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Sample records for abdominal withdrawal reflex

  1. Serotonin mimics tail shock in producing transient inhibition in the siphon withdrawal reflex of Aplysia.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, K; Carew, T J

    1991-08-01

    Tail shock-induced modulation of the siphon withdrawal reflex of Aplysia has recently been shown to have a transient inhibitory component, as well as a facilitatory component. This transient behavioral inhibition is also seen in a reduced preparation in which a cellular reflection of the inhibitory process, tail shock-induced inhibition of complex EPSPs in siphon motor neurons, is observed. The biogenic amine serotonin (5-HT) is known to play a role in the facilitatory aspects of sensitization in Aplysia. The aim of this article was to examine whether 5-HT might also contribute to the inhibitory effects of tail shock in the siphon withdrawal reflex. To examine this question, we carried out two kinds of experiments. First, in the isolated abdominal ganglion, we recorded intracellularly from siphon motor neurons and examined the effects of 5-HT on (1) complex (polysynaptic) EPSPs, produced by siphon nerve stimulation, and, simultaneously, (2) monosynaptic EPSPs from siphon sensory neurons. We found that, paralleling the effects of tail shock in the reduced preparation, 5-HT produced transient inhibition of the complex EPSP; the monosynaptic EPSP was facilitated by 5-HT. Second, we examined the behavioral effects of 5-HT on siphon withdrawal in a reduced preparation. We found that 5-HT again paralleled tail shock by producing transient inhibition of the siphon withdrawal reflex. Our results suggest that, in addition to its well-established facilitatory role in reflex modulation in Aplysia, 5-HT might play an important inhibitory role, as well.

  2. Intra-abdominal Pressures during Voluntary and Reflex Cough

    PubMed Central

    Addington, W Robert; Stephens, Robert E; Phelipa, Michael M; Widdicombe, John G; Ockey, Robin R

    2008-01-01

    Background Involuntary coughing such as that evoked from the larynx, the laryngeal cough reflex (LCR), triggers a coordinated contraction of the thoracic, abdominal and pelvic muscles, which increases intra-abdominal pressure (IAP), displaces the diaphragm upwards and generates the expiratory force for cough and airway clearance. Changes in the IAP during voluntary cough (VC) and the LCR can be measured via a pressure catheter in the bladder. This study evaluated the physiological characteristics of IAP generated during VC and the LCR including peak and mean pressures and calculations of the area under the curve (AUC) values during the time of the cough event or epoch. Methods Eleven female subjects between the ages of 18 and 75 underwent standard urodynamic assessment with placement of an intravesicular catheter with a fiberoptic strain gauge pressure transducer. The bladder was filled with 200 ml of sterile water and IAP recordings were obtained with VC and the induced reflex cough test (RCT) using nebulized inhaled 20% tartaric acid to induce the LCR. IAP values were used to calculate the area under the curve (AUC) by the numerical integration of intravesicular pressure over time (cm H2O·s). Results The mean (± SEM) AUC values for VC and the LCR were 349.6 ± 55.2 and 986.6 ± 116.8 cm H2O·s (p < 0.01). The mean IAP values were 45.6 ± 4.65 and 44.5 ± 9.31 cm H2O (NS = .052), and the peak IAP values were 139.5 ± 14.2 and 164.9 ± 15.8 cm H2O (p = 0.07) for VC and LCR, respectively. Conclusion The induced LCR is the involuntary rapid and repeated synchronous expiratory muscle activation that causes and sustains an elevated IAP over time, sufficient for airway protection. VC and LCR have different neurophysiological functions. Quantification of the LCR using AUC values and mean or peak IAP values may be useful as a clinical tool for determining neurophysiological airway protection status and provide a quantitative assessment of changes in a patient

  3. A cellular analysis of inhibition in the siphon withdrawal reflex of Aplysia.

    PubMed

    Wright, W G; Marcus, E A; Carew, T J

    1991-08-01

    Recent behavioral experiments examining the siphon withdrawal reflex of Aplysia have revealed inhibitory effects of strong tail shock, a stimulus commonly used as an unconditioned stimulus in studies of associative and nonassociative learning in Aplysia. We utilized a reduced preparation to perform a cellular analysis of tail shock-induced inhibition in the siphon withdrawal reflex. First, we carried out behavioral studies that showed that the reduced preparation exhibits a siphon withdrawal reflex to water jet stimuli, and that tail shock produces inhibitory behavioral effects comparable to those in the intact animal: (1) strong shock produces transient inhibition of nonhabituated responses, and (2) a habituated response is facilitated by weak shock, but not by strong shock, suggesting that increasing tail shock intensity recruits the inhibitory process that competes with facilitation of habituated reflexes. Next, we carried out cellular studies that showed that the amplitude of the complex EPSP in siphon motor neurons elicited by water jet stimuli to the siphon also exhibits the inhibitory patterns produced by tail shock: (1) the nondecremented complex EPSP (a neural correlate of a nonhabituated siphon withdrawal reflex) is significantly inhibited 90 sec after strong tail shock and recovers to preshock levels 10 min later, and (2) the decremented complex EPSP (a neural correlate of a habituated reflex) is significantly facilitated by weak shock, but is not facilitated by strong shock. In addition to the complex EPSP, we simultaneously examined the monosynaptic connection between siphon sensory neurons and siphon motor neurons. The monosynaptic EPSP does not show the pattern of inhibitory modulation by tail shock exhibited by the siphon withdrawal reflex and the complex EPSP: (1) the nondecremented monosynaptic EPSP is not inhibited 90 sec after strong shock, but tends to be above preshock levels; and (2) the decremented monosynaptic EPSP is facilitated by weak as

  4. The relationship between nociceptive brain activity, spinal reflex withdrawal and behaviour in newborn infants.

    PubMed

    Hartley, Caroline; Goksan, Sezgi; Poorun, Ravi; Brotherhood, Kelly; Mellado, Gabriela Schmidt; Moultrie, Fiona; Rogers, Richard; Adams, Eleri; Slater, Rebeccah

    2015-07-31

    Measuring infant pain is complicated by their inability to describe the experience. While nociceptive brain activity, reflex withdrawal and facial grimacing have been characterised, the relationship between these activity patterns has not been examined. As cortical and spinally mediated activity is developmentally regulated, it cannot be assumed that they are predictive of one another in the immature nervous system. Here, using a new experimental paradigm, we characterise the nociceptive-specific brain activity, spinal reflex withdrawal and behavioural activity following graded intensity noxious stimulation and clinical heel lancing in 30 term infants. We show that nociceptive-specific brain activity and nociceptive reflex withdrawal are graded with stimulus intensity (p < 0.001), significantly correlated (r = 0.53, p = 0.001) and elicited at an intensity that does not evoke changes in clinical pain scores (p = 0.55). The strong correlation between reflex withdrawal and nociceptive brain activity suggests that movement of the limb away from a noxious stimulus is a sensitive indication of nociceptive brain activity in term infants. This could underpin the development of new clinical pain assessment measures.

  5. The relationship between nociceptive brain activity, spinal reflex withdrawal and behaviour in newborn infants.

    PubMed

    Hartley, Caroline; Goksan, Sezgi; Poorun, Ravi; Brotherhood, Kelly; Mellado, Gabriela Schmidt; Moultrie, Fiona; Rogers, Richard; Adams, Eleri; Slater, Rebeccah

    2015-01-01

    Measuring infant pain is complicated by their inability to describe the experience. While nociceptive brain activity, reflex withdrawal and facial grimacing have been characterised, the relationship between these activity patterns has not been examined. As cortical and spinally mediated activity is developmentally regulated, it cannot be assumed that they are predictive of one another in the immature nervous system. Here, using a new experimental paradigm, we characterise the nociceptive-specific brain activity, spinal reflex withdrawal and behavioural activity following graded intensity noxious stimulation and clinical heel lancing in 30 term infants. We show that nociceptive-specific brain activity and nociceptive reflex withdrawal are graded with stimulus intensity (p < 0.001), significantly correlated (r = 0.53, p = 0.001) and elicited at an intensity that does not evoke changes in clinical pain scores (p = 0.55). The strong correlation between reflex withdrawal and nociceptive brain activity suggests that movement of the limb away from a noxious stimulus is a sensitive indication of nociceptive brain activity in term infants. This could underpin the development of new clinical pain assessment measures. PMID:26228435

  6. Temporal muscle activation assessment by ultrasound imaging during flexor withdrawal reflex and voluntary contraction.

    PubMed

    Jose, Gomez-Tames; Shuto, Nakamura; Jose, Gonzalez; Wenwei, Yu

    2013-01-01

    Activating flexor reflexes by electrical stimulation has been used as a mechanism to initiate the swing phase or to enhance it for spinal cord injured patients. However, it is necessary to know their contraction dynamics in order to artificially induce them at the right moment of a walking cycle. This requires understanding the temporal activation pattern of both surface and deep muscles simultaneously. This study aimed at developing a system to measure and analyze the temporal activation of both surface and deep muscles during voluntary contraction and flexor reflexes (also called withdrawal reflexes) using ultrasound imaging. A set of experiments were done to verify the validity of the system, while exploring the temporal pattern of muscle activation during flexor reflexes. As a result, we were able to quantify the surface and deep muscle activity by measuring the muscle thickness, pennation angle and long-axis displacement, from the ultrasound images.

  7. Central and peripheral control of siphon-withdrawal reflex in Aplysia californica.

    PubMed

    Perlman, A J

    1979-03-01

    1. The defensive withdrawal reflex of the siphon of Aplysia is a local response (exhibited by the organ that is stimulated) mediated by the conjoint action of both the central and peripheral nervous systems. 2. Three independent methods were used to determine the contribution of the central and peripheral nervous systems to the siphon-withdrawal reflex: 1) acute reversible deganglionation, 2) chronic deganglionation, and 3) a selective reversible hyperpolarization. With each of these techniques, the central nervous system was found to contribute about 55% of the total reflex. 3. Seven motor neurons were identified and characterized with respect to their electrophysiological properties and the motor actions. Three of the central motor cells belong to the LD clusters of cells (LDS1, LDS2, LDS3) and one is an RD cell (RDS). These four cells all receive excitatory synaptic input from siphon stimulation, excitatory synaptic input from the activity of the respiratory command cells network (interneuron II). large spontaneous IPSPs, and exhibit hyperpolarizing responses (H response) to iontophoretically applied acetylcholine (ACh). These cells all participate in the siphon-withdrawal component of a centrally commanded fixed-action pattern: spontaneous pumping movements of the mantle organs driven by the respiratory command cells. They receive an EPSP burst during the activity of the respiratory command cells and are competent to mediate the siphon motion. Three central siphon motor cells belong to the LB cluster (LBS1, LBS2, LBS3). These cells also receive excitatory input following stimulation of the siphon, a spontaneously occurring IPSP, and have H response to iontophoretically applied ACh. These cells, however, receive an IPSP burst during spontaneous pumping movement and thus do not participate in the active contraction phase of this behavior. LBS1 and LDS1 were examined with respect to their transmitter biochemistry and were found to be noncholinergic. 4. The siphon-withdrawal

  8. Classical conditioning of the Aplysia siphon-withdrawal reflex exhibits response specificity.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, R D; Lalevic, N; Clark, G A; Kandel, E R

    1989-10-01

    The gill- and siphon-withdrawal reflex of Aplysia undergoes classical conditioning of its amplitude and duration when siphon stimulation (the conditioned stimulus, CS) is paired with tail or mantle shock (the unconditioned stimulus, US). This conditioning of a preexisting response exhibits both temporal and stimulus specificities, which can be accounted for by activity-dependent enhancement of presynaptic facilitation of the siphon sensory neurons. To test whether conditioning of the reflex also exhibits response specificity (development of a new type of response to the CS that often resembles the response to the US), we measured the direction of siphon withdrawal in response to siphon stimulation (the CS) with tail or mantle shock as the US. The unlearned response to siphon stimulation is straight contraction, the response to tail shock is backward bending, and the response to mantle shock is forward bending. In the first experiment, we trained different animals with the tail or mantle US paired or unpaired with the CS; in a second experiment, we trained each animal with two CSs, one of which was paired with the US; in a third experiment, we varied US intensity; and in a fourth experiment, we trained each animal with two USs, one of which was paired with the CS. There was a significant, pairing-specific tendency for the direction of the response to the CS to resemble the response to the US after training in each experiment, demonstrating response specificity in conditioning of the withdrawal reflex. This feature of conditioning could in principle be accounted for by an elaboration of activity-dependent facilitation.

  9. Local application of neurotensin to abdominal organs triggers cardiovascular reflexes in guinea pigs: possible mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Rioux, F; Lemieux, M; Kérouac, R; Bernoussi, A; Roy, G

    1989-01-01

    Intraabdominal (IAB) injections or topical application of neurotensin (NT) to the serosal surface of the ileum or stomach evoked dose-dependent increases of blood pressure and of heart rate in anesthetized guinea pigs. These effects were markedly reduced by prior animal treatment with a ganglion blocker, alpha and beta adrenoceptor blockers, as well as by exposure of the abdominal organs to lidocaine, a local anesthetic. The blood pressure and heart rate responses to IAB injections or topical application of NT to the ileum or stomach were both inhibited by animal pretreatment with capsaicin. Cervical vagotomy or atropine pretreatment did not prevent or alter the cardiovascular responses to IAB injections of NT. These results suggest the presence in some organs and/or tissues of the abdominal cavity of sympathetic, capsaicin-sensitive sensory nerve fibers which, upon stimulation by NT, produce reflex increases of blood pressure and of heart rate.

  10. Alfaxalone Anaesthesia Facilitates Electrophysiological Recordings of Nociceptive Withdrawal Reflexes in Dogs (Canis familiaris).

    PubMed

    Hunt, James; Murrell, Jo; Knazovicky, David; Harris, John; Kelly, Sara; Knowles, Toby G; Lascelles, B Duncan X

    2016-01-01

    Naturally occurring canine osteoarthritis represents a welfare issue for affected dogs (Canis familiaris), but is also considered very similar to human osteoarthritis and has therefore been proposed as a model of disease in humans. Central sensitisation is recognized in human osteoarthritis sufferers but identification in dogs is challenging. Electromyographic measurement of responses to nociceptive stimulation represents a potential means of investigating alterations in central nociceptive processing, and has been evaluated in conscious experimental dogs, but is likely to be aversive. Development of a suitable anaesthetic protocol in experimental dogs, which facilitated electrophysiological nociceptive withdrawal reflex assessment, may increase the acceptability of using the technique in owned dogs with naturally occurring osteoarthritis. Seven purpose bred male hound dogs underwent electromyographic recording sessions in each of three states: acepromazine sedation, alfaxalone sedation, and alfaxalone anaesthesia. Electromyographic responses to escalating mechanical and electrical, and repeated electrical, stimuli were recorded. Subsequently the integral of both early and late rectified responses was calculated. Natural logarithms of the integral values were analysed within and between the three states using multi level modeling. Alfaxalone increased nociceptive thresholds and decreased the magnitude of recorded responses, but characteristics of increasing responses with increasing stimulus magnitude were preserved. Behavioural signs of anxiety were noted in two out of seven dogs during recordings in the acepromazine sedated state. There were few significant differences in response magnitude or nociceptive threshold between the two alfaxalone states. Following acepromazine premedication, induction of anaesthesia with 1-2 mg kg-1 alfaxalone, followed by a continuous rate infusion in the range 0.075-0.1 mg kg-1 min-1 produced suitable conditions to enable assessment

  11. Alfaxalone Anaesthesia Facilitates Electrophysiological Recordings of Nociceptive Withdrawal Reflexes in Dogs (Canis familiaris)

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, James; Murrell, Jo; Knazovicky, David; Harris, John; Kelly, Sara; Knowles, Toby G.; Lascelles, B. Duncan X.

    2016-01-01

    Naturally occurring canine osteoarthritis represents a welfare issue for affected dogs (Canis familiaris), but is also considered very similar to human osteoarthritis and has therefore been proposed as a model of disease in humans. Central sensitisation is recognized in human osteoarthritis sufferers but identification in dogs is challenging. Electromyographic measurement of responses to nociceptive stimulation represents a potential means of investigating alterations in central nociceptive processing, and has been evaluated in conscious experimental dogs, but is likely to be aversive. Development of a suitable anaesthetic protocol in experimental dogs, which facilitated electrophysiological nociceptive withdrawal reflex assessment, may increase the acceptability of using the technique in owned dogs with naturally occurring osteoarthritis. Seven purpose bred male hound dogs underwent electromyographic recording sessions in each of three states: acepromazine sedation, alfaxalone sedation, and alfaxalone anaesthesia. Electromyographic responses to escalating mechanical and electrical, and repeated electrical, stimuli were recorded. Subsequently the integral of both early and late rectified responses was calculated. Natural logarithms of the integral values were analysed within and between the three states using multi level modeling. Alfaxalone increased nociceptive thresholds and decreased the magnitude of recorded responses, but characteristics of increasing responses with increasing stimulus magnitude were preserved. Behavioural signs of anxiety were noted in two out of seven dogs during recordings in the acepromazine sedated state. There were few significant differences in response magnitude or nociceptive threshold between the two alfaxalone states. Following acepromazine premedication, induction of anaesthesia with 1–2 mg kg-1 alfaxalone, followed by a continuous rate infusion in the range 0.075–0.1 mg kg-1 min-1 produced suitable conditions to enable

  12. Signaled avoidance in the eye withdrawal reflex of the green crab

    PubMed Central

    Abramson, Charles I.; Armstrong, Philip M.; Feinman, Robin A.; Feinman, Richard D.

    1988-01-01

    Learning in a signaled avoidance procedure was studied in the eye withdrawal reflex of the green crab, Carcinus maenas. A puff of air to the eye, which causes eye retraction, was used as the unconditioned stimulus (US). A mild vibration on the carapace, which has no effect on untrained animals, was used as a warning (conditioned) stimulus (CS). Eye withdrawal during the CS led to the omission of the otherwise scheduled US. Acquisition was rapid, reaching about 75% avoidance after 30 trials. Extinction occurred slowly over the course of 40 CS-only trials. Yoked controls did not perform as well. The behavior of experimental animals in the avoidance procedure was found to be essentially identical to the performance of animals subjected to a classical conditioning paradigm in which CS responses had no effect on US presentation. Additional groups of animals were subjected to experiments in which (a) avoidance conditioning (60 trials) was followed by classical conditioning (40 trials) or (b) classical conditioning was followed by avoidance. The behavior of these groups was, again, essentially identical. The results suggest that there may be an underlying Pavlovian mechanism for the learned response, although the contribution of an operant process is not excluded. The results expand the range of invertebrate animals in which fundamental conditioning phenomena can be demonstrated, and may provide a neuronal model for learning in a signaled avoidance procedure. PMID:16812569

  13. Developmental adaptation of withdrawal reflexes to early alteration of peripheral innervation in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Holmberg, H; Schouenborg, J

    1996-01-01

    1. In adult decerebrate spinal rats whose plantar nerves (PLN) had been transected at either postnatal day 1 (P1) or P21 the nociceptive withdrawal reflexes (NWR) of musculi extensor digitorum longus (EDL), peroneus longus (PER) and semitendinosus (ST) were characterized with respect to receptive field (RF) organization, magnitude and time course, using electromyography. Thermal (short CO2 laser pulses) and mechanical (calibrated pinch) stimulation were used. The innervation patterns in normal and lesioned adult rats were assessed by acute nerve lesions. 2. The spatial organization of the mean mechano- and thermonociceptive RFs of all the muscles studied was similar to normal in both P1- and P21-lesioned rats, although in some P21-lesioned rats atypical EDL RFs were encountered. 3. In P1-lesioned rats thermo-NWR of PER and EDL had normal magnitudes, while mechano-NWR were reduced. In P21-lesioned rats both thermo- and mechano-NWR of these muscles had reduced magnitudes. Except for thermo-NWR of ST in P1-lesioned rats, which were increased, NWR of ST had normal magnitudes in both P1- and P21-lesioned rats. The time course of thermonociceptive NWR of the muscles studied were near normal in both P1- and P21-lesioned rats. 4. Acute nerve lesions in adult P1-lesioned rats revealed an essentially abolished contribution to NWR from the PLN. Instead, the contribution to NWR from other hindpaw nerves, such as the superficial and deep peroneal nerves, was dramatically increased. By contrast, in P21-lesioned rats, the regenerated PLN contributed significantly to the NWR. 5. It is concluded that despite profound alterations of plantar hindpaw innervation induced by early PLN transection the cutaneous nociceptive input to NWR attained an essentially normal spatial organization. An experience-dependent mechanism is suggested to be instrumental in adapting the reflex connectivity to the peripheral innervation. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID

  14. The contribution of facilitation of monosynaptic PSPs to dishabituation and sensitization of the Aplysia siphon withdrawal reflex.

    PubMed

    Antonov, I; Kandel, E R; Hawkins, R D

    1999-12-01

    To examine the relationship between synaptic plasticity and learning and memory as directly as possible, we have developed a new simplified preparation for studying the siphon-withdrawal reflex of Aplysia in which it is relatively easy to record synaptic connections between individual identified neurons during simple forms of learning. We estimated that monosynaptic EPSPs from LE siphon sensory neurons to LFS siphon motor neurons mediate approximately one-third of the reflex response measured in this preparation, which corresponds to siphon flaring in the intact animal. To investigate cellular mechanisms contributing to dishabituation and sensitization, we recorded evoked firing of LFS neurons, the siphon withdrawal produced by stimulation of an LFS neuron, the complex PSP in an LFS neuron, and the monosynaptic PSP from an "on-field" or "off-field" LE neuron to an LFS neuron during behavioral training. Unlike the simplified gill-withdrawal preparation (Cohen et al., 1997; Frost et al., 1997), in the siphon-withdrawal preparation we found no qualitative differences between the major cellular mechanisms contributing to dishabituation and sensitization, suggesting that dissociations that have been observed previously may be attributable to transient inhibition that does not occur for this component of the reflex. Furthermore, in the siphon-withdrawal preparation, all of the various cellular measures, including monosynaptic PSPs from either on-field or off-field LE neurons, changed approximately in parallel with changes in the behavior. These results provide the most direct evidence so far available that both dishabituation and sensitization involve multiple mechanisms, including heterosynaptic facilitation of sensory neuron-motor neuron PSPs.

  15. The Tail-Elicited Tail Withdrawal Reflex of "Aplysia" Is Mediated Centrally at Tail Sensory-Motor Synapses and Exhibits Sensitization across Multiple Temporal Domains

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Philips, Gary T.; Sherff, Carolyn M.; Menges, Steven A.; Carew, Thomas J.

    2011-01-01

    The defensive withdrawal reflexes of "Aplysia californica" have provided powerful behavioral systems for studying the cellular and molecular basis of memory formation. Among these reflexes the (T-TWR) has been especially useful. In vitro studies examining the monosynaptic circuit for the T-TWR, the tail sensory-motor (SN-MN) synapses, have…

  16. Contribution of polysynaptic pathways in the mediation and plasticity of Aplysia gill and siphon withdrawal reflex: evidence for differential modulation.

    PubMed

    Trudeau, L E; Castellucci, V F

    1992-10-01

    The gill and siphon withdrawal (GSW) reflex of Aplysia is centrally mediated by a monosynaptic and a polysynaptic pathway between sensory and motor neurons. The first objective of this article was to evaluate quantitatively the relative importance of these two components in the mediation of the GSW reflex. We have used an artificial sea water (ASW) solution containing a high concentration of divalent cations to raise the action potential threshold of the interneurons without affecting the monosynaptic component of the reflex (2:1 ASW). Compound EPSPs induced in gill or siphon motor neurons by direct stimulation of the siphon nerve or by tactile stimulation of the siphon skin were reduced by more than 75% in 2:1 ASW. These results indicate that interneurons intercalated between sensory and motor neurons are responsible for a considerable proportion of the afferent input to the motor neurons of the reflex. The second objective of this article was to compare the modulation of the monosynaptic and polysynaptic pathways. We have evaluated their respective contribution in sensitization of the GSW reflex by testing the effects of two neuromodulators of the reflex, 5-HT and small cardioactive peptide B (SCPB). We found that these two neuromodulators have a differential action on the two components of the GSW neuronal network. The polysynaptic pathway was more facilitated than the monosynaptic pathway by the neuropeptide SCPB. By contrast, 5-HT displayed an opposite selectivity. These results suggest that the polysynaptic component of the neuronal network underlying the GSW reflex is very important for its mediation. The data also indicate that the monosynaptic and polysynaptic components of the reflex can be differentially modulated. The diversity of modulatory actions at various sites of the GSW network should be relevant for learning-associated modifications in the intact animal.

  17. Heterosynaptic facilitation of tail sensory neuron synaptic transmission during habituation in tail-induced tail and siphon withdrawal reflexes of Aplysia.

    PubMed

    Stopfer, M; Carew, T J

    1996-08-15

    In cellular studies of habituation, such as in the gill and siphon withdrawal reflex to tactile stimulation of the siphon of Aplysia, a mechanism that has emerged as an explanation for response decrement during habituation is homosynaptic depression at sensory neurons mediating the behavioral response. We have examined the contribution of homosynaptic depression to habituation in sensory neurons that contribute to two reflex behaviors in Aplysia, tail withdrawal and siphon withdrawal, both elicited by threshold-level tail stimulation. In a companion paper (this issue), we reported that repeated tail stimulation, identical to that producing habituation in siphon withdrawal in freely moving animals, also produces habituation in reduced preparations. In this paper, we extend these behavioral findings by showing that in reduced preparations, identical tail stimulation also produces habituation of the tail withdrawal reflex. In addition, our cellular experiments show that (1) identified sensory and motor neurons in both reflex systems respond to identical repeated tail stimulation; in sensory neurons it produces a progressive decrease in spike number and increase in spike latency, and in motor neurons it produces progressive decrement in complex EPSPs and spike output. (2) Homosynaptic depression of the tail sensory neuron to tail motor neuron synapse does occur when the sensory neurons are activated repetitively by intracellular current. (3) Homosynaptic depression at this synapse does not occur when the sensory neurons are activated repetitively by threshold-level tail stimuli that elicit the behavioral reflex and cause habituation; rather, the sensory neurons exhibit significant heterosynaptic facilitation. Thus, in these reflexes, habituation is not accompanied by homosynaptic depression at the sensory neurons, suggesting that the plasticity underlying habituation occurs primarily at interneuronal sites.

  18. Habituation in the Tail Withdrawal Reflex Circuit is Impaired During Aging in Aplysia californica

    PubMed Central

    Kempsell, Andrew T.; Fieber, Lynne A.

    2016-01-01

    The relevance of putative contributors to age-related memory loss are poorly understood. The tail withdrawal circuit of the sea hare, a straightforward neural model, was used to investigate the aging characteristics of rudimentary learning. The simplicity of this neuronal circuit permits attribution of declines in the function of specific neurons to aging declines. Memory was impaired in advanced age animals compared to their performance at the peak of sexual maturity, with habituation training failing to attenuate the tail withdrawal response or to reduce tail motoneuron excitability, as occurred in peak maturity siblings. Baseline motoneuron excitability of aged animals was significantly lower, perhaps contributing to a smaller scope for attenuation. Conduction velocity in afferent fibers to tail sensory neurons (SN) decreased during aging. The findings suggest that age-related changes in tail sensory and motor neurons result in deterioration of a simple form of learning in Aplysia. PMID:26903863

  19. Effects of analgesic midbrain stimulation on reflex withdrawal and thermal escape in the rat.

    PubMed

    Soper, W Y

    1976-01-01

    Strong analgesia produced by mesencephalic electrical brain stimulation in rats significantly increased escape latencies in two-way escape from a floor heated by hydraulic circulation. Reflective reactions to pinching and needling were abolished or greatly diminished. Individual differences in the strengths of analgesia, as assessed by instrumental and reflex indicants, were highly correlated. Induction of analgesia was demonstrated in the absence of positive reinforcement effects produced by brain stimulation. The findings are discussed in relation to possible neural pain suppression systems with critical components situated in the midbrain.

  20. Recruitment of motor neuronal persistent inward currents shapes withdrawal reflexes in the frog

    PubMed Central

    Perrier, Jean-François; Tresch, Matthew C

    2005-01-01

    The details of behaviour are determined by the interplay of synaptic connectivity within neuronal circuitry and the intrinsic membrane properties of individual neurones. One particularly dramatic intrinsic property displayed by neurones in many regions of the nervous system is membrane potential bistability, in which transient excitation of a neurone results in a persistent depolarization outlasting the initial excitation. Here we characterize the contribution of such intrinsic bistability, also referred to as plateau properties and mediated by persistent inward currents (PICs), in spinal motor neurones to the production of withdrawal behaviours in the frog. We performed experiments on the isolated frog spinal cord with attached hindlimb. This preparation allowed the simultaneous monitoring of muscle activations during motor behaviour and intracellular neuronal recordings. We found that PICs, following their potentiation by serotonin (5-HT), are recruited and contribute to the production of withdrawal behaviours. These properties conferred a voltage-dependent prolongation to the duration of motor neuronal activity. Consistent with this potentiation of motor neuronal PICs, 5-HT also increased the duration of evoked muscle activations. This behavioural potentiation, as well as the expression of PICs in individual neurones, was reduced following antagonism of L-type Ca2+ channels. These results demonstrate that PICs in motor neurones can be recruited during the production of behaviour and play a role in specifying the temporal details of motor output. PMID:15528248

  1. The tail-elicited tail withdrawal reflex of Aplysia is mediated centrally at tail sensory-motor synapses and exhibits sensitization across multiple temporal domains

    PubMed Central

    Philips, Gary T.; Sherff, Carolyn M.; Menges, Steven A.; Carew, Thomas J.

    2011-01-01

    The defensive withdrawal reflexes of Aplysia californica have provided powerful behavioral systems for studying the cellular and molecular basis of memory formation. Among these reflexes the tail-elicited tail withdrawal reflex (T-TWR) has been especially useful. In vitro studies examining the monosynaptic circuit for the T-TWR, the tail sensory-motor (SN-MN) synapses, have identified the induction requirements and molecular basis of different temporal phases of synaptic facilitation that underlie sensitization in this system. They have also permitted more recent studies elucidating the role of synaptic and nuclear signaling during synaptic facilitation. Here we report the development of a novel, compartmentalized semi-intact T-TWR preparation that allows examination of the unique contributions of processing in the SN somatic compartment (the pleural ganglion) and the SN-MN synaptic compartment (the pedal ganglion) during the induction of sensitization. Using this preparation we find that the T-TWR is mediated entirely by central connections in the synaptic compartment. Moreover, the reflex is stably expressed for at least 24 h, and can be modified by tail shocks that induce sensitization across multiple temporal domains, as well as direct application of the modulatory neurotransmitter serotonin. This preparation now provides an experimentally powerful system in which to directly examine the unique and combined roles of synaptic and nuclear signaling in different temporal domains of memory formation. PMID:21450911

  2. A simplified preparation for relating cellular events to behavior: contribution of LE and unidentified siphon sensory neurons to mediation and habituation of the Aplysia gill- and siphon-withdrawal reflex.

    PubMed

    Frost, L; Kaplan, S W; Cohen, T E; Henzi, V; Kandel, E R; Hawkins, R D

    1997-04-15

    We have begun to analyze several elementary forms of learning in a simple preparation consisting of the isolated mantle organs and abdominal ganglion of Aplysia. Previous studies suggested that plasticity at siphon sensory neuron synapses contributes to habituation and dishabituation of the gill- and siphon-withdrawal reflex in this preparation. We next wished to identify the sensory neurons that participate in the reflex and examine their plasticity more directly. To investigate the contribution of the LE siphon mechanosensory cells, we recorded from them and gill or siphon motor neurons during the same siphon stimulation that has been used in behavioral experiments in this preparation. Our results indicate that the LE cells make a substantial contribution to the evoked response in the motor neurons under these conditions, but they suggest that other as yet unidentified siphon sensory neurons with lower thresholds and shorter latencies also contribute. In addition, we find that homosynaptic depression of monosynaptic postsynaptic potentials (PSPs) from LE sensory cells makes an important contribution to habituation of the response in the motor neurons. To investigate plasticity of PSPs from the unidentified sensory neurons, we recorded the PSP that was produced in a motor neuron by water-movement stimulation of the siphon, which does not cause firing of LE cells. Our results suggest that PSPs from the unidentified sensory neurons and the LE neurons undergo similar plasticity during habituation and dishabituation training. These results support the idea that plasticity at synapses of both LE and unidentified sensory neurons contributes to habituation and dishabituation of the reflex response in this preparation.

  3. Haemodynamic and abdominal motor reflexes elicited by neurotensin in anaesthetized guinea-pigs.

    PubMed Central

    Rioux, F.; Lemieux, M.

    1992-01-01

    1. Single intraperitoneal (i.p.) injections of neurotensin (NT) (0.14- 140 nmol kg-1) in anaesthetized guinea-pigs were found to trigger transient abdominal wall contractions (TAWC) accompanied by relatively sustained increases of systemic blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR). The modification of the latter NT effects by various drugs and surgical manipulations was examined to obtain some insight into the nature of, and possible relationship between, these responses. 2. The abdominal motor response (i.e. TAWC) to i.p. NT (14 nmol kg-1) was inhibited by prior i.v. injection of the guinea-pigs with pancuronium (0.27 mumol kg-1), morphine (1.5 and 15 mumol kg-1), clonidine (0.34 mumol kg-1), by concomitant i.p. injection of procaine 2% w/v, or by acute spinalization. It was potentiated by naloxone (2.8 and 28 mumol kg-1), but not affected by i.v. injection of autonomic drugs (i.e. pentolinium, prazosin, yohimbine and atropine), by capsaicin desensitization, or by acute bilateral cervical vagotomy. In spinalized animals a sustained abdominal wall contraction (SAWC) was unmasked, which was resistant to i.v. morphine, clonidine or baclofen but suppressed by i.v. pancuronium or i.p. lignocaine 2% w/v. 3. Haemodynamic responses to i.p. NT were not affected by i.v. pancuronium, morphine, naloxone, atropine, or by vagotomy. They were inhibited by i.v. pentolinium or clonidine (BP, HR), i.v. prazosin (BP), i.p. procaine 2% w/v (BP, HR), capsaicin desensitization or acute spinalization (BP, HR). Yohimbine (i.v.) potentiated BP and HR increases caused by i.p. NT.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1504727

  4. Realistic simulation of the Aplysia siphon-withdrawal reflex circuit: roles of circuit elements in producing motor output.

    PubMed

    Lieb, J R; Frost, W N

    1997-03-01

    The circuitry underlying the Aplysia siphon-elicited siphon-withdrawal reflex has been widely used to study the cellular substrates of simple forms of learning and memory. Nonetheless, the functional roles of the different neurons and synaptic connections modified with learning have yet to be firmly established. In this study we constructed a realistic computer simulation of the best-understood component of this network to better understand how the siphon-withdrawal circuit works. We used an integrate-and-fire scheme to simulate four neuron types (LFS, L29, L30, L34) and 10 synaptic connections. Each of these circuit components was individually constructed to match the mean or typical example of its biological counterpart on the basis of group measurements of each circuit element. Once each cell and synapse was modeled, its free parameters were fixed and not subject to further manipulation. The LFS motor neurons respond to sensory input with a brief phasic burst followed by a long-lasting period of tonic firing. We found that the assembled model network responded to sensory input in a qualitatively similar fashion, suggesting that many of the interneurons important for producing the LFS firing response have now been identified. By selectively removing different circuit elements, we determined the contribution of each of the LFS firing pattern. Our first finding was that the monosynaptic sensory neuron to motor neuron pathway contributed only to the initial brief burst of the LFS firing response, whereas the polysynaptic pathway determined the overall duration of LFS firing. By making more selective deletions, we found that the circuit elements responsible for transforming brief sensory neuron discharges into long-lasting LFS firing were the slow components of the L29-LFS fast/slow excitatory postsynaptic potentials. The inhibitory L30 neurons exerted a significant braking action on the flow of excitatory information through the circuit. Interestingly, L30 lost its

  5. Tail shock produces inhibition as well as sensitization of the siphon-withdrawal reflex of Aplysia: possible behavioral role for presynaptic inhibition mediated by the peptide Phe-Met-Arg-Phe-NH2.

    PubMed

    Mackey, S L; Glanzman, D L; Small, S A; Dyke, A M; Kandel, E R; Hawkins, R D

    1987-12-01

    Recent studies have shown that, in addition to being modulated by presynaptic facilitation, the sensory neurons of the gill- and siphon-withdrawal reflex of Aplysia are also capable of being modulated by transient presynaptic inhibition produced by the peptide Phe-Met-Arg-Phe-NH2. These two modulatory effects involve different second-messenger systems: the facilitation is mediated through cAMP-dependent protein phosphorylation, and the inhibition is mediated through the lipoxygenase pathway of arachidonic acid. To explore the behavioral function of this inhibition, we have carried out a parametric analysis of the effect of tail shock on the siphon-withdrawal reflex. In addition to producing sensitization of the withdrawal reflex, tail shock also transiently inhibits the reflex. The inhibition is produced by relatively weak shock, whereas sensitization is more prominent and may mask the inhibition with stronger shock. Furthermore, inhibition is not observed after habituation training. Cellular studies suggest that the behavioral inhibition is mediated, at least in part, by presynaptic inhibition of transmitter release from the siphon sensory neurons. Moreover, we have identified an interneuron within the left pleural ganglion (LPL16) that shows Phe-Met-Arg-Phe-NH2 immunoreactivity, is activated by tail shock, and simulates the presynaptic inhibitory actions produced by tail shock. Therefore, our results suggest that presynaptic inhibition mediated by Phe-Met-Arg-Phe-NH2 and its lipoxygenase second messenger contributes to behavioral inhibition of the siphon-withdrawal reflex.

  6. Spinal 5-HT-receptors and tonic modulation of transmission through a withdrawal reflex pathway in the decerebrated rabbit.

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, R. W.; Harris, J.; Houghton, A. K.

    1996-01-01

    1. In decerebrated, non-spinalized rabbits, intrathecal administration of either of the selective 5-HT1A-receptor antagonists (S)WAY-100135 or WAY-100635 resulted in dose-dependent enhancement of the reflex responses of gastrocnemius motoneurones evoked by electrical stimulation of all myelinated afferents of the sural nerve. The approximate ED50 for WAY-100635 was 0.9 nmol and that for (S)WAY-100135 13 nmol. Intrathecal doses of the antagonists which caused maximal facilitation of reflexes in non-spinalized rabbits had no effect in spinalized preparations. 2. In non-spinalized animals, intravenous administration of (S)WAY-100135 was significantly less effective in enhancing reflexes than when it was given by the intrathecal route. 3. When given intrathecally, the selective 5-HT 2A/2C-receptor antagonist, ICI 170,809, produced a bellshaped dose-effect curve, augmenting reflexes at low doses (< or = 44 nmol), but reducing them at higher doses (982 nmol). Idazoxan, the selective alpha 2-adrenoceptor antagonist, was less effective in enhancing reflex responses when given intrathecally after ICI 170,809 compared to when it was given alone. Intravenous ICI 170,809 resulted only in enhancement of reflexes and the facilitatory effects of subsequent intrathecal administration of idazoxan were not compromised. 4. The selective 5-HT3-receptor blocker ondansetron faciliated gastrocnemius medialis reflex responses in a dose-related manner when given by either intrathecal or intravenous routes. This drug was slightly more potent when given i.v. and it did not alter the efficacy of subsequent intrathecal administration of idazoxan. 5. None of the antagonists had any consistent effects on arterial blood pressure or heart rate. 6. These data are consistent with the idea that, in the decrebrated rabbit, 5-HT released from descending axons has multiple roles in controlling transmission through the sural-gastrocnemius medialis reflex pathway. Thus, it appears 5-HT tonically inhibits

  7. Functional uncoupling of inhibitory interneurons plays an important role in short-term sensitization of Aplysia gill and siphon withdrawal reflex.

    PubMed

    Trudeau, L E; Castellucci, V F

    1993-05-01

    Attempts to explain learning-associated potentiation of synaptic transmission in model systems such as withdrawal reflexes in the mollusk Aplysia or the hippocampus of vertebrates have focused on the mechanisms by which transmitter release is increased in the principal elements of the circuit. Increased transmission in neuronal networks such as the gill and siphon withdrawal reflex (GSWR) of Aplysia may, however, also be caused by a decrease of transmitter release by inhibitory interneurons. The importance and function of cholinergic inhibitory transmission in the GSWR network were investigated. Central application of the nicotinic cholinergic antagonist d-tubocurarine (d-TC) considerably potentiated gill contractions, evoked either by nerve stimulation or by tactile stimulation of the siphon. Compound EPSPs evoked in motoneurons upon siphon nerve stimulation were also significantly prolonged following application of d-TC, but were unaffected by hexamethonium, a blocker of excitatory ACh receptors in Aplysia. Recordings from excitatory interneurons showed that they received excitation followed by powerful inhibitory input upon stimulation of the siphon nerve. Application of d-TC completely blocked this rapid inhibition, thus prolonging the compound EPSPs evoked in the interneurons. These effects were obtained at a concentration of d-TC (100 microM) that almost totally blocked fast inhibitory cholinergic transmission, but was without effect on monosynaptic connections between sensory neurons and motoneurons of the reflex. Facilitation of (1) compound EPSCs in motoneurons and (2) evoked excitatory interneuronal firing was reduced in preparations already disinhibited by pretreatment with d-TC. Facilitation of sensory-motor synapses, however, was not reduced in the presence of d-TC, indicating that facilitatory interneurons are still activated under cholinergic blockade. These data show that transmission through the GSWR neuronal network is gated by a feedback

  8. Infant reflexes

    MedlinePlus

    ... neck reflex; Galant reflex; Truncal incurvation; Rooting reflex; Parachute reflex; Grasp reflex ... was stroked and begin to make sucking motions. PARACHUTE REFLEX This reflex occurs in slightly older infants ...

  9. Activity-dependent potentiation of recurrent inhibition: a mechanism for dynamic gain control in the siphon withdrawal reflex of Aplysia.

    PubMed

    Fischer, T M; Carew, T J

    1993-03-01

    The siphon withdrawal response (SWR) of Aplysia supports several forms of learning that are under both excitatory and inhibitory control. Here we examine the role of interneuronal processing on the regulation of siphon responses, with an emphasis on the role of inhibition. We focus on the recurrent circuit formed by the excitatory interneuron L29 and the inhibitory interneuron L30, and show that this circuit provides a mechanism for use-dependent regulation of excitatory input onto siphon motor neurons. We utilized a reduced preparation in which input to the SWR circuit was elicited by taps applied to the siphon; tap-evoked EPSPs were measured in LFS siphon motor neurons. We first show that L29 is an important source of excitatory input to LFS motor neurons: voltage-clamp inactivation of a single L29 (out of five) results in a significant reduction of tap-evoked EPSPs. Next, we demonstrate that direct intracellular activation of L29, surprisingly, produces transient inhibition of evoked input to motor neurons that lasts up to 40 sec. We then provide several lines of evidence that the mechanism of L29-induced inhibition is through the recruitment and potentiation of recurrent inhibition from L30: (1) L29 activation results in reduced tap-evoked responses of other (nonactivated) L29s; (2) direct activation of L30 mimics the inhibitory effects produced by L29 activation (LFS neurons receive no direct synaptic input from L30); and (3) the L30 IPSP is significantly potentiated as a result of its own activity, whether produced directly (by L30 activation) or indirectly (through L29 activation). This IPSP potentiation has the same time course as L29-induced inhibition of motor neuron responses. Thus activity-dependent potentiation of L30 transmission can inhibit motor neuron responses, in part through inactivation of the L29 interneuronal pool. Finally, we propose that L29-L30 interactions provide a mechanism for dynamic gain control in the SWR.

  10. Spinal reflexes in brain death.

    PubMed

    Beckmann, Yesim; Çiftçi, Yeliz; Incesu, Tülay Kurt; Seçil, Yaprak; Akhan, Galip

    2014-12-01

    Spontaneous and reflex movements have been described in brain death and these unusual movements might cause uncertainties in diagnosis. In this study we evaluated the presence of spinal reflexes in patients who fulfilled the criteria for brain death. Thirty-two (22 %) of 144 patients presented unexpected motor movements spontaneously or during examinations. These patients exhibited the following signs: undulating toe, increased deep tendon reflexes, plantar responses, Lazarus sign, flexion-withdrawal reflex, facial myokymia, neck-arm flexion, finger jerks and fasciculations. In comparison, there were no significant differences in age, sex, etiology of brain death and hemodynamic laboratory findings in patients with and without reflex motor movement. Spinal reflexes should be well recognized by physicians and it should be born in mind that brain death can be determined in the presence of spinal reflexes.

  11. Caring Reflexivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rallis, Sharon F.; Rossman, Gretchen B.

    2010-01-01

    This article provides a brief summary of the seven articles in this special issue through the lens of the concept of "caring reflexivity". In joining "caring" and "reflexivity", we deepen the conversation about what constitutes reflexivity, encouraging an explicit focus on the relational. Revisiting the first article, we argue that…

  12. Cutaneous activation of the inhibitory L30 interneurons provides a mechanism for regulating adaptive gain control in the siphon withdrawal reflex of Aplysia.

    PubMed

    Fischer, T M; Carew, T J

    1995-01-01

    The functional role of inhibition in the neural network underlying the siphon withdrawal response (SWR) of Aplysia was assessed by examining a recurrent circuit comprised of identified inhibitory interneurons (L30s), and excitatory interneurons (L29s). We previously showed that activity-dependent potentiation of the L30 inhibitory synapse onto L29 can regulate the net excitatory input elicited by tactile siphon stimulation onto siphon motor neurons (LFS cells) (Fischer and Carew, 1993a). To explore the functional significance of L30 potentiated inhibition, we have examined how a behaviorally relevant stimulus that activates the L30 interneurons modulates the SWR circuit. Utilizing a reduced preparation, we show that weak tactile stimulation of the tail strongly activates the L30s, and leads to significant potentiation of the L30 synapse. Next, we demonstrate that similar weak tail stimulation produces significant inhibition of siphon tap-evoked responses in both L29 interneurons and LFS motor neurons. We further show that this form of inhibition is transient, having a time course of approximately 60 sec. Finally, we directly tested the role of the L30s in mediating this form of inhibition by hyperpolarizing two (of three) L30 interneurons during tail stimulation. L30 inactivation significantly attenuated tail stimulation-induced inhibition of siphon-evoked input to both L29 interneurons and LFS motor neurons. Based on these results, we suggest that L30-potentiated inhibition may have an important adaptive role in optimizing the signal-to-noise ratio for activation of the SWR circuit by providing stabilization of SWR responsiveness under a wide range of environmental conditions.

  13. Abdominal tap

    MedlinePlus

    Peritoneal tap; Paracentesis; Ascites - abdominal tap; Cirrhosis - abdominal tap; Malignant ascites - abdominal tap ... abdominal cavity ( most often cancer of the ovaries ) Cirrhosis of the liver Damaged bowel Heart disease Infection ...

  14. Opiate withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Farrell, M

    1994-11-01

    Opiate withdrawal is one of the longest studied and most well described withdrawal syndromes. Opiate withdrawal has been described as akin to a moderate to severe flu-like illness. Opiate withdrawal is appropriately described as subjectively severe but objectively mild. This paper describes the mechanisms of opiate dependence and opiate withdrawal and reviews the available instruments for the measurement of withdrawal. The time course of assisted and unassisted withdrawal is described and the range of options for the management of assisted withdrawal are described. This review concludes that the most effective and least time- and resource-consuming approach to opiate withdrawal will substantially contribute to the overall social management of opiate dependence.

  15. Moro reflex

    MedlinePlus

    ... infants. Absence of the Moro reflex in an infant is abnormal. Absence on both sides suggests damage to the brain or spinal cord. Absence on only one side suggests either a broken shoulder bone or an injury to the group of nerves that run from ...

  16. Reflexives in Mohawk.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonvillain, Nancy

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the meanings and uses of two reflexive morphemes in the Mohawk language. Reflexive "atat" is shown to have both reflexive and reciprocal meanings. It is also realized in kinship terms and in the transitive pronominal prefix "yutat." Semi-reflexive "at" has some reflexive functions, and can mark middle voice and…

  17. [Oculorespiratory reflex].

    PubMed

    Thirion, B; Marchal, F; Pétry, L; George, J L; Crance, J P; Haberer, J P

    1990-01-01

    The lack of interest about oculorespiratory reflex (ORR) in surgery and experimental studies is obvious. However the authors insist on the importance of its clinical traduction. The purpose of this study is to determinate an experimental model with titration of stimulus (pressure or traction) and therapeutic test. Our first Results prove the clinic entity of O.R.R. In first conclusion, we can insist on the importance of ventilatory assistance during squint surgery and on the monitoring of PE CO2 and Sa O2.

  18. Wireless quantified reflex device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemoyne, Robert Charles

    The deep tendon reflex is a fundamental aspect of a neurological examination. The two major parameters of the tendon reflex are response and latency, which are presently evaluated qualitatively during a neurological examination. The reflex loop is capable of providing insight for the status and therapy response of both upper and lower motor neuron syndromes. Attempts have been made to ascertain reflex response and latency, however these systems are relatively complex, resource intensive, with issues of consistent and reliable accuracy. The solution presented is a wireless quantified reflex device using tandem three dimensional wireless accelerometers to obtain response based on acceleration waveform amplitude and latency derived from temporal acceleration waveform disparity. Three specific aims have been established for the proposed wireless quantified reflex device: 1. Demonstrate the wireless quantified reflex device is reliably capable of ascertaining quantified reflex response and latency using a quantified input. 2. Evaluate the precision of the device using an artificial reflex system. 3.Conduct a longitudinal study respective of subjects with healthy patellar tendon reflexes, using the wireless quantified reflex evaluation device to obtain quantified reflex response and latency. Aim 1 has led to the steady evolution of the wireless quantified reflex device from a singular two dimensional wireless accelerometer capable of measuring reflex response to a tandem three dimensional wireless accelerometer capable of reliably measuring reflex response and latency. The hypothesis for aim 1 is that a reflex quantification device can be established for reliably measuring reflex response and latency for the patellar tendon reflex, comprised of an integrated system of wireless three dimensional MEMS accelerometers. Aim 2 further emphasized the reliability of the wireless quantified reflex device by evaluating an artificial reflex system. The hypothesis for aim 2 is that

  19. Reflexives in Veracruz Huastec.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Constable, Peter G.

    A study examines various Huastec clause types that are reflexive in some sense, including ordinary reflexives, which involve co-reference. Two mutually exclusive morphosyntactic devices are used in Huastec: reflexive pronouns and verbal morphology. In this way, Huastec is like various European languages. Clauses involving reflexive pronouns and…

  20. Alcohol withdrawal

    MedlinePlus

    ... Seeing or feeling things that aren't there (hallucinations) Seizures Severe confusion ... alcohol withdrawal. You will be watched closely for hallucinations and other signs of delirium tremens. Treatment may ...

  1. Abdominal Bloating: Pathophysiology and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Seo, A Young; Oh, Dong Hyun

    2013-01-01

    Abdominal bloating is a very common and troublesome symptom of all ages, but it has not been fully understood to date. Bloating is usually associated with functional gastrointestinal disorders or organic diseases, but it may also appear alone. The pathophysiology of bloating remains ambiguous, although some evidences support the potential mechanisms, including gut hypersensitivity, impaired gas handling, altered gut microbiota, and abnormal abdominal-phrenic reflexes. Owing to the insufficient understanding of these mechanisms, the available therapeutic options are limited. However, medical treatment with some prokinetics, rifaximin, lubiprostone and linaclotide could be considered in the treatment of bloating. In addition, dietary intervention is important in relieving symptom in patients with bloating. PMID:24199004

  2. Nicotine Withdrawal

    PubMed Central

    McLaughlin, Ian; Dani, John A.; De Biasi, Mariella

    2015-01-01

    An aversive abstinence syndrome manifests 4–24 h following cessation of chronic use of nicotine-containing products. Symptoms peak on approximately the 3rd day and taper off over the course of the following 3–4 weeks. While the severity of withdrawal symptoms is largely determined by how nicotine is consumed, certain short nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have been shown to predispose individuals to consume larger amounts of nicotine more frequently—as well as to more severe symptoms of withdrawal when trying to quit. Additionally, rodent behavioral models and transgenic mouse models have revealed that specific nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subunits, cellular components, and neuronal circuits are critical to the expression of withdrawal symptoms. Consequently, by continuing to map neuronal circuits and nAChR subpopulations that underlie the nicotine withdrawal syndrome—and by continuing to enumerate genes that predispose carriers to nicotine addiction and exacerbated withdrawal symptoms—it will be possible to pursue personalized therapeutics that more effectively treat nicotine addiction. PMID:25638335

  3. Neural circuit of tail-elicited siphon withdrawal in Aplysia. I. Differential lateralization of sensitization and dishabituation.

    PubMed

    Bristol, Adam S; Sutton, Michael A; Carew, Thomas J

    2004-02-01

    The tail-elicited siphon withdrawal reflex (TSW) has been a useful preparation in which to study learning and memory in Aplysia. However, comparatively little is known about the neural circuitry that translates tail sensory input (via the P9 nerves to the pleural ganglion) to final reflex output by siphon motor neurons (MNs) in the abdominal ganglion. To address this question, we examined the functional architecture of the TSW circuit by selectively severing nerves of semi-intact preparations and recording either tail-evoked responses in the siphon MNs or measuring siphon withdrawal responses directly. We found that the neural circuit underlying TSW is functionally lateralized. We next tested whether the expression of learning in the TSW reflects the underlying circuit architecture and shows side-specificity. We tested behavioral and physiological correlates of three forms of learning: sensitization, habituation, and dishabituation. Consistent with the circuit architecture, we found that sensitization and habituation of TSW are expressed in a side-specific manner. Unexpectedly, we found that dishabituation was expressed bilaterally, suggesting that a modulatory pathway bridges the two (ipsilateral) input pathways of the circuit, but this path is only revealed for a specific form of learning, dishabituation. These results suggest that the effects of a descending modulatory signal are differentially "gated" during sensitization and dishabituation.

  4. Embodied Self-Reflexivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pagis, Michal

    2009-01-01

    Drawing on G. H. Mead and Merleau-Ponty, this paper aims to extend our understanding of self-reflexivity beyond the notion of a discursive, abstract, and symbolic process. It offers a framework for embodied self-reflexivity, which anchors the self in the reflexive capacity of bodily sensations. The data consist of two years of ethnographic…

  5. The menace reflex.

    PubMed

    van Ballegoij, Wouter J C; Koehler, Peter J; Meulen, Bastiaan C Ter

    2015-06-01

    The menace reflex (blink reflex to visual threat) tests visual processing at the bedside in patients who cannot participate in normal visual field testing. We reviewed a collection of recently discovered historical movies showing the experiments of the Dutch physiologist Gysbertus Rademaker (1887-1957), exploring the anatomy of this reflex by making cerebral lesions in dogs. The experiments show not only that the menace reflex is cortically mediated, but also that lesions outside the visual cortex can abolish the reflex. Therefore, although often erroneously used in this way, an absent menace does not always indicate a visual field deficit.

  6. The menace reflex.

    PubMed

    van Ballegoij, Wouter J C; Koehler, Peter J; Meulen, Bastiaan C Ter

    2015-06-01

    The menace reflex (blink reflex to visual threat) tests visual processing at the bedside in patients who cannot participate in normal visual field testing. We reviewed a collection of recently discovered historical movies showing the experiments of the Dutch physiologist Gysbertus Rademaker (1887-1957), exploring the anatomy of this reflex by making cerebral lesions in dogs. The experiments show not only that the menace reflex is cortically mediated, but also that lesions outside the visual cortex can abolish the reflex. Therefore, although often erroneously used in this way, an absent menace does not always indicate a visual field deficit. PMID:25670870

  7. Abdominal Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... can help the overall situation for the child. Teaching kids self-hypnosis [8] or guided imagery [8a] ... related topics? Functional Abdominal Pain (English, French or Spanish)—from The North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, ...

  8. Abdominal pain

    MedlinePlus

    Stomach pain; Pain - abdomen; Belly ache; Abdominal cramps; Bellyache; Stomachache ... Almost everyone has pain in the abdomen at some point. Most of the time, it is not serious. How bad your pain is ...

  9. Cardiovascular regulation by skeletal muscle reflexes in health and disease

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Megan N.; Mizuno, Masaki; Mitchell, Jere H.

    2011-01-01

    Heart rate and blood pressure are elevated at the onset and throughout the duration of dynamic or static exercise. These neurally mediated cardiovascular adjustments to physical activity are regulated, in part, by a peripheral reflex originating in contracting skeletal muscle termed the exercise pressor reflex. Mechanically sensitive and metabolically sensitive receptors activating the exercise pressor reflex are located on the unencapsulated nerve terminals of group III and group IV afferent sensory neurons, respectively. Mechanoreceptors are stimulated by the physical distortion of their receptive fields during muscle contraction and can be sensitized by the production of metabolites generated by working skeletal myocytes. The chemical by-products of muscle contraction also stimulate metaboreceptors. Once activated, group III and IV sensory impulses are transmitted to cardiovascular control centers within the brain stem where they are integrated and processed. Activation of the reflex results in an increase in efferent sympathetic nerve activity and a withdrawal of parasympathetic nerve activity. These actions result in the precise alterations in cardiovascular hemodynamics requisite to meet the metabolic demands of working skeletal muscle. Coordinated activity by this reflex is altered after the development of cardiovascular disease, generating exaggerated increases in sympathetic nerve activity, blood pressure, heart rate, and vascular resistance. The basic components and operational characteristics of the reflex, the techniques used in human and animals to study the reflex, and the emerging evidence describing the dysfunction of the reflex with the advent of cardiovascular disease are highlighted in this review. PMID:21841019

  10. Influence of delayed muscle reflexes on spinal stability: model-based predictions allow alternative interpretations of experimental data.

    PubMed

    Liebetrau, Anne; Puta, Christian; Anders, Christoph; de Lussanet, Marc H E; Wagner, Heiko

    2013-10-01

    Model-based calculations indicate that reflex delay and reflex gain are both important for spinal stability. Experimental results demonstrate that chronic low back pain is associated with delayed muscle reflex responses of trunk muscles. The aim of the present study was to analyze the influence of such time-delayed reflexes on the stability using a simple biomechanical model. Additionally, we compared the model-based predictions with experimental data from chronic low back pain patients and healthy controls using surface-electromyography. Linear stability methods were applied to the musculoskeletal model, which was extended with a time-delayed reflex model. Lateral external perturbations were simulated around equilibrium to investigate the effects of reflex delay and gain on the stability of the human lumbar spine. The model simulations predicted that increased reflex delays require a reduction of the reflex gain to avoid spinal instability. The experimental data support this dependence for the investigated abdominal muscles in chronic low back pain patients and healthy control subjects. Reflex time-delay and gain dependence showed that a delayed reflex latency could have relevant influence on spinal stability, if subjects do not adapt their reflex amplitudes. Based on the model and the experimental results, the relationship between muscle reflex response latency and the maximum of the reflex amplitude should be considered for evaluation of (patho) physiological data. We recommend that training procedures should focus on speeding up the delayed reflex response as well as on increasing the amplitude of these reflexes.

  11. Abdominal Sepsis.

    PubMed

    De Waele, Jan J

    2016-08-01

    Abdominal infections are an important challenge for the intensive care physician. In an era of increasing antimicrobial resistance, selecting the appropriate regimen is important and, with new drugs coming to the market, correct use is important more than ever before and abdominal infections are an excellent target for antimicrobial stewardship programs. Biomarkers may be helpful, but their exact role in managing abdominal infections remains incompletely understood. Source control also remains an ongoing conundrum, and evidence is increasing that its importance supersedes the impact of antibiotic therapy. New strategies such as open abdomen management may offer added benefit in severely ill patients, but more data are needed to identify its exact role. The role of fungi and the need for antifungal coverage, on the other hand, have been investigated extensively in recent years, but at this point, it remains unclear who requires empirical as well as directed therapy. PMID:27363829

  12. Abdominal thrusts

    MedlinePlus

    ... call 911 . If the person loses consciousness, start CPR . If you are not comfortable performing abdominal thrusts, ... American Red Cross. First Aid/CPR/AED Participant's Manual. 2nd ... Red Cross; 2014. Berg RA, Hemphill R, Abella BS, et al. Part 5: ...

  13. What is a reflex?

    PubMed Central

    Truog, Robert D.

    2015-01-01

    Uncertainty in diagnosing disorders of consciousness, and specifically in determining whether consciousness has been lost or retained, poses challenging scientific and ethical questions. Recent neuroimaging-based tests for consciousness have cast doubt on the reliability of behavioral criteria in assessing states of consciousness and generate new questions about the assumptions used in formulating coherent diagnostic criteria. The reflex, a foundational diagnostic tool, offers unique insight into these disorders; behaviors produced by unconscious patients are thought to be purely reflexive, whereas those produced by conscious patients can be volitional. Further investigation, however, reveals that reflexes cannot be reliably distinguished from conscious behaviors on the basis of any generalizable empirical characteristics. Ambiguity between reflexive and conscious behaviors undermines the capacity of the reflex to distinguish between disorders of consciousness and has implications for how these disorders should be conceptualized in future diagnostic criteria. PMID:26085602

  14. Perspective on the human cough reflex

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    This review dissects the complex human cough reflex and suggests hypotheses about the evolutionary basis for the reflex. A mechanosensory-induced cough reflex conveys through branches of myelinated Aδ nerve fibers is not chemically reactive (i.e., capsaicin, bradykinin); possibly, its evolution is to prevent the harmful effects of aspiration of gastric or particulate contents into the lungs. This became necessary as the larynx moves closer to the opening of the esophagus as human ancestors adapt phonation over olfaction beginning less than 10 million years ago. The second type of cough reflex, a chemosensory type, is carried by unmyelinated C fibers. Supposedly, its origin dates back when prehistoric humans began living in close proximity to each other and were at risk for infectious respiratory diseases or irritant-induced lung injury. The mechanism for the latter type of cough is analogous to induced pain after tissue injury; and, it is controlled by the identical transient receptor potential vanilloid cation channel (TRPV1). The airways do not normally manifest nociceptive pain from a stimulus but the only consistent response that capsaicin and lung inflammation provoke in healthy human airways is cough. TRPA1, another excitatory ion channel, has been referred to as the "irritant receptor" and its activation also induces cough. For both types of cough, the motor responses are identical and via coordinated, precisely-timed and sequential respiratory events orchestrated by complex neuromuscular networking of the diaphragm, chest and abdominal respiratory muscles, the glottis and parts of the brain. PMID:22074326

  15. Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms: Treatments

    MedlinePlus

    ... information Membership Directory (SIR login) Interventional Radiology Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms Interventional Radiologists Treat Abdominal Aneurysms Nonsurgically Interventional radiologists ...

  16. 29 CFR 4219.11 - Withdrawal liability upon mass withdrawal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Withdrawal liability upon mass withdrawal. 4219.11 Section... Redetermination of Withdrawal Liability Upon Mass Withdrawal § 4219.11 Withdrawal liability upon mass withdrawal. (a) Initial withdrawal liability. The plan sponsor of a multiemployer plan that experiences a...

  17. 29 CFR 4219.11 - Withdrawal liability upon mass withdrawal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Withdrawal liability upon mass withdrawal. 4219.11 Section... Redetermination of Withdrawal Liability Upon Mass Withdrawal § 4219.11 Withdrawal liability upon mass withdrawal. (a) Initial withdrawal liability. The plan sponsor of a multiemployer plan that experiences a...

  18. 29 CFR 4219.11 - Withdrawal liability upon mass withdrawal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Withdrawal liability upon mass withdrawal. 4219.11 Section... Redetermination of Withdrawal Liability Upon Mass Withdrawal § 4219.11 Withdrawal liability upon mass withdrawal. (a) Initial withdrawal liability. The plan sponsor of a multiemployer plan that experiences a...

  19. On Reflexive Data Models

    SciTech Connect

    Petrov, S.

    2000-08-20

    An information system is reflexive if it stores a description of its current structure in the body of stored information and is acting on the base of this information. A data model is reflexive, if its language is meta-closed and can be used to build such a system. The need for reflexive data models in new areas of information technology applications is argued. An attempt to express basic notions related to information systems is made in the case when the system supports and uses meta-closed representation of the data.

  20. The Grasp Reflex and Moro Reflex in Infants: Hierarchy of Primitive Reflex Responses

    PubMed Central

    Futagi, Yasuyuki; Toribe, Yasuhisa; Suzuki, Yasuhiro

    2012-01-01

    The plantar grasp reflex is of great clinical significance, especially in terms of the detection of spasticity. The palmar grasp reflex also has diagnostic significance. This grasp reflex of the hands and feet is mediated by a spinal reflex mechanism, which appears to be under the regulatory control of nonprimary motor areas through the spinal interneurons. This reflex in human infants can be regarded as a rudiment of phylogenetic function. The absence of the Moro reflex during the neonatal period and early infancy is highly diagnostic, indicating a variety of compromised conditions. The center of the reflex is probably in the lower region of the pons to the medulla. The phylogenetic meaning of the reflex remains unclear. However, the hierarchical interrelation among these primitive reflexes seems to be essential for the arboreal life of monkey newborns, and the possible role of the Moro reflex in these newborns was discussed in relation to the interrelationship. PMID:22778756

  1. Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA) Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) occurs when atherosclerosis ... aortic aneurysm treated? What is an abdominal aortic aneurysm? The aorta, the largest artery in the body, ...

  2. Corneomandibular reflex: Anatomical basis

    PubMed Central

    Pistacchi, Michele; Gioulis, Manuela; Mazzon, Davide; Marsala, Sandro Zambito

    2015-01-01

    Corneomandibular reflex is a pathological phenomenon evident in cases of severe brainstem damage. It is considered to be a pathological exteroceptive reflex, associated with precentro bulbar tract lesions. The sign is useful in distinguishing central neurological injuries to metabolic disorders in acutely comatose patients, localizing lesions to the upper brainstem area, determining the depth of coma and its evolution, providing evidence of uncal or transtentorial herniation in acute cerebral hemisphere lesions, and it is a marker of supraspinal level impairment in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and multiple sclerosis. This sign was evident in a patient with severe brain damage. We discuss the literature findings and its relevance in prognosis establishment. PMID:26752910

  3. Experimenting With Baroreceptor Reflexes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckberg, Dwain L.; Goble, Ross L.

    1988-01-01

    Carotid arteries stimulated by pressure or suction on neck. Baro-Cuff is silicone-rubber chamber that fits on front of subject's neck. Electronic system, stepping motor, bellows, and umbilical tube furnish controlled pressure to chamber. Pressure sensor provides feedback to microprocessor in electronic system. Developed to study blood-pressure-reflex responses of astronauts in outer space. Useful for terrestrial studies of patients with congestive heart failure, chronic diabetes mellitus, and other conditions in which blood-pressure-reflex controls behave abnormally.

  4. Reflex control of immunity

    PubMed Central

    Tracey, Kevin J.

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation can cause damage and even death. What controls this primitive and potentially lethal innate immune response to injury and infection? Molecular and neurophysiological studies during the past decade have revealed a pivotal answer: immunity is coordinated by neural circuits that operate reflexively The afferent arc of the reflex consists of nerves that sense injury and infection. This activates efferent neural circuits, including the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway that modulate immune responses and the progression of inflammatory diseases. It might be possible to develop therapeutics that target neural networks for the treatment of inflammatory disorders. PMID:19461672

  5. Comparison of operant escape and reflex tests of nociceptive sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Vierck, Charles J; Yezierski, Robert P

    2015-04-01

    Testing of reflexes such as flexion/withdrawal or licking/guarding is well established as the standard for evaluating nociceptive sensitivity and its modulation in preclinical investigations of laboratory animals. Concerns about this approach have been dismissed for practical reasons - reflex testing requires no training of the animals; it is simple to instrument; and responses are characterized by observers as latencies or thresholds for evocation. In order to evaluate this method, the present review summarizes a series of experiments in which reflex and operant escape responding are compared in normal animals and following surgical models of neuropathic pain or pharmacological intervention for pain. Particular attention is paid to relationships between reflex and escape responding and information on the pain sensitivity of normal human subjects or patients with pain. Numerous disparities between results for reflex and operant escape measures are described, but the results of operant testing are consistent with evidence from humans. Objective reasons are given for experimenters to choose between these and other methods of evaluating the nociceptive sensitivity of laboratory animals.

  6. Reflexivity in Pigeons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweeney, Mary M.; Urcuioli, Peter J.

    2010-01-01

    A recent theory of pigeons' equivalence-class formation (Urcuioli, 2008) predicts that reflexivity, an untrained ability to match a stimulus to itself, should be observed after training on two "mirror-image" symbolic successive matching tasks plus identity successive matching using some of the symbolic matching stimuli. One group of pigeons was…

  7. Primitive reflexes in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Vreeling, F W; Verhey, F R; Houx, P J; Jolles, J

    1993-01-01

    A standardised protocol for the examination of 15 primitive reflexes in which the amplitude and the persistence were scored separately, was applied to 25 patients with Parkinson's disease and an equal number of healthy matched control subjects. Most reflexes were found considerably more often in the patients than in the control subjects, especially the snout, the glabellar tap, and its variant, the nasopalpebral reflex. Only the mouth open finger spread reflex was present more often in the control subjects. For all reflexes except this last, the scores for amplitude and persistence of the reflexes for the control group never exceeded the scores for the patient group. Reflexes persisted more often in the patients than in the control subjects. Parkinsonism alone can explain a large number of primitive reflexes, irrespective of the severity or duration of the disease. In contrast, the number of reflexes was related more closely to cognitive scales. It is concluded that such reflexes may be helpful in diagnosing Parkinson's disease. In addition, a standardised protocol for eliciting and scoring is essential for the study of these reflexes in parkinsonism and other neuropsychiatric conditions. PMID:8270937

  8. Neonatal opioid withdrawal syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sutter, Mary Beth; Leeman, Lawrence; Hsi, Andrew

    2014-06-01

    Neonatal opioid withdrawal syndrome is common due to the current opioid addiction epidemic. Infants born to women covertly abusing prescription opioids may not be identified as at risk until withdrawal signs present. Buprenorphine is a newer treatment for maternal opioid addiction and appears to result in a milder withdrawal syndrome than methadone. Initial treatment is with nonpharmacological measures including decreasing stimuli, however pharmacological treatment is commonly required. Opioid monotherapy is preferred, with phenobarbital or clonidine uncommonly needed as adjunctive therapy. Rooming-in and breastfeeding may decease the severity of withdrawal. Limited evidence is available regarding long-term effects of perinatal opioid exposure.

  9. Reflexivity in pigeons.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, Mary M; Urcuioli, Peter J

    2010-11-01

    A recent theory of pigeons' equivalence-class formation (Urcuioli, 2008) predicts that reflexivity, an untrained ability to match a stimulus to itself, should be observed after training on two "mirror-image" symbolic successive matching tasks plus identity successive matching using some of the symbolic matching stimuli. One group of pigeons was trained in this fashion; a second group was trained similarly but with successive oddity (rather than identity). Subsequently, comparison-response rates on novel matching versus mismatching sequences with the remaining symbolic matching stimuli were measured on nonreinforced probe trials. Higher rates were observed on matching than on mismatching probes in the former group. The opposite effect--higher rates on mismatching than matching probes--was mostly absent in the latter group, despite being predicted by the theory. Nevertheless, the ostensible reflexivity effect observed in former group may be the first time this phenomenon has been demonstrated in any animal.

  10. Patterning of somatosympathetic reflexes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerman, I. A.; Yates, B. J.

    1999-01-01

    In a previous study, we reported that vestibular nerve stimulation in the cat elicits a specific pattern of sympathetic nerve activation, such that responses are particularly large in the renal nerve. This patterning of vestibulosympathetic reflexes was the same in anesthetized and decerebrate preparations. In the present study, we report that inputs from skin and muscle also elicit a specific patterning of sympathetic outflow, which is distinct from that produced by vestibular stimulation. Renal, superior mesenteric, and lumbar colonic nerves respond most strongly to forelimb and hindlimb nerve stimulation (approximately 60% of maximal nerve activation), whereas external carotid and hypogastric nerves were least sensitive to these inputs (approximately 20% of maximal nerve activation). In contrast to vestibulosympathetic reflexes, the expression of responses to skin and muscle afferent activation differs in decerebrate and anesthetized animals. In baroreceptor-intact animals, somatosympathetic responses were strongly attenuated (to <20% of control in every nerve) by increasing blood pressure levels to >150 mmHg. These findings demonstrate that different types of somatic inputs elicit specific patterns of sympathetic nerve activation, presumably generated through distinct neural circuits.

  11. Teaching Reflexivity in Qualitative Interviewing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsiung, Ping-Chun

    2008-01-01

    Reflexivity has gained paramount status in qualitative inquiry. It is central to debates on subjectivity, objectivity, and, ultimately, the scientific foundation of social science knowledge and research. Although much work on doing reflexivity by researchers and practitioners has been published, scholars have only recently begun to explore how one…

  12. Reflexive Planning for Later Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denton, Margaret A.; Kemp, Candace L.; French, Susan; Gafni, Amiram; Joshi, Anju; Rosenthal, Carolyn J.; Davies, Sharon

    2004-01-01

    Informed by Giddens' (1991) concept of "reflexive life" planning and the notion of later life as a time of increasing social and financial risk, this research explores the idea of "reflexive planning for later life". We utilize a conceptual model that incorporates three types of planning for later life: public protection, self-insurance, and…

  13. Reflex myoclonus in olivopontocerebellar atrophy.

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, M E; Artieda, J; Zubieta, J L; Obeso, J A

    1994-01-01

    The presence of reflex myoclonus in response to touching and pin-pricking the wrist or stretching the fingers and to photic stimulation was assessed in 24 patients with a presumed diagnosis of olivopontocerebellar atrophy (OPCA) and in 30 age matched control subjects. Reflex myoclonus to soma-esthetic stimulation was found in 23 patients and in none of the controls. Photic myoclonus was present in 12 patients and in none of the controls. Electrophysiological study of the reflex myoclonus showed enhanced (> 10 microV) somatosensory evoked potentials and an associated reflex electromyographic discharge (C-wave) in 15 patients. These findings indicate that reflex myoclonus is common in OPCA and probably of cortical origin. Images PMID:8158179

  14. [Reflex seizures, cinema and television].

    PubMed

    Olivares-Romero, Jesús

    2015-12-16

    In movies and television series are few references to seizures or reflex epilepsy even though in real life are an important subgroup of total epileptic syndromes. It has performed a search on the topic, identified 25 films in which they appear reflex seizures. Most seizures observed are tonic-clonic and visual stimuli are the most numerous, corresponding all with flashing lights. The emotions are the main stimuli in higher level processes. In most cases it is not possible to know if a character suffers a reflex epilepsy or suffer reflex seizures in the context of another epileptic syndrome. The main conclusion is that, in the movies, the reflex seizures are merely a visual reinforcing and anecdotal element without significant influence on the plot. PMID:26662874

  15. Acoustic reflex and general anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Farkas, Z

    1983-01-01

    Infant and small children are not always able to cooperate in impedance measurements. For this reason it was decided, -in special cases, -to perform acoustic reflex examination under general anaesthesia. The first report on stapedius reflex and general anaesthesia was published by Mink et al. in 1981. Under the effect of Tiobutabarbital, Propanidid and Diazepam there is no reflex response. Acoustic reflex can be elicited with Ketamin-hydrochlorid and Alphaxalone-alphadolone acetate narcosis. The reflex threshold remains unchanged and the amplitude of muscle contraction is somewhat increased. The method was used: 1. to assess the type and degree of hearing loss in children with cleft palate and/or lip prior to surgery. 2. to exclude neuromuscular disorders with indication of pharyngoplasties. 3. to quantify hearing level in children--mostly multiply handicapped--with retarded speech development. The results of Behavioral Observation and Impedance Audiometry are discussed and evaluated.

  16. [Reflex seizures, cinema and television].

    PubMed

    Olivares-Romero, Jesús

    2015-12-16

    In movies and television series are few references to seizures or reflex epilepsy even though in real life are an important subgroup of total epileptic syndromes. It has performed a search on the topic, identified 25 films in which they appear reflex seizures. Most seizures observed are tonic-clonic and visual stimuli are the most numerous, corresponding all with flashing lights. The emotions are the main stimuli in higher level processes. In most cases it is not possible to know if a character suffers a reflex epilepsy or suffer reflex seizures in the context of another epileptic syndrome. The main conclusion is that, in the movies, the reflex seizures are merely a visual reinforcing and anecdotal element without significant influence on the plot.

  17. Abdominal cerebrospinal fluid pseudocysts.

    PubMed

    Erşahin, Y; Mutluer, S; Tekeli, G

    1996-12-01

    Abdominal cerebrospinal fluid pseudocyst in an infrequent complication of ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunts. We reviewed ten patients with abdominal pseudocyst. There were five girls and five boys, aged between 4 months and 14 years. The number of shunt procedures prior to the presentation varied between one and five. Only one patient had had a previous shunt infection. No patients had undergone prior abdominal surgery other than VP shunting. The time from the last shunting procedure to the development of abdominal pseudocyst ranged from 3 weeks to 5 years. Presenting symptoms and signs were mainly related to abdominal complaints in all patients. Three patients also had signs of shunt malfunction. The diagnosis was made by ultrasound in all patients. Shunt infection was determined in six patients. Repositioning if the peritoneal catheter seemed to have a higher rate of recurrence. The diagnosis of abdominal pseudocyst should be considered in VP-shunted patients presenting with abdominal complaints.

  18. Abdominal Circulatory Interactions.

    PubMed

    Dagar, Gaurav; Taneja, Amit; Nanchal, Rahul S

    2016-04-01

    The abdominal compartment is separated from the thoracic compartment by the diaphragm. Under normal circumstances, a large portion of the venous return crosses the splanchnic and nonsplanchnic abdominal regions before entering the thorax and the right side of the heart. Mechanical ventilation may affect abdominal venous return independent of its interactions at the thoracic level. Changes in pressure in the intra-abdominal compartment may have important implications for organ function within the thorax, particularly if there is a sustained rise in intra-abdominal pressure. It is important to understand the consequences of abdominal pressure changes on respiratory and circulatory physiology. This article elucidates important abdominal-respiratory-circulatory interactions and their clinical effects. PMID:27016167

  19. Withdrawing Nutrition, Hydration

    Cancer.gov

    Module eleven of the EPEC-O Self-Study Original Version discusses the general aspects of withholding or withdrawing of life-sustaining therapies, and presents a specific application to artificial nutrition and hydration.

  20. [Reflexes, instincts, emotions and passions].

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Alberto Portera

    2008-01-01

    In animals of the same species, the reflexes, having evolved similarly, in a few milliseconds, automatically activate the corresponding reflex arch and without the intervention of the animal generate the adequate response: medullary, mesencephalic or trans-hemispheric. These neurophysiological functions have allowed the animals to be free from predators and increasy their longevity and, as a consequence, the appearance of numerous species during millions of years. A further step in the reflexes evolution, the instincts emerged and their activity, a result of neuro-hormonal functions, stimulates the male's sexual appetite when the females are receptive for their copulation and fecundation. PMID:18924359

  1. The vestibulosympathetic reflex in humans: neural interactions between cardiovascular reflexes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Chester A.; Monahan, Kevin D.

    2002-01-01

    1. Over the past 5 years, there has been emerging evidence that the vestibular system regulates sympathetic nerve activity in humans. We have studied this issue in humans by using head-down rotation (HDR) in the prone position. 2. These studies have clearly demonstrated increases in muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) and calf vascular resistance during HDR. These responses are mediated by engagement of the otolith organs and not the semicircular canals. 3. However, differential activation of sympathetic nerve activity has been observed during HDR. Unlike MSNA, skin sympathetic nerve activity does not increase with HDR. 4. Examination of the vestibulosympathetic reflex with other cardiovascular reflexes (i.e. barorereflexes and skeletal muscle reflexes) has shown an additive interaction for MSNA. 5. The additive interaction between the baroreflexes and vestibulosympathetic reflex suggests that the vestibular system may assist in defending against orthostatic challenges in humans by elevating MSNA beyond that of the baroreflexes. 6. In addition, the further increase in MSNA via otolith stimulation during isometric handgrip, when arterial pressure is elevated markedly, indicates that the vestibulosympathetic reflex is a powerful activator of MSNA and may contribute to blood pressure and flow regulation during dynamic exercise. 7. Future studies will help evaluate the importance of the vestibulosympathetic reflex in clinical conditions associated with orthostatic hypotension.

  2. Effects of age, but not sex, on elevated startle during withdrawal from acute morphine in adolescent and adult rats.

    PubMed

    Radke, Anna K; Gewirtz, Jonathan C; Carroll, Marilyn E

    2015-08-01

    Investigations into animal models of drug withdrawal have largely found that emotional signs of withdrawal (e.g. anxiety, anhedonia, and aversion) in adolescents are experienced earlier and less severely than in their adult counterparts. The majority of these reports have examined withdrawal from ethanol or nicotine. To expand our knowledge about the emotional withdrawal state in adolescent rats, we used potentiation of the acoustic startle reflex after an acute dose of morphine (10 mg/kg, subcutaneously) as a measure of opiate withdrawal. Startle was measured at four time points after morphine injection (2, 3, 4, and 5 h) in 28-day-old and 90-day-old male and female rats. The results of this experiment revealed that peak potentiation of the startle reflex occurred at 3 h in the adolescent rats and at 5 h in the adult rats, and that the magnitude of withdrawal was larger in the adults. No sex differences were observed. Overall, these results affirm that, similar to withdrawal from ethanol and nicotine, opiate withdrawal signs are less severe in adolescent than in adult rats.

  3. Effects of age, but not sex, on elevated startle during withdrawal from acute morphine in adolescent and adult rats

    PubMed Central

    Radke, Anna K.; Gewirtz, Jonathan C.; Carroll, Marilyn E.

    2015-01-01

    Investigations into animal models of drug withdrawal have largely found that emotional signs of withdrawal (e.g., anxiety, anhedonia, and aversion) in adolescents are experienced earlier and less severely than in their adult counterparts. The majority of these reports have examined withdrawal from ethanol or nicotine. In order to expand our knowledge about the emotional withdrawal state in adolescent rats, we used potentiation of the acoustic startle reflex after an acute dose of morphine (10 mg/kg, s.c.) as a measure of opioid withdrawal. Startle was measured at four time points after morphine injection (2, 3, 4, and 5 h) in 28 and 90 day old male and female rats. The results of this experiment revealed that peak potentiation of the startle reflex occurred at 3 h in the adolescent rats and at 5 h in the adult rats, and that the magnitude of withdrawal was larger in the adults. No sex differences were observed. Overall, these results affirm that, similar to withdrawal from ethanol and nicotine, opiate withdrawal signs are less severe in adolescent than in adult rats. PMID:26154436

  4. Vestibulo-spinal reflex mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reschke, M. F.

    1981-01-01

    The specific objectives of experiments designed to investigate postural reflex behavior during sustained weightlessness are discussed. The first is to investigate, during prolonged weightlessness with Hoffmann response (H-reflex) measurement procedures, vestibulo-spinal reflexes associated with vestibular (otolith) responses evoked during an applied linear acceleration. This objective includes not only an evaluation of otolith-induced changes in a major postural muscle but also an investigation with this technique of the adaptive process of the vestibular system and spinal reflex mechanisms to this unique environment. The second objective is to relate space motion sickness to the results of this investigation. Finally, a return to the vestibulo-spinal and postural reflexes to normal values following the flight will be examined. The flight experiment involves activation of nerve tissue (tibial N) with electrical shock and the recording of resulting muscle activity (soleus) with surface electrodes. Soleus/spinal H-reflex testing procedures will be used in conjuction with linear acceleration through the subject's X-axis.

  5. Hyperphagia in neonates withdrawing from methadone

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, A.; Kastner, B.; Taeusch, H

    1999-01-01

    AIMS—To examine whether hyperphagia is a clinically significant problem in infants born to women receiving methadone maintenance.
METHODS—The volume of feeds, changes in infant body weight, as well as occurrence of adverse clinical effects in infants withdrawing from methadone were studied during the first month of life. A retrospective chart review was conducted for all infants at San Francisco General between 1992 and 1995, born to women receiving methadone maintenance during their pregnancy. Forty four infants were identified and the data obtained from hospital medical records. The daily oral intake of these infants was recorded during the first month of life. The incidence of hyperphagia (oral intake> 190 cc/kg/day) was measured. Associations between infant oral intake and maternal methadone dose were studied using correlation analysis as well as Anova for repeated measures. Adverse clinical symptoms were also recorded. A subset of premature infants was studied separately.
RESULTS—The incidence of hyperphagia was 26% by day 8 and 56% by day 16 of life in the infants. Hyperphagia was not associated with maternal methadone dose or with infant withdrawal scores. Infants who were hyperphagic lost significantly more weight during the first week of life than those who were not. Despite significantly greater intake, the hyperphagic infants did not gain weight more rapidly during the first month of life compared with those infants with lower oral intake. Infants who were hyperphagic (maximum intake of 290 cc/kg/day) did not experience increased vomiting, aspiration, diarrhoea, or abdominal distention.
CONCLUSIONS—Hyperphagia is commonly found in infants withdrawing from methadone and can be persistent in a significant number. Hyperphagia was not associated with either increased neonatal weight gain or with adverse gastrointestinal consequences. Hyperphagia may occur in infants withdrawing from methadone who have high metabolic demands due to clinical

  6. Inpatient alcohol withdrawal syndrome.

    PubMed

    Monte-Secades, R; Rabuñal-Rey, R; Guerrero-Sande, H

    2015-03-01

    A 55-year-old man was admitted for a femur fracture; an alcohol fetor was noted on admission. The following day, the patient began to experience tremors and nervousness. Intravenous haloperidol was administered. Shortly afterwards, the patient experienced two generalized seizures and then began to experience delirium and uncontrollable agitation. The patient was diagnosed with alcohol withdrawal syndrome; high doses of intravenous midazolam were prescribed and infused. A few hours later, the patient presented signs of respiratory depression, requiring a transfer to the intensive care unit. After a review of the medical history, it was determined that the patient had been admitted on 3 previous occasions due to alcohol withdrawal and had progressed to delirium tremens after experiencing seizures. Can the risk of alcohol withdrawal syndrome and the need for prophylactic treatment be assessed on admission? Were appropriate monitoring and treatment measures employed? Would it have been possible to change his outcome? PMID:25559647

  7. Abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Keisler, Brian; Carter, Chuck

    2015-04-15

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm refers to abdominal aortic dilation of 3.0 cm or greater. The main risk factors are age older than 65 years, male sex, and smoking history. Other risk factors include a family history of abdominal aortic aneurysm, coronary artery disease, hypertension, peripheral artery disease, and previous myocardial infarction. Diagnosis may be made by physical examination, an incidental finding on imaging, or ultrasonography. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force released updated recommendations for abdominal aortic aneurysm screening in 2014. Men 65 to 75 years of age with a history of smoking should undergo one-time screening with ultrasonography based on evidence that screening will improve abdominal aortic aneurysm-related mortality in this population. Men in this age group without a history of smoking may benefit if they have other risk factors (e.g., family history of abdominal aortic aneurysm, other vascular aneurysms, coronary artery disease). There is inconclusive evidence to recommend screening for abdominal aortic aneurysm in women 65 to 75 years of age with a smoking history. Women without a smoking history should not undergo screening because the harms likely outweigh the benefits. Persons who have a stable abdominal aortic aneurysm should undergo regular surveillance or operative intervention depending on aneurysm size. Surgical intervention by open or endovascular repair is the primary option and is typically reserved for aneurysms 5.5 cm in diameter or greater. There are limited options for medical treatment beyond risk factor modification. Ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm is a medical emergency presenting with hypotension, shooting abdominal or back pain, and a pulsatile abdominal mass. It is associated with high prehospitalization mortality. Emergent surgical intervention is indicated for a rupture but has a high operative mortality rate. PMID:25884861

  8. [Abdominal compartment syndrome].

    PubMed

    Pottecher, T; Segura, P; Launoy, A

    2001-04-01

    French physicians dealing with abdominal emergencies are not very familiar with the abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS). Increased abdominal pressure has deleterious consequences on local (intestine, liver, kidney) circulation, leading to death in the absence of correct treatment. Abdominal trauma and ruptured aortic aneurism are the main causes of ACS. Clinical presentation may be misleading: respiratory failure, oliguria or circulatory symptoms are often predominant. Abdominal palpation is inefficient for evaluating intra-abdominal pressure (IAP); only measurement of cystic pressure allows precise evaluation of IAP. Abdominal decompression is the treatment of choice. It must be performed as soon as IAP exceeds 25 mmHg. The procedure may be risky with a high incidence of severe complications when ischaemic territories are reperfused. Recent data underline the importance of compensation of hypovolemia before decompression. Abdominal closure may necessitate various techniques (aponevrotomy, Bogota bags, etc.). At any rate, IAP must remain low at the end of the procedure. In case of suspicion of ACS, early measurement of IAP is mandatory. If pressure is over 25 mmHg, a decompressive procedure must be initiated. PMID:11340703

  9. [Semeiotics of abdominal tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Guseĭnov, G K; Ramazanova, A M; Guseĭnov, A G

    1984-01-01

    Examination of 119 patients with abdominal tuberculosis permitted the description of the characteristic semiotics of the illness. Today the patients with abdominal tuberculosis are mainly women of child-bearing age with a long-term tuberculosis catamnesis and intoxication, with a history of tuberculosis of different sites, those suffering from tuberculosis or its sequels at present (64%), those with pains (94%), discomfort or swelling of the abdomen (79%), malfunction of the gastrointestinal tract (65%), weight loss (86%), malnutrition (72%), anemia (63%), not infrequently with inflammatory induration (43%) or ascites in the abdominal cavity (39%). In addition to this characteristic semiotics, the patients with abdominal tuberculosis may demonstrate the most different and unexpected symptoms up to acute abdomen (23%). To make differential diagnosis of abdominal tuberculosis, one has often to resort to diagnostic laparotomy, laparoscopy, Koch's test and to trial therapy.

  10. [Ambulatory alcohol withdrawal].

    PubMed

    Grehl, Oliver

    2014-10-01

    Alcohol addiction is a common problem in daily life as well as in medicine. Apart from inpatient therapy programs, ambulatory withdrawal is a relatively new option, which may be done safely, efficient and cost-effective close to the domicile an without stigmatisation of the patient.

  11. Student Withdrawal Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayward, Craig

    This document addresses the problem of students withdrawing from courses before completion and in the process attempts to devise ways that Mendocino College can aid students complete their courses. The report uses findings from two research reports. The first report was completed at the Florida Community College (FCC), which discovered that 75% of…

  12. Hypertension after clonidine withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Husserl, F E; deCarvalho, J G; Batson, H M; Frohlich, E D

    1978-05-01

    Rebound hypertension occurred in two patients upon clonidine withdrawal. Treatment of the hypertensive crisis consists of both alpha- and beta-adrenergic receptor blockade, reserpine, or the reintroduction of clonidine. With effective control of pressure during the crisis, long-term antihypertensive therapy must be resumed.

  13. Cyproheptadine for pediatric intrathecal baclofen withdrawal: a case report.

    PubMed

    Saveika, Joseph A; Shelton, Jean E

    2007-12-01

    Intrathecal baclofen withdrawal syndrome is a known complication of intrathecal baclofen pumps. Its origin is postulated as an independent form of a serotonergic syndrome occurring from loss of gamma-aminobutyric acid B receptor-mediated inhibition of serotonin. Prodromal symptoms include pruritus, a return of deep tendon reflexes, and increased spastic hypertonia. Previous reports have documented use of cyproheptadine in treatment of this syndrome in adults with positive results. We present the case of a 14-yr-old child with cerebral palsy who developed pruritus and worsening spastic hypertonia 18 mos after pump implantation. She had been previously treated with 520 microg/day of intrathecal baclofen. Progression of her symptoms was successfully arrested by the administration of both oral and intrathecal baclofen and 6 mg of oral cyproheptadine every 6 hrs for 1 day. We postulate that cyproheptadine should be considered a valuable adjuvant therapy for treatment of suspected intrathecal baclofen withdrawal syndrome.

  14. A new objective method for acquisition and quantification of reflex receptive fields.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Michael Brun; Manresa, José Biurrun; Andersen, Ole Kæseler

    2015-03-01

    The nociceptive withdrawal reflex (NWR) is a polysynaptic spinal reflex correlated with pain perception. Assessment of this objective physiological measure constitutes the core of existing methods for quantification of reflex receptive fields (RRFs), which however still suffer from a certain degree of subjective involvement. This article proposes a strictly objective methodology for RRF quantification based on automated identification of NWR thresholds (NWR-Ts). Nociceptive withdrawal reflex thresholds were determined for 10 individual stimulation sites using an interleaved up-down staircase method. Reflexes were detected from electromyography by evaluation of interval peak z scores and application of conduction velocity analysis. Reflex receptive field areas were quantified from interpolated mappings of NWR-Ts and compared with existing RRF quantifications. A total of 3 repeated measures were performed in 2 different sessions to evaluate the test-retest reliability of the various quantifications, using coefficients of repeatability (CRs) and hypothetical sample sizes. The novel quantifications based on identification of NWR-Ts showed a similar level of reliability within and between sessions, whereas existing quantifications all demonstrated worse between-session than within-session reliability. The NWR-T-based quantifications required a smaller sample size than any of the existing RRF measures to detect a clinically relevant effect in a crossover study design involving more than 1 session. Of all measures, quantification from mapping of inversed NWR-Ts demonstrated superior reliability both within (CR, 0.25) and between sessions (CR, 0.28). The study presents a more reliable and robust quantification of the RRF to be used as biomarker of pain hypersensitivity in clinical and experimental research.

  15. [Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Ziaja, K; Sedlak, L; Urbanek, T; Kostyra, J; Ludyga, T

    2000-01-01

    The reported incidence of inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm (IAAA) is from 2% to 14% of patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm and the etiology of this disease is still discussed--according to the literature several pathogenic theories have been proposed. From 1992 to 1997 32 patients with IAAA were operated on. The patients were mostly symptomatic--abdominal pain was present in 68.75% cases, back pain in 31.25%, fever in 12.5% and weight loss in 6.25% of the operated patients. In all the patients ultrasound examination was performed, in 4 patients CT and in 3 cases urography. All the patients were operated on and characteristic signs of inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm like: thickened aortic wall, perianeurysmal infiltration or retroperitoneal fibrosis with involvement of retroperitoneal structures were found. In all cases surgery was performed using transperitoneal approach; in three cases intraoperatively contiguous abdominal organs were injured, which was connected with their involvement into periaortic inflammation. In 4 cases clamping of the aorta was done at the level of the diaphragmatic hiatus. 3 patients (9.37%) died (one patient with ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm). Authors present diagnostic procedures and the differences in the surgical tactic, emphasizing the necessity of the surgical therapy in patients with inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm.

  16. Spanish Reflexives: A Critique of Pedagogical Descriptions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lozano, Anthony G.

    1997-01-01

    Discusses pedagogical descriptions in high school textbooks covering Spanish reflexive verb constructions. Points out that these textbooks rarely contain the full reflexive construction displayed with all the grammatical persons and complete English glosses. (17 references) (Author/CK)

  17. Graphic Sequences of Spanish Nominals and Reflexives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lozano, Anthony G.

    1993-01-01

    The use of graphics for clarifying paradigmatic and syntagmatic relationships of nominals is described. This approach improves student understanding of reflexive, pseudo-reflexive, and nonreflexive sequences. (Contains seven references.) (Author/LB)

  18. Abdominal ultrasound (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Abdominal ultrasound is a scanning technique used to image the interior of the abdomen. Like the X-ray, MRI, ... it has its place as a diagnostic tool. Ultrasound scans use high frequency sound waves to produce ...

  19. [Clinical relevance of cardiopulmonary reflexes in anesthesiology].

    PubMed

    Guerri-Guttenberg, R A; Siaba-Serrate, F; Cacheiro, F J

    2013-10-01

    The baroreflex, chemoreflex, pulmonary reflexes, Bezold-Jarisch and Bainbridge reflexes and their interaction with local mechanisms, are a demonstration of the richness of cardiovascular responses that occur in human beings. As well as these, the anesthesiologist must contend with other variables that interact by attenuating or accentuating cardiopulmonary reflexes such as, anesthetic drugs, surgical manipulation, and patient positioning. In the present article we review these reflexes and their clinical relevance in anesthesiology.

  20. Social Withdrawal in Childhood

    PubMed Central

    Rubin, Kenneth H.; Coplan, Robert J.; Bowker, Julie C.

    2013-01-01

    Socially withdrawn children frequently refrain from social activities in the presence of peers. The lack of social interaction in childhood may result from a variety of causes, including social fear and anxiety or a preference for solitude. From early childhood through to adolescence, socially withdrawn children are concurrently and predictively at risk for a wide range of negative adjustment outcomes, including socio-emotional difficulties (e.g., anxiety, low self-esteem, depressive symptoms, and internalizing problems), peer difficulties (e.g., rejection, victimization, poor friendship quality), and school difficulties (e.g., poor-quality teacher-child relationships, academic difficulties, school avoidance). The goals of the current review are to (a) provide some definitional, theoretical, and methodological clarity to the complex array of terms and constructs previously employed in the study of social withdrawal; (b) examine the predictors, correlates, and consequences of child and early-adolescent social withdrawal; and (c) present a developmental framework describing pathways to and from social withdrawal in childhood. PMID:18851686

  1. Reflexive and Reciprocal Elements in Ixil.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ayres, Glenn

    1990-01-01

    Reflexives and reciprocals in Ixil, a Mayan language of Guatemala, appear to have features that distinguish them from reflexives surveyed in typological studies such as Faltz (1985) and Geniusiene (1987). Third person reflexives and reciprocals seem to have the form of a possessed noun optionally followed by a possessor NP. Moreover, reflexives…

  2. Development of learning and memory in Aplysia. I. Functional assembly of gill and siphon withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Rankin, C H; Stopfer, M; Marcus, E A; Carew, T J

    1987-01-01

    The marine mollusc Aplysia californica provides an excellent preparation with which to examine the development of the neuronal control of behavior for 2 reasons: first, adult Aplysia exhibit a variety of behaviors that are well understood in cellular terms; and second, the development of Aplysia from embryo to adult has been studied in considerable detail. Among the best understood behaviors in Aplysia are the withdrawal responses of the mantle organs (the gill, siphon, and mantle shelf), which exhibit 2 different kinds of behaviors: "spontaneous" contractions that are part of a fixed action pattern, a respiratory pumping sequence of the mantle organs, and reflex contractions in response to tactile stimuli. We have examined the development of both of these withdrawal behaviors in juvenile stages 9-12 and found that they are functionally assembled according to different ontogenetic timetables. Spontaneous contractions. As soon as the siphon and gill emerge, in stages 9 and 10, respectively, they each show a high rate of spontaneous contraction that gradually diminishes throughout subsequent stages until it reaches the low rate typical of adults (stage 13). Since the siphon emerges first, it already exhibits a significant decline in its spontaneous activity (e.g., in stage 11) when the gill's spontaneous activity is at its highest. In addition to a developmental trend in the rate of contractions, there was also a clear developmental progression in the degree of cocontraction of the siphon and gill during spontaneous contractions. In adults, the siphon and gill show a very high degree of cocontraction during spontaneous pumping. However, in juvenile animals, there was a very low degree. Thus, it appears that the siphon and gill withdrawal components of the fixed action pattern become progressively more functionally coupled during juvenile development. Reflex contractions. As soon as the siphon and gill emerge in their respective developmental stages, they exhibit a

  3. Abdominal emergencies in pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Coca Robinot, D; Liébana de Rojas, C; Aguirre Pascual, E

    2016-05-01

    Abdominal symptoms are among the most common reasons for pediatric emergency department visits, and abdominal pain is the most frequently reported symptom. Thorough history taking and physical examination can often reach the correct diagnosis. Knowing the abdominal conditions that are most common in each age group can help radiologists narrow the differential diagnosis. When imaging tests are indicated, ultrasonography is usually the first-line technique, enabling the diagnosis or adding relevant information with the well-known advantages of this technique. Nowadays, plain-film X-ray studies are reserved for cases in which perforation, bowel obstruction, or foreign body ingestion is suspected. It is also important to remember that abdominal pain can also occur secondary to basal pneumonia. CT is reserved for specific indications and in individual cases, for example, in patients with high clinical suspicion of abdominal disease and inconclusive findings at ultrasonography. We review some of the most common conditions in pediatric emergencies, the different imaging tests indicated in each case, and the imaging signs in each condition.

  4. Cocaine withdrawal in Planaria.

    PubMed

    Raffa, R B; Valdez, J M

    2001-10-26

    Cocaine-exposed planarians displayed abstinence-induced withdrawal behavior when placed into cocaine-free, but not cocaine-containing, water. The effect, manifested and quantified using a new spontaneous locomotor velocity metric, was dose-dependently related to cocaine exposure (8x10(-9) to 8x10(-5) M). Ultraviolet light (254 nm=7.83x10(-19) J), which was previously shown to interfere with drug-receptor interactions in Planaria, enhanced the abstinence-induced decreased locomotor velocity.

  5. [Abdominal actinomycosis: four cases].

    PubMed

    Ghannouchi Jaafoura, N; Kaabia, N; Khalifa, M; Ben Jazia, I; Hachfi, W; Braham, A; Letaief, A; Bahri, F

    2008-12-01

    The abdominal actinomycosis (AA) is a rare and often unrecognised suppurative chronic illness. It is caused by an anaerobic Gram positive bacteria, Actinomyces israelii. Abdominal actinomycosis is responsible for pseudotumoral syndrome often leading, to a large and mutilating surgery whereas a prolonged treatment by antibiotics would have permitted to cure the disease. The diagnosis is obtained generally from anatomopathologic exam. We report four cases of abdominal actinomycosis being revealed by a pseudotumoral syndrome. The diagnosis was only made after surgery. In spite of an active treatment by antibiotics during several months, two of our patients had a relapse of the infectious process. These four observations confirm the diagnostic and therapeutic difficulties previously reported by other authors.

  6. 29 CFR 4219.11 - Withdrawal liability upon mass withdrawal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... LIABILITY FOR MULTIEMPLOYER PLANS NOTICE, COLLECTION, AND REDETERMINATION OF WITHDRAWAL LIABILITY.... (a) Initial withdrawal liability. The plan sponsor of a multiemployer plan that experiences a mass... that has completely or partially withdrawn from the plan and for whom the liability has not...

  7. 29 CFR 4219.11 - Withdrawal liability upon mass withdrawal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... LIABILITY FOR MULTIEMPLOYER PLANS NOTICE, COLLECTION, AND REDETERMINATION OF WITHDRAWAL LIABILITY.... (a) Initial withdrawal liability. The plan sponsor of a multiemployer plan that experiences a mass... that has completely or partially withdrawn from the plan and for whom the liability has not...

  8. The Acute Abdominal Aorta.

    PubMed

    Mellnick, Vincent M; Heiken, Jay P

    2015-11-01

    Acute disorders of the abdominal aorta are potentially lethal conditions that require prompt evaluation and treatment. Computed tomography (CT) is the primary imaging method for evaluating these conditions because of its availability and speed. Volumetric CT acquisition with multiplanar reconstruction and three-dimensional analysis is now the standard technique for evaluating the aorta. MR imaging may be useful for select applications in stable patients in whom rupture has been excluded. Imaging is indispensable for diagnosis and treatment planning, because management has shifted toward endoluminal repair. Acute abdominal aortic conditions most commonly are complications of aneurysms and atherosclerosis. PMID:26526434

  9. 42 CFR 457.170 - Withdrawal process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Plans for Child Health Insurance Programs and Outreach Strategies § 457.170 Withdrawal process. (a... by providing written notice to CMS of the withdrawal. (b) Withdrawal of approved State plans. A...

  10. Confined Selective Withdrawal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evangelio, Alvaro; Campo-Cortes, Francisco; Gordillo, Jose Manuel

    2014-11-01

    It is well known that the controlled production of monodisperse simple and composite emulsions possesses uncountable applications in medicine, pharmacy, materials science and industry. Here we present both experiments and slender-body theory regarding the generation of simple emulsions using a configuration that we have called Confined Selective Withdrawal, since it is an improved configuration of the classical Selective Withdrawal. We consider two different situations, namely, the cases when the outer flow Reynolds number is high and low, respectively. Several geometrical configurations and a wide range of viscosity ratios are analyzed so that the physics behind the phenomenon can be fully understood. In addition, we present both experiments and theory regarding the generation of composite emulsions. This phenomenon is only feasible when the outer flow Reynolds number is low enough. In this case, we propose a more complex theory which requires the simultaneous resolution of two interfaces in order to predict the shape of the jet and the sizes of the drops formed. The excellent agreement between our slender-body approximation and the experimental evidence fully validates our theories.

  11. Toward reflexive climate adaptation research

    SciTech Connect

    Preston, Benjamin L.; Rickards, Lauren; Fünfgeld, Hartmut; Keenan, Rodney J.

    2015-06-22

    Climate adaptation research is expanding very quickly within an increasingly reflexive society where the relationship between academia and other social institutions is in a state of flux. Tensions exist between the two dominant research orientations of research about and research for adaptation. In particular, the research community is challenged to develop processes for successfully executing transdisciplinary research for adaptation when academic institutions and researchers are largely structured around traditional, disciplinary expertise and funding models. One tool for helping to manage this tension is a third, more reflexive, orientation toward adaptation research that is emerging in the literature. Finally, this new ‘research on adaptation research’ promises to help enhance understanding of the research enterprise itself and how it can become more adaptive.

  12. Toward reflexive climate adaptation research

    DOE PAGES

    Preston, Benjamin L.; Rickards, Lauren; Fünfgeld, Hartmut; Keenan, Rodney J.

    2015-06-22

    Climate adaptation research is expanding very quickly within an increasingly reflexive society where the relationship between academia and other social institutions is in a state of flux. Tensions exist between the two dominant research orientations of research about and research for adaptation. In particular, the research community is challenged to develop processes for successfully executing transdisciplinary research for adaptation when academic institutions and researchers are largely structured around traditional, disciplinary expertise and funding models. One tool for helping to manage this tension is a third, more reflexive, orientation toward adaptation research that is emerging in the literature. Finally, this newmore » ‘research on adaptation research’ promises to help enhance understanding of the research enterprise itself and how it can become more adaptive.« less

  13. Vestibular reflexes of otolith origin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Victor J.

    1988-01-01

    The vestibular system and its role in the maintenance of posture and in motion sickness is investigated using cats as experimental subjects. The assumption is that better understanding of the physiology of vestibular pathways is not only of intrinsic value, but will help to explain and eventually alleviate the disturbances caused by vestibular malfunction, or by exposure to an unusual environment such as space. The first project deals with the influence on the spinal cord of stimulation of the vestibular labyrinth, particularly the otoliths. A second was concerned with the properties and neural basis of the tonic neck reflex. These two projects are related, because vestibulospinal and tonic neck reflexes interact in the maintenance of normal posture. The third project began with an interest in mechanisms of motion sickness, and eventually shifted to a study of central control of respiratory muscles involved in vomiting.

  14. Human stretch reflex pathways reexamined

    PubMed Central

    Yavuz, Ş. Utku; Mrachacz-Kersting, Natalie; Sebik, Oğuz; Berna Ünver, M.; Farina, Dario

    2013-01-01

    Reflex responses of tibialis anterior motor units to stretch stimuli were investigated in human subjects. Three types of stretch stimuli were applied (tap-like, ramp-and-hold, and half-sine stretch). Stimulus-induced responses in single motor units were analyzed using the classical technique, which involved building average surface electromyogram (SEMG) and peristimulus time histograms (PSTH) from the discharge times of motor units and peristimulus frequencygrams (PSF) from the instantaneous discharge rates of single motor units. With the use of SEMG and PSTH, the tap-like stretch stimulus induced five separate reflex responses, on average. With the same single motor unit data, the PSF technique indicated that the tap stimulus induced only three reflex responses. Similar to the finding using the tap-like stretch stimuli, ramp-and-hold stimuli induced several peaks and troughs in the SEMG and PSTH. The PSF analyses displayed genuine increases in discharge rates underlying the peaks but not underlying the troughs. Half-sine stretch stimuli induced a long-lasting excitation followed by a long-lasting silent period in SEMG and PSTH. The increase in the discharge rate, however, lasted for the entire duration of the stimulus and continued during the silent period. The results are discussed in the light of the fact that the discharge rate of a motoneuron has a strong positive linear association with the effective synaptic current it receives and hence represents changes in the membrane potential more directly and accurately than the other indirect measures. This study suggests that the neuronal pathway of the human stretch reflex does not include inhibitory pathways. PMID:24225537

  15. Abdominal pain of spinal origin. Value of intercostal block.

    PubMed

    Ashby, E C

    1977-05-01

    A prospective study was made of 73 patients presenting in one year with abdominal pain provisionally diagnosed as of spinal origin. The criteria for audit of diagnosis and treatment are defined. The diagnosis was confirmed in 53 patients, 49 of whom had been treated with a lignocaine intercostal block in the relevant segment. Thirty-three of these (67.3%) had both complete and prolonged relief. It is suggested that the block causes interruption of a vicious circle of pain and muscle spasm in a 'spinal reflex pain syndrome'. PMID:860866

  16. Cuesta College Student Withdrawal Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagen, Peter F.; Cartnal, Ryan

    The spring 1999 student withdrawal survey was made available for approximately two weeks before the final withdrawal deadline to all students who formally dropped a class through the admissions office at either the North County or San Luis Obsipo campus of Cuesta College in California. A total of 438 useable surveys were collected. The identical…

  17. Screening for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    Understanding Task Force Recommendations Screening for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (Task Force) ... final recommendation statement on Screening for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm. This final recommendation statement applies to adults ages ...

  18. Abdominal Pain, Long-Term

    MedlinePlus

    MENU Return to Web version Abdominal Pain, Long-term See complete list of charts. Ongoing or recurrent abdominal pain, also called chronic pain, may be difficult to diagnose, causing frustration for ...

  19. [Reflexivity: a critical issue in qualitative research].

    PubMed

    de la Cuesta-Benjumea, Carmen

    2011-01-01

    Reflexivity is an English term that Spanish speaking people have to assign a technical meaning. Reflexivity expresses the conscience of researchers conscience and refers to their connection with the study's situation. It is a process by which researchers step back to critically exam the effect they have on the study and the impact of their interactions with participants. The reflexive process is embedded in all research levels and is present in all the research phases, from the research question to fieldwork, from data analysis to writing the final report. Nevertheless, the question is not so much to engage in reflective activities but to be a reflexive researcher. Reflexivity is a human ability that is present during social interactions. For this reason it is present in qualitative research. A self inquirer can be addressed as it is constructed by the relationships and interactions that are established with study participants. Reflexivity has an educational character that continues after the study is completed. PMID:21531602

  20. Some effects of vagal blockade on abdominal muscle activation and shortening in awake dogs.

    PubMed Central

    Leevers, A M; Road, J D

    1995-01-01

    1. The mechanisms of abdominal muscle activation are thought to be different during expiratory threshold loading (ETL) compared with hypercapnia. Our objectives in the present study were to determine the effects of removing excitatory vagal feedback on abdominal muscle activation, shortening and pattern of recruitment during ETL and hypercapnia. Six tracheotomized dogs were chronically implanted with sonomicrometer transducers and fine wire EMG electrodes in each of the four abdominal muscles. Muscle length changes and EMG activity were studied in the awake dog during ETL (6 dogs) and CO2 rebreathing (3 dogs), before and after vagal blockade. 2. Following vagal blockade, the change in volume (increase in functional residual capacity, FRC) during ETL was greater and active phasic shortening of all the abdominal muscles was reduced, when shortening was compared with a similar change in lung volume. Similarly, at comparable minute ventilation, abdominal muscle active shortening was also reduced during hypercapnia. The internal muscle layer was recruited preferentially in both control and vagally blocked dogs during both ETL and hypercapnia. 3. The degree of recruitment of the abdominal muscles during ETL and hypercapnia in awake dogs is influenced by vagal feedback, but less so than in anaesthetized dogs. These results illustrate the importance of the vagi and abdominal muscle activation in load compensation. However, vagal reflexes are apparently not contributing to the preferential recruitment of the internal muscle layer. In awake dogs during vagal blockade abdominal muscle recruitment still occurs by extravagal mechanisms. PMID:8568685

  1. Application of heat- and steam-generating sheets to the lumbar or abdominal region affects autonomic nerve activity.

    PubMed

    Nagashima, Yoshinao; Oda, Hideshi; Igaki, Michihito; Suzuki, Megumi; Suzuki, Atsushi; Yada, Yukihiro; Tsuchiya, Shuichi; Suzuki, Toshiyuki; Ohishi, Sachiko

    2006-06-30

    Effects of applying a heat- and steam-generating (HSG) sheet on peripheral hemodynamics and autonomic nerve activity were examined. An HSG sheet was applied to the lumbar or abdominal region. Measurements included skin temperature at the lumbar and abdominal regions and the fingertip, total hemoglobin, tissue oxygen saturation ratio (StO2), pupillary light reflex, changes in ECG R-R interval blood pressure and percutaneous electrogastrography (EGG). A heat-generating sheet without steam was used as the control. Based on the present findings, application of the HSG sheet to the lumbar or abdominal region may improve peripheral hemodynamics and inhibit sympathetic nerve activity, resulting in parasympathetic nerve activity dominance.

  2. Portraying Reflexivity in Health Services Research.

    PubMed

    Rae, John; Green, Bill

    2016-09-01

    A model is proposed for supporting reflexivity in qualitative health research, informed by arguments from Bourdieu and Finlay. Bourdieu refers to mastering the subjective relation to the object at three levels-the overall social space, the field of specialists, and the scholastic universe. The model overlays Bourdieu's levels of objectivation with Finlay's three stages of research (pre-research, data collection, and data analysis). The intersections of these two ways of considering reflexivity, displayed as cells of a matrix, pose questions and offer prompts to productively challenge health researchers' reflexivity. Portraiture is used to show how these challenges and prompts can facilitate such reflexivity, as illustrated in a research project.

  3. Generalized versus partial reflex seizures: a review.

    PubMed

    Italiano, Domenico; Ferlazzo, Edoardo; Gasparini, Sara; Spina, Edoardo; Mondello, Stefania; Labate, Angelo; Gambardella, Antonio; Aguglia, Umberto

    2014-08-01

    In this review we assess our currently available knowledge about reflex seizures with special emphasis on the difference between "generalized" reflex seizures induced by visual stimuli, thinking, praxis and language tasks, and "focal" seizures induced by startle, eating, music, hot water, somatosensory stimuli and orgasm. We discuss in particular evidence from animal, clinical, neurophysiological and neuroimaging studies supporting the concept that "generalized" reflex seizures, usually occurring in the setting of IGE, should be considered as focal seizures with quick secondary generalization. We also review recent advances in genetic and therapeutic approach of reflex seizures.

  4. Portraying Reflexivity in Health Services Research.

    PubMed

    Rae, John; Green, Bill

    2016-09-01

    A model is proposed for supporting reflexivity in qualitative health research, informed by arguments from Bourdieu and Finlay. Bourdieu refers to mastering the subjective relation to the object at three levels-the overall social space, the field of specialists, and the scholastic universe. The model overlays Bourdieu's levels of objectivation with Finlay's three stages of research (pre-research, data collection, and data analysis). The intersections of these two ways of considering reflexivity, displayed as cells of a matrix, pose questions and offer prompts to productively challenge health researchers' reflexivity. Portraiture is used to show how these challenges and prompts can facilitate such reflexivity, as illustrated in a research project. PMID:26935721

  5. Development of the Stretch Reflex in the Newborn: Reciprocal Excitation and Reflex Irradiation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myklebust, Barbara M.; Gottlieb, Gerald L.

    1993-01-01

    When tendon jerk reflexes were tested in seven newborns from one- to three-days old, stretch reflex responses in all major muscle groups of the lower limb were elicited. This "irradiation of reflexes" is a normal phenomenon in newborns, with the pathway becoming suppressed during normal maturation. In individuals with cerebral palsy, however, the…

  6. Lateral Abdominal Wall Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Baumann, Donald P.; Butler, Charles E.

    2012-01-01

    Lateral abdominal wall (LAW) defects can manifest as a flank hernias, myofascial laxity/bulges, or full-thickness defects. These defects are quite different from those in the anterior abdominal wall defects and the complexity and limited surgical options make repairing the LAW a challenge for the reconstructive surgeon. LAW reconstruction requires an understanding of the anatomy, physiologic forces, and the impact of deinnervation injury to design and perform successful reconstructions of hernia, bulge, and full-thickness defects. Reconstructive strategies must be tailored to address the inguinal ligament, retroperitoneum, chest wall, and diaphragm. Operative technique must focus on stabilization of the LAW to nonyielding points of fixation at the anatomic borders of the LAW far beyond the musculofascial borders of the defect itself. Thus, hernias, bulges, and full-thickness defects are approached in a similar fashion. Mesh reinforcement is uniformly required in lateral abdominal wall reconstruction. Inlay mesh placement with overlying myofascial coverage is preferred as a first-line option as is the case in anterior abdominal wall reconstruction. However, interposition bridging repairs are often performed as the surrounding myofascial tissue precludes a dual layered closure. The decision to place bioprosthetic or prosthetic mesh depends on surgeon preference, patient comorbidities, and clinical factors of the repair. Regardless of mesh type, the overlying soft tissue must provide stable cutaneous coverage and obliteration of dead space. In cases where the fasciocutaneous flaps surrounding the defect are inadequate for closure, regional pedicled flaps or free flaps are recruited to achieve stable soft tissue coverage. PMID:23372458

  7. Abdominal SPECT imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Van Heertum, R.L.; Brunetti, J.C.; Yudd, A.P.

    1987-07-01

    Over the past several years, abdominal single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging has evolved from a research tool to an important clinical imaging modality that is helpful in the diagnostic assessment of a wide variety of disorders involving the abdominal viscera. Although liver-spleen imaging is the most popular of the abdominal SPECT procedures, blood pool imaging is becoming much more widely utilized for the evaluation of cavernous hemangiomas of the liver as well as other vascular abnormalities in the abdomen. Adjunctive indium leukocyte and gallium SPECT studies are also proving to be of value in the assessment of a variety of infectious and neoplastic diseases. As more experience is acquired in this area, SPECT should become the primary imaging modality for both gallium and indium white blood cells in many institutions. Renal SPECT, on the other hand, has only recently been used as a clinical imaging modality for the assessment of such parameters as renal depth and volume. The exact role of renal SPECT as a clinical tool is, therefore, yet to be determined. 79 references.

  8. Abdominal emergencies during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Bouyou, J; Gaujoux, S; Marcellin, L; Leconte, M; Goffinet, F; Chapron, C; Dousset, B

    2015-12-01

    Abdominal emergencies during pregnancy (excluding obstetrical emergencies) occur in one out of 500-700 pregnancies and may involve gastrointestinal, gynecologic, urologic, vascular and traumatic etiologies; surgery is necessary in 0.2-2% of cases. Since these emergencies are relatively rare, patients should be referred to specialized centers where surgical, obstetrical and neonatal cares are available, particularly because surgical intervention increases the risk of premature labor. Clinical presentations may be atypical and misleading because of pregnancy-associated anatomical and physiologic alterations, which often result in diagnostic uncertainty and therapeutic delay with increased risks of maternal and infant morbidity. The most common abdominal emergencies are acute appendicitis (best treated by laparoscopic appendectomy), acute calculous cholecystitis (best treated by laparoscopic cholecystectomy from the first trimester through the early part of the third trimester) and intestinal obstruction (where medical treatment is the first-line approach, just as in the non-pregnant patient). Acute pancreatitis is rare, usually resulting from trans-ampullary passage of gallstones; it usually resolves with medical treatment but an elevated risk of recurrent episodes justifies laparoscopic cholecystectomy in the 2nd trimester and endoscopic sphincterotomy in the 3rd trimester. The aim of the present work is to review pregnancy-induced anatomical and physiological modifications, to describe the main abdominal emergencies during pregnancy, their specific features and their diagnostic and therapeutic management.

  9. Abdominal trauma by ostrich

    PubMed Central

    Usurelu, Sergiu; Bettencourt, Vanessa; Melo, Gina

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Ostriches typically avoid humans in the wild, since they correctly assess humans as potential predators, and, if approached, often run away. However, ostriches may turn aggressive rather than run when threatened, especially when cornered, and may also attack when they feel the need to defend their offspring or territories. Presentation of case A 71-year-old male patient presented with intra abdominal injury sustained from being kicked in the abdominal wall by an ostrich. During laparotomy, were found free peritoneal effusion and perforation of the small intestine. Discussion The clinical history and physical examination are extremely important for diagnostic and therapeutic decision making. CT-scan is the most accurate exam for making diagnosis. Surgery is the treatment of choice, and is always indicated when there is injury to the hollow viscera. In general it is possible to suture the defect. Conclusion In cases of blunt abdominal trauma by animals is necessary to have a low threshold of suspicion for acute abdomen. PMID:25685344

  10. 40 CFR 74.18 - Withdrawal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... opt-in source may request to withdraw from the Acid Rain Program by submitting an administrative... paragraph (f)(1) of this section. (b) Requesting withdrawal. To withdraw from the Acid Rain Program, the...-in source's prior violations. An opt-in source that withdraws from the Acid Rain Program shall...

  11. 40 CFR 74.18 - Withdrawal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... opt-in source may request to withdraw from the Acid Rain Program by submitting an administrative... paragraph (f)(1) of this section. (b) Requesting withdrawal. To withdraw from the Acid Rain Program, the...-in source's prior violations. An opt-in source that withdraws from the Acid Rain Program shall...

  12. 40 CFR 74.18 - Withdrawal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... opt-in source may request to withdraw from the Acid Rain Program by submitting an administrative... paragraph (f)(1) of this section. (b) Requesting withdrawal. To withdraw from the Acid Rain Program, the...-in source's prior violations. An opt-in source that withdraws from the Acid Rain Program shall...

  13. 40 CFR 74.18 - Withdrawal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... opt-in source may request to withdraw from the Acid Rain Program by submitting an administrative... paragraph (f)(1) of this section. (b) Requesting withdrawal. To withdraw from the Acid Rain Program, the...-in source's prior violations. An opt-in source that withdraws from the Acid Rain Program shall...

  14. 40 CFR 74.18 - Withdrawal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... opt-in source may request to withdraw from the Acid Rain Program by submitting an administrative... paragraph (f)(1) of this section. (b) Requesting withdrawal. To withdraw from the Acid Rain Program, the...-in source's prior violations. An opt-in source that withdraws from the Acid Rain Program shall...

  15. 5 CFR 1650.11 - Withdrawal elections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Withdrawal elections. 1650.11 Section 1650.11 Administrative Personnel FEDERAL RETIREMENT THRIFT INVESTMENT BOARD METHODS OF WITHDRAWING FUNDS FROM THE THRIFT SAVINGS PLAN Post-Employment Withdrawals § 1650.11 Withdrawal elections....

  16. 5 CFR 1650.11 - Withdrawal elections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Withdrawal elections. 1650.11 Section 1650.11 Administrative Personnel FEDERAL RETIREMENT THRIFT INVESTMENT BOARD METHODS OF WITHDRAWING FUNDS FROM THE THRIFT SAVINGS PLAN Post-Employment Withdrawals § 1650.11 Withdrawal elections....

  17. 5 CFR 1650.11 - Withdrawal elections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Withdrawal elections. 1650.11 Section 1650.11 Administrative Personnel FEDERAL RETIREMENT THRIFT INVESTMENT BOARD METHODS OF WITHDRAWING FUNDS FROM THE THRIFT SAVINGS PLAN Post-Employment Withdrawals § 1650.11 Withdrawal elections....

  18. 5 CFR 1650.11 - Withdrawal elections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Withdrawal elections. 1650.11 Section 1650.11 Administrative Personnel FEDERAL RETIREMENT THRIFT INVESTMENT BOARD METHODS OF WITHDRAWING FUNDS FROM THE THRIFT SAVINGS PLAN Post-Employment Withdrawals § 1650.11 Withdrawal elections....

  19. 5 CFR 1650.11 - Withdrawal elections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Withdrawal elections. 1650.11 Section 1650.11 Administrative Personnel FEDERAL RETIREMENT THRIFT INVESTMENT BOARD METHODS OF WITHDRAWING FUNDS FROM THE THRIFT SAVINGS PLAN Post-Employment Withdrawals § 1650.11 Withdrawal elections....

  20. The Dynamics of the Stapedial Acoustic Reflex.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moss, Sherrin Mary

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. This thesis aims to separate the neural and muscular components of the stapedial acoustic reflex, both anatomically and physiologically. It aims to present an hypothesis to account for the differences between ipsilateral and contralateral reflex characteristics which have so far been unexplained, and achieve a greater understanding of the mechanisms underlying the reflex dynamics. A technique enabling faithful reproduction of the time course of the reflex is used throughout the experimental work. The technique measures tympanic membrane displacement as a result of reflex stapedius muscle contraction. The recorded response can be directly related to the mechanics of the middle ear and stapedius muscle contraction. Some development of the technique is undertaken by the author. A model of the reflex neural arc and stapedius muscle dynamics is evolved that is based upon a second order system. The model is unique in that it includes a latency in the ipsilateral negative feedback loop. Oscillations commonly observed on reflex responses are seen to be produced because of the inclusion of a latency in the feedback loop. The model demonstrates and explains the complex relationships between neural and muscle dynamic parameters observed in the experimental work. This more comprehensive understanding of the interaction between the stapedius dynamics and the neural arc of the reflex would not usually have been possible using human subjects, coupled with a non-invasive measurement technique. Evidence from the experimental work revealed the ipsilateral reflex to have, on average, a 5 dB lower threshold than the contralateral reflex. The oscillatory charcteristics, and the steady state response, of the contralateral reflex are also seen to be significantly different from those of the ipsilateral reflex. An hypothesis to account for the experimental observations is proposed. It is propounded that chemical neurotransmitters

  1. Withdrawal: Expanding a Key Addiction Construct.

    PubMed

    Piper, Megan E

    2015-12-01

    Withdrawal is an essential component of classical addiction theory; it is a vital manifestation of dependence and motivates relapse. However, the traditional conceptualization of withdrawal as a cohesive collection of symptoms that emerge during drug deprivation and decline with either the passage of time or reinstatement of drug use, may be inadequate to explain scientific findings or fit with modern theories of addiction. This article expands the current understanding of tobacco withdrawal by examining: (1) withdrawal variability; (2) underlying causes of withdrawal variability, including biological and person factors, environmental influences, and the influence of highly routinized behavioral patterns; (3) new withdrawal symptoms that allow for enhanced characterization of the withdrawal experience; and (4) withdrawal-related cognitive processes. These topics provide guidance regarding the optimal assessment of withdrawal and illustrate the potential impact modern withdrawal conceptualization and assessment could have on identifying treatment targets.

  2. Withdrawal: Expanding a Key Addiction Construct.

    PubMed

    Piper, Megan E

    2015-12-01

    Withdrawal is an essential component of classical addiction theory; it is a vital manifestation of dependence and motivates relapse. However, the traditional conceptualization of withdrawal as a cohesive collection of symptoms that emerge during drug deprivation and decline with either the passage of time or reinstatement of drug use, may be inadequate to explain scientific findings or fit with modern theories of addiction. This article expands the current understanding of tobacco withdrawal by examining: (1) withdrawal variability; (2) underlying causes of withdrawal variability, including biological and person factors, environmental influences, and the influence of highly routinized behavioral patterns; (3) new withdrawal symptoms that allow for enhanced characterization of the withdrawal experience; and (4) withdrawal-related cognitive processes. These topics provide guidance regarding the optimal assessment of withdrawal and illustrate the potential impact modern withdrawal conceptualization and assessment could have on identifying treatment targets. PMID:25744958

  3. Restlessness related to SSRI withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Hirose, S

    2001-02-01

    There are reports that abrupt withdrawal of various selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors, such as fluvoxamine, can elicit in patients various withdrawal symptoms. Fluvoxamine has been widely used in Japan for approximately 1 year. However, there have been no case reports of withdrawal symptoms following abrupt fluvoxamine discontinuation in Japan. The author reports a case where the abrupt discontinuation of fluvoxamine produced restlessness in a depressed patient. The restlessness disappeared soon after the reinstatement of treatment with fluvoxamine. This case report suggests that clinicians should carefully scrutinize a patient's compliance to fluvoxamine as the withdrawal symptoms observed following abrupt discontinuation might be regarded as a relapse of depression or side-effects of the medicine. PMID:11235863

  4. Water withdrawals in Florida, 2012

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marella, Richard L.

    2015-01-01

    The largest percentage of freshwater withdrawals was from the South Florida Water Management District (46 percent), followed by the St. Johns River Water Management District (20 percent), Southwest Florida Water Management District (19 percent), Northwest Florida Water Management District (9 percent), and Suwannee River Water Management District (6 percent). The South Florida Water Management District accounted for the largest percentage of freshwater withdrawals for public-supply use (46 percent), commercial-industrial-mining self-supplied use (24 percent), agricultural self-supplied use (59 percent), and recreational-landscape irrigation use (63 percent). The Northwest Florida Water Management District accounted for the largest percentage of freshwater withdrawals for power-generation use (44 percent), and the Southwest Florida Water Management District accounted for the largest percentage of saline-water withdrawals for power-generation use (58 percent).

  5. Water withdrawals in Florida, 2012

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marella, Richard L.

    2015-09-01

    The largest percentage of freshwater withdrawals was from the South Florida Water Management District (46 percent), followed by the St. Johns River Water Management District (20 percent), Southwest Florida Water Management District (19 percent), Northwest Florida Water Management District (9 percent), and Suwannee River Water Management District (6 percent). The South Florida Water Management District accounted for the largest percentage of freshwater withdrawals for public-supply use (46 percent), commercial-industrial-mining self-supplied use (24 percent), agricultural self-supplied use (59 percent), and recreational-landscape irrigation use (63 percent). The Northwest Florida Water Management District accounted for the largest percentage of freshwater withdrawals for power-generation use (44 percent), and the Southwest Florida Water Management District accounted for the largest percentage of saline-water withdrawals for power-generation use (58 percent).

  6. Reflexive Practice: To Enhance Student Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roebuck, Joanne

    2007-01-01

    This paper reports on the use of reflexive practice activities designed to enhance learning for first year law students at James Cook University, Australia. The paper considers various aspects of student learning and explores connections between reflexive practice and concepts such as deep learning, understanding, motivation and engagement, and…

  7. [Non-reflex activity of the CNS].

    PubMed

    Brozek, G

    1995-06-01

    Recent studies of biological rhythms have modified Sherrington's concept of nervous system as exclusively reflexive to include the fact that some neural activity is also endogenously rhythmic. Reflexes are undoubtedly the most important components of animal's and human behavior. But are reflexes the basic units of all complex movements and acts? Rhythmical movements such as respiration, walking and running and other forms of locomotion, as well as rhythmical alimentary processes such as respiration, walking and running and other forms of locomotion, as well as rhythmical alimentary processes such as licking, mastication, and the peristaltic propulsion of nutrients and waste are examples of acts controlled by intrinsic oscillators, so called central pattern generators. Information from the periphery is, however, essential for controlling the extent and rate of movements. Between reflex and non-reflex activity it is possible to place complex species-specific responses called by ethologists fixed-action patterns. Recent investigators have shown that many complex sequences of behavior like speech or piano playing are determined by an internal plan, rather than being generated by a "chain" of reflexes. Non-reflexive activity appears earlier in ontogeny, and is probably phylogenetically older than reflexes.

  8. Steroid withdrawal in renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Grenda, Ryszard

    2013-11-01

    Over the last decade, steroid minimization became one of the major goals in pediatric renal transplantation. Different protocols have been used by individual centers and multicenter study groups, including early and late steroid withdrawal or even complete avoidance. The timing of steroid withdrawal determines if antibodies are used, as avoidance and early withdrawal require antibody induction, while late withdrawal typically does not. A monoclonal antibody was used in most protocols during an early steroid withdrawal together with tacrolimus and mycophenolate mofetil in low immunological risk patients. Polyclonal induction was reported as effective in high-risk patients. Cyclosporine A and mycophenolate mofetil were used in late steroid withdrawal with no induction. All described protocols were effective in terms of preventing acute rejection and preserving renal graft function. There was no superiority of any specific protocol in terms of clinical benefits of steroid withdrawal. Pre-puberty determined growth benefit while other clinical advantages, including better control of glycemia, lipids, and blood pressure, were age independent. It is not clear whether the steroid withdrawal increases the risk of recurrence of primary glomerular diseases post-transplant, however it cannot be excluded. There is no evidence to date for a higher risk of anti-HLA production in steroid-free children after renal transplantation. Key summary points--Current strategies to minimize the steroid-related adverse effects in pediatric renal graft recipients include steroid withdrawal, early or late after transplantation, or complete steroid avoidance--Early steroid withdrawal or avoidance is generally used following the induction therapy with mono- or polyclonal antibodies, while in late steroid withdrawal induction therapy was generally not used- Elimination of steroids (early or late) does not increase the risk of acute rejection and does not deteriorate long-term renal graft function

  9. Neuronal correlates of siphon withdrawal in freely behaving Aplysia.

    PubMed

    Kanz, J E; Eberly, L B; Cobbs, J S; Pinsker, H M

    1979-11-01

    1. Central neuronal mechanisms of siphon withdrawal in Aplysia were studied for the first time in intact, freely behaving animals by means of population recordings from implanted whole-nerve cuff electrodes. Intracellular follow-up studies were then conducted when the same animal was reduced to a semi-intact preparation. 2. Background spontaneous activity in the siphon nerve consisted of low-frequency firing of a population of efferent units containing identified siphon motoneurons. 3. Spontaneous patterned bursts of efferent activity occurred irregularly and were associated with all-or-nothing contractions of the parapodia, gill, and siphon. Spontaneous bursts were due to centrally generated activity in the interneuron II (INT II) network, an oscillatory network with endogenous pacemaker properties. 4. In intact animals, even weak tactile stimuli to the siphon typically triggered an INTII burst shortly after the stimulus-locked efferent activity. Thus, the stimulus can phase-advance the INT II oscillator. In semi-intact preparations, short-latency INT II bursts were triggered less less frequently and required more intense stimuli. 5. With weak to moderate-intensity stimuli in intact animals, the presence of short-latency triggered INT II bursts largely determined the duration of the siphon component and amplitude of the gill component of the withdrawal reflex. 6. When stimuli were repeated over a range of interstimulus intervals (from 60 to 1 min), the likelihood of triggering a short-latency INT II burst die not change systematically. Thus, the ability of the siphon stimulus to stably entrain the all-or-none INT II component over a wide range of intervals will interact behaviorally with the decrement of the monosynaptic component of the reflex with repetition.

  10. Leaking mycotic abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Sing, T M; Young, N; O'Rourke, I C; Tomlinson, P

    1994-11-01

    A case of leaking mycotic abdominal aortic aneurysm is reported, with a brief review of the literature. A 58 year old female presented with shoulder and abdominal pain associated with diarrhoea, vomiting and fever with leucocytosis. Computed tomography of the abdomen showed pooling of contrast in the retroperitoneum anterior to a non-dilated abdominal aorta. There was considerable retroperitoneal blood accumulating in a mass-like lesion in the right lower abdomen and pelvis obstructing the right renal collecting system. Laparotomy revealed a 4 cm diameter saccular aneurysm of the abdominal aorta, with a 1 cm diameter neck. Culture of the thrombus grew Streptococcus pyogenes. PMID:7993259

  11. Hypnosis for functional abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Gottsegen, David

    2011-07-01

    Chronic abdominal pain is a common pediatric condition affecting 20% of the pediatric population worldwide. Most children with this disorder are found to have no specific organic etiology and are given the diagnosis of functional abdominal pain. Well-designed clinical trials have found hypnotherapy and guided imagery to be the most efficacious treatments for this condition. Hypnotic techniques used for other somatic symptoms are easily adaptable for use with functional abdominal pain. The author discusses 2 contrasting hypnotic approaches to functional abdominal pain and provides implications for further research. These approaches may provide new insights into this common and complex disorder. PMID:21922712

  12. Cutaneous reflex modulation and self-induced reflex attenuation in cerebellar patients.

    PubMed

    Hoogkamer, Wouter; Van Calenbergh, Frank; Swinnen, Stephan P; Duysens, Jacques

    2015-02-01

    Modulation of cutaneous reflexes is important in the neural control of walking, yet knowledge about underlying neural pathways is still incomplete. Recent studies have suggested that the cerebellum is involved. Here we evaluated the possible roles of the cerebellum in cutaneous reflex modulation and in attenuation of self-induced reflexes. First we checked whether leg muscle activity during walking was similar in patients with focal cerebellar lesions and in healthy control subjects. We then recorded cutaneous reflex activity in leg muscles during walking. Additionally, we compared reflexes after standard (computer triggered) stimuli with reflexes after self-induced stimuli for both groups. Biceps femoris and gastrocnemius medialis muscle activity was increased in the patient group compared with the control subjects, suggesting a coactivation strategy to reduce instability of gait. Cutaneous reflex modulation was similar between healthy control subjects and cerebellar patients, but the latter appeared less able to attenuate reflexes to self-induced stimuli. This suggests that the cerebellum is not primarily involved in cutaneous reflex modulation but that it could act in attenuation of self-induced reflex responses. The latter role in locomotion would be consistent with the common view that the cerebellum predicts sensory consequences of movement.

  13. Achilles tendon reflex measuring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szebeszczyk, Janina; Straszecka, Joanna

    1995-06-01

    The examination of Achilles tendon reflex is widely used as a simple, noninvasive clinical test in diagnosis and pharmacological therapy monitoring in such diseases as: hypothyroidism, hyperthyroidism, diabetic neuropathy, the lower limbs obstructive angiopathies and intermittent claudication. Presented Achilles tendon reflect measuring system is based on the piezoresistive sensor connected with the cylinder-piston system. To determinate the moment of Achilles tendon stimulation a detecting circuit was used. The outputs of the measuring system are connected to the PC-based data acquisition board. Experimental results showed that the measurement accuracy and repeatability is good enough for diagnostics and therapy monitoring purposes. A user friendly, easy-to-operate measurement system fulfills all the requirements related to recording, presentation and storing of the patients' reflexograms.

  14. [Urinary urgency and reflex incontinence].

    PubMed

    Madersbacher, H

    1991-07-01

    Urge and reflex incontinence are caused by detrusor dysfunction:urgency may be due to hyperactivity or hypersensitivity of the bladder. Neurogenic hyperactivity of the detrusor is called detrusor hyperreflexia: the neurogenic uninhibited bladder is caused by incomplete, and the so-called reflex bladder by complete, suprasacral lesions. The pathophysiology of symptomatic and idiopathic detrusor hyperactivity and the therapeutic armentarium are described. Bladder drill together with biofeedback and pharmacotherapy with spasmolytic drugs - several potent spasmolytic drugs with different modes of action are available - are the basis of treatment for hyperactivity and hypersensitivity of the detrusor. An alternative is electrostimulation: stimulation of the afferents of the pudendal nerve, via the pelvic floor (anal, vaginal), percutaneously (dorsal nerve of the penis, clitoric nerve) or by the implantation of electrodes results in inhibition of the detrusor. Most (80-90%) patients can be treated successfully by conservative means. Operative measurements comprise bladder denervation and bladder augmentation. The results of bladder denervation by transtrigonal phenolization of the pelvic plexus are highly controversial. In patients with uncontrollable hyperactivity of the detrusor, augmentation of the bladder (e.g. clam ileocystoplasty) is the method of choice, while for those with uncontrollable hypersensitivity of the detrusor, cystectomy followed by bladder substitution should be performed as a last resort. Treatment for urinary incontinence due to detrusor hyperreflexia must be selected bearing in mind that bladder emptying is inadequate, in most cases because of dyssynergia between detrusor and external sphincter. Therapy is basically aimed at transforming hyperreflexia of the detrusor into hyporeflexia, primarily by potent spasmolytic drugs.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. Who withdraws? Psychological individual differences and employee withdrawal behaviors.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Ryan D; Swider, Brian W; Woo, Sang Eun; Allen, David G

    2016-04-01

    Psychological individual differences, such as personality, affectivity, and general mental ability, have been shown to predict numerous work-related behaviors. Although there is substantial research demonstrating relationships between psychological individual differences and withdrawal behaviors (i.e., lateness, absenteeism, and turnover), there is no integrative framework providing scholars and practitioners a guide for conceptualizing how, why, and under what circumstances we observe such relationships. In this integrative conceptual review we: (a) utilize the Cognitive-Affective Processing System framework (Mischel & Shoda, 1995) to provide an overarching theoretical basis for how psychological individual differences affect withdrawal behaviors; (b) create a theoretical model of the situated person that summarizes the existing empirical literature examining the effect of psychological differences on withdrawal behavior; and (c) identify future research opportunities based on our review and integrative framework. PMID:26595754

  16. Astronomical Data Reduction Workflows with Reflex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballester, P.; Bramich, D.; Forchi, V.; Freudling, W.; Garcia-Dabó, C. E.; klein Gebbinck, M.; Modigliani, A.; Moehler, S.; Romaniello, M.

    2014-05-01

    Reflex (http://www.eso.org/reflex) is an environment that provides an easy and flexible way to reduce VLT/VLTI science data using the ESO. Its top-level functionalities are: (1) Reflex allows to graphically specify the sequence in which the data reduction steps are executed, including conditional stops, loops and conditional branches, (2) Reflex makes it easy to inspect the intermediate and final data products and to repeat selected processing steps to optimize the data reduction, (3) the data organization necessary to reduce the data is built into the system and is fully automatic, (4) advanced users can plug-in their own Python or IDL modules and steps into the data reduction sequence, and (5) Reflex supports the development of data reduction workflows based on the ESO Common Pipeline Library. Reflex is based on the concept of a scientific workflow, whereby the data reduction cascade is rendered graphically and data seamlessly flow from one processing step to the next. It is distributed with a number of complete test datasets so that users can immediately start experimenting and familiarize themselves with the system (http://www.eso.org/pipelines). In this demo, we present the latest version of Reflex and its applications for astronomical data reduction processes.

  17. [Abdominal approaches and drainages of the abdominal cavity].

    PubMed

    Hagel, C; Schilling, M

    2006-04-01

    Appropriate access to the abdominal cavity is the first and crucial step for successful abdominal surgical intervention. In planning the incision, several variables have to be considered, such as anatomy of the abdominal wall, localization of the target organ, and individual conditions (previous incisions, minimal access surgery, etc). Medial laparotomy is the preferred incision for emergency cases and ill-defined pathologies, allowing access and hence exploration to all quadrants. Transverse laparotomies give superior access to the dorsal and right aspects of the liver and cause less pain in patients unfit for regional anesthetic procedures. Draining of the abdominal cavity is used after various resective and reconstructive procedures, but there is little evidence for its use in a number of operations such as gastric, hepatic, and colorectal resections. Advantages and disadvantages of different abdominal wall incisions and drainages are discussed.

  18. The Reflexes of the Fundus Oculi

    PubMed Central

    Ballantyne, A. J.

    1940-01-01

    The fundus reflexes reveal, in a manner not yet completely understood, the texture and contour of the reflecting surfaces and the condition of the underlying tissues. In this way they may play an important part in the biomicroscopy of the eye. The physiological reflexes are seen at their best in the eyes of young subjects, in well-pigmented eyes, with undilated pupils and with emmetropic refraction. Their absence during the first two decades, or their presence after the forties, their occurrence in one eye only, their appearance, disappearance or change of character should suggest the possibility of some pathological state. The investigation and interpretation of the reflexes are notably assisted by comparing the appearances seen with long and short wave lights such as those of the sodium and mercury vapour lamps, in addition to the usual ophthalmoscopic lights. Most of the surface reflexes disappear in the light of the sodium lamp, sometimes revealing important changes in the deeper layers of the retina and choroid. The physiological reflexes, chiefly formed on the surface of the internal limiting membrane, take the forms of the familiar watered silk or patchy reflexes, the peri-macular halo, the fan reflex in the macular depression and the reflex from the foveal pit. The watered silk or patchy reflexes often show a delicate striation which follows the pattern of the nerve-fibre layer, or there may be a granular or criss-cross texture. Reflexes which entirely lack these indications of “texture” should be considered as possibly pathological. This applies to the “beaten metal” reflexes and to those formed on the so-called hyaloid membrane. The occurrence of physiological reflexes in linear form is doubtful, and the only admittedly physiological punctate reflexes are the so-called Gunn's dots. Surface reflexes which are broken up into small points or flakes are pathological, and are most frequently seen in the central area of the fundus in cases of pigmentary

  19. [Research progress of rectoanal inhibitory reflex].

    PubMed

    Yin, Shuhui; Zhao, Ke

    2015-12-01

    The understanding of rectoanal inhibitory reflex (RAIR) is progressing for the latest 100 years. From the discovery of its important role in diagnosis of Hirschsprung's disease to all aspects of its development, reflex pathways, neural regulation and physiological functions, there have been more in-depth explorations. It is now recognized that a number of other diseases also have a more specific performance of RAIR. It has become an important and indispensable part to anorectal manometry. Research progress of rectoanal inhibitory reflex is reviewed in this article.

  20. Structure of the network mediating siphon-elicited siphon withdrawal in Aplysia.

    PubMed

    Frost, W N; Kandel, E R

    1995-06-01

    1. The network mediating siphon-elicited siphon withdrawal in Aplysia is a useful model system for cellular studies of simple forms of learning and memory. Here we describe three new cells in this circuit, L33, L34, and L35, and several new connections among the following network neurons: LE, L16, L29, L30, L32, L33, L34, and L35. On the basis of these findings we present an updated diagram of the network. Altogether, 100 neurons have now been identified in the abdominal ganglion that can participate in both siphon-elicited and spontaneous respiratory pumping siphon withdrawals. 2. Two features of the interneuronal population may have important behavioral functions. First, the L29 interneurons make fast and slow excitatory connections onto the LFS cells, which may be important for transforming brief sensory neuron discharges into the long-lasting motor neuron firing that underlies withdrawal duration. Second, inhibitory interneurons are prominent in the network. The specific connectivity of certain of these interneurons is appropriate to block potentially interfering inhibitory inputs from other networks during execution of the behavior. 3. Deliberate searches have so far revealed very few excitatory interneuronal inputs to the network interneurons and motor neurons within the abdominal ganglion. These results, together with intracellular studies by others, are more consistent at present with a relatively dedicated rather than a highly distributed organizational scheme for the siphon-elicited siphon withdrawal circuitry.

  1. Changes in the Achilles tendon reflexes following Skylab missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, J. T.; Nicogossian, A. E.; Hoffler, G. W.; Johnson, R. L.; Hordinsky, J. R.

    1977-01-01

    Postflight measurements of Achilles tendon reflex duration on Skylab crewmen indicate a state of disequilibrium between the flexor and extensor muscle groups with an initial decrease in reflex duration. As the muscles regain strength and mass there occurs an overcompensation reflected by increased reflex duration. Finally, when a normal neuromuscular state is reached the reflex duration returns to baseline value.

  2. How I Manage Abdominal Injuries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haycock, Christine E.

    1986-01-01

    In sports, abdominal injuries occur most frequently in cycling, horseback riding, and skiing. Most involve children, not adults. Any athlete sustaining a severe blow to the abdomen should be examined. Guidelines are provided for recognizing and treating injuries to the abdominal muscles, kidneys, spleen, and liver. (Author/MT)

  3. [The abdominal drop flap].

    PubMed

    Bodin, F; Liverneaux, P; Seigle-Murandi, F; Facca, S; Bruant-Rodier, C; Dissaux, C; Chaput, B

    2015-08-01

    The skin between the mastectomy scar and the future infra-mammary fold may be managed in different ways in delayed breast reconstruction using a DIEP (deep inferior epigastric perforator). Conserving this skin and positioning the flap skin paddle in the middle of the breast usually highlights skin color disparity because of two visible transition zones. Resection of the entire skin under the scar may be more aesthetic but limits direct closure possibility in case of flap failure. In order to benefit from both aesthetic result and safe surgical method, we propose the abdominal drop flap. The inferior thoracic skin flap is detached from the thoracic wall beyond the future infra-mammary fold, preserved and pushed under the breast.

  4. The legacy of care as reflexive learning

    PubMed Central

    García, Marta Rodríguez; Moya, Jose Luis Medina

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: to analyze whether the tutor's use of reflexive strategies encourages the students to reflect. The goal is to discover what type of strategies can help to achieve this and how tutors and students behave in the practical context. Method: a qualitative and ethnographic focus was adopted. Twenty-seven students and 15 tutors from three health centers participated. The latter had received specific training on reflexive clinical tutoring. The analysis was developed through constant comparisons of the categories. Results: the results demonstrate that the tutors' use of reflexive strategies such as didactic questioning, didactic empathy and pedagogical silence contributes to encourage the students' reflection and significant learning. Conclusions: reflexive practice is key to tutors' training and students' learning. PMID:27305180

  5. Hamstrings stretch reflex in human spasticity

    PubMed Central

    Burke, David; Gillies, J. D.; Lance, James W.

    1971-01-01

    In 16 patients with spastic paralysis the hamstrings stretch reflex was found to increase as the velocity of stretch increased, and generally to subside after movement ceased. These effects are attributable to the dynamic property of the primary spindle ending. The stretch reflex commonly appeared in only the last third of the stretching movement and was maximal as the knee became fully extended. This is consistent with the static properties of the primary and secondary spindle endings, and accounts for the absence of the clasp-knife phenomenon in the spastic hamstrings. The difference in the nature of the stretch reflex in spastic flexor and extensor muscles is best explained by the differential reflex effects of group II afferent fibres which facilitate flexor motoneurones and inhibit extensor motoneurones. PMID:4255176

  6. Reflex sympathetic dystrophy following traumatic myelopathy.

    PubMed

    Wainapel, S F

    1984-04-01

    Two cases of reflex sympathetic dystrophy in the upper extremity of patients with traumatic cervical spinal cord injuries are reported. Both patients had very incomplete lesions with early neurological recovery, suggesting an underlying central cord syndrome. Although reflex sympathetic dystrophy is often seen following stroke, it has only rarely been documented in traumatic myelopathy, and it should be considered in the differential diagnosis of unexplained pain syndromes in the extremities of paraplegic or quadriplegic patients. PMID:6728500

  7. The pupillary light reflex in normal subjects.

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, C J

    1981-01-01

    In 19 normal subjects the pupillary reflex to light was studied over a range of stimulus intensities by infrared electronic pupillography and analysed by a computer technique. Increasing stimulus intensity was associated with an increase in direct light reflex amplitude and maximum rate of constriction and redilatation. Latency from stimulus to onset of response-decreased with increasing stimulus intensity. The normal range for each of these parameters is given and the significance of these results in clinical pupillary assessment discussed. PMID:7326222

  8. Estimated freshwater withdrawals in Texas, 1990

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lurry, Dee L.

    1994-01-01

    This report presents 1990 freshwater withdrawal estimates for Texas by source and category. Withdrawal source is either ground water or surface water. Withdrawal categories include: self-supplied irrigation, thermoelectric-power generation, water supply, industrial and mining, and other (domestic, commercial, livestock). Withdrawal data are aggregated by county, major aquifer, and principal river basin. Only the four major categories of irrigation, thermoelectric-power generation, water supply, and industrial and mining are illustrated in this report, although all data are tabulated.

  9. [The oculocardiac reflex during vitrectomy under neuroleptanalgesia].

    PubMed

    Dornberger, I; Quast, D; Velhagen, K H; Bellach, J; Guckler, A

    1991-01-01

    Oculocardiac reflex (OCR) is a frequently occurring complication in eye operations. It is a trigemino-vagal reflex characterised by the clinical occurrence of bradycardia and other cardiac rhythm disturbances following manipulations on the eye and its surroundings especially after traction of the external eye muscles. In this paper based on an analysis of 402 anaesthesia records, a bradycardia frequency (f = less than 60/min) of 31.8% was noted while other rhythm disturbances occurred in 5.7%. Predisposition facts were identified as age over 50, hypertension and cardiac diseases requiring medication with cardiac drugs. The frequency of OCR is considerably lowered by diabetes mellitus. Examination of 159 traction measurements made at the lateral rectus muscle revealed that the first manipulation made at the rectus bulbi superior muscle resulted in a statistically significantly stronger reflex activity than at the other muscles. In a further series of investigations in which rectus bulbi superior muscle was tested last, this muscle again showed the biggest frequency deviation. Only determination of the percentage heart rate decrease is suitable for characterising reflex activity. The frequency of the reflex occurring in our study was 71.7%, the result being reduced by the high proportion of diabetics, who are relatively reflex insensitive.

  10. The Reflexes of the Fundus Oculi

    PubMed Central

    Ballantyne, A. J.

    1940-01-01

    The fundus reflexes reveal, in a manner not yet completely understood, the texture and contour of the reflecting surfaces and the condition of the underlying tissues. In this way they may play an important part in the biomicroscopy of the eye. The physiological reflexes are seen at their best in the eyes of young subjects, in well-pigmented eyes, with undilated pupils and with emmetropic refraction. Their absence during the first two decades, or their presence after the forties, their occurrence in one eye only, their appearance, disappearance or change of character should suggest the possibility of some pathological state. The investigation and interpretation of the reflexes are notably assisted by comparing the appearances seen with long and short wave lights such as those of the sodium and mercury vapour lamps, in addition to the usual ophthalmoscopic lights. Most of the surface reflexes disappear in the light of the sodium lamp, sometimes revealing important changes in the deeper layers of the retina and choroid. The physiological reflexes, chiefly formed on the surface of the internal limiting membrane, take the forms of the familiar watered silk or patchy reflexes, the peri-macular halo, the fan reflex in the macular depression and the reflex from the foveal pit. The watered silk or patchy reflexes often show a delicate striation which follows the pattern of the nerve-fibre layer, or there may be a granular or criss-cross texture. Reflexes which entirely lack these indications of “texture” should be considered as possibly pathological. This applies to the “beaten metal” reflexes and to those formed on the so-called hyaloid membrane. The occurrence of physiological reflexes in linear form is doubtful, and the only admittedly physiological punctate reflexes are the so-called Gunn's dots. Surface reflexes which are broken up into small points or flakes are pathological, and are most frequently seen in the central area of the fundus in cases of pigmentary

  11. The benzodiazepine withdrawal syndrome and its management.

    PubMed Central

    Onyett, S R

    1989-01-01

    The literature on benzodiazepine dependence and withdrawal is reviewed with an emphasis on social and psychological considerations. The problems of when to prescribe, identifying withdrawal symptoms, effective communication with the patient, the structure of withdrawal programmes, and the use of drugs, psychological approaches and other services are discussed. PMID:2576073

  12. A Detection Model of College Withdrawal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pleskac, Timothy J.; Keeney, Jessica; Merritt, Stephanie M.; Schmitt, Neal; Oswald, Frederick L.

    2011-01-01

    Many students during their college careers consider withdrawing from their respective college or university. Understanding why some students decide to withdraw yet others persist has implications for both the well being of students as well as for institutes of higher education. The present study develops a model of the decision to withdraw drawing…

  13. 42 CFR 1008.40 - Withdrawal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Withdrawal. 1008.40 Section 1008.40 Public Health... OPINIONS BY THE OIG Submission of a Formal Request for an Advisory Opinion § 1008.40 Withdrawal. The requestor of an advisory opinion may withdraw the request prior to the issuance of a formal advisory...

  14. Reflex ring laser amplifier system

    SciTech Connect

    Summers, M.A.

    1983-08-31

    The invention is a method and apparatus for providing a reflex ring laser system for amplifying an input laser pulse. The invention is particularly useful in laser fusion experiments where efficient production of high-energy and high power laser pulses is required. The invention comprises a large aperture laser amplifier in an unstable ring resonator which includes a combination spatial filter and beam expander having a magnification greater than unity. An input pulse is injected into the resonator, e.g., through an aperture in an input mirror. The injected pulse passes through the amplifier and spatial filter/expander components on each pass around the ring. The unstable resonator is designed to permit only a predetermined number of passes before the amplified pulse exits the resonator. On the first pass through the amplifier, the beam fills only a small central region of the gain medium. On each successive pass, the beam has been expanded to fill the next concentric non-overlapping region of the gain medium.

  15. Treatment of PAT. Bradycardiac reflexes induced by dive vs. body-tilt.

    PubMed

    Arabian, J M; Furedy, J J; Morrison, J; Szalai, J P

    1983-01-01

    It has been suggested that the dive reflex (elicited by face immersion in water with breath-hold) may be employed to induce vagally-mediated bradycardia in individuals with paroxysmal atrial tachycardia. However, in several cases the use of this reflex is reported to have led to exacerbation of the cardiac dysfunction. Examination of heart-rate and EKG T-wave amplitude changes during the dive in healthy, college-aged individuals indicated that warming the water (10 degrees through 20 degrees C to 40 degrees C) decreased the bradycardia, but did not alter the attenuation (approximately 100 mu v) of the T-wave. The latter effect was taken to indicate that sympathetic activity, as indexed by T-wave amplitude, was not reduced by increases in water temperature. On the other hand, a 90 degrees head-up to head-down body tilt produced a bradycardia response of some 30 bpm as well as a T-wave amplitude increase (sympathetic withdrawal) in the order of 100 mu v. These data suggest that individuals who exhibit symptoms of ventricular sympathetic irritability may be adversely affected by the dive maneuver, regardless of water temperature. The body-tilt induced reflex in such individuals may thus be more appropriate given the large-magnitude bradycardia and absence of T-wave attenuation. At the present, however, the body-tilt preparation has been used only with healthy normal subjects, so this suggestion remains to be directly tested.

  16. Reflex receptive fields are enlarged in patients with musculoskeletal low back and neck pain.

    PubMed

    Biurrun Manresa, José A; Neziri, Alban Y; Curatolo, Michele; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Andersen, Ole K

    2013-08-01

    Pain hypersensitivity has been consistently detected in chronic pain conditions, but the underlying mechanisms are difficult to investigate in humans and thus poorly understood. Patients with endometriosis pain display enlarged reflex receptive fields (RRF), providing a new perspective in the identification of possible mechanisms behind hypersensitivity states in humans. The primary hypothesis of this study was that RRF are enlarged in patients with musculoskeletal pain. Secondary study end points were subjective pain thresholds and nociceptive withdrawal reflex (NWR) thresholds after single and repeated (temporal summation) electrical stimulation. Forty chronic neck pain patients, 40 chronic low back pain patients, and 24 acute low back pain patients were tested. Electrical stimuli were applied to 10 sites on the sole of the foot to quantify the RRF, defined as the area of the foot from where a reflex was evoked. For the secondary end points, electrical stimuli were applied to the cutaneous innervation area of the sural nerve. All patient groups presented enlarged RRF areas compared to pain-free volunteers (P<.001). Moreover, they also displayed lower NWR and pain thresholds to single and repeated electrical stimulation (P<.001). These results demonstrate that musculoskeletal pain conditions are characterized by enlarged RRF, lowered NWR and pain thresholds, and facilitated temporal summation, most likely caused by widespread spinal hyperexcitability. This study contributes to a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying these pain conditions, and it supports the use of the RRF and NWR as objective biomarkers for pain hypersensitivity in clinical and experimental pain research. PMID:23707309

  17. Whole-body vibration-induced muscular reflex: Is it a stretch-induced reflex?

    PubMed Central

    Cakar, Halil Ibrahim; Cidem, Muharrem; Sebik, Oguz; Yilmaz, Gizem; Karamehmetoglu, Safak Sahir; Kara, Sadik; Karacan, Ilhan; Türker, Kemal Sıtkı

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] Whole-body vibration (WBV) can induce reflex responses in muscles. A number of studies have reported that the physiological mechanisms underlying this type of reflex activity can be explained by reference to a stretch-induced reflex. Thus, the primary objective of this study was to test whether the WBV-induced muscular reflex (WBV-IMR) can be explained as a stretch-induced reflex. [Subjects and Methods] The present study assessed 20 healthy males using surface electrodes placed on their right soleus muscle. The latency of the tendon reflex (T-reflex) as a stretch-induced reflex was compared with the reflex latency of the WBV-IMR. In addition, simulations were performed at 25, 30, 35, 40, 45, and 50 Hz to determine the stretch frequency of the muscle during WBV. [Results] WBV-IMR latency (40.5 ± 0.8 ms; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 39.0–41.9 ms) was significantly longer than T-reflex latency (34.6 ± 0.5 ms; 95% CI: 33.6–35.5 ms) and the mean difference was 6.2 ms (95% CI of the difference: 4.7–7.7 ms). The simulations performed in the present study demonstrated that the frequency of the stretch signal would be twice the frequency of the vibration. [Conclusion] These findings do not support the notion that WBV-IMR can be explained by reference to a stretch-induced reflex. PMID:26310784

  18. Control of abdominal and expiratory intercostal muscle activity during vomiting - Role of ventral respiratory group expiratory neurons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Alan D.; Tan, L. K.; Suzuki, Ichiro

    1987-01-01

    The role of ventral respiratory group (VRG) expiratory (E) neurons in the control of abdominal and internal intercostal muscle activity during vomiting was investigated in cats. Two series of experiments were performed: in one, the activity of VRG E neurons was recorded during fictive vomiting in cats that were decerebrated, paralyzed, and artificially ventilated; in the second, the abdominal muscle activity during vomiting was compared before and after sectioning the axons of descending VRG E neurons in decerebrate spontaneously breathing cats. The results show that about two-thirds of VRG E neurons that project at least as far caudally as the lower thoracic cord contribute to internal intercostal muscle activity during vomiting. The remaining VRG E neurons contribute to abdominal muscle activation. As shown by severing the axons of the VRG E neurons, other, as yet unidenified, inputs (either descending from the brain stem or arising from spinal reflexes) can also produce abdominal muscle activation.

  19. Variability in Hoffmann and tendon reflexes in healthy male subjects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Good, E.; Do, S.; Jaweed, M.

    1992-01-01

    There is a time dependent decrease in amplitude of H- and T-reflexes during Zero-G exposure and subsequently an increase in the amplitude of the H-reflex 2-4 hours after return to a 1-G environment. These alterations have been attributed to the adaptation of the human neurosensory system to gravity. The Hoffman reflex (H-reflex) is an acknowledged method to determine the integrity of the monosynaptic reflex arc. However deep tendon reflexes (DTR's or T-reflexes), elicited by striking the tendon also utilize the entire reflex arc. The objective of this study was to compare the variability in latency and amplitude of the two reflexes in healthy subjects. Methods: Nine healthy male subjects, 27-43 years in age, 161-175 cm in height plus 60-86 Kg in weight, underwent weekly testing for four weeks with a Dan-Tec EMG counterpoint EMG system. Subjects were studied prone and surface EMG electrodes were placed on the right and left soleus muscles. The H-reflex was obtained by stimulating the tibial nerve in the politeal fossa with a 0.2 msec square wave pulse delivered at 2 Hz until the maximum H-reflex was obtained. The T-reflex was invoked by tapping the achilles tendon with a self triggering reflex hammer connected to the EMG system. The latencies and amplitudes for the H- and T-reflexes were measured. Results: These data indicate that the amplitudes of these reflexes varied considerably. However, latencies to invoked responses were consistent. The latency of the T-reflex was approximately 3-5 msec longer than the H-reflex. Conclusion: The T-reflex is easily obtained, requires less time, and is more comfortable to perform. Qualitative data can be obtained by deploying self triggering, force plated reflex hammers both in the 1-G and Zero-G environment.

  20. A postnatal switch in GABAergic control of spinal cutaneous reflexes

    PubMed Central

    Hathway, Gareth; Harrop, Emily; Baccei, Mark; Walker, Suellen; Moss, Andrew; Fitzgerald, Maria

    2007-01-01

    GABAergic signalling exerts powerful inhibitory control over spinal tactile and nociceptive processing but during development GABA can be depolarizing and the functional consequences of this upon neonatal pain processing is unknown. Here we show a postnatal switch in tonic GABAA receptor (GABAAR) modulation of cutaneous tactile and nociceptive reflexes from excitation to inhibition, but only in the intact spinal cord. Neonatal and 21-day old (P21) rats were intrathecally treated with one of the GABAAR antagonists bicuculline and gabazine with both compounds dose-dependently decreasing hindpaw mechanical and thermal withdrawal thresholds in P21 rats but increasing them in P3 neonates. Intrathecal gabazine also produced an increase in the cutaneous evoked EMG response of the biceps femoris in P21 rates while lowering the response in neonates. Injections of 3H-gabazine in the L4-L5 region at P3 confirmed that gabazine binding was restricted to the lumbar spinal cord. Spinalisation of P3 neonates at the upper thoracic level prior to drug application reversed the behavioural and EMG responses to GABA antagonists so that they resembled those of P21 rats. The effects of spinalisation were consistent with gabazine facilitation of ventral root potentials observed in isolated neonatal spinal cord. These data show a marked postnatal developmental switch in GABAergic control of neonatal nociception that is mediated by supraspinal structures and illustrate the importance of studying developmental circuits in the intact nervous system. PMID:16420421

  1. Alcohol Withdrawal and Cerebellar Mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Jung, Marianna E

    2015-08-01

    Cerebellar disorders trigger the symptoms of movement problems, imbalance, incoordination, and frequent fall. Cerebellar disorders are shown in various CNS illnesses including a drinking disorder called alcoholism. Alcoholism is manifested as an inability to control drinking in spite of adverse consequences. Human and animal studies have shown that cerebellar symptoms persist even after complete abstinence from drinking. In particular, the abrupt termination (ethanol withdrawal) of long-term excessive ethanol consumption has shown to provoke a variety of neuronal and mitochondrial damage to the cerebellum. Upon ethanol withdrawal, excitatory neurotransmitter molecules such as glutamate are overly released in brain areas including cerebellum. This is particularly relevant to the cerebellar neuronal network as glutamate signals are projected to Purkinje neurons through granular cells that are the most populated neuronal type in CNS. This excitatory neuronal signal may be elevated by ethanol withdrawal stress, which promotes an increase in intracellular Ca(2+) level and a decrease in a Ca(2+)-binding protein, both of which result in the excessive entry of Ca(2+) to the mitochondria. Subsequently, mitochondria undergo a prolonged opening of mitochondrial permeability transition pore and the overproduction of harmful free radicals, impeding adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-generating function. This in turn provokes the leakage of mitochondrial molecule cytochrome c to the cytosol, which triggers a cascade of adverse cytosol reactions. Upstream to this pathway, cerebellum under the condition of ethanol withdrawal has shown aberrant gene modifications through altered DNA methylation, histone acetylation, or microRNA expression. Interplay between these events and molecules may result in functional damage to cerebellar mitochondria and consequent neuronal degeneration, thereby contributing to motoric deficit. Mitochondria-targeting research may help develop a powerful new

  2. Alcohol Withdrawal and Cerebellar Mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Jung, Marianna E

    2015-08-01

    Cerebellar disorders trigger the symptoms of movement problems, imbalance, incoordination, and frequent fall. Cerebellar disorders are shown in various CNS illnesses including a drinking disorder called alcoholism. Alcoholism is manifested as an inability to control drinking in spite of adverse consequences. Human and animal studies have shown that cerebellar symptoms persist even after complete abstinence from drinking. In particular, the abrupt termination (ethanol withdrawal) of long-term excessive ethanol consumption has shown to provoke a variety of neuronal and mitochondrial damage to the cerebellum. Upon ethanol withdrawal, excitatory neurotransmitter molecules such as glutamate are overly released in brain areas including cerebellum. This is particularly relevant to the cerebellar neuronal network as glutamate signals are projected to Purkinje neurons through granular cells that are the most populated neuronal type in CNS. This excitatory neuronal signal may be elevated by ethanol withdrawal stress, which promotes an increase in intracellular Ca(2+) level and a decrease in a Ca(2+)-binding protein, both of which result in the excessive entry of Ca(2+) to the mitochondria. Subsequently, mitochondria undergo a prolonged opening of mitochondrial permeability transition pore and the overproduction of harmful free radicals, impeding adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-generating function. This in turn provokes the leakage of mitochondrial molecule cytochrome c to the cytosol, which triggers a cascade of adverse cytosol reactions. Upstream to this pathway, cerebellum under the condition of ethanol withdrawal has shown aberrant gene modifications through altered DNA methylation, histone acetylation, or microRNA expression. Interplay between these events and molecules may result in functional damage to cerebellar mitochondria and consequent neuronal degeneration, thereby contributing to motoric deficit. Mitochondria-targeting research may help develop a powerful new

  3. Penetrating abdominal trauma.

    PubMed

    Henneman, P L

    1989-08-01

    The management of patients with penetrating abdominal trauma is outlined in Figure 1. Patients with hemodynamic instability, evisceration, significant gastrointestinal bleeding, peritoneal signs, gunshot wounds with peritoneal violation, and type 2 and 3 shotgun wounds should undergo emergency laparotomy. The initial ED management of these patients includes airway management, monitoring of cardiac rhythm and vital signs, history, physical examination, and placement of intravenous lines. Blood should be obtained for initial hematocrit, type and cross-matching, electrolytes, and an alcohol level or drug screen as needed. Initial resuscitation should utilize crystalloid fluid replacement. If more than 2 liters of crystalloid are needed to stabilize an adult (less in a child), blood should be given. Group O Rh-negative packed red blood cells should be immediately available for a patient in impending arrest or massive hemorrhage. Type-specific blood should be available within 15 minutes. A patient with penetrating thoracic and high abdominal trauma should receive a portable chest x-ray, and a hemo- or pneumothorax should be treated with tube thoracostomy. An unstable patient with clinical signs consistent with a pneumothorax, however, should receive a tube thoracostomy prior to obtaining roentgenographic confirmation. If time permits, a nasogastric tube and Foley catheter should be placed, and the urine evaluated for blood (these procedures can be performed in the operating room). If kidney involvement is suspected because of hematuria or penetrating trauma in the area of a kidney or ureter in a patient requiring surgery, a single-shot IVP should be performed either in the ED or the operating room. An ECG is important in patients with possible cardiac involvement and in patients over the age of 40 going to the operating room. Tetanus status should be updated, and appropriate antibiotics covering bowel flora should be given. Operative management should rarely be delayed

  4. Acute incarcerated external abdominal hernia

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xue-Fei

    2014-01-01

    External abdominal hernia occurs when abdominal organs or tissues leave their normal anatomic site and protrude outside the skin through the congenital or acquired weakness, defects or holes on the abdominal wall, including inguinal hernia, umbilical hernia, femoral hernia and so on. Acute incarcerated hernia is a common surgical emergency. With advances in minimally invasive devices and techniques, the diagnosis and treatment have witnessed major changes, such as the use of laparoscopic surgery in some cases to achieve minimally invasive treatment. However, strict adherence to the indications and contraindications is still required. PMID:25489584

  5. Jaw, blink and corneal reflex latencies in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, E A; Ongerboer de Visser, B W; Barendswaard, E C; Arts, R J

    1985-01-01

    Jaw, blink and corneal reflexes, which all involve the trigeminal system, were recorded in 54 patients with multiple sclerosis; thirty-seven of these patients were classified as having definite multiple sclerosis and 17 as indefinite multiple sclerosis, according to Schumacher's criteria. The jaw reflex was abnormal less frequently than either of the other two reflexes, but in four cases it was the only abnormal reflex found. Testing a combination of two or three trigeminal reflexes did not yield a higher incidence of abnormalities than testing the blink or corneal reflex alone. Nine patients showed abnormal reflexes which were unexpected on the basis of clinical symptoms. The combined recordings demonstrate at least one abnormal reflex in 74% of the patients. The various types of reflex abnormalities reflect major damage to different parts of the trigeminal system and may therefore make an important contribution to the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis. PMID:4087004

  6. Abdominal aortic feminism.

    PubMed

    Mortimer, Alice Emily

    2014-11-14

    A 79-year-old woman presented to a private medical practice 2 years previously for an elective ultrasound screening scan. This imaging provided the evidence for a diagnosis of an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) to be made. Despite having a number of recognised risk factors for an AAA, her general practitioner at the time did not follow the guidance set out by the private medical professional, that is, to refer the patient to a vascular specialist to be entered into a surveillance programme and surgically evaluated. The patient became symptomatic with her AAA, was admitted to hospital and found to have a tender, symptomatic, 6 cm leaking AAA. She consented for an emergency open AAA repair within a few hours of being admitted to hospital, despite the 50% perioperative mortality risk. The patient spent 4 days in intensive care where she recovered well. She was discharged after a 12 day hospital stay but unfortunately passed away shortly after her discharge from a previously undiagnosed gastric cancer.

  7. The trigeminocardiac reflex – a comparison with the diving reflex in humans

    PubMed Central

    Lemaitre, Frederic; Schaller, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    The trigeminocardiac reflex (TCR) has previously been described in the literature as a reflexive response of bradycardia, hypotension, and gastric hypermotility seen upon mechanical stimulation in the distribution of the trigeminal nerve. The diving reflex (DR) in humans is characterized by breath-holding, slowing of the heart rate, reduction of limb blood flow and a gradual rise in the mean arterial blood pressure. Although the two reflexes share many similarities, their relationship and especially their functional purpose in humans have yet to be fully elucidated. In the present review, we have tried to integrate and elaborate these two phenomena into a unified physiological concept. Assuming that the TCR and the DR are closely linked functionally and phylogenetically, we have also highlighted the significance of these reflexes in humans. PMID:25995761

  8. Audiogenic reflex seizures in cats

    PubMed Central

    Lowrie, Mark; Bessant, Claire; Harvey, Robert J; Sparkes, Andrew; Garosi, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This study aimed to characterise feline audiogenic reflex seizures (FARS). Methods An online questionnaire was developed to capture information from owners with cats suffering from FARS. This was collated with the medical records from the primary veterinarian. Ninety-six cats were included. Results Myoclonic seizures were one of the cardinal signs of this syndrome (90/96), frequently occurring prior to generalised tonic–clonic seizures (GTCSs) in this population. Other features include a late onset (median 15 years) and absence seizures (6/96), with most seizures triggered by high-frequency sounds amid occasional spontaneous seizures (up to 20%). Half the population (48/96) had hearing impairment or were deaf. One-third of cats (35/96) had concurrent diseases, most likely reflecting the age distribution. Birmans were strongly represented (30/96). Levetiracetam gave good seizure control. The course of the epilepsy was non-progressive in the majority (68/96), with an improvement over time in some (23/96). Only 33/96 and 11/90 owners, respectively, felt the GTCSs and myoclonic seizures affected their cat’s quality of life (QoL). Despite this, many owners (50/96) reported a slow decline in their cat’s health, becoming less responsive (43/50), not jumping (41/50), becoming uncoordinated or weak in the pelvic limbs (24/50) and exhibiting dramatic weight loss (39/50). These signs were exclusively reported in cats experiencing seizures for >2 years, with 42/50 owners stating these signs affected their cat’s QoL. Conclusions and relevance In gathering data on audiogenic seizures in cats, we have identified a new epilepsy syndrome named FARS with a geriatric onset. Further studies are warranted to investigate potential genetic predispositions to this condition. PMID:25916687

  9. [ENDOVASCULAR ABDOMINAL AORTIC ANEURISM REPAIR].

    PubMed

    Maĭstrenko, D N; Generalov, M I; Tarazov, P G; Zherebtsov, F K; Osovskikh, V V; Ivanov, A S; Oleshchuk, A N; Granov, D A

    2015-01-01

    The authors analyzed the single-center experience of treatment of 72 patients with abdominal aortic aneurisms and severe accompanied pathology. The aneurisms were repaired by stent-grafts. All the patients had abdominal aortic aneurisms with the diameters from 41 to 84 mm against the background of severe somatic pathology. It was a contraindication to planned open surgery. An installation of stent-graft was successful in all 72 follow-ups. It wasn't necessary to use a conversion to open surgery. The follow-up period consisted of 44,6?2,1 months. Control ultrasound and computer tomography studies hadn't revealed an increase of aneurism sack sizes or "eakages". A reduction of abdominal aortic aneurism sizes was noted in 37 patients on 4-5% during first year after operation. The stent-graft implantation extends the possibilities of abdominal aortic aneurism treatment for patients from a high surgical risk group. PMID:26234059

  10. Functional Abdominal Pain in Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... At low doses, these medicines can be excellent pain relievers for some children. A fearful, anxious, or depressed child however should be fully assessed by a psychiatrist or psychologist. Some psychological treatments that help children cope with functional abdominal pain ...

  11. Abdominal ultrasonography, 2nd Ed

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, B.B.

    1984-01-01

    This volume is a new and updated edition of an extensively illustrated text and reference on the capabilities and imaging of gray scale ultrasonography for each major abdominal organ. Each major organ system is treated separately, including liver, gallbladder and bile ducts, pancreas, kidney, retroperitoneum, abdominal vasculature, and more. There are over 500 illustrations and ten pages of full color plates for cross sectional anatomy.

  12. Using ESO Reflex with Web Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Järveläinen, P.; Savolainen, V.; Oittinen, T.; Maisala, S.; Ullgrén, M. Hook, R.

    2008-08-01

    ESO Reflex is a prototype graphical workflow system, based on Taverna, and primarily intended to be a flexible way of running ESO data reduction recipes along with other legacy applications and user-written tools. ESO Reflex can also readily use the Taverna Web Services features that are based on the Apache Axis SOAP implementation. Taverna is a general purpose Web Service client, and requires no programming to use such services. However, Taverna also has some restrictions: for example, no numerical types such integers. In addition the preferred binding style is document/literal wrapped, but most astronomical services publish the Axis default WSDL using RPC/encoded style. Despite these minor limitations we have created simple but very promising test VO workflow using the Sesame name resolver service at CDS Strasbourg, the Hubble SIAP server at the Multi-Mission Archive at Space Telescope (MAST) and the WESIX image cataloging and catalogue cross-referencing service at the University of Pittsburgh. ESO Reflex can also pass files and URIs via the PLASTIC protocol to visualisation tools and has its own viewer for VOTables. We picked these three Web Services to try to set up a realistic and useful ESO Reflex workflow. They also demonstrate ESO Reflex abilities to use many kind of Web Services because each of them requires a different interface. We describe each of these services in turn and comment on how it was used

  13. Abdominal emergencies in the geriatric patient

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Abdominal pain is one of the most frequent reasons that elderly people visit the emergency department (ED). In this article, we review the deadliest causes of abdominal pain in this population, including mesenteric ischemia, abdominal aortic aneurysm, and appendicitis and potentially lethal non-abdominal causes. We also highlight the pitfalls in diagnosing, or rather misdiagnosing, these clinical entities. PMID:25635203

  14. Reflex control of intestinal gas dynamics and tolerance in humans.

    PubMed

    Harder, Hermann; Serra, Jordi; Azpiroz, Fernando; Malagelada, Juan-R

    2004-01-01

    Intestinal transit of gas is normally adapted to the luminal gas load, but in some patients impaired transit may lead to gas retention and symptoms. We hypothesized that intestinal gas transit is regulated by reflex mechanisms released by segmental distension at various gut levels. In 24 healthy subjects, we measured gas evacuation and perception of jejunal gas infusion (12 ml/min) during simultaneous infusion of duodenal lipids mimicking the postprandial caloric load (Intralipid, 1 kcal/min). We evaluated the effects of proximal (duodenal) distension (n = 8), distal (rectal) distension (n = 8), and sham distension, as control (n = 8). Duodenal lipid infusion produced gas retention (366 +/- 106 ml) with low abdominal perception (1.5 +/- 0.8 score). Distension of either the duodenum or rectum during lipid infusion expedited gas transit and prevented retention (-120 +/- 164 and -124 +/- 162 ml retention, respectively; P < 0.05 vs. control). However, the tolerance to the intestinal gas load differed markedly, depending on the site of distension; perception remained low during rectal distension (2.6 +/- 0.7 score; not significant vs. control) but increased during duodenal distension (4.4 +/- 0.7 score; P < 0.05 vs. control). We conclude that focal gut distension, either at proximal or distal sites, accelerates gas transit, but the symptomatic response depends on the site of stimulation.

  15. Neural reflexes in inflammation and immunity

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The mammalian immune system and the nervous system coevolved under the influence of infection and sterile injury. Knowledge of homeostatic mechanisms by which the nervous system controls organ function was originally applied to the cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, musculoskeletal, and other body systems. Development of advanced neurophysiological and immunological techniques recently enabled the study of reflex neural circuits that maintain immunological homeostasis, and are essential for health in mammals. Such reflexes are evolutionarily ancient, dating back to invertebrate nematode worms that possess primitive immune and nervous systems. Failure of these reflex mechanisms in mammals contributes to nonresolving inflammation and disease. It is also possible to target these neural pathways using electrical nerve stimulators and pharmacological agents to hasten the resolution of inflammation and provide therapeutic benefit. PMID:22665702

  16. Laryngeal Reflexes: Physiology, Technique and Clinical Use

    PubMed Central

    Ludlow, Christy L.

    2015-01-01

    This review examines the current level of knowledge and techniques available for the study of laryngeal reflexes. Overall, the larynx is under constant control of several systems (including respiration, swallowing and cough) as well as sensory-motor reflex responses involving glossopharyngeal, pharyngeal, laryngeal and tracheobronchial sensory receptors. Techniques for the clinical assessment of these reflexes are emerging and need to be examined for sensitivity and specificity in identifying laryngeal sensory disorders. Quantitative assessment methods for the diagnosis of sensory reductions as well as sensory hypersensitivity may account for laryngeal disorders such as chronic cough, paradoxical vocal fold disorder and muscular tension dysphonia. The development of accurate assessment techniques could improve our understanding of the mechanisms involved in these disorders. PMID:26241237

  17. A reflex resonance model of vocal vibrato.

    PubMed

    Titze, Ingo R; Story, Brad; Smith, Marshall; Long, Russel

    2002-05-01

    A reflex mechanism with a long latency (>40 ms) is implicated as a plausible cause of vocal vibrato. At least one pair of agonist-antagonist muscles that can change vocal-fold length is needed, such as the cricothyroid muscle paired with the thyroarytenoid muscle, or the cricothyroid muscle paired with the lateral cricoarytenoid muscle or a strap muscle. Such an agonist-antagonist muscle pair can produce negative feedback instability in vocal-fold length with this long reflex latency, producing oscillations on the order of 5-7 Hz. It is shown that singers appear to increase the gain in the reflex loop to cultivate the vibrato, which grows out of a spectrum of 0-15-Hz physiologic tremors in raw form. PMID:12051447

  18. A reflex resonance model of vocal vibrato

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titze, Ingo R.; Story, Brad; Smith, Marshall; Long, Russel

    2002-05-01

    A reflex mechanism with a long latency (>40 ms) is implicated as a plausible cause of vocal vibrato. At least one pair of agonist-antagonist muscles that can change vocal-fold length is needed, such as the cricothyroid muscle paired with the thyroarytenoid muscle, or the cricothyroid muscle paired with the lateral cricoarytenoid muscle or a strap muscle. Such an agonist-antagonist muscle pair can produce negative feedback instability in vocal-fold length with this long reflex latency, producing oscillations on the order of 5-7 Hz. It is shown that singers appear to increase the gain in the reflex loop to cultivate the vibrato, which grows out of a spectrum of 0-15-Hz physiologic tremors in raw form.

  19. Reflexive composites: self-healing composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margraf, Thomas W., Jr.; Barnell, Thomas J.; Havens, Ernie; Hemmelgarn, Christopher D.

    2008-03-01

    Cornerstone Research Group Inc. has developed reflexive composites achieving increased vehicle survivability through integrated structural awareness and responsiveness to damage. Reflexive composites can sense damage through integrated piezoelectric sensing networks and respond to damage by heating discrete locations to activate the healable polymer matrix in areas of damage. The polymer matrix is a modified thermoset shape memory polymer that heals based on phenomena known as reptation. In theory, the reptation healing phenomena should occur in microseconds; however, during experimentation, it has been observed that to maximize healing and restore up to 85 % of mechanical properties a healing cycle of at least three minutes is required. This paper will focus on work conducted to determine the healing mechanisms at work in CRG's reflexive composites, the optimal healing cycles, and an explanation of the difference between the reptation model and actual healing times.

  20. Reflex: Graphical workflow engine for data reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ESO Reflex development Team

    2014-01-01

    Reflex provides an easy and flexible way to reduce VLT/VLTI science data using the ESO pipelines. It allows graphically specifying the sequence in which the data reduction steps are executed, including conditional stops, loops and conditional branches. It eases inspection of the intermediate and final data products and allows repetition of selected processing steps to optimize the data reduction. The data organization necessary to reduce the data is built into the system and is fully automatic; advanced users can plug their own modules and steps into the data reduction sequence. Reflex supports the development of data reduction workflows based on the ESO Common Pipeline Library. Reflex is based on the concept of a scientific workflow, whereby the data reduction cascade is rendered graphically and data seamlessly flow from one processing step to the next. It is distributed with a number of complete test datasets so users can immediately start experimenting and familiarize themselves with the system.

  1. Conservative management of abdominal injuries

    PubMed Central

    Okuş, Ahmet; Sevinç, Barış; Ay, Serden; Arslan, Kemal; Karahan, Ömer; Eryılmaz, Mehmet Ali

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Non-operative management of abdominal injuries has recently become more common. Especially non-operative treatment of blunt abdominal trauma is gaining wide acceptance. In this study, the efficacy of non-operative treatment in abdominal trauma (blunt penetrating) is discussed. Material and Methods: All patients who received treatment due to abdominal trauma from November 2008 to January 2013 were retrospectively analyzed. The demographic characteristics, type of injury, injured organ, type of treatment (operative vs. nonoperative) and mortality data were evaluated. Results: The study includes 115 patients treated for abdominal trauma in our department. The mechanism of trauma was stab wounds in 60%, blunt abdominal trauma in 23.5% and gunshot wounds in 16.5%. Forty-two patients (36.5%) were operated for hemodynamic instability and/or peritonitis on admission. The remaining 63.5% of patients (n=73) were treated nonoperatively, 10 of whom required laparotomy during follow-up. The remaining 63 patients were treated with non-operative management. The success rate for non-operative treatment was 86.3% and there was no difference in terms of the types of injuries. The mortality rate was 4.3% (n= 5) in the whole series, but there were no deaths among the patients who had received non-operative treatment. In the whole patient group 54.2% (n=63) were treated nonoperatively. Conclusion: Nonoperative treatment in abdominal trauma is safe and effective. Patients with clinical stability and normal physical examination findings can be treated nonoperatively with close monitoring. PMID:25931868

  2. Physiopharmacology of the peristaltic reflex: an update.

    PubMed

    De Ponti, F; Cosentino, M; Lecchini, S; Frigo, G M; Crema, A

    1991-06-01

    The peristaltic reflex is one of the simplest models which can be used to study the function of enteric neurons by recording intestinal motor activity. Peristalsis consists of a coordinated, aborally propagating motor activity which requires the functional integrity of receptor pathways, excitatory and inhibitory neural pathways and neuromuscular junctions. Luminal distension elicits polarized responses: an ascending excitatory response (ascending contraction) and a descending inhibitory response (descending relaxation). The present paper reviews the most recent acquisitions on the neural pathways and neurotransmitters involved in the regulation of the peristaltic reflex.

  3. Effects of acute alcohol withdrawal on nest building in mice selectively bred for alcohol withdrawal severity.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, Gian D; Phillips, Tamara J; Crabbe, John C

    2016-10-15

    Nest building has been used to assess thermoregulatory behavior and positive motivational states in mice. There are known genetic influences on ethanol withdrawal severity as well as individual/thermoregulatory nest building. Withdrawal Seizure-Prone (WSP-1, WSP-2) and Withdrawal Seizure-Resistant (WSR-1, WSR-2) mice were selectively bred for high vs low handling-induced convulsion (HIC) severity, respectively, during withdrawal from chronic ethanol vapor inhalation. They also differ in HIC severity during withdrawal from an acute, 4g/kg ethanol injection. In our initial study, withdrawal from an acute dose of ethanol dose-dependently impaired nest building over the initial 24h of withdrawal in genetically segregating Withdrawal Seizure Control (WSC) mice. In two further studies, acute ethanol withdrawal suppressed nest building for up to two days in WSP-1 females. Deficits in nest building from ethanol were limited to the initial 10h of withdrawal in WSR-1 females and to the initial 24h of withdrawal in WSP-1 and WSR-1 males. Effects of ethanol on nest building for up to two days were found in WSP-2 and WSR-2 mice of both sexes. Nest building deficits in female mice from the first replicate could not be explained by a general decrease in locomotor behavior. These results suggest that nest building is a novel behavioral phenotype for indexing the severity of acute ethanol withdrawal, and that genes contributing to this trait differ from those affecting acute withdrawal HIC severity. PMID:27503811

  4. [Extension of the concept of withdrawal signs].

    PubMed

    Kato, Shin

    2015-12-01

    If the conditions including normal-dose dependence in which withdrawal signs are observed in the absence of definite psychic dependence are classified as dependence, this classification should be regarded as inappropriate extension of the concept of drug dependence. These conditions should be diagnosed as 'withdrawal' as specified by the DSM-5 or ICD-10. Advancements of research have clarified that an increased number of drugs cause withdrawal signs. Some Japanese researchers use the concept of 'withdrawal signs of psychic dependence.' Their definition of drug dependence and concept of withdrawal signs, however, are different from the definition established by the WHO and the researchers specializing in this field. Thus, the concept of 'withdrawal signs of psychic dependence' raises a lot of questions. PMID:26964289

  5. Abdominal aortic grafting for spontaneous infrarenal abdominal aortic dissection.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Hiroto; Shibuya, Takashi; Shintani, Takashi; Uenaka, Hisazumi; Suehiro, Shigefumi; Satoh, Hisashi

    2010-02-01

    This case report concerns a 62-year-old woman with spontaneous infrarenal abdominal aortic dissection, which developed into claudication and rest pain in the lower extremity. Multi-row detector computed tomography showed the entry site of the abdominal aortic dissection at the second lumbar artery, while the reentry site was found intraoperatively at the median sacral artery, indicating that the false lumen had progressed and compressed the true lumen. A direct approach involving grafting appears to be an effective procedure for resolving mesenteric and lower extremity hypoperfusion due to aortic dissection with a dilated false channel, even during the acute period. PMID:19879731

  6. Evaluating the Reflexive Practices in a Learning Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruno, Andreina; Galuppo, Laura; Gilardi, Silvia

    2011-01-01

    Reflexivity is a primary requirement for professional work. Our aim was to describe a methodology suitable for detecting the development of reflexive practice through the analysis of 59 Master's degree students' journals. We explore the use and changes of reflexive practice in relation to the settings and activities of the course using analysis of…

  7. On Reflection: Is Reflexivity Necessarily Beneficial in Intercultural Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blasco, Maribel

    2012-01-01

    This article explores how the concept of reflexivity is used in intercultural education. Reflexivity is often presented as a key learning goal in acquiring intercultural competence (ICC). Yet, reflexivity can be defined in different ways, and take different forms across time and space, depending on the concepts of selfhood that prevail and how…

  8. Estimated freshwater withdrawals in Washington, 2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lane, Ron C.; Welch, Wendy B.

    2015-03-18

    The amount of public- and self-supplied water used for domestic, irrigation, livestock, aquaculture, industrial, mining, and thermoelectric power was estimated for state, county, and eastern and western regions of Washington during calendar year 2010. Withdrawals of freshwater for offstream uses were estimated to be about 4,885 million gallons per day. The total estimated freshwater withdrawals for 2010 was approximately 15 percent less than the 2005 estimate because of decreases in irrigation and thermoelectric power withdrawals.

  9. 29 CFR 4219.12 - Employers liable upon mass withdrawal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Employers liable upon mass withdrawal. 4219.12 Section 4219... Redetermination of Withdrawal Liability Upon Mass Withdrawal § 4219.12 Employers liable upon mass withdrawal. (a... experiences successive mass withdrawals, an employer that has been determined to be liable under this...

  10. 29 CFR 4219.12 - Employers liable upon mass withdrawal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Employers liable upon mass withdrawal. 4219.12 Section 4219... Redetermination of Withdrawal Liability Upon Mass Withdrawal § 4219.12 Employers liable upon mass withdrawal. (a... experiences successive mass withdrawals, an employer that has been determined to be liable under this...

  11. 29 CFR 4219.12 - Employers liable upon mass withdrawal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Employers liable upon mass withdrawal. 4219.12 Section 4219... Redetermination of Withdrawal Liability Upon Mass Withdrawal § 4219.12 Employers liable upon mass withdrawal. (a... experiences successive mass withdrawals, an employer that has been determined to be liable under this...

  12. 29 CFR 4219.12 - Employers liable upon mass withdrawal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Employers liable upon mass withdrawal. 4219.12 Section 4219... Redetermination of Withdrawal Liability Upon Mass Withdrawal § 4219.12 Employers liable upon mass withdrawal. (a... experiences successive mass withdrawals, an employer that has been determined to be liable under this...

  13. 29 CFR 4219.12 - Employers liable upon mass withdrawal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Employers liable upon mass withdrawal. 4219.12 Section 4219... Redetermination of Withdrawal Liability Upon Mass Withdrawal § 4219.12 Employers liable upon mass withdrawal. (a... experiences successive mass withdrawals, an employer that has been determined to be liable under this...

  14. Abdominal actinomycosis mimicking acute appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Conrad, Robert Joseph; Riela, Steven; Patel, Ravi; Misra, Subhasis

    2015-01-01

    A 52-year-old Hispanic woman presented to the emergency department, reporting worsening sharp lower right quadrant abdominal pain for 3 days. CT of the abdomen and pelvis showed evidence of inflammation in the peritoneal soft tissues adjacent to an enlarged and thick-walled appendix, an appendicolith, no abscess formation and a slightly thickened caecum consistent with acute appendicitis. During laparoscopic appendectomy, the caecum was noted to be firm, raising suspicion of malignancy. Surgical oncology team was consulted and open laparotomy with right hemicolectomy was performed. Pathology reported that the ileocaecal mass was not a malignancy but was, rather, actinomycosis. The patient was discharged after 10 days of intravenous antibiotics in the hospital, with the diagnosis of abdominal actinomycosis. Although the original clinical and radiological findings in this case were highly suggestive of acute appendicitis, abdominal actinomycosis should be in the differential for right lower quadrant pain as it may be treated non-operatively.

  15. Abdominal radiation causes bacterial translocation

    SciTech Connect

    Guzman-Stein, G.; Bonsack, M.; Liberty, J.; Delaney, J.P.

    1989-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if a single dose of radiation to the rat abdomen leads to bacterial translocation into the mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN). A second issue addressed was whether translocation correlates with anatomic damage to the mucosa. The radiated group (1100 cGy) which received anesthesia also was compared with a control group and a third group which received anesthesia alone but no abdominal radiation. Abdominal radiation lead to 100% positive cultures of MLN between 12 hr and 4 days postradiation. Bacterial translocation was almost nonexistent in the control and anesthesia group. Signs of inflammation and ulceration of the intestinal mucosa were not seen until Day 3 postradiation. Mucosal damage was maximal by Day 4. Bacterial translocation onto the MLN after a single dose of abdominal radiation was not apparently dependent on anatomical, histologic damage of the mucosa.

  16. A Reflexive Model for Teaching Instructional Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shambaugh, Neal; Magliaro, Susan

    2001-01-01

    Documents a five-year study of two instructors who collaborated on formally studying their teaching of a master's level instructional design course. Outlines their views on learning, teaching, and instructional design (ID), describes the ID course, and explains the reflexive instructional model used, in which the teachers examined their teaching…

  17. Biological Motion Cues Trigger Reflexive Attentional Orienting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shi, Jinfu; Weng, Xuchu; He, Sheng; Jiang, Yi

    2010-01-01

    The human visual system is extremely sensitive to biological signals around us. In the current study, we demonstrate that biological motion walking direction can induce robust reflexive attentional orienting. Following a brief presentation of a central point-light walker walking towards either the left or right direction, observers' performance…

  18. Taking Control of Reflexive Social Attention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ristic, Jelena; Kingstone, Alan

    2005-01-01

    Attention is shifted reflexively to where other people are looking. It has been argued by a number of investigators that this social attention effect reflects the obligatory bottom-up activation of domain-specific modules within the inferior temporal (IT) cortex that are specialized for processing face and gaze information. However, it is also the…

  19. Reflex Anuria After Renal Tumor Embolization

    SciTech Connect

    Kervancioglu, Selim Sirikci, Akif; Erbagci, Ahmet

    2007-04-15

    We report a case of reflex anuria after transarterial embolization of a renal tumor. Anuria developed immediately after embolization and resolved 74 hr following the procedure. We postulate that reflux anuria in our case was related to mechanoreceptors, chemoreceptors, or both, as these are stimulated by the occluded blood vessels, ischemia, and edema of the normal renal tissue of an embolized kidney.

  20. Plasma quiescence in a reflex discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Jerde, L.; Friedman, S.; Carr, W.; Seidl, M.

    1980-02-01

    A thermionic cathode reflex discharge and the plasma it produces are studied. It is found that extremely quiescent plasmas can be produced when the electron-loss rate due to classical diffusion is equal to the ion-loss rate. Particle and power balances for the quiescent plasma are obtained, and the average electron energy loss per ion produced is determined.

  1. Doing Reflexivity: Moments of Unbecoming and Becoming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Alison; Allan, Julie

    2014-01-01

    This paper offers an account of a reflexive "trip" undertaken by a professional doctoral student and her supervisor. It presents a series of vignettes which offer an account of unbecomings and becomings encountered by the student. Making use of a dialogic approach in which the supervisor responds to the student, we suggest this method of…

  2. Dilemmas and Deliberations in Reflexive Ethnographic Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Janean Valerie

    2014-01-01

    This paper traces insights into the challenges and dilemmas experienced whilst researching students' interpretations and understandings of the Behaviour Management in Schools policy in Western Australia. Journal records, supported by student transcripts, are woven together in a reflexive ethnographic journey--from the beginning phase of…

  3. Reflectivity, Reflexivity and Situated Reflective Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malthouse, Richard; Roffey-Barentsen, Jodi; Watts, Mike

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes an aspect of reflective practice referred to as situated reflective practice. The overarching theory is derived from social theories of structuration and reflexivity. In particular, from Giddens' theory of structuration, which sees social life as an interplay of agency and structure. Discussion of the research reported…

  4. Reflexive Learning: Stages towards Wisdom with Dreyfus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McPherson, Ian

    2005-01-01

    The Dreyfus (2001) account of seven stages of learning is considered in the context of the Dreyfus (1980s) account of five stages of skill development. The two new stages, Mastery and Practical Wisdom, make more explicit certain themes implicit in the five-stage account. In this way Dreyfus (2001) encourages a more reflexive approach. The themes…

  5. Abdominal aortic aneurysms: case report

    PubMed Central

    Hadida, Camille; Rajwani, Moez

    1998-01-01

    A 71-year-old male presented to a chiropractic clinic with subacute low back pain. While the pain appeared to be mechanical in nature, radiographic evaluation revealed an abdominal aortic aneurysm, which required the patient to have vascular surgery. This case report illustrates the importance of the history and physical examination in addition to a thorough knowledge of the features of abdominal aortic aneurysms. The application of spinal manipulative therapy in patients with (AAA) is also discussed. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3

  6. Recurrent abdominal pain during childhood.

    PubMed Central

    Scott, R. B.

    1994-01-01

    Recurrent abdominal pain is a common presenting complaint among children. A thorough history and physical examination and limited laboratory investigation should enable a physician to make a positive diagnosis of "functional" recurrent abdominal pain in 90% to 95% of cases; an organic cause is identified in only 5% to 10%. The care and thoroughness of the history and physical examination establish the physician's credibility; explaining the clinical basis for the diagnosis and educating the child and parents on what is known about the condition reassures the parents. PMID:8199511

  7. Radiological management of abdominal abscess.

    PubMed Central

    Mac Erlean, D P; Gibney, R G

    1983-01-01

    Forty-two abdominal and retroperitoneal abscesses were drained percutaneously under ultrasound guidance. A success rate of 85.7% was achieved. Subsequent surgery was required in only 5 patients. Postoperative and spontaneous abscesses did equally well. Most intra-abdominal and retroperitoneal abscesses are amenable to this form of percutaneous drainage. The procedure requires only local anaesthesia and is well tolerated. Surgical management should probably now be reserved for those cases which are considered unsuitable for percutaneous drainage or which fail to resolve following this procedure. PMID:6842496

  8. Laparoscopic excision of intra-abdominal paragonimiasis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jun-Young; Kang, Chang-Moo; Choi, Gi-Hong; Yang, Woo-Ick; Sim, Seo-Bo; Kwon, Ji-Eun; Kim, Kyung-Sik; Choi, Jin-Sub; Lee, Woo-Jung; Kim, Byong-Ro

    2007-12-01

    Lung fluke, Paragonimus westermani of Paragonimus species usually are accompanied by a persistent cough, hemoptysis, and chest pain. Extrapulmonary paragonimiasis caused by ectopic parasites in aberrant locations such as the abdominal wall, abdominal organs, and brain has been reported and the most commonly involved extrapulmonary organ is the brain. We present a case of 56-year-old male patient with intra-abdominal paragonimiasis who underwent laparoscopic excision of abdominal granuloma caused by parasite infection. An intra-abdominal mass associated with eosinophilia might be related to parasite infection. A laparoscopic approach is the most appropriate treatment modality in such benign abdominal pathology.

  9. Incontinence of urine due to instability of micturition reflexes: Part I. Detrusor reflex instability.

    PubMed

    Mahony, D T; Laferte, R O; Blais, D J

    1980-03-01

    Micturition reflex instability may result from malfunction of the detrusor reflex or instability of the pudendal nucleus which innervates the pelvic floor muscles and external sphincter. Detrusor instability is the result of sacral micturition reflex center (SMRC) hyperexcitability. This may be caused by underinhibition or overfacilitation of the SMRC, and there are both central and peripheral causes of each. Detrusor hypertrophy may invoke chronic overactivity of the detrusodetrusor facilitative reflex causing SMRC overfacilitation. Similarly, distal urethral stricture and/or chronic urethritis causing chronic overactivity of the urethrodetrusor facilitative reflex is a common cause of SMRC overfacilitation. Pathologic relaxation and weakness of the striated muscles of the pelvic floor and perineum resulting in underactivity of the perineodetrusor inhibitory reflex, is a common cause of SMRC underinhibition. In adult women these factors often coexist. Each may predispose to stress-induced detrusor instability and are often seen in association with, or are confused with, true stress incontinence. The distinguishing characteristics of detrusor hypertonicity and detrusor hyperreflexia are reviewed, and the various mechanisms of pseudostress incontinence and of urgency incontinence are discussed in detail.

  10. Acute withdrawal: diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Brust, John C M

    2014-01-01

    Symptoms of alcohol withdrawal range in severity from mild "hangover" to fatal delirium tremens (DTs). Tremor, hallucinosis, and seizures usually occur within 48 hours of abstinence. Seizures tend to be generalized without focality, occurring singly or in a brief cluster, but status epilepticus is not unusual. DTs usually appears after 48 hours of abstinence and consists of marked inattentiveness, agitation, hallucinations, fluctuating level of alertness, marked tremulousness, and sympathetic overactivity. The mainstay of treatment for alcohol withdrawal is benzodiazepine pharmacotherapy, which can be used to control mild early symptoms, to prevent progression to DTs, or to treat DTs itself. Alternative less evidence-based pharmacotherapies include phenobarbital, anticonvulsants, baclofen, gamma-hydroxybutyric acid, beta-blockers, alpha-2-agonists, and N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor blockers. Treatment of DTs is a medical emergency requiring heavy sedation in an intensive care unit, with close attention to autonomic instability, fever, fluid loss, and electrolyte imbalance. Frequent comorbid disorders include hypoglycemia, liver failure, pancreatitis, sepsis, meningitis, intracranial hemorrhage, and Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome.

  11. Modulation of the initial light reflex during affective picture viewing.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Robert R; Bradley, Margaret M; Lang, Peter J

    2014-09-01

    An initial reflexive constriction of the pupil to stimulation-the light reflex-is primarily modulated by brightness, but is attenuated when participants are under threat of shock (i.e., fear-inhibited light reflex). The present study assessed whether the light reflex is similarly attenuated when viewing emotional pictures. Pupil diameter was recorded while participants viewed erotic, violent, and neutral scenes that were matched in brightness; scrambled versions identical in brightness were also presented as an additional control. Compared to viewing neutral scenes, the light reflex was reliably modulated by hedonic content, with significant attenuation both when viewing unpleasant as well as pleasant pictures. No differences in the light reflex were found among scrambled versions. Thus, emotional modulation of the initial light reflex is not confined to a context of fear and is not indicative of brightness differences when viewing pictures of natural scenes.

  12. Abdominal pain - children under age 12

    MedlinePlus

    Stomach pain in children; Pain - abdomen - children; Abdominal cramps in children; Belly ache in children ... When your child complains of abdominal pain, see if they can describe ... kinds of pain: Generalized pain or pain over more than half ...

  13. 49 CFR 365.123 - Applicant withdrawal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Applicant withdrawal. 365.123 Section 365.123 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY... APPLICATIONS FOR OPERATING AUTHORITY How To Apply for Operating Authority § 365.123 Applicant withdrawal....

  14. Cognitive Impairment in Acute Cocaine Withdrawal

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, Brendan J.; Yeager, Kenneth R.; Pepper, Tom H.; Beversdorf, David Q.

    2005-01-01

    Objective To perform a pilot study to examine a range of cognitive flexibility tasks early in cocaine withdrawal. Background Previous neuropsychological investigations of cocaine withdrawal have conflicted regarding whether impaired cognitive flexibility occurs. However, most studies have examined patients later in withdrawal. Anxiety and yohimbine-induced panic are greatest early in withdrawal, and both anxiety and increased noradrenergic tone can impair cognitive flexibility. Method Twelve patients acutely withdrawing from cocaine were compared with gender-, age-, and estimated premorbid intelligence–matched control subjects on tests of cognitive flexibility as well as verbal fluency, verbal memory, spatial memory, and attention. Results As predicted, impairments were found on the cognitive flexibility tasks. Impairments also were present in verbal fluency and verbal memory but not spatial memory or attention. Conclusions We propose that the cognitive flexibility impairment may relate to the increased noradrenergic activation recently described in cocaine withdrawal. Impairments on verbal tasks may also relate to an impaired flexibility in the search of semantic networks. Further research will explore the effects of pharmacologic manipulation of the noradrenergic system on cognition in acute withdrawal. Recently, propranolol has been shown to benefit patients in cocaine withdrawal. Further research will explore whether impaired cognitive flexibility related to altered noradrenergic tone could serve as a mechanism for this treatment response. PMID:15970730

  15. 42 CFR 1008.40 - Withdrawal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Withdrawal. 1008.40 Section 1008.40 Public Health OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL-HEALTH CARE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OIG AUTHORITIES ADVISORY OPINIONS BY THE OIG Submission of a Formal Request for an Advisory Opinion § 1008.40 Withdrawal....

  16. New mechanisms and perspectives in nicotine withdrawal

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, K.J.; Muldoon, P.P.; De Biasi, M.; Damaj, M.I.

    2014-01-01

    Diseases associated with tobacco use constitute a major health problem worldwide. Upon cessation of tobacco use, an unpleasant withdrawal syndrome occurs in dependent individuals. Avoidance of the negative state produced by nicotine withdrawal represents a motivational component that promotes continued tobacco use and relapse after smoking cessation. With the modest success rate of currently available smoking cessation therapies, understanding mechanisms involved in the nicotine withdrawal syndrome are crucial for developing successful treatments. Animal models provide a useful tool for examining neuroadaptative mechanisms and factors influencing nicotine withdrawal, including sex, age, and genetic factors. Such research has also identified an important role for nicotinic receptor subtypes in different aspects of the nicotine withdrawal syndrome (e.g., physical vs. affective signs). In addition to nicotinic receptors, the opioid and endocannabinoid systems, various signal transduction pathways, neurotransmitters, and neuropeptides have been implicated in the nicotine withdrawal syndrome. Animal studies have informed human studies of genetic variants and potential targets for smoking cessation therapies. Overall, the available literature indicates that the nicotine withdrawal syndrome is complex, and involves a range of neurobiological mechanisms. As research in nicotine withdrawal progresses, new pharmacological options for smokers attempting to quit can be identified, and treatments with fewer side effects that are better tailored to the unique characteristics of patients may become available. PMID:25433149

  17. 21 CFR 314.620 - Withdrawal procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... FOR HUMAN USE APPLICATIONS FOR FDA APPROVAL TO MARKET A NEW DRUG Approval of New Drugs When Human... approval. For new drugs approved under this subpart, FDA may withdraw approval, following a hearing as... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Withdrawal procedures. 314.620 Section...

  18. 21 CFR 314.530 - Withdrawal procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... FOR HUMAN USE APPLICATIONS FOR FDA APPROVAL TO MARKET A NEW DRUG Accelerated Approval of New Drugs for Serious or Life-Threatening Illnesses § 314.530 Withdrawal procedures. (a) For new drugs approved under... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Withdrawal procedures. 314.530 Section...

  19. Increased pain sensitivity in alcohol withdrawal syndrome.

    PubMed

    Jochum, Thomas; Boettger, Michael K; Burkhardt, Christin; Juckel, Georg; Bär, Karl-Jürgen

    2010-08-01

    Withdrawal from analgesic and addictive substances such as opioids or ethanol is associated with increased sensitivity to sensory stimulation in animal models. Here, we investigated perception of innocuous and noxious thermal or electric stimuli applied to the left hand or sternum in 30 male patients undergoing withdrawal from alcohol, 30 male abstained alcoholics and matched controls. The alcohol withdrawal scale and the Banger score were obtained to estimate the severity of withdrawal. In addition, the Beck depression inventory was used to estimate the influence of depressive symptoms on pain perception. The data presented provide substantial evidence that subjects undergoing alcohol withdrawal show increased heat pain sensitivity. Interestingly, this effect was observed both on the left hand and sternum. Pain thresholds and tolerances of electric stimuli did not differ between groups. However, in a subgroup analysis, a higher sensitivity for electrical pain thresholds and tolerances was observed in those patients that were identified to require pharmacological treatment for withdrawal according to disease severity. Furthermore, the perceived painful thermal and electrical sensation was substantially influenced by the affective state of patients. No differences were found between patients of the abstained group and control subjects for any pain parameter. In conclusion, we demonstrate withdrawal-induced hyperalgesia upon thermal stimulation in patients. Since the influence of affective symptoms on pain perception during withdrawal is remarkable, we assume that peripheral and central mechanisms might account for this finding, which should be assessed in detail in future studies.

  20. 42 CFR 457.170 - Withdrawal process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Withdrawal process. 457.170 Section 457.170 Public... Plans for Child Health Insurance Programs and Outreach Strategies § 457.170 Withdrawal process. (a... amendment, or any portion of a proposed State plan or plan amendment, at any time during the review...

  1. 42 CFR 457.170 - Withdrawal process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...) STATE CHILDREN'S HEALTH INSURANCE PROGRAMS (SCHIPs) ALLOTMENTS AND GRANTS TO STATES Introduction; State Plans for Child Health Insurance Programs and Outreach Strategies § 457.170 Withdrawal process. (a... 42 Public Health 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Withdrawal process. 457.170 Section 457.170...

  2. 42 CFR 457.170 - Withdrawal process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...) STATE CHILDREN'S HEALTH INSURANCE PROGRAMS (SCHIPs) ALLOTMENTS AND GRANTS TO STATES Introduction; State Plans for Child Health Insurance Programs and Outreach Strategies § 457.170 Withdrawal process. (a... 42 Public Health 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Withdrawal process. 457.170 Section 457.170...

  3. 42 CFR 457.170 - Withdrawal process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...) STATE CHILDREN'S HEALTH INSURANCE PROGRAMS (SCHIPs) ALLOTMENTS AND GRANTS TO STATES Introduction; State Plans for Child Health Insurance Programs and Outreach Strategies § 457.170 Withdrawal process. (a... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Withdrawal process. 457.170 Section 457.170...

  4. Abdominal cocoon secondary to disseminated tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Puppala, Radha; Sripathi, Smiti; Kadavigere, Rajagopal; Koteshwar, Prakashini; Singh, Jyoti

    2014-01-01

    Abdominal cocoon, also known as sclerosing encapsulating peritonitis, represents a rare entity where a variable length of the small bowel is enveloped by a fibrocollagenous membrane giving the appearance of a cocoon. It may be asymptomatic and is often diagnosed incidentally at laparotomy. We present a rare case of abdominal cocoon due to abdominal tuberculosis. PMID:25239980

  5. Neonatal withdrawal syndrome after chronic maternal consumption of 4-methylethcathinone.

    PubMed

    Pichini, Simona; Rotolo, Maria Concetta; García, Jordi; Girona, Noelia; Leal, Lorna; García-Algar, Oscar; Pacifici, Roberta

    2014-12-01

    Synthetic cathinones have been markedly present in the Spanish drug market in recent years. These substances can be easily obtained in "smart shops", smoke shops, gas stations and web sites where they can be bought and received anonymously avoiding normal law controls. For the first time we present a case of a neonatal withdrawal syndrome in a baby born to a woman who was a chronic consumer of 4-methylethcathinone. The newborn presented with increased jitteriness and irritability, highpitched cry, hypertonia in the limbs and brisk tendon reflexes. 4-Methylethcathinone was identified and quantified by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry in the four subsequent 3cm segments of maternal hair (4.3, 4.0, 4.0 and 3.9ng/mg hair starting from most proximal segment) accounting for maternal consumption during the whole pregnancy and before and in neonatal meconium (0.7ng/g) confirming fetal exposure during intrauterine life. Methadone and its metabolite were also measured in maternal and neonatal matrices. Counseling pregnant women and women who may become pregnant on the consequences of fetal drug exposure to new designer drugs like 4-methylethcathinone is critical to preventing poor neonatal outcomes. This case report is informative to those studying designer drugs and those clinically involved with pregnant women abusing psychoactive substances.

  6. Reflex sympathetic dystrophy associated with antiepileptic drugs.

    PubMed

    Falasca, G F; Toly, T M; Reginato, A J; Schraeder, P L; O'Connor, C R

    1994-01-01

    Reflex sympathetic dystrophy syndrome (RSDS) complicating antiepileptic drug (AED) therapy is not well acknowledged in the neurologic literature. We report 4 patients with reflex sympathetic dystrophy that occurred while they were receiving AEDs. All patients had shoulder and hand involvement, which in 2 was bilateral, and 1 had ipsilateral foot involvement. Two patients did not respond to a change in AEDs, but all improved with a course of prednisone. One patient with phenobarbital (PB)-associated RSDS relapsed on inadvertent rechallenge with secobarbital. A review of the literature showed that several other fibrosing disorders are associated with AED administration, including Dupuytren's contractures, frozen shoulder, plantar and hand nodules, and Peyronie's disease. RSD associated with AEDs is important to recognize because it may result in permanent disability if treatment is delayed.

  7. The spinal reflex cannot be perceptually separated from voluntary movements.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Arko; Haggard, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Both voluntary and involuntary movements activate sensors in the muscles, skin, tendon and joints. As limb movement can result from a mixture of spinal reflexes and voluntary motor commands, the cortical centres underlying conscious proprioception might either aggregate or separate the sensory inputs generated by voluntary movements from those generated by involuntary movements such as spinal reflexes. We addressed whether healthy volunteers could perceive the contribution of a spinal reflex during movements that combined both reflexive and voluntary contributions. Volunteers reported the reflexive contribution in leg movements that were partly driven by the knee-jerk reflex induced by a patellar tendon tap and partly by voluntary motor control. In one condition, participants were instructed to kick back in response to a tendon tap. The results were compared to reflexes in a resting baseline condition without voluntary movement. In a further condition, participants were instructed to kick forwards after a tap. Volunteers reported the perceived reflex contribution by repositioning the leg to the perceived maximum displacement to which the reflex moved the leg after each tendon tap. In the resting baseline condition, the reflex was accurately perceived. We found a near-unity slope of linear regressions of perceived on actual reflexive displacement. Both the slope value and the quality of regression fit in individual volunteers were significantly reduced when volunteers were instructed to generate voluntary backward kicks as soon as they detected the tap. In the kick forward condition, kinematic analysis showed continuity of reflex and voluntary movements, but the reflex contribution could be estimated from electromyography (EMG) recording on each trial. Again, participants' judgements of reflexes showed a poor relation to reflex EMG, in contrast to the baseline condition. In sum, we show that reflexes can be accurately perceived from afferent information. However

  8. Photic sneeze reflex in nephropathic cystinosis.

    PubMed

    Katz, B; Melles, R B; Swenson, M R; Schneider, J A

    1990-12-01

    Photic induced sneeze is a reflex that occurs in certain individuals after exposure to bright light. Cystinosis is an autosomal recessive inborn error of metabolism in which nonprotein cystine accumulates within lysosomes. The pathognomonic ocular manifestation of cystinosis is corneal crystal deposition. We observed photic induced sneezes during ophthalmoscopic examination in five of 19 patients with nephropathic cystinosis (26%). We report on this observation and discuss possible pathophysiological mechanisms for photic induced sneezing in cystinosis.

  9. Photic sneeze reflex in nephropathic cystinosis.

    PubMed Central

    Katz, B; Melles, R B; Swenson, M R; Schneider, J A

    1990-01-01

    Photic induced sneeze is a reflex that occurs in certain individuals after exposure to bright light. Cystinosis is an autosomal recessive inborn error of metabolism in which nonprotein cystine accumulates within lysosomes. The pathognomonic ocular manifestation of cystinosis is corneal crystal deposition. We observed photic induced sneezes during ophthalmoscopic examination in five of 19 patients with nephropathic cystinosis (26%). We report on this observation and discuss possible pathophysiological mechanisms for photic induced sneezing in cystinosis. PMID:2275931

  10. Photic sneeze reflex in nephropathic cystinosis.

    PubMed

    Katz, B; Melles, R B; Swenson, M R; Schneider, J A

    1990-12-01

    Photic induced sneeze is a reflex that occurs in certain individuals after exposure to bright light. Cystinosis is an autosomal recessive inborn error of metabolism in which nonprotein cystine accumulates within lysosomes. The pathognomonic ocular manifestation of cystinosis is corneal crystal deposition. We observed photic induced sneezes during ophthalmoscopic examination in five of 19 patients with nephropathic cystinosis (26%). We report on this observation and discuss possible pathophysiological mechanisms for photic induced sneezing in cystinosis. PMID:2275931

  11. Basic Gravitational Reflexes in the Larval Frog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cochran, Stephen L.

    1996-01-01

    This investigation was designed to determine how a primitive vertebrate, the bullfrog tadpole, is able to sense and process gravitational stimuli. Because of the phylogenetic similarities of the vestibular systems in all vertebrates, the understanding of the gravitational reflexes in this relatively simple vertebrate should elucidate a skeletal framework on a elementary level, upon which the more elaborate reflexes of higher vertebrates may be constructed. The purpose of this study was to understand how the nervous system of the larval amphibian processes gravitational information. This study involved predominantly electrophysiological investigations of the isolated, alert (forebrain removed) bullfrog tadpole head. The focus of these experiments is threefold: (1) to understand from whole extraocular nerve recordings the signals sent to the eye following static gravitational tilt of the head; (2) to localize neuronal centers responsible for generating these signals through reversible pharmacological ablation of these centers; and (3) to record intracellularly from neurons within these centers in order to determine the single neuron's role in the overall processing of the center. This study has provided information on the mechanisms by which a primitive vertebrate processes gravitational reflexes.

  12. Transneuronal tracing of neural pathways controlling an abdominal muscle, rectus abdominis, in the ferret.

    PubMed

    Billig, I; Foris, J M; Card, J P; Yates, B J

    1999-02-27

    Abdominal muscles participate in generating a large number of behaviors and reflex responses, including expiration, coughing, sneezing, vomiting, postural control, production of speech, straining, facilitation of venous return to the heart, and reaction to vestibular stimulation. However, the only premotor neurons that have been conclusively shown to influence abdominal motoneurons are located in nucleus retroambiguus, the expiratory region of the caudal ventral respiratory group. In the present study, the neural circuitry controlling the activity of one abdominal muscle, rectus abdominis, was mapped using the transneuronal tracer pseudorabies virus (PRV) in the ferret. Injections of PRV into rectus abdominis labeled large presumed motoneurons in the ventral horn of T12-L4, and smaller presumed interneurons that were scattered in laminae VII, VIII, IX, and X of T4-L4. In addition, neurons in several areas of the medulla and caudal pons, including the retroambigual nucleus, medial and ventromedial reticular formation, nucleus prepositus hypoglossi, vestibular nuclei, and raphe nuclei, were infected by transynaptic passage of PRV from rectus abdominis motoneurons. Thus, the multifunctional roles of abdominal muscles appear to be coordinated by premotor neurons located in both the spinal cord and several regions of the brainstem. PMID:10023028

  13. Abdominal Distension and Vascular Collapse.

    PubMed

    Cosentino, Gina; Uwaifo, Gabriel I

    2016-04-01

    We present the case of a 43-year-old gentleman who presented to the emergency room with acute abdominal distension, confusion and vascular collapse. The emergent radiologic imaging obtained showed massive bilateral adrenal enlargement, but despite the initial clinical suspicion of possible overwhelming sepsis and/or massive abdominal/intralesional hemorrhage, lab tests based obtained rapidly confirmed the diagnosis of acute Addisonian crisis which responded dramatically to adrenocorticoid hormone replacement therapy and aggressive fluid resuscitation. The patient's established history of metastatic lung cancer confirmed this as a case of metastatic massive bilateral adrenal metastases with an initial presentation of acute adrenal insufficiency which is uncommon in the setting of metastatic carcinomatosis but more typically associated with lymphomas. Recognition of this clinical possibility is vital to enable rapid diagnosis and consequent life saving therapy. PMID:27328473

  14. [Abdominal bruit associated with hypertension].

    PubMed

    Fontseré, N; Bonet, J; Bonal, J; Romero, R

    2004-01-01

    First cause of secondary hypertension is renovascular hypertension which presents abdominal bruit in 16 to 20% of cases. This clinical sign is also associated with other vascular disease of the abdomen such as celiac trunk stenosis and/or aneurysms located on the pancreaticoduodenal or gastroduodenal arcs level, with little representation among aneurysm. They usually appear on a context of digestive complications like neoplasias, chronic pancreatitis or gastric obstructions possibly with obstructive icterus, hemorrhage and acute abdomen episodes. Its presentation in other contexts is rare and constitutes a diagnostic challenge. Diagnosis is made by abdominal arteriography which is the best method because you can locate the problem as well as intervene therapeutically with embolization of the aneurysme. We would like to emphasize the importance of a quick diagnosis due to the risk of rupture and the high morbi-mortality associated.

  15. Congenital lateral abdominal wall hernia.

    PubMed

    Montes-Tapia, Fernando; Cura-Esquivel, Idalia; Gutiérrez, Susana; Rodríguez-Balderrama, Isaías; de la O-Cavazos, Manuel

    2016-08-01

    Congenital abdominal wall defects that are located outside of the anterior wall are extremely rare and difficult to classify because there are no well accepted guidelines. There are two regions outside of the anterior wall: the flank or lateral wall; and the lumbar region. We report the case of a patient with an oval 3 cm-diameter hernia defect located above the anterior axillary line, which affects all layers of the muscular wall. An anorectal malformation consisting of a recto-vestibular fistula was also identified, and chest X-ray showed dextrocardia. The suggested treatment is repair of the defect before 1 year of age. Given that the anomalies described may accompany lateral abdominal wall hernia, it is important to diagnose and treat the associated defects.

  16. [Abdominal cystic tumor revealing lymphangioleiomyomatosis].

    PubMed

    Barbier, L; Ebbo, M; Andrac-Meyer, L; Schneilitz, N; Le Treut, Y-P; Reynaud-Gaubert, M; Hardwigsen, J

    2009-02-01

    We report the case of a 39 year-old woman with many years of intermittent abdominal pain who was found to have cystic masses evocative of cystic lymphangioma involving the posterior mediastinal and retroperitoneum. Worsening abdominal pain led to a recommendation for laparoscopic unroofing and decompression of the cysts. During the postoperative period, hemorrhagic shock required reintervention with excision of the tumoral mass. Pathologic examination revealed lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM). On the 15th postoperative day, the patient developed a chylopneumothorax which required prolonged chest tube drainage. The presence of multiple polycystic lesions in the pulmonary parenchyma supported the diagnosis of diffuse LAM with primary extrapulmonary presentation. This diagnosis should be considered preoperatively since it modifies the treatment: a complete excision of the cystic lesions seems to be necessary in order to prevent bleeding and lymphatic extravasation.

  17. Management of voluminous abdominal incisional hernia.

    PubMed

    Bouillot, J-L; Poghosyan, T; Pogoshian, T; Corigliano, N; Canard, G; Veyrie, N

    2012-10-01

    Incisional hernia is one of the classic complications after abdominal surgery. The chronic, gradual increase in size of some of these hernias is such that the hernia ring widens to a point where there is a loss of substance in the abdominal wall, herniated organs can become incarcerated or strangulated while poor abdominal motility can alter respiratory function. The surgical treatment of small (<5 cm) incisional hernias is safe and straightforward, by either laparotomy or laparoscopy. For large hernias, surgical repair is often difficult. After reintegration of herniated viscera into the abdominal cavity, the abdominal wall defect must be closed anatomically in order to restore the function to the abdominal wall. Prosthetic reinforcement of the abdominal wall is mandatory for long-term successful repair. There are multiple techniques for prosthetic hernia repair, but placement of Dacron mesh in the retromuscular plane is our preference. PMID:23137643

  18. Acute Abdominal Pain in Children.

    PubMed

    Reust, Carin E; Williams, Amy

    2016-05-15

    Acute abdominal pain accounts for approximately 9% of childhood primary care office visits. Symptoms and signs that increase the likelihood of a surgical cause for pain include fever, bilious vomiting, bloody diarrhea, absent bowel sounds, voluntary guarding, rigidity, and rebound tenderness. The age of the child can help focus the differential diagnosis. In infants and toddlers, clinicians should consider congenital anomalies and other causes, including malrotation, hernias, Meckel diverticulum, or intussusception. In school-aged children, constipation and infectious causes of pain, such as gastroenteritis, colitis, respiratory infections, and urinary tract infections, are more common. In female adolescents, clinicians should consider pelvic inflammatory disease, pregnancy, ruptured ovarian cysts, or ovarian torsion. Initial laboratory tests include complete blood count, erythrocyte sedimentation rate or C-reactive protein, urinalysis, and a pregnancy test. Abdominal radiography can be used to diagnose constipation or obstruction. Ultrasonography is the initial choice in children for the diagnosis of cholecystitis, pancreatitis, ovarian cyst, ovarian or testicular torsion, pelvic inflammatory disease, pregnancy-related pathology, and appendicitis. Appendicitis is the most common cause of acute abdominal pain requiring surgery, with a peak incidence during adolescence. When the appendix is not clearly visible on ultrasonography, computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging can be used to confirm the diagnosis. PMID:27175718

  19. Assessment of Hyperactive Reflexes in Patients with Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chung-Yong

    2015-01-01

    Hyperactive reflexes are commonly observed in patients with spinal cord injury (SCI) but there is a lack of convenient and quantitative characterizations. Patellar tendon reflexes were examined in nine SCI patients and ten healthy control subjects by tapping the tendon using a hand-held instrumented hammer at various knee flexion angles, and the tapping force, quadriceps EMG, and knee extension torque were measured to characterize patellar tendon reflexes quantitatively in terms of the tendon reflex gain (Gtr), contraction rate (Rc), and reflex loop time delay (td). It was found that there are significant increases in Gtr and Rc and decrease in td in patients with spinal cord injury as compared to the controls (P < 0.05). This study presented a convenient and quantitative method to evaluate reflex excitability and muscle contraction dynamics. With proper simplifications, it can potentially be used for quantitative diagnosis and outcome evaluations of hyperreflexia in clinical settings. PMID:25654084

  20. The exercise pressor reflex and peripheral artery disease.

    PubMed

    Stone, Audrey J; Kaufman, Marc P

    2015-03-01

    The exercise pressor reflex contributes to increases in cardiovascular and ventilatory function during exercise. These reflexive increases are caused by both mechanical stimulation and metabolic stimulation of group III and IV afferents with endings in contracting skeletal muscle. Patients with peripheral artery disease (PAD) have an augmented exercise pressor reflex. Recently, an animal model of PAD was established which allows further investigation of possible mechanisms involved in this augmented reflex. Earlier studies have identified ASIC3 channels, bradykinin receptors, P2X receptors, endoperoxide receptors, and thromboxane receptors as playing a role in evoking the exercise pressor reflex in healthy rats. This review focuses on recent studies using a rat model of PAD in order to determine possible mechanisms contributing to the exaggerated exercise pressor reflex seen in patients with this disease.

  1. 5 CFR 362.407 - Withdrawal and readmission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Withdrawal and readmission. 362.407... PROGRAMS Presidential Management Fellows Program § 362.407 Withdrawal and readmission. (a) Withdrawal. (1.... (b) Readmission. (1) If a Fellow withdraws from the Program for reasons that are related...

  2. 5 CFR 362.407 - Withdrawal and readmission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Withdrawal and readmission. 362.407... PROGRAMS Presidential Management Fellows Program § 362.407 Withdrawal and readmission. (a) Withdrawal. (1.... (b) Readmission. (1) If a Fellow withdraws from the Program for reasons that are related...

  3. 21 CFR 514.7 - Withdrawal of applications without prejudice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Withdrawal of applications without prejudice. 514... Withdrawal of applications without prejudice. The sponsor may withdraw his pending application from.... Such withdrawal may be made without prejudice to a future filing. Upon resubmission, the...

  4. 7 CFR 50.11 - Conditional withdrawal of service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... be made available. (b) Written notice of withdrawal of grading or inspection service under this... RULES OF PRACTICE GOVERNING WITHDRAWAL OF INSPECTION AND GRADING SERVICES Supplemental Rules of Practice § 50.11 Conditional withdrawal of service. (a) The Director may withdraw grading or inspection...

  5. 48 CFR 752.7024 - Withdrawal of students.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Withdrawal of students... Withdrawal of students. For use in contracts for participant training with an educational institution. Withdrawal of Students (APR 1984) (a) The Government may, at its option and at any time, withdraw any...

  6. 48 CFR 752.7024 - Withdrawal of students.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Withdrawal of students... Withdrawal of students. For use in contracts for participant training with an educational institution. Withdrawal of Students (APR 1984) (a) The Government may, at its option and at any time, withdraw any...

  7. 48 CFR 752.7024 - Withdrawal of students.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Withdrawal of students... Withdrawal of students. For use in contracts for participant training with an educational institution. Withdrawal of Students (APR 1984) (a) The Government may, at its option and at any time, withdraw any...

  8. 48 CFR 752.7024 - Withdrawal of students.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Withdrawal of students... Withdrawal of students. For use in contracts for participant training with an educational institution. Withdrawal of Students (APR 1984) (a) The Government may, at its option and at any time, withdraw any...

  9. 48 CFR 752.7024 - Withdrawal of students.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Withdrawal of students... Withdrawal of students. For use in contracts for participant training with an educational institution. Withdrawal of Students (APR 1984) (a) The Government may, at its option and at any time, withdraw any...

  10. 19 CFR 144.31 - Right to withdraw.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) WAREHOUSE AND REWAREHOUSE ENTRIES AND WITHDRAWALS Withdrawals from Warehouse § 144.31 Right to withdraw. Withdrawals from bonded warehouse may be made only by the person primarily liable for the payment of duties on the merchandise being withdrawn, i.e., the importer of record on the warehouse...

  11. 19 CFR 144.27 - Withdrawal from warehouse by transferee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Withdrawal from warehouse by transferee. 144.27...; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) WAREHOUSE AND REWAREHOUSE ENTRIES AND WITHDRAWALS Transfer of Right To Withdraw Merchandise from Warehouse § 144.27 Withdrawal from warehouse by transferee. At any time...

  12. Reduced emotional signs of opiate withdrawal in rats selectively bred for low (LoS) versus high (HiS) saccharin intake

    PubMed Central

    Radke, Anna K.; Holtz, Nathan A.; Gewirtz, Jonathan C.; Carroll, Marilyn E.

    2013-01-01

    Rationale Rats bred for high (HiS) and low (LoS) saccharin intake exhibit divergent behavioral responses to multiple drugs of abuse, with HiS rats displaying greater vulnerability to drug taking. Previous research indicates that this effect may be due to increased sensitivity to reward in HiS rats and to the aversive effects of acute drug administration in LoS rats. Objective The current study investigated whether HiS and LoS rats also exhibit different behavioral signs of withdrawal following one or repeated opiate exposures. Methods Emotional signs of opiate withdrawal were assessed with potentiation of the acoustic startle reflex and conditioned place aversion (CPA) in male and female HiS and LoS rats. Startle was measured before and 4 h after a 10 mg/kg injection of morphine on days 1, 2, and 7 of opiate exposure. CPA was induced with a two-day, naloxone-precipitated conditioning paradigm. Somatic signs of withdrawal and weight loss were used also measured. Results Male and female LoS rats exhibited lower startle potentiation than HiS rats on the seventh day of morphine exposure. LoS male rats also failed to develop a CPA to morphine withdrawal. No differences in physical withdrawal signs were observed between HiS and LoS rats, but males of both lines had more physical signs of withdrawal than females. Conclusions These results suggest that LoS rats are less vulnerable to the negative emotional effects of morphine withdrawal than HiS rats. A less severe withdrawal syndrome may contribute to decreased levels of drug taking in the LoS line. PMID:23254375

  13. Reflex Seizures Triggered by Diaper Change in Dravet Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Subki, Ahmed H; Alasmari, Aishah S; Jan, Fadi M; Moria, Feras A; Jan, Mohammed M

    2016-07-01

    Dravet syndrome (DS) is a severe epilepsy syndrome characterized by early onset of multiple types of seizures. We report the first case of reflex seizures triggered by diaper change in a girl at 9 months old and 2 years old with a mutation in the SCN1A gene causing DS. Reflex seizures have been reported in patients with DS provoked by increased body temperature or visual stimulation. The case we report widens the spectrum of triggers causing reflex seizures in children with DS. Cortical hyperexcitability resulting from the genetic defect explains the tendency to experience such reflex seizures.

  14. Estimated Freshwater Withdrawals in Oklahoma, 1990

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lurry, Dee L.; Tortorelli, Robert L.

    1996-01-01

    This report presents 1990 freshwater withdrawal estimates for Oklahoma by source and category. Withdrawal source is either ground water or surface water. Withdrawal categories include: irrigation, water supply, livestock, thermoelectric-power generation, domestic and commercial, and industrial and mining. Withdrawal data are aggregated by county, major aquifer, and principal river basin. Only the four major categories of irrigation, water supply, livestock, and thermoelectric-power generation are illustrated in this report, although data for all categories are tabulated. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) established the National Water-Use Information Program in 1977 to collect uniform, current, and reliable information on water use. The Oklahoma District of the USGS and the Oklahoma Water Resources Board participate in a cooperative program to collect and publish water-use information for Oklahoma. Data contained in this report were made available through the cooperative program.

  15. 46 CFR 390.9 - Qualified withdrawals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... policies of the Act. See § 390.3 (relating to policy considerations). (ii) Qualified withdrawals for the... in excess of $100,000. The Maritime Administrator may waive the monetary limit in this...

  16. 46 CFR 390.10 - Nonqualified withdrawals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... fulfill a substantial obligation under the agreement). (3) Types of nonqualified withdrawals which will be... losses; (ii) The party desires to make an expenditure for research, development or design and such...

  17. IDENTIFICATION AND MANAGEMENT OF ALCOHOL WITHDRAWAL SYNDROME

    PubMed Central

    Mirijello, Antonio; D’Angelo, Cristina; Ferrulli, Anna; Vassallo, Gabriele; Antonelli, Mariangela; Caputo, Fabio; Leggio, Lorenzo; Gasbarrini, Antonio; Addolorato, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Symptoms of alcohol withdrawal syndrome may develop within 6–24 hours after the abrupt discontinuation or decrease of alcohol consumption. Symptoms can vary from autonomic hyperactivity and agitation to delirium tremens. The gold-standard treatment for alcohol withdrawal syndrome is represented by benzodiazepines. Among them, different agents (i.e., long-acting or short-acting) and different regimens (front-loading, fixed dose or symptom-triggered) may be chosen on the basis of patient characteristics. Severe withdrawal could require ICU admission and the use of barbiturates or propofol. Other drugs, such as alpha2-agonists (clonidine and dexmetedomidine) and beta-blockers can be used as adjunctive treatments to control neuroautonomic hyperactivity. Furthermore, neuroleptics can help control hallucinations. Finally, other medications for the treatment for alcohol withdrawal syndrome have been investigated with promising results. These include carbamazepine, valproate, sodium oxybate, baclofen, gabapentin, and topiramate. The usefulness of these agents will be discussed in the text. PMID:25666543

  18. Morphine suppression of ethanol withdrawal in mice.

    PubMed

    Blum, K; Wallace, J E; Schwerter, H A; Eubanks, J D

    1976-01-15

    The acute administration of morphine, alcohol or dopamine results in a pronounced suppression of the convulsions produced by alcohol in mice. The suppressive action of morphine on alcohol withdrawal in the mouse apparently is not a product of morphine intoxication, but rather to some other specific interaction between alcohol and morphine in the central nervous system. The conclusion suggest that dopamine may play a significant role as a modulator in convulsions produced during alcohol withdrawal.

  19. Total water withdrawals in Mississippi, 1990

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, P.M.

    1994-01-01

    During 1990, the amount of water withdrawn from ground- and surface-water sources in Mississippi was about 3,600 Mgal/d (million gallons per day). Of this amount, 91 percent, or 3,300 Mgal/d, was withdrawn from freshwater sources. Of the total freshwater withdrawals, about 82 percent, or 2,700 Mgal/d, was withdrawn from ground-water sources. Total water withdrawals in Mississippi in 1990 for eight categories of use were as follows: irrigation, 1,900 Mgal/d; thermoelectric power, 700 Mgal/d; aquaculture, 400 Mgal/d; public supply, 320 Mgal/d; industrial and mining, 270 Mgal/d; domestic, 33 Mgal/d; commercial, 16 Mgal/d; and livestock, 16 Mgal/d. Overall, total withdrawals increased by 20 percent from 1985 to 1990, although the total population decreased about 2 percent. During the same period, total freshwater withdrawals increased by about 17 percent. Total saline with- drawals increased by about 60 percent from 1985 due to an increase in salin withdrawals for thermo- electric power generation. Total fresh and saline surface-water withdrawals decreased by about 6 percent from 1985, due to decrease in surface-water withdrawals for irrigation. Fresh ground-water withdrawals in Mississippi increased by about 33 percent, primarily due to an increase in irrigation. Since 1960, total ground- and surface-water with- drawals increased 70 percent for the same period. Irrigation had the greatest increase in with- drawals since 1960, with a 269 percent increase. Public supply had the second greatest, with a 178 percent increase.

  20. Withdrawing life-sustaining treatment: ethical considerations.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Sharon; Cooper, Andrew B; McKneally, Martin

    2007-08-01

    Withdrawing life-supporting technology from patients who are irremediably ill is morally troubling for caregivers, patients, and families. Interventions that enable clinicians to delay death create situations in which the dignity and comfort of dying patients may be sacrificed to spare professionals and families from their elemental fear of death. Understanding of the limits of treatment, expertise in palliation of symptoms, skillful communication, and careful orchestration of controllable events can help to manage the withdrawal of life support appropriately.

  1. Severe Relapsing Clozapine-Withdrawal Catatonia

    PubMed Central

    Shahrour, Tarek; Siddiq, Muez; Ghalib, Saad

    2015-01-01

    Catatonia as a clozapine-withdrawal syndrome has only been documented in the medical literature as case reports. We are reporting a case in which a 32-year-old man develops a catatonic state upon withdrawal of clozapine. The state was quite severe and needed ICU admission. The course was chronic and intermittent which we think was caused by the poor adherence to antipsychotics. The importance of identifying such cases early is underlined. PMID:26788394

  2. Successful Kidney and Lung Transplantation From a Deceased Donor With Blunt Abdominal Trauma and Intestinal Perforation.

    PubMed

    van Smaalen, Tim C; Krikke, Christina; Haveman, Jan Willem; van Heurn, L W Ernest

    2016-01-01

    The number of organ donors is limited by many contraindications for donation and poor quality of potential organ donors. Abdominal infection is a generally accepted contraindication for donation of abdominal organs. We present a 43-year-old man with lethal brain injury, blunt abdominal trauma, and intestinal perforation. After withdrawal of life-sustaining treatment and circulatory arrest, a minilaparotomy confirmed abdominal contamination with intestinal content. After closure of the abdomen, organs were preserved with in situ preservation with an aortic cannula inserted via the femoral artery. Thereafter, the kidneys were procured via bilateral lumbotomy to reduce the risk of direct bacterial contamination; lungs were retrieved following a standard practice. There was no bacterial or fungal growth in the machine preservation fluid of both kidneys. All organs were successfully transplanted, without postoperative infection, and functioned well after 6 months. We hereby show that direct contamination of organs can be avoided with the use of in situ preservation and retroperitoneal procurement. Intestinal perforation is not an absolute contraindication for donation, although the risk of bacterial or fungal transmission has to be evaluated per case. PMID:27500248

  3. [A comparison of the effects of single and chronic microinjections of GABA and picrotoxin into the caudate nucleus on the conditioned reflexes of dogs].

    PubMed

    Iakimovskiĭ, A F

    1990-01-01

    The effects on Pavlovian alimentary conditioned reflexes realization of two methods of intrastriatal microinjections--acute (separate) and long-term (chronic) one--are compared in experiments on dogs. Bilateral acute administration and the first week of chronic injection of 45 mcg of GABA into the caudate nuclei produced in dogs a manifest improvement of parameters of the conditioned differentiation inhibition, but only in the next period of chronic treatment an improvement of the positive Pavlovian alimentary conditioned reflex was obtained. The both ways of picrotoxin treatment impaired conditioned behaviour, and this effect was observed after the end of injection. No withdrawal effects were recorded. The data obtained give ground for discussion of the role of striatal GABAergic system in the positive modulation of adaptive alimentary behaviour. The application of novel psychopharmacological method in experimental and clinical fields of investigation is discussed.

  4. Taking control of reflexive social attention.

    PubMed

    Ristic, Jelena; Kingstone, Alan

    2005-01-01

    Attention is shifted reflexively to where other people are looking. It has been argued by a number of investigators that this social attention effect reflects the obligatory bottom-up activation of domain-specific modules within the inferior temporal (IT) cortex that are specialized for processing face and gaze information. However, it is also the case that top-down factors may modulate the activation of IT cells. Here we examined behaviorally whether reflexive social orienting is purely automatic or sensitive to top-down modulation. Participants were shown an ambiguous stimulus that could be perceived either as representing EYES or a CAR. In we demonstrated between groups that an automatic shift of attention, equivalent to that triggered by a schematic FACE, occurred only when the stimulus was referred to as possessing EYES. In all participants received the EYES and CAR conditions. When the stimulus was first referred to as a CAR and then as EYES, an attentional shift was only present for the EYES condition. However, when the stimulus was first referred to as possessing EYES, and then later as a CAR, attentional shifts were observed for both conditions. These data indicate that the emergence of a reflexive social attention effect is influenced by top-down mechanisms but in an asymmetrical manner. Top-down processes appear to be effective for triggering IT involvement, that is, for perceiving a stimulus as a face, which produces the social attention effect. But top-down mechanisms are ineffective once IT involvement has been triggered. That is, once a stimulus has been seen as having eyes, it continues to be seen that way, and accordingly, the social attention effect persists. PMID:15617667

  5. Methodological Reflexivity: Towards Evolving Methodological Frameworks through Critical and Reflexive Deliberations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raven, Glenda

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author argues for a central and critical role for "reflexivity in research" with the aim of developing and strengthening not only everyone's understanding of what everyone does in environmental education research, but also how, and why everyone does it. In a narrative account of methodological issues that occurred within, and…

  6. Alcohol Withdrawal Syndrome: Benzodiazepines and Beyond

    PubMed Central

    Sachdeva, Ankur; Chandra, Mina

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol dependence is an increasing and pervasive problem. Alcohol withdrawal symptoms are a part of alcohol dependence syndrome and are commonly encountered in general hospital settings, in most of the departments. Alcohol withdrawal syndrome ranges from mild to severe. The severe complicated alcohol withdrawal may present with hallucinations, seizures or delirium tremens. Benzodiazepines have the largest and the best evidence base in the treatment of alcohol withdrawal, and are considered the gold standard. Others, such as anticonvulsants, barbiturates, adrenergic drugs, and GABA agonists have been tried and have evidence. Supportive care and use of vitamins is essential in the management. Symptom triggered regime is favoured over fixed tapering dose regime, although monitoring through scales is cumbersome. This article aims to review the evidence base for appropriate clinical management of the alcohol withdrawal syndrome. We searched Pubmed for articles published in English on ‘Alcohol withdrawal syndrome’ in humans during the last 10 years. A total of 1182 articles came up. Articles not relevant to clinical utility and management were excluded based on the titles and abstract available. Full text articles, meta-analyses, systematic reviews and randomized controlled trials were obtained from this list and were considered for review. PMID:26500991

  7. Withdrawing Benzodiazepines in Patients With Anxiety Disorders.

    PubMed

    Lader, Malcolm; Kyriacou, Andri

    2016-01-01

    The large class of CNS-depressant medications-the benzodiazepines-have been extensively used for over 50 years, anxiety disorders being one of the main indications. A substantial proportion (perhaps up to 20-30 %) of long-term users becomes physically dependent on them. Problems with their use became manifest, and dependence, withdrawal difficulties and abuse were documented by the 1980s. Many such users experience physical and psychological withdrawal symptoms on attempted cessation and may develop clinically troublesome syndromes even during slow tapering. Few studies have been conducted to establish the optimal withdrawal schedules. The usual management comprises slow withdrawal over weeks or months together with psychotherapy of various modalities. Pharmacological aids include antidepressants such as the SSRIs especially if depressive symptoms supervene. Other pharmacological agents such as the benzodiazepine antagonist, flumazenil, and the hormonal agent, melatonin, remain largely experimental. The purpose of this review is to analyse the evidence for the efficacy of the usual withdrawal regimes and the newer agents. It is concluded that little evidence exists outside the usual principles of drug withdrawal but there are some promising leads.

  8. Antiepileptic Drug Withdrawal in Dogs with Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Gesell, Felix Kaspar; Hoppe, Sonja; Löscher, Wolfgang; Tipold, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological disorders in dogs and is treated by chronic administration of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). In human beings with epilepsy, it is common clinical practice to consider drug withdrawal after a patient has been in remission (seizure free) for three or more years, but withdrawal is associated with the risk of relapse. In the present study, the consequences of AED withdrawal were studied in dogs with epilepsy. Therefore, 200 owners of dogs with idiopathic or presumed idiopathic epilepsy were contacted by telephone interview, 138 cases could be enrolled. In 11 cases, the therapy had been stopped after the dogs had become seizure free for a median time of 1 year. Reasons for AED withdrawal were appearance or fear of adverse side effects, financial aspects, and the idea that the medication could be unnecessary. Following AED withdrawal, four of these dogs remained seizure free, seven dogs suffered from seizure recurrence, of which only three dogs could regain seizure freedom after resuming AED therapy. Due to the restricted case number, an exact percentage of dogs with seizure recurrence after AED withdrawal cannot be given. However, the present study gives a hint that similar numbers as in human patients are found, and the data can help owners of epileptic dogs and the responsible clinician to decide when and why to stop antiepileptic medication. PMID:26664952

  9. Antiepileptic Drug Withdrawal in Dogs with Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Gesell, Felix Kaspar; Hoppe, Sonja; Löscher, Wolfgang; Tipold, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological disorders in dogs and is treated by chronic administration of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). In human beings with epilepsy, it is common clinical practice to consider drug withdrawal after a patient has been in remission (seizure free) for three or more years, but withdrawal is associated with the risk of relapse. In the present study, the consequences of AED withdrawal were studied in dogs with epilepsy. Therefore, 200 owners of dogs with idiopathic or presumed idiopathic epilepsy were contacted by telephone interview, 138 cases could be enrolled. In 11 cases, the therapy had been stopped after the dogs had become seizure free for a median time of 1 year. Reasons for AED withdrawal were appearance or fear of adverse side effects, financial aspects, and the idea that the medication could be unnecessary. Following AED withdrawal, four of these dogs remained seizure free, seven dogs suffered from seizure recurrence, of which only three dogs could regain seizure freedom after resuming AED therapy. Due to the restricted case number, an exact percentage of dogs with seizure recurrence after AED withdrawal cannot be given. However, the present study gives a hint that similar numbers as in human patients are found, and the data can help owners of epileptic dogs and the responsible clinician to decide when and why to stop antiepileptic medication.

  10. Dysphoric milk ejection reflex: A case report

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Dysphoric Milk Ejection Reflex (D-MER) is an abrupt emotional "drop" that occurs in some women just before milk release and continues for not more than a few minutes. The brief negative feelings range in severity from wistfulness to self-loathing, and appear to have a physiological cause. The authors suggest that an abrupt drop in dopamine may occur when milk release is triggered, resulting in a real or relative brief dopamine deficit for affected women. Clinicians can support women with D-MER in several ways; often, simply knowing that it is a recognized phenomenon makes the condition tolerable. Further study is needed. PMID:21645333

  11. Multi-MA reflex triode research.

    SciTech Connect

    Swanekamp, Stephen Brian; Commisso, Robert J.; Weber, Bruce V.; Riordan, John C.; Allen, Raymond J.; Goyer, John R.; Murphy, Donald P.; Mikkelson, Kenneth A.; Harper-Slaboszewicz, Victor Jozef

    2010-08-01

    The Reflex Triode can efficiently produce and transmit medium energy (10-100 keV) x-rays. Perfect reflexing through thin converter can increase transmission of 10-100 keV x-rays. Gamble II experiment at 1 MV, 1 MA, 60 ns - maximum dose with 25 micron tantalum. Electron orbits depend on the foil thickness. Electron orbits from LSP used to calculate path length inside tantalum. A simple formula predicts the optimum foil thickness for reflexing converters. The I(V) characteristics of the diode can be understood using simple models. Critical current dominates high voltage triodes, bipolar current is more important at low voltage. Higher current (2.5 MA), lower voltage (250 kV) triodes are being tested on Saturn at Sandia. Small, precise, anode-cathode gaps enable low impedance operation. Sample Saturn results at 2.5 MA, 250 kV. Saturn dose rate could be about two times greater. Cylindrical triode may improve x-ray transmission. Cylindrical triode design will be tested at 1/2 scale on Gamble II. For higher current on Saturn, could use two cylindrical triodes in parallel. 3 triodes in parallel require positive polarity operation. 'Triodes in series' would improve matching low impedance triodes to generator. Conclusions of this presentation are: (1) Physics of reflex triodes from Gamble II experiments (1 MA, 1 MV) - (a) Converter thickness 1/20 of CSDA range optimizes x-ray dose; (b) Simple model based on electron orbits predicts optimum thickness from LSP/ITS calculations and experiment; (c) I(V) analysis: beam dynamics different between 1 MV and 250 kV; (2) Multi-MA triode experiments on Saturn (2.5 MA, 250 kV) - (a) Polarity inversion in vacuum, (b) No-convolute configuration, accurate gap settings, (c) About half of current produces useful x-rays, (d) Cylindrical triode one option to increase x-ray transmission; and (3) Potential to increase Saturn current toward 10 MA, maintaining voltage and outer diameter - (a) 2 (or 3) cylindrical triodes in parallel, (b) Triodes

  12. Superposition of H reflexes on steady contractions in man.

    PubMed Central

    Rüegg, D G; Krauer, R; Drews, H

    1990-01-01

    1. The aim of the investigation was to study the influence of steady isometric contractions on H reflexes of human soleus muscle. 2. Stimulating and recording conditions were hardly affected by plantar flexions which subjects maintained in a force matching task. 3. If the interval between a preceding control and the test stimulus was less than 8 s the test H reflex was depressed in the relaxed subject. The depression was diminished or removed if the test reflex was superimposed on a background activity. The interval between control and test H reflex was at least 8 s in the following experiments. 4. H reflexes were nearly independent of steady plantar flexions on which they were superimposed. In some subjects, there was a slight increase with increasing torque. During dorsal flexions, H reflexes in all subjects were inhibited with increasing torque. 5. The relationship between test H reflexes, control H reflexes and background activity was evaluated by varying pseudo-randomly stimulus intensity and steady flexion torque. The surface defined by this three-dimensional relation approximated a plane suggesting linear properties of the H reflex. In some subjects threshold intensity decreased slightly with torque, in others it was constant. 6. In response to a warning signal, human subjects initiated steady plantar or dorsal flexions in both feet and, at the same time, they started to concentrate on a light at the onset of which they performed a unilateral ballistic plantar contraction as fast as possible. The relations between H reflex and maintained flexion force during the warning period of the reaction time task were identical to those during force matching, showing that the behavioural context did not modulate the relations. 7. The relations were also the same if reflexes were evoked bi- or unilaterally, illustrating the absence of a mutual modification of simultaneously evoked H reflexes. 8. The relation was the same with ipsilateral matching and relaxed

  13. Wh-filler-gap dependency formation guides reflexive antecedent search

    PubMed Central

    Frazier, Michael; Ackerman, Lauren; Baumann, Peter; Potter, David; Yoshida, Masaya

    2015-01-01

    Prior studies on online sentence processing have shown that the parser can resolve non-local dependencies rapidly and accurately. This study investigates the interaction between the processing of two such non-local dependencies: wh-filler-gap dependencies (WhFGD) and reflexive-antecedent dependencies. We show that reflexive-antecedent dependency resolution is sensitive to the presence of a WhFGD, and argue that the filler-gap dependency established by WhFGD resolution is selected online as the antecedent of a reflexive dependency. We investigate the processing of constructions like (1), where two NPs might be possible antecedents for the reflexive, namely which cowgirl and Mary. Even though Mary is linearly closer to the reflexive, the only grammatically licit antecedent for the reflexive is the more distant wh-NP, which cowgirl. (1). Which cowgirl did Mary expect to have injured herself due to negligence? Four eye-tracking text-reading experiments were conducted on examples like (1), differing in whether the embedded clause was non-finite (1 and 3) or finite (2 and 4), and in whether the tail of the wh-dependency intervened between the reflexive and its closest overt antecedent (1 and 2) or the wh-dependency was associated with a position earlier in the sentence (3 and 4). The results of Experiments 1 and 2 indicate the parser accesses the result of WhFGD formation during reflexive antecedent search. The resolution of a wh-dependency alters the representation that reflexive antecedent search operates over, allowing the grammatical but linearly distant antecedent to be accessed rapidly. In the absence of a long-distance WhFGD (Experiments 3 and 4), wh-NPs were not found to impact reading times of the reflexive, indicating that the parser's ability to select distant wh-NPs as reflexive antecedents crucially involves syntactic structure. PMID:26500579

  14. Disturbed Paraspinal Reflex Following Prolonged Flexion-Relaxation and Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Ellen L.; Granata, Kevin P.

    2006-01-01

    Study Design. Repeated measures experimental study of the effect of flexion-relaxation, recovery, and gender on paraspinal reflex dynamics. Objective. To determine the effect of prolonged flexion-relaxation and recovery time on reflex behavior in human subjects. Summary of Background Data. Prolonged spinal flexion has been shown to disturb the paraspinal reflex activity in both animals and human beings. Laxity in passive tissues of the spine from flexion strain may contribute to desensitization of mechanoreceptors. Animal studies indicate that recovery of reflexes may take up to several hours. Little is known about human paraspinal reflex behavior following flexion tasks or the recovery of reflex behavior following the flexion tasks. Methods. A total of 25 subjects performed static flexionrelaxation tasks. Paraspinal muscle reflexes were recorded before and immediately after flexion-relaxation and after a recovery period. Reflexes were quantified from systems identification analyses of electromyographic response in relation to pseudorandom force disturbances applied to the trunk. Results. Trunk angle measured during flexion-relaxation postures was significantly higher following static flexion-relaxation tasks (P < 0.001), indicating creep deformation of passive supporting structures in the trunk. Reflex response was diminished following flexion-relaxation (P < 0.029) and failed to recover to baseline levels during 16 minutes of recovery. Conclusion. Reduced reflex may indicate that the spine is less stable following prolonged flexion-relaxation and, therefore, susceptible to injury. The absence of recovery in reflex after a substantial time indicates that increased low back pain risk from flexion-relaxation may persist after the end of the flexion task. PMID:16582860

  15. Endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair

    PubMed Central

    Norwood, M G A; Lloyd, G M; Bown, M J; Fishwick, G; London, N J; Sayers, R D

    2007-01-01

    The operative mortality following conventional abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair has not fallen significantly over the past two decades. Since its inception in 1991, endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) has provided an alternative to open AAA repair and perhaps an opportunity to improve operative mortality. Two recent large randomised trials have demonstrated the short and medium term benefit of EVAR over open AAA repair, although data on the long term efficacy of the technique are still lacking. This review aimed at providing an overview of EVAR and a discussion of the potential benefits and current limitations of the technique. PMID:17267674

  16. [Dirofilaria in the abdominal cavity].

    PubMed

    Révész, Erzsébet; Markovics, Gabriella; Darabos, Zoltán; Tóth, Ildikó; Fok, Eva

    2008-10-01

    Number of cases of filariasis have been recently reported in the Hungarian medical literature, most of them caused by Dirofilaria repens . Dirofilaria repens is a mosquito-transmitted filarioid worm in the subcutaneous tissue of dogs and cats. Human infection manifests as either subcutaneous nodules or lung parenchymal disease, which may even be asymptomatic. The authors report a human Dirofilaria repens infection of the abdominal cavity in a 61-year-old man,who underwent laparotomy for acute abdomen. Intraoperatively, local peritonitis was detected caused by a white nemathhelminth, measured 8 cm in size. Histocytology confirmed that the infection was caused by Dirofilaria repens.

  17. [Abdominal pain, constipation and anemia].

    PubMed

    Barresi, Fabio; Kunz Caflish, Isabel; Bayly-Schinzel, Leena; Dressel, Holger

    2016-03-30

    We present the case of a 42-year old man who went to the emergency department because of spasmodic abdominal pain. The abdomen was soft. A gastroscopy and a colonoscopy were without pathological findings. The laboratory analyses indicated anemia. The differential blood count showed basophilic granules in the red blood cells. The blood lead level was elevated. A lead poisoning was diagnosed. The cause was the oral intake of an ayurvedic medication which the patient had received in Bangladesh to treat his vitiligo. PMID:27005735

  18. Treatment of neonatal abdominal cysts.

    PubMed

    Dénes, J; Lukäcs, F V; Léb, J; Bognár, M

    1974-01-01

    Intraperitoneal or retroperitoneal cystic structures in the newborn appear with a variable clinical picture and in the case of intra-abdominal cysts, surgery is performed mostly on an emergency basis. In such cases the exact preoperative diagnosis is difficult and is seldom made. With early laparotomy, extensive small bowel resection can usually be avoided. Retroperitoneal lesions are mostly of renal origin; in such cases, preoperative diagnosis is easy, being based on specific examinations. In the year 1973, 5 newborns with an intraperitoneal or retroperitoneal cyst have been treated surgically. In this series, one infant died after resection of 90% of the small bowel.

  19. [Internationalization and innovation of abdominal acupuncture].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong-Zhou

    2013-09-01

    Characteristics of abdominal acupuncture are analyzed through three aspects of inheriting and innovation, collaborated research as well as international visual field. It is pointed that abdominal acupuncture is based on clinical practice, focuses on enhancing the therapeutic effect and expending the clinical application. It also promots the thinking on how to recall the tradition and how to inherit tradition availably. The modern medical problems should be studied and innovation resolutions should be searched, which can help the internationalization and modernization of abdominal acupuncture.

  20. [FUNCTIONAL PLASTIC OF ANTERIOR ABDOMINAL WALL HERNIAS].

    PubMed

    Grubnik, V V; Parfentyeva, N D; Parfentyev, R S

    2015-07-01

    In order to improve the treatment efficacy of postoperative anterior abdominal wall hernias the method of plastic with restoration of anatomical and physiological properties of the muscles of the anterior abdominal wall was used. After the intervention by the improved method, regardless of the location of the hernia defect yielded promising results for the conservation of anterior abdominal wall muscle function in 75% of cases completely restored functional ability of muscles recti abdomini. PMID:26591212

  1. Metabolic syndrome and the hepatorenal reflex.

    PubMed

    Wider, Michael D

    2016-01-01

    Insufficient hepatic O2 in animal and human studies has been shown to elicit a hepatorenal reflex in response to increased hepatic adenosine, resulting in stimulation of renal as well as muscle sympathetic nerve activity and activating the renin angiotensin system. Low hepatic ATP, hyperuricemia, and hepatic lipid accumulation reported in metabolic syndrome (MetS) patients may reflect insufficient hepatic O2 delivery, potentially accounting for the sympathetic overdrive associated with MetS. This theoretical concept is supported by experimental results in animals fed a high fructose diet to induce MetS. Hepatic fructose metabolism rapidly consumes ATP resulting in increased adenosine production and hyperuricemia as well as elevated renin release and sympathetic activity. This review makes the case for the hepatorenal reflex causing sympathetic overdrive and metabolic syndrome in response to exaggerated splanchnic oxygen consumption from excessive eating. This is strongly reinforced by the fact that MetS is cured in a matter of days in a significant percentage of patients by diet, bariatric surgery, or endoluminal sleeve, all of which would decrease splanchnic oxygen demand by limiting nutrient contact with the mucosa and reducing the nutrient load due to the loss of appetite or dietary restriction. PMID:27656314

  2. Metabolic syndrome and the hepatorenal reflex

    PubMed Central

    Wider, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Insufficient hepatic O2 in animal and human studies has been shown to elicit a hepatorenal reflex in response to increased hepatic adenosine, resulting in stimulation of renal as well as muscle sympathetic nerve activity and activating the renin angiotensin system. Low hepatic ATP, hyperuricemia, and hepatic lipid accumulation reported in metabolic syndrome (MetS) patients may reflect insufficient hepatic O2 delivery, potentially accounting for the sympathetic overdrive associated with MetS. This theoretical concept is supported by experimental results in animals fed a high fructose diet to induce MetS. Hepatic fructose metabolism rapidly consumes ATP resulting in increased adenosine production and hyperuricemia as well as elevated renin release and sympathetic activity. This review makes the case for the hepatorenal reflex causing sympathetic overdrive and metabolic syndrome in response to exaggerated splanchnic oxygen consumption from excessive eating. This is strongly reinforced by the fact that MetS is cured in a matter of days in a significant percentage of patients by diet, bariatric surgery, or endoluminal sleeve, all of which would decrease splanchnic oxygen demand by limiting nutrient contact with the mucosa and reducing the nutrient load due to the loss of appetite or dietary restriction. PMID:27656314

  3. Airway reflexes, autonomic function, and cardiovascular responses.

    PubMed Central

    Widdicombe, J; Lee, L Y

    2001-01-01

    In this article, we review the cardiovascular responses to the inhalation of irritants and pollutants. Many sensory receptors in the respiratory system, from nose to alveoli, respond to these irritants and set up powerful reflex changes, including those in the cardiovascular system. Systemic hypotension or hypertension, pulmonary hypertension, bradycardia, tachycardia, and dysrhythmias have all been described previously. Most of the experiments have been acute and have been performed on anesthetized experimental animals. Experiments on humans suggest we have similar sensory systems and reflex responses. However, we must use caution when applying the animal results to humans. Most animal experiments, unlike those with humans, have been performed using general anesthesia, with irritants administered in high concentrations, and often to a restricted part of the respiratory tract. Species differences in the response to irritants are well established. We must be even more careful when applying the results of acute experiments in animals to the pathophysiologic changes observed in prolonged exposure to environmental pollution in humans. PMID:11544167

  4. Cough reflex sensitization from esophagus and nose.

    PubMed

    Hennel, Michal; Brozmanova, Mariana; Kollarik, Marian

    2015-12-01

    The diseases of the esophagus and nose are among the major factors contributing to chronic cough although their role in different patient populations is debated. Studies in animal models and in humans show that afferent C-fiber activators applied on esophageal or nasal mucosa do not initiate cough, but enhance cough induced by inhaled irritants. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that activation of esophageal and nasal C-fibers contribute to cough reflex hypersensitivity observed in chronic cough patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and chronic rhinitis, respectively. The afferent nerves mediating cough sensitization from the esophagus are probably the neural crest-derived vagal jugular C-fibers. In addition to their responsiveness to high concentration of acid typical for gastroesophageal reflux (pH < 5), esophageal C-fibers also express receptors for activation by weakly acidic reflux such as receptors highly sensitive to acid and receptors for bile acids. The nature of sensory pathways from the nose and their activators relevant for cough sensitization are less understood. Increased cough reflex sensitivity was also reported in many patients with GERD or rhinitis who do not complain of cough indicating that additional endogenous or exogenous factors may be required to develop chronic coughing in these diseases.

  5. Metabolic syndrome and the hepatorenal reflex

    PubMed Central

    Wider, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Insufficient hepatic O2 in animal and human studies has been shown to elicit a hepatorenal reflex in response to increased hepatic adenosine, resulting in stimulation of renal as well as muscle sympathetic nerve activity and activating the renin angiotensin system. Low hepatic ATP, hyperuricemia, and hepatic lipid accumulation reported in metabolic syndrome (MetS) patients may reflect insufficient hepatic O2 delivery, potentially accounting for the sympathetic overdrive associated with MetS. This theoretical concept is supported by experimental results in animals fed a high fructose diet to induce MetS. Hepatic fructose metabolism rapidly consumes ATP resulting in increased adenosine production and hyperuricemia as well as elevated renin release and sympathetic activity. This review makes the case for the hepatorenal reflex causing sympathetic overdrive and metabolic syndrome in response to exaggerated splanchnic oxygen consumption from excessive eating. This is strongly reinforced by the fact that MetS is cured in a matter of days in a significant percentage of patients by diet, bariatric surgery, or endoluminal sleeve, all of which would decrease splanchnic oxygen demand by limiting nutrient contact with the mucosa and reducing the nutrient load due to the loss of appetite or dietary restriction.

  6. Reflex control of the circulation during exercise.

    PubMed

    Fadel, P J

    2015-12-01

    Appropriate cardiovascular and hemodynamic adjustments are necessary to meet the metabolic demands of working skeletal muscle during exercise. Alterations in the sympathetic and parasympathetic branches of the autonomic nervous system are fundamental in ensuring these adjustments are adequately made. Several neural mechanisms are responsible for the changes in autonomic activity with exercise and through complex interactions, contribute to the cardiovascular and hemodynamic changes in an intensity-dependent manner. This short review is from a presentation made at the Saltin Symposium June 2-4, 2015 in Copenhagen, Denmark. As such, the focus will be on reflex control of the circulation with an emphasis on the work of the late Dr. Bengt Saltin. Moreover, a concerted effort is made to highlight the novel and insightful concepts put forth by Dr. Saltin in his last published review article on the regulation of skeletal muscle blood flow in humans. Thus, the multiple roles played by adenosine triphosphate (ATP) including its ability to induce vasodilatation, override sympathetic vasoconstriction and stimulate skeletal muscle afferents (exercise pressor reflex) are discussed and a conceptual framework is set suggesting a major role of ATP in blood flow regulation during exercise.

  7. Reflexivity in Teams: A Review and New Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Konradt, Udo; Otte, Kai-Philip; Schippers, Michaéla C; Steenfatt, Corinna

    2016-01-01

    Team reflexivity posits that the extent to which teams reflect upon and adapt their functioning is positively related to team performance. While remarkable progress has been made to provide evidence of this relationship, the underlying framework is missing elements of current theoretical streams for analyzing and describing teamwork, leaving the diversity of effects of team reflexivity often untouched. In this article, we present an update for this framework, by reviewing previous research on reflexivity, addressing gaps in the literature, and revising the original model by integrating feedback and dynamic team effectiveness frameworks for describing temporal developments of reflexivity. We furthermore propose a new dimensional structure for reflexivity, relying on prior work conceptualizing teams as information-processing systems that learn and advance through social-cognitive elements. Our model is therefore not only suitable for explaining the diverse set of relationships between team reflexivity on outcomes, but also provides valuable directions for viewing reflexivity as process that takes place during both transition and action phases of teamwork. We conclude with implications for managers, identify limitations, and propose an agenda for further research into this area. This article contributes an extended perspective relevant for further theory development and for effectively managing reflexivity in teams. PMID:26457836

  8. Tendon reflex is suppressed during whole-body vibration.

    PubMed

    Karacan, Ilhan; Cidem, Muharrem; Yilmaz, Gizem; Sebik, Oguz; Cakar, Halil Ibrahim; Türker, Kemal Sıtkı

    2016-10-01

    In this study we have investigated the effect of whole body vibration (WBV) on the tendon reflex (T-reflex) amplitude. Fifteen young adult healthy volunteer males were included in this study. Records of surface EMG of the right soleus muscle and accelerometer taped onto the right Achilles tendon were obtained while participant stood upright with the knees in extension, on the vibration platform. Tendon reflex was elicited before and during WBV. Subjects completed a set of WBV. Each WBV set consisted of six vibration sessions using different frequencies (25, 30, 35, 40, 45, 50Hz) applied randomly. In each WBV session the Achilles tendon was tapped five times with a custom-made reflex hammer. The mean peak-to-peak (PP) amplitude of T-reflex was 1139.11±498.99µV before vibration. It decreased significantly during WBV (p<0.0001). The maximum PP amplitude of T-reflex was 1333±515μV before vibration. It decreased significantly during WBV (p<0.0001). No significant differences were obtained in the mean acceleration values of Achilles tendon with tapping between before and during vibration sessions. This study showed that T-reflex is suppressed during WBV. T-reflex suppression indicates that the spindle primary afferents must have been pre-synaptically inhibited during WBV similar to the findings in high frequency tendon vibration studies. PMID:27485766

  9. Iris Pigmentation and Fractionated Reaction and Reflex Time.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hale, Bruce D.; And Others

    Behavioral measures, fractionated reaction and reflex times by means of electromyography, were used to determine if the eye color differences are found in the central or peripheral regions of the nervous system. The purpose of this research was to determine the truth of the hypothesis that dark-eyed individuals have faster reflex and reaction time…

  10. Ultimate concerns in late modernity: Archer, Bourdieu and reflexivity.

    PubMed

    Farrugia, David; Woodman, Dan

    2015-12-01

    Through a critique of Margaret Archer's theory of reflexivity, this paper explores the theoretical contribution of a Bourdieusian sociology of the subject for understanding social change. Archer's theory of reflexivity holds that conscious 'internal conversations' are the motor of society, central both to human subjectivity and to the 'reflexive imperative' of late modernity. This is established through critiques of Bourdieu, who is held to erase creativity and meaningful personal investments from subjectivity, and late modernity is depicted as a time when a 'situational logic of opportunity' renders embodied dispositions and the reproduction of symbolic advantages obsolete. Maintaining Archer's focus on 'ultimate concerns' in a context of social change, this paper argues that her theory of reflexivity is established through a narrow misreading and rejection of Bourdieu's work, which ultimately creates problems for her own approach. Archer's rejection of any pre-reflexive dimensions to subjectivity and social action leaves her unable to sociologically explain the genesis of 'ultimate concerns', and creates an empirically dubious narrative of the consequences of social change. Through a focus on Archer's concept of 'fractured reflexivity', the paper explores the theoretical necessity of habitus and illusio for understanding the social changes that Archer is grappling with. In late modernity, reflexivity is valorized just as the conditions for its successful operation are increasingly foreclosed, creating 'fractured reflexivity' emblematic of the complex contemporary interaction between habitus, illusio, and accelerating social change.

  11. [The development of I. P. Pavlov's conditioned reflex theory].

    PubMed

    Kim, O J

    1992-01-01

    This paper deals with the theory of Ivan Petrovich Pavlov (1849-1936), a Russian physiologist who presented for the first time the systematic theory of the function of the brain that controls the whole behavior of animals, i.e. higher nervous activity through experimental studies. This paper, principally based on Lectures on Conditioned Reflexes (1928), investigates the development of conditioned reflex theory from its beginning by dividing it into three periods. First, during the period from 1898 to 1906, the fundamental concept of conditioned reflex was established and the study of conditioned reflex became an independent discipline. From 1907 to 1916, the second period, Pavlov theorized on higher nervous activity on the basis of extensive data from his laboratory experiments of conditioned reflex. And Pavlov complemented conditioned reflex theory, during the third period from 1916 to 1928, and extended the boundaries of it through applications of conditioned reflex theory to psychopathology and typology. The study contributes to the understanding that conditioned reflex theory was historically developed, and not presented as a complete form from the beginning, and that Pavlov intended to study the higher nervous activity through the method of neurophysiology.

  12. [Value of blink reflex studies in neurosurgical problems].

    PubMed

    Jamjoom, Z; Nahser, H C; Nau, H E

    1983-09-01

    Blinking reflex studies were done in neurosurgical patients with processes in the posterior fossa and idiopathic trigeminal neuralgia. Alterations were found in space occupying, ischemic, and traumatic lesions of the trigemino-facial system. The analysis of the components of the blinking reflex can give hints to the site of the lesion and also to the prognosis of the underlying process.

  13. Ultimate concerns in late modernity: Archer, Bourdieu and reflexivity.

    PubMed

    Farrugia, David; Woodman, Dan

    2015-12-01

    Through a critique of Margaret Archer's theory of reflexivity, this paper explores the theoretical contribution of a Bourdieusian sociology of the subject for understanding social change. Archer's theory of reflexivity holds that conscious 'internal conversations' are the motor of society, central both to human subjectivity and to the 'reflexive imperative' of late modernity. This is established through critiques of Bourdieu, who is held to erase creativity and meaningful personal investments from subjectivity, and late modernity is depicted as a time when a 'situational logic of opportunity' renders embodied dispositions and the reproduction of symbolic advantages obsolete. Maintaining Archer's focus on 'ultimate concerns' in a context of social change, this paper argues that her theory of reflexivity is established through a narrow misreading and rejection of Bourdieu's work, which ultimately creates problems for her own approach. Archer's rejection of any pre-reflexive dimensions to subjectivity and social action leaves her unable to sociologically explain the genesis of 'ultimate concerns', and creates an empirically dubious narrative of the consequences of social change. Through a focus on Archer's concept of 'fractured reflexivity', the paper explores the theoretical necessity of habitus and illusio for understanding the social changes that Archer is grappling with. In late modernity, reflexivity is valorized just as the conditions for its successful operation are increasingly foreclosed, creating 'fractured reflexivity' emblematic of the complex contemporary interaction between habitus, illusio, and accelerating social change. PMID:26434655

  14. Bourdieu and Science Studies: Toward a Reflexive Sociology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hess, David J.

    2011-01-01

    Two of Bourdieu's fundamental contributions to science studies--the reflexive analysis of the social and human sciences and the concept of an intellectual field--are used to frame a reflexive study of the history and social studies of science and technology as an intellectual field in the United States. The universe of large, Ph.D.-granting…

  15. The proboscis extension reflex not elicited in Magachilid bees

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Honey bees (Apis mellifera L.) will reflexively extend their proboscis in response to antennal stimulation with sucrose solution. For decades, the proboscis extension reflex (PER) of honey bees has been used as a tool to further the understanding of their cognitive processes, such as learning and m...

  16. A Movement Account of Long-Distance Reflexives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKeown, Rebecca Katherine

    2013-01-01

    This thesis examines reflexive pronouns, such as Icelandic "sig" (Cf. Thrainsson 2007), which may be bound from outside of an infinitive clause (which I call MD "medium distance" binding) in addition to being bound locally. I propose that such reflexives are linked to their antecedents via sisterhood followed by movement: the…

  17. Reflexivity of Discomfort in Insider-Outsider Educational Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamdan, Amani K.

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses my position as an Arab Muslim woman researcher who is affiliated with a Western university, researching Arab Muslim Canadian women. I discuss how reflexivity has emerged as an element of my research endeavours. Various notions of reflexivity in educational research have been expressed in the literature, yet I focus on what it…

  18. [The development of I. P. Pavlov's conditioned reflex theory].

    PubMed

    Kim, O J

    1992-01-01

    This paper deals with the theory of Ivan Petrovich Pavlov (1849-1936), a Russian physiologist who presented for the first time the systematic theory of the function of the brain that controls the whole behavior of animals, i.e. higher nervous activity through experimental studies. This paper, principally based on Lectures on Conditioned Reflexes (1928), investigates the development of conditioned reflex theory from its beginning by dividing it into three periods. First, during the period from 1898 to 1906, the fundamental concept of conditioned reflex was established and the study of conditioned reflex became an independent discipline. From 1907 to 1916, the second period, Pavlov theorized on higher nervous activity on the basis of extensive data from his laboratory experiments of conditioned reflex. And Pavlov complemented conditioned reflex theory, during the third period from 1916 to 1928, and extended the boundaries of it through applications of conditioned reflex theory to psychopathology and typology. The study contributes to the understanding that conditioned reflex theory was historically developed, and not presented as a complete form from the beginning, and that Pavlov intended to study the higher nervous activity through the method of neurophysiology. PMID:11618531

  19. Reflexivity in Teams: A Review and New Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Konradt, Udo; Otte, Kai-Philip; Schippers, Michaéla C; Steenfatt, Corinna

    2016-01-01

    Team reflexivity posits that the extent to which teams reflect upon and adapt their functioning is positively related to team performance. While remarkable progress has been made to provide evidence of this relationship, the underlying framework is missing elements of current theoretical streams for analyzing and describing teamwork, leaving the diversity of effects of team reflexivity often untouched. In this article, we present an update for this framework, by reviewing previous research on reflexivity, addressing gaps in the literature, and revising the original model by integrating feedback and dynamic team effectiveness frameworks for describing temporal developments of reflexivity. We furthermore propose a new dimensional structure for reflexivity, relying on prior work conceptualizing teams as information-processing systems that learn and advance through social-cognitive elements. Our model is therefore not only suitable for explaining the diverse set of relationships between team reflexivity on outcomes, but also provides valuable directions for viewing reflexivity as process that takes place during both transition and action phases of teamwork. We conclude with implications for managers, identify limitations, and propose an agenda for further research into this area. This article contributes an extended perspective relevant for further theory development and for effectively managing reflexivity in teams.

  20. Tendon reflex is suppressed during whole-body vibration.

    PubMed

    Karacan, Ilhan; Cidem, Muharrem; Yilmaz, Gizem; Sebik, Oguz; Cakar, Halil Ibrahim; Türker, Kemal Sıtkı

    2016-10-01

    In this study we have investigated the effect of whole body vibration (WBV) on the tendon reflex (T-reflex) amplitude. Fifteen young adult healthy volunteer males were included in this study. Records of surface EMG of the right soleus muscle and accelerometer taped onto the right Achilles tendon were obtained while participant stood upright with the knees in extension, on the vibration platform. Tendon reflex was elicited before and during WBV. Subjects completed a set of WBV. Each WBV set consisted of six vibration sessions using different frequencies (25, 30, 35, 40, 45, 50Hz) applied randomly. In each WBV session the Achilles tendon was tapped five times with a custom-made reflex hammer. The mean peak-to-peak (PP) amplitude of T-reflex was 1139.11±498.99µV before vibration. It decreased significantly during WBV (p<0.0001). The maximum PP amplitude of T-reflex was 1333±515μV before vibration. It decreased significantly during WBV (p<0.0001). No significant differences were obtained in the mean acceleration values of Achilles tendon with tapping between before and during vibration sessions. This study showed that T-reflex is suppressed during WBV. T-reflex suppression indicates that the spindle primary afferents must have been pre-synaptically inhibited during WBV similar to the findings in high frequency tendon vibration studies.

  1. Approaches to Reflexivity: Navigating Educational and Career Pathways

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dyke, Martin; Johnston, Brenda; Fuller, Alison

    2012-01-01

    This paper provides a critical appraisal of approaches to reflexivity in sociology. It uses data from social network research to argue that Archer's approach to reflexivity provides a valuable lens with which to understand how people navigate their education and career pathways. The paper is also critical of Archer's methodology and typology of…

  2. Reflexive Management Learning: An Integrative Review and a Conceptual Typology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cotter, Richard J.; Cullen, John G.

    2012-01-01

    The scale and reach of the recent global financial has created a fresh wave of interest in exploring more sustainable forms of management. A central thrust behind this trend in the practice of management development and education has been the accentuation of reflexivity. There are many variations in how reflexivity is understood, and this article…

  3. Role of stretch reflex in voluntary movements. [of human foot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gottlieb, G. L.; Agarwal, G. C.

    1975-01-01

    The stretch reflex is often described as a spinal servomechanism, a device for assisting in the regulation of muscle length. Observation of the EMG response to mechanical interruption of voluntary movements fails to demonstrate a significant role for spinal reflexes at 40 msec latency. Two functional responses with latencies of 120 msec and 200 msec, implying supraspinal mediation, are observed.

  4. 29 CFR 4219.18 - Withdrawal in a plan year in which substantially all employers withdraw.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... under this section shall be determined pursuant to § 4219.13. (c) Plan sponsor's obligations. The plan... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Withdrawal in a plan year in which substantially all... GUARANTY CORPORATION WITHDRAWAL LIABILITY FOR MULTIEMPLOYER PLANS NOTICE, COLLECTION, AND...

  5. 29 CFR 4219.18 - Withdrawal in a plan year in which substantially all employers withdraw.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... under this section shall be determined pursuant to § 4219.13. (c) Plan sponsor's obligations. The plan... 29 Labor 9 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Withdrawal in a plan year in which substantially all... GUARANTY CORPORATION WITHDRAWAL LIABILITY FOR MULTIEMPLOYER PLANS NOTICE, COLLECTION, AND...

  6. 29 CFR 4219.18 - Withdrawal in a plan year in which substantially all employers withdraw.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... under this section shall be determined pursuant to § 4219.13. (c) Plan sponsor's obligations. The plan... 29 Labor 9 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Withdrawal in a plan year in which substantially all... GUARANTY CORPORATION WITHDRAWAL LIABILITY FOR MULTIEMPLOYER PLANS NOTICE, COLLECTION, AND...

  7. Advanced techniques in abdominal surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Monson, J R

    1993-01-01

    Almost every abdominal organ is now amenable to laparoscopic surgery. Laparoscopic appendicectomy is a routine procedure which also permits identification of other conditions initially confused with an inflamed appendix. However, assessment of appendiceal inflammation is more difficult. Almost all colonic procedures can be performed laparoscopically, at least partly, though resection for colonic cancer is still controversial. For simple patch repair of perforated duodenal ulcers laparoscopy is ideal, and inguinal groin hernia can be repaired satisfactorily with a patch of synthetic mesh. Many upper abdominal procedures, however, still take more time than the open operations. These techniques reduce postoperative pain and the incidence of wound infections and allow a much earlier return to normal activity compared with open surgery. They have also brought new disciplines: surgeons must learn different hand-eye coordination, meticulous haemostasis is needed to maintain picture quality, and delivery of specimens may be problematic. The widespread introduction of laparoscopic techniques has emphasised the need for adequate training (operations that were straight-forward open procedures may require considerable laparoscopic expertise) and has raised questions about trainee surgeons acquiring adequate experience of open procedures. Images FIG 9 p1347-a p1347-b p1349-a p1350-a p1350-b PMID:8257893

  8. Mechanical ventilation in abdominal surgery.

    PubMed

    Futier, E; Godet, T; Millot, A; Constantin, J-M; Jaber, S

    2014-01-01

    One of the key challenges in perioperative care is to reduce postoperative morbidity and mortality. Patients who develop postoperative morbidity but survive to leave hospital have often reduced functional independence and long-term survival. Mechanical ventilation provides a specific example that may help us to shift thinking from treatment to prevention of postoperative complications. Mechanical ventilation in patients undergoing surgery has long been considered only as a modality to ensure gas exchange while allowing maintenance of anesthesia with delivery of inhaled anesthetics. Evidence is accumulating, however, suggesting an association between intraoperative mechanical ventilation strategy and postoperative pulmonary function and clinical outcome in patients undergoing abdominal surgery. Non-protective ventilator settings, especially high tidal volume (VT) (>10-12mL/kg) and the use of very low level of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) (PEEP<5cmH2O) or no PEEP, may cause alveolar overdistension and repetitive tidal recruitment leading to ventilator-associated lung injury in patients with healthy lungs. Stimulated by previous findings in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome, the use of lower tidal volume ventilation is becoming increasingly more common in the operating room. However, lowering tidal volume, though important, is only part of the overall multifaceted approach of lung protective mechanical ventilation. In this review, we aimed at providing the most recent and relevant clinical evidence regarding the use of mechanical ventilation in patients undergoing abdominal surgery.

  9. Inflated Reward Value in Early Opiate Withdrawal

    PubMed Central

    Wassum, Kate M.; Greenfield, Venuz Y.; Linker, Kay E.; Maidment, Nigel T.; Ostlund, Sean B.

    2014-01-01

    Through incentive learning the emotional experience of a reward in a relevant need state (e.g., hunger for food) sets the incentive value that guides the performance actions that earn that reward when the need state is encountered again. Opiate withdrawal has been proposed as a need state in which, through experience, opiate value can be increased resulting in escalated opiate self-administration. Endogenous opioid transmission plays anatomically dissociable roles in the positive emotional experience of reward consumption and incentive learning. We, therefore, sought to determine if chronic opiate exposure and withdrawal produces a disruption in the fundamental incentive learning process such that reward seeking, even for non-opiate rewards, can become maladaptive, inconsistent with the emotional experience of reward consumption and irrespective of need. Rats trained to earn sucrose or water on a reward-seeking chain were treated with morphine (10-30 mg/k.g., s.c.) daily for 11 d prior to testing in withdrawal. Opiate withdrawn rats showed elevated reward-seeking actions, but only after they experienced the reward in withdrawal, an effect that was strongest in early (1-3 d), as opposed to late (14-16 d) withdrawal. This was sufficient to overcome a negative reward value change induced by sucrose experience in satiety and, in certain circumstances, was inconsistent with the emotional experience of reward consumption. Lastly, we found that early opiate withdrawal-induced inflation of reward value was blocked by inactivation of basolateral amygdala mu opioid receptors. These data suggest that in early opiate withdrawal the incentive learning process is disrupted resulting in maladaptive reward seeking. PMID:25081350

  10. Antagonist-elicited cannabis withdrawal in humans.

    PubMed

    Gorelick, David A; Goodwin, Robert S; Schwilke, Eugene; Schwope, David M; Darwin, William D; Kelly, Deanna L; McMahon, Robert P; Liu, Fang; Ortemann-Renon, Catherine; Bonnet, Denis; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2011-10-01

    Cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonists have potential therapeutic benefits, but antagonist-elicited cannabis withdrawal has not been reported in humans. Ten male daily cannabis smokers received 8 days of increasingly frequent 20-mg oral Δ⁹-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) dosages (40-120 mg/d) around-the-clock to standardize cannabis dependence while residing on a closed research unit. On the ninth day, double-blind placebo or 20- (suggested therapeutic dose) or 40-mg oral rimonabant, a CB1-cannabinoid receptor antagonist, was administered. Cannabis withdrawal signs and symptoms were assessed before and for 23.5 hours after rimonabant. Rimonabant, THC, and 11-hydroxy-THC plasma concentrations were quantified by mass spectrometry. The first 6 subjects received 20-mg rimonabant (1 placebo); the remaining 4 subjects received 40-mg rimonabant (1 placebo). Fourteen subjects enrolled; 10 completed before premature termination because of withdrawal of rimonabant from clinical development. Three of 5 subjects in the 20-mg group, 1 of 3 in the 40-mg group, and none of 2 in the placebo group met the prespecified withdrawal criterion of 150% increase or higher in at least 3 visual analog scales for cannabis withdrawal symptoms within 3 hours of rimonabant dosing. There were no significant associations between visual analog scale, heart rate, or blood pressure changes and peak rimonabant plasma concentration, area-under-the-rimonabant-concentration-by-time curve (0-8 hours), or peak rimonabant/THC or rimonabant/(THC + 11-hydroxy-THC) plasma concentration ratios. In summary, prespecified criteria for antagonist-elicited cannabis withdrawal were not observed at the 20- or 40-mg rimonabant doses. These data do not preclude antagonist-elicited withdrawal at higher rimonabant doses.

  11. Antagonist-elicited cannabis withdrawal in humans.

    PubMed

    Gorelick, David A; Goodwin, Robert S; Schwilke, Eugene; Schwope, David M; Darwin, William D; Kelly, Deanna L; McMahon, Robert P; Liu, Fang; Ortemann-Renon, Catherine; Bonnet, Denis; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2011-10-01

    Cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonists have potential therapeutic benefits, but antagonist-elicited cannabis withdrawal has not been reported in humans. Ten male daily cannabis smokers received 8 days of increasingly frequent 20-mg oral Δ⁹-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) dosages (40-120 mg/d) around-the-clock to standardize cannabis dependence while residing on a closed research unit. On the ninth day, double-blind placebo or 20- (suggested therapeutic dose) or 40-mg oral rimonabant, a CB1-cannabinoid receptor antagonist, was administered. Cannabis withdrawal signs and symptoms were assessed before and for 23.5 hours after rimonabant. Rimonabant, THC, and 11-hydroxy-THC plasma concentrations were quantified by mass spectrometry. The first 6 subjects received 20-mg rimonabant (1 placebo); the remaining 4 subjects received 40-mg rimonabant (1 placebo). Fourteen subjects enrolled; 10 completed before premature termination because of withdrawal of rimonabant from clinical development. Three of 5 subjects in the 20-mg group, 1 of 3 in the 40-mg group, and none of 2 in the placebo group met the prespecified withdrawal criterion of 150% increase or higher in at least 3 visual analog scales for cannabis withdrawal symptoms within 3 hours of rimonabant dosing. There were no significant associations between visual analog scale, heart rate, or blood pressure changes and peak rimonabant plasma concentration, area-under-the-rimonabant-concentration-by-time curve (0-8 hours), or peak rimonabant/THC or rimonabant/(THC + 11-hydroxy-THC) plasma concentration ratios. In summary, prespecified criteria for antagonist-elicited cannabis withdrawal were not observed at the 20- or 40-mg rimonabant doses. These data do not preclude antagonist-elicited withdrawal at higher rimonabant doses. PMID:21869692

  12. Parametric exploration of the fear-inhibited light reflex.

    PubMed

    Hourdaki, Eugenia; Giakoumaki, Stella G; Grinakis, Vangelis; Theou, Katerina; Karataraki, Maria; Bitsios, Panos

    2005-07-01

    The effect of various parameters on the mediation of the fear-inhibited light reflex was examined. The light reflexes of 16 healthy men were measured across four light probe intensities, either in the presence of white noise alone or when the white noise was associated with the threat of either an electric shock or an acoustic sound blast. The white noise alone did not affect the light reflex amplitude. Both types of threat were subjectively anxiogenic and inhibited the light reflex across all light probe intensities, the threat of shock being more potent than the threat of sound blast. Importantly, the effect of either type of threat on the light reflex amplitude was found to increase with increasing light probe intensity, suggesting that brighter light probes may become more relevant motivationally in the threat condition, thus attracting greater allocation of attentional/cognitive resources.

  13. Electrical amygdala kindling in alcohol-withdrawal kindled rats.

    PubMed

    Ulrichsen, J; Woldbye, D P; Madsen, T M; Clemmesen, L; Haugbøl, S; Olsen, C H; Laursen, H; Bolwig, T G; Hemmingsen, R

    1998-01-01

    Repeated alcohol withdrawal has been shown to kindle seizure activity. The purpose of the present investigation was to study electrical amygdala kindling in rats previously exposed to alcohol-withdrawal kindling. In three independent experiments, male Wistar rats were subjected to multiple episodes each consisting of 2 days of severe alcohol intoxication and 5 days of alcohol withdrawal. In the first experiment, the alcohol-withdrawal kindled animals were divided into two groups depending on whether spontaneous alcohol-withdrawal seizures were observed in episodes 10-13. In the second and third experiments, the alcohol-withdrawal kindled animals were compared to a group in which alcohol-withdrawal kindling was prevented by diazepam treatment during the withdrawal reactions in order to discriminate between the effect of withdrawal and intoxication. Electrical kindling was initiated 28-35 days after the last alcohol dose by exposing the animals to daily electrical stimulations of the right amygdala. The results showed that amygdala kindling was facilitated in alcohol-withdrawal kindled animals which showed spontaneous withdrawal seizure activity, compared with animals exposed to multiple episodes of alcohol withdrawal which did not develop withdrawal seizures or with animals exposed to a single episode of alcohol intoxication. When compared to the control group, the alcohol-withdrawal kindled group with seizures also kindled at a faster rate, but the difference did not reach statistical significance and therefore the results must be regarded as preliminary at present.

  14. Resuscitation and auto resuscitation by airway reflexes in animals.

    PubMed

    Tomori, Zoltan; Donic, Viliam; Benacka, Roman; Jakus, Jan; Gresova, Sona

    2013-01-01

    Various diseases often result in decompensation requiring resuscitation. In infants moderate hypoxia evokes a compensatory augmented breath - sigh and more severe hypoxia results in a solitary gasp. Progressive asphyxia provokes gasping respiration saving the healthy infant - autoresuscitation by gasping. A neonate with sudden infant death syndrome, however, usually will not survive. Our systematic research in animals indicated that airway reflexes have similar resuscitation potential as gasping respiration. Nasopharyngeal stimulation in cats and most mammals evokes the aspiration reflex, characterized by spasmodic inspiration followed by passive expiration. On the contrary, expiration reflex from the larynx, or cough reflex from the pharynx and lower airways manifest by a forced expiration, which in cough is preceded by deep inspiration. These reflexes of distinct character activate the brainstem rhythm generators for inspiration and expiration strongly, but differently. They secondarily modulate the control mechanisms of various vital functions of the organism. During severe asphyxia the progressive respiratory insufficiency may induce a life-threatening cardio-respiratory failure. The sniff- and gasp-like aspiration reflex and similar spasmodic inspirations, accompanied by strong sympatho-adrenergic activation, can interrupt a severe asphyxia and reverse the developing dangerous cardiovascular and vasomotor dysfunctions, threatening with imminent loss of consciousness and death. During progressive asphyxia the reversal of gradually developing bradycardia and excessive hypotension by airway reflexes starts with reflex tachycardia and vasoconstriction, resulting in prompt hypertensive reaction, followed by renewal of cortical activity and gradual normalization of breathing. A combination of the aspiration reflex supporting venous return and the expiration or cough reflex increasing the cerebral perfusion by strong expirations, provides a powerful resuscitation and

  15. Resuscitation and auto resuscitation by airway reflexes in animals

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Various diseases often result in decompensation requiring resuscitation. In infants moderate hypoxia evokes a compensatory augmented breath – sigh and more severe hypoxia results in a solitary gasp. Progressive asphyxia provokes gasping respiration saving the healthy infant – autoresuscitation by gasping. A neonate with sudden infant death syndrome, however, usually will not survive. Our systematic research in animals indicated that airway reflexes have similar resuscitation potential as gasping respiration. Nasopharyngeal stimulation in cats and most mammals evokes the aspiration reflex, characterized by spasmodic inspiration followed by passive expiration. On the contrary, expiration reflex from the larynx, or cough reflex from the pharynx and lower airways manifest by a forced expiration, which in cough is preceded by deep inspiration. These reflexes of distinct character activate the brainstem rhythm generators for inspiration and expiration strongly, but differently. They secondarily modulate the control mechanisms of various vital functions of the organism. During severe asphyxia the progressive respiratory insufficiency may induce a life-threatening cardio-respiratory failure. The sniff- and gasp-like aspiration reflex and similar spasmodic inspirations, accompanied by strong sympatho-adrenergic activation, can interrupt a severe asphyxia and reverse the developing dangerous cardiovascular and vasomotor dysfunctions, threatening with imminent loss of consciousness and death. During progressive asphyxia the reversal of gradually developing bradycardia and excessive hypotension by airway reflexes starts with reflex tachycardia and vasoconstriction, resulting in prompt hypertensive reaction, followed by renewal of cortical activity and gradual normalization of breathing. A combination of the aspiration reflex supporting venous return and the expiration or cough reflex increasing the cerebral perfusion by strong expirations, provides a powerful resuscitation

  16. Drug withdrawal conceptualized as a stressor

    PubMed Central

    Chartoff, Elena H.; Carlezon, William A.

    2015-01-01

    Drug withdrawal is often conceptualized as an aversive state that motivates drug-seeking and drug-taking behaviors in humans. Stress is more difficult to define, but is also frequently associated with aversive states. Here we describe evidence for the simple theory that drug withdrawal is a stress-like state, on the basis of common effects on behavioral, neurochemical, and molecular endpoints. We also describe data suggesting a more complex relationship between drug withdrawal and stress. As one example, we will highlight evidence that, depending on drug class, components of withdrawal can produce effects that have characteristics consistent with mood elevation. In addition, some stressors can act as positive reinforcers, defined as having the ability to increase the probability of a behavior that produces it. As such, accumulating evidence supports the general principles of opponent process theory, whereby processes that have an affective valence are followed in time by an opponent process that has the opposite valence. Throughout, we identify gaps in knowledge and propose future directions for research. A better understanding of the similarities, differences, and overlaps between drug withdrawal and stress will lead to the development of improved treatments for addiction, as well as for a vast array of neuropsychiatric conditions that are triggered or exacerbated by stress. PMID:25083570

  17. Inpatient management of acute alcohol withdrawal syndrome.

    PubMed

    Perry, Elizabeth C

    2014-05-01

    Alcohol withdrawal is a common condition encountered in the hospital setting after abrupt discontinuation of alcohol in an alcohol-dependent individual. Patients may present with mild symptoms of tremulousness and agitation or more severe symptoms including withdrawal seizures and delirium tremens. Management revolves around early identification of at-risk individuals and symptom assessment using a validated tool such as the revised Clinical Institute Withdrawal Assessment for Alcohol score. Benzodiazepines remain the mainstay of treatment and can be administered using a front-loading, fixed-dose, or symptom-triggered approach. Long-acting benzodiazepines such as chlordiazepoxide or diazepam are commonly used and may provide a smoother withdrawal than shorter-acting benzodiazepines, but there are no data to support superiority of one benzodiazepine over another. Elderly patients or those with significant liver disease may have increased accumulation and decreased clearance of the long-acting benzodiazepines, and lorazepam or oxazepam may be preferred in these patients. Patients with symptoms refractory to high doses of benzodiazepines may require addition of a rescue medication such as phenobarbital, propofol or dexmedetomidine. Anticonvulsants (carbamazepine, valproate, gabapentin) may have a role in the management of mild to moderate withdrawal. Other medications such as β-antagonists or neuroleptics may offer additional benefit in select patients but should not be used a monotherapy.

  18. Withdrawal From Coparenting Interactions During Early Infancy

    PubMed Central

    Elliston, Donna; McHale, James; Talbot, Jean; Parmley, Meagan; Kuersten-Hogan, Regina

    2009-01-01

    This study examines early withdrawal in the coparenting system, and the utility of a brief problem-solving discussion about coparenting responsibilities as a means for evaluating such withdrawal. One hundred and fifteen couples were evaluated both prenatally and at 3 months postpartum. During prenatal assessments, parents rated their personalities and completed marital assessments. After the baby arrived, they completed a negotiation task in which they discussed disputes about parenting roles and responsibilities, and interacted together with the baby in a triadic play assessment. Fathers’ but not mothers’ withdrawal during coparenting negotiations was associated with greater disengagement and less warmth during triadic play and with fathers’ feelings that mothers did not respect their parenting. Fathers’ but not mothers’ withdrawal during coparenting negotiations was also forecast by low ego resilience and by an increase in depressive symptomatology during the postpartum. As the negotiation task appeared to be an effective provocateur of withdrawal when confronting coparenting disagreement, it may prove useful for eliciting this aspect of coparental process in work with couples. PMID:19130789

  19. A cross-study comparison of cannabis and tobacco withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Vandrey, Ryan G; Budney, Alan J; Moore, Brent A; Hughes, John R

    2005-01-01

    A valid cannabis withdrawal syndrome has recently been established, but its clinical importance remains unclear. One method to assess the importance of cannabis withdrawal is to compare it with an established withdrawal syndrome. Cannabis and tobacco withdrawal studies that employed similar methods were used to compare six participant-rated and four observer-rated symptoms. Descriptive and graphic comparisons indicate that the magnitude and time course of withdrawal effects are similar across the two syndromes. These findings are consistent with other evidence supporting the clinical importance of the cannabis withdrawal syndrome. There remains a need for prospective experimental studies to replicate these findings.

  20. Vibration paradox and H-reflex suppression: is H-reflex suppression results from distorting effect of vibration?

    PubMed

    Cakar, H I; Cidem, M; Kara, S; Karacan, I

    2014-09-01

    Vibration paradox is that an increase in muscles activity coexists with the inhibition of H-reflex during vibration. The H-reflex suppression may be due to the movement of stimulating electrode during vibration. The aim of this study was to test this hypothesis. Fifteen healthy young adult males participated in this study. The soleus myoelectrical activities were evaluated by surface electromyography (SEMG). The vibration was applied only to the left leg and the H-reflex of soleus muscle was measured in the right leg to prevent the probable measurement errors caused by the movement of stimulating electrode. The Hmax/Mmax ratio of the right soleus isolated from vibration effects significantly decreased during the left leg vibration. As a result, this study shows that the H-reflex is suppressed during the vibration and the movement of the stimulating electrode has no role on the suppression of H-reflex.

  1. Puerperal endometritis after abdominal twin delivery.

    PubMed

    Suonio, S; Huttunen, M

    1994-04-01

    The infectious complications of 122 consecutive abdominal twin deliveries over the period 1984-1989 were analyzed in a prospective clinical study, comparing them with 761 singleton abdominal deliveries over the period 1984-1986. The incidence of endometritis was nearly three-fold after twin deliveries and the incidence of abdominal wound infections nearly two-fold compared with singleton abdominal pregnancies (13.1/4.7% and 5.6/3.0%). The risk of amnionitis was increased ten-fold, 6 hours after rupture of the membranes in abdominal twin delivery, but no connection was found between amnionitis and endometritis, as in singleton abdominal deliveries. Multiple regression analysis indicated only two risk factors as regards puerperal endometritis after abdominal twin delivery: age under 25 years (odds ratio 6.9, 95% confidence limits 1.9-24.8), an association also seen in singleton abdominal deliveries, and a period of more than 6 hours from rupture of membranes to delivery (odds ratio 7.8, 95% confidence limits 2.1-28.5). Multiple pregnancy appears to be associated with an increased risk of endometritis. The etiological factors remain unknown, but a large placental bed and/or immunological factors may be implicated. PMID:8160537

  2. Pediatric Abdominal Pain: An Emergency Medicine Perspective.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jeremiah; Fox, Sean M

    2016-05-01

    Abdominal pain is a common complaint that leads to pediatric patients seeking emergency care. The emergency care provider has the arduous task of determining which child likely has a benign cause and not missing the devastating condition that needs emergent attention. This article reviews common benign causes of abdominal pain as well as some of the cannot-miss emergent causes. PMID:27133248

  3. Abdominal tuberculosis of the gastrointestinal tract: Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Debi, Uma; Ravisankar, Vasudevan; Prasad, Kaushal Kishor; Sinha, Saroj Kant; Sharma, Arun Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Abdominal tuberculosis is an increasingly common disease that poses diagnostic challenge, as the nonspecific features of the disease which may lead to diagnostic delays and development of complications. This condition is regarded as a great mimicker of other abdominal pathology. A high index of suspicion is an important factor in early diagnosis. Abdominal involvement may occur in the gastrointestinal tract, peritoneum, lymphnodes or solid viscera. Various investigative methods have been used to aid in the diagnosis of abdominal tuberculosis. Early diagnosis and initiation of antituberculous therapy and surgical treatment are essential to prevent morbidity and mortality. Most of the patients respond very well to standard antitubercular therapy and surgery is required only in a minority of cases. Imaging plays an important role in diagnosis of abdominal tuberculosis because early recognition of this condition is important. We reviewed our experience with the findings on various imaging modalities for diagnosis of this potentially treatable disease. PMID:25356043

  4. A fibromatosis case mimicking abdominal aorta aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Tasdemir, Arzu; Kahraman, Cemal; Tasdemir, Kutay; Mavili, Ertugrul

    2013-01-01

    Retroperitoneal fibrosis is a rare fibrosing reactive process that may be confused with mesenteric fibromatosis. Abdominal aorta aneurysm is rare too and mostly develops secondary to Behcet's disease, trauma, and infection or connective tissue diseases. Incidence of aneurysms occurring as a result of atherosclerotic changes increases in postmenopausal period. Diagnosis can be established with arteriography, tomography, or magnetic resonance imaging associated with clinical findings. Tumors and cysts should be considered in differential diagnosis. Abdominal ultrasound and contrast-enhanced computerized tomography revealed an infrarenal abdominal aorta aneurysm in a 41-year-old woman, but, on surgery, retroperitoneal fibrosis surrounding the aorta was detected. We present this interesting case because retroperitoneal fibrosis encircling the abdominal aorta can mimic abdominal aorta aneurysm radiologically.

  5. Carbon dioxide insufflation during withdrawal of the colonoscope improved postprocedure discomfort: a prospective, randomized, controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Wen-Hsin; Sun, Meng-Shun; Lo, Hoi-Wan; Tsai, Ching-Yang; Tsai, Yu-Jou

    2012-05-01

    In colonoscopy, the question of when and how to use carbon dioxide (CO(2)) insufflation remains uncertain. Inspection for the pathological changes during colonoscopy takes place during the withdrawal of the scope. This study aimed to determine whether CO(2) insufflation only at the withdrawal of the colonoscope has an effect comparable to that of CO(2) usage throughout the course of the procedure. Symptomatic patients were randomized in three groups: (1) patients given air insufflation (A; n = 33); (2) patients given CO(2) insufflation only at the time of scope withdrawal (CW; n = 33); and (3) patients given the CO(2) insufflation (C; n = 34) for the whole course of the colonoscopy. Patients were requested to answer questionnaires about their pain score during, at the end, and 1 h after the colonoscopy by using a pain numerical scale ranging from 0 to 10. The disparities of the pain score were noted at the end of the procedure and 1 h after the procedure (p = 0.026 and p < 0.001, respectively). We further analyzed the scores between two of the three groups. Both CW (vs. A; procedure end: p = 0.012, 1 h after: p = 0.001) and C (vs. A; procedure end: p = 0.072, 1 h after: p < 0.001) showed less postprocedure pain when compared with the group A. The pain score between CW and C were similar at each time segment (procedure end: p = 0.555, 1 h after: p = 0.491). CO(2) insufflation merely at the withdrawal of the colonoscope improved postprocedural abdominal discomfort and the effect was not inferior to that of full course CO(2) insufflation.

  6. Morphine withdrawal, treatments 1900-30.

    PubMed

    Malcolm, M T

    1999-03-01

    The treatments used between 1900 and 1930 for morphine withdrawal are discussed. The accounts are mainly taken from contemporary textbooks which contain fascinating descriptions of their authors' preferred methods and criticisms of regimes given by other therapists. Delirium, produced by atropine or similar substances, is advocated to cover withdrawal symptoms. The present paper draws parallels with current issues, e.g. withdrawal of opiate under cover of general anaesthesia, follow-up studies and cost-benefit analyses. The particular problems of addicted doctors in 1900-1930 are addressed as are the comparisons then made with non-medically qualified addicts. It is important we keep in mind past mistakes and over-valued ideas so as to reduce any similarly misplaced optimism in our current treatment options. PMID:11623818

  7. The Chinchilla's vestibulo-ocular reflex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merwin, W. H., Jr.; Wall, Conrad, III; Tomko, D. L.

    1989-01-01

    The horizontal vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) was measured and characterized in seven adult chinchillas using 0.01 to 1.0 Hz angular velocity sinusoids. Gains were less than compensatory, and were variable from day to day, but phases were highly repeatable both within and between animals. The best fitting transfer function to the average data of all animals had a dominant time constant of 7.5 sec, and an adaptation operator with a time constant of 24.0 sec. There were certain nonlinearities in the horizontal VOR of this animal, and it was difficult to elicit a robust optokinetic response. Results are discussed in relation to similar measurements in other species.

  8. Vestibular-ocular accommodation reflex in man

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, B.; Randle, R. J.; Stewart, J. D.

    1975-01-01

    Stimulation of the vestibular system by angular acceleration produces widespread sensory and motor effects. The present paper studies a motor effect which has not been reported in the literature, i.e., the influence of rotary acceleration of the body on ocular accommodation. The accommodation of 10 young men was recorded before and after a high-level deceleration to zero velocity following 30 sec of rotating. Accommodation was recorded continuously on an infrared optometer for 110 sec under two conditions: while the subjects observed a target set at the far point, and while they viewed the same target through a 0.3-mm pinhole. Stimulation by high-level rotary deceleration produced positive accommodation or a pseudomyopia under both conditions, but the positive accommodation was substantially greater and lasted much longer during fixation through the pinhole. It is hypothesized that this increase in accommodation is a result of a vestibular-ocular accommodation reflex.

  9. Cultural Reflexivity in Health Research and Practice

    PubMed Central

    Aronowitz, Robert; Deener, Andrew; Keene, Danya; Schnittker, Jason

    2015-01-01

    Recent public health movements have invoked cultural change to improve health and reduce health disparities. We argue that these cultural discourses have sometimes justified and maintained health inequalities when those with power and authority designated their own social practices as legitimate and healthy while labeling the practices of marginalized groups as illegitimate or unhealthy. This “misrecognition,” which creates seemingly objective knowledge without understanding historical and social conditions, sustains unequal power dynamics and obscures the fact that what is deemed legitimate and healthy can be temporally, geographically, and socially relative. We use examples from research across multiple disciplines to illustrate the potential consequences of cultural misrecognition, highlight instances in which culture was invoked in ways that overcame misrecognition, and discuss how cultural reflexivity can be used to improve health research and practice. PMID:25905833

  10. Vestibulospinal reflexes as a function of microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reschke, M. F.; Homick, J. L.; Anderson, D. J.

    1984-01-01

    Data from previous manned space flights suggest that an exposure to microgravity produces significant alterations in vestibular, neuromuscular, and related sensory system functions. It is possible that the observed changes are a function of adaptation induced by altered otolith input. An experiment in Spacelab 1 was conducted with the aim to study this adaptation as it occurred in flight and after flight, and to relate the observed changes to mechanisms underlying space motion sickness. The concept was explored by making use of the anatomic pathway which links the otolith organs and spinal motoneurons. The overall sensitivity of the spinal motoneurons was tested by two related methods. One method involves the electrical excitation of neural tissue and the recording of vestibulospinal reflexes in conjunction with a brief linear acceleration. The second method is concerned with measurements of dynamic postural ataxia. Results suggest that more than a single time constant may be involved in man's ability to return to baseline values.

  11. Bremsstrahlung target optimization for reflex triodes

    SciTech Connect

    Swanekamp, S. B.; Weber, B. V.; Stephanakis, S. J.; Mosher, D.; Commisso, R. J.

    2008-08-15

    The anode (tantalum) foil thickness in a reflex triode was varied from 2.5 to 250 {mu}m to maximize the dose from bremsstrahlung produced by a 1 MV, 1 MA, 100 ns electron beam. Experiments and computer simulations show that the dose is maximized for a foil thickness of about 25 {mu}m, 1/18th of the electron range computed from the continuous slowing down approximation. For foils thicker than optimum, self-absorption in the foil attenuates 10-100 keV photons, reducing the dose. For foils thinner than optimum, the dose decreases as a result of electron migration to large radius. A simple formula that predicts the optimum thickness as a function of the beam current and voltage is derived that should be applicable to a large range of experimental parameters.

  12. Cultural reflexivity in health research and practice.

    PubMed

    Aronowitz, Robert; Deener, Andrew; Keene, Danya; Schnittker, Jason; Tach, Laura

    2015-07-01

    Recent public health movements have invoked cultural change to improve health and reduce health disparities. We argue that these cultural discourses have sometimes justified and maintained health inequalities when those with power and authority designated their own social practices as legitimate and healthy while labeling the practices of marginalized groups as illegitimate or unhealthy. This "misrecognition," which creates seemingly objective knowledge without understanding historical and social conditions, sustains unequal power dynamics and obscures the fact that what is deemed legitimate and healthy can be temporally, geographically, and socially relative. We use examples from research across multiple disciplines to illustrate the potential consequences of cultural misrecognition, highlight instances in which culture was invoked in ways that overcame misrecognition, and discuss how cultural reflexivity can be used to improve health research and practice.

  13. Conditioning the middle ear reflex at sensation levels below reflex threshold: air jet and electrical stimulation.

    PubMed

    McDaniel-Bacon, L; Fulton, R T; Laskowski, R P

    1980-01-01

    An ABAB functional analysis, conditioning and generalization, design was used in 3 experiments (2 were formal studies and 1 was empirical in nature) to investigate the conditionability of the middle ear reflex. The conditioned stimuli were subreflex threshold pure tones of various frequencies and intensities. The unconditioned stimulus (UCS) was an auricular air jet to the contralateral ear in the first experiment and cutaneous electrical stimulation to the ipsolateral, probe ear in the last 2 experiments. Reflexes were monitored by an otoadmittance meter, storage oscilloscope, and strip chart recorder. In the first experiment (air jet UCS), no subjects met the conditioning criterion within the maximum presentation of 400 paired trials, despite pilot evidence which indicated conditioning was feasible. In the second experiment (electrical stimulation UCS), 2 subjects met conditioning criterion; however, only one subject reconditioned and demonstrated partial generalization to other conditioned stimuli. In the third experiment (electrical stimulation UCS), one of 3 subjects who had previously been unconditionable with the air jet UCS met conditioning and reconditioning criterion and demonstrated partial generalization. Results indicate that the middle ear reflex can be conditioned to be elicited by subreflex threshold pure tones, however, results are limited.

  14. Sudomotor function in sympathetic reflex dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Birklein, F; Sittl, R; Spitzer, A; Claus, D; Neundörfer, B; Handwerker, H O

    1997-01-01

    Sudomotor functions were studied in 27 patients suffering from reflex sympathetic dystrophy (RSD) according to the criteria established by Bonica (18 women, 9 men; mean age 50 +/- 12.3 years; median duration of disease 8 weeks, range 2-468 weeks). To measure local sweating rates, two small chambers (5 cm2) were affixed to corresponding areas of hairy skin on the affected and unaffected limbs. Dry nitrogen gas was passed through the chambers (270 ml/min) and evaporation was recorded at both devices with hygrometers. Thermoregulatory sweating (TST) was induced by raising body temperature (intake of 0.5 1 hot tea and infra-red irradiation). Local sweating was also induced through an axon reflex (QSART) by transcutaneous iontophoretic application of carbachol (5 min, 1 mA). In addition, skin temperature was measured on the affected and unaffected side by infra-red thermography. Mean skin temperature was significantly higher on the affected side (P < 0.003). In spite of the temperature differences, there was no difference in basal sweating on the affected and unaffected side. However, both methods of sudomotor stimulation lead to significantly greater sweating responses on the affected compared to the unaffected side (TST: P < 0.05, QSART: P < 0.004). Latency to onset of sweating was significantly shorter on the affected side under both test conditions (P < 0.04 and P < 0.003, respectively). Sweat responses were not correlated to absolute skin temperature but were probably related to the increased blood flow on the affected side. Our findings imply a differential disturbance of vasomotor and sudomotor mechanisms in affected skin. Whereas vasoconstrictor activity is apparently lowered, sudomotor output is either unaltered or may even be enhanced.

  15. Static ocular counterroll reflex in skew deviation

    PubMed Central

    Chandrakumar, M.; Blakeman, A.; Goltz, H.C.; Sharpe, J.A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The static ocular counterroll (OCR) reflex generates partially compensatory torsional eye movements during head roll. It is mediated by the utricle in the inner ear. Skew deviation is a vertical strabismus thought to be caused by imbalance in the utriculo-ocular pathway. We hypothesized that if skew deviation is indeed caused by damage to this reflex pathway, patients with skew deviation would show abnormal OCR. Methods: Eighteen patients with skew deviation caused by brainstem or cerebellar lesions and 18 normal participants viewed a target at 1 m. Ocular responses to static passive head roll-tilts of approximately 20° were recorded using search coils. Static OCR gain was calculated as the change in torsional eye position divided by the change in head position during sustained head roll. Perception of the subjective visual vertical (SVV) was also measured. Results: Group mean OCR gain was reduced by 45% in patients. At an individual level, OCR gains were asymmetric between eyes and between torsional directions in 90% of patients. In addition, the hypotropic eye incyclotorting gain was lower than the hypertropic eye excyclotorting gain during head roll toward the hypotropic eye in 94% of patients. No consistent pattern of gain asymmetry was found during head roll toward the hypertropic eye. The SVV was tilted toward the hypotropic eye. Conclusion: Static OCR gain is significantly reduced in skew deviation. Interocular and directional gain asymmetries are also prevalent. The asymmetries provide further evidence that disruption of the utriculo-ocular pathway is a mechanism for skew deviation. PMID:21813791

  16. Sudomotor function in sympathetic reflex dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Birklein, F; Sittl, R; Spitzer, A; Claus, D; Neundörfer, B; Handwerker, H O

    1997-01-01

    Sudomotor functions were studied in 27 patients suffering from reflex sympathetic dystrophy (RSD) according to the criteria established by Bonica (18 women, 9 men; mean age 50 +/- 12.3 years; median duration of disease 8 weeks, range 2-468 weeks). To measure local sweating rates, two small chambers (5 cm2) were affixed to corresponding areas of hairy skin on the affected and unaffected limbs. Dry nitrogen gas was passed through the chambers (270 ml/min) and evaporation was recorded at both devices with hygrometers. Thermoregulatory sweating (TST) was induced by raising body temperature (intake of 0.5 1 hot tea and infra-red irradiation). Local sweating was also induced through an axon reflex (QSART) by transcutaneous iontophoretic application of carbachol (5 min, 1 mA). In addition, skin temperature was measured on the affected and unaffected side by infra-red thermography. Mean skin temperature was significantly higher on the affected side (P < 0.003). In spite of the temperature differences, there was no difference in basal sweating on the affected and unaffected side. However, both methods of sudomotor stimulation lead to significantly greater sweating responses on the affected compared to the unaffected side (TST: P < 0.05, QSART: P < 0.004). Latency to onset of sweating was significantly shorter on the affected side under both test conditions (P < 0.04 and P < 0.003, respectively). Sweat responses were not correlated to absolute skin temperature but were probably related to the increased blood flow on the affected side. Our findings imply a differential disturbance of vasomotor and sudomotor mechanisms in affected skin. Whereas vasoconstrictor activity is apparently lowered, sudomotor output is either unaltered or may even be enhanced. PMID:9060012

  17. Perceptual rivalry: reflexes reveal the gradual nature of visual awareness.

    PubMed

    Naber, Marnix; Frässle, Stefan; Einhäuser, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    Rivalry is a common tool to probe visual awareness: a constant physical stimulus evokes multiple, distinct perceptual interpretations ("percepts") that alternate over time. Percepts are typically described as mutually exclusive, suggesting that a discrete (all-or-none) process underlies changes in visual awareness. Here we follow two strategies to address whether rivalry is an all-or-none process: first, we introduce two reflexes as objective measures of rivalry, pupil dilation and optokinetic nystagmus (OKN); second, we use a continuous input device (analog joystick) to allow observers a gradual subjective report. We find that the "reflexes" reflect the percept rather than the physical stimulus. Both reflexes show a gradual dependence on the time relative to perceptual transitions. Similarly, observers' joystick deflections, which are highly correlated with the reflex measures, indicate gradual transitions. Physically simulating wave-like transitions between percepts suggest piece-meal rivalry (i.e., different regions of space belonging to distinct percepts) as one possible explanation for the gradual transitions. Furthermore, the reflexes show that dominance durations depend on whether or not the percept is actively reported. In addition, reflexes respond to transitions with shorter latencies than the subjective report and show an abundance of short dominance durations. This failure to report fast changes in dominance may result from limited access of introspection to rivalry dynamics. In sum, reflexes reveal that rivalry is a gradual process, rivalry's dynamics is modulated by the required action (response mode), and that rapid transitions in perceptual dominance can slip away from awareness. PMID:21677786

  18. Cardiorespiratory parameters and respiratory reflexes in rabbits during hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Javorka, K; Calkovská, A; Petrásková, M; Gecelovská, V

    1996-01-01

    The effects of different body temperature (BT) on the respiratory and cardiovascular parameters and respiratory reflexes were studied in 33 anaesthetized adult rabbits. Hyperthermia elicited panting with mean panting respiratory rate 199 +/- 14 x min-1 in all anaesthetized rabbits. Significant correlations between BT and frequency of breathing (positive), heart rate (positive) or tidal volume (negative) were found. Cooling was accompanied by considerable arterial hypotension. Duration of the Hering-Breuer reflex (HB) was reduced by the rise of BT. Intensity of the reflex (assessed as the ratio of the apnoeic pause to the mean duration of the previous 5 breaths) was unchanged up to the body temperature eliciting panting (41.15 +/- 0.08 degrees C) when it was greatly diminished. Defensive airway reflexes were also changed in hyperthermia. The duration as well as the intensity of nasal apnoea (Kratschmer's reflex) and laryngeal chemoreflex apnoea were decreased. The intensities of respiratory efforts in sneezing and laryngeal coughing were reduced. The expulsive reactions evoked by mechanical stimulation of the larynx were replaced by very shortlasting inhibition of breathing during panting. The results indicate that reflex control of breathing via the Hering-Breuer reflex and the ability to eliminate irritants from the airways are diminished during hyperthermia and panting in anaesthetized rabbits. PMID:9085374

  19. Children's judgements of social withdrawal behaviours.

    PubMed

    Watling, Dawn

    2015-06-01

    Ding et al. (Brit. J. Dev. Psychol., 2015; 33, 159-173) demonstrated that Chinese children discriminate between the three subtypes of social withdrawal: Shyness, unsociability, and social avoidance. This commentary on the Ding et al.'s paper highlights the need to further explore the following: (1) children's understanding of the implications of being shy, unsociable, or socially avoidant, including assessing these which we know are associated with outcomes for socially withdrawn children; (2) what additional subtypes might exist naturally within the Chinese culture; and (3) consider the implications of social withdrawal on children's developing social skills.

  20. Does Melissa Officinalis Cause Withdrawal or Dependence?

    PubMed Central

    Demirci, Kadir; Akgönül, Mehmet; Demirdaş, Arif; Akpınar, Abdullah

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Melissa officinalis is a medical and aromatic plant that is used for its hypnotic, sedative, and spasmolytic effects. This report presents a case study of30-year-old patient who was admitted to an emergency department with restlessness, tremor, distractibility, and sweating following a discontinuation of Melissa officinalis consumption. Case report: In this case, withdrawal symptoms may be related to the dependence effect caused by long-term use of Melissa officinalis. Although Melissa officinalis, a plant, is preferred by many patients as an alternative to pharmaceutical drugs, patients should be made aware that it may have a risk of dependency and can lead to withdrawal symptoms. PMID:25870482

  1. Reflex anuria: an old concept with new evidence.

    PubMed

    Hou, Weibin; Wen, Jin; Ji, Zhigang; Chen, Jian; Li, Hanzhong

    2014-02-01

    Reflex anuria (RA) was defined by Hull as cessation of urine output from both kidneys due to irritation or trauma to one kidney or its ureter, or severely painful stimuli to other organs. This is not a common concept among urologists or nephrologists even though it has been proposed for more than half a century. The phenomenon has not been thoroughly understood. But intrarenal arteriolar spasm and ureteral spasm have gained wide acceptance as the mechanisms of RA. The present review summarized papers published up to now on RA, in order to depict the general profile of the disease and to further elucidate the pathogenesis of RA. A classification system of RA was proposed as neurovascular reflex, ureterorenal reflex, radiated renovascular reflex, renoureteral reflex, ureteroureteral reflex and radiated ureteral reflex, based on the two assumed mechanisms and the stimulus' origins. All these types except renoureteral reflex had gained supporting evidence from animal experiments and/or clinical case reports. RA is a diagnosis of exclusion, only being considered after ruling out common and tangible etiologies such as ureteral calculi, acute tubular necrosis, renal vascular occlusion, hypovolemia, infection, etc. If the diagnosis has been established, treatment plan should be directed toward the mechanisms more than the causative factors. Abnormalities of the autonomic nerve system and congenital urogenital malformations incline people to RA. In summary, RA is a cessation of urine production caused by stimuli on kidney, ureter or other organs, through a mechanism of reflex spasm of intrarenal arterioles or ureters, leading to acute renal failure. It is a functional rather than parenchymal disease.

  2. 8 CFR 335.10 - Withdrawal of application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... APPLICATION FOR NATURALIZATION § 335.10 Withdrawal of application. An applicant may request, in writing, that... this chapter. If USCIS does not consent to the withdrawal, the application for naturalization shall...

  3. 8 CFR 335.10 - Withdrawal of application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... APPLICATION FOR NATURALIZATION § 335.10 Withdrawal of application. An applicant may request, in writing, that... this chapter. If USCIS does not consent to the withdrawal, the application for naturalization shall...

  4. 8 CFR 335.10 - Withdrawal of application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... APPLICATION FOR NATURALIZATION § 335.10 Withdrawal of application. An applicant may request, in writing, that... this chapter. If USCIS does not consent to the withdrawal, the application for naturalization shall...

  5. [Human physiology: images and practices of the reflex].

    PubMed

    Wübben, Yvonne

    2010-01-01

    The essay examines the function of visualizations and practices in the formation of the reflex concept from Thomas Willis to Marshall Hall. It focuses on the specific form of reflex knowledge that images and practices can contain. In addition, the essay argues that it is through visual representations and experimental practices that technical knowledge is transferred to the field of human reflex physiology. When using technical metaphors in human physiology authors often seem to feel obliged to draw distinctions between humans, machines and animals. On closer scrutiny, these distinctions sometimes fail to establish firm borders between the human and the technical.

  6. Reversible abnormalities of the Hering Breuer reflex in acrylamide neuropathy.

    PubMed Central

    Satchell, P

    1985-01-01

    The sensitivity of the Hering Breuer reflex was compared in anaesthetised rabbits before, during and after the induction of acrylamide neuropathy, and was measured as the tracheal pressure which produced 30 seconds of apnoea. After four weeks of acrylamide (400 mg/kg total dose) there was ataxia and the conduction velocity of hindlimb motor nerves was significantly reduced. At this time there was a marked and reproducible reduction in the sensitivity of the Hering Breuer reflex. The ataxia resolved within a month of stopping acrylamide administration. Three months after the cessation of acrylamide the sensitivity of the Hering Breuer reflex had increased significantly but had not returned to normal. PMID:2993526

  7. Withdrawal from Buprenorphine/Naloxone and Maintenance with a Natural Dopaminergic Agonist: A Cautionary Note

    PubMed Central

    Blum, Kenneth; Oscar-Berman, Marlene; Femino, John; Waite, Roger L; Benya, Lisa; Giordano, John; Borsten, Joan; Downs, William B; Braverman, Eric R; Loehmann, Raquel; Dushaj, Kristina; Han, David; Simpatico, Thomas; Hauser, Mary; Barh, Debmalya; McLaughlin, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Background While numerous studies support the efficacy of methadone and buprenorphine for the stabilization and maintenance of opioid dependence, clinically significant opioid withdrawal symptoms occur upon tapering and cessation of dosage. Methods We present a case study of a 35 year old Caucasian female (Krissie) who was prescribed increasing dosages of prescription opioids after carpel tunnel surgery secondary to chronic pain from reflex sympathetic dystrophy and fibromyalgia. Over the next 5 years, daily dosage requirements increased to over 80 mg of Methadone and 300 ug/hr Fentanyl transdermal patches, along with combinations of 12–14 1600 mcg Actig lollipop and oral 100 mg Morphine and 30 mg oxycodone 1–2 tabs q4-6hr PRN for breakthrough pain. Total monthly prescription costs including supplemental benzodiazepines, hypnotics and stimulants exceeded $50,000. The patient was subsequently transferred to Suboxone® in 2008, and the dosage was gradually tapered until her admission for inpatient detoxification with KB220Z a natural dopaminergic agonist. We carefully documented her withdrawal symptoms when she precipitously stopped taking buprenorphine/naloxone and during follow-up while taking KB220Z daily. We also genotyped the patient using a reward gene panel including (9 genes 18 alleles): DRD 2,3,4; MOA-A; COMT; DAT1; 5HTTLLR; OPRM1; and GABRA3. Findings At 432 days post Suboxone® withdrawal the patient is being maintained on KB220Z, has been urine tested and is opioid free. Genotyping data revealed a moderate genetic risk for addiction showing a hypodopaminergic trait. This preliminary case data suggest that the daily use of KB220Z could provide a cost effective alternative substitution adjunctive modality for Suboxone®. We encourage double-blind randomized –placebo controlled studies to test the proposition that KB220Z may act as a putative natural opioid substitution maintenance adjunct. PMID:24273683

  8. Primitive Reflexes and Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder: Developmental Origins of Classroom Dysfunction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Myra; Houghton, Stephen; Chapman, Elaine

    2004-01-01

    The present research studied the symptomatologic overlap of AD/HD behaviours and retention of four primitive reflexes (Moro, Tonic Labyrinthine Reflex [TLR], Asymmetrical Tonic Neck Reflex [ATNR], Symmetrical Tonic Neck Reflex [STNR]) in 109 boys aged 7-10 years. Of these, 54 were diagnosed with AD/HD, 34 manifested sub-syndromal coordination,…

  9. [A scale for evaluating withdrawal symptoms induced by anxiolytic agents].

    PubMed

    Bourin, M

    1988-01-01

    A scale to evaluate the withdrawal syndrome induced by tranquilizers (TWS) is proposed to distinguish between anxiety induced symptoms and withdrawal induced symptoms. This scale was established and validated by Lader, the french translation was performed by the author. The most frequently observed symptoms during a withdrawal syndrome are physical tiredness, headache, vertigo and tremor but other symptoms are evaluated by this tranquilizers withdrawal scale.

  10. Intra-abdominal pressure during swimming.

    PubMed

    Moriyama, S; Ogita, F; Huang, Z; Kurobe, K; Nagira, A; Tanaka, T; Takahashi, H; Hirano, Y

    2014-02-01

    The present study aimed to determine the intra-abdominal pressure during front crawl swimming at different velocities in competitive swimmers and to clarify the relationships between stroke indices and changes in intra-abdominal pressure. The subjects were 7 highly trained competitive collegiate male swimmers. Intra-abdominal pressure was measured during front crawl swimming at 1.0, 1.2 and 1.4 m · s(-1) and during the Valsalva maneuver. Intra-abdominal pressure was taken as the difference between minimum and maximum values, and the mean of 6 stable front crawl stroke cycles was used. Stroke rate and stroke length were also measured as stroke indices. There were significant differences in stroke rate among all velocities (P < 0.05). However, there was no significant difference in stroke length by velocity. Significant within-subject correlations between intra-abdominal pressure and stroke rate or stroke length (P < 0.01) were observed, although there were no significant correlations between intra-abdominal pressure and stroke indices when controlling for swimming velocity. These findings do not appear to support the effectiveness of trunk training performed by competitive swimmers aimed at increasing intra-abdominal pressure. PMID:23868677

  11. Intra-abdominal pressure during swimming.

    PubMed

    Moriyama, S; Ogita, F; Huang, Z; Kurobe, K; Nagira, A; Tanaka, T; Takahashi, H; Hirano, Y

    2014-02-01

    The present study aimed to determine the intra-abdominal pressure during front crawl swimming at different velocities in competitive swimmers and to clarify the relationships between stroke indices and changes in intra-abdominal pressure. The subjects were 7 highly trained competitive collegiate male swimmers. Intra-abdominal pressure was measured during front crawl swimming at 1.0, 1.2 and 1.4 m · s(-1) and during the Valsalva maneuver. Intra-abdominal pressure was taken as the difference between minimum and maximum values, and the mean of 6 stable front crawl stroke cycles was used. Stroke rate and stroke length were also measured as stroke indices. There were significant differences in stroke rate among all velocities (P < 0.05). However, there was no significant difference in stroke length by velocity. Significant within-subject correlations between intra-abdominal pressure and stroke rate or stroke length (P < 0.01) were observed, although there were no significant correlations between intra-abdominal pressure and stroke indices when controlling for swimming velocity. These findings do not appear to support the effectiveness of trunk training performed by competitive swimmers aimed at increasing intra-abdominal pressure.

  12. 19 CFR 144.38 - Withdrawal for consumption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... provided in § 141.61(e) of this chapter. (b) Withdrawal for exportation to Canada or Mexico. A withdrawal... withdrawal of cigars, cigarettes, or cigarette papers or tubes subject to internal revenue tax, the statement for tax purposes required by § 275.81 of the regulations of the Internal Revenue Service (26 CFR §...

  13. 47 CFR 1.8 - Withdrawal of papers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Withdrawal of papers. 1.8 Section 1.8 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE General Rules of Practice and Procedure General § 1.8 Withdrawal of papers. The granting of a request to dismiss or withdraw...

  14. Teachers' Withdrawal Behaviors and Their Relationship with Work Ethic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erdemli, Özge

    2015-01-01

    Problem Situation: People experience ups and downs in their job satisfaction and motivation levels at different points of their work lives for various reasons. One of the outputs of low job satisfaction and motivation is defined as "withdrawal behaviors" in the literature. Withdrawal behaviors are any employee behavior of withdrawal from…

  15. 19 CFR 144.36 - Withdrawal for transportation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Withdrawal for transportation. 144.36 Section 144... § 144.36 Withdrawal for transportation. (a) Time limit. Merchandise may be withdrawn from warehouse for transportation to another port of entry if withdrawal for consumption or exportation can be accomplished at...

  16. 19 CFR 144.36 - Withdrawal for transportation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Withdrawal for transportation. 144.36 Section 144... § 144.36 Withdrawal for transportation. (a) Time limit. Merchandise may be withdrawn from warehouse for transportation to another port of entry if withdrawal for consumption or exportation can be accomplished at...

  17. 19 CFR 144.36 - Withdrawal for transportation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Withdrawal for transportation. 144.36 Section 144... § 144.36 Withdrawal for transportation. (a) Time limit. Merchandise may be withdrawn from warehouse for transportation to another port of entry if withdrawal for consumption or exportation can be accomplished at...

  18. 19 CFR 144.36 - Withdrawal for transportation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Withdrawal for transportation. 144.36 Section 144... § 144.36 Withdrawal for transportation. (a) Time limit. Merchandise may be withdrawn from warehouse for transportation to another port of entry if withdrawal for consumption or exportation can be accomplished at...

  19. 5 CFR 330.1001 - Withdrawal from competition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Withdrawal from competition. 330.1001... RECRUITMENT, SELECTION, AND PLACEMENT (GENERAL) Prohibited Practices § 330.1001 Withdrawal from competition... applicant or eligible to withdraw from competition or eligibility, for a position in the competitive...

  20. 5 CFR 330.1001 - Withdrawal from competition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Withdrawal from competition. 330.1001... RECRUITMENT, SELECTION, AND PLACEMENT (GENERAL) Prohibited Practices § 330.1001 Withdrawal from competition... applicant or eligible to withdraw from competition or eligibility, for a position in the competitive...

  1. 5 CFR 330.1001 - Withdrawal from competition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Withdrawal from competition. 330.1001... RECRUITMENT, SELECTION, AND PLACEMENT (GENERAL) Prohibited Practices § 330.1001 Withdrawal from competition... applicant or eligible to withdraw from competition or eligibility, for a position in the competitive...

  2. 5 CFR 330.1001 - Withdrawal from competition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Withdrawal from competition. 330.1001... RECRUITMENT, SELECTION, AND PLACEMENT (GENERAL) Prohibited Practices § 330.1001 Withdrawal from competition... applicant or eligible to withdraw from competition or eligibility, for a position in the competitive...

  3. 5 CFR 330.1001 - Withdrawal from competition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Withdrawal from competition. 330.1001... RECRUITMENT, SELECTION, AND PLACEMENT (GENERAL) Prohibited Practices § 330.1001 Withdrawal from competition... applicant or eligible to withdraw from competition or eligibility, for a position in the competitive...

  4. 27 CFR 31.137 - Withdrawal of partner(s).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Withdrawal of partner(s). 31.137 Section 31.137 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU... § 31.137 Withdrawal of partner(s). Withdrawal of partner(s) requires an amended registration. See §...

  5. 5 CFR 1650.2 - Eligibility for a TSP withdrawal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... calendar days after separation and who made a post-employment withdrawal while separated may not withdraw... described in subpart B of this part. (b) A post-employment withdrawal will not be paid unless TSP records indicate that the participant is separated from Government service. The TSP will cancel a...

  6. 5 CFR 362.207 - Withdrawal and readmission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Withdrawal and readmission. 362.207... PRESIDENTIAL MANAGEMENT FELLOWS PROGRAM Program Administration § 362.207 Withdrawal and readmission. (a...) An agency must notify OPM when a Fellow or Senior Fellow withdraws from the Program. (b)...

  7. 5 CFR 362.207 - Withdrawal and readmission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Withdrawal and readmission. 362.207... PRESIDENTIAL MANAGEMENT FELLOWS PROGRAM Program Administration § 362.207 Withdrawal and readmission. (a...) An agency must notify OPM when a Fellow or Senior Fellow withdraws from the Program. (b)...

  8. 5 CFR 362.207 - Withdrawal and readmission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Withdrawal and readmission. 362.207... PRESIDENTIAL MANAGEMENT FELLOWS PROGRAM Program Administration § 362.207 Withdrawal and readmission. (a...) An agency must notify OPM when a Fellow or Senior Fellow withdraws from the Program. (b)...

  9. 5 CFR 1650.31 - Age-based withdrawals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Age-based withdrawals. 1650.31 Section... FUNDS FROM THE THRIFT SAVINGS PLAN In-Service Withdrawals § 1650.31 Age-based withdrawals. (a) A participant who has reached age 591/2 and who has not separated from Government service is eligible...

  10. 5 CFR 1650.31 - Age-based withdrawals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Age-based withdrawals. 1650.31 Section... FUNDS FROM THE THRIFT SAVINGS PLAN In-Service Withdrawals § 1650.31 Age-based withdrawals. (a) A participant who has reached age 591/2 and who has not separated from Government employment is eligible...

  11. 5 CFR 1650.31 - Age-based withdrawals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Age-based withdrawals. 1650.31 Section... FUNDS FROM THE THRIFT SAVINGS PLAN In-Service Withdrawals § 1650.31 Age-based withdrawals. (a) A participant who has reached age 591/2 and who has not separated from Government employment is eligible...

  12. 5 CFR 1650.31 - Age-based withdrawals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Age-based withdrawals. 1650.31 Section... FUNDS FROM THE THRIFT SAVINGS PLAN In-Service Withdrawals § 1650.31 Age-based withdrawals. (a) A participant who has reached age 591/2 and who has not separated from Government employment is eligible...

  13. 5 CFR 1650.31 - Age-based withdrawals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Age-based withdrawals. 1650.31 Section... FUNDS FROM THE THRIFT SAVINGS PLAN In-Service Withdrawals § 1650.31 Age-based withdrawals. (a) A participant who has reached age 591/2 and who has not separated from Government service is eligible...

  14. 12 CFR 925.26 - Voluntary withdrawal from membership.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Voluntary withdrawal from membership. 925.26 Section 925.26 Banks and Banking FEDERAL HOUSING FINANCE BOARD FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANK MEMBERS AND HOUSING ASSOCIATES MEMBERS OF THE BANKS Withdrawal and Removal From Membership § 925.26 Voluntary withdrawal...

  15. 27 CFR 19.729 - Withdrawal of fuel alcohol.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Withdrawal of fuel alcohol. 19.729 Section 19.729 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU..., Withdrawal, and Transfer of Spirits § 19.729 Withdrawal of fuel alcohol. (a) For each shipment or...

  16. 27 CFR 19.729 - Withdrawal of fuel alcohol.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Withdrawal of fuel alcohol. 19.729 Section 19.729 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU..., Withdrawal, and Transfer of Spirits § 19.729 Withdrawal of fuel alcohol. (a) For each shipment or...

  17. 21 CFR 171.7 - Withdrawal of petition without prejudice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Withdrawal of petition without prejudice. 171.7... Withdrawal of petition without prejudice. (a) In some cases the Commissioner will notify the petitioner that... clarification or the obtaining of additional data. This withdrawal will be without prejudice to a future...

  18. 47 CFR 1.8 - Withdrawal of papers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Withdrawal of papers. 1.8 Section 1.8 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE General Rules of Practice and Procedure General § 1.8 Withdrawal of papers. The granting of a request to dismiss or withdraw...

  19. Dynamics of Lip Dyskinesia Associated with Neuroleptic Withdrawal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newell, Karl M.; Bodfish, James W.; Mahorney, Steven L.; Sprague, Robert L.

    2000-01-01

    The lip movements associated with dyskinesia in six adults with mental retardation were investigated through analysis at medication baseline, at the highest level of withdrawal dyskinesia, and at the lowest level of dyskinesia following medication withdrawal. Lip oscillations following withdrawal were linked to changes in structural complexity of…

  20. 27 CFR 19.424 - Authorized withdrawals free of tax.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... free of tax. 19.424 Section 19.424 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND... Withdrawals Spirits Withdrawn Free of Tax § 19.424 Authorized withdrawals free of tax. A proprietor may withdraw spirits from bonded premises free of tax as provided in this chapter: (a) Upon receipt of a...

  1. 27 CFR 19.424 - Authorized withdrawals free of tax.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... free of tax. 19.424 Section 19.424 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND... Withdrawals Spirits Withdrawn Free of Tax § 19.424 Authorized withdrawals free of tax. A proprietor may withdraw spirits from bonded premises free of tax as provided in this chapter: (a) Upon receipt of a...

  2. 20 CFR 408.355 - Can you withdraw your application?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Can you withdraw your application? 408.355 Section 408.355 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION SPECIAL BENEFITS FOR CERTAIN WORLD WAR II VETERANS Filing Applications Withdrawal of Application § 408.355 Can you withdraw your...

  3. 20 CFR 408.355 - Can you withdraw your application?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Can you withdraw your application? 408.355 Section 408.355 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION SPECIAL BENEFITS FOR CERTAIN WORLD WAR II VETERANS Filing Applications Withdrawal of Application § 408.355 Can you withdraw your...

  4. 20 CFR 408.355 - Can you withdraw your application?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Can you withdraw your application? 408.355 Section 408.355 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION SPECIAL BENEFITS FOR CERTAIN WORLD WAR II VETERANS Filing Applications Withdrawal of Application § 408.355 Can you withdraw your...

  5. 20 CFR 408.355 - Can you withdraw your application?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Can you withdraw your application? 408.355 Section 408.355 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION SPECIAL BENEFITS FOR CERTAIN WORLD WAR II VETERANS Filing Applications Withdrawal of Application § 408.355 Can you withdraw your...

  6. 20 CFR 408.355 - Can you withdraw your application?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Can you withdraw your application? 408.355 Section 408.355 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION SPECIAL BENEFITS FOR CERTAIN WORLD WAR II VETERANS Filing Applications Withdrawal of Application § 408.355 Can you withdraw your...

  7. 49 CFR 1522.113 - Withdrawal of approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY SECURITY RULES FOR ALL MODES OF TRANSPORTATION TSA-APPROVED VALIDATION FIRMS AND VALIDATORS TSA-Approved Validation Firms and Validators for the Certified Cargo Screening Program § 1522.113 Withdrawal of approval. (a) Basis for withdrawal of approval. TSA may withdraw approval of...

  8. 29 CFR 1955.5 - Petitions for withdrawal of approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) PROCEDURES FOR WITHDRAWAL OF APPROVAL OF STATE PLANS General § 1955.5 Petitions for withdrawal of approval. (a) At any time following the initial approval of a State plan under... initiate proceedings for withdrawal of approval of the plan under section 18(f) of the Act and this...

  9. 29 CFR 1955.5 - Petitions for withdrawal of approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) PROCEDURES FOR WITHDRAWAL OF APPROVAL OF STATE PLANS General § 1955.5 Petitions for withdrawal of approval. (a) At any time following the initial approval of a State plan under... initiate proceedings for withdrawal of approval of the plan under section 18(f) of the Act and this...

  10. 29 CFR 1955.5 - Petitions for withdrawal of approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) PROCEDURES FOR WITHDRAWAL OF APPROVAL OF STATE PLANS General § 1955.5 Petitions for withdrawal of approval. (a) At any time following the initial approval of a State plan under... initiate proceedings for withdrawal of approval of the plan under section 18(f) of the Act and this...

  11. 47 CFR 1.8 - Withdrawal of papers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Withdrawal of papers. 1.8 Section 1.8 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE General Rules of Practice and Procedure General § 1.8 Withdrawal of papers. The granting of a request to dismiss or withdraw...

  12. 47 CFR 1.8 - Withdrawal of papers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Withdrawal of papers. 1.8 Section 1.8 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE General Rules of Practice and Procedure General § 1.8 Withdrawal of papers. The granting of a request to dismiss or withdraw...

  13. 47 CFR 1.8 - Withdrawal of papers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Withdrawal of papers. 1.8 Section 1.8 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE General Rules of Practice and Procedure General § 1.8 Withdrawal of papers. The granting of a request to dismiss or withdraw...

  14. Withdrawal-Emergent Dyskinesias following Varenicline Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Toffey, Brittany A; Rabin, Marcie; Kurlan, Roger

    2015-01-01

    Varenicline (Chantix[R]) is a nicotinic acetylcholine receptor partial agonist used to aid smoking cessation. Adverse psychiatric and behavioral effects of the drug are recognized and national drug monitoring has included reports of tardive dyskinesia, but no cases have been described in the literature. We now report the first two cases of varenicline-related withdrawal emergent dyskinesias. PMID:26106454

  15. Withdrawal-Emergent Dyskinesias following Varenicline Therapy.

    PubMed

    Toffey, Brittany A; Rabin, Marcie; Kurlan, Roger

    2015-01-01

    Varenicline (Chantix[R]) is a nicotinic acetylcholine receptor partial agonist used to aid smoking cessation. Adverse psychiatric and behavioral effects of the drug are recognized and national drug monitoring has included reports of tardive dyskinesia, but no cases have been described in the literature. We now report the first two cases of varenicline-related withdrawal emergent dyskinesias.

  16. Helping Individuals Withdraw from Psychiatric Drugs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, David

    2007-01-01

    Many counselors, psychologists, and social workers assist clients to take psychotropic drugs but recoil from helping clients to rethink drug use or stop taking drugs. They might fear resisting the prevailing ideology, violating "standards of care," or contradicting physicians' advice. This article discusses withdrawal emergent reactions from…

  17. 46 CFR 390.9 - Qualified withdrawals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... appraisal to be the fair market value of the vessel, at the time of the acquisition, or the actual cost... in excess of $100,000. The Maritime Administrator may waive the monetary limit in this subparagraph... withdrawals—(1) Capitalized costs requirement. All qualified withdrawals must be for costs which...

  18. 46 CFR 390.9 - Qualified withdrawals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... appraisal to be the fair market value of the vessel, at the time of the acquisition, or the actual cost... in excess of $100,000. The Maritime Administrator may waive the monetary limit in this subparagraph... withdrawals—(1) Capitalized costs requirement. All qualified withdrawals must be for costs which...

  19. 9 CFR 332.14 - Voluntary withdrawal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 332.14 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE... CARCASSES, PARTS OF CARCASSES, MEAT, AND MEAT FOOD PRODUCTS § 332.14 Voluntary withdrawal. A selected establishment that is in full compliance with the requirements in this part may voluntarily end...

  20. 9 CFR 381.524 - Voluntary withdrawal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Voluntary withdrawal. 381.524 Section 381.524 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE... establishment that is in full compliance with the requirements in this part may voluntarily end...

  1. 9 CFR 381.524 - Voluntary withdrawal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Voluntary withdrawal. 381.524 Section 381.524 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE... establishment that is in full compliance with the requirements in this part may voluntarily end...

  2. 9 CFR 332.14 - Voluntary withdrawal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 332.14 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE... CARCASSES, PARTS OF CARCASSES, MEAT, AND MEAT FOOD PRODUCTS § 332.14 Voluntary withdrawal. A selected establishment that is in full compliance with the requirements in this part may voluntarily end...

  3. 14 CFR 93.223 - Slot withdrawal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR TRAFFIC AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES SPECIAL AIR TRAFFIC RULES Allocation of Commuter and Air Carrier IFR Operations at High Density Traffic Airports § 93.223 Slot withdrawal. (a) Slots do not represent a...

  4. 14 CFR 93.223 - Slot withdrawal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR TRAFFIC AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES SPECIAL AIR TRAFFIC RULES Allocation of Commuter and Air Carrier IFR Operations at High Density Traffic Airports § 93.223 Slot withdrawal. (a) Slots do not represent a...

  5. 14 CFR 93.223 - Slot withdrawal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR TRAFFIC AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES SPECIAL AIR TRAFFIC RULES Allocation of Commuter and Air Carrier IFR Operations at High Density Traffic Airports § 93.223 Slot withdrawal. (a) Slots do not represent a...

  6. 14 CFR 93.223 - Slot withdrawal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR TRAFFIC AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES SPECIAL AIR TRAFFIC RULES Allocation of Commuter and Air Carrier IFR Operations at High Density Traffic Airports § 93.223 Slot withdrawal. (a) Slots do not represent a...

  7. 14 CFR 93.223 - Slot withdrawal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR TRAFFIC AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES SPECIAL AIR TRAFFIC RULES Allocation of Commuter and Air Carrier IFR Operations at High Density Traffic Airports § 93.223 Slot withdrawal. (a) Slots do not represent a...

  8. 43 CFR 2091.5 - Withdrawals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Withdrawals. 2091.5 Section 2091.5 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND RESOURCE MANAGEMENT (2000) SPECIAL LAWS AND RULES Segregation and Opening...

  9. 43 CFR 2091.5 - Withdrawals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Withdrawals. 2091.5 Section 2091.5 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND RESOURCE MANAGEMENT (2000) SPECIAL LAWS AND RULES Segregation and Opening...

  10. 43 CFR 2091.5 - Withdrawals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Withdrawals. 2091.5 Section 2091.5 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND RESOURCE MANAGEMENT (2000) SPECIAL LAWS AND RULES Segregation and Opening...

  11. 43 CFR 2091.5 - Withdrawals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Withdrawals. 2091.5 Section 2091.5 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND RESOURCE MANAGEMENT (2000) SPECIAL LAWS AND RULES Segregation and Opening...

  12. Sodium Valproate Withdrawal Correlates with Reduced Aggression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pritchard, Duncan; Hoerger, Marguerite; Dyer, Tim; Graham, Nicola; Penney, Heather; Mace, F. Charles

    2014-01-01

    People with learning disabilities are sometimes prescribed psychotropic medication to help manage their challenging behaviour. This case study describes how a multicomponent behavioural intervention in conjunction with the systematic withdrawal of sodium valproate was strongly correlated with reduced aggression. No symptoms of bipolar disorder or…

  13. 29 CFR 102.58 - Withdrawal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Withdrawal. 102.58 Section 102.58 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor NATIONAL LABOR RELATIONS BOARD RULES AND REGULATIONS, SERIES 8 Procedure Under Section 10 (a) to (i) of the Act for the Prevention of Unfair Labor Practices 1 Back-Pay Proceedings §...

  14. 29 CFR 102.58 - Withdrawal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Withdrawal. 102.58 Section 102.58 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor NATIONAL LABOR RELATIONS BOARD RULES AND REGULATIONS, SERIES 8 Procedure Under Section 10 (a) to (i) of the Act for the Prevention of Unfair Labor Practices 1 Back-Pay Proceedings §...

  15. Teachers' Withdrawal Behaviors: Integrating Theory and Findings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shapira-Lishchinsky, Orly

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The article aims to investigate the relationships between different dimensions of organizational ethics and different withdrawal symptoms--lateness, absence, and intent to leave work. Design/methodology/approach: Participants were 1,016 school teachers from 35 high schools in Israel. A joint model of Glimmix procedure of SAS was used for…

  16. 31 CFR 1010.714 - Withdrawing requests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Withdrawing requests. 1010.714 Section 1010.714 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) FINANCIAL CRIMES ENFORCEMENT NETWORK, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY GENERAL PROVISIONS Administrative Rulings §...

  17. 31 CFR 1010.714 - Withdrawing requests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Withdrawing requests. 1010.714 Section 1010.714 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) FINANCIAL CRIMES ENFORCEMENT NETWORK, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY GENERAL PROVISIONS Administrative Rulings §...

  18. 31 CFR 1010.714 - Withdrawing requests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Withdrawing requests. 1010.714 Section 1010.714 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) FINANCIAL CRIMES ENFORCEMENT NETWORK, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY GENERAL PROVISIONS Administrative Rulings §...

  19. 7 CFR 1902.10 - Withdrawals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... SUPERVISED BANK ACCOUNTS Supervised Bank Accounts of Loan, Grant, and Other Funds § 1902.10 Withdrawals. (a) The Servicing Official will not countersign checks on the supervised bank account for the use of funds...-bearing accounts established through the use of an Interest-Bearing Deposit Agreement, such funds will...

  20. 9 CFR 332.14 - Voluntary withdrawal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Voluntary withdrawal. 332.14 Section 332.14 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY ORGANIZATION AND TERMINOLOGY; MANDATORY MEAT AND POULTRY PRODUCTS INSPECTION AND...

  1. 31 CFR 1010.714 - Withdrawing requests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Withdrawing requests. 1010.714 Section 1010.714 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) FINANCIAL CRIMES ENFORCEMENT NETWORK, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY GENERAL PROVISIONS Administrative Rulings §...

  2. Tobacco Withdrawal in Self-Quitters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, John R.

    1992-01-01

    Assessed self-reported and observer-rated signs and symptoms of nicotine withdrawal precessation and 2, 7, 14, 30, 90, and 180 days postcessation in smokers who quit on their own for 30 days. Anxiety, difficulty concentrating, hunger, irritability, restlessness, and weight gain increased; heart rate decreased postcessation. Postcessation…

  3. 75 FR 22868 - Withdrawal of Regulatory Guide

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-30

    ... Safe Shutdown Earthquake Ground Motion.'' FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Rebecca L. Karas... Determination of Safe Shutdown Earthquake Ground Motion,'' dated March 1997. RG 1.165 provides general...-Specific Earthquake Ground Motion.'' The withdrawal of Regulatory Guide 1.165 does not alter the...

  4. Cohort Survival and Withdrawal Study District Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shainline, Michael

    At the completion of the 1986-87 school year, the Albuquerque (New Mexico) Public Schools (APS) conducted a cohort survival and withdrawal study to follow-up 5,976 students who had begun the ninth grade within the district in 1983-84. Current records were matched with those from the 1983-84 school year to determine whether members of the…

  5. 21 CFR 314.530 - Withdrawal procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Withdrawal procedures. 314.530 Section 314.530 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS... with the provisions of part 15 of this chapter, with the following modifications: (1) An...

  6. 21 CFR 314.620 - Withdrawal procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Withdrawal procedures. 314.620 Section 314.620 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS... chapter, with the following modifications: (1) An advisory committee duly constituted under part 14...

  7. 21 CFR 601.43 - Withdrawal procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Withdrawal procedures. 601.43 Section 601.43 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS...) A postmarketing clinical study fails to verify clinical benefit; (2) The applicant fails to...

  8. 21 CFR 601.92 - Withdrawal procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Withdrawal procedures. 601.92 Section 601.92 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS... this section, if: (1) A postmarketing clinical study fails to verify clinical benefit; (2)...

  9. The proprioceptive reflex control of the intercostal muscles during their voluntary activation.

    PubMed

    Davis, J N; Sears, T A

    1970-08-01

    1. A quantitative study has been made of the reflex effects of sudden changes in mechanical load on contracting human intercostal muscles during willed breathing movements involving the chest wall. Averaging techniques were applied to recordings of electromyogram (EMG) and lung volume, and to other parameters of breathing.2. Load changes were effected for brief periods (10-150 msec) at any predetermined lung volume by sudden connexion of the airway to a pressure source variable between +/- 80 cm H(2)O so that respiratory movement could be either assisted or opposed. In some experiments airway resistance was suddenly reduced by porting from a high to a low resistance external airway.3. Contracting inspiratory and expiratory intercostal muscles showed a ;silent period' with unloading which is attributed to the sudden withdrawal from intercostal motoneurones of monosynaptic excitation of muscle spindle origin.4. For both inspiratory and expiratory intercostal muscles the typical immediate effect of an increase in load was an inhibitory response (IR) with a latency of about 22 msec followed by an excitatory response (ER) with a latency of 50-60 msec.5. It was established using brief duration stimuli (< 40 msec) that the IR depended on mechanical events associated with the onset of stimulation, whereas stimuli greater than 40 msec in duration were required to evoke the ER.6. For constant expiratory flow rate and a constant load, the ER of expiratory intercostal muscles increased as lung volume decreased within the limits set by maximal activation of the motoneurone pool as residual volume was approached.7. The ER to a constant load increased directly with the expiratory flow rate at which the load applied, also within limits set by maximal activation of the motoneurone pool.8. For a given load, the ER during phonation was greater than that occurring at a similar expiratory flow rate without phonation when the resistance of the phonating larynx was mimicked by an

  10. Laparoscopic repair of abdominal incisional hernia

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xue-Fei

    2016-01-01

    Abdominal incisional hernia is a common complication after open abdominal operations. Laparoscopic procedures have obvious mini-invasive advantages for surgical treatment of abdominal incisional hernia, especially to cases with big hernia defect. Laparoscopic repair of incisional hernia has routine mode but the actual operations will be various according to the condition of every hernia. Key points of these operations include design of the position of trocars, closure of defects and fixation of meshes. The details of these issues and experiences of perioperative evaluation and treatment will be talked about in this article. PMID:27761446

  11. Chylous Ascites after Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair.

    PubMed

    Ohki, Shinichi; Kurumisawa, Soki; Misawa, Yoshio

    2016-01-01

    A 73-year-old man was transferred for treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysm. He had no history of abdominal surgeries. Grafting between the infra-renal abdominal aorta and the bilateral common iliac arteries was performed. Proximal and distal cross clamps were applied for grafting. He developed chylous ascites on the 5th post-operative day, 2 days after initiation of oral intake. Fortunately, he responded to treatment with total parenteral hyper-alimentation for 10 days, followed by a low-fat diet. There was no recurrence of ascites. PMID:27087873

  12. [Internationalization and innovation of abdominal acupuncture].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong-Zhou

    2013-09-01

    Characteristics of abdominal acupuncture are analyzed through three aspects of inheriting and innovation, collaborated research as well as international visual field. It is pointed that abdominal acupuncture is based on clinical practice, focuses on enhancing the therapeutic effect and expending the clinical application. It also promots the thinking on how to recall the tradition and how to inherit tradition availably. The modern medical problems should be studied and innovation resolutions should be searched, which can help the internationalization and modernization of abdominal acupuncture. PMID:24298780

  13. Isolate abdominal bronchogenic cyst: a case report.

    PubMed

    Cetinkurşun, S; Oztürk, H; Celasun, B; Sakarya, M T; Sürer, I

    1997-04-01

    Isolated abdominal bronchogenic cysts are rare abnormalities. They are usually asymptomatic unless secondarily infected or large enough to cause compression of other vital structures. The authors report on a 20-month-old girl who had an abdominal bronchogenic cyst and presented with a history of recurrent urinary tract infections. The evaluation and treatment of this patient is presented as well as a review of the ten previously reported cases. A literature review showed only four cases in the pediatric age group. Excision is recommended to establish diagnosis and alleviate any symptoms. Abdominal bronchogenic cysts should be considered in the differential diagnosis of retroperitoneal masses.

  14. Boys Withdraw More in One-on-One Interactions, Whereas Girls Withdraw More in Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benenson, Joyce F.; Heath, Anna

    2006-01-01

    Past research predicts that males will be more likely to withdraw in one-on-one interactions versus groups, whereas females will be more likely to withdraw in groups than in one-on-one interactions. Ninety-eight 10-year-old children engaged in a word generation task either in same-sex dyads or in groups. Boys completed significantly more words in…

  15. Reflexive Research Ethics in Fetal Tissue Xenotransplantation Research

    PubMed Central

    Panikkar, Bindu; Smith, Natasha; Brown, Phil

    2013-01-01

    For biomedical research in which the only involvement of the human subject is the provision of tissue or organ samples, a blanket consent, i.e. consent to use the tissue for anything researchers wish to do, is considered by many to be adequate for legal and IRB requirements. Alternatively, a detailed informed consent provides patients or study participants with more thorough information about the research topic. We document here the beliefs and opinions of the research staff on informed consent and the discussion-based reflexive research ethics process that we employed in our fetal tissue xenotransplantion research on the impact of environmental exposures on fetal development. Reflexive research ethics entails the continued adjustment of research practice according to relational and reflexive understandings of what might be beneficent or harmful. Such reflexivity is not solely an individual endeavor, but rather a collective relationship between all actors in the research process. PMID:23074992

  16. Response characteristics of the human torsional vestibuloocular reflex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterka, Robert J.

    1992-01-01

    The characteristics of the response dynamics of the human torsional vestibuloocular reflex were studied during controlled rotations about an earth-horizontal axis. The results extended the frequency range to 2 Hz and identified the nonlinearity of the amplitude response.

  17. Speech Performance, Dysphagia and Oral Reflexes in Cerebral Palsy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Love, Russell J.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    The adequacy of biting, sucking, swallowing, and chewing as well as the presence or absence of nine infantile oral reflexes were assessed in 60 cerebral palsied individuals (ages 3 to 23). (Author/PHR)

  18. [Red reflex: prevention way to blindness in childhood].

    PubMed

    de Aguiar, Adriana Sousa Carvalho; Cardoso, Maria Vera Lúcia Moreira Leitão; Lúcio, Ingrid Martins Leite

    2007-01-01

    This study had as objective to investigate the result and the colour gradation of red reflex test in newborns (NB). It is a exploratory, quantitative study and the sample was 180 NB from maternity ward in Fortaleza-CE. From this, 156 showed result "no altered" and 24 "suspect". About the aspect of red reflex, 144 NB showed the same coloration in the two eyes, in 35 of this, the colour was red, in 33, orange reddish, in 46 orange colour, in 24 light yellow, in 6 yellow with whitish stains central. Of the suspect cases, the reflex was light yellow with whitish stains with lines. The nurse trained to accomplish the red reflex test can have important role at Neonatal Unit with actions about the prevention of ocular alterations in the childhood.

  19. Nasocardiac reflex during aspiration and injection through a nasogastric tube: An infrequent occurrence.

    PubMed

    Haldar, Rudrashish; Kaur, Jasleen; Bajwa, Sukhminder Jit Singh

    2015-04-01

    Nasocardiac reflex is a relatively less discussed variant of trigeminovagal reflex where the afferent arc of the reflex is represented by any of the branches of the trigeminal nerves, and the efferent arc is via the vagus nerve. Elicitation of this reflex is commonly seen during surgical manipulation and is manifested as bradycardia or even asystole. We report a case where nasocardiac reflex was unusually observed in a patient when aspiration and injection were done through a nasogastric tube.

  20. [Churg-Strauss abdominal manifestation].

    PubMed

    Suarez-Moreno, Roberto; Ponce-Pérez, Luis Virgilio; Margain-Paredes, Miguel Angel; Garza-de la Llave, Heriberto; Madrazo-Navarro, Mario; Espinosa-Álvarez, Arturo

    2014-01-01

    Antecedentes: la enfermedad de Churg-Strauss es poco común, idiopática, caracterizada por hipereosinofilia en sangre y tejidos, aunada a vasculitis sistémica en pacientes con antecedentes de asma o rinitis alérgica. Las manifestaciones gastrointestinales del síndrome de Churg Strauss se caracterizan por dolor abdominal, seguido de diarrea y hemorragia en 31-45% de los casos. Caso clínico: paciente masculino con antecedente de asma que acudió a consulta por abdomen agudo con probable apendicitis aguda; durante el protocolo de estudio se diagnosticó síndrome de Churg Strauss, con manifestaciones intestinales. Conclusión: el síndrome de Churg Strauss es una vasculitis poco frecuente que puede manifestarse con síntomas intestinales, como en este caso; es importante tenerlo en mente a la hora de los diagnósticos diferenciales. Existen pocos reportes con este síndrome asociado con abdomen agudo, todos ellos con mal pronóstico.

  1. Mechanical Characteristics of Reflex Durign Upright Posture in Paralyzed Subjects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yongchul; Youm, Youngil; Lee, Bumsuk; Kim, Youngho; Choi, Hyeonki

    The characteristics of flexor reflexes have been investigated in the previous studies with human subjects who were seated or supine position. However, researchers did not describe how the spinal circuits are used in different hip angles for paralyzed subjects, such as the standing position with walker or cane. In upright posture the compatibility between a flexor reflex of leg and body balance is a special problem for lower limb injured subjects. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of hip angle change on the flexor reflex evoked in standing paralyzed subjects supported by walker. In this study, six spinal cord injured and four stroke subjects were recruited through the inpatient physical therapy clinics of Korea national rehabilitation hospital. A single axis electronic goniometer was mounted on the lateral side of the hip joint of the impaired limb to record movements in the sagittal plane at this joint. The electronic goniometer was connected to a data acquisition system, through amplifiers to a computer. Since subject' posture influenced characteristics of the flexion reflex response, the subjects were supported in an upright posture by the help of parallelogram walder. Two series of tests were performed on each leg. The first series of the tests investigated the influence of hip angle during stationary standing posture on flexion reflex response. The hip angle was adjusted by the foot plate. The second examined the effect of the voluntary action of subject on swing motion during the gait. The electrically induced flexion reflex simultaneously produced the flexion of the hip, knee and dorsiflexion of the ankle enabling the swing phase of walking. Form the experimental results we observed that the reflex response of hip joint was largerwith the hip in the extended position than in the flexed position during standing posture. Under voluntary movement on flexion reflex during gaint, the peak hip angle induced by stimulation was

  2. Cardiovascular Reflexes Activity and Their Interaction during Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Crisafulli, Antonio; Marongiu, Elisabetta; Ogoh, Shigehiko

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac output and arterial blood pressure increase during dynamic exercise notwithstanding the exercise-induced vasodilation due to functional sympatholysis. These cardiovascular adjustments are regulated in part by neural reflexes which operate to guarantee adequate oxygen supply and by-products washout of the exercising muscles. Moreover, they maintain adequate perfusion of the vital organs and prevent excessive increments in blood pressure. In this review, we briefly summarize neural reflexes operating during dynamic exercise with particular emphasis on their interaction. PMID:26557662

  3. An electronic device to record consensual reflex in human pupil.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, H M; Costa, R M; Camilo, E N R; Gang, Hua

    2015-01-01

    Examination of the pupil offers an objective evaluation of visual function as well as the vegetative pathways to the eye. This work proposes the development of an effective method and a portable device to test the consensual pupillary reflex. The first results demonstrate the success of a new device construction and methodology to record the consensual reflex with different stimulus, in a situation of complete blockage of light.

  4. An experimental psychophysiological approach to human bradycardiac reflexes.

    PubMed

    Furedy, J J

    1985-01-01

    Bradycardic reflexes in man are both of scientific and clinical interest. Using the methods of experimental psychophysiology, control over relevant independent variables permits the study of fine-grained temporal physiologic response topographies, and of psychological factors that may modify the reflex. In addition, information can also be sought through interdisciplinary collaborations with experimental physiologists in order to shed light on the mechanism of the reflexes. These general features of the approach are illustrated by presenting data on two bradycardic reflex preparations: the laboratory dive analog, and the 90-degree negative tilt. The dive-analog studies have shown that a) the dive-reflex proper is a late-occurring bradycardia accompanied by a late-occurring vasoconstriction; and b) for the elicitation of this reflex, both breath-holding and face immersion are necessary. In addition, the physiologic manipulation of temperature affects the reflex in an inverse way over the range of 10 degrees to 40 degrees C, while the sense of control (a psychological variable) attenuates the reflex. The negative-tilt preparation produces a bradycardic response that is ideal as a Pavlovian unconditional response. Some Pavlovian conditioning arrangements, especially an "imaginational" form, do produce significant conditional bradycardic responding, and this has both potential clinical (e.g., biofeedback-related) and theoretical (e.g., S-R vs. S-S accounts of Pavlovian conditioning) applications. The paper ends with a comment on the cognitive paradigm shift in psychology. Although this shift is of importance, it is suggested that it is also important to "remember the response."

  5. The Tribolium homeotic gene Abdominal is homologous to abdominal-A of the Drosophila bithorax complex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stuart, J. J.; Brown, S. J.; Beeman, R. W.; Denell, R. E.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    The Abdominal gene is a member of the single homeotic complex of the beetle, Tribolium castaneum. An integrated developmental genetic and molecular analysis shows that Abdominal is homologous to the abdominal-A gene of the bithorax complex of Drosophila. abdominal-A mutant embryos display strong homeotic transformations of the anterior abdomen (parasegments 7-9) to PS6, whereas developmental commitments in the posterior abdomen depend primarily on Abdominal-B. In beetle embryos lacking Abdominal function, parasegments throughout the abdomen are transformed to PS6. This observation demonstrates the general functional significance of parasegmental expression among insects and shows that the control of determinative decisions in the posterior abdomen by homeotic selector genes has undergone considerable evolutionary modification.

  6. Modulation of trigeminal reflex excitability in migraine: effects of attention and habituation on the blink reflex.

    PubMed

    de Tommaso, Marina; Murasecco, Donatella; Libro, Giuseppe; Guido, Marco; Sciruicchio, Vittorio; Specchio, Luigi Maria; Gallai, Virgilio; Puca, Francomichele

    2002-06-01

    The modulation of trigeminal reflex excitability in migraine patients was evaluated during the asymptomatic phase by studying the effects of attention, habituation and preconditioning stimulus on the R2 and R3 components of the blink reflex (BR). Fifty patients suffering from migraine without aura, 20 affected by migraine with aura and 35 sex- and age-matched controls were selected. In subgroups of migraine with-aura and without-aura patients, and normal controls, the blink reflex was elicited during different cognitive situations: (a) spontaneous mental activity; (b) stimulus anticipation; (c) recognition of target numbers. In the remaining subjects, R2 and R3 habituation was evaluated by repetitive stimulation at 1, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25 and 30 s intervals. The R2 and R3 recovery curves were also computed. A reduced R3 threshold with a normal pain threshold was found in migraine with-aura and without-aura patients; the R3 component was not significantly correlated with the pain thresholds in patients and controls. The R2 and R3 components were less influenced by the warning of the stimulus in migraine without-aura and migraine with-aura patients, in comparison with the control group. A slight increase of both R2 and R3 recovery after preconditioning stimulus was also observed in migraine patients, probably caused by a phenomenon of trigeminal hyperexcitability persisting after the last attack. The abnormal BR modulation by alerting expresses in migraine a dysfunction of adaptation capacity to environmental conditions, probably predisposing to migraine. PMID:12031298

  7. Modulation of trigeminal reflex excitability in migraine: effects of attention and habituation on the blink reflex.

    PubMed

    de Tommaso, Marina; Murasecco, Donatella; Libro, Giuseppe; Guido, Marco; Sciruicchio, Vittorio; Specchio, Luigi Maria; Gallai, Virgilio; Puca, Francomichele

    2002-06-01

    The modulation of trigeminal reflex excitability in migraine patients was evaluated during the asymptomatic phase by studying the effects of attention, habituation and preconditioning stimulus on the R2 and R3 components of the blink reflex (BR). Fifty patients suffering from migraine without aura, 20 affected by migraine with aura and 35 sex- and age-matched controls were selected. In subgroups of migraine with-aura and without-aura patients, and normal controls, the blink reflex was elicited during different cognitive situations: (a) spontaneous mental activity; (b) stimulus anticipation; (c) recognition of target numbers. In the remaining subjects, R2 and R3 habituation was evaluated by repetitive stimulation at 1, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25 and 30 s intervals. The R2 and R3 recovery curves were also computed. A reduced R3 threshold with a normal pain threshold was found in migraine with-aura and without-aura patients; the R3 component was not significantly correlated with the pain thresholds in patients and controls. The R2 and R3 components were less influenced by the warning of the stimulus in migraine without-aura and migraine with-aura patients, in comparison with the control group. A slight increase of both R2 and R3 recovery after preconditioning stimulus was also observed in migraine patients, probably caused by a phenomenon of trigeminal hyperexcitability persisting after the last attack. The abnormal BR modulation by alerting expresses in migraine a dysfunction of adaptation capacity to environmental conditions, probably predisposing to migraine.

  8. Interaction of Baroreceptor and Chemoreceptor Reflexes MODULATION OF THE CHEMORECEPTOR REFLEX BY CHANGES IN BARORECEPTOR ACTIVITY

    PubMed Central

    Heistad, Donald D.; Abboud, Francois M.; Mark, Allyn L.; Schmid, Phillip G.

    1974-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the level of arterial pressure and degree of baroreceptor activation affect responses to stimulation of chemoreceptors. Chemoreceptors were stimulated by injecting nicotine into the common carotid artery of anesthetized and paralyzed dogs. Responses were observed in the innervated gracilis muscle, perfused at constant flow while perfusion pressure was measured. Arterial pressure was lowered by bleeding the animals and raised by transient occlusion of the descending aorta. Vasoconstrictor responses to stimulation of chemoreceptors were enhanced by hypotension and inhibited by elevation of arterial pressure. Potentiation of the chemoreceptor reflex by hemorrhagic hypotension was not the result of altered vascular resistance in the gracilis muscle, sensitization of chemoreceptors by catecholamines or acidosis, or changes in cerebral perfusion pressure. Additional studies were done in which we excluded the possibility that the changes resulted from direct effects of changes in arterial pressure on chemoreceptors. Both carotid bifurcations were isolated and perfused. On one side, pressure was raised to stimulate the carotid sinus baroreceptors. On the other side, the carotid body chemoreceptors were stimulated by nicotine or by hypoxic and hypercapnic blood. Activation of baroreceptors on one side attenuated the vasoconstrictor response to chemoreceptor stimulation on the other side. This excludes a direct effect of changes in arterial pressure on the chemoreceptors and suggests a central interaction of these reflexes. We conclude that vasoconstrictor responses to stimulation of chemoreceptors are potentiated by hypotension and inhibited by transient hypertension. These effects appear to result at least in part from a central interaction of chemoreceptor and baroreceptor reflexes. PMID:4825222

  9. Auditory Brainstem Circuits That Mediate the Middle Ear Muscle Reflex

    PubMed Central

    Mukerji, Sudeep; Windsor, Alanna Marie; Lee, Daniel J.

    2010-01-01

    The middle ear muscle (MEM) reflex is one of two major descending systems to the auditory periphery. There are two middle ear muscles (MEMs): the stapedius and the tensor tympani. In man, the stapedius contracts in response to intense low frequency acoustic stimuli, exerting forces perpendicular to the stapes superstructure, increasing middle ear impedance and attenuating the intensity of sound energy reaching the inner ear (cochlea). The tensor tympani is believed to contract in response to self-generated noise (chewing, swallowing) and nonauditory stimuli. The MEM reflex pathways begin with sound presented to the ear. Transduction of sound occurs in the cochlea, resulting in an action potential that is transmitted along the auditory nerve to the cochlear nucleus in the brainstem (the first relay station for all ascending sound information originating in the ear). Unknown interneurons in the ventral cochlear nucleus project either directly or indirectly to MEM motoneurons located elsewhere in the brainstem. Motoneurons provide efferent innervation to the MEMs. Although the ascending and descending limbs of these reflex pathways have been well characterized, the identity of the reflex interneurons is not known, as are the source of modulatory inputs to these pathways. The aim of this article is to (a) provide an overview of MEM reflex anatomy and physiology, (b) present new data on MEM reflex anatomy and physiology from our laboratory and others, and (c) describe the clinical implications of our research. PMID:20870664

  10. Changes in nociceptive reflex facilitation during carrageenan-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Herrero, J F; Cervero, F

    1996-04-22

    Facilitation of neuronal responses induced by repetitive electrical stimulation of C-fibres (wind-up) is thought to be a substrate of hyperalgesia. There is little information on how these responses are in turn modified during hyperalgesia, and the extent to which hyperalgesic states also induce a facilitation of the neuronal responses mediated by A-fibres. The current study was undertaken in order to evaluate the effects of peripheral inflammation and stimulus presentation on the facilitation of nociceptive reflexes. Flexor reflexes, recorded as single motor units, were evoked in rats by cycles of low and high frequency electrical stimulation with pulse durations of 0.2, 0.5 and 2 ms. Responses were studied in control and inflammatory conditions, using the carrageenan-induced mono-arthritis model. The results show that the facilitation of late (C-fibre mediated) responses was proportional to the pulse duration of stimulation, as well as to the stimulation frequency. Facilitation was always higher when animals were subjected to inflammation. In inflammatory conditions, facilitation of reflexes was observed not only for late (C-fibre mediated) but also for early (A-fibre mediated) reflex responses. However, the facilitation of these early responses was not proportional to the intensity of stimulation. Thus, in arthritic animals, late (C-fibre mediated) flexion reflexes elicited from the skin, are facilitated and early (A-fibre mediated) reflexes are not only facilitated but, in addition, show a novel wind-up phenomenon.

  11. Spontaneous rupture of the abdominal aorta.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, T. G.

    1977-01-01

    Fatal spontaneous rupture of the lower abdominal aorta in a previously healthy 61-year-old woman is reported; the possibility that she had the Ehlers-Danlos syndrome is discussed. Images Fig. 1 PMID:870895

  12. Genetics Home Reference: abdominal wall defect

    MedlinePlus

    ... size and can usually be diagnosed early in fetal development, typically between the tenth and fourteenth weeks of ... organs at the abdominal wall opening late in fetal development may also contribute to organ injury. Intestinal damage ...

  13. Understanding noninguinal abdominal hernias in the athlete.

    PubMed

    Cabry, Robert J; Thorell, Erik; Heck, Keith; Hong, Eugene; Berkson, David

    2014-01-01

    Abdominal hernias are common with over 20 million hernia repairs performed worldwide. Inguinal hernias are the most common type of hernia. Inguinal and sports hernia have been discussed at length in recent literature, and therefore, they will not be addressed in this article. The noninguinal hernias are much less common but do occur, and knowledge of these hernias is important when assessing the athlete with abdominal pain. Approximately 25% of abdominal wall hernias are noninguinal, and new data show the order of frequency as umbilical, epigastric, incisional, femoral, and all others (i.e., Spigelian, obturator, traumatic). Return-to-play guidelines need to be tailored to the athlete and the needs of their sport. Using guidelines similar to abdominal strain injuries can be a starting point for the treatment plan. Laparoscopic repair is becoming more popular because of safety and efficacy, and it may lead to a more rapid return to play. PMID:24614421

  14. Magnetic Surgical Instruments for Robotic Abdominal Surgery.

    PubMed

    Leong, Florence; Garbin, Nicolo; Natali, Christian Di; Mohammadi, Alireza; Thiruchelvam, Dhan; Oetomo, Denny; Valdastri, Pietro

    2016-01-01

    This review looks at the implementation of magnetic-based approaches in surgical instruments for abdominal surgeries. As abdominal surgical techniques advance toward minimizing surgical trauma, surgical instruments are enhanced to support such an objective through the exploration of magnetic-based systems. With this design approach, surgical devices are given the capabilities to be fully inserted intraabdominally to achieve access to all abdominal quadrants, without the conventional rigid link connection with the external unit. The variety of intraabdominal surgical devices are anchored, guided, and actuated by external units, with power and torque transmitted across the abdominal wall through magnetic linkage. This addresses many constraints encountered by conventional laparoscopic tools, such as loss of triangulation, fulcrum effect, and loss/lack of dexterity for surgical tasks. Design requirements of clinical considerations to aid the successful development of magnetic surgical instruments, are also discussed.

  15. [Intestinal occlusion and abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS)].

    PubMed

    Stagnitti, Franco

    2009-01-01

    Intestinal occlusion is defined as an independent predictive factor of intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH) which represents an independent predictor of mortality. Baggot in 1951 classified patients operated with intestinal occlusion as being at risk for IAH ("abdominal blow-out"), recommending them for open abdomen surgery proposed by Ogilvie. Abdominal surgery provokes IAH in 44.7% of cases with mortality which, in emergency, triples with respect to elective surgery (21.9% vs 6.8%). In particular, IAH is present in 61.2% of ileus and bowel distension and is responsible for 52% of mortality (54.8% in cases with intra-abdominal infection). These patients present with an increasing intra-abdominal pressure (IAP) which, over 20-25 mmHg, triggers an Abdominal Compartment Syndrome (ACS) with altered functions in some organs arriving at Multiple Organ Dysfunction Syndrome (MODS). The intestine normally covers 58% of abdominal volume but when there is ileus distension, intestinal pneumatosis develops (third space) which can occupy up to 90% of the entire cavity. At this moment, Gastro Intestinal Failure (GIF) can appear, which is a specific independent risk factor of mortality, motor of "Organ Failure". The pathophysiological evolution has many factors in 45% of cases: intestinal pneumatosis is associated with mucosal and serous edema, capillary leakage with an increase in extra-cellular volume and peritoneal fluid collections (fourth space). The successive loss of the mucous barrier permits a bacterial translocation which includes bacteria, toxins, pro-inflammatory factors and oxygen free radicals facilitating the passage from an intra-abdominal to inter-systemic vicious cyrcle. IAH provokes the raising of the diaphragm, and vascular and visceral compressions which induce hypertension in the various spaces with compartmental characteristics. These trigger hypertension in the renal, hepatic, pelvic, thoracic, cardiac, intracranial, orbital and lower extremity areas, giving

  16. ["Reflex--in a strict sense". Ivan Michajlovic Secenov and the founding myths of the 'Russian reflex empire'].

    PubMed

    Wurm, Barbara

    2009-03-01

    This paper aims to reconstruct Ivan Michajlovik Secenov's impact on reflex theory by looking at the different narratives which constitute his specific position in the history of science, where he is considered the Russian founder of a purely materialist framing of consciousness and behaviour, the father figure of objective psychology, and the predecessor of the 'great' Ivan Pavlov. I argue that Secenov himself was very much aware of the symbolic significance of the term "reflex" and that the rhetorical strategies in his opus magnum, The Reflexes of the Brain (1863), deliberately enforce the precarious twofold potential of reflexological conceptions as psycho-physiological structures as well as social programs. Also within the cultural and political settings of the 19th and 20th century, Secenov's comprehensive and multifaceted research work in the field of nerve physiology was gradually reduced to a strong, ideologically interpretable message: "All movements bearing the name of voluntary in physiology are reflex in a strict sense".

  17. ["Reflex--in a strict sense". Ivan Michajlovic Secenov and the founding myths of the 'Russian reflex empire'].

    PubMed

    Wurm, Barbara

    2009-03-01

    This paper aims to reconstruct Ivan Michajlovik Secenov's impact on reflex theory by looking at the different narratives which constitute his specific position in the history of science, where he is considered the Russian founder of a purely materialist framing of consciousness and behaviour, the father figure of objective psychology, and the predecessor of the 'great' Ivan Pavlov. I argue that Secenov himself was very much aware of the symbolic significance of the term "reflex" and that the rhetorical strategies in his opus magnum, The Reflexes of the Brain (1863), deliberately enforce the precarious twofold potential of reflexological conceptions as psycho-physiological structures as well as social programs. Also within the cultural and political settings of the 19th and 20th century, Secenov's comprehensive and multifaceted research work in the field of nerve physiology was gradually reduced to a strong, ideologically interpretable message: "All movements bearing the name of voluntary in physiology are reflex in a strict sense". PMID:19824305

  18. Crossed reflex reversal during human locomotion.

    PubMed

    Gervasio, Sabata; Farina, Dario; Sinkjær, Thomas; Mrachacz-Kersting, Natalie

    2013-05-01

    During human walking, precise coordination between the two legs is required in order to react promptly to any sudden hazard that could threaten stability. The networks involved in this coordination are not yet completely known, but a direct spinal connection between soleus (SOL) muscles has recently been revealed. For this response to be functional, as previously suggested, we hypothesize that it will be accompanied by a reaction in synergistic muscles, such as gastrocnemius lateralis (GL), and that a reversal of the response would occur when an opposite reaction is required. In the present study, surface EMGs of contralateral SOL and GL were analyzed after tibial nerve (TN), sural nerve (SuN), and medial plantar nerve (MpN) stimulation during two tasks in which opposite reactions are functionally expected: normal walking (NW), just before ipsilateral heel strike, and hybrid walking (HW) (legs walking in opposite directions), at ipsilateral push off and contralateral touchdown. Early crossed facilitations were observed in the contralateral GL after TN stimulation during NW, and a reversal of such responses occurred during HW. These results underline the functional significance of short-latency crossed responses and represent the first evidence for short-latency reflex reversal in the contralateral limb for humans. Muscle afferents seem to mediate the response during NW, while during HW cutaneous afferents are likely involved. It is thus possible that different afferents mediate the crossed response during different tasks.

  19. Reflex anuria affecting both kidneys following hysterectomy.

    PubMed

    Gholyaf, Mahmoud; Afzali, Saeed; Babolhavaegi, Hoshang; Rahimi, Abolfazl; Wagharseyedayn, Seyed A

    2009-01-01

    In situations when there is unilateral ureteral obstruction, the contralateral kidney retains its normal function. In rare instances however, it has been reported that unilateral ureteral obstruction can lead to reflex anuria (RA) and acute renal failure (ARF). Even more unusually, RA with ARF can occur without organic obstruction due to ureteric manipulation during pelvic surgery. We report a 78- year-old woman, who underwent hysterectomy because of endometrial carcinoma. She developed ARF evidenced by anuria of 120-hours duration, and gradual rise of serum creatinine levels to 11.8 mg/dL on the fifth day after hysterectomy. Ultrasound study of the urinary tract revealed bilateral moderate hydronephrosis. Detailed evaluation did not reveal any organic obstruction. She was managed with hemodialysis, control of hypertension and correction of fluid and electrolyte imbalances. By the sixth day, diuresis was established, and the blood urea and serum creatinine levels decreased to normal by the sixteenth day. The patient was finally discharged on the eighteenth day. Our case suggests that urologists and nephrologists should consider RA as one of the causes of anuria and ARF.

  20. Impaired Sacculocollic Reflex in Lateral Medullary Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seonhye; Kim, Hyo-Jung; Kim, Ji Soo

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to determine saccular dysfunction by measuring cervical vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials (cVEMP) and to correlate abnormality of cVEMP with results of other vestibular function tests in lateral medullary infarction (LMI). Methods: We recorded cVEMP in 21 patients with LMI documented on MRI. cVEMP was induced by a short tone burst and was recorded in contracting sternocleidomastoid muscle while patients turned their heads forcefully to the contralateral side against resistance. Patients also underwent video-oculographic recording of spontaneous, gaze-evoked and head shaking nystagmus (HSN), evaluation of ocular tilt reaction (OTR), measurement of the subjective visual vertical (SVV) tilt, bithermal caloric tests, and audiometry. Results: Nine patients (43%) showed abnormal cVEMP, unilateral in seven and bilateral in two. The cVEMP abnormalities included decreased p13–n23 amplitude in four, delayed p13/n23 responses in five, and both decreased and delayed responses in two. The abnormal cVEMP was ipsilesional in five, contralesional in two, and bilateral in two. The prevalence of OTR/SVV tilt, spontaneous nystagmus, and HSN did not differ between the patients with normal and abnormal cVEMP. Conclusion: cVEMP was abnormal in approximately half of the patients with LMI. The abnormal cVEMP indicates damage to the descending sacculocollic reflex pathway or disruption of commissural modulation between the vestibular nuclei. PMID:21415908

  1. Compensatory adrenal growth - A neurally mediated reflex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dallman, M. F.; Engeland, W. C.; Shinsako, J.

    1976-01-01

    The responses of young rats to left adrenalectomy or left adrenal manipulation were compared to surgical sham adrenalectomy in which adrenals were observed but not touched. At 12 h right adrenal wet weight, dry weight, DNA, RNA, and protein content were increased (P less than 0.05) after the first two operations. Left adrenal manipulation resulted in increased right adrenal weight at 12 h but no change in left adrenal weight. Sequential manipulation of the left adrenal at time 0 and the right adrenal at 12 h resulted in an enlarged right adrenal at 12 h (P less than 0.01), and an enlarged left adrenal at 24 h (P less than 0.05), showing that the manipulated gland was capable of response. Bilateral adrenal manipulation of the adrenal glands resulted in bilateral enlargement of 12 h (P less than 0.01). Taken together with previous results, these findings strongly suggest that compensatory adrenal growth is a neurally mediated reflex.

  2. Vestibuloocular reflex of rhesus monkeys after spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Bernard; Kozlovskaia, Inessa; Raphan, Theodore; Solomon, David; Helwig, Denice; Cohen, Nathaniel; Sirota, Mikhail; Iakushin, Sergei

    1992-01-01

    The vestibuloocular reflex (VOR) of two rhesus monkeys was recorded before and after 14 days of spaceflight. The gain (eye velocity/head velocity) of the horizontal VOR, tested 15 and 18 h after landing, was approximately equal to preflight values. The dominant time constant of the animal tested 15 h after landing was equivalent to that before flight. During nystagmus induced by off-vertical axis rotation (OVAR), the latency, rising time constant, steady-state eye velocity, and phase of modulation in eye velocity and eye position with respect to head position were similar in both monkeys before and after flight. There were changes in the amplitude of modulation of horizontal eye velocity during steady-state OVAR and in the ability to discharge stored activity rapidly by tilting during postrotatory nystagmus (tilt dumping) after flight: OVAR modulations were larger, and tilt dumping was lost in the one animal tested on the day of landing and for several days thereafter. If the gain and time constant of the horizontal VOR exchange in microgravity, they must revert to normal soon after landing. The changes that were observed suggest that adaptation to microgravity had caused alterations in way that the central nervous system processes otolith input.

  3. Artificial balancer - supporting device for postural reflex.

    PubMed

    Wojtara, Tytus; Sasaki, Makoto; Konosu, Hitoshi; Yamashita, Masashi; Shimoda, Shingo; Alnajjar, Fady; Kimura, Hidenori

    2012-02-01

    The evolutionarily novel ability to keep ones body upright while standing or walking, the human balance, deteriorates in old age or can be compromised after accidents or brain surgeries. With the aged society, age related balance problems are on the rise. Persons with balance problems are more likely to fall during their everyday life routines. Especially in elderly, falls can lead to bone fractures making the patient bedridden, weakening the body and making it more prone to other diseases. Health care expenses for a fall patient are often very high. There is a great deal of research being done on exoskeletons and power assists. However, these technologies concentrate mainly on the amplifications of human muscle power while balance has to be provided by the human themself. Our research has been focused on supporting human balance in harmony with the human's own posture control mechanisms such as postural reflexes. This paper proposes an artificial balancer that supports human balance through acceleration of a flywheel attached to the body. Appropriate correcting torques are generated through our device based on the measurements of body deflections. We have carried out experiments with test persons standing on a platform subject to lateral perturbations and ambulatory experiments while walking on a balance beam. These experiments have demonstrated the effectiveness of our device in supporting balance and the possibility of enhancing balance-keeping capability in human beings through the application of external torque. PMID:22169384

  4. Management of abdominal contusion in polytraumatized children.

    PubMed

    Canarelli, J P; Boboyono, J M; Ricard, J; Doidy, L; Collet, L M; Postel, J P

    1991-01-01

    Management of abdominal contusion in polytraumatized children is based on the conservative treatment of spleen and liver lesions when it is possible. Ultrasonography and CTScan can give a good evaluation of splenic, liver, pancreas or kidney lesions. In some cases, if the haemodynamic conditions are good, a non-operative treatment may be proposed. We report our experience of conservative management of intra abdominal lesions in children, about 91 cases in ten years. PMID:1869385

  5. Abdominal Aortic Aneurysmectomy in Renal Transplant Patients

    PubMed Central

    Jebara, Victor A.; Fabiani, Jean-Noël; Moulonguet-Deloris, L.; Acar, Christophe; Debauchez, Mathieu; Chachques, J.C.; Glotz, Denis; Duboust, Alain; Langanay, Thierry; Carpentier, Alain

    1990-01-01

    Because renal transplantation is allowing an increased number of patients to survive for prolonged periods, abdominal aortic aneurysms can be expected to occur with growing frequency in these patients. Surgical management of such cases involves the provision of allograft protection. To date, the literature contains 15 reports of abdominal aortic aneurysms in renal allograft recipients. We describe a 16th case and discuss the management of these patients. (Texas Heart Institute Journal 1990;17:240-4) Images PMID:15227179

  6. Abdominal apoplexy resulting in small bowel obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Le, Don; Guileyardo, Joseph; Casanova, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Abdominal apoplexy is a rare hemorrhagic condition involving the small arteries or veins within the abdominal cavity. A high degree of clinical suspicion, followed by appropriate diagnostic workup and therapeutic intervention, is critical, as nonoperative mortality approaches 100%. Contrary to most previously reported cases, which were associated with hemoperitoneum, we present a patient in which gastroduodenal artery dissection resulted in an organized retroperitoneal hematoma with local compression of the duodenum and subsequent bowel obstruction, resulting in vomiting, aspiration, and death. PMID:27695177

  7. Computed tomography of the postoperative abdominal aorta

    SciTech Connect

    Hilton, S.; Megibow, A.J.; Naidich, D.P.; Bosniak, M.A.

    1982-11-01

    Computed tomography (CT) of the abdomen was performed on 46 patients who had undergone graft replacement of abdominal aortic aneurysms. Twelve post-operative complications were found in nine patients. They included hemorrhage, infection, anastomotic pseudoaneurysms, major vessel occlusion, postoperative pancreatitis, and others. The varied apperance of the normal postoperative graft is also presented. It is concluded that CT is a rapid, sensitive, and noninvasive method for detecting or excluding postoperative complications of abdominal aortic surgery.

  8. A focus on intra-abdominal infections

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Complicated intra-abdominal infections are an important cause of morbidity and are frequently associated with poor prognosis, particularly in higher risk patients. Well defined evidence-based recommendations for intra-abdominal infections treatment are partially lacking because of the limited number of randomized-controlled trials. Factors consistently associated with poor outcomes in patients with intra-abdominal infections include increased illness severity, failed source control, inadequate empiric antimicrobial therapy and healthcare-acquired infection. Early prognostic evaluation of complicated intra-abdominal infections is important to select high-risk patients for more aggressive therapeutic procedures. The cornerstones in the management of complicated intra-abdominal infections are both source control and antibiotic therapy. The timing and the adequacy of source control are the most important issues in the management of intra-abdominal infections, because inadequate and late control of septic source may have a negative effect on the outcomes. Recent advances in interventional and more aggressive techniques could significantly decrease the morbidity and mortality of physiologically severe complicated intra-abdominal infections, even if these are still being debated and are yet not validated by limited prospective trials. Empiric antimicrobial therapy is nevertheless important in the overall management of intra-abdominal infections. Inappropriate antibiotic therapy may result in poor patient outcomes and in the appearance of bacterial resistance. Antimicrobial management is generally standardised and many regimens, either with monotherapy or combination therapy, have proven their efficacy. Routine coverage especially against Enterococci and candida spp is not always recommended, but can be useful in particular clinical conditions. A de escalation approach may be recommended in patients with specific risk factors for multidrug resistant infections such as

  9. Progress in Fully Automated Abdominal CT Interpretation

    PubMed Central

    Summers, Ronald M.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Automated analysis of abdominal CT has advanced markedly over just the last few years. Fully automated assessment of organs, lymph nodes, adipose tissue, muscle, bowel, spine, and tumors are some examples where tremendous progress has been made. Computer-aided detection of lesions has also improved dramatically. CONCLUSION This article reviews the progress and provides insights into what is in store in the near future for automated analysis for abdominal CT, ultimately leading to fully automated interpretation. PMID:27101207

  10. Abdominal apoplexy resulting in small bowel obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Le, Don; Guileyardo, Joseph; Casanova, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Abdominal apoplexy is a rare hemorrhagic condition involving the small arteries or veins within the abdominal cavity. A high degree of clinical suspicion, followed by appropriate diagnostic workup and therapeutic intervention, is critical, as nonoperative mortality approaches 100%. Contrary to most previously reported cases, which were associated with hemoperitoneum, we present a patient in which gastroduodenal artery dissection resulted in an organized retroperitoneal hematoma with local compression of the duodenum and subsequent bowel obstruction, resulting in vomiting, aspiration, and death.

  11. [Late primary abdominal pregnancy. Case report].

    PubMed

    Farías, Emigdio Torres; Gómez, Luis Guillermo Torres; Allegre, René Márquez; Higareda, Salvador Hernández

    2008-09-01

    Abdominal advanced pregnancy is an obstetric complication that put at risk maternal and fetal life. We report a case of advanced abdominal pregnancy with intact ovaries and fallopian tubes, without ureteroperitoneal fistulae and, late prenatal diagnosis, in a multiparous patient without risk factors, with alive newborn, and whose pregnancy was attended at Unidad Medica de Alta Especialidad, Hospital de Gineco-Obstetricia, Centro Medico Nacional de Occidente del IMSS, Guadalajara, Jalisco, México.

  12. Mapping current and future European public water withdrawals and consumption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandecasteele, I.; Bianchi, A.; Silva, F. Batista e.; Lavalle, C.; Batelaan, O.

    2014-02-01

    In Europe, public water withdrawals make up on average 30% and in some cases up to 60% of total water withdrawals. These withdrawals are becoming increasingly important with growing population density; hence there is a need to understand the spatial and temporal trends involved. Pan-European public/municipal water withdrawals and consumption were mapped for 2006 and forecasted for 2030. Population and tourism density were assumed to be the main driving factors for withdrawals. Country-level statistics on public water withdrawals were disaggregated to a combined population and tourism density map (the "user" density map) computed for 2006. The methodology was validated using actual regional withdrawal statistics from France for 2006. The total absolute error (TAE) calculated was proven to be reduced by taking into account the tourism density in addition to the population density. In order to forecast the map to 2030 we considered a reference scenario where per capita withdrawals were kept constant in time. Although there are large variations from region to region, this resulted in a European average increase of water withdrawals of 16%. If we extrapolate the average reduction in per capita withdrawals seen between 2000 and 2008, we forecast a reduction in average total water withdrawals of 4%. Considering a scenario where all countries converge to an optimal water use efficiency, we see an average decrease of 28%.

  13. Factors associated with abdominal obesity in children

    PubMed Central

    Melzer, Matheus Ribeiro Theodósio Fernandes; Magrini, Isabella Mastrangi; Domene, Semíramis Martins Álvares; Martins, Paula Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To identify the association of dietary, socioeconomic factors, sedentary behaviors and maternal nutritional status with abdominal obesity in children. Methods: A cross-sectional study with household-based survey, in 36 randomly selected census tracts in the city of Santos, SP. 357 families were interviewed and questionnaires and anthropometric measurements were applied in mothers and their 3-10 years-old children. Assessment of abdominal obesity was made by maternal and child's waist circumference measurement; for classification used cut-off points proposed by World Health Organization (1998) and Taylor et al. (2000) were applied. The association between variables was performed by multiple logistic regression analysis. Results: 30.5% of children had abdominal obesity. Associations with children's and maternal nutritional status and high socioeconomic status were shown in the univariate analysis. In the regression model, children's body mass index for age (OR=93.7; 95%CI 39.3-223.3), female gender (OR=4.1; 95%CI 1.8-9.3) and maternal abdominal obesity (OR=2.7; 95%CI 1.2-6.0) were significantly associated with children's abdominal obesity, regardless of the socioeconomic status. Conclusions: Abdominal obesity in children seems to be associated with maternal nutritional status, other indicators of their own nutritional status and female gender. Intervention programs for control of childhood obesity and prevention of metabolic syndrome should consider the interaction of the nutritional status of mothers and their children. PMID:26298655

  14. Genes and Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Hinterseher, Irene; Tromp, Gerard; Kuivaniemi, Helena

    2010-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a multifactorial disease with a strong genetic component. Since first candidate gene studies were published 20 years ago, nearly 100 genetic association studies using single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in biologically relevant genes have been reported on AAA. The studies investigated SNPs in genes of the extracellular matrix, the cardiovascular system, the immune system, and signaling pathways. Very few studies were large enough to draw firm conclusions and very few results could be replicated in another sample set. The more recent unbiased approaches are family-based DNA linkage studies and genome-wide genetic association studies, which have the potential of identifying the genetic basis for AAA, if appropriately powered and well-characterized large AAA cohorts are used. SNPs associated with AAA have already been identified in these large multicenter studies. One significant association was of a variant in a gene called CNTN3 which is located on chromosome 3p12.3. Two follow-up studies, however, could not replicate the association. Two other SNPs, which are located on chromosome 9p21 and 9q33 were replicated in other samples. The two genes with the strongest supporting evidence of contribution to the genetic risk for AAA are the CDKN2BAS gene, also known as ANRIL, which encodes an antisense RNA that regulates expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors CDKN2A and CDKN2B, and DAB2IP, which encodes an inhibitor of cell growth and survival. Functional studies are now needed to establish the mechanisms by which these genes contribute to AAA pathogenesis. PMID:21146954

  15. Peripheral reflex feedbacks in chronic heart failure: Is it time for a direct treatment?

    PubMed Central

    Giannoni, Alberto; Mirizzi, Gianluca; Aimo, Alberto; Emdin, Michele; Passino, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Despite repeated attempts to develop a unifying hypothesis that explains the clinical syndrome of heart failure (HF), no single conceptual paradigm for HF has withstood the test of time. The last model that has been developed, the neurohormonal model, has the great virtue of highlighting the role of the heart as an endocrine organ, as well as to shed some light on the key role on HF progression of neurohormones and peripheral organs and tissues beyond the heart itself. However, while survival in clinical trials based on neurohormonal antagonist drugs has improved, HF currently remains a lethal condition. At the borders of the neurohormonal model of HF, a partially unexplored path trough the maze of HF pathophysiology is represented by the feedback systems. There are several evidences, from both animal studies and humans reports, that the deregulation of baro-, ergo- and chemo-reflexes in HF patients elicits autonomic imbalance associated with parasympathetic withdrawal and increased adrenergic drive to the heart, thus fundamentally contributing to the evolution of the disease. Hence, on top of guideline-recommended medical therapy, mainly based on neurohormonal antagonisms, all visceral feedbacks have been recently considered in HF patients as additional potential therapeutic targets. PMID:26730288

  16. Peripheral reflex feedbacks in chronic heart failure: Is it time for a direct treatment?

    PubMed

    Giannoni, Alberto; Mirizzi, Gianluca; Aimo, Alberto; Emdin, Michele; Passino, Claudio

    2015-12-26

    Despite repeated attempts to develop a unifying hypothesis that explains the clinical syndrome of heart failure (HF), no single conceptual paradigm for HF has withstood the test of time. The last model that has been developed, the neurohormonal model, has the great virtue of highlighting the role of the heart as an endocrine organ, as well as to shed some light on the key role on HF progression of neurohormones and peripheral organs and tissues beyond the heart itself. However, while survival in clinical trials based on neurohormonal antagonist drugs has improved, HF currently remains a lethal condition. At the borders of the neurohormonal model of HF, a partially unexplored path trough the maze of HF pathophysiology is represented by the feedback systems. There are several evidences, from both animal studies and humans reports, that the deregulation of baro-, ergo- and chemo-reflexes in HF patients elicits autonomic imbalance associated with parasympathetic withdrawal and increased adrenergic drive to the heart, thus fundamentally contributing to the evolution of the disease. Hence, on top of guideline-recommended medical therapy, mainly based on neurohormonal antagonisms, all visceral feedbacks have been recently considered in HF patients as additional potential therapeutic targets.

  17. A method of reflexive balancing in a pragmatic, interdisciplinary and reflexive bioethics.

    PubMed

    Ives, Jonathan

    2014-07-01

    In recent years there has been a wealth of literature arguing the need for empirical and interdisciplinary approaches to bioethics, based on the premise that an empirically informed ethical analysis is more grounded, contextually sensitive and therefore more relevant to clinical practice than an 'abstract' philosophical analysis. Bioethics has (arguably) always been an interdisciplinary field, and the rise of 'empirical' (bio)ethics need not be seen as an attempt to give a new name to the longstanding practice of interdisciplinary collaboration, but can perhaps best be understood as a substantive attempt to engage with the nature of that interdisciplinarity and to articulate the relationship between the many different disciplines (some of them empirical) that contribute to the field. It can also be described as an endeavour to explain how different disciplinary approaches can be integrated to effectively answer normative questions in bioethics, and fundamental to that endeavour is the need to think about how a robust methodology can be articulated that successfully marries apparently divergent epistemological and metaethical perspectives with method. This paper proposes 'Reflexive Bioethics' (RB) as a methodology for interdisciplinary and empirical bioethics, which utilizes a method of 'Reflexive Balancing' (RBL). RBL has been developed in response to criticisms of various forms of reflective equilibrium, and is built upon a pragmatic characterization of Bioethics and a 'quasi-moral foundationalism', which allows RBL to avoid some of the difficulties associated with RE and yet retain the flexible egalitarianism that makes it intuitively appealing to many.

  18. A method of reflexive balancing in a pragmatic, interdisciplinary and reflexive bioethics.

    PubMed

    Ives, Jonathan

    2014-07-01

    In recent years there has been a wealth of literature arguing the need for empirical and interdisciplinary approaches to bioethics, based on the premise that an empirically informed ethical analysis is more grounded, contextually sensitive and therefore more relevant to clinical practice than an 'abstract' philosophical analysis. Bioethics has (arguably) always been an interdisciplinary field, and the rise of 'empirical' (bio)ethics need not be seen as an attempt to give a new name to the longstanding practice of interdisciplinary collaboration, but can perhaps best be understood as a substantive attempt to engage with the nature of that interdisciplinarity and to articulate the relationship between the many different disciplines (some of them empirical) that contribute to the field. It can also be described as an endeavour to explain how different disciplinary approaches can be integrated to effectively answer normative questions in bioethics, and fundamental to that endeavour is the need to think about how a robust methodology can be articulated that successfully marries apparently divergent epistemological and metaethical perspectives with method. This paper proposes 'Reflexive Bioethics' (RB) as a methodology for interdisciplinary and empirical bioethics, which utilizes a method of 'Reflexive Balancing' (RBL). RBL has been developed in response to criticisms of various forms of reflective equilibrium, and is built upon a pragmatic characterization of Bioethics and a 'quasi-moral foundationalism', which allows RBL to avoid some of the difficulties associated with RE and yet retain the flexible egalitarianism that makes it intuitively appealing to many. PMID:23444909

  19. The window of opportunity for treatment withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Dominic

    2011-03-01

    Physicians sometimes refer to a "window of opportunity" for withdrawing life-sustaining treatment in patients with acute severe brain injury. There is a period of critical illness and physiological instability when treatment withdrawal is likely to be followed by death but prognosis is uncertain. If decisions are delayed, greater prognostic certainty can be achieved, but with the risk that the patient is no longer dependent on life support and survives with very severe disability. In this article I draw on the example of birth asphyxia and highlight the role that the window of opportunity sometimes plays in decisions about life-sustaining treatment in intensive care. I outline the potential arguments in favor of and against taking the window into account. I argue that it is, at least sometimes, ethical and appropriate for physicians and parents to be influenced by the window of opportunity in their decisions about life-sustaining treatment.

  20. Dexmedetomidine for Sedation during Withdrawal of Support

    PubMed Central

    O’Hara, Chris; Tamburro, Robert F; Ceneviva, Gary D

    2015-01-01

    Agents used to control end-of-life suffering are associated with troublesome side effects. The use of dexmedetomidine for sedation during withdrawal of support in pediatrics is not yet described. An adolescent female with progressive and irreversible pulmonary deterioration was admitted. Despite weeks of therapy, she did not tolerate weaning of supplemental oxygen or continuous bilevel positive airway pressure. Given her condition and the perception that she was suffering, the family requested withdrawal of support. Despite opioids and benzodiazepines, she appeared to be uncomfortable after support was withdrawn. Ketamine was initiated. Relief from ketamine was brief, and its use was associated with a “wide-eyed” look that was distressing to the family. Ketamine was discontinued and a dexmedetomidine infusion was initiated. The patient’s level of comfort improved greatly. The child died peacefully 24 hours after initiating dexmedetomidine from her underlying disease rather than the effects of the sedative. PMID:26339188