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Sample records for abduction external rotation

  1. Shoulder abduction and external rotation restoration with nerve transfer.

    PubMed

    Kostas-Agnantis, Ioannis; Korompilias, Anastasios; Vekris, Marios; Lykissas, Marios; Gkiatas, Ioannis; Mitsionis, Gregory; Beris, Alexander

    2013-03-01

    In upper brachial plexus palsy patients, loss of shoulder function and elbow flexion is obvious as the result of paralysed muscles innervated by the suprascapular, axillary and musculocutaneus nerve. Shoulder stabilisation, restoration of abduction and external rotation are important as more distal functions will be affected by the shoulder situation. Between 2005 and 2011, eleven patients with upper type brachial plexus palsy were operated on with triceps nerve branch transfer to anterior axillary nerve branch and spinal accessory nerve transfer to the suprascapular nerve for shoulder abduction and external rotation restoration. Nine patients met the inclusion criteria for the study. All patients were men with ages ranged from 21 to 35 years (average, 27.4 years). The interval between injury and surgery ranged from 4 to 11 months (average, 7.2 months). Atrophy of the supraspinatus, infraspinatus and deltoid muscle and subluxation at the glenohumeral joint was obvious in all patients preoperatively. During the pre-op examination all patients had at least muscle grading 4 on the triceps muscle. The mean post-operative value of shoulder abduction was 112.2° (range: 60-170°) while preoperatively none of the patients was able for abduction (p<0.001). The mean post-operative value of shoulder external rotation was 66° (range: 35-110°) while preoperatively none of them was able for external rotation (p<0.001). Postoperative values of shoulder abduction were significantly better that those of external rotation (p=0.0004). The postoperative average muscle grading for shoulder abduction according the MRC scale was 3.6±0.5 and for the shoulder external rotation was 3.2±0.4. Combined nerve transfer by using the spinal accessory nerve for suprascapular nerve neurotisation and one of the triceps nerve branches for axillary nerve and teres minor branch neurotisation is an excellent choice for shoulder abduction and external rotation restoration. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier

  2. Can hip abduction and external rotation discriminate sacroiliac joint pain?

    PubMed

    Adhia, Divya Bharatkumar; Tumilty, Steve; Mani, Ramakrishnan; Milosavljevic, Stephan; Bussey, Melanie D

    2016-02-01

    The primary aim of the study is to determine if Hip Abduction and External Rotation (HABER) test is capable of reproducing familiar pain in individuals with low back pain (LBP) of sacroiliac joint (SIJ) origin (SIJ-positive) when compared with LBP of Non-SIJ origin (SIJ-negative). If so, the secondary aim is to determine the diagnostic accuracy of HABER test against the reference standard of pain provocation tests, and to determine which increments of the HABER test has highest sensitivity and specificity for identifying SIJ-positive individuals. Single-blinded diagnostic accuracy study. Participants [n(122)] between ages of 18-50 y, suffering from chronic non-specific LBP (≥3 months) volunteered in the study. An experienced musculoskeletal physiotherapist evaluated and classified participants into either SIJ-positive [n(45)] or SIJ-negative [n(77)], based on reference standard of pain provocation tests [≥3 positive tests = SIJ-positive]. Another musculoskeletal physiotherapist, blinded to clinical groups, evaluated participants for reproduction of familiar pain during each increment (10°, 20°, 30°, 40°, and 50°) of HABER test. The HABER test reproduced familiar pain in SIJ-positive individuals when compared with SIJ-negative individuals [p (0.001), R(2) (0.38), Exp(β) (5.95-10.32)], and demonstrated moderate level of sensitivity (67%-78%) and specificity (71%-72%) for identifying SIJ-positive individuals. Receiver operator curve analysis demonstrated that the HABER increments of ≥30° have the highest sensitivity (83%-100%) and specificity (52%-64%). The HABER test is capable of reproducing familiar pain in SIJ-positive LBP individuals and has moderate levels of sensitivity and specificity for identifying SIJ-positive LBP individuals. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Glenosphere size in reverse shoulder arthroplasty: is larger better for external rotation and abduction strength?

    PubMed

    Müller, Andreas M; Born, Marian; Jung, Christian; Flury, Matthias; Kolling, Christoph; Schwyzer, Hans-Kaspar; Audigé, Laurent

    2018-01-01

    The role of glenosphere size in reverse shoulder arthroplasty (RSA) may be important in prosthetic stability, joint kinematics, rotator cuff tension and excursion, scapular impingement, humeral lateralization, deltoid wrap, and the occurrence of "notching." This study compared short- and midterm clinical and radiographic outcomes for 2 different glenosphere sizes of a single RSA type with respect to implant positioning, glenoid size, and morphology. This retrospective analysis included 68 RSA procedures that were prospectively documented in a local register during a 5-year postoperative period. Two glenosphere diameter sizes of 36 mm (n = 33) and 44 mm (n = 35) were used. Standard radiographs were made preoperatively (ie, baseline) and at 6, 12, 24, and 60 months after surgery. Range of motion, strength, the Constant-Murley score, and the Shoulder Pain and Disability Index were also assessed at all follow-up visits. The effect of glenosphere size on measured outcomes was adjusted for baseline values, patient gender, and humeral head diameter. No significant differences were found in the functional scores between treatment groups at all follow-up assessments. At the 12-month follow-up, patients with a 44-mm glenosphere had greater external rotation in adduction (mean difference, 12°; P = .001) and abduction strength (mean difference, 1.4 kg; P = .026) compared with those with the smaller implant. These differences remained at 60 months. Scapular notching was observed in 38% of all patients, without any relevant difference between the groups. An increase in glenosphere diameter leads to a clinically moderate but significant increase in external rotation in adduction and abduction strength at midterm follow-up. Copyright © 2017 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. MR arthrography including abduction and external rotation images in the assessment of atraumatic multidirectional instability of the shoulder.

    PubMed

    Schaeffeler, Christoph; Waldt, Simone; Bauer, Jan S; Kirchhoff, Chlodwig; Haller, Bernhard; Schröder, Michael; Rummeny, Ernst J; Imhoff, Andreas B; Woertler, Klaus

    2014-06-01

    To evaluate diagnostic signs and measurements in the assessment of capsular redundancy in atraumatic multidirectional instability (MDI) of the shoulder on MR arthrography (MR-A) including abduction/external rotation (ABER) images. Twenty-one MR-A including ABER position of 20 patients with clinically diagnosed MDI and 17 patients without instability were assessed by three radiologists. On ABER images, presence of a layer of contrast between the humeral head (HH) and the anteroinferior glenohumeral ligament (AIGHL) (crescent sign) and a triangular-shaped space between the HH, AIGHL and glenoid (triangle sign) were evaluated; centring of the HH was measured. Anterosuperior herniation of the rotator interval (RI) capsule and glenoid version were determined on standard imaging planes. The crescent sign had a sensitivity of 57 %/62 %/48 % (observers 1/2/3) and specificity of 100 %/100 %/94 % in the diagnosis of MDI. The triangle sign had a sensitivity of 48 %/57 %/48 % and specificity of 94 %/94 %/100 %. The combination of both signs had a sensitivity of 86 %/90 %/81 % and specificity of 94 %/94 %/94 %. A positive triangle sign was significantly associated with decentring of the HH. Measurements of RI herniation, RI width and glenoid were not significantly different between both groups. Combined assessment of redundancy signs on ABER position MR-A allows for accurate differentiation between patients with atraumatic MDI and patients with clinically stable shoulders; measurements on standard imaging planes appear inappropriate. MR arthrography has the possibility to accurately identify patients with atraumatic MDI. Imaging of the shoulder in abduction and external rotation provides additive information. Capsular enlargement of the shoulder can be diagnosed on MR arthrography.

  5. Validity and reliability of isometric muscle strength measurements of hip abduction and abduction with external hip rotation in a bent-hip position using a handheld dynamometer with a belt.

    PubMed

    Aramaki, Hidefumi; Katoh, Munenori; Hiiragi, Yukinobu; Kawasaki, Tsubasa; Kurihara, Tomohisa; Ohmi, Yorikatsu

    2016-07-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to investigate the relatedness, reliability, and validity of isometric muscle strength measurements of hip abduction and abduction with an external hip rotation in a bent-hip position using a handheld dynamometer with a belt. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty healthy young adults, with a mean age of 21.5 ± 0.6 years were included. Isometric hip muscle strength in the subjects' right legs was measured under two posture positions using two devices: a handheld dynamometer with a belt and an isokinetic dynamometer. Reliability was evaluated using an intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC); relatedness and validity were evaluated using Pearson's product moment correlation coefficient. Differences in measurements of devices were assessed by two-way ANOVA. [Results] ICC (1, 1) was ≥0.9; significant positive correlations in measurements were found between the two devices under both conditions. No main effect was found between the measurement values. [Conclusion] Our findings revealed that there was relatedness, reliability, and validity of this method for isometric muscle strength measurements using a handheld dynamometer with a belt.

  6. A comparison of trapezius muscle activities of different shoulder abduction angles and rotation conditions during prone horizontal abduction

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Jin Yong; Lee, Jung Seok; Mun, Byeong Mu; Kim, Tae Ho

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study examined the differences in the activities of three parts of the trapezius muscle—the upper trapezius (UT), middle trapezius (MT), and lower trapezius (LT)—among three different rotation conditions of the shoulders, while subjects performed prone horizontal abduction (PHA) at 30°, 60°, 90°, and 120° of abduction. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects of this experimental study were 16 healthy male adults. Surface electromyography was used to collect data on the activity of each part of the trapezius. A two-way analysis of variance was used to compare the activities of each area of the trapezius—the UT, MT, and LT—among internal rotation (IR), the neutral position (NP), and external rotation (ER) of the shoulders during PHA with shoulder abduction of 30°, 60°, 90°, and 120°. [Results] Activity of the UT, MT, and LT significantly increased as the shoulder abduction angle increased during PHA. There was a significant difference only in the activity of the LT, with change in shoulder rotation. In addition, the muscle activity of the LT was highest during shoulder IR at 120°. [Conclusion] Although activity of the LT was the highest during IR at 120 abduction, PHA accompanied by ER at an abduction angle of 120° would be effective at eliciting high activity in the LT when PHA is performed. Nonetheless, at an early stage of rehabilitation, PHA accompanied by ER at low abduction angles of 30° and 60° would be desirable to elicit low activity of the UT and high activity of the LT. PMID:25642047

  7. Comparison between Conventional MR Arthrograhphy and Abduction and External Rotation MR Arthrography in Revealing Tears of the Antero-Inferior Glenoid Labrum

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jung-Ah; Suh, Sang-il; Kim, Baek Hyun; Cha, Sang Hoon; Lee, Ki Yeol; Lee, Chang Hee

    2001-01-01

    Objective To compare, in terms of their demonstration of tears of the anterior glenoid labrum, oblique axial MR arthrography obtained with the patient's shoulder in the abduction and external rotation (ABER) position, with conventional axial MR arthrography obtained with the patient's arm in the neutral position. Materials and Methods MR arthrography of the shoulder, including additional oblique axial sequences with the patient in the ABER position, was performed in 30 patients with a clinical history of recurrent anterior shoulder dislocation. The degree of anterior glenoid labral tear or defect was evaluated in both the conventional axial and the ABER position by two radiologists. Decisions were reached by consensus, and a three-point scale was used: grade 1=normal; grade 2=probable tear, diagnosed when subtle increased signal intensity in the labrum was apparent; grade 3=definite tear/defect, when a contrast material-filled gap between the labrum and the glenoid rim or deficient labrum was present. The scores for each imaging sequence were averaged and to compare conventional axial and ABER position scans, Student's t test was performed. Results In 21 (70%) of 30 patients, the same degree of anterior instability was revealed by both imaging sequences. Eight (27%) had a lower grade in the axial position than in the ABER position, while one (3%) had a higher grade in the axial position. Three whose axial scan was grade 1 showed only equivocal evidence of tearing, but their ABER-position scan, in which a contrast material-filled gap between the labrum and the glenoid rim was present, was grade 3. The average grade was 2.5 (SD=0.73) for axial scans and 2.8 (SD=0.46) for the ABER position. The difference between axial and ABER-position scans was statistically significant (p<0.05). Conclusion MR arthrography with the patient's shoulder in the ABER position is more efficient than conventional axial scanning in revealing the degree of tear or defect of the anterior

  8. Passive contribution of the rotator cuff to abduction and joint stability.

    PubMed

    Tétreault, Patrice; Levasseur, Annie; Lin, Jenny C; de Guise, Jacques; Nuño, Natalia; Hagemeister, Nicola

    2011-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare shoulder joint biomechanics during abduction with and without intact non-functioning rotator cuff tissue. A cadaver model was devised to simulate the clinical findings seen in patients with a massive cuff tear. Eight full upper limb shoulder specimens were studied. Initially, the rotator cuff tendons were left intact, representing a non-functional rotator cuff, as seen in suprascapular nerve paralysis or in cuff repair with a patch. Subsequently, a massive rotator cuff tear was re-created. Three-dimensional kinematics and force requirements for shoulder abduction were analyzed for each condition using ten abduction cycles in the plane of the scapula. Mediolateral displacements of the glenohumeral rotation center (GHRC) during abduction with an intact non-functioning cuff were minimal, but massive cuff tear resulted in significant lateral displacement of the GHRC (p < 0.013). Similarly, massive cuff tear caused increased superior migration of the GHRC during abduction compared with intact non-functional cuff (p < 0.01). From 5 to 30° of abduction, force requirements were significantly less with an intact non-functioning cuff than with massive cuff tear (p < 0.009). During abduction, an intact but non-functioning rotator cuff resulted in decreased GHRC displacement in two axes as well as lowered the force requirement for abduction from 5 to 30° as compared with the results following a massive rotator cuff tear. This provides insight into the potential biomechanical effect of repairing massive rotator cuff tears with a biological or synthetic "patch," which is a new treatment for massive cuff tear.

  9. Effect of forearm axially rotated posture on shoulder load and shoulder abduction / flexion angles in one-armed arrest of forward falls.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Hsiu-Hao; Chou, You-Li; Lou, Shu-Zon; Huang, Ming-Jer; Chou, Paul Pei-Hsi

    2011-03-01

    Falling onto the outstretched hand is the most common cause of upper extremity injury. This study develops an experimental model for evaluating the shoulder load during a simulated forward fall onto one hand with three different forearm axially rotated postures, and examines the shoulder abduction angle and shoulder flexion angle in each case. Fifteen healthy young male subjects with an average age of 23.7 years performed a series of one-armed arrests from a height of 5 cm onto a force plate. The kinematics and kinetics of the upper extremity were analyzed for three different forearm postures, namely 45° externally rotated, non-rotated, and 45° internally rotated. The shoulder joint load and shoulder abduction/flexion angles were significantly dependent on the rotational posture of the forearm. The shoulder medio-lateral shear forces in the externally rotated group were found to be 1.61 and 2.94 times higher than those in the non-rotated and internally rotated groups, respectively. The shoulder flexion angles in the externally rotated, non-rotated and internally rotated groups were 0.6°, 8.0° and 19.2°, respectively, while the corresponding shoulder abduction angles were 6.1°, 34.1° and 46.3°, respectively. In falls onto the outstretched hand, an externally rotated forearm posture should be avoided in order to reduce the medio-lateral shear force acting on the shoulder joint. In falls of this type, a 45° internally rotated forearm posture represents the most effective fall strategy in terms of minimizing the risk of upper extremity injuries. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Influence of fixation point of latissimus dorsi tendon transfer for irreparable rotator cuff tear on glenohumeral external rotation: A cadaver study.

    PubMed

    Bargoin, K; Boissard, M; Kany, J; Grimberg, J

    2016-12-01

    Latissimus dorsi tendon transfer is a surgical option for treating irreparable posterosuperior rotator cuff tears, notably when attempting to reconstruct active external rotation. We hypothesized that the positioning of the transfer's point of fixation would differ depending on the desired elbow-to-body external rotation or external rotation with the elbow abducted. Seven shoulders from four whole frozen cadavers were used. We created two systems to install the subject in a semi-seated position to allow external rotation elbow to body and the arm abducted 90°. Traction sutures were positioned on the latissimus dorsi muscle and a massive tear of the rotator cuff was created. We tested six different transfer positions. Muscle contraction of the latissimus dorsi was stimulated using 10-N and 20-N suspended weights. The point of fixation of the latissimus dorsi on the humeral head had an influence on the elbow-to-body external rotation and with 90° abduction (P<0.001). The fixation point for a maximum external rotation with the elbow to the body was the anterolateral position (P<0.016). The fixation point for a maximum external rotation at 90° abduction was the position centered on the infraspinatus footprint (P<0.078). The optimal point of fixation differs depending on whether external rotation is restored at 0° or 90° abduction. Fundamental study, anatomic study. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Relationship Between Deltoid and Rotator Cuff Muscles During Dynamic Shoulder Abduction: A Biomechanical Study of Rotator Cuff Tear Progression.

    PubMed

    Dyrna, Felix; Kumar, Neil S; Obopilwe, Elifho; Scheiderer, Bastian; Comer, Brendan; Nowak, Michael; Romeo, Anthony A; Mazzocca, Augustus D; Beitzel, Knut

    2018-05-01

    Previous biomechanical studies regarding deltoid function during glenohumeral abduction have primarily used static testing protocols. (1) Deltoid forces required for scapular plane abduction increase as simulated rotator cuff tears become larger, and (2) maximal abduction decreases despite increased deltoid forces. Controlled laboratory study. Twelve fresh-frozen cadaveric shoulders with a mean age of 67 years (range, 64-74 years) were used. The supraspinatus and anterior, middle, and posterior deltoid tendons were attached to individual shoulder simulator actuators. Deltoid forces and maximum abduction were recorded for the following tear patterns: intact, isolated subscapularis (SSC), isolated supraspinatus (SSP), anterosuperior (SSP + SSC), posterosuperior (infraspinatus [ISP] + SSP), and massive (SSC + SSP + ISP). Optical triads tracked 3-dimensional motion during dynamic testing. Fluoroscopy and computed tomography were used to measure critical shoulder angle, acromial index, and superior humeral head migration with massive tears. Mean values for maximum glenohumeral abduction and deltoid forces were determined. Linear mixed-effects regression examined changes in motion and forces over time. Pearson product-moment correlation coefficients ( r) among deltoid forces, critical shoulder angles, and acromial indices were calculated. Shoulders with an intact cuff required 193.8 N (95% CI, 125.5 to 262.1) total deltoid force to achieve 79.8° (95% CI, 66.4° to 93.2°) of maximum glenohumeral abduction. Compared with native shoulders, abduction decreased after simulated SSP (-27.2%; 95% CI, -43.3% to -11.1%, P = .04), anterosuperior (-51.5%; 95% CI, -70.2% to -32.8%, P < .01), and massive (-48.4%; 95% CI, -65.2% to -31.5%, P < .01) cuff tears. Increased total deltoid forces were required for simulated anterosuperior (+108.1%; 95% CI, 68.7% to 147.5%, P < .01) and massive (+57.2%; 95% CI, 19.6% to 94.7%, P = .05) cuff tears. Anterior deltoid forces were significantly

  12. Shoulder abduction diminishes self-reinforcement in transosseous-equivalent rotator cuff repair in both knotted and knotless techniques.

    PubMed

    Smith, Geoffrey C S; Lam, Patrick H

    2018-06-20

    The self-reinforcement mechanism after double row suturebridge rotator cuff repair generates increasing compressive forces at the tendon footprint with increasing tendon load. Passive range of motion is usually allowed after rotator cuff repair. The mechanism of self-reinforcement could be adversely affected by shoulder abduction. Rotator cuff tears were created ex vivo in nine pairs of ovine shoulders. Two different repair techniques were used. One group was repaired using a double row 'suturebridge' construct with tied horizontal medial row mattress sutures (Knotted repair group). The other group was repaired identically except that medial row knots were not tied (Knotless repair group). Footprint compression was measured at varying amounts of abduction and under tendon loads of 0, 10, 20, 30, 40, 50 and 60N. The rate of increase of contact pressure (degree of self-reinforcement) was calculated for each abduction angle. Abduction diminishes footprint contact pressure in both knotted and knotless double row suturebridge constructs. Progressive abduction from 0 to 40 abduction in the knotless group and 0-30 in the knotted group results in a decrease in self-reinforcement. Abduction beyond this does not cause a further decrease in self-reinforcement. There was no difference in the rate of increase of footprint contact pressure at each angle of abduction when comparing the knotted and knotless groups. In the post-operative period, high tendon load combined with minimal abduction would be expected to generate the greatest amount of footprint compression which may improve tendon healing. Therefore, to maximize footprint compression the use of abduction pillows should be avoided while early isometric strengthening should be used.

  13. In vivo kinematic analysis of the glenohumeral joint during dynamic full axial rotation and scapular plane full abduction in healthy shoulders.

    PubMed

    Kozono, Naoya; Okada, Takamitsu; Takeuchi, Naohide; Hamai, Satoshi; Higaki, Hidehiko; Ikebe, Satoru; Shimoto, Takeshi; Miake, Go; Nakanishi, Yoshitaka; Iwamoto, Yukihide

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the kinematics of healthy shoulders during dynamic full axial rotation and scapular plane full abduction using three-dimensional (3D)-to-two-dimensional (2D) model-to-image registration techniques. Dynamic glenohumeral kinematics during axial rotation and scapular plane abduction were analysed in 10 healthy participants. Continuous radiographic images of axial rotation and scapular plane abduction were taken using a flat panel radiographic detector. The participants received a computed tomography scan to generate virtual digitally reconstructed radiographs. The density-based digitally reconstructed radiographs were then compared with the serial radiographic images acquired using image correlations. These 3D-to-2D model-to-image registration techniques determined the 3D positions and orientations of the humerus and scapula during dynamic full axial rotation and scapular plane full abduction. The humeral head centre translated an average of 2.5 ± 3.1 mm posteriorly, and 1.4 ± 1.0 mm superiorly in the early phase, then an average of 2.0 ± 0.8 mm inferiorly in the late phase during external rotation motion. The glenohumeral external rotation angle had a significant effect on the anterior/posterior (A/P) and superior/inferior (S/I) translation of the humeral head centre (both p < 0.05). 33.6 ± 15.6° of glenohumeral external rotation occurred during scapular plane abduction. The humeral head centre translated an average of 0.6 ± 0.9 mm superiorly in the early phase, then 1.7 ± 2.6 mm inferiorly in the late phase, and translated an average of 0.4 ± 0.5 mm medially in the early phase, then 1.6 ± 1.0 mm laterally in the late phase during scapular plane abduction. The humeral abduction angle had a significant effect on the S/I and lateral/medial (L/M) translation of the humeral head centre (both p < 0.05). This study investigated 3D translations of the humerus relative to the scapula: during

  14. Influence of rotator cuff tears on glenohumeral stability during abduction tasks.

    PubMed

    Hölscher, Thomas; Weber, Tim; Lazarev, Igor; Englert, Carsten; Dendorfer, Sebastian

    2016-09-01

    One of the main goals in reconstructing rotator cuff tears is the restoration of glenohumeral joint stability, which is subsequently of utmost importance in order to prevent degenerative damage such as superior labral anterior posterior (SLAP) lesion, arthrosis, and malfunction. The goal of the current study was to facilitate musculoskeletal models in order to estimate glenohumeral instability introduced by muscle weakness due to cuff lesions. Inverse dynamics simulations were used to compute joint reaction forces for several static abduction tasks with different muscle weakness. Results were compared with the existing literature in order to ensure the model validity. Further arm positions taken from activities of daily living, requiring the rotator cuff muscles were modeled and their contribution to joint kinetics computed. Weakness of the superior rotator cuff muscles (supraspinatus; infraspinatus) leads to a deviation of the joint reaction force to the cranial dorsal rim of the glenoid. Massive rotator cuff defects showed higher potential for glenohumeral instability in contrast to single muscle ruptures. The teres minor muscle seems to substitute lost joint torque during several simulated muscle tears to maintain joint stability. Joint instability increases with cuff tear size. Weakness of the upper part of the rotator cuff leads to a joint reaction force closer to the upper glenoid rim. This indicates the comorbidity of cuff tears with SLAP lesions. The teres minor is crucial for maintaining joint stability in case of massive cuff defects and should be uprated in clinical decision-making. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:1628-1635, 2016. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Use of a shoulder abduction brace after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair: A study on gait performance and falls.

    PubMed

    Sonoda, Yuma; Nishioka, Takashi; Nakajima, Ryo; Imai, Shinji; Vigers, Piers; Kawasaki, Taku

    2018-04-01

    Fall prevention is essential in patients after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair because of the high risk of re-rupture. However, there are no reports related to falls that occur during the early postoperative period, while the affected limb is immobilized. This study assessed gait performance and falls in patients using a shoulder abduction brace after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. Prospective cohort and postoperative repeated measures. This study included 29 patients (mean age, 67.1 ± 7.4 years) who underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair followed by rehabilitation. The timed up and go test, Geriatric Depression Scale, and Falls Efficacy Scale were measured, and the numbers of falls were compared between those shoulder abduction brace users and patients who had undergone total hip or knee arthroplasty. In arthroscopic rotator cuff repair patients, there were significant improvements in timed up and go test and Geriatric Depression Scale, but no significant differences in Falls Efficacy Scale, between the second and fifth postoperative weeks ( p < 0.05). Additionally, arthroscopic rotator cuff repair patients fell more often than patients with total hip arthroplasty or total knee arthroplasty during the same period. The findings suggest that rehabilitation in arthroscopic rotator cuff repair patients is beneficial, but decreased gait performance due to the immobilizing shoulder abduction brace can lead to falls. Clinical relevance Although rehabilitation helps motor function and mental health after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair, shoulder abduction brace use is associated with impaired gait performance, high Falls Efficacy Scale scores, and risk of falls, so awareness of risk factors including medications and lower limb dysfunctions is especially important after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair.

  16. Does the latissimus dorsi tendon transfer for massive rotator cuff tears remain active postoperatively and restore active external rotation?

    PubMed

    Henseler, Jan Ferdinand; Nagels, Jochem; Nelissen, Rob G H H; de Groot, Jurriaan H

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the muscle activity with surface electromyography (EMG) and the clinical outcome of the latissimus dorsi transfer. It remains unclear whether the clinical results of the latissimus dorsi transfer for massive posterosuperior rotator cuff tears are achieved either by active muscle contractions or by a passive tenodesis effect of the transfer. Eight patients were evaluated preoperatively and at 1 year (SD, 0.1) after the latissimus dorsi transfer. Clinical evaluation of outcomes included active range of motion, Constant score, and visual analog scale (VAS) for pain and activities of daily living (ADL). Muscle activity was recorded with EMG during directional isometric abduction and adduction tasks. The external rotation in adduction improved from 23° to 51° (P = .03). The external rotation in abduction improved from 10° to 70° (P = .02). The mean Constant score improved from 39 to 62 postoperatively (P = .01). The VAS for pain at rest improved from 3.3 preoperatively to 0.1 (P = .02). The VAS for ADL improved from 4.9 to 2.3 (P = .05). The transferred latissimus dorsi remained active in all cases, as reflected by increased latissimus dorsi EMG activity during abduction tasks. In addition, the latissimus dorsi EMG activity shifted from preoperative antagonistic co-activation in adduction to synergistic activation in abduction. The latissimus dorsi has synergistic muscle activity after transfer. Apart from a tenodesis effect, directional muscle activity seems relevant for improved clinical outcome and pain relief. A specific gain was observed for external rotation in elevated arm positions, a motion essential for ADL tasks. Copyright © 2014 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Effect of shoulder abduction angle on biomechanical properties of the repaired rotator cuff tendons with 3 types of double-row technique.

    PubMed

    Mihata, Teruhisa; Fukuhara, Tetsutaro; Jun, Bong Jae; Watanabe, Chisato; Kinoshita, Mitsuo

    2011-03-01

    After rotator cuff repair, the shoulder is immobilized in various abduction positions. However, there is no consensus on the proper abduction angle. To assess the effect of shoulder abduction angle on the biomechanical properties of the repaired rotator cuff tendons among 3 types of double-row techniques. Controlled laboratory study. Thirty-two fresh-frozen porcine shoulders were used. A simulated rotator cuff tear was repaired by 1 of 3 double-row techniques: conventional double-row repair, transosseous-equivalent repair, and a combination of conventional double-row and bridging sutures (compression double-row repair). Each specimen underwent cyclic testing followed by tensile testing to failure at a simulated shoulder abduction angle of 0° or 40° on a material testing machine. Gap formation and failure loads were measured. Gap formation in conventional double-row repair at 0° (1.2 ± 0.5 mm) was significantly greater than that at 40° (0.5 ± 0.3mm, P = .01). The yield and ultimate failure loads for conventional double-row repair at 40° were significantly larger than those at 0° (P < .01), whereas those for transosseous-equivalent repair (P < .01) and compression double-row repair (P < .0001) at 0° were significantly larger than those at 40°. The failure load for compression double-row repair was the greatest among the 3 double-row techniques at both 0° and 40° of abduction. Bridging sutures have a greater effect on the biomechanical properties of the repaired rotator cuff tendon at a low abduction angle, and the conventional double-row technique has a greater effect at a high abduction angle. Proper abduction position after rotator cuff repair differs between conventional double-row repair and transosseous-equivalent repair. The authors recommend the use of the combined technique of conventional double-row and bridging sutures to obtain better biomechanical properties at both low and high abduction angles.

  18. Post-operative rotator cuff integrity, based on Sugaya's classification, can reflect abduction muscle strength of the shoulder.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Masahito; Collin, Phillipe; Josseaume, Thierry; Lädermann, Alexandre; Goto, Hideyuki; Sugimoto, Katumasa; Otsuka, Takanobu

    2018-01-01

    [ICC (2.1) = 0.39 and 0.49]. Although no significant correlation was found between overall post-operative constant score and Sugaya's classification, Sugaya's classification indicated significant correlation with the muscle strength score. Sugaya's classification showed repeatability and good agreement between the orthopaedist and radiologist, who are involved in the patient care for the rotator cuff tear. Common classification of rotator cuff integrity with good reliability will give appropriate information for clinicians to improve the patient care of the rotator cuff tear. This classification also would be helpful to predict the strength of arm abduction in the scapular plane. IV.

  19. Abducting Economics

    PubMed Central

    Singer, Burton

    2018-01-01

    Abduction is the process of generating and choosing models, hypotheses and data analyzed in response to surprising findings. All good empirical economists abduct. Explanations usually evolve as studies evolve. The abductive approach challenges economists to step outside the framework of received notions about the “identification problem” that rigidly separates the act of model and hypothesis creation from the act of inference from data. It asks the analyst to engage models and data in an iterative dynamic process, using multiple models and sources of data in a back and forth where both models and data are augmented as learning evolves. PMID:29430020

  20. A Profile of Glenohumeral Internal and External Rotation Motion in the Uninjured High School Baseball Pitcher, Part II: Strength

    PubMed Central

    Hurd, Wendy J.; Kaplan, Kevin M.; ElAttrache, Neal S.; Jobe, Frank W.; Morrey, Bernard F.; Kaufman, Kenton R.

    2011-01-01

    Context: A database describing the range of normal rotator cuff strength values in uninjured high school pitchers has not been established. Chronologic factors that contribute to adaptations in strength also have not been established. Objectives: To establish a normative profile of rotator cuff strength in uninjured high school baseball pitchers and to determine whether bilateral differences in rotator cuff strength are normal findings in this age group. Design: Cohort study. Setting: Baseball playing field. Patients or Other Participants: A total of 165 uninjured male high school baseball pitchers (age = 16 ± 1 years, height = 1.8 ± 0.1 m, mass = 76.8 ± 10.1 kg, pitching experience = 7 ± 2 years). Main Outcome Measure(s): Isometric rotator cuff strength was measured bilaterally with a handheld dynamometer. We calculated side-to-side differences in strength (external rotation [ER], internal rotation [IR], and the ratio of ER:IR at 90° of abduction), differences in strength by age, and the influence of chronologic factors (participant age, years of pitching experience) on limb strength. Results: Side-to-side differences in strength were found for ER, IR, and ER:IR ratio at 90° of abduction. Age at the time of testing was a significant but weak predictor of both ER strength (R2 = 0.032, P = .02) and the ER:IR ratio (R2 = 0.051, P = .004) at 90° of abduction. Conclusions: We established a normative profile of rotator cuff strength for the uninjured high school baseball pitcher that might be used to assist clinicians and researchers in the interpretation of muscle strength performance in this population. These data further suggested that dominant-limb adaptations in rotator cuff strength are a normal finding in this age group and did not demonstrate that these adaptations were a consequence of the age at the time of testing or the number of years of pitching experience. PMID:21669099

  1. Effects of augmented trunk stabilization with external compression support on shoulder and scapular muscle activity and maximum strength during isometric shoulder abduction.

    PubMed

    Jang, Hyun-jeong; Kim, Suhn-yeop; Oh, Duck-won

    2015-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of augmented trunk stabilization with external compression support (ECS) on the electromyography (EMG) activity of shoulder and scapular muscles and shoulder abductor strength during isometric shoulder abduction. Twenty-six women volunteered for the study. Surface EMG was used to monitor the activity of the upper trapezius (UT), lower trapezius (LT), serratus anterior (SA), and middle deltoid (MD), and shoulder abductor strength was measured using a dynamometer during three experimental conditions: (1) no external support (condition-1), (2) pelvic support (condition-2), and (3) pelvic and thoracic supports (condition-3) in an active therapeutic movement device. EMG activities were significantly lower for UT and higher for MD during condition 3 than during condition 1 (p < 0.05). The MD/UT ratio was significantly higher during condition 3 than during conditions 1 and 2, and higher during condition 2 than during condition 1 (p < 0.05). Shoulder abductor strength was significantly higher during condition 3 than during condition 1 (p < 0.05). These findings suggest that augmented trunk stabilization with the ECS may be advantageous with regard to reducing the compensatory muscle effort of the UT during isometric shoulder abduction and increasing shoulder abductor strength. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Alien Abductions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nickell, Joe

    2000-03-01

    Since the beginning of the modern UFO craze in 1947, an elaborate mythology has developed concerning alleged extraterrestrial visitations. ``Flying saucer" sightings (typically involving misperceptions of such mundane phenomena as meteors and research balloons) began to be accompanied in the 1950s by reports from ``contactees," persons who claimed to have had close encounters with, even to have been transported to distant planets by, UFO occupants. By the 1960s came reports of sporadic ``abductions" which have proliferated in correlation with media interest. (Indeed, by interaction between claimants and media the portrayal of aliens has evolved from a multiplicity of types into the rather standardized big-eyed humanoid model.) While evidence of alien contact has often been faked--as by spurious photos, ``crop circles," and the notorious ``Alien Autopsy" film--few alien abduction reports appear to be hoaxes. Most seem instead to come from sincere, sane individuals. Nevertheless, not one has been authenticated, and serious investigation shows that such claims can be explained as sleep-related phenomena (notably ``waking dreams"), hypnotic confabulation, and other psychological factors. As is typical of other mythologies, the alien myth involves supernormal beings that may interact with humans, and it purports to explain the workings of the universe and humanity's place within it.

  3. Reduced glenohumeral rotation, external rotation weakness and scapular dyskinesis are risk factors for shoulder injuries among elite male handball players: a prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Clarsen, Benjamin; Bahr, Roald; Andersson, Stig Haugsboe; Munk, Rikke; Myklebust, Grethe

    2014-09-01

    To determine whether rotator cuff strength, glenohumeral joint range of motion and scapular control are associated with shoulder injuries among elite male handball players. A total of 206 players in the Norwegian elite handball league for men were tested prior to the 2011-2012 season. Measures included: (1) glenohumeral internal and external rotation range of motion, (2) isometric internal rotation, external rotation and abduction strength and (3) assessment of scapular dyskinesis. Players were followed prospectively for the entire regular season (30 weeks), with shoulder problems registered bi-weekly using the Oslo Sports Trauma Research Center Overuse Injury Questionnaire. A cumulative severity score was calculated for each player based on their questionnaire responses. This was used as the outcome measure in risk factor analyses. The average prevalence of shoulder problems throughout the season was 28% (95% CI 25% to 31%). The prevalence of substantial shoulder problems, defined as those leading to moderate or severe reductions in handball participation or performance, or to time loss, was 12% (95% CI 11% to 13%). Significant associations were found between obvious scapular dyskinesis (OR 8.41, 95% CI 1.47 to 48.1, p<0.05), total rotational motion (OR 0.77 per 5° change, 95% CI 0.56 to 0.995, p<0.05) and external rotation strength (OR 0.71 per 10 Nm change, 95% CI 0.44 to 0.99, p<0.05) and shoulder injury. Injury prevention programmes should incorporate interventions aimed at improving glenohumeral rotational range of motion, external rotation strength and scapular control. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  4. The Hillman Rotation: An External Clinic Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sears, Joan M.; Veith, Jack

    2000-01-01

    Describes the external optometric education program at the Sidney Hillman Health Centre (Chicago, Illinois). Discusses the history of the clinic, its administrative and educational philosophy, and its affiliation with two prominent hospitals and the Illinois College of Optometry. (DB)

  5. The Influence of Surgical Stabilization on Glenohumeral Abduction Using 3-Dimensional Computed Tomography in Patients With Shoulder Instability.

    PubMed

    Bakshi, Neil K; Jameel, Omar F; Merrill, Zachary F; Debski, Richard E; Sekiya, Jon K

    2016-08-01

    This study compared the amount of glenohumeral abduction during arm abduction in the affected and unaffected shoulders of 3 groups of patients with shoulder instability: failed surgical stabilization, successful surgical stabilization, and unstable shoulder with no prior surgical intervention. All patients underwent bilateral shoulder computed tomography scans in 3 positions: 0° of abduction and 0° of external rotation (0-0 position), 30° of abduction and 30° of external rotation (30-30 position), and arms maximally abducted (overhead position). Three-dimensional computed tomography reconstruction was performed for both shoulders in all 3 positions. A specialized coordinate system marked specific points and directions on the humerus and glenoid of each model. These coordinates were used to calculate the glenohumeral abduction for the normal and affected sides in the 0-0, 30-30, and overhead positions. Thirty-nine patients with shoulder instability were included, of whom 14 had failed surgical repairs, 10 had successful surgical repairs, and 15 had unstable shoulders with no prior surgical intervention. In the overhead position, patients with failed surgical intervention had significantly less glenohumeral abduction in the failed shoulder (95.6° ± 12.7°) compared with the normal shoulder (101.5° ± 12.4°, P = .02). Patients with successfully stabilized shoulders had significantly less glenohumeral abduction in the successfully stabilized shoulder (93.6° ± 10.8°) compared with the normal shoulder (102.1° ± 12.5°, P = .03). Unstable shoulders with no prior surgical intervention (102.1° ± 10.3°) did not differ when compared with the normal shoulders (101.9° ± 10.9°, P = .95). Surgical intervention, regardless of its success, limits the amount of abduction at the glenohumeral joint. Level III, retrospective comparative study. Copyright © 2016 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. [Surgical treatment of pronation and supination external rotation trimalleolar fractures].

    PubMed

    Xu, Ye-qing; Zhan, Bei-lei; He, Fei-xiong; Wei, Hong-da

    2008-04-01

    To explore the operative method and its clinical effects of pronation and supination external rotation trimalleolar fractures. From March 2000 to July 2006,42 patients of the pronation and supination external rotation trimalleolar fractures treated with open reduction and internal fixation. Thirty-one were males and 11 were females,with an average age of 40.5 years (from 19 to 76 years). Four cases were open fractures and 38 cases close fractures. The fractures were classified as pronation-external rotation (grade IV) injury in 18 cases and supination-external rotation (grade IV)in 24 cases according to the system of Lauge-Hansen. The time of injury to operation was 2 hours to 27 days. The medial, lateral and posterior malleolus were exposed by standard anteromedial and Gatellier-Chastang approaches. The reduction and internal fixation started with the posterior,then the medial and the lateral malleolus and distal tibiofibular syndesmosis in sequence. The anteroposterior, lateral and mostise X-ray films were taken after operation. All the patients were followed up for an average time of 13.5 months(from 6 to 24 months). The time of union was from 12 to 16 weeks. The results were excellent in 20,good in 16, fair in 4 and poor in 2 cases according to Baird-Jackson ankle scoring system based on pain, stability, walking ability,range of motion and radiological manifestations. The excellent and good rate was 85.7%. There were no infection,malunion and nonunion of the fractures except that the inserted screw to distal tibiofibular syndesmosis was broken in 1 case. The key of operative treatment is to restore the anatomy of ankle and to regain the ankle function maximally.

  7. A Profile of Glenohumeral Internal and External Rotation Motion in the Uninjured High School Baseball Pitcher, Part I: Motion

    PubMed Central

    Hurd, Wendy J.; Kaplan, Kevin M.; ElAttrache, Neal S.; Jobe, Frank W.; Morrey, Bernard F.; Kaufman, Kenton R.

    2011-01-01

    Context: The magnitude of motion that is normal for the throwing shoulder in uninjured baseball pitchers has not been established. Chronologic factors contributing to adaptations in motion present in the thrower's shoulder also have not been established. Objectives: To develop a normative profile of glenohumeral rotation motion in uninjured high school baseball pitchers and to evaluate the effect of chronologic characteristics on the development of adaptations in shoulder rotation motion. Design: Cohort study. Setting: Baseball playing field. Patients or Other Participants: A total of 210 uninjured male high school baseball pitchers (age = 16±1.1 years, height = 1.8 + 0.1 m, mass = 77.5±11.2 kg, pitching experience = 6±2.3 years). Intervention(s): Using standard goniometric techniques, we measured passive rotational glenohumeral range of motion bilaterally with participants in the supine position. Main Outcome Measure(s): Paired t tests were performed to identify differences in motion between limbs for the group. Analysis of variance and post hoc Tukey tests were conducted to identify differences in motion by age. Linear regressions were performed to determine the influence of chronologic factors on limb motion. Results: Rotation motion characteristics for the population were established. We found no difference between sides for external rotation (ER) at 0° of abduction (t209 = 0.658, P = .51), but we found side-to-side differences in ER (t209 = −13.012, P<.001) and internal rotation (t209 = 15.304, P<.001) at 90° of abduction. Age at the time of testing was a significant negative predictor of ER motion for the dominant shoulder (R2 = 0.019, P = .049) because less ER motion occurred at the dominant shoulder with advancing age. We found no differences in rotation motion in the dominant shoulder across ages (F4,205 range, 0.451–1.730, P>.05). Conclusions: This range-of-motion profile might be used to assist with the interpretation of normal and atypical

  8. Excessive glenohumeral horizontal abduction as occurs during the late cocking phase of the throwing motion can be critical for internal impingement.

    PubMed

    Mihata, Teruhisa; McGarry, Michelle H; Kinoshita, Mitsuo; Lee, Thay Q

    2010-02-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effects of increased horizontal abduction with maximum external rotation, as occurs during the late cocking phase of throwing motion, on shoulder internal impingement. An increase in glenohumeral horizontal abduction will cause overlap of the rotator cuff insertion with respect to the glenoid and increase pressure between the supraspinatus and infraspinatus tendon insertions on the greater tuberosity and the glenoid. Controlled laboratory study. Eight cadaveric shoulders were tested with a custom shoulder testing system with the specimens in 60 degrees of glenohumeral abduction and maximum external rotation. The amount of internal impingement was evaluated by assessing the location of the supraspinatus and infraspinatus articular insertions on the greater tuberosity relative to the glenoid using a MicroScribe 3DLX. Pressure in the posterior-superior quadrant of the glenoid was measured using Fuji prescale film. Data were obtained with the humerus in the scapular plane and 15 degrees , 30 degrees , and 45 degrees of horizontal abduction from the scapular plane. At 30 degrees and 45 degrees of horizontal abduction, the articular margin of the supraspinatus and infraspinatus tendons was anterior to the posterior edge of the glenoid and less than 2 mm from the glenoid rim in the lateral direction; the contact pressure was also greater than that found in the scapular plane and 15 degrees of horizontal abduction. Conclusion Horizontal abduction beyond the coronal plane increased the amount of overlap and contact pressure between the supraspinatus and infraspinatus tendons and glenoid. Excessive glenohumeral horizontal abduction beyond the coronal plane may cause internal impingement, which may lead to rotator cuff tears and superior labral anterior to posterior (SLAP) lesions.

  9. Effects of hand grip exercise on shoulder joint internal rotation and external rotation peak torque.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong-Rour; Jong-Soon Kim, Laurentius

    2016-08-10

    The goal of this study is to analyze the effects of hand grip training on shoulder joint internal rotation (IR)/external rotation (ER) peak torque for healthy people. The research was conducted on 23 healthy adults in their 20 s-30 s who volunteered to participate in the experiment. Hand grip power test was performed on both hands of the research subjects before/after the test to study changes in hand grip power. Isokinetic machine was used to measure the concentric IRPT (internal rotation peak torque) and concentric ERPT (external rotation peak torque) at the velocity of 60°/sec, 90°/sec, and 180°/sec before/after the test. Hand grip training was performed daily on the subject's right hand only for four weeks according to exercise program. Finally, hand grip power of both hands and the maximum torque values of shoulder joint IR/ER were measured before/after the test and analyzed. There was a statistically significant difference in the hand grip power of the right hand, which was subject to hand grip training, after the experiment. Also, statistically significant difference for shoulder ERPT was found at 60°/sec. Hand grip training has a positive effect on shoulder joint IRPT/ERPT and therefore can help strengthen muscles around the shoulder without using weight on the shoulder. Consequently, hand grip training would help maintain strengthen the muscles around the shoulder in the early phase of rehabilitation process after shoulder surgery.

  10. Immobilization in External Rotation Versus Internal Rotation After Primary Anterior Shoulder Dislocation: A Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    PubMed

    Whelan, Daniel B; Kletke, Stephanie N; Schemitsch, Geoffrey; Chahal, Jaskarndip

    2016-02-01

    The recurrence rate after primary anterior shoulder dislocation is high, especially in young, active individuals. Recent studies have suggested external rotation immobilization as a method to reduce the rate of recurrent shoulder dislocation in comparison to traditional sling immobilization. To assess and summarize evidence from randomized controlled trials on the effect of internal rotation versus external rotation immobilization on the rate of recurrence after primary anterior shoulder dislocation. Meta-analysis. PubMed, MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and abstracts from recent proceedings were searched for eligible studies. Two reviewers selected studies for inclusion, assessed methodological quality, and extracted data. Six randomized controlled trials (632 patients) were included in this review. Demographic and prognostic variables measured at baseline were similar in the pooled groups. The average age was 30.1 years in the pooled external rotation group and 30.3 years in the pooled internal rotation group. Two studies found that external rotation immobilization reduced the rate of recurrence after initial anterior shoulder dislocation compared with conventional internal rotation immobilization, whereas 4 studies failed to find a significant difference between the 2 groups. This meta-analysis suggested no overall significant difference in the rate of recurrence among patients treated with internal rotation versus external rotation immobilization (risk ratio, 0.69; 95% CI, 0.42-1.14; P = .15). There was no significant difference in the rate of compliance between internal and external rotation immobilization (P = .43). The Western Ontario Shoulder Instability Index scores were pooled across 3 studies, and there was no significant difference between the 2 groups (P = .54). Immobilization in external rotation is not significantly more effective in reducing the recurrence rate after primary anterior shoulder dislocation than

  11. Shoulder External Rotation Fatigue and Scapular Muscle Activation and Kinematics in Overhead Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Mithun; Thigpen, Charles A.; Bunn, Kevin; Karas, Spero G.; Padua, Darin A.

    2011-01-01

    Context: Glenohumeral external rotation (GH ER) muscle fatigue might contribute to shoulder injuries in overhead athletes. Few researchers have examined the effect of such fatigue on scapular kinematics and muscle activation during a functional movement pattern. Objective: To examine the effects of GH ER muscle fatigue on upper trapezius, lower trapezius, serratus anterior, and infraspinatus muscle activation and to examine scapular kinematics during a diagonal movement task in overhead athletes. Setting: Human performance research laboratory. Design: Descriptive laboratory study. Patients or Other Participants: Our study included 25 overhead athletes (15 men, 10 women; age = 20 ± 2 years, height = 180 ± 11 cm, mass = 80 ± 11 kg) without a history of shoulder pain on the dominant side. Interventions: We tested the healthy, dominant shoulder through a diagonal movement task before and after a fatiguing exercise involving low-resistance, high-repetition, prone GH ER from 0° to 75° with the shoulder in 90° of abduction. Main Outcome Measure(s): Surface electromyography was used to measure muscle activity for the upper trapezius, lower trapezius, serratus anterior, and infraspinatus. An electromyographic motion analysis system was used to assess 3-dimensional scapular kinematics. Repeated-measures analyses of variance (phase × condition) were used to test for differences. Results: We found a decrease in ascending-phase and descending-phase lower trapezius activity (F1,25 = 5.098, P = .03) and an increase in descending-phase infraspinatus activity (F1,25 = 5.534, P = .03) after the fatigue protocol. We also found an increase in scapular upward rotation (F1,24 = 3.7, P = .04) postfatigue. Conclusions: The GH ER muscle fatigue protocol used in this study caused decreased lower trapezius and increased infraspinatus activation concurrent with increased scapular upward rotation range of motion during the functional task. This highlights the interdependence of scapular

  12. Latissimus dorsi transfer to restore external rotation with reverse shoulder arthroplasty: a biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Favre, Philippe; Loeb, Michael D; Helmy, Naeder; Gerber, Christian

    2008-01-01

    In patients with pseudoparesis of the shoulder resulting from irreparable rotator cuff tears, reverse shoulder arthroplasty (RSA) can restore active elevation, but external rotation remains less predictable. Latissimus dorsi transfer (LDT) has been shown to be effective in restoring external rotation in patients with posterosuperior tears of the rotator cuff. The aim of this study is to determine the capacity of the LDT to restore external rotation in combination with RSA and to investigate the mechanical advantage produced by 3 different insertion sites. A biomechanical model was created using a reverse total shoulder prosthesis with 3 different transfer insertions. Moment arms were measured for 2 static positions and 1 motion of the humerus. The moment arm analysis showed that LDT can improve active external rotation in the setting of a reverse prosthesis. An insertion site on the posterior side of the greater tuberosity (adjacent to the teres minor insertion) produced a greater external rotation moment arm.

  13. Hand-held dynamometer testing of the internal and external rotator musculature based on selected positions to establish normative data and unilateral ratios.

    PubMed

    Riemann, Bryan L; Davies, George J; Ludwig, Lauren; Gardenhour, Helen

    2010-12-01

    Objective documentation is needed of shoulder internal and external rotator strength using hand-held dynamometry in selected positions commonly used in a clinic. We compared strength measures and unilateral ratios between gender, limbs (dominant, nondominant), and 3 testing positions. We hypothesized that men would be stronger than women, the dominant shoulder would be stronger than the nondominant shoulder, and the seated neutral (0° adduction) and seated 30° abduction, 30° scaption, 30° diagonal (30°-30°-30°) positions would be stronger than the prone at 90°-90° position. Three positions (prone at 90°, seated at neutral, and seated at 30°-30°-30°) were evaluated in 181 individuals using hand-held dynamometry. Three separate 3-factor (limb by position by gender) analyses of variance were conducted on internal rotation, external rotation, and unilateral ratios. Although the dominant limb was significantly stronger (P < .001) than the nondominant for internal rotation, there was no difference for external rotation. The external rotators demonstrated significantly greater strength in the prone at 90° position compared with the seated at neutral (P = .001) and seated at 30°-30°-30° (P = .002) positions. The internal rotators demonstrated significantly greater (P = .036) strength in the neutral position than in the prone at 90° position for the women. The unilateral ratio of external rotators/internal rotators ranged from 86% to 99%. For the women, the prone at 90° ratio was significantly greater than seated at neutral (P = .001) and seated at 30°-30°-30° (P = .001) positions. Moderate strength relationships (r = 0.506 to 0.572) were revealed between body mass and all strength measures. The results of this study provide evidence to interpret normative data, bilateral comparisons and unilateral ratios of the internal/external rotators in the 3 selected positions. Because there are no differences between the seated at neutral and 30°-30°-30

  14. Influence of glenoid component design and humeral component retroversion on internal and external rotation in reverse shoulder arthroplasty: a cadaver study.

    PubMed

    Berhouet, J; Garaud, P; Favard, L

    2013-12-01

    A common disadvantage of reverse shoulder arthroplasty is limitation of the range of arm rotation. Several changes to the prosthesis design and implantation technique have been suggested to improve rotation range of motion (ROM). Glenoid component design and degree of humeral component retroversion influence rotation ROM after reverse shoulder arthroplasty. The Aequalis Reversed™ shoulder prosthesis (Tornier Inc., Edina, MN, USA) was implanted into 40 cadaver shoulders. Eight glenoid component combinations were tested, five with the 36-mm sphere (centred seating, eccentric seating, inferior tilt, centred with a 5-mm thick lateralised spacer, and centred with a 7-mm thick lateralised spacer) and three with the 42-mm sphere (centred with no spacer or with a 7-mm or 10-mm spacer). Humeral component position was evaluated with 0°, 10°, 20°, 30°, and 40° of retroversion. External and internal rotation ROMs to posterior and anterior impingement on the scapular neck were measured with the arm in 20° of abduction. The large glenosphere (42 mm) was associated with significantly (P<0.05) greater rotation ROMs, particularly when combined with a lateralised spacer (46° internal and 66° external rotation). Rotation ROMs were smallest with the 36-mm sphere. Greater humeral component retroversion was associated with a decrease in internal rotation and a significant increase (P<0.05) in external rotation. The best balance between rotation ROMs was obtained with the native retroversion, which was estimated at 17.5° on average in this study. Our anatomic study in a large number of cadavers involved a detailed and reproducible experimental protocol. However, we did not evaluate the variability in scapular anatomy. Earlier studies of the influence of technical parameters did not take humeral component retroversion into account. In addition, no previous studies assessed rotation ROMs. Rotation ROM should be improved by the use of a large-diameter glenosphere with a spacer to

  15. Effect of lateral offset center of rotation in reverse total shoulder arthroplasty: a biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Henninger, Heath B; Barg, Alexej; Anderson, Andrew E; Bachus, Kent N; Burks, Robert T; Tashjian, Robert Z

    2012-09-01

    Lateral offset center of rotation (COR) reduces the incidence of scapular notching and potentially increases external rotation range of motion (ROM) after reverse total shoulder arthroplasty (rTSA). The purpose of this study was to determine the biomechanical effects of changing COR on abduction and external rotation ROM, deltoid abduction force, and joint stability. A biomechanical shoulder simulator tested cadaveric shoulders before and after rTSA. Spacers shifted the COR laterally from baseline rTSA by 5, 10, and 15 mm. Outcome measures of resting abduction and external rotation ROM, and abduction and dislocation (lateral and anterior) forces were recorded. Resting abduction increased 20° vs native shoulders and was unaffected by COR lateralization. External rotation decreased after rTSA and was unaffected by COR lateralization. The deltoid force required for abduction significantly decreased 25% from native to baseline rTSA. COR lateralization progressively eliminated this mechanical advantage. Lateral dislocation required significantly less force than anterior dislocation after rTSA, and both dislocation forces increased with lateralization of the COR. COR lateralization had no influence on ROM (adduction or external rotation) but significantly increased abduction and dislocation forces. This suggests the lower incidence of scapular notching may not be related to the amount of adduction deficit after lateral offset rTSA but may arise from limited impingement of the humeral component on the lateral scapula due to a change in joint geometry. Lateralization provides the benefit of increased joint stability, but at the cost of increasing deltoid abduction forces. Copyright © 2012 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Electromyographic activity of selected scapular stabilizers during glenohumeral internal and external rotation contractions.

    PubMed

    Schachter, Aaron K; McHugh, Malachy P; Tyler, Timothy F; Kreminic, Ian J; Orishimo, Karl F; Johnson, Christopher; Ben-Avi, Simon; Nicholas, Stephen J

    2010-09-01

    An important synergistic relationship exists between the scapular stabilizers and the glenohumeral rotators. Information on the relative contribution of the scapular stabilizers to glenohumeral rotation would be useful for exercise prescription for overhead athletes and for patients with shoulder pathology. We hypothesized that the scapular stabilizers would be highly active during both maximal and submaximal internal and external rotation. Eight healthy male volunteers (16 shoulders) performed internal and external glenohumeral rotation testing at maximal and submaximal intensities. They also performed a scapular retraction rowing exercise at maximal and submaximal levels. Electromyographic (EMG) signals were recorded from the infraspinatus, pectoralis major, serratus anterior, and middle trapezius. Values were compared among muscle groups, among individual muscles at different intensity levels, and among individual muscles at different points in the arc of motion. For submaximal glenohumeral internal rotation, activity in the scapular stabilizers was not different (P = .1-.83) from activity in the internal rotator throughout the range of motion. For the initial two-thirds of maximal internal rotation, middle trapezius activity and pectoralis major activity were higher (P < .05) than serratus anterior activity. For submaximal external rotation, activity in the scapular stabilizers during the middle phase of the motion was higher (P < .05) than activity in the external rotators. For maximal external rotation these differences were present throughout the motion with middle trapezius activity exceeding 100% maximal voluntary contraction. The scapular stabilizers functioned at a similar or higher intensity than the glenohumeral rotators during internal and external rotation. This highlights the importance of training the scapular stabilizers in upper extremity athletes and in patients with shoulder pathology. (c) 2010 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of

  17. Does a critical rotator cuff tear stage exist?: a biomechanical study of rotator cuff tear progression in human cadaver shoulders.

    PubMed

    Oh, Joo Han; Jun, Bong Jae; McGarry, Michelle H; Lee, Thay Q

    2011-11-16

    It is unknown at which stage of rotator cuff tear the biomechanical environment is altered. The purpose of this study was to determine if a critical rotator cuff tear stage exists that alters glenohumeral joint biomechanics throughout the rotational range of shoulder motion, and to evaluate the biomechanical effect of parascapular muscle-loading. Eight cadaver shoulders were used with a custom testing system. Four progressive rotator cuff tear stages were investigated on the basis of footprint anatomy. Three muscle-loading conditions were examined: rotator cuff only; rotator cuff with deltoid muscle; and rotator cuff, deltoid, pectoralis major, and latissimus dorsi muscles. Testing was performed in the scapular plane with 0°, 30°, and 60° of shoulder abduction. The maximum internal and external rotations were measured with 3.4 Nm of torque. The position of the humeral head apex with respect to the glenoid was calculated with use of a MicroScribe 3DLX digitizing system throughout the rotational range of motion. The abduction capability was determined as the abduction angle achieved with increasing deltoid load. Tear of the entire supraspinatus tendon significantly increased maximum external rotation and significantly decreased abduction capability with higher deltoid loads (p < 0.05). Tear of the entire supraspinatus tendon and half of the infraspinatus tendon significantly shifted the humeral head apex posteriorly at the midrange of rotation and superiorly at maximum internal rotation (p < 0.05). Loading the pectoralis major and latissimus dorsi muscles decreased the amount of humeral head elevation due to deltoid loading. Tear of the entire supraspinatus tendon was the critical stage for increasing rotational range of shoulder motion and for decreased abduction capability. Further tear progression to the infraspinatus muscle was the critical stage for significant changes in humeral head kinematics. The pectoralis major and latissimus dorsi muscles played an

  18. Reliability of Measurement of Glenohumeral Internal Rotation, External Rotation, and Total Arc of Motion in 3 Test Positions

    PubMed Central

    Kevern, Mark A.; Beecher, Michael; Rao, Smita

    2014-01-01

    Context: Athletes who participate in throwing and racket sports consistently demonstrate adaptive changes in glenohumeral-joint internal and external rotation in the dominant arm. Measurements of these motions have demonstrated excellent intrarater and poor interrater reliability. Objective: To determine intrarater reliability, interrater reliability, and standard error of measurement for shoulder internal rotation, external rotation, and total arc of motion using an inclinometer in 3 testing procedures in National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I baseball and softball athletes. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Athletic department. Patients or Other Participants Thirty-eight players participated in the study. Shoulder internal rotation, external rotation, and total arc of motion were measured by 2 investigators in 3 test positions. The standard supine position was compared with a side-lying test position, as well as a supine test position without examiner overpressure. Results: Excellent intrarater reliability was noted for all 3 test positions and ranges of motion, with intraclass correlation coefficient values ranging from 0.93 to 0.99. Results for interrater reliability were less favorable. Reliability for internal rotation was highest in the side-lying position (0.68) and reliability for external rotation and total arc was highest in the supine-without-overpressure position (0.774 and 0.713, respectively). The supine-with-overpressure position yielded the lowest interrater reliability results in all positions. The side-lying position had the most consistent results, with very little variation among intraclass correlation coefficient values for the various test positions. Conclusions: The results of our study clearly indicate that the side-lying test procedure is of equal or greater value than the traditional supine-with-overpressure method. PMID:25188316

  19. Effects of humeral head compression taping on the isokinetic strength of the shoulder external rotator muscle in patients with rotator cuff tendinitis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Moon-Hwan; Oh, Jae-Seop

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of humeral head compression taping (HHCT) on the strength of the shoulder external rotator muscle in patients with rotator cuff tendinitis. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty patients with rotator cuff tendinitis were recruited. The shoulder external rotator strength was measured using a Biodex isokinetic dynamometer system. A paired t-test was performed to evaluate within-group differences in the strength of the shoulder external rotator muscle. [Results] Significantly higher shoulder external rotator peak torque and peak torque per body weight were found in the HHCT condition than in the no-taping condition. [Conclusion] HHCT may effectively increase the shoulder external rotator muscle strength in patients with rotator cuff tendinitis.

  20. Numerical Study of Rotating Turbulence with External Forcing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeung, P. K.; Zhou, Ye

    1998-01-01

    Direct numerical simulation at 256(exp 3) resolution have been carried out to study the response of isotropic turbulence to the concurrent effects of solid-body rotation and numerical forcing at the large scales. Because energy transfer to the smaller scales is weakened by rotation, energy input from forcing gradually builds up at the large scales, causing the overall kinetic energy to increase. At intermediate wavenumbers the energy spectrum undergoes a transition from a limited k(exp -5/3) inertial range to k(exp -2) scaling recently predicted in the literature. Although the Reynolds stress tensor remains approximately isotropic and three-components, evidence for anisotropy and quasi- two-dimensionality in length scales and spectra in different velocity components and directions is strong. The small scales are found to deviate from local isotropy, primarily as a result of anisotropic transfer to the high wavenumbers. To understand the spectral dynamics of this flow we study the detailed behavior of nonlinear triadic interactions in wavenumber space. Spectral transfer in the velocity component parallel to the axis of rotation is qualitatively similar to that in non-rotating turbulence; however the perpendicular component is characterized by a greatly suppressed energy cascade at high wavenumber and a local reverse transfer at the largest scales. The broader implications of this work are briefly addressed.

  1. Unlocking the talus by eversion limits medial ankle injury risk during external rotation.

    PubMed

    Button, Keith D; Wei, Feng; Haut, Roger C

    2015-10-15

    Eversion prior to excessive external foot rotation has been shown to predispose the anterior tibiofibular ligament (ATiFL) to failure, yet protect the anterior deltoid ligament (ADL) from failure despite high levels of foot rotation. The purpose of the current study was to measure the rotations of both the subtalar and talocrural joints during foot external rotation at sub-failure levels in either a neutral or a pre-everted position as a first step towards understanding the mechanisms of injury in previous studies. Fourteen (seven pairs) cadaver lower extremities were externally rotated 20° in either a pre-everted or neutral configuration, without producing injury. Motion capture was performed to track the tibia, talus, and calcaneus motions, and a joint coordinate system was used to analyze motions of the two joints. While talocrural joint rotation was greater in the neutral ankle (13.3±2.0° versus 10.5±2.7°, p=0.006), subtalar joint rotation was greater in the pre-everted ankle (2.4±1.9° versus 1.1±1.0°, p=0.014). Overall, the talocrural joint rotated more than the subtalar joint (11.9±2.8° versus 1.8±1.6°, p<0.001). It was proposed that the calcaneus and talus 'lock' in a neutral position, but 'unlock' when the ankle is everted prior to rotation. This locking/unlocking mechanism could be responsible for an increased subtalar rotation, but decreased talocrural rotation when the ankle is pre-everted, protecting the ADL from failure. This study may provide information valuable to the study of external rotation kinematics and injury risk. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Dependence of locked mode behavior on frequency and polarity of a rotating external magnetic perturbation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, S.; Shiraishi, J.; Takechi, M.; Matsunaga, G.; Isayama, A.; Hayashi, N.; Ide, S.

    2018-02-01

    Active control and stabilization of locked modes (LM) via rotating external magnetic perturbations are numerically investigated under a realistic low resistivity condition. To explore plasma responses to rotating and/or static external magnetic perturbations, we have developed a resistive magnetohydrodynamic code ‘AEOLUS-IT’. By using AEOLUS-IT, dependencies of mode behavior on frequency and polarity of the rotating magnetic perturbation are successfully clarified. Here, the rotational direction of the rotating magnetic perturbation to the equilibrium plasma rotation in the laboratory frame is referred to as ‘polarity’. The rotating magnetic perturbation acts on the background rotating plasma in the presence of a static field. Under such circumstances, there exist bifurcated states of the background rotating plasma, which should be taken into account when studying the dependence of the mode behavior on the rotating magnetic perturbation. It is found that there exist an optimum frequency and polarity of the rotating magnetic perturbation to control the LM, and that the LM is effectively stabilized by a co-polarity magnetic perturbation in comparison with a counter-polarity one.

  3. Hip external rotation strength predicts hop performance after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Kline, Paul W; Burnham, Jeremy; Yonz, Michael; Johnson, Darren; Ireland, Mary Lloyd; Noehren, Brian

    2018-04-01

    Quadriceps strength and single-leg hop performance are commonly evaluated prior to return to sport after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR). However, few studies have documented potential hip strength deficits after ACLR, or ascertained the relative contribution of quadriceps and hip strength to hop performance. Patients cleared for return to sports drills after ACLR were compared to a control group. Participants' peak isometric knee extension, hip abduction, hip extension, and hip external rotation (HER) strength were measured. Participants also performed single-leg hops, timed hops, triple hops, and crossover hops. Between-limb comparisons for the ACLR to control limb and the non-operative limb were made using independent two-sample and paired sample t tests. Pearson's correlations and stepwise multiple linear regression were used to determine the relationships and predictive ability of limb strength, graft type, sex, and limb dominance to hop performance. Sixty-five subjects, 20 ACLR [11F, age 22.8 (15-45) years, 8.3 ± 2 months post-op, mass 70.47 ± 12.95 kg, height 1.71 ± 0.08 m, Tegner 5.5 (3-9)] and 45 controls [22F, age 25.8 (15-45) years, mass 74.0 ± 15.2 kg, height 1.74 ± 0.1 m, Tegner 6 (3-7)], were tested. Knee extension (4.4 ± 1.5 vs 5.4 ± 1.8 N/kg, p = 0.02), HER (1.4 ± 0.4 vs 1.7 ± 0.5 N/kg, p = 0.04), single-leg hop (146 ± 37 vs 182 ± 38% limb length, p < 0.01), triple hop (417 ± 106 vs 519 ± 102% limb length, p < 0.01), timed hop (3.3 ± 2.0 vs 2.3 ± 0.6 s, p < 0.01), and crossover hop (364 ± 107 vs 446 ± 123% limb length, p = 0.01) were significantly impaired in the operative versus control subject limbs. Similar deficits existed between the operative and non-operative limbs. Knee extension and HER strength were significantly correlated with each of the hop tests, but only HER significantly predicted hop performance. After ACLR, patients have persistent HER strength

  4. Does medial tenderness predict deep deltoid ligament incompetence in supination-external rotation type ankle fractures?

    PubMed

    DeAngelis, Nicola A; Eskander, Mark S; French, Bruce G

    2007-04-01

    To identify whether medial tenderness is a predictor of deep deltoid ligament incompetence in supination-external rotation ankle fractures. All Weber B lateral malleolar fractures with normal medial clear space over a 9 month period were prospectively included in the study. Fracture patterns not consistent with a supination-external rotation mechanism were excluded. High-volume tertiary care referral center and Level I trauma center. Fifty-five skeletally mature patients with a Weber B lateral malleolar fracture and normal medial clear space presenting to our institution were included. All study patients had ankle anteroposterior, lateral, and mortise radiographs. Each patient was seen and evaluated by an orthopedic specialist and the mechanism of injury was recorded. Each patient was assessed for tenderness to palpation in the region of the deltoid ligament and then had an external rotation stress mortise radiograph. Correlating medial tenderness with deep deltoid competence as measured by stress radiographs. Thirteen patients (23.6%) were tender medially and had a positive external rotation stress radiograph. Thirteen patients (23.6%) were tender medially and had a negative external rotation stress radiograph. Nineteen patients (34.5%) were nontender medially and had a negative external rotation stress radiograph. Ten patients (18.2%) were nontender medially and had a positive external rotation stress radiograph. We calculated a chi statistic of 2.37 as well as the associated P value of 0.12. Medial tenderness as a measure of deep deltoid ligament incompetence had a sensitivity of 57%, a specificity of 59%, a positive predictive value of 50%, a negative predictive value of 66%, and an accuracy of 42%. There was no statistical significance between the presence of medial tenderness and deep deltoid ligament incompetence. There is a 25% chance of the fracture in question with medial tenderness having a positive external rotation stress and a 25% chance the fracture

  5. Self-Powered Nanocomposites under an External Rotating Magnetic Field for Noninvasive External Power Supply Electrical Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Fengluan; Jin, Long; Zheng, Xiaotong; Yan, Bingyun; Tang, Pandeng; Yang, Huikai; Deng, Weili; Yang, Weiqing

    2017-11-08

    Electrical stimulation in biology and gene expression has attracted considerable attention in recent years. However, it is inconvenient that the electric stimulation needs to be supplied an implanted power-transported wire connecting the external power supply. Here, we fabricated a self-powered composite nanofiber (CNF) and developed an electric generating system to realize electrical stimulation based on the electromagnetic induction effect under an external rotating magnetic field. The self-powered CNFs generating an electric signal consist of modified MWNTs (m-MWNTs) coated Fe 3 O 4 /PCL fibers. Moreover, the output current of the nanocomposites can be increased due to the presence of the magnetic nanoparticles during an external magnetic field is applied. In this paper, these CNFs were employed to replace a bullfrog's sciatic nerve and to realize the effective functional electrical stimulation. The cytotoxicity assays and animal tests of the nanocomposites were also used to evaluate the biocompatibility and tissue integration. These results demonstrated that this self-powered CNF not only plays a role as power source but also can act as an external power supply under an external rotating magnetic field for noninvasive the replacement of injured nerve.

  6. The influence of applied internal and external rotation on the pivot shift phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Kopf, Sebastian; Musahl, Volker; Perka, Carsten; Kauert, Ralf; Hoburg, Arnd; Becker, Roland

    2017-04-01

    The pivot shift test is performed in different techniques and the rotation of the tibia seems to have a significant impact on the amount of the pivot shift phenomenon. It has been hypothesised that external rotation will increase the phenomenon due to less tension at the iliotibial band in knee extension. Twenty-four patients with unilateral anterior cruciate ligament insufficiency were included prospectively. The pivot shift test was performed bilaterally in internal and external tibial rotation under general anaesthesia. Knee motion was captured using a femoral and a tibial inertial sensor. The difference between positive and negative peak values in Euclidean norm of acceleration was calculated to evaluate the amount of the pivot shift phenomenon. The pivot shift phenomenon was significantly increased in patients with ACL insufficiency when the test was performed in external [mean 5.2 ms - 2 (95% CI 4.3-6.0)] compared to internal tibial rotation [mean 4.4 ms - 2 (95% CI 3.5-5.4)] (p = 0.002). In healthy, contralateral knees did not show any difference between external [mean 4.0 ms - 2 (95% CI 3.3-4.7)] and internal tibial rotation [mean 4.0 ms - 2 (95% CI 3.4-4.6)] (ns). The pivot shift phenomenon was increased with external rotation in ACL-insufficient knees, and therefore, one should perform the pivot shift test, rather, in external rotation to easily evoke the, sometimes difficult to detect, pivot shift phenomenon. I (diagnostic study).

  7. Femoral Component External Rotation Affects Knee Biomechanics: A Computational Model of Posterior-stabilized TKA.

    PubMed

    Kia, Mohammad; Wright, Timothy M; Cross, Michael B; Mayman, David J; Pearle, Andrew D; Sculco, Peter K; Westrich, Geoffrey H; Imhauser, Carl W

    2018-01-01

    The correct amount of external rotation of the femoral component during TKA is controversial because the resulting changes in biomechanical knee function associated with varying degrees of femoral component rotation are not well understood. We addressed this question using a computational model, which allowed us to isolate the biomechanical impact of geometric factors including bony shapes, location of ligament insertions, and implant size across three different knees after posterior-stabilized (PS) TKA. Using a computational model of the tibiofemoral joint, we asked: (1) Does external rotation unload the medial collateral ligament (MCL) and what is the effect on lateral collateral ligament tension? (2) How does external rotation alter tibiofemoral contact loads and kinematics? (3) Does 3° external rotation relative to the posterior condylar axis align the component to the surgical transepicondylar axis (sTEA) and what anatomic factors of the femoral condyle explain variations in maximum MCL tension among knees? We incorporated a PS TKA into a previously developed computational knee model applied to three neutrally aligned, nonarthritic, male cadaveric knees. The computational knee model was previously shown to corroborate coupled motions and ligament loading patterns of the native knee through a range of flexion. Implant geometries were virtually installed using hip-to-ankle CT scans through measured resection and anterior referencing surgical techniques. Collateral ligament properties were standardized across each knee model by defining stiffness and slack lengths based on the healthy population. The femoral component was externally rotated from 0° to 9° relative to the posterior condylar axis in 3° increments. At each increment, the knee was flexed under 500 N compression from 0° to 90° simulating an intraoperative examination. The computational model predicted collateral ligament forces, compartmental contact forces, and tibiofemoral internal/external and

  8. Muscular Activation During Plyometric Exercises in 90° of Glenohumeral Joint Abduction

    PubMed Central

    Ellenbecker, Todd S.; Sueyoshi, Tetsuro; Bailie, David S.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Plyometric exercises are frequently used to increase posterior rotator cuff and periscapular muscle strength and simulate demands and positional stresses in overhead athletes. The purpose of this study was to provide descriptive data on posterior rotator cuff and scapular muscle activation during upper extremity plyometric exercises in 90° of glenohumeral joint abduction. Hypothesis: Levels of muscular activity in the posterior rotator cuff and scapular stabilizers will be high during plyometric shoulder exercises similar to previously reported electromyographic (EMG) levels of shoulder rehabilitation exercises. Study Design: Descriptive laboratory study. Methods: Twenty healthy subjects were tested using surface EMG during the performance of 2 plyometric shoulder exercises: prone external rotation (PERP) and reverse catch external rotation (RCP) using a handheld medicine ball. Electrode application included the upper and lower trapezius (UT and LT, respectively), serratus anterior (SA), infraspinatus (IN), and the middle and posterior deltoid (MD and PD, respectively) muscles. A 10-second interval of repetitive plyometric exercise (PERP) and 3 repetitions of RCP were sampled. Peak and average normalized EMG data were generated. Results: Normalized peak and average IN activity ranged between 73% and 102% and between 28% and 52% during the plyometric exercises, respectively, with peak and average LT activity measured between 79% and 131% and between 31% and 61%. SA activity ranged between 76% and 86% for peak and between 35% and 37% for average activity. Muscular activity levels in the MD and PD ranged between 49% and 72% and between 12% and 33% for peak and average, respectively. Conclusion: Moderate to high levels of muscular activity were measured in the rotator cuff and scapular stabilizers during these plyometric exercises with the glenohumeral joint abducted 90°. PMID:25553216

  9. Muscular activation during plyometric exercises in 90° of glenohumeral joint abduction.

    PubMed

    Ellenbecker, Todd S; Sueyoshi, Tetsuro; Bailie, David S

    2015-01-01

    Plyometric exercises are frequently used to increase posterior rotator cuff and periscapular muscle strength and simulate demands and positional stresses in overhead athletes. The purpose of this study was to provide descriptive data on posterior rotator cuff and scapular muscle activation during upper extremity plyometric exercises in 90° of glenohumeral joint abduction. Levels of muscular activity in the posterior rotator cuff and scapular stabilizers will be high during plyometric shoulder exercises similar to previously reported electromyographic (EMG) levels of shoulder rehabilitation exercises. Descriptive laboratory study. Twenty healthy subjects were tested using surface EMG during the performance of 2 plyometric shoulder exercises: prone external rotation (PERP) and reverse catch external rotation (RCP) using a handheld medicine ball. Electrode application included the upper and lower trapezius (UT and LT, respectively), serratus anterior (SA), infraspinatus (IN), and the middle and posterior deltoid (MD and PD, respectively) muscles. A 10-second interval of repetitive plyometric exercise (PERP) and 3 repetitions of RCP were sampled. Peak and average normalized EMG data were generated. Normalized peak and average IN activity ranged between 73% and 102% and between 28% and 52% during the plyometric exercises, respectively, with peak and average LT activity measured between 79% and 131% and between 31% and 61%. SA activity ranged between 76% and 86% for peak and between 35% and 37% for average activity. Muscular activity levels in the MD and PD ranged between 49% and 72% and between 12% and 33% for peak and average, respectively. Moderate to high levels of muscular activity were measured in the rotator cuff and scapular stabilizers during these plyometric exercises with the glenohumeral joint abducted 90°.

  10. Displaceability of SLAP lesion on shoulder MR arthrography with external rotation position.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jin Young; Ha, Doo Hoe; Lee, Sang Min; Blacksin, Marcia F; Kim, Kyung Ah; Kim, Jae Wha

    2011-08-01

    To investigate the usefulness of the external rotation (ER) position on magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography for the diagnosis of superior labral anterior to posterior (SLAP) lesion. Approval of institutional review board was obtained, and informed consent was waived. The MR arthrograms of 210 shoulders that were arthroscopically confirmed as SLAP lesion in 163 shoulders and intact superior labrum in 47 shoulders were retrospectively reviewed in each neutral and ER position for the diagnosis of SLAP lesion, the extent of distraction of the torn labrum, and the external rotation angle. The sensitivity, specificity, and diagnostic accuracy of MR arthrograms for determining SLAP lesion were assessed in each position. For the arthroscopically confirmed group, the diagnosis of SLAP lesion and the extent of distraction about the tear were compared between neutral and ER positions by Fisher's exact test and the paired t-test. The correlation between the external rotation angle and the diagnosis of SLAP lesion, and between the external rotation angle and the differences in the extent of distraction were evaluated in the ER position using the ANOVA test. Sensitivity and diagnostic accuracy of MR arthrography for SLAP lesion increased from 64.4% and 71.0% in the neutral position to 78.5% and 81.9% in the ER position, respectively, without change of specificity, which was 93.6% in both positions. The diagnosis of SLAP lesion was changed from negative to SLAP lesion in 16.0% of the arthroscopically confirmed group. Mean difference in the extent of distraction about the tear was 0.69 mm (range -1.40 ∼ 6.67 mm), which was statistically significant. There was no relationship between the external rotation angle and the diagnosis of SLAP lesion, and between the external rotation angle and the differences in the extent of distraction. Shoulder MR arthrography with additional ER positioning helps in the diagnosis of SLAP lesion and provides information about the displaceability

  11. The response of rotating machinery to external random vibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tessarzik, J. M.; Chiang, T.; Badgley, R. H.

    1974-01-01

    A high-speed turbogenerator employing gas-lubricated hydrodynamic journal and thrust bearings was subjected to external random vibrations for the purpose of assessing bearing performance in a dynamic environment. The pivoted-pad type journal bearings and the step-sector thrust bearing supported a turbine-driven rotor weighing approximately twenty-one pounds at a nominal operating speed of 36,000 rpm. The response amplitudes of both the rigid-supported and flexible-supported bearing pads, the gimballed thrust bearing, and the rotor relative to the machine casing were measured with capacitance type displacement probes. Random vibrations were applied by means of a large electrodynamic shaker at input levels ranging between 0.5 g (rms) and 1.5 g (rms). Vibrations were applied both along and perpendicular to the rotor axis. Response measurements were analyzed for amplitude distribution and power spectral density. Experimental results compare well with calculations of amplitude power spectral density made for the case where the vibrations were applied along the rotor axis. In this case, the rotor-bearing system was treated as a linear, three-mass model.

  12. Effectiveness of Hip External Rotator Strengthening Exercise in Korean Postural Bowleg Women.

    PubMed

    Park, Seong Hoon; Lee, Jun Won; Kim, Joo Hyun; Tak, Kyoung Seok; Lee, Byeong Ho; Suh, In Suck

    2017-08-01

    Postural bowleg is a subclinical entity with both aesthetic and functional outcomes and appears to be common in East Asian countries. Internal rotation of the hip joint is associated with varus alignment at the knee joint of the bowleg. Strengthening exercise for the hip external rotator muscles seems to be effective in improving varus alignment of bowleg, but no standardized exercise program exists. A standardized active resistance strengthening exercise for hip external rotator muscles could improve varus alignment of the lower limb in bowlegged Korean women. In this article, a case series study was conducted to observe changes following a standardized 3-month program using equipment designed for strengthening of the hip external rotator muscles. Photogrammetric and radiographic data were used to compare the gap between knees and tibiofemoral (TF) angles before and after the exercise program. As a result, on average, the knee gap decreased by 1.6 cm. The TF angle decreased by 1.5°. Regression analysis revealed a statistically significant association between changes in knee gap and TF angle. The standardized 3-month active resistance strengthening exercise program of hip external rotator muscles was effective in improving postural deviation and cosmetic outcomes in bowlegged Korean women. This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each article. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to the Table of Contents or the online Instructions to Authors www.springer.com/00266 .

  13. Multigrid Computations of 3-D Incompressible Internal and External Viscous Rotating Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheng, Chunhua; Taylor, Lafayette K.; Chen, Jen-Ping; Jiang, Min-Yee; Whitfield, David L.

    1996-01-01

    This report presents multigrid methods for solving the 3-D incompressible viscous rotating flows in a NASA low-speed centrifugal compressor and a marine propeller 4119. Numerical formulations are given in both the rotating reference frame and the absolute frame. Comparisons are made for the accuracy, efficiency, and robustness between the steady-state scheme and the time-accurate scheme for simulating viscous rotating flows for complex internal and external flow applications. Prospects for further increase in efficiency and accuracy of unsteady time-accurate computations are discussed.

  14. A Bizarre, Unexplained, and Progressive External Rotation of the Shoulder as a Presentation of a Metastatic Deposit in the Rotator Cuff.

    PubMed

    El-Tawil, Sherif; Prinja, Aditya; Stanton, Jeremy

    2015-01-01

    We describe the first reported case of a tumour deposit within the rotator cuff presenting as a bizarre, progressive, and fixed external rotation deformity of the shoulder. It is also the first reported case to our knowledge of an oesophageal primary metastasising to the rotator cuff.

  15. A Bizarre, Unexplained, and Progressive External Rotation of the Shoulder as a Presentation of a Metastatic Deposit in the Rotator Cuff

    PubMed Central

    El-Tawil, Sherif; Prinja, Aditya; Stanton, Jeremy

    2015-01-01

    We describe the first reported case of a tumour deposit within the rotator cuff presenting as a bizarre, progressive, and fixed external rotation deformity of the shoulder. It is also the first reported case to our knowledge of an oesophageal primary metastasising to the rotator cuff. PMID:26543658

  16. Does successful rotator cuff repair improve muscle atrophy and fatty infiltration of the rotator cuff? A retrospective magnetic resonance imaging study performed shortly after surgery as a reference.

    PubMed

    Hamano, Noritaka; Yamamoto, Atsushi; Shitara, Hitoshi; Ichinose, Tsuyoshi; Shimoyama, Daisuke; Sasaki, Tsuyoshi; Kobayashi, Tsutomu; Kakuta, Yohei; Osawa, Toshihisa; Takagishi, Kenji

    2017-06-01

    Muscle atrophy and fatty infiltration in the rotator cuff muscles are often observed in patients with chronic rotator cuff tears. The recovery from these conditions has not been clarified. Ninety-four patients were included in this study. The improvement in muscle atrophy and fatty infiltration in successfully repaired rotator cuff tears was evaluated by magnetic resonance imaging at 1 year and 2 years after surgery and was compared with muscle atrophy and fatty infiltration observed on magnetic resonance imaging at 2 weeks after surgery to discount any changes due to the medial retraction of the torn tendon. The patients' muscle strength was evaluated in abduction and external rotation. Muscle atrophy and fatty infiltration of the supraspinatus were significantly improved at 2 years after surgery in comparison to 2 weeks after surgery. The subjects' abduction and external rotation strength was also significantly improved at 2 years after surgery in comparison to the preoperative values. Patients whose occupation ratio was improved had a better abduction range of motion, stronger abduction strength, and higher Constant score. Patients whose fatty infiltration was improved had a better range of motion in flexion and abduction, whereas the improvements of muscle strength and the Constant score were similar in the group that showed an improvement of fatty infiltration and the group that did not. Muscle atrophy and fatty infiltration can improve after rotator cuff repair. The strengths of abduction and external rotation were also improved at 2 years after surgery. Copyright © 2016 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. [Outcome of operative treatment for supination-external rotation Lauge-Hansen stage IV ankle fractures].

    PubMed

    Kołodziej, Łukasz; Boczar, Tomasz; Bohatyrewicz, Andrzej; Zietek, Paweł

    2010-01-01

    Ankle fractures are among the most common musculoskeletal injures. These fractures occur with an overall age- and sex-adjusted incidence rate around 180 per 100 000 person-years. The most frequent mechanism is considered to be supination-external rotation (60 to 80% of all ankle fractures) consisting of pathologic external rotation of the foot initially placed in some degree of supination. According to Lauge-Hansen classification, ankle joint structures are damaged in a sequence where the final, stage IV injuries, represents transverse fracture of the medial malleolus or its equivalent-rupture of the deltoid ligament. The aim of this study is to compare the results of two subtypes of supination-external rotation stage IV fractures. 43 patients treated surgically in 2006 to 2007 at Authors institution because of stage IV supination-external rotation ankle fracture were submitted to retrospective analysis. There were 25 patients with bimalleolar fracture (type 1) and in 18 patients with lateral malleolar fracture with accompanying rupture of the deltoid ligament (type 2). The mean age was 46 years (from 20 to 82 years). Average follow up period was 37 months (from 24 to 46 months). For the evaluation of treatment AOFAS hind-foot score (American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society) was used. The mean AOFAS score scale for Type 1 fractures was 85 points and for type 2 was significantly higher and amounted to 91 points (p < 0.05). Supination-external rotation stage IV ankle fractures with medial malleolar fracture, requires the implementation of additional diagnostic and therapeutic strategies and procedures in order to improve the outcome of results.

  18. Perception as Abduction: Turning Sensor Data into Meaningful Representation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shanahan, Murray

    2005-01-01

    This article presents a formal theory of robot perception as a form of abduction. The theory pins down the process whereby low-level sensor data is transformed into a symbolic representation of the external world, drawing together aspects such as incompleteness, top-down information flow, active perception, attention, and sensor fusion in a…

  19. A NEW CLINICAL MUSCLE FUNCTION TEST FOR ASSESSMENT OF HIP EXTERNAL ROTATION STRENGTH: AUGUSTSSON STRENGTH TEST.

    PubMed

    Augustsson, Jesper

    2016-08-01

    Dynamic clinical tests of hip strength applicable on patients, non-athletes and athletes alike, are lacking. The aim of this study was therefore to develop and evaluate the reliability of a dynamic muscle function test of hip external rotation strength, using a novel device. A second aim was to determine if gender differences exist in absolute and relative hip strength using the new test. Fifty-three healthy sport science students (34 women and 19 men) were tested for hip external rotation strength using a device that consisted of a strap connected in series with an elastic resistance band loop, and a measuring tape connected in parallel with the elastic resistance band. The test was carried out with the subject side lying, positioned in 45 ° of hip flexion and the knees flexed to 90 ° with the device firmly fastened proximally across the knees. The subject then exerted maximal concentric hip external rotation force against the device thereby extending the elastic resistance band. The displacement achieved by the subject was documented by the tape measure and the corresponding force production was calculated. Both right and left hip strength was measured. Fifteen of the subjects were tested on repeated occasions to evaluate test-retest reliability. No significant test-retest differences were observed. Intra-class correlation coefficients ranged 0.93-0.94 and coefficients of variation 2.76-4.60%. In absolute values, men were significantly stronger in hip external rotation than women (right side 13.2 vs 11.0 kg, p = 0.001, left side 13.2 vs 11.5 kg, p = 0.002). There were no significant differences in hip external rotation strength normalized for body weight (BW) between men and women (right side 0.17 kg/BW vs 0.17 kg/BW, p = 0.675, left side 0.17 kg/BW vs 0.18 kg/BW, p = 0.156). The new muscle function test showed high reliability and thus could be useful for measuring dynamic hip external rotation strength in patients, non-athletes and athletes

  20. Effect of shoulder taping on maximum shoulder external and internal rotation range in uninjured and previously injured overhead athletes during a seated throw.

    PubMed

    McConnell, Jenny; Donnelly, Cyril; Hamner, Samuel; Dunne, James; Besier, Thor

    2011-09-01

    The purpose of our study was to investigate whether shoulder taping affects shoulder kinematics in injured and previously injured overhead athletes during a seated throw. Twenty-six overhead college athletes threw a handball three times with and without tape, while seated on a chair. An 8-camera Vicon Motion Capture system recorded markers placed on the upper limb and trunk during each of the throwing conditions. Scaled musculoskeletal models of the upper limb were created using OpenSim and inverse kinematics used to obtain relevant joint angles. Shoulder taping had no main effect on external (ER) and internal (IR) rotation range (ROM) of the shoulder, but a significant interaction effect was found (p = 0.003 and 0.02, respectively), depending on previous injury status, whereby both the ER and IR ROM of the shoulder in the group of previously injured athletes decreased when taped (143-138° and 54-51°, respectively), but increased in the group who had never been injured (131-135° and 42-44°, respectively). Maximum abduction range and ball velocity were not affected by the application of shoulder taping, regardless of previous injury status. Thus, application of shoulder taping has a differential effect on maximum shoulder ER and IR ROM during throwing depending on previous injury status. These findings have implications for returning athletes to sport after injury and for screening athletes at risk of injury. Copyright © 2011 Orthopaedic Research Society.

  1. Multipoles and Force on External Points for a Two-layered Spheroidal Liquid Mass Rotating Differentialy

    SciTech Connect

    Cisneros-Parra, Joel U.; Martinez-Herrera, Francisco J.; Montalvo-Castro, J. Daniel

    We recently reported on a series of equilibrium figures for a self-gravitating heterogeneous liquid body, consisting of two concentric distorted spheroids, “nucleus” and “atmosphere,” each endowed with its own internal motion of differential rotation. In our current work, we calculate the body’s force at external points and obtain a multipolar expansion of the potential. We also give an account of figures with prolate nuclei, which remained unnoticed by us in our former paper.

  2. Syndesmotic fixation in supination-external rotation ankle fractures: a prospective randomized study.

    PubMed

    Pakarinen, Harri J; Flinkkilä, Tapio E; Ohtonen, Pasi P; Hyvönen, Pekka H; Lakovaara, Martti T; Leppilahti, Juhana I; Ristiniemi, Jukka Y

    2011-12-01

    This study was designed to assess whether transfixion of an unstable syndesmosis is necessary in supination-external rotation (Lauge-Hansen SE/Weber B)-type ankle fractures. A prospective study of 140 patients with unilateral Lauge-Hansen supination-external rotation type 4 ankle fractures was done. After bony fixation, the 7.5-Nm standardized external rotation (ER) stress test for both ankles was performed under fluoroscopy. A positive stress examination was defined as a difference of more than 2 mm side-to-side in the tibiotalar or tibiofibular clear spaces on mortise radiographs. If the stress test was positive, the patient was randomized to either syndesmotic transfixion with 3.5-mm tricortical screws or no syndesmotic fixation. Clinical outcome was assessed using the Olerud-Molander scoring system, RAND 36-Item Health Survey, and Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) to measure pain and function after a minimum 1-year of followup. Twenty four (17%) of 140 patients had positive standardized 7.5-Nm ER stress tests after malleolar fixation. The stress view was positive three times on tibiotalar clear space, seven on tibiofibular clear space, and 14 times on both tibiotalar and tibiofibular clear spaces. There was no significant difference between the two randomization groups with regards to Olerud-Molander functional score, VAS scale measuring pain and function, or RAND 36-Item Health Survey pain or physical function at 1 year. Relevant syndesmotic injuries are rare in supination-external rotation ankle fractures, and syndesmotic transfixion with a screw did not influence the functional outcome or pain after the 1-year followup compared with no fixation.

  3. Dynamic Ultrasonography of the Deep External Rotator Musculature of the Hip: A Descriptive Study.

    PubMed

    Battaglia, Patrick J; Mattox, Ross; Haun, Daniel W; Welk, Aaron B; Kettner, Norman W

    2016-07-01

    No detailed reports exist describing the methodology of ultrasound image acquisition of the deep external rotator muscles of the hip. Because gluteal pain and sciatica are common, ultrasound may be a useful dynamic imaging adjunct in the evaluation of these patients. To describe dynamic ultrasonography of the deep external rotator muscles of the hip for diagnostic purposes. Descriptive. University radiology department. Participants (n = 25; 14 male) without gluteal pain or sciatica were enrolled (mean age 27.6 ± 4.7 years; mean body mass index 26.0 ± 4.1 kg/m(2)). Ultrasonographic cine clips oriented to the long axis of each deep external rotator muscle were captured. In addition, cine clips of the piriformis tendon and obturator internus tendon were obtained. Cine clips were analyzed approximately 1 week after completion of image acquisition independently by 2 blinded raters. A 5-point Likert scale to evaluate the diagnostic utility of the ultrasound image. The modal Likert scores for rater 1 were as follows: piriformis muscle = 4; piriformis tendon = 4; superior gemellus muscle = 3; obturator internus muscle = 4; obturator internus tendon = 4; inferior gemellus muscle = 4; quadratus femoris muscle = 4. The modal scores for rater 2 were: piriformis muscle = 4; piriformis tendon = 3; superior gemellus muscle = 4; obturator internus muscle = 3; obturator internus tendon = 4; inferior gemellus muscle = 3; quadratus femoris muscle = 4. Dynamic ultrasonography may be useful to image the hip deep external rotator musculature for diagnostic purposes and therefore aid in the evaluation of gluteal pain and sciatica. Future work should investigate the reliability and validity of ultrasonography in the evaluation of pathology of these muscles. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Study on a magnetic spiral-type wireless capsule endoscope controlled by rotational external permanent magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Bo; Zhang, Wei; Sun, Zhen-jun; Guo, Lin; Deng, Chao; Chen, Ya-qi; Zhang, Hong-hai; Liu, Sheng

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, the authors propose rotating an external permanent magnet (EPM) to manipulate the synchronous rotation of a magnetic spiral-type wireless capsule endoscope (WCE), and the synchronous rotation of the WCE is converted to its translational motion in intestinal tract. In order to preliminarily verify the feasibility of this method, a handheld actuator (HA) controlled by micro controller unit, a magnetic spiral-type WCE and a bracket were fabricated, theoretical analysis and simulations about the control distance of this method were performed, and in ex-vivo tests were examined in porcine small intestine to verify the control distance and control performances of this method. It was demonstrated that this method showed good performances in controlling the translational motion of the magnetic spiral-type WCE, and this method has great potential to be used in clinical application.

  5. Lower extremity control during turns initiated with and without hip external rotation.

    PubMed

    Zaferiou, Antonia M; Flashner, Henryk; Wilcox, Rand R; McNitt-Gray, Jill L

    2017-02-08

    The pirouette turn is often initiated in neutral and externally rotated hip positions by dancers. This provides an opportunity to investigate how dancers satisfy the same mechanical objectives at the whole-body level when using different leg kinematics. The purpose of this study was to compare lower extremity control strategies during the turn initiation phase of pirouettes performed with and without hip external rotation. Skilled dancers (n=5) performed pirouette turns with and without hip external rotation. Joint kinetics during turn initiation were determined for both legs using ground reaction forces (GRFs) and segment kinematics. Hip muscle activations were monitored using electromyography. Using probability-based statistical methods, variables were compared across turn conditions as a group and within-dancer. Despite differences in GRFs and impulse generation between turn conditions, at least 90% of each GRF was aligned with the respective leg plane. A majority of the net joint moments at the ankle, knee, and hip acted about an axis perpendicular to the leg plane. However, differences in shank alignment relative to the leg plane affected the distribution of the knee net joint moment when represented with respect to the shank versus the thigh. During the initiation of both turns, most participants used ankle plantar flexor moments, knee extensor moments, flexor and abductor moments at the push leg׳s hip, and extensor and abductor moments at the turn leg׳s hip. Representation of joint kinetics using multiple reference systems assisted in understanding control priorities. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Gravity versus manual external rotation stress view in evaluating ankle stability: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    LeBa, Thu-Ba; Gugala, Zbigniew; Morris, Randal P; Panchbhavi, Vinod K

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this prospective study was to determine whether gravity versus manual external rotation stress testing effectively detects widening of the medial clear space in isolated ankle fractures when compared with the uninjured contralateral side. Manual external rotation stress and gravity stress tests were performed on injured and uninjured ankles of ankle fracture patients in a clinic setting. Medial clear space measurements were recorded and differences between gravity and manual stress views were determined. Twenty consecutive patients with ankle injury were enrolled in the study. When compared with the uninjured side, gravity stress views showed a statistically significant (P = .017) increase in medial clear space widening (1.85 ± 1.07 mm) compared with manual stress view widening (1.35 ± 1.04 mm). This study suggests that gravity stress views are as effective as manual external rotation stress views in detecting medial clear space widening in isolated fibular fractures. Diagnostic, Level II: Prospective, comparative trial. © 2014 The Author(s).

  7. The Role of Abduction in Proving Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pedemonte, Bettina; Reid, David

    2011-01-01

    This paper offers a typology of forms and uses of abduction that can be exploited to better analyze abduction in proving processes. Based on the work of Peirce and Eco, we describe different kinds of abductions that occur in students' mathematical activity and extend Toulmin's model of an argument as a methodological tool to describe students'…

  8. Gender differences in passive knee biomechanical properties in tibial rotation.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyung-Soon; Wilson, Nicole A; Zhang, Li-Qun

    2008-07-01

    The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is the most commonly injured knee ligament with the highest incidence of injury in female athletes who participate in pivoting sports. Noncontact ACL injuries commonly occur with both internal and external tibial rotation. ACL impingement against the lateral wall of the intercondylar notch during tibial external rotation and abduction has been proposed as an injury mechanism, but few studies have evaluated in vivo gender-specific differences in laxity and stiffness in external and internal tibial rotations. The purpose of this study was to evaluate these differences. The knees of 10 male and 10 female healthy subjects were rotated between internal and external tibial rotation with the knee at 60 degrees of flexion. Joint laxity, stiffness, and energy loss were compared between male and female subjects. Women had higher laxity (p = 0.01), lower stiffness (p = 0.038), and higher energy loss (p = 0.008) in external tibial rotation than did men. The results suggest that women may be at greater risk of ACL injury resulting from impingement against the lateral wall of the intercondylar notch, which has been shown to be associated with external tibial rotation and abduction.

  9. Flexibility of internal and external glenohumeral rotation of junior female tennis players and its correlation with performance ranking.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Ching-Cheng; Hsu, Chih-Chia; Chiang, Jinn-Yen; Chang, Weng-Cheng; Tsai, Jong-Chang

    2016-12-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to compare the internal and external rotation of the dominant and nondominant shoulders of adolescent female tennis players. The correlation between the shoulder rotation range of motion and the player's ranking was also analyzed. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-one female junior tennis players who were 13 to 18 years old participated in this study. A standard goniometer was used to measure the internal and external rotation of both glenohumeral joints. The difference in internal and external rotation was calculated as the glenohumeral rotation deficit. The year-end ranking of each player was obtained from the Chinese Taipei Tennis Association. [Results] The internal rotation of the dominant shoulder was significantly smaller than that of the nondominant shoulder. Moreover, player ranking was significantly and negatively correlated with the internal rotation range of motion of both shoulders. On the other hand, the correlations of the internal and external rotation ranges of motion with the age, height, and weight were not significant. [Conclusion] The flexibility of the glenohumeral internal rotation is smaller in the dominant shoulder than of the nondominant shoulder in these junior female tennis players. Flexibility of the glenohumeral internal rotation may be a factor affecting performance in junior female tennis players.

  10. Does Maximal External Tibial Component Rotation Influence Tibiofemoral Load Distribution in the Primary Knee Arthroplasty Setting: A Comparison of Neutral vs Maximal Anatomical External Rotatory States.

    PubMed

    Manning, William A; Ghosh, Kanishka M; Blain, Alasdair P; Longstaff, Lee M; Rushton, Steven P; Deehan, David J

    2017-06-01

    Tibial component rotation at time of knee arthroplasty can influence conformity, load transmission across the polyethylene surface, and perhaps ultimately determined survivorship. Optimal tibial component rotation on the cut surface is reliant on standard per operative manual stressing. This subjective assessment aims to balance constraint and stability of the articulation through a full arc of movement. Using a cadaveric model, computer navigation and under defined, previously validated loaded conditions mimicking the in vivo setting, the influence of maximal tibial component external rotation compared with the neutral state was examined for changes in laxity and tibiofemoral continuous load using 3D displacement measurement and an orthosensor continuous load sensor implanted within the polyethylene spacer in a simulated single radius total knee arthroplasty. No significant difference was found throughout arc of motion (0-115 degrees of flexion) for maximal varus and/or valgus or rotatory laxity between the 2 states. The neutral state achieved equivalence for mediolateral load distribution at each point of flexion. We have found that external rotation of the tibial component increased medial compartment load in comparison with the neutral position. Compared with the neutral state, external rotation consistently effected a marginal, but not significant reduction in lateral load under similar loading conditions. The effects were most pronounced in midflexion. On the basis of these findings, we would advocate for the midtibial tubercle point to determine tibial component rotation and caution against component external rotation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Gyrokinetic simulations with external resonant magnetic perturbations: Island torque and nonambipolar transport with plasma rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waltz, R. E.; Waelbroeck, F. L.

    2012-03-01

    Static external resonant magnetic field perturbations (RMPs) have been added to the gyrokinetic code GYRO [J. Candy and R. E. Waltz, J. Comp. Phys. 186, 545 (2003)]. This allows nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations of the nonambipolar radial current flow jr, and the corresponding j→×B→ plasma torque (density) R[jrBp/c], induced by magnetic islands that break the toroidal symmetry of a tokamak. This extends the previous GYRO formulation for the transport of toroidal angular momentum (TAM) [R. E. Waltz, G. M. Staebler, J. Candy, and F. L. Hinton, Phys. Plasmas 14, 122507 (2007); errata 16, 079902 (2009)]. The focus is on electrostatic full torus radial slice simulations of externally induced q =m/n=6/3 islands with widths 5% of the minor radius or about 20 ion gyroradii. Up to moderately strong E ×B rotation, the island torque scales with the radial electric field at the resonant surface Er, the island width w, and the intensity I of the high-n micro-turbulence, as Erw√I . The radial current inside the island is carried (entirely in the n =3 component) and almost entirely by the ion E ×B flux, since the electron E ×B and magnetic flutter particle fluxes are cancelled. The net island torque is null at zero Er rather than at zero toroidal rotation. This means that while the expected magnetic braking of the toroidal plasma rotation occurs at strong co- and counter-current rotation, at null toroidal rotation, there is a small co-directed magnetic acceleration up to the small diamagnetic (ion pressure gradient driven) co-rotation corresponding to the zero Er and null torque. This could be called the residual stress from an externally induced island. At zero Er, the only effect is the expected partial flattening of the electron temperature gradient within the island. Finite-beta GYRO simulations demonstrate almost complete RMP field screening and n =3 mode unlocking at strong Er.

  12. Alien abduction: a medical hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Forrest, David V

    2008-01-01

    In response to a new psychological study of persons who believe they have been abducted by space aliens that found that sleep paralysis, a history of being hypnotized, and preoccupation with the paranormal and extraterrestrial were predisposing experiences, I noted that many of the frequently reported particulars of the abduction experience bear more than a passing resemblance to medical-surgical procedures and propose that experience with these may also be contributory. There is the altered state of consciousness, uniformly colored figures with prominent eyes, in a high-tech room under a round bright saucerlike object; there is nakedness, pain and a loss of control while the body's boundaries are being probed; and yet the figures are thought benevolent. No medical-surgical history was apparently taken in the above mentioned study, but psychological laboratory work evaluated false memory formation. I discuss problems in assessing intraoperative awareness and ways in which the medical hypothesis could be elaborated and tested. If physicians are causing this syndrome in a percentage of patients, we should know about it; and persons who feel they have been abducted should be encouraged to inform their surgeons and anesthesiologists without challenging their beliefs.

  13. Synchrotron radiation external beam rotational radiotherapy of breast cancer: proof of principle.

    PubMed

    Di Lillo, Francesca; Mettivier, Giovanni; Castriconi, Roberta; Sarno, Antonio; Stevenson, Andrew W; Hall, Chris J; Häusermann, Daniel; Russo, Paolo

    2018-05-01

    The principle of rotational summation of the absorbed dose for breast cancer treatment with orthovoltage X-ray beams was proposed by J. Boone in 2012. Here, use of X-ray synchrotron radiation for image guided external beam rotational radiotherapy treatment of breast cancer is proposed. Tumor irradiation occurs with the patient in the prone position hosted on a rotating bed, with her breast hanging from a hole in the bed, which rotates around a vertical axis passing through the tumor site. Horizontal collimation of the X-ray beam provides for whole breast or partial breast irradiation, while vertical translation of the bed and successive rotations allow for irradiation of the full tumor volume, with dose rates which permit also hypofractionated treatments. In this work, which follows a previous preliminary report, results are shown of a full series of measurements on polyethylene and acrylic cylindrical phantoms carried out at the Australian Synchrotron, confirmed by Geant4 Monte Carlo simulations, intended to demonstrate the proof of principle of the technique. Dose measurements were carried out with calibrated ion chambers, radiochromic films and thermoluminescence dosimeters. The photon energy investigated was 60 keV. Image guidance may occur with the transmitted beam for contrast-enhanced breast computed tomography. For a horizontal beam collimation of 1.5 cm and rotation around the central axis of a 14 cm-diameter polyethylene phantom, a periphery-to-center dose ratio of 14% was measured. The simulations showed that under the same conditions the dose ratio decreases with increasing photon energy down to 10% at 175 keV. These values are comparable with those achievable with conventional megavoltage radiotherapy of breast cancer with a medical linear accelerator. Dose painting was demonstrated with two off-center `cancer foci' with 1.3 Gy and 0.6 Gy target doses. The use of a radiosensitizing agent for dose enhancement is foreseen.

  14. Improper trunk rotation sequence is associated with increased maximal shoulder external rotation angle and shoulder joint force in high school baseball pitchers.

    PubMed

    Oyama, Sakiko; Yu, Bing; Blackburn, J Troy; Padua, Darin A; Li, Li; Myers, Joseph B

    2014-09-01

    In a properly coordinated throwing motion, peak pelvic rotation velocity is reached before peak upper torso rotation velocity, so that angular momentum can be transferred effectively from the proximal (pelvis) to distal (upper torso) segment. However, the effects of trunk rotation sequence on pitching biomechanics and performance have not been investigated. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of trunk rotation sequence on ball speed and on upper extremity biomechanics that are linked to injuries in high school baseball pitchers. The hypothesis was that pitchers with improper trunk rotation sequence would demonstrate lower ball velocity and greater stress to the joint. Descriptive laboratory study. Three-dimensional pitching kinematics data were captured from 72 high school pitchers. Subjects were considered to have proper or improper trunk rotation sequences when the peak pelvic rotation velocity was reached either before or after the peak upper torso rotation velocity beyond the margin of error (±3.7% of the time from stride-foot contact to ball release). Maximal shoulder external rotation angle, elbow extension angle at ball release, peak shoulder proximal force, shoulder internal rotation moment, and elbow varus moment were compared between groups using independent t tests (α < 0.05). Pitchers with improper trunk rotation sequences (n = 33) demonstrated greater maximal shoulder external rotation angle (mean difference, 7.2° ± 2.9°, P = .016) and greater shoulder proximal force (mean difference, 9.2% ± 3.9% body weight, P = .021) compared with those with proper trunk rotation sequences (n = 22). No other variables differed significantly different between groups. High school baseball pitchers who demonstrated improper trunk rotation sequences demonstrated greater maximal shoulder external rotation angle and shoulder proximal force compared with pitchers with proper trunk rotation sequences. Improper sequencing of the trunk and torso alter

  15. Clinical assessment of external rotation for the diagnosis of anterior shoulder hyperlaxity.

    PubMed

    Ropars, M; Fournier, A; Campillo, B; Bonan, I; Delamarche, P; Crétual, A; Thomazeau, H

    2010-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate two methods of clinical assessment for external rotation of the shoulder to optimise the diagnosis of hyperlaxity in patients being selected for surgery for stabilisation of chronic anterior instability. External rotation was evaluated in 70 healthy student volunteers by two examiners (intertester study) using two methods of assessment at 15-day intervals (intratester study). The first method used was the protocol described for the Instability Severity Index Score (ISIS). In this case, the subject was evaluated in the sitting position, bilaterally with passive range of motion movements. The shoulder was considered hyperlax if ER1 was greater than 85°. With the second, so-called "elbow on the table" (EOT) method, the subject was evaluated in the decubitus dorsal position, unilaterally with passive range of motion. The subject was considered to be hyperlax if ER1 was greater than 90°. Kappa values for intra- and intertester agreement with the ISIS method were average, while they were satisfactory with the intraclass coefficient (ICC). Kappa values for inter- and intratester agreement with the EOT method were average and good, respectively. This tendency was confirmed by the ICC which went from good to excellent for the two examiners in both series of measurements using the EOT method, showing better reproducibility with this method. Our study confirms that the most reproducible method for assessing external rotation is obtained by unilateral assessment of the patient in the decubitus dorsal position, with passive range of motion. An ER1 of 90° is the necessary threshold for hyperlaxity because of elbow retropulsion with this method, which provides immediate and visual evaluation and eliminates the necessity of goniometry. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Hip rotation angle is associated with frontal plane knee joint mechanics during running.

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, Masanori; Shimizu, Norifumi; Yanai, Toshimasa; Stefanyshyn, Darren J; Kawakami, Yasuo

    2015-02-01

    Inability to control lower extremity segments in the frontal and transverse planes resulting in large knee abduction angle and increased internal knee abduction impulse has been associated with patellofemoral pain (PFP). However, the influence of hip rotation angles on frontal plane knee joint kinematics and kinetics remains unclear. The purpose of this study was to explore how hip rotation angles are related to frontal plane knee joint kinematics and kinetics during running. Seventy runners participated in this study. Three-dimensional marker positions and ground reaction forces were recorded with an 8-camera motion analysis system and a force plate while subjects ran along a 25-m runway at a speed of 4m/s. Knee abduction, hip rotation and toe-out angles, frontal plane lever arm at the knee, internal knee abduction moment and impulse, ground reaction forces and the medio-lateral distance from the ankle joint center to the center of pressure (AJC-CoP) were quantified. The findings of this study indicate that greater hip external rotation angles were associated with greater toe-out angles, longer AJC-CoP distances, smaller internal knee abduction impulses with shorter frontal plane lever arms and greater knee abduction angles. Thus, there appears to exist a conflict between kinematic and kinetic risk factors of PFP, and hip external rotation angle may be a key factor to control frontal plane knee joint kinematics and kinetics. These results may help provide an appropriate manipulation and/or intervention on running style to reduce the risk of PFP. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Gyrokinetic Simulations with External Resonant Magnetic Perturbations: Island Torque and Nonambipolar Transport with Rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waltz, R. E.; Waelbroeck, F. L.

    2012-03-01

    Static external resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) have been added to the δf gyrokinetic code GYRO. This allows nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations of the nonambipolar radial current flow jr and the corresponding plasma torque (density) R[jrBθ/c], induced by islands that break the toroidal symmetry of a tokamak. This extends previous GYRO simulations for the transport of toroidal angular momentum (TAM) [1,2]. The focus is on full torus radial slice electrostatic simulations of induced q=m/n=6/3 islands with widths 5% of the minor radius. The island torque scales with the radial electric field Er the island width w, and the intensity I of the high-n micro-turbulence, as wErI^1/2. The net island torque is null at zero Er rather than at zero toroidal rotation. This means that there is a small co-directed magnetic acceleration to the small diamagnetic co-rotation corresponding to the zero Er which can be called the residual stress [2] from an externally induced island. Finite-beta GYRO simulations of a core radial slice demonstrate island unlocking and the RMP screening. 6pt[1] R.E. Waltz, et al., Phys. Plasmas 14, 122507 (2007). [2] R.E. Waltz, et al., Phys. Plasmas 18, 042504 (2011).

  18. Reverse shoulder arthroplasty leads to significant biomechanical changes in the remaining rotator cuff.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Sebastian; König, Christian; Heller, Markus; Perka, Carsten; Greiner, Stefan

    2011-08-16

    After reverse shoulder arthroplasty (RSA) external and internal rotation will often remain restricted. A postoperative alteration of the biomechanics in the remaining cuff is discussed as a contributing factor to these functional deficits. In this study, muscle moment arms as well as origin-to-insertion distance (OID) were calculated using three-dimensional models of the shoulder derived from CT scans of seven cadaveric specimens. Moment arms for humeral rotation are significantly smaller for the cranial segments of SSC and all segments of TMIN in abduction angles of 30 degrees and above (p ≤ 0.05). Abduction moment arms were significantly decreased for all segments (p ≤ 0.002). OID was significantly smaller for all muscles at the 15 degree position (p ≤ 0.005), apart from the cranial SSC segment. Reduced rotational moment arms in conjunction with the decrease of OID may be a possible explanation for the clinically observed impaired external and internal rotation.

  19. Upper lid crease approach for margin rotation in trachomatous cicatricial entropion without external sutures.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Antonio Augusto Velasco E; Akaishi, Patricia M S; Al-Dufaileej, Mohammed; Galindo-Ferreiro, Alicia

    2015-01-01

    To describe the use of a lid crease incision for upper eyelid margin rotation in cicatricial entropion combining internal traction on the anterior lamella, tarsotomy, and tarsal overlap without external sutures. Surgical description: The main steps of the procedure consisted of exposure of the entire tarsal plate up to the eyelashes followed by tarsotomy through the conjunctiva. A double-armed 6.0 polyglactin suture was then passed through the distal tarsal fragment to the marginal section of the orbicularis oculi muscle. As the sutures were tied, the distal tarsus advanced over the marginal section, and traction was exerted on the marginal strip of the orbicularis muscle. There were no bolsters or external knots. The pretarsal skin-muscle flap was closed with a 6.0 plain gut suture. We used this procedure at a tertiary hospital in Saudi Arabia from 2013 to 2014. Sixty upper lids of 40 patients (23 women and 17 men) were operated on, with an age range of 44-99 years [mean ± standard deviation (SD) = 70.9 ± 13.01 years]. Bilateral surgery was performed on 21 patients. Follow-up ranged from 1 to 12 months (mean 3.0 ± 2.71 months). Forty percent of the patients (24 lids) had more than 3 months' follow-up. The postoperative lid margin position was good in all cases. Trichiasis (two lashes) was observed in only one patient with unilateral entropion on the medial aspect of the operated lid. The upper lid margin can be effectively rotated through a lid crease incision with internal sutures. The technique combines the main mechanisms of the Wies and Trabut approaches and avoids the use of bolsters or external sutures, which require a second consultation to be removed. Some other lid problems, such as ptosis, retraction, or dermatochalasis, can be concomitantly addressed during the procedure.

  20. Long-term outcome of pronation-external rotation ankle fractures treated with syndesmotic screws only.

    PubMed

    Lambers, Kaj T A; van den Bekerom, Michel P J; Doornberg, Job N; Stufkens, Sjoerd A S; van Dijk, C Niek; Kloen, Peter

    2013-09-04

    There is sparse information in the literature on the outcome of Maisonneuve-type pronation-external rotation ankle fractures treated with syndesmotic screws. The primary aim of this study was to determine the long-term results of such treatment of these fractures as indicated by standardized patient-based and physician-based outcome measures. The secondary aim was to identify predictors of the outcome with use of bivariate and multivariate statistical analysis. Fifty patients with pronation-external rotation (predominantly Maisonneuve) fractures were treated with open reduction and internal fixation of the syndesmosis utilizing only one or two screws. The results were evaluated at a mean of twenty-one years after the fracture utilizing three standardized outcomes instruments: (1) the Foot and Ankle Ability Measure (FAAM), (2) the American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society (AOFAS) ankle-hindfoot scale, and (3) the Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression (CES-D) Scale. Osteoarthritis was graded according to the van Dijk and revised Takakura radiographic scoring systems. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify predictors of long-term outcome. Forty-four (92%) of forty-eighty patients had good or excellent AOFAS scores, and forty-four (90%) of forty-nine had good or excellent FAAM scores. Arthrodesis for severe osteoarthritis was performed in two patients. Radiographic evidence of osteoarthritis was observed in twenty-four (49%) of forty-nine patients. Multivariate analysis identified pain as the most important independent predictor of long-term ankle function as indicated by the AOFAS and FAAM scores, explaining 91% and 53% of the variation in scores, respectively. Analysis of pain as the dependent variable in bivariate analyses revealed that depression, ankle range of motion, and a subsequent surgery were significantly correlated with higher pain scores. No firm conclusions could be drawn after multivariate analysis of predictors of pain

  1. Supination external rotation ankle fractures: A simpler pattern with better outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Tejwani, Nirmal C; Park, Ji Hae; Egol, Kenneth A

    2015-01-01

    Background: Rotational injuries are the most common and usually classified as per the Lauge Hansen classification; with the most common subgroup being the supination external rotation (SER) mechanism. Isolated fractures of the distal fibula (SE2) without associated ligamentous injury are usually treated with a splint or brace and the patient may be allowed to weight bear as tolerated. This study reports the functional outcomes following a stable, low energy, rotational ankle fracture supination external rotation (SER2) when compared to unstable SER4 fractures treated operatively. Materials and Methods: 64 patients who were diagnosed and treated nonoperatively for a stable SER2 ankle fracture were followed prospectively. In the comparison group, 93 operatively treated fibular fractures were extracted from a prospectively collected database and evaluated comparison. Baseline characteristics obtained by trained interviewers at the time of injury included: Patient demographics, short form-36, short musculoskeletal functional assessment (SMFA) and American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) questionnaires. Patients were followed at 3, 6 and 12 months postsurgery. Additional information obtained at each followup point included any complications or evidence on fracture healing. Data were analyzed by the Student's t-test and theFisher's Exact Test to compare demographic and functional outcomes between the two cohorts. P < 0.05 was considered to be significant. Results: The average of patients’ age in the stable fracture cohort was 43 versus 45 in the SER4 group. Nearly 64% of the patient population was female when compared with 37% in the operative group. In the SER2 by 6 months all patients had returned to baseline functional status. There were 18 delayed unions (all healed by 6 months). Based on the functional outcome scores all patients had returned to preoperative level. In comparison, SE4 patients had less functional recovery at 3 and 6 months (P < 0

  2. Muscle recruitment patterns of the subscapularis, serratus anterior and other shoulder girdle muscles during isokinetic internal and external rotations.

    PubMed

    Gaudet, Sylvain; Tremblay, Jonathan; Begon, Mickael

    2018-05-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate the differences in peak muscle activity and recruitment patterns during high- and low-velocity, concentric and eccentric, internal and external isokinetic shoulder rotations. Electromyographic activity of the rotator cuff and eight superficial muscles of the shoulder girdle was recorded on 25 healthy adults during isokinetic internal and external shoulder rotation at 60°/s and 240°/s. Peak muscle activity, electromyographic envelopes and peak isokinetic moments were analyzed using three-factor ANOVA and statistical parametric mapping. The subscapularis and serratus anterior showed moderate to high peak activity levels during each conditions, while the middle and posterior deltoids, upper, middle and lower trapezius, infraspinatus and supraspinatus showed higher peak activity levels during external rotations (+36.5% of maximum voluntary activation (MVA)). The pectoralis major and latissimus dorsi were more active during internal rotations (+40% of MVA). Only middle trapezius and pectoralis major electromyographic activity decreased with increasing velocity. Peak muscle activity was similar or lower during eccentric contractions, although the peak isokinetic moment increased by 35% on average. The subscapularis and serratus anterior appear to be important stabilizers of the glenohumeral joint and scapula. Isokinetic eccentric training at high velocities may allow for faster recruitment of the shoulder girdle muscles, which could improve joint stability during shoulder internal and external rotations.

  3. Management of acetabular fractures with modified posterior approach to spare external hip rotators.

    PubMed

    Sarlak, Ahmet Y; Selek, Ozgur; Inanir, Murat; Musaoglu, Resul; Baran, Tuncay

    2014-04-01

    In the present study the quality of reduction and incidence of complications in hip external rotator sparing modified posterior approach was assessed in both simple and complex acetabular fractures. This retrospective study includes 37 patients (38 hips) with a mean age of 42.1 years (range 21-60), that had been treated for displaced acetabular fractures from June 2007 through May 2011. They were reviewed at a mean of 3 years (20-67 months). The fractures were classified according to the Letournel-Judet classification. Anatomic reduction and stable fixation of the fracture with less than 2mm residual displacement was achieved in 28 of 38 hips. At the final follow up the patients were evaluated clinically according to Merle d'Aubigne and Postel scoring system which had been modified by Matta and radiologically based on the criteria described by Matta. The clinical results were excellent in 20, good in 8, fair in 8, and poor 2 hips. Complications included two superficial local wound infection and 10 heterotopic ossification with 7 of the cases having grade I heterotopic ossification. Avascular necrosis of the femoral head was not seen in any of the 38 hips. One patient with preoperative sciatic nerve palsy had complete recovery of neurologic function. There were no cases of deep vein thrombosis or pulmonary embolism. The functional outcome was satisfactory in most of the cases and comparable with other larger series. Using the limited part of Henry's sciatic nerve exposure skin incision - working in the plane between gluteus maximus and the tensor fascia lata as in the classical Gibson approach and two portal external rotator hip sparing approach resulted in good fracture reduction without approach related complications. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. A concept analysis of abductive reasoning.

    PubMed

    Mirza, Noeman A; Akhtar-Danesh, Noori; Noesgaard, Charlotte; Martin, Lynn; Staples, Eric

    2014-09-01

    To describe an analysis of the concept of abductive reasoning. In the discipline of nursing, abductive reasoning has received only philosophical attention and remains a vague concept. In addition to deductive and inductive reasoning, abductive reasoning is not recognized even in prominent nursing knowledge development literature. Therefore, what abductive reasoning is and how it can inform nursing practice and education was explored. Concept analysis. Combinations of specific keywords were searched in Web of Science, CINAHL, PsychINFO, PubMed, Medline and EMBASE. The analysis was conducted in June 2012 and only literature before this period was included. No time limits were set. Rodger's evolutionary method for conducting concept analysis was used. Twelve records were included in the analysis. The most common surrogate term was retroduction, whereas related terms included intuition and pattern and similarity recognition. Antecedents consisted of a complex, puzzling situation and a clinician with creativity, experience and knowledge. Consequences included the formation of broad hypotheses that enhance understanding of care situations. Overall, abductive reasoning was described as the process of hypothesis or theory generation and evaluation. It was also viewed as inference to the best explanation. As a new approach, abductive reasoning could enhance reasoning abilities of novice clinicians. It can not only incorporate various ways of knowing but also its holistic approach to learning appears to be promising in problem-based learning. As nursing literature on abductive reasoning is predominantly philosophical, practical consequences of abductive reasoning warrant further research. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Effects of a compression garment on shoulder external rotation force outputs during isotonic contractions.

    PubMed

    Tsuruike, Masaaki; Ellenbecker, Todd S

    2013-02-01

    The use of compression garments (CGs) has been advocated for performance enhancement and recovery in athletes. The effect of a CG on humeral rotation motor control has not been previously tested. The purpose of this study was to examine the isotonic contraction of external rotation (ER) of the glenohumeral joint at different force outputs to determine the effect of wearing a long sleeve CG on muscular performance. Twelve male college tennis players and 12 male college soccer players were tested for ER of the dominant shoulder during both concentric and eccentric isotonic contractions. The subjects performed 5 consecutive repetitions of both concentric and eccentric ER at 20-30% and 40-50% of maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) intensities. All subjects were tested with and without CG as well as with and without ongoing visual feedback information (OVFI). The order of CG wearing and the presence of OVFI were randomly assigned across all subjects. The results indicated a significant 3-way interaction between CG wearing and OVFI across 2 loads. Specifically, significantly different mean value of the completion time was found between OVFI and no-OVFI without CG wearing at 40-50% of MVIC, whereas no difference in the completion time was found with and without OVFI with CG wearing. Taken together, with CG wearing, athletes may have ER at 40-50% of MVIC more readily maintained by peripheral feedback without visuomotor control imposed on force outputs as compared without CG wearing.

  6. Influence of Body Position on Shoulder and Trunk Muscle Activation During Resisted Isometric Shoulder External Rotation.

    PubMed

    Krause, David A; Dueffert, Lucas G; Postma, Jaclyn L; Vogler, Eric T; Walsh, Amy J; Hollman, John H

    External rotation (ER) strengthening of the shoulder is an integral component of rehabilitative and preventative programs for overhead athletes. A variety of shoulder ER strengthening exercises are reported, including those intended to integrate the core musculature. The purpose of this study was to examine ER torque and electromyographic (EMG) activation of shoulder and trunk muscles while performing resisted isometric shoulder ER in 3 positions (standing, side lying, and side plank). Significantly greater force and shoulder muscle activation would be generated while side lying given the inherent stability of the position, and greater trunk muscle activation would be generated in the less stable plank position. Quasi-experimental repeated-measures study. Level 5. A convenience sample of 25 healthy overhead recreational athletes (9 men, 16 women) participated in this study. EMG electrodes were placed on the infraspinatus, posterior deltoid, middle trapezius, multifidi, internal obliques, and external obliques. EMG signals were normalized to a maximal isometric contraction. Participants performed resisted isometric ER in standing, side-lying, and side plank positions. Results were analyzed using a repeated-measures analysis of variance with post hoc Bonferroni corrections (α = 0.05). There was no significant difference in ER torque between positions (α = 0.05). A significant difference in EMG activity of shoulder and trunk musculature between positions was found in 7 of the 8 muscles monitored. Significantly greater EMG activity in the infraspinatus, middle trapezius, and the nondominant external and internal obliques was found in the side plank position as compared with standing and side lying. While there was no difference in ER torque between the 3 exercise positions, EMG activity of the shoulder and trunk muscles was dependent on body position. If a clinician is seeking to integrate trunk muscle activation while performing shoulder ER strengthening, the side

  7. Measuring Eccentric Strength of the Shoulder External Rotators Using a Handheld Dynamometer: Reliability and Validity

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, Fredrik R.; Skillgate, Eva; Lapauw, Mattis L.; Clijmans, Dorien; Deneulin, Valentijn P.; Palmans, Tanneke; Engineer, Human Kinetic; Cools, Ann M.

    2015-01-01

    Context Shoulder strength assessment plays an important role in the clinical examination of the shoulder region. Eccentric strength measurements are of special importance in guiding the clinician in injury prevention or return-to-play decisions after injury. Objective To examine the absolute and relative reliability and validity of a standardized eccentric strength-measurement protocol for the glenohumeral external rotators. Design Descriptive laboratory study. Setting Testing environment at the Department of Rehabilitation Sciences and Physiotherapy of Ghent University, Belgium. Patients or Other Participants Twenty-five healthy participants (9 men and 16 women) without any history of shoulder pain were tested by 2 independent assessors using a handheld dynamometer (HHD) and underwent an isokinetic testing procedure. Intervention(s) The clinical protocol used an HHD, a DynaPort accelerometer to measure acceleration and angular velocity of testing 30°/s over 90° of range of motion, and a Biodex dynamometer to measure isokinetic activity. Main Outcome Measure(s) Three eccentric strength measurements: (1) tester 1 with the HHD, (2) tester 2 with the HHD, and (3) Biodex isokinetic strength measurement. Results The intratester reliability was excellent (0.879 and 0.858), whereas the intertester reliability was good, with an intraclass correlation coefficient between testers of 0.714. Pearson product moment correlation coefficients of 0.78 and 0.70 were noted between the HHD and the isokinetic data, showing good validity of this new procedure. Conclusions Standardized eccentric rotator cuff strength can be tested and measured in the clinical setting with good-to-excellent reliability and validity using an HHD. PMID:25974381

  8. Syndesmotic fixation in supination-external rotation ankle fractures: a prospective randomized study.

    PubMed

    Kortekangas, Tero H J; Pakarinen, Harri J; Savola, Olli; Niinimäki, Jaakko; Lepojärvi, Sannamari; Ohtonen, Pasi; Flinkkilä, Tapio; Ristiniemi, Jukka

    2014-10-01

    This study compared mid-term functional and radiologic results of syndesmotic transfixation with no fixation in supination external rotation (SER) ankle fractures with intraoperatively confirmed syndesmosis disruption. Our hypothesis was that early-stage good functional results would remain and unfixed syndesmosis disruption in SER IV ankle fractures would not lead to an increased incidence of osteoarthritis. A prospective study of 140 operatively treated patients with Lauge-Hansen SER IV (Weber B) ankle fractures was performed. After bony fixation, the 7.5-Nm standardized external rotation stress test for both ankles was performed under fluoroscopy. A positive stress examination was defined as a difference of more than 2 mm side-to-side in the tibiotalar or tibiofibular clear spaces on mortise radiographs. The patients were randomized to either syndesmotic screw fixation (13 patients) or no syndesmotic fixation (11 patients). After a minimum of 4 years of follow-up (mean, 58 months), ankle function and pain (Olerud-Molander, a 100-mm visual analogue scale [VAS] for ankle function and pain) and quality of life (RAND-36) of all 24 patients were assessed. Ankle joint congruity and osteoarthritis were assessed using mortise and lateral projection plain weight-bearing radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI; 3T) scans. Improvement in Olerud-Molander score, VAS, and RAND-36 showed no significant difference between groups during the follow-up. In the syndesmotic transfixation group, improvements in all functional parameters and pain measurements were not significant, whereas in the group without syndesmotic fixation, the Olerud-Molander score improved from 84 to 93 (P = .007) and the pain (VAS) score improved from 11 to 4 (P = .038) from 1 year to last follow-up. X-ray or MRI imaging showed no difference between groups at the last follow-up visit. With the numbers available, no significant difference in functional outcome or radiologic findings could be detected

  9. Application of an Externally Applied Rotating Magnetic Field for Control of MHD Relaxation Phenomena in the HIST Spherical Torus Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, Yusuke; Yoshikawa, Tatsuya; Nishioka, Tsutomu; Hashimoto, Shotaro; Fukumoto, Naoyuki; Nagata, Masayoshi

    Application of an externally applied rotating magnetic field (RMF) for control of MHD relaxation phenomena driven by a coaxial helicity injection has been proposed in the HIST spherical torus device. In this letter, the plasma responses to the RMF evaluated by magnetic fields inside the plasma in HIST are shown.

  10. A Medial Malleolar "Fleck Sign" May Predict Ankle Instability in Ligamentous Supination External Rotation Ankle Fractures.

    PubMed

    Nwosu, Kenneth; Schneiderman, Brian Andrew; Shymon, Stephen Joseph; Harris, Thomas

    2018-06-01

    Ankle joint stability dictates treatment in ligamentous supination external rotation ankle injuries (LSERAI). Investigation of the medial structures that support the ankle mortise is critical, and a small avulsion fracture, or "fleck", of the medial malleolus is occasionally encountered. This study aimed to assess the utility of this medial malleolus fleck sign (MMFS) in diagnosing instability requiring surgery in LSERAI. This retrospective observational study examined 166 LSERAI at a single level I trauma center. A standardized diagnostic and treatment protocol for ankle fractures was followed. LSERAI at presentation were reported as having a normal, dynamically wide, or statically wide medial clear space. Patient demographics, MMFS characteristics, and the use of operative management were recorded. MMFS incidence in the cohort was 16 (10%) of 166 and was present in 25% of patients with unstable LSERAI. Fifteen (94%) of 16 patients with a MMFS were deemed to have an unstable LSERAI (P < .005). MMFS had a 25% sensitivity and 99% specificity in diagnosing an unstable LSERAI. For the subgroup of patients without a statically wide medial clear space, MMFS had a 50% sensitivity and 99% specificity in determining instability. A MMFS may be indicative of an unstable LSERAI. With previous MRI studies demonstrating complete deltoid disruption in unstable LSERAI, we deduce the MMFS may be associated with extensive deltoid incompetence. The MMFS may help to diagnose a complete deltoid injury in LSERAI with a normal medial clear space, which could influence treatment and reduce patient morbidity, radiation exposure, and healthcare costs. Level III: Retrospective Cohort Study.

  11. [Clinical observation on external humeral epicondylitis treated with back-rotation traction].

    PubMed

    Fu, Rui-yang; Wang, Ya-ling; Gu, Zhong-zhong; Wang, Bao-hu; Zhu, Qi; Li, Ye; Wang, En-ping

    2009-02-01

    To evaluate the clinical effect of manipulation on external humeral epicondylitis, and to explore the functional mechanism and ideal treatment. Eighty-six patients who had been treated with acupuncture, obturation and needle-knife were divided into routine group and treatment group randomly. In routine group, there were 42 cases (male 13, female 29, means 40.8 years); and in treatment group there were 44 cases (male 16, female 28, means 41.2 years). There's no further treatment for the routine group after the therapy above, while the treatment group was added with back-rotation traction manipulation. Taking Verhaar therapy effect appraisal system of tennis-ball elbow to evaluate elbow function. After 7 days of therapy, the results were excellent in 13 cases, good in 16, fair in 4, poor in 9 in the routine group; and excellent in 38, good in 4 and fair in 2 in treatment group; and the effect in the treatment group were better than that of the routine group (P < 0.010). Half a year later, in the routine group 38 cases recurrenced and in the treatment group 10 cases recurrenced. Making manipulation after routine acupuncture, local obturation and needle-knife has active meaning to remove trauma inflammation, prevent re-conglutination, promote recovery and prevent recurrence.

  12. Abductive networks applied to electronic combat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery, Gerard J.; Hess, Paul; Hwang, Jong S.

    1990-08-01

    A practical approach to dealing with combinatorial decision problems and uncertainties associated with electronic combat through the use of networks of high-level functional elements called abductive networks is presented. It describes the application of the Abductory Induction Mechanism (AIMTM) a supervised inductive learning tool for synthesizing polynomial abductive networks to the electronic combat problem domain. From databases of historical expert-generated or simulated combat engagements AIM can often induce compact and robust network models for making effective real-time electronic combat decisions despite significant uncertainties or a combinatorial explosion of possible situations. The feasibility of applying abductive networks to realize advanced combat decision aiding capabilities was demonstrated by applying AIM to a set of electronic combat simulations. The networks synthesized by AIM generated accurate assessments of the intent lethality and overall risk associated with a variety of simulated threats and produced reasonable estimates of the expected effectiveness of a group of electronic countermeasures for a large number of simulated combat scenarios. This paper presents the application of abductive networks to electronic combat summarizes the results of experiments performed using AIM discusses the benefits and limitations of applying abductive networks to electronic combat and indicates why abductive networks can often result in capabilities not attainable using alternative approaches. 1. ELECTRONIC COMBAT. UNCERTAINTY. AND MACHINE LEARNING Electronic combat has become an essential part of the ability to make war and has become increasingly complex since

  13. Three-dimensional evaluation of cyclic displacement in single-row and double-row rotator cuff reconstructions under static external rotation.

    PubMed

    Lorbach, Olaf; Kieb, Matthias; Raber, Florian; Busch, Lüder C; Kohn, Dieter M; Pape, Dietrich

    2013-01-01

    The double-row suture bridge repair was recently introduced and has demonstrated superior biomechanical results and higher yield load compared with the traditional double-row technique. It therefore seemed reasonable to compare this second generation of double-row constructs to the modified single-row double mattress reconstruction. The repair technique, initial tear size, and tendon subregion will have a significant effect on 3-dimensional (3D) cyclic displacement under additional static external rotation of a modified single-row compared with a double-row rotator cuff repair. Controlled laboratory study. Rotator cuff tears (small to medium: 25 mm; medium to large: 35 mm) were created in 24 human cadaveric shoulders. Rotator cuff repairs were performed as modified single-row or double-row repairs, and cyclic loading (10-60 N, 10-100 N) was applied under 20° of external rotation. Radiostereometric analysis was used to calculate cyclic displacement in the anteroposterior (x), craniocaudal (y), and mediolateral (z) planes with a focus on the repair constructs and the initial tear size. Moreover, differences in cyclic displacement of the anterior compared with the posterior tendon subregions were calculated. Significantly lower cyclic displacement was seen in small to medium tears for the single-row compared with double-row repair at 60 and 100 N in the x plane (P = .001) and y plane (P = .001). The results were similar in medium to large tears at 100 N in the x plane (P = .004). Comparison of 25-mm versus 35-mm tears did not show any statistically significant differences for the single-row repairs. In the double-row repairs, lower gap formation was found for the 35-mm tears (P ≤ .05). Comparison of the anterior versus posterior tendon subregions revealed a trend toward higher anterior gap formation, although this was statistically not significant. The tested single-row reconstruction achieved superior results in 3D cyclic displacement to the tested double

  14. Lumbar lordosis angle and trunk and lower-limb electromyographic activity comparison in hip neutral position and external rotation during back squats.

    PubMed

    Oshikawa, Tomoki; Morimoto, Yasuhiro; Kaneoka, Koji

    2018-03-01

    [Purpose] To compare the lumbar lordosis angle and electromyographic activities of the trunk and lower-limb muscles in the hip neutral position and external rotation during back squats. [Subjects and Methods] Ten healthy males without severe low back pain or lower-limb injury participated in this study. The lumbar lordosis angle and electromyographic activities were measured using three-dimensional motion-capture systems and surface electrodes during four back squats: parallel back squats in the hip neutral position and external rotation and full back squats in the hip neutral position and external rotation. A paired t-test was used to compare parallel and full back squats measurements in the hip neutral position and external rotation, respectively. [Results] During parallel back squats, the average lumbar lordosis angle was significantly larger in hip external rotation than in the hip neutral position. During full back squats, lumbar erector spinae and multifidus activities were significantly lower in hip external rotation than in the hip neutral position, whereas gluteus maximus activity was significantly higher in hip external rotation than in the hip neutral position. [Conclusion] The back squat in hip external rotation induced improvement of lumbar kyphosis, an increasing of the gluteus maximus activity and a decrease of both lumbar erector spinae and multifidus activities.

  15. Lumbar lordosis angle and trunk and lower-limb electromyographic activity comparison in hip neutral position and external rotation during back squats

    PubMed Central

    Oshikawa, Tomoki; Morimoto, Yasuhiro; Kaneoka, Koji

    2018-01-01

    [Purpose] To compare the lumbar lordosis angle and electromyographic activities of the trunk and lower-limb muscles in the hip neutral position and external rotation during back squats. [Subjects and Methods] Ten healthy males without severe low back pain or lower-limb injury participated in this study. The lumbar lordosis angle and electromyographic activities were measured using three-dimensional motion-capture systems and surface electrodes during four back squats: parallel back squats in the hip neutral position and external rotation and full back squats in the hip neutral position and external rotation. A paired t-test was used to compare parallel and full back squats measurements in the hip neutral position and external rotation, respectively. [Results] During parallel back squats, the average lumbar lordosis angle was significantly larger in hip external rotation than in the hip neutral position. During full back squats, lumbar erector spinae and multifidus activities were significantly lower in hip external rotation than in the hip neutral position, whereas gluteus maximus activity was significantly higher in hip external rotation than in the hip neutral position. [Conclusion] The back squat in hip external rotation induced improvement of lumbar kyphosis, an increasing of the gluteus maximus activity and a decrease of both lumbar erector spinae and multifidus activities. PMID:29581666

  16. Does lateral versus medial exposure influence total knee tibial component final external rotation? A CT based study.

    PubMed

    Passeron, D; Gaudot, F; Boisrenoult, P; Fallet, L; Beaufils, P

    2009-10-01

    A previous study demonstrated that performing a total knee arthroplasty through a lateral approach including anterior tibial tuberosity (ATT) osteotomy (refixed in its original position) presented numerous advantages: correcting the preoperative patella lateral tilt and improving postoperative patella tracking. We hypothesized that these improvements in patella centering were, at least in part, due to an increased external rotation of the tibial component. Postoperative scannographic studies were, therefore, undertaken to measure tibial component rotation and analyze the results according the medial and lateral exposure used. Rotational positioning of the tibial component is influenced by the lateral or medial approach selected at surgery. Forty-five CAT scans, performed according to the protocol criteria of the French Hip and Knee Society (SFHG), were studied 3 months postoperatively: 15 knees operated through the lateral approach and 30 knees operated through a standard medial approach. The total knee utilized in all these cases was a posteriorly stabilized, fixed-bearing, design. We measured first the angle formed between the perpendicular to the transverse axis of the tibial component and the axis joining the ATT to the center of the knee; second we also measured the coronal distance between the center of the component and the anterior tibial tuberosity (ATT). In the group using the medial approach, the lateral position of the ATT was 7 + or - 3mm with a rotation angle of 18 degrees . In the group using the lateral approach these measurements were respectively 1 + or - 4mm and 2 degrees (p<0.0001). External rotation of the tibial component is substantially increased by the lateral approach compared to the medial approach. Better exposure of the lateral tibial plateau is probably responsible of this difference. This increased external rotation improves postoperative patella tracking. Prospective; comparative; non-randomized study; level 3. 2009 Elsevier Masson

  17. Effect of scapular external rotation on the axillary nerve during the arthroscopic Latarjet procedure: an anatomical investigation.

    PubMed

    Reinares, Felipe; Werthel, Jean-David; Moraiti, Constantina; Valenti, Philippe

    2017-10-01

    The first purpose of this study is to measure the distance between the axillary nerve and the exit point of K-wires placed retrograde through the glenoid in the setting of an arthroscopic Latarjet procedure. The second objective is to evaluate whether manual external rotation of the scapula alters that distance. In seven fresh-frozen specimens, two 2.0-mm K-wires were drilled through the glenoid using an arthroscopic Latarjet retrograde glenoid guide. These were drilled into the glenoid at the 7- and 8-o'clock positions (right shoulders) and at the 4- and 5-o'clock positions (left). K-wires were oriented parallel to the glenoid articular surface and perpendicular to the long superoinferior axis of the glenoid, 7 mm medial to the joint surface. Two independent evaluators measured the distances between the axillary nerve and the exit point of the K-wires in the horizontal plane (AKHS for the superior K-wire and AKHI for the inferior K-wire) and in the vertical plane (AKV). Measurements were taken with the scapula left free and were repeated with the scapula placed at 15° and 30° of external rotation. With the scapula left free, scapular external rotation was 34° ± 2.3°. In this position, the AKHS was 2.5 ± 1.6, 6.3 ± 1.2 mm at 15° of external rotation (ER) and 11.4 ± 1.4 mm at 30° ER. The AKHI distance was 0.37 ± 1.6, 3.4 ± 1.4 and 10.6 ± 2.1 mm, respectively, for the scapula left free, at 15° ER and 30° of ER. The AKV distances were, respectively, 0.12 ± 0.2, 4.9 ± 1.6 and 9.9 ± 1.7 mm. The increase in all distances was statistically significant (p < 0.001). Increasing scapular external rotation significantly increases the distance between the axillary nerve and the exit point of the K-wires, increasing the margin of safety during this procedure. Therefore, increased external rotation of the scapula could be an effective tool to decrease the risk of iatrogenic axillary nerve injury. Cadaveric study, Level V.

  18. Reliability, precision, and gender differences in knee internal/external rotation proprioception measurements.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Takashi; Sell, Timothy C; Abt, John P; Lephart, Scott M

    2012-11-01

    To develop and assess the reliability and precision of knee internal/external rotation (IR/ER) threshold to detect passive motion (TTDPM) and determine if gender differences exist. Test-retest for the reliability/precision and cross-sectional for gender comparisons. University neuromuscular and human performance research laboratory. Ten subjects for the reliability and precision aim. Twenty subjects (10 males and 10 females) for gender comparisons. All TTDPM tests were performed using a multi-mode dynamometer. Subjects performed TTDPM at two knee positions (near IR or ER end-range). Intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC (3,k)) and standard error of measurement (SEM) were used to evaluate the reliability and precision. Independent t-tests were used to compare genders. TTDPM toward IR and ER at two knee positions. Intrasession and intersession reliability and precision were good (ICC=0.68-0.86; SEM=0.22°-0.37°). Females had significantly diminished TTDPM toward IR at IR-test position (males: 0.77°±0.14°, females: 1.18°±0.46°, p=0.021) and TTDPM toward IR at the ER-test position (males: 0.87°±0.13°, females: 1.36°±0.58°, p=0.026). No other significant gender differences were found (p>0.05). The current IR/ER TTDPM methods are reliable and accurate for the test-retest or cross-section research design. Gender differences were found toward IR where the ACL acts as the secondary restraint. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Effects of 6-week sling-based training of the external-rotator muscles on the shoulder profile in elite female high school handball players.

    PubMed

    Genevois, Cyril; Berthier, Philippe; Guidou, Vincent; Muller, Franck; Thiebault, Boris; Rogowski, Isabelle

    2014-11-01

    In women's handball, the large numbers of throws and passes make the shoulder region vulnerable to overuse injuries. Repetitive throwing motions generate imbalance between shoulder internal- and external-rotator muscles. It has not yet been established whether sling-based training can improve shoulder external-rotator muscle strength. This study investigated the effectiveness of a 6-wk strengthening program in improving shoulder functional profile in elite female high school handball players. Crossover study. National elite handball training center. 25 elite female high school handball players. The program, completed twice per week for 6 wk, included sling-based strengthening exercises using a suspension trainer for external rotation with scapular retraction and scapular retraction alone. Maximal shoulder external- and internal-rotation strength, shoulder external- and internal-rotation range of motion (ROM), and maximal throwing velocity were assessed preintervention and postintervention for dominant and nondominant sides. After sling training, external- and internal-rotation strength increased significantly for both sides (P ≤ .001, and P = .004, respectively), with the result that there was no significant change in external- and internal-rotation strength ratios for either the dominant or the nondominant shoulder. No significant differences were observed for external-rotation ROM, while internal-rotation ROM decreased moderately, in particular in the dominant shoulder (P = .005). Maximal throwing velocity remained constant for the dominant arm, whereas a significant increase was found for the nondominant arm (P = .017). This 6-wk strengthening program was effective in improving shoulder external-rotator muscle strength but resulted in a decrease in the ROM in shoulder internal rotation, while throwing velocity remained stable. Adding a stretching program to this type of sling-based training program might help avoid potential detrimental effects on shoulder ROM.

  20. Error field assessment from driven rotation of stable external kinks at EXTRAP-T2R reversed field pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volpe, F. A.; Frassinetti, L.; Brunsell, P. R.; Drake, J. R.; Olofsson, K. E. J.

    2013-04-01

    A new non-disruptive error field (EF) assessment technique not restricted to low density and thus low beta was demonstrated at the EXTRAP-T2R reversed field pinch. Stable and marginally stable external kink modes of toroidal mode number n = 10 and n = 8, respectively, were generated, and their rotation sustained, by means of rotating magnetic perturbations of the same n. Due to finite EFs, and in spite of the applied perturbations rotating uniformly and having constant amplitude, the kink modes were observed to rotate non-uniformly and be modulated in amplitude. This behaviour was used to precisely infer the amplitude and approximately estimate the toroidal phase of the EF. A subsequent scan permitted to optimize the toroidal phase. The technique was tested against deliberately applied as well as intrinsic EFs of n = 8 and 10. Corrections equal and opposite to the estimated error fields were applied. The efficacy of the error compensation was indicated by the increased discharge duration and more uniform mode rotation in response to a uniformly rotating perturbation. The results are in good agreement with theory, and the extension to lower n, to tearing modes and to tokamaks, including ITER, is discussed.

  1. General-purpose abductive algorithm for interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, Richard K.; Hartigan, Julie

    1996-11-01

    Abduction, inference to the best explanation, is an information-processing task that is useful for solving interpretation problems such as diagnosis, medical test analysis, legal reasoning, theory evaluation, and perception. The task is a generative one in which an explanation comprising of domain hypotheses is assembled and used to account for given findings. The explanation is taken to be an interpretation as to why the findings have arisen within the given situation. Research in abduction has led to the development of a general-purpose computational strategy which has been demonstrated on all of the above types of problems. This abduction strategy can be performed in layers so that different types of knowledge can come together in deriving an explanation at different levels of description. Further, the abduction strategy is tractable and offers a very useful tradeoff between confidence in the explanation and completeness of the explanation. This paper will describe this computational strategy for abduction and demonstrate its usefulness towards perceptual problems by examining problem-solving systems in speech recognition and natural language understanding.

  2. [Missed diagnosis of hiding posterior marginal fracture of ankle with pronation-external rotation type and its treatment].

    PubMed

    Wang, Jia; Zhang, Yun-Tong; Zhang, Chun-Cai; Tang, Yang

    2014-01-01

    To analyze causes of missed diagnosis of hiding post-malleolar fractures in treating ankle joint fractures of pronation-external rotation type according to Lauge-Hansen classification and assess its medium-term outcomes. Among 103 patients with ankle joint fracture of pronation-external rotation type treated from March 2002 to June 2010,9 patients were missed diagnosis,including 6 males and 3 females,with a mean age of 35.2 years old (ranged, 18 to 55 years old) . Four patients were diagnosed during operation, 2 patients were diagnosed 2 or 3 days after first surgery and 3 patients came from other hospital. All the patients were treated remedially with lag screws and lock plates internal fixation. After operation,ankle joint function was evaluated according to American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS). All the 9 patients were followed up, and the duration ranged from 14 to 30 months (averaged, 17 months). No incision infection was found, and all incision healed at the first stage. At the latest follow-up, AOFAS was 83.0 +/- 4.4, the score of 4 patients diagnosed during operation was 85.0 +/- 2.9, and the score of 5 patients treated by secondary operation was 81.0 +/- 5.3. All the patients got fracture union observed by X-ray at a mean time of 2.2 months after operation. There were no complications such as internal fixation loosing, broken and vascular or nerve injuries. Ankle joint fracture of pronation-external rotation type may be combined with hiding post-malleolar fractures. So to patients with ankle joint fracture of pronation-external rotation type, lateral X-ray should be read carefully, and if necessary, CT or MRI examination should be performed. If adding lateral X-ray examination after reduction of exterior and interior ankle joint fixation, the missed diagnosis may be avoided.

  3. External rotation elastic bands at the lower limb decrease rearfoot eversion during walking: a preliminary proof of concept

    PubMed Central

    Souza, Thales R.; Araújo, Vanessa L.; Silva, Paula L.; Carvalhais, Viviane O. C.; Resende, Renan A.; Fonseca, Sérgio T.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background Reducing rearfoot eversion is a commonly desired effect in clinical practice to prevent or treat musculoskeletal dysfunction. Interventions that pull the lower limb into external rotation may reduce rearfoot eversion. Objective This study investigated whether the use of external rotation elastic bands, of different levels of stiffness, will decrease rearfoot eversion during walking. We hypothesized that the use of elastic bands would decrease rearfoot eversion and that the greater the band stiffness, the greater the eversion reduction. Method Seventeen healthy participants underwent three-dimensional kinematic analysis of the rearfoot and shank. The participants walked on a treadmill with and without high- and low-stiffness bands. Frontal-plane kinematics of the rearfoot-shank joint complex was obtained during the stance phase of walking. Repeated-measures ANOVAs were used to compare discrete variables that described rearfoot eversion-inversion: mean eversion-inversion; eversion peak; and eversion-inversion range of motion. Results The low-stiffness and high-stiffness bands significantly decreased eversion and increased mean eversion-inversion (p≤0.037) and eversion peak (p≤0.006) compared with the control condition. Both bands also decreased eversion-inversion range of motion (p≤0.047) compared with control by reducing eversion. The high-stiffness band condition was not significantly different from the low-stiffness band condition for any variables (p≥0.479). Conclusion The results indicated that the external rotation bands decreased rearfoot eversion during walking. This constitutes preliminary experimental evidence suggesting that increasing external rotation moments at the lower limb may reduce rearfoot eversion, which needs further testing. PMID:27849289

  4. [Manipulative reduction and percutaneous Kirschner wire internal fixation for grade IV supination-external rotation ankle fractures].

    PubMed

    Li, Jia; Sun, Jin-Ke; Wang, Chen-Lin

    2017-06-25

    To investigate surgical skills and clinical effects of manipulative reduction and percutaneous Kirschner wire internal fixation in treating grade IV supination-external rotation ankle fractures. From May 2013 to October 2016, 35 patients with grade IV supination-external rotation ankle fractures were treated with percutaneous Kirschner wire internal fixation, involving 22 males and 13 females with an average age of 38.2 years ranged from 18 to 65 years old. The time from injury to operation ranged from 2 h to 10 d with an average of 5 d. Reduction quality was assessed by Burwell-Charnley radiological criteria. Baird-Jackson ankle scoring system was used to assess clinical effects. Thirty-three patients were followed up from 10 to 28 months with an average of 14 months. Fracture healing time ranged from 10 to 18 weeks with an average of 12 weeks. According to Burwell-Charnley radiological criteria, 30 cases were obtained anatomic reduction, 3 cases moderate. According to Baird-Jackson ankle scoring system, total score was 93.8±5.4, 17 cases got excellent result, 12 good, 2 fair and 2 poor. Manipulative reduction and percutaneous Kirschner wire internal fixation in treating grade IV supination-external rotation ankle fractures has advantages of reliable efficacy, less complications. But higher require techniques were required for closed reduction. It is not suitable for severe crushed fracture and compressive articular surface fracture.

  5. Magnetic island and plasma rotation under external resonant magnetic perturbation in the T-10 tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Eliseev, L. G.; Ivanov, N. V., E-mail: ivanov-nv@nrcki.ru; Kakurin, A. M.

    2015-05-15

    Experimental comparison of the m = 2, n = 1 mode and plasma rotation velocities at q = 2 magnetic surface in a wide range of the mode amplitudes is presented. Phase velocity of the mode rotation is measured with a set of poloidal magnetic field sensors located at the inner side of the vacuum vessel wall. Plasma rotation velocity at the q = 2 magnetic surface in the direction of the mode phase velocity is measured with the heavy ion beam probe diagnostics. In the presence of a static Resonant Magnetic Perturbation (RMP), the rotation is irregular that appears as cyclical variations of the mode and plasmamore » instantaneous velocities. The period of these variations is equal to the period of the mode oscillations. In the case of high mode amplitude, the rotation irregularity of the mode is consistent with the rotation irregularity of the resonant plasma layer. On the contrary, the observed rise of the mode rotation irregularity in the case of low mode amplitude occurs without an increase of the rotation irregularity of the resonant plasma layer. The experimental results are simulated and analyzed with the TEAR code based on the two-fluid MHD approximation. Calculated irregularities of the mode and plasma rotation depend on the mode amplitude similar to the experimental data. For large islands, the rotation irregularity is attributed to oscillations of the electromagnetic torque applied to the resonant plasma layer. For small islands, the deviation of the mode rotation velocity from the plasma velocity occurs due to the effect of finite plasma resistivity.« less

  6. [TREATMENT OF PRONATION EXTERNAL ROTATION ANKLE FRACTURE COMBINED WITH SEPARATION OF DISTAL TIBIOFIBULAR SYNDESMOSIS].

    PubMed

    Wu, Benwen; Ding, Zhenqi; Huang, Guofeng; Liu, Guojun; Cai, Zhemin; Ding, Luobin; Li, Xiang

    2016-09-08

    To evaluate the difference between using and not using syndesmotic screw to treat pronation external rotation (PER) ankle fracture combined with separation of distal tibiofibular syndesmosis. Between April 2011 and October 2014, 46 cases of PER ankle fracture combined with separation of distal tibiofibular syndesmosis were treated, and syndesmotic screw was used in 24 cases (fixation group) and syndesmotic screw was not used in 22 cases (non-fixation group). There was no significant difference in gender, age, weight, cause of injury, side, injury to operation time, and fracture type between 2 groups ( P >0.05). The time for full weight-bearing, fracture healing time, and complications were recorded after operation. Anteroposterior and lateral X-ray films were taken to measure the tibiofibular overlap (TBOL) and tibiofibular clear space (TBCS). Baird-Jackson score was used to evaluate functional recovery of the ankle. All incision healed by first intention without complications. The cases were followed up 13-18 months (mean, 15.2 months) in 2 groups. The time for full weight-bearing was 8-12 weeks (median, 11 weeks) in fixation group, which was significantly later than that in non-fixation group (range, 6-10 weeks; median, 8 weeks) ( Z =-5.049, P =0.000). X-ray examination showed reduction of separation of distal tibiofibular syndesmosis. All fractures healed. The fracture healing time was (13.83±1.37) weeks in fixation group, and was (13.91±1.31) weeks in non-fixation group, showing no significant difference ( t =-0.191, P =0.945). No separation of distal tibiofibular syndesmosis, delayed union, nonunion, loosening, or breakage of fixation devices was observed in 2 groups. There was no significant difference in TBOL, TBCS, Baird-Jackson score and the excellent and good rate between 2 groups ( P >0.05). If the medial, lateral, and posterior structures of the ankle could be repaired according to injury, no significant influence on functional outcome of ankle or

  7. Longitudinal sex differences during landing in knee abduction in young athletes.

    PubMed

    Ford, Kevin R; Shapiro, Robert; Myer, Gregory D; Van Den Bogert, Antonie J; Hewett, Timothy E

    2010-10-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether biomechanical and neuromuscular risk factors related to abnormal movement patterns increased in females, but not males, during the adolescent growth spurt. A total of 315 subjects participated in two testing sessions approximately 1 yr apart. Male and female subjects were classified on the basis of their maturation status as pubertal or postpubertal. Three trials of a drop vertical jump (DVJ) were collected. Maximum knee abduction angle and external moments were calculated during the DVJ deceleration phase using a three-dimensional motion analysis system. Changes in knee abduction from the first to second year were compared among four subject groups (female pubertal, female postpubertal, male pubertal, and male postpubertal). There were no sex differences in peak knee abduction angle or moment during DVJ between pubertal males and females (P > 0.05). However, pubertal females increased peak abduction angle from first to second year (P < 0.001), whereas males demonstrated no similar change (P = 0.90) in the matched developmental stages. After puberty, the peak abduction angle and moment were greater in females relative to males (angle: female -9.3° ± 5.7°, male -3.6° ± 4.6°, P < 0.001; moment: female -21.9 ± 13.5 N·m, male -13.0 ± 12.0 N·m, P = 0.017). This study identified, through longitudinal analyses, that knee abduction angle was significantly increased in pubertal females during rapid adolescent growth, whereas males showed no similar change. In addition, knee abduction motion and moments were significantly greater for the subsequent year in young female athletes, after rapid adolescent growth, compared with males. The combination of longitudinal, sex, and maturational group differences indicates that early puberty seems to be a critical phase related to the divergence of increased anterior cruciate ligament injury risk factors.

  8. Employing Abductive Reasoning to Achieve Understanding

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-01

    Education needs to cultivate among students the habit of abductive reasoning, which requires the integration of mature theories into military work...instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed , and completing and reviewing this collection of information...

  9. Employing Abductive Reasoning to Achieve Understanding

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-12

    Military Education needs to cultivate among students the habit of abductive reasoning, which requires the integration of mature theories into military...instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed , and completing and reviewing this collection of information...

  10. Isokinetic evaluation of internal/external tibial rotation strength after the use of hamstring tendons for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Armour, Tanya; Forwell, Lorie; Litchfield, Robert; Kirkley, Alexandra; Amendola, Ned; Fowler, Peter J

    2004-01-01

    Evaluation of the knee after an anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with the use of the semitendinosus and gracilis (hamstring) autografts has primarily focused on flexion and extension strength. The semitendinosus and gracilis muscles contribute to internal tibial rotation, and it has been suggested that harvest of these tendons for the purpose of an anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction contributes to internal tibial rotation weakness. Internal tibial rotation strength may be affected by the semitendinosus and gracilis harvest after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Prospective evaluation of internal and external tibial rotation strength. Inclusion criteria for subjects (N = 30): unilateral anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction at least 2 years previously, a stable anterior cruciate ligament (<5-mm side-to-side difference) at time of testing confirmed by surgeon and KT-1000 arthrometer, no history of knee problems after initial knee reconstruction, a normal contralateral knee, and the ability to comply with the testing protocol. In an attempt to minimize unwanted subtalar joint motion, subjects were immobilized using an ankle brace and tested at angular velocities of 60 degrees /s, 120 degrees /s, and 180 degrees /s at a knee flexion angle of 90 degrees . The mean peak torque measurements for internal rotation strength of the operative limb (60 degrees /s, 17.4 +/- 4.5 ft-lb; 120 degrees /s, 13.9 +/- 3.3 ft-lb; 180 degrees /s, 11.6 +/- 3.0 ft-lb) were statistically different compared to the nonoperated limb (60 degrees /s, 20.5 +/- 4.7 ft-lb; 120 degrees /s, 15.9 +/- 3.8 ft-lb; 180 degrees /s, 13.4 +/- 3.8 ft-lb) at 60 degrees /s (P = .012), 120 degrees /s (P = .036), and 180 degrees /s (P = .045). The nonoperative limb demonstrated greater strength at all speeds. The mean torque measurements for external rotation were statistically similar when compared to the nonoperated limb at all angular velocities. We have shown through our study that

  11. Rotations

    Treesearch

    John R. Jones; Wayne D. Shepperd

    1985-01-01

    The rotation, in forestry, is the planned number of years between formation of a crop or stand and its final harvest at a specified stage of maturity (Ford-Robertson 1971). The rotation used for many species is the age of culmination of mean usable volume growth [net mean annual increment (MAI)]. At that age, usable volume divided by age reaches its highest level. That...

  12. Parents Who Abduct: A Qualitative Study with Implications for Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greif, Geoffrey L.; Hegar, Rebecca L.

    1994-01-01

    Conducted in-depth interviews with 17 parents (9 fathers and 8 mothers) who had abducted their own children. Reported reasons for abduction included unsatisfactory contact with court-related professionals, revenge, and fear for the child's safety. Some abductors, after the abduction had been resolved, had increased contact with their children.…

  13. Gender Difference Does Not Mean Genetic Difference: Externalizing Improves Performance in Mental Rotation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moe, Angelica

    2012-01-01

    The fear of underperforming owing to stereotype threat affects women's performance in tasks such as mathematics, chess, and spatial reasoning. The present research considered mental rotation and explored effects on performance and on regulatory focus of instructions pointing to different explanations for gender differences. Two hundred and one…

  14. Muscle contributions to elbow joint rotational stiffness in preparation for sudden external arm perturbations.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Michael W R; Keir, Peter J

    2014-04-01

    Understanding joint stiffness and stability is beneficial for assessing injury risk. The purpose of this study was to examine joint rotational stiffness for individual muscles contributing to elbow joint stability. Fifteen male participants maintained combinations of three body orientations (standing, supine, sitting) and three hand preloads (no load, solid tube, fluid filled tube) while a device imposed a sudden elbow extension. Elbow angle and activity from nine muscles were inputs to a biomechanical model to determine relative contributions to elbow joint rotational stiffness, reported as percent of total stiffness. A body orientation by preload interaction was evident for most muscles (P<.001). Brachioradialis had the largest change in contribution while standing (no load, 18.5%; solid, 23.8%; fluid, 26.3%). Across trials, the greatest contributions were brachialis (30.4±1.9%) and brachioradialis (21.7±2.2%). Contributions from the forearm muscles and triceps were 5.5±0.6% and 9.2±1.9%, respectively. Contributions increased at time points closer to the perturbation (baseline to anticipatory), indicating increased neuromuscular response to resist rotation. This study quantified muscle contributions that resist elbow perturbations, found that forearm muscles contribute marginally and showed that orientation and preload should be considered when evaluating elbow joint stiffness and safety.

  15. Postoperative stiff shoulder after open rotator cuff repair: a 3- to 20-year follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Vastamäki, H; Vastamäki, M

    2014-12-01

    Stiffness after a rotator cuff tear is common. So is stiffness after an arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. In the literature, however, postoperative restriction of passive range of motion after open rotator cuff repair in shoulders with free passive range of motion at surgery has seldom been recognized. We hypothesize that this postoperative stiffness is more frequent than recognized and slows the primary postoperative healing after a rotator cuff reconstruction. We wondered how common is postoperative restriction of both active and passive range of motion after open rotator cuff repair in shoulders with free passive preoperative range of motion, how it recovers, and whether this condition influences short- and long-term results of surgery. We also explored factors predicting postoperative shoulder stiffness. We retrospectively identified 103 postoperative stiff shoulders among 416 consecutive open rotator cuff repairs, evaluating incidence and duration of stiffness, short-term clinical results and long-term range of motion, pain relief, shoulder strength, and functional results 3-20 (mean 8.7) years after surgery in 56 patients. The incidence of postoperative shoulder stiffness was 20%. It delayed primary postoperative healing by 3-6 months and resolved during a mean 6.3 months postoperatively. External rotation resolved first, corresponding to that of the controls at 3 months; flexion and abduction took less than 1 year after surgery. The mean summarized range of motion (flexion + abduction + external rotation) increased as high as 93% of the controls' range of motion by 6 months and 100% by 1 year. Flexion, abduction, and internal rotation improved to the level of the contralateral shoulders as did pain, strength, and function. Age at surgery and condition of the biceps tendon were related to postoperative stiffness. Postoperative stiff shoulder after open rotator cuff repair is a common complication resolving in 6-12 months with good long-term results. © The

  16. The effect of trunk rotation during shoulder exercises on the activity of the scapular muscle and scapular kinematics.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, Taishi; Hasegawa, Satoshi; Matsumura, Aoi; Nakamura, Masatoshi; Ibuki, Satoko; Ichihashi, Noriaki

    2015-06-01

    In patients with shoulder disease, kinetic chain exercises including hip or trunk movement are recommended. However, the actual muscle activation and scapular kinematics of these exercises are not known. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of trunk rotation on shoulder exercises that are devised to improve scapular function. Thirteen healthy young men participated in this study. Scaption, external rotation in the first and second positions, and prone scapular retraction at 45°, 90°, and 145° of shoulder abduction were performed with and without trunk rotation. Electromyography was used to assess the scapular muscle activity of the upper trapezius (UT), middle trapezius (MT), lower trapezius (LT), and serratus anterior (SA), and electromagnetic motion capture was used to assess scapular motion. The muscle activity ratio, which is the activity of the UT to the MT, LT, and SA, was calculated. These data were compared between 2 conditions (with and without trunk rotation) for each exercise. Adding trunk rotation to scaption, the first external rotation, and the second external rotation significantly increased scapular external rotation and posterior tilt, and all 3 exercises increased LT activation. In addition, trunk rotation with scapular retraction at 90° and 145° of shoulder abduction significantly decreased the UT/LT ratio. Our findings suggest that shoulder exercises with trunk rotation in this study may be effective in patients who have difficulty in enhancing LT activity and suppressing excessive activation of the UT or in cases in which a decreased scapular external rotation or posterior tilt is observed. Copyright © 2015 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Does Humeral Component Lateralization in Reverse Shoulder Arthroplasty Affect Rotator Cuff Torque? Evaluation in a Cadaver Model.

    PubMed

    Chan, Kevin; Langohr, G Daniel G; Mahaffy, Matthew; Johnson, James A; Athwal, George S

    2017-10-01

    Humeral component lateralization in reverse total shoulder arthroplasty (RTSA) may improve the biomechanical advantage of the rotator cuff, which could improve the torque generated by the rotator cuff and increase internal and external rotation of the shoulder. The purpose of this in vitro biomechanical study was to evaluate the effect of humeral component lateralization (or lateral offset) on the torque of the anterior and posterior rotator cuff. Eight fresh-frozen cadaveric shoulders from eight separate donors (74 ± 8 years; six males, two females) were tested using an in vitro simulator. All shoulders were prescreened for soft tissue deficit and/or deformity before testing. A custom RTSA prosthesis was implanted that allowed five levels of humeral component lateralization (15, 20, 25, 30, 35 mm), which avoided restrictions imposed by commercially available designs. The torques exerted by the anterior and posterior rotator cuff were measured three times and then averaged for varying humeral lateralization, abduction angle (0°, 45°, 90°), and internal and external rotation (-60°, -30°, 0°, 30°, 60°). A three-way repeated measures ANOVA (abduction angle, humeral lateralization, internal rotation and external rotation angles) with a significance level of α = 0.05 was used for statistical analysis. Humeral lateralization only affected posterior rotator cuff torque at 0° abduction, where increasing humeral lateralization from 15 to 35 mm at 60° internal rotation decreased external rotation torque by 1.6 ± 0.4 Nm (95% CI, -0.07 -1.56 Nm; p = 0.06) from 4.0 ± 0.3 Nm to 2.4 ± 0.6 Nm, respectively, but at 60° external rotation increased external rotation torque by 2.2 ± 0.5 Nm (95% CI, -4.2 to -0.2 Nm; p = 0.029) from 6.2 ± 0.5 Nm to 8.3 ± 0.5 Nm, respectively. Anterior cuff torque was affected by humeral lateralization in more arm positions than the posterior cuff, where increasing humeral lateralization from 15 to 35 mm when at 60° internal rotation

  18. Effect of an external magnetic field on particle acceleration by a rotating black hole surrounded with quintessential energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaymatov, Sanjar; Ahmedov, Bobomurat; Stuchlík, Zdeněk; Abdujabbarov, Ahmadjon

    We investigate particle motion and collisions in the vicinity of rotating black holes immersed in combined cosmological quintessential scalar field and external magnetic field. The quintessential dark-energy field governing the spacetime structure is characterized by the quintessential state parameter ωq ∈ (‑1; ‑1/3) characterizing its equation of state, and the quintessential field-intensity parameter c determining the static radius where the black hole attraction is just balanced by the quintessential repulsion. The magnetic field is assumed to be test field that is uniform close to the static radius, where the spacetime is nearly flat, being characterized by strength B there. Deformations of the test magnetic field in vicinity of the black hole, caused by the Ricci non-flat spacetime structure are determined. General expression of the center-of-mass energy of the colliding charged or uncharged particles near the black hole is given and discussed in several special cases. In the case of nonrotating black holes, we discuss collisions of two particles freely falling from vicinity of the static radius, or one such a particle colliding with charged particle revolving at the innermost stable circular orbit. In the case of rotating black holes, we discuss briefly particles falling in the equatorial plane and colliding in close vicinity of the black hole horizon, concentrating attention to the interplay of the effects of the quintessential field and the external magnetic field. We demonstrate that the ultra-high center-of-mass energy can be obtained for black holes placed in an external magnetic field for an infinitesimally small quintessential field-intensity parameter c; the center-of-mass energy decreases if the quintessential field-intensity parameter c increases.

  19. Intraoperative assessment of the stability of the distal tibiofibular joint in supination-external rotation injuries of the ankle: sensitivity, specificity, and reliability of two clinical tests.

    PubMed

    Pakarinen, Harri; Flinkkilä, Tapio; Ohtonen, Pasi; Hyvönen, Pekka; Lakovaara, Martti; Leppilahti, Juhana; Ristiniemi, Jukka

    2011-11-16

    This study was designed to assess the sensitivity, specificity, and interobserver reliability of the hook test and the stress test for the intraoperative diagnosis of instability of the distal tibiofibular joint following fixation of ankle fractures resulting from supination-external rotation forces. We conducted a prospective study of 140 patients with an unstable unilateral ankle fracture resulting from a supination-external rotation mechanism (Lauge-Hansen SE). After internal fixation of the malleolar fracture, a hook test and an external rotation stress test under fluoroscopy were performed independently by the lead surgeon and assisting surgeon, followed by a standardized 7.5-Nm external rotation stress test of each ankle under fluoroscopy. A positive stress test result was defined as a side-to-side difference of >2 mm in the tibiotalar or the tibiofibular clear space on mortise radiographs. The sensitivity and specificity of each test were calculated with use of the standardized 7.5-Nm external rotation stress test as a reference. Twenty-four (17%) of the 140 patients had a positive standardized 7.5-Nm external rotation stress test after internal fixation of the malleolar fracture. The hook test had a sensitivity of 0.25 (95% confidence interval, 0.12 to 0.45) and a specificity of 0.98 (95% confidence interval, 0.94 to 1.0) for the detection of the same instabilities. The external rotation stress test had a sensitivity of 0.58 (95% confidence interval, 0.39 to 0.76) and a specificity of 0.96 (95% confidence interval, 0.90 to 0.98). Both tests had excellent interobserver reliability, with 99% agreement for the hook test and 98% for the stress test. Interobserver agreement for the hook test and the clinical stress test was excellent, but the sensitivity of these tests was insufficient to adequately detect instability of the syndesmosis intraoperatively.

  20. Matter-induced magnetic moment and neutrino helicity rotation in external fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ternov, Alexei I.

    2016-11-01

    The induced magnetic moment that arises due to the propagation of neutrinos in a dispersive medium can affect the dynamics of the neutrino spin in an external electromagnetic field. In particular, it can cause a helicity flip of a massive neutrino in a magnetic field. In some astrophysical media, this helicity transition mechanism could be more effective than a similar process caused by the anomalous magnetic moment of the neutrino. If the neutrino energy is sufficiently high, the two helicity transition mechanisms mentioned above can compensate each other. Then a helicity flip in an external field will not occur. Calculations are carried out using both the methods of relativistic quantum mechanics and the quasiclassical Bargmann-Michel-Telegdi equation.

  1. Dynamic Stress Testing Is Unnecessary for Unimalleolar Supination-External Rotation Ankle Fractures with Minimal Fracture Displacement on Lateral Radiographs.

    PubMed

    Nortunen, Simo; Leskelä, Hannu-Ville; Haapasalo, Heidi; Flinkkilä, Tapio; Ohtonen, Pasi; Pakarinen, Harri

    2017-03-15

    This study aimed to identify factors from standard radiographs that contributed to the stability of the ankle mortise in patients with isolated supination-external rotation fractures of the lateral malleolus (OTA/AO 44-B). Non-stress radiographs of the mortise and lateral views, without medial clear space widening or incongruity, were prospectively collected for 286 consecutive patients (mean age, 45 years [range, 16 to 85 years]), including 144 female patients (mean age, 50 years [range, 17 to 85 years]) and 142 male patients (mean age, 40 years [range, 16 to 84 years]) from 2 trauma centers. The radiographs were analyzed for fracture morphology by 2 orthopaedic surgeons, who were blinded to each other's measurements and to the results of external rotation stress radiographs (the reference for stability). Factors significantly associated with ankle mortise stability were tested in multiple logistic regression. Receiver operating characteristic analyses were performed for continuous variables to determine optimal thresholds. A sensitivity of >90% was used as the criterion for an optimal threshold. According to external rotation stress radiographs, 217 patients (75.9%) had a stable injury, defined as that with a medial clear space of <5 mm. Independent factors that predicted stable ankle mortise were female sex (odds ratio [OR], 2.5 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.4 to 4.6]), a posterior diastasis of <2 mm (corresponding with a sensitivity of 0.94 and specificity of 0.39) on lateral radiographs (OR, 10.8 [95% CI, 3.7 to 31.5]), and only 2 fracture fragments (OR, 7.3 [95% CI, 2.1 to 26.3]). When the posterior diastasis was <2 mm and only 2 fracture fragments were present, the probability of a stable ankle mortise was 0.98 for 48 female patients (16.8%) and 0.94 for 37 male patients (12.9%). Patients with noncomminuted lateral malleolar fractures (85 patients [29.7%]) could be diagnosed with a stable ankle mortise without further stress testing, when the fracture

  2. Treatment of Medial Malleolus or Pure Deltoid Ligament Injury in Patients with Supination-External Rotation Type IV Ankle Fractures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xu; Zhang, Chao; Yin, Jian-Wen; Wang, Chen; Huang, Jia-Zhang; Ma, Xin; Wang, Cheng-Wei; Wang, Xue

    2017-02-01

    To investigate the effect of internal fixation on postoperative ankle function in patients with supination-external rotation type IV ankle fractures, including medial malleolus fractures and deltoid ligament injury. Between January 2012 and June 2014, patients with medial structure injuries were enrolled in this study and assigned to the medial malleolus fracture group or the deltoid ligament group. The surgical procedures for the two groups were documented. The follow-up endpoint was the time point when the steel plate or screw was removed from the lateral ankle. The Olerud-Molander ankle scoring system was used to assess ankle function. A total of 84 patients with supination-external rotation type IV ankle fractures had complete medical records and were included in this study. The average age of the patients was 44.16 years (range, 15-75). The patient sample included 39 males and 45 females. Overall, 49 patients (19 males and 30 females) suffered a medial malleolus fracture. The average age of these patients was 40.20 years (range, 15-75). Patients with a posterior malleolar fracture fragment >25% of the articular surface accounted for 81.6% (40 patients) of these patients. Overall, 35 patients (20 males and 15 females) experienced a deltoid ligament injury. The average age of these patients was 44.21 years (range, 17-73). Patients with a posterior malleolar fracture fragment >25% of the articular surface accounted for 11.5% (four patients) of these patients. Open reduction was performed in patients with medial malleolus fractures, and two 4.0-mm cannulated screws were used to fixate the posterior malleolus and the medial malleolus. The suture-anchor technique was used to repair the ligaments in patients with deltoid ligament injuries. The follow-up endpoint was the time point when the steel plate and screws were removed from the lateral ankle in patients. The average follow-up period was 13.4 months (range, 11-17). The Olerud-Molander ankle scoring system was

  3. Decreased Shoulder External Rotation and Flexion Are Greater Predictors of Injury Than Internal Rotation Deficits: Analysis of 132 Pitcher-Seasons in Professional Baseball.

    PubMed

    Camp, Christopher L; Zajac, John M; Pearson, David B; Sinatro, Alec M; Spiker, Andrea M; Werner, Brian C; Altchek, David W; Coleman, Struan H; Dines, Joshua S

    2017-09-01

    The primary aims of this work were to (1) describe normal range of motion (ROM) profiles for elite pitchers, (2) describe the characteristics of shoulder and elbow injuries in professional pitchers over a 6-year period in one Major League Baseball organization, and (3) identify ROM measures that were independently associated with a future shoulder or elbow injury. Over 6 seasons (2010-2015), a preseason assessment was performed on all pitchers invited to Major League Baseball Spring Training for a single organization. ROM measures included shoulder flexion, horizontal adduction, external rotation (ER), internal rotation, as well as elbow flexion and extension, were measured for both the dominant and nondominant arm, and total range of motion and deficits were calculated. All noncontact shoulder and elbow injuries were identified. Using multivariate binomial logistic regression analysis to control for age, height, weight, and all other ROM measures, the factors associated with an increased risk of subsequent shoulder or elbow injury were identified. A total of 53 shoulder (n = 25) and elbow (n = 28) injuries occurred during 132 pitcher seasons (n = 81 pitchers). The most significant categorical risk factor associated with increased elbow injury rates was the presence of a shoulder flexion deficit >5° (odds ratio [OR] 2.83; P = .042). For continuous variables, the risk of elbow injury increased by 7% for each degree of increased shoulder ER deficit (OR 1.07; P = .030) and 9% for each degree of decreased shoulder flexion (OR 1.09; P = .017). None of the measures significantly correlated with shoulder injuries. Preseason shoulder ER and flexion deficits are independent risk factors for the development of elbow injuries during the upcoming season. Although prior work has supported the importance of reducing glenohumeral internal rotation deficits in pitchers, this study demonstrates that deficits in shoulder ER and flexion are more significant predictors of

  4. Colloidal suspensions in external rotating electric field: experimental studies and prospective applications in physics, material science, and biomedicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakovlev, Egor V.; Troshina, Anna V.; Korsakova, Sofia A.; Andronik, Mikhail; Rodionov, Ilya A.; Aliev, Ismail N.; Zaytsev, Kirill I.; Cherkasova, Olga P.; Tuchin, Valery V.; Yurchenko, Stanislav O.

    2018-04-01

    Colloidal suspensions and tunable self-assembly of colloidal particles attract a great interest in recent years. In this paper, we propose a new setup and technology for studies of self-assembly of colloidal particles, interection of which between themselves is tuned by external rotating electric fields. We reveal wide prospectives of electric field employment for tunable self-assembly, from suspensions of inorganic particles to ensembles of biological cells. These results make enable particle-resolved studies of various collective phenomena and fundamental processes in many-particle systems in equilibrium state and far from it, while the dynamics can be resolved at the level of individual particles using video microscopy. For the first time, we demonstrate that, apart from ability to prepare photonic crystalline films of inorganic silica particles, the tunable self-assembly provides a novel technological way for manipulation with ensembles of biological cells by control of interactions between them.

  5. A method for the estimate of the wall diffusion for non-axisymmetric fields using rotating external fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frassinetti, L.; Olofsson, K. E. J.; Fridström, R.; Setiadi, A. C.; Brunsell, P. R.; Volpe, F. A.; Drake, J.

    2013-08-01

    A new method for the estimate of the wall diffusion time of non-axisymmetric fields is developed. The method based on rotating external fields and on the measurement of the wall frequency response is developed and tested in EXTRAP T2R. The method allows the experimental estimate of the wall diffusion time for each Fourier harmonic and the estimate of the wall diffusion toroidal asymmetries. The method intrinsically considers the effects of three-dimensional structures and of the shell gaps. Far from the gaps, experimental results are in good agreement with the diffusion time estimated with a simple cylindrical model that assumes a homogeneous wall. The method is also applied with non-standard configurations of the coil array, in order to mimic tokamak-relevant settings with a partial wall coverage and active coils of large toroidal extent. The comparison with the full coverage results shows good agreement if the effects of the relevant sidebands are considered.

  6. An external dosimetry audit programme to credential static and rotational IMRT delivery for clinical trials quality assurance.

    PubMed

    Eaton, David J; Tyler, Justine; Backshall, Alex; Bernstein, David; Carver, Antony; Gasnier, Anne; Henderson, Julia; Lee, Jonathan; Patel, Rushil; Tsang, Yatman; Yang, Huiqi; Zotova, Rada; Wells, Emma

    2017-03-01

    External dosimetry audits give confidence in the safe and accurate delivery of radiotherapy. The RTTQA group have performed an on-site audit programme for trial recruiting centres, who have recently implemented static or rotational IMRT, and those with major changes to planning or delivery systems. Measurements of reference beam output were performed by the host centre, and by the auditor using independent equipment. Verification of clinical plans was performed using the ArcCheck helical diode array. A total of 54 measurement sessions were performed between May 2014 and June 2016 at 28 UK institutions, reflecting the different combinations of planning and delivery systems used at each institution. Average ratio of measured output between auditor and host was 1.002±0.006. Average point dose agreement for clinical plans was -0.3±1.8%. Average (and 95% lower confidence intervals) of gamma pass rates at 2%/2mm, 3%/2mm and 3%/3mm respectively were: 92% (80%), 96% (90%) and 98% (94%). Moderately significant differences were seen between fixed gantry angle and rotational IMRT, and between combination of planning systems and linac manufacturer, but not between anatomical treatment site or beam energy. An external audit programme has been implemented for universal and efficient credentialing of IMRT treatments in clinical trials. Good agreement was found between measured and expected doses, with few outliers, leading to a simple table of optimal and mandatory tolerances for approval of dosimetry audit results. Feedback was given to some centres leading to improved clinical practice. Copyright © 2017 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Tool wear modeling using abductive networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masory, Oren

    1992-09-01

    A tool wear model based on Abductive Networks, which consists of a network of `polynomial' nodes, is described. The model relates the cutting parameters, components of the cutting force, and machining time to flank wear. Thus real time measurements of the cutting force can be used to monitor the machining process. The model is obtained by a training process in which the connectivity between the network's nodes and the polynomial coefficients of each node are determined by optimizing a performance criteria. Actual wear measurements of coated and uncoated carbide inserts were used for training and evaluating the established model.

  8. Gender differences in hip and ankle joint kinematics on knee abduction during running.

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, Masanori; Ogawa, Haruna; Shimizu, Norifumi; Kanehisa, Hiroaki; Yanai, Toshimasa; Kawakami, Yasuo

    2014-01-01

    The knee is the most common site of running injuries, particularly prevalent in females. The purpose of this study was to clarify gender differences in the lower extremity kinematics during running, with a specific emphasis on the relationships between the distal and proximal factors and the knee joint kinematics. Eleven female and 11 male runners participated in this study. Three-dimensional marker positions were recorded with a motion analysis system while the subjects ran along a 25 m runway at a speed of 3.5 m/s. Kinematic variables were analyzed for the stance phase of the right leg. Female runners demonstrated significantly greater peak knee abduction (P<0.05), hip adduction (P<0.01) and internal rotation (P<0.05), whereas male runners demonstrated significantly greater peak rearfoot eversion (P<0.01). The knee abduction angles were positively correlated with hip adduction angles (r=0.49, P<0.05) and negatively correlated with rearfoot eversion (r= -0.69, P<0.001). There was no significant difference in normalised step width between genders (P>0.05). Smaller rearfoot eversion and greater hip adduction related closely to the greater knee abduction as the distal and proximal factors, respectively. These relationships are thought to be the compensatory joint motions in the frontal plane, because there was no significant difference in the normalised step width between females and males. The current results suggest that if the step width is identical, the subjects with greater knee abduction had smaller rearfoot eversion to compensate for greater hip adduction, which were more apparent in females. This explains greater knee abduction found in female runners, which can be linked to a high risk of knee injury.

  9. Statistical properties of Faraday rotation measure in external galaxies - I. Intervening disc galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Aritra; Mao, S. A.; Fletcher, Andrew; Kanekar, Nissim; Shukurov, Anvar; Schnitzeler, Dominic; Vacca, Valentina; Junklewitz, Henrik

    2018-06-01

    Deriving the Faraday rotation measure (RM) of quasar absorption line systems, which are tracers of high-redshift galaxies intervening background quasars, is a powerful tool for probing magnetic fields in distant galaxies. Statistically comparing the RM distributions of two quasar samples, with and without absorption line systems, allows one to infer magnetic field properties of the intervening galaxy population. Here, we have derived the analytical form of the probability distribution function (PDF) of RM produced by a single galaxy with an axisymmetric large-scale magnetic field. We then further determine the PDF of RM for one random sight line traversing each galaxy in a population with a large-scale magnetic field prescription. We find that the resulting PDF of RM is dominated by a Lorentzian with a width that is directly related to the mean axisymmetric large-scale field strength of the galaxy population if the dispersion of B0 within the population is smaller than . Provided that RMs produced by the intervening galaxies have been successfully isolated from other RM contributions along the line of sight, our simple model suggests that in galaxies probed by quasar absorption line systems can be measured within ≈50 per cent accuracy without additional constraints on the magneto-ionic medium properties of the galaxies. Finally, we discuss quasar sample selection criteria that are crucial to reliably interpret observations, and argue that within the limitations of the current data base of absorption line systems, high-metallicity damped Lyman-α absorbers are best suited to study galactic dynamo action in distant disc galaxies.

  10. The use of weightbearing radiographs to assess the stability of supination-external rotation fractures of the ankle.

    PubMed

    Weber, Martin; Burmeister, Helge; Flueckiger, Gerhard; Krause, Fabian G

    2010-05-01

    Isolated lateral malleolar fractures usually result from a supination-external rotation (SER) injury and may include a deltoid ligament rupture. The necessity of operative treatment is based on the recognition of a relevant medial soft-tissue disruption. Currently used tests to assess ankle stability include manual stress radiographs and gravity stress radiographs, but seem to overestimate the need for fracture fixation. We investigated the use of weightbearing radiographs to distinguish stable and unstable isolated lateral malleolar fractures induced by the SER mechanism in 57 patients. Patients with stable fractures (SER type II according to the Lauge-Hansen classification) were treated non-operatively with varying external support. Forty-seven patients were evaluated by questionnaire and AOFAS ankle-hindfoot score. Follow-up was 18-120 months (mean 62). Fifty-one of fifty-seven (90%) patients were found to have stable fractures (SER type II) and were treated nonoperatively. The AOFAS score was 96.1 points on average (range 85-100) at latest follow-up. Four patients reported minor complaints. A "moderate" correlation of risk factors (i.e. smoking) to delayed bone healing was found while the correlation of varying external support (i.e. bandage, cast) to the AOFAS score and delayed bone healing was "poor". The use of weightbearing radiographs is an easy, pain-free, safe and reliable method to exclude the need for operative treatment, with excellent clinical outcome in the majority of the patients seen at latest follow-up. The delay of 3-10 days until the decision about surgical treatment is well accepted by the patients.

  11. Humeral external rotation handling by using the Bobath concept approach affects trunk extensor muscles electromyography in children with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Grazziotin Dos Santos, C; Pagnussat, Aline S; Simon, A S; Py, Rodrigo; Pinho, Alexandre Severo do; Wagner, Mário B

    2014-10-20

    This study aimed to investigate the electromyographic activity of cervical and trunk extensors muscles in children with cerebral palsy during two handlings according to the Bobath concept. A crossover trial involving 40 spastic diplegic children was conducted. Electromyography (EMG) was used to measure muscular activity at sitting position (SP), during shoulder internal rotation (IR) and shoulder external rotation (ER) handlings, which were performed using the elbow joint as key point of control. Muscle recordings were performed at the fourth cervical (C4) and at the tenth thoracic (T10) vertebral levels. The Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) was used to assess whether muscle activity would vary according to different levels of severity. Humeral ER handling induced an increase on EMG signal of trunk extensor muscles at the C4 (P=0.007) and T10 (P<0.001) vertebral levels. No significant effects were observed between SP and humeral IR handling at C4 level; However at T10 region, humeral IR handling induced an increase of EMG signal (P=0.019). Humeral ER resulted in an increase of EMG signal at both levels, suggesting increase of extensor muscle activation. Furthermore, the humeral ER handling caused different responses on EMG signal at T10 vertebra level, according to the GMFCS classification (P=0.017). In summary, an increase of EMG signal was observed during ER handling in both evaluated levels, suggesting an increase of muscle activation. These results indicate that humeral ER handling can be used for diplegic CP children rehabilitation to facilitate cervical and trunk extensor muscles activity in a GMFCS level-dependent manner. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Rotator cuff strength in recurrent anterior shoulder instability.

    PubMed

    Edouard, Pascal; Degache, Francis; Beguin, Laurent; Samozino, Pierre; Gresta, Giorgio; Fayolle-Minon, Isabelle; Farizon, Frédéric; Calmels, Paul

    2011-04-20

    Although rotator-cuff muscle contraction plays an important role in stabilizing the glenohumeral joint, little is known about the role of these muscles in the pathophysiology of recurrent anterior instability. We intended to analyze the association between isokinetic internal rotator and external rotator muscle strength and glenohumeral joint instability in patients with recurrent anterior instability that was not previously treated surgically. We enrolled thirty-seven patients with unilateral recurrent anterior posttraumatic shoulder dislocation and eleven healthy nonathletic subjects in this controlled study. The association between internal rotator and external rotator strength and shoulder instability was analyzed by side-to-side comparisons and comparisons with a control group. Isokinetic internal rotator and external rotator strength was evaluated with a Con-Trex dynamometer, with the subject seated and the shoulder abducted 45° in the scapular plane. Tests were performed at 180°/s, 120°/s, and 60°/s in concentric mode for both sides. Peak torque normalized to body weight and external rotator to internal rotator ratio were calculated for each angular velocity. Clinical and isokinetic evaluation was done by the same rehabilitation physician. The association between shoulder instability and internal rotator and external rotator strength was associated with side-to-side differences (p < 0.05). Compared with a control group, strength values were lower on the pathological shoulder side of the patients with shoulder instability than on the healthy contralateral shoulder of control subjects at 180°/s and 120°/s (p < 0.05). The side-to-side differences were increased when the nondominant upper-extremity side was involved and were decreased when the dominant side was involved. There was no association between glenohumeral joint instability and external rotator to internal rotator ratio. Internal rotator and external rotator weakness was associated with recurrent

  13. Development and validation of a computational model to study the effect of foot constraint on ankle injury due to external rotation.

    PubMed

    Wei, Feng; Hunley, Stanley C; Powell, John W; Haut, Roger C

    2011-02-01

    Recent studies, using two different manners of foot constraint, potted and taped, document altered failure characteristics in the human cadaver ankle under controlled external rotation of the foot. The posterior talofibular ligament (PTaFL) was commonly injured when the foot was constrained in potting material, while the frequency of deltoid ligament injury was higher for the taped foot. In this study an existing multibody computational modeling approach was validated to include the influence of foot constraint, determine the kinematics of the joint under external foot rotation, and consequently obtain strains in various ligaments. It was hypothesized that the location of ankle injury due to excessive levels of external foot rotation is a function of foot constraint. The results from this model simulation supported this hypothesis and helped to explain the mechanisms of injury in the cadaver experiments. An excessive external foot rotation might generate a PTaFL injury for a rigid foot constraint, and an anterior deltoid ligament injury for a pliant foot constraint. The computational models may be further developed and modified to simulate the human response for different shoe designs, as well as on various athletic shoe-surface interfaces, so as to provide a computational basis for optimizing athletic performance with minimal injury risk.

  14. Two-View Gravity Stress Imaging Protocol for Nondisplaced Type II Supination External Rotation Ankle Fractures: Introducing the Gravity Stress Cross-Table Lateral View.

    PubMed

    Boffeli, Troy J; Collier, Rachel C; Gervais, Samuel J

    Assessing ankle stability in nondisplaced Lauge-Hansen supination external rotation type II injuries requires stress imaging. Gravity stress mortise imaging is routinely used as an alternative to manual stress imaging to assess deltoid integrity with the goal of differentiating type II from type IV injuries in cases without a posterior or medial fracture. A type II injury with a nondisplaced fibula fracture is typically treated with cast immobilization, and a type IV injury is considered unstable and often requires operative repair. The present case series (two patients) highlights a standardized 2-view gravity stress imaging protocol and introduces the gravity stress cross-table lateral view. The gravity stress cross-table lateral view provides a more thorough evaluation of the posterior malleolus owing to the slight external rotation and posteriorly directed stress. External rotation also creates less bony overlap between the tibia and fibula, allowing for better visualization of the fibula fracture. Gravity stress imaging confirmed medial-sided injury in both cases, confirming the presence of supination external rotation type IV or bimalleolar equivalent fractures. Open reduction and internal fixation was performed, and both patients achieved radiographic union. No further treatment was required at 21 and 33 months postoperatively. Copyright © 2017 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Flight and abduction in witchcraft and UFO lore.

    PubMed

    Musgrave, J B; Houran, J

    2000-04-01

    The lore surrounding the mythical Witches' Sabbat and contemporary reports of UFO abductions share three main characteristics: the use of masks, the appearance of "Men in Black," and references to flight and abduction. We review these three commonalities with particular focus on the aspect of flight and abduction. We argue that narratives of the Witches' Sabbat and UFO abductions share the same basic structure, common symbolism, and serve the same psychological needs of providing a coherent explanation for anomalous (ambiguous) experiences while simultaneously giving the experient a sense of freedom, release, and escape from the self. This pattern of similarities suggests the possibility that UFO abductions are a modern version of tales of flight to the Sabbat.

  16. Range of impingement-free abduction and adduction deficit after reverse shoulder arthroplasty. Hierarchy of surgical and implant-design-related factors.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, Sergio; Comiskey, Charles A; Luo, Zong-Ping; Pupello, Derek R; Frankle, Mark A

    2008-12-01

    Evaluations of functional outcomes of reverse shoulder arthroplasty have revealed variable improvements in the range of motion and high rates of scapular notching. The purpose of this study was to systematically examine the impact of surgical factors (location of the glenosphere on the glenoid and tilt angle of the glenosphere on the glenoid) and implant-related factors (implant size, center-of-rotation offset, and humeral neck-shaft angle) on impingement-free abduction motion. A computer model was developed to virtually simulate abduction/adduction motion and its dependence on five surgical and implant-related factors. Three conditions were tested for each factor, resulting in a total of 243 simulated combinations. The overall motion was determined from 0 degrees of abduction until maximum abduction, which would be limited by impingement of the humerosocket on the scapula. In those combinations in which 0 degrees of abduction could not be achieved, the adduction deficit was recorded. The largest average increase in the range of impingement-free abduction motion resulted from a more lateral center-of-rotation offset: the average increase was 31.9 degrees with a change in the center-of-rotation offset from 0 to 10 mm, and this change resulted in an increase in abduction motion in eighty of the eighty-one combinations. The position of the glenosphere on the glenoid was associated with the second largest average increase in abduction motion (28.1 degrees when the glenosphere position was changed from superior to inferior, with the change resulting in an increase in seventy-one of the eighty-one combinations). These factors were followed by glenosphere tilt, humeral neck-shaft angle, and prosthetic size in terms of their effects on abduction motion. The largest effect in terms of avoiding an adduction deficit was provided by a humeral neck-shaft angle of 130 degrees (the deficit was avoided in forty-nine of the eighty-one combinations in which this angle was used

  17. Cerclage wire and lag screw fixation of the lateral malleolus in supination and external rotation fractures of the ankle.

    PubMed

    Bajwa, Amarjit S; Gantz, D E

    2005-01-01

    Wound dehiscence and exposed lateral hardware can occur after open reduction internal fixation of lateral malleolus. The bulk of a lateral plate and the minimum soft tissue over the lateral malleolus may contribute to this situation. The objective of this study was to evaluate a series of patients with lateral malleolar fractures treated with operative reduction using minimal hardware. We wanted to observe whether there was any loss of reduction and whether there were any incidences of soft tissue disruption. Fifty-two patients with long spiral fracture of the lateral malleolus in a supination-external rotation injury were treated with two or three 3.5-mm lag screws inserted 1 cm apart and 1 or 2 circlage wires. Less rigid fixation was supplemented with a below-the-knee plaster cast. All patients were followed up until clinical and radiological evidence of fracture healing at 6, 10, and 14 weeks postoperatively. By 10 weeks, all patients were full weight bearing, although most patients still limped. At 14 weeks' follow-up, there were no infections or wound dehiscences. All patients were able to return to their activities of daily living. All the fractures had united without loss of original position. Two fractures of the posterior bone spikes seen during surgery united uneventfully. Long spiral fractures of the lateral malleolus of the ankle can be treated successfully with 2 or 3 lag screws and circlage wires without compromising the outcome of the fracture healing.

  18. A novel method for defining the Greyhound talocrural joint axis of rotation for hinged transarticular external skeletal fixation.

    PubMed

    Colborne, G R; Hadley, N R; Wallace, A M

    2013-01-01

    In order to apply hinged transarticular external skeletal fixation for stabilization of the injured canine tarsal joint, knowledge of the three-dimensional (3D) location and orientation of the transverse axis is necessary. This method of immobilization may be used as a primary or adjunctive method of stabilisation for a large number of traumatic conditions. Using pin-mounted markers in the cadaveric Greyhound crus and talus, a closed-form solution of absolute orientation was used to identify, on radiographs, the lateral and medial locations of the transverse axis by tracking the 3D excursions of the markers during flexion and extension. A line was drawn across the dorsal aspect of the calcaneus from the most dorsal point on the distal articular surface(proximal intertarsal joint: PIJ) to the most dorsal point on its proximal articulation with the body of the talus, and the location of the centre of rotation was expressed in terms of the length of that line. In seven Greyhound tarsal joints, the medial end of the axis was located 73 ± 10% proximal to the PIJ and 11 ± 7% dorsal to the line. The lateral end was 73 ± 9% proximal tothe PIJ and -2 ± 3% plantar to the line.

  19. Reliability and validity of goniometric iPhone applications for the assessment of active shoulder external rotation.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Katy; Gutierrez, Simran Bakshi; Sutton, Stacy; Morton, Stephanie; Morgenthaler, Andrea

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the reliability and validity of two smartphone applications: (1) GetMyROM - inclinometery-based and (2) DrGoniometry - photo-based in the measurement of active shoulder external rotation (ER) as compared to standard goniometry (SG). Ninety-four Texas Woman's University Doctor of Physical Therapy students from the School of Physical Therapy - Houston campus, were recruited to participate in this study. Two iPhone applications were compared to SG using both novice and experienced raters. Active shoulder ER range of motion was measured over two time periods in random order by blinded novice and experienced raters. Intra-rater reliability using novice raters for the two applications ranged from an intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) of 0.79 to 0.81 with SG at 0.82. Inter-rater reliability (novice/expert) for the two applications ranged from an ICC of 0.92 to 0.94 with SG at 0.91. Concurrent validity (when compared to SG) ranged from 0.93 to 0.94. There were no significant differences between the novice and experienced raters. Both applications were found to be reliable and comparable to SG. A photo-based application potentially offers a superior method of measurement as visualizing the landmarks may be simplified in this format and it provides a record of measurement. Further study using patient populations may find the two studied applications are useful as an adjunct for clinical practice.

  20. Repair of Tibiotarsal Rotation in 7 Chukar Partridges (Alectoris chukar) and 12 Domestic Pigeons (Columba livia domestica) with Type-2 External Skeletal Fixator Intramedullary Pin Tie-in.

    PubMed

    Kaya, Didar Aydin; Özsoy, Serhat

    2017-09-01

    Rotational deformities of the long bones affect various avian species. Tibiotarsal rotation may cause the leg to deviate up to 180° from the dorsoplantar axis in a matter of days, thus preventing the birds from walking freely and leading to the inability to stand. In this study, tibiotarsal rotation observed in pigeons and partridges was managed by creating a closed fracture in the tibiotarsus and then, following reduction, stabilizing it with an intramedullary tie-in Type 2 external skeletal fixation system. Functional healing was achieved in 12 pigeons (Columba livia domestica; mean healing time, 38 days) and 7 partridges (Alectoris chukar; mean healing time, 40 days). This treatment was successful. In small bird species (<1 kg), this simple and inexpensive surgical intervention may provide a highly effective method for the treatment of rotational deformities.

  1. The effect of in vivo rotator cuff muscle contraction on glenohumeral joint translation: An ultrasonographic and electromyographic study.

    PubMed

    Rathi, Sangeeta; Taylor, Nicholas F; Green, Rodney A

    2016-12-08

    The proposed stabilizing mechanism of rotator cuff muscles is to limit excessive humeral head translation. However, an accurate measurement of glenohumeral joint translation in vivo has been challenging. We aimed to measure the effect of rotator cuff muscle contraction on glenohumeral joint translation using real time ultrasound (RTUS) and electromyography. Twenty healthy adults with no history of shoulder pathology were recruited. Six intramuscular electrodes were inserted in the rotator cuff muscles (supraspinatus, upper and lower infraspinatus, teres minor, upper and lower subscapularis). Anterior and posterior glenohumeral translations were measured in testing conditions (with and without translation force, with and without isometric internal and external rotation), in two positions (shoulder neutral, abduction) and views (anterior, posterior). There was reduced glenohumeral translation with rotator cuff muscle contraction in the neutral anterior (F 2,38 =17.8, p<0.01), neutral posterior (F 1.6,31.0 =44.3, p<0.01) and abducted posterior (F 1.5,28.8 =5.2, p<0.02) positions. There were also differences between the amount of translation limited by anterior and posterior rotator cuff muscles in response to anterior and posterior translation forces (p<0.05), indicating that their activity was, to a certain extent, direction specific. For example, in both neutral and abducted positions, contraction of the posterior rotator cuff muscles, infraspinatus and teres minor, appeared to tether anterior translation of the humeral head. Our results confirm that the rotator cuff functions as a stabilizer of the glenohumeral joint by limiting humeral head translation and this is likely to be in a direction-specific manner. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. A validated method for modeling anthropoid hip abduction in silico.

    PubMed

    Hammond, Ashley S; Plavcan, J Michael; Ward, Carol V

    2016-07-01

    The ability to reconstruct hip joint mobility from femora and pelves could provide insight into the locomotion and paleobiology of fossil primates. This study presents a method for modeling hip abduction in anthropoids validated with in vivo data. Hip abduction simulations were performed on a large sample of anthropoids. The modeling approach integrates three-dimensional (3D) polygonal models created from laser surface scans of bones, 3D landmark data, and shape analysis software to digitally articulate and manipulate the hip joint. Range of femoral abduction (degrees) and the abducted knee position (distance spanned at the knee during abduction) were compared with published live animal data. The models accurately estimate knee position and (to a lesser extent) angular abduction across broad locomotor groups. They tend to underestimate abduction for acrobatic or suspensory taxa, but overestimate it in more stereotyped taxa. Correspondence between in vivo and in silico data varies at the specific and generic level. Our models broadly correspond to in vivo data on hip abduction, although the relationship between the models and live animal data is less straightforward than hypothesized. The models can predict acrobatic or stereotyped locomotor adaptation for taxa with values near the extremes of the range of abduction ability. Our findings underscore the difficulties associated with modeling complex systems and the importance of validating in silico models. They suggest that models of joint mobility can offer additional insight into the functional abilities of extinct primates when done in consideration of how joints move and function in vivo. Am J Phys Anthropol 160:529-548, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Turnout in Classical Dance: Is It Possible to Enhance the External Rotation of the Lower Limb by a Myofascial Manipulation? A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Lohr, Christine; Schmidt, Tobias

    2017-12-15

    Turnout in classical dance refers to the external rotation of the lower extremities so that the longitudinal axes of the feet form an angle of up to 180°. To what extent a myofascial manipulation (myofascial release, MFR) could enhance this external rotation is as yet unknown. In this pilot study, 16 students of dance and 3 dance instructors were randomly assigned to an intervention group (IG; N = 10) and a group of controls (CG; N = 9). Isolated external hip rotation (EHR) and functional turnout (TO) were evaluated three times (pre-, post-, and follow-up measurement) using a plurimeter and Functional Footprints® rotation discs. In addition, subjectively perceived physical flexibility (PPF) was determined by means of a written survey. The interval between pre- and post-measurement and between post- and follow-up measurement was 4 weeks. Only the IG received four 20-minute MFR treatments of the lower limb at weekly intervals between pre- and post-measurement. In both the post-measurement (pre- versus post-: p = 0.038, d = 0.77) and the follow-up measurement (pre- versus follow-up: p < 0.001, d = 1.66) the IG showed a significantly improved isolated EHR of the right hip and a significantly increased PPF (pre- versus post-: p = 0.047, d = 0.73; pre- versus follow-up: p = 0.012, d = 1.00). The left EHR as well as the right and left TO were not affected by the intervention. It was demonstrated that four sessions of MFR of the lower limb can induce an improvement in the isolated external hip rotation (right hip). The beneficial effects of the treatment regarding an improvement of functional turnout could not be entirely verified in this pilot study. However, the significant increase in the participants' subjective flexibility supports the promising trend in the objective parameters and emphasizes the need to undertake further research.

  4. Exercise therapy for treatment of supraspinatus tears does not alter glenohumeral kinematics during internal/external rotation with the arm at the side.

    PubMed

    Ferrer, Gerald A; Miller, R Matthew; Zlotnicki, Jason P; Tashman, Scott; Irrgang, James J; Musahl, Volker; Debski, Richard E

    2018-01-01

    Rotator cuff tears are a significant clinical problem, with exercise therapy being a common treatment option for patients. Failure rates of exercise therapy may be due to the failure to improve glenohumeral kinematics. Tears involving the supraspinatus may result in altered glenohumeral kinematics and joint instability for internal/external rotation with the arm at the side because not all muscles used to stabilize the glenohumeral joint are functioning normally. The objective of the study is to assess in vivo glenohumeral kinematic changes for internal/external rotation motions with the arm at the side of patients with a symptomatic full-thickness supraspinatus tear before and after a 12-week exercise therapy programme. Five patients underwent dynamic stereoradiography analysis before and after a 12-week exercise therapy protocol to measure changes in glenohumeral kinematics during transverse plane internal/external rotation with the arm at the side. Patient-reported outcomes and shoulder strength were also evaluated. No patient sought surgery immediately following exercise therapy. Significant improvements in isometric shoulder strength and patient-reported outcomes were observed (p < 0.05). No significant changes in glenohumeral kinematics following physical therapy were found. Isolated supraspinatus tears resulted in increased joint translations compared to healthy controls from the previous literature for internal/external rotation with the arm at the side. Despite satisfactory clinical outcomes following exercise therapy, glenohumeral kinematics did not change. The lack of changes may be due to the motion studied or the focus of current exercise therapy protocols being increasing shoulder strength and restoring range of motion. Current exercise therapy protocols should be adapted to also focus on restoring glenohumeral kinematics to improve joint stability since exercise therapy may have different effects depending on the motions of daily living. Prognostic

  5. Are professional handball players at risk for developing a glenohumeral internal rotation deficit in their dominant arm?

    PubMed

    Seabra, Pedro; Van Eck, Carola F; Sá, Márcia; Torres, João

    2017-05-01

    Overhead athletes, such as baseball players, have been shown to have adaptive changes in the shoulder range of motion (ROM) of their dominant arm. Professional handball players are a unique subtype of overhead athletes with very different demands from baseball players. The aim of this study was to determine if professional handball players demonstrate differences in shoulder ROM between their dominant and non-dominant arm and try to relate them with new variables. Fifty professional male handball players were included and completed a questionnaire regarding age at which they started to play, number of hours they practice a week, field position and arm dominance. ROM measurements were performed including forward flexion (FF), external rotation with the shoulder in abduction (ABER) and with adducted arm (ADER) and internal rotation with shoulder in abduction (IR). Statistical analysis was performed to determine differences in ROM between the dominant and non-dominant shoulder and if there is a relationship between these differences and shoulder load or field position. The dominant arm showed decreased internal rotation (47 vs. 56 degrees, p < 0.001) and increased external rotation both with the arm abducted (99 vs. 88 degrees, p < 0.001) and at the side (62 vs 57 degrees, p = 0.001). This was not correlated with shoulder load for any movement (FF, p = 0.980; ABER, p = 0.741; ADER, p = 0.803; IR, p = 0.085) but was dependent on field position with first line players showing the highest internal rotation deficit (13 degrees vs. 6-7 degrees in the other field positions, p = 0.013). This study showed that professional male handball players with a first line position have a significant risk for developing a glenohumeral internal rotation deficit, similar to the phenomenon seen in baseball pitchers.

  6. Enhancing Friction Stir Weldability of 6061-T6 Al and AZ31B Mg Alloys Assisted by External Non-rotational Shoulder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Shude; Huang, Ruofei; Meng, Xiangchen; Zhang, Liguo; Huang, Yongxian

    2017-05-01

    In order to increase cooling rate and then reduce the amounts of intermetallic compounds, external non-rotational shoulder tool system derived from traditional tool in friction stir welding was used to join dissimilar Al and Mg alloys. In this study, based on the external non-rotational shoulder, the weldability of Al and Mg alloys was significantly improved. The non-rotational shoulder tool is propitious to make more materials into weld, increase cooling rate and then reduce material adhesion of rotational pin, obtaining sound joint with smaller flashes and smooth surface. Importantly, the thickness of intermetallic compounds layer is reduced compared with traditional tool. Meanwhile, hardness values of dissimilar joint present uneven distribution, resulting from complex intercalated structures in nugget zone (NZ) featured by intermetallic compound layers and fine recrystallized Mg and Al grains. Compared with traditional tool, non-rotational shoulder is beneficial to higher tensile properties of joint. Due to the intermetallic compound layer formed in the interface of Al-Mg, the welding joint easily fractures at the NZ, presenting the typical brittle fracture mode.

  7. Anterior stability of the reverse shoulder arthroplasty depending on implant configuration and rotator cuff condition.

    PubMed

    Pastor, Marc-Frederic; Kraemer, Manuel; Wellmann, Mathias; Hurschler, Christof; Smith, Tomas

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the stabilizing influence of the rotator cuff as well as the importance of glenosphere and onlay configuration on the anterior stability of the reverse total shoulder replacement (RTSR). A reverse total shoulder replacement was implanted into eight human cadaveric shoulders, and biomechanical testing was performed under three conditions: after implantation of the RTSR, after additional dissection of the subscapularis tendon, and after additional dissection of the infraspinatus and teres minor tendon. Testing was performed in 30° of abduction and three rotational positions: 30° internal rotation, neutral rotation, and 30° external rotation. Furthermore, the 38-mm and 42-mm glenospheres were tested in combination with a standard and a high-mobility humeral onlay. A gradually increased force was applied to the glenohumeral joint in anterior direction until the RTSR dislocated. The 42-mm glenosphere showed superior stability compared with the 38-mm glenosphere. The standard humeral onlay required significantly higher anterior dislocation forces than the more shallow high-mobility onlay. External rotation was the most stable position. Furthermore, isolated detachment of the subscapularis and combined dissection of the infraspinatus, teres minor, and subscapularis tendon increased anterior instability. This study showed superior stability with the 42-mm glenosphere and the more conforming standard onlay. External rotation was the most stable position. Detachment of the subscapularis as well as dissection of the complete rotator cuff decreased anterior stability.

  8. Managing type II and type IV Lauge-Hansen supination external rotation ankle fractures: current orthopaedic practice.

    PubMed

    Kosuge, D D; Mahadevan, D; Chandrasenan, J; Pugh, H

    2010-11-01

    Differentiating supination external rotation (SER) type II and IV ankle injuries is challenging in the absence of a medial malleolar fracture or talar shift on radiographs. The accurate differentiation between a stable SER-II from an unstable SER-IV injury would allow implementation of the appropriate management plan from diagnosis. The aim of this study was to ascertain the practice of orthopaedic surgeons in dealing with these injuries. A postal survey was undertaken on 216 orthopaedic consultants from three regions. In the presence of medial-sided clinical signs (tenderness, swelling, ecchymosis), 22% of consultants would perform surgical fixation. 53% would choose non-operative treatment and the majority would monitor these fractures through serial radiographs. The remaining 25% of consultants would perform an examination under anaesthesia (EUA; 15%), request stress radiographs (9%) or an MRI scan (1%). Without medial-sided signs, 85% would advocate non-operative treatment and, of these, 74% would perform weekly radiographs. Interestingly, 6% would perform immediate surgical fixation. Stress radiographs (6%) and EUAs (2%) were advocated in the remaining group of consultants. Foot and ankle surgeons utilised stress radiographs more frequently and were more likely to proceed to surgical fixation should talar shift be demonstrated. Clinical practice is varied amongst the orthopaedic community. This may lead to unnecessary surgery in SER-II injuries and delay in diagnosis and operative management of SER-IV injuries. We have highlighted the various investigative modalities available that may be used in conjunction with clinical signs to make a more accurate diagnosis.

  9. Weightbearing vs Gravity Stress Radiographs for Stability Evaluation of Supination-External Rotation Fractures of the Ankle.

    PubMed

    Seidel, Angela; Krause, Fabian; Weber, Martin

    2017-07-01

    Isolated lateral malleolar fractures may result from a supination-external rotation (SER) injury of the ankle. Stable fractures maintain tibiotalar congruence due to competent medial restraints and can be treated nonoperatively with excellent functional results and long-term prognosis. Stability might be assessed with either stress radiographs or weightbearing radiographs. A consecutive series of patients with closed SER fractures (presumed AO 44-B1) were prospectively enrolled from 2008 to 2015. Patients with clearly unstable fractures (medial clear space more than 7 mm) on the initial nonweightbearing radiograph were excluded and operated on. All other patients were examined with a gravity stress and a weightbearing anteroposterior radiograph. Borderline instability of the fracture was assumed when the medial clear space was 4 to 7 mm. Those were treated nonoperatively. Of 104 patients with isolated lateral malleolar fractures of the SER type, 14 patients were treated operatively because of clear instability (displacement) on the initial radiographs. Of the nonoperative patients, 44 patients demonstrated borderline instability on the gravity stress but stability on the weightbearing radiograph ("gravity borderline"); the remaining 46 were stable in both tests ("gravity stable"). At an average follow-up of 23 months, no significant differences were seen in the American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society hindfoot score (92 points gravity-borderline group vs 93 points gravity-unstable group), the Foot Functional Index score (11 vs 10 points), the Short Form 36 (SF-36) physical component (86 vs 85 points), and SF-36 mental component (84 vs 81 points). Radiographically, all fractures had healed with anatomic congruity of the ankle. Weightbearing radiographs provided a reliable basis to decide about stability and nonoperative treatment in isolated lateral malleolar fractures of the SER type with excellent clinical and radiographic outcome at short-term follow-up. Gravity

  10. 21 CFR 890.3665 - Congenital hip dislocation abduction splint.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices § 890... abduction splint is a device intended for medical purposes to stabilize the hips of a young child with...

  11. A note on the application of the Prigogine theorem to rotation of tokamak-plasmas in absence of external torques.

    PubMed

    Sonnino, Giorgio; Cardinali, Alessandro; Sonnino, Alberto; Nardone, Pasquale; Steinbrecher, György; Zonca, Fulvio

    2014-03-01

    Rotation of tokamak-plasmas, not at the mechanical equilibrium, is investigated using the Prigogine thermodynamic theorem. This theorem establishes that, for systems confined in rectangular boxes, the global motion of the system with barycentric velocity does not contribute to dissipation. This result, suitably applied to toroidally confined plasmas, suggests that the global barycentric rotations of the plasma, in the toroidal and poloidal directions, are pure reversible processes. In case of negligible viscosity and by supposing the validity of the balance equation for the internal forces, we show that the plasma, even not in the mechanical equilibrium, may freely rotate in the toroidal direction with an angular frequency, which may be higher than the neoclassical estimation. In addition, its toroidal rotation may cause the plasma to rotate globally in the poloidal direction at a speed faster than the expression found by the neoclassical theory. The eventual configuration is attained when the toroidal and poloidal angular frequencies reaches the values that minimize dissipation. The physical interpretation able to explain the reason why some layers of plasma may freely rotate in one direction while, at the same time, others may freely rotate in the opposite direction, is also provided. Invariance properties, herein studied, suggest that the dynamic phase equation might be of the second order in time. We then conclude that a deep and exhaustive study of the invariance properties of the dynamical and thermodynamic equations is the most correct and appropriate way for understanding the triggering mechanism leading to intrinsic plasma-rotation in toroidal magnetic configurations.

  12. Intercultural caring-an abductive model.

    PubMed

    Wikberg, Anita; Eriksson, Katie

    2008-09-01

    The aim of this study was to increase the understanding of caring from a transcultural perspective and to develop the first outline of a theory. The theoretical perspective includes Eriksson's theory of caritative caring. Texts on caring by the transcultural theorists, including Campinha-Bacote, Kim-Godwin, Leininger and Ray, are analysed using content analysis. The overall theme that resulted from this analysis was that caring is a complex whole. Three main categories of caring emerged: inner caring, outer caring and the goal of caring. Inner caring consists of caring is a relationship, and caring and culture are seen in different dimensions. Outer caring refers to caring affected by educational, administrative and social and other structures. The goal of caring consists of caring leading to change towards health and well-being. The main categories include categories and subcategories that are compared with Eriksson's theory of caritative caring. A model for intercultural caring is generated abductively. Caring and culture appear in three dimensions: caring as ontology independent of context; caring as a phenomenon emphasised differently in different cultures; caring as nursing care activities is unique. Caring alleviates suffering and leads to health and well-being. This model describes caring from an intercultural perspective as a mutual but asymmetric relationship between the nurse and the patient, including the patient's family and community. The patient's cultural background and acculturation influence caring. The cultural background, cultural competence and organisation of the nurse also influence caring. Caring is seen as a complex whole. This study integrates Campinha-Bacote's, Kim-Godwin's, Leininger's and Ray's views of caring with Eriksson's caritative caring and presents caring from a transcultural perspective in a new way as a model for intercultural caring, which can benefit nursing care, education, research and administration.

  13. Preoperative Radiographic and CT Findings Predicting Syndesmotic Injuries in Supination-External Rotation-Type Ankle Fractures.

    PubMed

    Choi, Young; Kwon, Soon-Sun; Chung, Chin Youb; Park, Moon Seok; Lee, Seung Yeol; Lee, Kyoung Min

    2014-07-16

    The Lauge-Hansen classification system does not provide sufficient data related to syndesmotic injuries in supination-external rotation (SER)-type ankle fractures. The aim of the present study was to investigate factors helpful for the preoperative detection of syndesmotic injuries in SER-type ankle fractures using radiographs and computed tomography (CT). A cohort of 191 consecutive patients (104 male and eighty-seven female patients with a mean age [and standard deviation] of 50.7 ± 16.4 years) with SER-type ankle fractures who had undergone operative treatment were included. Preoperative ankle radiographs and CT imaging scans were made for all patients, and clinical data, including age, sex, and mechanism of injury (high or low-energy trauma), were collected. Patients were divided into two groups: the stable syndesmotic group and the unstable syndesmotic group, with a positive intraoperative lateral stress test leading to syndesmotic screw fixation. Fracture height, fracture length, medial joint space, extent of fracture, and bone attenuation were measured on radiographs and CT images and were compared between the groups. Binary logistic regression analysis was performed to identify the factors that significantly contributed to unstable syndesmotic injuries. Receiver operating characteristic curves were calculated, and cutoff values were suggested to predict unstable syndesmotic injuries on preoperative imaging measurements. Of the 191 patents with a SER-type ankle fracture, thirty-eight (19.9%) had a concurrent unstable syndesmotic injury. Age, sex, mechanism of injury, fracture height, medial joint space, and bone attenuation were significantly different between the two groups. In the binary logistic analysis, fracture height, medial joint space, and bone attenuation were found to be significant factors contributing to unstable syndesmotic injuries. The cutoff values for predicting unstable syndesmotic injuries were a fracture height of >3 mm and a medial

  14. Internal impingement in the etiology of rotator cuff tendinosis revisited.

    PubMed

    Budoff, Jeffrey E; Nirschl, Robert P; Ilahi, Omer A; Rodin, Dennis M

    2003-10-01

    The theory of internal impingement holds that, in overhead athletes, repeated contact between the undersurface of the rotator cuff and the posterosuperior glenoid rim leads to articular-sided partial-thickness rotator cuff tears and superior labral lesions. However, we have noted this same constellation of lesions in our general patient population. These recreational athletic patients do not routinely assume the position of extreme abduction and external rotation, and thus are unlikely to experience significant internal impingement forces. The goal of this study was to document the prevalence of superior labral lesions in patients being treated for partial-thickness undersurface rotator cuff tears. Retrospective case series. We retrospectively reviewed the records of 75 shoulders arthroscopically treated for partial-thickness articular-sided rotator cuff tears. With the exception of one professional tennis player, no patients were playing sports at a professional or major college level. No professional or collegiate throwing athletes were included. The prevalence of these lesions and their association with recreational athletics was noted. We found that 55 of 75 (73.3%) shoulders with articular-sided partial-thickness rotator cuff tears also had superior labral lesions. A statistically significant increased prevalence of superior labral lesions in the dominant shoulder was seen (P =.03). In addition, our patients who engaged in overhand throwing had significantly fewer superior labral lesions in the dominant shoulders than did nonthrowers (P =.017). The "kissing lesions" of undersurface rotator cuff tears and posterosuperior labral damage may be explained by mechanisms other than "internal impingement."

  15. Evaluation of Hip Internal and External Rotation Range of Motion as an Injury Risk Factor for Hip, Abdominal and Groin Injuries in Professional Baseball Players

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Richard; Zhou, Hanbing; Thompson, Matthew; Dawson, Courtney; Nguyen, Joseph; Coleman, Struan

    2015-01-01

    Normal hip range of motion (ROM) is essential in running and transfer of energy from lower to upper extremities during overhead throwing. Dysfunctional hip ROM may alter lower extremity kinematics and predispose athletes to hip and groin injuries. The purpose of this study is characterize hip internal/external ROM (Arc) and its effect on the risk of hip, hamstring, and groin injuries in professional baseball players. Bilateral hip internal and external ROM was measured on all baseball players (N=201) in one professional organization (major and minor league) during spring training. Players were organized according to their respective positions. All injuries were documented prospectively for an entire MLB season (2010 to 2011). Data was analyzed according to position and injuries during the season. Total number of players (N=201) with an average age of 24±3.6 (range=17-37). Both pitchers (N=93) and catchers (N=22) had significantly decreased mean hip internal rotation and overall hip arc of motion compared to the positional players (N=86). Players with hip, groin, and hamstring injury also had decreased hip rotation arc when compared to the normal group. Overall, there is a correlation between decreased hip internal rotation and total arc of motion with hip, hamstring, and groin injuries. PMID:26793294

  16. Suture Button Fixation Versus Syndesmotic Screws in Supination-External Rotation Type 4 Injuries: A Cost-Effectiveness Analysis.

    PubMed

    Neary, Kaitlin C; Mormino, Matthew A; Wang, Hongmei

    2017-01-01

    In stress-positive, unstable supination-external rotation type 4 (SER IV) ankle fractures, implant selection for syndesmotic fixation is a debated topic. Among the available syndesmotic fixation methods, the metallic screw and the suture button have been routinely compared in the literature. In addition to strength of fixation and ability to anatomically restore the syndesmosis, costs associated with implant use have recently been called into question. This study aimed to examine the cost-effectiveness of the suture button and determine whether suture button fixation is more cost-effective than two 3.5-mm syndesmotic screws not removed on a routine postoperative basis. Economic and decision analysis; Level of evidence, 2. Studies with the highest evidence levels in the available literature were used to estimate the hardware removal and failure rates for syndesmotic screws and suture button fixation. Costs were determined by examining the average costs for patients who underwent surgery for unstable SER IV ankle fractures at a single level-1 trauma institution. A decision analysis model that allowed comparison of the 2 fixation methods was developed. Using a 20% screw hardware removal rate and a 4% suture button hardware removal rate, the total cost for 2 syndesmotic screws was US$20,836 and the total effectiveness was 5.846. This yielded a total cost of $3564 per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) over an 8-year time period. The total cost for suture button fixation was $19,354 and the total effectiveness was 5.904, resulting in a total cost of $3294 per QALY over the same time period. A sensitivity analysis was then conducted to assess suture button fixation costs as well as screw and suture button hardware removal rates. Other possible treatment scenarios were also examined, including 1 screw and 2 suture buttons for operative fixation of the syndesmosis. To become more cost-effective, the screw hardware removal rate would have to be reduced to less than 10

  17. Does infantile abduction deficit indicate duane retraction syndrome until disproven?

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae Hyoung; Hwang, Jeong-Min

    2014-11-01

    Duane retraction syndrome consists of abduction deficit and palpebral fissure narrowing, upshoots, or downshoots on adduction. Infants with abduction deficit should be considered to have Duane retraction syndrome until disproven, because congenital abducens nerve palsy is extremely rare. The abducens nerve on the affected side is absent in type 1 Duane retraction syndrome and in some type 3 patients. The authors present a 7-month-old girl who showed limitation of abduction simulating Duane retraction syndrome. High-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed atrophic lateral rectus and present abducens nerve. This report is important because this case showed that congenital abducens nerve palsy exists, although it is extremely rare, and high-resolution MRI could be pivotal for the differentiation of Duane retraction syndrome and congenital abducens nerve palsy in infancy. © The Author(s) 2014.

  18. Inverted u-shaped purse and rotation flaps: correcting the inferoposterior deformity of reconstructed ears after canaloplasty of the external auditory meatus.

    PubMed

    Ji, Chenyang; Zhang, Jinming; An, Geng; Liang, Weiqiang; Pan, Shujuan; Chen, Yuhong; Wei, Zhe; Zhang, Ganlin

    2012-06-01

    After patients with congenital microtia receive external ear canal plasty, the mastoid area usually has insufficient space for ear reconstruction. Hence, after ear reconstruction, an inferoposterior position deformity of the ear appears to some extent. Using inverted U-shaped purse and rotation flaps can correct this deformity effectively. From May of 2009 to September of 2011, five patients received the described procedures in the authors' department. Inverted U-shaped purse and rotation flaps were used for all the patients. The inverted U-shaped purse flap was used to reduce the area of the canal orifice and to lower the position, and the rotation flap was applied to turn the ear in a more superoposterior position. Two patients also received full-thickness skin grafting to cover the secondary wound. In four patients, V-Y-plasty or Z-plasty was used to adjust the flap transition. For the five patients, the distances between the ear antihelix and canal orifice were shortened, and the areas of the canal orifice were diminished. The retroversion of the auricle was corrected in various degrees, and the angles of the long axis of the auricle and the horizontal line were increased an average of 14.4°. The vertical distance between the top of the helix and the center of the canal orifice was increased an average of 15.2 mm. A slight dog ear deformity in front of the crus of the helix was left after the operation, but it was alleviated in the follow-up period. By using inverted U-shaped purse and rotation flaps, the inferoposterior position deformity of the reconstructed ear after external ear canal plasty in congenital microtia can be resolved effectively. This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each article. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to the Table of Contents or the online Instructions to Authors http://www.springer.com/00266.

  19. Abductive Science Inquiry Using Mobile Devices in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahmed, Sohaib; Parsons, David

    2013-01-01

    Recent advancements in digital technology have attracted the interest of educators and researchers to develop technology-assisted inquiry-based learning environments in the domain of school science education. Traditionally, school science education has followed deductive and inductive forms of inquiry investigation, while the abductive form of…

  20. 22 CFR 40.103 - International child abduction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false International child abduction. 40.103 Section... IMMIGRANTS UNDER THE IMMIGRATION AND NATIONALITY ACT, AS AMENDED Miscellaneous § 40.103 International child... under such paragraph if the U.S. citizen child in question is physically located in a foreign state...

  1. 22 CFR 40.103 - International child abduction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false International child abduction. 40.103 Section... IMMIGRANTS UNDER THE IMMIGRATION AND NATIONALITY ACT, AS AMENDED Miscellaneous § 40.103 International child... under such paragraph if the U.S. citizen child in question is physically located in a foreign state...

  2. 22 CFR 40.103 - International child abduction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false International child abduction. 40.103 Section... IMMIGRANTS UNDER THE IMMIGRATION AND NATIONALITY ACT, AS AMENDED Miscellaneous § 40.103 International child... under such paragraph if the U.S. citizen child in question is physically located in a foreign state...

  3. 22 CFR 40.103 - International child abduction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false International child abduction. 40.103 Section... IMMIGRANTS UNDER THE IMMIGRATION AND NATIONALITY ACT, AS AMENDED Miscellaneous § 40.103 International child... under such paragraph if the U.S. citizen child in question is physically located in a foreign state...

  4. 22 CFR 40.103 - International child abduction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false International child abduction. 40.103 Section... IMMIGRANTS UNDER THE IMMIGRATION AND NATIONALITY ACT, AS AMENDED Miscellaneous § 40.103 International child... under such paragraph if the U.S. citizen child in question is physically located in a foreign state...

  5. Theorising and Practitioners in HRD: The Role of Abductive Reasoning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gold, Jeff; Walton, John; Cureton, Peter; Anderson, Lisa

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to argue that abductive reasoning is a typical but usually unrecognised process used by HRD scholars and practitioners alike. Design/methodology/approach: This is a conceptual paper that explores recent criticism of traditional views of theory-building, based on the privileging of scientific theorising, which…

  6. Teaching Abduction-Prevention Skills to Children with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunby, Kristin V.; Carr, James E.; LeBlanc, Linda A.

    2010-01-01

    Three children with autism were taught abduction-prevention skills using behavioral skills training with in situ feedback. All children acquired the skills, which were maintained at a 1-month follow-up assessment. In addition, 1 of the children demonstrated the skills during a stimulus generalization probe in a community setting. (Contains 1…

  7. 21 CFR 890.3665 - Congenital hip dislocation abduction splint.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Congenital hip dislocation abduction splint. 890.3665 Section 890.3665 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices § 890...

  8. 21 CFR 890.3665 - Congenital hip dislocation abduction splint.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Congenital hip dislocation abduction splint. 890.3665 Section 890.3665 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices § 890...

  9. 21 CFR 890.3665 - Congenital hip dislocation abduction splint.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Congenital hip dislocation abduction splint. 890.3665 Section 890.3665 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices § 890...

  10. 21 CFR 890.3665 - Congenital hip dislocation abduction splint.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Congenital hip dislocation abduction splint. 890.3665 Section 890.3665 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices § 890...

  11. Internal- and External-Rotation Peak Toque in Little League Baseball Players With Subacromial Impingement Syndrome: Improved by Closed Kinetic Chain Shoulder Training.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong-Rour; Kim, Laurentius Jongsoon

    2016-08-01

    Many studies have explored closed kinetic chain (CKC) shoulder exercises (SEs) with a sling because they are safer and more effective than open-chain exercises, especially in early stages of treatment. However, the application of CKC SE in youth baseball players has rarely been attempted, although teenage baseball players also experience shoulder pain. To investigate the effects of CKC SE on the peak torque of shoulder internal rotation (IR) and external rotation (ER) in youth baseball players. Single-group pretest, posttest. Biomechanics laboratory. 23 Little League Baseball players with subacromial impingement syndrome. The CKC SE with a sling was CKC shoulder-flexion exercise, extension exercise, IR exercise, and ER exercise. This exercise regimen was conducted 2 or 3 times/wk for 8 wk. The peak torque of shoulder IR and ER was measured using an isokinetic dynamometer. Concentric shoulder rotation was performed, with 5 repetitions at an angular velocity of 60°/s and 15 at 180°/s. The IR and ER peak torque significantly increased at each angular velocity after the exercise program. In particular, the increase in IR and ER peak torque values was statistically significant at an angular velocity of 180°/s. CKC SE was effective in increasing shoulder IR and ER strength, demonstrating its potential benefits in the prevention and treatment of shoulder injury. In addition, increased IR peak torque appears to improve throwing velocity in baseball players.

  12. Foreign Affairs: Specific Action Plan Needed to Improve Response to Parental Child Abductions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-03-01

    the child or prejudice to interested parties; (3) secure the voluntary return of the child or to bring about an amicable resolution of the issues, and...FOREIGN AFFAIRS Specific Action Plan Needed to Improve Response to Parental Child Abductions DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A Approved for Public Release...International Parental Child Abduction 17 Page 1 GAO/NSIAD-00-10 Parental Child Abduction Page 2 GAO/NSIAD-00-10 Parental Child Abduction GAP

  13. Parental Abduction from the Perspective of the Victims: Implications for Counselors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibbs, Mary Jo L.

    2009-01-01

    This is a descriptive study that examined parental abductions from the perspective of the abductee. The results will help counseling professionals better to understand the psychological consequences of parental abduction, coping mechanisms that were used by the abducted children and counseling techniques and strategies that helped the children…

  14. 22 CFR 94.6 - Procedures for children abducted to the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Procedures for children abducted to the United... CHILD ABDUCTION § 94.6 Procedures for children abducted to the United States. The U.S. Central Authority... to all Hague Convention applications seeking the return of children wrongfully removed to or retained...

  15. 22 CFR 94.7 - Procedures for children abducted from the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Procedures for children abducted from the United States. 94.7 Section 94.7 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE LEGAL AND RELATED SERVICES INTERNATIONAL CHILD ABDUCTION § 94.7 Procedures for children abducted from the United States. Upon receipt of an...

  16. The Abduction of Children by Strangers and Nonfamily Members: Estimating the Incidence Using Multiple Methods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finkelhor, David; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Used a national survey of households with children, a national survey of police records, and an analysis of FBI homicide data to estimate the incidence of nonfamily abductions of children. Offers a definition of abduction, analyzes problems in compiling abduction statistics, and discusses public policy on prevention and response. (RJM)

  17. Unexpected angular or rotational deformity after corrective osteotomy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Codman’s paradox reveals a misunderstanding of geometry in orthopedic practice. Physicians often encounter situations that cannot be understood intuitively during orthopedic interventions such as corrective osteotomy. Occasionally, unexpected angular or rotational deformity occurs during surgery. This study aimed to draw the attention of orthopedic surgeons toward the concepts of orientation and rotation and demonstrate the potential for unexpected deformity after orthopedic interventions. This study focused on three situations: shoulder arthrodesis, femoral varization derotational osteotomy, and femoral derotation osteotomy. Methods First, a shoulder model was generated to calculate unexpected rotational deformity to demonstrate Codman’s paradox. Second, femoral varization derotational osteotomy was simulated using a cylinder model. Third, a reconstructed femoral model was used to calculate unexpected angular or rotational deformity during femoral derotation osteotomy. Results Unexpected external rotation was found after forward elevation and abduction of the shoulder joint. In the varization and derotation model, closed-wedge osteotomy and additional derotation resulted in an unexpected extension and valgus deformity, namely, under-correction of coxa valga. After femoral derotational osteotomy, varization and extension of the distal fragment occurred, although the extension was negligible. Conclusions Surgeons should be aware of unexpected angular deformity after surgical procedure involving bony areas. The degree of deformity differs depending on the context of the surgical procedure. However, this study reveals that notable deformities can be expected during orthopedic procedures such as femoral varization derotational osteotomy. PMID:24886469

  18. Buckling delamination of the circular sandwich plate with piezoelectric face and elastic core layers under rotationally symmetric external pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbarov, Surkay D.; Cafarova, Fazile I.; Yahnioglu, Nazmiye

    2017-02-01

    The axisymmetric buckling delamination of the piezoelectric circular sandwich plate with piezoelectric face and elastic (metal) core layers around the interface penny-shaped cracks is investigated. The case is considered where short-circuit conditions with respect to the electrical potential on the upper and lower and also lateral surfaces of face layers are satisfied. It is assumed that the edge surfaces of the cracks have an infinitesimal rotationally symmetric initial imperfection and the development of this imperfection with rotationally symmetric compressive forces acting on the lateral surface of the plate is studied by employing the exact geometrically non-linear field equations and relations of electro-elasticity for piezoelectric materials. Solution to the considered nonlinear problem is reduced to solution of the series boundary value problems derived by applying the linearization procedure with respect to small imperfection of the sought values. Numerical results reveal the effect of piezoelectricity as well as geometrical and material parameters on the critical values are determined numerically by employing finite element method (FEM).

  19. Subscapularis slide correction of the shoulder internal rotation contracture after brachial plexus birth injury: technique and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Immerman, Igor; Valencia, Herbert; DiTaranto, Patricia; DelSole, Edward M; Glait, Sergio; Price, Andrew E; Grossman, John A I

    2013-03-01

    Internal rotation contracture is the most common shoulder deformity in patients with brachial plexus birth injury. The purpose of this investigation is to describe the indications, technique, and results of the subscapularis slide procedure. The technique involves the release of the subscapularis muscle origin off the scapula, with preservation of anterior shoulder structures. A standard postoperative protocol is used in all patients and includes a modified shoulder spica with the shoulder held in 60 degrees of external rotation and 30 degrees of abduction, aggressive occupational and physical therapy, and subsequent shoulder manipulation under anesthesia with botulinum toxin injections as needed. Seventy-one patients at 2 institutions treated with subscapularis slide between 1997 and 2010, with minimum follow-up of 39.2 months, were identified. Patients were divided into 5 groups based on the index procedure performed: subscapularis slide alone (group 1); subscapularis slide with a simultaneous microsurgical reconstruction (group 2); primary microsurgical brachial plexus reconstruction followed later by a subscapularis slide (group 3); primary microsurgical brachial plexus reconstruction followed later by a subscapularis slide combined with tendon transfers for shoulder external rotation (group 4); and subscapularis slide with simultaneous tendon transfers, with no prior brachial plexus surgery (group 5). Full passive external rotation equivalent to the contralateral side was achieved in the operating room in all cases. No cases resulted in anterior instability or internal rotation deficit. Internal rotation contracture of the shoulder after brachial plexus birth injury can be effectively managed with the technique of subscapularis slide.

  20. Correlation of glenohumeral internal rotation deficit and total rotational motion to shoulder injuries in professional baseball pitchers.

    PubMed

    Wilk, Kevin E; Macrina, Leonard C; Fleisig, Glenn S; Porterfield, Ronald; Simpson, Charles D; Harker, Paul; Paparesta, Nick; Andrews, James R

    2011-02-01

    Glenohumeral internal rotation deficit (GIRD) indicates a 20° or greater loss of internal rotation of the throwing shoulder compared with the nondominant shoulder. To determine whether GIRD and a deficit in total rotational motion (external rotation + internal rotation) compared with the nonthrowing shoulder correlate with shoulder injuries in professional baseball pitchers. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Over 3 competitive seasons (2005 to 2007), passive range of motion measurements were evaluated on the dominant and nondominant shoulders for 170 pitcher-seasons. This included 122 professional pitchers during the 3 seasons of data collection, in which some pitchers were measured during multiple seasons. Ranges of motion were measured with a bubble goniometer during the preseason, by the same examiner each year. External and internal rotation of the glenohumeral joint was assessed with the participant supine and the arm abducted 90° in the plane of the scapula, with the scapula stabilized anteriorly at the coracoid process. The reproducibility of the test methods had an intraclass correlation coefficient of .81. Days in which the player was unable to participate because of injury or surgery were recorded during the season by the medical staff of the team and defined as an injury. Pitchers with GIRD (n = 40) were nearly twice as likely to be injured as those without but without statistical significance (P = .17). Pitchers with total rotational motion deficit greater than 5° had a higher rate of injury. Minor league pitchers were more likely than major league pitchers to be injured. However, when players were injured, major league pitchers missed a significantly greater number of games than minor league pitchers. Compared with pitchers without GIRD, pitchers with GIRD appear to be at a higher risk for injury and shoulder surgery.

  1. Ultrasensitive detection of nitric oxide at 5.33 μm by using external cavity quantum cascade laser-based Faraday rotation spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lewicki, Rafał; Doty, James H.; Curl, Robert F.; Tittel, Frank K.; Wysocki, Gerard

    2009-01-01

    A transportable prototype Faraday rotation spectroscopic system based on a tunable external cavity quantum cascade laser has been developed for ultrasensitive detection of nitric oxide (NO). A broadly tunable laser source allows targeting the optimum Q3/2(3/2) molecular transition at 1875.81 cm−1 of the NO fundamental band. For an active optical path of 44 cm and 1-s lock-in time constant minimum NO detection limits (1σ) of 4.3 parts per billion by volume (ppbv) and 0.38 ppbv are obtained by using a thermoelectrically cooled mercury–cadmium–telluride photodetector and liquid nitrogen-cooled indium–antimonide photodetector, respectively. Laboratory performance evaluation and results of continuous, unattended monitoring of atmospheric NO concentration levels are reported. PMID:19625625

  2. Muscle activity response to external moment during single-leg drop landing in young basketball players: the importance of biceps femoris in reducing internal rotation of knee during landing.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Meguru; Sato, Haruhiko; Takahira, Naonobu

    2012-01-01

    Internal tibial rotation with the knee close to full extension combined with valgus collapse during drop landing generally results in non-contact anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between internal rotation of the knee and muscle activity from internal and external rotator muscles, and between the internal rotation of knee and externally applied loads on the knee during landing in collegiate basketball players. Our hypothesis was that the activity of biceps femoris muscle would be an important factor reducing internal knee rotation during landing. The subjects were 10 collegiate basketball students: 5 females and 5 males. The subjects performed a single-leg drop landing from a 25-cm height. Femoral and tibial kinematics were measured using a 3D optoelectronic tracking system during the drop landings, and then the knee angular motions were determined. Ground reaction forces and muscle activation patterns (lateral hamstring and medial hamstring) were simultaneously measured and computed. Results indicated that lower peak internal tibial rotation angle at the time of landing was associated with greater lateral hamstring activity (r = -0.623, p < 0.001). When gender was considered, the statistically significant correlation remained only in females. There was no association between the peak internal tibial rotation angle and the knee internal rotation moment. Control of muscle activity in the lateral to medial hamstring would be an important factor in generating sufficient force to inhibit excessive internal rotation during landing. Strengthening the biceps femoris might mitigate the higher incidence of non-contact ACL injury in female athletes. Key pointsLower activity of the external rotator muscle of the knee, which inhibits internal rotation of the knee, may be the reason why females tend to show a large internal rotation of the knee during drop landing.Externally applied internal rotation moment of

  3. Relation Between Subacromial Bursitis on Ultrasonography and Efficacy of Subacromial Corticosteroid Injection in Rotator Cuff Disease: A Prospective Comparison Study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Doo-Hyung; Hong, Ji Yeon; Lee, Michael Young; Kwack, Kyu-Sung; Yoon, Seung-Hyun

    2017-05-01

    To evaluate the correlations between subacromial bursitis (bursal thickening and effusion) on ultrasonography and its response to subacromial corticosteroid injection in patients with rotator cuff disease. Prospective, longitudinal comparison study. University-affiliated tertiary care hospital. Patients with rotator cuff disease (N=69) were classified into 3 groups based on ultrasonographic findings; (1) normative bursa group (group 1, n=23): bursa and effusion thickness <1mm; (2) bursa thickening group (group 2, n=22): bursa thickness >2mm and effusion thickness <1mm; and (3) bursa effusion group (group 3, n=24): bursa thickness <1mm and effusion thickness >2mm. A single subacromial injection with 20mg of triamcinolone acetonide. Visual analog scale (VAS) of shoulder pain, Shoulder Disability Questionnaire (SDQ), angles of active shoulder range of motion (flexion, abduction, external rotation, and internal rotation), and bursa and effusion thickness at pre- and posttreatment at week 8. There were no significant differences between the 3 groups in demographic characteristics pretreatment. Groups 2 and 3 showed a significant difference compared with group 1 in changes on the VAS and abduction; group 3 showed a significant difference compared with group 1 in changes of the SDQ, internal rotation, and external rotation; and all groups showed significant differences when compared with each other (groups 1 and 3, 2 and 3, and 1 and 2) in changes of thickness. A patient with ultrasonographic observation of subacromial bursitis, instead of normative bursa, can expect better outcome with subacromial corticosteroid injection. Therefore, we recommend a careful selection of patients using ultrasonography prior to injection. Copyright © 2016 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. A prospective randomized controlled trial comparing occupational therapy with home-based exercises in conservative treatment of rotator cuff tears.

    PubMed

    Krischak, Gert; Gebhard, Florian; Reichel, Heiko; Friemert, Benedikt; Schneider, Florian; Fisser, Christoph; Kaluscha, Rainer; Kraus, Michael

    2013-09-01

    This pilot study evaluates the outcome after occupational therapy, compared to home-based exercises in the conservative treatment of patients with full thickness rotator cuff tears. Forty-three adult subjects (range, 18-75 years), who had a full thickness rupture of the rotator cuff which was verified by magnetic imaging tomography, with clinical signs of a chronic rotator cuff impingement, and who were available for follow-up, were randomized to occupational therapy or to independent home-based exercises using a booklet. After drop-out, 38 patients were available for full examination at follow-up. Before therapy and after 2 months of conservative treatment, pain intensity, the Constant-Murley score, isokinetic strength testing in abduction and external rotation, functional limitation, clinical shoulder tests and health-related quality of life (EQ-5D) were evaluated. Two-thirds of the patients improved in clinical shoulder tests, regardless of the therapy group. There were no significant differences between the groups with reference to pain, range of motion, maximum peak force (abduction, external rotation), the Constant-Murley score, and the EQ-5D index. The only significant difference observed was the improvement in the self-assessed health- related quality of life (EQ-5D VAS) favoring home-based exercises. Home-based exercise, on the basis of an illustrated booklet with exercises twice a day, supplies comparable results to formal occupational therapy in the conservative treatment of rotator cuff tears. The results of this pilot study suggest some potential advantages related to psychological benefits using home-based treatment. Copyright © 2013 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Diagnostic accuracy of the gravity stress test and clinical signs in cases of isolated supination-external rotation-type lateral malleolar fractures.

    PubMed

    Nortunen, S; Flinkkilä, T; Lantto, I; Kortekangas, T; Niinimäki, J; Ohtonen, P; Pakarinen, H

    2015-08-01

    We prospectively assessed the diagnostic accuracy of the gravity stress test and clinical findings to evaluate the stability of the ankle mortise in patients with supination-external rotation-type fractures of the lateral malleolus without widening of the medial clear space. The cohort included 79 patients with a mean age of 44 years (16 to 82). Two surgeons assessed medial tenderness, swelling and ecchymosis and performed the external rotation (ER) stress test (a reference standard). A diagnostic radiographer performed the gravity stress test. For the gravity stress test, the positive likelihood ratio (LR) was 5.80 with a 95% confidence interval (CI) of 2.75 to 12.27, and the negative LR was 0.15 (95% CI 0.07 to 0.35), suggesting a moderate change from the pre-test probability. Medial tenderness, both alone and in combination with swelling and/or ecchymosis, indicated a small change (positive LR, 2.74 to 3.25; negative LR, 0.38 to 0.47), whereas swelling and ecchymosis indicated only minimal changes (positive LR, 1.41 to 1.65; negative LR, 0.38 to 0.47). In conclusion, when gravity stress test results are in agreement with clinical findings, the result is likely to predict stability of the ankle mortise with an accuracy equivalent to ER stress test results. When clinical examination suggests a medial-side injury, however, the gravity stress test may give a false negative result. ©2015 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  6. Working Notes of the 1990 Spring Symposium on Automated Abduction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-09-27

    possibilities for abstracting the leaf nodes in using apprenticeship learning techniques. In LTCAI.E the proof tree. Morgan Kaufmann, 1987. A detailed...ibm.com Abstract planation process and compute particular operational A major limitation of explanation-based learn - descriptions of the target...for the learning that would be difficult or impos- 3n educated, somewhat abstract guess at why the pro- sible using abduction. I position is likely to

  7. [Effectiveness comparison of flexible fixation and rigid fixation in treatment of ankle pronation-external rotation fractures with distal tibiofibular syndesmosis].

    PubMed

    Li, Yuewei; Zhang, Minghui; Li, Xiaorong; Chen, Xiaoyong; Deng, Jianlong

    2017-07-01

    To compare the effectiveness of flexible fixation and rigid fixation in the treatment of ankle pronation-external rotation fractures with distal tibiofibular syndesmosis. A retrospective analysis was made on the clinical data of 50 patients with ankle pronation-external rotation fractures and distal tibiofibular syndesmosis treated between January 2013 and December 2015. Suture-button fixation was used in 23 patients (flexible fixation group) and cortical screw fixation in 27 patients (rigid fixation group). There was no significant difference in age, gender, weight, side, fracture type, and time from trauma to surgery between 2 groups ( P >0.05). The operation time, medial clear space (MCS), tibiofibular clear space (TFCS), tibiofibular overlap (TFO), American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) score, and Foot and Ankle Disability Index (FADI) score were compared between 2 groups. The operation time was (83.0±9.1) minutes in the flexible fixation group and was (79.6±13.1) minutes in the rigid fixation group, showing no significant difference ( t =1.052, P =0.265). All patients achieved healing of incision by first intention. The patients were followed up 12-20 months (mean, 14 months). The X-ray films showed good healing of fracture in 2 groups. There was no screw fracture, delayed union or nounion. The fracture healing time was (12.1±2.5) months in the flexible fixation group and was (11.3±3.2) months in the rigid fixation group, showing no significant difference between 2 groups ( t =1.024, P =0.192). Reduction loss occurred after removal of screw in 2 cases of the rigid fixation group. At last follow-up, there was no significant difference in MCS, TFCS, TFO, AOFAS score and FADI score between 2 groups ( P >0.05). Suture-button fixation has similar effectiveness to screw fixation in ankle function and imaging findings, and flexible fixation has lower risk of reduction loss of distal tibiofibular syndesmosis than rigid fixation.

  8. Role of the trochlear nerve in eye abduction and frontal vision of the red-eared slider turtle (Trachemys scripta elegans).

    PubMed

    Dearworth, J R; Ashworth, A L; Kaye, J M; Bednarz, D T; Blaum, J F; Vacca, J M; McNeish, J E; Higgins, K A; Michael, C L; Skrobola, M G; Jones, M S; Ariel, M

    2013-10-15

    Horizontal head rotation evokes significant responses from trochlear motoneurons of turtle that suggests they have a functional role in abduction of the eyes like that in frontal-eyed mammals. The finding is unexpected given that the turtle is generally considered lateral-eyed and assumed to have eye movements instead like that of lateral-eyed mammals, in which innervation of the superior oblique muscle by the trochlear nerve (nIV) produces intorsion, elevation, and adduction (not abduction). Using an isolated turtle head preparation with the brain removed, glass suction electrodes were used to stimulate nIV with trains of current pulses. Eyes were monitored via an infrared camera with the head placed in a gimble to quantify eye rotations and their directions. Stimulations of nIV evoked intorsion, elevation, and abduction. Dissection of the superior oblique muscle identified lines of action and a location of insertion on the eye, which supported kinematics evoked by nIV stimulation. Eye positions in alert behaving turtles with their head extended were compared with that when their heads were retracted in the carapace. When the head was retracted, there was a reduction in interpupillary distance and an increase in binocular overlap. Occlusion of peripheral fields by the carapace forces the turtle to a more frontal-eyed state, perhaps the reason for the action of abduction by the superior oblique muscle. These findings support why trochlear motoneurons in turtle respond in the same way as abducens motoneurons to horizontal rotations, an unusual characteristic of vestibulo-ocular physiology in comparison with other mammalian lateral-eyed species. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Nonsurgical treatment to regain hip abduction motion in Perthes disease: a retrospective review.

    PubMed

    Carney, Brian T; Minter, Christin L

    2004-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to document the ability of a nonsurgical program to improve restricted passive hip abduction in children with Perthes disease. Containment as a form of treatment was recommended if passive hip abduction of 30 degrees or more could be achieved. Medical records and radiographs were retrospectively reviewed for 74 children. Age at admission and onset, side, length of stay, and measurement of passive hip abduction at admission/discharge were recorded. The average increase in abduction with the hip extended was 13 degrees. Forty-two children achieved 30 degrees or more of abduction with the hip extended. Average length of stay was 13 days. Management of restricted abduction in an inpatient setting can allow consideration of containment in 61% of children previously not thought to have the required motion.

  10. Context as Relevance-Driven Abduction and Charitable Satisficing

    PubMed Central

    Attardo, Salvatore

    2016-01-01

    It has been widely assumed that the full meaning of a linguistic expression can be grasped only within a situation, the context of the utterance. There is even agreement that certain factors within the situation are particularly significant, including gestures and facial expressions of the participants, their social roles, the setting of the exchange, the objects surrounding the participants, the linguistic, cultural and educational backgrounds of the participants, their beliefs, including those concerning the situation, the social procedures and conventions that regulate the situation. Finally, there is some agreement that context is dynamic, reflexive (the speakers are mutually aware of their beliefs), not limited to linguistics actions, and last but not least, a psychological construct. This definition of context is not (very) controversial, but it leaves out two major problems, which will be addressed in this paper: how is context arrived at? And, since a perfectly natural interpretation of the above definition could be that the context of each utterance is the entire universe, how is the relevant context delimited? Four related concepts will provide the answer to both questions: abductive reasoning, driven by relevance and cooperation, and bounded rationality and the principle of charity. Simply put, context is derived abductively by the speakers assuming that for the speakers to behave the way they behave and do so rationally, a given context must be available to them. The context is bounded by the simple requirement that speakers not try to optimize their interpretation/calculation, but rather satisfice, i.e., find the first acceptable solution and by the need to follow the principle of charity, which forces intersubjective agreement. Thus, abductive reasoning and bounded rationality will be shown to be sufficient to calculate the relevant context of utterances (or other rationality-driven interactions) and to effectively delimit the potentially infinite

  11. Context as Relevance-Driven Abduction and Charitable Satisficing.

    PubMed

    Attardo, Salvatore

    2016-01-01

    It has been widely assumed that the full meaning of a linguistic expression can be grasped only within a situation, the context of the utterance. There is even agreement that certain factors within the situation are particularly significant, including gestures and facial expressions of the participants, their social roles, the setting of the exchange, the objects surrounding the participants, the linguistic, cultural and educational backgrounds of the participants, their beliefs, including those concerning the situation, the social procedures and conventions that regulate the situation. Finally, there is some agreement that context is dynamic, reflexive (the speakers are mutually aware of their beliefs), not limited to linguistics actions, and last but not least, a psychological construct. This definition of context is not (very) controversial, but it leaves out two major problems, which will be addressed in this paper: how is context arrived at? And, since a perfectly natural interpretation of the above definition could be that the context of each utterance is the entire universe, how is the relevant context delimited? Four related concepts will provide the answer to both questions: abductive reasoning, driven by relevance and cooperation, and bounded rationality and the principle of charity. Simply put, context is derived abductively by the speakers assuming that for the speakers to behave the way they behave and do so rationally, a given context must be available to them. The context is bounded by the simple requirement that speakers not try to optimize their interpretation/calculation, but rather satisfice, i.e., find the first acceptable solution and by the need to follow the principle of charity, which forces intersubjective agreement. Thus, abductive reasoning and bounded rationality will be shown to be sufficient to calculate the relevant context of utterances (or other rationality-driven interactions) and to effectively delimit the potentially infinite

  12. The all-too-flexible abductive method: ATOM's normative status.

    PubMed

    Romeijn, Jan-Willem

    2008-09-01

    The author discusses the abductive theory of method (ATOM) by Brian Haig from a philosophical perspective, connecting his theory with a number of issues and trends in contemporary philosophy of science. It is argued that as it stands, the methodology presented by Haig is too permissive. Both the use of analogical reasoning and the application of exploratory factor analysis leave us with too many candidate theories to choose from, and explanatory coherence cannot be expected to save the day. The author ends with some suggestions to remedy the permissiveness and lack of normative force in ATOM, deriving from the experimental practice within which psychological data are produced.

  13. Every Mass or Mass Group When Created Will have No Motion, Linear, Rotational or Vibratory Motion, Singly or in Some Combination, Which May Be Later Modified by External Forces--A Natural Law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brekke, Stewart

    2010-03-01

    Every mass or mass group, from atoms and molecules to stars and galaxies,has no motion, is vibrating, rotating,or moving linearly, singularly or in some combination. When created, the excess energy of creation will generate a vibration, rotation and/or linear motion besides the mass or mass group. Curvilinear or orbital motion is linear motion in an external force field. External forces, such as photon, molecular or stellar collisions may over time modify the inital rotational, vibratory or linear motions of the mass of mass group. The energy equation for each mass or mass group is E=mc^2 + 1/2mv^2 + 1/2I2̂+ 1/2kx0^2 + WG+ WE+ WM.

  14. Glenohumeral joint translation and muscle activity in patients with symptomatic rotator cuff pathology: An ultrasonographic and electromyographic study with age-matched controls.

    PubMed

    Rathi, Sangeeta; Taylor, Nicholas F; Soo, Brendan; Green, Rodney A

    2018-03-02

    To determine whether patients with symptomatic rotator cuff pathology had more glenohumeral joint translation and different patterns of rotator cuff muscle activity compared to controls. Repeated measurements of glenohumeral translation and muscle activity in two positions and six testing conditions in two groups. Twenty participants with a symptomatic and diagnosed rotator cuff tear and 20 age, and gender matched controls were included. Neuromuscular activity was tested by inserting intramuscular electrodes in the rotator cuff muscles. Anterior and posterior glenohumeral translations were measured using real time ultrasound in testing conditions (with and without translation force, with and without isometric internal and external rotation), in two positions (shoulder neutral, 90° of abduction) and two force directions (anterior, posterior). Symptomatic pathology group demonstrated increased passive glenohumeral translation with posterior translation force (p<0.05). Overall, rotator cuff muscle contraction in the pathology group limited joint translation in a similar manner to the control group, but they did not show the normal direction specific pattern in the neutral posterior position (p<0.03). The pathology group demonstrated reduced EMG activity in the upper infraspinatus muscle relative to the reference position (p<0.02) with anterior translation force and in the supraspinatus (p<0.05) muscle with anterior and posterior translation force in the abducted position. Symptomatic pathology resulted in increased passive glenohumeral joint translation. Although there were some reductions in muscle activity with injury, their rotator cuff still controlled glenohumeral translation. These results highlight the need to consider joint translation in the assessment and management of patients with rotator cuff injury. Copyright © 2018 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Characteristics of Abductive Inquiry in Earth and Space Science: An Undergraduate Teacher Prospective Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramalis, T. R.; Liliasari; Herdiwidjaya, D.

    2016-08-01

    The purpose this case study was to describe characteristic features learning activities in the domain of earth and space science. Context of this study is earth and space learning activities on three groups of student teachers prospective, respectively on the subject of the shape and size of Earth, land and sea breeze, and moon's orbit. The analysis is conducted qualitatively from activity data and analyze students doing project work, student worksheets, group project report documents, note and audio recordings of discussion. Research findings identified the type of abduction: theoretical models abduction, factual abduction, and law abduction during the learning process. Implications for science inquiry learning as well as relevant research were suggested.

  16. Malleolar fractures and their ligamentous injury equivalents have similar outcomes in supination-external rotation type IV fractures of the ankle treated by anatomical internal fixation.

    PubMed

    Berkes, M B; Little, M T M; Lazaro, L E; Sculco, P K; Cymerman, R M; Daigl, M; Helfet, D L; Lorich, D G

    2012-11-01

    It has previously been suggested that among unstable ankle fractures, the presence of a malleolar fracture is associated with a worse outcome than a corresponding ligamentous injury. However, previous studies have included heterogeneous groups of injury. The purpose of this study was to determine whether any specific pattern of bony and/or ligamentous injury among a series of supination-external rotation type IV (SER IV) ankle fractures treated with anatomical fixation was associated with a worse outcome. We analysed a prospective cohort of 108 SER IV ankle fractures with a follow-up of one year. Pre-operative radiographs and MRIs were undertaken to characterise precisely the pattern of injury. Operative treatment included fixation of all malleolar fractures. Post-operative CT was used to assess reduction. The primary and secondary outcome measures were the Foot and Ankle Outcome Score (FAOS) and the range of movement of the ankle. There were no clinically relevant differences between the four possible SER IV fracture pattern groups with regard to the FAOS or range of movement. In this population of strictly defined SER IV ankle injuries, the presence of a malleolar fracture was not associated with a significantly worse clinical outcome than its ligamentous injury counterpart. Other factors inherent to the injury and treatment may play a more important role in predicting outcome.

  17. Method for Estimating Three-Dimensional Knee Rotations Using Two Inertial Measurement Units: Validation with a Coordinate Measurement Machine

    PubMed Central

    Vitali, Rachel V.; Cain, Stephen M.; Zaferiou, Antonia M.; Ojeda, Lauro V.; Perkins, Noel C.

    2017-01-01

    Three-dimensional rotations across the human knee serve as important markers of knee health and performance in multiple contexts including human mobility, worker safety and health, athletic performance, and warfighter performance. While knee rotations can be estimated using optical motion capture, that method is largely limited to the laboratory and small capture volumes. These limitations may be overcome by deploying wearable inertial measurement units (IMUs). The objective of this study is to present a new IMU-based method for estimating 3D knee rotations and to benchmark the accuracy of the results using an instrumented mechanical linkage. The method employs data from shank- and thigh-mounted IMUs and a vector constraint for the medial-lateral axis of the knee during periods when the knee joint functions predominantly as a hinge. The method is carefully validated using data from high precision optical encoders in a mechanism that replicates 3D knee rotations spanning (1) pure flexion/extension, (2) pure internal/external rotation, (3) pure abduction/adduction, and (4) combinations of all three rotations. Regardless of the movement type, the IMU-derived estimates of 3D knee rotations replicate the truth data with high confidence (RMS error < 4° and correlation coefficient r≥0.94). PMID:28846613

  18. Shoulder horizontal abduction stretching effectively increases shear elastic modulus of pectoralis minor muscle.

    PubMed

    Umehara, Jun; Nakamura, Masatoshi; Fujita, Kosuke; Kusano, Ken; Nishishita, Satoru; Araki, Kojiro; Tanaka, Hiroki; Yanase, Ko; Ichihashi, Noriaki

    2017-07-01

    Stretching maneuvers for the pectoralis minor muscle, which involve shoulder horizontal abduction or scapular retraction, are performed in clinical and sports settings because the tightness of this muscle may contribute to scapular dyskinesis. The effectiveness of stretching maneuvers for the pectoralis minor muscle is unclear in vivo. The purpose of this study was to verify the effectiveness of stretching maneuvers for the pectoralis minor muscle in vivo using ultrasonic shear wave elastography. Eighteen healthy men participated in this study. Elongation of the pectoralis minor muscle was measured for 3 stretching maneuvers (shoulder flexion, shoulder horizontal abduction, and scapular retraction) at 3 shoulder elevation angles (30°, 90°, and 150°). The shear elastic modulus, used as the index of muscle elongation, was computed using ultrasonic shear wave elastography for the 9 aforementioned stretching maneuver-angle combinations. The shear elastic modulus was highest in horizontal abduction at 150°, followed by horizontal abduction at 90°, horizontal abduction at 30°, scapular retraction at 30°, scapular retraction at 90°, scapular retraction at 150°, flexion at 150°, flexion at 90°, and flexion at 30°. The shear elastic moduli of horizontal abduction at 90° and horizontal abduction at 150° were significantly higher than those of other stretching maneuvers. There was no significant difference between horizontal abduction at 90° and horizontal abduction at 150°. This study determined that shoulder horizontal abduction at an elevation of 90° and horizontal abduction at an elevation of 150° were the most effective stretching maneuvers for the pectoralis minor muscle in vivo. Copyright © 2017 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Outcomes assessment in rotator cuff pathology: what are we measuring?

    PubMed

    Makhni, Eric C; Steinhaus, Michael E; Morrow, Zachary S; Jobin, Charles M; Verma, Nikhil N; Cole, Brian J; Bach, Bernard R

    2015-12-01

    Assessments used to measure outcomes associated with rotator cuff pathology and after repair are varied. This lack of standardization leads to difficulty drawing comparisons across studies. We hypothesize that this variability in patient-reported outcome measures and objective metrics used in rotator cuff studies persists even in high-impact, peer reviewed journals. All studies assessing rotator cuff tear and repair outcomes in 6 orthopedic journals with a high impact factor from January 2010 to December 2014 were reviewed. Cadaveric and animal studies and those without outcomes were excluded. Outcome measures included range of motion (forward elevation, abduction, external rotation, and internal rotation), strength (in the same 4 planes), tendon integrity imaging, patient satisfaction, and functional assessment scores. Of the 156 included studies, 63% documented range of motion measurements, with 18% reporting range of motion in all 4 planes. Only 38% of studies reported quantitative strength measurements. In 65% of studies, tendon integrity was documented with imaging (38% magnetic resonance imaging/magnetic resonance anrhrogram, 31% ultrasound, and 8% computed tomography arthrogram). Finally, functional score reporting varied significantly, with the 5 most frequently reported scores ranging from 16% to 61% in studies, and 15 of the least reported outcomes were each reported in ≤6% of studies. Significant variability exists in outcomes reporting after rotator cuff tear and repair, making comparisons between clinical studies difficult. Creating a uniformly accepted, validated outcomes tool that assesses pain, function, patient satisfaction, and anatomic integrity would enable consistent outcomes assessment after operative and nonoperative management and allow comparisons across the literature. Copyright © 2015 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Developing a Validity Argument through Abductive Reasoning with an Empirical Demonstration of the Latent Class Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Amery D.; Stone, Jake E.; Liu, Yan

    2016-01-01

    This article proposes and demonstrates a methodology for test score validation through abductive reasoning. It describes how abductive reasoning can be utilized in support of the claims made about test score validity. This methodology is demonstrated with a real data example of the Canadian English Language Proficiency Index Program…

  1. Modifying the hip abduction angle during bridging exercise can facilitate gluteus maximus activity.

    PubMed

    Kang, Sun-Young; Choung, Sung-Dae; Jeon, Hye-Seon

    2016-04-01

    To investigate how the erector spinae (ES) and gluteus maximus (GM) muscle activity and the anterior pelvic tilt angle change with different hip abduction angles during a bridging exercise. Twenty healthy participants (10 males and 10 females, aged 21.6 ± 1.6) voluntarily participated in this study. Surface electromyography (EMG) signals were recorded from the ES and GM during bridging at three hip abduction angles: 0°, 15°, and 30°. Simultaneously, the anterior pelvic tilt angle was measured using Image J software. The EMG amplitude of the GM muscle and the GM/ES EMG ratio were greatest at 30° hip abduction, followed by 15° and then 0° hip abduction during the bridging exercise. In contrast, the ES EMG amplitude at 30° hip abduction was significantly lesser than that at 0° and 15° abduction. Additionally, the anterior pelvic tilt angle was significantly lower at 30° hip abduction than at 0° or 15°. Bridging with 30° hip abduction can be recommended as an effective method to selectively facilitate GM muscle activity, minimize compensatory ES muscle activity, and decrease the anterior pelvic tilt angle. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Abduction-Induction (Generalization) Processes of Elementary Majors on Figural Patterns in Algebra

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rivera, F. D.; Becker, Joanne Rossi

    2007-01-01

    The article deals with issues concerning the abductive-inductive reasoning of 42 preservice elementary majors on patterns that consist of figural and numerical cues. We discuss: ways in which the participants develop generalizations about classes of abstract objects; abductive processes they exhibit which support their induction leading to a…

  3. Weight-Bearing Cone-Beam CT Scan Assessment of Stability of Supination External Rotation Ankle Fractures in a Cadaver Model.

    PubMed

    Lawlor, Mark C; Kluczynski, Melissa A; Marzo, John M

    2018-03-01

    The utility of computed tomography (CT) for measuring medial clear space (MCS) for determination of the stability of supination external rotation (SER) ankle fractures and in comparison to standard radiographs is unknown. We compared MCS on gravity stress (GS) radiographs to GS and weight bearing (WB) cone-beam CT (CBCT). An AO SER 44B3.1 ankle fracture was simulated in 10 human cadavers, also serving as controls. MCS was measured on GS radiographs, GS CBCT, and a simulated WB CBCT scan. Specimens were stable if MCS was <5 mm and unstable if MCS was ≥5 mm. Paired t tests were used to compare MCS from each imaging modality for controls versus SER injuries and stable versus unstable specimens. Compared with controls assessed by GS radiographs, MCS was greater for an SER injury when assessed by GS radiograph and GS CBCT scan within the stable group. Compared with controls assessed by GS radiographs, MCS was greater for SER injuries when assessed by GS radiograph, GS CBCT scan, and WB CBCT within the unstable group. MCS was reduced for stable versus unstable SER injuries assessed by WB CBCT. In a cadaveric model of SER ankle fracture, the medial clear space was statistically significantly greater for the experimental condition when assessed by gravity stress radiograph and gravity stress CBCT scan. Under weight-bearing conditions, the cone-beam CT scanner distinguished between stable and unstable ankles in the experimental condition. This study suggests that a WB cone-beam CT scan may be able to distinguish between stable and unstable SER ankle fractures and influence operative decision making.

  4. Comparing Different Surgical Techniques for Addressing the Posterior Malleolus in Supination External Rotation Ankle Fractures and the Need for Syndesmotic Screw Fixation.

    PubMed

    Li, Mengnai; Collier, Rachel C; Hill, Brian W; Slinkard, Nathaniel; Ly, Thuan V

    Trimalleolar ankle fractures are unstable injuries with possible syndesmotic disruption. Recent data have described inherent morbidity associated with screw fixation of the syndesmosis, including the potential for malreduction, hardware irritation, and post-traumatic arthritis. The posterior malleolus is an important soft tissue attachment for the posterior inferior syndesmosis ligament. We hypothesized that fixation of a sizable posterior malleolar (PM) fracture in supination external rotation type IV (SER IV) ankle fractures would act to stabilize the syndesmosis and minimize or eliminate the need for trans-syndesmotic fixation. A retrospective review of trimalleolar ankle fractures surgically treated from October 2006 to April of 2011 was performed. A total of 143 trimalleolar ankle fractures were identified, and 97 were classified as SER IV. Of the 97 patients, 74 (76.3%) had a sizable PM fragment. Syndesmotic fixation was required in 7 of 34 (20%) and 27 of 40 (68%), respectively, when the PM was fixed versus not fixed (p = .0002). When the PM was indirectly reduced using an anterior to posterior screw, 7 of 15 patients (46.7%) required syndesmotic fixation compared with none of 19 patients when the PM fragment was fixated with direct posterior lateral plate fixation (p = .0012). Fixation of the PM fracture in SER IV ankle fractures can restore syndesmotic stability and, thus, lower the rate of syndesmotic fixation. We found that fixation of a sizable PM fragment in SER IV or equivalent injuries through posterolateral plating can eliminate the need for syndesmotic screw fixation. Copyright © 2017 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Human rather than ape-like orbital morphology allows much greater lateral visual field expansion with eye abduction

    PubMed Central

    Denion, Eric; Hitier, Martin; Levieil, Eric; Mouriaux, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    While convergent, the human orbit differs from that of non-human apes in that its lateral orbital margin is significantly more rearward. This rearward position does not obstruct the additional visual field gained through eye motion. This additional visual field is therefore considered to be wider in humans than in non-human apes. A mathematical model was designed to quantify this difference. The mathematical model is based on published computed tomography data in the human neuro-ocular plane (NOP) and on additional anatomical data from 100 human skulls and 120 non-human ape skulls (30 gibbons; 30 chimpanzees / bonobos; 30 orangutans; 30 gorillas). It is used to calculate temporal visual field eccentricity values in the NOP first in the primary position of gaze then for any eyeball rotation value in abduction up to 45° and any lateral orbital margin position between 85° and 115° relative to the sagittal plane. By varying the lateral orbital margin position, the human orbit can be made “non-human ape-like”. In the Pan-like orbit, the orbital margin position (98.7°) was closest to the human orbit (107.1°). This modest 8.4° difference resulted in a large 21.1° difference in maximum lateral visual field eccentricity with eyeball abduction (Pan-like: 115°; human: 136.1°). PMID:26190625

  6. Outcome of lower trapezius transfer to reconstruct massive irreparable posterior-superior rotator cuff tear.

    PubMed

    Elhassan, Bassem T; Wagner, Eric R; Werthel, Jean-David

    2016-08-01

    Management of massive irreparable posterior-superior rotator cuff tear can be very challenging. This study reports the outcome of the lower trapezius transfer to reconstruct massive irreparable posterior-superior rotator cuff tear. Included were 33 patients with an average age of 53 years (range, 31-66 years). All patients had symptomatic massive irreparable rotator cuff tear that failed conservative or prior surgical treatment and underwent reconstruction with lower trapezius transfer prolonged by Achilles tendon allograft. The tear was considered irreparable based on the magnetic resonance imaging finding of ≥2 full-thickness rotator cuff tears associated with shortening and retraction of the tendon to the level of the glenoid and a high grade of fatty infiltration of the muscles. This was confirmed at the time of the surgery. At an average follow-up of 47 months, 32 patients had significant improvement in pain, subjective shoulder value, and Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand score and shoulder range of motion, including flexion, 120°; abduction, 90°; and external rotation 50°. One patient, with a body mass index of 36 kg/m(2), required débridement for an infection and then later underwent shoulder fusion. Patients with >60° of preoperative flexion had more significant gains in their range of motion. Shoulder external rotation improved in all patients regardless of the extent of the preoperative loss of motion. Transfer of the lower trapezius prolonged with Achilles tendon allograft to reconstruct massive irreparable posterior-superior rotator cuff tear may lead to good outcome in most patients, specifically for those who have preoperative flexion of >60°. Copyright © 2016 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The Effects of Posterior Rotator Cuff Cable Tears on Glenohumeral Biomechanics in a Cadaveric Model of the Throwing Shoulder

    PubMed Central

    Photopoulos, Christos Demetris; ElAttrache, Neal S.; Doermann, Alex; Akeda, Masaki; McGarry, Michelle H.; Lee, Thay Q.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: The rotator cuff cable has been postulated to be the primary load bearing substructure of the superior part of the rotator cuff. Tears of the posterior rotator cable are frequently seen in overhead throwing athletes. Although the biomechanical significance of the anterior rotator cable has been well described, our current understanding of the relevance of the posterior cable is limited. The purpose of this study was to examine how partial-thickness tears and full-thickness tears of the posterior rotator cable would alter glenohumeral biomechanics and kinematics in cadaveric shoulder models. Methods: Eight fresh-frozen cadaveric shoulder specimens were prepared and tested. To simulate the sequence of glenohumeral positions during the throwing motion, specimens were mounted on a custom shoulder testing system with the humerus positioned at 90° of abduction (30° scapular upward rotation, 60° glenohumeral abduction) and tested at 30, 60, 90, and 120 degrees of external rotation. After a circumferential capsulotomy was performed, rotator cuff muscles were loaded based on physiologic cross-sectional area ratios, and testing for each specimen was performed on each the following three conditions: intact posterior cable, partial-thickness (50%) articular-sided posterior cable tear, and full-thickness posterior cable tear. Primary outcome measures tested for each condition under the various degrees of glenohumeral rotation were: 1) anterior and total glenohumeral translation after application of a 30N anterior force; 2) path of glenohumeral articulation; 3) glenohumeral joint force. Results: With a 30N anterior force at 120° of external rotation, there was a significant increase in anterior glenohumeral translation between intact and full-thickness tear specimens (7.28±2.00mm and 17.49±3.75mm, respectively; p<0.05). Similarly, total joint translation at 120° of external rotation significantly increased between intact and full-thickness tear specimens (10

  8. Cardiovascular effects of abduction shoulder sling in elderly patients; is it really safe?

    PubMed

    Canbora, Kerem; Kose, Ozkan; Gurkan, Ufuk; Polat, Atilla; Erdem, Sevki; Haklar, Ugur

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of the prospective study is to investigate the cardiovascular effects of abduction shoulder sling (ASS) in elderly patients who underwent rotator cuff surgery. The study included 49 consecutive patients older than 50 years (mean 59.3 ± 8.2 years) who underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair surgery and used ASS in postoperative period. All cases underwent Holter electrocardiographic monitoring before (24 h) and after (48 h) the operation. The Holter findings were read by an experienced cardiologist and a pause of longer than 3 s and heart rate of <40 bpm was evaluated as significant bradycardia. One patient (61-year-old male) described feeling faint (presyncope) which was confirmed with the Holter finding of a pause more than 3 s which occurred in the day time. Two other patients (52-year-old male, and 62-year-old female) reported severe dizziness (hypotensive attack) which required admission to a general practitioner. However, Holter findings were normal in these patients. These three cases were referred to cardiology department for evaluation of carotid hypersensitivity syndrome (CSH). CSH was confirmed with tests made with provocative maneuvers in a sitting position. CSH was defined as at least 3 s of asystole (cardio-inhibitor type) during carotid massage or systolic blood pressure falling below 50 mmHg (vaso-depressor type). All three patients were obese patients and BMI was higher than 30. ASS may trigger CSH in short necked and obese patients by exerting mechanical stimulation to the carotid sinus. These patients should be informed about symptoms and signs of CSH and educated on the proper use of ASS and correct positioning of shoulder strap. CSH should be kept in mind in patients who present with dizziness, presyncope and palpitation during the postoperative period.

  9. Direct magnetic resonance (MR) shoulder arthrography: posterior approach under ultrasonographic guidance and abduction (PAUGA).

    PubMed

    Grasso, R F; Faiella, E; Cimini, P; Cazzato, R L; Luppi, G; Martina, F; Del Vescovo, R; Beomonte Zobel, B

    2013-08-01

    This study was undertaken to assess the reliability of the posterior approach under ultrasonographic guidance (PAUGA), with the arm abducted, before performing direct magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography of the shoulder. A total of 111 (82 men, 29 women; mean age, 24 years) underwent direct MR arthrography of the shoulder. Patients were enrolled because of glenohumeral instability (n=71), chronic shoulder pain (n=25), suspicion of rotator cuff tear (n=13) and adhesive capsulitis (n=2). Patients were placed in the lateral position, on the contralateral side to that being examined; the arm of the shoulder undergoing the examination was placed in slight internal rotation with the hand under the contralateral armpit. A gadolinium-based solution was injected into the articular capsule under cryoanaesthesia and sonographic guidance. A posterior approach was systematically applied. For each patient, the number of injection attempts, room time, complications and pain, as recorded on a 10-point visual analogue scale (VAS), were noted. For quantitative parameters (room time and pain intensity), the mean and standard deviation (SD) were calculated. Direct MR arthrographies were performed successfully in all patients; no immediate or late major complications were observed. Fourteen patients (12.6%) reported temporary and self-limiting compromise of arm movements, and 13 patients (11.7%) reported a vagal reaction not requiring medication. In 102 cases (92%), the injection was successful at the first attempt, whereas in the remaining nine cases (8%), needle repositioning without any additional puncture was required to obtain clear sonographic depiction of the position of the needle tip. Mean room time was 7.2±1.4 min. Mean pain intensity was 3.2±0.4 on the 10-point VAS scale. PAUGA is a reliable and rapid technique that is well tolerated by patients and easy for the radiologist to perform.

  10. Stability-based classification for ankle fracture management and the syndesmosis injury in ankle fractures due to a supination external rotation mechanism of injury.

    PubMed

    Pakarinen, Harri

    2012-12-01

    sensitivity and specificity of both clinical tests were calculated using the standard 7.5-Nm external rotation stress test as reference. Outcome was assessed after a minimum of one year of follow-up. Olerud-Molander (OM) scoring system, RAND 36-Item Health Survey, and VAS to measure pain and function were used as outcome measures in all studies. In study 1, 85 (53%) fractures were treated operatively using the stability based fracture classification. Non-operatively treated patients reported less pain and better OM (good or excellent 89% vs. 71%) and VAS functional scores compared to operatively treated patients although they experienced more displacement of the distal fibula (0 mm 30% vs. 69%; 0-2 mm 65% vs. 25%) after treatment. No non-operatively treated patients required operative fracture fixation during follow-up. In study 2, AITFL exploration and suture lead to equal functional outcome (OM mean, 77 vs. 73) to no exploration or fixation. In study 3, the hook test had a sensitivity of 0.25 and a specificity of 0.98. The external rotation stress test had a sensitivity of 0.58 and a specificity of 0.9. Both tests had excellent interobserver reliability; the agreement was 99% for the hook test and 98% for the stress test. There was no statistically significant difference in functional scores (OM mean, 79.6 vs. 83.6) or pain between syndesmosis transfixation and no fixation groups (Study 4). Our results suggest that a simple stability-based fracture classification is useful in choosing between non-operative and operative treatment of ankle fractures; approximately half of the ankle fractures can be treated non-operatively with success. Our observations also suggest that relevant syndesmosis injuries are rare in ankle fractures due to an SER mechanism of injury. According to our research, syndesmotic repair or fixation in SER ankle fracture has no influence on functional outcome or pain after minimum one year compared with no fixation.

  11. Interposition Dermal Matrix Xenografts: A Successful Alternative to Traditional Treatment of Massive Rotator Cuff Tears.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Julie A; Zgonis, Miltiadis H; Rickert, Kathleen D; Bradley, Kendall E; Kremen, Thomas J; Boggess, Blake R; Toth, Alison P

    2017-05-01

    Management of massive rotator cuff tears in shoulders without glenohumeral arthritis remains problematic for surgeons. Repairs of massive rotator cuff tears have failure rates of 20% to 94% at 1 to 2 years postoperatively as demonstrated with arthrography, ultrasound, and magnetic resonance imaging. Additionally, inconsistent outcomes have been reported with debridement alone of massive rotator cuff tears, and limitations have been seen with other current methods of operative intervention, including arthroplasty and tendon transfers. The use of interposition porcine acellular dermal matrix xenograft in patients with massive rotator cuff tears will result in improved subjective outcomes, postoperative pain, function, range of motion, and strength. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Sixty patients (61 shoulders) were prospectively observed for a mean of 50.3 months (range, 24-63 months) after repair of massive rotator cuff tears with porcine acellular dermal matrix xenograft as an interposition graft. Subjective outcome data were obtained with visual analog scale for pain score (0-10, 0 = no pain) and Modified American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (MASES) score. Active range of motion in flexion, external rotation, and internal rotation were recorded. Strength in the supraspinatus and infraspinatus muscles was assessed manually on a 10-point scale and by handheld dynamometer. Ultrasound was used to assess the integrity of the repair during latest follow-up. Mean visual analog scale pain score decreased from 4.0 preoperatively to 1.0 postoperatively ( P < .001). Mean active forward flexion improved from 140.7° to 160.4° ( P < .001), external rotation at 0° of abduction from 55.6° to 70.1° ( P = .001), and internal rotation at 90° of abduction from 52.0° to 76.2° ( P < .001). Supraspinatus manual strength increased from 7.7 to 8.8 ( P < .001) and infraspinatus manual strength from 7.7 to 9.3 ( P < .001). Mean dynamometric strength in forward flexion was 77.7 N

  12. The effects of plane and arc of elevation on electromyography of shoulder musculature in patients with rotator cuff tears.

    PubMed

    Alenabi, Talia; Dal Maso, Fabien; Tétreault, Patrice; Begon, Mickaël

    2016-02-01

    Arm elevations in different planes are commonly assessed in clinics and are included in rehabilitation protocols for patients with rotator cuff pathology. The aim of this study was to quantify the effect of plane and angle of elevation on shoulder muscles activity in patients with symptomatic rotator cuff tear to be used for rehabilitation purposes. Eight symptomatic patients with rotator cuff tears were assessed by using EMG (11 surface and 2 fine wire electrodes) synchronized with a motion analysis. The subjects completed five elevations in full can position (arm externally rotated and thumb up) in frontal, scapular and sagittal planes. Muscle activity in three elevation arcs of 20° (from 0° to 60°) was presented as the percentage of mean activity. Data were analyzed by mixed linear models (α=0.003), and Tuckey Post-hoc comparisons for significant effects (α=0.05). The effect of plane was significant for supraspinatus, middle trapezius, anterior, middle, and posterior deltoid, triceps, and pectoralis major (P<0.001). Supraspinatus was more active during abduction than scaption and flexion (P<0.05), and its activity did not increase significantly after 40° of elevation (P>0.05). Infraspinatus had similar activity pattern in the three planes of elevation (P>0.003) with increasing trend in accordance with the elevation angle. In any rehabilitation protocol, if less activity of supraspinatus is desired, active arm elevation should be directed toward flexion and scaption and postponed abduction to prevent high level of activity in this muscle. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Abdominal Hollowing Reduces Lateral Trunk Displacement During Single-Leg Squats in Healthy Females But Does Not Affect Peak Hip Abduction Angle or Knee Abductio Angle/Moment.

    PubMed

    Linde, Lukas D; Archibald, Jessica; Lampert, Eve C; Srbely, John Z

    2017-07-17

    Females suffer 4-6 times more non-contact anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries than males due to neuromuscular control deficits of the hip musculature leading to increases in hip adduction angle, knee abduction angle, and knee abduction moment during dynamic tasks such as single-leg squats. Lateral trunk displacement has been further related to ACL injury risk in females, leading to the incorporation of core strength/stability exercises in ACL preventative training programs. However, the direct mechanism relating lateral trunk displacement and lower limb ACL risk factors is not well established. To assess the relationship between lateral trunk displacement and lower limb measures of ACL injury risk by altering trunk control through abdominal activation techniques during single-leg squats in healthy females. Interventional Study Setting: Movement and Posture Laboratory Participants: 13 healthy females (21.3±0.88y, 1.68±0.07m, 58.27±5.46kg) Intervention: Trunk position and lower limb kinematics were recorded using an optoelectric motion capture system during single-leg squats under differing conditions of abdominal muscle activation (abdominal hollowing, abdominal bracing, control), confirmed via surface electromyography. Lateral trunk displacement, peak hip adduction angle, peak knee abduction angle/moment, and average muscle activity from bilateral internal oblique, external oblique, and erector spinae muscles. No differences were observed for peak lateral trunk displacement, peak hip adduction angle or peak knee abduction angle/moment. Abdominal hollowing and bracing elicited greater muscle activation than the control condition, and bracing was greater than hollowing in four of six muscles recorded. The lack of reduction in trunk, hip, and knee measures of ACL injury risk during abdominal hollowing and bracing suggests that these techniques alone may provide minimal benefit in ACL injury prevention training.

  14. The effects of performing a one-legged bridge with hip abduction and use of a sling on trunk and lower extremity muscle activation in healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Choi, Kyuju; Bak, Jongwoo; Cho, Minkwon; Chung, Yijung

    2016-09-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the changes in the muscle activities of the trunk and lower limbs of healthy adults during a one-legged bridge exercise using a sling, and with the addition of hip abduction. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-seven healthy individuals participated in this study (14 males and 13 females). The participants were instructed to perform the bridge exercises under five different conditions. Trunk and lower limb muscle activation of the erector spinae (ES), external oblique (EO), gluteus maximus (GM), and biceps femoris (BF) was measured using surface electromyography. Data analysis was performed using the mean scores of three trials performed under each condition. [Results] There was a significant increase in bilateral EO and contralateral GM with the one-legged bridge compared with the one-legged bridge with sling exercise. Muscle activation of the ipsilateral GM and BF was significantly less during the one-legged bridge exercise compared to the one-legged bridge with sling exercise, and was significantly greater during the one-legged bridge with hip abduction compared to the one-legged bridge exercise. The muscle activation of the contralateral GM and BF was significantly greater with the one-legged bridge with hip abduction compared to the general bridge exercise. [Conclusion] With the one-legged bridge with hip abduction, the ipsilateral EO, GM and BF muscle activities were significantly greater than those of the one-legged bridge exercise. The muscle activation of all trunk and contralateral lower extremity muscles increased with the bridge with sling exercises compared with general bridge exercises.

  15. Proposal for a trigonometric method to evaluate the abduction angle of the lower limbs in neonates.

    PubMed

    Lima, Thaís; Alves, Cyntia; Funayama, Carolina A R

    2008-12-01

    It is difficult to precisely measure articular arc movement in newborns using a goniometer. This article proposes an objective method based on trigonometry for the evaluation of lower limb abduction. With the newborn aligned in the dorsal decubitus position, 2 points are marked at the level of the medial malleolus, one on the sagittal line and the other at the end of the abduction. Using the right-sided line between these 2 points and a line from the medial malleolus to the reference point at the anterior superior iliac spine or umbilical scar, an isosceles triangle is drawn, and half of the inferential abduction angle is obtained by calculating the sine. Twenty healthy full-term newborns comprise the study cohort. Intersubject and intrasubject variability among the abduction angle values (mean [SD], 37 degrees [4] degrees) is low. This method is advantageous because the measurement is precise and because the sine can be used without approximation.

  16. Hip-abduction torque and muscle activation in people with low back pain.

    PubMed

    Sutherlin, Mark A; Hart, Joseph M

    2015-02-01

    Individuals with a history of low back pain (LBP) may present with decreased hip-abduction strength and increased trunk or gluteus maximus (GMax) fatigability. However, the effect of hip-abduction exercise on hip-muscle function has not been previously reported. To compare hip-abduction torque and muscle activation of the hip, thigh, and trunk between individuals with and without a history of LBP during repeated bouts of side-lying hip-abduction exercise. Repeated measures. Clinical laboratory. 12 individuals with a history of LBP and 12 controls. Repeated 30-s hip-abduction contractions. Hip-abduction torque, normalized root-mean-squared (RMS) muscle activation, percent RMS muscle activation, and forward general linear regression. Hip-abduction torque reduced in all participants as a result of exercise (1.57 ± 0.36 Nm/kg, 1.12 ± 0.36 Nm/kg; P < .001), but there were no group differences (F = 0.129, P = .723) or group-by-time interactions (F = 1.098, P = .358). All participants had increased GMax activation during the first bout of exercise (0.96 ± 1.00, 1.18 ± 1.03; P = .038). Individuals with a history of LBP had significantly greater GMax activation at multiple points during repeated exercise (P < .05) and a significantly lower percent of muscle activation for the GMax (P = .050) at the start of the third bout of exercise and for the biceps femoris (P = .039) at the end of exercise. The gluteal muscles best predicted hip-abduction torque in controls, while no consistent muscles were identified for individuals with a history of LBP. Hip-abduction torque decreased in all individuals after hip-abduction exercise, although individuals with a history of LBP had increased GMax activation during exercise. Gluteal muscle activity explained hip-abduction torque in healthy individuals but not in those with a history of LBP. Alterations in hip-muscle function may exist in individuals with a history of LBP.

  17. Outcomes After Patch Use in Rotator Cuff Repair.

    PubMed

    Steinhaus, Michael E; Makhni, Eric C; Cole, Brian J; Romeo, Anthony A; Verma, Nikhil N

    2016-08-01

    To provide a comprehensive review of clinical outcomes and retear rates after patch use in rotator cuff repair, and to determine the differences between available graft types and techniques. A systematic review was conducted from database (PubMed, Medline, Scopus, Embase) inception to January 2015 for English-language articles reporting outcome data with 9 months' minimum follow-up. Studies were assessed by 2 reviewers who collected pertinent data, with outcomes combined to generate frequency-weighted means. Twenty-four studies met the inclusion criteria. The frequency-weighted mean age was 61.9 years with 35.4 months' follow-up. The mean improvements in postoperative range of motion in the forward elevation, abduction, external rotation, and internal rotation planes were 58.6°, 66.2°, 16.6°, and 16.1°, respectively, and postoperative abduction strength improved by 3.84 kg. American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons, University of California-Los Angeles, Constant, Penn, and Oxford scores improved by 39.3, 10.7, 40.8, 34.4, and 17.6, respectively. Augmentation and interposition techniques showed similar improvements in range of motion, strength, and patient-reported outcomes (PROs), whereas xenografts showed less improvement in PROs compared with other graft types. Studies reported improvements in pain and activities of daily living (ADLs), with greater than 90% overall satisfaction, although few patients (13%) were able to return to preinjury activity. Whereas interposition and augmentation techniques showed similar improvements in pain and ADLs, xenografts showed less improvement in ADLs than other graft types. The overall retear rate was 25%, with rates of 34% and 12% for augmentation and interposition, respectively, and rates of 44%, 23%, and 15% for xenografts, allografts, and synthetic grafts, respectively. We report improvements in clinical and functional outcomes, with similar results for augmentation and interposition techniques, whereas xenografts showed

  18. Measurement of varus-valgus and internal-external rotational knee laxities in vivo--Part II: relationship with anterior-posterior and general joint laxity in males and females.

    PubMed

    Shultz, Sandra J; Shimokochi, Yohei; Nguyen, Anh-Dung; Schmitz, Randy J; Beynnon, Bruce D; Perrin, David H

    2007-08-01

    We examined sex differences in general joint laxity (GJL), and anterior-posterior displacement (ANT-POST), varus-valgus rotation (VR-VL), and internal-external rotation (INT-EXT) knee laxities, and determined whether greater ANT and GJL predicted greater VR-VL and INT-EXT. Twenty subjects were measured for GJL, and scored on a scale of 0-9. ANT and POST were measured using a standard knee arthrometer at 133 N. VR-VL and INT-EXT were measured using a custom joint laxity testing device, defined as the angular displacements (deg) of the tibia relative to the femur produced by 0-10 Nm of varus-valgus torques, and 0-5 Nm of internal-external torques, respectively. INT-EXT were measured during both non-weight-bearing (NWB) and weight-bearing (WB = 40% body weight) conditions while VR-VL were measured NWB. All laxity measures were greater for females compared to males except for POST. ANT and GJL positively predicted 62.5% of the variance in VR-VL and 41.8% of the variance in WB INT-EXT. ANT was the sole predictor of INT-EXT in NWB, explaining 42.3% of the variance. These findings suggest that subjects who score higher on clinical measures of GJL and ANT are also likely to have greater VR-VL and INT-EXT knee laxities.

  19. Three-dimensional shoulder kinematics normalize after rotator cuff repair.

    PubMed

    Kolk, Arjen; de Witte, Pieter Bas; Henseler, Jan Ferdinand; van Zwet, Erik W; van Arkel, Ewoud R A; van der Zwaal, Peer; Nelissen, Rob G H H; de Groot, Jurriaan H

    2016-06-01

    Patients with a rotator cuff (RC) tear often exhibit scapular dyskinesia with increased scapular lateral rotation and decreased glenohumeral elevation with arm abduction. We hypothesized that in patients with an RC tear, scapular lateral rotation, and thus glenohumeral elevation, will be restored to normal after RC repair. Shoulder kinematics were quantitatively analyzed in 26 patients with an electromagnetic tracking device (Flock of Birds) before and 1 year after RC repair in this observational case series. We focused on humeral range of motion and scapular kinematics during abduction. The asymptomatic contralateral shoulder was used as the control. Changes in scapular kinematics were associated with the gain in range of motion. Shoulder kinematics were analyzed using a linear mixed model. Mean arm abduction and forward flexion improved after surgery by 20° (95% confidence interval [CI], 2.7°-36.5°; P = .025) and 13° (95% CI, 1.2°-36.5°; P = .044), respectively. Kinematic analyses showed decreases in mean scapular protraction (ie, internal rotation) and lateral rotation (ie, upward rotation) during abduction by 3° (95% CI, 0.0°-5.2°; P = .046) and 4° (95% CI, 1.6°-8.4°; P = .042), respectively. Glenohumeral elevation increased by 5° (95% CI, 0.6°-9.7°; P = .028) at 80°. Humeral range of motion increased when scapular lateral rotation decreased and posterior tilt increased. Scapular kinematics normalize after RC repair toward a symmetrical scapular motion pattern as observed in the asymptomatic contralateral shoulder. The observed changes in scapular kinematics are associated with an increased overall range of motion and suggest restored function of shoulder muscles. Copyright © 2016 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. High- compared to low-arched athletes exhibit smaller knee abduction moments in walking and running.

    PubMed

    Powell, Douglas W; Andrews, Samantha; Stickley, Cris; Williams, D S Blaise

    2016-12-01

    High- (HA) and low-arched athletes (LA) experience distinct injury patterns. These injuries are the result of the interaction of structure and biomechanics. A suggested mechanism of patellofemoral pain pertains to frontal plane knee moments which may be exaggerated in LA athletes. We hypothesize that LA athletes will exhibit greater peak knee abduction moments than high-arched athletes. Twenty healthy female recreational athletes (10HA and 10LA) performed five over-ground barefoot walking and five barefoot running trials at a self-selected velocity while three-dimensional kinematics and ground reaction forces were recorded. Peak knee abduction moments and time-to-peak knee abduction moments were calculated using Visual 3D. High-arched athletes had smaller peak knee abduction moments compared to low-arched athletes during walking (KAM1: p=0.019; KAM2: p=0.015) and running (p=0.010). No differences were observed in time-to-peak knee abduction moment during walking (KAM1: p=0.360; KAM2: p=0.085) or running (p=0.359). These findings demonstrate that foot type is associated with altered frontal plane knee kinetics which may contribute to patellofemoral pain. Future research should address the efficacy of clinical interventions including orthotics and rehabilitation programs in these athletes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Higher-level fusion for military operations based on abductive inference: proof of principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pantaleev, Aleksandar V.; Josephson, John

    2006-04-01

    The ability of contemporary military commanders to estimate and understand complicated situations already suffers from information overload, and the situation can only grow worse. We describe a prototype application that uses abductive inferencing to fuse information from multiple sensors to evaluate the evidence for higher-level hypotheses that are close to the levels of abstraction needed for decision making (approximately JDL levels 2 and 3). Abductive inference (abduction, inference to the best explanation) is a pattern of reasoning that occurs naturally in diverse settings such as medical diagnosis, criminal investigations, scientific theory formation, and military intelligence analysis. Because abduction is part of common-sense reasoning, implementations of it can produce reasoning traces that are very human understandable. Automated abductive inferencing can be deployed to augment human reasoning, taking advantage of computation to process large amounts of information, and to bypass limits to human attention and short-term memory. We illustrate the workings of the prototype system by describing an example of its use for small-unit military operations in an urban setting. Knowledge was encoded as it might be captured prior to engagement from a standard military decision making process (MDMP) and analysis of commander's priority intelligence requirements (PIR). The system is able to reasonably estimate the evidence for higher-level hypotheses based on information from multiple sensors. Its inference processes can be examined closely to verify correctness. Decision makers can override conclusions at any level and changes will propagate appropriately.

  2. Functional evaluation of patient after arthroscopic repair of rotator cuff tear.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rohit; Jadhav, Umesh

    2014-06-01

    Rotator cuff tear is a common problem either after trauma or after degenerative tear in old age group. Arthroscopic repair is the current concept of rotator cuff repair. Here, we are trying to evaluate the functional outcome after arthroscopic repair of full thickness rotator cuff tear (single row) in Indian population. Twenty five patients (14 males and 11 females) who underwent arthroscopic repair of full thickness rotator cuff tear at a single institution were included in the study. Postoperatively patient's shoulder was rated according to UCLA score, pain was graded according to the visual analog score. The range of motion was analysed and documented. The mean age of the patients were 50.48 years. The preoperative VAS score mode was 7 and post operative VAS was 1 (p value <0.001). The UCLA grading was good in 80% (n = 20), fair in 12% (n = 3), excellent in 8% (n = 2) and poor results were seen in none of the patients. The mean UCLA improved from a score of 15.84 to 30.28 with a p value <0.001. Mean postoperative forward flexion was 161.6°, mean abduction was 147.6° and mean external rotation was 45.4°. Arthroscopic repair is a good procedure for full thickness rotator cuff tear with minimal complications. The newer double row repair claims to be biomechanically superior with faster healing rates without functional advantages, hence we used a single row repair considering the Indian population and the cost effectiveness of the surgery with good to excellent results.

  3. The relationship between abduction deficit and reoperation among patients with infantile esotropia.

    PubMed

    Rajavi, Zhale; Sabbaghi, Hamideh; Torkian, Pooya; Behradfar, Narges; Yaseri, Mehdi; Feizi, Mohadeseh; Faghihi, Mohammad; Sheibani, Kourosh

    2018-01-01

    To determine the relationship between abduction deficit and reoperation among patients with infantile esotropia (IET). The records of 216 patients (432 eyes) with IET who underwent surgery, from 2010 to 2015 were studied. Patients with IET whose deviation appeared before 6mo of age and had stable preoperative deviation in two examinations with at least 2wk apart and a minimum 3mo postoperative follow up were included. Cases with early onset accommodative esotropia, congenital cataract, retinopathy of prematurity (ROP), manifest nystagmus, fundus lesions, neurologic and ophthalmic anomalies, 6 th nerve palsy and Duane's syndrome were excluded. Preoperative abduction deficit was considered from -1 to -3 grading scale. Three months after surgery, children were classified into no-need reoperation [deviation≤15 prism diopters (PD)], and need-reoperation groups (deviation>15 PD). In this retrospective study, 117 female and 99 male patients with the mean surgical age of 4.7±6.4y were included. Reoperation rate was 33.3% and 16.0% in IET patients with and without abduction deficit, respectively in patients who had a history of late surgery. Abduction deficit increased the odds of reoperation by 82% [OR=1.82, 95% confidence interval (CI) =1.05 to 3.19, P =0.003] in patients who had a history of late surgery (>2 years old, P =0.021). Abduction deficit was improved significantly after operation ( P <0.001). Based on our results, abduction deficit can be considered as a risk factor of reoperation in IET patients who are operated at the age of more than 2y.

  4. The Influence of Task Constraints on the Glenohumeral Horizontal Abduction Angle of the Overarm Throw of Novice Throwers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breslin, Casey M.; Garner, John C.; Rudisill, Mary E.; Parish, Loraine E.; St. Onge, Paul M.; Campbell, Brian J.; Weimar, Wendi H.

    2009-01-01

    This study determines the effects of three baseballs and softballs of different masses (0.113 kg, 0.198 kg, 0.340 kg) and regulation diameters (22.86 and 30.48 cm, respectively) on the glenohumeral horizontal abduction angle of an overarm throw performed by young children who were novice throwers. Glenohumeral horizontal abduction angle was…

  5. Missing, Abducted, Runaway, and Thrownaway Children in America. First Report: Numbers and Characteristics, National Incidence Studies. Executive Summary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finkelhor, David; And Others

    What has in the past been called the missing children problem is in reality a set of at least five distinct problems, each of which needs to be researched, analyzed, and treated separately. The problems are family abductions, nonfamily abductions, runaways, thrownaways, and lost, injured, or otherwise missing children. Many of the children in at…

  6. Evaluation of a Commercially Available Program and in Situ Training by Parents to Teach Abduction-Prevention Skills to Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beck, Kimberly V.; Miltenberger, Raymond G.

    2009-01-01

    Child abduction is a serious problem; therefore, it is essential that researchers evaluate the efficacy of commercially available abduction-prevention programs. A multiple baseline design across participants (ages 6 to 8 years) was used to evaluate the effects of a training program, The Safe Side. Experimenters assessed safety responses in situ in…

  7. A Preliminary Evaluation of Two Behavioral Skills Training Procedures for Teaching Abduction-Prevention Skills to Schoolchildren

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Brigitte M; Miltenberger, Raymond G; Knudson, Peter; Egemo-Helm, Kristin; Kelso, Pamela; Jostad, Candice; Langley, Linda

    2006-01-01

    Although child abduction is a low-rate event, it presents a serious threat to the safety of children. The victims of child abduction face the threat of physical and emotional injury, sexual abuse, and death. Previous research has shown that behavioral skills training (BST) is effective in teaching children abduction-prevention skills, although not all children learn the skills. This study compared BST only to BST with an added in situ training component to teach abduction-prevention skills in a small-group format to schoolchildren. Results showed that both programs were effective in teaching abduction-prevention skills. In addition, the scores for the group that received in situ training were significantly higher than scores for the group that received BST alone at the 3-month follow-up assessment. PMID:16602383

  8. Roles of Abductive Reasoning and Prior Belief in Children's Generation of Hypotheses about Pendulum Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kwon, Yong-Ju; Jeong, Jin-Su; Park, Yun-Bok

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to test the hypothesis that student's abductive reasoning skills play an important role in the generation of hypotheses on pendulum motion tasks. To test the hypothesis, a hypothesis-generating test on pendulum motion, and a prior-belief test about pendulum motion were developed and administered to a sample of…

  9. Family Abduction Outcomes: Factors Associated with Duration and Emotional Trauma to Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plass, Peggy S.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Examines influences surrounding two specific outcomes of family abduction events: duration of the episode and the likelihood of emotional trauma to children involved. Findings indicate duration is influenced by preparedness, planning and intent, and with difficulty in physically locating the child. Emotional harm is associated with child…

  10. Evaluation of movements of lower limbs in non-professional ballet dancers: hip abduction and flexion

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The literature indicated that the majority of professional ballet dancers present static and active dynamic range of motion difference between left and right lower limbs, however, no previous study focused this difference in non-professional ballet dancers. In this study we aimed to evaluate active movements of the hip in non-professional classical dancers. Methods We evaluated 10 non professional ballet dancers (16-23 years old). We measured the active range of motion and flexibility through Well Banks. We compared active range of motion between left and right sides (hip flexion and abduction) and performed correlation between active movements and flexibility. Results There was a small difference between the right and left sides of the hip in relation to the movements of flexion and abduction, which suggest the dominant side of the subjects, however, there was no statistical significance. Bank of Wells test revealed statistical difference only between the 1st and the 3rd measurement. There was no correlation between the movements of the hip (abduction and flexion, right and left sides) with the three test measurements of the bank of Wells. Conclusion There is no imbalance between the sides of the hip with respect to active abduction and flexion movements in non-professional ballet dancers. PMID:21819566

  11. Characteristics of Abductive Inquiry in Earth Science: An Undergraduate Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oh, Phil Seok

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this case study was to describe characteristic features of abductive inquiry learning activities in the domain of earth science. Participants were undergraduate junior and senior students who were enrolled in an earth science education course offered for preservice secondary science teachers at a university in Korea. The undergraduate…

  12. Efficacy of the Stranger Safety Abduction-Prevention Program and Parent-Conducted in Situ Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miltenberger, Raymond G.; Fogel, Victoria A.; Beck, Kimberly V.; Koehler, Shannon; Shayne, Rachel; Noah, Jennifer; McFee, Krystal; Perdomo, Andrea; Chan, Paula; Simmons, Danica; Godish, Danielle

    2013-01-01

    Using a control group design, we evaluated the effectiveness of the "Stranger Safety" DVD (The Safe Side, 2004) and parent training of abduction-prevention skills with 6- to 8-year-old children. Children in the training or control group who did not demonstrate the safety skills received in situ training from their parents. There was no…

  13. Activation of the gluteus maximus and hamstring muscles during prone hip extension with knee flexion in three hip abduction positions.

    PubMed

    Kang, Sun-Young; Jeon, Hye-Seon; Kwon, Ohyun; Cynn, Heon-Seock; Choi, Boram

    2013-08-01

    The direction of fiber alignment within a muscle is known to influence the effectiveness of muscle contraction. However, most of the commonly used clinical gluteus maximus (GM) exercises do not consider the direction of fiber alignment within the muscle. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of hip abduction position on the EMG (electromyography) amplitude and onset time of the GM and hamstrings (HAM) during prone hip extension with knee flexion (PHEKF) exercise. Surface EMG signals were recorded from the GM and HAM during PHEKF exercise in three hip abduction positions: 0°, 15°, and 30°. Thirty healthy subjects voluntarily participated in this study. The results show that GM EMG amplitude was greatest in the 30° hip abduction position, followed by 15° and then 0° hip abduction during PHEKF exercise. On the other hand, the HAM EMG amplitude at 0° hip abduction was significantly greater than at 15° and 30° hip abduction. Additionally, GM EMG onset firing was delayed relative to that of the HAM at 0° hip abduction. On the contrary, the GM EMG onset occurred earlier than the HAM in the 15° and 30° hip abduction positions. These findings indicate that performing PHEKF exercise in the 30° hip abduction position may be recommended as an effective way to facilitate the GM muscle activity and advance the firing time of the GM muscle in asymptomatic individuals. This finding provides preliminary evidence that GM EMG amplitude and onset time can be modified by the degree of hip abduction. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Postoperative physical therapy program for latissimus dorsi and teres major tendons transfer to rotator cuff in children with obstetrical brachial plexus injury.

    PubMed

    Safoury, Yasser A; Eldesoky, Mohamed T; Abutaleb, Enas E; Atteya, Mohamed R; Gabr, Ahmed M

    2017-04-01

    The transfer of latissimus dorsi and teres major tendons to rotator cuff have been developed to rebalance the muscular dysfunction and improve shoulder range of motion in children with obstetrical brachial plexus palsy (OBPP). No previous study reported the ideal postoperative physical therapy program for these cases. The aim of the present study was to design appropriate postoperative physical therapy (PT) program after latissimus dorsi and teres major tendons transfer to rotator cuff in OBPP to improve upper limb function. Time series design. The patients were recruited from outpatient clinic of Kasr EL Aini Hospital, Cairo, Egypt. Forty seven OBPP infants (4.64±1.21 years with a range of 2.5 to 7 years, 21male and26 female) were allocated to one group. All patients had functional limitation in the involved arm due to muscle paralysis and contracture. Twenty-five patients had C5-C6 nerve root lesions while 22 had C5-C6-C7 nerve root lesions. The children underwent the surgical procedures of the transfer of latissimus dorsi and teres major tendons to rotator cuff. After the surgery the children participated in a designed physical therapy program for 6 months. Active shoulder abduction, flexion and external rotation range of motion (ROM) were assessed by electrogoniometer, and functional assessments were measured using the modified Mallet scale. All measurements were taken preoperative, 6 weeks, 3 months, and 6 months postoperatively after the application of the designed PT program. Repeated measure analysis of variance (ANOVA) followed by Bonferroni post-hoc test were used to show the improvement in all measured variables. Analysis revealed that shoulder abduction, flexion and external rotation ROM and shoulder function measured by modified Mallet scale were significantly improved (P<0.0001) after the designed postoperative PT program. It can be concluded that the combination treatment of surgical procedure and the postoperative physical therapy program seem to

  15. Effects of low-level laser therapy in combination with physiotherapy in the management of rotator cuff tendinitis.

    PubMed

    Eslamian, Fariba; Shakouri, Seyyed Kazem; Ghojazadeh, Morteza; Nobari, Ozra Eslampanah; Eftekharsadat, Bina

    2012-09-01

    Rotator cuff tendinitis is one of the main causes of shoulder pain. The objective of this study was to evaluate the possible additive effects of low-power laser treatment in combination with conventional physiotherapy endeavors in these patients. A total of 50 patients who were referred to the Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Clinic with shoulder pain and rotator cuff disorders were selected. Pain severity measured with visual analogue scale (VAS), abduction, and external rotation range of motion in shoulder joint was measured by goniometry, and evaluation of daily functional abilities of patients was measured by shoulder disability questionnaire. Twenty-five of the above patients were randomly assigned into the control group and received only routine physiotherapy. The other 25 patients were assigned into the experimental group and received conventional therapy plus low-level laser therapy (4 J/cm(2) at each point over a maximum of ten painful points of shoulder region for total 5 min duration). The above measurements were assessed at the end of the third week of therapy in each group and the results were analyzed statistically. In both groups, statistically significant improvement was detected in all outcome measures compared to baseline (p < 0.05). Comparison between two different groups revealed better results for control of pain (reduction in VAS average) and shoulder disability problems in the experimental group versus the control (3.1 ± 2.2 vs. 5 ± 2.6, p = 0.029 and 4.4 ± 3.1 vs. 8.5 ± 5.1, p = 0.031, respectively ) after intervention. Positive objective signs also had better results in the experimental group, but the mean range of active abduction (144.92 ± 31.6 vs. 132.80 ± 31.3) and external rotation (78.0 ± 19.5 vs. 76.3 ± 19.1) had no significant difference between the two groups (p = 0.20 and 0.77, respectively). As one of physical modalities, gallium-arsenide low-power laser combined with

  16. Postoperative full abduction in a patient of Duane retraction syndrome without an abducens nerve: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae Hyoung; Hwang, Jeong-Min

    2017-05-19

    Duane retraction syndrome (DRS) consists of abduction deficit, globe retraction and upshoots or downshoots with adduction. The abducens nerve on the affected side is absent in type 1 DRS. After bilateral medial rectus muscle recession in unilateral type 1 DRS may improve the abduction limitation, but still more than -3 limitation remains. A 6-month-old boy presented with esotropia which had been noticed in early infancy. He showed limited abduction, fissure narrowing on attempted adduction and a small upshoot OS. Left abducens nerve was not identified on magnetic resonance imaging compatible with Duane retraction syndrome type 1. He showed full abduction after bilateral medial rectus recession of 6.0 mm at the age of 9 months, and remained orthotropia with full abduction OU 2 years postoperatively. He is my only patient with Duane retraction syndrome who showed full abduction after bilateral medial rectus recession. A patient with the type 1 Duane retraction syndrome rarely may show full abduction after bilateral medial rectus recession mimicking infantile esotropia.

  17. Gender differences in knee abduction during weight-bearing activities: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Cronström, Anna; Creaby, Mark W; Nae, Jenny; Ageberg, Eva

    2016-09-01

    Increased knee abduction during weight-bearing activities is suggested to be a contributing factor for the high knee injury risk reported in women. However, studies investigating gender difference in knee abduction are inconclusive. To systematically review gender-differences in knee abduction during weight-bearing activities in individuals with or without knee injury. A systematic review and meta-analysis were conducted according to the PRISMA guidelines. A search in the databases Medline, CINAHL and EMBASE was performed until September 2015. Inclusion criteria were studies that reported (1) gender differences, (2) healthy individuals and/or those with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) deficiency or reconstruction or patellofemoral pain PFP, and (3) knee abduction assessed with either motion analysis or visual observation during weight-bearing activity. Fifty-eight articles met the inclusion criteria. Women with PFP had greater peak knee abduction compared to men (Std diff in mean; -1.34, 95%CI; -1.83 to -0.84). In healthy individuals, women performed weight-bearing tasks with greater knee abduction throughout the movement (initial contact, peak abduction, excursion) (Std diff in mean; -0.68 to -0.79, 95%CI; -1.04 to -0.37). In subgroup analyses by task, differences in knee abduction between genders were present for most tasks, including running, jump landings and cutting movements. There were too few studies in individuals with ACL injury to perform meta-analysis. The gender difference in knee abduction during weight-bearing activities should be considered in training programs aimed at preventing or treating knee injury. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Accuracy and reliability testing of two methods to measure internal rotation of the glenohumeral joint.

    PubMed

    Hall, Justin M; Azar, Frederick M; Miller, Robert H; Smith, Richard; Throckmorton, Thomas W

    2014-09-01

    We compared accuracy and reliability of a traditional method of measurement (most cephalad vertebral spinous process that can be reached by a patient with the extended thumb) to estimates made with the shoulder in abduction to determine if there were differences between the two methods. Six physicians with fellowship training in sports medicine or shoulder surgery estimated measurements in 48 healthy volunteers. Three were randomly chosen to make estimates of both internal rotation measurements for each volunteer. An independent observer made objective measurements on lateral scoliosis films (spinous process method) or with a goniometer (abduction method). Examiners were blinded to objective measurements as well as to previous estimates. Intraclass coefficients for interobserver reliability for the traditional method averaged 0.75, indicating good agreement among observers. The difference in vertebral level estimated by the examiner and the actual radiographic level averaged 1.8 levels. The intraclass coefficient for interobserver reliability for the abduction method averaged 0.81 for all examiners, indicating near-perfect agreement. Confidence intervals indicated that estimates were an average of 8° different from the objective goniometer measurements. Pearson correlation coefficients of intraobserver reliability for the abduction method averaged 0.94, indicating near-perfect agreement within observers. Confidence intervals demonstrated repeated estimates between 5° and 10° of the original. Internal rotation estimates made with the shoulder abducted demonstrated interobserver reliability superior to that of spinous process estimates, and reproducibility was high. On the basis of this finding, we now take glenohumeral internal rotation measurements with the shoulder in abduction and use a goniometer to maximize accuracy and objectivity. Copyright © 2014 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Mechanical risk of rotator cuff repair failure during passive movements: A simulation-based study.

    PubMed

    Haering, Diane; Blache, Yoann; Raison, Maxime; Begon, Mickael

    2015-12-01

    Despite improvements in rotator cuff surgery techniques, re-tear rate remains above 20% and increases with tear severity. Mechanical stresses to failure of repaired tendons have been reported. While optimal immobilization postures were proposed to minimize this stress, post-operative rehabilitation protocols have never been assessed with respect to these values. Purpose was to use musculoskeletal simulation to predict when the stress in repaired tendons exceeds safety limits during passive movements. Hence, guidelines could be provided towards safer post-operative exercises. Sixteen healthy participants volunteered in passive three-dimensional shoulder range-of-motion and passive rehabilitation exercises assessment. Stress in all rotator cuff tendons was predicted during each movement by means of a musculoskeletal model using simulations with different type and size of tears. Safety stress thresholds were defined based on repaired tendon loads to failure reported in the literature and used to discriminate safe from unsafe ranges-of-motion. Increased tear size and multiple tendons tear decreased safe range-of-motion. Mostly, glenohumeral elevations below 38°, above 65°, or performed with the arm held in internal rotation cause excessive stresses in most types and sizes of injury during abduction, scaption or flexion. Larger safe amplitudes of elevation are found in scapular plane for supraspinatus alone, supraspinatus plus infraspinatus, and supraspinatus plus subscapularis tears. This study reinforces that passive early rehabilitation exercises could contribute to re-tear due to excessive stresses. Recommendations arising from this study, for instance to keep the arm externally rotated during elevation in case of supraspinatus or supraspinatus plus infraspinatus tear, could help prevent re-tear. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Increased supraspinatus tendon thickness following fatigue loading in rotator cuff tendinopathy: potential implications for exercise therapy.

    PubMed

    McCreesh, Karen M; Purtill, Helen; Donnelly, Alan E; Lewis, Jeremy S

    2017-01-01

    Exercise imparts a load on tendon tissue that leads to changes in tendon properties. Studies suggest that loading immediately reduces tendon thickness, with a loss of this response in symptomatic tendinopathy. No studies investigating the response of tendon dimensions to load for the rotator cuff tendons exist. This study aimed to examine the short-term effect of loading on the thickness of the supraspinatus tendon and acromiohumeral distance those with and without rotator cuff tendinopathy. Participants were 20 painfree controls, and 23 people with painful rotator cuff tendinopathy. Supraspinatus tendon thickness and acromiohumeral distance were measured using ultrasound scans before, and at three time points after loading (1, 6 and 24 hours). Loading involved isokinetic eccentric and concentric external rotation and abduction. There was a significant increase in supraspinatus tendon thickness in the pain group at 1 (7%, ∆=0.38, 95% CI 0.19 to 0.57) and 6 hours (11%, ∆=0.53, 95% CI 0.34 to 0.71), although only the 6 hours difference exceeded minimal detectable difference. In contrast, there was a small non-significant reduction in thickness in controls. The acromiohumeral distance reduced significantly in both groups at 1 hour (controls: ∆=0.64, 95% CI 0.38 to 0.90; pain: ∆=1.1, 95% CI 0.85 to 1.33), with a larger change from baseline in the pain group. Those diagnosed with painful supraspinatus tendinopathy demonstrated increased thickening with delayed return to baseline following loading. Rehabilitation professionals may need to take into account the impact of loading to fatigue when planning rehabilitation programmes.

  1. Increased supraspinatus tendon thickness following fatigue loading in rotator cuff tendinopathy: potential implications for exercise therapy

    PubMed Central

    McCreesh, Karen M; Purtill, Helen; Donnelly, Alan E; Lewis, Jeremy S

    2017-01-01

    Background/aim Exercise imparts a load on tendon tissue that leads to changes in tendon properties. Studies suggest that loading immediately reduces tendon thickness, with a loss of this response in symptomatic tendinopathy. No studies investigating the response of tendon dimensions to load for the rotator cuff tendons exist. This study aimed to examine the short-term effect of loading on the thickness of the supraspinatus tendon and acromiohumeral distance those with and without rotator cuff tendinopathy. Methods Participants were 20 painfree controls, and 23 people with painful rotator cuff tendinopathy. Supraspinatus tendon thickness and acromiohumeral distance were measured using ultrasound scans before, and at three time points after loading (1, 6 and 24 hours). Loading involved isokinetic eccentric and concentric external rotation and abduction. Results There was a significant increase in supraspinatus tendon thickness in the pain group at 1 (7%, ∆=0.38, 95% CI 0.19 to 0.57) and 6 hours (11%, ∆=0.53, 95% CI 0.34 to 0.71), although only the 6 hours difference exceeded minimal detectable difference. In contrast, there was a small non-significant reduction in thickness in controls. The acromiohumeral distance reduced significantly in both groups at 1 hour (controls: ∆=0.64, 95% CI 0.38 to 0.90; pain: ∆=1.1, 95% CI 0.85 to 1.33), with a larger change from baseline in the pain group. Conclusion Those diagnosed with painful supraspinatus tendinopathy demonstrated increased thickening with delayed return to baseline following loading. Rehabilitation professionals may need to take into account the impact of loading to fatigue when planning rehabilitation programmes. PMID:29333279

  2. Reconstruction of an infrared band of meteorological satellite imagery with abductive networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singer, Harvey A.; Cockayne, John E.; Versteegen, Peter L.

    1995-01-01

    As the current fleet of meteorological satellites age, the accuracy of the imagery sensed on a spectral channel of the image scanning system is continually and progressively degraded by noise. In time, that data may even become unusable. We describe a novel approach to the reconstruction of the noisy satellite imagery according to empirical functional relationships that tie the spectral channels together. Abductive networks are applied to automatically learn the empirical functional relationships between the data sensed on the other spectral channels to calculate the data that should have been sensed on the corrupted channel. Using imagery unaffected by noise, it is demonstrated that abductive networks correctly predict the noise-free observed data.

  3. Uninformed sacrifice: Evidence against long-range alarm transmission in foraging ants exposed to localized abduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tejera, F.; Reyes, A.; Altshuler, E.

    2016-07-01

    It is well established that danger information can be transmitted by ants through relatively small distances, provoking either a state of alarm when they move away from potentially dangerous stimulus, or charge toward it aggressively. There is almost no knowledge if danger information can be transmitted along large distances. In this paper, we abduct leaf cutting ants of the species Atta insularis while they forage in their natural environment at a certain point of the foraging line, so ants make a "U" turn to escape from the danger zone and go back to the nest. Our results strongly suggest that those ants do not transmit "danger information" to other nestmates marching towards the abduction area. The individualistic behavior of the ants returning from the danger zone results in a depression of the foraging activity due to the systematic sacrifice of non-informed individuals.

  4. Absence of center of mass control for leg abduction in long-term weightlessness in humans.

    PubMed

    Pedrocchi, Alessandra; Baroni, Guido; Mouchnino, Laurence; Ferrigno, Giancarlo; Pedotti, Antonio; Massion, Jean

    2002-02-22

    The present investigation describes for the first time leg lateral abduction performance during long-term microgravity exposure. Two astronauts took part in the experiments, starting 2 weeks into the mission and lasting for 5 months. Results on joint angles kinematics confirm previous investigations on parabolic flights, showing good task fulfillment for both subjects. Special interest was focused on whole body center of mass (CM) positioning. As in short-term microgravity, no initial CM lateral shift toward the 'supporting' leg was observed. In contrast with short-term microgravity and ground-based experiments, no stabilization of the CM medio-lateral position was found but a significant shift of CM toward the moving leg was observed. This suggests that the adaptation to sustained weightlessness might have led to a microgravity-specific motor strategy for leg abduction, which was not focused on CM strategy.

  5. Wide step width reduces knee abduction moment of obese adults during stair negotiation.

    PubMed

    Yocum, Derek; Weinhandl, Joshua T; Fairbrother, Jeffrey T; Zhang, Songning

    2018-05-15

    An increased likelihood of developing obesity-related knee osteoarthritis may be associated with increased peak internal knee abduction moments (KAbM). Increases in step width (SW) may act to reduce this moment. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of increased SW on knee biomechanics during stair negotiation of healthy-weight and obese participants. Participants (24: 10 obese and 14 healthy-weight) used stairs and walked over level ground while walking at their preferred speed in two different SW conditions - preferred and wide (200% preferred). A 2 × 2 (group × condition) mixed model analysis of variance was performed to analyze differences between groups and conditions (p < 0.05). Increased SW increased the loading-response peak knee extension moment during descent and level gait, decreased loading-response KAbMs, knee extension and abduction range of motion (ROM) during ascent, and knee adduction ROM during descent. Increased SW increased loading-response peak mediolateral ground reaction force (GRF), increased peak knee abduction angle during ascent, and decreased peak knee adduction angle during descent and level gait. Obese participants experienced disproportionate changes in loading-response mediolateral GRF, KAbM and peak adduction angle during level walking, and peak knee abduction angle and ROM during ascent. Increased SW successfully decreased loading-response peak KAbM. Implications of this finding are that increased SW may decrease medial compartment knee joint loading, decreasing pain and reducing joint deterioration. Increased SW influenced obese and healthy-weight participants differently and should be investigated further. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Biomechanical comparison between the trapezius transfer and latissimus transfer for irreparable posterosuperior rotator cuff tears.

    PubMed

    Omid, Reza; Heckmann, Nathanael; Wang, Lawrence; McGarry, Michelle H; Vangsness, C Thomas; Lee, Thay Q

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the biomechanical effects of the lower trapezius transfer and to compare it with the latissimus dorsi transfer in a cadaveric model of a massive posterosuperior rotator cuff tear. Eight cadaveric shoulders were tested at 0°, 30°, and 60° of shoulder abduction. Range of motion, humeral rotational position due to muscle loading, joint reaction forces, and kinematics were measured. All specimens were tested in 4 conditions: intact, massive posterosuperior cuff tear, lower trapezius transfer, and latissimus dorsi transfer. A repeated-measures analysis of variance was used for statistical analysis. Internal rotation due to muscle loading increased with massive cuff tear compared with the intact condition (P < .05). The latissimus transfer corrected this change at 0° abduction, whereas the trapezius transfer corrected this at all abduction angles. The massive cuff tear decreased glenohumeral joint compression forces at all abduction angles; these forces were restored by the lower trapezius transfer (P < .05). At maximum humeral internal rotation and 0° of abduction, the humeral head apex shifted superiorly and laterally with massive cuff tear (P < .05); this shift was more closely restored to intact values by the trapezius transfer compared with the latissimus transfer (P < .05). The lower trapezius transfer is superior to the latissimus transfer at restoring native glenohumeral kinematics and joint reaction forces in our cadaveric model. It may be a promising treatment option for patients with a massive irreparable rotator cuff tear. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Behavioural processes in social context: female abductions, male herding and female grooming in hamadryas baboons.

    PubMed

    Polo, Pablo; Colmenares, Fernando

    2012-06-01

    The formation of bonds between strangers is an event that occurs routinely in many social animals, including humans, and, as social bonds in general, they affect the individuals' welfare and biological fitness. The present study was motivated by an interest in the behavioural processes that drive bond formation in a social context of hostility, in which the incumbent partners vary greatly in physical power and reproductive interests, a situation in which individuals of many group-living species find themselves often throughout their lives. We focused on the quantitative analysis of female abductions via male aggressive herding in a nonhuman primate, the hamadryas baboon, in which intersexual bonds are known to be strong. We tested three hypotheses informed by sexual conflict/sexual coercion theory (male herding-as-conditioning and female grooming-as-appeasement) and by socioecological theory (unit size and female competition). The results supported the predictions: males resorted to coercive tactics (aggressive herding) with abducted females, and abducted females elevated the amount of grooming directed at their new unit males; in fact, they escaped from the otherwise negative effect of unit size on female-to-male grooming. These findings reveal that conflicts of interest are natural ingredients underpinning social bonds and that resorting to coercive aggression may be an option especially when partners differ greatly in their physical power. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Asymmetry of lumbopelvic movement patterns during active hip abduction is a risk factor for low back pain development during standing.

    PubMed

    Sorensen, Christopher J; Johnson, Molly B; Norton, Barbara J; Callaghan, Jack P; Van Dillen, Linda R

    2016-12-01

    An induced-pain paradigm has been used in back-healthy people to understand risk factors for developing low back pain (LBP) during prolonged standing. We examined asymmetry of lumbopelvic movement timing during a clinical test of active hip abduction in back-healthy people who developed LBP symptoms during standing (Pain Developers; PDs) compared to back-healthy people who did not develop LBP symptoms during standing (Non Pain Developers, NPDs). Participants completed the hip abduction test while movement was recorded with a motion capture system. Difference in time between start of hip and lumbopelvic movement was calculated (startdiff). PDs moved the lumbopelvic region earlier during left hip abduction than right hip abduction. There was no difference between sides in NPDs. In PDs, the amount of asymmetry was related to average symptom intensity during standing. Asymmetric lumbopelvic movement patterns may be a risk factor for LBP development during prolonged standing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Asymmetry of lumbopelvic movement patterns during active hip abduction is a risk factor for low back pain development during standing

    PubMed Central

    Sorensen, Christopher J.; Johnson, Molly B.; Norton, Barbara J.; Callaghan, Jack P.; Van Dillen, Linda R.

    2016-01-01

    An induced-pain paradigm has been used in back-healthy people to understand risk factors for developing low back pain (LBP) during prolonged standing. We examined asymmetry of lumbopelvic movement timing during a clinical test of active hip abduction in back-healthy people who developed LBP symptoms during standing (Pain Developers; PDs) compared to back-healthy people who did not develop LBP symptoms during standing (Non Pain Developers, NPDs). Participants completed the hip abduction test while movement was recorded with a motion capture system. Difference in time between start of hip and lumbopelvic movement was calculated (startdiff). PDs moved the lumbopelvic region earlier during left hip abduction than right hip abduction. There was no difference between sides in NPDs. In PDs, the amount of asymmetry was related to average symptom intensity during standing. Asymmetric lumbopelvic movement patterns may be a risk factor for LBP development during prolonged standing. PMID:27744105

  10. Effect of acetabular cup abduction angle on wear of ultrahigh-molecular-weight polyethylene in hip simulator testing.

    PubMed

    Korduba, Laryssa A; Essner, Aaron; Pivec, Robert; Lancin, Perry; Mont, Michael A; Wang, Aiguo; Delanois, Ronald E

    2014-10-01

    The effect of acetabular component positioning on the wear rates of metal-on-polyethylene articulations has not been extensively studied. Placement of acetabular cups at abduction angles of more than 40° has been noted as a possible reason for early failure caused by increased wear. We conducted a study to evaluate the effects of different acetabular cup abduction angles on polyethylene wear rate, wear area, contact pressure, and contact area. Our in vitro study used a hip joint simulator and finite element analysis to assess the effects of cup orientation at 4 angles (0°, 40°, 50°, 70°) on wear and contact properties. Polyethylene bearings with 28-mm cobalt-chrome femoral heads were cycled in an environment mimicking in vivo joint fluid to determine the volumetric wear rate after 10 million cycles. Contact pressure and contact area for each cup abduction angle were assessed using finite element analysis. Results were correlated with cup abduction angles to determine if there were any differences among the 4 groups. The inverse relationship between volumetric wear rate and acetabular cup inclination angle demonstrated less wear with steeper cup angles. The largest abduction angle (70°) had the lowest contact area, largest contact pressure, and smallest head coverage. Conversely, the smallest abduction angle (0°) had the most wear and most head coverage. Polyethylene wear after total hip arthroplasty is a major cause of osteolysis and aseptic loosening, which may lead to premature implant failure. Several studies have found that high wear rates for cups oriented at steep angles contributed to their failure. Our data demonstrated that larger cup abduction angles were associated with lower, not higher, wear. However, this potentially "protective" effect is likely counteracted by other complications of steep cup angles, including impingement, instability, and edge loading. These factors may be more relevant in explaining why implants fail at a higher rate if

  11. Prolotherapy for Refractory Rotator Cuff Disease: Retrospective Case-Control Study of 1-Year Follow-Up.

    PubMed

    Lee, Doo-Hyung; Kwack, Kyu-Sung; Rah, Ueon Woo; Yoon, Seung-Hyun

    2015-11-01

    To determine the efficacy of prolotherapy for refractory rotator cuff disease. Retrospective case-control study. University-affiliated tertiary care hospital. Patients with nontraumatic refractory rotator cuff disease (N=151) who were unresponsive to 3 months of aggressive conservative treatment. Of the patients, 63 received prolotherapies with 16.5% dextrose 10-ml solution (treatment group), and 63 continued conservative treatment (control group). Not applicable. Visual analog scale (VAS) score of the average shoulder pain level for the past 1 week, Shoulder Pain and Disability Index (SPADI) score, isometric strength of the shoulder abductor, active range of motion (AROM) of the shoulder, maximal tear size on ultrasonography, and number of analgesic ingestions per day. Over 1-year follow-up, 57 patients in the treatment group and 53 in the control group were analyzed. There was no significant difference between the 2 groups in age, sex, shoulder dominance, duration of symptoms, and ultrasonographic findings at pretreatment. The average number of injections in the treatment group is 4.8±1.3. Compared with the control group, VAS score, SPADI score, isometric strength of shoulder abductor, and shoulder AROM of flexion, abduction, and external rotation showed significant improvement in the treatment group. There were no adverse events. To our knowledge, this is the first study to assess the efficacy of prolotherapy in rotator cuff disease. Prolotherapy showed improvement in pain, disability, isometric strength, and shoulder AROM in patients with refractory chronic rotator cuff disease. The results suggest positive outcomes, but one should still take caution in directly interpreting it as an effective treatment option, considering the limitations of this nonrandomized retrospective study. To show the efficacy of prolotherapy, further studies on prospective randomized controlled trials will be required. Copyright © 2015 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine

  12. Real-time feedback on knee abduction moment does not improve frontal-plane knee mechanics during jump landings.

    PubMed

    Beaulieu, M L; Palmieri-Smith, R M

    2014-08-01

    Excessive knee abduction loading is a contributing factor to anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury risk. The purpose of this study was to determine whether a double-leg landing training program with real-time visual feedback improves frontal-plane mechanics during double- and single-leg landings. Knee abduction angles and moments and vertical ground reaction forces (GRF) of 21 recreationally active women were quantified for double- and single-leg landings before and after the training program. This program consisted of two sessions of double-leg jump landings with real-time visual feedback on knee abduction moments for the experimental group and without real-time feedback for the control group. No significant differences were found between training groups. In comparison with pre-training data, peak knee abduction moments decreased 12% post-training for both double- and single-leg landings; whereas peak vertical GRF decreased 8% post-training for double-leg landings only, irrespective of training group. Real-time feedback on knee abduction moments, therefore, did not significantly improve frontal-plane knee mechanics during landings. The effect of the training program on knee abduction moments, however, transferred from the double-leg landings (simple task) to single-leg landings (more complex task). Consequently, ACL injury prevention efforts may not need to focus on complex tasks during which injury occurs. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. The predictive value of the clinical sign of limited hip abduction for developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH).

    PubMed

    Čustović, Svemir; Šadić, Sahmir; Vujadinović, Aleksandar; Hrustić, Asmir; Jašarević, Mahir; Čustović, Amer; Krupić, Ferid

    2018-08-01

    Aim To assess the relationship between the clinical sign of limited hip abduction and developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH). Methods A research was conducted on 450 newborns at the Neonatal Unit at the Clinic of Gynaecology and Obstetrics and the Orthopaedics and Traumatology Clinic of the University Clinical Centre, Tuzla, between 30th August 2011 and 30th April 2012. Clinical (degree of hip abduction) and ultrasound examination of all newborns' hips were performed using the Graf method on their first day of life. Results Clinical sign of limited hip abduction showed significant predictive value for DDH. There were 67 (14.7%) newborns with the clinical sign of limited hip abduction, of which 26 (5.7%) were on the left hip, 11 (2.4%) on the right hip and 30 (6.6%) on both hips. Limited hip abduction had a positive predictive value (PPV) of 40.3% and a negative predictive value (NPV) of 80.4% for DDH. Conclusion Limited hip abduction, especially unilateral, is a useful and important clinical sign of DDH. Doctors, who perform the first examination of the child after birth, would have to pay attention to this clinical sign. Newborns with this clinical sign would have to go to an ultrasound examination of the hips for further diagnosis. Copyright© by the Medical Assotiation of Zenica-Doboj Canton.

  14. Increased Upper Trapezius Muscle Stiffness in Overhead Athletes with Rotator Cuff Tendinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Leong, Hio Teng; Hug, François; Fu, Siu Ngor

    2016-01-01

    Although excessive tension of the upper trapezius (UT) is thought to contribute to rotator cuff tendinopathy, no study examined UT tension in athletes with and without rotator cuff tendinopathy. Here we used UT shear modulus measured using ultrasound shear wave elastography as an index of muscle stiffness/tension. The aims of this study were twofold: 1) to determine whether the UT muscle shear modulus is altered in athletes with rotator cuff tendinopathy compared to asymptomatic athletes, and 2) to detect optimal cut-off points of UT shear modulus in identifying athletes with rotator cuff tendinopathy. Forty-three male volleyball players (17 asymptomatic and 26 with rotator cuff tendinopathy, mean age = 22.9±3.5 years) participated in the study. UT shear modulus was quantified during active arm holding at 30° and 60° of shoulder abduction and passive arm positioning at 0°, 30° and 60° of shoulder abduction. During the active tasks, the UT shear modulus was higher in athletes with rotator cuff tendinopathy than the asymptomatic athletes (p = 0.002), regardless the arm position. During the passive tasks, athletes with rotator cuff tendinopathy exhibited a higher UT shear modulus than asymptomatic athletes only at 0° of shoulder abduction (13.0±2.5 kPa vs 10.2±1.8 kPa, p = 0.001). When considering the active task, an optimal cut-off shear modulus of 12.0 kPa at 30° of shoulder abduction (sensitivity = 0.84, specificity = 0.57, AUC = 0.757, p = 0.008) and 9.5 kPa at 60° of shoulder abduction (sensitivity = 0.88, specificity = 0.67, AUC = 0.816, p = 0.002) was detected. When considering the passive task at 0° of shoulder abduction, a cut-off of 12.2 kPa was found (sensitivity = 0.73, AUC = 0.817, p = 0.001). Findings from the present study show that monitoring passive and active UT muscle shear modulus may provide important information for the prevention/rehabilitation of rotator cuff tendinopathy. PMID:27159276

  15. Increased Upper Trapezius Muscle Stiffness in Overhead Athletes with Rotator Cuff Tendinopathy.

    PubMed

    Leong, Hio Teng; Hug, François; Fu, Siu Ngor

    2016-01-01

    Although excessive tension of the upper trapezius (UT) is thought to contribute to rotator cuff tendinopathy, no study examined UT tension in athletes with and without rotator cuff tendinopathy. Here we used UT shear modulus measured using ultrasound shear wave elastography as an index of muscle stiffness/tension. The aims of this study were twofold: 1) to determine whether the UT muscle shear modulus is altered in athletes with rotator cuff tendinopathy compared to asymptomatic athletes, and 2) to detect optimal cut-off points of UT shear modulus in identifying athletes with rotator cuff tendinopathy. Forty-three male volleyball players (17 asymptomatic and 26 with rotator cuff tendinopathy, mean age = 22.9±3.5 years) participated in the study. UT shear modulus was quantified during active arm holding at 30° and 60° of shoulder abduction and passive arm positioning at 0°, 30° and 60° of shoulder abduction. During the active tasks, the UT shear modulus was higher in athletes with rotator cuff tendinopathy than the asymptomatic athletes (p = 0.002), regardless the arm position. During the passive tasks, athletes with rotator cuff tendinopathy exhibited a higher UT shear modulus than asymptomatic athletes only at 0° of shoulder abduction (13.0±2.5 kPa vs 10.2±1.8 kPa, p = 0.001). When considering the active task, an optimal cut-off shear modulus of 12.0 kPa at 30° of shoulder abduction (sensitivity = 0.84, specificity = 0.57, AUC = 0.757, p = 0.008) and 9.5 kPa at 60° of shoulder abduction (sensitivity = 0.88, specificity = 0.67, AUC = 0.816, p = 0.002) was detected. When considering the passive task at 0° of shoulder abduction, a cut-off of 12.2 kPa was found (sensitivity = 0.73, AUC = 0.817, p = 0.001). Findings from the present study show that monitoring passive and active UT muscle shear modulus may provide important information for the prevention/rehabilitation of rotator cuff tendinopathy.

  16. Rotational seismology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, William H K.

    2016-01-01

    Rotational seismology is an emerging study of all aspects of rotational motions induced by earthquakes, explosions, and ambient vibrations. It is of interest to several disciplines, including seismology, earthquake engineering, geodesy, and earth-based detection of Einstein’s gravitation waves.Rotational effects of seismic waves, together with rotations caused by soil–structure interaction, have been observed for centuries (e.g., rotated chimneys, monuments, and tombstones). Figure 1a shows the rotated monument to George Inglis observed after the 1897 Great Shillong earthquake. This monument had the form of an obelisk rising over 19 metres high from a 4 metre base. During the earthquake, the top part broke off and the remnant of some 6 metres rotated about 15° relative to the base. The study of rotational seismology began only recently when sensitive rotational sensors became available due to advances in aeronautical and astronomical instrumentations.

  17. Past-life identities, UFO abductions, and satanic ritual abuse: the social construction of memories.

    PubMed

    Spanos, N P; Burgess, C A; Burgess, M F

    1994-10-01

    People sometimes fantasize entire complex scenarios and later define these experiences as memories of actual events rather than as imaginings. This article examines research associated with three such phenomena: past-life experiences, UFO alien contact and abduction, and memory reports of childhood ritual satanic abuse. In each case, elicitation of the fantasy events is frequently associated with hypnotic procedures and structured interviews which provide strong and repeated demands for the requisite experiences, and which then legitimate the experiences as "real memories." Research associated with these phenomena supports the hypothesis that recall is reconstructive and organized in terms of current expectations and beliefs.

  18. Abduction of Arm Facilitates Correction of Kinked Peel-Away Sheath During Subclavian Central Line Placement.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sunghoon

    2015-12-01

    A tunneled central line catheter placement using a subclavian vein approach can be complicated by an occurrence of peel-away sheath kink which prevents the advancement of the catheter through the sheath. The kink is created due to the angular junction of subclavian and brachiocephalic veins which meet at 90 degree angle. A technique is described which corrects the peel-away sheath kink by extending the subclavian/brachiocephalic vein angle to greater than 90 degrees by abducting the patient's arm. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Restoration of shoulder biomechanics according to degree of repair completion in a cadaveric model of massive rotator cuff tear: importance of margin convergence and posterior cuff fixation.

    PubMed

    Oh, Joo Han; McGarry, Michelle H; Jun, Bong Jae; Gupta, Akash; Chung, Kyung Chil; Hwang, James; Lee, Thay Q

    2012-11-01

    Complete repair in massive rotator cuff tear may not be possible, allowing for only partial repair. However, the effect of partial repair on glenohumeral biomechanics has not been evaluated. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to compare the rotational range of motion (ROM), glenohumeral kinematics, and gap formation at the repaired tendon edge following massive cuff tear and repair according to the degree of repair completion. Posterior fixation will restore the altered biomechanics of massive rotator cuff tear. Controlled laboratory study. Eight cadaveric shoulders were tested at 0°, 30°, and 60° of abduction in the scapular plane. Muscle loading was applied based on physiological muscle cross-sectional area ratios. Maximum internal (MaxIR) and external rotations (MaxER) were measured. Humeral head apex (HHA) position and gap formation at the repaired tendon edge were measured using a MicroScribe from MaxIR to MaxER in 30° increments. Testing was performed for intact, massive cuff tear, complete repair, and 4 types of partial repair. A repeated-measures analysis of variance was used to determine significant differences. Massive tear significantly increased ROM and shifted HHA superiorly in MaxIR at all abduction angles (P < .05). The complete repair restored ROM to intact (P < .05), while all partial repairs did not. Abnormal HHA elevation due to massive tear was restored by all repairs (P < .05). Release of the anterior single row alone and release of the marginal convergence significantly increased gap formation at the anterior tendon edge (P < .05). This study emphasizes the importance of anterior fixation in massive cuff tear to restore rotational range of motion and decrease gap formation at the repaired tendon edge and of posterior fixation to restore abnormal glenohumeral kinematics due to massive cuff tear. If complete repair of massive cuff tear is not possible, posterior cuff (infraspinatus) repair is necessary to restore abnormal glenohumeral

  20. Acute Hip Abduction Fatigue on Lumbopelvic-Hip Complex Stability in Softball Players.

    PubMed

    Washington, Jessica; Gilmer, Gabrielle; Oliver, Gretchen

    2018-05-14

    During an overhead throw, the gluteal muscle group stabilizes the lumbopelvic-hip complex (LPHC), leading to efficient energy transfer from the lower to upper extremity. It has been shown that LPHC instability can lead to throwing pathomechanics. The single leg squat has become a common assessment for LPHC stability, and could be used to determine the effects of fatigue on throwing athletes. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of an acute abduction fatigue protocol on the LPHC of collegiate softball players via the single leg squat assessment of the leg ipsilateral to the throwing arm. Eighteen National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I softball players volunteered (20.5±1.9 years; 169.4±10.0 cm; 72.9±11.5 kg). Each participant performed a single leg squat on the leg ipsilateral to the throwing arm prior to and post side-lying hip abduction fatigue. LPHC and lower extremity kinematics were examined to determine potential effects of fatigue on LPHC stability. There were no significant main effects or interactions of LPHC or lower extremity kinematics during the single leg squat assessments across the fatigue protocol. Based on the current study, an acute bout of fatigue to the hip abductors does not affect LPHC stability in single leg squat execution. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  1. Challenges Facing Evidence-Based Prevention: Incorporating an Abductive Theory of Method.

    PubMed

    Mason, W Alex; Cogua-Lopez, Jasney; Fleming, Charles B; Scheier, Lawrence M

    2018-06-01

    Current systems used to determine whether prevention programs are "evidence-based" rely on the logic of deductive reasoning. This reliance has fostered implementation of strategies with explicitly stated evaluation criteria used to gauge program validity and suitability for dissemination. Frequently, investigators resort to the randomized controlled trial (RCT) combined with null hypothesis significance testing (NHST) as a means to rule out competing hypotheses and determine whether an intervention works. The RCT design has achieved success across numerous disciplines but is not without limitations. We outline several issues that question allegiance to the RCT, NHST, and the hypothetico-deductive method of scientific inquiry. We also discuss three challenges to the status of program evaluation including reproducibility, generalizability, and credibility of findings. As an alternative, we posit that extending current program evaluation criteria with principles drawn from an abductive theory of method (ATOM) can strengthen our ability to address these challenges and advance studies of drug prevention. Abductive reasoning involves working from observed phenomena to the generation of alternative explanations for the phenomena and comparing the alternatives to select the best possible explanation. We conclude that an ATOM can help increase the influence and impact of evidence-based prevention for population benefit.

  2. Effectiveness of prolotherapy in the treatment of chronic rotator cuff lesions.

    PubMed

    Seven, M M; Ersen, O; Akpancar, S; Ozkan, H; Turkkan, S; Yıldız, Y; Koca, K

    2017-05-01

    Rotator cuff lesions are one of the major causes of shoulder pain and dysfunction. Numerous non-surgical treatment modalities have been described for chronic rotator cuff lesions, but the debate continues over the optimal procedure. The aim of this report is to present the results of prolotherapy in the treatment of chronic refractory rotator cuff lesions. Dextrose prolotherapy will reduce pain and improve shoulder function and patient satisfaction. We recruited 120 patients with chronic rotator cuff lesions and symptoms that persisted for longer than 6 months. Patients were divided into two groups: one treated with exercise (control group; n=60) and the other treated with prolotherapy injection (prolotherapy group; n=60). In the latter, ultrasound-guided prolotherapy injections were applied under aseptic conditions. In the former, patients received a physiotherapy protocol three sessions weekly for 12 weeks. Both groups were instructed to carry out a home exercise program. Clinical assessment of shoulder function was performed using a visual analog scale (VAS) for pain, Shoulder Pain and Disability Index (SPADI), Western Ontario Rotatory Cuff (WORC) Index, patient satisfaction, and shoulder range of motion. Patients were examined at baseline, weeks 3, 6, and 12, and last follow-up (minimum of one year). A total of 101 patients (44 controls and 57 in the prolotherapy group) completed all study protocols and were included in the study. Using a within-group comparison, both groups achieved significant improvements over baseline, as measured by the VAS, SPADI, WORC index, and shoulder range of motion (P<0.001). Using a between-group comparison, a significant difference was found in the VAS scores at baseline, weeks 3, 6, and 12, and last follow-up. In addition, significant differences were found in the SPADIs and WORC indices at weeks 6 and 12 and the last follow-up. Significant differences were found in shoulder abduction and flexion at week 12 and last follow

  3. Risk Factors, Pathobiomechanics and Physical Examination of Rotator Cuff Tears

    PubMed Central

    Moulton, Samuel G.; Greenspoon, Joshua A.; Millett, Peter J.; Petri, Maximilian

    2016-01-01

    Background: It is important to appreciate the risk factors for the development of rotator cuff tears and specific physical examination maneuvers. Methods: A selective literature search was performed. Results: Numerous well-designed studies have demonstrated that common risk factors include age, occupation, and anatomic considerations such as the critical shoulder angle. Recently, research has also reported a genetic component as well. The rotator cuff axially compresses the humeral head in the glenohumeral joint and provides rotational motion and abduction. Forces are grouped into coronal and axial force couples. Rotator cuff tears are thought to occur when the force couples become imbalanced. Conclusion: Physical examination is essential to determining whether a patient has an anterosuperior or posterosuperior tear. Diagnostic accuracy increases when combining a series of examination maneuvers. PMID:27708731

  4. The effect of long and short head biceps loading on glenohumeral joint rotational range of motion and humeral head position.

    PubMed

    McGarry, Michelle H; Nguyen, Michael L; Quigley, Ryan J; Hanypsiak, Bryan; Gupta, Ranjan; Lee, Thay Q

    2016-06-01

    To evaluate the effect of loading the long and short heads of the biceps on glenohumeral range of motion and humeral head position. Eight cadaveric shoulders were tested in 60° abduction in the scapula and coronal plane. Muscle loading was applied based on cross-sectional area ratios. The short and long head of the biceps were loaded individually followed by combined loading. Range of motion was measured with 2.2 Nm torque, and the humeral head apex position was measured using a MicroScribe. A paired t test with Bonferroni correction was used for statistics. Long head loading decreased internal rotation in both the scapular (17.9 %) and coronal planes (5.7 %) and external rotation in the scapular plane (2.6 %) (P < 0.04). With only short head loading, maximum internal rotation was significantly increased in the scapular and coronal plane. Long head and short head loading shifted the humeral head apex posteriorly in maximum internal rotation in both planes with the long head shift being significantly greater than the short head. Long head loading also shifted the humeral apex inferiorly in internal rotation and inferiorly posteriorly in neutral rotation in the scapular plane. With the long head unloaded, there was a significant superior shift with short head loading in both planes. Loading the long head of the biceps had a much greater effect on glenohumeral range of motion and humeral head shift than the short head of the biceps; however, in the absence of long head loading, with the short head loaded, maximum internal rotation increases and the humeral head shifts superiorly, which may contribute to impingement following tenodesis of the long head of the biceps. These small changes in rotational range of motion and humeral head position with biceps tenodesis may not lead to pathologic conditions in low-demand patients; however, in throwers, biceps tenodesis may lead to increased contact pressures in late-cocking and deceleration that will likely translate

  5. [Results of a series of deltoid flaps for the treatment of massive rotator cuff tears with an average follow-up of 3.5 years].

    PubMed

    Le Huec, J C; Liquois, F; Schaeverbecke, T; Zipoli, B; Chauveaux, D; Le Rebeller, A

    1996-01-01

    We report a series of 14 patients with a massive rotator cuff tear operated on with a deltoid flap according to Augereau's technique. The aim of this study was to evaluate the benefits of this technique using Constant's scoring system. The follow up is 40 months. 14 patients, mean age 59 years, with a total rotator cuff tear type III according to Gerber's classification were included. There was 13 total ruptures of the supra and infra spinatus tendon and one infraspinatus and subscapularis lesion. All the patients had shoulder pain, and the preoperative, Constant's score was 24.1/100. The diagnosis of the rotator cuff rupture was confirmed by X-rays, arthrography and ultra-sonography. 8 patients had a Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) evaluation. The surgical procedure was the technique described by Augereau, and three patients had a resection of the distal clavicle. One patient had a small piece of dacron to reinforce the suture of a very thin deltoid flap. All the patients had a immobilization in abduction and the rehabilitation programm began immediately. Results on pain were good: +11.4 points according to Constant's score, but improvement strength (+0.7 point) or motion (+1 point) was not significative. Postoperative Constant's score was 46.9, ponderated score increased from 29.5 per cent to 57.5 per cent. Ten patients were very satisfied, 2 were satisfied and two were disappointed. One of them neaded shoulder arthrodesis; the other needed a new surgery to remove the piece of dacron, and was allayed with NSAI drugs. External rotation was slightly increased: +2 point. These results are similar to others series on pain relief, but the results are poor on strength restauration and on shoulder motion. This technique is a heavy surgical procedure and results are not better than arthroscopic sub acromial decompression for massive rotator cuff tear.

  6. Anterior-inferior tibiofibular ligament anatomical repair and augmentation versus trans-syndesmosis screw fixation for the syndesmotic instability in external-rotation type ankle fracture with posterior malleolus involvement: A prospective and comparative study.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Yu; Yan, Xiaoyu; Xia, Ronggang; Cheng, Tao; Luo, Congfeng

    2016-07-01

    Syndesmosis injury is common in external-rotation type ankle fractures (ERAF). Trans-syndesmosis screw fixation, the gold-standard treatment, is currently controversial for its complications and biomechanical disadvantages. The purpose of this study was to introduce a new method of anatomically repairing the anterior-inferior tibiofibular ligament (AITFL) and augmentation with anchor rope system to treat the syndesmotic instability in ERAF with posterior malleolus involvement and to compare its clinical outcomes with that of trans-syndesmosis screw fixation. 53 ERAFs with posterior malleolus involvement received surgery, and the syndesmosis was still unstable after fracture fixation. They were randomised into screw fixation group and AITFL anatomical repair with augmentation group. Reduction quality, syndesmosis diastasis recurrence, pain (VAS score), time back to work, Olerud-Molander ankle score and range of motion (ROM) of ankle were investigated. Olerud-Molander score in AITFL repair group and screw group was 90.4 and 85.8 at 12-month follow-up (P>0.05). Plantar flexion was 31.2° and 34.3° in repair and screw groups (P=0.04). Mal-reduction happened in 5 cases (19.2%) in screw group while 2 cases (7.4%) in repair group. Postoperative syndesmosis re-diastasis occurred in 3 cases in screw group while zero in repair group (P>0.05). Pain score was similar between the two groups (P>0.05). Overall complication rate and back to work time were 26.9% and 3.7% (P=0.04), 7.15 months and 5.26 months (P=0.02) in screw group and repair group, respectively. For syndesmotic instability in ERAF with posterior malleolus involvement, the method of AITFL anatomical repair and augmentation with anchor rope system had an equivalent functional outcome and reduction, earlier rehabilitation and less complication compared with screw fixation. It can be selected as an alternative. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Rotating Wavepackets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lekner, John

    2008-01-01

    Any free-particle wavepacket solution of Schrodinger's equation can be converted by differentiations to wavepackets rotating about the original direction of motion. The angular momentum component along the motion associated with this rotation is an integral multiple of [h-bar]. It is an "intrinsic" angular momentum: independent of origin and…

  8. Rotational elasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vassiliev, Dmitri

    2017-04-01

    We consider an infinite three-dimensional elastic continuum whose material points experience no displacements, only rotations. This framework is a special case of the Cosserat theory of elasticity. Rotations of material points are described mathematically by attaching to each geometric point an orthonormal basis that gives a field of orthonormal bases called the coframe. As the dynamical variables (unknowns) of our theory, we choose the coframe and a density. We write down the general dynamic variational functional for our rotational theory of elasticity, assuming our material to be physically linear but the kinematic model geometrically nonlinear. Allowing geometric nonlinearity is natural when dealing with rotations because rotations in dimension three are inherently nonlinear (rotations about different axes do not commute) and because there is no reason to exclude from our study large rotations such as full turns. The main result of the talk is an explicit construction of a class of time-dependent solutions that we call plane wave solutions; these are travelling waves of rotations. The existence of such explicit closed-form solutions is a non-trivial fact given that our system of Euler-Lagrange equations is highly nonlinear. We also consider a special case of our rotational theory of elasticity which in the stationary setting (harmonic time dependence and arbitrary dependence on spatial coordinates) turns out to be equivalent to a pair of massless Dirac equations. The talk is based on the paper [1]. [1] C.G.Boehmer, R.J.Downes and D.Vassiliev, Rotational elasticity, Quarterly Journal of Mechanics and Applied Mathematics, 2011, vol. 64, p. 415-439. The paper is a heavily revised version of preprint https://arxiv.org/abs/1008.3833

  9. Preventing infant abductions: an infant security program transitioned into an interdisciplinary model.

    PubMed

    Hiner, Jacqueline; Pyka, Jeanine; Burks, Colleen; Pisegna, Lily; Gador, Rachel Ann

    2012-01-01

    Ensuring the safety of infants born in a hospital is a top priority and, therefore, requires a solid infant security plan. Using an interdisciplinary approach and a systematic change process, nursing leadership in collaboration with clinical nurses and security personnel analyzed the infant security program at this community hospital to identify vulnerabilities. By establishing an interdisciplinary approach to infant security, participants were able to unravel a complicated concept, systematically analyze the gaps, and agree to a plan of action. This resulted in improved communication and clarification of roles between the nursing and security divisions. Supply costs decreased by 17.4% after the first year of implementation. Most importantly, this project enhanced and strengthened the existing infant abduction prevention measures, hard wired the importance of infant security, and minimized vulnerabilities.

  10. Abduction, Deduction and Induction: Can These Concepts Be Used for an Understanding of Methodological Processes in Interpretative Case Studies?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Åsvoll, Håvard

    2014-01-01

    Within the area of interpretative case studies, there appears to be a vast amount of literature about theoretical interpretations as the main analytical strategy. In light of this theoretically based strategy in case studies, this article presents an extended perspective based on Charles Sanders Peirce's concepts of abduction, deduction and…

  11. The Use of Behavioral Skills Training and in situ Feedback to Protect Children with Autism from Abduction Lures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunby, Kristin V.; Rapp, John T.

    2014-01-01

    We examined the effects of behavioral skills training with in situ feedback on safe responding by children with autism to abduction lures that were presented after a high-probability (high-p) request sequence. This sequence was intended to simulate a grooming or recruitment process. Results show that all 3 participants ultimately acquired the…

  12. Using Abductive Research Logic: "The Logic of Discovery", to Construct a Rigorous Explanation of Amorphous Evaluation Findings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levin-Rozalis, Miri

    2010-01-01

    Background: Two kinds of research logic prevail in scientific research: deductive research logic and inductive research logic. However, both fail in the field of evaluation, especially evaluation conducted in unfamiliar environments. Purpose: In this article I wish to suggest the application of a research logic--"abduction"--"the logic of…

  13. Surgical correction of shoulder rotation deformity in brachial plexus birth palsy: long-term results in 118 patients.

    PubMed

    Hultgren, T; Jönsson, K; Roos, F; Järnbert-Pettersson, H; Hammarberg, H

    2014-10-01

    We present the long-term results of open surgery for internal shoulder rotational deformity in brachial plexus birth palsy (BPBP). From 1997 to 2005, 207 patients (107 females, 100 males, mean age 6.2 (0.6 to 34)) were operated on with subscapularis elongation and/or latissimus dorsi to infraspinatus transfer. Incongruent shoulder joints were relocated. The early results of these patients has been reported previously. We analysed 118 (64 females, 54 males, mean age 15.1 (7.6 to 34)) of the original patient cohort at a mean of 10.4 years (7.0 to 15.1) post-operatively. A third of patients with relocated joints had undergone secondary internal rotational osteotomy of the humerus. A mixed effects models approach was used to evaluate the effects of surgery on shoulder rotation, abduction, and the Mallet score. Independent factors were time (pre-and post-surgery), gender, age, joint category (congruent, relocated, relocated plus osteotomy) and whether or not a transfer had been performed. Data from a previously published short-term evaluation were reworked in order to obtain pre-operative values. The mean improvement in external rotation from pre-surgery to the long-term follow-up was 66.5° (95% confidence interval (CI) 61.5 to 71.6). The internal rotation had decreased by a mean of 22.6° (95% CI -18.7 to -26.5). The mean improvement in the three-grade aggregate Mallet score was 3.1 (95% CI 2.7 to 3.4), from 8.7 (95% CI 8.4 to 9.0) to 11.8 (11.5 to 12.1). Our results show that open subscapularis elongation achieves good long-term results for patients with BPBP and an internal rotation contracture, providing lasting joint congruency and resolution of the trumpet sign, but with a moderate mean loss of internal rotation. ©2014 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  14. Contribution of Lateral Column Lengthening to Correction of Forefoot Abduction in Stage IIb Adult Acquired Flatfoot Deformity Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Chan, Jeremy Y; Greenfield, Stephen T; Soukup, Dylan S; Do, Huong T; Deland, Jonathan T; Ellis, Scott J

    2015-12-01

    Correction of forefoot abduction in stage IIb adult acquired flatfoot likely depends on the amount of lateral column lengthening (LCL) performed, although this represents only one aspect of a successful reconstruction. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the correlation between common reconstructive variables and the observed change in forefoot abduction. Forty-one patients who underwent flatfoot reconstruction involving an Evans-type LCL were assessed retrospectively. Preoperative and postoperative anteroposterior (AP) radiographs of the foot at a minimum of 40 weeks (mean, 2 years) after surgery were reviewed to determine correction in forefoot abduction as measured by talonavicular coverage (TNC) angle, talonavicular uncoverage percent, talus-first metatarsal (T-1MT) angle, and lateral incongruency angle. Fourteen demographic and intraoperative variables were evaluated for association with change in forefoot abduction including age, gender, height, weight, body mass index, as well as the amount of LCL and medializing calcaneal osteotomy performed, LCL graft type, Cotton osteotomy, first tarsometatarsal fusion, flexor digitorum longus transfer, spring ligament repair, gastrocnemius recession and any one of the modified McBride/Akin/Silver procedures. Two variables significantly affected the change in lateral incongruency angle. These were weight (P = .04) and the amount of LCL performed (P < .001). No variables were associated with the change in TNC angle, talonavicular uncoverage percent, or T-1MT angle. Multivariate regression analysis revealed that LCL was the only significant predictor of the change in lateral incongruency angle. The final regression model for LCL showed a good fit (R2 = 0.70, P < .001). Each millimeter of LCL corresponded to a 6.8-degree change in lateral incongruency angle. Correction of forefoot abduction in flatfoot reconstruction was primarily determined by the LCL procedure and could be modeled linearly. We believe that the

  15. Rotator cuff tendinopathy alters the muscle activity onset and kinematics of scapula.

    PubMed

    Leong, Hio Teng; Ng, Gabriel Yin-Fat; Chan, Shing Chung; Fu, Siu Ngor

    2017-08-01

    Athletes with rotator cuff (RC) tendinopathy demonstrate an aberrant pattern of scapular motion which might relate to deficits in the scapular muscles. This study aimed to determine whether alteration in scapular kinematics is associated with deficits in the activity onset of scapular muscles. Forty-three male volleyball players (17 asymptomatic and 26 with RC tendinopathy) joined the study. Three-dimensional scapular kinematics was quantified using an acromial marker cluster method. The activity onset of the upper (UT), middle (MT), and lower trapezius (LT), and serratus anterior (SA) during arm abduction was assessed with electromyography. Athletes with RC tendinopathy demonstrated less scapular upward rotation (6.6±2.3 vs. 8.2±1.1°, p=0.021) in the early phase of shoulder abduction from 0° to 30° when compared to asymptomatic athletes. The tendinopathy group had delayed activity onset of LT (14.1±31.4ms vs. 74.4±45.1ms, p<0.001) and SA (-44.9±26.0ms vs. 23.0±25.2ms, p<0.001) relative to UT when compared to the asymptomatic group. In asymptomatic athletes, earlier activity onset of MT and LT relative to UT was associated with more scapular upward rotation during 0-30° of abduction (r=0.665, p=0.021) and 30-60° of abduction (r=0.680, p=0.015), respectively. Our findings showed the control of the scapular upward rotation is related to the activity onset of the scapular muscles in athletes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Rotational Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lockett, Keith

    1988-01-01

    Demonstrates several objects rolling down a slope to explain the energy transition among potential energy, translational kinetic energy, and rotational kinetic energy. Contains a problem from Galileo's rolling ball experiment. (YP)

  17. Definition of anatomical zero positions for assessing shoulder pose with 3D motion capture during bilateral abduction of the arms.

    PubMed

    Rettig, Oliver; Krautwurst, Britta; Maier, Michael W; Wolf, Sebastian I

    2015-12-09

    Surgical interventions at the shoulder may alter function of the shoulder complex. Clinically, the outcome can be assessed by universal goniometry. Marker-based motion capture may not resemble these results due to differing angle definitions. The clinical inspection of bilateral arm abduction for assessing shoulder dysfunction is performed with a marker based 3D optical measurement method. An anatomical zero position of shoulder pose is proposed to determine absolute angles according to the Neutral-0-Method as used in orthopedic context. Static shoulder positions are documented simultaneously by 3D marker tracking and universal goniometry in 8 young and healthy volunteers. Repetitive bilateral arm abduction movements of at least 150° range of motion are monitored. Similarly a subject with gleno-humeral osteoarthritis is monitored for demonstrating the feasibility of the method and to illustrate possible shoulder dysfunction effects. With mean differences of less than 2°, the proposed anatomical zero position results in good agreement between shoulder elevation/depression angles determined by 3D marker tracking and by universal goniometry in static positions. Lesser agreement is found for shoulder pro-/retraction with systematic deviations of up to 6°. In the bilateral arm abduction movements the volunteers perform a common and specific pattern in clavicula-thoracic and gleno-humeral motion with maximum shoulder angles of 32° elevation, 5° depression and 45° protraction, respectively, whereas retraction is hardly reached. Further, they all show relevant out of (frontal) plane motion with anteversion angles of 30° in overhead position (maximum abduction). With increasing arm anteversion the shoulder is increasingly retroverted, with a maximum of 20° retroversion. The subject with gleno-humeral osteoarthritis shows overall less shoulder abduction range of motion but with increased out-of-plane movement during abduction. The proposed anatomical zero definition

  18. Comparison of primary position measurements and abduction deficit between type 1 Duane syndrome and sixth cranial nerve palsy.

    PubMed

    Batra, Noopur Nikki; Arnoldi, Kyle; Reynolds, James D; Strominger, Mitchell B

    2011-06-01

    Unilateral Duane retraction syndrome type 1 (DRS-I) and unilateral sixth nerve palsy (6NP) present with limitation of abduction, incomitant esotropia, and frequently, a compensatory head turn. The purpose of this study was to compare the mean primary position measurement and to correlate this with the abduction deficit to determine if these measurements may be used to differentiate between the 2 conditions when other clinical signs of DRS-I (globe retraction, changes in lid fissure height, and upshoots/downshoots) are subtle. A database search of patients examined over a 5-year period revealed 69 cases of DRS-I and 62 cases of unilateral 6NP. Primary position measurements both at distance and near and limitation of abduction on version testing were recorded and compared. Mean abduction deficit was -3.5 ± 0.1 for DRS-I and -2.6 ± 0.2 for 6NP (P = 0.0004). Mean esotropia at near was 8.4 ± 1.1 prism diopters (PD) for DRS-I and 27.2 ± 2.4 PD for 6NP (P < 0.0001). Mean esotropia at distance was 10.3 ± 1.3 PD for DRS-I and 36.4 ± 2.4 PD for 6NP (P < 0.0001). The mean distance-near disparity for DRS-I was 1.94 ± 0.62 PD and 9.19 ± 1.28 PD for 6NP (P < 0.0001). The age-group of ≤2 years consisted of 23 DRS-I and only 2 6NP cases. The age-group between >2 years and <18 years had 41 DRS-I and 16 6NP cases, respectively. Finally, the age-group of ≥18 years had only 5 DRS-I and 44 6NP cases (P < 0.0001). Patients with DRS-I showed greater abduction deficit yet significantly less esotropia in primary position than those with 6NP. Patients with 6NP were more likely to have a significant distance-near disparity. In addition, patients with DRS-I tended to be younger than those with 6NP. This report documents that DRS-I and 6NP can be differentiated based on magnitude of primary position esotropia, comparison of primary position esotropia with severity of abduction deficit, distance-near disparity, and patient age.

  19. After abduction: exploring access to reintegration programs and mental health status among young female abductees in Northern Uganda

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Reintegration programs are commonly offered to former combatants and abductees to acquire civilian status and support services to reintegrate into post-conflict society. Among a group of young female abductees in northern Uganda, this study examined access to post-abduction reintegration programming and tested for between group differences in mental health status among young women who had accessed reintegration programming compared to those who self-reintegrated. Methods This cross-sectional study analysed interviews from 129 young women who had previously been abducted by the Lords Resistance Army (LRA). Data was collected between June 2011-January 2012. Interviews collected information on abduction-related experiences including age and year of abduction, manner of departure, and reintegration status. Participants were coded as ‘reintegrated’ if they reported ≥1 of the following reintegration programs: traditional cleansing ceremony, received an amnesty certificate, reinsertion package, or had gone to a reception centre. A t-test was used to measure mean differences in depression and anxiety measured by the Acholi Psychosocial Assessment Instrument (APAI) to determine if abductees who participated in a reintegration program had different mental status from those who self-reintegrated. Results From 129 young abductees, 56 (43.4%) had participated in a reintegration program. Participants had been abducted between 1988–2010 for an average length of one year, the median age of abduction was 13 years (IQR:11–14) with escaping (76.6%), being released (15.6%), and rescued (7.0%) being the most common manner of departure from the LRA. Traditional cleansing ceremonies (67.8%) were the most commonly accessed support followed by receiving amnesty (37.5%), going to a reception centre (28.6%) or receiving a reinsertion package (12.5%). Between group comparisons indicated that the mental health status of abductees who accessed ≥1 reintegration program

  20. Glenohumeral joint rotation range of motion in competitive swimmers.

    PubMed

    Riemann, Bryan L; Witt, Joe; Davies, George J

    2011-08-01

    Much research has examined shoulder range of motion adaptations in overhead-unilateral athletes. Based on the void examining overhead-bilateral athletes, especially competitive swimmers, we examined shoulder external rotation, isolated internal rotation, composite internal rotation, and total arc of motion range of motion of competitive swimmers. The range of motion of registered competitive swimmers (n = 144, age = 12-61 years) was compared by limb (dominant, non-dominant), sex, and age group (youth, high school, college, masters). Significantly (P < 0.05) greater dominant external rotation was observed for both men and women high school and college swimmers, youth women swimmers, and men masters swimmers compared with the non-dominant limb. The isolated internal rotation (glenohumeral rotation), composite internal rotation (glenohumeral rotation plus scapulothoracic protraction), and total arc of motion (external rotation plus composite internal rotation) of the non-dominant limb was significantly greater than that of the dominant limb by sex and age group. Youth and high school swimmers demonstrated significantly greater composite internal rotation than college and masters swimmers. Youth swimmers displayed significantly greater total arc of motion than all other age groups. These data will aid in the interpretation of shoulder range of motion values in competitive swimmers during preseason screenings, injury evaluations and post-rehabilitation programmes, with the results suggesting that differences exist in bilateral external rotation, isolated internal rotation, composite internal rotation, and total arc of motion range of motion.

  1. Earth Rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickey, Jean O.

    1995-01-01

    The study of the Earth's rotation in space (encompassing Universal Time (UT1), length of day, polar motion, and the phenomena of precession and nutation) addresses the complex nature of Earth orientation changes, the mechanisms of excitation of these changes and their geophysical implications in a broad variety of areas. In the absence of internal sources of energy or interactions with astronomical objects, the Earth would move as a rigid body with its various parts (the crust, mantle, inner and outer cores, atmosphere and oceans) rotating together at a constant fixed rate. In reality, the world is considerably more complicated, as is schematically illustrated. The rotation rate of the Earth's crust is not constant, but exhibits complicated fluctuations in speed amounting to several parts in 10(exp 8) [corresponding to a variation of several milliseconds (ms) in the Length Of the Day (LOD) and about one part in 10(exp 6) in the orientation of the rotation axis relative to the solid Earth's axis of figure (polar motion). These changes occur over a broad spectrum of time scales, ranging from hours to centuries and longer, reflecting the fact that they are produced by a wide variety of geophysical and astronomical processes. Geodetic observations of Earth rotation changes thus provide insights into the geophysical processes illustrated, which are often difficult to obtain by other means. In addition, these measurements are required for engineering purposes. Theoretical studies of Earth rotation variations are based on the application of Euler's dynamical equations to the problem of finding the response of slightly deformable solid Earth to variety of surface and internal stresses.

  2. Promoting convergence: The Phi spiral in abduction of mouse corneal behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Jerry; Nejad, Talisa Mohammad; Comets, Olivier; Flannery, Sean; Gulsoy, Eine Begum; Iannaccone, Philip; Foster, Craig

    2015-01-01

    Why do mouse corneal epithelial cells display spiraling patterns? We want to provide an explanation for this curious phenomenon by applying an idealized problem solving process. Specifically, we applied complementary line-fitting methods to measure transgenic epithelial reporter expression arrangements displayed on three mature, live enucleated globes to clarify the problem. Two prominent logarithmic curves were discovered, one of which displayed the ϕ ratio, an indicator of an optimal configuration in phyllotactic systems. We then utilized two different computational approaches to expose our current understanding of the behavior. In one procedure, which involved an isotropic mechanics-based finite element method, we successfully produced logarithmic spiral curves of maximum shear strain based pathlines but computed dimensions displayed pitch angles of 35° (ϕ spiral is ∼17°), which was altered when we fitted the model with published measurements of coarse collagen orientations. We then used model-based reasoning in context of Peircean abduction to select a working hypothesis. Our work serves as a concise example of applying a scientific habit of mind and illustrates nuances of executing a common method to doing integrative science. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Complexity 20: 22–38, 2015 PMID:25755620

  3. Horizontal gaze palsy and progressive scoliosis in a patient with congenital esotropia and inability to abduct. A case report.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Vega Cueto, A; Rodríguez-Ezcurra, J J; Rodríguez-Maiztegui, I

    2016-12-01

    The case is presented on a 4- year-old child with congenital esotropia, limitation of abduction, cross-fixation, and thoracolumbar scoliosis. Genetic testing of ROBO3 gene confirmed the diagnosis of horizontal gaze palsy and scoliosis (HGPSS) DISCUSSION: HGPPS is a rare congenital disorder characterised by absence of conjugate horizontal eye movements and progressive scoliosis developed in childhood and adolescence. We highlight this motility disorder as a part of the differential diagnosis of early childhood esotropia with cross- fixation and limitation of abduction. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Nuclear rotations

    SciTech Connect

    Bertsch, G.F.; Janssens, R.V.

    1997-07-01

    An analysis of the gamma-ray spectra produced using the quantum mechanical rotational energy formula is presented for nuclei with large angular momentum. This analysis is suitable for quantum mechanics, modern physics, or nuclear physics courses. (AIP) {copyright}{ital 1997 American Institute of Physics}

  5. Arthroscopic tenodesis versus tenotomy of the long head of biceps tendon in simultaneous rotator cuff repair.

    PubMed

    Meraner, Dominik; Sternberg, Christoph; Vega, Jordi; Hahne, Julia; Kleine, Michael; Leuzinger, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Full thickness rotator cuff tears are a common cause of shoulder pain and disability. While the role of the rotator cuff seems to be well known, the clinical significance of the biceps tendon for shoulder function has still been a subject of controversy. The aim of this study was to evaluate differences between tenodesis or tenotomy in simultaneous rotator cuff repair. For this retrospective study 53 consecutive patients (25f/28m, Ø age 58 years) undergoing arthroscopic double row rotator cuff reconstruction and suture bridge repair were included. The LHB was treated with tenodesis (n = 24) or tenotomy (n = 29). Clinical examination was carried out for all patients after an average of 34 months (range 27–38) following arthroscopic surgery. The Constant score, level of pain, range of motion in flexion and abduction, and isometric force for the operated and healthy shoulder in flexion and abduction were recorded. Patients in the tenodesis and tenotomy group reached similar good result regarding the Constant score (86.6 ± 11.9 vs. 81.3 ± 12.2; P = 0.120), pain (median 0, range 0–8 vs. Median 0, range 0–10; P = 0.421), and range of motion (flexion: median 180°, range 90°–180° vs. median 180°, range 90°–180°; P = 0.833; abduction: median 180°, range 90°–180° vs. median 180°, range 120°–180°; P = 0.472). Postoperative popeye sign was found only in one patient (1.9 %). At the time of postoperative follow-up, no patient reported cramping of the biceps. Isometric forces in abduction of the tenotomy group (mean 4.7 ± 2.9 kg; maximum 5.5 ± 2.8 kg) was significant lower compared to the tenodesis group (mean 6.6 ± 3.0 kg, P = 0.019; maximum 7.7 ± 2.9 kg, P = 0.007) and compared to healthy shoulders (mean 6.1 ± 3.0 kg P = 0.004; maximum 7.4 ± 3.1 kg, P = 0.001), all other measurements were similar. According to our results arthroscopic biceps tenodesis and tenotomy are valuable procedures in simultaneous rotator cuff repair regarding function

  6. Validity and reliability of smartphone magnetometer-based goniometer evaluation of shoulder abduction--A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Linda B; Sumner, Sean; Duong, Tina; Yan, Posu; Bajcsy, Ruzena; Abresch, R Ted; de Bie, Evan; Han, Jay J

    2015-12-01

    Goniometers are commonly used by physical therapists to measure range-of-motion (ROM) in the musculoskeletal system. These measurements are used to assist in diagnosis and to help monitor treatment efficacy. With newly emerging technologies, smartphone-based applications are being explored for measuring joint angles and movement. This pilot study investigates the intra- and inter-rater reliability as well as concurrent validity of a newly-developed smartphone magnetometer-based goniometer (MG) application for measuring passive shoulder abduction in both sitting and supine positions, and compare against the traditional universal goniometer (UG). This is a comparative study with repeated measurement design. Three physical therapists utilized both the smartphone MG and a traditional UG to measure various angles of passive shoulder abduction in a healthy subject, whose shoulder was positioned in eight different positions with pre-determined degree of abduction while seated or supine. Each therapist was blinded to the measured angles. Concordance correlation coefficients (CCCs), Bland-Altman plotting methods, and Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) were used for statistical analyses. Both traditional UG and smartphone MG were reliable in repeated measures of standardized joint angle positions (average CCC > 0.997) with similar variability in both measurement tools (standard deviation (SD) ± 4°). Agreement between the UG and MG measurements was greater than 0.99 in all positions. Our results show that the smartphone MG has equivalent reliability compared to the traditional UG when measuring passive shoulder abduction ROM. With concordant measures and comparable reliability to the UG, the newly developed MG application shows potential as a useful tool to assess joint angles. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. The impact of shoulder abduction loading on EMG-based intention detection of hand opening and closing after stroke.

    PubMed

    Lan, Yiyun; Yao, Jun; Dewald, Julius P A

    2011-01-01

    Many stroke patients are subject to limited hand functions in the paretic arm due to a significant loss of Corticospinal Tract (CST) fibers. A possible solution for this problem is to classify surface Electromyography (EMG) signals generated by hand movements and uses that to implement Functional Electrical Stimulation (FES). However, EMG usually presents an abnormal muscle coactivation pattern shown as increased coupling between muscles within and/or across joints after stroke. The resulting Abnormal Muscle Synergies (AMS) could make the classification more difficult in individuals with stroke, especially when attempting to use the hand together with other joints in the paretic arm. Therefore, this study is aimed at identifying the impact of AMS following stroke on EMG pattern recognition between two hand movements. In an effort to achieve this goal, 7 chronic hemiparetic chronic stroke subjects were recruited and asked to perform hand opening and closing movements at their paretic arm while being either fully supported by a virtual table or loaded with 25% of subject's maximum shoulder abduction force. During the execution of motor tasks EMG signals from the wrist flexors and extensors were simultaneously acquired. Our results showed that increased synergy-induced activity at elbow flexors, induced by increasing shoulder abduction loading, deteriorated the performance of EMG pattern recognition for hand opening for those with a weak grasp strength and EMG activity. However, no such impact on hand closing has yet been observed possibly because finger/wrist flexion is facilitated by the shoulder abduction-induced flexion synergy.

  8. Femoral component rotation in patellofemoral joint replacement.

    PubMed

    van Jonbergen, Hans-Peter W; Westerbeek, Robin E

    2018-06-01

    Clinical outcomes in patellofemoral joint replacement may be related to femoral component rotation. Assessment of rotational alignment is however difficult as patients with isolated patellofemoral osteoarthritis often have trochlear dysplasia. The use of the medial malleolus as a landmark to guide rotation has been suggested. The purpose of our study was to evaluate this technique with regard to femoral component rotation, and to correlate rotation with clinical outcomes at one-year follow-up. Forty-one knees in 39 patients had patellofemoral joint replacement using the Zimmer Gender-Solutions patellofemoral prosthesis. Intraoperatively, we determined femoral component rotational alignment using an extramedullary rod aimed at the inferior tip of the medial malleolus. Postoperatively, we measured the angle between the femoral component and the anatomical transepicondylar axis using CT. The amount of rotation was correlated with clinical outcomes at one-year follow-up. Forty knees in 38 patients were available for one-year follow-up. Mean femoral component rotation relative to the anatomical transepicondylar axis was 1.4° external rotation (range, -3.8 to 5.7°). We found no statistically significant correlation between femoral component rotation and change from baseline KOOS subscales at one-year follow-up. Our findings show that when using the medial malleolus as a landmark to guide rotation, the femoral component of the patellofemoral prosthesis was oriented in external rotation relative to the anatomical transepicondylar axis in 80% of knees. Our study did not show a relation between the amount of external rotation and clinical outcomes. Level III. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Prevention of Thumb Web Space Contracture With Multiplanar External Fixation.

    PubMed

    Harper, Carl M; Iorio, Matthew L

    2016-09-01

    Thumb web space contracture following hand trauma can be disabling with numerous reconstructive procedures existing to correct the resultant deformity. Following marked soft tissue injury to the hand we utilized the Stryker Hoffmann II Micro External Fixator System to link the first and second metacarpals by a multiplanar system using 1.6 or 2.0 mm self-drilling half-pins and 3 mm carbon fiber connecting rods. This facilitated placement of the thumb in maximal palmar abduction as well as allowed adjustment of thumb position throughout the postoperative period. This technique was performed on 5 patients. Two patients were treated with a first web space external fixator for table saw injuries to the radial aspect of the hand. An additional 2 patients were treated with a first web space external fixator following metacarpophalangeal joint capsular release in the setting of thermal burns. A fifth patient underwent second ray amputation, trapeziectomy and trapezoidectomy for squamous cell carcinoma with subsequent stabilization with the external fixator. The external fixator was left in place until soft tissues were healed (average 5.5 wk). The patients were allowed to mobilize their hand in as much as the external fixator allowed, and no device-associated complications were noted. Thumb web space was preserved with passive and supple thumb circumduction and web space abduction/adduction in all patients at an average follow-up of 5 months. The average Quick Dash Score was 35±5 and the average Modern Activity Subjective Survey of 2007 was 30±8.

  10. The effect of hip abduction on the EMG activity of vastus medialis obliquus, vastus lateralis longus and vastus lateralis obliquus in healthy subjects

    PubMed Central

    Bevilaqua-Grossi, Débora; Monteiro-Pedro, Vanessa; de Vasconcelos, Rodrigo Antunes; Arakaki, Juliano Coelho; Bérzin, Fausto

    2006-01-01

    Study design Controlled laboratory study. Objectives The purposes of this paper were to investigate (d) whether vastus medialis obliquus (VMO), vastus lateralis longus (VLL) and vastus lateralis obliquus (VLO) EMG activity can be influenced by hip abduction performed by healthy subjects. Background Some clinicians contraindicate hip abduction for patellofemoral patients (with) based on the premise that hip abduction could facilitate the VLL muscle activation leading to a VLL and VMO imbalance Methods and measures Twenty-one clinically healthy subjects were involved in the study, 10 women and 11 men (aged X = 23.3 ± 2.9). The EMG signals were collected using a computerized EMG VIKING II, with 8 channels and three pairs of surface electrodes. EMG activity was obtained from MVIC knee extension at 90° of flexion in a seated position and MVIC hip abduction at 0° and 30° with patients in side-lying position with the knee in full extension. The data were normalized in the MVIC knee extension at 50° of flexion in a seated position, and were submitted to ANOVA test with subsequent application of the Bonferroni multiple comparisons analysis test. The level of significance was defined as p ≤ 0.05. Results The VLO muscle demonstrated a similar pattern to the VMO muscle showing higher EMG activity in MVIC knee extension at 90° of flexion compared with MVIC hip abduction at 0° and 30° of abduction for male (p < 0.0007) and MVIC hip abduction at 0° of abduction for female subjects (p < 0.02196). There were no statistically significant differences in the VLL EMG activity among the three sets of exercises tested. Conclusion The results showed that no selective EMG activation was observed when comparison was made between the VMO, VLL and VLO muscles while performing MVIC hip abduction at 0° and 30° of abduction and MVIC knee extension at 90° of flexion in both male and female subjects. Our findings demonstrate that hip abduction do not facilitated VLL and VLO activity

  11. Comparison of HIV-related vulnerabilities between former child soldiers and children never abducted by the LRA in northern Uganda

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Thousands of former child soldiers who were abducted during the prolonged conflict in northern Uganda have returned to their home communities. Programmes that facilitate their successful reintegration continue to face a number of challenges. Although there is increasing knowledge of the dynamics of HIV infection during conflict, far less is known about its prevalence and implications for population health in the post-conflict period. This study investigated the effects of abduction on the prevalence of HIV and HIV-risk behaviours among young people in Gulu District, northern Uganda. An understanding of abduction experiences and HIV-risk behaviours is vital to both the development of effective reintegration programming for former child soldiers and the design of appropriate HIV prevention interventions for all young people. Methods In 2010, we conducted a cross-sectional study of 2 sub-counties in Gulu District. A demographic and behavioural survey was interview-administered to a purposively selected sample of 384 transit camp residents aged 15–29. Biological specimens were collected for HIV rapid testing in the field and confirmatory laboratory testing. Descriptive statistics were used to describe characteristics of abduction. Additionally, a gender-stratified bivariate analysis compared abductees’ and non-abductees’ HIV risk profiles. Results Of the 384 participants, 107 (28%) were former child soldiers (61% were young men and 39% were young women). The median age of participants was 20 and median age at abduction was 13. HIV prevalence was similar among former abductees and non-abductees (12% vs. 13%; p = 0.824), with no differences observed by gender. With respect to differences in HIV vulnerability, our bivariate analysis identified greater risky sexual behaviours in the past year for former abductees than non-abductees, but there were no differences between the two groups’ survival/livelihood activities and food insufficiency experiences

  12. Comparison of HIV-related vulnerabilities between former child soldiers and children never abducted by the LRA in northern Uganda.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sheetal; Schechter, Martin T; Sewankambo, Nelson K; Atim, Stella; Oboya, Charles; Kiwanuka, Noah; Spittal, Patricia M

    2013-08-07

    Thousands of former child soldiers who were abducted during the prolonged conflict in northern Uganda have returned to their home communities. Programmes that facilitate their successful reintegration continue to face a number of challenges. Although there is increasing knowledge of the dynamics of HIV infection during conflict, far less is known about its prevalence and implications for population health in the post-conflict period. This study investigated the effects of abduction on the prevalence of HIV and HIV-risk behaviours among young people in Gulu District, northern Uganda. An understanding of abduction experiences and HIV-risk behaviours is vital to both the development of effective reintegration programming for former child soldiers and the design of appropriate HIV prevention interventions for all young people. In 2010, we conducted a cross-sectional study of 2 sub-counties in Gulu District. A demographic and behavioural survey was interview-administered to a purposively selected sample of 384 transit camp residents aged 15-29. Biological specimens were collected for HIV rapid testing in the field and confirmatory laboratory testing. Descriptive statistics were used to describe characteristics of abduction. Additionally, a gender-stratified bivariate analysis compared abductees' and non-abductees' HIV risk profiles. Of the 384 participants, 107 (28%) were former child soldiers (61% were young men and 39% were young women). The median age of participants was 20 and median age at abduction was 13. HIV prevalence was similar among former abductees and non-abductees (12% vs. 13%; p = 0.824), with no differences observed by gender. With respect to differences in HIV vulnerability, our bivariate analysis identified greater risky sexual behaviours in the past year for former abductees than non-abductees, but there were no differences between the two groups' survival/livelihood activities and food insufficiency experiences, both overall and by gender. The

  13. A Randomized, Double-Blinded, Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trial Evaluating the Effectiveness of Daily Vibration After Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair.

    PubMed

    Lam, Patrick H; Hansen, Kaitlyn; Keighley, Geffrey; Hackett, Lisa; Murrell, George A C

    2015-11-01

    Rotator cuff repair is a common method to treat rotator cuff tears; however, retear rates remain high. High-frequency, low-magnitude vibration has been demonstrated to promote new bone formation in both animal models and in humans. This type of mechanical stimulation applied postoperatively will enhance tendon-to-bone healing and reduce postoperative retear rates. Randomized controlled trial; Level of evidence, 1. A randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled clinical trial was conducted to investigate the effects of 5 minutes of 80-Hz vibration applied daily after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair for 6 months on postoperative rotator cuff healing. The primary outcome was ultrasound-assessed repair integrity at 6 months after repair. Recruited patients were randomized into 2 groups: one group received a vibration device that oscillated at 80 Hz, and the other group received a placebo device. The postoperative retear rates of both groups were similar (9.1% [5/55] in the vibration group, and 9.3% [5/54] in the placebo group) at 6 months as determined by ultrasound imaging. Vibration did provide acute pain relief at 6 weeks after surgery (visual analog scale [VAS] score, 2.24 ± 0.29 cm) compared with placebo (VAS score, 3.67 ± 0.48 cm) (P < .003). Six months after surgery, both groups had significant reductions in pain during overhead activities, at rest, and during sleep and overall shoulder pain compared with before surgery (P < .001). Both the vibration and placebo groups had significant increases in shoulder strength with abduction in the scapular plane, adduction, liftoff, internal rotation, and external rotation 6 months after surgery. Statistical analysis showed that vibration was not a contributing factor at improving these parameters in these periods. High-frequency, low-magnitude vibration did provide acute pain relief on application 6 weeks after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair surgery. However, vibration did not improve tendon-to-bone healing

  14. Innominate movement patterns, rotation trends and range of motion in individuals with low back pain of sacroiliac joint origin.

    PubMed

    Adhia, Divya Bharatkumar; Milosavljevic, Stephan; Tumilty, Steve; Bussey, Melanie D

    2016-02-01

    Innominate kinematic anomalies resulting in low back pain (LBP) of sacroiliac joint (SIJ) origin (SIJ-positive), has always been a topic of contention, owing to difficultly in its evaluation. Recent technique of electromagnetic palpation-digitization has been able to accurately quantify innominate kinematics in healthy individuals. The purpose of this study is to determine if participants with LBP of SIJ origin (SIJ-positive) demonstrate significantly different innominate kinematics than participants with LBP of non-SIJ origin (SIJ-negative). Single-blinded cross-sectional case-control study. Participants [n(122)] between the ages of 18 to 50 years, suffering from chronic non-specific LBP (≥3 months) volunteered in the study. An experienced musculoskeletal physiotherapist evaluated and classified participants into either SIJ-positive [n(45)] or SIJ-negative [n(77)] group, using the reference standard pain provocation tests [≥3 positive tests = SIJ-positive]. A research physiotherapist, blinded to clinical groups, conducted the innominate kinematic testing using a valid and reliable electromagnetic palpation-digitization technique, during prone lying incremental hip abduction-external rotation test positions. The results of the mixed model regression analyses demonstrated that SIJ-positive participants exhibited significantly different innominate movement patterns and trends of rotation, but not innominate ranges of motion, when compared with SIJ-negative LBP participants. These findings demonstrate association between SIJ pain and altered innominate kinematics, and have led the groundwork for further exploration of clinical measurement, relevance, and management of these potentially important movement observations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. The optimum tension for bridging sutures in transosseous-equivalent rotator cuff repair: a cadaveric biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Park, Ji Soon; McGarry, Michelle H; Campbell, Sean T; Seo, Hyuk Jun; Lee, Yeon Soo; Kim, Sae Hoon; Lee, Thay Q; Oh, Joo Han

    2015-09-01

    Transosseous-equivalent (TOE) rotator cuff repair can increase contact area and contact pressure between the repaired cuff tendon and bony footprint and can show higher ultimate loads to failure and smaller gap formation compared with other repair techniques. However, it has been suggested that medial rotator cuff failure after TOE repair may result from increased bridging suture tension. To determine optimum bridging suture tension in TOE repair by evaluating footprint contact and construct failure characteristics at different tensions. Controlled laboratory study. A total of 18 fresh-frozen cadaveric shoulders, randomly divided into 3 groups, were constructed with a TOE configuration using the same medial suture anchor and placing a Tekscan sensing pad between the repaired rotator cuff tendon and footprint. Nine of the 18 shoulders were used to measure footprint contact characteristics. With use of the Tekscan measurement system, the contact pressure and area between the rotator cuff tendon and greater tuberosity were quantified for bridging suture tensions of 60, 90, and 120 N with glenohumeral abduction angles of 0° and 30° and humeral rotation angles of 30° (internal), 0°, and 30° (external). TOE constructs of all 18 shoulders then underwent construct failure testing (cyclic loading and load to failure) to determine the yield load, ultimate load, stiffness, hysteresis, strain, and failure mode at 60 and 120 N of tension. As bridging suture tension increased, contact force, contact pressure, and peak pressure increased significantly at all positions (P < .05 for all). Regarding contact area, no significant differences were found between 90 and 120 N at all positions, although there were significant differences between 60 and 90 N. The construct failure test demonstrated no significant differences in any parameters according to various tensions (P > .05 for all). Increasing bridging suture tension to over 90 N did not improve contact area but did increase

  16. Functional outcomes of endoscopic arytenoid abduction lateropexy for unilateral vocal cord paralysis with dyspnea.

    PubMed

    Matievics, Vera; Bach, Adam; Sztano, Balazs; Bere, Zsofia; Tobias, Zoltan; Castellanos, Paul F; Mueller, Andreas H; Rovo, Laszló

    2017-10-01

    In unilateral vocal cord paralysis (UVCP), hoarseness is usually the leading symptom; however, the diminished airway might lead to breathing problems as well, especially with exertion. The application of the classic resection glottis enlarging or medialization procedures might shift the breathing and/or the voice to a worse condition. The non-destructive endoscopic arytenoid abduction lateropexy (EAAL) might be a solution for this problem. The aim of our study was to analyze the phonatory and respiratory outcomes of this treatment concept. The first year phoniatric [Jitter, Shimmer, harmonics-to-noise ratio (HNR), maximum phonation time (MPT), fundamental frequency (F 0 ), Voice Handicap Index (VHI), Dysphonia Severity Index (DSI), Global-Roughness-Breathiness scale (GRB)], peak inspiratory flow (PIF), and quality of life (QoL) were evaluated in ten UVCP patients treated by EAAL for dyspnea generally presented on exertion. PIF, Jitter, QoL, GRB, and VHI significantly improved. DSI, HNR, and MPT got non-significantly better. F 0 slightly increased in all patients, a mild deterioration of shimmer was observed. These results prove that improving respiratory function is not necessarily associated with a deterioration in voice quality. The EAAL provides a significant improvement in breathing and the vibratory parameters of the postoperative, more tensed and straightened vocal cords proved to be more advantageous than the original (para) median 'loose' position. The over-adduction of the contralateral side more or less compensates for the disadvantageous, more lateral position of the operated side. EAAL might be an alternative treatment for unilateral vocal cord paralysis associated with breathing problems.

  17. Abductive Equivalential Translation and its application to Natural Language Database Interfacing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rayner, Manny

    1994-05-01

    The thesis describes a logical formalization of natural-language database interfacing. We assume the existence of a ``natural language engine'' capable of mediating between surface linguistic string and their representations as ``literal'' logical forms: the focus of interest will be the question of relating ``literal'' logical forms to representations in terms of primitives meaningful to the underlying database engine. We begin by describing the nature of the problem, and show how a variety of interface functionalities can be considered as instances of a type of formal inference task which we call ``Abductive Equivalential Translation'' (AET); functionalities which can be reduced to this form include answering questions, responding to commands, reasoning about the completeness of answers, answering meta-questions of type ``Do you know...'', and generating assertions and questions. In each case, a ``linguistic domain theory'' (LDT) Γ and an input formula F are given, and the goal is to construct a formula with certain properties which is equivalent to F, given Γ and a set of permitted assumptions. If the LDT is of a certain specified type, whose formulas are either conditional equivalences or Horn-clauses, we show that the AET problem can be reduced to a goal-directed inference method. We present an abstract description of this method, and sketch its realization in Prolog. The relationship between AET and several problems previously discussed in the literature is discussed. In particular, we show how AET can provide a simple and elegant solution to the so-called ``Doctor on Board'' problem, and in effect allows a ``relativization'' of the Closed World Assumption. The ideas in the thesis have all been implemented concretely within the SRI CLARE project, using a real projects and payments database. The LDT for the example database is described in detail, and examples of the types of functionality that can be achieved within the example domain are presented.

  18. The substance of love when encountering suffering: an interpretative research synthesis with an abductive approach.

    PubMed

    Thorkildsen, Kari Marie; Eriksson, Katie; Råholm, Maj-Britt

    2013-06-01

    This study presents the results of an interpretative research synthesis undertaken to explore the essence of love when encountering suffering. The idea of caring as an expression of love and compassion belongs with ideas that have shaped caring for hundreds of years. Love and suffering are the core concepts in caring science and thus demand a basic research approach. The synthesis was undertaken by the interpretation of 15 articles focusing on love in different aspects, but within a caring science perspective. The research process was guided by a hermeneutical perspective with an abductive approach. The substance of love, when encountering suffering, reveals itself in three themes: love as a holy power, love as fundamental for being and love as an ethical act, which are to be found, respectively, within three dimensions: love as holiness, love as a communion and love as an art. Love is a holy power and encompasses everything; it is the well of strength that heals. No human can exist without love: this points to the ethical responsibility one has as a neighbour. In the ethical act, love is evident in concrete caring actions. The core of the substance of love within the three dimensions can be understood as agape. Agape connects and mirrors the dimensions, while at the same time it is clear that agape stems from and moves towards holiness, enabling love to be the ethical foundation when encountering suffering. Through the dimensions of love as communion and love as an art agape intertwine with eros forming caritas enabling the human being to move towards the dimension of holiness, which signifies becoming through suffering. © 2012 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  19. Adjustable Augmented Rectus Muscle Transposition Surgery with or Without Ciliary Vessel Sparing for Abduction Deficiencies

    PubMed Central

    Hendler, Karen; Pineles, Stacy L.; Demer, Joseph L.; Yang, Dawn; Velez, Federico G.

    2014-01-01

    Background Vertical rectus transposition (VRT) is useful in abduction deficiencies. Posterior fixation sutures enhance the effect of VRT, but usually preclude the use of adjustable sutures. Augmentation of VRT by resection of the transposed muscles allows for an adjustable technique that can reduce induced vertical deviations and overcorrections. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the records of all patients undergoing adjustable partial or full tendon VRT augmented by resection of the transposed muscles. Ciliary vessels were preserved in most of the patients by either splitting the transposed muscle or by dragging the transposed muscle without disrupting the muscle insertion. Results Seven patients with abducens palsy and one with esotropic Duane syndrome were included. Both vertical rectus muscles were symmetrically resected by 3–5 mm. Preoperative central gaze esotropia of 30.6 ± 12.9Δ (range, 17–50Δ) decreased to 10.6 ± 8.8Δ (range, 0–25Δ) at the final visit (p = 0.003). Three patients required postoperative adjustment by recession of one of the transposed muscles due to an induced vertical deviation (mean 9.3Δ reduced to 0Δ), coupled with overcorrection (mean exotropia 11.3Δ reduced to 0 in two patients and exophoria 2Δ in one patient). At the final follow-up visit 3.8 ± 2.6 months postoperatively, one patient had a vertical deviation <4Δ, and none had overcorrection or anterior segment ischemia. Three patients required further surgery for recurrent esotropia. Conclusions Augmentation of VRT by resection of the transposed muscles can be performed with adjustable sutures and vessel-sparing technique. This allows for postoperative control of overcorrections and induced vertical deviations as well as less risk of anterior segment ischemia. PMID:24738948

  20. Adjustable augmented rectus muscle transposition surgery with or without ciliary vessel sparing for abduction deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Hendler, Karen; Pineles, Stacy L; Demer, Joseph L; Yang, Dawn; Velez, Federico G

    2014-06-01

    Vertical rectus transposition (VRT) is useful in abduction deficiencies. Posterior fixation sutures enhance the effect of VRT, but usually preclude the use of adjustable sutures. Augmentation of VRT by resection of the transposed muscles allows for an adjustable technique that can reduce induced vertical deviations and overcorrections. We retrospectively reviewed the records of all patients undergoing adjustable partial or full tendon VRT augmented by resection of the transposed muscles. Ciliary vessels were preserved in most of the patients by either splitting the transposed muscle or by dragging the transposed muscle without disrupting the muscle insertion. Seven patients with abducens palsy and one with esotropic Duane syndrome were included. Both vertical rectus muscles were symmetrically resected by 3-5 mm. Preoperative central gaze esotropia of 30.6 ± 12.9Δ (range, 17-50Δ) decreased to 10.6 ± 8.8Δ (range, 0-25Δ) at the final visit (p = 0.003). Three patients required postoperative adjustment by recession of one of the transposed muscles due to an induced vertical deviation (mean 9.3Δ reduced to 0Δ), coupled with overcorrection (mean exotropia 11.3Δ reduced to 0 in two patients and exophoria 2Δ in one patient). At the final follow-up visit 3.8 ± 2.6 months postoperatively, one patient had a vertical deviation <4Δ, and none had overcorrection or anterior segment ischemia. Three patients required further surgery for recurrent esotropia. Augmentation of VRT by resection of the transposed muscles can be performed with adjustable sutures and vessel-sparing technique. This allows for postoperative control of overcorrections and induced vertical deviations as well as less risk of anterior segment ischemia.

  1. Hall effect in the presence of rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zubkov, M. A.

    2018-02-01

    A rotating relativistic fermion system is considered. The consideration is based on the Dirac equation written in the laboratory (non-rotating) reference frame. Rotation in this approach gives rise to the effective magnetic and electric fields that act in the same way both on positive and negative electric charges. In the presence of external electric field in the given system the electric current appears orthogonal to both the electric field and the axis of rotation. The possible applications to the physics of quark-gluon plasma are discussed.

  2. Relationship between isometric shoulder strength and arms-only swimming power among male collegiate swimmers: study of valid clinical assessment methods.

    PubMed

    Awatani, Takenori; Morikita, Ikuhiro; Mori, Seigo; Shinohara, Junji; Tatsumi, Yasutaka

    2018-04-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of the present study was to confirm the relationships between shoulder strength (extensor strength and internal rotator strength) of the abducted position and swimming power during arm-only swimming. [Subjects and Methods] Fourteen healthy male collegiate swimmers participated in the study. Main measures were shoulder strength (strength using torque that was calculated from the upper extremity length and the isometric force of the abducted position) and swimming power. [Results] Internal rotation torque of the dominant side in the abducted external rotated position (r=0.85) was significantly correlated with maximum swimming power. The rate of bilateral difference in extension torque in the maximum abducted position (r=-0.728) was significantly correlated with the swimming velocity-to-swimming power ratio. [Conclusion] The results of this study suggest that internal rotator strength measurement in the abducted external rotated position and extensor strength measurement in the maximum abducted position are valid assessment methods for swimmers.

  3. The effect of a rotator cuff tear and its size on three-dimensional shoulder motion.

    PubMed

    Kolk, Arjen; Henseler, Jan Ferdinand; de Witte, Pieter Bas; van Zwet, Erik W; van der Zwaal, Peer; Visser, Cornelis P J; Nagels, Jochem; Nelissen, Rob G H H; de Groot, Jurriaan H

    2017-06-01

    Rotator cuff-disease is associated with changes in kinematics, but the effect of a rotator cuff-tear and its size on shoulder kinematics is still unknown in-vivo. In this cross-sectional study, glenohumeral and scapulothoracic kinematics of the affected shoulder were evaluated using electromagnetic motion analysis in 109 patients with 1) subacromial pain syndrome (n=34), 2) an isolated supraspinatus tear (n=21), and 3) a massive rotator cuff tear involving the supraspinatus and infraspinatus (n=54). Mixed models were applied for the comparisons of shoulder kinematics between the three groups during abduction and forward flexion. In the massive rotator cuff-tear group, we found reduced glenohumeral elevation compared to the subacromial pain syndrome (16°, 95% CI [10.5, 21.2], p<0.001) and the isolated supraspinatus tear group (10°, 95% CI [4.0, 16.7], p=0.002) at 110° abduction. Reduced glenohumeral elevation in massive rotator cuff tears coincides with an increase in scapulothoracic lateral rotation compared to subacromial pain syndrome (11°, 95% CI [6.5, 15.2], p<0.001) and supraspinatus tears (7°, 95% CI [1.8, 12.1], p=0.012). Comparable differences were observed for forward flexion. No differences in glenohumeral elevation were found between the subacromial pain syndrome and isolated supraspinatus tear group during arm elevation. The massive posterosuperior rotator cuff-tear group had substantially less glenohumeral elevation and more scapulothoracic lateral rotation compared to the other groups. These observations suggest that the infraspinatus is essential to preserve glenohumeral elevation in the presence of a supraspinatus tear. Shoulder kinematics are associated with rotator cuff-tear size and may have diagnostic potential. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Influence of Component Rotation in Total Knee Arthroplasty on Tibiofemoral Kinematics-A Cadaveric Investigation.

    PubMed

    Maderbacher, Guenther; Keshmiri, Armin; Springorum, Hans R; Maderbacher, Hermann; Grifka, Joachim; Baier, Clemens

    2017-09-01

    Physiological tibiofemoral kinematics have been shown to be important for good knee function after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The purpose of the present study was to investigate the influence of component rotation on tibiofemoral kinematics during knee flexion. We asked which axial component alignment best reconstructs physiological tibiofemoral kinematics and which combinations should be avoided. Ten healthy cadaveric knees were examined. By means of a navigational device, tibiofemoral kinematics between 0° and 90° of flexion were assessed before and after TKA using the following different rotational component alignment: femoral components: ligament balanced, 6° internal, 3° external rotation, and 6° external rotation in relation to the posterior condylar line; tibial components: self-adapted, 6° internal rotation, and 6° external rotation. Physiological tibiofemoral kinematics could be partly reconstructed by TKA. Ligament-balanced femoral rotation and 6° femoral external rotation both in combination with 6° tibial component external rotation, and 3° femoral external rotation in combination with 6° tibial component internal rotation or self-aligning tibial component were able to restore tibial longitudinal rotation. Largest kinematical differences were found for the combination femoral component internal and tibial component external rotations. From a kinematic-based view, surgeons should avoid internal rotation of femoral components. However, even often recommended combinations of rotational component alignment (3° femoral external and tibial external rotation) significantly change tibiofemoral kinematics. Self-aligning tibial components solely restored tibiofemoral kinematics with the combination of 3° femoral component of external rotation. For the future, navigational devices might help to axially align components to restore patient-specific and natural tibiofemoral kinematics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Effect of combined actions of hip adduction/abduction on the force generation and maintenance of pelvic floor muscles in healthy women

    PubMed Central

    Amorim, Amanda C.; Cacciari, Licia P.; Passaro, Anice C.; Silveira, Simone R. B.; Amorim, Cesar F.; Loss, Jefferson F.

    2017-01-01

    Pelvic floor muscle (PFM) force and coordination are related to urinary incontinence severity and to sexual satisfaction. Health professionals frequently combine classic PFM exercises with hip adduction/abduction contraction to treat these disorders, but the real benefits of this practice are still unknown. Based on a theoretical anatomy approach whereby the levator ani muscle is inserted into the obturator internus myofascia and in which force generated by hip movements should increase the contraction quality of PFMs, our aim was to investigate the effects of isometric hip adduction and abduction on PFM force generation. Twenty healthy, nulliparous women were evaluated using two strain-gauge dynamometers (one cylinder-like inside the vaginal cavity, and the other measuring hip adduction/abduction forces around both thighs) while performing three different tasks: (a) isolated PFM contraction; (b) PFM contraction combined with hip adduction (30% and 50% maximum hip force); and (c) PFM contraction combined with hip abduction (30% and 50% maximum hip force). Data were sampled at 100Hz and subtracted from the offset if existent. We calculated a gradient between the isolated PFM contraction and each hip condition (Δ Adduction and Δ Abduction) for all variables: Maximum force (N), instant of maximum-force occurrence (s), mean force in an 8-second window (N), and PFM force loss (N.s). We compared both conditions gradients in 30% and 50% by paired t-tests. All variables did not differ between hip conditions both in 30% and 50% of maximum hip force (p>.05). PFM contraction combined with isometric hip abduction did not increase vaginal force in healthy and nulliparous women compared to PFM contraction combined with isometric hip adduction. Therefore, so far, the use of hip adduction or abduction in PFM training and treatments are not justified for improving PFM strength and endurance. PMID:28542276

  6. Effect of combined actions of hip adduction/abduction on the force generation and maintenance of pelvic floor muscles in healthy women.

    PubMed

    Amorim, Amanda C; Cacciari, Licia P; Passaro, Anice C; Silveira, Simone R B; Amorim, Cesar F; Loss, Jefferson F; Sacco, Isabel C N

    2017-01-01

    Pelvic floor muscle (PFM) force and coordination are related to urinary incontinence severity and to sexual satisfaction. Health professionals frequently combine classic PFM exercises with hip adduction/abduction contraction to treat these disorders, but the real benefits of this practice are still unknown. Based on a theoretical anatomy approach whereby the levator ani muscle is inserted into the obturator internus myofascia and in which force generated by hip movements should increase the contraction quality of PFMs, our aim was to investigate the effects of isometric hip adduction and abduction on PFM force generation. Twenty healthy, nulliparous women were evaluated using two strain-gauge dynamometers (one cylinder-like inside the vaginal cavity, and the other measuring hip adduction/abduction forces around both thighs) while performing three different tasks: (a) isolated PFM contraction; (b) PFM contraction combined with hip adduction (30% and 50% maximum hip force); and (c) PFM contraction combined with hip abduction (30% and 50% maximum hip force). Data were sampled at 100Hz and subtracted from the offset if existent. We calculated a gradient between the isolated PFM contraction and each hip condition (Δ Adduction and Δ Abduction) for all variables: Maximum force (N), instant of maximum-force occurrence (s), mean force in an 8-second window (N), and PFM force loss (N.s). We compared both conditions gradients in 30% and 50% by paired t-tests. All variables did not differ between hip conditions both in 30% and 50% of maximum hip force (p>.05). PFM contraction combined with isometric hip abduction did not increase vaginal force in healthy and nulliparous women compared to PFM contraction combined with isometric hip adduction. Therefore, so far, the use of hip adduction or abduction in PFM training and treatments are not justified for improving PFM strength and endurance.

  7. Simultaneous determination of neuromuscular blockade at the adducting and abducting laryngeal muscles using phonomyography.

    PubMed

    Hemmerling, Thomas M; Michaud, Guillaume; Trager, Guillaume; Donati, François

    2004-06-01

    Phonomyography (PMG) is a new method for measuring neuromuscular blockade (NMB) at the larynx. In this study, we used PMG to compare NMB at the posterior cricoarytenoid (PCA) and the lateral cricoarytenoid muscle (LCA) in humans. Twelve patients were included in this study. Endotracheal intubation was performed without aid of neuromuscular blocking drugs. One small condenser microphone was inserted beside the vocal cords into the muscular process at the base of the arytenoid cartilage to record acoustic responses of the LCA (vocal cord adduction), and a second microphone was placed behind the larynx to measure NMB of the PCA (vocal cord abduction). Stimulation of the recurrent laryngeal nerve was performed using superficial electrodes placed at the neck (midline between jugular notch and cricoid cartilage) using train-of-four (TOF) stimulation every 12 s. After supramaximal stimulation, mivacurium 0.1 mg/kg was injected and onset, peak effect, and offset of NMB measured and compared using t-test (P < 0.05). The data are presented as mean (SD). Peak effect, onset time, and early recovery to 25% of control twitch height were not significantly different between PCA and LCA at 86% (13) versus 78% (16), 2.3 min (0.45) versus 2.3 min (1.0), and 9.55 min (3.05) versus 8.5 min (4.7), respectively. However, recovery to 75%, 90% of control twitch height, and recovery to a TOF ratio of 0.8 were significantly longer at the PCA than at the LCA at 14 min (4) versus 11 min (5), 17 min (5) versus 11.8 min (5.6), and 17.5 min (5.6) versus 12.3 min (5.5), respectively. The authors conclude that recovery of NMB at the PCA takes longer than at the LCA in humans after mivacurium. After neuromuscular blockade in humans, the recovery of the ability to open the vocal cords takes longer than the ability to close the vocal cords.

  8. Patellofemoral pain and asymmetrical hip rotation.

    PubMed

    Cibulka, Michael T; Threlkeld-Watkins, Julie

    2005-11-01

    Patellofemoral joint problems are the most common overuse injury of the lower extremity, and altered femoral or hip rotation may play a role in patellofemoral pain. The purpose of this case report is to describe the evaluation of and intervention for a patient with asymmetrical hip rotation and patellofemoral pain. The patient was a 15-year-old girl with an 8-month history of anterior right knee pain, without known trauma or injury. Prior to intervention, her score on the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) was 24%. Right hip medial (internal) rotation was less than left hip medial rotation, and manual muscle testing showed weakness of the right hip internal rotator and abductor muscles. The intervention was aimed at increasing right hip medial rotation, improving right hip muscle strength (eg, the muscle force exerted by a muscle or a group of muscles to overcome a resistance), and eliminating anterior right knee pain. After 6 visits (14 days), passive left and right hip medial rotations were symmetrical, and her right hip internal rotator and abductor muscle grades were Good plus. Her WOMAC score was 0%. The patient had right patellofemoral pain and an uncommon pattern of asymmetrical hip rotation, with diminished hip medial rotation and excessive hip lateral (external) rotation on the right side. The patient's outcomes suggest that femoral or hip joint asymmetry may be related to patellofemoral joint pain.

  9. Hip rotation range of motion in sitting and prone positions in healthy Japanese adults

    PubMed Central

    Han, Heonsoo; Kubo, Akira; Kurosawa, Kazuo; Maruichi, Shizuka; Maruyama, Hitoshi

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to elucidate the difference in hip external and internal rotation ranges of motion (ROM) between the prone and sitting positions. [Subjects] The subjects included 151 students. [Methods] Hip rotational ROM was measured with the subjects in the prone and sitting positions. Two-way repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to analyze ipsilateral hip rotation ROM in the prone and sitting positions in males and females. The total ipsilateral hip rotation ROM was calculated by adding the measured values for external and internal rotations. [Results] Ipsilateral hip rotation ROM revealed significant differences between two positions for both left and right internal and external rotations. Hip rotation ROM was significantly higher in the prone position than in the sitting position. Hip rotation ROM significantly differed between the men and women. Hip external rotation ROM was significantly higher in both positions in men; conversely, hip internal rotation ROM was significantly higher in both positions in women. [Conclusion] Hip rotation ROM significantly differed between the sexes and between the sitting and prone positions. Total ipsilateral hip rotation ROM, total angle of external rotation, and total angle of internal rotation of the left and right hips greatly varied, suggesting that hip joint rotational ROM is widely distributed. PMID:25729186

  10. In-line rotating capacitive torque sensor

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1991-09-10

    Disclosed are a method and apparatus for measuring torques developed along a rotating mechanical assembly comprising a rotating inner portion and a stationary outer portion. The rotating portion has an electrically-conductive flexing section fitted between two coaxial shafts in a configuration which varies radially in accordance with applied torque. The stationary portion comprises a plurality of conductive plates forming a surface concentric with and having a diameter slightly larger than the diameter of the rotating portion. The capacitance between the outer, nonrotating and inner, rotating portion varies with changes in the radial configuration of the rotating portion. Signal output varies approximately linearly with torque for small torques, nonlinearly for larger torques. The sensor is preferably surrounded by a conductive shell to minimize electrical interference from external sources. 18 figures.

  11. In-line rotating capacitive torque sensor

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, James W.

    1991-01-01

    A method and apparatus for measuring torques developed along a rotating mechanical assembly comprising a rotating inner portion and a stationary outer portion. The rotating portion has an electrically-conductive flexing section fitted between two coaxial shafts in a configuration which varies radially in accordance with applied torque. The stationary portion comprises a plurality of conductive plates forming a surface concentric with and having a diameter slightly larger than the diameter of the rotating portion. The capacitance between the outer, nonrotating and inner, rotating portion varies with changes in the radial configuration of the rotating portion. Signal output varies approximately linearly with torque for small torques, nonlinearly for larger torques. The sensor is preferably surrounded by a conductive shell to minimize electrical interference from external sources.

  12. Rotating Bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The NASA Bioreactor provides a low turbulence culture environment which promotes the formation of large, three-dimensional cell clusters. Due to their high level of cellular organization and specialization, samples constructed in the bioreactor more closely resemble the original tumor or tissue found in the body. NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues currently being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators.

  13. Anatomical glenohumeral internal rotation deficit and symmetric rotational strength in male and female young beach volleyball players.

    PubMed

    Saccol, Michele Forgiarini; Almeida, Gabriel Peixoto Leão; de Souza, Vivian Lima

    2016-08-01

    Beach volleyball is a sport with a high demand of shoulder structures that may lead to adaptations in range of motion (ROM) and strength like in other overhead sports. Despite of these possible alterations, no study evaluated the shoulder adaptations in young beach volleyball athletes. The aim of this study was to compare the bilateral ROM and rotation strength in the shoulders of young beach volleyball players. Goniometric passive shoulder ROM of motion and isometric rotational strength were evaluated in 19 male and 14 female asymptomatic athletes. External and internal ROM, total rotation motion, glenohumeral internal rotation deficit (GIRD), external rotation and internal rotation strength, bilateral deficits and external rotation to internal rotation ratio were measured. The statistical analysis included paired Student's t-test and analysis of variance with repeated measures. Significantly lower dominant GIRD was found in both groups (p<0.05), but only 6 athletes presented pathological GIRD. For strength variables, no significant differences for external or internal rotation were evident. Young beach volleyball athletes present symmetric rotational strength and shoulder ROM rotational adaptations that can be considered as anatomical. These results indicate that young practitioners of beach volleyball are subject to moderate adaptations compared to those reported for other overhead sports. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Dipole interaction of the Quincke rotating particles.

    PubMed

    Dolinsky, Yu; Elperin, T

    2012-02-01

    We study the behavior of particles having a finite electric permittivity and conductivity in a weakly conducting fluid under the action of the external electric field. We consider the case when the strength of the external electric field is above the threshold, and particles rotate due to the Quincke effect. We determine the magnitude of the dipole interaction of the Quincke rotating particles and the shift of frequency of the Quincke rotation caused by the dipole interaction between the particles. It is demonstrated that depending on the mutual orientation of the vectors of angular velocities of particles, vector-directed along the straight line between the centers of the particles and the external electric field strength vector, particles can attract or repel each other. In contrast to the case of nonrotating particles when the magnitude of the dipole interaction increases with the increase of the strength of the external electric field, the magnitude of the dipole interaction of the Quincke rotating particles either does not change or decreases with the increase of the strength of the external electric field depending on the strength of the external electric field and electrodynamic parameters of the particles.

  15. Dipole interaction of the Quincke rotating particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolinsky, Yu.; Elperin, T.

    2012-02-01

    We study the behavior of particles having a finite electric permittivity and conductivity in a weakly conducting fluid under the action of the external electric field. We consider the case when the strength of the external electric field is above the threshold, and particles rotate due to the Quincke effect. We determine the magnitude of the dipole interaction of the Quincke rotating particles and the shift of frequency of the Quincke rotation caused by the dipole interaction between the particles. It is demonstrated that depending on the mutual orientation of the vectors of angular velocities of particles, vector-directed along the straight line between the centers of the particles and the external electric field strength vector, particles can attract or repel each other. In contrast to the case of nonrotating particles when the magnitude of the dipole interaction increases with the increase of the strength of the external electric field, the magnitude of the dipole interaction of the Quincke rotating particles either does not change or decreases with the increase of the strength of the external electric field depending on the strength of the external electric field and electrodynamic parameters of the particles.

  16. Arthroscopic Subacromial Spacer Implantation in Patients With Massive Irreparable Rotator Cuff Tears: Clinical and Radiographic Results of 39 Retrospectives Cases.

    PubMed

    Deranlot, Julien; Herisson, Olivier; Nourissat, Geoffroy; Zbili, David; Werthel, Jean David; Vigan, Marie; Bruchou, Francois

    2017-09-01

    To evaluate the clinical and radiographic outcome of a biodegradable subacromial spacer in the treatment of massive irreparable rotator cuff tear. Between January 2011 and December 2014, all shoulders with symptomatic massive irreparable rotator cuff tears treated at our institution with arthroscopic implantation of a biodegradable subacromial spacer followed for at least 1 year were included in our series. Patients with osteoarthritis ≥ grade 3 in the Hamada classification were excluded. Outcome measures included pre- and postoperative, range of motion, Constant score, acromiohumeral distance, and Hamada classification on anteroposterior and lateral radiographs. Thirty-nine consecutive shoulders (37 patients) met the inclusion criteria. The mean age of patients was 69.8 (53-84) years. At the last follow-up (mean 32.8 ± 12.4 months), range of motion was significantly increased for all patients in anterior elevation (from 130° to 160°, P = .02), abduction (from 100° to 160°, P = .01), and external rotation (from 30° to 45°, P = .0001). The mean Constant score was also significantly (P < .001) improved from 44.8 (±15.2) preoperatively to 76.0 (±17.1) at the last follow-up. The mean acromiohumeral distance significantly (P = .002) decreased from 8.2 mm (±3.4) to 6.2 mm (±3.1) at the last follow-up. The Hamada score progressed of 1 radiographic stage in 4 shoulders (15%) and progressed of 3 stages in 2 (4%), whereas the other 32 shoulders remained stable. No intra- or postoperative complications were found except for 1 patient who required a revision for spacer migration. Arthroscopic implantation of a subacromial spacer for irreparable rotator cuff tear leads to significant improvement in shoulder function at a minimum of 1 year postoperatively. Level IV, therapeutic case series; treatment study. Copyright © 2017 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Shoulder joint abduction motion test bench: a new shoulder test bench for in vitro experiments with active muscle force simulation.

    PubMed

    Onder, Ursula; Blauth, Michael; Kralinger, Franz; Schmoelz, Werner

    2012-05-30

    In our society the average age is increasing, as are the number of proximal humeral head fractures. For fixation of these fractures, an increasing number of implants are available. New fixation devices should be compared biomechanically with established methods in a standardized fashion. The test bench that was designed was intended to simulate abduction motion of the humerus actively induced by muscle forces. We used three pneumatic muscles to apply forces to the tendons of the musculus supraspinatus and the bifid musculus deltoideus. Thus, it was possible to create an active abduction in the scapular plane. Two different fracture models (with and without medial support) were stabilised with an angular stable plate in sawbone models to reproduce a known clinical outcome with the newly designed test setup. The resultant force acting on the proximal humerus reached approximately 47% BW (per cent body weight), which amounted to 329.0 N (SD: 21.76). The supraspinatus reached maximum forces of 254.7 N (SD: 20.1) and the deltoid muscle 258.9 N (SD: 16.5). Fracture gap instrumentation with medial support resulted in a significantly reduced per-cycle fracture gap motion. The performance evaluation showed that the simulator produced predicable, reproducible movements with physiological muscle force magnitudes.

  18. Relationship between coracoacromial arch and rotator cuff analysed by a computer-assisted method.

    PubMed

    Casino, Daniela; Bruni, Danilo; Zaffagnini, Stefano; Martelli, Sandra; Visani, Andrea; Alvarez, Pau Golanò; Marcacci, Maurilio

    2008-06-01

    In this paper we describe and assess the feasibility of a computer-assisted method which could be useful to investigate the mechanism of subacromial impingment of the shoulder. The relationship between the infraspinatus and supraspinatus and the coracoacromial (CA) arch during passive elevation and abduction are described. The methodology is based on the use of a tracker for recording surfaces and passive movements and data elaboration using dedicated software. In four cadavers, we observed that the minimal distances between the rotator cuff insertions and CA arch were realized at 45 degrees abduction between the acromion and infraspinatus, at 50-90 degrees elevation between the acromion and supraspinatus and also at 45-70 degrees abduction between the CA ligament and supraspinatus. This study showed that the proposed method is able to provide repeatable kinematic data (ICC > or = 0.90), numerical anatomical data comparable with the literature and, moreover, individual measurements on the shoulder joint. This preliminary results support the extension of the methodology to an in vivo protocol to be used during computer-assisted arthroscopic surgery. (c) 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Modifying a shrug exercise can facilitate the upward rotator muscles of the scapula.

    PubMed

    Pizzari, Tania; Wickham, James; Balster, Simon; Ganderton, Charlotte; Watson, Lyn

    2014-02-01

    Scapular dyskinesis, characterised by drooping scapulae and reduced upward rotation, has been implicated in the presentation of a number of shoulder disorders. Traditionally, in shoulder rehabilitation programmes, the shrug exercise has been prescribed to facilitate upward rotation of the scapula by strengthening the upper trapezius muscle. The aim of this research was to compare muscle activation levels during the standard shrug and the upward rotation shrug in a normal and pathological population. Surface electrodes recorded electromyographical activity from upper trapezius, middle trapezius, lower trapezius and serratus anterior muscles in 23 normal participants and 14 participants with multi-directional shoulder instability. Participants completed 10 trials of the standard shrug exercise at 0° of shoulder abduction and the upward rotation shrug exercise at 30° of shoulder abduction in the coronal plane. Muscle activity was expressed as a percentage of maximum voluntary isometric contraction. The four muscles tested performed at a higher intensity during the modified shrug than the standard shrug. Upper trapezius and lower trapezius activity was significantly greater (P < 0.05) in both populations. Though for middle trapezius and serratus anterior muscles, the modified shrug was statistically significant only in the normal population, P = 0.031 and P = <0.001 respectively. The upward rotation shrug is a more effective exercise for eliciting muscle activity of the upper and lower trapezius than the standard shrug in a normal and multi-directional instability population. Clinically, the upward rotation shrug might be useful to address scapular dyskinesis involving drooping shoulders and reduced scapula upward rotation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Rotator cuff problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... smooth layer) lining these tendons. A rotator cuff tear occurs when one of the tendons is torn ... Poor posture over many years Aging Rotator cuff tears TEARS Rotator cuff tears may occur in two ...

  1. Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction. Report from the Committee on Foreign Relations (To Accompany Treaty Doc. 99-11). 99th Congress, 2d Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Committee on Foreign Relations.

    The Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction, an international law whose purpose is to establish uniform rules to be applied in cases of international child abduction, is described. The Hague Convention requires that children wrongfully removed or retained abroad in connection with parental custody disputes be…

  2. Gender differences in rotation of the shank during single-legged drop landing and its relation to rotational muscle strength of the knee.

    PubMed

    Kiriyama, Shinya; Sato, Haruhiko; Takahira, Naonobu

    2009-01-01

    Increased shank rotation during landing has been considered to be one of the factors for noncontact anterior cruciate ligament injuries in female athletes. There have been no known gender differences in rotational knee muscle strength, which is expected to inhibit exaggerated shank rotation. Women have less knee external rotator strength than do men. Lower external rotator strength is associated with increased internal shank rotation at the time of landing. Controlled laboratory study. One hundred sixty-nine healthy young subjects (81 female and 88 male; age, 17.0 +/- 1.0 years) volunteered to participate in this study. The subjects performed single-legged drop landings from a 20-cm height. Femoral and shank kinematics were measured using a 3D optoelectronic tracking system during the drop landings, and then the joint angles around the knee (flexion/extension, valgus/varus, and internal/external rotation) were calculated. The maximal isometric rotational muscle strength of the knee was measured at 30 degrees of knee flexion in a supine position using a dynamometer. The female subjects had significantly less external shank rotation strength than did the male subjects (P < .001). Female subjects also exhibited significantly greater peak shank internal rotation angles than did males during landing (P < .05). Moderate but significant association was found between the maximum shank external rotation strength and the peak shank internal rotation angle during landing (r = -0.322, P < .01). Female subjects tended to have poor shank external rotator strength. This may lead to large shank internal rotation movement during the single-legged drop landing. Improving strength training of the external rotator muscle may help decrease the rates of anterior cruciate ligament injury in female athletes.

  3. Mental Rotation, Pictured Rotation, and Tandem Rotation in Depth

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-01-01

    field. Such an explanation by natural geometry conflates visual comparison with physical measurement. This application of geometry is called natural in...the theory of vision parasitic on geometry: it is unclear what could be meant by a ’mental operation of rotation’, except by reference to physical ...operation, a mental analogue of the physical operation of rotation in space. Since then the story of mental rotation has become far more complicated

  4. Bridging suture makes consistent and secure fixation in double-row rotator cuff repair.

    PubMed

    Fukuhara, Tetsutaro; Mihata, Teruhisa; Jun, Bong Jae; Neo, Masashi

    2017-09-01

    Inconsistent tension distribution may decrease the biomechanical properties of the rotator cuff tendon after double-row repair, resulting in repair failure. The purpose of this study was to compare the tension distribution along the repaired rotator cuff tendon among three double-row repair techniques. In each of 42 fresh-frozen porcine shoulders, a simulated infraspinatus tendon tear was repaired by using 1 of 3 double-row techniques: (1) conventional double-row repair (no bridging suture); (2) transosseous-equivalent repair (bridging suture alone); and (3) compression double-row repair (which combined conventional double-row and bridging sutures). Each specimen underwent cyclic testing at a simulated shoulder abduction angle of 0° or 40° on a material-testing machine. Gap formation and tendon strain were measured during the 1st and 30th cycles. To evaluate tension distribution after cuff repair, difference in gap and tendon strain between the superior and inferior fixations was compared among three double-row techniques. At an abduction angle of 0°, gap formation after either transosseous-equivalent or compression double-row repair was significantly less than that after conventional double-row repair (p < 0.01). During the 30th cycle, both transosseous-equivalent repair (p = 0.02) and compression double-row repair (p = 0.01) at 0° abduction had significantly less difference in gap formation between the superior and inferior fixations than did conventional double-row repair. After the 30th cycle, the difference in longitudinal strain between the superior and inferior fixations at 0° abduction was significantly less with compression double-row repair (2.7% ± 2.4%) than with conventional double-row repair (8.6% ± 5.5%, p = 0.03). Bridging sutures facilitate consistent and secure fixation in double-row rotator cuff repairs, suggesting that bridging sutures may be beneficial for distributing tension equally among all sutures during double-row repair

  5. A comparison of the reliability of make versus break testing in measuring palmar abduction strength of the thumb.

    PubMed

    Lim, J X; Toh, R X; Chook, S K H; Sebastin, S J; Karjalainen, T

    2014-06-01

    Previous studies have established the role of quantitative measurements of palmar abduction strength of the thumb (PAST). This study compares the reliability of the 'make' versus the 'break' test in measuring PAST in healthy volunteers. In a 'make' test, the body part being tested is positioned at the start of its range of motion and the participant is asked to exert his/her maximal force. In a 'break' test, increasing force is applied to a body part after it has completed its range of motion, until the joint being tested gives way. PAST was measured in both hands in 100 healthy volunteers using a handheld device. Two examiners measured PAST using both the 'make' and 'break' test to determine inter-rater reliability. The tests were repeated in 30 volunteers 6 weeks after the initial testing to determine intra-rater reliability. Our results showed that the 'make' test has better inter and intra-rater reliability.

  6. Abduction of children of political dissidents in Argentina and the role of human genetics in their restitution.

    PubMed

    Penchaszadeh, V B

    1992-01-01

    Between 1976 and 1983 a brutal military dictatorship governed Argentina. The most basic human rights were severely violated and the method of forced disappearances of approximately 30,000 political dissidents was instituted. In this process, about 300 babies and children of the disappeared victims were also abducted by the military and given to childless families linked to the security forces. Women whose children and grandchildren had disappeared organized themselves as Grandmothers of Plaza de Mayo to search for their missing loved ones. This search was aided by human geneticists from different parts of the world who provided the scientific basis to establish the genetic identification through "grandpaternity testing," and by mental health professionals who provided the psychological theory supporting restitution of appropriated children to their legitimate families. Thus far, close to 50 children have been located, identified and restituted.

  7. Shoulder internal rotation elbow flexion test for diagnosing cubital tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ochi, Kensuke; Horiuchi, Yukio; Tanabe, Aya; Waseda, Makoto; Kaneko, Yasuhito; Koyanagi, Takahiro

    2012-06-01

    Shoulder internal rotation enhances symptom provocation attributed to cubital tunnel syndrome. We present a modified elbow flexion test--the shoulder internal rotation elbow flexion test--for diagnosing cubital tunnel syndrome. Fifty-five ulnar nerves in cubital tunnel syndrome patients and 123 ulnar nerves in controls were examined with 5 seconds each of elbow flexion, shoulder internal rotation, and shoulder internal rotation elbow flexion tests before and after treatment (surgery in 18; conservative in others). For the shoulder internal rotation elbow flexion test position, 90° abduction, maximum internal rotation, and 10° flexion of the shoulder were combined with the elbow flexion test position. The test was considered positive if any symptom for cubital tunnel syndrome developed <5 seconds. Influence of the shoulder internal rotation elbow flexion test was evaluated by nerve conduction studies in 10 cubital tunnel syndrome nerves and 7 control nerves. The sensitivities/specificities of the 5-second elbow flexion, shoulder internal rotation, and shoulder internal rotation elbow flexion tests were 25%/100%, 58%/100%, and 87%/98%, respectively. Sensitivity differences between the shoulder internal rotation elbow flexion test and the other two tests were significant. Shoulder internal rotation elbow flexion test results and cubital tunnel syndrome symptoms were significantly correlated. Influence of the shoulder internal rotation elbow flexion test on the ulnar nerve was seen in 8 of 10 cubital tunnel syndrome nerves but not in controls. The 5-second shoulder internal rotation elbow flexion test is specific, easy and quick provocative test for diagnosing cubital tunnel syndrome. Copyright © 2012 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Arguing at Play in the Fields of the Lord; or, Abducting Charles Peirce's Rhetorical Theory in "A Neglected Argument for the Reality of God"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newcomb, Matthew J.

    2009-01-01

    This article argues that the ideas of "play" and "abduction" in Charles Peirce's work represent an inventive theory of argument that opens up the kinds of activities that can be called "arguments" and avoids some of the struggles over imposed beliefs with which recent argument theory has grappled. (Contains 12 notes.)

  9. Dynamic Three-Dimensional Shoulder Mri during Active Motion for Investigation of Rotator Cuff Diseases.

    PubMed

    Tempelaere, Christine; Pierrart, Jérome; Lefèvre-Colau, Marie-Martine; Vuillemin, Valérie; Cuénod, Charles-André; Hansen, Ulrich; Mir, Olivier; Skalli, Wafa; Gregory, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    MRI is the standard methodology in diagnosis of rotator cuff diseases. However, many patients continue to have pain despite treatment, and MRI of a static unloaded shoulder seems insufficient for best diagnosis and treatment. This study evaluated if Dynamic MRI provides novel kinematic data that can be used to improve the understanding, diagnosis and best treatment of rotator cuff diseases. Dynamic MRI provided real-time 3D image series and was used to measure changes in the width of subacromial space, superior-inferior translation and anterior-posterior translation of the humeral head relative to the glenoid during active abduction. These measures were investigated for consistency with the rotator cuff diseases classifications from standard MRI. The study included: 4 shoulders with massive rotator cuff tears, 5 shoulders with an isolated full-thickness supraspinatus tear, 5 shoulders with tendinopathy and 6 normal shoulders. A change in the width of subacromial space greater than 4mm differentiated between rotator cuff diseases with tendon tears (massive cuff tears and supraspinatus tear) and without tears (tendinopathy) (p = 0.012). The range of the superior-inferior translation was higher in the massive cuff tears group (6.4mm) than in normals (3.4mm) (p = 0.02). The range of the anterior-posterior translation was higher in the massive cuff tears (9.2 mm) and supraspinatus tear (9.3 mm) shoulders compared to normals (3.5mm) and tendinopathy (4.8mm) shoulders (p = 0.05). The Dynamic MRI enabled a novel measure; 'Looseness', i.e. the translation of the humeral head on the glenoid during an abduction cycle. Looseness was better able at differentiating different forms of rotator cuff disease than a simple static measure of relative glenohumeral position.

  10. Dynamic Three-Dimensional Shoulder Mri during Active Motion for Investigation of Rotator Cuff Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Tempelaere, Christine; Pierrart, Jérome; Lefèvre-Colau, Marie-Martine; Vuillemin, Valérie; Cuénod, Charles-André; Hansen, Ulrich; Mir, Olivier; Skalli, Wafa; Gregory, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Background MRI is the standard methodology in diagnosis of rotator cuff diseases. However, many patients continue to have pain despite treatment, and MRI of a static unloaded shoulder seems insufficient for best diagnosis and treatment. This study evaluated if Dynamic MRI provides novel kinematic data that can be used to improve the understanding, diagnosis and best treatment of rotator cuff diseases. Methods Dynamic MRI provided real-time 3D image series and was used to measure changes in the width of subacromial space, superior-inferior translation and anterior-posterior translation of the humeral head relative to the glenoid during active abduction. These measures were investigated for consistency with the rotator cuff diseases classifications from standard MRI. Results The study included: 4 shoulders with massive rotator cuff tears, 5 shoulders with an isolated full-thickness supraspinatus tear, 5 shoulders with tendinopathy and 6 normal shoulders. A change in the width of subacromial space greater than 4mm differentiated between rotator cuff diseases with tendon tears (massive cuff tears and supraspinatus tear) and without tears (tendinopathy) (p = 0.012). The range of the superior-inferior translation was higher in the massive cuff tears group (6.4mm) than in normals (3.4mm) (p = 0.02). The range of the anterior-posterior translation was higher in the massive cuff tears (9.2 mm) and supraspinatus tear (9.3 mm) shoulders compared to normals (3.5mm) and tendinopathy (4.8mm) shoulders (p = 0.05). Conclusion The Dynamic MRI enabled a novel measure; ‘Looseness’, i.e. the translation of the humeral head on the glenoid during an abduction cycle. Looseness was better able at differentiating different forms of rotator cuff disease than a simple static measure of relative glenohumeral position. PMID:27434235

  11. Actuator assembly including a single axis of rotation locking member

    DOEpatents

    Quitmeyer, James N.; Benson, Dwayne M.; Geck, Kellan P.

    2009-12-08

    An actuator assembly including an actuator housing assembly and a single axis of rotation locking member fixedly attached to a portion of the actuator housing assembly and an external mounting structure. The single axis of rotation locking member restricting rotational movement of the actuator housing assembly about at least one axis. The single axis of rotation locking member is coupled at a first end to the actuator housing assembly about a Y axis and at a 90.degree. angle to an X and Z axis providing rotation of the actuator housing assembly about the Y axis. The single axis of rotation locking member is coupled at a second end to a mounting structure, and more particularly a mounting pin, about an X axis and at a 90.degree. angle to a Y and Z axis providing rotation of the actuator housing assembly about the X axis. The actuator assembly is thereby restricted from rotation about the Z axis.

  12. Arthroscopic-Assisted Latissimus Dorsi Tendon Transfer for Massive, Irreparable Rotator Cuff Tears: Technique and Short-Term Follow-Up of Patients With Pseudoparalysis.

    PubMed

    Kanatlı, Ulunay; Özer, Mustafa; Ataoğlu, Muhammet Baybars; Öztürk, Burak Yağmur; Gül, Orkun; Çetinkaya, Mehmet; Ayanoğlu, Tacettin

    2017-05-01

    To describe a modified technique for arthroscopic-assisted transfer of the latissimus dorsi tendon in a selected group of patients with irreparable rotator cuff tears and pseudoparalysis and to evaluate its short-term results. Fifteen patients with irreparable rotator cuff tears and pseudoparalysis treated by arthroscopic-assisted latissimus dorsi tendon transfer were included. The mean patient age was 61.53 ± 6.24 years (range, 52-71 years). Patients were assessed with physical examination, University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) Score and Constant-Murley score, as well as visual analog scale score at a mean follow-up of 26.4 ± 2.58 months (range, 24-31 months). At final follow-up, mean UCLA score increased to 27.47 ± 6.31 compared with the preoperative UCLA score of 6.53 ± 2.1 (P < .001). Constant-Murley score was 21 ± 7.41 and 59.73 ± 13.62 (P < .001), visual analog scale pain score was 7.47 ± 1.06 and 2.47 ± 0.91 (P < .001), active forward flexion was 58° ± 21.11° and 130° ± 30.05° (P < .001), active abduction was 51° ± 21.64° and 129.67° ± 25.45° (P < .001), and active external rotation was 13.33° ± 21.68° and 32° ± 18.03° (P < .001) preoperatively and postoperatively, respectively. Mean acromiohumeral distance was 3.13 ± 1.40 mm preoperatively, whereas it was 5.67 ± 1.67 mm postoperatively (P < .001). No significant complications requiring a revision surgery was observed during the final follow-up. The modified technique of arthroscopic-assisted transfer of the latissimus dorsi tendon is a feasible, minimally invasive option for the surgical treatment of irreparable rotator cuff tears in a subset of patients with pseudoparalysis. Level IV, therapeutic case series. Copyright © 2016 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. [Rotational stability of angiography catheters].

    PubMed

    Schröder, J; Weber, M

    1992-10-01

    Rotatory stability is a parameter that reflects the ability of a catheter to transmit a rotation applied at the outer end to the catheter tip for the purpose of selective probing. A method for measuring the rotatory stability is described, and the results of rotatory stability measurements of 70 different commercially available catheters are reported. There is an almost linear correlation between the rotatory stability and the difference between the respective fourth power of the external and internal diameter or, approximately, to the fourth power of the external diameter for catheters without wire reinforcement. With the same cross-sectional dimensions, the rotatory stability of teflon, polyethylene, and nylon catheters has an approximate ratio of 1:2:4. Wire reinforcement increases rotatory stability by an average factor of about 3. For catheters of calibers 5 F and 6 F, a correlation between the rotatory stability and the weight of the reinforcing wire mesh is apparent.

  14. Rotational cavity optomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wetzel, Wyatt; Rodenburg, B.; Ek, B.; Jha, A. K.; Bhattacharya, M.

    2017-04-01

    We consider optomechanics based on the exchange of orbital angular momentum between light and matter. Specifically we consider a nanoparticle levitated in an optical ring trap in a cavity. The motion of this particle is probed by an angular lattice created by two co-propagating beams carrying equal but opposite angular momenta. Firstwe consider the case where the lattice is weak, so the nanoparticle can execute complete rotations about the cavity axis. We establishanalytically the existence of a linear regime where accurate Doppler velocimetry can be performed on the nanoparticle, and also describe numerically the dynamics in the nonlinear regime where the velocimetry is no longer accurate. Second, we consider the case where the lattice is strong and the nanoparticle executes torsional motion about the cavity axis. We find the presence of an external torque introduces an instability, but can also be used to tune continuously the linear optomechanical coupling whose strength can be measured by homodyning the cavity output field. This research was supported by the National Science Foundation (NSF) (1454931), the Office of Naval Research (N00014-14-1-0803), and the Research Corporation for Science Advancement (20966).

  15. Rotational response of superconductors: Magnetorotational isomorphism and rotation-induced vortex lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babaev, Egor; Svistunov, Boris

    2014-03-01

    The analysis of nonclassical rotational response of superfluids and superconductors was performed by Onsager [Onsager, Nuovo Cimento, Suppl. 6, 279 (1949), 10.1007/BF02780991] and London [Superfluids (Wiley, New York, 1950)] and crucially advanced by Feynman [Prog. Low Temp. Phys. 1, 17 (1955), 10.1016/S0079-6417(08)60077-3]. It was established that, in the thermodynamic limit, neutral superfluids rotate by forming—without any threshold—a vortex lattice. In contrast, the rotation of superconductors at angular frequency Ω—supported by uniform magnetic field BL∝Ω due to surface currents—is of the rigid-body type (London law). Here we show that, neglecting the centrifugal effects, the behavior of a rotating superconductor is identical to that of a superconductor placed in a uniform fictitious external magnetic field H ˜=-BL. In particular, the isomorphism immediately implies the existence of two critical rotational frequencies in type-2 superconductors.

  16. Limited rotation of the mobile-bearing in a rotating platform total knee prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Garling, E H; Kaptein, B L; Nelissen, R G H H; Valstar, E R

    2007-01-01

    The hypothesis of this study was that the polyethylene bearing in a rotating platform total knee prosthesis shows axial rotation during a step-up motion, thereby facilitating the theoretical advantages of mobile-bearing knee prostheses. We examined 10 patients with rheumatoid arthritis who had a rotating platform total knee arthroplasty (NexGen LPS mobile, Zimmer Inc. Warsaw, USA). Fluoroscopic data was collected during a step-up motion six months postoperatively. A 3D-2D model fitting technique was used to reconstruct the in vivo 3D kinematics. The femoral component showed more axial rotation than the polyethylene mobile-bearing insert compared to the tibia during extension. In eight knees, the femoral component rotated internally with respect to the tibia during extension. In the other two knees the femoral component rotated externally with respect to the tibia. In all 10 patients, the femur showed more axial rotation than the mobile-bearing insert indicating the femoral component was sliding on the polyethylene of the rotating platform during the step-up motion. Possible explanations are a too limited conformity between femoral component and insert, the anterior located pivot location of the investigated rotating platform design, polyethylene on metal impingement and fibrous tissue formation between the mobile-bearing insert and the tibial plateau.

  17. External tank project new technology plan. [development of space shuttle external tank system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    A production plan for the space shuttle external tank configuration is presented. The subjects discussed are: (1) the thermal protection system, (2) thermal coating application techniques, (3) manufacturing and tooling, (4) propulsion system configurations and components, (5) low temperature rotating and sliding joint seals, (6) lightning protection, and (7) nondestructive testing technology.

  18. [Efficiency of a postoperative treatment after rotator cuff repair with a continuous passive motion device (CPM)].

    PubMed

    Michael, J W-P; König, D P; Imhoff, A B; Martinek, V; Braun, S; Hübscher, M; Koch, C; Dreithaler, B; Bernholt, J; Preis, S; Loew, M; Rickert, M; Speck, M; Bös, L; Bidner, A; Eysel, P

    2005-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to prove that a postoperative combined continuous passive motion (CPM) and physiotherapy treatment protocol (CPM group) can achieve 90 degrees active abduction in the shoulder joint earlier than physiotherapy alone (PT group). The indication was a complete tear of the rotator cuff. The study was conducted under in-patient and out-patient conditions. 55 patients were included in this study. The prospective, randomized multicenter study design complies with DIN EN 540. The primary endpoint was the time span until 90 degrees active abduction was achieved by the patients. Patients in the CPM group reached the primary endpoint on average 12 days earlier than the control group. This difference was statistically significant (p = 0.0292). Analyzing the secondary endpoints, e. g., pain and disablement, the results in the CPM group showed again advantages of the combined treatment protocol (CPM + physiotherapy). The postoperative treatment of a total tear of the rotator cuff with a combined continuous passive motion and physiotherapy protocol provided a significantly earlier range of motion in the shoulder joint than physiotherapy alone. There was no report of CPM-related adverse effects.

  19. Power Harvesting from Rotation?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chicone, Carmen; Feng, Z. C.

    2008-01-01

    We show the impossibility of harvesting power from rotational motions by devices attached to the rotating object. The presentation is suitable for students who have studied Lagrangian mechanics. (Contains 2 figures.)

  20. Compensation to whole body active rotation perturbation.

    PubMed

    Rossi, S; Gazzellini, S; Petrarca, M; Patanè, F; Salfa, I; Castelli, E; Cappa, P

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study is the exploration of the compensation mechanisms in healthy adults elicited by superimposing a horizontal perturbation, through a rotation of the support base, during a whole body active rotation around the participant's own vertical body axis. Eight healthy participants stood on a rotating platform while executing 90° whole body rotations under three conditions: no concurrent platform rotation (NP), support surface rotation of ± 45° in the same (45-S) and opposite (45-O) directions. Participants' kinematics and CoP displacements were analyzed with an optoelectronic system and a force platform. In both 45-S and 45-O conditions, there was a tendency for the head to be affected by the external perturbation and to be the last and least perturbed segment while the pelvis was the most perturbed. The observed reduced head perturbation in 45-S and 45-O trials is consistent with a goal-oriented strategy mediated by vision and vestibular information, whereas the tuning of lumbar rotation is consistent with control mechanisms mediated by somato-sensory information. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Nearshore sandbar rotation at single-barred embayed beaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blossier, B.; Bryan, K. R.; Daly, C. J.; Winter, C.

    2016-04-01

    The location of a shore-parallel nearshore sandbar derived from 7 years of video imagery data at the single-barred embayed Tairua Beach (NZ) is investigated to assess the contribution of barline rotation to the overall morphodynamics of sandbars in embayed environments and to characterize the process of rotation in relation to external conditions. Rotation induces cross-shore barline variations at the embayment extremities on the order of magnitude of those induced by alongshore uniform cross-shore migration of the bar. Two semiempirical models have been developed to relate the barline cross-shore migration and rotation to external wave forcing conditions. The rotation model is directly derived from the cross-shore migration model. Therefore, its formulation advocates for a primary role of cross-shore processes in the rotation of sandbars at embayed beaches. The orientation evolves toward an equilibrium angle directly related to the alongshore wave energy gradient due to two different mechanisms. Either the bar extremities migrate in opposite directions with no overall cross-shore bar migration (pivotal rotation) or the rotation relates to an overall migration of the barline which is not uniform along the beach (migration-driven rotation). Migration and rotation characteristic response times are similar, ranging from 10 to 30 days for mild and energetic wave conditions and above 200 days during very calm conditions or when the bar is located far offshore.

  2. Arthroscopic treatment for intratendinous rotator cuff tear results in satisfactory clinical outcomes and structural integrity.

    PubMed

    Cheon, Sang Jin; Lee, Hyo Yeol; Jeon, Woong Ki

    2018-04-20

    This study aimed to evaluate the clinical outcomes and structural integrity of arthroscopic repair of intratendinous rotator cuff tear. Patients who were diagnosed with an intratendinous tear but in whom conservative treatment failed were selected and underwent arthroscopic repair. Between 2008 and 2014, a total of 30 patients (6 men, 24 women; mean age, 59 ± 3.7 years) met the inclusion criteria and were followed up. The mean follow-up period was 26.3 ± 0.7 months. The results were evaluated using the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) score, the Society of the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons rating scale (ASES) questionnaire, and the visual analog scale (VAS) and range of motion (ROM) were measured preoperatively and at final follow-up. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed preoperatively and at 6.7 ± 0.2 months postoperatively. Postoperative MRI was performed on 27 out of 30 patients and analysed using the Sugaya classification. Corresponding to the preoperative MRI findings, arthroscopic findings of intratendinous tears were observed in all 30 patients. The mean active forward elevation ROM was 137.3° ± 15.4° before surgery and 168.8° ± 15.2° at the final follow-up. The internal and external rotations at abduction were 31.7° ± 5.1° and 63.0° ± 11.6° before surgery, respectively, and 60.5° ± 8.0° and 75.2° ± 10.8° after surgery, respectively. The UCLA score improved from of 20.1 ± 7.4 points preoperative to 28.4 ± 5.5 points at the final follow-up. The ASES score improved from 55.7 ± 15.3 points preoperative to 82.6 ± 9.7 points postoperatively. The VAS for pain score decreased from 6.4 ± 1.2 points preoperative to 1.6 ± 0.9 points postoperative. Satisfactory outcomes (excellent/good) in terms of UCLA and ASES scores were observed in 29 of 30 patients. Based on Sugaya classification, grades I, II, and III structural integrities were observed in 9

  3. Rotations with Rodrigues' Vector

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pina, E.

    2011-01-01

    The rotational dynamics was studied from the point of view of Rodrigues' vector. This vector is defined here by its connection with other forms of parametrization of the rotation matrix. The rotation matrix was expressed in terms of this vector. The angular velocity was computed using the components of Rodrigues' vector as coordinates. It appears…

  4. Hair and fiber transfer in an abduction case--evidence from different levels of trace evidence transfer.

    PubMed

    Taupin, J M

    1996-07-01

    Levels of trace evidence transfer were examined in a casework context. A girl was allegedly abducted in a car and rape attempted by the accused, who denied any contact with the victim. Clothing worn by the victim and the accused, and the covers from the front seats of the car, were analyzed for trace evidence. Three types of corresponding fibers and four possible pathways of transfer were identified. Synthetic fibers similar to those composing the car seat covers were located on the victim's clothing, consistent with direct transfer. Secondary transfer was indicated by dyed brown human head-type hairs (possibly originating from the accused's wife) located on the seat covers and on the victim's clothing. Secondary and possibly tertiary transfer was indicated by pink synthetic material and associated fibers (possibly originating from the victim's mother) located on the victim's clothing, a car seat cover and the accused's clothing. Light microscopy, comparison microscopy, and cross-sectioning techniques were used. The multiple fiber matches and the differing pathways and levels of transfer increased the strength of the association between the accused and the victim. After the fiber evidence was led at the trial, the accused pleaded guilty, thereby affirming the value of secondary transfer evidence.

  5. Special report. Update on EAS (electronic article surveillance) systems: protecting against patient wandering, infant abduction, property theft.

    PubMed

    1993-10-01

    Concern about wandering patients and infant abduction on the part of hospitals has sparked renewed interest in Electronic Article Surveillance (EAS) systems. Such systems had their origins in department stores and libraries where they are almost universally used. They also have applications in hospitals for preventing the theft of supplies and equipment. A number of companies provide EAS products for the health care field. How do you select the system that is best for your needs? "Talk to users. Pick out a number of profit and non-profit hospitals to get their views," advises Ted Algaier, vice president, marketing and sales, Innovative Control Systems, Inc., Waukesha, WI. "Examine the history of the company or vendor to determine if it understands the health care market and find out if the product really works." In this report, we'll review a number of EAS systems currently on the market, and present information on how they work, how effective they are, and costs involved. Also included are comments from users who have installed such systems.

  6. Abducted children and youth in Lord's Resistance Army in Northeastern Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC): mechanisms of indoctrination and control.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Jocelyn Td; Branham, Lindsay; Decker, Michele R

    2016-01-01

    Globally, an estimated 300,000 children under the age of 18 participate in combat situations; those in armed groups in particular suffer prolonged exposure to psychological and physical abuse. The Lord's Resistance Army (LRA) is a rebel movement known for its widespread conscription of children; yet little is known about this process once the group moved beyond northern Uganda. In this paper, we describe the processes related to abduction and indoctrination of youth by the LRA in northeastern Democratic Republic of the Congo ( DRC). In-depth interviews were conducted with formerly abducted children, their family members, community leaders, and service providers (total n = 34) in four communities in LRA-affected areas of northeastern DRC. Inductive coding of transcripts was undertaken to identify salient themes. Informants articulated a range of practices by the LRA to exert high levels of control over new recruits, including strict social isolation from recent abductees; control of communication; promoting new identity formation; and compelling children to act out strictly defined gendered roles. Witchcraft and secrecy are used to intimidate recruits and to magnify perception of the group's power. These methods promote de-identification with one's civilian and family life; and eventually the assimilation of a new language and identity. Indoctrination of newly abducted children into the LRA occurs via a complex system of control. This study provides one of the first detailed explorations of social and psychological mechanisms through which this is achieved, and focuses particularly on the gendered differences in the indoctrination process. Results support past findings that the LRA is a strategic and well-organized organization in its approach to enlisting child soldiers. Understanding some of the ways in which the LRA controls its recruits and the psychological impact of indoctrination enables reintegration programs to more effectively address these issues

  7. Hip abduction-adduction strength and one-leg hop tests: test-retest reliability and relationship to function in elite ice hockey players.

    PubMed

    Kea, J; Kramer, J; Forwell, L; Birmingham, T

    2001-08-01

    Single group, test-retest. To determine: (1) hip abduction and adduction torques during concentric and eccentric muscle actions, (2) medial and lateral one-leg hop distances, (3) the test-retest reliability of these measurements, and (4) the relationship between isokinetic measures of hip muscle strength and hop distances in elite ice hockey players. The skating motion used in ice hockey requires strong contractions of the hip and knee musculature. However, baseline scores for hip strength and hop distances, their test-retest reliability, and measures of the extent to which these tests are related for this population are not available. The dominant leg of 27 men (mean age 20 +/- 3 yrs) was tested on 2 occasions. Hip abduction and adduction movements were completed at 60 degrees.s(-1) angular velocity, with the subject lying on the non-test side and the test leg moving vertically in the subject's coronal plane. One-leg hops requiring jumping from and landing on the same leg without losing balance were completed in the medial and lateral directions. Hip adduction torques were significantly greater than abduction torques during both concentric and eccentric muscle actions, while no significant difference was observed between medial and lateral hop distances. Although hop test scores produced excellent ICCs (> 0.75) when determined using scores on 1 occasion, torques needed to be averaged over 2 test occasions to reach this level. Correlations between the strength and hop tests ranged from slight to low (r = -0.26 to 0.27) and were characterized by wide 95% confidence intervals (-0.54 to 0.61). Isokinetic tests of hip abduction and adduction did not provide a strong indication of performance during sideways hop tests. Although isokinetic tests can provide a measure of muscular strength under specific test conditions, they should not be relied upon as a primary indicator of functional abilities or readiness to return to activity.

  8. Rotational glenohumeral adaptations are associated with shoulder pathology in professional male handball players.

    PubMed

    Lubiatowski, Przemyslaw; Kaczmarek, Piotr; Cisowski, Pawel; Breborowicz, Ewa; Grygorowicz, Monika; Dzianach, Marcin; Krupecki, Tomasz; Laver, Lior; Romanowski, Leszek

    2018-01-01

    Glenohumeral range of motion adaptations may affect throwing athletes and contribute to shoulder injury. The purpose of this study was to evaluate shoulder rotation deficits among elite professional handball players and its correlation to the presence of shoulder pain and morphological changes. Eighty-seven elite professional handball players and 41 healthy non-athlete volunteers participated in the study. Evaluations included measurement of range of internal and external rotation, total arch of motion, identification of shoulder pain and ultrasound scan for diagnosis of rotator cuff tears and internal impingement. Glenohumeral rotational deficits (>20-25°) were found among 11 players group (13%). The throwing shoulders in the players group showed a decrease in internal rotation and an increase in external rotation with significantly larger ranges among players compared to the non-athlete group. Internal rotation deficit >20° was associated with higher incidence of shoulder pain among players. Both internal rotation deficits (>25°) and total arch of motion deficit (>20°) co-existed with higher incidence of internal impingement. Shoulder pain was common (36/97-41%) and was associated with decreased external rotation and total arch of motion. Internal impingement (found in 13/87-15%) correlated with decreased rotation ranges and a greater deficit in total arch of motion, whereas higher gain in external rotation correlated with a partial rotator cuff tear (found in 12/87-14%). Shoulder pathologies and problems commonly affected the group of handball players. Greater glenohumeral rotational deficits in throwing shoulders of handball players correlate with shoulder pain and internal impingement, while increased external rotation with partial rotator cuff tears. Such deficits affect 13% of the athlete population. Major clinical relevance of the study is to monitor handball players' shoulders both clinically and by proper imaging. Evaluation of range of rotation seems

  9. SEAL FOR ROTATING SHAFT

    DOEpatents

    Coffman, R.T.

    1957-12-10

    A seal is described for a rotatable shaft that must highly effective when the shaft is not rotating but may be less effective while the shaft is rotating. Weights distributed about a sealing disk secured to the shaft press the sealing disk against a tubular section into which the shiilt extends, and whem the shaft rotates, the centrifugal forces on the weights relieve the pressurc of the sealing disk against the tubular section. This action has the very desirible result of minimizing the wear of the rotating disk due to contact with the tubular section, while affording maximum sealing action when it is needed.

  10. Predictors of human rotation.

    PubMed

    Stochl, Jan; Croudace, Tim

    2013-01-01

    Why some humans prefer to rotate clockwise rather than anticlockwise is not well understood. This study aims to identify the predictors of the preferred rotation direction in humans. The variables hypothesised to influence rotation preference include handedness, footedness, sex, brain hemisphere lateralisation, and the Coriolis effect (which results from geospatial location on the Earth). An online questionnaire allowed us to analyse data from 1526 respondents in 97 countries. Factor analysis showed that the direction of rotation should be studied separately for local and global movements. Handedness, footedness, and the item hypothesised to measure brain hemisphere lateralisation are predictors of rotation direction for both global and local movements. Sex is a predictor of the direction of global rotation movements but not local ones, and both sexes tend to rotate clockwise. Geospatial location does not predict the preferred direction of rotation. Our study confirms previous findings concerning the influence of handedness, footedness, and sex on human rotation; our study also provides new insight into the underlying structure of human rotation movements and excludes the Coriolis effect as a predictor of rotation.

  11. Effects of asymptomatic rotator cuff pathology on in vivo shoulder motion and clinical outcomes.

    PubMed

    Baumer, Timothy G; Dischler, Jack; Mende, Veronica; Zauel, Roger; van Holsbeeck, Marnix; Siegal, Daniel S; Divine, George; Moutzouros, Vasilios; Bey, Michael J

    2017-06-01

    The incidence of asymptomatic rotator cuff tears has been reported to range from 15% to 39%, but the influence of asymptomatic rotator cuff pathology on shoulder function is not well understood. This study assessed the effects of asymptomatic rotator cuff pathology on shoulder kinematics, strength, and patient-reported outcomes. A clinical ultrasound examination was performed in 46 asymptomatic volunteers (age: 60.3 ± 7.5 years) with normal shoulder function to document the condition of their rotator cuff. The ultrasound imaging identified the participants as healthy (n = 14) or pathologic (n = 32). Shoulder motion was measured with a biplane x-ray imaging system, strength was assessed with a Biodex (Biodex Medical Systems, Inc., Shirley, NY, USA), and patient-reported outcomes were assessed using the Western Ontario Rotator Cuff Index and visual analog scale pain scores. Compared with healthy volunteers, those with rotator cuff pathology had significantly less abduction (P = .050) and elevation (P = .041) strength, their humerus was positioned more inferiorly on the glenoid (P = .018), and the glenohumeral contact path length was longer (P = .007). No significant differences were detected in the Western Ontario Rotator Cuff Index, visual analog scale, range of motion, or acromiohumeral distance. The differences observed between the healthy volunteers and those with asymptomatic rotator cuff pathology lend insight into the changes in joint mechanics, shoulder strength, and conventional clinical outcomes associated with the early stages of rotator cuff pathology. Furthermore, these findings suggest a plausible mechanical progression of kinematic and strength changes associated with the development of rotator cuff pathology. Copyright © 2016 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Modeling of Prosthetic Limb Rotation Control by Sensing Rotation of Residual Arm Bone

    PubMed Central

    Kuiken, Todd A.

    2011-01-01

    We proposed a new approach to improve the control of prosthetic arm rotation in amputees. Arm rotation is sensed by implanting a small permanent magnet into the distal end of the residual bone, which produces a magnetic field. The position of the bone rotation can be derived from magnetic field distribution detected with magnetic sensors on the arm surface, and then conveyed to the prosthesis controller to manipulate the rotation of the prosthesis. Proprioception remains intact for residual limb skeletal structures; thus, this control system should be natural and easy-to-use. In this study, simulations have been conducted in an upper arm model to assess the feasibility and performance of sensing the voluntary rotation of residual humerus with an implanted magnet. A sensitivity analysis of the magnet size and arm size was presented. The influence of relative position of the magnet to the magnetic sensors, orientation of the magnet relative to the limb axis, and displacement of the magnetic sensors on the magnetic field was evaluated. The performance of shielding external magnetostatic interference was also investigated. The simulation results suggest that the direction and angle of rotation of residual humerus could be obtained by decoding the magnetic field signals with magnetic sensors built into a prosthetic socket. This pilot study provides important guidelines for developing a practical interface between the residual bone rotation and the prosthesis for control of prosthetic rotation. PMID:18713682

  13. 38 CFR 4.71 - Measurement of ankylosis and joint motion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) Shoulder rotation—arm abducted to 90°, elbow flexed to 90° with the position of the forearm reflecting the midpoint 0° between internal and external rotation of the shoulder; and (b) supination and pronation—the...

  14. 38 CFR 4.71 - Measurement of ankylosis and joint motion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) Shoulder rotation—arm abducted to 90°, elbow flexed to 90° with the position of the forearm reflecting the midpoint 0° between internal and external rotation of the shoulder; and (b) supination and pronation—the...

  15. 38 CFR 4.71 - Measurement of ankylosis and joint motion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) Shoulder rotation—arm abducted to 90°, elbow flexed to 90° with the position of the forearm reflecting the midpoint 0° between internal and external rotation of the shoulder; and (b) supination and pronation—the...

  16. 38 CFR 4.71 - Measurement of ankylosis and joint motion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) Shoulder rotation—arm abducted to 90°, elbow flexed to 90° with the position of the forearm reflecting the midpoint 0° between internal and external rotation of the shoulder; and (b) supination and pronation—the...

  17. 38 CFR 4.71 - Measurement of ankylosis and joint motion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) Shoulder rotation—arm abducted to 90°, elbow flexed to 90° with the position of the forearm reflecting the midpoint 0° between internal and external rotation of the shoulder; and (b) supination and pronation—the...

  18. Rotating electric machine with fluid supported parts

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Jr., Joseph L.; Kirtley, Jr., James L.

    1981-01-01

    A rotating electric machine in which the armature winding thereof and other parts are supported by a liquid to withstand the mechanical stresses applied during transient overloads and the like. In particular, a narrow gap is provided between the armature winding and the stator which supports it and this gap is filled with an externally pressurized viscous liquid. The liquid is externally pressurized sufficiently to balance the static loads on the armature winding. Transient mechanical loads which deform the armature winding alter the gap dimensions and thereby additionally pressurize the viscous liquid to oppose the armature winding deformation and more nearly uniformly to distribute the resulting mechanical stresses.

  19. Notes on rotating turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeman, Otto

    1994-01-01

    This work investigates the turbulent constitutive relation when turbulence is subjected to solid body rotation. Laws regarding spectra and asymptotic decay of rotating homogeneous turbulence were confirmed through large-eddy simulation (LES) computations. Rotating turbulent flows exist in many industrial, geophysical, and astrophysical applications. From Lagrangian analysis a relation between turbulent stress and strain in rotating homogeneous turbulence was inferred. This relation was used to derive the spectral energy flux and, ultimately, the energy spectrum form. If the rotation wavenumber k(sub Omega) lies in the inertial subrange, then for wavenumbers less than k(sub Omega) the turbulence motions are affected by rotation and the energy spectrum slope is modified. Energy decay laws inferred in other reports and the present results suggest a modification of the epsilon model equation and eddy viscosity in k-epsilon models.

  20. Effects of Asymptomatic Rotator Cuff Pathology On In-Vivo Shoulder Motion and Clinical Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Baumer, Timothy G.; Dischler, Jack; Mende, Veronica; Zauel, Roger; van Holsbeeck, Marnix; Siegal, Daniel S.; Divine, George; Moutzouros, Vasilios; Bey, Michael J.

    2017-01-01

    Background The incidence of asymptomatic rotator cuff tears has been reported to range from 15–39%, but the influence of asymptomatic rotator cuff pathology on shoulder function is not well understood. The objective of this study was to assess the effects of asymptomatic rotator cuff pathology on shoulder kinematics, strength, and patient-reported outcomes. Methods 46 asymptomatic volunteers (age: 60.3±7.5) with normal shoulder function underwent a clinical ultrasound exam to document the condition of their rotator cuff. The ultrasound imaging identified subjects as healthy (n=14) or pathologic (n=32). Shoulder motion was measured with a biplane x-ray imaging system, strength was assessed with a Biodex, and patient-reported outcomes were assessed using the Western Ontario Rotator Cuff Index and VAS pain scores. Results Compared to healthy subjects, the subjects with rotator cuff pathology had significantly less abduction (p=0.050) and elevation (p=0.041) strength, their humerus was positioned more inferiorly on the glenoid (p=0.018), and the glenohumeral contact path length was longer (p=0.007). No significant differences were detected in terms of WORC, VAS, ROM, or acromiohumeral distance. Discussion The differences observed between the healthy subjects and subjects with asymptomatic rotator cuff pathology lend insight into the changes in joint mechanics, shoulder strength, and conventional clinical outcomes associated with the early stages of rotator cuff pathology. Furthermore, these findings suggest a plausible mechanical progression of kinematic and strength changes associated with the development of rotator cuff pathology. Level of evidence Basic Science Study, Kinesiology PMID:28131679

  1. [Rotator cuff tear of the hip].

    PubMed

    Jeanneret, Luc; Kurmann, Patric T; van Linthoudt, Daniel

    2008-05-14

    We report the observations of two women with a recurrent periarthritis of the hip complicated by a spontaneous rupture of the tendons of the gluteus medius and minimus. These patients usually complain from an acute lateral hip pain and show a Trendelenburg gait. When the rupture is complete, clinical evaluation reveals a drop of the pelvis on the non-stance side and resisted rotation starting from the extreme external rotation position is weak. MRI plays a key role in the diagnosis and the evaluation of a possible surgical repair. Hip rotator-cuff rupture is probably insufficiently diagnosed by ignorance. Nonetheless, optimized handling could relieve the pain of most these patients and improve the disability of some of them.

  2. Experimental rotator cuff repair. A preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Gerber, C; Schneeberger, A G; Perren, S M; Nyffeler, R W

    1999-09-01

    -centimeter-diameter ball under the hoof of the sheep. This led to healing in eight of ten shoulders repaired with the modified Mason-Allen stitch and cortical-bone augmentation. On histological analysis, both the simple-stitch and the modified Mason-Allen technique caused similar degrees of transient localized tissue damage. Mechanical pullout tests of repairs with the new technique showed a failure strength that was approximately 30 percent of that of an intact infraspinatus tendon at six weeks, 52 percent of that of an intact tendon at three months, and 81 percent of that of an intact tendon at six months. The repair technique with a modified Mason-Allen stitch with number-3 braided polyester suture material and cortical-bone augmentation was superior to the conventional repair technique. Use of the modified Mason-Allen stitch and the cortical-bone-augmentation device transferred the weakest point of the repair to the suture material rather than to the bone or the tendon. Failure to protect the rotator cuff post-operatively was associated with an exceedingly high rate of failure, even if optimum repair technique was used. Different techniques for rotator cuff repair substantially influence the rate of failure. A modified Mason-Allen stitch does not cause tendon necrosis, and use of this stitch with cortical-bone augmentation yields a repair that is biologically well tolerated and stronger in vivo than a repair with the conventional technique. Unprotected repairs, however, have an exceedingly high rate of failure even if optimum repair technique is used. Postoperative protection from tension overload, such as with an abduction splint, may be necessary for successful healing of massive rotator cuff tears.

  3. Response of plasma rotation to resonant magnetic perturbations in J-TEXT tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, W.; Chen, Z. Y.; Huang, D. W.; Hu, Q. M.; Shi, Y. J.; Ding, Y. H.; Cheng, Z. F.; Yang, Z. J.; Pan, X. M.; Lee, S. G.; Tong, R. H.; Wei, Y. N.; Dong, Y. B.; J-TEXT Team

    2018-03-01

    The response of plasma toroidal rotation to the external resonant magnetic perturbations (RMP) has been investigated in Joint Texas Experimental Tokamak (J-TEXT) ohmic heating plasmas. For the J-TEXT’s plasmas without the application of RMP, the core toroidal rotation is in the counter-current direction while the edge rotation is near zero or slightly in the co-current direction. Both static RMP experiments and rotating RMP experiments have been applied to investigate the plasma toroidal rotation. The core toroidal rotation decreases to lower level with static RMP. At the same time, the edge rotation can spin to more than 20 km s-1 in co-current direction. On the other hand, the core plasma rotation can be slowed down or be accelerated with the rotating RMP. When the rotating RMP frequency is higher than mode frequency, the plasma rotation can be accelerated to the rotating RMP frequency. The plasma confinement is improved with high frequency rotating RMP. The plasma rotation is decelerated to the rotating RMP frequency when the rotating RMP frequency is lower than the mode frequency. The plasma confinement also degrades with low frequency rotating RMP.

  4. Magnetic Actuator Modelling for Rotating Machinery Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendes, Ricardo Ugliara; de Castro, Hélio Fiori; Cavalca, Kátia Lucchesi; Ferreira, Luiz Otávio Saraiva

    Rotating machines have a wide range of application such as airplanes, factories, laboratories and power plants. Lately, with computer aid design, shafts finite element models including bearings, discs, seals and couplings have been developed, allowing the prediction of the machine behavior. In order to keep confidence during operation, it is necessary to monitor these systems, trying to predict future failures. One of the most applied technique for this purpose is the modal analysis. It consists of applying a perturbation force into the system and then to measure its response. However, there is a difficulty that brings limitations to the excitation of systems with rotating shafts when using impact hammers or shakers, once due to friction, undesired tangential forces and noise can be present in the measurements. Therefore, the study of a non-contact technique of external excitation becomes of high interest. In this sense, the present work deals with the study and development of a finite element model for rotating machines using a magnetic actuator as an external excitation source. This work also brings numerical simulations where the magnetic actuator was used to obtain the frequency response function of the rotating system.

  5. Immobilization in Neutral Rotation for a Glenohumeral Dislocation Using a Sling and Splint

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this manuscript is to provide an expedient means of immobilizing a glenohumeral dislocation in neutral rotation. This technique for post-reduction immobilization of a glenohumeral dislocation is inexpensive and easy to fabricate. Anterior glenohumeral dislocations often involve an avulsion of the labrum from the glenoid rim. In contrast to immobilization in internal rotation, positioning the shoulder in 0-45° of external rotation approximates the labrum and glenoid rim. It is hypothesized that placing the shoulder in a more externally rotated position could allow for better healing and increased joint stability. This technique places the shoulder in neutral rotation, because 45° of external rotation is awkward and may interfere with certain activities of daily living. Structural aluminum malleable (SAM) splints are used as an alternative to a bolster sling. The SAM splints are lightweight, simply shaped, and easily stored. PMID:21509136

  6. Units of rotational information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yuxiang; Chiribella, Giulio; Hu, Qinheping

    2017-12-01

    Entanglement in angular momentum degrees of freedom is a precious resource for quantum metrology and control. Here we study the conversions of this resource, focusing on Bell pairs of spin-J particles, where one particle is used to probe unknown rotations and the other particle is used as reference. When a large number of pairs are given, we show that every rotated spin-J Bell state can be reversibly converted into an equivalent number of rotated spin one-half Bell states, at a rate determined by the quantum Fisher information. This result provides the foundation for the definition of an elementary unit of information about rotations in space, which we call the Cartesian refbit. In the finite copy scenario, we design machines that approximately break down Bell states of higher spins into Cartesian refbits, as well as machines that approximately implement the inverse process. In addition, we establish a quantitative link between the conversion of Bell states and the simulation of unitary gates, showing that the fidelity of probabilistic state conversion provides upper and lower bounds on the fidelity of deterministic gate simulation. The result holds not only for rotation gates, but also to all sets of gates that form finite-dimensional representations of compact groups. For rotation gates, we show how rotations on a system of given spin can simulate rotations on a system of different spin.

  7. CONTROL ROD ROTATING MECHANISM

    DOEpatents

    Baumgarten, A.; Karalis, A.J.

    1961-11-28

    A threaded rotatable shaft is provided which rotates in response to linear movement of a nut, the shaft being surrounded by a pair of bellows members connected to either side of the nut to effectively seal the reactor from leakage and also to store up energy to shut down the reactor in the event of a power failure. (AEC)

  8. Short-rotation plantations

    Treesearch

    Philip E. Pope; Jeffery O. Dawson

    1989-01-01

    Short-rotation plantations offer several advantages over longer, more traditional rotations. They enhance the natural productivity of better sites and of tree species with rapid juvenile growth. Returns on investment are realized in a shorter period and the risk of loss is reduced compared with long term investments. Production of wood and fiber can be maximized by...

  9. SMAP Faraday Rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Le Vine, David

    2016-01-01

    Faraday rotation is a change in the polarization as signal propagates through the ionosphere. At L-band it is necessary to correct for this change and measurements are made on the spacecraft of the rotation angle. These figures show that there is good agreement between the SMAP measurements (blue) and predictions based on models (red).

  10. Adversarial Geospatial Abduction Problems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    which is new , shows that #GCD is #P-complete and, moreover, that there is no fully-polynomial random approximation scheme for #GCD unless NP equals the...use L∗ to form a new set of constraints to find a δ-core optimal explanation. We now present these δ-core constraints. Notice that the cardinality...EXBrf (∅, efd), flag1 = true, i = 2 (4) While flag1 (a) new val = cur val + inci (b) If new val > (1 + |L|2 ) · cur val then i. If EXBrf (B ∪ {pi

  11. Interpretation as Abduction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-01-01

    general, axioms of the form species D genus can be converted into biconditional axioms of the form genus A differentiae - species Often as in the above...the "et cetera" predicates can be used for any kind of differentiae distinguishing a species from the rest of a genus , and not just for those related...schema axiom into a number of axioms, each expressing different stereotypical features of the situation and each having in its antecedent the

  12. Rotation sensor switch

    DOEpatents

    Sevec, John B.

    1978-01-01

    A protective device to provide a warning if a piece of rotating machinery slows or stops comprises a pair of hinged weights disposed to rotate on a rotating shaft of the equipment. When the equipment is rotating, the weights remain in a plane essentially perpendicular to the shaft and constitute part of an electrical circuit that is open. When the shaft slows or stops, the weights are attracted to a pair of concentric electrically conducting disks disposed in a plane perpendicular to the shaft and parallel to the plane of the weights when rotating. A disk magnet attracts the weights to the electrically conducting plates and maintains the electrical contact at the plates to complete an electrical circuit that can then provide an alarm signal.

  13. Rotating stars in relativity.

    PubMed

    Paschalidis, Vasileios; Stergioulas, Nikolaos

    2017-01-01

    Rotating relativistic stars have been studied extensively in recent years, both theoretically and observationally, because of the information they might yield about the equation of state of matter at extremely high densities and because they are considered to be promising sources of gravitational waves. The latest theoretical understanding of rotating stars in relativity is reviewed in this updated article. The sections on equilibrium properties and on nonaxisymmetric oscillations and instabilities in f -modes and r -modes have been updated. Several new sections have been added on equilibria in modified theories of gravity, approximate universal relationships, the one-arm spiral instability, on analytic solutions for the exterior spacetime, rotating stars in LMXBs, rotating strange stars, and on rotating stars in numerical relativity including both hydrodynamic and magnetohydrodynamic studies of these objects.

  14. Quantum measurement of a rapidly rotating spin qubit in diamond.

    PubMed

    Wood, Alexander A; Lilette, Emmanuel; Fein, Yaakov Y; Tomek, Nikolas; McGuinness, Liam P; Hollenberg, Lloyd C L; Scholten, Robert E; Martin, Andy M

    2018-05-01

    A controlled qubit in a rotating frame opens new opportunities to probe fundamental quantum physics, such as geometric phases in physically rotating frames, and can potentially enhance detection of magnetic fields. Realizing a single qubit that can be measured and controlled during physical rotation is experimentally challenging. We demonstrate quantum control of a single nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center within a diamond rotated at 200,000 rpm, a rotational period comparable to the NV spin coherence time T 2 . We stroboscopically image individual NV centers that execute rapid circular motion in addition to rotation and demonstrate preparation, control, and readout of the qubit quantum state with lasers and microwaves. Using spin-echo interferometry of the rotating qubit, we are able to detect modulation of the NV Zeeman shift arising from the rotating NV axis and an external DC magnetic field. Our work establishes single NV qubits in diamond as quantum sensors in the physically rotating frame and paves the way for the realization of single-qubit diamond-based rotation sensors.

  15. Quantum measurement of a rapidly rotating spin qubit in diamond

    PubMed Central

    Fein, Yaakov Y.; Hollenberg, Lloyd C. L.; Scholten, Robert E.

    2018-01-01

    A controlled qubit in a rotating frame opens new opportunities to probe fundamental quantum physics, such as geometric phases in physically rotating frames, and can potentially enhance detection of magnetic fields. Realizing a single qubit that can be measured and controlled during physical rotation is experimentally challenging. We demonstrate quantum control of a single nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center within a diamond rotated at 200,000 rpm, a rotational period comparable to the NV spin coherence time T2. We stroboscopically image individual NV centers that execute rapid circular motion in addition to rotation and demonstrate preparation, control, and readout of the qubit quantum state with lasers and microwaves. Using spin-echo interferometry of the rotating qubit, we are able to detect modulation of the NV Zeeman shift arising from the rotating NV axis and an external DC magnetic field. Our work establishes single NV qubits in diamond as quantum sensors in the physically rotating frame and paves the way for the realization of single-qubit diamond-based rotation sensors. PMID:29736417

  16. Forefoot-rearfoot coupling patterns and tibial internal rotation during stance phase of barefoot versus shod running.

    PubMed

    Eslami, Mansour; Begon, Mickaël; Farahpour, Nader; Allard, Paul

    2007-01-01

    Based on twisted plate and mitered hinge models of the foot and ankle, forefoot-rearfoot coupling motion patterns can contribute to the amount of tibial rotation. The present study determined the differences of forefoot-rearfoot coupling patterns as well as excessive excursion of tibial internal rotation in shod versus barefoot conditions during running. Sixteen male subjects ran 10 times at 170 steps per minute under the barefoot and shod conditions. Forefoot-rearfoot coupling motions were assessed by measuring mean relative phase angle during five intervals of stance phase for the main effect of five time intervals and two conditions (ANOVA, P<0.05). Tibial internal rotation excursion was compared between the shod and barefoot conditions over the first 50% of stance phase using paired t-test, (P<0.05). Forefoot adduction/abduction and rearfoot eversion/inversion coupling motion patterns were significantly different between the conditions and among the intervals (P<0.05; effect size=0.47). The mean absolute relative angle was significantly modified to 37 degrees in-phase relationship at the heel-strike of running with shoe wears. No significant differences were noted in the tibial internal rotation excursion between shod and barefoot conditions. Significant variations in the forefoot adduction/abduction and rearfoot eversion/inversion coupling patterns could have little effect on the amount of tibial internal rotation excursion. Yet it remains to be determined whether changes in the frontal plane forefoot-rearfoot coupling patterns influence the tibia kinematics for different shoe wears or foot orthotic interventions. The findings question the rational for the prophylactic use of forefoot posting in foot orthoses.

  17. Assessment of the midflexion rotational laxity in posterior-stabilized total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Hino, Kazunori; Kutsuna, Tatsuhiko; Oonishi, Yoshio; Watamori, Kunihiko; Kiyomatsu, Hiroshi; Iseki, Yasutake; Watanabe, Seiji; Ishimaru, Yasumitsu; Miura, Hiromasa

    2017-11-01

    To evaluate changes in midflexion rotational laxity before and after posterior-stabilized (PS)-total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Twenty-nine knees that underwent PS-TKA were evaluated. Manual mild passive rotational stress was applied to the knees, and the internal-external rotational angle was measured automatically by a navigation system at 30°, 45°, 60°, and 90° of knee flexion. The post-operative internal rotational laxity was statistically significantly increased compared to the preoperative level at 30°, 45°, 60°, and 90° of flexion. The post-operative external rotational laxity was statistically significantly decreased compared to the preoperative level at 45° and 60° of flexion. The post-operative internal-external rotational laxity was statistically significantly increased compared to the preoperative level only at 30° of flexion. The preoperative and post-operative rotational laxity showed a significant correlation at 30°, 45°, 60°, and 90° of flexion. Internal-external rotational laxity increases at the initial flexion range due to resection of both the anterior or posterior cruciate ligaments and retention of the collateral ligaments in PS-TKA. Preoperative and post-operative rotational laxity indicated a significant correlation at the midflexion range. This study showed that a large preoperative rotational laxity increased the risk of a large post-operative laxity, especially at the initial flexion range in PS-TKA. III.

  18. External approach to rhinoplasty.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Wilfred S; Charbonneau, Paul A

    2015-07-01

    The technique of external rhinoplasty is outlined. Having reviewed 74 cases, its advantages and disadvantages are discussed. Reluctance to use this external approach seems to be based on emotional rather than radical grounds, for its seems to be the procedure of choice for many problems.

  19. Examination of the torque required to passively palmar abduct the thumb CMC joint in a pediatric population with hemiplegia and stroke.

    PubMed

    Stirling, Leia; Ahmad, Mona Qureshi; Kelty-Stephen, Damian; Correia, Annette

    2015-12-16

    Many activities of daily living involve precision grasping and bimanual manipulation, such as putting toothpaste on a toothbrush or feeding oneself. However, children afflicted by stroke, cerebral palsy, or traumatic brain injury may have lost or never had the ability to actively and accurately control the thumb. To translate insights from adult rehabilitation robotics to innovative therapies for hand rehabilitation in pediatric care, specifically for thumb deformities, an understanding of the torque needed to abduct the thumb to assist grasping tasks is required. Participants (n=16, 10 female, 13.2±3.1 years) had an upper extremity evaluation and measures were made of their passive range of motion, anthropometrics, and torques to abduct the thumb for both their affected and non-affected sides. Torque measures were made using a custom wrist orthosis that was adjusted for each participant. The torque to achieve maximum abduction was 1.47±0.61inlb for the non-affected side and 1.51±0.68inlb for the affected side, with a maximum recorded value of 4.87inlb. The overall maximum applied torque was observed during adduction and was 5.10inlb. We saw variation in the applied torque, which could have been due to the applied torques by the Occupational Therapist or the participant actively assisting or resisting the motion rather than remaining passive. We expect similar muscle and participant variation to exist with an assistive device. Thus, the data presented here can be used to inform the specifications for the development of an assistive thumb orthosis for children with "thumb-in-palm" deformity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Effects of the pelvic compression belt on gluteus medius, quadratus lumborum, and lumbar multifidus activities during side-lying hip abduction.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyung-Mi; Kim, Suhn-Yeop; Oh, Duck-Won

    2010-12-01

    The aims of this study were to assess the effect of the pelvic compression belt on the electromyographic (EMG) activities of gluteus medius (GM), quadratus lumborum (QL), and lumbar multifidus (LM) during side-lying hip abduction. Thirty-one volunteers (15 men and 16 women) with no history of pathology volunteered for this study. Subjects were instructed to perform hip abduction in side-lying position with and without applying the pelvic compression belt. The pelvic compression belt was adjusted just below the anterior superior iliac spines with the stabilizing pressure using elastic compression bands. Surface EMG data were collected from the GM, QL, and LM of the dominant limb. Significantly decreased EMG activity in the QL (without the pelvic compression belt, 60.19±23.66% maximal voluntary isometric contraction [MVIC]; with the pelvic compression belt, 51.44±23.00% MVIC) and significantly increased EMG activity in the GM (without the pelvic compression belt, 26.71±12.88% MVIC; with the pelvic compression belt, 35.02±18.28% MVIC) and in the LM (without the pelvic compression belt, 30.28±14.60% MVIC; with the pelvic compression belt, 37.47±18.94% MVIC) were found when the pelvic compression belt was applied (p<0.05). However, there were no significant differences of the EMG activity between male and female subjects. The findings suggest that the pelvic compression belt may be helpful to prevent unwanted substitution movement during side-lying hip abduction, through increasing the GM and LM and decreasing the QL. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Diagnostic accuracy of clinical examination features for identifying large rotator cuff tears in primary health care

    PubMed Central

    Cadogan, Angela; McNair, Peter; Laslett, Mark; Hing, Wayne; Taylor, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Rotator cuff tears are a common and disabling complaint. The early diagnosis of medium and large size rotator cuff tears can enhance the prognosis of the patient. The aim of this study was to identify clinical features with the strongest ability to accurately predict the presence of a medium, large or multitendon (MLM) rotator cuff tear in a primary care cohort. Methods: Participants were consecutively recruited from primary health care practices (n = 203). All participants underwent a standardized history and physical examination, followed by a standardized X-ray series and diagnostic ultrasound scan. Clinical features associated with the presence of a MLM rotator cuff tear were identified (P<0.200), a logistic multiple regression model was derived for identifying a MLM rotator cuff tear and thereafter diagnostic accuracy was calculated. Results: A MLM rotator cuff tear was identified in 24 participants (11.8%). Constant pain and a painful arc in abduction were the strongest predictors of a MLM tear (adjusted odds ratio 3.04 and 13.97 respectively). Combinations of ten history and physical examination variables demonstrated highest levels of sensitivity when five or fewer were positive [100%, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.86–1.00; negative likelihood ratio: 0.00, 95% CI: 0.00–0.28], and highest specificity when eight or more were positive (0.91, 95% CI: 0.86–0.95; positive likelihood ratio 4.66, 95% CI: 2.34–8.74). Discussion: Combinations of patient history and physical examination findings were able to accurately detect the presence of a MLM rotator cuff tear. These findings may aid the primary care clinician in more efficient and accurate identification of rotator cuff tears that may require further investigation or orthopedic consultation. PMID:24421626

  2. In Vivo Shoulder Function After Surgical Repair of a Torn Rotator Cuff

    PubMed Central

    Bey, Michael J.; Peltz, Cathryn D.; Ciarelli, Kristin; Kline, Stephanie K.; Divine, George W.; van Holsbeeck, Marnix; Muh, Stephanie; Kolowich, Patricia A.; Lock, Terrence R.; Moutzouros, Vasilios

    2015-01-01

    Background Surgical repair of a torn rotator cuff is based on the belief that repairing the tear is necessary to restore normal glenohumeral joint (GHJ) mechanics and achieve a satisfactory clinical outcome. Hypothesis Dynamic joint function is not completely restored by rotator cuff repair, thus compromising shoulder function and potentially leading to long-term disability. Study Design Controlled laboratory study and Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Methods Twenty-one rotator cuff patients and 35 control participants enrolled in the study. Biplane radiographic images were acquired bilaterally from each patient during coronal-plane abduction. Rotator cuff patients were tested at 3, 12, and 24 months after repair of a supraspinatus tendon tear. Control participants were tested once. Glenohumeral joint kinematics and joint contact patterns were accurately determined from the biplane radiographic images. Isometric shoulder strength and patient-reported outcomes were measured at each time point. Ultrasound imaging assessed rotator cuff integrity at 24 months after surgery. Results Twenty of 21 rotator cuff repairs appeared intact at 24 months after surgery. The humerus of the patients’ repaired shoulder was positioned more superiorly on the glenoid than both the patients’ contralateral shoulder and the dominant shoulder of control participants. Patient-reported outcomes improved significantly over time. Shoulder strength also increased over time, although strength deficits persisted at 24 months for most patients. Changes over time in GHJ mechanics were not detected for either the rotator cuff patients’ repaired or contralateral shoulders. Clinical outcome was associated with shoulder strength but not GHJ mechanics. Conclusion Surgical repair of an isolated supraspinatus tear may be sufficient to keep the torn rotator cuff intact and achieve satisfactory patient-reported outcomes, but GHJ mechanics and shoulder strength are not fully restored with current

  3. Greater Hip Extension but Not Hip Abduction Explosive Strength Is Associated With Lesser Hip Adduction and Knee Valgus Motion During a Single-Leg Jump-Cut

    PubMed Central

    Cronin, Baker; Johnson, Samuel T.; Chang, Eunwook; Pollard, Christine D.; Norcross, Marc F.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The relationships between hip abductor and extensor strength and frontal plane hip and knee motions that are associated with anterior cruciate ligament injury risk are equivocal. However, previous research on these relationships has evaluated relatively low-level movement tasks and peak torque rather than a time-critical strength measure such as the rate of torque development (RTD). Hypothesis: Females with greater hip abduction and extension RTD would exhibit lesser frontal plane hip and knee motion during a single-leg jump-cutting task. Study Design: Descriptive laboratory study. Methods: Forty recreationally active females performed maximal isometric contractions and single-leg jump-cuts. From recorded torque data, hip extension and abduction RTD was calculated from torque onset to 200 ms after onset. Three-dimensional motion analysis was used to quantify frontal plane hip and knee kinematics during the movement task. For each RTD measure, jump-cut biomechanics were compared between participants in the highest (high) and lowest (low) RTD tertiles. Results: No differences in frontal plane hip and knee kinematics were identified between high and low hip abduction RTD groups. However, those in the high hip extension RTD group exhibited lower hip adduction (high, 3.8° ± 3.0°; low, 6.5° ± 3.0°; P = .019) and knee valgus (high, –2.5° ± 2.3°; low, –4.4° ± 3.2°; P = .046) displacements during the jump-cut. Conclusion: In movements such as cutting that are performed with the hip in a relatively abducted and flexed position, the ability of the gluteus medius to control hip adduction may be compromised. However, the gluteus maximus, functioning as a hip abductor, may take on a pivotal role in controlling hip adduction and knee valgus motion during these types of tasks. Clinical Relevance: Training with a specific emphasis on increasing explosive strength of the hip extensors may be a means through which to improve frontal plane hip and knee

  4. Rotator cuff strength balance in glovebox workers

    DOE PAGES

    Lawton, Cindy M.; Weaver, Amelia M.; Chan, Martha Kwan Yi; ...

    2016-11-23

    Gloveboxes are essential to the pharmaceutical, semi-conductor, nuclear, and biochemical industries. While gloveboxes serve as effective containment systems, they are often difficult to work in and present a number of ergonomic hazards. One such hazard is injury to the rotator cuff, a group of tendons and muscles in the shoulder, connecting the upper arm to the shoulder blade. Rotator cuff integrity is critical to shoulder health. This study compared the rotator cuff muscle strength ratios of glovebox workers to the healthy norm. Descriptive statistics were collected using a short questionnaire. Handheld dynamometry was used to quantify the ratio of forcesmore » produced for shoulder internal and external rotation. Results showed this population to have shoulder strength ratios significantly different from the healthy norm. Strength ratios were found to be a sound predictor of symptom incidence. The deviation from the normal ratio demonstrates the need for solutions designed to reduce the workload on the rotator cuff musculature in order to improve health and safety. Assessment of strength ratios can be used to screen for risk of symptom development. As a result, this increases technical knowledge and augments operational safety.« less

  5. Rotator cuff strength balance in glovebox workers

    SciTech Connect

    Lawton, Cindy M.; Weaver, Amelia M.; Chan, Martha Kwan Yi

    Gloveboxes are essential to the pharmaceutical, semi-conductor, nuclear, and biochemical industries. While gloveboxes serve as effective containment systems, they are often difficult to work in and present a number of ergonomic hazards. One such hazard is injury to the rotator cuff, a group of tendons and muscles in the shoulder, connecting the upper arm to the shoulder blade. Rotator cuff integrity is critical to shoulder health. This study compared the rotator cuff muscle strength ratios of glovebox workers to the healthy norm. Descriptive statistics were collected using a short questionnaire. Handheld dynamometry was used to quantify the ratio of forcesmore » produced for shoulder internal and external rotation. Results showed this population to have shoulder strength ratios significantly different from the healthy norm. Strength ratios were found to be a sound predictor of symptom incidence. The deviation from the normal ratio demonstrates the need for solutions designed to reduce the workload on the rotator cuff musculature in order to improve health and safety. Assessment of strength ratios can be used to screen for risk of symptom development. As a result, this increases technical knowledge and augments operational safety.« less

  6. The rotation of Titan and Ganymede

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Hoolst, Tim; Coyette, Alexis; Baland, Rose-Marie; Trinh, Antony

    2016-10-01

    The rotation rates of Titan and Ganymede, the largest satellites of Saturn and Jupiter, are on average equal to their orbital mean motion. Here we discuss small deviations from the average rotation for both satellites and evaluate the polar motion of Titan induced by its surface fluid layers. We examine different causes at various time scales and assess possible consequences and the potential of using librations and polar motion as probes of the interior structure of the satellites.The rotation rate of Titan and Ganymede cannot be constant on the orbital time scale as a result of the gravitational torque of the central planet acting on the satellites. Titan is moreover expected to show significant polar motion and additional variations in the rotation rate due to angular momentum exchange with the atmosphere, mainly at seasonal periods. Observational evidence for deviations from the synchronous state has been reported several times for Titan but is unfortunately inconclusive. The measurements of the rotation variations are based on determinations of the shift in position of Cassini radar images taken during different flybys. The ESA JUICE (JUpiter ICy moons Explorer) mission will measure the rotation variations of Ganymede during its orbital phase around the satellite starting in 2032.We report on different theoretical aspects of the librations and polar motion. We consider the influence of the rheology of the ice shell and take into account Cassini measurements of the external gravitational field and of the topography of Titan and similar Galileo data about Ganymede. We also evaluate the librations and polar motion induced by Titan's hydrocarbon seas and use the most recent results of Titan's atmosphere dynamics. We finally evaluate the potential of rotation variations to constrain the satellite's interior structure, in particular its ice shell and ocean.

  7. Rotating reactor studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Glyn O.

    1991-01-01

    Undesired gravitational effects such as convection or sedimentation in a fluid can sometimes be avoided or decreased by the use of a closed chamber uniformly rotated about a horizontal axis. In a previous study, the spiral orbits of a heavy or buoyant particle in a uniformly rotating fluid were determined. The particles move in circles, and spiral in or out under the combined effects of the centrifugal force and centrifugal buoyancy. A optimization problem for the rotation rate of a cylindrical reactor rotated about its axis and containing distributed particles was formulated and solved. Related studies in several areas are addressed. A computer program based on the analysis was upgraded by correcting some minor errors, adding a sophisticated screen-and-printer graphics capability and other output options, and by improving the automation. The design, performance, and analysis of a series of experiments with monodisperse polystyrene latex microspheres in water were supported to test the theory and its limitations. The theory was amply confirmed at high rotation rates. However, at low rotation rates (1 rpm or less) the assumption of uniform solid-body rotation of the fluid became invalid, and there were increasingly strong secondary motions driven by variations in the mean fluid density due to variations in the particle concentration. In these tests the increase in the mean fluid density due to the particles was of order 0.015 percent. To a first approximation, these flows are driven by the buoyancy in a thin crescent-shaped depleted layer on the descending side of the rotating reactor. This buoyancy distribution is balanced by viscosity near the walls, and by the Coriolis force in the interior. A full analysis is beyond the scope of this study. Secondary flows are likely to be stronger for buoyant particles, which spiral in towards the neutral point near the rotation axis under the influence of their centrifugal buoyancy. This is because the depleted layer is

  8. Rotatable seal assembly. [Patent application; rotating targets

    DOEpatents

    Logan, C.M.; Garibaldi, J.L.

    1980-11-12

    An assembly is provided for rotatably supporting a rotor on a stator so that vacuum chambers in the rotor and stator remain in communication while the chambers are sealed from ambient air, which enables the use of a ball bearing or the like to support most of the weight of the rotor. The apparatus includes a seal device mounted on the rotor to rotate therewith, but shiftable in position on the rotor while being sealed to the rotor as by an O-ring. The seal device has a flat face that is biased towards a flat face on the stator, and pressurized air is pumped between the faces to prevent contact between them while spacing them a small distance apart to avoid the inflow of large amounts of air between the faces and into the vacuum chambers.

  9. Chaotic rotation of Hyperion?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Binzel, R. P.; Green, J. R.; Opal, C. B.

    1986-01-01

    Thomas et al. (1984) analyzed 14 Voyager 2 images of Saturn's satellite Hyperion and interpreted them to be consistent with a coherent (nonchaotic) rotation period of 13.1 days. This interpretation was criticized by Peale and Wisdom (1984), who argued that the low sampling frequency of Voyager data does not allow chaotic or nonchaotic rotation to be distinguished. New observations obtained with a higher sampling frequency are reported here which conclusively show that the 13.1 day period found by Thomas et al. was not due to coherent rotation.

  10. Coherent Perfect Rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crescimanno, Michael; Dawson, Nathan; Andrews, James

    2012-04-01

    Two classes of conservative, linear, optical rotary effects (optical activity and Faraday rotation) are distinguished by their behavior under time reversal. In analogy with coherent perfect absorption, where counterpropagating light fields are controllably converted into other degrees of freedom, we show that in a linear-conservative medium only time-odd (Faraday) rotation is capable of coherent perfect rotation, by which we mean the complete transfer of counterpropagating coherent light fields into their orthogonal polarization. This highlights the necessity of time reversal odd processes (not just absorption) and coherence in perfect mode conversion and may inform device design.

  11. Coherent perfect rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crescimanno, Michael; Dawson, Nathan J.; Andrews, James H.

    2012-09-01

    Two classes of conservative, linear, optical rotary effects (optical activity and Faraday rotation) are distinguished by their behavior under time reversal. Faraday rotation, but not optical activity, is capable of coherent perfect rotation, by which we mean the complete transfer of counterpropagating coherent light fields into their orthogonal polarization. Unlike coherent perfect absorption, however, this process is explicitly energy conserving and reversible. Our study highlights the necessity of time-reversal-odd processes (not just absorption) and coherence in perfect mode conversion and thus informs the optimization of active multiport optical devices.

  12. [External cephalic version].

    PubMed

    Navarro-Santana, B; Duarez-Coronado, M; Plaza-Arranz, J

    2016-08-01

    To analyze the rate of successful external cephalic versions in our center and caesarean sections that would be avoided with the use of external cephalic versions. From January 2012 to March 2016 external cephalic versions carried out at our center, which were a total of 52. We collected data about female age, gestational age at the time of the external cephalic version, maternal body mass index (BMI), fetal variety and situation, fetal weight, parity, location of the placenta, amniotic fluid index (ILA), tocolysis, analgesia, and newborn weight at birth, minor adverse effects (dizziness, hypotension and maternal pain) and major adverse effects (tachycardia, bradycardia, decelerations and emergency cesarean section). 45% of the versions were unsuccessful and 55% were successful. The percentage of successful vaginal delivery in versions was 84% (4% were instrumental) and 15% of caesarean sections. With respect to the variables studied, only significant differences in birth weight were found; suggesting that birth weight it is related to the outcome of external cephalic version. Probably we did not find significant differences due to the number of patients studied. For women with breech presentation, we recommend external cephalic version before the expectant management or performing a cesarean section. The external cephalic version increases the proportion of fetuses in cephalic presentation and also decreases the rate of caesarean sections.

  13. Piezosurgery in External Dacryocystorhinostomy.

    PubMed

    Czyz, Craig N; Fowler, Amy M; Dutton, Jonathan J; Cahill, Kenneth V; Foster, Jill A; Hill, Robert H; Everman, Kelly R; Nabavi, Cameron B

    Dacryocystorhinostomy (DCR) can be performed via an external or endoscopic approach. The use of ultrasonic or piezosurgery has been well described for endoscopic DCRs but is lacking for external DCRs. This study presents a case series of external DCRs performed using piezosurgery evaluating results and complications. Prospective, consecutive case series of patients undergoing primary external DCR for lacrimal drainage insufficiency. A standard external DCR technique was used using 1 of 2 piezosurgery systems for all bone incision. All patients received silicone intubation to the lacrimal system. Surgical outcome was measured in terms of patient-reported epiphora as follows: 1) complete resolution, 2) improvement >50%, 3) improvement <50%, and 4) No improvement. Intra and postoperative complications were also recorded. Fifty-two patients, 14 male and 38 female, were included in the study, with 2 patients having bilateral surgery. The average age of the patients was 55.8 years. The average length of follow up was 221 days. Surgical outcomes showed 72% of patients with complete resolution of epiphora and 21% with >50% improvement. There were 4 patients (7%) who had <50% improvement. There was 1 (2%) intraoperative complication and 2 (4%) postoperative complications recorded. Piezourgery is a viable modality for performing external DCRs. The lack of surgical complications shows a potential for decreased soft tissues damage. The surgical success rate based on patient-reported epiphora is similar to those published for mechanical external DCRs. This modality may benefit the novice surgeon in the reduction of soft and mucosal tissue damage.

  14. Humeral lengthening and proximal deformity correction with monorail external fixator in young adults.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Hongjiang; Zhu, Yi; Liu, Shen; Kang, Qinglin

    2018-05-01

    Several humeral lengthening or simultaneous deformity corrections through one osteotomy using various external fixators were reported, while literature regarding correction of shortening and proximal varus deformity is scarce. This retrospective clinical study evaluated the results of preforming an acute correction and delayed lengthening in young adults through two osteotomies using monorail external fixator. We report seven patients with various pathologies who underwent humeral proximal deformity correction and lengthening between 2009 and 2015. Pre-operative and post-operative clinical and radiographic data were collected. The mean follow-up time was 33.4 months (25-46 months). The humeral neck-shaft angle improved from 97.9° (85-110°) to 138.6° (135-145°). The magnitude of lengthening achieved was average 7.6 cm (range, 6-10 cm) at an average healing index of lengthening of 30.2 days/cm (range, 27.7-35.4 days/cm). There was a significant increase in range of shoulder abduction, and active abduction improved from pre-operative 136.4° (range, 95-160°) to post-operative 166.4° (range, 150-180°). The DASH score improved significance from 23.29 ± 8.36 to 6.57 ± 3.65 (t = 4.848; p < 0.001). Acute deformity correction and gradual lengthening with the monorail external fixator can be used for humeral shortening and proximal varus angular deformity. Functional improvement is expected after surgery and post-operative therapy.

  15. Rotating mobile launcher

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, T. J.

    1977-01-01

    Apparatus holds remotely piloted arm that accelerates until launching speed is reached. Then vehicle and counterweight at other end of arm are released simultaneously to avoid structural damage from unbalanced rotating forces.

  16. Rotator Cuff Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... They include tendinitis, bursitis, and injuries such as tears. Rotator cuff tendons can become inflamed from frequent ... to wear down, which can lead to a tear. Some tears are not painful, but others can ...

  17. Rotator cuff repair

    MedlinePlus

    ... techniques are used to repair a rotator cuff tear: During open repair, a surgical incision is made ... repair is done for large or more complex tears. During arthroscopy, the arthroscope is inserted through small ...

  18. Control of External Kink Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navratil, Gerald

    2004-11-01

    A fundamental pressure and current limiting phenomenon in magnetically confined plasmas for fusion energy is the long wavelength ideal-MHD kink mode. These modes have been extensively studied in tokamak and reversed field pinch (RFP) devices. They are characterized by significant amplitude on the boundary of the confined plasma and can therefore be controlled by manipulation of the external boundary conditions. In the past ten years, the theoretically predicted stabilizing effect of a nearby conducting wall has been documented in experiments, which opens the possibility of a significant increase in maximum stable plasma pressure. While these modes are predicted to remain unstable when the stabilizing wall is resistive, their growth rates are greatly reduced from the hydrodynamic time scale to the time scale of magnetic diffusion through the resistive wall. These resistive wall slowed kink modes have been identified as limiting phenomena in tokamak (DIII-D, PBX-M, HBT-EP, JT-60U, JET, NSTX) and RFP (HBTX, Extrap, T2R) devices. The theoretical prediction of stabilization to nearly the ideal wall pressure limit by toroidal plasma rotation and/or active feedback control using coils has recently been realized experimentally. Sustained, stable operation at double the no-wall pressure limit has been achieved. Discovery of the phenomenon of resonant field amplification by marginally stable kink modes and its role in the momentum balance of rotationally stabilized plasmas has emerged as a key feature. A theoretical framework, based on an extension of the very successful treatment of the n=0 axisymmetric mode developed in the early 1990's, to understand the stabilization mechanisms and model the performance of active feedback control systems is now established. This allows design of kink control systems for burning plasma experiments like ITER.

  19. Global rotation of mechanical metamaterials induced by their internal deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudek, K. K.; Gatt, R.; Mizzi, L.; Dudek, M. R.; Attard, D.; Grima, J. N.

    2017-09-01

    In this work, we propose the concept that a device based on mechanical metamaterials can be used to induce and control its own rotational motion as a result of internal deformations due to the conversion of translational degrees of freedom into rotational ones. The application of a linear force on the structural units of the system may be fine-tuned in order to obtain a desired type of rotation. In particular, we show, how it is possible to maximise the extent of rotation of the system through the alteration of the geometry of the system. We also show how a device based on this concept can be connected to an external body in order to rotate it which result may potentially prove to be very important in the case of applications such as telescopes employed in space.

  20. Study of magnetofluidic laser scattering under rotating magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pai, Chintamani; Shalini, M.; Varma, Vijaykumar B.; Radha, S.; Nagarajan, R.; Ramanujan, Raju V.

    2018-04-01

    Magnetic field driven self-assembly of magnetic nanoparticles provides wireless programmable approach for tunable magnetofluidic laser scattering. In this work, we study magnetofluidic laser scattering from a commercial aqueous magnetic fluid (EMG 707) under an external rotating magnetic field. A set-up is developed to generate rotating magnetic field for the purpose. Self-assembled magnetic nanoparticle structures in the form of chains and bundles are formed along the magnetic field. This creates a linear streak formation in the forward laser scattering. Rotating magnetic field produces rotating linear streak. We report our initial results of rotating linear streaks at 3 rpm, 6 rpm and 10 rpm and our analysis of the patterns. The studies are useful for developing magnetic fluid based optical devices.

  1. Rotating arc spark plug

    DOEpatents

    Whealton, John H.; Tsai, Chin-Chi

    2003-05-27

    A spark plug device includes a structure for modification of an arc, the modification including arc rotation. The spark plug can be used in a combustion engine to reduce emissions and/or improve fuel economy. A method for operating a spark plug and a combustion engine having the spark plug device includes the step of modifying an arc, the modifying including rotating the arc.

  2. Rotational rate sensor

    DOEpatents

    Hunter, Steven L.

    2002-01-01

    A rate sensor for angular/rotational acceleration includes a housing defining a fluid cavity essentially completely filled with an electrolyte fluid. Within the housing, such as a toroid, ions in the fluid are swept during movement from an excitation electrode toward one of two output electrodes to provide a signal for directional rotation. One or more ground electrodes within the housing serve to neutralize ions, thus preventing any effect at the other output electrode.

  3. Rotator cuff injuries.

    PubMed

    Crusher, R H

    2000-07-01

    Different types of rotator cuff injuries frequently present to Accident and Emergency departments and minor injury units but can be difficult to differentiate clinically. This brief case study describes the examination and diagnosis of related shoulder injuries, specifically rotator cuff tears/disruption and calcifying supraspinatus tendinitis. The relevant anatomy and current therapies for these injuries is also discussed to enable the emergency nurse practitioner to have a greater understanding of the theory surrounding their diagnosis and treatments.

  4. Robot Grasps Rotating Object

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, Brian H.; Tso, Kam S.; Litwin, Todd E.; Hayati, Samad A.; Bon, Bruce B.

    1991-01-01

    Experimental robotic system semiautomatically grasps rotating object, stops rotation, and pulls object to rest in fixture. Based on combination of advanced techniques for sensing and control, constructed to test concepts for robotic recapture of spinning artificial satellites. Potential terrestrial applications for technology developed with help of system includes tracking and grasping of industrial parts on conveyor belts, tracking of vehicles and animals, and soft grasping of moving objects in general.

  5. Instability in Rotating Machinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The proceedings contain 45 papers on a wide range of subjects including flow generated instabilities in fluid flow machines, cracked shaft detection, case histories of instability phenomena in compressors, turbines, and pumps, vibration control in turbomachinery (including antiswirl techniques), and the simulation and estimation of destabilizing forces in rotating machines. The symposium was held to serve as an update on the understanding and control of rotating machinery instability problems.

  6. Evaluation of rotator cuff muscle strength in healthy individuals

    PubMed Central

    Cortez, Paulo José Oliveira; Tomazini, José Elias

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the strength generated by the rotator muscles of the shoulder joint between the right upper limb and left upper limb among healthy individuals. METHODS: To evaluate the muscle strength of upper limbs from isometric contractions in the horizontal direction (rotation) an isometric dynamometer was used, equipped with transducers, signal conditioning, a data acquisition board, and finally, a computer. Study participants were 22 male military subjects, aged between 18 and 19 years old, body mass between 57.7 and 93.0 kg (71.8 ± 9.45 kg) and height between 1.67 and 1.90 m (1.75 ± 0.06 m), healthy and without clinical diseases or any type of orthopedic injury in the muscle skeletal system. RESULTS: The internal rotation in the right upper limb (RUL) was higher than the average strength of internal rotation in the left upper limb (LUL) (p = 0.723). The external rotation strength in RUL was lower than the average strength of external rotation in the LUL (p=0.788). No statistical difference was observed by comparing the strength values of all isometric strength tests. CONCLUSION: For the sample and methodology used to assess muscle strength, there was no statistical difference between the strength generated by the muscles of the rotator cuff of the right and left upper limbs. Experimental Study. PMID:26207091

  7. Future of External Reporting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powers, Kristina

    2015-01-01

    This chapter builds on prior chapters and focuses on higher education trends on the horizon and the resulting impact on external reporting for institutional researchers. Three practical recommendations and examples for institutional researchers are also presented.

  8. External Compression Headaches

    MedlinePlus

    ... People likely to get external compression headaches include construction workers, people in the military, police officers and ... If protective headwear, such as a sports or construction helmet, is necessary, make sure it fits properly ...

  9. A layered abduction model of perception: Integrating bottom-up and top-down processing in a multi-sense agent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Josephson, John R.

    1989-01-01

    A layered-abduction model of perception is presented which unifies bottom-up and top-down processing in a single logical and information-processing framework. The process of interpreting the input from each sense is broken down into discrete layers of interpretation, where at each layer a best explanation hypothesis is formed of the data presented by the layer or layers below, with the help of information available laterally and from above. The formation of this hypothesis is treated as a problem of abductive inference, similar to diagnosis and theory formation. Thus this model brings a knowledge-based problem-solving approach to the analysis of perception, treating perception as a kind of compiled cognition. The bottom-up passing of information from layer to layer defines channels of information flow, which separate and converge in a specific way for any specific sense modality. Multi-modal perception occurs where channels converge from more than one sense. This model has not yet been implemented, though it is based on systems which have been successful in medical and mechanical diagnosis and medical test interpretation.

  10. Children and young mothers' agency in the context of conflict: a review of the experiences of formerly abducted young people in Northern Uganda.

    PubMed

    Ochen, Eric Awich

    2015-04-01

    This paper critically examines the experiences of formerly abducted young women during their captivity with the Lord Resistance Army rebels and in the resettlement and reintegration period. Special attention is given to their exercise of agency and choices. Using a qualitative design, narrative interviews were conducted with child mothers (N=21), local and civic actors (N=17), and the general community through focus groups (N=10). Data transcripts were analyzed using template analysis methods to derive meanings and increase understanding of the situation. Abducted children faced significant difficulties during their captivity and also during their resettlement and reintegration process, yet they continued to exhibit strong agency to cope with the new realities. Despite these difficulties, opportunities existed which were utilized by the young people, albeit to different degrees depending on each young person's ability and initiative (agency). Situational factors limiting the child mothers' agency were identified as embedded within the latter's environment. This study raises the importance of appreciation of the young women's agency in both the bush-captivity experience and resettlement and reintegration processes within the community, post-conflict. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Technology Assessment for External Implementation of Artificial Gravity Utilizing the Deep Space Gateway Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raychev, R.; Griko, Y. V.

    2018-02-01

    Scenario drafting for early technology assessment of the external space centrifuge with little mass and variable radius of rotation is proposed to counteract micro gravity-associated physiological alterations in all physiological systems.

  12. A novel anchorage technique for transnasal traction in rigid external maxillary distraction.

    PubMed

    Varol, A; Basa, S

    2013-12-01

    We describe an effective technique for anchorage of transnasal traction in the management of maxillary rotation during external distraction. Copyright © 2012 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Rotational Spectrum of Sarin.

    PubMed

    Walker, A. R. Hight; Suenram, R. D.; Samuels, Alan; Jensen, James; Ellzy, Michael W.; Lochner, J. Michael; Zeroka, Daniel

    2001-05-01

    As part of an effort to examine the possibility of using molecular-beam Fourier-transform microwave spectroscopy to unambiguously detect and monitor chemical warfare agents, we report the first observation and assignment of the rotational spectrum of the nerve agent Sarin (GB) (Methylphosphonofluoridic acid 1-methyl-ethyl ester, CAS #107-44-8) at frequencies between 10 and 22 GHz. Only one of the two low-energy conformers of this organophosphorus compound (C(4)H(10)FO(2)P) was observed in the rotationally cold (T(rot)<2 K) molecular beam. The experimental asymmetric-rotor ground-state rotational constants of this conformer are A=2874.0710(9) MHz, B=1168.5776(4) MHz, C=1056.3363(4) MHz (Type A standard uncertainties are given, i.e., 1sigma), as obtained from a least-squares analysis of 74 a-, b-, and c-type rotational transitions. Several of the transitions are split into doublets due to the internal rotation of the methyl group attached to the phosphorus. The three-fold-symmetry barrier to internal rotation estimated from these splittings is 677.0(4) cm(-1). Ab initio electronic structure calculations using Hartree-Fock, density functional, and Moller-Plesset perturbation theories have also been made. The structure of the lowest-energy conformer determined from a structural optimization at the MP2/6-311G(**) level of theory is consistent with our experimental findings. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  14. Rotational Spectrum of Sarin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, A. R. Hight; Suenram, R. D.; Samuels, Alan; Jensen, James; Ellzy, Michael W.; Lochner, J. Michael; Zeroka, Daniel

    2001-05-01

    As part of an effort to examine the possibility of using molecular-beam Fourier-transform microwave spectroscopy to unambiguously detect and monitor chemical warfare agents, we report the first observation and assignment of the rotational spectrum of the nerve agent Sarin (GB) (Methylphosphonofluoridic acid 1-methyl-ethyl ester, CAS #107-44-8) at frequencies between 10 and 22 GHz. Only one of the two low-energy conformers of this organophosphorus compound (C4H10FO2P) was observed in the rotationally cold (Trot<2 K) molecular beam. The experimental asymmetric-rotor ground-state rotational constants of this conformer are A=2874.0710(9) MHz, B=1168.5776(4) MHz, C=1056.3363(4) MHz (Type A standard uncertainties are given, i.e., 1σ), as obtained from a least-squares analysis of 74 a-, b-, and c-type rotational transitions. Several of the transitions are split into doublets due to the internal rotation of the methyl group attached to the phosphorus. The three-fold-symmetry barrier to internal rotation estimated from these splittings is 677.0(4) cm-1. Ab initio electronic structure calculations using Hartree-Fock, density functional, and Moller-Plesset perturbation theories have also been made. The structure of the lowest-energy conformer determined from a structural optimization at the MP2/6-311G** level of theory is consistent with our experimental findings.

  15. Descriptive profile of hip rotation range of motion in elite tennis players and professional baseball pitchers.

    PubMed

    Ellenbecker, Todd S; Ellenbecker, Gail A; Roetert, E Paul; Silva, Rogerio Teixeira; Keuter, Greg; Sperling, Fabio

    2007-08-01

    Repetitive loading to the hip joint in athletes has been reported as a factor in the development of degenerative joint disease and intra-articular injury. Little information is available on the bilateral symmetry of hip rotational measures in unilaterally dominant upper extremity athletes. Side-to-side differences in hip joint range of motion may be present because of asymmetrical loading in the lower extremities of elite tennis players and professional baseball pitchers. Cohort (cross-sectional) study (prevalence); Level of evidence, 1. Descriptive measures of hip internal and external rotation active range of motion were taken in the prone position of 64 male and 83 female elite tennis players and 101 male professional baseball pitchers using digital photos and computerized angle calculation software. Bilateral differences in active range of motion between the dominant and nondominant hip were compared using paired t tests and Bonferroni correction for hip internal, external, and total rotation range of motion. A Pearson correlation test was used to test the relationship between years of competition and hip rotation active range of motion. No significant bilateral difference (P > .005) was measured for mean hip internal or external rotation for the elite tennis players or the professional baseball pitchers. An analysis of the number of subjects in each group with a bilateral difference in hip rotation greater than 10 degrees identified 17% of the professional baseball pitchers with internal rotation differences and 42% with external rotation differences. Differences in the elite male tennis players occurred in only 15% of the players for internal rotation and 9% in external rotation. Female subjects had differences in 8% and 12% of the players for internal and external rotation, respectively. Statistical differences were found between the mean total arc of hip range of internal and external rotation in the elite tennis players with the dominant side being greater

  16. Rotating superconductor magnet for producing rotating lobed magnetic field lines

    DOEpatents

    Hilal, Sadek K.; Sampson, William B.; Leonard, Edward F.

    1978-01-01

    This invention provides a rotating superconductor magnet for producing a rotating lobed magnetic field, comprising a cryostat; a superconducting magnet in the cryostat having a collar for producing a lobed magnetic field having oppositely directed adjacent field lines; rotatable support means for selectively rotating the superconductor magnet; and means for energizing the superconductor magnet.

  17. Is subscapularis recruited in a similar manner during shoulder internal rotation exercises and belly press and lift off tests?

    PubMed

    Ginn, Karen A; Reed, Darren; Jones, Chelsea; Downes, Anthony; Cathers, Ian; Halaki, Mark

    2017-06-01

    Although the belly press and lift off tests are recommended to assess subscapularis function, shoulder internal rotation (IR) exercises performed in other shoulder positions are more commonly used to restore subscapularis function. It is not known if shoulder IR exercises specifically activate subscapularis to the same degree as the lift off and belly press tests, and thus have the potential to effect subscapularis strength gains. Therefore, the aim was to compare subscapularis activation levels with those of other shoulder internal rotator muscles during the belly press and lift off tests and shoulder IR exercise positions. Original research. Twenty asymptomatic volunteers performed maximal isometric contractions during the belly press and lift off tests and shoulder IR performed at 90° and 0° abduction in an upright position and supported at 90° abduction in supine. Muscle activation levels were recorded using a combination of indwelling and surface electrodes. Data were normalized to maximum voluntary contractions and averaged. Moderate average subscapularis activation levels were recorded during all shoulder IR tasks examined with no significant difference between tasks (p=0.18). The belly press test was the only IR task in which subscapularis activation levels were significantly higher than all other shoulder internal rotator muscles (p<0.05). Shoulder IR exercises activate subscapularis to similar moderate levels as the belly press and lift off tests and therefore, have similar potential to strengthen subscapularis. However, the belly press test, with significantly higher subscapularis activation than other shoulder internal rotators, more specifically targets subscapularis. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Does proprioceptive acuity during active knee rotation in the transverse plane vary at different ranges?

    PubMed

    Muaidi, Qassim I

    2016-11-21

    Knee proprioception in the sagittal plane has been widely investigated in prospective studies, however limited information is known about proprioceptive acuity during active knee rotation and the way most commonly injured. To investigate whether proprioceptive acuity during active internal and external knee rotation varies at different ranges in the transverse plane. Healthy volunteers (N: 26) without previous injury or surgery of the knee joint participated in the study.Knee rotation proprioceptive acuity was measured using a custom-designed device. The measure of proprioceptive acuity used in this study was the just-noticeable-difference (JND). Participants actively rotated the knee at different intervals(initial, mid, and terminal internal or external rotation range) to one of four movement blocks and the magnitude of the permitted motion was judged. The means of the JND for proprioceptive acuity at initial internal rotation (0.80° ± 0.06) were significantly (p< 0.002) lower than for mid (1.62° ± 0.18), and terminal (2.08° ± 0.35) internal rotation. The means of the JND for proprioceptive acuity at initial external rotation (1.16° ± 0.10) were significantly (p< 0.04) lower than for mid (1.95° ± 0.30), and terminal (1.97° ± 0.24) internal rotation. Participants perceived smaller differences between active internal and external rotation movements at initial rotation range than at the mid and terminal rotation range of movement. This suggests better proprioceptive acuity at the initial rotation range of movement in the transverse plane.

  19. The Dissipation Rate Transport Equation and Subgrid-Scale Models in Rotating Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubinstein, Robert; Ye, Zhou

    1997-01-01

    The dissipation rate transport equation remains the most uncertain part of turbulence modeling. The difficulties arc increased when external agencies like rotation prevent straightforward dimensional analysis from determining the correct form of the modelled equation. In this work, the dissipation rate transport equation and subgrid scale models for rotating turbulence are derived from an analytical statistical theory of rotating turbulence. In the strong rotation limit, the theory predicts a turbulent steady state in which the inertial range energy spectrum scales as k(sup -2) and the turbulent time scale is the inverse rotation rate. This scaling has been derived previously by heuristic arguments.

  20. ANODAL TRANSCRANIAL DIRECT CURRENT STIMULATION (TDCS) INCREASES ISOMETRIC STRENGTH OF SHOULDER ROTATORS MUSCLES IN HANDBALL PLAYERS.

    PubMed

    Hazime, Fuad Ahmad; da Cunha, Ronaldo Alves; Soliaman, Renato Rozenblit; Romancini, Ana Clara Bezerra; Pochini, Alberto de Castro; Ejnisman, Benno; Baptista, Abrahão Fontes

    2017-06-01

    Weakness of the rotator cuff muscles can lead to imbalances in the strength of shoulder external and internal rotators, change the biomechanics of the glenohumeral joint and predispose an athlete to injury. Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a non-invasive brain stimulation technique that has demonstrated promising results in a variety of health conditions. However few studies addressed its potential approach in the realm of athletics. The purpose of this study was to investigate if transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) technique increases the isometric muscle strength of shoulder external and internal rotators in handball athletes. Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study. Eight female handball players aged between 17 and 21 years (Mean=19.65; SD=2.55) with 7.1 ± 4.8 years of experience in training, participating in regional and national competitions were recruited. Maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) of shoulder external and internal rotator muscles was evaluated during and after 30 and 60 minutes post one session of anodal and sham current (2mA; 0.057mA/cm 2 ) with a one-week interval between stimulations. Compared to baseline, MVIC of shoulder external and internal rotators significantly increased after real but not sham tDCS. Between-group differences were observed for external and internal rotator muscles. Maximal voluntary isometric contraction of external rotation increased significantly during tDCS, and 30 and 60 minutes post-tDCS for real tDCS compared to that for sham tDCS. For internal rotation MVIC increased significantly during and 60 minutes post-tDCS. The results indicate that transcranial direct current stimulation temporarily increases maximal isometric contractions of the internal and external rotators of the shoulder in handball players. 2.

  1. Head Rotation Movement Times.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Errol R; Chan, Alan H S; Heung, P T

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study was to measure head rotation movement times in a Fitts' paradigm and to investigate the transition region from ballistic movements to visually controlled movements as the task index of difficulty (ID) increases. For head rotation, there are gaps in the knowledge of the effects of movement amplitude and task difficulty around the critical transition region from ballistic movements to visually controlled movements. Under the conditions of 11 ID values (from 1.0 to 6.0) and five movement amplitudes (20° to 60°), participants performed a head rotation task, and movement times were measured. Both the movement amplitude and task difficulty have effects on movement times at low IDs, but movement times are dependent only on ID at higher ID values. Movement times of participants are higher than for arm/hand movements, for both ballistic and visually controlled movements. The information-processing rate of head rotational movements, at high ID values, is about half that of arm movements. As an input mode, head rotations are not as efficient as the arm system either in ability to use rapid ballistic movements or in the rate at which information may be processed. The data of this study add to those in the review of Hoffmann for the critical IDs of different body motions. The data also allow design for the best arrangement of display that is under the design constraints of limited display area and difficulty of head-controlled movements in a data-inputting task.

  2. Metasurface external cavity laser

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Luyao, E-mail: luyaoxu.ee@ucla.edu; Curwen, Christopher A.; Williams, Benjamin S.

    2015-11-30

    A vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting-laser is demonstrated in the terahertz range, which is based upon an amplifying metasurface reflector composed of a sub-wavelength array of antenna-coupled quantum-cascade sub-cavities. Lasing is possible when the metasurface reflector is placed into a low-loss external cavity such that the external cavity—not the sub-cavities—determines the beam properties. A near-Gaussian beam of 4.3° × 5.1° divergence is observed and an output power level >5 mW is achieved. The polarized response of the metasurface allows the use of a wire-grid polarizer as an output coupler that is continuously tunable.

  3. IO Rotation Movie

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    During its 1979 flyby, Voyager 2 observed Io only from a distance. However, the volcanic activity discovered by Voyager 1 months earlier was readily visible. This sequence of nine color images was collected using the Blue, Green and Orange filters from about 1.2 million kilometers. A 2.5 hour period is covered during which Io rotates 7 degrees.

    Rotating into view over the limb of Io are the plumes of the volcanoes Amirani (top) and Maui (lower). These plumes are very distinct against the black sky because they are being illuminated from behind. Notice that as Io rotates, the proportion of Io which is sunlit decreases greatly. This changing phase angle is because Io is moving between the spacecraft and the Sun.

    This time-lapse movie was produced at JPL by the Image Processing Laboratory in 1985.

  4. Rotating Aperture System

    DOEpatents

    Rusnak, Brian; Hall, James M.; Shen, Stewart; Wood, Richard L.

    2005-01-18

    A rotating aperture system includes a low-pressure vacuum pumping stage with apertures for passage of a deuterium beam. A stator assembly includes holes for passage of the beam. The rotor assembly includes a shaft connected to a deuterium gas cell or a crossflow venturi that has a single aperture on each side that together align with holes every rotation. The rotating apertures are synchronized with the firing of the deuterium beam such that the beam fires through a clear aperture and passes into the Xe gas beam stop. Portions of the rotor are lapped into the stator to improve the sealing surfaces, to prevent rapid escape of the deuterium gas from the gas cell.

  5. Lattice QCD in rotating frames.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Arata; Hirono, Yuji

    2013-08-23

    We formulate lattice QCD in rotating frames to study the physics of QCD matter under rotation. We construct the lattice QCD action with the rotational metric and apply it to the Monte Carlo simulation. As the first application, we calculate the angular momenta of gluons and quarks in the rotating QCD vacuum. This new framework is useful to analyze various rotation-related phenomena in QCD.

  6. Contact mechanics of reverse total shoulder arthroplasty during abduction: the effect of neck-shaft angle, humeral cup depth, and glenosphere diameter.

    PubMed

    Langohr, G Daniel G; Willing, Ryan; Medley, John B; Athwal, George S; Johnson, James A

    2016-04-01

    Implant design parameters can be changed during reverse shoulder arthroplasty (RSA) to improve range of motion and stability; however, little is known regarding their impact on articular contact mechanics. The purpose of this finite element study was to investigate RSA contact mechanics during abduction for different neck-shaft angles, glenosphere sizes, and polyethylene cup depths. Finite element RSA models with varying neck-shaft angles (155°, 145°, 135°), sizes (38 mm, 42 mm), and cup depths (deep, normal, shallow) were loaded with 400 N at physiological abduction angles. The contact area and maximum contact stress were computed. The contact patch and the location of maximum contact stress were typically located inferomedially in the polyethylene cup. On average for all abduction angles investigated, reducing the neck-shaft angle reduced the contact area by 29% for 155° to 145° and by 59% for 155° to 135° and increased maximum contact stress by 71% for 155° to 145° and by 286% for 155° to 135°. Increasing the glenosphere size increased the contact area by 12% but only decreased maximum contact stress by 2%. Decreasing the cup depth reduced the contact area by 40% and increased maximum contact stress by 81%, whereas increasing the depth produced the opposite effect (+52% and -36%, respectively). The location of the contact patch and maximum contact stress in this study matches the area of damage seen frequently on clinical retrievals. This finding suggests that damage to the inferior cup due to notching may be potentiated by contact stresses. Increasing the glenosphere diameter improved the joint contact area and did not affect maximum contact stress. However, although reducing the neck-shaft angle and cup depth can improve range of motion, our study shows that this also has some negative effects on RSA contact mechanics, particularly when combined. Copyright © 2016 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc

  7. Rotation of Giant Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kissin, Yevgeni; Thompson, Christopher

    2015-07-01

    The internal rotation of post-main sequence stars is investigated, in response to the convective pumping of angular momentum toward the stellar core, combined with a tight magnetic coupling between core and envelope. The spin evolution is calculated using model stars of initial mass 1, 1.5, and 5 {M}⊙ , taking into account mass loss on the giant branches. We also include the deposition of orbital angular momentum from a sub-stellar companion, as influenced by tidal drag along with the excitation of orbital eccentricity by a fluctuating gravitational quadrupole moment. A range of angular velocity profiles {{Ω }}(r) is considered in the envelope, extending from solid rotation to constant specific angular momentum. We focus on the backreaction of the Coriolis force, and the threshold for dynamo action in the inner envelope. Quantitative agreement with measurements of core rotation in subgiants and post-He core flash stars by Kepler is obtained with a two-layer angular velocity profile: uniform specific angular momentum where the Coriolis parameter {Co}\\equiv {{Ω }}{τ }{con}≲ 1 (here {τ }{con} is the convective time), and {{Ω }}(r)\\propto {r}-1 where {Co}≳ 1. The inner profile is interpreted in terms of a balance between the Coriolis force and angular pressure gradients driven by radially extended convective plumes. Inward angular momentum pumping reduces the surface rotation of subgiants, and the need for a rejuvenated magnetic wind torque. The co-evolution of internal magnetic fields and rotation is considered in Kissin & Thompson, along with the breaking of the rotational coupling between core and envelope due to heavy mass loss.

  8. Femoral sizing in total knee arthroplasty is rotation dependant.

    PubMed

    Koninckx, Angelique; Deltour, Arnaud; Thienpont, Emmanuel

    2014-12-01

    The mismatch between the medio-lateral (ML) and the antero-posterior (AP) size of femoral components in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) has been linked to gender, ethnicity, morphotype and height differences in patients. The hypothesis of this study was that the AP size measurement of a femoral component increases with more external rotation in posterior referencing TKA. During a 2-year period, 201 patients were included in this prospective study. The AP distance of the distal femur was measured with an AP sizer of the Vanguard (Biomet, Warsaw, US) knee system. This AP sizer allows to dial in external rotation by 1° increments and to determine the femoral size with an anterior boom. AP size was noted at 0°, 3° and 5° of external rotation and then compared for ML matching. Antero-posterior and corresponding ML sizes match perfectly for the Vanguard at 0° of external rotation and a central boom position on the anterior femoral surface. Then, the anterior boom was positioned on the antero-lateral cortex and the AP size increased a mean (SD) 1 (0.5) mm. With 3° of external rotation, the AP size increased a mean (SD) 2.3 (0.4) mm and for 5° a mean (SD) 3.8 (0.3) mm (P < 0.05). This increase in AP size resulted in ML overhang of 2.2 (1.2) mm for 3° and 4.8 (2.6) mm for 5° (P < 0.05). Antero-posterior size measurement of the distal femur is determined by the anatomy of the anterior surface with a higher antero-lateral cortex and the amount of external rotation that is dialled in during surgery. Since these parameters vary case per case, the availability of narrow components offers more surgical options to the surgeon and its importance extends beyond the gender aspect allowing different amounts of external rotation to be used without ML overhang. II.

  9. Rotating bubble membrane radiator

    DOEpatents

    Webb, Brent J.; Coomes, Edmund P.

    1988-12-06

    A heat radiator useful for expelling waste heat from a power generating system aboard a space vehicle is disclosed. Liquid to be cooled is passed to the interior of a rotating bubble membrane radiator, where it is sprayed into the interior of the bubble. Liquid impacting upon the interior surface of the bubble is cooled and the heat radiated from the outer surface of the membrane. Cooled liquid is collected by the action of centrifical force about the equator of the rotating membrane and returned to the power system. Details regarding a complete space power system employing the radiator are given.

  10. The rotating universe.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surdin, M.

    A closed universe obeying the Hubble equation v = Hu·r, where Hu is the Hubble constant, is considered. It is shown that such a universe is equivalent to a universe rotating around one of its diameters at an angular velocity Ωu = Hu. If one revives Blackett's conjecture, viz., a rotating body creates at its center a magnetic dipole, one computes the value of the magnetic field as B ≅ 2.5×10-5G. Intergalactic magnetic fields of the order of 10-6G were deduced from observations.

  11. Rotating shielded crane system

    DOEpatents

    Commander, John C.

    1988-01-01

    A rotating, radiation shielded crane system for use in a high radiation test cell, comprises a radiation shielding wall, a cylindrical ceiling made of radiation shielding material and a rotatable crane disposed above the ceiling. The ceiling rests on an annular ledge intergrally attached to the inner surface of the shielding wall. Removable plugs in the ceiling provide access for the crane from the top of the ceiling into the test cell. A seal is provided at the interface between the inner surface of the shielding wall and the ceiling.

  12. Rotating flexible drag mill

    DOEpatents

    Pepper, W.B.

    1984-05-09

    A rotating parachute for decelerating objects travelling through atmosphere at subsonic or supersonic deployment speeds includes a circular canopy having a plurality of circumferentially arranged flexible panels projecting radially from a solid central disk. A slot extends radially between adjacent panels to the outer periphery of the canopy. Upon deployment, the solid disk diverts air radially to rapidly inflate the panels into a position of maximum diameter. Air impinging on the panels adjacent the panel slots rotates the parachute during its descent. Centrifugal force flattens the canopy into a constant maximum diameter during terminal descent for maximum drag and deceleration.

  13. Investigation of intrinsic toroidal rotation scaling in KSTAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, J. W.; Lee, S. G.; Ko, S. H.; Seol, J.; Lee, H. H.; Kim, J. H.

    2017-07-01

    The behaviors of an intrinsic toroidal rotation without any external momentum sources are investigated in KSTAR. In these experiments, pure ohmic discharges with a wide range of plasma parameters are carefully selected and analyzed to speculate an unrevealed origin of toroidal rotation excluding any unnecessary heating sources, magnetic perturbations, and strong magneto-hydrodynamic activities. The measured core toroidal rotation in KSTAR is mostly in the counter-current direction and its magnitude strongly depends on the ion temperature divided by plasma current (Ti/IP). Especially the core toroidal rotation in the steady-state is well fitted by Ti/IP scaling with a slope of ˜-23, and the possible explanation of the scaling is compared with various candidates. As a result, the calculated offset rotation could not explain the measured core toroidal rotation since KSTAR has an extremely low intrinsic error field. For the stability conditions for ion and electron turbulences, it is hard to determine a dominant turbulence mode in this study. In addition, the intrinsic toroidal rotation level in ITER is estimated based on the KSTAR scaling since the intrinsic rotation plays an important role in stabilizing resistive wall modes for future reference.

  14. Earth's rotation in the framework of general relativity: rigid multipole moments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klioner, S. A.; Soffel, M.; Xu, Ch.; Wu, X.

    A set of equations describing the rotational motion of the Earth relative to the GCRS is formulated in the approximation of rigidly rotating multipoles. The external bodies are supposed to be mass monopoles. The derived set of formulas is supposed to form the theoretical basis for a practical post-Newtonian theory of Earth precession and nutation.

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging of the rotator cuff muscles after baseball pitching.

    PubMed

    Yanagisawa, O; Niitsu, M; Takahashi, H; Itai, Y

    2003-12-01

    The purposes of present study were to investigate quantitatively using functional MR imaging the effect of a series of throwing activities on rotator cuff muscles and to compare the effect of pitching with that of all-out shoulder external rotator exercise as the targeted external rotator muscle group (the infraspinatus and the teres minor). MRI measurements after 135 baseball pitches or all-out shoulder external rotator exercise (concentric mode) in each subject's nondominant shoulder. 6 amateur baseball pitchers. serial T2-weighted images of rotator cuff muscles were obtained before pitching (or shoulder exercise) and immediately, 30, 60 min, 24, 48, 96 hrs after pitching (or shoulder exercise). T2 relaxation times (T2) at each measurement time were calculated for the rotator cuff muscles. Both the supraspinatus and the external rotator muscle group showed significant T2 elevations until 96 hrs after pitching. The subscapularis also showed significantly increased T2 until postpitching 48 hrs. On the other hand, a significant T2 elevation continued until 60 min after shoulder exercise, but thereafter returned towards the value at rest over the next 24 hrs. Long lasting T2 elevations in rotator cuff muscles would be associated with an increase in each intramuscular water content, and may be attributed to the muscle damage that resulted from eccentric contraction during pitching. This information should serve as a useful complement to shoulder injury prevention for baseball pitchers.

  16. In vivo axial humero-ulnar rotation in normal and dysplastic canine elbow joints.

    PubMed

    Rohwedder, Thomas; Fischer, Martin; Böttcher, Peter

    2018-04-01

    To prospectively compare relative axial (internal-external) humero-ulnar rotation in normal and dysplastic canine elbow joints. Six normal elbows (five dogs) and seven joints (six dogs) with coronoid disease were examined. After implantation of 0.8 mm tantalum beads into humerus and ulna, biplanar x-ray movies of the implanted elbows were taken while dogs were walking on a treadmill. Based on the 2D bead coordinates of the synchronized x-ray movies virtual 3D humero-ulnar animations were calculated. Based on these, relative internal-external humero-ulnar rotation was measured over the first third of stance phase and expressed as maximal rotational amplitude. Amplitudes from three consecutive steps were averaged and groupwise compared using an unpaired t-test. In normal elbow joints mean axial relative humero-ulnar rotation was 2.9° (SD 1.1). Dysplastic joints showed a significantly greater rotational amplitude (5.3°, SD 2.0; p = 0.0229, 95% confidence interval 0.4-4.4). Dysplastic elbow joints show greater relative internal-external humero-ulnar rotation compared to normal elbows, which might reflect rotational joint instability. Increased relative internal-external humero-ulnar rotation might alter physiological joint contact and pressure patterns. Future studies are needed to verify if this plays a role in the pathogenesis of medial coronoid disease. Schattauer GmbH.

  17. A self-calibration method in single-axis rotational inertial navigation system with rotating mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yuanpei; Wang, Lingcao; Li, Kui

    2017-10-01

    Rotary inertial navigation modulation mechanism can greatly improve the inertial navigation system (INS) accuracy through the rotation. Based on the single-axis rotational inertial navigation system (RINS), a self-calibration method is put forward. The whole system is applied with the rotation modulation technique so that whole inertial measurement unit (IMU) of system can rotate around the motor shaft without any external input. In the process of modulation, some important errors can be decoupled. Coupled with the initial position information and attitude information of the system as the reference, the velocity errors and attitude errors in the rotation are used as measurement to perform Kalman filtering to estimate part of important errors of the system after which the errors can be compensated into the system. The simulation results show that the method can complete the self-calibration of the single-axis RINS in 15 minutes and estimate gyro drifts of three-axis, the installation error angle of the IMU and the scale factor error of the gyro on z-axis. The calibration accuracy of optic gyro drifts could be about 0.003°/h (1σ) as well as the scale factor error could be about 1 parts per million (1σ). The errors estimate reaches the system requirements which can effectively improve the longtime navigation accuracy of the vehicle or the boat.

  18. Effect of CorrelatedRotational Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hancock, Benjamin; Wagner, Caleb; Baskaran, Aparna

    The traditional model of a self-propelled particle (SPP) is one where the body axis along which the particle travels reorients itself through rotational diffusion. If the reorientation process was driven by colored noise, instead of the standard Gaussian white noise, the resulting statistical mechanics cannot be accessed through conventional methods. In this talk we present results comparing three methods of deriving the statistical mechanics of a SPP with a reorientation process driven by colored noise. We illustrate the differences/similarities in the resulting statistical mechanics by their ability to accurately capture the particles response to external aligning fields.

  19. Hydrodynamic Torques and Rotations of Superparamagnetic Bead Dimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pease, Christopher; Etheridge, J.; Wijesinghe, H. S.; Pierce, C. J.; Prikockis, M. V.; Sooryakumar, R.

    Chains of micro-magnetic particles are often rotated with external magnetic fields for many lab-on-a-chip technologies such as transporting beads or mixing fluids. These applications benefit from faster responses of the actuated particles. In a rotating magnetic field, the magnetization of superparamagnetic beads, created from embedded magnetic nano-particles within a polymer matrix, is largely characterized by induced dipoles mip along the direction of the field. In addition there is often a weak dipole mop that orients out-of-phase with the external rotating field. On a two-bead dimer, the simplest chain of beads, mop contributes a torque Γm in addition to the torque from mip. For dimers with beads unbound to each other, mop rotates individual beads which generate an additional hydrodynamic torque on the dimer. Whereas, mop directly torques bound dimers. Our results show that Γm significantly alters the average frequency-dependent dimer rotation rate for both bound and unbound monomers and, when mop exceeds a critical value, increases the maximum dimer rotation frequency. Models that include magnetic and hydrodynamics torques provide good agreement with the experimental findings over a range of field frequencies.

  20. Rotational and peak torque stiffness of rugby shoes.

    PubMed

    Ballal, Moez S; Usuelli, Federico Giuseppe; Montrasio, Umberto Alfieri; Molloy, Andy; La Barbera, Luigi; Villa, Tomaso; Banfi, Giuseppe

    2014-09-01

    Sports people always strive to avoid injury. Sports shoe designs in many sports have been shown to affect traction and injury rates. The aim of this study is to demonstrate the differing stiffness and torque in rugby boots that are designed for the same effect. Five different types of rugby shoes commonly worn by scrum forwards were laboratory tested for rotational stiffness and peak torque on a natural playing surface generating force patterns that would be consistent with a rugby scrum. The overall internal rotation peak torque was 57.75±6.26 Nm while that of external rotation was 56.55±4.36 Nm. The Peak internal and external rotational stiffness were 0.696±0.1 and 0.708±0.06 Nm/deg respectively. Our results, when compared to rotational stiffness and peak torques of football shoes published in the literature, show that shoes worn by rugby players exert higher rotational and peak torque stiffness compared to football shoes when tested on the same natural surfaces. There was significant difference between the tested rugby shoes brands. In our opinion, to maximize potential performance and lower the potential of non-contact injury, care should be taken in choosing boots with stiffness appropriate to the players main playing role. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Faraday rotation due to excitation of magnetoplasmons in graphene microribbons.

    PubMed

    Tymchenko, Mykhailo; Nikitin, Alexey Yu; Martín-Moreno, Luis

    2013-11-26

    A single graphene sheet, when subjected to a perpendicular static magnetic field, provides a Faraday rotation that, per atomic layer, greatly surpasses that of any other known material. In continuous graphene, Faraday rotation originates from the cyclotron resonance of massless carriers, which allows dynamical tuning through either external electrostatic or magneto-static setting. Furthermore, the rotation direction can be controlled by changing the sign of the carriers in graphene, which can be done by means of an external electric field. However, despite these tuning possibilities, the requirement of large magnetic fields hinders the application of the Faraday effect in real devices, especially for frequencies higher than a few terahertz. In this work we demonstrate that large Faraday rotation can be achieved in arrays of graphene microribbons, through the excitation of the magnetoplasmons of individual ribbons, at larger frequencies than those dictated by the cyclotron resonance. In this way, for a given magnetic field and chemical potential, structuring graphene periodically can produce large Faraday rotation at larger frequencies than what would occur in a continuous graphene sheet. Alternatively, at a given frequency, graphene ribbons produce large Faraday rotation at much smaller magnetic fields than in continuous graphene.

  2. The effect of bronchoscope rotation on tracheal tube orientation at the glottic level in a mannequin.

    PubMed

    Wong, David T; Yau, Brian; Thapar, Shikha; Adhikary, Sanjib D

    2010-10-01

    This study examined the effect of external fibreoptic bronchoscope (FOB) rotations on endotracheal tube (ETT) orientations at the glottic level. Using a mannequin, a nasal FOB was inserted for image capture. A second FOB with a preloaded ETT taped to its top was inserted orally into mid-trachea. The FOB with the taped ETT was rotated as a unit in the axial plane to five different external angles (-90°, -45°, 0°, +45°, +90°). At each external rotation, the ETT was advanced into the trachea. The image of the ETT at the glottic level was captured. Endotracheal tube orientation was quantified according to the glottic zone faced by the ETT. The ETT orientations were compared amongst the five external FOB rotations using the Kruskal-Wallis Test, while the ETT orientations at -90°, -45°, +45°, and +90° FOB rotations were compared with 0° rotation using the Mann-Whitney U test. There was a significant difference in the ETT orientations amongst the five FOB rotations (P < 0.001). The ETT orientations at -90°, -45°, +45°, and +90° FOB rotations were different from the 0° rotation (P < 0.001 for all comparisons). A -90° FOB rotation was most effective in turning the ETT tip away from the right laryngeal structures and the interarytenoid tissue. With the ETT loaded on a FOB, rotation of the FOB prior to advancing the ETT is effective in changing the ETT orientation at the glottis. A -90° FOB rotation is most effective in turning the ETT tip away from the right laryngeal structures and interarytenoid tissue.

  3. Effect of rotation on a rotating hot-wire sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hah, C.; Lakshminarayana, B.

    1978-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to discern the effects of centrifugal and Coriolis forces on a rotating hot-wire. The probe was calibrated in a wind tunnel as well as in a rotating mode. The effect of rotation was found to be negligibly small. A small change in cold resistance (1.5%) was observed in the rotating wire. The rotation seems to have a negligible effect on the fluid mechanics, heat transfer and material characteristics of the wire. This is a significant conclusion in view of the potential application of the hot-wire probe in a rotating passage (such as turbomachinery).

  4. [Internal and external haemorrhoids].

    PubMed

    Schuurman, J P; Go, P M N Y H

    2011-01-01

    In this article, we present 3 cases of patients with different types of haemorrhoidal disease. The first patient is a 27-year-old woman who had been experiencing incidental rectal blood loss without pain during defecation for 3 months. The second patient is a 76-year-old woman who had been bothered by varying degrees of pain from a swelling nearby the anus for 1 year. The third case involves a 31-year-old man who had had continuous severe pain in the anal area for 3 consecutive days. The first patient appeared to have internal hemorrhoids, whereas different forms of external hemorrhoids affected the patients in the other 2 cases. Internal haemorrhoids develop from the intraluminal corpus cavernosum recti; external haemorrhoids from the perianal marginal veins. Patients with internal haemorrhoids present with symptoms that include blood loss and prolaps feeling during defecation. In patients with external haemorrhoids pain is the prominent symptom. Internal haemorrhoids are treated either conservatively or surgically, depending upon their severity. Considering external haemorrhoidal disease surgical treatment provides the most rapid and persistent relief of symptoms.

  5. External Tank (ET) Separation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-05-16

    S134-E-005103 (16 May 2011) --- The STS-134 external fuel tank is seen during its release from space shuttle Endeavour in space following the successful launch on May 16, 2011. A camera in the umbilical well exposed the image. Photo credit: NASA

  6. External Tank (ET) Separation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-05-16

    S134-E-005014 (16 May 2011) --- The STS-134 external fuel tank is seen during its release from space shuttle Endeavour in space following the successful launch on May 16, 2011. A camera in the umbilical well exposed the image. Photo credit: NASA

  7. External Tank (ET) Separation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-05-16

    S134-E-005102 (16 May 2011) --- The STS-134 external fuel tank is seen during its release from space shuttle Endeavour in space following the successful launch on May 16, 2011. An STS-134 crew member using a hand-held still camera exposed the image. Photo credit: NASA

  8. External Tank (ET) Separation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-05-16

    S134-E-005085 (16 May 2011) --- The STS-134 external fuel tank is seen during its release from space shuttle Endeavour in space following the successful launch on May 16, 2011. An STS-134 crew member using a hand-held still camera exposed the image. Photo credit: NASA

  9. External Tank (ET) Separation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-05-16

    S134-E-005013 (16 May 2011) --- The STS-134 external fuel tank is seen during its release from space shuttle Endeavour in space following the successful launch on May 16, 2011. An STS-134 crew member using a hand-held still camera exposed the image. Photo credit: NASA

  10. Working with External Evaluators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silver, Lauren; Burg, Scott

    2015-01-01

    Hiring an external evaluator is not right for every museum or every project. Evaluations are highly situational, grounded in specific times and places; each one is unique. The museum and the evaluator share equal responsibility in an evaluation's success, so it is worth investing time and effort to ensure that both are clear about the goals,…

  11. Effect of limb rotation on radiographic alignment in total knee arthroplasties.

    PubMed

    Radtke, Kerstin; Becher, Christoph; Noll, Yvonne; Ostermeier, Sven

    2010-04-01

    Even in a well-aligned total knee arthroplasty (TKA), limb rotation at the time of radiographic assessment will alter the measurement of alignment. This could influence the radiographic outcome of TKA. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of limb rotation on radiographic alignment after TKA and to establish a re-calculation of this rotation by using existing radiographic landmarks. Synthetic femur and tibia (Sawbones), Inc. Vashon Island, WA) were used to create a TKA of the Triathlon knee prosthesis system (Stryker), Limerick, Ireland). The femoral alignment was 6.5 degrees valgus. The model was fixed in an upright stand. Five series of nine anteroposterior (AP) long leg radiographs were taken on a 30 cm x 120 cm plates in full extension with the limb rotated, in 5 degrees increments, from 20 degrees external rotation to 20 degrees internal rotation. After digitizing each radiograph (Scanner Hewlett Packard XJ 527), an observer measured the anatomic mechanical angle of the femur [AMA ( degrees )], the mechanical lateral proximal femur angle [mLPFA ( degrees )], the mechanical lateral distal femur angle [mLDFA ( degrees )], the mechanical medial proximal tibia angle [mMPTA ( degrees )] and the mechanical lateral distal tibia angle [mLDTA ( degrees )] using a digital measurement software (MediCAD, Hectec, Altfraunhofen, Germany). Besides, the observer measured the geometrical distances of the femoral component figured on the long leg radiograph. A ratio of one distance to another was measured (called femoral component distance ratio). The average radiographic anatomic alignment ranged from 6.827 degrees AMA (SD = 0.22 degrees ) in 20 degrees internal rotation to 4.627 degrees AMA (SD = 0.22 degrees ) in 20 degrees external rotation. Average mLPFA ( degrees ) ranged from 101.63 degrees (SD = 0.63) in 20 degrees internal rotation to 93.60 degrees (SD = 0.74 degrees ) in 20 degrees external rotation. Average mLDFA ( degrees ) ranged from 90.59 degrees

  12. Rotating Vessels for Growing Protein Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cottingham, Paul

    2005-01-01

    Rotating vessels have been proposed as means of growing larger, more nearly uniform protein crystals than would otherwise be possible in the presence of normal Earth gravitation. Heretofore, nonrotating vessels have been used. It is difficult to grow high-quality protein crystals in the terrestrial gravitational field because of convection plumes created by the interaction between gravitation and density gradients in protein-solution depletion layers around growing crystals. The density gradients and the associated convection plumes cause the surfaces of growing crystals to be exposed to nonuniform solution densities, thereby causing the crystals to form in irregular shapes. The microgravitational environment of outer space has been utilized to eliminate gravitation-induced convection, but this approach is generally not favorable because of the high cost and limited availability of space flight. The use of a rotating vessel according to the proposal is intended to ameliorate the effects of gravitation and the resultant convection, relative to the corresponding effects in a non-rotating vessel. The rotation would exert an averaging effect over time, distributing the convective force on the depletion layer. Therefore, the depletion layer would be more nearly uniform and, as a result, the growing crystal would be more nearly perfect. The proposal admits of variations (see figure), including the following: The growing crystal could be rotated about its own central axis or an external axis. The crystal-growth vessel could be of any of various shapes, including cylindrical, hemispherical, conical, and combinations thereof. The crystal-growth vessel could be suspended in a viscous fluid in an outer vessel to isolate the growing crystal from both ambient vibrations and vibrations induced by a mechanism that drives the rotation. The rotation could be coupled to the crystal-growth vessel by viscous or magnetic means. The crystal-growth vessel could be supported within the

  13. Rotational Dynamics with Tracker

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eadkhong, T.; Rajsadorn, R.; Jannual, P.; Danworaphong, S.

    2012-01-01

    We propose the use of Tracker, freeware for video analysis, to analyse the moment of inertia ("I") of a cylindrical plate. Three experiments are performed to validate the proposed method. The first experiment is dedicated to find the linear coefficient of rotational friction ("b") for our system. By omitting the effect of such friction, we derive…

  14. The Axial Curve Rotator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, Walter M.

    This document contains detailed directions for constructing a device that mechanically produces the three-dimensional shape resulting from the rotation of any algebraic line or curve around either axis on the coordinate plant. The device was developed in response to student difficulty in visualizing, and thus grasping the mathematical principles…

  15. Rotating Science Classrooms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hogg, Loretta A.

    1980-01-01

    Described is a science classroom program with centralized materials, and assistance and workshops for teachers. Classroom materials on one of five topics rotate every six weeks among five schools. Teachers plan specific units to match the arrival of the materials in their schools. (Author/DS)

  16. Compact rotating cup anemometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wellman, J. B.

    1968-01-01

    Compact, collapsible rotating cup anemometer is used in remote locations where portability and durability are factors in the choice of equipment. This lightweight instrument has a low wind-velocity threshold, is capable of withstanding large mechanical shocks while in its stowed configuration, and has fast response to wind fluctuations.

  17. Rotational waves in geodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerus, Artyom; Vikulin, Alexander

    2015-04-01

    The rotation model of a geoblock with intrinsic momentum was constructed by A.V. Vikulin and A.G. Ivanchin [9, 10] to describe seismicity within the Pacific Ocean margin. It is based on the idea of a rotational motion of geoblocks as the parts of the rotating body of the Earth that generates rotary deformation waves. The law of the block motion was derived in the form of the sine-Gordon equation (SG) [5, 9]; the dimensionless form of the equation is: δ2θ δ2θ δξ2 - δη2 = sinθ, (1) where θ = β/2, ξ = k0z and η = v0k0t are dimensionless coordinates, z - length of the chain of masses (blocks), t - time, β - turn angle, ν0 - representative velocity of the process, k0 - wave number. Another case analyzed was a chain of nonuniformly rotating blocks, with deviation of force moments from equilibrium positions μ, considering friction forces α along boundaries, which better matched a real-life seismic process. As a result, the authors obtained the law of motion for a block in a chain in the form of the modified SG equation [8]: δ2θ δ2θ δθ- δξ2 - δ η2 = sin θ+ α δη + μδ(ξ)sin θ (2)

  18. Rotatable stem and lock

    DOEpatents

    Deveney, Joseph E.; Sanderson, Stephen N.

    1984-01-01

    A valve stem and lock include a housing surrounding a valve stem, a solenoid affixed to an interior wall of the housing, an armature affixed to the valve stem and a locking device for coupling the armature to the housing body. When the solenoid is energized, the solenoid moves away from the housing body, permitting rotation of the valve stem.

  19. Rotating hairy black holes.

    PubMed

    Kleihaus, B; Kunz, J

    2001-04-23

    We construct stationary black-hole solutions in SU(2) Einstein-Yang-Mills theory which carry angular momentum and electric charge. Possessing nontrivial non-Abelian magnetic fields outside their regular event horizon, they represent nonperturbative rotating hairy black holes.

  20. Rotating Saddle Paul Trap.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rueckner, Wolfgang; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Describes a demonstration in which a ball is placed in an unstable position on a saddle shape. The ball becomes stable when it is rotated above some threshold angular velocity. The demonstration is a mechanical analog of confining a particle in a "Paul Trap". (DDR)

  1. Rotator Cuff Injuries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connors, G. Patrick

    Many baseball players suffer from shoulder injuries related to the rotator cuff muscles. These injuries may be classified as muscular strain, tendonitis or tenosynovitis, and impingement syndrome. Treatment varies from simple rest to surgery, so it is important to be seen by a physician as soon as possible. In order to prevent these injuries, the…

  2. Rotatable stem and lock

    DOEpatents

    Deveney, J.E.; Sanderson, S.N.

    1981-10-27

    A valve stem and lock is disclosed which includes a housing surrounding a valve stem, a solenoid affixed to an interior wall of the housing, an armature affixed to the valve stem and a locking device for coupling the armature to the housing body. When the solenoid is energized, the solenoid moves away from the housing body, permitting rotation of the valve stem.

  3. Rotationally Actuated Prosthetic Hand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norton, William E.; Belcher, Jewell G., Jr.; Carden, James R.; Vest, Thomas W.

    1991-01-01

    Prosthetic hand attached to end of remaining part of forearm and to upper arm just above elbow. Pincerlike fingers pushed apart to degree depending on rotation of forearm. Simpler in design, simpler to operate, weighs less, and takes up less space.

  4. Concepts in crop rotations

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Crop rotations have been a part of civilization since the Middle Ages. With colonization of what would become the United States came new crops of tobacco, cotton, and corn, the first two of which would play significant roles in both the economic beginnings and social fabric of the new country, how ...

  5. Negative Rotation Cinch Strap.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    This project discloses an improved unitary parachute torso harness, having a single fastening means, wherein an auxillary tightening strap is...attached to the groin straps of said harness. Said auxillary straps are used to prevent torso rotation or harness slippage and to prevent harness elongation

  6. Isometric hip-rotator torque production at varying degrees of hip flexion.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Sam; Hoffman, Mark

    2010-02-01

    Hip torque production is associated with certain knee injuries. The hip rotators change function depending on hip angle. To compare hip-rotator torque production between 3 angles of hip flexion, limbs, and sexes. Descriptive. University sports medicine research laboratory. 15 men and 15 women, 19-39 y. Three 6-s maximal isometric contractions of the hip external and internal rotators at 10 degrees, 40 degrees, and 90 degrees of hip flexion on both legs. Average torque normalized to body mass. Internal-rotation torque was greatest at 90 degrees of hip flexion, followed by 40 degrees of hip flexion and finally 10 degrees of hip flexion. External-rotation torque was not different based on hip flexion. The nondominant leg's external rotators were stronger than the dominant leg's, but the reverse was true for internal rotators. Finally, the men had more overall rotator torque. Hip-rotation torque production varies between flexion angle, leg, and sex. Clinicians treating lower extremity problems need to be aware of these differences.

  7. International Child Abduction Act. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Administrative Law and Governmental Relations of the Committee on the Judiciary. House of Representatives, One Hundredth Congress, Second Session on H.R. 2673 and H.R. 3971.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on the Judiciary.

    This document contains witnesses' testimonies and prepared statements from the Congressional hearing called to consider enactment of H.R. 2673, a bill to facilitate implementation of the 1980 Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction. The text of H.R. 2673 is included in the document as is the text of H.R. 3971, a bill…

  8. [Open double-row rotator cuff repair using the LASA-DR screw].

    PubMed

    Schoch, C; Geyer, S; Geyer, M

    2016-02-01

    Safe and cost-effective rotator-cuff repair. All types of rotator cuff lesions. Frozen shoulder, rotator cuff mass defect, defect arthropathy. Extensive four-point fixation on the bony footprint is performed using the double-row lateral augmentation screw anchor (LASA-DR) with high biomechanical stability. Following mobilization of the tendons, these are refixed in the desired configuration first medially and then laterally. To this end, two drilling channels (footprint and lateral tubercle) are created for each screw. Using the shuttle technique, a suture anchor screw is reinforced with up to four pairs of threads. The medial row is then pierced and tied, and the sutures that have been left long are tied laterally around the screw heads (double row). 4 Weeks abduction pillow, resulting in passive physiotherapy, followed by initiation of active assisted physiotherapy. Full weight-bearing after 4-6 months. Prospective analysis of 35 consecutive Bateman-III lesions with excellent results and low rerupture rate (6%).

  9. Partial articular-sided rotator cuff tears: in situ repair versus tear completion prior to repair.

    PubMed

    Sethi, Paul M; Rajaram, Arun; Obopilwe, Elifho; Mazzocca, Augustus D

    2013-06-01

    Uncertainty exists over the ideal surgical treatment method for partial articular-sided rotator cuff tears, with options ranging from debridement to in situ repair to tear completion prior to repair. The purpose of this study was to determine whether in situ repair was a viable biomechanical treatment option compared with tear completion prior to repair of partial articular-sided rotator cuff tears. Fourteen fresh-frozen cadaveric shoulders were dissected. Partial articular-sided tears were created and repaired using in situ repair or tear completion prior to the repair. Strain and displacement were measured at 45°, 60°, and 90° of glenohumeral abduction. Testing was performed with a load of 100 N applied for 30 cycles. Data from the biomechanical testing displayed 4 conditions that showed improved characteristics of in situ repair over completion and repair: bursal-sided strain anteriorly at 45°, bursal-sided strain anteriorly at 90°, bursal-sided displacement anteriorly at 45°, and bursal-sided displacement anteriorly at 90°. The data indicate that in situ repair is a viable biomechanical treatment option compared with tear completion prior to repair of partial articular-sided rotator cuff tears. When clinically appropriate, the in situ repair may offer some biomechanical advantages, with lower strain and displacement observed on the bursal side compared with tear completion prior to repair. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  10. The Rotator Interval – A Link Between Anatomy and Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Tamborrini, Giorgio; Möller, Ingrid; Bong, David; Miguel, Maribel; Marx, Christian; Müller, Andreas Marc; Müller-Gerbl, Magdalena

    2017-01-01

    Shoulder pathologies of the rotator cuff of the shoulder are common in clinical practice. The focus of this pictorial essay is to discuss the anatomical details of the rotator interval of the shoulder, correlate the anatomy with normal ultrasound images and present selected pathologies. We focus on the imaging of the rotator interval that is actually the anterosuperior aspect of the glenohumeral joint capsule that is reinforced externally by the coracohumeral ligament, internally by the superior glenohumeral ligament and capsular fibers which blend together and insert medially and laterally to the bicipital groove. In this article we demonstrate the capability of high-resolution musculoskeletal ultrasound to visualize the detailed anatomy of the rotator interval. MSUS has a higher spatial resolution than other imaging techniques and the ability to examine these structures dynamically and to utilize the probe for precise anatomic localization of the patient’s pain by sono-palpation. PMID:28845477

  11. Rotator Cuff Strength Ratio and Injury in Glovebox Workers

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, Amelia M.

    Rotator cuff integrity is critical to shoulder health. Due to the high workload imposed upon the shoulder while working in an industrial glovebox, this study investigated the strength ratio of the rotator cuff muscles in glovebox workers and compared this ratio to the healthy norm. Descriptive statistics were collected using a short questionnaire. Handheld dynamometry was used to quantify the ratio of forces produced in the motions of shoulder internal and external rotation. Results showed this population to have shoulder strength ratios that were significantly different from the healthy norm. The deviation from the normal ratio demonstrates the need formore » solutions designed to reduce the workload on the rotator cuff musculature of glovebox workers in order to improve health and safety. Assessment of strength ratios can be used to screen for risk of symptom development.« less

  12. The Rotator Interval - A Link Between Anatomy and Ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Tamborrini, Giorgio; Möller, Ingrid; Bong, David; Miguel, Maribel; Marx, Christian; Müller, Andreas Marc; Müller-Gerbl, Magdalena

    2017-06-01

    Shoulder pathologies of the rotator cuff of the shoulder are common in clinical practice. The focus of this pictorial essay is to discuss the anatomical details of the rotator interval of the shoulder, correlate the anatomy with normal ultrasound images and present selected pathologies. We focus on the imaging of the rotator interval that is actu