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Sample records for abdominis flap anatomic

  1. Use of the rectus abdominis muscle for abdominal stoma sphincter construction: an anatomical feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Bardoel, J W; Stadelmann, W K; Tobin, G R; Werker, P M; Stremel, R W; Kon, M; Barker, J H

    2000-02-01

    Permanent fecal abdominal stomas significantly decrease quality of life. Previous attempts to create continent stomas by using dynamic myoplasty procedures have resulted in disappointing outcomes, primarily owing to denervation atrophy of the muscle flap that was used in the creation of the sphincter and because of muscle fatigue resulting from continuous electrical stimulation that is received by the flap to force contraction. On the basis of these problems, we designed two separate studies: an anatomical study addressing flap denervation and a functional study addressing muscle fatigue. The present study addresses the first topic and was designed to develop a rectus abdominis muscle flap into a sphincter that was anatomically situated to create a stoma while preserving as much innervation as possible. In 24 rectus abdominis muscles of human cadavers, the neurovascular anatomy was defined, then the anatomical feasibility of two different muscle flap configurations was considered. The flaps investigated were the peninsula flap and island flap designs, with both using the most caudal segment of the rectus abdominis muscle in construction of the sphincter. Neither flap design required the killing of a nerve for stoma sphincter creation, resulting in minimal muscle denervation. The conclusion of our comparison was that the above, in conjunction with other features of the island flap design, such as muscle overlap after sphincter formation and abdominal wall positioning of the sphincter, made the island flap design better suited to stoma sphincter construction.

  2. Workhorse Flaps in Chest Wall Reconstruction: The Pectoralis Major, Latissimus Dorsi, and Rectus Abdominis Flaps

    PubMed Central

    Bakri, Karim; Mardini, Samir; Evans, Karen K.; Carlsen, Brian T.; Arnold, Phillip G.

    2011-01-01

    Large and life-threatening thoracic cage defects can result from the treatment of traumatic injuries, tumors, infection, congenital anomalies, and radiation injury and require prompt reconstruction to restore respiratory function and soft tissue closure. Important factors for consideration are coverage with healthy tissue to heal a wound, the potential alteration in respiratory mechanics created by large extirpations or nonhealing thoracic wounds, and the need for immediate coverage for vital structures. The choice of technique depends on the size and extent of the defect, its location, and donor site availability with consideration to previous thoracic or abdominal operations. The focus of this article is specifically to describe the use of the pectoralis major, latissimus dorsi, and rectus abdominis muscle flaps for reconstruction of thoracic defects, as these are the workhorse flaps commonly used for chest wall reconstruction. PMID:22294942

  3. Sexual dysfunction after colpectomy and vaginal reconstruction with a vertical rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap.

    PubMed

    Løve, Uffe S; Sjøgren, Pia; Rasmussen, Peter; Laurberg, Søren; Christensen, Henrik K

    2013-02-01

    The use of the vertical rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap in reconstruction after abdominoperineal resection or pelvic exenteration for neoplasia is well documented. However, functional outcomes after vaginal reconstruction, including sexual function, are poorly described. This study aimed to examine sexual function in women following extensive pelvic surgery with colpectomy and vaginal reconstruction with the use of a vertical rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap. This study is a retrospective review of medical records in combination with patient questionnaires. Nonresponders were followed up with a second contact. This study was performed at a tertiary care university medical center (Colorectal Section, Department of Surgery P, Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark) All women undergoing pelvic surgery and simultaneous vaginal reconstruction with the use of a vertical rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap between 2004 and 2010 at our department were identified from a patient database. Thirty women who were alive at the time of identification were included in the study. Sexual function before and after surgery was evaluated by the use of the Sexual function Vaginal changes Questionnaire. The main outcome end point was whether the patient was sexually active after vaginal reconstruction. Twenty-six participants (87%) answered the questionnaire. Fifty percent of patients reported an active sex life before surgery. In general, patients reported an unchanged desire for both physical and sexual contact after surgery. However, only 2 patients (14%) reported being sexually active after surgery. This was a retrospective study with a heterogeneous cohort involving several types of cancers and surgical procedures. Factors other than vertical rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap reconstruction itself may interfere with the sexual function. Extensive pelvic surgery with colpectomy leads to sexual dysfunction even when the vagina is reconstructed with a vertical rectus abdominis

  4. Free tissue transfer of the rectus abdominis myoperitoneal flap for oral reconstruction in a dog.

    PubMed

    Lanz, O I

    2001-12-01

    A five-month-old intact/male Boxer dog was presented 5-days following bite wound trauma to the maxillary region resulting in an oronasal fistula extending from the maxillary canine teeth to the soft palate. Multiple surgical procedures using local, buccal mucosal flaps failed to repair the oronasal fistula. Free tissue transfer of the rectus abdominis myoperitoneal flap using microvascular surgical techniques was successful in providing soft tissue reconstruction of the hard palate area. Complications of these surgical techniques included muscle contraction and subsequent muzzle distortion. Small, refractory oronasal fistulae at the perimeter of the myoperitoneal flap were repaired by primary wound closure.

  5. Donor-Site Complications and Remnant of Rectus Abdominis Muscle Status after Transverse Rectus Abdominis Myocutaneous Flap Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Chirappapha, Prakasit; Trikunagonvong, Noppadol; Rongthong, Sasiprapa; Lertsithichai, Panuwat; Sukarayothin, Thongchai; Leesombatpaiboon, Monchai; Panawattanakul, Rujira; Thaweepworadej, Panya

    2017-01-01

    Background: Transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous (TRAM) flap reconstruction after mastectomy in breast cancer patients has become one of the milestones in breast reconstruction. There are several techniques that have been used in an attempt to minimize untoward complications. We present the whole muscle with partial sheath-sparing technique that focuses on the anatomy of arcuate line and the closure of the anterior abdominal wall techniques with mesh and determine factors associated with its complications and outcomes. Methods: We retrospectively and prospectively review the results of 30 pedicled TRAM flaps that were performed between November 2013 and March 2016, focusing on outcomes and complications. Results: Among the 30 pedicled TRAM flap procedures in 30 patients, there were complications in 5 patients (17%). Most common complications were surgical-site infection (7%). After a median follow-up time of 15 months, no patient developed abdominal wall hernia or bulging in daily activities in our study, but 6 patients (20%) had asymptomatic abdominal wall bulging when exercised. Significant factors related to asymptomatic exercised abdominal wall bulging included having a body mass index of more than 23 kg/m2. Conclusion: Pedicled TRAM flap by using the technique of the whole muscle with partial sheath-sparing technique combined with reinforcement above the arcuate line with mesh can reduce the occurrence of abdominal bulging and hernia. PMID:28740793

  6. Laparoscopy in patients following transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Muller, C Y; Coleman, R L; Adams, W P

    2000-07-01

    We report our technique and experience performing laparoscopic pelvic surgery on four women after transverse abdominus rectus myocutaneous flap (TRAM). Examination under anesthesia is performed on all patients in the low lithotomy position parallel with the floor. The abdominal aorta is palpated and outlined. A pneumoperitoneum is created either by umbilical or left upper quadrant Veress placement. Patients with an acceptable umbilical location undergo port placement through the incision of the umbilical relocation. Other options include left upper quadrant or paramedian placement avoiding the ligamentum teres vessels. Lateral operative ports (5 mm) are placed with reference to the transverse incision present, the pelvic pathology, and the location of the umbilicus. Techniques of electrocautery, intra- and extracorporeal suturing and knot tying, and clips are preferred to minimize port size. Following unilateral or bilateral TRAM reconstruction, four consecutive breast cancer survivors underwent successful laparoscopic-assisted vaginal hysterectomy with oophorectomy using the periumbilical incision for trocar placement. The only complication was a superficial skin breakdown from an adhesive allergy that required 6 weeks for complete resolution. Laparoscopic pelvic surgery is feasible in women after TRAM reconstruction. Knowledge of anatomic and physiologic variations related to the TRAM procedure is necessary in planning a safe operation.

  7. Free Boomerang-shaped Extended Rectus Abdominis Myocutaneous flap: The longest possible skin/myocutaneous free flap for soft tissue reconstruction of extremities.

    PubMed

    Koul, Ashok R; Nahar, Sushil; Prabhu, Jagdish; Kale, Subhash M; Kumar, Praveen H P

    2011-09-01

    A soft tissue defect requiring flap cover which is longer than that provided by the conventional "long" free flaps like latissimus dorsi (LD) and anterolateral thigh (ALT) flap is a challenging problem. Often, in such a situation, a combination of flaps is required. Over the last 3 years, we have managed nine such defects successfully with a free "Boomerang-shaped" Extended Rectus Abdominis Myocutaneous (BERAM) flap. This flap is the slightly modified and "free" version of a similar flap described by Ian Taylor in 1983. This is a retrospective study of patients who underwent free BERAM flap reconstruction of soft tissue defects of extremity over the last 3 years. We also did a clinical study on 30 volunteers to compare the length of flap available using our design of BERAM flap with the maximum available flap length of LD and ALT flaps, using standard markings. Our clinical experience of nine cases combined with the results of our clinical study has confirmed that our design of BERAM flap consistently provides a flap length which is 32.6% longer than the standard LD flap and 42.2% longer than the standard ALT flap in adults. The difference is even more marked in children. The BERAM flap is consistently reliable as long as the distal end is not extended beyond the mid-axillary line. BERAM flap is simple in design, easy to harvest, reliable and provides the longest possible free skin/myocutaneous flap in the body. It is a useful new alternative for covering long soft tissue defects in the limbs.

  8. Free Boomerang-shaped Extended Rectus Abdominis Myocutaneous flap: The longest possible skin/myocutaneous free flap for soft tissue reconstruction of extremities

    PubMed Central

    Koul, Ashok R.; Nahar, Sushil; Prabhu, Jagdish; Kale, Subhash M.; Kumar, Praveen H. P.

    2011-01-01

    Background: A soft tissue defect requiring flap cover which is longer than that provided by the conventional “long” free flaps like latissimus dorsi (LD) and anterolateral thigh (ALT) flap is a challenging problem. Often, in such a situation, a combination of flaps is required. Over the last 3 years, we have managed nine such defects successfully with a free “Boomerang-shaped” Extended Rectus Abdominis Myocutaneous (BERAM) flap. This flap is the slightly modified and “free” version of a similar flap described by Ian Taylor in 1983. Materials and Methods: This is a retrospective study of patients who underwent free BERAM flap reconstruction of soft tissue defects of extremity over the last 3 years. We also did a clinical study on 30 volunteers to compare the length of flap available using our design of BERAM flap with the maximum available flap length of LD and ALT flaps, using standard markings. Results: Our clinical experience of nine cases combined with the results of our clinical study has confirmed that our design of BERAM flap consistently provides a flap length which is 32.6% longer than the standard LD flap and 42.2% longer than the standard ALT flap in adults. The difference is even more marked in children. The BERAM flap is consistently reliable as long as the distal end is not extended beyond the mid-axillary line. Conclusion: BERAM flap is simple in design, easy to harvest, reliable and provides the longest possible free skin/myocutaneous flap in the body. It is a useful new alternative for covering long soft tissue defects in the limbs. PMID:22279271

  9. Supercharging the transverse rectus abdominis musculocutaneous flap: breast reconstruction for the overweight and obese population.

    PubMed

    Wu, Liza C; Iteld, Lawrence; Song, David H

    2008-06-01

    Autologous breast reconstruction with the transverse rectus abdominis musculocutaneous (TRAM) flap is traditionally based on either the superior epigastric vessels (pedicled) or the deep inferior system (free). In the overweight and obese population, both techniques have been shown to have increased complications of the reconstructed breast. Another alternative is supercharging the flap by anastamosing the deep inferior epigastric vessels to either the internal mammary or thoracodorsal systems. We present a single surgeon's experience with unilateral TRAM reconstructions supercharged to either the thoracodorsal vessels, the internal mammary system, or in one case, perforator vessels in overweight and obese patients. Nineteen consecutive overweight or obese patients underwent delayed or immediate, unilateral autologous breast reconstruction with supercharged TRAM flaps between November 2000 and November 2004. The patients ranged in age from 28 to 66 years (average 49) and had an average body mass index (BMI) of 29.5 (24.9-38.3). Twelve patients had a BMI between 25 and 29.9 kg/m2; 7 patients had BMI > or =30 kg/m2. Left-sided reconstructions were 13; right-sided reconstructions were 6. Supercharging was performed by anastamosing the deep inferior epigastric artery and vein to the thoracodorsal vessels, internal mammary vessels, or perforator vessels. Follow-up ranged from 6 to 54 months. There was a qualitative increase in blood flow measured by audible Doppler signals in all patients after the arterial and venous anastamoses. There were no cases of partial or complete flap loss. One patient had a hematoma and subsequently developed minor fat necrosis. One patient had an infection of the reconstructed breast. There were no donor site complications. Supercharging the TRAM flap by means of microvascular augmentation of the deep inferior epigastric vessels provides a safe and effective breast reconstruction in the overweight and obese population with no additional

  10. Extensive Chest Wall Tissue Loss and its Management by Vertical Rectus Abdominis Myocutaneous Flap

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Sandip Kanti; Bain, Jayanta; Chattopadhyay, Debarati; Majumdar, Bijay Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Extensive electric burn around the chest in children is rare and this type of injury always poses a great challenge for its management. A 12-year-old male child with extensive electric burn of the chest wall was admitted to hospital. It was a neglected case of 9 days old burn; the young boy was in critical condition having systemic features of toxemia with widespread necrosis of the skin, subcutaneous tissues, and muscles along with exposed bones (ribs and sternum) with the risk of impending rupture of pleura through the exposed intercostal spaces. After initial resuscitation, a thorough debridement of all necrotic tissues was done. Thereafter, a superiorly based vertical rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap was harvested to cover the exposed bones and intercostal spaces. The remaining raw areas were skin grafted. The child made an excellent recovery with good outcome. PMID:28082777

  11. Reconstruction of Abdominal Wall of a Chronically Infected Postoperative Wound with a Rectus Abdominis Myofascial Splitting Flap

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Sung Kyu; Kang, Seok Joo; Kim, Jin Woo; Kim, Young Hwan

    2013-01-01

    Background If a chronically infected abdominal wound develops, complications such as peritonitis and an abdominal wall defect could occur. This could prolong the patient's hospital stay and increase the possibility of re-operation or another infection as well. For this reason, a solution for infection control is necessary. In this study, surgery using a rectus abdominis muscle myofascial splitting flap was performed on an abdominal wall defect. Methods From 2009 to 2012, 5 patients who underwent surgery due to ovarian rupture, cesarean section, or uterine myoma were chosen. In each case, during the first week after operation, the wound showed signs of infection. Surgery was chosen because the wounds did not resolve with dressing. Debridement was performed along the previous operation wound and dissection of the skin was performed to separate the skin and subcutaneous tissue from the attenuated rectus muscle and Scarpa's fascial layers. Once the anterior rectus sheath and muscle were adequately mobilized, the fascia and muscle flap were advanced medially so that the skin defect could be covered for reconstruction. Results Upon 3-week follow-up after a rectus abdominis myofascial splitting flap operation, no major complication occurred. In addition, all of the patients showed satisfaction in terms of function and esthetics at 3 to 6 months post-surgery. Conclusions Using a rectus abdominis myofascial splitting flap has many esthetic and functional benefits over previous methods of abdominal defect treatment, and notably, it enabled infection control by reconstruction using muscle. PMID:23362477

  12. Treatment of elbow osteomyelitis with an interposition arthroplasty using a rectus abdominis free flap.

    PubMed

    Jaiswal, Rohit; Busse, Brittany; Allen, Robert; Sahar, David

    2015-05-01

    Osteomyelitis of the elbow may be a complex clinical problem. Treatment goals include the eradication of infection and preservation of maximal joint function. Bony debridement may be necessary in addition to elbow joint arthroplasty. The use of synthetic material or allograft as the arthroplasty material may be contraindicated in the setting of infection. The use of free muscle transfer as an arthroplasty medium has not been well described. A 22-year-old paraplegic man developed recurrent osteomyelitis of the right elbow, necessitating extensive bony debridement by the orthopedic surgery team. Reconstruction arthroplasty was performed using a free rectus abdominis muscle flap as the arthroplasty material to serve as a source of biologically active, well-vascularized arthroplasty medium in the presence of ongoing infection. A successful free muscle flap arthroplasty was performed. External fixation and physical therapy were implemented postoperatively. The patient had resolution of osteomyelitis and excellent functional use of the elbow for activities of daily living and wheelchair motion. Elbow arthroplasty in the setting of active infection may be accomplished by means of free tissue muscle transfer. Elimination of infection and acceptable joint function may be possible with this form of reconstruction.

  13. Rotational flaps in oncologic breast surgery. Anatomical and technical considerations.

    PubMed

    Acea Nebril, Benigno; Builes Ramírez, Sergio; García Novoa, Alejandra; Varela Lamas, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Local flaps are a group of surgical procedures that can solve the thoracic closure of large defects after breast cancer surgery with low morbidity. Its use in skin necrosis complications after conservative surgery or skin sparing mastectomies facilitates the initiation of adjuvant treatments and reduces delays in this patient group. This article describes the anatomical basis for the planning of thoracic and abdominal local flaps. Also, the application of these local flaps for closing large defects in the chest and selective flaps for skin coverage by necrosis in breast conserving surgery. Copyright © 2016 AEC. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. Analysis of fiber type transformation and histology in chronic electrically stimulated canine rectus abdominis muscle island-flap stomal sphincters.

    PubMed

    Majzoub, Ramsey K; Bardoel, Janou W J M; Maldonado, Claudio; Barker, John H; Stadelmann, Wayne K

    2003-01-01

    Dynamic skeletal muscle flaps are designed to perform a specific functional task through contraction and relaxation of their muscle fibers. The most commonly used dynamic skeletal flaps today are for cardiomyoplasty and anal or urinary myoplasty. Low-frequency chronic stimulation of these flaps enables them to use their intrinsic energy stores in a more efficient manner through aerobic metabolic pathways for increased endurance and improved work capacity. The purpose of this study was to (1) determine whether fiber type transformation from fatigue-prone (type II) muscle fibers to fatigue-resistant (type I) muscle fibers could be demonstrated in the authors' chronic canine stomal sphincter model where the rectus abdominis muscle was used to create a functional stomal sphincter, (2) assess whether there is any correlation between the degree of muscle fiber type transformation and the continence times, and (3) examine the long-term effects of the training regimens on the skeletal muscle fibers through histologic and volumetric analysis. Eight dynamic island-flap sphincters were created from a part of the rectus abdominis muscle in mongrel dogs by preserving the deep inferior epigastric vascular pedicle and the most caudal investing intercostal nerve. The muscular sphincters were wrapped around a blind loop of distal ileum and trained with pacing electrodes. Two different training protocols were used. In group A (n = 4), a preexisting anal dynamic graciloplasty training protocol was used. A revised protocol was used in group B (n = 4). Muscle biopsy specimens were obtained before and after training from the rectus abdominis muscle sphincter. Fiber type transformation was assessed using a monoclonal antibody directed against the fatigue-prone type II fibers. Pretraining and posttraining skeletal muscle specimens were examined histologically. A significant fiber type conversion was achieved in both group A and group B animals, with each group achieving greater than 50

  15. Comparison of the deep inferior epigastric perforator flap and free transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap in postmastectomy reconstruction: a cost-effectiveness analysis.

    PubMed

    Thoma, Achilleas; Veltri, Karen; Khuthaila, Dana; Rockwell, Gloria; Duku, Eric

    2004-05-01

    This study compared the deep inferior epigastric perforator (DIEP) flap and the free transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous (TRAM) flap in postmastectomy reconstruction using a cost-effectiveness analysis. A decision analytic model was used. Medical costs associated with the two techniques were estimated from the Ontario Ministry of Health Schedule of Benefits for 2002. Hospital costs were obtained from St. Joseph's Healthcare, a university teaching hospital in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. The utilities of clinically important health states related to breast reconstruction were obtained from 32 "experts" across Canada and converted into quality-adjusted life years. The probabilities of these various clinically important health states being associated with the DIEP and free TRAM flaps were obtained after a thorough review of the literature. The DIEP flap was more costly than the free TRAM flap ($7026.47 versus $6508.29), but it provided more quality-adjusted life years than the free TRAM flap (28.88 years versus 28.53 years). The baseline incremental cost-utility ratio was $1464.30 per quality-adjusted life year, favoring adoption of the DIEP flap. Sensitivity analyses were performed by assuming that the probabilities of occurrence of hernia, abdominal bulging, total flap loss, operating room time, and hospital stay were identical with the DIEP and free TRAM techniques. By assuming that the probability of postoperative hernia for the DIEP flap increased from 0.008 to 0.054 (same as for TRAM flap), the incremental cost-utility ratio changed to $1435.00 per quality-adjusted life year. A sensitivity analysis was performed for the complication of hernia because the DIEP flap allegedly diminishes this complication. Increasing the probability of abdominal bulge from 0.041 to 0.103 for the DIEP flap changed the ratio to $2731.78 per quality-adjusted life year. When the probability of total flap failure was increased from 0.014 to 0.016, the ratio changed to $1384.01 per

  16. The Deep Inferior Epigastric Perforator and Pedicled Transverse Rectus Abdominis Myocutaneous Flap in Breast Reconstruction: A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Shane; Yek, Jacklyn; Ong, Wei Chen; Hing, Chor Hoong; Lim, Thiam Chye

    2013-01-01

    Background Our objective was to compare the complication rates of two common breast reconstruction techniques performed at our hospital and the cost-effectiveness for each test group. Methods All patients who underwent deep inferior epigastric perforator (DIEP) flap and transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous (TRAM) flap by the same surgeon were selected and matched according to age and mastectomy with or without axillary clearance. Patients from each resultant group were selected, with the patients matched chronologically. The remainder were matched for by co-morbidities. Sixteen patients who underwent immediate breast reconstruction with pedicled TRAM flaps and 16 patients with DIEP flaps from 1999 to 2006 were accrued. The average total hospitalisation cost, length of hospitalisation, and complications in the 2 year duration after surgery for each group were compared. Results Complications arising from both the pedicled TRAM flaps and DIEP flaps included fat necrosis (TRAM, 3/16; DIEP, 4/16) and other minor complications (TRAM, 3/16; DIEP, 1/16). The mean hospital stay was 7.13 days (range, 4 to 12 days) for the pedicled TRAM group and 7.56 (range, 5 to 10 days) for the DIEP group. Neither the difference in complication rates nor in hospital stay duration were statistically significant. The total hospitalisation cost for the DIEP group was significantly higher than that of the pedicled TRAM group (P<0.001). Conclusions Based on our study, the pedicled TRAM flap remains a cost-effective technique in breast reconstruction when compared to the newer, more expensive and tedious DIEP flap. PMID:23730591

  17. Analysis of chronic morphologic changes of small bowel in electrically stimulated canine island-flap rectus abdominis muscle stomal sphincters.

    PubMed

    Majzoub, R K; Bardoel, J W; Ackermann, D; Maldonado, C; Barker, J; Stadelmann, W K

    2001-11-01

    Dynamic myoplasty to achieve fecal continence has been used in humans with varying results. A potential complication of the use of dynamic skeletal sphincters to attain fecal continence is the development of ischemic strictures within the bowel encircled by the functional sphincter. This study examines the histologic changes present in the bowel wall used to create a functional dynamic island-flap stomal sphincter in a chronic canine model. The rectus abdominis muscles of canines were used to create island-flap stomal sphincters. Eight dynamic island-flap stomal sphincters were created from the rectus abdominis muscles in mongrel dogs by wrapping them around a blind loop of distal ileum that was no longer in continuity with the terminal small bowel. Temporary pacing electrodes were secured intramuscularly near the intercostal nerve entry point and connected to a subcutaneously placed pulse stimulator. Two different training protocols resulting in different contractile properties were used: Program A (n = 4) and Program B (n = 4). The island-flap sphincters were trained over 3 months to generate stomal intraluminal pressures of more than 60 mmHg in all animals. The intact sphincters, normal bowel, and contralateral stomal bowel were obtained when the animals were killed. Specimens were processed with paraffin embedding, sectioned, and stained with trichrome and hematoxylin-and-eosin stains. Measurements of the different bowel layers were made with a micrometer. The muscular sphincters were biopsied before and after training. Fiber-type histochemistry was performed with a monoclonal antibody to the fast isoforms of myosin. Pretrained and posttrained skeletal muscle specimens were examined histologically. The bowel wall within the functional dynamic stomal sphincter did not exhibit any significant architectural changes related to ischemic fibrosis or mucosal damage. A significant fiber-type conversion was achieved in both training groups with Programs A and B, with a

  18. Use of the rectus abdominis muscle flap to fill a retroperitoneal defect following blast injury.

    PubMed

    Talarczyk, Matthew R; Ricci, Michael A

    2009-02-01

    Wartime injuries from explosive devices have created the need for atypical responses to devastating and unusual injuries. We report a case of an explosive abdominal injury that produced a huge defect in the posterior abdominal wall which was ultimately repaired with a rectus abdominus flap, an usual use of this versatile muscle flap. The rectus abdominus muscle may be another tool available for the repair of wartime injuries.

  19. The Anterior Interosseus Artery Perforator Flap: Anatomical Dissections and Clinical Study.

    PubMed

    Panse, Nikhil S; Joshi, Sheetal B; Sahasrabudhe, Parag B; Bahetee, B; Gurude, Pradnya; Chandanwale, Ajay

    2017-05-01

    Reconstruction of upper extremity deformities continues to be a challenge to the reconstructive surgeon. Various loco regional, distant and free flaps are available for reconstruction. However, each has its own set of advantages and disadvantages. Of the commonly performed local flaps, radial artery forearm flap, and the posterior interosseus artery flap stand out prominently. Recently, perforator propeller flaps have been used for resurfacing the upper extremity. The anterior interosseus artery perforator flap is an uncommonly used and described flap. This study was divided into anatomical study and clinical application in a IV level of evidence. In the anatomical study, five upper extremities were studied. Clinically, 12 patients underwent reconstruction using the anterior interosseus artery perforator flap. Flaps were performed by a single surgeon. A retrospective review of these cases from November 2008 to May 2014 is presented. The anterior interosseus artery perforator was identified in four out of five cadaver limbs. The septocutaneous perforator was in the fifth extensor compartment around 4 cm proximal to the wrist joint. Of the twelve flaps, there was complete necrosis in one flap, and partial necrosis in one flap. The patient with complete necrosis underwent skin grafting at a later date. The wound healed secondarily in case of partial flap necrosis. Anterior interosseus artery perforator flap must be considered as an important reconstructive option in the armamentarium of the plastic surgeon, while managing hand and wrist defects.

  20. The Anterior Interosseus Artery Perforator Flap: Anatomical Dissections and Clinical Study

    PubMed Central

    Panse, Nikhil S; Joshi, Sheetal B; Sahasrabudhe, Parag B; Bahetee, B; Gurude, Pradnya; Chandanwale, Ajay

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND Reconstruction of upper extremity deformities continues to be a challenge to the reconstructive surgeon. Various loco regional, distant and free flaps are available for reconstruction. However, each has its own set of advantages and disadvantages. Of the commonly performed local flaps, radial artery forearm flap, and the posterior interosseus artery flap stand out prominently. Recently, perforator propeller flaps have been used for resurfacing the upper extremity. The anterior interosseus artery perforator flap is an uncommonly used and described flap. METHODS This study was divided into anatomical study and clinical application in a IV level of evidence. In the anatomical study, five upper extremities were studied. Clinically, 12 patients underwent reconstruction using the anterior interosseus artery perforator flap. Flaps were performed by a single surgeon. A retrospective review of these cases from November 2008 to May 2014 is presented. RESULTS The anterior interosseus artery perforator was identified in four out of five cadaver limbs. The septocutaneous perforator was in the fifth extensor compartment around 4 cm proximal to the wrist joint. Of the twelve flaps, there was complete necrosis in one flap, and partial necrosis in one flap. The patient with complete necrosis underwent skin grafting at a later date. The wound healed secondarily in case of partial flap necrosis. CONCLUSION Anterior interosseus artery perforator flap must be considered as an important reconstructive option in the armamentarium of the plastic surgeon, while managing hand and wrist defects. PMID:28713704

  1. Quadratus lumborum catheters for breast reconstruction requiring transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous flaps.

    PubMed

    Spence, Nicole Z; Olszynski, Patrycja; Lehan, Anne; Horn, Jean-Lois; Webb, Christopher A J

    2016-06-01

    Patients diagnosed with breast cancer may opt to undergo surgical reconstructive flaps at the time of or after mastectomies. These surgeries leave patients with significant postoperative pain and sometimes involve large surgical beds including graft sites from the abdomen to reconstruct the breast. Consequently, multimodal methods of pain management have become highly favored. Quadratus lumborum catheters offer an opioid-sparing technique that can be performed easily and safely. We present a case of a patient who underwent a breast flap reconstruction and had bilateral quadratus lumborum catheters placed for perioperative pain control.

  2. The Impact of Perioperative Hormonal Therapy for Breast Cancer on Transverse Rectus Abdominis Myocutaneous Flap Abdominal Complications.

    PubMed

    Huber, Katherine M; Clayman, Eric; Kumar, Ambuj; Smith, Paul

    2018-06-01

    The pedicled transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous (TRAM) flap is a reliable reconstructive option in breast cancer patients; however, it carries known risk of donor site hernia formation. Some hormonal therapy drugs have been associated with hernia formation in animal models. Minimal data exist concerning impact of hormonal therapy for breast cancer on abdominal donor site complications after breast reconstruction. Patients who underwent TRAM flap for breast cancer or high-risk status at a single institution by the senior author from 2003 to 2015 were identified. Charts were reviewed. Patient demographics, comorbidities, treatments, and abdominal complications were recorded. Patients were divided into groups based on use of hormonal therapy as well as exposure to specific drugs. Statistical analyses were performed. A total of 358 patients were included. Overall hernia rate was 5.9%. About 231 (64.5%) patients had hormonal therapy, whereas 127 (35.5%) did not. Difference in hernia formation was not statistically significant between the hormonal therapy group (6.9%) and the no hormonal therapy group (3.9%; P = 0.359). Patients exposed to tamoxifen and those exposed to anastrozole had no significant difference in complication rates compared with the no hormonal therapy group, whereas patients exposed to letrozole had increased rate of hernia (13.5%; P = 0.037) and infection (21.6%; P = 0.013) compared with the no hormonal therapy group (3.9% and 7.1%, respectively). Hormonal therapy is a useful adjunct for chemoprevention in breast cancer; however, use of letrozole in patients undergoing reconstruction with pedicled TRAM can lead to increase in certain complication rates.

  3. Phantom rectal sensations following abdominoperineal excision of the rectum (APER) and vertical rectus abdominis myocutaneous (VRAM) flap perineal reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Gould, Charlotte R; Branagan, Graham

    2016-11-01

    Phantom rectum is the sensation of an intact and/or functioning rectum, despite excision at surgery. Abdominoperineal excision of the rectum (APER) may be complemented by reconstructive operations and recently it was reported that patients undergoing APER and vertical rectus abdominis myocutaneous (VRAM) flap reconstruction are more prone to develop phantom sensations at an earlier timeframe and have more persistent symptoms than those who do not have perineal repairs. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of phantom rectal sensations in a cohort of these patients. Patients who underwent APER and VRAM flap reconstruction for anorectal carcinomas were identified from May 2008 to July 2012. Patients completed a questionnaire evaluating their experience of rectal symptoms post-surgery. Thirty-four of 47 eligible patients were enrolled in the study. PR sensations were experienced by 50 % of patients, the majority of which (65 %) were present for >1 year. The commonest sensation reported was the feeling of faeces in a normal rectum (24 %). Disturbances in quality of life were apparent in 44 %; notably, sleep was affected, patients expressed increased feelings of stress/sadness, heightened levels of anxiety and limitation of daily activities as consequences of PR symptoms. Few patients sought medical advice. Fifty percent of patients experience PR sensations post-surgery, comparable with reported data for patients who have undergone APER alone. The addition of VRAM reconstruction does not significantly alter the prevalence of PR symptoms. This paper provides further evidence that phantom rectum occurs frequently and thus all patients undergoing excision of the rectum should be counselled appropriately.

  4. Immediate transverse rectus abdominis musculocutaneous (TRAM) flap breast reconstruction in underweight Asian patients.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun Key; Eom, Jin Sup; Hwang, Chang Heon; Ahn, Sei Hyun; Son, Byung Ho; Lee, Taik Jong

    2014-11-01

    TRAM breast reconstruction is commonly thought to be inadequate for underweight patients and LD flap with implant is usually recommended. However, it is often difficult to find an appropriate implant for thin Asian women with small breasts. The authors present the results of using TRAM flap alone for immediate breast reconstruction in underweight Asian patients. Between September 2001 and October 2006, 564 patients underwent immediate TRAM flap-only breast reconstruction. Among these, 18 were underweight (BMI <18.5 kg/m(2)) and 317 were normal weight (18.5 kg/m(2) ≤ BMI < 23.0 kg/m(2)). Complications were classified as systemic, breast, and donor site. Complication rate, oncologic outcome and overall satisfaction and recommendation were compared between two groups. Standardized postoperative photographs were also subject to a panel for cosmetic assessment. the overall complication rate was 22.2 % in underweight group and 27.1 % in normal weight group (p = 0.32). There was a tendency that the breast complication rate was higher in the normal weight group and the abdominal complication rate was higher in the underweight group. However, neither of these was statistically significant. Mean satisfaction was not statistically different, either (8.44 vs. 8.60, p = 0.54). Panel assessment for overall cosmesis, symmetry and scarring showed no significant between-group differences. Immediate breast reconstruction using TRAM flap alone can be performed with acceptable complication rates and comparable patients' satisfaction score in a well selected underweight Asian women as in a normal weight group.

  5. Pedicled rectus abdominis muscle and fascia flap sling the bulbar urethra for treatment for male-acquired urinary incontinence: report of ten cases.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yue-Min; Zhang, Xin-Ru; Xie, Hong; Song, Lu-Jie; Feng, Chao; Fei, Xiao-Fang

    2014-03-01

    Male urinary incontinence is relatively common complication of radical prostatectomy and of posterior urethroplasty following traumatic pelvic fracture. Here, we investigate the use of pedicled rectus abdominis muscle and fascia flap sling of the bulbar urethra for treatment for male-acquired urinary incontinence. Ten patients with acquired urinary incontinence were included in the study. Urinary incontinence was secondary to TURP in three patients and was secondary to posterior urethroplasty performed following traumatic pelvic fracture in seven patients. Pedicled rectus abdominalis muscle and fascial flaps, approximately 2.5 cm wide and 15 cm long, were isolated. The flaps were inserted into a perineal incision through a subcutaneous tunnel. The free end of the flap was sectioned to form two muscle strips, each 3 cm in length, and inserted into the space between bulbar urethra and corpus cavernosa. After adequate sling tension had been achieved, the two strips of muscle were anastomosed around the bulbar urethra using a 2-zero polyglactin suture. The patients were followed up for between 12 and 82 months (mean 42.8 months). Complete continence was achieved with good voiding in seven of the 10 patients. In other three patients achieved good voiding following catheter removal, but incontinence was only moderately improved. A pedicled rectus muscle fascial sling of the bulbar urethra is an effective and safe treatment for male patients with mild to moderate acquired urinary incontinence, but it may not be suitable for severe incontinence or for patients with weak rectus abdominalis muscles.

  6. Anatomical basis of the extended TDAP flap: study of its territories of vascularization and its volume.

    PubMed

    Dast, Sandy; Havet, Eric; Dessena, Lidia; Abdulshakoor, Abeer; Alharbi, Mohammed; Vaucher, Richard; Herlin, Christian; Sinna, Raphael

    2017-08-01

    The concept of extended thoracodorsal artery perforator (TDAP) flap was described in 2015 for breast reconstruction. Our anatomical study aims to identify the territories vascularised by the thoracodorsal artery perforator via the deep muscular fascial network. The second goal was to define the volume of the extended TDAP flap. Ten extended TDAP flaps were dissected on 5 fresh human cadavers. Around the classical skin paddle of a TDAP flap, the dissections were performed in a subfascial level, including the muscular fascia and the adipose tissue compartments to increase the volume of the flap. After injection of methylene blue in the thoracodorsal artery, we measured the length and width, the surface and the volume of the coloured flap. The mean sizes of the extended TDAP flap were 24.9 cm × 20.1 cm. The mean surface of the total vascularization zone was 441 cm 2 . The mean volume of the vascularized flap was 193 ml. The thoracodorsal artery perforator via the deep muscular fascial network allows us to harvest a flap of 25 cm × 20 cm with a mean surface of 441 cm² and a mean volume of 193 ml. The extended TDAP flap is a credible option in breast reconstruction.

  7. Postmastectomy reconstruction: comparative analysis of the psychosocial, functional, and cosmetic effects of transverse rectus abdominis musculocutaneous flap versus breast implant reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Cederna, P S; Yates, W R; Chang, P; Cram, A E; Ricciardelli, E J

    1995-11-01

    Over 40,000 postmastectomy breast reconstructions are performed annually. In this study, we investigated the psychosocial, functional, and cosmetic effects of transverse rectus abdominis musculocutaneous (TRAM) flap versus breast implant reconstruction. Thirty-three women who had undergone postmastectomy breast reconstruction were contacted by telephone and agreed to participate in the study. Twenty-two women completed the self-assessment questionnaires regarding their quality of life, psychological symptoms, functional status, body image, and global satisfaction. The TRAM and implant groups contained 8 and 14 patients, respectively. The groups were well matched for age, employment status, marital status, race, religion, and severity of medical and surgical illnesses. The average follow-up was 36 months. Statistical analysis of the responses revealed that women who had undergone TRAM flap reconstruction were more satisfied with how their reconstructed breast felt to the touch (p = .01), and there was a trend toward greater satisfaction with the appearance of their reconstructed breast (p = .08). However, these same patients identified more difficulties as far as functioning at work or school, performing vigorous physical activities, participating in community or religious activities, visiting with relatives, and interacting with male friends (p < .04). There were no statistically significant differences in body image or overall satisfaction. In this small cohort study, both the TRAM flap group and the implant group were satisfied with the results of their breast reconstruction, but the TRAM flap group was more satisfied with how their breast felt and tended to be more satisfied with the cosmetic result. The TRAM flap group reported greater psychological, social, and physical impairments as a result of their reconstruction.

  8. Intra-abdominal pedicled rectus abdominis muscle flap for treatment of high-output enterocutaneous fistulae: case reports and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Carey, Joseph N; Sheckter, Clifford C; Watt, Andrew J; Lee, Gordon K

    2013-08-01

    Despite advances in nutritional supplementation, sepsis management, percutaneous drainage and surgical technique, enterocutaneous fistulae remain a considerable source of morbidity and mortality. Use of adjunctive modalities including negative pressure wound therapy and fibrin glue have been shown to improve the rapidity of fistula closure; however, the overall rate of closure remains poor. The challenge of managing chronic, high-output proximal enterocutaneous fistulae can be successfully achieved with appropriate medical management and intra-abdominal placement of pedicled rectus abdominis muscle flaps. We report two cases of recalcitrant high output enterocutaneous fistulae that were treated successfully with pedicled intra-abdominal rectus muscle flaps. Indications for pedicled intra-abdominal rectus muscle flaps include persistent patency despite a reasonable trial of non-operative intervention, failure of traditional operative interventions (serosal patch, Graham patch), and persistent electrolyte and nutritional abnormalities in the setting of a high-output fistula. Copyright © 2013 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. [The sural medial perforator flap: Anatomical bases, surgical technique and indications in head and neck reconstruction].

    PubMed

    Struk, S; Schaff, J-B; Qassemyar, Q

    2018-04-01

    The medial sural artery perforator (MSAP) flap is defined as a thin cutaneo-adipose perforator flap harvested on the medial aspect of the leg. The aims of this study were to describe the anatomical basis as well as the surgical technique and discuss the indications in head and neck reconstructive surgery. We harvested 10 MSAP flap on 5 fresh cadavers. For each case, the number and the location of the perforators were recorded. For each flap, the length of pedicle, the diameter of source vessels and the thickness of the flap were studied. Finally, we performed a clinical application of a MSAP flap. A total of 23 perforators with a diameter superior than 1mm were dissected on 10 legs. The medial sural artery provided between 1 and 4 musculocutaneous perforators. Perforators were located in average at 10.3cm±2cm from the popliteal fossa and at 3.6cm±1cm from the median line of the calf. The mean pedicle length was 12.1cm±2.5cm. At its origin, the source artery diameter was 1.8mm±0.25mm and source veins diameters were 2.45mm±0.9mm in average. There was no complication in our clinical application. This study confirms the reliability of previous anatomical descriptions of the medial sural artery perforator flap. This flap was reported as thin and particularly adapted for oral cavity reconstruction and for facial or limb resurfacing. Sequelae might be reduced as compared to those of the radial forearm flap with comparable results. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. [Vertical rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap for the closure of perineal wound after abdominoperineal resection of the rectum].

    PubMed

    Orhalmi, J; Vreský, B; Holéczy, P; Jackanin, S; Biath, P

    2009-06-01

    A major source of morbidity after abdominoperineal resection (APR) after neoadjuvant external beam pelvic radiation are perineal wound complications. Wound complications are common for 25-66% of patients overall. There are many of procedures provided to reconstruct the perineal defect after APR e.g. primary closure, secondary closure, superior gluteal artery flap and vertical rectus abdominus myocutaneous (VRAM) flap. Our purpose was to describe the effect of VRAM flap on reconstruction of perineal wound. VRAM flaps are ideally suited to bring nonirradiated tissue into defect associated with radical surgical extirpation procedures and irradiated fields. This flap, distally based in the deep inferior epigastric vessels, provides several distinct advantages. It is well perfused by the robust dominant pedicle and the deep inferior epigastric artery and vein. In addition, this flap provides adequate muscle bulk to obliterate pelvic dead space. The skin island can be used for resurfacing the perineal region, including the vaginal wall, and provides versatility for all patterns of resection. VRAM flap provides very good aesthetic and functional results, is technically relatively simple and radically decreases wound complications rate. The additional possibility is pull-through the flap transpelvically intraabdominally instead of pull-through via subcutaneous channel, especially with females.

  11. Anatomical study of the popliteal artery perforator-based propeller flap and its clinical application.

    PubMed

    Onishi, Tadanobu; Shimizu, Takamasa; Omokawa, Shohei; Sananpanich, Kanit; Kido, Akira; Mahakkanukrauh, Pasuk; Tanaka, Yasuhito

    2018-05-30

    There is lack of anatomical information regarding cutaneous perforator of the popliteal artery and its connections with the descending branch of the inferior gluteal and profunda femoris arteries. We aimed to evaluate the anatomical basis of popliteal artery perforator-based propeller flap from the posterior thigh region and to demonstrate our experience utilizing this flap. Ten fresh cadaveric lower extremities were dissected following injection of a silicone compound into the femoral artery. We investigated the number, location, length, and diameter of cutaneous perforators of the popliteal artery. Based on the results, we treated three cases with a large soft tissue defect around the knee using popliteal artery perforator-based propeller flap. We found a mean of 1.9 cutaneous perforators arising from the popliteal artery with a mean pedicle length of 6 cm and a mean arterial internal diameter of 0.9 mm, which were located at an average of 4 cm proximal to the bicondylar line. The most distal perforator consistently arose along the small saphenous vein and connected proximally with concomitant artery of the posterior femoral cutaneous nerve, forming a connection with perforating arteries of the profunda femoris artery. A mean of 4.5 cutaneous perforators branched from the arterial connection sites. All clinical cases healed without any complications. The popliteal artery perforator-based propeller flap is reliable for reconstruction of soft tissue defects around the knee. The flap should include the deep fascia and concomitant artery along with the posterior femoral cutaneous nerve for maintaining the blood supply.

  12. The application of multilobed flap designs for anatomic and functional oropharyngeal reconstructions.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jong Woo; Lee, Min Young; Oh, Tae Suk

    2013-11-01

    The oropharynx has a variety of functions, such as mastication, deglutition, articulation, taste, and airway protection. Because of its many roles, recent goals in head and neck reconstruction have focused on anatomic and functional reconstructions to minimize functional deficits. Since chemoradiation has earned a good reputation in the management of head and neck cancer, the manifestation of oropharyngeal defects has changed. Although we could not control the anatomic defects that were known to be related to the oropharyngeal functions, we hypothesized that optimizing the flap designs would be helpful for minimizing the functional deficits.Two hundred fifty cases of the head and neck reconstruction using free flaps were carried out between March 2006 and December 2010, where modified flap designs were applied. Among these, 37 tongue and 15 tonsillar reconstructions were analyzed for functional outcomes. The patients were of Asian ethnic background, and the average age was 52 years, including 38 males and 17 females. The average follow-up period was 20.5 months. Based on previous studies, the flap designs were categorized into type I, unilobe; type II, bilobe; type III, trilobe; type IV, quadrilobe; type V, additional lobe for lateral and posterior pharyngeal wall; and type VI, additional lobe for tongue base. The functional outcomes of both tongue and tonsillar reconstructions were investigated.To quantify the outcome in terms of swallowing and pronunciation, we analyzed the patients' function based on the 7-scale parameter. In terms of swallowing, the tongue reconstruction group scored 5.70 on average, whereas the tonsillar reconstruction group showed an average score of 4.53. With regard to speech intelligibility, the tongue reconstruction group revealed an average score of 5.67, whereas the tonsillar reconstruction group scored 5.46 on average.Our findings indicate that specification of the flap designs is helpful for minimizing the functional deficits in head

  13. The vascularized groin lymph node flap (VGLN): Anatomical study and flap planning using multi-detector CT scanner. The golden triangle for flap harvesting.

    PubMed

    Zeltzer, Assaf A; Anzarut, Alexander; Braeckmans, Delphine; Seidenstuecker, Katrin; Hendrickx, Benoit; Van Hedent, Eddy; Hamdi, Moustapha

    2017-09-01

    A growing number of surgeons perform lymph node transfers for the treatment of lymphedema. When harvesting a vascularized lymph node groin flap (VGLNF) one of the major concerns is the potential risk of iatrogenic lymphedema of the donor-site. This article helps understanding of the lymph node distribution of the groin in order to minimize this risk. Fifty consecutive patients undergoing abdominal mapping by multi-detector CT scanner were included and 100 groins analyzed. The groin was divided in three zones (of which zone II is the safe zone) and lymph nodes were counted and mapped with their distances to anatomic landmarks. Further node units were plotted and counted. The average age was 48 years. A mean number of nodes of 6.5/groin was found. In zone II, which is our zone of interest a mean of 3.1 nodes were counted with a mean size of 7.8 mm. In three patients no nodes were found in zone II. In five patients nodes were seen in zone II but were not sufficient in size or number to be considered a lymph node unit. On average the lymph node unit in zone II was found to be 48.3 mm from the pubic tubercle when projected on a line from the pubic tubercle to the anterior superior iliac spine, 16.0 mm caudal to this line, and 20.4 mm above the groin crease. On average the lymph node unit was a mean of 41.7 mm lateral to the SCIV-SIEV confluence. This study provides increased understanding of the lymphatic anatomy in zone II of the groin flap and suggests a refined technique for designing the VGLNF. As with any flap there is a degree of individual patient variability. However, having information on the most common anatomy and flap design is of great value. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Propeller Flaps With Reduced Rotational Angles: Clinical Experience on 40 Consecutive Reconstructions Performed at Different Anatomical Sites.

    PubMed

    Brunetti, Beniamino; Tenna, Stefania; Poccia, Igor; Persichetti, Paolo

    2017-02-01

    Despite of the widespread use of 180-degree propeller flaps in the field of soft tissue reconstruction, less information are available in the current literature to standardize the use of propeller flaps with reduced degrees of rotation.The authors report their experience with propeller flaps with reduced rotational angles reviewing clinical applications and outcomes of the technique in a series of 40 consecutive reconstructions. Forty elective defects of various etiologies located in different regions of the body (head and neck, trunk, buttocks and perineum, extremities) were reconstructed with less than 180 degrees rotated propeller flaps. The technique was applied to patients presenting with a strong audible perforator detected in close proximity to the wound and the defect located in a position adjacent to the axis of the chosen perforasome. Defect size ranged from 2 × 2 to 15 × 9 cm. Flap dimensions ranged from 5 × 2 to 21 × 10 cm. The flaps were based on 1 (34) or 2 (6) perforators and were mobilized with an angle of rotation of 45, 90, and 135 degrees in 7, 24, and 9 patients, respectively. Mean operative time was 105 minutes. All flaps survived postoperatively. In only 4 cases (10%) partial flap necrosis was registered. All flaps achieved adequate and durable reconstruction with excellent contour, with a follow-up ranging between 6 months and 2 years. Propeller flaps with reduced rotational angles represent a safe and versatile option to reconstruct soft tissues defects at different anatomical sites.

  15. The anatomical (angiosome) and clinical territories of cutaneous perforating arteries: development of the concept and designing safe flaps.

    PubMed

    Taylor, G Ian; Corlett, Russell J; Dhar, Shymal C; Ashton, Mark W

    2011-04-01

    Island "perforator flaps" have become state of the art for free-skin flap transfer. Recent articles by Saint-Cyr et al. and Rozen et al. have focused on the anatomical and the clinical territories of individual cutaneous perforating arteries in flap planning, and it is timely to compare this work with our angiosome concept. The angiosome concept, published in 1987, was reviewed and correlated with key experimental and clinical work by the authors, published subsequently at different times in different journals. In addition, new data are introduced to define these anatomical and clinical territories of the cutaneous perforators and to aid in the planning of safe skin flaps for local and free-flap transfer. The anatomical territory of a cutaneous perforator was defined in the pig, dog, guinea pig, and rabbit by a line drawn through its perimeter of anastomotic vessels that link it with adjacent perforators in all directions. The safe clinical territory of that perforator, seen not only in the same range of animals but also in the human using either the Doppler probe or computed tomography angiography to locate the vessels, was found reliably to extend to include the anatomical territory of the next adjacent cutaneous perforator, situated radially in any direction. The data provided by Saint-Cyr et al. and Rozen et al., coupled with the authors' own original work on the vascular territories of the body and their subsequent studies, reinforce the angiosome concept and provide the basis for the design of safe flaps for patient benefit.

  16. Analysis of effect isoxsuprine hydrochloride and nicotine in the Transverse Rectus Abdominis Myocutaneous flap (TRAM) in rats.

    PubMed

    Costa, Walder; Silva, Alcino Lázaro da; Costa, Gustavo Rocha; Vidigal, Paula Vieira Teixeira; Pereira, Fernando Henrique

    2015-07-01

    To evaluate the effects of isoxsuprine and nicotine on TRAM. Forty eight 48 Wistar rats distributed into four Groups (n=12). All rats received medication managed daily for 20 days: saline solution (SA), nicotine solution (NI), isoxsuprine solution (IS) and nicotine solution (NI) + isoxsuprine solution (IS). On day 21st the rats were submitted to the caudally based, right unipedicled TRAM flap and after 48 hours, made the macroscopic evaluation of the surface of the flap, photographic documentation and collection of material for histology. Data from macroscopic evaluation were analyzed by ANOVA and microscopic evaluation by Kruskal-Wallis test, with significance level of 5%. In the macroscopic evaluation of isoxsuprine Group retail presented absolute numbers: final area (p=0.001*) and viable area (p=0.006*) with the highest values; necrosis (p=0.001*) had the lowest value. Microscopic examination revealed no significant findings in the study of TRAM under the action of isoxsuprine and nicotine to the percentage of necrosis in the left and right cranial and caudal regions. There was significant improvement in viability of TRAM using the isoxsuprine solution alone. No influence using nicotine alone and in association with isoxsuprine.

  17. The Extended Nasoseptal Flap for Skull Base Reconstruction of the Clival Region: An Anatomical and Radiological Study

    PubMed Central

    Peris-Celda, Maria; Pinheiro-Neto, Carlos Diogenes; Funaki, Takeshi; Fernandez-Miranda, Juan C.; Gardner, Paul; Snyderman, Carl; Rhoton, Albert L.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Reconstruction of large clival defects after an endoscopic endonasal procedure is challenging. The objective is to analyze the morphology, indications, and limitations of the extended nasoseptal flap, which adds the nasal floor and inferior meatus mucosa, compared with the standard nasoseptal flap, for clival reconstruction. Design Twenty-seven sides of formalin-fixed anatomical specimens and 13 computed tomography (CT) scans were used. Under 0-degree endoscopic visualization, a standard flap on one side and an extended flap on the other side were performed, as well as exposure of the sella, cavernous sinus, and clival dura mater. Coverage of both flaps was assessed, and they were incised and extracted for measurements. Results The extended flap has two parts: septal and inferior meatal. The extended flaps are 20 mm longer and add 774 mm2 of mucosal area. They cover a clival defect from tuberculum to foramen magnum in 66.6% cases and from below the sella in 91.6%. They cover both parasellar and paraclival segments of the internal carotid arteries. The lateral inferior limits are the medial aspect of the hypoglossal canals and Eustachian tubes. CT scans can predict the need or limitation of an extended nasoseptal flap. Conclusions The nasal floor and inferior meatus mucosa adds a significant area for reconstruction of the clivus. A defect laterally beyond the hypoglossal canals is not likely covered with this variation of the flap. Preoperative CT scans are useful to guide the reconstruction techniques. PMID:24436940

  18. Classification and Microvascular Flap Selection for Anterior Cranial Fossa Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Vargo, James D; Przylecki, Wojciech; Camarata, Paul J; Andrews, Brian T

    2018-05-18

     Microvascular reconstruction of the anterior cranial fossa (ACF) creates difficult challenges. Reconstructive goals and flap selection vary based on the defect location within the ACF. This study evaluates the feasibility and reliability of free tissue transfer for salvage reconstruction of low, middle, and high ACF defects.  A retrospective review was performed. Reconstructions were anatomically classified as low (anterior skull base), middle (frontal bar/sinus), and high (frontal bone/soft tissue). Subjects were evaluated based on pathologic indication and goal, type of flap used, and complications observed.  Eleven flaps in 10 subjects were identified and anatomic sites included: low ( n  = 5), middle ( n  = 3), and high ( n  = 3). Eight of 11 reconstructions utilized osteocutaneous flaps including the osteocutaneous radial forearm free flap (OCRFFF) ( n  = 7) and fibula ( n  = 1). Other reconstructions included a split calvarial graft wrapped within a temporoparietal fascia free flap ( n  = 1), latissimus myocutaneous flap ( n  = 1), and rectus abdominis myofascial flap ( n  = 1). All 11 flaps were successful without microvascular compromise. No complications were observed in the high and middle ACF defect groups. Two of five flaps in the low defect group using OCRFFF flaps failed to achieve surgical goals despite demonstrating healthy flaps upon re-exploration. Complications included persistent cerebrospinal fluid leak ( n  = 1) and pneumocephalus ( n  = 1), requiring flap repositioning in one subject and a second microvascular flap in the second subject to achieve surgical goals.  In our experience, osteocutaneous flaps (especially the OCRFFF) are preferred for complete autologous reconstruction of high and middle ACF defects. Low skull base defects are more difficult to reconstruct, and consideration of free muscle flaps (no bone) should be weighed as an option in this anatomic area. Thieme Medical Publishers

  19. An anatomical study of the transversus abdominis plane block: location of the lumbar triangle of Petit and adjacent nerves.

    PubMed

    Jankovic, Zorica B; du Feu, Frances M; McConnell, Patricia

    2009-09-01

    The transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block is a new technique for providing analgesia to the anterior abdominal wall. Most previous studies have used the lumbar triangle of Petit as a landmark for the block. In this cadaveric study, we determined the exact position and size of the lumbar triangle of Petit and identified the nerves affected by the TAP block. The position of the lumbar triangle of Petit was assessed unilaterally in 26 cadaveric specimens relative to reliably palpable surface landmarks. In addition, a series of dissections were performed to explore the course of the nerves blocked by the TAP. The mean distance from the midaxillary line along the iliac crest to the center of the base of the lumbar triangle of Petit at the level of the subcutaneous tissue and over the skin surface was 6.9 cm (range, 4.5-9.2 cm) and 9.3 cm (range, 4-15.1 cm), respectively. The center of the lumbar triangle of Petit was 1.4 cm above the iliac crest. The depth of the TAP at the lumbar triangle of Petit position was 0.5-4 cm and at the midaxillary line it was 0.5-2 cm. The average size of the lumbar triangle of Petit was 2.3 cm x 3.3 cm x 2.2 cm, with an average area of 3.63 +/- 1.93 cm2. The three cadaveric specimens we explored showed the nerves blocked by TAP passed lateral to the triangle. An incidental finding was that in 66% of specimens the lumbar triangle of Petit contained small branches of the subcostal artery. The lumbar triangles of Petit found in the specimens in this study were more posterior than the literature suggests. The position of the lumbar triangle of Petit varies largely and the size is relatively small. The relevant nerves to be blocked had not entered the TAP in the specimens in this study at the point of the lumbar triangle of Petit. At the midaxillary line, however, all the nerves were in the TAP.

  20. [Anatomical study and clinical application of a leg flap pedicle-included with cutaneous nerve and its concomitant vessels].

    PubMed

    Liu, B; Hao, X; Goan, M

    2000-05-01

    To investigate the blood supply patterns and the clinical liability of a leg flap pedicle-included with cutaneous nerve and its concomitant vessels. Fresh cadaver legs with thirty-two in infants and two in adults were anatomically examined after the intravenous injection of the red Chlorinated Poly Vingl Choride (CPVC). Five patients with the soft tissue defects were selected for the treatment with the flap pedicle-included with the cutaneous nerve and its concomitant vessels. Four main cutaneous nerves were found in the leg after they perforated the deep fascia out. They were companioned with their concomitant vessels with different blood-supply pateeerns, which the upper part of the leg was in an axial pattern and the lower part was in a "chain-type anastomosing" pattern. Following the above-mentioned findings, five cases were successfully treated with this led flap. The leg flap should be designed along the cutaneous nerve and its concomitant vessels. When the flap is applied in the area of blood supply with "chain-type anastomosing" pattern, the deep fascia should also be included in the flap.

  1. Better anatomical and cosmetic results using tunneled lotus petal flap for plastic reconstruction after demolitive surgery for vulvar malignancy.

    PubMed

    Buda, Alessandro; Confalonieri, Pier Luigi; Rovati, Luca Carlo Vittorio; Fruscio, Robert; Giuliani, Daniela; Signorelli, Mauro; Dell'Anna, Tiziana; Pirovano, Cecilia; Milani, Rodolfo

    2012-06-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of tunneled lotus petal flap in terms of anatomical and cosmetic results in patients who underwent vulvoperineal reconstruction for vulvar malignancy. Between March 2010 and July 2011, 22 women underwent vulvoperineal reconstruction using tunneled lotus petal flap for primary or recurrent disease at San Gerardo Hospital, Monza. In 16 cases, lotus flaps were bilateral, whereas in 6 cases, they were monolateral. The median age was 72 years (range, 53-87 years). The mean operating time was 85 minutes. The mean length of follow-up was 10 months (range, 2-16 months). Postoperative complications occurred in 2 patients, including one case of partial flap necrosis and one case of donor site breakdown. Tunneled lotus petal flap is safe, easy and fast to perform, has a low rate of complications, and good functional and cosmetic results. This technique represents an optimal solution for plastic reconstruction in case of primary or recurrent vulvar disease, or in case of introital stenosis after primary inadequate closure.

  2. Radio-anatomical analysis of the pericranial flap "money box approach" for ventral skull base reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Santamaría, Alfonso; Langdon, Cristóbal; López-Chacon, Mauricio; Cordero, Arturo; Enseñat, Joaquim; Carrau, Ricardo; Bernal-Sprekelsen, Manuel; Alobid, Isam

    2017-11-01

    To evaluate the versatility of the pericranial flap (PCF) to reconstruct the ventral skull base, using the frontal sinus as a gate for its passage into the sinonasal corridor "money box approach." Anatomic-radiological study and case series. Various approaches and their respective defects (cribriform, transtuberculum, clival, and craniovertebral junction) were completed in 10 injected specimens. The PCF was introduced into the nose through the uppermost portion of the frontal sinus (money box approach). Computed tomography (CT) scans (n = 50) were used to measure the dimensions of the PCF and the skull base defects. The vertical projection of the external ear canal was used as the reference point to standardize the incisions for the PCF. The surface area and maximum length of the PCF were 121.5 ± 19.4 cm 2 and 18.3 ± 1.3 cm, respectively. Using CT scans, we determined that to reconstruct defects secondary to transcribriform, transtuberculum, clival, and craniovertebral approaches, the PCF distal incision must be placed respectively at -3.7 ± 2.0 cm (angle -17.4 ± 8.5°), -0.2 ± 2.0 cm (angle -1.0 ± 9.3°), +5.5 ± 2.3 cm (angle +24.4 ± 9.7°), +8.4 ± 2.4 cm (angle +36.6 ± 11.5°), as related to the reference point. Skull base defects in our clinical cohort (n = 6) were completely reconstructed uneventfully with the PCF. The PCF renders enough surface area to reconstruct all possible defects in the ventral and median skull base. Using the uppermost frontal sinus as a gateway into the nose (money box approach) is feasible and simple. NA. Laryngoscope, 127:2482-2489, 2017. © 2017 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  3. Internal Limiting Membrane Flap Techniques for the Repair of Large Macular Holes: a Short-Term Follow-up of Anatomical and Functional Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Guber, J; Lang, C; Valmaggia, C

    2017-04-01

    Background To evaluate the technique of inverted internal limiting membrane (ILM) flaps for the management of large macular holes and autologous ILM free flaps for non-closing macular holes. Patients and methods All macular holes were treated with pars plana vitrectomy and dual blue assisted ILM flap technique. The inverted ILM flap was created as a primary procedure for large macular holes (diameter > 400 µm). On the other hand, the free ILM flap technique was used as a secondary procedure for non-closing macular holes after failed initial standard procedure. SD-OCT images were taken to assess the anatomical outcome of surgery, while best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) was used to evaluate the functional outcome during a 2-month follow-up. Results All patients underwent successful planned manipulation of the ILM flap. In seven patients/eyes, an inverted ILM flap was created, in three patients/eyes a free ILM flap translocation was performed. All patients achieved complete anatomical closure. Partial microstructural reconstruction, demonstrated on SD-OCT as restoration of the external limiting membrane and the ellipsoid zone, was observed in some cases as early as one month after surgery. Functionally, in comparison to baseline, most of the patients showed improvements in BCVA of 1 to 2 lines at the first postoperative follow-up visit. Conclusions Inverted ILM flaps for large macular holes and free flaps for non-closing macular holes appear to be a safe and effective approach, with favourable short-term anatomical and functional results. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  4. [Pedicle flaps based on the sphenopalatine artery: anatomical and surgical study].

    PubMed

    Gras-Cabrerizo, Juan R; Gras-Albert, Juan R; Monjas-Canovas, Irene; García-Garrigós, Elena; Montserrat-Gili, Joan R; Sánchez del Campo, Francisco; Kolanczak, Katarzyna; Massegur-Solench, Humbert

    2014-01-01

    Local pedicle flaps based on the sphenopalatine artery make it possible to reconstruct large defects of the skull base (SB). From January 2008 to January 2013, 64 lesions with involvement of SB were analysed. These lesions were treated using endoscopic endonasal approach and required a pedicle flap based on the sphenopalatine artery. In addition, measurements and flexibility of the flaps were examined in 4 cadaveric nasal cavities. Surgical group. Sixty-four nasoseptal flaps (NSF) were used, in 4 cases associated with a middle turbinate flap (MTF), and in 1 case supplemented with an inferior turbinate flap (ITF). Five cerebrospinal fluid fistulas (8%) were noted. Among patients with initial lesions, 7% presented an anosmia. Cadaveric group. The length of the NSF varied between 5.2 cm and 7.7 cm and the width ranged from 3 cm to 4.5 cm. The ITF provided an anterior-posterior distance between 4.2 cm and 5 cm, with a width between 1.2 cm and 2.8 cm. The mean length of MTFs varied between 3.5 cm and 4.2 cm, with a width between 1.4 cm and 1.9 cm. The most versatile local flap for the reconstruction of skull base defects is the NSF, and flaps pedicled to the posterolateral nasal artery offer an excellent alternative. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. y Sociedad Española de Otorrinolaringología y Patología Cérvico-Facial. All rights reserved.

  5. Applying the Keystone Design Perforator Island Flap Concept in a Variety of Anatomic Locations: A Review of 60 Consecutive Cases by a Single Surgeon.

    PubMed

    Lanni, Michael Alan; Van Kouwenberg, Emily; Yan, Alan; Rezak, Kristen M; Patel, Ashit

    2017-07-01

    The keystone design perforator island flap has been gaining popularity for reconstruction of cutaneous defects. Published experience of this technique in North America is limited predominantly to the trunk and extremities; our study aims to demonstrate expanding applications. Retrospective chart review was conducted on all patients who underwent keystone flap reconstruction by a single surgeon. Outcomes of interest were wound healing complications (WHC) and surgical site infections (SSI). Mean follow up time was 24.4 months. Sixty consecutive flaps were performed with an overall WHC rate of 26.7% and SSI rate of 11.7%. Reconstructed sites included 25 lower extremity, 20 trunk, 5 upper extremity, and 10 head and neck. Flap size averaged 405.6 cm (range 16-2303). Wound healing complications were associated with coronary artery disease (P = 0.04) and traumatic defects (P = 0.043). Surgical site infections were associated with coronary artery disease (P = 0.02) and flap size of 251 to 500 cm (P = 0.039), although this association was not seen among flaps greater than 500 cm. Although more common in lower extremity reconstructions, no statistically significant associations between flap location and WHC (P = 0.055) or SSI (P = 0.29) were identified. There were no reconstructive failures and no patients required reoperation. This series demonstrates the versatility of the keystone flap in a wide variety of anatomic locations, with similar complication rates to those previously reported and no reoperations. Flap design was frequently modified based on the anatomical topography and adjacent subunits. To our knowledge, this is the largest and most diverse North American series of keystone flap reconstructions to date.

  6. A comparison of the effects of epidural and spinal anesthesia with ischemia-reperfusion injury on the rat transverse rectus abdominis musculocutaneous flap.

    PubMed

    Acar, Yusuf; Bozkurt, Mehmet; Firat, Ugur; Selcuk, Caferi Tayyar; Kapi, Emin; Isik, Fatma Birgul; Kuvat, Samet Vasfi; Celik, Feyzi; Bozarslan, Beri Hocaoglu

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare the effects of spinal and epidural anesthesia on a rat transverse rectus abdominus myocutaneous flap ischemia-reperfusion injury model.Forty Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into 4 experimental groups: group I (n = 10), sham group; group II (n = 10), control group; group III (n = 10), epidural group; and group IV (n = 10), spinal group. After the elevation of the transverse rectus abdominus myocutaneous flaps, all groups except for the sham group were subjected to normothermic no-flow ischemia for 4 hours, followed by a reperfusion period of 2 hours. At the end of the reperfusion period, biochemical and histopathological evaluations were performed on tissue samples.Although there was no significant difference concerning the malonyldialdehyde, nitric oxide, and paraoxonase levels in the spinal and epidural groups, the total antioxidant state levels were significantly increased, and the total oxidative stress levels were significantly decreased in the epidural group in comparison to the spinal group. The pathological evaluation showed that findings related to inflammation, nuclear change rates and hyalinization were significantly higher in the spinal group compared with the epidural group.Epidural anesthesia can be considered as a more suitable method that enables a decrease in ischemia-reperfusion injuries in the muscle flaps.

  7. Colostomy with Transversus Abdominis Plane Block

    PubMed Central

    Tekelioğlu, Ümit Yaşar; Demirhan, Abdullah; Şit, Mustafa; Kurt, Adem Deniz; Bilgi, Murat; Koçoğlu, Hasan

    2015-01-01

    Transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block is one of the abdominal field block. The TAP block is used for both anaesthetic management and post-operative pain therapy in lower abdominal surgery. TAP block is a procedure in which local anaesthetic agents are applied to the anatomic neurofacial space between the internal oblique and the transversus abdominis muscle. TAP block is a good method for post-operative pain control as well as allows for short operations involving the abdominal area. In this article, a case of colostomy under TAP block is presented. PMID:27366540

  8. Long-term outcomes of patients with breast cancer after nipple-sparing mastectomy/skin-sparing mastectomy followed by immediate transverse rectus abdominis musculocutaneous flap reconstruction: Comparison with conventional mastectomy in a single center study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sae Byul; Lee, Jong Won; Kim, Hee Jeong; Ko, Beom Seok; Son, Byung Ho; Eom, Jin Sup; Lee, Taik Jong; Ahn, Sei-Hyun

    2018-05-01

    To evaluate the oncological outcomes of patients with breast cancer after nipple-sparing mastectomy (NSM)/skin-sparing mastectomy (SSM), followed by immediate reconstruction, as compared to conventional mastectomy (CM).SSM/NSM has been increasingly used to treat women with breast cancer who wish to preserve the overlying breast skin, but concern exist regarding its oncological safety due to the potential for residual breast tissue. We report our experience performing SSM/NSM for breast cancer treatment compared to CM with a long follow-up period.All consecutive patients who underwent mastectomy for breast cancer at Asan Medical Center between January 1993 and December 2008 were identified by retrospective medical chart review. The patients who underwent NSM/SSM, followed by immediate breast reconstruction with a pedicled transverse rectus abdominis musculocutaneous flap (TRAM), were compared to the patients who underwent CM in terms of breast-cancer specific survival (BCSS) rate, distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS) rate, and local recurrence (LR) rate.During the study period, 6028 patients underwent mastectomy for breast cancer. Of these, 1032 and 4996 underwent NSM/SSM with TRAM and CM, respectively. Their median follow-up durations were 94.4 (range, 8.1-220.2) and 110.8 (range, 6.1-262.0) months, respectively. Their 5 year BCSS rates were 95.4% and 88.1%, respectively (log-rank, P < .001). Their 5 year DMFS rates were 93.0% and 85.6%, respectively (log-rank, P < .001).Relative to CM, NSM/SSM, followed by immediate breast reconstruction, may be a viable and oncologically safe surgical treatment in selected patients with breast cancer.

  9. The Lumbar Artery Perforator Flap: 3-Dimensional Anatomical Study and Clinical Applications.

    PubMed

    Bissell, Mary Beth; Greenspun, David T; Levine, Josh; Rahal, William; Al-Dhamin, Ammar; AlKhawaji, Ali; Morris, Steven F

    2016-10-01

    The lumbar region is a potential donor site for perforator-based rotational or free flaps or as a recipient site for free flaps to obtain coverage for deficits in the sacral region. Because of the lack of consensus regarding the microvascular anatomy of this potential flap site, a robust investigation of the anatomy of this region is required. Three-dimensional reconstructions (n = 6) of the microvasculature of the lumbar region were generated using MIMICS software (Materialise, Belgium) for each of the four paired lumbar vessels. Diameter, course, and pedicle length were recorded for all lumbar artery (LA) perforators. Statistical analysis was performed using SigmaStat 4.0 and graphs were generated using GraphPad Prism 6 Software. Perforators arising from the first pair of LAs are reliably detected along the inferior margin of the 12th rib, extending inferiorly and laterally from the midline while perforators arising from the fourth pair of LA perforate the fascia along a horizontal plane connecting the posterior iliac crests. There are significantly more cutaneous perforators arising from the first (L1) and fourth (L4) pairs of LA than from the second (L2) and third (L3) (mean ± SD: L1, 5.5 ± 1.2; L2, 1.4 ± 0.7; L3, 1.3 ± 0.7; L4, 4.8 ± 1.0; P < 0.05). The average perforator diameter arising from L1 is greater than those arising from L4 (diameter ± SD: L1, 1.2 mm ± 0.2 >L4, 0.8 mm ± 0.2; P < 0.0001). L1 and L4 perforators have longer pedicle lengths than those arising from L2 and L3 (length ± SD: L1, 98.2 mm ± 57.8; L4, 106.1 mm ± 23.3 >L2, 67.5 mm ± 27.4; L3, 78.5 mm ± 30.3; P < 0.05). Perforators arising from the first and fourth LAs arise in a predictable fashion, have adequate pedicle lengths, and are of suitable diameter to support a perforator flap. We present a case to support the potential use of this flap for microvascular breast reconstruction.

  10. The Pedicled Buccal Fat Pad: Anatomical Study of the New Flap for Skull Base Defect Reconstruction After Endoscopic Endonasal Transpterygoid Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Golbin, Denis A.; Lasunin, Nikolay V.; Cherekaev, Vasily A.; Polev, Georgiy A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the efficacy and safety of using a buccal fat pad for endoscopic skull base defect reconstruction. Design Descriptive anatomical study with an illustrative case presentation. Setting Anatomical study was performed on 12 fresh human cadaver specimens with injected arteries (24 sides). Internal carotid artery was exposed in the coronal plane via the endoscopic transpterygoid approach. The pedicled buccal fat pad was used for reconstruction. Participants: 12 human cadaver head specimens; one patient operated using the proposed technique. Main outcome measures: Proximity of the buccal fat pad flap to the defect, compliance of the flap, comfort and safety of harvesting procedure, and compatibility with the Hadad–Bassagasteguy nasoseptal flap. Results: Harvesting procedure was performed using anterior transmaxillary corridor. The pedicled buccal fat pad flap can be used to pack the sphenoid sinus or cover the internal carotid artery from cavernous to upper parapharyngeal segment. Conclusion The buccal fat pad can be safely harvested through the same approach without external incisions and is compliant enough to conform to the skull base defect. The proposed pedicled flap can replace free abdominal fat in central skull base reconstruction. The volume of the buccal fat pad allows obliteration of the sphenoid sinus or upper parapharyngeal space. PMID:28180047

  11. The Lateral Proximal Phalanx Flap for Contractures and Soft Tissue Defects in the Proximal Interphalangeal Joint: An Anatomical and Clinical Study.

    PubMed

    Beltrán, Aldo G; Romero, Camilo J

    2017-01-01

    Background: The management of contractures and soft tissue defects in the proximal interphalangeal (PIP) finger joint remains a challenge. We report a transposition flap from the lateral skin of the proximal phalanx that is based on perforating branches of the digital arteries and can be used safely for both palmar and dorsal cover defects. Methods: We first completed an anatomic study, dissecting 20 fingers in fresh cadavers with arterial injections and made the new flap in patients with dorsal or palmar defects in PIP joints. Results: In cadavers, we can reveal 4 constant branches from each digital artery in the proximal phalanx, with the more distal just in the PIP joint constituting the flap pedicle. Between February 2010 and February 2015, we designed 33 flaps in 29 patients, 7 for dorsal and 26 for palmar defects, with no instances of flap necrosis and 4 distal epidermolysis. The patients were between 4 and 69 years with no major complications, and all of the skin defects in the PIP joint were resolved satisfactorily without any relevant sequelae at the donor site. Conclusions: This flap procedure is an easy, reliable, versatile, and safe technique, and could be an important tool for the management of difficult skin defects and contractures at the PIP joint level.

  12. Anatomical and Histological Evaluation of the Retroauricular Fascia Flap for Staged Auricular Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Li, Yiyuan; Cui, Chunxiao; Zhang, Ruhong; Zhang, Qun; Xu, Zhicheng; Xu, Feng; Li, Datao

    2018-06-01

    The retroauricular fascia flap (RFF) is one of the most commonly used vascularized linings for auriculocephalic sulcus reconstruction in staged total auricular reconstruction. This study aims to investigate the histomorphometric features regarding the retroauricular fascia. Histological evaluation included qualitative observation and quantitative analysis of sections of RFF stained with hematoxylin and eosin, Masson's trichrome, Elastica van Gieson, CD31, and Lyve-1. Ultrasonographic evaluation included measurement of the thickness of the superficial layer of the retroauricular fascia (RFF origin) at three different positions in microtia patients. P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. RFF was a thin, highly organized layer with mainly collagen fibers. From its superior to inferior portions, the percentage of collagen fibers differed significantly (superior 87.57 ± 10.85%, middle 68.29 ± 29.02%, inferior 53.31 ± 33.33%, p < 0.05). The percentages of elastic fibers in the superior (4.86 ± 5.17%) and middle (5.05 ± 5.37%) areas were higher than that in the inferior (2.14 ± 2.42%, p < 0.05). RFF blood vessel density (20× magnification) decreased significantly from the superior to inferior portions (superior 6.39 ± 1.18, middle 5.17 ± 1.15, inferior 2.67 ± 0.78, p < 0.05). Lymphatic vessel density (20× magnification) also decreased significantly from the superior to inferior regions (superior 6.80 ± 0.62, middle 5.26 ± 1.17, inferior 2.11 ± 0.46, p < 0.05). Thickness of the superficial layer of retroauricular fascia increased significantly from the superior to inferior regions (superior 0.29 ± 0.06 mm, middle 0.36 ± 0.09 mm, inferior 0.53 ± 0.14 mm, p < 0.001). From cranial to caudal, the RFF became thicker, less elastic, and less vascularized, and contained fewer lymphatic vessels. Therefore, when the retroauricular fascia is large enough, the superior portion would be preferred for RFF in

  13. Anatomical and technical tips for use of the superficial inferior epigastric artery (SIEA) flap in breast reconstructive surgery.

    PubMed

    Dorafshar, Amir H; Januszyk, Michael; Song, David H

    2010-08-01

    Techniques for autologous breast reconstruction have evolved to minimize donor-site morbidity and reduce flap-specific complications. When available, the superficial inferior epigastric artery (SIEA) flap represents the optimal method to achieve the former. However, many microsurgeons have been reluctant to adopt this procedure due to technical challenges inherent to the surgery, as well as concerns with the intrinsic capacity of the superficial vessel system to adequately support this flap. This article sets forth a simple approach to the SIEA flap harvest and demonstrates that favorable results may be achieved even for small caliber vessels. A total of 46 patients underwent 53 SIEA breast reconstructions over a 6-year period using a modified approach for pedicle dissection and arterial inclusion criteria solely on the basis of presence of a palpable pulse. Average pedicle length harvested for all SIEA flaps was 6.07 cm; and mean arterial (0.96 mm) and venous (2.27 mm) diameters represent the lowest published values. Three flaps (5.7%) demonstrated fat necrosis or partial flap necrosis, with one (1.9%) complete flap loss. These results compare favorably with those of previous SIEA series employing diameter-based selection criteria, suggesting that the presence of a palpable arterial pulse may be sufficient to permit successful utilization of this flap. (c) Thieme Medical Publishers.

  14. Laparoscopic Harvest of the Rectus Abdominis for Perineal Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Agochukwu, Nneamaka; Bonaroti, Alisha; Beck, Sandra

    2017-01-01

    Summary: The rectus abdominis is a workhorse flap for perineal reconstruction, in particular after abdominoperineal resection (APR). Laparoscopic and robotic techniques for abdominoperineal surgery are becoming more common. The open harvest of the rectus abdominis negates the advantages of these minimally invasive approaches. (Sentence relating to advantages of laparoscopic rectus deleted here.) We present our early experience with laparoscopic harvest of the rectus muscle for perineal reconstruction. Three laparoscopic unilateral rectus abdominis muscle harvests were performed for perineal reconstruction following minimally invasive colorectal and urological procedures. The 2 patients who underwent APR also had planned external perineal skin reconstruction with local flaps. (Sentence deleted here to shorten abstract.) All rectus muscle harvests were performed laparoscopically. Two were for perineal reconstruction following laparoscopic APR, and 1 was for anterior vaginal wall reconstruction. This was done with 4 ports positioned on the contralateral abdomen. The average laparoscopic harvest time was 60–90 minutes. The rectus muscle remained viable in all cases. One patient developed partial necrosis of a posterior thigh fasciocutaneous flap after cancer recurrence. There were no pelvic abscesses, or abdominal wall hernias. Laparoscopic harvest of the rectus appears to be a cost-effective, reliable, and reproducible procedure for perineal with minimal donor-site morbidity. Larger clinical studies are needed to further establish the efficacy and advantages of the laparoscopic rectus for perineal reconstruction. PMID:29263976

  15. Cholecystectomy after breast reconstruction with a pedicled autologous tram flap. Types of surgical access

    PubMed Central

    Kostro, Justyna; Jankau, Jerzy; Bigda, Justyna; Skorek, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    The number of breast reconstruction procedures has been increasing in recent years. One of the suggested treatment methods is breast reconstruction with a pedicled skin and muscle TRAM flap (transverse rectus abdominis muscle – TRAM). Surgical incisions performed during a cholecystectomy procedure may be located in the areas significant for flap survival. The aim of this paper is to present anatomical changes in abdominal walls secondary to pedicled skin and muscle (TRAM) flap breast reconstruction, which influence the planned access in cholecystectomy procedures. The authors present 2 cases of cholecystectomy performed due to cholelithiasis in female patients with a history of TRAM flap breast reconstruction procedures. The first patient underwent a traditional method of surgery 14 days after the reconstruction due to acute cholecystitis. The second patient underwent a laparoscopy due to cholelithiasis 7 years after the TRAM procedure. In both cases an abdominal ultrasound scan was performed prior to the operation, and surgical access was determined following consultation with a plastic surgeon. The patient who had undergone traditional cholecystectomy developed an infection of the postoperative wound. The wound was treated with antibiotics, vacuum therapy and skin grafting. After 7 weeks complete postoperative wound healing and correct healing of the TRAM flap were achieved. The patient who had undergone laparoscopy was discharged home on the second postoperative day without any complications. In order to plan a safe surgical access, it is necessary to know the changes in the anatomy of abdominal walls following a pedicled TRAM flap breast reconstruction procedure. PMID:25337177

  16. A flap based on the plantar digital artery arch branch to improve appearance of reconstructed fingers: Anatomical and clinical application.

    PubMed

    Tang, Lin-Feng; Ju, Ji-Hui; Liu, Yue-Fei; Lan, Bo; Hou, Rui-Xing

    2018-02-01

    To investigate blood supply features of the flap based on the plantar digital artery arch and arch branch artery, and the treatment of outcomes of reconstructed fingers by the plantar digital artery arch branch island flap. Eight fresh foot specimens were employed with red emulsion infusion and microdissection. The vascular organization was observed in the second toe, such as initiation site, the course, and the number of the plantar digital artery arch branch. There were 15 fingers of 13 patients (8 males and 5 females) with finger defects accompanied by toe transfer, using the plantar digital artery arch branch flap inserted in the neck of the second toe to correct the appearance defect caused by a narrow "neck" and a bulbous tip. The intact plantar digital arches were identified in all specimens. The plantar digital artery arch had 5 branches. The range of external diameter of the arch branch was 0.4-0.6 mm. All the plantar digital artery arch branch island flaps and the reconstructed fingers survived. These cases were conducted with a follow-up period for 3-18 months (average, 9 months). All the plantar digital artery arch branch island flaps and reconstructed fingers demonstrated a satisfactory appearance and favorable sense function. The reconstructed finger-tip characteristic was good, with no obvious scar hyperplasia. The range of flexion and extension of reconstructed fingers was favorable as well. The plantar digital artery arch and arch branch artery possess regular vasa vasorum and abundant vascularity. A flap based on the plantar digital artery arch branch is an ideal selection for plastic surgery of reconstructed fingers. Copyright © 2017 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Dynamic rectus abdominis muscle sphincter for stoma continence: an acute functional study in a dog model.

    PubMed

    Bardoel, J W; Stadelmann, W K; Perez-Abadia, G A; Galandiuk, S; Zonnevijlle, E D; Maldonado, C; Stremel, R W; Tobin, G R; Kon, M; Barker, J H

    2001-02-01

    Fecal stomal incontinence is a problem that continues to defy surgical treatment. Previous attempts to create continent stomas using dynamic myoplasty have had limited success due to denervation atrophy of the muscle flap used in the creation of the sphincter and because of muscle fatigue resulting from continuous electrical stimulation. To address the problem of denervation atrophy, a stomal sphincter was designed using the most caudal segment of the rectus abdominis muscle, preserving its intercostal innervation as well as its vascular supply. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether this rectus abdominis muscle island flap sphincter design could maintain stomal continence acutely. In this experiment, six dogs were used to create eight rectus abdominis island flap stoma sphincters around a segment of distal ileum. Initially, the intraluminal stomal pressures generated by the sphincter using different stimulation frequencies were determined. The ability of this stomal sphincter to generate continence at different intraluminal bowel pressures was then assessed. In all cases, the rectus abdominis muscle sphincter generated peak pressures well above those needed to maintain stomal continence (60 mmHg). In addition, each sphincter was able to maintain stomal continence at all intraluminal bowel pressures tested.

  18. Free-style free flaps.

    PubMed

    Wei, Fu-Chan; Mardini, Samir

    2004-09-15

    Free-tissue transfer has become the accepted standard for reconstruction of complex defects. With the growth of this field, anatomic studies and clinical work have added many flaps to the armamentarium of the microvascular surgeon. Further advancements and experience with techniques of perforator flap surgery have allowed for the harvest of flaps in a free-style manner, where a flap is harvested based only on the preoperative knowledge of Doppler signals present in a specific region. Between June of 2002 and September of 2003, 13 free-style free flaps were harvested from the region of the thigh. All patients presented with an oral or pharyngeal cancer and underwent resection and immediate reconstruction of these flaps. All flaps were cutaneous and were harvested in a suprafascial plane. The average size of the flaps was 108 cm2 (range, 36 to 187 cm2), and the average length of the vascular pedicle was 10 cm (range, 9 to 12 cm). All flaps were successful in achieving wound coverage and functional outcomes without any vascular compromise necessitating re-exploration. Free-style free flaps have become a clinical reality. The concepts and techniques used to harvest a free-style free flap will aid in dealing with anatomic variations that are encountered during conventional flap harvest. Future trends in flap selection will focus mainly on choosing tissue with appropriate texture, thickness, and pliability to match requirements at the recipient site while minimizing donor-site morbidity.

  19. Reconstruction Using Locoregional Flaps for Large Skull Base Defects.

    PubMed

    Hatano, Takaharu; Motomura, Hisashi; Ayabe, Shinobu

    2015-06-01

    We present a modified locoregional flap for the reconstruction of large anterior skull base defects that should be reconstructed with a free flap according to Yano's algorithm. No classification of skull base defects had been proposed for a long time. Yano et al suggested a new classification in 2012. The lb defect of Yano's classification extends horizontally from the cribriform plate to the orbital roof. According to Yano's algorithm for subsequent skull base reconstructive procedures, a lb defect should be reconstructed with a free flap such as an anterolateral thigh free flap or rectus abdominis myocutaneous free flap. However, our modified locoregional flap has also enabled reconstruction of lb defects. In this case series, we used a locoregional flap for lb defects. No major postoperative complications occurred. We present our modified locoregional flap that enables reconstruction of lb defects.

  20. Avoiding Complications in Abdominal Wall Surgery: A Mathematical Model to Predict the Course of the Motor Innervation of the Rectus Abdominis.

    PubMed

    Tessone, Ariel; Nava, Maurizio; Blondeel, Phillip; Spano, Andrea

    2016-02-01

    Ever since its introduction, the transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap has become the mainstay of autologous breast reconstruction. However, concerns regarding donor site morbidity due to the breach of abdominal wall musculature integrity soon followed. Muscle-sparing techniques, eventually eliminating the muscle from the flap all-together with the deep inferior epigastric artery perforator flap, did not eliminate the problem of abdominal wall weakness. This led to the conclusion that motor innervation might be at fault. Studies have shown that even in the presence of an intact rectus abdominis muscle, and an intact anterior rectus sheath, denervation of the rectus abdominis muscle results in significant abdominal wall weakness leading to superior and inferior abdominal bulges, and abdominal herniation. Our aim was to establish a mathematical model to predict the location of the motor innervation to the rectus abdominis muscle, and thus provide surgeons with a tool that will allow them to reduce abdominal morbidity during deep inferior epigastric artery perforator and free muscle-sparing transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous surgery. We dissected 42 cadaveric hemiabdomens and mapped the course of the thoracolumbar nerves. We then standardized and analyzed our findings and presented them as a relative map which can be adjusted to body type and dimensions. Our dissections show that the motor innervation is closely related to the lateral vascular supply. Thus, when possible, we support the preferred utilization of the medial vascular supply, and the preservation of the lateral supply and motor innervation.

  1. Transversus Abdominis Plane Blocks with Single-Dose Liposomal Bupivacaine in Conjunction with a Nonnarcotic Pain Regimen Help Reduce Length of Stay following Abdominally Based Microsurgical Breast Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Jablonka, Eric M; Lamelas, Andreas M; Kim, Julie N; Molina, Bianca; Molina, Nathan; Okwali, Michelle; Samson, William; Sultan, Mark R; Dayan, Joseph H; Smith, Mark L

    2017-08-01

    Side effects associated with use of postoperative narcotics for pain control can delay recovery after abdominally based microsurgical breast reconstruction. The authors evaluated a nonnarcotic pain control regimen in conjunction with bilateral transversus abdominis plane blocks on facilitating early hospital discharge. A retrospective analysis was performed of consecutive patients who underwent breast reconstruction using abdominally based free flaps, with or without being included in a nonnarcotic protocol using intraoperative transversus abdominis plane blockade. During this period, the use of locoregional analgesia evolved from none (control), to continuous bupivacaine infusion transversus abdominis plane and catheters, to single-dose transversus abdominis plane blockade with liposomal bupivacaine solution. Demographic factors, length of stay, inpatient opioid consumption, and complications were reported for all three groups. One hundred twenty-eight consecutive patients (182 flaps) were identified. Forty patients (62 flaps) were in the infusion-liposomal bupivacaine group, 48 (66 flaps) were in the single-dose blockade-catheter group, and 40 (54 flaps) were in the control group. The infusion-liposomal bupivacaine patients had a significantly shorter hospital stay compared with the single-dose blockade-catheter group (2.65 ± 0.66 versus 3.52 ± 0.92 days; p < 0.0001) and the control group (2.65 ± 0.66 versus 4.05 ± 1.26 days; p < 0.0001). There was no significant difference in flap loss or major complications among groups. When used as part of a nonnarcotic postoperative pain regimen, transversus abdominis plane blocks performed with single injections of liposomal bupivacaine help facilitate early hospital discharge after abdominally based microsurgical breast reconstruction. A trend toward consistent discharge by postoperative day 2 was seen. This could result in significant cost savings for health care systems. Therapeutic, III.

  2. Free flap reconstruction for diabetic foot limb salvage.

    PubMed

    Sato, Tomoya; Yana, Yuichiro; Ichioka, Shigeru

    2017-12-01

    Although free flap is gaining popularity for the reconstruction of diabetic foot ulcers, it is unclear whether free flap reconstruction increases the chances of postoperative independent ambulation. The aim of this study is to evaluate the relationship between free flap success and postoperative ambulation. This study reviewed 23 cases of free flap reconstruction for diabetic foot ulcers between January 2007 and March 2014. Free rectus abdominis, latissimus dorsi, and anterolateral thigh flaps were used in ten, eight, and five patients, respectively. A comparison was made between free flap success and postoperative independent ambulation using Fisher's exact test. Two patients developed congestive heart failure with fatal consequences within 14 days postoperatively, resulting in an in-hospital mortality rate of 8.7%. Five patients lost their flaps (21.7%). Of the 16 patients who had flap success, 12 achieved independent ambulation. Five patients with flap loss did not achieve independent ambulation, except one patient who underwent secondary flap reconstruction using a distally based sural flap. Fisher's exact test revealed that independent ambulation was associated with free flap success (p = 0.047). The present study indicates that free flap reconstruction may increase the possibility of independent ambulation for patients with extensive tissue defects due to diabetic ulcers. Intermediate limb salvage rates and independent ambulation rates were favourable in patients with successful reconstruction. The use of foot orthoses and a team approach with pedorthists were effective to prevent recurrence.

  3. [APPLICATION VALUE OF INDOCYANINE GREEN ANGIOGRAPHY IN FLAP RECONSTRUCTIVE SURGERY].

    PubMed

    Yang, Kai; Mu, Lan; Liu, Yan; Peng, Zhe; Li, Guangxue

    2015-09-01

    To investigate the utility of indocyanine green angiography in flap reconstructive surgery and possibility of decrease the complications. Indocyanine green angiography was performed on 14 patients undergoing flap reconstructive surgery between February and December 2014 to evaluate the blood perfusion of the flap and to adjust the operation plan. Of 14 cases, 2 were male and 12 were female, aged 23-58 years (mean, 35.5 years); 11 flaps were used for breast reconstruction [including 3 free deep inferior epigastric antery perforator (DIEP) flaps, 4 pedicled transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous flaps (TRAM), 2 pedicled TRAM and free TRAM, and 2 pedicled latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flaps and prosthesis], 1 pedicled latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap for repairing chest wall defect, 1 pedicled profunda artery perforator (PAP) flap for upper leg defect, and 1 pedicled descending genicular artery perforator flap for knee defect. The size of the flaps ranged from 9 cm x 6 cm to 26 cm x 12 cm. A total of 32 indocyanine green angiography were performed. There was no adverse reactions to the infusion of indocyanine green. The surgery management was adjusted according to results of indocyanine green angiography findings in 5 of 14 cases. The distal part of flap were discarded because of poor perfusion in 3 cases (1 DIEP flap, 1 TRAM, and 1 PAP flap) and the other 2 cases (pedicled TRAM) needed additional free anastomosis to ensure sufficient blood supply (pedicled TRAM and free TRAM); the other flaps were harvested according to preoperative plan and repaired defect successfully. The mean follow-up was 5 months (range, 1-9 months). The other flaps survived without infection or fat necrosis except 1 PAP flap with distal necrosis. Intraoperative indocyanine green angiography can provide real-time information of flap perfusion and then the operation plan can be adjusted in time to ensure the flap survival.

  4. Ipsilateral pedicled TRAM flaps: the safer alternative?

    PubMed

    Clugston, P A; Gingrass, M K; Azurin, D; Fisher, J; Maxwell, G P

    2000-01-01

    Transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous (TRAM) flap breast reconstruction has become a commonly performed procedure in the 1990s. The original description of the procedure was that of an ipsilaterally based pedicle procedure. Concerns about potential folding of the pedicle with possible compromise of the vascular supply led many surgeons to prefer the contralateral pedicle. Subsequently, there have been several large clinical series of pedicled TRAM flaps showing a relatively high complication rate related to flap vascularity problems. Partial flap necrosis rates in pedicled TRAM series range from 5 to 44 percent. These findings resulted in many centers favoring free TRAM flap breast reconstruction, despite an increase in resource use and negligible differences in complication rates. Ipsilateral pedicle TRAM flap breast reconstruction is not a commonly reported procedure and is reserved for cases for which scars preclude use of the contralateral pedicle. Simplicity and versatility of flap shaping, improved maintenance of the inframammary fold, and lack of disruption of the natural xiphoid hollow give ipsilateral TRAM flaps further advantages. This study reports on a series of 252 consecutive ipsilateral TRAM flap reconstructions in 190 patients. The majority of patients underwent muscle-sparing procedures with preservation of a medial and a lateral strip of rectus muscle. Immediate reconstruction was done in 104 of the 190 patients. Skin-sparing (69 patients) or skin-reduction procedures (21 patients) were used in 90 of the 104 patients (87 percent) undergoing immediate reconstruction. Complication rates were comparable to those of series reported for contralateral TRAM flaps, except that partial flap necrosis (2.0 percent) was less in this series. Risk factors were analyzed with regard to the most common complications seen in this study. Ipsilateral TRAM flap breast reconstruction is our preferred method, if available, because we believe that it has several

  5. Free-style puzzle flap: the concept of recycling a perforator flap.

    PubMed

    Feng, Kuan-Ming; Hsieh, Ching-Hua; Jeng, Seng-Feng

    2013-02-01

    Theoretically, a flap can be supplied by any perforator based on the angiosome theory. In this study, the technique of free-style perforator flap dissection was used to harvest a pedicled or free skin flap from a previous free flap for a second difficult reconstruction. The authors call this a free-style puzzle flap. For the past 3 years, the authors treated 13 patients in whom 12 pedicled free-style puzzle flaps were harvested from previous redundant free flaps and recycled to reconstruct soft-tissue defects at various anatomical locations. One free-style free puzzle flap was harvested from a previous anterolateral thigh flap for buccal cancer to reconstruct a foot defect. Total flap survival was attained in 12 of 13 flaps. One transferred flap failed completely. This patient had received postoperative radiotherapy after the initial cancer ablation and free anterolateral thigh flap reconstruction. Another free flap was used to close and reconstruct the wound. All the donor sites could be closed primarily. The free-style puzzle flap, harvested from a previous redundant free flap and used as a perforator flap to reconstruct a new defect, has proven to be versatile and reliable. When indicated, it is an alternative donor site for further reconstruction of soft-tissue defects.

  6. Superficial ulnar artery perforator flap.

    PubMed

    Schonauer, Fabrizio; Marlino, Sergio; Turrà, Francesco; Graziano, Pasquale; Dell'Aversana Orabona, Giovanni

    2014-09-01

    Superficial ulnar artery is a rare finding but shows significant surgical implications. Its thinness and pliability make this flap an excellent solution for soft tissue reconstruction, especially in the head and neck region. We hereby report a successful free superficial ulnar artery perforator forearm flap transfer for tongue reconstruction. A 64-year-old man presenting with a squamous cell carcinoma of the left tongue underwent a wide resection of the tumor, left radical neck dissection, and reconstruction of the tongue and the left tonsillar pillar with the mentioned flap. No complications were observed postoperatively. The flap survived completely; no recurrence at 6 months of follow-up was detected. Superficial ulnar artery perforator flap has shown to be a safe alternative to other free tissue flaps in specific forearm anatomic conditions.

  7. Vulva reconstruction after pelvic exenteration, using a unique combination of two flaps

    PubMed Central

    van Bommel, Annelotte C M; Schreuder, Henk W R; Schellekens, Pascal P A

    2011-01-01

    A 64-year-old woman with recurrence of carcinoma of the vulva in an irradiated area received an en-bloc total pelvic exenteration. Reconstruction of the pelvic defect was performed with an anterolateral thigh (ALT) flap and a rectus abdominis muscle (RAM) flap (PM/RAM). This combination of flaps is unique, with excellent results. In a large defect, often irradiated in advance, well-vascularised tissue should be placed. Multiple flaps can be used to reconstruct these large pelvic defects, each with their own advantages and disadvantages. The combination of flaps used in this case uses the good properties of both flaps: the reliable and well-vascularised PM/RAM in combination with the ALT flap to provide much bulk in extreme large defects. PMID:22692483

  8. Postoperative morphine requirements of free TRAM and DIEP flaps.

    PubMed

    Kroll, S S; Sharma, S; Koutz, C; Langstein, H N; Evans GRD; Robb, G L; Chang, D W; Reece, G P

    2001-02-01

    In a review of the charts of 158 patients who had undergone breast reconstruction with free transverse rectus abdominis musculocutaneous (TRAM) or deep inferior epigastric perforator (DIEP) flaps and who were treated for postoperative pain with morphine administered by a patient-controlled analgesia pump, the total dose of morphine administered during hospitalization for the flap transfer was measured. Patients whose treatment was supplemented by other intravenous narcotics were excluded from the study. The mean amount of morphine per kilogram required by patients who had reconstruction with DIEP flaps (0.74 mg/kg, n = 26) was found to be significantly less than the amount required by patients who had reconstruction with TRAM flaps (1.65 mg/kg; n = 132; p < 0.001). DIEP flap patients also remained in the hospital less time (mean, 4.73 days) than did free TRAM flap patients (mean, 5.21 days; p = 0.026), but the difference was less than one full hospital day. It was concluded that the use of the DIEP flap does reduce the patient requirement for postoperative pain medication and therefore presumably reduces postoperative pain. It may also slightly shorten hospital stay.

  9. The clinical application of anterolateral thigh flap.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yao-Chou; Chiu, Haw-Yen; Shieh, Shyh-Jou

    2011-01-01

    The anterolateral thigh flap can provide a large skin paddle nourished by a long and large-caliber pedicle and can be harvested by two-team work. Most importantly, the donor-site morbidity is minimal. However, the anatomic variations decreased its popularity. By adapting free-style flap concepts, such as preoperative mapping of the perforators and being familiar with retrograde perforator dissection, this disadvantage had been overcome gradually. Furthermore, several modifications widen its clinical applications: the fascia lata can be included for sling or tendon reconstruction, the bulkiness could be created by including vastus lateralis muscle or deepithelization of skin flap, the pliability could be increased by suprafascial dissection or primary thinning, the pedicle length could be lengthening by proximally eccentric placement of the perforator, and so forth. Combined with these technical and conceptual advancements, the anterolateral thigh flap has become the workhorse flap for soft-tissue reconstructions from head to toe.

  10. The Clinical Application of Anterolateral Thigh Flap

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yao-Chou; Chiu, Haw-Yen; Shieh, Shyh-Jou

    2011-01-01

    The anterolateral thigh flap can provide a large skin paddle nourished by a long and large-caliber pedicle and can be harvested by two-team work. Most importantly, the donor-site morbidity is minimal. However, the anatomic variations decreased its popularity. By adapting free-style flap concepts, such as preoperative mapping of the perforators and being familiar with retrograde perforator dissection, this disadvantage had been overcome gradually. Furthermore, several modifications widen its clinical applications: the fascia lata can be included for sling or tendon reconstruction, the bulkiness could be created by including vastus lateralis muscle or deepithelization of skin flap, the pliability could be increased by suprafascial dissection or primary thinning, the pedicle length could be lengthening by proximally eccentric placement of the perforator, and so forth. Combined with these technical and conceptual advancements, the anterolateral thigh flap has become the workhorse flap for soft-tissue reconstructions from head to toe. PMID:22567234

  11. Bilateral pedicled myocutaneous vertical rectus abdominus muscle flaps to close vesicovaginal and pouch-vaginal fistulas with simultaneous vaginal and perineal reconstruction in irradiated pelvic wounds.

    PubMed

    Horch, Raymund E; Gitsch, G; Schultze-Seemann, W

    2002-09-01

    Chronic postoperative pouch-vaginal and vesicovaginal fistulas after hysterectomy and irradiation to treat advanced cervical cancer do not respond to conventional treatment because of the low vascularity in the irradiated area. We present the successful repair of these complications in a female patient, in whom several vaginal and abdominal approaches had been tried and had resulted not only in failure but also in tissue loss and fibrosis and persisting fistulas. First, a synchronous vaginoabdominal approach using a vertical myocutaneous distally based rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap was used successfully to close a pouch-vaginal fistula and simultaneously reconstruct the posterior vaginal wall. In a second approach, the persisting vesicovaginal fistula was closed by a right rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap while simultaneously reconstructing the anterior vaginal wall, closing the enterocutaneous stoma and performing an appendicovesicostomy as a continence channel for catheterization. Despite unfavorable local wound situations, including an enterocutaneous stoma through the rectus abdominis and various previous incision lines, the transfer of axially well-vascularized tissue can solve these problem wounds. Consecutive bilateral use of the rectus abdominis flap may be necessary to deal with extensive pelvic wounds. This technique should be considered as one repair modality in irradiated pelvic wounds with fistulas. Previous enterostomy is not a contraindication to the use of this flap.

  12. Evolution in Monitoring of Free Flap Autologous Breast Reconstruction after Nipple-Sparing Mastectomy: Is There a Best Way?

    PubMed

    Frey, Jordan D; Stranix, John T; Chiodo, Michael V; Alperovich, Michael; Ahn, Christina Y; Allen, Robert J; Choi, Mihye; Karp, Nolan S; Levine, Jamie P

    2018-05-01

    Free flap monitoring in autologous reconstruction after nipple-sparing mastectomy remains controversial. The authors therefore examined outcomes in nipple-sparing mastectomy with buried free flap reconstruction versus free flap reconstruction incorporating a monitoring skin paddle. Autologous free flap reconstructions with nipple-sparing mastectomy performed from 2006 to 2015 were identified. Demographics and operative results were analyzed and compared between buried flaps and those with a skin paddle for monitoring. Two hundred twenty-one free flaps for nipple-sparing mastectomy reconstruction were identified: 50 buried flaps and 171 flaps incorporating a skin paddle. The most common flaps used were deep inferior epigastric perforator (64 percent), profunda artery perforator (12.1 percent), and muscle-sparing transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous flaps (10.4 percent). Patients undergoing autologous reconstructions with a skin paddle had a significantly greater body mass index (p = 0.006). Mastectomy weight (p = 0.017) and flap weight (p < 0.0001) were significantly greater in flaps incorporating a skin paddle. Comparing outcomes, there were no significant differences in flap failure (2.0 percent versus 2.3 percent; p = 1.000) or percentage of flaps requiring return to the operating room (6.0 percent versus 4.7 percent; p = 0.715) between groups. Buried flaps had an absolute greater mean number of revision procedures per nipple-sparing mastectomy (0.82) compared with the skin paddle group (0.44); however, rates of revision procedures per nipple-sparing mastectomy were statistically equivalent between the groups (p = 0.296). Although buried free flap reconstruction in nipple-sparing mastectomy has been shown to be safe and effective, the authors' technique has evolved to favor incorporating a skin paddle, which allows for clinical monitoring and can be removed at the time of secondary revision. Therapeutic, III.

  13. An international comparison of reimbursement for DIEAP flap breast reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Reid, A W N; Szpalski, C; Sheppard, N N; Morrison, C M; Blondeel, P N

    2015-11-01

    The deep inferior epigastric artery perforator (DIEAP) flap is currently considered the gold standard for autologous breast reconstruction. With the current economic climate and health cutbacks, we decided to survey reimbursement for DIEAP flaps performed at the main international centres in order to assess whether they are funded consistently. Data were collected confidentially from the main international centres by an anonymous questionnaire. Our results illustrate the wide disparity in international DIEAP flap breast reconstruction reimbursement: a unilateral DIEAP flap performed in New York, USA, attracts €20,759, whereas the same operation in Madrid, Spain, will only be reimbursed for €300. Only 35.7% of the surgeons can set up their own fee. Moreover, 85.7% of the participants estimated that the current fees are insufficient, and most of them feel that we are evolving towards an even lower reimbursement rate. In 55.8% of the countries represented, there is no DIEAP-specific coding; in comparison, 74.4% of the represented countries have a specific coding for transverse rectus abdominis (TRAM) flaps. Finally, despite the fact that DIEAP flaps have become the gold standard for breast reconstruction, they comprise only a small percentage of all the total number of breast reconstruction procedures performed (7-15%), with the only exception being Belgium (40%). Our results demonstrate that DIEAP flap breast reconstruction is inconsistently funded. Unfortunately though, it appears that the current reimbursement offered by many countries may dissuade institutions and surgeons from offering this procedure. However, substantial evidence exists supporting the cost-effectiveness of perforator flaps for breast reconstruction, and, in our opinion, the long-term clinical benefits for our patients are so important that this investment of time and money is absolutely essential. Copyright © 2015 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons

  14. Instep island flaps.

    PubMed

    Reading, G

    1984-12-01

    The instep island flap is safe and useful. It is based on branches of the posterior tibial artery and can be a musculocutaneous or a direct fasciocutaneous island flap. Sensory branches of the digital nerves may be transposed with the flap. There is a wide arc of transposition and the flap has survived even in very difficult circumstances.

  15. Perforator Peroneal Artery Flap for Tongue Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Shubhra; Chavre, Sachin; Chandrashekar, Naveen Hedne; B S, Naveen

    2017-03-01

    angiosome proposed by Taylor paved the way for development of new flaps. True perforator flaps are those where the source vessel is left undisturbed and overlying skin flap is raised. Yoshimura proposed cutaneous flap could be raised from peroneal artery (Br J Plast Surg 42:715-718, 1989). Wolff et al. (Plast Reconstr Surg 113:107-113, 2004) first used perforator based peroneal artery flap for oral reconstruction. Location of perforators vary, hence pre operative localisation can be done by ultrasound doppler, CT angio or MR angiography. Disadvantages over radial flap include varying anatomic location of perforators, need for imaging and difficult dissection of delicate vessels through muscles and hence a learning curve. Our patient had an arterial thrombus within few hours post-operatively which was successfully salvaged with immediate re-exploration and re-anastomosis of artery. Post-operative healing was uneventful and donor site was closed primarily without the need for graft. Perforator peroneal flap serves as a useful armamentarium for reconstruction of moderate size defects of tongue, buccal mucosa and floor of mouth with advantages of thin pliable flap, minimal donor site morbidity and hidden scar.

  16. The midabdominal TRAM flap for breast reconstruction in morbidly obese patients.

    PubMed

    Gabbay, Joubin S; Eby, Joseph B; Kulber, David A

    2005-03-01

    The transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous (TRAM) flap is ideal for postmastectomy reconstruction but is tenuous in morbidly obese patients. Because of their relatively high incidence of postoperative complications, morbidly obese patients are often not considered candidates for autogenous reconstruction. The midabdominal TRAM flap has a more favorable anatomy and may represent an alternative technique in this patient population. The records of 18 morbidly obese patients who underwent postmastectomy reconstruction using a mid-abdominal TRAM flap from 1998 through 2002 were retrospectively reviewed. The mid-abdominal TRAM flap territory includes more of the supraumbilical region than the traditional TRAM flap, corresponding to an area with more abundant musculocutaneous perforators and greater dependence on the superior epigastric vascular system. All patients underwent unipedicled mid-abdominal TRAM flap surgery. Four patients with previous subumbilical midline incisions had a delay procedure with ligation of the inferior epigastric vessels. Complications investigated were flap necrosis greater than 10 percent or sufficient to require surgical revision, abdominal donor-site breakdown, seroma formation, umbilical necrosis, abdominal wall bulging or hernia, deep vein thrombosis, infected mesh, surgical revisions, fat necrosis, and extended hospital stay. At a mean follow-up time of 15.6 months (range, 12 to 24 months), three patients had postoperative complications requiring surgical revision. Two of these patients had previous midline abdominal incisions. One patient had both partial flap necrosis and a donor-site complication. The second patient had partial flap necrosis, and the third had an abdominal donor-site complication. No occurrences of abdominal wall hernia, total flap loss, deep vein thrombosis, infected mesh, extensive surgical revision, or extended hospitalization were noted in this series. The mid-abdominal TRAM flap represents an alternative method

  17. Rectus abdominis atrophy after ventral abdominal incisions: midline versus chevron.

    PubMed

    Vigneswaran, Y; Poli, E; Talamonti, M S; Haggerty, S P; Linn, J G; Ujiki, M B

    2017-08-01

    Although many outcomes have been compared between a midline and chevron incision, this is the first study to examine rectus abdominis atrophy after these two types of incisions. Patients undergoing open pancreaticobiliary surgery between 2007 and 2011 at our single institution were included in this study. Rectus abdominis muscle thickness was measured on both preoperative and follow-up computed tomography (CT) scans to calculate percent atrophy of the muscle after surgery. At average follow-up of 24.5 and 19.0 months, respectively, rectus abdominis atrophy was 18.9% greater in the chevron (n = 30) than in the midline (n = 180) group (21.8 vs. 2.9%, p < 0.0001). Half the patients with a chevron incision had >20% atrophy at follow-up compared with 10% with a midline incision [odds ratio (OR) 9.0, p < 0.0001]. No significant difference was observed in incisional hernia rates or wound infections between groups. In this study, chevron incisions resulted in seven times more atrophy of the rectus abdominis compared with midline incisions. The long-term effects of transecting the rectus abdominis and disrupting its innervation creates challenging abdominal wall pathology. Atrophy of the abdominal wall can not be readily fixed with an operation, and this significant side effect of a transverse incision should be factored into the surgeon's decision-making process when choosing a transverse over a midline incision.

  18. The Differential Use of Bilobed and Trilobed Transposition Flaps in Cutaneous Nasal Reconstructive Surgery.

    PubMed

    Knackstedt, Thomas; Lee, Kachiu; Jellinek, Nathaniel J

    2018-05-22

    Bilobed and trilobed transposition flaps are versatile random pattern transposition flaps which reliably restore nasal symmetry, topography, light reflex, contour and are frequently used in cutaneous nasal reconstructive surgery. We wish to compare the characteristics of bilobed and trilobed flaps in cutaneous reconstructive surgery and to identify scenarios for their differential use. A retrospective chart review over 7 years of consecutive patients reconstructed with a bilobed or trilobed flap after Mohs micrographic surgery was performed. Statistical analysis of patient and surgery characteristics, anatomic distribution, postprocedural events and need for revisions after both flap types was conducted. One hundred eleven patients with bilobed flaps and 74 patients with trilobed flaps were identified. Bilobed flaps are significantly more frequently used on the inferior nasal dorsum and on the sidewall whereas trilobed flaps are significantly more frequently used on the nasal tip and infratip. No significant difference in postprocedural events (complications, erythema, trapdoor, etc) was noted between the two flap types. Bilobed and trilobed transposition flaps are versatile repairs for nasal reconstruction. Trilobed flaps may be used to repair defects in a more distal nasal location than bilobed flaps. Regardless of flap type, complications are rare.

  19. Single-stage interpolation flaps in facial reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Hollmig, S Tyler; Leach, Brian C; Cook, Joel

    2014-09-01

    Relatively deep and complex surgical defects, particularly when adjacent to or involving free margins, present significant reconstructive challenges. When the use of local flaps is precluded by native anatomic restrictions, interpolation flaps may be modified to address these difficult wounds in a single operative session. To provide a framework to approach difficult soft tissue defects arising near or involving free margins and to demonstrate appropriate design and execution of single-stage interpolation flaps for reconstruction of these wounds. Examination of our utilization of these flaps based on an anatomic region and surgical approach. A region-based demonstration of flap conceptualization, design, and execution is provided. Tunneled, transposed, and deepithelialized variations of single-stage interpolation flaps provide versatile options for reconstruction of a variety of defects encroaching on or involving free margins. The inherently robust vascularity of these flaps supports importation of necessary tissue bulk while allowing aggressive contouring to restore an intricate native topography. Critical flap design allows access to distant tissue reservoirs and placement of favorable incision lines while preserving the inherent advantages of a single operative procedure.

  20. The unique and valuable soft tissue free flap in head and neck reconstruction: Lateral arm.

    PubMed

    Kang, Stephen Y; Eskander, Antoine; Patel, Krupal; Teknos, Theodoros N; Old, Matthew O

    2018-07-01

    While the lateral arm free flap has been well described, there is a relative paucity in its use compared to other free flaps and regional flaps. The lateral arm free flap is a unique soft tissue free flap that provides several reconstructive advantages in head and neck reconstruction: excellent contour and color match to facial skin, well compartmentalized fat, donor nerves for nerve grafting, and the ability to two-team harvest and close the donor site without a skin graft. A detailed anatomic and harvest technique is described, along with indications and advantages of using lateral free flap for head and neck reconstruction. A scoping literature review was also conducted to tabulate indications, overall success and complications of the flap. The lateral arm flap is a primary option for defects requiring soft tissue reconstruction in the head and neck. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Free flap reconstructions of tibial fractures complicated after internal fixation.

    PubMed

    Nieminen, H; Kuokkanen, H; Tukiainen, E; Asko-Seljavaara, S

    1995-04-01

    The cases of 15 patients are presented where microvascular soft-tissue reconstructions became necessary after internal fixation of tibial fractures. Primarily, seven of the fractures were closed. Eleven fractures had originally been treated by open reduction and internal fixation using plates and screws, and four by intramedullary nailing. All of the patients suffered from postoperative complications leading to exposure of the bone or fixation material. The internal fixation material was removed and radical revision of dead and infected tissue was carried out in all cases. Soft tissue reconstruction was performed using a free microvascular muscle flap (11 latissimus dorsi, three rectus abdominis, and one gracilis). In eight cases the nonunion of the fracture indicated external fixation. The microvascular reconstruction was successful in all 15 patients. In one case the recurrence of deep infection finally indicated a below-knee amputation. In another case, chronic infection with fistulation recurred postoperatively. After a mean follow-up of 26 months the soft tissue coverage was good in all the remaining 13 cases. All the fractures united. Microvascular free muscle flap reconstruction of the leg is regarded as a reliable method for salvaging legs with large soft-tissue defects or defects in the distal leg. If after internal fixation of the tibial fracture the osteosynthesis material or fracture is exposed, reconstruction of the soft-tissue can successfully be performed by free flap transfer. By radical revision, external fixation, bone grafting, and a free flap the healing of the fracture can be achieved.

  2. A Novel Perforator Flap Training Model Using a Chicken Leg.

    PubMed

    Cifuentes, Ignacio J; Yañez, Ricardo A; Salisbury, Maria C; Rodriguez, José R; Varas, Julian E; Dagnino, Bruno L

    2016-04-01

    Living animal models are frequently used for perforator flap dissection training, but no ex vivo models have been described. The aim of this study is to present a novel nonliving model for perforator flap training based on a constant perforator in the chicken leg. A total of 15 chicken legs were used in this study. Anatomical dissection of the perforator was performed after its identification using ink injection, and in four of these specimens a perforator-based flap was raised. The anatomical dissection revealed a constant intramuscular perforator with a median length of 5.7 cm. Median proximal and distal vessel diameters were 0.93 and 0.4 mm, respectively. The median dissection time was 77.5 minutes. This study introduces a novel, affordable, and reproducible model for the intramuscular dissection of a perforator-based flap using an ex vivo animal model. Its consistent perforator and appropriate-sized vessels make it useful for training.

  3. Dynamic Article: Tandem Robotic Technique of Extralevator Abdominoperineal Excision and Rectus Abdominis Muscle Harvest for Immediate Closure of the Pelvic Floor Defect.

    PubMed

    Singh, Puneet; Teng, Edward; Cannon, Lisa M; Bello, Brian L; Song, David H; Umanskiy, Konstantin

    2015-09-01

    Extralevator abdominoperineal excision for distal rectal cancers involves cylindrical excision of the mesorectum with wide division of the levator ani muscles. Although this technique has been shown to decrease local cancer recurrence and improve survival, it leaves the patient with a considerable pelvic floor defect that may require reconstruction. We developed an innovative technique of robotic extralevator abdominoperineal excision combined with robotic harvest of the rectus abdominis muscle flap for immediate reconstruction of the pelvic floor defect. This was a retrospective review pilot study. This study was conducted at a tertiary care cancer center. Three patients who underwent robotic extralevator abdominoperineal excision with robotic rectus abdominis flap harvest for distal rectal adenocarcinoma were included. Intraoperative and postoperative outcomes included operative time, intraoperative complications, length of hospital stay, wound complications, incidence of perineal hernia, persistent pain, and functional limitations. Three patients underwent this procedure. The median operative time was 522 minutes with median hospital stay of 6 days. One patient experienced perineal wound complication requiring limited incision and drainage followed by complete healing of the wound by secondary intention. The other 2 patients did not experience any wound complications. Longest follow-up was 16 months. None of the patients developed perineal hernias during this time period. The small sample size and retrospective nature were limitations. This technique confers multiple advantages including improved visualization and dexterity within the pelvis and accurate wide margins at the pelvic floor. An incisionless robotic flap harvest with preservation of the anterior rectus sheath obviates the risk of ventral hernia while providing robust tissue closure of the radiated abdominoperineal excision wound. This technique may result in faster postoperative recovery, decreased

  4. Distally based posterior interosseous flap: primary role in soft-tissue reconstruction of the hand.

    PubMed

    Agir, Hakan; Sen, Cenk; Alagöz, Sahin; Onyedi, Murat; Isil, Eda

    2007-09-01

    A series of 15 consecutive patients with various hand defects requiring flap coverage was reviewed in this study. The defects were all covered with the distally based posterior interosseous flap. Its main indications were in complex hand trauma, severe burn injury, or skin cancer ablation, either acute or postprimary. In 12 of the patients, flaps survived completely. In 3 patients, there was partial necrosis of the distal part of the flap, which did not require additional surgical procedure. Radial nerve palsy was noted in one of the cases, with a complete recovery after 3 months. Donor site was closed directly in up to 4-cm-wide flaps, while larger flaps required skin grafting. No major anatomic variation was observed. Distally based posterior interosseous flap is a reliable choice for various types and areas of hand defects, with very low donor-site morbidity, and should be more commonly considered in clinical practice.

  5. Preoperative TRAM free flap volume estimation for breast reconstruction in lean patients.

    PubMed

    Minn, Kyung Won; Hong, Ki Yong; Lee, Sang Woo

    2010-04-01

    To obtain pleasing symmetry in breast reconstruction with transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous (TRAM) free flap, a large amount of abdominal flap is elevated and remnant tissue is trimmed in most cases. However, elevation of abundant abdominal flap can cause excessive tension in donor site closure and increase the possibility of hypertrophic scarring especially in lean patients. The TRAM flap was divided into 4 zones in routine manner; the depth and dimension of the 4 zones were obtained using ultrasound and AutoCAD (Autodesk Inc., San Rafael, CA), respectively. The acquired numbers were then multiplied to obtain an estimate of volume of each zone and the each zone volume was added. To confirm the relation between the estimated volume and the actual volume, authors compared intraoperative actual TRAM flap volumes with preoperative estimated volumes in 30 consecutive TRAM free flap breast reconstructions. The estimated volumes and the actual elevated volumes of flap were found to be correlated by regression analysis (r = 0.9258, P < 0.01). According to this result, we could confirm the reliability of the preoperative volume estimation using our method. Afterward, the authors applied this method to 7 lean patients by estimation and revision of the design and obtained symmetric results with minimal donor site morbidity. Preoperative estimation of TRAM flap volume with ultrasound and AutoCAD (Autodesk Inc.) allow the authors to attain the precise volume desired for elevation. This method provides advantages in terms of minimal flap trimming, easier closure of donor sites, reduced scar widening and symmetry, especially in lean patients.

  6. Measurement of the volume of the pedicled TRAM flap in immediate breast reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Chang, K P; Lin, S D; Hou, M F; Lee, S S; Tsai, C C

    2001-12-01

    The transverse rectus abdominis musculocutaneous (TRAM) flap is now accepted as the standard for breast reconstruction, but achieving symmetrical breast reconstruction is still a challenge. A precise estimate of the volume of the flap is necessary to reconstruct a symmetrical and aesthetically pleasing breast. Many methods have been developed to overcome this problem, but they have not been suitable for the pedicled TRAM flap. By using a self-made device based on the Archimedes' principle, the authors can calculate accurately the volume of the pedicled TRAM flap and predict reliably the breast volume intraoperatively. The "procedure" is based on a self-made box into which the pedicled TRAM flap is placed. Warm saline is added to the box and the flap is then removed. Flap volume is calculated easily by determining the difference between the preestimated volume of the box and the volume of the residual water. From February to May 2000, this method was used on 28 patients to predict breast volume for breast reconstruction. This study revealed that the difference of the maximal chest circumferences (the index of the breast volume) demonstrates a positive correlation with the difference of the volumes and weights between the mastectomy specimen and the net TRAM flap. However, a more closely positive correlation exists between the differences of maximal chest circumference volume (r = 0.677) than maximal chest circumference weight (r = 0.618). These data reveal that the reconstructed breast's volume has a closer relationship with the volume of the net pedicled TRAM flap, rather than with its weight.

  7. Subcostal Transverse Abdominis Plane Block for Acute Pain Management: A Review.

    PubMed

    Soliz, Jose M; Lipski, Ian; Hancher-Hodges, Shannon; Speer, Barbra Bryce; Popat, Keyuri

    2017-10-01

    The subcostal transverse abdominis plane (SCTAP) block is the deposition of local anesthetic in the transverse abdominis plane inferior and parallel to the costal margin. There is a growing consensus that the SCTAP block provides better analgesia for upper abdominal incisions than the traditional transverse abdominis plane block. In addition, when used as part of a four-quadrant transverse abdominis plane block, the SCTAP block may provide adequate analgesia for major abdominal surgery. The purpose of this review is to discuss the SCTAP block, including its indications, technique, local anesthetic solutions, and outcomes.

  8. Reconstruction of a traumatic plantar foot defect with a novel free flap: The medial triceps brachii free flap.

    PubMed

    Leclère, Franck Marie; Casoli, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Lower extremity defects may account for 14.6% of the approximately 117 million visits to emergency departments in the U. S. in 2007. In this article, we present a reconstruction of a traumatic plantar foot defect with a medial triceps brachii (MTB) free flap. A 53-year-old man sustained an accidental gunshot wound to the right foot. The patient was admitted after the failure of a sural flap procedure performed in another hospital. He presented with a soft-tissue defect with calcaneal exposition and osteomyelitis. The defect was reconstructed with a MTB free flap anastomosed to his dorsalis pedis vessels. Flap raising time was 52 min. There were no intraoperative complications. The total flap surface was 38.5 cm². The pedicle length was 3 cm. The diameters of the artery and vein of the flap pedicle were 1.1 mm and 1.4 mm, respectively. Ischemia time was 28 min. His donor site healed uneventfully without any morbidity, and the scar was well concealed. The flaps survived and there was no partial flap necrosis. A split-thickness skin graft was performed 12 days postoperatively. Two months later, he had a completely healed wound with no contour abnormality. The total follow-up was 24 months. The patient was able to walk normally. MTB free flap appears to be an excellent option for plantar foot defects in patients with preserved vascularization of the foot. Due to the anatomical shape of the flap, the position of its pedicle, and the moldability of the muscle, we predict that the use of the MTB free flap will grow and develop rapidly for reconstruction of ankle and foot defects.

  9. Reconstruction of the pelvic floor and the vagina after total pelvic exenteration using the transverse musculocutaneous gracilis flap.

    PubMed

    Kaartinen, Ilkka S; Vuento, Maarit H; Hyöty, Marja K; Kallio, Jukka; Kuokkanen, Hannu O

    2015-01-01

    Total pelvic exenteration (TPE) is a rare operation in which the pelvic contents are removed entirely. Several options for pelvic floor and vaginal reconstruction have been described including transverse rectus abdominis musculocutaneous (TRAM) or deep inferior epigastric perforator (DIEP) flaps. The transverse musculocutaneous gracilis (TMG) flap has been introduced for breast reconstruction as a free flap. We adopted the pedicled TMG flap for reconstructions after TPE. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of this method in the literature. Between November 2011 and February 2014, 12 patients underwent TPE and reconstruction with unilateral (six patients) or bilateral (six patients) pedicled TMG flaps. Five patients underwent vaginal reconstruction with bilateral TMG flaps. We describe the operative procedure and the outcome of the operation in these patients. The total mean operative times for TPE with or without vaginal reconstruction were 467 ± 12 and 386 ± 59 min, respectively. The TMG flaps had enough vascular tissue and mobility for reconstructing the TPE defects. There was distal edge necrosis in one out of 18 flaps, while the rest survived completely. During the follow-up, complete wound healing with no signs of weakening of the pelvic floor was observed in all cases. Soft-tissue reconstructions are needed to reduce complications associated with TPE, to secure the pelvic floor and to reconstruct the vagina in select patients. The TMG flap is a logical flap choice that does not lead to functional deficits, complicate the abdominal ostomies or weaken the abdominal wall. It reduces the length of operation compared to that of abdominal flaps. IV, therapeutic. Copyright © 2014 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Relationship between BMI and Postoperative Complications with Free Flap in Anterolateral Craniofacial Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Yagi, Shunjiro; Toriyama, Kazuhiro; Takanari, Keisuke; Fujimoto, Yasushi; Nishio, Naoki; Fujii, Masazumi; Saito, Kiyoshi; Takahashi, Masakatsu; Kamei, Yuzuru

    2016-01-01

    Background: Although we have seen tremendous advancement in microsurgery over the last 2 decades and free tissue transfer has become standard for head and neck reconstruction, surgeons still struggle to prevent postoperative complications. We examined the relationship between body mass index (BMI) and postoperative complications in patients undergoing rectus abdominis free flap transfer after anterolateral craniofacial resection. Methods: This was a retrospective review of reconstructive surgery using rectus abdominis musculocutaneous free flap in patients with locally advanced maxillary sinus carcinoma from 2003 to 2014 (n = 35, 27 men and 8 women; average age, 60.9 ± 7.8 years). All patients underwent craniofacial reconstruction after anterior and middle cranial fossa skull base resection and maxillectomy (class IV, subtype a) with palatal resection. Patients were categorized based on sex, BMI, and other parameters. Results: Recipient-site infection occurred in 11 patients (31.4%), cerebrospinal fluid leakage in 6 (17.1%), partial flap necrosis in 2 (5.7%), total flap necrosis in 1 (2.9%), and facial fistula in 4 (11.4%). Women showed partial flap necrosis significantly more frequently (P = 0.047), probably owing to poor vascular supply of the subcutaneous fat layer. Patients with low BMI (<20 kg/m2) showed recipient-site infection (P = 0.02) and facial fistula (P = 0.01) significantly more frequently owing to insufficient tissue volume and poor vascular supply. Conclusion: Postoperative recipient-site infection and facial fistula occurred mainly in low-BMI patients. Surgeons should take care to achieve sufficient donor tissue on low-BMI patients. Using a prosthetic obturator in low-BMI patients for craniofacial reconstruction can be a good alternative option to reduce postoperative complications due to insufficient donor tissue volume. PMID:27257566

  11. Chest wall reconstruction using iliac bone allografts and muscle flaps.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Tutor, Emilio; Yeste, Luis; Murillo, Julio; Aubá, Cristina; Sanjulian, Mikel; Torre, Wenceslao

    2004-01-01

    Technically we can divide full-thickness thoracic reconstruction into 2 parts: providing a rigid support and ensuring well-vascularized coverage. Since 1986, the authors' center has had ample experience with bone banks and the use of cryopreserved bone grafts, which led them to consider the possibility of using these grafts for full-thickness chest wall reconstruction. They describe 3 patients in whom resection of the tumor and reconstruction of the thorax were carried out using iliac bone allografts covered with muscle flaps (1 pectoralis major and 2 rectus abdominis). None of the patients experienced breathing difficulties, pain, or instability after 14 months, 18 months, and 11 years of follow-up. The result of the reconstruction was excellent in all 3 patients in terms of function and aesthetics. The advantage of allografts compared with synthetic materials is their potential integration; they can become part of the host patient's living tissue.

  12. Four quadrant transversus abdominis plane block and continuous transversus abdominis plane analgesia: a 3-year prospective audit in 124 patients.

    PubMed

    Niraj, G; Kelkar, Aditi; Hart, Elaine; Kaushik, Vipul; Fleet, Danny; Jameson, John

    2015-11-01

    Transversus abdominis plane (TAP) blocks have been reported to be an effective method of providing analgesia after abdominal surgery. To perform a prospective audit on the effectiveness of a novel technique of providing continuous transversus abdominis plane (TAP) analgesia in patients undergoing emergency and elective abdominal surgery. Prospective single center audit over a 3-year period. University hospital. One hundred twenty-four American Society of Anesthesiologists I to IV adult patients presenting for elective as well as emergency abdominal surgery in whom epidural analgesia was contraindicated or refused. Four quadrant TAP blocks and continuous TAP analgesia. Numerical rating scale pain scores at rest and on coughing, nausea scores, satisfaction scores, complications, frequency of analgesia failure, therapeutic failure with continuous TAP analgesia and opioid consumption. One hundred twenty-four patients who received continuous TAP analgesia were audited. This included 34 patients for elective open surgery, 36 patients for emergency laparotomy, and 54 patients who underwent elective laparoscopic colorectal surgery. Surgical incision was within the dermatomal limit of the block in 70% of the patients (88/124). Therapeutic failure with the technique was 10%. Frequency of analgesic failure over the 48-hour period was none in 39% and below 5 episodes in 57%. Four quadrant transversus abdominis plane blocks and continuous TAP analgesia is an effective technique for providing postoperative analgesia after abdominal surgery. It has the potential to be used as a sole analgesic technique when the surgical incision is within its dermatomal limit. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. In situ monitoring of surgical flap viability using THz imaging (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajwa, Neha; Sung, Shijun; Grundfest, Warren; Taylor, Zachary

    2016-03-01

    This paper explores the utility of reflective THz imaging to assess the viability of surgical flaps. Flap surgery is a technique where tissue is harvested from a donor site and moved to a recipient while keeping the blood supply intact. This technique is common in head and neck tumor resection surgery where the reconstruction of complex and sensitive anatomic structures is routine following the resection of large and/or invasive tumors. Successful flap surgery results in tissue that is sufficiently perfused with both blood and extracellular water. If insufficient fluid levels are maintained, the flap tissue becomes necrotic and must be excised immediately to prevent infection developing and spreading to the surrounding areas. The goal of this work is to investigate the hydration of surgical flaps and correlate image features to successful graft outcomes. Advancement flaps were created on the abdomens of rat models. One rat model was labeled control and care was taken to ensure a successful flap outcome. The flap on the second rat was compromised with restricted blood flow and allowed to fail. The flaps of both rats were imaged once a day over the course of a week at which point the compromised flap had begun to show signs of necrosis. Significant differences in tissue water content were observed between rats over the experimental period. The results suggest that THz imaging may enable early assessment of flap viability.

  14. Evolution of transversus abdominis plane infiltration techniques for postsurgical analgesia following abdominal surgeries.

    PubMed

    Gadsden, Jeffrey; Ayad, Sabry; Gonzales, Jeffrey J; Mehta, Jaideep; Boublik, Jan; Hutchins, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    Transversus abdominis plane (TAP) infiltration is a regional anesthesia technique that has been demonstrated to be effective for management of postsurgical pain after abdominal surgery. There are several different clinical variations in the approaches used for achieving analgesia via TAP infiltration, and methods for identification of the TAP have evolved considerably since the landmark-guided technique was first described in 2001. There are many factors that impact the analgesic outcomes following TAP infiltration, and the various nuances of this technique have led to debate regarding procedural classification of TAP infiltration. Based on our current understanding of fascial and neuronal anatomy of the anterior abdominal wall, as well as available evidence from studies assessing local anesthetic spread and cutaneous sensory block following TAP infiltration, it is clear that TAP infiltration techniques are appropriately classified as field blocks. While the objective of peripheral nerve block and TAP infiltration are similar in that both approaches block sensory response in order to achieve analgesia, the technical components of the two procedures are different. Unlike peripheral nerve block, which involves identification or stimulation of a specific nerve or nerve plexus, followed by administration of a local anesthetic in close proximity, TAP infiltration involves administration and spread of local anesthetic within an anatomical plane of the surgical site.

  15. Three-step orbitofacial reconstruction after extended total maxillectomy using free RAM flap and expanded cervicofacial flap with cartilage grafts.

    PubMed

    Kajikawa, Akiyoshi; Ueda, Kazuki; Katsuragi, Yoko; Hirose, Taro; Asai, Emiko

    2010-10-01

    Facial defect after an extended total maxillectomy is one of the most difficult deformities to reconstruct aesthetically, because the defect is not only large but also three-dimensional. Although free-flap reconstruction is useful, the patchwork-like scar, bad colour match and poor texture match are major problems. The contracture and displacement of the reconstructed eyelids and eye socket are also serious matters. To resolve these problems, we have performed a three-step reconstruction using a free rectus abdominis myocutaneous (RAM) flap and an expanded cervicofacial flap with cartilage grafts. In the first step, a free RAM flap was transplanted to the defect after extended total maxillectomy. In the second step, tissue expanders were placed under the skin of the cheek and neck a year after the RAM flap transplantation. After expansion of the cheek and neck skin, the third step was performed. The inferior part of the external skin island of the RAM flap was raised and sutured to the superior margin of the skin island to create a pouch for the eye socket. Costal cartilage was grafted to reconstruct the orbital floor and malar prominence, and auricular cartilage was grafted to reconstruct the tarsal plates. Finally, the expanded cervicofacial flap was rotated to cover this construct. Two weeks after reconstruction, the neo-eyelids were divided to form the lid fissure. We performed the three-step reconstruction on six cases after extended total maxillectomy. In all cases, a deep and stable eye socket was reconstructed. The reconstructed eyelids and cheek were natural in appearance with good colour and texture match without conspicuous scars. To obtain symmetry and natural appearance in the orbitomaxillary reconstruction, there are five points that should be formed; the eye socket, the groundwork of the eye socket, the orbital floor and malar prominence, the tarsal plates and the surface of the eyelids and cheek. We do not reconstruct the palate to set prosthetic

  16. The Trapezius Muscle Flap: A Viable Alternative for Posterior Scalp and Neck Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hee Jun; Lee, Dong Hun; Kim, Yang Woo; Lee, Sang Gu; Cheon, Young Woo

    2016-11-01

    The trapezius muscle flap is not usually the first reconstructive option for skin and soft tissue defects in the posterior neck and scalp due to surgeons' unfamiliarity with the surgical anatomy and developments in free tissue transfer techniques. The goals of this study were to describe the clinical use of trapezius flaps in posterior neck and scalp reconstruction, and to investigate the vascular anatomy of trapezius flaps in Asians in order to obtain information facilitating the safe design and elevation of flaps in which most of the muscle is preserved. A retrospective chart review was performed of 10 patients who underwent trapezius muscle flap for posterior neck and scalp defects. We also performed an anatomical study of 16 flaps harvested from 8 preserved Asian adult cadavers and evaluated the main landmarks relevant for trapezius muscle flap. In the anatomical study, the mean vertical height from the inferior angle of the scapula to the point at which the superficial cervical artery penetrated the trapezius was 4.31±2.14 cm. The mean vertical height of the trapezius muscle flap pivot point was 9.53±2.08 cm from the external occipital protuberance. Among the 10 flaps, partial necrosis on the overlaid skin graft occurred in 1 patient and postoperative seroma occurred in another patient. Vascular variations in the trapezius muscle flap are uncommon in Asians, but when present, such variations appear to have little impact on harvesting the flap or on its circulation. The trapezius muscle flap is a viable alternative for posterior neck and scalp reconstruction.

  17. The Trapezius Muscle Flap: A Viable Alternative for Posterior Scalp and Neck Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hee Jun; Kim, Yang Woo; Lee, Sang Gu

    2016-01-01

    Background The trapezius muscle flap is not usually the first reconstructive option for skin and soft tissue defects in the posterior neck and scalp due to surgeons' unfamiliarity with the surgical anatomy and developments in free tissue transfer techniques. The goals of this study were to describe the clinical use of trapezius flaps in posterior neck and scalp reconstruction, and to investigate the vascular anatomy of trapezius flaps in Asians in order to obtain information facilitating the safe design and elevation of flaps in which most of the muscle is preserved. Methods A retrospective chart review was performed of 10 patients who underwent trapezius muscle flap for posterior neck and scalp defects. We also performed an anatomical study of 16 flaps harvested from 8 preserved Asian adult cadavers and evaluated the main landmarks relevant for trapezius muscle flap. Results In the anatomical study, the mean vertical height from the inferior angle of the scapula to the point at which the superficial cervical artery penetrated the trapezius was 4.31±2.14 cm. The mean vertical height of the trapezius muscle flap pivot point was 9.53±2.08 cm from the external occipital protuberance. Among the 10 flaps, partial necrosis on the overlaid skin graft occurred in 1 patient and postoperative seroma occurred in another patient. Conclusions Vascular variations in the trapezius muscle flap are uncommon in Asians, but when present, such variations appear to have little impact on harvesting the flap or on its circulation. The trapezius muscle flap is a viable alternative for posterior neck and scalp reconstruction. PMID:27896183

  18. Aesthetic Penoscrotal Resurfacing: Creating Propeller Flaps from Gluteal Folds.

    PubMed

    Han, So-Eun; Kim, Eun-Ji; Sung, Hyun Hwan; Pyon, Jai-Kyong

    2018-04-01

    Reconstruction of extensive penoscrotal defects is a surgical challenge. Resurfacing defects in highly complex three-dimensional structures and restoring their function are an essential part of the reconstruction of penoscrotal regions. We describe a technique using internal pudendal artery perforator (IPAP) pedicled propeller flaps created from the gluteal fold. This could be a reliable surgical option that maintains a natural looking scrotal pouch with minimal donor site morbidity and optimal sexual activity. We retrospectively reviewed data for 10 consecutive patients who had undergone penoscrotal reconstruction using IPAP pedicled propeller flaps between January 2011 and March 2015. The IPAP was identified using a hand-held Doppler ultrasound device. This was the pivot around which the flap was internally rotated more than 90° in a tension-free manner. The long axis of the flap was centred on the gluteal fold to provide a better-orientated donor site scar. Complications and patient satisfaction with respect to size, colour match, scar appearance, and sexual activity were evaluated. Anatomic and aesthetic penoscrotal reconstruction was performed without any major complications in the follow-up period (mean, 19.7 mo). The mean width of the IPAP pedicled propeller flaps was 6.7cm, and the mean length was 11.7cm. Partial distal flap necrosis occurred in only one case, and healed spontaneously. All of the patients were satisfied with the cosmetic and functional results. On the basis of reliable perforators, donor site morbidity, flap thickness, and a better orientated scar, our technique using IPAP pedicled propeller flaps created from the gluteal fold could be a reasonable surgical option for extensive penoscrotal reconstruction. The creation of pedicled propeller flaps using an internal pudendal artery perforator could be a reliable surgical option for reconstruction of extensive penoscrotal defects. The approach yields functional and aesthetically acceptable

  19. Preoperative color Doppler assessment in planning of gluteal perforator flaps.

    PubMed

    Isken, Tonguc; Alagoz, M Sahin; Onyedi, Murat; Izmirli, Hakki; Isil, Eda; Yurtseven, Nagehan

    2009-02-01

    Gluteal artery perforator flaps have gained popularity due to reliability, preservation of the muscle, versatility in flap design without restricting other flap options, and low donor-site morbidity in ambulatory patients and possibility of enabling future reconstruction in paraplegic patients. But the inconstant anatomy of the vascular plexus around the gluteal muscle makes it hard to predict how many perforators are present, what their volume of blood flow and size are, where they exit the overlying fascia, and what their course through the muscle will be. Without any prior investigations, the reconstructive surgeon could be surprised intraoperatively by previous surgical damage, scar formation, or anatomic variants.For these reasons, to confirm the presence and the location of gluteal perforators preoperatively we have used color Doppler ultrasonography. With the help of the color Doppler ultrasonography 26 patients, 21 men and 5 women, were operated between the years 2002 and 2007. The mean age of patients was 47.7 (age range: 7-77 years). All perforator vessels were marked preoperatively around the defect locations. The perforator based flap that will allow primary closure of the donor site and the defect without tension was planned choosing the perforator that showed the largest flow in color Doppler ultrasonography proximally. Perforators were found in the sites identified with color Doppler ultrasonography in all other flaps. In our study, 94.4% flap viability was ensured in 36 perforator-based gluteal area flaps. Mean flap elevation time was 31.9 minutes. We found that locating the perforators preoperatively helps to shorten the operation time without compromising a reliable viability of the perforator flaps, thus enabling the surgeon easier treatment of pressure sores.

  20. Availability of the lateral calcaneal region as a donor site of free flaps.

    PubMed

    Cho, Seung Woo; Park, Ji Ung; Kwon, Sung Tack

    2017-09-01

    Various methods have been used for the coverage of soft-tissue defects, such as local and free flaps, as well as perforator flaps performed using even supermicrosurgery. However, the techniques have some limitations regarding flap size and location when used to reconstruct small defects. We introduced the lateral calcaneal region as a donor site for free flaps in order to overcome these disadvantages and presented the results from a series of cases. A retrospective chart review was performed on 10 patients with small soft-tissue defects who underwent reconstruction with a lateral calcaneal free flap between January 2011 and May 2014. The reconstruction was performed on the defects at medial and lateral plantar area, dorsum of the foot, great toes and preauricular area. The size of the flaps ranged from 2.5 × 2.5 cm to 4.5 × 4.5 cm. The flaps exhibited complete survival in five cases. Partial necrosis occurred in three cases, two cases healed with secondary intention, and one case required a skin graft. The donor sites were treated with skin grafts and healed completely, with no complications. Lateral calcaneal free flaps have several advantages, such as anatomically constant pedicles, a pliable and thin texture, and the ability to be used as sensory flaps. They therefore represent an alternative option when conventional local or free flaps are not suitable, especially in cases of small defects. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Microsurgery 37:494-501, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. A microneurovascular TRAM flap does not compromise abdominal sensibility more than a conventional one.

    PubMed

    Puonti, Helena K; Jääskeläinen, Satu K; Hallikainen, Helena K; Partanen, Taina A

    2012-09-01

    Classic abdominoplasty for a transverse rectus abdominis musculocutaneous (TRAM) flap breast reconstruction impairs abdominal somatosensory function at the donor site. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the type of surgical procedure has an effect on somatosensory alterations of abdominal skin after TRAM flap breast reconstruction. Sixty patients (mean ± SD age, 50 ± 6.0 years) who underwent microvascular TRAM flap breast reconstruction and 20 healthy subjects (control group; mean age, 46 ± 6.7 years) participated in the study. Twenty patients had bilateral-nerve anastomosis, 20 had single-nerve anastomosis, and 20 underwent no nerve dissection for the TRAM flap. Clinical sensory examination and tactile and thermal quantitative sensory testing were performed and a patient questionnaire was administered at a mean of 2 to 4.5 years after surgery. All surgical techniques produced significant sensory impairment below the umbilicus, but there were no significant differences in total sensibility scores between the groups with single-nerve (mean sensibility score, 21.98 ± 2.7) and double-nerve (mean sensibility score, 20.71 ± 3.6) anastomosis of the TRAM flap. The best sensibility scores were found in the group with single-nerve dissection. Fifteen percent of patients complained of mild pain, and 13 percent felt occasional tactile hyperesthesia in their abdominal skin, mostly around the umbilicus and scars. In this study, unilateral or bilateral nerve dissection when preparing and lifting a TRAM flap did not seem to increase sensory alterations or postoperative pain in the abdominal donor site after breast reconstruction surgery. Cautious microneurovascular dissection techniques may even improve sensory recovery of the abdominal skin after TRAM flap breast reconstruction surgery.

  2. Funding analysis of bilateral autologous free-flap breast reconstructions in Australia.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Shiba; Ruskin, Olivia; McCombe, David; Morrison, Wayne; Webb, Angela

    2015-08-01

    Bilateral breast reconstructions are being increasingly performed. Autologous free-flap reconstructions represent the gold standard for post-mastectomy breast reconstruction but are resource intensive. This study aims to investigate the difference between hospital reimbursement and true cost of bilateral autologous free-flap reconstructions. Retrospective analysis of patients who underwent bilateral autologous free-flap reconstructions at a single Australian tertiary referral centre was performed. Hospital reimbursement was determined from coding analysis. A true cost analysis was also performed. Comparisons were made considering the effect of timing, indication and complications of the procedure. Forty-six bilateral autologous free-flap procedures were performed (87 deep inferior epigastric perforators (DIEPs), four superficial inferior epigastric artery perforator flaps (SIEAs) and one muscle-sparing free transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap (MS-TRAM)). The mean funding discrepancy between hospital reimbursement and actual cost was $12,137 ± $8539 (mean ± standard deviation (SD)) (n = 46). Twenty-four per cent (n = 11) of the cases had been coded inaccurately. If these cases were excluded from analysis, the mean funding discrepancy per case was $9168 ± $7453 (n = 35). Minor and major complications significantly increased the true cost and funding discrepancy (p = 0.02). Bilateral free-flap breast reconstructions performed in Australian public hospitals result in a funding discrepancy. Failure to be economically viable threatens the provision of this procedure in the public system. Plastic surgeons and hospital managers need to adopt measures in order to make these gold-standard procedures cost neutral. Copyright © 2015 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Control of Flap Vortices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenblatt, David

    2005-01-01

    A wind tunnel investigation was carried out on a semi-span wing model to assess the feasibility of controlling vortices emanating from outboard flaps and tip-flaps by actively varying the degree of boundary layer separation. Separation was varied by means of perturbations produced from segmented zero-efflux oscillatory blowing slots, while estimates of span loadings and vortex sheet strengths were obtained by integrating wing surface pressures. These estimates were used as input to inviscid rollup relations as a means of predicting changes to the vortex characteristics resulting from the perturbations. Surveys of flow in the wake of the outboard and tip-flaps were made using a seven-hole probe, from which the vortex characteristics were directly deduced. Varying the degree of separation had a marked effect on vortex location, strength, tangential velocity, axial velocity and size for both outboard and tip-flaps. Qualitative changes in vortex characteristics were well predicted by the inviscid rollup relations, while the failure to account for viscosity was presumed to be the main reason for observed discrepancies. Introducing perturbations near the outboard flap-edges or on the tip-flap exerted significant control over vortices while producing negligible lift excursions.

  4. [Preoperative CT angiography for planning free perforator flaps in breast reconstruction].

    PubMed

    Kuekrek, H; Müller, D; Paepke, S; Dobritz, M; Machens, H-G; Giunta, R E

    2011-04-01

    Preoperative Doppler ultrasonography for planning free perforator flaps is widely established to identify preoperatively perforators. The method allows one to localise the penetrating point of the perforator through the abdominal fascia. By this means it is not possible to see the intramuscular course or the position of the perforator in relation to the inferior epigastric artery. Lately the technique of computed tomographic angiography provides an opportunity for visualising the course of perforator vessels in these tissues. This paper summarises our experience with the preoperative CT angiography in our breast centre. Since spring 2009 we have reconstructed the breasts of 44 female patients by using free flaps from the lower abdominal wall. 6 of these were bilateral. In a total number of 50 breast reconstructions we used 23 deep inferior epigastric perforator (DIEP) flaps and 27 muscle-sparing transverse rectus abdominis muscle (TRAM) flaps. In addition to the preoperative ultrasonography, a CT angiography of the lower abdomen was conducted in 29 patients. On average they showed at least 2 perforators on the left as well as right abdominal sides, which could be used as flap vessels based on their signal intensity. Based on their estimated microsurgical dissection complexity, the perforator vessels could be classified into 3 groups: 1) direct perforators of category A with short intramuscular course (39%), 2) perforators with long intramuscular course of category B (50%) and 3) "turn around" perforators of category C, which pass medially around the rectus abdominis (11%). The technique of CT angiography permits a reliable preoperative visualisation of perforators in their entire course and facilitates the selection of the supplying perforator as well as the intraoperative procedure for the surgeon. The suggested classification of perforators into 3 groups simplifies the preoperative assessment of the microsurgical dissection effort. Compared to the commonly used

  5. Endoscopic Rectus Abdominis and Prepubic Aponeurosis Repairs for Treatment of Athletic Pubalgia.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Dean K; Matsuda, Nicole A; Head, Rachel; Tivorsak, Tanya

    2017-02-01

    Review of the English orthopaedic literature reveals no prior report of endoscopic repair of rectus abdominis tears and/or prepubic aponeurosis detachment. This technical report describes endoscopic reattachment of an avulsed prepubic aponeurosis and endoscopic repair of a vertical rectus abdominis tear immediately after endoscopic pubic symphysectomy for coexistent recalcitrant osteitis pubis as a single-stage outpatient surgery. Endoscopic rectus abdominis repair and prepubic aponeurosis repair are feasible surgeries that complement endoscopic pubic symphysectomy for patients with concurrent osteitis pubis and expand the less invasive options for patients with athletic pubalgia.

  6. The dorsal thoracic fascia: anatomic significance with clinical applications in reconstructive microsurgery.

    PubMed

    Kim, P S; Gottlieb, J R; Harris, G D; Nagle, D J; Lewis, V L

    1987-01-01

    The anatomic distribution and potential arterial flow patterns of the circumflex scapular artery were investigated by Microfil injection. These studies demonstrated that the circumflex scapular artery lies within the dorsal thoracic fascia, which plays a significant role in the circulation of the overlying skin and subcutaneous tissue. We conclude that scapular/parascapular flaps are fasciocutaneous flaps, the dorsal thoracic fascia can be transferred as a free flap without its overlying skin and subcutaneous tissue, and intercommunication exists between the myocutaneous perforators of the latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap and the vascular plexus of the dorsal thoracic fascia. We present microvascular cases in which the vascular properties of the dorsal thoracic fascia facilitated wound closure with free fascia flaps or expanded cutaneous or myocutaneous flaps.

  7. Ultrasound Assessment of the Transverse Abdominis During Functional Movement.

    PubMed

    Mangum, L Colby; Henderson, Kaitlin; Murray, Kyle P; Saliba, Susan A

    2018-05-01

    The traditional activation ratio divides contracted muscle thickness by resting muscle thickness while an abdominal draw-in maneuver is performed during hook lying. Ultrasound imaging during function, such as standing or gait, or peak knee flexion in a single-leg squat allows for further visualization of muscle activity. The goal of this study was to examine activation ratio calculations for transverse abdominis function in supine versus loaded conditions to determine the most informative normalization strategy for muscle activity based on thickness values. Transverse abdominis thickness was measured via ultrasound in 35 healthy participants under 4 different conditions. Comparisons were made between the traditional activation ratio tabletop, standing activation ratio (standing abdominal draw-in maneuver thickness/quiet standing thickness), and functional activation ratio (single-leg squat thickness/quiet standing thickness). Additionally, a cued activation ratio (single-leg squat with cued abdominal draw-in maneuver thickness/single-leg squat thickness) during the single-leg squat was obtained. Activation ratios of greater than 1.0 indicated that participants could activate the muscle during activity, and values were compared by analysis of variance. The participants included 23 women and 12 men with a mean age ± SD of 21.3 ± 2.7 years, mass of 66.1 ± 14.4 kg, and height of 168.5 ± 10.1 cm. Activation ratios exceeded 1.0 in 94.3% for the traditional activation ratio, 85.7% for the standing activation ratio, 82.9% for the cued activation ratio, and 82.9% for the functional activation ratio. With groups defined as tabletop activated or not, the standing, cued, and functional activation ratios were all significantly different (all P < .05). Normalizing muscle thickness to the corresponding functional position quiet value provides a useful functional activation ratio and may help clinicians better understand the transverse abdominis role

  8. Bilobed flap in sole surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez-Conejo-Mir, J.; Bueno Montes, J.; Moreno Gimenez, J.C.

    1985-09-01

    The bilobed flap is a simple reconstructive technique principally used to correct substantial defects in the facial region. The authors present their experience with this local flap in the difficult plantar area, with excellent short-term functional results. They describe the special characteristics of the bilobed flap in this zone, and comment on its indications and possible complications.

  9. Myositis with antimitochondrial antibodies diagnosed by rectus abdominis muscle biopsy.

    PubMed

    Uenaka, Takeshi; Kowa, Hisatomo; Sekiguchi, Kenji; Nagata, Kakuya; Ohtsuka, Yoshihisa; Kanda, Fumio; Toda, Tatsushi

    2013-05-01

    Antimitochondrial antibodies are autoantibodies detected in 90% of primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) patients. Some PBC cases are complicated by myositis, which is difficult to confirm due to minimal histological evidence of inflammation in limb muscles. Our aim was to determine the extent of inflammatory changes in a truncal muscle biopsy specimen from a PBC patient. A 48-year-old woman with a 5-year history of atrial fibrillation and chronic heart failure was evaluated for elevated serum creatine kinase level. Antimitochondrial M2 antibodies were detected, and PBC was diagnosed. A biceps brachii biopsy specimen showed mild, non-specific myogenic changes; a second biopsy was performed on the rectus abdominis muscle, which showed typical inflammatory changes. Myositis with antimitochondrial M2 antibodies was confirmed. In myositis patients with antimitochondrial M2 antibodies, muscles of the extremities are involved to a lesser extent. Radiological and histological examination focusing on truncal muscles, including a biopsy, is important. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Extended experience and modifications in the design and concepts of the keystone design island flap.

    PubMed

    Moncrieff, Marc D; Thompson, John F; Stretch, Jonathan R

    2010-08-01

    This paper describes modifications to the design of the keystone design island flap for the reconstruction of oncological defects. In particular, the paper outlines a spectrum of modifications to the design that permit the design to be tailored to a broad range of reconstructive needs, factoring in the anatomical location of the soft tissue defect and the quality of the integument in that locality. The biomechanics of the flap are also discussed in detail. Copyright 2009. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Donor-Site Morbidity After DIEAP Flap Breast Reconstruction—A 2-Year Postoperative Computed Tomography Comparison

    PubMed Central

    Bosse, Gerhard; Mynarek, Georg Karl; Berg, Thomas; Tindholdt, Tyge Tind; Tønseth, Kim Alexander

    2017-01-01

    Background: The study was undertaken to provide a more complete picture of donor-site morbidity following the deep inferior epigastric artery perforator (DIEAP) flap harvest in breast reconstruction. Most studies evaluating this subject have been performed using ultrasonography. Computed tomography (CT) might provide valuable information. Methods: In 14 patients who were reconstructed with a DIEAP flap, donor-site morbidity was assessed by comparing routine preoperative CT abdomen with CT abdomen performed 2 years postoperatively. The anteroposterior diameter and transverse diameter (TD) of the rectus muscle were measured bilaterally within 4 standardized zones. Diastasis recti abdominis (DRA) was measured in the same zones. The abdominal wall was assessed for hernias, bulging, and seromas. Results: The operated rectus muscle had a significantly increased anteroposterior diameter in 2 zones and decreased TD in 1 zone compared with preoperative measurements. Comparing the operated and nonoperated rectus muscles, the former had a significantly decreased TD in 1 zone. Supraumbilical DRA was significantly decreased with surgery, whereas infraumbilical DRA was significantly increased. No new hernias or bulging were found. Two patients had seroma formation in the abdominal wall. Conclusions: Symmetry of the 2 hemiabdomens is well preserved after DIEAP flap harvest; however, significant changes to the rectus muscles and DRA were observed. Hernia formation does not seem to be a postoperative complication of importance. The study indicates that DIEAP flaps result in limited donor-site morbidity, which for most patients does not outweigh the benefits of free perforator flap breast reconstruction. PMID:28831346

  12. Medial sural artery perforator flap: a challenging free flap.

    PubMed

    Toyserkani, Navid Mohamadpour; Sørensen, Jens Ahm

    Oral and extremity defect reconstruction can often require a flap that is thin, and traditionally, the radial forearm free flap has been used, however, this has significant donor site morbidity. Over the last decade, the medial sural artery perforator (MSAP) flap has emerged as a possible alternative with lower donor site morbidity. We present our experiences and review the literature regarding this promising but challenging flap. The study was a retrospective case series in a university hospital setting. All patients who had a MSAP flap performed at our institution were included until March 2015, and their data was retrieved from electronic patient records. In total, ten patients were reconstructed with a MSAP flap for floor of mouth (eight) and lower extremity (two) defect reconstruction. The median flap dimensions were as follows: 10 cm (range 7-14 cm), width 5 cm (range 3.5-8 cm), thickness 5 mm (range 4-8 mm), and pedicle length 10 cm (range 8-12 cm). In one case, the procedure was abandoned because of very small perforators and another flap was used. In two cases, late onset of venous congestion occurred which could not be salvaged. There were no donor site complaints. The MSAP flap is an ideal flap when a thin free flap is needed with lower donor site morbidity than alternative solutions. There seems to be a higher rate of late onset of venous thrombosis compared with more established flaps. Therefore, this flap should be monitored more closely for venous problems and we recommend performing two venous anastomoses when using this flap. Level of Evidence: Level IV, therapeutic study.

  13. The Omental Free Flap-A Review of Usage and Physiology.

    PubMed

    Mazzaferro, Daniel; Song, Ping; Massand, Sameer; Mirmanesh, Michael; Jaiswal, Rohit; Pu, Lee L Q

    2018-03-01

     The omental flap has a rich history of use over the last century, and specifically as a free flap in the last four decades. It has a wide variety of applications in reconstructive surgery and has shown itself to be a reliable donor tissue. We seek to review the properties that make the omental free flap a valuable tool in reconstruction, as well as its many surgical applications in all anatomic regions of the body.  We conducted a narrative review of the literature on Medline and Google Scholar. We reviewed basic science articles discussing the intrinsic properties of omental tissue, along with clinical papers describing its applications.  The omental free flap is anatomically suitable for harvest and wound coverage and has molecular properties that promote healing and improve function at recipient sites. It has demonstrated utility in a wide variety of reconstructive procedures spanning the head and neck, extremities, and viscera and for several purposes, including wound coverage, lymphedema treatment, and vascularization. It is also occasionally employed in the thoracic cavity and chest wall, though more often as a pedicled flap. More novel uses include its use for cerebrospinal fluid leaks.  The omental free flap is a valuable option for reconstructive efforts in nearly all anatomic regions. This is a result of its inherent anatomy and vascularity, and its angiogenic, immunogenic, and lymphatic properties. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  14. A Novel Perforator Flap Training Model Using a Chicken Leg

    PubMed Central

    Cifuentes, Ignacio J.; Yañez, Ricardo A.; Salisbury, Maria C.; Rodriguez, José R.; Varas, Julian E.; Dagnino, Bruno L.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction  Living animal models are frequently used for perforator flap dissection training, but no ex vivo models have been described. The aim of this study is to present a novel nonliving model for perforator flap training based on a constant perforator in the chicken leg. Methods  A total of 15 chicken legs were used in this study. Anatomical dissection of the perforator was performed after its identification using ink injection, and in four of these specimens a perforator-based flap was raised. Results  The anatomical dissection revealed a constant intramuscular perforator with a median length of 5.7 cm. Median proximal and distal vessel diameters were 0.93 and 0.4 mm, respectively. The median dissection time was 77.5 minutes. Conclusion  This study introduces a novel, affordable, and reproducible model for the intramuscular dissection of a perforator-based flap using an ex vivo animal model. Its consistent perforator and appropriate-sized vessels make it useful for training. PMID:27616823

  15. Noise Reduction of Aircraft Flap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutcheson, Florence V. (Inventor); Brooks, Thomas F. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A reduction in noise radiating from a side of a deployed aircraft flap is achieved by locating a slot adjacent the side of the flap, and then forcing air out through the slot with a suitable mechanism. One, two or even three or more slots are possible, where the slot is located at one;or more locations selected from a group of locations comprising a top surface of the flap, a bottom surface of the flap, an intersection of the top and side surface of the flap, an intersection of the bottom and side surfaces of the flap, and a side surface of the flap. In at least one embodiment the slot is substantially rectangular. A device for adjusting a rate of the air forced out through the slot can also be provided.

  16. [Subcostal transversus abdominis plane block can improve analgesia after laparoscopic cholecystectomy].

    PubMed

    Vrsajkov, Vladimir; Mančić, Nedjica; Mihajlović, Dunja; Milićević, Suzana Tonković; Uvelin, Arsen; Vrsajkov, Jelena Pantić

    After laparoscopic cholecystectomy, patients have moderate pain in the early postoperative period. Some studies shown beneficial effects of subcostal transversus abdominis plane block on reducing this pain. Our goal was to investigate influence of subcostal transversus abdominis plane block on postoperative pain scores and opioid consumption. We have randomized 76 patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy to receive either subcostal transversus abdominis plane block (n=38) or standard postoperative analgesia (n=38). First group received bilateral ultrasound guided subcostal transversus abdominis plane block with 20mL of 0.33% bupivacaine per side before operation and tramadol 1mg.kg -1 IV for pain breakthrough (≥6). Second group received after operation tramadol 1mg.kg -1 /6h as standard hospital analgesia protocol. Both groups received acetaminophen 1g/8h IV and metamizole 2.5g/12h. Pain at rest was recorded for each patient using NR scale (0-10) in period of 10min, 30min, 2h, 4h, 8h, 12h and 16h after the surgery. We obtained no difference between groups according age, weight, intraoperative fentanyl consumption and duration of surgery. Subcostal transversus abdominis plane block significantly reduced postoperative pain scores compared to standard analgesia in all periods after surgery. Tramadol consumption was significantly lower in the subcostal transversus abdominis plane (24.29±47.54g) than in the standard analgesia group (270.2±81.9g) (p=0.000). Our results show that subcostal transversus abdominis plane block can provide superior postoperative analgesia and reduction in opioid requirements after laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  17. [Free vascularized popliteal artery cutaneous branch flap for repair of wound on foot and ankle].

    PubMed

    Shen, Lilin; Song, Suping; Lin, Cuixia; Li, Wenlong; Sun, Xuesheng; Zhu, Tao; Li, Qiang

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the feasibility and effectiveness of free popi iteal artery cutaneous branch flap anastomosed with lateral tarsal artery and vein for the repair of wound on the foot and ankle by anatomical observation and clinical application. Latex was poured into the blood vessels of 8 cadavers, then perforator vessel of posterolateral upper calf was dissected, and the popl iteal artery cutaneous branch flap was designed with a pedicle of 2.5 cm in length; the lateral tarsal artery of the foot was dissected, could be freed to 6 cm in length; the diameter of these vessels was measured, and the number of the accompanying veins was counted. Between March 2010 and January 2013, 13 cases of foot and ankle wounds were repaired with popliteal artery cutaneous branch flap anastomosed with lateral tarsal artery and vein. The size of flaps ranged from 6.0 cm x 4.0 cm to 7.5 cm x 5.5 cm. There were 11 males and 2 females, aged from 41 to 65 years (mean, 47.3 years). The causes of injury included traffic accident in 8 cases, crushing in 4 cases, and twist by machine in 1 case. The size of wounds, ranged from 5.0 cm x 3.5 cm to 7.0 cm x 5.0 cm. The donor sites were sutured directly. According to anatomical observation, the popliteal artery cutaneous branch flap was designed by using the lateral popliteal artery perforator for shaft. The vessel of the pedicle perforator flaps from the popliteal artery cutaneous branch flap matched well with the lateral tarsal artery. vascular crisis occurred in 2 flaps, which survived after symptomatic treatment; the other flaps survived, with primary healing of wound and incision at donor site. The patients were all followed up 5-18 months (mean, 11 months). The flap had normal color and good elasticity. Second stage operation was performed to make the flap thinner in 3 female patients because of bulky flaps. The remaining patients had no obvious fat flap. According to American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) score for evaluation of

  18. Propeller flaps in eyelid reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Rajak, Saul N; Huilgol, Shyamala C; Murakami, Masahiro; Selva, Dinesh

    2018-03-14

    Propeller flaps are island flaps that reach the recipient site through an axial rotation. The flap has a subcutaneous pedicle on which it pivots, thereby resembling a helicopter propeller. We present our series of propeller flaps for the reconstruction of large eyelid defects. This is a retrospective review of the clinical case notes of eight patients that underwent tumour excision with reconstruction with a cutaneous propeller flap supplied by a non-perforator orbicularis pedicle between July and December 2016. Propeller flaps were used in the reconstruction of five lower lid defects (size range 19 × 5 mm to 25 × 8 mm), one medial canthus defect (13 mm diameter), one complete upper lid defect (42 × 19 mm diameter) and one lid sparing extenteration defect. The flaps were recruited from nasolabial, lateral canthal, temple or medial upper cheek skin. Post-operatively one case had 'trapdooring' which required flap revision at 4 months and one had persistent oedema that settled without intervention. The reconstruction of large eyelid defects is challenging in part because of the paucity of locally available skin. Propeller flaps are a paradigm shift in periocular reconstruction in which the subcutaneous pedicle enables the recruitment of large and highly mobile skin flaps from a wide area of regional tissue.

  19. Versatility of the Angularis Oris Axial Pattern Flap for Facial Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Losinski, Sara L; Stanley, Bryden J; Schallberger, Sandra P; Nelson, Laura L; Towle Millard, Heather A M

    2015-11-01

    To describe the versatility of the axial pattern flap based on the cutaneous perforating branch of the angularis oris artery for reconstruction of large facial defects in dogs, including complications and clinical outcomes. Retrospective clinical case series. Client-owned dogs (n = 8). Facial flaps (n = 9) based at the commissure of the lip with a caudodorsal orientation were utilized, with established anatomical borders. Flaps were elevated deep to the panniculus carnosus in a caudal to rostral direction, preserving the angularis oris artery, its cutaneous perforator, and surrounding cutaneous vasculature. Flaps were rotated dorsally or ventrally to cover the defect. Primary closure of the donor site was by direct apposition in all cases. Angularis oris axial pattern flaps were most commonly used to close large defects of the nasomaxillary area rostral to the eyes (6 dogs), followed by orbital (2) and intermandibular (1) defects. Defects occurred because of tumor resection (6 dogs), trauma (2), and a chronic, non-healing wounding (1). All flaps healed with acceptable functional and cosmetic outcomes without major complications. Followup ranged from 10 days to 16 months. Minor postoperative complications included flap edema (8 dogs), partial incisional dehiscence (3), distal tip necrosis (2), and oroantral fistula recurrence (1). Angularis oris axial pattern flaps provided hirsute, full-thickness skin coverage of a variety of large facial defects with minor complications, and should be considered when restructuring large defects of the rostral face or chin. © Copyright 2015 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  20. The temporalis muscle flap and temporoparietal fascial flap.

    PubMed

    Lam, Din; Carlson, Eric R

    2014-08-01

    The temporal arterial system provides reliable vascular anatomy for the temporalis muscle flap and temporoparietal fascial flap that can support multiple reconstructive needs of the oral and maxillofacial region. The minimal donor site morbidity and ease of development of these flaps result in their predictable and successful transfer for reconstructive surgery of the oral and maxillofacial region. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Skin flaps and grafts - self-care

    MedlinePlus

    ... Free flap - self-care; Skin autografting - self-care; Pressure ulcer skin flap self-care; Burns skin flap self- ... skin infection Surgery for skin cancer Venous ulcers , pressure ulcers , or diabetic ulcers that DO NOT heal After ...

  2. Rectus abdominis overuse injury in a tennis athlete treated with traumeel.

    PubMed

    Natsis, Konstantinos; Lyrtzis, Christos; Papathanasiou, Efthymia; Anastasopoulos, Nikos

    2012-01-01

    Rectus abdominis injuries are common in tennis players at all levels of competition. Traumeel(®) injection can be used for treatment of muscle strains and hematomas. A 21-year-old female tennis athlete was injured on the non-dominant rectus abdominis during the cocking phase of the service motion. She suffered from pain and tenderness. One week later, during a serve, she experienced severe pain on the contralateral side of her abdomen. Conservative treatment was performed by the team physician with rest, ice therapy and analgesics for 20 days, but she had recurrent injuries. The ultrasonography and MRI showed hematoma of the rectus abdominis muscle. She was treated with 2 injections of Traumeel(®) on the 2(nd), 4(th), 6(th) post-traumatic day and received 1 injection on the 10(th) post-traumatic day. She also modified her serve technique. On the fourth post-treatment week the athlete had pain-free function and both the MRI appearance and the size of rectus abdominal muscle were normal. She returned to her sport activities. There is no recurrence of her injury 2 years later. Rectus abdominis hematoma must be diagnosed early. Traumeel(®) injections are effective, safe and well-tolerated for the treatment of overuse injury of the rectus abdominis following strain.

  3. Vascular anatomy of the supraclavicular area revisited: feasibility of the free supraclavicular perforator flap.

    PubMed

    Cordova, Adriana; Pirrello, Roberto; D'Arpa, Salvatore; Jeschke, Johannes; Brenner, Erich; Moschella, Francesco

    2008-11-01

    The supraclavicular skin has been studied extensively and used as a pedicled flap for face and neck reconstruction. Its use as a free flap has not paralleled its use as a pedicled flap. The authors performed an anatomical investigation to assess the possibility of harvesting a free supraclavicular flap with the donor-site scar lying in the supraclavicular crease. In this article, the authors present the results of their anatomical study together with the preliminary clinical applications. Skin vascularization and feasibility of a free supraclavicular perforator flap were studied on 25 cadavers (15 fresh cadavers injected with colored latex at the Universiteé René Descartes in Paris; and 10 formalin-fixed, noninjected cadavers at the Innsbruck Medical University). The flap was used in two patients at the Plastic Surgery Department of the University of Palermo for a cutaneous facial reconstruction and intraoral reconstruction after cancer excision. An average of four perforators were consistently found in the supraclavicular area coming from the transverse cervical artery. Venous perforators drain into the superficial venous plexus rather than into the venae comitantes of the transverse cervical artery. Two flaps were successfully used based on these vessels. The vascularization of the supraclavicular skin depends on skin perforators coming from the transverse cervical artery and draining into the superficial venous plexus. Based on these vessels, a reliable free supraclavicular flap seems to be safe to harvest, with the scar hidden in the supraclavicular crease. The preliminary clinical applications of such a flap gave promising results, suggesting its potential applications.

  4. Externally blown flap noise research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorsch, R. G.

    1974-01-01

    The Lewis Research Center cold-flow model externally blown flap (EBF) noise research test program is summarized. Both engine under-the-wing and over-the-wing EBF wing section configurations were studied. Ten large scale and nineteen small scale EBF models were tested. A limited number of forward airspeed effect and flap noise suppression tests were also run. The key results and conclusions drawn from the flap noise tests are summarized and discussed.

  5. Diastasis of rectus abdominis muscles in low back pain patients.

    PubMed

    Doubkova, Lucie; Andel, Ross; Palascakova-Springrova, Ingrid; Kolar, Pavel; Kriz, Jiri; Kobesova, Alena

    2018-02-06

    Abdominal muscles are important spinal stabilizers and its poor coordination, as seen in diastasis of rectus abdominis (DRA), may contribute to chronic low back pain (LBP). However, this has not yet been studied directly. To conduct a pilot study to examine the association between DRA and LBP. Using a digital caliper, standard clinical DRA measurement was performed in 55 participants with and 54 without chronic LBP. Participants were on average 55 years old, 69 (63%) were women. Among the 16 participants with DRA, 11 (69%) had chronic LBP; among the 93 participants without DRA, 44 (47%) had LBP. Among men, 7 of 9 (77%) with DRA had LBP and 14 of 31 (45%) without DRA had LBP. Among women, 4 of 7 (57%) with DRA had LBP and 30 of 62 (48%) without DRA had LBP. BMI was the strongest correlate of DRA and may explain the relation between DRA and chronic LBP. DRA and LBP may be interrelated, especially among men. This may be a function of greater BMI in individuals with chronic LBP. Understanding the association between DRA, LBP, and BMI may have important implications for treatment of LBP and for intervention.

  6. Externally-blown-flap noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorsch, R. G.; Kreim, W. J.; Olsen, W. A.

    1972-01-01

    Noise data were obtained with a large externally blown flap model. A fan-jet engine exhaust was simulated by a 1/2-scale bypass nozzle supplied by pressurized air. The nozzle was pylon mounted on a wing section having a double-slotted flap for lift augmentation. Noise radiation patterns and spectra were obtained for nozzle exhaust velocities between 400 and 1150 ft/sec. The blown flap noise data are in good agreement with previous small model results extrapolated to test conditions by Strouhal scaling. The results indicate that blown flap noise must be suppressed to meet STOL aircraft noise goals.

  7. Management of Dropped Skull Flaps.

    PubMed

    Abdelfatah, Mohamed AbdelRahman

    2017-01-01

    Dropping a skull flap on the floor is an uncommon and avoidable mistake in the neurosurgical operating theater. This study retrospectively reviewed all incidents of dropped skull flaps in Ain-Shams University hospitals during a 10-year period to show how to manage this problem and its outcome. Thirty-one incidents of dropped skull flaps occurred from January 2004 to January 2014 out of more than 10,000 craniotomies. Follow-up period varied from 20 to 44 months. The bone flap was dropped while elevating the bone (n = 16), while drilling the bone on the operating table (n = 5), and during insertion of the bone flap (n = 10). Treatment included re-insertion of the skull flap after soaking it in povidone iodine and antibiotic solution (n = 17) or after autoclaving (n = 11), or discarding the skull flap and replacing it with a mesh cranioplasty in the same operation (n = 3). No bone or wound infection was noted during the follow-up period. Management of dropped skull flap is its prevention. Replacement of the skull flap, after decontamination, is an option that avoids the expense and time of cranioplasty.

  8. Double Back Cut in Post-mastectomy Breast Skin (Fish-Shaped Skin Paddle) in Delayed Pedicled TRAM Flap Breast Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Berezovsky, Alexander Bogdanov; Pagkalos, Vasileios A; Shoham, Yaron; Krieger, Yuval; Silberstein, Eldad

    2015-08-01

    Breast reconstruction has become standard of care for female patients with breast cancer. The transverse rectus abdominis musculo-cutaneous flap (TRAMf) is the most common method of immediate or delayed autologous breast reconstruction following mastectomy. We share our experience with modified, double back cut of post-mastectomy skin in delayed pedicled TRAMf breast reconstruction, resulting in fish-shaped skin paddle. This sort of back cut is a simple, reliable way to obtain a natural, esthetically pleasant breast mound with inconspicuous hidden scars.

  9. [Preliminary evaluation on seroma prevention and treatment with transposition of tissue flaps and arista hemostatic powder].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ruming; Tan, Yiwen; Wang, Heqi

    2006-12-01

    To investigate and evaluate prevention and treatment of seroma by transposition of tissue flaps and Arista hemostatic powder after regional lymph node resection in patients with malignant tumors. Twelve patients (6 males, 6 females; aged 31-81 years, with metastatic tumors underwent prevention and treatment of seroma with the tissue flaps and Arista hemostatic powder spray after regional lymph node resection. The metastatic tumors involved the axilla in 1 patient with breast carcinoma, the iliac and inguinal regions in 2 patients with carcinomas of the uterine cervix and the rectum, and the inguinal region in 9 patients, including 4 patients with malignant fibrous histiocytoma(3 in the thigh, 1 in the leg), 2 patients with squamous carcinomas in the leg, 1 patient with synovial sarcoma in the knee, 1 patient with epithelioid sarcoma in the leg, and 1 patient with malignant melanoma in the foot. As for the lymph node removal therapy. 1 patient underwent axillary lymph node removal, 2 patients underwent lymph node removal in theiliac and inguinal regions, and 9 patients underwent lymph node removal in the inguinal region. Meanwhile, of the 12 patients, 6 patients underwent transposition of sartorius flaps with Arista hemostatic powder, 3 patients underwent transposition of the rectus abdominis myocutaneous flaps (including 2 patients treated with Arista spray befor the wound closure and 1 patient treated by transposition of local skin flaps with Arista spray used again),and 3 patients underwent only the suturing of the wounds combined with Arista. At the same time, of the 12 patients,only 4 patient underwent the transplantation of artificial blood vessels. The follow-up for 2-10 months after operation revealed that 10 patients, who had received the transposition of tissue flaps and the spray of Arista hemostatic powder, had the first intention of the incision heal with seroma cured. Nine patients were given a preventive use of Arista hemostatic powder and therefore

  10. Blunt transection of rectus abdominis following seatbelt related trauma with associated small and large bowel injury.

    PubMed

    Patel, K; Doolin, R; Suggett, N

    2013-01-01

    Closed rupture of rectus abdominis following seatbelt related trauma is rare. We present the case of a 45 year old female who presented with closed rupture of the rectus abdominis in conjunction with damage to small bowel mesentery and infarction of small and large bowel following a high velocity road traffic accident. Multiple intestinal resections were required resulting in short bowel syndrome and abdominal wall reconstruction with a porcine collagen mesh. Post-operative complications included intra-abdominal sepsis and an enterocutaneous fistula. The presence of rupture of rectus abdominis muscle secondary to seatbelt injury should raise the suspicion of intra-abdominal injury. Our case highlights the need for suspicion, investigation and subsequent surgical management of intra-abdominal injury following identification of this rare consequence of seatbelt trauma. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  11. Reduction of Flap Side Edge Noise - the Blowing Flap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutcheson, Florence V.; Brooks, THomas F.

    2005-01-01

    A technique to reduce the noise radiating from a wing-flap side edge is being developed. As an airplane wing with an extended flap is exposed to a subsonic airflow, air is blown outward through thin rectangular chord-wise slots at various locations along the side edges and side surface of the flap to weaken and push away the vortices that originate in that region of the flap and are responsible for important noise emissions. Air is blown through the slots at up to twice the local flow velocity. The blowing is done using one or multiple slots, where a slot is located along the top, bottom or side surface of the flap along the side edge, or also along the intersection of the bottom (or top) and side surfaces.

  12. The free descending branch muscle-sparing latissimus dorsi flap: vascular anatomy and clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Colohan, Shannon; Wong, Corrine; Lakhiani, Chrisovalantis; Cheng, Angela; Maia, Munique; Arbique, Gary; Saint-Cyr, Michel

    2012-12-01

    Increasing focus on reducing morbidity from latissimus dorsi flaps has led to the evolution of muscle-sparing variants and perforator-based flaps. This study aimed to investigate the vascular anatomy of the muscle-sparing variant and to describe its application as a free flap based on the descending branch of the thoracodorsal artery. Twelve fresh cadavers underwent anatomical dissection and angiographic injection studies of the thoracodorsal arterial system. The musculocutaneous territories of the descending and transverse branches to the latissimus dorsi muscle were identified and assessed using three-dimensional reconstruction software of computed tomography imaging results. In the clinical study, five patients underwent reconstruction of a variety of defects using the free descending branch muscle-sparing latissimus dorsi flap. Three- and four-dimensional (computed tomography) angiography demonstrated perfusion of the latissimus dorsi muscle by the transverse and descending branches, with overlap of vascular territories via cross-linking vessels. The descending branch supplied a slightly greater cutaneous area overlying the muscle, although differences between both branches were not significant (p = 0.76). In the clinical study, the free muscle-sparing latissimus dorsi flap provided excellent coverage with no flap complications or seroma. The free muscle-sparing latissimus dorsi flap based on the descending branch of the thoracodorsal artery is a viable reconstructive option. Significant collateral flow between vessels allows for larger flap harvest than would be expected. The flap is technically simple to harvest, provides a large perfusion area, and is a reliable variant of the full latissimus dorsi flap. Therapeutic, V.

  13. Reconstruction of Nasal Cleft Deformities Using Expanded Forehead Flaps: A Case Series.

    PubMed

    Ramanathan, Manikandhan; Sneha, Pendem; Parameswaran, Ananthnarayanan; Jayakumar, Naveen; Sailer, Hermann F

    2014-12-01

    Reconstruction of the nasal clefts is a challenging task considering the nasal anatomic complexity and their possible association with craniofacial defects. The reconstruction of these defects needs extensive amounts of soft tissue that warrant the use of forehead flaps. Often presence of cranial defects and low hairline compromise the amount of tissue available for reconstruction warrenting tissue expansion. To evaluate the efficacy of tissue expansion in reconstruction of congenital nasal clefts. 9 patients with congenital nasal clefts involving multiple sub units were taken up for nasal reconstruction with expanded forehead flaps. The average amount of expansion needed was 200 ml. The reconstruction was performed in 3 stages. Expanded forehead flaps proved to be best modality for reconstruction providing the skin cover needed for ala, columella and dorsum with minimal scarring at the donor site. Expansion of the forehead flap is a viable option for multiple sub unit reconstruction in congenital nasal cleft deformities.

  14. Theory of flapping flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lippisch, Alexander

    1925-01-01

    Before attempting to construct a human-powered aircraft, the aviator will first try to post himself theoretically on the possible method of operating the flapping wings. This report will present a graphic and mathematical method, which renders it possible to determine the power required, so far as it can be done on the basis of the wing dimensions. We will first consider the form of the flight path through the air. The simplest form is probably the curve of ordinary wave motion. After finding the flight curve, we must next determine the change in the angle of attack while passing through the different phases of the wave.

  15. Mathematical modelling of the growth of human fetus anatomical structures.

    PubMed

    Dudek, Krzysztof; Kędzia, Wojciech; Kędzia, Emilia; Kędzia, Alicja; Derkowski, Wojciech

    2017-09-01

    The goal of this study was to present a procedure that would enable mathematical analysis of the increase of linear sizes of human anatomical structures, estimate mathematical model parameters and evaluate their adequacy. Section material consisted of 67 foetuses-rectus abdominis muscle and 75 foetuses- biceps femoris muscle. The following methods were incorporated to the study: preparation and anthropologic methods, image digital acquisition, Image J computer system measurements and statistical analysis method. We used an anthropologic method based on age determination with the use of crown-rump length-CRL (V-TUB) by Scammon and Calkins. The choice of mathematical function should be based on a real course of the curve presenting growth of anatomical structure linear size Ύ in subsequent weeks t of pregnancy. Size changes can be described with a segmental-linear model or one-function model with accuracy adequate enough for clinical purposes. The interdependence of size-age is described with many functions. However, the following functions are most often considered: linear, polynomial, spline, logarithmic, power, exponential, power-exponential, log-logistic I and II, Gompertz's I and II and von Bertalanffy's function. With the use of the procedures described above, mathematical models parameters were assessed for V-PL (the total length of body) and CRL body length increases, rectus abdominis total length h, its segments hI, hII, hIII, hIV, as well as biceps femoris length and width of long head (LHL and LHW) and of short head (SHL and SHW). The best adjustments to measurement results were observed in the exponential and Gompertz's models.

  16. Clinical utility of colour flow Doppler ultrasonography in planning anterolateral thigh flap harvest.

    PubMed

    Patel, Rajan S; Higgins, Kevin M; Enepekides, Danny J; Hamilton, Paul A

    2010-10-01

    The anatomic variability of cutaneous perforators contributes to the technical challenges of anterolateral thigh (ALT) free flap harvest. The objective of this study was to assess the accuracy and clinical utility of preoperative colour flow Doppler (CFD) ultrasonography in evaluating planned ALT flap donor sites. A prospective study of the infrainguinal vasculature (profunda femoris and lateral circumflex femoral arteries) in 16 consecutive patients scheduled for ALT free flap transfer for reconstruction of head and neck surgical defects was undertaken. All patients underwent CFD ultrasonography. The location of perforators and the thigh thickness determined by CFD ultrasonography were correlated with the actual intraoperative findings using a scatter plot and paired t-test. Two patients were diagnosed with bilateral silent infrainguinal claudication, which precluded safe use of the ALT donor site. In two other patients, the planned ALT donor site ipsilateral to the defect was not used because of silent infrainguinal claudication diagnosed by CFD ultrasonography. In the 14 patients who underwent ALT flap harvest, CFD ultrasonography identified 48 perforators, which coincided with 43 actual perforators found intraoperatively. CFD ultrasonography demonstrated a statistically significant correlation with the actual perforator locations (Spearman coefficient .76; p = .55). Although CFD ultrasonography tended to underestimate flap thickness, there was a statistically significant correlation (Spearman coefficient .94; p ≤ .0001) with the actual flap thickness. CFD ultrasonography has clinical utility in facilitating decision making and planning ALT flap harvest.

  17. Expanded Transposition Flap Technique for Total and Subtotal Resurfacing of the Face and Neck

    PubMed Central

    Spence, Robert J.

    2007-01-01

    Background: The reconstruction of major burn and other deformities resulting from significant soft tissue deficits of the face and neck is a continuing challenge for surgeons who wish to reliably restore facial function and aesthetic appearance. A primary problem is deficiency of well-matched donor skin. Other problems include the unique characteristics of facial skin, the fine anatomic nuances, and the unique functional demands placed on the face. This article describes an expanded shoulder transposition flap that can provide a large amount of both flap and full-thickness skin graft for total and subtotal reconstruction of the face. Methods: An expanded shoulder transposition flap has been used since 1986 for head and neck resurfacing 58 times in 41 patients ranging in age from 2 to 62 years. The details of the technique and the results of the flap including complications are described. Results: The flap proved remarkably reliable and reproducible in resurfacing the peripheral facial aesthetic units. The pedicle skin is often used for grafting of the central face with its finer features. The donor site of the flap is closed primarily. Conclusions: Twenty years' experience with expanded transposition flaps has shown it to be reliable and versatile in the reconstruction of major soft tissue deficits of the face and neck. It is a technique that provides economy of tissue, versatility, and is well within the skill, patience, and courage of most reconstructive surgeons. PMID:17534420

  18. Propeller Flaps: A Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Sisti, Andrea; D'Aniello, Carlo; Fortezza, Leonardo; Tassinari, Juri; Cuomo, Roberto; Grimaldi, Luca; Nisi, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Since their introduction in 1991, propeller flaps are increasingly used as a surgical approach to loss of substance. The aim of this study was to evaluate the indications and to verify the outcomes and the complication rates using this reconstructing technique through a literature review. A search on PubMed was performed using "propeller flap", "fasciocutaneous flap", "local flap" or "pedicled flap" as key words. We selected clinical studies using propeller flaps as a reconstructing technique. We found 119 studies from 1991 to 2015. Overall, 1,315 propeller flaps were reported in 1,242 patients. Most frequent indications included loss of substance following tumor excision, repair of trauma-induced injuries, burn scar contractures, pressure sores and chronic infections. Complications were observed in 281/1242 patients (22.6%) occurring more frequently in the lower limbs (31.8%). Partial flap necrosis and venous congestion were the most frequent complications. The complications' rate was significantly higher in infants (<10 years old) and in the older population (>70 years old) but there was not a significant difference between the sexes. Trend of complication rate has not improved during the last years. Propeller flaps showed a great success rate with low morbidity, quick recovery, good aesthetic outcomes and reduced cost. The quality and volume of the transferred soft tissue, the scar orientation and the possibility of direct donor site closure should be considered in order to avoid complications. Indications for propeller flaps are small- or medium-sized defects located in a well-vascularized area with healthy surrounding tissues. Copyright © 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  19. Lower-limb reconstruction with chimeric flaps: The quad flap.

    PubMed

    Azouz, Solomon M; Castel, Nikki A; Vijayasekaran, Aparna; Rebecca, Alanna M; Lettieri, Salvatore C

    2018-05-07

    Early soft-tissue coverage is critical for treating traumatic open lower-extremity wounds. As free-flap reconstruction evolves, injuries once thought to be nonreconstructable are being salvaged. Free-tissue transfer is imperative when there is extensive dead space or exposure of vital structures such as bone, tendon, nerves, or blood vessels. We describe 2 cases of lower-extremity crush injuries salvaged with the quad flap. This novel flap consists of parascapular, scapular, serratus, and latissimus dorsi free flaps in combination on one pedicle. This flap provides the large amount of soft-tissue coverage necessary to cover substantial defects from skin degloving, tibia and fibula fractures, and soft-tissue loss. In case 1, a 51-year-old woman was struck by an automobile and sustained bilateral tibia and fibula fractures, a crush degloving injury of the left leg, and a right forefoot traumatic amputation. She underwent reconstruction with a contralateral quad free flap. In case 2, a 53-year-old man sustained a right tibia plateau fracture with large soft-tissue defects from a motorcycle accident. He had a crush degloving injury of the entire anterolateral compartment over the distal and lower third of the right leg. The large soft-tissue defect was reconstructed with a contralateral quad flap. In both cases, the donor site was closed primarily and without early flap failures. There was one surgical complication, an abscess in case 2; the patient was taken back to the operating room for débridement of necrotic tissue. There have been no long-term complications in either case. Both patients achieved adequate soft-tissue coverage, avoided amputation, and had satisfactory aesthetic and functional outcomes. With appropriate surgical technique and patient selection, the quad-flap technique is promising for reconstructing the lower extremity. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. A comparison of plasma levobupivacaine concentrations following transversus abdominis plane block and rectus sheath block.

    PubMed

    Yasumura, R; Kobayashi, Y; Ochiai, R

    2016-05-01

    Levobupivacaine is commonly used as the local anaesthetic of choice in peripheral nerve blocks, but its pharmacokinetics have not been fully investigated. We compared the changes in plasma concentrations of levobupivacaine following transversus abdominis plane block and rectus sheath block. Fifty woman undergoing laparoscopy were randomly allocated to receive either a transversus abdominis plane block or an rectus sheath block. In both groups, 2.5 mg.kg(-1) levobupivacaine was administered, and blood samples were obtained 15 min, 30 min, 60 min and 120 min after injection. The mean maximum plasma concentration (Cmax) and mean time to reach Cmax (Tmax) as determined by non-linear regression analysis were 1.05 μg.ml(-1) and 32.4 min in the transversus abdominis plane group and 0.95 μg.ml(-1) and 60.9 min in the rectus sheath group, respectively. The plasma concentration of levobupivacaine peaked earlier in the transversus abdominis plane group than in the rectus sheath group and the maximum plasma concentration depended on the dose administered but not the procedure. © 2016 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  1. Myosonographic study of abdominal wall dynamics to assess donor site morbidity after microsurgical breast reconstruction with a DIEP or an ms-2 TRAM flap.

    PubMed

    Seidenstuecker, K; Legler, U; Munder, B; Andree, C; Mahajan, A; Witzel, C

    2016-05-01

    Currently, autologous breast reconstruction with a free tissue transfer from the lower abdomen is considered to be a safe method that provides a stable long-term solution. The DIEP-flap and the ms-2-TRAM-flap reconstructions have helped reduce donor site morbidity. In order to assess the potential differences between these techniques, we carried out myosonographic evaluations that assessed the muscle dynamics pre- and post-operatively. In addition to investigating the properties of the rectus abdominis muscle post-operatively, this prospective study also allowed us to analyse the muscle preoperatively and to investigate the prospects for harvesting a DIEP-flap as opposed to a TRAM-flap. Sixty patients underwent breast reconstruction with 71 (11 bilateral) free abdominal wall flaps (DIEP-: n = 48; ms-2-TRAM-flap: n = 23). Myosonographic examinations were performed preoperatively and at 3 and 6 months post-operatively. The thickness of the muscle at relaxation and maximum contraction and the difference between the muscle thickness measured at the two states were measured. A general-linear-model (GLM) was used for statistical analysis. The main variable was the surgical method, and the co-variables included BMI and patient age. The decision on whether to harvest a DIEP- or ms-2-TRAM-flap was made intra-operatively and based on the dominant perforator. It shows that the patients who underwent breast reconstruction with a DIEP-flap had significantly better muscle function (p < 0.05) in the follow-up. In addition, the analysis revealed that better muscle function before surgery made it more likely that a patient would undergo a DIEP-flap-reconstruction successfully. Patient age also had a highly significant effect on muscle recovery (p < 0.0005). This prospective study used a dynamic ultrasound evaluation of the abdominal wall and showed that the DIEP-flap significantly reduces donor site morbidity compared to the ms-2-TRAM-flap. The study also showed that good

  2. Flap Edge Noise Reduction Fins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khorrami, Mehdi R. (Inventor); Choudhan, Meelan M. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A flap of the type that is movably connected to an aircraft wing to provide control of an aircraft in flight includes opposite ends, wherein at least a first opposite end includes a plurality of substantially rigid, laterally extending protrusions that are spaced apart to form a plurality of fluidly interconnected passageways. The passageways have openings adjacent to upper and lower sides of the flap, and the passageways include a plurality of bends such that high pressure fluid flows from a high pressure region to a low pressure region to provide a boundary condition that inhibits noise resulting from airflow around the end of the flap.

  3. Dancing girl flap: a new flap suitable for web release.

    PubMed

    Shinya, K

    1999-12-01

    To create a deep web, a flap must be designed to have a high elongation effect in one direction along the mid-lateral line of the finger and also to have a shortening effect in the other direction, crossing at a right angle to the mid-lateral line. The dancing girl flap is a modification of a four-flap Z-plasty with two additional Z-plasties. It has a high elongation effect in one direction (>550%) and a shortening effect in the other direction at a right angle (<33%), creating a deep, U-shaped surface. This new flap can be used to release severe scar contracture with a web, and is most suitable for incomplete syndactyly with webs as high as the proximal interphalangeal joint.

  4. Indocyanine Green Fluorescence for Free-Flap Perfusion Imaging Revisited: Advanced Decision Making by Virtual Perfusion Reality in Visionsense Fusion Imaging Angiography.

    PubMed

    Bigdeli, Amir Khosrow; Gazyakan, Emre; Schmidt, Volker Juergen; Hernekamp, Frederick Jochen; Harhaus, Leila; Henzler, Thomas; Kremer, Thomas; Kneser, Ulrich; Hirche, Christoph

    2016-06-01

    Near-infrared indocyanine green video angiography (ICG-NIR-VA) has been introduced for free-flap surgery and may provide intraoperative flap designing as well as postoperative monitoring. Nevertheless, the technique has not been established in clinical routine because of controversy over benefits. Improved technical features of the novel Visionsense ICG-NIR-VA surgery system are promising to revisit the field of application. It features a unique real-time fusion image of simultaneous NIR and white light visualization, with highlighted perfusion, including a color-coded perfusion flow scale for optimized anatomical understanding. In a feasibility study, the Visionsense ICG-NIR-VA system was applied during 10 free-flap surgeries in 8 patients at our center. Indications included anterior lateral thigh (ALT) flap (n = 4), latissimus dorsi muscle flap (n = 1), tensor fascia latae flap (n = 1), and two bilateral deep inferior epigastric artery perforator flaps (n = 4). The system was used intraoperatively and postoperatively to investigate its impact on surgical decision making and to observe perfusion patterns correlated to clinical monitoring. Visionsense ICG-NIR-VA aided assessing free-flap design and perfusion patterns in all cases and correlated with clinical observations. Additional interventions were performed in 2 cases (22%). One venous anastomosis was revised, and 1 flap was redesigned. Indicated by ICG-NIR-VA, 1 ALT flap developed partial flap necrosis (11%). The Visionsense ICG-NIR-VA system allowed a virtual view of flap perfusion anatomy by fusion imaging in real-time. The system improved decision making for flap design and surgical decisions. Clinical and ICG-NIR-VA parameters correlated. Its future implementation may aid in improving outcomes for free-flap surgery, but additional experience is needed to define its final role. © The Author(s) 2015.

  5. Retroauricular skin: a flaps bank for ear reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Cordova, A; D'Arpa, S; Pirrello, R; Giambona, C; Moschella, F

    2008-01-01

    The retroauricular skin has always been given much attention by the reconstructive surgeon for ear and face reconstruction because it is richly vascularised, as many anatomical investigations show, it is hidden behind the ear, its skin is very similar to that of ear and face. All these reasons make it an ideal donor site for ear reconstruction. The authors propose their own algorithm for reconstruction of every kind of anterior defects of the auricle with different Retroauricular Island Flaps (RIFs) based on the location and size of the defect developed over a 16 years single institution's experience with a series of 216 consecutive cases. 216 patients have undergone ear reconstruction with RIFs from 1999 to 2006. In 52 a Superior Pedicle RIF (SP-RIF) was used for defects of the upper half of the auricle. In 68 cases a Perforator RIF (P-RIF) was used for conchal reconstruction. In 96 cases an Inferior Pedicle RIF (IP-RIF) was used for reconstruction of nonmarginal and superficial marginal defects of the auricle. No flap failure was recorded. Excellent morphological reconstruction was obtained with these flaps with no sequealae at the donor site in terms of form and function. Only in the case of P-RIFs the sulcus becomes flat in its central part, but this has never affected the possibility of wearing spectacles. The SP-RIFs may sometimes show some signs of venous stasis that invariably resolve in the first two postoperative days. The retroauricular skin may be considered a flaps bank for ear reconstruction. It offers in fact a great variety of island flaps that are suitable for every kind of loss of substance of the ear, have a safe vascularisation, skin of similar colour and texture, are easy to harvest under local anaesthesia on an outpatient basis and cause no relevant morbidity at the donor site. Location and size of the defects lead the choice between the different types of RIFs.

  6. Anatomical variations and sinusitis.

    PubMed

    Jorissen, M; Hermans, R; Bertrand, B; Eloy, P

    1997-01-01

    Paranasal sinus anatomy and variations have gained interest with the introduction of functional endoscopic sinus surgery and the concept of the ostiomeatal complex. Anatomical variations can be divided in structural abnormalities, (increased) pneumatization and supplementary openings. Most anatomical variations are equally found in control and sinusitis patients. The anatomical variations which are most commonly associated with sinus pathology are septal deviations, true conchae bullosae and supplementary maxillary ostia but the latter one only when recycling is present. The knowledge of anatomical variations is most important in the surgical management and specifically in the prevention of complications.

  7. The Gradual Expansion Muscle Flap

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    acute shortening and angulation of the tibia and rotational muscle flap coverage and split thickness skin grafting of the soft tissue defect...is also amenable to split-thickness skin grafting after tissue incorporation.11 In addition to donor site morbidity, free tissue transfer is dependent...necessary soft tissue coverage. In the second stage, after the flap has adequately set and overlying skin graft has full adherence, a Taylor Spatial

  8. [Aesthetic effect of wound repair with flaps].

    PubMed

    Tan, Qian; Zhou, Hong-Reng; Wang, Shu-Qin; Zheng, Dong-Feng; Xu, Peng; Wu, Jie; Ge, Hua-Qiang; Lin, Yue; Yan, Xin

    2012-08-01

    To investigate the aesthetic effect of wound repair with flaps. One thousand nine hundred and ninety-six patients with 2082 wounds hospitalized from January 2004 to December 2011. These wounds included 503 deep burn wounds, 268 pressure sores, 392 soft tissue defects caused by trauma, 479 soft tissue defects due to resection of skin cancer and mole removal, 314 soft tissue defects caused by scar excision, and 126 other wounds. Wound area ranged from 1.5 cm x 1.0 cm to 30.0 cm x 22.0 cm. Sliding flaps, expanded flaps, pedicle flaps, and free flaps were used to repair the wounds in accordance with the principle and timing of wound repair with flaps. Five flaps showed venous congestion within 48 hours post-operation, 2 flaps of them improved after local massage. One flap survived after local heparin wet packing and venous bloodletting. One flap survived after emergency surgical embolectomy and bridging with saphenous vein graft. One flap showed partial necrosis and healed after skin grafting. The other flaps survived well. One thousand three hundred and twenty-one patients were followed up for 3 months to 2 years, and flaps of them were satisfactory in shape, color, and elasticity, similar to that of normal skin. Some patients underwent scar revision later with good results. Application of suitable flaps in wound repair will result in quick wound healing, good function recovery, and satisfactory aesthetic effect.

  9. Electrically stimulated free-flap graciloplasty for urinary sphincter reconstruction: a new surgical procedure.

    PubMed

    van Aalst, V C; Werker, P M; Stremel, R W; Perez Abadia, G A; Petty, G D; Heilman, S J; Palacio, M M; Kon, M; Tobin, G R; Barker, J H

    1998-07-01

    In electrically stimulated (dynamic) graciloplasty for urinary incontinence, the gracilis muscle is transposed into the pelvis, and the distal part is used to reconstruct a neosphincter. Clinical outcomes using this technique have been disappointing due to stricture of the urethra caused by ischemia in the distal part of the gracilis and limited gracilis length available for neosphincter construction. Furthermore, the urethra is twisted by the contracting gracilis, rather than circumferentially squeezed. The purpose of the present study was to test the anatomical and functional feasibility of a new surgical approach to reconstruct a urinary sphincter, using the gracilis muscle as a free flap. In 12 human cadavers, the anatomical feasibility for creating a neosphincter by using the gracilis free flap was determined. In all cases, transfer of the gracilis muscle into the pelvis as a free flap (with the nerve intact) was feasible, and ample muscle was available to construct a neosphincter around the bladder neck. Gracilis neosphincter function was studied in seven dogs. The left gracilis muscle was subjected to transfer into the pelvis as an innervated free flap to create a neosphincter around the urethra. The right (control) gracilis muscle was lifted as a single pedicle flap, remained in situ, and was wrapped around a stent to mimic the urethra. Function (expressed as peak pressure generation and fatigue rate) and surface perfusion were determined for all gracilis muscles. In each dog, both sides were compared using the paired Student's t test for statistical analysis, and no significant difference was measured for the two groups. In conclusion, an innervated gracilis free flap can be used to create a neosphincter around the bladder neck. In an acute study in dogs, function and perfusion of the innervated gracilis free flap are not compromised.

  10. The Lateral Proximal Phalanx Flap for Contractures and Soft Tissue Defects in the Proximal Interphalangeal Joint

    PubMed Central

    Beltrán, Aldo G.; Romero, Camilo J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The management of contractures and soft tissue defects in the proximal interphalangeal (PIP) finger joint remains a challenge. We report a transposition flap from the lateral skin of the proximal phalanx that is based on perforating branches of the digital arteries and can be used safely for both palmar and dorsal cover defects. Methods: We first completed an anatomic study, dissecting 20 fingers in fresh cadavers with arterial injections and made the new flap in patients with dorsal or palmar defects in PIP joints. Results: In cadavers, we can reveal 4 constant branches from each digital artery in the proximal phalanx, with the more distal just in the PIP joint constituting the flap pedicle. Between February 2010 and February 2015, we designed 33 flaps in 29 patients, 7 for dorsal and 26 for palmar defects, with no instances of flap necrosis and 4 distal epidermolysis. The patients were between 4 and 69 years with no major complications, and all of the skin defects in the PIP joint were resolved satisfactorily without any relevant sequelae at the donor site. Conclusions: This flap procedure is an easy, reliable, versatile, and safe technique, and could be an important tool for the management of difficult skin defects and contractures at the PIP joint level. PMID:28082850

  11. Profunda Femoris Artery Perforator Propeller Flap: A Valid Method to Cover Complicated Ischiatic Pressure Sores.

    PubMed

    Scalise, Alessandro; Tartaglione, Caterina; Bolletta, Elisa; Pierangeli, Marina; Di Benedetto, Giovanni

    2015-08-01

    We report the case of a 50-year-old paraplegic man with a complicated grade III/IV ischiatic pressure sore treated with a propeller flap based on the first perforator of the profunda femoris artery. Our aim was to surgically reconstruct an ischiatic pressure sore in a patient with ankylosis using a fasciocutaneous perforator propeller flap obtained from the posterior region of the thigh. Our decision to perform a profunda femoris artery perforator propeller flap reconstruction was mainly due to the anatomical contiguity of the flap with the site of the lesion and the good quality of the skin harvested from the posterior region of the thigh. The use of the perforator fasciocutaneous flap represents a muscle-sparing technique, providing a better long-term result in surgical reconstruction. The choice of the 180-degree propeller flap was due to its ability to provide a good repair of the pressure ulcer and to pass over the ischiatic prominence in the patient in the forced decubitus position. The operatory course did not present any kind of complication. Using this reconstructive treatment, we have obtained complete coverage of the ischiatic pressure sore.

  12. Reconstruction techniques after extralevator abdominoperineal rectal excision or pelvic exenteration: meshes, plasties and flaps.

    PubMed

    Frasson, Matteo; Flor-Lorente, Blas; Carreño, Omar

    2014-03-01

    Perineal wound complications after abdomino-perineal rectal resection are frequent and clinically relevant for their impact on the length of hospitalization, costs, patients' quality of life and oncologic results. With the diffusion of the preoperative radiotherapy and the gradual shift to the extra-elevator technique, the perineal morbidity rate has increased. Many series describing different techniques of primary closure of the perineal defect have been published, but high-quality clinical studies, indicating which is the best option, are missing. A biologic mesh, associated if possible to an omentoplasty, seems to be sufficient to close the perineal defect after extra-elevator abdomino-perineal rectal resection. However, when the proctectomy is associated to the resection of other organs, as for example vagina or sacrum, resulting in an ample perineal defect, the vertical rectus abdominis flap seems to be the best option. If the perineal defect is smaller, the gracilis or gluteus flaps could be other valid alternatives. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Española de Cirujanos. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  13. PIV Measurements on a Blowing Flap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutcheson, Florence V.; Stead, Daniel J.

    2004-01-01

    PIV measurements of the flow in the region of a flap side edge are presented for several blowing flap configurations. The test model is a NACA 63(sub 2)-215 Hicks Mod-B main-element airfoil with a half-span Fowler flap. Air is blown from small slots located along the flap side edge on either the top, bottom or side surfaces. The test set up is described and flow measurements for a baseline and three blowing flap configurations are presented. The effects that the flap tip jets have on the structure of the flap side edge flow are discussed for each of the flap configurations tested. The results indicate that blowing air from a slot located along the top surface of the flap greatly weakened the top vortex system and pushed it further off the top surface. Blowing from the bottom flap surface kept the strong side vortex further outboard while blowing from the side surface only strengthened the vortex system or accelerated the merging of the side vortex to the flap top surface. It is concluded that blowing from the top or bottom surfaces of the flap may lead to a reduction of flap side edge noise.

  14. The "Tokyo" consensus on propeller flaps.

    PubMed

    Pignatti, Marco; Ogawa, Rei; Hallock, Geoffrey G; Mateev, Musa; Georgescu, Alexandru V; Balakrishnan, Govindasamy; Ono, Shimpei; Cubison, Tania C S; D'Arpa, Salvatore; Koshima, Isao; Hyakusoku, Hikko

    2011-02-01

    Over the past few years, the use of propeller flaps, which base their blood supply on subcutaneous tissue or isolated perforators, has become increasingly popular. Because no consensus has yet been reached on terminology and nomenclature of the propeller flap, different and confusing uses of the term can be found in the literature. In this article, the authors report the consensus on the definition and classification of propeller flaps reached by the authors that gathered at the First Tokyo Meeting on Perforator and Propeller Flaps in June of 2009. Some peculiar aspects of the surgical technique are discussed. A propeller flap can be defined as an "island flap that reaches the recipient site through an axial rotation." The classification is based on the nourishing pedicle (subcutaneous pedicled propeller flap, perforator pedicled propeller flap, supercharged propeller flap), the degrees of skin island rotation (90 to 180 degrees) and, when possible, the artery of origin of the perforator. The propeller flap is a useful reconstructive tool that can achieve good cosmetic and functional results. A flap should be called a propeller flap only if it fulfils the definition above. The type of nourishing pedicle, the source vessel (when known), and the degree of skin island rotation should be specified for each flap.

  15. Experimental Study of Wake / Flap Interaction Noise and the Reduction of Flap Side Edge Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutcheson, Florence V.; Stead, Daniel J.; Plassman, Gerald E.

    2016-01-01

    The effects of the interaction of a wake with a half-span flap on radiated noise are examined. The incident wake is generated by bars of various widths and lengths or by a simplified landing gear model. Single microphone and phased array measurements are used to isolate the effects of the wake interaction on the noise radiating from the flap side edge and flap cove regions. The effects on noise of the wake generator's geometry and relative placement with respect to the flap are assessed. Placement of the wake generators upstream of the flap side edge is shown to lead to the reduction of flap side edge noise by introducing a velocity deficit and likely altering the instabilities in the flap side edge vortex system. Significant reduction in flap side edge noise is achieved with a bar positioned directly upstream of the flap side edge. The noise reduction benefit is seen to improve with increased bar width, length and proximity to the flap edge. Positioning of the landing gear model upstream of the flap side edge also leads to decreased flap side edge noise. In addition, flap cove noise levels are significantly lower than when the landing gear is positioned upstream of the flap mid-span. The impact of the local flow velocity on the noise radiating directly from the landing gear is discussed. The effects of the landing gear side-braces on flap side edge, flap cove and landing gear noise are shown.

  16. Magnetic resonance angiography in perforator flap breast reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Levine, Joshua L.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) is an extremely useful preoperative imaging test for evaluation of the vasculature of donor tissue to be used in autologous breast reconstruction. MRA has sufficient spacial resolution to reliably visualize 1 mm perforating vessels and to accurately locate vessels in reference to a patient’s anatomic landmarks without exposing patients to ionizing radiation or iodinated contrast. The use of a blood pool contrast agent and the lack of radiation exposure allow multiple studies of multiple anatomic regions in one examination. The following article is a detailed description of our MRA protocol developed with our radiologists with examples that illustrate the utility of MRA in perforator flap breast reconstruction. PMID:27047787

  17. Exercise and Transversus Abdominis Muscle Atrophy after 60-d Bed Rest.

    PubMed

    Belavý, Daniel Ludovic; Gast, Ulf; Felsenberg, Dieter

    2017-02-01

    This study aimed to investigate atrophy in the deep abdominal muscles, spinal extensors, and the effect of high-load resistive exercise with and without whole-body vibration after 60 d of strict bed rest. Twenty-four subjects underwent 60 d of head-down tilt bed rest and performed either resistive vibration exercise (RVE), resistive exercise only (RE), or no exercise control (2nd Berlin BedRest Study). The thickness of the transversus abdominis, internal oblique, and erector spinae muscles and the area of the multifidus muscle were measured bilaterally via real-time ultrasound. Intention-to-treat analysis was implemented, and P values were adjusted by the false discovery rate method. At the end of the bed rest, transversus abdominis thickness was reduced by 18.3% in the inactive group (P = 0.00011) with no significant change in the RVE (-4.0%; P = 0.014 vs control) or RE (-5.0%; P = 0.10 vs control) groups. In the inactive subjects, internal oblique thickness reduced by 10.6% (P = 0.0025) and by 7% (P > 0.05) in each of the training groups. The lengthening of the lumbar spine was greatest on day 1 (+7.4%, P = 0.004) and day 2 (+6.3%, P = 0.004; day 54: +4.1%, P = 0.023). A 4.7% reduction of multifidus area was observed on day 1 of bed rest (P = 0.0049) and a 4.2% reduction of erector spinae thickness was observed on day 2 (P = 0.0011). Extensor atrophy and spinal lengthening was not affected by exercise. No significant difference was seen between RVE and RE. Bed rest leads to atrophy of the transversus abdominis and internal oblique muscles. The exercise program, which implemented lower-limb and back extension exercises against shoulder restraints, was able to reduce atrophy seen in transversus abdominis in bed rest.

  18. Large asymmetric hypertrophy of rectus abdominis muscle in professional tennis players.

    PubMed

    Sanchis-Moysi, Joaquin; Idoate, Fernando; Dorado, Cecilia; Alayón, Santiago; Calbet, Jose A L

    2010-12-31

    To determine the volume and degree of asymmetry of the musculus rectus abdominis (RA) in professional tennis players. The volume of the RA was determined using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in 8 professional male tennis players and 6 non-active male control subjects. Tennis players had 58% greater RA volume than controls (P = 0.01), due to hypertrophy of both the dominant (34% greater volume, P = 0.02) and non-dominant (82% greater volume, P = 0.01) sides, after accounting for age, the length of the RA muscle and body mass index (BMI) as covariates. In tennis players, there was a marked asymmetry in the development of the RA, which volume was 35% greater in the non-dominant compared to the dominant side (P<0.001). In contrast, no side-to-side difference in RA volume was observed in the controls (P = 0.75). The degree of side-to-side asymmetry increased linearly from the first lumbar disc to the pubic symphysis (r = 0.97, P<0.001). Professional tennis is associated with marked hypertrophy of the musculus rectus abdominis, which achieves a volume that is 58% greater than in non-active controls. Rectus abdominis hypertrophy is more marked in the non-dominant than in the dominant side, particularly in the more distal regions. Our study supports the concept that humans can differentially recruit both rectus abdominis but also the upper and lower regions of each muscle. It remains to be determined if this disequilibrium raises the risk of injury.

  19. Soccer Attenuates the Asymmetry of Rectus Abdominis Muscle Observed in Non-Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Idoate, Fernando; Calbet, Jose A. L.; Izquierdo, Mikel; Sanchis-Moysi, Joaquin

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To determine the volume and degree of asymmetry of the rectus abdominis muscle (RA) in professional soccer players. Methods The volume of the RA was determined using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in 15 professional male soccer players and 6 non-active male control subjects. Results Soccer players had 26% greater RA volume than controls (P<0.05), due to hypertrophy of both the dominant (28% greater volume, P<0.05) and non-dominant (25% greater volume, P<0.01) sides, after adjusting for age, length of the RA muscle and body mass index (BMI) as covariates. Total volume of the dominant side was similar to the contralateral in soccer players (P = 0.42) and in controls (P = 0.75) (Dominant/non-dominant = 0.99, in both groups). Segmental analysis showed a progressive increase in the degree of side-to-side asymmetry from the first lumbar disc to the pubic symphysis in soccer players (r = 0.80, P<0.05) and in controls (r = 0.75, P<0.05). The slope of the relationship was lower in soccer players, although this trend was not statistically significant (P = 0.14). Conclusions Professional soccer is associated with marked hypertrophy of the rectus abdominis muscle, which achieves a volume that is 26% greater than in non-active controls. Soccer induces the hypertrophy of the non-dominant side in proximal regions and the dominant side in regions closer to pubic symphysis, which attenuates the pattern of asymmetry of rectus abdominis observed in non-active population. It remains to be determined whether the hypertrophy of rectus abdominis in soccer players modifies the risk of injury. PMID:21541351

  20. Efficacy of ultrasound-guided transversus abdominis plane block in laparoscopic hysterectomy. Clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Guardabassi, D S; Lupi, S; Agejas, R; Allub, J M; García-Fornari, G

    2017-05-01

    Transversus abdominis plane block is a regional anaesthesia technique that has proven to be effective for postoperative pain reduction in different abdominal surgical procedures. This study evaluated its efficacy on post laparoscopic hysterectomy pain intensity and analgesic consumption. Randomized controlled trial which included 40 patients scheduled for laparoscopic hysterectomy, enrolled in 2 groups: transversus abdominis plane block+systemic analgesia (Group 1; n=20), versus systemic analgesia (Group 2; n=20). Opioid consumption within the first 24 postoperative hours, pain intensity scores at 60min, 2, 8 and 24h after surgery, adverse events related to systemic analgesia and time to hospital discharge were evaluated and registered. We found no differences between both groups in opioid consumption (10mg vs. 7mg; P=.2) and pain scores (NVS) within the first 24 postoperative hours, at 60min (3 vs. 5; P=.65), 120min (0 vs. 2; P=.15), 8 and 24h (0 vs. 0; P>.50) for the last 2 points in time analysed. Adverse events related to medication and time to hospital discharge showed similar results. Adding a transversus abdominis plane block technique to opioid PCA does not seem to improve postoperative pain management in laparoscopic hysterectomy. Patient preparation time and costs could be incremented and complications (although rare) related to the technique could appear. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. New model of flap-gliding flight.

    PubMed

    Sachs, Gottfried

    2015-07-21

    A new modelling approach is presented for describing flap-gliding flight in birds and the associated mechanical energy cost of travelling. The new approach is based on the difference in the drag characteristics between flapping and non-flapping due to the drag increase caused by flapping. Thus, the possibility of a gliding flight phase, as it exists in flap-gliding flight, yields a performance advantage resulting from the decrease in the drag when compared with continuous flapping flight. Introducing an appropriate non-dimensionalization for the mathematical relations describing flap-gliding flight, results and findings of generally valid nature are derived. It is shown that there is an energy saving of flap-gliding flight in the entire speed range compared to continuous flapping flight. The energy saving reaches the highest level in the lower speed region. The travelling speed of flap-gliding flight is composed of the weighted average of the differing speeds in the flapping and gliding phases. Furthermore, the maximum range performance achievable with flap-gliding flight and the associated optimal travelling speed are determined. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Pedicled Extranasal Flaps in Skull Base Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Grace G.; Hang, Anna X.; Mitchell, Candace; Zanation, Adam M.

    2013-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leaks most commonly arise during or after skull base surgery, although they occasionally present spontaneously. Recent advances in the repair of CSF leaks have enabled endoscopic endonasal surgery to become the preferred option for management of skull base pathology. Small defects (<1cm) can be repaired by multilayered free grafts. For large defects (>3cm), pedicled vascular flaps are the repair method of choice, resulting in much lower rates of postoperative CSF leaks. The pedicled nasoseptal flap (NSF) constitutes the primary reconstructive option for the vast majority of skull base defects. It has a large area of potential coverage and high rates of success. However, preoperative planning is required to avoid sacrificing the NSF during resection. In cases where the NSF is unavailable, often due to tumor involvement of the septum or previous resection removing or compromising the flap, other flaps may be considered. These flaps include intranasal options—inferior turbinate (IT) or middle turbinate (MT) flaps—as well as regional pedicled flaps: pericranial flap (PCF), temporoparietal fascial flap (TPFF), or palatal flap (PF). More recently, novel alternatives such as the pedicled facial buccinator flap (FAB) and the pedicled occipital galeopericranial flap (OGP) have been added to the arsenal of options for skull base reconstruction. Characteristics of and appropriate uses for each flap are described. PMID:23257554

  3. Efficient flapping flight of pterosaurs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strang, Karl Axel

    In the late eighteenth century, humans discovered the first pterosaur fossil remains and have been fascinated by their existence ever since. Pterosaurs exploited their membrane wings in a sophisticated manner for flight control and propulsion, and were likely the most efficient and effective flyers ever to inhabit our planet. The flapping gait is a complex combination of motions that sustains and propels an animal in the air. Because pterosaurs were so large with wingspans up to eleven meters, if they could have sustained flapping flight, they would have had to achieve high propulsive efficiencies. Identifying the wing motions that contribute the most to propulsive efficiency is key to understanding pterosaur flight, and therefore to shedding light on flapping flight in general and the design of efficient ornithopters. This study is based on published results for a very well-preserved specimen of Coloborhynchus robustus, for which the joints are well-known and thoroughly described in the literature. Simplifying assumptions are made to estimate the characteristics that can not be inferred directly from the fossil remains. For a given animal, maximizing efficiency is equivalent to minimizing power at a given thrust and speed. We therefore aim at finding the flapping gait, that is the joint motions, that minimize the required flapping power. The power is computed from the aerodynamic forces created during a given wing motion. We develop an unsteady three-dimensional code based on the vortex-lattice method, which correlates well with published results for unsteady motions of rectangular wings. In the aerodynamic model, the rigid pterosaur wing is defined by the position of the bones. In the aeroelastic model, we add the flexibility of the bones and of the wing membrane. The nonlinear structural behavior of the membrane is reduced to a linear modal decomposition, assuming small deflections about the reference wing geometry. The reference wing geometry is computed for

  4. Flexible wings in flapping flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moret, Lionel; Thiria, Benjamin; Zhang, Jun

    2007-11-01

    We study the effect of passive pitching and flexible deflection of wings on the forward flapping flight. The wings are flapped vertically in water and are allowed to move freely horizontally. The forward speed is chosen by the flapping wing itself by balance of drag and thrust. We show, that by allowing the wing to passively pitch or by adding a flexible extension at its trailing edge, the forward speed is significantly increased. Detailed measurements of wing deflection and passive pitching, together with flow visualization, are used to explain our observations. The advantage of having a wing with finite rigidity/flexibility is discussed as we compare the current results with our biological inspirations such as birds and fish.

  5. Anatomical Individualized ACL Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Rahnemai-Azar, Amir Ata; Sabzevari, Soheil; Irarrázaval, Sebastián; Chao, Tom; Fu, Freddie H

    2016-10-01

    The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is composed of two bundles, which work together to provide both antero-posterior and rotatory stability of the knee. Understanding the anatomy and function of the ACL plays a key role in management of patients with ACL injury. Anatomic ACL reconstruction aims to restore the function of the native ACL. Femoral and tibial tunnels should be placed in their anatomical location accounting for both the native ACL insertion site and bony landmarks. One main component of anatomical individualized ACL reconstruction is customizing the treatment according to each patient's individual characteristics, considering preoperative and intraoperative evaluation of the native ACL and knee bony anatomy. Anatomical individualized reconstruction surgery should also aim to restore the size of the native ACL insertion as well. Using this concept, while single bundle ACL reconstruction can restore the function of the ACL in some patients, double bundle reconstruction is indicated in others to achieve optimal outcome.

  6. The anatomy of the musculocutaneous latissimus dorsi flap for neophalloplasty.

    PubMed

    Dennis, M; Granger, A; Ortiz, A; Terrell, M; Loukos, M; Schober, J

    2018-03-01

    In transgender surgery, the ideal neophallus is one that: (a) is constructed using a reproducible procedure, (b) possesses tactile and erogenous sensation, (c) is large and rigid enough (naturally, or using a prosthesis) to permit penetrative intercourse, (d) leaves acceptable donor site morbidity, (e) results in esthetically satisfactory appearance, and (f) allows for voiding while standing. The musculocutaneous latissimus dorsi (MLD) flap has favorable results in the area of neophalloplasty. Among its advantages are acceptable donor site appearance, stiffness sufficient for intercourse, and esthetically satisfactory genital appearance. The anatomy of the MLD flap supports the creation of a neophallus for transsexual anatomy revision. Herein, we give an overview of the advantages and disadvantages of the procedure, and the anatomical details and surgical steps involved. Novel illustrations were created from standard surgical text descriptions to clarify this topic for surgical training and patient understanding and decision making. A review of the relevant literature regarding the anatomy, procedure development, and outcomes is presented. The MLD flap uses part of the latissimus dorsi muscle with branches of the thoracodorsal vessels and nerve to construct a neophallus. A thin strip of muscle around the pedicle is harvested, resulting in a slightly curvilinear scar. The blood supply is connected to the femoral artery and saphenous vein or the deep inferior epigastric artery and vein, while the nerve is connected to the ilioinguinal nerve or the obturator nerve. The MLD flap for neophalloplasty is a reliable graft with a well concealed scar and low donor site morbidity. Clin. Anat. 31:152-159, 2018. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Four-flap Breast Reconstruction: Bilateral Stacked DIEP and PAP Flaps

    PubMed Central

    Mayo, James L.; Allen, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: In cases of bilateral breast reconstruction when the deep inferior epigastric perforator (DIEP) free flap alone does not provide sufficient volume for body-specific reconstruction, stacking each DIEP flap with a second free flap will deliver added volume and maintain a purely autologous reconstruction. Stacking the profunda artery perforator (PAP) flap with the DIEP flap offers favorable aesthetics and ideal operative efficiency. We present the indications, technique, and outcomes of our experience with 4-flap breast reconstruction using stacked DIEP/PAP flaps. Methods: The authors performed 4-flap DIEP/PAP breast reconstruction in 20 patients who required bilateral reconstruction without adequate single donor flap volume. The timing of reconstruction, average mastectomy/flap weights, and operative time are reported. Complications reviewed include fat necrosis, dehiscence, hematoma, seroma, mastectomy flap necrosis, and flap loss. Results: Twenty patients underwent 4-flap DIEP/PAP breast reconstruction. Surgical time averaged 7 hours and 20 minutes. The primary recipient vessels were the antegrade and retrograde internal mammary vessels. No flap losses occurred. Complications included 1 hematoma, 1 incidence of arterial and venous thrombosis successfully treated with anastomotic revision, 1 incidence of thigh donor site dehiscence, and 3 episodes of minor mastectomy skin flap necrosis. Conclusions: Four-flap breast reconstruction is a favorable autologous reconstructive option for patients requiring bilateral reconstruction without adequate single donor flap volume. Stacking DIEP/PAP flaps as described is both safe and efficient. Furthermore, this combination provides superior aesthetics mirroring the natural geometry of the breast. Bilateral stacked DIEP/PAP flaps represent our first choice for breast reconstruction in this patient population. PMID:26090273

  8. Functional resurfacing of the palm: flap selection based on defect analysis.

    PubMed

    Engelhardt, T O; Rieger, U M; Schwabegger, A H; Pierer, G

    2012-02-01

    Extensive defect coverage of the palm and anatomical reconstruction of its unique functional capacity remains difficult. In manual laborers, reconstruction of sensation, range of motion, grip strength but also mechanical stability is required. Sensate musculo-/fasciocutaneous flaps bear disadvantages of tissue mobility with shifting/bulkiness under stress. Thin muscle and fascial flaps show adherence but preclude sensory nerve coaptation. The purpose of this review is to present our algorithm for reliable selection of the most appropriate procedure based on defect analysis. Defect analysis focusing on units of tactile gnosis provides information to weigh needs for sensation or soft tissue stability. We distinguish radial unit (r)-thenar, ulnar unit (u)-hypothenar and unit (c)-central plus distal palm. Individual parameters need similar consideration to choose adequate treatment. Unit (r) and unit (u) are regions of secondary touch demanding protective sensation. Restoration of sensation using neurovascular, fasciocutaneous flaps is recommended. In unit (c), tactile gnosis is of less, mechanical resistance of greater value. Reconstruction of soft tissue resistance is suggested first in this unit. In laborers, free fascial- or muscle flaps with plantar instep skin grafts may achieve near to anatomical reconstruction with minimal sensation. Combined defects involving unit (c) require correlation with individual parameters for optimal flap selection. Defect coverage of the palm should not consist of merely providing sensate vascularized tissue. The most appropriate procedure should be derived from careful defect analysis to achieve near to anatomical reconstruction. In laborers, defect related demands need close correlation with sensation and mechanical stability to be expected. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. [The effects of transversus abdominis plane block on analgesic and anesthetic consumption during total abdominal hysterectomy: a randomized controlled study].

    PubMed

    Karaman, Tugba; Ozsoy, Asker Zeki; Karaman, Serkan; Dogru, Serkan; Tapar, Hakan; Sahin, Aynur; Dogru, Hatice; Suren, Mustafa

    A transversus abdominis plane block is a peripheral block method that has been used successfully for pain relief after total abdominal hysterectomy. However, the effects of the combination of the transversus abdominis plane block and general anesthesia on analgesic and anesthetic requirements remain unclear. This randomized placebo-controlled study is aimed to evaluate the effects of transversus abdominis plane block on analgesic and anesthetic consumption during total abdominal hysterectomy under general anesthesia. Sixty-six women undergoing total abdominal hysterectomy were randomized into two groups to receive general anesthesia alone (control group) or with transversus abdominis plane block using 20mL of 0.25% bupivacaine (transversus abdominis plane group). Intraoperative remifentanil and sevoflurane consumption were recorded. We also evaluated the postoperative pain, nausea, quality of recovery scores and rescue analgesic requirement during postoperative 24hours. The total remifentanil and sevoflurane consumption is significantly lower in transversus abdominis plane group; respectively mean (SD) 0.130 (0.25) vs. 0.094 (0.02) mcg.kg -1 .min -1 ; p<0.01 and 0.295 (0.05) vs. 0.243 (0.06) mL.min -1 ; p<0.01. In the postoperative period, pain scores were significantly reduced in transversus abdominis plane group soon after surgery; median (range) 6 (2-10) vs. 3 (0-5); p<0.001, at 2h (5 [3-9] vs. 2.5 [0-6]; p<0.001), at 6h (4 [2-7] vs. 3[0-6], p<0.001), at 12h (3.5 [1-6] vs. 2 [1-5]; p=0.003). The patients in the transversus abdominis plane group had significantly higher QoR-40 scores 190.5 (175-197) vs. 176.5 (141-187); p<0.001). Combining transversus abdominis plane block with general anesthesia can provide reduced opioid and anesthetic consumption and can improve postoperative pain and quality of recovery scores in patients undergoing total abdominal hysterectomy. Copyright © 2018 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All

  10. Use of a 3D Skull Model to Improve Accuracy in Cranioplasty for Autologous Flap Resorption in a 3-Year-Old Child.

    PubMed

    Maduri, Rodolfo; Viaroli, Edoardo; Levivier, Marc; Daniel, Roy T; Messerer, Mahmoud

    2017-01-01

    Cranioplasty is considered a simple reconstructive procedure, usually performed in a single stage. In some clinical conditions, such as in children with multifocal flap osteolysis, it could represent a surgical challenge. In these patients, the partially resorbed autologous flap should be removed and replaced with a precustomed prosthesis which should perfectly match the expected bone defect. We describe the technique used for a navigated cranioplasty in a 3-year-old child with multifocal autologous flap osteolysis. We decided to perform a cranioplasty using a custom-made hydroxyapatite porous ceramic flap. The prosthesis was produced with an epoxy resin 3D skull model of the patient, which included a removable flap corresponding to the planned cranioplasty. Preoperatively, a CT scan of the 3D skull model was performed without the removable flap. The CT scan images of the 3D skull model were merged with the preoperative 3D CT scan of the patient and navigated during the cranioplasty to define with precision the cranioplasty margins. After removal of the autologous resorbed flap, the hydroxyapatite prosthesis matched perfectly with the skull defect. The anatomical result was excellent. Thus, the implementation of cranioplasty with image merge navigation of a 3D skull model may improve cranioplasty accuracy, allowing precise anatomic reconstruction in complex skull defect cases. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Reconstruction of Facial Defect Using Deltopectoral Flap.

    PubMed

    Aldelaimi, Tahrir N; Khalil, Afrah A

    2015-11-01

    Reconstruction of the head and neck is a challenge for otolarygology surgeons, maxillofacial surgeons as well as plastic surgeons. Defects caused by the resection and/or trauma should be closed with flaps which match in color, texture and hair bearing characteristics with the face. Deltopectoral flap is a one such flap from chest and neck skin mainly used to cover the facial defects. This study report a patient presenting with tragic Road Traffic Accident (RTA) admitted to maxillofacial surgery department at Ramadi Teaching Hospital, Anbar province, Iraq. An incision, medially based, was done and deltopectoral fascio-cutaneous flap was used for surgical exposure and closure of defects after RTA. There was no major complication. Good aesthetic and functional results were achieved. Deltopectoral flap is an excellent alternative for the reconstruction of head and neck. Harvesting and application of the flap is rapid and safe. Only a single incision is sufficient for dissection and flap elevation.

  12. Cost-effectiveness of monitoring free flaps.

    PubMed

    Subramaniam, Shiva; Sharp, David; Jardim, Christopher; Batstone, Martin D

    2016-06-01

    Methods of free flap monitoring have become more sophisticated and expensive. This study aims to determine the cost of free flap monitoring and examine its cost effectiveness. We examined a group of patients who had had free flaps to the head and neck over a two-year period, and combined these results with costs obtained from business managers and staff. There were 132 free flaps with a success rate of 99%. The cost of monitoring was Aus $193/flap. Clinical monitoring during this time period cost Aus$25 476 and did not lead to the salvage of any free flaps. Cost equivalence is reached between monitoring and not monitoring only at a failure rate of 15.8%. This is to our knowledge the first study to calculate the cost of clinical monitoring of free flaps, and to examine its cost-effectiveness. Copyright © 2016 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. All rights reserved.

  13. Innervated boomerang flap for finger pulp reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shao-Liang; Chiou, Tai-Fung

    2007-11-01

    The boomerang flap originates from the dorsolateral aspect of the proximal phalanx of an adjacent digit and is supplied by the retrograde blood flow through the vascular arcades between the dorsal and palmar digital arteries. To provide sensation of the boomerang flap for finger pulp reconstruction, the dorsal sensory branch of the proper digital nerve and the superficial sensory branch of the corresponding radial or ulnar nerve are included within the skin flap. After transfer of the flap to the injured site, epineural neurorrhaphies are done between the digital nerves of the pulp and the sensory branches of the flap. We used this sensory flap in five patients, with more than 1 year follow-up, and all patients achieved measurable two-points discrimination. The boomerang flap not only preserves the proper palmar digital artery but also provides an extended and innervated skin paddle. It seems to be an alternative choice for one-stage reconstruction of major pulp defect.

  14. Force Generation by Flapping Foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandyopadhyay, P. R.; Donnelly, M.

    1996-11-01

    Aquatic animals like fish use flapping caudal fins to produce axial and cross-stream forces. During WW2, German scientists had built and tested an underwater vehicle powered by similar flapping foils. We have examined the forces produced by a pair of flapping foils. We have examined the forced produced by a pair of flapping foils attached to the tail end of a small axisymmetric cylinder. The foils operate in-phase (called waving), or in anti-phase (called clapping). In a low-speed water tunnel, we have undertaken time-dependent measurements of axial and cross-stream forces and moments that are exerted by the vortex shedding process over the entire body. Phase-matched LDV measurements of vorticity-velocity vectors, as well as limited flow visualization of the periodic vortex shedding process have also been carried out. The direction of the induced velocity within a pair of shed vortices determines the nature of the forces produced, viz., thrust or drag or cross-stream forces. The clapping mode produces a widely dispersed symmetric array of vortices which results in axial forces only (thrust and rag). On the other hand, the vortex array is staggered in the waving mode and cross-stream (maneuvering) forces are then generated.

  15. Lift production through asymmetric flapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalikop, Shreyas; Sreenivas, K. R.

    2009-11-01

    At present, there is a strong interest in developing Micro Air Vehicles (MAV) for applications like disaster management and aerial surveys. At these small length scales, the flight of insects and small birds suggests that unsteady aerodynamics of flapping wings can offer many advantages over fixed wing flight, such as hovering-flight, high maneuverability and high lift at large angles of attack. Various lift generating mechanims such as delayed stall, wake capture and wing rotation contribute towards our understanding of insect flight. We address the effect of asymmetric flapping of wings on lift production. By visualising the flow around a pair of rectangular wings flapping in a water tank and numerically computing the flow using a discrete vortex method, we demonstrate that net lift can be produced by introducing an asymmetry in the upstroke-to-downstroke velocity profile of the flapping wings. The competition between generation of upstroke and downstroke tip vortices appears to hold the key to understanding this lift generation mechanism.

  16. Lower trapezius flap for recalcitrant wounds of the posterior skull and spine

    SciTech Connect

    Seyfer, A.E.

    1988-05-01

    The lower trapezius muscle and musculocutaneous flap has been useful in providing a reliable, expeditious closure for compromised defects of the upper spine and dorsal calvarium. It has been successfully employed in 6 patients as a one-stage procedure, all of whom had recalcitrant, postoperative wounds that failed to heal. It provides serviceable tissue that is able to withstand additional radiotherapy and also offers useful palliation without apparent disability. Pertinent anatomical and clinical considerations are discussed.

  17. Use of Cyanoacrylate Glue Casting for Stabilization of Periocular Skin Grafts and Flaps.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Colette M; Nguyen, Michelle; Mancini, Ronald

    To examine a novel technique for periocular skin graft and flap stabilization using cyanoacrylate glue applied to the host bed around the perimeter of the graft or flap to create an immobile cast in the immediate postoperative period to promote successful graft take and stable anatomic position. Retrospective review was performed of a single surgeon's patients who underwent periocular skin graft or flap between August 1, 2011, and February 29, 2016, in which cyanoacrylate glue was applied postoperatively for graft stabilization. Data examined included indication for procedure, location and size of graft, postoperative complications, and length of follow up postoperatively. Of 164 cases reviewed, 9 cases were identified in which cyanoacrylate glue was used as the sole means of graft or flap stabilization. Indications for surgery included repair of cicatricial ectropion (3 cases) and repair of Mohs defect status after excision of basal or squamous cell carcinoma (6 cases). All cases involved reformation of the lower eyelid. Five cases employed full-thickness skin grafts and 4 cases employed adjacent tissue rearrangement. Size of defect repaired ranged from 8 mm to 35 mm when largest diameter was measured. Complications included mild residual ectropion or mild punctal ectropion in 2 patients who was asymptomatic and did not require further surgery. No cases were complicated by hematoma, infection, or graft necrosis. Cyanoacrylate glue can be used to successfully stabilize skin grafts and flaps in the immediate postoperative period.

  18. Reliable harvest of a dorsal scapular artery perforator flap by augmenting its perfusion.

    PubMed

    Kim, So-Young; Lee, Kyeong-Tae; Mun, Goo-Hyun

    2016-02-01

    Despite confirmation of a reliable perforasome in the dorsal scapular artery in an anatomic study, a true perforator flap has not been recommended in previous clinical studies because of concerns regarding insufficient perfusion in the distal region. In this report, we present two cases of reconstruction for occipital defects caused by tumor extirpation using pedicled dorsal scapular artery perforator flaps without a muscle component. To secure the perfusion of the dorsal scapular artery perforator flap, inclusion of an additional perforator was attempted for perfusion augmentation. The second dorsal scapular artery perforator was harvested in one case. In an additional case, the sixth dorsal intercostal artery perforator with a branch that directly connected with the dorsal scapular artery within the trapezius muscle was additionally harvested. The flaps survived without any perfusion-related complications, including tip necrosis, and no donor site morbidities were observed. We suggest that a perfusion augmented dorsal scapular artery perforator flap by harvesting multiple perforators could be a safe and useful alternative for reconstructive surgery of head and neck defects. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Histologic change of arteriovenous malformations of the face and scalp after free flap transfer.

    PubMed

    Tark, K C; Chung, S

    2000-07-01

    In three patients with long-standing vascular malformations of the face and scalp, radial forearm free flaps were transferred after a near-total excision of the lesion. All patients had typical high-flow malformations with thrill and bruit. The onset and progression of the malformations were analyzed through clinical and histologic studies. After free flap transfer, the vascular malformations were followed up grossly and histologically for between 4 and 9 years. There was no recurrence of arteriovenous malformation after free flap transfer. The portion of the residual lesion adjacent to the transferred free flap disappeared, and the remaining discoloration also vanished grossly. Histologic comparison of immediate postoperative and 4-month postoperative specimens from the margin and residual lesion using Victoria blue staining showed that the typical preoperative findings for arteriovenous malformation-an intermingling of thick-walled vessels with abundant elastic fibers and thin-walled vessels without elastic fibers-had undergone change, resulting in the disappearance of the thick-walled vessels and leaving only homogeneous, thin-walled vasculature. The highly vascularized free flap, which does not contain abnormal fistulas, impacted the histologic change of the arteriovenous malformation by blocking the vicious cycle of ischemia and anatomic replacement of disfigured skin and subcutaneous tissues.

  20. The possibility for use of venous flaps in plastic surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Baytinger, V. F., E-mail: baitinger@mail.tomsknet.ru; Kurochkina, O. S., E-mail: kurochkinaos@yandex.ru; Selianinov, K. V.

    2015-11-17

    The use of venous flaps is controversial. The mechanism of perfusion of venous flaps is still not fully understood. The research was conducted on 56 white rats. In our experimental work we studied two different models of venous flaps: pedicled venous flap (PVF) and pedicled arterialized venous flap (PAVF). Our results showed that postoperative congestion was present in all flaps. However 66.7% of all pedicled venous flaps and 100% of all pedicled arterialized venous flaps eventually survived. Histological examination revealed that postoperatively the blood flow in the skin of the pedicled arterialized venous flap became «re-reversed» again; there were nomore » differences between mechanism of survival of venous flaps and other flaps. On the 7-14th day in the skin of all flaps were processes of neoangiogenesis and proliferation. Hence the best scenario for the clinical use of venous flaps unfolds when both revascularization and skin coverage are required.« less

  1. A Model of Free Tissue Transfer: The Rat Epigastric Free Flap

    PubMed Central

    Casal, Diogo; Pais, Diogo; Iria, Inês; Mota-Silva, Eduarda; Almeida, Maria-Angélica; Alves, Sara; Pen, Cláudia; Farinho, Ana; Mascarenhas-Lemos, Luís; Ferreira-Silva, José; Ferraz-Oliveira, Mário; Vassilenko, Valentina; Videira, Paula A.; Gory O'Neill, João

    2017-01-01

    Free tissue transfer has been increasingly used in clinical practice since the 1970s, allowing reconstruction of complex and otherwise untreatable defects resulting from tumor extirpation, trauma, infections, malformations or burns. Free flaps are particularly useful for reconstructing highly complex anatomical regions, like those of the head and neck, the hand, the foot and the perineum. Moreover, basic and translational research in the area of free tissue transfer is of great clinical potential. Notwithstanding, surgical trainees and researchers are frequently deterred from using microsurgical models of tissue transfer, due to lack of information regarding the technical aspects involved in the operative procedures. The aim of this paper is to present the steps required to transfer a fasciocutaneous epigastric free flap to the neck in the rat. This flap is based on the superficial epigastric artery and vein, which originates from and drain into the femoral artery and vein, respectively. On average the caliber of the superficial epigastric vein is 0.6 to 0.8 mm, contrasting with the 0.3 to 0.5 mm of the superficial epigastric artery. Histologically, the flap is a composite block of tissues, containing skin (epidermis and dermis), a layer of fat tissue (panniculus adiposus), a layer of striated muscle (panniculus carnosus), and a layer of loose areolar tissue. Succinctly, the epigastric flap is raised on its pedicle vessels that are then anastomosed to the external jugular vein and to the carotid artery on the ventral surface of the rat's neck. According to our experience, this model guarantees the complete survival of approximately 70 to 80% of epigastric flaps transferred to the neck region. The flap can be evaluated whenever needed by visual inspection. Hence, the authors believe this is a good experimental model for microsurgical research and training. PMID:28117814

  2. Three-dimensional Reconstruction of Scar Contracture-bearing Axilla and Digital Webs Using the Square Flap Method.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chenyu; Ogawa, Rei

    2014-05-01

    Joint scar contractures are characterized by tight bands of soft tissue that bridge the 2 ends of the joint like a web. Classical treatment methods such as Z-plasties are mainly based on 2-dimensional designs. Our square flap method is an alternative surgical method that restores the span of the web in a stereometric fashion, thereby reconstructing joint function. In total, 20 Japanese patients with joint scar contractures on the axillary (n = 10) or first digital web (n = 10) underwent square flap surgery. The maximum range of motion and commissure length were measured before and after surgery. A theoretical stereometric geometrical model of the square flap was established to compare it to the classical single (60 degree), 4-flap (45 degree), and 5-flap (60 degree) Z-plasties in terms of theoretical web reconstruction efficacy. All cases achieved 100% contracture release. The maximum range of motion and web space improved after square flap surgery (P = 0.001). Stereometric geometrical modeling revealed that the standard square flap (α = 45 degree; β = 90 degree) yields a larger flap area, length/width ratio, and postsurgical commissure length than the Z-plasties. It can also be adapted by varying angles α and β, although certain angle thresholds must be met to obtain the stereometric advantages of this method. When used to treat joint scar contractures, the square flap method can fully span the web space in a stereometric manner, thus yielding a close-to-original shape and function. Compared with the classical Z-plasties, it also provides sufficient anatomical blood supply while imposing the least physiological tension on the adjacent skin.

  3. Three-dimensional Reconstruction of Scar Contracture-bearing Axilla and Digital Webs Using the Square Flap Method

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chenyu

    2014-01-01

    Background: Joint scar contractures are characterized by tight bands of soft tissue that bridge the 2 ends of the joint like a web. Classical treatment methods such as Z-plasties are mainly based on 2-dimensional designs. Our square flap method is an alternative surgical method that restores the span of the web in a stereometric fashion, thereby reconstructing joint function. Methods: In total, 20 Japanese patients with joint scar contractures on the axillary (n = 10) or first digital web (n = 10) underwent square flap surgery. The maximum range of motion and commissure length were measured before and after surgery. A theoretical stereometric geometrical model of the square flap was established to compare it to the classical single (60 degree), 4-flap (45 degree), and 5-flap (60 degree) Z-plasties in terms of theoretical web reconstruction efficacy. Results: All cases achieved 100% contracture release. The maximum range of motion and web space improved after square flap surgery (P = 0.001). Stereometric geometrical modeling revealed that the standard square flap (α = 45 degree; β = 90 degree) yields a larger flap area, length/width ratio, and postsurgical commissure length than the Z-plasties. It can also be adapted by varying angles α and β, although certain angle thresholds must be met to obtain the stereometric advantages of this method. Conclusions: When used to treat joint scar contractures, the square flap method can fully span the web space in a stereometric manner, thus yielding a close-to-original shape and function. Compared with the classical Z-plasties, it also provides sufficient anatomical blood supply while imposing the least physiological tension on the adjacent skin. PMID:25289342

  4. The midline central artery forehead flap: a valid alternative to supratrochlear-based forehead flaps.

    PubMed

    Faris, Callum; van der Eerden, Paul; Vuyk, Hade

    2015-01-01

    This study clarifies the pedicle geometry and vascular supply of a midline forehead flap for nasal reconstruction. It reports on the vascular reliability of this flap and its ability to reduce hair transposition to the nose, a major complicating factor of previous forehead flap designs. To compare the vascular reliability of 3 different pedicle designs of the forehead flap in nasal reconstruction (classic paramedian, glabellar paramedian, and central artery flap design) and evaluate hair transposition rates and aesthetic results. Retrospective analysis of patient data and outcomes retrieved from computer files generated at the time of surgery, supplemented by data from the patient medical records and photographic documentation, from a tertiary referral nasal reconstructive practice, within a secondary-care hospital setting. The study population included all consecutive patients over a 19-year period who underwent primary forehead flap repair of nasal defects, with more than 3 months of postoperative follow-up and photographic documentation. Three sequential forehead flap patterns were used (classic paramedian flap, glabella flap, and central artery flap) for nasal reconstruction over the study duration. Data collected included patient characteristics, method of repair, complications, functional outcome, and patient satisfaction score. For cosmetic outcome, photographic documentation was scored by a medical juror. No forehead flap had vascular compromise in the first stage. Partial flap necrosis was reported in subsequent stages in 4 patients (1%), with no statistical difference in the rate of vascular compromise between the 3 flap designs. Hair transposition to the nose was lower in the central artery forehead flap (7%) compared with the classic paramedian (23%) and glabellar paramedian (13%) flaps (P < .05). Photographic evaluation in 227 patients showed that brow position (98%) and color match (83%) were good in the majority of the patients. In this series

  5. Lower Extremity Free Flaps for Breast Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Dayan, Joseph H; Allen, Robert J

    2017-11-01

    Thigh-based flaps are typically a secondary option for breast reconstruction because of concerns regarding limited tissue volume and donor-site morbidity. In recent years, there have been a number of new techniques and insights that have resulted in greater flexibility and improved outcomes. This article reviews lessons learned from a large collective experience using the following 4 flaps: transverse upper gracilis also known as transverse myocutaneous gracilis, diagonal upper gracilis, profunda artery perforator, and lateral thigh perforator flaps. Flap selection considerations include the patient's fat distribution and skin laxity, perforator anatomy, and scar location. Pearls to minimize donor-site morbidity include avoiding major lymphatic collectors in the femoral triangle and along the greater saphenous vein and respecting the limits of flap dimension to reduce wound healing complications and distal ischemia. Limited flap volume may be addressed with stacking another flap from the contralateral thigh or primary fat grafting as opposed to overaggressive flap harvest from a single thigh. A detailed review of the benefits and disadvantages of each flap and strategies to improve results is discussed. With careful planning and selection, thigh-based flaps can provide a reliable option patients desiring autologous breast reconstruction.

  6. Free Vastus Intermedius Muscle Flap: A Successful Alternative for Complex Reconstruction of the Neurocranium in Preoperated Patients.

    PubMed

    Horn, Dominik; Freudlsperger, Christian; Berger, Moritz; Freier, Kolja; Ristow, Oliver; Hoffmann, Jürgen; Sakowitz, Oliver; Engel, Michael

    2017-07-01

    The reconstruction of large cranial and scalp defects is a surgical and esthetic challenge. Single autologous tissue transfer can be insufficient due to the defect size and the anatomic complexity of the recipient site. Alloplastic patient-specific preformed implants can be used to recover hard tissue defects of the neurocranium. Nevertheless, for long-term success adequate soft tissue support is required. In this brief clinical study, the authors describe calvarian reconstruction in a 33-year-old patient with wound healing disorder after an initial resection of ependymoma. The patient suffered from osteonecrosis and wound breakdown in the fronto-parietal region. An alloplastic polymethylmethacrylate implant for hard tissue support was manufactured based on 3-dimensional visualization of a computed tomography scan. After the resection of remaining pathologic bone from earlier surgical procedures, the alloplastic implant was inserted to achieve functional coverage of the brain. Due to anatomic variation of donor site vessels during anterolateral thigh flap preparation, the authors performed a vastus intermedius free flap as a new muscular flap for craniofacial reconstruction. The authors achieved excellent functional and esthetic results. The muscular vastus intermedius free flap in combination with a split skin graft proves to be a new alternative to the anterolateral thigh flap for soft tissue reconstruction of the neurocranium.

  7. Normal postural responses preceding shoulder flexion: co-activation or asymmetric activation of transverse abdominis?

    PubMed

    Davarian, Sanaz; Maroufi, Nader; Ebrahimi, Esmaeil; Parnianpour, Mohammad; Farahmand, Farzam

    2014-01-01

    It is suggested that activation of the transverse abdominis muscle has a stabilizing effect on the lumbar spine by raising intra-abdominal pressure without added disc compression. However, its feedforward activity has remained a controversial issue. In addition, research regarding bilateral activation of trunk muscles during a unilateral arm movement is limited. The aim of this study was to evaluate bilateral anticipatory activity of trunk muscles during unilateral arm flexion. Eighteen healthy subjects (aged 25 ± 3.96 years) participated in this study and performed 10 trials of rapid arm flexion in response to a visual stimulus. The electromyographic activity of the right anterior deltoid (AD) and bilateral trunk muscles including the transverse abdominis/internal oblique (TA/IO), superficial lumbar multifidus (SLM) and lumbar erector spine (LES) was recorded. The onset latency and anticipatory activity of the recorded trunk muscles were calculated. The first muscle activated in anticipation of the right arm flexion was the left TA/IO. The right TA/IO activated significantly later than all other trunk muscles (P < 0.0005). In addition, anticipatory activity of the right TA/IO was significantly lower than all other trunk muscles (P < 0.0005). There was no significant difference in either onset latency or anticipatory activity among other trunk muscles (P > 0.05). Healthy subjects showed no bilateral anticipatory co-activation of TA/IO in unilateral arm elevation. Further investigations are required to delineate normal muscle activation pattern in healthy subjects prior to prescribing bilateral activation training of transverse abdominis for subjects with chronic low back pain.

  8. [Pedicle flap of nasal septum-basis nasi and temporal muscucofascial flap to repair nasoseptal perforation].

    PubMed

    Yin, Xinghong; Hu, Wei; Zhang, Xinhai; Sun, Min

    2014-10-01

    To explore curative effect with pedicle flap of nasal septum-basis nasi and temporal muscucofascial flap to repair nasal septal perforation. Dissecting mucoperichondrium and mucoperioseptum around the perforation and taking dowm and out xia-ward to the floor of nasal cavity to make a inferior extremity pedicle flap. Then,the flap was tumbled and sutured onto raw surface of contralateral side through perforation. Reapplicating autoallergic temporal musculofascial flap to repair another side perforation. Repairing perforation Sin twelve cases were sucessfully healed in endoscope. The pedicle flap of nasal septum-basis nasi and temporal muscucofascial flap is easy to acquire and no rejection. The flap has good blood supplying, high survival rate and provides adequate transplantating materail to repair comparatively large perforation.

  9. Anatomical curve identification

    PubMed Central

    Bowman, Adrian W.; Katina, Stanislav; Smith, Joanna; Brown, Denise

    2015-01-01

    Methods for capturing images in three dimensions are now widely available, with stereo-photogrammetry and laser scanning being two common approaches. In anatomical studies, a number of landmarks are usually identified manually from each of these images and these form the basis of subsequent statistical analysis. However, landmarks express only a very small proportion of the information available from the images. Anatomically defined curves have the advantage of providing a much richer expression of shape. This is explored in the context of identifying the boundary of breasts from an image of the female torso and the boundary of the lips from a facial image. The curves of interest are characterised by ridges or valleys. Key issues in estimation are the ability to navigate across the anatomical surface in three-dimensions, the ability to recognise the relevant boundary and the need to assess the evidence for the presence of the surface feature of interest. The first issue is addressed by the use of principal curves, as an extension of principal components, the second by suitable assessment of curvature and the third by change-point detection. P-spline smoothing is used as an integral part of the methods but adaptations are made to the specific anatomical features of interest. After estimation of the boundary curves, the intermediate surfaces of the anatomical feature of interest can be characterised by surface interpolation. This allows shape variation to be explored using standard methods such as principal components. These tools are applied to a collection of images of women where one breast has been reconstructed after mastectomy and where interest lies in shape differences between the reconstructed and unreconstructed breasts. They are also applied to a collection of lip images where possible differences in shape between males and females are of interest. PMID:26041943

  10. [Anatomical study of muscular latissimus dorsi surface vascularized by the transverse branch of thoraco-dorsal artery].

    PubMed

    Boucher, F; Pinatel, B; Shipkov, H; Mertens, P; Rouviere, O; Braye, F; Mojallal, A

    2014-10-01

    The latissimus dorsi muscle flap is a type V according to Mathes and Nahai. It is vascularized by a proximal main pedicle represented by the thoraco-dorsal pedicle and pedicle distal accessory represented by the dorsal branches of the posterior intercostal arteries. The main thoraco-dorsal pedicle has a descending branch and a transverse branch. This anatomical study clarifies the muscular territory vascularized by the transverse branch of thoraco-dorsal artery for a secondary use after harvesting a thoraco-dorsal artery perforator flap or a muscle-sparing latissimus dorsi flap. Our study focused on ten dissections latissimus dorsi muscle taken from five fresh cadavers chest, carried out within the University Department of Anatomy. The descending branch of thoraco-dorsal artery was ligated, the transverse branch was cannulated and injected with a mixture of barium sulfate/gelatin. After freezing, a static angiotomodensitometry (3D) of each flap was performed. The average muscular surface vascularized by the transverse branch is measured at 80% (77% minimum value, maximum value 83%) of the complete latissimus dorsi muscle. Intermuscular connections between the two branches of thoraco-dorsal pedicle were shown. The use of a ipsilateral latissimus dorsi muscle is a therapeutic option after harvesting a thoraco-dorsal artery perforator flap (TAP) or a muscle-sparing latissimus dorsi flap (MSLD-flap). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Vascular anatomy of the medial sural artery perforator flap: a new classification system of intra-muscular branching patterns.

    PubMed

    Dusseldorp, Joseph R; Pham, Quy J; Ngo, Quan; Gianoutsos, Mark; Moradi, Pouria

    2014-09-01

    The medial sural artery perforator (MSAP) flap is a versatile fasciocutaneous flap. The main difficulty encountered when raising the MSAP flap is in obtaining adequate pedicle length during intra-muscular dissection. The objective of this study was to determine the pattern of intra-muscular course of the MSAP flap pedicle. 14 cadaveric specimens were dissected and CT angiograms of 84 legs were examined. The intra-muscular branching pattern and depths of the medial sural artery branches were analyzed. The number of perforators, position of the dominant perforator and both intra-muscular and total pedicle length were also recorded and compared to existing anatomical data. Three types of arterial branching pattern were identified within the medial gastrocnemius, demonstrating one (31%), two (59%) or three or more (10%) main branches. A dominant perforator from the medial sural artery was present in 92% of anatomical specimens (13/14). Vertically, the location of the perforator from the popliteal crease was on average 13 cm (±2 cm). Transversely, the perforator originated 2.5 cm (±1 cm) from the posterior midline. Using CT angiography it was possible in 10 consecutive patients to identify a more superficial intra-muscular branch and determine the leg with the optimal branching pattern type for flap harvest. This study is the first to describe the variability of the intra-muscular arterial anatomy of the medial head of gastrocnemius muscle. Surgeons utilizing the MSAP flap option should be aware of the possible branching pattern types and consequently the differing perforator distribution and depths of intra-muscular branches. Routine use of pre-operative CT angiogram may help determine which leg has the most favorable branching pattern type and intra-muscular course for flap harvest. Copyright © 2014 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Pressure Distribution Over Airfoils with Fowler Flaps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wenzinger, Carl J; Anderson, Walter B

    1938-01-01

    Report presents the results of tests made of a Clark y airfoil with a Clark y Fowler flap and of an NACA 23012 airfoil with NACA Fowler flaps. Some of the tests were made in the 7 by 10-foot wind tunnel and others in the 5-foot vertical wind tunnel. The pressures were measured on the upper and lower surfaces at one chord section both on the main airfoils and on the flaps for several angles of attack with the flaps located at the maximum-lift settings. A test installation was used in which the model was mounted in the wind tunnel between large end planes so that two-dimensional flow was approximated. The data are given in the form of pressure-distribution diagrams and as plots of calculated coefficients for the airfoil-and-flap combinations and for the flaps alone.

  13. An innovative method of planning and displaying flap volume in DIEP flap breast reconstructions.

    PubMed

    Hummelink, S; Verhulst, Arico C; Maal, Thomas J J; Hoogeveen, Yvonne L; Schultze Kool, Leo J; Ulrich, Dietmar J O

    2017-07-01

    Determining the ideal volume of the harvested flap to achieve symmetry in deep inferior epigastric artery perforator (DIEP) flap breast reconstructions is complex. With preoperative imaging techniques such as 3D stereophotogrammetry and computed tomography angiography (CTA) available nowadays, we can combine information to preoperatively plan the optimal flap volume to be harvested. In this proof-of-concept, we investigated whether projection of a virtual flap planning onto the patient's abdomen using a projection method could result in harvesting the correct flap volume. In six patients (n = 9 breasts), 3D stereophotogrammetry and CTA data were combined from which a virtual flap planning was created comprising perforator locations, blood vessel trajectory and flap size. All projected perforators were verified with Doppler ultrasound. Intraoperative flap measurements were collected to validate the determined flap delineation volume. The measured breast volume using 3D stereophotogrammetry was 578 ± 127 cc; on CTA images, 527 ± 106 cc flap volumes were planned. The nine harvested flaps weighed 533 ± 109 g resulting in a planned versus harvested flap mean difference of 5 ± 27 g (flap density 1.0 g/ml). In 41 out of 42 projected perforator locations, a Doppler signal was audible. This proof-of-concept shows in small numbers that flap volumes can be included into a virtual DIEP flap planning, and transferring the virtual planning to the patient through a projection method results in harvesting approximately the same volume during surgery. In our opinion, this innovative approach is the first step in consequently achieving symmetric breast volumes in DIEP flap breast reconstructions. Copyright © 2017 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Influence of Flap Thickness on Nipple Projection After Nipple Reconstruction Using a Modified Star Flap.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Naohiro; Ando, Jiro; Harao, Michiko; Takemae, Masaru; Kishi, Kazuo

    2018-05-07

    In nipple reconstruction, the width, length, and thickness of modified star flaps are concerns for long-term reconstructed nipple projection. However, the flap's projection has not been analyzed, based on its thickness. The aim of the present study was to investigate how flap thickness in a modified star flap influences the resulting reconstructed nipple and achieves an appropriate flap width in design. Sixty-three patients who underwent nipple reconstruction using a modified star flap following implant-based breast reconstruction between August 2014 and July 2016 were included in this case-controlled study. The length of laterally diverging flaps was 1.5 times their width. The thickness of each flap was measured using ultrasonography, and the average thickness was defined as the flap thickness. We investigated the correlation between the resulting reconstructed nipple and flap thickness, and the difference of the change in the reconstructed nipple projection after using a thin or thick flap. The average flap thickness was 3.8 ± 1.7 (range 2.5-6.0) mm. There was a significant, linear correlation between the flap thickness and resulting reconstructed nipple projection (β = 0.853, p < 0.01). Furthermore, the difference between the thin and thick flaps in the resulting reconstructed nipple projection was significant (p < 0.01). Measuring the flap thickness preoperatively may allow surgeons to achieve an appropriate flap width; otherwise, alternative methods for higher projection might be used. This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each article. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to the Table of Contents or the online Instructions to Authors www.springer.com/00266 .

  15. Lower Extremity Reconstruction with Free Gracilis Flaps

    PubMed Central

    Nicoson, Michael C; Parikh, Rajiv P; Tung, Thomas H

    2017-01-01

    Background There have been significant advancements in lower extremity reconstruction over the last several decades, and the plastic surgeon’s armamentarium has grown to include free muscle and fasciocutaneous flaps along with local perforator and propeller flaps. While we have found a use for a variety of techniques for lower extremity reconstruction, the free gracilis has been our workhorse flap due to the ease of harvest, reliability, and low donor site morbidity. Methods This is a retrospective review of a single surgeon’s series of free gracilis flaps utilized for lower extremity reconstruction. Demographic information, comorbidities, outcomes and secondary procedures were analyzed. Results We identified 24 free gracilis flaps. The duration from injury to free flap coverage was 7 days or less in 6 patients, 8–30 days in 11 patients, 31–90 days in 4 patients, and > 90 days in 3 patients. There were 22 (92%) successful flaps and an overall limb salvage rate of 92%. There was one partial flap loss. Two flaps underwent incision and drainage in the operating room for infection. Two patients developed donor site hematomas. Four patients underwent secondary procedures for contouring. Our subset of pediatric patients had 100% flap survival and no secondary procedures at a mean 30 month follow up. Conclusions This study demonstrates the utility of the free gracilis flap in reconstruction of small to medium sized defects of the lower extremity. This flap has a high success rate and low donor site morbidity. Atrophy of the denervated muscle over time allows for good shoe fit, often obviating the need for secondary contouring procedures. PMID:28024305

  16. Wing flapping with minimum energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, R. T.

    1980-01-01

    A technique employed by Prandtl and Munk is adapted for the case of a wing in flapping motion to determine its lift distribution. The problem may be reduced to one of minimizing induced drag for a specified and periodically varying bending moment at the wing root. It is concluded that two wings in close tandem arrangement, moving in opposite phase, would eliminate the induced aerodynamic losses calculated

  17. Pedicled Temporalis Muscle Flap for Craniofacial Reconstruction: A 35-Year Clinical Experience with 366 Flaps.

    PubMed

    Spanio di Spilimbergo, Stefano; Nordera, Paolo; Mardini, Samir; Castiglione, Giusy; Chim, Harvey; Pinna, Vittore; Brunello, Massimo; Cusino, Claudio; Roberto, Squaquara; Baciliero, Ugo

    2017-02-01

    In the past 130 years, the temporalis muscle flap has been used for a variety of different indications. In this age of microsurgery and perforator flaps, the temporalis muscle flap still has many useful applications for craniofacial reconstruction. Three hundred sixty-six temporalis muscle flaps were performed in a single center between 1978 and 2012. The authors divided the cases into two series-before and after 1994-because, after 1994, they started to perform free flap reconstructions, and indications for reconstruction with a temporalis muscle flap were changed RESULTS:: In the series after 1994, flaps were most commonly used for reconstruction of defects in the maxilla, mandible, and oropharynx, in addition to facial reanimation and filling of orbital defects. Complications included total flap necrosis (1.6 percent) and partial flap necrosis (10.7 percent). The rate of material extrusion at the donor site decreased after porous polyethylene was uniformly used for reconstruction from 17.1 to 7.9 percent. The pedicled temporalis muscle flap continues to have many applications in craniofacial reconstruction. With increasing use of free flaps, the authors' indications for the pedicled temporalis muscle flap are now restricted to (1) orbital filling for congenital or acquired anophthalmia; (2) filling of unilateral maxillectomy defects; and (3) facial reanimation in selected cases of facial nerve palsy. Therapeutic, IV.

  18. Does the use of an acellular dermal graft in abdominal closure after rectus flap harvest impact the occurrence of post-operative hernia?

    PubMed

    Saman, Masoud; Kadakia, Sameep; Ducic, Yadranko

    2015-12-01

    Patients with rectus free flap harvest extending below the arcuate line are predisposed to postoperative hernia formation. As such, many authors have advocated the use of closure adjuncts to increase the integrity of the closure and prevent hernia or abdominal wall bulging. Busy level 1 public trauma center in metropolitan Fort Worth, Texas Following harvest of the rectus free flap, 48 patients underwent primary closure; 24 of these patients had defects extending below the arcuate line. Forty patients were closed with an acellular dermal graft; 22 of these patients had defects extending below the arcuate line. Postoperative hernia formation and local infection rate were examined in a minimum follow-up period of 1 year. Regardless of closure method, no hernias were observed in the postoperative period. Using an unpaired t test and an alpha value of 0.05, there was no statistically significant difference in the infection rate between the two groups. Following rectus abdominis myocutaneous free flap harvest, the use of an acellular dermal graft in abdominal wall closure may not be of any further advantage in the prevention of hernia. Retrospective (Level III).

  19. Pressure Available for Cooling with Cowling Flaps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stickle, George W; Naiman, Irven; Crigler, John L

    1941-01-01

    Report presents the results of a full-scale investigation conducted in the NACA 20-foot tunnel to determine the pressure difference available for cooling with cowling flaps. The flaps were applied to an exit slot of smooth contour at 0 degree flap angle. Flap angles of 0 degree, 15 degrees, and 30 degrees were tested. Two propellers were used; propeller c which has conventional round blade shanks and propeller f which has airfoil sections extending closer to the hub. The pressure available for cooling is shown to be a direct function of the thrust disk-loading coefficient of the propeller.

  20. Optimal propulsive flapping in Stokes flows.

    PubMed

    Was, Loïc; Lauga, Eric

    2014-03-01

    Swimming fish and flying insects use the flapping of fins and wings to generate thrust. In contrast, microscopic organisms typically deform their appendages in a wavelike fashion. Since a flapping motion with two degrees of freedom is able, in theory, to produce net forces from a time-periodic actuation at all Reynolds numbers, we compute in this paper the optimal flapping kinematics of a rigid spheroid in a Stokes flow. The hydrodynamics for the force generation and energetics of the flapping motion is solved exactly. We then compute analytically the gradient of a flapping efficiency in the space of all flapping gaits and employ it to derive numerically the optimal flapping kinematics as a function of the shape of the flapper and the amplitude of the motion. The kinematics of optimal flapping are observed to depend weakly on the flapper shape and are very similar to the figure-eight motion observed in the motion of insect wings. Our results suggest that flapping could be a exploited experimentally as a propulsion mechanism valid across the whole range of Reynolds numbers.

  1. Microsurgical free flaps: Controversies in maxillofacial reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    George, Rinku K.; Krishnamurthy, Arvind

    2013-01-01

    Reconstructive microsurgery for oral and maxillofacial (OMF) defects is considered as a niche specialty and is performed regularly only in a handful of centers. Till recently the pectoralis major myocutaneous flap (PMMC) was considered to be the benchmark for OMF reconstruction. This philosophy is changing fast with rapid advancement in reconstructive microsurgery. Due to improvement in instrumentation and the development of finer techniques of flap harvesting we can positively state that microsurgery has come of age. Better techniques, microscopes and micro instruments enable us to do things previously unimaginable. Supramicrosurgery and ultrathin flaps are a testimony to this. Years of innovation in reconstructive microsurgery have given us a reasonably good number of very excellent flaps. Tremendous work has been put into producing some exceptionally brilliant research articles, sometimes contradicting each other. This has led to the need for clarity in some areas in this field. This article will review some controversies in reconstructive microsurgery and analyze some of the most common microvascular free flaps (MFF) used in OMF reconstruction. It aims to buttress the fact that three flaps-the radial forearm free flap (RFFF), anterolateral thigh flap (ALT) and fibula are the ones most expedient in the surgeon's arsenal, since they can cater to almost all sizeable defects we come across after ablative surgery in the OMF region. They can thus aptly be titled as the workhorses of OMF reconstruction with regard to free flaps. PMID:23662264

  2. Refining the intrinsic chimera flap: a review.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Jayant P; Agarwal, Shailesh; Adler, Neta; Gottlieb, Lawrence J

    2009-10-01

    Reconstruction of complex tissue deficiencies in which each missing component is in a different spatial relationship to each other can be particularly challenging, especially in patients with limited recipient vessels. The chimera flap design is uniquely suited to reconstruct these deformities. Chimera flaps have been previously defined in many ways with 2 main categories: prefabricated or intrinsic. Herein we attempt to clarify the definition of a true intrinsic chimeric flap and provide examples of how these constructs provide a method for reconstruction of complex defects. The versatility of the intrinsic chimera flap and its procurement from 7 different vascular systems is described. A clarification of the definition of a true intrinsic chimera flap is described. In addition, construction of flaps from the lateral femoral circumflex, deep circumflex iliac, inferior gluteal, peroneal, subscapular, thoracodorsal, and radial arterial systems is described to showcase the versatility of these chimera flaps. A true intrinsic chimera flap must consist of more than a single tissue type. Each of the tissue components receives its blood flow from separate vascular branches or perforators that are connected to a single vascular source. These vascular branches must be of appropriate length to allow for insetting with 3-dimensional spatial freedom. There are a multitude of sites from which true intrinsic chimera flaps may be harvested.

  3. Reconstruction of the Foot and Ankle Using Pedicled or Free Flaps: Perioperative Flap Survival Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiucun; Cui, Jianli; Maharjan, Suraj; Lu, Laijin; Gong, Xu

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study is to determine the correlation between non-technical risk factors and the perioperative flap survival rate and to evaluate the choice of skin flap for the reconstruction of foot and ankle. Methods This was a clinical retrospective study. Nine variables were identified. The Kaplan-Meier method coupled with a log-rank test and a Cox regression model was used to predict the risk factors that influence the perioperative flap survival rate. The relationship between postoperative wound infection and risk factors was also analyzed using a logistic regression model. Results The overall flap survival rate was 85.42%. The necrosis rates of free flaps and pedicled flaps were 5.26% and 20.69%, respectively. According to the Cox regression model, flap type (hazard ratio [HR] = 2.592; 95% confidence interval [CI] (1.606, 4.184); P < 0.001) and postoperative wound infection (HR = 0.266; 95% CI (0.134, 0.529); P < 0.001) were found to be statistically significant risk factors associated with flap necrosis. Based on the logistic regression model, preoperative wound bed inflammation (odds ratio [OR] = 11.371,95% CI (3.117, 41.478), P < 0.001) was a statistically significant risk factor for postoperative wound infection. Conclusion Flap type and postoperative wound infection were both independent risk factors influencing the flap survival rate in the foot and ankle. However, postoperative wound infection was a risk factor for the pedicled flap but not for the free flap. Microvascular anastomosis is a major cause of free flap necrosis. To reconstruct complex or wide soft tissue defects of the foot or ankle, free flaps are safer and more reliable than pedicled flaps and should thus be the primary choice. PMID:27930679

  4. Rectus abdominis muscle injuries in elite handball players: management and rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Balius, Ramon; Pedret, Carles; Pacheco, Laura; Gutierrez, Josep Antoni; Vives, Joan; Escoda, Jaume

    2011-01-01

    Muscle injuries generally occur in two-joint muscles with a high percentage of type II fibers during the performance of eccentric activity. Some muscle injuries, such as those located in the adductor longus, a monoarticular muscle, as well as rectus abdominis do not fully comply with these requirements. This study examines five cases of elite handball players with ruptured rectus abdominals. Sonographically, lesions in rectus abdominis are shown as a disruption of the fibrillar pattern with a hematic suffusion that invades the entire lesion. In some of the cases, the ultrasound study was complemented with a MRI. A unified rehabilitation protocol was applied and the return to play time of each handball player ranged between 16 and 22 days, with an average of 18.2 days. Follow-up at 15 months showed no evidence of re-injury or residual discomfort and all of them are playing at their highest level. The aim of this study was to illustrate a feature of handball injury that, as in tennis and volleyball, is uncommon and so far has not been specifically reported. The phenomenon of contralateral abdominal hypertrophy in handball appears in the dominant arm as in tennis and volleyball. PMID:24198573

  5. Right Lower Quadrant Pain in a Young Female: Ultrasound Diagnosis of Rectus Abdominis Tear.

    PubMed

    Minardi, Joseph; Shaver, Erica; Monseau, Aaron; Pratt, Adam; Layman, Shelley M

    2015-11-01

    Right lower quadrant pain in young females presents a frequent diagnostic challenge for emergency physicians, with a broad differential and several important diagnoses. Using an "ultrasound first" imaging strategy can help decrease the use of computed tomography scans, with associated savings in radiation exposure, cost, and other resource use. We report a case of right lower quadrant pain in a young woman. After her initial history and physical examination, appendicitis was the leading differential. A bedside ultrasound was performed, leading to the uncommon diagnosis of rectus abdominis muscle tear. The sonographic findings of a muscle tear include increase in size, loss of linear, homogeneous architecture, and decreased echogenicity. Making this diagnosis at the bedside using ultrasound obviated the need for further imaging, avoiding unnecessary radiation exposure, and decreasing emergency department length of stay and overall cost, while leading to a tailored treatment plan. Why Should an Emergency Physician Be Aware of This? Rectus abdominis tear is a cause of right lower quadrant pain that may mimic appendicitis and should be considered in patients with this complaint. The ability to make this diagnosis with bedside ultrasound may assist in several important patient-oriented outcomes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Immediate breast reconstruction with a Latissimus dorsi flap has no detrimental effects on shoulder motion or postsurgical complications up to 1 year after surgery.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Riza Rute; do Nascimento, Simony Lira; Derchain, Sophie F M; Sarian, Luís Otávio

    2013-05-01

    Mastectomy negatively affects scapulothoracic and glenohumeral kinematics. Breast reconstructive methods such as the latissimus dorsi flap can result in anatomical modifications that may in theory further affect the shoulder apparatus. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of latissimus dorsi flap reconstruction on the recovery of shoulder motion and other postsurgical problems during the first year after mastectomy. This was a prospective cohort study of 104 consecutive mastectomies (47 with immediate latissimus dorsi flaps). Shoulder range of motion was assessed before and at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months after surgery. Pain, tissue adhesion, scar enlargement, and web syndrome were assessed during follow-up. There was a 30 percent decrease of shoulder range of motion 1 month after surgery, with gradual recovery over time. However, mean abduction and flexion capacities did not reach baseline levels and were on average 5 to 10 percent lower than baseline, even after 1 year. Over time, the latissimus dorsi flap was not associated with restriction of flexion or abduction. Scar enlargement (at the first month, p = 0.009) and tissue adhesion (at month 12, p = 0.032) were significantly less common in the latissimus dorsi flap group. The authors' study clearly suggests that the additional anatomical manipulation required for the latissimus dorsi flap procedure does not further affect shoulder kinematics and is associated with a lower incidence of tissue adhesion. Therapeutic, II.

  7. [Anatomy study on micro transverse flap pedicled with superfical palmar branch of radial artery from palmar wrist].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Min; Tian, Dehu; Shao, Xinzhong; Li, Dacun; Li, Jianfeng; Liu, Jingda; Zhao, Liang; Li, Hailei; Wang, Xiaolei; Zhang, Wentong; Wu, Jinying; Yuan, Zuoxiong

    2013-07-01

    To study the anatomical basis of micro transverse flap pedicled with the superfical palmar branch of radial artery from the palmar wrist for using this free flap to repair soft tissue defect of the finger. Thirty-eight fresh upper limb specimens (22 males and 16 females; aged 26-72 years with an average of 36 years; at left and right sides in 19 limbs respectively) were dissected and observed under operating microscope. Two specimens were made into casting mould of artery with bones, and 2 specimens were injected with red emulsion in radial artery. Thirty-four specimens were injected with 1% gentian violet solution in the superfical palmar branch of the radial artery. A transverse oval flap in the palmar wrist was designed, the axis of the flap was the distal palmar crease. The origin, distribution, and anastomosis of the superfical palmar branch of the radial artery were observed. The superficial palmar branch of the radial artery was constantly existed, it usually arises from the main trunk of the radial artery, 1.09-3.60 cm to proximal styloid process of radius. There were about 2-5 branches between the origin and the tubercle of scaphoid bone. The origin diameter was 1.00-3.00 mm, and the distal diameter at the styloid process of radius was 1.00-2.90 mm. The venous return of flap passed through 2 routes, and the innervations of the flap mainly from the palmar cutaneous branch of the median nerve. The area of the flap was 4 cm x 2 cm-6 cm x 2 cm. The origin and courses of the superficial palmar branch of the radial artery is constant, and its diameter is similar to that of the digital artery. A transverse oval flap pedicled with the superfical palmar branch of radial artery in the palmar wrist can be designed to repair defects of the finger.

  8. Quadratus Lumborum Block Versus Transversus Abdominis Plane Block for Postoperative Pain After Cesarean Delivery: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Blanco, Rafael; Ansari, Tarek; Riad, Waleed; Shetty, Nanda

    Effective postoperative analgesia after cesarean delivery enhances early recovery, ambulation, and breastfeeding. In a previous study, we established the effectiveness of the quadratus lumborum block in providing pain relief after cesarean delivery compared with patient-controlled analgesia (morphine). In the current study, we hypothesized that this method would be equal to or better than the transversus abdominis plane block with regard to pain relief and its duration of action after cesarean delivery. Between April 2015 and August 2015, we randomized 76 patients scheduled for elective cesarean delivery under spinal anesthesia to receive the quadratus lumborum block or the transversus abdominis plane block for postoperative pain relief. This trial was registered prospectively (NCT 02489851) [corrected]. Patients in the quadratus lumborum block group used significantly less morphine than the transversus abdominis plane block group (P < 0.05) at 12, 24, and 48 hours but not at 4 and 6 hours after cesarean delivery. This group also had significantly fewer morphine demands than the control group (P < 0.05) at 6, 12, 24, and 48 hours after cesarean delivery. No significant differences in visual analog scale results were shown between the 2 groups at rest or with movement. Calculated total pain relief at rest and with movement were similar (P < 0.001) in both groups. The quadratus lumborum block was more effective in reducing morphine consumption and demands than transversus abdominis plane blocks after cesarean section. This effect was observed up to 48 hours postoperatively.

  9. Risk Factor Analysis of Freestyle Propeller Flaps.

    PubMed

    Paik, Joo Myong; Pyon, Jai-Kyong

    2017-01-01

    Background  Freestyle propeller flaps have been widely used as a reconstructive option for both trunk and extremities. It offers the advantage of "like-with-like" reconstruction with an adjacent tissue with no dissection to the source vessels. However, there is the risk of vascular complications. In the present study, the authors investigated the incidence of vascular complications and their risk factors following freestyle propeller flap in the trunk and extremities. Methods  The authors conducted a retrospective review of 50 patients who underwent soft tissue reconstruction of the trunk and the extremities with 55 freestyle propeller flaps from 2004 to 2015. Data regarding patient demographics, surgical details, including the arc of rotation, and flap complications were collected from a prospectively maintained database and analyzed. Results  There were 10 flap complications (18.2%), including 7 superficial partial necrosis, 2 full-thickness partial necrosis, and 1 total necrosis from the 55 freestyle propeller flaps harvested. Previous irradiation was a significant risk factor for flap complications and the propeller flap harvested from the extremities showed a significantly higher rate of complications compared with those harvested from the trunk. Complication rates were higher in flaps with the arc of rotation between 150 and 180 degrees with marginal significance compared with flaps with the arc of rotation less than 150 degrees. Conclusions  Freestyle propeller flaps proved to be a valid and reliable option for reconstruction of defects in the trunk, while complication rate was quite high in the extremities. A prudent preoperative evaluation and preparation may be necessary before performing this surgical technique in the extremities. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  10. Refining the cross-finger flap: Considerations of flap insetting, aesthetics and donor site morbidity.

    PubMed

    Chong, Chew-Wei; Lin, Cheng-Hung; Lin, Yu-Te; Hsu, Chung-Chen; Chen, Shih-Heng

    2018-04-01

    We described a laterally based cross-finger flap for reconstruction of soft tissue defects in the fingers. This modification enables coverage of volar or dorsal soft tissue defects at the distal, middle or proximal phalanx. From March 2015 to January 2017, a total of 12 patients (13 fingers) underwent soft tissue reconstruction of the fingers with a laterally based cross-finger flap. The flap dimensions ranged from 13 ×7 mm to 43 ×13 mm. Eleven of the 13 flaps survived completely. The two flap failures were attributed to injuries in the donor fingers, rendering the blood supply of the flaps unreliable. All donor sites were closed primarily without the need for skin grafting, negating the problem of donor site morbidity that is associated with skin graft harvesting. The laterally based cross-finger flap is a versatile flap with less donor site morbidity and better aesthetics than a conventional cross-finger flap. We described the design of the flap, as well as the advantages and disadvantages, in doing a laterally based cross-finger flap. Copyright © 2017 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Reconstruction of Complex Facial Defects Using Cervical Expanded Flap Prefabricated by Temporoparietal Fascia Flap.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ling; Yang, Qinghua; Jiang, Haiyue; Liu, Ge; Huang, Wanlu; Dong, Weiwei

    2015-09-01

    Reconstruction of complex facial defects using cervical expanded flap prefabricated by temporoparietal fascia flap. Complex facial defects are required to restore not only function but also aesthetic appearance, so it is vital challenge for plastic surgeons. Skin grafts and traditional flap transfer cannot meet the reconstructive requirements of color and texture with recipient. The purpose of this sturdy is to create an expanded prefabricated temporoparietal fascia flap to repair complex facial defects. Two patients suffered severe burns on the face underwent complex facial resurfacing with prefabricated cervical flap. The vasculature of prefabricated flap, including the superficial temporal vessel and surrounding fascia, was used as the vascular carrier. The temporoparietal fascia flap was sutured underneath the cervical subcutaneous tissue, and expansion was begun in postoperative 1 week. After 4 to 6 months of expansion, the expander was removed, facial scars were excised, and cervical prefabricated flap was elevated and transferred to repair the complex facial defects. Two complex facial defects were repaired successfully by prefabricated temporoparietal fascia flap, and prefabricated flaps survived completely. On account of donor site's skin was thinner and expanded too fast, 1 expanded skin flap was rupture during expansion, but necrosis was not occurred after the 2nd operation. Venous congestion was observed in 1 patient, but after dressing, flap necrosis was not happened. Donor site was closed primarily. Postoperative follow-up 6 months, the color, texture of prefabricated flap was well-matched with facial skin. This method of expanded prefabricated flap may provide a reliable solution to the complex facial resurfacing.

  12. Energy management - The delayed flap approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bull, J. S.

    1976-01-01

    Flight test evaluation of a Delayed Flap approach procedure intended to provide reductions in noise and fuel consumption is underway using the NASA CV-990 test aircraft. Approach is initiated at a high airspeed (240 kt) and in a drag configuration that allows for low thrust. The aircraft is flown along the conventional ILS glide slope. A Fast/Slow message display signals the pilot when to extend approach flaps, landing gear, and land flaps. Implementation of the procedure in commercial service may require the addition of a DME navigation aid co-located with the ILS glide slope transmitter. The Delayed Flap approach saves 250 lb of fuel over the Reduced Flap approach, with a 95 EPNdB noise contour only 43% as large.

  13. Rotation Flaps-Principles and Locations.

    PubMed

    LoPiccolo, Matteo C

    2015-10-01

    The rotation flap is a classic method of tissue rearrangement. It is a simple yet effective tool for recruiting tissue from areas of laxity and redirecting vectors of tension to reconstruct wounds not amenable to primary closure. This article presents the basic design principles and specific applications of the rotation flap in dermatologic surgery. A Medline search of articles describing rotation flaps published prior to April 1, 2015 was performed, and several prominent texts in dermatologic surgery were reviewed. Information gathered from the above sources is combined with the clinical experience of the author and editors to present surgeons with a guide for planning and executing various rotation flaps. Mastering the technique of the rotation flap will allow a surgeon to repair a wide variety of cutaneous defects.

  14. Rotational Flap to Enhance Buccal Gingival Thickness and Implant Emergence Profile in the Esthetic Zone: Two Cases Reports

    PubMed Central

    AL-Juboori, Mohammed Jasim

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Many techniques have been developed to enhance the gingival thickness, gingival level and emergence profile around the implant in the esthetic zone. Introduction: In this study, a buccal rotational flap was used to improve the implant site in the esthetic zone and increase gingival tissue thickness. Methods: Two cases involved the use of a rotational flap during second-stage implant surgery, one case involved the use of a temporary crown with a healing abutment, and another case involved the use of a healing abutment. Result: The cases were followed up until the final crown was placed. The implant site was improved in 2 cases; the gingival thickness increased, the gingival level was enhanced and the emergence profile was developed. Conclusion: Many factors affect the results of a rotational flap; some factors are surgical, while others are prosthetic, biological and anatomical. PMID:28839477

  15. A propeller flap based on the thoracoacromial artery for reconstruction of a skin defect in the cervical region: a case report.

    PubMed

    Okada, Mitsuhiro; Ikeda, Mikinori; Uemura, Takuya; Takada, Jun; Nakamura, Hiroaki

    2013-05-01

    A propeller flap is useful for coverage of an adjacent skin defect without dissection back to source vessels and harvesting muscle tissues. The thoracoacromial artery is one of the vascular pedicles of the flaps for reconstruction in the cervical region. Use of a propeller flap based on the thoracoacromial artery has not previously been reported for reconstruction in the cervical region. We report a case in which a propeller flap based on the thoracoacromial artery was used for skin coverage after tumour resection in the cervical region together with an anatomical investigation. The propeller flap based on the thoracoacromial artery was harvested in the supine position, requiring no change in position after tumour resection. The skin defect was successfully reconstructed using the propeller flap based on the thoracoacromial artery with linear closure of the donor site. The propeller flap based on the thoracoacromial artery offers an alternative for reconstruction in the cervical region. Copyright © 2012 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Free sural artery perforator flap: An occasional gift in oral cavity reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Pease, Natalie L; Davies, Andrew; Townley, William A

    2016-07-01

    The medial sural artery perforator (MSAP) flap is becoming a popular strategy for reconstructing intraoral defects. We present a case in which no MSAPs were present, however, a perforator-based calf flap was successfully raised on the sural artery and used for tongue reconstruction. A corresponding anatomic study was undertaken to establish if this finding was reproducible. A 58-year-old woman underwent left hemiglossectomy for a squamous cell carcinoma of the tongue. Subsequently, 6 fresh frozen cadaveric limbs were dissected examining the blood supply of the posterior calf skin. The sural artery perforator (SAP) flap successfully reconstructed the defect. Our cadaveric study similarly demonstrated a septocutaneous SAP supplying the posterior calf skin in 1 of 6 limbs. SAPs allow a favorable flap dissection, as opposed to the musculocutaneous course of MSAPs. Our findings provide further evidence of the versatility of the calf donor site. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck 38: E2454-E2456, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Feedforward responses of transversus abdominis are directionally specific and act asymmetrically: implications for core stability theories.

    PubMed

    Allison, Garry T; Morris, Sue L; Lay, Brendan

    2008-05-01

    Experimental laboratory study supplemented with a repeated case study. To examine bilateral muscle activity of the deep abdominals in response to rapid arm raising, specifically to examine the laterality and directional specificity of feedforward responses of the transversus abdominis (TrA). Based on the feedforward responses of trunk muscles during rapid arm movements, authors have concluded that the deep trunk muscles have different control mechanisms compared to the more superficial muscles. It has been proposed that deep trunk muscles such as TrA contribute substantially to the stability of the lumbar spine and that this is achieved through simultaneous bilateral feedforward activation. These inferences are based on unilateral fine-wire electromyographic (EMG) data and there are limited investigations of bilateral responses of the TrA during unilateral arm raising. Bilateral fine-wire and surface EMG data from the anterior deltoid, TrA, obliquus internus (OI), obliquus externus, biceps femoris, erector spinae, and rectus abdominis during repeated arm raises were recorded at 2 kHz. EMG signal linear envelopes were synchronized to the onset of the anterior deltoid. A feedforward window was defined as the period up to 50 ms after the onset of the anterior deltoid, and paired onsets for bilateral muscles were plotted for both left and right arm movements. Trunk muscles from the group data demonstrated differences between sides (laterality), which were systematically altered when alternate arms were raised (directional specificity). This was clearly evident for the TrA but less obvious for the erector spinae. The ipsilateral biceps femoris and obliquus externus, and contralateral OI and TrA, were activated earlier than the alternate side for both right and left arm movements. This was a consistent pattern over a 7-year period for the case study. Data for the rectus abdominis derived from the case study demonstrated little laterality or directionally specific

  18. 14 CFR 23.697 - Wing flap controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Wing flap controls. 23.697 Section 23.697... STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Control Systems § 23.697 Wing flap controls. (a) Each wing flap control must be designed so that, when the flap...

  19. 14 CFR 23.697 - Wing flap controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Control Systems § 23.697 Wing flap controls. (a) Each wing flap control must be designed so that, when the flap... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Wing flap controls. 23.697 Section 23.697...

  20. 14 CFR 23.697 - Wing flap controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Control Systems § 23.697 Wing flap controls. (a) Each wing flap control must be designed so that, when the flap... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Wing flap controls. 23.697 Section 23.697...

  1. 14 CFR 23.697 - Wing flap controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Control Systems § 23.697 Wing flap controls. (a) Each wing flap control must be designed so that, when the flap... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Wing flap controls. 23.697 Section 23.697...

  2. 14 CFR 23.697 - Wing flap controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Control Systems § 23.697 Wing flap controls. (a) Each wing flap control must be designed so that, when the flap... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Wing flap controls. 23.697 Section 23.697...

  3. Comparison of gluteal perforator flaps and gluteal fasciocutaneous rotation flaps for reconstruction of sacral pressure sores.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yen-Chou; Huang, Eng-Yen; Lin, Pao-Yuan

    2014-03-01

    The gluteus maximus myocutaneous flap was considered the workhorse that reconstructed sacral pressure sores, but was gradually replaced by fasciocutaneous flap because of several disadvantages. With the advent of the perforator flap technique, gluteal perforator (GP) flap has gained popularity nowadays. The aim of this study was to compare the complications and outcomes between GP flaps and gluteal fasciocutaneous rotation (FR) flaps in the treatment of sacral pressure sores. Between April 2007 and June 2012, 63 patients underwent sacral pressure sore reconstructions, with a GP flap used in 31 cases and an FR flap used in 32 cases. Data collected on the patients included patient age, gender, co-morbidity for being bedridden and follow-up time. Surgical details collected included the defect size, operative time and estimated blood loss. Complications recorded included re-operation, dehiscence, flap necrosis, wound infection, sinus formation, donor-site morbidity and recurrence. The complications and clinical outcomes were compared between these two groups. We found that there was no significant difference in patient demographics, surgical complications and recurrence between these two groups. In gluteal FR flap group, all recurrent cases (five) were treated by reuse of previous flaps. Both methods are comparable, good and safe in treating sacral pressure sores. Gluteal FR flap can be performed without microsurgical dissection, and re-rotation is feasible in recurrent cases. The authors suggest using gluteal FR flaps in patients with a high risk of sore recurrence. Copyright © 2013 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Lower Extremity Limb Salvage with Cross Leg Pedicle Flap, Cross Leg Free Flap, and Cross Leg Vascular Cable Bridge Flap.

    PubMed

    Manrique, Oscar J; Bishop, Sarah N; Ciudad, Pedro; Adabi, Kian; Martinez-Jorge, Jorys; Moran, Steven L; Huang, Tony; Vijayasekaran, Aparna; Chen, Shih-Heng; Chen, Hung-Chi

    2018-05-16

     Lower extremity salvage following significant soft tissue loss can be complicated by lack of recipient vessel for free tissue transfer. We describe our experience in lower limb salvage for patients with no recipient vessels with the use of pedicle, free and cable bridge flaps.  A retrospective review from 1985 to 2017 of patients undergoing lower limb salvage using a contralateral pedicle cross leg (PCL) flaps, free cross leg (FCL) flaps, or free cable bridge (FCB) flaps was conducted. Demographics, etiology of the reconstruction, type of flap used, donor-site vessels, defect size, operating time, time of pedicle division, length of hospital stay, time to ambulation, and complications were analyzed.  A total of 53 patients (48 males and 5 females) with an average age of 35 years (range, 29-38 years) were identified. The etiology for the reconstruction was trauma in 52 patients and oncological resection in 1 patient. There were 18 PCL, 25 FCL, and 10 FCB completed. The recipient vessels for all flaps were the posterior tibial artery and vein. The average operating room times for PCL, FCL, and FCB flaps were 4, 9, and 10 hours, respectively. The average length of hospital stay was 5 weeks and average time to ambulation was 4 weeks. The average follow-up time was 7.5 years (range, 3-12 years). Complications encountered were hematoma (six), prolonged pain (six), total flap loss (two), reoperation (five), and infection (four). Limb salvage rates were 96.2%.  When ipsilateral limb vessels are not available, and other reconstructive options have been exhausted, cross leg flaps can be a viable option for limb salvage in the setting of extensive defects. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  5. Hydrodynamic schooling of flapping swimmers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Alexander D.; Masoud, Hassan; Newbolt, Joel W.; Shelley, Michael; Ristroph, Leif

    2015-10-01

    Fish schools and bird flocks are fascinating examples of collective behaviours in which many individuals generate and interact with complex flows. Motivated by animal groups on the move, here we explore how the locomotion of many bodies emerges from their flow-mediated interactions. Through experiments and simulations of arrays of flapping wings that propel within a collective wake, we discover distinct modes characterized by the group swimming speed and the spatial phase shift between trajectories of neighbouring wings. For identical flapping motions, slow and fast modes coexist and correspond to constructive and destructive wing-wake interactions. Simulations show that swimming in a group can enhance speed and save power, and we capture the key phenomena in a mathematical model based on memory or the storage and recollection of information in the flow field. These results also show that fluid dynamic interactions alone are sufficient to generate coherent collective locomotion, and thus might suggest new ways to characterize the role of flows in animal groups.

  6. Hydrodynamic schooling of flapping swimmers

    DOE PAGES

    Becker, Alexander D.; Masoud, Hassan; Newbolt, Joel W.; ...

    2015-10-06

    Fish schools and bird flocks are fascinating examples of collective behaviours in which many individuals generate and interact with complex flows. Motivated by animal groups on the move, here we explore how the locomotion of many bodies emerges from their flow-mediated interactions. Through experiments and simulations of arrays of flapping wings that propel within a collective wake, we discover distinct modes characterized by the group swimming speed and the spatial phase shift between trajectories of neighbouring wings. For identical flapping motions, slow and fast modes coexist and correspond to constructive and destructive wing–wake interactions. Simulations show that swimming in amore » group can enhance speed and save power, and we capture the key phenomena in a mathematical model based on memory or the storage and recollection of information in the flow field. Lastly, these results also show that fluid dynamic interactions alone are sufficient to generate coherent collective locomotion, and thus might suggest new ways to characterize the role of flows in animal groups.« less

  7. Aerodynamic characteristics of a wing with Fowler flaps including flap loads, downwash, and calculated effect on take-off

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Platt, Robert C

    1936-01-01

    This report presents the results of wind tunnel tests of a wing in combination with each of three sizes of Fowler flap. The purpose of the investigation was to determine the aerodynamic characteristics as affected by flap chord and position, the air loads on the flaps, and the effect of flaps on the downwash.

  8. Transversus abdominis plane block in renal allotransplant recipients: A retrospective chart review.

    PubMed

    Gopwani, S R; Rosenblatt, M A

    2016-01-01

    The efficacy of the transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block appears to vary considerably, depending on the surgical procedure and block technique. This study aims to add to the existing literature and provide a more clear understanding of the TAP blocks role as a postoperative analgesic technique, specifically in renal allotransplant recipients. A retrospective chart review was conducted by querying the intraoperative electronic medical record system of a 1200-bed tertiary academic hospital over a 5 months period, and reviewing anesthetic techniques, as well as postoperative morphine equivalent consumption. Fifty renal allotransplant recipients were identified, 13 of whom received TAP blocks while 37 received no regional analgesic technique. All blocks were performed under ultrasound guidance, with 20 mL of 0.25% bupivacaine injected in the transversus abdominis fascial plane under direct visualization. The primary outcome was postoperative morphine equivalent consumption. Morphine consumption was compared with the two-tailed Mann-Whitney U -test. Continuous variables of patient baseline characteristics were analyzed with unpaired t -test and categorical variables with Fischer Exact Test. A P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. A statistically significant decrease in cumulative morphine consumption was found in the group that received the TAP block at 6 h (2.46 mg vs. 7.27 mg, P = 0.0010), 12 h (3.88 mg vs. 10.20 mg, P = 0.0005), 24 h (6.96 mg vs. 14.75 mg, P = 0.0013), and 48 h (11 mg vs. 20.13 mg, P = 0.0092). The TAP block is a beneficial postoperative analgesic, opiate-sparing technique in renal allotransplant recipients.

  9. Comparison of ultrasound guided transversus abdominis plane block versus local wound infiltration for post operative analgesia in patients undergoing gynaecological surgery under general anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Ranjit, S; Shrestha, S K

    2014-01-01

    Transversus abdominis plane block has been recently developed as a part of multimodal post operative analgesic techniques. We compared the analgesic efficacy of this technique with local bupivacaine infiltration in patients undergoing gynaecological surgeries with pfannenstiel incision and lower midline incision under general anaesthesia. To evaluate the efficacy of ultrasound guided transversus abdominis plane block for postoperative analgesia. Patients were randomly allocated to three groups: control group (n=15), transversus abdominis plane block group (n=15), who received bilateral transversus abdominis plane blockwith 0.25% bupivacaine, and local infiltration group (n=15), who received local wound infiltration with 0.25% bupivacaine at the end of surgery. All patients received intramuscular diclofenac 12 hourly and intravenous tramadol SOS in the postoperative period. Visual analogue scores for pain were assessed at 1,2,4,8,12 and 24 hours postoperatively and these were compared between the three groups. Average tramadol consumption in 24 hours were also compared among the three groups. Data were subjected to univariate ANOVA test and chi-square test. Level of significance was set at 0.05. Visual analogue scores were significantly less in transversus abdominis plane block group and effect lasted up to 12 hours at rest postoperatively and 8 hours during cough and movement. Bilateral Transversus abdominis plane block was effective in reducing postoperative pain scores for 8 to 12 hours postoperatively. This block was also successful in reducing postoperative opioid requirement.

  10. A novel lobule rotation flap for the reconstruction of middle third auricular defects.

    PubMed

    Basu, Indraneil; Way, Benjamin; Al-Basri, Isam

    2013-12-01

    There are numerous techniques for the reconstruction of cutaneous defects of the pinna. Many of these distort the auricle, and several are challenging and time-consuming to perform. An illustrative case is presented to demonstrate a novel lobule rotational flap, which can be used to cover cutaneous defects of the middle third of the pinna. Postoperative photography illustrates that this simple one-stage technique causes minimal anatomical distortion and allows the final scar to be concealed within the inner helical rim. Small local flaps can be raised from the lobule to cover challenging defects of the middle third of the pinna. In selected patients, with abundant lobular tissue, this technique can be as effective as more complex reconstructive options. © 2013 The International Society of Dermatology.

  11. Comparison of gluteal fasciocutaneous rotational flaps and myocutaneous flaps for the treatment of sacral sores

    PubMed Central

    Ip, F. K.

    2005-01-01

    To compare the outcomes of gluteal fasciocutaneous rotational flaps and myocutaneous flaps in the treatment of sacral sores, together with a review of surgical complications in two matched cohorts. Thirty-eight patients (18 gluteal fasciocutaneous rotational flaps and 20 myocutaneous flaps) were reviewed retrospectively at a mean follow-up of 58 weeks. The rate of healing of the sore, the sore healing time, and the incidence of surgical complications, together with rate of recurrence, were obtained by chart review. Treatment groups were matched by patient characteristics, operative time and blood loss. The rate of healing of the sore, sore healing time and complication rate were comparable in the two groups but the rate of recurrence was lower to a statistically significant extent in myocutaneous flap patients. The authors suggest that both methods are comparable, good and safe in treating sacral sores; myocutaneous flaps are more durable. PMID:16333656

  12. On the generation of side-edge flap noise. [part span trailing edge flaps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howe, M. S.

    1981-01-01

    A theory is proposed for estimating the noise generated at the side edges of part span trailing edge flaps in terms of pressure fluctuations measured just in-board of the side edge of the upper surface of the flap. Asymptotic formulae are developed in the opposite extremes of Lorentz contracted acoustic wavelength large/small compared with the chord of the flap. Interpolation between these limiting results enables the field shape and its dependence on subsonic forward flight speed to be predicted over the whole frequency range. It is shown that the mean width of the side edge gap between the flap and the undeflected portion of the airfoil has a significant influence on the intensity of the radiated sound. It is estimated that the noise generated at a single side edge of a full scale part span flap can exceed that produced along the whole of the trailing edge of the flap by 3 dB or more.

  13. Occipital neuralgia: anatomic considerations.

    PubMed

    Cesmebasi, Alper; Muhleman, Mitchel A; Hulsberg, Paul; Gielecki, Jerzy; Matusz, Petru; Tubbs, R Shane; Loukas, Marios

    2015-01-01

    Occipital neuralgia is a debilitating disorder first described in 1821 as recurrent headaches localized in the occipital region. Other symptoms that have been associated with this condition include paroxysmal burning and aching pain in the distribution of the greater, lesser, or third occipital nerves. Several etiologies have been identified in the cause of occipital neuralgia and include, but are not limited to, trauma, fibrositis, myositis, fracture of the atlas, and compression of the C-2 nerve root, C1-2 arthrosis syndrome, atlantoaxial lateral mass osteoarthritis, hypertrophic cervical pachymeningitis, cervical cord tumor, Chiari malformation, and neurosyphilis. The management of occipital neuralgia can include conservative approaches and/or surgical interventions. Occipital neuralgia is a multifactorial problem where multiple anatomic areas/structures may be involved with this pathology. A review of these etiologies may provide guidance in better understanding occipital neuralgia. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Foucher first dorsal metacarpal artery flap versus littler heterodigital neurovascular flap in resurfacing thumb pulp loss defects.

    PubMed

    Delikonstantinou, Iraklis P; Gravvanis, Andreas I; Dimitriou, Vasilios; Zogogiannis, Ioannis; Douma, Amalia; Tsoutsos, Dimosthenis A

    2011-08-01

    Our study aims to illustrate the advantages and disadvantages of Foucher's first dorsal metacarpal artery flap and Littler's heterodigital neurovascular flap in thumb pulp reconstruction, by assessing wound healing of donor and recipient sites, sensibility, and functional outcome of the reconstructed thumb. Fourteen male patients were reconstructed either with Foucher (n = 8) or Littler flap (n = 6). Dissection of Foucher's flap was faster than that of Littler's flap. All Littler flaps survived completely, but we experienced 1 partial Foucher flap necrosis. Thumb motility and stability was optimal in all patients. Wound healing of donor sites was achieved in both groups. Two patients reconstructed with Littler flap developed scar contractures and presented a reduced range of motion of donor finger and first webspace, respectively. Although Littler flap resulted in better sensibility and tactile gnosis of the reconstructed thumb-pulp, Foucher flap ensured negligible donor site morbidity, complete cortical reorientation, and better overall hand function.

  15. The plane problem of the flapping wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birnbaum, Walter

    1954-01-01

    In connection with an earlier report on the lifting vortex sheet which forms the basis of the following investigations this will show how the methods developed there are also suitable for dealing with the air forces for a wing with a circulation variable with time. The theory of a propulsive wing flapping up and down periodically in the manner of a bird's wing is developed. This study shows how the lift and its moment result as a function of the flapping motion, what thrust is attainable, and how high is the degree of efficiency of this flapping propulsion unit if the air friction is disregarded.

  16. Boomerang flap reconstruction for the breast.

    PubMed

    Baumholtz, Michael A; Al-Shunnar, Buthainah M; Dabb, Richard W

    2002-07-01

    The boomerang-shaped latissimus dorsi musculocutaneous flap for breast reconstruction offers a stable platform for breast reconstruction. It allows for maximal aesthetic results with minimal complications. The authors describe a skin paddle to obtain a larger volume than either the traditional elliptical skin paddle or the extended latissimus flap. There are three specific advantages to the boomerang design: large volume, conical shape (often lacking in the traditional skin paddle), and an acceptable donor scar. Thirty-eight flaps were performed. No reconstruction interfered with patient's ongoing oncological regimen. The most common complication was seroma, which is consistent with other latissimus reconstructions.

  17. Dynamic response of a piezoelectric flapping wing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Alok; Khandwekar, Gaurang; Venkatesh, S.; Mahapatra, D. R.; Dutta, S.

    2015-03-01

    Piezo-composite membranes have advantages over motorized flapping where frequencies are high and certain coupling between bending and twisting is useful to generate lift and forward flight. We draw examples of fruit fly and bumble bee. Wings with Piezo ceramic PZT coating are realized. The passive mechanical response of the wing is characterized experimentally and validated using finite element simulation. Piezoelectric actuation with uniform electrode coating is characterized and optimal frequencies for flapping are identified. The experimental data are used in an empirical model and advanced ratio for a flapping insect like condition for various angular orientations is estimated.

  18. Ad hoc posterior tibial vessels perforator propeller flaps for the reconstruction of lower third leg soft- tissue defects

    PubMed Central

    Balakrishnan, Thalaivirithan Margabandu; Ramkumar, Jayagosh; Jaganmohan, Janardhanan

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Lower third leg soft tissue defects with anatomical and pathological constraints are posing formidable challenges to reconstructive surgeon. Aim: This retrospective study was conducted to assess the effectiveness of ad hoc posterior tibial vessels perforator-propeller flaps for the reconstruction of small and medium sized soft tissue defects in the lower third leg. Patients and Methods: 22 patients (16 were males and 6 were females) were involved in this study between period of January 2012 and December 2016.We followed the protocol of initial non delineating exploratory incision made to find out single best perforator in all patients. All the defects in leg reconstructed with adhoc posterior tibial vessel propeller flaps. Results: All 22 flaps survived well. All in an average of 13 months follow up period, had pain free walking, with minimal scarring and acceptable aesthesis at the reconstruction sites with no need for any secondary procedure. Conclusion: With inability of preoperatively dopplering the perforators in the lower third leg region, the exploratory posterior nondelineating incision was used in all cases to secure the single best perforator for the propeller flaps. Thus adhoc posterior tibial vessel propeller flaps are dependable, easily adoptable for the reconstruction of soft tissue defects of the lower third leg region. PMID:29618863

  19. Ad hoc posterior tibial vessels perforator propeller flaps for the reconstruction of lower third leg soft- tissue defects.

    PubMed

    Balakrishnan, Thalaivirithan Margabandu; Ramkumar, Jayagosh; Jaganmohan, Janardhanan

    2017-01-01

    Lower third leg soft tissue defects with anatomical and pathological constraints are posing formidable challenges to reconstructive surgeon. This retrospective study was conducted to assess the effectiveness of ad hoc posterior tibial vessels perforator-propeller flaps for the reconstruction of small and medium sized soft tissue defects in the lower third leg. 22 patients (16 were males and 6 were females) were involved in this study between period of January 2012 and December 2016.We followed the protocol of initial non delineating exploratory incision made to find out single best perforator in all patients. All the defects in leg reconstructed with adhoc posterior tibial vessel propeller flaps. All 22 flaps survived well. All in an average of 13 months follow up period, had pain free walking, with minimal scarring and acceptable aesthesis at the reconstruction sites with no need for any secondary procedure. With inability of preoperatively dopplering the perforators in the lower third leg region, the exploratory posterior nondelineating incision was used in all cases to secure the single best perforator for the propeller flaps. Thus adhoc posterior tibial vessel propeller flaps are dependable, easily adoptable for the reconstruction of soft tissue defects of the lower third leg region.

  20. The transverse musculocutaneous gracilis flap for breast reconstruction: guidelines for flap and patient selection.

    PubMed

    Schoeller, Thomas; Huemer, Georg M; Wechselberger, Gottfried

    2008-07-01

    The transverse musculocutaneous gracilis (TMG) flap has received little attention in the literature as a valuable alternative source of donor tissue in the setting of breast reconstruction. The authors give an in-depth review of their experience with breast reconstruction using the TMG flap. A retrospective review of 111 patients treated with a TMG flap for breast reconstruction in an immediate or a delayed setting between August of 2002 and July of 2007 was undertaken. Of these, 26 patients underwent bilateral reconstruction and 68 underwent unilateral reconstruction, and 17 patients underwent reconstruction unilaterally with a double TMG flap. Patient age ranged between 24 and 65 years (mean, 37 years). Twelve patients had to be taken back to the operating room because of flap-related problems and nine patients underwent successful revision microsurgically, resulting in three complete flap losses in a series of 111 patients with 154 transplanted TMG flaps. Partial flap loss was encountered in two patients, whereas fat tissue necrosis was managed conservatively in six patients. Donor-site morbidity was an advantage of this flap, with a concealed scar and minimal contour irregularities of the thigh, even in unilateral harvest. Complications included delayed wound healing (n = 10), hematoma (n = 5), and transient sensory deficit over the posterior thigh (n = 49). The TMG flap is more than an alternative to the deep inferior epigastric perforator (DIEP) flap in microsurgical breast reconstruction in selected patients. In certain indications, such as bilateral reconstructions, it possibly surpasses the DIEP flap because of a better concealed donor scar and easier harvest.

  1. Treatment of soft-tissue loss with nerve defect in the finger using the boomerang nerve flap.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chao; Tang, Peifu; Zhang, Xu

    2013-01-01

    This study reports simultaneous repair of soft-tissue loss and proper digital nerve defect in the finger using a boomerang nerve flap including nerve graft from the dorsal branch of the proper digital nerve. From July of 2007 to May of 2010, the flap was used in 17 fingers in 17 patients. The injured fingers included five index, seven long, and five ring fingers. The mean soft-tissue loss was 2.5 × 1.9 cm. The mean flap size was 2.8 × 2.1 cm. Proper digital nerve defects were reconstructed using nerve graft harvested from the dorsal branch of the adjacent finger's proper digital nerve. The average nerve graft length was 2.5 cm. The comparison group included 32 patients treated using a cross-finger flap and a secondary free nerve graft. In the study group, 15 flaps survived completely. Partial necrosis at the distal edge of the flap occurred in two cases. At a mean follow-up of 22 months, the average static two-point discrimination and Semmes-Weinstein monofilament test results on the pulp of the reconstructed finger were 7.5 mm and 3.86, respectively. In the comparison group, the results were 9.3 mm and 3.91, respectively. The study group presented better discriminatory sensation on the pulp and milder pain and cold intolerance in the reconstructed finger. The boomerang nerve flap is useful and reliable for reconstructing complicated finger damage involving soft-tissue loss and nerve defect, especially in difficult anatomical regions. Therapeutic, II.

  2. Treatment of ischial pressure sores with both profunda femoris artery perforator flaps and muscle flaps.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chae Min; Yun, In Sik; Lee, Dong Won; Lew, Dae Hyun; Rah, Dong Kyun; Lee, Won Jai

    2014-07-01

    Reconstruction of ischial pressure sore defects is challenging due to extensive bursas and high recurrence rates. In this study, we simultaneously applied a muscle flap that covered the exposed ischium and large bursa with sufficient muscular volume and a profunda femoris artery perforator fasciocutaneous flap for the management of ischial pressure sores. We retrospectively analyzed data from 14 patients (16 ischial sores) whose ischial defects had been reconstructed using both a profunda femoris artery perforator flap and a muscle flap between January 2006 and February 2014. We compared patient characteristics, operative procedure, and clinical course. All flaps survived the entire follow-up period. Seven patients (50%) had a history of surgery at the site of the ischial pressure sore. The mean age of the patients included was 52.8 years (range, 18-85 years). The mean follow-up period was 27.9 months (range, 3-57 months). In two patients, a biceps femoris muscle flap was used, while a gracilis muscle flap was used in the remaining patients. In four cases (25%), wound dehiscence occurred, but healed without further complication after resuturing. Additionally, congestion occurred in one case (6%), but resolved with conservative treatment. Among 16 cases, there was only one (6%) recurrence at 34 months. The combination of a profunda femoris artery perforator fasciocutaneous flap and muscle flap for the treatment of ischial pressure sores provided pliability, adequate bulkiness and few long-term complications. Therefore, this may be used as an alternative treatment method for ischial pressure sores.

  3. Free-style Deepithelialized Propeller Flaps: An Ideal Local Flap to Obliterate Wounds with Dead Space.

    PubMed

    Datli, Asli; Suh, HyunSuk; Kim, Young Chul; Choi, Doon Hoon; Hong, Joon Pio Jp

    2017-03-01

    The reconstruction of the posterior trunk, especially with large dead spaces, remains challenging. Regional muscle flaps may lack adequate volume and reach. The purpose of this report was to evaluate the efficacy of deepithelialized free-style perforator-based propeller flaps to obliterate defects with large dead space. A total of 7 patients with defects on the posterior trunk with large dead spaces were evaluated. After complete debridement or resection, all flaps were designed on a single perforator adjacent to the defect, deepithelialized, and then rotated in a propeller fashion. Flaps were further modified in some cases such as folding the flap after deepithelialization to increase bulk and to obliterate the dead space. The flap dimension ranged from 10 × 5 × 1 to 15 × 8 × 2.5 cm based on a single perforator. The rotation arch of the flap ranged from 90 to 180 degrees. Uneventful healing was noted in all cases. One case showed latent redness and swelling at 7 months after falling down, which resolved with medication. During the average follow-up of 28 months, there were no other flap and donor site complications. The deepithelialized propeller flap can be used efficiently to obliterate dead spaces in the posterior trunk and retains advantages such as having a good vascular supply, adequate bulk, sufficient reach without tension, and minimal donor site morbidity.

  4. Face resurfacing using a cervicothoracic skin flap prefabricated by lateral thigh fascial flap and tissue expander.

    PubMed

    Li, Qingfeng; Zan, Tao; Gu, Bin; Liu, Kai; Shen, Guoxiong; Xie, Yun; Weng, Rui

    2009-01-01

    Resurfacing of facial massive soft tissue defect is a formidable challenge because of the unique character of the region and the limitation of well-matched donor site. In this report, we introduce a technique for using the prefabricated cervicothoracic skin flap for facial resurfacing, in an attempt to meet the principle of flap selection in face reconstructive surgery for matching the color and texture, large dimension, and thinner thickness (MLT) of the recipient. Eleven patients with massive facial scars underwent resurfacing procedures with prefabricated cervicothoracic flaps. The vasculature of the lateral thigh fascial flap, including the descending branch of the lateral femoral circumflex vessels and the surrounding muscle fascia, was used as the vascular carrier, and the pedicles of the fascial flap were anastomosed to either the superior thyroid or facial vessels in flap prefabrication. A tissue expander was placed beneath the fascial flap to enlarge the size and reduce the thickness of the flap. The average size of the harvested fascia flap was 6.5 x 11.7 cm. After a mean interval of 21.5 weeks, the expanders were filled to a mean volume of 1,685 ml. The sizes of the prefabricated skin flaps ranged from 12 x 15 cm to 15 x 32 cm. The prefabricated skin flaps were then transferred to the recipient site as pedicled flaps for facial resurfacing. All facial soft tissue defects were successfully covered by the flaps. The donor sites were primarily closed and healed without complications. Although varied degrees of venous congestion were developed after flap transfers, the marginal necrosis only occurred in two cases. The results in follow-up showed most resurfaced faces restored natural contour and regained emotional expression. MLT is the principle for flap selection in resurfacing of the massive facial soft tissue defect. Our experience in this series of patients demonstrated that the prefabricated cervicothoracic skin flap could be a reliable alternative

  5. Latissimus Dorsi Myocutaneous Flap for Breast Reconstruction: Bad Rap or Good Flap?

    PubMed Central

    Perdikis, Galen; Koonce, Stephanie; Collis, George; Eck, Dustin

    2011-01-01

    Objective: This article serves to review latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap as an option for breast reconstruction postmastectomy. Since the introduction of the latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap in the late 1970s, its use has always been as a secondary technique, particularly after the development of the transverse rectus abdominus myocutaneous flap in the 1980s. Methods: A literature review of the history of latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap utilized for breast reconstruction as well as a review of our institution's experience with latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap and tissue expander placement was performed. Results: There remains a paucity of published studies investigating latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap for breast reconstruction. Most studies have small numbers and do not utilize tissue expanders. More recently several small studies have been published that show acceptably low complication rates with aesthetically pleasing outcomes when latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap is employed with a tissue expander. At our institution, we have employed latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap with tissue expander placement for both delayed and immediate reconstruction with subsequent replacement with a permanent implant with a capsular contraction rate of 10.5%. Our data and others more recently published demonstrate very acceptable capsular contracture rates and aesthetic outcomes, particularly when an expander is utilized. Conclusion: The latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap remains an excellent choice for breast reconstruction with a low risk of complications. PMID:22031843

  6. Latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap for breast reconstruction: bad rap or good flap?

    PubMed

    Perdikis, Galen; Koonce, Stephanie; Collis, George; Eck, Dustin

    2011-01-01

    This article serves to review latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap as an option for breast reconstruction postmastectomy. Since the introduction of the latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap in the late 1970s, its use has always been as a secondary technique, particularly after the development of the transverse rectus abdominus myocutaneous flap in the 1980s. A literature review of the history of latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap utilized for breast reconstruction as well as a review of our institution's experience with latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap and tissue expander placement was performed. There remains a paucity of published studies investigating latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap for breast reconstruction. Most studies have small numbers and do not utilize tissue expanders. More recently several small studies have been published that show acceptably low complication rates with aesthetically pleasing outcomes when latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap is employed with a tissue expander. At our institution, we have employed latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap with tissue expander placement for both delayed and immediate reconstruction with subsequent replacement with a permanent implant with a capsular contraction rate of 10.5%. Our data and others more recently published demonstrate very acceptable capsular contracture rates and aesthetic outcomes, particularly when an expander is utilized. The latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap remains an excellent choice for breast reconstruction with a low risk of complications.

  7. Route Flap Damping Made Usable

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelsser, Cristel; Maennel, Olaf; Mohapatra, Pradosh; Bush, Randy; Patel, Keyur

    The Border Gateway Protocol (BGP), the de facto inter-domain routing protocol of the Internet, is known to be noisy. The protocol has two main mechanisms to ameliorate this, MinRouteAdvertisementInterval (MRAI), and Route Flap Damping (RFD). MRAI deals with very short bursts on the order of a few to 30 seconds. RFD deals with longer bursts, minutes to hours. Unfortunately, RFD was found to severely penalize sites for being well-connected because topological richness amplifies the number of update messages exchanged. So most operators have disabled it. Through measurement, this paper explores the avenue of absolutely minimal change to code, and shows that a few RFD algorithmic constants and limits can be trivially modified, with the result being damping a non-trivial amount of long term churn without penalizing well-behaved prefixes' normal convergence process.

  8. [Muscle-sparing latissimus dorsi flap. Vascular anatomy and indications in breast reconstruction].

    PubMed

    Mojallal, A; Saint-Cyr, M; Wong, C; Veber, M; Braye, F; Rohrich, R

    2010-04-01

    The muscle-sparing latissimus dorsi flap pedicled on descending branch presents distinct advantages in breast reconstruction, specially when there is a transversely oriented skin paddle, including reduced donor site morbidity, sparing muscle function and greater freedom of orientation of the skin paddle. This study reports the anatomical basis, surgical technique, advantages and complications of this technique. Four clinical cases illustrate surgical indications in breast reconstructive surgery. An anatomical cadaveric study underwent to University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas. The goal was performed to determine the location of the bifurcation of the thoracodorsal artery and the course of its descending branch compare to the anterior side of latissimus dorsi muscle. Four clinical cases illustrated indications of muscle-sparing latissimus dorsi flap pedicled on descending branch in breast reconstruction. These cases showed advantages and complications of the technique, and impact on donor site. Fifteen descending branch muscle-sparing latissimus dorsi flaps were harvested. All flaps had a bifurcation of the thoracodorsal artery. The average was located at 5,1cm from posterior axillary side (from 2,1 to 7,5 cm) and average of 2,2 cm from the anterior side of latissimus dorsi muscle (from 1,3 to 3,1cm). To 5, 10 and 15 cm from posterior axillary side, the descending branch was located at respectively an average of 2,0 cm (from 1,4 to 2,5), 2,4 cm (from 1,3 to 3,3), and 2,9 cm (from 2,0 to 3,8) behind the anterior side of latissimus dorsi muscle. The average length of descending branch was measured at 15,2 cm (from 13,2 to 19,0). None clinical cases paddle suffering was observed. Donor site morbidity was less than classical or extended adipomuscular technique. Latissimus dorsi muscle function is spared. The muscle-sparing latissimus dorsi flap, pedicled on descending branch, is versatile and reproducible. It results in minimal functional deficit of the

  9. A composite gluteofemoral flap for reconstruction of large pressure sores over the sacrococcygeal region.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yun; Zhuang, Yue-Hong; Xue, Lan; Zheng, He-Ping; Lin, Jian-Hua

    2015-12-01

    Gigantic pressure sores pose a daunting challenge for plastic surgeons. This paper presents a composite gluteofemoral flap for reconstruction of large pressure sores over the sacrococcygeal region. In this anatomical study, 30 embalmed cadaveric lower limbs were used for dissection to observe the musculocutaneous perforators of the inferior gluteal artery and the longitudinal nutritional vascular chain of the posterior femoral cutaneous nerve. In this clinical study, eight patients underwent surgical harvest of the composite gluteofemoral flap for coverage of grade IV sacrococcygeal pressure sores. The size of the pressure sores ranged between 16 × 9 cm and 22 × 10 cm. The inferior gluteal artery was present in 26 cases and absent in four cases. It gave off two to four musculocutaneous branches with a diameter larger than 0.5 mm to the gluteus maximus. A direct cutaneous branch was given off at the inferior margin of the gluteus maximus, serving as a nutritional artery for the posterior femoral cutaneous nerve. The size of the flap harvested ranged between 22 × 9 cm and 32 × 10 cm. Flaps in seven patients survived uneventfully and developed epidermal necrosis at the distal margin in one case. An average 2-year follow-up revealed no recurrence of pressure sores. The composite gluteofemoral flap, being robust in blood supply, simple in surgical procedure, and large in donor territory, is an important addition to the armamentarium. Copyright © 2015 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Scapular flap for maxillectomy defect reconstruction and preliminary results using three-dimensional modeling.

    PubMed

    Modest, Mara C; Moore, Eric J; Abel, Kathryn M Van; Janus, Jeffrey R; Sims, John R; Price, Daniel L; Olsen, Kerry D

    2017-01-01

    Discuss current techniques utilizing the scapular tip and subscapular system for free tissue reconstruction of maxillary defects and highlight the impact of medical modeling on these techniques with a case series. Case review series at an academic hospital of patients undergoing maxillectomy + thoracodorsal scapula composite free flap (TSCF) reconstruction. Three-dimensional (3D) models were used in the last five cases. 3D modeling, surgical, functional, and aesthetic outcomes were reviewed. Nine patients underwent TSCF reconstruction for maxillectomy defects (median age = 43 years; range, 19-66 years). Five patients (55%) had a total maxillectomy (TM) ± orbital exenteration, whereas four patients (44%) underwent subtotal palatal maxillectomy. For TM, the contralateral scapula tip was positioned with its natural concavity recreating facial contour. The laterally based vascular pedicle was ideally positioned for facial vessel anastomosis. For subtotal-palatal defect, an ipsilateral flap was harvested, but inset with the convex surface facing superiorly. Once 3D models were available from our anatomic modeling lab, they were used for intraoperative planning of the last five patients. Use of the model intraoperatively improved efficiency and allowed for better contouring/plating of the TSCF. At last follow-up, all patients had good functional outcomes. Aesthetic outcomes were more successful in patients where 3D-modeling was used (100% vs. 50%). There were no flap failures. Median follow-up >1 month was 5.2 months (range, 1-32.7 months). Reconstruction of maxillectomy defects is complex. Successful aesthetic and functional outcomes are critical to patient satisfaction. The TSCF is a versatile flap. Based on defect type, choosing laterality is crucial for proper vessel orientation and outcomes. The use of internally produced 3D models has helped refine intraoperative contouring and flap inset, leading to more successful outcomes. 4. Laryngoscope, 127:E8-E14

  11. Early Reconstruction of Distal Leg and Foot in Acute High-Voltage Electrical Burn: Does Location of Pedicle in the Zone of Injury Affect the Outcome of Distally Based Sural Flap?

    PubMed

    Asʼadi, Kamran; Salehi, Seyed Hamid; Shoar, Saeed

    2017-01-01

    Distally based fasciocutaneous sural flap is popular in the reconstruction of distal leg and foot burns. However, utilization of this technique in high-voltage electrical injury has been challenging. The present study aimed to compare the outcome of early aggressive debridement and coverage of contact point of acute high-voltage electrical injury using distally based fasciocutaneous sural flap between high-risk and low-risk patients defined by the anatomic proximity of the flap pedicle to the zone of injury. A total of 51 patients with contact point of high-voltage electrical burn (HVEB) in distal leg and foot undergoing distally based fasciocutaneous sural flap were included in this prospective clinical study. In 28 patients, the flap pedicle was not involved in the contact point of high-voltage electrical injury (low risk/control group), whereas in 21 patients, it was located inside the zone of injury (high-risk/case group). Patients were followed up for a median of 21 months (range, 12-44 months). Wound dimensions to be covered were relatively similar between the 2 groups. Complications of flap survival (primary outcome) and other minor early and late complications (secondary outcome) did not significantly differ between the 2 groups (P > 0.05). Provided that early and completed debridements of contact points of HVEB were achieved, distally based sural flap is feasible and there is reliable coverage in HVEB even in patients with flap pedicle located in vicinity of the zone of injury.

  12. A dynamical system for interacting flapping swimmers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oza, Anand; Ramananarivo, Sophie; Ristroph, Leif; Shelley, Michael

    2015-11-01

    We present the results of a theoretical investigation into the dynamics of interacting flapping swimmers. Our study is motivated by the recent experiments of Becker et al., who studied a one-dimensional array of self-propelled flapping wings that swim within each other's wakes in a water tank. They discovered that the system adopts certain ``schooling modes'' characterized by specific spatial phase relationships between swimmers. To rationalize these phenomena, we develop a discrete dynamical system in which the swimmers are modeled as heaving airfoils that shed point vortices during each flapping cycle. We then apply our model to recent experiments in the Applied Math Lab, in which two tandem flapping airfoils are free to choose both their speed and relative positions. We expect that our model may be used to understand how schooling behavior is influenced by hydrodynamics in more general contexts. Thanks to the NSF for its support.

  13. Free 'mini' groin flap for digital resurfacing.

    PubMed

    Tare, M; Ramakrishnan, V

    2009-06-01

    Ten cases of post-traumatic skin and soft tissue loss over the digits were resurfaced by free 'mini' groin flap. Five patients had defects of the dorsum of the digit, three had proximal palmar defects, one patient had circumferential skin loss and one had multiple digital injuries. The flap was harvested from the contralateral groin using a two-team approach. The average size of the flap was 5.5 x 4.75 cm and the mean operating time was 2.45 hrs. All patients had physiotherapy within 48-72 hrs. There were no flap losses. Six patients were happy with the cosmetic result and did not require any further debulking. We recommend free tissue transfer for digital resurfacing specifically in moderate to large dorsal defects, proximal volar defects, circumferential skin loss and multiple digit injuries.

  14. Viscous investigation of a flapping foil propulsor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posri, Attapol; Phoemsapthawee, Surasak; Thaweewat, Nonthipat

    2018-01-01

    Inspired by how fishes propel themselves, a flapping-foil device is invented as an alternative propulsion system for ships and boats. The performance of such propulsor has been formerly investigated using a potential flow code. The simulation results have shown that the device has high propulsive efficiency over a wide range of operation. However, the potential flow gives good results only when flow separation is not present. In case of high flapping frequency, the flow separation can occur over a short instant due to fluid viscosity and high angle of attack. This may cause a reduction of propulsive efficiency. A commercial CFD code based on Lattice Boltzmann Method, XFlow, is then employed in order to investigate the viscous effect over the propulsive performance of the flapping foil. The viscous results agree well with the potential flow results, confirming the high efficiency of the propulsor. As expected, viscous results show lower efficiency in high flapping frequency zone.

  15. Pharmacokinetics of bupivacaine after bilateral ultrasound-guided transversus abdominis plane block following cesarean delivery under spinal anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Trabelsi, B; Charfi, R; Bennasr, L; Marzouk, S Ben; Eljebari, H; Jebabli, N; Sassi, M Ben; Trabelsi, S; Maghrebi, H

    2017-11-01

    Transversus abdominis plane block is an effective method of post-cesarean analgesia. There are no data available about plasma bupivacaine levels after this block in adults. This study aimed to assess bupivacaine pharmacokinetic parameters after ultrasound-guided transversus abdominis plane blocks following cesarean delivery under spinal anesthesia. A prospective observational study in parturients undergoing elective cesarean delivery under hyperbaric bupivacaine spinal anesthesia was conducted. After surgery, patients received bilateral transversus abdominis plane block (50mg bupivacaine each side). Venous blood samples were collected immediately before performing the block and at 10, 20, 30, 45, 60, 90, 120, 180, 240, 720 and 1440minutes. High performance liquid chromatography was used to measure total plasma bupivacaine concentrations. Mean bupivacaine area under the curve (AUC) was calculated from 0 to 24hours. Data were collected from 17 parturients. Mean age and body mass index were 31±6y and 30±4kg/m 2 respectively. Mean plasma bupivacaine concentration before the block was 171ng/mL. Mean peak concentration was 802.36ng/mL (range 231.8 to 3504.5ng/mL). Mean time to peak concentration was 30min and mean area-under-the-curve (0-24h) was 4505.4h.ng/mL. Mean elimination half-life was 8.75h. Three subjects had concentrations above the quoted toxic threshold and mild symptoms suggestive of neurotoxicity were reported by two subjects, but no treatment was required. Single-dose bilateral transversus abdominis plane block using 100mg of bupivacaine, after spinal anesthesia for cesarean delivery, can result in toxic plasma bupivacaine concentrations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Aerodynamic effects of flexibility in flapping wings.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Liang; Huang, Qingfeng; Deng, Xinyan; Sane, Sanjay P

    2010-03-06

    Recent work on the aerodynamics of flapping flight reveals fundamental differences in the mechanisms of aerodynamic force generation between fixed and flapping wings. When fixed wings translate at high angles of attack, they periodically generate and shed leading and trailing edge vortices as reflected in their fluctuating aerodynamic force traces and associated flow visualization. In contrast, wings flapping at high angles of attack generate stable leading edge vorticity, which persists throughout the duration of the stroke and enhances mean aerodynamic forces. Here, we show that aerodynamic forces can be controlled by altering the trailing edge flexibility of a flapping wing. We used a dynamically scaled mechanical model of flapping flight (Re approximately 2000) to measure the aerodynamic forces on flapping wings of variable flexural stiffness (EI). For low to medium angles of attack, as flexibility of the wing increases, its ability to generate aerodynamic forces decreases monotonically but its lift-to-drag ratios remain approximately constant. The instantaneous force traces reveal no major differences in the underlying modes of force generation for flexible and rigid wings, but the magnitude of force, the angle of net force vector and centre of pressure all vary systematically with wing flexibility. Even a rudimentary framework of wing veins is sufficient to restore the ability of flexible wings to generate forces at near-rigid values. Thus, the magnitude of force generation can be controlled by modulating the trailing edge flexibility and thereby controlling the magnitude of the leading edge vorticity. To characterize this, we have generated a detailed database of aerodynamic forces as a function of several variables including material properties, kinematics, aerodynamic forces and centre of pressure, which can also be used to help validate computational models of aeroelastic flapping wings. These experiments will also be useful for wing design for small

  17. Aerodynamic effects of flexibility in flapping wings

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Liang; Huang, Qingfeng; Deng, Xinyan; Sane, Sanjay P.

    2010-01-01

    Recent work on the aerodynamics of flapping flight reveals fundamental differences in the mechanisms of aerodynamic force generation between fixed and flapping wings. When fixed wings translate at high angles of attack, they periodically generate and shed leading and trailing edge vortices as reflected in their fluctuating aerodynamic force traces and associated flow visualization. In contrast, wings flapping at high angles of attack generate stable leading edge vorticity, which persists throughout the duration of the stroke and enhances mean aerodynamic forces. Here, we show that aerodynamic forces can be controlled by altering the trailing edge flexibility of a flapping wing. We used a dynamically scaled mechanical model of flapping flight (Re ≈ 2000) to measure the aerodynamic forces on flapping wings of variable flexural stiffness (EI). For low to medium angles of attack, as flexibility of the wing increases, its ability to generate aerodynamic forces decreases monotonically but its lift-to-drag ratios remain approximately constant. The instantaneous force traces reveal no major differences in the underlying modes of force generation for flexible and rigid wings, but the magnitude of force, the angle of net force vector and centre of pressure all vary systematically with wing flexibility. Even a rudimentary framework of wing veins is sufficient to restore the ability of flexible wings to generate forces at near-rigid values. Thus, the magnitude of force generation can be controlled by modulating the trailing edge flexibility and thereby controlling the magnitude of the leading edge vorticity. To characterize this, we have generated a detailed database of aerodynamic forces as a function of several variables including material properties, kinematics, aerodynamic forces and centre of pressure, which can also be used to help validate computational models of aeroelastic flapping wings. These experiments will also be useful for wing design for small robotic

  18. [Graphic reconstruction of anatomic surfaces].

    PubMed

    Ciobanu, O

    2004-01-01

    The paper deals with the graphic reconstruction of anatomic surfaces in a virtual 3D setting. Scanning technologies and soft provides a greater flexibility in the digitization of surfaces and a higher resolution and accuracy. An alternative cheap method for the reconstruction of 3D anatomic surfaces is presented in connection with some studies and international projects developed by Medical Design research team.

  19. Venous coupler use for free-flap breast reconstructions: specific analyses of TMG and DIEP flaps.

    PubMed

    Bodin, Frédéric; Brunetti, Stefania; Dissaux, Caroline; Erik, A Sauleau; Facca, Sybille; Bruant-Rodier, Catherine; Liverneaux, Philippe

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this report was to present the results of comparisons of anastomotic data and flap complications in the use of venous coupler in breast reconstruction with the transverse musculocutaneous gracilis (TMG) flap and the deep inferior epigastric perforator (DIEP) flap. Over a three-year period, 95 patients suffering from breast cancer were treated with mastectomy and breast reconstruction using free flaps. We performed 121 mechanical venous anastomoses for 105 flap procedures (80 DIEP and 25 TMG). The coupler size, anastomotic duration, number of anastomoses and postoperative complications were assessed for the entire series. The coupling device was perfectly suitable for all end-to-end anastomoses between the vein(s) of the flap and the internal mammary vein(s). No venous thrombosis occurred. The mean anastomotic time did not significantly differ between the DIEP (330 seconds) and TMG flap procedures (352 seconds) (P = 0.069). Additionally, there were no differences in coupling time observed following a comparison of seven coupler sizes (P = 0.066). The mean coupler size used during the TMG flap procedure was smaller than that used with the DIEP (2.4 mm versus 2.8 mm) (P < 0.001). The mean size was also smaller when double venous anastomoses were required compared to single anastomosis (2.4 mm versus 2.9 mm) (P < 0.001). The double branching was more frequent with the TMG flap (28%) than with the DIEP flap (11%). The coupler size used was smaller for the TMG procedure and when double venous anastomosis was performed. Additionally, anastomotic time was not affected by the flap type or coupler size used or by anastomosis number. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Surface electromyography activity of the rectus abdominis, internal oblique, and external oblique muscles during forced expiration in healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Ito, Kenichi; Nonaka, Koji; Ogaya, Shinya; Ogi, Atsushi; Matsunaka, Chiaki; Horie, Jun

    2016-06-01

    We aimed to characterize rectus abdominis, internal oblique, and external oblique muscle activity in healthy adults under expiratory resistance using surface electromyography. We randomly assigned 42 healthy adult subjects to 3 groups: 30%, 20%, and 10% maximal expiratory intraoral pressure (PEmax). After measuring 100% PEmax and muscle activity during 100% PEmax, the activity and maximum voluntary contraction of each muscle during the assigned experimental condition were measured. At 100% PEmax, the external oblique (p<0.01) and internal oblique (p<0.01) showed significantly elevated activity compared with the rectus abdominis muscle. Furthermore, at 20% and 30% PEmax, the external oblique (p<0.05 and<0.01, respectively) and the internal oblique (p<0.05 and<0.01, respectively) showed significantly elevated activity compared with the rectus abdominis muscle. At 10% PEmax, no significant differences were observed in muscle activity. Although we observed no significant difference between 10% and 20% PEmax, activity during 30% PEmax was significantly greater than during 20% PEmax (external oblique: p<0.05; internal oblique: p<0.01). The abdominal oblique muscles are the most active during forced expiration. Moreover, 30% PEmax is the minimum intensity required to achieve significant, albeit very slight, muscle activity during expiratory resistance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Triple flap technique for vulvar reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Mercut, R; Sinna, R; Vaucher, R; Giroux, P A; Assaf, N; Lari, A; Dast, S

    2018-04-09

    Perineal defects are encountered ever more frequently, in the treatment of vulvar cancers or abdominoperineal resection. The surgical treatment of vulvar cancer leads to significant skin defect. The aim of the reconstruction is not to provide volume but rather to resurface perineum. We propose a new solution to cover the extensive skin defect remaining after excision. We report 3 patients who underwent large excision for vulvar cancer, with lymph node dissection. For reconstruction, we performed 3 advancement flaps. Two V-Y flaps cantered on the infra-gluteal folds and based on pudendal perforator arteries were used to cover the postero-lateral parts of the defect. The third advancement flap from the superior aspect of the defect was a Y-V Mons pubis flap. The defects were successfully covered by the 3 flap technique. The first patient suffered a non-union that slowly healed by secondary intention. For the other cases, we used the same technique, but applied negative pressure wound therapy on the sutures, with excellent results. The 3 flap technique is a simple and reliable method and the donor site morbidity is minimal. It can be realised without changing the position of the patient after tumour excision, and does not require delicate perforator dissection. This surgical option can be easily applied, allowing better management of these cases. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. [A variant of island flaps for the covering of pressure sores: the hatchet flap. Apropos of 31 cases].

    PubMed

    Quillot, M; Lodde, J P; Pegorier, O; Reynaud, J P; Cormerais, A

    1994-08-01

    The authors propose a modification of the classical design of island flaps for cover of pressure sores, applied to gluteus maximus and tensor fascia lata muscles: the hatchet flap. 31 flaps have been used including 13 gluteus maximus superior flaps for sacral pressure sores, 9 gluteal inferior flaps for ischial pressure sores and 9 tensor fascia lata flaps for trochanteric pressure sores. A small partial necrosis and two cases of sepsis were observed in this series, but did not require surgical revision. The authors emphasize the value of this modification of the classical flap design, which preserves an even better musculocutaneous capital in these patients, who are often already multi-operated. The very rapid recovery of patients supports the authors' application of hatchet flaps to the surgery of pressure sores, and suggests the extension to other musculocutaneous flaps in the future.

  3. Aerodynamics power consumption for mechanical flapping wings undergoing flapping and pitching motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razak, N. A.; Dimitriadis, G.; Razaami, A. F.

    2017-07-01

    Lately, due to the growing interest in Micro Aerial Vehicles (MAV), interest in flapping flight has been rekindled. The reason lies in the improved performance of flapping wing flight at low Reynolds number regime. Many studies involving flapping wing flight focused on the generation of unsteady aerodynamic forces such as lift and thrust. There is one aspect of flapping wing flight that received less attention. The aspect is aerodynamic power consumption. Since most mechanical flapping wing aircraft ever designed are battery powered, power consumption is fundamental in improving flight endurance. This paper reports the results of experiments carried out on mechanical wings under going active root flapping and pitching in the wind tunnel. The objective of the work is to investigate the effect of the pitch angle oscillations and wing profile on the power consumption of flapping wings via generation of unsteady aerodynamic forces. The experiments were repeated for different airspeeds, flapping and pitching kinematics, geometric angle of attack and wing sections with symmetric and cambered airfoils. A specially designed mechanical flapper modelled on large migrating birds was used. It will be shown that, under pitch leading conditions, less power is required to overcome the unsteady aerodnamics forces. The study finds less power requirement for downstroke compared to upstroke motion. Overall results demonstrate power consumption depends directly on the unsteady lift force.

  4. [Applied anatomy study and clinical application of great saphenous veno-saphenous neurocutaneous vascular flap].

    PubMed

    Li, Zelong; Ding, Zihai; Wang, Peixin; Xie, Yibo; Zeng, Bo

    2006-03-01

    To provide the anatomic basis for defect repair of the knee, leg, foot and ankle with great saphenous veno-saphenous neurocutaneous vascular island flaps. The origin, diameter, branches, distribution and anastomoses of the saphenous artery and saphenous neurocutaneous vascular were observed on 20 sides of adult leg specimens and 4 fresh cadaver voluntary legs. Another 4 fresh cadaver voluntary legs were radiographed with a soft X-ray system after the intravenous injection of Vermilion and cross-sections under profound fascial, other hand, micro-anatomic examination was also performed in these 4 fresh cadaver legs. The soft tissue defects in lower extremity, upper extremity, heel or Hucou in hand were repaired with the proximal or distal pedicle flaps or free flaps in 18 patients (12 males and 6 females,aging from 7 to 53 years). The defect was caused by trauma, tumour, ulcer and scar. The locations were Hucou (1 case), upper leg (3 cases), lower extremity and heal (14 cases). Of then, 7 cases were complicated by bone exposure, 3 cases by tendon exposure and 1 case by steel espouse, the defect size were 4 cm x 4 cm to 7 cm x 13 cm. The flap sizes were 4 cm x 6 cm to 8 cm x 15 cm, which pedicle length was 8-11 cm with 2.5-4.0 cm fascia and 1-2 cm skin at width. Genus descending genicular artery began from 9.33 +/- 0.81 cm away from upper the condyles medialis, it branched saphenous artery accompanying saphenous nerve descendent. And saphenous artery reached the surface of the skin 7.21 +/- 0.82 cm away from lower the condyles medialis, and anastomosed with the branches of tibialis posterior artery, like "Y" or "T" pattern. The chain linking system of arteries were found accompanying along the great saphenous vein as saphenous nerve, and then a axis blood vessel was formed. The small artery of only 0.05-0.10 mm in diameter, distributed around the great saphenous vein within 5-8 mm and arranged parallelly along the vein like water wave in soft X-ray film. All proximal

  5. Reconstruction of totally degloved fingers: a novel application of the bilobed spiraled innervated radial artery superficial palmar branch perforator flap design provides for primary donor-site closure.

    PubMed

    Chi, Zhenglin; Yang, Peng; Song, Dajiang; Li, Zan; Tang, Liang; Gao, Weiyang; Song, Yonghuan; Chu, Tingang

    2017-05-01

    To investigate the results of resurfacing completely degloved digits using bilobed innervated radial artery superficial palmar branch (RASPB) perforator flap in a spiral fashion. A detailed anatomic study on 30 adult fresh frozen cadavers preinjected with silicone rubber compound to demarcate arterial anatomy documented locations, numbers, and diameters of arteries and skin perforators with surrounding nerves. The flap-raising procedure was performed using four fresh cadaver specimen. We reviewed the reconstruction of 12 digits by using a bilobed spiraled innervated RASPB free perforator flap after non-replantable degloving injury. Two skin paddles were marked out using standard points of reference. At least two separate cutaneous perforator vessels were identified using a hand-held Doppler and were dissected back to the RASPB in retrograde fashion. The skin paddles were then divided between the two cutaneous perforators to provide two separate paddles with a common vascular supply. The skin paddles were stacked in a spiral fashion on the flap inset, effectively increasing the width of the flap to cover the totally degloved finger while still allowing closure of the primary donor-site. The RASPB was present within the flap in all cadavers. The direct perforator and the musculocutaneous perforator were available in 93.33 and 76.67 %, respectively, with neither of them in 6.67 % of the cases. The constantly present two perforators allowed the design of a new bilobed spiraled innervated radial artery superficial palmar branch perforator flap. We used the proposed flap to reconstruct completely degloved digits in 12 patients (mean age 28.6 years; range 17-35 years). With our proposed flap, no flap failure or re-exploration occurred and the donor site was closed primarily in all cases. All the flaps survived uneventfully. Total active motion ranged from 92° to 140° and 111° to 155° in the cases with and without metacarpophalangeal joint involvement, respectively

  6. Specific fibre composition and metabolism of the rectus abdominis muscle of bovine Charolais cattle

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background An important variability of contractile and metabolic properties between muscles has been highlighted. In the literature, the majority of studies on beef sensorial quality concerns M. longissimus thoracis. M. rectus abdominis (RA) is easy to sample without huge carcass depreciation and may appear as an alternative to M. longissimus thoracis for fast and routine physicochemical analysis. It was considered interesting to assess the muscle fibres of M. rectus abdominis in comparison with M. longissimus thoracis (LT) and M. triceps brachii (TB) on the basis of metabolic and contractile properties, area and myosin heavy chain isoforms (MyHC) proportions. Immuno-histochemical, histochemical, histological and enzymological techniques were used. This research concerned two populations of Charolais cattle: RA was compared to TB in a population of 19 steers while RA was compared to LT in a population of 153 heifers. Results RA muscle had higher mean fibre areas (3350 μm2 vs 2142 to 2639 μm2) than the two other muscles. In RA muscle, the slow-oxidative fibres were the largest (3957 μm2) and the fast-glycolytic the smallest (2868 μm2). The reverse was observed in TB muscle (1725 and 2436 μm2 respectively). In RA muscle, the distinction between fast-oxidative-glycolytic and fast-glycolytic fibres appeared difficult or impossible to establish, unlike in the other muscles. Consequently the classification based on ATPase and SDH activities seemed inappropriate, since the FOG fibres presented rather low SDH activity in this muscle in comparison to the other muscles of the carcass. RA muscle had a higher proportion of I fibres than TB and LT muscles, balanced by a lower proportion either of IIX fibres (in comparison to TB muscle) or of IIA fibres (in comparison to LT muscle). However, both oxidative and glycolytic enzyme activities were lower in RA than in TB muscle, although the LDH/ICDH ratio was higher in RA muscle (522 vs 340). Oxidative enzyme activities were

  7. Effect of age and carcass weight on quality traits of m. rectus abdominis from Charolais heifers.

    PubMed

    Ellies-Oury, M P; Dumont, R; Perrier, G; Roux, M; Micol, D; Picard, B

    2017-04-01

    In practice cattle may be slaughtered at different combinations of age and weight. As each of these factors could affect meat quality traits, the present work aimed to identify which combination can be expected to increase overall meat quality of m. rectus abdominis of Charolais heifers. Totally, 40 heifers were slaughtered either at 26±1 or at 36±1 months of age. Young heifers were sampled at two different carcass weights (349±12 and 394±8 kg). Old heifers were also sampled at two different carcass weights (397±6 and 451±9 kg). The m. rectus abdominis was excised 24 h postmortem to determine metabolic enzyme activities, myosin heavy-chain isoform proportions, lipid contents, collagen content and collagen solubility. Shear force measurements were evaluated on raw and broiled meat after 14 days of ageing. Meat quality traits scored between 0 and 10 by sensory analysis. Increasing slaughter age from 26 to 36 months had no impact on either raw/broiled shear force (0.31⩽P⩽0.47) and/or meat quality traits (0.62⩽P⩽0.91) or on physicochemical properties of heifer's meat samples. Increasing carcass weight for a similar slaughter age of 26 months had also impact neither on meat quality traits (0.52⩽P⩽0.91) nor on muscular properties. On the contrary, increasing carcass weight for a similar slaughter age of 36 months had induced a decrease of muscular shear force (raw muscle; P=0.009) and a concomitant decrease of total collagen content (P=0.03). Nevertheless, no significant impact on meat quality traits was revealed by the sensorial panel (0.13⩽P⩽0.49). Metabolic enzyme activities (0.13⩽P⩽0.86) and myosin heavy-chain proportions (0.13⩽P⩽0.96) were not significantly impacted by slaughter age and carcass weight. Thus, the impact of increasing carcass weight and/or slaughter age in young Charolais heifers has a limited impact on meat quality traits and associated muscular characteristics. Modulating heifer's cycles (age and/or carcass weight in

  8. [The anatomic tradition in Venice].

    PubMed

    Capitanio, G; Stracca Pansa, V

    2000-04-01

    Venice had a long tradition and great reputation in the study of anatomical science dating back to the 1300's. The "Serenissima" Republic favoured the study and practice of anatomy as part of medical professional formation. Before the construction of the anatomical theater of San Giacomo dell'Orio, which took place in 1671, anatomical dissections were performed in churches, convents, hospitals and private homes. Even though Venice was not a University seat, it boosted numerous Venetian anatomists, among whom Benedetti, Massa, Santorini, and the medical activity of illustrious professors at the nearby University of Padua such as Vesalio, Falloppio, Spigelio, Vislingio and Morgagni.

  9. Comparison of Dorsal Intercostal Artery Perforator Propeller Flaps and Bilateral Rotation Flaps in Reconstruction of Myelomeningocele Defects.

    PubMed

    Tenekeci, Goktekin; Basterzi, Yavuz; Unal, Sakir; Sari, Alper; Demir, Yavuz; Bagdatoglu, Celal; Tasdelen, Bahar

    2018-04-09

    Bilateral rotation flaps are considered the workhorse flaps in reconstruction of myelomeningocele defects. Since the introduction of perforator flaps in the field of reconstructive surgery, perforator flaps have been used increasingly in the reconstruction of various soft tissue defects all over the body because of their appreciated advantages. The aim of this study was to compare the complications and surgical outcomes between bilateral rotation flaps and dorsal intercostal artery perforator (DICAP) flaps in the soft tissue reconstruction of myelomeningocele defects. Between January 2005-February 2017, we studied 47 patients who underwent reconstruction of myelomeningocele defects. Patient demographics, operative data, and postoperative data were reviewed retrospectively and are included in the study. We found no statistically significant differences in patient demographics and surgical complications between these two groups; this may be due to small sample size. With regard to complications-partial flap necrosis, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage, necessity for reoperation, and wound infection-DICAP propeller flaps were clinically superior to rotation flaps. Partial flap necrosis was associated with CSF leakage and wound infection, and CSF leakage was associated with wound dehiscence. Although surgical outcomes obtained with DICAP propeller flaps were clinically superior to those obtained with rotation flaps, there was no statistically significant difference between the two patient groups. A well-designed comparative study with adequate sample size is needed. Nonetheless, we suggest using DICAP propeller flaps for reconstruction of large myelomeningocele defects.

  10. 14 CFR 23.699 - Wing flap position indicator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Control Systems § 23.699 Wing flap position indicator. There must be a wing flap position...

  11. 14 CFR 23.699 - Wing flap position indicator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Control Systems § 23.699 Wing flap position indicator. There must be a wing flap position...

  12. 14 CFR 23.699 - Wing flap position indicator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Control Systems § 23.699 Wing flap position indicator. There must be a wing flap position...

  13. 14 CFR 23.699 - Wing flap position indicator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Control Systems § 23.699 Wing flap position indicator. There must be a wing flap position...

  14. Flow field of flexible flapping wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sallstrom, Erik

    The agility and maneuverability of natural fliers would be desirable to incorporate into engineered micro air vehicles (MAVs). However, there is still much for engineers to learn about flapping flight in order to understand how such vehicles can be built for efficient flying. The goal of this study is to develop a methodology for capturing high quality flow field data around flexible flapping wings in a hover environment and to interpret it to gain a better understanding of how aerodynamic forces are generated. The flow field data was captured using particle image velocimetry (PIV) and required that measurements be taken around a repeatable flapping motion to obtain phase-averaged data that could be studied throughout the flapping cycle. Therefore, the study includes the development of flapping devices with a simple repeatable single degree of freedom flapping motion. The acquired flow field data has been examined qualitatively and quantitatively to investigate the mechanisms behind force production in hovering flight and to relate it to observations in previous research. Specifically, the flow fields have been investigated around a rigid wing and several carbon fiber reinforced flexible membrane wings. Throughout the whole study the wings were actuated with either a sinusoidal or a semi-linear flapping motion. The semi-linear flapping motion holds the commanded angular velocity nearly constant through half of each half-stroke while the sinusoidal motion is always either accelerating or decelerating. The flow fields were investigated by examining vorticity and vortex structures, using the Q criterion as the definition for the latter, in two and three dimensions. The measurements were combined with wing deflection measurements to demonstrate some of the key links in how the fluid-structure interactions generated aerodynamic forces. The flow fields were also used to calculate the forces generated by the flapping wings using momentum balance methods which yielded

  15. Reliability of real-time ultrasound for the assessment of transversus abdominis function.

    PubMed

    Kidd, Adrian W; Magee, Scott; Richardson, Carolyn A

    2002-07-01

    Transversus abdominis (TrA) has now been established as a key muscle for the stabilization of the lumbar spine and sacroiliac joints. Significantly, dysfunction of this muscle has also been implicated in low back pain. Real-time ultrasound (US) is a non-invasive procedure that has the potential to evaluate objectively the function of TrA. To investigate M-mode US as a reliable method of assessing TrA function. M-mode US was used to measure the width of TrA as subjects drew in their lower abdominal wall at a controlled speed to a target depth. Eleven subjects were imaged. the measures of TrA width were reliable and ranged between 3.14mm relaxed and 6.35mm contracted. The standard error of measurement ranged between 0.18mm and 0.57mm. M-mode US provides a reliable non-invasive measure of a controlled contraction of TrA.

  16. Transversus abdominis is part of a global not local muscle synergy during arm movement.

    PubMed

    Morris, S L; Lay, B; Allison, G T

    2013-10-01

    The trunk muscle transversus abdominis (TrA) is thought to be controlled independently of the global trunk muscles. Methodological issues in the 1990s research such as unilateral electromyography and a limited range of arm movements justify a re-examination of this theory. The hypothesis tested is that TrA bilateral co-contraction is a typical muscle synergy during arm movement. The activity of 6 pairs of trunk and lower limb muscles was recorded using bilateral electromyography during anticipatory postural adjustments (APAs) associated with the arm movements. The integrated APA electromyographical signals were analyzed for muscle synergy using Principle Component Analysis. TrA does not typically bilaterally co-contract during arm movements (1 out of 6 participants did). APA muscle activity of all muscles during asymmetrical arm movements typically reflected a direction specific diagonal pattern incorporating a twisting motion to transfer energy from the ground up. This finding is not consistent with the hypothesis that TrA plays a unique role providing bilateral, feedforward, multidirectional stiffening of the spine. This has significant implications to the theories underlying the role of TrA in back pain and in the training of isolated bilateral co-contraction of TrA in the prophylaxis of back pain. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. A Novel Augmented Reality-Based Navigation System in Perforator Flap Transplantation - A Feasibility Study.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Taoran; Zhu, Ming; Zan, Tao; Gu, Bin; Li, Qingfeng

    2017-08-01

    In perforator flap transplantation, dissection of the perforator is an important but difficult procedure because of the high variability in vascular anatomy. Preoperative imaging techniques could provide substantial information about vascular anatomy; however, it cannot provide direct guidance for surgeons during the operation. In this study, a navigation system (NS) was established to overlie a vascular map on surgical sites to further provide a direct guide for perforator flap transplantation. The NS was established based on computed tomographic angiography and augmented reality techniques. A virtual vascular map was reconstructed according to computed tomographic angiography data and projected onto real patient images using ARToolKit software. Additionally, a screw-fixation marker holder was created to facilitate registration. With the use of a tracking and display system, we conducted the NS on an animal model and measured the system error on a rapid prototyping model. The NS assistance allowed for correct identification, as well as a safe and precise dissection of the perforator. The mean value of the system error was determined to be 3.474 ± 1.546 mm. Augmented reality-based NS can provide precise navigation information by directly displaying a 3-dimensional individual anatomical virtual model onto the operative field in real time. It will allow rapid identification and safe dissection of a perforator in free flap transplantation surgery.

  18. 14 CFR 25.1511 - Flap extended speed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Flap extended speed. 25.1511 Section 25... Limitations § 25.1511 Flap extended speed. The established flap extended speed V FE must be established so that it does not exceed the design flap speed V F chosen under §§ 25.335(e) and 25.345, for the...

  19. 14 CFR 25.1511 - Flap extended speed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Flap extended speed. 25.1511 Section 25... Limitations § 25.1511 Flap extended speed. The established flap extended speed V FE must be established so that it does not exceed the design flap speed V F chosen under §§ 25.335(e) and 25.345, for the...

  20. Treatment of Ischial Pressure Sores with Both Profunda Femoris Artery Perforator Flaps and Muscle Flaps

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chae Min; Yun, In Sik; Lee, Dong Won; Lew, Dae Hyun; Rah, Dong Kyun

    2014-01-01

    Background Reconstruction of ischial pressure sore defects is challenging due to extensive bursas and high recurrence rates. In this study, we simultaneously applied a muscle flap that covered the exposed ischium and large bursa with sufficient muscular volume and a profunda femoris artery perforator fasciocutaneous flap for the management of ischial pressure sores. Methods We retrospectively analyzed data from 14 patients (16 ischial sores) whose ischial defects had been reconstructed using both a profunda femoris artery perforator flap and a muscle flap between January 2006 and February 2014. We compared patient characteristics, operative procedure, and clinical course. Results All flaps survived the entire follow-up period. Seven patients (50%) had a history of surgery at the site of the ischial pressure sore. The mean age of the patients included was 52.8 years (range, 18-85 years). The mean follow-up period was 27.9 months (range, 3-57 months). In two patients, a biceps femoris muscle flap was used, while a gracilis muscle flap was used in the remaining patients. In four cases (25%), wound dehiscence occurred, but healed without further complication after resuturing. Additionally, congestion occurred in one case (6%), but resolved with conservative treatment. Among 16 cases, there was only one (6%) recurrence at 34 months. Conclusions The combination of a profunda femoris artery perforator fasciocutaneous flap and muscle flap for the treatment of ischial pressure sores provided pliability, adequate bulkiness and few long-term complications. Therefore, this may be used as an alternative treatment method for ischial pressure sores. PMID:25075362

  1. Reconstruction of eyelids with Washio flap in anophthalmia.

    PubMed

    Tvrdek, M; Kozák, J

    2014-01-01

    The authors present a case report of a patient with anophthalmia in whom retroauriculo-temporal flap (Washio flap) was used for reconstruction of eyelids. This flap, which is mostly used for reconstructions of nasal defects, was not used in this way according to available literature.

  2. 14 CFR 25.1511 - Flap extended speed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Flap extended speed. 25.1511 Section 25.1511 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT... Limitations § 25.1511 Flap extended speed. The established flap extended speed V FE must be established so...

  3. 14 CFR 23.1511 - Flap extended speed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Flap extended speed. 23.1511 Section 23.1511 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT... Information § 23.1511 Flap extended speed. (a) The flap extended speed V FE must be established so that it is...

  4. 14 CFR 23.1511 - Flap extended speed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Flap extended speed. 23.1511 Section 23.1511 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT... Information § 23.1511 Flap extended speed. (a) The flap extended speed V FE must be established so that it is...

  5. 14 CFR 25.1511 - Flap extended speed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Flap extended speed. 25.1511 Section 25.1511 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT... Limitations § 25.1511 Flap extended speed. The established flap extended speed V FE must be established so...

  6. 14 CFR 23.1511 - Flap extended speed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Flap extended speed. 23.1511 Section 23.1511 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT... Information § 23.1511 Flap extended speed. (a) The flap extended speed V FE must be established so that it is...

  7. 14 CFR 25.1511 - Flap extended speed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Flap extended speed. 25.1511 Section 25.1511 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT... Limitations § 25.1511 Flap extended speed. The established flap extended speed V FE must be established so...

  8. Optimization of the Flapping Wing Systems for Micro Air Vehicle

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    as 87%, under specific combinations of the flapping kinematics by water tunnel experiments [5]. Pesavento and Wang found that optimized flapping wing...41-72. [6] Pesavento , U., and Wang Z. J., “Flapping Wing Flight Can Save Aerodynamic Power Compared to Steady Flight,” Physical Review Letters

  9. 14 CFR 23.1511 - Flap extended speed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Flap extended speed. 23.1511 Section 23.1511 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT... Information § 23.1511 Flap extended speed. (a) The flap extended speed V FE must be established so that it is...

  10. 14 CFR 23.1511 - Flap extended speed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Flap extended speed. 23.1511 Section 23.1511 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT... Information § 23.1511 Flap extended speed. (a) The flap extended speed V FE must be established so that it is...

  11. Pedicled unipolar latissimus dorsi flap for reconstruction of finger extensor *

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Mitsuhiko; Kasai, Tokio; Hibino, Naohito; Ishii, Seiji; Mitsuhashi, Tadashi

    2017-01-01

    Abstract We describe the use of a pedicled unipolar latissimus dorsi flap to restore finger extension. The patient had large defects in the radial nerve and extensor musculature. A long-tailed, 50-cm-long flap was prepared, which enabled the end of the flap to be sutured to the extensor digitorum. PMID:28470032

  12. Posttraumatic eyebrow reconstruction with hair-bearing temporoparietal fascia flap

    PubMed Central

    Denadai, Rafael; Raposo-Amaral, Cassio Eduardo; Marques, Frederico Figueiredo; Raposo-Amaral, Cesar Augusto

    2015-01-01

    The temporoparietal fascia flap has been extensively used in craniofacial reconstructions. However, its use for eyebrow reconstruction has been sporadically reported. We describe a successfully repaired hair-bearing temporoparietal fascia flap after traumatic avulsion of eyebrow. Temporoparietal fascia flap is a versatile tool and should be considered as a therapeutic option by all plastic surgeons. PMID:25993077

  13. Tracheal reconstruction with a pleuroperiosteal flap.

    PubMed

    Krespi, Y P; Biller, H F; Baek, S M

    1983-12-01

    Reconstruction of extensive tracheal defects remains a difficult surgical problem. In many experiments restoration of tracheal mucosa by autogenous or homologous soft tissue grafts has usually failed because of rejection or tracheal obstruction. This experimental work employed a two-stage surgical procedure that allowed reconstruction of extensive circumferential full-thickness defects of the trachea. Stage I involved the creation of a vascularized pleuroperiosteal flap that was formed into a rigid tube around a Silastic stent. Stage II consisted of creation of a full-thickness circumferential tracheal defect and repair with the flap in those animals in which a suitable rigid tube had been formed. The results of these experiments argue strongly that a vascularized composite pleuroperiosteal flap can produce an adequate tracheal replacement.

  14. [Soft tissue defects treated with perforator flaps].

    PubMed

    Weum, Sven; de Weerd, Louis; Klein, Steven; Hage, J Joris

    2008-01-31

    Treatment of soft tissue defects caused by trauma, tumour surgery or pressure sores is a challenge to the reconstructive surgeon. Although contour and function may be restored by tissue transposition, traditional methods often cause significant donor site morbidity. This article describes how increased understanding of vascular anatomy has led to the development of new techniques. The article is based on textbooks of plastic surgery, selected articles and own clinical experience. Pedicled and free perforator flaps represent the latest development in surgical treatment of soft tissue defects. The use of perforator flaps can considerably reduce the disadvantages that are associated with other surgical methods. The use of perforator flaps demands microsurgical skills, but has many advantages. Reliable vascular supply and a good aesthetical result can be combined with minimal donor site morbidity. In many cases this technique may even give sensibility to the reconstructed area.

  15. Prefabricated scalping forehead flap with skeletal support.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Masao; Suzuki, Ayano; Mizukami, Takahide; Terai, Tsutomu; Fukamizu, Hidekazu

    2009-07-01

    It is difficult to reconstruct a nose with adequate shape, color, and texture in patients who have full-thickness nasal defects with extensive loss of skeletal support. The scalping forehead flap is a reliable technique for nasal reconstruction. To our knowledge, however, there have been no reports about a prefabricated scalping forehead flap with a bone graft as skeletal support. In the case reported here, a prefabricated scalping forehead flap combined with an iliac bone graft as skeletal support was used to successfully reconstruct a full-thickness defect of the nose associated with partial frontal bone loss and complete loss of the nasal bones. Acceptable functional and aesthetic results were achieved. This method may be a good alternative for reconstruction of full-thickness nasal defects with extensive loss of skeletal support.

  16. Latissimus Dorsi Flap in Breast Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Sood, Rachita; Easow, Jeena M.; Konopka, Geoffrey; Panthaki, Zubin J.

    2018-01-01

    Background: Surgeons employ the latissimus dorsi flap (LDF) for reconstruction of a large variety of breast cancer surgery defects, including quadrantectomy, lumpectomy, modified radical mastectomy, and others. The LDF may be used in delayed or immediate reconstruction, in combination with tissue expanders for a staged reconstruction, with implant-based immediate reconstruction, or alone as an autogenous flap. Methods: The authors discuss the historical uses and more recent developments in the LDF. More recent advancements, including the “scarless” approach and augmentation with the thoracodorsal artery perforator flap, are discussed. Results: The LDF is a reliable means for soft tissue coverage providing form and function during breast reconstruction with acceptable perioperative and long-term morbidities. Conclusions: When there is a paucity of tissue, the LDF can provide tissue volume in autologous reconstruction, as well as a reliable vascular pedicle for implant-based reconstruction as in the setting of irradiated tissue. PMID:29334788

  17. Unit Advancement Flap for Lower Lip Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Ogino, Akihiro; Onishi, Kiyoshi; Okada, Emi; Nakamichi, Miho

    2018-05-01

    Lower lip reconstruction requires consideration of esthetic and functional outcome in selecting a surgical procedure, and reconstruction with local tissue is useful. The authors reconstructed full-thickness defects with a unit advancement flap. Reconstruction was performed using this method in 4 patients with lower lip squamous cell carcinoma in whom tumor resection with preservation of the mouth angle was possible. The lower lip resection width was 30 to 45 mm, accounting for 50% to 68% of the entire width of the lower lip. The flap was prepared by lateral extension from above the mental unit and matched with the potential wrinkle line of the lower lip in order to design a unit morphology surrounded by the anterior margin of the depressor labii inferioris muscle. It was elevated as a full-thickness flap composed of the orbicularis oris muscle, skin, and mucosa of the residual lower lip from the bilateral sides, and advanced to the defect. Flap transfer was adjusted by small triangular resection of the skin on the lateral side of the mental unit. The postoperative scar was inconspicuous in all patients and there was no impairment of the mouth opening-closing or articulation functions. This was a relatively simple surgical procedure. A blood supply of the flap was stable, and continuity of the orbicularis oris muscle was reconstructed by transferred the residual lower lip advancement flap from the bilateral sides. The postoperative mouth opening-closing function was sufficient, and dentures could be placed from an early phase in elderly patients. The postoperative scar was consistent with the lip unit morphology, being esthetically superior. This procedure may be applicable for reconstruction of defects approximately 1/3 to 2/3 the width of the lower lip where the mouth angle is preserved.

  18. Use of the medial femoral condyle vascularized bone flap in traumatic avascular necrosis of the navicular: a case report.

    PubMed

    Holm, Janson; Vangelisti, Garrett; Remmers, Jared

    2012-01-01

    The medial femoral condyle vascularized bone flap has a high success rate in published literature regarding its use in nonunions and avascular necrosis of the upper and lower extremities. It is reported to have minimal donor site morbidity and the ability to provide structural support and torsional strength to load-bearing areas. The flap has found particular success in the treatment of scaphoid nonunions. The tarsal navicular, similar to the scaphoid, is largely articular cancellous bone with little surface area for vascular inflow. These anatomic features make the navicular prone to nonunion and avascular necrosis in traumatic scenarios. We describe a case of nonunion and avascular necrosis of the tarsal navicular occurring as sequelae of a high-impact midfoot injury sustained in an automobile accident. After an initial attempt at open reduction and internal fixation with midfoot bridge plating, subsidence and nonunion resulted. An attempt at arthrodesis of the talonavicular and naviculocuneiform joints was then undertaken. This too failed, leading to the development of additional collapse and avascular necrosis. The site was treated with a medial femoral condyle vascularized bone flap. In this single case, the patient returned to pain-free ambulation and reported excellent outcomes and functional capacity. Although we present a successful case, a larger case series is necessary to establish the use of this flap as a reliable option for the treatment of nonunion and avascular necrosis of the tarsal navicular. Copyright © 2012 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Panorama of Reconstruction of Skull Base Defects: From Traditional Open to Endonasal Endoscopic Approaches, from Free Grafts to Microvascular Flaps

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, Camilo; Mason, Eric; Solares, C. Arturo

    2014-01-01

    Introduction A substantial body of literature has been devoted to the distinct characteristics and surgical options to repair the skull base. However, the skull base is an anatomically challenging location that requires a three-dimensional reconstruction approach. Furthermore, advances in endoscopic skull base surgery encompass a wide range of surgical pathology, from benign tumors to sinonasal cancer. This has resulted in the creation of wide defects that yield a new challenge in skull base reconstruction. Progress in technology and imaging has made this approach an internationally accepted method to repair these defects. Objectives Discuss historical developments and flaps available for skull base reconstruction. Data Synthesis Free grafts in skull base reconstruction are a viable option in small defects and low-flow leaks. Vascularized flaps pose a distinct advantage in large defects and high-flow leaks. When open techniques are used, free flap reconstruction techniques are often necessary to repair large entry wound defects. Conclusions Reconstruction of skull base defects requires a thorough knowledge of surgical anatomy, disease, and patient risk factors associated with high-flow cerebrospinal fluid leaks. Various reconstruction techniques are available, from free tissue grafting to vascularized flaps. Possible complications that can befall after these procedures need to be considered. Although endonasal techniques are being used with increasing frequency, open techniques are still necessary in selected cases. PMID:25992142

  20. Flap Edge Aeroacoustic Measurements and Predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, Thomas F.; Humphreys, William M., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    An aeroacoustic model test has been conducted to investigate the mechanisms of sound generation on high-lift wing configurations. This paper presents an analysis of flap side-edge noise, which is often the most dominant source. A model of a main element wing section with a half-span flap was tested at low speeds of up to a Mach number of 0.17, corresponding to a wing chord Reynolds number of approximately 1.7 million. Results are presented for flat (or blunt), flanged, and round flap-edge geometries, with and without boundary-layer tripping, deployed at both moderate and high flap angles. The acoustic database is obtained from a Small Aperture Directional Array (SADA) of microphones, which was constructed to electronically steer to different regions of the model and to obtain farfield noise spectra and directivity from these regions. The basic flap-edge aerodynamics is established by static surface pressure data, as well as by Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) calculations and simplified edge flow analyses. Distributions of unsteady pressure sensors over the flap allow the noise source regions to be defined and quantified via cross-spectral diagnostics using the SADA output. It is found that shear layer instability and related pressure scatter is the primary noise mechanism. For the flat edge flap, two noise prediction methods based on unsteady surface pressure measurements are evaluated and compared to measured noise. One is a new causality spectral approach developed here. The other is a new application of an edge-noise scatter prediction method. The good comparisons for both approaches suggest that much of the physics is captured by the prediction models. Areas of disagreement appear to reveal when the assumed edge noise mechanism does not fully define the noise production. For the different edge conditions, extensive spectra and directivity are presented. Significantly, for each edge configuration, the spectra for different flow speeds, flap angles, and

  1. Flap-edge aeroacoustic measurements and predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, Thomas F.; Humphreys, William M.

    2003-03-01

    An aeroacoustic model test has been conducted to investigate the mechanisms of sound generation on high-lift wing configurations. This paper presents an analysis of flap side-edge noise, which is often the most dominant source. A model of a main element wing section with a half-span flap was tested at low speeds of up to a Mach number of 0.17, corresponding to a wing chord Reynolds number of approximately 1.7 million. Results are presented for flat (or blunt), flanged, and round flap-edge geometries, with and without boundary-layer tripping, deployed at both moderate and high flap angles. The acoustic database is obtained from a small aperture directional array (SADA) of microphones, which was constructed to electronically steer to different regions of the model and to obtain farfield noise spectra and directivity from these regions. The basic flap-edge aerodynamics is established by static surface pressure data, as well as by computational fluid dynamics (CFD) calculations and simplified edge flow analyses. Distributions of unsteady pressure sensors over the flap allow the noise source regions to be defined and quantified via cross-spectral diagnostics using the SADA output. It is found that shear layer instability and related pressure scatter is the primary noise mechanism. For the flat edge flap, two noise prediction methods based on unsteady-surface-pressure measurements are evaluated and compared to measured noise. One is a new causality spectral approach developed here. The other is a new application of an edge-noise scatter prediction method. The good comparisons for both approaches suggest that the prediction models capture much of the physics. Areas of disagreement appear to reveal when the assumed edge noise mechanism does not fully define the noise production. For the different edge conditions, extensive spectra and directivity are presented. The complexity of the directivity results demonstrate the strong role of edge source geometry and frequency in

  2. Flap Edge Aeroacoustic Measurements and Predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, Thomas F.; Humphreys, William M., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    An aeroacoustic model test has been conducted to investigate the mechanisms of sound generation on high-lift wing configurations. This paper presents an analysis of flap side-edge noise, which is often the most dominant source. A model of a main element wing section with a half-span flap was tested at low speeds of up to a Mach number of 0.17, corresponding to a wing chord Reynolds number of approximately 1.7 million. Results are presented for flat (or blunt), flanged, and round flap-edge geometries, with and without boundary-layer tripping, deployed at both moderate and high flap angles. The acoustic database is obtained from a Small Aperture Directional Array (SADA) of microphones, which was constructed to electronically steer to different regions of the model and to obtain farfield noise spectra and directivity from these regions. The basic flap-edge aerodynamics is established by static surface pressure data, as well as by Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) calculations and simplified edge flow analyses. Distributions of unsteady pressure sensors over the flap allow the noise source regions to be defined and quantified via cross-spectral diagnostics using the SADA output. It is found that shear layer instability and related pressure scatter is the primary noise mechanism. For the flat edge flap, two noise prediction methods based on unsteady-surface-pressure measurements are evaluated and compared to measured noise. One is a new causality spectral approach developed here. The other is a new application of an edge-noise scatter prediction method. The good comparisons for both approaches suggest that much of the physics is captured by the prediction models. Areas of disagreement appear to reveal when the assumed edge noise mechanism does not fully define, the noise production. For the different edge conditions, extensive spectra and directivity are presented. Significantly, for each edge configuration, the spectra for different flow speeds, flap angles, and

  3. 50 CFR Figure 16 to Part 223 - Escape Opening and Flap Dimensions for the Double Cover Flap TED

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 10 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Escape Opening and Flap Dimensions for the Double Cover Flap TED 16 Figure 16 to Part 223 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES... MARINE AND ANADROMOUS SPECIES Pt. 223, Fig. 16 Figure 16 to Part 223—Escape Opening and Flap Dimensions...

  4. 50 CFR Figure 16 to Part 223 - Escape Opening and Flap Dimensions for the Double Cover Flap TED

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 10 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Escape Opening and Flap Dimensions for the Double Cover Flap TED 16 Figure 16 to Part 223 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES... MARINE AND ANADROMOUS SPECIES Pt. 223, Fig. 16 Figure 16 to Part 223—Escape Opening and Flap Dimensions...

  5. Postoperative analgesic efficacy of ultrasound-guided ilioinguinal-iliohypogastric nerve block compared with medial transverse abdominis plane block in inguinal hernia repair: A prospective, randomised trial.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Nidhi; Sen, Indu Mohini; Mandal, Banashree; Batra, Ankita

    2018-03-29

    Analgesic efficacy of ultrasound-guided transverse abdominis plane block, administered a little more medially, just close to the origin of the transverse abdominis muscle has not yet been investigated in patients undergoing unilateral inguinal hernia repair. We hypothesised that medial transverse abdominis plane block would provide comparable postoperative analgesia to ilioinguinal-iliohypogastric nerve block in inguinal hernia repair patients. This prospective, randomised trial was conducted in 50 ASA I and II male patients≥18 years of age. Patients were randomised into two groups to receive either pre-incisional ipsilateral ultrasound-guided ilioinguinal-iliohypogastric nerve block or medial transverse abdominis plane block, with 0.3ml/kg of 0.25% bupivacaine. Our primary objective was postoperative 24-hour analgesic consumption and secondary outcomes included pain scores, time to first request for rescue analgesic and side effects, if any, in the postoperative period. There was no significant difference in the total postoperative analgesic consumption [group I: 66.04mg; group II: 68.33mg (P value 0.908)]. Time to first request for rescue analgesic was delayed, though statistically non-significant (P value 0.326), following medial transverse abdominis plane block, with excellent pain relief seen in 58.3% patients as opposed to 45.8% patients in ilioinguinal-iliohypogastric nerve block group. Medial transverse abdominis plane block being a novel, simple and easily performed procedure can serve as an useful alternative to ilioinguinal-iliohypogastric nerve block for providing postoperative pain relief in inguinal hernia repair patients. Copyright © 2018 Société française d'anesthésie et de réanimation (Sfar). Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. A randomised trial of the analgesic efficacy of ultrasound-guided transversus abdominis plane block after caesarean delivery under general anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Tan, Terry T; Teoh, Wendy H L; Woo, David C M; Ocampo, Cecilia E; Shah, Mukesh K; Sia, Alex T H

    2012-02-01

    Previous studies examining the efficacy of transversus abdominis plane block after caesarean section have mostly been in parturients under spinal anaesthesia. We postulated that the advantage of performing transversus abdominis plane block after caesarean section might be even more obvious after general anaesthesia, resulting in reduced 24-h consumption of morphine. DESIGN, SETTING, PATIENTS AND INTERVENTIONS: In this single centre, randomised double-blind controlled trial, 40 women who underwent caesarean delivery under general anaesthesia were allocated randomly to receive a transversus abdominis plane block or no block. In those who received the block, 20 ml of levobupivacaine 2.5 mg ml was deposited bilaterally into the transversus abdominis plane under ultrasound guidance using a Sonosite Titan (SonoSite, Bothell, Washington, USA) 7-13 MHz linear transducer at the end of surgery when the patient was still anaesthetised. We recorded patient-controlled intravenous morphine use for 24 h, pain scores at rest and activity, sedation, nausea and vomiting, use of antiemetic medication and overall maternal satisfaction. The primary outcome was 24-h morphine consumption. Patients who received the transversus abdominis plane block used significantly less morphine in 24 h than those in the control group [12.3 (2.6) vs. 31.4 mg (3.1), P<0.001) and had higher satisfaction scores [16 (80%) vs. 5 (25%), P = 0.012). There were no differences between groups in the visual analogue pain scores, sedation level, nausea and vomiting or the use of antiemetic medication. Ultrasound-guided transversus abdominis plane block reduced morphine consumption following caesarean section under general anaesthesia, with increased maternal satisfaction.

  7. Parasacral Perforator Flaps for Reconstruction of Sacral Pressure Sores.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chin-Ta; Chen, Shih-Yi; Chen, Shyi-Gen; Tzeng, Yuan-Sheng; Chang, Shun-Cheng

    2015-07-01

    Despite advances in reconstruction techniques, pressure sores continue to present a challenge to the plastic surgeon. The parasacral perforator flap is a reliable flap that preserves the entire contralateral side as a future donor site. On the ipsilateral side, the gluteal muscle itself is preserved and all flaps based on the inferior gluteal artery are still possible. We present our experience of using parasacral perforator flaps in reconstructing sacral defects. Between August 2004 and January 2013, 19 patients with sacral defects were included in this study. All the patients had undergone surgical reconstruction of sacral defects with a parasacral perforator flap. The patients' sex, age, cause of sacral defect, flap size, flap type, numbers of perforators used, rotation angle, postoperative complications, and hospital stay were recorded. There were 19 parasacral perforator flaps in this series. All flaps survived uneventfully except for 1 parasacral perforator flap, which failed because of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection. The overall flap survival rate was 95% (18/19). The mean follow-up period was 17.3 months (range, 2-24 months). The average length of hospital stay was 20.7 days (range, 9-48 days). No flap surgery-related mortality was found. Also, there was no recurrence of sacral pressure sores or infected pilonidal cysts during the follow-up period. Perforator-based flaps have become popular in modern reconstructive surgery because of low donor-site morbidity and good preservation of muscle. Parasacral perforator flaps are durable and reliable in reconstructing sacral defects. We recommend the parasacral perforator flap as a good choice for reconstructing sacral defects.

  8. SURGICAL OUTCOMES AFTER INVERTED INTERNAL LIMITING MEMBRANE FLAP VERSUS CONVENTIONAL PEELING FOR VERY LARGE MACULAR HOLES.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Raja; Singh, Sumit R; Taylor, Stanford; Berrocal, Maria H; Chhablani, Jay; Tyagi, Mudit; Ohno-Matsui, Kyoko; Pappuru, Rajeev R; Apte, Rajendra S

    2018-04-23

    To evaluate the anatomical and visual outcomes of inverted flap technique of peeling of internal limiting membrane (ILM) versus standard peeling of ILM for macular holes of basal diameter more than 800 μm. Patients with very large idiopathic macular holes more than 800 μm in basal diameter (ranging from 243 μm to 840 μm in minimum diameter) were retrospectively included in the study. In Group A, 18 eyes of 18 patients underwent ILM peeling using the inverted flap technique. In Group B, 18 eyes of 18 patients underwent conventional ILM peeling. The primary endpoint was the rate of hole closure at 6 months after surgery. The secondary outcome measure was the change in best-corrected visual acuity at 6 months after surgery. There were no significant differences in ocular characteristics of the study groups at baseline except for the age distribution. Mean macular hole diameter was 1,162.8 ± 206.0 μm and 1,229.6 ± 228.1 μm in Group A and Group B, respectively. The hole closure rate was 88.9% (16/18) in Group A and 77.8% (14/18) in Group B (P = 0.66). The mean gain in best-corrected visual acuity was higher in Group A than in Group B (P = 0.12) at 6 months, but this was not statistically significant. There were no severe ocular adverse events in either group. In this multicenter series, inverted ILM flap technique did not lead to significantly higher anatomical closure rates than conventional ILM peeling in large macular holes more than 800 μm in diameter.

  9. The Supraclavicular Artery Perforator Flap: A Comparative Study of Imaging Techniques Used in Preoperative Mapping.

    PubMed

    Sheriff, Hemin Oathman; Mahmood, Kawa Abdullah; Hamawandi, Nzar; Mirza, Aram Jamal; Hawas, Jawad; Moreno, Esther Granell; Clavero, Juan Antonio; Hankins, Christopher; Masia, Jaume

    2018-05-18

     The supraclavicular artery flap is an excellent flap for head and neck reconstruction. The aim of this study is to assess imaging techniques to define the precise vascular boundaries of this flap.  Six imaging techniques were used for supraclavicular artery mapping in 65 cases; handheld Doppler, triplex ultrasound, computed tomography angiography, magnetic resonance angiography, digital subtraction angiography, and indocyanine green angiography. We checked the site of the perforators, the course of a supraclavicular artery, and anatomical mapping of the supraclavicular artery.  Handheld Doppler identified perforators' sites in 80% of the cases but showed no results for the course of the vessel. Triplex ultrasound identified the site of perforators in 52.9%, and partial mapping of the course of a supraclavicular artery in 64.7% of the cases. Computerized tomography angiography showed the site of perforators in 60%, and the course of supraclavicular artery completely in 45%, and partially in an additional 30%of the cases examined. Magnetic resonance angiography showed negative results for all parameters. Digital subtraction angiography showed the partial course of a supraclavicular artery in 62.5%, but showed no perforators. Indocyanine green angiography showed the site of perforators in 60% and a partial course of supraclavicular artery distal to perforators in 60%.Anatomical mapping of the vessel was possible with computerized tomography angiogram completely in 45%, and partially in 30%, and was also possible with indocyanine green angiography partially in 60%.  Computerized tomography angiography showed best results in the mapping of the supraclavicular artery, but with an inability to define the perforator perfusion territories, and also with risks of irradiation, while indocyanine green angiography is a good alternative as it could precisely map the superficial course of the artery and angiosomes, with no radiation exposure. Thieme Medical Publishers

  10. Color Doppler Sonographic and Cadaveric Study of the Arterial Vascularity of the Lateral Upper Arm Flap.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ruimei; Ding, Yu; Sun, Chuanzheng; Li, Xiaojiang; Wang, Jinde; Li, Lei; Yang, Jie; Ren, Yanxin; Zhong, Zhaoming

    2016-04-01

    To determine the importance of adequate preoperative assessment with color Doppler sonography to assist in the successful transfer of lateral upper arm flaps by studying the lateral upper arm flap with color Doppler sonography and analyzing the anatomic features of the radial collateral artery. A clinical case-control study was performed. The radial collateral artery was studied with color Doppler sonography in 15 healthy volunteers. The origins, courses, variations, and locations of the perforators of the radial collateral artery were recorded. The results and data from the color Doppler sonographic investigation were compared with an anatomic study that was performed on 22 adult cadaveric upper limb specimens. The volunteer group (14 of 15 volunteers) and the cadaveric group (19 of 22 upper arm specimens) clearly showed that the branch pattern of the arterial supply was as follows: brachial artery → deep brachial artery → radial collateral artery → posterior radial collateral artery → myocutaneous perforator. Variations in the origin of the radial collateral artery were identified in 1 volunteer bilaterally and in 3 upper arm specimens. The diameters of the artery and vein measured at the distal insertion of the deltoid and the origin of the deep brachial artery were not significantly different between the volunteer and cadaver groups (P > .05). Due to the difference in measuring methods, the length of the vascular pedicles was significantly different between the groups (P < .05). Color Doppler sonography can facilitate the preoperative assessment of the origin, course, variations, and locations of the radial collateral artery and therefore may increase the success rate of lateral upper arm flap transfer. © 2016 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  11. The influence of simulated transversus abdominis muscle force on sacroiliac joint flexibility during asymmetric moment application to the pelvis.

    PubMed

    Gnat, Rafael; Spoor, Kees; Pool-Goudzwaard, Annelies

    2015-10-01

    The role of so-called local muscle system in motor control of the lower back and pelvis is a subject of ongoing debate. Prevailing beliefs in stabilizing function of this system were recently challenged. This study investigated the impact of in vitro simulated force of transversely oriented fibres of the transversus abdominis muscle (a part of the local system) on flexibility of the sacroiliac joint during asymmetric moment application to the pelvis. In 8 embalmed specimens an incremental moment was applied in the sagittal plane to one innominate with respect to the fixed contralateral innominate. Ranges of motion of the sacroiliac joint were recorded using the Vicon Motion Capture System. Load-deformation curves were plotted and flexibility of the sacroiliac joint was calculated separately for anterior and posterior rotations of the innominate, with and without simulated muscle force. Flexibility of the sacroiliac joint was significantly bigger during anterior rotation of the innominate, as compared to posterior rotation (Anova P<0.05). After application of simulated force of transversus abdominis, flexibility of the joint did not change both during anterior and posterior rotations of the innominate. A lack of a stiffening effect of simulated transversus abdominis force on the sacroiliac joint was demonstrated. Earlier hypotheses suggesting a stiffening influence of this muscle on the pelvis cannot be confirmed. Consistent with previous findings smaller flexibility of the joint recorded during posterior rotation of the innominate may be of clinical importance for physio- and manual therapists. However, major limitations of the study should be acknowledged: in vitro conditions and simulation of only solitary muscle force. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Internal Oblique and Transversus Abdominis Muscle Fatigue Induced by Slumped Sitting Posture after 1 Hour of Sitting in Office Workers

    PubMed Central

    Waongenngarm, Pooriput; Rajaratnam, Bala S.; Janwantanakul, Prawit

    2015-01-01

    Background Prolonged sitting leads to low back discomfort and lumbopelvic muscle fatigue. This study examined the characteristics of body perceived discomfort and trunk muscle fatigue during 1 hour of sitting in three postures in office workers. Methods Thirty workers sat for 1 hour in one of three sitting postures (i.e., upright, slumped, and forward leaning postures). Body discomfort was assessed using the Body Perceived Discomfort scale at the beginning and after 1 hour of sitting. Electromyographic (EMG) signals were recorded from superficial lumbar multifidus, iliocostalis lumborum pars thoracis, internal oblique (IO)/transversus abdominis (TrA), and rectus abdominis muscles during 1 hour of sitting. The median frequency (MDF) of the EMG power spectrum was calculated. Results Regardless of the sitting posture, the Body Perceived Discomfort scores in the neck, shoulder, upper back, low back, and buttock significantly increased after 1 hour of sitting compared with baseline values (t(9) = −11.97 to −2.69, p < 0.05). The MDF value of the EMG signal of rectus abdominis, iliocostalis lumborum pars thoracis, and multifidus muscles was unchanged over time in all three sitting postures. Only the right and left IO/TrA in the slumped sitting posture was significantly associated with decreased MDF over time (p = 0.019 to 0.041). Conclusion Prolonged sitting led to increased body discomfort in the neck, shoulder, upper back, low back, and buttock. No sign of trunk muscle fatigue was detected over 1 hour of sitting in the upright and forward leaning postures. Prolonged slumped sitting may relate to IO/TrA muscle fatigue, which may compromise the stability of the spine, making it susceptible to injury. PMID:27014491

  13. Liposomal Bupivacaine Use in Transversus Abdominis Plane Blocks Reduces Pain and Postoperative Intravenous Opioid Requirement After Colorectal Surgery.

    PubMed

    Stokes, Audrey L; Adhikary, Sanjib D; Quintili, Ashley; Puleo, Frances J; Choi, Christine S; Hollenbeak, Christopher S; Messaris, Evangelos

    2017-02-01

    Enhanced recovery protocols frequently use multimodal postoperative analgesia to improve postoperative outcomes in patients undergoing colorectal surgery. The purpose of this study was to evaluate liposomal bupivacaine use in transversus abdominis plane blocks on postoperative pain scores and opioid use after colorectal surgery. This was a retrospective cohort study comparing outcomes between patients receiving nonliposomal anesthetic (n = 104) and liposomal bupivacaine (n = 303) blocks. The study was conducted at a single tertiary care center. Patients included those identified within an institutional database as inpatients undergoing colorectal procedures between 2013 and 2015 who underwent transversus abdominis plane block for perioperative analgesia. The study measured postoperative pain scores and opioid requirements. Patients receiving liposomal bupivacaine had significantly lower pain scores for the first 24 to 36 postoperative hours. Pain scores were similar after 36 hours. The use of intravenous opioids among the liposomal bupivacaine group decreased by more than one third during the hospitalization (99.1 vs 64.5 mg; p = 0.040). The use of ketorolac was also decreased (49.0 vs 18.3 mg; p < 0.001). In subgroup analysis, the decrease in opioid use was observed between laparoscopic and robotic procedures but not with laparotomies. No significant differences were noted in the use of oral opioids, acetaminophen, or ibuprofen. Postoperative length of stay and total cost were decreased in the liposomal bupivacaine group but did not achieve statistical significance. The study was limited by its retrospective, single-center design and heterogeneity of block administration. Attenuated pain scores observed with liposomal bupivacaine use were associated with significantly lower intravenous opioid and ketorolac use, suggesting that liposomal bupivacaine-containing transversus abdominis plane blocks are well aligned with the opioid-reducing goals of many enhanced

  14. Anatomical popliteal artery entrapment syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Yong Jae; Kwon, Tae-Won; Gwon, Jun Gyo; Cho, Yong-Pil; Hwang, Seung-Jun; Go, Ki-Young

    2018-05-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze anatomical popliteal artery entrapment syndrome (PAES) and to individualize the treatment of this condition according to the anatomical status of the artery and the adjacent structure. A total of 35 anatomical PAES legs in 23 consecutive patients treated within the Asan Medical Center, Seoul, Korea between 1995 and 2011 were analyzed retrospectively. Anatomical PAES was diagnosed by MRI and/or CT scans of the knee joint, and CT or conventional transfemoral arteriography of the lower extremities. We noted a type II gastrocnemius medial head (GNM) anomaly, a type III GNM anomaly, or an aberrant plantaris muscle in 51.4%, 20%, and 28.6% of PAES legs, respectively. In assessments of the arterial lesions, popliteal or tibial artery occlusion was noted in 19 of 26 symptomatic PAES legs. For cases without popliteal artery lesions, myotomy of the anatomically deranged muscle was performed in 5 of 7 symptomatic and 4 of 9 asymptomatic PAES legs. For occluded popliteal arteries, we performed ten direct repairs of the pathological popliteal artery and 4 femoro-below the knee popliteal bypass surgeries. As a result of the arterial Surgery, 9 direct procedures with myotomy yielded a patent artery, while 3 graft failures were noted in the bypass group. The median follow-up period was 84 months (range, 12-206 months). We recommend that treatment of PAES should be individualized based on pathology, symptoms, and various imaging studies.

  15. Pre-expanded Intercostal Perforator Super-Thin Skin Flap.

    PubMed

    Liao, Yunjun; Luo, Yong; Lu, Feng; Hyakusoku, Hiko; Gao, Jianhua; Jiang, Ping

    2017-01-01

    This article introduces pre-expanded super-thin intercostal perforator flaps, particularly the flap that has a perforator from the first to second intercostal spaces. The key techniques, advantages and disadvantages, and complications and management of this flap are described. At present, the thinnest possible flap is achieved by thinning the pre-expanded flap that has a perforator from the first to second intercostal spaces. It is used to reconstruct large defects on the face and neck, thus restoring function and cosmetic appearance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Decellularized skin/adipose tissue flap matrix for engineering vascularized composite soft tissue flaps.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qixu; Johnson, Joshua A; Dunne, Lina W; Chen, Youbai; Iyyanki, Tejaswi; Wu, Yewen; Chang, Edward I; Branch-Brooks, Cynthia D; Robb, Geoffrey L; Butler, Charles E

    2016-04-15

    Using a perfusion decellularization protocol, we developed a decellularized skin/adipose tissue flap (DSAF) comprising extracellular matrix (ECM) and intact vasculature. Our DSAF had a dominant vascular pedicle, microcirculatory vascularity, and a sensory nerve network and retained three-dimensional (3D) nanofibrous structures well. DSAF, which was composed of collagen and laminin with well-preserved growth factors (e.g., vascular endothelial growth factor, basic fibroblast growth factor), was successfully repopulated with human adipose-derived stem cells (hASCs) and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), which integrated with DSAF and formed 3D aggregates and vessel-like structures in vitro. We used microsurgery techniques to re-anastomose the recellularized DSAF into nude rats. In vivo, the engineered flap construct underwent neovascularization and constructive remodeling, which was characterized by the predominant infiltration of M2 macrophages and significant adipose tissue formation at 3months postoperatively. Our results indicate that DSAF co-cultured with hASCs and HUVECs is a promising platform for vascularized soft tissue flap engineering. This platform is not limited by the flap size, as the entire construct can be immediately perfused by the recellularized vascular network following simple re-integration into the host using conventional microsurgical techniques. Significant soft tissue loss resulting from traumatic injury or tumor resection often requires surgical reconstruction using autologous soft tissue flaps. However, the limited availability of qualitative autologous flaps as well as the donor site morbidity significantly limits this approach. Engineered soft tissue flap grafts may offer a clinically relevant alternative to the autologous flap tissue. In this study, we engineered vascularized soft tissue free flap by using skin/adipose flap extracellular matrix scaffold (DSAF) in combination with multiple types of human cells. Following

  17. Propeller thoracodorsal artery perforator flap for breast reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Angrigiani, Claudio; Rancati, Alberto; Escudero, Ezequiel; Artero, Guillermo; Gercovich, Gustavo; Deza, Ernesto Gil

    2014-08-01

    The thoracodorsal artery perforator (TDAP) flap has been described for breast reconstruction. This flap requires intramuscular dissection of the pedicle. A modification of the conventional TDAP surgical technique for breast reconstruction is described, utilizing instead a propeller TDAP flap. The authors present their clinical experience with the propeller TDAP flap in breast reconstruction alone or in combination with expanders or permanent implants. From January 2009 to February 2013, sixteen patients had breast reconstruction utilizing a propeller TDAP flap. Retrospective analysis of patient characteristics, clinical indications, procedure and outcomes were performed. The follow-up period ranged from 4 to 48 months. Sixteen patients had breast reconstruction using a TDAP flap with or without simultaneous insertion of an expander or implant. All flaps survived, while two cases required minimal resection due to distal flap necrosis, healing by second intention. There were not donor-site seromas, while minimal wound dehiscence was detected in two cases. The propeller TDAP flap appears to be safe and effective for breast reconstruction, resulting in minimal donor site morbidity. The use of this propeller flap emerges as a true alternative to the traditional TDAP flap.

  18. Double transverse myocutaneous gracilis free flaps for unilateral breast reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Werdin, Frank; Haug, Daniel M; Amr, Amro; Schoeller, Thomas

    2016-10-01

    In cases were the deep inferior epigastric perforator flap (DIEP flap) is not available and unilateral transverse myocutaneous gracilis flap (TMG flap) is not sufficient for breast reconstruction, we perform double TMG flaps as a reconstructive method. In this report, we present our results of the use of double TMG free-flap-transfer for unilateral breast reconstruction. Between August 2004 and June 2012 we performed 58 TMG flaps in 29 patients for unilateral breast reconstruction. Patient data were analyzed and operative outcome (operation time, complication rate and aesthetic results) were investigated. Aesthetic outcome was evaluated retrospectively via photo documentation by an independent plastic surgeon. The results were classified in;unsatisfactory, satisfactory, good and very good. The average operating time was 6 hours 55 minutes (295 - 650 minutes). Of 58 TMG flaps, 57 (98.3%) were successful. Thrombosis occurred in seven (12%) cases (1 arterial, 6 venous). Flap salvage was successful in six cases and flap failure occurred in one (1.7%) case. The results of 25 patients were graded as good and very good. Three patients showed satisfying and one patient unsatisfying results. Double TMG flaps in unilateral breast reconstruction could lead to good operative results. This method further expands the range of options with autologous tissue in reconstructive breast surgery. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Microsurgery 36:539-545, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. "Apron" flap and re-creation of the inframammary fold following TRAM flap breast reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Amir, A; Silfen, R; Hauben, D J

    2000-03-01

    To the best of our knowledge, the recreation of an inframammary fold after TRAM flap breast reconstruction has not yet been described. This article offers a technique for the creation of an inframammary fold as a secondary procedure. The technique has been performed thus far in two patients with good aesthetic outcomes and no postoperative complications. It may also be suitable for adding bulk to the TRAM flap, especially in bilateral breast reconstruction, and for other minor chest deformities.

  20. A new mucosal propeller flap (deep lingual artery axial propeller): the renaissance of lingual flaps.

    PubMed

    Cordova, Adriana; Toia, Francesca; D'Arpa, Salvatore; Giunta, Gabriele; Moschella, Francesco

    2015-03-01

    Lingual flaps provide ideal mucosal coverage for intraoral defects but traditionally require two surgical stages. The authors present an axial mucosal propeller flap for single-stage intraoral reconstruction. The flap includes the mucosa of the lateral side of the tongue, islanded on the deep lingual vessels. Between 2011 and 2013, 23 patients underwent intraoral mucosal reconstruction with a deep lingual artery axial propeller flap after cancer resection in the cheek (n = 16), floor of the mouth (n = 2), retromolar trigone (n = 2), hard palate (n = 2), and soft palate (n = 1). Mean defect size was 19.5 cm. Preoperative and postoperative intraoral function was evaluated with the Functional Intraoral Glasgow Scale. The authors always achieved one-stage reconstruction with primary donor-site closure. The only complications were an infection treated conservatively and a late oronasal fistula caused by radiotherapy. All patients resumed an oral diet after 1 week and none required surgical revision. Mean 12-month postoperative Functional Intraoral Glasgow Scale score was better than the preoperative score (13.5 versus 12.8). The deep lingual artery axial propeller flap combines the advantages of the traditional lingual flap (i.e., reliable axial vascularization and like-with-like reconstruction) with those of a propeller flap (i.e., one-stage transfer of like tissue and extreme mobility) and has wider indications than a conventional lingual flap. The technique is fast and has low morbidity and good functional results, and the authors recommend it as a first-choice technique to reconstruct moderate to large intraoral defects. Therapeutic, IV.

  1. The female knee: anatomic variations.

    PubMed

    Conley, Sheryl; Rosenberg, Aaron; Crowninshield, Roy

    2007-01-01

    Traditional knee implants have been designed "down the middle,"based on the combined average size and shape of male and female knee anatomy.Sex-based research in the field of orthopaedics has led to new understanding of the anatomic differences between the sexes and the associated implications for women undergoing total knee arthroplasty. Through the use of a comprehensive bone morphology atlas that utilizes novel three-dimensional computed tomography analysis technology, significant anatomic differences have been documented in the shape and size of female knees compared with male knees. This research identifies three notable anatomic differences in the female population: a less prominent anterior condyle, an increased Q angle, and a reduced medial-lateral:anterior-posterior aspect ratio.

  2. Impaired mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and supercomplex assembly in rectus abdominis muscle of diabetic obese individuals.

    PubMed

    Antoun, Ghadi; McMurray, Fiona; Thrush, A Brianne; Patten, David A; Peixoto, Alyssa C; Slack, Ruth S; McPherson, Ruth; Dent, Robert; Harper, Mary-Ellen

    2015-12-01

    Skeletal muscle mitochondrial dysfunction has been documented in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus; however, specific respiratory defects and their mechanisms are poorly understood. The aim of the current study was to examine oxidative phosphorylation and electron transport chain (ETC) supercomplex assembly in rectus abdominis muscles of 10 obese diabetic and 10 obese non-diabetic individuals. Twenty obese women undergoing Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery were recruited for this study. Muscle samples were obtained intraoperatively and subdivided for multiple analyses, including high-resolution respirometry and assessment of supercomplex assembly. Clinical data obtained from referring physicians were correlated with laboratory findings. Participants in both groups were of a similar age, weight and BMI. Mitochondrial respiration rates were markedly reduced in diabetic vs non-diabetic patients. This defect was observed during maximal ADP-stimulated respiration in the presence of complex I-linked substrates and complex I- and II-linked substrates, and during maximal uncoupled respiration. There were no differences in fatty acid (octanoyl carnitine) supported respiration, leak respiration or isolated activity of cytochrome c oxidase. Intriguingly, significant correlations were found between glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) levels and maximal respiration or respiration supported by complex I, complex I and II or fatty acid. In the muscle of diabetic patients, blue native gel electrophoresis revealed a striking decrease in complex I, III and IV containing ETC supercomplexes. These findings support the hypothesis that ETC supercomplex assembly may be an important underlying mechanism of muscle mitochondrial dysfunction in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  3. Reliability of real-time ultrasound measurement of transversus abdominis thickness in healthy trained subjects.

    PubMed

    Gnat, Rafael; Saulicz, Edward; Miądowicz, Barbara

    2012-08-01

    To investigate intra- and inter-rater reliability of the ultrasound measurement of transversus abdominis (TrA) thickness and thickness change (difference between thickness at rest and during contraction) in asymptomatic, trained subjects. To define the number of repeated measurements that provide acceptable level of reliability. To investigate variability of the measurements over time of 5 days and the reliability of duplicate analysis of images. A single-group repeated-measures design was used to assess reliability. Healthy volunteers (n = 10) were subjected to 1-week training in voluntary activation of TrA. Real-time ultrasound imaging and subsequent measurement of the TrA thickness at rest and during voluntary contraction were repeated on Monday, Wednesday and Friday of the next week. Using a single repeated measurement, intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) for TrA thickness were: 0.86-0.95 (intra-rater), 0.86-0.92 (inter-rater); and for TrA thickness change: 0.34-0.56 (intra-rater), 0.47-0.61 (inter-rater). Using the mean of three repeated measurements respective values were: 0.97, 0.96-0.98; and 0.81-0.84, 0.80-0.90. No significant differences were found between mean values of TrA thickness as well as thickness change obtained on three consecutive measurement days. Duplicate analysis of the images was highly reliable with ICCs of 0.89-0.99. Two repeated measurements for TrA thickness and at least three measurements for TrA thickness change are needed to achieve acceptable levels of intra- and inter-rater reliability. In healthy trained volunteers TrA thickness and thickness change are relatively stable parameters over a 5-day period. Duplicate analysis of the same images by two blinded observers is reliable.

  4. Transversus Abdominis Plane Block Versus Surgical Site Infiltration for Pain Management After Open Total Abdominal Hysterectomy.

    PubMed

    Gasanova, Irina; Alexander, John; Ogunnaike, Babatunde; Hamid, Cherine; Rogers, David; Minhajuddin, Abu; Joshi, Girish P

    2015-11-01

    Surgical site infiltration and transversus abdominis plane (TAP) blocks are commonly used to improve pain relief after lower abdominal surgery. This randomized, observer-blinded study was designed to compare the analgesic efficacy of TAP blocks with surgical site infiltration in patients undergoing open total abdominal hysterectomy via a Pfannenstiel incision. Patients were randomized to receive either bilateral ultrasound-guided TAP blocks using bupivacaine 0.5% 20 mL on each side (n = 30) or surgical site infiltration with liposomal bupivacaine 266 mg diluted to 60 mL injected in the preperitoneal, subfascial, and subcutaneous planes (n = 30). The remaining aspects of the perioperative care were standardized. An investigator blinded to the group allocation documented pain scores at rest and with coughing, opioid requirements, nausea, vomiting, and rescue antiemetics in the postanesthesia care unit and at 2, 6, 12, 24, and 48 hours postoperatively. The primary outcome measure was pain scores on coughing at 6 hours postoperatively. One patient in each group was excluded from the analysis because of reoperation within 24 hours in the TAP block group and change of incision type in the infiltration group. The pain scores at rest and with coughing were significantly lower in the surgical site infiltration group at all postoperative time points (P < 0.0001) except at rest in the postanesthesia care unit. The opioid requirements between 24 and 48 hours were significantly lower in the infiltration group (P = 0.009). The nausea scores, occurrence of vomiting, and need for rescue antiemetics were similar. Surgical site infiltration provided superior pain relief at rest and on coughing, as well as reduced opioid consumption for up to 48 hours. Future studies need to compare TAP blocks with liposomal bupivacaine with surgical site infiltration with liposomal bupivacaine.

  5. Transversus abdominis plane block as a component of multimodal analgesia for laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

    PubMed

    Oksar, Menekse; Koyuncu, Onur; Turhanoglu, Selim; Temiz, Muhyittin; Oran, Mustafa Cemil

    2016-11-01

    To evaluate and compare intercostal-iliac transversus abdominis plane (TAP) and oblique subcostal TAP (OSTAP) blocks for multimodal analgesia in patients receiving laparoscopic cholecystectomy. A prospective, randomized, double-blinded clinical study. Operating room, postoperative recovery area, and ward. In total, 60 laparoscopic cholecystectomy patients (43 women, 17 men, American Society of Anesthesiologists grades I-II) were enrolled from the general surgery department of our tertiary care center. The patients were assigned to 1 of the 3 groups. Group 1 received TAP blocks (n=20), group 2 received OSTAP blocks (n=20), and group 3 patients were used as controls and received patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) only (n=20). After the induction of anesthesia, blocks were performed bilaterally in study groups 1 and 2, using 20mL of lidocaine (5mg/mL). PCA with intravenous tramadol was routinely provided for all patients during the first 24hours. The intraoperative use of remifentanil, postoperative visual analog scale (VAS) scores, demand for PCA, and total analgesic consumption were recorded. The patients in the control group had greater analgesic demands and analgesic consumption than did those in groups 1 and 2. However, patients in the OSTAP group had lower VAS scores than did those in groups 1 and 3. The demand for analgesia was greater in the control group than in groups 1 and 2. Moreover, lower VAS scores were recorded in the OSTAP group than in groups 1 and 3 and were positively correlated with total PCA consumption among all patients. However, postoperative VAS scores were negatively correlated with the total intraoperative consumption of remifentanil at 24hours. TAP and OSTAP blocks improved postoperative analgesia in patients receiving laparoscopic cholecystectomy, which resulted in lower VAS scores and reduction in total analgesic consumption. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Effect of transversus abdominis plane block on cost of laparoscopic cholecystectomy anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Kokulu, Serdar; Bakı, Elif Doğan; Kaçar, Emre; Bal, Ahmet; Şenay, Hasan; Üstün, Kübra Demir; Yılmaz, Sezgin; Ela, Yüksel; Sıvacı, Remziye Gül

    2014-12-23

    Use of transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block for postoperative analgesia is continuously increasing. However, few studies have investigated intraoperative effects of TAP block. We aimed to study the effects of TAP block in terms of cost-effectiveness and consumption of inhalation agents. Forty patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy were enrolled in this study. Patients were randomly divided into 2 groups: Group 1 (n=20) patients received TAP block and Group 2 (n=20) patients did not receive TAP block. Standard anesthesia induction was used in all patients. For the maintenance of anesthesia, fractional inspired oxygen (FIO2) of 50% in air with desflurane was used with a fresh gas flow of 4 L/min. All patients were monitored with electrocardiography and for peripheral oxygen saturation (SpO2), end-tidal carbon dioxide (ET), heart rate (HR), noninvasive mean blood pressure (MBP), and bispectral index (BIS). Bilateral TAP blocks were performed under ultrasound guidance to Group 1 patients. The BIS value was maintained at between 40 and 50 during the surgery. The Dion formula was used to calculate consumption of desflurane for each patient. There was no difference between the groups with respect to demographic characteristics of the patients. Duration of anesthesia, surgery time, and dosage of fentanyl were similar in the 2 groups. However, the cost and consumption of desflurane was significantly lower in Group 1. Total anesthesia consumption was lower and the cost-effectiveness of anesthesia was better in TAP block patients with general anesthesia than in non-TAP block patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

  7. Transversus abdominis plane block vs. wound infiltration in Caesarean section: a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Telnes, A; Skogvoll, E; Lonnée, H

    2015-04-01

    Multiple studies suggest that transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block (without intrathecal morphine) after Caesarean section (CS) reduces post-operative morphine consumption. In our study, we wanted to compare the analgesic effect of TAP block with infiltration of the wound after CS. We included 60 pregnant women scheduled for elective CS under spinal anaesthesia in a randomised, single-centre, double-blind study. Thirty patients received ultrasound-guided TAP block using 20 ml bupivacaine 0.25% with adrenaline 5 μg/ml bilaterally and 20 ml normal saline as wound infiltration (TAP group). The other 30 patients (the control group) received normal saline 20 ml bilaterally in the TAP, and 20 ml bupivacaine 0.25% with adrenaline 5 μg/ml as wound infiltration. The main outcome was cumulative morphine consumption at 48 h after surgery. In addition, continuous morphine consumption, pain scores and side effects were registered. Fifty-seven patients completed the study. Cumulative morphine consumption at 48 h (mean±standard deviation) was 41±34 mg in the TAP group and 38±27 mg in the control group (P=0.7); a difference of 3 mg (95% confidence interval -13 to 19 mg). Morphine consumption at any time up to 48 h was virtually identical in both groups. Side effects were similar, except for a higher degree of sedation in the TAP group (P=0.04). Compared with wound infiltration with local anaesthetics, TAP block did not reduce cumulative morphine consumption following CS. The TAP block was associated with more pronounced sedation. © 2015 The Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Efficacy of transversus abdominis plane block with liposomal bupivacaine during open abdominal wall reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Fayezizadeh, Mojtaba; Majumder, Arnab; Neupane, Ruel; Elliott, Heidi L; Novitsky, Yuri W

    2016-09-01

    Transversus abdominis plane block (TAPb) is an analgesic adjunct used for abdominal surgical procedures. Liposomal bupivacaine (LB) demonstrates prolonged analgesic effects, up to 72 hours. We evaluated the analgesic efficacy of TAPb using LB for patients undergoing open abdominal wall reconstruction (AWR). Fifty patients undergoing AWR with TAPb using LB (TAP-group) were compared with a matched historical cohort undergoing AWR without TAPb (control group). Outcome measures included postoperative utilization of morphine equivalents, numerical rating scale pain scores, time to oral narcotics, and length of stay (LOS). Cohorts were matched demographically. No complications were associated with TAPb or LB. TAP-group evidenced significantly reduced narcotic requirements on operative day (9.5 mg vs 16.5 mg, P = .004), postoperative day (POD) 1 (26.7 mg vs 39.5 mg, P = .01) and POD2 (29.6 mg vs 40.7 mg, P = .047) and pain scores on operative day (5.1 vs 7.0, P <.001), POD1 (4.2 vs 5.5, P = .002), and POD2 (3.9 vs 4.8, P = .04). In addition, TAP-group demonstrated significantly shorter time to oral narcotics (2.7 days vs 4.0 days, P <.001) and median LOS (5.2 days vs 6.8 days, P = .004). TAPb with LB demonstrated significant reductions in narcotic consumption and improved pain control. TAPb allowed for earlier discontinuation of intravenous narcotics and shorter LOS. Intraoperative TAPb with LB appears to be an effective adjunct for perioperative analgesia in patients undergoing open AWR. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Efficacy of transverse abdominis plane block in reduction of postoperation pain in laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

    PubMed

    Saliminia, Alireza; Azimaraghi, Omid; Babayipour, Shiva; Ardavan, Kamelia; Movafegh, Ali

    2015-12-01

    Transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block is a recently introduced regional anesthesia technique that is used for postoperative pain reduction in some abdominal surgeries. The present study evaluated the efficacy of the TAP block on the post laparoscopic cholecystectomy pain intensity and analgesic consumption. Fifty-four patients were enrolled in three groups: TAP block with normal saline (Group 1, n = 18); TAP block with bupivacaine (Group 2, n = 18); and TAP block with bupivacaine plus sufentanil (Group 3, n = 18). The time to the first fentanyl request, fentanyl consumption in the 24 hours following surgery, and postoperative pain intensity at 30 minutes, 1 hour, 6 hours, 12 hours, and 24 hours following discharge for recovery were measured and recorded. The total amount of 24-hour fentanyl consumption was higher in Group 1 (877.8 ± 338.8 μg) than either Group 2 (566.7 ± 367.8 μg) or Group 3 (555.5 ± 356.8 μg; p = 0.03). Postoperative pain score was higher in Group 1 than intervention groups (p = 0.006); however, there was no significant difference in intervention groups. The time to the first fentanyl request in Group 1 (79.44 ± 42.2) was significantly lower than Group 3 (206.38 ± 112.7; p = 0.001). The present study demonstrated that bilateral TAP block with 0.5% bupivacaine reduces post laparoscopic cholecystectomy pain intensity and fentanyl request and prolongs time to the first analgesic request. Adding sufentanil to the block solution reduced neither pain intensity nor fentanyl further consumption. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Transversus Abdominis Plane Block for Post Hysterectomy Pain: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Bacal, Vanessa; Rana, Urvi; McIsaac, Daniel I; Chen, Innie

    2018-04-30

    The objective of this study was to address the efficacy of transversus abdominis plane (TAP) blocks in pain management among women who undergo elective hysterectomy for benign pathology in both open and minimally invasive surgeries. We performed a systematic review by searching for bibliographic citations from Medline, Embase and Cochrane Library. MeSH headings for TAP blocks and hysterectomy were combined and restricted to the English language. We included RCTs comparing TAP blocks to placebo or no block in patients who underwent elective hysterectomy. Pain was measured using a visual analog score (VAS) on a scale of 0-100. We calculated pooled mean differences in VAS and total morphine consumption at 2 and 24 hours by performing a random effects meta-analysis. Fourteen studies met the inclusion criteria, comprising 855 participants. At 2 hours, mean VAS scores for patients who underwent TAP blocks were significantly lower after both total abdominal hysterectomy (TAH) (mean difference -14.97 [CI: -20.35- -9.59]) and total laparoscopic hysterectomy (TLH) (-18.16 [CI: -34.78- -1.53]) compared to placebo or no block. Pain scores at 24 hours for patients who underwent TAPB were significantly lower after both TAH (-10.09 [CI: -17.35- -2.83]) and TLH (-9.12 [CI: -18.12- -0.13]) compared to placebo or no block. Mean difference in morphine consumption was -9.53 mg (CI -15.43- -3.63) for TAH and -3.15 mg (CI: -8.41- 2.12) for TLH. In conclusion, TAP blocks provide significant postoperative early and delayed pain control compared to placebo or no block among women who undergo hysterectomy. There was reduced morphine consumption among patients who underwent TAH, but not after TLH. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Effect of Transversus Abdominis Plane Block on Cost of Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy Anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Kokulu, Serdar; Bakı, Elif Doğan; Kaçar, Emre; Bal, Ahmet; Şenay, Hasan; Üstün, Kübra Demir; Yılmaz, Sezgin; Ela, Yüksel; Sıvacı, Remziye Gül

    2014-01-01

    Background Use of transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block for postoperative analgesia is continuously increasing. However, few studies have investigated intraoperative effects of TAP block. We aimed to study the effects of TAP block in terms of cost-effectiveness and consumption of inhalation agents. Material/Methods Forty patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy were enrolled in this study. Patients were randomly divided into 2 groups: Group 1 (n=20) patients received TAP block and Group 2 (n=20) patients did not receive TAP block. Standard anesthesia induction was used in all patients. For the maintenance of anesthesia, fractional inspired oxygen (FIO2) of 50% in air with desflurane was used with a fresh gas flow of 4 L/min. All patients were monitored with electrocardiography and for peripheral oxygen saturation (SpO2), end-tidal carbon dioxide (ET), heart rate (HR), noninvasive mean blood pressure (MBP), and bispectral index (BIS). Bilateral TAP blocks were performed under ultrasound guidance to Group 1 patients. The BIS value was maintained at between 40 and 50 during the surgery. The Dion formula was used to calculate consumption of desflurane for each patient. Results There was no difference between the groups with respect to demographic characteristics of the patients. Duration of anesthesia, surgery time, and dosage of fentanyl were similar in the 2 groups. However, the cost and consumption of desflurane was significantly lower in Group 1. Conclusions Total anesthesia consumption was lower and the cost-effectiveness of anesthesia was better in TAP block patients with general anesthesia than in non-TAP block patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy. PMID:25534331

  12. Randomized clinical trial of transversus abdominis plane block versus placebo control in live-donor nephrectomy.

    PubMed

    Hosgood, Sarah A; Thiyagarajan, Umasanker M; Nicholson, Harriet F L; Jeyapalan, Inthira; Nicholson, Michael L

    2012-09-15

    Laparoscopic surgery reduces pain after donor nephrectomy; however, most patients still require a significant amount of postoperative parenteral opiate analgesia. Therefore, there is a need to investigate techniques that might further reduce postoperative pain. This study assessed the safety and efficacy of using a transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Forty-six patients were analyzed in the trial and were randomized to undergo the TAP block procedure with either bupivacaine (n=24) or saline placebo (Control n=22) injected into the muscle plane. Prefilled syringes were dispensed with the group allocation concealed to maintain blinding. After surgery, the amount of morphine, level of pain, and measures of recovery were recorded. The amount of morphine used 6 hr after surgery was significantly lower in patients receiving TAP block with bupivacaine compared with the control (presented as mean [SD], 12.4 [8.4] vs. 21.2 [14.0] mg; P=0.015). However, the total amount of morphine used was similar in both groups 45.6 [31.4] vs. 52.7 [28.8] mg; P=0.771. Patients in the bupivacaine group experienced significantly less pain on postoperative days 1 (score, 19 [15] vs. 37 [20]; P=0.003) and 2 (score, 11 [10] vs. 19 [13]; P=0.031). Recovery and postoperative hospital stay were similar in both groups. There were no complications associated with the procedure. The TAP block procedure is beneficial in reducing postoperative pain and early morphine requirements in laparoscopic live-donor nephrectomy.

  13. To flap or not to flap: a discussion between a fish and a jellyfish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Nathan; Roh, Chris; Idrees, Suhail; Gharib, Morteza

    2016-11-01

    Fish and jellyfish are known to swim by flapping and by periodically contracting respectively, but which is the more effective propulsion mechanism? In an attempt to answer this question, an experimental comparison is made between simplified versions of these motions to determine which generates the greatest thrust for the least power. The flapping motion is approximated by pitching plates while periodic contractions are approximated by clapping plates. A machine is constructed to operate in either a flapping or a clapping mode between Reynolds numbers 1,880 and 11,260 based on the average plate tip velocity and span. The effect of the total sweep angle, total sweep time, plate flexibility, and duty cycle are investigated. The average thrust generated and power required per cycle are compared between the two modes when their total sweep angle and total sweep time are identical. In general, operating in the clapping mode required significantly more power to generate a similar thrust compared to the flapping mode. However, modifying the duty cycle for clapping caused the effectiveness to approach that of flapping with an unmodified duty cycle. These results suggest that flapping is the more effective propulsion mechanism within the range of Reynolds numbers tested. This work was supported by the Charyk Bio-inspired Laboratory at the California Institute of Technology, the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship under Grant No. DGE-1144469, and the Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowships program.

  14. Anatomical variations of the carpal tunnel structures

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Ryan; Chesney, Amy; Seal, Shane; McKnight, Leslie; Thoma, Achilleas

    2009-01-01

    There are many anatomical variations in and around the carpal tunnel that affect the nerves, tendons and arteries in this area. Awareness of these variations is important both during the clinical examination and during carpal tunnel release. The purpose of the present review is to highlight recognized anatomical variations within the carpal tunnel including variation in nerve anatomy, tendon anatomical variants, vascular anatomical variations and muscle anatomical variations. PMID:20808747

  15. [Mediaeval anatomic iconography (Part II)].

    PubMed

    Barg, L

    1996-01-01

    In the second part of his paper the author has presented a mediaeval anatomical draft based on empirical studies. From the first drawings from XVth century showing the places of blood-letting and connected with astrological prognostics, to systematical drawings by Guido de Vigevano. He has stressed the parallel existence of two lines of teaching anatomy; one based on philosophical concepts (discussed in the first part of paper), the second one based on empirical concepts. The latter trend has formed the grounds for final transformation, which has taken place in anatomical science in age of Renaissance.

  16. Uniportal anatomic combined unusual segmentectomies.

    PubMed

    González-Rivas, Diego; Lirio, Francisco; Sesma, Julio

    2017-01-01

    Nowadays, sublobar anatomic resections are gaining momentum as a valid alternative for early stage lung cancer. Despite being technically demanding, anatomic segmentectomies can be performed by uniportal video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) approach to combine the benefits of minimally invasiveness with the maximum lung sparing. This procedure can be even more complex if a combined resection of multiple segments from different lobes has to be done. Here we report five cases of combined and unusual segmentectomies done by the same experienced surgeon in high volume institutions to show uniportal VATS is a feasible approach for these complex resections and to share an excellent educational resource.

  17. Uniportal anatomic combined unusual segmentectomies

    PubMed Central

    Lirio, Francisco; Sesma, Julio

    2017-01-01

    Nowadays, sublobar anatomic resections are gaining momentum as a valid alternative for early stage lung cancer. Despite being technically demanding, anatomic segmentectomies can be performed by uniportal video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) approach to combine the benefits of minimally invasiveness with the maximum lung sparing. This procedure can be even more complex if a combined resection of multiple segments from different lobes has to be done. Here we report five cases of combined and unusual segmentectomies done by the same experienced surgeon in high volume institutions to show uniportal VATS is a feasible approach for these complex resections and to share an excellent educational resource. PMID:29078653

  18. Anatomically accurate individual face modeling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Prakash, Edmond C; Sung, Eric

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents a new 3D face model of a specific person constructed from the anatomical perspective. By exploiting the laser range data, a 3D facial mesh precisely representing the skin geometry is reconstructed. Based on the geometric facial mesh, we develop a deformable multi-layer skin model. It takes into account the nonlinear stress-strain relationship and dynamically simulates the non-homogenous behavior of the real skin. The face model also incorporates a set of anatomically-motivated facial muscle actuators and underlying skull structure. Lagrangian mechanics governs the facial motion dynamics, dictating the dynamic deformation of facial skin in response to the muscle contraction.

  19. Flapping wing aerodynamics: from insects to vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Chin, Diana D; Lentink, David

    2016-04-01

    More than a million insects and approximately 11,000 vertebrates utilize flapping wings to fly. However, flapping flight has only been studied in a few of these species, so many challenges remain in understanding this form of locomotion. Five key aerodynamic mechanisms have been identified for insect flight. Among these is the leading edge vortex, which is a convergent solution to avoid stall for insects, bats and birds. The roles of the other mechanisms - added mass, clap and fling, rotational circulation and wing-wake interactions - have not yet been thoroughly studied in the context of vertebrate flight. Further challenges to understanding bat and bird flight are posed by the complex, dynamic wing morphologies of these species and the more turbulent airflow generated by their wings compared with that observed during insect flight. Nevertheless, three dimensionless numbers that combine key flow, morphological and kinematic parameters - the Reynolds number, Rossby number and advance ratio - govern flapping wing aerodynamics for both insects and vertebrates. These numbers can thus be used to organize an integrative framework for studying and comparing animal flapping flight. Here, we provide a roadmap for developing such a framework, highlighting the aerodynamic mechanisms that remain to be quantified and compared across species. Ultimately, incorporating complex flight maneuvers, environmental effects and developmental stages into this framework will also be essential to advancing our understanding of the biomechanics, movement ecology and evolution of animal flight. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  20. Propulsion of a flapping and oscillating airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrick, I E

    1937-01-01

    Formulas are given for the propelling or drag force experience in a uniform air stream by an airfoil or an airfoil-aileron combination, oscillating in any of three degrees of freedom; vertical flapping, torsional oscillations about a fixed axis parallel to the span, and angular oscillations of the aileron about a hinge.

  1. 14 CFR 23.701 - Flap interconnection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Control... independent of the flap drive system; or by an approved equivalent means; or (2) Be designed so that the... airplanes, it must be designed to account for the unsummetrical loads resulting from flight with the engines...

  2. 14 CFR 23.701 - Flap interconnection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Control... independent of the flap drive system; or by an approved equivalent means; or (2) Be designed so that the... airplanes, it must be designed to account for the unsummetrical loads resulting from flight with the engines...

  3. 14 CFR 23.701 - Flap interconnection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Control... independent of the flap drive system; or by an approved equivalent means; or (2) Be designed so that the... airplanes, it must be designed to account for the unsummetrical loads resulting from flight with the engines...

  4. 14 CFR 23.701 - Flap interconnection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Control... independent of the flap drive system; or by an approved equivalent means; or (2) Be designed so that the... airplanes, it must be designed to account for the unsummetrical loads resulting from flight with the engines...

  5. Accelerating recovery after trauma with free flaps.

    PubMed

    Harris, G D; Nagle, D J; Lewis, V L; Bauer, B S

    1987-08-01

    Free flap versatility and dependability make the final result of microvascular reconstruction highly predictable. Free tissue transplantation should be considered as a primary treatment after trauma. The early use of free tissue transfer will result in fewer operations and a shortened duration of hospitalization in the initial post-trauma period.

  6. The role of postoperative hematoma on free flap compromise.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Faisal I; Gerecci, Deniz; Gonzalez, Javier D; Peck, Jessica J; Wax, Mark K

    2015-08-01

    Hematomas may develop in the postoperative setting after free tissue transfer. When hematomas occur, they can exert pressure on surrounding tissues. Their effect on the vascular pedicle of a free flap is unknown. We describe our incidence of hematoma in free flaps and outcomes when the flap is compromised. Retrospective chart review of 1,883 free flaps performed between July 1998 and June 2014 at a tertiary referral center. Patients with free flap compromise due to hematoma were identified. Etiology, demographic data, and outcomes were evaluated. Eighty-eight (4.7%) patients developed hematomas. Twenty (22.7%) of those had flap compromise. Twelve compromises (60%) showed evidence of pedicle thrombosis. The salvage rate was 75% versus 54% in 79 flaps with compromise from other causes (P = .12). Mean time to detection of the hematoma was 35.3 hours in salvaged flaps compared to 91.6 hours in unsalvageable flaps (P = .057). Time to operating room (OR) from detection was 2.8 hours in salvageable flaps compared to 12.4 hours in nonsalvageable flaps (P = .053). The salvage rate for flaps that returned to the OR in <5 hours was 93.3% compared to 20% (P = .0049) for those that did not. Vascular thrombosis reduced salvage rate to 58.3% from 100% (P = .002) when there was no thrombosis. In our series hematomas developed rarely. When they did, 23% went on to develop flap compromise. Prompt recognition and re-exploration allowed for a high salvage rate. Vessel thrombosis predicted inability to salvage the flap. 4 © 2015 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  7. Breast oedema following free flap breast reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Greenhowe, Jennifer; Stephen, Christopher; McClymont, Liusaidh; Munnoch, D Alex

    2017-08-01

    Breast oedema causes significant morbidity and is historically difficult to quantify. The aim of this study was to identify changes in breast tissue water content from pre-operative levels in the native breast to post-operative levels in mastectomy skin flaps and free flaps in the reconstructed breast. One hundred patients undergoing unilateral mastectomy and immediate free flap breast reconstruction were examined pre-operatively and at three post-operative appointments. A validated moisture meter was used to record dermal water percentages of each breast quadrant and areola in both breasts pre-operatively, then four quadrants of both breasts plus the unaffected areola and free flap at each post-operative review. Native skin of the reconstructed breast showed significant, persistent increase in MWC from 45.6% ± 0.5% to 72.8% ± 0.9% at 1st follow up (p < 0.001), decreasing only to 67.6% ± 0.8% by 3rd follow up. There was a marked difference (p < 0.001) in the mean water content (MWC) of the initial free flap (39.7% ± 0.6%) compared to 61.8% ± 1.7% at 1st follow up, then 55.1% ± 1.4% at 2nd and 53.7% ± 1.3% at 3rd follow ups. The unaffected breast showed a small but significant increase in MWC of all quadrants at subsequent follow up (greatest difference 3.1% at 1st follow up). This patient group demonstrates significant, persistent oedema of the reconstructed breast, which can be monitored using a non-invasive moisture meter. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Anatomical terminology, then and now.

    PubMed

    O'Rahilly, R

    1989-01-01

    Anatomical terminology, which had become chaotic by the nineteenth century, was codified in the BNA of 1895, when some 5,000 terms were carefully selected from among approximately 50,000 names. The BNA and its three major revisions (BR, INA, PNA) are here reviewed and placed in historical perspective. It is emphasized that many anatomical terms are very ancient and that the various nomenclatures are not 'new terminologies' but rather, for the most part, selections of already existing names. This can be seen clearly in the naming of the cranial nerves. Another example, the carpal and tarsal bones, is analysed in detail. Of the 8 carpal bones, for instance, the current names for 7 of them are those proposed by Henle in 1855. All the nomenclatures are, as they should be, in Latin, but it is understood that translations of many terms into other languages are necessary. Although views pro and con have been expressed, current usage favours the erect posture and the anatomical position as a basis, as well as the elimination of eponyms. In both teaching and research, the Nomina has been of great benefit in reducing drastically the number of unnecessary synonyms and in providing a coherent, internationally accepted system that is now the standard in anatomical textbooks. Hence, further use of the Nomina should be encouraged.

  9. Transperitoneal rectus sheath block and transversus abdominis plane block for laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair: A novel approach.

    PubMed

    Nagata, Jun; Watanabe, Jun; Nagata, Masato; Sawatsubashi, Yusuke; Akiyama, Masaki; Tajima, Takehide; Arase, Koichi; Minagawa, Noritaka; Torigoe, Takayuki; Nakayama, Yoshifumi; Horishita, Reiko; Kida, Kentaro; Hamada, Kotaro; Hirata, Keiji

    2017-08-01

    A laparoscopic approach for inguinal hernia repair is now considered the gold standard. Laparoscopic surgery is associated with a significant reduction in postoperative pain. Epidural analgesia cannot be used in patients with perioperative anticoagulant therapy because of complications such as epidural hematoma. As such, regional anesthetic techniques, such as ultrasound-guided rectus sheath block and transversus abdominis plane block, have become increasingly popular. However, even these anesthetic techniques have potential complications, such as rectus sheath hematoma, if vessels are damaged. We report the use of a transperitoneal laparoscopic approach for rectus sheath block and transversus abdominis plane block as a novel anesthetic procedure. An 81-year-old woman with direct inguinal hernia underwent laparoscopic transabdominal preperitoneal inguinal repair. Epidural anesthesia was not performed because anticoagulant therapy was administered. A Peti-needle™ was delivered through the port, and levobupivacaine was injected though the peritoneum. Surgery was performed successfully, and the anesthetic technique did not affect completion of the operative procedure. The patient was discharged without any complications. This technique was feasible, and the procedure was performed safely. Our novel analgesia technique has potential use as a standard postoperative regimen in various laparoscopic surgeries. Additional prospective studies to compare it with other techniques are required. © 2017 Japan Society for Endoscopic Surgery, Asia Endosurgery Task Force and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  10. Reconstruction of pressure sores with perforator-based propeller flaps.

    PubMed

    Jakubietz, Rafael G; Jakubietz, Danni F; Zahn, Robert; Schmidt, Karsten; Meffert, Rainer H; Jakubietz, Michael G

    2011-03-01

    Perforator flaps have been successfully used for reconstruction of pressure sores. Although V-Y advancement flaps approximate debrided wound edges, perforator-based propeller flaps allow rotation of healthy tissue into the defect. Perforator-based propeller flaps were planned in 13 patients. Seven pressure sores were over the sacrum, five over the ischial tuberosity, and one on the tip of the scapula. Three patients were paraplegic, six were bedridden, and five were ambulatory. In three patients, no perforators were found. In 10 patients, propeller flaps were transferred. In two patients, total flap necrosis occurred, which was reconstructed with local advancement flaps. In two cases, a wound dehiscence occurred and had to be revised. One hematoma required evacuation. No further complications were noted. No recurrence at the flap site occurred. Local perforator flaps allow closure of pressure sores without harvesting muscle. The propeller version has the added benefit of transferring tissue from a distant site, avoiding reapproximation of original wound edges. Twisting of the pedicle may cause torsion and venous obstruction. This can be avoided by dissecting a pedicle of at least 3 cm. Propeller flaps are a safe option for soft tissue reconstruction of pressure sores. © Thieme Medical Publishers.

  11. Defining the Role of Free Flaps in Partial Breast Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Smith, Mark L; Molina, Bianca J; Dayan, Erez; Jablonka, Eric M; Okwali, Michelle; Kim, Julie N; Dayan, Joseph H

    2018-03-01

     Free flaps have a well-established role in breast reconstruction after mastectomy; however, their role in partial breast reconstruction remains poorly defined. We reviewed our experience with partial breast reconstruction to better understand indications for free tissue transfer.  A retrospective review was performed of all patients undergoing partial breast reconstruction at our center between February 2009 and October 2015. We evaluated the characteristics of patients who underwent volume displacement procedures versus volume replacement procedures and free versus pedicled flap reconstruction.  There were 78 partial breast reconstructions, with 52 reductions/tissue rearrangements (displacement group) and 26 flaps (replacement group). Bra cup size and body mass index (BMI) were significantly smaller in the replacement group. Fifteen pedicled and 11 free flaps were performed. Most pedicled flaps (80.0%) were used for lateral or upper pole defects. Most free flaps (72.7%) were used for medial and inferior defects or when there was inadequate donor tissue for a pedicled flap. Complications included hematoma, cellulitis, and one aborted pedicled flap.  Free and pedicled flaps are useful for partial breast reconstruction, particularly in breast cancer patients with small breasts undergoing breast-conserving treatment (BCT). Flap selection depends on defect size, location, and donor tissue availability. Medial defects are difficult to reconstruct using pedicled flaps due to arc of rotation and intervening breast tissue. Free tissue transfer can overcome these obstacles. Confirming negative margins before flap reconstruction ensures harvest of adequate volume and avoids later re-operation. Judicious use of free flaps for oncoplastic reconstruction expands the possibility for breast conservation. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  12. Calf Perforator Flaps: A Freestyle Solution for Oral Cavity Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Molina, Alexandra R; Citron, Isabelle; Chinaka, Fungayi; Cascarini, Luke; Townley, William A

    2017-02-01

    Reconstruction of oral cavity defects requires a thin, pliable flap for optimal functional results. Traditional flap choices are imperfect: the anterolateral thigh flap is excessively thick, whereas the radial forearm flap has a poor donor site. The authors therefore favor calf perforator flaps such as the medial sural artery perforator flap to provide thin tissue with an acceptable donor site. This two-part study aims to demonstrate their suitability for intraoral reconstruction. In the radiologic part of the study, the authors compared thigh and calf tissue thickness by examining lower limb computed tomographic scans of 100 legs. For their clinical study, they collected data prospectively on 20 cases of oral cavity reconstruction using calf perforator flaps. The mean thickness of the calf tissue envelope was significantly less than that of the thigh (8.4 mm compared with 17 mm) based on computed tomographic analysis. In the clinical study, a medial sural artery perforator was used in the majority of cases (17 of 20). The mean pedicle length was 10.2 cm and the mean time to raise a flap was 85 minutes. There were no flap losses. One patient was returned to the operating room for management of late hematoma and wound dehiscence. Calf perforator flaps provide ideal tissue for intraoral reconstruction and are significantly thinner than anterolateral thigh flaps. In addition to medial sural artery perforator flaps, the authors raised both sural and soleal artery perforator flaps in this series. Opportunistic use of the calf donor site allows the harvest of thin tissue with minimal donor-site morbidity. Therapeutic, IV.

  13. Analgesic effect of ultrasound-guided transversus abdominis plane block after total abdominal hysterectomy: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Røjskjaer, Jesper O; Gade, Erik; Kiel, Louise B; Lind, Morten N; Pedersen, Lars M; Kristensen, Billy B; Rasmussen, Yvonne H; Foss, Nicolai B

    2015-03-01

    To assess the effect of bilateral ultrasound-guided transversus abdominis plane block with ropivacaine compared with placebo as part of a multimodal analgesic regimen. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial following the CONSORT criteria. Hvidovre University Hospital. Forty-six women scheduled for total abdominal hysterectomy. Women received either ropivacaine 0.75%, 20 mL (n = 24) or 0.9% saline, 20 mL (n = 24) in the transversus abdominis plane on each side. Primary outcome was the 24-h postoperative morphine consumption. Secondary outcomes were pain scores at rest and during coughing, postoperative nausea and vomiting at 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, and 24 h, and time to first mobilization. There was no difference in the mean 24-h postoperative morphine consumption between the two groups (p = 0.733). The ropivacaine group had significantly lower median pain scores at 1 h (p = 0.008) and 2 h (p = 0.027) postoperatively at rest and at 8 h (p = 0.028) during coughing. There was no significant difference in other secondary outcomes. There was no reduction in 24-h morphine consumption when using an ultrasound-guided transversus abdominis plane block in women undergoing total abdominal hysterectomy. As part of a multimodal regimen the transversus abdominis plane block showed some effect on pain scores at rest only in the early postoperative period. © 2014 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  14. Intraoperative use of indocyanine green angiography for selecting the more reliable perforator of the anterolateral thigh flap: A comparison study.

    PubMed

    La Padula, Simone; Hersant, Barbara; Meningaud, Jean Paul

    2018-03-30

    Anatomical variability of anterolateral thigh flap (ALT) perforators has been reported. The aim of this study is to assess if the use of intraoperative indocyanine green angiography (iICGA) can help surgeons to choose the ALT flap best perforator to be preserved. A retrospective study was conducted in 28 patients with open tibial fracture, following a road traffic crash, who had undergone ALT flap. Patients were classified into two groups: ICGA group (iICGA was used to select the more reliable perforator) and control group. The mean tissue loss size of the ICGA group (n = 13, 11 men and 2 women, mean age: 52 ± 6 years) was of 16.6 cm × 12.2 cm. The mean defect size of the control group (n = 15, 14 men and 1 women, mean age: 50 ± 5.52 years) was of 15.3 cm × 11.1 cm. Statistical analysis was performed to analyze and compare the results. ICGA allowed preserving only the most functional perforator, that provided the best ALT flap perfusion in 10 out of the 13 cases (77%). ICGA allowed a significant operative time reduction (160 ± 23 vs. 202 ± 48 minutes; P < .001). One case of distal necrosis was observed in the ICGA group (mean follow-up 12.3 months), while partial skin necrosis occurred in three cases of the control group (mean follow-up 13.1 months); P = .35. No additional coverage was required and a successful bone healing was observed in both groups. These findings suggest that iICGA is an effective method that allows to select the most reliable ALT flap perforators and to reduce operative time. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Perioperative transversus abdominis plane (TAP) blocks for analgesia after abdominal surgery.

    PubMed

    Charlton, Shona; Cyna, Allan M; Middleton, Philippa; Griffiths, James D

    2010-12-08

    The transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block is a peripheral nerve block which anaesthetises the abdominal wall. The increasing use of TAP block, as a form of pain relief after abdominal surgery warrants evaluation of its effectiveness as an adjunctive technique to routine care and, when compared with other analgesic techniques. To assess effects of TAP blocks (and variants) on postoperative analgesia requirements after abdominal surgery. We searched specialised registers of Cochrane Anaesthesia and Cochrane Pain, Palliative and Supportive Care Review Groups, CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE and CINAHL to June 2010. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing TAP block or rectus sheath block with: no TAP or rectus sheath block; placebo; systemic, epidural or any other analgesia. At least two review authors assessed study eligibility and risk of bias, and extracted data. We included eight studies (358 participants), five assessing TAP blocks, three assessing rectus sheath blocks; with moderate risk of bias overall. All studies had a background of general anaesthesia in both arms in most cases.Compared with no TAP block or saline placebo, TAP block resulted in significantly less postoperative requirement for morphine at 24 hours (mean difference (MD) -21.95 mg, 95% confidence interval (CI) -37.91 to 5.96; five studies, 236 participants) and 48 hours (MD -28.50, 95% CI -38.92 to -18.08; one study of 50 participants) but not at two hours (all random-effects analyses). Pain at rest was significantly reduced in two studies, but not a third.Only one of three included studies of rectus sheath blocks found a reduction in postoperative analgesic requirements in participants receiving blocks. One study, assessing number of participants who were pain-free after their surgery, found more participants who received a rectus sheath block to be pain-free for up to 10 hours postoperatively. As with TAP blocks, rectus sheath blocks made no apparent impact on nausea and vomiting

  16. The analgesic efficacy of subcostal transversus abdominis plane block with Mercedes incision.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jian-Guo; Li, Hui-Ling; Pei, Qing-Qing; Feng, Zhi-Ying

    2018-04-10

    Conventional perioperative analgesic modalities (e.g. opioids, epidural analgesia) have their own drawbacks, which limit their clinical application. This study investigated the opioid-sparing effectsof the oblique subcostal transversus abdominis plane (OSTAP) blockade with ropivacaine for the patients undergoing open liver resection with a Mercedes incision. 126 patients who were scheduled for open liver resection were enrolled in this study. Patients were randomly assigned to receive bilateral ultrasound-guided OSTAPblocks with either 0.375% ropivacaine (groupT) or 0.9% isotonic saline (group C). Both groups also received intravenous patient-controlled analgesia and intravenous 40 mg parecoxib every 12 h for a total of 3 days. Preoperative and intraoperative parameters, plus intraoperative and postoperative cumulative sufentanil consumption, were recorded. 70 patients were enrolled in the study finally. There were no significant differences between the two groups with respect to preoperative parameters, and surgical and anesthetic characteristics. The intraoperative sufentanil use, cumulative sufentanil consumption at 5 min after extubation, 2 h, 4 h,12 h and 24 h after operation in group T was significantly less than that in group C (P = 0.001, 0.001, 0.000, 0.000, 0.001 and 0.044, respectively). Compared with group C, postoperative NRS pain scores at rest were significantly lower at 2 h and 4 h postoperatively in group T (P = 0.04and 0.02, respectively); NRS scores at the time of coughing were also significantly lower in group T than in group C at all time points except 5 min after extubation (all P < 0.001). Furthermore, compared with group C, the number of intraoperative vasodilator use, the extubation time and the incidence of nausea was reduced in group T. Ultrasound-guided OSTAP block with ropivacaine can significantly decrease the perioperative cumulative dosage of analgesics and improve analgesic effect without obvious side

  17. Comparative analysis of open and robotic transversus abdominis release for ventral hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Bittner, James G; Alrefai, Sameer; Vy, Michelle; Mabe, Micah; Del Prado, Paul A R; Clingempeel, Natasha L

    2018-02-01

    Transversus abdominis release (TAR) is a safe, effective strategy to repair complex ventral incisional hernia (VIH); however, open TAR (o-TAR) often necessitates prolonged hospitalization. Robot-assisted TAR (r-TAR) may benefit short-term outcomes and shorten convalescence. This study compares 90-day outcomes of o-TAR and r-TAR for VIH repair. A single-center, retrospective review of patients who underwent o-TAR or r-TAR for VIH from 2015 to 2016 was conducted. Patient and hernia characteristics, operative data, and 90-day outcomes were compared. The primary outcome was hospital length of stay, and secondary metrics were morbidity, surgical site events, and readmission. Overall, 102 patients were identified (76 o-TAR and 26 r-TAR). Patients were comparable regarding age, gender, body mass index, and the presence of co-morbidities. Diabetes was more common in the open group (22.3 vs. 0%, P = 0.01). Most VIH defects were midline (89.5 vs. 83%, P = 0.47) and recurrent (52.6 vs. 58.3%, P = 0.65). Hernia characteristics were similar regarding mean defect size (260 ± 209 vs. 235 ± 107 cm 2 , P = 0.55), mesh removal, and type/size mesh implanted. Average operative time was longer in the r-TAR cohort (287 ± 121 vs. 365 ± 78 min, P < 0.01) despite most receiving mesh fixation with fibrin sealant alone (18.4 vs. 91.7%, P < 0.01). r-TAR trended toward lower morbidity (39.2 vs. 19.2%, P = 0.09), less severe complications, and similar rates of surgical site events and readmission (6.6 vs. 7.7%, P = 1.00). In addition, r-TAR resulted in a significantly shorter median hospital length of stay compared to o-TAR (6 days, 95% CI 5.9-8.3 vs. 3 days, 95% CI 3.2-4.3). In select patients, the robotic surgical platform facilitates a safe, minimally invasive approach to complex abdominal wall reconstruction, specifically TAR. Robot-assisted TAR for VIH offers the short-term benefits of low morbidity and decreased hospital length of stay compared to open TAR.

  18. Experimental study on axial pedicled composite flap prefabrication with high density porous polyethylene implants: medporocutaneous flap.

    PubMed

    Kocman, A Emre; Kose, Aydan A; Karabagli, Yakup; Baycu, Cengiz; Cetin, Cengiz

    2008-01-01

    Composite flaps including soft tissues with bone or cartilage are widely used in reconstruction of three-dimensional defects, but have some disadvantages. Flap prefabrication with alloplastic implants is an alternative procedure. Axial pattern vascularised high density porous polyethylene (HDPP) implants are capable of sustaining skin grafts. The purpose of this study was to examine the vascularisation pattern of the skin island in a composite flap prefabrication model prepared with vascularised HDPP implants. Forty male Wistar rats divided into four groups were used. A 9.5 x 6 x 2 mm HDPP block was centered on the dissected saphenous pedicle and anchored under the abdominal skin in the experimental group I (n=10). In experimental group II (n=10) saphenous artery and vein were put between the skin and the implant. Thus, the structures were laid as skin, HDPP block, pedicle in experimental group I and skin, pedicle, HDPP block in experimental group II. HDPP block-implanted and pedicle-implanted only groups served as control groups I and II, respectively. Eight weeks after prefabrication, skin islands 1.5 x 5 cm in size incorporated with implants were elevated based on saphenous vessels in the experimental groups and skin islands only based on the pedicle in control group II. Skin islands of the same dimensions were raised as grafts in control group I. Nylon sheets were put under the flaps and grafts to prevent vascularisation from the recipient bed. Flap viability was assessed by measuring the surface area on the 7th day. Total necrosis developed in composite grafts of control group I. Flap survival was higher in experimental group II and control group II (45% and 46.8%) than in group I (29.28%). Histologic studies demonstrated fibrovascular ingrowth into the HDPP implants, except in control group I, with significant inflammatory response and necrosis. Vascularisation of skin and implants from the pedicle was seen also microangiographically. In conclusion, a

  19. Ultrasound guided transversus abdominis plane vs surgeon administered intraoperative regional field infiltration with bupivacaine for early postoperative pain control in children undergoing open pyeloplasty.

    PubMed

    Lorenzo, Armando J; Lynch, Johanne; Matava, Clyde; El-Beheiry, Hossam; Hayes, Jason

    2014-07-01

    Regional analgesic techniques are commonly used in pediatric urology. Ultrasound guided transversus abdominis plane block has recently gained popularity. However, there is a paucity of information supporting a benefit over regional field infiltration. We present a parallel group, randomized, controlled trial evaluating ultrasound guided transversus abdominis plane block superiority over surgeon delivered regional field infiltration for children undergoing open pyeloplasty at a tertiary referral center. Following ethics board approval and registration, children 0 to 6 years old were recruited and randomized to undergo perioperative transversus abdominis plane block or regional field infiltration for early post-pyeloplasty pain control. General anesthetic delivery, surgical technique and postoperative analgesics were standardized. A blinded assessor regularly captured pain scores in the recovery room using the FLACC (Face, Legs, Activity, Cry, Consolability) scale. The primary outcome was the need for rescue morphine administration based on a FLACC score of 3 or higher. Two pediatric urologists performed 57 pyeloplasties during a 2.5-year period, enrolling 32 children (16 in each group, balanced for age and weight). There were statistically significant differences in the number of children requiring rescue morphine administration (13 of 16 receiving transversus abdominis plane block and 6 of 16 receiving regional field infiltration, p = 0.011), mean ± SD total morphine consumption (0.066 ± 0.051 vs 0.028 ± 0.040 mg/kg, p = 0.021) and mean ± SD pain scores (5 ± 5 vs 2 ± 3, p = 0.043) in the recovery room, in favor of surgeon administered regional field infiltration. No local anesthetic specific adverse events were noted. Ultrasound guided transversus abdominis plane block is not superior to regional field infiltration with bupivacaine as a strategy to minimize early opioid requirements following open pyeloplasty in children. Instead, our data suggest that

  20. Phosphate steering by Flap Endonuclease 1 promotes 5'-flap specificity and incision to prevent genome instability

    DOE PAGES

    Tsutakawa, Susan E.; Thompson, Mark J.; Arvai, Andrew S.; ...

    2017-06-27

    DNA replication and repair enzyme Flap Endonuclease 1 (FEN1) is vital for genome integrity, and FEN1 mutations arise in multiple cancers. FEN1 precisely cleaves single-stranded (ss) 5'-flaps one nucleotide into duplex (ds) DNA. Yet, how FEN1 selects for but does not incise the ss 5'-flap was enigmatic. Here we combine crystallographic, biochemical and genetic analyses to show that two dsDNA binding sites set the 5'polarity and to reveal unexpected control of the DNA phosphodiester backbone by electrostatic interactions. Via phosphate steering', basic residues energetically steer an inverted ss 5'-flap through a gateway over FEN1's active site and shift dsDNA formore » catalysis. Mutations of these residues cause an 18,000-fold reduction in catalytic rate in vitro and large-scale trinucleotide (GAA) n repeat expansions in vivo, implying failed phosphate-steering promotes an unanticipated lagging-strand template-switch mechanism during replication. Thus, phosphate steering is an unappreciated FEN1 function that enforces 5'-flap specificity and catalysis, preventing genomic instability.« less

  1. Scalp Free Flap Reconstruction Using Anterolateral Thigh Flap Pedicle for Interposition Artery and Vein Grafts

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jun Hyung; Eun, Suk Chan; Lee, Jong Hoon; Hong, Sung Hee; Kim, Chin Whan

    2012-01-01

    We experienced satisfactory outcomes by synchronously transplanting an artery and vein using an anterolateral thigh flap pedicle between the vascular pedicle and recipient vessel of a flap for scalp reconstruction. A 45-year-old man developed a subdural hemorrhage due to a fall injury. In this patient, the right temporal cranium was missing and the patient had 4×3 cm and 6×5 cm scalp defects. We planned a scalp reconstruction using a latissimus dorsi free flap. Intraoperatively, there was a severe injury to the right superficial temporal vessel because of previous neurosurgical operations. A 15 cm long pedicle defect was needed to reach the recipient facial vessels. For the vascular graft, the descending branch of the lateral circumflex femoral artery and two venae comitantes were harvested. The flap survived well and the skin graft was successful with no notable complications. When an interposition graft is needed in the reconstruction of the head and neck region for which mobility is mandatory to a greater extent, a sufficient length of graft from an anterolateral flap pedicle could easily be harvested. Thus, this could contribute to not only resolving the disadvantages of a venous graft but also to successfully performing a vascular anastomosis. PMID:22783493

  2. Phosphate steering by Flap Endonuclease 1 promotes 5'-flap specificity and incision to prevent genome instability

    SciTech Connect

    Tsutakawa, Susan E.; Thompson, Mark J.; Arvai, Andrew S.

    DNA replication and repair enzyme Flap Endonuclease 1 (FEN1) is vital for genome integrity, and FEN1 mutations arise in multiple cancers. FEN1 precisely cleaves single-stranded (ss) 5'-flaps one nucleotide into duplex (ds) DNA. Yet, how FEN1 selects for but does not incise the ss 5'-flap was enigmatic. Here we combine crystallographic, biochemical and genetic analyses to show that two dsDNA binding sites set the 5'polarity and to reveal unexpected control of the DNA phosphodiester backbone by electrostatic interactions. Via phosphate steering', basic residues energetically steer an inverted ss 5'-flap through a gateway over FEN1's active site and shift dsDNA formore » catalysis. Mutations of these residues cause an 18,000-fold reduction in catalytic rate in vitro and large-scale trinucleotide (GAA) n repeat expansions in vivo, implying failed phosphate-steering promotes an unanticipated lagging-strand template-switch mechanism during replication. Thus, phosphate steering is an unappreciated FEN1 function that enforces 5'-flap specificity and catalysis, preventing genomic instability.« less

  3. Power performance optimization and loads alleviation with active flaps using individual flap control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pettas, Vasilis; Barlas, Thanasis; Gertz, Drew; Madsen, Helge A.

    2016-09-01

    The present article investigates the potential of Active Trailing Edge Flaps (ATEF) in terms of increase in annual energy production (AEP) as well as reduction of fatigue loads. The basis for this study is the DTU 10 MW Reference Wind Turbine (RWT) simulated using the aeroelastic code HAWC2. In an industrial-oriented manner the baseline rotor is upscaled by 5% and the ATEFs are implemented in the outer 30% of the blades. The flap system is kept simple and robust with a single flap section and control with wind speed, rotor azimuth, root bending moments and angle of attack in flap's mid-section being the sensor inputs. The AEP is increased due to the upscaling but also further due to the flap system while the fatigue loads in components of interest (blade, tower, nacelle and main bearing) are reduced close to the level of the original turbine. The aim of this study is to demonstrate a simple and applicable method that can be a technology enabler for rotor upscaling and lowering cost of energy.

  4. Flapping dynamics of a thin liquid sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vadivukkarasan, M.; Kumaran, Dhivyaraja; Panchagnula, Mahesh; Multi-phase flow physics Group Team

    2017-11-01

    We attempt to delineate and describe the complete evolution of a thin soap film when air is blown through a nozzle in the normal direction. The sequence of events and its intrinsic dynamics are captured using high speed imaging. By careful observation, it was observed that multiple mechanisms occur in the same system and each event is triggered by an independent mechanism. The events include (a) flapping of a liquid sheet and pinching of the bubble, (b) onset of rupture on the liquid sheet, (c) formation of ligaments and (d) ejection of drops. From this study, it is shown that these events are predominantly governed by Kelvin-Helmholtz instability, Taylor - Culick law, Rayleigh-Taylor instability and capillary instability, respectively. The present experiments can be considered as an extension to the previous studies on soap films as well as thin flapping sheets which has direct relevance to coaxial atomizers used in aircraft applications.

  5. USB noise reduction by nozzle and flap modifications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayden, R. E.

    1976-01-01

    The development of concepts for reducing upper surface blown flap noise at the source through flap modifications and special nozzles is reviewed. In particular, recent results obtained on the aerodynamic and acoustic performance of flaps with porous surfaces near the trailing edge and multi-slotted nozzles are reviewed. Considerable reduction (6-10 db) of the characteristic low frequency peak is shown. The aerodynamic performance is compared with conventional systems, and prospects for future improvements are discussed.

  6. PECASE: Soaring Mechanisms for Flapping-Wing Micro Air Vehicles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-31

    2015 2. REPORT TYPE Final 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE PECASE: Soaring mechanisms for flapping - wing micro air vehicles 6. AUTHOR(S) Robert J. Wood 3...N00014-10-1-0684 Award Title: "PECASE: Soaring mechanisms for flapping - wing micro air vehicles" [previous award: N00014-08-1-0919, "Hovering Control for...Insect-Inspired Flapping - Wing Micro Air Vehicles"] Final report a. Scientific and Technical Objectives The Harvard Microrobotics Lab has

  7. [Pedicled versus free TRAM flap for breast reconstruction].

    PubMed

    Galla, T J; Lukas, B; Feller, A M

    1999-03-01

    In breast reconstruction, the free TRAM-flap offers many advantages over the pedicled TRAM-flap. Due to its superior perfusion, the free flap rarely develops necrosis. Shaping of the flap is easier due to the lack of the thick muscle pedicle. Because the rectus muscle is spared, there is minimal donor site morbidity. However, the necessary microvascular anastomoses reduced the acceptance of the free TRAM-flap. During a 13-months period, 51 breast reconstructions were performed in 41 patients, 31 unilateral and ten bilateral. 45 flaps served for delayed reconstruction and six flaps for immediate reconstruction. The operations were performed by two teams working simultaneously. The average operating time was 3.9 hours for unilateral and 6.9 hours for bilateral delayed reconstruction. For immediate reconstruction, 6.2 and 6.3 hours were required for uni- and bilateral procedures, respectively. In 38 flaps, the thoracodorsal vessels served as recipient vessels; 13 flaps were anastomosed to the internal mammary artery and vein. Postoperative complications were observed in 13 patients. Three vessel anastomoses had to be revised. In one flap, a partial necrosis occurred; in two flaps hematoma evacuation was necessary. Two patients suffered from fat necroses at the abdomen and one umbilicus was lost. Skin irritations and seromas at the abdomen occurred in five patients. Pulmonary embolism was diagnosed in one patient three weeks postoperatively. Abdominal hernias or bulging in the epigastric area were not observed up to 15 months after reconstruction. These results reveal a low complication rate for breast reconstruction with the free TRAM-flap. The advantages of this technique as compared to the pedicled technique are discussed.

  8. Traumatic corneal flap displacement after laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK)

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Tsung-Han; Peng, Kai-Ling; Lin, Chien-Jen

    2017-01-01

    Background Laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) is the most common and popular procedure performed for the correction of refractive errors in the last two decades. We report a case of traumatic flap displacement with flap folding which occurred 3 years after LASIK was performed. Previous literature suggests that vision prognosis would be closely related to proper and prompt management of traumatic flap displacement with flap folding 3 years after LASIK. Case presentation A 23-year-old female presented to our hospital who had undergone uneventful LASIK in both eyes 3 years prior. Unfortunately, she had suffered a blunt trauma in her right eye in a car accident. A late onset of corneal flap displacement was found with upper and lower portion of the flap being folded inside the corneal bed. Surgical intervention for debridement with subsequent reposition of corneal flap was performed as soon as possible in the operating room. A bandage contact lens was placed, and topical antibiotic and corticosteroids were given postoperatively. Two days after the operation, the displaced corneal flap was found to be well attached smoothly on the corneal bed without folds. The best-corrected visual acuity was 6/6 with refraction of −0.75 D to 1.0 D ×175° in her right eye 1 month later. Literature review We reviewed a total of 19 published cases of late-onset traumatic flap dislocations or displacements after LASIK with complete data from 2000 to 2014. Conclusion Traumatic displacement of corneal flaps after LASIK may occur after blunt injury with specific direction of force to the flap margin, especially tangential one. According to the previous literature, late-onset traumatic flap displacement may happen at any time after LASIK and be caused by various types of injuries. Fortunately, good visual function could mostly be restored with immediate and proper management. PMID:28458585

  9. Traumatic corneal flap displacement after laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK).

    PubMed

    Tsai, Tsung-Han; Peng, Kai-Ling; Lin, Chien-Jen

    2017-01-01

    Laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) is the most common and popular procedure performed for the correction of refractive errors in the last two decades. We report a case of traumatic flap displacement with flap folding which occurred 3 years after LASIK was performed. Previous literature suggests that vision prognosis would be closely related to proper and prompt management of traumatic flap displacement with flap folding 3 years after LASIK. A 23-year-old female presented to our hospital who had undergone uneventful LASIK in both eyes 3 years prior. Unfortunately, she had suffered a blunt trauma in her right eye in a car accident. A late onset of corneal flap displacement was found with upper and lower portion of the flap being folded inside the corneal bed. Surgical intervention for debridement with subsequent reposition of corneal flap was performed as soon as possible in the operating room. A bandage contact lens was placed, and topical antibiotic and corticosteroids were given postoperatively. Two days after the operation, the displaced corneal flap was found to be well attached smoothly on the corneal bed without folds. The best-corrected visual acuity was 6/6 with refraction of -0.75 D to 1.0 D ×175° in her right eye 1 month later. We reviewed a total of 19 published cases of late-onset traumatic flap dislocations or displacements after LASIK with complete data from 2000 to 2014. Traumatic displacement of corneal flaps after LASIK may occur after blunt injury with specific direction of force to the flap margin, especially tangential one. According to the previous literature, late-onset traumatic flap displacement may happen at any time after LASIK and be caused by various types of injuries. Fortunately, good visual function could mostly be restored with immediate and proper management.

  10. Water Tunnel Studies of Dynamic Wing Flap Effects

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-01

    applications where dynamic flaps have been studied are in the active elevon rotor and wind turbines . Any analytical or computational study needs to be...observed here that most of these pertain to other applications such as rotorcraft and wind turbine flow control. At times, a Gurney flap has been for...the flap-slices used. Source: [12]. .......................14 Figure 6. NACA 2212 at wind tunnel section. Source: [8

  11. The First Dorsal Metatarsal Artery Perforator Propeller Flap.

    PubMed

    Hallock, Geoffrey G

    2016-06-01

    Distal foot and toe defects requiring a vascularized flap for coverage have very limited options, oftentimes justifying even a free flap. Perforator flaps in general and propeller flaps in particular have opened up an entirely new subset of local tissue transfer alternatives that can potentially avoid the difficulties that accompany microvascular tissue transfers. The first dorsal metatarsal artery (FDMA) perforator propeller flap represents another variation of this theme. A standard FDMA flap from the dorsum of the foot was raised in reversed fashion based on the distal communicating branch or "perforator" from the plantar foot circulation in 2 patients with great toe defects. All distal skin tissue between this perforator and the defect was kept with the FDMA flap as an attached minor blade, to thereby create an FDMA propeller flap. Salvage of the great toe in both patients was achieved. The benefit of the minor blade of the propeller was to fill a portion of the donor site defect of the traditional FDMA major blade, to permit tension-free donor site closure of the dorsal foot without sequela. The distal-based FDMA flap can be useful as a local flap for coverage of distal foot and toe wounds, but direct donor site closure can be problematic as mirrored by its relative the dorsalis pedis flap. The FDMA perforator propeller flap variation can achieve the same reconstructive goals while simultaneously transferring vascularized tissue into the dorsal foot donor site to thereby minimize the tension if direct closure is possible or minimize the need for a skin graft in this notoriously difficult region.

  12. Lumbar artery perforators: an anatomical study based on computed tomographic angiography imaging.

    PubMed

    Sommeling, Casper Emile; Colebunders, Britt; Pardon, Heleen E; Stillaert, Filip B; Blondeel, Phillip N; van Landuyt, Koenraad

    2017-08-01

    The free lumbar artery perforator flap has recently been introduced as a potentially valuable option for autologous breast reconstruction in a subset of patients. Up to date, few anatomical studies, exploring the lumbar region as a donor site for perforator- based flaps, have been conducted. An anatomical study of the position of the dominant lumbar artery perforator was performed, using the preoperative computed tomographic angiography images of 24 autologous breast reconstruction patients. In total, 61 dominant perforators were determined, 28 on the left and 33 on the right side. A radiologist defined the position of the perforator as coordinates in an xy-grid. Dominant perforators were shown to originate from the lumbar arteries at the level of lumbar vertebrae three or four. Remarkably, approximately 85% of these lumbar artery perforators enter the skin at 7-10 cm lateral from the midline (mean left 8.6 cm, right 8.2 cm). This study concludes a rather constant position of the dominant perforator. Therefore, preoperative-computed tomographic angiography is not always essential to find this perforator and Doppler ultrasound could be considered as an alternative, thereby carefully assessing all advantages and disadvantages inherent to either of these imaging methods.

  13. Inexpensive anatomical trainer for bronchoscopy.

    PubMed

    Di Domenico, Stefano; Simonassi, Claudio; Chessa, Leonardo

    2007-08-01

    Flexible fiberoptic bronchoscopy is an indispensable tool for optimal management of intensive care unit patients. However, the acquisition of sufficient training in bronchoscopy is not straightforward during residency, because of technical and ethical problems. Moreover, the use of commercial simulators is limited by their high cost. In order to overcome these limitations, we realized a low-cost anatomical simulator to acquire and maintain the basic skill to perform bronchoscopy in ventilated patients. We used 1.5 mm diameter iron wire to construct the bronchial tree scaffold; glazier-putty was applied to create the anatomical model. The model was covered by several layers of newspaper strips previously immersed in water and vinilic glue. When the model completely dried up, it was detached from the scaffold by cutting it into six pieces, it was reassembled, painted and fitted with an endotracheal tube. We used very cheap material and the final cost was euro16. The trainer resulted in real-scale and anatomically accurate, with appropriate correspondence on endoscopic view between model and patients. All bronchial segments can be explored and easily identified by endoscopic and external vision. This cheap simulator is a valuable tool for practicing, particularly in a hospital with limited resources for medical training.

  14. The anatomical basis for wrinkles.

    PubMed

    Pessa, Joel E; Nguyen, Hang; John, George B; Scherer, Philipp E

    2014-02-01

    Light and electron microscopy have not identified a distinct anatomical structure associated with either skin wrinkles or creases, and a histological difference between wrinkled and adjacent skin has not been identified. The authors investigate whether facial wrinkles are related to underlying lymphatic vessels and perilymphatic fat. Lymphatic vessels with a specialized tube of perilymphatic fat were identified beneath palmar creases. Sections of skin, adipose tissue, and muscle were harvested from each of 13 cadavers. Three sites were investigated: the transverse forehead crease, lateral orbicularis oculi wrinkle (crow's feet), and the nasojugal crease. The tissue was paraffin embedded and processed. Two-step indirect immunohistochemistry was performed, and images were examined using laser confocal microscopy. Measurements were taken with software. Every wrinkle examined was found above and within ±1 mm of a major lymphatic vessel and its surrounding tube of adipose tissue. The results satisfied our null hypothesis and were statistically significant. Lymphatic vessels were identified by positive immunofluorescence as well as histological criteria. These findings have been further validated by fluorochrome tracer studies. An anatomical basis for wrinkles was identified among the specimens studied. Lymphatic vessels, along with the surrounding distinct perilymphatic fat, traveled directly beneath wrinkles and creases. Lymphatic dysregulation leads to inflammation, scarring, and fibrosis, but inadvertent injection of these vessels can be avoided with anatomical knowledge.

  15. Aerodynamics of high frequency flapping wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zheng; Roll, Jesse; Cheng, Bo; Deng, Xinyan

    2010-11-01

    We investigated the aerodynamic performance of high frequency flapping wings using a 2.5 gram robotic insect mechanism developed in our lab. The mechanism flaps up to 65Hz with a pair of man-made wing mounted with 10cm wingtip-to-wingtip span. The mean aerodynamic lift force was measured by a lever platform, and the flow velocity and vorticity were measured using a stereo DPIV system in the frontal, parasagittal, and horizontal planes. Both near field (leading edge vortex) and far field flow (induced flow) were measured with instantaneous and phase-averaged results. Systematic experiments were performed on the man-made wings, cicada and hawk moth wings due to their similar size, frequency and Reynolds number. For insect wings, we used both dry and freshly-cut wings. The aerodynamic force increase with flapping frequency and the man-made wing generates more than 4 grams of lift at 35Hz with 3 volt input. Here we present the experimental results and the major differences in their aerodynamic performances.

  16. Anatomy of vastus lateralis muscle flap.

    PubMed

    Tayfur, Volkan; Magden, Orhan; Edizer, Mete; Atabey, Atay

    2010-11-01

    A vastus lateralis muscle flap is used as a pedicled and free flap. In this study, the vastus lateralis muscles of 15 adult formalin-fixed cadavers (30 cases) were dissected. The dominant pedicle was found to be descending branch of the lateral circumflex femoral artery. The mean diameter of the artery was found to be 2.1 mm. This pedicle was located 119.4 mm distal to the pubic symphysis. The mean length of the major pedicle was found to be 56.8 mm when the dominant pedicle was chosen to nourish the flap. The dominant pedicle entered the muscle 155.8 and 213.7 mm from the greater trochanter and the anterior superior iliac spine, respectively. The muscle had proximal minor pedicles from the ascending and transverse branches of lateral circumflex femoral artery. These arteries had mean diameters of 1.8 and 2.0 mm, respectively. The distal minor branches were present in all of the dissections. The distal branch had a mean diameter of 1.8 mm. The origin of this distal branch was located 83.7 mm proximal to the intercondylar line. The motor nerve of the vastus lateralis was found to be originating from femoral nerve. The nerve entered the muscle 194.6 mm from the anterior superior iliac spine.

  17. Flapping inertia for selected rotor blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, John D.; May, Matthew J.

    1991-01-01

    Aerodynamics of helicopter rotor systems cannot be investigated without consideration for the dynamics of the rotor. One of the principal properties of the rotor which affects the rotor dynamics is the inertia of the rotor blade about its root attachment. Previous aerodynamic investigation have been performed on rotor blades with a variety of planforms to determine the performance differences due to blade planform. The blades tested for this investigation have been tested on the U.S. Army 2 meter rotor test system (2MRTS) in the NASA Langley 14 by 22 foot subsonic tunnel for hover performance. This investigation was intended to provide fundamental information on the flapping inertia of five rotor blades with differing planforms. The inertia of the bare cuff and the cuff with a blade extension were also measured for comparison with the inertia of the blades. Inertia was determined using a swing testing technique, using the period of oscillation to determine the effective flapping inertia. The effect of damping in the swing test was measured and described. A comparison of the flapping inertials for rectangular and tapered planform blades of approximately the same mass showed the tapered blades to have a lower inertia, as expected.

  18. Reverse Saphenous Conduit Flap in 19 Dogs and 1 Cat.

    PubMed

    Cavalcanti, Jacqueline V J; Barry, Sabrina L; Lanz, Otto I; Barnes, Katherine; Coutin, Julia V

    2018-05-14

    The purpose of this retrospective study was to report the outcomes of 19 dogs and 1 cat undergoing reverse saphenous conduit flap between 1999 and 2016. Reverse saphenous conduit flap was used to treat traumatic wounds and wounds resulting from tumor excision in the hind limb; the majority of cases had medial shearing injuries. All animals had complete flap survival. In five animals (20%), minor donor site dehiscence occurred, which did not require surgery. Other postoperative complications included signs of severe venous congestion in one dog. Reverse saphenous conduit flap is a useful technique to repair skin defects of the distal hind limb.

  19. Translational damping on high-frequency flapping wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parks, Perry A.

    Flapping fliers such as insects and birds depend on passive translational and rotational damping to terminate quick maneuvers and to provide a source of partial stability in an otherwise unstable dynamic system. Additionally, passive translational and rotational damping reduce the amount of active kinematic changes that must be made to terminate maneuvers and maintain stability. The study of flapping-induced damping phenomena also improves the understanding of micro air vehicle (MAV) dynamics needed for the synthesis of effective flight control strategies. Aerodynamic processes which create passive translational and rotational damping as a direct result of symmetric flapping with no active changes in wing kinematics have been previously studied and were termed flapping counter-force (FCF) and flapping counter-torque (FCT), respectively. In this first study of FCF measurement in air, FCF generation is measured using a pendulum system designed to isolate and measure the relationship of translational flapping-induced damping with wingbeat frequency for a 2.86 gram mechanical flapper equipped with real cicada wings. Analysis reveals that FCF generation and wingbeat frequency are directly proportional, as expected from previous work. The quasi-steady FCF model using Blade-Element-Theory is used as an estimate for translational flapping-induced damping. In most cases, the model proves to be accurate in predicting the relationship between flapping-induced damping and wingbeat frequency. "Forward-backward" motion proves to have the strongest flapping-induced damping while "up-down" motion has the weakest.

  20. New method for maximum mobilization of temporalis muscle flap.

    PubMed

    Masic, Tarik; Babajic, Emina; Dervisevic, Almir; Hassouba, Mahmoud

    2012-01-01

    Pedicled temporalis muscle flap presenting a good flap for closing large craniofacial defects. Careful surgeons usually do not mobilize temporalis muscle flap enough to make appropriate use, fully closure, especially if defect exceeds the median line. Temporalis flap was used in 16 patients, ages ranged between 12 and 76. In all cases defect reconstruction was done by useing new method of extending standard temporal muscle flap. During surgical procedure it is very important to keep periosteal elevator in close contact with the bone. Then, there is no risk for pedicle injury. After vascular pedicle is identified elevating temporal muscle has to be continued by releasing the muscle insertion from the coronoid process. By this way, flap length and arc of rotation is increased. The flap remained viable in all instances. Most of the patients experienced no perioperative complications. There was no major complications or mortality as a result of performed procedures. With this division, flap length was increased at least 2 cm wich is enough for covering defects crossing the midline. Instead of using bilateral temporalis muscle flaps for defect closure, unilateral is sufficient. With this extension of the pedicle length now rotation point is not at the level of the zygomatic arch but lower part mandibular neck.

  1. Neodymium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser fusion of endarterectomy flaps.

    PubMed

    Humphrey, P W; Slocum, M M; Loy, T S; Silver, D

    1995-07-01

    This study evaluated the efficacy of neodymium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser welding of flaps in canine arteries and in securing the distal flap during human carotid endarterectomy. Endarterectomy flaps were created in both common carotid and both common femoral arteries in 12 dogs. The flaps were repaired with either the neodymium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser or with 6-0 polypropylene sutures. The arteries were removed after duplex scanning at either 7 or 28 days. Eighteen high carotid endarterectomy flaps in 16 patients have been subsequently secured with the laser welding technique. Laser repairs (125 +/- 19 joule) of the canine arteries were completed more quickly than suture repairs (mean 25 seconds vs 135 seconds, respectively; p < 0.04). Duplex ultrasonography revealed no discernable differences between the two groups of arteries. Arteries studied at 7 days revealed three microscopic flaps (two suture, one laser), more subintimal fibroblastic proliferation in suture than laser-repaired carotid arteries (3: 1, p = 0.0530), and similar amounts of inflammation in suture- and laser-repaired arteries. Arteries studied at 28 days revealed one microscopic intimal flap (suture-repaired); equal fibroblastic and inflammatory responses in suture- and laser-repaired vessels; and no evidence of laser thermal injury. Eighteen carotid endarterectomy flaps have been successfully fused with no immediate or long-term complications in 16 patients (follow-up of 0 to 24 months). Laser fusion appears to be a safe and effective method for securing distal carotid endarterectomy flaps.

  2. A novel animal model for skin flap prelamination with biomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xianyu; Luo, Xusong; Liu, Fei; Gu, Chuan; Wang, Xi; Yang, Qun; Qian, Yunliang; Yang, Jun

    2016-09-01

    Several animal models of skin flap construction were reported using biomaterials in a way similar to prefabrication. However, there are few animal model using biomaterials similar to prelamination, another main way of clinical skin flap construction that has been proved to be reliable. Can biomaterials be added in skin flap prelamination to reduce the use of autogenous tissues? Beside individual clinical attempts, animal model is needed for randomized controlled trial to objectively evaluate the feasibility and further investigation. Combining human Acellular Dermal Matrix (hADM) and autologous skin graft, we prelaminated flaps based on inguinal fascia. One, two, three and four weeks later, hADM exhibited a sound revascularization and host cell infiltration. Prelaminated skin flaps were then raised and microsurgically transplanted back to groin region. Except for flaps after one week of prelamination, flaps from other subgroups successfully reconstructed defects. After six to sixteen weeks of transplantation, hADM was proved to being able to maintain its original structure, having a wealth of host tissue cells and achieving full revascularization.To our knowledge, this is the first animal model of prelaminating skin flap with biomaterials. Success of this animal model indicates that novel flap prelamination with biomaterials is feasible.

  3. Mandibular reconstruction in irradiated patients utilizing myosseous-cutaneous flaps

    SciTech Connect

    Pearlman, N.W.; Albin, R.E.; O'Donnell, R.S.

    1983-10-01

    Myosseous-cutaneous flaps were used for mandibular reconstruction in 16 irradiated patients. Three of six sternomastoid-clavicle flaps failed (all in conjunction with a neck dissection), as did one of 10 pectoralis major-anterior-fifth rib flaps. One trapezius-scapular flap was used and it succeeded. We found the blood supply of the sternomastoid-clavicle flap too tenuous for use in conjunction with a neck dissection. The trapezius-scapular flap had too short an arc of rotation to be used for defects other than those in the horizontal ramus. In addition, this flap required a change of position and created an undesirable functional deformity. The pectoralis major-fifthmore » rib flap, in contrast, could be used for a variety of defects, in conjunction with a neck dissection, and did not require a change of position during operation. We found it to be the most versatile and dependable of the flaps employed in this series.« less

  4. Vortex leading edge flap assembly for supersonic airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudolph, Peter K. C. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A leading edge flap (16) for supersonic transport airplanes is disclosed. In its stowed position, the leading edge flap forms the lower surface of the wing leading edge up to the horizontal center of the leading edge radius. For low speed operation, the vortex leading edge flap moves forward and rotates down. The upward curve of the flap leading edge triggers flow separation on the flap and rotational flow on the upper surface of the flap (vortex). The rounded shape of the upper fixed leading edge provides the conditions for a controlled reattachment of the flow on the upper wing surface and therefore a stable vortex. The vortex generates lift and a nose-up pitching moment. This improves maximum lift at low speed, reduces attitude for a given lift coefficient and improves lift to drag ratio. The mechanism (27) to move the vortex flap consists of two spanwise supports (24) with two diverging straight tracks (64 and 68) each and a screw drive mechanism (62) in the center of the flap panel (29). The flap motion is essentially normal to the airloads and therefore requires only low actuation forces.

  5. Development of a morphing flap using shape memory alloy actuators: the aerodynamic characteristics of a morphing flap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Seung-Hee; Bae, Jae-Sung; Rho, Jin-Ho

    2014-07-01

    The discontinuous contour of a wing with conventional flaps diminishes the aerodynamic performance of an aircraft. A wing with a continuous contour does not experience extreme flow stream fluctuations during flight, and consequently has good aerodynamic characteristics. In this study, a morphing flap using shape memory alloy actuators is proposed, designed and fabricated, and its aerodynamic characteristics are investigated using aerodynamic analyses and wind tunnel tests. The ribs of the morphing flap are designed and fabricated with multiple elements joined together in a way that allows relative rotations of adjacent elements and forms a smooth contour of the morphing flap. The aerodynamic analyses of this multiple-element morphing-flap wing are performed using XFLR pro; its aerodynamic performance is compared with that of a mechanical-flap wing, and is measured through wind-tunnel tests.

  6. The myocutaneous trapezius flap revisited: a treatment algorithm for optimal surgical outcomes based on 43 flap reconstructions.

    PubMed

    Can, Anil; Orgill, Dennis P; Dietmar Ulrich, J O; Mureau, Marc A M

    2014-12-01

    Because the vascular anatomy of the trapezius flap is highly variable, choosing the most appropriate flap type and design is essential to optimize outcomes and minimize postoperative complications. The aim of this study was to develop a surgical treatment algorithm for trapezius flap transfers. The medical files of all consecutive patients with a myocutaneous trapezius flap reconstruction of the head, neck, and upper back area treated at three different university medical centers between July 2001 and November 2012 were reviewed. There were 43 consecutive flaps performed in 38 patients with a mean follow-up time of 15 months (range, 1-48 months). Eleven patients had a mentosternal burn scar contracture (12 flaps), 12 patients (13 flaps) presented with cancer, and 15 patients (18 flaps) were suffering from chronic wounds due to failed previous reconstruction (n = 6), osteoradionecrosis (n = 1), chronic infection (n = 3), bronchopleural fistula (n = 3), and pressure sores (n = 2). The mean defect size was 152 cm(2). Sixteen flaps were based on the superficial cervical artery (SCA; type 2), 16 were based on the dorsal scapular artery (DSA; type 3), one was based on the intercostal arteries (type 4), and 10 flaps were based on both the DSA and SCA. Recipient-site complications requiring reoperation occurred in 16.3%, including one total flap failure (2.6%). The trapezius myocutaneous flap is a valuable option to reconstruct various head and neck and upper back defects. Based on our data, a surgical treatment algorithm was developed in an attempt to reduce variation in care and improve clinical outcomes. Copyright © 2014 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The radix nasi island flap: a versatile musculocutaneous flap for defects of the eyelids, nose, and malar region.

    PubMed

    Seyhan, Tamer

    2009-03-01

    A versatile musculocutan flap from the radix nasi region, the radix nasi island flap, is described. The flap has an axial blood supply derived from the dorsal nasal branch of the ophthalmic artery which is anastomosed to the terminal branch of the facial artery. The flap includes the skin, subcutaneous tissue, and procerus muscle. Ten patients, aged 50 to 86 years, have been reconstructed with this flap for defects in the nose (in 4 cases), midface (in 4 cases) and lower eyelids (in 2 cases). The mean flap size was 17 x 23 mm (range: 15 x 20 to 20 x 27 mm). All flaps fully survived. Additional complications and morbidity were not observed. The donor sites were closed a primarily closure in all cases. Follow-up ranged from 3 to 12 months (mean: 8.2 months). The radix nasi flap is a safe flap, has minimal donor site morbidity, and is especially suited for nasal and midface reconstruction in terms of attaining a suitable color and thickness.

  8. Optimization design and dynamic analysis on the drive mechanisms of flapping-wing air vehicles based on flapping trajectories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Lingwang; Zhang, Xingwei; Luo, Pan; Huang, Panpan

    2017-10-01

    The optimization designs and dynamic analysis on the driving mechanism of flapping-wing air vehicles on base of flapping trajectory patterns is carried out in this study. Three different driving mechanisms which are spatial double crank-rocker, plane five-bar and gear-double slider, are systematically optimized and analysed by using the Mat lab and Adams software. After a series debugging on the parameter, the comparatively ideal flapping trajectories are obtained by the simulation of Adams. Present results indicate that different drive mechanisms output different flapping trajectories and have their unique characteristic. The spatial double crank-rocker mechanism can only output the arc flapping trajectory and it has the advantages of small volume, high flexibility and efficient space utilization. Both planar five-bar mechanism and gear-double slider mechanism can output the oval, figure of eight and double eight flapping trajectories. Nevertheless, the gear-double slider mechanism has the advantage of convenient parameter setting and better performance in output double eight flapping trajectory. This study can provide theoretical basis and helpful reference for the design of the drive mechanisms of flapping-wing air vehicles with different output flapping trajectories.

  9. Navier-Stokes Computations of a Wing-Flap Model With Blowing Normal to the Flap Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, D. Douglas, Jr.

    2005-01-01

    A computational study of a generic wing with a half span flap shows the mean flow effects of several blown flap configurations. The effort compares and contrasts the thin-layer, Reynolds averaged, Navier-Stokes solutions of a baseline wing-flap configuration with configurations that have blowing normal to the flap surface through small slits near the flap side edge. Vorticity contours reveal a dual vortex structure at the flap side edge for all cases. The dual vortex merges into a single vortex at approximately the mid-flap chord location. Upper surface blowing reduces the strength of the merged vortex and moves the vortex away from the upper edge. Lower surface blowing thickens the lower shear layer and weakens the merged vortex, but not as much as upper surface blowing. Side surface blowing forces the lower surface vortex farther outboard of the flap edge by effectively increasing the aerodynamic span of the flap. It is seen that there is no global aerodynamic penalty or benefit from the particular blowing configurations examined.

  10. Gastrocnaemius-propeller extended miocutanous flap: a new chimaeric flap for soft tissue reconstruction of the knee.

    PubMed

    Innocenti, M; Cardin-Langlois, E; Menichini, G; Baldrighi, C

    2014-02-01

    Soft tissue defects involving the anterior aspect of the knee are a frequent finding in a number of pathological conditions. The aim of this article is to describe a new pedicled flap consisting of a conventional medial gastrocnaemius muscle flap associated with a propeller flap based on a perforator of the medial sural artery. Five males ranging in age between 26 and 72 years underwent a reconstruction of the soft tissue of the knee by means of the described procedure. Three patients sustained complex tissue loss subsequent to high-energy trauma; two losses were due to septic complications after elective knee surgery. Four flaps survived allowing adequate proximal tibial metaphysis and patella coverage. One patient underwent early above-the-knee amputation due to life-threatening septicaemia. The described chimaera flap consists of a medial gastrocnaemius flap with a skin paddle that is elevated on a perforator of the medial sural artery and then rotated according to the propeller flaps' principles. It provides effective coverage of large soft tissue defects of the knee. In the authors' experience, the propeller flap portion proved to be particularly useful to cover the patella, while the muscle flap was used to cover the proximal metaphysis of the tibia and fill the dead space if present. Copyright © 2013 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Propeller Flap for Complex Distal Leg Reconstruction: A Versatile Alternative when Reverse Sural Artery Flap is Not Feasible.

    PubMed

    Ademola, Samuel A; Michael, Afieharo I; Oladeji, Femi J; Mbaya, Kefas M; Oyewole, O

    2015-01-01

    Reverse sural artery fasciocutaneous flap has become a workhorse for the reconstruction of distal leg soft tissue defects. When its use is not feasible, perforator-based propeller flap offers a better, easier, faster, and cheaper alternative to free flap. We present our experience with two men both aged 34 years who sustained Gustilo 3B injuries from gunshot. The donor area for reversed sural artery flap was involved in the injuries. They had early debridement, external fixation, and wound coverage with perforator-based propeller flaps. The donor sites were covered with skin graft. All flaps survived. There were minor wound edge ulcers due to the pressure of positioning that did not affect flap survival and the ulcers healed with conservative management. Perforator-based propeller flap is a versatile armamentarium for reconstruction of soft tissue defects of the distal leg in resource-constrained settings, especially when the donor area for a reverse flow sural flap artery is involved in the injury.

  12. The "chimeric" trapezius muscle and fasciocutaneous flap (dorsal scapular artery perforator flap): a new design for complex 3-dimensional defects.

    PubMed

    Rozen, Warren M; Fox, Carly M; Leong, James; Morsi, Adel

    2013-11-01

    Multiple variations of the musculocutaneous trapezius flap have been described, each of which use a single composite musculocutaneous unit in their designs. The limitation of such designs is the ability to use the components in a 3-dimensional manner, with only 1 vector existing in the geometry of the musculocutaneous unit. A review of the literature was undertaken with regard to designs of the musculocutaneous trapezius flap, and we present a new technique for flap design. With identification of individual perforators to each of the muscle and fasciocutaneous portions of the trapezius flap, the 2 components can act in a chimeric fashion, able to fill both a deep and complex 3-dimensional space while covering the wound with robust skin. A range of flap designs have been described, including transverse, oblique, and vertical skin paddles accompanying the trapezius muscle. We describe a technique with which a propeller-style skin paddle based on a cutaneous perforator can be raised in any orientation with respect to the underlying muscle. In a presented case, separation of the muscular and fasciocutaneous components of the trapezius flap was able to obliterate dead space around exposed cervicothoracic spinal metalwork and obtain robust wound closure in a patient with previous radiotherapy. This concomitant use of a muscle and fasciocutaneous perforator flap based on a single perforator, a so-called chimeric perforator flap, is a useful modification to trapezius musculocutaneous flap design.

  13. Analgesic efficacy of transversus abdominis plane block in neonates and early infants for colostomy and reversal of colostomy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chee Kean; Teo, Shu Ching; Phui, Vui Eng; Saman, Mat Ariffin

    2015-01-01

    The application of ultrasound-guided transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block in paediatric population is gaining popularity among anaesthetists. We present a case series of ultrasound-guided TAP block in ten neonate and infants undergoing colostomy and reversal of stoma. Classical TAP as described by Hebbard was carried out and a maximum dosage of 1ml/kg of 0.25% levobupivacaine was injected. Pain score was assessed using Neonatal Infant Pain Scale for 24 hours. In all patients, the block was successful with minimal hemodynamic changes intraoperatively and no additional systemic analgesia was needed intraoperative and immediate postoperatively. Ultrasound-guided TAP block has an important role in providing safe and effective analgesia for colostomy creation and reversal of stoma surgeries in paediatric population.

  14. Folding in and out: passive morphing in flapping wings.

    PubMed

    Stowers, Amanda K; Lentink, David

    2015-03-25

    We present a new mechanism for passive wing morphing of flapping wings inspired by bat and bird wing morphology. The mechanism consists of an unactuated hand wing connected to the arm wing with a wrist joint. Flapping motion generates centrifugal accelerations in the hand wing, forcing it to unfold passively. Using a robotic model in hover, we made kinematic measurements of unfolding kinematics as functions of the non-dimensional wingspan fold ratio (2-2.5) and flapping frequency (5-17 Hz) using stereo high-speed cameras. We find that the wings unfold passively within one to two flaps and remain unfolded with only small amplitude oscillations. To better understand the passive dynamics, we constructed a computer model of the unfolding process based on rigid body dynamics, contact models, and aerodynamic correlations. This model predicts the measured passive unfolding within about one flap and shows that unfolding is driven by centrifugal acceleration induced by flapping. The simulations also predict that relative unfolding time only weakly depends on flapping frequency and can be reduced to less than half a wingbeat by increasing flapping amplitude. Subsequent dimensional analysis shows that the time required to unfold passively is of the same order of magnitude as the flapping period. This suggests that centrifugal acceleration can drive passive unfolding within approximately one wingbeat in small and large wings. Finally, we show experimentally that passive unfolding wings can withstand impact with a branch, by first folding and then unfolding passively. This mechanism enables flapping robots to squeeze through clutter without sophisticated control. Passive unfolding also provides a new avenue in morphing wing design that makes future flapping morphing wings possibly more energy efficient and light-weight. Simultaneously these results point to possible inertia driven, and therefore metabolically efficient, control strategies in bats and birds to morph or recover

  15. Diastasis recti abdominis during pregnancy and 12 months after childbirth: prevalence, risk factors and report of lumbopelvic pain

    PubMed Central

    Tennfjord, Merete Kolberg; Hilde, Gunvor; Ellström-Engh, Marie; Bø, Kari

    2016-01-01

    Background/aim Diastasis recti abdominis (DRA) is defined as a separation of the 2 muscle bellies of rectus abdominis. To date there is scant knowledge on prevalence, risk factors, and consequences of the condition. The present study aimed to investigate the prevalence of DRA during pregnancy and post partum, presence of possible risk factors, and the occurrence of lumbopelvic pain among women with and without DRA. Methods This prospective cohort study followed 300 first-time pregnant women from pregnancy till 12 months post partum. Data were collected by electronic questionnaire and clinical examinations. DRA was defined as a palpated separation of ≥2 fingerbreadths either 4.5 cm above, at or 4.5 cm below the umbilicus. Women with and without DRA were compared with independent samples Student's t-test and χ2/Fisher exact test, and OR with significance level >0.05. Results Prevalence of DRA was 33.1%, 60.0%, 45.4%, and 32.6% at gestation week 21, 6 weeks, 6 months and 12 months post partum, respectively. No difference in risk factors was found when comparing women with and without DRA. OR showed a greater likelihood for DRA among women reporting heavy lifting ≥20 times weekly (OR 2.18 95% CI 1.05 to 4.52). There was no difference in reported lumbopelvic pain (p=0.10) in women with and without DRA. Conclusions Prevalence of mild DRA was high both during pregnancy and after childbirth. Women with and without DRA reported the same amount of lumbopelvic pain 12 months post partum. PMID:27324871

  16. Transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block in laparoscopic colorectal surgery improves postoperative pain management: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Hain, E; Maggiori, L; Prost À la Denise, J; Panis, Y

    2018-04-01

    Transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block is a locoregional anaesthesia technique of growing interest in abdominal surgery. However, its efficacy following laparoscopic colorectal surgery is still debated. This meta-analysis aimed to assess the efficacy of TAP block after laparoscopic colorectal surgery. All comparative studies focusing on TAP block after laparoscopic colorectal surgery have been systematically identified through the MEDLINE database, reviewed and included. Meta-analysis was performed according to the Mantel-Haenszel method for random effects. End-points included postoperative opioid consumption, morbidity, time to first bowel movement and length of hospital stay. A total of 13 studies, including 7 randomized controlled trials, were included, comprising a total of 600 patients who underwent laparoscopic colorectal surgery with TAP block, compared with 762 patients without TAP block. Meta-analysis of these studies showed that TAP block was associated with a significantly reduced postoperative opioid consumption on the first day after surgery [weighted mean difference (WMD) -14.54 (-25.14; -3.94); P = 0.007] and a significantly shorter time to first bowel movement [WMD -0.53 (-0.61; -0.44); P < 0.001] but failed to show any impact on length of hospital stay [WMD -0.32 (-0.83; 0.20); P = 0.23] although no study considered length of stay as its primary outcome. Finally, TAP block was not associated with a significant increase in the postoperative overall complication rate [OR = 0.84 (0.62-1.14); P = 0.27]. Transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block in laparoscopic colorectal surgery improves postoperative opioid consumption and recovery of postoperative digestive function without any significant drawback. Colorectal Disease © 2018 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  17. Transversus Abdominis Plane Block Versus Wound Infiltration for Analgesia After Cesarean Delivery: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Tawfik, Mohamed Mohamed; Mohamed, Yaser Mohamed; Elbadrawi, Rania Elmohamadi; Abdelkhalek, Mostafa; Mogahed, Maiseloon Mostafa; Ezz, Hanaa Mohamed

    2017-04-01

    Transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block and local anesthetic wound infiltration provide analgesia after cesarean delivery. Studies comparing the 2 techniques are scarce, with conflicting results. This double-blind, randomized controlled trial aimed to compare bilateral ultrasound-guided TAP block with single-shot local anesthetic wound infiltration for analgesia after cesarean delivery performed under spinal anesthesia. We hypothesized that the TAP block would decrease postoperative cumulative fentanyl consumption at 24 hours. Eligible subjects were American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status II parturients with full-term singleton pregnancies undergoing elective cesarean delivery under spinal anesthesia. Exclusion criteria were: <19 years of age or >40 years of age; height <150 cm, weight <60 kg, body mass index ≥40 kg/m; contraindications to spinal anesthesia; history of recent opioid exposure; hypersensitivity to any of the drugs used in the study; significant cardiovascular, renal, or hepatic disease; and known fetal abnormalities. Eighty subjects were randomly allocated to 2 equal groups. In the infiltration group, participants received 15 mL of bupivacaine 0.25% in each side of the surgical wound (total 30 mL); and in the TAP group, participants received 20 mL of bupivacaine 0.25% bilaterally in the TAP block (total 40 mL). The TAP block and wound infiltration were performed by the primary investigator and the operating obstetrician, respectively. All participants received postoperative standard analgesia (ketorolac and paracetamol) and intravenous fentanyl via patient-controlled analgesia. Patients and outcome assessors were blinded to the study group. The primary outcome was the cumulative fentanyl consumption at 24 hours. Secondary outcomes were the time to the first postoperative fentanyl dose, cumulative fentanyl consumption at 2, 4, 6, and 12 hours, pain scores at rest and on movement at 2, 4, 6, 12, and 24 hours, the deepest level of

  18. Cocontraction of Ankle Dorsiflexors and Transversus Abdominis Function in Patients With Low Back Pain

    PubMed Central

    Chon, Seung-Chul; You, Joshua H.; Saliba, Susan A.

    2012-01-01

    Context The abdominal draw-in maneuver (ADIM) with cocontraction has been shown to be a more effective method of activating the transversus abdominis (TrA) in healthy adults than the ADIM alone. Whether such an augmented core stabilization exercise is effective in managing low back pain (LBP) remains uncertain. Objective To determine the effect of 2 weeks of ADIM and cocontraction training on abdominal muscle thickness and activation timing and to monitor pain and function in patients with LBP. Design Case-control study. Setting Local orthopaedic clinic and research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants Twenty patients with mechanical LBP (age = 27.20 ± 6.46 years, height = 166.25 ± 8.70 cm, mass = 58.10 ± 11.81 kg) and 20 healthy, age-matched people (age = 24.25 ± 1.59 years, height = 168.00 ± 8.89 cm, mass = 60.65 ± 11.99 kg) volunteered for the study. Intervention(s) Both the LBP and control groups received ten 30-minute sessions of ADIM and cocontraction training of the tibialis anterior (TA) and rectus femoris (RF) muscles over a 2-week period. Main Outcome Measure(s) A separate, mixed-model analysis of variance was computed for the thicknesses of the TrA, internal oblique (IO), and external oblique muscles. The differences in mean and peak electromyographic (EMG) amplitudes, onset time, and latency were compared between the groups. The visual analog pain scale, Pain Disability Index, and LBP rating scale were used to assess pain in the LBP group before and after the intervention. Results We found an interaction between the LBP and control groups and a main effect from pretest to posttest for only TrA muscle thickness change (F1,38 = 6.57, P = .01). Reductions in all pain measures were observed after training (P < .05). Group differences in peak and mean EMG amplitudes and onset time values for TrA/IO and TA were achieved (P < .05). The RF peak (t38 = −3.12, P = .003) and mean (t38 = −4.12, P = .001) EMG amplitudes were different, but no group

  19. Measuring quality in anatomic pathology.

    PubMed

    Raab, Stephen S; Grzybicki, Dana Marie

    2008-06-01

    This article focuses mainly on diagnostic accuracy in measuring quality in anatomic pathology, noting that measuring any quality metric is complex and demanding. The authors discuss standardization and its variability within and across areas of care delivery and efforts involving defining and measuring error to achieve pathology quality and patient safety. They propose that data linking error to patient outcome are critical for developing quality improvement initiatives targeting errors that cause patient harm in addition to using methods of root cause analysis, beyond those traditionally used in cytologic-histologic correlation, to assist in the development of error reduction and quality improvement plans.

  20. Utilization management in anatomic pathology.

    PubMed

    Lewandrowski, Kent; Black-Schaffer, Steven

    2014-01-01

    There is relatively little published literature concerning utilization management in anatomic pathology. Nonetheless there are many utilization management opportunities that currently exist and are well recognized. Some of these impact only the cost structure within the pathology department itself whereas others reduce charges for third party payers. Utilization management may result in medical legal liabilities for breaching the standard of care. For this reason it will be important for pathology professional societies to develop national utilization guidelines to assist individual practices in implementing a medically sound approach to utilization management. © 2013.

  1. Routine preoperative colour Doppler duplex ultrasound scanning in anterolateral thigh flaps.

    PubMed

    Lichte, Johanna; Teichmann, Jan; Loberg, Christina; Kloss-Brandstätter, Anita; Bartella, Alexander; Steiner, Timm; Modabber, Ali; Hölzle, Frank; Lethaus, Bernd

    2016-10-01

    The anterolateral thigh flap (ALT) is often used to reconstruct the head and neck and depends on one or more skin perforators, which often present with variable anatomy. The aim of this study was to localise and evaluate the precise position of these perforators preoperatively with colour Doppler duplex ultrasound scanning (US). We detected 74 perforators in 30 patients. The mean duration of examination with colour Doppler was 29 (range 13-51) minutes. Adequate perforators and their anatomical course could be detected preoperatively extremely accurately (p<0.001). The mean difference between the preoperatively marked, and the real, positions was 6.3 (range 0-16) mm. There was a highly significant correlation between the accuracy of the prediction and the body mass index of the patient (0.75; p<0.001). Neither the age nor the sex of the patient correlated with the accuracy of the prediction. Colour Doppler duplex US used preoperatively to localise perforators in ALT flaps is reliable and could be adopted as standard procedure. Copyright © 2016 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Multiple Free Internal Limiting Membrane Flap Insertion in the Treatment of Macular Hole-Associated Retinal Detachment in High Myopia.

    PubMed

    Chen, San-Ni; Hsieh, Yi-Ting; Yang, Chung-May

    2018-06-06

    The aim of this paper was to evaluate the efficacy of multiple free internal limiting membrane (ILM) flap insertion in the management of macular hole-associated retinal detachment in high myopia. Eyes receiving operation for macular hole-associated retinal detachment were retrospectively recruited. Those in the study group received ILM peeling and multiple free ILM flap insertion, while those in the control group received ILM peeling only. Postoperative anatomical outcomes and best-corrected visual acuity were compared between the 2 groups. Twenty-seven eyes of 27 patients were recruited in this study (13 in the study group, 14 in the control group). After the operation, the retina was reattached in all cases in both groups. The macular hole closure rate was 100% in the study group but only 42.9% in the control group (adjusted p < 0.001). The eyes in the study group had better visual improvement (logMAR -0.58 ± 0.43) than those in the control group (logMAR -0.31 ± 0.50) with borderline significance (adjusted p = 0.078). For macular hole-associated retinal detachment in highly myopic eyes, the multiple free ILM flap insertion technique offers an effective way to close macular holes. Whether this result also means better visual outcome remains to be seen. © 2018 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Osteomyocutaneous fibular flap harvesting: Computer-assisted planning of perforator vessels using Computed Tomographic Angiography scan and cutting guide.

    PubMed

    Battaglia, Salvatore; Maiolo, Vincenzo; Savastio, Gabriella; Zompatori, Maurizio; Contedini, Federico; Antoniazzi, Elisa; Cipriani, Riccardo; Marchetti, Claudio; Tarsitano, Achille

    2017-10-01

    Mandibular reconstruction performed after virtual planning has become more common during recent years. The gold standard for extensive mandibular reconstruction is of course a fibular free flap. In designing an osteomyocutaneous fibula flap, poor planning, aberrant anatomy and/or inadequate perforator vessels are the most frequent causes of complications and may force the surgeon to modify the flap design, explore the contralateral leg or harvest an additional microvascular flap. The goal of our study was to pre-operatively evaluate the vascular anatomy of the fibula and localize the cutaneous perforator vessels, so to create the fibular cutting guide based on the position of the cutaneous perforator and safely harvest the reconstructive flap. Twenty consecutive patients who were candidates for mandibular reconstruction using a fibular microvascular free flap were enrolled in this study between January 2016 and August 2016. The patients were preoperatively assessed with a Computed Tomographic scan of head and neck and with a Computed Tomographic Angiography (CTA) scan of the lower limbs to evaluate the vascular anatomy of the fibula. Virtual planning was carried out for all patients. The fibular cutting guide was based on the position of the perforator cutaneous vessels, which were used to harvest the cutaneous part of the flap. Preoperative CT measurements were performed in order to identify the cutaneous perforators on the patients' skin. Intraoperative checking was performed to evaluate the accuracy of the perforators' position and the reproducibility of the virtual planning. In 5 patients out of 20 (25%), anatomical anomalies were discovered, without clinical evidence. The perforator vessels were localized in all patients. The average difference between the CTA and the intraoperative perforator localization was 1 mm (range 0-2 mm). Fibular cutting guide was positioned and fitted the anatomy of the patients in all treated patients. This allowed us to perform

  4. Use of the pericranial flap in medial canthal reconstruction: another application for this versatile flap.

    PubMed

    Leatherbarrow, Brian; Watson, Adam; Wilcsek, Geoffrey

    2006-01-01

    To describe the use and outcomes of a versatile surgical technique in the reconstruction of deep soft tissue and bony defects of the medial canthus. A retrospective review of consecutive cases requiring reconstruction of medial canthal defects involving loss of periosteum or bone by a median forehead pericranial flap and full-thickness skin grafting in a tertiary referral hospital setting. Two techniques were used: an open technique, using a midline forehead incision; and an endoscopic technique, using 2 incisions behind the hairline. Twenty-one cases were identified: 19 open and 2 endoscopic. The average length of follow-up was 13 months (range, 6-50 months). Ten cases required additional oculoplastic procedures including local periosteal flaps and mucous membrane grafts. Two cases (10%) had complete flap failure; one of these was caused by infection. Five (24%) had partial (< 50%) skin graft necrosis. Two cases (10%) have required further surgery. Our experience shows the pericranial flap to be versatile, robust, and easy to manipulate, offering advantages over alternative techniques when used for the repair of deep medial canthal defects. It is a valuable reconstructive technique that can yield good cosmetic and functional results.

  5. To flap or not to flap: continued discussion with particle image velocimetry of the near wake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Nathan; Roh, Chris; Idrees, Suhail; Gharib, Morteza

    2017-11-01

    We continue the discussion of which underwater propulsion mechanism is more effective: flapping used by fish or periodic contractions used by jellyfish. The two propulsion mechanisms are simplified into flapping and clapping plate motions, respectively, to allow for a direct comparison. A device is designed to operate in either mode of propulsion between Reynolds numbers 1,880 and 11,260, based on the average tip velocity and the span of the plate. The stroke angle, stroke time, flexibility, and duty cycle are varied to determine their impact on the generated thrust and the required torque. Overall, the clapping mode tends to require significantly more power to generate a similar thrust compared to that from the flapping mode. The performance of the clapping mode is increased by modifying the duty cycle such that the closing motion is faster than the opening motion causing a greater thrust and a similar efficiency to that from the flapping mode. Interestingly, when using rigid plates, the average thrust generated per cycle is similar between the two modes when the overall kinematics are equivalent. Investigation of the near wake of both modes through digital particle image velocimetry provides insight into the cause of this similar thrust. This work was supported by the Charyk Bio-inspired Laboratory at the California Institute of Technology, the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship under Grant No. DGE-1144469, and the Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowships program.

  6. Submental island pedicled flap vs radial forearm free flap for oral reconstruction: comparison of outcomes.

    PubMed

    Paydarfar, Joseph A; Patel, Urjeet A

    2011-01-01

    To compare intraoperative, postoperative, and functional results of submental island pedicled flap (SIPF) against radial forearm free flap (RFFF) reconstruction for tongue and floor-of-mouth reconstruction. Multi-institutional retrospective review. Academic tertiary referral center. Consecutive patients from February 2003 to December 2009 undergoing resection of oral tongue or floor of mouth followed by reconstruction with SIPF or RFFF. Two groups: SIPF vs RFFF. Duration of operation, hospital stay, surgical complications, and speech and swallowing function. The study included 60 patients, 27 with SIPF reconstruction and 33 with RFFF reconstruction. Sex, age, and TNM stage were similar for both groups. Mean flap size was smaller for SIPF (36 cm²) than for RFFF (50 cm²) (P < .001). Patients undergoing SIPF reconstruction had shorter operations (mean, 8 hours 44 minutes vs 13 hours 00 minutes; P < .001) and shorter hospitalization (mean, 10.6 days vs 14.0 days; P < .008) compared with patients who underwent RFFF. Donor site, flap-related, and other surgical complications were comparable between groups, as was speech and swallowing function. Reconstruction of oral cavity defects with the SIPF results in shorter operative time and hospitalization without compromising functional outcomes. The SIPF may be a preferable option in reconstruction of oral cavity defects less than 40 cm².

  7. Repair of nostril stenosis using a triple flap combination: boomerang, nasolabial, and vestibular rotation flaps.

    PubMed

    Bozkurt, Mehmet; Kapi, Emin; Kuvat, Samet Vasfi; Selçuk, Caferi Tayyar

    2012-11-01

    Tissue losses within the nose due to various reasons result in the loss of normal anatomy and function. The external nasal valve area is one of the most important functional components of the nose. The columella, lobule, nostril, and alar region are among the components forming the external nasal valve area. Deformities of the nostrils are among the most frequently observed features that interfere with the functional anatomy of the nose. Malformations of the nostrils often emerge subsequent to cleft lip repairs. Stenoses are a common type of pathology among nostril deformities. In cases where a stenosis has formed, breathing problems and developmental anomalies may occur. In the patient with nostril stenosis presented in this report, there was a serious alar collapse and contracture subsequent to a cleft lip repair. In order to repair the nostril stenosis, a "boomerang flap" was chosen. This boomerang flap was used in combination with a nasolabial flap, a vestibular rotation flap, and a conchal cartilage graft to achieve a satisfactory repair.

  8. Calcaneocuboid joint instability: a novel operative technique for anatomic reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Lohrer, Heinz; Arentz, Sabine

    2004-05-01

    A case history of a 13-year-old female national top-level gymnast, suffering from calcaneocuboid joint instability, is presented. The procedure was done as an anatomic repair by capsular reefing, which was augmented using a local periosteal flap. Initially, the athlete twisted her ankle. Clinical investigation revealed no sign of a lateral ankle ligament injury, but following this initial examination, recurrent giving-way of the foot occurred. She additionally felt significant but diffuse pain on the lateral side of the foot during loading in training and competition. For 2 months she was unable to run and conservative treatment failed. Diagnosis of a calcaneocuboid instability was established 4 months after the initial lesion by clinical and x-ray stress examination of the calcaneocuboid joint. Open surgery was successfully performed. Early functional posttreatment was done and the patient returned to full high-level gymnastics ability 16 weeks after surgery. Two years later, a similar injury occurred to the opposite calcaneocuboid joint and the same operative procedure again led to full sports ability.

  9. [Free gracilis muscle flap with plantar intermediate thickness skin graft: case report, review of anatomy and functional reconstruction of the palm].

    PubMed

    Engelhardt, T O; Rieger, U M; Baltaci, M; Pierer, G; Schwabegger, A H

    2011-08-01

    Skin and soft-tissue architecture of the palm are unique. Coverage of extensive soft-tissue defects restoring the functional capacity of the palm remains a challenging task. Anatomic restoration with skin from another area is hardly possible. In manual labourers, reconstruction of mechanical soft-tissue stability is required in addition to sensation, range of motion and grip strength. Sensate fasciocutaneous flaps bear disadvantages of tissue mobility, shifting and bulkiness. Published criteria for defect-related flap selection are sparse. Defect analysis (anatomy, units of tactile gnosis, individual parameters) provides information to weigh needs for sensation or tissue stability, influencing selection of most appropriate procedures. We distinguished 4 units: hypothenar (H), thenar (T) and central palm (Z). (Z) consists of a central palmar unit (c') and the distal palm (d'). Individual parameters (age, profession, dominant hand, psychosocial aspects) were also considered. Units (T) and (H), regions of secondary touch, demand protective sensation by applying sensate fasciocutaneous flaps. In labourers tactile gnosis in (Z) is of less, tissue stability of greater value. An extensive palmar defect (9×13 cm, affecting unit (Z), partially affecting units (T) and (H), of the dominant hand) with combined vessel, nerve, tendon injuries (male labourer, 21 years) was covered after defect analysis with a free gracilis muscle flap and a glabrous intermediate (0.5 mm) thickness skin graft from the instep region. 29 months postoperatively anatomic conditions of palmar soft tissue (Vancouver scar scale: 1), high mechanical soft-tissue stability including normal hand function were evident. Semmes Weinstein testing showed positive pressure sensation. Professional reintegration after 5 months was possible. Defect coverage of the palm must not consist of merely providing sensate vascularised tissue. The most appropriate procedure can be derived from careful defect analysis

  10. Treatment of ischial pressure sores with double adipofascial turnover flaps.

    PubMed

    Lin, Haodong; Hou, Chunlin; Xu, Zhen; Chen, Aiming

    2010-01-01

    Despite a variety of flap reconstruction options, the ischium remains the most difficult pressure sore site to treat. This article describes the authors' successful surgical procedure for coverage of ischial ulcers using double adipofascial turnover flaps.After debridement, the adipofascial flaps are harvested both cephalad and caudal to the defect. The flaps are then turned over to cover the exposed bone in a manner so as to overlap the 2 flaps. The skin is then closed with sutures in 2 layers. A total of 15 patients with ischial sores were treated using this surgical procedure.The follow-up period ranged from 11 to 159 months, with a mean of 93.6 months. Overall, 86.7% of the flaps (13 of 15) healed primarily. One patient had a recurrent grade II ischial pressure sore again 11 months after the operation. The other 14 patients did not have a recurrence.Treatment of ischial pressure sores with adipofascial turnover flaps provides an easy, minimally invasive procedure, with preservation of future flap options, and a soft-tissue supply sufficient for covering the bony prominence and filling dead space. This technique is a reliable and safe reconstructive modality for the management of minor ischial pressure sores.

  11. Porcine experimental model for perforator flap raising in reconstructive microsurgery.

    PubMed

    González-García, José A; Chiesa-Estomba, Carlos M; Álvarez, Leire; Altuna, Xabier; García-Iza, Leire; Thomas, Izaskun; Sistiaga, Jon A; Larruscain, Ekhiñe

    2018-07-01

    Perforator free flap-based reconstruction of the head and neck is a challenging surgical procedure and needs a steep learning curve. A reproducible mammal large animal model with similarities to human anatomy is relevant for perforator flap raising and microanastomosis. The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of a swine model for perforator-based free flaps in reconstructive microsurgery. Eleven procedures were performed under general anesthesia in a porcine model, elevating a skin flap vascularized by perforating musculocutaneous branches of the superior epigastric artery to evaluate the relevance of this model for head and neck reconstructive microsurgery. The anterior abdominal skin perforator-based free flap in a swine model irrigated by the superior epigastric artery was elevated in eleven procedures. In six of these procedures, we could perform an arterial and venous microanastomosis to the great vessels located in the base of the neck. The porcine experimental model of superior epigastric artery perforator-based free flap reconstruction offers relevant similarities to the human deep inferior epigastric artery perforator flap. We could demonstrate this model as acceptable for perforator free flap training due to the necessity of perforator and pedicle dissection and transfer to a distant area. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The gust-mitigating potential of flapping wings.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Alex; Ravi, Sridhar; Watkins, Simon; Watmuff, Jon; Wang, Chun; Liu, Hao; Petersen, Phred

    2016-08-02

    Nature's flapping-wing flyers are adept at negotiating highly turbulent flows across a wide range of scales. This is in part due to their ability to quickly detect and counterract disturbances to their flight path, but may also be assisted by an inherent aerodynamic property of flapping wings. In this study, we subject a mechanical flapping wing to replicated atmospheric turbulence across a range of flapping frequencies and turbulence intensities. By means of flow visualization and surface pressure measurements, we determine the salient effects of large-scale freestream turbulence on the flow field, and on the phase-average and fluctuating components of pressure and lift. It is shown that at lower flapping frequencies, turbulence dominates the instantaneous flow field, and the random fluctuating component of lift contributes significantly to the total lift. At higher flapping frequencies, kinematic forcing begins to dominate and the flow field becomes more consistent from cycle to cycle. Turbulence still modulates the flapping-induced flow field, as evidenced in particular by a variation in the timing and extent of leading edge vortex formation during the early downstroke. The random fluctuating component of lift contributes less to the total lift at these frequencies, providing evidence that flapping wings do indeed provide some inherent gust mitigation.

  13. Active Flap Control of the SMART Rotor for Vibration Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Steven R.; Anand, R. Vaidyanathan; Straub, Friedrich K.; Lau, Benton H.

    2009-01-01

    Active control methodologies were applied to a full-scale active flap rotor obtained during a joint Boeing/ DARPA/NASA/Army test in the Air Force National Full-Scale Aerodynamic Complex 40- by 80-foot anechoic wind tunnel. The active flap rotor is a full-scale MD 900 helicopter main rotor with each of its five blades modified to include an on-blade piezoelectric actuator-driven flap with a span of 18% of radius, 25% of chord, and located at 83% radius. Vibration control demonstrated the potential of active flaps for effective control of vibratory loads, especially normal force loads. Active control of normal force vibratory loads using active flaps and a continuous-time higher harmonic control algorithm was very effective, reducing harmonic (1-5P) normal force vibratory loads by 95% in both cruise and approach conditions. Control of vibratory roll and pitch moments was also demonstrated, although moment control was less effective than normal force control. Finally, active control was used to precisely control blade flap position for correlation with pretest predictions of rotor aeroacoustics. Flap displacements were commanded to follow specific harmonic profiles of 2 deg or more in amplitude, and the flap deflection errors obtained were less than 0.2 deg r.m.s.

  14. Accuracy of Visual Estimation of LASIK Flap Thickness.

    PubMed

    Brenner, Jason E; Fadlallah, Ali; Hatch, Kathryn M; Choi, Catherine; Sayegh, Rony R; Kouyoumjian, Paul; Wu, Simon; Frangieh, George T; Melki, Samir A

    2017-11-01

    To assess the accuracy of surgeons' visual estimation of LASIK flap thickness when created by a femtosecond laser by comparing it to ultrasound measurements. Surgeons were asked to visually estimate the thickness of a femtosecond flap during the procedure. Total corneal thickness was measured by ultrasound pachymetry prior to the procedure and the stromal bed was similarly measured after flap lifting. The estimates from three experienced surgeons (cornea fellowship trained and more than 5 years in practice) were compared to those of three cornea fellows, with each surgeon evaluating 20 eyes (120 total). Surgeons were not told the thickness of the flaps unless required for safety reasons. The average difference between visual and ultrasonic estimation of LASIK flap thickness was 15.20 μm. The flap was 10 μm thicker than estimated in 37% of eyes, 20 μm thicker in 17% of eyes, and 30 μm thicker in 10% of eyes. The largest deviation was 53 μm. There was no statistically significant difference between the accuracy of experienced surgeons and fellows (P = .51). There are significant differences between surgeons' visual estimates and ultrasonic measurements of LASIK flap thickness. Relying on these visual estimates may lead to deeper excimer laser ablation than intended. This could lead to thinner residual stromal beds and higher percent tissue altered than planned. The authors recommend that surgeons measure flaps intraoperatively to maximize accuracy and safety. [J Refract Surg. 2017;33(11):765-767.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  15. Pectoralis myocutaneous flap for salvage of necrotic wounds

    SciTech Connect

    Price, J.C.; Davis, R.K.; Koltai, P.J.

    1985-02-01

    The authors have utilized six pectoralis major myocutaneous flaps in attempts to salvage extensive necrotic wounds of the pharynx and neck. The flap was employed in the following situations: massive necrosis of the entire neck skin with both carotid artery systems exposed, radiation necrosis of the neck skin with exposure of carotid artery, dehiscence of gastric pull-up from pharynx with resultant carotid exposure, failed trapezius flap in a radionecrotic oral cavity, and two cases of pharyngocutaneous fistula with extensive soft tissue necrosis. These flaps achieved healing in all cases. One death occurred 3 weeks following complete cutaneous healing secondary tomore » a ruptured carotid pseudoaneurysm. One flap underwent total skin loss but the entirety of the muscle survived and the fistula was successfully closed with the back of the muscle being subsequently skin grafted. One case of dehiscence of the flap from oral mucosa resulted in a minor exposure of mandible with limited osteoradionecrosis controlled by topical means. This flap has performed extremely well in these precarious and difficult situations that previously may not have been salvageable. It has also been effective in abbreviating the required hospitalization and wound care. The authors conclude that the pectoralis myocutaneous flap should be the primary choice for the management of extensive postsurgical wound necrosis.« less

  16. 14 CFR 25.701 - Flap and slat interconnection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Control Systems § 25... equivalent means. (b) If a wing flap or slat interconnection or equivalent means is used, it must be designed... be designed for the loads imposed when the wing flaps or slats on one side are carrying the most...

  17. 14 CFR 25.701 - Flap and slat interconnection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Control Systems § 25... equivalent means. (b) If a wing flap or slat interconnection or equivalent means is used, it must be designed... be designed for the loads imposed when the wing flaps or slats on one side are carrying the most...

  18. 14 CFR 25.701 - Flap and slat interconnection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Control Systems § 25... equivalent means. (b) If a wing flap or slat interconnection or equivalent means is used, it must be designed... be designed for the loads imposed when the wing flaps or slats on one side are carrying the most...

  19. Surgical gem: island advancement flaps for lip reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, Andrew J

    2014-08-01

    Island advancement flaps provide specific advantages for repairing certain defects on the upper lip. We discuss the design and execution of this flap for defects on the alar sill and philtrum. © 2014 The Author. Australasian Journal of Dermatology © 2014 The Australasian College of Dermatologists.

  20. Brain Anatomical Network and Intelligence

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jun; Qin, Wen; Li, Kuncheng; Yu, Chunshui; Jiang, Tianzi

    2009-01-01

    Intuitively, higher intelligence might be assumed to correspond to more efficient information transfer in the brain, but no direct evidence has been reported from the perspective of brain networks. In this study, we performed extensive analyses to test the hypothesis that individual differences in intelligence are associated with brain structural organization, and in particular that higher scores on intelligence tests are related to greater global efficiency of the brain anatomical network. We constructed binary and weighted brain anatomical networks in each of 79 healthy young adults utilizing diffusion tensor tractography and calculated topological properties of the networks using a graph theoretical method. Based on their IQ test scores, all subjects were divided into general and high intelligence groups and significantly higher global efficiencies were found in the networks of the latter group. Moreover, we showed significant correlations between IQ scores and network properties across all subjects while controlling for age and gender. Specifically, higher intelligence scores corresponded to a shorter characteristic path length and a higher global efficiency of the networks, indicating a more efficient parallel information transfer in the brain. The results were consistently observed not only in the binary but also in the weighted networks, which together provide convergent evidence for our hypothesis. Our findings suggest that the efficiency of brain structural organization may be an important biological basis for intelligence. PMID:19492086

  1. Anatomic partial nephrectomy: technique evolution.

    PubMed

    Azhar, Raed A; Metcalfe, Charles; Gill, Inderbir S

    2015-03-01

    Partial nephrectomy provides equivalent long-term oncologic and superior functional outcomes as radical nephrectomy for T1a renal masses. Herein, we review the various vascular clamping techniques employed during minimally invasive partial nephrectomy, describe the evolution of our partial nephrectomy technique and provide an update on contemporary thinking about the impact of ischemia on renal function. Recently, partial nephrectomy surgical technique has shifted away from main artery clamping and towards minimizing/eliminating global renal ischemia during partial nephrectomy. Supported by high-fidelity three-dimensional imaging, novel anatomic-based partial nephrectomy techniques have recently been developed, wherein partial nephrectomy can now be performed with segmental, minimal or zero global ischemia to the renal remnant. Sequential innovations have included early unclamping, segmental clamping, super-selective clamping and now culminating in anatomic zero-ischemia surgery. By eliminating 'under-the-gun' time pressure of ischemia for the surgeon, these techniques allow an unhurried, tightly contoured tumour excision with point-specific sutured haemostasis. Recent data indicate that zero-ischemia partial nephrectomy may provide better functional outcomes by minimizing/eliminating global ischemia and preserving greater vascularized kidney volume. Contemporary partial nephrectomy includes a spectrum of surgical techniques ranging from conventional-clamped to novel zero-ischemia approaches. Technique selection should be tailored to each individual case on the basis of tumour characteristics, surgical feasibility, surgeon experience, patient demographics and baseline renal function.

  2. Acoustic characteristics of externally blown flap systems with mixer nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodykoontz, J. H.; Dorsch, R. G.; Wagner, J. M.

    1974-01-01

    Noise tests were conducted on a large scale, cold flow model of an engine-under-the-wing externally blown flap lift augmentation system employing a mixer nozzle. The mixer nozzle was used to reduce the flap impingement velocity and, consequently, try to attenuate the additional noise caused by the interaction between the jet exhaust and the wing flap. Results from the mixer nozzle tests are summarized and compared with the results for a conical nozzle. The comparison showed that with the mixer nozzle, less noise was generated when the trailing flap was in a typical landing setting (e.g., 60 deg). However, for a takeoff flap setting (20 deg), there was little or no difference in the acoustic characteristics when either the mixer or conical nozzle was used.

  3. Study of Flapping Flight Using Discrete Vortex Method Based Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devranjan, S.; Jalikop, Shreyas V.; Sreenivas, K. R.

    2013-12-01

    In recent times, research in the area of flapping flight has attracted renewed interest with an endeavor to use this mechanism in Micro Air vehicles (MAVs). For a sustained and high-endurance flight, having larger payload carrying capacity we need to identify a simple and efficient flapping-kinematics. In this paper, we have used flow visualizations and Discrete Vortex Method (DVM) based simulations for the study of flapping flight. Our results highlight that simple flapping kinematics with down-stroke period (tD) shorter than the upstroke period (tU) would produce a sustained lift. We have identified optimal asymmetry ratio (Ar = tD/tU), for which flapping-wings will produce maximum lift and find that introducing optimal wing flexibility will further enhances the lift.

  4. Works on theory of flapping wing. [considering boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golubev, V. V.

    1980-01-01

    It is shown mathematically that taking account of the boundary layer is the only way to develop a theory of flapping wings without violating the basic observations and mathematics of hydromechanics. A theory of thrust generation by flapping wings can be developed if the conventional downstream velocity discontinuity surface is replaced with the observed Karman type vortex streets behind a flapping wing. Experiments show that the direction of such vortices is the reverse of that of conventional Karman streets. The streets form by breakdown of the boundary layer. Detailed analysis of the movements of certain birds and insects during flight 'in place' is fully consistent with this theory of the lift, thrust and drag of flapping wings. Further directions for research into flight with flapping wings are indicated.

  5. Clinical application of scrotal flap on penis lengthening.

    PubMed

    Zhuo, Qinqiang; Li, Shirong; Wu, Julong; Wang, Zhenxiang; Yang, Dongyun; Tao, Ling

    2009-03-01

    To investigate the clinical application of the scrotal flap on penis lengthening. One hundred and fifty-two patients were operated using the scrotal flap from July 1998 to January 2008 at the Department of Plastic and Aesthetic, Surgery Southwest Hospital, Chongqing, China. The procedure consisted of designing a positive sign shaped incision 1.5cm above the root of the penis, dissect and release the superficial suspensory ligament and part of the deep suspensory ligament, then cover the elongated cavernosum with proper scrotal flap. Six-month to 5-year follow-up showed that all patients were satisfied with the good contour and function of the penis. The operation was successful. The method of using scrotal flap on penis lengthening has the following advantages: simple operation, reliable blood supply of the flap, one-stage operation, and satisfactory postoperative results. It is a preferable operation technique for penis lengthening.

  6. Coarse-grained models for interacting, flapping swimmers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oza, Anand; Ristroph, Leif; Shelley, Michael; Courant Institute Applied Math Lab Collaboration

    2016-11-01

    We present the results of a theoretical investigation into the dynamics of interacting flapping swimmers. Our study is motivated by ongoing experiments in the NYU Applied Math Lab, in which freely-translating, heaving airfoils interact hydrodynamically to choose their relative positions and velocities. We develop a discrete dynamical system in which flapping swimmers shed point vortices during each flapping cycle, which in turn exert forces on the swimmers. We present a framework for finding exact solutions to the evolution equations and for assessing their stability, giving physical insight into the preference for certain observed "schooling states". The model may be extended to arrays of flapping swimmers, and configurations in which the swimmers' flapping frequencies are incommensurate. Generally, our results indicate how hydrodynamics may mediate schooling and flocking behavior in biological contexts. A. Oza acknowledges the support of the NSF Mathematical Sciences Postdoctoral Fellowship.

  7. Propeller Flaps: A Review of Indications, Technique, and Results

    PubMed Central

    D'Arpa, Salvatore; Toia, Francesca; Pirrello, Roberto; Moschella, Francesco; Cordova, Adriana

    2014-01-01

    In the last years, propeller flaps have become an appealing option for coverage of a large range of defects. Besides having a more reliable vascular pedicle than traditional flap, propeller flaps allow for great freedom in design and for wide mobilization that extend the possibility of reconstructing difficult wounds with local tissues and minimal donor-site morbidity. They also allow one-stage reconstruction of defects that usually require multiple procedures. Harvesting of a propeller flap requires accurate patient selection, preoperative planning, and dissection technique. Complication rate can be kept low, provided that potential problems are prevented, promptly recognized, and adequately treated. This paper reviews current knowledge on propeller flaps. Definition, classification, and indications in the different body regions are discussed based on a review of the literature and on the authors' experience. Details about surgical technique are provided, together with tips to avoid and manage complications. PMID:24971367

  8. LASIK flap buttonhole treated immediately by PRK with mitomycin C.

    PubMed

    Kymionis, George D; Portaliou, Dimitra M; Karavitaki, Alexandra E; Krasia, Maria S; Kontadakis, Georgios A; Stratos, Aimilianos; Yoo, Sonia H

    2010-03-01

    To describe the visual outcomes of three patients who had LASIK flap buttonhole and were treated immediately with photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) and topical mitomycin C (MMC) 0.02%. Three patients underwent bilateral LASIK with the SCHWIND Carriazo-Pendula 90 microm head microkeratome. In all three cases, a buttonhole flap occurred in the left eye. The flap was repositioned and phototherapeutic keratectomy for 50 microm was used for epithelial removal while immediate PRK with MMC was performed to treat the buttonhole flap. Three months after the procedure, uncorrected distance visual acuity and corrected distance visual acuity were 20/20 with regular topographic findings. Using PRK with MCC immediately after the occurrence of the LASIK flap buttonhole may be an effective treatment.

  9. Tensor fascia lata flap versus tensor fascia lata perforator-based island flap for the coverage of extensive trochanteric pressure sores.

    PubMed

    Kim, Youn Hwan; Kim, Sang Wha; Kim, Jeong Tae; Kim, Chang Yeon

    2013-06-01

    Tensor fascia lata (TFL) musculocutaneous flaps often require a donor site graft when harvesting a large flap. However, a major drawback is that it also sacrifices the muscle. To overcome this disadvantage, we designed a TFL perforator-based island flap that was harvested from a site near the defect and involved transposition within 90 degrees without full isolation of the pedicles. We performed procedures on 17 musculocutaneous flaps and 23 perforator-based island flaps, and compared the outcomes of these surgeries. The overall complication rate was 27.5% (11 regions). There were 7 complications related to the musculocutaneous flaps and 4 complications related to the perforator flaps. Although there were no statistical differences between those groups, lower complication rates were associated with procedures involving perforator flaps. The TFL perforator procedure is a simple and fast operation that avoids sacrificing muscle. This decreases complication rates compared to true perforator flap techniques that require dissection around the perforator or pedicle.

  10. Evaluation of the cranial rectus abdominus muscle pedicle flap as a blood supply for the caudal superficial epigastric skin flap in dogs.

    PubMed

    Degner, D A; Walshaw, R; Arnoczky, S P; Smith, R J; Patterson, J S; Degner, L A; Hamaide, A; Rosenstein, D

    1996-01-01

    This study evaluates the cranial rectus abdominus muscle pedicle flap as the sole blood supply for the caudal superficial epigastric skin flap. This flap was composed of a cranially based rectus abdominus muscle pedicle flap that was attached to the caudal superficial epigastric island skin flap (including mammary glands 2 to 5) via the pudendoepigastric trunk. Selective angiography of the cranial epigastric artery in eight cadaver dogs proved that the arterial vasculature in the cranial rectus abdominus was contiguous with that in the caudal superficial epigastric skin flap. In the live dog study, three of six of the flaps failed because of venous insufficiency. Necrosis of mammary gland 2 occurred in two of six flaps. One of six flaps survived with the exception of the cranial most aspect of mammary gland 2. Angiography of the cranial epigastric artery proved that arterial blood supply to these flaps was intact. Histological evaluation of the failed flaps showed full-thickness necrosis of the skin and subcutaneous tissues, the presence of severe congestion, and venous thrombosis. Retrograde venous blood flow through the flap was inconsistent, and hence resulted in failure of this myocutaneous flap. Use of this flap for clinical wound reconstruction cannot be recommended.

  11. Reconstruction of Large Postburn Facial-Scalp Scars by Expanded Pedicled Deltopectoral Flap and Random Scalp Flap: Technique Improvements to Enlarge the Reconstructive Territory.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xianjie; Li, Yang; Li, Weiyang; Liu, Chaohua; Peng, Pai; Song, Baoqiang; Xia, Wensen; Yi, Chenggang; Lu, Kaihua; Su, Yingjun

    2017-09-01

    The scars of face and scalp caused by burning often show as 1 large facial-scalp scar. The deltopectoral flap was recognized as one of the first choices for the facial scar reconstruction. However, this flap cannot cross the level of zygomatic arch traditionally when it was transferred with pedicle. When the flap reconstructed the facial-scalp scars with expanded random scalp flap, another flap was often needed to reconstruct the remaining temple and forehead scars. The authors reviewed 24 patients of large facial-scalp scars reconstructed by expanded pedicled deltopectoral flap and scalp flap with several technique improvements. The seaming scar between the deltopectoral flap and scalp flap in the temple region formed the new hairline. The technique improvements included ligation of the perforating branches of the transverse cervical artery and thoracoacromial artery when dissecting the pocket, the partial bolster compressive dressing to the distal part of the flap and dividing the pedicle partly as a delaying procedure before dividing the pedicle completely. Good skin compliance, normal contours, and emotional expression were noted. There were complications including expander exposure in 3 patients, stretch marks in 5 patients, flap tip necrosis in 2 patients, and mild postoperative hypertrophic scars in 3 patients. In conclusion, the expanded pedicled deltopectoral flap can enlarge the reconstructive territory in face successfully with the technique improvements. The combination of the expanded pedicled deltopectoral flap and scalp flap is a reliable and excellent reconstructive option for large postburn facial-scalp scars.

  12. Desferrioxamine: a practical method for improving neovascularization of prefabricated flaps.

    PubMed

    Li, Bin; Li, Hua; Jin, Rui; Cheng, Chen; Wang, Jing; Zhu, Hainan; Zan, Tao; Li, Qingfeng; Hao, Lijun

    2015-02-01

    Prefabricated flaps are an ideal alternative to repair massive and complex tissue defects. Nevertheless, the risk of necrosis due to unpredictable blood supplies is a major obstacle to the application of prefabricated flaps. The survival of a prefabricated flap depends on the neovascularization between the vascular carrier and the donor tissue. Here, we proposed that the iron chelator, desferrioxamine (DFX), owned therapeutic effects that promoted the neovascularization of prefabricated flaps. An abdominal prefabricated flap model was created in rats via a 2-stage operation. The rats were allocated into 4 groups as follows: 2 groups of rats received DFX treatments during the first or the second stage of the operation, respectively; 1 group of rats received a delay procedure 1 week before the second operation; and the final group was used as a blank control. Flap survival rates and capillary densities were evaluated between groups. The influence of DFX on the dermal fibroblasts was also studied in vitro. Desferrioxamine treatment during the first stage of the operation greatly increased flap survival rate compared to the blank control. The results were similar to those produced by the delay treatment. The vessel count results were consistent with the flap survival rate findings. In vitro, DFX treatment up-regulated the expression levels of several angiogenic factors in the dermal fibroblasts. Nevertheless, DFX treatment during the second stage of the operation was therapeutically detrimental. The application of DFX around the time of vascular carrier implantation greatly promoted neovascularization of prefabricated flaps, but was therapeutically detrimental after the flaps had been elevated.

  13. Release of hand burn contracture: comparing the ALT perforator flap with the gracilis free flap with split skin graft.

    PubMed

    Misani, M; Zirak, C; Hau, Lê Thua Trung; De Mey, A; Boeckx, W

    2013-08-01

    The use of microsurgery in the management of burn sequelae is not a new idea. According to the properties of various types of free flaps different goals can be achieved or various additional procedures have to be combined. We report the comparison of two different free flaps on a single patient for reconstruction of both upper extremities for burn sequelae. A 1-year-old child sustained severe burns on both hands, arms and thorax and was initially only treated conservatively. This resulted in severe contractures. At the age of 4-years a free gracilis flap was selected for reconstruction of his left hand and a free anterolateral thigh flap for the right hand. We noticed a better functional and esthetic result for the gracilis flap associated with a shorter operative time and a minor donor site morbidity. The intraoperative technique and time, postoperative complications, functional and esthetic results and donor site morbidities were studied in the two types of flaps chosen. A review of literature was also performed. Our experience reported a better success of the gracilis muscle flap covered with a split skin graft compared to the anterolateral thigh flap in the reconstruction of hand function after severe burn sequelae. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  14. 50 CFR Figure 16 to Part 223 - Escape Opening and Flap Dimensions for the Double Cover Flap TED

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Escape Opening and Flap Dimensions for the Double Cover Flap TED 16 Figure 16 to Part 223 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE MARINE MAMMALS THREATENED MARINE...

  15. 50 CFR Figure 16 to Part 223 - Escape Opening and Flap Dimensions for the Double Cover Flap TED

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 10 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Escape Opening and Flap Dimensions for the Double Cover Flap TED 16 Figure 16 to Part 223 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE MARINE MAMMALS THREATENED...

  16. 50 CFR Figure 16 to Part 223 - Escape Opening and Flap Dimensions for the Double Cover Flap TED

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Escape Opening and Flap Dimensions for the Double Cover Flap TED 16 Figure 16 to Part 223 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE MARINE MAMMALS THREATENED MARINE AND ANADROMOUS SPECIES Pt. 223, Fig. 1...

  17. Computed Tomographic Angiographic Perforator Localization for Virtual Surgical Planning of Osteocutaneous Fibular Free Flaps in Head and Neck Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Ettinger, Kyle S; Alexander, Amy E; Arce, Kevin

    2018-04-10

    Virtual surgical planning (VSP), computer-aided design and computer-aided modeling, and 3-dimensional printing are 3 distinct technologies that have become increasingly used in head and neck oncology and microvascular reconstruction. Although each of these technologies has long been used for treatment planning in other surgical disciplines, such as craniofacial surgery, trauma surgery, temporomandibular joint surgery, and orthognathic surgery, its widespread use in head and neck reconstructive surgery remains a much more recent event. In response to the growing trend of VSP being used for the planning of fibular free flaps in head and neck reconstruction, some surgeons have questioned the technology's implementation based on its inadequacy in addressing other reconstructive considerations beyond hard tissue anatomy. Detractors of VSP for head and neck reconstruction highlight its lack of capability in accounting for multiple reconstructive factors, such as recipient vessel selection, vascular pedicle reach, need for dead space obliteration, and skin paddle perforator location. It is with this premise in mind that the authors report on a straightforward technique for anatomically localizing peroneal artery perforators during VSP for osteocutaneous fibular free flaps in which bone and a soft tissue skin paddle are required for ablative reconstruction. The technique allows for anatomic perforator localization during the VSP session based solely on data existent at preoperative computed tomographic angiography (CTA); it does not require any modifications to preoperative clinical workflows. It is the authors' presumption that many surgeons in the field are unaware of this planning capability within the context of modern VSP for head and neck reconstruction. The primary purpose of this report is to introduce and further familiarize surgeons with the technique of CTA perforator localization as a method of improving intraoperative fidelity for VSP of osteocutaneous fibular

  18. A retrospective study: Multivariate logistic regression analysis of the outcomes after pressure sores reconstruction with fasciocutaneous, myocutaneous, and perforator flaps.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Yu-Jen; Liao, Wen-Chieh; Wang, Tien-Hsiang; Shih, Yu-Chung; Ma, Hsu; Lin, Chih-Hsun; Wu, Szu-Hsien; Perng, Cherng-Kang

    2017-08-01

    Despite significant advances in medical care and surgical techniques, pressure sore reconstruction is still prone to elevated rates of complication and recurrence. We conducted a retrospective study to investigate not only complication and recurrence rates following pressure sore reconstruction but also preoperative risk stratification. This study included 181 ulcers underwent flap operations between January 2002 and December 2013 were included in the study. We performed a multivariable logistic regression model, which offers a regression-based method accounting for the within-patient correlation of the success or failure of each flap. The overall complication and recurrence rates for all flaps were 46.4% and 16.0%, respectively, with a mean follow-up period of 55.4 ± 38.0 months. No statistically significant differences of complication and recurrence rates were observed among three different reconstruction methods. In subsequent analysis, albumin ≤3.0 g/dl and paraplegia were significantly associated with higher postoperative complication. The anatomic factor, ischial wound location, significantly trended toward the development of ulcer recurrence. In the fasciocutaneous group, paraplegia had significant correlation to higher complication and recurrence rates. In the musculocutaneous flap group, variables had no significant correlation to complication and recurrence rates. In the free-style perforator group, ischial wound location and malnourished status correlated with significantly higher complication rates; ischial wound location also correlated with significantly higher recurrence rate. Ultimately, our review of a noteworthy cohort with lengthy follow-up helped identify and confirm certain risk factors that can facilitate a more informed and thoughtful pre- and postoperative decision-making process for patients with pressure ulcers. Copyright © 2017 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All

  19. Evaluation of three-dimensional printing for internal fixation of unstable pelvic fracture from minimal invasive para-rectus abdominis approach: a preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Canjun; Xiao, Jidong; Wu, Zhanglin; Huang, Wenhua

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy and feasibility of three-dimensional printing (3D printing) assisted internal fixation of unstable pelvic fracture from minimal invasive para-rectus abdominis approach. A total of 38 patients with unstable pelvic fractures were analyzed retrospectively from August 2012 to February 2014. All cases were treated operatively with internal fixation assisted by three-dimensional printing from minimal invasive para-rectus abdominis approach. Both preoperative CT and three-dimensional reconstruction were performed. Pelvic model was created by 3D printing. Data including the best entry points, plate position and direction and length of screw were obtained from simulated operation based on 3D printing pelvic model. The diaplasis and internal fixation were performed by minimal invasive para-rectus abdominis approach according to the optimized dada in real surgical procedure. Matta and Majeed score were used to evaluate currative effects after operation. According to the Matta standard, the outcome of the diaplasis achieved 97.37% with excellent and good. Majeed assessment showed 94.4% with excellent and good. The imageological examination showed consistency of internal fixation and simulated operation. The mean operation time was 110 minutes, mean intraoperative blood loss 320 ml, and mean incision length 6.5 cm. All patients have achieved clinical healing, with mean healing time of 8 weeks. Three-dimensional printing assisted internal fixation of unstable pelvic fracture from minimal invasive para-rectus abdominis approach is feasible and effective. This method has the advantages of trauma minimally, bleeding less, healing rapidly and satisfactory reduction, and worthwhile for spreading in clinical practice.

  20. Establishing Immediate Reliability of Sonographic Measurements of the Transversus Abdominis in Asymptomatic Adults Performing Upright Loaded Functional Tasks in a Clinical Context Without Delayed Recorded Measurement.

    PubMed

    McPherson, Sue; Watson, Todd; Pate, Lindsey

    2016-08-01

    This study examined the reliability of sonographic measurements of the transversus abdominis of adults without low back pain during upright loaded functional tasks in real time, without relying on delayed recorded images. A single-group repeated-measures reliability study was conducted on 12 healthy participants without low back pain. Six of these adults reported a prior history of abdominal drawing-in maneuver training without sonographic measurement. The participants performed 3 trials of neutral standing, a loaded forward reach, and a loaded box lift under rest and with abdominal drawing-in maneuver instructions; task order was randomized. Transversus abdominis thickness measurements were obtained by an experienced rater using B-mode sonography in real-time via electronic calipers twice on the same static image during all trials by a rater. The rater was masked to group assignment and on-screen measurement output and required to respond to trivia questions between repeated measurements. The participants included 6 male and 6 female adults with a mean age ± SD of 26.3 ± 3.7 years. Intra-rater intraclass correlation coefficients (2,3) were high and precise for the rater's first and second measurements for all tasks and instruction conditions for mean transversus abdominis thickness and percent change in thickness measurements (eg, ranges were 0.968-0.997 for intraclass correlation coefficients, 0.01-0.21 mm for standard errors of the measurement, and 0.01-0.58 mm for minimal detectable changes). Calipers cleared by the rater or a research assistant produced similar findings of excellent reliability and precision. High intra-rater reliability and precision of transversus abdominis thickness measurements were obtained by a physical therapist in real time from asymptomatic adults performing upright loaded functional tasks under rest and with abdominal drawing-in maneuver instructions.

  1. Do various baseline characteristics of transversus abdominis and lumbar multifidus predict clinical outcomes in nonspecific low back pain? A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Wong, Arnold Y L; Parent, Eric C; Funabashi, Martha; Stanton, Tasha R; Kawchuk, Gregory N

    2013-12-01

    Although individual reports suggest that baseline morphometry or activity of transversus abdominis or lumbar multifidus predict clinical outcome of low back pain (LBP), a related systematic review is unavailable. Therefore, this review summarized evidence regarding the predictive value of these muscular characteristics. Candidate publications were identified from 6 electronic medical databases. After review, 5 cohort studies were included. Although this review intended to encompass studies using different muscle assessment methods, all included studies coincidentally used ultrasound imaging. No research investigated the relation between static morphometry and clinical outcomes. Evidence synthesis showed limited evidence supporting poor baseline transversus abdominis contraction thickness ratio as a treatment effect modifier favoring motor control exercise. Limited evidence supported that high baseline transversus abdominis lateral slide was associated with higher pain intensity after various exercise interventions at 1-year follow-up. However, there was limited evidence for the absence of relation between the contraction thickness ratio of transversus abdominis or anticipatory onset of lateral abdominal muscles at baseline and the short- or long-term LBP intensity after exercise interventions. There was conflicting evidence for a relation between baseline percent thickness change of lumbar multifidus during contraction and the clinical outcomes of patients after various conservative treatments. Given study heterogeneity, the small number of included studies and the inability of conventional greyscale B-mode ultrasound imaging to measure muscle activity, our findings should be interpreted with caution. Further large-scale prospective studies that use appropriate technology (ie, electromyography to assess muscle activity) should be conducted to investigate the predictive value of morphometry or activity of these muscles with respect to LBP-related outcomes measures

  2. Pressure Distributions for the GA(W)-2 Airfoil with 20% Aileron, 25% Slotted Flap and 30% Fowler Flap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wentz, W. H., Jr.; Fiscko, K. A.

    1978-01-01

    Surface pressure distributions were measured for the 13% thick GA(W)-2 airfoil section fitted with 20% aileron, 25% slotted flap and 30% Fowler flap. All tests were conducted at a Reynolds number of 2.2 x 10 to the 6th power and a Mach number of 0.13. Pressure distribution and force and moment coefficient measurements are compared with theoretical results for a number of cases. Agreement between theory and experiment is generally good for low angles of attack and small flap deflections. For high angles and large flap deflections where regions of separation are present, the theory is inadequate. Theoretical drag predictions are poor for all flap-extended cases.

  3. Distant Pedicle Flaps for Soft Tissue Coverage of Severely Burned Hands: An Old Idea Revisited

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-09-01

    choice remains immedi- Fig. 2. Groin flap. Groin flap revision with liposuction . D.J. Barillo et al. / Burns 27 (2001) 613–619 617 Fig. 2. (Continued...to cover hand defects. Secondary liposuction procedures are effec- tive in debulking the flap. The Tensor Fascia Lata Flap (TFL) is based upon the

  4. "Reading man flap" design for reconstruction of circular infraorbital and malar skin defects.

    PubMed

    Seyhan, Tamer; Caglar, Baris

    2008-11-01

    Surgical complications such as lid retraction and ectropion from graft or flap scar contracture make reconstruction of skin defects in the malar and infraorbital regions challenging. A new flap design, the reading man flap, was used to overcome these problems. The Limberg and bilobed flap were compared with the reading man flap. The reading man flap consists mainly of a superiorly based quadrangular flap and an inferiorly based triangular flap. Malar and infraorbital circular skin defects measuring 14 x 14 to 40 x 40 mm were reconstructed with a reading man flap in 13 patients. The defects occurred after basal cell carcinoma in all patients. The Limberg flap, bilobed flap, and reading man flap were planned for same-sized defects on the abdominoplasty resection material. The results were compared in terms of total scar area, scar length, and total healthy skin area discarded. When comparing the 3 flap designs, the reading man flap was the most suitable flap in terms of total scar area and length. The reading man flap can be used to reconstruct malar and infraorbital circular defects with good cosmetic results and without creating any tractional forces to the eyelids.

  5. Aeroacoustic Measurements of a Wing-Flap Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meadows, Kristine R.; Brooks, Thomas F.; Humphreys, William M.; Hunter, William H.; Gerhold, Carl H.

    1997-01-01

    Aeroacoustic measurements are being conducted to investigate the mechanisms of sound generation in high-lift wing configurations, and initial results are presented. The model is approximately 6 percent of a full scale configuration, and consists of a main element NACA 63(sub 2) - 215 wing section and a 30 percent chord half-span flap. Flow speeds up to Mach 0.17 are tested at Reynolds number up to approximately 1.7 million. Results are presented for a main element at a 16 degree angle of attack, and flap deflection angles of 29 and 39 degrees. The measurement systems developed for this test include two directional arrays used to localize and characterize the noise sources, and an array of unsteady surface pressure transducers used to characterize wave number spectra and correlate with acoustic measurements. Sound source localization maps show that locally dominant noise sources exist on the flap-side edge. The spectral distribution of the noise sources along the flap-side edge shows a decrease in frequency of the locally dominant noise source with increasing distance downstream of the flap leading edge. Spectra are presented which show general spectral characteristics of Strouhal dependent flow-surface interaction noise. However, the appearance of multiple broadband tonal features at high frequency indicates the presence of aeroacoustic phenomenon following different scaling characteristics. The scaling of the high frequency aeroacoustic phenomenon is found to be different for the two flap deflection angles tested. Unsteady surface pressure measurements in the vicinity of the flap edge show high coherence levels between adjacent sensors on the flap-side edge and on the flap edge upper surface in a region which corresponds closely to where the flap-side edge vortex begins to spill over to the flap upper surface. The frequency ranges where these high levels of coherence occur on the flap surface are consistent with the frequency ranges in which dominant features

  6. The effect of bridge exercise method on the strength of rectus abdominis muscle and the muscle activity of paraspinal muscles while doing treadmill walking with high heels.

    PubMed

    Kang, Taewook; Lee, Jaeseok; Seo, Junghoon; Han, Dongwook

    2017-04-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this research is to investigate the effect of the method of bridge exercise on the change of rectus abdominis muscle and the muscle activity of paraspinal muscles while doing treadmill walking with high heels. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects of this research are healthy female students consisting of 10 persons performing bridge exercises in a supine group, 10 persons performing bridge exercises in a prone group, and 10 persons in a control group while in S university in Busan. Bridge exercise in supine position is performed in hook lying position. Bridge exercise in prone position is plank exercise in prostrate position. To measure the strength of rectus abdominis muscle, maintaining times of the posture was used. To measure the muscle activity of paraspinal muscles, EMG (4D-MT & EMD-11, Relive, Korea) was used. [Results] The strength of rectus abdominis muscle of both bridge exercises in the supine group and bridge exercises in the prone group increases significantly after exercise. The muscle activity of paraspinal muscle such as thoracic parts and lumbar parts in bridge exercises in the prone group decreases statistically while walking on a treadmill with high heels. Muscle activity of thoracic parts paraspinal muscle and bridge exercises in the supine group decreased significantly. [Conclusion] According to this study, we noticed that bridge exercise in a prone position is desirable for women who prefer wearing high heels as a back pain prevention exercise method.

  7. Anatomical landmarks of radical prostatecomy.

    PubMed

    Stolzenburg, Jens-Uwe; Schwalenberg, Thilo; Horn, Lars-Christian; Neuhaus, Jochen; Constantinides, Costantinos; Liatsikos, Evangelos N

    2007-03-01

    In the present study, we review current literature and based on our experience, we present the anatomical landmarks of open and laparoscopic/endoscopic radical prostatectomy. A thorough literature search was performed with the Medline database on the anatomy and the nomenclature of the structures surrounding the prostate gland. The correct handling of puboprostatic ligaments, external urethral sphincter, prostatic fascias and neurovascular bundle is necessary for avoiding malfunction of the urogenital system after radical prostatectomy. When evaluating new prostatectomy techniques, we should always take into account both clinical and final oncological outcomes. The present review adds further knowledge to the existing "postprostatectomy anatomical hazard" debate. It emphasizes upon the role of the puboprostatic ligaments and the course of the external urethral sphincter for urinary continence. When performing an intrafascial nerve sparing prostatectomy most urologists tend to approach as close to the prostatic capsula as possible, even though there is no concurrence regarding the nomenclature of the surrounding fascias and the course of the actual neurovascular bundles. After completion of an intrafascial technique the specimen does not contain any periprostatic tissue and thus the detection of pT3a disease is not feasible. This especially becomes problematic if the tumour reaches the resection margin. Nerve sparing open and laparoscopic radical prostatectomy should aim in maintaining sexual function, recuperating early continence after surgery, without hindering the final oncological outcome to the procedure. Despite the different approaches for radical prostatectomy the key for better results is the understanding of the anatomy of the bladder neck and the urethra.

  8. Uncertainty Analysis for a Jet Flap Airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Lawrence L.; Cruz, Josue

    2006-01-01

    An analysis of variance (ANOVA) study was performed to quantify the potential uncertainties of lift and pitching moment coefficient calculations from a computational fluid dynamics code, relative to an experiment, for a jet flap airfoil configuration. Uncertainties due to a number of factors including grid density, angle of attack and jet flap blowing coefficient were examined. The ANOVA software produced a numerical model of the input coefficient data, as functions of the selected factors, to a user-specified order (linear, 2-factor interference, quadratic, or cubic). Residuals between the model and actual data were also produced at each of the input conditions, and uncertainty confidence intervals (in the form of Least Significant Differences or LSD) for experimental, computational, and combined experimental / computational data sets were computed. The LSD bars indicate the smallest resolvable differences in the functional values (lift or pitching moment coefficient) attributable solely to changes in independent variable, given just the input data points from selected data sets. The software also provided a collection of diagnostics which evaluate the suitability of the input data set for use within the ANOVA process, and which examine the behavior of the resultant data, possibly suggesting transformations which should be applied to the data to reduce the LSD. The results illustrate some of the key features of, and results from, the uncertainty analysis studies, including the use of both numerical (continuous) and categorical (discrete) factors, the effects of the number and range of the input data points, and the effects of the number of factors considered simultaneously.

  9. Aerodynamic sound generation of flapping wing.

    PubMed

    Bae, Youngmin; Moon, Young J

    2008-07-01

    The unsteady flow and acoustic characteristics of the flapping wing are numerically investigated for a two-dimensional model of Bombus terrestris bumblebee at hovering and forward flight conditions. The Reynolds number Re, based on the maximum translational velocity of the wing and the chord length, is 8800 and the Mach number M is 0.0485. The computational results show that the flapping wing sound is generated by two different sound generation mechanisms. A primary dipole tone is generated at wing beat frequency by the transverse motion of the wing, while other higher frequency dipole tones are produced via vortex edge scattering during a tangential motion. It is also found that the primary tone is directional because of the torsional angle in wing motion. These features are only distinct for hovering, while in forward flight condition, the wing-vortex interaction becomes more prominent due to the free stream effect. Thereby, the sound pressure level spectrum is more broadband at higher frequencies and the frequency compositions become similar in all directions.

  10. A Spine Loading Model of Women in the Military

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-10-01

    Table 1.8. Left erector spinae anatomical cross-sectional areas ..................................... 42 Table 1.9. Right rectus abdominis anatomical...cross-sectional areas ................................ 43 Table 1.10. Left rectus abdominis anatomical cross-sectional areas...Right rectus abdominis coronal plane moment-arms ....................................... 59 Table 1.26. Left rectus abdominis coronal plane moment-arms

  11. Design and construction of an airfoil with controlled flap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amin, Md. Ruhul; Rahman, S. M. Mahbobur; Mashud, Mohammad; Rabbi, Md. Fazle

    2017-06-01

    For modern aircrafts maneuvering control and reduction of power loss is a matter of great concern in Aerodynamics. Separation of airflow over the wings of aircraft at high angle of attack or at other situations is a hindrance to proper maneuvering control. As flow separation increases drag force on the aircraft, it consumes excess power. For these reasons much effort and research has gone into the design of aerodynamic surfaces which delay flow separation and keep the local flow attached for as long as possible. One of the simple and cost-effective way is to use a hinged flap on the wing of the aircraft, which lifts and self-adjusts to a position dependent on the aerodynamic forces and flap weight due to reversed flow at increasing angle of attack. There is a limitation of this kind of process. At very high angles of attack, the reversed flow would cause the flap to tip forwards entirely and the effect of the flap would vanish. For recovering this limitation an idea of controlling the movement or rotation of the flap has been proposed in this paper. A light surface was selected as a flap and was coupled to the shaft of a servo motor, which was placed on a model airfoil. For controlling the angle of rotation of the motor as well as the flap arbitrarily, an electronic circuit comprising necessary components was designed and applied to the servo motor successfully.

  12. Principles of definitive soft tissue coverage with flaps.

    PubMed

    Levin, L Scott

    2008-01-01

    Despite the emergence of negative pressure wound therapy with reticulated open cell foam (NPWT/ROCF) as delivered by V.A.C.(R) Therapy (KCI, San Antonio, TX) for orthopaedic trauma, vascularized tissue transfer whether it be pedicle, free, or tissue transfer using the operating microscope or as an island, remains the mainstay of soft tissue reconstruction for orthopaedic traumatology. The critisism of microvascular procedures has been that they are lengthy, costly, and required technical expertise to perform. While technical skills are required, microsurgical care has evolved into a routine operation with high degrees of success in experienced hand. The problem that still remains is access to surgeons who are interested in soft tissue reconstruction and can perform definitive coverage with flaps. There is a need in the orthopaedic community to solve the problem of lack of flap surgeons and as a result, NPWT/ROCF has been touted as the answer to flap reconstruction. NPWT/ROCF is an important addition to soft tissue reconstruction but it serves as a bridge rather than definitive coverage in many hands. Just as wound technology is evolving with tissue substitutes, growth factors and NPWT/ROCF flaps technology continues to advance with new perforator flaps and local regional flaps, particularly the sural flap, coming on line as mainstays of soft tissue reconstruction.

  13. Paramuscular perforators in DIEAP flap for breast reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Pons, Gemma; Masia, Jaume; Sanchez-Porro, Lídia; Larrañaga, Jose; Clavero, Juan Angel

    2014-12-01

    One of the main steps in perforator flap surgery is to identify the dominant perforator. Using multidetector row computed tomography (MDCT) for the preoperative planning of deep inferior epigastric artery perforator (DIEAP) flap surgery, we identified a perforator with a large caliber, an excellent location in the middle abdominal region, and a totally extramuscular trajectory in a significant number of patients. We describe the frequency of this perforator and determine its characteristics. We conducted a retrospective study of 482 patients who underwent 526 DIEAP flaps for breast reconstruction from October 2003 to October 2011. Mean age at surgery was 51.3 years old. A preoperative MDCT of abdominal vascularization was performed in all patients. MDCT identified a dominant perforator with a paramuscular course in 12.4% of abdominal walls. In all cases, it was located in the midline and emerged directly from the deep inferior epigastric system. Its mean caliber was 1.9 mm. The flap was harvested based on this perforator in all these patients, and mean harvest time was 51 minutes. The characteristics of this perforator made dissection easier and reduced morbidity at the donor site. There were no flap losses and the only complications were minor. We located a paramuscular perforator in 12.4% of patients undergoing breast reconstruction with abdominal perforator flaps. Its morphological features and extramuscular course make it the perforator of choice in DIEAP flap surgery.

  14. [Reconstruction of facial soft tissue defects with pedicled expanded flaps].

    PubMed

    Yangqun, Li; Yong, Tang; Wen, Chen; Zhe, Yang; Muxin, Zhao; Lisi, Xu; Chunmei, Hu; Yuanyuan, Liu; Ning, Ma; Jun, Feng; Weixin, Wang

    2014-09-01

    To investigate the application of pedicled expanded flaps for the reconstruction of facial soft tissue defects. The expanded skin flaps, pedicled with orbicularis oculi muscle, submental artery, the branch of facial artery, superficial temporal artery, interior upper arm artery, had similar texture and color as facial soft tissue. The pedicled expanded flaps have repaired the facial soft tissue defects. Between Jan. 2003 to Dec. 2013, 157 cases with facial soft tissue defects were reconstructed by pedicled expanded flaps. Epidermal necrosis happened at the distal end of 8 expanded flaps, pedicled with interior upper arm artery(4 cases), orbicularis oculi muscle(3 cases) and submental artery(1 case), which healed spontaneously after dressing. All the other flaps survived completely with similar color and inconspicuous scar. 112 cases were followed up for 8 months to 8 years. Satisfactory results were achieved in 75 cases. 37 cases with hypertrophic scar at incisions need secondary operation. Island pedicled expanded flap with similar texture and color as facial soft tissue is suitable for facial soft tissue defects. The facial extra-incision and large dog-ear deformity could be avoided.

  15. Droplet ejection and sliding on a flapping film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xi; Doughramaji, Nicole; Betz, Amy Rachel; Derby, Melanie M.

    2017-03-01

    Water recovery and subsequent reuse are required for human consumption as well as industrial, and agriculture applications. Moist air streams, such as cooling tower plumes and fog, represent opportunities for water harvesting. In this work, we investigate a flapping mechanism to increase droplet shedding on thin, hydrophobic films for two vibrational cases (e.g., ± 9 mm and 11 Hz; ± 2 mm and 100 Hz). Two main mechanisms removed water droplets from the flapping film: vibrational-induced coalescence/sliding and droplet ejection from the surface. Vibrations mobilized droplets on the flapping film, increasing the probability of coalescence with neighboring droplets leading to faster droplet growth. Droplet departure sizes of 1-2 mm were observed for flapping films, compared to 3-4 mm on stationary films, which solely relied on gravity for droplet removal. Additionally, flapping films exhibited lower percentage area coverage by water after a few seconds. The second removal mechanism, droplet ejection was analyzed with respect to surface wave formation and inertia. Smaller droplets (e.g., 1-mm diameter) were ejected at a higher frequency which is associated with a higher acceleration. Kinetic energy of the water was the largest contributor to energy required to flap the film, and low energy inputs (i.e., 3.3 W/m2) were possible. Additionally, self-flapping films could enable novel water collection and condensation with minimal energy input.

  16. Keystone-designed buried de-epithelialized flap

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hoon; Ryu, Wan Cheol; Yoon, Chi Sun; Kim, Kyu Nam

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Effective obliteration of dead space after reconstructive surgery facilitates a good cosmetic outcome and prevention of delayed wound healing and recurrent infection. We evaluated the efficacy of a keystone-designed buried de-epithelialized (KBD) flap for the obliteration of small to moderately sized surgical dead spaces. We reviewed the medical records of patients who received a KBD flap following removal of a mass or debridement of necrotic tissue from September 2015 to February 2016. The diagnosis, site, dead space dimensions, flap width, drain data, complications, and follow-up duration were recorded. Twenty-eight KBD flaps were evaluated, including 9 cases of fat necrosis, 7 cases of epidermal cyst, and 12 cases of lipoma. Dead space dimensions ranged from 2 × 1.5 × 1 cm to 10 × 5 × 3 cm, with a mean depth of 2.01 cm. Flap sizes ranged from 2.5 × 1 cm to 11 × 3 cm, with a mean flap width of 2.01 cm. No postoperative complications, such as seroma or hematoma, occurred. The cosmetic results were favorable, and all patients were satisfied with their final outcomes. The KBD flap is useful for the obliteration of small to moderately sized surgical dead spaces both spatially and physiologically and shows excellent cosmetic outcomes. PMID:28538418

  17. Reconstruction of the vulva with sensate gluteal fold flaps.

    PubMed

    Kuokkanen, H; Mikkola, A; Nyberg, R H; Vuento, M H; Kaartinen, I; Kuoppala, T

    2013-01-01

    Soft-tissue reconstruction of the vulva following resection of malignancies is challenging. The function of perineal organs should be preserved and the reconstructed area should maintain an acceptable cosmetic appearance. Reconstruction with local flaps is usually sufficient in the primary phase after a radical vulvectomy. Numerous flaps have been designed for vulvar reconstruction usually based on circulation from the internal pudendal artery branches. In this paper we introduce our modification of the gluteal fold V-Y advancement flap as a primary reconstruction after a radical vulvectomy. Twenty-two patients were operated with a radical vulvectomy because of vulvar malignancies. The operation was primary in eight and secondary in 14 patients. The reconstruction of the vulva was performed in the same operation for each patient. All flaps survived completely. Wound complications were registered in three patients. Late problems with urinary stream were corrected in two patients. A local recurrence of the malignancy was observed in six patients during the follow-up period. Gluteal fold flap is easy to perform, has a low rate of complications and gives good functional results. Even a large defect can be reconstructed reliably with this method. A gluteal fold V-Y advancement flap is sensate and our modification allows the flap to be transposed with lesser dissection as presented before.

  18. Vascular Patterns and Perfusion of Mucogingival Tissues and their Relation to Periodontal Flap Design

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-05-01

    flaps were mosL vulnerable to necrosis . Sutures placed with minimal tension did not adversely affect blood perfusion of surgically replaced flaps. vi * C...perfusion change with narrow flaps most severely affected. In general, narrow thin flaps were most vulnerable to necrosis . Sutures placed with minimal...Day Narrow Pedicle ............. 75 B. Fluorescein Angiography of Envelope Flap Immediately Post Surgery and Necrosis of Marginal Third of Six

  19. Subcutaneous pedicle propeller flap: An old technique revisited and modified!

    PubMed Central

    Karki, Durga; Mehta, Nikhil; Narayan, Ravi Prakash

    2016-01-01

    Background: Post-burn axillary and elbow scar contracture is a challenging problem to the reconstructive surgeon owing to the wide range of abduction and extension that should be achieved, respectively, while treating either of the joint. The aim of this paper is to highlight the use of subcutaneous pedicle propeller flap for the management of post-burn axillary and elbow contractures. Methodology: This is a prospective case study of axillary and elbow contractures managed at a tertiary care hospital using propeller flap based on subcutaneous pedicle from 2009 to 2014. Surgical treatment comprised of subcutaneous-based pedicle propeller flap from the normal tissue within the contracture based on central axis pedicle. The flap was rotated axially to break the contracture. The technique further encompassed a modification, a Zig-Zag incision of the flap, which was seen to prevent hypertrophy along the incision line. There was a mean period of 12 months of follow-up. Results: Thirty-eight patients consisting of 22 males and 16 females were included in this study among which 23 patients had Type II axillary contractures and 15 had moderate flexion contractures at elbow joint. The post-operative abduction achieved at shoulder joint had a mean of 168° whereas extension achieved at elbow had a mean of 175°. The functional and aesthetic results were satisfactory. Conclusion: The choice of surgical procedure for reconstruction of post-burn upper extremity contractures should be made according to the pattern of scar contracture and the state of surrounding skin. The choice of subcutaneous pedicle propeller flap should be emphasised because of the superior functional results of flap as well as ease to learn it. Moreover, the modification of propeller flap described achieves better results in terms of scar healing. There is an inter-positioning of healthy skin in between the graft, so it prevents scar band formation all around the flap. PMID:27833285

  20. Subcutaneous pedicle propeller flap: An old technique revisited and modified!

    PubMed

    Karki, Durga; Mehta, Nikhil; Narayan, Ravi Prakash

    2016-01-01

    Post-burn axillary and elbow scar contracture is a challenging problem to the reconstructive surgeon owing to the wide range of abduction and extension that should be achieved, respectively, while treating either of the joint. The aim of this paper is to highlight the use of subcutaneous pedicle propeller flap for the management of post-burn axillary and elbow contractures. This is a prospective case study of axillary and elbow contractures managed at a tertiary care hospital using propeller flap based on subcutaneous pedicle from 2009 to 2014. Surgical treatment comprised of subcutaneous-based pedicle propeller flap from the normal tissue within the contracture based on central axis pedicle. The flap was rotated axially to break the contracture. The technique further encompassed a modification, a Zig-Zag incision of the flap, which was seen to prevent hypertrophy along the incision line. There was a mean period of 12 months of follow-up. Thirty-eight patients consisting of 22 males and 16 females were included in this study among which 23 patients had Type II axillary contractures and 15 had moderate flexion contractures at elbow joint. The post-operative abduction achieved at shoulder joint had a mean of 168° whereas extension achieved at elbow had a mean of 175°. The functional and aesthetic results were satisfactory. The choice of surgical procedure for reconstruction of post-burn upper extremity contractures should be made according to the pattern of scar contracture and the state of surrounding skin. The choice of subcutaneous pedicle propeller flap should be emphasised because of the superior functional results of flap as well as ease to learn it. Moreover, the modification of propeller flap described achieves better results in terms of scar healing. There is an inter-positioning of healthy skin in between the graft, so it prevents scar band formation all around the flap.

  1. "Internet of Things" Real-Time Free Flap Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang Hun; Shin, Ho Seong; Lee, Sang Hwan

    2018-01-01

    Free flaps are a common treatment option for head and neck reconstruction in plastic reconstructive surgery, and monitoring of the free flap is the most important factor for flap survival. In this study, the authors performed real-time free flap monitoring based on an implanted Doppler system and "internet of things" (IoT)/wireless Wi-Fi, which is a convenient, accurate, and efficient approach for surgeons to monitor a free flap. Implanted Doppler signals were checked continuously until the patient was discharged by the surgeon and residents using their own cellular phone or personal computer. If the surgeon decided that a revision procedure or exploration was required, the authors checked the consumed time (positive signal-to-operating room time) from the first notification when the flap's status was questioned to the determination for revision surgery according to a chart review. To compare the efficacy of real-time monitoring, the authors paired the same number of free flaps performed by the same surgeon and monitored the flaps using conventional methods such as a physical examination. The total survival rate was greater in the real-time monitoring group (94.7% versus 89.5%). The average time for the real-time monitoring group was shorter than that for the conventional group (65 minutes versus 86 minutes). Based on this study, real-time free flap monitoring using IoT technology is a method that surgeon and reconstruction team can monitor simultaneously at any time in any situation.

  2. Anatomical and functional outcomes of retinectomies in retinal detachments complicated by proliferative vitreoretinopathy.

    PubMed

    Adhi, Mohammad Idrees; Siyal, Nisar; Aziz, Sumbul

    2017-01-01

    To study anatomical and functional outcomes of retinectomies in rhegmatogenous retinal detachments complicated by proliferative vitreoretinopathy. This is a retrospective interventional consecutive case series of eyes with rhegmatogenous retinal detachments complicated by advanced proliferative vitreoretinopathy and managed by relaxing retinectomy over a period of seventeen years. Three-port pars plana vitrectomy included core vitrectomy and removal of all epi-retinal membranes. On failure to flatten, retina was cut and excised. Basal vitrectomy and removal of anterior flap of retina then followed. Silicone oil was used as temponade in majority of cases. The dependent variables were anatomical and functional outcomes. The statistical analysis was performed on SPSS 21. Series included 370 eyes of 337 patients. Mean follow up was 39 months. Scleral explant was used in 90(24.39%) cases. Two hundred and nine (56.49%) eyes were operated with trans conjunctival sutureless vitrectomy technique. Procedure was bilateral in 33 patients (09.79%). Retina attached in 311(84.05%) eyes after initial surgery. Final re-attachment after one or more surgeries was achieved in 344(92.97%) eyes. Two hundred and eleven (57.02%) cases achieved visual acuity of 6/60 or better. Relaxing retinectomies have good and encouraging anatomical and functional outcomes. This surgery can be effectively carried out with trans conjunctival sutureless vitrectomy technique.

  3. Osteoradionecrosis of the olecranon: treatment by radial forearm flap

    SciTech Connect

    Thornton, J.W.; Stevenson, T.R.; VanderKolk, C.A.

    1987-12-01

    Osteoradionecrosis of the olecranon is an unusual pathologic entity, treated best by debridement and wound closure using vascularized tissue. Local skin is often unavailable for flap design and transposition. The radial forearm flap can be isolated on a proximal vascular pedicle and transposed to cover the wound. In the case presented, healing was brisk and complete, allowing early elbow mobilization. Although the donor site is not easily concealed, no functional impairment results from flap elevation and all full-thickness wounds are confined to the involved extremity.

  4. Free anterolateral thigh flap for reconstruction of major craniofacial defects.

    PubMed

    Amin, Ayman; Rifaat, Mohammed; Civantos, Francisco; Weed, Donald; Abu-Sedira, Mohammed; Bassiouny, Mahmoud

    2006-02-01

    Free-tissue transfer has revolutionized skull-base surgery by expanding the ability to perform cranial base resection and by improving the quality of reconstruction. The anterolateral thigh flap has come recently into use in the field of head and neck reconstruction. Its role in craniofacial and midface reconstruction has not been specifically defined. This study involved a total of 18 patients who were treated over a 5-year period from 1998 to 2003. Seventeen patients had locally advanced head and neck cancer, requiring craniofacial resection, and one patient had a complicated gun shot wound of the forehead. Thirteen patients were treated at the National Cancer Institute, Cairo University, Egypt, and five patients at the University of Miami, Florida. The patients presented with defects of the anterior skull base (5), lateral skull base (3), scalp and calvarium (3), and the midface (7). The anterolateral thigh flap was used as a myocutaneous flap in 11 cases and as a perforator fasciocutaneous flap in seven cases. Musculocutaneous perforators supplied the majority of flaps (17/18). Total flap survival occurred in 17 cases; one patient developed complete flap necrosis. The most commonly used recipient vessels were the facial vessels and the external jugular vein. Major complications included one case with meningitis; the patient died after failure of treatment. Another patient died 6 weeks postoperatively from pulmonary embolism. One patient developed CSF leak that stopped spontaneously. In addition, two patients developed minor wound dehiscence that healed spontaneously. The donor-site wound healed without problems except in two cases. One patient had an incomplete take of the skin graft; the other developed wound infection and superficial sloughing. Both wounds healed spontaneously. In addition to the feasibility of simultaneous flap harvesting with tumor resection, the flap's advantage in skull base reconstruction is its reliable blood supply, which can provide

  5. [Applicability of Pedicled Coronoid Process and Temporal Muscle(Fascial)Combined(PCPTM)Flap for Reconstruction of Orbital Floor Defect Following Hemi-Maxillectomy for Advanced Maxillary Cancer - A Report of Two Cases].

    PubMed

    Karino, Masaaki; Kanno, Takahiro; Kaneko, Ichiro; Ide, Taichi; Yoshino, Aya; Sekine, Joji

    2017-11-01

    We usually perform surgery for resectable oral and maxillofacial carcinomas. Following complete cancer resection, reconstruction of soft and hard tissues using various types of local flaps and/or vascularized free flaps is usually performed. The maxilla is composed of various anatomical structures. In particular, reconstruction of the orbit is one of the most important and challenging procedures for prevention of functional and esthetic complications. Here we report 2 cases of orbital floor defect reconstruction following advanced maxillary cancer resection using a pedicled coronoid process and temporal muscle (fascial)combined(PCPTM)flap. Case 1: A 69-year-old Japanese man with squamous cell carcinoma of the left maxilla (cT4aN2bM0, Stage IV A). Case 2: An 86-year-old Japanese woman with recurrence of myoepithelial carcinoma of the left maxilla. In both cases, the orbital floor defect was reconstructed following hemi-maxillectomy using a PCPTM flap. Minor infection and/or partial necrosis were observed postoperatively, and a maxillofacial prosthesis was used in one case. A PCPTM flap was feasible for reconstruction of surgical defects of the orbital floor following maxillectomy for cancer.

  6. The Temporalis Muscle Flap for Palate Reconstruction: Case Series and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Brennan, Tara; Tham, Tristan M.; Costantino, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Introduction  The temporalis myofascial (TM) is an important reconstructive flap in palate reconstruction. Past studies have shown the temporalis myofascial flap to be safe as well as effective. Free flap reconstruction of palate defects is also a popular method used by contemporary surgeons. We aim to reaffirm the temporalis myofascial flap as a viable alternative to free flaps for palate reconstruction. Objective  We report our results using the temporalis flap for palate reconstruction in one of the largest case series reported. Our literature review is the first to describe complication rates of palate reconstruction using the TM flap. Methods  Retrospective chart review and review of the literature. Results  Fifteen patients underwent palate reconstruction with the TM flap. There were no cases of facial nerve injury. Five (33%) of these patients underwent secondary cranioplasty to address temporal hollowing after the TM flap. Three out of fifteen (20%) had flap related complications. Fourteen (93%) of the palate defects were successfully reconstructed, with the remaining case pending a secondary procedure to close the defect. Ultimately, all of the flaps (100%) survived. Conclusion  The TM flap is a viable method of palate defect closure with a high defect closure rate and flap survival rate. TM flaps are versatile in repairing palate defects of all sizes, in all regions of the palate. Cosmetic deformity created from TM flap harvest may be addressed using cranioplasty implant placement, either primarily or during a second stage procedure. PMID:28680495

  7. The Economy in Autologous Tissue Transfer: Part 1. The Kiss Flap Technique.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi Xin; Hayakawa, Thomas J; Levin, L Scott; Hallock, Geoffrey G; Lazzeri, Davide

    2016-03-01

    All reconstructive microsurgeons realize the need to improve aesthetic and functional donor-site outcomes. A "kiss" flap design concept was developed to increase the surface area of skin flap coverage while minimizing donor-site morbidity. The main goal of the kiss flap technique is to harvest multiple skin paddles that are smaller than those raised with traditional techniques, to minimize donor-site morbidity. These smaller flap components are then sutured to each other, or said to kiss each other side-by-side, to create a large, wide