DD does not increase post-procedure complications or one-year mortality. PMID:26129720

  3. Abdominal desmoplastic small round cell tumor without extraperitoneal metastases: Is there a benefit for HIPEC after macroscopically complete cytoreductive surgery?

    PubMed Central

    Honoré, C.; Atallah, V.; Mir, O.; Orbach, D.; Ferron, G.; LePéchoux, C.; Delhorme, J. B.; Philippe-Chomette, P.; Sarnacki, S.; Msika, S.; Terrier, P.; Glehen, O.; Martelli, H.; Minard-Colin, V.; Bertucci, F.; Blay, J. Y.; Bonvalot, S.; Elias, D.; LeCesne, A.; Sargos, P.

    2017-01-01

    Background Desmoplastic Small Round Cell Tumor (DSRCT) is a rare disease affecting predominantly children and young adults and for which the benefit of hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC) after complete cytoreductive surgery (CCRS) remains unknown. Methods To identify patients with DSRCT without extraperitoneal metastases (EPM) who underwent CCRS between 1991 and 2015, a retrospective nation-wide survey was conducted by crossing the prospective and retrospective databases of the French Network for Rare Peritoneal Malignancies, French Reference Network in Sarcoma Pathology, French Sarcoma Clinical Network and French Pediatric Cancer Society. Results Among the 107 patients with DSRCT, 48 had no EPM and underwent CCRS. The median peritoneal cancer index (PCI) was 9 (range: 2–27). Among these 48 patients, 38 (79%) had pre- and/or postoperative chemotherapy and 23 (48%) postoperative whole abdominopelvic radiotherapy (WAP-RT). Intraperitoneal chemotherapy was administered to 11 patients (23%): two received early postoperative intraperitoneal chemotherapy (EPIC) and nine HIPEC. After a median follow-up of 30 months, the median overall survival (OS) of the entire cohort was 42 months. The 2-y and 5-y OS were 72% and 19%. The 2-y and 5-y disease-free survival (DFS) were 30% and 12%. WAP-RT was the only variable associated with longer peritoneal recurrence-free survival and DFS after CCRS. The influence of HIPEC/EPIC on OS and DFS was not statistically conclusive. Conclusion The benefit of HIPEC is still unknown and should be evaluated in a prospective trial. The value of postoperative WAP-RT seems to be confirmed. PMID:28234908

  4. Physiologic Simulation of the Fontan Surgery with Variable Wall Properties and Respiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Christopher; Bazilevs, Yuri; Feinstein, Jeffrey; Marsden, Alison

    2010-11-01

    Children born with single ventricle heart defects typically undergo a surgical procedure known as a total cavopulmonary connection (TCPC). The goal of this work is to perform hemodynamic simulations accounting for motion of the arterial walls in the TCPC. We perform fluid structure interactions (FSI) simulations using an Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) finite element framework into a patient-specific model of the TCPC. The patient's post-op anatomy is reconstructed from MRI data. Respiration rate, heart rate, and venous pressures are obtained from catheterization data, and flowrates are obtained from phase contrast MRI data and are used together with a respiratory model. Lumped parameter (RCR) boundary conditions are used at the outlets. This study is the first to introduce variable elastic properties for the different areas of the TCPC, including a Gore-Tex conduit. Quantities such as wall shear stresses and pressures at critical junctions are extracted from the simulation and are compared with pressure tracings from clinical data as well as with rigid wall simulations.

  5. A population-level analysis of abdominal wall reconstruction by component separation in the morbidly obese patient: can it be performed safely?

    PubMed

    Nelson, Jonas A; Fischer, John P; Wink, Jason D; Kovach, Stephen J

    2014-10-01

    Morbid obesity is increasing at an alarming rate and a significant portion of patients presenting for complex abdominal wall reconstruction (AWR) and component separation fall into this category, creating added medical and surgical challenges to an already difficult operation. The goal of this study was to utilise the Nationwide 2005-2010 American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement database (ACS-NSQIP) to perform a population level analysis of the role of morbid obesity on 30-day perioperative morbidity with the hope of improving patient care, counselling and risk stratification. Morbidly obese patients (BMI > 40 kg/m(2)) were compared to non-obese patients (BMI < 30 kg/m(2)). Outcome variables assessed included major surgical complications, major medical complications, major renal complications, major wound complications, return to OR (ROR), and venous thromboembolism (VTE). Significant variables in a univariate analysis were included in a multivariate logistic regression controlling for patient characteristics (p < 0.05). In total, 1695 patients undergoing AWR were identified in the ACS-NSQIP database. Of these, 614 patients were non-obese (average BMI = 25.7 ± 3.0 kg/m(2)) and 314 were morbidly obese (average BMI = 45.9 ± 5.8 kg/m(2)). Multivariate analyses determined that morbid obesity did not significantly contribute to major surgical, medical, renal or wound complications. However, it was significantly associated with ROR (OR = 2.8, p < 0.001) and VTE (OR = 5.2, p = 0.04). Morbid obesity is an independent risk factor for ROR and VTE related complications, in the 30 day post-operative period. Additional perioperative care is warranted to decrease such early re-operations and for preventable complications.

  6. Abdominal actinomycosis masquerading as an omental tumor in a 12-year-old female.

    PubMed

    Hirayama, Yutaka; Iinuma, Yasushi; Hashizume, Naoki; Yoshida, Motomu; Iida, Hisataka; Shibuya, Hiroyuki; Naito, Shinichi; Nitta, Koju

    2013-02-01

    We herein report a case of abdominal actinomycosis in a 12-year-old girl in whom an omental primary tumor was suspected before surgery. The patient began to experience intermittent lower left abdominal pain. Abdominal computed tomography (CT) scans were inconclusive at this time, but 6 months later, CT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examinations showed a 7-cm, tumor-like lesion in the left abdominal cavity; malignancy could not be ruled out. The tumor, which originated in the omentum and adhered strongly to the left abdominal wall, was resected along with approximately 90 % of the omentum, the peritoneum in contact with the mass, and the posterior layer of the rectus abdominal sheath, under suspicion of a malignant tumor. However, omental actinomycosis was the final pathological diagnosis. The patient's antibiotic treatment was changed to a penicillin-series oral antibiotic to prevent recurrence of the actinomycosis. The patient was discharged from our hospital 16 days after the first surgery, but she developed three episodes of ileus; the first two required surgery. The patient has had no further recurrences of actinomycosis or postoperative ileus 20 months after discharge.

  7. Catastrophic necrotizing fasciitis after blunt abdominal trauma with delayed recognition of the coecal rupture--case report.

    PubMed

    Pecic, Vanja; Nestorovic, Milica; Kovacevic, Predrag; Tasic, Dragan; Stanojevic, Goran

    2014-03-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis (NF) is a rare bacterial infection with dramatic course, characterized by widespread necrosis of the skin, subcutaneous tissue, and superficial fascia which can often lead to death. We present a case of a 27-year-old male with NF. One day after experiencing blunt abdominal trauma caused by falling over bike handlebars, the patient was admitted to a regional hospital and treated for diffuse abdominal pain and large hematoma of the anterior abdominal wall. Due to worsening of general condition, he was referred to our hospital the following day and operated on urgently. Surgery revealed rupture of the coecum with peritonitis and abdominal wall infection. After surgery, fulminant necrotizing fasciitis developed. Antibiotics were prescribed according to wound cultures and subsequent necrectomies were performed. After 25 days, reconstruction of the abdominal wall with skin grafts was obtained. Despite all resuscitation measures including fluids, blood transfusions, and parenteral nutrition, lung infection and MODS caused death 42 days after initial operation. Blunt abdominal trauma can cause the rupture of intestine, and if early signs of peritoneal irritation should present, emergency laparotomy should be performed. Disastrous complication are rare but lethal.

  8. Abdominal ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... Kidney - blood and urine flow Abdominal ultrasound References Chen L. Abdominal ultrasound imaging. In: Sahani DV, Samir ... the Health on the Net Foundation (www.hon.ch). The information provided herein should not be used ...

  9. Abdominal tap

    MedlinePlus

    ... tap; Cirrhosis - abdominal tap; Malignant ascites - abdominal tap Images Digestive system Peritoneal sample References Garcia-Tiso G. ... urac.org). URAC's accreditation program is an independent audit to verify that A.D.A.M. follows ...

  10. Abdominal Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... call your doctor. In Spanish— Dolor abdominal en niños menores de 12 años What is recurrent abdominal ... Functional abdominal pain (FAP) typically affects kids ages 4-12, and is quite common, affecting up to ...

  11. A prospective, controlled evaluation of the abdominal reapproximation anchor abdominal wall closure system in combination with VAC therapy compared with VAC alone in the management of an open abdomen.

    PubMed

    Long, Kristin L; Hamilton, David A; Davenport, Daniel L; Bernard, Andrew C; Kearney, Paul A; Chang, Phillip K

    2014-06-01

    Dramatic increases in damage control and decompressive laparotomies and a significant increase in patients with open abdominal cavities have resulted in numerous techniques to facilitate fascial closure. We hypothesized addition of the abdominal reapproximation anchor system (ABRA) to the KCI Abdominal Wound Vac™ (VAC) or KCI ABThera™ would increase successful primary closure rates and reduce operative costs. Fourteen patients with open abdomens were prospectively randomized into a control group using VAC alone (control) or a study group using VAC plus ABRA (VAC-ABRA). All patients underwent regular VAC changes; patients receiving VAC-ABRA also underwent concomitant daily elastomer adjustment of the ABRA system. Primary end points included abdominal closure, number of operating room (OR) visits, and OR time use. Eight patients were included in the VAC-ABRA group and six patients in the control group. Primary closure rates between groups were not statistically different; however, the number of trips to the OR and OR time use were different. Despite higher Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II scores, larger starting wound size, and higher rates of abdominal compartment syndrome, closure rates in the VAC-ABRA group were similar to VAC alone. Importantly, however, fewer OR trips and less OR time were required for the VAC-ABRA group.

  12. Abdominal Aortic Surgery: Anesthetic Implications

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, Anthony J.

    1991-01-01

    The objectives of the review are to highlight the clinical characteristics of the patient population; to assess multivariate risk factor analysis and the invasive/non-invasive techniques available for risk factor identification and management in this high-risk surgical population; to assess the major hemodynamic, metabolic, and regional blood flow changes associated with aortic cross-clamping/unclamping procedures and techniques for their modification or attenuation; and to assess the influence of perioperative anesthetic techniques and management on patient outcome. PMID:1814052

  13. 2013 WSES guidelines for management of intra-abdominal infections

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Despite advances in diagnosis, surgery, and antimicrobial therapy, mortality rates associated with complicated intra-abdominal infections remain exceedingly high. The 2013 update of the World Society of Emergency Surgery (WSES) guidelines for the management of intra-abdominal infections contains evidence-based recommendations for management of patients with intra-abdominal infections. PMID:23294512

  14. [Abdominal paracentesis].

    PubMed

    Glauser, Frédéric; Barras, Anne-Catherine; Pache, Isabelle; Monti, Matteo

    2008-10-29

    Abdominal paracentesis is frequently performed in the clinical setting. Every newly developed ascites need to be investigated by abdominal paracentesis. Any clinical or biological deterioration in patients with chronic ascites also requires a new paracentesis. Therapeutically abdominal paracentesis is performed for refractory or symptomatic ascites. As other invasive procedures, it is critical to master its indications, contra-indications and complications. The aim of this article is to review the basics of abdominal paracentesis in order to help physicians to carry out this technical skill.

  15. [Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Mikami, Y; Kyogoku, M

    1994-08-01

    Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm (IAAA) is a distinct clinicopathological entity, characterized by: (1) clinical presentation, such as back pain, weight loss, and increased ESR, (2) patchy and/or diffuse lymphoplasmacytic infiltration, and (3) marked periaortic fibrosis resulting in thickening of the aneurysmal wall and occasional retroperitoneal fibrosis. Its pathogenesis is unknown, but some authors support the theory that IAAA is a subtype of atherosclerotic abdominal aortic aneurysm because of close relationship between IAAA and atherosclerotic change. In this article, we describe clinical and histological features of IAAA on the basis of the literature and our review of 6 cases of IAAA, emphasizing the similarity and difference between IAAA and atherosclerotic abdominal aortic aneurysm. Our review supports that marked lamellar fibrosis completely replacing the media and adventitia, patchy lymphocytic infiltration (mostly B cells) and endarteritis obliterans are characteristic features of IAAA.

  16. Abdominal tumors in children

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Chaeyoun; Youn, Joong Kee; Han, Ji-Won; Kim, Hyun-Young; Jung, Sung-Eun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The use of minimally invasive surgery (MIS) in pediatric patients has been steadily increasing in recent years. However, its use for diagnosing and treating abdominal tumors in children is still limited compared with adults, especially when malignancy is a matter of debate. Here, we describe the experience at our center with pediatric abdominal tumors to show the safety and feasibility of MIS. Based on a retrospective review of patient records, we selected for study those pediatric patients who had undergone diagnostic exploration or curative resection for abdominal tumors at a single center from January 2010 through August 2015. Diagnostic exploration for abdominal tumors was performed in 32 cases and curative resection in 173 cases (205 operations). MIS was performed in 11 cases of diagnostic exploration (34.4%) and 38 cases of curative resection (21.9%). The mean age of the children who underwent MIS was 6.09 ± 5.2 years. With regard to diagnostic exploration, patient characteristics and surgical outcomes were found to be similar for MIS and open surgery. With regard to curative resection, however, the mean age was significantly lower among the patients who underwent open surgery (4.21 ± 4.20 vs 6.02 ± 4.99 for MIS, P = 0.047), and the proportion of malignancies was significantly higher (80% vs 39.4% for MIS, P < 0.001). MIS compared favorably with open surgery with respect to the rate of recurrence (6.7% vs 35.1%, P = 0.035), the rate of intraoperative transfusions (34.2% vs 58.5%, P = 0.01), the median amount of blood transfused (14 vs 22 mL/kg, P = 0.001), and the mean number of hospital days (4.66 ± 2.36 vs 7.21 ± 5.09, P < 0.001). Complication rates did not differ significantly between the MIS and open surgery groups. The operation was converted to open surgery in 3 cases (27.2%) of diagnostic MIS and in 5 cases (13.1%) of curative MIS. MIS was found to be both feasible and effective for the

  17. Effect of alpha lipoic acid co-administration on structural and immunohistochemical changes in subcutaneous tissue of anterior abdominal wall of adult male albino rat in response to polypropylene mesh implantation.

    PubMed

    Mazroa, Shireen A; Asker, Samar A; Asker, Waleed; Abd Ellatif, Mohamed

    2015-06-01

    Polypropylene mesh is commonly used in the treatment of abdominal hernia. Different approaches were addressed to improve their tissue integration and consequently reduce long-term complications. This study aimed to investigate the effect of alpha-lipoic acid (ALA) co-administration on structural and immunohistochemical (IHC) changes in the subcutaneous tissues of the anterior abdominal wall of the adult rat in response to polypropylene mesh implantation. Forty adult male albino rats were divided into: group I (control), group II (receiving ALA), group III (polypropylene mesh implantation) and group IV (mesh implantation + ALA co-administration). After 4 weeks, subcutaneous tissue samples were prepared for light microscopy and IHC study of CD34 as a marker for angiogenesis. In groups I and II rats, positive CD34 expression was demonstrated by IHC reaction, localized to endothelial cells lining small blood vessels. Group III showed an excess inflammatory reaction, deposition of both regular and irregularly arranged collagen fibres around mesh pores and few elastic fibres. CD34-positive was detected not only in cells lining small blood vessels but also in other cells scattered in the connective tissue indicating angiogenesis. In group IV, ALA co-administration resulted in less inflammatory reaction, regular collagen deposition, enhanced elastic fibres synthesis and a significant increase in CD34-positive cells and small blood vessels reflecting improved angiogenesis. ALA co-administration with polypropylene mesh implantation controlled the inflammatory reaction, helped regular collagen deposition, enhanced elastic fibres synthesis and improved angiogenesis in the subcutaneous tissue of anterior abdominal wall of adult albino rats, suggesting a possible role of ALA in optimizing mesh integration in subcutaneous tissue.

  18. Effect of alpha lipoic acid co-administration on structural and immunohistochemical changes in subcutaneous tissue of anterior abdominal wall of adult male albino rat in response to polypropylene mesh implantation

    PubMed Central

    Mazroa, Shireen A; Asker, Samar A; Asker, Waleed; Abd Ellatif, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Polypropylene mesh is commonly used in the treatment of abdominal hernia. Different approaches were addressed to improve their tissue integration and consequently reduce long-term complications. This study aimed to investigate the effect of alpha-lipoic acid (ALA) co-administration on structural and immunohistochemical (IHC) changes in the subcutaneous tissues of the anterior abdominal wall of the adult rat in response to polypropylene mesh implantation. Forty adult male albino rats were divided into: group I (control), group II (receiving ALA), group III (polypropylene mesh implantation) and group IV (mesh implantation + ALA co-administration). After 4 weeks, subcutaneous tissue samples were prepared for light microscopy and IHC study of CD34 as a marker for angiogenesis. In groups I and II rats, positive CD34 expression was demonstrated by IHC reaction, localized to endothelial cells lining small blood vessels. Group III showed an excess inflammatory reaction, deposition of both regular and irregularly arranged collagen fibres around mesh pores and few elastic fibres. CD34-positive was detected not only in cells lining small blood vessels but also in other cells scattered in the connective tissue indicating angiogenesis. In group IV, ALA co-administration resulted in less inflammatory reaction, regular collagen deposition, enhanced elastic fibres synthesis and a significant increase in CD34-positive cells and small blood vessels reflecting improved angiogenesis. ALA co-administration with polypropylene mesh implantation controlled the inflammatory reaction, helped regular collagen deposition, enhanced elastic fibres synthesis and improved angiogenesis in the subcutaneous tissue of anterior abdominal wall of adult albino rats, suggesting a possible role of ALA in optimizing mesh integration in subcutaneous tissue. PMID:25891652

  19. A bizarre abdominal cystic lesion.

    PubMed

    Zucchini, Giorgia; Pezzilli, Raffaele; Ricci, Claudio; Casadei, Riccardo; Santini, Donatella; Calculli, Lucia; Corinaldesi, Roberto

    2010-09-06

    In spite of careful intraoperative precautions and gauze counts, mistakes can still occur during surgery. In the case reported, a retained gauze leaved during a surgical approach for removing a solid-cystic papillary tumor localized in the pancreatic tail, caused both persistent abdominal discomfort and the presence of an abdominal cystic lesion at imaging techniques. When a previous operative history is present, a foreign body should be taken into account in the differential diagnosis of a patient with an intra-abdominal cystic mass. Finally, radio-opaque marker should be routinely used by surgeons in order to reach a correct diagnosis in operated patients having retained gauze.

  20. Abdominal pain

    MedlinePlus

    Stomach pain; Pain - abdomen; Belly ache; Abdominal cramps; Bellyache; Stomachache ... Almost everyone has pain in the abdomen at some point. Most of the time, it is not serious. How bad your pain is ...

  1. [Abdominal pain].

    PubMed

    Gschossmann, J M; Holtmann, G; Netzer, P; Essig, M; Balsiger, B M; Scheurer, U

    2005-10-01

    Abdominal pain can result from a variety of different intra- and extra-abdominal disorders. Given the wide variety of etiological triggers for this pain, the primary task during the first stage of the diagnostic work-up is to determine as soon as possible the underlying cause and the degree of emergency. The aim of this evaluation is to adapt the therapeutic measures which are necessary for a causal treatment to the individual situation. Contrary to somatic causes of abdominal pain, the availability of such a causal therapy for functional bowel disorders is still very limited. Given this dilemma, the therapeutic focus of abdominal pain associated with these functional syndromes has to be placed on symptom-oriented treatment.

  2. "Abdominal crunch"-induced rhabdomyolysis presenting as right upper quadrant pain.

    PubMed

    Haas, D C; Bohnker, B K

    1999-02-01

    A young, active duty sailor presented with right upper quadrant abdominal pain. History, physical, and laboratory findings initially suggested cholecystitis or related disease. Further evaluation found myoglobinuria and a recently increased exercise program, leading to the diagnosis of exercise-induced right upper abdominal wall rhabdomyolysis. Although not a common cause of abdominal pain, this diagnosis should be considered in the patient with abdominal pain and a recently increased exercise program, particularly exercises of the abdominal wall such as "abdominal crunches."

  3. [The effect of ionizing radiation on the blood plasma and erythrocytes and on the wall of the abdominal aorta of rats].

    PubMed

    Nikulin, A A; Pustovalov, A P; Voronkov, I F

    1988-01-01

    On days 7 and 15 after gamma-irradiation (4 Gy) changes were noted in the temperature dependence of the erythrocyte suspension viscosity coefficient, in the electrolyte composition of the abdominal aorta, plasma, and erythrocytes, in Na, K- and Mg-ATPase activity, and in the intensity of fluorescence of 1.8 ANS of erythrocyte ghost of albino rats. The changes were a function of the stage of radiation sickness and were more pronounced on the 15th day following irradiation.

  4. Hybrid video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery lobectomy and en-bloc chest wall resection for non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Solli, Pierogiorgio; Coonar, Aman S.

    2016-01-01

    Chest wall invasion is seen in 5% to 8% of patients presenting with lung cancer. We report a case of complete resection of a 14 cm × 9 cm pT3N0M0 squamous cell carcinoma arising from the right lower lobe and invading the lower chest wall posteriorly, in a 75 years old male, via a hybrid thoracoscopic [video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS)] approach. Following conventional VATS lobectomy, a targeted 10 cm incision was performed to allow wide resection of the 7th to 10th ribs and 6th to 9th transverse processes, with the defect being subsequently reconstructed with a composite rigid prosthesis. The patient made an uneventful recovery, and was discharged on the 3rd postoperative day; with later adjuvant chemotherapy. Thoracoscopic surgery is not currently widely adopted in patients with chest wall invasion, likely due to the technical difficulties. We briefly review the various techniques described in the current literature, whilst emphasising a role for such an approach in highly selected cases. PMID:27747030

  5. Abdominal Sepsis.

    PubMed

    De Waele, Jan J

    2016-08-01

    Abdominal infections are an important challenge for the intensive care physician. In an era of increasing antimicrobial resistance, selecting the appropriate regimen is important and, with new drugs coming to the market, correct use is important more than ever before and abdominal infections are an excellent target for antimicrobial stewardship programs. Biomarkers may be helpful, but their exact role in managing abdominal infections remains incompletely understood. Source control also remains an ongoing conundrum, and evidence is increasing that its importance supersedes the impact of antibiotic therapy. New strategies such as open abdomen management may offer added benefit in severely ill patients, but more data are needed to identify its exact role. The role of fungi and the need for antifungal coverage, on the other hand, have been investigated extensively in recent years, but at this point, it remains unclear who requires empirical as well as directed therapy.

  6. Endovascular Surgery for Inflammatory Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm with Contrast Allergy—Usefulness of Carbon Dioxide Angiography and Intravascular Ultrasound: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Morito, Haruna; Hoshina, Katsuyuki; Hosaka, Akihiro; Okamoto, Hiroyuki; Shigematsu, Kunihiro; Miyata,, Tetsuro

    2012-01-01

    We report a patient with inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm who underwent endovascular aneurysm repair, despite his having an allergy to iodinated contrast medium and anatomy unsuitable for the procedure. Intravascular ultrasound-guided and CO2-assisted aortic stent graft placement was performed, and the procedures resulted in the successful exclusion of the aneurysm with regression of the mantle sign and resolution of hydronephrosis. PMID:23555498

  7. [Differential surgical treatment of victims with damage to the small and large intestines in a closed abdominal injury combined, depending on the prediction of traumatic disease course and morphological changes of the intestinal wall].

    PubMed

    Zaruts'kyĭ, Ia L; Denysenko, V M; Khomenko, I P; Levkivskyĭ, R H

    2013-08-01

    Use of differentiated surgical approach to the management of surgical treatment, depending on the degree of violation of systemic hemodynamics, the timing and volume of surgical procedures, depending on the prognosis of traumatic disease course of cardiac index, interventions in the small and large intestine depending on morphological changes of the intestinal wall by cardiac and stroke indexes, put method extra-enteric anastomosis in patients with damage to the small intestine and colon combined with closed abdominal injury permitted to reduce the rate of postoperative complications from 22.2 to 10.1%, mortality at 2.1 times in shock period (from 19.3 to 9.2%) and the overall mortality from 33.3 to 21.1%.

  8. Rare entity: Ectopic liver tissue in the wall of the gallbladder - A case report.

    PubMed

    Arslan, Yusuf; Altintoprak, Fatih; Serin, Kursat R; Kivilcim, Taner; Yalkin, Omer; Ozkan, Orhan V; Celebi, Fehmi

    2014-12-16

    Ectopic liver tissue (ELT) is a rare condition, which is usually not diagnosed preoperatively, but coincidentally during abdominal surgery. While the location of ELT can vary, it is usually localized on the gallbladder wall or in close proximity. ELT is associated with various complications, a major complication being extrahepatic hepatocellular carcinoma. A 59-year-old female underwent elective surgery for chronic cholecystitis with stones. During laparoscopic exploration, a 2-cm-diameter ELT was detected in the anterior gallbladder wall and a laparoscopic cholecystectomy was performed. The case is presented due to the rare nature of ELT and as a reminder of ELT-related complications.

  9. Comparative study of the microvascular blood flow in the intestinal wall, wound contraction and fluid evacuation during negative pressure wound therapy in laparostomy using the V.A.C. abdominal dressing and the ABThera open abdomen negative pressure therapy system.

    PubMed

    Lindstedt, Sandra; Malmsjö, Malin; Hlebowicz, Joanna; Ingemansson, Richard

    2015-02-01

    This study aimed to compare the changes in microvascular blood flow in the small intestinal wall, wound contraction and fluid evacuation, using the established V.A.C. abdominal dressing (VAC dressing) and a new abdominal dressing, the ABThera open abdomen negative pressure therapy system (ABThera dressing), in negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT). Midline incisions were made in 12 pigs that were subjected to treatment with NPWT using the VAC or ABThera dressing. The microvascular blood flow in the intestinal wall was measured before and after the application of topical negative pressures of −50, −75 and −125mmHg using laser Doppler velocimetry. Wound contraction and fluid evacuation were also measured. Baseline blood flow was defined as 100% in all settings. The blood flow was significantly reduced to 64·6±6·7% (P <0·05) after the application of −50mmHg using the VAC dressing, and to 65·3±9·6% (P <0·05) after the application of −50mmHg using the ABThera dressing. The blood flow was significantly reduced to 39·6±6·7% (P <0·05) after the application of −125mmHg using VAC and to 40·5±6·2% (P <0·05) after the application of −125mmHg using ABThera. No significant difference in reduction in blood flow could be observed between the two groups. The ABThera system afforded significantly better fluid evacuation from the wound, better drainage of the abdomen and better wound contraction than the VAC dressing.

  10. Abdominal Adhesions

    MedlinePlus

    ... Adhesions 1 Ward BC, Panitch A. Abdominal adhesions: current and novel therapies. Journal of Surgical Research. 2011;165(1):91–111. Seek Help for ... and how to participate, visit the NIH Clinical Research Trials and You website ... Foundation for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders 700 West Virginia ...

  11. Prevalence of acute post-operative pain in patients in adult age-group undergoing inpatient abdominal surgery and correlation of intensity of pain and satisfaction with analgesic management: A cross-sectional single institute-based study

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Prashant Kumar; Saikia, Priyam; Lahakar, Mangala

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Considering the paucity of regional data, this study was designed to investigate the prevalence of post-operative pain and determine if there exists any correlation between the intensity of post-operative pain and patient's level of satisfaction with their pain management after inpatient abdominal surgery at an academic tertiary care government centre. Methods: Pain intensity was measured in 120 patients with numeric rating scale at the fifth post-operative hour, second and third post-operative day. A questionnaire was used to measure the level of satisfaction with nurse's and doctor's response to their pain and overall pain management. Results: The prevalence of post-operative pain was 84.17%, 92.5% and 96.66% at the fifth post-operative hour, second and third post-operative day, respectively. Less number of patients experienced severe intensity pain on the third post-operative day (P = 0.00046), whereas the number of patients experiencing mild pain increased (P < 0.000) compared to the fifth post-operative hour. The number of patients with complete analgesia decreased on the third post-operative day (P = 0.001 compared to fifth post-operative day). The Spearman correlation coefficient between pain score on the third post-operative day and level of satisfaction with nurse's response, doctor's response to pain and the overall pain management was − 0.0218 (P = 0.8107), 0.1307 (P = 0.1553) and 0.0743 (P = 0.4195), respectively. Conclusion: There is a high prevalence of acute post-operative pain in patients undergoing inpatient abdominal surgery at our institute. There is a weak correlation between the intensity of pain and level of satisfaction with pain management. PMID:27761037

  12. Repair of Large Abdominal Wall Defects Using Total Anterior Aponeurotic Flap: Anatomical Feasibility Study and Comparison with Ramirez’s Technique

    PubMed Central

    Assalino, Michela; Morel, Philippe; Fasel, Jean H. D.; Stimec, Bojan V.; Tobalem, Mickael

    2016-01-01

    Summary: In this cadaveric study, we explored the feasibility of a maximal mobilization of the superficial abdominal fascia, in a continuous flap, to achieve a tension-free covering of midline defects. The aponeurosis of the external oblique muscle was incised along the anterior axillary line and then detached up to the anterior rectus sheath. The latter was opened between the external and the internal oblique aponeurosis while keeping the continuity with the external oblique fascia. The obtained flap was solid and uninterrupted. The width gain reached 15 ± 3 cm on each sides, providing tissue advancement 60% longer than Ramirez’s technique (n = 8). The described technique allows large covering with respect to the anatomical planes. Further clinical tests should evaluate the validity of such concept in the repair of giant and asymmetrical hernias.

  13. Effects of two different strategies of fluid administration on inflammatory mediators, plasma electrolytes and acid/base disorders in patients undergoing major abdominal surgery: a randomized double blind study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Administration of normal saline might increase circulating levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines and may cause variation of plasmatic electrolytic and hyperchloremic acidosis, which in turn can impair renal function. Hence the use of balanced solutions could influence the inflammatory cascade triggered by the surgical procedures, the plasmatic electrolyte concentration, the acid–base equilibrium, and the renal function. Methods This is a double blind randomized trial. Forty patients undergoing major abdominal surgery (bowel cancer) were allocated in two groups, the balanced solution (BS) group in which the fluids administered were balanced solutions (colloids and crystalloids); and the unbalanced solution (UBS) group in which the fluids administered were unbalanced solutions (colloids and crystalloids). Measurements were performed after anaesthesia induction (T0), at the end of surgery (T1), within 2 h after surgery (T2) and 24 h after the beginning of surgery (T3). The following data were collected: 1) active matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) and its tissue inhibitor (TIMP-1), IL-6, IL-8, IL-10; 2) blood gases variables; 3) electrolytes, albumin, total serum protein and the strong ion difference; 4) neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) from urinary sample. Results The BS group exhibited higher circulating level of IL-10 and TIMP-1 and lower level of active MMP-9. The UBS group experienced hypercloremia, hypocalcemia, hypomagnesemia, worse acid–base equilibrium and higher level of NGAL. Conclusions The use of balanced solutions was responsible of less alteration of plasmatic electrolytes, acid–base equilibrium, kidney function and it might be associated with an early anti-inflammatory mechanisms triggering. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov (Ref: NCT01320891). PMID:24059479

  14. Empyema following intra-abdominal sepsis.

    PubMed

    Ballantyne, K C; Sethia, B; Reece, I J; Davidson, K G

    1984-09-01

    Over the past 9 years, ten patients have presented to the Thoracic Unit, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, with 12 empyemas secondary to intra-abdominal sepsis. In eight patients, the presenting signs and symptoms were wrongly attributed to primary intra-thoracic pathology. All were subsequently found to have intra-abdominal sepsis. The presence of empyema after recent abdominal surgery or abdominal pain strongly suggests a diagnosis of ipsilateral subphrenic abscess. Adequate surgical drainage is essential. In our experience, limited thoracotomy with subdiaphragmatic extension offers the best access to both pleural and subphrenic spaces and provides the greatest chance of eradicating infection on both sides of the diaphragm.

  15. Telemedicine, virtual reality, and surgery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccormack, Percival D.; Charles, Steve

    1994-01-01

    Two types of synthetic experience are covered: virtual reality (VR) and surgery, and telemedicine. The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: geometric models; physiological sensors; surgical applications; virtual cadaver; VR surgical simulation; telesurgery; VR Surgical Trainer; abdominal surgery pilot study; advanced abdominal simulator; examples of telemedicine; and telemedicine spacebridge.

  16. Abdominal emergencies during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Bouyou, J; Gaujoux, S; Marcellin, L; Leconte, M; Goffinet, F; Chapron, C; Dousset, B

    2015-12-01

    Abdominal emergencies during pregnancy (excluding obstetrical emergencies) occur in one out of 500-700 pregnancies and may involve gastrointestinal, gynecologic, urologic, vascular and traumatic etiologies; surgery is necessary in 0.2-2% of cases. Since these emergencies are relatively rare, patients should be referred to specialized centers where surgical, obstetrical and neonatal cares are available, particularly because surgical intervention increases the risk of premature labor. Clinical presentations may be atypical and misleading because of pregnancy-associated anatomical and physiologic alterations, which often result in diagnostic uncertainty and therapeutic delay with increased risks of maternal and infant morbidity. The most common abdominal emergencies are acute appendicitis (best treated by laparoscopic appendectomy), acute calculous cholecystitis (best treated by laparoscopic cholecystectomy from the first trimester through the early part of the third trimester) and intestinal obstruction (where medical treatment is the first-line approach, just as in the non-pregnant patient). Acute pancreatitis is rare, usually resulting from trans-ampullary passage of gallstones; it usually resolves with medical treatment but an elevated risk of recurrent episodes justifies laparoscopic cholecystectomy in the 2nd trimester and endoscopic sphincterotomy in the 3rd trimester. The aim of the present work is to review pregnancy-induced anatomical and physiological modifications, to describe the main abdominal emergencies during pregnancy, their specific features and their diagnostic and therapeutic management.

  17. Retrospective analysis of a VACM (vacuum-assisted closure and mesh-mediated fascial traction) treatment manual for temporary abdominal wall closure - results of 58 consecutive patients.

    PubMed

    Beltzer, Christian; Eisenächer, Alexander; Badendieck, Steffen; Doll, Dietrich; Küper, Markus; Lenz, Stefan; Krapohl, Björn Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Einleitung: Das optimale Behandlungskonzept eines temporären Bauchdeckenverschlusses (temporary abdominal closure, TAC) bei kritisch kranken viszeralchirurgischen Patienten mit offenem Abdomen („open abdomen“, OA) ist weiterhin unklar. Durch eine VACM-Therapie (vacuum-assisted closure and mesh-mediated fascial traction) scheinen sich gegenüber anderen Verfahren des TAC höhere Faszienverschlussraten (delayed primary fascial closure rate, FCR) realisieren zu lassen. Material und Methoden: Patienten unserer Klinik (n=58), welche in den Jahren 2005 bis 2008 mittels eines VAC/VACM-Behandlungsmanuals behandelt wurden, wurden retrospektiv analysiert. Ergebnisse: Die FCR aller Patienten betrug insgesamt 48,3% (95%-Konfidenzintervall: 34,95–61,78). Bei Patienten, bei denen im Verlauf ein Vicryl-Netz auf Faszienebene implantiert wurde (VACM-Therapie), konnte eine FCR von 61,3% realisiert werden. Die Letalität der mittels VACM therapierten Patienten betrug 45,2% (95%-KI: 27,32–63,97).Schlussfolgerung: Die Ergebnisse der eigenen Untersuchung bestätigen bisherige Studienergebnisse, die eine akzeptable FCR bei non-trauma-Patienten durch Anwendung der VACM-Therapie zeigen konnten. Die VACM-Therapie scheint aktuell Therapiekonzept der ersten Wahl bei Patienten mit OA und Indikation zum TAC zu sein.

  18. Less Invasive Endometrial Cancer Surgery with Extraperitoneal Pelvic and Para-aortic Lymphadenectomy via a Small Midline Abdominal Incision and the Retroperitoneal Approach.

    PubMed

    Komiyama, Shinichi; Takeya, Chiaki; Takahashi, Rena; Nagasaki, Sumito; Kubushiro, Kaneyuki

    2016-01-01

    [Objective] To achieve less invasive lymphadenectomy in endometrial cancer patients, we performed extraperitoneal pelvic and para-aortic lymphadenectomy via a small midline abdominal incision with retroperitoneal approach. The feasibility and safety of this method were investigated. [Methods] Inclusion criteria were 1) endometrioid adenocarcinoma diagnosed by preoperative biopsy, 2) myometrial invasion by magnetic resonance imaging, and 3) no peritoneal dissemination or distant metastasis by computed tomography. Systematic extraperitoneal dissection of pelvic and para-aortic lymph nodes was performed via an approximately 12-cm midline lower abdominal incision, after which hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy were done (extraperitoneal group). The historical control group was patients who underwent standard transperitoneal lymphadenectomy followed by hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy. The two groups were compared for demographic characteristics, perioperative factors, and complications. [Results] A total of 62 patients were enrolled. Demographic and clinicopathological factors showed no differences between the extraperitoneal group (n = 34) and the historical control group (n = 28). The median number of pelvic (30 vs. 28) and para-aortic (14 vs. 17) nodes dissected was also similar. However, median intraoperative blood loss was significantly smaller in the extraperitoneal group than the control group (220 vs. 573 g). Median operating time (265 vs. 323.5 min), median laparotomy time (60 vs. 295 min), and median initial flatus time (8 vs. 32 hours) were all significantly shorter in the extraperitoneal group, while complications and severe postoperative pain were significantly less frequent. [Conclusions] Our new technique was feasible, safe, and less invasive than standard laparotomy. It is an alternative to laparoscope-assisted or robotic procedures.

  19. Less Invasive Endometrial Cancer Surgery with Extraperitoneal Pelvic and Para-aortic Lymphadenectomy via a Small Midline Abdominal Incision and the Retroperitoneal Approach

    PubMed Central

    Komiyama, Shinichi; Takeya, Chiaki; Takahashi, Rena; Nagasaki, Sumito; Kubushiro, Kaneyuki

    2016-01-01

    [Objective] To achieve less invasive lymphadenectomy in endometrial cancer patients, we performed extraperitoneal pelvic and para-aortic lymphadenectomy via a small midline abdominal incision with retroperitoneal approach. The feasibility and safety of this method were investigated. [Methods] Inclusion criteria were 1) endometrioid adenocarcinoma diagnosed by preoperative biopsy, 2) myometrial invasion by magnetic resonance imaging, and 3) no peritoneal dissemination or distant metastasis by computed tomography. Systematic extraperitoneal dissection of pelvic and para-aortic lymph nodes was performed via an approximately 12-cm midline lower abdominal incision, after which hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy were done (extraperitoneal group). The historical control group was patients who underwent standard transperitoneal lymphadenectomy followed by hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy. The two groups were compared for demographic characteristics, perioperative factors, and complications. [Results] A total of 62 patients were enrolled. Demographic and clinicopathological factors showed no differences between the extraperitoneal group (n = 34) and the historical control group (n = 28). The median number of pelvic (30 vs. 28) and para-aortic (14 vs. 17) nodes dissected was also similar. However, median intraoperative blood loss was significantly smaller in the extraperitoneal group than the control group (220 vs. 573 g). Median operating time (265 vs. 323.5 min), median laparotomy time (60 vs. 295 min), and median initial flatus time (8 vs. 32 hours) were all significantly shorter in the extraperitoneal group, while complications and severe postoperative pain were significantly less frequent. [Conclusions] Our new technique was feasible, safe, and less invasive than standard laparotomy. It is an alternative to laparoscope-assisted or robotic procedures. PMID:27313778

  20. Gender Differences in Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Hannawa, Kevin K.; Eliason, Jonathan L.; Upchurch, Gilbert R.

    2010-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) comprise the 10th leading cause of death in Caucasian males 65–74 years of age, and accounted for nearly 16,000 deaths overall in the year 2000. Therefore, understanding the pathophysiology of AAAs is an important undertaking. Clinically, multiple risk factors are associated with the development of AAAs, including increasing age, positive smoking history, and hypertension. Male gender is also a well-established risk factor for the development of an AAA with a 4:1 male to female ratio. The reason for this gender disparity is unknown. The pathogenesis of AAAs formation is complex and multifactorial. Histologically, AAAs are characterized by early chemokine driven leukocyte infiltration into the aortic wall. Subsequent destruction of elastin and collagen in the media and adventitia ensues due to excessive local production of matrix degrading enzymes, and is accompanied by smooth muscle cell loss and thinning of the aortic wall. At present, there are no medical therapies available to treat patients with aortic aneurysms, using only the crude measurement of aortic diameter as a threshold for which patients must undergo life-threatening and costly surgery. Defining the early mechanisms underlying gender-related differences in AAA formation are critical, as understanding differences in disease patterns based on gender may allow us to develop new translational approaches to the prevention and treatment of patients with aortic aneurysms. PMID:19426607

  1. [Prosthetic material in incisional hernia surgery].

    PubMed

    López-Cano, Manuel; Barreiro Morandeira, Francisco

    2010-09-01

    There are different designs of prosthesis for use in the repair of incisional hernia, and it is often difficult to choose the most appropriate. The biological behaviour of the material must be a key part in the selection, although this behaviour will vary depending on what materials are available. A proper understanding of the relationship of the material with the abdominal wall dynamics is another important factor in this selection. Finally we need a stable repair without long term side effects. This paper analyses the prostheses more commonly available for incisional hernia surgery in the non-emergency situation.

  2. Effects of the changes in the wall shear stresses (WSS) acting on endothelial cells (EC) during the enlargement of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms (AAA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salsac, Anne-Virginie

    2005-03-01

    The changes in the spatial and temporal distribution of the WSS and gradients of WSS during the enlargement of AAAs are important to understand the etiology and progression of this vascular disease, since they affect the wall structural integrity, primarily via the changes induced on the shape, functions and metabolism of the endothelial cells. PIV measurements were performed in aneurysm models, while changing systematically their size and geometry. Two regions with distinct patterns of WSS were identified. The region of flow detachment extends over the proximal half and is characterized by oscillatory WSS of very low mean. The region of flow reattachment, located distally, is dominated by large, negative WSS and sustained gradients of WSS that result from the impact of the vortex ring on the wall. Cultured EC were subjected to these two types of stimuli in vitro. The permeability of the endothelium was found to be largely increased in the flow detachment region. Endothelium cell-cell adhesion, proliferation and apoptosis were also affected by the high gradients of WSS.

  3. A randomised controlled trial on the efficacy and side-effect profile (nausea/vomiting/sedation) of morphine-6-glucuronide versus morphine for post-operative pain relief after major abdominal surgery.

    PubMed

    Binning, Alexander R; Przesmycki, Krzysztof; Sowinski, Piotr; Morrison, Lachlan M M; Smith, Terry W; Marcus, Paul; Lees, James P; Dahan, Albert

    2011-04-01

    Morphine is the first choice of treatment of severe post-operative pain, despite the occurrence of often discomforting (post-operative nausea or vomiting (PONV)) and sometimes dangerous (sedation, respiratory depression) side effects. Literature data indicate that morphine's active metabolite, morphine-6-glucuronide (M6G), is a powerful analgesic with a possibly more favourable side-effect profile. In this multi-centre randomised controlled clinical trial patients undergoing major abdominal surgery were randomised to M6G or morphine treatment. Treatment started 30-60 min prior to the end of surgery and was continued postoperatively, after patients were titrated to comfort, via patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) for 24-48 h. Pain intensity, nausea, vomiting and sedation scores were collected at regular intervals. In the study 268 patients were randomised to M6G and 249 to morphine. Withdrawal due to insufficient pain relief occurred predominantly just after surgery and was higher in the M6G group (16.8%) than in the morphine group (8.8%), suggesting a slower onset of analgesia for M6G compared to morphine. Subjects who continued on PCA remained equi-analgesic throughout the study. During the first 24h, nausea levels showed a 27% difference in favour of M6G which narrowly failed to reach statistical significance (P=0.052). Sub-analysis showed a significant reduction in nausea levels in females on M6G (30% difference, P=0.034). In all patients, similar reductions of 30-35% were observed in anti-emetic use, vomiting, PONV (a combined measure of nausea and vomiting) in favour of M6G, persisting for the first 24h postoperatively. Reductions in sedation were observed in the first 4h post-operative period for M6G patients.

  4. [Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Siebenmann, R; Schneider, K; von Segesser, L; Turina, M

    1988-06-11

    348 cases of abdominal aortic aneurysm were reviewed for typical features of inflammatory aneurysm (IAAA) (marked thickening of aneurysm wall, retroperitoneal fibrosis and rigid adherence of adjacent structures). IAAA was present in 15 cases (14 male, 1 female). When compared with patients who had ordinary aneurysms, significantly more patients complained of back or abdominal pain (p less than 0.01). Erythrocyte sedimentation rate was highly elevated. Diagnosis was established in 7 of 10 computed tomographies. 2 patients underwent emergency repair for ruptured aneurysm. Unilateral ureteral obstruction was present in 4 cases and bilateral in 1. Repair of IAAA was performed by a modified technique. Histological examination revealed thickening of the aortic wall, mainly of the adventitial layer, infiltrated by plasma cells and lymphocytes. One 71-year-old patient operated on for rupture of IAAA died early, and another 78-year-old patient after 5 1/2 months. Control computed tomographies revealed spontaneous regression of inflammatory infiltration after repair. Equally, hydronephrosis due to ureteral obstruction could be shown to disappear or at least to decrease. IAAA can be diagnosed by computed tomography with high sensitivity. Repair involves low risk, but modification of technique is necessary. The etiology of IAAA remains unclear.

  5. Endometriosis of Extra-Abdominal Soft Tissues: A Tertiary Center Experience.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jayson; Strauss, Dirk C; Messiou, Christina; Thway, Khin

    2016-09-01

    While endometriosis, defined as the presence of endometrial tissue in extrauterine sites, is most frequently encountered within the peritoneal cavity, a small but significant proportion of cases occur at extra-abdominal soft tissue sites, particularly in relation to previous abdominal surgery. We reviewed the cases of endometriosis of soft tissue sites seen at a tertiary soft tissue center. All cases of extra-abdominal soft tissue endometriosis diagnosed at this institution over a 13-year period were reviewed, and clinical and pathologic findings were recorded. Forty-five patients had diagnoses of soft tissue endometriosis and there were 34 diagnostic biopsies and 26 surgical excision specimens. All but 1 case were abdominal wall lesions, with 1 located in the upper arm. A total of 33 patients presented with lesions in scars of previous operations (31 in Pfannenstiel incisions for Caesarean sections, presenting with a median interval of 6 years (range 1-16 years) following surgery). The lesions ranged in size from 1 to 8 cm (median 3.5 cm). One case showed decidualized stroma with trophoblast cells, while 2 had secondary adenocarcinoma arising from endometriosis. Eighteen cases were tested for β-catenin expression immunohistochemically, of which 5 showed at least focal nuclear positivity in the surrounding fibrous tissue (although not within glands or stroma). Soft tissue endometriosis is seen most commonly in surgical scars, particularly following Caesarean sections. Spontaneous endometriosis also most commonly occurs in the abdominal wall, although can occur exceptionally at unusual sites, such as extremities. Secondary changes, including carcinomas, can arise from endometriosis. The differential diagnosis of these lesions includes fibromatosis, which may be erroneously diagnosed on small, nonrepresentative core biopsy specimens.

  6. Effect of carbodiimide-derivatized hyaluronic acid gelatin on preventing postsurgical intra-abdominal adhesion formation and promoting healing in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Fang; Lin, Long-Xiang; Zhang, Hui-Hui; Huang, Dan; Sun, Yu-Long

    2016-05-01

    Adhesions often occur after abdominal surgery. It could cause chronic pelvic pain, intestinal obstruction, and infertility. A hydrogel biomaterial, carbodiimide-derivatized hyaluronic acid gelatin (cd-HA gelatin), has been successfully used to reduce adhesion formation after flexor tendon grafting. This study investigated the efficacy of cd-HA gelatin in preventing postsurgical peritoneal adhesions in a rat model. The surgical traumas were created on the underlying muscle of the abdominal wall and the serosal layer of the cecum. The wounds were covered with or without cd-HA gelatin. Animals were euthanized at day 14 after surgery. Adhesion formation was assessed with adhesion degree and adhesion breaking strength. The healing of abdominal wall was evaluated with biomechanical testing and histological analysis. The adhesions occurred in all rats (n = 12) without cd-HA gelatin treatment. The application of cd-HA gelatin significantly reduced the adhesion rate from 100% to 58%. The decrease of adhesion breaking strength also manifested that cd-HA gelatin could reduce postsurgical intra-abdominal adhesion formation. Moreover, it was found that cd-HA gelatin was a safe material and could promote tissue healing. The cd-HA gelatin hydrogel could reduce the formation of intra-abdominal adhesions without adversely effects on wound healing.

  7. [The use of prosthesis material in emergency surgery. Comments on a clinical case].

    PubMed

    Pacifico, G; Landi, L; Rizzo, D; Corsi, A; Masi, C

    1998-10-01

    The authors briefly report the case of a patient in whom a double Mersilene graft was used to repair a strangulated umbilical hernia. This report is interesting for various reasons. Firstly, the fact that surgery was performed under emergency conditions and secondly, the position of the graft, which was certainly not ideal--even if obligatory owing to the circumstances under which the operation was performed--in the abdominal wall. In spite of the successful results obtained, the authors feel that graft should preferably be used in elective surgery in which additional operations are not required which may further contaminate the operating field. In particular, special attention should be paid to graft position in relation to the various layers of the abdominal wall.

  8. [An application of low-invasive access in ultrasound-guided surgery of liquid formation of the abdominal cavity and retroperitoneal space].

    PubMed

    Demin, D B; Laĭkov, A V; Funygin, M S; Chegodaeva, A A; Solodov, Iu Iu; Butina, K V

    2014-01-01

    The article presents a low-invasive method in the intraoperative ultrasound-guided surgery. The method had several steps: an access (2-3 cm) was made to a liquid formation with the following aspiration of contents, a necrotic detritus was removed through the wound tract using simultaneous ultrasound examination of efficacy of emptying the cavity with drainage. This means allowed the performance of single-stage sanitization and drainage of cavity formations, which contained the liquid and dense necrotic tissues in the lumen. The method was effective, technically workable in any surgical hospital. At the same time, it was economically reasonable, because there wasn't need to buy an additional equipment. The application of the means considerably shortened a hospital stay and the lethality was reduced.

  9. Abdominal compartment syndrome following abdominoplasty: A case report and review

    PubMed Central

    Izadpanah, Arash; Izadpanah, Ali; Karunanayake, Mihiran; Petropolis, Christian; Deckelbaum, Dan L.; Luc, Mario

    2014-01-01

    Abdominoplasty is among the most commonly performed aesthetic procedures in plastic surgery. Despite high complication rate, abdominal contouring procedures are expected to rise in popularity with the advent of bariatric surgery. Patients with a history of gastric bypass surgery have an elevated incidence of small bowel obstruction from internal herniation, which is associated with non-specific upper abdominal pain, nausea, and a decrease in appetite. Internal hernias, when subjected to elevated intra-abdominal pressures, have a high-risk of developing ischemic bowel. We present a case report of patient with previous laparoscopic Roux-en-y gastric bypass who developed acute ischemic bowel leading to abdominal compartment syndrome following abdominoplasty. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case in the literature. We herein emphasise on the subtle symptoms and signs that warrant further investigations in prospective patients for an abdominal contouring procedure with a prior history of gastric bypass surgery. PMID:25190927

  10. Abdominal compartment syndrome following abdominoplasty: A case report and review.

    PubMed

    Izadpanah, Arash; Izadpanah, Ali; Karunanayake, Mihiran; Petropolis, Christian; Deckelbaum, Dan L; Luc, Mario

    2014-05-01

    Abdominoplasty is among the most commonly performed aesthetic procedures in plastic surgery. Despite high complication rate, abdominal contouring procedures are expected to rise in popularity with the advent of bariatric surgery. Patients with a history of gastric bypass surgery have an elevated incidence of small bowel obstruction from internal herniation, which is associated with non-specific upper abdominal pain, nausea, and a decrease in appetite. Internal hernias, when subjected to elevated intra-abdominal pressures, have a high-risk of developing ischemic bowel. We present a case report of patient with previous laparoscopic Roux-en-y gastric bypass who developed acute ischemic bowel leading to abdominal compartment syndrome following abdominoplasty. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case in the literature. We herein emphasise on the subtle symptoms and signs that warrant further investigations in prospective patients for an abdominal contouring procedure with a prior history of gastric bypass surgery.

  11. Percutaneous endoscopic colostomy: a useful technique when surgery is not an option

    PubMed Central

    Tun, Gloria; Bullas, Dominic; Bannaga, Ayman; Said, Elmuhtady M.

    2016-01-01

    Percutaneous endoscopic colostomy (PEC) is a minimally invasive endoscopic procedure that offers an alternative treatment for high-risk patients with sigmoid volvulus or intestinal pseudo-obstruction who have tried conventional treatment options without success or those who are unfit for surgery. The procedure acts as an irrigation or decompressing channel and provides colonic ‘fixation’ to the anterior abdominal wall. The risk of complications highlights the importance of informed consent for patients and relatives. PMID:27708513

  12. [Intra-abdominal mycoses].

    PubMed

    Boos, C; Kujath, P; Bruch, H-P

    2005-01-01

    The incidence of invasive mycoses in patients undergoing abdominal surgery amounts to approximately 8% and shows an upward trend in epidemiological studies. The lethality of these systemic mycoses, which are mostly based on Candida infections constitutes up to 60%. The development of a sytemic mycosis is marked by exogenic, endogenic and iatrogenic risk factors and typically displays tissue invasion after an initial fungal contamination or systemic dissemination via fungal sepsis. Fungal peritonitis is generally a monoinfection with Candida spp., where Candida albicans outweighs in 70% of cases. Aspergillus spp. are only detected abdominally in rare cases. The histological verification of a fungal invasion is regarded as proof of the existence of an invasive mycosis, but typical macroscopic findings with corresponding cultural findings can also confirm the diagnosis. Systemic mycosis requires an early initiation of a consistent antimycotic therapy as well as definitive surgical eradication of the focus in order to reduce high lethal rate. Resistances or incorrect dosages can be validated objectively by means of histological monitoring of the antimycotic therapy, thus affording early recognition of the need to change the substance class.

  13. Care of the open abdomen after cytoreductive surgery and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy for peritoneal surface malignancies.

    PubMed

    Dell, Deena Damsky; Held-Warmkessel, Jeanne; Jakubek, Pamela; O'Mara, Tina

    2014-07-01

    A patient with a mucinous appendiceal cancer presents to the surgeon complaining of abdominal discomfort and nausea. Having undergone a prior right hemicolectomy, the patient has been disease free and on surveillance with clinical and carcinogenic antigen (CEA) monitoring. The CEA was noted to be elevated and a computed tomography scan revealed peritoneal nodules throughout the abdomen with a presumptive diagnosis of pseudomyxoma peritonei (progressive peritoneal implants from a mucinous primary). Several therapeutic options were offered and the patient selected to undergo cytoreductive surgery (CRS) with the potential to receive hyperthermic interoperative chemotherapy (HIPEC). Extensive resection was performed, including removal of the entire greater omentum, partial gastrectomy, and total pelvic exenteration with end colostomy and ileal conduit. Reassessment of the peritoneal cavity after the resections revealed almost complete cytoreduction. HIPEC was performed with mitomycin C and, after drainage and abdominal washing, the intestinal segments were anastomosed and the abdominal wall closed. Seven days postoperatively, an acute abdomen with septic shock developed as a result of a leak from the ileocolonic anastomosis. The patient returned to the operating room and an exploratory laparotomy, a small bowel resection, a resection of the ileocolonic anastomosis, and an abdominal washout were performed. Edema of the bowel caused by peritonitis resulting from the anastomotic leak necessitated delayed closure of the abdominal wall. A temporary abdominal closure using the ABThera™ Open Abdomen Negative Pressure Therapy system was applied and the abdomen was eventually closed.

  14. A comparison among portal lactate, intramucosal sigmoid Ph, and deltaCO2 (PaCO2 - regional Pco2) as indices of complications in patients undergoing abdominal aortic aneurysm surgery.

    PubMed

    Donati, Abele; Cornacchini, Oriana; Loggi, Silvia; Caporelli, Sandro; Conti, Giovanna; Falcetta, Stefano; Alò, Francesco; Pagliariccio, Gabriele; Bruni, Elisabetta; Preiser, Jean-Charles; Pelaia, Paolo

    2004-10-01

    Our aim in this observational, prospective, noncontrolled study was to detect, in 29 patients who underwent abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) surgery, correlations between the incidence of postoperative organ failure and intraoperative changes in arterial and portal blood lactate; changes in intramucosal sigmoid pH (pHi); differences between sigmoid Pco(2) and arterial Pco(2) (DeltaCO(2)); and hemoglobin (Hb). Hb, arterial blood lactate concentrations, pHi, and DeltaCO(2) (air tonometry) were recorded at the start of anesthesia (T0), before aorta clamping (T1), 30 minutes after clamping (T2), and at the end of surgery (T3). Portal venous lactate concentrations were recorded at T1 and T2. Patients were stratified into two groups: group A patients had no postoperative organ failure, and group B patients had one or more organ failures. As compared with group A (n = 16), group B patients (n = 13) had a lower pHi value at T2 and T3 and a higher DeltaCO(2) at T3. A pHi value of <7.15 was a predictor of organ failure, with a sensitivity of 92.3%, a specificity of 68.8%, and positive and negative predictive values of 70.6% and 91.7%, respectively, whereas a DeltaCO(2) value of >28 mm Hg predicted later organ failure with a sensitivity of 92.3%, a specificity of 62.5%, and positive and negative predictive values of 66.6% and 90.9%, respectively. Portal venous lactate concentrations were larger in group B at T2 (P < 0.001), and an increase >or=5 g/dL predicted later postoperative organ failure with a sensitivity of 92.3%, a specificity of 100%, and positive and negative predictive values of 100% and 94.1%, respectively. The comparison of the receiving operator characteristic curves to test the discrimination of each variable and the logistic regression analysis revealed that the increase in portal lactate was the best predictor for the development of postoperative organ failure. Hb concentration was significantly smaller in group B at T0 (13.8 +/- 1.0 g/dL versus 12.2 +/- 2

  15. Desmoid tumor following abdominally-based free flap breast reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Christine; Hammoudeh, Ziyad S.

    2017-01-01

    Desmoid tumors are fibroblastic connective tissue tumors that most commonly develop within the anterior abdominal wall. The etiology of desmoid tumors has not been well defined; however, hereditary, hormonal, traumatic, and surgery-related causes have been implicated. Desmoid tumors are believed to arise from musculoaponeurotic structures. Development in the breast is very rare. Several reports of desmoid tumors arising in the vicinity of the fibrous capsule of a breast implant have been described, but to date, the authors are not aware of any published cases following autologous breast reconstruction. This report describes a desmoid tumor developing after a muscle-sparing free transverse rectus abdominis musculocutaneous (TRAM) flap for breast reconstruction and subsequent surgical management. PMID:28210557

  16. Intra-abdominal abscess and intractable sinus - a rare late complication after splenectomy

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Badri; Hampton, James

    2017-01-01

    Intra-abdominal abscess and an intractable abdominal wall sinus forty years after splenectomy is rare, which has not been described previously in the surgical literature. We report the management of a patient who had presented with an intractable sinus on his left hypochondrium forty years after having undergone splenectomy and cholecystectomy, which persisted for more than two years despite repeated surgery and courses of antibiotics and compromised quality of life significantly from pain. A sinogram and computerised tomographic scan followed by exploration and laying open of the sinus delivered multiple silk sutures used for ligation of splenic pedicle, led to complete resolution of the sinus. It is important to avoid using non-absorbable silk sutures during splenectomy when splenectomy is undertaken in a contaminated field. Appropriate imaging and exploration is mandatory for its resolution. PMID:28138442

  17. Evaluation of surgical anti-adhesion products to reduce postsurgical intra-abdominal adhesion formation in a rat model

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hui-Hui; Liao, Ni-Na; Luo, Jing-Wan; Sun, Yu-Long

    2017-01-01

    Background Adhesions frequently occur after abdominal surgery. Many anti-adhesion products have been used in clinic. However, the evidences are short for surgeons to reasonably choose the suitable anti-adhesion produces in clinical practice. This study provided such evidence by comparing the efficiency of five products to prevent abdominal adhesion formation in a rat model. Methods Fifty-six Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into seven groups: sham-operation group, adhesion group, and five product groups (n = 8). The abdomens of rats were opened. The injuries were created on abdominal wall and cecum in the adhesion and product groups. The wounds on abdominal wall and cecum of rats in the adhesion group were not treated before the abdomens were closed. The wounds on abdominal wall and cecum of rats in the product groups were covered with anti-adhesion product: polylactic acid (PLA) film, Seprafilm®, medical polyethylene glycol berberine liquid (PEG), medical sodium hyaluronate gel (HA), or medical chitosan (Chitosan). Fourteen days after surgery, the adhesions were evaluated by incidence, severity, adhesion area on abdominal wall and adhesion breaking strength. Results The application of PLA film and Seprafilm® significantly reduced the incidence, severity, adhesion area and breaking strength of cecum-abdomen adhesion (P<0.05). HA, PEG and Chitosan failed to significantly reduce the cecum-abdomen adhesion (P>0.05). The statistical significances in the incidence and severity of abdomen-adipose adhesion between adhesion group and the product groups were not achieved. However, Seprafilm® was more effective to reduce abdomen-adipose adhesion than PLA film. Furthermore, it was found that the products tested in this study did not effectively reduce cecum-adipose adhesion. The application of PEG could result in abdomen-small intestine adhesion. Conclusion Based on the results of this study, the preference order of anti-adhesion products used to reduce

  18. Arteriomegaly and inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm. Case report.

    PubMed

    Cavallini, M; Uccini, S; Luzi, G; Murante, G; Tagliacozzo, S

    1997-02-01

    In this case report inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm (IAAA) was superimposed on an arteriomegaly condition complicated by bilateral aneurysm of the common iliac arteries. Obstruction of the right ureter, mild hydronephrosis of the left system and a slight impairment of renal function were also present. Preoperative cellular and humoral immunological parameters were within normal limits while the erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) was elevated (74 mm). Histological analysis showed numerous scattered lymphoid cells or organized in follicles with germinal centers within the adventitial thickening of the IAAA wall. Immunohistochemical analysis on frozen sections demonstrated that dispersed and perivascular lymphoid cells were mainly composed of similar amounts of CD3+/CD4+ and CD3+/CD8+ T lymphocytes. Histological analysis of the common iliac artery aneurysm showed a mild intimal thickening will small aggregates of macrophages. After aneurysm repair all peripheral blood analysis normalized within one month after surgery. The IAAA observed in our patient with arteriomegaly as underlying arterial disease cannot be interpreted as an inflammatory variation of an atherosclerotic aneurysm. The histological pattern of the inflammatory reaction and its resolution after surgery give, in our opinion, more credit to the etiopathogenetic hypothesis of a reaction elicited by an antigen within the arterial wall of the infrarenal aorta which might be enhanced by the lymphatic stasis subsequent to aneurysm compression.

  19. Intestinal injury mechanisms after blunt abdominal impact.

    PubMed

    Cripps, N P; Cooper, G J

    1997-03-01

    Intestinal injury is frequent after non-penetrating abdominal trauma, particularly after modern, high-energy transfer impacts. Under these circumstances, delay in the diagnosis of perforation is a major contributor to morbidity and mortality. This study establishes patterns of intestinal injury after blunt trauma by non-penetrating projectiles and examines relationships between injury distribution and abdominal wall motion. Projectile impacts of variable momentum were produced in 31 anaesthetised pigs to cause abdominal wall motion of varying magnitude and velocity. No small bowel injury was observed at initial impact velocity of less than 40 m/s despite gross abdominal compression. At higher velocity, injury to the small bowel was frequent, irrespective of the degree of abdominal compression (P = 0.00044). Large bowel injury was observed at all impact velocities and at all degrees of abdominal compression. This study confirms the potential for intestinal injury in high velocity, low momentum impacts which do not greatly compress the abdominal cavity and demonstrates apparent differences in injury mechanisms for the small bowel and colon. Familiarity with injury mechanisms may reduce delays in the diagnosis of intestinal perforation in both military and civilian situations.

  20. Complications of bariatric surgery: Presentation and emergency management.

    PubMed

    Kassir, Radwan; Debs, Tarek; Blanc, Pierre; Gugenheim, Jean; Ben Amor, Imed; Boutet, Claire; Tiffet, Olivier

    2016-03-01

    The epidemic in obesity has led to an increase in number of so called bariatric procedures. Doctors are less comfortable managing an obese patient after bariatric surgery. Peri-operative mortality is less than 1%. The specific feature in the obese patient is that the classical signs of peritoneal irritation are never present as there is no abdominal wall and therefore no guarding or rigidity. Simple post-operative tachycardia in obese patients should be taken seriously as it is a WARNING SIGNAL. The most common complication after surgery is peritonitis due to anastomotic fistula formation. This occurs typically as an early complication within the first 10 days post-operatively and has an incidence of 1-6% after gastric bypass and 3-7% after sleeve gastrectomy. Post-operative malnutrition is extremely rare after restrictive surgery (ring, sleeve gastrectomy) although may occur after malabsorbative surgery (bypass, biliary pancreatic shunt) and is due to the restriction and change in absorption. Prophylactic cholecystectomy is not routinely carried out during the same procedure as the bypass. Superior mesenteric vein thrombosis after bariatric surgery is a diagnosis which should be considered in the presence of any postoperative abdominal pain. Initially a first etiological assessment is performed (measurement of antithrombin III and of protein C and protein S, testing for activated protein C resistance). If the least doubt is present, a medical or surgical consultation should be requested with a specialist practitioner in the management of obese patients as death rates increase with delayed diagnosis.

  1. Keratinocyte Growth Factor Combined with a Sodium Hyaluronate Gel Inhibits Postoperative Intra-Abdominal Adhesions

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Guangbing; Zhou, Cancan; Wang, Guanghui; Fan, Lin; Wang, Kang; Li, Xuqi

    2016-01-01

    Postoperative intra-abdominal adhesion is a very common complication after abdominal surgery. One clinical problem that remains to be solved is to identify an ideal strategy to prevent abdominal adhesions. Keratinocyte growth factor (KGF) has been proven to improve the proliferation of mesothelial cells, which may enhance fibrinolytic activity to suppress postoperative adhesions. This study investigated whether the combined administration of KGF and a sodium hyaluronate (HA) gel can prevent intra-abdominal adhesions by improving the orderly repair of the peritoneal mesothelial cells. The possible prevention mechanism was also explored. The cecum wall and its opposite parietal peritoneum were abraded after laparotomy to induce intra-abdominal adhesion formation. Animals were randomly allocated to receive topical application of HA, KGF, KGF + HA, or normal saline (Control). On postoperative day 7, the adhesion score was assessed with a visual scoring system. Masson’s trichrome staining, picrosirius red staining and hydroxyproline assays were used to assess the magnitude of adhesion and tissue fibrosis. Cytokeratin, a marker of the mesothelial cells, was detected by immunohistochemistry. The levels of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) in the abdominal fluid were determined using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs). Western blotting was performed to examine the expression of the TGF-β1, fibrinogen and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) proteins in the rat peritoneal adhesion tissue. The combined administration of KGF and HA significantly reduced intra-abdominal adhesion formation and fibrin deposition and improved the orderly repair of the peritoneal mesothelial cells in the rat model. Furthermore, the combined administration of KGF and HA significantly increased the tPA levels but reduced the levels of IL-6, tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) and TGF-β1 in the abdominal fluid. The expression

  2. [Paediatric one-stop surgery: a series of 75 cases].

    PubMed

    López Alvarez-Buhilla, P; Astigarraga Aguirre, I; Torres Piedra, C; Azcona Zorrilla, M I; Olaizola Mendibil, A; Latorre Guisasola, M

    2009-01-01

    By one-stop surgery is meant the performing of both the pre-surgery assessment and the surgical procedure on the same day. We report our experience with a pilot study on one-stop surgery in the province of Bizkaia, with a population of 124,494 children aged 1 to 14 years old. Under the new scheme, the patient average of four visits to the hospital outpatient clinics was cut down to only one. Diagnosis and pre-surgery assessments were made by the children's Primary Care Paediatricians at their NHS clinics. Seventy-five children were treated over 10 months. They had abdominal wall, genital or soft tissue surgery. Only two developed minor complications. Families were generally satisfied with the quality of the medical care received as shown by a survey: 32.7% scored it as "excellent", 36.2% "very good", 24.1% "good" and 3.4% "medium". We think that one-stop surgery is a breakthrough in ambulatory surgery. Not only does it dramatically lower the number of visits to hospital outpatient clinics, but also the waiting time for surgery, the costs, and the surgeon's workload, and helps streamline the Public Health Services and the quality of the medical care as perceived by both patients and families. Ensuring a close relationship between Paediatric Surgeons and Primary Care Paediatricians is paramount.

  3. Revision breast and chest wall reconstruction in Poland and pectus excavatum following implant complication using free deep inferior epigastric perforator flap.

    PubMed

    Dionyssiou, Dimitrios; Demiri, Efterpi; Batsis, Georgios; Pavlidis, Leonidas

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to present the case of a female patient with Poland's syndrome and pectus excavatum deformity who underwent breast and chest wall reconstruction with a pre-shaped free deep inferior epigastric perforator flap. A 57-year-old female patient with Poland's syndrome and pectus excavatum presented with a Baker III capsular contracture following a previously performed implant-based right breast reconstruction. After a chest and abdominal CT angiography, she was staged as 2A1 chest wall deformity according to Park's classification and underwent implant removal and capsulectomy, followed by a pre-shaped free abdominal flap transfer, providing both breast reconstruction and chest wall deformity correction in a single stage operation. Post-operative course was uneventful, and the aesthetic result remains highly satisfactory 24 months after surgery. Deep inferior epigastric free flap represents an interesting reconstructive solution when treating Poland's syndrome female patients with chest wall and breast deformities.

  4. Endovascular Repair of a Blunt Abdominal Aortic Injury

    PubMed Central

    Tobler, William D.; Tan, Tze-Woei; Farber, Alik

    2012-01-01

    Blunt abdominal aortic injury is an uncommon traumatic finding. In the past, treatment options have traditionally consisted of open operative repair; however, the development of endovascular surgery has created new interventional possibilities. This case is presented to demonstrate the applications of endovascular abdominal aortic repair for a blunt traumatic injury. PMID:23730142

  5. Evaluation of deformation accuracy of a virtual pneumoperitoneum method based on clinical trials for patient-specific laparoscopic surgery simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oda, Masahiro; Qu, Jia Di; Nimura, Yukitaka; Kitasaka, Takayuki; Misawa, Kazunari; Mori, Kensaku

    2012-02-01

    This paper evaluates deformation accuracy of a virtual pneumoperitoneum method by utilizing measurement data of real deformations of patient bodies. Laparoscopic surgery is an option of surgical operations that is less invasive technique as compared with traditional surgical operations. In laparoscopic surgery, the pneumoperitoneum process is performed to create a viewing and working space. Although a virtual pneumoperitoneum method based on 3D CT image deformation has been proposed for patient-specific laparoscopy simulators, quantitative evaluation based on measurements obtained in real surgery has not been performed. In this paper, we evaluate deformation accuracy of the virtual pneumoperitoneum method based on real deformation data of the abdominal wall measured in operating rooms (ORs.) The evaluation results are used to find optimal deformation parameters of the virtual pneumoperitoneum method. We measure landmark positions on the abdominal wall on a 3D CT image taken before performing a pneumoperitoneum process. The landmark positions are defined based on anatomical structure of a patient body. We also measure the landmark positions on a 3D CT image deformed by the virtual pneumoperitoneum method. To measure real deformations of the abdominal wall, we measure the landmark positions on the abdominal wall of a patient before and after the pneumoperitoneum process in the OR. We transform the landmark positions measured in the OR from the tracker coordinate system to the CT coordinate system. A positional error of the virtual pneumoperitoneum method is calculated based on positional differences between the landmark positions on the 3D CT image and the transformed landmark positions. Experimental results based on eight cases of surgeries showed that the minimal positional error was 13.8 mm. The positional error can be decreased from the previous method by calculating optimal deformation parameters of the virtual pneumoperitoneum method from the experimental

  6. [Robotic surgery].

    PubMed

    Sándor, József; Haidegger, Tamás; Kormos, Katalin; Ferencz, Andrea; Csukás, Domokos; Bráth, Endre; Szabó, Györgyi; Wéber, György

    2013-10-01

    Due to the fast spread of laparoscopic cholecystectomy, surgical procedures have been changed essentially. The new techniques applied for both abdominal and thoracic procedures provided the possibility for minimally invasive access with all its advantages. Robots - originally developed for industrial applications - were retrofitted for laparoscopic procedures. The currently prevailing robot-assisted surgery is ergonomically more advantageous for the surgeon, as well as for the patient through the more precise preparative activity thanks to the regained 3D vision. The gradual decrease of costs of robotic surgical systems and development of new generations of minimally invasive devices may lead to substantial changes in routine surgical procedures.

  7. Genetic Algorithm for Analysis of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms in Radiology Reports

    SciTech Connect

    Patton, Robert M; Beckerman, Barbara G; Treadwell, Jim N; Potok, Thomas E

    2010-01-01

    An abdominal aortic aneurysm is a problem in which the wall of the artery that supplies blood to the abdomen and lower extremities expands under pressure or balloons outward. Patients must undergo surgery to repair such aneurysm, and there is currently no known indicator of success or failure from this surgery. Our work uses a genetic algorithm to analyze radiology reports from these patients to look for common patterns in the language used as well as common features of both successful and unsuccessful surgieries. The results of the genetic algorithm show that patients with complications or unusual characteristics can be identified from a set of radiology reports without the use of search keywords, clustering, categorization, or ontology. This allows medical researchers to search and identify interesting patient records without the need for explicitly defining what interesting patient records are.

  8. Lateral abdominal muscle size at rest and during abdominal drawing-in manoeuvre in healthy adolescents.

    PubMed

    Linek, Pawel; Saulicz, Edward; Wolny, Tomasz; Myśliwiec, Andrzej; Kokosz, Mirosław

    2015-02-01

    Lateral abdominal wall muscles in children and adolescents have not been characterised to date. In the present report, we examined the reliability of the ultrasound measurement and thickness of the oblique external muscle (OE), oblique internal muscle (OI) and transverse abdominal muscle (TrA) at rest and during abdominal drawing-in manoeuvre (ADIM) on both sides of the body in healthy adolescents. We also determined possible differences between boys and girls and defined any factors-such as body mass, height and BMI-that may affect the thickness of the abdominal muscles. B-mode ultrasound was used to assess OE, OI and TrA on both sides of the body in the supine position. Ultrasound measurements at rest and during ADIM were reliable in this age group (ICC3,3 > 0.92). OI was always the thickest and TrA the thinnest muscle on both sides of the body. In this group, an identical pattern of the contribution of the individual muscles to the structure of the lateral abdominal wall (OI > OE > TrA) was observed. At rest and during ADIM, no statistically significant side-to-side differences were demonstrated in either gender. The body mass constitutes between 30% and <50% of the thickness differences in all muscles under examination at rest and during ADIM. The structure of lateral abdominal wall in adolescents is similar to that of adults. During ADIM, the abdominal muscles in adolescents react similarly to those in adults. This study provided extensive information regarding the structure of the lateral abdominal wall in healthy adolescents.

  9. Reconstruction of the Lower Abdominal Region Using Bilateral Pedicled Anterolateral Thigh Flaps Combined With Poly-Surgical Mesh: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Bo; Zhou, Xiao; Li, Zan; Chen, Ju-Ying; Peng, Xiao-Wei; Yang, Li-Chang; Lv, Chun-Liu

    2015-12-01

    The en-bloc resection of neoplasms on the abdominal wall often causes extensive defects that are difficult to manage. The anterolateral thigh (ALT) flap is a widely used flap in reconstructive surgery of defects. In this article, we present a case using bilateral pedicle anterolateral thigh flaps combined with a surgical polymesh to repair a large defect (22 cm × 18 cm) caused by dissection of a recurrent fibromatosis with good functional and aesthetic effects. There were no obvious morbidities or complications during a 6-month follow-up period.We conclude that the bilateral pedicle anterolateral thigh flap is a good choice for reconstruction of large lower abdominal wall defects. It can afford sufficient soft tissue coverage without obvious donor site morbidity.

  10. Partial splenectomy, transposition of the spleen to the abdominal wall or splenohepatoplasty in portal hypertensive rats. Effects on portal venous pressure and homeostasis--microscopical appearance of the transposed spleen.

    PubMed

    Tröbs, R B; Bennek, J

    1998-06-01

    Reduction of the splenic volume by partial resection and collateral development after transposition are of potential value in the elective treatment of esophageal varices, hypersplenism and ascites. A study was performed on young Wistar rats. A simple animal model of extrahepatic portal hypertension was used, narrowing the portal vein to an outer diameter of one millimeter (PVS). One day, three weeks and seven weeks after this operation the portal venous pressure was elevated as compared with the sham-operated controls. The portal hypertension was statistically significant at week three (1.31 +/- 0.04 vs. 0.72 +/- 0.18 kPa, p = 0.01). Portocaval pressure gradient after partial resection of the spleen (SR) and intramuscular transposition (IMTrans) was compared with the pressure gradient after graded portal vein ste