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Sample records for abducens nerve palsy

  1. Abducens Nerve Palsy in Pregnancy: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Yousefi, Sayedeh Reyhaneh

    2016-01-01

    Headache, blurring of vision and confusion are neurologic symptoms of preeclampsia. Whereas abducens nerve palsy during pregnancy is an extremely rare condition, we report here a 40-year-old patient with diplopia, blurring of vision and abducens nerve palsy in the 39th week of pregnancy with history of hypertension (HTN). No specific pathology was found. Symptoms of abducens nerve palsy were resolved spontaneously by controlling blood pressure after delivery. PMID:28208948

  2. Benign recurrent abducens (6th) nerve palsy in two children.

    PubMed

    Knapp, Christopher M; Gottlob, Irene

    2004-03-01

    Benign recurrent abducens (6th) nerve palsy is rare. We found 23 cases in children reported in the literature; however, many of these cases followed immunization or were associated with viral illness. Here we report two cases of recurrent abducens nerve palsy with no obvious etiology. The diagnosis should be considered in any child who experiences abducens nerve palsy in the absence of any underlying pathology or precipitating factors.

  3. Horner's Syndrome with Abducens Nerve Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Na Hee; Sung, Sun Hee

    2011-01-01

    A 68-year-old male patient presented with a week of sudden diplopia. He had been diagnosed with nasopharyngeal cancer 8 months prior and had undergone chemotherapy with radiotherapy. Eight-prism diopter right esotropia in the primary position and a remarkable limitation in abduction in his right eye were observed. Other pupillary disorders and lid drooping were not found. After three weeks, the marginal reflex distance 1 was 3 mm in the right eye and 5 mm in the left eye. The pupil diameter was 2.5 mm in the right eye, and 3 mm in the left eye under room illumination. Under darkened conditions, the pupil diameter was 3.5 mm in the right eye, and 5 mm in the left eye. After topical application of 0.5% apraclonidine, improvement in the right ptosis and reversal pupillary dilatation were observed. On brain magnetic resonance imaging, enhanced lesions on the right cavernous sinus, both sphenoidal sinuses, and skull base suggested the invasion of nasopharyngeal cancer. Lesions on the cavernous sinus need to be considered in cases of abducens nerve palsy and ipsilateral Horner's syndrome. PMID:22131787

  4. Horner's syndrome with abducens nerve palsy.

    PubMed

    Kang, Na Hee; Lim, Key Hwan; Sung, Sun Hee

    2011-12-01

    A 68-year-old male patient presented with a week of sudden diplopia. He had been diagnosed with nasopharyngeal cancer 8 months prior and had undergone chemotherapy with radiotherapy. Eight-prism diopter right esotropia in the primary position and a remarkable limitation in abduction in his right eye were observed. Other pupillary disorders and lid drooping were not found. After three weeks, the marginal reflex distance 1 was 3 mm in the right eye and 5 mm in the left eye. The pupil diameter was 2.5 mm in the right eye, and 3 mm in the left eye under room illumination. Under darkened conditions, the pupil diameter was 3.5 mm in the right eye, and 5 mm in the left eye. After topical application of 0.5% apraclonidine, improvement in the right ptosis and reversal pupillary dilatation were observed. On brain magnetic resonance imaging, enhanced lesions on the right cavernous sinus, both sphenoidal sinuses, and skull base suggested the invasion of nasopharyngeal cancer. Lesions on the cavernous sinus need to be considered in cases of abducens nerve palsy and ipsilateral Horner's syndrome.

  5. Abducens nerve palsy due to inferior petrosal sinus thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Shivam Om; Siddiqui, Junaid; Katirji, Bashar

    2017-02-24

    Isolated unilateral abducens nerve palsy is usually due to ischemia, trauma or neoplasm. Dorello's canal is the space between the petrous apex and superolateral portion of the clivus, bound superiorly by Gruber's ligament. The abducens nerve travels with inferior petrosal sinus (IPS) though the Dorello's canal before entering the cavernous sinus. A 31-year-old man presented with neck pain, and binocular horizontal diplopia, worse looking towards left and at distance. He had a history of intravenous drug abuse but no history of hypertension or diabetes. On examination, he had complete left 6th nerve palsy with normal fundi, pupils, and other cranial nerves. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia was detected with naïve tricuspid valve endocarditis and multiple septic emboli to lungs with infarcts. His cerebrospinal fluid was normal. MRI of the brain was normal. MRV of head and neck showed thrombosis of the left internal jugular vein, left sigmoid sinus and left inferior petrosal sinus with normal cavernous sinus and no evidence of mastoiditis. He was treated with broad spectrum antibiotics. He was not anticoagulated for fear of pulmonary hemorrhage from pulmonary infarcts. Although cerebral venous sinus thrombosis commonly presents with elevated intracranial pressure, isolated ipsilateral 6th nerve palsy from its compression in Dorello's canal due to thrombosis of the ipsilateral inferior petrosal sinus is extremely rare. To our knowledge, only two patients have been reported with isolated abducens palsy due to IPS thrombosis; one caused by septic emboli and the other developed it during IPS cortisol level sampling.

  6. Orbitoethmoidal impacted injury by kitchen knife causing abducens nerve palsy.

    PubMed

    Carneiro, José Thiers; da Silva Tabosa, Ana Karla; de Souza, Fernando Jordão; Shinohara, Elio Hitoshi

    2011-06-01

    Impacted knife injuries in the maxillofacial region are rare and infrequently reported. In cases of injury involving orbit or eye, these reports are even rarer. Damage to the orbital contents may result in a rupture of the globe, extraocular muscle injury, lacrimal gland damage, and others. Orbital foreign bodies are not only difficult to detect, and clinical features vary according to its size, characteristics, shape, penetrating method, and site. In this report, a case of abducens nerve palsy after orbitoethmoidal knife injury is presented.

  7. Alternating Hemiplegia with Ipsilateral Supranuclear Facial Palsy and Abducens Nerve Palsy Caused by Pontine Infarction.

    PubMed

    Maeshima, Shinichiro; Tsunoda, Tetsuya; Okamoto, Sayaka; Ozeki, Yasunori; Sonoda, Shigeru

    2016-01-01

    A 62-year-old right-handed man was diagnosed with a cerebral infarction in the ventromedial region of the left lower pons. He showed left abducens nerve palsy, left-sided supranuclear palsy of the lower part of the face and right hemiparesis. We hypothesized that the mechanism underlying the patient's ipsilateral supranuclear facial palsy involved the corticofacial fibers after they crossed the midline.

  8. Horner's Syndrome and Contralateral Abducens Nerve Palsy Associated with Zoster Meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Bum-Joo; Kim, Ji-Soo

    2013-01-01

    A 55-year-old woman presented with diplopia following painful skin eruptions on the right upper extremity. On presentation, she was found to have 35 prism diopters of esotropia and an abduction limitation in the left eye. Two weeks later, she developed blepharoptosis and anisocoria with a smaller pupil in the right eye, which increased in the darkness. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis showed pleocytosis and a positive result for immunoglobulin G antibody to varicella zoster virus. She was diagnosed to have zoster meningitis with Horner's syndrome and contralateral abducens nerve palsy. After intravenous antiviral and steroid treatments, the vesicular eruptions and abducens nerve palsy improved. Horner's syndrome and diplopia resolved after six months. Here we present the first report of Horner's syndrome and contralateral abducens nerve palsy associated with zoster meningitis. PMID:24311937

  9. Horner's syndrome and contralateral abducens nerve palsy associated with zoster meningitis.

    PubMed

    Cho, Bum-Joo; Kim, Ji-Soo; Hwang, Jeong-Min

    2013-12-01

    A 55-year-old woman presented with diplopia following painful skin eruptions on the right upper extremity. On presentation, she was found to have 35 prism diopters of esotropia and an abduction limitation in the left eye. Two weeks later, she developed blepharoptosis and anisocoria with a smaller pupil in the right eye, which increased in the darkness. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis showed pleocytosis and a positive result for immunoglobulin G antibody to varicella zoster virus. She was diagnosed to have zoster meningitis with Horner's syndrome and contralateral abducens nerve palsy. After intravenous antiviral and steroid treatments, the vesicular eruptions and abducens nerve palsy improved. Horner's syndrome and diplopia resolved after six months. Here we present the first report of Horner's syndrome and contralateral abducens nerve palsy associated with zoster meningitis.

  10. [Case of pontine infarction causing alternating hemiplegia with ipsilateral abducens nerve palsy and contralateral supranuclear facial nerve palsy].

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Katsuhiko; Tougou, Masaki; Oishi, Minoru; Kamei, Satoshi; Mizutani, Tomohiko

    2008-02-01

    We report a 73-year-old man with alternating abducent hemiplegia (Raymond syndrome) and contralateral supranuclear facial nerve palsy. On admission, he showed lateral gaze palsy of the right eye, left supranuclear facial nerve palsy, dysarthria and left hemiparesis. Brain MRI showed an infarct that was located in the paramedian and lateral area in the base of the caudal pons on the right side. MRA showed a mild stenosis of the basilar artery. Hemiplegia and supranuclear facial nerve palsy were considered to be caused by the involvement of corticospinal tract and corticobulbar tract that run at the ventromedial area of the pons. Abducens nerve palsy was considered to be caused by the involvement of infranuclear abducens nerve fibers. There has been one previously reported case of Raymond syndrome in which MRI determined the precise location of the lesion. In this case, a small hematoma was found at the ventral and medial pontomedullary junction, whereas the infarct in our case was located in the pontine base. We considered that documentation of our case was an important contribution to determine the pathogenesis of supranuclear facial nerve palsy due to caudal pontine lesions.

  11. MRI negative meningeal myeloma with abducens nerve palsies responding to intrathecal chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Grisold, A; Weber, C; Hainfellner, J; Gisslinger, H; Kasprian, G; Auff, E; Sycha, T; Grisold, W

    2014-12-15

    Meningeal involvement of multiple myeloma is rare. A patient with multiple myeloma presented with bilateral abducens nerve palsies. In the MRI neither lytic skull lesions nor meningeal enhancement could be found. The diagnosis was based on CSF studies and cytology. A neurologic remission was achieved with intrathecal chemotherapy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Unilateral abducens and bilateral facial nerve palsies associated with posterior fossa exploration surgery

    PubMed Central

    Khalil, Ayman; Clerkin, James; Mandiwanza, Tafadzwa; Green, Sandra; Javadpour, Mohsen

    2016-01-01

    Multiple cranial nerves palsies following a posterior fossa exploration confined to an extradural compartment is a rare clinical presentation. This case report describes a young man who developed a unilateral abducens and bilateral facial nerve palsies following a posterior fossa exploration confined to an extradural compartment. There are different theories to explain this presentation, but the exact mechanism remains unclear. We propose that this patient cranial nerve palsies developed following cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak, potentially as a consequence of rapid change in CSF dynamics. PMID:26951144

  13. Abducens nerve palsy caused by basilar impression associated with atlanto-occipital assimilation.

    PubMed

    Hirose, Y; Sagoh, M; Mayanagi, K; Murakami, H

    1998-06-01

    A 47-year-old male presented with abducens nerve palsy due to basilar impression associated with atlanto-occipital assimilation manifesting as slowly progressive bilateral trigeminal neuralgia and diplopia in the right lateral gaze. X-ray and computed tomography of the skull confirmed the diagnosis of basilar impression and atlanto-occipital assimilation, and magnetic resonance imaging disclosed tightness of the posterior cranial fossa. Surgical suboccipital decompression resulted in gradual resolution of the patient's complaints, and no additional symptoms were recognized. Impairment of the sixth cranial nerve is a rare symptom compared to those of the fifth or the eighth cranial nerve in a patient with a craniocervical malformation. However, the present case shows the possibility of cranial nerve dysfunction due to tightness of the posterior cranial fossa, and suggests that surgical treatment for basilar impression with atlanto-occipital assimilation should be considered in patients with uncommon and unusual symptoms.

  14. Bilateral abducens and facial nerve palsies as a localizing sign due to reduction in intracranial pressure after fourth ventriculoperitoneal shunting

    PubMed Central

    Maramattom, Boby Varkey; Panikar, Dilip

    2016-01-01

    A trapped fourth ventricle often requires fourth ventriculoperitoneal shunting (4VP). Complications of this procedure include shunt blockage, infection, shunt migration, and overdrainage. Cranial nerve palsies are very rare after 4VP shunting and have been described with over drainage and brainstem distortion. We present an unusual case of bilateral abducens and facial nerve palsies after 4VP shunting after normalization of 4th ventricular parameters. Measurement of various brainstem angles presented us with a plausible hypothesis to explain the cranial nerve dysfunction. PMID:27994363

  15. The diagnostic yield of neuroimaging in sixth nerve palsy--Sankara Nethralaya Abducens Palsy Study (SNAPS): Report 1.

    PubMed

    Nair, Akshay Gopinathan; Ambika, Selvakumar; Noronha, Veena Olma; Gandhi, Rashmin Anilkumar

    2014-10-01

    The aim was to assess the etiology of sixth nerve palsy and on the basis of our data, to formulate a diagnostic algorithm for the management in sixth nerve palsy. Retrospective chart review. Of the 104 neurologically isolated cases, 9 cases were attributable to trauma, and 95 (86.36%) cases were classified as nontraumatic, neurologically isolated cases. Of the 95 nontraumatic, isolated cases of sixth nerve palsy, 52 cases were associated with vasculopathic risk factors, namely diabetes and hypertension and were classified as vasculopathic sixth nerve palsy (54.7%), and those with a history of sixth nerve palsy from birth (6 cases) were classified as congenital sixth nerve palsy (6.3%). Of the rest, neuroimaging alone yielded a cause in 18 of the 37 cases (48.64%). Of the other 19 cases where neuroimaging did not yield a cause, 6 cases were attributed to preceding history of infection (3 upper respiratory tract infection and 3 viral illnesses), 2 cases of sixth nerve palsy were found to be a false localizing sign in idiopathic intracranial hypertension and in 11 cases, the cause was undetermined. In these idiopathic cases of isolated sixth nerve palsy, neuroimaging yielded no positive findings. In the absence of risk factors, a suggestive history, or positive laboratory and clinical findings, neuroimaging can serve as a useful diagnostic tool in identifying the exact cause of sixth nerve palsy. Furthermore, we recommend an algorithm to assess the need for neuroimaging in sixth nerve palsy.

  16. Vincristine-induced polyneuropathy in a child with stage I Wilms' tumour presenting with unilateral abducens nerve palsy.

    PubMed

    Panjawatanan, Panadeekarn; Charoenkwan, Pimlak; Katanyuwong, Kamornwan; Choeyprasert, Worawut

    2014-06-25

    A 4-year-old boy presented with right esotropia while receiving vincristine and dactinomycin for stage I Wilms' tumour according to the National Wilms Tumour Study-5 protocol. On examination, he had isolated limitation of his right lateral gaze. CT of the brain and cerebrospinal fluid examination were normal. A nerve conduction velocity study which was performed on the peripheral nerves revealed predominant motor polyneuropathy compatible with axonal loss involving the upper limbs. The patient had received a cumulative vincristine dose of 17 mg/m(2) before developing esotropia. Vincristine-induced abducens nerve mononeuropathy and subclinical motor polyneuropathy was suspected. Unilateral esotropia markedly improved after the discontinuation of vincristine and a short course of oral pyridoxine treatment.

  17. Post-traumatic Unilateral Avulsion of the Abducens Nerve with Damage to Cranial Nerves VII and VIII: Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Yamasaki, Fumiyuki; Akiyama, Yuji; Tsumura, Ryu; Kolakshyapati, Manish; Adhikari, Rupendra Bahadur; Takayasu, Takeshi; Nosaka, Ryo; Kurisu, Kaoru

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic injuries of the abducens nerve as a consequence of facial and/or head trauma occur with or without associated cervical or skull base fracture. This is the first report on unilateral avulsion of the abducens nerve in a 29-year-old man with severe right facial trauma. In addition, he exhibited mild left facial palsy, and moderate left hearing disturbance. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using fast imaging employing steady-state acquisition (FIESTA) revealed avulsion of left sixth cranial nerve. We recommend thin-slice MR examination in patients with abducens palsy after severe facial and/or head trauma. PMID:28664004

  18. Detailed anatomy of the abducens nerve in the lateral rectus muscle.

    PubMed

    Nam, Yong Seok; Kim, In-Beom; Shin, Sun Young

    2017-10-01

    The aims of this study were to elucidate the detailed anatomy of the abducens nerve in the lateral rectus muscle (LRM) and the intramuscular innervation pattern using Sihler staining. In this cohort study, 32 eyes of 16 cadavers were assessed. Dissection was performed from the LRM origin to its insertion. The following distances were measured: from LRM insertion to the bifurcation point of the abducens nerve, from LRM insertion to the entry site of the superior branch or inferior branch, from the upper border of the LRM to the entry site of the superior branch, from the lower border of LRM to the entry site of inferior branch, and the widths of the main trunk and superior and inferior branches. The single trunk of the abducens nerve divided into two branches 37 mm from insertion of the LRM, and 22 of 32 (68.8%) orbits showed only two superior and inferior branches with no subdivision. The superior branch entered the LRM more anteriorly (P = 0.037) and the superior branch was thinner than the inferior branch (P = 0.040). The most distally located intramuscular nerve ending was observed at 52.9 ± 3.5% of the length of each muscle. Non-overlap between the superior and inferior intramuscular arborization of the nerve was detected in 27 of 32 cases (84.4%). Five cases (15.6%) showed definite overlap of the superior and inferior zones. This study revealed the detailed anatomy of the abducens nerve in the LRM and provides helpful information to understand abducens nerve palsy. Clin. Anat. 30:873-877, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Microvascular Cranial Nerve Palsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Español Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Microvascular Cranial Nerve Palsy Sections What Is Microvascular Cranial Nerve Palsy? ... Microvascular Cranial Nerve Palsy Treatment What Is Microvascular Cranial Nerve Palsy? Leer en Español: ¿Qué Es una Parálisis ...

  20. Anatomic variation of the abducens nerve in a single cadaver dissection: the "petrobasilar canal".

    PubMed

    Pizzolorusso, Felice; Cirotti, Andrea; Pizzolorusso, Gianfranco

    2017-04-01

    Anatomic variations of the petrosphenoid ligament, Dorello's canal and the course of the abducens nerve have been extensively described over the past years. In the present report of a single cadaver dissection, we describe an unusual course of the abducens nerve at the level of the petrous bone. The right abducens nerve did not enter Dorello's canal, but ran below the petrous bone through a narrow canal in the petrobasilar suture, which we called the "petrobasilar canal". No anatomic variations of the left abducens nerve were noted.

  1. Inferior Rectus Transposition: A Novel Procedure for Abducens Palsy.

    PubMed

    Velez, Federico G; Chang, Melinda Y; Pineles, Stacy L

    2017-05-01

    Superior rectus transposition has been popularized for the treatment of abduction deficiencies. Potential complications include induced vertical deviation and torsion. A new procedure, the inferior rectus transposition (IRT), may be similarly beneficial for patients at risk for postoperative vertical deviation or incyclotropia. The purpose of this study is to describe the outcomes of patients undergoing IRT. Prospective, interventional case series. Five patients in an academic pediatric ophthalmology and strabismus practice with a complete lateral rectus palsy who underwent IRT were studied. Changes in anomalous head posture, ocular rotations, ocular alignment, and torsion preoperatively to postoperatively were compared. The patients ranged in age from 19-89 years. There was a significant correction in the angle of esotropia (ET) from 39±17Δ (14-55Δ) to 12 ± 9.8Δ (0-22Δ) postoperatively (P = .02). Two of 5 patients had preoperative hypertropia of the affected eye (1.4 ± 2.2Δ; range, 2-5Δ). One of those had no vertical deviation postoperatively and 1 patient resulted in 2Δ hypotropia. One patient without vertical misalignment preoperatively developed a small postoperative vertical deviation. Torticollis significantly improved from 31.4 ± 11.6° to 5 ± 5.8° (P = .004). All patients improved abduction, with a mean of -4.4 ± 0.5 preoperatively to -3.4 ± 0.9 postoperatively (P = .07). Initial postoperative follow-up in patients with abducens palsy undergoing IRT shows a significant improvement in ocular alignment and torticollis. In patients with preoperative hypertropia, IRT resulted in a downward shifting effect on the operated eye. IRT may be a beneficial procedure for patients with preoperative hypertropia or intorsion requiring transposition procedures. Future studies with larger populations and longer durations of follow-up will be required before this procedure can be recommended. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. [Peripheral facial nerve palsy].

    PubMed

    Nauta, J M; Timmenga, N M; Cats, H

    1993-04-01

    There are different etiological factors concerning the acute peripheral facial nerve palsy. In the majority of the cases, however, no etiological factor can be found. These cases are called idiopathic facial palsy or Bells palsy. Perhaps local anaesthetics could play a role as an etiological factor. By means of a case-report this form of facial nerve palsy will be discussed.

  3. Benign recurrent VI nerve palsy in childhood.

    PubMed

    Bixenman, W W; von Noorden, G K

    1981-01-01

    The case of a child with six documented episodes of benign recurrent unilateral VI nerve palsy between the ages of 2 1/2 months and 3 years is presented. Despite the recognized self-limiting course of this disorder, its possible evolution into a comitant esotropia makes close follow-up mandatory. The practical aspects of management including maintenance occlusion therapy are stressed as well as the need for prompt surgical intervention once the acquired stabismus has become stabilized. The etiology of benign VI nerve palsy of childhood may have the same immunological basis as other cases of para-infectious neuropathy. This isolated postinfective cranial mononeuropathy easily blends into the continuum of neurological involvement seen with the Landry-Guillian-Barre syndrome. With recovery from the initial episode, the abducens nerve may have become predisposed to recurrent inflammatory episodes and recurrent loss of function. Most often these recurrences are triggered by febrile illnesses of childhood.

  4. Natural history of idiopathic abducens nerve paresis in a young adult.

    PubMed

    Hussaindeen, Jameel Rizwana; Mani, Revathy; Rakshit, Archayeeta; Ramasubramanian, Srikanth; Vittal Praveen, Smitha

    2016-01-01

    The natural history of idiopathic abducens nerve paresis and the role of conservative management such as vision training during the recovery process is not well documented in the literature to the best of our knowledge. This case report presents the natural recovery process of idiopathic abducens nerve paresis in a young adult and the role of vision therapy in the recovery process. Copyright © 2016 Spanish General Council of Optometry. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. Facial nerve palsy due to birth trauma

    MedlinePlus

    Seventh cranial nerve palsy due to birth trauma; Facial palsy - birth trauma; Facial palsy - neonate; Facial palsy - infant ... infant's facial nerve is also called the seventh cranial nerve. It can be damaged just before or at ...

  6. Isolated bilateral sixth nerve palsy secondary to metastatic carcinoma: a case report with a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Kocak, Zafer; Celik, Yahya; Uzal, M Cem; Uygun, Kazim; Kaya, Meryem; Albayram, Sait

    2003-12-01

    Isolated sixth nerve palsies usually occur in the vasculopathic age group and are often associated with diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and atherosclerosis but also occur in the presence of skull base tumors. However, isolated bilateral sixth nerve palsies are an extremely rare complication of skull base lesions due to metastatic neoplasms. A case of a 46-year-old man with metastatic small-cell carcinoma of the lung that developed acute bilateral abducens nerve palsies is presented. Although this appears to be an isolated case, metastasis to the skull base must be included in the differential diagnosis of isolated bilateral sixth nerve palsies.

  7. Unilateral sixth nerve palsy.

    PubMed

    Sotoodehnia, Mehran; Safaei, Arash; Rasooli, Fatemeh; Bahreini, Maryam

    2017-06-01

    The diagnosis of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis still remains a real challenge. Seizure, unusual headache with sudden onset, unexplained persistently unilateral vascular headache and neurologic deficit-which is difficult to be attributed to a vascular territory are some of the suggestive symptoms. An isolated sixth nerve palsy is discussed as a rare presentation for cerebral venous thrombosis. Following the extensive investigation to rule out other possible diagnoses, magnetic resonance venogram revealed the final etiology of sixth nerve palsy that was ipsilateral left transverse sinus thrombosis; therefore, anticoagulant treatment with low molecular weight heparin was administered. Rapid and accurate diagnosis and treatment cause to achieve excellent outcomes for most patients. Considering different clinical features, risk factors and high index of suspicion are helpful to reach the diagnosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Radial nerve palsy

    PubMed Central

    Bumbasirevic, Marko; Palibrk, Tomislav; Lesic, Aleksandar; Atkinson, Henry DE

    2016-01-01

    As a result of its proximity to the humeral shaft, as well as its long and tortuous course, the radial nerve is the most frequently injured major nerve in the upper limb, with its close proximity to the bone making it vulnerable when fractures occur. Injury is most frequently sustained during humeral fracture and gunshot injuries, but iatrogenic injuries are not unusual following surgical treatment of various other pathologies. Treatment is usually non-operative, but surgery is sometimes necessary, using a variety of often imaginative procedures. Because radial nerve injuries are the least debilitating of the upper limb nerve injuries, results are usually satisfactory. Conservative treatment certainly has a role, and one of the most important aspects of this treatment is to maintain a full passive range of motion in all the affected joints. Surgical treatment is indicated in cases when nerve transection is obvious, as in open injuries or when there is no clinical improvement after a period of conservative treatment. Different techniques are used including direct suture or nerve grafting, vascularised nerve grafts, direct nerve transfer, tendon transfer, functional muscle transfer or the promising, newer treatment of biological therapy. Cite this article: Bumbasirevic M, Palibrk T, Lesic A, Atkinson HDE. Radial nerve palsy. EFORT Open Rev 2016;1:286-294. DOI: 10.1302/2058-5241.1.000028. PMID:28461960

  9. Intrinsic properties guide proximal abducens and oculomotor nerve outgrowth in avian embryos.

    PubMed

    Lance-Jones, Cynthia; Shah, Veeral; Noden, Drew M; Sours, Emily

    2012-02-01

    Proper movement of the vertebrate eye requires the formation of precisely patterned axonal connections linking cranial somatic motoneurons, located at defined positions in the ventral midbrain and hindbrain, with extraocular muscles. The aim of this research was to assess the relative contributions of intrinsic, population-specific properties and extrinsic, outgrowth site-specific cues during the early stages of abducens and oculomotor nerve development in avian embryos. This was accomplished by surgically transposing midbrain and caudal hindbrain segments, which had been pre-labeled by electroporation with an EGFP construct. Graft-derived EGFP+ oculomotor axons entering a hindbrain microenvironment often mimicked an abducens initial pathway and coursed cranially. Similarly, some EGFP+ abducens axons entering a midbrain microenvironment mimicked an oculomotor initial pathway and coursed ventrally. Many but not all of these axons subsequently projected to extraocular muscles that they would not normally innervate. Strikingly, EGFP+ axons also took initial paths atypical for their new location. Upon exiting from a hindbrain position, most EGFP+ oculomotor axons actually coursed ventrally and joined host branchiomotor nerves, whose neurons share molecular features with oculomotor neurons. Similarly, upon exiting from a midbrain position, some EGFP+ abducens axons turned caudally, elongated parallel to the brainstem, and contacted the lateral rectus muscle, their originally correct target. These data reveal an interplay between intrinsic properties that are unique to oculomotor and abducens populations and shared ability to recognize and respond to extrinsic directional cues. The former play a prominent role in initial pathway choices, whereas the latter appear more instructive during subsequent directional choices. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Peripheral nerve palsy by torsional nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Guerra, Waltraud Kleist-Welch; Schroeder, Henry W S

    2011-04-01

    Peripheral nerve palsy caused by torsional nerve injury is rare. Only a few patients have been reported in the literature. The etiology of this type of nerve lesion is poorly understood. To report on 5 patients presenting with peripheral nerve palsy caused by a torsional nerve injury. Five patients presented with 6 upper peripheral nerve palsy involving the axillary nerve (n = 2), musculocutaneous nerve (n = 2), radial nerve (n = 1), and suprascapular nerve (n = 1). There was no history of trauma in 3 patients, but in the other 2 patients, nerve palsy occurred after a traumatic event. Because of a lack of spontaneous recovery, surgical exploration was performed. Torsion of the whole nerve (n = 5) or only 1 fascicle (n = 1) was found. Epifascicular epineurectomy and detorsion, as well as resection of the torsion site with subsequent primary nerve suture, were performed in 3 lesions. Good to excellent recovery of motor function was achieved in all 5 patients. In the last patient who presented with 2 nerve torsions, the follow-up period after the last surgery is too short to allow evaluation. Although not a frequent event, torsional nerve injury should be taken into consideration when dealing with peripheral nerve injuries. Surgical exploration with detorsion or suture results in good recovery.

  11. Preoperative simulation of the running course of the abducens nerve in a large petroclival meningioma: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Yang, Kaichuang; Ikawa, Fusao; Onishi, Shumpei; Kolakshyapati, Manish; Takeda, Masaaki; Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Ishifuro, Minoru; Akiyama, Yuji; Morishige, Mizuki; Kurisu, Kaoru

    2017-04-01

    One of the most important and useful pieces of information in the preoperative evaluation of a large petroclival meningioma is the running course of the abducens nerve. The abducens nerve is small and has a long intracranial course, making it prone to compression by the tumor at various anatomical points. In relatively large tumors, it is difficult to confirm the entire course of the abducens nerve, even by heavy T2-thin slice imaging. We report a case of successful preoperative estimation of the course of the abducens nerve that aided in its complete preservation during the resection of a large petroclival tumor.

  12. An unusual variant of the abducens nerve duplication with two nerve trunks merging within the orbit: a case report with comments on developmental background.

    PubMed

    Wysiadecki, Grzegorz; Polguj, Michał; Topol, Mirosław

    2016-07-01

    This study reports the first case of abducens nerve duplication along its entire intracranial course, ending within the orbit. A distinct abducens nerve duplication reaching the common tendinous ring (annulus of Zinn), as well as another split within the intraconal segment of the nerve have been revealed. Additionally, two groups (superior and inferior) of abducens nerve sub-branches to the lateral rectus muscle were visualised using Sihler's stain. The analysed anatomical variation has never been reported before and it seems to be in the middle of the spectrum between the cases of duplication occurring only within the intracranial segments of the abducens nerve found in the literature and those continuing throughout the whole course of the nerve. Abducens nerve duplication may be treated as a relic of early stages of ontogenesis. Such a variant might result from alternative developmental pathways in which axons of the abducens nerve, specific for a given segment of the lateral rectus muscle, run separately at some stage, instead of forming a single stem.

  13. Sixth nerve palsy + ipsilateral Horner's Syndrome = Parkinson's Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ebner, Roberto N; Ayerza, Dolores Ribero; Aghetoni, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    To present five patients with VIth nerve palsy and ipsilateral Horner's Syndrome (HS), as a result of cavernous sinus alteration. Consecutive case series. Five patients presented abducens palsy with horizontal diplopia (3 in primary position and 2 in lateral gaze only) and ipsilateral HS. Apraclonidine 0.5% drops evidenced sympathetic denervation in all patients 40-60 min after instillation. All 5 cases had neuroimages (MRI in 3 cases, Computerized Tomography - CT in one case and Magnetic Resonance Angiography - MRA in one case) demonstrating cavernous sinus lesions; 2 meningiomas, 1 carotid-cavernous aneurism, 1 foreign body (bullet) and 1 squamous cell carcinoma. Lesions on the cavernous sinus need to be considered in cases of abducens nerve palsy and ipsilateral Horner's Syndrome.

  14. Non-invasive transcranial stimulation of rat abducens nerve by focused ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyungmin; Taghados, Seyed Javid; Fischer, Krisztina; Maeng, Lee-So; Park, Shinsuk; Yoo, Seung-Schik

    2012-01-01

    Non-pharmacological and non-surgical transcranial modulation of the nerve function may provide new opportunities in evaluation and treatment of cranial nerve diseases. This study investigates the possibility of using low-intensity transcranial focused ultrasound (FUS) to selectively stimulate the rat abducens nerve located above the base of the skull. FUS (frequencies of 350 kHz and 650 kHz) operating in a pulsed mode was applied to the abducens nerve of Sprague-Dawley rats under stereotactic guidance. The abductive eyeball movement ipsilateral to the side of sonication was observed at 350 kHz, using the 0.36 msec tone burst duration (TBD), 1.5 kHz pulse repetition frequency (PRF), and the overall sonication duration of 200 msec. Histological and behavioral monitoring showed no signs of disruption in the blood brain barrier (BBB) as well as no damage to the nerves and adjacent brain tissue resulting from the sonication. As a novel functional neuro-modulatory modality, the pulsed application of FUS has potential in diagnostic and therapeutic applications in diseases of the peripheral nervous system. PMID:22763009

  15. Motor palsies of cranial nerves (excluding VII) after vaccination: reports to the US Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System.

    PubMed

    Woo, Emily Jane; Winiecki, Scott K; Ou, Alan C

    2014-01-01

    We reviewed cranial nerve palsies, other than VII, that have been reported to the US Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS). We examined patterns for differences in vaccine types, seriousness, age, and clinical characteristics. We identified 68 reports of cranial nerve palsies, most commonly involving the oculomotor (III), trochlear (IV), and abducens (VI) nerves. Isolated cranial nerve palsies, as well as palsies occurring as part of a broader clinical entity, were reported. Forty reports (59%) were classified as serious, suggesting that a cranial nerve palsy may sometimes be the harbinger of a broader and more ominous clinical entity, such as a stroke or encephalomyelitis. There was no conspicuous clustering of live vs. inactivated vaccines. The patient age range spanned the spectrum from infants to the elderly. Independent data may help to clarify whether, when, and to what extent the rates of cranial nerve palsies following particular vaccines may exceed background levels.

  16. Palsies of Cranial Nerves That Control Eye Movement

    MedlinePlus

    ... Medical News Palsies of Cranial Nerves That Control Eye Movement By Michael Rubin, MDCM, Weill Cornell Medical College; ... Gaze Palsies Palsies of Cranial Nerves That Control Eye Movement Third Cranial Nerve (Oculomotor Nerve) Palsy Fourth Cranial ...

  17. Sixth nerve palsy + ipsilateral Horner’s Syndrome = Parkinson’s Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ebner, Roberto N.; Ayerza, Dolores Ribero; Aghetoni, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To present five patients with VIth nerve palsy and ipsilateral Horner’s Syndrome (HS), as a result of cavernous sinus alteration. Study design Consecutive case series. Material and methods Five patients presented abducens palsy with horizontal diplopia (3 in primary position and 2 in lateral gaze only) and ipsilateral HS. Apraclonidine 0.5% drops evidenced sympathetic denervation in all patients 40–60 min after instillation. All 5 cases had neuroimages (MRI in 3 cases, Computerized Tomography – CT in one case and Magnetic Resonance Angiography – MRA in one case) demonstrating cavernous sinus lesions; 2 meningiomas, 1 carotid-cavernous aneurism, 1 foreign body (bullet) and 1 squamous cell carcinoma. Conclusion Lesions on the cavernous sinus need to be considered in cases of abducens nerve palsy and ipsilateral Horner’s Syndrome. PMID:25859142

  18. Hypoglossal nerve palsy: 245 cases.

    PubMed

    Stino, Amro M; Smith, Benn E; Temkit, Mohamed; Reddy, Srivan Nagi

    2016-12-01

    Apart from a case series of 100 subjects in 1996 and several small cohorts, there have been no large retrospective series of cranial nerve XII (CN XII) palsy. From 1984 to 2014, 245 cases of CN XII palsy were identified via retrospective chart review using historical and exam findings that confirmed the diagnosis. In addition to clinical characteristics, univariate and multivariate models were investigated to predict neoplastic CN XII palsy. Major etiologic categories included: postoperative (29.3%), idiopathic (15.1%), primary neoplastic (14.2%), metastatic malignancy (13.0%), inflammatory (7.3%), radiation (6.1%), and traumatic (4.1%). A multivariate model revealed male gender and a personal history of cancer as predictive of neoplastic CN XII palsy. The most frequent etiologies and disease categories of CN XII palsy were identified, and male gender and personal history of cancer were found to be predictive of a neoplastic cause of CN XII palsy. Muscle Nerve 54: 1050-1054, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Usefulness of intraoperative electromyographic monitoring of oculomotor and abducens nerves during skull base surgery.

    PubMed

    Li, Zi-Yi; Li, Ming-Chu; Liang, Jian-Tao; Bao, Yu-Hai; Chen, Ge; Guo, Hong-Chuan; Ling, Feng

    2017-08-02

    Intraoperative neurophysiologic monitoring of the extraocular cranial nerve (EOCN) is not commonly performed because of technical difficulty and risk, reliability of the result and predictability of the postoperative function of the EOCN. We performed oculomotor nerve (CN III) and abducens nerve (CN VI) intraoperative monitoring in patients with skull base surgery by recording the spontaneous muscle activity (SMA) and compound muscle action potential (CMAP). Two types of needle electrodes of different length were percutaneously inserted into the extraocular muscles with the free-hand technique. We studied the relationships between the SMA and CMAP and postoperative function of CN III and CN VI. A total of 23 patients were included. Nineteen oculomotor nerves and 22 abducens nerves were monitored during surgery, respectively. Neurotonic discharge had a positive predictive value of less than 50% and negative predictive value of more than 80% for postoperative CN III and CN VI dysfunction. The latency of patients with postoperative CN III dysfunction was 2.79 ± 0.13 ms, longer than that with intact CN III function (1.73 ± 0.11 ms). One patient had transient CN VI dysfunction, whose CMAP latency (2.54 ms) was longer than that of intact CN VI function (2.11 ± 0.38 ms). There was no statistically significant difference between patients with paresis and with intact function. The method of intraoperative monitoring of EOCNs described here is safe and useful to record responses of SMA and CMAP. Neurotonic discharge seems to have limited value in predicting the postoperative function of CN III and CN VI. The onset latency of CMAP longer than 2.5 ms after tumor removal is probably relevant to postoperative CN III and CN VI dysfunction. However, a definite quantitative relationship has not been found between the amplitude and stimulation intensity of CMAP and the postoperative outcome of CN III and CN VI.

  20. The human trochlear and abducens nerves at different ages - a morphometric study.

    PubMed

    Ramkumar, Muthu; Sharma, Saroj; Jacob, Tony G; Bhardwaj, Daya N; Nag, Tapas C; Roy, Tara Sankar

    2015-02-01

    The trochlear and abducens nerves (TN and AN) control the movement of the superior oblique and lateral rectus muscles of the eyeball, respectively. Despite their immense clinical and radiological importance no morphometric data was available from a wide spectrum of age groups for comparison with either pathological or other conditions involving these nerves. In the present study, morphometry of the TN and AN was performed on twenty post-mortem samples ranging from 12-90 years of age. The nerve samples were processed for resin embedding and toluidine blue stained thin (1µm) sections were used for estimating the total number of myelinated axons by fractionator and the cross sectional area of the nerve and the axons by point counting methods. We observed that the TN was covered by a well-defined epineurium and had ill-defined fascicles, whereas the AN had multiple fascicles with scanty epineurium. Both nerves contained myelinated and unmyelinated fibers of various sizes intermingled with each other. Out of the four age groups (12-20y, 21-40y, 41-60y and >61y) the younger groups revealed isolated bundles of small thinly myelinated axons. The total number of myelinated fibers in the TN and AN at various ages ranged from 1100-3000 and 1600-7000, respectively. There was no significant change in the cross-sectional area of the nerves or the axonal area of the myelinated nerves across the age groups. However, myelin thickness increased significantly in the AN with aging (one way ANOVA). The present study provides baseline morphometric data on the human TN and AN at various ages.

  1. Gamma Knife radiosurgery in the treatment of abducens nerve schwannomas: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Govindaraju Lakshmi; Sharma, Manish Singh; Kale, Shashank S; Agrawal, Deepak; Singh, Manmohan; Sharma, Bhawani Shankar

    2016-10-01

    OBJECTIVE Of the intracranial schwannomas, those arising from the vestibular nerves are the most common. Abducens nerve (AN) schwannomas are very rare, and there is limited literature on their optimal management. Therapeutic options include surgery and/or stereotactic radiosurgery. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKRS) in these sixth cranial nerve (CN) schwannomas. METHODS The authors performed a retrospective analysis of patients who had undergone GKRS for intracranial tumors at their institute in the period from 2003 to 2010. Inclusion criteria were as follows: isolated AN paresis on presentation, a lesion along the course of the sixth CN, and imaging features characteristic of a schwannoma. Patients with other CN deficits and neurofibromatosis Type 2 were excluded. Symptomatic improvement was defined as the resolution of or an improvement in diplopia noted on a subjective basis or as an improvement in lateral eyeball excursion noted objectively on follow-up. A reduction in tumor volume by at least 20%, as noted by comparing the pre- and post-GKRS images, was deemed significant. RESULTS Six patients with a mean age of 37.1 years (range 17-55 years) underwent primary GKRS. There were 2 prepontine cistern, 3 cavernous sinus, and 1 cisterno-cavernous tumor. The mean duration of symptoms was 6.1 months (range 3-12 months). The mean tumor volume was 3.3 cm(3) (range 1.5-4.8 cm(3)). The mean tumor margin radiation dose was 12.5 Gy (range 12-14 Gy), while the median margin dose was 12 Gy (50% isodose line). The median number of isocenters used was 5 (range 4-8). The brainstem received an average 8.35-Gy radiation dosage (range 5.5-11 Gy). The mean follow-up duration was 44.3 months (range 24-78 months). Symptoms remained stable in 1 patient, improved in 3, and resolved in 2 (total improvement 83%). Magnetic resonance imaging at the last follow-up showed a stable tumor size in 3 patients (50%) and a reduction in the other 3

  2. Clinical correlation of imaging findings in congenital cranial dysinnervation disorders involving abducens nerve.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Chanchal; Sharma, Pradeep; Saxena, Rohit; Garg, Ajay; Sharma, Sanjay

    2017-02-01

    High-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of intracranial parts of sixth nerve and seventh nerve and the extraocular muscles (EOMs) in orbit to correlate the clinical characteristics in patients with two special forms of strabismus in congenital cranial dysinnervation disorders which are Duane's retraction syndrome (DRS) and Mobius syndrome. Morphological analysis by 3T MRI of orbit (using surface coils) and brain (using 32 channel head coil) was performed on 6 patients with clinical DRS (1 bilateral), 2 cases with Mobius syndrome, and 1 case with congenital sixth nerve palsy. These were compared with findings in five controls. We observed absence/hypoplasia of sixth nerve in five out of seven eyes with DRS (71.42%), anomalous course in one eye, sixth and seventh nerve absence/hypoplasia in affected eyes with Mobius syndrome and bilateral absence/hypoplasia of the sixth nerve in congenital sixth nerve palsy. For EOMs we calculated maximum diameter, area, and circumference of muscles using Osirix software, and noticed significant hypoplasia of lateral rectus in comparison to controls (P < 0.001). MRI gives useful information regarding confirmation of clinical diagnosis and its neurological anomalies in complex cases and helps to plan tailor made surgical management.

  3. Accessory nerve palsy.

    PubMed

    Olarte, M; Adams, D

    1977-11-01

    After apparently uncomplicated excision of benign lesions in the posterior cervical triangle, two patients had shoulder pain. In one, neck pain and trapezius weakness were not prominent until one month after surgery. Inability to elevate the arm above the horizontal without externally rotating it, and prominent scapular displacement on arm abduction, but not on forward pushing movements, highlighted the trapezius dysfunction and differentiated it from serratus anterior weakness. Spinal accessory nerve lesions should be considered when minor surgical procedures, lymphadenitis, minor trauma, or tumours involved the posterior triangle of the neck.

  4. Electrodiagnostic confirmation of long thoracic nerve palsy.

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, P E

    1980-01-01

    Long thoracic nerve latencies were measured in 25 normal subjects. The nerve was stimulated at Erb's point. Monopolar electrodes were used to record the motor evoked response from the serratus anterior muscle. The mean long thoracic nerve latency was 3.9 +/- 0.6 ms. Four athletes with unilateral, isolated long thoracic nerve palsies were compared with the control group and with the uninvolved extremities. Long thoracic nerve latency examinations may help confirm the presence of long thoracic nerve palsy and test proximal nerve conduction. Images PMID:7354356

  5. Visualization of the Abducens Nerve in its Petroclival Segment Using Contrast-Enhanced FIESTA MRI: The Size of the Petroclival Venous Confluence Affects Detectability.

    PubMed

    Özgür, A; Esen, K; Kara, E; Temel, G O

    2017-03-01

    Visualization of the abducens nerve in its petroclival segment still remains challenging. We aimed to investigate the detectability of the petroclival segment of the abducens nerve and to evaluate the role of the size of the petroclival venous confluence (PVC) in the visibility of the nerve using contrast-enhanced fast imaging employing steady-state acquisition (FIESTA) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We retrospectively evaluated the contrast-enhanced FIESTA images of 237 patients (female/male: 127/110; mean age: 49.0 ± 14.7). Two radiologists divided the imaging findings of the petroclival segments of the abducens nerves into three groups: 0 (not visualized), 1 (partially visualized), and 2 (completely visualized). Another radiologist measured the anteroposterior diameter of the PVC from the clival bony surface to the inner layer of dura at the dural entrance level of the abducens nerve. One-way analysis of variance, Tukey's test, and receiving operating curve analysis were performed. Among 474 abducens nerves, 76 were classified as group 0 (76/474, 16.03 %), 100 were classified as group 1 (100/474, 21.10 %), and 298 were classified as group 2 (298/474, 62.87 %). There was significant difference in mean anteroposterior diameters of the PVC for each group (group 0, 0.95 mm; group 1, 1.80 mm; group 2, 2.51 mm). The cut-off values for the differentiation of group 0 from group 1 and group 1 from group 2 were found to be 1.35 and 2.09 mm, respectively. Abducens nerve in its petroclival segment can be reliably identified using contrast-enhanced FIESTA MRI especially in those with a greater anteroposterior diameter of the PVC.

  6. A case of possible paraneoplastic neurological syndrome presenting as multiple cranial nerve palsies associated with gallbladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Kaido, Misako; Yuasa, Yoshihito; Yamamoto, Tameyoshi; Munakata, Satoru; Tagawa, Naohiro; Tanaka, Keiko

    2016-09-29

    We report the case of a patient who had developed multiple cranial nerve palsies in the course of possible paraneoplastic neurological syndrome (PNS) associated with gallbladder cancer. Twelve days prior to visiting our hospital, a 69-year-old man began experiencing neurological symptoms, beginning with diplopia and progressing to ptosis of the left palpebra and subsequent complete closure of the eye within 8 days. Results of the initial medical examination indicated paresis of left oculomotor (III) and abducens (VI) nerves. MRI of the brain revealed no focal lesion that could have resulted in compression of the affected nerves, while further examination ruled out diabetes mellitus, infection, vasculitis, and other systemic autoimmune diseases as potential causes. Gadolinium-enhanced MRI revealed high intensity located in the oculomotor nerves, and steroid pulse therapy was performed based on the assumption of inflammatory diseases. Although slight improvement was observed with respect to the left extraocular paresis, subsequent emergence of bilateral facial nerve (VII) palsy, right abducens nerve palsy, and right oculomotor nerve palsy occurred in succession. PET/CT performed under suspicion of PNS, confirmed the presence of gallbladder cancer. Surgical extirpation of the cancer occurred 3 months following the appearance of left oculomotor paralysis, after which the patient underwent postoperative chemotherapy. All cranial nerve palsies resolved within 2 months after the operation, and both cancer and PNS have shown no recurrence for over 5 years. Pathological examination of the resected tumor revealed well-differentiated tubular adenocarcinoma showing some signs of epithelial-mesenchymal transition, typically an indicator of a poor prognosis. Nevertheless, lymph node metastasis did not progress beyond N2, and the cancer was completely removed by lymph node dissection. Therefore, the presence of multiple cranial palsies in this patient led to early detection of

  7. Spontaneous nerve torsion: unusual cause of radial nerve palsy.

    PubMed

    Endo, Yoshimi; Miller, Theodore T; Carlson, Erik; Wolfe, Scott W

    2015-03-01

    Spontaneous nerve torsion is a rare cause of nerve palsy. We describe a case of nerve torsion affecting the radial nerve in order to inform radiologists of the existence of this condition and subtle features on cross-sectional imaging that can suggest the diagnosis preoperatively.

  8. Usefulness of intraoperative monitoring of oculomotor and abducens nerves during surgical treatment of the cavernous sinus meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Kaspera, Wojciech; Adamczyk, Piotr; Ślaska-Kaspera, Aleksandra; Ładziński, Piotr

    2015-03-01

    We analyzed the usefulness and prognostic value of intraoperative monitoring for identification of the oculomotor (III) and the abducens (VI) nerve in patients with cavernous sinus meningiomas. 43 patients diagnosed with cavernous sinus meningiomas were divided according to their topography. Function of the nerves was scored on original clinical and neurophysiological scales. The percentage of nerves identified correctly with the monitoring was significantly higher (91% vs. 53% for nerve III and 70% vs. 23% for nerve VI, p<0.001). The fractions of nerves III and VI identified correctly by means of the monitoring were significantly higher in the case of tumors with intra- and extracavernous location (89% vs. 32%, p<0.01) and intracavernous tumors (80% vs. 20%, p<0.05), respectively. The quality of post-resection recording correlated with functional status of both the nerves determined 9 months after the surgery (R=0.51, p<0.001 for nerve III and R=0.57, p<0.01 for nerve VI). Even a trace or pathological response to the post-resection stimulation was associated with improved functional status (90% vs. 50%, p<0.05 for nerve III and 93% vs. 38%, p<0.01 for nerve VI). Neurophysiological monitoring of ocular motor nerves enables their intraoperative identification during resections of the cavernous sinus meningiomas. Intraoperative monitoring of nerve III is particularly important in the case of tumors with extra- and intracavernous location, and the monitoring of nerve VI in the case of intracavernous tumors. The outcome of the post-resection monitoring has prognostic value with regard to the clinical status of the nerves on long-term follow-up. Copyright © 2014 Medical University of Bialystok. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  9. Surgical management of third nerve palsy

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Anupam; Bahuguna, Chirag; Nagpal, Ritu; Kumar, Barun

    2016-01-01

    Third nerve paralysis has been known to be associated with a wide spectrum of presentation and other associated factors such as the presence of ptosis, pupillary involvement, amblyopia, aberrant regeneration, poor bell's phenomenon, superior oblique (SO) overaction, and lateral rectus (LR) contracture. Correction of strabismus due to third nerve palsy can be complex as four out of the six extraocular muscles are involved and therefore should be approached differently. Third nerve palsy can be congenital or acquired. The common causes of isolated third nerve palsy in children are congenital (43%), trauma (20%), inflammation (13%), aneurysm (7%), and ophthalmoplegic migraine. Whereas, in adult population, common etiologies are vasculopathic disorders (diabetes mellitus, hypertension), aneurysm, and trauma. Treatment can be both nonsurgical and surgical. As nonsurgical modalities are not of much help, surgery remains the main-stay of treatment. Surgical strategies are different for complete and partial third nerve palsy. Surgery for complete third nerve palsy may involve supra-maximal recession - resection of the recti. This may be combined with SO transposition and augmented by surgery on the other eye. For partial third nerve, palsy surgery is determined according to nature and extent of involvement of extraocular muscles. PMID:27433033

  10. Facial nerve palsy aboard a commercial aircraft.

    PubMed

    Grossman, Alon; Ulanovski, David; Barenboim, Erez; Azaria, Bella; Goldstein, Liav

    2004-12-01

    Facial baroparesis is facial nerve palsy secondary to barotrauma. This phenomenon is frequently seen in divers, but is under-reported there and has rarely been described in aviators or passengers aboard commercial aircraft. We describe a 24-yr-old healthy aviator who experienced an episode of facial nerve palsy during ascent while traveling as a passenger aboard a commercial flight. The probable pathogenesis of this phenomenon in this case is described.

  11. Recurrent facial nerve palsy in paediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Eidlitz-Markus, T; Gilai, A; Mimouni, M; Shuper, A

    2001-11-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the clinical presentation and prognosis of recurrent facial nerve palsy (RFNP) in children. The files of 182 patients referred to the Schneider Children's Medical Centre of Israel for neurological evaluation of isolated peripheral facial nerve palsy between October 1992 and December 1998 were reviewed. RFNP was found in 11 patients (9 females, 2 males), with an incidence of 6%. In two males, the aetiology was traced to Melkersson-Rosenthal syndrome and these patients were separated from the rest of the group. Three children had two episodes of facial nerve paresis which completely resolved clinically within several weeks. Six other children underwent electrophysiological studies. Two of the latter with residual neurological damage, and one child with abnormal blink reflex only, showed decreased facial nerve conduction velocity and abnormal blink reflex. Three children with complete recovery had disturbed blink reflex only with normal nerve conduction. Brain imaging studies as well as laboratory work-up were non-contributory in all cases. The frequency of recurrent facial nerve palsy in children was similar to that in adults. The most significant factors in the evaluation of recurrent facial nerve palsy are medical history and physical findings at diagnosis and after short follow-up. In our patients, electrophysiological studies did not have either clinical or prognostic significance. The rate of full clinical recovery is about 70%, lower than in Bell palsy.

  12. Facial nerve palsy associated with underwater barotrauma.

    PubMed Central

    Whelan, T. R.

    1990-01-01

    This report describes a case of facial nerve palsy following barotitis media sustained at shallow depth. The neuropraxia is likely to have been due to the direct effect of pressure, facilitated by a congenital hiatus in the bony canal protecting the facial nerve in the middle ear. PMID:2216996

  13. [Management of peripheral facial nerve palsy in children].

    PubMed

    Tabarki, B

    2014-10-01

    Peripheral facial nerve palsy may (secondary) or may not have a detectable cause (idiopathic facial palsy or Bell's palsy). Idiopathic facial palsy is the common form of facial palsy. It remains diagnosis by exclusion. The prognosis is more favourable in children than in adults. We present current diagnostic procedures and recommendations regarding treatment in children.

  14. Management of Atraumatic Posterior Interosseous Nerve Palsy.

    PubMed

    Sigamoney, Kohila Vani; Rashid, Abbas; Ng, Chye Yew

    2017-10-01

    The posterior interosseous nerve (PIN) is susceptible to a number of traumatic and atraumatic pathologies. In this article, we aim to review our current understanding of the etiology, pathology, diagnosis, treatment options, and published outcomes of atraumatic PIN palsy. In general, the etiology of atraumatic PIN palsy can be divided into mechanical, which is caused by an extrinsic compressive force on the nerve, and nonmechanical, which is caused by an intrinsic inflammatory reaction within the nerve. As per this discussion, there are 3 causes for atraumatic PIN palsy. These are entrapment neuropathy, Parsonage-Turner syndrome, and spontaneous "hourglass" constriction. The typical presentation of atraumatic PIN palsy is a patient with spontaneous onset of weakness of fingers/thumb metacarpophalangeal joints extension. However, the wrist extension is preserved with radial deviation due to preservation of extensor carpi radialis longus/brevis function. Magnetic resonance imaging is the imaging of choice and neurophysiology is indicated in all patients. If there is an obvious structural cause of the nerve palsy, prompt decompression and removal of the causative lesion are recommended to avoid irreversible damage to the nerve/muscles. Otherwise, in general, we would recommend consideration for exploration should there be no sign of recovery after 6 weeks of observation. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Plasmacytoma of the Clivus Presenting as Bilateral Sixth Nerve Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Kalwani, Neil; Remenschneider, Aaron K.; Faquin, William; Ferry, Judith; Holbrook, Eric H.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Importance Plasmacytomas are monoclonal proliferations of plasma cells that may arise within soft tissue or bone. The skull base is a rare site for plasmacytomas to occur, and few cases have been reported in the literature. When present in the skull base, plasmacytomas may result in cranial neuropathies and often progress to multiple myeloma more rapidly than other intracranial or skeletal plasmacytomas. Clinical Presentation A 69-year-old man presented with a primary complaint of diplopia and an examination consistent with bilateral abducens nerve palsy. No other deficits were noted. Magnetic resonance imaging of the skull base demonstrated a large T1 isointense moderately enhancing lesion centered within the clivus. Endoscopic biopsy of the mass revealed sheets and aggregates of mature monoclonal plasma cells. The patient's initial systemic work-up revealed that this was a solitary lesion, and he was treated with radiation therapy to the skull base with a durable local effect at 18-month follow-up. Unfortunately he progressed to multiple myeloma with peripheral osteolytic lesions but has been stabilized on chemotherapeutics. Conclusion The clivus is an unusual site for intracranial plasmacytomas, and enhancing lesions must be differentiated from chordoma. Characteristic findings on histopathology include an immunoglobulin light-chain restricted clonal proliferation of plasma cells. Treatment is most commonly radiotherapy with surgery reserved for biopsy and palliation. Clinicians should be aware of the increased risk of progression to multiple myeloma in skull base plasmacytomas. PMID:26251795

  16. Management of peripheral facial nerve palsy

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Peripheral facial nerve palsy (FNP) may (secondary FNP) or may not have a detectable cause (Bell’s palsy). Three quarters of peripheral FNP are primary and one quarter secondary. The most prevalent causes of secondary FNP are systemic viral infections, trauma, surgery, diabetes, local infections, tumor, immunological disorders, or drugs. The diagnosis of FNP relies upon the presence of typical symptoms and signs, blood chemical investigations, cerebro-spinal-fluid-investigations, X-ray of the scull and mastoid, cerebral MRI, or nerve conduction studies. Bell’s palsy may be diagnosed after exclusion of all secondary causes, but causes of secondary FNP and Bell’s palsy may coexist. Treatment of secondary FNP is based on the therapy of the underlying disorder. Treatment of Bell’s palsy is controversial due to the lack of large, randomized, controlled, prospective studies. There are indications that steroids or antiviral agents are beneficial but also studies, which show no beneficial effect. Additional measures include eye protection, physiotherapy, acupuncture, botulinum toxin, or possibly surgery. Prognosis of Bell’s palsy is fair with complete recovery in about 80% of the cases, 15% experience some kind of permanent nerve damage and 5% remain with severe sequelae. PMID:18368417

  17. Delayed facial nerve decompression for Bell's palsy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang Hoon; Jung, Junyang; Lee, Jong Ha; Byun, Jae Yong; Park, Moon Suh; Yeo, Seung Geun

    2016-07-01

    Incomplete recovery of facial motor function continues to be long-term sequelae in some patients with Bell's palsy. The purpose of this study was to investigate the efficacy of transmastoid facial nerve decompression after steroid and antiviral treatment in patients with late stage Bell's palsy. Twelve patients underwent surgical decompression for Bell's palsy 21-70 days after onset, whereas 22 patients were followed up after steroid and antiviral therapy without decompression. Surgical criteria included greater than 90 % degeneration on electroneuronography and no voluntary electromyography potentials. This study was a retrospective study of electrodiagnostic data and medical chart review between 2006 and 2013. Recovery from facial palsy was assessed using the House-Brackmann grading system. Final recovery rate did not differ significantly in the two groups; however, all patients in the decompression group recovered to at least House-Brackmann grade III at final follow-up. Although postoperative hearing threshold was increased in both groups, there was no significant between group difference in hearing threshold. Transmastoid decompression of the facial nerve in patients with severe late stage Bell's palsy at risk for a poor facial nerve outcome reduced severe complications of facial palsy with minimal morbidity.

  18. Management of peripheral facial nerve palsy.

    PubMed

    Finsterer, Josef

    2008-07-01

    Peripheral facial nerve palsy (FNP) may (secondary FNP) or may not have a detectable cause (Bell's palsy). Three quarters of peripheral FNP are primary and one quarter secondary. The most prevalent causes of secondary FNP are systemic viral infections, trauma, surgery, diabetes, local infections, tumor, immunological disorders, or drugs. The diagnosis of FNP relies upon the presence of typical symptoms and signs, blood chemical investigations, cerebro-spinal-fluid-investigations, X-ray of the scull and mastoid, cerebral MRI, or nerve conduction studies. Bell's palsy may be diagnosed after exclusion of all secondary causes, but causes of secondary FNP and Bell's palsy may coexist. Treatment of secondary FNP is based on the therapy of the underlying disorder. Treatment of Bell's palsy is controversial due to the lack of large, randomized, controlled, prospective studies. There are indications that steroids or antiviral agents are beneficial but also studies, which show no beneficial effect. Additional measures include eye protection, physiotherapy, acupuncture, botulinum toxin, or possibly surgery. Prognosis of Bell's palsy is fair with complete recovery in about 80% of the cases, 15% experience some kind of permanent nerve damage and 5% remain with severe sequelae.

  19. Blepharoptosis Associated With Third Cranial Nerve Palsy.

    PubMed

    Bagheri, Abbas; Borhani, Morteza; Salehirad, Shahram; Yazdani, Shahin; Tavakoli, Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the demographics and outcomes of management for blepharoptosis associated with third cranial nerve palsy at a tertiary eye center. This retrospective cross-sectional and interventional study was performed on hospital records of patients with ptosis associated with third cranial nerve palsy who were referred to Labbafinejad Medical Center from January 1999 to January 2009. The authors evaluated age, sex, laterality, severity of involvement, etiology, clinical findings, and treatment modalities and outcomes in patients with blepharoptosis due to third cranial nerve palsy over a 10-year period. Of a total of 45 subjects, 25 cases (55.6%) were males and 20 subjects (44.4%) were females. Mean age of enrolled subjects was 21.1 ± 15.5 years. Etiologies included trauma in 21 (46.7%), congenital in 16 (35.6%), and other causes in 8 (17.7%) cases. Overall, 18 of 45 patients (40%) underwent ptosis surgery: of these, 15 (83.3%) subjects improved with one procedure, whereas 3 (16.7%) subjects required more than one operation. For initial ptosis surgery, 5 (27.7%) patients underwent levator resection and 13 (72.3%) cases underwent frontalis sling; all second and third procedures were frontalis sling. One-step, 2-step, and 3-step ptosis surgery was accomplished in 15 (83.3%), 1 (5.6%), and 2 (11.1%) patients, respectively. Eventually, an open visual axis was attained in all cases following 1-3 operations. Trauma was the most common cause of ptosis associated with third cranial nerve palsy in the current series. Surgical management of ptosis in patients with third nerve palsy may be challenging but most subjects achieve good results following appropriate and stepwise surgical plans.

  20. [Third cranial nerve palsy in sphenoid sinusitis].

    PubMed

    Dores, Luís Almeida; Simão, Marco Alveirinho; Marques, Marta Canas; Dias, Éscar

    2014-01-01

    Sphenoid sinus disease is particular not only for its clinical presentation, as well as their complications. Although rare, these may present as cranial nerve deficits, so it is important to have a high index of suspicion and be familiar with its diagnosis and management. Symptoms are often nonspecific, but the most common are headache, changes in visual acuity and diplopia due to dysfunction of one or more ocular motor nerves. The authors report a case of a 59 years-old male, who was referred to the ENT emergency department with frontal headaches for one week which had progressively worsened and were associated, since the last 12 hours, with diplopia caused by left third cranial nerve palsy. Neurologic examination was normal aside from the left third cranial nerve palsy. Anterior and posterior rhinoscopy excluded the presence of nasal masses and purulent rhinorrhea. The CT scan revealed a soft tissue component and erosion of the roof of the left sphenoid sinus. Patient was admitted for intravenous antibiotics and steroids treatment without any benefit after 48 hours. He was submitted to endoscopic sinus surgery with resolution of the symptoms 10 days after surgery. The authors present this case for its rarity focusing on the importance of differential diagnosis in patients with headaches and cranial nerves palsies.

  1. Sixth Nerve Palsy in Paediatric Intracranial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Reid, Julia E.; Reem, Rachel E.; Aylward, Shawn C.; Rogers, David L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The purpose of this study was to report the incidence and describe the characteristics of sixth cranial nerve (CN VI) palsy in paediatric patients with intracranial hypertension (IH). A retrospective chart review of central Ohio children diagnosed with IH over the 3-year period from 2010 to 2013 was conducted. IH without identifiable cause was defined as idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH), whereas IH with identifiable pathologic aetiology was deemed secondary intracranial hypertension (SIH). A subset of patients with CN VI palsy was identified. Data collected included patient age, gender, past medical history, aetiology of SIH, ophthalmic examination, lumbar puncture results, neuroimaging results, and response to treatment. Seventy-eight children with intracranial hypertension were included in the study. Nine (11.5%) children (four males, five females; median age 14, range: 3–18) were found to have a unilateral (n = 2) or bilateral (n = 7) CN VI palsy. Five children had IIH; the remaining four had SIH from cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (n = 2) and infection (n = 2). The mean lumbar puncture opening pressure for the nine patients with CN VI palsy was 40 cm H2O (range: 21–65 cm H2O). Papilloedema was present in 8/9 (89%) patients. One patient required a lumboperitoneal shunt, and two others required optic nerve sheath fenestrations in addition to medical management. All cases of CN VI palsy resolved with treatment. In our primary service area, the incidence of CN VI palsy is approximately 12% among paediatric IH patients. The majority of cases with CN VI palsy presented with papilloedema and all cases resolved with treatment of intracranial hypertension. PMID:27928378

  2. Common peroneal nerve palsy in maxillofacial surgery setting.

    PubMed

    Desai, Sqn Ldr Jimish

    2017-01-01

    Common peroneal nerve palsy in maxillofacial surgery setting is an uncommon and rarely reported complication. A patient who developed common peroneal nerve palsy following reduction and fixation of pan facial fractures under general anesthesia is presented. The patient developed common peroneal nerve palsy on the second postoperative day. He recovered with conservative treatment after 3 months. The authors consider that the nerve palsy was a result of compression of common peroneal nerve related to patient positioning in the perioperative period. Patient- and surgery-related risk factors are also to be considered. Thus, for at risk patients, positioning is of utmost importance in both intra- and peri-operative period.

  3. Peroneal nerve palsy caused by thrombosis of crural veins.

    PubMed

    Bendszus, M; Reiners, K; Perez, J; Solymosi, L; Koltzenburg, M

    2002-06-11

    Acute palsies of the peroneal nerve may have a variety of causes. In many patients, the cause remains undetermined. The authors report a patient with a thrombosis of a crural vein causing an acute peroneal nerve palsy. If the clinical history of patients with an acute peroneal nerve lesion is suggestive of venous thrombosis an appropriate diagnostic workup should be considered.

  4. Sixth Nerve Palsy from Cholesterol Granuloma of the Petrous Apex

    PubMed Central

    Roemer, Ségolène; Maeder, Philippe; Daniel, Roy Thomas; Kawasaki, Aki

    2017-01-01

    Herein, we report a patient who had an isolated sixth nerve palsy due to a petrous apex cholesterol granuloma. The sixth nerve palsy appeared acutely and then spontaneously resolved over several months, initially suggesting a microvascular origin of the palsy. Subsequent recurrences of the palsy indicated a different pathophysiologic etiology and MRI revealed the lesion at the petrous apex. Surgical resection improved the compressive effect of the lesion at Dorello’s canal and clinical improvement was observed. A relapsing–remitting sixth nerve palsy is an unusual presentation of this rare lesion. PMID:28261154

  5. Facial nerve palsy and hemifacial spasm.

    PubMed

    Valls-Solé, Josep

    2013-01-01

    Facial nerve lesions are usually benign conditions even though patients may present with emotional distress. Facial palsy usually resolves in 3-6 weeks, but if axonal degeneration takes place, it is likely that the patient will end up with a postparalytic facial syndrome featuring synkinesis, myokymic discharges, and hemifacial mass contractions after abnormal reinnervation. Essential hemifacial spasm is one form of facial hyperactivity that must be distinguished from synkinesis after facial palsy and also from other forms of facial dyskinesias. In this condition, there can be ectopic discharges, ephaptic transmission, and lateral spread of excitation among nerve fibers, giving rise to involuntary muscle twitching and spasms. Electrodiagnostic assessment is of relevance for the diagnosis and prognosis of peripheral facial palsy and hemifacial spasm. In this chapter the most relevant clinical and electrodiagnostic aspects of the two disorders are reviewed, with emphasis on the various stages of facial palsy after axonal degeneration, the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying the various features of hemifacial spasm, and the cues for differential diagnosis between the two entities.

  6. Peroneal nerve palsy after compression stockings application

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jun Hyun; Kim, Won Il; Kim, Ji Yeon; Choe, Won Joo

    2016-01-01

    Peroneal nerve palsy can be caused by various etiology. We report unilateral peroneal nerve palsy after compression stockings application. A 64-year-old man underwent off-pump coronary bypass graft. Surgeon did not use saphenous vein for the bypass graft. Sedation was stopped after 3 h postoperative. After 16 h, for prophylaxis of deep vein thrombosis, knee-high elastic stocking was applied. After 1 h, he took off right stocking because of numbness but left stocking was kept. After 24 h postoperative, (8 h after stocking application) patient complained suddenly left foot drop. Manual muscle test revealed 0/5 of ankle dorsiflexion, ankle eversion, and toe extension. Sensory was decreased to 70% in lower half of anterolateral aspect of tibia, foot dorsum, and toes. Foot drop and sensory abnormality decreased in 3 weeks. Cardiac surgery patients already have many risk factors for peripheral neuropathy. Clinicians should be careful when applying stockings on those patients. PMID:27833497

  7. Peroneal nerve palsy after compression stockings application.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jun Hyun; Kim, Won Il; Kim, Ji Yeon; Choe, Won Joo

    2016-01-01

    Peroneal nerve palsy can be caused by various etiology. We report unilateral peroneal nerve palsy after compression stockings application. A 64-year-old man underwent off-pump coronary bypass graft. Surgeon did not use saphenous vein for the bypass graft. Sedation was stopped after 3 h postoperative. After 16 h, for prophylaxis of deep vein thrombosis, knee-high elastic stocking was applied. After 1 h, he took off right stocking because of numbness but left stocking was kept. After 24 h postoperative, (8 h after stocking application) patient complained suddenly left foot drop. Manual muscle test revealed 0/5 of ankle dorsiflexion, ankle eversion, and toe extension. Sensory was decreased to 70% in lower half of anterolateral aspect of tibia, foot dorsum, and toes. Foot drop and sensory abnormality decreased in 3 weeks. Cardiac surgery patients already have many risk factors for peripheral neuropathy. Clinicians should be careful when applying stockings on those patients.

  8. Peripheral facial nerve palsy after therapeutic endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun Jeong; Lee, Jun; Lee, Ji Woon; Lee, Jun Hyung; Park, Chol Jin; Kim, Young Dae; Lee, Hyun Jin

    2015-03-01

    Peripheral facial nerve palsy (FNP) is a mononeuropathy that affects the peripheral part of the facial nerve. Primary causes of peripheral FNP remain largely unknown, but detectable causes include systemic infections (viral and others), trauma, ischemia, tumor, and extrinsic compression. Peripheral FNP in relation to extrinsic compression has rarely been described in case reports. Here, we report a case of a 71-year-old man who was diagnosed with peripheral FNP following endoscopic submucosal dissection. This case is the first report of the development of peripheral FNP in a patient undergoing therapeutic endoscopy. We emphasize the fact that physicians should be attentive to the development of peripheral FNP following therapeutic endoscopy.

  9. Acute unilateral facial nerve palsy.

    PubMed

    Yeong, Siew Swan; Tassone, Peter

    2011-05-01

    Mrs PS, 78 years of age, presented with acute left-sided otalgia, ear swelling and subsequent unilateral facial paralysis (Figure 1). She denied any otorrhoea or hearing loss. Past medical history relevant to the presenting complaint included: * Bell palsy diagnosed 20 years ago with no residual effect * biopsy confirmed benign parotid lump (diagnosed 3 years previously). Histopathology revealed a pleomorphic adenoma. Mrs PS declined surgical intervention at the time * chicken pox as a child * normal fasting blood glucose 1 month previously and no known immune compromise. Examination revealed yellow crusts and small vesicles on the external acoustic meatus (Figure 2). A 10 mm well defined firm and nontender nodule was palpable at the ramus of the mandible.

  10. Bell's palsy: a facial nerve paralysis diagnosis of exclusion.

    PubMed

    Yetter, M F; Ogren, F P; Moore, G F; Yonkers, A J

    1990-05-01

    Bell's Palsy is not synonymous with facial nerve paralysis. While it is a common cause of facial nerve paralysis, it is a diagnosis of exclusion and other causes of facial nerve paralysis should be ruled out by appropriate evaluation and follow-up. A case report is presented of a patient with a facial nerve paralysis, which was initially diagnosed as Bell's Palsy, but which was found to be a poorly differentiated parotid malignancy causing facial nerve paralysis. A review and discussion of Bells Palsy, evaluation and treatment is presented.

  11. Posterior interosseous nerve palsy in a machine gunner.

    PubMed

    Sonna, L A; Scott, B R

    1995-07-01

    We report the case of a 19-year-old Infantryman who developed posterior interosseous nerve palsy and a transient sensory deficit in a radial distribution after prolonged carrying of an M60 machine gun. Posterior interosseous nerve palsy has been reported in association with a variety of activities involving forceful, repetitive pronation and supination; however, to our knowledge, no previous cases of this palsy have been reported in association with use of a military weapon.

  12. Nerve Transfer in Delayed Obstetrical Palsy Repair

    PubMed Central

    Sénès, Filippo; Catena, Nunzio; Sénès, Jacopo

    2015-01-01

    Objective  When root avulsions are detected in children suffering from obstetrical brachial plexus palsy (OBPP), neurotization procedures of different nerve trunks are commonly applied in primary brachial plexus repair, to connect distally the nerves of the upper limbs using healthy nerve structures. This article aims to outline our experience of neurotization procedures in OBPP, which involves nerve transfers in the event of delayed repair, when a primary repair has not occurred or has failed. In addition, we propose the opportunity for late repair, focusing on extending the time limit for nerve surgery beyond that which is usually recommended. Although, according to different authors, the time limit is still unclear, it is generally estimated that nerve repair should take place within the first months of life. In fact, microsurgical repair of OBPP is the technique of choice for young children with the condition who would otherwise have an unfavorable outcome. However, in certain cases the recovery process is not clearly defined so not all the patients are direct candidates for primary nerve surgery. Methods  In the period spanning January 2005 through January 2011, among a group of 105 patients suffering from OBPP, ranging from 1 month to 7 years of age, the authors have identified a group of 32 partially recovered patients. All these patients underwent selective neurotization surgery, which was performed in a period ranging from 5 months to 6.6 years of age. Results  Late neurotization of muscular groups achieved considerable functional recovery in these patients, who presented with reduced motor function during early childhood. The said patients, with the exception of five, would initially have avoided surgery because they had not met the criteria for nerve surgery. Conclusion  We have concluded that the execution of late nerve surgical procedures can be effective in children affected by OBPP. PMID:27917233

  13. Ophthalmic management of facial nerve palsy.

    PubMed

    Lee, V; Currie, Z; Collin, J R O

    2004-12-01

    The ophthalmologist plays a pivotal role in the evaluation and rehabilitation of patients with facial nerve palsy. It is crucial to recognize and treat the potentially life-threatening underlying causes. The immediate ophthalmic priority is to ensure adequate corneal protection. The medium to long-term management consists of treatment of epiphora, hyperkinetic disorders secondary to aberrant regeneration and poor cosmesis. Patients should be appropriately referred for general facial re-animation. This review aims to provide a guide to the management of this complex condition.

  14. Common peroneal nerve palsy in a UH-60 aviator.

    PubMed

    McGrail, M A

    1999-06-01

    A case of common peroneal nerve palsy in a UH-60 Blackhawk U.S. Army helicopter pilot is reported. A review of the literature revealed several reports of common peroneal nerve palsy, although there were no published reports of this injury secondary to performing flight duties in the UH-60 cockpit. A common practice among Blackhawk pilots is to brace the "collective" with their left knee, subjecting the common peroneal nerve to possible injury. This action should be considered as a possible cause of common peroneal nerve palsy in this select group of aviators.

  15. Focal myositis presenting with radial nerve palsy.

    PubMed

    Alzagatiti, B I; Bertorini, T E; Horner, L H; Maccarino, V S; O'Brien, T

    1999-07-01

    Focal myositis is a rare inflammatory pseudotumor of skeletal muscle which usually has a benign course. We report a 56-year-old woman with a painful mass in the left arm with a radial nerve palsy. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the left arm showed a mass in the triceps muscle that was suggestive of a soft-tissue sarcoma. Electromyography showed a severe radial neuropathy involving both motor and sensory axons. An open biopsy showed focal myositis. Treatment with corticosteroids resulted in complete disappearance of the mass clinically and by MRI, without recurrence for more than 2 years. Radial nerve function also recovered completely. As a treatable cause of focal neuropathy, focal myositis should be included in the differential diagnosis of a muscle mass. Copyright 1999 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  16. Median Nerve Palsies due to Injections: A Review.

    PubMed

    Andrea, Andrea; Gonzales, Jocelyn R; Iwanaga, Joe; Oskouian, Rod J; Tubbs, R Shane

    2017-05-29

    Injection nerve palsy (INP) in the median nerve is an iatrogenic peripheral nerve injury that can be inflicted by a faulty intramuscular injection in the median nerve area. The literature reports a 2% incidence of INP among all peripheral nerve injuries. The incidence of INP in developed countries has decreased significantly during the past decade, but the injury appears to remain prevalent in developing countries. A deep understanding of the anatomy of the peripheral nerves, and a precise intramuscular injection technique, have been shown to be vital for preventing INP in the median nerve. Debates continue regarding what, if any, intervention is necessary for injection palsies; and if it is needed, when it should be carried out. In this article, we will review the literature related to median injection nerve palsy and recommended methods of prevention.

  17. Delayed and isolated oculomotor nerve palsy following minor head trauma

    PubMed Central

    Nakagawa, Yu; Toda, Masahiro; Shibao, Shunsuke; Yoshida, Kazunari

    2017-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to consider the mechanism of isolated oculomotor nerve palsy after minor head trauma. Case Description: We report a rare case of delayed and isolated oculomotor nerve palsy following minor head trauma. A 19-year-old boy complained of double vision 1 day after a minor head trauma. Neuro-ophthalmic examination showed isolated left oculomotor nerve palsy. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging examination revealed no abnormal findings and steroid therapy was administered for a week. Three months after the injury, the ptosis and extraocular movements had fully resolved, although the pupillary light reflex was still abnormal. Conclusions: Delayed and isolated oculomotor nerve palsy may be caused by an injury at the point where the oculomotor nerve runs over the posterior petroclinoid ligament. Because edema of the damaged oculomotor nerve might result in constriction at the point where the nerve pierces the dura of the cavernous sinus, symptoms of oculomotor nerve palsy appeared late after trauma. Steroid treatment reducing edema could be effective for delayed and isolated oculomotor nerve palsy following minor head trauma. PMID:28217399

  18. Fracture of skull base with delayed multiple cranial nerve palsies.

    PubMed

    Yildirim, Altan; Gurelik, Mustafa; Gumus, Cesur; Kunt, Tanfer

    2005-07-01

    This report describes a pediatric case of delayed glossopharyngeal nerve, vagus nerve, and facial nerve palsies after a head injury. Computed tomography scan of the skull base revealed the fracture of the petrous part of the temporal bone, and the fracture involved the tip of petrous pyramid, in front of the jugular foramen. The anatomical features, mechanisms, diagnosis, and treatment are discussed.

  19. Neuralgic Amyotrophy Manifesting as Mimicking Posterior Interosseous Nerve Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jin Seo; Kang, Suk Hyung; Choi, Eun Hi

    2015-01-01

    The upper trunk of the brachial plexus is the most common area affected by neuralgic amyotrophy (NA), and paresis of the shoulder girdle muscle is the most prevalent manifestation. Posterior interosseous nerve palsy is a rare presentation in patients with NA. It results in dropped finger on the affected side and may be misdiagnosed as entrapment syndrome or compressive neuropathy. We report an unusual case of NA manifested as PIN palsy and suggest that knowledge of clinical NA phenotypes is crucial for early diagnosis of peripheral nerve palsies. PMID:26713154

  20. Transfer of pectoral nerves to the musculocutaneous nerve in obstetric upper brachial plexus palsy.

    PubMed

    Blaauw, Gerhard; Slooff, Albert C J

    2003-08-01

    To investigate the results of transfer of pectoral nerves to the musculocutaneous nerve for treatment of obstetric brachial palsy. In 25 cases of obstetric brachial palsy (20 after breech deliveries), branches of the pectoral nerve plexus were transferred directly to the musculocutaneous nerve. For all patients, the nerve transfer was part of an extended brachial plexus reconstruction. Results were tested both clinically and with the Mallet scale, at a mean follow-up time of 70 months (standard deviation, 34.3 mo). There were two complete failures, which were attributable to disconnection of the transferred nerve endings. The results after transfer were excellent in 17 cases and fair in 5 cases. Steindler flexorplasty improved elbow flexion for three patients. Transfer of pectoral nerves to the musculocutaneous nerve for treatment of obstetric upper brachial palsy may be effective, if the specific anatomic features of the pectoral nerve plexus are sufficiently appreciated.

  1. Lateral rectus myositis mimicking an abducens nerve palsy in a pregnant woman.

    PubMed

    Haslinda, Abd-Rahim; Shatriah, Ismail; Azhany, Yaakub; Nik-Ahmad-Zuky, Nik-Lah; Yunus, Rohaizan

    2014-01-01

    Myositis is a rare unknown inflammatory disorder of the skeletal muscle tissue. Generalized inflammatory myopathies, polymyositis, and dermatomyositis have been reported during pregnancy. Isolated orbital myositis in pregnancy has not been previously described in the literature. The authors report a case of left isolated orbital myositis in a primigravida at 38 weeks gestation affecting the patient's left lateral rectus muscle. MRI of the orbit was consistent with the diagnosis. She showed remarkable clinical improvement with oral corticosteroids therapy.

  2. Recurrent unilateral facial nerve palsy in a child with dehiscent facial nerve canal

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Christopher; Ulualp, Seckin O; Koral, Korgun

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The dehiscent facial nerve canal has been well documented in histopathological studies of temporal bones as well as in clinical setting. We describe clinical and radiologic features of a child with recurrent facial nerve palsy and dehiscent facial nerve canal. Methods: Retrospective chart review. Results: A 5-year-old male was referred to the otolaryngology clinic for evaluation of recurrent acute otitis media and hearing loss. He also developed recurrent left peripheral FN palsy associated with episodes of bilateral acute otitis media. High resolution computed tomography of the temporal bones revealed incomplete bony coverage of the tympanic segment of the left facial nerve. Conclusions: Recurrent peripheral FN palsy may occur in children with recurrent acute otitis media in the presence of a dehiscent facial nerve canal. Facial nerve canal dehiscence should be considered in the differential diagnosis of children with recurrent peripheral FN palsy. PMID:28228958

  3. Skull base metastases causing acute bilateral hypoglossal nerve palsy.

    PubMed

    Rotta, F T; Romano, J G

    1997-05-01

    Acute bilateral tongue palsy is a rare clinical presentation. We report one such case caused by skull base metastases from prostate cancer. There were no other cranial nerves involved or associated neurological deficit. Mild improvement was seen following radiation therapy. We review the anatomy of the nerve and differential diagnosis of its disfunction.

  4. Metaphyseal dysplasia associated with chronic facial nerve palsy.

    PubMed

    Christodoulou, Loucas; Pavlidou, Efterpi; Spyridou, Cristina; Eccles, Simon; Calder, Alistair; Mankad, Kshitij; Kinali, Maria

    2016-07-01

    Metaphyseal dysplasia (Pyle disease) is a rare autosomal recessive disease with impressive and characteristic radiological findings but relatively mild clinical features. It is usually incidentally diagnosed, despite the impressive radiological findings of gross metaphyseal widening and thinning of cortical bone. Herein, we report an exceptionally unusual case of metaphyseal dysplasia in association with chronic facial nerve palsy. Chronic facial nerve palsy due to compression of the facial nerve in a patient with Pyle disease represents an unusual novelty. Furthermore, this case delineates the clinical spectrum and phenotype of such a rare clinical entity. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that such an association is being described.

  5. Complete Spinal Accessory Nerve Palsy From Carrying Climbing Gear.

    PubMed

    Coulter, Jess M; Warme, Winston J

    2015-09-01

    We report an unusual case of spinal accessory nerve palsy sustained while transporting climbing gear. Spinal accessory nerve injury is commonly a result of iatrogenic surgical trauma during lymph node excision. This particular nerve is less frequently injured by blunt trauma. The case reported here results from compression of the spinal accessory nerve for a sustained period-that is, carrying a load over the shoulder using a single nylon rope for 2.5 hours. This highlights the importance of using proper load-carrying equipment to distribute weight over a greater surface area to avoid nerve compression in the posterior triangle of the neck. The signs and symptoms of spinal accessory nerve palsy and its etiology are discussed. This report is particularly relevant to individuals involved in mountaineering and rock climbing but can be extended to anyone carrying a load with a strap over one shoulder and across the body.

  6. Two-level motor nerve transfer for the treatment of long thoracic nerve palsy.

    PubMed

    Ray, Wilson Z; Pet, Mitchell A; Nicoson, Michael C; Yee, Andrew; Kahn, Lorna C; Mackinnon, Susan E

    2011-10-01

    The authors report a case of long thoracic nerve (LTN) palsy treated with two-level motor nerve transfers of a pectoral fascicle of the middle trunk, and a branch of the thoracodorsal nerve. This procedure resulted in near-total improvement of the winged scapula deformity, and a return of excellent shoulder function. A detailed account of the postoperative physical therapy regimen is included, as this critical component of the favorable result cannot be overlooked. This case establishes the two-level motor nerve transfer as a new option for treating LTN palsy, and demonstrates that nerve transfers should be considered in the therapeutic algorithm of an idiopathic mononeuritis.

  7. [Phrenic nerve palsy after heart surgery. The Bichat Hospital experience].

    PubMed

    de Brux, J L; Hvass, U; Popoff, G; Böhm, G; Depoix, J P; Hazebroucq, J; Langlois, J

    1991-01-01

    The frequency of phrenic nerve palsy varies from 2.5 to 8.3%, according to different authors. Contact of the phrenic nerve with cold (ice or saline) seems to be the most frequent etiology. This study points out that good insulation between phrenic nerve and ice slush, used in the pericardium, results in almost complete disappearance of this complication, which is not a benign one, as emphasized by the two deaths in our series.

  8. Facial nerve palsy: etiology and approach to diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Lorch, Margarita; Teach, Stephen J

    2010-10-01

    Facial nerve palsy has a broad differential diagnosis and possible psychological and anatomical consequences. A thorough investigation must be performed to determine the cause of the palsy and to direct treatment. If no cause can be found, therapy with prednisone with or without an antiviral medication can be considered and begun as early as possible after onset of symptoms. Resolution and time to recovery vary with etiology, but overall prognosis is good.

  9. [Motor replacement surgery via tendon transfer in radial nerve palsy].

    PubMed

    Koulaxouzidis, G; Stark, G B; Lampert, F M

    2015-02-01

    Restoration of active extension of wrist, thumb and digits by muscle-tendon transposition. Radial nerve palsy due to peripheral nerve injury. Peripheral nerve disease. Muscle or tendon injury. Restoration of wrist extension in high radial nerve palsy. Reversible distal radial nerve palsy, absence of suitable donor muscles, spasticity, limited range of motion of affected joints, extensive scarring and inappropriate soft tissue conditions, unjustifiable loss of function at donor site. Reinnervated donor muscles, progressive muscle disease, insufficient patient compliance. Dissection of the flexor carpi ulnaris, palmaris longus and pronator teres tendon insertion. Transposition of the tendons. Interweaving of tendons of the pronator teres and extensor carpi radialis brevis muscles, the extensor digitorum communis and flexor carpi ulnaris muscles, as well as the extensor pollicis longus and palmaris longus muscles using the Pulvertaft technique. 3 Weeks immobilization in forearm splint. Additional immobilization for 2 weeks at night. Subsequently, intensive physical and occupational therapy for another 4-6 weeks is required, starting 3 weeks postoperatively. The procedure was carried out in 12 patients over the past 14 years. We treated proximal radial nerve palsy in nine cases. In accordance with the current medical literature, we consider the described motor replacement surgery a reliable procedure.

  10. Phrenic Nerve Palsy as Initial Presentation of Large Retrosternal Goitre.

    PubMed

    Hakeem, Arsheed Hussain; Hakeem, Imtiyaz Hussain; Wani, Fozia Jeelani

    2016-12-01

    Unilateral phrenic nerve palsy as initial presentation of the retrosternal goitre is extremely rare event. This is a case report of a 57-year-old woman with history of cough and breathlessness of 3 months duration, unaware of the thyroid mass. She had large cervico-mediastinal goiter and chest radiograph revealed raised left sided hemidiaphragm. Chest CT scan did not reveal any lung parenchymal or mediastinal pathology. The patient underwent a total thyroidectomy through a cervical approach. The final pathology was in favor of multinodular goitre. Even after 1 year of follow up, phrenic nerve palsy did not improve indicating permanent damage. Phrenic nerve palsy as initial presentation of the retrosternal goitre is unusual event. This case is reported not only because of the rare nature of presentation, but also to make clinicians aware of the entity so that early intervention may prevent attendant morbidity.

  11. Acute peripheral facial palsy: is there a trigeminal nerve involvement?

    PubMed

    Uluduz, Derya; Kiziltan, Meral E; Akalin, Mehmet Ali

    2010-07-26

    The aim of this study was to investigate trigeminal nerve involvement in patients with peripheral facial palsy. In total, 25 patients with facial nerve palsy and 19 controls were tested by electrophysiological methods regarding their facial and trigeminal nerve functions within 1 month after disease onset. The presence of an abnormal blink reflex was determined in patients with peripheral facial palsy by comparing paralytic and non-paralytic sides (12.3+/-1.1 and 10.8+/-1.3, respectively; p=0.001). However, the average masseter inhibitory reflex difference between the paretic and non-paralytic sides of patients compared with the corresponding side-to-side comparison for controls was not statistically significant. The masseter inhibitory reflex response was abnormal in some cases. These findings suggest that the masseter inhibitory reflex, a trigemino-trigeminal reflex, was normal in most of our patients with peripheral facial palsy, but may be abnormal in individual cases. Our study showed that subclinical disorders affecting the trigeminal pathways occur in individual patients with idiopathic facial palsy, while the majority of patients have no trigeminal nerve involvement.

  12. Causes of Secondary Radial Nerve Palsy and Results of Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Reichert, Paweł; Wnukiewicz, Witold; Witkowski, Jarosław; Bocheńska, Aneta; Mizia, Sylwia; Gosk, Jerzy; Zimmer, Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to analyze the causes that lead to secondary damage of the radial nerve and to discuss the results of reconstructive treatment. Material/Methods The study group consisted of 33 patients treated for radial nerve palsy after humeral fractures. Patients were diagnosed based on clinical examinations, ultrasonography, electromyography, or nerve conduction velocity. During each operation, the location and type of nerve damage were analyzed. During the reconstructive treatment, neurolysis, direct neurorrhaphy, or reconstruction with a sural nerve graft was used. The outcomes were evaluated using the Medical Research Council (MRC) scales and the quick DASH score. Results Secondary radial nerve palsy occurs after open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) by plate, as well as by closed reduction and internal fixation (CRIF) by nail. In the case of ORIF, it most often occurs when the lateral approach is used, as in the case of CRIF with an insertion interlocking screws. The results of the surgical treatment were statistically significant and depended on the time between nerve injury and revision (reconstruction) surgery, type of damage to the radial nerve, surgery treatment, and type of fixation. Treatment results were not statistically significant, depending on the type of fracture or location of the nerve injury. Conclusions The potential risk of radial nerve neurotmesis justifies an operative intervention to treat neurological complications after a humeral fracture. Adequate surgical treatment in many of these cases allows for functional recovery of the radial nerve. PMID:26895570

  13. Skull base osteomyelitis presenting with an isolated hypoglossal nerve palsy

    PubMed Central

    Kasfiki, Eirini Vasileiou; Kelly, Ciaran; Smith, John; Nicolaides, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    This is the first case of skull base osteomyelitis presenting with isolated bilateral hypoglossal nerve palsy reported in the literature. A 75-year-old man presented with tongue paralysis without any other cranial nerve palsy. He was otherwise well apart from recently having a high prostate-specific antigen level recorded. Investigations for malignancy or cerebrovascular insult were negative with the diagnosis of skull base osteomyelitis confirmed using CT. Following treatment with intravenous antibiotics for 6 weeks, symptoms resolved. PMID:23853016

  14. Surgical treatment of a long thoracic nerve palsy.

    PubMed

    Novak, Christine B; Mackinnon, Susan E

    2002-05-01

    A 17-year-old patient presented with a long thoracic nerve palsy following an idiopathic onset of weakness to the serratus anterior muscle. With no evidence of recovery 3.5 months following onset of serratus anterior weakness, the patient underwent a thoracodorsal to long thoracic nerve transfer to reinnervate the serratus anterior muscle. Follow-up examination 6.5 years following the nerve transfer revealed no scapular winging, full range of motion of the shoulder and no reported functional shoulder restriction. We conclude that a thoracodorsal to long thoracic nerve transfer results in good functional recovery of the serratus anterior muscle.

  15. Peroneal palsy after bariatric surgery; is nerve decompresion always necessary?

    PubMed

    Ramos-Leví, Ana M; Matías-Guiu, Jordi A; Guerrero, Antonio; Sánchez-Pernaute, Andrés; Rubio, Miguel A

    2013-01-01

    We present two patients who underwent successful bariatric surgery and developed peroneal nerve palsy six months after the procedure. This is an unusual complication which determines a significant functional limitation, mainly because of foot drop, and its presence may be a hallmark of excessive and rapid weight loss. We discuss possible pathogenic mechanisms and therapeutic options, and we emphasize the important role of an adequate nutritional management, in order to avoid the need for a surgical nerve decompression.

  16. Hansen's disease and HIV coinfection with facial nerve palsy.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Nidhi; Kar, Sumit; Madke, Bhushan; Gangane, Nitin

    2015-01-01

    There are very few published reports of HIV leprosy co infection in India in spite of having a large burden of both leprosy and HIV. Herein we are reporting a case of co-infection of Hansen's disease and HIV with facial nerve palsy.

  17. Pudendal nerve palsy in trauma and elective orthopaedic surgery.

    PubMed

    Polyzois, Ioannis; Tsitskaris, Konstantinos; Oussedik, Sam

    2013-12-01

    The incidence of pudendal nerve palsy following routine trauma and elective orthopaedic surgery procedures ranges from 1.9% to 27.6%. Excessive and/or prolonged traction against the perineal post of a traction table, leading to direct compression and localised ischaemia to the nerve are suggested mechanisms of injury. Misuse of traction and the inappropriate placement of the perineal post, leading to crushing and stretching of the pudendal nerve, are two main contributing factors leading to its postoperative palsy. The sequelae may be sensory, motor or mixed. In most cases, these injuries are transient and tend to resolve within several weeks or months. However, complete neurological recovery may be unpredictable and the effects of ongoing dysfunction potentially disastrous for the individual. In terms of preventative measures, magnitude and duration of traction time should be minimised; traction should be limited to the critical operative steps only. Additionally, the perineal post should be placed between the genitalia and the contralateral leg. A well-padded, large-diameter perineal post should be used (>10cm). Adequate muscle relaxation during anaesthesia is particularly important in young men who have strong muscles and thus require larger traction forces when compared to elderly patients. Orthopaedic surgeons should be aware of the pathophysiology behind the development of this palsy and the measures that can be employed to reduce its occurrence. In procedures where a traction table is employed, consenting for pudendal nerve palsy should be considered by the surgical team.

  18. [Sixth nerve palsies in children. Presentation of four cases].

    PubMed

    Zimmermann-Paiz, Martin A; Fang-Sung, Jen Wen

    2008-10-01

    The etiology of the sixth nerve palsy in children includes multiple causes, being the acquired ones the most frequent. Due to the importance of the adequate management and possible implications of this pathology, four patients are presented for analysis and discussion.

  19. Reaching the Limit of the Oculomotor Plant: 3D Kinematics after Abducens Nerve Stimulation during the Torsional Vestibulo-Ocular Reflex

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Hui; Angelaki, Dora E.

    2012-01-01

    Accumulating evidence shows that the oculomotor plant is capable of implementing aspects of three-dimensional kinematics such as Listing's law and the half-angle rule. But these studies have only examined the eye under static conditions or with movements that normally obey these rules (e.g., saccades and pursuit). Here we test the capability of the oculomotor plant to rearrange itself as necessary for non-half-angle behavior. Three monkeys (Macaca mulatta) fixated five vertically displaced targets along the midsagittal plane while sitting on a motion platform that rotated sinusoidally about the naso-occipital axis. This activated the torsional, rotational vestibulo-ocular reflex, which exhibits a zero-angle or negative-angle rule (depending on the visual stimulus). On random sinusoidal cycles, we stimulated the abducens nerve and observed the resultant eye movements. If the plant has rearranged itself to implement this non-half-angle behavior, then stimulation should reveal this behavior. On the other hand, if the plant is only capable of half-angle behavior, then stimulation should reveal a half-angle rule. We find the latter to be true and therefore additional neural signals are likely necessary to implement non-half-angle behavior. PMID:22993439

  20. Median to radial nerve transfer for treatment of radial nerve palsy. Case report.

    PubMed

    Mackinnon, Susan E; Roque, Brandon; Tung, Thomas H

    2007-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to report a surgical technique of nerve transfer to restore radial nerve function after a complete palsy due to a proximal injury to the radial nerve. The authors report the case of a patient who underwent direct nerve transfer of redundant or expendable motor branches of the median nerve in the proximal forearm to the extensor carpi radialis brevis and the posterior interosseous branches of the radial nerve. Assessment included degree of recovery of wrist and finger extension, and median nerve function including pinch and grip strength. Clinical evidence of reinnervation was noted at 6 months postoperatively. The follow-up period was 18 months. Recovery of finger and wrist extension was almost complete with Grade 4/5 strength. Pinch and grip strength were improved postoperatively. No motor or sensory deficits related to the median nerve were noted, and the patient is very satisfied with her degree of functional restoration. Transfer of redundant synergistic motor branches of the median nerve can successfully reinnervate the finger and wrist extensor muscles to restore radial nerve function. This median to radial nerve transfer offers an alternative to nerve repair, graft, or tendon transfer for the treatment of radial nerve palsy.

  1. [Treatment of idiopathic peripheral facial nerve paralysis (Bell's palsy)].

    PubMed

    Meyer, Martin Willy; Hahn, Christoffer Holst

    2013-01-28

    Bell's palsy is defined as an idiopathic peripheral facial nerve paralysis of sudden onset. It affects 11-40 persons per 100,000 per annum. Many patients recover without intervention; however, up to 30% have poor recovery of facial muscle control and experience facial disfigurement. The aim of this study was to make an overview of which pharmacological treatments have been used to improve outcomes. The available evidence from randomized controlled trials shows significant benefit from treating Bell's palsy with corticosteroids but shows no benefit from antivirals.

  2. Neuro-ophthalmological approach to facial nerve palsy

    PubMed Central

    Portelinha, Joana; Passarinho, Maria Picoto; Costa, João Marques

    2014-01-01

    Facial nerve palsy is associated with significant morbidity and can have different etiologies. The most common causes are Bell’s palsy, Ramsay–Hunt syndrome and trauma, including surgical trauma. Incidence varies between 17 and 35 cases per 100,000. Initial evaluation should include accurate clinical history, followed by a comprehensive investigation of the head and neck, including ophthalmological, otological, oral and neurological examination, to exclude secondary causes. Routine laboratory testing and diagnostic imaging is not indicated in patients with new-onset Bell’s palsy, but should be performed in patients with risk factors, atypical cases or in any case without resolution within 4 months. Many factors are involved in determining the appropriate treatment of these patients: the underlying cause, expected duration of nerve dysfunction, anatomical manifestations, severity of symptoms and objective clinical findings. Systemic steroids should be offered to patients with new-onset Bell’s palsy to increase the chance of facial nerve recovery and reduce synkinesis. Ophthalmologists play a pivotal role in the multidisciplinary team involved in the evaluation and rehabilitation of these patients. In the acute phase, the main priority should be to ensure adequate corneal protection. Treatment depends on the degree of nerve lesion and on the risk of the corneal damage based on the amount of lagophthalmos, the quality of Bell’s phenomenon, the presence or absence of corneal sensitivity and the degree of lid retraction. The main therapy is intensive lubrication. Other treatments include: taping the eyelid overnight, botulinum toxin injection, tarsorrhaphy, eyelid weight implants, scleral contact lenses and palpebral spring. Once the cornea is protected, longer term planning for eyelid and facial rehabilitation may take place. Spontaneous complete recovery of Bell’s palsy occurs in up to 70% of cases. Long-term complications include aberrant regeneration

  3. Radial nerve palsy caused by spontaneously occurring nerve torsion. Case report.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, E; Di Rienzo, A; Marchese, E; Massimi, L; Lauretti, L; Pallini, R

    2001-04-01

    An 18-year-old man presented with a spontaneously occurring radial nerve palsy that spared the triceps muscle. At surgery, the portion of the radial nerve located at the midarm level had an hourglass-like appearance. Under magnification, an external-internal neurolysis of the narrowed portion of the hourglass-shaped portion revealed nerve torsion. Straightening of the twisted nerve and fixation accomplished using epiperineurium-fascia stitches to avoid a new torsion resulted in complete functional recovery of the radial nerve.

  4. Medial rectus muscle anchoring in complete oculomotor nerve palsy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Si Hyung; Chang, Jee Ho

    2015-10-01

    The management of exotropia resulting from complete oculomotor nerve palsy is challenging. Conventional therapeutic interventions, including supramaximal resection and recession, superior oblique tendon resection and transposition, and several ocular anchoring procedures have yielded less-than-adequate results. Here we describe a novel surgical technique of anchoring the medial rectus muscle to the medial orbital wall in combination with lateral rectus disinsertion and reattachment to the lateral orbital wall.

  5. Transient delayed facial nerve palsy after inferior alveolar nerve block anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Tzermpos, Fotios H; Cocos, Alina; Kleftogiannis, Matthaios; Zarakas, Marissa; Iatrou, Ioannis

    2012-01-01

    Facial nerve palsy, as a complication of an inferior alveolar nerve block anesthesia, is a rarely reported incident. Based on the time elapsed, from the moment of the injection to the onset of the symptoms, the paralysis could be either immediate or delayed. The purpose of this article is to report a case of delayed facial palsy as a result of inferior alveolar nerve block, which occurred 24 hours after the anesthetic administration and subsided in about 8 weeks. The pathogenesis, treatment, and results of an 8-week follow-up for a 20-year-old patient referred to a private maxillofacial clinic are presented and discussed. The patient's previous medical history was unremarkable. On clinical examination the patient exhibited generalized weakness of the left side of her face with a flat and expressionless appearance, and she was unable to close her left eye. One day before the onset of the symptoms, the patient had visited her dentist for a routine restorative procedure on the lower left first molar and an inferior alveolar block anesthesia was administered. The patient's medical history, clinical appearance, and complete examinations led to the diagnosis of delayed facial nerve palsy. Although neurologic occurrences are rare, dentists should keep in mind that certain dental procedures, such as inferior alveolar block anesthesia, could initiate facial nerve palsy. Attention should be paid during the administration of the anesthetic solution.

  6. Spontaneous radial nerve palsy subsequent to non-traumatic neuroma.

    PubMed

    Ebrahimpour, Adel; Nazerani, Shahram; Tavakoli Darestani, Reza; Khani, Salim

    2013-09-01

    Spontaneous radial palsy is a not rare finding in hand clinics. The anatomy of the radial nerve renders it prone to pressure paralysis as often called "Saturday night palsy". This problem is a transient nerve lesion and an acute one but the case presented here is very unusual in that it seems this entity can also occur as an acute on chronic situation with neuroma formation. A 61 year-old man presented with the chief complaint of inability to extend the wrist and the fingers of the left hand which began suddenly the night before admission, following a three-week history of pain, numbness and tingling sensation of the affected extremity. He had no history of trauma to the extremity. Electromyography revealed a severe conductive defect of the left radial nerve with significant axonal loss at the upper arm. Surgical exploration identified a neuroma of the radial nerve measuring 1.5 cm in length as the cause of the paralysis. The neuroma was removed and an end-to-end nerve coaption was performed. Complete recovery of the hand and finger extension was achieved in nine months.

  7. Late reconstruction of median nerve palsy.

    PubMed

    Ko, Jia-Wei Kevin; Mirarchi, Adam J

    2012-10-01

    The median nerve provides sensory innervation to the radial aspect of the hand, including the palm, thumb, index, long, and half of the ring fingers. It provides motor innervation to most of the volar forearm musculature and, importantly, to m ost of thenar musculature. The main goal of median nerve reconstructive procedures is to restore thumb opposition. There are a variety of transfers that can achieve this goal but tendon transfers must recreate thumb opposition, which involves 3 basics movements: thumb abduction, flexion, and pronation. Many tendon transfers exist and the choice of tendon transfer should be tailored to the patient's needs. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Homozygous hemoglobin S (HbSS) presenting with bilateral facial nerve palsy: a case report.

    PubMed

    Ogundunmade, Babatunde Gbolahan; Jasper, Unyime Sunday

    2014-10-16

    Bilateral facial nerve palsy is a relatively rare presentation and often points to a serious underlying medical condition. Several studies have reported presentation of bilateral facial nerve palsy in association with Lyme disease, Guillain-Barre syndrome, systemic lupus erythematosus, human immunodeficiency virus, sarcoidosis, diabetes and Hanson disease. While unilateral facial nerve palsy is sometimes associated with hemiplegia in sickle cell patients, no case of bilateral facial nerve palsy have been reported in the literature. A 29-year-old black African woman who is a known homozygous haemoglobin S (HbSS) presented with bilateral facial nerve palsy. She had the said condition 2 months post delivery of her first child and reported for physiotherapy 3 months post incidence. The pre-treatment House Brackmann Facial Grading Scale (HBFGS) Scores were 3 for right side and 4 for left side. This patient was not on any medication for the facial palsy. After 4 sessions of combination therapy consisting of faradism, facial exercises and massage there was remarkable improvement in the neurological status of the facial muscles. The post treatment House Brackmann Facial Grading Scale score was 2 bilaterally. Bilateral facial nerve palsy may be an initial presentation of sickle cell anemia patients in the absence of other overt clinical presentations. Therefore sickle cell anemia should be considered among others, in the differential diagnosis of bilateral facial nerve palsy. Furthermore, this case report has highlighted the important role of physiotherapy in the management of bilateral facial nerve palsy.

  9. Hypoglossal nerve transfer in obstetric brachial plexus palsy.

    PubMed

    Blaauw, Gerhard; Sauter, Ymte; Lacroix, Cyrielle L E; Slooff, Albert C J

    2006-01-01

    A cost-benefit analysis was performed of hypoglossal nerve transfer in six patients with obstetric brachial palsy taking into account the factors donor site morbidity and extent of recovery. Hypoglossal nerve transfer was employed in four children for elbow flexion only; in two patients for elbow flexion as well as for elbow extension. The transfer was part of an extended brachial plexus reconstruction for treatment of obstetric brachial plexus palsy. After a mean post-operative interval of 52 months (SD+/-8.1), two professional speech therapists investigated late donor site morbidity by analyzing elementary and communicative functions. The functional result for the arm was assessed using the Mallet scale and by performing a physical examination. Following hypoglossal nerve transfer, early donor site morbidity was significant causing great anxiety in the parents. Late donor site morbidity consisted of serious oral problems in a number of the children. They also showed clear associated movements in the arm during mouth/tongue activity. Recovery of powerful volitional elbow flexion was achieved in four cases only. We do not believe that the sacrifice of such an important function as exerted by the hypoglossal nerve is balanced by the gain demonstrated in our series.

  10. Sudden peroneal nerve palsy in an osteoarthritic knee: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Vijay; Nayak, Mayur; Ansari, Tahir; Malhotra, Rajesh

    2017-01-01

    Peroneal nerve injuries have been reported in association with various causes around the knee such as traumatic varus injury, traumatic dislocation, upper tibial osteotomy, knee arthroscopy and total knee arthroplasty. Two instances of varus arthritic knee associated with a peroneal nerve palsy have been reported so far. One presented with gradual onset peroneal nerve palsy that recovered with time and the other with sudden onset peroneal nerve palsy that did not recover. We describe the case of a 63-year-old man who presented with a symptomatic varus arthritic knee and sudden onset peroneal nerve palsy with synovial cysts over the lateral aspect of the knee. We performed a total knee arthroplasty with decompression of the synovial cyst in the same patient. Three months following the surgery the patient was walking pain free with a completely recovered nerve palsy. PMID:28287389

  11. Femoral Nerve Palsy with Patella Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang Hyoung; Lee, Tong Joo; Woo, Min Su

    2013-01-01

    Femoral neuropathy may be associated with various etiologies and can cause severe walking disability. We present the case of a 25-year-old woman who underwent surgical repair for a patella fracture and complained of lower extremity pain, paresthesia, and weakness postoperatively. Electromyography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed partial peripheral neuropathy of the left femoral nerve associated with the patella fracture. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of femoral neuropathy associated with a patella fracture. PMID:24369003

  12. Laryngeal zoster with multiple cranial nerve palsies.

    PubMed

    Van Den Bossche, Paul; Van Den Bossche, Karolien; Vanpoucke, Hilde

    2008-03-01

    A young immunocompetent patient is presented with a very rare presentation of a common viral illness: herpes zoster of the left hemilarynx with sensorial and motoric neuropathy of three ipsilateral lower cranial nerves: IX, X and XI. The mucosal lesions were discovered during upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. PCR of erosional exsudate confirmed the clinical diagnosis. Antiviral therapy and corticosteroids possibly contributed to the prosperous evolution with complete healing.

  13. Treating facial nerve palsy by true termino-lateral hypoglossal-facial nerve anastomosis.

    PubMed

    Sleilati, F H; Nasr, M W; Stephan, H A; Asmar, Z D; Hokayem, N E

    2010-11-01

    Hypoglossal-facial nerve anastomosis is a time-proven technique for the repair of facial nerve palsy. Efforts have been made to reduce hypoglossal nerve injury, the main drawback of the technique. In this study, the anastomosis is a true termino-lateral neurorrhaphy with only an epineural window in the hypoglossal nerve sheath. A re-routing technique of the temporal facial nerve is also performed to allow a direct anastomosis to the hypoglossal nerve without the need for a jump graft. The first three results reported are very encouraging, with a satisfactory return of facial mimics and without any impairment of lingual function. Copyright © 2009 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Unusual insidious spinal accessory nerve palsy: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Isolated spinal accessory nerve dysfunction has a major detrimental impact on the functional performance of the shoulder girdle, and is a well-documented complication of surgical procedures in the posterior triangle of the neck. To the best of our knowledge, the natural course and the most effective way of handling spontaneous spinal accessory nerve palsy has been described in only a few instances in the literature. Case presentation We report the case of a 36-year-old Caucasian, Greek man with spontaneous unilateral trapezius palsy with an insidious course. To the best of our knowledge, few such cases have been documented in the literature. The unusual clinical presentation and functional performance mismatch with the imaging findings were also observed. Our patient showed a deterioration that was different from the usual course of this pathology, with an early onset of irreversible trapezius muscle dysfunction two months after the first clinical signs started to manifest. A surgical reconstruction was proposed as the most efficient treatment, but our patient declined this. Although he failed to recover fully after conservative treatment for eight months, he regained moderate function and is currently virtually pain-free. Conclusion Clinicians have to be aware that due to anatomical variation and the potential for compensation by the levator scapulae, the clinical consequences of any injury to the spinal accessory nerve may vary. PMID:20507553

  15. Common peroneal nerve palsy caused by compression stockings after surgery.

    PubMed

    Güzelküçük, Ümüt; Skempes, Dimitrios; Kumnerddee, Wipoo

    2014-07-01

    Peroneal nerve palsy is one of the more common entrapment neuropathies of the lower limb and can be a result of a multitude of causes. Compression stockings are commonly used for prophylaxis of deep venous thromboembolism after surgery. The entrapment on the head and the neck of the fibula caused by compression stockings is uncommon. In this article, the authors report a 46-yr-old male patient who was operated on for postauricular squamous cell carcinoma of the skin. On the third postoperative day, it was noticed that compression stockings had rolled down, and a linear impression mark was observed under its upper edge at the proximal part of the left cruris. He had left foot drop and difficulty in walking during gait assessment. The needle electromyography confirmed total axonal degeneration of the left peroneal nerve with denervation potentials. The aim of this report was to emphasize the importance of the size and length of the compression stockings and regular skin control in avoiding the risk for peroneal nerve palsy.

  16. Nerve Transfers for Persistent Traumatic Peroneal Nerve Palsy: The Inselspital Bern Experience.

    PubMed

    Leclère, Franck Marie; Badur, Nicole; Mathys, Lukas; Vögelin, Esther

    2015-10-01

    Patients in whom conventional peroneal nerve repair surgery failed to reconstitute useful foot lift need to be evaluated for their suitability to undergo a concomitant tendon transfer procedure or nerve transfers. To report our first clinical experience with nerve transfers for persistent traumatic peroneal nerve palsy. Between 2007 and 2013, 8 patients were operated on for foot drop after unsuccessful nerve surgery. Six patients without fatty degeneration of the anterior tibial muscle and proximal lesion of the peroneal nerve were oriented for tibial to peroneal nerve transfer. In the other 2 cases where the anterior and lateral compartments were destructed, the anterior tibial muscle function was reconstructed with a neurotized lateral gastrocnemius transfer. For each patient, we graded postoperative results using the British Medical Research Council scheme and the Ninkovic assessment scale. Of the 6 patients who underwent nerve transfer of the anterior tibial muscle, 2 patients had excellent results, 1 patient had good results, 1 patient had fair results, and 2 patients had poor results. Of the 2 patients that underwent neurotized lateral gastrocnemius transfer, 1 patient achieved excellent results after tenolysis, whereas 1 patient achieved poor results. After the nerve transfer, 5 patients did not wear an ankle-foot orthosis. Four patients did not limp. Four patients were able to walk barefoot, navigate stairs, and participate in activities. Early clinical results after tibial to peroneal nerve transfer and neurotized lateral gastrocnemius transfer appear mixed. The results of nerve transfer seem, on the whole, less reliable than the literature reports on tendon transfer.

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging findings of isolated abducent nerve palsy induced by vascular compression of vertebrobasilar dolichoectasia

    PubMed Central

    Arishima, Hidetaka; Kikuta, Ken-ichiro

    2017-01-01

    If the origin of isolated abducent nerve palsy cannot be found on neuroradiological examinations, diabetes mellitus is known as a probable cause; however, some cases show no potential causes of isolated abducent nerve palsy. Here, we report a 74-year-old male who suffered from diplopia due to isolated left abducent nerve palsy. Magnetic resonance angiography and fast imaging employing steady-state acquisition imaging clearly showed a dolichoectasic vertebrobasilar artery compressing the left abducent nerve upward and outward. There were no abnormal lesions in the brain stem, cavernous sinus, or orbital cavity. Laboratory data showed no abnormal findings. We concluded that neurovascular compression of the left abducent nerve might cause isolated left abducent nerve palsy. We observed him without surgical treatment considering his general condition with angina pectoris and old age. His symptom due to the left abducent nerve palsy persisted. From previous reports, conservative treatment could not improve abducent nerve palsy. Microvascular decompression should be considered for abducent nerve palsy due to vascular compression if patients are young, and their general condition is good. We also discuss interesting characteristics with a review of the literature. PMID:28149097

  18. Corneal edema induced by cold in trigeminal nerve palsy

    SciTech Connect

    Thorgaard, G.L.; Holland, E.J.; Krachmer, J.H.

    1987-05-15

    We examined a 34-year-old man who complained of decreased visual acuity in the right eye when exposed to cold environmental temperatures. Although examination at room temperature was unremarkable, he developed prominent unilateral corneal edema of the right eye when placed in a cold room at 4 C. Corneal thickness increased from 525 to 789 microns in the affected eye. Further examination disclosed a right-sided trigeminal nerve palsy. He was eventually found to have a 3 X 2-cm tentorial ridge meningioma on the right.

  19. Bell's facial nerve palsy in pregnancy: a clinical review.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Ahsen; Nduka, Charles; Moth, Philippa; Malhotra, Raman

    2017-05-01

    Bell's facial nerve palsy (FNP) during pregnancy and the puerperium can present significant challenges for the patient and clinician. Presentation and prognosis can be worse in this group of patients. This article reviews the background, manifestation and management options of FNP. In particular, it focuses on the controversies that exist regarding corticosteroid use during pregnancy and outlines approaches to diagnosis and treatment. Based on this review, we recommend an early evidence-based approach using guidelines derived from non-pregnant populations. This includes assessment for atypical causes, a multidisciplinary input and early introduction of corticosteroids to limit progression and improve prognosis.

  20. [The results of tendon transfer in irreparable radial nerve palsy].

    PubMed

    Nalbantoğlu, Ufuk; Ozkan, Türker; Türkmen, I Metin

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the results of tendon transfers in patients with irreparable radial nerve palsy. The study included 29 patients (5 females, 24 males; mean age 29 years; range 9 to 51 years) who underwent tendon transfers for radial nerve palsy. Four patients had low- and 25 patients had high-level radial nerve palsy. The mean duration of tendon transfer after injury (paralysis time) was 19.7 months (range 1 day to 180 months). Clinical evaluations included joint range of motion and muscle strengths. Functional evaluation was made using the Tajima criteria. The mean follow-up was 56.9 months (range 5 to 90 months). Muscle strengths were measured as follows: 3 (n=3), 4 (n=10), and 5 (n=12) for the wrist extensor muscle; 3 (n=7), 4 (n=10), and 5 (n=12) for the finger extensor muscle; and 3 (n=6), 4 (n=13), and 5 (n=10) for the thumb extensor muscle. The mean wrist range of motion was 67.4 degrees , extension was 48.3 degrees (10 degrees to 70 degrees ), and flexion was 21.5 degrees (10 degrees to 55 degrees ). The mean metacarpophalangeal joint extension was 1.7 degrees (0 degrees to 12 degrees ), thumb abduction was 45.6 degrees (34 degrees to 56 degrees ), and thumb interphalangeal joint extension was 18 degrees (0 degrees to 30 degrees ). According to the Tajima criteria, the results were excellent in 15 patients (51.7%), good in nine patients (31%), and moderate in five patients (17.2%). Eight patients (27.6%) had radial deviation deformity and four patients (13.8%) had 1-level weaker finger extensor muscle strength compared to the other fingers. The flexor carpi ulnaris (FCU) was used in the transfer of patients who developed radial deviation deformity. Treatment of irreparable radial nerve palsy with tendon transfers yields successful results. Radial deviation deformity mostly occurs in patients receiving FCU transfer for finger extension.

  1. Facial Nerve Palsy: Providing Eye Comfort and Cosmesis

    PubMed Central

    Alsuhaibani, Adel H.

    2010-01-01

    Development of facial nerve palsy (FNP) may lead to dramatic change in the patient's facial function, expression, and emotions. The ophthalmologist may play an important role in the initial evaluation, and the long-term management of patients with new-onset of FNP. In patients with expected temporary facial weakness, no efforts should be wasted to ensure proper corneal protection. Patients with permanent functional deficit may require combination of surgical procedures tailored to the patient's clinical findings that may require good eye comfort and cosmesis. PMID:20616921

  2. Acute Facial Nerve Palsy With Ipsilateral Soft Palate Ulcers.

    PubMed

    Mauprivez, Cédric; Comte, Clément; Labrousse, Marc; Khonsari, Roman H

    2017-09-01

    Ramsay-Hunt syndrome (RHS) is a rare complication of herpes zoster in which reactivation of latent varicella zoster virus (VZV) infection occurs in the geniculate ganglion. Major clinical findings are peripheral facial nerve palsy accompanied by ipsilateral ear pain and erythematous vesicular rash on the external ear (herpes zoster oticus) and in the mouth. Thus, diagnosis of RHS is usually clinical. However, auricular herpetic eruption is not always present, making diagnosis more difficult. This report describes a case of RHS with left facial palsy without skin lesions in 60-year-old woman. Multiple ulcers were found on her left soft palate. Polymerase chain reaction analysis on oral mucosa biopsy samples and serologic assays allowed the identification of VZV as the causal agent. Knowledge of the anatomy of the facial nerve is important for oral and maxillofacial surgeons when dealing with patients with RHS, especially in unusual and clinically misleading forms of this syndrome. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Primary radial nerve palsy in patients with acute humeral shaft fractures.

    PubMed

    Ekholm, Radford; Ponzer, Sari; Törnkvist, Hans; Adami, Johanna; Tidermark, Jan

    2008-07-01

    The primary aim was to report on the recovery of radial nerve function in patients with acute closed humeral shaft fractures and associated primary radial nerve palsy. The secondary aim was to report on the long-term functional outcome and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in patients with this specific injury. Six major hospitals in Stockholm County. Descriptive study. Retrospective assessment of radial nerve recovery and fracture healing. Prospective assessment of functional outcome and HRQoL. Thirty-three patients with acute radial nerve palsy and a closed humeral shaft fracture in a population of 358 patients with 361 humeral shaft fractures. Nonoperative or operative treatment as per decision of the attending orthopedic surgeon. Recovery of the radial nerve, fracture healing, functional outcome according to the Short Musculoskeletal Function Assessment (SMFA) and the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH). HRQoL according to Short Form 36 (SF-36). Among the 18 patients treated nonoperatively, 16 (89%) displayed a complete recovery from their radial nerve palsy while 2 (11%) presented minor sequelae. In 11 (73%) of the 15 patients treated primarily operatively, the nerve function recovered completely while 2 patients (13%) had minor sequelae and 2 (13%) had major sequelae, i.e. 1 partial nerve palsy and 1 total radial nerve palsy. Sixteen patients (48%) were available for assessment of the long-term functional outcome and HRQoL at a mean of 7 years (range, 6 to 8 years). The range of motion and the muscular strength of the injured arm, the functional outcome according to the SMFA, and HRQoL according to the SF-36 showed results comparable to those previously reported for patients with healed humeral shaft fractures without associated radial nerve palsy. This study confirms the high spontaneous recovery rate of primary radial nerve palsies in patients with closed humeral shaft fractures. Primary radial nerve palsy should not be regarded as an

  4. Cranial Nerve Palsies: A Rare, Long-Term Complication of Radiotherapy for Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Alcon, Andre; Geiger, Erik J; Pandit, Amrita; McGregor, Andrew; Narayan, Deepak

    2015-10-01

    Cranial nerves (CN) are believed to be relatively resistant to radiotherapy (RT); however, there have been case reports of cranial nerve palsy (CNP) following RT. We present a case of a gentleman with cranial nerve palsy of CN V and VII after RT for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). A 54-year-old male presented to our clinic with masticatory difficulty, facial hypoesthesia, and dysphagia. In 1998, he was treated with external beam RT for NPC. He underwent sural nerve grafting, anastomosing his functioning hypoglossal nerve to the buccal branch of the facial nerve in an end-to-side fashion, and direct implantation of a nerve graft from the spinal accessory to the masseter muscle. He unfortunately was unable to regain masticatory function postoperatively. Cranial nerve palsies are severely debilitating to patients and difficult to treat. Radiation-induced CNP is important to consider in the differential diagnosis in patients previously treated for NPC.

  5. Median nerve entrapment and ulnar nerve palsy following elbow dislocation in a child.

    PubMed

    Petratos, Dimitrios V; Stavropoulos, Nikolaos A; Morakis, Emmanouil A; Matsinos, George S

    2012-01-01

    This report presents a rare case of a child who presented with neglected intra-articular entrapment of the median nerve, ulnar nerve palsy, and intra-articular incarceration of the medial epicondyle following closed reduction of an elbow dislocation. In the present case, as in most other cases, the diagnosis and treatment were delayed. Careful initial and postreduction neurological examination, as well as careful interpretation of the plain radiographs, is necessary for early detection of any nerve complications and associated fractures of an elbow dislocation. The authors' opinion is that a child with an elbow dislocation, which is initially neurologically intact but advances to a median or ulnar nerve deficit after the reduction, must undergo early surgical exploration, especially when the dislocation is associated with a medial epicondyle fracture.

  6. Nerve transfers in brachial plexus birth palsies: indications, techniques, and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Kozin, Scott H

    2008-11-01

    The advent of nerve transfers has greatly increased surgical options for children who have brachial plexus birth palsies. Nerve transfers have considerable advantages, including easier surgical techniques, avoidance of neuroma resection, and direct motor and sensory reinnervation. Therefore, any functioning nerve fibers within the neuroma are preserved. Furthermore, a carefully selected donor nerve results in little or no clinical deficit. However, some disadvantages and unanswered questions remain. Because of a lack of head-to-head comparison between nerve transfers and nerve grafting, the window of opportunity for nerve grafting may be missed, which may degrade the ultimate outcome. Time will tell the ultimate role of nerve transfer or nerve grafting.

  7. Facial nerve hemangiomas at geniculate ganglion: preservation of nerve integrity is correlated with duration of facial palsy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kai; Chou, Haiyan; Li, Yefeng

    2015-01-01

    To study preservation of nerve integrity in 16 cases with facial nerve hemangiomas at geniculate ganglion (GG). 16 cases with facial nerve hemangiomas at GG, who presented with facial palsy, were included in the study. Preservation of nerve integrity was attempted by the same surgeon during surgical removal, and those who failed to preserve nerve integrity underwent nerve grafting. The patients were divided into longer duration group (>12months) and shorter duration group (≤12months) according to duration of facial palsy, and preservation of nerve integrity in the couple of groups was compared. Nerve integrity was preserved in 2 of 10 cases (20%) among longer duration group, while it was preserved in 5 of 6 cases (83.3%) among shorter duration group (p<0.05). All the cases with nerve integrity preserved recovered to grade III or better, among which 3 cases recovered to grade I or grade II, while only 3 of 9 cases (33.3%) with nerve grafting recovered to grade III at the best. Preservation of nerve integrity was correlated with duration of facial palsy in cases with hemangiomas at GG. Patients with nerve integrity preserved showed better outcomes of facial nerve. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. A smartphone-based automatic diagnosis system for facial nerve palsy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun Seok; Kim, So Young; Kim, Young Ho; Park, Kwang Suk

    2015-10-21

    Facial nerve palsy induces a weakness or loss of facial expression through damage of the facial nerve. A quantitative and reliable assessment system for facial nerve palsy is required for both patients and clinicians. In this study, we propose a rapid and portable smartphone-based automatic diagnosis system that discriminates facial nerve palsy from normal subjects. Facial landmarks are localized and tracked by an incremental parallel cascade of the linear regression method. An asymmetry index is computed using the displacement ratio between the left and right side of the forehead and mouth regions during three motions: resting, raising eye-brow and smiling. To classify facial nerve palsy, we used Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA) and Support Vector Machine (SVM), and Leave-one-out Cross Validation (LOOCV) with 36 subjects. The classification accuracy rate was 88.9%.

  9. Radial nerve palsy associated with slightly angulated pediatric supracondylar humerus fracture.

    PubMed

    Sairyo, K; Henmi, T; Kanematsu, Y; Nakano, S; Kajikawa, T

    1997-04-01

    This report reviews a case of radial nerve palsy associated with a supracondylar fracture of the right humerus. The patient was a four-year-old boy. Radiographs of the injury showed simple extension and a slightly angulated fracture. Complete radial nerve palsy was observed at the first consultation. After three months of conservative treatment without any obvious improvement, an operative exploration of the right radial nerve was conducted. Intraoperatively, the nerve was found to be transected, with both ends of the ruptured nerve buried in scar tissue at the fracture site. Five months after the nerve suture operation, the palsy was cured completely. This case shows that even a minimal displacement fracture can be associated with severe nerve injury that requires surgical treatment.

  10. Isolated glossopharyngeal and vagus nerves palsy due to fracture involving the left jugular foramen.

    PubMed

    Alberio, N; Cultrera, F; Antonelli, V; Servadei, F

    2005-07-01

    This report describes a case of delayed post-traumatic glossopharyngeal and vagus nerves palsy (i.e. dysphonia and swallowing dysfunction). A high resolution CT study of the cranial base detected a fracture rim encroaching on the left jugular foramen. Treatment consisted in supportive measures with incomplete recovery during a one-year follow-up period. Lower cranial nerves palsies after head trauma are rare and, should they occur, a thorough investigation in search of posterior cranial base and cranio-cervical lesions is warranted. The presumptive mechanism in our case is a fracture-related oedema and ischemic damage to the nerves leading to the delayed occurrence of the palsy.

  11. Proteinase 3-antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-positive ulcerative colitis presenting with abducens neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Kirito, Yuki; Yamamoto, Daisuke; Uchiyama, Tsuyoshi

    2017-01-01

    A 72-year-old man with ulcerative colitis (UC) presented with complete left abducens nerve palsy. Although MRI showed no significant changes, cerebrospinal fluid analysis revealed pleocytosis and elevated protein and interleukin (IL)-6 levels. His serum proteinase 3-antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (PR3-ANCA) level was also elevated to 31.1 U/mL, but granulomatosis with polyangiitis was not observed. On the basis of the diagnosis of autoimmune cranial neuropathy, he was treated with steroid therapy. While tapering steroid therapy, his serum PR3-ANCA levels; cerebrospinal fluid findings, including IL-6 levels; and symptoms improved. Serum PR3-ANCA could be a useful parameter of neurological disorders associated with ANCA-positive UC. PMID:28069788

  12. Isolated clival metastasis as the cause of abducens nerve palsy in a patient of breast carcinoma: A rare case report

    PubMed Central

    Kapoor, Akhil; Beniwal, Vimla; Beniwal, Surender; Mathur, Harsh; Kumar, Harvindra Singh

    2015-01-01

    Metastatic lesions to the clivus have been reported in various cancers including lung cancer, prostate carcinoma, skin melanoma, and hepatocellular carcinoma. There have been only a few reports of breast cancer presenting with isolated clival metastasis. We report a case of 35-year-old lady, who was known case of breast carcinoma presented with diplopia as the only sign of clival metastasis. The etiology was established by magnetic resonance imaging which showed an enhancing lesion in the clivus. The diagnosis of clival metastasis from breast cancer was confirmed by transsphenoidal biopsy. PMID:26044482

  13. Two cases of elderly-onset hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsy manifesting bilateral peroneal nerve palsies.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, Norihiko; Suzuki, Naoki; Tateyama, Maki; Takai, Yoshiki; Misu, Tatsuro; Nakashima, Ichiro; Itoyama, Yasuto; Aoki, Masashi

    2012-09-01

    Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsy (HNPP) is characterized by recurrent focal neuropathies, which usually become symptomatic in the second or third decade of life. However, clinical phenotypic heterogeneity among patients with HNPP has recently been reported. Certain patients show polyneuropathy-type diffuse nerve injuries, whereas others remain asymptomatic at older ages. We present two cases of elderly-onset bilateral peroneal nerve palsies with diffuse muscle weakness in the lower limbs and glove-and-stocking type sensory disturbance. Both patients were diagnosed with HNPP by genetic analyses that detected deletions of chromosome 17p11.2 in peripheral myelin protein 22 genes. Their clinical courses suggested that the Japanese sitting style termed 'seiza', a way of sitting on the floor with the lower legs crossed under the thighs, was a precipitating factor for the bilateral peroneal nerve palsies.

  14. Facial palsy after inferior alveolar nerve block: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Chevalier, V; Arbab-Chirani, R; Tea, S H; Roux, M

    2010-11-01

    Bell's palsy is an idiopathic and acute, peripheral nerve palsy resulting in inability to control facial muscles on the affected side because of the involvement of the facial nerve. This study describes a case of Bell's palsy that developed after dental anaesthesia. A 34-year-old pregnant woman at 35 weeks of amenorrhea, with no history of systemic disease, was referred by her dentist for treatment of a mandibular left molar in pulpitis. An inferior alveolar nerve block was made prior to the access cavity preparation. 2h later, the patient felt the onset of a complete paralysis of the left-sided facial muscles. The medical history, the physical examination and the complementary exams led neurologists to the diagnosis of Bell's palsy. The treatment and results of the 1-year follow-up are presented and discussed. Bell's palsy is a rare complication of maxillofacial surgery or dental procedures, the mechanisms of which remain uncertain.

  15. Transient facial nerve paralysis (Bell's palsy) following administration of hepatitis B recombinant vaccine: a case report.

    PubMed

    Paul, R; Stassen, L F A

    2014-01-01

    Bell's palsy is the sudden onset of unilateral transient paralysis of facial muscles resulting from dysfunction of the seventh cranial nerve. Presented here is a 26-year-old female patient with right lower motor neurone facial palsy following hepatitis B vaccination. Readers' attention is drawn to an uncommon cause of Bell's palsy, as a possible rare complication of hepatitis B vaccination, and steps taken to manage such a presentation.

  16. Long thoracic nerve palsy: a follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Goodman, C E; Kenrick, M M; Blum, M V

    1975-08-01

    Twelve patients who had previously been treated for palsy of the long thoracic nerve of Bell and resultant serratus anterior paralysis were examined in a follow-up study designed to determine their extent of recovery and/or residual disability. The patients' histories were reviewed, following which they were recalled for updating of the history and reexamination. It was found that those patients whose lesions were due to acute trauma had only partial or no recovery of serratus function, while those with infectious, toxic, allergic or idiopathic etiologies had partial or complete recovery. The occurrence of a prolonged interval between onset of symptoms and institution of therapy was found to adversely affect prognosis. Among those patients with no recovery of serratus anterior function, some were able to maintain relatively good active motion in the affected shoulder by substituting with the trapezius.

  17. Modulation of parkinsonian tremor by radial nerve palsy.

    PubMed

    Pullman, S L; Elibol, B; Fahn, S

    1994-10-01

    We analyzed rest and postural hand tremors in a Parkinson's disease patient who developed and recovered from a right radial nerve palsy at the spiral groove, and found that, despite complete paralysis of all extensors below the elbow, tremor frequencies remained unchanged while tremor amplitudes actually increased. This provides compelling evidence for a central generation of parkinsonian tremor frequency that is not influenced by the effects of peripheral modulation. In addition, the increase in tremor amplitudes may be due to disinhibited flexor activity caused by normally operating spinal segmental mechanisms interacting with central tremor generators programmed to alternate between antagonist muscles. Peripheral treatment of tremors--with muscle paralysis or botulinum toxin, for example--therefore may not be effective in stopping tremor oscillations in Parkinson's disease and may even worsen tremor amplitudes if all antagonists of a tremoring joint are not treated equally.

  18. Leukemia cutis and facial nerve palsy as presenting symptoms of acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Gold, Heidi L; Grynspan, David; Kanigsberg, Nordau

    2014-01-01

    Leukemia cutis and facial nerve palsy are rare presenting symptoms of leukemia. This report describes a case of acute T-cell lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) presenting with only these two symptoms, a presentation of ALL that, to our knowledge, has not been previously described. It serves to alert physicians to look for underlying malignancy in the setting of cutaneous findings associated with facial nerve palsy. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Familial long thoracic nerve palsy: a manifestation of brachial plexus neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Phillips, L H

    1986-09-01

    Long thoracic nerve palsy causes weakness of the serratus anterior muscle and winging of the scapula. It is usually traumatic in origin. Isolated long thoracic nerve palsy has not been recognized as the major manifestation of familial brachial plexus neuropathy, but I have studied the syndrome in four members of three generations of one family. One individual suffered an episode of facial paresis. The inheritance pattern was autosomal dominant.

  20. Newborn radial nerve palsy: report of four cases and review of published reports.

    PubMed

    Hayman, M; Roland, E H; Hill, A

    1999-09-01

    Four newborns presented with isolated radial nerve palsy during the first 2 days of life. In three, there was a history of failure of progression of labor, which may have resulted in prolonged radial nerve compression. Furthermore, three infants had fat necrosis of the upper arm above the elbow, suggestive of compression of the radial nerve in the region of the spiral groove. Significant recovery of function was evident within 1 month in all four infants. The authors review published reports about the rare condition of isolated radial nerve palsy in the newborn.

  1. Iatrogenic cushing syndrome to facial nerve palsy: via intracranial tuberculoma-an interesting journey.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarti, Subrata

    2014-12-01

    Isolated Facial nerve palsy is a less common neurological manifestation of intracranial tuberculoma. Again, tuberculoma can arise following development of Cushing syndrome after prolonged intake of steroids due to origin of immunosuppressed state. Thus exogenous steroid administration leading to iatrogenic Cushing Syndrome which again causing tuberculoma, with facial nerve palsy developing as a manifestation of tuberculoma is not unnatural but definitely a unique scenario. The author reports an interesting case where a patient developed left sided facial palsy following development of intracranial tuberculoma from iatrogenic Cushing syndrome after longterm intake of Dexamethasone as a treatment for low back pain. This situation is rarely reported before.

  2. Facial nerve palsy following intra-oral surgery performed with local anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Cousin, G C

    2000-10-01

    The precise cause of Bell's palsy remains unclear. A variety of mechanisms have been linked to this palsy, including viral re-activation, demyelination, oedema, vasopasm and trauma. A link with dental treatment has been suggested previously, and a series of seven cases of facial nerve palsy following intra-oral surgery are reported. All of the patients had local anaesthetic solution containing adrenaline as the vasoconstrictor administered. There may be under-reporting of this association, as patients with facial nerve palsy are treated by specialists from several disciplines, not only maxillofacial surgeons. An association with local anaesthesia administered to permit dental treatment would have important medicolegal consequences, and perhaps go some way to explaining the pathophysiology of Bell's palsy.

  3. Management of acute cranial nerve 3, 4 and 6 palsies: role of neuroimaging.

    PubMed

    Tamhankar, Madhura A; Volpe, Nicholas J

    2015-11-01

    This article will discuss the management of isolated, acute cranial nerve 3,4 and 6 palsies with special focus on the role of neuroimaging in older adults based on recently published data. Acute cranial nerve palsies affecting the third, fourth or sixth cranial nerves in isolation or in combination with other neurological signs and symptoms can be due to a variety of causes such as ischemia, inflammation, infection and compression of the ocular motor nerves. Although neuroimaging is generally recommended in all individuals presenting with ocular motor nerve palsies that occur in association with other neurological signs and symptoms, the indications for neuroimaging in older individuals (age > 50 years) who present with acute isolated ocular motor nerve palsies are less clear and controversial. Past and recent studies have attempted to address this question. A recent prospective study found that overall 16.5% of adult patients presenting with acute ocular motor mononeuropathy had structural lesions on MRI scan and 4.6% with fourth and sixth nerve palsies and no risk factors were found to have positive MRI scans. On the basis of recently published data, we recommend contrast-enhanced MRI for all patients presenting with acute, isolated ocular motor mononeuropathies irrespective of age. Studies have clearly shown a small but significant prevalence of important findings in this group of patients thus favoring neuroimaging at the time of diagnosis.

  4. Clinical Study of Eleven Patients with Midbrain Infarction-Induced Oculomotor Nerve Palsy.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Katsuhiko; Suzuki, Yutaka; Takahashi, Keiko; Kamei, Satoshi; Ishikawa, Hiroshi

    2016-07-01

    Midbrain lesion-induced oculomotor nerve palsy can be divided into the nuclear and infranuclear types. In the infranuclear type, the degree of each subtype of ocular muscle palsy usually varies. The neuroradiological findings of 11 patients with midbrain infarction-induced oculomotor nerve palsy were analyzed. Their infarcts were grouped into rostral and caudal lesions. Each group was then divided into lesions that occurred in the paramedian and lateral regions before being subdivided further into lesions that occurred in the tegmental, central, and ventral areas. Unilateral and bilateral infarcts were seen in 9 and 2 patients, respectively. The ventrocentral area of the rostral paramedian region was the most commonly affected part. External ocular muscle palsy was observed in all 11 patients. Ten patients had infranuclear oculomotor nerve palsy. Of these 10 patients, 9 had adduction palsy. Internal ocular muscle palsy was detected in 4 patients. The patient with nuclear type had bilateral ptosis and bilateral elevation palsy and did not exhibit Bell's phenomenon; however, her lesion was unilateral. Vertical gaze palsy was detected in 3 patients who continued to exhibit Bell's phenomenon. In the 3 cases in which patients with vertical gaze palsy continued to exhibit Bell's phenomenon, it was considered that the palsy was caused by impairment of the rostral interstitial nucleus of the medial longitudinal fasciculus. Our study suggested that the intra-axial fascicular fibers innervating the medial rectus muscle are particularly susceptible to infarction, possibly because they are the most centrally located in the intra-axial oculomotor fascicular fibers. Copyright © 2016 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Bell's palsy and partial hypoglossal to facial nerve transfer: Case presentation and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Socolovsky, Mariano; Páez, Miguel Domínguez; Masi, Gilda Di; Molina, Gonzalo; Fernández, Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    Background: Idiopathic facial nerve palsy (Bell's palsy) is a very common condition that affects active population. Despite its generally benign course, a minority of patients can remain with permanent and severe sequelae, including facial palsy or dyskinesia. Hypoglossal to facial nerve anastomosis is rarely used to reinnervate the mimic muscle in these patients. In this paper, we present a case where a direct partial hypoglossal to facial nerve transfer was used to reinnervate the upper and lower face. We also discuss the indications of this procedure. Case Description: A 53-year-old woman presenting a spontaneous complete (House and Brackmann grade 6) facial palsy on her left side showed no improvement after 13 months of conservative treatment. Electromyography (EMG) showed complete denervation of the mimic muscles. A direct partial hypoglossal to facial nerve anastomosis was performed, including dissection of the facial nerve at the fallopian canal. One year after the procedure, the patient showed House and Brackmann grade 3 function in her affected face. Conclusions: Partial hypoglossal–facial anastomosis with intratemporal drilling of the facial nerve is a viable technique in the rare cases in which severe Bell's palsy does not recover spontaneously. Only carefully selected patients can really benefit from this technique. PMID:22574255

  6. Radial nerve palsy associated with fractures of the shaft of the humerus: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Shao, Y C; Harwood, P; Grotz, M R W; Limb, D; Giannoudis, P V

    2005-12-01

    The management of radial nerve palsy associated with fractures of the shaft of the humerus has been disputed for several decades. This study has systematically reviewed the published evidence and developed an algorithm to guide management. We searched web-based databases for studies published in the past 40 years and identified further pages through manual searches of the bibliography in papers identified electronically. Of 391 papers identified initially, encompassing a total of 1045 patients with radial nerve palsy, 35 papers met all our criteria for eligibility. Meticulous extraction of the data was carried out according to a preset protocol. The overall prevalence of radial nerve palsy after fracture of the shaft of the humerus in 21 papers was 11.8% (532 palsies in 4517 fractures). Fractures of the middle and middle-distal parts of the shaft had a significantly higher association with radial nerve palsy than those in other parts. Transverse and spiral fractures were more likely to be associated with radial nerve palsy than oblique and comminuted patterns of fracture (p < 0.001). The overall rate of recovery was 88.1% (921 of 1045), with spontaneous recovery reaching 70.7% (411 of 581) in patients treated conservatively. There was no significant difference in the final results when comparing groups which were initially managed expectantly with those explored early, suggesting that the initial expectant treatment did not affect the extent of nerve recovery adversely and would avoid many unnecessary operations. A treatment algorithm for the management of radial nerve palsy associated with fracture of the shaft of the humerus is recommended by the authors.

  7. Success of prisms in the management of diplopia due to fourth nerve palsy.

    PubMed

    Tamhankar, Madhura A; Ying, Gui-Shuang; Volpe, Nicholas J

    2011-09-01

    To analyze the success of prism use in alleviating diplopia in patients with fourth nerve palsy and to provide recommendations for prism prescription. In this retrospective cohort study, the medical records of 83 patients who were prescribed prisms for symptomatic diplopia due to fourth nerve palsy were analyzed. Data on the nature and duration of diplopia, motility and alignment findings, and amount and type of prism prescribed were recorded. The success of prescribed prismatic correction was assessed by the patient's self-reporting of satisfaction with prism use and follow-up records. The main outcome measure was the satisfaction rate associated with the use of prisms (satisfaction score 1 or 2) in patients with fourth nerve palsy. There were 69 patients with congenital fourth nerve palsy and 14 patients with acquired fourth nerve palsy who received prisms. The mean primary position (± SD) deviation in this group was 7.8 (± 4.6) prism diopters (PD). The mean prism prescription was 6 (± 2.9) PD. Overall, 92% of patients were satisfied with the use of prisms. During the length of follow-up, which ranged from 2 months to more than 6 years (median: 18 months), 86% of the cohort continued using prisms while 14% of patients underwent strabismus surgery. Among 15 patients who had primary position deviation greater than 15 PD, 80% of the patients reported satisfaction with prisms, and in the 11 patients who received 10 PD or more of prismatic correction, 82% were satisfied. Prisms are an effective modality for the management of patients with symptomatic diplopia due to fourth nerve palsy. Even in patients with larger deviations including those who were prescribed greater than 10 PD of correction, the success rate of prisms in alleviating diplopia was high. Prisms should be considered as initial therapy in symptomatic patients with fourth nerve palsy.

  8. Success of Prisms in the Management of Diplopia Due to Fourth Nerve Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Tamhankar, Madhura A.; Ying, Gui-shuang; Volpe, Nicholas J.

    2014-01-01

    Background To analyze the success of prism use in alleviating diplopia in patients with fourth nerve palsy and to provide recommendations for prism prescription. Methods In this retrospective cohort study, the medical records of 83 patients who were prescribed prisms for symptomatic diplopia due to fourth nerve palsy were analyzed. Data on the nature and duration of diplopia, motility and alignment findings, and amount and type of prism prescribed were recorded. The success of prescribed prismatic correction was assessed by the patient’s self-reporting of satisfaction with prism use and follow-up records. The main outcome measure was the satisfaction rate associated with the use of prisms (satisfaction score 1 or 2) in patients with fourth nerve palsy. Results There were 69 patients with congenital fourth nerve palsy and 14 patients with acquired fourth nerve palsy who received prisms. The mean primary position (±SD) deviation in this group was 7.8 (±4.6) prism diopters (PD). The mean prism prescription was 6 (±2.9) PD. Overall, 92% of patients were satisfied with the use of prisms. During the length of follow-up, which ranged from 2 months to more than 6 years (median: 18 months), 86% of the cohort continued using prisms while 14% of patients underwent strabismus surgery. Among 15 patients who had primary position deviation greater than 15 PD, 80% of the patients reported satisfaction with prisms, and in the 11 patients who received 10 PD or more of prismatic correction, 82% were satisfied. Conclusion Prisms are an effective modality for the management of patients with symptomatic diplopia due to fourth nerve palsy. Even in patients with larger deviations including those who were prescribed greater than 10 PD of correction, the success rate of prisms in alleviating diplopia was high. Prisms should be considered as initial therapy in symptomatic patients with fourth nerve palsy. PMID:21378578

  9. An unusual case of multiple cranial nerve palsies in Wegener's granulomatosis.

    PubMed Central

    Daderian, A. D.; Chayasirisobhon, S.

    2000-01-01

    We describe an unusual case of Wegener's granulomatosis, which initially caused fulminant palsies affecting cranial nerves II, V, VI, VII, and VIII during a brief episode of the disease. The patient was successfully treated with immunosuppressive therapy. Wegener's granulomatosis should be suspected when multiple cranial nerves are initially affected. PMID:11052460

  10. Recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy due to displacement of a gastric band.

    PubMed

    Fussey, J M; Ahsan, F

    2016-11-01

    The left recurrent laryngeal nerve is at increased risk of compression by oesophageal pathology due to its long course through the neck and thorax. Here we report a case of left vocal cord palsy secondary to displacement of a gastric band, resulting in oesophageal dilatation and neuropraxia of the left recurrent laryngeal nerve. Vocal cord function partially improved following removal of the gastric band.

  11. Bungee jumper's foot drop peroneal nerve palsy caused by bungee cord jumping.

    PubMed

    Torre, P R; Williams, G G; Blackwell, T; Davis, C P

    1993-11-01

    Peroneal nerve injury is a common peripheral neuropathy from a variety of conditions and injuries. We encountered a case of peroneal nerve palsy in a professional bungee cord jumper. Review of the literature showed no previous report of this particular injury in bungee cord jumping.

  12. Ischemic paralysis of the facial nerve: a possible etiologic factor in Bell's palsy.

    PubMed

    Calcaterra, T C; Rand, R W; Bentson, J R

    1976-01-01

    Numerous causes of peripheral facial nerve paralyses have been described; however, none has satisfactorily explained the genesis of the most common type of paralysis, Bell's palsy. Two patients undergoing an experimental embolization of vascular intracranial tumors suffered a total peripheral facial nerve paralysis when occlusion of the middle meningeal artery had been accomplished. It is speculated that this paralysis resulted from ischemia of the horizontal portion of the facial nerve, an observation that has not previously been described and that might be applicable as well to the etiology of Bell's palsy.

  13. Delayed Femoral Nerve Palsy Associated with Iliopsoas Hematoma after Primary Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    Femoral nerve neuropathy after total hip arthroplasty is rare but catastrophic complication. Pain and quadriceps muscle weakness caused by this complication can significantly affect the functional outcome. Here we present a case report, describing delayed onset femoral nerve palsy associated with iliopsoas hematoma following pseudoaneurysm of a branch of profunda femoris artery after 3 months of primary total hip arthroplasty in an 80-year-old female patient with single kidney. Hip arthroplasty was done for painful primary osteoarthritis of left hip. Diagnosis of femoral nerve palsy was made by clinical examination and computed tomography imaging of pelvis. Patient was managed by surgical evacuation of hematoma and physiotherapy. The patient's clinical symptoms were improved after surgical evacuation of hematoma. This is the first case report of its kind in English literature regarding delayed onset femoral nerve palsy after primary total hip arthroplasty due to pseudoaneurysm of a branch of profunda femoris artery without any obvious precipitating factor. PMID:27752378

  14. Radial nerve palsy owing to localized hypertrophic neuropathy (intraneural perineurioma) in early childhood.

    PubMed

    Isaac, Sherif; Athanasou, Nicholas A; Pike, Michael; Burge, Peter D

    2004-01-01

    Localized hypertrophic neuropathy, also termed intraneural perineurioma, is a rare disorder of unknown etiology that produces a slowly progressive painless focal lesion of a peripheral nerve. It is characterized histologically by concentric whorls ("onion bulbs") of epithelial membrane antigen-reactive, S-100 protein-negative perineurial cells surrounding nerve fibers. We report a radial nerve palsy in a child aged 2 years in whom the diagnosis of localized hypertrophic neuropathy was made by biopsy. Resection of the affected nerve segment and sural nerve grafting produced no useful recovery after 3 years, probably because of the long duration of denervation. When this mononeuropathy presents in early childhood, uncertainty over the time of onset can lead to difficulty in distinguishing this potentially treatable lesion from congenital and other causes of nerve palsy.

  15. Rhomboid nerve transfer to the suprascapular nerve for shoulder reanimation in brachial plexus palsy: A clinical report.

    PubMed

    Goubier, J-N; Teboul, F

    2016-10-01

    Recovery of shoulder function is a real challenge in cases of partial brachial plexus palsy. Currently, in C5-C6 root injuries, transfer of the long head of the triceps brachii branch is done to revive the deltoid muscle. Spinal accessory nerve transfer is typically used for reanimation of the suprascapular nerve. We propose an alternative technique in which the nerve of the rhomboid muscles is transferred to the suprascapular nerve. A 33-year-old male patient with a C5-C6 brachial plexus injury with shoulder and elbow flexion palsy underwent surgery 7 months after the injury. The rhomboid nerve was transferred to the suprascapular nerve and the long head of the triceps brachii branch to the axillary nerve for shoulder reanimation. A double transfer of fascicles was performed, from the ulnar and median nerves to the biceps brachii branch and brachialis branch, respectively, for elbow flexion. At 14 months' follow-up, elbow flexion was rated M4. Shoulder elevation was 85 degrees and rated M4, and external rotation was 80 degrees and rated M4. After performing a cadaver study showing that transfer of the rhomboid nerve to the suprascapular nerve is technically possible, here we report and discuss the clinical outcomes of this new transfer technique.

  16. Fibular nerve palsy after hip replacement: Not only surgeon responsibility. Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) a rare cause of nerve liability.

    PubMed

    Logroscino, G; Del Tedesco, F; Cambise, C; Coraci, D; Donati, F; Santilli, V; Padua, L

    2016-06-01

    Mononeuropathy after surgery may occur and hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies is a possible pathological condition related to paresis after hip surgery. We present a case of 66-year-old man presenting severe weakness at inferior limb muscles after hip prosthesis revision. Clinic and electrophysiology showed severe right fibular nerve damage and ultrasound found a marked enlargement of the same nerve, associated with focal enlargements in other nerves. A diagnosis of hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies was suspected and confirmed by genetic test. The patient gradually recovered returning to a normal daily active life. Ultrasound was crucial for diagnosis. The suspicion and diagnosis of latent neuropathy, which can occur after surgical intervention, may lead to a better understand of the risks of the surgery, specific for the patient, and avoid the wrong attribution to surgical malpractice.

  17. Vertical muscle transposition with silicone band belting in VI nerve palsy

    PubMed Central

    Freitas, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    A woman aged 60 years developed a Millard-Gubler syndrome after a diagnosis of a cavernous angioma in the median and paramedian areas of the pons. In this context, she presented a right VI nerve palsy, right conjugate gaze palsy, facial palsy and left hemiparesis. To improve the complete VI nerve palsy, we planned a modified transposition approach, in which procedure we made a partial transposition of vertical rectus with a silicone band that was fixated posteriorly. After the procedure, the patient gained the ability to slightly abduct the right eye. We found no compensatory torticollis in the primary position of gaze. There was also an improvement of elevation and depression movements of the right eye. We obtained satisfactory results with a theoretically reversible technique, which is adjustable intraoperatively with no need of muscle detachment, preventing anterior segment ischaemia and allowing simultaneous recession of the medial rectus muscles, if necessary. PMID:27974341

  18. Long-term clinical outcomes of spinal accessory nerve transfer to the suprascapular nerve in patients with brachial plexus palsy.

    PubMed

    Emamhadi, Mohammadreza; Alijani, Babak; Andalib, Sasan

    2016-09-01

    For the reconstruction of brachial plexus lesions, restoration of elbow flexion and shoulder function is fundamental and is achieved by dual nerve transfers. Shoulder stabilization and movement are crucial in freedom of motion of the upper extremity. In patients with C5-C6 brachial plexus injury, spinal accessory nerve transfer to the suprascapular nerve and a fascicle of ulnar nerve to musculocutaneous nerve (dual nerve transfer) are carried out for restoration of shoulder abduction and elbow flexion, respectively. In the present study, we evaluated the long-term clinical outcomes of spinal accessory nerve transfer to the suprascapular nerve for restoration of shoulder abduction in patients with brachial plexus palsy undergoing a dual nerve transfer. In the present retrospective review, 22 consecutive subjects with upper brachial plexus palsy were assessed. All of the subjects underwent spinal accessory nerve transfer to the suprascapular nerve and a dual nerve transfer from the ulnar nerve to the biceps branch and from the median nerve to the brachialis branch of the musculocutaneous nerve simultaneously. All of the subjects were followed up for 18 to 24 months (average, 21.7 months) for assessing the recovery of the shoulder abduction and motor function. Spinal accessory nerve transfer to the suprascapular nerve showed a motor function recovery of M3 and M4 in 13.6 and 63.6% of the subjects, respectively. However, 22.7 % of the subjects remained with a motor function of M2. The mean of shoulder abduction reached 55.55 ± 9.95° (range, 40-72°). Altogether, good functional results regained in 17 out of 22 the subjects (77.2 %). Linear regression analysis showed that advanced age was a predictor of low motor functional grade. The evidence from the present study suggests that transferring spinal accessory nerve to the suprascapular nerve for restoring shoulder abduction is an effective and reliable treatment with high success rate in patients with brachial

  19. Use of intercostal nerves for neurotization of the musculocutaneous nerve in infants with birth-related brachial plexus palsy.

    PubMed

    Kawabata, H; Shibata, T; Matsui, Y; Yasui, N

    2001-03-01

    The use of intercostal nerves (ICNs) for the neurotization of the musculocutaneous nerve (MCN) in adult patients with traumatic brachial plexus palsy has been well described. However, its use for brachial plexus palsy in infants has rarely been reported. The authors surgically created 31 ICN-MCN communications for birth-related brachial plexus palsy and present the surgical results. Thirty-one neurotizations of the MCN, performed using ICNs, were conducted in 30 patients with birth-related brachial plexus palsy. In most cases other procedures were combined to reconstruct all upper-extremity function. The mean patient age at surgery was 5.8 months and the mean follow-up period was 5.2 years. Intercostal nerves were transected 1 cm distal to the mammary line and their stumps were transferred to the axilla, where they were coapted directly to the MCN. Two ICNs were used in 26 cases and three ICNs in five cases. The power of the biceps muscle of the arm was rated Grade M4 in 26 (84%) of 31 patients. In the 12 patients who underwent surgery when they were younger than 5 months of age, all exhibited a grade of M4 (100%) in their biceps muscle power. These results are better than those previously reported in adults. Neurotization of the MCN by surgically connecting ICNs is a safe, reliable, and effective procedure for reconstruction of the brachial plexus in patients suffering from birth-related palsy.

  20. Discharge profiles of abducens, accessory abducens, and orbicularis oculi motoneurons during reflex and conditioned blinks in alert cats.

    PubMed

    Trigo, J A; Gruart, A; Delgado-García, J M

    1999-04-01

    The discharge profiles of identified abducens, accessory abducens, and orbicularis oculi motoneurons have been recorded extra- and intracellularly in alert behaving cats during spontaneous, reflexively evoked, and classically conditioned eyelid responses. The movement of the upper lid and the electromyographic activity of the orbicularis oculi muscle also were recorded. Animals were conditioned by short, weak air puffs or 350-ms tones as conditioned stimuli (CS) and long, strong air puffs as unconditioned stimulus (US) using both trace and delayed conditioning paradigms. Motoneurons were identified by antidromic activation from their respective cranial nerves. Orbicularis oculi and accessory abducens motoneurons fired an early, double burst of action potentials (at 4-6 and 10-16 ms) in response to air puffs or to the electrical stimulation of the supraorbital nerve. Orbicularis oculi, but not accessory abducens, motoneurons fired in response to flash and tone presentations. Only 10-15% of recorded abducens motoneurons fired a late, weak burst after air puff, supraorbital nerve, and flash stimulations. Spontaneous fasciculations of the orbicularis oculi muscle and the activity of single orbicularis oculi motoneurons that generated them also were recorded. The activation of orbicularis oculi motoneurons during the acquisition of classically conditioned eyelid responses happened in a gradual, sequential manner. Initially, some putative excitatory synaptic potentials were observed in the time window corresponding to the CS-US interval; by the second to the fourth conditioning session, some isolated action potentials appeared that increased in number until some small movements were noticed in eyelid position traces. No accessory abducens motoneuron fired and no abducens motoneuron modified their discharge rate for conditioned eyelid responses. The firing of orbicularis oculi motoneurons was related linearly to lid velocity during reflex blinks but to lid position during

  1. Extensor indicis proprius opponensplasty for isolated traumatic low median nerve palsy: A case series.

    PubMed

    Al-Qattan, Mohammad M

    2012-01-01

    The standard opponensplasty for isolated low median nerve palsy in nonleprosy patients uses the flexor digitorum superficialis of the ring finger. To report the results of extensor indicis proprius (EIP) opponensplasty in 15 consecutive nonleprosy patients with isolated traumatic low median nerve palsy. A retrospective study of the author's cases of EIP opponensplasty for isolated traumatic median nerve palsy over the past 15 years was conducted. The author used the EIP to restore thumb opposition in all cases of isolated median nerve palsies when the following conditions were present: protective sensibility in the median nerve distribution; normal power of EIP; supple hands; and full passive range of opposition with no contracture of the first web space. There were a total of 15 patients with a mean age of 30 years (range 20 to 45 years). They all had traumatic isolated low median nerve palsy with recovery of at least protective sensation and no recovery of opposition. The tendon was harvested just proximal to the extensor expansion, the flexor carpi ulnaris was used as a pulley and the insertion was to the tendon of abductor pollicis brevis. There were no postoperative complications or extension lag of the donor finger. Using previously published criteria, 12 patients experienced excellent results while the remaining three had a good result. In nonleprosy patients with isolated traumatic low median nerve palsy, the results of this transfer are consistent and there is no need to harvest the EIP tendon distal to the extensor expansion because a single insertion to the abductor pollicis brevis is sufficient.

  2. Interfascicular Neurolysis for Incomplete Spontaneous Posterior Interosseous Nerve Palsy with a Surgical Delay of 17 Years: Is It Still Effective?

    PubMed

    Ochi, Kensuke; Horiuchi, Yukio; Arino, Hiroshi; Toyama, Yoshiaki

    2015-01-01

    A 55-year-old woman with incomplete spontaneous posterior interosseous nerve (PIN) palsy underwent interfascicular neurolysis and tendon transfer, 17 years after its onset. After one year, her nerve function partially recovered electrophysiologically. This case suggests that incomplete spontaneous PIN palsy may recover by interfascicular neurolysis, even with a long preoperative delay.

  3. A 3-Year Review of Cranial Nerve Palsies from the University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital Eye Clinic, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Pedro-Egbe, Chinyere Nnenne; Fiebai, Bassey; Awoyesuku, Elizabeth Akon

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To provide the types, frequency and clinical information on common cranial nerve palsies seen at the Eye Clinic at the University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital. Materials and Methods: A chart review was performed of patients who presented with cranial nerve palsy at the Eye Clinic over a 3-year period (January 2009-December 2011). Data were collected on age, sex, type of cranial nerve palsy, a history of systemic disease such as diabetes mellitus (DM), hypertension and cerebrovascular disease. Exclusion criteria included medical charts with incomplete data. Data was analyzed using Epi-info Version 6.04D. Statistical significance was indicated by P < 0.05. Results: Twenty-four patients had cranial nerve palsies. There were 11 males and 13 females with a mean age of 34.50 ± 18.41 years. Four patients (26.6%) had exotropia while three patients (20%) had esotropia. Complete ophthalmoplegia was noted in two patients (13.3%). The 3rd and 6th cranial nerves were affected in seven patients each (29.2%) and five patients (20.8%) had 7th cranial nerve palsy. Approximately 38% of patients with cranial nerve palsies had systemic disorders (16.7% systemic hypertension; 12.5% DM). The relationship between cranial nerve palsy and systemic disorder was statistically significant (P < 0.01). Conclusion: This is the first study in the literature on ocular cranial nerve palsies in Southern Nigeria. Third and sixth cranial nerve palsies were the most common cases to present to the University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital Eye Clinic. There was a statistically significant association to systemic disorders such as hypertension and DM and majority of cases with 6th cranial nerve palsy. PMID:24791110

  4. Scapular Winging Secondary to Apparent Long Thoracic Nerve Palsy in a Young Female Swimmer

    PubMed Central

    Nawa, Shiro

    2015-01-01

    Background  In neurological diseases, winging of the scapula occurs because of serratus anterior muscle dysfunction due to long thoracic nerve palsy, or trapezius muscle dysfunction due to accessory nerve palsy. Several sports can cause long thoracic nerve palsy, including archery and tennis. To our knowledge, this is the first report of long thoracic nerve palsy in an aquatic sport. Objective  The present study is a rare case of winging of the scapula that occurred during synchronized swimming practice. Methods  The patient's history with the present illness, examination findings, rehabilitation progress, and related medical literature are presented. Results  A 14-year-old female synchronized swimmer had chief complaints of muscle weakness, pain, and paresthesia in the right scapula. Upon examination, marked winging of the scapula appeared during anterior arm elevation, as did floating of the superior angle. After 1 year of therapy, right shoulder girdle pain and paresthesia had disappeared; however, winging of the scapula remained. Conclusions  Based on this observation and the severe pain in the vicinity of the second dorsal rib, we believe the cause was damage to the nerve proximal to the branch arising from the upper nerve trunk that innervates the serratus anterior. PMID:27917241

  5. Scapular Winging Secondary to Apparent Long Thoracic Nerve Palsy in a Young Female Swimmer.

    PubMed

    Nawa, Shiro

    2015-12-01

     In neurological diseases, winging of the scapula occurs because of serratus anterior muscle dysfunction due to long thoracic nerve palsy, or trapezius muscle dysfunction due to accessory nerve palsy. Several sports can cause long thoracic nerve palsy, including archery and tennis. To our knowledge, this is the first report of long thoracic nerve palsy in an aquatic sport.  The present study is a rare case of winging of the scapula that occurred during synchronized swimming practice.  The patient's history with the present illness, examination findings, rehabilitation progress, and related medical literature are presented.  A 14-year-old female synchronized swimmer had chief complaints of muscle weakness, pain, and paresthesia in the right scapula. Upon examination, marked winging of the scapula appeared during anterior arm elevation, as did floating of the superior angle. After 1 year of therapy, right shoulder girdle pain and paresthesia had disappeared; however, winging of the scapula remained.  Based on this observation and the severe pain in the vicinity of the second dorsal rib, we believe the cause was damage to the nerve proximal to the branch arising from the upper nerve trunk that innervates the serratus anterior.

  6. ANCA-negative Wegener's granulomatosis with multiple lower cranial nerve palsies.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Hee; Park, Jin; Bae, Jung Ho; Cho, Min-Sun; Park, Kee Duk; Jeong, Jee Hyang

    2013-11-01

    Wegener's granulomatosis (WG) is a systemic vasculitis affecting small and medium-sized vessels with granulomatous formation. Though it is known for respiratory tract and kidney involvement, neurologic manifestation has been also reported. Herein we report a patient who suffered pansinusitis with multiple lower cranial nerve palsies but reached remission by immunosuppressant after the diagnosis of WG. A 54-yr-old female visited with headache, hearing difficulty, and progressive bulbar symptoms. She experienced endoscopic sinus surgeries due to refractory sinusitis. Neurologic examination revealed multiple lower cranial nerve palsies. Vasculitic markers showed no abnormality. Nasal biopsy revealed granulomatous inflammation and vasculitis involving small vessels. Given cyclophosphamide and prednisolone, her symptoms were prominently improved. WG should be considered in the patient with multiple cranial nerve palsies, especially those with paranasal sinus disease. Because WG can be lethal if delayed in treatment, prompt immunosuppressant is warranted after the diagnostic tissue biopsy.

  7. A Case of Oculomotor Nerve Palsy and Choroidal Tuberculous Granuloma Associated with Tuberculous Meningoencephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Sunghyuk; Chang, Woohyok

    2008-01-01

    We report a rare case of oculomotor nerve palsy and choroidal tuberculous granuloma associated with tuberculous meningoencephalitis. A 15-year-old male visited our hospital for an acute drop of the left eyelid and diplopia. He has been on anti-tuberculous drugs (isoniazid, rifampin) for 1 year for his tuberculous encephalitis. A neurological examination revealed a conscious clear patient with isolated left oculomotor nerve palsy, which manifested as ptosis, and a fundus examination revealed choroidal tuberculoma. Other anti-tuberculous drugs (pyrazinamide, ethambutol) and a steroid (dexamethasone) were added. After 3 months on this medication, ptosis of the left upper eyelid improved and the choroidal tuberculoma decreasedin size, but a right homonymous visual field defect remained. When a patient with tuberculous meningitis presents with abrupt onset oculomotor nerve palsy, rapid re-diagnosis should be undertaken and proper treatment initiated, because the prognosis is critically dependent on the timing of adequate treatment. PMID:18784452

  8. Isolated oculomotor nerve palsy resulting from acute traumatic tentorial subdural hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Victoria; Kouliev, Timur

    2016-01-01

    Acute subdural hematoma (SDH) resulting from head trauma is a potentially life-threatening condition that requires expedient diagnosis and intervention to ensure optimal patient outcomes. Rapidly expanding or large hematomas, elevated intracranial pressure, and associated complications of brain herniation are associated with high mortality rates and poor recovery of neurological function. However, smaller bleeds (clot thickness <10 mm) or hematomas occurring in infrequent locations, such as the tentorium cerebelli, may be difficult to recognize and patients may present with unusual or subtle signs and symptoms, including isolated cranial nerve palsies. Knowledge of neuroanatomy supported by modern neuroimaging can greatly aid in recognition and diagnosis of such lesions. In this report, we present a case of isolated oculomotor nerve palsy resulting from compressive tentorial SDH following blunt head trauma, review the literature concerning similar cases, and make recommendations regarding the diagnosis of SDH in patients presenting with isolated cranial nerve palsies. PMID:27843362

  9. Characteristics of the perception for unilateral facial nerve palsy.

    PubMed

    Mun, Sue Jean; Park, Kyung Tae; Kim, Yoonjoong; Park, Joo Hyun; Kim, Young Ho

    2015-11-01

    Patients with facial nerve palsy (FNP) are actually evaluated by other people rather than doctors or the patients themselves. This study was performed to investigate the characteristics of the perception of unilateral FNP in Korean people. A questionnaire using photographs of four patients with four different grades (House-Brackmann) of FNP was given to two hundred people with no FNP. Subjects of each gender, ranging from 20 to 69 years of age, participated. The questionnaire, showing facial expressions of resting, smiling, whistling, eye closing, and frowning, consisted of questions concerning the identification and the involved side of FNP, the unnatural areas of the face, and the unnaturalness of the facial expressions. The overall identification rate of FNP was 75.0%. The identification rate increased according to the increase in the grade of the patient's FNP (p < .001). The overall detection rate of the involved side was 54.5%, and that rate decreased with increasing subject age (p < .001). The area of the most unnatural facial expression was reported to be the mouth, followed by the eyes and cheeks. The most unnatural facial expression was also reported to be smiling, followed by eye closing and whistling. There was no difference in the identification rate of FNP according to education level. However, the overall detection rate of the involved side was higher in the high-education group (p < .001). The detection rate for the involved side of FNP was lower than the rate of identification of FNP and was significantly low in the middle-aged/elderly and low-education level groups.

  10. A guide to the evaluation of fourth cranial nerve palsies.

    PubMed

    Lee; Hayman; Beaver; Prager; Kelder; Scasta; Avilla; von Noorden GK; Tang

    1998-12-01

    PURPOSE To devise a cost-effective guide for the evaluation of fourth nerve palsies (FNP). METHODS A review of the pertinent English language literature was performed to devise a guide for the evaluation (including neuroimaging) of FNP. The authors report a retrospective review of imaging studies performed on 206 patients with FNP. RESULTS The literature was used to develop the imaging guide. In the retrospective chart review of 206 patients from two tertiary care centers, 28 patients (13.6%) underwent a computed tomography scan and/or a magnetic resonance scan. Of these patients, five had associated neurological symptoms (non-isolated), one was traumatic, five were congenital, four were vasculopathic, eleven were non-vasculopathic, and two were progressive. Following the recommendations of the imaging guide, the five isolated congenital FNP and the four isolated vasculopathic FNP would not have undergone neuroimaging studies. The total costs of these neuroimaging studies in these nine patients were 19,000 dollars. Four patients in the retrospective review with associated neurological deficits (non-isolated) should have undergone neuroimaging according to the guide, but did not. CONCLUSIONS Although the evaluation of FNP can be difficult, the decision to order neuroimaging can be improved by using an imaging guide. An imaging guide for the evaluation of FNP may allow more appropriate and cost-effective imaging of these patients. Isolated congenital, old traumatic, or vasculopathic FNP do not require neuroimaging studies. Patients with non-isolated FNP should have directed neuroimaging studies based upon the results of clinical examination.

  11. [Third nerve palsy as the only manifestation of occult temporal arteritis].

    PubMed

    Asensio-Sánchez, V M; Morales-Gómez, I; Rodríguez-Vaca, I

    2009-08-01

    Two patients (80 and 67 year-old) presented with diplopia for a sudden right 3rd cranial nerve palsy without other ocular or systemic symptoms related to temporal arteritis. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein levels were normal. Subsequent biopsy of the superficial temporal artery confirmed the diagnosis of temporal arteritis. Patients with ocular nerve palsy could have occult temporal arteritis. Aged patients with an acute ocular ischemic lesion, without elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein levels and systemic symptoms, should raise a high index of suspicion for temporal arteritis.

  12. Bilateral Facial Nerve Palsy in Acute B Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Sen, Shiraj; Gupta, Arjun; Friedman, Paul; Naina, Harris V

    2016-06-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a haematological malignancy that can involve the central nervous system (CNS). Less than 10 % of patients with ALL have CNS involvement at presentation. The cranial nerve most commonly affected is cranial nerve VII although bilateral involvement is rare. Management and outcomes of these patients are not well understood. Moreover bilateral Bells palsy as a presenting symptom of ALL is extremely uncommon. We report a very unusual presentation of ALL with bilateral facial nerve palsy, and discuss the management strategies and outcomes for patients with ALL that present with cranial nerve palsies.

  13. Fascicular constrictions in patients with spontaneous palsy of the anterior interosseous nerve and the posterior interosseous nerve.

    PubMed

    Ochi, Kensuke; Horiuchi, Yukio; Tazaki, Kenichi; Takayama, Shinichiro; Matsumura, Takashi

    2012-02-01

    There is no definition for fascicular constrictions of the spontaneous anterior interosseous nerve palsy (sAINP) and spontaneous posterior interosseous nerve palsy (sPINP). One surgeon has evaluated his findings in our 32 patients of sAINP/sPINP using either photographs or video tapes and proposed a definition. All patients had interfascicular neurolysis, and 87 case reports of "fascicular constriction" were also evaluated. Fascicular constriction was defined as every instance of thinning in the fascicle regardless to its extent. Thinning as a result of extrinsic compression was excluded. The fascicular constrictions were divided into four types: recessed, recessed-bulging, rotation, and rotation-bulging constriction. Two independent surgeons went through our findings to verify their repeatability. The relation between the fascicular constrictions and age at the onset of palsy was evaluated using Student's t test. We found 54 fascicular constrictions, with many variations. However, they could all be categorised by our method. The repeatability among the independent authors was 96%. The age at the onset of palsy was significantly younger in rotation-bulging than in rotation constriction (p = 0.0003). Our definition of describing fascicular constrictions was accurate, and should help to provide consensus in describing these palsies.

  14. Distal Ulna Fracture With Delayed Ulnar Nerve Palsy in a Baseball Player.

    PubMed

    Pasque, Charles B; Pearson, Clark; Margo, Bradley; Ethel, Robert

    2016-02-01

    We present a case report of a college baseball player who sustained a blunt-trauma, distal-third ulna fracture from a thrown ball with delayed presentation of ulnar nerve palsy. Even after his ulna fracture had healed, the nerve injury made it difficult for the athlete to control a baseball while throwing, resulting in a delayed return to full baseball activity for 3 to 4 months. He had almost complete nerve recovery by 6 months after his injury and complete nerve recovery by 1 year after his injury.

  15. Reinterpretation of Electrodiagnostic Studies and Magnetic Resonance Imaging Scans in Patients with Nontraumatic "Isolated" Anterior Interosseous Nerve Palsy.

    PubMed

    Maldonado, Andrés A; Amrami, Kimberly K; Mauermann, Michelle L; Spinner, Robert J

    2016-11-01

    Different hypotheses have been proposed for the pathophysiology of anterior interosseous nerve palsy: compression, fascicular constriction, or nerve inflammation (Parsonage-Turner syndrome). The authors hypothesized that critical reinterpretation of electrodiagnostic studies and magnetic resonance imaging scans of patients with a diagnosis of anterior interosseous nerve palsy could provide insight into the pathophysiology and treatment. A retrospective review was performed of all patients with a diagnosis of nontraumatic anterior interosseous nerve palsy and an upper extremity magnetic resonance imaging scan. The original electrodiagnostic study and magnetic resonance imaging scan reports were reinterpreted by a neuromuscular neurologist and musculoskeletal radiologist, respectively, both blinded to the authors' hypothesis. Sixteen patients met the inclusion criteria as having "isolated" anterior interosseous nerve palsy. Physical examination revealed weakness in muscles not innervated by the anterior interosseous nerve in five cases (31 percent), and electrodiagnostic studies showed abnormalities not related to the anterior interosseous nerve in nine of 15 cases (60 percent). In all cases, reinterpretation of the magnetic resonance imaging scans demonstrated atrophy in at least one muscle not innervated by the anterior interosseous nerve and did not reveal any evidence of compression of the anterior interosseous nerve. All patients in the authors' series with presumed isolated anterior interosseous nerve palsy had magnetic resonance imaging evidence of a more diffuse muscle involvement pattern, without any radiologic signs of nerve compression of the anterior interosseous nerve branch itself. These data strongly support an inflammatory pathophysiology.

  16. Frequency of the superior rectus muscle overaction/contracture syndrome in unilateral fourth nerve palsy.

    PubMed

    Molinari, Andrea; Ugrin, Maria Cristina

    2009-12-01

    Superior oblique palsy is accompanied in most cases by overaction of the muscle's ipsilateral antagonist, the inferior oblique muscle. Overaction and contracture of the ipsilateral superior rectus muscle in patients with unilateral fourth (trochlear) nerve palsy is seldom discussed in the literature. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the frequency of superior rectus muscle overaction/contracture syndrome in patients with unilateral trochlear nerve palsy. The records of 198 patients with unilateral trochlear nerve palsy examined by the authors between July 1987 and July 2008 were reviewed retrospectively. All patients underwent complete eye examination with measurement of the deviation in the 9 positions of gaze and with the head tilted to both sides in all cooperative patients. Selection criteria for superior rectus muscle overaction/contracture syndrome in these patients were as follows: vertical deviation of 15(Delta) or larger in primary position, equal or larger hypertropia with the ipsilateral forced tilt test than with the eyes looking straight ahead, more than 5(Delta) hypertropia of the affected eye in horizontal gaze to the same side, hypertropia in all upgazes, and overaction of the contralateral superior oblique muscle. Of 198 patients, 33 (16.6%) met the selection criteria for superior rectus muscle overaction/contracture syndrome. Superior rectus muscle overaction/contracture syndrome frequently occurs in unilateral superior oblique palsy.

  17. Influence of congenital facial nerve palsy on craniofacial growth in craniofacial microsomia.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jaehoon; Park, Sang Woo; Kwon, Geun-Yong; Kim, Sang-Hyun; Hur, Ji An; Baek, Seung-Hak; Kim, Jae Chan; Choi, Tae Hyun; Kim, Sukwha

    2014-11-01

    Facial muscles are of major importance in human craniofacial growth and development. The purpose of our study was to investigate whether congenital facial nerve palsy influences craniofacial growth in craniofacial microsomia. Fifty-one patients with unilateral craniofacial microsomia and no history of craniofacial skeletal surgery whose radiographs were taken after craniofacial growth was complete were included in this study. These patients were divided into groups in which the facial nerve was involved or uninvolved. The authors evaluated a total of seven measurement items to analyze the midface and mandibular asymmetry. Twenty patients had facial nerve involvement, and 31 had no involvement. None of the measurement items revealed any significant differences between the facial nerve-involved group and the uninvolved group within the same modified Pruzansky grade. There was no correlation between the type of facial nerve involvement and the measurement items. In relationships among the measurement items within each group, maxillary asymmetry was indirectly correlated with mandibular asymmetry or midline deviation through the occlusal plane angle in the uninvolved groups. However, in the facial nerve-involved group, the relationships disappeared. When the correlations in the facial nerve-involved group were compared with those of the uninvolved group, the relationships in the uninvolved group appeared more significant than in the facial nerve-involved group. The loss of relationships between the upper and lower jaw in the facial nerve-involved group might have been caused by subtle changes, which occur in midfacial bones and in the mandible due to facial nerve palsy. The main limitation of our study is that aside from facial nerve palsy, craniofacial microsomia has many factors that can influence craniofacial growth, such as hypoplasia of the mandibular condyle and soft tissue deficiencies. Copyright © 2014 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and

  18. Bell palsy in lyme disease-endemic regions of canada: a cautionary case of occult bilateral peripheral facial nerve palsy due to Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Ho, Karen; Melanson, Michel; Desai, Jamsheed A

    2012-09-01

    Lyme disease caused by the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi is a multisystem disorder characterized by three clinical stages: dermatologic, neurologic, and rheumatologic. The number of known Lyme disease-endemic areas in Canada is increasing as the range of the vector Ixodes scapularis expands into the eastern and central provinces. Southern Ontario, Nova Scotia, southern Manitoba, New Brunswick, and southern Quebec are now considered Lyme disease-endemic regions in Canada. The use of field surveillance to map risk and endemic regions suggests that these geographic areas are growing, in part due to the effects of climate warming. Peripheral facial nerve palsy is the most common neurologic abnormality in the second stage of Lyme borreliosis, with up to 25% of Bell palsy (idiopathic peripheral facial nerve palsy) occurring due to Lyme disease. Here we present a case of occult bilateral facial nerve palsy due to Lyme disease initially diagnosed as Bell palsy. In Lyme disease-endemic regions of Canada, patients presenting with unilateral or bilateral peripheral facial nerve palsy should be evaluated for Lyme disease with serologic testing to avoid misdiagnosis. Serologic testing should not delay initiation of appropriate treatment for presumed Bell palsy.

  19. Posterior interosseous nerve palsy by synovial cyst of proximal radioulnar joint: our experience after 5 years.

    PubMed

    Monacelli, G; Ceci, F; Prezzemoli, G; Spagnoli, A; Lotito, S; Irace, S

    2011-06-01

    The posterior interosseous nerve palsy is a neuropathy of radial nerve interesting its deep motor branch. The neuropathy can appear with a hollow in the proximal half of the forearm without significant swelling, a complete loss of extension of the fingers with radial deviation of the wrist during extension. In some cases, PIN compression may simulate tendon rupture in rheumatologic diseases, because the pain and the paralysis occur suddenly, so often can be difficult to make a diagnosis. The palsy is caused by compression of the posterior interosseous nerve from soft tissue tumours or tumour-like masses: ganglions, lipomas, rheumatoid synovitis, synovial chondromatosis, fibromas, neurofibromas, bursitis, synovial cysts of the elbow and radioulnar proximal joints. The aim of our research was to individuate the better treatment for the posterior interosseous nerve palsy. From 2002 to 2007 we examined 8 patients: 2 female and 6 male. Median age was 43 years. The diagnosis was made by clinical examination, ultrasound, nerve conduction studies and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Patients underwent to decompressing posterior interosseous nerve surgery. After the surgical exploration in 8 cases a globular mass of around 2.5 cm to 4.5 cm diameter was discovered. At the histological examination, a synovial cyst of the elbow joint was found in 7 out of 8 patients and an hemangioma tumor in the one remaining patient. 12 months was the median time for a complete recovery after the operation, confirmed by EMG. The surgical treatment offers a complete resolution in all cases.

  20. Trochlear Nerve Palsy Associated with Claude Bernard-Horner Syndrome after Brainstem Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Bazan, Rodrigo; Braga, Gabriel Pereira; Gomes, Daniela Laranja; Yamashita, Seizo; Betting, Luiz Eduardo; Resende, Luiz Antonio de Lima

    2011-01-01

    The association of unilateral trochlear nerve palsy with Claude Bernard-Horner syndrome represents a rare clinical condition. We present the case of a patient with this unusual presentation. The investigation performed implicated cerebrovascular disease as the underlying cause of the condition in this patient. PMID:22114581

  1. Postpartum pituitary apoplexy with isolated oculomotor nerve palsy: A rare medical emergency.

    PubMed

    Raina, Sujeet; Jearth, Vaneet; Sharma, Ashish; Sharma, Rajesh; Mistry, Kewal

    2015-01-01

    Pituitary apoplexy is a clinical syndrome characterized by sudden onset headache, visual deficits, ophthalmoplegia, altered mental status, and hormonal dysfunction due to an expanding mass within the sella turcica resulting from hemorrhage or infarction of pituitary gland. We report a case of pituitary apoplexy that developed in postpartum period following postpartum hemorrhage and presented with isolated third cranial nerve palsy.

  2. Recurrent 6th nerve palsy in a child following different live attenuated vaccines: case report

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Recurrent benign 6th nerve palsy in the paediatric age group is uncommon, but has been described following viral and bacterial infections. It has also been temporally associated with immunization, but has not been previously described following two different live attenuated vaccines. Case presentation A case is presented of a 12 month old Caucasian boy with recurrent benign 6th nerve palsy following measles-mumps-rubella and varicella vaccines, given on separate occasions with complete recovery following each episode. No alternate underlying etiology was identified despite extensive investigations and review. Conclusions The majority of benign 6th nerve palsies do not have a sinister cause and have an excellent prognosis, with recovery expected in most cases. The exact pathophysiology is unknown, although hypotheses including autoimmune mechanisms and direct viral invasion could explain the pathophysiology behind immunization related nerve palsies. It is important to rule out other aetiologies with thorough history, physical examination and investigations. There is limited information in the literature regarding the safety of a repeat dose of a live vaccine in this setting. Future immunizations should be considered on a case-by-case basis. PMID:22545865

  3. Altered sensorium and multiple cranial nerve palsies in a recently diagnosed diabetic.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Shaifali; Chaubal, C C; Jindal, Sushil; Aher, Atul; Biswas, Rakesh

    2010-07-01

    We report a recent diabetic who presented with hyperglycemic, hyperosmolar, non ketotic state with coma and multiple cranial nerve palsies due to an associated previously undetected sinus infection. This is a classic case revisited purely for its educational value in terms of clinical photographs, tissue biopsy and imaging findings. These findings reiterate the devastating neurological consequences of fungal sinusitis in diabetic patients.

  4. The use of galantamine in the treatment of post-traumatic oculomotor and trochlear nerve palsy.

    PubMed

    Tokarz-Sawińska, Ewa; Lachowicz, Ewelina; Gosławski, Wojciech

    2013-01-01

    To assess the suitability of galantamine for the symptomatic treatment of post-traumatic oculomotor (III) and trochlear (IV) nerve palsy. The routine ophthalmic and strabological examination was performed in five patients (4 females and 1 male) at the age of 31 to 57 years (mean 40.7) with the post-traumatic ophthalmic complications. Due to the unilateral oculomotor and trochlear nerve palsy, which had not resolved within 2-6 (mean duration of 4 months) months following traffic accident, galantamine was used. Nivalin and Reminyl were administered in iontophoresis and orally, respectively, for 10-18 months (mean duration of 14 months). The ocular muscle motion exercises and prism correction were also used. The increased range of ocular motion (100%), reducing of the angle of strabismus horizontally (40%) and vertically (60%), statistically significant extension of palpebral fissure (60%), and regression of diplopia (80% total without correction) were observed. The binocular vision after treatment in the free- and instrument-space environment were also improved (100% simultaneous perception, fusion 80%, stereopsis 60%). The early galantamine administration in patient with n. III and n. IV post-traumatic palsy accelerates the resolution of post-traumatic ophthalmic symptoms. It is an effective treatment which offers the elimination of strabismus, diplopia and ptosis, at the same time improvings ocular movements and binocular vision. galantamine, post-traumatic nerve palsy, oculomotor and trochlear nerves.

  5. Müllerectomy for upper eyelid retraction and lagophthalmos due to facial nerve palsy.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Adam S; Frueh, Bartley R; Elner, Victor M

    2005-09-01

    Facial nerve palsy often results in symptoms of ocular irritation due to inadequate eyelid closure. Weakened protractor function results in relative upper eyelid retraction and contributes to lagophthalmos. To evaluate the role of müllerectomy in the comprehensive surgical treatment of ocular exposure due to facial nerve palsy. Thirty-four patients with chronic facial nerve palsy underwent unilateral transconjunctival removal of Müller muscle and were followed up for an average of 20 months postoperatively. Other procedures were performed to treat lower eyelid retraction, as required. Preoperative and postoperative ocular exposure symptoms, upper eyelid position, lagophthalmos, and keratopathy were compared. Of the 59 preoperative symptoms, 15 (25%) resolved and 39 (66%) improved. Upper eyelid position was lowered by an average of 1.35 mm (P<.001). Lagophthalmos (P = .002) and corneal exposure (P<.001) were significantly improved. Three patients required levator aponeurosis repair, 2 for preexisting dehiscence and 1 for inadvertent aponeurosis transection. Müllerectomy is a rapid, safe, and reproducible surgical method for lowering the upper eyelid and reducing ocular exposure symptoms and signs due to chronic facial nerve palsy.

  6. Postpartum pituitary apoplexy with isolated oculomotor nerve palsy: A rare medical emergency

    PubMed Central

    Raina, Sujeet; Jearth, Vaneet; Sharma, Ashish; Sharma, Rajesh; Mistry, Kewal

    2015-01-01

    Pituitary apoplexy is a clinical syndrome characterized by sudden onset headache, visual deficits, ophthalmoplegia, altered mental status, and hormonal dysfunction due to an expanding mass within the sella turcica resulting from hemorrhage or infarction of pituitary gland. We report a case of pituitary apoplexy that developed in postpartum period following postpartum hemorrhage and presented with isolated third cranial nerve palsy. PMID:26752912

  7. Hepatocellular carcinoma metastasizing to the skull base involving multiple cranial nerves.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soo Ryang; Kanda, Fumio; Kobessho, Hiroshi; Sugimoto, Koji; Matsuoka, Toshiyuki; Kudo, Masatoshi; Hayashi, Yoshitake

    2006-11-07

    We describe a rare case of HCV-related recurrent multiple hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) metastasizing to the skull base involving multiple cranial nerves in a 50-year-old woman. The patient presented with symptoms of ptosis, fixation of the right eyeball, and left abducens palsy, indicating disturbances of the right oculomotor and trochlear nerves and bilateral abducens nerves. Brain contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) revealed an ill-defined mass with abnormal enhancement around the sella turcica. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) disclosed that the mass involved the clivus, cavernous sinus, and petrous apex. On contrast-enhanced MRI with gadolinium-chelated contrast medium, the mass showed inhomogeneous intermediate enhancement. The diagnosis of metastatic HCC to the skull base was made on the basis of neurological findings and imaging studies including CT and MRI, without histological examinations. Further studies may provide insights into various methods for diagnosing HCC metastasizing to the craniospinal area.

  8. Reanimation of elbow extension with intercostal nerves transfers in total brachial plexus palsies.

    PubMed

    Goubier, Jean-Noël; Teboul, Frédéric; Khalifa, Heba

    2011-01-01

    Restoration of flexion in the elbow is the priority in the management of brachial plexus injuries. Current techniques of reconstructions, combining both nerve grafting and nerve transfer, allow more extensive repair, with additional targets: shoulder, elbow extension, hand. The transfer of intercostal nerves onto the nerve of the triceps long head is used to restore elbow extension. The aim of this retrospective study is to evaluate the results of this procedure, in total brachial plexus palsies with uninjured C5 and C6 roots. Eleven patients with total brachial plexus injury were reviewed 24 months in average after intercostal nerves transfer. The average age of the patients was twenty-nine years. The average time to surgery after occurrence of the injury was 5 months. Triceps re-innervation and strength of elbow extension were evaluated. The averaged time required for triceps re-innervation after intercostal nerve transfer was 9 months. Seven patients achieved M4 elbow extension according to the Medical Research Council grading system. Two patients achieved M3 elbow extension. Two patients had poor results (M2 and M0). Transfer of intercostal nerves onto the nerve of the triceps long head is a reliable procedure for the restoration of elbow extension in total brachial plexus palsy. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. Waveform changes in antidromic facial nerve responses in patients with Bell's palsy.

    PubMed

    Nakatani, Hiroaki; Iwai, Mitsuru; Takeda, Taizo; Hamada, Masashi; Kakigi, Akinobu; Nakahira, Mitsuhiko

    2002-02-01

    We repeatedly tested the antidromic facial nerve response within 7 days after onset of paralysis in patients with Bell's palsy. None of 109 patients showed the triphasic waveform that reflects normal conduction of the facial nerve action potential. The waves recorded from patients showed biphasic, monophasic, or flat waveforms. Eighty-two of 88 patients with complete recovery showed biphasic waves, whereas half of the patients with nerve degeneration had monophasic or flat waves. Most patients with complete recovery maintained biphasic waves, but in patients with incomplete recovery, the waveforms changed to monophasic or flat, except in 1 case. The presence of monophasic or flat waves with a low facial score strongly suggests nerve degeneration. The antidromic facial nerve response is recommended as a method of diagnosing paralysis and monitoring the progression of intratemporal facial nerve damage during its early stages.

  10. Bilateral Cranial IX and X Nerve Palsies After Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Seung Don; Kim, Dong Hwan; Lee, Seung Ah; Joo, Hye In; Yeo, Jin Ah

    2016-01-01

    We report a 57-year-old man with bilateral cranial nerve IX and X palsies who presented with severe dysphagia. After a mild head injury, the patient complained of difficult swallowing. Physical examination revealed normal tongue motion and no uvular deviation. Cervical X-ray findings were negative, but a brain computed tomography revealed a skull fracture involving bilateral jugular foramen. Laryngoscopy indicated bilateral vocal cord palsy. In a videofluoroscopic swallowing study, food residue remained in the vallecula and pyriform sinus, and there was reduced motion of the pharynx and larynx. Electromyography confirmed bilateral superior and recurrent laryngeal neuropathy. PMID:26949684

  11. Tardy palsy of descending branch of posterior interosseous nerve: sequela to plate osteosynthesis of forearm bones.

    PubMed

    Lal, Hitesh; Bansal, Pankaj; Khare, Rahul; Mittal, Deepak

    2010-02-01

    We report a case of tardy paralysis of the descending branch of the posterior interosseous nerve as a consequence of plate osteosynthesis for fracture of both bone forearms. The patient had been operated on 23 years earlier and palsy occurred after a gap of 19 years. The most probable antecedent cause of the palsy was the use of a high-profile implant. The patient was treated by removal of the plate and tendon transfer. Copyright 2010 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The use of cromolyn sodium in the prevention of nerve degeneration in Bell's palsy.

    PubMed

    McGovern, F H; Estevez, J

    1980-10-01

    Clinical use by inhalation of cromolyn sulphate, a mast cell degranulator inhibitor, within four days after the onset of Bell's palsy will prevent nerve degeneration and provide complete recovery within a range of two weeks. The successful administration of the drug supports our experimental concept of Bell's palsy as an immunological disease. The triggering action of the mast cell as a part of IgE antibody cell mediator system is postulated as the key role on controlling the neural edema. In this paper we contrast the difference in disease duration time and degree of recovery in a group of patients using high dose prednisone therapy and a group using cromolyn sulphate.

  13. Rare encounter of unilateral facial nerve palsy in an adolescent with Guillain-Barré syndrome.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Mehtab; Sharma, Parnika; Charadva, Creana; Prasad, Manish

    2016-01-28

    Unilateral facial nerve palsy is rarely encountered in Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS). We report a case of an adolescent girl who presented with peripheral ascending weakness, preceded by Campylobacter jejuni infection. After treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin, the peripheral weakness improved. Electro-diagnostic testing confirmed axonal dysfunction and the patient was positive for antiganglioside antibodies. However, the patient developed unilateral left-sided facial weakness. She was managed with further intravenous immunoglobulin and intensive physiotherapy. The outcome for facial palsy was very good, with almost complete resolution after 2 weeks.

  14. A rare case of posterior interosseous nerve palsy associated with radial head fracture.

    PubMed

    Serrano, Karen D; Rebella, Gregory S; Sansone, Jason M; Kim, Michael K

    2012-08-01

    Radial head fractures are the most common fractures occurring about the elbow in adults, but there have been few reported cases of associated nerve injury. The little-known posterior interosseous nerve travels in close proximity to the radial head and is particularly susceptible to injury. The objectives of this case report include raising awareness of the possibility of posterior interosseous nerve palsy after radial head fracture and reviewing the clinical assessment of the posterior interosseous nerve to exclude occult injury. Here we report a case of a 21-year-old man who developed a posterior interosseous nerve palsy after a fracture of the radial head sustained during a wrestling match. He also sustained frostbite to the extremity due to overaggressive icing of the injury. Physicians should screen patients with radial head fractures for associated nerve injury. A thorough neurovascular examination with attention to the motor innervation patterns in the hand and wrist will help identify posterior interosseous nerve involvement. Careful discharge instructions will help prevent iatrogenic frostbite from overaggressive icing of injuries. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. A rare presentation of spontaneous internal carotid artery dissection with Horner's syndrome, VIIth, Xth and XIIth nerve palsies.

    PubMed

    Majeed, Azer; Ribeiro, Nuno Pedro Lobato; Ali, Asem; Hijazi, Mohsen; Farook, Hina

    2016-10-01

    Spontaneous internal carotid artery dissection (sICAD) is an uncommon cause of isolated cranial nerve palsies. Commonly patients present with stroke, headache, facial pain and Horner's syndrome, with upto 16% having cranial nerve palsies. We present the case of a 55-year-old man who presented with hoarseness, dysphagia and tongue swelling, mimicking a tongue base tumor. He was found to have unilateral VIIth, Xth and XIIth nerve palsies with Horner's syndrome. Magnetic resonance imaging showed high signal changes and loss of signal void in right internal carotid artery, later confirmed by Angiography as a dissection with pseudo-aneurysm. He was started on anticoagulation and made a good recovery on discharge. This case presents a unique combination of cranial nerve palsies due to internal carotid artery dissection (ICAD) and to our knowledge is the first reported case in the literature. Early recognition and institution of appropriate therapy is critical to prevention of ischemic stroke.

  16. A rare presentation of spontaneous internal carotid artery dissection with Horner's syndrome, VIIth, Xth and XIIth nerve palsies

    PubMed Central

    Majeed, Azer; Ribeiro, Nuno Pedro Lobato; Ali, Asem; Hijazi, Mohsen; Farook, Hina

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous internal carotid artery dissection (sICAD) is an uncommon cause of isolated cranial nerve palsies. Commonly patients present with stroke, headache, facial pain and Horner's syndrome, with upto 16% having cranial nerve palsies. We present the case of a 55-year-old man who presented with hoarseness, dysphagia and tongue swelling, mimicking a tongue base tumor. He was found to have unilateral VIIth, Xth and XIIth nerve palsies with Horner's syndrome. Magnetic resonance imaging showed high signal changes and loss of signal void in right internal carotid artery, later confirmed by Angiography as a dissection with pseudo-aneurysm. He was started on anticoagulation and made a good recovery on discharge. This case presents a unique combination of cranial nerve palsies due to internal carotid artery dissection (ICAD) and to our knowledge is the first reported case in the literature. Early recognition and institution of appropriate therapy is critical to prevention of ischemic stroke. PMID:27699055

  17. Conjugate Gaze Palsies

    MedlinePlus

    ... version Home Brain, Spinal Cord, and Nerve Disorders Cranial Nerve Disorders Conjugate Gaze Palsies Horizontal gaze palsy Vertical ... Version. DOCTORS: Click here for the Professional Version Cranial Nerve Disorders Overview of the Cranial Nerves Internuclear Ophthalmoplegia ...

  18. Multiple arm lipomatosis and posterior interosseus nerve palsy.

    PubMed

    Dominici, F; Ginanneschi, F; Spidalieri, R; Rossi, A

    2008-01-01

    Lipomas are common benign soft tissue tumours which tend to be indolent and risk free. Lipomas rarely spread in the deep soft tissue causing posterior interosseous nerve (PIN) neuropathy. We present two patients with multiple lipomatosis of the arms and PIN paralysis, with a brief review of the cases reported in literature. We emphasize the role of electromyographic study as unique methodical capable to reveal an early radial nerve damage, permitting an optimal post-surgical nerve function recovering.

  19. Tendon transfers for radial and median nerve palsies.

    PubMed

    Kozin, Scott H

    2005-01-01

    Paralysis or irreparable injury to the radial or median nerve results in considerable impairment of hand function that directly affects activities of daily living. Radial nerve loss prevents wrist and digit extension, which hinders object acquisition and release. Median nerve loss deprives the hand of thumb function, especially opposition, which impedes prehension. Tendon transfers to restore function are indicated when nerve recovery is no longer expected. Tendon transfer can re-establish active movement and enhance function. The maximum benefit after tendon transfer, however, requires a close working relationship among patient, therapist, and physician. This article will highlight the surgical principles and rehabilitative process to achieve this goal.

  20. Posterior interosseous nerve palsy caused by synovial chondromatosis arising in the annular periradial recesses of the elbow.

    PubMed

    Fujioka, Hiroyuki; Futani, Hiroyuki; Fukunaga, Satoru; Okuno, Hiroaki; Kano, Masao; Tsukamoto, Yoshitane; Tanaka, Juichi; Yoshiya, Shinichi

    2011-04-01

    We present a rare case report of a patient who presented with posterior interosseous nerve palsy caused by synovial chondromatosis. Synovial chondromatosis arising in the annular periradial recesses of the elbow joint was detected, and the mass developed two major portions constricted with the annular ligament. After surgical resection, posterior interosseous nerve palsy fully recovered and there was no recurrence of the lesion of synovial chondromatosis.

  1. Pituitary apoplexy presenting as isolated third cranial nerve palsy with ptosis : two case reports.

    PubMed

    Cho, Won-Jin; Joo, Sung-Pil; Kim, Tae-Sun; Seo, Bo-Ra

    2009-02-01

    Pituitary apoplexy is a clinical syndrome caused by an acute ischemic or hemorrhagic vascular accident involving a pituitary adenoma or an adjacent pituitary gland. Pituitary apoplexy may be associated with a variety of neurological and endocrinological signs and symptoms. However, isolated third cranial nerve palsy with ptosis as the presenting sign of pituitary apoplexy is very rare. We describe two cases of pituitary apoplexy presenting as sudden-onset unilateral ptosis and diplopia. In one case, brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed a mass in the pituitary fossa with signs of hemorrhage, upward displacement of the optic chiasm, erosion of the sellar floor and invasion of the right cavernous sinus. In the other case, MRI showed a large area of insufficient enhancement in the anterior pituitary consistent with pituitary infarction or Sheehan's syndrome. We performed neurosurgical decompression via a transsphenoidal approach. Both patients showed an uneventful recovery. Both cases of isolated third cranial nerve palsy with ptosis completely resolved during the early postoperative period. We suggest that pituitary apoplexy should be included in the differential diagnosis of patients presenting with isolated third cranial nerve palsy with ptosis and that prompt neurosurgical decompression should be considered for the preservation of third cranial nerve function.

  2. Pituitary Apoplexy Presenting as Isolated Third Cranial Nerve Palsy with Ptosis : Two Case Reports

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Won-Jin; Kim, Tae-Sun; Seo, Bo-Ra

    2009-01-01

    Pituitary apoplexy is a clinical syndrome caused by an acute ischemic or hemorrhagic vascular accident involving a pituitary adenoma or an adjacent pituitary gland. Pituitary apoplexy may be associated with a variety of neurological and endocrinological signs and symptoms. However, isolated third cranial nerve palsy with ptosis as the presenting sign of pituitary apoplexy is very rare. We describe two cases of pituitary apoplexy presenting as sudden-onset unilateral ptosis and diplopia. In one case, brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed a mass in the pituitary fossa with signs of hemorrhage, upward displacement of the optic chiasm, erosion of the sellar floor and invasion of the right cavernous sinus. In the other case, MRI showed a large area of insufficient enhancement in the anterior pituitary consistent with pituitary infarction or Sheehan's syndrome. We performed neurosurgical decompression via a transsphenoidal approach. Both patients showed an uneventful recovery. Both cases of isolated third cranial nerve palsy with ptosis completely resolved during the early postoperative period. We suggest that pituitary apoplexy should be included in the differential diagnosis of patients presenting with isolated third cranial nerve palsy with ptosis and that prompt neurosurgical decompression should be considered for the preservation of third cranial nerve function. PMID:19274125

  3. [Correlation between facial nerve functional evaluation and efficacy evaluation of acupuncture treatment for Bell's palsy].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhang-ling; Li, Cheng-xin; Jiang, Yue-bo; Zuo, Cong; Cai, Yun; Wang, Rui

    2012-09-01

    To assess and grade facial nerve dysfunction according to the extent of facial paralysis in the clinical course of acupuncture treatment for Bell's palsy, and to observe the interrelationship between the grade, the efficacy and the period of treatment, as well as the effect on prognosis. The authors employed the House-Brackmann scale, a commonly used evaluation scale for facial paralysis motor function, and set standards for eye fissure and lips. According to the improved scale, the authors assessed and graded the degree of facial paralysis in terms of facial nerve dysfunction both before and after treatment. The grade was divided into five levels: mild, moderate, moderately severe, severe dysfunction and complete paralysis. The authors gave acupuncture treatment according to the state of the disease without artificially setting the treatment period. The observation was focused on the efficacy and the efficacy was evaluated throughout the entire treatment process. Fifty-three cases out of 68 patients with Bell's palsy were cured and the overall rate of efficacy was 97%. Statistically significant differences (P<0.01) were perceived among the efficacy of five levels of facial nerve dysfunction. Efficacy was correlated with the damage level of the disease (correlation coefficient r=0.423, P<0.01). The course of treatment also extended with the severity of facial nerve dysfunction (P<0.01). Differences exist in patients with Bell's palsy in terms of severity of facial nerve dysfunction. Efficacy is reduced in correlation with an increase in facial nerve dysfunction, and the period of treatment varies in need of different levels of facial nerve dysfunction. It is highly necessary to assess and grade patients before observation and treatment in clinical study, and choose corresponding treatment according to severity of damage of the disease.

  4. Nerve Palsy after Total Hip Arthroplasty without Subtrochanteric Femoral Shortening Osteotomy for a Completely Dislocated Hip Joint

    PubMed Central

    Sonohata, Motoki; Kitajima, Masaru; Kawano, Shunsuke; Mawatari, Masaaki

    2016-01-01

    Background: Neurological injuries are a rare but devastating complication after total hip arthroplasty (THA). The purpose of this study was to retrospectively determine the frequency of nerve palsy after THA without subtrochanteric femoral shortening osteotomy in patients with a completely dislocated hip joint without pseudo-articulation between the femoral head and iliac bone. Methods: Between October 1999 and September 2001, nine primary THAs were performed for patients with a completely dislocated hip joint. The limb lengths, neurological abnormalities, and the extent of their neurological recovery were evaluated. Three THAs were combined with subtrochanteric femoral shortening osteotomy, and six THAs were combined without subtrochanteric femoral shortening osteotomy. Results: The mean length of the operation was 4.8 cm (range, 3.0-6.5 cm). Sciatic nerve palsy developed in four of the nine patients after THA. None of the cases with sciatic nerve palsy were combined with subtrochanteric femoral shortening osteotomy. Three of four patients did not completely recover from sciatic nerve palsy. Conclusions: THA for patients with a completely dislocated hip was associated with a high risk of nerve palsy due to excessive limb lengthening; the potential for recovery from nerve palsy was observed to be poor. Subtrochanteric femoral shortening osteotomy should be used in combination with THA in patients with a completely dislocated hip. PMID:28217204

  5. Distal nerve transfer versus supraclavicular nerve grafting: comparison of elbow flexion outcome in neonatal brachial plexus palsy with C5-C7 involvement.

    PubMed

    Heise, Carlos O; Siqueira, Mario G; Martins, Roberto S; Foroni, Luciano H; Sterman-Neto, Hugo

    2017-06-24

    Ulnar and median nerve transfers to arm muscles have been used to recover elbow flexion in infants with neonatal brachial plexus palsy, but there is no direct outcome comparison with the classical supraclavicular nerve grafting approach. We retrospectively analyzed patients with C5-C7 neonatal brachial plexus palsy submitted to nerve surgery and recorded elbow flexion recovery using the active movement scale (0-7) at 12 and 24 months after surgery. We compared 13 patients submitted to supraclavicular nerve grafting with 21 patients submitted to distal ulnar or median nerve transfer to biceps motor branch. We considered elbow flexion scores of 6 or 7 as good results. The mean elbow flexion score and the proportion of good results were better using distal nerve transfers than supraclavicular grafting at 12 months (p < 0.01), but not at 24 months. Two patients with failed supraclavicular nerve grafting at 12 months showed good elbow flexion recovery after ulnar nerve transfers. Distal nerve transfers provided faster elbow flexion recovery than supraclavicular nerve grafting, but there was no significant difference in the outcome after 24 months of surgery. Patients with failed supraclavicular grafting operated early can still benefit from late distal nerve transfers. Supraclavicular nerve grafting should remain as the first line surgical treatment for children with neonatal brachial plexus palsy.

  6. Hemi-hypoglossal nerve transfer for obstetric brachial plexus palsy: report of 3 cases.

    PubMed

    Al-Thunyan, Abdullah; Al-Qattan, Mohammad M; Al-Meshal, Obaid; Al-Husainan, Hanan; Al-Assaf, Assaf

    2015-03-01

    Use of the entire hypoglossal nerve for nerve transfer in obstetric palsy is not recommended because of major donor nerve morbidity in terms of feeding and speech problems. We used a hemi-hypoglossal nerve transfer for biceps reinnervation in obstetric palsy in 3 infants with multiple root avulsions. Two of the 3 infants recovered normal or near-normal elbow flexion. There was no donor nerve morbidity in terms of feeding. Speech was assessed at age 20 to 27 months and was appropriate for age, which indicates that early speech development (speech intelligibility and articulation) were not affected. However, phonological development (expected to develop by age 3 y) and full consonant development (expected to be complete by age 5 y) could not be assessed because all children were younger than age 3 years at final follow-up. Our results confirm the relative safety of using a hemi-hypoglossal nerve transfer in infants. The transfer deserves study in a larger series and with longer follow-up, particularly regarding speech development. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Diagnostic Value of Facial Nerve Antidromic Evoked Potential in Patients With Bell's Palsy: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji Hoon; Kim, Sun Mi; Yang, Hea Eun; Lee, Jang Woo

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess the practical diagnostic value of facial nerve antidromic evoked potential (FNAEP), we compared it with the diagnostic value of the electroneurography (ENoG) test in Bell's palsy. Methods In total, 20 patients with unilateral Bell's palsy were recruited. Between the 1st and 17th days after the onset of facial palsy, FNAEP and ENoG tests were conducted. The degeneration ratio and FNAEP latency difference between the affected and unaffected sides were calculated in all subjects. Results In all patients, FNAEP showed prolonged latencies on the affected side versus the unaffected side. The difference was statistically significant. In contrast, there was no significant difference between sides in the normal control group. In 8 of 20 patients, ENoG revealed a degeneration ratio less than 50%, but FNAEP show a difference of more than 0.295±0.599 ms, the average value of normal control group. This shows FNAEP could be a more sensitive test for Bell's palsy diagnosis than ENoG. In particular, in 10 patients tested within 7 days after onset, an abnormal ENoG finding was noted in only four of them, but FNAEP showed a significant latency difference in all patients at this early stage. Thus, FANEP was more sensitive in detecting facial nerve injury than the ENoG test (p=0.031). Conclusion FNAEP has some clinical value in the diagnosis of facial nerve degeneration. It is important that FNAEP be considered in patients with facial palsy at an early stage and integrated with other relevant tests. PMID:25024963

  8. Different nerve ultrasound patterns in charcot-marie-tooth types and hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies.

    PubMed

    Padua, Luca; Coraci, Daniele; Lucchetta, Marta; Paolasso, Ilaria; Pazzaglia, Costanza; Granata, Giuseppe; Cacciavillani, Mario; Luigetti, Marco; Manganelli, Fiore; Pisciotta, Chiara; Piscosquito, Giuseppe; Pareyson, Davide; Briani, Chiara

    2017-08-12

    Nerve ultrasound in Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease has focused mostly on the upper limbs. We performed an evaluation of a large cohort of CMT patients in which we sonographically characterized nerve abnormalities in different disease types, ages, and nerves. Seventy patients affected by different CMT types and hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) were evaluated, assessing median, ulnar, fibular, tibial, and sural nerves bilaterally. Data were correlated with age. Nerve dimensions were correlated with CMT type, age, and nerve site. Nerves were larger in demyelinating than in axonal neuropathies. Nerve involvement was symmetric. CMT1 patients had larger nerves than did patients with other CMT types. Patients with HNPP showed enlargement at entrapment sites. Our study confirms the general symmetry of ultrasound nerve patterns in CMT. When compared with ultrasound studies of nerves of the upper limbs, evaluation of the lower limbs did not provide additional information. Muscle Nerve, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. C5 Nerve root palsies following cervical spine surgery: A review

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Nancy E.; Hollingsworth, Renee

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cervical C5 nerve root palsies may occur in between 0% and 30% of routine anterior or posterior cervical spine operations. They are largely attributed to traction injuries/increased cord migration following anterior/posterior decompressions. Of interest, almost all studies cite spontaneous resolution of these deficits without surgery with 3–24 postoperative months. Methods: Different studies cite various frequencies for C5 root palsies following anterior or posterior cervical spine surgery. In their combined anterior/posterior series involving C4-C5 level decompressions, Libelski et al. cited up to a 12% incidence of C5 palsies. In Gu et al. series, C5 root palsies occurred in 3.1% of double-door laminoplasty, 4.5% of open-door laminoplasty, and 11.3% of laminectomy. Miller et al. observed an intermediate 6.9% frequency of C5 palsies followed by posterior cervical decompressions and fusions (PCDF). Results: Gu et al. also identified multiple risk factors for developing C5 palsies following posterior surgery; male gender, ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL), narrower foramina, laminectomy, and marked dorsal spinal cord drift. Miller et al. also identified an average $1918 increased cost for physical/occupational therapy for patients with C5 palsies. Conclusions: The incidence of C5 root deficits for anterior/posterior cervical surgery at C4-C5 was 12% in one series, and ranged up to 11.3% for laminectomies, while others cited 0–30%. Although identification of preoperative risk factors for C5 root deficits may help educate patients regarding these risks, there is no clear method for their avoidance at this time. PMID:26005577

  10. Lateral medullary infarction with ipsilateral hemiparesis, lemniscal sensation loss and hypoglossal nerve palsy.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaodi; Wang, Yuzhou

    2014-04-01

    Here, we present a rare case of a lateral medullary infarction with ipsilateral hemiparesis, lemniscal sensation loss and hypoglossal nerve palsy. In this case, we proved Opalski's hypothesis by diffusion tensor tractography that ipsilateral hemiparesis in a medullary infarction is due to the involvement of the decussated corticospinal tract. We found that the clinical triad of ipsilateral hemiparesis, lemniscal sensation loss and hypoglossal nerve palsy, which had been regarded as a variant of medial medullary syndrome, turned out to be caused by lateral lower medullary infarction. Therefore, this clinical triad does not imply the involvement of the anteromedial part of medulla oblongata, when it is hard to distinguish a massive lateral medullary infarction from a hemimedullary infarction merely from MR images. At last, we suggest that hyperreflexia and Babinski's sign may not be indispensable to the diagnosis of Opalski's syndrome and we propose that "hemimedullary infarction with ipsilateral hemiparesis" is intrinsically a variant of lateral medullary infarction.

  11. Prosthetic ambulation in a paraplegic patient with a transfemoral amputation and radial nerve palsy.

    PubMed

    Shin, J C; Park, C; Kim, D Y; Choi, Y S; Kim, Y K; Seong, Y J

    2000-08-01

    Great importance and caution should be placed on prosthetic fitting for a paraplegic patient with an anesthetic residual limb if functional ambulation is to be achieved. The combination of paraplegia with a transfemoral amputation and radial nerve palsy is a complex injury that makes the rehabilitation process difficult. This article describes a case of L2 paraplegia with a transfemoral amputation and radial nerve palsy on the right side. Following the rehabilitation course, the patient independently walked using a walker at indoor level with a transfemoral prosthesis with ischial containment socket, polycentric knee assembly, endoskeletal shank and multiaxis foot assembly and a knee ankle foot orthosis on the sound side. The difficulties of fitting a functional prosthesis to an insensate limb and the rehabilitation stages leading to functional ambulation are reviewed.

  12. Thixotropy of levator palpebrae as the cause of lagophthalmos after peripheral facial nerve palsy.

    PubMed

    Aramideh, M; Koelman, J H T M; Devriese, P P; Speelman, J D; Ongerboer de Visser, B W

    2002-05-01

    Patients with facial nerve palsy are at risk of developing corneal ulceration because of lagophthalmos (incomplete closure of the affected eyelid). Lagophthalmos could result from thixotropy of the levator palpebrae muscle--that is, the formation of tight crossbridges between the actin and myosin filaments of the muscle fibres causing stiffness of the muscle--rather than from paralysis of the orbicularis occuli muscle as previously supposed. This possibility was investigated in 13 patients with a peripheral facial nerve palsy in a prospective open study. The levator muscle of the affected eyelid was stretched by manipulation and downward movement of the passively closed upper eyelid for approximately 15 seconds. The amount of lagophthalmos was measured before and immediately after this manoeuvre. In all patients except one there was a clear reduction in lagophthalmos (mean reduction 72%; range 60-100%). Thus in this setting the lagophthalmos appears to be caused by thixotropy of the levator palpebrae muscle, which has implications for treatment.

  13. [Third cranial nerve palsy and Purtscher retinopathy in a child with multiple injuries].

    PubMed

    Larrañaga-Fragoso, P; del-Barrio, Z; Noval, S; Pastora, N; Royo, A

    2015-07-01

    A 4 year-old girl was referred to our hospital after have suffered a severe accident. The patient was diagnosed with complete third nerve palsy in her right eye and Purtscher retinopathy in her left eye. Purtscher retinopathy is a rare condition. The diagnosis is made on clinical ground and its treatment is not well defined although it is believed that systemic steroids could improve the visual outcome. Traumatic third nerve palsy has a poor spontaneous recovery. The use of botulinum toxin might be useful in children to improve the recovery rate, maintaining binocularity, and avoiding amblyopia in other cases. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. Oberlin's ulnar nerve transfer to the biceps motor nerve in obstetric brachial plexus palsy: indications, and good and bad results.

    PubMed

    Noaman, Hassan Hamdy; Shiha, Anis Elsayed; Bahm, Jörg

    2004-01-01

    We present 7 children with obstetric brachial plexus palsy treated by transferring two motor fascicles out of the ulnar nerve to the biceps nerve. Three were male, and 4 were female. The left-side brachial plexus was affected in 4 patients, and the right side in 3 patients. All children had vaginal delivery; two of them presented with shoulder dystocia. The average birth weight was 4300 g (range, 3620-5500 g). Average age at time of operation was 16 months (range, 11-24 months). The indication for the operation was absent active elbow flexion with active shoulder abduction against gravity in 4 cases, and no biceps function and bad shoulder function in 3 cases. Oberlin's ulnar nerve transfer was done in 4 cases without brachial plexus exploration in those children with good shoulder function, and exploration of the brachial plexus was performed in the other 3 cases with bad shoulder function. The average follow-up was 19 months (range, 13-30 months). Five children had biceps muscle >or=M(3) with active elbow flexion against gravity, and 2 children had biceps muscle nerve transfer for upper-type obstetric brachial plexus palsy in 1). breech delivery with avulsion of C5 and C6 nerve roots,) late presentation with good recovery of shoulder function, and 3). neuroma-in-continuity of the upper trunk with intraoperative good nerve conduction for the shoulder muscles, the same as preoperative good shoulder function but with no biceps action. Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  15. Isolated Oculomotor Nerve Palsy Following Minor Head Trauma; a Case report

    PubMed Central

    GoliKhatir, Iraj; Aminiahidashti, Hamed; Motamed Motlagh, Hasan; Heidari, Seyed Farshad

    2017-01-01

    Isolated third nerve palsy develops in numerous intracranial pathologies such as closed head trauma, tumor, and aneurysm. This report describes a 61 years old female with an abrasion on the left forehead and ptosis of the left eye. Initial computed tomography did not reveal any causative cerebral and vascular lesions or orbital and cranial fractures. High-resolution and multi-axial enhanced Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can be helpful in diagnosis and monitoring of patients with this rare phenomenon. PMID:28286849

  16. Graphic-visual adaptation of House-Brackmann facial nerve grading for peripheral facial palsy.

    PubMed

    Lazarini, P; Mitre, E; Takatu, E; Tidei, R

    2006-06-01

    To determine if the diagram with schematic drawings of the face based on House-Brackmann facial nerve grading scale can be of easier use than the original grading scale for facial palsy patients. Prospective case study of 32 patients with facial palsy. Tertiary referral center-university hospital. Patients with different degrees of acute peripheral facial palsy from any cause. The patients were photographed and then classified by degree of facial palsy through analysis of the pictures. At first, three of the authors individually utilised the original classification described by House-Brackmann facial nerve grading and then, after 7 days, they employed the illustration table proposed. After 30 days, the same methods were again used by the same authors for both House-Brackmann facial nerve grading and the illustration table. The analysis of the obtained data reveals that the classification described by House and Brackmann (Otolaryngol. Head Neck Surg. 1985;93:146) presents several items to be evaluated, making it difficult to use and demanding greater time for correct application. On the contrary, the proposed illustration table allows faster evaluation and easier memorisation, not being subject to possible interpretation or translation mistakes, as illustrations are a universal language. Neither method presented absolute reproducibility, however, we found slightly larger concordance indexes among the authors for the proposed illustration table. We noticed average values of reproducibility were approximately 65% in the House-Brackmann classification, and 75% in the evaluation using the diagram of the schematic drawings. The authors concluded that the illustration table could be utilised in substitution for the original description of House-Brackmann facial nerve grading; they also concluded that the illustration table allows faster evaluation and easier memorisation.

  17. Cranial Sixth-Nerve Palsy and Eosinophilia in an Outbreak of Mycoplasma Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Wing, Howard J.; Lindzon, Martin

    1987-01-01

    The authors discuss a case in which three siblings presented with Mycoplasma pneumonia. All three had a typical rise in complement fixation antibody titres. However, the sibling with the highest titre also developed cranial sixth-nerve palsy; in addition, she was the only one of the three who did not have an eosinophilia. The authors review the symptomatology of Mycoplasma pneumonia and the involvement of the central nervous system. PMID:21263943

  18. A Case of Wegener's Granulomatosis Presenting with Unilateral Facial Nerve Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Ujjawal, Roy; Koushik, Pan; Ajay, Panwar; Subrata, Chakrabarti

    2016-01-01

    Wegener's granulomatosis or granulomatosis with polyangiitis is a necrotizing vasculitis affecting both arterioles and venules. The disease is characterized by the classical triad involving acute inflammation of the upper and lower respiratory tracts with renal involvement. However, the disease pathology can affect any organ system. This case presents Wegener's granulomatosis presenting with facial nerve palsy as the first manifestation of the disease, which is rarely reported in medical literature. PMID:27110249

  19. Palsy of the rear limbs in Mycobacterium lepraemurium-infected mice results from bone damage and not from nerve involvement.

    PubMed

    Rojas-Espinosa, O; Becerril-Villanueva, E; Wek-Rodríguez, K; Arce-Paredes, P; Reyes-Maldonado, E

    2005-06-01

    A small but relatively constant proportion (3-5%) of mice chronically infected with Mycobacterium lepraemurium (MLM) develops bilateral paralysis of the rear limbs. The aim of the study was to investigate whether or not the bilateral leg palsy results from nerve involvement. Direct bacterial nerve infection or acute/delayed inflammation might possibly affect the nerves. Therefore, palsied animals were investigated for the presence of: (a) histopathological changes in the leg tissues including nerves, bones and annexes, and (b) serum antibodies to M. lepraemurium and M. leprae lipids, including phenolic glycolipid I from M. leprae. Histopathological study of the palsied legs revealed that the paralysis was not the result of direct involvement of the limb nerves, as neither bacilli nor inflammatory cells were observed in the nerve branches studied. Antibodies to brain lipids and cardiolipin were not detected in the serum of the palsied animals, thus ruling out an immune response to self-lipids as the basis for the paralysis. Although high levels of antibodies to MLM lipids were detected in the serum of palsied animals they were not related to limb paralysis, as the nerves of the palsied legs showed no evidence of inflammatory damage. In fact, nerves showed no evidence of damage. Paralysis resulted from severe damage of the leg bones. Within the bones the bone marrow became replaced by extended bacilli-laden granulomas that frequently eroded the bone wall, altering the normal architecture of the bone and its annexes, namely muscle, tendons and connective tissue. Although this study rules out definitively the infectious or inflammatory damage of nerves in murine leprosy, it opens a new avenue of research into the factors that participate in the involvement or the sparing of nerves in human and murine leprosy, respectively.

  20. Palsy of the rear limbs in Mycobacterium lepraemurium-infected mice results from bone damage and not from nerve involvement

    PubMed Central

    Rojas-Espinosa, O; Becerril-Villanueva, E; Wek-Rodríguez, K; Arce-Paredes, P; Reyes-Maldonado, E

    2005-01-01

    A small but relatively constant proportion (3–5%) of mice chronically infected with Mycobacterium lepraemurium (MLM) develops bilateral paralysis of the rear limbs. The aim of the study was to investigate whether or not the bilateral leg palsy results from nerve involvement. Direct bacterial nerve infection or acute/delayed inflammation might possibly affect the nerves. Therefore, palsied animals were investigated for the presence of: (a) histopathological changes in the leg tissues including nerves, bones and annexes, and (b) serum antibodies to M. lepraemurium and M. leprae lipids, including phenolic glycolipid I from M. leprae. Histopathological study of the palsied legs revealed that the paralysis was not the result of direct involvement of the limb nerves, as neither bacilli nor inflammatory cells were observed in the nerve branches studied. Antibodies to brain lipids and cardiolipin were not detected in the serum of the palsied animals, thus ruling out an immune response to self-lipids as the basis for the paralysis. Although high levels of antibodies to MLM lipids were detected in the serum of palsied animals they were not related to limb paralysis, as the nerves of the palsied legs showed no evidence of inflammatory damage. In fact, nerves showed no evidence of damage. Paralysis resulted from severe damage of the leg bones. Within the bones the bone marrow became replaced by extended bacilli-laden granulomas that frequently eroded the bone wall, altering the normal architecture of the bone and its annexes, namely muscle, tendons and connective tissue. Although this study rules out definitively the infectious or inflammatory damage of nerves in murine leprosy, it opens a new avenue of research into the factors that participate in the involvement or the sparing of nerves in human and murine leprosy, respectively. PMID:15932504

  1. Acute onset of facial nerve palsy associated with Lyme disease in a 6 year-old child.

    PubMed

    Siwula, Joy M; Mathieu, Gregory

    2002-01-01

    Pediatric facial nerve palsy (FNP) can result from a variety of etiologies including Lyme disease, varicella, primary gingivostomatitis, herpes zoster oticus (Ramsay Hunt syndrome), coxsackievirus, trauma, otitis media, HIV, diseases causing tumors or demyelinations, compressions, and possibly Epstein Barr virus. Lyme disease has been implicated as the cause of over 50% of the FNPs in children. The paralysis of the facial nerve disturbs motor function to the muscles of facial expression and results in a flaccid appearance of the face (unilateral or bilateral). This case report derails undiagnosed Lyme disease presenting as a facial palsy in a 6 year, 5 month-old white female. The palsy was recognized and consultation with the child's physician prompted definitive diagnosis and treatment. A review of the literature and the implications of facial nerve palsy are discussed.

  2. Superior Oblique Anterior Transposition with Horizontal Recti Recession-Resection for Total Third-Nerve Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Eraslan, Muhsin; Cerman, Eren; Onal, Sumru; Ogut, Mehdi Suha

    2015-01-01

    Aims. To report the results of lateral rectus muscle recession, medial rectus muscle resection, and superior oblique muscle transposition in the restoration and maintenance of ocular alignment in primary position for patients with total third-nerve palsy. Methods. The medical records of patients who underwent surgery between March 2007 and September 2011 for total third-nerve palsy were reviewed. All patients underwent a preoperative assessment, including a detailed ophthalmologic examination. Results. A total of 6 patients (age range, 14–45 years) were included. The median preoperative horizontal deviation was 67.5 Prism Diopter (PD) (interquartile range [IQR] 57.5–70) and vertical deviation was 13.5 PD (IQR 10–20). The median postoperative horizontal residual exodeviation was 8.0 PD (IQR 1–16), and the vertical deviation was 0 PD (IQR 0–4). The median correction of hypotropia following superior oblique transposition was 13.5 ± 2.9 PD (range, 10–16). All cases were vertically aligned within 5 PD. Four of the six cases were aligned within 10 PD of the horizontal deviation. Adduction and head posture were improved in all patients. All patients gained new area of binocular single vision in the primary position after the operation. Conclusion. Lateral rectus recession, medial rectus resection, and superior oblique transposition may be used to achieve satisfactory cosmetic and functional results in total third-nerve palsy. PMID:26640703

  3. Iatrogenic Radial Nerve Palsy After Humeral Shaft Nonunion Repair: More Common Than You Think.

    PubMed

    Kakazu, Rafael; Dailey, Steven K; Schroeder, Amanda J; Wyrick, John D; Archdeacon, Michael T

    2016-05-01

    To determine the rate of iatrogenic radial nerve palsy (RNP) after surgical repair of established humeral shaft nonunion (HSNU). Retrospective chart review. Level I trauma center. Fifty-four patients with HSNU, 10 (18.5%) of whom developed an iatrogenic RNP after nonunion repair. HSNU repair with compression plate stabilization with or without autogenous bone graft. Postoperative iatrogenic RNP. Ten (18.5%) patients developed iatrogenic radial nerve palsies: 8 experienced complete resolution (mean, 2.5 months) and 2 experienced partial resolution. There were no statistically significant differences between patients who developed nerve palsy and those who did not in regard to age, gender, tobacco use, diabetic status, previous RNP, initial management (operative vs. nonoperative), surgical approach, presence of infected nonunion, number of previous surgeries, or operative time (P > 0.05). The occurrence of iatrogenic RNP for patients undergoing surgical repair of an HSNU was 18.5%. According to historical data, this rate is nearly 3 times higher than for those undergoing open reduction and internal fixation of either acute humeral shaft fractures or HSNUs. Therapeutic Level IV. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of Levels of Evidence.

  4. Peroneal nerve branching suggests compression palsy in the deformities of Charcot-Marie Tooth disease.

    PubMed

    Guyton, Gregory P

    2006-10-01

    Altered expression of the PMP-22 protein may be implicated in Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease and the much rarer disease, hereditary liability to pressure palsy. An element of chronic pressure palsy may explain the unique distribution of motor imbalance in patients with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. If this is the case, innervation of the lateral leg motor units should show sufficient anatomic segregation to explain the variable disease patterns. Twelve fresh cadaver specimens were dissected to examine the innervation of the anterior and lateral compartment muscles from the peroneal nerve. Nine specimens had a branch to the peroneus longus at or proximal to nerve passage of the posterior fibular neck. The first branch to the peroneus longus was 2.1 +/- 6.7 mm proximal, and the first branch to the peroneus brevis was 110.9 +/- 19 mm distal. The nerve to the tibialis anterior originated within 5 mm of the reference point and wrapped transversely along the fibular neck for 17.2 +/- 1.4 mm. These discrete pathways to the individual motor units in the anterolateral leg were consistent with the possible implication of chronic pressure palsy in the patterns of atrophy in Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease.

  5. Recurrent Isolated Sixth Nerve Palsy in Relapsing-Remitting Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Al-Bustani, Najwa; Weiss, Michael D

    2015-09-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) is an immune-mediated sensory and motor demyelinating polyneuropathy that typically presents as a relapsing-remitting or progressive disorder. Cranial neuropathies infrequently occur in association with other more typical symptoms of CIDP. We report a case of CIDP with recurrent isolated sixth nerve palsy. Her physical examination showed a right sixth nerve palsy and absent deep tendon reflexes as the only indicator of her disease. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed thickening without enhancement of the trigeminal and sixth cranial nerves. Nerve conduction study (NCS) revealed a sensory and motor demyelinating polyneuropathy with conduction block and temporal dispersion in multiple nerves consistent with CIDP. Cerebrospinal fluid demonstrated albuminic-cytologic dissociation. She had a remarkable response to intravenous immunoglobulin and remains asymptomatic without any additional immunomodulating therapy. Isolated cranial neuropathies can rarely occur as the sole manifestation of relapsing-remitting CIDP. The profound demyelination found on NCS in this case demonstrates that there can be a dramatic discordance between the clinical and electrodiagnostic findings in some patients with this disorder.

  6. The staged management of ophthalmic complications of facial nerve palsy.

    PubMed

    Seiff, S R; Chang, J S

    1993-12-01

    A six-stage approach to the management of the ophthalmic complications of facial palsy was developed to aid the physician in logically organizing therapy and to provide patients with reassuring goals. This stepwise approach was applied prospectively in 120 consecutive facial palsy patients from 1986 to 1990. The six stages included (a) supportive care (with and without tarsorrhaphy), (b) planning facial reanimation, (c) lower eyelid and lateral canthal resuspension, (d) passive upper eyelid reanimation, (e) dynamic eyelid animation (palpebral springs), and (f) soft tissue repositioning including eyebrow lift and blepharoplasty. Each stage was considered in order, although action in each stage was not appropriate for all patients. All 120 patients received supportive care, which was all that was necessary to accomplish the therapeutic goals for 63 (52.5%). Eight patients received temporary tarsorrhaphies (7%) and 14 (12%) permanent. One hundred ten were considered for stage 2. Thirty-five underwent stage 3 procedures, 30 received gold weights in stage 4, 5 had palpebral springs placed in stage 5, and 6 underwent stage 6 procedures. This staged approach was effective in achieving corneal compensation, maintaining vision, and improving the quality of life in all patients.

  7. Role of Kabat rehabilitation in facial nerve palsy: a randomised study on severe cases of Bell's palsy.

    PubMed

    Monini, S; Iacolucci, C M; Di Traglia, M; Lazzarino, A I; Barbara, M

    2016-08-01

    The treatment of Bell's palsy (BP), based on steroids and/or antiviral drugs, may still leave a certain percentage of affected subjects with disfiguring sequelae due to incomplete recovery. The different procedures of physical rehabilitation have not been demonstrated to play a favourable role in this disorder. The aim of the present study was to compare functional outcomes in severe cases of Bell's palsy when treated by steroids alone or by steroids accompanied by Kabat physical rehabilitation. This prospective study included 94 subjects who showed sudden facial nerve (FN) palsy with House-Brackmann grade IV or V and who were divided into two groups on the basis of the therapeutic approach: one group (a) was treated by steroids, and the other (b) received steroids in combination with physical rehabilitation. Medical treatment consisted in administration of steroids at a dosage of 60 mg per day for 15 days; physical rehabilitative treatment consisted in proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation according to Kabat, and was administered to one of the two groups of subjects. Recovery rate, degree of recovery and time for recovery were compared between the two groups using the Mann-Whitney and univariate logistic regression statistical tests (Ward test). Kabat patients (group b) had about 20 times the odds of improving by three HB grades or more (OR = 17.73, 95% CI = 5.72 to 54.98, p < 0.001) than patients who did not receive physical treatment (group a). The mean speed of recovery in group b was the half of that recorded for group a (non-Kabat subjects). No difference was observed in the incidence of synkineses between the two groups. Steroid treatment appears to provide better and faster recovery in severe cases (HB IV and V) of BP when complemented with Kabat physical rehabilitation. © Copyright by Società Italiana di Otorinolaringologia e Chirurgia Cervico-Facciale, Rome, Italy.

  8. Lepromatous leprosy with bilateral facial nerve palsy and hyperthyroidism.

    PubMed

    Singal, A; Vij, A; Pandhi, D

    2006-01-01

    Bilateral lagophthalmos secondary to facial nerve is extremely uncommon. Further, the aetiology in most of these cases is of central origin unlike the peripheral involvement in leprosy. A patient of lepromatous leprosy (LL) may be euthyroid or hypothyroid on account of leprous involvement of the thyroid gland. A case of LL with bilateral lagophthalmos and hyperthyroidism is reported.

  9. A case of bilateral lower cranial nerve palsies after base of skull trauma with complex management issues: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Lehn, Alexander Christoph; Lettieri, Jennie; Grimley, Rohan

    2012-05-01

    Fractures of the skull base can cause lower cranial nerve palsies because of involvement of the nerves as they traverse the skull. A variety of syndromes have been described, often involving multiple nerves. These are most commonly unilateral, and only a handful of cases of bilateral cranial nerve involvement have been reported. We describe a 64-year-old man with occipital condylar fracture complicated by bilateral palsies of IX and X nerves associated with dramatic physiological derangement causing severe management challenges. Apart from debilitating postural hypotension, he developed dysphagia, severe gastrointestinal dysmotility, issues with airway protection as well as airway obstruction, increased oropharyngeal secretions and variable respiratory control. This is the first report of a patient with traumatic bilateral cranial nerve IX and X nerve palsies. This detailed report and the summary of all 6 previous case reports of traumatic bilateral lower cranial nerve palsies illustrate clinical features, treatment strategies, and outcomes of these rare events.

  10. Prognostic value of facial nerve antidromic evoked potentials in bell palsy: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Wenhao, Zhang; Minjie, Chen; Chi, Yang; Weijie, Zhang

    2012-01-01

    To analyze the value of facial nerve antidromic evoked potentials (FNAEPs) in predicting recovery from Bell palsy. Study Design. Retrospective study using electrodiagnostic data and medical chart review. Methods. A series of 46 patients with unilateral Bell palsy treated were included. According to taste test, 26 cases were associated with taste disorder (Group 1) and 20 cases were not (Group 2). Facial function was established clinically by the Stennert system after monthly follow-up. The result was evaluated with clinical recovery rate (CRR) and FNAEP. FNAEPs were recorded at the posterior wall of the external auditory meatus of both sides. Results. Mean CRR of Group 1 and Group 2 was 61.63% and 75.50%. We discovered a statistical difference between two groups and also in the amplitude difference (AD) of FNAEP. Mean ± SD of AD was -6.96% ± 12.66% in patients with excellent result, -27.67% ± 27.70% with good result, and -66.05% ± 31.76% with poor result. Conclusions. FNAEP should be monitored in patients with intratemporal facial palsy at the early stage. FNAEP at posterior wall of external auditory meatus was sensitive to detect signs of taste disorder. There was close relativity between FNAEPs and facial nerve recovery.

  11. Isolated oculomotor nerve palsy after lumbar epidural steroid injection in a diabetic patient

    PubMed Central

    Gozal, Yair M.; Atchley, Kristine; Curt, Bradford A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: In patients with diabetes mellitus, epidural steroid injections (ESI) have been noted to cause significant elevation of blood glucose levels, typically lasting 1–3 days. Here, we describe a previously unreported complication of a diabetic third nerve palsy associated with an ESI. Case Description: A 66-year-old man with a history of coronary artery disease, hypertension, and insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus presented with low back pain and left lower extremity radiculopathy. The lumbar magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed mild spondylosis, most severe at the L4-5 level, accompanied by a broad based disc protrusion resulting in mild central and moderate biforaminal stenosis. The patient underwent a left-sided L4-L5 transforaminal ESI resulting in transient elevation of his blood glucose levels. On post-procedure day 2, he developed a frontal headache and a complete right third nerve palsy with partial pupillary involvement. The MRI and MR angiography (MRA) of the brain revealed no compressive lesions or oculomotor abnormalities. Ophthalmoplegia and pupillary dysfunction resolved spontaneously over 4 months. Conclusions: Although rare, a history of a recent ESI should be considered as the etiology of an isolated oculomotor palsy in diabetic patients. PMID:28144494

  12. Idiopathic Ninth, Tenth, and Twelfth Cranial Nerve Palsy with Ipsilateral Headache: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Seung-Ho

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This case report is to report the effect of Korean traditional treatment for idiopathic ninth, tenth, and twelfth cranial nerve palsy with ipsilateral headache. Methods: The medical history and imaging and laboratory test of a 39-year-old man with cranial palsy were tested to identify the cause of disease. A 0.2-mL dosage of Hwangyeonhaedoktang pharmacopuncture was administered at CV23 and CV17, respectively. Acupuncture was applied at P06, Li05, TE05, and G37 on the right side of the body. Zhuapiandutongbang (左 偏頭痛方) was administered at 30 minutes to 1 hour after mealtime three times a day. The symptoms were investigated using Visual Analogue Scale (VAS). Results: The results of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography (CT), and laboratory tests were normal. The medical history showed no trauma, other illnesses, family history of diseases, medications, smoking, drinking and so on. All symptoms disappeared at the 10th day of treatment. Conclusion: Korean traditional treatment such as acupuncture, pharmcopuncture, and herbal medicine for the treatment of ninth, tenth, and twelfth cranial nerve palsy of unknown origin is suggested to be effective even though this conclusion is based on a single. PMID:25780655

  13. Contralateral Spinal Accessory Nerve Transfer: A New Technique in Panavulsive Brachial Plexus Palsy.

    PubMed

    Zermeño-Rivera, Jaime; Gutiérrez-Amavizca, Bianca Ethel

    2015-06-01

    Brachial plexus avulsion results from excessive stretching and can occur secondary to motor vehicle accidents, mainly in motorcyclists. In a 28-year-old man with panavulsive brachial plexus palsy, we describe an alternative technique to repair brachial plexus avulsion and to stabilize and preserve shoulder function by transferring the contralateral spinal accessory nerve to the suprascapular nerve. We observed positive clinical and electromyographic results in sternocleidomastoid, trapezius, supraspinatus, infraspinatus, pectoralis, triceps, and biceps, with good outcome and prognosis for shoulder function at 12 months after surgery. This technique provides a unique opportunity for patients suffering from severe brachial plexus injuries and lacking enough donor nerves to obtain shoulder stability and mobility while avoiding bone fusion and preserving functionality of the contralateral shoulder with favorable postoperative outcomes.

  14. Partial anterior interosseous nerve palsy: isolated neuropraxia of the branch to flexor pollicis longus.

    PubMed

    Haflah, Nor Hazla Mohamed; Rashid, Abdul Halim Abd; Sapuan, Jamari

    2010-01-01

    Anterior interosseous nerve palsy is rare. Isolated neuropraxia of its branch to the flexor pollicis longus is even rarer. We present a case of a 24-year-old man who presented with weakness of his left thumb flexion after sustaining closed fracture of the proximal third of his left radius. On exploration, the anterior interosseous nerve and its branches was found to be intact as was the flexor pollicis longus. Electrophysiological studies demonstrated acute left anterior interosseous nerve neuropathy. Electromyography showed discrete motor unit at the flexor pollicis longus. Two months later the patient had full recovery of the flexor pollicis longus. We would like to highlight this rare occurrence and present a detailed history of this case to increase awareness amongst clinicians regarding this condition.

  15. Clinical studies of photodynamic therapy for malignant brain tumors: facial nerve palsy after temporal fossa photoillumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, Paul J.; Wilson, Brian C.; Lilge, Lothar D.; Varma, Abhay; Bogaards, Arjen; Fullagar, Tim; Fenstermaker, Robert; Selker, Robert; Abrams, Judith

    2003-06-01

    In two randomized prospective studies of brain tumor PDT more than 180 patients have been accrued. At the Toronto site we recognized two patients who developed a lower motor neuron (LMN) facial paralysis in the week following the PDT treatment. In both cases a temporal lobectomy was undertaken and the residual tumor cavity was photo-illuminated. The surface illuminated included the temporal fossa floor, thus potentially exposing the facial nerve to the effect of PDT. The number of frontal, temporal, parietal, and occipital tumors in this cohort was 39, 24, 12 and 4, respectively. Of the 24 temporal tumors 18 were randomized to Photofrin-PDT. Of these 18 a temporal lobectomy was carried out exposing the middle fossa floor as part of the tumor resection. In two of the 10 patients where the lobectomy was carried out and the fossa floor was exposed to light there occurred a postoperative facial palsy. Both patients recovered facial nerve function in 6 and 12 weeks, respectively. 46 J/cm2 were used in the former and 130 J/cm2 in the latter. We did not encounter a single post-operative LMN facial plasy in the 101 phase 2 patients treated with Photofrin-PDT. Among 688 supratentorial brain tumor operations in the last decade involving all pathologies and all locations no case of early post-operative LMN facial palsy was identified in the absence of PDT. One further patient who had a with post-PDT facial palsy was identified at the Denver site. Although it is possible that these patients had incidental Bell's palsy, we now recommend shielding the temporal fossa floor during PDT.

  16. The Evidence for Nerve Repair in Obstetric Brachial Plexus Palsy Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Pondaag, Willem; Malessy, Martijn J. A.

    2014-01-01

    Strong scientific validation for nerve reconstructive surgery in infants with Obstetric Brachial Plexus Palsy is lacking, as no randomized trial comparing surgical reconstruction versus conservative treatment has been performed. A systematic review of the literature was performed to identify studies that compare nerve reconstruction to conservative treatment, including neurolysis. Nine papers were identified that directly compared the two treatment modalities. Eight of these were classified as level 4 evidence and one as level 5 evidence. All nine papers were evaluated in detail to describe strong and weak points in the methodology, and the outcomes from all studies were presented. Pooling of data was not possible due to differences in patient selection for surgery and outcome measures. The general consensus is that nerve reconstruction is indicated when the result of nerve surgery is assumedly better than the expected natural recovery, when spontaneous recovery is absent or severely delayed. The papers differed in methodology on how the cut-off point to select infants for nerve reconstructive surgical therapy should be determined. The justification for nerve reconstruction is further discussed. PMID:24551845

  17. [Dermoid Cyst in Meckel's Cave Presenting with Oculomotor Nerve Palsy and Trigeminal Neuralgia:A Case Report].

    PubMed

    Tanabe, Nozomu; Tomita, Takahiro; Nagai, Shoichi; Kuwayama, Naoya; Noguchi, Kyo; Kuroda, Satoshi

    2016-10-01

    The authors report a rare case of an intracranial dermoid cyst found in Meckel's cave. A 63-year-old woman developed left oculomotor nerve palsy and was referred to their hospital. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a cystic lesion in the left Meckel's cave and prepontine cistern, but her symptoms gradually improved during conservative observation. However, three years later she complained of left facial pain in the territory of the second branch of the trigeminal nerve. The left oculomotor nerve palsy exacerbated again. Although her trigeminal neuralgia improved after carbamazepine administration, her oculomotor nerve palsy did not recover. Therefore, she underwent direct surgery through the anterior transpetrosal approach, and the fat-containing tumor cyst was completely resected. The tumor was strongly compressing the left trigeminal nerve and its ganglion in Meckel's cave. After surgery, her facial pain completely resolved and her oculomotor nerve palsy gradually improved. Histological examination revealed that the cyst wall was composed of a single layer of squamous epithelium and contained hair and keratin. A pathological diagnosis of a dermoid cyst was made.

  18. [Application of grading evaluation on facial nerve function of Bell's palsy treated with electroacupuncture].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhang-Ling; Zuo, Cong; Cheng, Shu-Luo; Shao, Wei-Wei; Liu, Li-Ping

    2013-08-01

    To explore the correlation of facial nerve injury degree with facial contraction degree induced by electric stimulation in the treatment of Bell's palsy with electroacupuncture, and the significance in elec tric reaction grading evaluation. Sixty-eight cases of Bell's palsy were enrolled. The positive and negative electrodes of the acupuncture treatment apparatus were attached to the needle handles at the 3 groups of points, named Taiyang (EX-HN 5)-Yangbai(GB 14), Xiaguan (ST 7)-Quanliao (SI 18) and Heliao (LI 19)-Jiachengjiang (Extra). The disperse-dense wave was applied. According to the severity of local muscle contraction after needling, the electric reaction was divided into 4 grades, named superior, moderate, poor and no reaction. After acupuncture and electroacupuncture, the efficacy was evaluated in accordance with the different electric reaction grades. The curative rate was 100.0% (44/44) in patients with superior electric reaction, was 100.0% (7/7) in patients with moderate electric reaction, was 18.2% (2/11) in patients with poor electric reaction and was 0 (0/6) in patients with noelectric reaction. The difference was significant statistically in comparison of 4 groups (P<0.01). The superiority correlation presented between the efficacy and electric reaction grade (P< 0.001). The higher the superiority of electric reaction grade was, the better the efficacy was. The difference in the efficacy among different electric reaction grades was significant statistically (P<0.001). And the course of treatment was the shortest for those with the high superiority of electric reaction. The reaction grade of electric stimulation is conform to the facial nerve injury grading in Bell's palsy. The contraction degree of facial mimetic muscle induced by electroacupuncture stimulation is closely correlated with severity of disease. Based on the electric reaction, the facial nerve injury severity can be understood generally and the prognosis be judged.

  19. Palpebral spring in the management of lagophthalmos and exposure keratopathy secondary to facial nerve palsy.

    PubMed

    Demirci, Hakan; Frueh, Bartley R

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate the use of a palpebral spring, a dynamic facial reanimation technique, in the management of lagophthalmos and exposure keratopathy secondary to facial nerve palsy. A palpebral spring was placed in 29 eyelids of 28 patients with symptomatic facial nerve palsy. Preoperative and postoperative symptoms, upper eyelid margin to midpupil distance, lagophthalmos, and exposure keratopathy were evaluated. At an average of 83 months follow-up, preoperative symptoms improved or resolved in 26 (90%) eyes. The upper eyelid margin to midpupil distance decreased and lagophthalmos and exposure keratopathy significantly improved after palpebral spring placement (p < 0.001). After modification of the technique by suturing the spring to the anterior tarsal surface, rather than encasing the tip in a silicone tube and letting it ride freely, tension of the spring required adjustment in 4 eyes (27%). Dislocation of the spring from the tarsus without exposure through the skin was observed in 1 eyelid (7%). The spring was replaced because of loss of function secondary to metal fatigue in 5 eyelids (33%) after an average of 43 months. Exposure of the spring through the skin was observed in 2 eyelids (14%) and required spring removal from 1 eyelid and replacement of the spring in the other. A palpebral spring is an effective treatment for lagophthalmos and exposure keratopathy in patients with facial nerve palsy who do not receive adequate relief from the static procedures of lower eyelid tightening and upper eyelid lowering. This technique significantly improved symptoms and signs in these patients while allowing some of the blink reflex.

  20. Transient Superficial Peroneal Nerve Palsy After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Alrowaili, Majed

    2016-04-26

    A 19-year-old male subject was diagnosed with medial meniscal, lateral meniscal and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear. The symptoms did not subside after 4 months of physical therapy, and he underwent arthroscopic partial medial and lateral meniscectomy and ACL reconstruction. Immediately after the patient woke up from general anesthesia, he started experience loss of sensation in the area of superficial peroneal nerve with inverted dorsiflexion of foot and ankle. Instantly, the bandage and knee brace was removed and a diagnosis of compartment syndrome was ruled out. After eight hours, post-operatively, the patient started receiving physiotherapy. He complained of numbness and tingling in the same area. After 24 h, post-operatively, the patient started to regain dorsiflexion and eversion gradually. Two days after the surgery, the patient exhibited complete recovery of neurological status.

  1. Transient Superficial Peroneal Nerve Palsy After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    A 19-year-old male subject was diagnosed with medial meniscal, lateral meniscal and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear. The symptoms did not subside after 4 months of physical therapy, and he underwent arthroscopic partial medial and lateral meniscectomy and ACL reconstruction. Immediately after the patient woke up from general anesthesia, he started experience loss of sensation in the area of superficial peroneal nerve with inverted dorsiflexion of foot and ankle. Instantly, the bandage and knee brace was removed and a diagnosis of compartment syndrome was ruled out. After eight hours, post-operatively, the patient started receiving physiotherapy. He complained of numbness and tingling in the same area. After 24 h, post-operatively, the patient started to regain dorsiflexion and eversion gradually. Two days after the surgery, the patient exhibited complete recovery of neurological status. PMID:27478579

  2. Incomplete peripheral facial nerve palsy and ulnar neuropathy due to leprosy mistaken as faciobrachial stroke

    PubMed Central

    Lalla, Rakesh; Mulherkar, Rupal Vijay; Misar, Parag Vijay

    2015-01-01

    A middle-aged woman was referred to our hospital emergency ward in view of acute onset left faciobrachial weakness. An urgent MRI of the brain was performed, which did not reveal any abnormality and hence a neurology consultation was arranged in order to rule out acute stroke. However, examination and retrospective history taking proved to be a valuable aid in this patient's diagnosis. The incomplete lower motor neuron facial nerve palsy and hand weakness due to leprosy in reaction was confused by the general practitioner as a faciobrachial stroke. PMID:26106179

  3. Post Traumatic Delayed Bilateral Facial Nerve Palsy (FNP): Diagnostic Dilemma of Expressionless Face.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rakesh; Mittal, Radhey Shyam

    2015-04-01

    Bilateral facial nerve palsy [FNP] is a rare condition. Mostly it is idiopathic. Post traumatic bilateral FNP is even more rare and having unique neurosurgical considerations. Post traumatic delayed presentation of bilateral FNP is socially debilitating and also having diagnostic challenge. Due to lack of facial asymmetry as present in unilateral facial paralysis, it is difficult to recognize. We are presenting a case of delayed onset bilateral FNP who developed FNP after 12 days of head injury with a brief discussion of its diagnostic dilemma and management along with literature review.

  4. Transfer of the intercostal nerves to the nerve of the long head of the triceps to recover elbow extension in brachial plexus palsy.

    PubMed

    Goubier, Jean-Noel; Teboul, Frédéric

    2007-06-01

    Restoration of elbow flexion is the first goal in brachial plexus injuries. The current procedures using nerve grafts and nerve transfers authorize more extensive repairs, with different possible targets: shoulder, elbow extension, and hand. Elbow extension is important to stabilize the elbow without the contralateral hand and allows achieving a useful grasp. The transfer of the intercostal nerves to the nerve of the long head of the triceps may restore this function in brachial plexus palsies. Furthermore, in case of C5 to C7 palsy, this transfer spares the radial nerve and gives a chance to spontaneous triceps recovery by the reinnervation from C8 root. Moreover, in case of absence or insufficient (M0 to M2 according to Medical Research Council scoring) recovery of elbow flexion strength by nerve surgery, the reinnervated triceps can be transferred. We present the technique of intercostal nerve transfer to the long head of the triceps branch to restore elbow extension in brachial plexus palsy. Results concerning 10 patients are presented.

  5. Living-donor nerve transplantation for global obstetric brachial plexus palsy.

    PubMed

    Gruber, Scott A; Mancias, Pedro; Swinford, Rita D; Prashner, Heather R; Clifton, Jorge; Henry, Mark H

    2006-05-01

    The first reported case of live-donor nerve transplantation is presented, performed in an 8-month-old infant with global obstetric brachial plexus palsy (OBPP) and four root avulsions who had undergone prior sural nerve autografting at 3 months. Cross-chest C7 nerve transfer and temporary tacrolimus/prednisone immunosuppression were utilized. Acute rejection was prevented, with no observable complications from the immunosuppressive medications, ipsilateral deficits resulting from the use of the contralateral C7 root as a donor nerve, or untoward effects on growth and development occurring over a 2-year follow-up period. Although some return of sensory and motor responses on nerve conduction studies was documented, the failure to observe a clinically significant functional improvement in the affected limb directly attributable to the transplant may have been due to performing the procedure too late and/or inadequate follow-up. Results of additional cases performed earlier than in this patient with longer follow-up will need to be evaluated to determine whether the procedure proves to be a viable therapeutic option for treatment of global OBPP with four or five root avulsions.

  6. Nerve growth factor for Bell’s palsy: A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    SU, YIPENG; DONG, XIAOMENG; LIU, JUAN; HU, YAOZHI; CHEN, JINBO

    2015-01-01

    A meta-analysis was performed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of nerve growth factor (NGF) in the treatment of Bell’s palsy. PubMed, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Embase and a number of Chinese databases, including the China National Knowledge Infrastructure, China Biology Medicine disc, VIP Database for Chinese Technical Periodicals and Wan Fang Data, were used to collect randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of NGF for Bell’s palsy. The span of the search covered data from the date of database establishment until December 2013. The included trials were screened comprehensively and rigorously. The efficacies of NGF were pooled via meta-analysis performed using Review Manager 5.2 software. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using the fixed-effects model. The meta-analysis of eight RCTs showed favorable effects of NGF on the disease response rate (n=642; OR, 3.87; 95% CI, 2.13–7.03; P<0.01; I2=0%). However, evidence supporting the effectiveness of NGF for the treatment of Bell’s palsy is limited. The number and quality of trials are too low to form solid conclusions. Further meticulous RCTs are required to overcome the limitations identified in the present study. PMID:25574223

  7. Management of Synkinesis and Asymmetry in Facial Nerve Palsy: A Review Article

    PubMed Central

    Pourmomeny, Abbas Ali; Asadi, Sahar

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The important sequelae of facial nerve palsy are synkinesis, asymmetry, hypertension and contracture; all of which have psychosocial effects on patients. Synkinesis due to mal regeneration causes involuntary movements during a voluntary movement. Previous studies have advocated treatment using physiotherapy modalities alone or with exercise therapy, but no consensus exists on the optimal approach. Thus, this review summarizes clinical controlled studies in the management of synkinesis and asymmetry in facial nerve palsy. Materials and Methods: Case-controlled clinical studies of patients at the acute stage of injury were selected for this review article. Data were obtained from English-language databases from 1980 until mid-2013. Results: Among 124 articles initially captured, six randomized controlled trials involving 269 patients were identified with appropriate inclusion criteria. The results of all these studies emphasized the benefit of exercise therapy. Four studies considered electromyogram (EMG) biofeedback to be effective through neuromuscular re-education. Conclusion: Synkinesis and inconsistency of facial muscles could be treated with educational exercise therapy. EMG biofeedback is a suitable tool for this exercise therapy. PMID:25320703

  8. Spontaneous resolution of a Meckel's cave arachnoid cyst causing sixth cranial nerve palsy.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Maud; Gujar, Sachin; Trobe, Jonathan; Gandhi, Dheeraj

    2008-09-01

    A 32-year-old pregnant woman developed a progressive right sixth cranial nerve palsy as an isolated finding. Brain MRI disclosed a discrete lobulated lesion centered in the right Meckel's cave with intermediate signal on T1, high signal on T2, and diffusion characteristics similar to those of cerebrospinal fluid on apparent diffusion coefficient mapping. The initial radiologic diagnosis was schwannoma or meningioma. No intervention occurred. Shortly after cesarean delivery, the abduction deficit began to lessen spontaneously. One month later, the abduction deficit had further improved; 7 months later it had completely resolved. Repeat MRI after delivery failed to disclose the lesion, which was now interpreted as consistent with an arachnoid cyst arising within Meckel's cave. Twenty-one similar cases of Meckel's cave arachnoid cyst or meningocele have been reported, 7 found incidentally and 14 causing symptoms, 2 of which produced ipsilateral sixth cranial nerve palsies. All previously reported symptomatic patients were treated surgically. This is the first report of an arachnoid cyst arising from Meckel's cave in pregnancy and having spontaneous resolution.

  9. Nasopharyngeal carcinoma with cranial nerve palsy: The importance of MRI for radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Joseph T.-C.; Lin, C.-Y.; Chen, T.-M.; Kang, C.-J.; Ng, S.-H.; Chen, I.-H.; Wang, H.-M.; Cheng, A.-J.; Liao, C.-T. . E-mail: cgmhnog@yahoo.com

    2005-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate various prognostic factors and the impact of imaging modalities on tumor control in patients with nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC) with cranial nerve (China) palsy. Material and Methods: Between September 1979 and December 2000, 330 NPC patients with CN palsy received radical radiotherapy (RT) by the conventional opposing technique at Chang Gung Memorial Hospital-Linkou. Imaging methods used varied over that period, and included conventional tomography (Tm) for 47 patients, computerized tomography (CT) for 195 patients, and magnetic resonance image (MRI) for 88 patients. Upper CN (II-VI) palsy was found in 268 patients, lower CN (IX-XII) in 13, and 49 patients had both. The most commonly involved CN were V or VI or both (23%, 12%, and 16%, respectively). All patients had good performance status (World Health Organization <2). The median external RT dose was 70.2 Gy (range, 63-77.5 Gy). Brachytherapy was also given to 156 patients in addition to external RT, delivered by the remote after-loading, high-dose-rate technique. A total of 139 patients received cisplatin-based chemotherapy, in 115 received as neoadjuvant or adjuvant chemotherapy and in 24 concomitant with RT. Recovery from CN palsy occurred in 171 patients during or after radiotherapy. Patients who died without a specific cause identified were regarded as having died with persistent disease. Results: The 3-year, 5-year, and 10-year overall survival was 47.1%, 34.4%, and 22.2%. The 3-year, 5-year, and 10-year disease-specific survival (DSS) rates were 50.4%, 37.8%, and 25.9%. The 5-year DSS for patients staged with MRI, CT, and Tm were 46.9%, 36.7%, and 21.9%, respectively (p = 0.016). The difference between MRI and CT was significant (p = 0.015). The 3-year and 5-year local control rates were 62% and 53%, respectively. The 5-year local control was 68.2% if excluding patients who died without a specific cause. Patients who had an MRI had a significantly better tumor control rate than those

  10. Radiation-induced lower cranial nerve palsy in patients with head and neck carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    JANSSEN, STEFAN; GLANZMANN, CHRISTOPH; YOUSEFI, BITA; LOEWENICH, KARL; HUBER, GERHARD; SCHMID, STEPHAN; STUDER, GABRIELA

    2015-01-01

    Radiation-induced cranial nerve palsy (RICNP) is a severe long-term complication in patients with head and neck cancer following high-dose radiation therapy (RT). We present the case report of a patient with bilateral RICNP of the hypoglossal and vagus cranial nerves (XII/X) following postoperative RT in the era prior to the introduction of intensity-modulated RT (IMRT), and an analysis of our IMRT patient cohort at risk including the case of a XII RICNP. A total of 201 patients whose glosso-pharyngeal (IX), X and XII cranial nerves had been exposed to >65 Gy definitive IMRT in our institution between January, 2002 and December, 2012 with or without systemic therapy, were retrospectively identified. A total of 151 patients out of 201 fulfilling the following criteria were included in the analysis: Locoregionally controlled disease, with a follow-up (FU) of >24 months and >65 Gy exposure of the nerves of interest. So far, one of the assessed 151 IMRT patients at risk exhibited symptoms of RICNP after 6 years. The mean/median FU of the entire cohort was 71/68 months (range, 27–145). The results were compared with literature reports. In conclusion, RICNP appears to be a rare complication. However, a longer FU and a larger sample size are required to draw reliable conclusions on the incidence of RICNP in the era of IMRT. PMID:26171186

  11. Third nerve palsy following carotid artery dissection and posterior cerebral artery thrombectomy: Case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Kogan, Michael; Natarajan, Sabareesh K.; Kim, Nina; Sawyer, Robert N.; Snyder, Kenneth V.; Siddiqui, Adnan H.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Common causes of oculomotor nerve palsy are diabetes, aneurysmal compression, and uncal herniation. A lesser-known cause of third nerve dysfunction is ischemia, often due to carotid artery dissection. Case Description: An 80-year-old man presented with an acute ischemic stroke with a National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score of >20 from a high cervical internal carotid artery (ICA) dissection and a tandem ICA terminus embolic occlusion with extension of clot into the adjacent fetal posterior cerebral artery (PCA). We used a stentriever to perform selective PCA thrombectomy, with immediate postthrombectomy development of ipsilateral anisocoria. The anisocoria progressed into complete oculomotor nerve palsy over 8 h after the procedure. Conclusions: The clinical course described in this case is consistent with injury to the third nerve due to mechanical injury or occlusion of perforator supply to the nerve during thrombectomy. Oculomotor nerve palsy is a rare but known complication after ischemia; however, to our knowledge, this is the first case after thrombectomy for a PCA embolus. PMID:25525555

  12. The 'pulseless pink' hand after supracondylar fracture of the humerus in children: the predictive value of nerve palsy.

    PubMed

    Mangat, K S; Martin, A G; Bache, C E

    2009-11-01

    We compared two management strategies for the perfused but pulseless hand after stabilisation of a Gartland type III supracondylar fracture. We identified 19 patients, of whom 11 were treated conservatively after closed reduction (group 1). Four required secondary exploration, of whom three had median and/or anterior interosseus nerve palsy at presentation. All four were found to have tethering or entrapment of both nerve and vessel at the fracture site. Only two regained patency of the brachial artery, and one patient has a persistent neurological deficit. In six of the eight patients who were explored early (group 2) the vessel was tethered at the fracture site. In group 2 four patients also had a nerve palsy at presentation and were similarly found to have tethering or entrapment of both the nerve and the vessel. The patency of the brachial artery was restored in all six cases and their neurological deficits recovered completely. We would recommend early exploration of a Gartland type III supracondylar fracture in patients who present with a coexisting anterior interosseous or median nerve palsy, as these appear to be strongly predictive of nerve and vessel entrapment.

  13. Diagnostic imaging and pathogenesis of the traumatic intratumoural haemorrhage of schwannoma causing acute high radial nerve palsy: case report.

    PubMed

    Okada, Mitsuhiro; Takada, Jun; Ohsawa, Masahiko; Nakamura, Hiroaki

    2012-12-01

    We describe the first report of haemorrhaged schwannoma presenting with acute high radial nerve palsy after traumatic injury of the upper arm. Anticoagulant therapy may induce intratumoural haemorrhage, resulting in symptomatic increases in size within the limited space of the upper arm. The radiological, surgical and pathological findings are discussed.

  14. Carotid artery pseudoaneurysm after orthognathic surgery causing lower cranial nerve palsies: endovascular repair.

    PubMed

    Hacein-Bey, Lotfi; Blazun, Judith M; Jackson, Richard F

    2013-11-01

    Reported complications following Le Fort osteotomies are rare but can include epistaxis from disruptions or pseudo-aneurysms of the maxillary artery or its distal branches the descending palatine and sphenopalatine arteries, aseptic necrosis of the maxilla, ophthalmic injuries including blindness, ophthalmoplegia, and keratitis sicca, and arteriovenous fistulas or false aneurysms of the carotid arteries (external and/or internal). The mechanism of injury to neurovascular structures can be the result of direct or indirect trauma, such as injuries from surgical instruments, traction injuries during manipulation of the osteotomized bone segments or during inadvertent manipulations of the head and neck, or from fractures extending to the base of the skull, orbit, or pterygopalatine fossa associated with the pterygomandibular dysjunction or maxillary downfracture. An 18 year-old male with facial bone dysplasia, apertognathia, maxillary hypoplasia and mandibular hyperplasia was treated with maxillary Le Fort I osteotomy with internal fixation and elastic intermaxillary fixation. Following surgery, the patient developed palsies of the vagus and accessory nerves manifesting as dysphagia, cough, vocal cord paralysis and trapezius muscle atrophy. Cross sectional imaging revealed a small, laterally pointing pseudoaneurysm of the high cervical internal carotid artery (ICA) at the skull base, exerting pulsatile mass effect on adjacent lower cranial nerves. The patient was treated with carotid artery stent reconstruction and pseudoaneurysm coil obliteration, and kept on dual antiplatelet therapy for two months. Partial recovery from cranial nerve palsies was observed within a year. A small, broad-based, laterally-pointing ICA pseudoaneurysm at the exit of the carotid canal without surrounding hematoma was clearly demonstrated on CTA, which visualization was difficult on MRA due to considerable metallic artifact from surgical hardware. Angiography exquisitely demonstrated the

  15. Tourniquet-Related Iatrogenic Femoral Nerve Palsy after Knee Surgery: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Mingo-Robinet, Juan; Castañeda-Cabrero, Carlos; Alvarez, Vicente; León Alonso-Cortés, José Miguel; Monge-Casares, Eva

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. Tourniquet-induced nerve injuries have been reported in the literature, but even if electromyography abnormalities in knee surgery are frequent, only two cases of permanent femoral nerve palsies have been reported, both after prolonged tourniquet time. We report a case of tourniquet-related permanent femoral nerve palsy after knee surgery. Case Report. We report a case of a 58-year-old woman who underwent surgical treatment of a patella fracture. Tourniquet was inflated to 310 mmHg for 45 minutes. After surgery, patient complained about paralysis of the quadriceps femoris with inability to extend the knee. Electromyography and nerve conduction study showed a severe axonal neuropathy of the left femoral nerve, without clinical remission after several months. Discussion. Even if complications are not rare, safe duration and pressure for tourniquet use remain a controversy. Nevertheless, subtle clinical lesions of the femoral nerve or even subclinical lesions only detectable by nerve conduction and EMG activity are frequent, so persistent neurologic dysfunction, even if rare, may be an underreported complication of tourniquet application. Elderly persons with muscle atrophy and flaccid, loose skin might be in risk for iatrogenic nerve injury secondary to tourniquet. PMID:24371536

  16. Facial nerve decompression surgery using bFGF-impregnated biodegradable gelatin hydrogel in patients with Bell palsy.

    PubMed

    Hato, Naohito; Nota, Jumpei; Komobuchi, Hayato; Teraoka, Masato; Yamada, Hiroyuki; Gyo, Kiyofumi; Yanagihara, Naoaki; Tabata, Yasuhiko

    2012-04-01

    Basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) promotes the regeneration of denervated nerves. The aim of this study was to evaluate the regeneration-facilitating effects of novel facial nerve decompression surgery using bFGF in a gelatin hydrogel in patients with severe Bell palsy. Prospective clinical study. Tertiary referral center. Twenty patients with Bell palsy after more than 2 weeks following the onset of severe paralysis were treated with the new procedure. The facial nerve was decompressed between tympanic and mastoid segments via the mastoid. A bFGF-impregnated biodegradable gelatin hydrogel was placed around the exposed nerve. Regeneration of the facial nerve was evaluated by the House-Brackmann (H-B) grading system. The outcomes were compared with the authors' previous study, which reported outcomes of the patients who underwent conventional decompression surgery (n = 58) or conservative treatment (n = 43). The complete recovery (H-B grade 1) rate of the novel surgery (75.0%) was significantly better than the rate of conventional surgery (44.8%) and conservative treatment (23.3%). Every patient in the novel decompression surgery group improved to H-B grade 2 or better even when undergone between 31 and 99 days after onset. Advantages of this decompression surgery are low risk of complications and long effective period after onset of the paralysis. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first clinical report of the efficacy of bFGF using a new drug delivery system in patients with severe Bell palsy.

  17. A Rare Combination Open Fracture Dislocation of Elbow with Open Fracture both Bones Forearm with Radial Nerve Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Shivanna, Deepak; Aski, Bahubali; Manjunath, Dayanand; Bhatnagar, Abhinav

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The injury pattern of open fracture dislocation of elbow with fracture both bones forearm with radial nerve injury is very rare. Very few reports are there in literature related to this kind of injury. However this combination is first of its kind. This rare injury needs special attention by early intervention and biological fixation to achieve good results. Case Report: A 22 year old female presented to us with history of road traffic accident. On evaluation patient had combination of open fracture dislocation of elbow with open diaphyseal fracture of both forearm bones with radial nerve palsy. The patient was treated in emergency and followed for 2 years. Conclusion: Open fracture dislocation of elbow is a rare entity. Our case additionally had open fracture both the bones forearm with radial nerve palsy. Early intervention and biological fixation with minimal invasion gives good results in terms of range of movements and patient satisfaction. PMID:27298951

  18. Measurement of facial movements with Photoshop software during treatment of facial nerve palsy*

    PubMed Central

    Pourmomeny, Abbas Ali; Zadmehr, Hassan; Hossaini, Mohsen

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Evaluating the function of facial nerve is essential in order to determine the influences of various treatment methods. The aim of this study was to evaluate and assess the agreement of Photoshop scaling system versus the facial grading system (FGS). METHODS: In this semi-experimental study, thirty subjects with facial nerve paralysis were recruited. The evaluation of all patients before and after the treatment was performed by FGS and Photoshop measurements. RESULTS: The mean values of FGS before and after the treatment were 35 ± 25 and 67 ± 24, respectively (p < 0.001). In Photoshop assessment, mean changes of face expressions in the impaired side relative to the normal side in rest position and three main movements of the face were 3.4 ± 0.55 and 4.04 ± 0.49 millimeter before and after the treatment, respectively (p < 0.001). Spearman's correlation coefficient between different values in the two methods was 0.66 (p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Evaluating the facial nerve palsy using Photoshop was more objective than using FGS. Therefore, it may be recommended to use this method instead. PMID:22973325

  19. Functional deficit after transfer of the pronator teres for acquired radial nerve palsy.

    PubMed

    Skie, Martin C; Parent, Thomas E; Mudge, Kenneth M; Wood, Virchel E

    2007-04-01

    A suitable muscle motor in reconstruction after acquired never injury should have adequate strength to perform the desired task, be aligned in the direction of pull, have synergistic action, and not result in unacceptable functional loss. In radial nerve palsy, the pronator teres is the most common motor donor used to restore wrist extension. Although the pronator teres remains aligned to provide pronation, the force deficit of the transfer is not known. We used 6 cadavers and 6 patients to determine the loss of pronation strength both experimentally and clinically. Cadaveric testing showed a loss of pronation produced with similar load after transfer of the pronator. Clinical testing showed statistically significant loss of pronation ranging from 24% to 44%, depending on the method of testing. This deficit may be an important consideration in some clinical situations when transfers are used while waiting for radial nerve function to return. In the cadaveric biomechanic testing, we simulated the pronator teres-to-extensor carpi radialis brevis tendon transfer and showed a decreased range of motion and force developed after transfer. The clinical arm of the study confirmed our biomechanic findings by showing the loss of pronation function. This loss may be an important factor when planning reconstruction for radial nerve injuries. Therapeutic IV.

  20. Radial nerve palsy after arthroscopic anterior capsular release for degenerative elbow contracture.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin-Young; Cho, Chul-Hyun; Choi, Jin-Hyung; Lee, Sung-Tae; Kang, Chul-Hyung

    2007-12-01

    Because the use of arthroscopy has increased recently for the treatment of elbow lesions, reports of complications have become more common. Nerve injury after arthroscopic anterior capsular release is an extremely rare complication, with 4 reported cases worldwide. We usually use a sharp-tipped electrocautery device with a 0.5-mm diameter during arthroscopic capsular release. In this case, because the former was not prepared, we used a ball-tipped electrocautery device with a 3-mm diameter. Herein, we experienced a case of radial nerve palsy after arthroscopic anterior capsular release using a ball-tipped electrocautery device on a degenerative elbow contracture. We supposed that the electrocautery device caused transiently thermal injury of the radial nerve despite proper portal entry site, intra-articular distension, and gentle arthroscopic manipulation. Elbow arthroscopy remains a technically difficult procedure with the potential for neurologic complications. To perform surgery safely, knowledge of the regional neuroanatomy and a thorough understanding of proper instrument usage are required.

  1. Pituitary apoplexy with third cranial nerve palsy after off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Tomohiro

    2011-08-01

    We present a rare case with pituitary apoplexy after three-vessel off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting (OPCAB). The patient exhibited right third cranial nerve palsy; ptosis of the right eye with completely dilated pupils and a loss of reflex to light after the effects of anesthesia completely subsided. The patient underwent endonasal transsphenoidal resection of the pituitary gland 14 days after the OPCAB, and the symptoms completely disappeared 40 days after the resection. OPCAB is recommended for patients with known pituitary tumor who require coronary artery bypass grafting, but OPCAB also has a risk of pituitary apoplexy. The present case report is the first to describe pituitary apoplexy after OPCAB. Pituitary apoplexy is a very rare complication after cardiac surgery, but cardiac surgeons should know the disease and quickly diagnose it to avoid severe brain injury.

  2. Double Augmented Vertical Rectus Transposition for Large-Angle Esotropia Due to Sixth Nerve Palsy.

    PubMed

    Singh, Priyanka; Vijayalakshmi, Perumalsamy; Shetty, Shashikant; Vora, Priyanka; Kalwaniya, Suresh

    2016-11-01

    To study the binocular alignment and ocular motility in patients with large-angle esotropia due to sixth nerve palsy treated with double augmented vertical recti transposition. This was a prospective interventional study. Fifteen patients with non-resolving sixth nerve palsy who underwent surgical correction were included in the study. Fourteen patients also underwent an additional medial rectus recession. Two patients with an associated small vertical deviation had a selective augmentation of one vertical rectus muscle. Binocular alignment, ocular motility, duction limitation, improvement in head posture, induced vertical deviations, and field of diplopia-free binocular single vision (when possible) were analyzed. Successful outcome was defined as a residual horizontal deviation of 10 prism diopters (PD) or less with no vertical deviation at final follow-up (6 months). The double augmented Hummelsheim procedure improved esotropia from 58.3 ± 10.8 PD preoperatively to 7.2 ± 5.1 PD postoperatively (P = .001). Three (20%) patients had residual deviation of greater than 10 PD, of which 1 patient had diplopia and was treated with prisms. Postoperative binocular field of vision was performed in 6 patients, the mean of which was 20° for abduction and 45° for adduction. Three of 6 patients had elimination of face turn and the rest had residual head posture of less than 5°. Two patients had an induced vertical deviation of less than 4 PD. In patients who had selective augmentation, the vertical deviation was completely corrected. The patients operated on with double augmentation of the Hummelsheim procedure combined with medial rectus recession had reduced mean primary esotropia and improved diplopia-free field of vision postoperatively. [J Pediatr Ophthalmol Strabismus. 2016;53(6):369-374.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  3. A pediatric case with peripheral facial nerve palsy caused by a granulomatous lesion associated with cat scratch disease.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Chizuko; Inaba, Yuji; Tsukahara, Keiko; Mochizuki, Mie; Sawanobori, Emi; Nakazawa, Yozo; Aoyama, Kouki

    2017-09-18

    Cat scratch disease is a common infectious disorder caused by Bartonella henselae that is transmitted primarily by kittens. It typically exhibits a benign and self-limiting course of subacute regional lymphadenopathy and fever lasting two to eight weeks. The most severe complication of cat scratch disease is involvement of the nervous system, such as encephalitis, meningitis, and polyneuritis. Peripheral facial nerve palsy associated with Bartonella infection is rare; few reported pediatric and adult cases exist and the precise pathogenesis is unknown. A previously healthy 7-year-old boy presented with fever, cervical lymphadenopathy, and peripheral facial nerve palsy associated with serologically confirmed cat scratch disease. The stapedius muscle reflex was absent on the left side and brain magnetic resonance imaging revealed a mass lesion at the left internal auditory meatus. The patient's symptoms and imaging findings were gradually resolved after the antibiotics and corticosteroids treatment. The suspected granulomatous lesion was considered to have resulted from the host's immune reaction to Bartonella infection and impaired the facial nerve. This is the first case report providing direct evidence of peripheral facial nerve palsy caused by a suspected granulomatous lesion associated with cat scratch disease and its treatment course. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Outcome of patients presenting with idiopathic facial nerve paralysis (Bell's palsy) in a tertiary centre--a five year experience.

    PubMed

    Tang, I P; Lee, S C; Shashinder, S; Raman, R

    2009-06-01

    This is a retrospective study. The objective of this study is to review the factors influencing the outcome of treatment for the patients presented with idiopathic facial nerve paralysis. The demographic data, clinical presentation and management of 84 patients with idiopathic facial nerve paralysis (Bell's palsy) were collected from the medical record office, reviewed and analyzed from 2000 to 2005. Thirty-four (72.3%) out of 47 patients who were treated with oral prednisolone alone, fully recovered from Bell's palsy meanwhile 36 (97%) out of 37 patients who were treated with combination of oral prednisolone and acyclovir fully recovered. The difference was statistically significant. 42 (93.3%) out of 45 patients who presented within three days to our clinic, fully recovered while 28 (71.8%) out of 39 patients presented later then three days had full recovery from Bell's palsy. The difference was statistically significant. The outcome of full recovery is better with the patients treated with combined acyclovir and prednisolone compared with prednisolone alone. The patients who were treated after three days of clinical presentation, who were more than 50 years of age, who had concurrent chronic medical illness and facial nerve paralysis HB Grade IV to VI during initial presentation have reduced chance of full recovery of facial nerve paralysis.

  5. Retrospective case series with one year follow-up after radial nerve palsy associated with humeral fractures.

    PubMed

    Lang, Nikolaus Wilhelm; Ostermann, Roman Christian; Arthold, Cathrin; Joestl, Julian; Platzer, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess recovery and clinical outcome in patients with primary or secondary radial nerve palsy following humeral shaft fracture. We retrospectively assessed 102 patients (45 female and 57 male) with humeral shaft fracture and concomitant radial nerve palsy, who were followed up for 12 months. Patients were divided into two groups with primary or secondary radial nerve palsy depending on the onset. Muscle function was measured according to Daniels classification and degree of nerve damage was assessed by the Sunderland classification. The average time for onset of recovery after primary RNP was 10.5 ± 3.31 weeks, in the case of secondary RNP it was 8.9 ± 7.98 weeks (p < 0.05). Full recovery or significant improvement was achieved with average of 26.7 ± 8.86 weeks and 23.9 ± 6.04 weeks respectively (p < 0.05). Trauma mechanism and type of treatment had no significant influence on time of onset of recovery or time to full recovery (p < 0.904). Secondary RNP shows tendency for earlier recovery and is more commonly associated with ORIF.

  6. [A case of long thoracic nerve palsy, with winged scapula, as a result of prolonged exertion on practicing archery].

    PubMed

    Shimizu, J; Nishiyama, K; Takeda, K; Ichiba, T; Sakuta, M

    1990-08-01

    Reports of isolated long thoracic nerve palsy are rare in Japan. We reported a case of isolated long thoracic nerve palsy, resulted from recurrent injury to the nerve. Muscle CT and electrodiagnostic study were useful for confirming diagnosis of this cases. This patient was a student aged 20 years, with nothing of importance in his family or past history. After he started practicing archery, winging of left scapula was gradually developed. Physical examination revealed weakness and atrophy of left serratus anterior muscle. There was no wasting and weakness of other should girdle muscles. Hematochemical tests were normal, except slight hyperthyroidism. Radiography and myelography of the cervical spine were normal. Muscle CT of upper thoracic level demonstrated atrophy of left serratus anterior muscle, and no abnormality were found in other muscles. Electromyogram of the left serratus anterior revealed discrete activity of reduced amplitude, and fibrillation potentials and positive sharp waves. Conduction time for left long thoracic nerve was prolonged, and amplitude of the evoked response was small and there were temporal dispersion. Muscle CT and electrodiagnostic studies were suggestive of neuroapraxia of left long thoracic nerve. Over stretching or compression during exercises may be responsible for the damage to the long thoracic nerve.

  7. [Delayed paresis of the femoral nerve after total hip arthroplasty associated with hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP)].

    PubMed

    Schuh, A; Dürr, V; Weier, H; Zeiler, G; Winterholler, M

    2004-07-01

    Delayed lesions of the femoral or sciatic nerve are a rare complication after total hip arthroplasty. Several cases in association with cement edges, scar tissue, broken cerclages, deep hematoma, or reinforcement rings have been published. We report about a 62-year-old female who developed a pure motor paresis of the quadriceps muscle 2 weeks after total hip arthroplasty. After electrophysiological evaluation had revealed an isolated femoral nerve lesion, revision of the femoral nerve was performed. During operative revision no pathologic findings could be seen. One week later the patient developed paralysis of the left wrist and finger extensors after using crutches. Electrophysiological evaluation revealed several nerve conduction blocks in physiological entrapments and the diagnosis of hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) was established. Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) is a rare disease with increased vulnerability of the peripheral nerve system with mostly reversible sensorimotor deficits. It should be taken into consideration in cases of atypical findings of compression syndromes of peripheral nerves or delayed neuropathy, e. g., after total hip arthroplasty.

  8. Correlation between "hourglass-like fascicular constriction" and idiopathic anterior interosseous nerve palsy.

    PubMed

    Sunagawa, Toru; Nakashima, Yuko; Shinomiya, Rikuo; Kurumadani, Hiroshi; Adachi, Nobuo; Ochi, Mitsuo

    2017-04-01

    In recent operative cases of anterior interosseous nerve palsy (AINP), hourglass-like fascicular constrictions have been reported. We prospectively investigated the ultrasonographic history of these lesions to better understand the role of this lesion in AINP. Seven patients who were diagnosed with idiopathic AINP based on classic clinical findings and had hourglass-like fascicular constrictions found on ultrasonography were included. All but 1 patient selected surgery, and we followed up all patients clinically and with ultrasonography. In the 5 patients treated surgically in whom paralysis recovered to a level greater than M4, postoperative ultrasonography revealed less constriction. The other patient experienced little recovery after surgery, and the severe constriction remained. In a conservatively treated patient, the paralysis recovered completely, and upon ultrasonography, the constriction had lessened. Although the mechanism is still unknown, hourglass-like fascicular constriction lessened with relief of motor weakness both in operatively and conservatively treated patients. Muscle Nerve 55: 508-512, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Facial nerve palsy, headache, peripheral neuropathy and Kaposi’s sarcoma in an elderly man

    PubMed Central

    Daoussis, Dimitrios; Chroni, Elisabeth; Tsamandas, Athanassios C; Andonopoulos, Andrew P

    2014-01-01

    We present a case of an elderly man, who initially presented with right facial nerve palsy, ipsilateral headache, elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and no fever. A presumptive diagnosis of giant cell arteritis was made and the patient was treated with high-dose steroids. A temporal artery biopsy was negative. Several months later, while on 16 mg of methylprednisolone daily, he presented with severe sensorimotor peripheral symmetric neuropathy, muscle wasting and inability to walk, uncontrolled blood sugar and psychosis. A work-up for malignancy was initiated with the suspicion of a paraneoplastic process. At the same time a biopsy of the macular skin lesions that had appeared on the skin of the left elbow and right knee almost simultaneously was inconclusive, whereas a repeat biopsy from the same area of the lesions that had become nodular, a month later, was indicative of Kaposi’s sarcoma. Finally, a third biopsy of a similar lesion, after spreading of the skin process, confirmed the diagnosis of Kaposi’s sarcoma. He was treated with interferon α and later was seen in very satisfactory condition, with no clinical evidence of neuropathy, normal muscle strength, no headache, normal electrophysiologic nerve studies, involution of Kaposi’s lesions and a normal ESR. PMID:24945015

  10. Hypoglossal Nerve Palsy After Airway Management for General Anesthesia: An Analysis of 69 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Aalap C.; Barnes, Christopher; Spiekerman, Charles F.; Bollag, Laurent A.

    2014-01-01

    Isolated hypoglossal nerve palsy (HNP), or neurapraxia, a rare postoperative complication after airway management, causes ipsilateral tongue deviation, dysarthria, and dysphagia. We reviewed the pathophysiological causes of hypoglossal nerve injury and discuss the associated clinical and procedural characteristics of affected patients. Furthermore, we identified procedural factors potentially affecting HNP recovery duration and propose several measures that may reduce the risk of HNP. While HNP can occur after a variety of surgeries, most cases in the literature were reported after orthopedic and otolaryngology operations, typically in males. The diagnosis is frequently missed by the anesthesia care team in the recovery room due to the delayed symptomatic onset and often requires neurology and otolaryngology evaluations to exclude serious etiologies. Signs and symptoms are self-limited, with resolution occurring within 2 months in 50% of patients, and 80% resolving within 4 months. Currently, there are no specific preventive or therapeutic recommendations. We found 69 cases of HNP after procedural airway management reported in the literature from 1926–2013. PMID:25625257

  11. [Palliative radiation treatment for superior mediastinal lymph nodes of a patient with recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy-a case report of advanced lung cancer].

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Eisuke; Koshiishi, Haruya; Takahashi, Masayoshi; Saitoh, Tsutomu; Takei, Hidefumi; Hayashi, Naganobu

    2012-11-01

    The recurrent laryngeal nerve is a branch of the vagus nerve. On the right side, it branches anteriorly to the subclavian artery in the neck. In cases of malignant diseases, lymph node metastasis can lead to recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy. Patients with this condition often suffer from aspiration pneumonia, which requires tube feeding. In this case of an advanced lung cancer, we treated the involved lymph node in the neck with palliative radiotherapy, which restored normal nerve function.

  12. Management of a full-thickness burn to the foot following sciatic nerve palsy secondary to primary total hip replacement

    PubMed Central

    Jabir, Shehab; Frew, Quentin; El-Muttardi, Naguib; Dziewulski, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Sciatic nerve palsy following total hip replacement is a rare but serious complication. The neurological sequelae that follow range from pure sensory loss to combined motor and sensory loss involving most of the lower limb. The loss of nociceptive feedback predisposes patients to accidental damage to the lower limb. We present the case of a lady with sciatic nerve palsy who sustained full-thickness burn injuries to her foot via a hot water bottle. The dilemma between debridement and grafting following a recent history of surgical trauma (ie, total hip replacement) versus secondary healing via dressings and regular review is discussed. Although grafting is the standard treatment in such burns, we recommend secondary healing over grafting provided the burns are not extensive. This enables potential recovery of sensation and reduces operative trauma to the limb which may retard resolution of the neuropraxia. PMID:23595171

  13. [A pediatric case of rupture of the brachial artery and radial nerve palsy secondary to proximal humeral exostosis].

    PubMed

    Parratte, S; Launay, F; Jouve, J-L; Malikov, S; Petit, P; Bollini, G

    2007-04-01

    Rupture of the brachial artery associated with radial nerve palsy in a context of exostosis of the proximal humerus has not been described to date in the literature. Our patient was a fourteen-year-old girl with a history of violent pain occurring suddenly with no prodrome or triggering factor. The pain was localized at the level of the proximal left humerus. Physical examination revealed the presence of a hematoma and complete motor radial nerve palsy. The diagnosis was not confirmed by computed tomography with contrast injection but was confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging which eliminated malignant transformation of the exostosis. After checking the neurovascular bundles and evacuating the hematoma, treatment consisted in resection of the exostosis and arterial repair with an autologous venous graft. We discuss the diagnostic and therapeutic challenges which present vascular complications due to exostosis.

  14. Successful endovascular management of brain aneurysms presenting with mass effect and cranial nerve palsy.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Tamer; Hamimi, Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    Aneurysms presented with mass effect are traditionally treated by surgical clipping to decompress their mass effect. The aim of this work is to discuss the efficiency of endovascular techniques in treating 47 patients with variable sizes of intracranial aneurysms presented with mass effect and/or cranial nerve palsy. There were 47 patients with 47 unruptured aneurysms. Group I includes 28 giant aneurysms; all are treated by parent vessel occlusion with or without intra-aneurysmal occlusion depending on anatomical locations. Group II includes 19 small and large aneurysms; all are treated by selective endosaccular occlusion with coils. Clinical presentations were ocular cranial nerve dysfunction (82.9%), optic nerve or chiasmatic dysfunction (21.2%), brain stem compression (8.5%), embolic (6%), epistaksis (4%), proptosis (2%), and bleeding per ear (2%). Out of 47 patients, symptoms were resolved in 31 cases (66%), improved in 10 cases (21%), and unchanged in six cases (13%). Out of 28 giant aneurysms, symptoms were resolved in 19 (68%), improved in four (14%), and unchanged in five (18%). Only four (14%) patients out of the 19 giant aneurysms with complete symptoms resolution showed significant mass reduction in MRI. Out of 19 non-giant aneurysm cases treated by selective endovascular occlusion with coils, symptoms were resolved in 12 cases (63%), improved in six (32%), and unchanged in one (5%). No complications from the treatment were observed. The longer the duration of symptoms before endovascular treatment is, the longer the duration till improvement or resolution postoperative in both groups. Recovery of aneurysm-induced mass effect occurs in most patients both after parent vessel occlusion and after selective coiling, and is comparable to results after surgical clipping. The improvement starts independent of aneurysmal shrinkage in postoperative MRI follow-ups. The arrest of pulsations and partial shrinkage within the aneurysms after endovascular treatment may

  15. Bupivacaine Injection for Management of Lagophthalmos Due to Long-Standing Idiopathic Facial Nerve Palsy.

    PubMed

    Rajabi, Mohammad Taher; Shadravan, Mahla; Mazloumi, Mehdi; Tabatabaie, Syed Ziaeddin; Hosseini, Seyedeh Simindokht; Rajabi, Mohammad Bagher

    2015-01-01

    To report the results of bupivacaine injection into the orbicularis oculi muscle to treat lagophthalmos in patients with long-standing Bell palsy. In this prospective interventional case series, bupivacaine, 5 ml of a 0.750% solution, was injected into the preseptal and pretarsal area of the orbicularis oculi in each of 10 patients with idiopathic peripheral facial nerve palsy. The measures of vertical eyelid apertures during open and closed eyes were made before the procedure and 1, 3, and 6 months after injection. A total of 10 eyes including 2 men and 8 women with an average age of 43 years (26-64 years) were studied. The mean amount of lagophthalmos before injection and after 6 months of follow up were 3.9 mm and 2.3 mm, respectively (p = 0.01)). The mean amount of corneal exposure before injection and after 6 months of follow up was 1.05 mm and 0.25 mm, respectively (p < 0.01). The mean scleral show in open eyes before injection and after 6 months of follow up were 1.20 mm and 0.75 mm, respectively (p = 0.08). The mean scleral show in closed eyes before injection and after 6 months of follow up were 1.95 mm and 1.15 mm, respectively (p = 0.01). All the patients reported significant decrease in epiphora. Bupivacaine injection in the paretic orbicularis oculi muscle improves eyelid closure and lagophthalmos and epiphora.

  16. Contralateral facial nerve palsy following mandibular second molar removal: is there co-relation or just coincidence?

    PubMed Central

    Zalagh, Mohammed; Boukhari, Ali; Attifi, Hicham; Hmidi, Mounir; Messary, Abdelhamid

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral facial nerve palsy (FNP) is the most common cranial nerves neuropathy. It is very rare during dental treatment. Classically, it begins immediately after the injection of local anaesthetic into the region of inferior dental foramen and it's homolateral to the injection. Recovery takes a few hours, normally as long the anaesthetic lasts. The authors present a 44-year-old patient who presented a contralateral delayed-onset facial paralysis arising from dental procedure and discuss the plausible pathogenesis mechanism of happen and a possible relationship between dental procedure and contralateral FNP. PMID:25419300

  17. [Facial palsy].

    PubMed

    Cavoy, R

    2013-09-01

    Facial palsy is a daily challenge for the clinicians. Determining whether facial nerve palsy is peripheral or central is a key step in the diagnosis. Central nervous lesions can give facial palsy which may be easily differentiated from peripheral palsy. The next question is the peripheral facial paralysis idiopathic or symptomatic. A good knowledge of anatomy of facial nerve is helpful. A structure approach is given to identify additional features that distinguish symptomatic facial palsy from idiopathic one. The main cause of peripheral facial palsies is idiopathic one, or Bell's palsy, which remains a diagnosis of exclusion. The most common cause of symptomatic peripheral facial palsy is Ramsay-Hunt syndrome. Early identification of symptomatic facial palsy is important because of often worst outcome and different management. The prognosis of Bell's palsy is on the whole favorable and is improved with a prompt tapering course of prednisone. In Ramsay-Hunt syndrome, an antiviral therapy is added along with prednisone. We also discussed of current treatment recommendations. We will review short and long term complications of peripheral facial palsy.

  18. Cytoarchitecture of the abducens nucleus of man: a Nissl and Golgi study.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, R; Rodella, L; Rezzani, R; Gioia, M

    1996-01-01

    The abducens nucleus is a pontine nucleus directly involved in oculomotion through its connections with the lateral rectus muscle of the eye. The aim of the present study was to investigate the cytoarchitectural organization of the abducens nucleus in man. The data obtained showed that the nerve cell bodies were small, medium and large in size and polygonal, oval, round or spindle shaped. The cytoplasm of all neurons appeared basophilic due to clearly evident scattered Nissl granules. On the basis of the characteristics of the dendritic arborization, multipolar and fusiform cells were identified. The multipolar neurons showed four to eight primary dendrites which gave off a wide secondary ramification. The fusiform neurons showed two dendrites emerging from the opposite poles of the elongated nerve cell body. The dendrites of all the neurons were largely confined within the boundaries of the nucleus. This finding would suggest that the neuronal relationships of the abducens nucleus supplied by the afferent fibers which pass through or end within it take place almost completely inside the nucleus. The wider dendritic arborization shown by the multipolar cells would indicate the latter as the principal target fields for the afferent inputs.

  19. Differences in the diameter of facial nerve and facial canal in bell's palsy--a 3-dimensional temporal bone study.

    PubMed

    Vianna, Melissa; Adams, Meredith; Schachern, Patricia; Lazarini, Paulo Roberto; Paparella, Michael Mauro; Cureoglu, Sebahattin

    2014-03-01

    Bell's palsy is hypothesized to result from virally mediated neural edema. Ischemia occurs as the nerve swells in its bony canal, blocking neural blood supply. Because viral infection is relatively common and Bell's palsy relatively uncommon, it is reasonable to hypothesize that there are anatomic differences in facial canal (FC) that predispose the development of paralysis. Measurements of facial nerve (FN) and FC as it follows its tortuous course through the temporal bone are difficult without a 3D view. In this study, 3D reconstruction was used to compare temporal bones of patients with and without history of Bell's palsy. Twenty-two temporal bones (HTBs) were included in the study, 12 HTBs from patients with history of Bell's palsy and 10 healthy controls. Three-dimensional models were generated from HTB histopathologic slides with reconstruction software (Amira), diameters of the FC and FN were measured at the midpoint of each segment. The mean diameter of the FC and FN was significantly smaller in the tympanic and mastoid segments (p = 0.01) in the BP group than in the controls. The FN to FC diameter ratio (FN/FC) was significantly bigger in the mastoid segment of BP group, when compared with the controls. When comparing the BP and control groups, the narrowest part of FC was the labyrinthine segment in control group and the tympanic segment in the BP. This study suggests an anatomic difference in the diameter of FC in the tympanic and mastoid segments but not in the labyrinthine segment in patients with Bell's palsy.

  20. Immunohistochemical study of neurons in the rat abducens nucleus that project to the flocculus.

    PubMed Central

    Rodella, L; Rezzani, R; Bianchi, R

    1996-01-01

    The neurons of the rat abducens nucleus that project to the flocculus of the cerebellum were studied by double labelling using the retrograde transport of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) immunohistochemistry. Double-labelled cells were present bilaterally in the dorsal and dorsomedial zones of the cranial pole of the nucleus. They represented about half of the total number of HRP-positive neurons. These findings show the existence of a bilateral projection from the abducens nucleus to the flocculus which uses acetylcholine as a neurotransmitter. This projection could be part of the system of the nerve circuits through which the cerebellum modulates visual activities. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8763489

  1. International Federation of Societies for Surgery of the Hand Committee report: the role of nerve transfers in the treatment of neonatal brachial plexus palsy.

    PubMed

    Tse, Raymond; Kozin, Scott H; Malessy, Martijn J; Clarke, Howard M

    2015-06-01

    Nerve transfers have gained popularity in the treatment of adult brachial plexus palsy; however, their role in the treatment of neonatal brachial plexus palsy (NBPP) remains unclear. Brachial plexus palsies in infants differ greatly from those in adults in the patterns of injury, potential for recovery, and influences of growth and development. This International Federation of Societies for Surgery of the Hand committee report on NBPP is based upon review of the current literature. We found no direct comparisons of nerve grafting to nerve transfer for primary reconstruction of NBPP. Although the results contained in individual reports that use each strategy for treatment of Erb palsy are similar, comparison of nerve transfer to nerve grafting is limited by inconsistencies in outcomes reported, by multiple confounding factors, and by small numbers of patients. Although the role of nerve transfers for primary reconstruction remains to be defined, nerve transfers have been found to be effective and useful in specific clinical circumstances including late presentation, isolated deficits, failed primary reconstruction, and multiple nerve root avulsions. In the case of NBPP more severe than Erb palsy, nerve transfers alone are inadequate to address all of the deficits and should only be considered as adjuncts if maximal re-innervation is to be achieved. Surgeons who commit to care of infants with NBPP need to avoid an over-reliance on nerve transfers and should also have the capability and inclination for brachial plexus exploration and nerve graft reconstruction. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Isolated trigeminal nerve palsy with motor involvement as a presenting manifestation of multiple sclerosis in an equatorial region – a case report

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Isolated cranial nerve palsies are considered to be an uncommon presenting feature of multiple sclerosis. Involvement of the trigeminal nerve, particularly its motor component as part of a clinically isolated syndrome of multiple sclerosis has rarely been reported in equatorial regions and no cases have been described in Sri Lanka thus far. Case Presentation We report a case of isolated right sided trigeminal nerve palsy (Motor and Sensory) in a 34 year old previously well lady from urban Sri Lanka who was found to have characteristic lesions on Magnetic Resonance Imaging highly suggestive of multiple sclerosis. Conclusions Multiple sclerosis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients who present with isolated cranial nerve palsies. Clinicians should have a high index of suspicion when evaluating such patients especially in low prevalence regions close to the equator. Early recognition and treatment of such a “Clinically Isolated Syndrome” may prevent early relapse. PMID:22647398

  3. Humerus shaft fracture associated with traumatic radial nerve palsy: An international survey among orthopedic trauma surgeons from Latin America and Asia/Pacific.

    PubMed

    Giordano, Vincenzo; Belangero, William; Pires, Robinson Esteves; Labronici, Pedro José

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to explore the real-life practice of clinical management of humeral shaft fracture associated with traumatic radial nerve palsy among orthopedic trauma surgeons. Two hundred seventy-nine orthopedic surgeons worldwide reviewed 10 real cases of a humeral shaft fracture associated with traumatic radial nerve palsy answering two questions: (1) What treatment would you choose/recommend: nonoperative or operative? (2) What are the reasons for your decision-making? The survey was developed in an online survey tool. All participants were active members from AOTrauma International. Two hundred sixty-six (95.3%) participants were from Latin America and Asia/Pacific. One hundred sixty-two participants (58.1%) had more than 10 years in practice and 178 (63.8%) of them did trauma as the main area of interest. One hundred fifty-one (54.1%) participants treated less than three humeral shaft fractures a month. Traumatic radial nerve palsy was the main reason (88.4%) for surgeons to recommend surgical treatment. Open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) or percutaneous fixation of the fracture associated with acutely explore of radial nerve was the first option in 62.0% of the cases. A combination of morphology and level of the fracture and the presence of the radial nerve palsy was the most suggested reason to surgically treat the humerus fracture. The main isolated factor was the morphology of the fracture. Our survey highlight the tendency for a more aggressive management of any humeral shaft fracture associated with a traumatic radial nerve palsy, with surgeons preferring to use ORIF with acute exploration of the radial nerve. Nonsurgical management was the less chosen option among the 279 respondents. Fracture morphology, level of the fracture, and the presence of the radial nerve palsy were most influential for guiding their treatment.

  4. Preoperative percutaneous mapping of the frontal branch of the facial nerve to assess the risk of frontalis muscle palsy after a supraorbital keyhole approach.

    PubMed

    Park, Jaechan; Jung, Tae-du; Kang, Dong-Hun; Lee, So-Hyun

    2013-05-01

    Although a supraorbital keyhole approach utilizing an eyebrow incision and supraorbital minicraniotomy is one of the most commonly used keyhole approaches for treating cerebral aneurysms, the risk of frontalis muscle palsy due to an injury of the frontal branch of the facial nerve remains a serious drawback to a supraorbital keyhole approach as a minimally invasive surgical technique. Therefore, the authors attempted to evaluate the risk of frontalis muscle palsy by mapping the frontal nerve branch in the lower forehead using a nerve conduction study in individual patients. Percutaneous mapping of the frontal nerve branch was performed preoperatively on 52 patients who underwent supraorbital keyhole approaches for aneurysmal clipping. The maximal compound muscle action potentials (CMAPs) in the lower forehead were observed at 5 points along a laterally inclined line angled 30° from the midpupillary line, in which the points were 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 2.5, and 3.0 cm as measured from the supraorbital margin. ResULTS Severe frontalis muscle palsy was observed in 11 patients (21.2%), yet recovery occurred 2-5 months after surgery. No patients experienced permanent palsy. The incidence of severe palsy was 7.4% in those patients showing clear CMAPs with a high location (exclusively at 2.0, 2.5, or 3.0 cm), 14.3% in those with a bimodal distribution, 40.0% in those with a low location (exclusively at 1.5 cm), and 83.3% in those with an extremely low location (exclusively at 1.0 cm). Percutaneous mapping of the frontal branch of the facial nerve using a nerve conduction study can be used to assess the risk of postoperative frontalis muscle palsy following a supraorbital keyhole approach. The patients with the highest risk of postoperative palsy showed a clear CMAP exclusively at 1.0 cm along the inclined line measured from the supraorbital margin.

  5. Ulnar nerve dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    Neuropathy - ulnar nerve; Ulnar nerve palsy; Mononeuropathy; Cubital tunnel syndrome ... compressed in the elbow, a problem called cubital tunnel syndrome may result. When damage destroys the nerve ...

  6. Rhino-oculo Cerebral Mucormycosis with Multiple Cranial Nerve Palsy in Diabetic Patient: Review of Six Cases.

    PubMed

    Sachdeva, Kavita

    2013-12-01

    AIM of the study is to evaluate etiopathogenesis role played by predisposing conditions (Diabetes, Immunosupression), precipitating factors (trauma/surgery/ketoacidosis) and possible role of occupational hazard is discussed briefly. Clinical presentation and management of patients presenting with rhinoorbitocerebral mucormycosis is discussed. The prospective study of patient undergoing treatment of mucormycosis] without control Setting was done in ENT Deptt. NSCB Medical College, Jabalpur (tertiary referral centre of mid India). Subject were patients presenting with invasive fungal rhino sinusitis presenting with orbital involvement and cranial nerve palsies undergoing treatment. The detailed history, clinical examination including cranial nerve examination, blood test, CTscan and biopsy. Nasal endoscopy, CWL surgery and medical management with 6 month follow up. All six patients were diabetic when evaluated on presentation. Two patients had ketoacidosis. Four had history of surgery in recent past. Blood stained nasal discharge and dysaesthesia of face are early warning signs. They had necrotic lesion in nose and infraorbital area with 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 and 7 cranial nerve involvement. Skin necrosis/Mucosal necrosis, facial palsy and diplopia signify advanced disease. Altered sensorium, panopthalmitis & diabetes complicated with ketoacidosis signify bad prognosis. In present study two patients with advanced disease, altered sensorium and ketoacidosis succumbed within 72 hours in spite of anti fungal medicine. Of the four surviving patients, all responded well to treatment but had residual sixth and seventh nerve palsy. One patient defaulted in diabetes control & had recurrence after 6 months. Early diagnosis, aggressive surgical debridement and proper management of underlying metabolic abnormality along with amphotericin B can avert the bad prognosis of rhinoorbitocerebral mucormycosis.

  7. Sonographic Evaluation of the Peripheral Nerves in Hereditary Neuropathy With Liability to Pressure Palsies: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Se Hwa; Yoon, Joon Shik; Park, Bum Jun

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) is an autosomal dominantly inherited disorder that affects peripheral nerves by repeated focal pressure. HNPP can be diagnosed by clinical findings, electrodiagnostic studies, histopathological features, and genetic analysis. Ultrasonography is increasingly used for the diagnosis of neuromuscular diseases; however, sonographic features of HNPP have not been clearly defined. We report the sonographic findings and comparative electrodiagnostic data in a 73-year-old woman with HNPP, confirmed by genetic analysis. The cross-sectional areas of peripheral nerves were enlarged at typical nerve entrapment sites, but enlargement at non-entrapment sites was uncommon. These sonographic features may be helpful for diagnosis of HNPP when electrodiagnostic studies are suspicious of HNPP and/or gene study is not compatible. PMID:24639934

  8. Sonographic evaluation of the peripheral nerves in hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kim, Se Hwa; Yang, Seung Nam; Yoon, Joon Shik; Park, Bum Jun

    2014-02-01

    Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) is an autosomal dominantly inherited disorder that affects peripheral nerves by repeated focal pressure. HNPP can be diagnosed by clinical findings, electrodiagnostic studies, histopathological features, and genetic analysis. Ultrasonography is increasingly used for the diagnosis of neuromuscular diseases; however, sonographic features of HNPP have not been clearly defined. We report the sonographic findings and comparative electrodiagnostic data in a 73-year-old woman with HNPP, confirmed by genetic analysis. The cross-sectional areas of peripheral nerves were enlarged at typical nerve entrapment sites, but enlargement at non-entrapment sites was uncommon. These sonographic features may be helpful for diagnosis of HNPP when electrodiagnostic studies are suspicious of HNPP and/or gene study is not compatible.

  9. The management of peripheral facial nerve palsy: "paresis" versus "paralysis" and sources of ambiguity in study designs.

    PubMed

    Linder, Thomas E; Abdelkafy, Wael; Cavero-Vanek, Sandra

    2010-02-01

    , independent of the treatment regimen. In the Bell's paralysis group, 38 patients (70%) recovered completely after 1 year, including 94% of patients with a denervation by ENoG of less than 90%. Thirty percent of Bell's paralysis patients recovered incompletely, revealing the worst outcome in patients with a 100% denervation on ENoG. None of the 4 patients with HZO and ENoG denervation of more than 90% recovered to normal facial function. We found a highly significant difference regarding the time course and final outcome in patients with incomplete palsies versus total paralysis; however, only 3 of 250 studies make this distinction. The time course for improvement and the extent of recovery is significantly different in patients presenting with an incomplete facial nerve paresis compared with patients with a total paralysis. Whereas the term "palsy" includes both entities, the term "paralysis" should only be used to describe total loss of nerve function. Patients with incomplete acute Bell's palsy (paresis) should start to improve their facial function early (1-2 wk after onset) and are expected to recover completely within 3 months. These patients do not benefit from antiviral medications and most likely do not profit from systemic steroids. Mixing patients with different severity of palsies will always lead to controversial results.

  10. Results of spinal accessory to suprascapular nerve transfer in 110 patients with complete palsy of the brachial plexus.

    PubMed

    Bertelli, Jayme Augusto; Ghizoni, Marcos Flávio

    2016-06-01

    OBJECTIVE Transfer of the spinal accessory nerve to the suprascapular nerve is a common procedure, performed to reestablish shoulder motion in patients with total brachial plexus palsy. However, the results of this procedure remain largely unknown. METHODS Over an 11-year period (2002-2012), 257 patients with total brachial plexus palsy were operated upon in the authors' department by a single surgeon and had the spinal accessory nerve transferred to the suprascapular nerve. Among these, 110 had adequate follow-up and were included in this study. Their average age was 26 years (SD 8.4 years), and the mean interval between their injury and surgery was 5.2 months (SD 2.4 months). Prior to 2005, the suprascapular and spinal accessory nerves were dissected through a classic supraclavicular L-shape incision (n = 29). Afterward (n = 81), the spinal accessory and suprascapular nerves were dissected via an oblique incision, extending from the point at which the plexus crossed the clavicle to the anterior border of the trapezius muscle. In 17 of these patients, because of clavicle fractures or dislocation, scapular fractures or retroclavicular scarring, the incision was extended by detaching the trapezius from the clavicle to expose the suprascapular nerve at the suprascapular fossa. In all patients, the brachial plexus was explored and elbow flexion reconstructed by root grafting (n = 95), root grafting and phrenic nerve transfer (n = 6), phrenic nerve transfer (n = 1), or third, fourth, and fifth intercostal nerve transfer. Postoperatively, patients were followed for an average of 40 months (SD 13.7 months). RESULTS Failed recovery, meaning less than 30° abduction, was observed in 10 (9%) of the 110 patients. The failure rate was 25% between 2002 and 2004, but dropped to 5% after the staged/extended approach was introduced. The mean overall range of abduction recovery was 58.5° (SD 26°). Comparing before and after distal suprascapular nerve exploration (2005-2012), the

  11. Grafting the C5 root to the musculocutaneous nerve partially restores hand sensation in complete palsies of the brachial plexus.

    PubMed

    Bertelli, Jayme Augusto; Ghizoni, Marcos Flávio

    2012-08-01

    In complete brachial plexus palsy, we have hypothesized that grafting to the musculocutaneous nerve should restore some hand sensation because the musculocutaneous nerve can drive hand sensation directly or via communication with the radial and median nerves. To investigate sensory recovery in the hand and forearm after C5 root grafting to the musculocutaneous nerve in patients with a total brachial plexus injury. Eleven patients who had recovered elbow flexion after musculocutaneous nerve grafting from a preserved C5 root and who had been followed for a minimum of 3 years were screened for sensory recovery in the hand and forearm. Six matched patients who had not undergone surgery served as controls. Methods of assessment included testing for pain sensation using Adson forceps, cutaneous pressure threshold measurements using Semmes-Weinstein monofilaments, and the static 2-point discrimination test. Deep sensation was evaluated by squeezing the first web space, and thermal sensation was assessed using warm and cold water. All grafted patients recovered sensation in a variable territory extending from just over the thenar eminence to the entire lateral forearm and hand. Seven patients were capable of perceiving 2-0 monofilament pressure on the thenar eminence, palm, and dorsoradial aspect of the hand. All could differentiate warm and cold water. None recovered 2-point discrimination. None of the patients in the control group recovered any kind of sensation in the affected limb. Grafting the musculocutaneous nerve can restore nociceptive sensation on the radial side of the hand.

  12. Laryngeal and phrenic nerve involvement in a patient with hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP).

    PubMed

    Cortese, A; Piccolo, G; Lozza, A; Schreiber, A; Callegari, I; Moglia, A; Alfonsi, E; Pareyson, D

    2016-07-01

    Lower cranial and phrenic nerve involvement is exceptional in hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP). Here we report the occurrence of reversible laryngeal and phrenic nerve involvement in a patient with HNPP. The patient recalled several episodes of reversible weakness and numbness of his feet and hands since the age of 30 years. His medical history was uneventful, apart from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). At age 44, following severe weight loss, he presented with progressive dysphonia and hoarseness. EMG of cricoarytenoid and thyroarytenoid muscles and laryngeal fibroscopy confirmed vocal cord paralysis. These speech disturbances gradually regressed. Two years later, he reported rapidly worsening dyspnea. Electroneurography showed increased distal latency of the right phrenic nerve and diaphragm ultrasonography documented reduced right hemi-diaphragm excursion. Six months later and after optimization of CODP treatment, his respiratory function had improved and both phrenic nerve conduction and diaphragm excursion were completely restored. We hypothesize that chronic cough and nerve stretching in the context of CODP, together with severe weight loss, may have triggered the nerve paralysis in this patient. Our report highlights the need for optimal management of comorbidities such as CODP as well as careful control of weight in HNPP patients to avoid potentially harmful complications.

  13. Transient Facial Nerve Paralysis (Bell's Palsy) following Intranasal Delivery of a Genetically Detoxified Mutant of Escherichia coli Heat Labile Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, David J. M.; Huo, Zhiming; Barnett, Susan; Kromann, Ingrid; Giemza, Rafaela; Galiza, Eva; Woodrow, Maria; Thierry-Carstensen, Birgit; Andersen, Peter; Novicki, Deborah; Del Giudice, Giuseppe; Rappuoli, Rino

    2009-01-01

    Background An association was previously established between facial nerve paralysis (Bell's palsy) and intranasal administration of an inactivated influenza virosome vaccine containing an enzymatically active Escherichia coli Heat Labile Toxin (LT) adjuvant. The individual component(s) responsible for paralysis were not identified, and the vaccine was withdrawn. Methodology/Principal Findings Subjects participating in two contemporaneous non-randomized Phase 1 clinical trials of nasal subunit vaccines against Human Immunodeficiency Virus and tuberculosis, both of which employed an enzymatically inactive non-toxic mutant LT adjuvant (LTK63), underwent active follow-up for adverse events using diary-cards and clinical examination. Two healthy subjects experienced transient peripheral facial nerve palsies 44 and 60 days after passive nasal instillation of LTK63, possibly a result of retrograde axonal transport after neuronal ganglioside binding or an inflammatory immune response, but without exaggerated immune responses to LTK63. Conclusions/Significance While the unique anatomical predisposition of the facial nerve to compression suggests nasal delivery of neuronal-binding LT–derived adjuvants is inadvisable, their continued investigation as topical or mucosal adjuvants and antigens appears warranted on the basis of longstanding safety via oral, percutaneous, and other mucosal routes. PMID:19756141

  14. Unilateral blindness with third cranial nerve palsy and abnormal enhancement of extraocular muscles on magnetic resonance imaging of orbit after the ingestion of methanol.

    PubMed

    Chung, Tae Nyoung; Kim, Sun Wook; Park, Yoo Seok; Park, Incheol

    2010-05-01

    Methanol is generally known to cause visual impairment and various systemic manifestations. There are a few reported specific findings for methanol intoxication on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain. A case is reported of unilateral blindness with third cranial nerve palsy oculus sinister (OS) after the ingestion of methanol. Unilateral damage of the retina and optic nerve were confirmed by fundoscopy, flourescein angiography, visual evoked potential and electroretinogram. The optic nerve and extraocular muscles (superior rectus, medial rectus, inferior rectus and inferior oblique muscle) were enhanced by gadolinium-DTPA on MRI of the orbit. This is the first case report of permanent monocular blindness with confirmed unilateral damage of the retina and optic nerve, combined with third cranial nerve palsy after methanol ingestion.

  15. One- vs two-muscle surgery for presumed unilateral fourth nerve palsy associated with moderate angle hyperdeviations.

    PubMed

    Nash, David L; Hatt, Sarah R; Leske, David A; May, Laura; Bothun, Erick D; Mohney, Brian G; Brodsky, Michael C; Holmes, Jonathan M

    2017-07-04

    To compare one-muscle versus two-muscle surgery for moderate-angle hyperdeviations due to presumed unilateral fourth nerve palsy. Retrospective chart review METHODS: 73 patients (5 to 86 years) underwent either one- or two-muscle surgery at our institution, for moderate hyperdeviation, due to presumed unilateral fourth nerve palsy, measuring 14 to 25 PD in straight ahead gaze at distance fixation. Six week and 1-year motor success was defined as zero vertical deviation or 1-4 PD undercorrection at distance, overcorrection as any reversal of hypertropia, and undercorrection as >4 PD. Diplopia success was defined as no diplopia, or only rarely for distance straight ahead and reading. 28 patients underwent one-muscle surgery, and 45 patients underwent two-muscle surgery. Motor success was similar (64% vs 67%, P>0.99 at 6 weeks; 47% vs 55%, P=0.8 at 1 year, n=46), but there were more undercorrections at 6-weeks with one-muscle surgery (36% vs 16%, p=0.09), and more overcorrections at 6-weeks with two-muscle surgery (0% vs 18%, p=0.02). Diplopia success was also somewhat similar between one- and two-muscle surgery at 6 weeks (73% vs 60%, p=0.5) and 1 year (45% vs 59%, P=0.5). For moderate angle hyperdeviations due to presumed unilateral fourth nerve palsy, there appears no clear advantage of two-muscle surgery for motor outcomes. Diplopia success at was similar between one- and two-muscle surgery, due to a greater number of less symptomatic undercorrections with one-muscle surgery, and a smaller number of more symptomatic overcorrections with two-muscle surgery. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. A case of idiopathic hypertrophic pachymeningitis presenting with chronic headache and multiple cranial nerve palsies

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yuanyuan; Chen, Jun; Gui, Li

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Idiopathic hypertrophic pachymeningitis (IHP) is a rare condition, characterized by a chronic fibrosing inflammatory process usually involving either the intracranial or spinal dura mater, but rarely both. Here, we report a rare case of IHP affecting both the intracranial and spinal dura mater. We also discussed the diagnosis, management, and outcome of IHP. Patient concerns: We reviewed the case of a 60-year-old woman presenting with chronic headache, multiple cranial nerve palsies and gait disturbance. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of her head revealed thickened and contrast-enhanced dura in the craniocervical region as well as obstructive hydrocephalus and cerebellar tonsillar herniation. The patient had a suboccipital craniectomy and posterior decompression through C1 plus a total laminectomy. The dura was partially resected to the extent of the bony decompression, and a duroplasty was performed. Diagnoses: Microscopic examination of the surgically resected sample showed chronic inflammatory changes, lymphoplasmacytic cell infiltration, fibrous tissue hyperplasia, and hyaline degeneration. Blood tests to evaluate the secondary causes of hypertrophic pachymeningitis (HP) were unremarkable. Interventions: Steroid was used to treat suspected IHP. Outcomes: Postoperatively, the patient showed gradual improvement in her headache, glossolalia, and bucking. Prior to discharge, a follow-up MRI showed improvement of the dura mater thickening. Lessons: IHP is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the dura mater that usually causes neurological deficits. Clinical manifestations of IHP, MRI findings, and laboratory abnormalities are the essential components for making an accurate diagnosis. When the radiological or laboratory evaluation is uncertain, but neurological deficits are present, a prompt surgical approach should be considered. Postoperative steroid therapy and close observation for recurrence are necessary to ensure a good long-term outcome

  17. Occurrence and severity of upper eyelid skin contracture in facial nerve palsy.

    PubMed

    Ziahosseini, K; Venables, V; Neville, C; Nduka, C; Patel, B; Malhotra, R

    2016-05-01

    PurposeTo describe the occurrence and severity of upper eyelid skin contracture in facial nerve palsy (FNP).MethodsWe enroled consecutive patients with unilateral FNP into this study. Patients with previous upper eyelid surgery for either side were excluded. We developed a standardised technique to measure the distance between the upper eyelid margin and the lower border of brow (LMBD). FNP was graded using the Sunnybrook grading scale. Its aetiology, duration, and treatment were noted. Upper and lower marginal reflex distance and lagophthalmos were also noted.ResultsSixty-six patients (mean age 51 years) were included. FNP was owing to a variety of aetiologies. LMBD on the paralytic side was shorter than the normal contralateral side in 47 (71%), equal in 15 (23%), and larger in four (6%) patients. The mean contracture was 3.4 mm (median: 3, range: 1-12) with 11 (17%) patients showing 5 mm or more of skin contracture. The mean LMBD on the paralytic side in all patients was significantly smaller than the contralateral side; 30±3.7 (median: 30; 95% CI 29-31) compared with 32±3.7 (median: 32; 95% CI 32-33), respectively, P<0.0001, two-tailed paired t-test.ConclusionTo our knowledge, this is the first study that quantitatively demonstrates contraction of the upper eyelid skin in FNP. This finding is valuable in directing optimal early management to minimise skin contracture and to caution surgeons against unnecessary upper eyelid skin excision.

  18. Occurrence and severity of upper eyelid skin contracture in facial nerve palsy

    PubMed Central

    Ziahosseini, K; Venables, V; Neville, C; Nduka, C; Patel, B; Malhotra, R

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To describe the occurrence and severity of upper eyelid skin contracture in facial nerve palsy (FNP). Methods We enroled consecutive patients with unilateral FNP into this study. Patients with previous upper eyelid surgery for either side were excluded. We developed a standardised technique to measure the distance between the upper eyelid margin and the lower border of brow (LMBD). FNP was graded using the Sunnybrook grading scale. Its aetiology, duration, and treatment were noted. Upper and lower marginal reflex distance and lagophthalmos were also noted. Results Sixty-six patients (mean age 51 years) were included. FNP was owing to a variety of aetiologies. LMBD on the paralytic side was shorter than the normal contralateral side in 47 (71%), equal in 15 (23%), and larger in four (6%) patients. The mean contracture was 3.4 mm (median: 3, range: 1–12) with 11 (17%) patients showing 5 mm or more of skin contracture. The mean LMBD on the paralytic side in all patients was significantly smaller than the contralateral side; 30±3.7 (median: 30; 95% CI 29–31) compared with 32±3.7 (median: 32; 95% CI 32–33), respectively, P<0.0001, two-tailed paired t-test. Conclusion To our knowledge, this is the first study that quantitatively demonstrates contraction of the upper eyelid skin in FNP. This finding is valuable in directing optimal early management to minimise skin contracture and to caution surgeons against unnecessary upper eyelid skin excision. PMID:26939561

  19. [A 55-year-old man with prostate cancer, papilledema, and multiple cranial nerve palsies].

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Y; Matsubayashi, S; Fukushima, T; Honda, S; Yubiide, K; Arakawa, A; Mori, H; Suda, K; Imai, H; Fujime, M

    1994-08-01

    We report a 55-year-old man with papilledema and multiple cranial nerve palsies. He was well until 52 years of age when there was an onset of progressive difficulty in initiating urination; he visited the urology service of our hospital where a diagnosis of prostate cancer was made; the cancer was invading the bladder and was metastasizing to lymph nodes and bones. He was treated with oochiectomy and estrogen preparations with some improvement in his symptoms. Two years later, he developed difficulty in urination again, and transurethral resection of the tumor was performed in 1991. In December 1991, he noted tingling and numb sensation in his left face, which had become progressive worse within the next one month, and he developed blepharoptosis and deafness all on the left side. He was admitted to the urology service on February 4, 1992, and a neurological consultation was asked. On physical examination, general findings were unremarkable, except for lymph node enlargements of about 0.5 to 1.0 mm in size in cervical and inguinal regions. On neurologic examination, he was alert with normal mental activities; higher cerebral functions were intact. He had normal vision and visual fields, however, papilledema was present bilaterally; pupils and light reactions were normal. Extraocular muscles were intact on the right side, however, moderate restriction was noted in the left eye in that all the extraocular muscles except for the medial rectus were weak; blepharoptosis was noted on the left; no nystagmus was present. The sensation was diminished in the left face, and left facial paresis of the peripheral type was also noted; the taste sensation was also diminished in the left anterior two thirds of the tongue. He had sensorineural deafness on the left side. The other cranial nerves appeared intact. He walked normally; no weakness or muscle atrophy was noted; muscle tone was normal and no ataxia was observed. Deep reflexes were normally elicited and symmetric; the

  20. [Treatment of mid-distal humeral shaft fractures associated with radial nerve palsy using minimally invasive plating osteosynthesis technique].

    PubMed

    An, Zhiquan; Zeng, Bingfang; He, Xiaojian; Huang, Peiyan

    2008-05-01

    To explore the possibility of treating mid-distal humeral shaft fractures associated with radial nerve palsies with minimal invasive plating osteosynthesis (MIPO) techniques. From April 2003 to October 2006, 10 patients with mid-distal humeral shaft fractures associated with radial nerve palsies were treated. All patients were male, aged 19-58 years. According to AO/ASIF classification, there were 4 cases of B1 type, 2 cases of B3 type, 1 case of A2 type, 1 case of B2 type, 1 case of C3 type and 1 case of A3 type. A straight 4.5 mm dynamic compression plate was placed on the anterior aspect of humerus through two small incisions located on the anterior side of proximal and distal part of the arm. The radial nerve exploration was performed through a lateral small incision made on the fracture site. The fractures were then reduced by manual manipulation and the plate was fixated to the main fragments with 3 screws in each end of the plate. The postoperative complications, the bone healing time, and the recovery time of the radial nerve functions were recorded. The functions of the affected shoulder and elbow were assessed with UCLA and Mayo elbow performance score system respectively. All incision healed by first intention. Ten patients were followed up 9-36 months with an average of 15.7 months. The X-ray films showed that the union of fractures was achieved 12-16 weeks (13.6 weeks on average). The function of the radial nerves recovered completely 12-36 weeks (17.8 weeks on average) in 9 patients. The abductions of the affected shoulder were 150-170 degrees (165 degrees on average). The ROM of the elbows were 130-140 degrees (135.5 degrees on average). According to the UCLA shoulder scoring system, 9 patients achieved the excellent result and 1 patient achieved the good result. All the patients had the excellent results according to Mayo elbow performance score system. The mid-distal humeral shaft fractures associated with radial nerve palsies can be treated with

  1. [Invasive aspergillosis of sphenoidal sinus in a patient in Djibouti, revealed by palsy of cranial nerves: a case report].

    PubMed

    Crambert, A; Gauthier, J; Vignal, R; Conessa, C; Lombard, B

    2013-05-01

    The authors report a case of invasive aspergillosis of a sphenoid sinus mucocele revealed in a patient with diabetes in Djibouti by homolateral palsy of the 3rd, 4th, 5th and 6th nerves. This rare condition occurs preferentially in immunodeficient subjects. Because of its clinical polymorphism, its diagnosis is difficult and is often not made until complications develop. Endonasal surgery with anatomopathological and mycological examination is both a diagnostic and therapeutic procedure. It must be performed early, to avoid functional or even life-threatening complications.

  2. Treatment of Cervical Internal Carotid Artery Spontaneous Dissection with Pseudoaneurysm and Unilateral Lower Cranial Nerves Palsy by Two Silk Flow Diverters

    SciTech Connect

    Zelenak, Kamil; Zelenakova, Jana; DeRiggo, Julius; Kurca, Egon; Kantorova, Ema; Polacek, Hubert

    2013-08-01

    Internal carotid artery (ICA) lesions in the parapharyngeal space (a dissection and a pseudoaneurysm) may present as isolated lower cranial nerves (IX, X, XI, and XII) palsy (Collet-Sicard syndrome). Some arteriopathies such as fibromuscular dysplasia and tortuosity make a vessel predisposed to dissection. Extreme vessel tortuosity makes the treatment by a stent graft impossible. Two Silk stents were used in a 46 year-old man with left lower cranial nerves (IX-XII) palsy for the treatment of left ICA spontaneous dissection with pseudoaneurysm. A follow-up angiogram 5 months later confirmed pseudoaneurysm thrombosis and patency of the left ICA. The patient recovered completely from the deficits.

  3. Bell's Palsy.

    PubMed

    Reich, Stephen G

    2017-04-01

    Bell's palsy is a common outpatient problem, and while the diagnosis is usually straightforward, a number of diagnostic pitfalls can occur, and a lengthy differential diagnosis exists. Recognition and management of Bell's palsy relies on knowledge of the anatomy and function of the various motor and nonmotor components of the facial nerve. Avoiding diagnostic pitfalls relies on recognizing red flags or features atypical for Bell's palsy, suggesting an alternative cause of peripheral facial palsy. The first American Academy of Neurology (AAN) evidence-based review on the treatment of Bell's palsy in 2001 concluded that corticosteroids were probably effective and that the antiviral acyclovir was possibly effective in increasing the likelihood of a complete recovery from Bell's palsy. Subsequent studies led to a revision of these recommendations in the 2012 evidence-based review, concluding that corticosteroids, when used shortly after the onset of Bell's palsy, were "highly likely" to increase the probability of recovery of facial weakness and should be offered; the addition of an antiviral to steroids may increase the likelihood of recovery but, if so, only by a very modest effect. Bell's palsy is characterized by the spontaneous acute onset of unilateral peripheral facial paresis or palsy in isolation, meaning that no features from the history, neurologic examination, or head and neck examination suggest a specific or alternative cause. In this setting, no further testing is necessary. Even without treatment, the outcome of Bell's palsy is favorable, but treatment with corticosteroids significantly increases the likelihood of improvement.

  4. Noninvasive and painless magnetic stimulation of nerves improved brain motor function and mobility in a cerebral palsy case.

    PubMed

    Flamand, Véronique H; Schneider, Cyril

    2014-10-01

    Motor deficits in cerebral palsy disturb functional independence. This study tested whether noninvasive and painless repetitive peripheral magnetic stimulation could improve motor function in a 7-year-old boy with spastic hemiparetic cerebral palsy. Stimulation was applied over different nerves of the lower limbs for 5 sessions. We measured the concurrent aftereffects of this intervention on ankle motor control, gait (walking velocity, stride length, cadence, cycle duration), and function of brain motor pathways. We observed a decrease of ankle plantar flexors resistance to stretch, an increase of active dorsiflexion range of movement, and improvements of corticospinal control of ankle dorsiflexors. Joint mobility changes were still present 15 days after the end of stimulation, when all gait parameters were also improved. Resistance to stretch was still lower than prestimulation values 45 days after the end of stimulation. This case illustrates the sustained effects of repetitive peripheral magnetic stimulation on brain plasticity, motor function, and gait. It suggests a potential impact for physical rehabilitation in cerebral palsy. Copyright © 2014 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Surgical Outcomes of Inferior Oblique Myectomy in Unilateral Congenital Superior Oblique Palsy with or without Trochlear Nerve

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Jeong-Min

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To compare the surgical outcomes of inferior oblique (IO) myectomy in congenital superior oblique palsy (SOP) according to the presence of the trochlear nerve identified with high-resolution MRI. Data Extraction Forty-one congenital SOP patients without a trochlear nerve (absent group) and 23 patients with a trochlear nerve (present group) who underwent IO myectomy as the primary surgical treatment were retrospectively reviewed. “Motor success” was defined as postoperative ipsilateral hypertropia ≤ 4 prism diopter (PD). “Head tilt improvement” was regarded as postoperative angle of head tilt < 5 degrees (°). Success rates for motor alignment and head tilt improvement, cumulative probabilities of success, and factors influencing surgical responses were evaluated. Results The cumulative probabilities of motor success at 2 years after IO myectomy were 92% in patients with a trochlear nerve and 86% in patients without a trochlear nerve (P = 0.138). The cumulative probabilities of undercorrection and recurrence of hypertropia after 2 years were 0% in the present group versus 21% in the absent group (P = 0.014). The cumulative probabilities of persistent head tilt after 2 years were 14% in the present group and 20% in the absent group (P = 0.486). A younger age at operation was associated with reduced probabilities of motor success and head tilt improvement (P = 0.009, P = 0.022 respectively). A greater preoperative angle of head tilt was associated with persistent head tilt after surgery (P = 0.038). Conclusions Congenital SOP without a trochlear nerve had a higher risk of hypertropia undercorrection after IO myectomy compared to patients with a trochlear nerve. A younger age at operation and larger preoperative head tilt was related to poor outcomes. PMID:27391445

  6. [The bilateral long thoracic nerve palsy presenting with "scapula alata", as a result of weight training. A case report].

    PubMed

    Ebata, Atsuko; Kokubun, Norito; Miyamoto, Tomoyuki; Hirata, Koichi

    2005-04-01

    A 28-year-old male barber with no similar disease in his family admitted to our hospital because of difficulty of raising his arms in March 2003. When he was 18 years old, he broke his left clavicle. He started weight training from January 2003, then he gradually felt difficulty to raise his arms. Physical examination on admission showed weakness and atrophy of both serratus anterior muscles and there was no weakness in the other muscles. Serum CK level was 806 IU/l and CT scan of the upper thoracic levels revealed atrophy of the serratus anterior muscles on the both sides. Needle electromyography showed neurogenic change in the right serratus anterior muscle. Thus the diagnosis of bilateral long thoracic nerve palsy was made. Bilateral scapular winging (scapula alata) is commonly caused by systemic disease, especially muscular dystrophy or spinal muscular atrophy. Bilateral long thoracic nerve palsy by weight training should be known as one of the cause for the "scapula alata".

  7. [Recurrent multiple cranial nerve palsy in a gravida with type 1 diabetes, that remitted after delivery and with steroid therapy].

    PubMed

    Shindo, Akihiro; Taniguchi, Akira; Nakano, Chisako; Sasaki, Ryogen; Sugiyama, Takashi; Kuzuhara, Shigeki

    2008-08-01

    We report a rare case of multiple cranial nerve palsy associated with pregnancy, the cause of which remained to be clarified despite of extensive inspections. A 28-year-old woman with type 1 diabetes on insulin therapy developed left oculomotor nerve palsy in the fourth month of pregnancy. Her symptoms improved after one month's administration of vitamins B1 and B12. Numbness appeared in the left side of the face in the 8th month of pregnancy, and then moved to the right side in two weeks. Dysarthria and dysphagia occurred one month later. Bulbar symptoms were worsened, and she became unable to eat or drink. Neurological examination revealed disturbance of sensation in the right side of the face, soft palate paresis, and bilateral atrophy and fasciculation of the tongue. Extensive laboratory examinations including immunological and endocrinological studies, cerebrospinal fluid examination and brain magnetic resonance imaging were unremarkable. These symptoms remitted spontaneously after delivery, and the methylprednisolone pulse therapy accelerated the improvement. Neurological examination done one year after delivery showed complete recovery of the symptoms except for persistent tongue atrophy.

  8. Ptosis as partial oculomotor nerve palsy due to compression by infundibular dilatation of posterior communicating artery, visualized with three-dimensional computer graphics: case report.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Yuta; Imai, Hideaki; Yoshino, Masanori; Kin, Taichi; Takasago, Megumi; Saito, Kuniaki; Nakatomi, Hirofumi; Saito, Nobuhito

    2014-01-01

    Oculomotor nerve palsy (ONP) due to internal carotid-posterior communicating artery (PcomA) aneurysm generally manifests as partial nerve palsy including pupillary dysfunction. In contrast, infundibular dilatation (ID) of the PcomA has no pathogenic significance, and mechanical compression of the cranial nerve is extremely rare. We describe a 60-year-old woman who presented with progressive ptosis due to mechanical compression of the oculomotor nerve by an ID of the PcomA. Three-dimensional computer graphics (3DCG) accurately visualized the mechanical compression by the ID, and her ptosis was improved after clipping of the ID. ID of the PcomA may cause ONP by mechanical compression and is treatable surgically. 3DCG are effective for the diagnosis and preoperative simulation.

  9. Prophylactic cross-face nerve flap for muscle protection prior to facial palsy.

    PubMed

    Koshima, Isao; Narushima, Mitsunaga; Mihara, Makoto; Yamamoto, Yusuke; Iida, Takuya; Uchida, Gentaro

    2011-02-01

    The facial muscles of a 28-year-old woman with left acoustic neuroma were successfully protected with a vascularised cross-face nerve flap using a vascularised lateral femoral cutaneous nerve along with a perforator of the lateral circumflex femoral system. It was transferred as a vascularised cross-face nerve flap to bridge a 15-cm-long defect between the bilateral buccal branches. Three months after the nerve flap transfer, the total tumour including the facial nerve was resected. Postoperatively, rapid nerve sprouting through the nerve flap and excellent facial reanimation were obtained 3-6 months after resection. This method is a one-stage reconstruction procedure, has minimal donor-site morbidity and results in strong postoperative muscle contraction. To our knowledge, this is the first report on a prophylactic cross-face nerve flap technique for the protection of facial muscles before facial nerve transection, and also the usefulness of vascularised lateral femoral cutaneous nerve flap.

  10. Facial nerve palsy secondary to Epstein-Barr virus infection of the middle ear in pediatric population may be more common than we think.

    PubMed

    Vogelnik, Katarina; Matos, Aleš

    2017-09-18

    Facial nerve palsy is a rare complication of acute otitis media (AOM). The general understanding is that this complication has a bacterial cause although bacteria can be isolated from the middle ear only in approximately two-thirds of cases of AOM. Detection of viral agents from specimens obtained during myringotomy in patients with AOM suggests a possible role of viruses in the etiology of this disease. We studied 5 otherwise healthy 17- to 27-month-old children who were referred to the Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Cervicofacial Surgery from December 2012 to January 2016 because of AOM and ipsilateral facial nerve palsy. In all cases, serological tests were indicative of a primary Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection and no other causative pathogens were identified during hospitalization. In one patient, the technique of in situ hybridization (ISH) detected EBV-specific ribonucleic acid (RNA) sequences within tissue sections obtained during mastoidectomy. The aim of this article is to alert clinicians that AOM induced facial nerve palsy secondary to an acute EBV infection in the pediatric population is very likely more common than originally thought. To our knowledge until the present case series, only 2 cases of AOM induced facial nerve palsy secondary to an acute EBV infection have been reported and no cases of EBV infection proven by the ISH technique showing the presence of EBV-specific RNA sequences in patient's tissue biopsies have been reported until now.

  11. Neuregulin-1 released by biodegradable gelatin hydrogels can accelerate facial nerve regeneration and functional recovery of traumatic facial nerve palsy.

    PubMed

    Yasui, Go; Yamamoto, Yuhei; Shichinohe, Ryuji; Funayama, Emi; Oyama, Akihiko; Hayashi, Toshihiko; Furukawa, Hiroshi

    2016-03-01

    Neuregulin-1 is an essential axoglial signal required for peripheral nerve development, and evidence that neuregulin-1 is also required for effective nerve repair is growing. In this study, the effects of neuregulin-1-impregnated gelatin hydrogels on nerve regeneration and functional recovery after anastomosis of the facial nerve were investigated in a rat model of traumatic facial nerve paralysis. Twenty-four adult male rats underwent complete resection of the facial nerve trunk, followed by end-to-end anastomosis with epineural sutures. The animals were then randomly allocated to one of three treatment groups (eight rats/group): no additional intervention (Group I), single-shot injection of neuregulin-1 into the epineurium of the facial nerve at the suture sites (Group II), or implantation of a hydrogel impregnated with neuregulin-1 at the injury site (Group III). After surgery, mimetic muscle movements were evaluated weekly. Eight weeks after surgery, the mimetic muscles were injected with a neural tracer (1,10-dioctadecyl-3,3,30,30-tetramethylindocarbocyanin perchlorate, DiI). Retrograde-labeled neurons were counted in the facial nuclei, and facial nerve specimens were stained with toluidine blue for histological examination of axon density. Group III exhibited significantly faster recovery of mimetic muscle function, a higher density of large-diameter axons (>5 μm) in the facial nerve, and greater numbers of retrogradely labeled neurons in the ipsilateral facial nucleus compared with Groups I and II. Continuous release of neuregulin-1 from impregnated gelatin hydrogels can accelerate facial nerve regeneration. Copyright © 2015 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Peroneal nerve palsy: a complication of umbilical artery catheterization in the full-term newborn of a mother with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Giannakopoulou, Christina; Korakaki, Eftichia; Hatzidaki, Eleftheria; Manoura, Antonia; Aligizakis, Agisilaos; Velivasakis, Emmanuel

    2002-04-01

    Umbilical artery catheters are an essential aid in the treatment of newborn infants who have cardiopulmonary disease. However, it is well-known that umbilical artery catheterization is associated with complications. The most frequent visible problem in an umbilical line is blanching or cyanosis of part or all of a distal extremity or the buttock area resulting from either vasospasm or a thrombotic or embolic incidence. Ischemic necrosis of the gluteal region is a rare complication of umbilical artery catheterization. We report the case of a full-term infant of an insulin-dependent diabetic mother with poor blood glucose control who developed a left peroneal nerve palsy after ischemic necrosis of the gluteal region after umbilical artery catheterization. The infant was born weighing 5050 g. The mother of the infant had preexisting diabetes mellitus that was treated with insulin from the age of 14 years. The metabolic control of the mother had been unstable both before and during the pregnancy. The neonate developed respiratory distress syndrome soon after birth and was immediately transferred to the neonatal intensive care unit. Mechanical ventilation via endotracheal tube was quickly considered necessary after rapid pulmonary deterioration. Her blood glucose levels were 13 mg/dL. A 3.5-gauge umbilical catheter was inserted into the left umbilical artery for blood sampling without difficulty when the infant required 100% oxygen to maintain satisfactory arterial oxygen pressure. Femoral pulses and circulation in the lower limbs were normal immediately before and after catheterization. A radiograph, which was taken immediately, showed the tip of the catheter to be at a level between the fourth and fifth sacral vertebrae. The catheter was removed immediately. Circulation and femoral pulses were normal and no blanching of the skin was observed. Another catheter was repositioned and the tip was confirmed radiologically to be in the thoracic aorta between the sixth and

  13. Nerve sources for facial reanimation with muscle transplant in patients with unilateral facial palsy: clinical analysis of 3 techniques.

    PubMed

    Faria, Jose Carlos M; Scopel, Gean P; Busnardo, Fabio F; Ferreira, Marcus C

    2007-07-01

    Ninety-one patients with long-standing unilateral facial palsy and submitted to reanimation of the face with muscle transplant were divided into 3 nonrandomized groups: group I: 2-stage facial reanimation, cross face followed by gracilis muscle transplant, 58 patients; group II: 1-stage reanimation with latissimus dorsi muscle transplant, 11 patients (a branch of the facial nerve on the nonparalyzed side of the face was used as the nerve source for reanimation in groups I and II); group III: 1-stage reanimation with gracilis muscle transplant and neural coaptation of the respective nerve and the ipsilateral masseteric branch of the trigeminal nerve, 22 patients. No microvascular complications were observed. The average interval between surgery and initial muscle contractions was 11.1 months, 7.2 months, and 3.7 months in group I, group II, and group III, respectively. The quality (intensity and shape) of the smile, voluntary or involuntary, obtained on the reanimated side in relation to the unaffected side was considered good or excellent in 53.4%, 54.5%, and 86.3% of the patients in groups I, II, and III, respectively. In group I, the average age of the patients with excellent or good results (19.8 + 10.5 years) was significantly lower than that of the patients with fair or poor results or absence of movement (36.5 + 13.3 years). The smile was considered emotional or involuntary in 34% of the patients in group I and 45% in group II. Most of the patients in each group were only able to produce "voluntary smiles". Crossed synkinesis with lip puckering was observed in 48% of the patients in group I and 90% in group II. The results obtained with 1-stage facial reanimation with masseteric nerve were more uniform and predictable than those obtained with the other techniques evaluated in this study.

  14. Long-term resolution of delayed onset hypoglossal nerve palsy following occipital condyle fracture: Case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Vadivelu, Sudhakar; Masood, Zihan; Krueger, Bryan; Marciano, Rudy; Chen, David; Houseman, Cliff; Insinga, Salvatore

    2017-01-01

    The authors present the case of a patient that demonstrates resolution of delayed onset hypoglossal nerve palsy (HNP) subsequent to occipital condyle fracture following a motor vehicle accident. Decompression of the hypoglossal nerve and craniocervical fixation led to satisfactory long-term (>5 years) outcome. There is a scarcity of literature in recognizing HNPs following trauma and a lack of pathophysiological understanding to both a delayed presentation and to resolution versus persistence. This is the first report demonstrating long-term resolution of hypoglossal nerve injury following trauma to the craniocervical junction.

  15. Long-term resolution of delayed onset hypoglossal nerve palsy following occipital condyle fracture: Case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Vadivelu, Sudhakar; Masood, Zihan; Krueger, Bryan; Marciano, Rudy; Chen, David; Houseman, Cliff; Insinga, Salvatore

    2017-01-01

    The authors present the case of a patient that demonstrates resolution of delayed onset hypoglossal nerve palsy (HNP) subsequent to occipital condyle fracture following a motor vehicle accident. Decompression of the hypoglossal nerve and craniocervical fixation led to satisfactory long-term (>5 years) outcome. There is a scarcity of literature in recognizing HNPs following trauma and a lack of pathophysiological understanding to both a delayed presentation and to resolution versus persistence. This is the first report demonstrating long-term resolution of hypoglossal nerve injury following trauma to the craniocervical junction. PMID:28694600

  16. Severe, traumatic soft-tissue loss in the antecubital fossa and proximal forearm associated with radial and/or median nerve palsy: nerve recovery after coverage with a pedicled latissimus dorsi muscle flap.

    PubMed

    Al-Qattan, M M

    2001-02-01

    A total of 6 patients with complex, traumatic wounds of the antecubital fossa and proximal forearm were included in this study. All patients presented with radial and/or median nerve palsies in addition to their soft-tissue defect. Except for 1 patient with a 15-cm defect of the radial nerve, all other traumatized nerves appeared in-continuity at the time of surgery. However, the nerve injury was severe enough to induce Wallerian degeneration (i.e., axonotmesis in traumatized nerves in-continuity). Three patients required brachial artery reconstruction with a reverse saphenous vein graft. Wound coverage was accomplished using a pedicled latissimus dorsi muscle flap, which was covered with a split-thickness skin graft. Successful reconstruction was obtained in all patients. Follow-up ranged from 2 to 6 years. The range of motion at the elbow and forearm was considered excellent in 5 patients and good in the remaining patient who had an intra-articular fracture. Motor recovery of traumatized nerves in-continuity was observed in all but 1 patient who had persistent partial anterior interosseous nerve palsy. The grip strength of the injured hand measured 70% to 85% of the contralateral uninjured hand. Median nerve sensory recovery was excellent in all patients. The versatility of the pedicled latissimus dorsi muscle flap for coverage of these complex wounds with traumatized neurovascular bundles around the elbow is discussed.

  17. A novel mechanotronic orthosis enables symmetrical gait kinematics in a patient with a femoral nerve palsy - a case study.

    PubMed

    Hobusch, G M; Hasenöhrl, T; Pieber, K; Schmalz, T; Dana, S; Ambrozy, C; Pohlig, K; Dietl, H; Crevenna, R; Skrbensky, G von; Hofer, C; Auberger, R; Windhager, R

    2017-04-01

    The usage of stance- and swing-phase control orthoses (SSCOs) is a good option in patients with neuromuscular insufficiency of the quadriceps muscle in a broad range of musculo-skeletal disorders. The subjective sensation of improved mobility in daily life and walking comfort could be objectively confirmed by the ability to walk without crutches and by harmonization of the gait patterns in hip and knee. They could also be a considered mobility device after limb salvage surgery, which may even have an impact on preoperative decision making. IMPLICATIONS FOR REHABILITATION Symmetric gate in spite of femoral nerve palsy. Early gate improvements even after hours. High patient?s motivation to use the device.

  18. Vascular endothelial growth factor gene therapy improves nerve regeneration in a model of obstetric brachial plexus palsy.

    PubMed

    Hillenbrand, Matthias; Holzbach, Thomas; Matiasek, Kaspar; Schlegel, Jürgen; Giunta, Riccardo E

    2015-03-01

    The treatment of obstetric brachial plexus palsy has been limited to conservative therapies and surgical reconstruction of peripheral nerves. In addition to the damage of the brachial plexus itself, it also leads to a loss of the corresponding motoneurons in the spinal cord, which raises the need for supportive strategies that take the participation of the central nervous system into account. Based on the protective and regenerative effects of VEGF on neural tissue, our aim was to analyse the effect on nerve regeneration by adenoviral gene transfer of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in postpartum nerve injury of the brachial plexus in rats. In the present study, we induced a selective crush injury to the left spinal roots C5 and C6 in 18 rats within 24 hours after birth and examined the effect of VEGF-gene therapy on nerve regeneration. For gene transduction an adenoviral vector encoding for VEGF165 (AdCMV.VEGF165) was used. In a period of 11 weeks, starting 3 weeks post-operatively, functional regeneration was assessed weekly by behavioural analysis and force measurement of the upper limb. Morphometric evaluation was carried out 8 months post-operatively and consisted of a histological examination of the deltoid muscle and the brachial plexus according to defined criteria of degeneration. In addition, atrophy of the deltoid muscle was evaluated by weight determination comparing the left with the right side. VEGF expression in the brachial plexus was quantified by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Furthermore the motoneurons of the spinal cord segment C5 were counted comparing the left with the right side. On the functional level, VEGF-treated animals showed faster nerve regeneration. It was found less degeneration and smaller mass reduction of the deltoid muscle in VEGF-treated animals. We observed significantly less degeneration of the brachial plexus and a greater number of surviving motoneurons (P < 0·05) in the VEGF group. The results of

  19. Posterior interosseous nerve palsy caused by parosteal lipoma of proximal radius.

    PubMed

    Nishida, J; Shimamura, T; Ehara, S; Shiraishi, H; Sato, T; Abe, M

    1998-07-01

    Lipomas are common benign soft tissue tumors which tend to be indolent, and symptoms caused by nerve compression are unusual. However, a parosteal lipoma, occurring adjacent to the proximal radius may easily cause paralysis of the posterior interosseous nerve because of a specific anatomical relationship of these structures in that area. Two cases of parosteal lipoma of the proximal radius causing paralysis of the posterior interosseous nerve are reported. CT and MR imaging demonstrate the characteristic fatty mass around the radius and are specific in making the diagnosis. Surgical excision should be promptly performed to ensure optimal recovery from the nerve paralysis.

  20. Sphenoid sinus mucocele presenting with oculomotor nerve palsy and affecting the functions of trigeminal nerve: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Yong, Wei-Wei; Zhou, Shui-Hong; Bao, Yang-Yang

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of first-episode sphenoid mucocele successfully treated via transnasal endoscopic drainage and marsupialization of the mucocele. A 55 year-old female presented with persistent right-side facial numbness (in the areas of the first and second branches of the trigeminal nerve) and right-side ptosis. Computed tomography (CT) imaging and Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed opacification and expansion of the right-side sphenoid sinus lesion. The lesion was diagnosed as right-side sphenoid mucocele affecting the functions of the trigeminal (first and second branches), and oculomotor nerves. Transnasal endoscopic drainage and marsupialization of the mucocele result in rapid regression of these symptoms. PMID:26629234

  1. A Case of Common Peroneal Nerve Palsy Associated with Internal Iliac Artery Embolization by Using N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate (NBCA).

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Keishi; Ogawa, Yukihisa; Murakami, Kenji; Arai, Yasunori; Nishimaki, Hiroshi; Mimura, Hidefumi; Nakajima, Yasuo

    2017-09-01

    A 64-year-old man was scheduled to undergo endovascular aneurysm repair for an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Since preoperative computed tomography showed an AAA with common iliac artery and internal iliac artery (IIA) aneurysms, IIA embolization was scheduled. Embolization using a coil was supposed to be performed; however, the lateral sacral artery could not be selected. For this reason, IIA embolization using N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate (NBCA) was undertaken. During embolization, the median sacral artery was unexpectedly embolized through the lateral sacral artery. The patient complained of drop foot just after embolization; he was diagnosed with iatrogenic common peroneal nerve palsy. We have learned that sciatic nerve palsy can occur in cases of embolization with a liquid NBCA-Lipiodol mixture to the lateral or sacral median artery.

  2. Radiation-Induced Cranial Nerve Palsy: A Cross-Sectional Study of Nasopharyngeal Cancer Patients After Definitive Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, Lin; Lu, Jiade J.; Liss, Adam L.; Hu Chaosu; Guo Xiaomao; Wu Yongru; Zhang Youwang

    2011-04-01

    Purpose: To address the characteristics and the causative factors of radiation-induced cranial nerve palsy (CNP) in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients with an extensive period of followed-up. Patients and Methods: A total of 317 consecutive and nonselected patients treated with definitive external-beam radiotherapy between November 1962 and February 1995 participated in this study. The median doses to the nasopharynx and upper neck were 71 Gy (range, 55-86 Gy) and 61 Gy (range, 34-72 Gy), respectively. Conventional fractionation was used in 287 patients (90.5%). Forty-five patients (14.2%) received chemotherapy. Results: The median follow-up was 11.4 years (range, 5.1-38.0 years). Ninety-eight patients (30.9%) developed CNP, with a median latent period of 7.6 years (range, 0.3-34 years). Patients had a higher rate of CNP (81 cases, 25.5%) in lower-group cranial nerves compared with upper group (44 cases, 13.9%) ({chi}{sup 2} = 34.444, p < 0.001). Fifty-nine cases experienced CNP in more than one cranial nerve. Twenty-two of 27 cases (68.8%) of intragroup CNP and 11 of 32 cases (40.7%) of intergroup CNP occurred synchronously ({chi}{sup 2} = 4.661, p = 0.031). The cumulative incidences of CNP were 10.4%, 22.4%, 35.5%, and 44.5% at 5, 10, 15, and 20 years, respectively. Multivariate analyses revealed that CNP at diagnosis, chemotherapy, total radiation dose to the nasopharynx, and upper neck fibrosis were independent risk factors for developing radiation-induced CNP. Conclusion: Radiation-induced fibrosis may play an important role in radiation-induced CNP. The incidence of CNP after definitive radiotherapy for NPC remains high after long-term follow-up and is dose and fractionation dependent.

  3. Review: oculomotor cranial nerve palsies: symptoms, problems and non-surgical preoperative management of the resultant complex incomitant strabismus and monocular and binocular vision disturbances.

    PubMed

    Khawam, Edward; Fahed, Daoud

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this presentation is first to describe the symptoms and problems encountered in cranial nerve palsies (CNP). The purpose is also to describe the different means of treatment during the observational preoperative period and their positive or negative impact on each of the symptoms and problems. Finally, we will present our way of handling these patients in their preoperative period: practical, inexpensive, and unsophisticated means that keep the patient comfortable and prevent the secondary untoward effects that can take place.

  4. [A case of transient postoperative median nerve palsy due to the use of the wrist holder to stabilize an intra-arterial catheter].

    PubMed

    Ohata, Hiroto; Iida, Yuko; Kito, Kazuhiro; Kawamura, Michika; Yamashita, Mika; Ohta, Shuichiro; Ueda, Norio; Iida, Hiroki

    2013-06-01

    We experienced a case of right median nerve palsy at the distal forearm following abdominal surgery. We postulate that the cause of the median nerve palsy is overextension of the wrist by the inappropriate fixation with a holder. The patient was a 46-year-old man with habit of smoking receiving low-anterior resection of the rectum under general and epidural anesthesia in lithotomy position. During surgery his upper limbs were placed on padded arm board abducted about 80 degrees and affixed with soft cotton. His forearms were slightly supinated, whereas his elbows were not over-extended. A 22 G cannula was inserted in the right radial artery and the right wrist was fixed with plastic-holder with soft pad. This position was maintained throughout the operation approximetly for 250 minutes. During anesthesia any special events regarding hemodynamic variables were not observed. He complained of numbness in the palmar side of the digits 1-3 on his right hand without motor disturbance 4 hours after the operation. Examination by the anesthesiologist revealed median nerve palsy. Fortunately, this symptom gradually but completely resolved over the next few days. The possible causes of this neuropathy include the overextension of the wrist or the unexpected extension of the elbow beyond the acceptable range by the supination of forearm, which was induced by the attachment used to stabilize an intra-arterial catheter. Therefore, in the current case we should have returned the wrists promptly to the neutral position following arterial catheter placement to prevent the median nerve palsy. This case suggests the importance of holding the proper position of the arm during surgery.

  5. Superficial radial neuropathy and brachioradial motor nerve palsy associated with proximal radius osteochondroma.

    PubMed

    Oz, Oğuzhan; Yücel, Mehmet; Ulaş, Umit; Eroğlu, Erdal; Odabaşi, Zeki

    2010-01-01

    The cutaneous branch of the radial nerve (superficial radial nerve, SRN) might be compressed or injured at various anatomical sites along its course in the forearm. Compression of the SRN occurring at the proximal third of the forearm is unusual. A 22-year-old man was admitted with pain and paraesthesia over the lateral aspect of his right wrist and thumb and pain at the elbow for six months. In electrodiagnostic testing, a sensory nerve action potential from the right SRN could not be recorded, while it was normal on the left. In a needle electromyography study, denervation potentials have been seen in the right brachioradial muscle and a decrease in interference pattern signals was also found. An exophytic lesion of the proximal radius was observed in radiographs. Computed tomography evaluation revealed an osteochondroma of the proximal radius. Neuropathies of the SRN and the brachioradial motor branch of the radial nerve are thought to be associated with proximal radial osteochondroma.

  6. Rhinocerebral mucormycosis with isolated sixth nerve palsy in an immunocompetent patient.

    PubMed

    Jain, Shraddha; Kumar, Sunil; Kaushal, Amit

    2011-10-01

    We report a case of rhinocerebral mucormycosis in a 31 year old immunocompetent female presenting initially like acute rhinosinusitis with nasal stuffiness, severe headache, vomiting who soon developed isolated right lateral rectus palsy. Computed tomography (CT) scan of the Post-Nasal Spaces(PNS) showed an ill defined expansile heterogenous density mass in the sphenoid with extension into the ethmoids, nasal cavity, optic canal, superior orbital fissure, clivus and right temporal lobe with signal void in Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). The debris and polypoid mucosa obtained on nasal endoscopy revealed mucormycosis on histopathologic examination. The patient was managed with urgent surgical debridement and medical management.

  7. Functional and anatomical basis for brain plasticity in facial palsy rehabilitation using the masseteric nerve.

    PubMed

    Buendia, Javier; Loayza, Francis R; Luis, Elkin O; Celorrio, Marta; Pastor, Maria A; Hontanilla, Bernardo

    2016-03-01

    Several techniques have been described for smile restoration after facial nerve paralysis. When a nerve other than the contralateral facial nerve is used to restore the smile, some controversy appears because of the nonphysiological mechanism of smile recovering. Different authors have reported natural results with the masseter nerve. The physiological pathways which determine whether this is achieved continue to remain unclear. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, brain activation pattern measuring blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) signal during smiling and jaw clenching was recorded in a group of 24 healthy subjects (11 females). Effective connectivity of premotor regions was also compared in both tasks. The brain activation pattern was similar for smile and jaw-clenching tasks. Smile activations showed topographic overlap though more extended for smile than clenching. Gender comparisons during facial movements, according to kinematics and BOLD signal, did not reveal significant differences. Effective connectivity results of psychophysiological interaction (PPI) from the same seeds located in bilateral facial premotor regions showed significant task and gender differences (p < 0.001). The hypothesis of brain plasticity between the facial nerve and masseter nerve areas is supported by the broad cortical overlap in the representation of facial and masseter muscles. Copyright © 2015 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Bell's palsy and autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Greco, A; Gallo, A; Fusconi, M; Marinelli, C; Macri, G F; de Vincentiis, M

    2012-12-01

    To review our current knowledge of the etiopathogenesis of Bell's palsy, including viral infection or autoimmunity, and to discuss disease pathogenesis with respect to pharmacotherapy. Relevant publications on the etiopathogenesis, clinical presentation, diagnosis and histopathology of Bell's palsy from 1975 to 2012 were analysed. Bell's palsy is an idiopathic peripheral nerve palsy involving the facial nerve. It accounts for 60 to 75% of all cases of unilateral facial paralysis. The annual incidence of Bell's palsy is 15 to 30 per 100,000 people. The peak incidence occurs between the second and fourth decades (15 to 45 years). The aetiology of Bell's palsy is unknown but viral infection or autoimmune disease has been postulated as possible pathomechanisms. Bell's palsy may be caused when latent herpes viruses (herpes simplex, herpes zoster) are reactivated from cranial nerve ganglia. A cell-mediated autoimmune mechanism against a myelin basic protein has been suggested for the pathogenesis of Bell's palsy. Bell's palsy may be an autoimmune demyelinating cranial neuritis, and in most cases, it is a mononeuritic variant of Guillain-Barré syndrome, a neurologic disorder with recognised cell-mediated immunity against peripheral nerve myelin antigens. In Bell's palsy and GBS, a viral infection or the reactivation of a latent virus may provoke an autoimmune reaction against peripheral nerve myelin components, leading to the demyelination of cranial nerves, especially the facial nerve. Given the safety profile of acyclovir, valacyclovir, and short-course oral corticosteroids, patients who present within three days of the onset of symptoms should be offered combination therapy. However it seems logical that in fact, steroids exert their beneficial effect via immunosuppressive action, as is the case in some other autoimmune disorders. It is to be hoped that (monoclonal) antibodies and/or T-cell immunotherapy might provide more specific treatment guidelines in the

  9. Acute necrosis after Gamma Knife surgery in vestibular schwannoma leading to multiple cranial nerve palsies.

    PubMed

    Kapitza, Sandra; Pangalu, Athina; Horstmann, Gerhard A; van Eck, Albert T; Regli, Luca; Tarnutzer, Alexander A

    2016-08-01

    We discuss a rare acute complication after Gamma Knife therapy (Elekta AB, Stockholm, Sweden) in a single patient. A 52-year-old woman presented with vertigo, facial weakness and hearing loss emerging 48hours following Gamma Knife radiosurgery for a right-sided vestibular schwannoma. Neurological examination 6days after symptom onset showed right-sided facial palsy, spontaneous left-beating nystagmus and pathologic head-impulse testing to the right. Pure-tone audiogram revealed right-sided sensorineural hearing loss. A diagnosis of acute vestibulocochlear and facial neuropathy was made. Brain MRI demonstrated focal contrast sparing within the schwannoma, likely related to acute radiation necrosis. Acute multiple cranial neuropathies of the cerebellopontine angle after Gamma Knife treatment should raise suspicion of acute tissue damage within the schwannoma and should result in urgent MRI. Treatment with steroids may be considered based on accompanying swelling and edema. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Deep peroneal nerve palsy with isolated lateral compartment syndrome secondary to peroneus longus tear: a report of two cases and a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Hiramatsu, Kunihiko; Yonetani, Yasukazu; Kinugasa, Kazutaka; Nakamura, Norimasa; Yamamoto, Koji; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Hamada, Masayuki

    2016-06-01

    Drop foot is typically caused by neurologic disease such as lumbar disc herniation, but we report two rare cases of deep peroneal nerve palsy with isolated lateral compartment syndrome secondary to peroneus longus tears. Both patients developed mild pain in the lower legs while playing sport, and were aware of drop foot. As compartment pressures were elevated, fasciotomy was performed immediately, and the tendon of the peroneus longus was completely detached from its proximal origin. The patients were able to return their original sports after 3 months, and clinical examination revealed no hypesthesia or muscle weakness in the deep peroneal nerve area at the time of last follow-up. The common peroneal nerve pierced the deep fascia and lay over the fibular neck, which formed the floor of a short tunnel (the so-called fibular tunnel), then passed the lateral compartment just behind the peroneus longus. The characteristic anatomical situation between the fibular tunnel and peroneus longus might have caused deep peroneal nerve palsy in these two cases after hematoma adjacent to the fibular tunnel increased lateral compartment pressure.

  11. Suprascapular nerve palsy after arthroscopic Latarjet procedure: a case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Sastre, Sergi; Peidro, Lluis; Méndez, Anna; Calvo, Emilio

    2016-02-01

    The Bristow and Latarjet procedures have become popular among orthopaedic surgeons thanks to the development of new instruments that allow the use of arthroscopic techniques to treat cases of glenohumeral instability with bone defects or capsular deficiency. Nonetheless, several complications have been reported after Latarjet procedures, including neurological injuries. This report describes surgical damage to the suprascapular nerve, an unusual complication. Level of evidence Expert opinion, Level V.

  12. Incidence of cranial nerve palsy after preoperative embolization of glomus jugulare tumors using Onyx.

    PubMed

    Gaynor, Brandon G; Elhammady, Mohamed Samy; Jethanamest, Daniel; Angeli, Simon I; Aziz-Sultan, Mohammad A

    2014-02-01

    The resection of glomus jugulare tumors can be challenging because of their inherent vascularity. Preoperative embolization has been advocated as a means of reducing operative times, blood loss, and surgical complications. However, the incidence of cranial neuropathy associated with the embolization of these tumors has not been established. The authors of this study describe their experience with cranial neuropathy following transarterial embolization of glomus jugulare tumors using ethylene vinyl alcohol (Onyx, eV3 Inc.). The authors retrospectively reviewed all cases of glomus jugulare tumors that had been treated with preoperative embolization using Onyx at their institution in the period from 2006 to 2012. Patient demographics, clinical presentation, grade and amount of Onyx used, degree of angiographic devascularization, and procedural complications were recorded. Over a 6-year period, 11 patients with glomus jugulare tumors underwent preoperative embolization with Onyx. All embolization procedures were completed in one session. The overall mean percent of tumor devascularization was 90.7%. No evidence of nontarget embolization was seen on postembolization angiograms. There were 2 cases (18%) of permanent cranial neuropathy attributed to the embolization procedures (facial nerve paralysis and lower cranial nerve dysfunction). Embolizing glomus jugulare tumors with Onyx can produce a dramatic reduction in tumor vascularity. However, the intimate anatomical relationship and overlapping blood supply between these tumors and cranial nerves may contribute to a high incidence of cranial neuropathy following Onyx embolization.

  13. Recurrent Bell's palsy in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, A D

    1990-09-01

    A case of recurrent Bell's palsy occurring in two successive pregnancies in a 37-year-old woman is presented. The causes of facial nerve paralysis of the lower motor neurone type are discussed. The rate of recurrence of Bell's palsy during pregnancy is unknown. Treatment with corticosteroids of Bell's palsy during pregnancy poses the threat of possible side effects on the fetus.

  14. Bells Palsy Association.

    PubMed

    2011-03-16

    Bells Palsy is a facial paralysis, usually affecting one side of the head, caused by damage to the facial nerve. The Bell's Palsy Association (BPA) is a charity that provides information, advice and support to people with the condition and their carers.

  15. Transfer of the phrenic nerve to the posterior division of the lower trunk to recover thumb and finger extension in brachial plexus palsy.

    PubMed

    Lin, Haodong; Hou, Chunlin; Chen, Aimin; Xu, Zhen

    2011-01-01

    Hand function is severely impaired in cases of lower root avulsion. In the present study, the authors investigated the clinical effectiveness and safety of phrenic nerve transfer to the posterior division of the lower trunk of the brachial plexus to recover thumb and finger extension. Between 2004 and 2006, 10 patients with brachial plexus palsy underwent phrenic nerve transfer as part of a strategy for surgical reconstruction of their plexuses. The mean patient age of was 27.2 years (range 18-44 years), and the mean interval from injury to surgery was 5.7 months (range 3-9 months). The phrenic nerve was always transferred to the posterior division of the lower trunk. The follow-up of the patients ranged from 2.5 to 4.4 years, with an average follow-up length of 3.5 years. There were no major complications related to the surgery. Eight patients recovered to Grade 3 or better (Medical Research Council grade) in extensor digitorum strength, and 7 patients recovered to Grade 3 or better in extensor pollicis strength. None of the patients had any clinical signs or symptoms of respiratory insufficiency. Satisfactory thumb and finger extension can be achieved by phrenic nerve transfer to the posterior division of the lower trunk of the brachial plexus. This procedure is simple and less traumatic than that of transferring the phrenic nerve to the radial nerve. It is indicated in cases in which the brachial plexus is relatively intact at the division level.

  16. Bell's palsy with ipsilateral numbness.

    PubMed

    Vanopdenbosch, L J; Verhoeven, K; Casselman, J W

    2005-07-01

    Bell's palsy is an idiopathic facial palsy of the peripheral type. A herpes virus is the most likely mechanism. We report a patient with the often encountered combination of a facial palsy with ipsilateral sensory changes. Magnetic resonance imaging showed had contrast enhancement in the greater petrosal nerve. Viral spread through anatomical connections could be an explanation for the association of facial palsy with numbness.

  17. [Palliative tendon transfer for reanimation of the wrist and finger extension lag. Report of 14 transfers for radial nerve palsies and ten transfers for brachial plexus lesions].

    PubMed

    Bincaz, L E; Cherifi, H; Alnot, J Y

    2002-01-01

    This retrospective study is based on 23 males and one female, of an average age of 36.2 years that presented to us between 1982 and 2000 with an average follow up of 61 months, with fully established paralysis of wrist and fingers extension. Fourteen patients had isolated radial nerve palsy, while ten patients had brachial plexus lesions. 1) The tendon transfer for radial nerve palsy was: PT to ECRB, FCU to ED + EPL and PL to APL + EPB; 2) for brachial plexus injury, the tendon transfer was: PT (n = 4) or FDS III or IV (n = 5) to ECRB, FCU (n = 8) or FDS IV (n = 1) to ED + EPL, PL to APL + EPB and wrist arthrodesis with transfer of FDS IV to ED + EPL and PL to APL + EPB. The results were evaluated according to the degree of wrist movement, MP extension of long fingers, opening of first commissure, thumb opposition, grip power and the subjective evaluation of results. Concerning the radial nerve palsy: results are excellent in nine cases and good in one case. An active extension of the wrist of 38 degrees was obtained as well as MP extension of 0 degree with the wrist straightened. Thumb oppositioned was conserved (Kapandji = 8.2), opening of the first commissure 40 degrees and grip power was 20 kg. Concerning the brachial plexus lesions: results are excellent in five cases and good in the other five. An active wrist extension of 32 degrees was obtained, as well as MP extension deficit of 16 degrees with wrist straightened. Opposition was concerned (Kapandji = 7.2), opening of first commissure of 38 degrees and grip power of 13 kg. The functional results are satisfactory, but the analytic study shows some effect of tenodesis of MP extension.

  18. A case of idiopathic hypertrophic pachymeningitis presenting with chronic headache and multiple cranial nerve palsies: A case report.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yuanyuan; Chen, Jun; Gui, Li

    2017-07-01

    Idiopathic hypertrophic pachymeningitis (IHP) is a rare condition, characterized by a chronic fibrosing inflammatory process usually involving either the intracranial or spinal dura mater, but rarely both. Here, we report a rare case of IHP affecting both the intracranial and spinal dura mater. We also discussed the diagnosis, management, and outcome of IHP. We reviewed the case of a 60-year-old woman presenting with chronic headache, multiple cranial nerve palsies and gait disturbance. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of her head revealed thickened and contrast-enhanced dura in the craniocervical region as well as obstructive hydrocephalus and cerebellar tonsillar herniation. The patient had a suboccipital craniectomy and posterior decompression through C1 plus a total laminectomy. The dura was partially resected to the extent of the bony decompression, and a duroplasty was performed. Microscopic examination of the surgically resected sample showed chronic inflammatory changes, lymphoplasmacytic cell infiltration, fibrous tissue hyperplasia, and hyaline degeneration. Blood tests to evaluate the secondary causes of hypertrophic pachymeningitis (HP) were unremarkable. Steroid was used to treat suspected IHP. Postoperatively, the patient showed gradual improvement in her headache, glossolalia, and bucking. Prior to discharge, a follow-up MRI showed improvement of the dura mater thickening. IHP is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the dura mater that usually causes neurological deficits. Clinical manifestations of IHP, MRI findings, and laboratory abnormalities are the essential components for making an accurate diagnosis. When the radiological or laboratory evaluation is uncertain, but neurological deficits are present, a prompt surgical approach should be considered. Postoperative steroid therapy and close observation for recurrence are necessary to ensure a good long-term outcome.

  19. Persistent hiccups and vomiting with multiple cranial nerve palsy in a case of zoster sine herpete.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Takeshi; Fujisaki, Natsumi; Nakachi, Ryo; Sueyoshi, Takeshi; Suwazono, Shugo; Suehara, Masahito

    2014-01-01

    A 76-year-old man came to our hospital complaining of hiccups and vomiting lasting for five days. A neurological examination showed dysfunction of cranial nerves V, VII, VIII, IX and X on the left side. Cerebrospinal fluid polymerase chain reaction for varicella zoster virus-DNA was positive. The patient responded well to treatment with intravenous acyclovir and steroids. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case report of zoster sine herpete presenting with persistent hiccups and vomiting. It is important to keep in mind that herpes zoster can present with symptoms that closely resemble those of intractable hiccups and nausea of neuromyelitis optica. Early detection of the virus is critical for making appropriate treatment decisions.

  20. Cranial nerves palsy as an initial feature of an early onset distal hereditary motor neuropathy--a new distal hereditary motor neuropathy phenotype.

    PubMed

    Haberlová, J; Claeys, K G; De Jonghe, P; Seeman, P

    2009-06-01

    Distal hereditary motor neuropathy is a heterogeneous group of disorders characterised by a pure motor axonal neuropathy. It is occasionally associated with additional signs such as facial weakness, vocal cord paralysis, weakness of the diaphragm, and pyramidal signs. Although predominantly the inheritance is autosomal dominant, all types of inheritance have been described. Here we report a Czech family with cranial nerves palsy as an initial feature of a non progressive infantile onset dominant distal hereditary motor neuropathy. This family may represent a new subtype of distal hereditary motor neuropathy.

  1. [Erysipel at the lower leg combined with a peripheral peroneus nerve palsy--an unusual occurrence].

    PubMed

    Röllinghoff, M; Delank, K-S; Haupt, W F; Eysel, P

    2006-01-01

    We present the clinical case of a fifty-year-old man who presented two times with a foot elevator paresis and an erysipel first on the right and after two months on the left side. Afterwards, we carried out a thorough case history with the help of clinical, radiological and magnetic resonance imaging. Even so the clinical pathology of the foot elevator paresis could not be manifested. A compartment syndrome could be discounted. In the context of the second stay during a neurology examination on both legs electromyography was performed and the nerve speed was tested. A peripheral peroneus paresis of unknown level and of unknown aetiology was demonstrated. The erysipel regressed rapidly under intravenous ampicillin antibiotics while the peroneus paresis was unchanged. The patent was released with a peroneus splint on both sides. With this case report we would like to point out the causes of peripheral peroneus paresis with regard to an additional erysipel. This case report is discussed regarding the possible aetiopathology and the current literature.

  2. [Facial nerve function index evaluation on deviation of the mouth in intractable facial palsy treated with sticking needle and traction method on three points of the mouth].

    PubMed

    Feng, Hua; Ding, Min; Jiang, Ya-Qiu; Jin, Chang-Xu; Lin, Tian-Yun

    2010-09-01

    To probe into the effective acupuncture technique for deviation of the mouth in intractable facial palsy. One hundred and one cases of intractable facial palsy were randomly divided into an observation group (48 cases) and a control group (53 cases). Cuanzhu (BL 2), Sibai (ST 2), Jiache (ST 6) and Qianzheng (Extra) on the affected side were punctured in two groups. Additionally, three acupoints of the mouth were supplemented, named Dicang (ST 4), Kouheliao (LI 19) and Jiachengjiang (Extra) were added, and the sticking needle and traction method was adopted on them in observation group. the routine needling technique was applied in control group. The treatment was given once a day and 10-day treatment made one session. The changes in facial nerve function index (FNFI) were observed in 2 sessions of treatment. After treatment, FNFI in two groups increased significantly (both P < 0.01), but the improvement in observation group was better than that in control group (P < 0.01). In observation group, the basic recovery rate of FNFI was 87.5% (42/48), which was higher than that (67.9%, 36/53) in control group (P < 0.05). The sticking needle and traction method o three points is the quite effective approach in the treatment of deviation of the mouth in intractable facial palsy.

  3. Bell's palsy.

    PubMed

    Holland, N Julian; Bernstein, Jonathan M

    2014-04-09

    Bell's palsy is characterised by an acute, unilateral, partial, or complete paralysis of the face. Bell's palsy occurs in a lower motor neurone pattern. The weakness may be partial or complete, and may be associated with mild pain, numbness, increased sensitivity to sound, and altered taste. Bell's palsy is idiopathic, but a proportion of cases may be caused by re-activation of herpes virus at the geniculate ganglion of the facial nerve. Bell's palsy is most common in people aged 15 to 40 years, with a 1 in 60 lifetime risk. Most people make a spontaneous recovery within 1 month, but up to 30% show delayed or incomplete recovery. We conducted a systematic review to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of drug treatments for Bell's palsy in adults and children? What are the effects of physical treatments for Bell's palsy in adults and children? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to October 2013 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). We found 13 studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. In this systematic review, we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: antiviral treatment, corticosteroids (alone or with antiviral treatment), hyperbaric oxygen therapy, and facial re-training.

  4. Restoration of hand function in C7-T1 brachial plexus palsies using a staged approach with nerve and tendon transfer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cheng-Gang; Dong, Zhen; Gu, Yu-Dong

    2014-11-01

    Brachial plexus palsies of C7-T1 result in the complete loss of hand function, including finger and thumb flexion and extension as well as intrinsic muscle function. The task of reanimating such a hand remains challenging, and so far there has been no reliable neurological reconstructive method for restoring hand function. The authors aimed to establish a reliable strategy to reanimate the paralyzed hand. Two patients had sustained C7-T1 complete lesions. In the first stage of the operative procedure, a supinator motor branch to posterior interosseous nerve transfer was performed with brachialis motor branch transfer to the median nerve to restore finger and thumb extension and flexion. In the second stage, the intact brachioradialis muscle was used for abductorplasty to restore thumb opposition. Both patients regained good finger extension and flexion. Thumb opposition was also attained, and overall hand function was satisfactory. The described strategy proved effective and reliable in restoring hand function after C7-T1 brachial plexus palsies.

  5. Bilateral internal superior laryngeal nerve palsy of traumatic cervical injury patient who presented as loss of cough reflex after anterior cervical discectomy with fusion.

    PubMed

    Shin, Dong-Uk; Sung, Joo-Kyung; Nam, Kyung-Hun; Cho, Dae-Chul

    2012-09-01

    Injury to the bilateral internal branch of superior laryngeal nerve (ibSLN) brings on an impairment of the laryngeal cough reflex that could potentially result in aspiration pneumonia and other respiratory illnesses. We describe a patient with traumatic cervical injury who underwent bilateral ibSLN palsy after anterior cervical discectomy with fusion (ACDF). An 75-year-old man visited with cervical spine fracture and he underwent ACDF through a right side approach. During the post-operative days, he complained of high pitched tone defect, and occasional coughing during meals. With a suspicion of SLN injury and for the work up for the cause of aspiration, we performed several studies. According to the study results, he was diagnosed as right SLN and left ibSLN palsy. We managed him for protecting from silent aspiration. Swallowing study was repeated and no evidence of aspiration was found. The patient was discharged with incomplete recovery of a high pitched tone and improved state of neurologic status. The SLN is an important structure; therefore, spine surgeons need to be concerned and be cautious about SLN injury during high cervical neck dissection, especially around the level of C3-C4 and a suspicious condition of a contralateral nerve injury.

  6. [From the abducens nucleus to spatial memory: an ocular motor journey].

    PubMed

    Pierrot-Deseilligny, C

    2005-05-01

    Advances in our knowledge on eye movements over the last 25 years are reviewed, focusing on the author's experience. First, the advantages of binocular frontal vision, which is a common characteristic of all predator mammals, are compared to those of lateral vision, characterizing their preys. Binocular frontal vision implies a perfect parallelism of both eyes, which is ensured in the pons by means of the abducens nucleus, controlling abduction as well as adduction. The pathological example of the "one-and-a-half" syndrome, in which the abducens nucleus and the adjacent medial longitudinal fasciculus are simultaneously impaired, is described. The main brainstem syndromes involving vertical eye movements are also reviewed: in particular, the third nerve nucleus syndrome, in which both ipsilateral third nerve paralysis and contralateral superior rectus paralysis (with hypotropia) result from a unilateral third nerve nucleus lesion. A case of upbeat nystagmus (in the primary position of gaze) due to a small upper pontine lesion, probably affecting the ventral tegmental tract (VTT) is also reported. This is an opportunity to emphasize that, although a number of cases of upbeat nystagmus due to focal brainstem lesions affecting the upward vestibular pathway (UVP)--either at the upper pontine (VTT) or caudal medullary level--exist in the literature, no convincing cases with downbeat nystagmus (in the primary position of gaze) due to a focal brainstem lesion have been reported. Downbeat nystagmus could result from a UVP hyperactivity (secondary to a floccular lesion) and the notion that this pathway is physiologically predominant compared to the downward pathway, maybe due to gravity, is developed. A new hypothesis about the role of the caudal medulla in UVP is also proposed. Next, the cortical control of saccadic eye movements is reviewed, with a reminder that reflexive saccades are mainly triggered by the parietal eye field whereas intentional saccades depend upon the

  7. Distinctive patterns of sonographic nerve enlargement in Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1A and hereditary neuropathy with pressure palsies.

    PubMed

    Goedee, Stephan H; Brekelmans, Geert J F; van den Berg, Leonard H; Visser, Leo H

    2015-07-01

    The extent of sonomorphologic differences of peripheral nerves between CMT and HNPP is unknown. We recruited 9 patients with CMT-1A and 9 with HNPP. Patients underwent a standardized sonographic protocol, which evaluated nerve size and vascularization. We quantitatively assessed fascicle size and echogenicity. All 18 patients demonstrated nerve enlargement, but no increased vascularization. HNPP demonstrated larger nerves at sites of entrapment (median nerve at the carpal tunnel p=0.049, ulnar nerve at the sulcus p<0.001), greater swelling ratios of median (p<0.001), ulnar (p=0.017) and fibular nerve (p=0.005) than CMT-1A. CMT-1A revealed larger nerves proximal to sites of entrapment (median and fibular nerve, brachial plexus p<0.001). Nerve fascicles where larger (p<0.001) and more hypo-echogenic in CMT-1A. Nerve, fascicle size nor echogenicity correlated with age, gender or MRC sum-score. Ultrasonography of nerves reveals specific phenotypes differentiating CMT-1A from HNPP. In CMT-1A enlargement of nerves and fascicles is multifocal among multiple nerves, whereas in HNPP nerve enlargement is restricted to sites of entrapment. Our findings of specific sonomorphological phenotypes, differentiating CMT-1A from HNPP, may help to improve our pathophysiological insights in CMT and HNPP. Copyright © 2014 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Bell's palsy

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Bell's palsy is characterised by an acute, unilateral, partial or complete paralysis of the face, which may occur with mild pain, numbness, increased sensitivity to sound, and altered taste. Bell's palsy remains idiopathic, but a proportion may be caused by reactivation of herpes viruses from cranial nerve ganglia. Bell's palsy is most common in people aged 15-40 years, affecting 1 in 60 in their lifetime. Most make a spontaneous recovery within 1 month, but up to 30% have delayed or incomplete recovery. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of treatments in adults and children? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library and other important databases up to February 2006 (BMJ Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found eight systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: antiviral treatment, corticosteroids (alone or plus antiviral treatment), facial nerve decompression surgery, and mime therapy. PMID:19450338

  9. Bell's palsy.

    PubMed

    Holland, Julian

    2008-01-02

    Bell's palsy is characterised by an acute, unilateral, partial or complete paralysis of the face, which may occur with mild pain, numbness, increased sensitivity to sound, and altered taste. Bell's palsy remains idiopathic, but a proportion may be caused by reactivation of herpes viruses from cranial nerve ganglia. Bell's palsy is most common in people aged 15-40 years, affecting 1 in 60 in their lifetime. Most make a spontaneous recovery within 1 month, but up to 30% have delayed or incomplete recovery. We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of treatments in adults and children? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library and other important databases up to February 2006 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). We found eight systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: antiviral treatment, corticosteroids (alone or plus antiviral treatment), facial nerve decompression surgery, and mime therapy.

  10. Bell's palsy.

    PubMed

    Holland, Julian; Bernstein, Jonathan

    2011-03-07

    Bell's palsy is characterised by an acute, unilateral, partial, or complete paralysis of the face (i.e., lower motor neurone pattern). The weakness may be partial (paresis) or complete (paralysis), and may be associated with mild pain, numbness, increased sensitivity to sound, and altered taste. Bell's palsy remains idiopathic, but a proportion of cases may be caused by reactivation of herpes viruses from the geniculate ganglion of the facial nerve. Bell's palsy is most common in people aged 15 to 40 years, with a 1 in 60 lifetime risk. Most make a spontaneous recovery within 1 month, but up to 30% show delayed or incomplete recovery. We conducted a systematic review to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of treatments in adults and children? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to June 2010 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically. Please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). We found 14 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: antiviral treatment, corticosteroids (alone or plus antiviral treatment), hyperbaric oxygen therapy, facial nerve decompression surgery, and facial retraining.

  11. Iatrogenic Radial Nerve Palsy following Closed Reduction of a Simple Diaphyseal Humeral Fracture: Beware the Perfect X-Ray

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Morgan; O'Neill, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Radial nerve injury is a recognised complication associated with humeral shaft fracture. A case of iatrogenic radial nerve injury is presented following fracture reduction. The relevant anatomy, challenges in management of humeral fractures with associated radial nerve injury, and the importance of detailed clinical assessment and documentation are discussed. PMID:27478658

  12. Detection of third and sixth cranial nerve palsies with a novel method for eye tracking while watching a short film clip

    PubMed Central

    Samadani, Uzma; Farooq, Sameer; Ritlop, Robert; Warren, Floyd; Reyes, Marleen; Lamm, Elizabeth; Alex, Anastasia; Nehrbass, Elena; Kolecki, Radek; Jureller, Michael; Schneider, Julia; Chen, Agnes; Shi, Chen; Mendhiratta, Neil; Huang, Jason H.; Qian, Meng; Kwak, Roy; Mikheev, Artem; Rusinek, Henry; George, Ajax; Fergus, Robert; Kondziolka, Douglas; Huang, Paul P.; Smith, R. Theodore

    2015-01-01

    OBJECT Automated eye movement tracking may provide clues to nervous system function at many levels. Spatial calibration of the eye tracking device requires the subject to have relatively intact ocular motility that implies function of cranial nerves (CNs) III (oculomotor), IV (trochlear), and VI (abducent) and their associated nuclei, along with the multiple regions of the brain imparting cognition and volition. The authors have developed a technique for eye tracking that uses temporal rather than spatial calibration, enabling detection of impaired ability to move the pupil relative to normal (neurologically healthy) control volunteers. This work was performed to demonstrate that this technique may detect CN palsies related to brain compression and to provide insight into how the technique may be of value for evaluating neuropathological conditions associated with CN palsy, such as hydrocephalus or acute mass effect. METHODS The authors recorded subjects’ eye movements by using an Eyelink 1000 eye tracker sampling at 500 Hz over 200 seconds while the subject viewed a music video playing inside an aperture on a computer monitor. The aperture moved in a rectangular pattern over a fixed time period. This technique was used to assess ocular motility in 157 neurologically healthy control subjects and 12 patients with either clinical CN III or VI palsy confirmed by neuro-ophthalmological examination, or surgically treatable pathological conditions potentially impacting these nerves. The authors compared the ratio of vertical to horizontal eye movement (height/width defined as aspect ratio) in normal and test subjects. RESULTS In 157 normal controls, the aspect ratio (height/width) for the left eye had a mean value ± SD of 1.0117 ± 0.0706. For the right eye, the aspect ratio had a mean of 1.0077 ± 0.0679 in these 157 subjects. There was no difference between sexes or ages. A patient with known CN VI palsy had a significantly increased aspect ratio (1.39), whereas 2

  13. Detection of third and sixth cranial nerve palsies with a novel method for eye tracking while watching a short film clip.

    PubMed

    Samadani, Uzma; Farooq, Sameer; Ritlop, Robert; Warren, Floyd; Reyes, Marleen; Lamm, Elizabeth; Alex, Anastasia; Nehrbass, Elena; Kolecki, Radek; Jureller, Michael; Schneider, Julia; Chen, Agnes; Shi, Chen; Mendhiratta, Neil; Huang, Jason H; Qian, Meng; Kwak, Roy; Mikheev, Artem; Rusinek, Henry; George, Ajax; Fergus, Robert; Kondziolka, Douglas; Huang, Paul P; Smith, R Theodore

    2015-03-01

    Automated eye movement tracking may provide clues to nervous system function at many levels. Spatial calibration of the eye tracking device requires the subject to have relatively intact ocular motility that implies function of cranial nerves (CNs) III (oculomotor), IV (trochlear), and VI (abducent) and their associated nuclei, along with the multiple regions of the brain imparting cognition and volition. The authors have developed a technique for eye tracking that uses temporal rather than spatial calibration, enabling detection of impaired ability to move the pupil relative to normal (neurologically healthy) control volunteers. This work was performed to demonstrate that this technique may detect CN palsies related to brain compression and to provide insight into how the technique may be of value for evaluating neuropathological conditions associated with CN palsy, such as hydrocephalus or acute mass effect. The authors recorded subjects' eye movements by using an Eyelink 1000 eye tracker sampling at 500 Hz over 200 seconds while the subject viewed a music video playing inside an aperture on a computer monitor. The aperture moved in a rectangular pattern over a fixed time period. This technique was used to assess ocular motility in 157 neurologically healthy control subjects and 12 patients with either clinical CN III or VI palsy confirmed by neuro-ophthalmological examination, or surgically treatable pathological conditions potentially impacting these nerves. The authors compared the ratio of vertical to horizontal eye movement (height/width defined as aspect ratio) in normal and test subjects. In 157 normal controls, the aspect ratio (height/width) for the left eye had a mean value ± SD of 1.0117 ± 0.0706. For the right eye, the aspect ratio had a mean of 1.0077 ± 0.0679 in these 157 subjects. There was no difference between sexes or ages. A patient with known CN VI palsy had a significantly increased aspect ratio (1.39), whereas 2 patients with known CN III

  14. [A case of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) type 1 complicated by diabetes mellitus (DM) showing bilateral phrenic nerve palsy].

    PubMed

    Takakura, Yuka; Furuya, Hirokazu; Yamashita, Ken-ichiro; Murai, Hiroyuki; Araki, Takehisa; Kikuchi, Hitoshi; Ohyagi, Yasumasa; Yamada, Takeshi; Kira, Jun-ichi

    2002-04-01

    We here report a 44-year-old woman with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) type 1 who showed severe bilateral phrenic nerve palsy (PNP). She had chronic progressive distal dominant muscle weakness and atrophy since early in her second decade and had been unable to walk by herself due to weakness of the legs since she was 40-years old. At that time, she was diagnosed with diabetes mellitus (DM). She also had difficulty breathing when she was in a supine position. On admission, sural nerve biopsy showed a marked decrease of large and small myelinated fibers and numerous onion bulb formations, which are compatible with CMT type 1. Chest X-ray showed bilateral elevation of the diaphragm, which was more marked on the right side, indicating bilateral PNP. Since it is reported that CMT patients show demyelination of the phrenic nerve subclinically, and DM itself may facilitate the development of PNP, periodic evaluations of respiratory function may thus be useful for preventing respiratory failure in patients with CMT, especially when it is complicated with DM.

  15. Delayed diagnosed intermuscular lipoma causing a posterior interosseous nerve palsy in a patient with cervical spondylosis: the “priceless” value of the clinical examination in the technological era

    PubMed Central

    COLASANTI, R.; IACOANGELI, M.; DI RIENZO, A.; DOBRAN, M.; DI SOMMA, L.; NOCCHI, N.; SCERRATI, M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Posterior interosseous nerve (PIN) palsy may present with various symptoms, and may resemble cervical spondylosis. Case report We report about a 59-year-old patient with cervical spondylosis which delayed the diagnosis of posterior interosseous nerve (PIN) palsy due to an intermuscular lipoma. Initial right hand paraesthesias and clumsiness, together with MR findings of right C5–C6 and C6–C7 foraminal stenosis, misled the diagnostic investigation. The progressive loss of extension of all right hand fingers brought to detect a painless mass compressing the PIN. Electrophysiological studies confirmed a right radial motor neuropathy at the level of the forearm. Results Surgical tumor removal and nerve decompression resulted in a gradual motor deficits recovery. Conclusions A thorough clinical examination is paramount, and electrophysiology may differentiate between cervical and peripheral nerve lesions. Ultrasonography and MR offer an effective evaluation of lipomas, which represent a rare cause of PIN palsy. Surgical decompression and lipoma removal generally determine excellent prognoses, with very few recurrences. PMID:27142825

  16. Bell's palsy

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Bell's palsy is characterised by an acute, unilateral, partial, or complete paralysis of the face (i.e., lower motor neurone pattern). The weakness may be partial (paresis) or complete (paralysis), and may be associated with mild pain, numbness, increased sensitivity to sound, and altered taste. Bell's palsy remains idiopathic, but a proportion of cases may be caused by reactivation of herpes viruses from the geniculate ganglion of the facial nerve. Bell's palsy is most common in people aged 15 to 40 years, with a 1 in 60 lifetime risk. Most make a spontaneous recovery within 1 month, but up to 30% show delayed or incomplete recovery. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of treatments in adults and children? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to June 2010 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 14 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: antiviral treatment, corticosteroids (alone or plus antiviral treatment), hyperbaric oxygen therapy, facial nerve decompression surgery, and facial retraining. PMID:21375786

  17. [Patient with MPO-ANCA-associated disease with interstitial pneumonia and lower cranial nerves palsy who was previously exposed to asbestos].

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Kenji; Fukuzumi, Munehisa; Aizawa, Toyoaki; Shibata, Masahiko; Sakai, Toshihiko; Tojima, Hirokazu

    2010-11-01

    A 65-year-old man who was occupationally exposed to asbestos for 40 years was admitted to our hospital with fever and cough. Chest CT revealed paraseptal emphysema, subpleural fibrosis in both lungs, and pleural plaques. On bronchoalveolar lavage fluid contained elevated levels of lymphocytes and neutrophils (15% and 17%, respectively), and asbestos bodies were also found. Because serum MPO-ANCA titer was elevated to 188 EU, we suspected ANCA-associated disease with interstitial pneumonia. Prednisolone was begun at 30 mg/day and his lung opacities partially disappeared. Six weeks later, he complained of headache, dysphagia and hoarseness, and was admitted to the neurology department of the hospital. Under a diagnosis of either hypertrophic pachymeningitis or neuritis due to angiitis of the lower cranial nerves, steroid pulse therapy was performed. Asbestos exposure may have been a contributing factor for ANCA generation in this case. Furthermore, the fact that cranial nerves palsy occurred in spite of steroid therapy may also be important.

  18. Outcomes of Transferring a Healthy Motor Fascicle From the Radial Nerve to a Branch for the Triceps to Recover Elbow Extension in Partial Brachial Plexus Palsy.

    PubMed

    Flores, Leandro Pretto

    2017-03-01

    Triceps reinnervation is an important objective to pursue when repairing the brachial plexus for cases with upper roots injuries, and a number of different techniques have been developed in order to restore elbow extension in such cases. To demonstrate the surgical outcomes associated with the technique of transferring a single healthy motor fascicle from the radial nerve of the affected arm to a branch innervating 1 of the 3 heads of the triceps. A retrospective study of 13 adult patients sustaining an upper trunk syndrome associated with total elbow extension palsy who underwent the proposed technique as part of the surgical planning for reconstruction of the brachial plexus. Outcomes scored as M4 for elbow extension were noted in 9 cases (70%), M3 in 3 (23%), and M1 in 1 subject (7%). No patient considered the postoperative strength for carpal or finger extension as impaired. There were no differences in outcomes by using a fascicle activating carpal or finger extension as donor, as well as regarding the use of the branch to the medial or lateral head of the triceps as the recipient. The technique of transferring a healthy motor fascicle from the radial nerve of the affected side to one of its nonfunctional motor branches to the triceps is an effective and safe procedure for recovering elbow extension function in patients sustaining partial injuries of the brachial plexus.

  19. Intrinsic determinants of synaptic phenotype: an experimental study of abducens internuclear neurons connecting with anomalous targets.

    PubMed

    de la Cruz, R R; Benítez-Temiño, B; Pastor, A M

    2002-01-01

    The present experiments investigate the role of postsynaptic neurons in the morphological differentiation of presynaptic terminals that are formed de novo in the adult CNS. Abducens internuclear neurons in the adult cat were chosen as the experimental model. These neurons project onto the contralateral medial rectus motoneurons of the oculomotor nucleus. Abducens internuclear axon terminals were identified by their anterograde labeling with biocytin and analyzed at the electron microscopic level. To promote the formation of new synapses, two different experimental approaches were used. First, after the selective ablation of medial rectus motoneurons with ricin, abducens internuclear neurons reinnervated the neighboring oculomotor internuclear neurons. Second, after axotomy followed by embryonic cerebellar grafting, abducens internuclear axons invaded the implanted tissue and established synaptic connections in both the molecular and granule cell layer. Boutons contacting the oculomotor internuclear neurons developed ultrastructural characteristics that resembled the control synapses on medial rectus motoneurons. In the grafted cerebellar tissue, abducens internuclear axons and terminals did not resemble climbing or mossy fibers but showed similarities with control boutons. However, labeled boutons analyzed in the granule cell layer established a higher number of synaptic contacts than controls. This could reflect a trend towards the mossy fiber phenotype, although labeled boutons significantly differed in every measured parameter with the mossy fiber rosettes found in the graft. We conclude that at least for the abducens internuclear neurons, the ultrastructural differentiation of axon terminals reinnervating novel targets in the adult brain seems to be mainly under intrinsic control, with little influence by postsynaptic cells.

  20. Early and reliable detection of herpes simplex virus type 1 and varicella zoster virus DNAs in oral fluid of patients with idiopathic peripheral facial nerve palsy: Decision support regarding antiviral treatment?

    PubMed

    Lackner, Andreas; Kessler, Harald H; Walch, Christian; Quasthoff, Stefan; Raggam, Reinhard B

    2010-09-01

    Idiopathic peripheral facial nerve palsy has been associated with the reactivation of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) or varicella zoster virus (VZV). In recent studies, detection rates were found to vary strongly which may be caused by the use of different oral fluid collection devices in combination with molecular assays lacking standardization. In this single-center pilot study, liquid phase-based and absorption-based oral fluid collection was compared. Samples were collected with both systems from 10 patients with acute idiopathic peripheral facial nerve palsy, 10 with herpes labialis or with Ramsay Hunt syndrome, and 10 healthy controls. Commercially available IVD/CE-labeled molecular assays based on fully automated DNA extraction and real-time PCR were employed. With the liquid phase-based oral fluid collection system, three patients with idiopathic peripheral facial nerve palsy tested positive for HSV-1 DNA and another two tested positive for VZV DNA. All patients with herpes labialis tested positive for HSV-1 DNA and all patients with Ramsay Hunt syndrome tested positive for VZV DNA. With the absorption-based oral fluid collection system, detections rates and viral loads were found to be significantly lower when compared to those obtained with the liquid phase-based collection system. Collection of oral fluid with a liquid phase-based system and the use of automated and standardized molecular methods allow early and reliable detection of HSV-1 and VZV DNAs in patients with acute idiopathic peripheral facial nerve palsy and may provide a valuable decision support regarding start of antiviral treatment at the first clinical visit.

  1. Erb-Duchenne and Dejerine-Klumpke Palsies

    MedlinePlus

    ... those nerves. Erb-Duchenne (Erb's) palsy refers to paralysis of the upper brachial plexus. Dejerine-Klumpke (Klumpke's) palsy refers to paralysis of the lower brachial plexus. Although injuries can ...

  2. Pronation can increase the pressure on the posterior interosseous nerve under the arcade of Frohse: a possible mechanism of palsy after two-incision repair for distal biceps rupture--clinical experience and a cadaveric investigation.

    PubMed

    Links, Annie C; Graunke, Kyle S; Wahl, Christopher; Green, John R; Matsen, Frederick A

    2009-01-01

    Posterior interosseous nerve palsy is a recognized complication of 2-incision distal biceps tendon repair. We hypothesize that intraoperative forearm pronation can cause compression of the posterior interosseous nerve beneath the supinator and arcade of Frohse. Six human male cadaver upper extremities were dissected. Pressure on the posterior interosseous nerve beneath the arcade of Frohse and supinator was measured with a Swan-Ganz catheter connected to a pressure transducer. Pressure was significantly elevated in maximal pronation in all specimens with the elbow in both flexion and extension. Pressures at full pronation were significantly higher than pressures measured at 60 degrees of pronation (5 +/- 2 mm Hg in 60 degrees of pronation and 90 degrees of flexion, P < .0001; 7 +/- 3 mm Hg in 60 degrees of pronation and extension, P < 005). Maximal pronation can cause increased pressure on the posterior interosseous nerve. The safety of 2-incision distal biceps repair may be increased by avoiding prolonged, uninterrupted periods of hyperpronation.

  3. An objective functional evaluation of the flexor carpi ulnaris set of triple tendon transfer in radial nerve palsy.

    PubMed

    Latheef, L; Bhardwaj, P; Sankaran, A; Sabapathy, S R

    2017-02-01

    This study reports an objective assessment of postoperative function of 11 triple transfers for high radial palsies, using pronator teres for wrist extension, flexor carpi ulnaris for finger extension and palmaris longus for thumb extension. The mean follow-up was 3.3 years. Assessment was done by recording the active ranges of wrist motion, grip strength, wrist and finger strength and work simulation. The mean strength and range of wrist extension were 42% and 86%, respectively, of the contralateral wrist. Other measured movements were within the functional range and work simulation confirmed good restoration of function. The mean DASH score was 3.45, with no patient reporting any specific functional complaints. This study shows that even though the range of wrist motion and the strength of the wrist and fingers are less than normal, hand function remains good. We conclude that the flexor carpi ulnaris set of tendon transfer works well. 3.

  4. Cerebrospinal fluid dissemination of anaplastic intraventricular meningioma: report of a case presenting with progressive brainstem dysfunction and multiple cranial nerve palsies.

    PubMed

    Fujimaki, Motoki; Takanashi, Masashi; Kobayashi, Manami; Wada, Kei-ichiro; Machida, Yutaka; Kondo, Akihide; Hattori, Nobutaka; Miwa, Hideto

    2016-05-31

    It is extremely rare to see cerebrospinal fluid dissemination of intraventricular meningioma, particularly with the development of acute, progressive brainstem/cerebellar dysfunction with an absence of mass formation in the corresponding anatomical sites. An 81-year-old man was admitted because of double vision, right facial nerve palsy and truncal ataxia. Brain magnetic resonance imaging showed normal findings except for a tumor mass in the left lateral ventricle, which had been noted over 6 months previously. The patient developed hiccups, hyperventilation, and drowsiness, which worsened progressively, and did not respond to corticosteroid or intraventricular immunoglobulin therapy. Cerebrospinal fluid study revealed a mild elevation of protein, and cytology was negative. The patient died and an autopsy was performed. Postmortem investigation disclosed a malignant transformation of benign fibroid meningioma with cerebrospinal fluid dissemination of the malignant cells, diversely involving the surface of brainstem, cerebellum, and spinal cords, secondarily resulting in extensive ischemia in the brain parenchyma by vessel occlusion. If a patient with an intraventricular tumor develops acute, progressive neurological symptoms, the possibility that it is be caused by cerebrospinal fluid dissemination of tumor cells, after malignant transformation, should be considered.

  5. Optimal learning in a virtual patient simulation of cranial nerve palsies: the interaction between social learning context and student aptitude.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Teresa R; Lyons, Rebecca; Chuah, Joon Hao; Kopper, Regis; Lok, Benjamin C; Cendan, Juan C

    2013-01-01

    Simulation in medical education provides students with opportunities to practice interviews, examinations, and diagnosis formulation related to complex conditions without risks to patients. To examine differences between individual and team participation on learning outcomes and student perspectives through use of virtual patients (VPs) for teaching cranial nerve (CN) evaluation. Fifty-seven medical students were randomly assigned to complete simulation exercises either as individuals or as members of three-person teams. Students interviewed, examined, and diagnosed VPs with possible CN damage in the neurological exam rehearsal virtual environment (NERVE). Knowledge of CN abnormalities was assessed pre- and post-simulation. Student perspectives of system usability were evaluated post-simulation. An aptitude-treatment interaction (ATI) effect was detected; at pre-test scores ≤ 50%, students in teams scored higher (83%) at post-test than did students as individuals (62%, p = 0.02). Post-simulation, students in teams reported greater confidence in their ability to diagnose CN abnormalities than did students as individuals (p = 0.02; mean rating = 4.0/5.0 and 3.4/5.0, respectively). The ATI effect allows us to begin defining best practices for the integration of VP simulators into the medical curriculum. We are persuaded to implement future NERVE exercises with small teams of medical students.

  6. Optimal learning in a virtual patient simulation of cranial nerve palsies: The interaction between social learning context and student aptitude

    PubMed Central

    JOHNSON, TERESA R.; LYONS, REBECCA; CHUAH, JOON HAO; KOPPER, REGIS; LOK, BENJAMIN C.; CENDAN, JUAN C.

    2013-01-01

    Background Simulation in medical education provides students with opportunities to practice interviews, examinations, and diagnosis formulation related to complex conditions without risks to patients. Aim To examine differences between individual and team participation on learning outcomes and student perspectives through use of virtual patients (VPs) for teaching cranial nerve (CN) evaluation. Methods Fifty-seven medical students were randomly assigned to complete simulation exercises either as individuals or as members of three-person teams. Students interviewed, examined, and diagnosed VPs with possible CN damage in the Neurological Exam Rehearsal Virtual Environment (NERVE). Knowledge of CN abnormalities was assessed pre- and post-simulation. Student perspectives of system usability were evaluated post-simulation. Results An aptitude-treatment interaction (ATI) effect was detected; at pre-test scores ≤50%, students in teams scored higher (83%) at post-test than did students as individuals (62%, p = 0.02). Post-simulation, students in teams reported greater confidence in their ability to diagnose CN abnormalities than did students as individuals (p = 0.02; mean rating = 4.0/5.0 and 3.4/5.0, respectively). Conclusion The ATI effect allows us to begin defining best practices for the integration of VP simulators into the medical curriculum. We are persuaded to implement future NERVE exercises with small teams of medical students. PMID:22938679

  7. Recurrences of Bell's palsy.

    PubMed

    Cirpaciu, D; Goanta, C M; Cirpaciu, M D

    2014-01-01

    Bell's palsy in known as the most common cause of facial paralysis, determined by the acute onset of lower motor neuron weakness of the facial nerve with no detectable cause. With a lifetime risk of 1 in 60 and an annual incidence of 11-40/100,000 population, the condition resolves completely in around 71% of the untreated cases. Clinical trials performed for Bell's palsy have reported some recurrences, ipsilateral or contralateral to the side affected in the primary episode of facial palsy. Only few data are found in the literature. Melkersson-Rosenthal is a rare neuromucocutaneous syndrome characterized by recurrent facial paralysis, fissured tongue (lingua plicata), orofacial edema. We attempted to analyze some clinical and epidemiologic aspects of recurrent idiopathic palsy, and to develop relevant correlations between the existing data in literature and those obtained in this study. This is a retrospective study carried out on a 10-years period for adults and a five-year period for children. A number of 185 patients aged between 4 and 70 years old were analyzed. 136 of them were adults and 49 were children. 22 of 185 patients with Bell's palsy (12%) had a recurrent partial or complete facial paralysis with one to six episodes of palsy. From this group of 22 cases, 5 patients were diagnosed with Melkersson-Rosenthal syndrome. The patients' age was between 4 and 70 years old, with a medium age of 27,6 years. In the group studied, fifteen patients, meaning 68%, were women and seven were men. The majority of patients in our group with more than two facial palsy episodes had at least one episode on the contralateral side. Our study found a significant incidence of recurrences of idiopathic facial palsy. Recurrent idiopathic facial palsy and Melkersson-Rosenthal syndrome is diagnosed more often in young females. Recurrence is more likely to occur in the first two years from the onset, which leads to the conclusion that we should have a follow up of patients

  8. Recurrences of Bell's palsy

    PubMed Central

    Cirpaciu, D; Goanta, CM; Cirpaciu, MD

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Bell’s palsy in known as the most common cause of facial paralysis, determined by the acute onset of lower motor neuron weakness of the facial nerve with no detectable cause. With a lifetime risk of 1 in 60 and an annual incidence of 11-40/100,000 population, the condition resolves completely in around 71% of the untreated cases. Clinical trials performed for Bell’s palsy have reported some recurrences, ipsilateral or contralateral to the side affected in the primary episode of facial palsy. Only few data are found in the literature. Melkersson-Rosenthal is a rare neuromucocutaneous syndrome characterized by recurrent facial paralysis, fissured tongue (lingua plicata), orofacial edema. Purpose. We attempted to analyze some clinical and epidemiologic aspects of recurrent idiopathic palsy, and to develop relevant correlations between the existing data in literature and those obtained in this study. Methods & Materials. This is a retrospective study carried out on a 10-years period for adults and a five-year period for children. Results. A number of 185 patients aged between 4 and 70 years old were analyzed. 136 of them were adults and 49 were children. 22 of 185 patients with Bell’s palsy (12%) had a recurrent partial or complete facial paralysis with one to six episodes of palsy. From this group of 22 cases, 5 patients were diagnosed with Melkersson-Rosenthal syndrome. The patients’ age was between 4 and 70 years old, with a medium age of 27,6 years. In the group studied, fifteen patients, meaning 68%, were women and seven were men. The majority of patients in our group with more than two facial palsy episodes had at least one episode on the contralateral side. Conclusions. Our study found a significant incidence of recurrences of idiopathic facial palsy. Recurrent idiopathic facial palsy and Melkersson-Rosenthal syndrome is diagnosed more often in young females. Recurrence is more likely to occur in the first two years from the onset, which

  9. Bell's Palsy following acupuncture treatment--a case report.

    PubMed

    Rosted, Palle; Woolley, David R

    2007-06-01

    A case of Bell's palsy after acupuncture is presented. It concerns a healthy 47 year old man who developed Bell's palsy less than 24 hours after local acupuncture treatment for temporomandibular dysfunction. The Bell's palsy recovered within two weeks, and may have been caused by a haematoma around the facial nerve.

  10. Obstetrical brachial plexus palsy: Can excision of upper trunk neuroma and nerve grafting improve function in babies with adequate elbow flexion at nine months of age?

    PubMed

    Argenta, Anne E; Brooker, Jack; MacIssac, Zoe; Natali, Megan; Greene, Stephanie; Stanger, Meg; Grunwaldt, Lorelei

    2016-05-01

    Accepted indications for exploration in obstetrical brachial plexus palsy (OBPP) vary by center. Most agree that full elbow flexion against gravity at nine months of age implies high chance of spontaneous recovery and thus excludes a baby from surgical intervention. However, there are certain movements of the shoulder and forearm that may not be used frequently by the infant, but are extremely important functionally as they grow. These movements are difficult to assess in a baby and may lead to some clinicians to recommend conservative treatment, when this cohort of infants may in fact benefit substantially from surgery. A retrospective review was conducted on all infants managed surgically at the Brachial Plexus Center of a major children's hospital from 2009 to 2014. Further analysis identified five patients who had near-normal AMS scores for elbow flexion but who had weakness of shoulder abduction, flexion, external rotation, and/or forearm supination. In contrast to standard conservative management, this cohort underwent exploration, C5-6 neuroma excision, and sural nerve grafting. Data analysis was performed on this group to look for overall improvement in function. During an average follow-up period of 29 months, all patients made substantial gains in motor function of the shoulder and forearm, without loss of elbow flexion or extension, or worsening of overall outcome. In select infants with brachial plexus injuries but near-normal AMS scores for elbow flexion, surgical intervention may be indicated to achieve the best functional outcome. Copyright © 2016 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Bilateral conjugacy of movement initiation is retained at the eye but not at the mouth following long-term unilateral facial nerve palsy.

    PubMed

    Coulson, Susan E; O'Dwyer, Nicholas J; Adams, Roger D; Croxson, Glen R

    2006-08-01

    Voluntary eyelid closure and smiling were studied in 11 normal subjects and 11 patients with long-term unilateral facial nerve palsy (FNP). The conjugacy of eyelid movements shown previously for blinks was maintained for voluntary eye closures in normal subjects, with movement onset being synchronous in both eyes. Bilateral onset synchrony of the sides of the mouth was also observed in smiling movements in normal subjects. In FNP patients, initiation of movement of the paretic and non-paretic eyelids was also synchronous, but markedly delayed relative to normal (by 136 ms = 32%). The initiation of bilateral movements at the mouth was similarly delayed, but in contrast to the eyes, it was not synchronous. Central neural processing in the FNP subjects was normal, however, since unilateral movements at the mouth were not delayed. The delays therefore point to considerable additional information processing needed for initiating bilateral facial movements after FNP. The maintenance of bilateral onset synchrony in eyelid closure and its loss in smiling following FNP is an important difference in the neural control of these facial regions. Bilateral conjugacy of eyelid movements is probably crucial for coordinating visual input and was achieved apparently without conscious effort on the part of the patients. Bilateral conjugacy of movements at the sides of the mouth may be less critical for normal function, although patients would very much like to achieve it in order to improve the appearance of their smile. Since the everyday frequency of eyelid movements is considerably greater than that of smiling, it is possible that the preserved eyelid conjugacy in these patients with long-term FNP is merely a product of greater experience. However, if synchrony of movement onset is found to be preserved in patients with acute FNP, then it would suggest that eyelid conjugacy has a privileged status in the neural organisation of the face.

  12. Development and validation of a computerized model of smiling: Modeling the percentage movement required for perception of smiling in unilateral facial nerve palsy.

    PubMed

    Penn, Jack W; James, Antonia; Khatib, Manaf; Ahmed, Usama; Bella, Husam; Clarke, Alex; Butler, Peter E M

    2013-03-01

    The inability to smile stands out as a notable difficulty for individuals with facial nerve palsies; a problem that facial reanimation surgery aims to rectify. However, smile reconstruction currently lacks quantitative data by which to objectively measure outcomes. This study aims to identify the relative importance of different oral muscles in terms of smiling, and explore the percentage function that needs to be restored for a smile to be perceived by an observer. A computer animation tool was developed to model the oral facial muscles and demonstrate the facial expressions produced by contraction of different muscle groups. By programming a variable unilateral paralysis of the zygomaticus major, the effects of 0-100% function of this muscle can also be seen in a further set of animations using the basic muscular structure of a smile to produce a computerized proxy smile. These animations were shown to 75 adults from the general population who reported those expressions they perceived as a smile. The only facial expression consistently associated with a perceived smile was caused by the combined contraction of the zygomaticus major and the levator anguli oris (P < 0.001). This concurs with previously reported observations of the human smile. Over 70% of the subjects were able to perceive a smile with just 40% function of the unilateral paralyzed zygomaticus major. These results present an objective target for facial reanimation surgery by which outcomes may be measured. This computerized model also provides a valuable tool for patient education during pre-operative consent. Copyright © 2012 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Imaging the ocular motor nerves.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Teresa; Verbist, Berit; van Buchem, Mark; van Osch, Thijs; Webb, Andrew

    2010-05-01

    The ocular motor nerves (OMNs) comprise the oculomotor, trochlear and the abducens nerves. According to their course, they are divided into four or five anatomic segments: intra-axial, cisternal, cavernous and intra-orbital and, for the abducens nerve, an additional interdural segment. Magnetic resonance imaging is the imaging method of choice in the evaluation of the normal and pathologic ocular motor nerves. CT still plays a limited but important role in the evaluation of the intraosseous portions at the skull base and bony foramina. We describe for each segment of these cranial nerves, the normal anatomy, the most appropriate image sequences and planes, their imaging appearance and pathologic conditions. Magnetic resonance imaging with high magnetic fields is a developing and promising technique. We describe our initial experience with a Phillips 7.0T MRI scanner in the evaluation of the brainstem segments of the OMNs. As imaging becomes more refined, an understanding of the detailed anatomy is increasingly necessary, as the demand on radiology to diagnose smaller lesions also increases.

  14. Acupuncture treatment of facial palsy.

    PubMed

    Bokhari, Syed Zahid Hussain; Zahid, Syeda Samina

    2010-01-01

    Bell's palsy is an idiopathic, acute peripheral-nerve palsy involving the facial nerve which supplies all the muscles of facial expression. This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of electro-A=acupuncture on patients with facial palsy. This study was conducted on patients with facial palsy at a private clinic at Peshawar during 1999-2009, and 49 cases were included in the study. All those cases that were within first two weeks of illness or who had related history of stroke or they had upper motor neuron lesion were not included in the study. Electroacupuncture was used as the main therapeutic technique to treat these cases. Patients were subjected to acupuncture treatment at four major points on the face for 20-25 minutes everyday for 10 days. Specific points were used for nasolabial fold and watering of the eye. After rest for a week patients were again evaluated and another course of treatment comprising of 5-10 days was sufficient in most cases. Frequency of electro-acupuncture is kept at 60-80 cycles per minute. Total number of patients studied was 49 with duration of illness as early as 3 weeks to a year and above. Cases with duration of illness from 3 weeks onward showed rapid recovery of palsy symptoms with electro-acupuncture. All cases showed recovery. Palsy of the angle of the mouth did not recover completely. Electro-acupuncture is effective in treating facial palsy cases.

  15. Cerebral Palsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... ol (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Cerebral palsy (CP) is a group of disorders that affect ... resource—it highlights the ADDM Network’s data on cerebral palsy in a way that is useful for stakeholders ...

  16. Cerebral Palsy

    MedlinePlus

    Cerebral palsy is a group of disorders that affect a person's ability to move and to maintain balance ... do not get worse over time. People with cerebral palsy may have difficulty walking. They may also have ...

  17. Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsy.

    PubMed

    Paprocka, Justyna; Kajor, Maciej; Jamroz, Ewa; Jezela-Stanek, Aleksandra; Seeman, Pavel; Marszał, Elzbieta

    2006-01-01

    Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsy (HNPP) is an autosomal dominant disease with sensory and motor nerve palsies usually precipitated by trivial trauma or compression. In the majority of cases HNPP is caused by deletion of the peripheral myelin protein 22 gene (PMP22) on chromosome 17p11.2. The authors present a family case with genetically proven HNPP.

  18. Grafting of a new target prevents synapse loss in abducens internuclear neurons induced by axotomy.

    PubMed

    Benítez-Temiño, B; de la Cruz, R R; Pastor, A M

    2003-01-01

    The loss of afferent synaptic boutons is a prominent alteration induced by axotomy on adult central neurons. In this work we attempted to prove whether synapse loss could be reverted by reconnection with a new target. We severed the medial longitudinal fascicle of adult cats and then transplanted embryonic cerebellar primordia at the lesion site immediately after lesion. As previously shown, the transected axons from abducens internuclear neurons penetrate and reinnervate the graft [J Comp Neurol 444 (2002) 324]. By immunocytochemistry and electron microscopy we studied the synaptology of abducens internuclear neurons under three conditions: control, axotomy and transplant (2 months of survival time). Semithin sections of the abducens nucleus were immunostained against calretinin, to identify abducens internuclear neurons, and either synaptophysin (SF), to label synaptic terminals, or glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) to detect the astrocytic reaction. Optical and linear density of SF and GFAP immunostaining were measured. Data revealed a significant decrease in the density of SF-labeled terminals with a parallel increase in GFAP-immunoreactive elements after axotomy. On the contrary, in the transplant group, the density of SF-labeled terminals was found similar to control, and the astrocytic reaction induced by lesion was significantly reduced. At the ultrastructural level, synaptic coverage and linear density of boutons were measured around the somata of abducens internuclear neurons. Whereas a significant reduction in both parameters was found after axotomy, cells of the transplant group received a normal density of synaptic endings. The ratio between F- and S-type boutons was found similar in the three groups. Therefore, these findings indicate that the grafting of a new target can prevent the loss of afferent synaptic boutons produced by the axotomy.

  19. Bell's Palsy Diagnosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stories Español Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Bell's Palsy Sections What Is Bell's Palsy? Bell's Palsy Symptoms Bell's Palsy Treatment What Is Bell's Palsy? Written By: Kierstan Boyd Reviewed By: Philip ...

  20. Extensive dural sinus thrombosis and bilateral lateral rectus palsy as an uncommon complication of chronic suppurative otitis media.

    PubMed

    Balasubramanian, Anusha; Mohamad, Irfan; Sidek, Dinsuhaimi

    2013-01-25

    Dural venous sinus thrombosis, especially of the sigmoid sinus, is a known but uncommon intracranial extradural complication of chronic suppurative otitis media. Even rarer is the simultaneous occurrence of bilateral abducens palsy in the same patient. We report the case of an adolescent male who presented with signs of raised intracranial pressure, diplopia and bilateral lateral rectus palsy associated with a history of left ear discharge and neck swelling. Extensive dural sinus thrombosis extending right up to the left internal jugular vein was confirmed on CT imaging. The patient was successfully treated with thrombolytic agents and antibiotic therapy. The pathophysiology of the concurrent complications is discussed.

  1. A case of Klumpke's obstetric brachial plexus palsy following a Cesarean section.

    PubMed

    Al-Qattan, Mohammad M; El-Sayed, Amel A F

    2016-09-01

    It is generally thought that Klumpke's palsy is not seen as obstetric injury. The authors present a case of Klumpke's palsy with Horner syndrome following delivery by emergency Cesarean section. Neurolysis and nerve grafting partially corrected the paralysis.

  2. Partial relapse of Bell's palsy following superficial radiotherapy to a basal cell carcinoma in the temple.

    PubMed

    Brincat, S; Mantell, B S

    1986-07-01

    A patient who developed a partial relapse of Bell's palsy following superficial radiotherapy to a basal cell carcinoma in the temple is reported. Nerves injured by Bell's palsy may be more susceptible to radiation induced damage.

  3. Bell palsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... This nerve is called the facial or seventh cranial nerve. Damage to this nerve causes weakness or paralysis ... where it travels through the bones of the skull. This nerve controls movement of the muscles of the face. ...

  4. Clinical practice guideline: Bell's palsy.

    PubMed

    Baugh, Reginald F; Basura, Gregory J; Ishii, Lisa E; Schwartz, Seth R; Drumheller, Caitlin Murray; Burkholder, Rebecca; Deckard, Nathan A; Dawson, Cindy; Driscoll, Colin; Gillespie, M Boyd; Gurgel, Richard K; Halperin, John; Khalid, Ayesha N; Kumar, Kaparaboyna Ashok; Micco, Alan; Munsell, Debra; Rosenbaum, Steven; Vaughan, William

    2013-11-01

    Bell's palsy, named after the Scottish anatomist, Sir Charles Bell, is the most common acute mono-neuropathy, or disorder affecting a single nerve, and is the most common diagnosis associated with facial nerve weakness/paralysis. Bell's palsy is a rapid unilateral facial nerve paresis (weakness) or paralysis (complete loss of movement) of unknown cause. The condition leads to the partial or complete inability to voluntarily move facial muscles on the affected side of the face. Although typically self-limited, the facial paresis/paralysis that occurs in Bell's palsy may cause significant temporary oral incompetence and an inability to close the eyelid, leading to potential eye injury. Additional long-term poor outcomes do occur and can be devastating to the patient. Treatments are generally designed to improve facial function and facilitate recovery. There are myriad treatment options for Bell's palsy, and some controversy exists regarding the effectiveness of several of these options, and there are consequent variations in care. In addition, numerous diagnostic tests available are used in the evaluation of patients with Bell's palsy. Many of these tests are of questionable benefit in Bell's palsy. Furthermore, while patients with Bell's palsy enter the health care system with facial paresis/paralysis as a primary complaint, not all patients with facial paresis/paralysis have Bell's palsy. It is a concern that patients with alternative underlying etiologies may be misdiagnosed or have unnecessary delay in diagnosis. All of these quality concerns provide an important opportunity for improvement in the diagnosis and management of patients with Bell's palsy. The primary purpose of this guideline is to improve the accuracy of diagnosis for Bell's palsy, to improve the quality of care and outcomes for patients with Bell's palsy, and to decrease harmful variations in the evaluation and management of Bell's palsy. This guideline addresses these needs by encouraging

  5. Obstetrical brachial plexus palsy.

    PubMed

    Romaña, M C; Rogier, A

    2013-01-01

    Obstetrical brachial plexus palsy is considered to be the result of a trauma during the delivery, even if there remains some controversy surrounding the causes. Although most babies recover spontaneously in the first 3 months of life, a small number remains with poor recovery which requires surgical brachial plexus exploration. Surgical indications depend on the type of lesion (producing total or partial palsy) and particularly the nonrecovery of biceps function by the age of 3 months. In a global palsy, microsurgery will be mandatory and the strategy for restoration will focus first on hand reinnervation and secondarily on providing elbow flexion and shoulder stability. Further procedures may be necessary during growth in order to avoid fixed contractured deformities or to give or increase strength of important muscle functions like elbow flexion or wrist extension. The author reviews the history of obstetrical brachial plexus injury, epidemiology, and the specifics of descriptive and functional anatomy in babies and children. Clinical manifestations at birth are directly correlated with the anatomical lesion. Finally, operative procedures are considered, including strategies of reconstruction with nerve grafting in infants and secondary surgery to increase functional capacity at later ages. However, normal function is usually not recovered, particularly in total brachial plexus palsy.

  6. Eye Movements and Abducens Motoneuron Behavior During Cholinergically Induced REM Sleep

    PubMed Central

    Marquez-Ruiz, Javier; Escudero, Miguel

    2009-01-01

    Study objectives: The injection of cholinergic drugs in the pons has been largely used to induce REM sleep as a useful model to study different processes during this period. In the present study, microinjections of carbachol in the nucleus reticularis pontis oralis (NRPO) were performed to test the hypothesis that eye movements and the behavior of extraocular motoneurons during induced REM sleep do not differ from those during spontaneous REM sleep. Methods: Six female adult cats were prepared for chronic recording of eye movements (by means of the search-coil technique) and electroencephalography, electromyography, ponto-geniculo-occipital (PGO) waves at the lateral geniculate nucleus, and identified abducens motoneuron activities after microinjections of the cholinergic agonist carbachol into the NRPO. Results: Unilateral microinjections (n = 13) of carbachol in the NRPO induced REM sleep-like periods in which the eyes performed a convergence and downward rotation interrupted by phasic complex rapid eye movements associated to PGO waves. During induced-REM sleep abducens motoneurons lost their tonic activity and eye position codification, but continued codifying eye velocity during the burst of eye movements. Conclusion: The present results show that eye movements and the underlying behavior of abducens motoneurons are very similar to those present during natural REM sleep. Thus, microinjection of carbachol seems to activate the structures responsible for the exclusive oculomotor behavior observed during REM sleep, validating this pharmacological model and enabling a more efficient exploration of phasic and tonic phenomena underlying eye movements during REM sleep. Citation: Marquez-Ruiz J; Escudero M. Eye movements and abducens motoneuron behavior during cholinergically induced REM sleep. SLEEP 2009;32(4):471–481. PMID:19413141

  7. Acupuncture for Bell's palsy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ning; Zhou, Muke; He, Li; Zhou, Dong; Li, N

    2010-08-04

    Bell's palsy or idiopathic facial palsy is an acute facial paralysis due to inflammation of the facial nerve. A number of studies published in China have suggested acupuncture is beneficial for facial palsy. The objective of this review was to examine the efficacy of acupuncture in hastening recovery and reducing long-term morbidity from Bell's palsy. We updated the searches of the Cochrane Neuromuscular Disease Group Trials Specialized Register (24 May 2010), The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (Issue 2, 2010), MEDLINE (January 1966 to May 2010), EMBASE (January 1980 to May 2010), AMED (January 1985 to May 2010), LILACS (from January 1982 to May 2010) and the Chinese Biomedical Retrieval System (January 1978 to May 2010) for randomised controlled trials using 'Bell's palsy' and its synonyms, 'idiopathic facial paralysis' or 'facial palsy' as well as search terms including 'acupuncture'. Chinese journals in which we thought we might find randomised controlled trials relevant to our study were handsearched. We reviewed the bibliographies of the randomised trials and contacted the authors and known experts in the field to identify additional published or unpublished data. We included all randomised controlled trials involving acupuncture by needle insertion in the treatment of Bell's palsy irrespective of any language restrictions. Two review authors identified potential articles from the literature search, extracted data and assessed quality of each trial independently. All disagreements were resolved by discussion between the review authors. The literature search and handsearching identified 49 potentially relevant articles. Of these, six RCTs were included involving 537 participants with Bell's palsy. Two more possible trials were identified in the update than the previous version of this systematic review, but both were excluded because they were not real RCTs. Of the six included trials, five used acupuncture while the other one used

  8. Temporal bone rhabdomyosarcoma presenting as acute peripheral facial nerve paralysis.

    PubMed

    Reid, Samuel R; Hetzel, Thomas; Losek, Joseph

    2006-10-01

    Facial palsy is not an uncommon presentation to an emergency department. Whereas most patients will ultimately receive a diagnosis of Bell palsy (idiopathic peripheral seventh cranial nerve palsy), a subset will have an identifiable cause for their facial paralysis. Children are more likely to have an identifiable cause than are adults. We present a case in which a child presented with acute peripheral facial nerve palsy and was found to have temporal bone rhabdomyosarcoma. The key clinical finding was the presence of both 7th and 12th cranial nerve palsy.

  9. Dual encoding of muscle tension and eye position by abducens motoneurons

    PubMed Central

    Davis-López de Carrizosa, María A.; Morado-Díaz, Camilo J.; Miller, Joel M.; de la Cruz, Rosa R.; Pastor, Ángel M.

    2011-01-01

    Extraocular muscle tension associated with spontaneous eye movements has a pulse-slide-step profile similar to that of motoneuron firing rate. Existing models only relate motoneuron firing to eye position, velocity and acceleration. We measured and quantitatively compared lateral rectus muscle force and eye position with the firing of abducens motoneurons in the cat to determine fundamental encoding correlations. During fixations (step), muscle force increased exponentially with eccentric eye position, consistent with a model of estimate ensemble motor innervation based on neuronal sensitivities and recruitment order. Moreover, firing rate in all motoneurons tested was better related to eye position than to muscle tension during fixations. In contrast, during the postsaccadic slide phase, the time constant of firing rate decay was closely related to that of muscle force decay, suggesting that all motoneurons encode muscle tension as well. Discharge characteristics of abducens motoneurons formed overlapping clusters of phasic and tonic motoneurons, thus, tonic units recruited earlier and had a larger slide signal. We conclude that the slide signal is a discharge characteristic of the motoneuron that controls muscle tension during the post-saccadic phase and that motoneurons are specialized for both tension and position-related properties. The organization of signal content in the pool of abducens motoneurons from the very phasic to the very tonic units is possibly a result of the differential trophic background received from distinct types of muscle fibers. PMID:21307263

  10. Cerebral Palsy (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Cerebral Palsy KidsHealth > For Parents > Cerebral Palsy A A A ... kids who are living with the condition. About Cerebral Palsy Cerebral palsy is one of the most common ...

  11. Cerebral palsy - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - cerebral palsy ... The following organizations are good resources for information on cerebral palsy : National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke -- www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/cerebral_palsy/cerebral_palsy. ...

  12. Bell's Palsy (For Kids)

    MedlinePlus

    ... de los dientes Video: Getting an X-ray Bell's Palsy KidsHealth > For Kids > Bell's Palsy Print A A ... usually goes away on its own. What Is Bell's Palsy? Bell's palsy weakens or paralyzes the muscles on ...

  13. Cerebral Palsy (For Teens)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Right Sport for You Healthy School Lunch Planner Cerebral Palsy KidsHealth > For Teens > Cerebral Palsy Print A A ... do just what everyone else does. What Is Cerebral Palsy? Cerebral palsy (CP) is a disorder of the ...

  14. Time course of Bell palsy.

    PubMed

    Qiu, W W; Yin, S S; Stucker, F J; Aarstad, R F; Nguyen, H H

    1996-09-01

    This study was designed to quantitatively characterize the time course of facial palsy and the relationship between electroneurography and the facial nerve grading percentage as a function of onset time. Bilateral electroneurographic recordings during different stages in the course of the disease were repeated and compared with categorized videotaped facial movements using the House-Brackmann facial nerve grading system in 32 patients with Bell palsy. Preliminary results of this study demonstrate a time gap between the percentage of electroneurographic response and the category of the facial nerve grading system during the same period of disease progress. A theoretical model of the time course and specific patterns regarding the recovery of facial function is established. The theoretical time course of facial palsy is divided into 3 stages; preclinical, clinical, and postclinical. Based on the time course of electroneurographic and facial grading functions, the period between 10 and 14 days after onset was found to be most valuable for prediction of recovery. According to this theoretical model, a given time course pattern based on the results of serial electroneurographic recordings provides reliable prognostic information on recovery from Bell palsy.

  15. Bell's Palsy.

    PubMed

    Vakharia, Kavita; Vakharia, Kalpesh

    2016-02-01

    Bell's palsy is unilateral, acute onset facial paralysis that is a common condition. One in every 65 people experiences Bell's palsy in the course of their lifetime. The majority of patients afflicted with this idiopathic disorder recover facial function. Initial treatment involves oral corticosteroids, possible antiviral drugs, and protection of the eye from desiccation. A small subset of patients may be left with incomplete recovery, synkinesis, facial contracture, or hemifacial spasm. A combination of medical and surgical treatment options exist to treat the long-term sequelae of Bell's palsy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Acupuncture for Bell's palsy.

    PubMed

    He, L; Zhou, D; Wu, B; Li, N; Zhou, M K

    2004-01-01

    Bell's palsy or idiopathic facial palsy is an acute facial paralysis due to inflammation of the facial nerve. A number of studies published in China have suggested acupuncture is beneficial for facial palsy. The objective of this review was to examine the efficacy of acupuncture in hastening recovery and reducing long-term morbidity from Bell's palsy. We searched the Cochrane Neuromuscular Disease Group Register, MEDLINE (January 1966 to December 2002), EMBASE (January 1980 to December 2002), LILACS (from January 1982 to December 2002) and the Chinese Biomedical Retrieval System (January 1978 to December 2002) for randomised controlled trials using 'Bell's palsy' and its synonyms, 'idiopathic facial paralysis' or 'facial palsy' as well as search terms including 'acupuncture'. Chinese journals in which we thought we might find randomised controlled trials or controlled clinical trials relevant to our study were handsearched. We reviewed the bibliographies of the randomised trials and contacted the authors and known experts in the field to identify additional published or unpublished data. We included all randomised or quasi-randomised controlled trials involving acupuncture in the treatment of Bell's palsy irrespective of any language restrictions. Two reviewers identified potential articles from the literature search and extracted data independently using a data extraction form. The assessment of methodological quality included allocation concealment, patient blinding, differences at baseline of the experimental groups and completeness of follow-up. Two reviewers assessed quality independently. All disagreements were resolved by discussion between the reviewers. Three studies including a total of 238 patients met the inclusion criteria. Two of them used acupuncture while the third used acupuncture combined with drugs. No trials reported on the outcomes specified for this review. Three included studies showed that the therapeutic effect of acupuncture alone was

  17. Acupuncture for Bell's palsy.

    PubMed

    He, L; Zhou, M K; Zhou, D; Wu, B; Li, N; Kong, S Y; Zhang, D P; Li, Q F; Yang, J; Zhang, X

    2007-10-17

    Bell's palsy or idiopathic facial palsy is an acute facial paralysis due to inflammation of the facial nerve. A number of studies published in China have suggested acupuncture is beneficial for facial palsy. The objective of this review was to examine the efficacy of acupuncture in hastening recovery and reducing long-term morbidity from Bell's palsy. We searched the Cochrane Neuromuscular Disease Group Trials Register, MEDLINE (January 1966 to April 2006), EMBASE (January 1980 to April 2006), LILACS (from January 1982 to April 2006) and the Chinese Biomedical Retrieval System (January 1978 to April 2006) for randomised controlled trials using 'Bell's palsy' and its synonyms, 'idiopathic facial paralysis' or 'facial palsy' as well as search terms including 'acupuncture'. Chinese journals in which we thought we might find randomised controlled trials or controlled clinical trials relevant to our study were handsearched. We reviewed the bibliographies of the randomised trials and contacted the authors and known experts in the field to identify additional published or unpublished data. We included all randomised or quasi-randomised controlled trials involving acupuncture in the treatment of Bell's palsy irrespective of any language restrictions. Two review authors identified potential articles from the literature search and extracted data independently using a data extraction form. The assessment of methodological quality included allocation concealment, patient blinding, differences at baseline of the experimental groups and completeness of follow-up. Two review authors assessed quality independently. All disagreements were resolved by discussion between the review authors. Six studies including a total of 537 participants met the inclusion criteria. Five of them used acupuncture while another one used acupuncture combined with drugs. No trials reported on the outcomes specified for this review. Harmful side effects were not reported in any of the trials. Flaws in

  18. Bell's Palsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bell's palsy, some people with the condition may benefit from the following: Relaxation techniques. Relaxing by using techniques such as meditation and yoga may relieve muscle tension and chronic pain. Acupuncture. ...

  19. Bell's palsy and herpes simplex virus.

    PubMed

    Schirm, J; Mulkens, P S

    1997-11-01

    Bell's palsy, which is defined as idiopathic peripheral facial paralysis of sudden onset, accounts for > 50% of all cases of facial paralysis. Different theories on the etiology of Bell's palsy have been proposed and investigated. Various clinical studies have suggested an etiological link between Bell's palsy and herpes simplex virus (HSV). In addition, animal experiments have shown the ability of HSV to induce facial paralysis. In our opinion, the possible link between Bell's palsy and HSV can only be explored properly by studying the human facial nerve, and especially the geniculate ganglion itself. Different groups have tried to detect hypothetically reactivated and hypothetically latent HSV in the facial nerves of Bell's palsy patients and control patients, respectively. The isolation of infectious HSV from facial nerve tissue by conventional cell culture methods appeared to be very difficult, also when Bell's palsy patients were tested. Instead, modern molecular methods, such as in situ hybridization and the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) could easily detect HSV DNA in geniculate ganglia. The detection of HSV-specific latency-associated transcripts in the ganglia of control patients provided further evidence for the hypothetically latent state of HSV in the geniculate ganglia in these patients. Recent PCR experiments performed by a Japanese group strongly suggest that the area adjacent to the geniculate ganglia does not usually contain any HSV at all, except in patients with Bell's palsy. This well-controlled study provides conclusive evidence that reactivation of HSV genomes from the geniculate ganglia is the most important cause of Bell's palsy. Consequently, it has been suggested that "Bell's palsy" be renamed as "herpetic facial paralysis".

  20. Bell's Palsy as a Possible Complication of Hepatitis B Vaccination in A Child

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Hüseyin; Orbak, Zerrin

    2009-01-01

    Bell's Palsy is the sudden onset of unilateral temporary paralysis of facial muscles resulting from seventh cranial nerve dysfunction. Presented here is a two-year old female patient with right peripheral facial palsy following hepatitis B vaccination. Readers’ attention is drawn to an uncommon cause of Bell's Palsy, as a rare complication of hepatitis B vaccination. PMID:19902808

  1. Bell's palsy as a possible complication of hepatitis B vaccination in a child.

    PubMed

    Alp, Handan; Tan, Hüseyin; Orbak, Zerrin

    2009-10-01

    Bell's Palsy is the sudden onset of unilateral temporary paralysis of facial muscles resulting from seventh cranial nerve dysfunction. Presented here is a two-year old female patient with right peripheral facial palsy following hepatitis B vaccination. Readers' attention is drawn to an uncommon cause of Bell's Palsy, as a rare complication of hepatitis B vaccination.

  2. [Obstetric brachial palsy, a historical review].

    PubMed

    Collado-Vazquez, S; Jimenez-Antona, C; Carrillo, J M

    2012-11-16

    Lesions of the peripheral nerves have been known since ancient times, but there are few references to the treatments that were used in the past. AIM. To analyse obstetric brachial palsy and its treatments throughout history. There are a number of different references to the peripheral nerves and their lesions, although little is known about the treatments that were applied in the past. William Smellie first reported obstetric brachial palsy in 1764 and the term was coined by Duchenne de Boulogne in 1872. In 1877, Erb analysed four cases of obstetric brachial palsy and conducted studies on the excitation of the brachial plexus with electric currents. In 1885, Klumpke described palsy of the lower roots of the brachial plexus. In the late 19th century pathophysiology studies were carried out and at the beginning of the 20th century the first surgical interventions were performed. Today, microsurgery techniques, protocols on how to proceed, and rehabilitation treatment of this lesion are all available and offer good outcomes. Since the first clinical description of obstetric brachial palsy by Smellie and the reports of the different types of brachial palsy by Duchenne, Erb and Klumpke, many pathophysiological studies have been conducted. Notable developments have been made in conservative and surgical treatments, with very favourable recoveries being observed in children with obstetric brachial palsy.

  3. Lower motor neuron facial palsy in cerebral venous sinus thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Girish Baburao; Ravi, Yadav; Nagaraja, Dindigur; Veerendrakumar, Mustare

    2013-01-01

    With advances in the neuro-imaging modalities, diverse manifestations of the cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVT) are being recognized. There are very few reports of isolated cranial nerve palsies in CVT. In this case report, we describe a patient of lower motor neuron facial palsy with CVT who was successfully treated with anticoagulation, highlighting the atypical manifestation of the disease. PMID:23914113

  4. The Six Syndromes of the Sixth Cranial Nerve

    PubMed Central

    Azarmina, Mohsen; Azarmina, Hossein

    2013-01-01

    The sixth cranial nerve runs a long course from the brainstem to the lateral rectus muscle. Based on the location of an abnormality, other neurologic structures may be involved with the pathology related to this nerve. Sixth nerve palsy is frequently due to a benign process with full recovery within weeks, yet caution is warranted as it may portend a serious neurologic process. Hence, early diagnosis is often critical for some conditions that present with sixth nerve palsy. This article outlines a simple clinical approach to sixth nerve palsy based on its anatomy. PMID:23943691

  5. Cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Colver, Allan; Fairhurst, Charles; Pharoah, Peter O D

    2014-04-05

    The syndrome of cerebral palsy encompasses a large group of childhood movement and posture disorders. Severity, patterns of motor involvement, and associated impairments such as those of communication, intellectual ability, and epilepsy vary widely. Overall prevalence has remained stable in the past 40 years at 2-3·5 cases per 1000 livebirths, despite changes in antenatal and perinatal care. The few studies available from developing countries suggest prevalence of comparable magnitude. Cerebral palsy is a lifelong disorder; approaches to intervention, whether at an individual or environmental level, should recognise that quality of life and social participation throughout life are what individuals with cerebral palsy seek, not improved physical function for its own sake. In the past few years, the cerebral palsy community has learned that the evidence of benefit for the numerous drugs, surgery, and therapies used over previous decades is weak. Improved understanding of the role of multiple gestation in pathogenesis, of gene environment interaction, and how to influence brain plasticity could yield significant advances in treatment of the disorder. Reduction in the prevalence of post-neonatal cerebral palsy, especially in developing countries, should be possible through improved nutrition, infection control, and accident prevention. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Bell's palsy: diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Tiemstra, Jeffrey D; Khatkhate, Nandini

    2007-10-01

    Bell's palsy is a peripheral palsy of the facial nerve that results in muscle weakness on one side of the face. Affected patients develop unilateral facial paralysis over one to three days with forehead involvement and no other neurologic abnormalities. Symptoms typically peak in the first week and then gradually resolve over three weeks to three months. Bell's palsy is more common in patients with diabetes, and although it can affect persons of any age, incidence peaks in the 40s. Bell's palsy has been traditionally defined as idiopathic; however, one possible etiology is infection with herpes simplex virus type 1. Laboratory evaluation, when indicated by history or risk factors, may include testing for diabetes mellitus and Lyme disease. A common short-term complication of Bell's palsy is incomplete eyelid closure with resultant dry eye. A less common long-term complication is permanent facial weakness with muscle contractures. Approximately 70 to 80 percent of patients will recover spontaneously; however, treatment with a seven-day course of acyclovir or valacyclovir and a tapering course of prednisone, initiated within three days of the onset of symptoms, is recommended to reduce the time to full recovery and increase the likelihood of complete recuperation.

  7. A case of myeloperoxidase anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (MPO-ANCA)-associated hypertrophic pachymeningitis presenting with multiple cranial nerve palsies and diabetes insipidus.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Ken; Sainouchi, Makoto; Goto, Masahiro; Murase, Nagako; Ohtani, Ryo; Nakamura, Michikazu

    2016-05-31

    A 61-year-old woman developed hearing difficulties and became thirsty after experiencing cold symptoms. A neurological examination revealed a loss of odor sensation, facial palsy, dysphasia, and dysarthria. Vocal cord palsy was observed during pharyngoscopy. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a thickened pituitary stalk and swelling of the pituitary gland, but no high signal intensity regions were seen in the posterior portion of the pituitary gland. Gadolinium-enhanced MRI demonstrated a thickened dura mater over the anterior cranial fossa. A biopsy specimen of the thickened dura mater showed fibrosis, granulomatous inflammation, and necrotic foci. Blood tests detected myeloperoxidase anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (MPO-ANCA). The patient's urine osmolarity was low even though she exhibited hypernatremia. We diagnosed her with hypertrophic pachymeningitis associated with MPO-ANCA and diabetes insipidus. The patient received two courses of 5-day high-dose intravenous methylprednisolone (1.0 g/day), and was subsequently administered oral prednisolone, which gradually relieved her symptoms. However, the patient's symptoms recurred despite the high-dose prednisolone treatment. It was difficult to control the patient's symptoms in this case with oral prednisolone monotherapy, but combined treatment with cyclosporine resulted in sustained remission. It is considered that patients with MPO-ANCA-positive hypertrophic pachymeningitis require combination therapy with prednisolone and immunosuppressive agents at an early stage.

  8. Dynamics of Primate Oculomotor Plant Revealed by Effects of Abducens Microstimulation

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Sean R.; Porrill, John; Sklavos, Sokratis; Gandhi, Neeraj J.; Sparks, David L.; Dean, Paul

    2009-01-01

    Despite their importance for deciphering oculomotor commands, the mechanics of the extraocular muscles and orbital tissues (oculomotor plant) are poorly understood. In particular, the significance of plant nonlinearities is uncertain. Here primate plant dynamics were investigated by measuring the eye movements produced by stimulating the abducens nucleus with brief pulse trains of varying frequency. Statistical analysis of these movements indicated that the effects of stimulation lasted about 40 ms after the final pulse, after which the eye returned passively toward its position before stimulation. Behavior during the passive phase could be approximated by a linear plant model, corresponding to Voigt elements in series, with properties independent of initial eye position. In contrast, behavior during the stimulation phase revealed a sigmoidal relation between stimulation frequency and estimated steady-state tetanic tension, together with a frequency-dependent rate of tension increase, that appeared very similar to the nonlinearities previously found for isometric-force production in primate lateral rectus muscle. These results suggest that the dynamics of the oculomotor plant have an approximately linear component related to steady-state viscoelasticity and a nonlinear component related to changes in muscle activation. The latter may in part account for the nonlinear relations observed between eye-movement parameters and single-unit firing patterns in the abducens nucleus. These findings point to the importance of recruitment as a simplifying factor for motor control with nonlinear plants. PMID:19297512

  9. Microsurgical anatomy of the ocular motor nerves.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Liu, Hao; Liu, En-Zhong; Lin, You-Zhi; Zhao, Shi-Guang; Jing, Guo-Hua

    2010-08-01

    This study was designed to provide anatomic data to help surgeons avoid damage to the ocular motor nerves during intraorbital operations. The microsurgical anatomy of the ocular motor nerves was studied in 50 adult cadaveric heads (100 orbits). Dissections were performed with a microscope. The nerves were exposed and the neural and muscular relationships of each portion of the nerve were examined and measured. The superior division of the oculomotor nerve coursed between the optic nerve and the superior rectus muscle after it left the annular tendon, and its branches entered into the superior rectus muscle and levator muscle. A mean of five fibers (range 3-7) innervated the superior rectus muscle, and a mean of one fiber (range 1-2) followed a medial direction (84%) or went straight through the superior rectus muscle (16%). The inferior division of the oculomotor nerve branched into the medial rectus, inferior rectus and inferior oblique muscles. The trochlear nerve ended on the orbital side of the posterior one-third of the superior oblique muscle in 76 specimens. The abducens nerve ended on the posterior one-third of the lateral rectus muscle in 86 specimens. If the belly of the lateral rectus muscle was divided into three superior-inferior parts, the nerve commonly entered into the middle one-third in 74 specimens. Based on the observed data, microanatomical relationships of the orbital contents were revised.

  10. Pathophysiology of facial nerve paralysis induced by herpes simplex virus type 1 infection.

    PubMed

    Honda, Nobumitu; Hato, Naohito; Takahashi, Hirotaka; Wakisaka, Hiroyuki; Kisaki, Hisanobu; Murakami, Shingo; Gyo, Kiyofumi

    2002-07-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) has been proven to be a cause of Bell's palsy; however, the underlying pathophysiology of the facial nerve paralysis is not fully understood. We established a mouse model with facial nerve paralysis induced by HSV-1 infection simulating Bell's palsy and investigated the pathophysiology of the facial nerve paralysis. The time course of the R1 latency in the blink reflex tests paralleled the recovery of the facial nerve paralysis well, whereas electroneurographic recovery tended to be delayed, compared to that of the paralysis; these responses are usually seen in Bell's palsy. On histopathologic analysis, intact, demyelinated, and degenerated nerves were intermingled in the facial nerve in the model. The similarity of the time course of facial nerve paralysis and the electrophysiological results in Bell's palsy and the model strongly suggest that the pathophysiological basis of Bell's palsy is a mixed lesion of various nerve injuries.

  11. Bell's Palsy and Herpes Zoster Oticus.

    PubMed

    Morrow

    2000-09-01

    Normal facial movement is required for chewing, swallowing, speaking, and protecting the eye. Bell's palsy causes most cases of acute, unilateral facial palsy; infection with herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 1 may be its major cause. Varicella zoster virus (VZV) reactivation (Ramsay Hunt syndrome) is less common, but may appear without skin lesions in a form indistinguishable from Bell's palsy. Symptoms improve in nearly all patients with Bell's palsy, and most patients with Ramsay Hunt syndrome, but many are left with functional and cosmetic deficits. Steroids are frequently used to optimize outcomes in Bell's palsy, but proof of their effectiveness is marginal. Oral prednisone has been studied extensively, although some reports have suggested a higher recovery rate with intravenous steroids. Given the existing data, we support the use of oral prednisone in those patients with complete facial palsy, and no contraindications to their use (Fig. 1). In this author's opinion, the greatly increased cost and inconvenience of intravenous steroids cannot be justified by the data available. Antiviral agents may also be effective in treatment of Bell's palsy; HSV is susceptible to acyclovir and related agents. There have been few investigations of acyclovir treatment in Bell's palsy, but one controlled study showed added benefit when the drug was used with prednisone. The risk and cost of acyclovir is low enough that we support its use, with oral steroids, in those patients with complete facial paralysis. Several small studies have implied that oral acyclovir improves the outcome of facial palsy for patients with Ramsay Hunt syndrome. Although these studies do not prove efficacy, evidence for the benefits of antiviral agents in other forms of zoster is strong enough to recommend their use when the facial nerve is involved. VZV is less sensitive to acyclovir than HSV, so higher doses are recommended to treat Ramsay Hunt syndrome. Because some Ramsay Hunt syndrome patients

  12. A general practice approach to Bell's palsy.

    PubMed

    Phan, Nga T; Panizza, Benedict; Wallwork, Benjamin

    2016-11-01

    Bell's palsy is characterised by an acute onset of unilateral, lower motor neuron weakness of the facial nerve in the absence of an identifiable cause. Establishing the correct diagnosis is imperative and choosing the correct treatment options can optimise the likelihood of recovery. This article summarises our understanding of Bell's palsy and the evidence-based management options available for adult patients. The basic assessment should include a thorough history and physical examination as the diagnosis of Bell's palsy is based on exclusion. For confirmed cases of Bell's palsy, corticosteroids are the mainstay of treatment and should be initiated within 72 hours of symptom onset. Antiviral therapy in combination with corticosteroid therapy may confer a small benefit and may be offered on the basis of shared decision making. Currently, no recommendations can be made for acupuncture, physical therapy, electrotherapy or surgical decompression because well-designed studies are lacking and available data are of low quality.

  13. Arachnoid cyst masquerading as obstetric brachial plexus palsy.

    PubMed

    Muthukumar, Natarajan; Santhanakrishnan, Alwar Govindan; Sivakumar, Krishnaswamy

    2012-07-01

    Obstetric brachial plexus palsy is not uncommon. However, lesions masquerading as obstetric brachial plexus palsy are rare. A child with a cervicothoracic arachnoid cyst masquerading as obstetric brachial plexus palsy is presented, and the relevant literature is reviewed. A girl born by vaginal delivery at full term without any antecedent risk factors for obstetric brachial plexus palsy was noted to have decreased movements of the right upper extremity. After 7 months, there was no improvement. An MRI scan was obtained, which revealed a cervicothoracic spinal extradural arachnoid cyst. During surgery, the cyst was found to communicate with the dura at the axilla of the C-7 nerve root. The cyst was excised in toto. Six months later, there was improvement in the infant's neurological status. This case illustrates that spinal arachnoid cysts should be entertained in the differential diagnosis when a child presents with obstetric brachial plexus palsy without known antecedent risk factors for obstetric palsy.

  14. [Arguments favouring the pharmacotherapy of Bells' palsy].

    PubMed

    de Ru, J A; van Benthem, P P G; Hordijk, G J

    2005-06-25

    Some clinicians claim a spontaneous complete recovery of facial nerve function after Bell's palsy in more than 80% of patients. However, for elderly patients and patients with a severe paresis/paralysis this is not the case. The main cause of Bell's palsy is probably reactivation of latent herpes viruses. Recent literature supports treatment with corticosteroids and antiviral medication, inhibiting viral replication and reducing oedema in the bony canal of the facial nerve. Using this medication in the first days of the disease provides a further 15% of patients with a good outcome in addition to the ones that improve spontaneously. Therefore, prednisone and valacyclovir are recommended for all patients with Bell's palsy and severe dysfunction, i.e. House-Brackmann facial grading scale IV, V and VI.

  15. Diagnosis and management of Bell's palsy.

    PubMed

    Santos, Renata de Faria; Brasileiro, Bernardo Ferreira

    2011-01-01

    Bell's palsy (BP) is an idiopathic peripheral facial nerve paralysis of sudden onset. Its most alarming symptom is unilateral facial weakness, which can result in the inability to close the eyelids, smile, or whistle. The pathogenesis of BP is controversial and is believed to be caused by inflammation of the facial nerve at the geniculate ganglion. Many viruses, especially herpes simplex and herpes zoster, have been suggested as initiators of this inflammatory process; however, this has not been proven. This report describes the case of a 14-year-old girl with right hemifacial palsy who sought treatment one month after the onset of palsy. The patient experienced a satisfactory recovery within 30 days of treatment and has maintained a stable physical outcome after 15 months of follow-up. Early treatment based on careful investigation of BP, with particular attention given to the differential diagnosis of BP, can improve the patient's function and esthetics.

  16. Efficacy of intraoperative monitoring of transcranial electrical stimulation-induced motor evoked potentials and spontaneous electromyography activity to identify acute-versus delayed-onset C-5 nerve root palsy during cervical spine surgery: clinical article.

    PubMed

    Bhalodia, Vidya M; Schwartz, Daniel M; Sestokas, Anthony K; Bloomgarden, Gary; Arkins, Thomas; Tomak, Patrick; Gorelick, Judith; Wijesekera, Shirvinda; Beiner, John; Goodrich, Isaac

    2013-10-01

    Deltoid muscle weakness due to C-5 nerve root injury following cervical spine surgery is an uncommon but potentially debilitating complication. Symptoms can manifest upon emergence from anesthesia or days to weeks following surgery. There is conflicting evidence regarding the efficacy of spontaneous electromyography (spEMG) monitoring in detecting evolving C-5 nerve root compromise. By contrast, transcranial electrical stimulation-induced motor evoked potential (tceMEP) monitoring has been shown to be highly sensitive and specific in identifying impending C-5 injury. In this study the authors sought to 1) determine the frequency of immediate versus delayed-onset C-5 nerve root injury following cervical spine surgery, 2) identify risk factors associated with the development of C-5 palsies, and 3) determine whether tceMEP and spEMG neuromonitoring can help to identify acutely evolving C-5 injury as well as predict delayed-onset deltoid muscle paresis. The authors retrospectively reviewed the neuromonitoring and surgical records of all patients who had undergone cervical spine surgery involving the C-4 and/or C-5 level in the period from 2006 to 2008. Real-time tceMEP and spEMG monitoring from the deltoid muscle was performed as part of a multimodal neuromonitoring protocol during all surgeries. Charts were reviewed to identify patients who had experienced significant changes in tceMEPs and/or episodes of neurotonic spEMG activity during surgery, as well as those who had shown new-onset deltoid weakness either immediately upon emergence from the anesthesia or in a delayed fashion. Two hundred twenty-nine patients undergoing 235 cervical spine surgeries involving the C4-5 level served as the study cohort. The overall incidence of perioperative C-5 nerve root injury was 5.1%. The incidence was greatest (50%) in cases with dual corpectomies at the C-4 and C-5 spinal levels. All patients who emerged from anesthesia with deltoid weakness had significant and unresolved

  17. A light and electron microscope study of rat abducens nucleus neurons projecting to the cerebellar flocculus.

    PubMed Central

    Rodella, L; Rezzani, R; Corsetti, G; Simonetti, C; Stacchiotti, A; Ventura, R G

    1995-01-01

    Injection of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) into the cerebellar flocculus of the rat was employed to identify neurons in the abducens nucleus that project to the flocculus. The number, ultrastructural features and precise localisation of these neurons in the nucleus were examined. They were present bilaterally and represented about 7% of the total neuronal population of each nucleus. They were localised principally in the dorsomedial area of the cranial half of each nucleus and did not display the typical ultrastructural features of motoneurons. It is concluded that the localisation and ultrastructural characteristics of these HRP-positive neurons are useful for distinguishing them from other neuronal populations within the nucleus. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 PMID:7649835

  18. Anterior opercular cortex lesions cause dissociated lower cranial nerve palsies and anarthria but no aphasia: Foix-Chavany-Marie syndrome and "automatic voluntary dissociation" revisited.

    PubMed

    Weller, M

    1993-01-01

    Anarthria and bilateral central facio-linguovelo-pharyngeo-masticatory paralysis with "automatic voluntary dissociation" are the clinical hallmarks of Foix-Chavany-Marie syndrome (FCMS), the corticosubcortial type of suprabulbar palsy. A literature review of 62 FCMS reports allowed the differentiation of five clinical types of FCMS: (a) the classical and most common form associated with cerebrovascular disease, (b) a subacute form caused by central nervous system infections, (c) a developmental form probably most often related to neuronal migration disorders, (d) a reversible form in children with epilepsy, and (e) a rare type associated with neurodegenerative disorders. Bilateral opercular lesions were confirmed in 31 of 41 patients who had CT or MRI performed, and by necropsy in 7 of 10 patients. FCMS could be attributed to unilateral lesions in 2 patients. The typical presentation and differential diagnosis of FCMS provide important clues to lesion localization in clinical neurology. FCMS is a paretic and not an apraxic disorder and is not characterized by language disturbances. Its clinical features prove divergent corticobulbar pathways for voluntary and automatic motor control of craniofacial muscles. Precise clinico-neuroradiological correlations should facilitate the identification of the structural substrate of "automatic voluntary dissociation" in FCMS.

  19. Eye Movements and Abducens Motoneuron Behavior after Cholinergic Activation of the Nucleus Reticularis Pontis Caudalis

    PubMed Central

    Márquez-Ruiz, Javier; Escudero, Miguel

    2010-01-01

    Study Objectives: The aim of this work was to characterize eye movements and abducens (ABD) motoneuron behavior after cholinergic activation of the nucleus reticularis pontis caudalis (NRPC). Methods: Six female adult cats were prepared for chronic recording of eye movements (using the scleral search-coil technique), electroencephalography, electromyography, ponto-geniculo-occipital (PGO) waves in the lateral geniculate nucleus, and ABD motoneuron activities after microinjections of the cholinergic agonist carbachol into the NRPC. Results: Unilateral microinjections of carbachol in the NRPC induced tonic and phasic phenomena in the oculomotor system. Tonic effects consisted of ipsiversive rotation to the injected side, convergence, and downward rotation of the eyes. Phasic effects consisted of bursts of rhythmic rapid eye movements directed contralaterally to the injected side along with PGO-like waves in the lateral geniculate and ABD nuclei. Although tonic effects were dependent on the level of drowsiness, phasic effects were always present and appeared along with normal saccades when the animal was vigilant. ABD motoneurons showed phasic activities associated with ABD PGO-like waves during bursts of rapid eye movements, and tonic and phasic activities related to eye position and velocity during alertness. Conclusion The cholinergic activation of the NRPC induces oculomotor phenomena that are somewhat similar to those described during REM sleep. A precise comparison of the dynamics and timing of the eye movements further suggests that a temporal organization of both NRPCs is needed to reproduce the complexity of the oculomotor behavior during REM sleep. Citation: Márquez-Ruiz J; Escudero M. Eye movements and abducens motoneuron behavior after cholinergic activation of the nucleus reticularis pontis caudalis. SLEEP 2010;33(11):1517-1527. PMID:21102994

  20. Common questions about Bell palsy.

    PubMed

    Albers, Janet R; Tamang, Stephen

    2014-02-01

    Bell palsy is an acute affliction of the facial nerve, resulting in sudden paralysis or weakness of the muscles on one side of the face. Testing patients with unilateral facial paralysis for diabetes mellitus or Lyme disease is not routinely recommended. Patients with Lyme disease typically present with additional manifestations, such as arthritis, rash, or facial swelling. Diabetes may be a comorbidity of Bell palsy, but testing is not needed in the absence of other indications, such as hypertension. In patients with atypical symptoms, magnetic resonance imaging with contrast enhancement can be used to rule out cranial mass effect and to add prognostic value. Steroids improve resolution of symptoms in patients with Bell palsy and remain the preferred treatment. Antiviral agents have a limited role, and may improve outcomes when combined with steroids in patients with severe symptoms. When facial paralysis is prolonged, surgery may be indicated to prevent ocular desiccation secondary to incomplete eyelid closure. Facial nerve decompression is rarely indicated or performed. Physical therapy modalities, including electrostimulation, exercise, and massage, are neither beneficial nor harmful.

  1. [Trigeminal sensory involvement in Bell's palsy (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Lapresle, J; Fernandez Manchola, I; Lasjaunias, P

    1980-01-26

    Trigeminal sensory involvement was noted in 14 out of 24 cases of Bell's palsy. The authors describe its characteristics and its chronology with regard to the facial paralysis. Then they propose a vascular mechanism for this association on the basis of two kinds of data. First it is known that there is a common arterial supply of the VIIth and Vth cranial nerves through the middle meningeal vascular system. Secondly some exceptional complications of embolisation within that system have included involvement of both VIIth and Vth sensory nerves. These facts support the vascular basis of Bell's palsy and present an example of a vascular territorial pathology in cranial nerve involvement.

  2. Evidence based management of Bell's palsy.

    PubMed

    McCaul, James A; Cascarini, Luke; Godden, Daryl; Coombes, Darryl; Brennan, Peter A; Kerawala, Cyrus J

    2014-05-01

    Bell's palsy (idiopathic facial paralysis) is caused by the acute onset of lower motor neurone weakness of the facial nerve with no detectable cause. With a lifetime risk of 1 in 60 and an annual incidence of 11-40/100,000 population, the condition resolves completely in around 71% of untreated cases. In the remainder facial nerve function will be impaired in the long term. We summarise current published articles regarding early management strategies to maximise recovery of facial nerve function and minimise long-term sequelae in the condition. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Pattern of facial palsy in a typical Nigerian specialist hospital.

    PubMed

    Lamina, S; Hanif, S

    2012-12-01

    Data on incidence of facial palsy is generally lacking in Nigeria. To assess six years' incidence of facial palsy in Murtala Muhammed Specialist Hospital (MMSH), Kano, Nigeria. The records of patients diagnosed as facial problems between January 2000 and December 2005 were scrutinized. Data on diagnosis, age, sex, side affected, occupation and causes were obtained. A total number of 698 patients with facial problems were recorded. Five hundred and ninety four (85%) were diagnosed as facial palsy. Out of the diagnosed facial palsy, males (56.2%) had a higher incidence than females; 20-34 years age group (40.3%) had a greater prevalence; the commonest cause of facial palsy was found out to be Idiopathic (39.1%) and was most common among business men (31.6%). Right sided facial palsy (52.2%) was predominant. Incidence of facial palsy was highest in 2003 (25.3%) and decreased from 2004. It was concluded that the incidence of facial palsy was high and Bell's palsy remains the most common causes of facial (nerve) paralysis.

  4. A Pilot Study of Diagnostic Neuromuscular Ultrasound in Bell's Palsy.

    PubMed

    Tawfik, Eman A; Walker, Francis O; Cartwright, Michael S

    2015-01-01

    Neuromuscular ultrasound of the cranial nerves is an emerging field which may help in the assessment of cranial neuropathies. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of neuromuscular ultrasound in Bell's palsy. A second objective was to assess the possibility of any associated vagus nerve abnormality. Twenty healthy controls and 12 Bell's palsy patients were recruited. The bilateral facial nerves, vagus nerves, and frontalis muscles were scanned using an 18 MHz linear array transducer. Facial nerve diameter, vagus nerve cross-sectional area, and frontalis thickness were measured. Mean facial nerve diameter was .8 ± .2 mm in controls and 1.1 ± .3 mm in patients group. The facial nerve diameter was significantly larger in patients than controls (P = .006, 95% CI for the difference between groups of .12-.48), with a significant side-to-side difference in patients as well (P = .004, 95% CI for side-to-side difference of .08-.52). ROC curve analysis of the absolute facial nerve diameter revealed a sensitivity of 75% and a specificity of 70%. No significant differences in vagus nerve cross-sectional area or frontalis thickness were detected between patients and controls. Ultrasound can detect facial nerve enlargement in Bell's palsy and may have a role in assessment, or follow-up, of Bell's palsy and other facial nerve disorders. The low sensitivity of the current technique precludes its routine use for diagnosis, however, this study demonstrates its validity and potential for future research. Copyright © 2015 by the American Society of Neuroimaging.

  5. Laser Phototherapy As Modality of Clinical Treatment in Bell's Palsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marques, A. M. C.; Soares, L. G. P.; Marques, R. C.; Pinheiro, A. L. B.; Dent, M.

    2011-08-01

    Bell's palsy is defined as a peripheral facial nerve palsy, idiophatic, and sudden onset and is considered the most common cause of this pathology. It is caused by damage to cranial nerves VII, resulting in complete or partial paralysis of the facial mimic. May be associated with taste disturbances, salivation, tearing and hyperacusis. It is diagnosed after ruling out all possible etiologies, because its cause is not fully understood.Some researches shows that herpes virus may cause this type of palsy due to reactivation of the virus or by imunnomediated post-viral nerve demielinization. Physical therapy, corticosteroids and antiviral therapy have become the most widely accepted treatments for Bell's palsy. Therapy with low-level laser (LLLT) may induce the metabolism of injured nerve tissue for the production of proteins associated with its growth and to improve nerve regeneration. The success of the treatment of Bell's palsy by using laser phototherapy isolated or in association with other therapeutic approach has been reported on the literature. In most cases, the recovery occurs without uneventfully (complications), the acute illness is not associated with serious disorders. We will present a clinical approach for treating this condition.

  6. Hypoglossal-facial nerve anastomosis and rehabilitation in patients with complete facial palsy: cohort study of 30 patients followed up for three years

    PubMed Central

    Toffola, Elena Dalla; Pavese, Chiara; Cecini, Miriam; Petrucci, Lucia; Ricotti, Susanna; Bejor, Maurizio; Salimbeni, Grazia; Biglioli, Federico; Klersy, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Summary Our study evaluates the grade and timing of recovery in 30 patients with complete facial paralysis (House-Brackmann grade VI) treated with hypoglossal-facial nerve (XII-VII) anastomosis and a long-term rehabilitation program, consisting of exercises in facial muscle activation mediated by tongue movement and synkinesis control with mirror feedback. Reinnervation after XII-VII anastomosis occurred in 29 patients, on average 5.4 months after surgery. Three years after the anastomosis, 23.3% of patients had grade II, 53.3% grade III, 20% grade IV and 3.3% grade VI ratings on the House-Brackmann scale. Time to reinnervation was associated with the final House-Brackmann grade. Our study demonstrates that patients undergoing XII-VII anastomosis and a long-term rehabilitation program display a significant recovery of facial symmetry and movement. The recovery continues for at least three years after the anastomosis, meaning that prolonged follow-up of these patients is advisable. PMID:25473738

  7. Do oral steroids aid recovery in children with Bell's palsy?

    PubMed

    Ismail, Abdul Qader; Alake, Oluwaseyi; Kallappa, Chetana

    2014-10-01

    There is growing evidence that steroids are not beneficial for treatment of paediatric patients with Bell's palsy. To investigate, we conducted a retrospective longitudinal study examining notes of 100 children, over 12 years coded for facial nerve palsy. Of the 79 diagnosed with Bell's palsy, all recovered, and for 46 patients we had data on interval from onset of symptoms to resolution (median duration in treated group = 5 weeks, range = 39; median duration in untreated group = 6 weeks, range = 11; P = .86). From our results, we conclude that all children with Bell's palsy recovered, with or without steroid treatment, with no statistically significant difference in symptoms duration. Complications of unresolved Bell's palsy can have important long-term functional and psychosocial consequences. Therefore, we need further research on use of steroids in children with complete/severe cases; it would be a shame to omit treatment due to "absence of evidence" rather than "evidence of absence." © The Author(s) 2013.

  8. Isolated AA Amyloidosis of the Radial Nerve.

    PubMed

    Pérez-de la Fuente, Teresa; Fernández-Jara, Javier; Rodríguez-Urcelay, Pilar; Jiménez-Heffernan, Jose; Juárez, Ángel

    2017-09-01

    Amyloidosis affecting peripheral nerve is usually seen in primary amyloidosis. We are reporting on the case of a 74-year-old man with a 16-month history of progressive left radial nerve paralysis. Perioperative imaging detected an enlarged radial nerve in the middle-distal part of the arm. The patient had an antecedent of amyloid deposits in the lung. A radial nerve amyloidosis was suspected and confirmed with a biopsy assisted by ultrasonography, resulting in a secondary amyloidosis form. Isolated radial nerve palsy due to nerve damage by amyloidosis has been reported before, but not in AA or secondary amyloidosis.

  9. [Case of median nerve paralysis after hepatic segmentectomy].

    PubMed

    Yoshimatsu, Aya; Hoshi, Takuo; Tanaka, Makoto

    2011-05-01

    We report a case of a median nerve palsy. Hepatic segmentectomy and lymphnode dissection were performed in a 21-year-old man for multiple liver and retroperitoneal lymph nodes metastasis of seminoma. After surgery, patient complained of motor paralysis and hypesthesia of the left palm side of the thumb, first finger and radial half of the middle finger. He was diagnosed as having median nerve palsy. Motor paralysis and hypesthesia gradually disappeared over the two weeks after surgery. We should pay attention to appropriate positioning of the arm during surgery, and preoperative use of paclitaxel needs to be considered as etiology for perioperative peripheral nerve palsy.

  10. Bell's palsy following primary tooth extraction. A case report.

    PubMed

    Owsley, David; Goldsmith, Jay P

    2012-04-01

    Bell's palsy is characterized by acute peripheral facial nerve paralysis. Unilateral paralysis of CN 7 is reported in 20 to 30 people out of 100,000 in the general population. It affects individuals of all ages. Most cases are idiopathic, while a few are identified as resulting from infectious or non-infectious causes. The association between herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) and Bell's palsy has been considered since the 1970s. Few cases have been reported after tooth extraction.

  11. Nerve Transfers in Birth Related Brachial Plexus Injuries: Where Do We Stand?

    PubMed

    Davidge, Kristen M; Clarke, Howard M; Borschel, Gregory H

    2016-05-01

    This article reviews the assessment and management of obstetrical brachial plexus palsy. The potential role of distal nerve transfers in the treatment of infants with Erb's palsy is discussed. Current evidence for motor outcomes after traditional reconstruction via interpositional nerve grafting and extraplexal nerve transfers is reviewed and compared with the recent literature on intraplexal distal nerve transfers in obstetrical brachial plexus injury. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The history of facial palsy and spasm: Hippocrates to Razi.

    PubMed

    Sajadi, Mohammad M; Sajadi, Mohamad-Reza M; Tabatabaie, Seyed Mahmoud

    2011-07-12

    Although Sir Charles Bell was the first to provide the anatomic basis for the condition that bears his name, in recent years researchers have shown that other European physicians provided earlier clinical descriptions of peripheral cranial nerve 7 palsy. In this article, we describe the history of facial distortion by Greek, Roman, and Persian physicians, culminating in Razi's detailed description in al-Hawi. Razi distinguished facial muscle spasm from paralysis, distinguished central from peripheral lesions, gave the earliest description of loss of forehead wrinkling, and gave the earliest known description of bilateral facial palsy. In doing so, he accurately described the clinical hallmarks of a condition that we recognize as Bell palsy.

  13. [Cerebral palsy].

    PubMed

    Malagón Valdez, Jorge

    2007-01-01

    The term cerebral palsy (CP), is used for a great number of clinical neurological syndromes. The syndromes are characterized by having a common cause, motor defects. It is important, because they can cause a brain damage by presenting motor defects and some associated deficiencies, such as mental deficiency, epilepsy, language and visual defects and pseudobulbar paralysis, with the non-evolving fact. Some authors prefer using terms such as "non-evolving encephalopathies". In the treatment the utility of prevention programs of early stimulation and special rehabilitation methods, and treatment of associated deficiencies such as epilepsy, mental deficiency, language, audition and visual problems, and the attention deficit improve the prognosis in an important way. The prognosis depends on the severity of the disease and the associated manifestations.

  14. Tonic inhibition and ponto-geniculo-occipital-related activities shape abducens motoneuron discharge during REM sleep

    PubMed Central

    Escudero, Miguel; Márquez-Ruiz, Javier

    2008-01-01

    Eye movements, ponto-geniculo-occipital (PGO) waves, muscular atonia and desynchronized cortical activity are the main characteristics of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. Although eye movements designate this phase, little is known about the activity of the oculomotor system during REM sleep. In this work, we recorded binocular eye movements by the scleral search-coil technique and the activity of identified abducens (ABD) motoneurons along the sleep–wake cycle in behaving cats. The activity of ABD motoneurons during REM sleep was characterized by a tonic decrease of their mean firing rate throughout this period, and short bursts and pauses coinciding with the occurrence of PGO waves. We demonstrate that the decrease in the mean firing discharge was due to an active inhibition of ABD motoneurons, and that the occurrence of primary and secondary PGO waves induced a pattern of simultaneous but opposed phasic activation and inhibition on each ABD nucleus. With regard to eye movements, during REM sleep ABD motoneurons failed to codify eye position as during alertness, but continued to codify eye velocity. The pattern of tonic inhibition and the phasic activations and inhibitions shown by ABD motoneurons coincide with those reported in other non-oculomotor motoneurons, indicating that the oculomotor system – contrary to what has been accepted until now – is not different from other motor systems during REM sleep, and that all motor systems are receiving similar command signals during this period. PMID:18499728

  15. United Cerebral Palsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... stay up to date with everything UCP! Affiliate Network UCP affiliates provide services and support on a ... with Cerebral Palsy and other disabilities and their networks. Individuals with cerebral palsy and other disabilities deserve ...

  16. Cerebral Palsy (For Kids)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Emergency Room? What Happens in the Operating Room? Cerebral Palsy KidsHealth > For Kids > Cerebral Palsy A A A ... the things that kids do every day. What's CP? Some kids with CP use wheelchairs and others ...

  17. Bell's Palsy (For Teens)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Palsy? Bell's palsy is a temporary weakness or paralysis of the muscles on one side of the ... sent correctly. That's what causes weakness or temporary paralysis on one side of the face. When the ...

  18. Bell's Palsy (For Teens)

    MedlinePlus

    ... or the flu . Someone who is infected with Lyme disease also can develop Bell's palsy. Of course, this ... that everyone who has a viral infection or Lyme disease will get Bell's palsy — most people don't. ...

  19. Bell's Palsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... viral infection such as viral meningitis or the common cold sore virus— herpes simplex —causes the disorder. They believe that the facial nerve swells and becomes inflamed in reaction to the infection, ... occur at any age, but it is less common before age 15 or after age 60. It ...

  20. Bell's palsy: data from a study of 70 cases.

    PubMed

    Cirpaciu, D; Goanta, C M

    2014-01-01

    Bell's palsy is a condition that affects the facial nerve, which is one of the twelve cranial nerves. Its main function is to control all the muscles of the facial expression. It is a unilateral, acute, partial or complete paralysis of the facial nerve. Bell's palsy remains the most common cause of facial nerve paralysis, more often encountered in females aged 17 to 30 years, recurrent in many cases and with poor associations with other pathologic conditions. In modern literature, the suspected etiology could be due to the reactivation of the latent herpes viral infections in the geniculate ganglia, and their subsequent migration to the facial nerve but, favorable outcome by using vasodilators, neurotrophic and corticosteroid therapy was recorded.

  1. Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies occurring during military training.

    PubMed

    Delacour, H; Bompaire, F; Biale, L; Sallansonnet-Froment, M; Ceppa, F; Burnat, P

    2012-03-01

    Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) is an autosomal-dominant peripheral neuropathy characterized by recurrent isolated nerve palsies, which are precipitated by trivial compression and trauma. Although HNPP has been well-described in literature, it often goes unrecognized. We report a case of HNPP occurring during military training to promote recognition and proper management of this entity.

  2. Bell's Palsy in Children: Role of the School Nurse in Early Recognition and Referral

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Shirley C.

    2008-01-01

    Bell's palsy is the most common condition affecting facial nerves. It is an acute, rapidly progressing, idiopathic, unilateral facial paralysis that is generally self-limiting and non-life threatening that occurs in all age groups (Okuwobi, Omole, & Griffith, 2003). The school nurse may be the first person to assess facial palsy and muscle…

  3. Bell's Palsy in Children: Role of the School Nurse in Early Recognition and Referral

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Shirley C.

    2008-01-01

    Bell's palsy is the most common condition affecting facial nerves. It is an acute, rapidly progressing, idiopathic, unilateral facial paralysis that is generally self-limiting and non-life threatening that occurs in all age groups (Okuwobi, Omole, & Griffith, 2003). The school nurse may be the first person to assess facial palsy and muscle…

  4. Cerebral Palsy (For Kids)

    MedlinePlus

    ... CPR: A Real Lifesaver Kids Talk About: Coaches Cerebral Palsy KidsHealth > For Kids > Cerebral Palsy Print A A A What's in this article? ... the first word you spoke? For kids with cerebral palsy, called CP for short, taking a first step ...

  5. Aging and Cerebral Palsy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Networker, 1993

    1993-01-01

    This special edition of "The Networker" contains several articles focusing on aging and cerebral palsy (CP). "Aging and Cerebral Palsy: Pathways to Successful Aging" (Jenny C. Overeynder) reports on the National Invitational Colloquium on Aging and Cerebral Palsy held in April 1993. "Observations from an Observer" (Kathleen K. Barrett) describes…

  6. Outcome of Bell's palsy in children.

    PubMed

    Dhiravibulya, Kanlaya

    2002-03-01

    Acute idiopathic facial nerve paralysis (Bell's palsy) is a non life-threatening disorder but may cause important impact. In Thailand there has been no report of the outcome of Bell's palsy in children. Eighty four children with facial palsy were treated at Prasat Neurological Institute from January 1996 to July 2001. The etiology was found in 9 children (10.7%). Seventy five children were Bell's palsy. Twenty eight children were excluded, twenty two of these were loss to follow-up after the first visit and in six the onset were more than 30 days before presentation. Forty seven children remained for study. The mean age was 8.8 years (range from 2 years to 15 years 8 months). The male to female ratio was 1:1.1. The ratio of left to right side involvement was 1.3:1. Two children had recurrent facial palsy (4.3%). The duration from onset to recurrence was 6 months to 3 years 5 months. Oral prednisolone was given in 39 children. Complete recovery was observed in 29 children (61.7%) and almost complete recovery in 18 children (38.2%). All children recovered within 7 months. The mean duration of recovery was 6.61 weeks (range from 9 days to 28 weeks). The outcome of children aged under and over six years was not statistically different. The outcome of early and late steroid treatment could not be compared in this study.

  7. Bell's palsy in children.

    PubMed

    Singhi, Pratibha; Jain, Vivek

    2003-12-01

    Bell's palsy is a self-limiting idiopathic rapid onset facial palsy that is non-life-threatening and has a generally favorable prognosis. Facial paralysis can be caused by numerous conditions, all of which should be excluded before a diagnosis of Bell's palsy is reached. The etiopathogenesis of Bell's palsy is uncertain; acute immune demyelination triggered by a viral infection may be responsible. Controversy exists regarding treatment options. This article reviews the differential diagnosis and diagnostic and therapeutic options and discusses the controversies related to the various treatment modalities (steroids, acyclovir, and surgery). A simple practical approach to diagnosing and treating children with Bell's palsy is suggested.

  8. Plexin a4 expression in adult rat cranial nerves.

    PubMed

    Gutekunst, Claire-Anne; Gross, Robert E

    2014-11-01

    PlexinsA1-A4 participate in class 3 semaphorin signaling as co-receptors to neuropilin 1 and 2. PlexinA4 is the latest member of the PlexinA subfamily to be identified. In previous studies, we described the expression of PlexinA4 in the brain and spinal cord of the adult rat. Here, antibodies to PlexinA4 were used to reveal immunolabeling in most of the cranial nerve surveyed. Labeling was found in the olfactory, optic, oculomotor, trochlear, trigeminal, abducens, facial, vestibulocochlear, glossopharyngeal, vagus, and hypoglossal nerves. This is the first detailed description of the cellular and subcellular distribution of PlexinA4 in the adult cranial nerves. The findings will set the basis for future studies on the potential role of PlexinA4 in regeneration and repair of the adult central and peripheral nervous system. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Facial nerve paralysis in children

    PubMed Central

    Ciorba, Andrea; Corazzi, Virginia; Conz, Veronica; Bianchini, Chiara; Aimoni, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Facial nerve palsy is a condition with several implications, particularly when occurring in childhood. It represents a serious clinical problem as it causes significant concerns in doctors because of its etiology, its treatment options and its outcome, as well as in little patients and their parents, because of functional and aesthetic outcomes. There are several described causes of facial nerve paralysis in children, as it can be congenital (due to delivery traumas and genetic or malformative diseases) or acquired (due to infective, inflammatory, neoplastic, traumatic or iatrogenic causes). Nonetheless, in approximately 40%-75% of the cases, the cause of unilateral facial paralysis still remains idiopathic. A careful diagnostic workout and differential diagnosis are particularly recommended in case of pediatric facial nerve palsy, in order to establish the most appropriate treatment, as the therapeutic approach differs in relation to the etiology. PMID:26677445

  10. [Depiction of the cranial nerves around the cavernous sinus by 3D reversed FISP with diffusion weighted imaging (3D PSIF-DWI)].

    PubMed

    Ishida, Go; Oishi, Makoto; Jinguji, Shinya; Yoneoka, Yuichiro; Sato, Mitsuya; Fujii, Yukihiko

    2011-10-01

    To evaluate the anatomy of cranial nerves running in and around the cavernous sinus, we employed three-dimensional reversed fast imaging with steady-state precession (FISP) with diffusion weighted imaging (3D PSIF-DWI) on 3-T magnetic resonance (MR) system. After determining the proper parameters to obtain sufficient resolution of 3D PSIF-DWI, we collected imaging data of 20-side cavernous regions in 10 normal subjects. 3D PSIF-DWI provided high contrast between the cranial nerves and other soft tissues, fluid, and blood in all subjects. We also created volume-rendered images of 3D PSIF-DWI and anatomically evaluated the reliability of visualizing optic, oculomotor, trochlear, trigeminal, and abducens nerves on 3D PSIF-DWI. All 20 sets of cranial nerves were visualized and 12 trochlear nerves and 6 abducens nerves were partially identified. We also presented preliminary clinical experiences in two cases with pituitary adenomas. The anatomical relationship between the tumor and cranial nerves running in and around the cavernous sinus could be three-dimensionally comprehended by 3D PSIF-DWI and the volume-rendered images. In conclusion, 3D PSIF-DWI has great potential to provide high resolution "cranial nerve imaging", which visualizes the whole length of the cranial nerves including the parts in the blood flow as in the cavernous sinus region.

  11. Current approach to radial nerve paralysis.

    PubMed

    Lowe, James B; Sen, Subhro K; Mackinnon, Susan E

    2002-09-15

    After studying this article, the participant should be able to: 1. Identify all potential points of radial nerve compression and other likely causes of radial nerve injury. 2. Accurately diagnose both surgical and nonsurgical causes of radial nerve paralysis. 3. Define a safe and effective approach to the surgical release and reconstruction of the radial nerve. Radial nerve paralysis, which can result from a complex humerus fracture, direct nerve trauma, compressive neuropathies, neuritis, or (rarely) from malignant tumor formation, has been reported throughout the literature, with some controversy regarding its diagnosis and management. The appropriate management of any radial nerve palsy depends primarily on an accurate determination of its cause, severity, duration, and level of involvement. The radial nerve can be injured as proximally as the brachial plexus or as distally as the posterior interosseous or radial sensory nerve. This article reviews the etiology, prognosis, and various treatments available for radial nerve paralysis. It also provides a new classification system and treatment algorithm to assist in the management of patients with radial nerve palsies, and it offers a simple, five-step approach to radial nerve release in the forearm.

  12. Bell's palsy and herpes viruses: to (acyclo)vir or not to (acyclo)vir?

    PubMed

    Steiner, I; Mattan, Y

    1999-11-15

    The majority of peripheral seventh cranial nerve palsy cases remain without an identified etiology and will eventually be diagnosed as idiopathic or Bell's palsy. Some features of this condition may be characteristic of a viral infection. Indeed, several herpes viruses have been implicated as potential causative pathogens. Besides varicella-zoster virus, shown to cause Bell's palsy under the Ramsay-Hunt syndrome, recent years have seen an increased interest and focus on the possible herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) etiology in idiopathic facial paralysis. We review the clinical, biological and virological basis for the potential herpetic cause of Bell's palsy and the rational for antiviral therapy in this condition.

  13. Classic Raymond Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Khan, Majid; Naveed, Sadaf; Haider, Iqbal; Humayun, Mohammad; Khan, Abidullah

    2017-03-01

    Classic Raymond syndrome presents with abducens nerve palsy on the ipsilateral side with contralateral hemiparesis and facial nerve paralysis. A 60-year gentleman presented with deviation of left angle of mouth and right sided weakness. Examination showed that he had left sided abducens nerve palsy, with contralateral central facial paralysis and paresis. MRI of brain confirmed left pontine infarct. These findings were consistent with classic Raymond syndrome. Till now, only a few cases have been reported worldwide, this being the first case reported in South Asia. This case confirms that classic Raymond syndrome is different from the common type of Raymond syndrome in terms of sparing of coritcofacial fibers in the latter type.

  14. Cranial Nerve Disorders in Children: MR Imaging Findings.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jae-Yeon; Yoon, Hye-Kyung; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Yoon, Hee Mang; Jung, Ah Young; Cho, Young Ah; Lee, Jin Seong; Yoon, Chong Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Cranial nerve disorders are uncommon disease conditions encountered in pediatric patients, and can be categorized as congenital, inflammatory, traumatic, or tumorous conditions that involve the cranial nerve itself or propagation of the disorder from adjacent organs. However, determination of the normal course, as well as abnormalities, of cranial nerves in pediatric patients is challenging because of the small caliber of the cranial nerve, as well as the small intracranial and skull base structures. With the help of recently developed magnetic resonance (MR) imaging techniques that provide higher spatial resolution and fast imaging techniques including three-dimensional MR images with or without the use of gadolinium contrast agent, radiologists can more easily diagnose disease conditions that involve the small cranial nerves, such as the oculomotor, abducens, facial, and hypoglossal nerves, as well as normal radiologic anatomy, even in very young children. If cranial nerve involvement is suspected, careful evaluation of the cranial nerves should include specific MR imaging protocols. Localization is an important consideration in cranial nerve imaging, and should cover entire pathways and target organs as much as possible. Therefore, radiologists should be familiar not only with the various diseases that cause cranial nerve dysfunction, and the entire course of each cranial nerve including the intra-axial nuclei and fibers, but also the technical considerations for optimal imaging of pediatric cranial nerves. In this article, we briefly review normal cranial nerve anatomy and imaging findings of various pediatric cranial nerve dysfunctions, as well as the technical considerations of pediatric cranial nerve imaging. Online supplemental material is available for this article. (©)RSNA, 2016.

  15. [Circulatory effects of stellate ganglion block in idiopathic facial palsy].

    PubMed

    Murakawa, K; Ishimoto, E; Noma, K; Ishida, K; Nishijima, M; Izumi, R

    1994-03-01

    The circulatory effects of stellate ganglion block (SGB) on the blood flow through the common carotid artery were determined in 35 patients in acute phase of idiopathic facial palsy (Bell's palsy). SGB was performed by para-tracheal approach with 8 ml of 1% mepivacaine. The blood flow was measured with an ultrasonic blood flowmeter before and 30 minutes after SGB at both sides of the common carotid artery in 20 cases. Measurement was performed continuously for 90 minutes on the palsy side in the other 15 patients. Before SGB, there were no significant differences between the blood flow of the palsy side and the intact side. Thirty minutes after SGB, the blood flow markedly increased to 169.4 +/- 6.2% on the performed side with no change on the non-performed side in 20 cases. In the other 15 patients, the blood flow increased significantly 5 minutes after SGB and reached its peak of 179.7 +/- 11.1% at 20 minutes later. This increase continued for 75 minutes after SGB. It is well known that impaired microcirculation in the facial nerve has an important role in the pathophysiology of Bell's palsy. In view of the fact that the nutrient arteries for the facial nerve are the peripheral branches of the external carotid artery, we believe that SGB which causes significant increase in the blood flow through the common carotid artery is an effective treatment in Bell's palsy.

  16. Assessment of recurrent laryngeal nerve function during thyroid surgery

    PubMed Central

    Douglas, J; Smith, B; Dougherty, T; Ayshford, C

    2014-01-01

    Introduction There is disparity in the reported incidence of temporary and permanent recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) palsy following thyroidectomy. Much of the disparity is due to the method of assessing vocal cord function. We sought to identify the incidence and natural history of temporary and permanent vocal cord palsy following thyroid surgery. The authors wanted to establish whether intraoperative nerve monitoring and stimulation aids in prognosis when managing vocal cord palsy. Methods Prospective data on consecutive thyroid operations were collected. Intraoperative nerve monitoring and stimulation, using an endotracheal tube mounted device, was performed in all cases. Endoscopic examination of the larynx was performed on the first postoperative day and at three weeks. Results Data on 102 patients and 123 nerves were collated. Temporary and permanent RLN palsy rates were 6.1% and 1.7%. Most RLN palsies were identified on the first postoperative day with all recognised at the three-week review. No preoperative clinical risk factors were identified. Although dysphonia at the three-week follow-up visit was the only significant predictor of vocal cord palsy, only two-thirds of patients with cord palsies were dysphonic. Intraoperative nerve monitoring and stimulation did not predict outcome in terms of vocal cord function. Conclusions Temporary nerve palsy rates were consistent with other series where direct laryngoscopy is used to assess laryngeal function. Direct laryngoscopy is the only reliable measure of cord function, with intraoperative monitoring being neither a reliable predictor of cord function nor a predictor of eventual laryngeal function. The fact that all temporary palsies recovered within four months has implications for staged procedures. PMID:24780671

  17. Rehabilitation of Bell's palsy patient with complete dentures.

    PubMed

    Muthuvignesh, J; Kumar, N Suman; Reddy, D Narayana; Rathinavelu, Pradeep; Egammai, S; Adarsh, A

    2015-08-01

    Facial nerve disorders may be of sudden onset and more often of unknown etiology. Edema of the facial nerve within the fallopian canal results in Bell's palsy. This causes compression of the nerve and affects the microcirculation. Many authors have suggested treatment for facial nerve paralysis ranging from simple physiotherapy to complicated microvascular decompression. It more often results in symptoms like synkinesis and muscle spasm after the decompression surgery of the nerve because of the inability to arrange the nerve fibers within the canal. The treatment choice also depends on patient's age, extent of the nerve damage, and patient's needs and desires. Many patients who cannot be rehabilitated functionally can be treated for esthetics of the involved muscles. This case report elaborates about a patient who was rehabilitated for esthetics and to some extent for function.

  18. Rehabilitation of Bell's palsy patient with complete dentures

    PubMed Central

    Muthuvignesh, J.; Kumar, N. Suman; Reddy, D. Narayana; Rathinavelu, Pradeep; Egammai, S.; Adarsh, A.

    2015-01-01

    Facial nerve disorders may be of sudden onset and more often of unknown etiology. Edema of the facial nerve within the fallopian canal results in Bell's palsy. This causes compression of the nerve and affects the microcirculation. Many authors have suggested treatment for facial nerve paralysis ranging from simple physiotherapy to complicated microvascular decompression. It more often results in symptoms like synkinesis and muscle spasm after the decompression surgery of the nerve because of the inability to arrange the nerve fibers within the canal. The treatment choice also depends on patient's age, extent of the nerve damage, and patient's needs and desires. Many patients who cannot be rehabilitated functionally can be treated for esthetics of the involved muscles. This case report elaborates about a patient who was rehabilitated for esthetics and to some extent for function. PMID:26538967

  19. CROSSED LEG PALSY with Report of a Recurrent Case

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Isidore I.

    1949-01-01

    A form of peroneal palsy may be caused by crossing the legs. Two physical factors—pressure and tension — are the basic causes, although other factors may be contributory. Direct pressure is applied by the bones of the two legs, compressing the peroneal nerve between them at its superficial part near the head and neck of the fibula. The palsy may be overlooked as an integral part of a widespread disorder so that careful evaluation and observation of the patient's habits are required. Detection becomes especially difficult when the palsy is bilateral, for then the lesion by virtue of its symmetry blends more readily with associated polyneuritis. A case of recurrent peroneal palsy due to crossing the legs in a prolonged postoperative convalescence is reported in detail. PMID:18145967

  20. Diagnosis and management of patients with Bell's palsy.

    PubMed

    Mooney, Tracy

    Bell's palsy (idiopathic facial paralysis) is the most common cause of acute unilateral facial nerve paralysis. Although it is usually a self-limiting condition, it can be distressing for the patient. Many people who experience one-sided facial paralysis fear that it is a symptom of stroke. However, there are subtle differences between Bell's palsy and stroke. This article discusses potential causes of the condition and identifies the differences between Bell's palsy and stroke. In addition, appropriate strategies for the care of patients with the condition are suggested. Management includes antiviral medication, corticosteroid therapy, eye care, botulinum toxin type A injection, physiotherapy, surgery and acupuncture. Psychological and emotional care of these patients is also important because any facial disability caused by facial nerve paralysis can result in anxiety and stress.

  1. Hereditary Neuropathy With Liability to Pressure Palsies: A Single-Center Experience in Southern Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzoni, Paulo José; Kay, Cláudia Suemi Kamoi; Cavalet, Cristiane; Arndt, Raquel C.; Werneck, Lineu Cesar; Scola, Rosana Herminia

    2016-01-01

    The spectrum of clinical and electrophysiological features in hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) is broad. We analyze a series of Brazilian patients with HNPP. Correlations between clinical manifestations, laboratory features, electrophysiological analyze, histological and molecular findings were done. In five cases, more than one episode occurred before diagnosis. Median nerve in the carpal tunnel at the wrist, ulnar nerve in its groove at the elbow, fibular nerve in the head of the fibula at the knee, radial nerve in its groove of the humerus and suprascapular nerve in its notch at the supraspinous fossa were found as focal neuropathies. One patient presented with persistent writer’s cramp after ulnar nerve palsy. Nerve conduction studies showed focal neuropathy in all patients and concomitant generalized symmetrical neuropathy in eight patients. Molecular analysis of the PMP22 gene detected deletion of the 1.5-Mb fragment in all patients. PMID:27761228

  2. MRI exploration of the intrapetrous facial nerve.

    PubMed

    Girard, N; Poncet, M; Chays, A; Florence, A; Gignac, D; Magnan, J; Raybaud, C

    1993-12-01

    We report our experience of intrapetrous facial nerve evaluation in 33 patients examined by three-dimensional MRI (3D-FT) with intravenous gadolinium injection. The examinations were performed by a 1 Tesla magnet, using Flash and Turbo-Flash sequences which enabled us to obtain contiguous millimetric sections and to make reconstructions in all planes. Among these 33 patients, 31 had facial palsy and 2 a facial nerve lesion without clinical signs and discovered by chance. Facial palsy had started rather abruptly in 26 cases. It was either idiopathic (n = 20) or caused by herpes zoster (n = 1), injuries (n = 2), metastasis (n = 1) and tumour (n = 1); it was concomitant with a granuloma in 1 case. Five patients seen or explored late had congenital cholesteatoma (n = 2), facial nerve neurinoma (n = 2) or persistent idiopathic facial palsy (n = 1). There was no contrast enhancement in "chronic" non tumoral facial palsy. All tumours (neurinoma, neurofibroma, metastasis) were contrast-enhanced, as were the 2 cases of traumatic palsy and the case with granuloma of the labyrinth. In acute idiopathic facial palsy (n = 20), contrast enhancement was demonstrated in 11 patients; among these, recovery was complete at 2 months in 1 case and incomplete in 9 cases; 1 patient was lost sight of. In the 9 patients without contrast enhancement, recovery was complete in 7; 2 patients were lost sight of. This study shows that minute lesions of the facial nerve can be detected with millimetric MRI T1-weighted sequences and contrast enhancement. It also suggests that contrast enhancement has some prognostic value in patients with acute idiopathic facial palsy.

  3. Corticosteroid treatment of childhood Bell's palsy.

    PubMed

    Unüvar, E; Oğuz, F; Sidal, M; Kiliç, A

    1999-11-01

    The therapeutic effect of corticosteroids in acute idiopathic peripheral nerve paralysis (Bell's palsy) in children is controversial. The authors evaluated the effect of steroids on the early and late outcome of children with Bell's palsy in a prospective randomized controlled setting. Forty-two patients (21 females, 21 males) with complete paralysis were enrolled in the study. Group 1 (n = 21) received methylprednisolone (1 mg/kg daily for 10 days orally); Group 2 (n = 21) did not. All patients were observed in the first 3 days of the disease and at 4, 6, and 12 months of follow-up. The mean age of Group 1 was 52.4 +/- 4.3 months, not significantly different from that of Group 2. In Group 1, 86% and 100% exhibited normal nerve function at 4 and 6 months of follow-up, respectively; in Group 2, 72% and 86% demonstrated complete recovery at 4 and 6 months, respectively, with improvement in all patients by 12 months. The improvement rates between the treated and untreated groups did not differ significantly. No side effects necessitated steroid withdrawal. The results of this study indicate that steroid therapy initiated at an early stage of childhood Bell's palsy does not significantly improve the outcome.

  4. A patient with bilateral facial palsy associated with hypertension and chickenpox: learning points.

    PubMed

    Al-Abadi, Eslam; Milford, David V; Smith, Martin

    2010-11-26

    Bilateral facial nerve paralysis is an uncommon presentation and even more so in children. There are reports of different causes of bilateral facial nerve palsy. It is well-established that hypertension and chickenpox causes unilateral facial paralysis and the importance of checking the blood pressure in children with facial nerve paralysis cannot be stressed enough. The authors report a boy with bilateral facial nerve paralysis in association with hypertension and having recently recovered from chickenpox. The authors review aspects of bilateral facial nerve paralysis as well as hypertension and chickenpox causing facial nerve paralysis.

  5. A patient with bilateral facial palsy associated with hypertension and chickenpox: learning points

    PubMed Central

    Al-Abadi, Eslam; Milford, David V; Smith, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Bilateral facial nerve paralysis is an uncommon presentation and even more so in children. There are reports of different causes of bilateral facial nerve palsy. It is well-established that hypertension and chickenpox causes unilateral facial paralysis and the importance of checking the blood pressure in children with facial nerve paralysis cannot be stressed enough. The authors report a boy with bilateral facial nerve paralysis in association with hypertension and having recently recovered from chickenpox. The authors review aspects of bilateral facial nerve paralysis as well as hypertension and chickenpox causing facial nerve paralysis. PMID:22797481

  6. Cerebral Palsy (CP) Quiz

    MedlinePlus

    ... SSI file Error processing SSI file Pop Quiz: Cerebral Palsy Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... Sandy is the parent of a child with cerebral palsy and the Board President of Gio’s Garden , a ...

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging findings in delayed facial palsy after stapes surgery.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Marc; Balaker, Ashley; Kirsch, Claudia; Mendelsohn, Abie; Ishiyama, Akira

    2010-09-01

    1. To retrospectively review the pathophysiology and radiologic features of delayed facial palsy after stapedectomy. 2. To discuss the cause and management strategy of this unusual problem. Four hundred fifty stapedectomies performed between 2001 and 2007 by a single surgeon were retrospectively reviewed. Two patients in this series developed a delayed facial palsy postoperatively. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed on patients with delayed facial palsy after stapedectomy and was repeated as their clinical symptoms resolved. The patients were treated medically with oral corticosteroids and antiviral medications. The clinical course and radiographic characteristics on MRI of patients with delayed facial palsy are presented. Two of 450 patients who underwent stapedectomies (0.4%) during a 7-year period developed the rare complication of delayed facial palsy (postoperative Days 12 and 41, respectively). Both patients experienced periauricular pain and dysgeusia, followed by rapidly progressive complete facial nerve paralysis. The operated ear showed no sign of infection. MRI with gadolinium of the internal auditory canal demonstrated enhancement of the labyrinthine portion of the facial nerve as seen in Bell's palsy. Both patients were treated with oral corticosteroids and antiviral medications. Subsequent imaging revealed decreased enhancement with resolution of facial paralysis. In the rare complication of delayed facial palsy after stapedectomy, MRI findings support the hypothesis that reactivation of a latent virus is the underlying cause. Therefore, delayed facial paralysis after stapedectomy should be treated similarly to Bell's palsy with steroid and antiviral medical therapy.

  8. Microsurgical reconstruction of obstetric brachial plexus palsy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liang; Gu, Yu-Dong; Wang, Huan

    2008-01-01

    The incidence of obstetric brachial plexus palsy is not declining. Heavy birth weight of the infant and breech delivery are considered two important risk factors and Caesarean section delivery seems to be a protective factor. There are two clinical appearances, that is, paralysis of the upper roots and that of total roots, and Klumpke's palsy involving the C8 and T1 roots is rarely seen. Computed tomography myelography (CTM) is still the best way of visualizing nerve roots. Surgical intervention is needed for 20-25% of all patients and clinical information is decisive for the indication of surgery. Most often, a conducting neuroma of the upper trunk is encountered, and it is believed that neuroma resection followed by microsurgical reconstruction of the brachial plexus gives the best results. Copyright 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc. Microsurgery, 2008.

  9. Lagophthalmos after facial palsy: current therapeutic options.

    PubMed

    Vásquez, Luz María; Medel, Ramón

    2014-01-01

    As the facial nerve carries sensory, motor and parasympathetic fibres involved in facial muscle innervation, facial palsy results in functional and cosmetic impairment. It can result from a wide variety of causes like infectious processes, trauma, neoplasms, autoimmune diseases, and most commonly Bell's palsy, but it can also be of iatrogenic origin. The main ophthalmic sequel is lagophthalmos. The increased surface exposure increases the risk of keratitis, corneal ulceration, and potentially loss of vision. Treatment options are wide; some are temporary, some permanent. In addition to gold standard and traditional therapies and procedures, new options are being proposed aiming to improve not only lagophthalmos but also the quality of life of these patients. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Isolated long thoracic nerve paralysis - a rare complication of anterior spinal surgery: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Isolated long thoracic nerve injury causes paralysis of the serratus anterior muscle. Patients with serratus anterior palsy may present with periscapular pain, weakness, limitation of shoulder elevation and scapular winging. Case presentation We present the case of a 23-year-old woman who sustained isolated long thoracic nerve palsy during anterior spinal surgery which caused external compressive force on the nerve. Conclusion During positioning of patients into the lateral decubitus position, the course of the long thoracic nerve must be attended to carefully and the nerve should be protected from any external pressure. PMID:19830192

  11. [Paralysis of the oculomotor nerve caused by aneurysm--general facts and a case report].

    PubMed

    Szabo, Bianca; Szabo, I; Ciurea, A V

    2011-01-01

    One of the most frequent etiology of oculomotor nerve palsy are intracerebral aneurysms. Due to anatomical facts (its course and main relations with vascular structures of the brain) lesions of the oculomotor nerve often occur. In this paper there are presented essential issues concerning neuroanatomy of the III-rd cranial nerve pair main locations of the cerebral aneurysms in order to investigate the effect of nerve compression, clinical data regarding the palsy of the oculomotor nerve due to a cerebral aneurysm, the treatment and post surgery recovery followed by a clinical report.

  12. Nerve lesioning with direct current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravid, E. Natalie; Shi Gan, Liu; Todd, Kathryn; Prochazka, Arthur

    2011-02-01

    Spastic hypertonus (muscle over-activity due to exaggerated stretch reflexes) often develops in people with stroke, cerebral palsy, multiple sclerosis and spinal cord injury. Lesioning of nerves, e.g. with phenol or botulinum toxin is widely performed to reduce spastic hypertonus. We have explored the use of direct electrical current (DC) to lesion peripheral nerves. In a series of animal experiments, DC reduced muscle force by controlled amounts and the reduction could last several months. We conclude that in some cases controlled DC lesioning may provide an effective alternative to the less controllable molecular treatments available today.

  13. Comparison of Facial Nerve Paralysis in Adults and Children

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Chang Il; Hong, Chang Kee; Park, Moon Suh

    2008-01-01

    Purpose Facial nerve injury can occur in the regions ranging from the cerebral cortex to the motor end plate in the face, and from many causes including trauma, viral infection, and idiopathic factors. Facial nerve paralysis in children, however, may differ from that in adults. We, therefore, evaluated its etiology and recovery rate in children and adults. Materials and Methods We retrospectively evaluated the records of 975 patients, ranging in age from 0 to 88 years, who displayed facial palsy at Kyung Hee Medical Center between January 1986 and July 2005. Results The most frequent causes of facial palsy in adults were Bell's palsy (54.9%), infection (26.8%), trauma (5.9%), iatrogenic (2.0%), and tumors (1.8%), whereas the most frequent causes of facial palsy in children were Bell's palsy (66.2%), infection (14.6%), trauma (13.4%), birth trauma (3.2%), and leukemia (1.3%). Recovery rates in adults were 91.4% for Bell's palsy, 89.0% for infection, and 64.3% for trauma, whereas recovery rates in children were 93.1% for Bell's palsy, 90.9% for infection, and 42.9% for trauma. Conclusion These results show that causes of facial palsy are similar in adults and children, and recovery rates in adults and children are not significantly different. PMID:18972592

  14. Extracranial spinal accessory nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Donner, T R; Kline, D G

    1993-06-01

    Eighty-three consecutive patients with extracranial accessory nerve injury seen over a 12-year period are reviewed. The most common etiology was iatrogenic injury to the nerve at the time of previous surgery. Such operations were usually minor in nature and often related to lymph node or benign tumor removal. Examination usually distinguished winging due to trapezius weakness from that of serratus anterior palsy. Trapezius weakness was seen in all cases. Sternocleidomastoid weakness was unusual. Patients with accessory palsy were evaluated by both clinical and electromyographic studies. Patients who exhibited no clinical or electrical evidence of regeneration were operated on (44 cases). Based on intraoperative nerve action potential studies, 8 lesions in continuity had neurolysis alone. Resection with repair either by end-to-end suture or by grafts was necessary in 31 cases. One case had suture removed from nerve, two had nerve placed into target muscle, and two had more proximal neurotization. Function was usually improved in both operative and nonoperative patients. Related anatomy is discussed.

  15. Plasma endothelin level in the acute stage of Bell palsy.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, M; Iijima, M; Kukimoto, N; Kuga, M

    1996-08-01

    To determine the plasma endothelin level in the acute stage in patients with Bell palsy (based on the hypothesis that endothelin, which is a potent vasoconstrictor, may play a role in the mechanism of the onset of facial nerve paralysis and in view of the fact that the etiology of Bell palsy is still a maze of unknowns). The study involved 62 patients with the acute stage (tested within 10 days of onset) of Bell palsy (i.e., idiopathic acute peripheral facial paralysis) and an additional 36 healthy persons who served as control subjects. To determine the content of endothelin, 2 ml of plasma samples was collected from each subject. Endothelin-1 was extracted and analyzed by a radioimmunoassay by using anti-endothelin-1 antibody. Nihon University Itabashi Hospital, a referral and institutional center in Tokyo, Japan. The patients who were suffering from Bell palsy exhibited a statistically significant (P < .01) increase in the endothelin level compared with that in the 36 normal control subjects. An age-matched comparison (ranges, 20-29 years and 30-39 years) of patients with Bell palsy with normal control subjects revealed a significant difference between the normal group and the group with Bell palsy in the plasma endothelin level for both age groups that were tested (P < .01). The mean value of the endothelin level in patients with Bell palsy was maximal on day 5, and the percentage of patients with abnormally elevated endothelin levels was 100% from days 6 to 9. Endothelin, which has potent vasoconstrictive effects, may contribute to the pathogenesis of the microcirculatory impairment that occurs in patients with Bell palsy, mainly by promoting secondary ischemia.

  16. Acute bulbar palsy plus syndrome: A rare variant of Guillain-Barre syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ray, Sanghamitra; Jain, Prakash Chand

    2016-01-01

    Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS) is the most common cause of acute flaccid paralysis worldwide both in adult and pediatric population. Although flaccid paralysis is the hallmark of this disease, there are some rare variants which may be easily missed unless suspected. Here, we present a very rare variant of GBS - acute bulbar palsy plus syndrome in a pediatric patient. A 13-year-old female child presented with right-sided lower motor neuron type of facial palsy and palsy of bilateral glossopharyngeal and vagus nerve of 2 weeks duration. On detailed neurological examination, motor and sensory system were normal, but the deep tendon reflexes were absent universally. Nerve conduction study showed demyelinating motor neuropathy. Based on typical clinical course and electrophysiological studies, the diagnosis was made. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first pediatric case of unilateral facial palsy with bulbar involvement without any motor abnormality.

  17. Cerebral Palsy (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... 10 Tips for Parents Healthy Habits for TV, Video Games, and the Internet Cerebral ... cerebral Cerebral palsy (CP) is a disorder that affects muscle tone, movement, and motor skills (the ability to move in a coordinated and ...

  18. Progressive Supranuclear Palsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Education » Fact Sheets Progressive Supranuclear Palsy Fact Sheet Table of Contents (click to jump to sections) What ... Information Page NINDS Epilepsy Information Page NINDS Familial Periodic Paralyses Information Page NINDS Farber's Disease Information Page ...

  19. Progressive Supranuclear Palsy

    MedlinePlus

    Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) is a rare brain disease. It affects brain cells that control the movement of your eyes. This leads to ... speech, vision and swallowing problems. Doctors sometimes confuse PSP with Parkinson's disease or Alzheimer's disease. PSP has ...

  20. Rapid genetic screening of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A and hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies patients.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaobo; Zi, Xiaohong; Li, Lin; Zhan, Yajing; Huang, Shunxiang; Li, Jin; Li, Xuning; Li, Xigui; Hu, Zhengmao; Xia, Kun; Tang, Beisha; Zhang, Ruxu

    2012-11-15

    We used the allele-specific PCR-double digestion method on peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22) to determine duplication and deletion mutations in the proband and family members of one family with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1 and one family with hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies. The proband and one subclinical family member from the Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1 family had a PMP22 gene duplication; one patient from the hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies family had a PMP22 gene deletion. Electron microscopic analysis of ultrathin sections of the superficial peroneal nerve from the two probands demonstrated demyelination and myelin sheath hyperplasia, as well as an 'onion-like' structure in the Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A patient. We observed an irregular thickened myelin sheath and 'mouse-nibbled'-like changes in the patient with hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies. In the Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A patient, nerve electrophysiological examination revealed moderate-to-severe reductions in the motor and sensory conduction velocities of the bilateral median nerve, ulnar nerve, tibial nerve, and sural nerve. Moreover, the compound muscle action potential amplitude was decreased. In the patient with hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies, the nerve conduction velocity of the bilateral tibial nerve and sural nerve was moderately reduced, and the nerve conduction velocity of the median nerve and ulnar nerve of both upper extremities was slightly reduced.

  1. Nanomedicine in cerebral palsy

    PubMed Central

    Balakrishnan, Bindu; Nance, Elizabeth; Johnston, Michael V; Kannan, Rangaramanujam; Kannan, Sujatha

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral palsy is a chronic childhood disorder that can have diverse etiologies. Injury to the developing brain that occurs either in utero or soon after birth can result in the motor, sensory, and cognitive deficits seen in cerebral palsy. Although the etiologies for cerebral palsy are variable, neuroinflammation plays a key role in the pathophysiology of the brain injury irrespective of the etiology. Currently, there is no effective cure for cerebral palsy. Nanomedicine offers a new frontier in the development of therapies for prevention and treatment of brain injury resulting in cerebral palsy. Nanomaterials such as dendrimers provide opportunities for the targeted delivery of multiple drugs that can mitigate several pathways involved in injury and can be delivered specifically to the cells that are responsible for neuroinflammation and injury. These materials also offer the opportunity to deliver agents that would promote repair and regeneration in the brain, resulting not only in attenuation of injury, but also enabling normal growth. In this review, the current advances in nanotechnology for treatment of brain injury are discussed with specific relevance to cerebral palsy. Future directions that would facilitate clinical translation in neonates and children are also addressed. PMID:24204146

  2. Nanomedicine in cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Balakrishnan, Bindu; Nance, Elizabeth; Johnston, Michael V; Kannan, Rangaramanujam; Kannan, Sujatha

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral palsy is a chronic childhood disorder that can have diverse etiologies. Injury to the developing brain that occurs either in utero or soon after birth can result in the motor, sensory, and cognitive deficits seen in cerebral palsy. Although the etiologies for cerebral palsy are variable, neuroinflammation plays a key role in the pathophysiology of the brain injury irrespective of the etiology. Currently, there is no effective cure for cerebral palsy. Nanomedicine offers a new frontier in the development of therapies for prevention and treatment of brain injury resulting in cerebral palsy. Nanomaterials such as dendrimers provide opportunities for the targeted delivery of multiple drugs that can mitigate several pathways involved in injury and can be delivered specifically to the cells that are responsible for neuroinflammation and injury. These materials also offer the opportunity to deliver agents that would promote repair and regeneration in the brain, resulting not only in attenuation of injury, but also enabling normal growth. In this review, the current advances in nanotechnology for treatment of brain injury are discussed with specific relevance to cerebral palsy. Future directions that would facilitate clinical translation in neonates and children are also addressed.

  3. Initial lesions in Bell's palsy and Ramsay-Hunt syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nakatani, Hiroaki; Yamakawa, Kazuhiro; Hamada, Masashi; Takeda, Taizo; Kakigi, Akinobu; Iwai, Mitsuru

    2010-01-01

    The antidromic facial nerve response (AFNR) revealed that the initial lesion in both Bell's palsy and Hunt syndrome was mainly located around the geniculate ganglion within 1 week after onset of paralysis. The preoperative AFNR reflected the response near the initial lesion. To review the initial lesion in Bell's palsy and Ramsay-Hunt syndrome using intraoperative monitoring of the AFNR. 15 patients, including 8 with Bell's palsy and 7 with Ramsay-Hunt syndrome, were checked for the AFNR before and during transmastoid decompression surgery within 1 week after onset of paralysis. The AFNR monitoring was performed at the posterosuperior part of the anulus tympanicus preoperatively and at 4 points of the facial nerve during surgery. The nerve conduction block sites were diagnosed by the AFNR waveform. The monophasic wave revealing the block site was mainly observed at the geniculate ganglion in both diseases. The latencies of the preoperative responses corresponded to those recorded intraoperatively around the pyramidal segment of the facial nerve.

  4. [Bell's palsy: from viral aetiology to diagnostic reality].

    PubMed

    Tankéré, F; Bernat, I

    2009-09-01

    Peripheral injury of the facial nerve is a frequent disorder. It is a stressful situation for the patient and it is functionally hazardous for the cornea. Facial palsy is due to a lesion involving the facial pontine nucleus or the nerve trunk in its route from the pontocerebellar angle to the parotid. The idiopathic facial paralysis or Bell's palsy (BP) is the most common cause but acute facial palsy can also be due to tumors. A rigorous clinical history and examination must be performed to guide the additional biological, radiological and cochleovestibular investigations in order to reach the diagnosis. The pathophysiology of BP remains unclear, but seems to be due to the reactivation of Herpes simplex virus type 1 within the intrapetrous pathway of facial nerve. The treatment remains controversial but, for most of the authors, consists of early administration of corticosteroids with or without antiviral agents. Ninety percent of the patients recover normal facial function with this treatment. The severe BP resulting in hemifacial spasm must be quickly identified by electrophysiological testing. They need appropriate rehabilitation and for some authors facial nerve surgical decompression in emergency.

  5. The asymmetric facial skin perfusion distribution of Bell's palsy discovered by laser speckle imaging technology.

    PubMed

    Cui, Han; Chen, Yi; Zhong, Weizheng; Yu, Haibo; Li, Zhifeng; He, Yuhai; Yu, Wenlong; Jin, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Bell's palsy is a kind of peripheral neural disease that cause abrupt onset of unilateral facial weakness. In the pathologic study, it was evidenced that ischemia of facial nerve at the affected side of face existed in Bell's palsy patients. Since the direction of facial nerve blood flow is primarily proximal to distal, facial skin microcirculation would also be affected after the onset of Bell's palsy. Therefore, monitoring the full area of facial skin microcirculation would help to identify the condition of Bell's palsy patients. In this study, a non-invasive, real time and full field imaging technology - laser speckle imaging (LSI) technology was applied for measuring facial skin blood perfusion distribution of Bell's palsy patients. 85 participants with different stage of Bell's palsy were included. Results showed that Bell's palsy patients' facial skin perfusion of affected side was lower than that of the normal side at the region of eyelid, and that the asymmetric distribution of the facial skin perfusion between two sides of eyelid is positively related to the stage of the disease (P <  0.001). During the recovery, the perfusion of affected side of eyelid was increasing to nearly the same with the normal side. This study was a novel application of LSI in evaluating the facial skin perfusion of Bell's palsy patients, and we discovered that the facial skin blood perfusion could reflect the stage of Bell's palsy, which suggested that microcirculation should be investigated in patients with this neurological deficit. It was also suggested LSI as potential diagnostic tool for Bell's palsy.

  6. Perinatal brachial plexus palsy

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, John; Watt, Joe; Olson, Jaret; Van Aerde, John

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND Perinatal brachial plexus palsy (PBPP) is a flaccid paralysis of the arm at birth that affects different nerves of the brachial plexus supplied by C5 to T1 in 0.42 to 5.1 infants per 1000 live births. OBJECTIVES To identify antenatal factors associated with PBPP and possible preventive measures, and to review the natural history as compared with the outcome after primary or secondary surgical interventions. METHODS A literature search on randomized controlled trials, systematic reviews and meta-analyses on the prevention and treatment of PBPP was performed. EMBASE, Medline, CINAHL and the Cochrane Library were searched until June 2005. Key words for searches included ‘brachial plexus’, ‘brachial plexus neuropathy’, ‘brachial plexus injury’, ‘birth injury’ and ‘paralysis, obstetric’. RESULTS There were no prospective studies on the cause or prevention of PBPP. Whereas birth trauma is said to be the most common cause, there is some evidence that PBPP may occur before delivery. Shoulder dystocia and PBPP are largely unpredictable, although associations of PBPP with shoulder dystocia, infants who are large for gestational age, maternal diabetes and instrumental delivery have been reported. The various forms of PBPP, clinical findings and diagnostic measures are described. Recent evidence suggests that the natural history of PBPP is not all favourable, and residual deficits are estimated at 20% to 30%, in contrast with the previous optimistic view of full recovery in greater than 90% of affected children. There were no randomized controlled trials on nonoperative management. There was no conclusive evidence that primary surgical exploration of the brachial plexus supercedes conservative management for improved outcome. However, results from nonrandomized studies indicated that children with severe injuries do better with surgical repair. Secondary surgical reconstructions were inferior to primary intervention, but could still improve arm

  7. The association of Varicella zoster virus reactivation with Bell's palsy in children.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Aziz, Mosaad; Azab, Noha A; Khalifa, Badwy; Rashed, Mohammed; Naguib, Nader

    2015-03-01

    Bell's palsy is considered the most common cause of facial nerve paralysis in children. Although different theories have been postulated for its diagnosis, reactivation of the Varicella zoster virus (VZV) has been implicated as one of the causes of Bell's palsy. The aim of the study was to evaluate the association of Varicella-zoster virus infection with Bell's palsy and its outcome in children. A total of 30 children with Bell's palsy were recruited and were assayed for evidence of VZV infection. The severity of facial nerve dysfunction and the recovery rate were evaluated according to House-Brackmann Facial Nerve Grading Scale (HB FGS). Paired whole blood samples from all patients were obtained at their initial visit and 3 weeks later, and serum samples were analyzed for VZV IgG and IgM antibodies using ELISA. A significantly higher percentage of Bell's palsy patients were seropositive for VZV IgM antibodies than controls (36.6% of patients vs 10% of controls) while for VZV IgG antibodies the difference was statistically nonsignificant. HB FGS in Bell's palsy patients with serologic evidence of VZV recent infection or reactivation showed a statistiacally significant less cure rate than other patients. VZV reactivation may be an important cause of acute peripheral facial paralysis in children. The appropriate diagnosis of VZV reactivation should be done to improve the outcome and the cure rate by the early use of antiviral treatment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Birth brachial plexus palsy: a race against time.

    PubMed

    Patra, Sambeet; Narayana Kurup, Jayakrishnan K; Acharya, Ashwath M; Bhat, Anil K

    2016-07-11

    A 5-year-old child presented to us with weakness of the left upper limb since birth. With the given history of obstetric trauma and limb examination, a diagnosis of birth brachial plexus palsy was made. Brachial plexus exploration along with microsurgery was performed at the same time which included extrinsic neurolysis of the roots and trunks and nerve transfer for better shoulder external rotation and elbow flexion. Both the movements were severely restricted previously due to co-contractures with the shoulder internal rotators and triceps. The problem of birth brachial plexus palsy is proving to be a global health burden both in developed countries and in developing countries such as India. The lack of awareness among the general public and primary healthcare providers and inadequate orthopaedic and neurosurgeons trained to treat the condition have worsened the prognosis. This case lays stress on the delayed complications in birth brachial palsy and its effective management. 2016 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  9. Transient unilateral combined paresis of the hypoglossal nerve and lingual nerve following intubation anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Ulusoy, Hulya; Besir, Ahmet; Cekic, Bahanur; Kosucu, Muge; Geze, Sukran

    2014-01-01

    Nerve damage may occur in the pharyngolaryngeal region during general anesthesia. The most frequently injured nerves are the hypoglossal, lingual and recurrent laryngeal. These injuries may arise in association with several factors, such as laryngoscopy, endotracheal intubation and tube insertion, cuff pressure, mask ventilation, the triple airway maneuver, the oropharyngeal airway, manner of intubation tube insertion, head and neck position and aspiration. Nerve injuries in this region may take the form of an isolated single nerve or of paresis of two nerves together in the form of hypoglossal and recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy (Tapia's syndrome). However, combined injury of the lingual and hypoglossal nerves following intubation anesthesia is a much rarer condition. The risk of this damage can be reduced with precautionary measures. We describe a case of combined unilateral nervus hypoglossus and nervus lingualis paresis developing after intubation anesthesia.

  10. High-frequency ultrasound as an adjunct to neural electrophysiology: Evaluation and prognosis of Bell's palsy.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuo; Guo, Rui-Jun; Liang, Xiao-Ning; Wu, Yue; Cao, Wen; Zhang, Zhen-Ping; Zhao, Wei; Liang, Hai-Dong

    2016-01-01

    Bell's palsy is a form of temporary facial nerve paralysis that occurs primarily in young adults. Previously, various methods were used to assess outcomes in facial nerve disease. The aim of the present study was to characterize the main branches of the normal and abnormal facial nerve using high-frequency ultrasonography (HFUS). A total of 104 healthy volunteers, 40 patients with acute onset of Bell's palsy and 30 patients who underwent 3-month routine therapy for Bell's palsy disease were included in the study. The healthy volunteers and patients were selected for HFUS examination and VII nerve conduction. The results showed significant differences in nerve diameter, echogenicity, delitescence and amplitude in different groups. Statistically significant correlations were identified for severity grading in one of the experimental groups during HFUS examinations. In conclusion, HFUS as a complementary technique paired with neural electrophysiology may establish the normal values of facial nerve. Additionally, HFUS was beneficial in the process of evaluation and prognosis of Bell's palsy disease.

  11. High-frequency ultrasound as an adjunct to neural electrophysiology: Evaluation and prognosis of Bell's palsy

    PubMed Central

    LI, SHUO; GUO, RUI-JUN; LIANG, XIAO-NING; WU, YUE; CAO, WEN; ZHANG, ZHEN-PING; ZHAO, WEI; LIANG, HAI-DONG

    2016-01-01

    Bell's palsy is a form of temporary facial nerve paralysis that occurs primarily in young adults. Previously, various methods were used to assess outcomes in facial nerve disease. The aim of the present study was to characterize the main branches of the normal and abnormal facial nerve using high-frequency ultrasonography (HFUS). A total of 104 healthy volunteers, 40 patients with acute onset of Bell's palsy and 30 patients who underwent 3-month routine therapy for Bell's palsy disease were included in the study. The healthy volunteers and patients were selected for HFUS examination and VII nerve conduction. The results showed significant differences in nerve diameter, echogenicity, delitescence and amplitude in different groups. Statistically significant correlations were identified for severity grading in one of the experimental groups during HFUS examinations. In conclusion, HFUS as a complementary technique paired with neural electrophysiology may establish the normal values of facial nerve. Additionally, HFUS was beneficial in the process of evaluation and prognosis of Bell's palsy disease. PMID:26889221

  12. Cutaneous Sensibility Changes in Bell's Palsy Patients.

    PubMed

    Cárdenas Palacio, Carlos Andrés; Múnera Galarza, Francisco Alejandro

    2017-05-01

    Objective Bell's palsy is a cranial nerve VII dysfunction that renders the patient unable to control facial muscles from the affected side. Nevertheless, some patients have reported cutaneous changes in the paretic area. Therefore, cutaneous sensibility changes might be possible additional symptoms within the clinical presentation of this disorder. Accordingly, the aim of this research was to investigate the relationship between cutaneous sensibility and facial paralysis severity in these patients. Study Design Prospective longitudinal cohort study. Settings Tertiary care medical center. Subjects and Methods Twelve acute-onset Bell's palsy patients were enrolled from March to September 2009. In addition, 12 sex- and age-matched healthy volunteers were tested. Cutaneous sensibility was evaluated with pressure threshold and 2-point discrimination at 6 areas of the face. Facial paralysis severity was evaluated with the House-Brackmann scale. Results Statistically significant correlations based on the Spearman's test were found between facial paralysis severity and cutaneous sensitivity on forehead, eyelid, cheek, nose, and lip ( P < .05). Additionally, significant differences based on the Student's t test were observed between both sides of the face in 2-point discrimination on eyelid, cheek, and lip ( P < .05) in Bell's palsy patients but not in healthy subjects. Conclusion Such results suggest a possible relationship between the loss of motor control of the face and changes in facial sensory information processing. Such findings are worth further research about the neurophysiologic changes associated with the cutaneous sensibility disturbances of these patients.

  13. Transient unilateral oculomotor palsy and severe headache in childhood Kawasaki disease.

    PubMed

    Thapa, Rajoo; Mallick, Debkrishna; Biswas, Biswajit; Chakrabartty, Subroto

    2011-01-01

    Transient affliction of the cranial nerves may at times be either the presenting feature or complication of otherwise uncomplicated Kawasaki disease (KD) in infants and children. The present report describes a 6 year 9 month old boy with classical KD who developed right-sided oculomotor nerve palsy (manifested by ipsilateral ptosis and medial rectus palsy) resulting in symptoms like severe nausea, intense frontal headache and double vision. The palsy resolved within 5 days of intravenous immunoglobulin therapy, with no residual ophthalmological abnormality at 6 weeks. Besides increased intracranial pressure, which commonly occurs during the course of KD in children, secondary to aseptic meningitis, intense headache in such children may have cranial nerve paresis as accentuating factors.

  14. Treatment of peroneal nerve injuries with simultaneous tendon transfer and nerve exploration

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Common peroneal nerve palsy leading to foot drop is difficult to manage and has historically been treated with extended bracing with expectant waiting for return of nerve function. Peroneal nerve exploration has traditionally been avoided except in cases of known traumatic or iatrogenic injury, with tendon transfers being performed in a delayed fashion after exhausting conservative treatment. We present a new strategy for management of foot drop with nerve exploration and concomitant tendon transfer. Method We retrospectively reviewed a series of 12 patients with peroneal nerve palsies that were treated with tendon transfer from 2005 to 2011. Of these patients, seven were treated with simultaneous peroneal nerve exploration and repair at the time of tendon transfer. Results Patients with both nerve repair and tendon transfer had superior functional results with active dorsiflexion in all patients, compared to dorsiflexion in 40% of patients treated with tendon transfers alone. Additionally, 57% of patients treated with nerve repair and tendon transfer were able to achieve enough function to return to running, compared to 20% in patients with tendon transfer alone. No patient had full return of native motor function resulting in excessive dorsiflexion strength. Conclusion The results of our limited case series for this rare condition indicate that simultaneous nerve repair and tendon transfer showed no detrimental results and may provide improved function over tendon transfer alone. PMID:25099247

  15. Stereotactic radiotherapy using Novalis for skull base metastases developing with cranial nerve symptoms.

    PubMed

    Mori, Yoshimasa; Hashizume, Chisa; Kobayashi, Tatsuya; Shibamoto, Yuta; Kosaki, Katsura; Nagai, Aiko

    2010-06-01

    Skull base metastases are challenging situations because they often involve critical structures such as cranial nerves. We evaluated the role of stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) which can give high doses to the tumors sparing normal structures. We treated 11 cases of skull base metastases from other visceral carcinomas. They had neurological symptoms due to cranial nerve involvement including optic nerve (3 patients), oculomotor (3), trigeminal (6), abducens (1), facial (4), acoustic (1), and lower cranial nerves (1). The interval between the onset of cranial nerve symptoms and Novalis SRT was 1 week to 7 months. Eleven tumors of 8-112 ml in volume were treated by Novalis SRT with 30-50 Gy in 10-14 fractions. The tumors were covered by 90-95% isodose. Imaging and clinical follow-up has been obtained in all 11 patients for 5-36 months after SRT. Seven patients among 11 died from primary carcinoma or other visceral metastases 9-36 months after Novalis SRT. All 11 metastatic tumors were locally controlled until the end of the follow-up time or patient death, though retreatment for re-growth was done in 1 patient. In 10 of 11 patients, cranial nerve deficits were improved completely or partially. In some patients, the cranial nerve symptoms were relieved even during the period of fractionated SRT. Novalis SRT is thought to be safe and effective treatment for skull base metastases with involvement of cranial nerves and it may improve cranial nerve symptoms quickly.

  16. Bell’s palsy: data from a study of 70 cases

    PubMed Central

    Cirpaciu, D; Goanta, CM

    2014-01-01

    Bell’s palsy is a condition that affects the facial nerve, which is one of the twelve cranial nerves. Its main function is to control all the muscles of the facial expression. It is a unilateral, acute, partial or complete paralysis of the facial nerve. Bell's palsy remains the most common cause of facial nerve paralysis, more often encountered in females aged 17 to 30 years, recurrent in many cases and with poor associations with other pathologic conditions. In modern literature, the suspected etiology could be due to the reactivation of the latent herpes viral infections in the geniculate ganglia, and their subsequent migration to the facial nerve but, favorable outcome by using vasodilators, neurotrophic and corticosteroid therapy was recorded. PMID:25870668

  17. Imaging of Cranial Nerves III, IV, VI in Congenital Cranial Dysinnervation Disorders.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae Hyoung; Hwang, Jeong Min

    2017-06-01

    Congenital cranial dysinnervation disorders are a group of diseases caused by abnormal development of cranial nerve nuclei or their axonal connections, resulting in aberrant innervation of the ocular and facial musculature. Its diagnosis could be facilitated by the development of high resolution thin-section magnetic resonance imaging. The purpose of this review is to describe the method to visualize cranial nerves III, IV, and VI and to present the imaging findings of congenital cranial dysinnervation disorders including congenital oculomotor nerve palsy, congenital trochlear nerve palsy, Duane retraction syndrome, Möbius syndrome, congenital fibrosis of the extraocular muscles, synergistic divergence, and synergistic convergence. © 2017 The Korean Ophthalmological Society.

  18. Bell's palsy: an update on idiopathic facial paralysis.

    PubMed

    Billue, J S

    1997-08-01

    Patients with Bell's palsy, or idiopathic facial paralysis, present sporadically in the primary care setting. New evidence implicates reactivated herpes simplex virus (HSV) as the etiologic agent in greater than 70% of cases diagnosed as Bell's palsy. Careful evaluation of the patient with facial paralysis, including history, physical examination, and diagnostic assessment, may mandate the expeditious treatment of facial paralysis to prevent faulty nerve regeneration during the recovery period. Using the results of an objective tool for grading resting facial symmetry, symmetry of voluntary movement, and synkinesis can provide a quantitative measurement for decision making. These data are also useful in documenting progression or regression of the patient's facial paralysis. Administration of acyclovir with prednisone improves the recovery of complete facial functioning following an episode of Bell's palsy. During the acute and convalescent stages, the eye on the affected side must be protected until function is restored to the facial nerve. Residual effects of Bell's palsy lasting more than 6 months may indicate another diagnosis and the need to refer the patient to a specialist.

  19. Facial palsy in children: emergency department management and outcome.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cheng-Hsien; Chang, Yu-Che; Shih, Hong-Mo; Chen, Chun-Yu; Chen, Jih-Chang

    2010-02-01

    To describe the characteristics of children who present to an emergency department (ED) with facial palsy and determine the association of outcome with etiology, degree of initial paralysis, and ED management. This was a retrospective cohort study of children who presented to an ED with facial nerve paralysis (FNP). There were 85 patients with a mean age of 8.0 (SD, 6.1) years; 60% (n = 51) of the patients were male, and 65.9% (n = 56) were admitted to the hospital. Bell palsy (50.6%) was the most common etiology followed by infectious (22.4%), traumatic (16.5%), congenital (7.1%), and neoplastic etiologies (3.5%). Patients with Bell palsy had shorter recovery times (P = 0.049), and traumatic cases required a longer time for recovery (P = 0.016). Acute otitis media (AOM)-related pediatric FNP had shorter recovery times than non-AOM-related cases (P = 0.005) in infectious group. Patients given steroid therapy did not have a shorter recovery time (P = 0.237) or a better recovery (P = 0.269). There was no difference in recovery rate of pediatric patients with Bell palsy between hospitalization or not (P = 0.952). Bell palsy, infection, and trauma were most common etiologies of pediatric FNP. Recovery times were shorter in pediatric patients with Bell palsy and AOM-related FNP, whereas recovery took longer in traumatic cases. Steroid therapy did not seem beneficial for pediatric FNP. Hospitalization is not indicated for pediatric patients with Bell palsy.

  20. Medical treatment of Bell's palsy. Oral vs. intravenous administration.

    PubMed

    Tani, M; Kinishi, M; Takahara, T; Hosomi, H; Amatsu, M

    1988-01-01

    Infusion therapy using low-molecular dextran in combination with high-dose cortisone was modified from Stennert's original protocol and indicated in 50 cases of Bell's palsy. The effects of infusion were compared with the outcome in 36 cases treated by orally-administered steroids and vasodilators. In the case of incomplete palsy, the recovery rate was excellent regardless of the mode of treatment. If the palsy is not progressive, it is not necessary for patients with this condition to have infusion therapy. In the case of complete palsy, 95% of those with normal nerve excitability (NE) experienced complete recovery when treated by infusion. However, only 71% of this group experienced complete recovery when treated with oral administration. In the group with diminished or absent NE, complete recovery was obtained in 58% of the patients treated with infusion, whereas only 18% recovered completely when given oral administration. Thus, the recovery rate increased sharply in the case of infusion therapy. Therefore, the above-mentioned method of infusion therapy is indicated in cases of complete or progressively incomplete Bell's palsy except in those cases where its use is contra-indicated for some other reason.