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Sample records for abduction external rotation

  1. Validity and reliability of isometric muscle strength measurements of hip abduction and abduction with external hip rotation in a bent-hip position using a handheld dynamometer with a belt

    PubMed Central

    Aramaki, Hidefumi; Katoh, Munenori; Hiiragi, Yukinobu; Kawasaki, Tsubasa; Kurihara, Tomohisa; Ohmi, Yorikatsu

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to investigate the relatedness, reliability, and validity of isometric muscle strength measurements of hip abduction and abduction with an external hip rotation in a bent-hip position using a handheld dynamometer with a belt. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty healthy young adults, with a mean age of 21.5 ± 0.6 years were included. Isometric hip muscle strength in the subjects’ right legs was measured under two posture positions using two devices: a handheld dynamometer with a belt and an isokinetic dynamometer. Reliability was evaluated using an intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC); relatedness and validity were evaluated using Pearson’s product moment correlation coefficient. Differences in measurements of devices were assessed by two-way ANOVA. [Results] ICC (1, 1) was ≥0.9; significant positive correlations in measurements were found between the two devices under both conditions. No main effect was found between the measurement values. [Conclusion] Our findings revealed that there was relatedness, reliability, and validity of this method for isometric muscle strength measurements using a handheld dynamometer with a belt. PMID:27512280

  2. Validity and reliability of isometric muscle strength measurements of hip abduction and abduction with external hip rotation in a bent-hip position using a handheld dynamometer with a belt.

    PubMed

    Aramaki, Hidefumi; Katoh, Munenori; Hiiragi, Yukinobu; Kawasaki, Tsubasa; Kurihara, Tomohisa; Ohmi, Yorikatsu

    2016-07-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to investigate the relatedness, reliability, and validity of isometric muscle strength measurements of hip abduction and abduction with an external hip rotation in a bent-hip position using a handheld dynamometer with a belt. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty healthy young adults, with a mean age of 21.5 ± 0.6 years were included. Isometric hip muscle strength in the subjects' right legs was measured under two posture positions using two devices: a handheld dynamometer with a belt and an isokinetic dynamometer. Reliability was evaluated using an intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC); relatedness and validity were evaluated using Pearson's product moment correlation coefficient. Differences in measurements of devices were assessed by two-way ANOVA. [Results] ICC (1, 1) was ≥0.9; significant positive correlations in measurements were found between the two devices under both conditions. No main effect was found between the measurement values. [Conclusion] Our findings revealed that there was relatedness, reliability, and validity of this method for isometric muscle strength measurements using a handheld dynamometer with a belt. PMID:27512280

  3. Relationship of turnout to hip abduction in professional ballet dancers.

    PubMed

    Kushner, S; Saboe, L; Reid, D; Penrose, T; Grace, M

    1990-01-01

    The ability to externally rotate or turn out the hip is fundamental to ballet. Every classical dancer aims to achieve perfect turnout. The purpose of this study was to determine how much turnout is necessary for maximal abduction. It was hypothesized that moderate turnout is sufficient for this purpose. Twenty-two professional dancers from the Alberta Ballet Company were studied. Measurements of passive hip abduction were taken at 0 degree, 45 degrees, 60 degrees, 70 degrees, 80 degrees, 90 degrees and maximum hip lateral rotation using a goniometer and Leighton flexometer. Statistical analysis was done using Pearson correlation coefficients. A significant positive correlation was found between abduction and lateral rotation (P less than 0.05). The greater the position of external rotation, the more abduction achieved. In conclusion, the traditional emphasis on good turnout has some scientific merit and functional implications. PMID:2372080

  4. Strength and muscle activity of shoulder external rotation of subjects with and without scapular dyskinesis

    PubMed Central

    Uga, Daisuke; Nakazawa, Rie; Sakamoto, Masaaki

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to clarify the relationship between scapular dyskinesis and shoulder external rotation strength and muscle activity. [Subjects and Methods] Both shoulders of 20 healthy males were evaluated. They were classified into 19 normal, 8 subtly abnormal, and 13 obviously abnormal shoulders using the scapular dyskinesis test. Subtly abnormal shoulders were subsequently excluded from the analysis. Shoulder external rotation strength and muscle activity (infraspinatus, serratus anterior, upper, middle, and lower trapezius) were measured in 2 positions using a handheld dynamometer and surface electromyography while sitting in a chair with shoulder 0° abduction and flexion (1st position), and while lying prone on the elbows with the shoulders elevated in the zero position (zero position). The strength ratio was calculated to quantify the change in strength between the positions (zero position / 1st position). [Results] In the obviously abnormal shoulder group, the strength in the 1st position was significantly stronger, the strength ratio was significantly smaller, and the serratus anterior in the zero position showed significantly lower activity than the normal shoulder group. [Conclusion] In shoulder external rotation in the zero position, in obviously abnormal shoulders, the serratus anterior is poorly recruited, weakening the shoulder external rotation strength. PMID:27190434

  5. Alien Abductions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nickell, Joe

    2000-03-01

    Since the beginning of the modern UFO craze in 1947, an elaborate mythology has developed concerning alleged extraterrestrial visitations. ``Flying saucer" sightings (typically involving misperceptions of such mundane phenomena as meteors and research balloons) began to be accompanied in the 1950s by reports from ``contactees," persons who claimed to have had close encounters with, even to have been transported to distant planets by, UFO occupants. By the 1960s came reports of sporadic ``abductions" which have proliferated in correlation with media interest. (Indeed, by interaction between claimants and media the portrayal of aliens has evolved from a multiplicity of types into the rather standardized big-eyed humanoid model.) While evidence of alien contact has often been faked--as by spurious photos, ``crop circles," and the notorious ``Alien Autopsy" film--few alien abduction reports appear to be hoaxes. Most seem instead to come from sincere, sane individuals. Nevertheless, not one has been authenticated, and serious investigation shows that such claims can be explained as sleep-related phenomena (notably ``waking dreams"), hypnotic confabulation, and other psychological factors. As is typical of other mythologies, the alien myth involves supernormal beings that may interact with humans, and it purports to explain the workings of the universe and humanity's place within it.

  6. Electromyographic Analysis of the Shoulder Girdle Musculature During External Rotation Exercises

    PubMed Central

    Alizadehkhaiyat, Omid; Hawkes, David H.; Kemp, Graham J.; Frostick, Simon P.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Implementation of overhead activity, a key component of many professional sports, requires an effective and balanced activation of the shoulder girdle muscles, particularly during forceful external rotation (ER) motions. Purpose: To identify activation strategies of 16 shoulder girdle muscles/muscle segments during common shoulder ER exercises. Study Design: Descriptive laboratory study. Method: Thirty healthy subjects were included in this study, and 16 shoulder girdle muscles/muscle segments were investigated (surface electrode: anterior, middle, and posterior deltoid; upper, middle, and lower trapezius; serratus anterior; teres major; upper and lower latissimus dorsi; and upper and lower pectoralis major; fine wire electrodes: supraspinatus, infraspinatus, subscapularis, and rhomboid major) using a telemetric electromyography (EMG) system. Five ER exercises (standing ER at 0° and 90° of abduction, with underarm towel roll, prone ER at 90° of abduction, side-lying ER with underarm towel) were studied. Exercise EMG amplitudes were normalized to EMG at maximum ER force in a standard position. Univariate analysis of variance and post hoc analysis applied on EMG activity of each muscle were used to assess the main effect of the exercise condition. Results: Muscular activity differed significantly among the ER exercises (P < .05 to P < .001). The greatest activation for anterior and middle deltoid, supraspinatus, upper trapezius, and serratus anterior occurred during standing ER at 90° of abduction; for posterior deltoid, middle trapezius, and rhomboid during side-lying ER with underarm towel; for lower trapezius, upper and lower latissimus dorsi, subscapularis, and teres major during prone ER at 90° of abduction; and for the clavicular and sternal part of the pectoralis major during standing ER with underarm towel. Conclusion: Key glenohumeral and scapular muscles can be optimally activated during specific ER exercises, particularly in positions that

  7. The Hillman Rotation: An External Clinic Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sears, Joan M.; Veith, Jack

    2000-01-01

    Describes the external optometric education program at the Sidney Hillman Health Centre (Chicago, Illinois). Discusses the history of the clinic, its administrative and educational philosophy, and its affiliation with two prominent hospitals and the Illinois College of Optometry. (DB)

  8. Three-Dimensional Rotations of the Scapula During Arm Abduction: Evaluation of the Acromion Marker Cluster Method in Comparison With a Model-Based Approach Using Biplanar Radiograph Images.

    PubMed

    Duprey, Sonia; Billuart, Fabien; Sah, Sungjin; Ohl, Xavier; Robert, Thomas; Skalli, Wafa; Wang, Xuguang

    2015-10-01

    Noninvasive methods enabling measurement of shoulder bone positions are paramount in clinical and ergonomics applications. In this study, the acromion marker cluster (AMC) method is assessed in comparison with a model-based approach allowing scapula tracking from low-dose biplanar radiograph images. Six healthy male subjects participated in this study. Data acquisition was performed for 6 arm abduction positions (0°, 45°, 90°, 120°, 150°, 180°). Scapula rotations were calculated using the coordinate systems and angle sequence was defined by the ISB. The comparison analysis was based on root mean square error (RMSE) calculation and nonparametric statistical tests. RMSE remained under 8° for 0° to 90° arm abduction and under 13.5° for 0° to 180° abduction; no significant differences were found between the 2 methods. Compared with previous works, an improved accuracy of the AMC approach at high arm abduction positions was obtained. This could be explained by the different sources of data used as the "gold standard." PMID:26099159

  9. Rotating copper plasmoid in external magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Pandey, Pramod K.; Thareja, Raj K.

    2013-02-15

    Effect of nonuniform magnetic field on the expanding copper plasmoid in helium and argon gases using optical emission spectroscopy and fast imaging is presented. We report a peculiar oscillatory rotation of plasmoid in magnetic field and argon ambient. The temporal variation and appearance of the dip in the electron temperature show a direct evidence of the threading and expulsion of the magnetic field lines from the plasmoid. Rayleigh Taylor instability produced at the interface separating magnetic field and plasma is discussed.

  10. Hip External Rotator Strength Is Associated With Better Dynamic Control of the Lower Extremity During Landing Tasks.

    PubMed

    Malloy, Philip J; Morgan, Alexander M; Meinerz, Carolyn M; Geiser, Christopher F; Kipp, Kristof

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the association between hip strength and lower extremity kinematics and kinetics during unanticipated single-leg landing and cutting tasks in collegiate female soccer players. Twenty-three National Collegiate Athletic Association division I female soccer players were recruited for strength testing and biomechanical analysis. Maximal isometric hip abduction and external rotation strength were measured using a hand-held dynamometer and expressed as muscle torque (force × femoral length) and normalized to body weight. Three-dimensional lower extremity kinematics and kinetics were assessed with motion analysis and force plates, and an inverse dynamics approach was used to calculate net internal joint moments that were normalized to body weight. Greater hip external rotator strength was significantly associated with greater peak hip external rotation moments (r = 0.47; p = 0.021), greater peak knee internal rotation moments (r = 0.41; p = 0.048), greater hip frontal plane excursion (r = 0.49; p = 0.017), and less knee transverse plane excursion (r = -0.56; p = 0.004) during unanticipated single-leg landing and cutting tasks. In addition, a statistical trend was detected between hip external rotator strength and peak hip frontal plane moments (r = 0.39; p = 0.06). The results suggest that females with greater hip external rotator strength demonstrate better dynamic control of the lower extremity during unanticipated single-leg landing and cutting tasks and provide further support for the link between hip strength and lower extremity landing mechanics. PMID:26110347

  11. The flow external to a rotating torus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calabretto, Sophie A. W.; Denier, James P.; Mattner, Trent W.

    2015-12-01

    Imparting a sudden rotation to a torus (or other symmetric smooth object) in an otherwise quiescent, viscous fluid serves to generate boundary layers at the object's surface. These boundary layers are known to exhibit a finite-time singularity at the equator which manifests in a thickening of the boundary layer and subsequent development of an equatorial jet. Here we consider the post-collision flow dynamics, demonstrating that the equatorial jet serves to shed a finite amplitude toroidal vortex pair. The radial jet is also shown to develop an absolute instability at suitably high Reynolds numbers.

  12. The flow external to a rotating torus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calabretto, Sophie A. W.; Denier, James P.; Mattner, Trent W.

    2016-08-01

    Imparting a sudden rotation to a torus (or other symmetric smooth object) in an otherwise quiescent, viscous fluid serves to generate boundary layers at the object's surface. These boundary layers are known to exhibit a finite-time singularity at the equator which manifests in a thickening of the boundary layer and subsequent development of an equatorial jet. Here we consider the post-collision flow dynamics, demonstrating that the equatorial jet serves to shed a finite amplitude toroidal vortex pair. The radial jet is also shown to develop an absolute instability at suitably high Reynolds numbers.

  13. Tidal deformation of a slowly rotating material body: External metric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landry, Philippe; Poisson, Eric

    2015-05-01

    We construct the external metric of a slowly rotating, tidally deformed material body in general relativity. The tidal forces acting on the body are assumed to be weak and to vary slowly with time, and the metric is obtained as a perturbation of a background metric that describes the external geometry of an isolated, slowly rotating body. The tidal environment is generic and characterized by two symmetric trace-free tidal moments Ea b and Ba b, and the body is characterized by its mass M , its radius R , and a dimensionless angular-momentum vector χa≪1 . The perturbation accounts for all couplings between χa and the tidal moments. The body's gravitational response to the applied tidal field is measured in part by the familiar gravitational Love numbers K2el and K2mag , but we find that the coupling between the body's rotation and the tidal environment requires the introduction of four new quantities, which we designate as rotational-tidal Love numbers. All these Love numbers are gauge invariant in the usual sense of perturbation theory, and all vanish when the body is a black hole.

  14. External Electromagnetic Fields of Slowly Rotating Relativistic Magnetized NUT Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmedov, B. J.; Khugaev, A. V.

    2006-08-01

    Analytic general relativistic expressions for the electromagnetic fields external to a slowly-rotating magnetized NUT star with non-vanishing gravitomagnetic charge have been presented. Solutions for the electric and magnetic fields have been found after separating the Maxwell equations in the external background spacetime of a slowly rotating NUT star into angular and radial parts in the lowest order approximation in specific angular momentum and NUT parameter . The relativistic star is considered isolated and in vacuum, with different models for stellar magnetic field: i) monopolar magnetic field and ii) dipolar magnetic field aligned with the axis of rotation. It has been shown that the general relativistic corrections due to the dragging of reference frames and gravitomagnetic charge are not present in the form of the magnetic fields but emerge only in the form of the electric fields. In particular, it has been obtained that the frame-dragging and gravitomagnetic charge provide an additional induced electric field which is analogous to the one introduced by the rotation of the star in the flat spacetime limit.

  15. Shoulder External Rotation Fatigue and Scapular Muscle Activation and Kinematics in Overhead Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Mithun; Thigpen, Charles A.; Bunn, Kevin; Karas, Spero G.; Padua, Darin A.

    2011-01-01

    Context: Glenohumeral external rotation (GH ER) muscle fatigue might contribute to shoulder injuries in overhead athletes. Few researchers have examined the effect of such fatigue on scapular kinematics and muscle activation during a functional movement pattern. Objective: To examine the effects of GH ER muscle fatigue on upper trapezius, lower trapezius, serratus anterior, and infraspinatus muscle activation and to examine scapular kinematics during a diagonal movement task in overhead athletes. Setting: Human performance research laboratory. Design: Descriptive laboratory study. Patients or Other Participants: Our study included 25 overhead athletes (15 men, 10 women; age = 20 ± 2 years, height = 180 ± 11 cm, mass = 80 ± 11 kg) without a history of shoulder pain on the dominant side. Interventions: We tested the healthy, dominant shoulder through a diagonal movement task before and after a fatiguing exercise involving low-resistance, high-repetition, prone GH ER from 0° to 75° with the shoulder in 90° of abduction. Main Outcome Measure(s): Surface electromyography was used to measure muscle activity for the upper trapezius, lower trapezius, serratus anterior, and infraspinatus. An electromyographic motion analysis system was used to assess 3-dimensional scapular kinematics. Repeated-measures analyses of variance (phase × condition) were used to test for differences. Results: We found a decrease in ascending-phase and descending-phase lower trapezius activity (F1,25 = 5.098, P = .03) and an increase in descending-phase infraspinatus activity (F1,25 = 5.534, P = .03) after the fatigue protocol. We also found an increase in scapular upward rotation (F1,24 = 3.7, P = .04) postfatigue. Conclusions: The GH ER muscle fatigue protocol used in this study caused decreased lower trapezius and increased infraspinatus activation concurrent with increased scapular upward rotation range of motion during the functional task. This highlights the interdependence of scapular

  16. Valgus osteotomy for hinge abduction.

    PubMed

    de Gheldere, Antoine; Eastwood, Deborah M

    2011-07-01

    Failure of the enlarged and deformed anterolateral portion of the femoral head to roll into the acetabulum during abduction alters hip joint mechanics. The resultant hinge abduction is associated with pain, and the patient often has restricted movement. A valgus osteotomy removes the deformed portion of the femoral head away from the weight-bearing area and ensures there is pain-free congruent range of movement around the weight-bearing position. The concomitant improvement in lever arm function and leg length results in a better gait pattern. In immature patients, abolition of hinge abduction allows the lateral acetabular ossification center to grow more normally. PMID:21742146

  17. Teeth clenching reduces arm abduction force.

    PubMed

    Sato, Hajime; Kawano, Tsutomu; Saito, Mitsuru; Toyoda, Hiroki; Maeda, Yoshinobu; Türker, Kemal Sitki; Kang, Youngnam

    2014-07-01

    It has been reported that the 90° arm abduction force counteracting external adduction loads appeared to be smaller under teeth clenching condition than under non-clenching condition. To elucidate the physiological mechanism underlying the possible inhibitory effect of teeth clenching on the arm abduction, we have attempted to quantify the difference in the force induced against the fast and slow ramp load between the arm abductions under teeth non-clenching and clenching conditions. When the load of adduction moment was linearly increased, the abductor force increased to a maximal isometric contraction force (MICF) and further increased to a maximal eccentric contraction force (MECF) with forced adduction. The MICF measured under teeth clenching was significantly lower than that under non-clenching, despite no significant difference in the MECF between the two conditions. The reduction in MICF caused by teeth clenching was enhanced by increasing the velocity of the load. These results suggest that clenching inhibits abduction force only during isometric contraction phase. The invariability of MECF would indicate the lack of involvement of fatigue in such inhibitory effects of clenching. To discover the source of the inhibition, we have examined the effects of teeth clenching on the stretch reflex in the deltoid muscle. The stretch reflex of deltoid muscles was inhibited during clenching, contrary to what was expected from the Jendrassik maneuver. Taken together, our results suggest that the teeth clenching reduced the MICF by depressing the recruitment of deltoid motoneurones presumably via the presynaptic inhibition of spindle afferent inputs onto those motoneurones. PMID:24687460

  18. Concentric Internal and Eccentric External Fatigue Resistanc of the Shoulder Rotator Muscles in Female Tennis Players

    PubMed Central

    Niederbracht, Yvonne

    2008-01-01

    Background Shoulder muscle imbalance is a potential shoulder injury risk factor in athletes performing overhead sports. While normative functional peak strength of concentric external to concentric internal shoulder muscle fatigue data is available, comparisons of functional eccentric external to concentric internal shoulder rotator muscle fatigue resistance, which impacts muscle imbalance throughout the duration of play, have not been studied in this population. Objectives To assess fatigue resistance of the internal and external shoulder rotator muscles in female tennis players. Methods Fifteen female collegiate tennis players were tested bilaterally for shoulder concentric internal and eccentric external peak torque production throughout 20 maximal repetitions on a Kin-Com isokinetic dynamometer. Twelve t - tests were conducted to evaluate for differences in peak torque, relative fatigue ratios, and functional peak torque ratios between extremities and mode of activation during the first, as well as, last five repetitions that were conducted. Results Non-dominant concentric internal and eccentric external peak torque production significantly decreased throughout the twenty repetitions. Neither dominant concentric internal peak torque decrements and eccentric peak torque decrements were not significantly different across the twenty contractions. These changes in peak torque upon subsequent repetitions resulted in relative fatigue ratios of dominant eccentric external rotation that were significantly greater than non-dominant eccentric external rotation. Relative fatigue ratios of dominant concentric internal rotation did not differ from non-dominant concentric internal rotation. Conclusions The data suggest that eccentrically activated external shoulder rotator muscles could possibly adapt to overhead activities by becoming more fatigue resistant. PMID:21509131

  19. Muscular Activation During Plyometric Exercises in 90° of Glenohumeral Joint Abduction

    PubMed Central

    Ellenbecker, Todd S.; Sueyoshi, Tetsuro; Bailie, David S.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Plyometric exercises are frequently used to increase posterior rotator cuff and periscapular muscle strength and simulate demands and positional stresses in overhead athletes. The purpose of this study was to provide descriptive data on posterior rotator cuff and scapular muscle activation during upper extremity plyometric exercises in 90° of glenohumeral joint abduction. Hypothesis: Levels of muscular activity in the posterior rotator cuff and scapular stabilizers will be high during plyometric shoulder exercises similar to previously reported electromyographic (EMG) levels of shoulder rehabilitation exercises. Study Design: Descriptive laboratory study. Methods: Twenty healthy subjects were tested using surface EMG during the performance of 2 plyometric shoulder exercises: prone external rotation (PERP) and reverse catch external rotation (RCP) using a handheld medicine ball. Electrode application included the upper and lower trapezius (UT and LT, respectively), serratus anterior (SA), infraspinatus (IN), and the middle and posterior deltoid (MD and PD, respectively) muscles. A 10-second interval of repetitive plyometric exercise (PERP) and 3 repetitions of RCP were sampled. Peak and average normalized EMG data were generated. Results: Normalized peak and average IN activity ranged between 73% and 102% and between 28% and 52% during the plyometric exercises, respectively, with peak and average LT activity measured between 79% and 131% and between 31% and 61%. SA activity ranged between 76% and 86% for peak and between 35% and 37% for average activity. Muscular activity levels in the MD and PD ranged between 49% and 72% and between 12% and 33% for peak and average, respectively. Conclusion: Moderate to high levels of muscular activity were measured in the rotator cuff and scapular stabilizers during these plyometric exercises with the glenohumeral joint abducted 90°. PMID:25553216

  20. Eversion during external rotation of the human cadaver foot produces high ankle sprains.

    PubMed

    Wei, Feng; Post, Joel M; Braman, Jerrod E; Meyer, Eric G; Powell, John W; Haut, Roger C

    2012-09-01

    While high ankle sprains are often clinically ascribed to excessive external foot rotation, no experimental study documents isolated anterior tibiofibular ligament (ATiFL) injury under this loading. We hypothesized that external rotation of a highly everted foot would generate ATiFL injury, in contrast to deltoid ligament injury from external rotation of a neutral foot. Twelve (six pairs) male cadaveric lower extremity limbs underwent external foot rotation until gross failure. All limbs were positioned in 20° of dorsiflexion and restrained with elastic athletic tape. Right limbs were in neutral while left limbs were everted 20°. Talus motion relative to the tibia was measured using motion capture. Rotation at failure for everted limbs (46.8 ± 6.1°) was significantly greater than for neutral limbs (37.7 ± 5.4°). Everted limbs showed ATiFL injury only, while neutral limbs mostly demonstrated deltoid ligament failure. This is the first biomechanical study to produce isolated ATiFL injury under external foot rotation. Eversion of the axially loaded foot predisposes the ATiFL to injury, forming a basis for high ankle sprain. The study helps clarify a mechanism of high ankle sprain and may heighten clinical awareness of isolated ATiFL injury in cases of foot eversion prior to external rotation. It may also provide guidance to investigate the effect of prophylactic measures for this injury. PMID:22328337

  1. Perception as Abduction: Turning Sensor Data into Meaningful Representation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shanahan, Murray

    2005-01-01

    This article presents a formal theory of robot perception as a form of abduction. The theory pins down the process whereby low-level sensor data is transformed into a symbolic representation of the external world, drawing together aspects such as incompleteness, top-down information flow, active perception, attention, and sensor fusion in a…

  2. External electromagnetic fields of a slowly rotating magnetized star with gravitomagnetic charge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmedov, B. J.; Khugaev, A. V.; Abdujabbarov, A. A.

    2012-02-01

    We study Maxwell equations in the external background spacetime of a slowly rotating magnetized NUT star and find analytical solutions for the exterior electric fields after separating the equations for electric field into angular and radial parts in the lowest order in angular momentum and NUT charge approximation. The star is considered isolated and in vacuum, with dipolar magnetic field aligned with the axis of rotation. The contribution to the external electric field of star from the NUT charge is considered in detail.

  3. Relationship between hip external rotation and turnout angle for the five classical ballet positions.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, C B; Gross, M T; Klug, K B

    1998-05-01

    Functional turnout for each of the five classical ballet positions involves lower extremity motion that occurs primarily through hip external rotation. Ballet dancers often attempt to increase turnout angle through excessive motions at the foot or knee that may be associated with the development of musculoskeletal pathology. The purpose of this study was to further the understanding of turnout by identifying the relationship between available hip external rotation an functional turnout for the five classical ballet positions. Subjects were 20 female ballet dancers between the ages of 11 and 14. The investigators measured hip external rotation as the sum of passive external rotation available at both hips of each subject. Functional turnout angle was measured for each subject as the subject stood in each of the five classical ballet positions. A repeated measures analysis of variance and Tukey Honestly Significant Difference test indicated that hip external rotation was significantly less than functional turnout for the five classical ballet positions. No significant differences in functional turnout angle were present among the five ballet functional turnout angle for each of the five ballet positions. Hip external rotation should not be used to predict functional turnout for the five classical ballet positions. Turnout in first position may be useful as guide for functional turnout for the crossed foot positions: third, fourth, and fifth. PMID:9580893

  4. False allegation of child abduction.

    PubMed

    Canning, Kathleen E; Hilts, Mark A; Muirhead, Yvonne E

    2011-05-01

    Cases in which a child has been falsely reported as missing or abducted can be extremely challenging to the law enforcement agencies responsible for their investigation. In the absence of a witnessed abduction or an obvious crime scene, it is difficult to determine whether a child has actually been abducted or has become a victim of a homicide and a false allegation. The purpose of this study was to examine falsely alleged kidnapping cases and identify successful investigative strategies. Sixty-one adjudicated false allegation cases involving 66 victims were analyzed. The mean age of the victim was 5 years. Victims came from generally unstable, high-risk family situations and were killed primarily by biological parents. Victims were killed because they were unwanted or viewed as an obstacle to a desired goal, or they were victims of abuse or maltreatment that ended in fatality. PMID:21361941

  5. Numerical Study of Rotating Turbulence with External Forcing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeung, P. K.; Zhou, Ye

    1998-01-01

    Direct numerical simulation at 256(exp 3) resolution have been carried out to study the response of isotropic turbulence to the concurrent effects of solid-body rotation and numerical forcing at the large scales. Because energy transfer to the smaller scales is weakened by rotation, energy input from forcing gradually builds up at the large scales, causing the overall kinetic energy to increase. At intermediate wavenumbers the energy spectrum undergoes a transition from a limited k(exp -5/3) inertial range to k(exp -2) scaling recently predicted in the literature. Although the Reynolds stress tensor remains approximately isotropic and three-components, evidence for anisotropy and quasi- two-dimensionality in length scales and spectra in different velocity components and directions is strong. The small scales are found to deviate from local isotropy, primarily as a result of anisotropic transfer to the high wavenumbers. To understand the spectral dynamics of this flow we study the detailed behavior of nonlinear triadic interactions in wavenumber space. Spectral transfer in the velocity component parallel to the axis of rotation is qualitatively similar to that in non-rotating turbulence; however the perpendicular component is characterized by a greatly suppressed energy cascade at high wavenumber and a local reverse transfer at the largest scales. The broader implications of this work are briefly addressed.

  6. Reliability of Measurement of Glenohumeral Internal Rotation, External Rotation, and Total Arc of Motion in 3 Test Positions

    PubMed Central

    Kevern, Mark A.; Beecher, Michael; Rao, Smita

    2014-01-01

    Context: Athletes who participate in throwing and racket sports consistently demonstrate adaptive changes in glenohumeral-joint internal and external rotation in the dominant arm. Measurements of these motions have demonstrated excellent intrarater and poor interrater reliability. Objective: To determine intrarater reliability, interrater reliability, and standard error of measurement for shoulder internal rotation, external rotation, and total arc of motion using an inclinometer in 3 testing procedures in National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I baseball and softball athletes. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Athletic department. Patients or Other Participants Thirty-eight players participated in the study. Shoulder internal rotation, external rotation, and total arc of motion were measured by 2 investigators in 3 test positions. The standard supine position was compared with a side-lying test position, as well as a supine test position without examiner overpressure. Results: Excellent intrarater reliability was noted for all 3 test positions and ranges of motion, with intraclass correlation coefficient values ranging from 0.93 to 0.99. Results for interrater reliability were less favorable. Reliability for internal rotation was highest in the side-lying position (0.68) and reliability for external rotation and total arc was highest in the supine-without-overpressure position (0.774 and 0.713, respectively). The supine-with-overpressure position yielded the lowest interrater reliability results in all positions. The side-lying position had the most consistent results, with very little variation among intraclass correlation coefficient values for the various test positions. Conclusions: The results of our study clearly indicate that the side-lying test procedure is of equal or greater value than the traditional supine-with-overpressure method. PMID:25188316

  7. Unlocking the talus by eversion limits medial ankle injury risk during external rotation.

    PubMed

    Button, Keith D; Wei, Feng; Haut, Roger C

    2015-10-15

    Eversion prior to excessive external foot rotation has been shown to predispose the anterior tibiofibular ligament (ATiFL) to failure, yet protect the anterior deltoid ligament (ADL) from failure despite high levels of foot rotation. The purpose of the current study was to measure the rotations of both the subtalar and talocrural joints during foot external rotation at sub-failure levels in either a neutral or a pre-everted position as a first step towards understanding the mechanisms of injury in previous studies. Fourteen (seven pairs) cadaver lower extremities were externally rotated 20° in either a pre-everted or neutral configuration, without producing injury. Motion capture was performed to track the tibia, talus, and calcaneus motions, and a joint coordinate system was used to analyze motions of the two joints. While talocrural joint rotation was greater in the neutral ankle (13.3±2.0° versus 10.5±2.7°, p=0.006), subtalar joint rotation was greater in the pre-everted ankle (2.4±1.9° versus 1.1±1.0°, p=0.014). Overall, the talocrural joint rotated more than the subtalar joint (11.9±2.8° versus 1.8±1.6°, p<0.001). It was proposed that the calcaneus and talus 'lock' in a neutral position, but 'unlock' when the ankle is everted prior to rotation. This locking/unlocking mechanism could be responsible for an increased subtalar rotation, but decreased talocrural rotation when the ankle is pre-everted, protecting the ADL from failure. This study may provide information valuable to the study of external rotation kinematics and injury risk. PMID:26315917

  8. Effects of humeral head compression taping on the isokinetic strength of the shoulder external rotator muscle in patients with rotator cuff tendinitis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Moon-Hwan; Oh, Jae-Seop

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of humeral head compression taping (HHCT) on the strength of the shoulder external rotator muscle in patients with rotator cuff tendinitis. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty patients with rotator cuff tendinitis were recruited. The shoulder external rotator strength was measured using a Biodex isokinetic dynamometer system. A paired t-test was performed to evaluate within-group differences in the strength of the shoulder external rotator muscle. [Results] Significantly higher shoulder external rotator peak torque and peak torque per body weight were found in the HHCT condition than in the no-taping condition. [Conclusion] HHCT may effectively increase the shoulder external rotator muscle strength in patients with rotator cuff tendinitis. PMID:25642053

  9. External Electromagnetic Fields of a Slowly Rotating Magnetized Star with Nonvanishing Gravitomagnetic Charge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmedov, B. J.; Khugaev, A. V.; Rakhmatov, N. I.

    2008-09-01

    We write Maxwell equations in the external background spacetime of a slowly rotating magnetized NUT star and find analytical solutions after separating them into angular and radial parts. The star is considered isolated and in vacuum, with monopolar configuration model for the stellar magnetic field. The contribution to the external field from the NUT charge and frame-dragging effect are considered in detail.

  10. The Role of Abduction in Proving Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pedemonte, Bettina; Reid, David

    2011-01-01

    This paper offers a typology of forms and uses of abduction that can be exploited to better analyze abduction in proving processes. Based on the work of Peirce and Eco, we describe different kinds of abductions that occur in students' mathematical activity and extend Toulmin's model of an argument as a methodological tool to describe students'…

  11. The response of rotating machinery to external random vibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tessarzik, J. M.; Chiang, T.; Badgley, R. H.

    1974-01-01

    A high-speed turbogenerator employing gas-lubricated hydrodynamic journal and thrust bearings was subjected to external random vibrations for the purpose of assessing bearing performance in a dynamic environment. The pivoted-pad type journal bearings and the step-sector thrust bearing supported a turbine-driven rotor weighing approximately twenty-one pounds at a nominal operating speed of 36,000 rpm. The response amplitudes of both the rigid-supported and flexible-supported bearing pads, the gimballed thrust bearing, and the rotor relative to the machine casing were measured with capacitance type displacement probes. Random vibrations were applied by means of a large electrodynamic shaker at input levels ranging between 0.5 g (rms) and 1.5 g (rms). Vibrations were applied both along and perpendicular to the rotor axis. Response measurements were analyzed for amplitude distribution and power spectral density. Experimental results compare well with calculations of amplitude power spectral density made for the case where the vibrations were applied along the rotor axis. In this case, the rotor-bearing system was treated as a linear, three-mass model.

  12. Effect of shoulder taping on maximum shoulder external and internal rotation range in uninjured and previously injured overhead athletes during a seated throw.

    PubMed

    McConnell, Jenny; Donnelly, Cyril; Hamner, Samuel; Dunne, James; Besier, Thor

    2011-09-01

    The purpose of our study was to investigate whether shoulder taping affects shoulder kinematics in injured and previously injured overhead athletes during a seated throw. Twenty-six overhead college athletes threw a handball three times with and without tape, while seated on a chair. An 8-camera Vicon Motion Capture system recorded markers placed on the upper limb and trunk during each of the throwing conditions. Scaled musculoskeletal models of the upper limb were created using OpenSim and inverse kinematics used to obtain relevant joint angles. Shoulder taping had no main effect on external (ER) and internal (IR) rotation range (ROM) of the shoulder, but a significant interaction effect was found (p = 0.003 and 0.02, respectively), depending on previous injury status, whereby both the ER and IR ROM of the shoulder in the group of previously injured athletes decreased when taped (143-138° and 54-51°, respectively), but increased in the group who had never been injured (131-135° and 42-44°, respectively). Maximum abduction range and ball velocity were not affected by the application of shoulder taping, regardless of previous injury status. Thus, application of shoulder taping has a differential effect on maximum shoulder ER and IR ROM during throwing depending on previous injury status. These findings have implications for returning athletes to sport after injury and for screening athletes at risk of injury. PMID:21437968

  13. Low-Cost Alternative External Rotation Shoulder Brace and Review of Treatment in Acute Shoulder Dislocations

    PubMed Central

    Lacy, Kyle; Cooke, Chris; Cooke, Pat; Schupbach, Justin; Vaidya, Rahul

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic dislocations of the shoulder commonly present to emergency departments (EDs). Immediate closed reduction of both anterior and posterior glenohumeral dislocations is recommended and is frequently performed in the ED. Recurrence of dislocation is common, as anteroinferior labral tears (Bankart lesions) are present in many anterior shoulder dislocations.14,15,18,23 Immobilization of the shoulder following closed reduction is therefore recommended; previous studies support the use of immobilization with the shoulder in a position of external rotation, for both anterior and posterior shoulder dislocations.7–11,19 In this study, we present a technique for assembling a low-cost external rotation shoulder brace using materials found in most hospitals: cotton roll, stockinette, and shoulder immobilizers. This brace is particularly suited for the uninsured patient, who lacks the financial resources to pay for a pre-fabricated brace out of pocket. We also performed a cost analysis for our low-cost external rotation shoulder brace, and a cost comparison with pre-fabricated brand name braces. At our institution, the total materials cost for our brace was $19.15. The cost of a pre-fabricated shoulder brace at our institution is $150 with markup, which is reimbursed on average at $50.40 according to our hospital billing data. The low-cost external rotation shoulder brace is therefore a more affordable option for the uninsured patient presenting with acute shoulder dislocation. PMID:25671019

  14. The interaction between plasma rotation, stochastic fields and tearing mode excitation by external perturbation fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeBock, M. F. M.; Classen, I. G. J.; Busch, C.; Jaspers, R. J. E.; Koslowski, H. R.; Unterberg, B.; TEXTOR Team

    2008-01-01

    For fusion reactors, based on the principle of magnetic confinement, it is important to avoid so-called magnetic islands or tearing modes. They reduce confinement and can be the cause of major disruptions. One class of magnetic islands is that of the perturbation field driven modes. This perturbation field can, for example, be the intrinsic error field. Theoretical work predicts a strong relationship between plasma rotation and the excitation of perturbation field modes. Experimentally, the theory on mode excitation and plasma rotation has been confirmed on several tokamaks. In those experiments, however, the control over the plasma rotation velocity and direction, and over the externally applied perturbation field was limited. In this paper experiments are presented that were carried out at the TEXTOR tokamak. Two tangential neutral beam injectors and a set of helical perturbation coils, called the dynamic ergodic divertor (DED), provide control over both the plasma rotation and the external perturbation field in TEXTOR. This made it possible to set up a series of experiments to test the theory on mode excitation and plasma rotation in detail. The perturbation field induced by the DED not only excites magnetic islands, it also sets up a layer near the plasma boundary where the magnetic field is stochastic. It will be shown that this stochastic field alters both the rotational response of the plasma on the perturbation field and the threshold for mode excitation. It therefore has to be included in an extended theory on mode excitation.

  15. A NEW CLINICAL MUSCLE FUNCTION TEST FOR ASSESSMENT OF HIP EXTERNAL ROTATION STRENGTH: AUGUSTSSON STRENGTH TEST

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction Dynamic clinical tests of hip strength applicable on patients, non–athletes and athletes alike, are lacking. The aim of this study was therefore to develop and evaluate the reliability of a dynamic muscle function test of hip external rotation strength, using a novel device. A second aim was to determine if gender differences exist in absolute and relative hip strength using the new test. Methods Fifty–three healthy sport science students (34 women and 19 men) were tested for hip external rotation strength using a device that consisted of a strap connected in series with an elastic resistance band loop, and a measuring tape connected in parallel with the elastic resistance band. The test was carried out with the subject side lying, positioned in 45 ° of hip flexion and the knees flexed to 90 ° with the device firmly fastened proximally across the knees. The subject then exerted maximal concentric hip external rotation force against the device thereby extending the elastic resistance band. The displacement achieved by the subject was documented by the tape measure and the corresponding force production was calculated. Both right and left hip strength was measured. Fifteen of the subjects were tested on repeated occasions to evaluate test–retest reliability. Results No significant test–retest differences were observed. Intra–class correlation coefficients ranged 0.93–0.94 and coefficients of variation 2.76–4.60%. In absolute values, men were significantly stronger in hip external rotation than women (right side 13.2 vs 11.0 kg, p = 0.001, left side 13.2 vs 11.5 kg, p = 0.002). There were no significant differences in hip external rotation strength normalized for body weight (BW) between men and women (right side 0.17 kg/BW vs 0.17 kg/BW, p = 0.675, left side 0.17 kg/BW vs 0.18 kg/BW, p = 0.156). Conclusions The new muscle function test showed high reliability and thus could be useful for measuring dynamic hip

  16. A method for calculating plasma rotation velocity due to internal and external sources

    SciTech Connect

    Taguchi, M.

    2011-10-15

    A method for calculating the plasma rotation velocity caused by the effect of fluctuations due to instabilities and/or by externally imposed sources is presented for multiple ion species plasmas in a general toroidal magnetic field. The rotation velocity is shown to be obtained by solving generalized Spitzer equations, accompanied with the drift kinetic equations employing the pitch-angle-scattering and Krook collision terms. This method reduces to the moment equation approach in the conventional neoclassical transport theory when the source term can be approximated by a momentum source.

  17. Hip rotation angle is associated with frontal plane knee joint mechanics during running.

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, Masanori; Shimizu, Norifumi; Yanai, Toshimasa; Stefanyshyn, Darren J; Kawakami, Yasuo

    2015-02-01

    Inability to control lower extremity segments in the frontal and transverse planes resulting in large knee abduction angle and increased internal knee abduction impulse has been associated with patellofemoral pain (PFP). However, the influence of hip rotation angles on frontal plane knee joint kinematics and kinetics remains unclear. The purpose of this study was to explore how hip rotation angles are related to frontal plane knee joint kinematics and kinetics during running. Seventy runners participated in this study. Three-dimensional marker positions and ground reaction forces were recorded with an 8-camera motion analysis system and a force plate while subjects ran along a 25-m runway at a speed of 4m/s. Knee abduction, hip rotation and toe-out angles, frontal plane lever arm at the knee, internal knee abduction moment and impulse, ground reaction forces and the medio-lateral distance from the ankle joint center to the center of pressure (AJC-CoP) were quantified. The findings of this study indicate that greater hip external rotation angles were associated with greater toe-out angles, longer AJC-CoP distances, smaller internal knee abduction impulses with shorter frontal plane lever arms and greater knee abduction angles. Thus, there appears to exist a conflict between kinematic and kinetic risk factors of PFP, and hip external rotation angle may be a key factor to control frontal plane knee joint kinematics and kinetics. These results may help provide an appropriate manipulation and/or intervention on running style to reduce the risk of PFP. PMID:25572723

  18. Feedback suppression of rotating external kink instabilities in the presence of noise

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, Jeremy M.; De Bono, Bryan; James, Royce W.; Levesque, Jeffrey P.; Mauel, Michael E.; Maurer, David A.; Navratil, Gerald A.; Pedersen, Thomas Sunn; Shiraki, Daisuke

    2008-08-15

    The authors report on the first experimental demonstration of active feedback suppression of rotating external kink modes near the ideal wall limit in a tokamak using Kalman filtering to discriminate the n=1 kink mode from background noise. The Kalman filter contains an internal model that captures the dynamics of a rotating, growing n=1 mode. Suppression of the external kink mode is demonstrated over a broad range of phase angles between the sensed mode and applied control field, and performance is robust at noise levels that render proportional gain feedback ineffective. Suppression of the kink mode is accomplished without excitation of higher frequencies as was observed in previous experiments using lead-lag loop compensation [A. J. Klein et al., Phys Plasmas 12, 040703 (2005)].

  19. Study on a magnetic spiral-type wireless capsule endoscope controlled by rotational external permanent magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Bo; Zhang, Wei; Sun, Zhen-jun; Guo, Lin; Deng, Chao; Chen, Ya-qi; Zhang, Hong-hai; Liu, Sheng

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, the authors propose rotating an external permanent magnet (EPM) to manipulate the synchronous rotation of a magnetic spiral-type wireless capsule endoscope (WCE), and the synchronous rotation of the WCE is converted to its translational motion in intestinal tract. In order to preliminarily verify the feasibility of this method, a handheld actuator (HA) controlled by micro controller unit, a magnetic spiral-type WCE and a bracket were fabricated, theoretical analysis and simulations about the control distance of this method were performed, and in ex-vivo tests were examined in porcine small intestine to verify the control distance and control performances of this method. It was demonstrated that this method showed good performances in controlling the translational motion of the magnetic spiral-type WCE, and this method has great potential to be used in clinical application.

  20. Implication of Abduction: Complexity without Organized Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamiura, Moto

    2010-11-01

    Abduction, which is articulated by C.S. Peirce, is one of the forms of inference. Abduction has been researched not only in philosophy but also in artificial intelligence and information science. Finlay and Dix's representation of abduction (1996) has almost the same meaning which is given by Peirce. On the other hand, Sawa and Gunji (2010) express three types of inference as operations of arrows on a simple triangular diagram. In the present paper, we show that Sawa-Gunji's representation of abduction is consistent with Finlay-Dix's one, and synthesize the two representations. Both parameter estimation and abduction occupy a similar position on the synthesized representation, but they are not completely corresponding. We present "incomplete" parameter estimation as a sort of "simulated abduction", since abduction has an intrinsic incompleteness, which means that abduction is formally equivalent to "the logical fallacy affirming the consequent". In other words, a numerical aspect of abduction (i.e. the simulated abduction) is formalized as incomplete parameter estimation. The concept of simulated abduction is applied to parameter estimation of auto-regressive models, and the effects of it is investigated. As a result of the numerical analyses, the distribution of the incompletely estimated parameter shows a power law of the slop -2 in the tail, although conventionally estimated parameter is normally distributed. The power law of the incompletely estimated parameter is based on the structure of ratio distribution. In other words, this result shows that the power law can arise when system observers premise a linearity of input and output data which are too small to estimate the system structure. We call the premise of the system observers "linearity bias". As an example of the cause of power law distributions, self-organized criticality (SOC) has been known. These distributions are based on the mechanisms of the systems themselves, which have some organized

  1. Gyrokinetic simulations with external resonant magnetic perturbations: Island torque and nonambipolar transport with plasma rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waltz, R. E.; Waelbroeck, F. L.

    2012-03-01

    Static external resonant magnetic field perturbations (RMPs) have been added to the gyrokinetic code GYRO [J. Candy and R. E. Waltz, J. Comp. Phys. 186, 545 (2003)]. This allows nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations of the nonambipolar radial current flow jr, and the corresponding j→×B→ plasma torque (density) R[jrBp/c], induced by magnetic islands that break the toroidal symmetry of a tokamak. This extends the previous GYRO formulation for the transport of toroidal angular momentum (TAM) [R. E. Waltz, G. M. Staebler, J. Candy, and F. L. Hinton, Phys. Plasmas 14, 122507 (2007); errata 16, 079902 (2009)]. The focus is on electrostatic full torus radial slice simulations of externally induced q =m/n=6/3 islands with widths 5% of the minor radius or about 20 ion gyroradii. Up to moderately strong E ×B rotation, the island torque scales with the radial electric field at the resonant surface Er, the island width w, and the intensity I of the high-n micro-turbulence, as Erw√I . The radial current inside the island is carried (entirely in the n =3 component) and almost entirely by the ion E ×B flux, since the electron E ×B and magnetic flutter particle fluxes are cancelled. The net island torque is null at zero Er rather than at zero toroidal rotation. This means that while the expected magnetic braking of the toroidal plasma rotation occurs at strong co- and counter-current rotation, at null toroidal rotation, there is a small co-directed magnetic acceleration up to the small diamagnetic (ion pressure gradient driven) co-rotation corresponding to the zero Er and null torque. This could be called the residual stress from an externally induced island. At zero Er, the only effect is the expected partial flattening of the electron temperature gradient within the island. Finite-beta GYRO simulations demonstrate almost complete RMP field screening and n =3 mode unlocking at strong Er.

  2. Reliability of a New Clinical Instrument for Measuring Internal and External Glenohumeral Rotation

    PubMed Central

    Lindenfeld, Thomas N.; Fleckenstein, Cassie M.; Levy, Martin S.; Grood, Edward S.; Frush, Todd J.; Parameswaran, A. Dushi

    2015-01-01

    Background: The shoulder plays a critical role in many overhead athletic activities. Several studies have shown alterations in shoulder range of motion (ROM) in the dominant shoulder of overhead athletes and correlation with significantly increased risk of injury to the shoulder and elbow. The purpose of this study was to measure isolated glenohumeral joint internal/external rotation (IR/ER) to determine inter- and intraobserver reliability of a new clinical device. Hypothesis: (1) Inter- and intraobserver reliability would exceed 90% for measures of glenohumeral joint IR, ER, and total arc of motion; (2) the dominant arm would exhibit significantly increased ER, significantly decreased IR, and no difference in total arc of motion compared with the nondominant shoulder; and (3) a significant difference exists in total arc between male and female patients. Study Design: Case series. Level of Evidence: Level 4. Methods: Thirty-seven subjects (mean age, 23 years; range, 13-54 years) were tested by 2 orthopaedic surgeons. A single test consisted of 1 arc of motion from neutral to external rotation to internal rotation and back to neutral within preset torque limits. Each examiner performed 3 tests on the dominant and nondominant shoulders. Each examiner completed 2 installations. Results: Testing reliability demonstrated that neither trial, installation, nor observer were significant sources of variation. The maximum standard deviation was 1.3° for total arc of motion and less than 2° for most other measurements. Dominant arm ER was significantly greater than nondominant arm ER (P = 0.02), and dominant arm IR was significantly less than nondominant arm IR (P = 0.00). Mean total rotation was 162°, with no significant differences in total rotation between dominant and nondominant arms (P = 0.34). Mean total arc of motion was 45° greater in female subjects. Differences in total arc of motion between male and female subjects was statistically significant (P < 0

  3. Completing fault models for abductive diagnosis

    SciTech Connect

    Knill, E.; Cox, P.T.; Pietrzykowski, T.

    1992-11-05

    In logic-based diagnosis, the consistency-based method is used to determine the possible sets of faulty devices. If the fault models of the devices are incomplete or nondeterministic, then this method does not necessarily yield abductive explanations of system behavior. Such explanations give additional information about faulty behavior and can be used for prediction. Unfortunately, system descriptions for the consistency-based method are often not suitable for abductive diagnosis. Methods for completing the fault models for abductive diagnosis have been suggested informally by Poole and by Cox et al. Here we formalize these methods by introducing a standard form for system descriptions. The properties of these methods are determined in relation to consistency-based diagnosis and compared to other ideas for integrating consistency-based and abductive diagnosis.

  4. Kilovoltage Rotational External Beam Radiotherapy on a Breast Computed Tomography Platform: A Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect

    Prionas, Nicolas D.; McKenney, Sarah E.; Stern, Robin L.; Boone, John M.

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate the feasibility of a dedicated breast computed tomography (bCT) platform to deliver rotational kilovoltage (kV) external beam radiotherapy (RT) for partial breast irradiation, whole breast irradiation, and dose painting. Methods and Materials: Rotational kV-external beam RT using the geometry of a prototype bCT platform was evaluated using a Monte Carlo simulator. A point source emitting 178 keV photons (approximating a 320-kVp spectrum with 4-mm copper filtration) was rotated around a 14-cm voxelized polyethylene disk (0.1 cm tall) or cylinder (9 cm tall) to simulate primary and primary plus scattered photon interactions, respectively. Simulations were also performed using voxelized bCT patient images. Beam collimation was varied in the x-y plane (1-14 cm) and in the z-direction (0.1-10 cm). Dose painting for multiple foci, line, and ring distributions was demonstrated using multiple rotations with varying beam collimation. Simulations using the scanner's native hardware (120 kVp filtered by 0.2-mm copper) were validated experimentally. Results: As the x-y collimator was narrowed, the two-dimensional dose profiles shifted from a cupped profile with a high edge dose to an increasingly peaked central dose distribution with a sharp dose falloff. Using a 1-cm beam, the cylinder edge dose was <7% of the dose deposition at the cylinder center. Simulations using 120-kVp X-rays showed distributions similar to the experimental measurements. A homogeneous dose distribution (<2.5% dose fluctuation) with a 20% decrease in dose deposition at the cylinder edge (i.e., skin sparing) was demonstrated by weighted summation of four dose profiles using different collimation widths. Simulations using patient bCT images demonstrated the potential for treatment planning and image-guided RT. Conclusions: Rotational kV-external beam RT for partial breast irradiation, dose painting, and whole breast irradiation with skin sparing is feasible on a bCT platform with

  5. Abductive networks applied to electronic combat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery, Gerard J.; Hess, Paul; Hwang, Jong S.

    1990-08-01

    A practical approach to dealing with combinatorial decision problems and uncertainties associated with electronic combat through the use of networks of high-level functional elements called abductive networks is presented. It describes the application of the Abductory Induction Mechanism (AIMTM) a supervised inductive learning tool for synthesizing polynomial abductive networks to the electronic combat problem domain. From databases of historical expert-generated or simulated combat engagements AIM can often induce compact and robust network models for making effective real-time electronic combat decisions despite significant uncertainties or a combinatorial explosion of possible situations. The feasibility of applying abductive networks to realize advanced combat decision aiding capabilities was demonstrated by applying AIM to a set of electronic combat simulations. The networks synthesized by AIM generated accurate assessments of the intent lethality and overall risk associated with a variety of simulated threats and produced reasonable estimates of the expected effectiveness of a group of electronic countermeasures for a large number of simulated combat scenarios. This paper presents the application of abductive networks to electronic combat summarizes the results of experiments performed using AIM discusses the benefits and limitations of applying abductive networks to electronic combat and indicates why abductive networks can often result in capabilities not attainable using alternative approaches. 1. ELECTRONIC COMBAT. UNCERTAINTY. AND MACHINE LEARNING Electronic combat has become an essential part of the ability to make war and has become increasingly complex since

  6. Resistivity and sheared rotation effects on the toroidal external kink mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, A. J.; Brennan, D. P.; Finn, J. M.

    2014-10-01

    We present PEST-III analysis of the toroidal external kink with plasma resistivity and sheared rotation for a range of equilibria varying elongation, driven unstable by increasing β. The results show that the typical ordering for marginally stable β values is βrp,rw <βrp,iw <βip,rw <βip,iw , where rp,ip signify resistive or ideal plasma, and iw,rw indicate ideal wall or resistive wall (no-wall). The two resistive plasma β limits are significantly lower than the two ideal plasma values. We vary aspects of the tearing layer physics by means of a variational principle with Padé approximants, and compare with a general computational solution for the layers to gain insight. We also include pressure gradient and local velocity shear within the layers. Global rotation shear Ω' is included in the form of a relative rotation of the q = 2 , 3 , ... surfaces and we investigate the resultant effect on the poloidal mode number spectrum. We then present a model for active feedback control, which is the toroidal generalization building on recent results in cylindrical mode control theory [D. P. Brennan and J. M. Finn, submitted to Phys. Plasmas (2014)].

  7. Internal and external components of the bacterial flagellar motor rotate as a unit.

    PubMed

    Hosu, Basarab G; Nathan, Vedavalli S J; Berg, Howard C

    2016-04-26

    Most bacteria that swim, including Escherichia coli, are propelled by helical filaments, each driven at its base by a rotary motor powered by a proton or a sodium ion electrochemical gradient. Each motor contains a number of stator complexes, comprising 4MotA 2MotB or 4PomA 2PomB, proteins anchored to the rigid peptidoglycan layer of the cell wall. These proteins exert torque on a rotor that spans the inner membrane. A shaft connected to the rotor passes through the peptidoglycan and the outer membrane through bushings, the P and L rings, connecting to the filament by a flexible coupling known as the hook. Although the external components, the hook and the filament, are known to rotate, having been tethered to glass or marked by latex beads, the rotation of the internal components has remained only a reasonable assumption. Here, by using polarized light to bleach and probe an internal YFP-FliN fusion, we show that the innermost components of the cytoplasmic ring rotate at a rate similar to that of the hook. PMID:27071081

  8. General-purpose abductive algorithm for interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, Richard K.; Hartigan, Julie

    1996-11-01

    Abduction, inference to the best explanation, is an information-processing task that is useful for solving interpretation problems such as diagnosis, medical test analysis, legal reasoning, theory evaluation, and perception. The task is a generative one in which an explanation comprising of domain hypotheses is assembled and used to account for given findings. The explanation is taken to be an interpretation as to why the findings have arisen within the given situation. Research in abduction has led to the development of a general-purpose computational strategy which has been demonstrated on all of the above types of problems. This abduction strategy can be performed in layers so that different types of knowledge can come together in deriving an explanation at different levels of description. Further, the abduction strategy is tractable and offers a very useful tradeoff between confidence in the explanation and completeness of the explanation. This paper will describe this computational strategy for abduction and demonstrate its usefulness towards perceptual problems by examining problem-solving systems in speech recognition and natural language understanding.

  9. Longitudinal Sex Differences during Landing in Knee Abduction in Young Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Ford, Kevin R.; Shapiro, Robert; Myer, Gregory D.; Bogert, Antonie J. van den; Hewett, Timothy E.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose The objective of this study was to determine if biomechanical and neuromuscular risk factors related to abnormal movement patterns increased in females, but not males, during the adolescent growth spurt. Methods 315 subjects participated in two testing sessions approximately one year apart. Male and female subjects were classified based on their maturation status as pubertal or post-pubertal. Three trials of a drop vertical jump (DVJ) were collected. Maximum knee abduction angle and external moments were calculated during the DVJ deceleration phase using a 3D motion analysis system. Changes in knee abduction from the first to second year were compared among four subject groups (female pubertal, female post-pubertal, male pubertal and male post-pubertal). Results There were no sex differences in peak knee abduction angle or moment during DVJ between pubertal males and females (p>0.05). However, pubertal females increased peak abduction angle from the first to second year (p<0.001), while males demonstrated no similar change (p=0.90) in the matched developmental stages. Following puberty, the peak abduction angle and moment were greater in females relative to males (angle: female -9.3±5.7°, male -3.6±4.6°, p<0.001; moment: female:-21.9±13.5 Nm, male:-13.0±12.0 Nm, p=0.017). Conclusion This study identified, through longitudinal analyses, that knee abduction angle was significantly increased in pubertal females during rapid adolescent growth, while males showed no similar change. In addition, knee abduction motion and moments were significantly greater for subsequent year in young female athletes, following rapid adolescent growth, compared to males. The combination of longitudinal, sex and maturational group differences indicate that early puberty appears to be a critical phase related to the divergence of increased ACL injury risk factors. PMID:20305577

  10. The changes in shoulder rotation strength ratio for various shoulder positions and speeds in the scapular plane between baseball players and non-players

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Hwai-Ting; Ko, Hsing-Tsen; Lee, Kung-Che; Chen, Ying-Cheng; Wang, Dean-Chuan

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to investigate the effect of shoulder positions and speeds on internal and external rotation torque of college baseball players and age-matched non-players. [Subjects] Twenty first-level collegiate baseball players and 19 college students were recruited. [Methods] A dynamometer system was used to evaluate the shoulder rotation strength in sitting postures. Three testing positions, namely shoulder abduction of 45°, 70°, and 90° in the scapular plane, were combined with three testing speeds at 60°/s, 120°/s, and 210°/s. [Results] The maximum external and internal rotation torques both occurred at shoulder abduction of 70°. However, only external rotation torque was affected by the speed, with the peak value observed at 60°/s. The internal rotation torque of baseball players was larger than that of the control group under all testing conditions, but the external rotation did not show any difference. The ratio of external to internal rotation torque changed with the testing positions and speeds in both groups. The ratio in the control group was greater than that in the player group. [Conclusion] The shoulder position could affect the rotational strength, and the baseball players could strengthen their external rotators for better performance and injury prevention. PMID:26157263

  11. The variability in the external rotation axis of the distal femur: an MRI-based anatomical study.

    PubMed

    Jones, Carl; Nawaz, Zuhair; Hassan, Abdel; White, Simon; Khaleel, Arshad

    2016-02-01

    Commonly used total knee arthroplasty (TKA) systems utilising measured resection techniques default to 5°-7° valgus for the distal cut relative to the anatomical axis and 3° external rotation of the femoral component relative to posterior condylar axis (PCA). Rotational errors of the femoral component are associated with pain, patella maltracking and a poorer outcome. We analysed MRI scans from patients undergoing TKA using patient-specific instrumentation to assess coronal and rotational alignment from landmarks identified on the scans. One hundred and eight scans in 59 males and 49 females were studied with age range 35-93 years (mean 67.9 years). We found 91 % of patients had a femoral valgus angle between 5° and 7° (mean angles 5.9°), while only 24 % had an external rotation angle between 2.5° and 3.5° relative to PCA. There was no statistical significance in rotation between males and females although outliers tended to be female. Mean Whiteside's angle was 92.9° (87.8-98). This study highlights the variations in external rotation between patients undergoing TKA using the PCA as a reference for rotation. This may be a contributing factor in implant malalignment and patient dissatisfaction. PMID:26530410

  12. Shielding of External Magnetic Perturbations By Torque In Rotating Tokamak Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jong-Kyu; Boozer, Allen H.; Menard, Jonathan E.; Gerhardt, Stefan P.; Sabbagh, Steve A.

    2009-08-24

    The imposition of a nonaxisymmetric magnetic perturbation on a rotating tokamak plasma requires energy and toroidal torque. Fundamental electrodynamics implies that the torque is essentially limited and must be consistent with the external response of a plasma equilibrium ƒ = j x B. Here magnetic measurements on National Spherical Torus eXperiment (NSTX) device are used to derive the energy and the torque, and these empirical evaluations are compared with theoretical calculations based on perturbed scalar pressure equilibria ƒ = ∇p coupled with the theory of nonambipolar transport. The measurement and the theory are consistent within acceptable uncertainties, but can be largely inconsistent when the torque is comparable to the energy. This is expected since the currents associated with the torque are ignored in scalar pressure equilibria, but these currents tend to shield the perturbation.

  13. A Kalman filter for feedback control of rotating external kink instabilities in the presence of noise

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, Jeremy M.; De Bono, Bryan; Levesque, Jeffrey P.; Mauel, Michael E.; Maurer, David A.; Navratil, Gerald A.; Pedersen, Thomas Sunn; Shiraki, Daisuke; James, Royce W.

    2009-05-15

    The simulation and experimental optimization of a Kalman filter feedback control algorithm for n=1 tokamak external kink modes are reported. In order to achieve the highest plasma pressure limits in ITER, resistive wall mode stabilization is required [T. C. Hender et al., Nucl. Fusion 47, S128 (2007)] and feedback algorithms will need to distinguish the mode from noise due to other magnetohydrodynamic activity. The Kalman filter contains an internal model that captures the dynamics of a rotating, growing n=1 mode. This model is actively compared with real-time measurements to produce an optimal estimate for the mode's amplitude and phase. On the High Beta Tokamak-Extended Pulse experiment [T. H. Ivers et al., Phys. Plasmas 3, 1926 (1996)], the Kalman filter algorithm is implemented using a set of digital, field-programmable gate array controllers with 10 {mu}s latencies. Signals from an array of 20 poloidal sensor coils are used to measure the n=1 mode, and the feedback control is applied using 40 poloidally and toroidally localized control coils. The feedback system with the Kalman filter is able to suppress the external kink mode over a broad range of phase angles between the sensed mode and applied control field. Scans of filter parameters show good agreement between simulation and experiment, and feedback suppression and excitation of the kink mode are enhanced in experiments when a filter made using optimal parameters from the scans is used.

  14. Evaluating foot kinematics using magnetic resonance imaging: from maximum plantar flexion, inversion, and internal rotation to maximum dorsiflexion, eversion, and external rotation.

    PubMed

    Fassbind, Michael J; Rohr, Eric S; Hu, Yangqiu; Haynor, David R; Siegler, Sorin; Sangeorzan, Bruce J; Ledoux, William R

    2011-10-01

    The foot consists of many small bones with complicated joints that guide and limit motion. A variety of invasive and noninvasive means [mechanical, X-ray stereophotogrammetry, electromagnetic sensors, retro-reflective motion analysis, computer tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)] have been used to quantify foot bone motion. In the current study we used a foot plate with an electromagnetic sensor to determine an individual subject's foot end range of motion (ROM) from maximum plantar flexion, internal rotation, and inversion to maximum plantar flexion, inversion, and internal rotation to maximum dorsiflexion, eversion, and external rotation. We then used a custom built MRI-compatible device to hold each subject's foot during scanning in eight unique positions determined from the end ROM data. The scan data were processed using software that allowed the bones to be segmented with the foot in the neutral position and the bones in the other seven positions to be registered to their base positions with minimal user intervention. Bone to bone motion was quantified using finite helical axes (FHA). FHA for the talocrural, talocalcaneal, and talonavicular joints compared well to published studies, which used a variety of technologies and input motions. This study describes a method for quantifying foot bone motion from maximum plantar flexion, inversion, and internal rotation to maximum dorsiflexion, eversion, and external rotation with relatively little user processing time. PMID:22070336

  15. Measuring Eccentric Strength of the Shoulder External Rotators Using a Handheld Dynamometer: Reliability and Validity

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, Fredrik R.; Skillgate, Eva; Lapauw, Mattis L.; Clijmans, Dorien; Deneulin, Valentijn P.; Palmans, Tanneke; Engineer, Human Kinetic; Cools, Ann M.

    2015-01-01

    Context Shoulder strength assessment plays an important role in the clinical examination of the shoulder region. Eccentric strength measurements are of special importance in guiding the clinician in injury prevention or return-to-play decisions after injury. Objective To examine the absolute and relative reliability and validity of a standardized eccentric strength-measurement protocol for the glenohumeral external rotators. Design Descriptive laboratory study. Setting Testing environment at the Department of Rehabilitation Sciences and Physiotherapy of Ghent University, Belgium. Patients or Other Participants Twenty-five healthy participants (9 men and 16 women) without any history of shoulder pain were tested by 2 independent assessors using a handheld dynamometer (HHD) and underwent an isokinetic testing procedure. Intervention(s) The clinical protocol used an HHD, a DynaPort accelerometer to measure acceleration and angular velocity of testing 30°/s over 90° of range of motion, and a Biodex dynamometer to measure isokinetic activity. Main Outcome Measure(s) Three eccentric strength measurements: (1) tester 1 with the HHD, (2) tester 2 with the HHD, and (3) Biodex isokinetic strength measurement. Results The intratester reliability was excellent (0.879 and 0.858), whereas the intertester reliability was good, with an intraclass correlation coefficient between testers of 0.714. Pearson product moment correlation coefficients of 0.78 and 0.70 were noted between the HHD and the isokinetic data, showing good validity of this new procedure. Conclusions Standardized eccentric rotator cuff strength can be tested and measured in the clinical setting with good-to-excellent reliability and validity using an HHD. PMID:25974381

  16. Electromyographic analysis of the infraspinatus and scapular stabilizing muscles during isometric shoulder external rotation at various shoulder elevation angles

    PubMed Central

    Uga, Daisuke; Endo, Yasuhiro; Nakazawa, Rie; Sakamoto, Masaaki

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to clarify activation of the infraspinatus and scapular stabilizing muscles during shoulder external rotation at various shoulder elevation angles. [Subjects] Twenty subjects participated in this study and all measurements were performed on the right shoulder. [Methods] Isometric shoulder external rotation strength and surface electromyographic data were measured with the shoulder at 0°, 45°, 90°, and 135° elevation in the scapular plane. The electromyographic data were collected from the infraspinatus, upper trapezius, middle trapezius, lower trapezius, and serratus anterior muscles. These measurements were compared across the various shoulder elevation angles. [Results] The strength measurements did not differ significantly by angulation. The infraspinatus activity was 92%, 75%, 68%, and 57% of the maximum voluntary contraction, which significantly decreased as shoulder elevation increased. The serratus anterior activity was 24%, 48%, 53%, and 62% of the maximum voluntary contraction, which significantly increased as shoulder elevation increased. [Conclusion] Shoulder external rotation torque was maintained regardless of shoulder elevation angle. The shoulder approximated to the zero position as the shoulder elevation increased so that infraspinatus activity decreased and the scapular posterior tilting by the serratus anterior might generate shoulder external rotation torque. PMID:26957748

  17. Externalities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zicht, Barbara, Ed.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    This issue explains the concept of externalities (benefits or burdens which accrue to society when there is a difference between the private cost or benefit of an action and the social cost or benefit of that action). These external or social costs of individual actions are often referred to as spillover costs. Three brief teaching units follow…

  18. The Dosimetric Impact of Prostate Rotations During Electromagnetically Guided External-Beam Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Amro, Hanan; Hamstra, Daniel A.; Mcshan, Daniel L.; Sandler, Howard; Vineberg, Karen; Hadley, Scott; Litzenberg, Dale

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To study the impact of daily rotations and translations of the prostate on dosimetric coverage during radiation therapy (RT). Methods and Materials: Real-time tracking data for 26 patients were obtained during RT. Intensity modulated radiation therapy plans meeting RTOG 0126 dosimetric criteria were created with 0-, 2-, 3-, and 5-mm planning target volume (PTV) margins. Daily translations and rotations were used to reconstruct prostate delivered dose from the planned dose. D{sub 95} and V{sub 79} were computed from the delivered dose to evaluate target coverage and the adequacy of PTV margins. Prostate equivalent rotation is a new metric introduced in this study to quantify prostate rotations by accounting for prostate shape and length of rotational lever arm. Results: Large variations in prostate delivered dose were seen among patients. Adequate target coverage was met in 39%, 65%, and 84% of the patients for plans with 2-, 3-, and 5-mm PTV margins, respectively. Although no correlations between prostate delivered dose and daily rotations were seen, the data showed a clear correlation with prostate equivalent rotation. Conclusions: Prostate rotations during RT could cause significant underdosing even if daily translations were managed. These rotations should be managed with rotational tolerances based on prostate equivalent rotations.

  19. Magnetic island and plasma rotation under external resonant magnetic perturbation in the T-10 tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliseev, L. G.; Ivanov, N. V.; Kakurin, A. M.; Melnikov, A. V.; Perfilov, S. V.

    2015-05-01

    Experimental comparison of the m = 2, n = 1 mode and plasma rotation velocities at q = 2 magnetic surface in a wide range of the mode amplitudes is presented. Phase velocity of the mode rotation is measured with a set of poloidal magnetic field sensors located at the inner side of the vacuum vessel wall. Plasma rotation velocity at the q = 2 magnetic surface in the direction of the mode phase velocity is measured with the heavy ion beam probe diagnostics. In the presence of a static Resonant Magnetic Perturbation (RMP), the rotation is irregular that appears as cyclical variations of the mode and plasma instantaneous velocities. The period of these variations is equal to the period of the mode oscillations. In the case of high mode amplitude, the rotation irregularity of the mode is consistent with the rotation irregularity of the resonant plasma layer. On the contrary, the observed rise of the mode rotation irregularity in the case of low mode amplitude occurs without an increase of the rotation irregularity of the resonant plasma layer. The experimental results are simulated and analyzed with the TEAR code based on the two-fluid MHD approximation. Calculated irregularities of the mode and plasma rotation depend on the mode amplitude similar to the experimental data. For large islands, the rotation irregularity is attributed to oscillations of the electromagnetic torque applied to the resonant plasma layer. For small islands, the deviation of the mode rotation velocity from the plasma velocity occurs due to the effect of finite plasma resistivity.

  20. Neck rotation modulates flexion synergy torques, indicating an ipsilateral reticulospinal source for impairment in stroke

    PubMed Central

    Drogos, Justin; Carmona, Carolina; Keller, Thierry; Dewald, Julius P. A.

    2012-01-01

    The effect of reticular formation excitability on maximum voluntary torque (MVT) generation and associated muscle activation at the shoulder and elbow was investigated through natural elicitation (active head rotation) of the asymmetric tonic neck reflex (ATNR) in 26 individuals with stroke and 9 age-range-matched controls. Isometric MVT generation at the shoulder and elbow was quantified with the head rotated (face pointing) contralateral and ipsilateral to the paretic (stroke) and dominant (control) arm. Given the dominance of abnormal torque coupling of elbow flexion with shoulder abduction (flexion synergy) in stroke and well-developed animal models demonstrating a linkage between reticular formation and ipsilateral elbow flexors and shoulder abductors, we hypothesized that constituent torques of flexion synergy, specifically elbow flexion and shoulder abduction, would increase with contralateral head rotation. The findings of this investigation support this hypothesis. Increases in MVT for three of four flexion synergy constituents (elbow flexion, shoulder abduction, and shoulder external rotation) were observed during contralateral head rotation only in individuals with stroke. Electromyographic data of the associated muscle coactivations were nonsignificant but are presented for consideration in light of a likely underpowered statistical design for this specific variable. This study not only provides evidence for the reemergence of ATNR following stroke but also indicates a common neuroanatomical link, namely, an increased reliance on ipsilateral reticulospinal pathways, as the likely mechanism underlying the expression of both ATNR and flexion synergy that results in the loss of independent joint control. PMID:22956793

  1. Sciatic Nerve Palsy Caused by Ruptured and Contracted Short External Rotator Muscles after Primary Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jong-Seok; Hong, Chang-Hwa; Soh, Jae-Wan; Nho, Jae-Hwi; Suh, You-Sung; Lee, Hwan-Woong

    2015-01-01

    Although the incidence of sciatic nerve palsy following total hip arthroplasty is low, this complication can cause devastating permanent nerve palsy. The authors experienced a case of sciatic nerve palsy caused by ruptured and contracted external rotator muscles following total hip arthroplasty in a patient suffering from osteonecrosis of the femoral head. We report this unusual case of sciatic nerve palsy with a review of the literature.

  2. Magnetic island and plasma rotation under external resonant magnetic perturbation in the T-10 tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Eliseev, L. G.; Ivanov, N. V. Kakurin, A. M.; Perfilov, S. V.; Melnikov, A. V.

    2015-05-15

    Experimental comparison of the m = 2, n = 1 mode and plasma rotation velocities at q = 2 magnetic surface in a wide range of the mode amplitudes is presented. Phase velocity of the mode rotation is measured with a set of poloidal magnetic field sensors located at the inner side of the vacuum vessel wall. Plasma rotation velocity at the q = 2 magnetic surface in the direction of the mode phase velocity is measured with the heavy ion beam probe diagnostics. In the presence of a static Resonant Magnetic Perturbation (RMP), the rotation is irregular that appears as cyclical variations of the mode and plasma instantaneous velocities. The period of these variations is equal to the period of the mode oscillations. In the case of high mode amplitude, the rotation irregularity of the mode is consistent with the rotation irregularity of the resonant plasma layer. On the contrary, the observed rise of the mode rotation irregularity in the case of low mode amplitude occurs without an increase of the rotation irregularity of the resonant plasma layer. The experimental results are simulated and analyzed with the TEAR code based on the two-fluid MHD approximation. Calculated irregularities of the mode and plasma rotation depend on the mode amplitude similar to the experimental data. For large islands, the rotation irregularity is attributed to oscillations of the electromagnetic torque applied to the resonant plasma layer. For small islands, the deviation of the mode rotation velocity from the plasma velocity occurs due to the effect of finite plasma resistivity.

  3. Effect of Resistance Training Maintaining the Joint Angle-torque Profile Using a Haptic-based Machine on Shoulder Internal and External Rotation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yeonghun; Lee, Kunwoo; Moon, Jeheon; Koo, Dohoon; Park, Jaewoo; Kim, Kyengnam; Hong, Daehie; Shin, Inshik

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to present an individualized resistance training method to enable exercise while maintaining an exercise load that is set according to an individual’s joint angle-torque using a haptic-based resistance training machine. [Methods] Five participants (machine group) performed individualized shoulder internal and external rotation training with a haptic resistance training machine, while another five participants performed general dumbbell-based shoulder internal and external rotation training for eight weeks. Internal and external rotation powers of subjects were measured using an isokinetic machine before and after training. [Results] The average powers of both shoulder internal and external rotation has been improved after training (25.72%, 13.62%). The improvement in power of external rotation in the machine group was significantly higher than that in the control group. [Conclusion] This study proposes a haptic-based individualized rotator cuff muscle training method. The training protocol maintaining the joint angle-torque profile showed better improvement of shoulder internal/external rotation than dumbbell training. PMID:24764626

  4. Spatiotemporal differences of brain activation between internal and external strategies in mental rotation: A behavioral and ERD/ERS study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhuo; Guo, Xiaoli; Lyu, Yuanyuan; Chen, Hongzhou; Tong, Shanbao

    2016-06-01

    Subjects may voluntarily implement an internal or external strategy during mental rotation (MR) task. However, few studies have reported the spatiotemporal differences of brain activation between the two MR strategies. This study aims to compare the two strategies from the perspective of behavioral performance and spatiotemporal brain activations in each cognitive sub-stage using EEG measurements. Both the internal (IN) and external (EX) groups showed a significant 'angle effect' on reaction time (RT) and accuracy (ACC). However, a smaller increase of RT with rotation angle was observed in the EX group. Event-related (de)synchronization in the beta band revealed similar temporal patterns of brain activation in the two groups, but with a stronger activation in the MR sub-stage in the EX group. We speculate that MR of 3D abstract objects is easier when an external strategy is used, and would be promoted by an additional visual-spatial process involving the parietal-occipital areas. Our results suggested that the differences between the two strategies were mainly induced by main MR rather than other cognitive processes. PMID:27132083

  5. Flight and abduction in witchcraft and UFO lore.

    PubMed

    Musgrave, J B; Houran, J

    2000-04-01

    The lore surrounding the mythical Witches' Sabbat and contemporary reports of UFO abductions share three main characteristics: the use of masks, the appearance of "Men in Black," and references to flight and abduction. We review these three commonalities with particular focus on the aspect of flight and abduction. We argue that narratives of the Witches' Sabbat and UFO abductions share the same basic structure, common symbolism, and serve the same psychological needs of providing a coherent explanation for anomalous (ambiguous) experiences while simultaneously giving the experient a sense of freedom, release, and escape from the self. This pattern of similarities suggests the possibility that UFO abductions are a modern version of tales of flight to the Sabbat. PMID:10840926

  6. Synthetic Patch Rotator Cuff Repair: A 10-year Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    Shepherd, Henry M.; Lam, Patrick H.; Murrell, George A. C.

    2013-01-01

    Background The present study aimed to determine the long-term outcome as a result of the use of synthetic patches as tendon substitutes to bridge massive irreparable rotator cuff defects. Methods All patients who previously had a rotator cuff repair with a synthetic patch (2-mm Gore DUALMESH ePTFE patch; Gore, Flagstaff, AZ, USA; or a 2.87-mm Bard PTFE Felt pledgets; CR Bard, Warwick, RI, USA) were followed-up at a minimum of 8.5 years postoperatively. Assessment of shoulder pain, function, range of motion, strength and imaging was performed. Results Six patients had an interpositional repair with a synthetic patch. One patient had died. In the remaining five patients, the mean tear size at repair was 27 cm2. At 9.7 years postoperatively, all the patches remained in situ and no patient required further surgery. The repair was intact in four out of five patients. Patients had improved external rotation and abduction compared to before surgery (p < 0.02). Conclusions We describe the long-term outcomes of patients who had undergone synthetic patch rotator cuff repair for an irreparable rotator cuff tear. At 9.7 years postoperatively, patients reported less severe and more infrequent pain, as well as greater overall shoulder function, compared to before surgery. Patients also had increased passive external rotation and abduction. All the patches remain in situ and there have been no further operations on these shoulders. PMID:27582907

  7. Do changes in hand grip strength correlate with shoulder rotator cuff function?

    PubMed Central

    Herrington, Lee; Hoyle, Rebecca; Prescott, Evie; Bellamy, Nathan

    2016-01-01

    Background Shoulder pain as a result of rotator cuff pathology is one of the most common musculoskeletal complaints presenting within primary care. Assessment of hand grip strength has been proposed as an indicator of rotator cuff function. This experimental study assessed the relationship between grip strength and shoulder lateral rotator muscle strength in a number of different shoulder positions, aiming to investigate whether such a relationship existed and whether grip strength could be used as a functional assessment tool for the posterior cuff. Methods Twenty-seven healthy, physically active, volunteers (19 males, eight females) with no history of shoulder, upper limb or neck injury comprised the study group. The mean (SD) age was 19.8 (5.7) years (range 18 years to 23 years). Grip strength (measured with hand grip dynamometer) and lateral rotator strength (measured with a hand held dynamometer) was measured at neutral, 90° abduction, and 90° abduction with 90° external rotation. Results The correlation between grip strength and shoulder lateral rotation strength ranged between r = 0.91 (r2 = 0.84) and r = 0.72 (r2 = 0.52) across all positions. Conclusions A strong correlation between grip strength and lateral rotator strength was shown at all positions for both left and right hands, suggesting that assessment of grip strength could be used as a rotator cuff monitor of recruitment function. PMID:27583010

  8. Mechanisms for generating toroidal rotation in tokamaks without external momentum input

    SciTech Connect

    Solomon, W. M.; Kaye, S. M.; Bell, R. E.; Hahm, T. S.; Burrell, K. H.; Garofalo, A. M.; Grassie, J. S. de; Jackson, G. L.; Petty, C. C.; Strait, E. J.; Waltz, R. E.; Cole, A. J.; Diamond, P. H.; Lanctot, M. J.; Reimerdes, H.; Sabbagh, S. A.; Tala, T.

    2010-05-15

    Recent experiments on DIII-D [J. L. Luxon, Nucl. Fusion 42, 614 (2002)] and National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [M. Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40, 557 (2000)] have focused on investigating mechanisms of driving rotation in fusion plasmas. The so-called intrinsic rotation is generated by an effective torque, driven by residual stresses in the plasma, which appears to originate in the plasma edge. A clear scaling of this intrinsic drive with the H-mode pressure gradient is observed. Coupled with the experimentally inferred pinch of angular momentum, such an edge source is capable of producing sheared rotation profiles. Intrinsic drive is also possible directly in the core, although the physics mechanisms are much more complex. Another option which is being explored is the use of nonresonant magnetic fields for spinning the plasma. It is found beneficially that the torque from these fields can be enhanced at low rotation, which assists in spinning the plasma from rest, and offers increased resistance against plasma slowing.

  9. Gender Difference Does Not Mean Genetic Difference: Externalizing Improves Performance in Mental Rotation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moe, Angelica

    2012-01-01

    The fear of underperforming owing to stereotype threat affects women's performance in tasks such as mathematics, chess, and spatial reasoning. The present research considered mental rotation and explored effects on performance and on regulatory focus of instructions pointing to different explanations for gender differences. Two hundred and one…

  10. The effects of core muscle activation on dynamic trunk position and knee abduction moments: implications for ACL injury.

    PubMed

    Jamison, Steve T; McNally, Michael P; Schmitt, Laura C; Chaudhari, Ajit M W

    2013-09-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury is one of the most common serious lower-extremity injuries experienced by athletes participating in field and court sports and often occurs during a sudden change in direction or pivot. Both lateral trunk positioning during cutting and peak external knee abduction moments have been associated with ACL injury risk, though it is not known how core muscle activation influences these variables. In this study, the association between core muscle pre-activation and trunk position as well as the association between core muscle pre-activation and peak knee abduction moment during an unanticipated run-to-cut maneuver were investigated in 46 uninjured individuals. Average co-contraction indices and percent differences between muscle pairs were calculated prior to initial contact for internal obliques, external obliques, and L5 extensors using surface electromyography. Outside tilt of the trunk was defined as positive when the trunk was angled away from the cutting direction. No significant associations were found between pre-activations of core muscles and outside tilt of the trunk. Greater average co-contraction index of the L5 extensors was associated with greater peak knee abduction moment (p=0.0107). Increased co-contraction of the L5 extensors before foot contact could influence peak knee abduction moment by stiffening the spine, limiting sagittal plane trunk flexion (a motion pattern previously linked to ACL injury risk) and upper body kinetic energy absorption by the core during weight acceptance. PMID:23891313

  11. Dissipative Nonlinear Schrödinger Equation with External Forcing in Rotational Stratified Fluids and Its Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yun-Long; Yang, Hong-Wei; Yin, Bao-Shu; Yang, De-Zhou; Xu, Zhen-Hua; Feng, Xing-Ru

    2015-10-01

    The dissipative nonlinear Schrödinger equation with a forcing item is derived by using of multiple scales analysis and perturbation method as a mathematical model of describing envelope solitary Rossby waves with dissipation effect and external forcing in rotational stratified fluids. By analyzing the evolution of amplitude of envelope solitary Rossby waves, it is found that the shear of basic flow, Brunt-Vaisala frequency and β effect are important factors in forming the envelope solitary Rossby waves. By employing Jacobi elliptic function expansion method and Hirota's direct method, the analytic solutions of dissipative nonlinear Schrödinger equation and forced nonlinear Schrödinger equation are derived, respectively. With the help of these solutions, the effects of dissipation and external forcing on the evolution of envelope solitary Rossby wave are also discussed in detail. The results show that dissipation causes slowly decrease of amplitude of envelope solitary Rossby waves and slowly increase of width, while it has no effect on the propagation speed and different types of external forcing can excite the same envelope solitary Rossby waves. It is notable that dissipation and different types of external forcing have certain influence on the carrier frequency of envelope solitary Rossby waves. Supported by Foundation for Innovative Research Groups of the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant No. 41421005, National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos. 41376030, 41376029, 41476019, NSFC-Shandong Joint Fund for Marine Science Research Centers Grant (U1406401), Special Funds for Theoretical Physics of the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant No. 11447205

  12. The effects of hip external rotator exercises and toe-spread exercises on lower extremity muscle activities during stair-walking in subjects with pronated foot

    PubMed Central

    Goo, Young-Mi; Kim, Da-Yeon; Kim, Tae-Ho

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of the present study was to examine the effects of toe-spread (TS) exercises and hip external rotator strengthening exercises for pronated feet on lower extremity muscle activities during stair-walking. [Subjects and Methods] The participants were 20 healthy adults with no present or previous pain, no past history of surgery on the foot or the ankle, and no foot deformities. Ten subjects performed hip external rotator strengthening exercises and TS exercises and the remaining ten subjects performed only TS exercises five times per week for four weeks. [Results] Less change in navicular drop height occurred in the group that performed hip external rotator exercises than in the group that performed only TS exercises. The group that performed only TS exercises showed increased abductor hallucis muscle activity during both stair-climbing and -descending, and the group that performed hip external rotator exercises showed increased muscle activities of the vastus medialis and abductor hallucis during stair-climbing and increased muscle activity of only the abductor hallucis during stair-descending after exercise. [Conclusion] Stair-walking can be more effectively performed if the hip external rotator muscle is strengthened when TS exercises are performed for the pronated foot. PMID:27134364

  13. The influence of various resistance loads on the ratio of activity of the external rotator muscles of the shoulder and the anterior gliding of the humeral head during external rotation exercise.

    PubMed

    Jo, Marg-Eun; Lee, Seung-Min; Jang, Jun-Hyeok; Lee, Sang-Yeol

    2015-10-01

    [Purpose] To quantify the ratio of activation of the infraspinatus and posterior deltoid muscles and the anterior gliding motion of the humeral head during external rotation (ER) motions of the shoulder performed in prone position against different external resistance loads. [Subjects] Twenty healthy women between the ages of 20 and 30 years. [Methods] Activity ratio was quantified as the difference in the root mean square of the smoothed electromyography signal (EMG) of the posterior deltoid to the infraspinatus muscle, and anterior gliding pressure of the humeral head using a pressure biofeedback unit (PBU), for three resistance loads: 0, 1 and 2 kg. [Results] There was a significant correlation among all three variables (load, ratio, and pressure). Anterior gliding pressure correlated with the activity ratio, with activity of the posterior deltoid increasing with the magnitude of the resistance load. [Conclusion] There was a positive association between the magnitude of resistance load, activity of the posterior deltoid and anterior gliding pressure of the humeral head. The PBU could be used to facilitate the recruitment of the infraspinatus muscle at higher loads to improve glenohumeral joint stability during ER exercise against higher resistance. PMID:26644683

  14. Kinematic mental simulations in abduction and deduction.

    PubMed

    Khemlani, Sangeet Suresh; Mackiewicz, Robert; Bucciarelli, Monica; Johnson-Laird, Philip N

    2013-10-15

    We present a theory, and its computer implementation, of how mental simulations underlie the abductions of informal algorithms and deductions from these algorithms. Three experiments tested the theory's predictions, using an environment of a single railway track and a siding. This environment is akin to a universal Turing machine, but it is simple enough for nonprogrammers to use. Participants solved problems that required use of the siding to rearrange the order of cars in a train (experiment 1). Participants abduced and described in their own words algorithms that solved such problems for trains of any length, and, as the use of simulation predicts, they favored "while-loops" over "for-loops" in their descriptions (experiment 2). Given descriptions of loops of procedures, participants deduced the consequences for given trains of six cars, doing so without access to the railway environment (experiment 3). As the theory predicts, difficulty in rearranging trains depends on the numbers of moves and cars to be moved, whereas in formulating an algorithm and deducing its consequences, it depends on the Kolmogorov complexity of the algorithm. Overall, the results corroborated the use of a kinematic mental model in creating and testing informal algorithms and showed that individuals differ reliably in the ability to carry out these tasks. PMID:24082090

  15. Kinematic mental simulations in abduction and deduction

    PubMed Central

    Khemlani, Sangeet Suresh; Mackiewicz, Robert; Bucciarelli, Monica; Johnson-Laird, Philip N.

    2013-01-01

    We present a theory, and its computer implementation, of how mental simulations underlie the abductions of informal algorithms and deductions from these algorithms. Three experiments tested the theory’s predictions, using an environment of a single railway track and a siding. This environment is akin to a universal Turing machine, but it is simple enough for nonprogrammers to use. Participants solved problems that required use of the siding to rearrange the order of cars in a train (experiment 1). Participants abduced and described in their own words algorithms that solved such problems for trains of any length, and, as the use of simulation predicts, they favored “while-loops” over “for-loops” in their descriptions (experiment 2). Given descriptions of loops of procedures, participants deduced the consequences for given trains of six cars, doing so without access to the railway environment (experiment 3). As the theory predicts, difficulty in rearranging trains depends on the numbers of moves and cars to be moved, whereas in formulating an algorithm and deducing its consequences, it depends on the Kolmogorov complexity of the algorithm. Overall, the results corroborated the use of a kinematic mental model in creating and testing informal algorithms and showed that individuals differ reliably in the ability to carry out these tasks. PMID:24082090

  16. Incidence of Peroneal Tendinopathy After Application of a Posterior Antiglide Plate for Repair of Supination External Rotation Lateral Malleolar Fractures.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Jungtae; Kim, Sehun; Lee, Jung-Soo; Woo, Kyungjei; Sung, Ki-Sun

    2016-01-01

    Posterior antiglide plating is widely used to treat lateral malleolar fractures caused by supination-external rotation injuries. Despite its widespread use, this technique can be associated with postoperative peroneal tendinopathy. The purpose of the present observational review was to report the incidence of peroneal tendinopathy after the use of posterior antiglide plating to treat lateral malleolar fractures caused by a supination-external rotation injury. A total of 70 patients were followed up for a minimum of 12 (mean 55, range 12 to 109) months. Bony union was obtained in all cases after a mean of 57 (range 37 to 81) days. The median number of screw holes in the plate was 4.9 (range 4 to 7), and the median number of screws used to fixate the fibula was 6.58 (range 5 to 10). The mean American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society hindfoot-ankle score at the final follow-up examination was 90.8 (range 55 to 100). Clinically, 3 (4.29%) of the 70 patients had lateral or posterolateral ankle pain indicative of peroneal tendinopathy after the index surgery, without any objective evidence. Of the 70 patients, 41 (58.57%) underwent surgical removal of the fibular hardware, 2 (4.87%) because of lateral ankle discomfort. At removal, inspection of the peroneal tendon sheath and/or tendons showed no gross evidence of tendinopathy in any of the patients. We concluded that the incidence of clinically evident peroneal tendon symptoms associated with posterior antiglide plating is low (4.3%), and direct operative inspection revealed no gross evidence of tendinopathy. PMID:26342665

  17. Manual Stress Ankle Radiography Has Poor Ability to Predict Deep Deltoid Ligament Integrity in a Supination External Rotation Fracture Cohort.

    PubMed

    Schottel, Patrick C; Fabricant, Peter D; Berkes, Marschall B; Garner, Matthew R; Little, Milton T M; Hentel, Keith D; Mintz, Douglas N; Helfet, David L; Lorich, Dean G

    2015-01-01

    Stress ankle radiographs are routinely performed to determine deep deltoid ligament integrity in supination external rotation (SER) ankle fractures. However, variability is present in the published data regarding what medial clear space (MCS) value constitutes a positive result. The purposes of the present study were to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of different MCS cutoff values and determine whether this clinical test could accurately discriminate between patients with and without a deep deltoid ligament disruption. MCS measurements were recorded for stress ankle injury radiographs in an SER ankle fracture cohort. Preoperative ankle magnetic resonance imaging studies, obtained for all patients, were then read independently by 2 musculoskeletal attending radiologists to determine deep deltoid ligament integrity. The MCS measurements were compared with the magnetic resonance imaging diagnosis using receiver operating characteristic analyses to determine the sensitivity, specificity, and optimal data-driven cutoff values. SER II-III patients demonstrated a mean stress MCS distance of 4.3 ± 0.98 mm compared with 5.8 ± 1.76 mm in the SER IV cohort (p < .001). An analysis of differing MCS positive cutoff thresholds revealed that a stress MCS of 5.0 mm maximized the combined sensitivity and specificity of the external rotation test: 65.8% sensitive and 76.5% specific. Using the receiver operating characteristic curve analysis of the MCS measurement, the calculated area under the curve was 0.77, indicating inadequate discriminative ability for diagnosing SER pattern fractures with or without a deep deltoid ligament tear. Judicious use of additional diagnostic testing in patients with a stress MCS result between 4.0 mm and 5.5 mm is warranted. PMID:25189335

  18. Response of a partial wall to an external perturbation of rotating plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Atanasiu, C. V.; Zakharov, L. E.

    2013-09-15

    In this paper, we present the response of a 3D thin multiply connected wall to an external kink mode perturbation in axisymmetric tokamak configurations. To calculate the contribution of the plasma perturbed magnetic field in the vacuum region, we have made use of the concept of surface currents [following C. V. Atanasiu, A. H. Boozer, L. E. Zakharov, and A. A. Subbotin, Phys. Plasmas 6, 2781 (1999)]. The wall response is expressed in terms of a stream function of the wall surface currents, which are obtained by solving a diffusion type equation, taking into account the contribution of the wall currents themselves iteratively. The use of stream function makes the approach applicable for both well-studied earlier Resistive Wall Modes and for Wall Touching Kink Modes, which were discovered recently as a key phenomenon in disruptions [L. E. Zakharov, S. A. Galkin, and S. N. Gerasimov, Phys. Plasmas 19, 055703 (2012)]. New analytical expressions, suitable for numerical calculations of toroidal harmonics of the vacuum magnetic fields from the surface currents on axisymmetric shells, are derived.

  19. Response of a partial wall to an external perturbation of rotating plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atanasiu, C. V.; Zakharov, L. E.

    2013-09-01

    In this paper, we present the response of a 3D thin multiply connected wall to an external kink mode perturbation in axisymmetric tokamak configurations. To calculate the contribution of the plasma perturbed magnetic field in the vacuum region, we have made use of the concept of surface currents [following C. V. Atanasiu, A. H. Boozer, L. E. Zakharov, and A. A. Subbotin, Phys. Plasmas 6, 2781 (1999)]. The wall response is expressed in terms of a stream function of the wall surface currents, which are obtained by solving a diffusion type equation, taking into account the contribution of the wall currents themselves iteratively. The use of stream function makes the approach applicable for both well-studied earlier Resistive Wall Modes and for Wall Touching Kink Modes, which were discovered recently as a key phenomenon in disruptions [L. E. Zakharov, S. A. Galkin, and S. N. Gerasimov, Phys. Plasmas 19, 055703 (2012)]. New analytical expressions, suitable for numerical calculations of toroidal harmonics of the vacuum magnetic fields from the surface currents on axisymmetric shells, are derived.

  20. The current anatomical description of the inferior glenohumeral ligament does not correlate with its functional role in positions of external rotation.

    PubMed

    Moore, Susan M; Stehle, Jens H; Rainis, Eric J; McMahon, Patrick J; Debski, Richard E

    2008-12-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the strain distribution in the inferior glenohumeral ligament at 0 degree, 30 degrees, and 60 degrees of external rotation with an anterior load applied to the joint. Five cadaver shoulders were dissected free of all soft tissue except the glenohumeral capsule and a 7 x 11 grid of strain markers were affixed to the inferior glenohumeral ligament. The location of these strain markers was then determined for a reference strain configuration and while a 25 N anterior load was applied to simulate a clinical exam for instability. The magnitude and direction of the maximum principal strains were then determined at each joint position. For all specimens, the magnitude of the maximum principal strains were significantly greater for 30 degrees and 60 degrees of external rotation when compared to 0 degree of external rotation. Furthermore, when comparing 30 degrees to 60 degrees of external rotation, three of the five specimens were significantly different. Additionally, the previously described regions of the inferior glenohumeral ligament could not be identified with a qualitative evaluation of the strain distribution pattern for each specimen at all external rotation angles. This indicates that our current description of the three regions of the inferior glenohumeral ligament does not correspond to its functional role. Additionally, the directions of the maximum principal strains across the inferior glenohumeral ligament became more aligned with one another as external rotation was increased. The complex strain distributions observed indicates that future studies should treat the inferior glenohumeral capsule as a continuous sheet of fibrous tissue. PMID:18524007

  1. Intercultural caring-an abductive model.

    PubMed

    Wikberg, Anita; Eriksson, Katie

    2008-09-01

    The aim of this study was to increase the understanding of caring from a transcultural perspective and to develop the first outline of a theory. The theoretical perspective includes Eriksson's theory of caritative caring. Texts on caring by the transcultural theorists, including Campinha-Bacote, Kim-Godwin, Leininger and Ray, are analysed using content analysis. The overall theme that resulted from this analysis was that caring is a complex whole. Three main categories of caring emerged: inner caring, outer caring and the goal of caring. Inner caring consists of caring is a relationship, and caring and culture are seen in different dimensions. Outer caring refers to caring affected by educational, administrative and social and other structures. The goal of caring consists of caring leading to change towards health and well-being. The main categories include categories and subcategories that are compared with Eriksson's theory of caritative caring. A model for intercultural caring is generated abductively. Caring and culture appear in three dimensions: caring as ontology independent of context; caring as a phenomenon emphasised differently in different cultures; caring as nursing care activities is unique. Caring alleviates suffering and leads to health and well-being. This model describes caring from an intercultural perspective as a mutual but asymmetric relationship between the nurse and the patient, including the patient's family and community. The patient's cultural background and acculturation influence caring. The cultural background, cultural competence and organisation of the nurse also influence caring. Caring is seen as a complex whole. This study integrates Campinha-Bacote's, Kim-Godwin's, Leininger's and Ray's views of caring with Eriksson's caritative caring and presents caring from a transcultural perspective in a new way as a model for intercultural caring, which can benefit nursing care, education, research and administration. PMID:18840233

  2. The Immediate Effect of Humerus Anatomical Neck-shaft Rotation on Glenohumeral Joint Contracture

    PubMed Central

    Ohtsuki, Keisuke

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] Elderly female patients with glenohumeral joint (GHJ) contracture, forced into prolonged immobility were examined. Range of motion exercises using humerus anatomical neck-shaft rotation were performed, and the immediate effect and adaptation were investigated. [Subjects and Methods] A total of ten individuals with a mean age of 79.4 ± 11.0 years were included in this study. The controlled intervention involved conventional range of motion exercises, and the experimental intervention involved humerus anatomical neck-shaft rotation. Each exercise was performed 30 times. Shoulder joint flexion and abduction and external rotation of the GHJ range of motion were measured with the scapula fixed. Each change in range of motion was compared using ANOVA; less than 5% was considered significant. [Results] After the experimental intervention, significant increases were seen in shoulder joint flexion, abduction, and external rotation ranges of motion. [Conclusion] Therefore, this method was effective as a means of improving the range of motion of the GHJ. PMID:24764621

  3. Humeral external rotation handling by using the Bobath concept approach affects trunk extensor muscles electromyography in children with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Grazziotin Dos Santos, C; Pagnussat, Aline S; Simon, A S; Py, Rodrigo; Pinho, Alexandre Severo do; Wagner, Mário B

    2014-10-20

    This study aimed to investigate the electromyographic activity of cervical and trunk extensors muscles in children with cerebral palsy during two handlings according to the Bobath concept. A crossover trial involving 40 spastic diplegic children was conducted. Electromyography (EMG) was used to measure muscular activity at sitting position (SP), during shoulder internal rotation (IR) and shoulder external rotation (ER) handlings, which were performed using the elbow joint as key point of control. Muscle recordings were performed at the fourth cervical (C4) and at the tenth thoracic (T10) vertebral levels. The Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) was used to assess whether muscle activity would vary according to different levels of severity. Humeral ER handling induced an increase on EMG signal of trunk extensor muscles at the C4 (P=0.007) and T10 (P<0.001) vertebral levels. No significant effects were observed between SP and humeral IR handling at C4 level; However at T10 region, humeral IR handling induced an increase of EMG signal (P=0.019). Humeral ER resulted in an increase of EMG signal at both levels, suggesting increase of extensor muscle activation. Furthermore, the humeral ER handling caused different responses on EMG signal at T10 vertebra level, according to the GMFCS classification (P=0.017). In summary, an increase of EMG signal was observed during ER handling in both evaluated levels, suggesting an increase of muscle activation. These results indicate that humeral ER handling can be used for diplegic CP children rehabilitation to facilitate cervical and trunk extensor muscles activity in a GMFCS level-dependent manner. PMID:25462474

  4. A novel method for defining the Greyhound talocrural joint axis of rotation for hinged transarticular external skeletal fixation.

    PubMed

    Colborne, G R; Hadley, N R; Wallace, A M

    2013-01-01

    In order to apply hinged transarticular external skeletal fixation for stabilization of the injured canine tarsal joint, knowledge of the three-dimensional (3D) location and orientation of the transverse axis is necessary. This method of immobilization may be used as a primary or adjunctive method of stabilisation for a large number of traumatic conditions. Using pin-mounted markers in the cadaveric Greyhound crus and talus, a closed-form solution of absolute orientation was used to identify, on radiographs, the lateral and medial locations of the transverse axis by tracking the 3D excursions of the markers during flexion and extension. A line was drawn across the dorsal aspect of the calcaneus from the most dorsal point on the distal articular surface(proximal intertarsal joint: PIJ) to the most dorsal point on its proximal articulation with the body of the talus, and the location of the centre of rotation was expressed in terms of the length of that line. In seven Greyhound tarsal joints, the medial end of the axis was located 73 ± 10% proximal to the PIJ and 11 ± 7% dorsal to the line. The lateral end was 73 ± 9% proximal tothe PIJ and -2 ± 3% plantar to the line. PMID:23612749

  5. Rotator cuff injuries in adolescent athletes.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Jennifer M; Arkader, Alexandre; Wells, Lawrence M; Ganley, Theodore J

    2013-03-01

    The cause of rotator cuff injuries in the young athlete has been described as an overuse injury related to internal impingement. Abduction coupled with external rotation is believed to impinge on the rotator cuff, specifically the supraspinatus, and lead to undersurface tears that can progress to full-thickness tears. This impingement is believed to be worsened with increased range of motion and instability in overhead athletes. A retrospective review of seven patients diagnosed with rotator cuff injuries was performed to better understand this shoulder injury pattern. The type of sport played, a history of trauma, diagnosis, treatment method, and outcome were noted. Six patients were male and one was a female. Baseball was the primary sport for four patients, basketball for one, gymnastics for one, and wrestling for one. The following injury patterns were observed: two patients tore their subscapularis tendon, two sustained avulsion fractures of their lesser tuberosity, one tore his rotator interval, one tore his supraspinatus, and one avulsed his greater tuberosity. Only four patients recalled a specific traumatic event. Three patients were treated with arthroscopic rotator cuff repair, three with miniopen repair, and one was treated with rehabilitation. Six of the seven patients returned to their preinjury level of sport after treatment. Rotator cuff tears are rare in the adolescent age group. The injury patterns suggest that acute trauma likely accounts for many rotator cuff tears and their equivalents in the young patient. Adolescents with rotator cuff tears reliably return to sports after treatment. The possibility of rotator cuff tears in skeletally immature athletes should be considered. The prognosis is very good once this injury is identified and treated. PMID:22668571

  6. 21 CFR 890.3665 - Congenital hip dislocation abduction splint.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Congenital hip dislocation abduction splint. 890.3665 Section 890.3665 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices §...

  7. 21 CFR 890.3665 - Congenital hip dislocation abduction splint.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Congenital hip dislocation abduction splint. 890.3665 Section 890.3665 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices §...

  8. 21 CFR 890.3665 - Congenital hip dislocation abduction splint.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Congenital hip dislocation abduction splint. 890.3665 Section 890.3665 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices §...

  9. 21 CFR 890.3665 - Congenital hip dislocation abduction splint.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Congenital hip dislocation abduction splint. 890.3665 Section 890.3665 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices §...

  10. 21 CFR 890.3665 - Congenital hip dislocation abduction splint.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Congenital hip dislocation abduction splint. 890.3665 Section 890.3665 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices §...

  11. TEACHING ABDUCTION-PREVENTION SKILLS TO CHILDREN WITH AUTISM

    PubMed Central

    Gunby, Kristin V; Carr, James E; LeBlanc, Linda A

    2010-01-01

    Three children with autism were taught abduction-prevention skills using behavioral skills training with in situ feedback. All children acquired the skills, which were maintained at a 1-month follow-up assessment. In addition, 1 of the children demonstrated the skills during a stimulus generalization probe in a community setting. PMID:20808500

  12. Abductive Science Inquiry Using Mobile Devices in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahmed, Sohaib; Parsons, David

    2013-01-01

    Recent advancements in digital technology have attracted the interest of educators and researchers to develop technology-assisted inquiry-based learning environments in the domain of school science education. Traditionally, school science education has followed deductive and inductive forms of inquiry investigation, while the abductive form of…

  13. Theorising and Practitioners in HRD: The Role of Abductive Reasoning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gold, Jeff; Walton, John; Cureton, Peter; Anderson, Lisa

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to argue that abductive reasoning is a typical but usually unrecognised process used by HRD scholars and practitioners alike. Design/methodology/approach: This is a conceptual paper that explores recent criticism of traditional views of theory-building, based on the privileging of scientific theorising, which…

  14. 22 CFR 40.103 - International child abduction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false International child abduction. 40.103 Section... IMMIGRANTS UNDER THE IMMIGRATION AND NATIONALITY ACT, AS AMENDED Miscellaneous § 40.103 International child... under such paragraph if the U.S. citizen child in question is physically located in a foreign...

  15. 22 CFR 40.103 - International child abduction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false International child abduction. 40.103 Section... IMMIGRANTS UNDER THE IMMIGRATION AND NATIONALITY ACT, AS AMENDED Miscellaneous § 40.103 International child... under such paragraph if the U.S. citizen child in question is physically located in a foreign...

  16. 22 CFR 40.103 - International child abduction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false International child abduction. 40.103 Section... IMMIGRANTS UNDER THE IMMIGRATION AND NATIONALITY ACT, AS AMENDED Miscellaneous § 40.103 International child... under such paragraph if the U.S. citizen child in question is physically located in a foreign...

  17. 22 CFR 40.103 - International child abduction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false International child abduction. 40.103 Section... IMMIGRANTS UNDER THE IMMIGRATION AND NATIONALITY ACT, AS AMENDED Miscellaneous § 40.103 International child... under such paragraph if the U.S. citizen child in question is physically located in a foreign...

  18. 22 CFR 40.103 - International child abduction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false International child abduction. 40.103 Section... IMMIGRANTS UNDER THE IMMIGRATION AND NATIONALITY ACT, AS AMENDED Miscellaneous § 40.103 International child... under such paragraph if the U.S. citizen child in question is physically located in a foreign...

  19. Evaluation of Peer Training for Teaching Abduction Prevention Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tarasenko, Melissa A.; Miltenberger, Raymond G.; Brower-Breitwieser, Carrie; Bosch, Amanda

    2010-01-01

    Child abduction is a serious problem, with approximately 100 children killed each year by nonfamily abductors. Training programs to teach children the correct skills to use if they ever come into contact with a stranger can be effective when they incorporate behavioral skills training (BST) and in-situ training (IST) into their protocol. However,…

  20. 22 CFR 94.7 - Procedures for children abducted from the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Procedures for children abducted from the United States. 94.7 Section 94.7 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE LEGAL AND RELATED SERVICES INTERNATIONAL CHILD ABDUCTION § 94.7 Procedures for children abducted from the United States. Upon receipt of...

  1. Parental Abduction from the Perspective of the Victims: Implications for Counselors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibbs, Mary Jo L.

    2009-01-01

    This is a descriptive study that examined parental abductions from the perspective of the abductee. The results will help counseling professionals better to understand the psychological consequences of parental abduction, coping mechanisms that were used by the abducted children and counseling techniques and strategies that helped the children…

  2. The Abduction of Children by Strangers and Nonfamily Members: Estimating the Incidence Using Multiple Methods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finkelhor, David; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Used a national survey of households with children, a national survey of police records, and an analysis of FBI homicide data to estimate the incidence of nonfamily abductions of children. Offers a definition of abduction, analyzes problems in compiling abduction statistics, and discusses public policy on prevention and response. (RJM)

  3. Three Abductive Solutions to the Meno Paradox--with Instinct, Inference, and Distributed Cognition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paavola, Sami; Hakkarainen, Kai

    2005-01-01

    This article analyzes three approaches to resolving the classical Meno paradox, or its variant, the learning paradox, emphasizing Charles S. Peirce's notion of abduction. Abduction provides a way of dissecting those processes where something new, or conceptually more complex than before, is discovered or learned. In its basic form, abduction is a…

  4. 22 CFR 94.7 - Procedures for children abducted from the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Procedures for children abducted from the United States. 94.7 Section 94.7 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE LEGAL AND RELATED SERVICES INTERNATIONAL CHILD ABDUCTION § 94.7 Procedures for children abducted from the United States. Upon receipt of...

  5. Influence of an external force field on the dynamics of a free core and fluid in a rotating spherical cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlov, V. G.; Kozlov, N. V.; Subbotin, S. V.

    2015-07-01

    This research involves experimental studies of the dynamics of a free spherical core and fluid motion in a spherical cavity rotating around the horizontal axis. The gravity field causes circular oscillations of the core in the reference frame of the cavity creating an averaged force in the Stokes boundary layer which makes the core rotate relative to the cavity (vibrational hydrodynamic top). The core rotates in the direction opposite to that of the cavity (lagging differential rotation). The research shows that the differential rotation intensity is determined by the ratio between the gravitational and centrifugal acceleration, as well as the ratio of the core size to the thickness of the Stokes layer. Various regimes of the fluid flow have been studied. The shape of subcritical flow is a circular-section column extended along the geometric continuation of the sphere. Increasing the differential rotation rate of the core results in various independent modes of instability of the column. One of such modes involves development of an azimuthal wave on the column boundary. The second mode is a system of two-dimensional vortices extended along the axis and rotating inside the column. It has been discovered that the development of supercritical structures causes changes in the differential rotation rate of the core.

  6. Forced magnetic reconnection and field penetration of an externally applied rotating helical magnetic field in the TEXTOR tokamak.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Y; de Bock, M F M; Finken, K H; Jakubowski, M; Jaspers, R; Koslowski, H R; Kraemer-Flecken, A; Lehnen, M; Liang, Y; Matsunaga, G; Reiser, D; Wolf, R C; Zimmermann, O

    2006-08-25

    The magnetic field penetration process into a magnetized plasma is of basic interest both for plasma physics and astrophysics. In this context special measurements on the field penetration and field amplification are performed by a Hall probe on the dynamic ergodic divertor (DED) on the TEXTOR tokamak and the data are interpreted by a two-fluid plasma model. It is observed that the growth of the forced magnetic reconnection by the rotating DED field is accompanied by a change of the plasma fluid rotation. The differential rotation frequency between the DED field and the plasma plays an important role in the process of the excitation of tearing modes. The momentum input from the rotating DED field to the plasma is interpreted by both a ponderomotive force at the rational surface and a radial electric field modified by an edge ergodization. PMID:17026312

  7. Evaluation of Hip Internal and External Rotation Range of Motion as an Injury Risk Factor for Hip, Abdominal and Groin Injuries in Professional Baseball Players

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Richard; Zhou, Hanbing; Thompson, Matthew; Dawson, Courtney; Nguyen, Joseph; Coleman, Struan

    2015-01-01

    Normal hip range of motion (ROM) is essential in running and transfer of energy from lower to upper extremities during overhead throwing. Dysfunctional hip ROM may alter lower extremity kinematics and predispose athletes to hip and groin injuries. The purpose of this study is characterize hip internal/external ROM (Arc) and its effect on the risk of hip, hamstring, and groin injuries in professional baseball players. Bilateral hip internal and external ROM was measured on all baseball players (N=201) in one professional organization (major and minor league) during spring training. Players were organized according to their respective positions. All injuries were documented prospectively for an entire MLB season (2010 to 2011). Data was analyzed according to position and injuries during the season. Total number of players (N=201) with an average age of 24±3.6 (range=17-37). Both pitchers (N=93) and catchers (N=22) had significantly decreased mean hip internal rotation and overall hip arc of motion compared to the positional players (N=86). Players with hip, groin, and hamstring injury also had decreased hip rotation arc when compared to the normal group. Overall, there is a correlation between decreased hip internal rotation and total arc of motion with hip, hamstring, and groin injuries. PMID:26793294

  8. Evaluation of Hip Internal and External Rotation Range of Motion as an Injury Risk Factor for Hip, Abdominal and Groin Injuries in Professional Baseball Players.

    PubMed

    Li, Xinning; Ma, Richard; Zhou, Hanbing; Thompson, Matthew; Dawson, Courtney; Nguyen, Joseph; Coleman, Struan

    2015-12-28

    Normal hip range of motion (ROM) is essential in running and transfer of energy from lower to upper extremities during overhead throwing. Dysfunctional hip ROM may alter lower extremity kinematics and predispose athletes to hip and groin injuries. The purpose of this study is characterize hip internal/external ROM (Arc) and its effect on the risk of hip, hamstring, and groin injuries in professional baseball players. Bilateral hip internal and external ROM was measured on all baseball players (N=201) in one professional organization (major and minor league) during spring training. Players were organized according to their respective positions. All injuries were documented prospectively for an entire MLB season (2010 to 2011). Data was analyzed according to position and injuries during the season. Total number of players (N=201) with an average age of 24±3.6 (range=17-37). Both pitchers (N=93) and catchers (N=22) had significantly decreased mean hip internal rotation and overall hip arc of motion compared to the positional players (N=86). Players with hip, groin, and hamstring injury also had decreased hip rotation arc when compared to the normal group. Overall, there is a correlation between decreased hip internal rotation and total arc of motion with hip, hamstring, and groin injuries. PMID:26793294

  9. An approach to evaluating heuristics in abduction: a case study using RedSoar--an abductive system for red blood cell antibody identification.

    PubMed

    Amra, N K; Smith, J W; Johnson, K A; Johnson, T R

    1992-01-01

    Abduction, or inference to a best explanation, is a ubiquitous type of inference that is frequently used by humans in a wide range of tasks. However, many realistic domains have properties that make abduction computationally intractable (i.e., where the time to reach a solution increases exponentially with the number of possible explanations). We present a domain task analysis and performance evaluation of RedSoar, a plausible cognitive computational model of abduction, that accomplishes the antibody identification task in immunohematology. The task analysis reveals how a computationally intractable abductive problem, where one is seeking optimal solutions, can be reformulated to be a computationally tractable abductive problem, by seeking satisfactory rather then optimal solutions. From the satisfactory perspective, our evaluation framework of RedSoar's performance explores the computational benefits and costs of having directly available abstract hypothesis formation knowledge, and how a strong causal constraint between hypotheses and data reduces the combinatorial explosion of constructing a best explanation. PMID:1482960

  10. A Comparison of Glenohumeral Internal and External Range of Motion and Rotation Strength in healthy and Individuals with Recurrent Anterior Instability

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghifar, Amirreza; Ilka, Shahab; Dashtbani, Hasan; Sahebozamani, Mansour

    2014-01-01

    Background: The glenohumeral joint becomes dislocated more than any other major joint because it maintains a wide range of motion and its stability is inherently weak. The most common complication following acute initial shoulder dislocation is recurrent dislocation or chronic instability. Imbalance of strength and range of motion in individuals with anterior dislocation can be a contributing factor in recurrent dislocation as well. Methods: This case-control study consisted of 24 individuals with a mean age of 24.29±4.33 years, and a mean dislocation rate of 5.37±3.62 times. Isometric cuff strength was measured using a handheld dynamometer and for range of motion, the Leighton flexometer was used in internal and external rotational motions of both upper extremities. Independent t-test was used for data analysis. Results: The internal and external range of motion of the injured glenohumeral joint was lower than the uninjured joint (P<0.001). Similarly, the internal and external rotation strength of the injured joint was lower than the uninjured joint (P<0.001). Conclusions: According to previous data, imbalance of strength and range of motion in individuals with anterior shoulder dislocation can be a contributing factor in long-term disability and increased recurrent dislocation and our finding confirm decreased range of motion and strength in our patients. Hence, proper exercise and rehabilitation plans need to be developed for those suffering from this complication. PMID:25386585

  11. A Predictive Model to Estimate Knee-Abduction Moment: Implications for Development of a Clinically Applicable Patellofemoral Pain Screening Tool in Female Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Myer, Gregory D.; Ford, Kevin R.; Foss, Kim D. Barber; Rauh, Mitchell J.; Paterno, Mark V.; Hewett, Timothy E.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Prospective measures of high external knee-abduction moment (KAM) during landing identify female athletes at increased risk of patellofemoral pain (PFP). A clinically applicable screening protocol is needed. Objective: To identify biomechanical laboratory measures that would accurately quantify KAM loads during landing that predict increased risk of PFP in female athletes and clinical correlates to laboratory-based measures of increased KAM status for use in a clinical PFP injury-risk prediction algorithm. We hypothesized that we could identify clinical correlates that combine to accurately determine increased KAM associated with an increased risk of developing PFP. Design: Descriptive laboratory study. Setting: Biomechanical laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Adolescent female basketball and soccer players (n = 698) from a single-county public school district. Main Outcome Measure(s): We conducted tests of anthropometrics, maturation, laxity, flexibility, strength, and landing biomechanics before each competitive season. Pearson correlation and linear and logistic regression modeling were used to examine high KAM (>15.4 Nm) compared with normal KAM as a surrogate for PFP injury risk. Results: The multivariable logistic regression model that used the variables peak knee-abduction angle, center-of-mass height, and hip rotational moment excursion predicted KAM associated with PFP risk (>15.4 NM of KAM) with 92% sensitivity and 74% specificity and a C statistic of 0.93. The multivariate linear regression model that included the same predictors accounted for 70% of the variance in KAM. We identified clinical correlates to laboratory measures that combined to predict high KAM with 92% sensitivity and 47% specificity. The clinical prediction algorithm, including knee-valgus motion (odds ratio [OR] = 1.46, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.31, 1.63), center-of-mass height (OR = 1.21, 95% CI = 1.15, 1.26), and hamstrings strength/body fat percentage (OR

  12. Dynamic and static control of the human knee joint in abduction-adduction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, L Q; Wang, G

    2001-09-01

    It is unclear whether humans can voluntarily control dynamic and static properties in knee abduction-adduction, which may be important in performing functional tasks and preventing injuries, whether the main load is about the abduction axis or not. A joint-driving device was used to perturb the knee in abduction-adduction at full knee extension under both passive (muscle relaxed) and active (muscle contracted in abduction or adduction) conditions. Dynamic control properties in knee abduction-adduction were characterized by joint stiffness, viscosity, and limb inertia, and quasi-static knee torque-angle relationship was characterized by knee abduction-adduction laxity and quasi-static stiffness (at a 20Nm moment). It was found that the subjects were capable of generating net abduction and adduction moment through differential co-contraction of muscles crossing the medial and lateral sides of the knee, which helped to reduce the abduction-adduction joint laxity (p< or =0.01) and increase stiffness (p<0.027) and viscous damping. Knee abduction laxity was significantly lower than adduction laxity (p=0.043) and the quasi-static abduction stiffness was significantly higher than adduction stiffness (p<0.001). The knee joint showed significantly higher stiffness and viscosity in abduction-adduction than their counterparts in knee flexion-extension at comparable levels of joint torque (p<0.05). Similar to dynamic flexion-extension properties, the system damping ratio remained constant over different levels of contraction, indicating simplified control tasks for the central nervous system; while the natural undamped frequency increased considerably with abduction-adduction muscle contraction, presumably making the knee a quicker system during strenuous tasks involving strong muscle contraction. PMID:11506781

  13. Role of the trochlear nerve in eye abduction and frontal vision of the red-eared slider turtle (Trachemys scripta elegans).

    PubMed

    Dearworth, J R; Ashworth, A L; Kaye, J M; Bednarz, D T; Blaum, J F; Vacca, J M; McNeish, J E; Higgins, K A; Michael, C L; Skrobola, M G; Jones, M S; Ariel, M

    2013-10-15

    Horizontal head rotation evokes significant responses from trochlear motoneurons of turtle that suggests they have a functional role in abduction of the eyes like that in frontal-eyed mammals. The finding is unexpected given that the turtle is generally considered lateral-eyed and assumed to have eye movements instead like that of lateral-eyed mammals, in which innervation of the superior oblique muscle by the trochlear nerve (nIV) produces intorsion, elevation, and adduction (not abduction). Using an isolated turtle head preparation with the brain removed, glass suction electrodes were used to stimulate nIV with trains of current pulses. Eyes were monitored via an infrared camera with the head placed in a gimble to quantify eye rotations and their directions. Stimulations of nIV evoked intorsion, elevation, and abduction. Dissection of the superior oblique muscle identified lines of action and a location of insertion on the eye, which supported kinematics evoked by nIV stimulation. Eye positions in alert behaving turtles with their head extended were compared with that when their heads were retracted in the carapace. When the head was retracted, there was a reduction in interpupillary distance and an increase in binocular overlap. Occlusion of peripheral fields by the carapace forces the turtle to a more frontal-eyed state, perhaps the reason for the action of abduction by the superior oblique muscle. These findings support why trochlear motoneurons in turtle respond in the same way as abducens motoneurons to horizontal rotations, an unusual characteristic of vestibulo-ocular physiology in comparison with other mammalian lateral-eyed species. PMID:23681972

  14. Unexpected angular or rotational deformity after corrective osteotomy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Codman’s paradox reveals a misunderstanding of geometry in orthopedic practice. Physicians often encounter situations that cannot be understood intuitively during orthopedic interventions such as corrective osteotomy. Occasionally, unexpected angular or rotational deformity occurs during surgery. This study aimed to draw the attention of orthopedic surgeons toward the concepts of orientation and rotation and demonstrate the potential for unexpected deformity after orthopedic interventions. This study focused on three situations: shoulder arthrodesis, femoral varization derotational osteotomy, and femoral derotation osteotomy. Methods First, a shoulder model was generated to calculate unexpected rotational deformity to demonstrate Codman’s paradox. Second, femoral varization derotational osteotomy was simulated using a cylinder model. Third, a reconstructed femoral model was used to calculate unexpected angular or rotational deformity during femoral derotation osteotomy. Results Unexpected external rotation was found after forward elevation and abduction of the shoulder joint. In the varization and derotation model, closed-wedge osteotomy and additional derotation resulted in an unexpected extension and valgus deformity, namely, under-correction of coxa valga. After femoral derotational osteotomy, varization and extension of the distal fragment occurred, although the extension was negligible. Conclusions Surgeons should be aware of unexpected angular deformity after surgical procedure involving bony areas. The degree of deformity differs depending on the context of the surgical procedure. However, this study reveals that notable deformities can be expected during orthopedic procedures such as femoral varization derotational osteotomy. PMID:24886469

  15. Context as Relevance-Driven Abduction and Charitable Satisficing

    PubMed Central

    Attardo, Salvatore

    2016-01-01

    It has been widely assumed that the full meaning of a linguistic expression can be grasped only within a situation, the context of the utterance. There is even agreement that certain factors within the situation are particularly significant, including gestures and facial expressions of the participants, their social roles, the setting of the exchange, the objects surrounding the participants, the linguistic, cultural and educational backgrounds of the participants, their beliefs, including those concerning the situation, the social procedures and conventions that regulate the situation. Finally, there is some agreement that context is dynamic, reflexive (the speakers are mutually aware of their beliefs), not limited to linguistics actions, and last but not least, a psychological construct. This definition of context is not (very) controversial, but it leaves out two major problems, which will be addressed in this paper: how is context arrived at? And, since a perfectly natural interpretation of the above definition could be that the context of each utterance is the entire universe, how is the relevant context delimited? Four related concepts will provide the answer to both questions: abductive reasoning, driven by relevance and cooperation, and bounded rationality and the principle of charity. Simply put, context is derived abductively by the speakers assuming that for the speakers to behave the way they behave and do so rationally, a given context must be available to them. The context is bounded by the simple requirement that speakers not try to optimize their interpretation/calculation, but rather satisfice, i.e., find the first acceptable solution and by the need to follow the principle of charity, which forces intersubjective agreement. Thus, abductive reasoning and bounded rationality will be shown to be sufficient to calculate the relevant context of utterances (or other rationality-driven interactions) and to effectively delimit the potentially infinite

  16. Diagnostic accuracy of the gravity stress test and clinical signs in cases of isolated supination-external rotation-type lateral malleolar fractures.

    PubMed

    Nortunen, S; Flinkkilä, T; Lantto, I; Kortekangas, T; Niinimäki, J; Ohtonen, P; Pakarinen, H

    2015-08-01

    We prospectively assessed the diagnostic accuracy of the gravity stress test and clinical findings to evaluate the stability of the ankle mortise in patients with supination-external rotation-type fractures of the lateral malleolus without widening of the medial clear space. The cohort included 79 patients with a mean age of 44 years (16 to 82). Two surgeons assessed medial tenderness, swelling and ecchymosis and performed the external rotation (ER) stress test (a reference standard). A diagnostic radiographer performed the gravity stress test. For the gravity stress test, the positive likelihood ratio (LR) was 5.80 with a 95% confidence interval (CI) of 2.75 to 12.27, and the negative LR was 0.15 (95% CI 0.07 to 0.35), suggesting a moderate change from the pre-test probability. Medial tenderness, both alone and in combination with swelling and/or ecchymosis, indicated a small change (positive LR, 2.74 to 3.25; negative LR, 0.38 to 0.47), whereas swelling and ecchymosis indicated only minimal changes (positive LR, 1.41 to 1.65; negative LR, 0.38 to 0.47). In conclusion, when gravity stress test results are in agreement with clinical findings, the result is likely to predict stability of the ankle mortise with an accuracy equivalent to ER stress test results. When clinical examination suggests a medial-side injury, however, the gravity stress test may give a false negative result. PMID:26224832

  17. Hip Abduction Can Prevent Posterior Edge Loading of Hip Replacements

    PubMed Central

    van Arkel, Richard J; Modenese, Luca; Phillips, Andrew TM; Jeffers, Jonathan RT

    2013-01-01

    Edge loading causes clinical problems for hard-on-hard hip replacements, and edge loading wear scars are present on the majority of retrieved components. We asked the question: are the lines of action of hip joint muscles such that edge loading can occur in a well-designed, well-positioned acetabular cup? A musculoskeletal model, based on cadaveric lower limb geometry, was used to calculate for each muscle, in every position within the complete range of motion, whether its contraction would safely pull the femoral head into the cup or contribute to edge loading. The results show that all the muscles that insert into the distal femur, patella, or tibia could cause edge loading of a well-positioned cup when the hip is in deep flexion. Patients frequently use distally inserting muscles for movements requiring deep hip flexion, such as sit-to-stand. Importantly, the results, which are supported by in vivo data and clinical findings, also show that risk of edge loading is dramatically reduced by combining deep hip flexion with hip abduction. Patients, including those with sub-optimally positioned cups, may be able to reduce the prevalence of edge loading by rising from chairs or stooping with the hip abducted. © 2013 Orthopaedic Research Society Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 31:1172–1179, 2013. PMID:23575923

  18. Developing a Validity Argument through Abductive Reasoning with an Empirical Demonstration of the Latent Class Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Amery D.; Stone, Jake E.; Liu, Yan

    2016-01-01

    This article proposes and demonstrates a methodology for test score validation through abductive reasoning. It describes how abductive reasoning can be utilized in support of the claims made about test score validity. This methodology is demonstrated with a real data example of the Canadian English Language Proficiency Index Program…

  19. 22 CFR 94.6 - Procedures for children abducted to the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Procedures for children abducted to the United States. 94.6 Section 94.6 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE LEGAL AND RELATED SERVICES INTERNATIONAL... Aspects of International Child Abduction....

  20. 22 CFR 94.6 - Procedures for children abducted to the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Procedures for children abducted to the United States. 94.6 Section 94.6 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE LEGAL AND RELATED SERVICES INTERNATIONAL... Aspects of International Child Abduction....

  1. Abductive inferences to psychological variables: Steiger's question and best explanations of psychopathy.

    PubMed

    Markus, Keith A; Hawes, Samuel W; Thasites, Rula J

    2008-09-01

    Abductive inference often involves inference to the best explanation. A focus on the bestness of explanations facilitates a comparative analysis of how abductive inference would differ if approached with four contrasting sets of assumptions about how scientific inference works: positivism, realism, and two kinds of pragmatism. As a thought experiment, one can imagine a situation in which competing models of psychopathy differ in parsimony and fit to the data, but produce a tie when considering both virtues in combination. The thought experiment demonstrates that Steiger's (1990) question about how best to combine competing virtues in scientific inference applies to abductive inference and that the answers depend upon other assumptions about how science works. The comparative analysis helps focus some of the issues that require clarification before abductive inference can enter the Pantheon of standard research methods in psychology. More constructively, the analysis also demonstrates that one need not accept scientific realism to accept and use abductive inference. PMID:18618735

  2. Human rather than ape-like orbital morphology allows much greater lateral visual field expansion with eye abduction.

    PubMed

    Denion, Eric; Hitier, Martin; Levieil, Eric; Mouriaux, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    While convergent, the human orbit differs from that of non-human apes in that its lateral orbital margin is significantly more rearward. This rearward position does not obstruct the additional visual field gained through eye motion. This additional visual field is therefore considered to be wider in humans than in non-human apes. A mathematical model was designed to quantify this difference. The mathematical model is based on published computed tomography data in the human neuro-ocular plane (NOP) and on additional anatomical data from 100 human skulls and 120 non-human ape skulls (30 gibbons; 30 chimpanzees / bonobos; 30 orangutans; 30 gorillas). It is used to calculate temporal visual field eccentricity values in the NOP first in the primary position of gaze then for any eyeball rotation value in abduction up to 45° and any lateral orbital margin position between 85° and 115° relative to the sagittal plane. By varying the lateral orbital margin position, the human orbit can be made "non-human ape-like". In the Pan-like orbit, the orbital margin position (98.7°) was closest to the human orbit (107.1°). This modest 8.4° difference resulted in a large 21.1° difference in maximum lateral visual field eccentricity with eyeball abduction (Pan-like: 115°; human: 136.1°). PMID:26190625

  3. Human rather than ape-like orbital morphology allows much greater lateral visual field expansion with eye abduction

    PubMed Central

    Denion, Eric; Hitier, Martin; Levieil, Eric; Mouriaux, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    While convergent, the human orbit differs from that of non-human apes in that its lateral orbital margin is significantly more rearward. This rearward position does not obstruct the additional visual field gained through eye motion. This additional visual field is therefore considered to be wider in humans than in non-human apes. A mathematical model was designed to quantify this difference. The mathematical model is based on published computed tomography data in the human neuro-ocular plane (NOP) and on additional anatomical data from 100 human skulls and 120 non-human ape skulls (30 gibbons; 30 chimpanzees / bonobos; 30 orangutans; 30 gorillas). It is used to calculate temporal visual field eccentricity values in the NOP first in the primary position of gaze then for any eyeball rotation value in abduction up to 45° and any lateral orbital margin position between 85° and 115° relative to the sagittal plane. By varying the lateral orbital margin position, the human orbit can be made “non-human ape-like”. In the Pan-like orbit, the orbital margin position (98.7°) was closest to the human orbit (107.1°). This modest 8.4° difference resulted in a large 21.1° difference in maximum lateral visual field eccentricity with eyeball abduction (Pan-like: 115°; human: 136.1°). PMID:26190625

  4. A Preliminary Evaluation of Two Behavioral Skills Training Procedures for Teaching Abduction-Prevention Skills to Schoolchildren

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Brigitte M.; Miltenberger, Raymond G.; Knudson, Peter; Egemo-Helm, Kristin; Kelso, Pamela; Jostad, Candice; Langley, Linda

    2006-01-01

    Although child abduction is a low-rate event, it presents a serious threat to the safety of children. The victims of child abduction face the threat of physical and emotional injury, sexual abuse, and death. Previous research has shown that behavioral skills training (BST) is effective in teaching children abduction-prevention skills, although not…

  5. Abductive learning of quantized stochastic processes with probabilistic finite automata.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, Ishanu; Lipson, Hod

    2013-02-13

    We present an unsupervised learning algorithm (GenESeSS) to infer the causal structure of quantized stochastic processes, defined as stochastic dynamical systems evolving over discrete time, and producing quantized observations. Assuming ergodicity and stationarity, GenESeSS infers probabilistic finite state automata models from a sufficiently long observed trace. Our approach is abductive; attempting to infer a simple hypothesis, consistent with observations and modelling framework that essentially fixes the hypothesis class. The probabilistic automata we infer have no initial and terminal states, have no structural restrictions and are shown to be probably approximately correct-learnable. Additionally, we establish rigorous performance guarantees and data requirements, and show that GenESeSS correctly infers long-range dependencies. Modelling and prediction examples on simulated and real data establish relevance to automated inference of causal stochastic structures underlying complex physical phenomena. PMID:23277601

  6. Plastazote abduction orthosis in the management of neonatal hip instability.

    PubMed

    Eberle, Charles F

    2003-01-01

    Since 1987, 113 consecutive newborns with either Ortolani-positive or provocative-positive hip examinations in the newborn nursery have been treated with a Plastazote hip abduction orthosis when diagnosed and followed to determine if the method was safe, effective, and easy to use. Ortolani-positive hips often had bilateral abnormalities in the hip examination, were frequently associated with breech position, and were anatomically more dysplastic than those hips that were unstable by provocative testing. No patient developed ischemic necrosis during follow-up. Only two had additional treatment of their unstable hips. The rest had excellent results. Parents and caregivers found the device easy to use. The orthosis is recommended as the primary method for managing newborns with clinical instability to either the provocative or Ortolani test as being safe, effective, and easy to use across all skill levels. PMID:12960623

  7. Data-Driven Abductive Discovery in the Earth Sciences (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazen, R. M.

    2013-12-01

    Traditional pathways to discovery in the Earth sciences rely on inductive and deductive approaches, by which patterns and phenomena in nature are discovered first, and observations and modeling to test causal hypotheses follow. These powerful methods have proven successful in documenting and comprehending many aspects of the natural world, but they are inherently less efficient at discovering new complex patterns that require synthesis of diverse types of data. Consequently, such gradual global processes as plate tectonics and climate change required decades of integrated data synthesis preceding discovery of critical Earth phenomena. Vast but largely untapped Earth science data resources offer a potentially revolutionary alternative 'abductive' approach to investigate Earth's co-evolving geo- and biospheres--a systematic data-driven search for accelerated discovery of hidden patterns in the data resources of a dozen different disciplines. Today's Earth science enterprises generate terabytes per day of new data, yet these vast resources are woefully underutilized because they are not linked into a single platform. We advocate the implementation of data infrastructure and interrogation strategies that link existing and new data resources and methods in mineralogy, paleontology, proteomics, irreversible thermodynamics, geodynamics, and geochronology, coupled with newly adapted statistical analysis and visualization capabilities--a new kind of open-access 'scientific instrument' that could transform the Earth sciences. Recent 'brute force' studies of variations in minerals of beryllium, cobalt, mercury, and molybdenum through deep time demonstrate the potential of this concept as a means to search for critical resources; generate insights regarding the co-evolution of ocean chemistry and microbial metabolism; uncover evidence for the timing and rates of near-surface oxygenation; and document subtle ongoing feedbacks between terrestrial life, weathering, soils, and

  8. [Experimental vocal cord abduction impairment with an artificial vocal cord].

    PubMed

    Isozaki, Eiji; Tobisawa, Shinsuke; Nishizawa, Misato; Nakayama, Hideto; Fukui, Kotaro; Takanishi, Asuo

    2009-07-01

    Non-invasive positive pressure ventilation (NPPV) has recently been applied to the patients with multiple system atrophy (MSA) with various respiratory complications including vocal cord abduction impairment and respiratory disturbance by the central origin. Any consensus guidelines on setting up the inspiratory positive airway pressure (IPAP) and expiratory one (EPAP), however, have not been raised yet. To investigate this problem, we made the upper airway tract model with moderately and severely narrow glottis using a training/test lung and the artificial vocal cord which was developed for a humanoid talking robot in Waseda University. The artificial vocal cord was molded out of a high performance thermoplastic rubber in imitation of the human larynx. Previous studies using with a high-speed camera and a sound analyzer showed that the artificial vocal cord resembled human larynx closely both morphologically and functionally. The opening and closing movements of the artificial vocal cord were observed fiberscopically under various conditions of IPAP (4-20 cmH2O) and EPAP (4-10 cmH2O). The maximal glottic width during inspiration and expiration were measured by a pair of calipers on the video-monitored display. Both of the moderately and the severely narrow artificial vocal cords without non-paralytic factors showed typical paradoxical movement showing adduction in inspiration and abduction in expiration, which is characteristic to vocal cord abductor impairment seen in MSA. In the model with moderately severe narrow glottis, this paradoxical movement was released under any positive pressures of continuous (CPAP) and bilevel (Bilevel PAP) modes. In the model with severely narrow glottis, however, there existed a threshold in setting up the optimal EPAP to release the paradoxical movement. In conclusion, EPAP-leading procedure seems to be preferable to IPAP-leading procedure to dilate the narrow glottis as a pneumatic splint in the managements of the patients with

  9. Vertical axis rotations in fold and thrust belts: Comparison of AMS and paleomagnetic data in the Western External Sierras (Southern Pyrenees)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pueyo Anchuela, Ó.; Pueyo, E. L.; Pocoví Juan, A.; Gil Imaz, A.

    2012-04-01

    Geometry and kinematics of fold-and-thrust belts can be complex settings when oblique structures and vertical-axis rotations (VAR) take place during thrust emplacement. Many techniques can be used to unravel such complex tectonic histories, from classic ones like strain analysis and changes of paleocurrents, to more modern approaches such as paleomagnetism and calcite twin analysis. In this paper, anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility is compared to vertical axis rotations deduced from paleomagnetic data along three cross-sections in the External Sierras and the Jaca Basin (southwestern Pyrenees). These data enable us to state that: 1) AMS represents pre-tilting deformation fabrics and magnetic lineation behaves like a passive marker during later deformation; and 2) a primary record of the paleomagnetic field can be found in the area. Therefore, the difference with the paleomagnetic reference is the local VAR. The comparison of the two datasets allows us to draw the following conclusions: A) the changes in both paleomagnetic VAR and magnetic lineation orientation between neighbouring sites are similar; and B) there is a significant linear regression between VAR and trend changes in magnetic lineation. Deviations in magnetic lineation with respect to the expected local magnetic lineation permit vertical axis rotations to be quantified using the AMS dataset. The combined analysis of paleomagnetic and AMS data enables: 1) a quicker comparison of the kinematic evolution in areas with similar AMS patterns; 2) the identification of anomalous orientations of magnetic lineation linked to VARs; and 3) the use of AMS analysis as a homogeneity test for VARs determined from other techniques. AMS is proposed as a suitable preliminary technique to select further sites for paleomagnetic analysis since paleomagnetic laboratory procedures are much more time-consuming than AMS measurements, AMS does not usually modify sample remanence and hence samples can be used for both types of

  10. Comparison of humeral rotation co-activation of breast cancer population and healthy shoulders.

    PubMed

    Brookham, Rebecca L; Dickerson, Clark R

    2016-08-01

    Upper limb morbidities are common amongst the breast cancer population (BCP) and have a direct impact on independence. Comparing muscle co-activation strategies between BCP and healthy populations may assist in identifying muscle dysfunction and promote clinical interpretation of dysfunction, which could direct preventative and therapeutic interventions. The purposes of this study were to define humeral rotation muscle co-activation of a BCP and to compare it with a previously defined co-activation relationship of a healthy population. Fifty BCP survivors performed 18 isometric internal and external rotation exertions at various postures and intensities. Surface and intramuscular electrodes recorded shoulder muscle activity. BCP co-activation was predicted at r(2)=0.77 during both exertion types. Humeral abduction angle and task intensity were important factors in the prediction of co-activation in both populations. Comparisons made between populations identified differing muscle strategies used by BCP to maintain postural control. Compared to healthy co-activation, the BCP demonstrated greater activation of internal (IR) and external rotator (ER) type muscles during their respective rotation type. The BCP demonstrated increased (⩾8.7%) activation of pectoralis major. This study has provided insight into how BCP muscles compensate during dysfunction. Continued advancement of this knowledge can provide more understanding of dysfunction, promote generation of evidence-based therapies, and can be useful in biomechanical modeling. PMID:26296634

  11. Effect of tight clothes on cervical and thoracic spine muscles during shoulder abduction

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min-hee; Yoo, Won-gyu

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was investigated the effect of tight clothes on cervical and thoracic spine muscles activities during shoulder abduction. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects of this study were 10 healthy males. The subjects performed two shoulder abduction trials for each of two jacket-wearing conditions. The right upper, middle, and lower trapezius and serratus anterior muscles activities were measured using a surface electromyography system during right shoulder abduction. [Results] The upper and middle trapezius muscle activities during shoulder abduction were significantly increased under the tight-jacket conditions compared with the general-jacket conditions. The lower trapezius and serratus anterior muscle activities were significantly decreased under the tight-jacket conditions compared with the general-jacket conditions. [Conclusion] The results of this study suggest that normal scapular movements did not occur sufficiently when wearing a tight jacket. PMID:27313348

  12. Sleep paralysis, sexual abuse, and space alien abduction.

    PubMed

    McNally, Richard J; Clancy, Susan A

    2005-03-01

    Sleep paralysis accompanied by hypnopompic ('upon awakening') hallucinations is an often-frightening manifestation of discordance between the cognitive/perceptual and motor aspects of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. Awakening sleepers become aware of an inability to move, and sometimes experience intrusion of dream mentation into waking consciousness (e.g. seeing intruders in the bedroom). In this article, we summarize two studies. In the first study, we assessed 10 individuals who reported abduction by space aliens and whose claims were linked to apparent episodes of sleep paralysis during which hypnopompic hallucinations were interpreted as alien beings. In the second study, adults reporting repressed, recovered, or continuous memories of childhood sexual abuse more often reported sleep paralysis than did a control group. Among the 31 reporting sleep paralysis, only one person linked it to abuse memories. This person was among the six recovered memory participants who reported sleep paralysis (i.e. 17% rate of interpreting it as abuse-related). People rely on personally plausible cultural narratives to interpret these otherwise baffling sleep paralysis episodes. PMID:15881271

  13. Agape: Peirce's Abduction Concerning the Growth of Intelligibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staab, Janice Marie

    Is the metaphysical articulation of the unity between science and sentiment either possible or desirable? Assuming an affirmative answer to both of these questions, this dissertation contends that the notion of agape may provide such a unity. Though agape has historical roots in the Christian notion of divine love, Charles S. Peirce considered this "law of Love" to be the fundamental principle giving coherence to the otherwise random, spontaneous evolution of the physical and psychical universe. The ability of agape to accomplish this unification is based upon the connection which Peirce drew between it and the logic of abduction, or hypothesis formation. By explicating the way in which agape acts as Peirce's primary evolutionary hypothesis, agape will be shown to act as a bridge between continuous evolutionary processes and discrete evolutionary events. As a similar debate is currently being explored regarding the evolution of quantum mechanical systems, this dissertation has the corollary purpose of indicating precisely how Peirce's notion of agape speaks to questions posed by contemporary quantum theorists.

  14. Behavioral Skills Training to Improve the Abduction-Prevention Skills of Children with Autism.

    PubMed

    Ledbetter-Cho, Katherine; Lang, Russell; Davenport, Katy; Moore, Melissa; Lee, Allyson; O'Reilly, Mark; Watkins, Laci; Falcomata, Terry

    2016-09-01

    A concurrent multiple baseline across participants design evaluated the effects of behavioral skills training (BST) on abduction-prevention skills of four children with autism. Across phases, confederates presented four types of abduction lures: (a) simple requests, (b) appeals to authority, (c) assistance requests, and (d) incentives. During baseline, lures resulted in children leaving with confederate strangers. During intervention, BST targeted a three-step response (i.e., refuse, move away, and report) and the abduction-prevention skills of all participants improved. Improvements generalized to novel settings and confederates and were maintained at 4 weeks. There is currently limited research on abduction-prevention pertaining to individuals with ASD. BST can be used to teach abduction-prevention skills to individuals with ASD. BST can be effective at teaching appropriate responses to multiple types of abduction lures. The effects of BST on multiple responses to multiple types of lures can generalize across settings and people and maintain over time. PMID:27622133

  15. Long-axis rotation: the missing link in proximal-to-distal segmental sequencing.

    PubMed

    Marshall, R N; Elliott, B C

    2000-04-01

    Most assessments of segmental sequencing in throwing, striking or kicking have indicated a proximal-to-distal sequencing of end-point linear speeds, joint angular velocities, segment angular velocities and resultant joint moments. However, the role of long-axis rotations has not been adequately quantified and located in the proximal-to-distal sequence. The timing and importance of upper arm internal-external rotation and pronation-supination in the development of racquet head speed have been examined in the tennis serve and squash forehand drive and considered in relation to conventional concepts of proximal-to-distal sequencing. Both long-axis rotations reached their peak angular speeds late in both strokes, typically after shoulder flexion-extension, shoulder abduction-adduction and elbow extension. These results clarify and confirm the importance of upper limb long-axis rotations in the production of racquet head speed. It appears that traditional proximal-to-distal sequencing concepts are inadequate to describe accurately the complexity of the tennis serve or squash forehand drive. It is essential to consider upper arm and forearm longitudinal axis rotations in explaining the mechanics of these movements and in developing coaching emphases, strength training schedules and injury prevention programmes. PMID:10824641

  16. Rotator Interval Lesion and Damaged Subscapularis Tendon Repair in a High School Baseball Player

    PubMed Central

    Muto, Tomoyuki; Ninomiya, Hiroki; Inui, Hiroaki; Komai, Masahiko; Nobuhara, Katsuya

    2015-01-01

    In 2013, a 16-year-old baseball pitcher visited Nobuhara Hospital complaining of shoulder pain and limited range of motion in his throwing shoulder. High signal intensity in the rotator interval (RI) area (ball sign), injured subscapularis tendon, and damage to both the superior and middle glenohumeral ligaments were identified using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Repair of the RI lesion and partially damaged subscapularis tendon was performed in this pitcher. During surgery, an opened RI and dropping of the subscapularis tendon were observed. The RI was closed in a 90° externally rotated and abducted position. To reconfirm the exact repaired state of the patient, arthroscopic examination was performed from behind. However, suture points were not visible in the >30° externally rotated position, which indicates that the RI could not be correctly repaired with the arthroscopic procedure. One year after surgery, the patient obtained full function of the shoulder and returned to play at a national convention. Surgical repair of the RI lesion should be performed in exactly the correct position of the upper extremity. PMID:26618017

  17. Higher-level fusion for military operations based on abductive inference: proof of principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pantaleev, Aleksandar V.; Josephson, John

    2006-04-01

    The ability of contemporary military commanders to estimate and understand complicated situations already suffers from information overload, and the situation can only grow worse. We describe a prototype application that uses abductive inferencing to fuse information from multiple sensors to evaluate the evidence for higher-level hypotheses that are close to the levels of abstraction needed for decision making (approximately JDL levels 2 and 3). Abductive inference (abduction, inference to the best explanation) is a pattern of reasoning that occurs naturally in diverse settings such as medical diagnosis, criminal investigations, scientific theory formation, and military intelligence analysis. Because abduction is part of common-sense reasoning, implementations of it can produce reasoning traces that are very human understandable. Automated abductive inferencing can be deployed to augment human reasoning, taking advantage of computation to process large amounts of information, and to bypass limits to human attention and short-term memory. We illustrate the workings of the prototype system by describing an example of its use for small-unit military operations in an urban setting. Knowledge was encoded as it might be captured prior to engagement from a standard military decision making process (MDMP) and analysis of commander's priority intelligence requirements (PIR). The system is able to reasonably estimate the evidence for higher-level hypotheses based on information from multiple sensors. Its inference processes can be examined closely to verify correctness. Decision makers can override conclusions at any level and changes will propagate appropriately.

  18. A three-dimensional model of vocal fold abductionÕadduction

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Eric J.; Titze, Ingo R.; Alipour, Fariborz

    2006-01-01

    A three-dimensional biomechanical model of tissue deformation was developed to simulate dynamic vocal fold abduction and adduction. The model was made of 1721 nearly incompressible finite elements. The cricoarytenoid joint was modeled as a rocking–sliding motion, similar to two concentric cylinders. The vocal ligament and the thyroarytenoid muscle’s fiber characteristics were implemented as a fiber–gel composite made of an isotropic ground substance imbedded with fibers. These fibers had contractile and/or passive nonlinear stress–strain characteristics. The verification of the model was made by comparing the range and speed of motion to published vocal fold kinematic data. The model simulated abduction to a maximum glottal angle of about 31°. Using the posterior-cricoarytenoid muscle, the model produced an angular abduction speed of 405° per second. The system mechanics seemed to favor abduction over adduction in both peak speed and response time, even when all intrinsic muscle properties were kept identical. The model also verified the notion that the vocalis and muscularis portions of the thyroarytenoid muscle play significantly different roles in posturing, with the muscularis portion having the larger effect on arytenoid movement. Other insights into the mechanisms of abduction/adduction were given. PMID:15101653

  19. Reverse Shoulder Arthroplasty for Management of Postinfectious Arthropathy With Rotator Cuff Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Morris, Brent J; Waggenspack, Wame N; Laughlin, Mitzi S; Elkousy, Hussein A; Gartsman, Gary M; Edwards, T Bradley

    2015-08-01

    Treatment of patients with rotator cuff deficiency and arthritis in the setting of a prior glenohumeral infection (postinfectious arthropathy) is complex, with little evidence to guide treatment. The current authors present their approach to management of these patients and clinical outcomes after reverse shoulder arthroplasty (RSA). All primary RSAs performed for postinfectious arthropathy and rotator cuff deficiency with native glenohumeral joints were identified in a prospective shoulder arthroplasty registry. Eight patients with a minimum of 2-year follow-up were included in the analysis. Clinical outcomes, including the Constant score, the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) score, the Western Ontario Osteoarthritis Shoulder (WOOS) index, the Single Assessment Numeric Evaluation (SANE) score, and range of motion measurements, were assessed preoperatively and at final follow-up. At an average follow-up of 4.4 years, no patient had a clinically detectable recurrence of infection. Significant improvements were noted in all outcome scores from preoperative evaluation to final follow-up after RSA, including Constant score (P=.003), ASES score (P<.001), WOOS index (P=.002), SANE score (P=.025), forward flexion (P<.001), abduction (P<.001), and external rotation (P=.020). Seven of 8 patients reported they were satisfied or very satisfied at final follow-up. Reverse shoulder arthroplasty can be performed in patients without significant medical comorbidities in the setting of postinfectious arthropathy and rotator cuff deficiency with a low risk of recurrence of infection. Significant clinical improvements were noted at short-term follow-up. PMID:26270757

  20. Not without a fair fight: failed abductions of females in wild hamadryas baboons.

    PubMed

    Pines, Mathew; Swedell, Larissa

    2011-07-01

    In contrast to other papionin monkeys, hamadryas baboons are characterized by female-biased dispersal. Given that hamadryas females do not disperse voluntarily, one mechanism for female transfer between bands is thought to be abductions during aggressive intergroup conflict. To date, however, no successful abductions have been witnessed. We describe three abduction events at the Filoha field site in Ethiopia, two interband and one intraband, in which the abductors successfully separated a female from her leader male for several minutes or hours. In each case, the original leader male located the abductor and retrieved the female, even if it involved entering the social sphere of another band. These observations suggest that a hamadryas leader male will risk injury and loss of additional females in his attempt to retrieve a female from an abductor unless the abductor has openly challenged the leader for possession of his female and physically defeated him. PMID:21359653

  1. Early rehabilitation affects functional outcomes and activities of daily living after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Shimo, Satoshi; Sakamoto, Yuta; Tokiyoshi, Akinari; Yamamoto, Yasuhiro

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The effect of early rehabilitation protocols after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair is currently unknown. We examined short-term effects of early rehabilitation on functional outcomes and activities of daily living after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. [Subject and Methods] An 82-year-old male fell during a walk, resulting in a supraspinatus tear. Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair was performed using a single-row technique. He wore an abduction brace for 6 weeks after surgery. [Results] From day 1 after surgery, passive range of motion exercises, including forward flexion and internal and external rotation were performed twice per day. Starting at 6 weeks after surgery, active range of motion exercises and muscle strengthening exercises were introduced gradually. At 6 weeks after surgery, his active forward flexion was 150°, UCLA shoulder rating scale score was 34 points, and Quick Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand questionnaire disability/symptom score was 36 points. At 20 weeks after surgery, his active forward flexion was 120°, UCLA shoulder rating scale score was 34 points, and Quick Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand questionnaire disability/symptom score was 0 points. [Conclusion] These protocols are recommended to physical therapists during rehabilitation for arthroscopic rotator cuff repair to support rapid reintegration into activities of daily living. PMID:27064886

  2. Early rehabilitation affects functional outcomes and activities of daily living after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair: a case report.

    PubMed

    Shimo, Satoshi; Sakamoto, Yuta; Tokiyoshi, Akinari; Yamamoto, Yasuhiro

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The effect of early rehabilitation protocols after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair is currently unknown. We examined short-term effects of early rehabilitation on functional outcomes and activities of daily living after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. [Subject and Methods] An 82-year-old male fell during a walk, resulting in a supraspinatus tear. Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair was performed using a single-row technique. He wore an abduction brace for 6 weeks after surgery. [Results] From day 1 after surgery, passive range of motion exercises, including forward flexion and internal and external rotation were performed twice per day. Starting at 6 weeks after surgery, active range of motion exercises and muscle strengthening exercises were introduced gradually. At 6 weeks after surgery, his active forward flexion was 150°, UCLA shoulder rating scale score was 34 points, and Quick Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand questionnaire disability/symptom score was 36 points. At 20 weeks after surgery, his active forward flexion was 120°, UCLA shoulder rating scale score was 34 points, and Quick Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand questionnaire disability/symptom score was 0 points. [Conclusion] These protocols are recommended to physical therapists during rehabilitation for arthroscopic rotator cuff repair to support rapid reintegration into activities of daily living. PMID:27064886

  3. [An abduction applicance for congenital dislocation of the hip (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Lang, G; Kehr, P; Paternotte, H; Aebi, J; Pintu, J

    1980-06-21

    The appliance described consists of a shoulder belt from which an abduction bar is hanging. Two adjustable rings enclosing the thigh and the leg of the child are attached to the shoulder-belt and to the bar. The lower limb is not immobilized but kept flexes and abducted. The appliance is primarliy used for those children with minor dysplasis of the hip who do not require complete immobilization but cannot be left without any treatment. It is also useful after prolonged orthopaedic or surgical immobilization. PMID:7402893

  4. Missing, Abducted, Runaway, and Thrownaway Children in America. First Report: Numbers and Characteristics, National Incidence Studies. Executive Summary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finkelhor, David; And Others

    What has in the past been called the missing children problem is in reality a set of at least five distinct problems, each of which needs to be researched, analyzed, and treated separately. The problems are family abductions, nonfamily abductions, runaways, thrownaways, and lost, injured, or otherwise missing children. Many of the children in at…

  5. The Influence of Task Constraints on the Glenohumeral Horizontal Abduction Angle of the Overarm Throw of Novice Throwers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breslin, Casey M.; Garner, John C.; Rudisill, Mary E.; Parish, Loraine E.; St. Onge, Paul M.; Campbell, Brian J.; Weimar, Wendi H.

    2009-01-01

    This study determines the effects of three baseballs and softballs of different masses (0.113 kg, 0.198 kg, 0.340 kg) and regulation diameters (22.86 and 30.48 cm, respectively) on the glenohumeral horizontal abduction angle of an overarm throw performed by young children who were novice throwers. Glenohumeral horizontal abduction angle was…

  6. Greater Step Widths Reduce Internal Knee Abduction Moments in Medial Compartment Knee Osteoarthritis Patients During Stair Ascent.

    PubMed

    Paquette, Max R; Klipple, Gary; Zhang, Songning

    2015-08-01

    Increased step widths have been shown to reduce peak internal knee abduction moments in healthy individuals but not in knee osteoarthritis patients during stair descent. This study aimed to assess effects of increased step widths on peak knee abduction moments and associated variables in adults with medial knee osteoarthritis and healthy older adults during stair ascent. Thirteen healthy older adults and 13 medial knee osteoarthritis patients performed stair ascent using preferred, wide, and wider step widths. Three-dimensional kinematics and ground reaction forces (GRFs) using an instrumented staircase were collected. Increased step width reduced first and second peak knee abduction moments, and knee abduction moment impulse. In addition, frontal plane GRF at time of first and second peak knee abduction moment and lateral trunk lean at time of first peak knee abduction moment were reduced with increased step width during stair ascent in both groups. Knee abduction moment variables were not different between knee osteoarthritis patients and healthy controls. Our findings suggest that increasing step width may be an effective simple gait alteration to reduce knee abduction moment variables in both knee osteoarthritis and healthy adults during stair ascent. However, long term effects of increasing step width during stair ascent in knee osteoarthritis and healthy adults remain unknown. PMID:25781222

  7. Repetitive H-Wave® device stimulation and program induces significant increases in the range of motion of post operative rotator cuff reconstruction in a double-blinded randomized placebo controlled human study

    PubMed Central

    Blum, Kenneth; Chen, Amanda LC; Chen, Thomas JH; Waite, Roger L; Downs, B William; Braverman, Eric R; Kerner, Mallory M; Savarimuthu, Stella M; DiNubile, Nicholas

    2009-01-01

    Background Albeit other prospective randomized controlled clinical trials on H-Wave Device Stimulation (HWDS), this is the first randomized double-blind Placebo controlled prospective study that assessed the effects of HWDS on range of motion and strength testing in patients who underwent rotator cuff reconstruction. Methods Twenty-two patients were randomly assigned into one of two groups: 1) H-Wave device stimulation (HWDS); 2) Sham-Placebo Device (PLACEBO). All groups received the same postoperative dressing and the same device treatment instructions. Group I was given HWDS which they were to utilize for one hour twice a day for 90 days postoperatively. Group II was given the same instructions with a Placebo device (PLACEBO). Range of motion was assessed by using one-way ANOVA with a Duncan Multiple Range Test for differences between the groups preoperatively, 45 days postoperatively, and 90 days postoperatively by using an active/passive scale for five basic ranges of motions: Forward Elevation, External Rotation (arm at side), External Rotation (arm at 90 degrees abduction), Internal Rotation (arm at side), and Internal Rotation (arm at 90 degrees abduction). The study also evaluated postoperative changes in strength by using the Medical Research Council (MRC) grade assessed strength testing. Results Patients who received HWDS compared to PLACEBO demonstrated, on average, significantly improved range of motion. Results confirm a significant difference for external rotation at 45 and 90 days postoperatively; active range at 45 days postoperatively (p = 0.007), active at 90 days postoperatively (p = 0.007). Internal rotation also demonstrated significant improvement compared to PLACEBO at 45 and 90 days postoperatively; active range at 45 days postoperatively (p = 0.007), and active range at 90 days postoperatively (p = 0.006). There was no significant difference between the two groups for strength testing. Conclusion HWDS compared to PLACEBO induces a

  8. International Child Abduction Act 1989 (No. 22 of 1989), 22 August 1989.

    PubMed

    1989-01-01

    This Belize Act gives effect to the Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction of 1980. Among other things, it provides that the Family Court is authorized to give interim directions for the purpose of securing the welfare of a child or preventing changes in the circumstances relevant to the determination of an application. PMID:12344035

  9. Efficacy of the Stranger Safety Abduction-Prevention Program and Parent-Conducted in Situ Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miltenberger, Raymond G.; Fogel, Victoria A.; Beck, Kimberly V.; Koehler, Shannon; Shayne, Rachel; Noah, Jennifer; McFee, Krystal; Perdomo, Andrea; Chan, Paula; Simmons, Danica; Godish, Danielle

    2013-01-01

    Using a control group design, we evaluated the effectiveness of the "Stranger Safety" DVD (The Safe Side, 2004) and parent training of abduction-prevention skills with 6- to 8-year-old children. Children in the training or control group who did not demonstrate the safety skills received in situ training from their parents. There was no…

  10. Evaluation of movements of lower limbs in non-professional ballet dancers: hip abduction and flexion

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The literature indicated that the majority of professional ballet dancers present static and active dynamic range of motion difference between left and right lower limbs, however, no previous study focused this difference in non-professional ballet dancers. In this study we aimed to evaluate active movements of the hip in non-professional classical dancers. Methods We evaluated 10 non professional ballet dancers (16-23 years old). We measured the active range of motion and flexibility through Well Banks. We compared active range of motion between left and right sides (hip flexion and abduction) and performed correlation between active movements and flexibility. Results There was a small difference between the right and left sides of the hip in relation to the movements of flexion and abduction, which suggest the dominant side of the subjects, however, there was no statistical significance. Bank of Wells test revealed statistical difference only between the 1st and the 3rd measurement. There was no correlation between the movements of the hip (abduction and flexion, right and left sides) with the three test measurements of the bank of Wells. Conclusion There is no imbalance between the sides of the hip with respect to active abduction and flexion movements in non-professional ballet dancers. PMID:21819566

  11. Roles of Abductive Reasoning and Prior Belief in Children's Generation of Hypotheses about Pendulum Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kwon, Yong-Ju; Jeong, Jin-Su; Park, Yun-Bok

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to test the hypothesis that student's abductive reasoning skills play an important role in the generation of hypotheses on pendulum motion tasks. To test the hypothesis, a hypothesis-generating test on pendulum motion, and a prior-belief test about pendulum motion were developed and administered to a sample of…

  12. Examining the Effectiveness and Efficiency of Two Delivery Models to Teach Children Abduction Prevention Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seckinger-Bancroft, Kimberly E.

    2010-01-01

    Nearly all children receive abduction prevention training. Most traditional education programs increase the learner's knowledge, but often fail to produce concomitant behavior change. Behavioral Skills Training (BST) is a multi-component, behavior-based training strategy with empirical support demonstrating its effectiveness in teaching children…

  13. Characteristics of Abductive Inquiry in Earth Science: An Undergraduate Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oh, Phil Seok

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this case study was to describe characteristic features of abductive inquiry learning activities in the domain of earth science. Participants were undergraduate junior and senior students who were enrolled in an earth science education course offered for preservice secondary science teachers at a university in Korea. The undergraduate…

  14. Towards the development of a novel experimental shoulder simulator with rotating scapula and individually controlled muscle forces simulating the rotator cuff.

    PubMed

    Baumgartner, Daniel; Tomas, Daniel; Gossweiler, Lukas; Siegl, Walter; Osterhoff, Georg; Heinlein, Bernd

    2014-03-01

    A preclinical analysis of novel implants used in shoulder surgery requires biomechanical testing conditions close to physiology. Existing shoulder experiments may only partially apply multiple cycles to simulate postoperative, repetitive loading tasks. The aim of the present study was therefore the development of an experimental shoulder simulator with rotating scapula able to perform multiple humeral movement cycles by simulating individual muscles attached to the rotator cuff. A free-hanging, metallic humerus pivoted in a polyethylene glenoid is activated by tension forces of linear electroactuators to simulate muscles of the deltoideus (DELT), supraspinatus (SSP), infraspinatus/teres minor and subscapularis. The abductors DELT and SSP apply forces with a ratio of 3:1 up to an abduction angle of 85°. The rotating scapular part driven by a rotative electro actuator provides one-third to the overall arm abduction. Resulting joint forces and moments are measured by a 6-axis load cell. A linear increase in the DELT and SSP motors is shown up to a maximum of 150 and 50 N for the DELT and SSP, respectively. The force vector in the glenoid resulted in 253 N at the maximum abduction. The present investigation shows the contribution of individual muscle forces attached to the moving humerus to perform active abduction in order to reproducibly test shoulder implants. PMID:24170552

  15. Reconstruction of an infrared band of meteorological satellite imagery with abductive networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singer, Harvey A.; Cockayne, John E.; Versteegen, Peter L.

    1995-01-01

    As the current fleet of meteorological satellites age, the accuracy of the imagery sensed on a spectral channel of the image scanning system is continually and progressively degraded by noise. In time, that data may even become unusable. We describe a novel approach to the reconstruction of the noisy satellite imagery according to empirical functional relationships that tie the spectral channels together. Abductive networks are applied to automatically learn the empirical functional relationships between the data sensed on the other spectral channels to calculate the data that should have been sensed on the corrupted channel. Using imagery unaffected by noise, it is demonstrated that abductive networks correctly predict the noise-free observed data.

  16. Abductive machine learning for modeling and predicting the educational score in school health surveys.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Aal, R E; Mangoud, A M

    1996-09-01

    The use of modern abductive machine learning techniques is described for modeling and predicting outcome parameters in terms of input parameters in medical survey data. The AIM (Abductory Induction Mechanism) abductive network machine-learning tool is used to model the educational score in a health survey of 2,720 Albanian primary school children. Data included the child's age, gender, vision, nourishment, parasite infection, family size, parents' education, and educational score. Models synthesized by training on just 100 cases predict the educational score output for the remaining 2,620 cases with 100% accuracy. Simple models represented as analytical functions highlight global relationships and trends in the survey population. Models generated are quite robust, with no change in the basic model structure for a 10-fold increase in the size of the training set. Compared to other statistical and neural network approaches, AIM provides faster and highly automated model synthesis, requiring little or no user intervention. PMID:8952313

  17. Uninformed sacrifice: Evidence against long-range alarm transmission in foraging ants exposed to localized abduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tejera, F.; Reyes, A.; Altshuler, E.

    2016-07-01

    It is well established that danger information can be transmitted by ants through relatively small distances, provoking either a state of alarm when they move away from potentially dangerous stimulus, or charge toward it aggressively. There is almost no knowledge if danger information can be transmitted along large distances. In this paper, we abduct leaf cutting ants of the species Atta insularis while they forage in their natural environment at a certain point of the foraging line, so ants make a "U" turn to escape from the danger zone and go back to the nest. Our results strongly suggest that those ants do not transmit "danger information" to other nestmates marching towards the abduction area. The individualistic behavior of the ants returning from the danger zone results in a depression of the foraging activity due to the systematic sacrifice of non-informed individuals.

  18. The study of wear behaviors on abducted hip joint prostheses by an alternate finite element approach.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yi-Tsung; Wu, James Shih-Shyn; Chen, Jian-Horng

    2016-07-01

    An acetabular cup with larger abduction angles is able to affect the normal function of the cup seriously that may cause early failure of the total hip replacement (THR). Complexity of the finite element (FE) simulation in the wear analysis of the THR is usually concerned with the contact status, the computational effort, and the possible divergence of results, which become more difficult on THRs with larger cup abduction angles. In the study, we propose a FE approach with contact transformation that offers less computational effort. Related procedures, such as Lagrangian Multiplier, partitioned matrix inversion, detection of contact forces, continuity of contact surface, nodal area estimation, etc. are explained in this report. Through the transformed methodology, the computer round-off error is tremendously reduced and the embedded repetitive procedure can be processed precisely and quickly. Here, wear behaviors of THR with various abduction angles are investigated. The most commonly used combination, i.e., metal-on-polyethylene, is adopted in the current study where a cobalt-chromium femoral head is paired with an Ultra High Molecular Weight Polyethylene (UHMWPE) cup. In all illustrations, wear coefficients are estimated by self-averaging strategy with available experimental datum reported elsewhere. The results reveal that the THR with larger abduction angles may produce deeper depth of wear but the volume of wear presents an opposite tendency; these results are comparable with clinical and experimental reports. The current approach can be widely applied easily to fields such as the study of the wear behaviors on ante-version, impingement, and time-dependent behaviors of prostheses etc. PMID:27265055

  19. Effect of acetabular cup abduction angle on wear of ultrahigh-molecular-weight polyethylene in hip simulator testing.

    PubMed

    Korduba, Laryssa A; Essner, Aaron; Pivec, Robert; Lancin, Perry; Mont, Michael A; Wang, Aiguo; Delanois, Ronald E

    2014-10-01

    The effect of acetabular component positioning on the wear rates of metal-on-polyethylene articulations has not been extensively studied. Placement of acetabular cups at abduction angles of more than 40° has been noted as a possible reason for early failure caused by increased wear. We conducted a study to evaluate the effects of different acetabular cup abduction angles on polyethylene wear rate, wear area, contact pressure, and contact area. Our in vitro study used a hip joint simulator and finite element analysis to assess the effects of cup orientation at 4 angles (0°, 40°, 50°, 70°) on wear and contact properties. Polyethylene bearings with 28-mm cobalt-chrome femoral heads were cycled in an environment mimicking in vivo joint fluid to determine the volumetric wear rate after 10 million cycles. Contact pressure and contact area for each cup abduction angle were assessed using finite element analysis. Results were correlated with cup abduction angles to determine if there were any differences among the 4 groups. The inverse relationship between volumetric wear rate and acetabular cup inclination angle demonstrated less wear with steeper cup angles. The largest abduction angle (70°) had the lowest contact area, largest contact pressure, and smallest head coverage. Conversely, the smallest abduction angle (0°) had the most wear and most head coverage. Polyethylene wear after total hip arthroplasty is a major cause of osteolysis and aseptic loosening, which may lead to premature implant failure. Several studies have found that high wear rates for cups oriented at steep angles contributed to their failure. Our data demonstrated that larger cup abduction angles were associated with lower, not higher, wear. However, this potentially "protective" effect is likely counteracted by other complications of steep cup angles, including impingement, instability, and edge loading. These factors may be more relevant in explaining why implants fail at a higher rate if

  20. Behavioural processes in social context: female abductions, male herding and female grooming in hamadryas baboons.

    PubMed

    Polo, Pablo; Colmenares, Fernando

    2012-06-01

    The formation of bonds between strangers is an event that occurs routinely in many social animals, including humans, and, as social bonds in general, they affect the individuals' welfare and biological fitness. The present study was motivated by an interest in the behavioural processes that drive bond formation in a social context of hostility, in which the incumbent partners vary greatly in physical power and reproductive interests, a situation in which individuals of many group-living species find themselves often throughout their lives. We focused on the quantitative analysis of female abductions via male aggressive herding in a nonhuman primate, the hamadryas baboon, in which intersexual bonds are known to be strong. We tested three hypotheses informed by sexual conflict/sexual coercion theory (male herding-as-conditioning and female grooming-as-appeasement) and by socioecological theory (unit size and female competition). The results supported the predictions: males resorted to coercive tactics (aggressive herding) with abducted females, and abducted females elevated the amount of grooming directed at their new unit males; in fact, they escaped from the otherwise negative effect of unit size on female-to-male grooming. These findings reveal that conflicts of interest are natural ingredients underpinning social bonds and that resorting to coercive aggression may be an option especially when partners differ greatly in their physical power. PMID:22391051

  1. Psychophysiological responding during script-driven imagery in people reporting abduction by space aliens.

    PubMed

    McNally, Richard J; Lasko, Natasha B; Clancy, Susan A; Macklin, Michael L; Pitman, Roger K; Orr, Scott P

    2004-07-01

    Is recollection of highly improbable traumatic experiences accompanied by psychophysiological responses indicative of intense emotion? To investigate this issue, we measured heart rate, skin conductance, and left lateral frontalis electromyographic responses in individuals who reported having been abducted by space aliens. Recordings of these participants were made during script-driven imagery of their reported alien encounters and of other stressful, positive, and neutral experiences they reported. We also measured the psychophysiological responses of control participants while they heard the scripts of the abductees. We predicted that if "memories" of alien abduction function like highly stressful memories, then psychophysiological reactivity to the abduction and stressful scripts would be greater than reactivity to the positive and neutral scripts, and this effect would be more pronounced among abductees than among control participants. Contrast analyses confirmed this prediction for all three physiological measures (ps < .05). Therefore, belief that one has been traumatized may generate emotional responses similar to those provoked by recollection of trauma (e.g., combat). PMID:15200635

  2. A device for sample rotation under external load for the simultaneous measurement of strain and orientation dependent material properties by means of TOF neutron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheffzük, Ch; Hempel, H.; Frischbutter, A.; Walther, K.; Schilling, F. R.

    2012-02-01

    The time-of-flight diffractometer Epsilon-MDS at the modernised pulsed reactor IBR-2M at Dubna is designed for the detection of residual and applied strains in polycrystalline materials. The instrument allows the recording of diffraction patterns with high resolution (Δd/d = 5×l0-3 to the best) over a wide wavelength band (λmax = 7.8 Å d max = 5.6 Å). Complicated polyphase materials like rocks consisting of minerals with large unit cells and low crystal symmetry can be investigated. The diffractometer is equipped with 81 detectors positioned behind nine radial collimators at a unique Bragg angle of 2θ = 90° for the central detector and at different radial angles allowing the simultaneous measurement of nine sample directions. A pressure device for the in situ investigation of intra-crystalline strain under uniaxial load up to 150 MPa on cylindrical samples is available. The macroscopic strain on the sample surface can be determined simultaneously by means of a laser extensometer. The sample can be rotated around its axis, i.e. limited information on texture can be obtained. The simultaneous strain and CPO measurements are helpful for a better understanding of the deformational behaviour of polycrystalline materials, e.g. to investigate elastic processes in rocks before, during and after rock failure.

  3. Past-life identities, UFO abductions, and satanic ritual abuse: the social construction of memories.

    PubMed

    Spanos, N P; Burgess, C A; Burgess, M F

    1994-10-01

    People sometimes fantasize entire complex scenarios and later define these experiences as memories of actual events rather than as imaginings. This article examines research associated with three such phenomena: past-life experiences, UFO alien contact and abduction, and memory reports of childhood ritual satanic abuse. In each case, elicitation of the fantasy events is frequently associated with hypnotic procedures and structured interviews which provide strong and repeated demands for the requisite experiences, and which then legitimate the experiences as "real memories." Research associated with these phenomena supports the hypothesis that recall is reconstructive and organized in terms of current expectations and beliefs. PMID:7960296

  4. Efficacy of the stranger safety abduction-prevention program and parent-conducted in situ training.

    PubMed

    Miltenberger, Raymond G; Fogel, Victoria A; Beck, Kimberly V; Koehler, Shannon; Shayne, Rachel; Noah, Jennifer; McFee, Krystal; Perdomo, Andrea; Chan, Paula; Simmons, Danica; Godish, Danielle

    2013-12-01

    Using a control group design, we evaluated the effectiveness of the Stranger Safety DVD (The Safe Side, 2004) and parent training of abduction-prevention skills with 6- to 8-year-old children. Children in the training or control group who did not demonstrate the safety skills received in situ training from their parents. There was no significant difference in safety skills between the training and control groups after the training group viewed the DVD. Children in both groups scored significantly better after receiving in situ training, with no significant difference in performance between groups. PMID:24114614

  5. Kinetic description of a degenerate, rotating, non-neutral electron plasma in external magnetic fields in the framework of the Thomas-Fermi-Dirac theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molinari, V. G.; Rocchi, F.; Sumini, M.

    2002-01-01

    Aim of this work is to extend the results obtained in a previous study on the magnetic confinement and stability of a quantum degenerate non-neutral fermion plasma. This extension consists in the inclusion in the previously set up model of the effects of the exchange forces, and generalises the Thomas-Fermi (TF) approach used in the referenced work towards a Thomas-Fermi-Dirac (TFD) statistical description. The TF model has not only been used extensively and with success in these years to study atomic, nuclear and molecular properties, or to evaluate features of matter in extreme conditions such as low temperatures and/or high densities typical of astrophysics and inertial confinement fusion experiments, but also to found hydrodynamic theories for the diffusion and stability of fermion plasmas, one component non-neutral degenerate fluids, plasmas etc. In this paper an equation for density profiles in cylindrical symmetry is found, from the semiclassical kinetic theory of quantum gases, which takes into account the effects of temperature, average velocity, external magnetic field and quantum exchange. Numerical solutions of this equation for the case of complete quantum degeneracy are given and comparisons with the previous results are carried out.

  6. Posterior Capsular Plication Constrains the Glenohumeral Joint by Drawing the Humeral Head Closer to the Glenoid and Resisting Abduction

    PubMed Central

    DeAngelis, Joseph P.; Hertz, Benjamin; Wexler, Michael T.; Patel, Nehal; Walley, Kempland C.; Harlow, Ethan R.; Manoukian, Ohan S.; Masoudi, Aidin; Vaziri, Ashkan; Ramappa, Arun J.; Nazarian, Ara

    2015-01-01

    Background: Shoulder pain is a common problem, with 30% to 50% of the American population affected annually. While the majority of these shoulder problems improve, there is a high rate of recurrence, as 54% of patients experience persistent symptoms 3 years after onset. Purpose: Posterior shoulder tightness has been shown to alter glenohumeral (GH) kinematics. Clinically, posterior shoulder contractures result in a significant loss of internal rotation and abduction (ABD). In this study, the effect of a posterior capsular contracture on GH kinematics was investigated using an intact cadaveric shoulder without violating the joint capsule or the rotator cuff. Study Design: Controlled laboratory study. Methods: Glenohumeral motion, humeral load, and subacromial contact pressure were measured in 6 fresh-frozen left shoulders during passive ABD from 60° to 100° using an automated robotic upper extremity testing system. Baseline values were compared with the experimental condition in which the full thickness of posterior tissues was plicated without decompressing the joint capsule. Results: Posterior soft tissue plication resulted in increased compression between the humeral head and the glenoid (axial load) at 90° of ABD. Throughout ABD, the posterior contracture increased the anterior and superior moment on the humeral head, but it did not change the GH kinematics in this intact model. As a result, there was no increase in the subacromial contact pressure during ABD with posterior plication. Conclusion: In an intact cadaveric shoulder, posterior contracture does not alter GH motion or subacromial contact pressure during passive ABD. By tightening the soft tissue envelope posteriorly, there is an increase in compressive load on the articular cartilage and anterior/superior force on the humeral head. These findings suggest that subacromial impingement in the setting of a posterior soft tissue contracture may result from alterations in scapulothoracic motion, not

  7. Increased Upper Trapezius Muscle Stiffness in Overhead Athletes with Rotator Cuff Tendinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Leong, Hio Teng; Hug, François; Fu, Siu Ngor

    2016-01-01

    Although excessive tension of the upper trapezius (UT) is thought to contribute to rotator cuff tendinopathy, no study examined UT tension in athletes with and without rotator cuff tendinopathy. Here we used UT shear modulus measured using ultrasound shear wave elastography as an index of muscle stiffness/tension. The aims of this study were twofold: 1) to determine whether the UT muscle shear modulus is altered in athletes with rotator cuff tendinopathy compared to asymptomatic athletes, and 2) to detect optimal cut-off points of UT shear modulus in identifying athletes with rotator cuff tendinopathy. Forty-three male volleyball players (17 asymptomatic and 26 with rotator cuff tendinopathy, mean age = 22.9±3.5 years) participated in the study. UT shear modulus was quantified during active arm holding at 30° and 60° of shoulder abduction and passive arm positioning at 0°, 30° and 60° of shoulder abduction. During the active tasks, the UT shear modulus was higher in athletes with rotator cuff tendinopathy than the asymptomatic athletes (p = 0.002), regardless the arm position. During the passive tasks, athletes with rotator cuff tendinopathy exhibited a higher UT shear modulus than asymptomatic athletes only at 0° of shoulder abduction (13.0±2.5 kPa vs 10.2±1.8 kPa, p = 0.001). When considering the active task, an optimal cut-off shear modulus of 12.0 kPa at 30° of shoulder abduction (sensitivity = 0.84, specificity = 0.57, AUC = 0.757, p = 0.008) and 9.5 kPa at 60° of shoulder abduction (sensitivity = 0.88, specificity = 0.67, AUC = 0.816, p = 0.002) was detected. When considering the passive task at 0° of shoulder abduction, a cut-off of 12.2 kPa was found (sensitivity = 0.73, AUC = 0.817, p = 0.001). Findings from the present study show that monitoring passive and active UT muscle shear modulus may provide important information for the prevention/rehabilitation of rotator cuff tendinopathy. PMID:27159276

  8. Increased Upper Trapezius Muscle Stiffness in Overhead Athletes with Rotator Cuff Tendinopathy.

    PubMed

    Leong, Hio Teng; Hug, François; Fu, Siu Ngor

    2016-01-01

    Although excessive tension of the upper trapezius (UT) is thought to contribute to rotator cuff tendinopathy, no study examined UT tension in athletes with and without rotator cuff tendinopathy. Here we used UT shear modulus measured using ultrasound shear wave elastography as an index of muscle stiffness/tension. The aims of this study were twofold: 1) to determine whether the UT muscle shear modulus is altered in athletes with rotator cuff tendinopathy compared to asymptomatic athletes, and 2) to detect optimal cut-off points of UT shear modulus in identifying athletes with rotator cuff tendinopathy. Forty-three male volleyball players (17 asymptomatic and 26 with rotator cuff tendinopathy, mean age = 22.9±3.5 years) participated in the study. UT shear modulus was quantified during active arm holding at 30° and 60° of shoulder abduction and passive arm positioning at 0°, 30° and 60° of shoulder abduction. During the active tasks, the UT shear modulus was higher in athletes with rotator cuff tendinopathy than the asymptomatic athletes (p = 0.002), regardless the arm position. During the passive tasks, athletes with rotator cuff tendinopathy exhibited a higher UT shear modulus than asymptomatic athletes only at 0° of shoulder abduction (13.0±2.5 kPa vs 10.2±1.8 kPa, p = 0.001). When considering the active task, an optimal cut-off shear modulus of 12.0 kPa at 30° of shoulder abduction (sensitivity = 0.84, specificity = 0.57, AUC = 0.757, p = 0.008) and 9.5 kPa at 60° of shoulder abduction (sensitivity = 0.88, specificity = 0.67, AUC = 0.816, p = 0.002) was detected. When considering the passive task at 0° of shoulder abduction, a cut-off of 12.2 kPa was found (sensitivity = 0.73, AUC = 0.817, p = 0.001). Findings from the present study show that monitoring passive and active UT muscle shear modulus may provide important information for the prevention/rehabilitation of rotator cuff tendinopathy. PMID:27159276

  9. Ambulatory assessment of shoulder abduction strength curve using a single wearable inertial sensor.

    PubMed

    Picerno, Pietro; Viero, Valerio; Donati, Marco; Triossi, Tamara; Tancredi, Virginia; Melchiorri, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present article was to assess the reliability of strength curves as determined from tridimensional linear accelerations and angular velocities measured by a single inertial measurement unit (IMU) fixed on the upper arm during a shoulder abduction movement performed holding a 1 kg dumbbell in the hand. Within-subject repeatability of the task was assessed on 45 subjects performing four trials consisting of one maximal shoulder abduction-adduction movement. Intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was computed on the average movement angular velocity (VEL) and range of movement (ROM) across the four trials. Within-subject repeatability of torque curves was assessed in terms of waveform similarities by computing the coefficient of multiple determination (CMD). Accuracy of the estimated ROM was assessed using an isokinetic dynamometer. High ICC values of ROM (0.955) and VEL (0.970) indicated a high within-subject repeatability of the task. A high waveform similarity of torque curves was also found between trials (CMD = 0.867). Accuracy with respect to isokinetic dynamometer in estimating ROM was always <1 degree (p = 0.37). This study showed the effectiveness of using a single wearable IMU for the assessment of strength curve during isoinertial movements in a way that complies with the needs of clinicians in an ambulatory setting. PMID:26230401

  10. Geometric pattern of the hominoid hallucal tarsometatarsal complex. Quantifying the degree of hallux abduction in early hominids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berillon, Gilles

    1999-05-01

    The degree of hallux abduction in extant and fossil hominoids is analysed in terms of geometric relationships between the first metatarsal and the medial cuneiform and quantified by angular data, in relation to grasping ability and locomotor pattern. The 'australopithecine' pattern corresponds to an abducted first podal ray with some grasping abilities and seems to be derived from a ' Proconsul-like' pattern rather than a 'living African great ape-like' pattern. The Olduvai Hominid 8 condition closely resembles that of the modern human which corresponds to a full bipedalism.

  11. Shoulder 3D range of motion and humerus rotation in two volleyball spike techniques: injury prevention and performance.

    PubMed

    Seminati, Elena; Marzari, Alessandra; Vacondio, Oreste; Minetti, Alberto E

    2015-06-01

    Repetitive stresses and movements on the shoulder in the volleyball spike expose this joint to overuse injuries, bringing athletes to a career threatening injury. Assuming that specific spike techniques play an important role in injury risk, we compared the kinematic of the traditional (TT) and the alternative (AT) techniques in 21 elite athletes, evaluating their safety with respect to performance. Glenohumeral joint was set as the centre of an imaginary sphere, intersected by the distal end of the humerus at different angles. Shoulder range of motion and angular velocities were calculated and compared to the joint limits. Ball speed and jump height were also assessed. Results indicated the trajectory of the humerus to be different for the TT, with maximal flexion of the shoulder reduced by 10 degrees, and horizontal abduction 15 degrees higher. No difference was found for external rotation angles, while axial rotation velocities were significantly higher in AT, with a 5% higher ball speed. Results suggest AT as a potential preventive solution to shoulder chronic pathologies, reducing shoulder flexion during spiking. The proposed method allows visualisation of risks associated with different overhead manoeuvres, by depicting humerus angles and velocities with respect to joint limits in the same 3D space. PMID:26151344

  12. Measurement of scapula upward rotation: a reliable clinical procedure

    PubMed Central

    Watson, L; Balster, S; Finch, C; Dalziel, R

    2005-01-01

    Background: It is important to deal with the scapula when developing rehabilitation strategies for the shoulder complex. This requires clinical measurement tools that are readily available and easy to apply and which provide a reliable evaluation of scapula motion. Method: Twenty six patients were assessed in two repeat tests within a single testing session. Patients exhibiting a wide spectrum of shoulder pathology were selected. The angle of scapular upward rotation was measured during total shoulder abduction. The measurement protocol was performed twice during a single testing session by a single tester. Results of the two tests were compared and the reliability assessed by intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs). Results: There was no significant difference in the scapula measurements taken during the two tests at each testing position. Overall, there was very good intrarater reliability (ICC = 0.88). The ICC ranged from 0.81 (at 135°) to 0.94 (at both resting and end of total shoulder abduction range). Conclusion: The Plurimeter-V gravity inclinometer can be used effectively and reliably for measuring upward rotation of the scapula in all ranges of shoulder abduction in the coronal plane. PMID:16118295

  13. Identification of a frequency response model of joint rotation.

    PubMed

    Becker, J D; Mote, C D

    1990-02-01

    A second order, linear oscillator transfer function model is fit to the measured transfer function relating the abduction-adduction rotation of the first finger to the applied moment. Nearly constant isometric contractions of the first palmar and dorsal interossei are maintained by the subjects during the measurements. The stiffness and damping components of the identified models increase significantly with increasing isometric contraction when compared to those recorded under relaxed contraction. Muscle fatigue causes the natural frequency, damping ratio and stiffness of the joint rotation to decrease under full isometric contraction, and it causes the natural frequency and stiffness to increase when the muscles are relaxed. PMID:2308296

  14. The Use of Behavioral Skills Training and in situ Feedback to Protect Children with Autism from Abduction Lures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunby, Kristin V.; Rapp, John T.

    2014-01-01

    We examined the effects of behavioral skills training with in situ feedback on safe responding by children with autism to abduction lures that were presented after a high-probability (high-p) request sequence. This sequence was intended to simulate a grooming or recruitment process. Results show that all 3 participants ultimately acquired the…

  15. How Can Teachers Help Students Formulate Scientific Hypotheses? Some Strategies Found in Abductive Inquiry Activities of Earth Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oh, Phil Seok

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to find how the teacher could help students formulate scientific hypotheses. Data came from two microteaching episodes in which two groups of pre-service secondary science teachers taught high school students as they were engaged in abductive inquiry activities of earth science. Multiple data sources including video…

  16. Abduction, Deduction and Induction: Can These Concepts Be Used for an Understanding of Methodological Processes in Interpretative Case Studies?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Åsvoll, Håvard

    2014-01-01

    Within the area of interpretative case studies, there appears to be a vast amount of literature about theoretical interpretations as the main analytical strategy. In light of this theoretically based strategy in case studies, this article presents an extended perspective based on Charles Sanders Peirce's concepts of abduction, deduction and…

  17. Using Abductive Research Logic: "The Logic of Discovery", to Construct a Rigorous Explanation of Amorphous Evaluation Findings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levin-Rozalis, Miri

    2010-01-01

    Background: Two kinds of research logic prevail in scientific research: deductive research logic and inductive research logic. However, both fail in the field of evaluation, especially evaluation conducted in unfamiliar environments. Purpose: In this article I wish to suggest the application of a research logic--"abduction"--"the logic of…

  18. Predictors of Pain and Function in Patients With Symptomatic, Atraumatic Full-Thickness Rotator Cuff Tears

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Joshua D.; Pedroza, Angela; Jones, Grant L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Although the prevalence of full-thickness rotator cuff tears increases with age, many patients are asymptomatic and may not require surgical repair. The factors associated with pain and loss of function in patients with rotator cuff tears are not well defined. Purpose To determine which factors correlate with pain and loss of function in patients with symptomatic, atraumatic full-thickness rotator cuff tears who are enrolled in a structured physical therapy program. Study Design Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods A multicenter group enrolled patients with symptomatic, atraumatic rotator cuff tears in a prospective, nonrandomized cohort study evaluating the effects of a structured physical therapy program. Time-zero patient data were reviewed to test which factors correlated with Western Ontario Rotator Cuff (WORC) index and American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) scores. Results A total of 389 patients were enrolled. Mean ASES score was 53.9; mean WORC score was 46.9. The following variables were associated with higher WORC and ASES scores: female sex (P = .001), education level (higher education, higher score; P <.001), active abduction (degrees; P = .021), and strength in forward elevation (P = .002) and abduction (P = .007). The following variables were associated with lower WORC and ASES scores: male sex (P = .001), atrophy of the supraspinatus (P = .04) and infraspinatus (P = .003), and presence of scapulothoracic dyskinesia (P < .001). Tear size was not a significant predictor (WORC) unless comparing isolated supraspinatus tears to supraspinatus, infraspinatus, and subscapularis tears (P = .004). Age, tear retraction, duration of symptoms, and humeral head migration were not statistically significant. Conclusion Nonsurgically modifiable factors, such as scapulothoracic dyskinesia, active abduction, and strength in forward elevation and abduction, were identified that could be addressed nonoperatively with therapy. Therefore

  19. From War to Classroom: PTSD and Depression in Formerly Abducted Youth in Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Winkler, Nina; Ruf-Leuschner, Martina; Ertl, Verena; Pfeiffer, Anett; Schalinski, Inga; Ovuga, Emilio; Neuner, Frank; Elbert, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Background: Trained local screeners assessed the mental-health status of male and female students in Northern Ugandan schools. The study aimed to disclose potential differences in mental health-related impairment in two groups, former child soldiers (n = 354) and other war-affected youth (n = 489), as well as to separate factors predicting mental suffering in learners. Methods: Participants were randomly selected. We used the Post-Traumatic Diagnostic Scale to assess symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and for potential depression the respective section of the Hopkins Symptom Checklist with a locally validated cut-off. Results: Almost all respondents had been displaced at least once in their life. 30% of girls and 50% of the boys in the study reported past abduction history. Trauma exposure was notably higher in the group of abductees. In former child soldiers, a PTSD rate of 32% was remarkably higher than that for non-abductees (12%). Especially in girls rates of potential depression were double those in the group of former abductees (17%) than in the group of non-abductees (8%). In all groups, trauma exposure increased the risk of developing PTSD. A path-analytic model for developing PTSD and potential depression revealed both previous trauma exposure as well as duration of abduction to have significant influences on trauma-related mental suffering. Findings also suggest that in Northern Ugandan schools trauma spectrum disorders are common among war-affected learners. Conclusions: Therefore, it is suggested the school context should be used to provide mental-health support structures within the education system for war-affected youth at likely risk of developing war-related mental distress. PMID:25788887

  20. Decision of the National People's Congress (NPC) Standing Committee on Strict Punishment for Criminals Who Abduct, Sell, and Kidnap Women and Children [4 September 1991].

    PubMed

    1991-09-01

    This document contains the text of a 1991 Chinese amended law which seeks to punish criminals who abduct and sell women and children. The law assigns a prison sentence of 3-10 years and a fine for the abduction and sale of women and children. When circumstances are deemed especially serious, the penalty is increased to death and confiscation of property. Such circumstances include being the ringleader of a group which abducts and sells women and children, abducting and selling three or more women or children, raping abducted women, inducing or forcing women to prostitution, causing serious injury or death to abducted women and children or their relatives, and selling women and children outside of the territory. A 10-year sentence is to be imposed for the use of force, threats, or narcotics to kidnap women and children to sell them. Those who buy abducted women or children are also to be punished unless they fail to obstruct the women from returning to their home, fail to abuse the children, or fail to obstruct the children from saving themselves. PMID:12292476

  1. After abduction: exploring access to reintegration programs and mental health status among young female abductees in Northern Uganda

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Reintegration programs are commonly offered to former combatants and abductees to acquire civilian status and support services to reintegrate into post-conflict society. Among a group of young female abductees in northern Uganda, this study examined access to post-abduction reintegration programming and tested for between group differences in mental health status among young women who had accessed reintegration programming compared to those who self-reintegrated. Methods This cross-sectional study analysed interviews from 129 young women who had previously been abducted by the Lords Resistance Army (LRA). Data was collected between June 2011-January 2012. Interviews collected information on abduction-related experiences including age and year of abduction, manner of departure, and reintegration status. Participants were coded as ‘reintegrated’ if they reported ≥1 of the following reintegration programs: traditional cleansing ceremony, received an amnesty certificate, reinsertion package, or had gone to a reception centre. A t-test was used to measure mean differences in depression and anxiety measured by the Acholi Psychosocial Assessment Instrument (APAI) to determine if abductees who participated in a reintegration program had different mental status from those who self-reintegrated. Results From 129 young abductees, 56 (43.4%) had participated in a reintegration program. Participants had been abducted between 1988–2010 for an average length of one year, the median age of abduction was 13 years (IQR:11–14) with escaping (76.6%), being released (15.6%), and rescued (7.0%) being the most common manner of departure from the LRA. Traditional cleansing ceremonies (67.8%) were the most commonly accessed support followed by receiving amnesty (37.5%), going to a reception centre (28.6%) or receiving a reinsertion package (12.5%). Between group comparisons indicated that the mental health status of abductees who accessed ≥1 reintegration program

  2. Clinical and Radiological Evaluation after Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair Using Suture Bridge Technique

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kwang Won; Bae, Kyoung Wan; Choy, Won Sik

    2013-01-01

    Background We retrospectively assessed the clinical outcomes and investigated risk factors influencing retear after arthroscopic suture bridge repair technique for rotator cuff tear through clinical assessment and magnetic resonance arthrography (MRA). Methods Between January 2008 and April 2011, sixty-two cases of full-thickness rotator cuff tear were treated with arthroscopic suture bridge repair technique and follow-up MRA were performed. The mean age was 56.1 years, and mean follow-up period was 27.4 months. Clinical and functional outcomes were assessed using range of motion, Korean shoulder score, Constant score, and UCLA score. Radiological outcome was evaluated with preoperative and follow-up MRA. Potential predictive factors that influenced cuff retear, such as age, gender, geometric patterns of tear, size of cuff tear, acromioplasty, fatty degeneration, atrophy of cuff muscle, retraction of supraspinatus, involved muscles of cuff and osteolysis around the suture anchor were evaluated. Results Thirty cases (48.4%) revealed retear on MRA. In univariable analysis, retear was significantly more frequent in over 60 years age group (62.5%) than under 60 years age group (39.5%; p = 0.043), and also in medium to large-sized tear than small-sized tear (p = 0.003). There was significant difference in geometric pattern of tear (p = 0.015). In multivariable analysis, only age (p = 0.036) and size of tear (p = 0.030) revealed a significant difference. The mean active range of motion for forward flexion, abduction, external rotation at the side and internal rotation at the side were significantly improved at follow-up (p < 0.05). The mean Korean shoulder score, Constant score, and UCLA score increased significantly at follow-up (p < 0.01). The range of motion, Korean shoulder score, Constant score, and UCLA score did not differ significantly between the groups with retear and intact repairs (p > 0.05). The locations of retear were insertion site in 10 cases (33.3%) and

  3. Can self-report instruments of shoulder function capture functional differences in older adults with and without a rotator cuff tear?

    PubMed

    Vidt, Meghan E; Santago, Anthony C; Hegedus, Eric J; Marsh, Anthony P; Tuohy, Christopher J; Poehling, Gary G; Freehill, Michael T; Miller, Michael E; Saul, Katherine R

    2016-08-01

    Rotator cuff tears (RCT) are prevalent in older individuals and may compound age-associated functional declines. Our purpose was to determine whether self-report measures of perceived functional ability are valid for older patients with RCT. Twenty five subjects participated (12M/13F; age=63.9±3.0years); 13 with RCT and 12 controls (CON). Participants completed self-report measures of shoulder function (SST, ASES, WORC) and health-related quality of life (SF-36). Isometric joint moment and range of motion (ROM) were measured at the shoulder. Relationships among functional self-reports, and between these measures and joint moment and ROM were assessed; group differences for total and subcategory scores were evaluated. There were significant correlations among self-reports (rs=0.62-0.71, p⩽0.02). For RCT subjects, ASES was associated with all joint moments except adduction (p⩽0.02); SST, ASES, and WORC were associated with abduction and external rotation ROM (p⩽0.04). For RCT subjects, SST and WORC were associated with SF-36 physical function subcategory scores (p⩽0.05). The RCT group scored worse than CON on all functional self-reports (p<0.01) and WORC and ASES subcategories (p<0.01). In conclusion, SST, ASES, and WORC demonstrate utility and discriminant validity for older individuals by distinguishing those with RCT, but this work suggests prioritizing ASES given its stronger association with functional group strength. PMID:26208428

  4. Visuomotor Correction is a Robust Contributor to Force Variability During Index Finger Abduction by Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Tracy, Brian L.; Hitchcock, Leah N.; Welsh, Seth J.; Paxton, Roger J.; Feldman-Kothe, Caitlin E.

    2015-01-01

    We examined aging-related differences in the contribution of visuomotor correction to force fluctuations during index finger abduction via the analysis of two datasets from similar subjects. Study (1) Young (N = 27, 23 ± 8 years) and older adults (N = 14, 72 ± 9 years) underwent assessment of maximum voluntary contraction force (MVC) and force steadiness during constant-force (CF) index finger abduction (2.5, 30, 65% MVC). For each trial, visual feedback of the force (VIS) was provided for 8–10 s and removed for 8–10 s (NOVIS). Visual gain of the force feedback at 2.5% MVC was high; 12- and 26-fold greater than the 30 and 65% MVC targets. Mean force, standard deviation (SD) of force, and coefficient of variation (CV) of force was calculated for detrended (<0.5 Hz drift removed) VIS and NOVIS data segments. Study (2) A similar group of 14 older adults performed discrete, randomly-ordered VIS or NOVIS trials at low target forces (1–3% MVC) and high visual gain. Study (1) For young adults the CV of force was similar between VIS and NOVIS for the 2.5% (4.8 vs. 4.3%), 30% (3.2 vs. 3.2%) and 65% (3.5 vs. 4.2%) target forces. In contrast, for older adults the CV of force was greater for VIS than NOVIS for 2.5% MVC (6.6 vs. 4.2%, p < 0.001), but not for the 30% (2.4 vs. 2.4%) and 65% (3.1 vs. 3.3%) target forces. At 2.5% MVC, the increase in CV of force for VIS compared with NOVIS was significantly greater (age × visual condition p = 0.008) for older than young adults. Study (2) Similarly, for older adults performing discrete, randomly ordered trials the CV of force was greater for VIS than NOVIS (6.04 vs. 3.81%, p = 0.01). When visual force feedback was a dominant source of information at low forces, normalized force variability was ~58% greater for older adults, but only 11% greater for young adults. The significant effect of visual feedback for older adults was not dependent on the order of presentation of visual conditions. The results indicate that impaired

  5. The effects of shoulder joint abduction angles on the muscle activity of the serratus anterior muscle and the upper trapezius muscle while vibrations are applied

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Da-eun; Moon, Dong-chul

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the ratio between the upper trapezius and the serratus anterior muscles during diverse shoulder abduction exercises applied with vibrations in order to determine the appropriate exercise methods for recovery of scapular muscle balance. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-four subjects voluntarily participated in this study. The subjects performed shoulder abduction at various shoulder joint abduction angles (90°, 120°, 150°, 180°) with oscillation movements. [Results] At 120°, all the subjects showed significant increases in the muscle activity of the serratus anterior muscle in comparison with the upper trapezius muscle. However, no significant difference was found at angles other than 120°. [Conclusion] To selectively strengthen the serratus anterior, applying vibration stimuli at the 120° shoulder abduction position is considered to be appropriate. PMID:25642052

  6. Promoting convergence: The Phi spiral in abduction of mouse corneal behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Jerry; Nejad, Talisa Mohammad; Comets, Olivier; Flannery, Sean; Gulsoy, Eine Begum; Iannaccone, Philip; Foster, Craig

    2015-01-01

    Why do mouse corneal epithelial cells display spiraling patterns? We want to provide an explanation for this curious phenomenon by applying an idealized problem solving process. Specifically, we applied complementary line-fitting methods to measure transgenic epithelial reporter expression arrangements displayed on three mature, live enucleated globes to clarify the problem. Two prominent logarithmic curves were discovered, one of which displayed the ϕ ratio, an indicator of an optimal configuration in phyllotactic systems. We then utilized two different computational approaches to expose our current understanding of the behavior. In one procedure, which involved an isotropic mechanics-based finite element method, we successfully produced logarithmic spiral curves of maximum shear strain based pathlines but computed dimensions displayed pitch angles of 35° (ϕ spiral is ∼17°), which was altered when we fitted the model with published measurements of coarse collagen orientations. We then used model-based reasoning in context of Peircean abduction to select a working hypothesis. Our work serves as a concise example of applying a scientific habit of mind and illustrates nuances of executing a common method to doing integrative science. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Complexity 20: 22–38, 2015 PMID:25755620

  7. Comparison of Isokinetic Hip Abduction and Adduction Peak Torques and Ratio Between Sexes

    PubMed Central

    Sugimoto, Dai; Mattacola, Carl G.; Mullineaux, David R.; Palmer, Thomas G.; Hewett, Timothy E.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate hip abductor and adductor peak torque outputs and compare their ratios between sexes. Design A cross-sectional laboratory-controlled study. Setting Participants visited a laboratory and performed an isokinetic hip abductor and adductor test. All participants performed 2 sets of 5 repetitions of concentric hip abduction and adduction in a standing position at 60 degrees per second. Gravity was determined as a function of joint angle relative to the horizontal plane and was corrected by normalizing the weight of the limb on an individual basis. Participants A total of 36 collegiate athletes. Independent Variable Sex (20 females and 16 males). Main Outcome Measures Bilateral peak hip abductor and adductor torques were measured. The 3 highest peak torque values were averaged for each subject. Results Independent t tests were used to compare sex differences in hip abductor and adductor peak torques and the abductor:adductor peak torque ratios. Males demonstrated significantly greater hip abductor peak torque compared with females (males 1.29 ± 0.24 Nm/kg, females 1.13 ± 0.20 Nm/kg; P = 0.03). Neither hip adductor peak torque nor their ratios differed between sexes. Conclusions Sex differences in hip abductor strength were observed. The role of weaker hip abductors in females deserves further attention and may be a factor for higher risk of knee pathologies. PMID:24905541

  8. Comparison of HIV-related vulnerabilities between former child soldiers and children never abducted by the LRA in northern Uganda

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Thousands of former child soldiers who were abducted during the prolonged conflict in northern Uganda have returned to their home communities. Programmes that facilitate their successful reintegration continue to face a number of challenges. Although there is increasing knowledge of the dynamics of HIV infection during conflict, far less is known about its prevalence and implications for population health in the post-conflict period. This study investigated the effects of abduction on the prevalence of HIV and HIV-risk behaviours among young people in Gulu District, northern Uganda. An understanding of abduction experiences and HIV-risk behaviours is vital to both the development of effective reintegration programming for former child soldiers and the design of appropriate HIV prevention interventions for all young people. Methods In 2010, we conducted a cross-sectional study of 2 sub-counties in Gulu District. A demographic and behavioural survey was interview-administered to a purposively selected sample of 384 transit camp residents aged 15–29. Biological specimens were collected for HIV rapid testing in the field and confirmatory laboratory testing. Descriptive statistics were used to describe characteristics of abduction. Additionally, a gender-stratified bivariate analysis compared abductees’ and non-abductees’ HIV risk profiles. Results Of the 384 participants, 107 (28%) were former child soldiers (61% were young men and 39% were young women). The median age of participants was 20 and median age at abduction was 13. HIV prevalence was similar among former abductees and non-abductees (12% vs. 13%; p = 0.824), with no differences observed by gender. With respect to differences in HIV vulnerability, our bivariate analysis identified greater risky sexual behaviours in the past year for former abductees than non-abductees, but there were no differences between the two groups’ survival/livelihood activities and food insufficiency experiences

  9. Prevention of Thumb Web Space Contracture With Multiplanar External Fixation.

    PubMed

    Harper, Carl M; Iorio, Matthew L

    2016-09-01

    Thumb web space contracture following hand trauma can be disabling with numerous reconstructive procedures existing to correct the resultant deformity. Following marked soft tissue injury to the hand we utilized the Stryker Hoffmann II Micro External Fixator System to link the first and second metacarpals by a multiplanar system using 1.6 or 2.0 mm self-drilling half-pins and 3 mm carbon fiber connecting rods. This facilitated placement of the thumb in maximal palmar abduction as well as allowed adjustment of thumb position throughout the postoperative period. This technique was performed on 5 patients. Two patients were treated with a first web space external fixator for table saw injuries to the radial aspect of the hand. An additional 2 patients were treated with a first web space external fixator following metacarpophalangeal joint capsular release in the setting of thermal burns. A fifth patient underwent second ray amputation, trapeziectomy and trapezoidectomy for squamous cell carcinoma with subsequent stabilization with the external fixator. The external fixator was left in place until soft tissues were healed (average 5.5 wk). The patients were allowed to mobilize their hand in as much as the external fixator allowed, and no device-associated complications were noted. Thumb web space was preserved with passive and supple thumb circumduction and web space abduction/adduction in all patients at an average follow-up of 5 months. The average Quick Dash Score was 35±5 and the average Modern Activity Subjective Survey of 2007 was 30±8. PMID:27203276

  10. Rotational moulding.

    PubMed

    Crawford, R J; Kearns, M P

    2003-10-01

    Rotational moulding promises designers attractive economics and a low-pressure process. The benefits of rotational moulding are compared here with other manufacturing methods such as injection and blow moulding. PMID:14603714

  11. Rotating Vesta

    NASA Video Gallery

    Astronomers combined 146 exposures taken by NASA's Hubble SpaceTelescope to make this 73-frame movie of the asteroid Vesta's rotation.Vesta completes a rotation every 5.34 hours.› Asteroid and...

  12. Abductive Equivalential Translation and its application to Natural Language Database Interfacing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rayner, Manny

    1994-05-01

    The thesis describes a logical formalization of natural-language database interfacing. We assume the existence of a ``natural language engine'' capable of mediating between surface linguistic string and their representations as ``literal'' logical forms: the focus of interest will be the question of relating ``literal'' logical forms to representations in terms of primitives meaningful to the underlying database engine. We begin by describing the nature of the problem, and show how a variety of interface functionalities can be considered as instances of a type of formal inference task which we call ``Abductive Equivalential Translation'' (AET); functionalities which can be reduced to this form include answering questions, responding to commands, reasoning about the completeness of answers, answering meta-questions of type ``Do you know...'', and generating assertions and questions. In each case, a ``linguistic domain theory'' (LDT) Γ and an input formula F are given, and the goal is to construct a formula with certain properties which is equivalent to F, given Γ and a set of permitted assumptions. If the LDT is of a certain specified type, whose formulas are either conditional equivalences or Horn-clauses, we show that the AET problem can be reduced to a goal-directed inference method. We present an abstract description of this method, and sketch its realization in Prolog. The relationship between AET and several problems previously discussed in the literature is discussed. In particular, we show how AET can provide a simple and elegant solution to the so-called ``Doctor on Board'' problem, and in effect allows a ``relativization'' of the Closed World Assumption. The ideas in the thesis have all been implemented concretely within the SRI CLARE project, using a real projects and payments database. The LDT for the example database is described in detail, and examples of the types of functionality that can be achieved within the example domain are presented.

  13. Wave-Driven Rotation In Centrifugal Mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Abraham J. Fetterman and Nathaniel J. Fisch

    2011-03-28

    Centrifugal mirrors use supersonic rotation to provide axial confinement and enhanced stability. Usually the rotation is produced using electrodes, but these electrodes have limited the rotation to the Alfven critical ionization velocity, which is too slow to be useful for fusion. Instead, the rotation could be produced using radio frequency waves. A fixed azimuthal ripple is a simple and efficient wave that could produce rotation by harnessing alpha particle energy. This is an extension of the alpha channeling effect. The alpha particle power and efficiency in a simulated devices is sufficient to produce rotation without external energy input. By eliminating the need for electrodes, this opens new opportunities for centrifugal traps.

  14. Rotating Wavepackets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lekner, John

    2008-01-01

    Any free-particle wavepacket solution of Schrodinger's equation can be converted by differentiations to wavepackets rotating about the original direction of motion. The angular momentum component along the motion associated with this rotation is an integral multiple of [h-bar]. It is an "intrinsic" angular momentum: independent of origin and…

  15. Treatment of the Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip with an Abduction Brace in Children up to 6 Months Old

    PubMed Central

    Wahlen, Raphaël; Zambelli, Pierre-Yves

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Use of Pavlik harness for the treatment of DDH can be complicated for parents. Any misuse or failure in the adjustments may lead to significant complications. An abduction brace was introduced in our institution, as it was thought to be easier to use. Aim. We assess the results for the treatment of DDH using our abduction brace in children of 0–6 months old and compare these results with data on treatments using the Pavlik harness. Method. Retrospective analysis of patients with DDH from 0 to 6 months old at diagnosis, performed from 2004 to 2009. Outcomes were rates of reduction of the hip and avascular necrosis of the femoral head (AVN). Follow-up was at one year and up to 4 years old. Results. Hip reduction was successful in 28 of 33 patients (85%), with no AVN. Conclusion. Our results in terms of hip reduction rate and AVN rate are similar to those found in literature assessing Pavlik harness use, with a simpler and comfortable treatment procedure. PMID:25815214

  16. Supergranulation rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schou, Jesper; Beck, John G.

    2001-01-01

    Simple convection models estimate the depth of supergranulation at approximately 15,000 km which suggests that supergranules should rotate at the rate of the plasma in the outer 2% of the Sun by radius. Previous measurements (Snodgrass & Ulrich, 1990; Beck & Schou, 2000) found that supergranules rotate significantly faster than this, with a size-dependent rotation rate. We expand on previous work and show that the torsional oscillation signal seen in the supergranules tracks that obtained for normal modes. We also find that the amplitudes and lifetimes of the supergranulation are size dependent.

  17. Solar rotation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dziembowski, W.

    Sunspot observations made by Johannes Hevelius in 1642 - 1644 are the first ones providing significant information about the solar differential rotation. In modern astronomy the determination of the rotation rate is done in a routine way by measuring positions of various structures on the solar surface as well as by studying the Doppler shifts of spectral lines. In recent years a progress in helioseismology enabled determination of the rotation rate in the layers inaccessible for direct observations. There are still uncertainties concerning, especially, the temporal variations of the rotation rate and its behaviour in the radiative interior. We are far from understanding the observations. Theoretical works have not yet resulted in a satisfactory model for the angular momentum transport in the convective zone.

  18. Rotational aerophones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, N. H.; Tarnopolsky, A. Z.; Lai, J. C. S.

    2002-03-01

    Free rotational aerophones such as the bullroarer, which consists of a wooden slat whirled around on the end of a string, and which emits a loud pulsating roar, have been used in many ancient and traditional societies for ceremonial purposes. This article presents an experimental and theoretical investigation of this instrument. The aerodynamics of rotational behavior is elucidated, and relates slat rotation frequency to slat width and velocity through the air. Analysis shows that sound production is due to generation of an oscillating-rotating dipole across the slat, the role of the vortices shed by the slat being relatively minor. Apparent discrepancies between the behavior of a bullroarer slat and a slat mounted on an axle in a wind tunnel are shown to be due to viscous friction in the bearings of the wind-tunnel experiment.

  19. Arguing at Play in the Fields of the Lord; or, Abducting Charles Peirce's Rhetorical Theory in "A Neglected Argument for the Reality of God"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newcomb, Matthew J.

    2009-01-01

    This article argues that the ideas of "play" and "abduction" in Charles Peirce's work represent an inventive theory of argument that opens up the kinds of activities that can be called "arguments" and avoids some of the struggles over imposed beliefs with which recent argument theory has grappled. (Contains 12 notes.)

  20. External Beam Therapy (EBT)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z External Beam Therapy (EBT) External beam therapy (EBT) is a ... follow-up should I expect? What is external beam therapy and how is it used? External beam ...

  1. Abduction of children of political dissidents in Argentina and the role of human genetics in their restitution.

    PubMed

    Penchaszadeh, V B

    1992-01-01

    Between 1976 and 1983 a brutal military dictatorship governed Argentina. The most basic human rights were severely violated and the method of forced disappearances of approximately 30,000 political dissidents was instituted. In this process, about 300 babies and children of the disappeared victims were also abducted by the military and given to childless families linked to the security forces. Women whose children and grandchildren had disappeared organized themselves as Grandmothers of Plaza de Mayo to search for their missing loved ones. This search was aided by human geneticists from different parts of the world who provided the scientific basis to establish the genetic identification through "grandpaternity testing," and by mental health professionals who provided the psychological theory supporting restitution of appropriated children to their legitimate families. Thus far, close to 50 children have been located, identified and restituted. PMID:1401048

  2. Various shrug exercises can change scapular kinematics and scapular rotator muscle activities in subjects with scapular downward rotation syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji-Hyun; Cynn, Heon-Seock; Choi, Woo-Jeong; Jeong, Hyo-Jung; Yoon, Tae-Lim

    2016-02-01

    Scapular dyskinesis, characterized by scapular downward rotation syndrome (SDRS) affects scapula-humeral rhythm and results in shoulder dysfunction. Previous study has led to the recommendation of standard shrug exercise to contend with SDRS and strengthen the upper trapezius (UT) muscle. However, few researchers have examined which shrug exercise is most effective. The aim of this research was to compare scapular kinematic changes and scapular rotator muscles activity across three different shrug exercises in SDRS. The amounts of scapular downward rotation were measured by a caliper and the scapular upward rotation angle was measured using two digital inclinometers. Surface electromyography was used to measure EMG amplitude from the UT, lower trapezius (LT), serratus anterior (SA), and levator scapula (LS). Seventeen subjects with SDRS were recruited for this study. The subjects performed three shrug exercises with 30° shoulder abduction (preferred shrug, frontal shrug, and stabilization shrug). The stabilization shrug showed a significantly greater scapular upward rotation angle compared with the preferred shrug (P=0.004) and frontal shrug (P=0.006). The UT activity was significantly greater in the frontal shrug than in the preferred shrug (P=0.002). The UT/LS muscle activity ratio was also significantly greater in the frontal shrug than in the preferred shrug (P=0.004). The stabilization shrug should be preferred to enhance the upward rotation angle. In addition, the frontal shrug can be used as an effective method to increase UT activity and to decrease LS activity in SDRS. PMID:26625348

  3. Earth Rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickey, Jean O.

    1995-01-01

    The study of the Earth's rotation in space (encompassing Universal Time (UT1), length of day, polar motion, and the phenomena of precession and nutation) addresses the complex nature of Earth orientation changes, the mechanisms of excitation of these changes and their geophysical implications in a broad variety of areas. In the absence of internal sources of energy or interactions with astronomical objects, the Earth would move as a rigid body with its various parts (the crust, mantle, inner and outer cores, atmosphere and oceans) rotating together at a constant fixed rate. In reality, the world is considerably more complicated, as is schematically illustrated. The rotation rate of the Earth's crust is not constant, but exhibits complicated fluctuations in speed amounting to several parts in 10(exp 8) [corresponding to a variation of several milliseconds (ms) in the Length Of the Day (LOD) and about one part in 10(exp 6) in the orientation of the rotation axis relative to the solid Earth's axis of figure (polar motion). These changes occur over a broad spectrum of time scales, ranging from hours to centuries and longer, reflecting the fact that they are produced by a wide variety of geophysical and astronomical processes. Geodetic observations of Earth rotation changes thus provide insights into the geophysical processes illustrated, which are often difficult to obtain by other means. In addition, these measurements are required for engineering purposes. Theoretical studies of Earth rotation variations are based on the application of Euler's dynamical equations to the problem of finding the response of slightly deformable solid Earth to variety of surface and internal stresses.

  4. Rotation Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    In aircraft turbine engine research, certain investigations require extremely precise measurement of the position of a rotating part, such as the rotor, a disc-like part of the engine's compressor which revolves around a shaft at extremely high speeds. For example, in studies of airflow velocity within a compressor, researchers need to know-for data correlation the instantaneous position of a given spot on the rotor each time a velocity measurement is made. Earlier methods of measuring rotor shaft angle required a physical connection to the shaft, which limited the velocity of the rotating object.

  5. Libration in the earth's rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, B. F.; Liu, H. S.; Dong, D. N.; Herring, T. A.

    1991-01-01

    External luni-solar torque exerted on the difference (B-A) of the earth's two equatorial principal moments of inertia gives rise to two types of librational motions in the earth's rotation: the semidiurnal libration in spin and the prograde diurnal libration in polar motion. Formulas for the librations considering a realistic earth model and their tidal decompositions are derived and evaluated. The spin libration has a maximum peal-to-peak amplitude of 0.90 milliarcseconds, that of the polar libration is 0.06 milliarcseconds. Implications concerning their detectability and role in the tidal variation of earth rotation are discussed.

  6. Estimating Location without External Cues

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Allen

    2014-01-01

    The ability to determine one's location is fundamental to spatial navigation. Here, it is shown that localization is theoretically possible without the use of external cues, and without knowledge of initial position or orientation. With only error-prone self-motion estimates as input, a fully disoriented agent can, in principle, determine its location in familiar spaces with 1-fold rotational symmetry. Surprisingly, localization does not require the sensing of any external cue, including the boundary. The combination of self-motion estimates and an internal map of the arena provide enough information for localization. This stands in conflict with the supposition that 2D arenas are analogous to open fields. Using a rodent error model, it is shown that the localization performance which can be achieved is enough to initiate and maintain stable firing patterns like those of grid cells, starting from full disorientation. Successful localization was achieved when the rotational asymmetry was due to the external boundary, an interior barrier or a void space within an arena. Optimal localization performance was found to depend on arena shape, arena size, local and global rotational asymmetry, and the structure of the path taken during localization. Since allothetic cues including visual and boundary contact cues were not present, localization necessarily relied on the fusion of idiothetic self-motion cues and memory of the boundary. Implications for spatial navigation mechanisms are discussed, including possible relationships with place field overdispersion and hippocampal reverse replay. Based on these results, experiments are suggested to identify if and where information fusion occurs in the mammalian spatial memory system. PMID:25356642

  7. Estimating location without external cues.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Allen

    2014-10-01

    The ability to determine one's location is fundamental to spatial navigation. Here, it is shown that localization is theoretically possible without the use of external cues, and without knowledge of initial position or orientation. With only error-prone self-motion estimates as input, a fully disoriented agent can, in principle, determine its location in familiar spaces with 1-fold rotational symmetry. Surprisingly, localization does not require the sensing of any external cue, including the boundary. The combination of self-motion estimates and an internal map of the arena provide enough information for localization. This stands in conflict with the supposition that 2D arenas are analogous to open fields. Using a rodent error model, it is shown that the localization performance which can be achieved is enough to initiate and maintain stable firing patterns like those of grid cells, starting from full disorientation. Successful localization was achieved when the rotational asymmetry was due to the external boundary, an interior barrier or a void space within an arena. Optimal localization performance was found to depend on arena shape, arena size, local and global rotational asymmetry, and the structure of the path taken during localization. Since allothetic cues including visual and boundary contact cues were not present, localization necessarily relied on the fusion of idiothetic self-motion cues and memory of the boundary. Implications for spatial navigation mechanisms are discussed, including possible relationships with place field overdispersion and hippocampal reverse replay. Based on these results, experiments are suggested to identify if and where information fusion occurs in the mammalian spatial memory system. PMID:25356642

  8. Hip rotation range of motion in sitting and prone positions in healthy Japanese adults

    PubMed Central

    Han, Heonsoo; Kubo, Akira; Kurosawa, Kazuo; Maruichi, Shizuka; Maruyama, Hitoshi

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to elucidate the difference in hip external and internal rotation ranges of motion (ROM) between the prone and sitting positions. [Subjects] The subjects included 151 students. [Methods] Hip rotational ROM was measured with the subjects in the prone and sitting positions. Two-way repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to analyze ipsilateral hip rotation ROM in the prone and sitting positions in males and females. The total ipsilateral hip rotation ROM was calculated by adding the measured values for external and internal rotations. [Results] Ipsilateral hip rotation ROM revealed significant differences between two positions for both left and right internal and external rotations. Hip rotation ROM was significantly higher in the prone position than in the sitting position. Hip rotation ROM significantly differed between the men and women. Hip external rotation ROM was significantly higher in both positions in men; conversely, hip internal rotation ROM was significantly higher in both positions in women. [Conclusion] Hip rotation ROM significantly differed between the sexes and between the sitting and prone positions. Total ipsilateral hip rotation ROM, total angle of external rotation, and total angle of internal rotation of the left and right hips greatly varied, suggesting that hip joint rotational ROM is widely distributed. PMID:25729186

  9. Special report. Update on EAS (electronic article surveillance) systems: protecting against patient wandering, infant abduction, property theft.

    PubMed

    1993-10-01

    Concern about wandering patients and infant abduction on the part of hospitals has sparked renewed interest in Electronic Article Surveillance (EAS) systems. Such systems had their origins in department stores and libraries where they are almost universally used. They also have applications in hospitals for preventing the theft of supplies and equipment. A number of companies provide EAS products for the health care field. How do you select the system that is best for your needs? "Talk to users. Pick out a number of profit and non-profit hospitals to get their views," advises Ted Algaier, vice president, marketing and sales, Innovative Control Systems, Inc., Waukesha, WI. "Examine the history of the company or vendor to determine if it understands the health care market and find out if the product really works." In this report, we'll review a number of EAS systems currently on the market, and present information on how they work, how effective they are, and costs involved. Also included are comments from users who have installed such systems. PMID:10129699

  10. Hair and fiber transfer in an abduction case--evidence from different levels of trace evidence transfer.

    PubMed

    Taupin, J M

    1996-07-01

    Levels of trace evidence transfer were examined in a casework context. A girl was allegedly abducted in a car and rape attempted by the accused, who denied any contact with the victim. Clothing worn by the victim and the accused, and the covers from the front seats of the car, were analyzed for trace evidence. Three types of corresponding fibers and four possible pathways of transfer were identified. Synthetic fibers similar to those composing the car seat covers were located on the victim's clothing, consistent with direct transfer. Secondary transfer was indicated by dyed brown human head-type hairs (possibly originating from the accused's wife) located on the seat covers and on the victim's clothing. Secondary and possibly tertiary transfer was indicated by pink synthetic material and associated fibers (possibly originating from the victim's mother) located on the victim's clothing, a car seat cover and the accused's clothing. Light microscopy, comparison microscopy, and cross-sectioning techniques were used. The multiple fiber matches and the differing pathways and levels of transfer increased the strength of the association between the accused and the victim. After the fiber evidence was led at the trial, the accused pleaded guilty, thereby affirming the value of secondary transfer evidence. PMID:8754584

  11. Diplopia, Convergent Strabismus, and Eye Abduction Palsy in a 12-Year-Old Boy with Autoimmune Thyroiditis.

    PubMed

    Marques, Pedro; Jacinto, Sandra; Pinto, Maria do Carmo; Limbert, Catarina; Lopes, Lurdes

    2016-01-01

    Pseudotumor cerebri (PTC) is defined by clinical criteria of increased intracranial pressure, elevated intracranial pressure with normal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) composition, and exclusion of other causes such tumors, vascular abnormalities, or infections. The association of PTC with levothyroxine (LT4) has been reported. A 12-year-old boy has been followed up for autoimmune thyroiditis under LT4. Family history was irrelevant for endocrine or autoimmune diseases. A TSH level of 4.43 μUI/mL (0.39-3.10) motivated a LT4 adjustment from 75 to 88 μg/day. Five weeks later, he developed horizontal diplopia, convergent strabismus with left eye abduction palsy, and papilledema. Laboratorial evaluation revealed elevated free thyroxine level (1.05 ng/dL [0.65-1.01]) and low TSH, without other alterations. Lumbar puncture was performed and CSF opening pressure was 24 cm H2O with normal composition. Blood and CSF cultures were sterile. Brain MRI was normal. LT4 was temporarily discontinued and progressive improvement was observed, with a normal fundoscopy at day 10 and reversion of diplopia one month later. LT4 was restarted at lower dose and gradually titrated. The boy is currently asymptomatic. This case discloses the potential role of LT4 in inducing PTC. Despite its rarity and unclear association, PTC must be seen as a potential complication of LT4, after excluding all other intracranial hypertension causes. PMID:27379191

  12. Diplopia, Convergent Strabismus, and Eye Abduction Palsy in a 12-Year-Old Boy with Autoimmune Thyroiditis

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Maria do Carmo; Limbert, Catarina; Lopes, Lurdes

    2016-01-01

    Pseudotumor cerebri (PTC) is defined by clinical criteria of increased intracranial pressure, elevated intracranial pressure with normal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) composition, and exclusion of other causes such tumors, vascular abnormalities, or infections. The association of PTC with levothyroxine (LT4) has been reported. A 12-year-old boy has been followed up for autoimmune thyroiditis under LT4. Family history was irrelevant for endocrine or autoimmune diseases. A TSH level of 4.43 μUI/mL (0.39–3.10) motivated a LT4 adjustment from 75 to 88 μg/day. Five weeks later, he developed horizontal diplopia, convergent strabismus with left eye abduction palsy, and papilledema. Laboratorial evaluation revealed elevated free thyroxine level (1.05 ng/dL [0.65–1.01]) and low TSH, without other alterations. Lumbar puncture was performed and CSF opening pressure was 24 cm H2O with normal composition. Blood and CSF cultures were sterile. Brain MRI was normal. LT4 was temporarily discontinued and progressive improvement was observed, with a normal fundoscopy at day 10 and reversion of diplopia one month later. LT4 was restarted at lower dose and gradually titrated. The boy is currently asymptomatic. This case discloses the potential role of LT4 in inducing PTC. Despite its rarity and unclear association, PTC must be seen as a potential complication of LT4, after excluding all other intracranial hypertension causes. PMID:27379191

  13. Anatomical glenohumeral internal rotation deficit and symmetric rotational strength in male and female young beach volleyball players.

    PubMed

    Saccol, Michele Forgiarini; Almeida, Gabriel Peixoto Leão; de Souza, Vivian Lima

    2016-08-01

    Beach volleyball is a sport with a high demand of shoulder structures that may lead to adaptations in range of motion (ROM) and strength like in other overhead sports. Despite of these possible alterations, no study evaluated the shoulder adaptations in young beach volleyball athletes. The aim of this study was to compare the bilateral ROM and rotation strength in the shoulders of young beach volleyball players. Goniometric passive shoulder ROM of motion and isometric rotational strength were evaluated in 19 male and 14 female asymptomatic athletes. External and internal ROM, total rotation motion, glenohumeral internal rotation deficit (GIRD), external rotation and internal rotation strength, bilateral deficits and external rotation to internal rotation ratio were measured. The statistical analysis included paired Student's t-test and analysis of variance with repeated measures. Significantly lower dominant GIRD was found in both groups (p<0.05), but only 6 athletes presented pathological GIRD. For strength variables, no significant differences for external or internal rotation were evident. Young beach volleyball athletes present symmetric rotational strength and shoulder ROM rotational adaptations that can be considered as anatomical. These results indicate that young practitioners of beach volleyball are subject to moderate adaptations compared to those reported for other overhead sports. PMID:26360827

  14. Dynamic Three-Dimensional Shoulder Mri during Active Motion for Investigation of Rotator Cuff Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Tempelaere, Christine; Pierrart, Jérome; Lefèvre-Colau, Marie-Martine; Vuillemin, Valérie; Cuénod, Charles-André; Hansen, Ulrich; Mir, Olivier; Skalli, Wafa; Gregory, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Background MRI is the standard methodology in diagnosis of rotator cuff diseases. However, many patients continue to have pain despite treatment, and MRI of a static unloaded shoulder seems insufficient for best diagnosis and treatment. This study evaluated if Dynamic MRI provides novel kinematic data that can be used to improve the understanding, diagnosis and best treatment of rotator cuff diseases. Methods Dynamic MRI provided real-time 3D image series and was used to measure changes in the width of subacromial space, superior-inferior translation and anterior-posterior translation of the humeral head relative to the glenoid during active abduction. These measures were investigated for consistency with the rotator cuff diseases classifications from standard MRI. Results The study included: 4 shoulders with massive rotator cuff tears, 5 shoulders with an isolated full-thickness supraspinatus tear, 5 shoulders with tendinopathy and 6 normal shoulders. A change in the width of subacromial space greater than 4mm differentiated between rotator cuff diseases with tendon tears (massive cuff tears and supraspinatus tear) and without tears (tendinopathy) (p = 0.012). The range of the superior-inferior translation was higher in the massive cuff tears group (6.4mm) than in normals (3.4mm) (p = 0.02). The range of the anterior-posterior translation was higher in the massive cuff tears (9.2 mm) and supraspinatus tear (9.3 mm) shoulders compared to normals (3.5mm) and tendinopathy (4.8mm) shoulders (p = 0.05). Conclusion The Dynamic MRI enabled a novel measure; ‘Looseness’, i.e. the translation of the humeral head on the glenoid during an abduction cycle. Looseness was better able at differentiating different forms of rotator cuff disease than a simple static measure of relative glenohumeral position. PMID:27434235

  15. In-line rotating capacitive torque sensor

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, James W.

    1991-01-01

    A method and apparatus for measuring torques developed along a rotating mechanical assembly comprising a rotating inner portion and a stationary outer portion. The rotating portion has an electrically-conductive flexing section fitted between two coaxial shafts in a configuration which varies radially in accordance with applied torque. The stationary portion comprises a plurality of conductive plates forming a surface concentric with and having a diameter slightly larger than the diameter of the rotating portion. The capacitance between the outer, nonrotating and inner, rotating portion varies with changes in the radial configuration of the rotating portion. Signal output varies approximately linearly with torque for small torques, nonlinearly for larger torques. The sensor is preferably surrounded by a conductive shell to minimize electrical interference from external sources.

  16. In-line rotating capacitive torque sensor

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1991-09-10

    Disclosed are a method and apparatus for measuring torques developed along a rotating mechanical assembly comprising a rotating inner portion and a stationary outer portion. The rotating portion has an electrically-conductive flexing section fitted between two coaxial shafts in a configuration which varies radially in accordance with applied torque. The stationary portion comprises a plurality of conductive plates forming a surface concentric with and having a diameter slightly larger than the diameter of the rotating portion. The capacitance between the outer, nonrotating and inner, rotating portion varies with changes in the radial configuration of the rotating portion. Signal output varies approximately linearly with torque for small torques, nonlinearly for larger torques. The sensor is preferably surrounded by a conductive shell to minimize electrical interference from external sources. 18 figures.

  17. Asymmetric error field interaction with rotating conducting walls

    SciTech Connect

    Paz-Soldan, C.; Brookhart, M. I.; Hegna, C. C.; Forest, C. B.

    2012-07-15

    The interaction of error fields with a system of differentially rotating conducting walls is studied analytically and compared to experimental data. Wall rotation causes eddy currents to persist indefinitely, attenuating and rotating the original error field. Superposition of error fields from external coils and plasma currents are found to break the symmetry in wall rotation direction. The vacuum and plasma eigenmodes are modified by wall rotation, with the error field penetration time decreased and the kink instability stabilized, respectively. Wall rotation is also predicted to reduce error field amplification by the marginally stable plasma.

  18. Rotating gravity gradiometer study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forward, R. L.

    1982-04-01

    Two rotating gravity gradiometer (RGG) sensors, along with all the external electronics needed to operate them, and the fixtures and special test equipment needed to fill and align the bearings, were assembled in a laboratory, and inspected. The thermal noise threshold of the RGG can be lowered by replacing a damping resistor in the first stage electronics by an active artificial resistor that generates less random voltage noise per unit bandwidth than the Johnson noise from the resistor it replaces. The artificial resistor circuit consists of an operational amplifier, three resistors, and a small DC to DC floating power supply. These are small enough to be retrofitted to the present circuit boards inside the RGG rotor in place of the 3 Megohm resistor. Using the artificial resistor, the thermal noise of the RGG-2 sensor can be lowered from 0.3 Eotvos to 0.15 Eotvos for a 10 sec integration time.

  19. Rotating gravity gradiometer study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forward, R. L.

    1982-01-01

    Two rotating gravity gradiometer (RGG) sensors, along with all the external electronics needed to operate them, and the fixtures and special test equipment needed to fill and align the bearings, were assembled in a laboratory, and inspected. The thermal noise threshold of the RGG can be lowered by replacing a damping resistor in the first stage electronics by an active artificial resistor that generates less random voltage noise per unit bandwidth than the Johnson noise from the resistor it replaces. The artificial resistor circuit consists of an operational amplifier, three resistors, and a small DC to DC floating power supply. These are small enough to be retrofitted to the present circuit boards inside the RGG rotor in place of the 3 Megohm resistor. Using the artificial resistor, the thermal noise of the RGG-2 sensor can be lowered from 0.3 Eotvos to 0.15 Eotvos for a 10 sec integration time.

  20. Rotating Bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The NASA Bioreactor provides a low turbulence culture environment which promotes the formation of large, three-dimensional cell clusters. Due to their high level of cellular organization and specialization, samples constructed in the bioreactor more closely resemble the original tumor or tissue found in the body. NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues currently being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators.

  1. Automated External Defibrillator

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is an Automated External Defibrillator? An automated external defibrillator (AED) is a portable device that ... Institutes of Health Department of Health and Human Services USA.gov

  2. External tank project new technology plan. [development of space shuttle external tank system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    A production plan for the space shuttle external tank configuration is presented. The subjects discussed are: (1) the thermal protection system, (2) thermal coating application techniques, (3) manufacturing and tooling, (4) propulsion system configurations and components, (5) low temperature rotating and sliding joint seals, (6) lightning protection, and (7) nondestructive testing technology.

  3. A pilot study of a family focused, psychosocial intervention with war-exposed youth at risk of attack and abduction in north-eastern Democratic Republic of Congo.

    PubMed

    O'Callaghan, Paul; Branham, Lindsay; Shannon, Ciarán; Betancourt, Theresa S; Dempster, Martin; McMullen, John

    2014-07-01

    Rural communities in the Haut-Uele Province of northern Democratic Republic of Congo live in constant danger of attack and/or abduction by units of the Lord's Resistance Army operating in the region. This pilot study sought to develop and evaluate a community-participative psychosocial intervention involving life skills and relaxation training and Mobile Cinema screenings with this war-affected population living under current threat. 159 war-affected children and young people (aged 7-18) from the villages of Kiliwa and Li-May in north-eastern DR Congo took part in this study. In total, 22% of participants had been abduction previously while 73% had a family member abducted. Symptoms of post-traumatic stress reactions, internalising problems, conduct problems and pro-social behaviour were assessed by blinded interviewers at pre- and post-intervention and at 3-month follow-up. Participants were randomised (with an accompanying caregiver) to 8 sessions of a group-based, community-participative, psychosocial intervention (n=79) carried out by supervised local, lay facilitators or a wait-list control group (n=80). Average seminar attendance rates were high: 88% for participants and 84% for caregivers. Drop-out was low: 97% of participants were assessed at post-intervention and 88% at 3 month follow-up. At post-test, participants reported significantly fewer symptoms of post-traumatic stress reactions compared to controls (Cohen's d=0.40). At 3 month follow up, large improvements in internalising symptoms and moderate improvements in pro-social scores were reported, with caregivers noting a moderate to large decline in conduct problems among the young people. Trial Registration clinicalTrials.gov, Identifier: NCT01542398. PMID:24636358

  4. Examination of the torque required to passively palmar abduct the thumb CMC joint in a pediatric population with hemiplegia and stroke.

    PubMed

    Stirling, Leia; Ahmad, Mona Qureshi; Kelty-Stephen, Damian; Correia, Annette

    2015-12-16

    Many activities of daily living involve precision grasping and bimanual manipulation, such as putting toothpaste on a toothbrush or feeding oneself. However, children afflicted by stroke, cerebral palsy, or traumatic brain injury may have lost or never had the ability to actively and accurately control the thumb. To translate insights from adult rehabilitation robotics to innovative therapies for hand rehabilitation in pediatric care, specifically for thumb deformities, an understanding of the torque needed to abduct the thumb to assist grasping tasks is required. Participants (n=16, 10 female, 13.2±3.1 years) had an upper extremity evaluation and measures were made of their passive range of motion, anthropometrics, and torques to abduct the thumb for both their affected and non-affected sides. Torque measures were made using a custom wrist orthosis that was adjusted for each participant. The torque to achieve maximum abduction was 1.47±0.61inlb for the non-affected side and 1.51±0.68inlb for the affected side, with a maximum recorded value of 4.87inlb. The overall maximum applied torque was observed during adduction and was 5.10inlb. We saw variation in the applied torque, which could have been due to the applied torques by the Occupational Therapist or the participant actively assisting or resisting the motion rather than remaining passive. We expect similar muscle and participant variation to exist with an assistive device. Thus, the data presented here can be used to inform the specifications for the development of an assistive thumb orthosis for children with "thumb-in-palm" deformity. PMID:26542786

  5. Rotator Cuff Tears

    MedlinePlus

    ... doctors because of a rotator cuff problem. A torn rotator cuff will weaken your shoulder. This means ... or more of the rotator cuff tendons is torn, the tendon no longer fully attaches to the ...

  6. Rotator Cuff Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... others can be very painful. Treatment for a torn rotator cuff depends on age, health, how severe ... is, and how long you've had the torn rotator cuff. Treatment for torn rotator cuff includes: ...

  7. Rotator cuff problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... days, such as in painting and carpentry Poor posture over many years Aging Rotator cuff tears TEARS ... also help prevent rotator cuff problems. Practice good posture to keep your rotator cuff tendons and muscles ...

  8. External artery heat pipe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gernert, Nelson J. (Inventor); Ernst, Donald M. (Inventor); Shaubach, Robert M. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    An improved heat pipe with an external artery. The longitudinal slot in the heat pipe wall which interconnects the heat pipe vapor space with the external artery is completely filled with sintered wick material and the wall of the external artery is also covered with sintered wick material. This added wick structure assures that the external artery will continue to feed liquid to the heat pipe evaporator even if a vapor bubble forms within and would otherwise block the liquid transport function of the external artery.

  9. [Why can it be difficult for clinicians to diagnose acute lyme disease? From physiopathology to diagnosis, via abductive reasoning and Bayes theorem].

    PubMed

    Godefroid, C; Buttafuoco, F; Richard, T; Goubella, A; Vanhaeverbeek, M

    2014-01-01

    The diagnosis of acute neuroborreliosis may be difficult if it's regarded as a "classical" infectious disease. Through a clinical case, we illustrate the difficulties met and we suggest two ways of reflexion to assist in the diagnosis:--firstly, we explain how the comprehension of the behavior of the pathogen agent, which is similar to a parasitic behavior, can help to choose and interpret the results of additional tests;--secondly, we develop practically the clinical form of Bayes's theorem to demonstrate the interest of a rational Bayesian and abductive approach which should be preferred to the classical hypothetical and deductive reasoning. PMID:25672014

  10. Greater Hip Extension but Not Hip Abduction Explosive Strength Is Associated With Lesser Hip Adduction and Knee Valgus Motion During a Single-Leg Jump-Cut

    PubMed Central

    Cronin, Baker; Johnson, Samuel T.; Chang, Eunwook; Pollard, Christine D.; Norcross, Marc F.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The relationships between hip abductor and extensor strength and frontal plane hip and knee motions that are associated with anterior cruciate ligament injury risk are equivocal. However, previous research on these relationships has evaluated relatively low-level movement tasks and peak torque rather than a time-critical strength measure such as the rate of torque development (RTD). Hypothesis: Females with greater hip abduction and extension RTD would exhibit lesser frontal plane hip and knee motion during a single-leg jump-cutting task. Study Design: Descriptive laboratory study. Methods: Forty recreationally active females performed maximal isometric contractions and single-leg jump-cuts. From recorded torque data, hip extension and abduction RTD was calculated from torque onset to 200 ms after onset. Three-dimensional motion analysis was used to quantify frontal plane hip and knee kinematics during the movement task. For each RTD measure, jump-cut biomechanics were compared between participants in the highest (high) and lowest (low) RTD tertiles. Results: No differences in frontal plane hip and knee kinematics were identified between high and low hip abduction RTD groups. However, those in the high hip extension RTD group exhibited lower hip adduction (high, 3.8° ± 3.0°; low, 6.5° ± 3.0°; P = .019) and knee valgus (high, –2.5° ± 2.3°; low, –4.4° ± 3.2°; P = .046) displacements during the jump-cut. Conclusion: In movements such as cutting that are performed with the hip in a relatively abducted and flexed position, the ability of the gluteus medius to control hip adduction may be compromised. However, the gluteus maximus, functioning as a hip abductor, may take on a pivotal role in controlling hip adduction and knee valgus motion during these types of tasks. Clinical Relevance: Training with a specific emphasis on increasing explosive strength of the hip extensors may be a means through which to improve frontal plane hip and knee

  11. External combustion engine with improved piston and crankshaft linkage

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, F.

    1991-03-12

    This patent describes improvement in an external heat engine having a piston mounted for movement between a first position and a second position, means for forcibly moving the piston from the first position to the second position (power stroke), a crankshaft rotatable about a main axis, and means for linking the piston and crankshaft so that linear movement of the piston from the first position to the second position during the power stroke is transformed into rotational movement of the crankshaft, the power stroke corresponding to a first portion of one rotation of the crankshaft about the main axis, the piston moving from the second position to the first position during a second portion of one rotation of the crankshaft (compression stroke). The improvement comprises: means for linking the piston and crankshaft comprises a rotatable member; means connected to the piston for rotatably supporting the rotatable member, the rotatable member being rotatable about a first point and being connected to the crankshaft at a second point offset from the first point, for rotation about the first point in response to rotation of the crankshaft about its main axis, the first point being disposed so that when the piston is in the first position, the first point is substantially aligned with the main axis of the crankshaft during a third portion of one rotation of the crankshaft about the main axis.

  12. Actuator assembly including a single axis of rotation locking member

    DOEpatents

    Quitmeyer, James N.; Benson, Dwayne M.; Geck, Kellan P.

    2009-12-08

    An actuator assembly including an actuator housing assembly and a single axis of rotation locking member fixedly attached to a portion of the actuator housing assembly and an external mounting structure. The single axis of rotation locking member restricting rotational movement of the actuator housing assembly about at least one axis. The single axis of rotation locking member is coupled at a first end to the actuator housing assembly about a Y axis and at a 90.degree. angle to an X and Z axis providing rotation of the actuator housing assembly about the Y axis. The single axis of rotation locking member is coupled at a second end to a mounting structure, and more particularly a mounting pin, about an X axis and at a 90.degree. angle to a Y and Z axis providing rotation of the actuator housing assembly about the X axis. The actuator assembly is thereby restricted from rotation about the Z axis.

  13. Long-axis rotation: a missing degree of freedom in avian bipedal locomotion.

    PubMed

    Kambic, Robert E; Roberts, Thomas J; Gatesy, Stephen M

    2014-08-01

    Ground-dwelling birds are typically characterized as erect bipeds having hind limbs that operate parasagittally. Consequently, most previous research has emphasized flexion/extension angles and moments as calculated from a lateral perspective. Three-dimensional (3D) motion analyses have documented non-planar limb movements, but the skeletal kinematics underlying changes in foot orientation and transverse position remain unclear. In particular, long-axis rotation of the proximal limb segments is extremely difficult to measure with topical markers. Here, we present six degree of freedom skeletal kinematic data from maneuvering guineafowl acquired by marker-based XROMM (X-ray Reconstruction of Moving Morphology). Translations and rotations of the hips, knees, ankles and pelvis were derived from animated bone models using explicit joint coordinate systems. We distinguished sidesteps, sidestep yaws, crossover yaws, sidestep turns and crossover turns, but birds often performed a sequence of blended partial maneuvers. Long-axis rotation of the femur (up to 38 deg) modulated the foot's transverse position. Long-axis rotation of the tibiotarsus (up to 65 deg) also affected medio-lateral positioning, but primarily served to either re-orient a swing phase foot or yaw the body about a stance phase foot. Tarsometatarsal long-axis rotation was minimal, as was hip, knee and ankle abduction/adduction. Despite having superficially hinge-like joints, birds coordinate substantial long-axis rotations of the hips and knees to execute complex 3D maneuvers while striking a diversity of non-planar poses. PMID:24855675

  14. A layered abduction model of perception: Integrating bottom-up and top-down processing in a multi-sense agent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Josephson, John R.

    1989-01-01

    A layered-abduction model of perception is presented which unifies bottom-up and top-down processing in a single logical and information-processing framework. The process of interpreting the input from each sense is broken down into discrete layers of interpretation, where at each layer a best explanation hypothesis is formed of the data presented by the layer or layers below, with the help of information available laterally and from above. The formation of this hypothesis is treated as a problem of abductive inference, similar to diagnosis and theory formation. Thus this model brings a knowledge-based problem-solving approach to the analysis of perception, treating perception as a kind of compiled cognition. The bottom-up passing of information from layer to layer defines channels of information flow, which separate and converge in a specific way for any specific sense modality. Multi-modal perception occurs where channels converge from more than one sense. This model has not yet been implemented, though it is based on systems which have been successful in medical and mechanical diagnosis and medical test interpretation.

  15. Children and young mothers' agency in the context of conflict: a review of the experiences of formerly abducted young people in Northern Uganda.

    PubMed

    Ochen, Eric Awich

    2015-04-01

    This paper critically examines the experiences of formerly abducted young women during their captivity with the Lord Resistance Army rebels and in the resettlement and reintegration period. Special attention is given to their exercise of agency and choices. Using a qualitative design, narrative interviews were conducted with child mothers (N=21), local and civic actors (N=17), and the general community through focus groups (N=10). Data transcripts were analyzed using template analysis methods to derive meanings and increase understanding of the situation. Abducted children faced significant difficulties during their captivity and also during their resettlement and reintegration process, yet they continued to exhibit strong agency to cope with the new realities. Despite these difficulties, opportunities existed which were utilized by the young people, albeit to different degrees depending on each young person's ability and initiative (agency). Situational factors limiting the child mothers' agency were identified as embedded within the latter's environment. This study raises the importance of appreciation of the young women's agency in both the bush-captivity experience and resettlement and reintegration processes within the community, post-conflict. PMID:25641049

  16. Deltoid muscle shape analysis with magnetic resonance imaging in patients with chronic rotator cuff tears

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background It seems appropriate to assume, that for a full and strong global shoulder function a normally innervated and active deltoid muscle is indispensable. We set out to analyse the size and shape of the deltoid muscle on MR-arthrographies, and analyse its influence on shoulder function and its adaption (i.e. atrophy) for reduced shoulder function. Methods The fatty infiltration (Goutallier stages), atrophy (tangent sign) and selective myotendinous retraction of the rotator cuff, as well as the thickness and the area of seven anatomically defined segments of the deltoid muscle were measured on MR-arthrographies and correlated with shoulder function (i.e. active abduction). Included were 116 patients, suffering of a rotator cuff tear with shoulder mobility ranging from pseudoparalysis to free mobility. Kolmogorov-Smirnov test was used to determine the distribution of the data before either Spearman or Pearson correlation and a multiple regression was applied to reveal the correlations. Results Our developed method for measuring deltoid area and thickness showed to be reproducible with excellent interobserver correlations (r = 0.814–0.982). The analysis of influencing factors on active abduction revealed a weak influence of the amount of SSP tendon (r = −0.25; p < 0.01) and muscle retraction (r = −0.27; p < 0.01) as well as the stage of fatty muscle infiltration (GFDI: r = −0.36; p < 0.01). Unexpectedly however, we were unable to detect a relation of the deltoid muscle shape with the degree of active glenohumeral abduction. Furthermore, long-standing rotator cuff tears did not appear to influence the deltoid shape, i.e. did not lead to muscle atrophy. Conclusions Our data support that in chronic rotator cuff tears, there seems to be no disadvantage to exhausting conservative treatment and to delay implantation of reverse total shoulder arthroplasty, as the shape of deltoid muscle seems only to be influenced by natural aging

  17. External radiation surveillance

    SciTech Connect

    Antonio, E.J.

    1995-06-01

    This section of the 1994 Hanford Site Environmental Report describes how external radiation was measured, how surveys were performed, and the results of these measurements and surveys. External radiation exposure rates were measured at locations on and off the Hanford Site using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD). External radiation and contamination surveys were also performed with portable radiation survey instruments at locations on and around the Hanford Site.

  18. Adjustable spacer with rotational lock

    SciTech Connect

    Bowyer, M.L.

    1984-02-28

    A spacing apparatus for tubing conduit in a subterranean well, normally for use with an electric component with a longitudinally extending external electrical cable, permits irrotational adjustment of the length of the tubing conduit. The spacing apparatus comprises telescoping members which are keyed to prevent rotation therebetween. A threaded member, longitudinally fixed relative to one longitudinal member, normally engages threads extending substantially along the entire length of the other telescoping member. Movement of a retaining sleeve permits disengagement of the threaded segments which ratchet along the threads during telescoping movement. The length of the conduit can thus be irrotationally adjusted to remove slack from the electrical cable.

  19. Equilibrium, multistability, and chiral asymmetry in rotated mirror plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Valanju, P.M.; Mahajan, S.M.; Quevedo, H.J.

    2006-06-15

    The Hall term in two-fluid magnetohydrodynamics is shown to be necessary to balance the curl of the ion inertial force in a rotating plasma with spatially nonuniform crossed electric and magnetic fields. Two-fluid solutions are obtained that qualitatively explain the multistable rotational response observed in magneto-Bernoulli experiment, imply chiral symmetry breaking, i.e., handedness, and yield new dynamo-like electromotive terms in the effective circuit equation for externally rotated mirror plasma equilibria.

  20. Tilt stability of rotating current rings with passive conductors

    SciTech Connect

    Zweibel, E.G.; Pomphrey, N.

    1984-12-01

    We study the combined effects of rotation and resistive passive conductors on the stability of a rigid current in an external magnetic field. We present numerical and approximate analytical solutions to the equations of motion, which show that the ring is always tilt unstable on the resistive decay timescale of the conductors, although rotation and eddy currents may stabilize it over short times. Possible applications of our model include spheromaks which rotate or which are encircled by energetic particle rings.

  1. The External Degree Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Syracuse Univ., NY. School of Management.

    An external degree is one granted on the basis of academic work undertaken through independent and flexible study and pursued in whole or in part outside of the framework of existing college and university courses. A person's qualifications for an external degree are measured not by a list of accumulated formal courses taken and passed, but by an…

  2. Rotational preference in gymnastics.

    PubMed

    Heinen, Thomas; Jeraj, Damian; Vinken, Pia M; Velentzas, Konstantinos

    2012-06-01

    In gymnastics, most skills incorporate rotations about one or more body axes. At present, the question remains open if factors such as lateral preference and/or vestibulo-spinal asymmetry are related to gymnast's rotational preference. Therefore, we sought to explore relationships in gymnast's rotation direction between different gymnastic skills. Furthermore, we sought to explore relationships between rotational preference, lateral preference, and vestibulo-spinal asymmetry. In the experiment n = 30 non-experts, n = 30 near-experts and n = 30 experts completed a rotational preference questionnaire, a lateral preference inventory, and the Unterberger-Fukuda Stepping Test. The results revealed, that near-experts and experts more often rotate rightward in the straight jump with a full turn when rotating leftward in the round-off and vice versa. The same relationship was found for experts when relating the rotation preference in the handstand with a full turn to the rotation preference in the straight jump with a full turn. Lateral preference was positively related to rotational preference in non-expert gymnasts, and vestibulo-spinal asymmetry was positively related to rotational preference in experts. We suggest, that gymnasts should explore their individual rotational preference by systematically practicing different skills with a different rotation direction, bearing in mind that a clearly developed structure in rotational preference between different skills may be appropriate to develop more complex skills in gymnastics. PMID:23486362

  3. Rotational Preference in Gymnastics

    PubMed Central

    Heinen, Thomas; Jeraj, Damian; Vinken, Pia M.; Velentzas, Konstantinos

    2012-01-01

    In gymnastics, most skills incorporate rotations about one or more body axes. At present, the question remains open if factors such as lateral preference and/or vestibulo-spinal asymmetry are related to gymnast’s rotational preference. Therefore, we sought to explore relationships in gymnast’s rotation direction between different gymnastic skills. Furthermore, we sought to explore relationships between rotational preference, lateral preference, and vestibulo-spinal asymmetry. In the experiment n = 30 non-experts, n = 30 near-experts and n = 30 experts completed a rotational preference questionnaire, a lateral preference inventory, and the Unterberger-Fukuda Stepping Test. The results revealed, that near-experts and experts more often rotate rightward in the straight jump with a full turn when rotating leftward in the round-off and vice versa. The same relationship was found for experts when relating the rotation preference in the handstand with a full turn to the rotation preference in the straight jump with a full turn. Lateral preference was positively related to rotational preference in non-expert gymnasts, and vestibulo-spinal asymmetry was positively related to rotational preference in experts. We suggest, that gymnasts should explore their individual rotational preference by systematically practicing different skills with a different rotation direction, bearing in mind that a clearly developed structure in rotational preference between different skills may be appropriate to develop more complex skills in gymnastics. PMID:23486362

  4. Nearshore sandbar rotation at single-barred embayed beaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blossier, B.; Bryan, K. R.; Daly, C. J.; Winter, C.

    2016-04-01

    The location of a shore-parallel nearshore sandbar derived from 7 years of video imagery data at the single-barred embayed Tairua Beach (NZ) is investigated to assess the contribution of barline rotation to the overall morphodynamics of sandbars in embayed environments and to characterize the process of rotation in relation to external conditions. Rotation induces cross-shore barline variations at the embayment extremities on the order of magnitude of those induced by alongshore uniform cross-shore migration of the bar. Two semiempirical models have been developed to relate the barline cross-shore migration and rotation to external wave forcing conditions. The rotation model is directly derived from the cross-shore migration model. Therefore, its formulation advocates for a primary role of cross-shore processes in the rotation of sandbars at embayed beaches. The orientation evolves toward an equilibrium angle directly related to the alongshore wave energy gradient due to two different mechanisms. Either the bar extremities migrate in opposite directions with no overall cross-shore bar migration (pivotal rotation) or the rotation relates to an overall migration of the barline which is not uniform along the beach (migration-driven rotation). Migration and rotation characteristic response times are similar, ranging from 10 to 30 days for mild and energetic wave conditions and above 200 days during very calm conditions or when the bar is located far offshore.

  5. Synchronous states of slowly rotating pendula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapitaniak, Marcin; Czolczynski, Krzysztof; Perlikowski, Przemysław; Stefanski, Andrzej; Kapitaniak, Tomasz

    2014-08-01

    Coupled systems that contain rotating elements are typical in physical, biological and engineering applications and for years have been the subject of intensive studies. One problem of scientific interest, which among others occurs in such systems is the phenomenon of synchronization of different rotating parts. Despite different initial conditions, after a sufficiently long transient, the rotating parts move in the same way - complete synchronization, or a permanent constant shift is established between their displacements, i.e., the angles of rotation - phase synchronization. Synchronization occurs due to dependence of the periods of rotating elements motion and the displacement of the base on which these elements are mounted. We review the studies on the synchronization of rotating pendula and compare them with the results obtained for oscillating pendula. As an example we consider the dynamics of the system consisting of n pendula mounted on the movable beam. The pendula are excited by the external torques which are inversely proportional to the angular velocities of the pendula. As the result of such excitation each pendulum rotates around its axis of rotation. It has been assumed that all pendula rotate in the same direction or in the opposite directions. We consider the case of slowly rotating pendula and estimate the influence of the gravity on their motion. We classify the synchronous states of the identical pendula and observe how the parameters mismatch can influence them. We give evidence that synchronous states are robust as they exist in the wide range of system parameters and can be observed in a simple experiment.

  6. Video analysis of trunk and knee motion during non-contact anterior cruciate ligament injury in female athletes: lateral trunk and knee abduction motion are combined components of the injury mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Hewett, T E; Torg, J S; Boden, B P

    2014-01-01

    Background The combined positioning of the trunk and knee in the coronal and sagittal planes during non-contact anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury has not been previously reported. Hypothesis During ACL injury female athletes demonstrate greater lateral trunk and knee abduction angles than ACL-injured male athletes and uninjured female athletes. Design Cross-section control-cohort design. Methods Analyses of still captures from 23 coronal (10 female and 7 male ACL-injured players and 6 female controls) or 28 sagittal plane videos performing similar landing and cutting tasks. Significance was set at p ≤ 0.05. Results Lateral trunk and knee abduction angles were higher in female compared to male athletes during ACL injury (p ≤ 0.05) and trended toward being greater than female controls (p = 0.16, 0.13, respectively). Female ACL-injured athletes showed less forward trunk lean than female controls (mean (SD) initial contact (IC): 1.6 (9.3)° vs 14.0 (7.3)°, p ≤ 0.01). Conclusion Female athletes landed with greater lateral trunk motion and knee abduction during ACL injury than did male athletes or control females during similar landing and cutting tasks. Clinical relevance Lateral trunk and knee abduction motion are important components of the ACL injury mechanism in female athletes as observed from video evidence of ACL injury. PMID:19372088

  7. Hip Rotational Velocities During the Full Golf Swing

    PubMed Central

    Gulgin, Heather; Armstrong, Charles; Gribble, Phillip

    2009-01-01

    Since labral pathology in professional golfers has been reported, and such pathology has been associated with internal/external hip rotation, quantifying the rotational velocity of the hips during the golf swing may be helpful in understanding the mechanism involved in labral injury. Thus, the purpose of this study was to determine the peak internal/external rotational velocities of the thigh relative to the pelvis during the golf swing. Fifteen female, collegiate golfers participated in the study. Data were acquired through high-speed three dimensional (3-D) videography using a multi-segment bilateral marker set to define the segments, while the subjects completed multiple repetitions of a drive. The results indicated that the lead hip peak internal rotational velocity was significantly greater than that of the trail hip external rotational velocity (p = 0.003). It appears that the lead hip of a golfer experiences much higher rotational velocities during the downswing than that of the trail hip. In other structures, such as the shoulder, an increased risk of soft tissue injury has been associated with high levels of rotational velocity. This may indicate that, in golfers, the lead hip may be more susceptible to injury such as labral tears than that of the trailing hip. Key points Lead hip of golfer experiences significantly higher rotational velocities than the trail hip. Golfers may be more susceptible to injuries on the lead hip. Clubhead velocities were consistent with elite female golfers. PMID:24149541

  8. Improving spatial updating accuracy in absence of external feedback.

    PubMed

    Mackrous, I; Simoneau, M

    2015-08-01

    Updating the position of an earth-fixed target during whole-body rotation seems to rely on cognitive processes such as the utilization of external feedback. According to perceptual learning models, improvement in performance can also occur without external feedback. The aim of this study was to assess spatial updating improvement in the absence and in the presence of external feedback. While being rotated counterclockwise (CCW), participants had to predict when their body midline had crossed the position of a memorized target. Four experimental conditions were tested: (1) Pre-test: the target was presented 30° in the CCW direction from participant's midline. (2) Practice: the target was located 45° in the CCW direction from participant's midline. One group received external feedback about their spatial accuracy (Mackrous and Simoneau, 2014) while the other group did not. (3) Transfer T(30)CCW: the target was presented 30° in the CCW direction to evaluate whether improvement in performance, during practice, generalized to other target eccentricity. (4) Transfer T(30)CW: the target was presented 30° in the clockwise (CW) direction and participants were rotated CW. This transfer condition evaluated whether improvement in performance generalized to the untrained rotation direction. With practice, performance improved in the absence of external feedback (p=0.004). Nonetheless, larger improvement occurred when external feedback was provided (ps=0.002). During T(30)CCW, performance remained better for the feedback than the no-feedback group (p=0.005). However, no group difference was observed for the untrained direction (p=0.22). We demonstrated that spatial updating improved without external feedback but less than when external feedback was given. These observations are explained by a mixture of calibration processes and supervised vestibular learning. PMID:25987200

  9. Power Harvesting from Rotation?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chicone, Carmen; Feng, Z. C.

    2008-01-01

    We show the impossibility of harvesting power from rotational motions by devices attached to the rotating object. The presentation is suitable for students who have studied Lagrangian mechanics. (Contains 2 figures.)

  10. Evaluating External Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeSantis, James R.

    1978-01-01

    Effective external communication by higher education institutions is described as an ongoing program, based on objective research, continuous informal feedback, and informed anticipation of changes in the environment that will force changes in the institution. (JMF)

  11. Future of External Reporting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powers, Kristina

    2015-01-01

    This chapter builds on prior chapters and focuses on higher education trends on the horizon and the resulting impact on external reporting for institutional researchers. Three practical recommendations and examples for institutional researchers are also presented.

  12. Master external pressure charts

    SciTech Connect

    Michalopoulos, E.

    1996-12-01

    This paper presents a method to develop master external pressure charts from which individual external pressure charts for each material specification may be derived. The master external charts can represent a grouping of materials with similar chemical composition, similar stress-strain curves but produced to different strength levels. External pressure charts are used by various Sections of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel and Piping Codes to design various components such as cylinders, sphered, formed heads, tubes, piping, rings and other components, subjected to external pressure or axial compression loads. These charts are pseudo stress-strain curves for groups of materials with similar stress-strain shapes. The traditional approach was originally developed in the 1940`s and is a graphical approach where slopes to the strain curves are drawn graphically from which pseudo-strain levels are calculated. The new method presented in this paper develops mathematical relationships for the material stress-strain curves and the external pressure charts. The method has the ability to calculate stress-strain curves from existing external pressure charts. The relationships are a function of temperature, the modulus of elasticity, yield strength, and two empirical material constants. In this approach, conservative assumptions used to assign materials to lower bound external pressure charts can be removed. This increases the buckling strength capability of many materials in the Code, providing economic benefits while maintaining the margin of safety specified by the Code criteria. The method can also reduce the number of material charts needed in the Code and provides for the capability to extend the existing pressure charts to higher design temperatures. The new method is shown to contain a number of improvements over the traditional approach and is presently under consideration by appropriate ASME Code committees.

  13. Fracture severity of distal radius fractures treated with locking plating correlates with limitations in ulnar abduction and inferior health-related quality of life

    PubMed Central

    Tsitsilonis, Serafim; Machó, David; Manegold, Sebastian; Krapohl, Björn Dirk; Wichlas, Florian

    2016-01-01

    Introduction/background: The operative treatment of distal radius fractures has significantly increased after the introduction of locking plates. The aim of the present study was the evaluation of health-related quality of life, functional and radiological outcome of patients with distal radius fractures treated with the locking compression plate (LCP). Materials and methods: In the present study 128 patients (130 fractures) that were operatively treated with the LCP (2.4 mm/3.5 mm, Synthes®) were retrospectively evaluated. Mean follow-up was 22.7 months (SD 10.6). The fractures were radiographically evaluated (radial inclination, palmar tilt, ulnar variance) pre-, postoperatively and at the last follow-up visit. Range of motion (ROM) was documented. Grip strength was assessed with the use of a JAMAR dynamometer. The score for disabilities of the arm, shoulder and hand (DASH) and the Gartland-Werley score (GWS) were evaluated. Health-associated quality of life was assessed with use of SF-36 Health Survey. Results: Postoperative reduction was excellent; at the last follow-up visit only minimal reduction loss was observed. Except for pronation, a statistically significant decrease of ROM was present; in most cases that was not disturbing for the patients. The injured side achieved 83.9% of grip strength of the intact side. Mean DASH was 18.9 and mean GWS was 3.5. Health-associated quality of life was generally not compromised. However, limitations in ulnar abduction correlated with inferior quality of life. Fracture severity correlated with inferior quality of life, despite the absence of correlation with the functional and radiological outcome. Complication rate was low. Conclusions: Fracture severity seems to affect ulnar abduction and therefore patient quality of life, despite almost anatomical reduction; the objective and subjective scores were in most cases excellent. Modern everyday activities, such as keyboard typing, could be associated with the present

  14. Externally modulated theranostic nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Urban, Cordula; Urban, Alexander S.; Charron, Heather; Joshi, Amit

    2013-01-01

    Externally modulated nanoparticles comprise a rapidly advancing class of cancer nanotherapeutics, which combine the favorable tumor accumulation of nanoparticles, with external spatio-temporal control on therapy delivery via optical, magnetic, or ultrasound modalities. The local control on therapy enables higher tumor treatment efficacy, while simultaneously reducing off-target effects. The nanoparticle interactions with external fields have an additional advantage of frequently generating an imaging signal, and thus such agents provide theranostic (both diagnostic and therapeutic) capabilities. In this review, we classify the emerging externally modulated theranostic nanoparticles according to the mode of external control and describe the physiochemical mechanisms underlying the external control of therapy, and illustrate the major embodiments of nanoparticles in each class with proven biological efficacy: (I) electromagnetic radiation in visible and near-infrared range is being exploited for gold based and carbon nanostructures with tunable surface plasmon resonance (SPR) for imaging and photothermal therapy (PTT) of cancer, photochemistry based manipulations are employed for light sensitive liposomes and porphyrin based nanoparticles; (II) Magnetic field based manipulations are being developed for iron-oxide based nanostructures for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetothermal therapy; (III) ultrasound based methods are primarily being employed to increase delivery of conventional drugs and nanotherapeutics to tumor sites. PMID:24834381

  15. Rotations with Rodrigues' Vector

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pina, E.

    2011-01-01

    The rotational dynamics was studied from the point of view of Rodrigues' vector. This vector is defined here by its connection with other forms of parametrization of the rotation matrix. The rotation matrix was expressed in terms of this vector. The angular velocity was computed using the components of Rodrigues' vector as coordinates. It appears…

  16. Mechanism of rotational relaxation.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polanyi, J. C.; Woodall, K. B.

    1972-01-01

    A model is presented which describes the characteristic pattern of relaxation of a nonthermal rotational distribution of hydrogen halide, peaked initially at high rotational quantum number J, to a thermal distribution without generating a peak at intermediate J. A method for correcting infrared chemiluminiscence data for modest rotational relaxation is also suggested.

  17. Rotating electric machine with fluid supported parts

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.L. Jr.; Kirtley, J.L. Jr.

    1981-09-22

    A rotating electric machine is described in which the armature winding thereof and other parts are supported by a liquid to withstand the mechanical stresses applied during transient overloads and the like. In particular, a narrow gap is provided between the armature winding and the stator which supports it and this gap is filled with an externally pressurized viscous liquid. The liquid is externally pressurized sufficiently to balance the static loads on the armature winding. Transient mechanical loads which deform the armature winding alter the gap dimensions and thereby additionally pressurize the viscous liquid to oppose the armature winding deformation and more nearly uniformly to distribute the resulting mechanical stresses. 10 figs.

  18. Rotating electric machine with fluid supported parts

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Jr., Joseph L.; Kirtley, Jr., James L.

    1981-01-01

    A rotating electric machine in which the armature winding thereof and other parts are supported by a liquid to withstand the mechanical stresses applied during transient overloads and the like. In particular, a narrow gap is provided between the armature winding and the stator which supports it and this gap is filled with an externally pressurized viscous liquid. The liquid is externally pressurized sufficiently to balance the static loads on the armature winding. Transient mechanical loads which deform the armature winding alter the gap dimensions and thereby additionally pressurize the viscous liquid to oppose the armature winding deformation and more nearly uniformly to distribute the resulting mechanical stresses.

  19. Dynamic Interplay of Coherent Rotations and Domain Wall Motion in Faraday Rotators based on Ferromagnetic Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garzarella, Anthony; Wu, Dong; Shinn, Mannix

    Under small, externally-applied magnetic fields, the Faraday rotation in magneto-optic material containing ferromagnetic domains is driven primarily by two principal mechanisms: domain wall motion and coherent domain rotations. Domain wall motion yields a larger Faraday responsivity but is limited by magnetically induced optical incoherence and by damping effects. Coherent domain rotation yields smaller Faraday rotations, but exhibits a flatter and broader frequency response. The two mechanisms occur along orthogonal principal axes and may be probed independently. However, when probed along an oblique angle to the principal axes, the relationship between the Faraday rotation and the external field changes from linear to tensorial. Although this may lead to more complicated phenomena (e.g. a sensitivity axis that depends on RF frequency), the interplay of domain rotation and domain wall motion can be exploited to improve responsivity or bandwidth. The detailed experimental data can be understood in terms of a quantitative model for the magnitude and direction of the responsivity vector. Applications to magnetic field sensors based on arrayed bismuth doped iron garnet films will be emphasized in this presentation.

  20. Dynamics of molecular superrotors in an external magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korobenko, Aleksey; Milner, Valery

    2015-08-01

    We excite diatomic oxygen and nitrogen to high rotational states with an optical centrifuge and study their dynamics in an external magnetic field. Ion imaging is employed to directly visualize, and follow in time, the rotation plane of the molecular superrotors. The two different mechanisms of interaction between the magnetic field and the molecular angular momentum in paramagnetic oxygen and non-magnetic nitrogen lead to qualitatively different behaviour. In nitrogen, we observe the precession of the molecular angular momentum around the field vector. In oxygen, strong spin-rotation coupling results in faster and richer dynamics, encompassing the splitting of the rotation plane into three separate components. As the centrifuged molecules evolve with no significant dispersion of the molecular wave function, the observed magnetic interaction presents an efficient mechanism for controlling the plane of molecular rotation.

  1. SEAL FOR ROTATING SHAFT

    DOEpatents

    Coffman, R.T.

    1957-12-10

    A seal is described for a rotatable shaft that must highly effective when the shaft is not rotating but may be less effective while the shaft is rotating. Weights distributed about a sealing disk secured to the shaft press the sealing disk against a tubular section into which the shiilt extends, and whem the shaft rotates, the centrifugal forces on the weights relieve the pressurc of the sealing disk against the tubular section. This action has the very desirible result of minimizing the wear of the rotating disk due to contact with the tubular section, while affording maximum sealing action when it is needed.

  2. Rotation of tokamak halo currents

    SciTech Connect

    Boozer, Allen H.

    2012-05-15

    During tokamak disruptions, halo currents, which can be tenths of the total plasma current, can flow at the plasma edge along the magnetic field lines that intercept the chamber walls. Non-axisymmetric halo currents are required to maintain force balance as the plasma kinks when the edge safety factor drops to about two in a vertical displacement event. The plasma quickly assumes a definite toroidal velocity v{sub a}(r) with respect to that of the magnetic kink, v{sub k}, where v{sub a}(r) is set by the radial electric field required for ambipolarity. The plasma velocity, v{sub pl}=v{sub a}+v{sub k}, near the edge is influenced by the interaction with neutrals and with the potential in the halo required for quasi-neutrality on open magnetic field lines, and the plasma velocity in the core is influenced by external error fields. When plasma effects dominate magnetic locking, the magnetic kink should rotate at a diamagnetic speed of either the edge or the core. If the magnetic field lines of the halo plasma intercept the wall at locations of very different electrical conductivity, the toroidal rotation of the halo currents can intermittently stall at wall locations of high conductivity. Such stalling is seen in experiments. The toroidal phase difference between the stalled halo currents and the kink, which is expected to rotate smoothly, must satisfy {delta}{phi}<{+-}{pi}/2. A concern cited by ITER engineers is that the time varying force of the rotating halo could substantially increase the disruption loads on in-vessel components.

  3. Rotation of tokamak halo currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boozer, Allen H.

    2012-05-01

    During tokamak disruptions, halo currents, which can be tenths of the total plasma current, can flow at the plasma edge along the magnetic field lines that intercept the chamber walls. Non-axisymmetric halo currents are required to maintain force balance as the plasma kinks when the edge safety factor drops to about two in a vertical displacement event. The plasma quickly assumes a definite toroidal velocity va(r) with respect to that of the magnetic kink, vk, where va(r) is set by the radial electric field required for ambipolarity. The plasma velocity, vpl=va+vk, near the edge is influenced by the interaction with neutrals and with the potential in the halo required for quasi-neutrality on open magnetic field lines, and the plasma velocity in the core is influenced by external error fields. When plasma effects dominate magnetic locking, the magnetic kink should rotate at a diamagnetic speed of either the edge or the core. If the magnetic field lines of the halo plasma intercept the wall at locations of very different electrical conductivity, the toroidal rotation of the halo currents can intermittently stall at wall locations of high conductivity. Such stalling is seen in experiments. The toroidal phase difference between the stalled halo currents and the kink, which is expected to rotate smoothly, must satisfy δϕ <±π/2. A concern cited by ITER engineers is that the time varying force of the rotating halo could substantially increase the disruption loads on in-vessel components.

  4. Diagnostic accuracy of clinical examination features for identifying large rotator cuff tears in primary health care

    PubMed Central

    Cadogan, Angela; McNair, Peter; Laslett, Mark; Hing, Wayne; Taylor, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Rotator cuff tears are a common and disabling complaint. The early diagnosis of medium and large size rotator cuff tears can enhance the prognosis of the patient. The aim of this study was to identify clinical features with the strongest ability to accurately predict the presence of a medium, large or multitendon (MLM) rotator cuff tear in a primary care cohort. Methods: Participants were consecutively recruited from primary health care practices (n = 203). All participants underwent a standardized history and physical examination, followed by a standardized X-ray series and diagnostic ultrasound scan. Clinical features associated with the presence of a MLM rotator cuff tear were identified (P<0.200), a logistic multiple regression model was derived for identifying a MLM rotator cuff tear and thereafter diagnostic accuracy was calculated. Results: A MLM rotator cuff tear was identified in 24 participants (11.8%). Constant pain and a painful arc in abduction were the strongest predictors of a MLM tear (adjusted odds ratio 3.04 and 13.97 respectively). Combinations of ten history and physical examination variables demonstrated highest levels of sensitivity when five or fewer were positive [100%, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.86–1.00; negative likelihood ratio: 0.00, 95% CI: 0.00–0.28], and highest specificity when eight or more were positive (0.91, 95% CI: 0.86–0.95; positive likelihood ratio 4.66, 95% CI: 2.34–8.74). Discussion: Combinations of patient history and physical examination findings were able to accurately detect the presence of a MLM rotator cuff tear. These findings may aid the primary care clinician in more efficient and accurate identification of rotator cuff tears that may require further investigation or orthopedic consultation. PMID:24421626

  5. Metasurface external cavity laser

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Luyao Curwen, Christopher A.; Williams, Benjamin S.; Hon, Philip W. C.; Itoh, Tatsuo; Chen, Qi-Sheng

    2015-11-30

    A vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting-laser is demonstrated in the terahertz range, which is based upon an amplifying metasurface reflector composed of a sub-wavelength array of antenna-coupled quantum-cascade sub-cavities. Lasing is possible when the metasurface reflector is placed into a low-loss external cavity such that the external cavity—not the sub-cavities—determines the beam properties. A near-Gaussian beam of 4.3° × 5.1° divergence is observed and an output power level >5 mW is achieved. The polarized response of the metasurface allows the use of a wire-grid polarizer as an output coupler that is continuously tunable.

  6. Metasurface external cavity laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Luyao; Curwen, Christopher A.; Hon, Philip W. C.; Chen, Qi-Sheng; Itoh, Tatsuo; Williams, Benjamin S.

    2015-11-01

    A vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting-laser is demonstrated in the terahertz range, which is based upon an amplifying metasurface reflector composed of a sub-wavelength array of antenna-coupled quantum-cascade sub-cavities. Lasing is possible when the metasurface reflector is placed into a low-loss external cavity such that the external cavity—not the sub-cavities—determines the beam properties. A near-Gaussian beam of 4.3° × 5.1° divergence is observed and an output power level >5 mW is achieved. The polarized response of the metasurface allows the use of a wire-grid polarizer as an output coupler that is continuously tunable.

  7. A microscale thermophoretic turbine driven by external diffusive heat flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Mingcheng; Liu, Rui; Ripoll, Marisol; Chen, Ke

    2014-10-01

    We propose a theoretical prototype of a micro-scale turbine externally driven by diffusive heat flux without the need for macroscopic particle flux, which is in sharp contrast to conventional turbines. The prototypes are described analytically and validated by computer simulations. Our results indicate that a micro-scale turbine composed of anisotropic blades can rotate unidirectionally in an external temperature gradient due to the anisotropic thermophoresis effect. The rotational direction and speed depend on the temperature gradient, the geometry and the thermophoretic properties of the turbine. The proposed thermophoretic turbines can be experimentally realized and implemented on micro-devices such as computer-chips to recover waste heat or to facilitate cooling.We propose a theoretical prototype of a micro-scale turbine externally driven by diffusive heat flux without the need for macroscopic particle flux, which is in sharp contrast to conventional turbines. The prototypes are described analytically and validated by computer simulations. Our results indicate that a micro-scale turbine composed of anisotropic blades can rotate unidirectionally in an external temperature gradient due to the anisotropic thermophoresis effect. The rotational direction and speed depend on the temperature gradient, the geometry and the thermophoretic properties of the turbine. The proposed thermophoretic turbines can be experimentally realized and implemented on micro-devices such as computer-chips to recover waste heat or to facilitate cooling. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr03990d

  8. Non-Newtonian rotational swimming: experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, S.; Godinez, F. A.; Zenit, R.; Lauga, E.

    2013-11-01

    Recently Pak et al. (PoF, 2012) showed that a device composed of two unequal spheres (snowman) could swim in a viscoelastic fluid under a rotational actuation. By symmetry such device isn't able to move in a Newtonian fluid but because of its geometrical asymmetry is able to generate asymmetric elastic response and generate a purely viscoelastic thrust. We implemented this swimmer experimentally using a magnetic snowman driven by an external rotating magnetic field. We demonstrate that the snowman swims solely as a result of fluid elasticity. We conduct tests in Newtonian and Boger fluids, varying the sphere size ratio and rotation speed. We also conducted measurements in a confined environment, which showed an improved swimming performance.

  9. Global Rotation of Non-Rotating Origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukushima, T.

    2001-11-01

    At its 24th General Assembly held at Manchester last year, the IAU has adopted the Celestial Ephemeris Origin (CEO) as a new longitude origin of the celestial coordinate system (Capitaine et al. 2000, IAU 2001). The CEO is the application of Guinot's non-rotating origin (NRO) to the Earth's equator (Guinot 1979, Capitaine et al. 1986, Capitaine 1990). By using the current IAU precession/nutation theory, we integrated the global orbit of CEO. It is a slightly curved zigzag pattern of the amplitude of around 23o moving secularly along the ecliptic. Among its kinematical features, we note that CEO has a large secular component of rotation with respect to the inertial reference frame. The current speed of this global rotation is as large as around -4.15 ''/yr. The negative sign shows that CEO rotates clockwise with respect to the inertial frame when viewed from the north celestial pole. Unfortunately this is a general property of NROs. On the other hand, such secular rotation does not exist for some geometrically-defined longitude origins like K, H, and Σ already discussed in Kovalevsky and McCarthy (1998). We think that the existence of a global secular rotaion means that the CEO, and NROs in general, is not appropriate to be specified as the x-axis of celestial coordinate systems.

  10. Literature: External Forms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Regional Curriculum Project, Atlanta, GA.

    This curriculum guide, developed as part of a total English curriculum for pre-kindergarten through grade 10, suggests that students can best understand literature by understanding its recurring external forms or genres, and includes (1) an overview describing the four literary genres of drama, narrative poetry, narrative fiction, and lyric poetry…

  11. External Environmental Forecast.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lapin, Joel D.

    Representing current viewpoints of academics, futures experts, and social observers, this external environmental forecast presents projections and information of particular relevance to the future of Catonsville Community College. The following topics are examined: (1) population changes and implications for higher education; (2) state and local…

  12. External Otitis (Swimmer's Ear)

    MedlinePlus

    ... drops, keeping water out of the ear, and pain relievers are the most common forms of treatment. External otitis may involve the entire canal, as ... does not allow fungus to grow as well. Treatment of boils depends on ... relievers, such as oxycodone with acetaminophen , can be given ...

  13. Combined Solar system and rotation curve constraints on MOND

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hees, Aurélien; Famaey, Benoit; Angus, Garry W.; Gentile, Gianfranco

    2016-01-01

    The Modified Newtonian Dynamics (MOND) paradigm generically predicts that the external gravitational field in which a system is embedded can produce effects on its internal dynamics. In this communication, we first show that this external field effect (EFE) can significantly improve some galactic rotation curves fits by decreasing the predicted velocities of the external part of the rotation curves. In modified gravity versions of MOND, this EFE also appears in the Solar system and leads to a very good way to constrain the transition function of the theory. A combined analysis of the galactic rotation curves and Solar system constraints (provided by the Cassini spacecraft) rules out several classes of popular MOND transition functions, but leaves others viable. Moreover, we show that Laser Interferometer Space Antenna Pathfinder will not be able to improve the current constraints on these still viable transition functions.

  14. The spatial rotator.

    PubMed

    Rasmusson, A; Hahn, U; Larsen, J O; Gundersen, H J G; Jensen, E B Vedel; Nyengaard, J R

    2013-05-01

    This paper presents a new local volume estimator, the spatial rotator, which is based on measurements on a virtual 3D probe, using computer assisted microscopy. The basic design of the probe builds upon the rotator principle which requires only a few manual intersection markings, thus making the spatial rotator fast to use. Since a 3D probe is involved, it is expected that the spatial rotator will be more efficient than the the nucleator and the planar rotator, which are based on measurements in a single plane. An extensive simulation study shows that the spatial rotator may be more efficient than the traditional local volume estimators. Furthermore, the spatial rotator can be seen as a further development of the Cavalieri estimator, which does not require randomization of sectioning or viewing direction. The tissue may thus be sectioned in any arbitrary direction, making it easy to identify the specific tissue region under study. In order to use the spatial rotator in practice, however, it is necessary to be able to identify intersection points between cell boundaries and test rays in a series of parallel focal planes, also at the peripheral parts of the cell boundaries. In cases where over- and underprojection phenomena are not negligible, they should therefore be corrected for if the spatial rotator is to be applied. If such a correction is not possible, it is needed to avoid these phenomena by using microscopy with increased resolution in the focal plane. PMID:23488880

  15. The Effect of Excessive Glenhumeral Internal Rotation Deficit on Subacromial Joint Space and Forward Scapular Posture among Baseball Pitchers

    PubMed Central

    Laudner, Kevin G.; Wong, Regan; Latal, Jim; Meister, Keith

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Baseball pitchers frequently present with varying levels of glenohumeral internal rotation deficits (GIRD) in their throwing arms when compared to their non-throwing arms. However, excessive bilateral differences in internal rotation motion have been associated with several shoulder pathologies including both subacromial and internal impingement. Additionally, patients diagnosed with subacromial impingement commonly present with decreased subacromial joint space and increased forward scapular posture. These characteristics have not been, as of yet, evaluated and associated to those pitchers who present with excessive GIRD. The purpose of this study was to determine if a group of baseball pitchers with excessive GIRD have differences in subacromial joint space and forward scapular posture when compared to a control group. Methods: Twenty-five asymptomatic professional baseball pitchers with excessive GIRD were matched with 25 pitchers with acceptable levels of GIRD. Excessive GIRD was classified as an amount greater than 10% of the total arc of motion (i.e. dominant shoulder total arc=160°; 0.10x160°=16°; excessive GIRD=>16°). A digital inclinometer was used to measure glenohumeral internal and external rotation range of motion with participants in a supine position and their scapula stabilized. Diagnostic ultrasound was used to measure the distance of the subacromial joint space with the throwing arm resting at the side of the participant’s body (0° abduction). Bilateral forward scapular posture was assessed with each participant standing against a wall and then the distance between the wall and their anterior acromion was measured using the double square technique. The bilateral difference between these measurements was used to determine the amount of forward scapular posture for the throwing arm. Separate t-tests were run to determine significant differences between groups (p<0.05). Results: Results are summarized in Figure 1. The total arc of

  16. [External ear melanoma].

    PubMed

    Amando García, L; Suárez Nieto, C; Madrigal Rubiales, B; García García, J

    2003-02-01

    Cutaneous melanomas are the tumours that have increased more their incidence in the last fifty years. Melanomas arising from the external auditory canal are extraordinariously unfrequent. These tumours show an aggressive and silent behaviour, and due to this the diagnosis is frequently made in an advanced stage. A male with a malignant melanoma arising from his left external auditory canal was attended in our department, suspecting an epidermoid carcinoma. The clinical findings and the extension of the lesion required a lateral temporal bone resection, parotidectomy and neck dissection to achieve a total resection. We present a review of the literature about this entity and an analysis of the incidence, significance of the lymph node metastases and value of the elective neck dissection. PMID:12802982

  17. Externally triggered microcapsules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Dennis R. (Inventor); Mosier, Benjamin (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Disclosed are microcapsules comprising a polymer shell enclosing one or more immiscible liquid phases in which a drug or drug precursor are contained in a liquid phase. The microparticles also contain magnetic particles that can be heated by application of an external magnetic field and thus heated to a predetermined Curie temperature. Heating of the particles melts the polymer shell and releases the drug without causing heating of surrounding tissues.

  18. Modeling rapidly rotating stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieutord, M.

    2006-06-01

    We review the quest of modeling rapidly rotating stars during the past 40 years and detail the challenges to be taken up by models facing new data from interferometry, seismology, spectroscopy... We then present the progress of the ESTER project aimed at giving a physically self-consistent model for the structure and evolution of rapidly rotating stars.

  19. Rotatable shear plate interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Duffus, Richard C.

    1988-01-01

    A rotatable shear plate interferometer comprises a transparent shear plate mounted obliquely in a tubular supporting member at 45.degree. with respect to its horizontal center axis. This tubular supporting member is supported rotatably around its center axis and a collimated laser beam is made incident on the shear plate along this center axis such that defocus in different directions can be easily measured.

  20. CONTROL ROD ROTATING MECHANISM

    DOEpatents

    Baumgarten, A.; Karalis, A.J.

    1961-11-28

    A threaded rotatable shaft is provided which rotates in response to linear movement of a nut, the shaft being surrounded by a pair of bellows members connected to either side of the nut to effectively seal the reactor from leakage and also to store up energy to shut down the reactor in the event of a power failure. (AEC)

  1. THE OLD ROTATION, 2005

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Old Rotation (circa 1896) is the oldest, continuous cotton experiment in the world. Its 13 plots on 1 acre of land on the campus of Auburn University continue to document the long-term effects of crop rotations with and without winter legumes (crimson clover) as a source of nitrogen for cotton,...

  2. A case study of the abductive reasoning processes of pre-service elementary education students in a role playing setting concerning a mock senate hearing on global climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petty, Michael Eugene

    Science education has a rich history of studies into the impact of analogical reasoning upon researcher and student alike. These have focused on how induction and deduction are utilized in determining the appropriateness of the analogy being scrutinized. Research in artificial intelligence has demonstrated that human cognition cannot be modeled with only inductive and deductive forms of logic. Charles S. Peirce proposed abduction as a form of logic central to the process of inquiry and discovery. This involves reasoning from observation to best explanation or hypothesis. Peirce's Theory of Signs provided the theoretical foundation and a model of abduction developed by Shank and Cunningham from Peirce's theory offered the conceptual basis for the study. This study uses discourse analysis to attempt to understand the abductive reasoning processes of two groups of students as they interpret new information concerning the political and scientific perspective of the Greening Earth Society and the Center for Disease Control in an authentic, undergraduate-level classroom setting. The five students were members of a capstone course in science education for pre-service elementary education majors who had an interest in science education. The entire class was comprised of fourteen students partitioned into five groups for the culminating exercise for the course. Analysis was carried out using journal entries, audiotapes of planning sessions, a brief summary of their understanding, and videotapes of the mock Senate hearings. The results demonstrated that different members of the group arrived at their understanding using different pathways suggested by the model. While some proceeded linearly, others skipped some stages and later came back to find supportive evidence to strengthen their beliefs. The model is useful in understanding their abductive processes and may provide insight into how we might consider the process in the design of future curriculum for elementary science

  3. Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair.

    PubMed

    Burkhart, Stephen S; Lo, Ian K Y

    2006-06-01

    Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair is being performed by an increasing number of orthopaedic surgeons. The principles, techniques, and instrumentation have evolved to the extent that all patterns and sizes of rotator cuff tear, including massive tears, can now be repaired arthroscopically. Achieving a biomechanically stable construct is critical to biologic healing. The ideal repair construct must optimize suture-to-bone fixation, suture-to-tendon fixation, abrasion resistance of suture, suture strength, knot security, loop security, and restoration of the anatomic rotator cuff footprint (the surface area of bone to which the cuff tendons attach). By achieving optimized repair constructs, experienced arthroscopic surgeons are reporting results equal to those of open rotator cuff repair. As surgeons' arthroscopic skill levels increase through attendance at surgical skills courses and greater experience gained in the operating room, there will be an increasing trend toward arthroscopic repair of most rotator cuff pathology. PMID:16757673

  4. Interferometry for rotating sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velle, S.; Mehrabi Pari, S.; Csernai, L. P.

    2016-06-01

    The two particle interferometry method to determine the size of the emitting source after a heavy ion collision is extended. Following the extension of the method to spherical expansion dynamics, here we extend the method to rotating systems. It is shown that rotation of a cylindrically symmetric system leads to modifications, which can be perceived as spatial asymmetry by the "azimuthal HBT" method. We study an exact rotating and expanding solution of the fluid dynamical model of heavy ion reactions. We consider a source that is azimuthally symmetric in space around the axis of rotation, and discuss the features of the resulting two particle correlation function. This shows the azimuthal asymmetry arising from the rotation. We show that this asymmetry leads to results similar to those given by spatially asymmetric sources.

  5. Rotation sensor switch

    DOEpatents

    Sevec, John B.

    1978-01-01

    A protective device to provide a warning if a piece of rotating machinery slows or stops comprises a pair of hinged weights disposed to rotate on a rotating shaft of the equipment. When the equipment is rotating, the weights remain in a plane essentially perpendicular to the shaft and constitute part of an electrical circuit that is open. When the shaft slows or stops, the weights are attracted to a pair of concentric electrically conducting disks disposed in a plane perpendicular to the shaft and parallel to the plane of the weights when rotating. A disk magnet attracts the weights to the electrically conducting plates and maintains the electrical contact at the plates to complete an electrical circuit that can then provide an alarm signal.

  6. Ultrasound-guided gradual reduction using flexion and abduction continuous traction for developmental dysplasia of the hip: a new method of treatment.

    PubMed

    Fukiage, K; Futami, T; Ogi, Y; Harada, Y; Shimozono, F; Kashiwagi, N; Takase, T; Suzuki, S

    2015-03-01

    We describe our experience in the reduction of dislocation of the hip secondary to developmental dysplasia using ultrasound-guided gradual reduction using flexion and abduction continuous traction (FACT-R). During a period of 13 years we treated 208 Suzuki type B or C complete dislocations of the hip in 202 children with a mean age of four months (0 to 11). The mean follow-up was 9.1 years (five to 16). The rate of reduction was 99.0%. There were no recurrent dislocations, and the rate of avascular necrosis of the femoral head was 1.0%. The rate of secondary surgery for residual acetabular dysplasia was 19.2%, and this was significantly higher in those children in whom the initial treatment was delayed or if other previous treatments had failed (p = 0.00045). The duration of FACT-R was significantly longer in severe dislocations (p = 0.001) or if previous treatments had failed (p = 0.018). This new method of treatment is effective and safe in these difficult cases and offers outcomes comparable to or better than those of standard methods. PMID:25737526

  7. GLENOHUMERAL ROTATIONAL RANGE OF MOTION DIFFERENCES BETWEEN FAST BOWLERS AND SPIN BOWLERS IN ELITE CRICKETERS

    PubMed Central

    SKN, Bhargava; Karuppannan, Selvamani

    2012-01-01

    Background: The shoulder, particularly the glenohumeral joint with its predominant reliance upon soft tissues for stability is prone to injury among the cricketers who bowl regularly. These shoulder injuries are more common in spin bowlers than fast bowlers. A decreased internal rotational difference and increased external rotational difference exist when comparing the dominant shoulder with non‐dominant shoulder between overarm cricketers and non‐throwing wicket keepers. Purpose: To compare the glenohumeral internal and external rotation range of motion differences between fast bowlers and spin bowlers. Methods: A cross‐sectional design was utilized for this study. Thirty‐five fast bowlers and 31 spin bowlers from an elite group were recruited based on the selection criteria. Glenohumeral passive internal and external rotational differences between dominant and non‐dominant shoulders were measured using a standardized mechanical inclinometer. Results: Independent t‐tests revealed a statistically significant difference for external rotational difference (p=0.005) between fast and spin bowlers and no such difference for internal rotational difference (p=0.549) between them at 0.05 level. Conclusion: External rotational difference is significantly different between fast bowlers and spin bowlers but not internal rotational difference. Level of Evidence: Level 4 PMID:23316421

  8. ROTATING GLOBULAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Bianchini, P.; Varri, A. L.; Bertin, G.; Zocchi, A.

    2013-07-20

    Internal rotation is thought to play a major role in the dynamics of some globular clusters. However, in only a few cases has internal rotation been studied by the quantitative application of realistic and physically justified global models. Here, we present a dynamical analysis of the photometry and three-dimensional kinematics of {omega} Cen, 47 Tuc, and M15, by means of a recently introduced family of self-consistent axisymmetric rotating models. The three clusters, characterized by different relaxation conditions, show evidence of differential rotation and deviations from sphericity. The combination of line-of-sight velocities and proper motions allows us to determine their internal dynamics, predict their morphology, and estimate their dynamical distance. The well-relaxed cluster 47 Tuc is interpreted very well by our model; internal rotation is found to explain the observed morphology. For M15, we provide a global model in good agreement with the data, including the central behavior of the rotation profile and the shape of the ellipticity profile. For the partially relaxed cluster {omega} Cen, the selected model reproduces the complex three-dimensional kinematics; in particular, the observed anisotropy profile, characterized by a transition from isotropy to weakly radial anisotropy and then to tangential anisotropy in the outer parts. The discrepancy found for the steep central gradient in the observed line-of-sight velocity dispersion profile and for the ellipticity profile is ascribed to the condition of only partial relaxation of this cluster and the interplay between rotation and radial anisotropy.

  9. Evaluation of muscular activity duration in shoulders with rotator cuff tears using inertial sensors and electromyography.

    PubMed

    Duc, Cyntia; Pichonnaz, Claude; Bassin, Jean-Philippe; Farron, Alain; Jolles, Brigitte M; Aminian, Kamiar

    2014-12-01

    Shoulder disorders, including rotator cuff tears, affect the shoulder function and result in adapted muscle activation. Although these adaptations have been studied in controlled conditions, free-living activities have not been investigated. Based on the kinematics measured with inertial sensors and portable electromyography, the objectives of this study were to quantify the duration of the muscular activation in the upper trapezius (UT), medial deltoid (MD) and biceps brachii (BB) during motion and to investigate the effect of rotator cuff tear in laboratory settings and daily conditions. The duration of movements and muscular activations were analysed separately and together using the relative time of activation (T(EMG/mov)). Laboratory measurements showed the parameter's reliability through movement repetitions (ICC > 0.74) and differences in painful shoulders compared with healthy ones (p < 0.05): longer activation for UT; longer activation for MD during abduction and tendency to shorter activation in other movements; shorter activation for BB. In daily conditions, T(EMG/mov) for UT was longer, whereas it was shorter for MD and BB (p < 0.05). Moreover, significant correlations were observed between these parameters and clinical scores. This study thus provides new insights into the rotator cuff tear effect on duration of muscular activation in daily activity. PMID:25390457

  10. Rotating reactor studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Glyn O.

    1991-01-01

    Undesired gravitational effects such as convection or sedimentation in a fluid can sometimes be avoided or decreased by the use of a closed chamber uniformly rotated about a horizontal axis. In a previous study, the spiral orbits of a heavy or buoyant particle in a uniformly rotating fluid were determined. The particles move in circles, and spiral in or out under the combined effects of the centrifugal force and centrifugal buoyancy. A optimization problem for the rotation rate of a cylindrical reactor rotated about its axis and containing distributed particles was formulated and solved. Related studies in several areas are addressed. A computer program based on the analysis was upgraded by correcting some minor errors, adding a sophisticated screen-and-printer graphics capability and other output options, and by improving the automation. The design, performance, and analysis of a series of experiments with monodisperse polystyrene latex microspheres in water were supported to test the theory and its limitations. The theory was amply confirmed at high rotation rates. However, at low rotation rates (1 rpm or less) the assumption of uniform solid-body rotation of the fluid became invalid, and there were increasingly strong secondary motions driven by variations in the mean fluid density due to variations in the particle concentration. In these tests the increase in the mean fluid density due to the particles was of order 0.015 percent. To a first approximation, these flows are driven by the buoyancy in a thin crescent-shaped depleted layer on the descending side of the rotating reactor. This buoyancy distribution is balanced by viscosity near the walls, and by the Coriolis force in the interior. A full analysis is beyond the scope of this study. Secondary flows are likely to be stronger for buoyant particles, which spiral in towards the neutral point near the rotation axis under the influence of their centrifugal buoyancy. This is because the depleted layer is

  11. Rotatable seal assembly. [Patent application; rotating targets

    DOEpatents

    Logan, C.M.; Garibaldi, J.L.

    1980-11-12

    An assembly is provided for rotatably supporting a rotor on a stator so that vacuum chambers in the rotor and stator remain in communication while the chambers are sealed from ambient air, which enables the use of a ball bearing or the like to support most of the weight of the rotor. The apparatus includes a seal device mounted on the rotor to rotate therewith, but shiftable in position on the rotor while being sealed to the rotor as by an O-ring. The seal device has a flat face that is biased towards a flat face on the stator, and pressurized air is pumped between the faces to prevent contact between them while spacing them a small distance apart to avoid the inflow of large amounts of air between the faces and into the vacuum chambers.

  12. DIRBE External Calibrator (DEC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wyatt, Clair L.; Thurgood, V. Alan; Allred, Glenn D.

    1987-01-01

    Under NASA Contract No. NAS5-28185, the Center for Space Engineering at Utah State University has produced a calibration instrument for the Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment (DIRBE). DIRBE is one of the instruments aboard the Cosmic Background Experiment Observatory (COBE). The calibration instrument is referred to as the DEC (Dirbe External Calibrator). DEC produces a steerable, infrared beam of controlled spectral content and intensity and with selectable point source or diffuse source characteristics, that can be directed into the DIRBE to map fields and determine response characteristics. This report discusses the design of the DEC instrument, its operation and characteristics, and provides an analysis of the systems capabilities and performance.

  13. External split field generator

    SciTech Connect

    Thundat, Thomas George; Van Neste, Charles W.; Vass, Arpad Alexander

    2012-02-21

    A generator includes a coil disposed about a core. A first stationary magnetic field source may be disposed on a first end portion of the core and a second stationary magnetic field source may be disposed on a second end portion of core. The first and second stationary magnetic field sources apply a stationary magnetic field to the coil. An external magnetic field source may be disposed outside the coil to apply a moving magnetic field to the coil. Electrical energy is generated in response to an interaction between the coil, the moving magnetic field, and the stationary magnetic field.

  14. Progressive External Ophthalmoplegia.

    PubMed

    McClelland, Collin; Manousakis, Georgios; Lee, Michael S

    2016-06-01

    Progressive external ophthalmoplegia (PEO), marked by progressive bilateral ptosis and diffuse reduction in ocular motility, represents a finding of mitochondrial myopathy rather than a true diagnosis. PEO often occurs with other systemic features of mitochondrial dysfunction that can cause significant morbidity and mortality. Accurate and early recognition of PEO is paramount for the optimal care of these patients. We present an evidence-based review of the presenting neuro-ophthalmic features, differential diagnosis, diagnostic tools, systemic implications, and treatment options for isolated PEO and other PEO-associated mitochondrial syndromes. PMID:27072953

  15. Chaotic rotation of Hyperion?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Binzel, R. P.; Green, J. R.; Opal, C. B.

    1986-01-01

    Thomas et al. (1984) analyzed 14 Voyager 2 images of Saturn's satellite Hyperion and interpreted them to be consistent with a coherent (nonchaotic) rotation period of 13.1 days. This interpretation was criticized by Peale and Wisdom (1984), who argued that the low sampling frequency of Voyager data does not allow chaotic or nonchaotic rotation to be distinguished. New observations obtained with a higher sampling frequency are reported here which conclusively show that the 13.1 day period found by Thomas et al. was not due to coherent rotation.

  16. Acoustic rotation control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elleman, D. D.; Croonquist, A. P.; Wang, T. G. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A system is described for acoustically controlled rotation of a levitated object, which avoids deformation of a levitated liquid object. Acoustic waves of the same wavelength are directed along perpendicular directions across the object, and with the relative phases of the acoustic waves repeatedly switched so that one wave alternately leads and lags the other by 90 deg. The amount of torque for rotating the object, and the direction of rotation, are controlled by controlling the proportion of time one wave leads the other and selecting which wave leads the other most of the time.

  17. E-Alerts: Combustion, engines, and propellants (reciprocation and rotating combustion engines). E-mail newsletter

    SciTech Connect

    1999-04-01

    Design, performance, and testing of reciprocating and rotating engines of various configurations for all types of propulsion. Includes internal and external combustion engines; engine exhaust systems; engine air systems components; engine structures; stirling and diesel engines.

  18. [Recent experience with reconstruction operations in ruptures of the rotator cuff.].

    PubMed

    Chomiak, J

    1997-01-01

    The author presents his short-term experience with reconstruction operations in ruptures of the rotator cuff which were performed according to principles accepted at present in twenty five patients (26 shoulders) during 1993-1996. Men predominated in the group (16 men) and the majority of patients were in the age bracket from 50-70 years. The follow-up period was 6-36 months. Massive ruptures with a lesion of the cuff exceeding 5 cm (10 times) predominated, followed by ruptures with a lesion under 2 cm (9 times). In the majority of patients the operatoin was made using the Kessel-Gschwend approach. After anterior acromionplasty the tendons of the cuff were released and fixed into the ridge between the articular area of the head of the joint and the large tubercle. The operated extremity was fixed on an abduction splint for 4-6 weeks and this was followed by controlled rehabilitation for 1-2 months. According to Constant's functional score excellent results were achieved in 31 % of the operated patients, a satisfactory result in 11 % and an unsatisfactory result in 23 % of the operated patients. The presented results are consistent above all with the subjective evaluation and evaluation of pain resulting from subacromial decompression. The functional result is consiostent with the achieved extent of mobility of the shoulder. In the majority of patients however marked restriction of strength in abduction persists due to muscular hypotrophy asa result of predominating inveterate massive ruptures. Unsatisfactory results were recorded in six patients in conjunction with the following circumstances: reoperation in the subacromial space, mechanical failure of the suture, deep infection in diabetes mellitus, operation of an occupational injury with attempted compensation and refractory cervicobrachial syndrome with an impact on the shoulder joint. From this initial experience ensues that reconstructions of the rotator cuff are successful provided the indication is correct

  19. Healing rates for challenging rotator cuff tears utilizing an acellular human dermal reinforcement graft

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Vivek

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This study presents a retrospective case series of the clinical and structural outcomes (1.5 T MRI) of arthroscopic rotator cuff repair with acellular human dermal graft reinforcement performed by a single surgeon in patients with large, massive, and previously repaired rotator cuff tears. Materials and Methods: Fourteen patients with mean anterior to posterior tear size 3.87 ± 0.99 cm (median 4 cm, range 2.5–6 cm) were enrolled in the study and were evaluated for structural integrity using a high-field (1.5 T) MRI at an average of 16.8 months after surgery. The Constant-Murley scores, the Flexilevel Scale of Shoulder Function (Flex SF), scapular plane abduction, and strength were analyzed. Results: MRI results showed that the rotator cuff repair was intact in 85.7% (12/14) of the patients studied. Two patients had a Sugaya Type IV recurrent tear (2 of 14; 14.3%), which were both less than 1 cm. The Constant score increased from a preoperative mean of 49.72 (range 13–74) to a postoperative mean of 81.07 (range 45–92) (P value = 0.009). Flexilevel Scale of Shoulder Function (Flex SF) Score normalized to a 100-point scale improved from a preoperative mean of 53.69 to a postoperative mean of 79.71 (P value = 0.003). The Pain Score improved from a preoperative mean of 7.73 to a postoperative mean of 13.57 (P value = 0.008). Scapular plane abduction improved from a preoperative mean of 113.64° to a postoperative mean of 166.43° (P value = 0.010). The strength subset score improved from a preoperative mean of 1.73 kg to a postoperative mean of 7.52 kg (P value = 0.006). Conclusions: This study presents a safe and effective technique that may help improve the healing rates of large, massive, and revision rotator cuff tears with the use of an acellular human dermal allograft. This technique demonstrated favorable structural healing rates and statistically improved functional outcomes in the near term. Level of Evidence: 4. Retrospective case series. PMID

  20. Glenohumeral Rotational Motion and Strength and Baseball Pitching Biomechanics

    PubMed Central

    Hurd, Wendy J.; Kaufman, Kenton R.

    2012-01-01

    Context: Addressing loss of shoulder range of motion and rotator cuff weakness in injury-prevention programs might be an effective strategy for preventing throwing arm injuries in baseball pitchers. However, the influence of these clinical measures on pitching biomechanics is unclear. Objective: To evaluate the relationships among clinical measures of shoulder rotational motion and strength and 3-dimensional pitching biomechanics and to evaluate the presence of coupling between the shoulder and the elbow during pitching to provide insight into the influence of clinical shoulder characteristics on elbow biomechanics. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Biomechanics laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: A total of 27 uninjured male high school baseball pitchers (age  =  16 ± 1.1 years, height  =  183 ± 7 cm, mass  =  83 ± 12 kg). Main Outcome Measure(s): Clinical measures included shoulder internal- and external-rotation range of motion and peak isometric internal- and external-rotator strength. Three-dimensional upper extremity biomechanics were assessed as participants threw from an indoor pitching mound to a target at regulation distance. Linear regressions were used to assess the influence of clinical measures on the peak shoulder internal and external rotation moments and the peak elbow-adduction moment. Results: We found a positive relationship between clinically measured internal-rotator strength and shoulder external-rotation moment (R2  =  0.181, P  =  .04) during pitching. We also noted an inverse relationship between clinically measured external-rotation motion and the elbow-adduction moment (R2  =  0.160, P  =  .04) and shoulder internal-rotation moment (R2  =  0.250, P  =  .008) during pitching. We found a positive relationship between peak shoulder internal-rotation moment and the peak elbow-adduction moment (R2  =  0.815, P < .001) during pitching. Conclusions: This study provides insight into the

  1. Brownian dipole rotator in alternating electric field.

    PubMed

    Rozenbaum, V M; Vovchenko, O Ye; Korochkova, T Ye

    2008-06-01

    The study addresses the azimuthal jumping motion of an adsorbed polar molecule in a periodic n -well potential under the action of an external alternating electric field. Starting from the perturbation theory of the Pauli equation with respect to the weak field intensity, explicit analytical expressions have been derived for the time dependence of the average dipole moment as well as the frequency dependences of polarizability and the average angular velocity, the three quantities exhibiting conspicuous stochastic resonance. As shown, unidirectional rotation can arise only provided simultaneous modulation of the minima and maxima of the potential by an external alternating field. For a symmetric potential of hindered rotation, the average angular velocity, if calculated by the second-order perturbation theory with respect to the field intensity, has a nonzero value only at n=2 , i.e., when two azimuthal wells specify a selected axis in the system. Particular consideration is given to the effect caused by the asymmetry of the two-well potential on the dielectric loss spectrum and other Brownian motion parameters. When the asymmetric potential in a system of dipole rotators arises from the average local fields induced by an orientational phase transition, the characteristics concerned show certain peculiarities which enable detection of the phase transition and determination of its parameters. PMID:18643221

  2. Brownian dipole rotator in alternating electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozenbaum, V. M.; Vovchenko, O. Ye.; Korochkova, T. Ye.

    2008-06-01

    The study addresses the azimuthal jumping motion of an adsorbed polar molecule in a periodic n -well potential under the action of an external alternating electric field. Starting from the perturbation theory of the Pauli equation with respect to the weak field intensity, explicit analytical expressions have been derived for the time dependence of the average dipole moment as well as the frequency dependences of polarizability and the average angular velocity, the three quantities exhibiting conspicuous stochastic resonance. As shown, unidirectional rotation can arise only provided simultaneous modulation of the minima and maxima of the potential by an external alternating field. For a symmetric potential of hindered rotation, the average angular velocity, if calculated by the second-order perturbation theory with respect to the field intensity, has a nonzero value only at n=2 , i.e., when two azimuthal wells specify a selected axis in the system. Particular consideration is given to the effect caused by the asymmetry of the two-well potential on the dielectric loss spectrum and other Brownian motion parameters. When the asymmetric potential in a system of dipole rotators arises from the average local fields induced by an orientational phase transition, the characteristics concerned show certain peculiarities which enable detection of the phase transition and determination of its parameters.

  3. Rotator Cuff Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... cuff are common. They include tendinitis, bursitis, and injuries such as tears. Rotator cuff tendons can become ... cuff depends on age, health, how severe the injury is, and how long you've had the ...

  4. The Rotating Mirror.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenslade, Thomas B., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Discusses theory of the rotating mirror, its use in measuring the velocity of the electrical signal in wires, and the velocity of light. Concludes with a description of the manometric flame apparatus developed for analyzing sound waves. (SK)

  5. Rotating mobile launcher

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, T. J.

    1977-01-01

    Apparatus holds remotely piloted arm that accelerates until launching speed is reached. Then vehicle and counterweight at other end of arm are released simultaneously to avoid structural damage from unbalanced rotating forces.

  6. Rotator cuff problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... tear occurs when one of the tendons is torn from the bone from overuse or injury. Causes ... surgery with a larger incision) to repair the torn tendon. Outlook (Prognosis) With rotator cuff tendinitis, rest, ...

  7. Rotator cuff repair

    MedlinePlus

    ... already torn from chronic rotator cuff problems. A partial tear may not require surgery. Instead, rest and ... Follow any discharge and self-care instructions you are given. You will be wearing a sling when you leave the hospital. ...

  8. Electromagnetic rotational actuation.

    SciTech Connect

    Hogan, Alexander Lee

    2010-08-01

    There are many applications that need a meso-scale rotational actuator. These applications have been left by the wayside because of the lack of actuation at this scale. Sandia National Laboratories has many unique fabrication technologies that could be used to create an electromagnetic actuator at this scale. There are also many designs to be explored. In this internship exploration of the designs and fabrications technologies to find an inexpensive design that can be used for prototyping the electromagnetic rotational actuator.

  9. Rotational rate sensor

    DOEpatents

    Hunter, Steven L.

    2002-01-01

    A rate sensor for angular/rotational acceleration includes a housing defining a fluid cavity essentially completely filled with an electrolyte fluid. Within the housing, such as a toroid, ions in the fluid are swept during movement from an excitation electrode toward one of two output electrodes to provide a signal for directional rotation. One or more ground electrodes within the housing serve to neutralize ions, thus preventing any effect at the other output electrode.

  10. Robot Grasps Rotating Object

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, Brian H.; Tso, Kam S.; Litwin, Todd E.; Hayati, Samad A.; Bon, Bruce B.

    1991-01-01

    Experimental robotic system semiautomatically grasps rotating object, stops rotation, and pulls object to rest in fixture. Based on combination of advanced techniques for sensing and control, constructed to test concepts for robotic recapture of spinning artificial satellites. Potential terrestrial applications for technology developed with help of system includes tracking and grasping of industrial parts on conveyor belts, tracking of vehicles and animals, and soft grasping of moving objects in general.

  11. Instability in Rotating Machinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The proceedings contain 45 papers on a wide range of subjects including flow generated instabilities in fluid flow machines, cracked shaft detection, case histories of instability phenomena in compressors, turbines, and pumps, vibration control in turbomachinery (including antiswirl techniques), and the simulation and estimation of destabilizing forces in rotating machines. The symposium was held to serve as an update on the understanding and control of rotating machinery instability problems.

  12. Rotating arc spark plug

    DOEpatents

    Whealton, John H.; Tsai, Chin-Chi

    2003-05-27

    A spark plug device includes a structure for modification of an arc, the modification including arc rotation. The spark plug can be used in a combustion engine to reduce emissions and/or improve fuel economy. A method for operating a spark plug and a combustion engine having the spark plug device includes the step of modifying an arc, the modifying including rotating the arc.

  13. Rotational Spectrum of Sarin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, A. R. Hight; Suenram, R. D.; Samuels, Alan; Jensen, James; Ellzy, Michael W.; Lochner, J. Michael; Zeroka, Daniel

    2001-05-01

    As part of an effort to examine the possibility of using molecular-beam Fourier-transform microwave spectroscopy to unambiguously detect and monitor chemical warfare agents, we report the first observation and assignment of the rotational spectrum of the nerve agent Sarin (GB) (Methylphosphonofluoridic acid 1-methyl-ethyl ester, CAS #107-44-8) at frequencies between 10 and 22 GHz. Only one of the two low-energy conformers of this organophosphorus compound (C4H10FO2P) was observed in the rotationally cold (Trot<2 K) molecular beam. The experimental asymmetric-rotor ground-state rotational constants of this conformer are A=2874.0710(9) MHz, B=1168.5776(4) MHz, C=1056.3363(4) MHz (Type A standard uncertainties are given, i.e., 1σ), as obtained from a least-squares analysis of 74 a-, b-, and c-type rotational transitions. Several of the transitions are split into doublets due to the internal rotation of the methyl group attached to the phosphorus. The three-fold-symmetry barrier to internal rotation estimated from these splittings is 677.0(4) cm-1. Ab initio electronic structure calculations using Hartree-Fock, density functional, and Moller-Plesset perturbation theories have also been made. The structure of the lowest-energy conformer determined from a structural optimization at the MP2/6-311G** level of theory is consistent with our experimental findings.

  14. The Dissipation Rate Transport Equation and Subgrid-Scale Models in Rotating Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubinstein, Robert; Ye, Zhou

    1997-01-01

    The dissipation rate transport equation remains the most uncertain part of turbulence modeling. The difficulties arc increased when external agencies like rotation prevent straightforward dimensional analysis from determining the correct form of the modelled equation. In this work, the dissipation rate transport equation and subgrid scale models for rotating turbulence are derived from an analytical statistical theory of rotating turbulence. In the strong rotation limit, the theory predicts a turbulent steady state in which the inertial range energy spectrum scales as k(sup -2) and the turbulent time scale is the inverse rotation rate. This scaling has been derived previously by heuristic arguments.

  15. The effect of external environment on the evolution of protostellar disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorobyov, Eduard I.; Lin, D. N. C.; Guedel, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Aims: Using numerical hydrodynamics simulations, we studied the gravitational collapse of prestellar cores of subsolar mass embedded into a low-density external environment. Methods: Four models with different magnitude and direction of rotation of the external environment with respect to the central core were studied and compared with an isolated model. Results: We found that the infall of matter from the external environment can significantly alter the disk properties as compared to those seen in the isolated model. Depending on the magnitude and direction of rotation of the external environment, a variety of disks can form including compact (≤200 AU) ones shrinking in size owing to infall of external matter with low angular momentum, as well as extended disks forming from infall of external matter with high angular momentum. The former are usually stable against gravitational fragmentation, while the latter are prone to fragmentation and formation of stellar systems with substellar/very-low-mass companions. In the case of a counter-rotating external environment, very compact (<5 AU) and short-lived (≲ a few 105 yr) disks can form when infalling material has low angular momentum. The most interesting case is found for the infall of counter-rotating external material with high angular momentum, leading to the formation of counter-rotating inner and outer disks separated by a deep gap at a few tens AU. The gap migrates inward owing to accretion of the inner disk onto the protostar, turns into a central hole, and finally disappears, giving way to the outer strongly gravitationally unstable disk. This model may lead to the emergence of a transient stellar system with planetary/substellar components counter-rotating with respect to that of the star.

  16. ANALYSIS ON THE VARIATION OF MEDIAL ROTATION VALUES ACCORDING TO THE POSITION OF THE HUMERAL DIAPHYSIS

    PubMed Central

    Miyazaki, Alberto Naoki; Fregoneze, Marcelo; Santos, Pedro Doneux; da Silva, Luciana Andrade; do Val Sella, Guilherme; Cohen, Carina; Busin Giora, Taís Stedile; Checchia, Sergio Luiz; Raia, Fabio; Pekelman, Hélio; Cymrot, Raquel

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the validity of measurements of medial rotation (MR) of the shoulder, using vertebral levels, according to the variation in the position of the humeral diaphysis, and to test the bi-goniometer as a new measuring instrument. Methods: 140 shoulders (70 patients) were prospectively evaluated in cases presenting unilateral shoulder MR limitation. The vertebral level was evaluated by means of a visual scale and was correlated with the angle obtained according to the position of the humeral diaphysis, using the bi-goniometer developed with the Department of Mechanical Engineering of Mackenzie University. Results: The maximum vertebral level reached through MR on the unaffected side ranged from T3 to T12, and on the affected side, from T6 to the trochanter. Repositioning of the affected limb in MR according to the angular values on the normal side showed that 57.13% of the patients reached lower levels, between the sacrum, gluteus and trochanter. From analysis on the maximum vertebral level attained and the variation between the affected angle x (frontal plane: abduction and MR of the shoulder) and the unaffected angle x in MR, we observed that the greater the angle of the diaphyseal axis was, the lower the variation in the vertebral level attained was. From evaluating the linear correlation between the variables of difference in maximum vertebral level reached and variation in the affected angle y (extension and abduction of the shoulder) and the unaffected angle y in MR, we observed that there was no well-established linear relationship between these variables. Conclusion: Measurement of MR using vertebral levels does not correspond to the real values, since it varies according to the positioning of the humeral diaphysis. PMID:27047845

  17. Dynamic properties of the human vestibulo-ocular reflex during head rotations in roll

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seidman, S. H.; Leigh, R. J.; Tomsak, R. L.; Grant, M. P.; Dell'Osso, L. F.

    1995-01-01

    We investigated the dynamic properties of the human vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) during roll head rotations in three human subjects using the magnetic search coil technique. In the first of two experiments, we quantify the behavior of the ocular motor plant in the torsional plane. The subject's eye was mechanically displaced into intorsion, extorsion or abduction, and the dynamic course of return of the eye to its resting position was measured. The mean predominant time constants of return were 210 msec from intorsion, 83 msec from extorsion, and 217 msec from abduction, although there was considerable variability of results from different trials and subjects. In the second experiment, we quantify the efficacy of velocity-to-position integration of the vestibular signal. Position-step stimuli were used to test the torsional or horizontal VOR, being applied with subjects heads erect or supine. After a torsional position-step, the eye drifted back to its resting position, but after a horizontal position-step the eye held its new horizontal position. To interpret these responses we used a simple model of the VOR with parameters of the ocular motor plant set to values determined during Exp 1. The time constant of the velocity-to-position neural integrator was smaller (typically 2 sec) in the torsional plane than in the horizontal plane (> 20 sec). No disconjugacy of torsional eye movements was observed. Thus, the dynamic properties of the VOR in roll differ significantly from those of the VOR in yaw, reflecting different visual demands placed on this reflex in these two planes.

  18. [External ophthalmomyiasis: case reports].

    PubMed

    Yar, Kemal; Özcan, Altan Atakan; Koltaş, İ Soner

    2011-01-01

    We report two cases with external ophthalmomyiasis due to infestation with the larvae of Oestrus ovis. During an ophthalmologic examination, motile larvae were seen on the conjunctiva, which were removed and sent to the Department of Parasitology for identification. Microscopic examination of the specimens revealed that both patients were infested with the first stage larvae of O. ovis. The patients were treated with topical antibiotics and steroids and recovered without any complications. O. ovis larvae are the most common cause of ophthalmomyiasis worldwide. They are usually seen in underdeveloped, agricultural areas with high numbers of livestock, especially during Spring and Summer. These kind of infestations should be kept in mind in cases of conjunctivitis in the warm months of the year. PMID:22198925

  19. Hanford External Dosimetry Program

    SciTech Connect

    Fix, J.J.

    1990-10-01

    This document describes the Hanford External Dosimetry Program as it is administered by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) in support of the US Department of Energy (DOE) and its Hanford contractors. Program services include administrating the Hanford personnel dosimeter processing program and ensuring that the related dosimeter data accurately reflect occupational dose received by Hanford personnel or visitors. Specific chapters of this report deal with the following subjects: personnel dosimetry organizations at Hanford and the associated DOE and contractor exposure guidelines; types, characteristics, and procurement of personnel dosimeters used at Hanford; personnel dosimeter identification, acceptance testing, accountability, and exchange; dosimeter processing and data recording practices; standard sources, calibration factors, and calibration processes (including algorithms) used for calibrating Hanford personnel dosimeters; system operating parameters required for assurance of dosimeter processing quality control; special dose evaluation methods applied for individuals under abnormal circumstances (i.e., lost results, etc.); and methods for evaluating personnel doses from nuclear accidents. 1 ref., 14 figs., 5 tabs.

  20. External Measures of Cognition

    PubMed Central

    Cairό, Osvaldo

    2011-01-01

    The human brain is undoubtedly the most impressive, complex, and intricate organ that has evolved over time. It is also probably the least understood, and for that reason, the one that is currently attracting the most attention. In fact, the number of comparative analyses that focus on the evolution of brain size in Homo sapiens and other species has increased dramatically in recent years. In neuroscience, no other issue has generated so much interest and been the topic of so many heated debates as the difference in brain size between socially defined population groups, both its connotations and implications. For over a century, external measures of cognition have been related to intelligence. However, it is still unclear whether these measures actually correspond to cognitive abilities. In summary, this paper must be reviewed with this premise in mind. PMID:22065955

  1. The effect of transcranial direct current stimulation on the expression of the flexor synergy in the paretic arm in chronic stroke is dependent on shoulder abduction loading.

    PubMed

    Yao, Jun; Drogos, Justin; Veltink, Fleur; Anderson, Caitlyn; Concha Urday Zaa, Janny; Hanson, Laura Imming; Dewald, Julius P A

    2015-01-01

    Reaching ability of the paretic upper extremity in individuals with stroke decreases with increased shoulder abduction (SABD) loads. Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) has been implemented to improve movement ability following stroke. However, results from previous studies vary, perhaps due to the influence of impairment level and the type of motor tasks that were used to study the effects of tDCS. This study specifically examines the impact of SABD loading on the effects of tDCS in 9 individuals with moderate to severe chronic stroke. In 3 different sessions, participants repeated a reaching assessment with various SABD loads (supported on a haptic table, 25%, and 50% of maximum voluntary SABD torque) in random order, pre and post one of the following 15-min tDCS protocols: anodal stimulation of lesioned M1, cathodal stimulation of non-lesioned M1, or anodal stimulation of non-lesioned M1. Sham stimulation was also conducted preceding one of the tDCS sessions. The averaged maximum reaching distance over valid trials was calculated for each condition. We observed significant interactions between SABD load, tDCS protocol and time (i.e., pre or post-tDCS). Post hoc test showed that anodal stimulation of the lesioned M1 caused a clear trend (p = 0.058) of increasing the reaching ability at a medium level of SABD loading (25%), but not for higher loads (50%). This suggests that anodal stimulation increases residual corticospinal tract activity, which successfully increases reaching ability at moderate loads; however, is insufficient to make significant changes at higher SABD loads. We also found that cathodal stimulation of the non-lesioned M1 significantly (p = 0.018) decreased the reaching distance at a high level of SABD loading (50%). This study demonstrated, for the first time, that the effect of tDCS on the reaching ability is dependent on SABD loads in individuals with moderate to severe stroke. PMID:26029081

  2. Rotating superconductor magnet for producing rotating lobed magnetic field lines

    DOEpatents

    Hilal, Sadek K.; Sampson, William B.; Leonard, Edward F.

    1978-01-01

    This invention provides a rotating superconductor magnet for producing a rotating lobed magnetic field, comprising a cryostat; a superconducting magnet in the cryostat having a collar for producing a lobed magnetic field having oppositely directed adjacent field lines; rotatable support means for selectively rotating the superconductor magnet; and means for energizing the superconductor magnet.

  3. Theoretical Model for Plasma Rotation Paradox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppi, B.; Penn, G.

    1998-04-01

    Significant plasma rotation has been observed in toroidal plasmas subject to ICRF heating in the absence of direct angular momentum inputs( J.E. Rice, M.J. Greenwald, I.H. Hutchinson, et al., MIT report PSFC/JA-97-4, submitted to Nuclear Fusion.). The plasma rotates in the direction of the plasma current with typical toroidal velocities of 10^4 m/s at the magnetic axis in Alcator C-Mod experiments. A process to induce this rotation is proposed that is related to the excitation of a special class of magnetosonic modes which are radially confined only if they have a poloidal phase velocity in the ion cyclotron direction, resulting in a correlated toroidal phase velocity. These ``contained modes''( B. Coppi, G. Penn, C. Riconda, Annals of Physics 261) (1997) 117. will deposit their angular momentum to the plasma as they damp out. In contrast, modes having the opposite phase velocity can be expected to convert into external modes which will then be absorbed by the enclosing wall. The resulting torque on the plasma is in the same direction as the toroidal current. We find that this mechanism is consistent with the observed magnitude and direction of the plasma rotation. A relevant issue is the transport of angular momentum from the mode layer to the magnetic axis, for which secondary instabilities may have to be considered.

  4. Rotating Hele-Shaw cells with ferrofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miranda, José A.

    2000-08-01

    We investigate the flow of two immiscible, viscous fluids in a rotating Hele-Shaw cell, when one of the fluids is a ferrofluid and an external magnetic field is applied. The interplay between centrifugal and magnetic forces in determining the instability of the fluid-fluid interface is analyzed. The linear stability analysis of the problem shows that a nonuniform, azimuthal magnetic field, applied tangential to the cell, tends to stabilize the interface. We verify that maximum growth rate selection of initial patterns is influenced by the applied field, which tends to decrease the number of interface ripples. We contrast these results with the situation in which a uniform magnetic field is applied normally to the plane defined by the rotating Hele-Shaw cell.

  5. A microscale thermophoretic turbine driven by external diffusive heat flux.

    PubMed

    Yang, Mingcheng; Liu, Rui; Ripoll, Marisol; Chen, Ke

    2014-11-21

    We propose a theoretical prototype of a micro-scale turbine externally driven by diffusive heat flux without the need for macroscopic particle flux, which is in sharp contrast to conventional turbines. The prototypes are described analytically and validated by computer simulations. Our results indicate that a micro-scale turbine composed of anisotropic blades can rotate unidirectionally in an external temperature gradient due to the anisotropic thermophoresis effect. The rotational direction and speed depend on the temperature gradient, the geometry and the thermophoretic properties of the turbine. The proposed thermophoretic turbines can be experimentally realized and implemented on micro-devices such as computer-chips to recover waste heat or to facilitate cooling. PMID:25268245

  6. Intercostal muscles are used during rotation of the thorax in humans.

    PubMed

    Whitelaw, W A; Ford, G T; Rimmer, K P; De Troyer, A

    1992-05-01

    To test the idea that the lateral intercostal muscles may be more suited to aid in rotational than respiratory movements of the thorax, we inserted bipolar fine-wire electrodes in external and internal intercostal muscles in the right midaxillary line in nine sitting subjects and examined the pattern of contraction of these muscles during voluntary axial rotations of the thorax (30-35 degrees), resting breathing, and CO2-induced hyperpnea. The right external intercostal muscles were strongly recruited in rotations to the left but were not active in rotations to the right. In contrast, the right internal intercostal muscles were active in rotations to the right but not in rotations to the left. Rotations completed in 1 or 2 s were associated with an early burst of electromyographic activity, followed by a low plateau that persisted while the rotation was held. Rotations made very gradually over 5-10 s were associated with gradually rising electromyographic activity. The amplitude of activity recorded during 30-35 degrees rotations was equivalent to that measured when minute ventilation was increased by CO2 to 50 l/min. We conclude that the lateral intercostal muscles have a major role in producing axial rotations of the thorax. PMID:1601803

  7. Scrubbing noise of externally blown flaps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fink, M. R.

    1975-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted to examine the aeroacoustic mechanism that produces externally blown flap (EBF) scrubbing noise, i.e. a surface-radiated noise which is generally strongest normal to UTW deflected flaps. Scrubbing noise was not radiated from portions of the surface adjacent to strong, locally coherent turbulent eddies. Instead, scrubbing noise seemed to come from weak loading fluctuations that were coherent along the scrubbed span. These loading fluctuations probably were induced by the convected large-scale vortex structure of the attached exhaust jet. Deflecting a UTW flap would reduce the distance between the vortex trajectory and the flap surface, increasing the resulting dipole noise and rotating its directivity. In contrast, deflecting a USB flap would increase this distance, so that observable scrubbing noise would be radiated only from the undeflected forward portion of the wing.

  8. Rotating Aperture System

    DOEpatents

    Rusnak, Brian; Hall, James M.; Shen, Stewart; Wood, Richard L.

    2005-01-18

    A rotating aperture system includes a low-pressure vacuum pumping stage with apertures for passage of a deuterium beam. A stator assembly includes holes for passage of the beam. The rotor assembly includes a shaft connected to a deuterium gas cell or a crossflow venturi that has a single aperture on each side that together align with holes every rotation. The rotating apertures are synchronized with the firing of the deuterium beam such that the beam fires through a clear aperture and passes into the Xe gas beam stop. Portions of the rotor are lapped into the stator to improve the sealing surfaces, to prevent rapid escape of the deuterium gas from the gas cell.

  9. Rotating ice blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorbolo, Stephane; Adami, Nicolas; Grasp Team

    2014-11-01

    The motion of ice discs released at the surface of a thermalized bath was investigated. As observed in some rare events in the Nature, the discs start spinning spontaneously. The motor of this motion is the cooling of the water close to the ice disc. As the density of water is maximum at 4°C, a downwards flow is generated from the surface of the ice block to the bottom. This flow generates the rotation of the disc. The speed of rotation depends on the mass of the ice disc and on the temperature of the bath. A model has been constructed to study the influence of the temperature of the bath. Finally, ice discs were put on a metallic plate. Again, a spontaneous rotation was observed. FNRS is thanked for financial support.

  10. IO Rotation Movie

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    During its 1979 flyby, Voyager 2 observed Io only from a distance. However, the volcanic activity discovered by Voyager 1 months earlier was readily visible. This sequence of nine color images was collected using the Blue, Green and Orange filters from about 1.2 million kilometers. A 2.5 hour period is covered during which Io rotates 7 degrees.

    Rotating into view over the limb of Io are the plumes of the volcanoes Amirani (top) and Maui (lower). These plumes are very distinct against the black sky because they are being illuminated from behind. Notice that as Io rotates, the proportion of Io which is sunlit decreases greatly. This changing phase angle is because Io is moving between the spacecraft and the Sun.

    This time-lapse movie was produced at JPL by the Image Processing Laboratory in 1985.

  11. Lattice QCD in rotating frames.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Arata; Hirono, Yuji

    2013-08-23

    We formulate lattice QCD in rotating frames to study the physics of QCD matter under rotation. We construct the lattice QCD action with the rotational metric and apply it to the Monte Carlo simulation. As the first application, we calculate the angular momenta of gluons and quarks in the rotating QCD vacuum. This new framework is useful to analyze various rotation-related phenomena in QCD. PMID:24010426

  12. Relationship between spinal range of motion and trunk muscle activity during trunk rotation

    PubMed Central

    Sugaya, Tomoaki; Sakamoto, Masaaki; Nakazawa, Rie; Wada, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to clarify the relationship between spinal range of motion and trunk muscle activity during trunk rotation using a three-dimensional motion analysis system and surface electromyography. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects comprised 11 healthy men. A three-dimensional motion analysis system measured the trunk rotational angle of 4 segments of the thoracic vertebrae and 2 segments of the lumbar vertebrae. Surface electromyography measured the activities of the unilateral latissimus dorsi, lumbar multifidus, rectus abdominis, external oblique, internal oblique, and transversus abdominis muscles. [Results] During ipsilateral rotation at thoracic vertebral levels, the muscle activity of the latissimus dorsi and external oblique was significantly increased compared with the activity in the 0–10% range of trunk rotation. During early ipsilateral rotation at lumbar vertebral levels, the muscle activity of the internal oblique and transversus abdominis was significantly increased compared with that in the 0–10% range of trunk rotation. During contralateral rotation at both thoracic and lumbar vertebral levels, the muscle activity of the external oblique was significantly increased compared with that in the 0–10% range of trunk rotation. [Conclusion] This study indicates that it is important to consider vertebral segments and spinal range of motion during trunk rotation. PMID:27065549

  13. Rotation of Giant Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kissin, Yevgeni; Thompson, Christopher

    2015-07-01

    The internal rotation of post-main sequence stars is investigated, in response to the convective pumping of angular momentum toward the stellar core, combined with a tight magnetic coupling between core and envelope. The spin evolution is calculated using model stars of initial mass 1, 1.5, and 5 {M}⊙ , taking into account mass loss on the giant branches. We also include the deposition of orbital angular momentum from a sub-stellar companion, as influenced by tidal drag along with the excitation of orbital eccentricity by a fluctuating gravitational quadrupole moment. A range of angular velocity profiles {{Ω }}(r) is considered in the envelope, extending from solid rotation to constant specific angular momentum. We focus on the backreaction of the Coriolis force, and the threshold for dynamo action in the inner envelope. Quantitative agreement with measurements of core rotation in subgiants and post-He core flash stars by Kepler is obtained with a two-layer angular velocity profile: uniform specific angular momentum where the Coriolis parameter {Co}\\equiv {{Ω }}{τ }{con}≲ 1 (here {τ }{con} is the convective time), and {{Ω }}(r)\\propto {r}-1 where {Co}≳ 1. The inner profile is interpreted in terms of a balance between the Coriolis force and angular pressure gradients driven by radially extended convective plumes. Inward angular momentum pumping reduces the surface rotation of subgiants, and the need for a rejuvenated magnetic wind torque. The co-evolution of internal magnetic fields and rotation is considered in Kissin & Thompson, along with the breaking of the rotational coupling between core and envelope due to heavy mass loss.

  14. Effective Q criterion for disk stability in an external potential

    SciTech Connect

    Jog, Chanda J.

    2014-06-01

    The standard Q criterion (with Q > 1) describes the stability against local, axisymmetric perturbations in a disk supported by rotation and random motion. Most astrophysical disks, however, are under the influence of an external gravitational potential, which can significantly affect their stability. A typical example is a galactic disk embedded in a dark matter halo. Here, we do a linear perturbation analysis for a disk in an external potential and obtain a generalized dispersion relation and the effective stability criterion. An external potential, such as that due to the dark matter halo concentric with the disk, contributes to the unperturbed rotational field and significantly increases its stability. We obtain the values for the effective Q parameter for the Milky Way and for a low surface brightness galaxy, UGC 7321. We find that in each case the stellar disk by itself is barely stable and it is the dark matter halo that stabilizes the disk against local, axisymmetric gravitational instabilities. Thus, the dark matter halo is necessary to ensure local disk stability. This result has been largely missed so far because in practice the Q parameter for a galactic disk is obtained using the observed rotational field that already includes the effect of the halo.

  15. Rotating flexible drag mill

    DOEpatents

    Pepper, W.B.

    1984-05-09

    A rotating parachute for decelerating objects travelling through atmosphere at subsonic or supersonic deployment speeds includes a circular canopy having a plurality of circumferentially arranged flexible panels projecting radially from a solid central disk. A slot extends radially between adjacent panels to the outer periphery of the canopy. Upon deployment, the solid disk diverts air radially to rapidly inflate the panels into a position of maximum diameter. Air impinging on the panels adjacent the panel slots rotates the parachute during its descent. Centrifugal force flattens the canopy into a constant maximum diameter during terminal descent for maximum drag and deceleration.

  16. Rotating bubble membrane radiator

    DOEpatents

    Webb, Brent J.; Coomes, Edmund P.

    1988-12-06

    A heat radiator useful for expelling waste heat from a power generating system aboard a space vehicle is disclosed. Liquid to be cooled is passed to the interior of a rotating bubble membrane radiator, where it is sprayed into the interior of the bubble. Liquid impacting upon the interior surface of the bubble is cooled and the heat radiated from the outer surface of the membrane. Cooled liquid is collected by the action of centrifical force about the equator of the rotating membrane and returned to the power system. Details regarding a complete space power system employing the radiator are given.

  17. Rotating shielded crane system

    DOEpatents

    Commander, John C.

    1988-01-01

    A rotating, radiation shielded crane system for use in a high radiation test cell, comprises a radiation shielding wall, a cylindrical ceiling made of radiation shielding material and a rotatable crane disposed above the ceiling. The ceiling rests on an annular ledge intergrally attached to the inner surface of the shielding wall. Removable plugs in the ceiling provide access for the crane from the top of the ceiling into the test cell. A seal is provided at the interface between the inner surface of the shielding wall and the ceiling.

  18. Rotating Vessels for Growing Protein Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cottingham, Paul

    2005-01-01

    Rotating vessels have been proposed as means of growing larger, more nearly uniform protein crystals than would otherwise be possible in the presence of normal Earth gravitation. Heretofore, nonrotating vessels have been used. It is difficult to grow high-quality protein crystals in the terrestrial gravitational field because of convection plumes created by the interaction between gravitation and density gradients in protein-solution depletion layers around growing crystals. The density gradients and the associated convection plumes cause the surfaces of growing crystals to be exposed to nonuniform solution densities, thereby causing the crystals to form in irregular shapes. The microgravitational environment of outer space has been utilized to eliminate gravitation-induced convection, but this approach is generally not favorable because of the high cost and limited availability of space flight. The use of a rotating vessel according to the proposal is intended to ameliorate the effects of gravitation and the resultant convection, relative to the corresponding effects in a non-rotating vessel. The rotation would exert an averaging effect over time, distributing the convective force on the depletion layer. Therefore, the depletion layer would be more nearly uniform and, as a result, the growing crystal would be more nearly perfect. The proposal admits of variations (see figure), including the following: The growing crystal could be rotated about its own central axis or an external axis. The crystal-growth vessel could be of any of various shapes, including cylindrical, hemispherical, conical, and combinations thereof. The crystal-growth vessel could be suspended in a viscous fluid in an outer vessel to isolate the growing crystal from both ambient vibrations and vibrations induced by a mechanism that drives the rotation. The rotation could be coupled to the crystal-growth vessel by viscous or magnetic means. The crystal-growth vessel could be supported within the

  19. Externalities of oil imports revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Lemon, R.

    1980-09-01

    A re-analysis of the externalities associated with oil imports reaffirms the major findings of an earlier study: (1) The current externalities of oil imports are large even after several favorable assumptions are made, including the existence of a large buffer stock and enlightened monetary and fiscal policy. (2) The large externalities of oil imports call for increased domestic supplies, including conservation, if they are cost-effective and based on marginal social costs. (3) A corrective public policy could involve oil-import taxes and the subsidization of new domestic energy sources without large government externalities. 20 references.

  20. Maintenance of arytenoid abduction following carbon dioxide laser debridement of the articular cartilage and joint capsule of the cricoarytenoid joint combined with prosthetic laryngoplasty in horses: an in vivo and in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, J F; Couetil, L; Miller, M A

    2014-02-01

    The objective was to evaluate CO2 laser debridement of the cricoarytenoid joint (CAJ) combined with prosthetic laryngoplasty to prevent post-operative loss of arytenoid abduction in seven horses. Horses were assigned to either laser debridement of the left CAJ and laryngoplasty (laser treated, n=5) or control laryngoplasty (sham, n=2), and were evaluated with endoscopic examinations and measurement of right to left angle quotients (RLQ) to assess maintenance of arytenoid abduction. The animals were euthanased at intervals after surgery and larynges were harvested for post-mortem testing, including determination of translaryngeal flow, pressure, impedance and RLQ. Measurements were obtained under increasing vacuum-generated negative pressure with laryngoplasty sutures intact and with the knot/crimp of the laryngoplasty sutures removed. Following post-mortem testing the cricoarytenoid joints were examined histologically. Post-operative endoscopic examinations revealed no significant differences between RLQ measurements calculated for day 1 following surgery to the termination date of the study for the seven horses. Post-mortem RLQ at airflows of 10 and 60 L/s was significantly higher in sham than in laser treated horses both before and after knot/crimp removal. Translaryngeal impedance at 10 and 60 L/s was not statistically different between groups. Histopathology revealed necrosis and loss of articular cartilage in the laser treated horses. The lymphoid cell infiltration subsided but joint capsule and periarticular fibrosis increased over the course of the study. Post-operative loss of arytenoid abduction after laryngoplasty can be minimized with CO2 laser debridement of the CAJ joint. PMID:24405681

  1. Rotational fluxons of Bose-Einstein condensates in coplanar double-ring traps

    SciTech Connect

    Brand, J.; Haigh, T. J.; Zuelicke, U.

    2009-07-15

    Rotational analogs to magnetic fluxons in conventional Josephson junctions are predicted to emerge in the ground state of rotating tunnel-coupled annular Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs). Such topological condensate-phase structures can be manipulated by external potentials. We determine conditions for observing macroscopic quantum tunneling of a fluxon. Rotational fluxons in double-ring BECs can be created, manipulated, and controlled by external potentials in different ways than is possible in the solid-state system, thus rendering them a promising candidate system for studying and utilizing quantum properties of collective many-particle degrees of freedom.

  2. High knee abduction moments are common risk factors for patellofemoral pain (PFP) and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury in girls: Is PFP itself a predictor for subsequent ACL injury?

    PubMed Central

    Myer, Gregory D; Ford, Kevin R; Di Stasi, Stephanie L; Foss, Kim D Barber; Micheli, Lyle J; Hewett, Timothy E

    2014-01-01

    Background Identifying risk factors for knee pain and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury can be an important step in the injury prevention cycle. Objective We evaluated two unique prospective cohorts with similar populations and methodologies to compare the incidence rates and risk factors associated with patellofemoral pain (PFP) and ACL injury. Methods The ‘PFP cohort’ consisted of 240 middle and high school female athletes. They were evaluated by a physician and underwent anthropometric assessment, strength testing and three-dimensional landing biomechanical analyses prior to their basketball season. 145 of these athletes met inclusion for surveillance of incident (new) PFP by certified athletic trainers during their competitive season. The ‘ACL cohort’ included 205 high school female volleyball, soccer and basketball athletes who underwent the same anthropometric, strength and biomechanical assessment prior to their competitive season and were subsequently followed up for incidence of ACL injury. A one-way analysis of variance was used to evaluate potential group (incident PFP vs ACL injured) differences in anthropometrics, strength and landing biomechanics. Knee abduction moment (KAM) cut-scores that provided the maximal sensitivity and specificity for prediction of PFP or ACL injury risk were also compared between the cohorts. Results KAM during landing above 15.4 Nm was associated with a 6.8% risk to develop PFP compared to a 2.9% risk if below the PFP risk threshold in our sample. Likewise, a KAM above 25.3 Nm was associated with a 6.8% risk for subsequent ACL injury compared to a 0.4% risk if below the established ACL risk threshold. The ACL-injured athletes initiated landing with a greater knee abduction angle and a reduced hamstrings-to-quadriceps strength ratio relative to the incident PFP group. Also, when comparing across cohorts, the athletes who suffered ACL injury also had lower hamstring/quadriceps ratio than the players in the PFP

  3. Tests of Rotating Cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, Elliott G

    1924-01-01

    Tests were made in the no. 1 wind tunnel at Langley Memorial Aeronautical Laboratory to determine the air forces acting on rotating cylinders with axes perpendicular to the direction of motion. One cylinder had a circular cross-section, the other that of a greek cross.

  4. Rotational waves in geodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerus, Artyom; Vikulin, Alexander

    2015-04-01

    The rotation model of a geoblock with intrinsic momentum was constructed by A.V. Vikulin and A.G. Ivanchin [9, 10] to describe seismicity within the Pacific Ocean margin. It is based on the idea of a rotational motion of geoblocks as the parts of the rotating body of the Earth that generates rotary deformation waves. The law of the block motion was derived in the form of the sine-Gordon equation (SG) [5, 9]; the dimensionless form of the equation is: δ2θ δ2θ δξ2 - δη2 = sinθ, (1) where θ = β/2, ξ = k0z and η = v0k0t are dimensionless coordinates, z - length of the chain of masses (blocks), t - time, β - turn angle, ν0 - representative velocity of the process, k0 - wave number. Another case analyzed was a chain of nonuniformly rotating blocks, with deviation of force moments from equilibrium positions μ, considering friction forces α along boundaries, which better matched a real-life seismic process. As a result, the authors obtained the law of motion for a block in a chain in the form of the modified SG equation [8]: δ2θ δ2θ δθ- δξ2 - δ η2 = sin θ+ α δη + μδ(ξ)sin θ (2)

  5. Troubleshooting rotating equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, R.F. )

    1992-10-01

    This paper reports that equipment problems in a Peruvian refinery illustrate the process engineer's role as a troubleshooter. Examples show that rotating equipment problems can stem from mechanical or process factors and involve both inspection/maintenance specialists and process engineers.

  6. Rotatable stem and lock

    DOEpatents

    Deveney, Joseph E.; Sanderson, Stephen N.

    1984-01-01

    A valve stem and lock include a housing surrounding a valve stem, a solenoid affixed to an interior wall of the housing, an armature affixed to the valve stem and a locking device for coupling the armature to the housing body. When the solenoid is energized, the solenoid moves away from the housing body, permitting rotation of the valve stem.

  7. Rotational clutter metric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salem, Salem; Halford, Carl; Moyer, Steve; Gundy, Matthew

    2009-08-01

    A new approach to linear discriminant analysis (LDA), called orthogonal rotational LDA (ORLDA) is presented. Using ORLDA and properly accounting for target size allowed development of a new clutter metric that is based on the Laplacian pyramid (LP) decomposition of clutter images. The new metric achieves correlation exceeding 98% with expert human labeling of clutter levels in a set of 244 infrared images. Our clutter metric is based on the set of weights for the LP levels that best classify images into clutter levels as manually classified by an expert human observer. LDA is applied as a preprocessing step to classification. LDA suffers from a few limitations in this application. Therefore, we propose a new approach to LDA, called ORLDA, using orthonormal geometric rotations. Each rotation brings the LP feature space closer to the LDA solution while retaining orthogonality in the feature space. To understand the effects of target size on clutter, we applied ORLDA at different target sizes. The outputs are easily related because they are functions of orthogonal rotation angles. Finally, we used Bayesian decision theory to learn class boundaries for clutter levels at different target sizes.

  8. Concepts in crop rotations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Crop rotations have been a part of civilization since the Middle Ages. With colonization of what would become the United States came new crops of tobacco, cotton, and corn, the first two of which would play significant roles in both the economic beginnings and social fabric of the new country, how ...

  9. Anisotropy in rotating drums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Povall, Timothy; McBride, Andrew; Govender, Indresan

    2015-11-01

    An anisotropic relationship between the stress and the strain rate has been observed in two-dimensional simulations of rotating drums. The objective of this work is to investigate the structure of the constitutive relation using three-dimensional discrete-element-method simulations of a rotating drum containing identical rigid spheres for a range of rotational speeds. Anisotropy is quantified from the alignment of the stress and strain rate tensors, with the strain rate computed using a least-squares fit. It is shown that in certain regions there is a strong anisotropic relationship, regardless of the speed of rotation. The effective friction coefficient is examined in order to determine the phase space in which the μ (I) rheology is valid. Lastly, a depth-averaged approach through the flowing layer is employed to determine the relationship between the velocity tangential to the equilibrium surface and the height of the flowing layer. A power-law relationship that approaches linear at high speeds is observed. Supported by NRF/DST Scarce Skills (South Africa).

  10. Rotator Cuff Injuries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connors, G. Patrick

    Many baseball players suffer from shoulder injuries related to the rotator cuff muscles. These injuries may be classified as muscular strain, tendonitis or tenosynovitis, and impingement syndrome. Treatment varies from simple rest to surgery, so it is important to be seen by a physician as soon as possible. In order to prevent these injuries, the…

  11. Rotatable stem and lock

    DOEpatents

    Deveney, J.E.; Sanderson, S.N.

    1981-10-27

    A valve stem and lock is disclosed which includes a housing surrounding a valve stem, a solenoid affixed to an interior wall of the housing, an armature affixed to the valve stem and a locking device for coupling the armature to the housing body. When the solenoid is energized, the solenoid moves away from the housing body, permitting rotation of the valve stem.

  12. Rotating Saddle Paul Trap.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rueckner, Wolfgang; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Describes a demonstration in which a ball is placed in an unstable position on a saddle shape. The ball becomes stable when it is rotated above some threshold angular velocity. The demonstration is a mechanical analog of confining a particle in a "Paul Trap". (DDR)

  13. Rotating Responsibility Reaps Rewards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Barbara; Schullery, Nancy

    2000-01-01

    Describes a process used for group assignments in a business communication course which holds all group members accountable by using a structure of rotating responsibility. Discusses selecting assignments and implementing the process, noting how this structure requires equivalent advance preparation from all members and provides opportunities for…

  14. Rotationally Actuated Prosthetic Hand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norton, William E.; Belcher, Jewell G., Jr.; Carden, James R.; Vest, Thomas W.

    1991-01-01

    Prosthetic hand attached to end of remaining part of forearm and to upper arm just above elbow. Pincerlike fingers pushed apart to degree depending on rotation of forearm. Simpler in design, simpler to operate, weighs less, and takes up less space.

  15. Rotational Dynamics with Tracker

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eadkhong, T.; Rajsadorn, R.; Jannual, P.; Danworaphong, S.

    2012-01-01

    We propose the use of Tracker, freeware for video analysis, to analyse the moment of inertia ("I") of a cylindrical plate. Three experiments are performed to validate the proposed method. The first experiment is dedicated to find the linear coefficient of rotational friction ("b") for our system. By omitting the effect of such friction, we derive…

  16. Wigner rotations in laser cavities.

    PubMed

    Başkal, S; Kim, Y S

    2002-08-01

    The Wigner rotation is important in many branches of physics, chemistry, and engineering sciences. It is a group theoretical effect resulting from two Lorentz boosts. The net effect is one boost followed or preceded by a rotation. While the term "Wigner rotation" is derived from Wigner's little group whose transformations leave the four-momentum of a given particle invariant, it is shown that the Wigner rotation is different from the rotations in the little group. This difference is clearly spelled out, and it is shown to be possible to construct the corresponding Wigner rotation from the little-group rotation. It is shown also that the ABCD matrix for light beams in a laser cavity shares the same mathematics as the little-group rotation, from which the Wigner rotation can be constructed. PMID:12241308

  17. ROTATIONAL SPLITTING OF PULSATION MODES

    SciTech Connect

    Deupree, Robert G.; Beslin, Wilfried

    2010-10-01

    Mode splittings produced by uniform rotation and a particular form of differential rotation are computed for two-dimensional rotating 10 M{sub sun} zero-age main sequence stellar models. The change in the character of the mode splitting is traced as a function of uniform rotation rate, and it is found that only relatively slow rotation rates are required before the mode splitting becomes asymmetric about the azimuthally symmetric (m = 0) mode. Increased rotation produces a progressively altered pattern of the individual modes with respect to each other. Large mode splittings begin to overlap with the mode splittings produced by different radial and latitudinal modes at relatively low rotation rates. The mode-splitting pattern for the differentially rotating stars we model is different than that for uniformly rotating stars, making the mode splitting a possible discriminant of the internal angular momentum distribution if one assumes that the formidable challenge of mode identification can be overcome.

  18. Trends in infant abductions (2005).

    PubMed

    Nahirny, Cathy

    2005-01-01

    Infant kidnapping in healthcare facilities has been sharply reduced since the 1990s when educational programs and tagging systems were introduced. However, infant abductors in recent years have changed their methods of operation to meet improved nursery safeguards. In this updated report, the author warns of some new dangers posed by the Internet. PMID:16535955

  19. High incidence of acute full-thickness rotator cuff tears

    PubMed Central

    Abu-Zidan, Fikri; Lunsjo, Karl

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose Epidemiological studies of full-thickness rotator cuff tears (FTRCTs) have mainly investigated degenerative lesions. We estimated the population-based incidence of acute FTRCT using a new diagnostic model. Patients and methods During the period November 2010 through October 2012, we prospectively studied all patients aged 18–75 years with acute onset of pain after shoulder trauma, with limited active abduction, and with normal conventional radiographs. 259 consecutive patients met these inclusion criteria. The patients had a median age of 51 (18–75) years. 65% were males. The patients were divided into 3 groups according to the clinical findings: group I, suspected FTRCT; group II, other specific diagnoses; and group III, sprain. Semi-acute MRI was performed in all patients in group I and in patients in group III who did not recover functionally. Results We identified 60 patients with FTRCTs. The estimated annual incidence of MRI-verified acute FTRCT was 16 (95% CI: 11–23) per 105 inhabitants for the population aged 18–75 years and 25 (CI: 18–36) per 105 inhabitants for the population aged 40–75 years. The prevalence of acute FTRCT in the study group was 60/259 (23%, CI: 18–28). The tears were usually large and affected more than 1 tendon in 36 of these 60 patients. The subscapularis was involved in 38 of the 60 patients. Interpretation Acute FTRCTs are common shoulder injuries, especially in men. They are usually large and often involve the subscapularis tendon. PMID:25708526

  20. External Examining: Fit for Purpose?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloxham, Sue; Price, Margaret

    2015-01-01

    In a context of international concern about academic standards, the practice of external examining is widely admired for its role in defending standards. Yet a contradiction exists between this faith in examining and continuing concerns about standards. This article argues that external examining rests on assumptions about standards which are…

  1. Choosing a Truly External Evaluator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ray, Marilyn

    2006-01-01

    This scenario discusses a situation in which a proposal has been published by a consortium of foundations for an "external" evaluator to evaluate a replication at two new sites of a program they have been funding for many years. A proposal is received from Dr. Porto-Novo, who has been the external evaluator of the initial program for about 10…

  2. Achieving ligament stability and correct rotational alignment of the femur in knee arthroplasty: a study using the Medial Pivot knee.

    PubMed

    Shakespeare, David; Kinzel, Vera; Ledger, Michael

    2005-12-01

    In a series of 90 Medial Pivot arthroplasties rotational alignment of the femur was achieved by provisionally reconstructing the lateral side of the joint and tensioning the medial side with feeler gauges. Axial CT scans were employed to measure the rotational alignment relative to surgical epicondylar axis. In valgus knees the cutting block was externally rotated to adjust for posterolateral bone loss. The mean rotational alignment of the femur was 0.6 degrees of external rotation (S.D. 1.3, range 3 degrees of ER to 4 degrees of IR). The mean laxity of the medial ligament was 1 mm in flexion (SD 1, range 0-5 mm) and 0.5 mm in flexion (S.D. 0.5, range 0-2 mm) In those knees in which the medial ligament had been released the CT alignment was perfect, but when internally rotated against the hip 3-4 mm of gapping was noted. In valgus knees the mean rotation of the femoral component was 0.8 degrees of internal rotation (S.D. 1.5, range 1 degrees of IR to 4 degrees of ER). In spite of externally rotating the cutting block there was still a tendency to internally rotate the femur in some knees. This simple technique achieves the two goals of ligament stability and correct rotational alignment in a high proportion of cases. It may be applicable to any instrument system which employs posterior referencing. PMID:15967668

  3. Bidirectional microfluidic pumping using an array of magnetic Janus microspheres rotating around magnetic disks.

    PubMed

    van den Beld, Wesley T E; Cadena, Natalia L; Bomer, Johan; de Weerd, Eddy L; Abelmann, Leon; van den Berg, Albert; Eijkel, Jan C T

    2015-07-01

    We demonstrate a novel, flexible and programmable method to pump liquid through microchannels in lab-on-a-chip systems without the use of an external pump. The pumping principle is based on the rotation of ferromagnetic Janus microspheres around permalloy disks, driven by an external rotating magnetic field. By placing the disks close to the edge of the microchannel, a pumping rate of at least 0.3 nL min(-1) was measured using tracking microspheres. Geometric programming of the pumping direction is possible by positioning the magnetic disk close to the side wall. A second degree of freedom in the pumping direction is offered by the rotational direction of the external magnetic field. This method is especially suited for flow-controlled recirculation of chemical and biological species in microchannels - for example, medium recirculation in culture chambers - opening the way towards novel, portable, on-chip applications without the need for external fluidic or electrical connections. PMID:26030131

  4. Malignant external otitis: CT evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Curtin, H.D.; Wolfe, P.; May, M.

    1982-11-01

    Malignant external otitis is an aggressive infection caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa that most often occurs in elderly diabetics. Malignant external otitis often spreads inferiorly from the external canal to involve the subtemporal area and progresses medially towards the petrous apex leading to multiple cranial nerve palsies. The computed tomographic (CT) findings in malignant external otitis include obliteration of the normal fat planes in the subtemporal area as well as patchy destruction of the bony cortex of the mastoid. The point of exit of the various cranial nerves can be identified on CT scans, and the extent of the inflammatory mass correlates well with the clinical findings. Four cases of malignant external otitis are presented. In each case CT provided a good demonstration of involvement of the soft tissues at the base of the skull.

  5. Depletable externalities and Pigouvian taxation

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, A.M. III

    1984-06-01

    In their book Baumol and Oates (The Theory of Environmental Policy: Externalities, Public Outlays, and the Quality of Life; Prentice-Hall, Englewood Cliffs, NJ (1975).) argue that whether an externality is depletable (private) or undepletable (public) is the key characteristic in determining the optimal pricing pattern. They argue that unlike the undepletable case a negative depletable externality requires not only a charge or tax on the generator of the externality but a payment or compensation to the victim in order to achieve Pareto optimality. It is shown that the key characteristic determining whether compensation of victims is required for efficiency is not the depletability of the externality but whether the victim can costlessly control or limit the amount of the damaging substance received. 6 references.

  6. Leiomyoma of External Auditory Canal.

    PubMed

    George, M V; Puthiyapurayil, Jamsheeda

    2016-09-01

    This article reports a case of piloleiomyoma of external auditory canal, which is the 7th case of leiomyoma of the external auditory canal being reported and the 2nd case of leiomyoma arising from arrectores pilorum muscles, all the other five cases were angioleiomyomas, arising from blood vessels. A 52 years old male presented with a mass in the right external auditory canal and decreased hearing of 6 months duration. Tumor excision done by end aural approach. Histopathological examination report was leiomyoma. It is extremely rare for leiomyoma to occur in the external auditory canal because of the non-availability of smooth muscles in the external canal. So it should be considered as a very rare differential diagnosis for any tumor or polyp in the ear canal. PMID:27508144

  7. Wave-driven Rotation in Supersonically Rotating Mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    A. Fetterman and N.J. Fisch

    2010-02-15

    Supersonic rotation in mirrors may be produced by radio frequency waves. The waves produce coupled diffusion in ion kinetic and potential energy. A population inversion along the diffusion path then produces rotation. Waves may be designed to exploit a natural kinetic energy source or may provide the rotation energy on their own. Centrifugal traps for fusion and isotope separation may benefit from this wave-driven rotation.

  8. Weight-Bearing Hip Rotation Range of Motion in Female Golfers

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, Charles; Gribble, Phillip

    2010-01-01

    Background Many sports involve movements during which the lower extremity functions as a closed kinetic chain, requiring weight-bearing (WB) range of motion (ROM). Assessment of the capacity for internal and external rotation motion at the hip is typically performed with the individual in a prone, supine, or seated position. Such measurements represent ROM in a non-weight bearing (NWB) position, and, as a result, may not appropriately assess the capacity of the joint to meet the demands of the athlete's sport. To date, no research exists which documents WB hip ROM in golfers relative to the ROM demands of the golf swing or the symmetry of weight-bearing hip rotation ROM in female golfers. Objectives Weight-bearing hip rotation ROM was measured in female golfers and compared to the actual hip rotation ROM that occurred during a full golf swing. Methods Fifteen right-handed, female collegiate golfers participated in the study. The WB hip rotation ROM was measured during three different stance conditions and during full golf swings using a custom-built testing device. These actions were captured using a 3-D motion analysis system. Results The golfers WB ROM was symmetrical for external rotation and internal rotation, p = 0.648 and p = 0.078, respectively. During the backswing, the golfers used approximately 20-25% of their available WB right internal rotation, and 50-75% of their available WB left external rotation. For the downswing, the golfers used approximately 34-37% of their available WB right external rotation and 84-131% of their available WB left internal rotation. The golfers used significantly more external and internal hip rotation ROM on the left (lead) hip during both phases of the full golf swing (p < 0.001), demonstrating an asymmetrical movement pattern. Discussion In general, golfers did not exceed the measured WB ROM limits during the golf swing but did demonstrate decreased WB internal rotation on the lead hip. Conclusion Clinicians need to pay

  9. Different configurations of laser vibrometry for quality control of electric motors with external rotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiariotti, P.; Ciarmatori, R.; Castellini, P.; Bastari, A.; Paone, N.

    2012-06-01

    When designing a test bench for vibration based diagnostics of machines with external rotating parts, such as electric motors having a rotating external rotor, one may choose among single point vibrometry, rotational vibrometry or in-plane vibrometry. The paper discusses these different options, taking the assumption that the minimum number of measuring instruments is preferred when instrumenting a quality control system and provides an insight into advantages and limitations of each instrument. In particular the following issues are discussed: a) possible installation lay-outs; b) alignment problems (and possible advantages for diagnostics), c) typical signals and diagnostic features which can be observed. The research presented refers to electric motors for home appliances, but potentially has wider application fields to other rotating machines.

  10. Rotation dependence of a phase delay between plasma edge electron density and temperature fields due to a fast rotating, resonant magnetic perturbation field

    SciTech Connect

    Stoschus, H.; Schmitz, O.; Frerichs, H.; Unterberg, B.; Abdullaev, S. S.; Clever, M.; Coenen, J. W.; Kruezi, U.; Schega, D.; Samm, U.; Jakubowski, M. W.

    2010-06-15

    Measurements of the plasma edge electron density n{sub e} and temperature T{sub e} fields during application of a fast rotating, resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) field show a characteristic modulation of both, n{sub e} and T{sub e} coherent to the rotation frequency of the RMP field. A phase delay PHI between the n{sub e}(t) and T{sub e}(t) waveforms is observed and it is demonstrated that this phase delay PHI is a function of the radius with PHI(r) depending on the relative rotation of the RMP field and the toroidal plasma rotation. This provides for the first time direct experimental evidence for a rotation dependent damping of the external RMP field in the edge layer of a resistive high-temperature plasma which breaks down at low rotation and high resonant field amplitudes.

  11. Jet Rotation Driven by Magnetohydrodynamic Shocks in Helical Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fendt, Christian

    2011-08-01

    In this paper, we present a detailed numerical investigation of the hypothesis that a rotation of astrophysical jets can be caused by magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) shocks in a helical magnetic field. Shock compression of the helical magnetic field results in a toroidal Lorentz force component that will accelerate the jet material in the toroidal direction. This process transforms magnetic angular momentum (magnetic stress) carried along the jet into kinetic angular momentum (rotation). The mechanism proposed here only works in a helical magnetic field configuration. We demonstrate the feasibility of this mechanism by axisymmetric MHD simulations in 1.5 and 2.5 dimensions using the PLUTO code. In our setup, the jet is injected into the ambient gas with zero kinetic angular momentum (no rotation). We apply different dynamical parameters for jet propagation such as the jet internal Alfvén Mach number and fast magnetosonic Mach number, the density contrast of the jet to the ambient medium, and the external sonic Mach number of the jet. The mechanism we suggest should work for a variety of jet applications, e.g., protostellar or extragalactic jets, and internal jet shocks (jet knots) or external shocks between the jet and the ambient gas (entrainment). For typical parameter values for protostellar jets, the numerically derived rotation feature looks consistent with the observations, i.e., rotational velocities of 0.1%-1% of the jet bulk velocity.

  12. JET ROTATION DRIVEN BY MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC SHOCKS IN HELICAL MAGNETIC FIELDS

    SciTech Connect

    Fendt, Christian

    2011-08-10

    In this paper, we present a detailed numerical investigation of the hypothesis that a rotation of astrophysical jets can be caused by magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) shocks in a helical magnetic field. Shock compression of the helical magnetic field results in a toroidal Lorentz force component that will accelerate the jet material in the toroidal direction. This process transforms magnetic angular momentum (magnetic stress) carried along the jet into kinetic angular momentum (rotation). The mechanism proposed here only works in a helical magnetic field configuration. We demonstrate the feasibility of this mechanism by axisymmetric MHD simulations in 1.5 and 2.5 dimensions using the PLUTO code. In our setup, the jet is injected into the ambient gas with zero kinetic angular momentum (no rotation). We apply different dynamical parameters for jet propagation such as the jet internal Alfven Mach number and fast magnetosonic Mach number, the density contrast of the jet to the ambient medium, and the external sonic Mach number of the jet. The mechanism we suggest should work for a variety of jet applications, e.g., protostellar or extragalactic jets, and internal jet shocks (jet knots) or external shocks between the jet and the ambient gas (entrainment). For typical parameter values for protostellar jets, the numerically derived rotation feature looks consistent with the observations, i.e., rotational velocities of 0.1%-1% of the jet bulk velocity.

  13. Rotating trapped Bose-Einstein condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fetter, A. L.

    2008-01-01

    Trapped Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) differ considerably from the standard textbook example of a uniform Bose gas. In an isotropic harmonic potential V( r) = ½ Mω2 r 2, the single-particle ground state introduces a new intrinsic scale of length [the ground-state size d = √ ℏ/( Mω)] and energy [the ground-state energy E 0 = frac{3} {2} ℏω]. When the trap rotates at a low angular velocity, the behavior of a single vortex illustrates the crucial role of discrete quantized vorticity. For more rapid rotation, the condensate contains a vortex array. The resulting centrifugal forces expand the condensate radially and shrink it axially; thus, the condensate becomes effectively two dimensional. If the external rotation speed approaches the frequency of the radial harmonic confining potential, the condensate enters the "lowest-Landau-level" regime, and a simple description again becomes possible. Eventually, the system is predicted to make a quantum phase transition to a highly correlated state analogous to the fractional quantum Hall states of electrons in a strong magnetic field.

  14. Solar Internal Rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schou, J.; SOE Internal Rotation Team

    With the flood of high quality helioseismic data from the instruments on the SOHO spacecraft (MDI/VIRGO/GOLF) and ground based instruments (eg. GONG and LOWL) we have been able to get increasingly detailed information on the rotation and other large scale flows in the solar interior. In this talk I will discuss some of the highlights of what we have learned so far and what we may expect to learn in the near future. Among the recent advances have been tighter constraints on the tachocline at the bottom of the convection zone, detection of details in the surface rotation rate similar to the torsional oscillations found in the surface Doppler shift and helioseismic evidence for meridional flows. The MDI project is supported by NASA contract NAG5-3077 at Stanford University.

  15. Rotatable seal assembly

    DOEpatents

    Logan, Clinton M.; Garibaldi, Jack L.

    1982-01-01

    An assembly is provided for rotatably supporting a rotor on a stator so that vacuum chambers in the rotor and stator remain in communication while the chambers are sealed from ambient air, which enables the use of a ball bearing or the like to support most of the weight of the rotor. The apparatus includes a seal device mounted on the rotor to rotate therewith, but shiftable in position on the rotor while being sealed to the rotor as by an O-ring. The seal device has a flat face that is biased towards a flat face on the stator, and pressurized air is pumped between the faces to prevent contact between them while spacing them a small distance apart to avoid the inflow of large amounts of air between the faces and into the vacuum chambers.

  16. Muon spin rotation studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The bulk of the muon spin rotation research work centered around the development of the muon spin rotation facility at the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) of Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The collimation system was both designed and fabricated at Virginia State University. This improved collimation system, plus improvements in detectors and electronics enabled the acquisition of spectra free of background out to 15 microseconds. There were two runs at Brookhaven in 1984, one run was devoted primarily to beam development and the other run allowed several successful experiments to be performed. The effect of uniaxial strain on an Fe(Si) crystal at elevated temperature (360K) was measured and the results are incorporated herein. A complete analysis of Fe pulling data taken earlier is included.

  17. A call for rotators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mountain, Gregory

    “Needed: highly motivated geoscientists willing to slow the pace of their research for 1-2 years while managing federal government support of their discipline. Assured: change of perspective; no change in pay. Contact your National Science Foundation Program Director for details.—No, this isn't an NSF job announcement; this is an open letter to members of the Earth science community from a recently “retired” NSF rotator concerned by the small number of researchers interested in a Washington tour. I learned firsthand the extent to which an individual in this position is entrusted with decision-making powers, and as a result, I believe that each of us in the research community should feel responsible for ensuring that highly qualified people serve as rotators.

  18. Rotation of FK Comae

    SciTech Connect

    Rucinski, S.M. )

    1990-03-01

    V sin i for the rapidly rotating G-type giant FK Com is estimated using high-resolution coude spectra and the Fourier transform approach. The result, V sin i = 159 + or - 4 km/s, agrees well with recent determinations which used direct comparison of FK Com spectra with those of artificially broadened standards. If FK Com does not differ drastically in its internal structure from more normal stars, its angular momentum is a few (perhaps 10) times larger than for single rapidly rotating stars following standard relations for the upper main sequence. It angular momentum is about 3 times smaller than that of the orbital motion in a typical W UMa-type system. 30 refs.

  19. Rotational spectrum of tryptophan

    SciTech Connect

    Sanz, M. Eugenia Cabezas, Carlos Mata, Santiago Alonso, Josè L.

    2014-05-28

    The rotational spectrum of the natural amino acid tryptophan has been observed for the first time using a combination of laser ablation, molecular beams, and Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy. Independent analysis of the rotational spectra of individual conformers has conducted to a definitive identification of two different conformers of tryptophan, with one of the observed conformers never reported before. The analysis of the {sup 14}N nuclear quadrupole coupling constants is of particular significance since it allows discrimination between structures, thus providing structural information on the orientation of the amino group. Both observed conformers are stabilized by an O–H···N hydrogen bond in the side chain and a N–H···π interaction forming a chain that reinforce the strength of hydrogen bonds through cooperative effects.

  20. A Translational Polarization Rotator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chuss, David T.; Wollack, Edward J.; Pisano, Giampaolo; Ackiss, Sheridan; U-Yen, Kongpop; Ng, Ming wah

    2012-01-01

    We explore a free-space polarization modulator in which a variable phase introduction between right- and left-handed circular polarization components is used to rotate the linear polarization of the outgoing beam relative to that of the incoming beam. In this device, the polarization states are separated by a circular polarizer that consists of a quarter-wave plate in combination with a wire grid. A movable mirror is positioned behind and parallel to the circular polarizer. As the polarizer-mirror distance is separated, an incident liear polarization will be rotated through an angle that is proportional to the introduced phase delay. We demonstrate a prototype device that modulates Stokes Q and U over a 20% bandwidth.

  1. Broadband Rotational Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pate, Brooks

    2014-06-01

    The past decade has seen several major technology advances in electronics operating at microwave frequencies making it possible to develop a new generation of spectrometers for molecular rotational spectroscopy. High-speed digital electronics, both arbitrary waveform generators and digitizers, continue on a Moore's Law-like development cycle that started around 1993 with device bandwidth doubling about every 36 months. These enabling technologies were the key to designing chirped-pulse Fourier transform microwave (CP-FTMW) spectrometers which offer significant sensitivity enhancements for broadband spectrum acquisition in molecular rotational spectroscopy. A special feature of the chirped-pulse spectrometer design is that it is easily implemented at low frequency (below 8 GHz) where Balle-Flygare type spectrometers with Fabry-Perot cavity designs become technologically challenging due to the mirror size requirements. The capabilities of CP-FTMW spectrometers for studies of molecular structure will be illustrated by the collaborative research effort we have been a part of to determine the structures of water clusters - a project which has identified clusters up to the pentadecamer. A second technology trend that impacts molecular rotational spectroscopy is the development of high power, solid state sources in the mm-wave/THz regions. Results from the field of mm-wave chirped-pulse Fourier transform spectroscopy will be described with an emphasis on new problems in chemical dynamics and analytical chemistry that these methods can tackle. The third (and potentially most important) technological trend is the reduction of microwave components to chip level using monolithic microwave integrated circuits (MMIC) - a technology driven by an enormous mass market in communications. Some recent advances in rotational spectrometer designs that incorporate low-cost components will be highlighted. The challenge to the high-resolution spectroscopy community - as posed by Frank De

  2. On rotational conical flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrari, Carlo

    1952-01-01

    Some general properties of isoenergetic rotational conical fields are determined. For such fields, provided the physical parameters of the fluid flow are known on a conical reference surface, it being understood that they satisfy certain imposed conditions, it is shown how to construct the hodographs in the various meridional semiplanes, as the envelope of either the tangents to the hodographs or of the osculatory circles.

  3. Dynamic rotating-shield brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yunlong; Flynn, Ryan T.; Kim, Yusung; Yang, Wenjun; Wu, Xiaodong

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: To present dynamic rotating shield brachytherapy (D-RSBT), a novel form of high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) with electronic brachytherapy source, where the radiation shield is capable of changing emission angles during the radiation delivery process.Methods: A D-RSBT system uses two layers of independently rotating tungsten alloy shields, each with a 180° azimuthal emission angle. The D-RSBT planning is separated into two stages: anchor plan optimization and optimal sequencing. In the anchor plan optimization, anchor plans are generated by maximizing the D{sub 90} for the high-risk clinical-tumor-volume (HR-CTV) assuming a fixed azimuthal emission angle of 11.25°. In the optimal sequencing, treatment plans that most closely approximate the anchor plans under the delivery-time constraint will be efficiently computed. Treatment plans for five cervical cancer patients were generated for D-RSBT, single-shield RSBT (S-RSBT), and {sup 192}Ir-based intracavitary brachytherapy with supplementary interstitial brachytherapy (IS + ICBT) assuming five treatment fractions. External beam radiotherapy doses of 45 Gy in 25 fractions of 1.8 Gy each were accounted for. The high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV) doses were escalated such that the D{sub 2cc} of the rectum, sigmoid colon, or bladder reached its tolerance equivalent dose in 2 Gy fractions (EQD2 with α/β= 3 Gy) of 75 Gy, 75 Gy, or 90 Gy, respectively.Results: For the patients considered, IS + ICBT had an average total dwell time of 5.7 minutes/fraction (min/fx) assuming a 10 Ci{sup 192}Ir source, and the average HR-CTV D{sub 90} was 78.9 Gy. In order to match the HR-CTV D{sub 90} of IS + ICBT, D-RSBT required an average of 10.1 min/fx more delivery time, and S-RSBT required 6.7 min/fx more. If an additional 20 min/fx of delivery time is allowed beyond that of the IS + ICBT case, D-RSBT and S-RSBT increased the HR-CTV D{sub 90} above IS + ICBT by an average of 16.3 Gy and 9.1 Gy, respectively

  4. Rotating Brush Seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lattime, S. B.; Braun, M. J.; Choy. F. K.; Hendricks, R. C.; Steinetz, B. M.

    2006-01-01

    The proven technology of brush seals has been extended to the mitigation of problems arising from friction and wear at the bristle-rotor interface at high surface speeds. In prototype testing, the brush is mounted on, and free to rotate with the shaft, thus providing a complaint primary seal. A face seal positioned between the backing plate of the brush seal and the housing provides a secondary seal. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the interaction between the brush bristles and the shaft at high surface speeds as well as introduce a numerical model to simulate the bristle behavior. A test facility was constructed to study the effects of centrifugal forces on bristle deflection in a single rotating brush seal. The bristle-rotor interface was observed through a video camera, which utilized a high magnification borescope and a high frequency strobe light source. Rotational speeds of the rotor and the brush seal were measured by a magnetic and optical speed sensor, respectively. Preliminary results with speeds up to 11,000 rpm show no speed differential between the brush seal and rotor, or any instability problems associated with the brush seal. Bristle liftoff from the rotor is successfully captured on video.

  5. Rotational magnetic induction tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trakic, Adnan; Eskandarnia, Neda; Keong Li, Bing; Weber, Ewald; Wang, Hua; Crozier, Stuart

    2012-02-01

    In magnetic induction tomography (MIT), an array of excitation coils is typically used to apply time-varying magnetic fields to induce eddy currents in the material to be studied. The magnetic fields from the eddy currents are then detected by an array of sensing coils to form an image of passive electromagnetic properties (i.e. conductivity, permittivity and permeability). Increasing the number of transmitters and receivers can provide a better image quality at the expense of a larger and more expensive MIT system. Instead of increasing the number of coils, this study investigates the possibility of rotating a single transmit-receive coil to image the electrical properties of the sample, by emulating an array of 200 transmit-receive coils by time-division multiplexing. Engineering details on the electromechanical design and development of a rotating MIT system are presented. The experimental results indicate that representative images of conductive samples can be obtained at 5 MHz by rotating a single transmit-receive coil.

  6. Bioreactor rotating wall vessel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The NASA Bioreactor provides a low turbulence culture environment which promotes the formation of large, three-dimensional cell clusters. Due to their high level of cellular organization and specialization, samples constructed in the bioreactor more closely resemble the original tumor or tissue found in the body. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators. Cell constructs grown in a rotating bioreactor on Earth (left) eventually become too large to stay suspended in the nutrient media. In the microgravity of orbit, the cells stay suspended. Rotation then is needed for gentle stirring to replenish the media around the cells.

  7. [Disorders of intestinal rotation and fixation in older children].

    PubMed

    Králová, M; Koudelka, J; Preis, J; Kuliacek, P; Stefan, H; Kopecký, A

    1995-12-01

    The authors discuss five older children where malrotation of the gut was diagnosed. The youngest child was three years old, the oldest 16 years. In three children the malrotation was diagnosed from clinical symptoms and examination by imaging methods, in two it was detected by chance during operation. In the two children where the impaired rotation of the gut was detected on operation, non-rotation was involved. In the remaining three children twice a left side paraduodenal hernia was diagnosed and once an external stenosis of the duodenum by Ladd's bands. PMID:8629173

  8. MHD Turbulence Sheared in Fixed and Rotating Frames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kassinos, S. C.; Knaepen, B.; Wray, A.

    2004-01-01

    We consider homogeneous turbulence in a conducting fluid that is exposed to a uniform external magnetic field while being sheared in fixed and rotating frames. We take both the frame-rotation axis and the applied magnetic field to be aligned in the direction normal to the plane of the mean shear. Here a systematic parametric study is carried out in a series of Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) in order to clarify the main effects determining the structural anisotropy and stability of the flow.

  9. Identification of a low plasma-rotation threshold for stabilization of the resistive-wall mode.

    PubMed

    Takechi, M; Matsunaga, G; Aiba, N; Fujita, T; Ozeki, T; Koide, Y; Sakamoto, Y; Kurita, G; Isayama, A; Kamada, Y

    2007-02-01

    The plasma rotation necessary for stabilization of resistive-wall modes (RWMs) is investigated by controlling the toroidal plasma rotation with external momentum input by injection of tangential neutral beams. The observed threshold is 0.3% of the Alfvén velocity and much smaller than the previous experimental results obtained with magnetic braking. This low critical rotation has a very weak beta dependence as the ideal wall limit is approached. These results indicate that for large plasmas such as in future fusion reactors with low rotation, the requirement of the additional feedback control system for stabilizing RWM is much reduced. PMID:17358869

  10. Coordinate-Free Rotation Operator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leubner, C.

    1979-01-01

    Suggests the use of a coordinate-free rotation operator for the teaching of rotations in Euclidean three space because of its twofold didactic advantage. Illustrates the potentialities of the coordinate-free rotation operator approach by a number of examples. (Author/GA)

  11. Goniometer-rotation-angle recorder

    SciTech Connect

    Shchagin, A.V.

    1985-12-01

    This paper describes a goniometer-rotation-angle recorder with a discrete drive. The rotation angle in a given plane is recorded by bidirectional sign counter of positive and negative drive-actuation numbers for rotations in positive and negative directions. The maximum capacity of the counter is + or - 9 decimal digits.

  12. Drift waves in rotating plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, W.; Liu, J.

    1983-09-01

    The stability of the electron drift wave is investigated in the presence of E x B plasma rotation typical of the central cell plasma in tandem mirrors. It is shown that a rotationally-driven drift wave may occur at low azimuthal mode numbers. Conditions for rotational instabilities are derived. Quasilinear formulas are given for the anomalous transport associated with the unstable fluctuations.

  13. On the Product of Rotations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trenkler, G.; Trenkler, D.

    2008-01-01

    Using the elementary tools of matrix theory, we show that the product of two rotations in the three-dimensional Euclidean space is a rotation again. For this purpose, three types of rotation matrices are identified which are of simple structure. One of them is the identity matrix, and each of the other two types can be uniquely characterized by…

  14. Rotating plug bearing and seal

    DOEpatents

    Wade, Elman E.

    1977-01-01

    A bearing and seal structure for nuclear reactors utilizing rotating plugs above the nuclear reactor vessel. The structure permits lubrication of bearings and seals of the rotating plugs without risk of the lubricant draining into the reactor vessel below. The structure permits lubrication by utilizing a rotating outer race bearing.

  15. Doppler observations of solar rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scherrer, P. H.; Wilcox, J. M.

    1980-01-01

    Daily observations of the photospheric equatorial rotation rate using the Doppler effect are made at the Stanford Solar Observatory. These observations show no variations in the rotation rate that exceed the observational error of about 1%. The average rotation rate is indistinguishable from that of sunspots and large-scale magnetic field structures.

  16. Doppler observations of solar rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scherrer, P. H.

    1980-01-01

    Daily observations of the photospheric equatorial rotation rate using the Doppler effect mode at the Sanford Solar Observatory are presented. These observations show no variations in the rotation rate that exceed the observational error of about one percent. The average rotation rate is indistinguishable from that of sunspots and large scale magnetic field structures.

  17. On General Relativistic Uniformly Rotating White Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boshkayev, Kuantay; Rueda, Jorge A.; Ruffini, Remo; Siutsou, Ivan

    2013-01-01

    The properties of uniformly rotating white dwarfs (RWDs) are analyzed within the framework of general relativity. Hartle's formalism is applied to construct the internal and external solutions to the Einstein equations. The white dwarf (WD) matter is described by the relativistic Feynman-Metropolis-Teller equation of state which generalizes that of Salpeter by taking into account the finite size of the nuclei, and the Coulomb interactions as well as electroweak equilibrium in a self-consistent relativistic fashion. The mass M, radius R, angular momentum J, eccentricity epsilon, and quadrupole moment Q of RWDs are calculated as a function of the central density ρ c and rotation angular velocity Ω. We construct the region of stability of RWDs (J-M plane) taking into account the mass-shedding limit, inverse β-decay instability, and the boundary established by the turning points of constant J sequences which separates stable from secularly unstable configurations. We found the minimum rotation periods ~0.3, 0.5, 0.7, and 2.2 s and maximum masses ~1.500, 1.474, 1.467, 1.202 M ⊙ for 4He, 12C, 16O, and 56Fe WDs, respectively. By using the turning-point method, we found that RWDs can indeed be axisymmetrically unstable and we give the range of WD parameters where this occurs. We also construct constant rest-mass evolution tracks of RWDs at fixed chemical composition and show that, by losing angular momentum, sub-Chandrasekhar RWDs (mass smaller than maximum static one) can experience both spin-up and spin-down epochs depending on their initial mass and rotation period, while super-Chandrasekhar RWDs (mass larger than maximum static one) only spin up.

  18. ON GENERAL RELATIVISTIC UNIFORMLY ROTATING WHITE DWARFS

    SciTech Connect

    Boshkayev, Kuantay; Rueda, Jorge A.; Ruffini, Remo; Siutsou, Ivan E-mail: jorge.rueda@icra.it E-mail: siutsou@icranet.org

    2013-01-10

    The properties of uniformly rotating white dwarfs (RWDs) are analyzed within the framework of general relativity. Hartle's formalism is applied to construct the internal and external solutions to the Einstein equations. The white dwarf (WD) matter is described by the relativistic Feynman-Metropolis-Teller equation of state which generalizes that of Salpeter by taking into account the finite size of the nuclei, and the Coulomb interactions as well as electroweak equilibrium in a self-consistent relativistic fashion. The mass M, radius R, angular momentum J, eccentricity {epsilon}, and quadrupole moment Q of RWDs are calculated as a function of the central density {rho} {sub c} and rotation angular velocity {Omega}. We construct the region of stability of RWDs (J-M plane) taking into account the mass-shedding limit, inverse {beta}-decay instability, and the boundary established by the turning points of constant J sequences which separates stable from secularly unstable configurations. We found the minimum rotation periods {approx}0.3, 0.5, 0.7, and 2.2 s and maximum masses {approx}1.500, 1.474, 1.467, 1.202 M {sub Sun} for {sup 4}He, {sup 12}C, {sup 16}O, and {sup 56}Fe WDs, respectively. By using the turning-point method, we found that RWDs can indeed be axisymmetrically unstable and we give the range of WD parameters where this occurs. We also construct constant rest-mass evolution tracks of RWDs at fixed chemical composition and show that, by losing angular momentum, sub-Chandrasekhar RWDs (mass smaller than maximum static one) can experience both spin-up and spin-down epochs depending on their initial mass and rotation period, while super-Chandrasekhar RWDs (mass larger than maximum static one) only spin up.

  19. External dacryocystorhinostomy: Tips and tricks

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Mohammad Javed; Naik, Milind N.; Honavar, Santosh G.

    2012-01-01

    Dacryocystorhinostomy or DCR is one of the most common oculoplastics surgery performed. It is a bypass procedure that creates an anastomosis between the lacrimal sac and the nasal mucosa via a bony ostium. It may be performed through an external skin incision or intranasally with or without endoscopic visualization. This article will discuss the indications, goals, and simple techniques for a successful outcome of an external DCR. PMID:23440476

  20. Isocenter characteristics of an external ring proton gantry

    SciTech Connect

    Moyers, Michael F. . E-mail: moyers@proton.llumc.edu; Lesyna, Waylan

    2004-12-01

    Purpose: Determine the shape, size, geometric center, and virtual center of the isocenter for a proton gantry and compare to electron/X-ray accelerator gantries. Methods and materials: The majority of commercial electron/X-ray accelerator gantries consist of a rotating treatment head mounted to a stationary stand through a slewing ring bearing. The world's first proton gantry uses two rotating external rings, to which is mounted a fixed treatment nozzle with a movable snout that extends close to the center of rotation. The radial aspect of the isocenter for two similar proton gantries and two different electron/X-ray gantries were measured in the gantry frame of reference with a front pointer and a theodolite. These results were then transformed into room coordinates. The axial aspect of the isocenter was measured with a dial indicator. Results: The radial aspect of the isocenter for slewing ring gantries has the shape of two concentric circles. The radial aspect of the isocenter for external ring gantries is shaped like a butterfly. The size of the mechanical isocenter is independent of the gantry style. Conclusions: The locations of the geometric and virtual centers can be determined to within 0.2 mm. Multiple gantry angle treatments can be delivered with a single setup allowing 2 mm for gantry and nozzle deflections. Precision treatments can be delivered allowing only 0.5 mm if the measured isocenter path is applied.

  1. Rim sealing of rotor-stator wheelspaces in the absence of external flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chew, J. W.; Dadkhan, S.; Turner, A. B.

    1991-06-01

    Sealing of the cavity formed between a rotating disk and a satator in the absence of a forced external flow is considered. In these circumstances, the pumping action of the rotating disk may draw fluid into the cavity through the rim seal. Minimum cavity throughflow rates required to prevent such ingress are estimated experimentally and from a mathematical model. Measurements for three different types of rim are reported for a range of seal clearance and for rotational Reynolds numbers up to 3 x 10 exp 6. The mathematical model is found to correlate the experimental data reasonably well.

  2. Estimating extragalactic Faraday rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oppermann, N.; Junklewitz, H.; Greiner, M.; Enßlin, T. A.; Akahori, T.; Carretti, E.; Gaensler, B. M.; Goobar, A.; Harvey-Smith, L.; Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Pratley, L.; Schnitzeler, D. H. F. M.; Stil, J. M.; Vacca, V.

    2015-03-01

    Observations of Faraday rotation for extragalactic sources probe magnetic fields both inside and outside the Milky Way. Building on our earlier estimate of the Galactic contribution, we set out to estimate the extragalactic contributions. We discuss the problems involved; in particular, we point out that taking the difference between the observed values and the Galactic foreground reconstruction is not a good estimate for the extragalactic contributions. We point out a degeneracy between the contributions to the observed values due to extragalactic magnetic fields and observational noise and comment on the dangers of over-interpreting an estimate without taking into account its uncertainty information. To overcome these difficulties, we develop an extended reconstruction algorithm based on the assumption that the observational uncertainties are accurately described for a subset of the data, which can overcome the degeneracy with the extragalactic contributions. We present a probabilistic derivation of the algorithm and demonstrate its performance using a simulation, yielding a high quality reconstruction of the Galactic Faraday rotation foreground, a precise estimate of the typical extragalactic contribution, and a well-defined probabilistic description of the extragalactic contribution for each data point. We then apply this reconstruction technique to a catalog of Faraday rotation observations for extragalactic sources. The analysis is done for several different scenarios, for which we consider the error bars of different subsets of the data to accurately describe the observational uncertainties. By comparing the results, we argue that a split that singles out only data near the Galactic poles is the most robust approach. We find that the dispersion of extragalactic contributions to observed Faraday depths is most likely lower than 7 rad/m2, in agreement with earlier results, and that the extragalactic contribution to an individual data point is poorly

  3. Rotation and Mass Loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owocki, S.

    2008-06-01

    Stellar rotation can play an important role in structuring and enhancing the mass loss from massive stars. Initial 1D models focussed on the expected centrifugal enhancement of the line-driven mass flux from the equator of a rotating star, but the review here emphasizes that the loss of centrifugal support away from the stellar surface actually limits the steady mass flux to just the point-star CAK value, with models near critical rotation characterized by a slow, subcritical acceleration. Recent suggestions that such slow outflows might have high enough density to explain disks in Be or B[e] stars are examined in the context of 2D simulations of the ``Wind Compressed Disk'' (WCD) paradigm, together with a review of the tendency for poleward components of the line-driving force to inhibit WCD formation. When one accounts for equatorial gravity darkening, the net tendency is in fact for the relatively bright regions at higher latitude to drive a faster, denser ``bipolar'' outflow. I discuss the potential relevance for the bipolar form of nebulae from LBV stars like η Carinae, but emphasize that, since the large mass loss associated with the eruption of eta Carinae's Homunculus would heavily saturate line-driving, explaining its bipolar form requires development of analogous models for continuum-driven mass loss. I conclude with a discussion of how radiation seems inherently ill-suited to supporting or driving a geometrically thin, but optically thick disk or disk outflow. The disks inferred in Be and B[e] stars may instead be centrifugally ejected, with radiation inducing an ablation flow from the disk surface, and thus perhaps playing a greater role in destroying (rather than creating) an orbiting, circumstellar disk.

  4. Slip effect for thin liquid film on a rotating disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanagisawa, Masahiro

    1987-02-01

    A flow for thin liquid films on rotating disks has been theoretically and experimentally studied. Liquid depletion behavior during a spin-coating process is calculated by solving the Navier-Stokes equation, taking into account interface slip between liquid and disk. Excellent agreement is seen between the model prediction and experimental data. According to observed depletion behavior on thin liquid films for various spin-coating parameters, half life falls off at the inverse square of rotational speed, and increases when viscosity increases, although the increasing rate falls off. The interface slip, represented as an external friction coefficient, is thermodynamically explained by the different (Δrc) in critical surface tension (rc) values between the liquid and the disk, which will be proportional to the solubility parameter. An infinite external friction coefficient, representing nonslip flow, may be given, when Δrc is zero. Spin-off experiments for liquids of various rc values, prepared by differing surface treatments, support this consideration.

  5. Interferometric rotation sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, T. M. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    An interferometric rotation sensor and control system is provided which includes a compound prism interferometer and an associated direction control system. Light entering the interferometer is split into two paths with the light in the respective paths being reflected an unequal number of times, and then being recombined at an exit aperture in phase differing relationships. Incoming light is deviated from the optical axis of the device by an angle, alpha. The angle causes a similar displacement of the two component images at the exit aperture which results in a fringe pattern. Fringe numbers are directly related to angle alpha. Various control systems of the interferometer are given.

  6. ROTATING PLASMA DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Boyer, K.; Hammel, J.E.; Longmire, C.L.; Nagle, D.E.; Ribe, F.L.; Tuck, J.L.

    1961-10-24

    ABS>A method and device are described for obtaining fusion reactions. The basic concept is that of using crossed electric and magnetic fields to induce a plasma rotation in which the ionized particles follow a circumferential drift orbit on wldch a cyclotron mode of motion is superimposed, the net result being a cycloidal motion about the axis of symmetry. The discharge tube has a radial electric field and a longitudinal magnetic field. Mirror machine geometry is utilized. The device avoids reliance on the pinch effect and its associated instability problems. (AEC)

  7. Magnetopause rotational forms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnerup, B. U. O.; Ledley, B. G.

    1974-01-01

    Magnetic field data from the Goddard Space Flight Center magnetometer experiment on board Ogo 5 are analyzed by the minimum-variance technique for two magnetopause crossings, believed to provide the best evidence presently available of magnetopause rotational discontinuities. Approximate agreement with predictions from MHD and first-order orbit theory is found, but available low-energy electron data suggest the presence of significant non-MHD effects. The paper also illustrates an improved method for data interval selection, a new magnetopause hodogram representation, and the utility of data simulation.

  8. Elastic Stability of Concentric Tube Robots Subject to External Loads.

    PubMed

    Ha, Junhyoung; Park, Frank C; Dupont, Pierre E

    2016-06-01

    Concentric tube robots, which are comprised of precurved elastic tubes that are concentrically arranged, are being developed for many medical interventions. The shape of the robot is determined by the rotation and translation of the tubes relative to each other, and also by any external forces applied by the environment. As the tubes rotate and translate relative to each other, elastic potential energy caused by tube bending and twisting can accumulate; if a configuration is not locally elastically stable, then a dangerous snapping motion may occur as energy is suddenly released. External loads on the robot also influence elastic stability. In this paper, we provide a second-order sufficient condition, and also a separate necessary condition, for elastic stability. Using methods of optimal control theory, we show that these conditions apply to general concentric tube robot designs subject to arbitrary conservative external loads. They can be used to assess the stability of candidate robot configurations. Our results are validated via comparison with other known stability criteria, and their utility is demonstrated by an application to stable path planning. PMID:26441407

  9. Advanced Prop-fan Engine Technology (APET) single- and counter-rotation gearbox/pitch change mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, C. N.

    1985-01-01

    The preliminary design of advanced technology (1992) turboprop engines for single-rotation prop-fans and conceptual designs of pitch change mechanisms for single- and counter-rotation prop-fan application are discussed. The single-rotation gearbox is a split path, in-line configuration. The counter-rotation gearbox is an in-line, differential planetary design. The pitch change mechanisms for both the single- and counter-rotation arrangements are rotary/hydraulic. The advanced technology single-rotation gearbox yields a 2.4 percent improvement in aircraft fuel burn and a one percent improvement in operating cost relative to a current technology gearbox. The 1992 counter-rotation gearbox is 15 percent lighter, 15 percent more reliable, 5 percent lower in cost, and 45 percent lower in maintenance cost than the 1992 single-rotation gearbox. The pitch controls are modular, accessible, and external.

  10. Sample rotating turntable kit for infrared spectrometers

    DOEpatents

    Eckels, Joel Del; Klunder, Gregory L.

    2008-03-04

    An infrared spectrometer sample rotating turntable kit has a rotatable sample cup containing the sample. The infrared spectrometer has an infrared spectrometer probe for analyzing the sample and the rotatable sample cup is adapted to receive the infrared spectrometer probe. A reflectance standard is located in the rotatable sample cup. A sleeve is positioned proximate the sample cup and adapted to receive the probe. A rotator rotates the rotatable sample cup. A battery is connected to the rotator.

  11. Digital rotation measurement unit

    DOEpatents

    Sanderson, S.N.

    1983-09-30

    A digital rotation indicator is disclosed for monitoring the position of a valve member having a movable actuator. The indicator utilizes mercury switches adapted to move in cooperation with the actuator. Each of the switches produces an output as it changes state when the actuator moves. A direction detection circuit is connected to the switches to produce a first digital signal indicative of the direction of rotation of the actuator. A count pulse generating circuit is also connected to the switches to produce a second digital pulse signal having count pulses corresponding to a change of state of any of the mercury switches. A reset pulse generating circuit is provided to generate a reset pulse each time a count pulse is generated. An up/down counter is connected to receive the first digital pulse signal and the second digital pulse signal and to count the pulses of the second digital pulse signal either up or down depending upon the instantaneous digital value of the first digital signal whereby a running count indicative of the movement of the actuator is maintained.

  12. Rotating drum filter

    DOEpatents

    Anson, Donald

    1990-01-01

    A perforated drum (10) rotates in a coaxial cylindrical housing (18) having three circumferential ports (19,22,23), and an axial outlet (24) at one end. The axis (11) is horizontal. A fibrous filter medium (20) is fed through a port (19) on or near the top of the housing (81) by a distributing mechanism (36) which lays a uniform mat (26) of the desired thickness onto the rotating drum (10). This mat (26) is carried by the drum (10) to a second port (23) through which dirty fluid (13) enters. The fluid (13) passes through the filter (26) and the cleaned stream (16) exits through the open end (15) of the drum (10) and the axial port (24) in the housing (18). The dirty filter material (20) is carried on to a third port (22) near the bottom of the housing (18) and drops into a receiver (31) from which it is continuously removed, cleaned (30), and returned (32) to the charging port (36) at the top. To support the filter mat, the perforated cylinder may carry a series of tines (40), shaped blades (41), or pockets, so that the mat (26) will not fall from the drum (10) prematurely. To minimize risk of mat failure, the fluid inlet port (23) may be located above the horizontal centerline (11).

  13. New type of rotating disk singlet oxygen generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schall, Wolfgang O.; Duschek, Frank R.

    1997-04-01

    A small rotating disk generator, particularly suited for closed cycle operation has been built and operated successfully. The generator has no external drive for the disks, but is rather driven by the momentum of the injected basic hydrogen peroxide. The rotation rate and the submergence of the disks in the liquid pool can be adjusted independently by the liquid flow rate, the size of the injection nozzle, the height of the outlet for the liquid, and also by the amount of injected gas. The closed cycle comprises a liquid reservoir for the cooling of the liquid and for the sedimentation of crystallized salt, and a gear pump for circulation of the liquid. First results for utilization and yield have been gained as a function of total pressure, rotation rate, and gas flow rate and composition. The performance of the generator shows a remarkable improvement over a Sparger type generator for equal flow rates.

  14. Rehabilitation of the Overhead Throwing Athlete: There Is More to It Than Just External Rotation/Internal Rotation Strengthening.

    PubMed

    Wilk, Kevin E; Arrigo, Christopher A; Hooks, Todd R; Andrews, James R

    2016-03-01

    The repetitive nature of throwing manifests characteristic adaptive changes to the shoulder, scapulothoracic, and hip/pelvis complexes that result in a set of unique physical traits in the overhead throwing athlete. An effective rehabilitation program is dependent upon an accurate evaluation and differential diagnosis to determine the causative factors for the athlete's pathologic features. The treatment program should be individualized with specific strengthening and flexibility exercises to achieve the dynamic stability that is required for overhead function. In this article we describe the characteristics of the throwing shoulder, along with a multiphased rehabilitation program that allows for the restoration of strength, mobility, endurance, and power and is aimed toward a return to unrestricted sporting activity. We also describe exercises that link the upper and lower extremities because of the importance of core control and leg strength in the development of power during the act of throwing. Additionally, proper throwing mechanics, utilization of pitch counts, appropriate rest, and proper off-season conditioning will help decrease overall injury risk in the overhead throwing athlete. PMID:26972270

  15. Pentagon chain in external fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovács, György; Gulácsi, Zsolt

    2015-11-01

    We consider a pentagon chain described by a Hubbard type of model considered under periodic boundary conditions. The system (i) is placed in an external magnetic field perpendicular to the plane of the cells, and (ii) is in a site-selective manner under the action of an external electric potential. In these conditions, we show in an exact manner that the physical properties of the system can be qualitatively changed. The changes cause first strong modifications of the band structure of the system created by the one-particle part of the Hamiltonian, and second, produce marked changes of the phase diagram. We exemplify this by deducing ferromagnetic ground states in the presence of external fields in two different domains of the parameter space.

  16. Rotating mirror plasmas in the quest of magnetofluid states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quevedo, Hernan Javier

    The goal of this dissertation is to describe and discuss the first steps taken by the Magneto Bernoulli eXperiment (MBX) to create magnetofluid states in the laboratory using a rotating plasma in an external mirror magnetic field. The terminology magnetofluid has been introduced to characterize a plasma model, based on 2-fluid theory, that treats the flow and the magnetic field in a symmetrical way. Many interesting astrophysical and laboratory problems involve large flows and fall in this category. Based on the set of parameters where MBX should run, we set up the experiment, and added different probes to diagnose the rotating plasma. We have also installed a data acquisition system, and set up an archive system (to store the data) that can be accessed worldwide. Experimental results demonstrate that supersonic flows can be generated with biasing electrodes at the throat of the mirror magnetic field. Alfvenic flows needed for a transition to magnetofluid states could not be reached because the initial plasma density was too low. At low bias (slow rotational speed) the plasma has E x B/B 2 drift rotation and the magnetic fields lines are equipotentials. With a higher bias, we observed large potential drops along the field lines. We also observed an asymmetry in the polarity of the bias which leads to constraints in the control of the sheared plasma flow. We present a model that captures many of these features. In conjunction with experimental efforts we develop a theory for a rotating plasma embedded in an external mirror magnetic field. An analytic solution that involves rigid rotation of the plasma shows important differences between a 2-fluid system and ideal MHD. We find high non equipotential magnetic lines and asymmetry to compare with the experimental results.

  17. Vortex structures of rotating spin-orbit-coupled Bose-Einstein condensates

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Xiangfa; Zhou Jing; Wu Congjun

    2011-12-15

    We consider the quasi-two-dimensional two-component Bose-Einstein condensates with Rashba spin-orbit (SO) coupling in a rotating trap. The rotation angular velocity couples to the mechanical angular momentum, which contains a noncanonical part arising from SO coupling. The effects of an external Zeeman term favoring spin polarization along the radial direction is also considered, which has the same form as the noncanonical part of the mechanical angular momentum. The rotating condensate exhibits a variety of rich structures by varying the strengths of the trapping potential and interaction. With a strong trapping potential, the condensate exhibits a half-quantum vortex-lattice configuration. Such a configuration is driven to the normal one by introducing the external radial Zeeman field. In the case of a weak trap potential, the condensate exhibits a multidomain pattern of plane-wave states under the external radial Zeeman field.

  18. Martian external magnetic field proxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langlais, Benoit; Civet, Francois

    2015-04-01

    Mars possesses no dynamic magnetic field of internal origin as it is the case for the Earth or for Mercury. Instead Mars is characterized by an intense and localized magnetic field of crustal origin. This field is the result of past magnetization and demagnetization processes, and reflects its evolution. The Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF) interacts with Mars' ionized environment to create an external magnetic field. This external field is weak compared to lithospheric one but very dynamic, and may hamper the detailed analysis of the internal magnetic field at some places or times. Because there are currently no magnetic field measurements made at Mars' surface, it is not possible to directly monitor the external field temporal variability as it is done in Earth's ground magnetic observatories. In this study we examine to indirect ways of quantifying this external field. First we use the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) mission which measures the solar wind about one hour upstream of the bow-shock resulting from the interaction between the solar wind and the Earth's internal magnetic field. These measurements are extrapolated to Mars' position taking into account the orbital configurations of the Mars-Earth system and the velocity of particles carrying the IMF. Second we directly use Mars Global Surveyor magnetic field measurements to quantify the level of variability of the external field. We subtract from the measurements the internal field which is otherwise modeled, and bin the residuals first on a spatial and then on a temporal mesh. This allows to compute daily or semi daily index. We present a comparison of these two proxies and demonstrate their complementarity. We also illustrate our analysis by comparing our Martian external field proxies to terrestrial index at epochs of known strong activity. These proxies will especially be useful for upcoming magnetic field measurements made around or at the surface of Mars.

  19. Stellar counter-rotation in lenticular galaxy NGC 448

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katkov, Ivan Yu.; Sil'chenko, Olga K.; Chilingarian, Igor V.; Uklein, Roman I.; Egorov, Oleg V.

    2016-09-01

    The counter-rotation phenomenon in disc galaxies directly indicates a complex galaxy assembly history which is crucial for our understanding of galaxy physics. Here, we present the complex data analysis for a lenticular galaxy NGC 448, which has been recently suspected to host a counter-rotating stellar component. We collected deep long-slit spectroscopic observations using the Russian 6-m telescope and performed the photometric decomposition of Sloan Digital Sky Survey archival images. We exploited (i) a non-parametric approach in order to recover stellar line-of-sight velocity distributions and (ii) a parametric spectral decomposition technique in order to disentangle stellar population properties of both main and counter-rotating stellar discs. Our spectral decomposition stays in perfect agreement with the photometric analysis. The counter-rotating component contributes ≈30 per cent to the total galaxy light. We estimated its stellar mass to be 9.0^{+2.7}_{-1.8}× 109 M_{⊙}. The radial scalelength of counter-rotating disc is ≈3 times smaller than that of the main disc. Both discs harbour old stars but the counter-rotating components reveal a detectable negative age gradient that might suggest an extended inside-out formation during 3…4 Gyr. The counter-rotating disc hosts more metal-rich stars and possesses a shallower metallicity gradient with respect to the main disc. Our findings rule out cosmological filaments as a source of external accretion which is considered as a potential mechanism of the counter-rotating component formation in NGC 448, and favour the satellite merger event with the consequent slow gas accretion.

  20. Shoulder Rotator Muscle Dynamometry Characteristics: Side Asymmetry and Correlations with Ball-Throwing Speed in Adolescent Handball Players

    PubMed Central

    Pontaga, Inese; Zidens, Janis

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the investigation was to: 1) compare shoulder external/internal rotator muscles’ peak torques and average power values and their ratios in the dominant and non-dominant arm; 2) determine correlations between shoulder rotator muscles’ peak torques, average power and ball-throwing speed in handball players. Fourteen 14 to 15-year-old male athletes with injury-free shoulders participated in the study (body height: 176 ± 7 cm, body mass 63 ± 9 kg). The tests were carried out by an isokinetic dynamometer system in the shoulder internal and external rotation movements at angular velocities of 60°/s, 90°/s and 240°/s during concentric contractions. The eccentric external– concentric internal rotator muscle contractions were performed at the velocity of 90°/s. The player threw a ball at maximal speed keeping both feet on the floor. The speed was recorded with reflected light rays. Training in handball does not cause significant side asymmetry in shoulder external/internal rotator muscle peak torques or the average power ratio. Positive correlations between isokinetic characteristics of the shoulder internal and external rotator muscles and ball-throwing speed were determined. The power produced by internal rotator muscles during concentric contractions after eccentric contractions of external rotator muscles was significantly greater in the dominant than in the non-dominant arm. Thus, it may be concluded that the shoulder eccentric external/concentric internal rotator muscle power ratio is significantly greater than this ratio in the concentric contractions of these muscles. PMID:25414738

  1. Internal rotation of the sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duvall, T. L., Jr.; Dziembowski, W. A.; Goode, P. R.; Gough, D. O.; Harvey, J. W.; Leibacher, J. W.

    1984-01-01

    The frequency difference between prograde and retrograde sectoral solar oscillations is analyzed to determine the rotation rate of the solar interior, assuming no latitudinal dependence. Much of the solar interior rotates slightly less rapidly than the surface, while the innermost part apparently rotates more rapidly. The resulting solar gravitational quadrupole moment is J2 = (1.7 + or - 0.4) x 10 to the -7th and provides a negligible contribution to current planetary tests of Einstein's theory of general relativity.

  2. Space station neutral external environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ehlers, H.; Leger, L.

    1988-01-01

    Molecular contamination levels arising from the external induced neutral environment of the Space Station (Phase 1 configuration) were calculated using the MOLFLUX model. Predicted molecular column densities and deposition rates generally meet the Space Station contamination requirements. In the doubtful cases of deposition due to materials outgassing, proper material selection, generally excluding organic products exposed to the external environment, must be considered to meet contamination requirements. It is important that the Space Station configuration, once defined, is not significantly modified to avoid introducing new unacceptable contamination sources.

  3. Multisystemic Therapy for Externalizing Youth.

    PubMed

    Zajac, Kristyn; Randall, Jeff; Swenson, Cynthia Cupit

    2015-07-01

    Externalizing problems are multidetermined and related to individual, family, peer, school, and community risk factors. Multisystemic therapy (MST) was originally developed to address these risk factors among youth with serious conduct problems who are at-risk for out-of-home placement. Several decades of research have established MST as an evidence-based intervention for adolescents with serious clinical problems, including serious offending, delinquency, substance abuse, and parental physical abuse and neglect. This article presents an overview of the clinical procedures and evidence base of MST for externalizing problems as well as 2 adaptations: MST for Substance Abuse and MST for Child Abuse and Neglect. PMID:26092742

  4. Rotating raster generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, C. A. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A rotating raster generator is provided which enables display of a television raster at any arbitrary roll angle. The generator includes four integrator circuits each of which receives a first voltage input corresponding to the sine or cosine of the desired roll angle and a second input comprising conventional horizontal or vertical sync pulses. The integrator circuits each comprise an operational amplifier and a capacitor connected for producing a ramp output having a rate of change proportional to the roll angle input, an electronic switch responsive to the sync input for resetting the integrator, and a summer that adds the ramp output of the integrator to the roll angle input so as to provide a zero-centered deflection control voltage.

  5. Stimulated rotational Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parazzoli, C. G.; Rafanelli, G. L.; Capps, D. M.; Drutman, C.

    1989-03-01

    The effect of Stimulated Rotational Raman Scattering (SRRS) processes on high energy laser directed energy weapon systems was studied. The program had 3 main objectives; achieving an accurate description of the physical processes involved in SRRS; developing a numerical algorithm to confidently evaluate SRRS-induced losses in the propagation of high energy laser beams in the uplink and downlink segments of the optical trains of various strategic defense system scenarios; and discovering possible methods to eliminate, or at least reduce, the deleterious effects of SRRS on the energy deposition on target. The following topics are discussed: the motivation for the accomplishments of the DOE program; the Semiclassical Theory of Non-Resonant SRRS for Diatomic Homonuclear Molecules; and then the following appendices; Calculation of the Dipole Transition Reduced Matrix Element, Guided Tour of Hughes SRRS Code, Running the Hughes SRRS Code, and Hughes SRRS Code Listing.

  6. The Rapidly Rotating Sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanasoge, Shravan M.; Duvall, Thomas L., Jr.; Sreenivasan, Katepalli R.

    2012-01-01

    Convection in the solar interior is thought to comprise structures at a continuum of scales, from large to small. This conclusion emerges from phenomenological studies and numerical simulations though neither covers the proper range of dynamical parameters of solar convection. In the present work, imaging techniques of time-distance helioseismology applied to observational data reveal no long-range order in the convective motion. We conservatively bound the associated velocity magnitudes, as a function of depth and the spherical-harmonic degree l to be 20-100 times weaker than prevailing estimates within the wavenumber band l < 60. The observationally constrained kinetic energy is approximately a thousandth of the theoretical prediction, suggesting the prevalence of an intrinsically different paradigm of turbulence. A fundamental question arises: what mechanism of turbulence transports the heat ux of a solar luminosity outwards? The Sun is seemingly a much faster rotator than previously thought, with advection dominated by Coriolis forces at scales l < 60.

  7. Asteroid Ida Rotation Sequence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This montage of 14 images (the time order is right to left, bottom to top) shows Ida as it appeared in the field of view of Galileo's camera on August 28, 1993. Asteroid Ida rotates once every 4 hours, 39 minutes and clockwise when viewed from above the north pole; these images cover about one Ida 'day.' This sequence has been used to create a 3-D model that shows Ida to be almost croissant shaped. The earliest view (lower right) was taken from a range of 240,000 kilometers (150,000 miles), 5.4 hours before closest approach. The asteroid Ida draws its name from mythology, in which the Greek god Zeus was raised by the nymph Ida.

  8. Rotated Heisenberg model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Fadi; Ye, Jinwu; Liu, Wu-Ming

    2015-03-01

    We show that Rotated Heisenberg (RH) model is a new class of quantum spin models to describe magnetic materials with strong spin-orbit couplings (SOC). We introduce Wilson loops to characterize frustrations and gauge equivalent class. For a special equivalent class, we identify a new spin-orbital entangled commensurate ground state. It supports a novel gapped elementary excitation named as in-commensurate magnons which have two gap minima continuously tuned by the SOC strength. At low temperatures, the in-commensurate magnons lead to dramatic effects in all physical quantities such as density of states, specific heat, magnetization and various spin correlation functions. At high temperatures, the specific heat and transverse spin structure factors depend on the SOC strength explicitly. We argue that one gauge may be realized in current experiments and other gauges may also be realized in near future experiments. Various experimental detections are discussed. This work is supported by NSF-DMR-1161497, NSFC-11174210.

  9. PLT rotating pumped limiter

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, S.A.; Budny, R.V.; Corso, V.; Boychuck, J.; Grisham, L.; Heifetz, D.; Hosea, J.; Luyber, S.; Loprest, P.; Manos, D.

    1984-07-01

    A limiter with a specially contoured front face and the ability to rotate during tokamak discharges has been installed in a PLT pump duct. These features have been selected to handle the unique particle removal and heat load requirements of ICRF heating and lower-hybrid current-drive experiments. The limiter has been conditioned and commissioned in an ion-beam test stand by irradiation with 1 MW power, 200 ms duration beams of 40 keV hydrogen ions. Operation in PLT during ohmic discharges has proven the ability of the limiter to reduce localized heating caused by energetic electron bombardment and to remove about 2% of the ions lost to the PLT walls and limiters.

  10. Rotating Gravity Gradiometer Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forward, R. L.

    1976-01-01

    The application of a Rotating Gravity Gradiometer (RGG) system on board a Lunar Polar Orbiter (LPO) for the measurement of the Lunar gravity field was investigated. A data collection simulation study shows that a gradiometer will give significantly better gravity data than a doppler tracking system for the altitudes under consideration for the LOP, that the present demonstrated sensitivity of the RGG is adequate for measurement of the Lunar gravity gradient field, and that a single RGG instrument will provide almost as much data for geophysical interpretation as an orthogonal three axis RGG system. An engineering study of the RGG sensor/LPO spacecraft interface characteristics shows that the RGG systems under consideration are compatible with the present models of the LPO spacecraft.

  11. Earth's variable rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hide, Raymond; Dickey, Jean O.

    1991-01-01

    Recent improvements in geodetic data and practical meteorology have advanced research on fluctuations in the earth's rotation. The interpretation of these fluctuations is inextricably linked with studies of the dynamics of the earth-moon system and dynamical processes in the liquid metallic core of the earth (where the geomagnetic field originates), other parts of the earth's interior, and the hydrosphere and atmosphere. Fluctuations in the length of the day occurring on decadal time scales have implications for the topographay of the core-mantle boundary and the electrical, magnetic, ande other properties of the core and lower mantle. Investigations of more rapid fluctuations bear on meteorological studies of interannual, seasonal, and intraseasonal variations in the general circulation of the atmosphere and the response of the oceans to such variations.

  12. Cartilage Pressure Distributions Provide a Footprint to Define Female Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Quatman, Carmen E.; Kiapour, Ali; Myer, Gregory D.; Ford, Kevin R.; Demetropoulos, Constantine K.; Goel, Vijay K.; Hewett, Timothy E.

    2012-01-01

    Background Bone bruises located on the lateral femoral condyle and posterolateral tibia are commonly associated with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries and may contribute to the high risk for knee osteoarthritis after ACL injury. The resultant footprint (location) of a bone bruise after ACL injury provides evidence of the inciting injury mechanism. Purpose/Hypothesis (1) To analyze tibial and femoral articular cartilage pressure distributions during normal landing and injury simulations, and (2) to evaluate ACL strains for conditions that lead to articular cartilage pressure distributions similar to bone bruise patterns associated with ACL injury. The hypothesis was that combined knee abduction and anterior tibial translation injury simulations would demonstrate peak articular cartilage pressure distributions in the lateral femoral condyle and posterolateral tibia. The corollary hypothesis was that combined knee abduction and anterior tibial translation injury conditions would result in the highest ACL strains. Study Design Descriptive laboratory study. Methods Prospective biomechanical data from athletes who subsequently suffered ACL injuries after testing (n = 9) and uninjured teammates (n = 390) were used as baseline input data for finite element model comparisons. Results Peak articular pressures that occurred on the posterolateral tibia and lateral femoral condyle were demonstrated for injury conditions that had a baseline knee abduction angle of 5°. Combined planar injury conditions of abduction/anterior tibial translation, anterior tibial translation/internal tibial rotation, or anterior tibial translation/external tibial rotation or isolated anterior tibial translation, external tibial rotation, or internal tibial rotation resulted in peak pressures in the posterolateral tibia and lateral femur. The highest ACL strains occurred during the combined abduction/anterior tibial translation condition in the group that had a baseline knee abduction angle

  13. Closeup view of an External Tank (ET) Attach Ring undergoing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Close-up view of an External Tank (ET) Attach Ring undergoing preparations in the Processing Building of the Rotation Processing and Surge Facility at Kennedy Space Center. After preparations are complete the ET Attach Ring will be mated to the top of the Aft Motor Segment. The most prominent features in this view are the ET/Solid Rocket Booster Struts in the center and left in the view and the Aft Integrated Electronics Assembly located on the right side if the ring in this view. - Space Transportation System, Solid Rocket Boosters, Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, 2101 NASA Parkway, Houston, Harris County, TX

  14. Freezing of Energy of a Soliton in an External Potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bambusi, D.; Maspero, A.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper we study the dynamics of a soliton in the generalized NLS with a small external potential ɛV of Schwartz class. We prove that there exists an effective mechanical system describing the dynamics of the soliton and that, for any positive integer r, the energy of such a mechanical system is almost conserved up to times of order ɛ - r . In the rotational invariant case we deduce that the true orbit of the soliton remains close to the mechanical one up to times of order ɛ - r .

  15. Plasma rotation induced by RF

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, V. S.; Chiu, S. C.; Lin-Liu, Y. R. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5698; Omelchenko, Y. A. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5698

    1999-09-20

    Plasma rotation has many beneficial effects on tokamak operation including stabilization of MHD and microturbulence to improve the beta limit and confinement. Contrary to present-day tokamaks, neutral beams may not be effective in driving rotation in fusion reactors; hence the investigation of radiofrequency (RF) induced plasma rotation is of great interest and potential importance. This paper reviews the experimental results of RF induced rotation and possible physical mechanisms, suggested by theories, to explain the observations. This subject is only in the infancy of its research and many challenging issues remained to be understood and resolved. (c) 1999 American Institute of Physics.

  16. Biologics in rotator cuff surgery

    PubMed Central

    Schär, Michael O; Rodeo, Scott A

    2014-01-01

    Pathologies of the rotator cuff are by far the most common cause of shoulder dysfunction and pain. Even though reconstruction of the rotator cuff results in improved clinical outcome scores, including decreased pain, several studies report high failure rates. Orthopaedic research has therefore focused on biologically augmenting the rotator cuff reconstruction and improving tendon–bone healing of the rotator cuff. This biological augmentation has included the application of different platelet concentrates containing growth factors, mesenchymal stem cells, scaffolds and a combination of the above. The present review provides an overview over the biological augmentation options based upon current evidence.

  17. External cephalic version experiences in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mi-Young; Park, Min-Young

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate obstetric outcomes of external cephalic version (ECV) performed at or near term. Methods Single pregnant woman with breech presentation at or near term (n=145), who experienced ECV by one obstetrician from November 2009 to July 2014 in our institution were included in the study. Maternal baseline characteristic and fetal ultrasonographic variables were checked before the procedure. After ECV, the delivery outcomes of the women were gathered. Variables affecting the success or failure of ECV were evaluated. Results Success rate of ECV was 71.0% (n=103). Four variables (parity, amniotic fluid index, fetal spine position and rotational direction) were observed to be in correlation with success or failure of ECV. In contactable 83 individuals experienced successful ECV, cesarean delivery rates were 18.1%, 28.9%, and 5.3% in total, nulliparas, and multiparas, respectively. Conclusion Based on the results, ECV is proposed to be safe for both mother and her fetus. In addition, it is a valuable procedure that increases probability of vaginal delivery for women with breech presentation. PMID:27004197

  18. Rotational velocities of A-type stars. IV. Evolution of rotational velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zorec, J.; Royer, F.

    2012-01-01

    Context. In previous works of this series, we have shown that late B- and early A-type stars have genuine bimodal distributions of rotational velocities and that late A-type stars lack slow rotators. The distributions of the surface angular velocity ratio Ω/Ωcrit (Ωcrit is the critical angular velocity) have peculiar shapes according to spectral type groups, which can be caused by evolutionary properties. Aims: We aim to review the properties of these rotational velocity distributions in some detail as a function of stellar mass and age. Methods: We have gathered vsini for a sample of 2014 B6- to F2-type stars. We have determined the masses and ages for these objects with stellar evolution models. The (Teff,log L/L⊙)-parameters were determined from the uvby-β photometry and the HIPPARCOS parallaxes. Results: The velocity distributions show two regimes that depend on the stellar mass. Stars less massive than 2.5 M⊙ have a unimodal equatorial velocity distribution and show a monotonical acceleration with age on the main sequence (MS). Stars more massive have a bimodal equatorial velocity distribution. Contrarily to theoretical predictions, the equatorial velocities of stars from about 1.7 M⊙ to 3.2 M⊙ undergo a strong acceleration in the first third of the MS evolutionary phase, while in the last third of the MS they evolve roughly as if there were no angular momentum redistribution in the external stellar layers. The studied stars might start in the ZAMS not necessarily as rigid rotators, but with a total angular momentum lower than the critical one of rigid rotators. The stars seem to evolve as differential rotators all the way of their MS life span and the variation of the observed rotational velocities proceeds with characteristic time scales δt ≈ 0.2 tMS, where tMS is the time spent by a star in the MS. Full Table 1 is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc

  19. How to Minimize Rotational Conflict between Femoral & Tibial Component in Total Knee Arthroplasty: The Use of Femoro-Tibial Axial Synchronizer (Linker)

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Jai-Gon; Moon, Young-Wan; Kim, Sang-Min

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to investigate the correlation between rotational axes of femur and tibia with the use of Linker. Materials and Methods This study was carried out from August 2009 to February 2010 on 54 patients (106 knees), who were diagnosed with simultaneous bilateral total knee arthroplasty. With the use of postoperative computed tomography scans, it was investigated how much the rotational angle of femoral and tibial components matched. Results The tibial component was internally rotated for the femoral component at an angle of 0.8°. The femoral component was externally rotated for the surgical transepicondylar axis (TEA) at an angle of 1.6 (range: from 4.8° of internal rotation to 7.9° of external rotation, SD=2.2°), and the tibial component was externally rotated for the surgical TEA at an average angle of 0.9 (range: from 5.1° of internal rotation to 8.3° of external rotation, SD=3.1°). Conclusion The femoro-tibial synchronizer helped to improve the orientation and positioning of both femoral component and tibial component, and also increase the correlation of the rotational axes of the two components. PMID:25683995

  20. Modeling rigid magnetically rotated microswimmers: Rotation axes, bistability, and controllability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meshkati, Farshad; Fu, Henry Chien

    2014-12-01

    Magnetically actuated microswimmers have recently attracted attention due to many possible biomedical applications. In this study we investigate the dynamics of rigid magnetically rotated microswimmers with permanent magnetic dipoles. Our approach uses a boundary element method to calculate a mobility matrix, accurate for arbitrary geometries, which is then used to identify the steady periodically rotating orbits in a co-rotating body-fixed frame. We evaluate the stability of each of these orbits. We map the magnetoviscous behavior as a function of dimensionless Mason number and as a function of the angle that the magnetic field makes with its rotation axis. We describe the wobbling motion of these swimmers by investigating how the rotation axis changes as a function of experimental parameters. We show that for a given magnetic field strength and rotation frequency, swimmers can have more than one stable periodic orbit with different rotation axes. Finally, we demonstrate that one can improve the controllability of these types of microswimmers by adjusting the relative angle between the magnetic field and its axis of rotation.

  1. Unidirectional rotating coordinate rotation digital computer algorithm based on rotational phase estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chaozhu; Han, Jinan; Yan, Huizhi

    2015-06-01

    The improved coordinate rotation digital computer (CORDIC) algorithm gives high precision and resolution phase rotation, but it has some shortages such as high iterations and big system delay. This paper puts forward unidirectional rotating CORDIC algorithm to solve these problems. First, using under-damping theory, a part of unidirectional phase rotations is carried out. Then, the threshold value of angle is determined based on phase rotation estimation method. Finally, rotation phase estimation completes the rest angle iterations. Furthermore, the paper simulates and implements the numerical control oscillator by Quartus II software and Modelsim software. According to the experimental results, the algorithm reduces iterations and judgment of sign bit, so that it decreases system delay and resource utilization and improves the throughput. We always analyze the error brought by this algorithm. It turned out that the algorithm has a good application prospect in global navigation satellite system and channelized receiver.

  2. Unidirectional rotating coordinate rotation digital computer algorithm based on rotational phase estimation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chaozhu; Han, Jinan; Yan, Huizhi

    2015-06-01

    The improved coordinate rotation digital computer (CORDIC) algorithm gives high precision and resolution phase rotation, but it has some shortages such as high iterations and big system delay. This paper puts forward unidirectional rotating CORDIC algorithm to solve these problems. First, using under-damping theory, a part of unidirectional phase rotations is carried out. Then, the threshold value of angle is determined based on phase rotation estimation method. Finally, rotation phase estimation completes the rest angle iterations. Furthermore, the paper simulates and implements the numerical control oscillator by Quartus II software and Modelsim software. According to the experimental results, the algorithm reduces iterations and judgment of sign bit, so that it decreases system delay and resource utilization and improves the throughput. We always analyze the error brought by this algorithm. It turned out that the algorithm has a good application prospect in global navigation satellite system and channelized receiver. PMID:26133856

  3. Surface dimpling on rotating work piece using rotation cutting tool

    SciTech Connect

    Bhapkar, Rohit Arun; Larsen, Eric Richard

    2015-03-31

    A combined method of machining and applying a surface texture to a work piece and a tool assembly that is capable of machining and applying a surface texture to a work piece are disclosed. The disclosed method includes machining portions of an outer or inner surface of a work piece. The method also includes rotating the work piece in front of a rotating cutting tool and engaging the outer surface of the work piece with the rotating cutting tool to cut dimples in the outer surface of the work piece. The disclosed tool assembly includes a rotating cutting tool coupled to an end of a rotational machining device, such as a lathe. The same tool assembly can be used to both machine the work piece and apply a surface texture to the work piece without unloading the work piece from the tool assembly.

  4. 10 Core External Environmental Trends.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    El Camino Coll., Torrance, CA.

    This is an institutional report summarizing 10 core external environmental trends and their implications for El Camino College and the surrounding community. The report offers a brief description for the following trends: (1) there is more emphasis on colleges becoming learning institutions rather than teaching institutions; (2) the current and…

  5. HIGH-PRECISION MACLAURIN-BASED MODELS OF ROTATING LIQUID PLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Hubbard, W. B.

    2012-09-01

    We present an efficient numerical self-consistent field method for calculating a gravitational model of a rotating liquid planet to spherical harmonic degree {approx}30 and a precision {approx}10{sup -12} in the external gravity field. The method's accuracy is validated by comparing results, for Jupiter rotation parameters, with the exact Maclaurin constant-density solution. The method can be generalized to non-constant density.

  6. Technical basis document for external events

    SciTech Connect

    OBERG, B.D.

    2003-03-22

    This document supports the Tank Farms Documented Safety Analysis and presents the technical basis for the frequencies of externally initiated accidents. The consequences of externally initiated events are discussed in other documents that correspond to the accident that was caused by the external event. The external events include aircraft crash, vehicle accident, range fire, and rail accident.

  7. Counter-rotating accretion discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyda, S.; Lovelace, R. V. E.; Ustyugova, G. V.; Romanova, M. M.; Koldoba, A. V.

    2015-01-01

    Counter-rotating discs can arise from the accretion of a counter-rotating gas cloud on to the surface of an existing corotating disc or from the counter-rotating gas moving radially inwards to the outer edge of an existing disc. At the interface, the two components mix to produce gas or plasma with zero net angular momentum which tends to free-fall towards the disc centre. We discuss high-resolution axisymmetric hydrodynamic simulations of viscous counter-rotating discs for the cases where the two components are vertically separated and radially separated. The viscosity is described by an isotropic α-viscosity including all terms in the viscous stress tensor. For the vertically separated components, a shear layer forms between them and the middle part of this layer free-falls to the disc centre. The accretion rates are increased by factors of ˜102-104 over that for a conventional disc rotating in one direction with the same viscosity. The vertical width of the shear layer and the accretion rate are strongly dependent on the viscosity and the mass fraction of the counter-rotating gas. In the case of radially separated components where the inner disc corotates and the outer disc rotates in the opposite direction, a gap between the two components opens and closes quasi-periodically. The accretion rates are ≳25 times larger than those for a disc rotating in one direction with the same viscosity.

  8. Spatially homogeneous rotating world models.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ozsvath, I.

    1971-01-01

    The mathematical problem encountered when looking for the simplest expanding and rotating model of the universe without the compactness condition for the space sections is formulated. The Lagrangian function is derived for four different rotating universes simultaneously. These models correspond in a certain sense to Godel's (1950) ?symmetric case.'

  9. IAU Poles and Rotation Rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, J. L.

    1997-01-01

    Every three years the IAU/IAG/COSPAR Working Group on Cartographic Coordinates and Rotational Elements of the Planets and Satellites revises tables giving the directions of the north poles rotation and the prime meridians of the planets, satellites, and asteriods and also tables of their sizes and shapes.

  10. Rotations of the Regular Polyhedra

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, MaryClara; Soto-Johnson, Hortensia

    2006-01-01

    The study of the rotational symmetries of the regular polyhedra is important in the classroom for many reasons. Besides giving the students an opportunity to visualize in three dimensions, it is also an opportunity to relate two-dimensional and three-dimensional concepts. For example, rotations in R[superscript 2] require a point and an angle of…

  11. Quartic Rotation Criteria and Algorithms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarkson, Douglas B.; Jennrich, Robert I.

    1988-01-01

    Most of the current analytic rotation criteria for simple structure in factor analysis are summarized and identified as members of a general symmetric family of quartic criteria. A unified development of algorithms for orthogonal and direct oblique rotation using arbitrary criteria from this family is presented. (Author/TJH)

  12. Irrigation on the Old Rotation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Old Rotation (circa 1896) is the oldest, continuous cotton experiment in the world. There are 13 plots on one acre of land on the campus of Auburn University to document the long-term effects of crop rotations with and without winter legumes as a source of N for cotton, corn, soybean, and wheat...

  13. Rotational joint for prosthetic leg

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. C.; Owens, L. J.

    1977-01-01

    Device is installed in standard 30 millimeter tubing used for lower leg prosthetics. Unit allows proper rotation (about 3 degrees) of foot relative to the hip, during normal walking or running. Limited rotational movement with restoring force results in a more natural gait.

  14. Three-Mode Orthomax Rotation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiers, Henk A. L.

    1997-01-01

    Provides a fully flexible approach for orthomax rotation of the core to simple structure with respect to three modes simultaneously. Computationally the approach relies on repeated orthomax rotation applied to supermatrices containing the frontal, lateral, or horizontal slabs, respectively. Exemplary analyses illustrate the procedure. (Author/SLD)

  15. Defensive externality and blame projection following failure.

    PubMed

    Hochreich, D J

    1975-09-01

    This study focuses upon the relationship between internal-external control and defensive blame projection. Trust was used as a moderator variable for making differential predictions concerning the behavior of two subgroups of externals: defensive externals, whose externality is presumed to reflect primarily a verbal technique of defense, and congruent externals, whose externality reflects a more genuine belief that most outcomes are determined by forces beyond their personal control. As predicted, defensive externals showed a stronger tendency than did congruent externals and internals to resort to blame projection following failure at an achievement task. There were no group differences in attribution following task success. Defensive externals were found to be more responsive to negative feedback than were congruent externals. PMID:1177087

  16. Optomechanics for absolute rotation detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davuluri, Sankar

    2016-07-01

    In this article, we present an application of optomechanical cavity for the absolute rotation detection. The optomechanical cavity is arranged in a Michelson interferometer in such a way that the classical centrifugal force due to rotation changes the length of the optomechanical cavity. The change in the cavity length induces a shift in the frequency of the cavity mode. The phase shift corresponding to the frequency shift in the cavity mode is measured at the interferometer output to estimate the angular velocity of absolute rotation. We derived an analytic expression to estimate the minimum detectable rotation rate in our scheme for a given optomechanical cavity. Temperature dependence of the rotation detection sensitivity is studied.

  17. Rotational chaos in dissipative systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casdagli, Martin

    1988-01-01

    An investigation is made into chaotic attractors arising from a quasiperiodic transition to chaos, using a quantity called the rotation interval. The rotation interval describes the short term rotation rates available to the attractor. We present algorithms to calculate it given an appropriate map, differential equation or time series. We find that the rotation interval has a very robust parameter dependence: its endpoints are almost always phase locked. Our numerical ideas are based on the theory of dissipative twist maps, which is reviewed. This theory is also used to prove a theorem about the non-existence of certain strange attractors in nearly conservative systems. Finally, an investigation is made into the relationship between the rotation interval and topological entropy, and the breakup of invariant circles.

  18. Factors affecting rotator cuff healing.

    PubMed

    Mall, Nathan A; Tanaka, Miho J; Choi, Luke S; Paletta, George A

    2014-05-01

    Several studies have noted that increasing age is a significant factor for diminished rotator cuff healing, while biomechanical studies have suggested the reason for this may be an inferior healing environment in older patients. Larger tears and fatty infiltration or atrophy negatively affect rotator cuff healing. Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair, double-row repairs, performing a concomitant acromioplasty, and the use of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) do not demonstrate an improvement in structural healing over mini-open rotator cuff repairs, single-row repairs, not performing an acromioplasty, or not using PRP. There is conflicting evidence to support postoperative rehabilitation protocols using early motion over immobilization following rotator cuff repair. PMID:24806015

  19. Rotating Bondi Accretion Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Myeong-Gu; Han, Du-Hwan

    2016-06-01

    The characteristics of accretion flow onto a black hole are determined by the physical condition of gas at large radius. When the gas has no angular momentum and is polytropic, the accretion flow becomes the classic Bondi flow. The mass accretion rate in such case is an eigenvalue and uniquely determined by the density and the temperature of the surrounding gas for a given black hole mass. When the gas has angular momentum above some critical value, the angular momentum of the gas should be removed by viscosity to reach the black hole horizon. We study, within the slim disk approximation, rotating polytropic accretion flow with alpha viscosity as an an extension of the Bondi flow. The characteristics of the accretion flow are now determined by the temperature, density, and angular momentum of the gas at the outer boundary. We explore the effects of the viscosity parameter and the outer boundary radius on the physical characteristic of the flow, especially on the mass accretion rate, and compare the result with previous works of Park (2009) and Narayan & Fabian (2011).

  20. Simulating rotational grazing management.

    PubMed

    Cros, M J; Duru, M; Garcia, F; Martin-Clouaire, R

    2001-09-01

    Dairy systems predominantly based on rotational grazing are notoriously hard to manage. In order to ensure profitability, this type of production requires quite good organisation, planning, and operating capability on the part of the farmer. A simulation-based decision support system, called SEPATOU, has been developed for this purpose. At the core of the decision support approach lies an explicit and rigorous modelling of the management strategy that underlies a dairy farmer's decision-making behaviour (real or hypothetical). The SEPATOU system is a discrete-event simulator that reproduces the day-to-day dynamics of the farmer's decision process and the response of the controlled biophysical system for which models of grass growth, animal consumption, and milk production are used. SEPATOU provides the means to evaluate and compare tentative strategies by simulating their application throughout the production season under different hypothetical weather conditions. The relative worth of a strategy can be assessed by analysing the effects on the biophysical system and their variability across the representative range of possible conditions that is considered. The activities to be managed concern the type and amount of conserved feed, where to fertilise and how much, the choice of fields to harvest, and most importantly, which field to graze next. Typically, SEPATOU is designed to be used by extension services and farming system scientists. It is implemented in C++ and is currently undergoing a validation process with the intended users. PMID:11697661

  1. Does a water-training macrocycle really create imbalances in swimmers' shoulder rotator muscles?

    PubMed

    Batalha, Nuno; Marmeleira, José; Garrido, Nuno; Silva, António J

    2015-01-01

    The continuous execution of swimming techniques may cause muscle imbalances in shoulder rotators leading to injury. However, there is a lack of published research studies on this topic. The aim of this study was to analyze the influence of a competitive swim period on the shoulder rotator-cuff balance in young swimmers. A randomized controlled pretest-posttest design was used, with two measurements performed during the first macrocycle of the swimming season (baseline and 16 weeks). Twenty-seven young male swimmers (experimental group) and 22 male students who were not involved in swim training (control group) with the same characteristics were evaluated. Peak torque of shoulder internal and external rotators was assessed. Concentric action at 1.04 rad s(-1) (3 repetitions) and 3.14 rad s(-1) (20 repetitions) was measured using an isokinetic dynamometer (Biodex System 3). External/internal rotators strength ratios were also obtained. For both protocols, there were significant training effects on internal rotator strength and external/internal rotator ratios (p ≤ .05). This trend was the same for both shoulders. Within-group analysis showed significant changes from baseline to 16 weeks for internal rotators strength and unilateral ratios of the experimental group. Swimmers' internal rotator strength levels increased significantly. In contrast, a significant decrease of the unilateral ratios was observed. Findings suggest that a competitive swim macrocycle leads to an increase in muscular imbalances in the shoulder rotators of young competitive swimmers. Swimming coaches should consider implementing a compensatory strength-training program. PMID:24754705

  2. Gender effect on the scapular 3D posture and kinematic in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, C; Croisier, J L; Rigaux, E; Brüls, O; Denoël, V; Forthomme, B

    2016-05-01

    Populations considered for shoulder analysis are often composed of various ratios of men and women. It is consequently hypothesized that gender has no significant effect on the joint kinematic. However, the literature reports, for the shoulder, differences in the range of motion between genders. The specific influence of gender on the scapulo-thoracic kinematics has not been studied yet. The dominant shoulder of two populations of men and women composed of 11 subjects each were evaluated in three dimensions for three distinct motions: flexion in the sagittal plane, abduction in the frontal plane and gleno-humeral internal/external rotation with the arm abducted at 90°. Posture, kinematics and range of motion were studied separately. For flexion and abduction and with regard to the scapular kinematic, external rotation was significantly larger for women than men. The differences were of at least 5° at 120° of humeral elevation. Upward rotations were identical. Women also showed larger average active humero-thoracic range of motion. The mean differences were of 13°, 7°, 12° and 5° for abduction, flexion, internal rotation and external rotation, respectively. No difference was observed between the scapular resting positions of both populations. The observed differences concerning both the scapular and humeral patterns would indicate that the shoulder behaviour of men and women should not be expected to be similar. PMID:25382377

  3. General-relativistic rotation laws in rotating fluid bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mach, Patryk; Malec, Edward

    2015-06-01

    We formulate new general-relativistic extensions of Newtonian rotation laws for self-gravitating stationary fluids. They have been used to rederive, in the first post-Newtonian approximation, the well-known geometric dragging of frames. We derive two other general-relativistic weak-field effects within rotating tori: the recently discovered dynamic antidragging and a new effect that measures the deviation from the Keplerian motion and/or the contribution of the fluids self-gravity. One can use the rotation laws to study the uniqueness and the convergence of the post-Newtonian approximations as well as the existence of the post-Newtonian limits.

  4. MGR External Events Hazards Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    L. Booth

    1999-11-06

    The purpose and objective of this analysis is to apply an external events Hazards Analysis (HA) to the License Application Design Selection Enhanced Design Alternative 11 [(LADS EDA II design (Reference 8.32))]. The output of the HA is called a Hazards List (HL). This analysis supersedes the external hazards portion of Rev. 00 of the PHA (Reference 8.1). The PHA for internal events will also be updated to the LADS EDA II design but under a separate analysis. Like the PHA methodology, the HA methodology provides a systematic method to identify potential hazards during the 100-year Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) operating period updated to reflect the EDA II design. The resulting events on the HL are candidates that may have potential radiological consequences as determined during Design Basis Events (DBEs) analyses. Therefore, the HL that results from this analysis will undergo further screening and analysis based on the criteria that apply during the performance of DBE analyses.

  5. Multisystemic Therapy for Externalizing Youth

    PubMed Central

    Zajac, Kristyn; Randall, Jeff; Swenson, Cynthia Cupit

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis Externalizing problems are multi-determined and related to individual, family, peer, school, and community risk factors. Multisystemic therapy (MST) was originally developed to address these risk factors among youth with serious conduct problems who were at-risk for out-of-home placement. Several decades of research has established MST as an evidence-based intervention for adolescents with serious clinical problems, including serious offending, delinquency, substance abuse, and parental physical abuse and neglect. Further, research points to the importance of maintaining high treatment fidelity through systematic quality assurance procedures to replicate positive clinical outcomes. This paper presents an overview of the clinical procedures and evidence base of MST for externalizing problems as well as two adaptations: MST for Substance Abuse and MST for Child Abuse and Neglect. PMID:26092742

  6. Linear and nonlinear magneto-optical rotation on the narrow strontium intercombination line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, K.; Kwong, C. C.; Pramod, M. S.; Wilkowski, D.

    2016-05-01

    In the presence of an external static magnetic field, an atomic gas becomes optically active, showing magneto-optical rotation. In the saturated regime, the coherences among the excited substates give a nonlinear contribution to the rotation of the light polarization. In contrast with the linear magneto-optical rotation, the nonlinear counterpart is insensitive to Doppler broadening. By varying the temperature of a cold strontium gas, we observe both regimes by driving the J =0 →J =1 transition on the intercombination line. For this narrow transition, the sensitivity to the static magnetic field is typically three orders of magnitude larger than for a standard broad alkali-metal transition.

  7. Externally Pressurized Journal Gas Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laub, John H.

    1959-01-01

    Externally pressurized gas-lubricated bearings with multiple orifice feed are investigated. An analytical treatment is developed for a semi-cylindrical bearing with 9 orifices and for a cylindrical journal bearing with 192 radial and 24 axial orifices. Experiments are described on models of the two bearing configurations with specially designed fixtures which incorporate pneumatic loading and means for determining pressure profiles, gas flow and gap height. The correlation between theory and experiment is satisfactory.

  8. Externally blown flap noise research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorsch, R. G.

    1974-01-01

    The Lewis Research Center cold-flow model externally blown flap (EBF) noise research test program is summarized. Both engine under-the-wing and over-the-wing EBF wing section configurations were studied. Ten large scale and nineteen small scale EBF models were tested. A limited number of forward airspeed effect and flap noise suppression tests were also run. The key results and conclusions drawn from the flap noise tests are summarized and discussed.

  9. [Prostate cancer external beam radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    de Crevoisier, R; Pommier, P; Latorzeff, I; Chapet, O; Chauvet, B; Hennequin, C

    2016-09-01

    The prostate external beam radiotherapy techniques are described, when irradiating the prostate or after prostatectomy, with and without pelvic lymph nodes. The following parts are presented: indications of radiotherapy, total dose and fractionation, planning CT image acquisition, volume of interest delineation (target volumes and organs at risk) and margins, Intensity modulated radiotherapy planning and corresponding dose-volume constraints, and finally Image guided radiotherapy. PMID:27516051

  10. Equilibrium and magnetic properties of a rotating plasma annulus

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Zhehui; Si Jiahe; Liu Wei; Li Hui

    2008-10-15

    Local linear analysis shows that magneto-rotational instability can be excited in laboratory rotating plasmas with a density of 10{sup 19} m{sup -3}, a temperature on the order of 10 eV, and a magnetic field on the order of 100 G. A laboratory plasma annulus experiment with a dimension of {approx}1 m, and rotation at {approx}0.5 sound speed is described. Correspondingly, magnetic Reynolds number of these plasmas is {approx}1000, and magnetic Prandtl number ranges from about one to a few hundred. A radial equilibrium, {rho}U{sub {theta}}{sup 2}/r=d(p+B{sub z}{sup 2}/2{mu}{sub 0})/dr=K{sub 0}, with K{sub 0} being a nonzero constant, is proposed for the experimental data. Plasma rotation is observed to drive a quasisteady diamagnetic electrical current (rotational current drive) in a high-{beta} plasma annulus. The rotational energy depends on the direction and the magnitude of the externally applied magnetic field. Radial current (J{sub r}) is produced through biasing the center rod at a negative electric potential relative to the outer wall. J{sub r}xB{sub z} torque generates and sustains the plasma rotation. Rotational current drive can reverse the direction of vacuum magnetic field, satisfying a necessary condition for self-generated closed magnetic flux surfaces inside plasmas. The Hall term is found to be substantial and therefore needs to be included in the Ohm's law for the plasmas. Azimuthal magnetic field (B{sub {theta}}) is found to be comparable with the externally applied vacuum magnetic field B{sub z}, and mainly caused by the electric current flowing in the center cylinder; thus, B{sub {theta}}{proportional_to}r{sup -1}. Magnetic fluctuations are anisotropic, radial-dependent, and contain many Fourier modes below the ion cyclotron frequency. Further theoretical analysis reflecting these observations is needed to interpret the magnetic fluctuations.

  11. Gravity darkening in rotating stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espinosa Lara, F.; Rieutord, M.

    2011-09-01

    Context. Interpretation of interferometric observations of rapidly rotating stars requires a good model of their surface effective temperature. Until now, laws of the form T_eff∝ g_eff^β have been used, but they are only valid for slowly rotating stars. Aims: We propose a simple model that can describe the latitudinal variations in the flux of rotating stars at any rotation rate. Methods: This model assumes that the energy flux is a divergence-free vector that is antiparallel to the effective gravity. Results: When mass distribution can be described by a Roche model, the latitudinal variations in the effective temperature only depend on a single parameter, namely the ratio of the equatorial velocity to the Keplerian velocity. We validate this model by comparing its predictions to those of the most realistic two-dimensional models of rotating stars issued from the ESTER code. The agreement is very good, as it is with the observations of two rapidly rotating stars, α Aql and α Leo. Conclusions: We suggest that as long as a gray atmosphere can be accepted, the inversion of data on flux distribution coming from interferometric observations of rotating stars uses such a model, which has just one free parameter.

  12. Rotation to Maximize the Construct Validity of Factors in the NEO Personality Inventory.

    PubMed

    McCrae, R R; Costa, P T

    1989-01-01

    The NEO Personality Inventory (NEO-PI) consists of 5 global domain and 18 specific facet scales developed to measure aspects of the five major dimensions of normal personality. To obtain optimal measures of these five dimensions from the NEO-PI scales, a method for the orthogonal rotation of principal components to maximize the convergent and discriminant validity of the rotated factors (validimax rotation) is proposed and applied to NEO-PI factors. Self-report data from 983 men and women were used to obtain the factors, and six alternative operationalizations of the five-factor model were used as external criteria to guide rotation. The rotation obtained was cross-validated on peer and spouse ratings on the NEO-PI, and in a second sample. NEO-PI domain scales, varimax factors, and validimax factors all showed evidence of construct validity, but validimax factors were somewhat superior, especially as measures of Agreeableness and Conscientiousness. PMID:26794299

  13. Giant Faraday Rotation of High-Order Plasmonic Modes in Graphene-Covered Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Kuzmin, Dmitry A; Bychkov, Igor V; Shavrov, Vladimir G; Temnov, Vasily V

    2016-07-13

    Plasmonic Faraday rotation in nanowires manifests itself in the rotation of the spatial intensity distribution of high-order surface plasmon polariton (SPP) modes around the nanowire axis. Here we predict theoretically the giant Faraday rotation for SPPs propagating on graphene-coated magneto-optically active nanowires. Upon the reversal of the external magnetic field pointing along the nanowire axis some high-order plasmonic modes may be rotated by up to ∼100° on the length scale of about 500 nm at mid-infrared frequencies. Tuning the carrier concentration in graphene by chemical doping or gate voltage allows for controlling SPP-properties and notably the rotation angle of high-order azimuthal modes. Our results open the door to novel plasmonic applications ranging from nanowire-based Faraday isolators to the magnetic control in quantum-optical applications. PMID:27348746

  14. Axial gap rotating electrical machine

    DOEpatents

    None

    2016-02-23

    Direct drive rotating electrical machines with axial air gaps are disclosed. In these machines, a rotor ring and stator ring define an axial air gap between them. Sets of gap-maintaining rolling supports bear between the rotor ring and the stator ring at their peripheries to maintain the axial air gap. Also disclosed are wind turbines using these generators, and structures and methods for mounting direct drive rotating electrical generators to the hubs of wind turbines. In particular, the rotor ring of the generator may be carried directly by the hub of a wind turbine to rotate relative to a shaft without being mounted directly to the shaft.

  15. Orbital, Rotational, and Climatic Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bills, Bruce G. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    The report of an international meeting on the topic of Orbital, Rotational, and Climatic Interactions, which was held 9-11 Jul. 1991 at the Johns Hopkins University is presented. The meeting was attended by 22 researchers working on various aspects of orbital and rotational dynamics, paleoclimate data analysis and modeling, solid-Earth deformation studies, and paleomagnetic analyses. The primary objective of the workshop was to arrive at a better understanding of the interactions between the orbital, rotational, and climatic variations of the Earth. This report contains a brief introduction and 14 contributed papers which cover most of the topics discussed at the meeting.

  16. The rotation of comet nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whipple, F. L.

    1982-01-01

    Spin-vector research on cometary nuclei is reviewed with emphasis on the actual determination of rotation period and spin-axis orientation. The rotation periods of 47 comets are compared with those of 41 asteroids with diameters of not more than 40 km. It is shown that the median periods for the comets is 15.0 hr as compared with 6.8 hr for the asteroids and that the preliminary distribution curve for the logarithms of the comet periods is not Gaussian and is flatter than the corresponding curve for the asteroids. Slow accumulation at low relative velocities is suggested as the cause of the longer comet rotation periods.

  17. Cell rotation using optoelectronic tweezers.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yuan-Li; Huang, Yuan-Peng; Lu, Yen-Sheng; Hou, Max T; Yeh, J Andrew

    2010-01-01

    A cell rotation method by using optoelectronic tweezers (OET) is reported. The binary image of a typical OET device, whose light and dark sides act as two sets of parallel plates with different ac voltages, was used to create a rotating electric field. Its feasibility for application to electrorotation of cells was demonstrated by rotating Ramos and yeast cells in their pitch axes. The electrorotation by using OET devices is dependent on the medium and cells' electrical properties, the cells' positions, and the OET device's geometrical dimension, as well as the frequency of the electric field. PMID:21267435

  18. Cooling system for rotating machine

    DOEpatents

    Gerstler, William Dwight; El-Refaie, Ayman Mohamed Fawzi; Lokhandwalla, Murtuza; Alexander, James Pellegrino; Quirion, Owen Scott; Palafox, Pepe; Shen, Xiaochun; Salasoo, Lembit

    2011-08-09

    An electrical machine comprising a rotor is presented. The electrical machine includes the rotor disposed on a rotatable shaft and defining a plurality of radial protrusions extending from the shaft up to a periphery of the rotor. The radial protrusions having cavities define a fluid path. A stationary shaft is disposed concentrically within the rotatable shaft wherein an annular space is formed between the stationary and rotatable shaft. A plurality of magnetic segments is disposed on the radial protrusions and the fluid path from within the stationary shaft into the annular space and extending through the cavities within the radial protrusions.

  19. The automated rotating shadowband spectroradiometer

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, L.; Beik, M.A.; Michalsky, J.J.

    1993-11-01

    We are developing a photodiode array rotating shadowband spectroradiometer (RSS) as part of the Instrument Development Program (IDP) of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program of the United States Department of Energy (DOE). This instrument uses the automated rotating shadowband technique to separate and measure the spectrally resolved direct-normal, total horizontal, and diffuse horizontal irradiances in the 360 to 1060 nm wavelength region. It is intended as an instrument for the central facility of each of the cloud and radiation testbed (CART) sites, and will complement the array of multi-filter rotating shadowband radiometers (MFRSR) currently being deployed by ARM and other research programs including TOGA/COARE.

  20. Rotating apparatus for isoelectric focusing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bier, Milan (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    This disclosure is directed to an isoelectric focusing apparatus, wherein stabilization of the fluid containing the isolated proteins is achieved by carrying out the separation in a rotating cylinder with the separation cavity of the cylinder being segmented by means of filter elements. The filter elements are constituted of a material offering some degree of resistance to fluid convection, but allowing relatively free and unhindered passage of current and transport of proteins. The combined effect of segmentation and rotation has been found to be superior to either segmentation or rotation alone in maintaining the stability of the migrated fractions.

  1. Rotational deformities of the long bones can be corrected with rotationally guided growth during the growth phase.

    PubMed

    Cobanoglu, Mutlu; Cullu, Emre; Kilimci, Figen Sevil; Ocal, Mehmet Kamil; Yaygingul, Rahime

    2016-06-01

    Background and purpose - Coronal and sagittal plane long bone deformities can be corrected with guided growth, whereas transverse plane rotational deformities require osteotomy and internal or external fixation. We investigated whether rotational changes can be introduced with the plating technique. Methods - 45 rabbits (6 weeks old) were divided into 3 groups. The unoperated right tibia was used as control. In groups 1 and 3, two plates were placed obliquely to the long axis and in different directions. In group 2, a sham operation was performed with screws. Animals in groups 1 and 2 were followed for 4 weeks. In group 3 the implants were removed 4 weeks after the operation to observe rebound effect, and the animals were followed for another 4 weeks. The tibial torsion was assessed on computed tomography (CT). External rotation was accepted as a negative value. Results - In group 1, mean torsion was -20° (SD 7.9) in the right tibia and -2.9° (SD 7.2) in the left tibia (p < 0.001). In group 2, mean torsion was -23° (SD 4.9) in the right tibia and -26° (SD 6.5) in the left tibia (p = 0.2). In group 3, mean torsion was -21° (SD 6.3) in the right tibia and -9.5° (SD 5.3) in the left tibia (p < 0.001). Intergroup evaluation for left torsion showed a significant difference between group 2 and the other groups (p < 0.001). When the rebound effect was evaluated, there was no statistically significant difference between groups 1 and 3 (p = 0.08). Interpretation - A rotational change was attained with this technique. Although a rebound effect was seen after implant removal, it did not reach statistical significance. The final rotational change remained constant. PMID:26900795

  2. Rotational deformities of the long bones can be corrected with rotationally guided growth during the growth phase

    PubMed Central

    Cobanoglu, Mutlu; Cullu, Emre; Kilimci, Figen Sevil; Ocal, Mehmet Kamil; Yaygingul, Rahime

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose Coronal and sagittal plane long bone deformities can be corrected with guided growth, whereas transverse plane rotational deformities require osteotomy and internal or external fixation. We investigated whether rotational changes can be introduced with the plating technique. Methods 45 rabbits (6 weeks old) were divided into 3 groups. The unoperated right tibia was used as control. In groups 1 and 3, two plates were placed obliquely to the long axis and in different directions. In group 2, a sham operation was performed with screws. Animals in groups 1 and 2 were followed for 4 weeks. In group 3 the implants were removed 4 weeks after the operation to observe rebound effect, and the animals were followed for another 4 weeks. The tibial torsion was assessed on computed tomography (CT). External rotation was accepted as a negative value. Results In group 1, mean torsion was −20° (SD 7.9) in the right tibia and −2.9° (SD 7.2) in the left tibia (p < 0.001). In group 2, mean torsion was −23° (SD 4.9) in the right tibia and −26° (SD 6.5) in the left tibia (p = 0.2). In group 3, mean torsion was −21° (SD 6.3) in the right tibia and −9.5° (SD 5.3) in the left tibia (p < 0.001). Intergroup evaluation for left torsion showed a significant difference between group 2 and the other groups (p < 0.001). When the rebound effect was evaluated, there was no statistically significant difference between groups 1 and 3 (p = 0.08). Interpretation A rotational change was attained with this technique. Although a rebound effect was seen after implant removal, it did not reach statistical significance. The final rotational change remained constant. PMID:26900795

  3. Fluctuations in rotation rate of the flagellar motor of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Kara-Ivanov, M; Eisenbach, M; Caplan, S R

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to study the changes in rotation rate of the bacterial motor and to try to discriminate between various sources of these changes with the aim of understanding the mechanism of force generation better. To this end Escherichia coli cells were tethered and videotaped with brief stroboscopic light flashes. The records were scanned by means of a computerized motion analysis system, yielding cell size, radius of rotation, and accumulated angle of rotation as functions of time for each cell selected. In conformity with previous studies, fluctuations in the rotation rate of the flagellar motor were invariably found. Employing an exclusively counterclockwise rotating mutant ("gutted" RP1091 strain) and using power spectral density, autocorrelation and residual mean square angle analysis, we found that a simple superposition of rotational diffusion on a steady rotary motion is insufficient to describe the observed rotation. We observed two additional rotational components, one fluctuating (0.04-0.6 s) and one oscillating (0.8-7 s). However, the effective rotational diffusion coefficient obtained after taking these two components into account generally exceeded that calculated from external friction by two orders of magnitude. This is consistent with a model incorporating association and dissociation of force-generating units. PMID:7669902

  4. Optimization approaches for planning external beam radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gozbasi, Halil Ozan

    Cancer begins when cells grow out of control as a result of damage to their DNA. These abnormal cells can invade healthy tissue and form tumors in various parts of the body. Chemotherapy, immunotherapy, surgery and radiotherapy are the most common treatment methods for cancer. According to American Cancer Society about half of the cancer patients receive a form of radiation therapy at some stage. External beam radiotherapy is delivered from outside the body and aimed at cancer cells to damage their DNA making them unable to divide and reproduce. The beams travel through the body and may damage nearby healthy tissue unless carefully planned. Therefore, the goal of treatment plan optimization is to find the best system parameters to deliver sufficient dose to target structures while avoiding damage to healthy tissue. This thesis investigates optimization approaches for two external beam radiation therapy techniques: Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) and Volumetric-Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT). We develop automated treatment planning technology for IMRT that produces several high-quality treatment plans satisfying provided clinical requirements in a single invocation and without human guidance. A novel bi-criteria scoring based beam selection algorithm is part of the planning system and produces better plans compared to those produced using a well-known scoring-based algorithm. Our algorithm is very efficient and finds the beam configuration at least ten times faster than an exact integer programming approach. Solution times range from 2 minutes to 15 minutes which is clinically acceptable. With certain cancers, especially lung cancer, a patient's anatomy changes during treatment. These anatomical changes need to be considered in treatment planning. Fortunately, recent advances in imaging technology can provide multiple images of the treatment region taken at different points of the breathing cycle, and deformable image registration algorithms can

  5. International Space Station External Contamination Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikatarian, Ron; Soares, Carlos

    2000-01-01

    PResentation slides examine external contamination requirements; International Space Station (ISS) external contamination sources; ISS external contamination sensitive surfaces; external contamination control; external contamination control for pre-launch verification; flight experiments and observations; the Space Shuttle Orbiter waste water dump, materials outgassing, active vacuum vents; example of molecular column density profile, modeling and analysis tools; sources of outgassing induced contamination analyzed to date, quiescent sources, observations on optical degradation due to induced external contamination in LEO; examples of typical contaminant and depth profiles; and status of the ISS system, material outgassing, thruster plumes, and optical degradation.

  6. Collapsing thin shells with rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delsate, Térence; Rocha, Jorge V.; Santarelli, Raphael

    2014-06-01

    We construct exact solutions describing the motion of rotating thin shells in a fully backreacted five-dimensional rotating black hole spacetime. The radial equation of motion follows from the Darmois-Israel junction conditions, where both interior and exterior geometries are taken to be equal angular momenta Myers-Perry solutions. We show that rotation generates anisotropic pressures and momentum along the shell. Gravitational collapse scenarios including rotation are analyzed and a new class of stationary solutions is introduced. Energy conditions for the anisotropic matter shell are briefly discussed. We find that the weak energy condition is not violated for the collapse scenario where the shell starts at rest from infinity, nor for the new class of stationary solutions in anti-de Sitter. We further prove that the cosmic censorship conjecture is always satisfied in our setup.

  7. High performance rotational vibration isolator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunderland, Andrew; Blair, David G.; Ju, Li; Golden, Howard; Torres, Francis; Chen, Xu; Lockwood, Ray; Wolfgram, Peter

    2013-10-01

    We present a new rotational vibration isolator with an extremely low resonant frequency of 0.055 ± 0.002 Hz. The isolator consists of two concentric spheres separated by a layer of water and joined by very soft silicone springs. The isolator reduces rotation noise at all frequencies above its resonance which is very important for airborne mineral detection. We show that more than 40 dB of isolation is achieved in a helicopter survey for rotations at frequencies between 2 Hz and 20 Hz. Issues affecting performance such as translation to rotation coupling and temperature are discussed. The isolator contains almost no metal, making it particularly suitable for electromagnetic sensors.

  8. Interpretation of rapidly rotating pulsars

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, F. . Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik); Glendenning, N.K. )

    1992-08-05

    The minimum possible rotational period of pulsars, which are interpreted as rotating neutron stars, is determined by applying a representative collection of realistic nuclear equations of state. It is found that none of the selected equations of state allows for neutron star rotation at periods below 0.8--0.9 ms. Thus, this work strongly supports the suggestion that if pulsars with shorter rotational periods were found, these are likely to be strange-quark-matter stars. The conclusion that the confined hadronic phase of nucleons and nuclei is only metastable would then be almost inescapable, and the plausible ground-state in that event is the deconfined phase of (3-flavor) strange-quark-matter.

  9. Rotating Apparatus for Isoelectric Focusing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bier, M.

    1986-01-01

    Remixing of separated fractions prevented. Improved isoelectric focusing apparatus helps to prevent electro-osmosis and convection, both of which cause remixing of separated fractions. Fractionating column segmented and rotated about horizontal axis: Only combined effects of both features fully effective in making good separations. Improved apparatus slowly rotated continuously or rocked (at rotational amplitude of at least 180 degrees) about its horizontal axis so average gravitational vector experienced by fluid is zero and convection is therefore suppressed. Electro-osmosis suppressed and convection further suppressed by separating column into disklike compartments along its length with filters. Experiments have shown dimensions of apparatus not critical. Typical compartment and column volumes are 2 and 40 ml, respectively. Rotation speeds lie between 3 and 30 rpm.

  10. Rotator cuff repair - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... shoulder and arm bones. The tendons can be torn from overuse or injury. ... Surgery to repair a torn rotator cuff is usually very successful at relieving pain in the shoulder. The procedure is less predictable at returning strength ...

  11. An Exercise in Rotational Motion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahoney, Brother James

    1980-01-01

    Describes an advanced high school physics experiment demonstrating rotational kinematics and dynamics, using simple equipment such as empty coffee cans, inclined planes, meter sticks, and a large 10-second demonstration timer. (CS)

  12. Rotator cuff - self-care

    MedlinePlus

    ... tendons that attach to the bones of the shoulder joint, allowing the shoulder to move and remain stable. Common rotator cuff ... can help when you feel pain in your shoulder. An ice pack applied to the shoulder 20 ...

  13. Rotation, differential rotation, and gyrochronology of active Kepler stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinhold, Timo; Gizon, Laurent

    2015-11-01

    Context. In addition to the discovery of hundreds of exoplanets, the high-precision photometry from the CoRoT and Kepler satellites has led to measurements of surface rotation periods for tens of thousands of stars, which can potentially be used to infer stellar ages via gyrochronology. Aims: Our main goal is to derive ages of thousands of field stars using consistent rotation period measurements derived by different methods. Multiple rotation periods are interpreted as surface differential rotation (DR). We study the dependence of DR with rotation period and effective temperature. Methods: We reanalyze a previously studied sample of 24 124 Kepler stars using different approaches based on the Lomb-Scargle periodogram. Each quarter (Q1-Q14) is treated individually using a prewhitening approach. Additionally, the full time series and their different segments are analyzed. Results: For more than 18 500 stars our results are consistent with the rotation periods from McQuillan et al. (2014, ApJS, 211, 24). Of these, more than 12 300 stars show multiple significant peaks, which we interpret as DR. Dependencies of the DR with rotation period and effective temperature could be confirmed, e.g., the relative DR increases with rotation period. Gyrochronology ages between 100 Myr and 10 Gyr were derived for more than 17 000 stars using different gyrochronology relations, most of them with uncertainties dominated by period variations. We find a bimodal age distribution for Teff between 3200-4700 K. The derived ages reveal an empirical activity-age relation using photometric variability as stellar activity proxy. Additionally, we found 1079 stars with extremely stable (mostly short) periods. Half of these periods may be associated with rotation stabilized by non-eclipsing companions, the other half might be due to pulsations. Conclusions: The derived gyrochronology ages are well constrained since more than ~93.0% of the stars seem to be younger than the Sun where calibration is

  14. Rotational evolution of slow-rotator sequence stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanzafame, A. C.; Spada, F.

    2015-12-01

    Context. The observed relationship between mass, age and rotation in open clusters shows the progressive development of a slow-rotator sequence among stars possessing a radiative interior and a convective envelope during their pre-main sequence and main-sequence evolution. After 0.6 Gyr, most cluster members of this type have settled on this sequence. Aims: The observed clustering on this sequence suggests that it corresponds to some equilibrium or asymptotic condition that still lacks a complete theoretical interpretation, and which is crucial to our understanding of the stellar angular momentum evolution. Methods: We couple a rotational evolution model, which takes internal differential rotation into account, with classical and new proposals for the wind braking law, and fit models to the data using a Monte Carlo Markov chain (MCMC) method tailored to the problem at hand. We explore to what extent these models are able to reproduce the mass and time dependence of the stellar rotational evolution on the slow-rotator sequence. Results: The description of the evolution of the slow-rotator sequence requires taking the transfer of angular momentum from the radiative core to the convective envelope into account. We find that, in the mass range 0.85-1.10 M⊙, the core-envelope coupling timescale for stars in the slow-rotator sequence scales as M-7.28. Quasi-solid body rotation is achieved only after 1-2 Gyr, depending on stellar mass, which implies that observing small deviations from the Skumanich law (P ∝ √{t}) would require period data of older open clusters than is available to date. The observed evolution in the 0.1-2.5 Gyr age range and in the 0.85-1.10 M⊙ mass range is best reproduced by assuming an empirical mass dependence of the wind angular momentum loss proportional to the convective turnover timescale and to the stellar moment of inertia. Period isochrones based on our MCMC fit provide a tool for inferring stellar ages of solar-like main

  15. Nonaxisymmetric oscillations of differentially rotating relativistic stars

    SciTech Connect

    Passamonti, Andrea; Stavridis, Adamantios; Kokkotas, Kostas D.

    2008-01-15

    Nonaxisymmetric oscillations of differentially rotating stars are studied using both slow rotation and Cowling approximation. The equilibrium stellar models are relativistic polytropes where differential rotation is described by the relativistic j-constant rotation law. The oscillation spectrum is studied versus three main parameters: the stellar compactness M/R, the degree of differential rotation A, and the number of maximum couplings l{sub max}. It is shown that the rotational splitting of the nonaxisymmetric modes are strongly enhanced by increasing the compactness of the star and the degree of differential rotation. Finally, we investigate the relation between the fundamental quadrupole mode and the corotation band of differentially rotating stars.

  16. Maximising somersault rotation in tumbling.

    PubMed

    King, M A Mark A; Yeadon, M R Maurice R

    2004-04-01

    Performing complex somersaulting skills during the flight phase of tumbling requires the generation of linear and angular momenta during the approach and takeoff phases. This paper investigates how approach characteristics and takeoff technique affect performance with a view to maximising somersault rotation in tumbling. A five-segment planar simulation model, customised to an elite gymnast, was used to produce a simulation which closely matched a recorded performance of a double layout somersault by the elite gymnast. Three optimisations were carried out to maximise somersault rotation with different sets of initial conditions. Using the same initial linear and angular momentum as the double layout somersault and varying the joint torque activation timings allowed a double straight somersault to be performed with 19% more rotation potential than the actual performance. Increasing the approach velocity to a realistic maximum of 7 ms(-1) resulted in a 42% reduction in rotation potential when the activation timings were unchanged but allowed a triple layout somersault to be performed with an increase of 31% in rotation potential when activation timings were re-optimised. Increasing also the initial angular momentum to a realistic maximum resulted in a 4% reduction in rotation potential when the activation timings were unchanged but allowed a triple straight somersault to be performed with a further increase of 9% in rotation potential when activation timings were re-optimised. It is concluded that the limiting factor to maximising somersault rotation is the ability to generate high linear and angular velocities during the approach phase coupled with the ability to adopt consonant activation timings during the takeoff phase. PMID:14996558

  17. Rotating Shadowband Spectroradiometer (RSS) Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Kiedron, P; Schlemmer, J; Klassen, M

    2005-01-01

    The rotating shawdowband spectroradiometer (RSS) implements the same automated shadowbanding technique used by the multifilter rotating shadowband radiometer (MFRSR), and so it too provides spectrally-resolved, direct-normal, diffuse-horizontal, and total-horizontal irradiances, and can be calibrated in situ via Langley regression. The irradiance spectra are measured simultaneously at all spectral elements (pixels) in 360-nm to 1050-nm range.

  18. Rotation of the planet mercury.

    PubMed

    Jefferys, W H

    1966-04-01

    The equations of motion for the rotation of Mercury are solved for the general case by an asymptotic expansion. The findings of Liu and O'Keefe, obtained by numerical integration of a special case, that it is possible for Mercury's rotation to be locked into a 2:3 resonance with its revolution, are confirmed in detail. The general solution has further applications. PMID:17741632

  19. Relativity on Rotated Graph Paper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salgado, Roberto

    2011-11-01

    We present visual calculations in special relativity using spacetime diagrams drawn on graph paper that has been rotated by 45 degrees. The rotated lines represent lightlike directions in Minkowski spacetime, and the boxes in the grid (called light-clock diamonds) represent ticks of an inertial observer's lightclock. We show that many quantitative results can be read off a spacetime diagram by counting boxes, using a minimal amount of algebra.

  20. The Rotation of Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tovmassian, H. M.

    2015-09-01

    The method for detection of the galaxy cluster rotation based on the study of distribution of member galaxies with velocities lower and higher than the cluster mean velocity over the cluster image is proposed. The search for rotation is made for flat clusters with a/b > 1.8 and BMI type clusters which are expected to be rotating. For comparison there were studied also round clusters and clusters of NBMI type, the second by brightness galaxy, which does not differ significantly from the cluster cD galaxy. Seventeen out of studied 65 clusters are found to be rotating. It was found that the detection rate is sufficiently high for flat clusters, over 60%, and clusters of BMI type with dominant cD galaxy, ≈ 35% . The obtained results show that clusters were formed from the huge primordial gas clouds and preserved the rotation of the primordial clouds, unless they did not experience mergings with other clusters and groups of galaxies, as a result of which the rotation was prevented.