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Sample records for abductor muscle weakness

  1. Influence of weak hip abductor muscles on joint contact forces during normal walking: probabilistic modeling analysis.

    PubMed

    Valente, Giordano; Taddei, Fulvia; Jonkers, Ilse

    2013-09-03

    The weakness of hip abductor muscles is related to lower-limb joint osteoarthritis, and joint overloading may increase the risk for disease progression. The relationship between muscle strength, structural joint deterioration and joint loading makes the latter an important parameter in the study of onset and follow-up of the disease. Since the relationship between hip abductor weakness and joint loading still remains an open question, the purpose of this study was to adopt a probabilistic modeling approach to give insights into how the weakness of hip abductor muscles, in the extent to which normal gait could be unaltered, affects ipsilateral joint contact forces. A generic musculoskeletal model was scaled to each healthy subject included in the study, and the maximum force-generating capacity of each hip abductor muscle in the model was perturbed to evaluate how all physiologically possible configurations of hip abductor weakness affected the joint contact forces during walking. In general, the muscular system was able to compensate for abductor weakness. The reduced force-generating capacity of the abductor muscles affected joint contact forces to a mild extent, with 50th percentile mean differences up to 0.5 BW (maximum 1.7 BW). There were greater increases in the peak knee joint loads than in loads at the hip or ankle. Gluteus medius, particularly the anterior compartment, was the abductor muscle with the most influence on hip and knee loads. Further studies should assess if these increases in joint loading may affect initiation and progression of osteoarthritis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Effect of Vibram FiveFingers Minimalist Shoes on the Abductor Hallucis Muscle.

    PubMed

    Campitelli, Nicholas A; Spencer, Scott A; Bernhard, Kaitlyn; Heard, Kristen; Kidon, Alan

    2016-09-02

    This study investigated the effect of Vibram FiveFingers Bikila minimalist shoes on intrinsic foot musculature. We hypothesized that a gradual transition into minimalist shoes will increase the thickness of the abductor hallucis muscle. Forty-one individuals were divided into four groups: control (traditional shod) (n = 9), restricted walking in Vibram FiveFingers (n = 11), running in Vibram FiveFingers (n = 10), and unlimited walking in Vibram FiveFingers (n = 11). At baseline, 12 weeks, and 24 weeks, the thickness of the abductor hallucis muscle was determined using ultrasound. Statistical analysis was performed to determine the significance of differences in muscle thickness at the three different time points. The mean thickness of the abductor hallucis muscle at 24 weeks was significantly greater than that at baseline for the restricted walking (P = .005) and running (P < .001) groups. In the unlimited walking group, the mean thickness of the muscle at 12 weeks was significantly greater than that at baseline (P < .05) but not at 24 weeks. There were no significant differences in muscle thickness among the three time points for the control group (P = .432). This study demonstrated that wearing Vibram FiveFinger Bikila footwear over a controlled period of time, an unlimited amount of time, as well as transitioning runners over a 6-month period of time using the 10% philosophy for increasing mileage, significantly increases intrinsic muscle thickness of the abductor hallucis. The abductor hallucis muscle aids in support of the medial longitudinal arch, and an increase in this muscle thickness may help reduce running-related injuries thought to arise from arch weakness.

  3. Resisted side-stepping: the effect of posture on hip abductor muscle activation

    PubMed Central

    Berry, Justin W.; Lee, Theresa S.; Foley, Hanna D.; Lewis, Cara L.

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Controlled laboratory study, repeated-measures design. Objectives To compare hip abductor muscle activity and hip and knee joint kinematics in the moving limb to the stance limb during resisted side-stepping and also to determine if muscle activity was affected by the posture (upright standing versus squat) used to perform the exercise. Background Hip abductor weakness has been associated with a variety of lower extremity injuries. Resisted side-stepping is often used as an exercise to increase strength and endurance of the hip abductors. Exercise prescription would benefit from knowing the relative muscle activity level generated in each limb and for different postures during the side-stepping exercise. Methods Twenty-four healthy adults participated in this study. Kinematics and surface electromyographic (EMG) data from the gluteus maximus, gluteus medius, and tensor fascia lata (TFL) were collected as participants performed side-stepping with a resistive band around the ankle while maintaining each of 2 postures: 1) upright standing and 2) squat. Results Mean normalized EMG signal amplitude of the gluteus maximus, gluteus medius, and TFL was higher in the stance limb than the moving limb (P≤.001). Gluteal muscle activity was higher, while TFL muscle activity was lower, in the squat posture compared to the upright standing posture (P<.001). Hip abduction excursion was greater in the stance limb than in the moving limb (P<.001). Conclusions The 3 hip abductor muscles respond differently to the posture variations of side-stepping exercise in healthy individuals. When prescribing resisted side-stepping exercises, therapists should consider the differences in hip abductor activation across limbs and variations in trunk posture. PMID:26161629

  4. Ipsilateral hip abductor weakness after inversion ankle sprain.

    PubMed

    Friel, Karen; McLean, Nancy; Myers, Christine; Caceres, Maria

    2006-01-01

    Hip stability and strength are important for proper gait mechanics and foot position during heel strike. To determine the relationships between hip muscle strength and chronic ankle sprains and hip muscle strength and ankle range of motion. Ex post facto design with the uninvolved limb serving as the control. Laboratory. A total of 23 subjects with unilateral chronic ankle sprain were recruited. Subjects had at least 2 ipsilateral ankle sprains and were bearing full weight, with the most recent injury occurring at least 3 months earlier. They were not undergoing formal or informal rehabilitation at the time of the study. We obtained goniometric measurements for all planes of motion at the ankle. Handheld dynamometry was used to assess the strength of the hip abductor and hip extensor muscles in both limbs. Hip abductor muscle strength and plantar flexion were significantly less on the involved side than the uninvolved side (P < .001 in each case). Strength of the involved hip abductor and hip extensor muscles was significantly correlated (r = 0.539, P < .01). No significant difference was noted in hip extensor muscle strength between sides (P = .19). Our subjects with unilateral chronic ankle sprains had weaker hip abduction strength and less plantar-flexion range of motion on the involved sides. Clinicians should consider exercises to increase hip abduction strength when developing rehabilitation programs for patients with ankle sprains.

  5. Ipsilateral Hip Abductor Weakness After Inversion Ankle Sprain

    PubMed Central

    Friel, Karen; McLean, Nancy; Myers, Christine; Caceres, Maria

    2006-01-01

    Context: Hip stability and strength are important for proper gait mechanics and foot position during heel strike. Objective: To determine the relationships between hip muscle strength and chronic ankle sprains and hip muscle strength and ankle range of motion. Design: Ex post facto design with the uninvolved limb serving as the control. Setting: Laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: A total of 23 subjects with unilateral chronic ankle sprain were recruited. Subjects had at least 2 ipsilateral ankle sprains and were bearing full weight, with the most recent injury occurring at least 3 months earlier. They were not undergoing formal or informal rehabilitation at the time of the study. Main Outcome Measure(s): We obtained goniometric measurements for all planes of motion at the ankle. Handheld dynamometry was used to assess the strength of the hip abductor and hip extensor muscles in both limbs. Results: Hip abductor muscle strength and plantar flexion were significantly less on the involved side than the uninvolved side (P < .001 in each case). Strength of the involved hip abductor and hip extensor muscles was significantly correlated (r = 0.539, P < .01). No significant difference was noted in hip extensor muscle strength between sides (P = .19). Conclusions: Our subjects with unilateral chronic ankle sprains had weaker hip abduction strength and less plantar-flexion range of motion on the involved sides. Clinicians should consider exercises to increase hip abduction strength when developing rehabilitation programs for patients with ankle sprains. PMID:16619098

  6. The anatomy of the hip abductor muscles.

    PubMed

    Flack, N A M S; Nicholson, H D; Woodley, S J

    2014-03-01

    The anatomy of the hip abductors has not been comprehensively examined, yet is important to understanding function and pathology in the gluteal region. For example, pathology of the hip abductor muscle-tendon complexes can cause greater trochanteric pain syndrome, and may be associated with gluteal atrophy and fatty infiltration. The purpose of this study was to investigate the detailed morphology of gluteus medius (GMed), gluteus minimus (GMin), and tensor fascia lata (TFL), and determine whether the muscles comprised anatomical compartments. The gluteal region from 12 cadavers was dissected and data collected on attachment sites, volume, fascicular and tendinous anatomy, and innervation. Three sites of GMed origin were identified (gluteal fossa, gluteal aponeurosis, and posteroinferior edge of the iliac crest) and the distal tendon had lateral and posterior parts. GMed was the largest in volume (27.6 ± 11.6 cm(3); GMin 14.1 ± 11.1 cm(3); TFL 1.8 ± 0.8 cm(3)). Fascicles of GMin originated from the gluteal fossa, inserting onto the deep surface of its distal tendon and the hip joint capsule. TFL was encapsulated in the fascia lata, having no bony attachment. Primary innervation patterns varied for GMed, with three or four branches supplying different regions of muscle. Distinct secondary nerve branches entered four regions of GMin; no differential innervation was observed for TFL. On the basis of architectural parameters and innervation, GMed, and GMin each comprise of four compartments but TFL is a homogenous muscle. It is anticipated that these data will be useful for future clinical and functional studies of the hip abductors. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Free Neurovascular Latissimus Dorsi Muscle Transplantation for Reconstruction of Hip Abductors.

    PubMed

    Barrera-Ochoa, Sergi; Collado-Delfa, Jose Manuel; Sallent, Andrea; Lluch, Alejandro; Velez, Roberto

    2017-09-01

    Resection of tumors affecting the hip abductors can cause significant decrease in muscle strength and may lead to abnormal gait and poor function. We present a case report showing full functional recovery after resection of a synovial sarcoma affecting the right gluteus medius and minimus muscles with reconstruction free neurovascular latissimus dorsi muscle transplantation. The latissimus dorsi muscle was harvested following standard technique and fixed to the ilium and the greater trochanter. Receptor vessels were end-to-end anastomosed to the subscapular vessels followed by an end-to-end epineural suture between the superior gluteal nerve and the thoracodorsal nerve. A year after surgery, there is no evidence of recurrent disease; electromyographic analysis shows complete reinnervation of the latissimus dorsi muscle flap, and the patient has achieved full functional recovery. Free functional latisimus dorsi transfer could be considered as a viable reconstruction technique after hip abductors resection in tumor surgery.

  8. Isokinetic imbalance of adductor-abductor hip muscles in professional soccer players with chronic adductor-related groin pain.

    PubMed

    Belhaj, K; Meftah, S; Mahir, L; Lmidmani, F; Elfatimi, A

    2016-11-01

    This study aims to compare the isokinetic profile of hip abductor and adductor muscle groups between soccer players suffering from chronic adductor-related groin pain (ARGP), soccer players without ARGP and healthy volunteers from general population. Study included 36 male professional soccer players, who were randomly selected and followed-up over two years. Of the 21 soccer players eligible to participate in the study, 9 players went on to develop chronic ARGP and 12 players did not. Ten healthy male volunteers were randomly selected from the general population as a control group. Comparison between the abductor and adductor muscle peak torques for players with and without chronic ARGP found a statistically significant difference on the dominant and non-dominant sides (p < .005), with the abductor muscle significantly stronger than the adductor muscle. In the group of healthy volunteers, the adductor muscle groups were significantly stronger than the abductor muscle groups on both dominant and non-dominant sides (p < .05). For the group of players who had developed chronic ARGP, abductor-adductor torque ratios were significantly higher on the affected side (p = .008). The adductor muscle strength was also significantly decreased on the affected side. This imbalance appears to be a risk factor for adductor-related groin injury. Therefore, restoring the correct relationship between these two agonist and antagonist hip muscles may be an important preventative measure that should be a primary concern of training and rehabilitation programmes.

  9. Hip Abductor Muscle Volume and Strength Differences Between Women With Chronic Hip Joint Pain and Asymptomatic Controls.

    PubMed

    Mastenbrook, Matthew J; Commean, Paul K; Hillen, Travis J; Salsich, Gretchen B; Meyer, Gretchen A; Mueller, Michael J; Clohisy, John C; Harris-Hayes, Marcie

    2017-12-01

    Study Design Secondary analysis, cross-sectional study. Background Chronic hip joint pain (CHJP) can lead to limitations in activity participation, but the musculoskeletal factors associated with the condition are relatively unknown. Understanding the factors associated with CHJP may help develop rehabilitation strategies to improve quality of life of individuals with long-term hip pain. Objectives To compare measures of hip abductor muscle volume and hip abductor muscle strength between women with CHJP and asymptomatic controls. Methods Thirty women, 15 with CHJP and 15 matched asymptomatic controls (age range, 18-40 years), participated in this study. Magnetic resonance imaging was used to determine the volume of the primary hip abductor muscles, consisting of the gluteus medius, gluteus minimus, a small portion of the gluteus maximus, and the tensor fascia latae, within a defined region of interest. Break tests were performed using a handheld dynamometer to assess hip abductor strength. During the strength test, the participant was positioned in sidelying with the involved hip in 15° of abduction. Independent-samples t tests were used to compare muscle volume and strength values between those with CHJP and asymptomatic controls. Results Compared to asymptomatic controls, women with CHJP demonstrated significantly increased gluteal muscle volume (228 ± 40 cm 3 versus 199 ± 29 cm 3 , P = .032), but decreased hip abductor strength (74.6 ± 16.8 Nm versus 93.6 ± 20.2 Nm, P = .009). There were no significant differences in tensor fascia lata muscle volume between the 2 groups (P = .640). Conclusion Women with CHJP appear to have larger gluteal muscle volume, but decreased hip abductor strength, compared to asymptomatic controls. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2017;47(12):923-930. Epub 9 Oct 2017. doi:10.2519/jospt.2017.7380.

  10. Testing the Hip Abductor Muscle Strength of Older Persons Using a Handheld Dynamometer.

    PubMed

    Awwad, Daniel H; Buckley, Jonathan D; Thomson, Rebecca L; O'Connor, Matthew; Carbone, Tania A; Chehade, Mellick J

    2017-09-01

    To investigate the reliability of a clinically applicable method of dynamometry to assess and monitor hip abductor muscle strength in older persons. Bilateral isometric hip abductor muscle strength measured with a handheld dynamometer, patients supine with the contralateral hip positioned directly against a wall for stabilization. Reliability determined by comparing intra-assessor and inter-assessor results and comparison to a criterion standard (stabilized dynamometer with patients in the standing position). UniSA Nutritional Physiology Research Centre. Twenty-one patients older than 65 years were recruited from the Royal Adelaide Hospital. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs), bias, and limits of agreement calculated to determine reliability. Intra-assessor and inter-assessor ICCs were high (0.94 and 0.92-0.94, respectively). There was no intra-assessor bias and narrow limits of agreement (±2.4%). There was a small inter-assessor bias but narrow limits of agreement (0.6%-0.9% and ± 2.3%, respectively). There was a wide variation comparing results to the criterion standard (±5.0%-5.2% limits of agreement), highlighting problems attributed to difficulties that the test population had with the standing position used in the criterion standard test. Testing older persons' hip abductor muscle strength while in the supine position with optimal pelvic stabilization using a handheld dynamometer is highly reliable. While further studies must be done to assess patients with specific pathologies, this test has potential application to monitor and evaluate the effects of surgical interventions and/or rehabilitation protocols for a variety of conditions affecting hip abductor function such as hip fractures and arthritis.

  11. A review of the anatomy of the hip abductor muscles, gluteus medius, gluteus minimus, and tensor fascia lata.

    PubMed

    Flack, Natasha Amy May Sparks; Nicholson, Helen D; Woodley, Stephanie Jane

    2012-09-01

    The hip abductor muscles have the capability to contribute to numerous actions, including pelvic stabilization during gait, and abduction and rotation at the hip joint. To fully understand the role of these muscles, as well as their involvement in hip joint dysfunction, knowledge of their anatomical structure is essential. The clinical literature suggests anatomical diversity within these muscles, and that gluteus medius (GMed) and gluteus minimus (GMin), in particular, may be comprised of compartments. This systematic review of the English literature focuses on the gross anatomy of GMed, GMin, and tensor fascia lata (TFL) muscles. Although studies of this muscle group have generated useful descriptions, comparison of results is hindered by methodological limitations. Furthermore, there is no single comprehensive anatomical investigation of all three muscles. Several aspects of the morphology of attachment sites are unknown or unclear. There is little data on fascicle orientation, the interface between fascicles and tendons, and the specific patterning of the superior gluteal nerve. Consequently, the existence of anatomical compartmentalization within the hip abductor muscles is difficult to assess. Further research of the architecture and innervation of the hip abductor muscle group is required; a better understanding of the precise anatomy of these muscles should improve our understanding of their specific functions and their contribution to the pathogenesis of disorders affecting the hip joint. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. The effects of gluteus maximus and abductor hallucis strengthening exercises for four weeks on navicular drop and lower extremity muscle activity during gait with flatfoot.

    PubMed

    Goo, Young-Mi; Kim, Tae-Ho; Lim, Jin-Yong

    2016-03-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of the present study is to examine the effects of abductor hallucis and gluteus maximus strengthening exercises on pronated feet. [Subjects and Methods] The present study was conducted with 18 adults without no history of surgery on the foot or ankle. One group performed both gluteus maximus strengthening exercises and abductor hallucis strengthening exercises, while the other group performed only abductor hallucis strengthening exercises five times per week for four weeks. [Results] The group that performed both gluteus maximus and abductor hallucis strengthening exercises showed smaller values in the height of navicular drop than the group that performed only abductor hallucis strengthening exercises. The muscle activity of the gluteus maximus and the vastus medialis increased during heel-strike in the group that added gluteus maximus exercises, and the muscle activity of the abductor hallucis significantly increased in both groups. [Conclusion] Given the results of the present study, it can be suggested that strengthening the gluteus maximus while also performing exercises to correct the pronated foot is an effective method for achieving normal gait.

  13. Distribution and severity of weakness among patients with polymyositis, dermatomyositis and juvenile dermatomyositis

    PubMed Central

    Harris-Love, M. O.; Shrader, J. A.; Koziol, D.; Pahlajani, N.; Jain, M.; Smith, M.; Cintas, H. L.; McGarvey, C. L.; James-Newton, L.; Pokrovnichka, A.; Moini, B.; Cabalar, I.; Lovell, D. J.; Wesley, R.; Plotz, P. H.; Miller, F. W.; Hicks, J. E.

    2009-01-01

    Objective. To describe the distribution and severity of muscle weakness using manual muscle testing (MMT) in 172 patients with PM, DM and juvenile DM (JDM). The secondary objectives included characterizing individual muscle group weakness and determining associations of weakness with functional status and myositis characteristics in this large cohort of patients with myositis. Methods. Strength was assessed for 13 muscle groups using the 10-point MMT and expressed as a total score, subscores based on functional and anatomical regions, and grades for individual muscle groups. Patient characteristics and secondary outcomes, such as clinical course, muscle enzymes, corticosteroid dosage and functional status were evaluated for association with strength using univariate and multivariate analyses. Results. A gradient of proximal weakness was seen, with PM weakest, DM intermediate and JDM strongest among the three myositis clinical groups (P ≤ 0.05). Hip flexors, hip extensors, hip abductors, neck flexors and shoulder abductors were the muscle groups with the greatest weakness among all three clinical groups. Muscle groups were affected symmetrically. Conclusions. Axial and proximal muscle impairment was reflected in the five weakest muscles shared by our cohort of myositis patients. However, differences in the pattern of weakness were observed among all three clinical groups. Our findings suggest a greater severity of proximal weakness in PM in comparison with DM. PMID:19074186

  14. Abductor pollicis longus: a case of mistaken identity.

    PubMed

    Elliott, B G

    1992-08-01

    Abductor pollicis longus, long regarded as a motor for the thumb, is anatomically and functionally a radial deviator of the wrist and should be so named. The abductor carpi is proposed. If the other radial deviators of the wrist are acting this tendon can be selectively utilized as a transfer without loss of function. Reflex spasm of this muscle probably plays an important role in the radial deviation deformity seen in the rheumatoid hand.

  15. The Influence of Hip Abductor Weakness on Frontal Plane Motion of the Trunk and Pelvis in Patients with Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krautwurst, Britta K.; Wolf, Sebastian I.; Heitzmann, Daniel W. W.; Gantz, Simone; Braatz, Frank; Dreher, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Trendelenburg walking pattern is a common finding in various disorders, including cerebral palsy (CP), where it is seen in children and adults. Clinically, this deviation is viewed as a consequence of hip abductor weakness resulting in pelvic obliquity. Trunk lean to the ipsilateral side is a common compensatory mechanism to counteract pelvic…

  16. Intratester Reliability and Construct Validity of a Hip Abductor Eccentric Strength Test.

    PubMed

    Brindle, Richard A; Ebaugh, David; Milner, Clare E

    2018-06-06

    Side-lying hip abductor strength tests are commonly used to evaluate muscle strength. In a "break" test, the tester applies sufficient force to lower the limb to the table while the patient resists. The peak force is postulated to occur while the leg is lowering, thus representing the participant's eccentric muscle strength. However, it is unclear whether peak force occurs before or after the leg begins to lower. To determine intrarater reliability and construct validity of a hip abductor eccentric strength test. Intrarater reliability and construct validity study. Twenty healthy adults (26 [6] y; 1.66 [0.06] m; 62.2 [8.0] kg) made 2 visits to the laboratory at least 1 week apart. During the hip abductor eccentric strength test, a handheld dynamometer recorded peak force and time to peak force, and limb position was recorded via a motion capture system. Intrarater reliability was determined using intraclass correlation, SEM, and minimal detectable difference. Construct validity was assessed by determining if peak force occurred after the start of the lowering phase using a 1-sample t test. The hip abductor eccentric strength test had substantial intrarater reliability (intraclass correlation (3,3)  = .88; 95% confidence interval, .65-.95), SEM of 0.9 %BWh, and a minimal detectable difference of 2.5 %BWh. Construct validity was established as peak force occurred 2.1 (0.6) seconds (range: 0.7-3.7 s) after the start of the lowering phase of the test (P ≤ .001). The hip abductor eccentric strength test is a valid and reliable measure of eccentric muscle strength. This test may be used clinically to assess changes in eccentric muscle strength over time.

  17. Structure and function of the abductors in patients with hip osteoarthritis: Systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Amelia Rose; Noronha, Marcos de; Zacharias, Anita; Kapakoulakis, Theo; Green, Rodney

    2016-04-27

    Hip osteoarthritis (OA) is a major cause of morbidity. Rehabilitation for this population focuses on strengthening the hip muscles, particularly the abductors, however the deficit in function of these muscles is unclear. To review the evidence for the differences in structure and function of hip abductors (gluteus medius and minimus and tensor fascia lata) in hip OA. A systematic review was conducted using MEDLINE, AMED, CINAHL and SportDISCUS, from the earliest date to September 2013. Studies that compared hip OA patients with controls, or the unaffected contralateral hip were included. Studies needed to report data on an outcome related to gross gluteal muscle function. An initial yield of 141 studies was reduced to 22 after application of inclusion/exclusion criteria. Meta-analysis confirmed greater hip abductor strength in the control group (standardized mean difference = SMD -0.93, 95%CI -1.70 to -0.16) and the unaffected limb (SMD -0.26, 95%CI -0.48 to -0.04). Meta-analyses showed no differences in muscle size either between groups or limbs. Few electromyography studies have been reported and meta-analysis was not possible. Hip abductor strength is reduced in OA patients when compared to healthy controls and to the unaffected limb. Data on muscle size and activity is limited.

  18. Changes in Knee Biomechanics After a Hip-Abductor Strengthening Protocol for Runners With Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ferber, Reed; Kendall, Karen D.; Farr, Lindsay

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Context: Very few authors have investigated the relationship between hip-abductor muscle strength and frontal-plane knee mechanics during running. Objective: To investigate this relationship using a 3-week hip-abductor muscle-strengthening program to identify changes in strength, pain, and biomechanics in runners with patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS). Design: Cohort study. Setting: University-based clinical research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Fifteen individuals (5 men, 10 women) with PFPS and 10 individuals without PFPS (4 men, 6 women) participated. Intervention(s): The patients with PFPS completed a 3-week hip-abductor strengthening protocol; control participants did not. Main Outcome Measure(s): The dependent variables of interest were maximal isometric hip-abductor muscle strength, 2-dimensional peak knee genu valgum angle, and stride-to-stride knee-joint variability. All measures were recorded at baseline and 3 weeks later. Between-groups differences were compared using repeated-measures analyses of variance. Results: At baseline, the PFPS group exhibited reduced strength, no difference in peak genu valgum angle, and increased stride-to-stride knee-joint variability compared with the control group. After the 3-week protocol, the PFPS group demonstrated increased strength, less pain, no change in peak genu valgum angle, and reduced stride-to-stride knee-joint variability compared with baseline. Conclusions: A 3-week hip-abductor muscle-strengthening protocol was effective in increasing muscle strength and decreasing pain and stride-to-stride knee-joint variability in individuals with PFPS. However, concomitant changes in peak knee genu valgum angle were not observed. PMID:21391799

  19. Intra- and Inter-Rater Reliability of the Rate of Force Development of Hip Abductor Muscles Measured by Hand-Held Dynamometer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Takeda, Kazuya; Tanabe, Shigeo; Koyama, Soichiro; Nagai, Tomoko; Sakurai, Hiroaki; Kanada, Yoshikiyo; Shomoto, Koji

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to clarify the intra- and inter-rater reliability of the rate of force development in hip abductor muscle force measurements using a hand-held dynamometer. Thirty healthy adults were separately assessed by two independent raters on two separate days. Rate of force development was calculated from the slope of the…

  20. Effect of experimentally reduced distal sensation on postural response to hip abductor/ankle evertor muscle vibration.

    PubMed

    Glasser, S; Collings, R; Paton, J; Marsden, J

    2015-07-01

    This study assessed whether postural responses induced by vibratory perturbations of the hip abductors and ankle evertors, were modified when distal tactile sensation was experimentally reduced through cooling. Sixteen healthy subjects were investigated pre and post cooling. Subjects stood with their eyes closed with a stance width of 4 cm. A 2s vibratory stimulus was applied to the left or right hip abductor or ankle evertor muscle. The order of the site and side of the stimulation was randomised. The postural response to hip abductor and ankle evertor vibration was recorded using 3D motion analysis (Codamotion, Leicestershire). Medio-lateral centre of pressure motion was simultaneously recorded during quiet standing via a force plate (Kistler, UK). Pre-cooling people responded to unilateral ankle vibration with an ipsilateral translation and tilt of the pelvis, and an ipsilateral tilt of the trunk. People responded to unilateral hip vibration with a contralateral translation and tilt of the pelvis, and an ipsilateral tilt of the trunk. Following an experimental reduction in distal tactile sensation there was a significant reduction in the amplitude of pelvic tilt in response to ankle vibration (F(6.2)=P<0.05) and a significant increase in amplitude of pelvic tilt in response to hip vibration (F(5.2)=P<0.05). This suggests that the sensitivity to artificial stimulation of hip proprioception increases with distal cooling, possibly indicating a change in the gain/weighting placed upon sensory information from the hips. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Bilateral Vocal Fold Medialization: A Treatment for Abductor Spasmodic Dysphonia.

    PubMed

    Dewan, Karuna; Berke, Gerald S

    2017-11-10

    Abductor spasmodic dysphonia, a difficult-to-treat laryngologic condition, is characterized by spasms causing the vocal folds to remain abducted despite efforts to adduct them during phonation. Traditional treatment for abductor spasmodic dysphonia-botulinum toxin injection into the posterior cricoarytenoid muscle-can be both technically challenging and uncomfortable. Due to the difficulty of needle placement, it is often unsuccessful. The purpose of this investigation is to present a previously undescribed treatment for abductor spasmodic dysphonia-bilateral vocal fold medialization. A retrospective case review of all cases of abductor spasmodic dysphonia treated in a tertiary care laryngology practice with bilateral vocal fold medialization over a 10-year period was performed. The Voice Handicap Index and the Voice-Related Quality of Life surveys were utilized to assess patient satisfaction with voice outcome. Six patients with abductor spasmodic dysphonia treated with bilateral vocal fold medialization were identified. Disease severity ranged from mild to severe. All six patients reported statistically significant improvement in nearly all Voice Handicap Index and Voice-Related Quality of Life parameters. They reported fewer voice breaks and greater ease of communication. Results were noted immediately and symptoms continue to be well controlled for many years following medialization. Bilateral vocal fold medialization is a safe and effective treatment for abductor spasmodic dysphonia. It is performed under local anesthesia and provides phonation improvement in the short and long term. Copyright © 2017 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Relationship between lower extremity isometric muscle strength and standing balance in patients with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Citaker, Seyit; Guclu-Gunduz, Arzu; Yazici, Gokhan; Bayraktar, Deniz; Nazliel, Bijen; Irkec, Ceyla

    2013-01-01

    Muscle strength and standing balance decrease in patients with Multiple Sclerosis (MS). The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship between the lower extremity isometric muscle strength and standing balance in patients with MS. Forty-seven patients with MS and 10 healthy volunteers were included. Neurological disability level was assessed using Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS). Isometric strength of seven lower extremity muscles (hip flexor-extensor-abductor-adductor, knee flexor-extensor, and ankle dorsal flexor) was assessed using hand-held dynamometer. Duration of static one-leg standing balance was measured using digital chronometer. Hip flexor-extensor-abductor-adductor, knee flexor-extensor, and ankle dorsal flexor isometric muscle strength, and duration of one-leg standing balance were decreased in patients with MS when compared with controls (p < 0.05). All assessed lower extremity isometric muscle strength and EDSS level was related duration of one-leg standing balance in patients with MS. All assessed lower extremity isometric muscle strength (except ankle dorsal flexor) was related with EDSS. Hip flexor-extensor-abductor-adductor, knee flexor-extensor, and ankle dorsal flexor isometric muscle strength decreases in ambulatory MS patients. Lower extremity muscle weakness and neurological disability level are related with imbalance in MS population. Hip and knee region muscles weakness increases the neurological disability level. For the better balance and decrease neurological disability level whole lower extremity muscle strengthening should be included in rehabilitation programs.

  3. A randomised trial into the effect of an isolated hip abductor strengthening programme and a functional motor control programme on knee kinematics and hip muscle strength.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Kathryn; Hebron, Clair; Williams, Jonathan M

    2015-05-03

    Dynamic knee valgus and internal femoral rotation are proposed to be contributory risk factors for patellofemoral pain and anterior cruciate ligament injuries. Multimodal interventions including hip abductor strengthening or functional motor control programmes have a positive impact of pain, however their effect on knee kinematics and muscle strength is less clear. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of isolated hip abductor strengthening and a functional motor control exercise on knee kinematics and hip abductor strength. This prospective, randomised, repeated measures design included 29 asymptomatic volunteers presenting with increase knee valgus and femoral internal rotation. Participants completed either isolated hip abductor strengthening or a functional motor control exercise for 5 weeks. Knee kinematics were measured using inertial sensors during 2 functional activities and hip abductor strength measured using a load cell during isometric hip abduction. There were no significant differences in dynamic knee valgus and internal rotation following the isolated hip abductor or functional motor control intervention, and no significant differences between the groups for knee angles. Despite this, the actual magnitude of reduction in valgus was 10° and 5° for the functional motor control group and strengthening group respectively. The actual magnitude of reduction in internal rotation was 9° and 18° for the functional motor control group and strengthening group respectively. Therefore there was a tendency towards clinically significant improvements in knee kinematics in both exercise groups. A statistically significant improvement in hip abductor strength was evident for the functional motor control group (27% increase; p = 0.008) and strengthening group (35% increase; p = 0.009) with no significant difference between the groups being identified (p = 0.475). Isolated hip strengthening and functional motor control exercises resulted in

  4. The association of visually-assessed quality of movement during jump-landing with ankle dorsiflexion range-of-motion and hip abductor muscle strength among healthy female athletes.

    PubMed

    Rabin, Alon; Einstein, Ofira; Kozol, Zvi

    2018-05-01

    To explore the association between ankle dorsiflexion (DF) range of motion (ROM), and hip abductor muscle strength, to visually-assessed quality of movement during jump-landing. Cross-sectional. Gymnasium of participating teams. 37 female volleyball players. Quality of movement in the frontal-plane, sagittal-plane, and overall (both planes) was visually rated as "good/moderate" or "poor". Weight-bearing Ankle DF ROM and hip abductor muscle strength were compared between participants with differing quality of movement. Weight-bearing DF ROM on both sides was decreased among participants with "poor" sagittal-plane quality of movement (dominant side: 50.8° versus 43.6°, P = .02; non-dominant side: 54.6° versus 45.9°, P = .01), as well as among participants with an overall "poor" quality of movement (dominant side: 51.8° versus 44.0°, P < .01; non-dominant side: 56.5° versus 45.1°, P < .01). Weight-bearing ankle DF on the non-dominant side was decreased among participants with a "poor" frontal-plane quality of movement (53.9° versus 46.0°, P = .02). No differences in hip abductor muscle strength were noted between participants with differing quality of movement. Visual assessment of jump-landing can detect differences in quality of movement that are associated with ankle DF ROM. Clinicians observing a poor quality of movement may wish to assess ankle DF ROM. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Effect of changes of femoral offset on abductor and joint reaction forces in total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Rüdiger, Hannes A; Guillemin, Maïka; Latypova, Adeliya; Terrier, Alexandre

    2017-11-01

    Anatomical reconstruction in total hip arthroplasty (THA) allows for physiological muscle function, good functional outcome and implant longevity. Quantitative data on the effect of a loss or gain of femoral offset (FO) are scarce. The aim of this study was to quantitatively describe the effect of FO changes on abductor moment arms, muscle and joint reactions forces. THA was virtually performed on 3D models built from preoperative CT scans of 15 patients undergoing THA. Virtual THA was performed with a perfectly anatomical reconstruction, a loss of 20% of FO (-FO), and a gain of 20% of FO (+FO). These models were combined with a generic musculoskeletal model (OpenSim) to predict moment arms, muscle and joint reaction forces during normal gait cycles. In average, with -FO reconstructions, muscle moment arms decreased, while muscle and hip forces increased significantly (p < 0.001). We observed the opposite with +FO reconstructions. Gluteus medius was more affected than gluteus minimus. -FO had more effect than +FO. A change of 20% of FO induced an average change 8% of abductor moment arms, 16% of their forces, and 6% of the joint reaction force. To our knowledge, this is the first report providing quantitative data on the effect of FO changes on muscle and joint forces during normal gait. A decrease of FO necessitates an increase of abductor muscle force to maintain normal gait, which in turn increases the joint reaction force. This effect underscores the importance of an accurate reconstruction of the femoral offset.

  6. Hip abductor, trunk extensor and ankle plantar flexor endurance in females with and without patellofemoral pain.

    PubMed

    Van Cant, Joachim; Pitance, Laurent; Feipel, Véronique

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies have reported strength deficit in hip abduction, extension and external rotation in females with patellofemoral pain (PFP) when compared with healthy control; however, there is conflicting evidence for a decrease in hip muscle endurance. Therefore, it seems important to evaluate hip muscle endurance in females with PFP. Moreover, trunk extensor and ankle plantar flexor endurance have not yet been evaluate in females with PFP. To compare hip abductor, trunk extensor and ankle plantar flexor endurance between females with and without PFP. Twenty females with PFP (mean age, 21.1 years) and 76 healthy females (mean age, 20.5 years) were recruited. Subject performed three endurance clinical tests: (1) The hip abductor isometric endurance test, (2) The Sorensen test and (3) The heel rise test. Group differences were assessed using an independent t tests, or Mann-Whitney U tests for non-normally distributed data. Subjects with PFP exhibited significantly lower hip abductor, trunk extensor and ankle plantar flexor endurance than healthy controls. On average, subjects with PFP had deficits of 16% in hip abduction, 14% in trunk extension and 26% in ankle plantar flexion. Females with PFP exhibited diminished hip abductor, trunk extensor and ankle plantar flexor endurance compared to healthy controls.

  7. Oedema of the abductor digiti quinti muscle due to subacute denervation: report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Chimutengwende-Gordon, Mukai; O'Donnell, Paul; Cullen, Nicholas; Singh, Dishan

    2014-03-01

    The clinical presentation of abductor digiti quinti (ADQ) denervation is often non-specific. The diagnosis is generally clinical and may be easily missed. This case report of two patients describes the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) finding of unilateral oedema and fatty infiltration isolated to the ADQ. A 36-year old woman who presented with laterally located left foot pain was initially diagnosed as having plantar fasciitis. An MRI scan arranged due to the unusual site of the pain showed increased signal intensity within the ADQ muscle on T1 and T2 images indicating fatty infiltration. Short tau inversion recovery (STIR) images showed hyperintensity of the ADQ indicating oedema. The MRI scan of a 45-year old man who presented with a three month history of left heel pain revealed similar findings. These MRI appearances indicate subacute denervation, which, when involving solely the ADQ muscle suggests entrapment of the first branch of the lateral plantar nerve. Consideration of this imaging finding when examining MRI scans of patients with non-specific heel pain has the potential to facilitate diagnosis. Copyright © 2013 European Foot and Ankle Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Skeletal muscle weakness in osteogenesis imperfecta mice.

    PubMed

    Gentry, Bettina A; Ferreira, J Andries; McCambridge, Amanda J; Brown, Marybeth; Phillips, Charlotte L

    2010-09-01

    Exercise intolerance, muscle fatigue and weakness are often-reported, little-investigated concerns of patients with osteogenesis imperfecta (OI). OI is a heritable connective tissue disorder hallmarked by bone fragility resulting primarily from dominant mutations in the proα1(I) or proα2(I) collagen genes and the recently discovered recessive mutations in post-translational modifying proteins of type I collagen. In this study we examined the soleus (S), plantaris (P), gastrocnemius (G), tibialis anterior (TA) and quadriceps (Q) muscles of mice expressing mild (+/oim) and moderately severe (oim/oim) OI for evidence of inherent muscle pathology. In particular, muscle weight, fiber cross-sectional area (CSA), fiber type, fiber histomorphology, fibrillar collagen content, absolute, relative and specific peak tetanic force (P(o), P(o)/mg and P(o)/CSA respectively) of individual muscles were evaluated. Oim/oim mouse muscles were generally smaller, contained less fibrillar collagen, had decreased P(o) and an inability to sustain P(o) for the 300-ms testing duration for specific muscles; +/oim mice had a similar but milder skeletal muscle phenotype. +/oim mice had mild weakness of specific muscles but were less affected than their oim/oim counterparts which demonstrated readily apparent skeletal muscle pathology. Therefore muscle weakness in oim mice reflects inherent skeletal muscle pathology. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Discharge properties of abductor hallucis before, during, and after an isometric fatigue task.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Luke A; Racinais, Sebastien; Cresswell, Andrew G

    2013-08-01

    Abductor hallucis is the largest muscle in the arch of the human foot and comprises few motor units relative to its physiological cross-sectional area. It has been described as a postural muscle, aiding in the stabilization of the longitudinal arch during stance and gait. The purpose of this study was to describe the discharge properties of abductor hallucis motor units during ramp and hold isometric contractions, as well as its discharge characteristics during fatigue. Intramuscular electromyographic recordings from abductor hallucis were made in 5 subjects; from those recordings, 42 single motor units were decomposed. Data were recorded during isometric ramp contractions at 60% maximum voluntary contraction (MVC), performed before and after a submaximal isometric contraction to failure (mean force 41.3 ± 15.3% MVC, mean duration 233 ± 116 s). Motor unit recruitment thresholds ranged from 10.3 to 54.2% MVC. No significant difference was observed between recruitment and derecruitment thresholds or their respective discharge rates for both the initial and postfatigue ramp contractions (all P > 0.25). Recruitment threshold was positively correlated with recruitment discharge rate (r = 0.47, P < 0.03). All motor units attained similar peak discharge rates (14.0 ± 0.25 pulses/s) and were not correlated with recruitment threshold. Thirteen motor units could be followed during the isometric fatigue task, with a decline in discharge rate and increase in discharge rate variability occurring in the final 25% of the task (both P < 0.05). We have shown that abductor hallucis motor units discharge relatively slowly and are considerably resistant to fatigue. These characteristics may be effective for generating and sustaining the substantial level of force that is required to stabilize the longitudinal arch during weight bearing.

  10. Reliability of measuring hip abductor strength following total knee arthroplasty using a hand-held dynamometer.

    PubMed

    Schache, Margaret B; McClelland, Jodie A; Webster, Kate E

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the test-retest reliability of measuring hip abductor strength in patients with total knee arthroplasty (TKA) using a hand-held dynamometer (HHD) with two different types of resistance: belt and manual resistance. Test-retest reliability of 30 subjects (17 female, 13 male, 71.9 ± 7.4 years old), 9.2 ± 2.7 days post TKA was measured using belt and therapist resistance. Retest reliability was calculated with intra-class coefficients (ICC3,1) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for both the group average and the individual scores. A paired t-test assessed whether a difference existed between the belt and therapist methods of resistance. ICCs were 0.82 and 0.80 for the belt and therapist resisted methods, respectively. Hip abductor strength increases of 8 N (14%) for belt resisted and 14 N (17%) for therapist resisted measurements of the group average exceeded the 95% CI and may represent real change. For individuals, hip abductor strength increases of 33 N (72%) (belt resisted) and 57 N (79%) (therapist resisted) could be interpreted as real change. Hip abductor strength can be reliably measured using HHD in the clinical setting with the described protocol. Belt resistance demonstrated slightly higher test-retest reliability. Reliable measurement of hip abductor muscle strength in patients with TKA is important to ensure deficiencies are addressed in rehabilitation programs and function is maximized. Hip abductor strength can be reliably measured with a hand-held dynamometer in the clinical setting using manual or belt resistance.

  11. Knee joint contact mechanics during downhill gait and its relationship with varus/valgus motion and muscle strength in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Farrokhi, Shawn; Voycheck, Carrie A; Gustafson, Jonathan A; Fitzgerald, G Kelley; Tashman, Scott

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this exploratory study was to evaluate tibiofemoral joint contact point excursions and velocities during downhill gait and assess the relationship between tibiofemoral joint contact mechanics with frontal-plane knee joint motion and lower extremity muscle weakness in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Dynamic stereo X-ray was used to quantify tibiofemoral joint contact mechanics and frontal-plane motion during the loading response phase of downhill gait in 11 patients with knee OA and 11 control volunteers. Quantitative testing of the quadriceps and the hip abductor muscles was also performed. Patients with knee OA demonstrated larger medial/lateral joint contact point excursions (p < 0.02) and greater heel-strike joint contact point velocities (p < 0.05) for the medial and lateral compartments compared to the control group. The peak medial/lateral joint contact point velocity of the medial compartment was also greater for patients with knee OA compared to their control counterparts (p = 0.02). Additionally, patients with knee OA demonstrated significantly increased frontal-plane varus motion excursions (p < 0.01) and greater quadriceps and hip abductor muscle weakness (p = 0.03). In general, increased joint contact point excursions and velocities in patients with knee OA were linearly associated with greater frontal-plane varus motion excursions (p < 0.04) but not with quadriceps or hip abductor strength. Altered contact mechanics in patients with knee OA may be related to compromised frontal-plane joint stability but not with deficits in muscle strength.

  12. Isometric muscle strength and mobility capacity in children with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Dallmeijer, Annet J; Rameckers, Eugene A; Houdijk, Han; de Groot, Sonja; Scholtes, Vanessa A; Becher, Jules G

    2017-01-01

    To determine the relationship between isometric leg muscle strength and mobility capacity in children with cerebral palsy (CP) compared to typically developing (TD) peers. Participants were 62 children with CP (6-13 years), able to walk with (n = 10) or without (n = 52) walking aids, and 47 TD children. Isometric muscle strength of five muscle groups of the leg was measured using hand-held dynamometry. Mobility capacity was assessed with the 1-min walk, the 10-m walk, sit-to-stand, lateral-step-up and timed-stair tests. Isometric strength of children with CP was reduced to 36-82% of TD. When adjusted for age and height, the percentage of variance in mobility capacity that was explained by isometric strength of the leg muscles was 21-24% (walking speed), 25% (sit-to-stand), 28% (lateral-step-up) and 35% (timed-stair) in children with CP. Hip abductors and knee flexors had the largest contribution to the explained variance, while knee extensors showed the weakest correlation. Weak or no associations were found between strength and mobility capacity in TD children. Isometric strength, especially hip abductor and knee flexor strength, is moderately related to mobility capacity in children with CP, but not in TD children. To what extent training of these muscle groups will lead to better mobility capacity needs further study. Implications for Rehabilitation Strength training in children with cerebral palsy (CP) may be targeted more specifically at hip abductors and knee flexors. The moderate associations imply that large improvements in mobility capacity may not be expected when strength increases.

  13. Hip-Abductor Fatigue and Single-Leg Landing Mechanics in Women Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Patrek, Mary F.; Kernozek, Thomas W.; Willson, John D.; Wright, Glenn A.; Doberstein, Scott T.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Context: Reduced hip-abductor strength and muscle activation may be associated with altered lower extremity mechanics, which are thought to increase the risk for anterior cruciate ligament injury. However, experimental evidence supporting this relationship is limited. Objective: To examine the changes in single-leg landing mechanics and gluteus medius recruitment that occur after a hip-abductor fatigue protocol. Design: Descriptive laboratory study. Patients or Other Participants: Twenty physically active women (age  =  21.0 ± 1.3 years). Intervention(s): Participants were tested before (prefatigue) and after (postfatigue) a hip-abductor fatigue protocol consisting of repetitive side-lying hip abduction. Main Outcome Measure(s): Outcome measures included sagittal-plane and frontal-plane hip and knee kinematics at initial contact and at 60 milliseconds after initial contact during 5 single-leg landings from a height of 40 cm. Peak hip and knee sagittal-plane and frontal-plane joint moments during this time interval were also analyzed. Measures of gluteus medius activation, including latency, peak amplitude, and integrated signal, were recorded. Results: A small (<1°) increase in hip-abduction angle at initial contact and a small (<1°) decrease in knee-abduction (valgus) angle at 60 milliseconds after contact were observed in the postfatigue landing condition. No other kinematic changes were noted for the knee or hip at initial contact or at 60 milliseconds after initial contact. Peak external knee-adduction moment decreased 27% and peak hip adduction moment decreased 24% during the postfatigue landing condition. Gluteus medius activation was delayed after the protocol, but no difference in peak or integrated signal was seen during the landing trials. Conclusions: Changes observed during single-leg landings after hip-abductor fatigue were not generally considered unfavorable to the integrity of the anterior cruciate ligament. Further work may be

  14. Quadriceps combined with hip abductor strengthening versus quadriceps strengthening in treating knee osteoarthritis: a study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yujie; Zhang, Chi; Jiang, Wei; Huang, Juan; Xu, Lili; Pang, Guoyin; Tang, Haiyan; Chen, Ruyan; Yu, Jihua; Guo, Shengmin; Xu, Fangyuan; Wang, Jianxiong

    2018-05-15

    Lower limb strengthening, especially the quadriceps training, is of much necessity for patients with knee osteoarthritis (KOA). Previous studies suggest that strengthening of the hip muscles, especially the hip abductor, can potentially relieve the KOA-associated symptoms. Nevertheless, the effects of quadriceps combined with hip abductor strengthening remain unclear. Therefore, the current randomized controlled trial is designed aiming to observe whether quadriceps in combination with hip abductor strengthening can better improve the function and reduce pain in KOA patients than quadriceps training alone. A total of 80 subjects with symptomatic KOA will be recruited from the communities and hospital outpatient, and will be randomly assigned to the experiment group (Quadriceps-plus-hip-abductor-strengthening) or the control group (Quadriceps-strengthening). Specifically, participants in the experiment group will complete 4 exercises to train the quadriceps and hip abductor twice a day for 6 weeks at home, while those in the control group will only perform 2 exercises to strengthen the quadriceps. Besides, all patients will also receive usual care management, including health education and physical agent therapy when necessary. Knee pain will be measured using the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) at baseline, in every week during the course of treatment, as well as 8 and 12 weeks after randomization. Furthermore, knee function will be measured using the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) scale, and the quality of life will be measured using the MOS Item Short-form Health Survey (SF-36). In this study, several simple tests will be applied to assess the objective function. All the assessments except for VAS will be carried out at baseline, and in the 6th, 8th and 12th weeks respectively. Our findings will provide more evidence for the effects of hip abductor strengthening on relieving pain and improving function in KOA patients. Hip

  15. Knee Joint Contact Mechanics during Downhill Gait and its Relationship with Varus/Valgus Motion and Muscle Strength in Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Farrokhi, Shawn; Voycheck, Carrie A.; Gustafson, Jonathan A.; Fitzgerald, G. Kelley; Tashman, Scott

    2015-01-01

    Objective The objective of this exploratory study was to evaluate tibiofemoral joint contact point excursions and velocities during downhill gait and assess the relationship between tibiofemoral joint contact mechanics with frontal-plane knee joint motion and lower extremity muscle weakness in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Methods Dynamic stereo X-ray was used to quantify tibiofemoral joint contact mechanics and frontal-plane motion during the loading response phase of downhill gait in 11 patients with knee OA and 11 control volunteers. Quantitative testing of the quadriceps and the hip abductor muscles was also performed. Group differences in contact mechanics and frontal-plane motion excursions were compared using analysis of covariance with adjustments for body mass index. Differences in strength were compared using independent sample t-tests. Additionally, linear associations between contact mechanics with frontal-plane knee motion and muscle strength were evaluated using Pearson's correlation coefficients. Results Patients with knee OA demonstrated larger medial/lateral joint contact point excursions (p<0.02) and greater heel-strike joint contact point velocities (p<0.05) for the medial and lateral compartments compared to the control group. The peak medial/lateral joint contact point velocity of the medial compartment was also greater for patients with knee OA compared to their control counterparts (p=0.02). Additionally, patients with knee OA demonstrated significantly increased frontal-plane varus motion excursions (p<0.01) and greater quadriceps and hip abductor muscle weakness (p=0.03). In general, increased joint contact point excursions and velocities in patients with knee OA were linearly associated with greater frontal-plane varus motion excursions (p<0.04) but not with quadriceps or hip abductor strength. Conclusion Altered contact mechanics in patients with knee OA may be related to compromised frontal-plane joint stability but not with

  16. Objective Evaluation of Muscle Strength in Infants with Hypotonia and Muscle Weakness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reus, Linda; van Vlimmeren, Leo A.; Staal, J. Bart; Janssen, Anjo J. W. M.; Otten, Barto J.; Pelzer, Ben J.; Nijhuis-van der Sanden, Maria W. G.

    2013-01-01

    The clinical evaluation of an infant with motor delay, muscle weakness, and/or hypotonia would improve considerably if muscle strength could be measured objectively and normal reference values were available. The authors developed a method to measure muscle strength in infants and tested 81 typically developing infants, 6-36 months of age, and 17…

  17. Fatigue is associated with muscle weakness in Ehlers-Danlos syndrome: an explorative study.

    PubMed

    Voermans, N C; Knoop, H; Bleijenberg, G; van Engelen, B G

    2011-06-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of inherited connective tissue disorders characterised by joint hypermobility, skin hyperextensibility and tissue fragility. It has recently been shown that muscle weakness occurs frequently in EDS, and that fatigue is a common and clinically important symptom. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between fatigue severity and subjective and objective measures of muscle weakness. Furthermore, the predictive value of muscle weakness for fatigue severity was determined, together with that of pain and physical activity. An explorative, cross-sectional, observational study. Thirty EDS patients, recruited from the Dutch patient association, were investigated at the neuromuscular outpatient department of a tertiary referral centre in The Netherlands. Muscle strength measured with manual muscle strength testing and hand-held dynamometry. Self-reported muscle weakness, pain, physical activity levels and fatigue were assessed with standardised questionnaires. Fatigue severity in EDS was significantly correlated with measured and self-reported muscle weakness (r=-0.408 for manual muscle strength, r=0.461 for hand-held dynamometry and r=0.603 for self-reported muscle weakness). Both muscle weakness and pain severity were significant predictors of fatigue severity in a multiple regression analysis. The results suggest a positive and direct relationship between fatigue severity and muscle weakness in EDS. Future research should focus on the relationship between fatigue, muscle weakness and objectively measured physical activity, preferably in a larger cohort of EDS patients. Copyright © 2010 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Sex hormones and skeletal muscle weakness.

    PubMed

    Sipilä, Sarianna; Narici, Marco; Kjaer, Michael; Pöllänen, Eija; Atkinson, Ross A; Hansen, Mette; Kovanen, Vuokko

    2013-06-01

    Human ageing is accompanied with deterioration in endocrine functions the most notable and well characterized of which being the decrease in the production of sex hormones. Current research literature suggests that low sex hormone concentration may be among the key mechanism for sarcopenia and muscle weakness. Within the European large scale MYOAGE project, the role of sex hormones, estrogens and testosterone, in causing the aging-related loss of muscle mass and function was further investigated. Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) in women is shown to diminish age-associated muscle loss, loss in fast muscle function (power), and accumulation of fat in skeletal muscle. Further HRT raises the protein synthesis rate in skeletal muscle after resistance training, and has an anabolic effect upon connective tissue in both skeletal muscle and tendon, which influences matrix structure and mechanical properties. HRT influences gene expression in e.g. cytoskeletal and cell-matrix proteins, has a stimulating effect upon IGF-I, and a role in IL-6 and adipokine regulation. Despite low circulating steroid-hormone level, postmenopausal women have a high local concentration of steroidogenic enzymes in skeletal muscle.

  19. Biomechanical consequences of running with deep core muscle weakness.

    PubMed

    Raabe, Margaret E; Chaudhari, Ajit M W

    2018-01-23

    The deep core muscles are often neglected or improperly trained in athletes. Improper function of this musculature may lead to abnormal spinal loading, muscle strain, or injury to spinal structures, all of which have been associated with increased low back pain (LBP) risk. The purpose of this study was to identify potential strategies used to compensate for weakness of the deep core musculature during running and to identify accompanying changes in compressive and shear spinal loads. Kinematically-driven simulations of overground running were created for eight healthy young adults in OpenSim at increasing levels of deep core muscle weakness. The deep core muscles (multifidus, quadratus lumborum, psoas, and deep fascicles of the erector spinae) were weakened individually and together. The superficial longissimus thoracis was a significant compensator for 4 out of 5 weakness conditions (p < 0.05). The deep erector spinae required the largest compensations when weakened individually (up to a 45 ± 10% increase in compensating muscle force production, p = 0.004), revealing it may contribute most to controlling running kinematics. With complete deep core muscle weakness, peak anterior shear loading increased on all lumbar vertebrae (up to 19%, p = 0.001). Additionally, compressive spinal loading increased on the upper lumbar vertebrae (up to 15%, p = 0.007) and decreased on the lower lumbar vertebrae (up to 8%, p = 0.008). Muscular compensations may increase risk of muscular fatigue or injury and increased spinal loading over numerous gait cycles may result in damage to spinal structures. Therefore, insufficient strength of the deep core musculature may increase a runner's risk of developing LBP. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Excess TGF-β mediates muscle weakness associated with bone metastases in mice

    PubMed Central

    Reiken, Steven; Xie, Wenjun; Andersson, Daniel C.; John, Sutha; Chiechi, Antonella; Wright, Laura E.; Umanskaya, Alisa; Niewolna, Maria; Trivedi, Trupti; Charkhzarrin, Sahba; Khatiwada, Pooja; Wronska, Anetta; Haynes, Ashley; Benassi, Maria Serena; Witzmann, Frank A.; Zhen, Gehua; Wang, Xiao; Cao, Xu; Roodman, G. David; Marks, Andrew R.; Guise, Theresa A.

    2015-01-01

    Cancer-associated muscle weakness is poorly understood and there is no effective treatment. Here, we find that seven different mouse models of human osteolytic bone metastases, representing breast, lung and prostate cancers, as well as multiple myeloma exhibited impaired muscle function, implicating a role for the tumor-bone microenvironment in cancer-associated muscle weakness. We found that TGF-β, released from the bone surface as a result of metastasis-induced bone destruction upregulated NADPH oxidase 4 (Nox4), resulting in elevated oxidization of skeletal muscle proteins, including the ryanodine receptor/calcium (Ca2+) release channel (RyR1). The oxidized RyR1 channels leaked Ca2+, resulting in lower intracellular signaling required for proper muscle contraction. We found that inhibiting RyR1 leak, TGF-β signaling, TGF-β release from bone or Nox4 all improved muscle function in mice with MDA-MB-231 bone metastases. Humans with breast cancer- or lung cancer-associated bone metastases also had oxidized skeletal muscle RyR1 that is not seen in normal muscle. Similarly, skeletal muscle weakness, higher levels of Nox4 protein and Nox4 binding to RyR1, and oxidation of RyR1 were present in a mouse model of Camurati-Engelmann disease, a non-malignant metabolic bone disorder associated with increased TGF-β activity. Thus, metastasis-induced TGF-β release from bone contributes to muscle weakness by decreasing Ca2+-induced muscle force production. PMID:26457758

  1. Effects of Inspiratory Muscle Training and Calisthenics-and-Breathing Exercises in COPD With and Without Respiratory Muscle Weakness.

    PubMed

    Basso-Vanelli, Renata P; Di Lorenzo, Valéria A Pires; Labadessa, Ivana G; Regueiro, Eloisa M G; Jamami, Mauricio; Gomes, Evelim L F D; Costa, Dirceu

    2016-01-01

    Patients with COPD may experience respiratory muscle weakness. Two therapeutic approaches to the respiratory muscles are inspiratory muscle training and calisthenics-and-breathing exercises. The aims of the study are to compare the effects of inspiratory muscle training and calisthenics-and-breathing exercises associated with physical training in subjects with COPD as an additional benefit of strength and endurance of the inspiratory muscles, thoracoabdominal mobility, physical exercise capacity, and reduction in dyspnea on exertion. In addition, these gains were compared between subjects with and without respiratory muscle weakness. 25 subjects completed the study: 13 composed the inspiratory muscle training group, and 12 composed the calisthenics-and-breathing exercises group. Subjects were assessed before and after training by spirometry, measurements of respiratory muscle strength and test of inspiratory muscle endurance, thoracoabdominal excursion measurements, and the 6-min walk test. Moreover, scores for the Modified Medical Research Council dyspnea scale were reported. After intervention, there was a significant improvement in both groups of respiratory muscle strength and endurance, thoracoabdominal mobility, and walking distance in the 6-min walk test. Additionally, there was a decrease of dyspnea in the 6-min walk test peak. A difference was found between groups, with higher values of respiratory muscle strength and thoracoabdominal mobility and lower values of dyspnea in the 6-min walk test peak and the Modified Medical Research Council dyspnea scale in the inspiratory muscle training group. In the inspiratory muscle training group, subjects with respiratory muscle weakness had greater gains in inspiratory muscle strength and endurance. Both interventions increased exercise capacity and decreased dyspnea during physical effort. However, inspiratory muscle training was more effective in increasing inspiratory muscle strength and endurance, which could

  2. Early Exercise Rehabilitation of Muscle Weakness in Acute Respiratory Failure Patients

    PubMed Central

    Berry, Michael J.; Morris, Peter E.

    2013-01-01

    Acute Respiratory Failure patients experience significant muscle weakness which contributes to prolonged hospitalization and functional impairments post-hospital discharge. Based on our previous work, we hypothesize that an exercise intervention initiated early in the intensive care unit aimed at improving skeletal muscle strength could decrease hospital stay and attenuate the deconditioning and skeletal muscle weakness experienced by these patients. Summary Early exercise has the potential to decrease hospital length of stay and improve function in Acute Respiratory Failure patients. PMID:23873130

  3. Objective evaluation of muscle strength in infants with hypotonia and muscle weakness.

    PubMed

    Reus, Linda; van Vlimmeren, Leo A; Staal, J Bart; Janssen, Anjo J W M; Otten, Barto J; Pelzer, Ben J; Nijhuis-van der Sanden, Maria W G

    2013-04-01

    The clinical evaluation of an infant with motor delay, muscle weakness, and/or hypotonia would improve considerably if muscle strength could be measured objectively and normal reference values were available. The authors developed a method to measure muscle strength in infants and tested 81 typically developing infants, 6-36 months of age, and 17 infants with Prader-Willi Syndrome (PWS) aged 24 months. The inter-rater reliability of the measurement method was good (ICC=.84) and the convergent validity was confirmed by high Pearson's correlations between muscle strength, age, height, and weight (r=.79-.85). A multiple linear regression model was developed to predict muscle strength based on age, height, and weight, explaining 73% of the variance in muscle strength. In infants with PWS, muscle strength was significantly decreased. Pearson's correlations showed that infants with PWS in which muscle strength was more severely affected also had a larger motor developmental delay (r=.75). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Reference values of hip abductor torque among youth athletes: Influence of age, sex and sports.

    PubMed

    Bittencourt, Natália Franco Netto; Santos, Thiago Ribeiro Teles; Gonçalves, Gabriela Gomes Pavan; Coelho, Amanda Priscila; Gomes, Bárbara Gonçalves Braz de Magalhães; Mendonça, Luciana De Michelis; Fonseca, Sérgio Teixeira

    2016-09-01

    (1) To determine the reference values of hip abductor torque in youth athletes; (2) To investigate the influence of sex, age and sports on hip abductors torque. Cross-sectional. Sports clubs. 301 volleyball, basketball and futsal athletes between 10 and 19 years of age. Mean value of three maximal isometric hip abductor torques, evaluated using a hand-held dynamometer. The mean values of maximal isometric hip abductor torque ranged from 1.03 to 1.50 Nm/kg. The dominant hip abductor torque values were greater in 15-19 years old (1.41 ± 0.27 Nm/kg) than in 10-14 years old (1.12 ± 0.31 Nm/kg). In addition, the hip abductor torque values were smaller in basketball players (1.15 ± 0.31 Nm/kg) than futsal (1.34 ± 0.37 Nm/kg) and volleyball players (1.28 ± 0.25 Nm/kg). The comparison of hip abductor torque between futsal and volleyball players revealed no difference. The hip abductor torque values were greater in male volleyball athletes (1.28 ± 0.25 Nm/kg) than female volleyball athletes (1.13 ± 0.22 Nm/kg). This study established reference values for maximal isometric hip abductor torque in youth volleyball, basketball and futsal athletes. In addition, the results demonstrated that sex, age and sports influenced hip abductor torque. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. [Degenerative rupture of the hip abductors. Missed diagnosis with therapy-resistant trochanteric pain of the hips and positive Trendelenburg sign in elderly patients].

    PubMed

    Aepli-Schneider, N; Treumann, T; Müller, U; Schmid, L

    2012-01-01

    The cases of four elderly patients with persistent trochanteric pain and tears of the gluteus medius and/or gluteus minimus tendons detected in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are presented. There was no history of local trauma in any patient but three patients had a positive Trendelenburg sign. Magnetic resonance imaging showed either an obvious discontinuity of the affected tendon or an increased T2 signal above, or less specifically lateral to the greater trochanter. The presence of an elongated tendon on MRI is most likely indicative of a partial rupture of the tendon. Pain and local tenderness over the lateral aspect of the hip in clinical examination is commonly attributed to trochanteric bursitis or trochanteric pain syndrome. Partial or complete tears of the gluteus medius and/or gluteus minimus tendons are thought to represent an unusual finding. However, the true incidence and the clinical significance of hip abductor degeneration and rupture remain to be determined. More studies are needed to examine the prevalence of ruptures in asymptomatic patients, to evaluate the subsequent risk for developing osteoarthritis of the hip (caused by impaired protective reflexes originating from proprioceptive nerve endings in muscle spindles) and to determine the risk for falls related to weakness of hip abduction. Furthermore, no data exist regarding the success rate of conservative treatment. Tears of the gluteus medius and minimus tendons in the elderly population are likely to be a more common cause of pain in the greater trochanteric region than previously thought. In patients who do not respond to conservative treatment, weakness of hip abduction (positive Trendelenburg sign) and new limping should point to the possibility of hip abductor ruptures. The most useful examination technique for diagnosis is MRI.

  6. Hip muscle strength is decreased in middle-aged recreational male athletes with midportion Achilles tendinopathy: A cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Habets, B; Smits, H W; Backx, F J G; van Cingel, R E H; Huisstede, B M A

    2017-05-01

    Investigating differences in hip muscle strength between athletes with Achilles tendinopathy (AT) and asymptomatic controls. Cross-sectional case-control study. Sports medical center. Twelve recreational male athletes with mid-portion AT and twelve matched asymptomatic controls. Isometric strength of the hip abductors, external rotators, and extensors was measured using a handheld dynamometer. Functional hip muscle performance was evaluated with the single-leg squat. The Victorian Institute of Sport Assessment-Achilles (VISA-A) questionnaire was completed to determine clinical severity of symptoms. Compared to controls, participants with AT demonstrated 28.9% less isometric hip abduction strength (p = 0.012), 34.2% less hip external rotation strength (p = 0.010), and 28.3% less hip extension strength (p = 0.034) in the injured limb. Similar differences were found for the non-injured limb (26.7-41.8%; p < 0.03). No significant differences were found in functional hip muscle performance between the injured and non-injured limb or between the groups, and no significant correlation was found between hip muscle strength and VISA-A scores. Recreational male athletes with chronic mid-portion AT demonstrated bilateral weakness of hip abductors, external rotators, and extensors compared to their asymptomatic counterparts. These findings suggest that hip muscle strength may be important in the assessment and rehabilitation of those with AT. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The effects of muscle weakness on degenerative spondylolisthesis: A finite element study.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Rui; Niu, Wen-Xin; Zeng, Zhi-Li; Tong, Jian-Hua; Zhen, Zhi-Wei; Zhou, Shuang; Yu, Yan; Cheng, Li-Ming

    2017-01-01

    Whether muscle weakness is a cause, or result, of degenerative spondylolisthesis is not currently well understood. Little biomechanical evidence is available to offer an explanation for the mechanism behind exercise therapy. Therefore, the aim of this study is to investigate the effects of back muscle weakness on degenerative spondylolisthesis and to tease out the biomechanical mechanism of exercise therapy. A nonlinear 3-D finite element model of L3-L5 was constructed. Forces representing global back muscles and global abdominal muscles, follower loads and an upper body weight were applied. The force of the global back muscles was reduced to 75%, 50% and 25% to simulate different degrees of back muscle weakness. An additional boundary condition which represented the loads from other muscles after exercise therapy was set up to keep the spine in a neutral standing position. Shear forces, intradiscal pressure, facet joint forces and von Mises equivalent stresses in the annuli were calculated. The intervertebral rotations of L3-L4 and L4-L5 were within the range of in vitro experimental data. The calculated intradiscal pressure of L4-L5 for standing was 0.57MPa, which is similar to previous in vivo data. With the back muscles were reduced to 75%, 50% and 25% force, the shear force moved increasingly in a ventral direction. Due to the additional stabilizing force and moment provided by boundary conditions, the shear force varied less than 15%. Reducing the force of global back muscles might lead to, or aggravate, degenerative spondylolisthesis with forward slipping from biomechanical point of view. Exercise therapy may improve the spinal biomechanical environment. However, the intrinsic correlation between back muscle weakness and degenerative spondylolisthesis needs more clinical in vivo study and biomechanical analysis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Practical Recommendations for Diagnosis and Management of Respiratory Muscle Weakness in Late-Onset Pompe Disease

    PubMed Central

    Boentert, Matthias; Prigent, Hélène; Várdi, Katalin; Jones, Harrison N.; Mellies, Uwe; Simonds, Anita K.; Wenninger, Stephan; Barrot Cortés, Emilia; Confalonieri, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Pompe disease is an autosomal-recessive lysosomal storage disorder characterized by progressive myopathy with proximal muscle weakness, respiratory muscle dysfunction, and cardiomyopathy (in infants only). In patients with juvenile or adult disease onset, respiratory muscle weakness may decline more rapidly than overall neurological disability. Sleep-disordered breathing, daytime hypercapnia, and the need for nocturnal ventilation eventually evolve in most patients. Additionally, respiratory muscle weakness leads to decreased cough and impaired airway clearance, increasing the risk of acute respiratory illness. Progressive respiratory muscle weakness is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in late-onset Pompe disease even if enzyme replacement therapy has been established. Practical knowledge of how to detect, monitor and manage respiratory muscle involvement is crucial for optimal patient care. A multidisciplinary approach combining the expertise of neurologists, pulmonologists, and intensive care specialists is needed. Based on the authors’ own experience in over 200 patients, this article conveys expert recommendations for the diagnosis and management of respiratory muscle weakness and its sequelae in late-onset Pompe disease. PMID:27763517

  9. Relationship between muscle mass and physical performance: is it the same in older adults with weak muscle strength?

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyoung-Eun; Jang, Soong-Nang; Lim, Soo; Park, Young Joo; Paik, Nam-Jong; Kim, Ki Woong; Jang, Hak Chul; Lim, Jae-Young

    2012-11-01

    the relationship between muscle mass and physical performance has not been consistent among studies. to clarify the relationship between muscle mass and physical performance in older adults with weak muscle strength. cross-sectional analysis using the baseline data of 542 older men and women from the Korean Longitudinal Study on Health and Aging. dual X-ray absorptiometry, isokinetic dynamometer and the Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB) were performed. Two muscle mass parameters, appendicular skeletal mass divided by weight (ASM/Wt) and by height squared (ASM/Ht(2)), were measured. We divided the participants into a lower-quartile (L25) group and an upper-three-quartiles (H75) group based on the knee-extensor peak torque. Correlation analysis and logistic regression models were used to assess the association between muscle mass and low physical performance, defined as SPPB scores <9, after controlling for confounders. in the L25 group, no correlation between mass and SPPB was detected, whereas the correlation between peak torque and SPPB was significant and higher than that in the H75 group. Results from the logistic models also showed no association between muscle mass and SPPB in the L25 group, whereas muscle mass was associated with SPPB in the H75 group. muscle mass was not associated with physical performance in weak older adults. Measures of muscle strength may be of greater clinical importance in weak older adults than is muscle mass per se.

  10. Effects of respiratory muscle training (RMT) in children with infantile-onset Pompe disease and respiratory muscle weakness.

    PubMed

    Jones, Harrison N; Crisp, Kelly D; Moss, Tronda; Strollo, Katherine; Robey, Randy; Sank, Jeffrey; Canfield, Michelle; Case, Laura E; Mahler, Leslie; Kravitz, Richard M; Kishnani, Priya S

    2014-01-01

    Respiratory muscle weakness is a primary therapeutic challenge for patients with infantile Pompe disease. We previously described the clinical implementation of a respiratory muscle training (RMT) regimen in two adults with late-onset Pompe disease; both demonstrated marked increases in inspiratory and expiratory muscle strength in response to RMT. However, the use of RMT in pediatric survivors of infantile Pompe disease has not been previously reported. We report the effects of an intensive RMT program on maximum inspiratory pressure (MIP) and maximum expiratory pressure (MEP) using A-B-A (baseline-treatment-posttest) single subject experimental design in two pediatric survivors of infantile Pompe disease. Both subjects had persistent respiratory muscle weakness despite long-term treatment with alglucosidase alfa. Subject 1 demonstrated negligible to modest increases in MIP/MEP (6% increase in MIP, d=0.25; 19% increase in MEP, d=0.87), while Subject 2 demonstrated very large increases in MIP/MEP (45% increase in MIP, d=2.38; 81% increase in MEP, d=4.31). Following three-month RMT withdrawal, both subjects maintained these strength increases and demonstrated maximal MIP and MEP values at follow-up. Intensive RMT may be a beneficial treatment for respiratory muscle weakness in pediatric survivors of infantile Pompe disease.

  11. Prevalence of clinically relevant muscle weakness and its association with vitamin D status among older adults in Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Orces, Carlos H

    2017-10-01

    Muscle weakness and 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) deficiency have been associated with adverse outcomes among older adults. However, little is known about the relationship between clinically relevant muscle weakness and 25(OH)D levels in Ecuador. To examine the prevalence of muscle weakness and its association with 25(OH)D status among subjects aged 60 years and older in Ecuador. The present study was based on data from 2205 participants in the first National Survey of Health, Wellbeing, and Aging. The Foundation for the National Institute of Health Sarcopenia Project criteria was used to examine muscle weakness prevalence rates. Gender-specific general linear and logistic regression models adjusted for potential confounders were created to compare mean 25(OH)D concentrations and 25(OH)D deficiency across muscle strength categories, respectively. An estimated 32.2% of women and 33.4% of men had evidence of clinically relevant muscle weakness in Ecuador. In general, increased muscle weakness prevalence rates were present among Indigenous, residents in the rural Andes Mountains, underweight subjects, and those with a sedentary lifestyle. Muscle strength was significantly and directly correlated with mean 25(OH)D levels. After controlling for potential confounders, 25(OH)D deficiency prevalence rates were 31 and 43% higher among men and women with muscle weakness than those with normal strength, respectively. One-third of older adults nationwide had evidence of muscle weakness. While the present study found a significant correlation between muscle strength and 25(OH)D concentrations, further research is needed to examine whether optimizing 25(OH)D levels may improve muscle weakness among older adults.

  12. Muscle strength, gait, and balance in 20 patients with hip osteoarthritis followed for 2 years after THA

    PubMed Central

    Dalén, Nils; Berg, Hans E

    2010-01-01

    Background Patients with hip osteoarthritis (OA) have muscular weakness, impaired balance, and limp. Deficits in the different limb muscles and their recovery courses are largely unknown, however. We hypothesized that there is persisting muscular weakness in lower limb muscles and an impaired balance and gait 2 years after THA. Patients and methods 20 elderly patients with unilateral OA were assessed before, and 6 and 24 months after surgery for maximal voluntary isometric strength of hip and knee muscles and by gait analysis, postural stability, and clinical scores (HHS, SF-36, EuroQoL). Results Hip muscles showed a remaining 6% weakness compared to the contralateral healthy limb 2 years after THA. Preoperatively and 6 months postoperatively, that deficit was 18% and 12%, respectively. Knee extensors fully recovered a preoperative 27% deficit after 2 years. Gait analysis demonstrated a shorter single stance phase for the OA limb compared to healthy limb preoperatively, that had already recovered at the 6-month follow-up. Balance of two-foot standing showed improvement in both sagittal and lateral sway after operation. All clinical scores improved. Interpretation Muscle strength data demonstrated a slow but full recovery of muscles acting about the knee, but there was still a deficit in hip muscle strength 2 years after THA. Gait and balance recovered after the operation. To accelerate improvement in muscular strength after THA, postoperative training should probably be more intense and target hip abductors. PMID:20367414

  13. Hip abductor function and lower extremity landing kinematics: sex differences.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Cale A; Uhl, Timothy L; Mattacola, Carl G; Shapiro, Robert; Rayens, William S

    2007-01-01

    Rapid deceleration during sporting activities, such as landing from a jump, has been identified as a common mechanism of acute knee injury. Research into the role of potential sex differences in hip abductor function with lower extremity kinematics when landing from a jump is limited. To evaluate sex differences in hip abductor function in relation to lower extremity landing kinematics. 2 x 2 mixed-model factorial design using a between-subjects factor (sex) and a repeated factor (test). University laboratory. A sample of convenience consisting of 30 healthy adults (15 women, 15 men) with no history of lower extremity surgery and no lower extremity injuries within 6 months of testing. Landing kinematics were assessed as subjects performed 3 pre-exercise landing trials that required them to hop from 2 legs and land on a single leg. Isometric peak torque (PT) of the hip abductors was measured, followed by an endurance test during which subjects maintained 50% of their PT to the limits of endurance. After a 15-minute rest period, subjects completed a 30-second bout of isometric hip abduction, from which we calculated the percentage of endurance capacity (%E). Immediately after exercise, subjects completed 3 postexercise landing trials. PT, %E, and peak joint displacement (PJD) of the hip and knee in all 3 planes of motion. Women demonstrated lower PT values (5.8 +/- 1.2% normalized to body weight and height) than did their male counterparts (7.2 +/- 1.5% normalized to body weight and height, P = .009). However, no sex differences were seen in %E. Women also demonstrated larger knee valgus PJD (7.26 degrees +/- 6.61 degrees) than did men (3.29 degrees +/- 3.54 degrees, P = .04). Women's PT was moderately correlated with hip flexion, adduction, and knee valgus PJD; however, PT did not significantly correlate with men's landing kinematics. Regardless of sex, hip flexion (P = .002) and hip adduction (P = .001) were significantly increased following the 30-second bout of

  14. Simulating the effect of muscle weakness and contracture on neuromuscular control of normal gait in children.

    PubMed

    Fox, Aaron S; Carty, Christopher P; Modenese, Luca; Barber, Lee A; Lichtwark, Glen A

    2018-03-01

    Altered neural control of movement and musculoskeletal deficiencies are common in children with spastic cerebral palsy (SCP), with muscle weakness and contracture commonly experienced. Both neural and musculoskeletal deficiencies are likely to contribute to abnormal gait, such as equinus gait (toe-walking), in children with SCP. However, it is not known whether the musculoskeletal deficiencies prevent normal gait or if neural control could be altered to achieve normal gait. This study examined the effect of simulated muscle weakness and contracture of the major plantarflexor/dorsiflexor muscles on the neuromuscular requirements for achieving normal walking gait in children. Initial muscle-driven simulations of walking with normal musculoskeletal properties by typically developing children were undertaken. Additional simulations with altered musculoskeletal properties were then undertaken; with muscle weakness and contracture simulated by reducing the maximum isometric force and tendon slack length, respectively, of selected muscles. Muscle activations and forces required across all simulations were then compared via waveform analysis. Maintenance of normal gait appeared robust to muscle weakness in isolation, with increased activation of weakened muscles the major compensatory strategy. With muscle contracture, reduced activation of the plantarflexors was required across the mid-portion of stance suggesting a greater contribution from passive forces. Increased activation and force during swing was also required from the tibialis anterior to counteract the increased passive forces from the simulated dorsiflexor muscle contracture. Improvements in plantarflexor and dorsiflexor motor function and muscle strength, concomitant with reductions in plantarflexor muscle stiffness may target the deficits associated with SCP that limit normal gait. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. The Effect of Paired Muscle Stimulation on Preparation for Movement.

    PubMed

    Brownjohn, Philip W; Blakemore, Rebekah L; Fox, Jonathan A; Shemmell, Jonathan

    2018-06-07

    Paired muscle stimulation is used clinically to facilitate the performance of motor tasks for individuals with motor dysfunction. However, the optimal temporal relationship between stimuli for enhancing movement remains unknown. We hypothesized that synchronous, muscle stimulation would increase the extent to which stimulated muscles are concurrently prepared for movement. We validated a measure of muscle-specific changes in corticomotor excitability prior to movement. We used this measure to examine the preparation of the first dorsal interosseous (FDI), abductor digiti minimi (ADM), abductor pollicis brevis (APB) muscles prior to voluntary muscle contractions before and after paired muscle stimulation at four interstimulus intervals (0, 5, 10, and 75 ms). Paired muscle stimulation increased premovement excitability in the stimulated FDI, but not in the ADM muscle. Interstimulus interval was not a significant factor in determining efficacy of the protocol. Paired stimulation, therefore, did not result in a functional association being formed between the stimulated muscles. Somatosensory potentials evoked by the muscle stimuli were small compared to those commonly elicited by stimulation of peripheral nerves, suggesting that the lack of functional association formation between muscles may be due to the small magnitude of afferent volleys from the stimulated muscles, particularly the ADM, reaching the cortex.

  16. Proximal muscle weakness as a result of osteomalacia associated with celiac disease: a case report.

    PubMed

    Oz, B; Akan, O; Kocyigit, H; Gürgan, H A

    2016-02-01

    A 24-year-old woman suffering from back and hip pain with difficulty in walking was reported. She had proximal muscle weakness. Laboratory findings led to the diagnosis of osteomalacia. Positivity of antibodies strengthened suspicion of celiac disease. In patients with proximal muscle weakness, osteomalacia should be considered in differential diagnosis even in a young woman. A 24-year-old woman suffering from back pain, bilateral hip pain, and difficulty in walking was reported. Her symptoms had started in the first trimester of pregnancy. In her physical examination, proximal muscle weakness and waddling gait pattern were determined. Her lumbar spine and hip MRI revealed no obvious pathological findings. Electromyography showed a myophatic pattern. Physical examination, normal values of creatine kinase, and muscle biopsy were supplied to exclude the diagnosis of primer muscle diseases. Laboratory findings led to the diagnosis of osteomalacia with normal renal function. Gastrointestinal symptoms and positivity of anti-gliadin and anti-endomysium antibodies strengthened the suspicion of celiac disease as a cause of the osteomalacia. The diagnosis of celiac disease was confirmed with duodenal mucosal biopsy. In patients with proximal muscle weakness and waddling gait pattern, osteomalacia should be considered in differential diagnosis even in a young woman and underlying disease should be investigated.

  17. The spectrum of muscle histopathologic findings in 42 weak scleroderma patients

    PubMed Central

    Paik, Julie J.; Wigley, Fredrick M.; Lloyd, Thomas E.; Corse, Andrea M.; Casciola-Rosen, Livia; Shah, Ami A.; Boin, Francesco; Hummers, Laura K.; Mammen, Andrew L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine if distinct muscle pathological features exist in scleroderma subjects with weakness. Methods This retrospective study included weak scleroderma subjects with muscle biopsies available for review. Biopsies were systematically assessed for individual pathologic features including inflammation, necrosis, fibrosis, and acute neurogenic atrophy. Based on the aggregate individual features, biopsies were assigned a histopathologic category of polymyositis, dermatomyositis, necrotizing myopathy, non-specific myositis, “acute denervation”, “fibrosis only”, or “other”. Clinical data analyzed included autoantibody profiles, scleroderma subtype and disease duration, Medsger muscle severity scores, creatine kinase (CK), electromyography (EMG), and muscle magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Results 42 subjects (79% female and 64% diffuse scleroderma) were included in this study. Necrosis (67%), inflammation (48%), acute neurogenic atrophy (48%), and fibrosis (33%) were the most prevalent pathologic features. The presence of fibrosis was strongly associated with anti-PM-Scl antibodies. Histopathologic categories included non-specific myositis (36%), necrotizing myopathy (21%), dermatomyositis (7%), “acute denervation” (7%), “fibrosis only” (7%), and polymyositis (5%). Disease duration of scleroderma at the time of muscle biopsy was shorter in polymyositis than other histopathologic categories. Patients with anti-PM-Scl and Scl-70 antibodies also had a shorter disease duration than those with other auto-antibody profiles. Conclusion Non-specific myositis and necrotizing myopathy were the most common histopathologic categories in weak scleroderma subjects. Surprisingly, nearly half of the subjects studied had histological evidence of acute motor denervation (acute neurogenic atrophy); this has not been previously reported. Taken together, these observations suggest that a variety of pathologic mechanisms may underlie the development of

  18. Progressive Muscle Atrophy and Weakness After Treatment by Mantle Field Radiotherapy in Hodgkin Lymphoma Survivors

    SciTech Connect

    Leeuwen-Segarceanu, Elena M. van, E-mail: e.segarceanu@antoniusziekenhuis.nl; Dorresteijn, Lucille D.A.; Pillen, Sigrid

    Purpose: To describe the damage to the muscles and propose a pathophysiologic mechanism for muscle atrophy and weakness after mantle field radiotherapy in Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) survivors. Methods and Materials: We examined 12 patients treated by mantle field radiotherapy between 1969 and 1998. Besides evaluation of their symptoms, the following tests were performed: dynamometry; ultrasound of the sternocleidomastoid, biceps, and antebrachial flexor muscles; and needle electromyography of the neck, deltoid, and ultrasonographically affected arm muscles. Results: Ten patients (83%) experienced neck complaints, mostly pain and muscle weakness. On clinical examination, neck flexors were more often affected than neck extensors. Onmore » ultrasound, the sternocleidomastoid was severely atrophic in 8 patients, but abnormal echo intensity was seen in only 3 patients. Electromyography of the neck muscles showed mostly myogenic changes, whereas the deltoid, biceps, and antebrachial flexor muscles seemed to have mostly neurogenic damage. Conclusions: Many patients previously treated by mantle field radiotherapy develop severe atrophy and weakness of the neck muscles. Neck muscles within the radiation field show mostly myogenic damage, and muscles outside the mantle field show mostly neurogenic damage. The discrepancy between echo intensity and atrophy suggests that muscle damage is most likely caused by an extrinsic factor such as progressive microvascular fibrosis. This is also presumed to cause damage to nerves within the radiated field, resulting in neurogenic damage of the deltoid and arm muscles.« less

  19. Inherited and Acquired Muscle Weakness: A Moving Target for Diagnostic Muscle Biopsy.

    PubMed

    Stenzel, Werner; Schoser, Benedikt

    2017-08-01

    Inherited and acquired muscular weakness is caused by multiple conditions. While the inherited ones are mostly caused by mutations in genes coding for myopathic or neurogenic diseases, the acquired ones occur due to inflammatory, endocrine, or toxic etiologies. Precise diagnosis of a specific disease may be challenging and may require a multidisciplinary approach. What is the current place for a diagnostic biopsy of skeletal muscle? Diagnostic muscle biopsy lost in this context its first-tier place in the primary diagnostic workup for some diseases, but it is still mandatory for others. We here summarize conditions in which we believe a diagnostic sample is most relevant and mention those in which a biopsy may be secondary or can even be left out. We would like to stress that muscle biopsy nowadays has a new important place in description and definition of new diseases, for example, discovered by modern genetic approaches. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart, New York.

  20. Muscle weakness in a girl with autoimmune hepatitis and Graves' disease.

    PubMed

    Sarkhy, Ahmed; Persad, Rabindranath; Tarnopolsky, Mark

    2009-02-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is a chronic hepatic autoimmune disease of unknown etiology associated with inflammatory changes and autoantibodies. The combination of AIH, Grave's disease, and myasthenia gravis (MG) is rare, with only one other case reported. We report a pediatric patient with AIH type 2 and Grave's disease who developed MG whilst on a treatment with corticosteroids. A 13-year-old girl, diagnosed with thyrotoxicosis, was identified as having AIH type 2. During the course of her therapy, she developed muscle weakness. Investigations revealed increased anti-acetylcholine receptor (AChR) antibodies and her electromyography (EMG) was characteristic for MG. Her course is described here. This case highlights the importance of investigating muscle weakness in severely ill hospitalized patients.

  1. Comparison of foot muscle morphology and foot kinematics between recreational runners with normal feet and with asymptomatic over-pronated feet.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xianyi; Aeles, Jeroen; Vanwanseele, Benedicte

    2017-05-01

    Over-pronated feet are common in adults and are associated with lower limb injuries. Studying the foot muscle morphology and foot kinematic patterns is important for understanding the mechanism of over-pronation related injuries. The aim of this study is to compare the foot muscle morphology and foot inter-segmental kinematics between recreational runners with normal feet and those with asymptomatic over-pronated feet. A total of 26 recreational runners (17 had normal feet and 9 had over-pronated feet) participated in this study and their foot type was assessed using the 6-item Foot Posture Index. Selected foot muscles were scanned using an ultrasound device and the scanned images were processed to measure the thickness and cross-sectional area of the muscles. Muscles of interest include abductor hallucis, abductor digiti minimi, flexor digitorum brevis and longus, tibialis anterior and peroneus muscles. Foot kinematic data during walking was collected using a 3D motion capture system incorporating the Oxford Foot Model. The results show that individuals with over-pronated feet have larger size of abductor hallucis, flexor digitorum brevis and longus and smaller abductor digiti minimi than controls. Higher rearfoot peak eversion and forefoot peak supination during walking were observed in individuals with over-pronated feet. However, during gait the forefoot peak abduction was comparable. These findings indicate that in active asymptomatic individuals with over-pronated feet, the foot muscle morphology is adapted to increase control of the foot motion. The morphological characteristics of the foot muscles in asymptomatic individuals with over-pronated feet may affect their foot kinematics and benefit prevention from injuries. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Quantitative Muscle Ultrasonography in Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyewon; Jee, Sungju; Park, Soo Ho; Ahn, Seung-Chan; Im, Juneho; Sohn, Min Kyun

    2016-12-01

    To assess the reliability of quantitative muscle ultrasonography (US) in healthy subjects and to evaluate the correlation between quantitative muscle US findings and electrodiagnostic study results in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). The clinical significance of quantitative muscle US in CTS was also assessed. Twenty patients with CTS and 20 age-matched healthy volunteers were recruited. All control and CTS subjects underwent a bilateral median and ulnar nerve conduction study (NCS) and quantitative muscle US. Transverse US images of the abductor pollicis brevis (APB) and abductor digiti minimi (ADM) were obtained to measure muscle cross-sectional area (CSA), thickness, and echo intensity (EI). EI was determined using computer-assisted, grayscale analysis. Inter-rater and intra-rater reliability for quantitative muscle US in control subjects, and differences in muscle thickness, CSA, and EI between the CTS patient and control groups were analyzed. Relationships between quantitative US parameters and electrodiagnostic study results were evaluated. Quantitative muscle US had high inter-rater and intra-rater reliability in the control group. Muscle thickness and CSA were significantly decreased, and EI was significantly increased in the APB of the CTS group (all p<0.05). EI demonstrated a significant positive correlation with latency of the median motor and sensory NCS in CTS patients (p<0.05). These findings suggest that quantitative muscle US parameters may be useful for detecting muscle changes in CTS. Further study involving patients with other neuromuscular diseases is needed to evaluate peripheral muscle change using quantitative muscle US.

  3. Non-neural Muscle Weakness Has Limited Influence on Complexity of Motor Control during Gait

    PubMed Central

    Goudriaan, Marije; Shuman, Benjamin R.; Steele, Katherine M.; Van den Hauwe, Marleen; Goemans, Nathalie; Molenaers, Guy; Desloovere, Kaat

    2018-01-01

    Cerebral palsy (CP) and Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) are neuromuscular disorders characterized by muscle weakness. Weakness in CP has neural and non-neural components, whereas in DMD, weakness can be considered as a predominantly non-neural problem. Despite the different underlying causes, weakness is a constraint for the central nervous system when controlling gait. CP demonstrates decreased complexity of motor control during gait from muscle synergy analysis, which is reflected by a higher total variance accounted for by one synergy (tVAF1). However, it remains unclear if weakness directly contributes to higher tVAF1 in CP, or whether altered tVAF1 reflects mainly neural impairments. If muscle weakness directly contributes to higher tVAF1, then tVAF1 should also be increased in DMD. To examine the etiology of increased tVAF1, muscle activity data of gluteus medius, rectus femoris, medial hamstrings, medial gastrocnemius, and tibialis anterior were measured at self-selected walking speed, and strength data from knee extensors, knee flexors, dorsiflexors and plantar flexors, were analyzed in 15 children with CP [median (IQR) age: 8.9 (2.2)], 15 boys with DMD [8.7 (3.1)], and 15 typical developing (TD) children [8.6 (2.7)]. We computed tVAF1 from 10 concatenated steps with non-negative matrix factorization, and compared tVAF1 between the three groups with a Mann-Whiney U-test. Spearman's rank correlation coefficients were used to determine if weakness in specific muscle groups contributed to altered tVAF1. No significant differences in tVAF1 were found between DMD [tVAF1: 0.60 (0.07)] and TD children [0.65 (0.07)], while tVAF1 was significantly higher in CP [(0.74 (0.09)] than in the other groups (both p < 0.005). In CP, weakness in the plantar flexors was related to higher tVAF1 (r = −0.72). In DMD, knee extensor weakness related to increased tVAF1 (r = −0.50). These results suggest that the non-neural weakness in DMD had limited influence on complexity of

  4. The influence of hip abductor muscle performance on dynamic postural stability in females with patellofemoral pain.

    PubMed

    Lee, Szu-Ping; Souza, Richard B; Powers, Christopher M

    2012-07-01

    Hip abductors play an important role in maintaining trunk and pelvis stability during unipedal tasks. The purpose of the study was to compare postural stability between individuals with patellofemoral pain (PFP) and pain-free controls. A secondary purpose was to evaluate the effect of a hip stabilizing brace on postural stability. Twenty females with PFP (27.3±6.3 years) and 19 controls (26.1±4.5 years) participated. Each subject performed a unipedal step-down balance task with the stance leg on a force platform from which center of pressure (COP) excursion was recorded. Quantitative COP excursion patterns (mean and peak displacements) were used as measures of postural stability. For subjects with PFP, postural stability also was quantified following the application of a hip stabilizing brace. Hip abductor strength was significantly lower in PFP group compared to the control group (1.39±0.4 vs. 1.62±0.26 N/kg-BW, p=0.046). Peak and mean medial-lateral COP displacements during the balance task were greater in the PFP group (39.8±6.7 vs. 24.3±3.8 mm, p<0.001; 24.7±16.3 vs. 13.5±4.4 mm, p=0.005). Application of the hip stabilizing brace reduced the peak and mean COP displacement (39.8±6.7 vs. 24.7±4.7 mm, p<0.001; 24.7±16.3 vs. 16.8±15.1 mm, p=0.02). Our results demonstrate that females with PFP exhibit impaired medial-lateral postural stability when compared to control subjects. Application of a hip stabilizing brace significantly improved stability to a level comparable to the controls. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Influence of Hip Abductor Strength on Functional Outcomes Before and After Total Knee Arthroplasty: Post Hoc Analysis of a Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Loyd, Brian J; Jennings, Jason M; Judd, Dana L; Kim, Raymond H; Wolfe, Pamela; Dennis, Douglas A; Stevens-Lapsley, Jennifer E

    2017-09-01

    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is associated with declines in hip abductor (HA) muscle strength; however, a longitudinal analysis demonstrating the influence of TKA on trajectories of HA strength change has not been conducted. The purpose of this study was to quantify changes in HA strength from pre-TKA through 3 months post-TKA and to characterize the relationship between HA strength changes and physical performance. This study is a post hoc analysis of a randomized controlled trial. Data from 162 participants (89 women, mean age = 63 y) were used for analysis. Data were collected by masked assessors preoperatively and at 1 and 3 months following surgery. Outcomes included: Timed "Up and Go" test (TUG), Stair Climbing Test (SCT), Six-Minute Walk Test (6MWT), and walking speed. Paired t tests were used for between- and within-limb comparisons of HA strength. Multivariable regression was used to determine contributions of independent variables, HA and knee extensor strength, to the dependent variables of TUG, SCT, 6MWT, and walking speed at each time point. Hip abductor strength was significantly lower in the surgical limb pre-TKA (mean = 0.015; 95% CI = 0.010-0.020), 1 month post-TKA (0.028; 0.023-0.034), and 3 months post-TKA (0.02; 0.014-0.025) compared with the nonsurgical limb. Hip abductor strength declined from pre-TKA to 1 month post-TKA (18%), but not at the 3-month time point (0%). Hip abductor strength independently contributed to performance-based outcomes pre-TKA; however, this contribution was not observed post-TKA. The post hoc analysis prevents examining all outcomes likely to be influenced by HA strength. Surgical limb HA strength is impaired prior to TKA, and worsens following surgery. Furthermore, HA strength contributes to performance-based outcomes, supporting the hypothesis that HA strength influences functional recovery. © 2017 American Physical Therapy Association

  6. The Influence of Muscle Weakness on the Association Between Obesity and Inpatient Recovery From Total Hip Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Oosting, Ellen; Hoogeboom, Thomas J; Dronkers, Jaap J; Visser, Marlieke; Akkermans, Reinier P; van Meeteren, Nico L U

    2017-06-01

    There is ongoing discussion about whether preoperative obesity is negatively associated with inpatient outcomes of total hip arthroplasty (THA). The aim was to investigate the interaction between obesity and muscle strength and the association with postoperative inpatient recovery after THA. Preoperative obesity (body mass index [BMI] >30 kg/m 2 ) and muscle weakness (hand grip strength <20 kg for woman and <30 kg for men) were measured about 6 weeks before THA. Patients with a BMI <18.5 kg/m 2 were excluded. Outcomes were delayed inpatient recovery of activities (>2 days to reach independence of walking) and prolonged length of hospital stay (LOS, >4 days and/or discharge to extended rehabilitation). Univariate and multivariable regression analyses with the independent variables muscle weakness and obesity, and the interaction between obesity and muscle weakness, were performed and corrected for possible confounders. Two hundred and ninety-seven patients were included, 54 (18%) of whom were obese and 21 (7%) who also had muscle weakness. Obesity was not significantly associated with prolonged LOS (odds ratio [OR] 1.36, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.75-2.47) or prolonged recovery of activities (OR 1.77, 95% CI 0.98-3.22), but the combination of obesity and weakness was significantly associated with prolonged LOS (OR 3.59, 95% CI 1.09-11.89) and prolonged recovery of activities (OR 6.21, 95% CI 1.64-23.65). Obesity is associated with inpatient recovery after THA only in patients with muscle weakness. The results of this study suggest that we should measure muscle strength in addition to BMI (or body composition) to identify patients at risk of prolonged LOS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Hip Abductor Strengthening Improves Physical Function Following Total Knee Replacement: One-Year Follow-Up of a Randomized Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Harikesavan, Karvannan; Chakravarty, Raj D; Maiya, Arun G; Hegde, Sanjay P; Y Shivanna, Shivakumar

    2017-01-01

    Total knee replacement (TKR) is the commonest surgical procedure for patients with severe pain and impaired physical function following end stage knee osteoarthritis. The hip abductors are well renowned in stabilization of the trunk and hip during walking, maintaining the lower limb position, and transferring the forces from the lower limbs to the pelvis. To assess the efficacy of hip abductor strengthening exercise on functional outcome using performance based outcome measures following total knee replacement. An observer blinded randomized pilot trial design was conducted at Manipal hospital, Bangalore, India. Participants designated for elective TKR were randomized to experimental group hip abductor strengthening along with standard rehabilitation (n=10) or control group standard rehabilitation alone (n=10). Participants followed for one year to assess physical function using performance based outcomes, such as timed up and go test, single leg stance test, six minute walk test, knee extensor strength and hip abductor strength. Eighteen participants with a mean age of 63.1 ± 5.5 years (8 Males and 10 Females) completed the study. Improvement in hip abduction strength, single leg stand test was superior in hip abductor strengthening group at 3 months and 1 year when compared to standard rehabilitation alone. Hip abductor strengthening showed superior improvements in single leg stance test and six minute walk test. Hip abductor strengthening exercises has the potential to improve physical function following total knee replacement.

  8. Changes in hip abductor moment 3 or more years after femoral derotation osteotomy among individuals with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Boyer, Elizabeth R; Novacheck, Tom F; Schwartz, Michael H

    2017-09-01

    To examine the effect of femoral derotation osteotomy (FDO) on dimensionless hip abductor moment during gait in children with cerebral palsy. We retrospectively analyzed data from independent ambulators within our database. Postoperative visits 1 year (short-term) and at least 3 years (mid-term) were analyzed. We estimated the coronal plane hip abductor moment arm based on musculoskeletal modeling that accounted for anteversion and hip rotation. There were 140 individuals with a short-term analysis (77 males, 63 females; age at surgery 9y 11mo [range 4y 5mo-17y 5mo]) and 29 with mid-term analysis (15 males, 14 females; age at surgery 8y 7mo [range 4y 5mo-13y 1mo]). At short-term, anteversion and internal hip rotation decreased 35° and 13° respectively, which increased median (IQR) moment arms from 20 (23) per cent below normal to 2 (12) per cent above normal. Dimensionless mean hip abductor moment remained unchanged at short-term. Mid-term anteversion did not change but hip rotation increased 8° and hip abductor moment increased to 0.040 (0.029). There was no change in pelvic and trunk obliquity, although hip abductor strength increased and walking velocity decreased at mid-term. The unexpected lack of improvement in hip abductor moment from pre- to short-term may be caused by gait compensations that unload the hip. The increase in hip abductor moment beyond 3 years postoperatively underscores the benefits of an FDO into adolescence for independent ambulating individuals with cerebral palsy. © 2017 Mac Keith Press.

  9. Acute antibody-directed myostatin inhibition attenuates disuse muscle atrophy and weakness in mice.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Kate T; Cobani, Vera; Ryall, James G; Ibebunjo, Chikwendu; Lynch, Gordon S

    2011-04-01

    Counteracting the atrophy of skeletal muscle associated with disuse has significant implications for minimizing the wasting and weakness in plaster casting, joint immobilization, and other forms of limb unloading, with relevance to orthopedics, sports medicine, and plastic and reconstructive surgery. We tested the hypothesis that antibody-directed myostatin inhibition would attenuate the loss of muscle mass and functional capacity in mice during 14 or 21 days of unilateral hindlimb casting. Twelve-week-old C57BL/10 mice were subjected to unilateral hindlimb plaster casting or served as controls. Mice received subcutaneous injections of saline or a mouse chimera of anti-human myostatin antibody (PF-354, 10 mg/kg; n = 6-9) on days 0 and 7 and were tested for muscle function on day 14, or were treated on days 0, 7, and 14 and tested for muscle function on day 21. Hindlimb casting reduced muscle mass, fiber size, and function of isolated soleus and extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles (P < 0.05). PF-354 attenuated the loss of muscle mass, fiber size, and function with greater effects after 14 days than after 21 days of casting, when wasting and weakness had plateaued (P < 0.05). Antibody-directed myostatin inhibition therefore attenuated the atrophy and loss of functional capacity in muscles from mice subjected to unilateral hindlimb casting with reductions in muscle size and strength being most apparent during the first 14 days of disuse. These findings highlight the therapeutic potential of antibody-directed myostatin inhibition for disuse atrophy especially within the first 2 wk of disuse.

  10. Compensatory strategies during manual wheelchair propulsion in response to weakness in individual muscle groups: A simulation study.

    PubMed

    Slowik, Jonathan S; McNitt-Gray, Jill L; Requejo, Philip S; Mulroy, Sara J; Neptune, Richard R

    2016-03-01

    The considerable physical demand placed on the upper extremity during manual wheelchair propulsion is distributed among individual muscles. The strategy used to distribute the workload is likely influenced by the relative force-generating capacities of individual muscles, and some strategies may be associated with a higher injury risk than others. The objective of this study was to use forward dynamics simulations of manual wheelchair propulsion to identify compensatory strategies that can be used to overcome weakness in individual muscle groups and identify specific strategies that may increase injury risk. Identifying these strategies can provide rationale for the design of targeted rehabilitation programs aimed at preventing the development of pain and injury in manual wheelchair users. Muscle-actuated forward dynamics simulations of manual wheelchair propulsion were analyzed to identify compensatory strategies in response to individual muscle group weakness using individual muscle mechanical power and stress as measures of upper extremity demand. The simulation analyses found the upper extremity to be robust to weakness in any single muscle group as the remaining groups were able to compensate and restore normal propulsion mechanics. The rotator cuff muscles experienced relatively high muscle stress levels and exhibited compensatory relationships with the deltoid muscles. These results underline the importance of strengthening the rotator cuff muscles and supporting muscles whose contributions do not increase the potential for impingement (i.e., the thoracohumeral depressors) and minimize the risk of upper extremity injury in manual wheelchair users. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Compensatory Strategies during Manual Wheelchair Propulsion in Response to Weakness in Individual Muscle Groups: A Simulation Study

    PubMed Central

    Slowik, Jonathan S.; McNitt-Gray, Jill L.; Requejo, Philip S.; Mulroy, Sara J.; Neptune, Richard R.

    2016-01-01

    Background The considerable physical demand placed on the upper extremity during manual wheelchair propulsion is distributed among the individual muscles. The strategy used to distribute the workload is likely influenced by the relative force-generating capacities of individual muscles, and some strategies may be associated with a higher injury risk than others. The objective of this study was to use forward dynamics simulations of manual wheelchair propulsion to identify compensatory strategies that can be used to overcome weakness in individual muscle groups and identify specific strategies that may increase injury risk. Identifying these strategies can provide rationale for the design of targeted rehabilitation programs aimed at preventing the development of pain and injury in manual wheelchair users. Methods Muscle-actuated forward dynamics simulations of manual wheelchair propulsion were analyzed to identify compensatory strategies in response to individual muscle group weakness, using individual muscle mechanical power and stress as measures of upper extremity demand. Findings The simulation analyses found the upper extremity to be robust to weakness in any single muscle group as the remaining groups were able to compensate and restore normal propulsion mechanics. The rotator cuff muscles experienced relatively high muscle stress levels and exhibited compensatory relationships with the deltoid muscles. Interpretation These results underline the importance of strengthening the rotator cuff muscles and supporting muscles whose contributions do not increase the potential for impingement (i.e., the thoracohumeral depressors) and minimize the risk of upper extremity injury in manual wheelchair users. PMID:26945719

  12. ASSOCIATION OF ISOMETRIC STRENGTH OF HIP AND KNEE MUSCLES WITH INJURY RISK IN HIGH SCHOOL CROSS COUNTRY RUNNERS.

    PubMed

    Luedke, Lace E; Heiderscheit, Bryan C; Williams, D S Blaise; Rauh, Mitchell J

    2015-11-01

    High school cross country runners have a high incidence of overuse injuries, particularly to the knee and shin. As lower extremity strength is modifiable, identification of strength attributes that contribute to anterior knee pain (AKP) and shin injuries may influence prevention and management of these injuries. To determine if a relationship existed between isometric hip abductor, knee extensor and flexor strength and the incidence of AKP and shin injury in high school cross country runners. Sixty-eight high school cross country runners (47 girls, 21 boys) participated in the study. Isometric strength tests of hip abductors, knee extensors and flexors were performed with a handheld dynamometer. Runners were prospectively followed during the 2014 interscholastic cross country season for occurrences of AKP and shin injury. Bivariate logistic regression was used to examine risk relationships between strength values and occurrence of AKP and shin injury. During the season, three (4.4%) runners experienced AKP and 13 (19.1%) runners incurred a shin injury. Runners in the tertiles indicating weakest hip abductor (chi-square = 6.140; p=0.046), knee extensor (chi-square = 6.562; p=0.038), and knee flexor (chi-square = 6.140; p=0.046) muscle strength had a significantly higher incidence of AKP. Hip and knee muscle strength was not significantly associated with shin injury. High school cross country runners with weaker hip abductor, knee extensor and flexor muscle strength had a higher incidence of AKP. Increasing hip and knee muscle strength may reduce the likelihood of AKP in high school cross country runners. 2b.

  13. The impact of permanent muscle weakness on quality of life in periodic paralysis: a survey of 66 patients.

    PubMed

    Cavel-Greant, Deborah; Lehmann-Horn, Frank; Jurkat-Rott, Karin

    2012-10-01

    The periodic paralyses are hereditary muscle diseases which cause both episodic and permanent weakness. Permanent weakness may include both reversible and fixed components, the latter caused by fibrosis and fatty replacement. To determine the degree of handicap and impact of permanent weakness on daily life, we conducted a 68-question online survey of 66 patients over 41 years (mean age, 60 ± 14 years). Permanent weakness occurred in 68%, muscle pain in 82% and muscle fatigue in 89%. Eighty-three percent of patients reported themselves as moderately to very active between ages 18-35. At the time of the survey only 14% reported themselves as moderately to very active. Contrary to the literature, only 21% of patients reported decreased frequency of episodic weakness with increased age. Sixty-seven percent had incurred injuries due to falls. Mobility aids were required by 49%. Strength increased in 49% of patients receiving professional physiotherapy and in 62% performing self-managed exercise routines. A decline of strength was observed by 40% with professional and by 16% with self-managed exercise routine, suggesting that overworking muscles may not be beneficial. There is an average of 26 years between age at onset and age at diagnosis indicating that diagnostic schemes can be improved. In summary our data suggests that permanent muscle weakness has a greater impact on the quality of life of patients than previously anticipated.

  14. Hip Abductor Strengthening Improves Physical Function Following Total Knee Replacement: One-Year Follow-Up of a Randomized Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Harikesavan, Karvannan; Chakravarty, Raj D.; Maiya, Arun G; Hegde, Sanjay P.; Y. Shivanna, Shivakumar

    2017-01-01

    Background: Total knee replacement (TKR) is the commonest surgical procedure for patients with severe pain and impaired physical function following end stage knee osteoarthritis. The hip abductors are well renowned in stabilization of the trunk and hip during walking, maintaining the lower limb position, and transferring the forces from the lower limbs to the pelvis. Objective: To assess the efficacy of hip abductor strengthening exercise on functional outcome using performance based outcome measures following total knee replacement. Methods: An observer blinded randomized pilot trial design was conducted at Manipal hospital, Bangalore, India. Participants designated for elective TKR were randomized to experimental group hip abductor strengthening along with standard rehabilitation (n=10) or control group standard rehabilitation alone (n=10). Participants followed for one year to assess physical function using performance based outcomes, such as timed up and go test, single leg stance test, six minute walk test, knee extensor strength and hip abductor strength. Result: Eighteen participants with a mean age of 63.1 ± 5.5 years (8 Males and 10 Females) completed the study. Improvement in hip abduction strength, single leg stand test was superior in hip abductor strengthening group at 3 months and 1 year when compared to standard rehabilitation alone. Conclusion: Hip abductor strengthening showed superior improvements in single leg stance test and six minute walk test. Hip abductor strengthening exercises has the potential to improve physical function following total knee replacement. PMID:28567148

  15. Plantar flexor muscle weakness and fatigue in spastic cerebral palsy patients.

    PubMed

    Neyroud, Daria; Armand, Stéphane; De Coulon, Geraldo; Sarah R Dias Da Silva; Maffiuletti, Nicola A; Kayser, Bengt; Place, Nicolas

    2017-02-01

    Patients with cerebral palsy develop an important muscle weakness which might affect the aetiology and extent of exercise-induced neuromuscular fatigue. This study evaluated the aetiology and extent of plantar flexor neuromuscular fatigue in patients with cerebral palsy. Ten patients with cerebral palsy and 10 age- and sex-matched healthy individuals (∼20 years old, 6 females) performed four 30-s maximal isometric plantar flexions interspaced by a resting period of 2-3s to elicit a resting twitch. Maximal voluntary contraction force, voluntary activation level and peak twitch were quantified before and immediately after the fatiguing task. Before fatigue, patients with cerebral palsy were weaker than healthy individuals (341±134N vs. 858±151N, p<0.05) and presented lower voluntary activation (73±19% vs. 90±9%, p<0.05) and peak twitch (100±28N vs. 199±33N, p<0.05). Maximal voluntary contraction force was not significantly reduced in patients with cerebral palsy following the fatiguing task (-10±23%, p>0.05), whereas it decreased by 30±12% (p<0.05) in healthy individuals. Plantar flexor muscles of patients with cerebral palsy were weaker than their healthy peers but showed greater fatigue resistance. Cerebral palsy is a widely defined pathology that is known to result in muscle weakness. The extent and origin of muscle weakness were the topic of several previous investigations; however some discrepant results were reported in the literature regarding how it might affect the development of exercise-induced neuromuscular fatigue. Importantly, most of the studies interested in the assessment of fatigue in patients with cerebral palsy did so with general questionnaires and reported increased levels of fatigue. Yet, exercise-induced neuromuscular fatigue was quantified in just a few studies and it was found that young patients with cerebral palsy might be more fatigue resistant that their peers. Thus, it appears that (i) conflicting results exist regarding

  16. Muscle strength and areal bone mineral density at the hip in women: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Pasco, Julie A; Holloway, Kara L; Brennan-Olsen, Sharon L; Moloney, David J; Kotowicz, Mark A

    2015-05-24

    Muscle strengthening exercises are promoted for building and maintaining a healthy skeleton. We aimed to investigate the relationship between muscle strength and areal bone mineral density (BMD) at the hip in women aged 26-97 years. This cross-sectional study utilises data from 863 women assessed for the Geelong Osteoporosis Study. Measures of hip flexor and abductor strength were made using a hand-held dynamometer (Nicholas Manual Muscle Tester). The maximal measure from three trials on each leg was used for analyses. BMD was measured at the hip using dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA; Lunar DPX-L). Total lean mass, body fat mass and appendicular lean mass were determined from whole body DXA scans. Linear regression techniques were used with muscle strength as the independent variable and BMD as the dependent variable. Models were adjusted for age and indices of body composition. Measures of age-adjusted hip flexor strength and hip abductor strength were positively associated with total hip BMD. For each standard deviation (SD) increase in hip flexor strength, the increase in mean total hip BMD (SD) was 10.4 % (p = 0.009). A similar pattern was observed for hip abductor strength, with an increase in mean total hip BMD of 22.8 % (p = 0.025). All associations between hip muscle strength and total hip BMD were independent of height, but were nullified after adjusting for appendicular lean mass or total lean mass. There was a positive association observed between muscle strength and BMD at the hip. However, this association was explained by measures of lean mass.

  17. Agrin mutations lead to a congenital myasthenic syndrome with distal muscle weakness and atrophy.

    PubMed

    Nicole, Sophie; Chaouch, Amina; Torbergsen, Torberg; Bauché, Stéphanie; de Bruyckere, Elodie; Fontenille, Marie-Joséphine; Horn, Morten A; van Ghelue, Marijke; Løseth, Sissel; Issop, Yasmin; Cox, Daniel; Müller, Juliane S; Evangelista, Teresinha; Stålberg, Erik; Ioos, Christine; Barois, Annie; Brochier, Guy; Sternberg, Damien; Fournier, Emmanuel; Hantaï, Daniel; Abicht, Angela; Dusl, Marina; Laval, Steven H; Griffin, Helen; Eymard, Bruno; Lochmüller, Hanns

    2014-09-01

    Congenital myasthenic syndromes are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of rare diseases resulting from impaired neuromuscular transmission. Their clinical hallmark is fatigable muscle weakness associated with a decremental muscle response to repetitive nerve stimulation and frequently related to postsynaptic defects. Distal myopathies form another clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of primary muscle disorders where weakness and atrophy are restricted to distal muscles, at least initially. In both congenital myasthenic syndromes and distal myopathies, a significant number of patients remain genetically undiagnosed. Here, we report five patients from three unrelated families with a strikingly homogenous clinical entity combining congenital myasthenia with distal muscle weakness and atrophy reminiscent of a distal myopathy. MRI and neurophysiological studies were compatible with mild myopathy restricted to distal limb muscles, but decrement (up to 72%) in response to 3 Hz repetitive nerve stimulation pointed towards a neuromuscular transmission defect. Post-exercise increment (up to 285%) was observed in the distal limb muscles in all cases suggesting presynaptic congenital myasthenic syndrome. Immunofluorescence and ultrastructural analyses of muscle end-plate regions showed synaptic remodelling with denervation-reinnervation events. We performed whole-exome sequencing in two kinships and Sanger sequencing in one isolated case and identified five new recessive mutations in the gene encoding agrin. This synaptic proteoglycan with critical function at the neuromuscular junction was previously found mutated in more typical forms of congenital myasthenic syndrome. In our patients, we found two missense mutations residing in the N-terminal agrin domain, which reduced acetylcholine receptors clustering activity of agrin in vitro. Our findings expand the spectrum of congenital myasthenic syndromes due to agrin mutations and show an unexpected

  18. Does the addition of hip strengthening exercises improve outcomes following total knee arthroplasty? A study protocol for a randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Schache, Margaret B; McClelland, Jodie A; Webster, Kate E

    2016-06-13

    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is effective in reducing pain and improving function for end-stage knee osteoarthritis. However, muscle weakness and functional limitations persist despite assistance from post-operative rehabilitation programs that traditionally focus on quadriceps strengthening and range of movement exercises. Hip abductor muscle weakness is evident in knee osteoarthritis and hip muscle strengthening reduces knee pain in this group. Following TKA, people with weak hip abductor strength perform more poorly on measures of physical function. However, very little is known of the effectiveness of including hip abductor strengthening exercises in post-operative rehabilitation. The aim of this trial is to compare the effects of targeted hip abductor strengthening to those of traditional care in a TKA rehabilitation program on muscle strength, patient reported outcomes and functional performance measures. This protocol describes a single-blinded randomized controlled trial, where 104 participants referred for inpatient rehabilitation following TKA will be recruited. Participants will be randomized using computer-generated numbers to one of two groups: usual care or usual care with additional hip strengthening exercises. Participants will attend physiotherapy daily during their inpatient length of stay, and will then attend between six and eight physiotherapy sessions as an outpatient. Primary outcomes are isometric hip abductor strength and the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS). Secondary outcomes are stair climb test, 6 min walk test, timed up and go, 40 m fast-paced walk test, 30 second chair stand test, isometric quadriceps strength, Lower Extremity Functional Scale (LEFS) and SF-12. Outcome measures will be recorded at baseline (admission to inpatient rehabilitation), and then 3 weeks, 6 weeks and 6 months post admission to rehabilitation. The findings of this study will determine whether the addition of targeted hip strengthening

  19. Ca2+ sensitizers: An emerging class of agents for counterbalancing weakness in skeletal muscle diseases?

    PubMed

    Ochala, Julien

    2010-02-01

    Ca(2+) ions are key regulators of skeletal muscle contraction. By binding to contractile proteins, they initiate a cascade of molecular events leading to cross-bridge formation and ultimately, muscle shortening and force production. The ability of contractile proteins to respond to Ca(2+) attachment, also known as Ca(2+) sensitivity, is often compromised in acquired and congenital skeletal muscle disorders. It constitutes, undoubtedly, a major physiological cause of weakness for patients. In this review, we discuss recent studies giving strong molecular and cellular evidence that pharmacological modulators of some of the contractile proteins, also termed Ca(2+) sensitizers, are efficient agents to improve Ca(2+) sensitivity and function in diseased skeletal muscle cells. In fact, they compensate for the impaired contractile proteins response to Ca(2+) binding. Currently, such Ca(2+) sensitizing compounds are successfully used for reducing problems in cardiac disorders. Therefore, in the future, under certain conditions, these agents may represent an emerging class of agents to enhance the quality of life of patients suffering from skeletal muscle weakness. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Pharmacological inhibition of myostatin protects against skeletal muscle atrophy and weakness after anterior cruciate ligament tear.

    PubMed

    Wurtzel, Caroline Nw; Gumucio, Jonathan P; Grekin, Jeremy A; Khouri, Roger K; Russell, Alan J; Bedi, Asheesh; Mendias, Christopher L

    2017-11-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears are among the most frequent knee injuries in sports medicine, with tear rates in the US up to 250,000 per year. Many patients who suffer from ACL tears have persistent atrophy and weakness even after considerable rehabilitation. Myostatin is a cytokine that directly induces muscle atrophy, and previous studies rodent models and patients have demonstrated an upregulation of myostatin after ACL tear. Using a preclinical rat model, our objective was to determine if the use of a bioneutralizing antibody against myostatin could prevent muscle atrophy and weakness after ACL tear. Rats underwent a surgically induced ACL tear and were treated with either a bioneutralizing antibody against myostatin (10B3, GlaxoSmithKline) or a sham antibody (E1-82.15, GlaxoSmithKline). Muscles were harvested at either 7 or 21 days after induction of a tear to measure changes in contractile function, fiber size, and genes involved in muscle atrophy and hypertrophy. These time points were selected to evaluate early and later changes in muscle structure and function. Compared to the sham antibody group, 7 days after ACL tear, myostatin inhibition reduced the expression of proteolytic genes and induced the expression of hypertrophy genes. These early changes in gene expression lead to a 22% increase in muscle fiber cross-sectional area and a 10% improvement in maximum isometric force production that were observed 21 days after ACL tear. Overall, myostatin inhibition lead to several favorable, although modest, changes in molecular biomarkers of muscle regeneration and reduced muscle atrophy and weakness following ACL tear. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 35:2499-2505, 2017. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Short-term effects of hip abductors and lateral rotators strengthening in females with patellofemoral pain syndrome: a randomized controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Thiago Yukio; Rossetto, Flavio Marcondes; Magalhães, Eduardo; Bryk, Flavio Fernandes; Lucareli, Paulo Roberto Garcia; de Almeida Aparecida Carvalho, Nilza

    2010-11-01

    Randomized clinical trial. To investigate the influence of strengthening the hip abductor and lateral rotator musculature on pain and function of females with patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS). Hip muscle weakness in women athletes has been the focus of many recent studies and is suggested as an important impairment to address in the conservative treatment of women with PFPS. However, it is still not well established if strengthening these muscles is associated with clinical improvement in pain and function in sedentary females with PFPS. Seventy females (average±SD age, 25±07 years), with a diagnosis of unilateral PFPS, were distributed randomly into 3 groups: 22 females in the knee exercise group, who received a conventional treatment that emphasized stretching and strengthening of the knee musculature; 23 females in the knee and hip exercise group, who performed exercises to strengthen the hip abductors and external rotators in addition to the same exercises performed by those in the knee exercise group; and of the 25 females who did not receive any treatment. The females of the nontreatment group (control) were instructed to maintain their normal daily activities. An 11-point numerical pain rating scale (NPRS) was used to assess pain during stair ascent and descent. The lower extremity functional scale (LEFS) and the anterior knee pain scale (AKPS) were used to assess function. The single-limb single hop test was also used as a functional outcome to measure preintervention and 4-week postintervention function. The 3 groups were homogeneous prior to treatment in respect to demographic, pain, and functional scales data. Both the knee exercise and the knee and hip exercise groups showed significant improvement in the LEFS, the AKPS, and the NPRS, when compared to the control group (P<.05 and P<.001, respectively). But, when we considered minimal clinically important differences, only the knee and hip exercise group demonstrated mean improvements in AKPS and

  2. Effects of Plyometric Training on Muscle-Activation Strategies and Performance in Female Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Swanik, Kathleen A.; Swanik, C. Buz; Straub, Stephen J.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effects of plyometric training on muscle-activation strategies and performance of the lower extremity during jumping exercises. Subjects: Twenty healthy National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I female athletes. Design and Setting: A pretest and posttest control group design was used. Experimental subjects performed plyometric exercises 2 times per week for 6 weeks. Measurements: We used surface electromyography to assess preparatory and reactive activity of the vastus medialis and vastus lateralis, medial and lateral hamstrings, and hip abductors and adductors. Vertical jump height and sprint speed were assessed with the VERTEC and infrared timing devices, respectively. Results: Multivariate analyses of variance revealed significant (P < .05) increases in firing of adductor muscles during the preparatory phase, with significant interactions for area, mean, and peak. A Tukey honestly significant difference post hoc analysis revealed significant increases in preparatory adductor area, mean, and peak for experimental group. A significant (P = .037) increase in preparatory adductor-to-abductor muscle coactivation in the experimental group was identified, as well as a trend (P = .053) toward reactive quadriceps-to- hamstring muscle coactivation in the experimental group. Pearson correlation coefficients revealed significant between-groups adaptations in muscle activity patterns pretest to posttest. Although not significant, experimental and control subjects had average increases of 5.8% and 2.0% in vertical jump height, respectively. Conclusions: The increased preparatory adductor activity and abductor-to-adductor coactivation represent preprogrammed motor strategies learned during the plyometric training. These data strongly support the role of hip-musculature activation strategies for dynamic restraint and control of lower extremity alignment at ground contact. Plyometric exercises should be incorporated into the training regimens

  3. Quantitative muscle ultrasound is useful for evaluating secondary axonal degeneration in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Hokkoku, Keiichi; Matsukura, Kiyoshi; Uchida, Yudai; Kuwabara, Midori; Furukawa, Yuichi; Tsukamoto, Hiroshi; Hatanaka, Yuki; Sonoo, Masahiro

    2017-10-01

    In chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP), exclusion of secondary axonal degeneration is challenging with conventional methods such as nerve conduction study (NCS), needle electromyography, and nerve biopsy. Increased echo intensity (EI) and decreased muscle thickness (MT) identified on muscle ultrasound (MUS) examination represent muscle denervation due to axonal degeneration in neurogenic disorders, suggesting MUS as a new tool to detect secondary axonal degeneration in patients with CIDP. EI and MT of abductor pollicis brevis, abductor digiti minimi, and first dorsal interosseous muscles were measured in 16 CIDP patients. Raw values were converted into z -scores using data from 60 normal controls (NCs). Six of 45 muscles showed abnormally high EI and low MT, suggesting denervation following secondary axonal degeneration. These six muscles belonged to two patients with long disease history, unresponsiveness to treatment, and long interval from onset to initial therapy. There were no significant differences in EI and MT ( p  = .23 and .67, respectively) between the CIDP and NC groups, although NCS results revealed obvious demyelinating abnormalities in all CIDP patients, suggesting the fact that muscle structures will be preserved, and EI and MT will not change unless secondary axonal degeneration occurs in CIDP. MUS is a promising tool for evaluating secondary axonal degeneration in patients with CIDP.

  4. Sex differences in the branching position of the nerve to the abductor digiti minimi muscle: an anatomical study of cadavers.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Daisuke; Naito, Munekazu; Hayashi, Shogo; Ohmichi, Yusuke; Ohmichi, Mika; Nakano, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    The nerve to the abductor digiti minimi muscle (ADMM nerve) is the first branch of the lateral plantar nerve or originates directly from the posterior tibial nerve. Damage to the ADMM nerve is a cause of heel pain and eventually results in ADMM atrophy. It is known that ADMM atrophy occurs more often in females than in males, and the reason remains unclear. This study aimed to explore sex differences in the branching pattern, position, and angle of the ADMM nerve. Forty-two cadavers (20 males, 22 females) were dissected at Aichi Medical University between 2011 and 2015. Cases of foot deformity or atrophy were excluded and 67 ft (30 male, 37 female) were examined to assess the branching pattern, position, and angle of the ADMM nerve. The branching positions of the ADMM nerve were superior to the malleolar-calcaneal axis (MCA) in 37 ft (55 %), on the MCA in 10 ft (15 %), and inferior to the MCA in 20 ft (30 %). There was no case among male feet in which the ADMM nerve branched inferior to the MCA, whereas this pattern was observed in 19 of 37 female feet (51 %). The branching position of the ADMM nerve was significantly closer to the MCA in female feet than in male feet. There were no significant sex differences in the branching pattern and angle of the ADMM nerve. The ADMM nerve sometimes branches off inferior to the MCA in females, but not in males. This difference may be the reason for the more frequent occurrence of ADMM atrophy in females than in males.

  5. Test-Retest Reliability of Innovated Strength Tests for Hip Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Christophe; Corten, Kristoff; Wesseling, Mariska; Peers, Koen; Simon, Jean-Pierre; Jonkers, Ilse; Desloovere, Kaat

    2013-01-01

    The burden of hip muscles weakness and its relation to other impairments has been well documented. It is therefore a pre-requisite to have a reliable method for clinical assessment of hip muscles function allowing the design and implementation of a proper strengthening program. Motor-driven dynamometry has been widely accepted as the gold-standard for lower limb muscle strength assessment but is mainly related to the knee joint. Studies focusing on the hip joint are less exhaustive and somewhat discrepant with regard to optimal participants position, consequently influencing outcome measures. Thus, we aimed to develop a standardized test setup for the assessment of hip muscles strength, i.e. flexors/extensors and abductors/adductors, with improved participant stability and to define its psychometric characteristics. Eighteen participants performed unilateral isokinetic and isometric contractions of the hip muscles in the sagittal and coronal plane at two separate occasions. Peak torque and normalized peak torque were measured for each contraction. Relative and absolute measures of reliability were calculated using the intraclass correlation coefficient and standard error of measurement, respectively. Results from this study revealed higher levels of between-day reliability of isokinetic/isometric hip abduction/flexion peak torque compared to existing literature. The least reliable measures were found for hip extension and adduction, which could be explained by a less efficient stabilization technique. Our study additionally provided a first set of reference normalized data which can be used in future research. PMID:24260550

  6. Respiratory muscle weakness and respiratory muscle training in severely disabled multiple sclerosis patients.

    PubMed

    Gosselink, R; Kovacs, L; Ketelaer, P; Carton, H; Decramer, M

    2000-06-01

    To evaluate the contribution of respiratory muscle weakness (part 1) and respiratory muscle training (part 2) to pulmonary function, cough efficacy, and functional status in patients with advanced multiple sclerosis (MS). Survey (part 1) and randomized controlled trial (part 2). Rehabilitation center for MS. Twenty-eight bedridden or wheelchair-bound MS patients (part 1); 18 patients were randomly assigned to a training group (n = 9) or a control group (n = 9) (part 2). The training group (part 2) performed three series of 15 contractions against an expiratory resistance (60% maximum expiratory pressure [PEmax]) two times a day, whereas the control group performed breathing exercises to enhance maximal inspirations. Forced vital capacity (FVC), inspiratory, and expiratory muscle strength (PImax and PEmax), neck flexion force (NFF), cough efficacy by means of the Pulmonary Index (PI), and functional status by means of the Extended Disability Status Scale (EDSS). Part 1 revealed a significantly reduced FVC (43% +/- 26% predicted), PEmax (18% +/- 8% predicted), and PImax (27% +/- 11% predicted), whereas NFF was only mildly reduced (93% +/- 26% predicted). The PI (median score, 10) and EDSS (median score, 8.5) were severely reduced. PEmax was significantly correlated to FVC, EDSS, and PI (r = .77, -.79, and -.47, respectively). In stepwise multiple regression analysis. PEmax was the only factor contributing to the explained variance in FVC (R2 = .60), whereas body weight (R2 = .41) was the only factor for the PI. In part 2, changes in PImax and PEmax tended to be higher in the training group (p = .06 and p = .07, respectively). The PI was significantly improved after 3 months of training compared with the control group (p < .05). After 6 months, the PI remained significantly better in the training group. Expiratory muscle strength was significantly reduced and related to FVC, cough efficacy, and functional status. Expiratory muscle training tended to enhance

  7. Identification and Small Molecule Inhibition of an Activating Transcription Factor 4 (ATF4)-dependent Pathway to Age-related Skeletal Muscle Weakness and Atrophy*

    PubMed Central

    Ebert, Scott M.; Dyle, Michael C.; Bullard, Steven A.; Dierdorff, Jason M.; Murry, Daryl J.; Fox, Daniel K.; Bongers, Kale S.; Lira, Vitor A.; Meyerholz, David K.; Talley, John J.; Adams, Christopher M.

    2015-01-01

    Aging reduces skeletal muscle mass and strength, but the underlying molecular mechanisms remain elusive. Here, we used mouse models to investigate molecular mechanisms of age-related skeletal muscle weakness and atrophy as well as new potential interventions for these conditions. We identified two small molecules that significantly reduce age-related deficits in skeletal muscle strength, quality, and mass: ursolic acid (a pentacyclic triterpenoid found in apples) and tomatidine (a steroidal alkaloid derived from green tomatoes). Because small molecule inhibitors can sometimes provide mechanistic insight into disease processes, we used ursolic acid and tomatidine to investigate the pathogenesis of age-related muscle weakness and atrophy. We found that ursolic acid and tomatidine generate hundreds of small positive and negative changes in mRNA levels in aged skeletal muscle, and the mRNA expression signatures of the two compounds are remarkably similar. Interestingly, a subset of the mRNAs repressed by ursolic acid and tomatidine in aged muscle are positively regulated by activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4). Based on this finding, we investigated ATF4 as a potential mediator of age-related muscle weakness and atrophy. We found that a targeted reduction in skeletal muscle ATF4 expression reduces age-related deficits in skeletal muscle strength, quality, and mass, similar to ursolic acid and tomatidine. These results elucidate ATF4 as a critical mediator of age-related muscle weakness and atrophy. In addition, these results identify ursolic acid and tomatidine as potential agents and/or lead compounds for reducing ATF4 activity, weakness, and atrophy in aged skeletal muscle. PMID:26338703

  8. Neuromuscular electrical stimulation for muscle weakness in adults with advanced disease.

    PubMed

    Jones, Sarah; Man, William D-C; Gao, Wei; Higginson, Irene J; Wilcock, Andrew; Maddocks, Matthew

    2016-10-17

    This review is an update of a previously published review in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews Issue 1, 2013 on Neuromuscular electrical stimulation for muscle weakness in adults with advanced disease.Patients with advanced progressive disease often experience muscle weakness, which can impact adversely on their ability to be independent and their quality of life. In those patients who are unable or unwilling to undertake whole-body exercise, neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) may be an alternative treatment to enhance lower limb muscle strength. Programmes of NMES appear to be acceptable to patients and have led to improvements in muscle function, exercise capacity, and quality of life. However, estimates regarding the effectiveness of NMES based on individual studies lack power and precision. Primary objective: to evaluate the effectiveness of NMES on quadriceps muscle strength in adults with advanced disease. Secondary objectives: to examine the safety and acceptability of NMES, and its effect on peripheral muscle function (strength or endurance), muscle mass, exercise capacity, breathlessness, and health-related quality of life. We identified studies from searches of the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (CDSR), and Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE) (the Cochrane Library), MEDLINE (OVID), Embase (OVID), CINAHL (EBSCO), and PsycINFO (OVID) databases to January 2016; citation searches, conference proceedings, and previous systematic reviews. We included randomised controlled trials in adults with advanced chronic respiratory disease, chronic heart failure, cancer, or HIV/AIDS comparing a programme of NMES as a sole or adjunct intervention to no treatment, placebo NMES, or an active control. We imposed no language restriction. Two review authors independently extracted data on study design, participants, interventions, and outcomes. We assessed risk of bias using

  9. Effects of augmented trunk stabilization with external compression support on shoulder and scapular muscle activity and maximum strength during isometric shoulder abduction.

    PubMed

    Jang, Hyun-jeong; Kim, Suhn-yeop; Oh, Duck-won

    2015-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of augmented trunk stabilization with external compression support (ECS) on the electromyography (EMG) activity of shoulder and scapular muscles and shoulder abductor strength during isometric shoulder abduction. Twenty-six women volunteered for the study. Surface EMG was used to monitor the activity of the upper trapezius (UT), lower trapezius (LT), serratus anterior (SA), and middle deltoid (MD), and shoulder abductor strength was measured using a dynamometer during three experimental conditions: (1) no external support (condition-1), (2) pelvic support (condition-2), and (3) pelvic and thoracic supports (condition-3) in an active therapeutic movement device. EMG activities were significantly lower for UT and higher for MD during condition 3 than during condition 1 (p < 0.05). The MD/UT ratio was significantly higher during condition 3 than during conditions 1 and 2, and higher during condition 2 than during condition 1 (p < 0.05). Shoulder abductor strength was significantly higher during condition 3 than during condition 1 (p < 0.05). These findings suggest that augmented trunk stabilization with the ECS may be advantageous with regard to reducing the compensatory muscle effort of the UT during isometric shoulder abduction and increasing shoulder abductor strength. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Powerful signals for weak muscles.

    PubMed

    Saini, Amarjit; Faulkner, Steve; Al-Shanti, Nasser; Stewart, Claire

    2009-10-01

    The aim of the present review is to summarise, evaluate and critique the different mechanisms involved in anabolic growth of skeletal muscle and the catabolic processes involved in cancer cachexia and sarcopenia of ageing. This is highly relevant, since they represent targets for future promising clinical investigations. Sarcopenia is an inevitable process associated with a gradual reduction in muscle mass and strength, associated with a reduction in motor unit number and atrophy of muscle fibres, especially the fast type IIa fibres. The loss of muscle mass with ageing is clinically important because it leads to diminished functional ability and associated complications. Cachexia is widely recognised as severe and rapid wasting accompanying disease states such as cancer or immunodeficiency disease. One of the main characteristics of cancer cachexia is asthenia or lack of strength, which is directly related to the muscle loss. Indeed, apart from the speed of loss, muscle wasting during cancer and ageing share many common metabolic pathways and mediators. In healthy young individuals, muscles maintain their mass and function because of a balance between protein synthesis and protein degradation associated with rates of anabolic and catabolic processes, respectively. Muscles grow (hypertrophy) when protein synthesis exceeds protein degradation. Conversely, muscles shrink (atrophy) when protein degradation dominates. These processes are not occurring independently of each other, but are finely coordinated by a web of intricate signalling networks. Such signalling networks are in charge of executing environmental and cellular cues that ultimately determine whether muscle proteins are synthesised or degraded. Increasing our understanding for the pathways involved in hypertrophy and atrophy and particularly the interaction of these pathways is essential in designing therapeutic strategies for both prevention and treatment of muscle wasting conditions with age and with

  11. Identification and Small Molecule Inhibition of an Activating Transcription Factor 4 (ATF4)-dependent Pathway to Age-related Skeletal Muscle Weakness and Atrophy.

    PubMed

    Ebert, Scott M; Dyle, Michael C; Bullard, Steven A; Dierdorff, Jason M; Murry, Daryl J; Fox, Daniel K; Bongers, Kale S; Lira, Vitor A; Meyerholz, David K; Talley, John J; Adams, Christopher M

    2015-10-16

    Aging reduces skeletal muscle mass and strength, but the underlying molecular mechanisms remain elusive. Here, we used mouse models to investigate molecular mechanisms of age-related skeletal muscle weakness and atrophy as well as new potential interventions for these conditions. We identified two small molecules that significantly reduce age-related deficits in skeletal muscle strength, quality, and mass: ursolic acid (a pentacyclic triterpenoid found in apples) and tomatidine (a steroidal alkaloid derived from green tomatoes). Because small molecule inhibitors can sometimes provide mechanistic insight into disease processes, we used ursolic acid and tomatidine to investigate the pathogenesis of age-related muscle weakness and atrophy. We found that ursolic acid and tomatidine generate hundreds of small positive and negative changes in mRNA levels in aged skeletal muscle, and the mRNA expression signatures of the two compounds are remarkably similar. Interestingly, a subset of the mRNAs repressed by ursolic acid and tomatidine in aged muscle are positively regulated by activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4). Based on this finding, we investigated ATF4 as a potential mediator of age-related muscle weakness and atrophy. We found that a targeted reduction in skeletal muscle ATF4 expression reduces age-related deficits in skeletal muscle strength, quality, and mass, similar to ursolic acid and tomatidine. These results elucidate ATF4 as a critical mediator of age-related muscle weakness and atrophy. In addition, these results identify ursolic acid and tomatidine as potential agents and/or lead compounds for reducing ATF4 activity, weakness, and atrophy in aged skeletal muscle. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  12. Inter-Tester Reliability and Precision of Manual Muscle Testing and Hand-Held Dynamometry in Lower Limb Muscles of Children with Spina Bifida

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahony, Kate; Hunt, Adrienne; Daley, Deborah; Sims, Susan; Adams, Roger

    2009-01-01

    Reliability and measurement precision of manual muscle testing (MMT) and hand-held dynamometry (HHD) were compared for children with spina bifida. Strength measures were obtained of the hip flexors, hip abductors, and knee extensors of 20 children (10 males, 10 females; mean age 9 years 10 months; range: 5 to 15 years) by two experienced physical…

  13. 'Bald trochanter' spontaneous rupture of the conjoined tendons of the gluteus medius and minimus presenting as a trochanteric bursitis.

    PubMed

    LaBan, Myron M; Weir, Susan K; Taylor, Ronald S

    2004-10-01

    A 66-yr-old white woman presented with progressive complaints of right lateral hip and thigh pain associated with a disabling limp without an antecedent history of trauma. Physical examination revealed localized pain over the right greater trochanter to palpation. A full pain-free range of motion of the right hip was associated with weakness in the hip abductors. The patient ambulated with a compensated right Trendelenburg gait. Subsequent magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a trochanteric bursitis and an effusion of the hip and a full-thickness tear of the gluteus medius muscle, with both a disruption and retraction of the tendon of an atretic gluteus minimus muscle. Conjoined tendon pathology of both the gluteus medius and minimus as, revealed by magnetic resonance examination, is probably more frequent than heretofore commonly recognized. In patients presenting with "intractable" complaints of a trochanteric bursitis and an ambulatory limp due to weakness in the hip abductors, imaging studies calling attention to a possible tendon rupture may be diagnostic.

  14. Influence of muscle groups' activation on proximal femoral growth tendency.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Priti; Shefelbine, Sandra J; Pontén, Eva; Gutierrez-Farewik, Elena M

    2017-12-01

    Muscle and joint contact force influence stresses at the proximal growth plate of the femur and thus bone growth, affecting the neck shaft angle (NSA) and femoral anteversion (FA). This study aims to illustrate how different muscle groups' activation during gait affects NSA and FA development in able-bodied children. Subject-specific femur models were developed for three able-bodied children (ages 6, 7, and 11 years) using magnetic resonance images. Contributions of different muscle groups-hip flexors, hip extensors, hip adductors, hip abductors, and knee extensors-to overall hip contact force were computed. Specific growth rate for the growth plate was computed, and the growth was simulated in the principal stress direction at each element in the growth front. The predicted growth indicated decreased NSA and FA (of about [Formula: see text] over a four-month period) for able-bodied children. Hip abductors contributed the most, and hip adductors, the least, to growth rate. All muscles groups contributed to a decrease in predicted NSA ([Formula: see text]0.01[Formula: see text]-0.04[Formula: see text] and FA ([Formula: see text]0.004[Formula: see text]-[Formula: see text]), except hip extensors and hip adductors, which showed a tendency to increase the FA ([Formula: see text]0.004[Formula: see text]-[Formula: see text]). Understanding influences of different muscle groups on long bone growth tendency can help in treatment planning for growing children with affected gait.

  15. Diaphragm Plasticity in Aging and Disease: Therapies for Muscle Weakness go from Strength to Strength.

    PubMed

    Greising, Sarah M; Ottenheijm, Coen A C; O'Halloran, Ken D; Barreiro, Esther

    2018-04-19

    The diaphragm is the main inspiratory muscle and is required to be highly active throughout the lifespan. The diaphragm muscle must be able to produce and sustain various behaviors that range from ventilatory to non-ventilatory such as those required for airway maintenance and clearance. Throughout the lifespan various circumstances and conditions may affect the ability of the diaphragm muscle to generate requisite forces and in turn the diaphragm muscle may undergo significant weakness and dysfunction. For example, hypoxic stress, critical illness, cancer cachexia, chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder (COPD), and age-related sarcopenia all represent conditions in which significant diaphragm muscle dysfunction exits. This perspective review article presents several interesting topics involving diaphragm plasticity in aging and disease that were presented at the International Union of Physiological Sciences (IUPS) Conference in 2017.This review seeks to maximize the broad and collective research impact on diaphragm muscle dysfunction in the search for transformative treatment approaches to improve the diaphragm muscle health during aging and disease.

  16. Fibrillation potentials, positive sharp waves and fasciculation in the intrinsic muscles of the foot in healthy subjects.

    PubMed Central

    Falck, B; Alaranta, H

    1983-01-01

    The extensor digitorum brevis and abductor digiti minimi muscles were examined bilaterally with electromyography in 53 healthy subjects. In 72% of the subjects either fibrillation potentials, positive sharp waves or fasciculation was seen in at least one muscle examined. These slight, usually symmetric neuropathic signs are believed to be associated with normal aging and to some extent also with external trauma to the nerves and muscles in the distal parts of the foot. PMID:6886709

  17. MUSCLE WEAKNESS, FATIGUE, AND TORQUE VARIABILITY: EFFECTS OF AGE AND MOBILITY STATUS

    PubMed Central

    KENT-BRAUN, JANE A.; CALLAHAN, DAMIEN M.; FAY, JESSICA L.; FOULIS, STEPHEN A.; BUONACCORSI, JOHN P.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Whereas deficits in muscle function, particularly power production, develop in old age and are risk factors for mobility impairment, a complete understanding of muscle fatigue during dynamic contractions is lacking. We tested hypotheses related to torque-producing capacity, fatigue resistance, and variability of torque production during repeated maximal contractions in healthy older, mobility-impaired older, and young women. Methods Knee extensor fatigue (decline in torque) was measured during 4 min of dynamic contractions. Torque variability was characterized using a novel 4-component logistic regression model. Results Young women produced more torque at baseline and during the protocol than older women (P < 0.001). Although fatigue did not differ between groups (P = 0.53), torque variability differed by group (P = 0.022) and was greater in older impaired compared with young women (P = 0.010). Conclusions These results suggest that increased torque variability may combine with baseline muscle weakness to limit function, particularly in older adults with mobility impairments. PMID:23674266

  18. Muscle Weakness and Fibrosis Due to Cell Autonomous and Non-cell Autonomous Events in Collagen VI Deficient Congenital Muscular Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Satoru; Ogawa, Megumu; Malicdan, May Christine; Nonaka, Ikuya; Nishino, Ichizo

    2017-02-01

    Congenital muscular dystrophies with collagen VI deficiency are inherited muscle disorders with a broad spectrum of clinical presentation and are caused by mutations in one of COL6A1-3 genes. Muscle pathology is characterized by fiber size variation and increased interstitial fibrosis and adipogenesis. In this study, we define critical events that contribute to muscle weakness and fibrosis in a mouse model with collagen VI deficiency. The Col6a1 GT/GT mice develop non-progressive weakness from younger age, accompanied by stunted muscle growth due to reduced IGF-1 signaling activity. In addition, the Col6a1 GT/GT mice have high numbers of interstitial skeletal muscle mesenchymal progenitor cells, which dramatically increase with repeated myofiber necrosis/regeneration. Our results suggest that impaired neonatal muscle growth and the activation of the mesenchymal cells in skeletal muscles contribute to the pathology of collagen VI deficient muscular dystrophy, and more importantly, provide the insights on the therapeutic strategies for collagen VI deficiency. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Muscle Weakness Is Associated With an Increase of Left Ventricular Mass Through Excessive Blood Pressure Elevation During Exercise in Patients With Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Kamada, Yumi; Masuda, Takashi; Tanaka, Shinya; Akiyama, Ayako; Nakamura, Takeshi; Hamazaki, Nobuaki; Okubo, Michihito; Kobayashi, Naoyuki; Ako, Junya

    2017-08-03

    Autonomic imbalance in hypertension induces excessive blood pressure (BP) elevation during exercise, thereby increasing left ventricular mass (LVM). Although muscle weakness enhances autonomic imbalance by stimulating muscle sympathetic activity during exercise, it is unclear whether muscle weakness is associated with an increase of LVM in patients with hypertension. This study aimed to investigate the relationships between muscle weakness, BP elevation during exercise, and LVM in these patients. Eighty-six hypertensive patients aged 69 ± 8 years with controlled resting BP (ie, < 140/90 mmHg) were recruited. Plasma brain natriuretic peptide (BNP), left ventricular mass index (LVMI), and knee extension muscle strength were measured. Changes in plasma noradrenaline (NORA) and brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (ba-PWV) were assessed before and after an ergometer exercise test performed at moderate intensity (ΔNORA and ΔPWV, respectively). A difference between baseline and peak systolic BP during the exercise test was defined as BP elevation during exercise (ΔSBP). Relationships between muscle strength, ΔNORA, ΔPWV, ΔSBP, BNP, and LVMI were analyzed, and significant factors increasing LVM were identified using univariate and multivariate regression analyses. Muscle strength was negatively correlated with ΔNORA (r = -0.202, P = 0.048), ΔPWV (r = -0.328, P = 0.002), ΔSBP (r = -0.230, P = 0.033), BNP (r = -0.265, P = 0.014), and LVMI (r = -0.233, P = 0.031). LVMI was positively correlated with ΔPWV (r = 0.246, P = 0.023) and ΔSBP (r = 0.307, P = 0.004). Muscle strength was a significant independent factor associated with LVMI (β = -0.331, P = 0.010). Our findings suggest that muscle weakness is associated with an increase of LVM through excessive BP elevation during exercise in patients with hypertension.

  20. Automatic assessment of volume asymmetries applied to hip abductor muscles in patients with hip arthroplasty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klemt, Christian; Modat, Marc; Pichat, Jonas; Cardoso, M. J.; Henckel, Joahnn; Hart, Alister; Ourselin, Sebastien

    2015-03-01

    Metal-on-metal (MoM) hip arthroplasties have been utilised over the last 15 years to restore hip function for 1.5 million patients worldwide. Althoug widely used, this hip arthroplasty releases metal wear debris which lead to muscle atrophy. The degree of muscle wastage differs across patients ranging from mild to severe. The longterm outcomes for patients with MoM hip arthroplasty are reduced for increasing degrees of muscle atrophy, highlighting the need to automatically segment pathological muscles. The automated segmentation of pathological soft tissues is challenging as these lack distinct boundaries and morphologically differ across subjects. As a result, there is no method reported in the literature which has been successfully applied to automatically segment pathological muscles. We propose the first automated framework to delineate severely atrophied muscles by applying a novel automated segmentation propagation framework to patients with MoM hip arthroplasty. The proposed algorithm was used to automatically quantify muscle wastage in these patients.

  1. The Effects on Muscle Activation of Flatfoot during Gait According to the Velocity on an Ascending Slope.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chang-Ryeol; Kim, Myoung-Kwon

    2014-05-01

    [Purpose] This study determined the difference between flatfeet and normal feet in humans on an ascending slope using electromyography (EMG). [Subjects] This study was conducted on 30 adults having normal feet (n=15) and flatfeet (n=15), all of whom were 21 to 30 years old. [Methods] A treadmill (AC5000M, SCIFIT,) was used to analyze kinematic features during gait. These features were analyzed at slow, normal, and fast gait velocities on an ascending slope. A surface electromyogram (TeleMyo 2400T, Noraxon Co., USA) was used to measure muscle activity changes. [Results] The activities of most muscles in the subjects with flatfeet were significantly different from the muscle activities in the subjects with normal feet at different gait velocities on an ascending slope. There were significant differences in the vastus medialis and abductor hallucis muscles. [Conclusion] Because muscle activation of the vastus medialis in relation to stability of the lower extremity has a tendency to increase with an increase in gait velocity on an ascending slope, we hypothesized that higher impact transfer to the knee joints occurs in subjects with flatfeet due to the lack of a medial longitudinal arch and that the abductor halluces muscles, which provide dynamic stability to the medial longitudinal arches, do not activate well when they are needed in subjects with flatfeet.

  2. The relationship of strength and muscle balance to shoulder pain and impingement syndrome in elite quadriplegic wheelchair rugby players.

    PubMed

    Miyahara, M; Sleivert, G G; Gerrard, D F

    1998-04-01

    Wheelchair athletes are susceptible to injuries related to overuse of the shoulder, in particular shoulder impingement syndrome. The present study examined the relationship of shoulder pain to demographic details, isokinetic strength and muscle balance in 8 elite quadriplegic rugby players. Demographic data were collected using personal interviews and each subject was clinically examined for signs of impingement syndrome by a physician. In addition each subject underwent bilateral isokinetic strength testing of the shoulder at 60 and 180 deg/s for abduction/adduction and internal/external rotation. A series of step-wise multiple discriminant analysis successfully predicted clinical symptoms from demographic, muscular strength and balance data. In particular, there was a significant deficit in adductor strength and this was related to shoulder pain and wasting of the scapular muscles. This strength deficit may be due to the high level of spinal lesions in the quadriplegic population. The level of spinal lesion may contribute to the aetiology of shoulder pathology in quadriplegia, and differentiate it from that observed in able-bodied athletes who exhibit weak abductors.

  3. The Simultaneous Determination of Muscle Cell pH Using a Weak Acid and Weak Base

    PubMed Central

    Adler, Sheldon

    1972-01-01

    Should significant pH heterogeneity exist within cells then the simultaneous calculation of intracellular pH from the distribution of a weak acid will give a value closest to the highest pH in the system, whereas calculation from the distribution of a weak base will give a value closer to the lowest pH. These two values should then differ significantly. Intact rat diaphragms were exposed in vitro to varying bicarbonate concentrations (pure metabolic) and CO2 tensions (pure respiratory), and steady-state cell pH was measured simultaneously either by distribution of the weak acid 5,5-dimethyloxazolidine-2,4-dione-14C (pH DMO) or by distribution of the weak base nicotine-14C (pH nicotine). The latter compound was found suitable to measure cell pH since it was neither metabolized nor bound by rat diaphragms. At an external pH of 7.40, pH DMO was 7.17 while pH nicotine was 6.69—a pH difference of 0.48 pH units (P < 0.001). In either respiratory or metabolic alkalosis both DMO and pH nicotine rose so that differences between them remained essentially constant. Metabolic acidosis induced a decrease in both values though they fell more slowly than did extracellular pH. In contradistinction, in respiratory acidosis, decreasing extracellular pH from 7.40 to 6.80 resulted in 0.35 pH unit drop in pH DMO while pH nicotine remained constant. In every experiment, under all external conditions, pH DMO exceeded pH nicotine. These results indicate that there is significant pH heterogeneity within diaphragm muscle, but the degree of heterogeneity may vary under different external conditions. The metabolic implications of these findings are discussed. In addition, the data show that true overall cell pH is between 6.69 and 7.17—a full pH higher than would be expected from thermodynamic considerations alone. This implies the presence of active processes to maintain cell pH. PMID:5009113

  4. Differential effect of muscle vibration on intracortical inhibitory circuits in humans

    PubMed Central

    Rosenkranz, Karin; Rothwell, John C

    2003-01-01

    Low amplitude muscle vibration (0.5 ms; 80 Hz; duration 1.5 s) was applied in turn to each of three different intrinsic hand muscles (first dorsal interosseus, FDI; abductor pollicis brevis, APB; and abductor digiti minimi, ADM) in order to test its effect on the EMG responses evoked by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Recordings were also taken from flexor and extensor carpi radialis (FCR and ECR, respectively). We evaluated the amplitude of motor evoked potentials (MEPs) produced by a single TMS pulse, short interval intracortical inhibition and facilitation (SICI and ICF) and long interval intracortical inhibition (LICI). TMS pulses were applied 1 s after the start of vibration with subjects relaxed throughout. Vibration increased the amplitude of MEPs evoked in the vibrated muscle (162 ± 6 % of MEP with no vibration; mean ± s.e.m.), but suppressed MEPs in the two non-vibrated hand muscles (72 ± 9 %). Compared with no vibration (test response reduced to 51 ± 5 % of control), there was less SICI in the vibrated muscle (test response reduced to 92 ± 28 % of control) and more in the non-vibrated hand muscles (test response reduced to 27 ± 5 % of control). The opposite occurred for LICI: compared with the no vibration condition (test response reduced to 33 ± 6 % control), there was more LICI in the vibrated muscle (test response reduced to 17 ± 3 % control) than in the non-vibrated hand muscles (test response reduced to 80 ± 11 % control) even when the intensity of the test stimulus was adjusted to compensate for the changes in baseline MEP. There was no effect on ICF. Cutaneous stimulation of the index finger (80 Hz, 1.5 s duration, twice sensory threshold) had no consistent differential effect on any of the parameters. We conclude that vibratory input from muscle can differentially modulate excitability in motor cortical circuits. PMID:12821723

  5. Facial-muscle weakness, speech disorders and dysphagia are common in patients with classic infantile Pompe disease treated with enzyme therapy.

    PubMed

    van Gelder, C M; van Capelle, C I; Ebbink, B J; Moor-van Nugteren, I; van den Hout, J M P; Hakkesteegt, M M; van Doorn, P A; de Coo, I F M; Reuser, A J J; de Gier, H H W; van der Ploeg, A T

    2012-05-01

    Classic infantile Pompe disease is an inherited generalized glycogen storage disorder caused by deficiency of lysosomal acid α-glucosidase. If left untreated, patients die before one year of age. Although enzyme-replacement therapy (ERT) has significantly prolonged lifespan, it has also revealed new aspects of the disease. For up to 11 years, we investigated the frequency and consequences of facial-muscle weakness, speech disorders and dysphagia in long-term survivors. Sequential photographs were used to determine the timing and severity of facial-muscle weakness. Using standardized articulation tests and fibreoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing, we investigated speech and swallowing function in a subset of patients. This study included 11 patients with classic infantile Pompe disease. Median age at the start of ERT was 2.4 months (range 0.1-8.3 months), and median age at the end of the study was 4.3 years (range 7.7 months -12.2 years). All patients developed facial-muscle weakness before the age of 15 months. Speech was studied in four patients. Articulation was disordered, with hypernasal resonance and reduced speech intelligibility in all four. Swallowing function was studied in six patients, the most important findings being ineffective swallowing with residues of food (5/6), penetration or aspiration (3/6), and reduced pharyngeal and/or laryngeal sensibility (2/6). We conclude that facial-muscle weakness, speech disorders and dysphagia are common in long-term survivors receiving ERT for classic infantile Pompe disease. To improve speech and reduce the risk for aspiration, early treatment by a speech therapist and regular swallowing assessments are recommended.

  6. The effect of muscle weakness on the capability gap during gross motor function: a simulation study supporting design criteria for exoskeletons of the lower limb.

    PubMed

    Afschrift, Maarten; De Groote, Friedl; De Schutter, Joris; Jonkers, Ilse

    2014-08-04

    Enabling persons with functional weaknesses to perform activities of daily living (ADL) is one of the main challenges for the aging society. Powered orthoses, or exoskeletons, have the potential to support ADL while promoting active participation of the user. For this purpose, assistive devices should be designed and controlled to deliver assistance as needed (AAN). This means that the level of assistance should bridge the capability gap, i.e. the gap between the capabilities of the subjects and the task requirements. However, currently the actuators of exoskeletons are mainly designed using inverse dynamics (ID) based calculations of joint moments. The goal of the present study is to calculate the capability gap for the lower limb during ADL when muscle weakness is present, which is needed for appropriate selection of actuators to be integrated in exoskeletons. A musculoskeletal model (MM) is used to calculate the joint kinematics, joint kinetics and muscle forces of eight healthy subjects during ADL (gait, sit-to-stand, stand-to-sit, stair ascent, stair descent). Muscle weakness was imposed to the MM by a stepwise decrease in maximal isometric force imposed to all muscles. Muscle forces were calculated using static optimization. In order to compensate for muscle weakness, ideal moment actuators that represent the motors of an exoskeleton in the simulation were added to deliver AAN required to perform the task. The ID approach overestimates the required assistance since it relies solely on the demands of the task, whereas the AAN approach incorporates the capabilities of the subject. Furthermore, the ID approach delivers continuous support whereas the AAN approach targets the period where a capability gap occurs. The level of muscle weakness for which the external demands imposed by ADL can no longer be met by active muscle force production, is respectively 40%, 70%, 80% and 30%. The present workflow allows estimating the AAN during ADL for different levels of

  7. Intrinsic Foot Muscle Activation During Specific Exercises: A T2 Time Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study.

    PubMed

    Gooding, Thomas M; Feger, Mark A; Hart, Joseph M; Hertel, Jay

    2016-08-01

    The intrinsic foot muscles maintain the medial longitudinal arch and aid in force distribution and postural control during gait. Impaired intrinsic foot-muscle function has been linked to various foot conditions. Several rehabilitative exercises have been proposed to improve it; however, literature that identifies which individual muscles are activated during specific intrinsic foot-muscle exercises is lacking. To describe changes in activation of the intrinsic plantar foot muscles after 4 exercises as measured with T2 magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Descriptive laboratory study. Research laboratory. Eight healthy National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I collegiate cross-country and track athletes (5 men and 3 women: age = 20 ± 0.93 years, height = 180.98 ± 10.84 cm, mass = 70.91 ± 7.82 kg). Participants underwent T2 MRI before and after each exercise. They completed 1 set of 40 repetitions of each exercise (short-foot exercise, toes spread out, first-toe extension, second- to fifth-toes extension). Percentage increases in muscle activation of the abductor hallucis, flexor digitorum brevis, abductor digiti minimi, quadratus plantae, flexor digiti minimi, adductor hallucis oblique, flexor hallucis brevis, and interossei and lumbricals (analyzed together) after each exercise were assessed using T2 MRI. All muscles showed increased activation after all exercises. The mean percentage increase in activation ranged from 16.7% to 34.9% for the short-foot exercise, 17.3% to 35.2% for toes spread out, 13.1% to 18.1% for first-toe extension, and 8.9% to 22.5% for second- to fifth-toes extension. All increases in activation had associated 95% confidence intervals that did not cross zero. Each of the 4 exercises was associated with increased activation in all of the plantar intrinsic foot muscles evaluated. These results may have clinical implications for the prescription of specific exercises to target individual intrinsic foot muscles.

  8. Phenotypic conversion of distinct muscle fiber populations to electrocytes in a weakly electric fish.

    PubMed

    Unguez, G A; Zakon, H H

    1998-09-14

    In most groups of electric fish, the electric organ (EO) derives from striated muscle cells that suppress many muscle phenotypic properties. This phenotypic conversion is recapitulated during regeneration of the tail in the weakly electric fish Sternopygus macrurus. Mature electrocytes, the cells of the electric organ, are considerably larger than the muscle fibers from which they derive, and it is not known whether this is a result of muscle fiber hypertrophy and/or fiber fusion. In this study, electron micrographs revealed fusion of differentiated muscle fibers during the formation of electrocytes. There was no evidence of hypertrophy of muscle fibers during their phenotypic conversion. Furthermore, although fish possess distinct muscle phenotypes, the extent to which each fiber population contributes to the formation of the EO has not been determined. By using myosin ATPase histochemistry and anti-myosin heavy chain (MHC) monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), different fiber types were identified in fascicles of muscle in the adult tail. Mature electrocytes were not stained by the ATPase reaction, nor were they labeled by any of the anti-MHC mAbs. In contrast, mature muscle fibers exhibited four staining patterns. The four fiber types were spatially arranged in distinct compartments with little intermixing; peripherally were two populations of type I fibers with small cross-sectional areas, whereas more centrally were two populations of type II fibers with larger cross-sectional areas. In 2- and 3-week regenerating blastema, three fiber types were clearly discerned. Most (> 95%) early-forming electrocytes had an MHC phenotype similar to that of type II fibers. In contrast, fusion among type I fibers was rare. Together, ultrastructural and immunohistochemical analyses revealed that the fusion of muscle fibers gives rise to electrocytes and that this fusion occurs primarily among the population of type II fibers in regenerating blastema.

  9. Expression of the inclusion body myopathy 3 mutation in Drosophila depresses myosin function and stability and recapitulates muscle inclusions and weakness.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Melkani, Girish C; Suggs, Jennifer A; Melkani, Anju; Kronert, William A; Cammarato, Anthony; Bernstein, Sanford I

    2012-06-01

    Hereditary myosin myopathies are characterized by variable clinical features. Inclusion body myopathy 3 (IBM-3) is an autosomal dominant disease associated with a missense mutation (E706K) in the myosin heavy chain IIa gene. Adult patients experience progressive muscle weakness. Biopsies reveal dystrophic changes, rimmed vacuoles with cytoplasmic inclusions, and focal disorganization of myofilaments. We constructed a transgene encoding E706K myosin and expressed it in Drosophila (E701K) indirect flight and jump muscles to establish a novel homozygous organism with homogeneous populations of fast IBM-3 myosin and muscle fibers. Flight and jump abilities were severely reduced in homozygotes. ATPase and actin sliding velocity of the mutant myosin were depressed >80% compared with wild-type myosin. Light scattering experiments and electron microscopy revealed that mutant myosin heads bear a dramatic propensity to collapse and aggregate. Thus E706K (E701K) myosin appears far more labile than wild-type myosin. Furthermore, mutant fly fibers exhibit ultrastructural hallmarks seen in patients, including cytoplasmic inclusions containing aberrant proteinaceous structures and disorganized muscle filaments. Our Drosophila model reveals the unambiguous consequences of the IBM-3 lesion on fast muscle myosin and fibers. The abnormalities observed in myosin function and muscle ultrastructure likely contribute to muscle weakness observed in our flies and patients.

  10. Muscle strength and fatigue in newly diagnosed patients with myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Vinge, Lotte; Andersen, Henning

    2016-10-01

    Dynamometry is increasingly used as an objective measurement of muscle strength in neurological diseases. No study has applied dynamometry in untreated newly diagnosed patients with myasthenia gravis (MG). Isometric muscle strength at the shoulder, knee, and ankle was determined in 21 MG patients before and after initial anti-myasthenic treatment. Isometric strength was compared with MG evaluation scales. Muscle strength was reduced for knee extensors and shoulder abductors but normal for ankle extensors. Isometric muscle strength did not correlate significantly with manual muscle testing (MG Composite). Dynamometry revealed improved muscle strength of up to 50% (median 17%; range -1.8-49.8) despite no change in the MG Composite score. Dynamometry appears to be a more sensitive method of identifying changes in limb strength than MG evaluation scales. This supports the use of dynamometry in MG patients, especially for evaluation of the effect of anti-myasthenic treatment. Muscle Nerve 54: 709-714, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Median and ulnar muscle and sensory evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Felsenthal, G

    1978-08-01

    The medical literature was reviewed to find suggested clinical applications of the study of the amplitude of evoked muscle action potentials (MAP) and sensory action potentials (SAP). In addition, the literature was reviewed to ascertain the normal amplitude and duration of the evoked MAP and SAP as well as the factors affecting the amplitude: age, sex, temperature, ischemia. The present study determined the normal amplitude and duration of the median and ulnar MAP and SAP in fifty normal subjects. The amplitude of evoked muscle or sensory action potentials depends on multiple factors. Increased skin resistance, capacitance, and impedance at the surface of the recording electrode diminishes the amplitude. Similarly, increased distance from the source of the action potential diminishes its amplitude. Increased interelectrode distance increases the amplitude of the bipolarly recorded sensory action potential until a certain interelectrode distance is exceeded and the diphasic response becomes tri- or tetraphasic. Artifact or poor technique may reduce the potential difference between the recording electrodes or obscure the late positive phase of the action potential and thus diminish the peak to peak amplitude measurement. Intraindividual comparison indicated a marked difference of amplitude in opposite hands. The range of the MAP of the abductor pollicis brevis in one hand was 40.0--100% of the response in the opposite hand. For the abductor digiti minimi, the MAP was 58.5--100% of the response of the opposite hand. The median and ulnar SAP was between 50--100% of the opposite SAP. Consequent to these findings the effect of hand dominance on the amplitude of median and ulnar evoked muscle and sensory action potentials was studied in 41 right handed volunteers. The amplitudes of the median muscle action potential (p less than 0.02) and the median and ulnar sensory action potentials (p less than 0.001) were significantly less in the dominant hand. There was no

  12. Clinical Implications for Muscle Strength Differences in Women of Different Age and Racial Groups: The WIN Study.

    PubMed

    Trudelle-Jackson, Elaine; Ferro, Emerenciana; Morrow, James R

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Reduction in muscle strength is strongly associated with functional decline in women, and women with lower quadriceps strength adjusted for body weight are more likely to develop knee osteoarthritis. OBJECTIVE: To compare body weight--adjusted strength among women of different age/racial groups. STUDY DESIGN: Cross-sectional study of muscle strength in 918 women aged 20--83 (M ± SD = 52 ± 13). METHODS: An orthopedic examination was conducted including measurement of handgrip and lower extremity strength (hip abductors/external rotators, knee flexors/extensors). Data were grouped into young (20--39 years, n = 139), middle (40--54 years, n = 300), and older (55+ years, n = 424) ages for white (n = 699) and African American (AA) (n = 164) women. Means and standard deviations for strength adjusted for body weight were calculated for each age and racial group and compared using 2-way multivariate analysis of variance and post hoc tests. RESULTS: No significant age-by-race interaction (P = .092) but significant main effects for age and race (P < .001). Pairwise comparisons revealed significant differences in knee extensor and flexor strength between all age groups. For grip and hip external rotator strength, significant differences were found between the middle and older groups. Differences in hip abductor strength were found between the young and middle-aged groups. AA women had lower strength than white women in all muscle groups (P < .05) except hip external rotators. CONCLUSIONS: Strength decreased with age in all muscle groups but magnitude of decrease varied by muscle. Strengthening programs should target different muscles, depending on a woman's age and race.

  13. Hereditary sensory ataxic neuropathy associated with proximal muscle weakness in the lower extremities.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Tatsufumi; Fukai, Yuta; Rikimaru, Mitsue; Henmi, Shoji; Ohsawa, Yutaka; Sunada, Yoshihide

    2010-04-15

    We describe three patients from the same family with hereditary sensory ataxic neuropathy followed by proximal muscle weakness in the lower extremities. Sensory ataxic gait began as an initial symptom when patients were in their 50s. Mild proximal weakness in the lower extremities appeared several years later. Serum creatine kinase was mildly elevated. Nerve conduction studies revealed sensory dominant axonal neuropathy, and short sensory evoked potentials showed involvement of the sensory nerve axon, dorsal root ganglia and posterior funiculus of the spinal cord. Needle electromyography showed fibrillation, positive sharp waves, and multiple giant motor unit potentials, suggesting the involvement of anterior horn motor neurons or the anterior root. Autosomal recessive inheritance was considered, because of consanguinity. The disorder described here may be a new clinical entity with unique clinical manifestations. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Non-invasive assessment of muscle stiffness in patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Lacourpaille, Lilian; Hug, François; Guével, Arnaud; Péréon, Yann; Magot, Armelle; Hogrel, Jean-Yves; Nordez, Antoine

    2015-02-01

    Assessment of muscle mechanical properties may provide clinically valuable information for follow-up of patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) through the course of their disease. In this study we aimed to assess the effect of DMD on stiffness of relaxed muscles using elastography (supersonic shear imaging). Fourteen DMD patients and 13 control subjects were studied. Six muscles were measured at 2 muscle lengths (shortened and stretched): gastrocnemius medialis (GM); tibialis anterior (TA); vastus lateralis (VL); biceps brachii (BB); triceps brachii (TB); and abductor digiti minimi (ADM). Stiffness was significantly higher in DMD patients compared with controls for all the muscles (main effect for population, P < 0.033 in all cases), except for ADM. The effect size was small (d = 0.33 for ADM at both muscle lengths) to large (d = 0.86 for BB/stretched). Supersonic shear imaging is a sensitive non-invasive technique to assess the increase in muscle stiffness associated with DMD. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Weakness

    MedlinePlus

    ... ALS) Weakness of the muscles of the face ( Bell palsy ) Group of disorders involving brain and nervous system ... them ( myasthenia gravis ) Polio Home Care Follow the treatment your health care provider recommends to treat the ...

  16. The efficacy of modified direct lateral versus posterior approach on gait function and hip muscle strength after primary total hip arthroplasty at 12months follow-up. An explorative randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Rosenlund, Signe; Broeng, Leif; Overgaard, Søren; Jensen, Carsten; Holsgaard-Larsen, Anders

    2016-11-01

    The lateral and the posterior approach are the most commonly used procedures for total hip arthroplasty. Due to the detachment of the hip abductors, lateral approach is claimed to cause reduced hip muscle strength and altered gait pattern. However, this has not been investigated in a randomised controlled trial. The aim was to compare the efficacy of total hip arthroplasty performed by lateral or posterior approach on gait function and hip muscle strength up to 12months post-operatively. We hypothesised that posterior approach would be superior to lateral approach. Forty-seven patients with primary hip osteoarthritis were randomised to total hip arthroplasty with either posterior or lateral approach and evaluated pre-operatively, 3 and 12months post-operatively using 3-dimensional gait analyses as objective measures of gait function, including Gait Deviation Index, temporo-spatial parameters and range of motion. Isometric maximal hip muscle strength in abduction, flexion and extension was also tested. Post-operatively, no between-group difference in gait function was observed. However, both hip abductor and flexor muscle strength improved more in the posterior approach group: -0.20(Nm/kg)[95%CI:-0.4 to 0.0] and -0.20(Nm/kg)[95%CI:-0.4 to 0.0], respectively. Contrary to our first hypothesis, the overall gait function in the posterior approach group did not improve more than in the lateral approach group. However, in agreement with our second hypothesis, patients in the posterior approach group improved more in hip abductor and flexor muscle strength at 12months. Further investigation of the effect of reduced maximal hip muscle strength on functional capacity is needed. ClinicalTrials.gov. No.: NCT01616667. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Correlation of the Y-Balance Test with Lower-limb Strength of Adult Women

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dong-Kyu; Kim, Gyoung-Mo; Ha, Sung-Min; Oh, Jae-Seop

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to elucidate the relationship between Y-balance test (YBT) distance and the lower-limb strength of adult women. [Subjects] Forty women aged 45 to 80 years volunteered for this study. [Methods] The participants were tested for maximal muscle strength of the lower limbs (hip extensors, hip flexors, hip abductors, knee extensors, knee flexors, and ankle dorsiflexors) and YBT distances in the anterior, posteromedial, and posterolateral directions. Pearson’s correlation coefficient was used to quantify the linear relationships between YBT distances and lower-limb strength. [Results] Hip extensor and knee flexor strength were positively correlated with YBT anterior distance. Hip extensor, hip abductor, and knee flexor strength were positively correlated with the YBT posteromedial distance. Hip extensor and knee flexor strength were positively correlated with YBT posterolateral distance. [Conclusion] There was a weak correlation between lower-limb strength (hip extensors, hip abductors, and knee flexors) and dynamic postural control as measured by the YBT. PMID:24926122

  18. Primary Motor Cortex Representation of Handgrip Muscles in Patients with Leprosy

    PubMed Central

    Rangel, Maria Luíza Sales; Sanchez, Tiago Arruda; Moreira, Filipe Azaline; Hoefle, Sebastian; Souto, Inaiacy Bittencourt; da Cunha, Antônio José Ledo Alves

    2015-01-01

    Background Leprosy is an endemic infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae that predominantly attacks the skin and peripheral nerves, leading to progressive impairment of motor, sensory and autonomic function. Little is known about how this peripheral neuropathy affects corticospinal excitability of handgrip muscles. Our purpose was to explore the motor cortex organization after progressive peripheral nerve injury and upper-limb dysfunction induced by leprosy using noninvasive transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Methods In a cross-sectional study design, we mapped bilaterally in the primary motor cortex (M1) the representations of the hand flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS), as well as of the intrinsic hand muscles abductor pollicis brevis (APB), first dorsal interosseous (FDI) and abductor digiti minimi (ADM). All participants underwent clinical assessment, handgrip dynamometry and motor and sensory nerve conduction exams 30 days before mapping. Wilcoxon signed rank and Mann-Whitney tests were performed with an alpha-value of p<0.05. Findings Dynamometry performance of the patients’ most affected hand (MAH), was worse than that of the less affected hand (LAH) and of healthy controls participants (p = 0.031), confirming handgrip impairment. Motor threshold (MT) of the FDS muscle was higher in both hemispheres in patients as compared to controls, and lower in the hemisphere contralateral to the MAH when compared to that of the LAH. Moreover, motor evoked potential (MEP) amplitudes collected in the FDS of the MAH were higher in comparison to those of controls. Strikingly, MEPs in the intrinsic hand muscle FDI had lower amplitudes in the hemisphere contralateral to MAH as compared to those of the LAH and the control group. Taken together, these results are suggestive of a more robust representation of an extrinsic hand flexor and impaired intrinsic hand muscle function in the hemisphere contralateral to the MAH due to leprosy. Conclusion Decreased

  19. Muscle fiber types composition and type identified endplate morphology of forepaw intrinsic muscles in the rat.

    PubMed

    Pan, Feng; Mi, Jing-Yi; Zhang, Yan; Pan, Xiao-Yun; Rui, Yong-Jun

    2016-06-01

    The failure to accept reinnervation is considered to be one of the reasons for the poor motor functional recovery of intrinsic hand muscles (IHMs) after nerve injury. Rat could be a suitable model to be used in simulating motor function recovery of the IHMs after nerve injury as to the similarities in function and anatomy of the muscles between human and rat. However, few studies have reported the muscle fiber types composition and endplate morphologic characteristics of intrinsic forepaw muscles (IFMs) in the rat. In this study, the myosin heavy chain isoforms and acetylcholine receptors were stained by immunofluorescence to show the muscle fiber types composition and endplates on type-identified fibers of the lumbrical muscles (LMs), interosseus muscles (IMs), abductor digiti minimi (AM) and flexor pollicis brevis (FM) in rat forepaw. The majority of IFMs fibers were labeled positively for fast-switch fiber. However, the IMs were composed of only slow-switch fiber. With the exception of the IMs, the other IFMs had a part of hybrid fibers. Two-dimensional morphological characteristics of endplates on I and IIa muscle fiber had no significant differences among the IFMs. The LMs is the most suitable IFMs of rat to stimulate reinnervation of the IHMs after nerve injury. Gaining greater insight into the muscle fiber types composition and endplate morphology in the IFMs of rat may help understand the pathological and functional changes of IFMs in rat model stimulating reinnervation of IHMs after peripheral nerve injury.

  20. Non-Weight-Bearing and Weight-Bearing Ultrasonography of Select Foot Muscles in Young, Asymptomatic Participants: A Descriptive and Reliability Study.

    PubMed

    Battaglia, Patrick J; Mattox, Ross; Winchester, Brett; Kettner, Norman W

    The primary aim of this study was to determine the reliability of diagnostic ultrasound imaging for select intrinsic foot muscles using both non-weight-bearing and weight-bearing postures. Our secondary aim was to describe the change in muscle cross-sectional area (CSA) and dorsoplantar thickness when bearing weight. An ultrasound examination was performed with a linear ultrasound transducer operating between 9 and 12 MHz. Long-axis and short-axis ultrasound images of the abductor hallucis, flexor digitorum brevis, and quadratus plantae were obtained in both the non-weight-bearing and weight-bearing postures. Two examiners independently collected ultrasound images to allow for interexaminer and intraexaminer reliability calculation. The change in muscle CSA and dorsoplantar thickness when bearing weight was also studied. There were 26 participants (17 female) with a mean age of 25.5 ± 3.8 years and a mean body mass index of 28.0 ± 7.8 kg/m 2 . Inter-examiner reliability was excellent when measuring the muscles in short axis (intraclass correlation coefficient >0.75) and fair to good in long axis (intraclass correlation coefficient >0.4). Intraexaminer reliability was excellent for the abductor hallucis and flexor digitorum brevis and ranged from fair to good to excellent for the quadratus plantae. Bearing weight did not reduce interexaminer or intraexaminer reliability. All muscles exhibited a significant increase in CSA when bearing weight. This is the first report to describe weight-bearing diagnostic ultrasound of the intrinsic foot muscles. Ultrasound imaging is reliable when imaging these muscles bearing weight. Furthermore, muscle CSA increases in the weight-bearing posture. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Effect of Contralateral Strength Training on Muscle Weakness in People With Multiple Sclerosis: Proof-of-Concept Case Series.

    PubMed

    Manca, Andrea; Cabboi, Maria Paola; Ortu, Enzo; Ginatempo, Francesca; Dragone, Daniele; Zarbo, Ignazio Roberto; de Natale, Edoardo Rosario; Mureddu, Giovanni; Bua, Guido; Deriu, Franca

    2016-06-01

    The contralateral strength training (CST) effect is a transfer of muscle performance to the untrained limb following training of the contralateral side. The aim of this study was to explore, in individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS) presenting marked lower limb strength asymmetry, the effectiveness of CST on management of muscle weakness of the more-affected limb following training of the less-affected limb. A single-subject research design was used. Eight individuals with MS underwent 16 to 18 high-intensity training sessions of the less-affected ankle dorsiflexor muscles. The primary outcome measure of this single-system case series was maximal strength expressed as peak moment and maximal work. Secondary outcome measures were: Six-Minute-Walk Test, Timed "Up & Go" Test, 10-Meter Timed Walk Test, and Multiple Sclerosis Quality of Life-54 questionnaire. After the 6-week intervention, the contralateral more affected (untrained) limb showed a 22% to 24% increase in maximal strength. From pretest-posttest measurements, participants also performed significantly better on the clinical and functional secondary outcome measures. At the 12-week follow-up, the strength levels of the weaker untrained limb remained significantly superior to baseline levels in the majority (5 out of 8) of the outcome parameters. Considering the design used, the absence of a control group, and the sample size, these findings should be cautiously generalized and will need confirmation in a properly planned randomized controlled trial. The present proof-of-concept study shows, for the first time, the occurrence of the CST effect on muscle performance of ankle dorsiflexor muscles in people with MS. These preliminary findings reveal new potential implications for CST as a promising rehabilitation approach to those conditions where unilateral muscle weakness does not allow or makes difficult performing conventional strength training of the weaker limb. © 2016 American Physical Therapy

  2. Effect of acute fatigue of the hip abductors on control of balance in young and older women.

    PubMed

    Bellew, James W; Panwitz, Beth L; Peterson, Laura; Brock, Mary C; Olson, Katie E; Staples, William H

    2009-07-01

    To examine the effects of acute fatigue of the hip abductors on the control of balance in young and older women. Pretest-posttest. University research laboratory. Healthy young women (n=20; age, 23.0+/-1.5y; height, 166.52+/-4.5 cm; mass, 65.33+/-10.5 kg) and community-dwelling older women (n=20; age, 71.65+/-7.2y; height, 162.31+/-3.8 cm; mass, 71.16+/-11.6 kg) without a fall history. Measurements of control of single-limb balance before and after fatiguing the hip abductors of the dominant leg. Performance on 3 clinical assessments of control of balance: the modified Functional Reach Test in the forward, left, and right directions; the Lower-Extremity Reach Test in forward and lateral directions; and the Single-Limb Stance Time Test (SLSTT). Although the younger subjects showed a significantly greater control of balance than the older women in most tests, control of balance after acute fatigue failed to show a significant decline in either age group. The only exception to this was the SLSTT in the younger women in whom a significant 26% decline was noted (P<.05). Acute fatigue of the hip abductors did not result in a decreased control of balance in healthy young or older women without fall history. Despite considerable changes in movement strategies used to complete the postfatigue tests of balance, quantitative measures of balance did not decrease.

  3. Effects of obesity on lower extremity muscle function during walking at two speeds.

    PubMed

    Lerner, Zachary F; Board, Wayne J; Browning, Raymond C

    2014-03-01

    Walking is a recommended form of physical activity for obese adults, yet the effects of obesity and walking speed on the biomechanics of walking are not well understood. The purpose of this study was to examine joint kinematics, muscle force requirements and individual muscle contributions to the walking ground reaction forces (GRFs) at two speeds (1.25 ms(-1) and 1.50 ms(-1)) in obese and nonobese adults. Vasti (VAS), gluteus medius (GMED), gastrocnemius (GAST), and soleus (SOL) forces and their contributions to the GRFs were estimated using three-dimensional musculoskeletal models scaled to the anthropometrics of nine obese (35.0 (3.78 kg m(-2))); body mass index mean (SD)) and 10 nonobese (22.1 (1.02 kg m(-2))) subjects. The obese individuals walked with a straighter knee in early stance at the faster speed and greater pelvic obliquity during single limb support at both speeds. Absolute force requirements were generally greater in obese vs. nonobese adults, the main exception being VAS, which was similar between groups. At both speeds, lean mass (LM) normalized force output for GMED was greater in the obese group. Obese individuals appear to adopt a gait pattern that reduces VAS force output, especially at speeds greater than their preferred walking velocity. Greater relative GMED force requirements in obese individuals may contribute to altered kinematics and increased risk of musculoskeletal injury/pathology. Our results suggest that obese individuals may have relative weakness of the VAS and hip abductor muscles, specifically GMED, which may act to increase their risk of musculoskeletal injury/pathology during walking, and therefore may benefit from targeted muscle strengthening. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Non-weight bearing-induced muscle weakness: the role of myosin quantity and quality in MHC type II fibers.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong-Hee; Thompson, LaDora V

    2014-07-15

    We tested the hypothesis that non-weight bearing-induced muscle weakness (i.e., specific force) results from decreases in myosin protein quantity (i.e., myosin content per half-sarcomere and the ratio of myosin to actin) and quality (i.e., force per half-sarcomere and population of myosin heads in the strong-binding state during muscle contraction) in single myosin heavy chain (MHC) type II fibers. Fisher-344 rats were assigned to weight-bearing control (Con) or non-weight bearing (NWB). The NWB rats were hindlimb unloaded for 2 wk. Diameter, force, and MHC content were determined in permeabilized single fibers from the semimembranosus muscle. MHC isoform and the ratio of MHC to actin in each fiber were determined by gel electrophoresis and silver staining techniques. The structural distribution of myosin from spin-labeled fiber bundles during maximal isometric contraction was evaluated using electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. Specific force (peak force per cross-sectional area) in MHC type IIB and IIXB fibers from NWB was significantly reduced by 38% and 18%, respectively. MHC content per half-sarcomere was significantly reduced by 21%. Two weeks of hindlimb unloading resulted in a reduced force per half-sarcomere of 52% and fraction of myosin strong-binding during contraction of 34%. The results suggest that reduced myosin and actin content (quantity) and myosin quality concomitantly contribute to non-weight bearing-related muscle weakness. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  5. The influence of changes in trunk and pelvic posture during single leg standing on hip and thigh muscle activation in a pain free population.

    PubMed

    Prior, Simon; Mitchell, Tim; Whiteley, Rod; O'Sullivan, Peter; Williams, Benjamin K; Racinais, Sebastien; Farooq, Abdulaziz

    2014-03-27

    Thigh muscle injuries commonly occur during single leg loading tasks and patterns of muscle activation are thought to contribute to these injuries. The influence trunk and pelvis posture has on hip and thigh muscle activation during single leg stance is unknown and was investigated in a pain free population to determine if changes in body posture result in consistent patterns of changes in muscle activation. Hip and thigh muscle activation patterns were compared in 22 asymptomatic, male subjects (20-45 years old) in paired functionally relevant single leg standing test postures: Anterior vs. Posterior Trunk Sway; Anterior vs. Posterior Pelvic Rotation; Left vs. Right Trunk Shift; and Pelvic Drop vs. Raise. Surface EMG was collected from eight hip and thigh muscles calculating Root Mean Square. EMG was normalized to an "upright standing" reference posture. Repeated measures ANOVA was performed along with associated F tests to determine if there were significant differences in muscle activation between paired test postures. In right leg stance, Anterior Trunk Sway (compared to Posterior Sway) increased activity in posterior sagittal plane muscles, with a concurrent deactivation of anterior sagittal plane muscles (p: 0.016 - <0.001). Lateral hip abductor muscles increased activation during Left Trunk Shift (compared to Right) (p :≤ 0.001). Lateral Pelvic Drop (compared to Raise) decreased activity in hip abductors and increased hamstring, adductor longus and vastus lateralis activity (p: 0.037 - <0.001). Changes in both trunk and pelvic posture during single leg stance generally resulted in large, predictable changes in hip and thigh muscle activation in asymptomatic young males. Changes in trunk position in the sagittal plane and pelvis position in the frontal plane had the greatest effect on muscle activation. Investigation of these activation patterns in clinical populations such as hip and thigh muscle injuries may provide important insights into injury

  6. Hypoglycemia, hepatic dysfunction, muscle weakness, cardiomyopathy, free carnitine deficiency and long-chain acylcarnitine excess responsive to medium chain triglyceride diet.

    PubMed

    Glasgow, A M; Engel, A G; Bier, D M; Perry, L W; Dickie, M; Todaro, J; Brown, B I; Utter, M F

    1983-05-01

    Fraternal twins who had fasting hypoglycemia, hypoketonemia, muscle weakness, and hepatic dysfunction are reported. The hepatic dysfunction occurred only during periods of caloric deprivation. The surviving patient developed a cardiomyopathy. In this sibling, muscle weakness and cardiomyopathy were markedly improved by a diet high in medium chain triglycerides. There was a marked deficiency of muscle total carnitine and a mild deficiency of hepatic total carnitine. Unlike patients with systemic carnitine deficiency, serum and muscle long-chain acylcarnitine were elevated and renal reabsorption of carnitine was normal. It was postulated that the defect in long-chain fatty acid oxidation in this disorder is caused by an abnormality in the mitochondrial acylcarnitine transport. Detailed studies of the cause of the hypoglycemia revealed that insulin, growth hormone, cortisol, and glucagon secretion were appropriate and that it is unlikely that there was a major deficiency of a glycolytic or gluconeogenic enzyme. Glucose production and alanine conversion to glucose were in the low normal range when compared to normal children in the postabsorptive state. The hypoglycemia in our patients was probably due to a modest increase in glucose consumption, secondary to the decreased oxidation of fatty acids and ketones, alternate fuels which spare glucose utilization, plus a modest decrease in hepatic glucose production secondary to decreased available hepatic energy substrates.

  7. Effects of wide step walking on swing phase hip muscle forces and spatio-temporal gait parameters.

    PubMed

    Bajelan, Soheil; Nagano, Hanatsu; Sparrow, Tony; Begg, Rezaul K

    2017-07-01

    Human walking can be viewed essentially as a continuum of anterior balance loss followed by a step that re-stabilizes balance. To secure balance an extended base of support can be assistive but healthy young adults tend to walk with relatively narrower steps compared to vulnerable populations (e.g. older adults and patients). It was, therefore, hypothesized that wide step walking may enhance dynamic balance at the cost of disturbed optimum coupling of muscle functions, leading to additional muscle work and associated reduction of gait economy. Young healthy adults may select relatively narrow steps for a more efficient gait. The current study focused on the effects of wide step walking on hip abductor and adductor muscles and spatio-temporal gait parameters. To this end, lower body kinematic data and ground reaction forces were obtained using an Optotrak motion capture system and AMTI force plates, respectively, while AnyBody software was employed for muscle force simulation. A single step of four healthy young male adults was captured during preferred walking and wide step walking. Based on preferred walking data, two parallel lines were drawn on the walkway to indicate 50% larger step width and participants targeted the lines with their heels as they walked. In addition to step width that defined walking conditions, other spatio-temporal gait parameters including step length, double support time and single support time were obtained. Average hip muscle forces during swing were modeled. Results showed that in wide step walking step length increased, Gluteus Minimus muscles were more active while Gracilis and Adductor Longus revealed considerably reduced forces. In conclusion, greater use of abductors and loss of adductor forces were found in wide step walking. Further validation is needed in future studies involving older adults and other pathological populations.

  8. Hyperhomocysteinemia associated skeletal muscle weakness involves mitochondrial dysfunction and epigenetic modifications

    PubMed Central

    Veeranki, Sudhakar; Winchester, Lee J; Tyagi, Suresh C

    2015-01-01

    HHcy has been implicated in elderly frailty, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Using C57 and CBS+/- mice and C2C12 cell line, we investigated mechanisms behind HHcy induced skeletal muscle weakness and fatigability. Possible alterations in metabolic capacity (levels of LDH, CS, MM-CK and COX-IV), in structural proteins (levels of dystrophin) and in mitochondrial function (ATP production) were examined. An exercise regimen was employed to reverse HHcy induced changes. CBS+/- mice exhibited more fatigability, and generated less contraction force. No significant changes in muscle morphology were observed. However, there is corresponding reduction in large muscle fiber number in CBS+/- mice. Excess fatigability was not due to changes in key enzymes involved in metabolism, but was due to reduced ATP levels. A marginal reduction in dystrophin levels along with a decrease in mitochondrial transcription factor A (mtTFA) were observed. There was also an increase in the mir-31, and mir-494 quantities that were implicated in dystrophin and mtTFA regulation respectively. The molecular changes elevated during HHcy, with the exception of dystrophin levels, were reversed after exercise. In addition, amount of NRF-1, one of the transcriptional regulators of mtTFA, was significantly decreased. Furthermore, there was enhancement in mir-494 levels and a concomitant decline in mtTFA protein quantity in homocysteine treated cells. These changes in C2C12 cells were also accompanied by an increase in DNMT3a and DNMT3b proteins and global DNA methylation levels. Together, these results suggest that HHcy plays a causal role in enhanced fatigability through mitochondrial dysfunction which involves epigenetic changes. PMID:25615794

  9. Potential sites of compression of tibial nerve branches in foot: a cadaveric and imaging study.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Sanjib Kumar; Raheja, Shashi; Tuli, Anita

    2013-09-01

    Hypertrophy of abductor hallucis muscle is one of the reported causes of compression of tibial nerve branches in foot, resulting in tarsal tunnel syndrome. In this study, we dissected the foot (including the sole) of 120 lower limbs in 60 human cadavers (45 males and 15 females), aged between 45 and 70 years to analyze the possible impact of abductor hallucis muscle in compression neuropathy of tibial nerve branches. We identified five areas in foot, where tibial nerve branches could be compressed by abductor hallucis. Our findings regarding three of these areas were substantiated by clinical evidence from ultrasonography of ankle and sole region, conducted in the affected foot of 120 patients (82 males and 38 females), aged between 42 and 75 years, who were referred for evaluation of pain and/or swelling in medial side of ankle joint with or without associated heel and/or sole pain. We also assessed whether estimation of parameters for the muscle size could identify patients at risk of having nerve compression due to abductor hallucis muscle hypertrophy. The interclass correlation coefficient for dorso-planter thickness of abductor hallucis muscle was 0.84 (95% CI, 0.63-0.92) and that of medio-lateral width was 0.78 (95% CI, 0.62-0.88) in the imaging study, suggesting both are reliable parameters of the muscle size. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis showed, if ultrasonographic estimation of dorso-plantar thickness is >12.8 mm and medio-lateral width > 30.66 mm in patients with symptoms of nerve compression in foot, abductor hallucis muscle hypertrophy associated compression neuropathy may be suspected. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Early Life Exposure to Chronic Intermittent Hypoxia Primes Increased Susceptibility to Hypoxia-Induced Weakness in Rat Sternohyoid Muscle during Adulthood

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Fiona B.; Dempsey, Eugene M.; O'Halloran, Ken D.

    2016-01-01

    Intermittent hypoxia is a feature of apnea of prematurity (AOP), chronic lung disease, and sleep apnea. Despite the clinical relevance, the long-term effects of hypoxic exposure in early life on respiratory control are not well defined. We recently reported that exposure to chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH) during postnatal development (pCIH) causes upper airway muscle weakness in both sexes, which persists for several weeks. We sought to examine if there are persistent sex-dependent effects of pCIH on respiratory muscle function into adulthood and/or increased susceptibility to re-exposure to CIH in adulthood in animals previously exposed to CIH during postnatal development. We hypothesized that pCIH would cause long-lasting muscle impairment and increased susceptibility to subsequent hypoxia. Within 24 h of delivery, pups and their respective dams were exposed to CIH: 90 s of hypoxia reaching 5% O2 at nadir; once every 5 min, 8 h per day for 3 weeks. Sham groups were exposed to normoxia in parallel. Three groups were studied: sham; pCIH; and pCIH combined with adult CIH (p+aCIH), where a subset of the pCIH-exposed pups were re-exposed to the same CIH paradigm beginning at 13 weeks. Following gas exposures, sternohyoid and diaphragm muscle isometric contractile and endurance properties were examined ex vivo. There was no apparent lasting effect of pCIH on respiratory muscle function in adults. However, in both males and females, re-exposure to CIH in adulthood in pCIH-exposed animals caused sternohyoid (but not diaphragm) weakness. Exposure to this paradigm of CIH in adulthood alone had no effect on muscle function. Persistent susceptibility in pCIH-exposed airway dilator muscle to subsequent hypoxic insult may have implications for the control of airway patency in adult humans exposed to intermittent hypoxic stress during early life. PMID:26973537

  11. Pattern Differences of Small Hand Muscle Atrophy in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and Mimic Disorders.

    PubMed

    Fang, Jia; Liu, Ming-Sheng; Guan, Yu-Zhou; Du, Hua; Li, Ben-Hong; Cui, Bo; Ding, Qing-Yun; Cui, Li-Ying

    2016-04-05

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and some mimic disorders, such as distal-type cervical spondylotic amyotrophy (CSA), Hirayama disease (HD), and spinobulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) may present with intrinsic hand muscle atrophy. This study aimed to investigate different patterns of small hand muscle involvement in ALS and some mimic disorders. We compared the abductor digiti minimi/abductor pollicis brevis (ADM/APB) compound muscle action potential (CMAP) ratios between 200 ALS patients, 95 patients with distal-type CSA, 88 HD patients, 43 SBMA patients, and 150 normal controls. The ADM/APB CMAP amplitude ratio was significantly higher in the ALS patients (P < 0.001) than that in the normal controls. The ADM/APB CMAP amplitude ratio was significantly reduced in the patients with distal-type CSA (P < 0.001) and the HD patients (P < 0.001) compared with that in the normal controls. The patients with distal-type CSA had significantly lower APB CMAP amplitude than the HD patients (P = 0.004). The ADM/APB CMAP amplitude ratio was significantly lower in the HD patients (P < 0.001) than that in the patients with distal-type CSA. The ADM/APB CMAP amplitude ratio of the SBMA patients was similar to that of the normal controls (P = 0.862). An absent APB CMAP and an abnormally high ADM/APB CMAP amplitude ratio (≥4.5) were observed exclusively in the ALS patients. The different patterns of small hand muscle atrophy between the ALS patients and the patients with mimic disorders presumably reflect distinct pathophysiological mechanisms underlying different disorders, and may aid in distinguishing between ALS and mimic disorders.

  12. High-intensity interval training prevents oxidant-mediated diaphragm muscle weakness in hypertensive mice.

    PubMed

    Bowen, T Scott; Eisenkolb, Sophia; Drobner, Juliane; Fischer, Tina; Werner, Sarah; Linke, Axel; Mangner, Norman; Schuler, Gerhard; Adams, Volker

    2017-01-01

    Hypertension is a key risk factor for heart failure, with the latter characterized by diaphragm muscle weakness that is mediated in part by increased oxidative stress. In the present study, we used a deoxycorticosterone acetate (DOCA)-salt mouse model to determine whether hypertension could independently induce diaphragm dysfunction and further investigated the effects of high-intensity interval training (HIIT). Sham-treated (n = 11), DOCA-salt-treated (n = 11), and DOCA-salt+HIIT-treated (n = 15) mice were studied over 4 wk. Diaphragm contractile function, protein expression, enzyme activity, and fiber cross-sectional area and type were subsequently determined. Elevated blood pressure confirmed hypertension in DOCA-salt mice independent of HIIT (P < 0.05). Diaphragm forces were impaired by ∼15-20% in DOCA-salt vs. sham-treated mice (P < 0.05), but this effect was prevented after HIIT. Myosin heavy chain (MyHC) protein expression tended to decrease (∼30%; P = 0.06) in DOCA-salt vs. sham- and DOCA-salt+HIIT mice, whereas oxidative stress increased (P < 0.05). Enzyme activity of NADPH oxidase was higher, but superoxide dismutase was lower, with MyHC oxidation elevated by ∼50%. HIIT further prevented direct oxidant-mediated diaphragm contractile dysfunction (P < 0.05) after a 30 min exposure to H 2 O- 2 (1 mM). Our data suggest that hypertension induces diaphragm contractile dysfunction via an oxidant-mediated mechanism that is prevented by HIIT.-Bowen, T. S., Eisenkolb, S., Drobner, J., Fischer, T., Werner, S., Linke, A., Mangner, N., Schuler, G., Adams, V. High-intensity interval training prevents oxidant-mediated diaphragm muscle weakness in hypertensive mice. © FASEB.

  13. Muscle Weakness Thresholds for Prediction of Diabetes in Adults.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Mark D; Zhang, Peng; Choksi, Palak; Markides, Kyriakos S; Al Snih, Soham

    2016-05-01

    Despite the known links between weakness and early mortality, what remains to be fully understood is the extent to which strength preservation is associated with protection from cardiometabolic diseases, such as diabetes. The purposes of this study were to determine the association between muscle strength and diabetes among adults, and to identify age- and sex-specific thresholds of low strength for detection of risk. A population-representative sample of 4066 individuals, aged 20-85 years, was included from the combined 2011-2012 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) data sets. Strength was assessed using a handheld dynamometer, and the single highest reading from either hand was normalized to body mass. A logistic regression model was used to assess the association between normalized grip strength and risk of diabetes, as determined by haemoglobin A1c levels ≥6.5 % (≥48 mmol/mol), while controlling for sociodemographic characteristics, anthropometric measures and television viewing time. For every 0.05 decrement in normalized strength, there were 1.26 times increased adjusted odds for diabetes in men and women. Women were at lower odds of having diabetes (odds ratio 0.49; 95 % confidence interval 0.29-0.82). Age, waist circumference and lower income were also associated with diabetes. The optimal sex- and age-specific weakness thresholds to detect diabetes were 0.56, 0.50 and 0.45 for men at ages of 20-39, 40-59 and 60-80 years, respectively, and 0.42, 0.38 and 0.33 for women at ages of 20-39, 40-59 and 60-80 years, respectively. We present thresholds of strength that can be incorporated into a clinical setting for identifying adults who are at risk of developing diabetes and might benefit from lifestyle interventions to reduce risk.

  14. Muscle Weakness Thresholds for Prediction of Diabetes in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Mark D.; Zhang, Peng; Choksi, Palak; Markides, Kyriakos S.; Al Snih, Soham

    2016-01-01

    Background Despite the known links between weakness and early mortality, what remains to be fully understood is the extent to which strength preservation is associated with protection from cardiometabolic diseases such as diabetes. Purpose The purposes of this study were to determine the association between muscle strength and diabetes among adults, and to identify age- and sex-specific thresholds of low strength for detection of risk. Methods A population-representative sample of 4,066 individuals, aged 20–85 years, was included from the combined 2011–2012 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey datasets. Strength was assessed using a hand-held dynamometer, and the single largest reading from either hand was normalized to body mass. A logistic regression model was used to assess the association between normalized grip strength and risk of diabetes, as determined by hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels (≥6.5% [≥48 mmol/mol]), while controlling for sociodemographic characteristics, anthropometric measures, and television viewing time. Results For every 0.05 decrement in normalized strength, there was a 1.26 times increased adjusted odds for diabetes in men and women. Women were at lower odds of having diabetes (OR: 0.49; 95% CI: 0.29–0.82), whereas age, waist circumference and lower income were inversely associated. Optimal sex- and age-specific weakness thresholds to detect diabetes were 0.56, 0.50, and 0.45 for men, and 0.42, 0.38, and 0.33 for women, for ages 20–39 years, 40–59 years, and 60–80 years. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance We present thresholds of strength that can be incorporated into a clinical setting for identifying adults that are at risk for developing diabetes, and that might benefit from lifestyle interventions to reduce risk. PMID:26744337

  15. The role of the inspiratory muscle weakness in functional capacity in hemodialysis patients

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Rosalina Tossige; Neves, Camila Danielle Cunha; de Oliveira, Evandro Silveira; Alves, Frederico Lopes; Rodrigues, Vanessa Gomes Brandão; Maciel, Emílio Henrique Barroso

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Inspiratory muscle function may be affected in patients with End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD), further worsening the functional loss in these individuals. However, the impact of inspiratory muscle weakness (IMW) on the functional capacity (FC) of hemodialysis patients remains unknown. Thus, the present study aimed to evaluate the impact of IMW on FC in ESRD patients undergoing hemodialysis. Materials and methods ESRD patients on hemodialysis treatment for more than six months were evaluated for inspiratory muscle strength and FC. Inspiratory muscle strength was evaluated based on maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP). IMW was defined as MIP values less than 70% of the predicted value. FC was evaluated using the Incremental Shuttle Walk test (ISWT). Patients whose predicted peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak) over the distance walked during the ISWT was less than 16mL/kg/min were considered to have FC impairment. Associations between variables were assessed by linear and logistic regression, with adjustment for age, sex, body mass index (BMI), presence of diabetes and hemoglobin level. Receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was used to determine different cutoff values of the MIP for normal inspiratory muscle strength and FC. Results Sixty-five ERSD patients (67.7% male), aged 48.2 (44.5–51.9) years were evaluated. MIP was an independent predictor of the distance walked during the ISWT (R2 = 0.44). IMW was an independent predictor of VO2peak < 16mL/kg/min. (OR = 5.7; p = 0.048) in adjusted logistic regression models. ROC curves showed that the MIP cutoff value of 82cmH2O had a sensitivity of 73.5% and specificity of 93.7% in predicting normal inspiratory strength and a sensitivity and specificity of 76.3% and 70.4%, respectively, in predicting VO2peak ≥ 16mL/kg/min. Conclusions IMW is associated with reduced FC in hemodialysis patients. Evaluation of the MIP may be important to functional monitoring in clinical practice and can help in the

  16. The role of the inspiratory muscle weakness in functional capacity in hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Figueiredo, Pedro Henrique Scheidt; Lima, Márcia Maria Oliveira; Costa, Henrique Silveira; Gomes, Rosalina Tossige; Neves, Camila Danielle Cunha; Oliveira, Evandro Silveira de; Alves, Frederico Lopes; Rodrigues, Vanessa Gomes Brandão; Maciel, Emílio Henrique Barroso; Balthazar, Cláudio Heitor

    2017-01-01

    Inspiratory muscle function may be affected in patients with End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD), further worsening the functional loss in these individuals. However, the impact of inspiratory muscle weakness (IMW) on the functional capacity (FC) of hemodialysis patients remains unknown. Thus, the present study aimed to evaluate the impact of IMW on FC in ESRD patients undergoing hemodialysis. ESRD patients on hemodialysis treatment for more than six months were evaluated for inspiratory muscle strength and FC. Inspiratory muscle strength was evaluated based on maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP). IMW was defined as MIP values less than 70% of the predicted value. FC was evaluated using the Incremental Shuttle Walk test (ISWT). Patients whose predicted peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak) over the distance walked during the ISWT was less than 16mL/kg/min were considered to have FC impairment. Associations between variables were assessed by linear and logistic regression, with adjustment for age, sex, body mass index (BMI), presence of diabetes and hemoglobin level. Receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was used to determine different cutoff values of the MIP for normal inspiratory muscle strength and FC. Sixty-five ERSD patients (67.7% male), aged 48.2 (44.5-51.9) years were evaluated. MIP was an independent predictor of the distance walked during the ISWT (R2 = 0.44). IMW was an independent predictor of VO2peak < 16mL/kg/min. (OR = 5.7; p = 0.048) in adjusted logistic regression models. ROC curves showed that the MIP cutoff value of 82cmH2O had a sensitivity of 73.5% and specificity of 93.7% in predicting normal inspiratory strength and a sensitivity and specificity of 76.3% and 70.4%, respectively, in predicting VO2peak ≥ 16mL/kg/min. IMW is associated with reduced FC in hemodialysis patients. Evaluation of the MIP may be important to functional monitoring in clinical practice and can help in the stratification of patients eligible to perform exercise testing.

  17. Patellofemoral pain and asymmetrical hip rotation.

    PubMed

    Cibulka, Michael T; Threlkeld-Watkins, Julie

    2005-11-01

    Patellofemoral joint problems are the most common overuse injury of the lower extremity, and altered femoral or hip rotation may play a role in patellofemoral pain. The purpose of this case report is to describe the evaluation of and intervention for a patient with asymmetrical hip rotation and patellofemoral pain. The patient was a 15-year-old girl with an 8-month history of anterior right knee pain, without known trauma or injury. Prior to intervention, her score on the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) was 24%. Right hip medial (internal) rotation was less than left hip medial rotation, and manual muscle testing showed weakness of the right hip internal rotator and abductor muscles. The intervention was aimed at increasing right hip medial rotation, improving right hip muscle strength (eg, the muscle force exerted by a muscle or a group of muscles to overcome a resistance), and eliminating anterior right knee pain. After 6 visits (14 days), passive left and right hip medial rotations were symmetrical, and her right hip internal rotator and abductor muscle grades were Good plus. Her WOMAC score was 0%. The patient had right patellofemoral pain and an uncommon pattern of asymmetrical hip rotation, with diminished hip medial rotation and excessive hip lateral (external) rotation on the right side. The patient's outcomes suggest that femoral or hip joint asymmetry may be related to patellofemoral joint pain.

  18. Maximum toe flexor muscle strength and quantitative analysis of human plantar intrinsic and extrinsic muscles by a magnetic resonance imaging technique.

    PubMed

    Kurihara, Toshiyuki; Yamauchi, Junichiro; Otsuka, Mitsuo; Tottori, Nobuaki; Hashimoto, Takeshi; Isaka, Tadao

    2014-01-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate the relationships between the maximum isometric toe flexor muscle strength (TFS) and cross-sectional area (CSA) of the plantar intrinsic and extrinsic muscles and to identify the major determinant of maximum TFS among CSA of the plantar intrinsic and extrinsic muscles. Twenty six young healthy participants (14 men, 12 women; age, 20.4 ± 1.6 years) volunteered for the study. TFS was measured by a specific designed dynamometer, and CSA of plantar intrinsic and extrinsic muscles were measured using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). To measure TFS, seated participants optimally gripped the bar with their toes and exerted maximum force on the dynamometer. For each participant, the highest force produced among three trials was used for further analysis. To measure CSA, serial T1-weighted images were acquired. TFS was significantly correlated with CSA of the plantar intrinsic and extrinsic muscles. Stepwise multiple linear regression analyses identified that the major determinant of TFS was CSA of medial parts of plantar intrinsic muscles (flexor hallucis brevis, flexor digitorum brevis, quadratus plantae, lumbricals and abductor hallucis). There was no significant difference between men and women in TFS/CSA. CSA of the plantar intrinsic and extrinsic muscles is one of important factors for determining the maximum TFS in humans.

  19. Sildenafil reduces respiratory muscle weakness and fibrosis in the mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Percival, Justin M; Whitehead, Nicholas P; Adams, Marvin E; Adamo, Candace M; Beavo, Joseph A; Froehner, Stanley C

    2012-09-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the most common form of muscular dystrophy caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene. Loss of dystrophin initiates a progressive decline in skeletal muscle integrity and contractile capacity which weakens respiratory muscles including the diaphragm, culminating in respiratory failure, the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in DMD patients. At present, corticosteroid treatment is the primary pharmacological intervention in DMD, but has limited efficacy and adverse side effects. Thus, there is an urgent need for new safe, cost-effective, and rapidly implementable treatments that slow disease progression. One promising new approach is the amplification of nitric oxide-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (NO-cGMP) signalling pathways with phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5) inhibitors. PDE5 inhibitors serve to amplify NO signalling that is attenuated in many neuromuscular diseases including DMD. We report here that a 14-week treatment of the mdx mouse model of DMD with the PDE5 inhibitor sildenafil (Viagra(®), Revatio(®)) significantly reduced mdx diaphragm muscle weakness without impacting fatigue resistance. In addition to enhancing respiratory muscle contractility, sildenafil also promoted normal extracellular matrix organization. PDE5 inhibition slowed the establishment of mdx diaphragm fibrosis and reduced matrix metalloproteinase-13 (MMP-13) expression. Sildenafil also normalized the expression of the pro-fibrotic (and pro-inflammatory) cytokine tumour necrosis factor α (TNFα). Sildenafil-treated mdx diaphragms accumulated significantly less Evans Blue tracer dye than untreated controls, which is also indicative of improved diaphragm muscle health. We conclude that sildenafil-mediated PDE5 inhibition significantly reduces diaphragm respiratory muscle dysfunction and pathology in the mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. This study provides new insights into the therapeutic utility of targeting defects in NO

  20. The Evolution of and Risk Factors for Neck Muscle Atrophy and Weakness in Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Treated With Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lu-Lu; Mao, Yan-Ping; Zhou, Guan-Qun; Tang, Ling-Long; Qi, Zhen-Yu; Lin, Li; Yao, Ji-Jin; Ma, Jun; Lin, Ai-Hua; Sun, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to investigate the evolution of sternocleidomastoid muscle (SCM) atrophy in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients following intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), and the relationship between SCM atrophy and neck weakness. Data were retrospectively analyzed from 223 biopsy-proven NPC patients with no distant metastasis who underwent IMRT with or without chemotherapy. The volume of SCM was measured on pretreatment magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and MRIs were conducted 1, 2, and 3 years after the completion of IMRT. Change in SCM volume was calculated and classified using the late effects of normal tissues–subjective, objective, management, and analytic system. The grade of neck muscle weakness, classified by the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events V 3.0, was measured 3 years after the completion of IMRT. The average SCM atrophy ratio was −10.97%, −18.65%, and −22.25% at 1, 2, and 3 years postirradiation, respectively. Multivariate analysis indicated N stage and the length of time after IMRT were independent prognostic variables. There were significant associations between the degree of SCM atrophy and neck weakness. Radical IMRT can cause significant SCM atrophy in NPC patients. A more advanced N stage was associated with more severe SCM atrophy, but no difference was observed between N2 and N3. SCM atrophy progresses over time during the 3 years following IMRT. Grade of SCM atrophy is significantly associated with neck weakness. PMID:26252307

  1. Relative contribution of different altered motor unit control to muscle weakness in stroke: a simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Henry; Suresh, Nina L.; Zev Rymer, William; Hu, Xiaogang

    2018-02-01

    Objective. Chronic muscle weakness impacts the majority of individuals after a stroke. The origins of this hemiparesis is multifaceted, and an altered spinal control of the motor unit (MU) pool can lead to muscle weakness. However, the relative contribution of different MU recruitment and discharge organization is not well understood. In this study, we sought to examine these different effects by utilizing a MU simulation with variations set to mimic the changes of MU control in stroke. Approach. Using a well-established model of the MU pool, this study quantified the changes in force output caused by changes in MU recruitment range and recruitment order, as well as MU firing rate organization at the population level. We additionally expanded the original model to include a fatigue component, which variably decreased the output force with increasing length of contraction. Differences in the force output at both the peak and fatigued time points across different excitation levels were quantified and compared across different sets of MU parameters. Main results. Across the different simulation parameters, we found that the main driving factor of the reduced force output was due to the compressed range of MU recruitment. Recruitment compression caused a decrease in total force across all excitation levels. Additionally, a compression of the range of MU firing rates also demonstrated a decrease in the force output mainly at the higher excitation levels. Lastly, changes to the recruitment order of MUs appeared to minimally impact the force output. Significance. We found that altered control of MUs alone, as simulated in this study, can lead to a substantial reduction in muscle force generation in stroke survivors. These findings may provide valuable insight for both clinicians and researchers in prescribing and developing different types of therapies for the rehabilitation and restoration of lost strength after stroke.

  2. Muscle atrophy, voluntary activation disturbances, and low serum concentrations of IGF-1 and IGFBP-3 are associated with weakness in people with chronic stroke.

    PubMed

    Silva-Couto, Marcela de Abreu; Prado-Medeiros, Christiane Lanatovitz; Oliveira, Ana Beatriz; Alcântara, Carolina Carmona; Guimarães, Araci Teixeira; Salvini, Tania de Fatima; Mattioli, Rosana; de Russo, Thiago Luiz

    2014-07-01

    The muscle weakness that is exhibited poststroke is due to a multifactorial etiology involving the central nervous system and skeletal muscle changes. Insulinlike growth factor 1 (IGF-1) and IGF binding protein 3 (IGFBP-3) have been described as biomarkers of neuromuscular performance in many conditions. However, no information about these biomarkers is available for people with chronic hemiparesis. The purpose of this study was to investigate possible factors involved in muscle weakness, such as IGF-1 and IGFBP-3 serum concentrations, muscle volume, and neuromuscular performance of the knee flexors and extensors, in people with chronic hemiparesis poststroke. This was a cross-sectional study. A cross-sectional study was performed on 14 individuals poststroke who were paired with healthy controls. Mobility, function, balance, and quality of life were recorded as outcome measures. Knee flexor and extensor muscle volumes and neuromuscular performance were measured using nuclear magnetic resonance imaging, dynamometry, and electromyography. The serum concentrations of IGF-1 and IGFBP-3 were quantified by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The hemiparetic group had low serum concentrations of IGF-1 (25%) and IGFBP-3 (40%); reduced muscle volume in the vastus medialis (32%), vastus intermedius (29%), biceps femoris (16%), and semitendinosus and semimembranosus (12%) muscles; reduced peak torque, power, and work of the knee flexors and extensors; and altered agonist and antagonist muscle activation compared with controls. Low serum concentrations of IGF-1 and IGFBP-3, deficits in neuromuscular performance, selective muscle atrophy, and decreased agonist muscle activation were found in the group with chronic hemiparesis poststroke. Both hemorrhagic and ischemic stroke were considered, and the data reflect a chronic poststroke population with good function. © 2014 American Physical Therapy Association.

  3. Mice deficient in ribosomal protein S6 phosphorylation suffer from muscle weakness that reflects a growth defect and energy deficit.

    PubMed

    Ruvinsky, Igor; Katz, Maximiliano; Dreazen, Avigail; Gielchinsky, Yuval; Saada, Ann; Freedman, Nanette; Mishani, Eyal; Zimmerman, Gabriel; Kasir, Judith; Meyuhas, Oded

    2009-05-19

    Mice, whose ribosomal protein S6 cannot be phosphorylated due to replacement of all five phosphorylatable serine residues by alanines (rpS6(P-/-)), are viable and fertile. However, phenotypic characterization of these mice and embryo fibroblasts derived from them, has established the role of these modifications in the regulation of the size of several cell types, as well as pancreatic beta-cell function and glucose homeostasis. A relatively passive behavior of these mice has raised the possibility that they suffer from muscle weakness, which has, indeed, been confirmed by a variety of physical performance tests. A large variety of experimental methodologies, including morphometric measurements of histological preparations, high throughput proteomic analysis, positron emission tomography (PET) and numerous biochemical assays, were used in an attempt to establish the mechanism underlying the relative weakness of rpS6(P-/-) muscles. Collectively, these experiments have demonstrated that the physical inferiority appears to result from two defects: a) a decrease in total muscle mass that reflects impaired growth, rather than aberrant differentiation of myofibers, as well as a diminished abundance of contractile proteins; and b) a reduced content of ATP and phosphocreatine, two readily available energy sources. The abundance of three mitochondrial proteins has been shown to diminish in the knockin mouse. However, the apparent energy deficiency in this genotype does not result from a lower mitochondrial mass or compromised activity of enzymes of the oxidative phosphorylation, nor does it reflect a decline in insulin-dependent glucose uptake, or diminution in storage of glycogen or triacylglycerol (TG) in the muscle. This study establishes rpS6 phosphorylation as a determinant of muscle strength through its role in regulation of myofiber growth and energy content. Interestingly, a similar role has been assigned for ribosomal protein S6 kinase 1, even though it regulates

  4. Skeletal Muscle and Lymphocyte Mitochondrial Dysfunctions in Septic Shock Trigger ICU-Acquired Weakness and Sepsis-Induced Immunoparalysis.

    PubMed

    Maestraggi, Quentin; Lebas, Benjamin; Clere-Jehl, Raphaël; Ludes, Pierre-Olivier; Chamaraux-Tran, Thiên-Nga; Schneider, Francis; Diemunsch, Pierre; Geny, Bernard; Pottecher, Julien

    2017-01-01

    Fundamental events driving the pathological processes of septic shock-induced multiorgan failure (MOF) at the cellular and subcellular levels remain debated. Emerging data implicate mitochondrial dysfunction as a critical factor in the pathogenesis of sepsis-associated MOF. If macrocirculatory and microcirculatory dysfunctions undoubtedly participate in organ dysfunction at the early stage of septic shock, an intrinsic bioenergetic failure, sometimes called "cytopathic hypoxia," perpetuates cellular dysfunction. Short-term failure of vital organs immediately threatens patient survival but long-term recovery is also severely hindered by persistent dysfunction of organs traditionally described as nonvital, such as skeletal muscle and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). In this review, we will stress how and why a persistent mitochondrial dysfunction in skeletal muscles and PBMC could impair survival in patients who overcome the first acute phase of their septic episode. First, muscle wasting protracts weaning from mechanical ventilation, increases the risk of mechanical ventilator-associated pneumonia, and creates a state of ICU-acquired muscle weakness, compelling the patient to bed. Second, failure of the immune system ("immunoparalysis") translates into its inability to clear infectious foci and predisposes the patient to recurrent nosocomial infections. We will finally emphasize how mitochondrial-targeted therapies could represent a realistic strategy to promote long-term recovery after sepsis.

  5. Muscle shear elastic modulus is linearly related to muscle torque over the entire range of isometric contraction intensity.

    PubMed

    Ateş, Filiz; Hug, François; Bouillard, Killian; Jubeau, Marc; Frappart, Thomas; Couade, Mathieu; Bercoff, Jeremy; Nordez, Antoine

    2015-08-01

    Muscle shear elastic modulus is linearly related to muscle torque during low-level contractions (<60% of Maximal Voluntary Contraction, MVC). This measurement can therefore be used to estimate changes in individual muscle force. However, it is not known if this relationship remains valid for higher intensities. The aim of this study was to determine: (i) the relationship between muscle shear elastic modulus and muscle torque over the entire range of isometric contraction and (ii) the influence of the size of the region of interest (ROI) used to average the shear modulus value. Ten healthy males performed two incremental isometric little finger abductions. The joint torque produced by Abductor Digiti Minimi was considered as an index of muscle torque and elastic modulus. A high coefficient of determination (R(2)) (range: 0.86-0.98) indicated that the relationship between elastic modulus and torque can be accurately modeled by a linear regression over the entire range (0% to 100% of MVC). The changes in shear elastic modulus as a function of torque were highly repeatable. Lower R(2) values (0.89±0.13 for 1/16 of ROI) and significantly increased absolute errors were observed when the shear elastic modulus was averaged over smaller ROI, half, 1/4 and 1/16 of the full ROI) than the full ROI (mean size: 1.18±0.24cm(2)). It suggests that the ROI should be as large as possible for accurate measurement of muscle shear modulus. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Motor fatigability in persons with multiple sclerosis: Relation between different upper limb muscles, and with fatigue and the perceived use of the arm in daily life.

    PubMed

    Severijns, Deborah; Van Geel, Fanny; Feys, Peter

    2018-01-01

    Motor fatigability is increasingly acknowledged in persons with MS (pwMS). It is unknown whether fatigability is generalized across upper limb muscles and relates to fatigue and perceived difficulties in upper limb use. This observational case-controlled study included twenty PwMS (median EDSS = 3, range 1.5-6.5) and twenty healthy controls who performed 30″ sustained maximal muscle contractions for index finger abduction, hand grip, elbow flexion and shoulder abduction. A static fatigue index (SFI) was calculated to assess motor fatigability for each muscle group. PwMS completed the Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS) and Modified Fatigue Index Scale (MFIS), to quantify severity and perceived impact of fatigue and the Manual Ability Measure (MAM-36) reflecting perceived difficulty in using the upper limbs. Comparisons between groups and muscles was made by t-tests. Associations between outcomes were calculated with correlation coefficients. Fatigue was highest in pwMS. PwMS showed preserved muscle strength and a greater motor fatigability in elbow flexors compared to healthy controls. SFI of elbow flexors and shoulder abductors were associated, and contributed to FSS and MFIS. SFI of elbow flexors and finger abductors predicted half of the variation in MAM-36. Increased motor fatigability was only present in elbow flexors of PwMS, indicating that expression of motor fatigability is not generalized. Fatigability was associated with perceived fatigue (impact) and daily life upper limb use. Results are preliminary given the small sample size with predominantly persons with mild MS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Posterior Cricoarytenoid Muscle Dynamics in Canines and Humans

    PubMed Central

    Chhetri, Dinesh K.; Neubauer, Juergen; Sofer, Elazar

    2015-01-01

    Objective The posterior cricoarytenoid (PCA) muscle is the sole abductor of the glottis and serves important functions during respiration, phonation, cough, and sniff. The present study examines vocal fold abduction dynamics during PCA muscle activation. Study Design Basic science study using an in vivo canine model and human subjects. Methods In four canines and five healthy humans vocal fold abduction time was measured using high speed video recording. In the canines, PCA muscle activation was achieved using graded stimulation of the PCA nerve branch. The human subjects performed coughing and sniffing tasks. High speed video and audio signals were concurrently recorded. Results In the canines the vocal fold moved posteriorly, laterally, and superiorly during abduction. Average time to reach 10%, 50% and 90% abduction was 23, 50, and 100 ms with low stimulation, 24, 58, and 129 ms with medium stimulation, and 21, 49, and 117 ms with high level stimulation. In the humans, 100% abduction times for coughing and sniffing tasks were 79 and 193 ms, respectively. Conclusion The PCA abduction times in canines are within the range in humans. The results also further support the notion that PCA muscles are fully active during cough. Level of Evidence N/A (Animal studies and basic research) PMID:24781959

  8. Hip and ankle range of motion and hip muscle strength in young female ballet dancersand controls

    PubMed Central

    Bennell, K.; Khan, K. M.; Matthews, B.; De Gruyter, M.; Cook, E.; Holzer, K.; Wark, J. D.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To compare the hip and ankle range of motion and hip muscle strength in 8-11 year old novice female ballet dancers and controls. METHODS: Subjects were 77 dancers and 49 controls (mean (SD) age 9.6 (0.8) and 9.6 (0.7) years respectively). Supine right active hip external rotation (ER) and internal rotation (IR) were measured using an inclinometer. A turnout protractor was used to assess standing active turnout range. The measure of ER achieved from below the hip during turnout (non-hip ER) was calculated by subtracting hip ER range from turnout range, and hip ER:IR was derived by dividing ER range by IR range. Range of right weight bearing ankle dorsiflexion was measured in a standing lunge using two methods: the distance from the foot to the wall (in centimetres) and the angle of the shank to the vertical via an inclinometer (in degrees). Right calf muscle range was measured in weight bearing using an inclinometer. A manual muscle tester was used to assess right isometric hip flexor, internal rotator, external rotator, abductor, and adductor strength. RESULTS: Dancers had less ER (p<0.05) and IR (p<0.01) range than controls but greater ER:IR (p<0.01). Although there was no difference in turnout between groups, the dancers had greater non-hip ER. Dancers had greater range of ankle dorsiflexion than controls, measured in both centimetres (p<0.01) and degrees (p<0.05), but similar calf muscle range. After controlling for body weight, controls had stronger hip muscles than dancers except for hip abductor strength which was similar. Regression analyses disclosed a moderate relation between turnout and hip ER (r = 0.40). There were no significant correlations between range of motion and training years and weekly training hours. CONCLUSIONS: Longitudinal follow up will assist in determining whether or not hip and ankle range in young dancers is genetically fixed and unable to be improved with further balletic training. 


 PMID:10522638

  9. Experimental muscle pain increases variability of neural drive to muscle and decreases motor unit coherence in tremor frequency band.

    PubMed

    Yavuz, Utku Ş; Negro, Francesco; Falla, Deborah; Farina, Dario

    2015-08-01

    It has been observed that muscle pain influences force variability and low-frequency (<3 Hz) oscillations in the neural drive to muscle. In this study, we aimed to investigate the effect of experimental muscle pain on the neural control of muscle force at higher frequency bands, associated with afferent feedback (alpha band, 5-13 Hz) and with descending cortical input (beta band, 15-30 Hz). Single-motor unit activity was recorded, in two separate experimental sessions, from the abductor digiti minimi (ADM) and tibialis anterior (TA) muscles with intramuscular wire electrodes, during isometric abductions of the fifth finger at 10% of maximal force [maximum voluntary contraction (MVC)] and ankle dorsiflexions at 25% MVC. The contractions were repeated under three conditions: no pain (baseline) and after intramuscular injection of isotonic (0.9%, control) and hypertonic (5.8%, painful) saline. The results showed an increase of the relative power of both the force signal and the neural drive at the tremor frequency band (alpha, 5-13 Hz) between the baseline and hypertonic (painful) conditions for both muscles (P < 0.05) but no effect on the beta band. Additionally, the strength of motor unit coherence was lower (P < 0.05) in the hypertonic condition in the alpha band for both muscles and in the beta band for the ADM. These results indicate that experimental muscle pain increases the amplitude of the tremor oscillations because of an increased variability of the neural control (common synaptic input) in the tremor band. Moreover, the concomitant decrease in coherence suggests an increase in independent input in the tremor band due to pain. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  10. Does hip joint positioning affect maximal voluntary contraction in the gluteus maximus, gluteus medius, tensor fasciae latae and sartorius muscles?

    PubMed

    Bernard, J; Beldame, J; Van Driessche, S; Brunel, H; Poirier, T; Guiffault, P; Matsoukis, J; Billuart, F

    2017-11-01

    Minimally invasive total hip arthroplasty (THA) is presumed to provide functional and clinical benefits, whereas in fact the literature reveals that gait and posturographic parameters following THA do not recover values found in the general population. There is a significant disturbance of postural sway in THA patients, regardless of the surgical approach, although with some differences between approaches compared to controls: the anterior and anterolateral minimally invasive approaches seem to be more disruptive of postural parameters than the posterior approach. Electromyographic (EMG) study of the hip muscles involved in surgery [gluteus maximus (GMax), gluteus medius (GMed), tensor fasciae latae (TFL), and sartorius (S)] could shed light, the relevant literature involves discordant methodologies. We developed a methodology to assess EMG activity during maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) of the GMax, GMed, TFL and sartorius muscles as a reference for normalization. A prospective study aimed to assess whether hip joint positioning and the learning curve on an MVC test affect the EMG signal during a maximal voluntary contraction. Hip positioning and the learning curve on an MVC test affect EMG signal during MVC of GMax, GMed, TFL and S. Thirty young asymptomatic subjects participated in the study. Each performed 8 hip muscle MVCs in various joint positions recorded with surface EMG sensors. Each MVC was performed 3 times in 1 week, with the same schedule every day, controlling for activity levels in the preceding 24h. EMG activity during MVC was expressed as a ratio of EMG activity during unipedal stance. Non-parametric tests were applied. Statistical analysis showed no difference according to hip position for abductors or flexors in assessing EMG signal during MVC over the 3 sessions. Hip abductors showed no difference between abduction in lateral decubitus with hip straight versus hip flexed: GMax (19.8±13.7 vs. 14.5±7.8, P=0.78), GMed (13.4±9.0 vs. 9.9±6

  11. [Open repair of gluteus medius and minimus tendons tears with double-row technique : Clinical and radiological results].

    PubMed

    Schröder, J H; Geßlein, M; Schütz, M; Perka, C; Krüger, D

    2018-03-01

    Operative refixation is a new therapeutic option in cases of failed conservative treatment for trochanteric pain syndrome (TPS) and lesions of the hip abductors in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Evaluation of the clinical and radiological results after open gluteus medius and minimus tendon reconstruction with a double-row technique was carried out. Patients with failed conservative treatment for TPS and confirmed lesions of the hip abductors in MRI were treated by open hip abductor tendon reconstruction with a double-row technique. The patients were evaluated preoperatively and postoperatively (minimum follow-up 12 months) using the modified Harris hip score (mHHS) and a subjective score (subjective hip value, SHV). Preoperative and postoperative MRI evaluation included measurement of hip abductor muscle diameter and cross-sectional area as well as fatty degeneration. In this study 12 consecutive cases of open reconstruction of the hip abductor tendons were included. There was a significant improvement in the mHHS. In one case the patient showed an atraumatic rupture in the proximal anchor row. The MRI showed a significant improvement in muscle diameter and cross-sectional area for the gluteus medius muscle of the affected and the contralateral side, while the degree of fatty degeneration did not improve. The fatty degeneration showed a significant correlation with the postoperative results in the mHHS and the SHV. Operative reconstruction of lesions in the hip abductor tendons is a therapy option with significant improvement of patient satisfaction and functional scores as well as muscle diameter and cross-sectional area for the gluteus medius. The degree of fatty degeneration and possible differential diagnoses need to be taken into consideration.

  12. Muscle twitching

    MedlinePlus

    ... Some are common and normal. Others are signs of a nervous system disorder. Causes Causes may include: Autoimmune disorders , such ... muscle Spinal muscular atrophy Weak muscles (myopathy) Symptoms of a nervous system disorder include: Loss of, or change in, sensation ...

  13. Disease-Induced Skeletal Muscle Atrophy and Fatigue

    PubMed Central

    Powers, Scott K.; Lynch, Gordon S.; Murphy, Kate T.; Reid, Michael B.; Zijdewind, Inge

    2016-01-01

    Numerous health problems including acute critical illness, cancer, diseases associated with chronic inflammation, and neurological disorders often result in skeletal muscle weakness and fatigue. Disease-related muscle atrophy and fatigue is an important clinical problem because acquired skeletal muscle weakness can increase the duration of hospitalization, result in exercise limitation, and contribute to a poor quality of life. Importantly, skeletal muscle atrophy is also associated with increased morbidity and mortality of patients. Therefore, improving our understanding of the mechanism(s) responsible for skeletal muscle weakness and fatigue in patients is a required first step to develop clinical protocols to prevent these skeletal muscle problems. This review will highlight the consequences and potential mechanisms responsible for skeletal muscle atrophy and fatigue in patients suffering from acute critical illness, cancer, chronic inflammatory diseases, and neurological disorders. PMID:27128663

  14. Vgf is a novel biomarker associated with muscle weakness in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), with a potential role in disease pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhong; Lange, Dale J; Ho, Lap; Bonini, Sara; Shao, Belinda; Salton, Stephen R; Thomas, Sunil; Pasinetti, Giulio Maria

    2008-04-15

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that affects nerve cells in the brain and the spinal cord. Previous proteomic evidence revealed that the content of certain peptide fragments including Vgf-derived peptide aa 398-411 (Vgf(398-411)) of the precursor Vgf protein in the cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) correctly identified patients with ALS from normal and disease controls. Using quantitative ELISA immunoassay we found that the CSF levels of Vgf decreases with muscle weakness in patients with ALS. In SOD1 G93A transgenic mice, loss of full-length Vgf content in CSF, serum and in SMI-32 immunopositive spinal cord motor neurons is noted in asymptomatic animals (approximately 75 days old) and continues to show a progressive decline as animals weaken. In vitro studies show that viral-mediated exogenous Vgf expression in primary mixed spinal cord neuron cultures attenuates excitotoxic injury. Thus, while Vgf may be a reliable biomarker of progression of muscle weakness in patients with ALS, restoration of Vgf expression in spinal cord motor neurons may therapeutically rescue spinal cord motorneurons against excitotoxic injury.

  15. ASSOCIATION BETWEEN LONG-TERM QUADRICEPS WEAKNESS AND EARLY WALKING MUSCLE CO-CONTRACTION AFTER TOTAL KNEE ARTHROPLASTY

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Yuri; Mizner, Ryan L.; Snyder-Mackler, Lynn

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Quadriceps weakness is one of the primary post-operative impairments that persist long term for patients after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). We hypothesized that early gait muscle recruitment patterns of the quadriceps and hamstrings with diminished knee performance at 3 months after surgery would be related to long-term quadriceps strength at one year after TKA. METHODS Twenty-one subjects who underwent primary unilateral TKA and 14 age-matched healthy controls were analyzed. At three months after TKA, the maximum voluntary isometric contraction of quadriceps and a comprehensive gait analysis were performed. Quadriceps strength was assessed again at one year after surgery. RESULTS Quadriceps muscle recruitment of the operated limb was greater than the non-operated limb during the loading response of gait (p=0.03), but there were no significant differences in hamstring recruitment or co-contraction between limbs (p>0.05). There were significant differences in quadriceps muscle recruitment during gait between the non-operated limb of TKA group and healthy control group (p<0.05). The TKA group showed a significant inverse relationship between one year quadriceps strength and co-contraction (r = −0.543) and hamstring muscle recruitment (r = −0.480) during loading response at 3 months after TKA. CONCLUSIONS The results revealed a reverse relationship where stronger patients tended to demonstrate lower quadriceps recruitment at 3 months post-surgery that was not observed in the healthy peer group. The altered neuromuscular patterns of quadriceps and hamstrings during gait may influence chronic quadriceps strength in individuals after TKA. PMID:23352711

  16. Correlation between quantitative whole-body muscle magnetic resonance imaging and clinical muscle weakness in Pompe disease.

    PubMed

    Horvath, Jeffrey J; Austin, Stephanie L; Case, Laura E; Greene, Karla B; Jones, Harrison N; Soher, Brian J; Kishnani, Priya S; Bashir, Mustafa R

    2015-05-01

    Previous examination of whole-body muscle involvement in Pompe disease has been limited to physical examination and/or qualitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In this study we assess the feasibility of quantitative proton-density fat-fraction (PDFF) whole-body MRI in late-onset Pompe disease (LOPD) and compare the results with manual muscle testing. Seven LOPD patients and 11 disease-free controls underwent whole-body PDFF MRI. Quantitative MR muscle group assessments were compared with physical testing of muscle groups. The 95% upper limits of confidence intervals for muscle groups were 4.9-12.6% in controls and 6.8-76.4% in LOPD patients. LOPD patients showed severe and consistent tongue and axial muscle group involvement, with less marked involvement of peripheral musculature. MRI was more sensitive than physical examination for detection of abnormality in multiple muscle groups. This integrated, quantitative approach to muscle assessment provides more detailed data than physical examination and may have clinical utility for monitoring disease progression and treatment response. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Muscle contributions to the acceleration of the whole body centre of mass during recovery from forward loss of balance by stepping in young and older adults.

    PubMed

    Graham, David F; Carty, Christopher P; Lloyd, David G; Barrett, Rod S

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the muscular contributions to the acceleration of the whole body centre of mass (COM) of older compared to younger adults that were able to recover from forward loss of balance with a single step. Forward loss of balance was achieved by releasing participants (14 older adults and 6 younger adults) from a static whole-body forward lean angle of approximately 18 degrees. 10 older adults and 6 younger adults were able to recover with a single step and included in subsequent analysis. A scalable anatomical model consisting of 36 degrees-of-freedom was used to compute kinematics and joint moments from motion capture and force plate data. Forces for 92 muscle actuators were computed using Static Optimisation and Induced Acceleration Analysis was used to compute individual muscle contributions to the three-dimensional acceleration of the whole body COM. There were no significant differences between older and younger adults in step length, step time, 3D COM accelerations or muscle contributions to 3D COM accelerations. The stance and stepping leg Gastrocnemius and Soleus muscles were primarily responsible for the vertical acceleration experienced by the COM. The Gastrocnemius and Soleus from the stance side leg together with bilateral Hamstrings accelerated the COM forwards throughout balance recovery while the Vasti and Soleus of the stepping side leg provided the majority of braking accelerations following foot contact. The Hip Abductor muscles provided the greatest contribution to medial-lateral accelerations of the COM. Deficits in the neuromuscular control of the Gastrocnemius, Soleus, Vasti and Hip Abductors in particular could adversely influence balance recovery and may be important targets in interventions to improve balance recovery performance.

  18. Mitochondrial function in skeletal muscle of patients with protracted critical illness and ICU-acquired weakness.

    PubMed

    Jiroutková, Kateřina; Krajčová, Adéla; Ziak, Jakub; Fric, Michal; Waldauf, Petr; Džupa, Valér; Gojda, Jan; Němcova-Fürstová, Vlasta; Kovář, Jan; Elkalaf, Moustafa; Trnka, Jan; Duška, František

    2015-12-24

    Mitochondrial damage occurs in the acute phase of critical illness, followed by activation of mitochondrial biogenesis in survivors. It has been hypothesized that bioenergetics failure of skeletal muscle may contribute to the development of ICU-acquired weakness. The aim of the present study was to determine whether mitochondrial dysfunction persists until protracted phase of critical illness. In this single-centre controlled-cohort ex vivo proof-of-concept pilot study, we obtained vastus lateralis biopsies from ventilated patients with ICU-acquired weakness (n = 8) and from age and sex-matched metabolically healthy controls (n = 8). Mitochondrial functional indices were measured in cytosolic context by high-resolution respirometry in tissue homogenates, activities of respiratory complexes by spectrophotometry and individual functional capacities were correlated with concentrations of electron transport chain key subunits from respiratory complexes II, III, IV and V measured by western blot. The ability of aerobic ATP synthesis (OXPHOS) was reduced to ~54% in ICU patients (p<0.01), in correlation with the depletion of complexes III (~38% of control, p = 0.02) and IV (~26% of controls, p<0.01) and without signs of mitochondrial uncoupling. When mitochondrial functional indices were adjusted to citrate synthase activity, OXPHOS and the activity of complexes I and IV were not different, whilst the activities of complexes II and III were increased in ICU patients 3-fold (p<0.01) respectively 2-fold (p<0.01). Compared to healthy controls, in ICU patients we have demonstrated a ~50% reduction of the ability of skeletal muscle to synthetize ATP in mitochondria. We found a depletion of complex III and IV concentrations and relative increases in functional capacities of complex II and glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase/complex III.

  19. Mitochondrial Function in an In Vitro Model of Skeletal Muscle of Patients With Protracted Critical Illness and Intensive Care Unit-Acquired Weakness.

    PubMed

    Jiroutková, Kateřina; Krajčová, Adéla; Žiak, Jakub; Fric, Michal; Gojda, Jan; Džupa, Valér; Kalous, Martin; Tůmová, Jana; Trnka, Jan; Duška, František

    2017-09-01

    Functional mitochondria in skeletal muscle of patients with protracted critical illness and intensive care unit-acquired weakness are depleted, but remaining mitochondria have increased functional capacities of respiratory complexes II and III. This can be an adaptation to relative abundancy of fatty acid over glucose caused by insulin resistance. We hypothesized that the capacity of muscle mitochondria to oxidize fatty acid is increased in protracted critical illness. We assessed fatty acid oxidation (FAO) and mitochondrial functional indices in vitro by using extracellular flux analysis in cultured myotubes obtained by isolating and culturing satellite cells from vastus lateralis muscle biopsy samples from patients with ICU-acquired weakness (n = 6) and age-matched healthy controls (n = 7). Bioenergetic measurements were performed at baseline and after 6 days of exposure to free fatty acids (FFAs). Mitochondrial density in myotubes from ICU patients was 69% of healthy controls ( P = .051). After adjustment to mitochondrial content, there were no differences in adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthesis or the capacity and coupling of the respiratory chain. FAO capacity in ICU patients was 157% of FAO capacity in controls ( P = .015). In myotubes of ICU patients, unlike healthy controls, the exposure to FFA significantly ( P = .009) increased maximum respiratory chain capacity. In an in vitro model of skeletal muscle of patients with protracted critical illness, we have shown signs of adaptation to increased FAO. Even in the presence of glucose and insulin, elevation of FFAs in the extracellular environment increased maximal capacity of the respiratory chain.

  20. Mechanisms of quadriceps muscle weakness in knee joint osteoarthritis: the effects of prolonged vibration on torque and muscle activation in osteoarthritic and healthy control subjects.

    PubMed

    Rice, David A; McNair, Peter J; Lewis, Gwyn N

    2011-01-01

    A consequence of knee joint osteoarthritis (OA) is an inability to fully activate the quadriceps muscles, a problem termed arthrogenic muscle inhibition (AMI). AMI leads to marked quadriceps weakness that impairs physical function and may hasten disease progression. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether γ-loop dysfunction contributes to AMI in people with knee joint OA. Fifteen subjects with knee joint OA and 15 controls with no history of knee joint pathology participated in this study. Quadriceps and hamstrings peak isometric torque (Nm) and electromyography (EMG) amplitude were collected before and after 20 minutes of 50 Hz vibration applied to the infrapatellar tendon. Between-group differences in pre-vibration torque were analysed using a one-way analysis of covariance, with age, gender and body mass (kg) as the covariates. If the γ-loop is intact, vibration should decrease torque and EMG levels in the target muscle; if dysfunctional, then torque and EMG levels should not change following vibration. One-sample t tests were thus undertaken to analyse whether percentage changes in torque and EMG differed from zero after vibration in each group. In addition, analyses of covariance were utilised to analyse between-group differences in the percentage changes in torque and EMG following vibration. Pre-vibration quadriceps torque was significantly lower in the OA group compared with the control group (P = 0.005). Following tendon vibration, quadriceps torque (P < 0.001) and EMG amplitude (P ≤0.001) decreased significantly in the control group but did not change in the OA group (all P > 0.299). Hamstrings torque and EMG amplitude were unchanged in both groups (all P > 0.204). The vibration-induced changes in quadriceps torque and EMG were significantly different between the OA and control groups (all P < 0.011). No between-group differences were observed for the change in hamstrings torque or EMG (all P > 0.554). γ-loop dysfunction may

  1. The value of multiple tests of respiratory muscle strength

    PubMed Central

    Steier, Joerg; Kaul, Sunny; Seymour, John; Jolley, Caroline; Rafferty, Gerrard; Man, William; Luo, Yuan M; Roughton, Michael; Polkey, Michael I; Moxham, John

    2007-01-01

    Background Respiratory muscle weakness is an important clinical problem. Tests of varying complexity and invasiveness are available to assess respiratory muscle strength. The relative precision of different tests in the detection of weakness is less clear, as is the value of multiple tests. Methods The respiratory muscle function tests of clinical referrals who had multiple tests assessed in our laboratories over a 6‐year period were analysed. Thresholds for weakness for each test were determined from published and in‐house laboratory data. The patients were divided into three groups: those who had all relevant measurements of global inspiratory muscle strength (group A, n = 182), those with full assessment of diaphragm strength (group B, n = 264) and those for whom expiratory muscle strength was fully evaluated (group C, n = 60). The diagnostic outcome of each inspiratory, diaphragm and expiratory muscle test, both singly and in combination, was studied and the impact of using more than one test to detect weakness was calculated. Results The clinical referrals were primarily for the evaluation of neuromuscular diseases and dyspnoea of unknown cause. A low maximal inspiratory mouth pressure (Pimax) was recorded in 40.1% of referrals in group A, while a low sniff nasal pressure (Sniff Pnasal) was recorded in 41.8% and a low sniff oesophageal pressure (Sniff Poes) in 37.9%. When assessing inspiratory strength with the combination of all three tests, 29.6% of patients had weakness. Using the two non‐invasive tests (Pimax and Sniff Pnasal) in combination, a similar result was obtained (low in 32.4%). Combining Sniff Pdi (low in 68.2%) and Twitch Pdi (low in 67.4%) reduced the diagnoses of patients with diaphragm weakness to 55.3% in group B. 38.3% of the patients in group C had expiratory muscle weakness as measured by maximum expiratory pressure (Pemax) compared with 36.7% when weakness was diagnosed by cough gastric pressure (Pgas), and 28.3% when

  2. Abductor Digiti Minimi Flap for Vascularized Coverage in the Surgical Management of Complex Regional Pain Syndrome Following Carpal Tunnel Release.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Kevin; Klausmeyer, Melissa A; Jupiter, Jesse B

    2017-11-01

    The development of Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS) represents a potentially devastating complication following carpal tunnel release. In the presence of a suspected incomplete release of the transverse carpal ligament or direct injury to the median nerve, neurolysis as well as nerve coverage to prevent recurrent scar has been shown to be effective. Retrospective chart review and telephone interview was conducted for patients who underwent abductor digiti minimi flap coverage and neurolysis of the median nerve for CRPS following carpal tunnel release. Fourteen wrists in 12 patients were reviewed. Mean patient age was 64 years (range, 49-83 years), and the mean follow-up was 44 months. Carpal tunnel outcome instrument scores were 47.4 ± 6.8 preoperatively and 27.1 ± 10.6 at follow-up ( P < .001). Quick Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (QuickDASH) scores at follow-up were 29.4 ± 26. No significant postoperative complications were identified. The abductor digiti minimi flap is a reliable option with minimal donor site morbidity. It provides predictable coverage when treating CRPS following carpal tunnel syndrome.

  3. Dynamical Coordination of Hand Intrinsic Muscles for Precision Grip in Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Li, Ke; Wei, Na; Cheng, Mei; Hou, Xingguo; Song, Jun

    2018-03-12

    This study investigated the effects of diabetes mellitus (DM) on dynamical coordination of hand intrinsic muscles during precision grip. Precision grip was tested using a custom designed apparatus with stable and unstable loads, during which the surface electromyographic (sEMG) signals of the abductor pollicis brevis (APB) and first dorsal interosseous (FDI) were recorded simultaneously. Recurrence quantification analysis (RQA) was applied to quantify the dynamical structure of sEMG signals of the APB and FDI; and cross recurrence quantification analysis (CRQA) was used to assess the intermuscular coupling between the two intrinsic muscles. This study revealed that the DM altered the dynamical structure of muscle activation for the FDI and the dynamical intermuscular coordination between the APB and FDI during precision grip. A reinforced feedforward mechanism that compensates the loss of sensory feedbacks in DM may be responsible for the stronger intermuscular coupling between the APB and FDI muscles. Sensory deficits in DM remarkably decreased the capacity of online motor adjustment based on sensory feedback, rendering a lower adaptability to the uncertainty of environment. This study shed light on inherent dynamical properties underlying the intrinsic muscle activation and intermuscular coordination for precision grip and the effects of DM on hand sensorimotor function.

  4. Muscle Weakness in the Empty and Full Can Tests Cannot Differentiate Rotator Cuff Tear from Cervical Spondylotic Amyotrophy: Pain Provocation is a Useful Finding.

    PubMed

    Iwata, Eiichiro; Shigematsu, Hideki; Inoue, Kazuya; Egawa, Takuya; Sakamoto, Yoshihiro; Tanaka, Yasuhito

    2017-01-01

    Rotator cuff tears and cervical spondylotic amyotrophy (CSA) are often confused as the main symptom in those with difficulty in shoulder elevation. Empty and full can tests are frequently used for the clinical diagnosis of rotator cuff tears. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether the empty and full can test results can help differentiate rotator cuff tears from CSA. Twenty-seven consecutive patients with rotator cuff tears and 25 with CSA were enrolled. We prospectively performed empty and full can tests in patients with rotator cuff tears and CSA. The following signs were considered positive: (a) muscle weakness during the empty can test, (b) muscle weakness during the full can test, (c) pain provocation during the empty can test, and (d) pain provocation during the full can test. We calculated the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) of rotator cuff tears for each positive finding. The sensitivity and specificity of each index were as follows (sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV): (a) 77.8%, 0%, 45.7%, 0%; (b) 66.7%, 4.0%, 42.9%, 10.0%; (c) 88.9%, 96.0%, 96.0%, 88.9%; and (d) 74.1%, 96.0%, 95.2%, 77.4%. There were significant differences for each index. Muscle weakness during the empty and full can tests was not useful in differentiating rotator cuff tears from CSA because of low specificity and PPV. However, pain provocation was useful in differentiating these two conditions because of high specificity and PPV.

  5. [Pathophysiology of respiratory muscle weakness].

    PubMed

    Windisch, W

    2008-03-01

    The respiratory system consists of two parts which can be impaired independently from each other, the lungs and the respiratory pump. The latter is a complex system covering different anatomic structures: the breathing centre, the peripheral nervous system, the respiratory muscles, and the thorax. According to this complexity several underlying conditions can cause insufficiency of the respiratory pump, i. e. ventilatory failure. Disturbances of the breathing centre, different neuromuscular disorders, impairments of the mechanics, such as thoracic deformities or hyperinflation, and airway obstruction are example conditions responsible for ventilatory failure. Main characteristic of ventilatory failure is the occurrence of hypercapnia which is in contrast to pulmonary failure where diffusion disturbances typically not cause hypercapnia. Both acute and chronic ventilatory failure presenting with hypercapnia can develop. In acute ventilatory failure respiratory acidosis develops, but in chronic respiratory failure pH is normalized as a consequence of metabolic retention of bicarbonate. However, acute on chronic ventilatory failure can present with a combined picture, i. e. elevated bicarbonate levels, acidosis, and often severe hypercapnia. Clinical signs such as tachypnea, features of the underlying disease or hypercapnia are important diagnostic tools in addition to the measurement of pressures generated by the respiratory muscles. Non-invasive and widely available techniques, such as the assessment of the maximal ins- and expiratory mouth pressures (PImax, PEmax), should be used as screening instruments, but the reliability of these measurements is reduced due to the volitional character of the tests and due to the impossibility to define normal values. Inspiratory pressures can be assessed more accurately and independently from the patients' effort: with or without the insertion of oesophageal and gastric balloon catheters. However, this technique is more invasive

  6. The ICM research agenda on intensive care unit-acquired weakness.

    PubMed

    Latronico, Nicola; Herridge, Margaret; Hopkins, Ramona O; Angus, Derek; Hart, Nicholas; Hermans, Greet; Iwashyna, Theodore; Arabi, Yaseen; Citerio, Giuseppe; Wesley Ely, E; Hall, Jesse; Mehta, Sangeeta; Puntillo, Kathleen; Van den Hoeven, Johannes; Wunsch, Hannah; Cook, Deborah; Dos Santos, Claudia; Rubenfeld, Gordon; Vincent, Jean-Louis; Van den Berghe, Greet; Azoulay, Elie; Needham, Dale M

    2017-09-01

    We present areas of uncertainty concerning intensive care unit-acquired weakness (ICUAW) and identify areas for future research. Age, pre-ICU functional and cognitive state, concurrent illness, frailty, and health trajectories impact outcomes and should be assessed to stratify patients. In the ICU, early assessment of limb and diaphragm muscle strength and function using nonvolitional tests may be useful, but comparison with established methods of global and specific muscle strength and physical function and determination of their reliability and normal values would be important to advance these techniques. Serial measurements of limb and respiratory muscle strength, and systematic screening for dysphagia, would be helpful to clarify if and how weakness of these muscle groups is independently associated with outcome. ICUAW, delirium, and sedatives and analgesics may interact with each other, amplifying the effects of each individual factor. Reduced mobility in patients with hypoactive delirium needs investigations into dysfunction of central and peripheral nervous system motor pathways. Interventional nutritional studies should include muscle mass, strength, and physical function as outcomes, and prioritize elucidation of mechanisms. At follow-up, ICU survivors may suffer from prolonged muscle weakness and wasting and other physical impairments, as well as fatigue without demonstrable weakness on examination. Further studies should evaluate the prevalence and severity of fatigue in ICU survivors and define its association with psychiatric disorders, pain, cognitive impairment, and axonal loss. Finally, methodological issues, including accounting for baseline status, handling of missing data, and inclusion of patient-centered outcome measures should be addressed in future studies.

  7. Vgf is a novel biomarker associated with muscle weakness in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), with a potential role in disease pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhong; Lange, Dale J.; Ho, Lap; Bonini, Sara; Shao, Belinda; Salton, Stephen R.; Thomas, Sunil; Pasinetti, Giulio Maria

    2008-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that affects nerve cells in the brain and the spinal cord. Previous proteomic evidence revealed that the content of certain peptide fragments including Vgf-derived peptide aa 398-411 (Vgf398-411) of the precursor Vgf protein in the cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) correctly identified patients with ALS from normal and disease controls. Using quantitative ELISA immunoassay we found that the CSF levels of Vgf decreases with muscle weakness in patients with ALS. In SOD1 G93A transgenic mice, loss of full-length Vgf content in CSF, serum and in SMI-32 immunopositive spinal cord motor neurons is noted in asymptomatic animals (approximately 75 days old) and continues to show a progressive decline as animals weaken. In vitro studies show that viral-mediated exogenous Vgf expression in primary mixed spinal cord neuron cultures attenuates excitotoxic injury. Thus, while Vgf may be a reliable biomarker of progression of muscle weakness in patients with ALS, restoration of Vgf expression in spinal cord motor neurons may therapeutically rescue spinal cord motorneurons against excitotoxic injury. PMID:18432310

  8. Muscle weakness in TPM3-myopathy is due to reduced Ca2+-sensitivity and impaired acto-myosin cross-bridge cycling in slow fibres

    PubMed Central

    Yuen, Michaela; Cooper, Sandra T.; Marston, Steve B.; Nowak, Kristen J.; McNamara, Elyshia; Mokbel, Nancy; Ilkovski, Biljana; Ravenscroft, Gianina; Rendu, John; de Winter, Josine M.; Klinge, Lars; Beggs, Alan H.; North, Kathryn N.; Ottenheijm, Coen A.C.; Clarke, Nigel F.

    2015-01-01

    Dominant mutations in TPM3, encoding α-tropomyosinslow, cause a congenital myopathy characterized by generalized muscle weakness. Here, we used a multidisciplinary approach to investigate the mechanism of muscle dysfunction in 12 TPM3-myopathy patients. We confirm that slow myofibre hypotrophy is a diagnostic hallmark of TPM3-myopathy, and is commonly accompanied by skewing of fibre-type ratios (either slow or fast fibre predominance). Patient muscle contained normal ratios of the three tropomyosin isoforms and normal fibre-type expression of myosins and troponins. Using 2D-PAGE, we demonstrate that mutant α-tropomyosinslow was expressed, suggesting muscle dysfunction is due to a dominant-negative effect of mutant protein on muscle contraction. Molecular modelling suggested mutant α-tropomyosinslow likely impacts actin–tropomyosin interactions and, indeed, co-sedimentation assays showed reduced binding of mutant α-tropomyosinslow (R168C) to filamentous actin. Single fibre contractility studies of patient myofibres revealed marked slow myofibre specific abnormalities. At saturating [Ca2+] (pCa 4.5), patient slow fibres produced only 63% of the contractile force produced in control slow fibres and had reduced acto-myosin cross-bridge cycling kinetics. Importantly, due to reduced Ca2+-sensitivity, at sub-saturating [Ca2+] (pCa 6, levels typically released during in vivo contraction) patient slow fibres produced only 26% of the force generated by control slow fibres. Thus, weakness in TPM3-myopathy patients can be directly attributed to reduced slow fibre force at physiological [Ca2+], and impaired acto-myosin cross-bridge cycling kinetics. Fast myofibres are spared; however, they appear to be unable to compensate for slow fibre dysfunction. Abnormal Ca2+-sensitivity in TPM3-myopathy patients suggests Ca2+-sensitizing drugs may represent a useful treatment for this condition. PMID:26307083

  9. Muscle weakness in TPM3-myopathy is due to reduced Ca2+-sensitivity and impaired acto-myosin cross-bridge cycling in slow fibres.

    PubMed

    Yuen, Michaela; Cooper, Sandra T; Marston, Steve B; Nowak, Kristen J; McNamara, Elyshia; Mokbel, Nancy; Ilkovski, Biljana; Ravenscroft, Gianina; Rendu, John; de Winter, Josine M; Klinge, Lars; Beggs, Alan H; North, Kathryn N; Ottenheijm, Coen A C; Clarke, Nigel F

    2015-11-15

    Dominant mutations in TPM3, encoding α-tropomyosinslow, cause a congenital myopathy characterized by generalized muscle weakness. Here, we used a multidisciplinary approach to investigate the mechanism of muscle dysfunction in 12 TPM3-myopathy patients. We confirm that slow myofibre hypotrophy is a diagnostic hallmark of TPM3-myopathy, and is commonly accompanied by skewing of fibre-type ratios (either slow or fast fibre predominance). Patient muscle contained normal ratios of the three tropomyosin isoforms and normal fibre-type expression of myosins and troponins. Using 2D-PAGE, we demonstrate that mutant α-tropomyosinslow was expressed, suggesting muscle dysfunction is due to a dominant-negative effect of mutant protein on muscle contraction. Molecular modelling suggested mutant α-tropomyosinslow likely impacts actin-tropomyosin interactions and, indeed, co-sedimentation assays showed reduced binding of mutant α-tropomyosinslow (R168C) to filamentous actin. Single fibre contractility studies of patient myofibres revealed marked slow myofibre specific abnormalities. At saturating [Ca(2+)] (pCa 4.5), patient slow fibres produced only 63% of the contractile force produced in control slow fibres and had reduced acto-myosin cross-bridge cycling kinetics. Importantly, due to reduced Ca(2+)-sensitivity, at sub-saturating [Ca(2+)] (pCa 6, levels typically released during in vivo contraction) patient slow fibres produced only 26% of the force generated by control slow fibres. Thus, weakness in TPM3-myopathy patients can be directly attributed to reduced slow fibre force at physiological [Ca(2+)], and impaired acto-myosin cross-bridge cycling kinetics. Fast myofibres are spared; however, they appear to be unable to compensate for slow fibre dysfunction. Abnormal Ca(2+)-sensitivity in TPM3-myopathy patients suggests Ca(2+)-sensitizing drugs may represent a useful treatment for this condition. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved

  10. Protocol for diaphragm pacing in patients with respiratory muscle weakness due to motor neurone disease (DiPALS): a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Motor neurone disease (MND) is a devastating illness which leads to muscle weakness and death, usually within 2-3 years of symptom onset. Respiratory insufficiency is a common cause of morbidity, particularly in later stages of MND and respiratory complications are the leading cause of mortality in MND patients. Non Invasive Ventilation (NIV) is the current standard therapy to manage respiratory insufficiency. Some MND patients however do not tolerate NIV due to a number of issues including mask interface problems and claustrophobia. In those that do tolerate NIV, eventually respiratory muscle weakness will progress to a point at which intermittent/overnight NIV is ineffective. The NeuRx RA/4 Diaphragm Pacing System was originally developed for patients with respiratory insufficiency and diaphragm paralysis secondary to stable high spinal cord injuries. The DiPALS study will assess the effect of diaphragm pacing (DP) when used to treat patients with MND and respiratory insufficiency. Method/Design 108 patients will be recruited to the study at 5 sites in the UK. Patients will be randomised to either receive NIV (current standard care) or receive DP in addition to NIV. Study participants will be required to complete outcome measures at 5 follow up time points (2, 3, 6, 9 and 12 months) plus an additional surgery and 1 week post operative visit for those in the DP group. 12 patients (and their carers) from the DP group will also be asked to complete 2 qualitative interviews. Discussion The primary objective of this trial will be to evaluate the effect of Diaphragm Pacing (DP) on survival over the study duration in patients with MND with respiratory muscle weakness. The project is funded by the National Institute for Health Research, Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Programme (project number 09/55/33) and the Motor Neurone Disease Association and the Henry Smith Charity. Trial Registration: Current controlled trials ISRCTN53817913. The views and opinions

  11. Elbow flexor and extensor muscle weakness in lateral epicondylalgia.

    PubMed

    Coombes, Brooke K; Bisset, Leanne; Vicenzino, Bill

    2012-05-01

    To evaluate whether deficits of elbow flexor and extensor muscle strength exist in lateral epicondylalgia (LE) in comparison with a healthy control population. Cross-sectional study. 150 participants with unilateral LE were compared with 54 healthy control participants. Maximal isometric elbow flexion and extension strength were measured bilaterally using a purpose-built standing frame such that gripping was avoided. The authors found significant side differences in elbow extensor (-6.54 N, 95% CI -11.43 to -1.65, p=0.008, standardised mean difference (SMD) -0.45) and flexor muscle strength (-11.26 N, 95% CI -19.59 to -2.94, p=0.009, SMD -0.46) between LE and control groups. Within the LE group, only elbow extensor muscle strength deficits between sides was significant (affected-unaffected: -2.94 N, 95% CI -5.44 to -0.44). Small significant deficits of elbow extensor and flexor muscle strength exist in the affected arm of unilateral LE in comparison with healthy controls. Notably, comparing elbow strength between the affected and unaffected sides in unilateral epicondylalgia is likely to underestimate these deficits. Trial Registration Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Register ACTRN12609000051246.

  12. A comparison of respiratory and peripheral muscle strength, functional exercise capacity, activities of daily living and physical fitness in patients with cystic fibrosis and healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Arikan, Hulya; Yatar, İlker; Calik-Kutukcu, Ebru; Aribas, Zeynep; Saglam, Melda; Vardar-Yagli, Naciye; Savci, Sema; Inal-Ince, Deniz; Ozcelik, Ugur; Kiper, Nural

    2015-01-01

    There are limited reports that compare muscle strength, functional exercise capacity, activities of daily living (ADL) and parameters of physical fitness of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients with healthy peers in the literature. The purpose of this study was to assess and compare respiratory and peripheral muscle strength, functional exercise capacity, ADL and physical fitness in patients with CF and healthy subjects. Nineteen patients with CF (mean forced expiratory volume in one second-FEV1: 86.56±18.36%) and 20 healthy subjects were included in this study. Respiratory (maximal inspiratory pressure-MIP and maximal expiratory pressure-MEP) and peripheral muscle strength (quadriceps, shoulder abductors and hand grip strength) were evaluated. Functional exercise capacity was determined with 6min walk test (6MWT). ADL was assessed with Glittre ADL test and physical fitness was assessed with Munich fitness test (MFT). There were not any statistically significant difference in MIP, %MIP, MEP and %MEP values between two groups (p>0.05). %Peripheral muscle strength (% quadriceps and shoulder abductors strength), 6MWT distance and %6MWT distance were significantly lower in patients with CF than those of healthy subjects (p<0.05). Glittre ADL-test time was significantly longer in patients with CF than healthy subjects (p<0.05). According to Munich fitness test, the number of bouncing a ball, hanging score, distance of standing vertical jumping and standing vertical jumping score were significantly lower in patients with CF than those of healthy subjects (p<0.05). Peripheral muscle strength, functional exercise capacity, ADL performance and speed, coordination, endurance and power components of physical fitness are adversely affected in mild-severe patients with CF compared to healthy peers. Evaluations must be done in comprehensive manner in patients with CF with all stages. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Muscle contributions to the acceleration of the whole body centre of mass during recovery from forward loss of balance by stepping in young and older adults

    PubMed Central

    Graham, David F.; Carty, Christopher P.; Lloyd, David G.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the muscular contributions to the acceleration of the whole body centre of mass (COM) of older compared to younger adults that were able to recover from forward loss of balance with a single step. Forward loss of balance was achieved by releasing participants (14 older adults and 6 younger adults) from a static whole-body forward lean angle of approximately 18 degrees. 10 older adults and 6 younger adults were able to recover with a single step and included in subsequent analysis. A scalable anatomical model consisting of 36 degrees-of-freedom was used to compute kinematics and joint moments from motion capture and force plate data. Forces for 92 muscle actuators were computed using Static Optimisation and Induced Acceleration Analysis was used to compute individual muscle contributions to the three-dimensional acceleration of the whole body COM. There were no significant differences between older and younger adults in step length, step time, 3D COM accelerations or muscle contributions to 3D COM accelerations. The stance and stepping leg Gastrocnemius and Soleus muscles were primarily responsible for the vertical acceleration experienced by the COM. The Gastrocnemius and Soleus from the stance side leg together with bilateral Hamstrings accelerated the COM forwards throughout balance recovery while the Vasti and Soleus of the stepping side leg provided the majority of braking accelerations following foot contact. The Hip Abductor muscles provided the greatest contribution to medial-lateral accelerations of the COM. Deficits in the neuromuscular control of the Gastrocnemius, Soleus, Vasti and Hip Abductors in particular could adversely influence balance recovery and may be important targets in interventions to improve balance recovery performance. PMID:29069097

  14. Fast and singular muscle responses initiate the startle response of Pantodon buchholzi (Osteoglossomorpha).

    PubMed

    Starosciak, A K; Kalola, R P; Perkins, K P; Riley, J A; Saidel, W M

    2008-01-01

    The startle response of Pantodon buchholzi, the African butterfly fish, is a complete or incomplete ballistic jump resulting from abduction of the pectoral fins. This study analyzed the neuromuscular basis for such a jump by recording in vivo electromyograms (emgs) from the muscles of abduction, the muscularis abductor superficialis (MAS) and the muscularis abductor profundus (MAP). The motor neurons innervating the MAS muscle were localized by retrograde transport of biocytin. The latency between stimulus and the evoked emg in the MAS was less than 5 ms; the latency of the MAP was about 6.5 ms. A single emg was recorded per jump. High speed video demonstrated that onset of a startle movement began within 10 ms of the onset of fin abduction. The emg associated with this movement is short (<2 ms) and followed by a variably-shaped, slower and smaller potential of 10-30 ms duration. The brief period between stimulus and startle response of Pantodon suggests a Mauthner neuron-related response, only with the behavior occurring in the vertical plane. The MAS may act only in a startle response, whereas the MAP might have a role in other behaviors. Elicited jumping habituates after a single trial. Electrophysiological evidence is presented indicating that the innervating motor neurons are suppressed for seconds following a stimulus. The neurons innervating the MAS are located at the medullary-spinal cord junction and possess an average radius of approximately 17.9 mum. These fish have been historically described as 'fresh water' flying fish. As a single emg occurs per startle response, repetitive pectoral activity generating flying cannot be supported. Pantodon 'flight' is ballistic. Copyright 2007 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. Muscle force distribution of the lower limbs during walking in diabetic individuals with and without polyneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Aline A; Ackermann, Marko; Ferreira, Jean P; Orselli, Maria Isabel V; Sacco, Isabel C N

    2017-11-09

    Muscle force estimation could advance the comprehension of the neuromuscular strategies that diabetic patients adopt to preserve walking ability, which guarantees their independence as they deal with their neural and muscular impairments due to diabetes and neuropathy. In this study, the lower limb's muscle force distribution during gait was estimated and compared in diabetic patients with and without polyneuropathy. Thirty individuals were evaluated in a cross-sectional study, equally divided among controls (CG) and diabetic patients with (DNG) and without (DG) polyneuropathy. The acquired ground reaction forces and kinematic data were used as input variables for a scaled musculoskeletal model in the OpenSim software. The maximum isometric force of the ankle extensors and flexors was reduced in the model of DNG by 30% and 20%, respectively. The muscle force was calculated using static optimization, and peak forces were compared among groups (flexors and extensors of hip, knee, and ankle; ankle evertors; and hip abductors) using MANOVAs, followed by univariate ANOVAs and Newman-Keuls post-hoc tests (p < 0.05). From the middle to late stance phase, DG showed a lower soleus muscle peak force compared to the CG (p=0.024) and the DNG showed lower forces in the gastrocnemius medialis compared to the DG (p=0.037). At the terminal swing phase, the semitendinosus and semimembranosus peak forces showed lower values in the DG compared to the CG and DNG. At the late stance, the DNG showed a higher peak force in the biceps short head, semimembranosus, and semitendinosus compared to the CG and DG. Peak forces of ankle (flexors, extensors, and evertors), knee (flexors and extensors), and hip abductors distinguished DNG from DG, and both of those from CG. Both diabetic groups showed alterations in the force production of the ankle extensors with reductions in the forces of soleus (DG) and gastrocnemius medialis (DNG) seen in both diabetic groups, but only DNG showed an increase

  16. Muscle hypertrophy and pseudohypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Walters, Jon

    2017-10-01

    The physical examination always begins with a thorough inspection and patients with potential neuromuscular weakness are no exception. One question neurologists routinely address during this early part of the assessment is whether or not there is muscle enlargement. This finding may reflect true muscle hypertrophy-myofibres enlarged from repetitive activity, for example, in myotonia congenita or neuromyotonia-or muscles enlarged by the infiltration of fat or other tissue termed pseudohypertrophy or false enlargement. Pseudohypertrophic muscles are frequently paradoxically weak. Recognising such a clinical clue at the bed side can facilitate a diagnosis or at least can narrow down the list of potential suspects. This paper outlines the conditions, both myopathic and neurogenic, that cause muscle enlargement. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  17. Finger extension weakness and downbeat nystagmus motor neuron disease syndrome: A novel motor neuron disorder?

    PubMed

    Delva, Aline; Thakore, Nimish; Pioro, Erik P; Poesen, Koen; Saunders-Pullman, Rachel; Meijer, Inge A; Rucker, Janet C; Kissel, John T; Van Damme, Philip

    2017-12-01

    Disturbances of eye movements are infrequently encountered in motor neuron diseases (MNDs) or motor neuropathies, and there is no known syndrome that combines progressive muscle weakness with downbeat nystagmus. To describe the core clinical features of a syndrome of MND associated with downbeat nystagmus, clinical features were collected from 6 patients. All patients had slowly progressive muscle weakness and wasting in combination with downbeat nystagmus, which was clinically most obvious in downward and lateral gaze. Onset was in the second to fourth decade with finger extension weakness, progressing to other distal and sometimes more proximal muscles. Visual complaints were not always present. Electrodiagnostic testing showed signs of regional motor axonal loss in all patients. The etiology of this syndrome remains elusive. Because finger extension weakness and downbeat nystagmus are the discriminating clinical features of this MND, we propose the name FEWDON-MND syndrome. Muscle Nerve 56: 1164-1168, 2017. © 2017 The Authors Muscle & Nerve Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. The Effects of a Transition to Minimalist Shoe Running on Intrinsic Foot Muscle Size.

    PubMed

    Johnson, A W; Myrer, J W; Mitchell, U H; Hunter, I; Ridge, S T

    2016-02-01

    A proposed benefit of minimalist shoe running is an increase in intrinsic foot muscle strength. This study examined change in intrinsic foot muscle size in runners transitioning to Vibram FiveFingers™ minimalist shoes compared to a control group running in traditional running shoes. We compare pre-transition size between runners who developed bone marrow edema to those who did not. 37 runners were randomly assigned to the Vibram FiveFingers™ group (n=18) or control group (n=19). Runners' bone marrow edema and intrinsic foot muscle size were measured at baseline and after 10 weeks. Total running volume was maintained by all runners. A significant increase in abductor hallucis cross-sectional area of 10.6% occurred in the Vibram FiveFingers™ group compared to the control group (p=0.01). There was no significant change in any of the other muscles examined (p>0.05). 8 of the Vibram FiveFingers™ runners, and 1 control runner developed bone marrow edema. Those who developed bone marrow edema, primarily women, had significantly smaller size in all assessed muscles (p≤0.05). Size of intrinsic foot muscles appears to be important in safely transitioning to minimalist shoe running. Perhaps intrinsic foot muscle strengthening may benefit runners wanting to transition to minimalist shoes. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  19. Surface Electromyographic Examination of Poststroke Neuromuscular Changes in Proximal and Distal Muscles Using Clustering Index Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Weidi; Zhang, Xu; Tang, Xiao; Cao, Shuai; Gao, Xiaoping; Chen, Xiang

    2018-01-01

    Whether stroke-induced paretic muscle changes vary across different distal and proximal muscles remains unclear. The objective of this study was to compare paretic muscle changes between a relatively proximal muscle (the biceps brachii muscle) and two distal muscles (the first dorsal interosseous muscle and the abductor pollicis brevis muscle) following hemisphere stroke using clustering index (CI) analysis of surface electromyograms (EMGs). For each muscle, surface EMG signals were recorded from the paretic and contralateral sides of 12 stroke subjects versus the dominant side of eight control subjects during isometric muscle contractions to measure the consequence of graded levels of contraction (from a mild level to the maximal voluntary contraction). Across all examined muscles, it was found that partial paretic muscles had abnormally higher or lower CI values than those of the healthy control muscles, which exhibited a significantly larger variance in the CI via a series of homogeneity of variance tests (p < 0.05). This finding indicated that both neurogenic and myopathic changes were likely to take place in paretic muscles. When examining two distal muscles of individual stroke subjects, relatively consistent CI abnormalities (toward neuropathy or myopathy) were observed. By contrast, consistency in CI abnormalities were not found when comparing proximal and distal muscles, indicating differences in motor unit alternation between the proximal and distal muscles on the paretic sides of stroke survivors. Furthermore, CI abnormalities were also observed for all three muscles on the contralateral side. Our findings help elucidate the pathological mechanisms underlying stroke sequels, which might prove useful in developing improved stroke rehabilitation protocols. PMID:29379465

  20. The effect of low back pain on trunk muscle size/function and hip strength in elite football (soccer) players.

    PubMed

    Hides, Julie A; Oostenbroek, Tim; Franettovich Smith, Melinda M; Mendis, M Dilani

    2016-12-01

    Low back pain (LBP) is a common problem in football (soccer) players. The effect of LBP on the trunk and hip muscles in this group is unknown. The relationship between LBP and trunk muscle size and function in football players across the preseason was examined. A secondary aim was to assess hip muscle strength. Twenty-five elite soccer players participated in the study, with assessments conducted on 23 players at both the start and end of the preseason. LBP was assessed with questionnaires and ultrasound imaging was used to assess size and function of trunk muscles at the start and end of preseason. Dynamometry was used to assess hip muscle strength at the start of the preseason. At the start of the preseason, 28% of players reported the presence of LBP and this was associated with reduced size of the multifidus, increased contraction of the transversus abdominis and multifidus muscles. LBP decreased across the preseason, and size of the multifidus muscle improved over the preseason. Ability to contract the abdominal and multifidus muscles did not alter across the preseason. Asymmetry in hip adductor and abductor muscle strength was found between players with and without LBP. Identifying modifiable factors in players with LBP may allow development of more targeted preseason rehabilitation programmes.

  1. Mechanisms of quadriceps muscle weakness in knee joint osteoarthritis: the effects of prolonged vibration on torque and muscle activation in osteoarthritic and healthy control subjects

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction A consequence of knee joint osteoarthritis (OA) is an inability to fully activate the quadriceps muscles, a problem termed arthrogenic muscle inhibition (AMI). AMI leads to marked quadriceps weakness that impairs physical function and may hasten disease progression. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether γ-loop dysfunction contributes to AMI in people with knee joint OA. Methods Fifteen subjects with knee joint OA and 15 controls with no history of knee joint pathology participated in this study. Quadriceps and hamstrings peak isometric torque (Nm) and electromyography (EMG) amplitude were collected before and after 20 minutes of 50 Hz vibration applied to the infrapatellar tendon. Between-group differences in pre-vibration torque were analysed using a one-way analysis of covariance, with age, gender and body mass (kg) as the covariates. If the γ-loop is intact, vibration should decrease torque and EMG levels in the target muscle; if dysfunctional, then torque and EMG levels should not change following vibration. One-sample t tests were thus undertaken to analyse whether percentage changes in torque and EMG differed from zero after vibration in each group. In addition, analyses of covariance were utilised to analyse between-group differences in the percentage changes in torque and EMG following vibration. Results Pre-vibration quadriceps torque was significantly lower in the OA group compared with the control group (P = 0.005). Following tendon vibration, quadriceps torque (P < 0.001) and EMG amplitude (P ≤0.001) decreased significantly in the control group but did not change in the OA group (all P > 0.299). Hamstrings torque and EMG amplitude were unchanged in both groups (all P > 0.204). The vibration-induced changes in quadriceps torque and EMG were significantly different between the OA and control groups (all P < 0.011). No between-group differences were observed for the change in hamstrings torque or EMG (all P > 0

  2. Fatigue of muscles weakened by death of motoneurons.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Christine K; Zijdewind, Inge

    2006-01-01

    Weakness is a characteristic of muscles influenced by the postpolio syndrome (PPS), amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), and spinal cord injury (SCI). The strength deficits relate to changes in muscle use and to the chronic denervation that can follow the spinal motoneuron death common to these disorders. PPS, ALS, and SCI also involve variable amounts of supraspinal neuron death, the effects of which on muscle weakness remains unclear. Nevertheless, weakness of muscle itself defines the functional consequences of these disorders. A weaker muscle requires an individual to work that muscle at higher than usual intensities relative to its maximal capacity, inducing progressive fatigue and an increased sense of effort. Little evidence is available to suggest that the fatigue commonly experienced by individuals with these disorders relates to an increase in the intrinsic fatigability of the muscle fibers. The only exception is when SCI induces chronic muscle paralysis. To reduce long-term functional deficits in these disorders, studies must identify the signaling pathways that influence neuron survival and determine the factors that encourage and limit sprouting of motor axons. This may ensure that a greater proportion of the fibers in each muscle remain innervated and available for use.

  3. Comparative functional anatomy of hindlimb muscles and bones with reference to aquatic adaptation of the sea otter.

    PubMed

    Mori, Kent; Suzuki, Satoshi; Koyabu, Daisuke; Kimura, Junpei; Han, Sung-Yong; Endo, Hideki

    2015-05-01

    Although the sea otter (Enhydra lutris) is a complete aquatic species, spending its entire life in the ocean, it has been considered morphologically to be a semi-aquatic animal. This study aimed to clarify the unique hindlimb morphology and functional adaptations of E. lutris in comparison to other Mustelidae species. We compared muscle mass and bone measurements of five Mustelidae species: the sea otter, Eurasian river otter (Lutra lutra), American mink (Neovison vison), Japanese weasel (Mustela itatsi) and Siberian weasel (M. sibirica). In comparison with the other 4 species, E. lutris possessed significantly larger gluteus, popliteus and peroneus muscles, but smaller adductor and ischiopubic muscles. The popliteus muscle may act as a medial rotator of the crus, and the peroneus muscle may act as an abductor of the fifth toe and/or the pronator of the foot. The bundles of the gluteus superficialis muscle of E. lutris were fused with those of the tensor fasciae latae muscle and gluteofemoralis muscles, and they may play a role in femur abduction. These results suggest that E. lutris uses the abducted femur, medially rotated crus, eversion of the ankle and abducted fifth digit or extended interdigital web as a powerful propulsion generator. Therefore, we conclude that E. lutris is a complete aquatic animal, possessing differences in the proportions of the hindlimb muscles compared with those in other semi-aquatic and terrestrial mustelids.

  4. Comparative functional anatomy of hindlimb muscles and bones with reference to aquatic adaptation of the sea otter

    PubMed Central

    MORI, Kent; SUZUKI, Satoshi; KOYABU, Daisuke; KIMURA, Junpei; HAN, Sung-Yong; ENDO, Hideki

    2015-01-01

    Although the sea otter (Enhydra lutris) is a complete aquatic species, spending its entire life in the ocean, it has been considered morphologically to be a semi-aquatic animal. This study aimed to clarify the unique hindlimb morphology and functional adaptations of E. lutris in comparison to other Mustelidae species. We compared muscle mass and bone measurements of five Mustelidae species: the sea otter, Eurasian river otter (Lutra lutra), American mink (Neovison vison), Japanese weasel (Mustela itatsi) and Siberian weasel (M. sibirica). In comparison with the other 4 species, E. lutris possessed significantly larger gluteus, popliteus and peroneus muscles, but smaller adductor and ischiopubic muscles. The popliteus muscle may act as a medial rotator of the crus, and the peroneus muscle may act as an abductor of the fifth toe and/or the pronator of the foot. The bundles of the gluteus superficialis muscle of E. lutris were fused with those of the tensor fasciae latae muscle and gluteofemoralis muscles, and they may play a role in femur abduction. These results suggest that E. lutris uses the abducted femur, medially rotated crus, eversion of the ankle and abducted fifth digit or extended interdigital web as a powerful propulsion generator. Therefore, we conclude that E. lutris is a complete aquatic animal, possessing differences in the proportions of the hindlimb muscles compared with those in other semi-aquatic and terrestrial mustelids. PMID:25715875

  5. Cardiopulmonary fitness and muscle strength in patients with osteogenesis imperfecta type I.

    PubMed

    Takken, Tim; Terlingen, Heike C; Helders, Paul J M; Pruijs, Hans; Van der Ent, Cornelis K; Engelbert, Raoul H H

    2004-12-01

    To evaluate cardiopulmonary function, muscle strength, and cardiopulmonary fitness (VO 2 peak) in patients with osteogenesis imperfecta (OI). In 17 patients with OI type I (mean age 13.3 +/- 3.9 years) cardiopulmonary function was assessed at rest using spirometry, plethysmography, electrocardiography, and echocardiography. Exercise capacity was measured using a maximal exercise test on a bicycle ergometer and an expired gas analysis system. Muscle strength in shoulder abductors, hip flexors, ankle dorsal flexor, and grip strength were measured. All results were compared with reference values. Cardiopulmonary function at rest was within normal ranges, but when it was compared with normal height for age and sex, vital capacities were reduced. Mean absolute and relative VO 2 peak were respectively -1.17 (+/- 0.67) and -1.41 (+/- 1.52) standard deviations lower compared with reference values ( P < .01). Muscle strength also was significantly reduced in patients with OI, ranging from -1.24 +/- 1.40 to -2.88 +/- 2.67 standard deviations lower compared with reference values. In patients with OI type I, no pulmonary or cardiac abnormalities at rest were found. The exercise tolerance and muscle strength were significantly reduced in patients with OI, which might account for their increased levels of fatigue during activities of daily living.

  6. The Gait Deviation Index Is Associated with Hip Muscle Strength and Patient-Reported Outcome in Patients with Severe Hip Osteoarthritis-A Cross-Sectional Study.

    PubMed

    Rosenlund, Signe; Holsgaard-Larsen, Anders; Overgaard, Søren; Jensen, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    The Gait Deviation Index summarizes overall gait 'quality', based on kinematic data from a 3-dimensional gait analysis. However, it is unknown which clinical outcomes may affect the Gait Deviation Index in patients with primary hip osteoarthritis. The aim of this study was to investigate associations between Gait Deviation Index as a measure of gait 'quality' and hip muscle strength and between Gait Deviation Index and patient-reported outcomes in patients with primary hip osteoarthritis. Forty-seven patients (34 males), aged 61.1 ± 6.7 years, with BMI 27.3 ± 3.4 (kg/m2) and with severe primary hip osteoarthritis underwent 3-dimensional gait analysis. Mean Gait Deviation Index, pain after walking and maximal isometric hip muscle strength (flexor, extensor, and abductor) were recorded. All patients completed the 'Physical Function Short-form of the Hip disability and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (HOOS-Physical Function) and the Hip disability and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score subscales for pain (HOOS-Pain) and quality-of-life (HOOS-QOL). Mean Gait Deviation Index was positively associated with hip abduction strength (p<0.01, r = 0.40), hip flexion strength (p = 0.01, r = 0.37), HOOS-Physical Function (p<0.01, r = 0.41) HOOS-QOL (p<0.01, r = 0.41), and negatively associated with HOOS-Pain after walking (p<0.01, r = -0.45). Adjusting the analysis for walking speed did not affect the association. Patients with the strongest hip abductor and hip flexor muscles had the best gait 'quality'. Furthermore, patients with higher physical function, quality of life scores and lower pain levels demonstrated better gait 'quality'. These findings indicate that interventions aimed at improving hip muscle strength and pain management may to a moderate degree improve the overall gait 'quality' in patients with primary hip OA.

  7. The Gait Deviation Index Is Associated with Hip Muscle Strength and Patient-Reported Outcome in Patients with Severe Hip Osteoarthritis—A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Rosenlund, Signe; Holsgaard-Larsen, Anders; Overgaard, Søren; Jensen, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    Background The Gait Deviation Index summarizes overall gait ‘quality’, based on kinematic data from a 3-dimensional gait analysis. However, it is unknown which clinical outcomes may affect the Gait Deviation Index in patients with primary hip osteoarthritis. The aim of this study was to investigate associations between Gait Deviation Index as a measure of gait ‘quality’ and hip muscle strength and between Gait Deviation Index and patient-reported outcomes in patients with primary hip osteoarthritis. Method Forty-seven patients (34 males), aged 61.1 ± 6.7 years, with BMI 27.3 ± 3.4 (kg/m2) and with severe primary hip osteoarthritis underwent 3-dimensional gait analysis. Mean Gait Deviation Index, pain after walking and maximal isometric hip muscle strength (flexor, extensor, and abductor) were recorded. All patients completed the ‘Physical Function Short-form of the Hip disability and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (HOOS-Physical Function) and the Hip disability and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score subscales for pain (HOOS-Pain) and quality-of-life (HOOS-QOL). Results Mean Gait Deviation Index was positively associated with hip abduction strength (p<0.01, r = 0.40), hip flexion strength (p = 0.01, r = 0.37), HOOS-Physical Function (p<0.01, r = 0.41) HOOS-QOL (p<0.01, r = 0.41), and negatively associated with HOOS-Pain after walking (p<0.01, r = -0.45). Adjusting the analysis for walking speed did not affect the association. Conclusion Patients with the strongest hip abductor and hip flexor muscles had the best gait ‘quality’. Furthermore, patients with higher physical function, quality of life scores and lower pain levels demonstrated better gait ‘quality’. These findings indicate that interventions aimed at improving hip muscle strength and pain management may to a moderate degree improve the overall gait ‘quality’ in patients with primary hip OA. PMID:27065007

  8. Elderly persons with ICU-acquired weakness: the potential role for β-hydroxy-β-methylbutyrate (HMB) supplementation?

    PubMed

    Rahman, Adam; Wilund, Kenneth; Fitschen, Peter J; Jeejeebhoy, Khursheed; Agarwala, Ravi; Drover, John W; Mourtzakis, Marina

    2014-07-01

    Intensive care unit (ICU)-acquired weakness is common and characterized by muscle loss, weakness, and paralysis. It is associated with poor short-term outcomes, including increased mortality, but the consequences of reduced long-term outcomes, including decreased physical function and quality of life, can be just as devastating. ICU-acquired weakness is particularly relevant to elderly patients who are increasingly consuming ICU resources and are at increased risk for ICU-acquired weakness and complications, including mortality. Elderly patients often enter critical illness with reduced muscle mass and function and are also at increased risk for accelerated disuse atrophy with acute illness. Increasingly, intensivists and researchers are focusing on strategies and therapies aimed at improving long-term neuromuscular function. β-Hydroxy-β-methylbutyrate (HMB), an ergogenic supplement, has shown efficacy in elderly patients and certain clinical populations in counteracting muscle loss. The present review discusses ICU-acquired weakness, as well as the unique physiology of muscle loss and skeletal muscle function in elderly patients, and then summarizes the evidence for HMB in elderly patients and in clinical populations. We subsequently postulate on the potential role and strategies in studying HMB in elderly ICU patients to improve muscle mass and function. © 2013 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  9. Influence of modified muscle morphology and activity pattern on the results of musculoskeletal system modelling in cerebral palsy patient.

    PubMed

    Ogrodnik, Justyna; Piszczatowski, Szczepan

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the influence of modified morphological parameters of the muscle model and excitation pattern on the results of musculoskeletal system numerical simulation in a cerebral palsy patient. The modelling of the musculoskeletal system was performed in the AnyBody Modelling System. The standard model (MoCap) was subjected to modifications consisting of changes in morphological parameters and excitation patterns of selected muscles. The research was conducted with the use of data of a 14-year-old cerebral palsy patient. A reduction of morphological parameters (variant MI) caused a decrease in the value of active force generated by the muscle with changed geometry, and as a consequence the changes in active force generated by other muscles. A simulation of the abnormal excitation pattern (variant MII) resulted in the muscle's additional activity during its lengthening. The simultaneous modification of the muscle morphology and excitation pattern (variant MIII) points to the interdependence of both types of muscle model changes. A significant increase in the value of the reaction force in the hip joint was observed as a consequence of modification of the hip abductor activity. The morphological parameters and the excitation pattern of modelled muscles have a significant influence on the results of numerical simulation of the musculoskeletal system functioning.

  10. Which is the best predictor of excessive hip internal rotation in women with patellofemoral pain: Rearfoot eversion or hip muscle strength? Exploring subgroups.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Amanda Schenatto; de Oliveira Silva, Danilo; Briani, Ronaldo Valdir; Ferrari, Deisi; Aragão, Fernando Amâncio; Pazzinatto, Marcella Ferraz; de Azevedo, Fábio Mícolis

    2018-03-26

    Patellofemoral pain (PFP) has been linked to increased patellofemoral joint stress as a result of excessive hip internal rotation. Lower hip strength and/or excessive rearfoot eversion have been used to explain such altered movement pattern; however, it is unknown which one is the best predictor of excessive hip internal rotation. To investigate if peak rearfoot eversion and/or peak concentric hip abductor strength can predict peak hip internal rotation during stair ascent in women with PFP. This cross-sectional study included thirty-seven women with PFP which underwent three-dimensional kinematic analysis during stair ascent and hip abductor strength analysis in an isokinetic dynamometer. A forced entry linear regression model analysis was carried out to determine which independent variables present the best capability to predict the hip internal rotation. Peak concentric hip abductor strength significantly predicted peak hip internal rotation during stair ascent (R 2  = 0.27, p = 0.001). Peak rearfoot eversion did not predict peak hip internal rotation during stair ascent (R 2  < 0.01, p = 0.62). A Post-hoc analysis was conducted to explore if a subgroup with excessive rearfoot eversion would predict hip internal rotation. Based on a previous reported cut-off point, 48.6% of the participants were classified as excessive rearfoot eversion. For the subgroup with excessive rearfoot eversion, peak concentric hip abductor strength and peak rearfoot eversion significantly predicted peak hip internal rotation during stair ascent (R 2  = 0.26, p = 0.02; R 2  = 0.42, p = 0.003, respectively). For non-excessive rearfoot eversion subgroup, peak concentric hip abductor strength significantly predicted peak hip internal rotation during stair ascent (R 2  = 0.53; p < 0.001); and peak rearfoot eversion did not (R 2  = 0.01; p = 0.65). Findings indicate that hip muscle strength seems to be related with hip internal rotation in all

  11. Vitamin D and muscle function

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Muscle weakness is a hallmark of severe vitamin D deficiency, but the effect of milder vitamin D deficiency or insufficiency on muscle mass and performance and risk of falling is uncertain. In this presentation, I review the evidence that vitamin D influences muscle mass and performance, balance, an...

  12. Co-activation: its association with weakness and specific neurological pathology

    PubMed Central

    Busse, Monica E; Wiles, Charles M; van Deursen, Robert WM

    2006-01-01

    Background Net agonist muscle strength is in part determined by the degree of antagonist co-activation. The level of co-activation might vary in different neurological disorders causing weakness or might vary with agonist strength. Aim This study investigated whether antagonist co-activation changed a) with the degree of muscle weakness and b) with the nature of the neurological lesion causing weakness. Methods Measures of isometric quadriceps and hamstrings strength were obtained. Antagonist (hamstring) co-activation during knee extension was calculated as a ratio of hamstrings over quadriceps activity both during an isometric and during a functional sit to stand (STS) task (using kinematics) in groups of patients with extrapyramidal (n = 15), upper motor neuron (UMN) (n = 12), lower motor neuron (LMN) with (n = 18) or without (n = 12) sensory loss, primary muscle or neuromuscular junction disorder (n = 17) and in healthy matched controls (n = 32). Independent t-tests or Mann Witney U tests were used to compare between the groups. Correlations between variables were also investigated. Results In healthy subjects mean (SD) co-activation of hamstrings during isometric knee extension was 11.8 (6.2)% and during STS was 20.5 (12.9)%. In patients, co-activation ranged from 7 to 17% during isometric knee extension and 15 to 25% during STS. Only the extrapyramidal group had lower co-activation levels than healthy matched controls (p < 0.05). Agonist isometric muscle strength and co-activation correlated only in muscle disease (r = -0.6, p < 0.05) and during STS in UMN disorders (r = -0.7, p < 0.5). Conclusion It is concluded that antagonist co-activation does not systematically vary with the site of neurological pathology when compared to healthy matched controls or, in most patient groups, with strength. The lower co-activation levels found in the extrapyramidal group require confirmation and further investigation. Co-activation may be relevant to individuals with muscle

  13. Gradual downhill running improves age-related skeletal muscle and bone weakness: implication of autophagy and bone morphogenetic proteins.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeong-Seok; Lee, Young-Hee; Yi, Ho-Keun

    2016-12-01

    What is the central question of this study? Exercise training by running has an effect on age-related muscle and bone wasting that improves physical activity and quality of life in the elderly. However, the effect of downhill running on age-related muscle and bone wasting, and its mechanisms, are unclear. What is the main finding and its importance? Gradual downhill running can improve skeletal muscle growth and bone formation by enhancing autophagy and bone morphogenetic protein signalling in aged rats. Therefore, downhill running exercise might be a practical intervention to improve skeletal muscle and bone protection in the elderly. Recent evidence suggests that autophagy and the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signalling pathway regulate skeletal muscle growth and bone formation in aged rats. However, the effect of downhill running on muscle growth and bone formation is not well understood. Thus, we investigated the effect of downhill and uphill running on age-related muscle and bone weakness. Young and late middle-aged rats were randomly assigned to control groups (young, YC; and late middle-aged, LMC) and two types of running training groups (late middle-aged downhill, LMD; and late middle-aged uphill, LMU). Training was progressively carried out on a treadmill at a speed of 21 m min -1 with a slope of +10 deg for uphill training versus 16 m min -1 with a slope of -16 deg for downhill training, both for 60 min day -1 , 5 days week -1 for 8 weeks. Downhill and uphill training increased autophagy-related protein 5, microtubule-associated protein light chain, Beclin-1 and p62 proteins in aged rats. In addition, superoxide dismutase, haem oxygenase-1 and the BMP signalling pathway were elevated. Phosphorylation of mammalian target of rapamycin and myogenic differentiation were increased significantly in the LMD and LMU groups. Consequently, in the femur, BMP-2, BMP-7 and autophagy molecules were highly expressed in the LMD and LMU groups. These results

  14. Finger extension weakness and downbeat nystagmus motor neuron disease syndrome: A novel motor neuron disorder?

    PubMed Central

    Delva, Aline; Thakore, Nimish; Pioro, Erik P.; Poesen, Koen; Saunders‐Pullman, Rachel; Meijer, Inge A.; Rucker, Janet C.; Kissel, John T.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTACT Introduction: Disturbances of eye movements are infrequently encountered in motor neuron diseases (MNDs) or motor neuropathies, and there is no known syndrome that combines progressive muscle weakness with downbeat nystagmus. Methods: To describe the core clinical features of a syndrome of MND associated with downbeat nystagmus, clinical features were collected from 6 patients. Results: All patients had slowly progressive muscle weakness and wasting in combination with downbeat nystagmus, which was clinically most obvious in downward and lateral gaze. Onset was in the second to fourth decade with finger extension weakness, progressing to other distal and sometimes more proximal muscles. Visual complaints were not always present. Electrodiagnostic testing showed signs of regional motor axonal loss in all patients. Discussion: The etiology of this syndrome remains elusive. Because finger extension weakness and downbeat nystagmus are the discriminating clinical features of this MND, we propose the name FEWDON‐MND syndrome. Muscle Nerve 56: 1164–1168, 2017 PMID:28440863

  15. Musculoskeletal anatomy of the pelvic fin of Polypterus: implications for phylogenetic distribution and homology of pre- and postaxial pelvic appendicular muscles.

    PubMed

    Molnar, Julia L; Johnston, Peter S; Esteve-Altava, Borja; Diogo, Rui

    2017-04-01

    As a member of the most basal clade of extant ray-finned fishes (actinopterygians) and of one of the most basal clades of osteichthyans (bony fishes + tetrapods), Polypterus can provide insights into the ancestral anatomy of both ray-finned and lobe-finned fishes, including those that gave rise to tetrapods. The pectoral fin of Polypterus has been well described but, surprisingly, neither the bones nor the muscles of the pelvic fin are well known. We stained and dissected the pelvic fin of Polypterus senegalus and Polypterus delhezi to offer a detailed description of its musculoskeletal anatomy. In addition to the previously described adductor and abductor muscles, we found preaxial and postaxial muscles similar to those in the pectoral fin of members of this genus. The presence of pre- and postaxial muscles in both the pectoral and pelvic fins of Polypterus, combined with recent descriptions of similar muscles in the lobe-finned fishes Latimeria and Neoceratodus, suggests that they were present in the most recent common ancestor of bony fishes. These results have crucial implications for the evolution of appendicular muscles in both fish and tetrapods. © 2016 Anatomical Society.

  16. Diospyros rhodocalyx (Tako-Na), a Thai folk medicine, associated with hypokalemia and generalized muscle weakness: a case series.

    PubMed

    Othong, Rittirak; Trakulsrichai, Satariya; Wananukul, Winai

    2017-11-01

    Diospyros rhodocalyx (Tako-Na) is a Thai folk medicine purported to promote longevity, treat impotence, etc. We present patients with hypokalemia, weakness and hypertension after consuming Tako-Na tea. Case 1: A 61-year-old man was brought in nine hours after drinking 400-500 mL of Tako-Na tea. One handful of Tako-Na bark was boiled in water to make tea. He had vomiting and watery diarrhea six hours after drinking it. He took no medications and had no history of hypertension. The only remarkable vital sign was BP 167/90 mmHg. Physical examination revealed generalized muscle weakness. Laboratory findings were potassium 2.7 mmol/L, bicarbonate 24 mmol/L, and transtubular potassium gradient (TTKG) 5.6. He was discharged the next day with a BP 140/90 mmHg and potassium 4.2 mmol/L. Case 2: A 78-year-old man, a friend of case 1, also drank Tako-Na tea from the same pot at the same time as case 1. He also had vomiting and diarrhea six hours later. He took no medications despite past history of hypertension (baseline SBP 140-160). Initial BP was 230/70 mmHg. He also had muscle weakness. Laboratory findings were potassium 3.3 mmol/L, bicarbonate 24 mmol/L, TTKG 7.37 and normal thyroid function. He was also discharged the next day with a BP 148/70 mmHg and potassium 4.2 mmol/L. Case 3-7: These were patients reported to a poison center and their potassium concentrations were 1.4, 1.4, 3.3, 1.3 and 1.2 mmol/L, respectively. Three of them were intubated and case 3 died. Tako-Na contains betulin, betulinic acid, taraxerone, lupeol, and lupenone. Their structures are similar to glycyrrhetic acid, the active metabolite of glycyrrhizic acid found in licorice which is well known to cause pseudoaldosteronism. Glycyrrhetic acid is potent in inhibiting 11-beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, and causes pseudoaldosteronism. We hypothesize that the compounds in Tako-Na act in the same way as glycyrrhetic acid in producing pseudoaldosteronism.

  17. Treatment of osteoarthritis of the first carpometacarpal joint by resection-suspension-interposition arthoplasty using the split abductor pollicis longus tendon.

    PubMed

    Harenberg, P S; Jakubietz, M G; Jakubietz, R G; Schmidt, K; Meffert, R H

    2013-02-01

    Reduction of pain and gain of functionality in symptomatic osteoarthritis of the first carpometacarpal joint. Idiopathic, rheumatic, or posttraumatic osteoarthritis of the first carpometacarpal joint. RELATIVE CONTRAINDICATIONS: Poor general condition, poor condition of the hand's soft tissue/skin, chronic regional pain syndrome, current or recent infections of the hand, heavy manual labor (decision on a by-case basis). Supine position, hand pronated or slightly tilted. Upper arm tourniquet (Esmarch's method). Loupe magnification. Incision over the first extensor compartment. Exposure and incision of the thumb's basal joint. Resection of the trapezium. Exposure of the abductor pollicis longus (APL) tendon. Longitudinal split of the tendon harvesting the distally based ulnar part of the tendon. The split APL tendon is wrapped around the flexor carpi radialis (FCR) muscle tendon, suturing it to the tendon and back to itself. The rest of the split APL tendon is placed into the gap between the scaphoid and the first metacarpal bone, which is followed by wound closure. Plaster cast (thumb abduction splint) for 4 weeks. Stable commercially available wrist brace for at least 2 more weeks. There were no significant differences between the FCR arthroplasty (Epping's method) and the APL arthroplasty (Wulle's technique) regarding pain (visual analog scale), disability/usability (DASH score), or range of motion. Patients who had undergone APL arthroplasty showed significantly better grip and pinch strength. Furthermore, the operating time was significantly shorter and scars were significantly smaller in APL arthroplasty.

  18. Electrical Stimulation Frequency and Skeletal Muscle Characteristics: Effects on Force and Fatigue.

    PubMed

    Vromans, Maria; Faghri, Pouran

    2017-12-05

    This investigation aimed to determine the force and muscle surface electromyography (EMG) responses to different frequencies of electrical stimulation (ES) in two groups of muscles with different size and fiber composition (fast- and slow-twitch fiber proportions) during a fatigue-inducing protocol. Progression towards fatigue was evaluated in the abductor pollicis brevis (APB) and vastus lateralis (VL) when activated by ES at three frequencies (10, 35, and 50Hz). Ten healthy adults (mean age: 23.2 ± 3.0 years) were recruited; participants signed an IRB approved consent form prior to participation. Protocols were developed to 1) identify initial ES current intensity required to generate the 25% maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) at each ES frequency and 2) evaluate changes in force and EMG activity during ES-induced contraction at each frequency while progressing towards fatigue. For both muscles, stimulation at 10Hz required higher current intensity of ES to generate the initial force. There was a significant decline in force in response to ES-induced fatigue for all frequencies and for both muscles (p<0.05). However, the EMG response was not consistent between muscles. During the progression towards fatigue, the APB displayed an initial drop in force followed by an increase in EMG activity and the VL displayed a decrease in EMG activity for all frequencies. Overall, it appeared that there were some significant interactions between muscle size and fiber composition during progression towards fatigue for different ES frequencies. It could be postulated that muscle characteristics (size and fiber composition) should be considered when evaluating progression towards fatigue as EMG and force responses are not consistent between muscles.

  19. The Evolution of and Risk Factors for Neck Muscle Atrophy and Weakness in Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Treated With Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy: A Retrospective Study in an Endemic Area.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lu-Lu; Mao, Yan-Ping; Zhou, Guan-Qun; Tang, Ling-Long; Qi, Zhen-Yu; Lin, Li; Yao, Ji-Jin; Ma, Jun; Lin, Ai-Hua; Sun, Ying

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the evolution of sternocleidomastoid muscle (SCM) atrophy in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients following intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), and the relationship between SCM atrophy and neck weakness.Data were retrospectively analyzed from 223 biopsy-proven NPC patients with no distant metastasis who underwent IMRT with or without chemotherapy. The volume of SCM was measured on pretreatment magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and MRIs were conducted 1, 2, and 3 years after the completion of IMRT. Change in SCM volume was calculated and classified using the late effects of normal tissues-subjective, objective, management, and analytic system. The grade of neck muscle weakness, classified by the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events V 3.0, was measured 3 years after the completion of IMRT.The average SCM atrophy ratio was -10.97%, -18.65%, and -22.25% at 1, 2, and 3 years postirradiation, respectively. Multivariate analysis indicated N stage and the length of time after IMRT were independent prognostic variables. There were significant associations between the degree of SCM atrophy and neck weakness.Radical IMRT can cause significant SCM atrophy in NPC patients. A more advanced N stage was associated with more severe SCM atrophy, but no difference was observed between N2 and N3. SCM atrophy progresses over time during the 3 years following IMRT. Grade of SCM atrophy is significantly associated with neck weakness.

  20. Fatigue Responses in Various Muscle Groups in Well-Trained Competitive Male Players after a Simulated Soccer Game

    PubMed Central

    Fransson, Dan; Vigh-Larsen, Jeppe Foged; Fatouros, Ioannis G.; Krustrup, Peter; Mohr, Magni

    2018-01-01

    Abstract We examined the degree of post-game fatigue and the recovery pattern in various leg and upper-body muscle groups after a simulated soccer game. Well-trained competitive male soccer players (n = 12) participated in the study. The players completed the Copenhagen Soccer Test, a 2 x 45 min simulated soccer protocol, following baseline measures of maximal voluntary contractions of multiple muscle groups and systemic markers of muscle damage and inflammation at 0, 24 and 48 h into recovery. All muscle groups had a strength decrement (p ≤ 0.05) at 0 h post-match with knee flexors (14 ± 3%) and hip abductors (6 ± 1%) demonstrating the largest and smallest impairment. However, 24 h into recovery all individual muscles had recovered. When pooled in specific muscle groups, the trunk muscles and knee joint muscles presented the largest decline 0 h post-match, 11 ± 2% for both, with the performance decrement still persistent (4 ± 1%, p ≤ 0.05) for trunk muscles 24 h into recovery. Large inter-player variations were observed in game-induced fatigue and recovery patterns in the various muscle groups. Markers of muscle damage and inflammation peaked 0 h post-match (myoglobin) and 24 h into recovery (creatine kinase), respectively, but thereafter returned to baseline. Intermittent test performance correlated with creatine kinase activity 24 h after the Copenhagen Soccer Test (r = -0.70; p = 0.02). In conclusion, post-game fatigue is evident in multiple muscle groups with knee flexors showing the greatest performance decrement. Fatigue and recovery patterns vary markedly between muscle groups and players, yet trunk muscles display the slowest recovery. PMID:29599862

  1. Fatigue Responses in Various Muscle Groups in Well-Trained Competitive Male Players after a Simulated Soccer Game.

    PubMed

    Fransson, Dan; Vigh-Larsen, Jeppe Foged; Fatouros, Ioannis G; Krustrup, Peter; Mohr, Magni

    2018-03-01

    We examined the degree of post-game fatigue and the recovery pattern in various leg and upper-body muscle groups after a simulated soccer game. Well-trained competitive male soccer players (n = 12) participated in the study. The players completed the Copenhagen Soccer Test, a 2 x 45 min simulated soccer protocol, following baseline measures of maximal voluntary contractions of multiple muscle groups and systemic markers of muscle damage and inflammation at 0, 24 and 48 h into recovery. All muscle groups had a strength decrement ( p ≤ 0.05) at 0 h post-match with knee flexors (14 ± 3%) and hip abductors (6 ± 1%) demonstrating the largest and smallest impairment. However, 24 h into recovery all individual muscles had recovered. When pooled in specific muscle groups, the trunk muscles and knee joint muscles presented the largest decline 0 h post-match, 11 ± 2% for both, with the performance decrement still persistent (4 ± 1%, p ≤ 0.05) for trunk muscles 24 h into recovery. Large inter-player variations were observed in game-induced fatigue and recovery patterns in the various muscle groups. Markers of muscle damage and inflammation peaked 0 h post-match (myoglobin) and 24 h into recovery (creatine kinase), respectively, but thereafter returned to baseline. Intermittent test performance correlated with creatine kinase activity 24 h after the Copenhagen Soccer Test (r = -0.70; p = 0.02). In conclusion, post-game fatigue is evident in multiple muscle groups with knee flexors showing the greatest performance decrement. Fatigue and recovery patterns vary markedly between muscle groups and players, yet trunk muscles display the slowest recovery.

  2. Understanding the origin of non-immune cell-mediated weakness in the idiopathic inflammatory myopathies - potential role of ER stress pathways.

    PubMed

    Lightfoot, Adam P; Nagaraju, Kanneboyina; McArdle, Anne; Cooper, Robert G

    2015-11-01

    Discussion of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress pathway activation in idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIM), and downstream mechanisms causative of muscle weakness. In IIM, ER stress is an important pathogenic process, but how it causes muscle dysfunction is unknown. We discuss relevant pathways modified in response to ER stress in IIM: reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and mitochondrial dysfunction, and muscle cytokine (myokine) generation. First, ER stress pathway activation can induce changes in mitochondrial bioenergetics and ROS production. ROS can oxidize cellular components, causing muscle contractile dysfunction and energy deficits. Novel compounds targeting ROS generation and/or mitochondrial dysfunction can improve muscle function in several myopathologies. Second, recent research has demonstrated that skeletal muscle produces multiple myokines. It is suggested that these play a role in causing muscle weakness. Myokines are capable of immune cell recruitment, thus contributing to perturbed muscle function. A characterization of myokines in IIM would clarify their pathogenic role, and so identify new therapeutic targets. ER stress pathway activation is clearly of etiological relevance in IIM. Research to better understand mechanisms of weakness downstream of ER stress is now required, and which may discover new therapeutic targets for nonimmune cell-mediated weakness.

  3. Osteogenesis Imperfecta: Muscle-Bone Interactions when Bi-directionally Compromised.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Charlotte L; Jeong, Youngjae

    2018-06-16

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a hereditary connective tissue disorder of skeletal fragility and more recently muscle weakness. This review highlights our current knowledge of the impact of compromised OI muscle function on muscle-bone interactions and skeletal strength in OI. The ramifications of inherent muscle weakness in OI muscle-bone interactions are just beginning to be elucidated. Studies in patients and in OI mouse models implicate altered mechanosensing, energy metabolism, mitochondrial dysfunction, and paracrine/endocrine crosstalk in the pathogenesis of OI. Compromised muscle-bone unit impacts mechanosensing and the ability of OI muscle and bone to respond to physiotherapeutic and pharmacologic treatment strategies. Muscle and bone are both compromised in OI, making it essential to understand the mechanisms responsible for both impaired muscle and bone functions and their interdependence, as this will expand and drive new physiotherapeutic and pharmacological approaches to treat OI and other musculoskeletal disorders.

  4. Contributions of muscles and passive dynamics to swing initiation over a range of walking speeds.

    PubMed

    Fox, Melanie D; Delp, Scott L

    2010-05-28

    Stiff-knee gait is a common walking problem in cerebral palsy characterized by insufficient knee flexion during swing. To identify factors that may limit knee flexion in swing, it is necessary to understand how unimpaired subjects successfully coordinate muscles and passive dynamics (gravity and velocity-related forces) to accelerate the knee into flexion during double support, a critical phase just prior to swing that establishes the conditions for achieving sufficient knee flexion during swing. It is also necessary to understand how contributions to swing initiation change with walking speed, since patients with stiff-knee gait often walk slowly. We analyzed muscle-driven dynamic simulations of eight unimpaired subjects walking at four speeds to quantify the contributions of muscles, gravity, and velocity-related forces (i.e. Coriolis and centrifugal forces) to preswing knee flexion acceleration during double support at each speed. Analysis of the simulations revealed contributions from muscles and passive dynamics varied systematically with walking speed. Preswing knee flexion acceleration was achieved primarily by hip flexor muscles on the preswing leg with assistance from biceps femoris short head. Hip flexors on the preswing leg were primarily responsible for the increase in preswing knee flexion acceleration during double support with faster walking speed. The hip extensors and abductors on the contralateral leg and velocity-related forces opposed preswing knee flexion acceleration during double support. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Contributions of muscles and passive dynamics to swing initiation over a range of walking speeds

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Melanie D.; Delp, Scott L.

    2010-01-01

    Stiff-knee gait is a common walking problem in cerebral palsy characterized by insufficient knee flexion during swing. To identify factors that may limit knee flexion in swing, it is necessary to understand how unimpaired subjects successfully coordinate muscles and passive dynamics (gravity and velocity-related forces) to accelerate the knee into flexion during double support, a critical phase just prior to swing that establishes the conditions for achieving sufficient knee flexion during swing. It is also necessary to understand how contributions to swing initiation change with walking speed, since patients with stiff-knee gait often walk slowly. We analyzed muscle-driven dynamic simulations of eight unimpaired subjects walking at four speeds to quantify the contributions of muscles, gravity, and velocity-related forces (i.e. Coriolis and centrifugal forces) to preswing knee flexion acceleration during double support at each speed. Analysis of the simulations revealed contributions from muscles and passive dynamics varied systematically with walking speed. Preswing knee flexion acceleration was achieved primarily by hip flexor muscles on the preswing leg with assistance from biceps femoris short head. Hip flexors on the preswing leg were primarily responsible for the increase in preswing knee flexion acceleration during double support with faster walking speed. The hip extensors and abductors on the contralateral leg and velocity-related forces opposed preswing knee flexion acceleration during double support. PMID:20236644

  6. Acoustic myography as an indicator of force during sustained contractions of a small hand muscle.

    PubMed

    Goldenberg, M S; Yack, H J; Cerny, F J; Burton, H W

    1991-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that muscle sound amplitudes would remain constant during sustained submaximal isometric contractions, we recorded acoustic myograms from the abductor digiti minimi muscle in 12 subjects at 15, 25, 50, and 75% of a maximum voluntary contraction (MVC). Muscle sounds were detected with an omni-directional electret microphone encased in closed-cell foam and attached to the skin over the muscle. Acoustic amplitudes from the middle and end of the sustained contractions were compared with the amplitudes from the beginning of contractions to determine whether acoustic amplitudes varied in magnitude as force remained constant. Physiological tremor was eliminated from the acoustic signal by use of a Fourier truncation at 14 Hz. The amplitudes of the acoustic signal at a contraction intensity of 75% MVC remained constant, reflecting force production over time. At 50% MVC, the root-mean-square amplitude decreased from the beginning to the end of the contraction (P less than 0.05). Acoustic amplitudes increased over time at 15 and 25% MVC and were significantly higher at the end of the contractions than at the beginning (P less than 0.05). Alterations in the acoustic amplitude, which reflect changes in the lateral vibrations of the muscle, may be indicative of the different recruitment strategies used to maintain force during sustained isometric contractions.

  7. Comparative musculoskeletal anatomy of chameleon limbs, with implications for the evolution of arboreal locomotion in lizards and for teratology.

    PubMed

    Molnar, Julia L; Diaz, Raul E; Skorka, Tautis; Dagliyan, Grant; Diogo, Rui

    2017-09-01

    Chameleon species have recently been adopted as models for evo-devo and macroevolutionary processes. However, most anatomical and developmental studies of chameleons focus on the skeleton, and information about their soft tissues is scarce. Here, we provide a detailed morphological description based on contrast enhanced micro-CT scans and dissections of the adult phenotype of all the forelimb and hindlimb muscles of the Veiled Chameleon (Chamaeleo calyptratus) and compare these muscles with those of other chameleons and lizards. We found the appendicular muscle anatomy of chameleons to be surprisingly conservative considering the remarkable structural and functional modifications of the limb skeleton, particularly the distal limb regions. For instance, the zygodactyl autopodia of chameleons are unique among tetrapods, and the carpals and tarsals are highly modified in shape and number. However, most of the muscles usually present in the manus and pes of other lizards are present in the same configuration in chameleons. The most obvious muscular features related to the peculiar opposable autopodia of chameleons are: (1) presence of broad, V-shaped plantar and palmar aponeuroses, and absence of intermetacarpales and intermetatarsales, between the digits separated by the cleft in each autopod; (2) oblique orientation of the superficial short flexors originating from these aponeuroses, which may allow these muscles to act as powerful adductors of the "super-digits"; and (3) well-developed abductor digiti minimi muscles and abductor pollicis/hallucis brevis muscles, which may act as powerful abductors of the "super-digits." © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. An electromyographic study of muscle relaxants in man.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, H; Kanayama, T; Nakagawa, H; Yazaki, S; Shiratsuchi, T

    1975-05-01

    Supramaximal paired stimuli were applied to the ulnar nerve, and the amplitude of the muscle action potential evoked in the abductor digiti minimi by the second member of the stimulus pair (test response) was compared with that evoked by the first component (conditioning response). The interval between the two components of the stimulus pair (the pair interval) was increased stepwise from 7 to 100 msec and a curve (recovery curve) was obtained by relating the changes in pair interval to the difference in amplitude of the test and conditioning responses. Alterations of the recovery curve (RC) during partial paralysis by muscle relaxants were investigated in healthy adult patients under the lightest plane of general anaesthesia. The control curve obtained in 32 subjects before the administration of a muscle relaxant drug was characterized by slight depressions at very short intervals of paired stimuli, followed by a slight potentiation at 20-100 msec. With non-depolarizing relaxants, RC altered to the characteristic pattern of potentiation at very short intervals of stimuli, followed by a notable depression at longer intervals. In depolarizing blocks with small doses of suxamethonium, the depression of RC at short intervals in the control was enhanced and the pattern of RC was different from that of non-depolarizing agents. When desensitization blocks were instigated by the i.v. administration of suxamethonium, the RC patterns were similar to those of competitive agents.

  9. Accommodation: The role of the external muscles of the eye: A consideration of refractive errors in relation to extraocular malfunction.

    PubMed

    Hargrave, B K

    2014-11-01

    Speculation as to optical malfunction has led to dissatisfaction with the theory that the lens is the sole agent in accommodation and to the suggestion that other parts of the eye are also conjointly involved. Around half-a-century ago, Robert Brooks Simpkins suggested that the mechanical features of the human eye were precisely such as to allow for a lengthening of the globe when the eye accommodated. Simpkins was not an optical man but his theory is both imaginative and comprehensive and deserves consideration. It is submitted here that accommodation is in fact a twofold process, and that although involving the lens, is achieved primarily by means of a give - and - take interplay between adducting and abducting external muscles, whereby an elongation of the eyeball is brought about by a stretching of the delicate elastic fibres immediately behind the cornea. The three muscles responsible for convergence (superior, internal and inferior recti) all pull from in front backwards, while of the three abductors (external rectus and the two obliques) the obliques pull from behind forwards, allowing for an easy elongation as the eye turns inwards and a return to its original length as the abducting muscles regain their former tension, returning the eye to distance vision. In refractive errors, the altered length of the eyeball disturbs the harmonious give - and - take relationship between adductors and abductors. Such stresses are likely to be perpetuated and the error exacerbated. Speculation is not directed towards a search for a possible cause of the muscular imbalance, since none is suspected. Muscles not used rapidly lose tone, as evidenced after removal of a limb from plaster. Early attention to the need for restorative exercise is essential and results usually impressive. If flexibility of the external muscles of the eyes is essential for continuing good sight, presbyopia can be avoided and with it the supposed necessity of glasses in middle life. Early attention

  10. Respiratory weakness in patients with chronic neck pain.

    PubMed

    Dimitriadis, Zacharias; Kapreli, Eleni; Strimpakos, Nikolaos; Oldham, Jacqueline

    2013-06-01

    Respiratory muscle strength is one parameter that is currently proposed to be affected in patients with chronic neck pain. This study was aimed at examining whether patients with chronic neck pain have reduced respiratory strength and with which neck pain problems their respiratory strength is associated. In this controlled cross-sectional study, 45 patients with chronic neck pain and 45 healthy well-matched controls were recruited. Respiratory muscle strength was assessed through maximal mouth pressures. The subjects were additionally assessed for their pain intensity and disability, neck muscle strength, endurance of deep neck flexors, neck range of movement, forward head posture and psychological states. Paired t-tests showed that patients with chronic neck pain have reduced Maximal Inspiratory (MIP) (r = 0.35) and Maximal Expiratory Pressures (MEP) (r = 0.39) (P < 0.05). Neck muscle strength (r > 0.5), kinesiophobia (r < -0.3) and catastrophizing (r < -0.3) were significantly associated with maximal mouth pressures (P < 0.05), whereas MEP was additionally negatively correlated with neck pain and disability (r < -0.3, P < 0.05). Neck muscle strength was the only predictor that remained as significant into the prediction models of MIP and MEP. It can be concluded that patients with chronic neck pain present weakness of their respiratory muscles. This weakness seems to be a result of the impaired global and local muscle system of neck pain patients, and psychological states also appear to have an additional contribution. Clinicians are advised to consider the respiratory system of patients with chronic neck pain during their usual assessment and appropriately address their treatment. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Importance and challenges of measuring intrinsic foot muscle strength

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Intrinsic foot muscle weakness has been implicated in a range of foot deformities and disorders. However, to establish a relationship between intrinsic muscle weakness and foot pathology, an objective measure of intrinsic muscle strength is needed. The aim of this review was to provide an overview of the anatomy and role of intrinsic foot muscles, implications of intrinsic weakness and evaluate the different methods used to measure intrinsic foot muscle strength. Method Literature was sourced from database searches of MEDLINE, PubMed, SCOPUS, Cochrane Library, PEDro and CINAHL up to June 2012. Results There is no widely accepted method of measuring intrinsic foot muscle strength. Methods to estimate toe flexor muscle strength include the paper grip test, plantar pressure, toe dynamometry, and the intrinsic positive test. Hand-held dynamometry has excellent interrater and intrarater reliability and limits toe curling, which is an action hypothesised to activate extrinsic toe flexor muscles. However, it is unclear whether any method can actually isolate intrinsic muscle strength. Also most methods measure only toe flexor strength and other actions such as toe extension and abduction have not been adequately assessed. Indirect methods to investigate intrinsic muscle structure and performance include CT, ultrasonography, MRI, EMG, and muscle biopsy. Indirect methods often discriminate between intrinsic and extrinsic muscles, but lack the ability to measure muscle force. Conclusions There are many challenges to accurately measure intrinsic muscle strength in isolation. Most studies have measured toe flexor strength as a surrogate measure of intrinsic muscle strength. Hand-held dynamometry appears to be a promising method of estimating intrinsic muscle strength. However, the contribution of extrinsic muscles cannot be excluded from toe flexor strength measurement. Future research should clarify the relative contribution of intrinsic and extrinsic muscles

  12. [H reflex in patients with spastic quadriplegia].

    PubMed

    Miyama, Sahoko; Arimoto, Kiyoshi; Kimiya, Satoshi

    2009-01-01

    Hoffmann reflex (H reflex) is an electrically elicited spinal monosynaptic reflex. H reflex was examined in 18 patients with spastic quadriplegia who had perinatal or postnatal problems. H reflex was elicitable in 11 patients for the abductor pollicis brevis (61.1%), 10 for the abductor digiti minimi (55.6%) and 16 for the abductor hallucis (88.9%). Because the abductor pollicis brevis and the abductor digiti minimi do not exhibit H reflex in normal subjects, it was suggested that the excitability of alpha motor neurons innervating these muscles was increased. H reflex was not detected for the extensor digitorum brevis in any patients, indicating the difference in the excitability among alpha motor neurons. In some patients, H reflex did not disappear under supramaximal stimuli. We conclude that the mechanism of evolution of H reflex in patients with spastic quadriplegia is different from that in normal subjects.

  13. The effects of smartphone use on upper extremity muscle activity and pain threshold

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Minkyung; Hong, Yunkyung; Lee, Seunghoon; Won, Jinyoung; Yang, Jinjun; Park, Sookyoung; Chang, Kyu-Tae; Hong, Yonggeun

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to determine whether muscle activity and pressure-induced pain in the upper extremities are affected by smartphone use, and to compare the effects of phone handling with one hand and with both hands. [Subjects] The study subjects were asymptomatic women 20–22 years of age. [Methods] The subjects sat in a chair with their feet on the floor and the elbow flexed, holding a smartphone positioned on the thigh. Subsequently, the subjects typed the Korean anthem for 3 min, one-handed or with both hands. Each subject repeated the task three times, with a 5-min rest period between tasks to minimize fatigue. Electromyography (EMG) was used to record the muscle activity of the upper trapezius (UT), extensor pollicis longus (EPL), and abductor pollicis (AP) during phone operation. We also used a dolorimeter to measure the pressure-induced pain threshold in the UT. [Results] We observed higher muscle activity in the UT, AP, and EPL in one-handed smartphone use than in its two-handed use. The pressure-induced pain threshold of the UT was lower after use of the smartphone, especially after one-handed use. [Conclusion] Our results show that smartphone operation with one hand caused greater UT pain and induced increased upper extremity muscle activity. PMID:26180311

  14. The relationship between hamstring length and gluteal muscle strength in individuals with sacroiliac joint dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Massoud Arab, Amir; Reza Nourbakhsh, Mohammad; Mohammadifar, Ali

    2011-01-01

    It has been suggested that tight hamstring muscle, due to its anatomical connections, could be a compensatory mechanism for providing sacroiliac (SI) joint stability in patients with gluteal muscle weakness and SIJ dysfunction. The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between hamstring muscle length and gluteal muscle strength in subjects with sacroiliac joint dysfunction. A total of 159 subjects with and without low back pain (LBP) between the ages of 20 and 65 years participate in the study. Subjects were categorized into three groups: LBP without SIJ involvement (n = 53); back pain with SIJ dysfunction (n = 53); and no low back pain (n = 53). Hamstring muscle length and gluteal muscle strength were measured in all subjects. The number of individuals with gluteal weakness was significantly (P = 0.02) higher in subjects with SI joint dysfunction (66%) compared to those with LBP without SI joint dysfunctions (34%). In pooled data, there was no significant difference (P = 0.31) in hamstring muscle length between subjects with SI joint dysfunction and those with back pain without SI involvement. In subjects with SI joint dysfunction, however, those with gluteal muscle weakness had significantly (P = 0.02) shorter hamstring muscle length (mean = 158±11°) compared to individuals without gluteal weakness (mean = 165±10°). There was no statistically significant difference (P>0.05) in hamstring muscle length between individuals with and without gluteal muscle weakness in other groups. In conclusion, hamstring tightness in subjects with SI joint dysfunction could be related to gluteal muscle weakness. The slight difference in hamstring muscle length found in this study, although statistically significant, was not sufficient for making any definite conclusions. Further studies are needed to establish the role of hamstring muscle in SI joint stability. PMID:22294848

  15. The relationship between hamstring length and gluteal muscle strength in individuals with sacroiliac joint dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Massoud Arab, Amir; Reza Nourbakhsh, Mohammad; Mohammadifar, Ali

    2011-02-01

    It has been suggested that tight hamstring muscle, due to its anatomical connections, could be a compensatory mechanism for providing sacroiliac (SI) joint stability in patients with gluteal muscle weakness and SIJ dysfunction. The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between hamstring muscle length and gluteal muscle strength in subjects with sacroiliac joint dysfunction. A total of 159 subjects with and without low back pain (LBP) between the ages of 20 and 65 years participate in the study. Subjects were categorized into three groups: LBP without SIJ involvement (n = 53); back pain with SIJ dysfunction (n = 53); and no low back pain (n = 53). Hamstring muscle length and gluteal muscle strength were measured in all subjects. The number of individuals with gluteal weakness was significantly (P = 0.02) higher in subjects with SI joint dysfunction (66%) compared to those with LBP without SI joint dysfunctions (34%). In pooled data, there was no significant difference (P = 0.31) in hamstring muscle length between subjects with SI joint dysfunction and those with back pain without SI involvement. In subjects with SI joint dysfunction, however, those with gluteal muscle weakness had significantly (P = 0.02) shorter hamstring muscle length (mean = 158±11°) compared to individuals without gluteal weakness (mean = 165±10°). There was no statistically significant difference (P>0.05) in hamstring muscle length between individuals with and without gluteal muscle weakness in other groups. In conclusion, hamstring tightness in subjects with SI joint dysfunction could be related to gluteal muscle weakness. The slight difference in hamstring muscle length found in this study, although statistically significant, was not sufficient for making any definite conclusions. Further studies are needed to establish the role of hamstring muscle in SI joint stability.

  16. Cancer cachexia decreases specific force and accelerates fatigue in limb muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, B.M.; Frye, G.S.; Ahn, B.

    Highlights: •C-26 cancer cachexia causes a significant decrease in limb muscle absolute force. •C-26 cancer cachexia causes a significant decrease in limb muscle specific force. •C-26 cancer cachexia decreases fatigue resistance in the soleus muscle. •C-26 cancer cachexia prolongs time to peak twitch tension in limb muscle. •C-26 cancer cachexia prolongs one half twitch relaxation time in limb muscle. -- Abstract: Cancer cachexia is a complex metabolic syndrome that is characterized by the loss of skeletal muscle mass and weakness, which compromises physical function, reduces quality of life, and ultimately can lead to mortality. Experimental models of cancer cachexia havemore » recapitulated this skeletal muscle atrophy and consequent decline in muscle force generating capacity. However, more recently, we provided evidence that during severe cancer cachexia muscle weakness in the diaphragm muscle cannot be entirely accounted for by the muscle atrophy. This indicates that muscle weakness is not just a consequence of muscle atrophy but that there is also significant contractile dysfunction. The current study aimed to determine whether contractile dysfunction is also present in limb muscles during severe Colon-26 (C26) carcinoma cachexia by studying the glycolytic extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle and the oxidative soleus muscle, which has an activity pattern that more closely resembles the diaphragm. Severe C-26 cancer cachexia caused significant muscle fiber atrophy and a reduction in maximum absolute force in both the EDL and soleus muscles. However, normalization to muscle cross sectional area further demonstrated a 13% decrease in maximum isometric specific force in the EDL and an even greater decrease (17%) in maximum isometric specific force in the soleus. Time to peak tension and half relaxation time were also significantly slowed in both the EDL and the solei from C-26 mice compared to controls. Since, in addition to postural control, the

  17. Muscle Weakness and Speech in Oculopharyngeal Muscular Dystrophy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neel, Amy T.; Palmer, Phyllis M.; Sprouls, Gwyneth; Morrison, Leslie

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: We documented speech and voice characteristics associated with oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD). Although it is a rare disease, OPMD offers the opportunity to study the impact of myopathic weakness on speech production in the absence of neurologic deficits in a relatively homogeneous group of speakers. Methods: Twelve individuals…

  18. Relationship between Physical Impairments and Movement Patterns During Gait in Patients With End-stage Hip Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Zeni, Joseph; Pozzi, Federico; Abujaber, Sumayah; Miller, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Patients with hip osteoarthritis demonstrate limited range of motion, muscle weakness and altered biomechanics; however, few studies have evaluated the relationships between physical impairments and movement asymmetries. The purpose of this study was to identify the physical impairments related to movement abnormalities in patients awaiting total hip arthroplasty. We hypothesized that muscle weakness and pain would be related to greater movement asymmetries. Fifty-six subjects who were awaiting total hip arthroplasty were enrolled. Pain was assessed using a 0 to 10 scale, range of motion was assessed with the Harris Hip Score and isometric hip abductor strength was tested using a hand-held dynamometer. Trunk, pelvis and hip angles and moments in the frontal and sagittal planes were measured during walking using three dimensional motion analysis. During gait, subjects had 3.49 degrees less peak hip flexion and 8.82 degrees less extension angles (p<0.001) and had 0.03 Nm/k*m less hip abduction moment on the affected side (p=0.043). Weaker hip muscles were related to greater pelvis (r=−0.291) and trunk (r=−0.332) rotations in the frontal plane. These findings suggest that hip weakness drives abnormal movement patterns at the pelvis and trunk in patients with hip osteoarthritis to a greater degree than hip pain. PMID:25492583

  19. Nonpharmacologic Pain Management and Muscle Strengthening following Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Chughtai, Morad; Elmallah, Randa D K; Mistry, Jaydev B; Bhave, Anil; Cherian, Jeffrey Jai; McGinn, Tanner L; Harwin, Steven F; Mont, Michael A

    2016-04-01

    Despite technological advances in total knee arthroplasty (TKA), management of postoperative muscle weakness and pain continue to pose challenges for both patients and health care providers. Nonpharmacologic therapies, such as neuromodulation in the form of neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) and transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS), and other modalities, such as cryotherapy and prehabilitation, have been highlighted as possible adjuncts to standard-of-care pharmacologic management to treat postoperative pain and muscle weakness. The aim of this review was to discuss existing evidence for neuromodulation in the treatment of pain and muscular weakness following TKA, and to shed light on other noninvasive and potential future modalities. Our review of the literature demonstrated that NMES, prehabilitation, and some specialized exercises are beneficial for postoperative muscle weakness, and TENS, cooling therapies, and compression may help to alleviate post-TKA pain. However, there are no clear guidelines for the use of these modalities. Further studies should be aimed at developing guidelines or delineating indications for neuromodulation and other nonpharmacologic therapies in the management of post-TKA pain and muscle weakness. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  20. Ultrasound Imaging of Muscle Contraction of the Tibialis Anterior in Patients with Facioscapulohumeral Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Gijsbertse, Kaj; Goselink, Rianne; Lassche, Saskia; Nillesen, Maartje; Sprengers, André; Verdonschot, Nico; van Alfen, Nens; de Korte, Chris

    2017-11-01

    A need exists for biomarkers to diagnose, quantify and longitudinally follow facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) and many other neuromuscular disorders. Furthermore, the pathophysiological mechanisms leading to muscle weakness in most neuromuscular disorders are not completely understood. Dynamic ultrasound imaging (B-mode image sequences) in combination with speckle tracking is an easy, applicable and patient-friendly imaging tool to visualize and quantify muscle deformation. This dynamic information provides insight in the pathophysiological mechanisms and may help to distinguish the various stages of diseased muscle in FSHD. In this proof-of-principle study, we applied a speckle tracking technique to 2-D ultrasound image sequences to quantify the deformation of the tibialis anterior muscle in patients with FSHD and in healthy controls. The resulting deformation patterns were compared with muscle ultrasound echo intensity analysis (a measure of fat infiltration and dystrophy) and clinical outcome measures. Of the four FSHD patients, two patients had severe peroneal weakness and two patients had mild peroneal weakness on clinical examination. We found a markedly varied muscle deformation pattern between these groups: patients with severe peroneal weakness showed a different motion pattern of the tibialis anterior, with overall less displacement of the central tendon region, while healthy patients showed a non-uniform displacement pattern, with the central aponeurosis showing the largest displacement. Hence, dynamic muscle ultrasound of the tibialis anterior muscle in patients with FSHD revealed a distinctively different tissue deformation pattern among persons with and without tibialis anterior weakness. These findings could clarify the understanding of the pathophysiology of muscle weakness in FSHD patients. In addition, the change in muscle deformation shows good correlation with clinical measures and quantitative muscle ultrasound measurements. In

  1. Associations among pain catastrophizing, muscle strength, and physical performance after total knee and hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Kazuhiro; Kako, Masato; Suzuki, Kentaro; Hattori, Keiko; Fukuyasu, Saori; Sato, Koji; Kadono, Izumi; Sakai, Tadahiro; Hasegawa, Yukiharu; Nishida, Yoshihiro

    2017-01-01

    AIM To investigate whether reductions in pain catastrophizing associated with physical performance in the early period after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) or total hip arthroplasty (THA). METHODS The study group of 46 participants underwent TKA or THA. The participants were evaluated within 7 d before the operation and at 14 d afterwards. Physical performance was measured by the Timed Up and Go (TUG) test, and 10-m gait time was measured at comfortable and maximum speeds. They rated their knee or hip pain using a visual analog scale (VAS) for daily life activities. Psychological characteristics were measured by the Pain Catastrophizing Scale (PCS). Physical characteristics were measured by isometric muscle strength of knee extensors and hip abductors on the operated side. The variables of percent changes between pre- and post-operation were calculated by dividing post-operation score by pre-operation score. RESULTS Postoperative VAS and PCS were better than preoperative for both TKA and THA. Postoperative physical performance and muscle strength were poorer than preoperative for both TKA and THA. The percent change in physical performance showed no correlation with preoperative variables. In TKA patients, the percent change of PCS showed correlation with percent change of TUG (P = 0.016), 10-m gait time at comfortable speeds (P = 0.003), and 10-m gait time at maximum speeds (P = 0.042). The percent change of muscle strength showed partial correlation with physical performances. The percent change of VAS showed no correlation with physical performances. On the other hand, in THA patients, the percent change of hip abductor strength showed correlation with percent change of TUG (P = 0.047), 10-m gait time at comfortable speeds (P = 0.001), and 10-m gait time at maximum speeds (P = 0.021). The percent change of knee extensor strength showed partial correlation with physical performances. The percent change of VAS and PCS showed no correlation with physical

  2. Myosin Binding Protein-C Slow Phosphorylation is Altered in Duchenne Dystrophy and Arthrogryposis Myopathy in Fast-Twitch Skeletal Muscles.

    PubMed

    Ackermann, Maegen A; Ward, Christopher W; Gurnett, Christina; Kontrogianni-Konstantopoulos, Aikaterini

    2015-08-19

    Myosin Binding Protein-C slow (sMyBP-C), encoded by MYBPC1, comprises a family of regulatory proteins of skeletal muscles that are phosphorylated by PKA and PKC. MYBPC1 missense mutations are linked to the development of Distal Arthrogryposis-1 (DA-1). Although structure-function details for this myopathy are evolving, function is undoubtedly driven by sequence variations and post-translational modifications in sMyBP-C. Herein, we examined the phosphorylation profile of sMyBP-C in mouse and human fast-twitch skeletal muscles. We used Flexor Digitorum Brevis (FDB) isolated from young (~2-months old) and old (~14-months old) wild type and mdx mice, and human Abductor Hallucis (AH) and gastrocnemious muscles carrying the DA-1 mutations. Our results indicate both constitutive and differential phosphorylation of sMyBP-C in aged and diseased muscles. We report a 7-35% reduction in the phosphorylation levels of select sites in old wild type and young or old mdx FDB mouse muscles, compared to young wild type tissue. Similarly, we observe a 30-70% decrease in the phosphorylation levels of all PKA and PKC phospho-sites in the DA-1 AH, but not gastrocnemius, muscle. Overall, our studies show that the phosphorylation pattern of sMyBP-C is differentially regulated in response to age and disease, suggesting that phosphorylation plays important roles in these processes.

  3. Myopathy in Childhood Muscle-Specific Kinase Myasthenia Gravis.

    PubMed

    Kirzinger, Lukas; Khomenko, Andrei; Schulte-Mattler, Wilhelm; Backhaus, Roland; Platen, Sabine; Schalke, Berthold

    2016-12-01

    Adult and pediatric patients suffering from MuSK (muscle-specific kinase) -antibody positive myasthenia gravis exhibit similar features to individuals with acetylcholine receptor (AChR) antibodies, but they differ in several characteristics such as a predominant bulbar, respiratory and neck weakness, a generally worse disease severity and a tendency to develop muscle atrophy. Muscle atrophy is a rare phenomenon that is usually restricted to the facial muscles. We describe a girl with MuSK-antibody positive myasthenia gravis who developed a myopathy with severe generalized muscular weakness, muscle atrophy, and myopathic changes on electromyography. This is the first published example of a generalized myopathic syndrome in myasthenia gravis. We review the relevant literature and discuss the hypothesis of a mitochondrial myopathy as a pathogenic mechanism in MuSK-antibody positive myasthenia gravis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Manual muscle testing: a method of measuring extremity muscle strength applied to critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Ciesla, Nancy; Dinglas, Victor; Fan, Eddy; Kho, Michelle; Kuramoto, Jill; Needham, Dale

    2011-04-12

    Survivors of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and other causes of critical illness often have generalized weakness, reduced exercise tolerance, and persistent nerve and muscle impairments after hospital discharge. Using an explicit protocol with a structured approach to training and quality assurance of research staff, manual muscle testing (MMT) is a highly reliable method for assessing strength, using a standardized clinical examination, for patients following ARDS, and can be completed with mechanically ventilated patients who can tolerate sitting upright in bed and are able to follow two-step commands. (7, 8) This video demonstrates a protocol for MMT, which has been taught to ≥ 43 research staff who have performed >800 assessments on >280 ARDS survivors. Modifications for the bedridden patient are included. Each muscle is tested with specific techniques for positioning, stabilization, resistance, and palpation for each score of the 6-point ordinal Medical Research Council scale. Three upper and three lower extremity muscles are graded in this protocol: shoulder abduction, elbow flexion, wrist extension, hip flexion, knee extension, and ankle dorsiflexion. These muscles were chosen based on the standard approach for evaluating patients for ICU-acquired weakness used in prior publications. (1,2).

  5. Neuromuscular electrical stimulation of the cricothyroid muscle in patients with suspected superior laryngeal nerve weakness.

    PubMed

    Guzman, Marco; Rubin, Adam; Cox, Paul; Landini, Fernando; Jackson-Menaldi, Cristina

    2014-03-01

    In this retrospective case study, we report the apparent clinical effectiveness of neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) in combination with voice therapy (VT) for rehabilitating dysphonia secondary to suspected superior laryngeal nerve (SLN) weakness in two female patients. Both patients failed or plateaued with traditional VT but had significant improvement with the addition of NMES of the cricothyroid muscle and SLN using a VitalStim unit. Stimulation was provided simultaneously with voice exercises based on musical phonatory tasks. Both acoustic analysis and endoscopic evaluation demonstrated important improvements after treatment. In the first patient, the major change was obtained within the primo passaggio region; specifically, a decrease in voice breaks was demonstrated. In the second patient, an improvement in voice quality (less breathiness) and vocal range were the most important findings. Additionally, each patient reported a significant improvement in their voice complaints. Neuromuscular laryngeal electrical stimulation in combination with vocal exercises might be a useful tool to improve voice quality in patients with SLN injury. Copyright © 2014 The Voice Foundation. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Respiratory muscle training increases respiratory muscle strength and reduces respiratory complications after stroke: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Menezes, Kênia Kp; Nascimento, Lucas R; Ada, Louise; Polese, Janaine C; Avelino, Patrick R; Teixeira-Salmela, Luci F

    2016-07-01

    After stroke, does respiratory muscle training increase respiratory muscle strength and/or endurance? Are any benefits carried over to activity and/or participation? Does it reduce respiratory complications? Systematic review of randomised or quasi-randomised trials. Adults with respiratory muscle weakness following stroke. Respiratory muscle training aimed at increasing inspiratory and/or expiratory muscle strength. Five outcomes were of interest: respiratory muscle strength, respiratory muscle endurance, activity, participation and respiratory complications. Five trials involving 263 participants were included. The mean PEDro score was 6.4 (range 3 to 8), showing moderate methodological quality. Random-effects meta-analyses showed that respiratory muscle training increased maximal inspiratory pressure by 7 cmH2O (95% CI 1 to 14) and maximal expiratory pressure by 13 cmH2O (95% CI 1 to 25); it also decreased the risk of respiratory complications (RR 0.38, 95% CI 0.15 to 0.96) compared with no/sham respiratory intervention. Whether these effects carry over to activity and participation remains uncertain. This systematic review provided evidence that respiratory muscle training is effective after stroke. Meta-analyses based on five trials indicated that 30minutes of respiratory muscle training, five times per week, for 5 weeks can be expected to increase respiratory muscle strength in very weak individuals after stroke. In addition, respiratory muscle training is expected to reduce the risk of respiratory complications after stroke. Further studies are warranted to investigate whether the benefits are carried over to activity and participation. PROSPERO (CRD42015020683). [Menezes KKP, Nascimento LR, Ada L, Polese JC, Avelino PR, Teixeira-Salmela LF (2016) Respiratory muscle training increases respiratory muscle strength and reduces respiratory complications after stroke: a systematic review.Journal of Physiotherapy62: 138-144]. Copyright © 2016 Australian

  7. Contributions of foot muscles and plantar fascia morphology to foot posture.

    PubMed

    Angin, Salih; Mickle, Karen J; Nester, Christopher J

    2018-03-01

    The plantar foot muscles and plantar fascia differ between different foot postures. However, how each individual plantar structure contribute to foot posture has not been explored. The purpose of this study was to investigate the associations between static foot posture and morphology of plantar foot muscles and plantar fascia and thus the contributions of these structures to static foot posture. A total of 111 participants were recruited, 43 were classified as having pes planus and 68 as having normal foot posture using Foot Posture Index assessment tool. Images from the flexor digitorum longus (FDL), flexor hallucis longus (FHL), peroneus longus and brevis (PER), flexor hallucis brevis (FHB), flexor digitorum brevis (FDB) and abductor hallucis (AbH) muscles, and the calcaneal (PF1), middle (PF2) and metatarsal (PF3) regions of the plantar fascia were obtained using a Venue 40 ultrasound system with a 5-13 MHz transducer. In order of decreasing contribution, PF3 > FHB > FHL > PER > FDB were all associated with FPI and able to explain 69% of the change in FPI scores. PF3 was the highest contributor explaining 52% of increases in FPI score. Decreased thickness was associated with increased FPI score. Smaller cross sectional area (CSA) in FHB and PER muscles explained 20% and 8% of increase in FPI score. Larger CSA of FDB and FHL muscles explained 4% and 14% increase in FPI score respectively. The medial plantar structures and the plantar fascia appear to be the major contributors to static foot posture. Elucidating the individual contribution of multiple muscles of the foot could provide insight about their role in the foot posture. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Ultrasound evaluation of foot muscles and plantar fascia in pes planus.

    PubMed

    Angin, Salih; Crofts, Gillian; Mickle, Karen J; Nester, Christopher J

    2014-01-01

    Multiple intrinsic and extrinsic soft tissue structures that apply forces and support the medial longitudinal arch have been implicated in pes planus. These structures have common functions but their interaction in pes planus is not fully understood. The aim of this study was to compare the cross-sectional area (CSA) and thickness of the intrinsic and extrinsic foot muscles and plantar fascia thickness between normal and pes planus feet. Forty-nine adults with a normal foot posture and 49 individuals with pes planus feet were recruited from a university population. Images of the flexor digitorum longus (FDL), flexor hallucis longus (FHL), peroneus longus and brevis (PER), flexor hallucis brevis (FHB), flexor digitorum brevis (FDB) and abductor hallucis (AbH) muscles and the plantar fascia were obtained using a Venue 40 ultrasound system with a 5-13 MHz transducer. The CSA and thickness of AbH, FHB and PER muscles were significantly smaller (AbH -12.8% and -6.8%, FHB -8.9% and -7.6%, PER -14.7% and -10%), whilst FDL (28.3% and 15.2%) and FHL (24% and 9.8%) were significantly larger in the pes planus group. The middle (-10.6%) and anterior (-21.7%) portions of the plantar fascia were thinner in pes planus group. Greater CSA and thickness of the extrinsic muscles might reflect compensatory activity to support the MLA if the intrinsic foot muscle function has been compromised by altered foot structure. A thinner plantar fascia suggests reduced load bearing, and regional variations in structure and function in feet with pes planus. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Neurogenic Orofacial Weakness and Speech in Adults With Dysarthria

    PubMed Central

    Makashay, Matthew J.; Helou, Leah B.; Clark, Heather M.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose This study compared orofacial strength between adults with dysarthria and neurologically normal (NN) matched controls. In addition, orofacial muscle weakness was examined for potential relationships to speech impairments in adults with dysarthria. Method Matched groups of 55 adults with dysarthria and 55 NN adults generated maximum pressure (Pmax) against an air-filled bulb during lingual elevation, protrusion and lateralization, and buccodental and labial compressions. These orofacial strength measures were compared with speech intelligibility, perceptual ratings of speech, articulation rate, and fast syllable-repetition rate. Results The dysarthria group demonstrated significantly lower orofacial strength than the NN group on all tasks. Lingual strength correlated moderately and buccal strength correlated weakly with most ratings of speech deficits. Speech intelligibility was not sensitive to dysarthria severity. Individuals with severely reduced anterior lingual elevation Pmax (< 18 kPa) had normal to profoundly impaired sentence intelligibility (99%–6%) and moderately to severely impaired speech (26%–94% articulatory imprecision; 33%–94% overall severity). Conclusions Results support the presence of orofacial muscle weakness in adults with dysarthrias of varying etiologies but reinforce tenuous links between orofacial strength and speech production disorders. By examining individual data, preliminary evidence emerges to suggest that speech, but not necessarily intelligibility, is likely to be impaired when lingual weakness is severe. PMID:28763804

  10. Elderly Onset of Weakness in Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Fee, Dominic B.

    2012-01-01

    A 77-year-old male is presented. He had onset of proximal weakness 10 years earlier. His course was slowly progressive. Despite having phenotypic features of facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSH), genetic testing for this was delayed because of his age of onset, lack of family history, and benign appearing muscle biopsy. This case is one of the oldest onset of weakness in genetically confirmed FSH and highlights the recognized expansion in phenotype that has occurred since the advent of genetic testing. PMID:23024867

  11. Elderly onset of weakness in facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Fee, Dominic B

    2012-01-01

    A 77-year-old male is presented. He had onset of proximal weakness 10 years earlier. His course was slowly progressive. Despite having phenotypic features of facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSH), genetic testing for this was delayed because of his age of onset, lack of family history, and benign appearing muscle biopsy. This case is one of the oldest onset of weakness in genetically confirmed FSH and highlights the recognized expansion in phenotype that has occurred since the advent of genetic testing.

  12. Large enhancement of skeletal muscle cell glucose uptake and suppression of hepatocyte glucose-6-phosphatase activity by weak uncouplers of oxidative phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Martineau, Louis C

    2012-02-01

    Perturbation of energy homeostasis in skeletal muscle and liver resulting from a transient inhibition of mitochondrial energy transduction can produce effects of relevance for the control of hyperglycemia through activation of the AMP-activated protein kinase, as exemplified by the antidiabetic drug metformin. The present study focuses on uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation rather than its inhibition as a trigger for such effects. The reference weak uncoupler 2,4-dinitrophenol, fourteen naturally-occurring phenolic compounds identified as uncouplers in isolated rat liver mitochondria, and fourteen related compounds with little or no uncoupling activity were tested for enhancement of glucose uptake in differentiated C2C12 skeletal muscle cells following 18 h of treatment at 25-100 μM. A subset of compounds were tested for suppression of glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) activity in H4IIE hepatocytes following 16 h at 12.5-25 μM. Metformin (400 μM) was used as a standard in both assays. Dinitrophenol and nine of eleven compounds that induced 50% or more uncoupling at 100 μM in isolated mitochondria enhanced basal glucose uptake by 53 to 269%; the effect of the 4'-hydroxychalcone butein was more than 6-fold that of metformin; negative control compounds increased uptake by no more than 25%. Dinitrophenol and four 4'-hydroxychalconoids also suppressed hepatocyte G6Pase as well as, or more effectively than metformin, whereas the unsubstituted parent compound chalcone, devoid of uncoupling activity, had no effect. Activities key to glycemic control can be induced by a wide range of weak uncouplers, including compounds free of difficult-to-metabolize groups typically associated with uncouplers. Uncoupling represents a valid and possibly more efficient alternative to inhibition for triggering cytoprotective effects of therapeutic relevance to insulin resistance in both muscle and liver. Identification of actives of natural origin and the insights into their structure

  13. Peripheral facial weakness (Bell's palsy).

    PubMed

    Basić-Kes, Vanja; Dobrota, Vesna Dermanović; Cesarik, Marijan; Matovina, Lucija Zadro; Madzar, Zrinko; Zavoreo, Iris; Demarin, Vida

    2013-06-01

    Peripheral facial weakness is a facial nerve damage that results in muscle weakness on one side of the face. It may be idiopathic (Bell's palsy) or may have a detectable cause. Almost 80% of peripheral facial weakness cases are primary and the rest of them are secondary. The most frequent causes of secondary peripheral facial weakness are systemic viral infections, trauma, surgery, diabetes, local infections, tumor, immune disorders, drugs, degenerative diseases of the central nervous system, etc. The diagnosis relies upon the presence of typical signs and symptoms, blood chemistry tests, cerebrospinal fluid investigations, nerve conduction studies and neuroimaging methods (cerebral MRI, x-ray of the skull and mastoid). Treatment of secondary peripheral facial weakness is based on therapy for the underlying disorder, unlike the treatment of Bell's palsy that is controversial due to the lack of large, randomized, controlled, prospective studies. There are some indications that steroids or antiviral agents are beneficial but there are also studies that show no beneficial effect. Additional treatments include eye protection, physiotherapy, acupuncture, botulinum toxin, or surgery. Bell's palsy has a benign prognosis with complete recovery in about 80% of patients, 15% experience some mode of permanent nerve damage and severe consequences remain in 5% of patients.

  14. Low-frequency oscillations of the neural drive to the muscle are increased with experimental muscle pain

    PubMed Central

    Negro, Francesco; Gizzi, Leonardo; Falla, Deborah

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the influence of nociceptive stimulation on the accuracy of task execution and motor unit spike trains during low-force isometric contractions. Muscle pain was induced by infusion of hypertonic saline into the abductor digiti minimi muscle of 11 healthy men. Intramuscular EMG signals were recorded from the same muscle during four isometric contractions of 60-s duration at 10% of the maximal force [maximal voluntary contraction (MVC)] performed before injection (baseline), after injection of isotonic (control) or hypertonic saline (pain), and 15 min after pain was no longer reported. Each contraction was preceded by three 3-s ramp contractions from 0% to 10% MVC. The low-frequency oscillations of motor unit spike trains were analyzed by the first principal component of the low-pass filtered spike trains [first common component (FCC)], which represents the effective neural drive to the muscle. Pain decreased the accuracy of task performance [coefficient of variation (CoV) for force: baseline, 2.8 ± 1.8%, pain, 3.9 ± 1.8%; P < 0.05] and reduced motor unit discharge rates [11.6 ± 2.3 pulses per second (pps) vs. 10.7 ± 1.7 pps; P < 0.05]. Motor unit recruitment thresholds (2.2 ± 1.2% MVC vs. 2.4 ± 1.6% MVC), interspike interval variability (18.4 ± 4.9% vs. 19.1 ± 5.4%), strength of motor unit short-term synchronization [common input strength (CIS) 1.02 ± 0.44 vs. 0.83 ± 0.22], and strength of common drive (0.47 ± 0.08 vs. 0.47 ± 0.06) did not change across conditions. The FCC signal was correlated with force (R = 0.45 ± 0.06), and the CoV for FCC increased in the painful condition (5.69 ± 1.29% vs. 7.83 ± 2.61%; P < 0.05). These results indicate that nociceptive stimulation increased the low-frequency variability in synaptic input to motoneurons. PMID:22049336

  15. Prevalence of adult Pompe disease in patients with proximal myopathic syndrome and undiagnosed muscle biopsy.

    PubMed

    Golsari, Amir; Nasimzadah, Arzoo; Thomalla, Götz; Keller, Sarah; Gerloff, Christian; Magnus, Tim

    2018-03-01

    We examined patients with limb-girdle muscle weakness and/or hyper-CKaemia and undiagnosed muscle biopsy for late onset Pompe disease (LOPD). Patients with an inconclusive limb-girdle muscle weakness who presented at our neuromuscular centre between 2005 and 2015 with undiagnosed muscle biopsies were examined by dry blood spot testing (DBS) including determination of the enzyme activity of acid alpha-glucosidase (GAA). In the case of depressed enzyme activity, additional gene testing of the GAA gene was carried out. Of the 340 evaluated muscle biopsies, 69 patients fulfilled the inclusion criteria and were examined with DBS. Among those patients, 76% showed a limb-girdle muscle weakness and 14% showed a hyper-CKaemia. A diagnosis of LOPD could be established in the case of two patients (2.9%) with reduced GAA enzyme activity and proof of mutations in the GAA gene. One of the two patients presents in the muscle biopsy suggestive features of Pompe disease including vacuoles with positive acid phosphatase reaction. In summary, our results show that a muscle biopsy can be helpful in identifying LOPD patients, but vacuolation with glycogen storage can also be absent. An inconspicuous muscle biopsy does not rule out Pompe disease. Consequently, all patients with limb-girdle muscle weakness should be examined by DBS before conducting a muscle biopsy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Extrapulmonary features of bronchiectasis: muscle function, exercise capacity, fatigue, and health status.

    PubMed

    Ozalp, Ozge; Inal-Ince, Deniz; Calik, Ebru; Vardar-Yagli, Naciye; Saglam, Melda; Savci, Sema; Arikan, Hulya; Bosnak-Guclu, Meral; Coplu, Lutfi

    2012-06-11

    There are limited number of studies investigating extrapulmonary manifestations of bronchiectasis. The purpose of this study was to compare peripheral muscle function, exercise capacity, fatigue, and health status between patients with bronchiectasis and healthy subjects in order to provide documented differences in these characteristics for individuals with and without bronchiectasis. Twenty patients with bronchiectasis (43.5 ± 14.1 years) and 20 healthy subjects (43.0 ± 10.9 years) participated in the study. Pulmonary function, respiratory muscle strength (maximal expiratory pressure - MIP - and maximal expiratory pressure - MEP), and dyspnea perception using the Modified Medical Research Council Dyspnea Scale (MMRC) were determined. A six-minute walk test (6MWT) was performed. Quadriceps muscle, shoulder abductor, and hand grip strength (QMS, SAS, and HGS, respectively) using a hand held dynamometer and peripheral muscle endurance by a squat test were measured. Fatigue perception and health status were determined using the Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS) and the Leicester Cough Questionnaire (LCQ), respectively. Number of squats, 6MWT distance, and LCQ scores as well as lung function testing values and respiratory muscle strength were significantly lower and MMRC and FSS scores were significantly higher in patients with bronchiectasis than those of healthy subjects (p < 0.05). In bronchiectasis patients, QMS was significantly associated with HGS, MIP and MEP (p < 0.05). The 6MWT distance was significantly correlated to LCQ psychological score (p < 0.05). The FSS score was significantly associated with LCQ physical and total and MMRC scores (p < 0.05). The LCQ psychological score was significantly associated with MEP and 6MWT distance (p < 0.05). Peripheral muscle endurance, exercise capacity, fatigue and health status were adversely affected by the presence of bronchiectasis. Fatigue was associated with dyspnea and health status

  17. Weakness of whole muscles in mice deficient in Cu, Zn superoxide dismutase is not explained by defects at the level of the contractile apparatus.

    PubMed

    Larkin, Lisa M; Hanes, Michael C; Kayupov, Erdan; Claflin, Dennis R; Faulkner, John A; Brooks, Susan V

    2013-08-01

    Mice deficient in Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase (Sod1 (-/-) mice) demonstrate elevated oxidative stress associated with rapid age-related declines in muscle mass and force. The decline in mass for muscles of Sod1 (-/-) mice is explained by a loss of muscle fibers, but the mechanism underlying the weakness is not clear. We hypothesized that the reduced maximum isometric force (F o) normalized by cross-sectional area (specific F o) for whole muscles of Sod1 (-/-) compared with wild-type (WT) mice is due to decreased specific F o of individual fibers. Force generation was measured for permeabilized fibers from muscles of Sod1 (-/-) and WT mice at 8 and 20 months of age. WT mice were also studied at 28 months to determine whether any deficits observed for fibers from Sod1 (-/-) mice were similar to those observed in old WT mice. No effects of genotype were observed for F o or specific F o at either 8 or 20 months, and no age-associated decrease in specific F o was observed for fibers from Sod1 (-/-) mice, whereas specific F o for fibers of WT mice decreased by 20 % by 28 months. Oxidative stress has also been associated with decreased maximum velocity of shortening (V max), and we found a 10 % lower V max for fibers from Sod1 (-/-) compared with WT mice at 20 months. We conclude that the low specific F o of muscles of Sod1 (-/-) mice is not explained by damage to contractile proteins. Moreover, the properties of fibers of Sod1 (-/-) mice do not recapitulate those observed with aging in WT animals.

  18. Amino Acid Sensing in Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Moro, Tatiana; Ebert, Scott M.; Adams, Christopher M.; Rasmussen, Blake B.

    2016-01-01

    Aging impairs skeletal muscle protein synthesis, leading to muscle weakness and atrophy. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain poorly understood. Here, we review evidence that mTORC1- and ATF4-mediated amino acid sensing pathways, triggered by impaired amino acid delivery to aged skeletal muscle, may play important roles in skeletal muscle aging. Interventions that alleviate age-related impairments in muscle protein synthesis, strength and/or muscle mass appear to do so by reversing age-related changes in skeletal muscle amino acid delivery, mTORC1 activity and/or ATF4 activity. An improved understanding of the mechanisms and roles of amino acid sensing pathways in skeletal muscle may lead to evidence-based strategies to attenuate sarcopenia. PMID:27444066

  19. Evaluation of muscle hyperactivity of the grimacing muscles by unilateral tight eyelid closure and stapedius muscle tone.

    PubMed

    Shiba, Masato; Matsuo, Kiyoshi; Ban, Ryokuya; Nagai, Fumio

    2012-10-01

    Muscle hyperactivity of grimacing muscles, including the orbicularis oculi and corrugator supercilii muscles that cause crow's feet and a glabellar frown line with ageing, cannot be accurately evaluated by surface observation. In 71 subjects, this study investigated the extent to which grimacing muscles are innervated by the bilateral motor cortices, whether the corticofacial projection to the grimacing muscles affects the facially innervated stapedius muscle tone by measuring static compliance of the tympanic membrane, and whether unilateral tight eyelid closure with contraction of the grimacing muscles changes static compliance. Unilateral tight eyelid closure and its subsequent change in the contralateral vertical medial eyebrow position revealed that motor neurons of the orbicularis oculi and corrugator supercilii muscles were innervated by the bilateral motor cortices with weak-to-strong contralateral dominance. The orbicularis oculi, corrugator supercilii, and stapedius muscles innervated by the bilateral motor cortices had increased muscle hyperactivity, which lowered the vertical medial eyebrow position and decreased the static compliance of the tympanic membrane more than those innervated by the unilateral motor cortex. Unilateral enhanced tight eyelid closure with contraction of the grimacing muscles in certain subjects ipsilaterally decreased the static compliance with increased contraction of the stapedius muscle, which probably occurs to immobilise the tympanic membrane and protect the inner ear from loud sound. Evaluation of unilateral tight eyelid closure and the subsequent change in the contralateral vertical medial eyebrow position as well as a measurement of the static compliance for the stapedius muscle tone has revealed muscle hyperactivity of grimacing muscles.

  20. Relationship between function of masticatory muscle in mouse and properties of muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Abe, Shinichi; Hiroki, Emi; Iwanuma, Osamu; Sakiyama, Koji; Shirakura, Yoshitaka; Hirose, Daiki; Shimoo, Yoshiaki; Suzuki, Masashi; Ikari, Yasutoyo; Kikuchi, Ryusuke; Ide, Yoshinobu; Yoshinari, Masao

    2008-05-01

    Mammals exhibit marked morphological differences in the muscles surrounding the jaw bone due to differences in eating habits. Furthermore, the myofiber properties of the muscles differ with function. Since the muscles in the oral region have various functions such as eating, swallowing, and speech, it is believed that the functional role of each muscle differs. Therefore, to clarify the functional role of each masticatory muscle, the myofiber properties of the adult mouse masticatory muscles were investigated at the transcriptional level. Expression of MyHC-2b with a fast contraction rate and strong force was frequently noted in the temporal and masseter muscles. This suggests that the temporal and masseter muscles are closely involved in rapid antero-posterior masticatory movement, which is characteristic in mice. Furthermore, expression of MyHC-1 with a low contraction rate and weak continuous force was frequently detected in the lateral pterygoid muscle. This suggests that, in contrast to other masticatory muscles, mouse lateral pterygoid muscle is not involved in fast masticatory movement, but is involved in functions requiring continuous force such as retention of jaw position. This study revealed that muscles with different roles function comprehensively during complicated masticatory movement.

  1. The relationship between preoperative needle electromyography findings and muscle power restoration after surgery in severe carpal tunnel syndrome patients.

    PubMed

    Hara, Yuki; Nishiura, Yasumasa; Ochiai, Naoyuki; Murai, Shinji; Yamazaki, Masashi

    2017-05-01

    Needle electromyography provides essential information about the functional aspects of the muscle. But little attention has been given in the literature to needle electromyography examinations in carpal tunnel syndrome. We examined the relationship between preoperative needle electromyography findings and functional recovery of the abductor pollicis brevis (APB) muscle in severe carpal tunnel syndrome patients. The subjects of this study were 49 patients, 58 hands, who fit the following 5 criteria: (1) idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome; (2) pre-op MMT grade of the APB muscle was M0 or M1; (3) APB-CMAP (compound muscle action potential) was not evoked in a median nerve conduction study; (4) needle electromyography of the APB muscle had been done; (5) underwent carpal tunnel release only. The patients were divided into two groups according to the results of pre-op needle electromyography: voluntary motor unit potential of the APB muscle was evoked [MUP(+) group]or not [MUP(-) group]. We evaluated APB muscle strength at one year after surgery, and patient satisfaction and functional evaluations (CTSI-FS) at more than one year after. The APB muscle recovery rate to M3 or higher was 100% in the MUP(+) group, and 57% in the MUP(-) group. Patient satisfaction was also high and functional recovery was sufficient in the MUP(+) group. No patients requested a second opponensplasty. Our findings suggest that post-op restoration of thumb function relates to whether or not the MUP ofthe APB muscle is evoked. Single-stage opponensplasty may be unnecessary if the MUP of the APB muscle is; evoked. Needle electromyography is therefore useful in consideration for opponensplasty. Level Ⅲ, case-control study. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Presence and Absence of Muscle Contraction Elicited by Peripheral Nerve Electrical Stimulation Differentially Modulate Primary Motor Cortex Excitability.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Ryoki; Kotan, Shinichi; Nakagawa, Masaki; Miyaguchi, Shota; Kojima, Sho; Saito, Kei; Inukai, Yasuto; Onishi, Hideaki

    2017-01-01

    Modulation of cortical excitability by sensory inputs is a critical component of sensorimotor integration. Sensory afferents, including muscle and joint afferents, to somatosensory cortex (S1) modulate primary motor cortex (M1) excitability, but the effects of muscle and joint afferents specifically activated by muscle contraction are unknown. We compared motor evoked potentials (MEPs) following median nerve stimulation (MNS) above and below the contraction threshold based on the persistence of M-waves. Peripheral nerve electrical stimulation (PES) conditions, including right MNS at the wrist at 110% motor threshold (MT; 110% MNS condition), right MNS at the index finger (sensory digit nerve stimulation [DNS]) with stimulus intensity approximately 110% MNS (DNS condition), and right MNS at the wrist at 90% MT (90% MNS condition) were applied. PES was administered in a 4 s ON and 6 s OFF cycle for 20 min at 30 Hz. In Experiment 1 ( n = 15), MEPs were recorded from the right abductor pollicis brevis (APB) before (baseline) and after PES. In Experiment 2 ( n = 15), M- and F-waves were recorded from the right APB. Stimulation at 110% MNS at the wrist evoking muscle contraction increased MEP amplitudes after PES compared with those at baseline, whereas DNS at the index finger and 90% MNS at the wrist not evoking muscle contraction decreased MEP amplitudes after PES. M- and F-waves, which reflect spinal cord or muscular and neuromuscular junctions, did not change following PES. These results suggest that muscle contraction and concomitant muscle/joint afferent inputs specifically enhance M1 excitability.

  3. Presence and Absence of Muscle Contraction Elicited by Peripheral Nerve Electrical Stimulation Differentially Modulate Primary Motor Cortex Excitability

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Ryoki; Kotan, Shinichi; Nakagawa, Masaki; Miyaguchi, Shota; Kojima, Sho; Saito, Kei; Inukai, Yasuto; Onishi, Hideaki

    2017-01-01

    Modulation of cortical excitability by sensory inputs is a critical component of sensorimotor integration. Sensory afferents, including muscle and joint afferents, to somatosensory cortex (S1) modulate primary motor cortex (M1) excitability, but the effects of muscle and joint afferents specifically activated by muscle contraction are unknown. We compared motor evoked potentials (MEPs) following median nerve stimulation (MNS) above and below the contraction threshold based on the persistence of M-waves. Peripheral nerve electrical stimulation (PES) conditions, including right MNS at the wrist at 110% motor threshold (MT; 110% MNS condition), right MNS at the index finger (sensory digit nerve stimulation [DNS]) with stimulus intensity approximately 110% MNS (DNS condition), and right MNS at the wrist at 90% MT (90% MNS condition) were applied. PES was administered in a 4 s ON and 6 s OFF cycle for 20 min at 30 Hz. In Experiment 1 (n = 15), MEPs were recorded from the right abductor pollicis brevis (APB) before (baseline) and after PES. In Experiment 2 (n = 15), M- and F-waves were recorded from the right APB. Stimulation at 110% MNS at the wrist evoking muscle contraction increased MEP amplitudes after PES compared with those at baseline, whereas DNS at the index finger and 90% MNS at the wrist not evoking muscle contraction decreased MEP amplitudes after PES. M- and F-waves, which reflect spinal cord or muscular and neuromuscular junctions, did not change following PES. These results suggest that muscle contraction and concomitant muscle/joint afferent inputs specifically enhance M1 excitability. PMID:28392766

  4. Catechins activate muscle stem cells by Myf5 induction and stimulate muscle regeneration.

    PubMed

    Kim, A Rum; Kim, Kyung Min; Byun, Mi Ran; Hwang, Jun-Ha; Park, Jung Il; Oh, Ho Taek; Kim, Hyo Kyeong; Jeong, Mi Gyeong; Hwang, Eun Sook; Hong, Jeong-Ho

    2017-07-22

    Muscle weakness is one of the most common symptoms in aged individuals and increases risk of mortality. Thus, maintenance of muscle mass is important for inhibiting aging. In this study, we investigated the effect of catechins, polyphenol compounds in green tea, on muscle regeneration. We found that (-)-epicatechin gallate (ECG) and (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) activate satellite cells by induction of Myf5 transcription factors. For satellite cell activation, Akt kinase was significantly induced after ECG treatment and ECG-induced satellite cell activation was blocked in the presence of Akt inhibitor. ECG also promotes myogenic differentiation through the induction of myogenic markers, including Myogenin and Muscle creatine kinase (MCK), in satellite and C2C12 myoblast cells. Finally, EGCG administration to mice significantly increased muscle fiber size for regeneration. Taken together, the results suggest that catechins stimulate muscle stem cell activation and differentiation for muscle regeneration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Pharmacological strategies in lung cancer-induced cachexia: effects on muscle proteolysis, autophagy, structure, and weakness.

    PubMed

    Chacon-Cabrera, Alba; Fermoselle, Clara; Urtreger, Alejandro J; Mateu-Jimenez, Mercè; Diament, Miriam J; de Kier Joffé, Elisa D Bal; Sandri, Marco; Barreiro, Esther

    2014-11-01

    Cachexia is a relevant comorbid condition of chronic diseases including cancer. Inflammation, oxidative stress, autophagy, ubiquitin-proteasome system, nuclear factor (NF)-κB, and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) are involved in the pathophysiology of cancer cachexia. Currently available treatment is limited and data demonstrating effectiveness in in vivo models are lacking. Our objectives were to explore in respiratory and limb muscles of lung cancer (LC) cachectic mice whether proteasome, NF-κB, and MAPK inhibitors improve muscle mass and function loss through several molecular mechanisms. Body and muscle weights, limb muscle force, protein degradation and the ubiquitin-proteasome system, signaling pathways, oxidative stress and inflammation, autophagy, contractile and functional proteins, myostatin and myogenin, and muscle structure were evaluated in the diaphragm and gastrocnemius of LC (LP07 adenocarcinoma) bearing cachectic mice (BALB/c), with and without concomitant treatment with NF-κB (sulfasalazine), MAPK (U0126), and proteasome (bortezomib) inhibitors. Compared to control animals, in both respiratory and limb muscles of LC cachectic mice: muscle proteolysis, ubiquitinated proteins, autophagy, myostatin, protein oxidation, FoxO-1, NF-κB and MAPK signaling pathways, and muscle abnormalities were increased, while myosin, creatine kinase, myogenin, and slow- and fast-twitch muscle fiber size were decreased. Pharmacological inhibition of NF-κB and MAPK, but not the proteasome system, induced in cancer cachectic animals, a substantial restoration of muscle mass and force through a decrease in muscle protein oxidation and catabolism, myostatin, and autophagy, together with a greater content of myogenin, and contractile and functional proteins. Attenuation of MAPK and NF-κB signaling pathway effects on muscles is beneficial in cancer-induced cachexia. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Disorders of lipid metabolism in muscle.

    PubMed

    Di Mauro, S; Trevisan, C; Hays, A

    1980-01-01

    At rest and during sustained exercise, lipids are the main source of energy for muscle. Free fatty acids become available to muscle from plasma free fatty acids and triglycerides, and from intracellular triglycride lipid droplets. Transport of long-chain fatty acyl groups into the mitochondria requires esterification and de-esterification with carnitine by the "twin" enzymes carnitine palmityltransferase (CPT) I and II, bound to the outer and inner faces of the inner mitochondrial membrane. Carnitine deficiency occurs in two clinical syndromes. (1) In the myopathic form, there is weakness; muscle biopsy shows excessive accumulation of lipid droplets; and the carnitine concentration is markedly decreased in muscle but normal in plasma. (2) In the systemic form, there are weakness and recurrent episodes of hepatic encephalopathy; muscle biopsy shows lipid storage; and the carnitine concentration is decreased in muscle, liver, and plasma. The etiology of carnitine deficiency is not known in either the myopathic or the systemic form, but administration of carnitine or corticosteroids has been beneficial in some patients. "Secondary" carnitine deficiency may occur in patients with malnutrition, liver disease, chronic hemodialysis, and, possibly, mitochondrial disorders. CPT deficiency causes recurrent myoglobinuria, usually precipitated by prolonged exercise or fasting. Muscle biopsy may be normal or show varying degrees of lipid storage. Genetic transmission is probably autosomal recessive, but the great male predominance (20/21) remains unexplained. In many cases, lipid storage myopathy is not accompanied by carnitine or CPT deficiency, and the biochemical error remains to be identified.

  7. The General Weakness Syndrome Therapy (GymNAST) study: protocol for a cohort study on recovery on walking function

    PubMed Central

    Mehrholz, Jan; Mückel, Simone; Oehmichen, Frank; Pohl, Marcus

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Critical illness myopathy (CIM) and polyneuropathy (CIP) are common complications of critical illness that frequently occur together. Both cause so called intensive care unit (ICU)-acquired muscle weakness. This weakness of limb muscles increases morbidity and delay rehabilitation and recovery of walking ability. Although full recovery has been reported people with severe weakness may take months to improve walking. Focused physical rehabilitation of people with ICU-acquired muscle weakness is therefore of great importance. However, although physical rehabilitation is common, detailed knowledge about the pattern and the time course of recovery of walking function are not well understood. Therefore, the aim of the General Weakness Syndrome Therapy (GymNAST) study is to describe the time course of recovery of walking function and other activities of daily living in these patients. Methods and analysis We conduct a prospective cohort study of people with ICU-acquired muscle weakness with defined diagnosis of CIM or CIP. Based on our sample size calculation, approximately 150 patients will be recruited from the ICU of our hospital in Germany. Amount and content of physical rehabilitation, clinical tests for example, muscle strength and motor function and neuropsychological assessments will be used as independent variables. The primary outcomes will include recovery of walking function and mobility. Secondary outcomes will include global motor function, activities in daily life and participation. Ethics and dissemination The study is being carried out in agreement with the Declaration of Helsinki and conducted with the approval of the local medical Ethics Committee (Landesärztekammer Sachsen, Germany, reference number EK-BR-32/13-1) and with the understanding and written consent of each patient's guardian. The results of this study will be published in peer-reviewed journals and disseminated to the medical society and general public. PMID:25344484

  8. Investigation of the activation of the temporalis and masseter muscles in voluntary and spontaneous smile production.

    PubMed

    Steele, Jessica E; Woodcock, Ian R; Murphy, Adrian D; Ryan, Monique M; Penington, Tony J; Coombs, Christopher J

    2018-07-01

    Masticatory muscles or their nerve supply are options for facial reanimation surgery, but their ability to create spontaneous smile has been questioned. This study assessed the percentage of healthy adults who activate the temporalis and masseter muscles during voluntary and spontaneous smile. Healthy volunteer adults underwent electromyography (EMG) studies of the temporalis and masseter muscles during voluntary and spontaneous smile. Responses were repeated three times and recorded as negative, weakly positive, or strongly positive according to the activity observed. The best response was used for analysis. Thirty healthy adults (median age: 34 years, range: 25-69 years) participated. Overall, 92% of the masseter muscles were activated during voluntary smile (22% strong, 70% weak). Seventy-seven percent of the masseter muscles were activated in spontaneous smile (12% strong, 65% weak). The temporalis muscle was activated in 62% of responses in voluntary smile (15% strong, 47% weak) and in 45% of responses in spontaneous smile (13% strong, 32% weak). No significant difference was found for males vs females or closed vs open mouth smiles. There was no significant difference in responses between voluntary and spontaneous smiles for the temporalis and masseter muscles, and their use in voluntary smile did not predict activity in spontaneous smile. Our study has shown that masseter and temporalis are active in a high proportion of healthy adults during voluntary and spontaneous smiles. Further work is required to determine the relationship between preoperative donor muscle activation and postoperative spontaneous smile, and whether masticatory muscle activity can be upregulated with appropriate training. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. An ergonomics study of thumb movements on smartphone touch screen.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Jinghong; Muraki, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the relationships between thumb muscle activity and thumb operating tasks on a smartphone touch screen with one-hand posture. Six muscles in the right thumb and forearm were targeted in this study, namely adductor pollicis, flexor pollicis brevis, abductor pollicis brevis (APB), abductor pollicis longus, first dorsal interosseous (FDI) and extensor digitorum. The performance measures showed that the thumb developed fatigue rapidly when tapping on smaller buttons (diameter: 9 mm compared with 3 mm), and moved more slowly in flexion-extension than in adduction-abduction orientation. Meanwhile, the electromyography and perceived exertion values of FDI significantly increased in small button and flexion-extension tasks, while those of APB were greater in the adduction-abduction task. This study reveals that muscle effort among thumb muscles on a touch screen smartphone varies according to the task, and suggests that the use of small touch buttons should be minimised for better thumb performance.

  10. Electromiography comparison of distal and proximal lower limb muscle activity patterns during external perturbation in subjects with and without functional ankle instability.

    PubMed

    Kazemi, Khadijeh; Arab, Amir Massoud; Abdollahi, Iraj; López-López, Daniel; Calvo-Lobo, César

    2017-10-01

    Ankle sprain is one of the most common injuries among athletes and the general population. Most ankle injuries commonly affect the lateral ligament complex. Changes in postural sway and hip abductor muscle strength may be generated after inversion ankle sprain. Therefore, the consequences of ankle injury may affect proximal structures of the lower limb. The aim is to describe and compare the activity patterns of distal and proximal lower limb muscles following external perturbation in individuals with and without functional ankle instability. The sample consisted of 16 women with functional ankle instability and 18 healthy women were recruited to participate in this research. The external perturbation via body jacket using surface electromyography, amplitude and onset of muscle activity of gluteus maximums, gluteus medius, tibialis anterior, and peroneus longus was recorded and analyzed during external perturbation. There were differences between the onset of muscles activity due to perturbation direction in the two groups (healthy and functional ankle instability). In the healthy group, there were statistically significant differences in amplitude of proximal muscle activity with distal muscle activity during front perturbation with eyes open and closed. In the functional ankle instability group; there were statistically significant differences in amplitude of proximal muscle activity with distal muscle activity during perturbation of the front and back with eyes open. There were statistically significant differences in the onset of muscle activity and amplitude of muscle activity, with-in and between groups (P<0.05). Therefore, in the presence of functional ankle instability, activation patterns of the lower limb proximal muscles may be altered. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Effects of muscle contraction on cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potentials in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Rosengren, Sally M

    2015-11-01

    Cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (cVEMPs) are vestibular-dependent muscle reflexes recorded from the sternocleidomastoid (SCM) muscles in humans. cVEMP amplitude is modulated by stimulus intensity and SCM muscle contraction strength, but the effect of muscle contraction is less well-documented. The effects of intensity and contraction were therefore compared in 25 normal subjects over a wide range of contractions. cVEMPs were recorded at different contraction levels while holding stimulus intensity constant and at different intensities while holding SCM contraction constant. The effect of muscle contraction on cVEMP amplitude was linear for most of the range of muscle contractions in the majority of subjects (mean R(2)=0.93), although there were some nonlinearities when the contraction was either very weak or very strong. Very weak contractions were associated with absent responses, incomplete morphology and prolonged p13 latencies. Normalization of amplitudes, by dividing the p13-n23 amplitude by the muscle contraction estimate, reduced the effect of muscle contraction, but tended to underestimate the amplitude with weak contractions. Minimum contraction levels are required for accurate interpretation of cVEMPs. These data highlight the importance of measuring SCM contraction strength when recording cVEMPs. Copyright © 2015 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Relationships between eccentric hip isokinetic torque and functional performance.

    PubMed

    Baldon, Rodrigo de Marche; Lobato D, Ferreira Moreira; Carvalho, Lívia Pinheiro; Wun P, Yan Lam; Presotti, Cátia Valéria; Serrão, Fábio Viadanna

    2012-02-01

    Recently, attention in sports has been given to eccentric hip-muscle function, both in preventing musculoskeletal injuries and improving performance. To determine the key isokinetic variables of eccentric hip torque that predict the functional performance of women in the single-leg triple long jump (TLJ) and the timed 6-m single-leg hop (TH). Within-subject correlational study. Musculoskeletal laboratory. 32 healthy women age 18-25 y. The participants performed 2 sets of 5 eccentric hip-abductor/adductor and lateral/medial-rotator isokinetic contractions (30°/s) and 3 attempts in the TLJ and TH. The independent variables were the eccentric hip-abductor and -adductor and medial- and lateral-rotator isokinetic peak torque, normalized according to body mass (Nm/kg). The dependent variables were the longest distance achieved in the TLJ normalized according to body height and the shortest time spent during the execution of the TH. The forward-stepwise-regression analysis showed that the combination of the eccentric hip lateral-rotator and -abductor isokinetic peak torque provided the most efficient estimate of both functional tests, explaining 65% of the TLJ variance (P < .001) and 55% of the TH variance (P < .001). Higher values for eccentric hip lateral-rotator and hip-abductor torques reflected better performance. Thus, the eccentric action of these muscles should be considered in the development of physical training programs that aim to increase functional performance.

  13. Anatomy of the pectoral and forelimb muscles of wildtype and green fluorescent protein-transgenic axolotls and comparison with other tetrapods including humans: a basis for regenerative, evolutionary and developmental studies

    PubMed Central

    Diogo, R; Tanaka, E M

    2012-01-01

    stated in the literature, A. mexicanum has a muscle coracoradialis that has both a well developed proximal fleshy belly and a distal long and thin tendon, supporting the idea that this muscle very likely corresponds to at least part of the amniote biceps brachii. Our observations also: (i) confirmed that the flexores digitorum minimi, interphalangeus digiti 3, pronator quadratus and palmaris profundus 1 are present as distinct muscles in A. mexicanum, supporting the idea that the latter muscle does not correspond to the pronator accessorius of reptiles; (ii) confirmed that the so-called extensor antebrachii radialis is present as a distinct muscle in this species and, importantly, indicated that this muscle corresponds to the supinator of other tetrapods; (iii) showed that, contrary to some other urodeles, including some other Ambystoma species, there is no distinct muscle epitrochleoanconeus in A. mexicanum and; (iv) showed that the ulnar and radial bundles of the abductor et extensor digiti 1 correspond to the abductor pollicis longus and extensor pollicis longus of other tetrapods, respectively. PMID:22957800

  14. Anatomy of the pectoral and forelimb muscles of wildtype and green fluorescent protein-transgenic axolotls and comparison with other tetrapods including humans: a basis for regenerative, evolutionary and developmental studies.

    PubMed

    Diogo, R; Tanaka, E M

    2012-12-01

    stated in the literature, A. mexicanum has a muscle coracoradialis that has both a well developed proximal fleshy belly and a distal long and thin tendon, supporting the idea that this muscle very likely corresponds to at least part of the amniote biceps brachii. Our observations also: (i) confirmed that the flexores digitorum minimi, interphalangeus digiti 3, pronator quadratus and palmaris profundus 1 are present as distinct muscles in A. mexicanum, supporting the idea that the latter muscle does not correspond to the pronator accessorius of reptiles; (ii) confirmed that the so-called extensor antebrachii radialis is present as a distinct muscle in this species and, importantly, indicated that this muscle corresponds to the supinator of other tetrapods; (iii) showed that, contrary to some other urodeles, including some other Ambystoma species, there is no distinct muscle epitrochleoanconeus in A. mexicanum and; (iv) showed that the ulnar and radial bundles of the abductor et extensor digiti 1 correspond to the abductor pollicis longus and extensor pollicis longus of other tetrapods, respectively. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Anatomy © 2012 Anatomical Society.

  15. Changes in actin structural transitions associated with oxidative inhibition of muscle contraction.

    PubMed

    Prochniewicz, Ewa; Spakowicz, Daniel; Thomas, David D

    2008-11-11

    We have used transient phosphorescence anisotropy (TPA) to detect changes in actin structural dynamics associated with oxidative inhibition of muscle contraction. Contractility of skinned rabbit psoas muscle fibers was inhibited by treatment with 50 mM H 2O 2, which induced oxidative modifications in the myosin head and in actin, as previously reported. Using proteins purified from oxidized and unoxidized muscle, we used TPA to measure the effects of weakly (+ATP) and strongly (no ATP) bound myosin heads (S1) on the microsecond dynamics of actin labeled at Cys374 with erythrosine iodoacetamide. Oxidative modification of S1 had no effect on actin dynamics in the absence of ATP (strong binding complex), but restricted the dynamics in the presence of ATP (weakly bound complex). In contrast, oxidative modification of actin did not have a significant effect on the weak-to-strong transitions. Thus, we concluded that (1) the effects of oxidation on the dynamics of actin in the actomyosin complex are predominantly determined by oxidation-induced changes in S1, and (2) changes in weak-to-strong structural transitions in actin and myosin are coupled to each other and are associated with oxidative inhibition of muscle contractility.

  16. Lifting the nebula: novel insights into skeletal muscle contractility.

    PubMed

    Ottenheijm, Coen A C; Granzier, Henk

    2010-10-01

    Nebulin is a giant protein and a constituent of the skeletal muscle sarcomere. The name of this protein refers to its unknown (i.e., nebulous) function. However, recent rapid advances reveal that nebulin plays important roles in the regulation of muscle contraction. When these functions of nebulin are compromised, muscle weakness ensues, as is the case in patients with nemaline myopathy.

  17. Effects of squat lift training and free weight muscle training on maximum lifting load and isolinetic peak torque of young adults without impairments.

    PubMed

    Yeung, S S; Ng, G Y

    2000-06-01

    Manual lifting is a frequent cause of back injury, and there is no evidence as to which training mode can provide the best training effect for lifting performance and muscle force. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a squat lift training and a free weight muscle training program on the maximum lifting load and isokinetic peak torque in subjects without known neuromuscular or musculoskeletal impairments. Thirty-six adults (20 male, 16 female) without known neuromuscular or musculoskeletal impairments participated. The subjects' mean age was 21.25 years (SD=1.16, range=20-24). Subjects were divided into 3 groups. Subjects in group 1 (n=12) performed squat lift training. Subjects in group 2 (n=12) participated in free weight resistance training of their shoulder abductors, elbow flexors, knee extensors and trunk extensors. Subjects in group 3 (n=12) served as controls. The maximum lifting load and isokinetic peak torques of the trunk extensors, knee extensors, elbow flexors, and shoulder abductors of each subject were measured before and after the study. Training was conducted on alternate days for 4 weeks, with an initial load of 80% of each subject's maximum capacity and with the load increased by 5% weekly. All groups were comparable for all measured variables before the study. After 4 weeks, subjects in groups 1 and 2 demonstrated more improvement in maximum lifting load and isokinetic peak torque of the back extensors compared with the subjects in group 3, but the 2 training groups were not different. The findings demonstrate that both squat lift and free weight resistance training are equally effective in improving the lifting load and isokinetic back extension performance of individuals without impairments.

  18. Evaluation of the effects of the Arm Light Exoskeleton on movement execution and muscle activities: a pilot study on healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Pirondini, Elvira; Coscia, Martina; Marcheschi, Simone; Roas, Gianluca; Salsedo, Fabio; Frisoli, Antonio; Bergamasco, Massimo; Micera, Silvestro

    2016-01-23

    Exoskeletons for lower and upper extremities have been introduced in neurorehabilitation because they can guide the patient's limb following its anatomy, covering many degrees of freedom and most of its natural workspace, and allowing the control of the articular joints. The aims of this study were to evaluate the possible use of a novel exoskeleton, the Arm Light Exoskeleton (ALEx), for robot-aided neurorehabilitation and to investigate the effects of some rehabilitative strategies adopted in robot-assisted training. We studied movement execution and muscle activities of 16 upper limb muscles in six healthy subjects, focusing on end-effector and joint kinematics, muscle synergies, and spinal maps. The subjects performed three dimensional point-to-point reaching movements, without and with the exoskeleton in different assistive modalities and control strategies. The results showed that ALEx supported the upper limb in all modalities and control strategies: it reduced the muscular activity of the shoulder's abductors and it increased the activity of the elbow flexors. The different assistive modalities favored kinematics and muscle coordination similar to natural movements, but the muscle activity during the movements assisted by the exoskeleton was reduced with respect to the movements actively performed by the subjects. Moreover, natural trajectories recorded from the movements actively performed by the subjects seemed to promote an activity of muscles and spinal circuitries more similar to the natural one. The preliminary analysis on healthy subjects supported the use of ALEx for post-stroke upper limb robotic assisted rehabilitation, and it provided clues on the effects of different rehabilitative strategies on movement and muscle coordination.

  19. A study of muscle involvement in scrub typhus.

    PubMed

    Kalita, Jayantee; Misra, Usha K; Mani, Vinita E; Mahadevan, Anita; Shankar, Susrala K

    2015-01-15

    Patients with scrub typhus often complain of myalgia, but a comprehensive study on muscle dysfunction is lacking. We therefore report the clinical, electromyographic and muscle biopsy findings in patients with scrub typhus. Consecutive patients with scrub typhus were included, and their clinical and laboratory findings were noted. The patients with myalgia or weakness and elevated serum creatine kinase (CK) were considered to have muscle involvement. Electromyography (EMG) and muscle biopsy were done in some patients. Patients were treated with doxycycline 200mg daily for 7 days, and their clinical and biochemical outcome on discharge and one month were evaluated. 13 out of 33 (39.4%) patients had muscle involvement and their CK levels ranged between 287 and 3166 (859 ± 829) U/L. EMG revealed short duration polyphasic potentials, and muscle histopathology revealed evidence of vasculitis. There were significant correlations between severity of weakness and CK levels (r = -0.6; p < 0.001), platelet counts (r = 0.4; p = 0.04), duration of illness (r = -0.4; p = 0.01) and disability on discharge (r = -0.4; p = 0.04). Patients with muscle involvement had more severe illness evidenced by a lower Glasgow Coma Scale score (p < 0.001), thrombocytopenia (p = 0.05) and greater disability on discharge (p = 0.007), when compared to those without muscle involvement. All the patients had complete recovery following doxycycline therapy, and CK levels also normalized. Muscle dysfunction was present in 39% patients with scrub typhus. Although muscle histopathology showed evidence of vasculitis, patients responded to doxycycline. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. 38 CFR 4.56 - Evaluation of muscle disabilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., the cardinal signs and symptoms of muscle disability are loss of power, weakness, lowered threshold of... signs or symptoms of muscle disability as defined in paragraph (c) of this section. (iii) Objective... injury. Through and through or deep penetrating wound of short track from a single bullet, small shell or...

  1. 38 CFR 4.56 - Evaluation of muscle disabilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., the cardinal signs and symptoms of muscle disability are loss of power, weakness, lowered threshold of... signs or symptoms of muscle disability as defined in paragraph (c) of this section. (iii) Objective... injury. Through and through or deep penetrating wound of short track from a single bullet, small shell or...

  2. Nebulin deficiency in adult muscle causes sarcomere defects and muscle-type-dependent changes in trophicity: novel insights in nemaline myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Frank; Buck, Danielle; De Winter, Josine; Kolb, Justin; Meng, Hui; Birch, Camille; Slater, Rebecca; Escobar, Yael Natelie; Smith, John E.; Yang, Lin; Konhilas, John; Lawlor, Michael W.; Ottenheijm, Coen; Granzier, Henk L.

    2015-01-01

    Nebulin is a giant filamentous protein that is coextensive with the actin filaments of the skeletal muscle sarcomere. Nebulin mutations are the main cause of nemaline myopathy (NEM), with typical adult patients having low expression of nebulin, yet the roles of nebulin in adult muscle remain poorly understood. To establish nebulin's functional roles in adult muscle, we studied a novel conditional nebulin KO (Neb cKO) mouse model in which nebulin deletion was driven by the muscle creatine kinase (MCK) promotor. Neb cKO mice are born with high nebulin levels in their skeletal muscles, but within weeks after birth nebulin expression rapidly falls to barely detectable levels Surprisingly, a large fraction of the mice survive to adulthood with low nebulin levels (<5% of control), contain nemaline rods and undergo fiber-type switching toward oxidative types. Nebulin deficiency causes a large deficit in specific force, and mechanistic studies provide evidence that a reduced fraction of force-generating cross-bridges and shortened thin filaments contribute to the force deficit. Muscles rich in glycolytic fibers upregulate proteolysis pathways (MuRF-1, Fbxo30/MUSA1, Gadd45a) and undergo hypotrophy with smaller cross-sectional areas (CSAs), worsening their force deficit. Muscles rich in oxidative fibers do not have smaller weights and can even have hypertrophy, offsetting their specific-force deficit. These studies reveal nebulin as critically important for force development and trophicity in adult muscle. The Neb cKO phenocopies important aspects of NEM (muscle weakness, oxidative fiber-type predominance, variable trophicity effects, nemaline rods) and will be highly useful to test therapeutic approaches to ameliorate muscle weakness. PMID:26123491

  3. Analysis of three different equations for predicting quadriceps femoris muscle strength in patients with COPD *

    PubMed Central

    Nellessen, Aline Gonçalves; Donária, Leila; Hernandes, Nidia Aparecida; Pitta, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To compare equations for predicting peak quadriceps femoris (QF) muscle force; to determine the agreement among the equations in identifying QF muscle weakness in COPD patients; and to assess the differences in characteristics among the groups of patients classified as having or not having QF muscle weakness by each equation. Methods: Fifty-six COPD patients underwent assessment of peak QF muscle force by dynamometry (maximal voluntary isometric contraction of knee extension). Predicted values were calculated with three equations: an age-height-weight-gender equation (Eq-AHWG); an age-weight-gender equation (Eq-AWG); and an age-fat-free mass-gender equation (Eq-AFFMG). Results: Comparison of the percentage of predicted values obtained with the three equations showed that the Eq-AHWG gave higher values than did the Eq-AWG and Eq-AFFMG, with no difference between the last two. The Eq-AHWG showed moderate agreement with the Eq-AWG and Eq-AFFMG, whereas the last two also showed moderate, albeit lower, agreement with each other. In the sample as a whole, QF muscle weakness (< 80% of predicted) was identified by the Eq-AHWG, Eq-AWG, and Eq-AFFMG in 59%, 68%, and 70% of the patients, respectively (p > 0.05). Age, fat-free mass, and body mass index are characteristics that differentiate between patients with and without QF muscle weakness. Conclusions: The three equations were statistically equivalent in classifying COPD patients as having or not having QF muscle weakness. However, the Eq-AHWG gave higher peak force values than did the Eq-AWG and the Eq-AFFMG, as well as showing greater agreement with the other equations. PMID:26398750

  4. [An autopsy case of progressive generalized muscle atrophy over 14 years due to post-polio syndrome].

    PubMed

    Oki, Ryosuke; Uchino, Akiko; Izumi, Yuishin; Ogawa, Hirohisa; Murayama, Shigeo; Kaji, Ryuji

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of a 72-year-old man who had contracted acute paralytic poliomyelitis in his childhood. Thereafter, he had suffered from paresis involving the left lower limb, with no relapse or progression of the disease. He began noticing slowly progressive muscle weakness and atrophy in the upper and lower extremities in his 60s. At the age of 72, muscle weakness developed rapidly, and he demonstrated dyspnea on exertion and dysphagia. He died after about 14 years from the onset of muscle weakness symptoms. Autopsy findings demonstrated motoneuron loss and glial scars not only in the plaque-like lesions in the anterior horns, which were sequelae of old poliomyelitis, but also throughout the spine. No Bunina bodies, TDP-43, and ubiquitin inclusions were found. Post-polio syndrome is rarely fatal due to rapid progressive dyspnea and dysphagia. Thus, the pathological findings in the patient are considered to be related to the development of muscle weakness.

  5. Changes in actin structural transitions associated with oxidative inhibition of muscle contraction

    PubMed Central

    Prochniewicz, Ewa; Spakowicz, Daniel; Thomas, David D.

    2011-01-01

    We have used transient phosphorescence anisotropy (TPA) to detect changes in actin structural dynamics associated with oxidative inhibition of muscle contraction. Contractility of skinned rabbit psoas muscle fibers was inhibited by treatment with 50 mM H2O2, which induced oxidative modifications in the myosin head and in actin, as previously reported. Using proteins purified from oxidized and unoxidized muscle, we used TPA to measure the effects of weakly (+ATP) and strongly (no ATP) bound myosin heads (S1) on the microsecond dynamics of actin labeled at Cys374 with erythrosine iodoacetamide. Oxidative modification of S1 had no effect on actin dynamics in the absence of ATP (strong binding complex), but restricted the dynamics in the presence of ATP (weakly bound complex). In contrast, oxidative modification of actin did not have a significant effect on the weak-to-strong transitions. Thus, we concluded that (1) the effects of oxidation on the dynamics of actin in the actomyosin complex are predominantly determined by oxidation-induced changes in S1, and (2) changes in weak-to-strong structural transitions in actin and myosin are coupled to each other and are associated with oxidative inhibition of muscle contractility. PMID:18855423

  6. Influence of mental practice on development of voluntary control of a novel motor acquisition task.

    PubMed

    Creelman, Jim

    2003-08-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to assess whether mental practice facilitates the development of voluntary control over the recruitment of the abductor hallucis muscle to produce isolated big toe abduction. A sample of convenience of 15 women and 20 men with a mean age of 28.8 yr. (SD=5.7) and healthy feet, who were unable voluntarily to abduct the big toe, were randomly assigned to one of three groups, a mental practice group, a physical practice group, and a group who performed a control movement during practice. Each subject received neuromuscular electrical stimulation to introduce the desired movement prior to each of five practice bouts over a single session lasting 2 hr. Big toe abduction active range of motion and surface electromyographic (EMG) output of the abductor hallucis and extensor digitorum brevis muscles were measured prior to the first practice bout and following each practice bout, yielding seven acquisition trials. Acquisition is defined as an improvement in both active range of motion and in the difference between the integrated EMG of the abductor hallucis and extensor digitorum brevis muscles during successive acquisition trials. Seven members of both the mental and physical practice groups and one member of the control group met the acquisition criteria. Chi-square analysis indicated the group difference was statistically significant, suggesting mental practice was effective for this task.

  7. Global muscle dysfunction as a risk factor of readmission to hospital due to COPD exacerbations.

    PubMed

    Vilaró, Jordi; Ramirez-Sarmiento, Alba; Martínez-Llorens, Juana M A; Mendoza, Teresa; Alvarez, Miguel; Sánchez-Cayado, Natalia; Vega, Angeles; Gimeno, Elena; Coronell, Carlos; Gea, Joaquim; Roca, Josep; Orozco-Levi, Mauricio

    2010-12-01

    Exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are associated with several modifiable (sedentary life-style, smoking, malnutrition, hypoxemia) and non-modifiable (age, co-morbidities, severity of pulmonary function, respiratory infections) risk factors. We hypothesise that most of these risk factors may have a converging and deleterious effects on both respiratory and peripheral muscle function in COPD patients. A multicentre study was carried out in 121 COPD patients (92% males, 63 ± 11 yr, FEV(1), 49 ± 17%pred). Assessments included anthropometrics, lung function, body composition using bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA), and global muscle function (peripheral muscle (dominant and non-dominant hand grip strength, HGS), inspiratory (PI(max)), and expiratory (PE(max)) muscle strength). GOLD stage, clinical status (stable vs. non-stable) and both current and past hospital admissions due to COPD exacerbations were included as covariates in the analyses. Respiratory and peripheral muscle weakness were observed in all subsets of patients. Muscle weakness, was significantly associated with both current and past hospitalisations. Patients with history of multiple admissions showed increased global muscle weakness after adjusting by FEV(1) (PE(max), OR = 6.8, p < 0.01; PI(max), OR = 2.9, p < 0.05; HGSd, OR = 2.4, and HGSnd, OR = 2.6, p = 0.05). Moreover, a significant increase in both respiratory and peripheral muscle weakness, after adjusting by FEV(1), was associated with current acute exacerbations. Muscle dysfunction, adjusted by GOLD stage, is associated with an increased risk of hospital admissions due to acute episodes of exacerbation of the disease. Current exacerbations further deteriorate muscle dysfunction. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Effects of Muscle Strength and Balance Control on Sit-to-Walk and Turn Durations in the Timed Up and Go Test.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tzurei; Chou, Li-Shan

    2017-12-01

    To examine the association of muscle strength and balance control with the amount of time taken to perform sit-to-walk (STW) or turning components of the Timed Up and Go (TUG) test in older adults. Correlations; multiple regression models. General community. Older adults (N=60) age >70 years recruited from the community. Not applicable. Muscle strength, balance control, and TUG test performance time. Muscle strength was quantified by peak joint moments during the isometric maximal voluntary contraction test for bilateral hip abductors, knee extensors, and ankle plantar flexors. Balance control was assessed with the Berg Balance Scale, Fullerton Advanced Balance Scale, and center of mass and ankle inclination angle derived during the TUG test performance. We found that balance control measures were significantly associated with both STW and turning durations even after controlling for muscle strength and other confounders (STW duration: P<.001, turning duration: P=.001). Adding strength to the regression model was found to significantly improve its prediction of STW duration (F change =5.945, P=.018), but not turning duration (F change =1.03, P=.14). Our findings suggest that poor balance control is an important factor that contributes to longer STW and turning durations on the TUG test. Furthermore, strength has a higher association with STW than turning duration. Copyright © 2016 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Motor unit recruitment strategies and muscle properties determine the influence of synaptic noise on force steadiness

    PubMed Central

    Dideriksen, Jakob L.; Negro, Francesco; Enoka, Roger M.

    2012-01-01

    Motoneurons receive synaptic inputs from tens of thousands of connections that cause membrane potential to fluctuate continuously (synaptic noise), which introduces variability in discharge times of action potentials. We hypothesized that the influence of synaptic noise on force steadiness during voluntary contractions is limited to low muscle forces. The hypothesis was examined with an analytical description of transduction of motor unit spike trains into muscle force, a computational model of motor unit recruitment and rate coding, and experimental analysis of interspike interval variability during steady contractions with the abductor digiti minimi muscle. Simulations varied contraction force, level of synaptic noise, size of motor unit population, recruitment range, twitch contraction times, and level of motor unit short-term synchronization. Consistent with the analytical derivations, simulations and experimental data showed that force variability at target forces above a threshold was primarily due to low-frequency oscillations in neural drive, whereas the influence of synaptic noise was almost completely attenuated by two low-pass filters, one related to convolution of motoneuron spike trains with motor unit twitches (temporal summation) and the other attributable to summation of single motor unit forces (spatial summation). The threshold force above which synaptic noise ceased to influence force steadiness depended on recruitment range, size of motor unit population, and muscle contractile properties. This threshold was low (<10% of maximal force) for typical values of these parameters. Results indicate that motor unit recruitment and muscle properties of a typical muscle are tuned to limit the influence of synaptic noise on force steadiness to low forces and that the inability to produce a constant force during stronger contractions is mainly attributable to the common low-frequency oscillations in motoneuron discharge rates. PMID:22423000

  10. Posterolateral hip muscle strengthening versus quadriceps strengthening for patellofemoral pain: a comparative control trial.

    PubMed

    Khayambashi, Khalil; Fallah, Alireza; Movahedi, Ahmadreza; Bagwell, Jennifer; Powers, Christopher

    2014-05-01

    To compare the efficacy of posterolateral hip muscle strengthening versus quadriceps strengthening in reducing pain and improving health status in persons with patellofemoral pain (PFP). Comparative control trial. Rehabilitation facility. Persons with a diagnosis of PFP (N=36; 18 men, 18 women). Patients were alternately assigned to a posterolateral hip muscle strengthening group (9 men and 9 women) or a quadriceps strengthening group (9 men and 9 women). The posterolateral hip muscle strengthening group performed hip abductor and external rotator strengthening exercises, whereas the quadriceps strengthening group performed quadriceps strengthening exercises (3 times a week for 8wk). Pain (visual analog scale [VAS]) and health status (Western Ontario McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index [WOMAC]) were assessed at baseline, postintervention, and 6-month follow-up. Significant improvements in VAS and WOMAC scores were observed in both groups from baseline to postintervention and baseline to 6-month follow-up (P<.001). Improvements in VAS and WOMAC scores in the posterolateral hip exercise group were superior to those in the quadriceps exercise group postintervention and at 6-month follow-up (P<.05). Although both intervention programs resulted in decreased pain and improved function in persons with PFP, outcomes in the posterolateral hip exercise group were superior to the quadriceps exercise group. The superior outcomes obtained in the posterolateral hip exercise group were maintained 6 months postintervention. Copyright © 2014 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Rejuvenation of the aged muscle stem cell population restores strength to injured aged muscles

    PubMed Central

    Cosgrove, Benjamin D.; Gilbert, Penney M.; Porpiglia, Ermelinda; Mourkioti, Foteini; Lee, Steven P.; Corbel, Stephane Y.; Llewellyn, Michael E.; Delp, Scott L.; Blau, Helen M.

    2014-01-01

    The aged suffer from progressive muscle weakness and regenerative failure. We demonstrate that muscle regeneration is impaired with aging due in part to a cell-autonomous functional decline in skeletal muscle stem cells (MuSCs). Two-thirds of aged MuSCs are intrinsically defective relative to young MuSCs, with reduced capacity to repair myofibers and repopulate the stem cell reservoir in vivo following transplantation due to a higher incidence of cells that express senescence markers and that have elevated p38α/β MAPK activity. We show that these limitations cannot be overcome by transplantation into the microenvironment of young recipient muscles. In contrast, subjecting the aged MuSC population to transient inhibition of p38α/β in conjunction with culture on soft hydrogel substrates rapidly expands the residual functional aged MuSC population, rejuvenating its potential for regeneration, serial transplantation, and strengthening damaged muscles of aged mice. These findings reveal a synergy between biophysical and biochemical cues that provides a paradigm for a localized autologous muscle stem cell therapy in aged individuals. PMID:24531378

  12. Muscle atrophy in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy: a computed tomography assessment.

    PubMed

    Ohyama, K; Koike, H; Katsuno, M; Takahashi, M; Hashimoto, R; Kawagashira, Y; Iijima, M; Adachi, H; Watanabe, H; Sobue, G

    2014-07-01

    Muscle atrophy is generally mild in patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) compared with the severity and duration of the muscle weakness. Muscle atrophy was evaluated using computed tomography (CT) in patients with CIDP. Thirty-one patients with typical CIDP who satisfied the diagnostic criteria for the definite CIDP classification proposed by the European Federation of Neurological Societies and the Peripheral Nerve Society were assessed. The clinicopathological findings in patients with muscle atrophy were also compared with those in patients without atrophy. Computed tomography evidence was found of marked muscle atrophy with findings suggestive of fatty degeneration in 11 of the 31 patients with CIDP. CT-assessed muscle atrophy was in the lower extremities, particularly in the ankle plantarflexor muscles. Muscle weakness, which reflects the presence of muscle atrophy, tended to be more pronounced in the lower extremities than in the upper extremities in patients with muscle atrophy, whereas the upper and lower limbs tended to be equally affected in patients without muscle atrophy. Nerve conduction examinations revealed significantly greater reductions in compound muscle action potential amplitudes in the tibial nerves of patients with muscle atrophy. Sural nerve biopsy findings were similar in both groups. The functional prognoses after immunomodulatory therapies were significantly poorer amongst patients with muscle atrophy. Muscle atrophy was present in a subgroup of patients with CIDP, including patients with a typical form of the disease. These patients tended to demonstrate predominant motor impairments of the lower extremities and poorer functional prognoses. © 2014 The Author(s) European Journal of Neurology © 2014 EFNS.

  13. Exercise capacity, muscle strength and fatigue in sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Marcellis, R G J; Lenssen, A F; Elfferich, M D P; De Vries, J; Kassim, S; Foerster, K; Drent, M

    2011-09-01

    The aim of this case-control study was to investigate the prevalence of exercise intolerance, muscle weakness and fatigue in sarcoidosis patients. Additionally, we evaluated whether fatigue can be explained by exercise capacity, muscle strength or other clinical characteristics (lung function tests, radiographic stages, prednisone usage and inflammatory markers). 124 sarcoidosis patients (80 males) referred to the Maastricht University Medical Centre (Maastricht, the Netherlands) were included (mean age 46.6±10.2 yrs). Patients performed a 6-min walk test (6MWT) and handgrip force (HGF), elbow flexor muscle strength (EFMS), quadriceps peak torque (QPT) and hamstring peak torque (HPT) tests. Maximal inspiratory pressure (P(I,max)) was recorded. All patients completed the Fatigue Assessment Scale (FAS) questionnaire. The 6MWT was reduced in 45% of the population, while HGF, EFMS, QPT and HPT muscle strength were reduced in 15, 12, 27 and 18%, respectively. P(I,max) was reduced in 43% of the population. The majority of the patients (81%) reported fatigue (FAS ≥22). Patients with reduced peripheral muscle strength of the upper and/or lower extremities were more fatigued and demonstrated impaired lung functions, fat-free mass, P(I,max), 6MWT and quality of life. Fatigue was neither predicted by exercise capacity, nor by muscle strength. Besides fatigue, exercise intolerance and muscle weakness are frequent problems in sarcoidosis. We therefore recommend physical tests in the multidisciplinary management of sarcoidosis patients, even in nonfatigued patients.

  14. Effect of temperature on residual force enhancement in single skeletal muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun-Jeong; Herzog, Walter

    2008-08-28

    It is well accepted that the steady-state isometric force following active stretching of a muscle is greater than the steady-state isometric force obtained in a purely isometric contraction at the same length. This property of skeletal muscle has been called residual force enhancement (FE). Despite decades of research the mechanisms responsible for FE have remained largely unknown. Based on previous studies showing increases in FE in fibers in which cross-bridges were biased towards weakly bound states, we hypothesized that FE might be associated with a stretch-induced facilitation of transitioning from weakly to strongly bound cross-bridges. In order to test this hypothesis, single fibers (n=11) from the lumbrical muscles of frog (Rana pipiens) were used to determine FE at temperatures of 7 and 20 degrees C. At the cold temperature, cross-bridges are biased towards weakly bound states, therefore we expected FE to be greater at 7 degrees C compared to 20 degrees C. The average FE was significantly greater at 7 degrees C (11.5+/-1.1%) than at 20 degrees C (7.8+/-1.0%), as expected. The enhancement of force/stiffness was also significantly greater at the low (13.3+/-1.4%) compared to the high temperature (5.6+/-1.7%), indicating an increased conversion from weakly to strongly bound cross-bridges at the low temperature. We conclude from the results of this study that muscle preparations that are biased towards weakly bound cross-bridge states show increased FE for given stretch conditions, thereby supporting the idea that FE might be caused, in part, by a stretch-induced facilitation of the conversion of weakly to strongly bound cross-bridges.

  15. Differentiating between adductor and abductor spasmodic dysphonia using airflow interruption

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Matthew R.; Jiang, Jack J.; Rieves, Adam L.; McElveen, Kelsey A.B.; Ford, Charles N.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To measure the laryngeal resistance (RL), subglottal pressure (Ps), and mean flow rate (MFR) of adductor (ADSD) and abductor (ABSD) spasmodic dysphonia patients using the airflow interrupter. Methods The RL of six ABSD and seven ADSD patients was measured using the airflow interrupter, a noninvasive device designed to measure MFR and Ps via mechanical balloon valve interruption. Subjects performed ten trials at each of two intensity levels, with each trial consisting of a sustained /a/ during which phonation was interrupted for 500 ms. Laryngeal resistance was calculated as subglottal pressure divided by airflow. Results Mean RL for the ADSD and ABSD subtypes at 65 dB were 24.78 cmH2O/l/s and 14.51 cmH2O/l/s, respectively (p = 0.04). Mean RL at 70 dB were 40.02 cmH2O/l/s and 15.84 cmH2O/l/s (p = 0.014). Ps for the ADSD and ABSD subtypes at 65 dB were 10.23 cmH2O and 8.32 cmH2O, respectively (p = 0.582). At the 70 dB level, Ps were 12.39 cmH2O and 11.78 cmH2O (p = 0.886). MFR for the ADSD and ABSD subtypes at 65 dB were 435 ml/s and 746 ml/s (p = 0.205). Mean MFR at 70 dB were 518 ml/s and 848 ml/s (p = 0.198). Conclusion Noninvasive measurements of RL may be useful for differentiating between ADSD and ABSD. This simple objective test which produces a quantitative output could be used to evaluate laryngeal function in patients with spasmodic dysphonia. PMID:19554636

  16. Nutrient-rich meat proteins in offsetting age-related muscle loss.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Stuart M

    2012-11-01

    From a health perspective, an underappreciated consequence of the normal aging process is the impacts that the gradual loss of skeletal muscle mass, termed sarcopenia, has on health beyond an effect on locomotion. Sarcopenia, refers to the loss of muscle mass, and associated muscle weakness, which occurs in aging and is thought to proceed at a rate of approximately 1% loss per year. However, periods of inactivity due to illness or recovery from orthopedic procedures such as hip or knee replacement are times of accelerated sarcopenic muscle loss from which it may be more difficult for older persons to recover. Some of the consequences of age-related sarcopenia are easy to appreciate such as weakness and, eventually, reduced mobility; however, other lesser recognized consequences include, due to the metabolic role the skeletal muscle plays, an increased risk for poor glucose control and a predisposition toward weight gain. What we currently know is that two stimuli can counter this age related muscle loss and these are physical activity, specifically resistance exercise (weightlifting), and nutrition. The focus of this paper is on the types of dietary protein that people might reasonably consume to offset sarcopenic muscle loss. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Poor physical function in elderly women in low-level aged care is related to muscle strength rather than to measures of sarcopenia.

    PubMed

    Woods, Julie L; Iuliano-Burns, Sandra; King, Susannah J; Strauss, Boyd J; Walker, Karen Z

    2011-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of sarcopenia and investigate relationships among body composition, muscle strength, and physical function in elderly women in low-level aged care. Sixty-three ambulatory women (mean age 86 years) participated in this cross-sectional study where body composition was determined by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA); ankle, knee, and hip strength by the Nicholas Manual Muscle Tester; and physical function by 'timed up and go' (TUG) and walking speed (WS) over 6 meters. Body composition data from a female reference group (n = 62, mean age 29 years) provided cut-off values for defining sarcopenia. Elderly women had higher body mass index (P < 0.001), lower lean mass (P < 0.001), and higher fat mass (P < 0.01) than the young reference group. Only a small proportion (3.2%) had absolute sarcopenia (defined by appendicular skeletal muscle mass/height squared) whereas 37% had relative sarcopenia class II (defined by percentage skeletal muscle mass). Scores for TUG and WS indicated relatively poor physical function, yet these measures were not associated with muscle mass or indices of sarcopenia. In multivariate analysis, only hip abductor strength predicted both TUG and WS (both P = 0.01). Hip strength is a more important indicator of physical functioning than lean mass. Measurement of hip strength may therefore be a useful screening tool to detect those at risk of functional decline and requirement for additional care. Further longitudinal studies with a range of other strength measures are warranted.

  18. The Sick and the Weak: Neuropathies/Myopathies in the Critically Ill

    PubMed Central

    Friedrich, O.; Reid, M. B.; Van den Berghe, G.; Vanhorebeek, I.; Hermans, G.; Rich, M. M.; Larsson, L.

    2015-01-01

    Critical illness polyneuropathies (CIP) and myopathies (CIM) are common complications of critical illness. Several weakness syndromes are summarized under the term intensive care unit-acquired weakness (ICUAW). We propose a classification of different ICUAW forms (CIM, CIP, sepsis-induced, steroid-denervation myopathy) and pathophysiological mechanisms from clinical and animal model data. Triggers include sepsis, mechanical ventilation, muscle unloading, steroid treatment, or denervation. Some ICUAW forms require stringent diagnostic features; CIM is marked by membrane hypoexcitability, severe atrophy, preferential myosin loss, ultrastructural alterations, and inadequate autophagy activation while myopathies in pure sepsis do not reproduce marked myosin loss. Reduced membrane excitability results from depolarization and ion channel dysfunction. Mitochondrial dysfunction contributes to energy-dependent processes. Ubiquitin proteasome and calpain activation trigger muscle proteolysis and atrophy while protein synthesis is impaired. Myosin loss is more pronounced than actin loss in CIM. Protein quality control is altered by inadequate autophagy. Ca2+ dysregulation is present through altered Ca2+ homeostasis. We highlight clinical hallmarks, trigger factors, and potential mechanisms from human studies and animal models that allow separation of risk factors that may trigger distinct mechanisms contributing to weakness. During critical illness, altered inflammatory (cytokines) and metabolic pathways deteriorate muscle function. ICUAW prevention/treatment is limited, e.g., tight glycemic control, delaying nutrition, and early mobilization. Future challenges include identification of primary/secondary events during the time course of critical illness, the interplay between membrane excitability, bioenergetic failure and differential proteolysis, and finding new therapeutic targets by help of tailored animal models. PMID:26133937

  19. Intensive care unit-acquired weakness.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, Richard D; Hall, Jesse B

    2010-03-01

    Severe weakness is being recognized as a complication that impacts significantly on the pace and degree of recovery and return to former functional status of patients who survive the organ failures that mandate life-support therapies such as mechanical ventilation. Despite the apparent importance of this problem, much remains to be understood about its incidence, causes, prevention, and treatment. Review from literature and an expert round-table. The Brussels Round Table Conference in 2009 convened more than 20 experts in the fields of intensive care, neurology, and muscle physiology to review current understandings of intensive care unit-acquired weakness and to improve clinical outcome. Formal electrophysiological evaluation of patients with intensive care unit-acquired weakness can identify peripheral neuropathies, myopathies, and combinations of these disorders, although the correlation of these findings to weakness measurable at the bedside is not always precise. For routine clinical purposes, bedside assessment of neuromuscular function can be performed but is often confounded by complicating factors such as sedative and analgesic administration. Risk factors for development of intensive care unit-acquired weakness include bed rest itself, sepsis, and corticosteroid exposure. A strong association exists between weakness and long-term ventilator dependence; weakness is a major determinant of patient outcomes after surviving acute respiratory failure and may be present for months, or indefinitely, in the convalescence phase of critical illness. Although much has been learned about the physiology and cell and molecular biology of skeletal and diaphragm dysfunction under conditions of aging, exercise, disuse, and sepsis, the application of these understandings to the bedside requires more study in both bench models and patients. Although a trend toward greater immobilization and sedation of patients has characterized the past several decades of intensive care

  20. An elderly-onset limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 1B (LGMD1B) with pseudo-hypertrophy of paraspinal muscles.

    PubMed

    Furuta, Mitsuru; Sumi-Akamaru, Hisae; Takahashi, Masanori P; Hayashi, Yukiko K; Nishino, Ichizo; Mochizuki, Hideki

    2016-09-01

    Mutations in LMNA, encoding A-type lamins, lead to diverse disorders, collectively called "laminopathies," which affect the striated muscle, cardiac muscle, adipose tissue, skin, peripheral nerve, and premature aging. We describe a patient with limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 1B (LGMD1B) carrying a heterozygous p.Arg377His mutation in LMNA, in whom skeletal muscle symptom onset was at the age of 65 years. Her weakness started at the erector spinae muscles, which showed marked pseudo-hypertrophy even at the age of 72 years. Her first episode of syncope was at 44 years; however, aberrant cardiac conduction was not revealed until 60 years. The p.Arg377His mutation has been previously reported in several familial LMNA-associated myopathies, most of which showed muscle weakness before the 6th decade. This is the first report of pseudo-hypertrophy of paravertebral muscles in LMNA-associated myopathies. The pseudo-hypertrophy of paravertebral muscles and the elderly-onset of muscle weakness make this case unique and reportable. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Muscle-Bone Interactions in Pediatric Bone Diseases.

    PubMed

    Veilleux, Louis-Nicolas; Rauch, Frank

    2017-10-01

    Here, we review the skeletal effects of pediatric muscle disorders as well as muscle impairment in pediatric bone disorders. When starting in utero, muscle disorders can lead to congenital multiple contractures. Pediatric-onset muscle weakness such as cerebral palsy, Duchenne muscular dystrophy, spinal muscular atrophy, or spina bifida typically are associated with small diameter of long-bone shafts, low density of metaphyseal bone, and increased fracture incidence in the lower extremities, in particular, the distal femur. Primary bone diseases can affect muscles through generic mechanisms, such as decreased physical activity or in disease-specific ways. For example, the collagen defect underlying the bone fragility of osteogenesis imperfecta may also affect muscle force generation or transmission. Transforming growth factor beta released from bone in Camurati Engelman disease may decrease muscle function. Considering muscle-bone interactions does not only contribute to the understanding of musculoskeletal disorders but also can identify new targets for therapeutic interventions.

  2. Recovery from muscle weakness by exercise and FES: lessons from Masters, active or sedentary seniors and SCI patients.

    PubMed

    Carraro, Ugo; Kern, Helmut; Gava, Paolo; Hofer, Christian; Loefler, Stefan; Gargiulo, Paolo; Edmunds, Kyle; Árnadóttir, Íris Dröfn; Zampieri, Sandra; Ravara, Barbara; Gava, Francesco; Nori, Alessandra; Gobbo, Valerio; Masiero, Stefano; Marcante, Andrea; Baba, Alfonc; Piccione, Francesco; Schils, Sheila; Pond, Amber; Mosole, Simone

    2017-08-01

    Many factors contribute to the decline of skeletal muscle that occurs as we age. This is a reality that we may combat, but not prevent because it is written into our genome. The series of records from World Master Athletes reveals that skeletal muscle power begins to decline at the age of 30 years and continues, almost linearly, to zero at the age of 110 years. Here we discuss evidence that denervation contributes to the atrophy and slowness of aged muscle. We compared muscle from lifelong active seniors to that of sedentary elderly people and found that the sportsmen have more muscle bulk and slow fiber type groupings, providing evidence that physical activity maintains slow motoneurons which reinnervate muscle fibers. Further, accelerated muscle atrophy/degeneration occurs with irreversible Conus and Cauda Equina syndrome, a spinal cord injury in which the human leg muscles may be permanently disconnected from the nervous system with complete loss of muscle fibers within 5-8 years. We used histological morphometry and Muscle Color Computed Tomography to evaluate muscle from these peculiar persons and reveal that contraction produced by home-based Functional Electrical Stimulation (h-bFES) recovers muscle size and function which is reversed if h-bFES is discontinued. FES also reverses muscle atrophy in sedentary seniors and modulates mitochondria in horse muscles. All together these observations indicate that FES modifies muscle fibers by increasing contractions per day. Thus, FES should be considered in critical care units, rehabilitation centers and nursing facilities when patients are unable or reluctant to exercise.

  3. Thumb postures and physical loads during mobile phone use - a comparison of young adults with and without musculoskeletal symptoms.

    PubMed

    Gustafsson, Ewa; Johnson, Peter W; Hagberg, Mats

    2010-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate thumb postures, thumb movements and muscle activity when using mobile phones for SMS messaging and to determine whether there were differences in these exposures (a) across various mobile phone tasks, (b) between gender and (c) between subjects with and without musculoskeletal symptoms in shoulders and upper extremities. Fifty-six young adults (15 healthy and 41 with musculoskeletal symptoms) performed a series of distinct tasks on a mobile phone. Muscular load in four forearm/hand muscles in the right arm and the right and left trapezius muscles were measured using electromyography (EMG). Thumb movements were registered using an electrogoniometer. The results showed that postures (sitting or standing) and the type of mobile phone task (holding the phone versus texting) affected muscle activity and thumb positions. Females compared to males had higher muscle activity in the extensor digitorum and the abductor pollicis longus when entering SMS messages and tended to have greater thumb abduction, higher thumb movement velocities and fewer pauses in the thumb movements. Subjects with symptoms had lower muscle activity levels in the abductor pollicis longus and tended to have higher thumb movement velocities and fewer pauses in the thumb movements compared to those without symptoms.

  4. New Device for Intrinsic Hand Muscle Strength Measurement: An Alternative to Strain Gauge Handheld Dynamometer.

    PubMed

    Madhanagopal, Jagannathan; Singh, Om Prakash; Mohan, Vikram; Sathasivam, Kathiresan V; Omar, Abdul Hafidz; Abdul Kadir, Mohammed Rafiq

    2017-01-01

    An accurate measurement of intrinsic hand muscle strength (IHMS) is required by clinicians for effective clinical decision-making, diagnosis of certain diseases, and evaluation of the outcome of treatment. In practice, the clinicians use Intrins-o-meter and Rotterdam Intrinsic Hand Myometer for IHMS measurement. These are quite bulky, expensive, and possess poor interobserver reliability (37-52%) and sensitivity. The purpose of this study was to develop an alternative lightweight, accurate, cost-effective force measurement device with a simple electronic circuit and test its suitability for IHMS measurement. The device was constructed with ketjenblack/deproteinized natural rubber sensor, 1-MΩ potential divider, and Arduino Uno through the custom-written software. Then, the device was calibrated and tested for accuracy and repeatability within the force range of finger muscles (100 N). The 95% limit of agreement in accuracy from -1.95 N to 2.06 N for 10 to 100 N applied load and repeatability coefficient of ±1.91 N or 6.2% was achieved. Furthermore, the expenditure for the device construction was around US$ 53. For a practical demonstration, the device was tested among 16 participants for isometric strength measurement of the ulnar abductor and dorsal interossei. The results revealed that the performance of the device was suitable for IHMS measurement.

  5. Multivariate analysis of variations in intrinsic foot musculature among hominoids.

    PubMed

    Oishi, Motoharu; Ogihara, Naomichi; Shimizu, Daisuke; Kikuchi, Yasuhiro; Endo, Hideki; Une, Yumi; Soeta, Satoshi; Amasaki, Hajime; Ichihara, Nobutsune

    2018-05-01

    Comparative analysis of the foot muscle architecture among extant great apes is important for understanding the evolution of the human foot and, hence, human habitual bipedal walking. However, to our knowledge, there is no previous report of a quantitative comparison of hominoid intrinsic foot muscle dimensions. In the present study, we quantitatively compared muscle dimensions of the hominoid foot by means of multivariate analysis. The foot muscle mass and physiological cross-sectional area (PCSA) of five chimpanzees, one bonobo, two gorillas, and six orangutans were obtained by our own dissections, and those of humans were taken from published accounts. The muscle mass and PCSA were respectively divided by the total mass and total PCSA of the intrinsic muscles of the entire foot for normalization. Variations in muscle architecture among human and extant great apes were quantified based on principal component analysis. Our results demonstrated that the muscle architecture of the orangutan was the most distinctive, having a larger first dorsal interosseous muscle and smaller abductor hallucis brevis muscle. On the other hand, the gorilla was found to be unique in having a larger abductor digiti minimi muscle. Humans were distinguished from extant great apes by a larger quadratus plantae muscle. The chimpanzee and the bonobo appeared to have very similar muscle architecture, with an intermediate position between the human and the orangutan. These differences (or similarities) in architecture of the intrinsic foot muscles among humans and great apes correspond well to the differences in phylogeny, positional behavior, and locomotion. © 2018 Anatomical Society.

  6. Hypophosphatemia promotes lower rates of muscle ATP synthesis.

    PubMed

    Pesta, Dominik H; Tsirigotis, Dimitrios N; Befroy, Douglas E; Caballero, Daniel; Jurczak, Michael J; Rahimi, Yasmeen; Cline, Gary W; Dufour, Sylvie; Birkenfeld, Andreas L; Rothman, Douglas L; Carpenter, Thomas O; Insogna, Karl; Petersen, Kitt Falk; Bergwitz, Clemens; Shulman, Gerald I

    2016-10-01

    Hypophosphatemia can lead to muscle weakness and respiratory and heart failure, but the mechanism is unknown. To address this question, we noninvasively assessed rates of muscle ATP synthesis in hypophosphatemic mice by using in vivo saturation transfer [ 31 P]-magnetic resonance spectroscopy. By using this approach, we found that basal and insulin-stimulated rates of muscle ATP synthetic flux (V ATP ) and plasma inorganic phosphate (P i ) were reduced by 50% in mice with diet-induced hypophosphatemia as well as in sodium-dependent P i transporter solute carrier family 34, member 1 (NaPi2a)-knockout (NaPi2a -/- ) mice compared with their wild-type littermate controls. Rates of V ATP normalized in both hypophosphatemic groups after restoring plasma P i concentrations. Furthermore, V ATP was directly related to cellular and mitochondrial P i uptake in L6 and RC13 rodent myocytes and isolated muscle mitochondria. Similar findings were observed in a patient with chronic hypophosphatemia as a result of a mutation in SLC34A3 who had a 50% reduction in both serum P i content and muscle V ATP After oral P i repletion and normalization of serum P i levels, muscle V ATP completely normalized in the patient. Taken together, these data support the hypothesis that decreased muscle ATP synthesis, in part, may be caused by low blood P i concentrations, which may explain some aspects of muscle weakness observed in patients with hypophosphatemia.-Pesta, D. H., Tsirigotis, D. N., Befroy, D. E., Caballero, D., Jurczak, M. J., Rahimi, Y., Cline, G. W., Dufour, S., Birkenfeld, A. L., Rothman, D. L., Carpenter, T. O., Insogna, K., Petersen, K. F., Bergwitz, C., Shulman, G. I. Hypophosphatemia promotes lower rates of muscle ATP synthesis. © The Author(s).

  7. Hypophosphatemia promotes lower rates of muscle ATP synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Pesta, Dominik H.; Tsirigotis, Dimitrios N.; Befroy, Douglas E.; Caballero, Daniel; Jurczak, Michael J.; Rahimi, Yasmeen; Cline, Gary W.; Dufour, Sylvie; Birkenfeld, Andreas L.; Rothman, Douglas L.; Carpenter, Thomas O.; Insogna, Karl; Petersen, Kitt Falk; Bergwitz, Clemens; Shulman, Gerald I.

    2016-01-01

    Hypophosphatemia can lead to muscle weakness and respiratory and heart failure, but the mechanism is unknown. To address this question, we noninvasively assessed rates of muscle ATP synthesis in hypophosphatemic mice by using in vivo saturation transfer [31P]-magnetic resonance spectroscopy. By using this approach, we found that basal and insulin-stimulated rates of muscle ATP synthetic flux (VATP) and plasma inorganic phosphate (Pi) were reduced by 50% in mice with diet-induced hypophosphatemia as well as in sodium-dependent Pi transporter solute carrier family 34, member 1 (NaPi2a)-knockout (NaPi2a−/−) mice compared with their wild-type littermate controls. Rates of VATP normalized in both hypophosphatemic groups after restoring plasma Pi concentrations. Furthermore, VATP was directly related to cellular and mitochondrial Pi uptake in L6 and RC13 rodent myocytes and isolated muscle mitochondria. Similar findings were observed in a patient with chronic hypophosphatemia as a result of a mutation in SLC34A3 who had a 50% reduction in both serum Pi content and muscle VATP. After oral Pi repletion and normalization of serum Pi levels, muscle VATP completely normalized in the patient. Taken together, these data support the hypothesis that decreased muscle ATP synthesis, in part, may be caused by low blood Pi concentrations, which may explain some aspects of muscle weakness observed in patients with hypophosphatemia.—Pesta, D. H., Tsirigotis, D. N., Befroy, D. E., Caballero, D., Jurczak, M. J., Rahimi, Y., Cline, G. W., Dufour, S., Birkenfeld, A. L., Rothman, D. L., Carpenter, T. O., Insogna, K., Petersen, K. F., Bergwitz, C., Shulman, G. I. Hypophosphatemia promotes lower rates of muscle ATP synthesis. PMID:27338702

  8. Electromyographic and kinetic analysis of two abdominal muscle performance tests.

    PubMed

    Haladay, Douglas E; Denegar, Craig R; Miller, Sayers J; Challis, John

    2015-01-01

    In order to accurately assess the abdominal muscles, clinicians need valid clinical measures. The double leg lowering test (DLLT) and lower abdominal muscle progression (LAMP) are two common tests of abdominal muscle performance. The purposes of this study were to determine the relation between surface electromyographic (EMG) activity during the DLLT and LAMP levels; hip joint resultant moments and DLLT and LAMP levels; and the two measures of DLLT and LAMP. Ten healthy participants were tested under both conditions. Surface EMG activity of the abdominal muscles was obtained, while pelvic movement was detected simultaneously. A moderate to strong association was found between rectus abdominus muscle activity and a moderate association with the external obliques with both test levels. For the internal oblique/transversus abdominus, a moderate and weak association was found with the DLLT and LAMP, respectively. A very strong association existed between the hip resultant joint moments (RJM) and the DLLT, while there was a weak correlation between hip RJM and the LAMP. No significant correlation was found between the DLLT and LAMP grades. This finding suggests that these tests may measure different qualities of muscle performance and provides preliminary support for their use. Further evaluation of these assessments with clinical populations is necessary.

  9. The influence of hip strength on lower-limb, pelvis, and trunk kinematics and coordination patterns during walking and hopping in healthy women.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jo Armour; Popovich, John M; Kulig, Kornelia

    2014-07-01

    Cross-sectional laboratory study. To compare peak lower-limb, pelvis, and trunk kinematics and interjoint and intersegmental coordination in women with strong and weak hip muscle performance. Persons with lower extremity musculoskeletal disorders often demonstrate a combination of weak hip musculature and altered kinematics during weight-bearing dynamic tasks. However, the association between hip strength and kinematics independent of pathology or pain is unclear. Peak hip extensor and abductor torques were measured in 150 healthy young women. Of these, 10 fit the criteria for the strong group and 9 for the weak group, representing those with the strongest and weakest hip musculature, respectively, of the 150 screened individuals. Kinematics of the hip, knee, pelvis, and trunk were measured during the stance phases of walking and rate-controlled hopping. Hip/knee and pelvis/trunk coordination were calculated using the vector coding technique. There were no group differences in peak hip, knee, or pelvis kinematics. Participants in the weak group demonstrated greater trunk lateral bend toward the stance limb during hopping (P = .002, effect size [d] = 1.88). In the transverse plane, those in the weak group utilized less inphase coordination between the hip and the knee during walking (P = .036, d = 1.45) and more antiphase coordination between the hip and knee during hopping (P = .03, d = 1.47). In the absence of pain or pathology, poor hip muscle performance does not affect peak hip or knee joint kinematics in young women, but is associated with significantly different lower-limb and trunk/pelvis coordination during weight-bearing dynamic tasks. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2014;44(7):525-531. Epub 10 May 2014. doi:10.2519/jospt.2014.5028.

  10. Cross-sectional association between muscle strength and self-reported physical function in 195 hip osteoarthritis patients.

    PubMed

    Hall, Michelle; Wrigley, Tim V; Kasza, Jessica; Dobson, Fiona; Pua, Yong Hao; Metcalf, Ben R; Bennell, Kim L

    2017-02-01

    This study aimed to evaluate associations between strength of selected hip and knee muscles and self-reported physical function, and their clinical relevance, in men and women with hip osteoarthritis (OA). Cross-sectional data from 195 participants with symptomatic hip OA were used. Peak isometric torque of hip extensors, flexors, and abductors, and knee extensors were measured, along with physical function using the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index questionnaire. Separate linear regressions in men and women were used to determine the association between strength and physical function accounting for age, pain, and radiographic disease severity. Subsequently, magnitudes of strength associated with estimates of minimal clinically important improvement (MCII) in physical function were estimated according to severity of difficulty with physical function. For men, greater strength of the hip extensors, hip flexors and knee extensors were each associated with better physical function. For women, greater muscle strength of all tested muscles were each associated with better physical function. For men and women, increases in muscle strength between 17-32%, 133-223%, and 151-284% may be associated with estimates of MCII in physical function for those with mild, moderate, and severe physical dysfunction, respectively. Greater isometric strength of specific hip and thigh muscle groups may be associated with better self-reported physical function in men and women. In people with mild physical dysfunction, an estimate of MCII in physical function may be associated with attainable increases in strength. However, in patients with more severe dysfunction, greater and perhaps unattainable strength increases may be associated with an estimate of MCII in physical function. Longitudinal studies are required to validate these observations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Reduced force of diaphragm muscle fibers in patients with chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Manders, Emmy; Bonta, Peter I.; Kloek, Jaap J.; Symersky, Petr; Bogaard, Harm-Jan; Hooijman, Pleuni E.; Jasper, Jeff R.; Malik, Fady I.; Stienen, Ger J. M.; Vonk-Noordegraaf, Anton; de Man, Frances S.

    2016-01-01

    Patients with pulmonary hypertension (PH) suffer from inspiratory muscle weakness. However, the pathophysiology of inspiratory muscle dysfunction in PH is unknown. We hypothesized that weakness of the diaphragm, the main inspiratory muscle, is an important contributor to inspiratory muscle dysfunction in PH patients. Our objective was to combine ex vivo diaphragm muscle fiber contractility measurements with measures of in vivo inspiratory muscle function in chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) patients. To assess diaphragm muscle contractility, function was studied in vivo by maximum inspiratory pressure (MIP) and ex vivo in diaphragm biopsies of the same CTEPH patients (N = 13) obtained during pulmonary endarterectomy. Patients undergoing elective lung surgery served as controls (N = 15). Muscle fiber cross-sectional area (CSA) was determined in cryosections and contractility in permeabilized muscle fibers. Diaphragm muscle fiber CSA was not significantly different between control and CTEPH patients in both slow-twitch and fast-twitch fibers. Maximal force-generating capacity was significantly lower in slow-twitch muscle fibers of CTEPH patients, whereas no difference was observed in fast-twitch muscle fibers. The maximal force of diaphragm muscle fibers correlated significantly with MIP. The calcium sensitivity of force generation was significantly reduced in fast-twitch muscle fibers of CTEPH patients, resulting in a ∼40% reduction of submaximal force generation. The fast skeletal troponin activator CK-2066260 (5 μM) restored submaximal force generation to levels exceeding those observed in control subjects. In conclusion, diaphragm muscle fiber contractility is hampered in CTEPH patients and contributes to the reduced function of the inspiratory muscles in CTEPH patients. PMID:27190061

  12. A human in vitro model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy muscle formation and contractility.

    PubMed

    Nesmith, Alexander P; Wagner, Matthew A; Pasqualini, Francesco S; O'Connor, Blakely B; Pincus, Mark J; August, Paul R; Parker, Kevin Kit

    2016-10-10

    Tongue weakness, like all weakness in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), occurs as a result of contraction-induced muscle damage and deficient muscular repair. Although membrane fragility is known to potentiate injury in DMD, whether muscle stem cells are implicated in deficient muscular repair remains unclear. We hypothesized that DMD myoblasts are less sensitive to cues in the extracellular matrix designed to potentiate structure-function relationships of healthy muscle. To test this hypothesis, we drew inspiration from the tongue and engineered contractile human muscle tissues on thin films. On this platform, DMD myoblasts formed fewer and smaller myotubes and exhibited impaired polarization of the cell nucleus and contractile cytoskeleton when compared with healthy cells. These structural aberrations were reflected in their functional behavior, as engineered tongues from DMD myoblasts failed to achieve the same contractile strength as healthy tongue structures. These data suggest that dystrophic muscle may fail to organize with respect to extracellular cues necessary to potentiate adaptive growth and remodeling. © 2016 Nesmith et al.

  13. Relationship between lower limb muscle strength, self-reported pain and function, and frontal plane gait kinematics in knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Park, Sang-Kyoon; Kobsar, Dylan; Ferber, Reed

    2016-10-01

    The relationship between muscle strength, gait biomechanics, and self-reported physical function and pain for patients with knee osteoarthritis is not well known. The objective of this study was to investigate these relationships in this population. Twenty-four patients with knee osteoarthritis and 24 healthy controls were recruited. Self-reported pain and function, lower-limb maximum isometric force, and frontal plane gait kinematics during treadmill walking were collected on all patients. Between-group differences were assessed for 1) muscle strength and 2) gait biomechanics. Linear regressions were computed within the knee osteoarthritis group to examine the effect of muscle strength on 1) self-reported pain and function, and 2) gait kinematics. Patients with knee osteoarthritis exhibited reduced hip external rotator, knee extensor, and ankle inversion muscle force output compared with healthy controls, as well as increased peak knee adduction angles (effect size=0.770; p=0.013). Hip abductor strength was a significant predictor of function, but not after controlling for covariates. Ankle inversion, hip abduction, and knee flexion strength were significant predictors of peak pelvic drop angle after controlling for covariates (34.4% unique variance explained). Patients with knee osteoarthritis exhibit deficits in muscle strength and while they play an important role in the self-reported function of patients with knee osteoarthritis, the effect of covariates such as sex, age, mass, and height was more important in this relationship. Similar relationships were observed from gait variables, except for peak pelvic drop, where hip, knee, and ankle strength remained important predictors of this variable after controlling for covariates. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. [A 65-year-old woman with dysarthria, dysphagia, weakness, and gait disturbance].

    PubMed

    Imai, H; Furukawa, Y; Sumino, S; Mori, H; Ueda, G; Shirai, T; Kondo, T; Mizuno, Y

    1995-04-01

    We report a 65-year-old woman with progressive dysarthria, dysphagia, weakness, and gait disturbance. The patient was well until 59 years of age (January of 1986) when she noted bilateral ptosis. One year later, she noted a gradual onset of difficulty in speech (articulation). Her speech slowly deteriorated and she noted weakness in chewing power and difficulty in swallowing in addition. In October 1987, she developed emotional incontinence. In January of 1988, she started to drag her left foot. She was admitted to our hospital on June 13 of 1988. On admission, she was alert and general physical examination was unremarkable. Neurologic examination revealed no dementia; her higher cerebral functions appeared intact. Ptosis was present bilaterally more on the right. She showed difficulty in opening her eyes on command; no contraction of the frontal muscles was seen upon attempted eye opening. There was a moderate limitation in the vertical gaze. Forced laughing and crying were seen. Facial muscles were moderately weak without apparent atrophy. The movement of the soft palate was very weak, and swallowing disturbance was more prominent for liquid staff. The tongue appeared somewhat small, however, no fasciculation was noted. Her step was small and the posture was stooped. Retropulsion was present, however, Romberg's sign was absent. No muscle atrophy was apparent, however, diffuse mile to moderate muscle weakness was noted in all four limbs. Cerebellar sign was absent. Deep tendon reflexes were exaggerated bilaterally, and Babinski sign was present on the left side. Sensation was intact. Routine blood tests were unremarkable as was a cranial CT scan. Her ptosis did not improve after 10 mg of edrophonium injection. CSF was also normal. She was transferred to another hospital but her neurological disabilities further progressed. In 1989, she was totally unable to move her limbs; she could only move her eyes; still consciousness was clear without dementia. She developed

  15. Poor physical function in elderly women in low-level aged care is related to muscle strength rather than to measures of sarcopenia

    PubMed Central

    Woods, Julie L; Iuliano-Burns, Sandra; King, Susannah J; Strauss, Boyd J; Walker, Karen Z

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the prevalence of sarcopenia and investigate relationships among body composition, muscle strength, and physical function in elderly women in low-level aged care. Subjects and methods: Sixty-three ambulatory women (mean age 86 years) participated in this cross-sectional study where body composition was determined by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA); ankle, knee, and hip strength by the Nicholas Manual Muscle Tester; and physical function by ‘timed up and go’ (TUG) and walking speed (WS) over 6 meters. Body composition data from a female reference group (n = 62, mean age 29 years) provided cut-off values for defining sarcopenia. Results: Elderly women had higher body mass index (P < 0.001), lower lean mass (P < 0.001), and higher fat mass (P < 0.01) than the young reference group. Only a small proportion (3.2%) had absolute sarcopenia (defined by appendicular skeletal muscle mass/height squared) whereas 37% had relative sarcopenia class II (defined by percentage skeletal muscle mass). Scores for TUG and WS indicated relatively poor physical function, yet these measures were not associated with muscle mass or indices of sarcopenia. In multivariate analysis, only hip abductor strength predicted both TUG and WS (both P = 0.01). Conclusion: Hip strength is a more important indicator of physical functioning than lean mass. Measurement of hip strength may therefore be a useful screening tool to detect those at risk of functional decline and requirement for additional care. Further longitudinal studies with a range of other strength measures are warranted. PMID:21472094

  16. A hip abduction exercise prior to prolonged standing increased movement while reducing cocontraction and low back pain perception in those initially reporting low back pain.

    PubMed

    Viggiani, Daniel; Callaghan, Jack P

    2016-12-01

    Persons who develop low back pain from prolonged standing exhibit increased muscle cocontraction, decreased movement and increased spine extension. However, it is unclear how these factors relate to pain development. The purpose of this study was to use hip abductor fatigue to manipulate muscle activity patterns and determine its effects on standing behaviours and pain development. Forty participants stood for two hours twice, once following a hip abductor fatigue exercise (fatigue), and once without exercise beforehand (control). Trunk and gluteal muscle activity were measured to determine cocontraction. Lumbo-pelvic angles and force plates were used to assess posture and movement strategies. Visual analog scales differentiated pain (PDs) and non-pain developers (NPDs). PDs reported less low back pain during the fatigue session, with females having earlier reductions of similar scale than males. The fatigue session reduced gluteal and trunk cocontraction and increased centre of pressure movement; male and female PDs had opposing spine posture compensations. Muscle fatigue prior to standing reduced cocontraction, increased movement during standing and reduced the low back pain developed by PDs; the timing of pain reductions depended on spine postures adopted during standing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Muscle stem cell dysfunction impairs muscle regeneration in a mouse model of Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pawlikowski, Bradley; Betta, Nicole Dalla; Elston, Tiffany; Williams, Darian A; Olwin, Bradley B

    2018-03-09

    Down syndrome, caused by trisomy 21, is characterized by a variety of medical conditions including intellectual impairments, cardiovascular defects, blood cell disorders and pre-mature aging phenotypes. Several somatic stem cell populations are dysfunctional in Down syndrome and their deficiencies may contribute to multiple Down syndrome phenotypes. Down syndrome is associated with muscle weakness but skeletal muscle stem cells or satellite cells in Down syndrome have not been investigated. We find that a failure in satellite cell expansion impairs muscle regeneration in the Ts65Dn mouse model of Down syndrome. Ts65Dn satellite cells accumulate DNA damage and over express Usp16, a histone de-ubiquitinating enzyme that regulates the DNA damage response. Impairment of satellite cell function, which further declines as Ts65Dn mice age, underscores stem cell deficiencies as an important contributor to Down syndrome pathologies.

  18. Closed kinetic chain exercises with or without additional hip strengthening exercises in management of patellofemoral pain syndrome: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Ismail, M M; Gamaleldein, M H; Hassa, K A

    2013-10-01

    Patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS) is a common musculoskeletal pain condition, especially in females. Decreased hip muscle strength has been implicated as a contributing factor. Isolated open kinetic chain hip abductors and lateral rotators exercises were added by many authors to the rehabilitation program. However, Closed Kinetic Chain (CKC) exercises focusing on hip and knee muscles were not investigated if they can produce similar effect of hip strengthening and decreasing pain without the need of isolated exercises for hip musculature. The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of a CKC exercises program with or without additional hip strengthening exercises on pain and hip abductors and lateral rotators peak torque. Prospective randomized clinical trial. Patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome referred to the outpatient physical therapy clinic of the faculty of physical therapy, cairo university. Thirty two patients who had patellofemoral pain syndrome with age ranged from eighteen to thirty years. Patients were randomly assigned into two groups: CKC group and CKC with hip muscles strengthening exercises as a control (CO) group. Treatment was given 3 times/week, for 6 weeks. Patients were evaluated pre- and post-treatment for their pain severity using VAS, function of knee joint using Kujala questionnaire, hip abductors and external rotators concentric/eccentric peak torque. There were significant improvements in pain, function and hip muscles peak torque in both groups (P<0.05). However, there was no statistically significant difference between groups in hip muscles torque (P<0.05) but pain and function improvements were significantly greater in the CO group (P<0.05). Six weeks CKC program focusing on knee and hip strengthening has similar effect in improving hip muscles torque in patients with PFPS as a CKC exercises with additional hip strengthening exercises. However, adding isolated hip strengthening exercises has the advantage of more

  19. Modified Mostardi approach with ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene tape for total hip arthroplasty provides a good rate of union of osteotomized fragments.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Yutaka; Akiyama, Haruhiko; Nankaku, Manabu; So, Kazutaka; Matsuda, Shuichi

    2015-07-01

    A lateral approach is common in total hip arthroplasty because of the good exposure it provides and its low complication rates. However, a drawback of the procedure is that the abductor mechanism is damaged when the tendinous insertion of the abductor muscle is split. Here, we describe a wafer technique using ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene tape for promising reattachment of the abductor mechanism. We retrospectively evaluated 120 consecutive primary total hip arthroplasties performed using a modified Mostardi approach, which involved reattaching the trochanter using either a braided polyester suture (polyester suture group, n = 60) or ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene tape (UHMWPE tape group, n = 60). The osteotomized fragment was reattached by inducing bone-to-bone contact using 3-mm-wide tapes that were precisely tied with a double-loop sliding knot in conjunction with a cable gun tensioner. The abductor strength and radiographic union rate were postoperatively assessed at 4 weeks and 6 months, respectively. A statistically significant lower incidence of nonunion and cutout was observed in the UHMWPE group (0 and 5.0 %, respectively) compared to the polyester suture group (8.3 and 15 %, respectively). No differences in abductor strength either preoperatively or at 4 weeks postoperatively were observed between the groups. In radiographically healed patients, abductor strength at 4 weeks post-surgery exceeded preoperative strength. The recovery rate of hip abductor strength was 109.9 ± 34.3 % in union patients and 92.9 ± 23.3 % in nonunion patients, which was statistically significant. The mean Japanese Orthopedic Association hip scores improved from 48.6 to 86.8 in union patients and from 50.3 to 85.9 in nonunion patients at 1 year postoperatively; however, this difference was not significant. The modified Mostardi approach using ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene tape can promote successful union of the osteotomized fragment.

  20. Low back and lower-limb muscle performance in male and female recreational runners with chronic low back pain.

    PubMed

    Cai, Congcong; Kong, Pui W

    2015-06-01

    Controlled laboratory study, cross-sectional. To compare lumbar extensor muscle fatigability, lumbar stabilizing muscle activation, and lower-limb strength between male and female runners with chronic low back pain (LBP) and healthy runners. Little is known about muscle performance in runners with chronic LBP. Eighteen recreational runners with chronic LBP (9 men, 9 women; mean age, 27.8 years) and 18 healthy recreational runners (9 men, 9 women; mean age, 24.6 years) were recruited. The median frequency slopes for bilateral iliocostalis and longissimus were calculated from electromyographic signals captured during a 2-minute Sorensen test. The thickness changes of the transversus abdominis and lumbar multifidus between resting and contraction were measured using an ultrasound scanner. Peak concentric torques of the bilateral hip extensors, hip abductors, and knee extensors were measured using an isokinetic dynamometer at 60°/s. The average values for both sides were used for statistical analysis. When averaged across sexes, peak knee extensor torque was 12.2% lower in the LBP group compared to the healthy group (mean difference, 0.29 Nm/kg; 95% confidence interval: 0.06, 0.53; P = .016). Male runners with chronic LBP exhibited smaller lumbar multifidus thickness changes compared to healthy male runners (mean difference, 0.13 cm; 95% confidence interval: 0.01, 0.25; P = .033). No other group differences were observed. Runners with chronic LBP exhibited diminished knee extensor strength compared to healthy runners. Male runners with chronic LBP demonstrated additional deficits in lumbar multifidus activation.

  1. [Adverse muscle effects of a podofyllotoxin-containing cytotoxic drug product with simvastatin].

    PubMed

    Kaipiainen-Seppänen, Oili; Savolainen, Elina; Elfving, Pia; Kononoff, Aulikki

    2009-01-01

    With the ageing population, drug interactions pose an increasing challenge to health professionals. We describe four patients, for whom concurrent administration of a podofyllotoxin-containing cytotoxic drug product and simvastatin caused severe adverse effects on muscles, including muscle pain, soreness or fatigue or weakness, and in some patients also disintegration of muscle tissue, i.e. rhabdomyolysis. The metabolism of both drugs proceeds via the common CYP3A4 enzyme pathway.

  2. Impact of Spinal Manipulation on Cortical Drive to Upper and Lower Limb Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Haavik, Heidi; Niazi, Imran Khan; Jochumsen, Mads; Sherwin, Diane; Flavel, Stanley; Türker, Kemal S.

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates whether spinal manipulation leads to changes in motor control by measuring the recruitment pattern of motor units in both an upper and lower limb muscle and to see whether such changes may at least in part occur at the cortical level by recording movement related cortical potential (MRCP) amplitudes. In experiment one, transcranial magnetic stimulation input–output (TMS I/O) curves for an upper limb muscle (abductor pollicus brevis; APB) were recorded, along with F waves before and after either spinal manipulation or a control intervention for the same subjects on two different days. During two separate days, lower limb TMS I/O curves and MRCPs were recorded from tibialis anterior muscle (TA) pre and post spinal manipulation. Dependent measures were compared with repeated measures analysis of variance, with p set at 0.05. Spinal manipulation resulted in a 54.5% ± 93.1% increase in maximum motor evoked potential (MEPmax) for APB and a 44.6% ± 69.6% increase in MEPmax for TA. For the MRCP data following spinal manipulation there were significant difference for amplitude of early bereitschafts-potential (EBP), late bereitschafts potential (LBP) and also for peak negativity (PN). The results of this study show that spinal manipulation leads to changes in cortical excitability, as measured by significantly larger MEPmax for TMS induced input–output curves for both an upper and lower limb muscle, and with larger amplitudes of MRCP component post manipulation. No changes in spinal measures (i.e., F wave amplitudes or persistence) were observed, and no changes were shown following the control condition. These results are consistent with previous findings that have suggested increases in strength following spinal manipulation were due to descending cortical drive and could not be explained by changes at the level of the spinal cord. Spinal manipulation may therefore be indicated for the patients who have lost tonus of their muscle and/or are

  3. The Ca2+ sensitizer CK‐2066260 increases myofibrillar Ca2+ sensitivity and submaximal force selectively in fast skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Arthur J.; Hartman, James J.; Hinken, Aaron C.; Lee, Ken; Durham, Nickie; Russell, Alan J.; Malik, Fady I.; Westerblad, Håkan; Jasper, Jeffrey R.

    2017-01-01

    Key points We report that the small molecule CK‐2066260 selectively slows the off‐rate of Ca2 + from fast skeletal muscle troponin, leading to increased myofibrillar Ca2 + sensitivity in fast skeletal muscle.Rodents dosed with CK‐2066260 show increased hindlimb muscle force and power in response to submaximal rates of nerve stimulation in situ.CK‐2066260 has no effect on free cytosolic [Ca2 +] during contractions of isolated muscle fibres.We conclude that fast skeletal muscle troponin sensitizers constitute a potential therapy to address an unmet need of improving muscle function in conditions of weakness and premature muscle fatigue. Abstract Skeletal muscle dysfunction occurs in many diseases and can lead to muscle weakness and premature muscle fatigue. Here we show that the fast skeletal troponin activator, CK‐2066260, counteracts muscle weakness by increasing troponin Ca2+ affinity, thereby increasing myofibrillar Ca2+ sensitivity. Exposure to CK‐2066260 resulted in a concentration‐dependent increase in the Ca2+ sensitivity of ATPase activity in isolated myofibrils and reconstituted hybrid sarcomeres containing fast skeletal muscle troponin C. Stopped‐flow experiments revealed a ∼2.7‐fold decrease in the Ca2+ off‐rate of isolated troponin complexes in the presence of CK‐2066260 (6 vs. 17 s−1 under control conditions). Isolated mouse flexor digitorum brevis fibres showed a rapidly developing, reversible and concentration‐dependent force increase at submaximal stimulation frequencies. This force increase was not accompanied by any changes in the free cytosolic [Ca2+] or its kinetics. CK‐2066260 induced a slowing of relaxation, which was markedly larger at 26°C than at 31°C and could be linked to the decreased Ca2+ off‐rate of troponin C. Rats dosed with CK‐2066260 showed increased hindlimb isometric and isokinetic force in response to submaximal rates of nerve stimulation in situ producing significantly higher absolute forces

  4. Ethanol Exposure Causes Muscle Degeneration in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Coffey, Elizabeth C.; Pasquarella, Maggie E.; Goody, Michelle F.

    2018-01-01

    Alcoholic myopathies are characterized by neuromusculoskeletal symptoms such as compromised movement and weakness. Although these symptoms have been attributed to neurological damage, EtOH may also target skeletal muscle. EtOH exposure during zebrafish primary muscle development or adulthood results in smaller muscle fibers. However, the effects of EtOH exposure on skeletal muscle during the growth period that follows primary muscle development are not well understood. We determined the effects of EtOH exposure on muscle during this phase of development. Strikingly, muscle fibers at this stage are acutely sensitive to EtOH treatment: EtOH induces muscle degeneration. The severity of EtOH-induced muscle damage varies but muscle becomes more refractory to EtOH as muscle develops. NF-kB induction in muscle indicates that EtOH triggers a pro-inflammatory response. EtOH-induced muscle damage is p53-independent. Uptake of Evans blue dye shows that EtOH treatment causes sarcolemmal instability before muscle fiber detachment. Dystrophin-null sapje mutant zebrafish also exhibit sarcolemmal instability. We tested whether Trichostatin A (TSA), which reduces muscle degeneration in sapje mutants, would affect EtOH-treated zebrafish. We found that TSA and EtOH are a lethal combination. EtOH does, however, exacerbate muscle degeneration in sapje mutants. EtOH also disrupts adhesion of muscle fibers to their extracellular matrix at the myotendinous junction: some detached muscle fibers retain beta-Dystroglycan indicating failure of muscle end attachments. Overexpression of Paxillin, which reduces muscle degeneration in zebrafish deficient for beta-Dystroglycan, is not sufficient to rescue degeneration. Taken together, our results suggest that EtOH exposure has pleiotropic deleterious effects on skeletal muscle. PMID:29615556

  5. A prospective pilot study measuring muscle volumetric change in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Thomas M; Burness, Christine; Connolly, Daniel J; Rao, D Ganesh; Hoggard, Nigel; Mawson, Susan; McDermott, Christopher J; Wilkinson, Iain D; Shaw, Pamela J

    2013-09-01

    Our objective was to investigate the potential of muscle volume, measured with magnetic resonance (MR), as a biomarker to quantify disease progression in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). In this longitudinal pilot study, we first sought to determine the stability of volumetric muscle MR measurements in 11 control subjects at two time-points. We assessed feasibility of detecting atrophy in four patients with ALS, followed at three-month intervals for 12 months. Muscle power and MR volume were measured in thenar eminence (TEm), first dorsal interosseous (1DIO), tibialis anterior (TA) and tongue. Changes over time were assessed using linear regression models and t-tests. Results demonstrated that, in controls, no volumetric MR changes were seen (mean volume variation in all muscles < 5%, p > 0.1). In patients, between-subject heterogeneity was identified. Trends for volume loss were found in TEm (mean, - 26.84%, p = 0.056) and TA (- 8.29%, p = 0.077), but not in 1DIO (- 18.47%, p = 0.121) or tongue (< 5%, p = 0.367). In conclusion, volumetric muscle MR appears a stable measure in controls, and progressive volume loss was demonstrable in individuals with ALS in whom clinical weakness progressed. In this small study, subclinical atrophy was not demonstrable using muscle MR. Clinico-radiological discordance between muscle weakness and MR atrophy could reflect a contribution of upper motor neuron pathology.

  6. Agreement and Predictive Validity Using Less Conservative FNIH Sarcopenia Project Weakness Cutpoints

    PubMed Central

    Shaffer, Nancy Chiles; Ferrucci, Luigi; Shardell, Michelle; Simonsick, Eleanor M.; Studenski, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The FNIH Sarcopenia Project derived conservative definitions for weakness and low lean mass, resulting in low prevalence and low agreement with prior definitions. The FNIH Project also estimated a less conservative cutpoint for low grip strength, potentially yielding a cutpoint for low lean mass more consistent with the European Working Group on Sarcopenia in Older People (EWGSOP). We derived lean mass cutpoints based on the less conservative cutpoint for grip strength (WeakI), and assessed agreement with EWGSOP and prediction of incident slow walking and mortality. DESIGN, SETTING, PARTICIPANTS, MEASUREMENTS Longitudinal analysis of 287 men and 258 women from the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging aged >65 years, with 2–10 years followup. Weakness was determined via hand dynamometer, appendicular lean mass (ALM) via DEXA, and slow walking by 6m usual pace walk <0.8m/s. Analyses used classification and regression tree analysis, Cohen’s Kappa, and Cox models. RESULTS Cutpoints derived from WeakI for ALM (ALMI) and ALM adjusted for body mass index (ALM/BMII) were (ALMI) <21.4kg (men) and <14.1kg (women); and (ALM/BMII) <0.725 (men) and <0.591 (women). Kappas with EWGSOP were (ALMI); 0.65 (men) and 0.75 (women) and ALM/BMII; 0.34 (men) and 0.47 (women). In men, the hazard ratio for incident slow walking by WeakI + ALMI was 2.44 (95% CI:1.02–5.82) versus 2.91 (95% CI:1.11–7.62) by EWGSOP. Neither approach predicted incident slow walking in women. CONCLUSION The ALMI cutpoints agree with EWGSOP and predict slow walking in men. Future studies should explore sex differences in the relationship between body composition and physical function and the impact of change in muscle mass on muscle strength and physical function. PMID:28024092

  7. The effects of muscle hypotonia and weakness on balance: a study on Prader-Willi and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome patients.

    PubMed

    Galli, Manuela; Cimolin, Veronica; Vismara, Luca; Grugni, Graziano; Camerota, Filippo; Celletti, Claudia; Albertini, Giorgio; Rigoldi, Chiara; Capodaglio, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) are two different genetical disorders both characterized, among other features, by muscular hypotonia. Postural control seems to be impaired in both conditions. The aim of the present study was to quantitatively compare postural control in adult PWS and EDS using stabilometric platform to unveil possible common determinants of impaired balance. We enrolled 11 PWS and 21 EDS adult patients and 20 age-matched controls. They were instructed to maintain an upright standing position for 30s with open eyes (OEs) focusing on a 6 cm black circle positioned at a distance of 1.5m. Both PWS and EDS patients were characterized by higher RANGEML, RANGEAP and trajectory length of CoP values as compared to CG. No statistically differences were found between PWS and EDS in terms of any of these parameters. The results demonstrated that both PWS and EDS are characterized by a severe postural instability. Muscle hypotonia and weakness may account for reduced balance capacity. Quantitative characterization of instability is important to identify, develop and enhance rehabilitation interventions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Joint proprioception, muscle strength, and functional ability in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee.

    PubMed

    van der Esch, M; Steultjens, M; Harlaar, J; Knol, D; Lems, W; Dekker, J

    2007-06-15

    To test the hypotheses that poor knee joint proprioception is related to limitations in functional ability, and poor proprioception aggravates the impact of muscle weakness on limitations in functional ability in osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee. Sixty-three patients with symptomatic OA of the knee were tested. Proprioceptive acuity was assessed by establishing the joint motion detection threshold (JMDT) in the anteroposterior direction. Muscle strength was measured using a computer-driven isokinetic dynamometer. Functional ability was assessed by the 100-meter walking test, the Get Up and Go (GUG) test, and the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index physical function (WOMAC-PF) questionnaire. Correlation analyses were performed to assess the relationship between proprioception, muscle strength, and functional ability. Regression analyses were performed to assess the impact of proprioception on the relationship between muscle strength and functional ability. Poor proprioception (high JMDT) was related to more limitation in functional ability (walking time r = 0.30, P < 0.05; GUG time r = 0.30, P < 0.05; WOMAC-PF r = 0.26, P <0.05). In regression analyses, the interaction between proprioception and muscle strength was significantly related to functional ability (walking time, P < 0.001 and GUG time, P < 0.001) but not to WOMAC-PF score (P = 0.625). In patients with poor proprioception, reduction of muscle strength was associated with more severe deterioration of functional ability than in patients with accurate proprioception. Patients with poor proprioception show more limitation in functional ability, but this relationship is rather weak. In patients with poor proprioception, muscle weakness has a stronger impact on limitations in functional ability than in patients with accurate proprioception.

  9. Reliability of new software in measuring cervical multifidus diameters and shoulder muscle strength in a synchronized way; an ultrasonographic study

    PubMed Central

    Rahnama, Leila; Rezasoltani, Asghar; Khalkhali-Zavieh, Minoo; Rahnama, Behnam; Noori-Kochi, Farhang

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study was conducted with the purpose of evaluating the inter-session reliability of new software to measure the diameters of the cervical multifidus muscle (CMM), both at rest and during isometric contractions of the shoulder abductors in subjects with neck pain and in healthy individuals. METHOD: In the present study, the reliability of measuring the diameters of the CMM with the Sonosynch software was evaluated by using 24 participants, including 12 subjects with chronic neck pain and 12 healthy individuals. The anterior-posterior diameter (APD) and the lateral diameter (LD) of the CMM were measured in a resting state and then repeated during isometric contraction of the shoulder abductors. Measurements were taken on separate occasions 3 to 7 days apart in order to determine inter-session reliability. Intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), standard error of measurement (SEM), and smallest detectable difference (SDD) were used to evaluate the relative and absolute reliability, respectively. RESULTS: The Sonosynch software has shown to be highly reliable in measuring the diameters of the CMM both in healthy subjects and in those with neck pain. The ICCs 95% CI for APD ranged from 0.84 to 0.94 in subjects with neck pain and from 0.86 to 0.94 in healthy subjects. For LD, the ICC 95% CI ranged from 0.64 to 0.95 in subjects with neck pain and from 0.82 to 0.92 in healthy subjects. CONCLUSIONS: Ultrasonographic measurement of the diameters of the CMM using Sonosynch has proved to be reliable especially for APD in healthy subjects as well as subjects with neck pain. PMID:26443975

  10. Amplification of proinflammatory phenotype, damage, and weakness by oxidative stress in the diaphragm muscle of mdx mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong-Hee; Lawler, John M

    2012-05-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a common and devastating type of childhood-onset muscular dystrophy, attributed to an X-linked defect in the gene that encodes dystrophin. Myopathy with DMD is most pronounced in the diaphragm muscle and fast-twitch limb muscles and is dependent upon susceptibility to damage, inflammatory cell infiltration, and proinflammatory signaling (nuclear factor-κB; NF-κB). Although recent papers have reawakened the notion that oxidative stress links inflammatory signaling with pathology in DMD in limb muscle, the importance of redox mechanisms had been clouded by inconsistent results from indirect scavenger approaches, including in the diaphragm muscle. Therefore, we used a novel catalytic mimetic of superoxide dismutase and catalase (EUK-134) as a direct scavenger of oxidative stress in myopathy in the diaphragm of the mdx mouse model. EUK-134 reduced 4-hydroxynonenal and total hydroperoxides, markers of oxidative stress in the mdx diaphragm. EUK-134 also attenuated positive staining of macrophages and T-cells as well as activation of NF-κB and p65 protein abundance. Moreover, EUK-134 ameliorated markers of muscle damage including internalized nuclei, variability of cross-sectional area, and type IIc fibers. Finally, impairment of contractile force was partially rescued by EUK-134 in the diaphragm of mdx mice. We conclude that oxidative stress amplifies DMD pathology in the diaphragm muscle. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Quadriceps muscle strength and voluntary activation after polio.

    PubMed

    Beelen, Anita; Nollet, Frans; de Visser, Marianne; de Jong, Bareld A; Lankhorst, Gustaaf J; Sargeant, Anthony J

    2003-08-01

    Quadriceps strength, maximal anatomical cross-sectional area (CSA), maximal voluntary activation (MVA), and maximal relaxation rate (MRR) were studied in 48 subjects with a past history of polio, 26 with and 22 without postpoliomyelitis syndrome (PPS), and in 13 control subjects. It was also investigated whether, apart from CSA, MVA and MRR were determinants of muscle strength. Polio subjects had significantly less strength, CSA, and MRR in the more-affected quadriceps than control subjects. MVA was reduced in 18 polio subjects and normal in all controls. PPS subjects differed from non-PPS subjects only in that the MVA of the more-affected quadriceps was significantly lower. Both CSA and MVA were found to be associated with muscle strength. Quadriceps strength in polio subjects was dependent not only on muscle mass, but also on the ability to activate the muscles. Since impaired activation was more pronounced in PPS subjects, the new muscle weakness and functional decline in PPS may be due not only to a gradual loss of muscle fibers, but also to an increasing inability to activate the muscles.

  12. Ultrasound evaluation of intrinsic plantar muscles and fascia in hallux valgus

    PubMed Central

    Lobo, César Calvo; Marín, Alejandro Garrido; Sanz, David Rodríguez; López, Daniel López; López, Patricia Palomo; Morales, Carlos Romero; Corbalán, Irene Sanz

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A cross-sectional area (CSA) and thickness reduction of the abductor hallucis (AbH) is shown in subjects with hallux valgus (HV). To date, other soft-tissue structures have not been researched in relation with HV. The aim of this study was to compare the CSA and thickness of the intrinsic plantar muscles and fascia (PF) between feet with and without HV. Therefore, a cross-sectional and case-control study was performed using B-mode with an iU22 Philips ultrasound system and a 5 to 17-MHz transducer. The CSA and thickness were measured for the AbH, flexor digitorum brevis (FDB) and flexor hallucis brevis (FHB), and also the thickness for the anterior, middle, and posterior PF portions. A convenience sample of 40 feet, 20 with HV and 20 without HV, was recruited from a clinical and research center. A multivariate regression analysis using linear regression was performed to evaluate the ultrasound imaging measurements (α = 0.05). Consequently, statistically significant differences were observed between the groups (P < 0.05) for the AbH and FHB thickness, and CSA reduction, and also the plantar fascia thickness increase in favor of the HV group. On the contrary, the FDB thickness and CSA did not show statistically significant differences (P ≥ 0.05). In conclusion, the CSA and thickness of the AbH and FHB intrinsic plantar muscles are reduced, whereas the thickness of the anterior, middle, and posterior PF portions are increased, in subjects with HV compared with those without HV. PMID:27828846

  13. Hominin Hip Biomechanics: Changing Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Warrener, Anna G

    2017-05-01

    The shape of the human pelvis reflects the unique demands placed on the hip abductor muscles (gluteus medius and gluteus minimus), which stabilize the body in the frontal plane during bipedal locomotion. This morphological shift occurred early in hominin evolution, yet important shape differences between hominin species have led to significant disagreement about abductor function and locomotor capability in these extinct taxa. A static biomechanical model that relies on a close association between skeletal measurements of the pelvis and femur has traditionally been used to reconstruct hip biomechanics in these species. However, experimental biomechanical approaches have highlighted the dynamic nature of mediolateral balance in walking and running, challenging the assumptions of the static hip model. This article reviews traditional approaches for understanding hip abductor function, shows how they have been applied to the fossil hominin record, and discusses new techniques that integrate the dynamic nature of mediolateral balance during human locomotion. Anat Rec, 300:932-945, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Weaker lower extremity muscle strength predicts traumatic knee injury in youth female but not male athletes.

    PubMed

    Ryman Augustsson, Sofia; Ageberg, Eva

    2017-01-01

    The role of lower extremity (LE) muscle strength for predicting traumatic knee injury in youth athletes is largely unknown. The aim was to investigate the influence of LE muscle strength on traumatic knee injury in youth female and male athletes. 225 athletes (40% females) from sport senior high schools in Sweden were included in this case-control study. The athletes recorded any traumatic knee injury that had occurred during their high-school period in a web-based injury form. A one repetition maximum (1RM) barbell squat test was used to measure LE muscle strength. The 1RM was dichotomised to analyse 'weak' versus 'strong' athletes according to the median (weak median vs strong median ). 63 traumatic knee injuries, including 18 ACL injuries, were registered. The majority of injured female athletes were in the weak group compared with the strong group (p=0.0001). The odds of sustaining a traumatic knee injury and an ACL injury was 9.5 times higher and 7 times higher, respectively, in the weak median group compared with the strong median group in females (p ≤0.011). A relative 1RM squat ≤1.05 kg (105% of bodyweight) was established as the best cut-off value to distinguish high versus low risk of injury in female athletes. No strength-injury relationships were observed for the male athletes (p ≥0.348). Weaker LE muscle strength predicted traumatic knee injury in youth female athletes, but not in males. This suggests that LE muscle strength should be included in injury screening in youth female athletes.

  15. Clinical outcomes and frontal plane two-dimensional biomechanics during the 30-second single leg stance test in patients before and after hip abductor tendon reconstructive surgery.

    PubMed

    Huxtable, Rose E; Ackland, Timothy R; Janes, Gregory C; Ebert, Jay R

    2017-07-01

    Hip abductor tendon tears are a common cause of Greater Trochanteric Pain Syndrome. Conservative treatments are often ineffective and surgical reconstruction may be recommended. This study investigated the improvement in clinical outcomes and frontal plane two-dimensional biomechanics during a 30-second single leg stance test, in patients undergoing reconstruction. We hypothesized that clinical scores and pertinent biomechanical variables would significantly improve post-surgery, and these outcomes would be significantly correlated. Twenty-one patients with symptomatic tendon tears underwent reconstruction. Patients were evaluated pre-surgery, and at 6 and 12months post-surgery, using patient-reported outcome measures, assessment of hip abductor strength and six-minute walk capacity. Frontal plane, two-dimensional, biomechanical variables including pelvis-on-femur angle, pelvic drop, trunk lean and lateral pelvic shift, were evaluated throughout a 30-second single leg stance test. ANOVA evaluated outcomes over time, while Pearson's correlations investigated associations between clinical scores, pain, functional and biomechanical outcome variables. While clinical and functional measures significantly improved (P<0.05) over time, no significant group differences (P>0.05) were observed in biomechanical variables from pre- to post-surgery. While five patients displayed a positive Trendelenburg sign pre-surgery, only one was positive post-surgery. Clinical outcomes and biomechanical variables during the single leg stance test were not correlated. Despite improvements in clinical and functional measures over time, biomechanical changes during a weight bearing single leg stance test were not significantly different following tendon repair. Follow up beyond 12months may be required, whereby symptomatic relief may precede functional and biomechanical improvement. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Acute effects of muscle vibration on sensorimotor integration.

    PubMed

    Lapole, Thomas; Tindel, Jérémy

    2015-02-05

    Projections from the somesthetic cortex are believed to be involved in the modulation of motor cortical excitability by muscle vibration. The aim of the present pilot study was to analyse the effects of a vibration intervention on short-latency afferent inhibition (SAI), long-latency afferent inhibition (LAI), and afferent facilitation (AF), three intracortical mechanisms reflecting sensorimotor integration. Abductor pollicis brevis (APB) SAI, AF and LAI were investigated on 10 subjects by conditioning test transcranial magnetic stimulation pulses with median nerve electrical stimulation at inter-stimuli intervals in the range 15-25 ms, 25-60 ms, and 100-200 ms, respectively. Test motor evoked potentials (MEPs) were compared to unconditioned MEPs. Measurements were performed before and just after 15 min of vibration applied to the muscle belly of APB at a frequency of 80 Hz. SAI and LAI responses were significantly reduced compared to unconditioned test MEPs (P=0.039 and P<0.001, respectively). AF MEP amplitude was greater than SAI and LAI one (P=0.009 and P=0.004, respectively), but not different from test MEP (P=0.511). There was no significant main effect of vibration (P=0.905). However, 4 subjects were clearly identified as responders. Their mean vibration-induced increase was 324 ± 195% in APB SAI MEP amplitude, and 158 ± 53% and 319 ± 80% in AF and LAI, respectively. Significant differences in SAI, AF and LAI vibration-induced changes were found for responders when compared to non-responders (P=0.019, P=0.038, and P=0.01, respectively). A single session of APB vibration may increase sensorimotor integration, via decreased inhibition and increased facilitation. However, such results were not observed for all subjects, suggesting that other factors (such as attention to the sensory inputs) may have played a role. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. A REVIEW OF ELECTRICAL STIMULATION AND ITS EFFECT ON LINGUAL, LABIAL AND BUCCAL MUSCLE STRENGTH.

    PubMed

    Safi, Mohammed F; Wright-Harp, Wilhelmina; Lucker, Jay R; Payne, Joan C; Harris, Ovetta

    2014-11-01

    Lingual, labial and buccal weakness (LLBW) is a widespread consequence of several neurological insults. LLBW impact on oral motor functions such as speech production and swallowing is well documented in the literature. Therefore, it is important for the speech-language pathologists to have access to evidence-based approaches for treatment. Thus, it is imperative that the speech-language pathology field search for effective treatment approaches and explore new treatment modalities that can improve therapy outcomes. One relatively new modality in this field is neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES). The purpose of this paper is fivefold: (a) to provide an overview of the general effects of NMES on skeletal muscles; (b) to review the effect of NMES on orofacial musculature evaluating the potential appropriateness of NMES for use in strengthening lingual, labial and buccal muscles; (c) to identify future directions for research with consideration of its potential role in improving speech intelligibility and the oral preparatory phase of swallowing in patients with oral motor weakness; (d) to provide a brief anatomic and physiologic bases of LLBW; (e) to provide background information for orofacial myologists who may encounter individuals with LLBW. NMES is a modality that is commonly used in physical therapy and occupational therapy fields that assists in treating several motor and sensory muscular disorders including muscular weakness. The literature reviewed demonstrate that very limited data related to the use of NMES on orofacial muscles exist despite the fact that these muscles can be easily accessed by electrical stimulation from the surface. This review of the research using electrical stimulation of muscles highlights the need for experimental treatment studies that investigate the effect of NMES on orofacial weakness.

  18. A Wider Pelvis Does Not Increase Locomotor Cost in Humans, with Implications for the Evolution of Childbirth

    PubMed Central

    Warrener, Anna G.; Lewton, Kristi L.; Pontzer, Herman; Lieberman, Daniel E.

    2015-01-01

    The shape of the human female pelvis is thought to reflect an evolutionary trade-off between two competing demands: a pelvis wide enough to permit the birth of large-brained infants, and narrow enough for efficient bipedal locomotion. This trade-off, known as the obstetrical dilemma, is invoked to explain the relative difficulty of human childbirth and differences in locomotor performance between men and women. The basis for the obstetrical dilemma is a standard static biomechanical model that predicts wider pelves in females increase the metabolic cost of locomotion by decreasing the effective mechanical advantage of the hip abductor muscles for pelvic stabilization during the single-leg support phase of walking and running, requiring these muscles to produce more force. Here we experimentally test this model against a more accurate dynamic model of hip abductor mechanics in men and women. The results show that pelvic width does not predict hip abductor mechanics or locomotor cost in either women or men, and that women and men are equally efficient at both walking and running. Since a wider birth canal does not increase a woman’s locomotor cost, and because selection for successful birthing must be strong, other factors affecting maternal pelvic and fetal size should be investigated in order to help explain the prevalence of birth complications caused by a neonate too large to fit through the birth canal. PMID:25760381

  19. Proximal weakness of lower limbs as the sole presentation of hyperthyroidism: report of one case.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chu-Chin; Chiu, Pao-Chin; Shih, Chen-Houng; Hsieh, Kai-Sheng

    2005-01-01

    Most children with acute or chronic flaccid limb weakness have a disorder of motor unit. However, it is very important to exclude cerebral or other upper motor neuron disorders before we approach such patients as pure muscle disorders. In general, neuropathy results in distal limb weakness, myopathy manifests with proximal weakness. There are exceptions, however. Accurate diagnosis in this wide array of disorders is dependent on a careful clinical assessment followed by the appropriate investigations. Here we report a 14-year-old girl who presented with progressive difficulty in rising up from the floor for one month. Neurological examination revealed an obese, clumsy but clear girl with stable vital signs. The muscle power of neck and upper limbs was normal. There was positive Gower sign, but the toe and heel gaits were acceptable. The initial blood work and motor/sensory nerve conduction velocity were unremarkable. Further study for thyroid function showed a hyperthyroid state. The proximal myopathy recovered soon after medical treatment. There were no other symptoms, and signs indicating hyperthyroidism and proximal myopathy of lower limbs was the isolated clinical feature. Hyperthyroid myopathy is common in hyperthyroidism, but is unusual as the sole presenting symptom.

  20. Voluntary physical activity protects from susceptibility to skeletal muscle contraction-induced injury but worsens heart function in mdx mice.

    PubMed

    Hourdé, Christophe; Joanne, Pierre; Medja, Fadia; Mougenot, Nathalie; Jacquet, Adeline; Mouisel, Etienne; Pannerec, Alice; Hatem, Stéphane; Butler-Browne, Gillian; Agbulut, Onnik; Ferry, Arnaud

    2013-05-01

    It is well known that inactivity/activity influences skeletal muscle physiological characteristics. However, the effects of inactivity/activity on muscle weakness and increased susceptibility to muscle contraction-induced injury have not been extensively studied in mdx mice, a murine model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy with dystrophin deficiency. In the present study, we demonstrate that inactivity (ie, leg immobilization) worsened the muscle weakness and the susceptibility to contraction-induced injury in mdx mice. Inactivity also mimicked these two dystrophic features in wild-type mice. In contrast, we demonstrate that these parameters can be improved by activity (ie, voluntary wheel running) in mdx mice. Biochemical analyses indicate that the changes induced by inactivity/activity were not related to fiber-type transition but were associated with altered expression of different genes involved in fiber growth (GDF8), structure (Actg1), and calcium homeostasis (Stim1 and Jph1). However, activity reduced left ventricular function (ie, ejection and shortening fractions) in mdx, but not C57, mice. Altogether, our study suggests that muscle weakness and susceptibility to contraction-induced injury in dystrophic muscle could be attributable, at least in part, to inactivity. It also suggests that activity exerts a beneficial effect on dystrophic skeletal muscle but not on the heart. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Late-onset Pompe disease: what is the prevalence of limb-girdle muscular weakness presentation?

    PubMed

    Lorenzoni, Paulo José; Kay, Cláudia Suemi Kamoi; Higashi, Nádia Sugano; D'Almeida, Vânia; Werneck, Lineu Cesar; Scola, Rosana Herminia

    2018-04-01

    Pompe disease is an inherited disease caused by acid alpha-glucosidase (GAA) deficiency. A single center observational study aimed at assessing the prevalence of late-onset Pompe disease in a high-risk Brazilian population, using the dried blood spot test to detect GAA deficiency as a main screening tool. Dried blood spots were collected for GAA activity assay from 24 patients with "unexplained" limb-girdle muscular weakness without vacuolar myopathy in their muscle biopsy. Samples with reduced enzyme activity were also investigated for GAA gene mutations. Of the 24 patients with dried blood spots, one patient (4.2%) showed low GAA enzyme activity (NaG/AaGIA: 40.42; %INH: 87.22%). In this patient, genetic analysis confirmed two heterozygous mutations in the GAA gene (c.-32-13T>G/p.Arg854Ter). Our data confirm that clinicians should look for late-onset Pompe disease in patients whose clinical manifestation is an "unexplained" limb-girdle weakness even without vacuolar myopathy in muscle biopsy.

  2. Displacement of the hip center of rotation after arthroplasty of Crowe III and IV dysplasia: a radiological and biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Abolghasemian, Mansour; Samiezadeh, Saeid; Jafari, Davood; Bougherara, Habiba; Gross, Allan E; Ghazavi, Mohammad T

    2013-06-01

    To study the direction and biomechanical consequences of hip center of rotation (HCOR) migration in Crowe type III and VI hips after total hip arthroplasty, post-operative radiographs and CT scans of several unilaterally affected hips were evaluated. Using a three-dimensional model of the human hip, the HCOR was moved in all directions, and joint reaction force (JRF) and abductor muscle force (AMF) were calculated for single-leg stance configuration. Comparing to the normal side, HCOR had displaced medially and inferiorly by an average of 23.4% and 20.8%, respectively, of the normal femoral head diameter. Significant decreases in JRF (13%) and AMF (46.13%) were observed in a presumptive case with that amount of displacement. Isolated inferior displacement had a small, increasing effect on these forces. In Crowe type III and IV hips, the HCOR migrates inferiorly and medially after THA, resulting in a decrease in JRF, AMF, and abductor muscle contraction force. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The role of MicroRNAs in COPD muscle dysfunction and mass loss: implications on the clinic.

    PubMed

    Barreiro, Esther

    2016-09-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a common preventable and treatable disease and a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. In COPD, comorbidities, acute exacerbations, and systemic manifestations negatively influence disease severity, prognosis, and progression regardless of the respiratory condition. Several factors and biological mechanisms are involved in the pathophysiology of COPD muscle dysfunction. The non-coding microRNAs were shown to be differentially expressed in the respiratory and limb muscles of patients with COPD. Moreover, a differential expression profile of muscle-specific microRNAs has also been demonstrated in the lower limb muscles of COPD patients with and without muscle mass loss and weakness. All these features are reviewed herein. The most relevant articles on the topic in question were selected from PubMed to write this review. Expert commentary: MicroRNAs are excellent targets for the design of specific therapeutic interventions in patients with muscle weakness. Selective enhancers of microRNAs that promote myogenesis (proliferation and differentiation of satellite cells) should be designed to alleviate the negative impact of skeletal muscle dysfunction and mass loss in COPD regardless of the degree of the airway obstruction.

  4. Bone mineral density, muscle strength, and recreational exercise in men

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snow-Harter, C.; Whalen, R.; Myburgh, K.; Arnaud, S.; Marcus, R.

    1992-01-01

    Muscle strength has been shown to predict bone mineral density (BMD) in women. We examined this relationship in 50 healthy men who ranged in age from 28 to 51 years (average 38.3 years). BMD of the lumbar spine, proximal femur, whole body, and tibia were measured by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (Hologic QDR 1000W). Dynamic strength using one repetition maximum was assessed for the biceps, quadriceps, and back extensors and for the hip abductors, adductors, and flexors. Isometric grip strength was measured by dynamometry. Daily walking mileage was assessed by 9 week stepmeter records and kinematic analysis of video filming. Subjects were designated as exercisers and nonexercisers. Exercisers participated in recreational exercise at least two times each week. The results demonstrated that BMD at all sites correlated with back and biceps strength (p < 0.01 to p = 0.0001). Body weight correlated with tibia and whole-body BMD (p < 0.001); age negatively correlated with Ward's triangle BMD (p < 0.01). In stepwise multiple regressions, back strength was the only independent predictor of spine and femoral neck density (R2 = 0.27). Further, back strength was the most robust predictor of BMD at the trochanter, Ward's triangle, whole body, and tibia, although biceps strength, age, body weight, and leg strength contributed significantly to BMD at these skeletal sites, accounting for 35-52% of the variance in BMD. Exercisers and nonexercisers were similar for walking (3.97 versus 3.94 miles/day), age (37.8 versus 38.5) years, and weight (80.0 versus 77.7 kg). However, BMD and muscle strength were significantly greater in exercises than in nonexercisers.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  5. Titin-based stiffening of muscle fibers in Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Ottenheijm, Coen A.C.; Voermans, Nicol C.; Hudson, Bryan D.

    Tenascin-X (TNX) is an extracellular matrix glycoprotein whose absence leads to Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome (EDS). TNX-deficient EDS patients present with joint hypermobility and muscle weakness attributable to increased compliance of the extracellular matrix. We hypothesized that in response to the increased compliance of the extracellular matrix in TNX-deficient EDS patients, intracellular adaptations take place in the elastic properties of the giant muscle protein titin. We performed extensive single muscle fiber mechanical studies to determine active and passive properties in TNX-deficient EDS patients. Gel-electrophoresis, Western blotting, and microarray studies were used to evaluate titin expression and phosphorylation. X-ray diffraction was used tomore » measure myofilament lattice spacing. Passive tension of muscle fibers from TNX-deficient EDS patients was markedly increased. Myofilament extraction experiments indicated that the increased passive tension is attributable to changes in the properties of the sarcomeric protein titin. Transcript and protein data indicated no changes in titin isoform expression. Instead, differences in posttranslational modifications within titin's elastic region were found. In patients, active tension was not different at maximal activation level, but at submaximal activation level it was augmented attributable to increased calcium sensitivity. This increased calcium sensitivity might be attributable to stiffer titin molecules. In response to the increased compliance of the extracellular matrix in muscle of TNX-deficient EDS patients, a marked intracellular stiffening occurs of the giant protein titin. The stiffening of titin partly compensates for the muscle weakness in these patients by augmenting submaximal active tension generation.« less

  6. Recurrent Muscle Weakness with Rhabdomyolysis, Metabolic Crises, and Cardiac Arrhythmia Due to Bi-allelic TANGO2 Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Lalani, Seema R.; Liu, Pengfei; Rosenfeld, Jill A.; Watkin, Levi B.; Chiang, Theodore; Leduc, Magalie S.; Zhu, Wenmiao; Ding, Yan; Pan, Shujuan; Vetrini, Francesco; Miyake, Christina Y.; Shinawi, Marwan; Gambin, Tomasz; Eldomery, Mohammad K.; Akdemir, Zeynep Hande Coban; Emrick, Lisa; Wilnai, Yael; Schelley, Susan; Koenig, Mary Kay; Memon, Nada; Farach, Laura S.; Coe, Bradley P.; Azamian, Mahshid; Hernandez, Patricia; Zapata, Gladys; Jhangiani, Shalini N.; Muzny, Donna M.; Lotze, Timothy; Clark, Gary; Wilfong, Angus; Northrup, Hope; Adesina, Adekunle; Bacino, Carlos A.; Scaglia, Fernando; Bonnen, Penelope E.; Crosson, Jane; Duis, Jessica; Maegawa, Gustavo H.B.; Coman, David; Inwood, Anita; McGill, Jim; Boerwinkle, Eric; Graham, Brett; Beaudet, Art; Eng, Christine M.; Hanchard, Neil A.; Xia, Fan; Orange, Jordan S.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Lupski, James R.; Yang, Yaping

    2016-01-01

    The underlying genetic etiology of rhabdomyolysis remains elusive in a significant fraction of individuals presenting with recurrent metabolic crises and muscle weakness. Using exome sequencing, we identified bi-allelic mutations in TANGO2 encoding transport and Golgi organization 2 homolog (Drosophila) in 12 subjects with episodic rhabdomyolysis, hypoglycemia, hyperammonemia, and susceptibility to life-threatening cardiac tachyarrhythmias. A recurrent homozygous c.460G>A (p.Gly154Arg) mutation was found in four unrelated individuals of Hispanic/Latino origin, and a homozygous ∼34 kb deletion affecting exons 3–9 was observed in two families of European ancestry. One individual of mixed Hispanic/European descent was found to be compound heterozygous for c.460G>A (p.Gly154Arg) and the deletion of exons 3–9. Additionally, a homozygous exons 4–6 deletion was identified in a consanguineous Middle Eastern Arab family. No homozygotes have been reported for these changes in control databases. Fibroblasts derived from a subject with the recurrent c.460G>A (p.Gly154Arg) mutation showed evidence of increased endoplasmic reticulum stress and a reduction in Golgi volume density in comparison to control. Our results show that the c.460G>A (p.Gly154Arg) mutation and the exons 3–9 heterozygous deletion in TANGO2 are recurrent pathogenic alleles present in the Latino/Hispanic and European populations, respectively, causing considerable morbidity in the homozygotes in these populations. PMID:26805781

  7. Influence of vision on masticatory muscles function: surface electromyographic evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Ciavarella, Domenico; Palazzo, Antonio; De Lillo, Alfredo; Lo Russo, Lucio; Paduano, Sergio; Laino, Luigi; Chimenti, Claudio; Frezza, Federica; Lo Muzio, Lorenzo

    2014-01-01

    Summary The role of the ocular disorders (OD) in pathogenesis of MMp is still a controversal issue. Ocular arc reflexes (OAR) may involve changes in head and neck posture and generate modifications of contraction resulting in muscle contraction and finally weakness. sEMG tests were performed on 28 patients (13 with masticatory muscles pain and myopia/15 healthy) in rest position with eyes open and eyes closed. Patients group control (healthy patients) showed no significance difference in sEMG record in open/close test. In non healthy patients there were great differences between the sEMG recordings with eyes closed and open. Temporalis and masseters showed a statistical difference of means activation in two tests (temporalis p = 0.0010; masseters = 0.0006). Great difference there was in means muscles activation between open eyes healthy test and non healthy. No difference in close eyes test was evaluated in temporalis and masseters close test in the two groups. The exact causes of MMp are still unknown. The role how ocular disorders (OD) may play an important role in pathogenesis of MMp is still a controversal issue. Ocular arc reflexes (OAR) may involve changes in head and neck posture and generate modifications of contraction resulting in muscle contraction and finally weakness. PMID:25002919

  8. Muscle-specific kinase-antibody-positive myasthenia gravis after autologous bone marrow transplantation.

    PubMed

    Grover, Kavita Mohindra; Sripathi, Naganand; Elias, Stanton Bernard

    2012-03-01

    A 44-year-old man presented with oculobulbar weakness approximately 5 years after autologous bone marrow transplantation (BMT). His workup led to the diagnosis of muscle-specific kinase-antibody-related myasthenia gravis (MG). There has been only one case report of muscle-specific kinase-antibody-positive MG after BMT, which was allogeneic. We report the first case of autologous BMT-associated MG with muscle-specific kinase antibody. The pathogenic mechanisms of immune dysregulation leading to MG after BMT are discussed.

  9. Lung volume recruitment acutely increases respiratory system compliance in individuals with severe respiratory muscle weakness

    PubMed Central

    Molgat-Seon, Yannick; Hannan, Liam M.; Dominelli, Paolo B.; Peters, Carli M.; Fougere, Renee J.; McKim, Douglas A.; Sheel, A. William

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine whether lung volume recruitment (LVR) acutely increases respiratory system compliance (Crs) in individuals with severe respiratory muscle weakness (RMW). Individuals with RMW resulting from neuromuscular disease or quadriplegia (n=12) and healthy controls (n=12) underwent pulmonary function testing and the measurement of Crs at baseline, immediately after, 1 h after and 2 h after a single standardised session of LVR. The LVR session involved 10 consecutive supramaximal lung inflations with a manual resuscitation bag to the highest tolerable mouth pressure or a maximum of 50 cmH2O. Each LVR inflation was followed by brief breath-hold and a maximal expiration to residual volume. At baseline, individuals with RMW had lower Crs than controls (37±5 cmH2O versus 109±10 mL·cmH2O−1, p<0.001). Immediately after LVR, Crs increased by 39.5±9.8% to 50±7 mL·cmH2O−1 in individuals with RMW (p<0.05), while no significant change occurred in controls (p=0.23). At 1 h and 2 h post-treatment, there were no within-group differences in Crs compared to baseline (all p>0.05). LVR had no significant effect on measures of pulmonary function at any time point in either group (all p>0.05). During inflations, mean arterial pressure decreased significantly relative to baseline by 10.4±2.8 mmHg and 17.3±3.0 mmHg in individuals with RMW and controls, respectively (both p<0.05). LVR acutely increases Crs in individuals with RMW. However, the high airway pressures during inflations cause reductions in mean arterial pressure that should be considered when applying this technique. PMID:28326313

  10. Comparative anatomy of the radial sesamoid bone in the polar bear (Ursus maritimus), the brown bear (Ursus arctos) and the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca).

    PubMed

    Endo, H; Makita, T; Sasaki, M; Arishima, K; Yamamoto, M; Hayashi, Y

    1999-08-01

    Since we have clarified the manipulation mechanism using the radial sesamoid (RS) in the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca), our aim in this study is to examine the position, shape and function of the RS morphologically, and to observe the attachment to the RS of the M. abductor pollicis longus and the M. opponens pollicis in the other Ursidae species. So, we focused on the carpus and manus of the polar bear (Ursus maritimus) and the brown bear (Ursus arctos) in this study. The RS was tightly articulated to the radial carpal, and could not adduct-abduct independently of the radial carpal. The M. abductor pollicis longus tendon and the M. opponens pollicis belly were attached to the RS, independently. In the polar bear, the deep concave and the flat surface were confirmed in attachment area for these two muscles. The morphological relationship between the RS and the M. abductor pollicis longus and the M. opponens pollicis in the two species of bears were essentially consistent with that in the giant panda. It also demonstrated that the manipulation mechanism of the giant panda has been completely based on the functional relationship between the small RS, and the M. abductor pollicis longus and the M. opponens pollicis in Ursidae species.

  11. GFPT1 deficiency in muscle leads to myasthenia and myopathy in mice.

    PubMed

    Issop, Yasmin; Hathazi, Denisa; Khan, Muzamil Majid; Rudolf, Rüdiger; Weis, Joachim; Spendiff, Sally; Slater, Clarke R; Roos, Andreas; Lochmüller, Hanns

    2018-06-14

    Glutamine-fructose-6-phosphate transaminase 1 (GFPT1) is the rate-limiting enzyme in the hexosamine biosynthetic pathway which yields precursors required for protein and lipid glycosylation. Mutations in GFPT1 and other genes downstream of this pathway cause congenital myasthenic syndrome (CMS) characterised by fatigable muscle weakness due to impaired neurotransmission. The precise pathomechanisms at the neuromuscular junction (NMJ) due to a deficiency in GFPT1 is yet to be discovered. One of the challenges we face is the viability of Gfpt1 -/- knockout mice. In this study, we use Cre/LoxP technology to generate a muscle-specific GFPT1 knockout mouse model, Gfpt1tm1d/tm1d, characteristic of the human CMS phenotype. Our data suggests a critical role for muscle derived GFPT1 in the development of the NMJ, neurotransmission, skeletal muscle integrity, and highlights that a deficiency in skeletal muscle alone is sufficient to cause morphological postsynaptic NMJ changes that are accompanied by presynaptic alterations despite the conservation of neuronal GFPT1 expression. In addition to the conventional morphological NMJ changes and fatigable muscle weakness, Gfpt1tm1d/tm1d mice display a progressive myopathic phenotype with the presence of tubular aggregates in muscle, characteristic of the GFPT1-CMS phenotype. We further identify an upregulation of skeletal muscle proteins glypican-1, farnesyltransferase/geranylgeranyltransferase type-1 subunit alpha and Muscle-specific kinase which are known to be involved in the differentiation and maintenance of the NMJ. The Gfpt1tm1d/tm1d model allows for further investigation of pathophysiological consequences on genes and pathways downstream of GFPT1 likely to involve misglycosylation or hypoglycosylation of NMJs and muscle targets.

  12. The Effect of Visual and Auditory Enhancements on Excitability of the Primary Motor Cortex during Motor Imagery: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ikeda, Kohei; Higashi, Toshio; Sugawara, Kenichi; Tomori, Kounosuke; Kinoshita, Hiroshi; Kasai, Tatsuya

    2012-01-01

    The effect of visual and auditory enhancements of finger movement on corticospinal excitability during motor imagery (MI) was investigated using the transcranial magnetic stimulation technique. Motor-evoked potentials were elicited from the abductor digit minimi muscle during MI with auditory, visual and, auditory and visual information, and no…

  13. The Drosophila muscle LIM protein, Mlp84B, cooperates with D-titin to maintain muscle structural integrity.

    PubMed

    Clark, Kathleen A; Bland, Jennifer M; Beckerle, Mary C

    2007-06-15

    Muscle LIM protein (MLP) is a cytoskeletal LIM-only protein expressed in striated muscle. Mutations in human MLP are associated with cardiomyopathy; however, the molecular mechanism by which MLP functions is not established. A Drosophila MLP homolog, mlp84B, displays many of the same features as the vertebrate protein, illustrating the utility of the fly for the study of MLP function. Animals lacking Mlp84B develop into larvae with a morphologically intact musculature, but the mutants arrest during pupation with impaired muscle function. Mlp84B displays muscle-specific expression and is a component of the Z-disc and nucleus. Preventing nuclear retention of Mlp84B does not affect its function, indicating that Mlp84B site of action is likely to be at the Z-disc. Within the Z-disc, Mlp84B is colocalized with the N-terminus of D-titin, a protein crucial for sarcomere organization and stretch mechanics. The mlp84B mutants phenotypically resemble weak D-titin mutants. Furthermore, reducing D-titin activity in the mlp84B background leads to pronounced enhancement of the mlp84B muscle defects and loss of muscle structural integrity. The genetic interactions between mlp84B and D-titin reveal a role for Mlp84B in maintaining muscle structural integrity that was not obvious from analysis of the mlp84B mutants themselves, and suggest Mlp84B and D-titin cooperate to stabilize muscle sarcomeres.

  14. Muscle response to leg lengthening during distraction osteogenesis.

    PubMed

    Thorey, Fritz; Bruenger, Jens; Windhagen, Henning; Witte, Frank

    2009-04-01

    Continuous lengthening of intact muscles during distraction osteogenesis leads to an increase of sarcomeres and enhances the regeneration of tendons and blood vessels. A high distraction rate leads to an excessive leg and muscle lengthening and might cause damages of muscle fibers with fibrosis, necrosis, and muscle weakness. Complications like muscle contractures or atrophy after postoperative immobilization emphazize the importance of muscles and their function in the clinical outcome. In an animal model of distraction osteogenesis, 18 sheep were operated with an external fixator followed by 4 days latency, 21 days distraction (1.25 mm per day) and 51 days consolidation. The anatomical location (gastrocnemius, peroneus tertius, and first flexor digitorum longus muscle), dimension and occurrence of muscular defects were characterized histologically. The callus formation and leg axis was monitored by weekly X-rays. Additionally, serum creatine kinase was analyzed during a distraction and consolidation period. Significant signs of muscle lesions in all three observed muscles can be found postoperatively, whereas normal callus formation and regular leg axis was observed radiologically. The peroneus tertius and first flexor digitorum longus muscles were found to have significantly more signs of fibrosis, inflammatory, and necrosis. Creatine kinase showed two peaks: 4 and 39 days postoperative as an indication of muscle damage and regeneration. The study implicates that muscle damages should be considered when a long-distance distraction osteogenesis is planned. The surgeon should consider these muscle responses and individually discuss a two-stage treatment or additional muscle tendon releases to minimize the risk of muscle damages.

  15. Imaging of respiratory muscles in neuromuscular disease: A review.

    PubMed

    Harlaar, L; Ciet, P; van der Ploeg, A T; Brusse, E; van der Beek, N A M E; Wielopolski, P A; de Bruijne, M; Tiddens, H A W M; van Doorn, P A

    2018-03-01

    Respiratory muscle weakness frequently occurs in patients with neuromuscular disease. Measuring respiratory function with standard pulmonary function tests provides information about the contribution of all respiratory muscles, the lungs and airways. Imaging potentially enables the study of different respiratory muscles, including the diaphragm, separately. In this review, we provide an overview of imaging techniques used to study respiratory muscles in neuromuscular disease. We identified 26 studies which included a total of 573 patients with neuromuscular disease. Imaging of respiratory muscles was divided into static and dynamic techniques. Static techniques comprise chest radiography, B-mode (brightness mode) ultrasound, CT and MRI, and are used to assess the position and thickness of the diaphragm and the other respiratory muscles. Dynamic techniques include fluoroscopy, M-mode (motion mode) ultrasound and MRI, used to assess diaphragm motion in one or more directions. We discuss how these imaging techniques relate with spirometric values and whether these can be used to study the contribution of the different respiratory muscles in patients with neuromuscular disease. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Patient-specific fibre-based models of muscle wrapping

    PubMed Central

    Kohout, J.; Clapworthy, G. J.; Zhao, Y.; Tao, Y.; Gonzalez-Garcia, G.; Dong, F.; Wei, H.; Kohoutová, E.

    2013-01-01

    In many biomechanical problems, the availability of a suitable model for the wrapping of muscles when undergoing movement is essential for the estimation of forces produced on and by the body during motion. This is an important factor in the Osteoporotic Virtual Physiological Human project which is investigating the likelihood of fracture for osteoporotic patients undertaking a variety of movements. The weakening of their skeletons makes them particularly vulnerable to bone fracture caused by excessive loading being placed on the bones, even in simple everyday tasks. This paper provides an overview of a novel volumetric model that describes muscle wrapping around bones and other muscles during movement, and which includes a consideration of how the orientations of the muscle fibres change during the motion. The method can calculate the form of wrapping of a muscle of medium size and visualize the outcome within tenths of seconds on commodity hardware, while conserving muscle volume. This makes the method suitable not only for educational biomedical software, but also for clinical applications used to identify weak muscles that should be strengthened during rehabilitation or to identify bone stresses in order to estimate the risk of fractures. PMID:24427519

  17. Effect of experimental hyperthyroidism on protein turnover in skeletal and cardiac muscle.

    PubMed

    Carter, W J; Van Der Weijden Benjamin, W S; Faas, F H

    1980-10-01

    Since experimental hyperthyroidism reduces skeletal muscle mass while simultaneously increasing cardiac muscle mass, the effect of hyperthyroidism on muscle protein degradation was compared in skeletal and cardiac muscle. Pulse-labeling studies using (3H) leucine and (14C) carboxyl labeled aspartate and glutamate were carried out. Hyperthyroidism caused a 25%-29% increase in protein breakdown in both sarcoplasmic and myofibrillar fractions of skeletal muscle. Increased muscle protein degradation may be a major factor in the development of skeletal muscle wasting and weakness in hyperthyroidism. In contrast, protein breakdown appeared to be reduced 22% in the sarcoplasmic fraction of hyperthyroid heart muscle and was unchanged in the myofibrillar fraction. Possible reasons for the contrasting effects of hyperthyroidism on skeletal and cardiac muscle include increased sensitivity of the hyperthyroid heart to catecholamines, increased cardiac work caused by the hemodynamic effects of hyperthyroidism, and a different direct effect of thyroid hormone at the nuclear level in cardiac as opposed to skeletal muscle.

  18. Novel excitation-contraction coupling related genes reveal aspects of muscle weakness beyond atrophy—new hopes for treatment of musculoskeletal diseases

    PubMed Central

    Manring, Heather; Abreu, Eduardo; Brotto, Leticia; Weisleder, Noah; Brotto, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Research over the last decade strengthened the understanding that skeletal muscles are not only the major tissue in the body from a volume point of view but also function as a master regulator contributing to optimal organismal health. These new contributions to the available body of knowledge triggered great interest in the roles of skeletal muscle beyond contraction. The World Health Organization, through its Global Burden of Disease (GBD) report, recently raised further awareness about the key importance of skeletal muscles as the GDB reported musculoskeletal (MSK) diseases have become the second greatest cause of disability, with more than 1.7 billion people in the globe affected by a diversity of MSK conditions. Besides their role in MSK disorders, skeletal muscles are also seen as principal metabolic organs with essential contributions to metabolic disorders, especially those linked to physical inactivity. In this review, we have focused on the unique function of new genes/proteins (i.e., MTMR14, MG29, sarcalumenin, KLF15) that during the last few years have helped provide novel insights about muscle function in health and disease, muscle fatigue, muscle metabolism, and muscle aging. Next, we provide an in depth discussion of how these genes/proteins converge into a common function of acting as regulators of intracellular calcium homeostasis. A clear link between dysfunctional calcium homeostasis is established and the special role of store-operated calcium entry is analyzed. The new knowledge that has been generated by the understanding of the roles of previously unknown modulatory genes of the skeletal muscle excitation-contraction coupling (ECC) process brings exciting new possibilities for treatment of MSK diseases, muscle regeneration, and skeletal muscle tissue engineering. The next decade of skeletal muscle and MSK research is bound to bring to fruition applied knowledge that will hopefully offset the current heavy and sad burden of MSK diseases on the

  19. Novel excitation-contraction coupling related genes reveal aspects of muscle weakness beyond atrophy-new hopes for treatment of musculoskeletal diseases.

    PubMed

    Manring, Heather; Abreu, Eduardo; Brotto, Leticia; Weisleder, Noah; Brotto, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Research over the last decade strengthened the understanding that skeletal muscles are not only the major tissue in the body from a volume point of view but also function as a master regulator contributing to optimal organismal health. These new contributions to the available body of knowledge triggered great interest in the roles of skeletal muscle beyond contraction. The World Health Organization, through its Global Burden of Disease (GBD) report, recently raised further awareness about the key importance of skeletal muscles as the GDB reported musculoskeletal (MSK) diseases have become the second greatest cause of disability, with more than 1.7 billion people in the globe affected by a diversity of MSK conditions. Besides their role in MSK disorders, skeletal muscles are also seen as principal metabolic organs with essential contributions to metabolic disorders, especially those linked to physical inactivity. In this review, we have focused on the unique function of new genes/proteins (i.e., MTMR14, MG29, sarcalumenin, KLF15) that during the last few years have helped provide novel insights about muscle function in health and disease, muscle fatigue, muscle metabolism, and muscle aging. Next, we provide an in depth discussion of how these genes/proteins converge into a common function of acting as regulators of intracellular calcium homeostasis. A clear link between dysfunctional calcium homeostasis is established and the special role of store-operated calcium entry is analyzed. The new knowledge that has been generated by the understanding of the roles of previously unknown modulatory genes of the skeletal muscle excitation-contraction coupling (ECC) process brings exciting new possibilities for treatment of MSK diseases, muscle regeneration, and skeletal muscle tissue engineering. The next decade of skeletal muscle and MSK research is bound to bring to fruition applied knowledge that will hopefully offset the current heavy and sad burden of MSK diseases on the

  20. Histochemical characteristics of a tonic smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Gilloteaux, J; Stalmans-Falys, M

    1979-09-01

    It is suggested that ABRM, smooth muscle of Mytilus edulis L. and Mytilus galloprovincialis Lmk. (Mollusca Pelecypoda), is composed of one histochemical fibre type. The fibres are characterized by a low myofibrillar ATPase activity. Succinic and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide oxidoreductase activities are distributed in a reverse pattern than that of the ATPase activity. Glycogen phosphorylase is richly represented in ABRM fibres and this detection is in opposition with the negative detection of alkaline phosphatase activity. These preliminary histochemical observations are similar to those found in some vertebrate smooth muscles. Mitochondrial glycerol-3-phosphate, 6-phosphogluconate, lactate and octopine dehydrogenases are not detected in muscle fibres whereas glio-interstitial tissues show weak but distinct reactivity. These last results especially characterize Mytilus catch fibres and are briefly discussed in relationship with previous physiological, biochemical and morphological observations.

  1. Common input to motor units of intrinsic and extrinsic hand muscles during two-digit object hold.

    PubMed

    Winges, Sara A; Kornatz, Kurt W; Santello, Marco

    2008-03-01

    Anatomical and physiological evidence suggests that common input to motor neurons of hand muscles is an important neural mechanism for hand control. To gain insight into the synaptic input underlying the coordination of hand muscles, significant effort has been devoted to describing the distribution of common input across motor units of extrinsic muscles. Much less is known, however, about the distribution of common input to motor units belonging to different intrinsic muscles and to intrinsic-extrinsic muscle pairs. To address this void in the literature, we quantified the incidence and strength of near-simultaneous discharges of motor units residing in either the same or different intrinsic hand muscles (m. first dorsal, FDI, and m. first palmar interosseus, FPI) during two-digit object hold. To extend the characterization of common input to pairs of extrinsic muscles (previous work) and pairs of intrinsic muscles (present work), we also recorded electromyographic (EMG) activity from an extrinsic thumb muscle (m. flexor pollicis longus, FPL). Motor-unit synchrony across FDI and FPI was weak (common input strength, CIS, mean +/- SE: 0.17 +/- 0.02). Similarly, motor units from extrinsic-intrinsic muscle pairs were characterized by weak synchrony (FPL-FDI: 0.25 +/- 0.02; FPL-FPI: 0.29 +/- 0.03) although stronger than FDI-FPI. Last, CIS from within FDI and FPI was more than three times stronger (0.70 +/- 0.06 and 0.66 +/- 0.06, respectively) than across these muscles. We discuss present and previous findings within the framework of muscle-pair specific distribution of common input to hand muscles based on their functional role in grasping.

  2. Contribution of oxidative stress to pathology in diaphragm and limb muscles with Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong-Hee; Kwak, Hyo-Bum; Thompson, LaDora V; Lawler, John M

    2013-02-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a degenerative skeletal muscle disease that makes walking and breathing difficult. DMD is caused by an X-linked (Xp21) mutation in the dystrophin gene. Dystrophin is a scaffolding protein located in the sarcolemmal cytoskeleton, important in maintaining structural integrity and regulating muscle cell (muscle fiber) growth and repair. Dystrophin deficiency in mouse models (e.g., mdx mouse) destabilizes the interface between muscle fibers and the extracellular matrix, resulting in profound damage, inflammation, and weakness in diaphragm and limb muscles. While the link between dystrophin deficiency with inflammation and pathology is multi-factorial, elevated oxidative stress has been proposed as a central mediator. Unfortunately, the use of non-specific antioxidant scavengers in mouse and human studies has led to inconsistent results, obscuring our understanding of the importance of redox signaling in pathology of muscular dystrophy. However, recent studies with more mechanistic approaches in mdx mice suggest that NAD(P)H oxidase and nuclear factor-kappaB are important in amplifying dystrophin-deficient muscle pathology. Therefore, more targeted antioxidant therapeutics may ameliorate damage and weakness in human population, thus promoting better muscle function and quality of life. This review will focus upon the pathobiology of dystrophin deficiency in diaphragm and limb muscle primarily in mouse models, with a rationale for development of targeted therapeutic antioxidants in DMD patients.

  3. Vitamin D and muscle function.

    PubMed

    Dawson-Hughes, Bess

    2017-10-01

    Muscle weakness is a hallmark of severe vitamin D deficiency, but the effect of milder vitamin D deficiency or insufficiency on muscle mass and performance and risk of falling is uncertain. In this presentation, I review the evidence that vitamin D influences muscle mass and performance, balance, and risk of falling in older adults. Special consideration is given to the impact of both the starting 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] level and the dose administered on the clinical response to supplemental vitamin D in older men and women. Based on available evidence, older adults with serum 25(OH)D levels <40nmol/L appear most likely to improve their muscle performance with supplementation. The vitamin D dose range of 800-1000 IU per day has been effective in many studies; lower doses have generally been ineffective and several doses above this range have increased the risk of falls. In conclusion, older adults with serum 25(OH)D levels <40nmol/L are likely to have fewer falls if supplemented with 800-1000 IU per day of vitamin D. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Effects of microgravity on rat muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, D. A.

    1990-01-01

    It is well known that humans exposed to long term spaceflight experience undesirable progressive muscle weakness and increased fatigability. This problem has prompted the implementation of inflight exercise programs because most investigators believe that the major cause of diminished muscle performance is a combination of disuse and decreased workload. Inflight exercise has improved muscle health, but deficits have persisted, indicating that either the regimens utilized were suboptimal or there existed additional debilitating factors which were not remedied by exercise. Clarification of this question requires an improved understanding of the cellular and molecular basis of spaceflight-induced muscle deterioration. To this end, multiple investigations have been performed on the muscles from rats orbited 5 to 22 days in Cosmos biosatellites and Spacelab-3 (2,4,5,8,10 to 14,16,18,19,21 to 23,25,27,28). The eight Cosmos 1887 investigations examined the structural and biochemical changes in skeletal and cardiac muscles of rats exposed to microgravity for 12.5 days and returned to terrestrial gravity 2.3 days before tissues were collected. Even though interpretation of these results was complicated by the combination of inflight and postflight induced alterations, the consensus is that there is marked heterogeneity in both degree and type of responses from the whole muscle level down to the molecular level. Collectively, the muscle investigations of Cosmos 1887 clearly illustrate the wide diversity of muscle tissue responses to spaceflight. Judging from the summary report of this mission, heterogeneity of responses is not unique to muscle tissue. Elucidating the mechanism underlying this heterogeneity holds the key to explaining adaptation of the organism to prolonged spaceflight.

  5. Antibody-directed myostatin inhibition enhances muscle mass and function in tumor-bearing mice.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Kate T; Chee, Annabel; Gleeson, Ben G; Naim, Timur; Swiderski, Kristy; Koopman, René; Lynch, Gordon S

    2011-09-01

    Cancer cachexia describes the progressive skeletal muscle wasting and weakness in many cancer patients and accounts for >20% of cancer-related deaths. We tested the hypothesis that antibody-directed myostatin inhibition would attenuate the atrophy and loss of function in muscles of tumor-bearing mice. Twelve-week-old C57BL/6 mice received a subcutaneous injection of saline (control) or Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) tumor cells. One week later, mice received either once weekly injections of saline (control, n = 12; LLC, n = 9) or a mouse chimera of anti-human myostatin antibody (PF-354, 10 mg·kg⁻¹·wk⁻¹, LLC+PF-354, n = 11) for 5 wk. Injection of LLC cells reduced muscle mass and maximum force of tibialis anterior (TA) muscles by 8-10% (P < 0.05), but the muscle atrophy and weakness were prevented with PF-354 treatment (P > 0.05). Maximum specific (normalized) force of diaphragm muscle strips was reduced with LLC injection (P < 0.05) but was not improved with PF-354 treatment (P > 0.05). PF-354 enhanced activity of oxidative enzymes in TA and diaphragm muscles of tumor-bearing mice by 118% and 89%, respectively (P < 0.05). Compared with controls, apoptosis that was not of myofibrillar or satellite cell origin was 140% higher in TA muscle cross sections from saline-treated LLC tumor-bearing mice (P < 0.05) but was not different in PF-354-treated tumor-bearing mice (P > 0.05). Antibody-directed myostatin inhibition attenuated the skeletal muscle atrophy and loss of muscle force-producing capacity in a murine model of cancer cachexia, in part by reducing apoptosis. The improvements in limb muscle mass and function highlight the therapeutic potential of antibody-directed myostatin inhibition for cancer cachexia.

  6. Control of food intake and muscle wasting in cachexia.

    PubMed

    Amitani, Marie; Asakawa, Akihiro; Amitani, Haruka; Inui, Akio

    2013-10-01

    Cachexia is characterized by anorexia, weakness, weight loss, and muscle wasting. Anorexia and muscle wasting are the key features of cachexia and they affect mortality, morbidity, and quality of life. Consistent studies have found that feeding-regulating peptides such as melanocortin, ghrelin, and leptin are related to muscle metabolism, and the balance of catabolism and anabolism in muscle is regulated in the hypothalamus, which also regulates appetite and energy expenditure. In cachexia, proinflammatory cytokines, such as TNF-α, IL-1, IL-6 and Angiotensin II induce muscle atrophy. The mechanism is suggested via upregulation of MuRF1 and MAFbx. In contrast, the orexigenic peptide, AgRP and ghrelin have the effect to decrease proinflammatory cytokines and increase body weight, food intake, and muscle mass. The understandings of the pathological mechanism of anorexia and muscle metabolism in view of the crosstalk between brain and muscle will open the new way for the management of cachexia. In this review, we describe recent experimental and clinical studies that have examined the regulation of food intake and muscle wasting in cachexia. This article is part of a Directed Issue entitled: Molecular basis of muscle wasting. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Effect of stretching with and without muscle strengthening exercises for the foot and hip in patients with plantar fasciitis: A randomized controlled single-blind clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Kamonseki, Danilo H; Gonçalves, Geiseane A; Yi, Liu C; Júnior, Império Lombardi

    2016-06-01

    To compare the effect of stretching with and without muscle strengthening of the foot alone or foot and hip on pain and function in patients with plantar fasciitis. Single blind randomized controlled trial. Eighty-three patients with plantar fasciitis were allocated to one of three treatment options for an eight-week period: Foot Exercise Group (FEG - extrinsic and intrinsic foot muscles), Foot and Hip Exercise Group (FHEG - abductor and lateral rotator muscles) and Stretching Alone Exercise Group (SAEG). A visual analog scale for pain, the Foot and Ankle Outcome Score and the Star Excursion Balance Test. All evaluations were performed before treatment and after the last treatment session. Improvements were found in all groups regarding the visual analog scale, the pain, activities of daily living, sports and recreation, quality of life (p < 0.001) and other symptoms (p < 0.01) subscales of the Foot and Ankle Outcome Score as well as posterolateral movement, posteromedial movement and composite score (p < 0.001) on the Star Excursion Balance Test. No time-group interactions were found for any of the variables (p > 0.05). All three exercise protocols analyzed led to improvements at eight-week follow-up in pain, function and dynamic lower limb stability in patients with plantar fasciitis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Anatomy of psoas muscle innervation: Cadaveric study.

    PubMed

    Mahan, Mark A; Sanders, Luke E; Guan, Jian; Dailey, Andrew T; Taylor, William; Morton, David A

    2017-05-01

    Hip flexion weakness is relatively common after lateral transpsoas surgery. Persistent weakness may result from injury to the innervation of the psoas major muscles (PMMs); however, anatomical texts have conflicting descriptions of this innervation, and the branching pattern of the nerves within the psoas major, particularly relative to vertebral anatomy, has not been described. The authors dissected human cadavers to describe the branching pattern of nerves supplying the PMMs. Sixteen embalmed cadavers were dissected, and the fine branching pattern of the innervation to the PMM was studied in 24 specimens. The number of branches and width and length of each branch of nerves to the PMMs were quantified. Nerve branches innervating the PMMs arose from spinal nerve levels L1-L4, with an average of 6.3 ± 1.1 branches per muscle. The L1 nerve branch was the least consistently present, whereas L2 and L3 branches were the most robust, the most numerous, and always present. The nerve branches to the psoas major commonly crossed the intervertebral (IV) disc obliquely prior to ramification within the muscle; 76%, 80%, and 40% of specimens had a branch to the PMM cross the midportion of the L2-3, L3-4, and L4-5 IV discs, respectively. The PMMs are segmentally innervated from the L2-L4 ventral rami branches, where these branches course obliquely across the L2-3, L3-4, and L4-5 IV discs. Knowledge of the mapping of nerve branches to the PMMs may reduce injury and the incidence of persistent weak hip flexion during lateral transpsoas surgery. Clin. Anat. 30:479-486, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Muscle dependency of corticomuscular coherence in upper and lower limb muscles and training-related alterations in ballet dancers and weightlifters.

    PubMed

    Ushiyama, Junichi; Takahashi, Yuji; Ushiba, Junichi

    2010-10-01

    It has been well documented that the 15- to 35-Hz oscillatory activity of the sensorimotor cortex shows coherence with the muscle activity during weak to moderate steady contraction. To investigate the muscle dependency of the corticomuscular coherence and its training-related alterations, we quantified the coherence between electroencephalogram (EEG) from the sensorimotor cortex and rectified electromyogram (EMG) from five upper limb (first dorsal interosseous, flexor carpi radialis, extensor carpi radialis, biceps brachii, triceps brachii) and four lower limb muscles (soleus, tibialis anterior, biceps femoris, rectus femoris), while maintaining a constant force level at 30% of maximal voluntary contraction of each muscle, in 24 untrained, 12 skill-trained (ballet dancers), and 10 strength-trained (weightlifters) individuals. Data from untrained subjects demonstrated the muscle dependency of corticomuscular coherence. The magnitude of the EEG-EMG coherence was significantly greater in the distally located lower limb muscles, such as the soleus and tibialis anterior, than in the upper or other lower limb muscles in untrained subjects (P < 0.05). These results imply that oscillatory coupling between the sensorimotor cortex and spinal motoneurons during steady contraction differs among muscles, according to the functional role of each muscle. In addition, the ballet dancers and weightlifters showed smaller EEG-EMG coherences than the untrained subjects, especially in the lower limb muscles (P < 0.05). These results indicate that oscillatory interaction between the sensorimotor cortex and spinal motoneurons can be changed by long-term specialized use of the muscles and that this neural adaptation may lead to finer control of muscle force during steady contraction.

  10. Spasmodic dysphonia: a laryngeal control disorder specific to speech.

    PubMed

    Ludlow, Christy L

    2011-01-19

    Spasmodic dysphonia (SD) is a rare neurological disorder that emerges in middle age, is usually sporadic, and affects intrinsic laryngeal muscle control only during speech. Spasmodic bursts in particular laryngeal muscles disrupt voluntary control during vowel sounds in adductor SD and interfere with voice onset after voiceless consonants in abductor SD. Little is known about its origins; it is classified as a focal dystonia secondary to an unknown neurobiological mechanism that produces a chronic abnormality of laryngeal motor neuron regulation during speech. It develops primarily in females and does not interfere with breathing, crying, laughter, and shouting. Recent postmortem studies have implicated the accumulation of clusters in the parenchyma and perivascular regions with inflammatory changes in the brainstem in one to two cases. A few cases with single mutations in THAP1, a gene involved in transcription regulation, suggest that a weak genetic predisposition may contribute to mechanisms causing a nonprogressive abnormality in laryngeal motor neuron control for speech but not for vocal emotional expression. Research is needed to address the basic cellular and proteomic mechanisms that produce this disorder to provide intervention that could target the pathogenesis of the disorder rather than only providing temporary symptom relief.

  11. Temporalis muscle hypertrophy and reduced skull eccentricity in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Straathof, C S M; Doorenweerd, N; Wokke, B H A; Dumas, E M; van den Bergen, J C; van Buchem, M A; Hendriksen, J G M; Verschuuren, J J G M; Kan, H E

    2014-10-01

    Muscle hypertrophy and muscle weakness are well known in Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Decreased muscle force can have secondary effects on skeletal growth and development such as facial and dental morphology changes. In this study, we quantified temporal muscle thickness, circumference, and eccentricity of the skull and the head on T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans of the head of 15 Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients and 15 controls. Average temporal muscle thickness was significantly increased in patients (12.9 ± 5.2 mm) compared to controls (6.8 ± 1.4 mm) (P < .0001), whereas the shape of the skull was significantly rounder compared to controls. Temporal muscle thickness and skull eccentricity were significantly negatively correlated in patients, and positively in controls. Hypertrophy of the temporal muscles and changes in skull eccentricity appear to occur early in the course of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Further studies in younger patients are needed to confirm a causal relationship. © The Author(s) 2014.

  12. Exercise and nutritional interventions for improving aging muscle health.

    PubMed

    Forbes, Scott C; Little, Jonathan P; Candow, Darren G

    2012-08-01

    Skeletal muscle mass declines with age (i.e., sarcopenia) resulting in muscle weakness and functional limitations. Sarcopenia has been associated with physiological changes in muscle morphology, protein and hormonal kinetics, insulin resistance, inflammation, and oxidative stress. The purpose of this review is to highlight how exercise and nutritional intervention strategies may benefit aging muscle. It is well known that resistance exercise training increases muscle strength and size and evidence also suggests that resistance training can increase mitochondrial content and decrease oxidative stress in older adults. Recent findings suggest that fast-velocity resistance exercise may be an effective intervention for older adults to enhance muscle power and functional capacity. Aerobic exercise training may also benefit aging skeletal muscle by enhancing mitochondrial bioenergetics, improving insulin sensitivity, and/or decreasing oxidative stress. In addition to exercise, creatine monohydrate, milk-based proteins, and essential fatty acids all have biological effects which could enhance some of the physiological adaptations from exercise training in older adults. Additional research is needed to determine whether skeletal muscle adaptations to increased activity in older adults are further enhanced with effective nutritional interventions and whether this is due to enhanced muscle protein synthesis, improved mitochondrial function, and/or a reduced inflammatory response.

  13. An Antibody Blocking Activin Type II Receptors Induces Strong Skeletal Muscle Hypertrophy and Protects from Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Minetti, Giulia C.; Sheppard, KellyAnn; Ibebunjo, Chikwendu; Feige, Jerome N.; Hartmann, Steffen; Brachat, Sophie; Rivet, Helene; Koelbing, Claudia; Morvan, Frederic; Hatakeyama, Shinji

    2014-01-01

    The myostatin/activin type II receptor (ActRII) pathway has been identified to be critical in regulating skeletal muscle size. Several other ligands, including GDF11 and the activins, signal through this pathway, suggesting that the ActRII receptors are major regulatory nodes in the regulation of muscle mass. We have developed a novel, human anti-ActRII antibody (bimagrumab, or BYM338) to prevent binding of ligands to the receptors and thus inhibit downstream signaling. BYM338 enhances differentiation of primary human skeletal myoblasts and counteracts the inhibition of differentiation induced by myostatin or activin A. BYM338 prevents myostatin- or activin A-induced atrophy through inhibition of Smad2/3 phosphorylation, thus sparing the myosin heavy chain from degradation. BYM338 dramatically increases skeletal muscle mass in mice, beyond sole inhibition of myostatin, detected by comparing the antibody with a myostatin inhibitor. A mouse version of the antibody induces enhanced muscle hypertrophy in myostatin mutant mice, further confirming a beneficial effect on muscle growth beyond myostatin inhibition alone through blockade of ActRII ligands. BYM338 protects muscles from glucocorticoid-induced atrophy and weakness via prevention of muscle and tetanic force losses. These data highlight the compelling therapeutic potential of BYM338 for the treatment of skeletal muscle atrophy and weakness in multiple settings. PMID:24298022

  14. Relative strengths of the calf muscles based on MRI volume measurements.

    PubMed

    Jeng, Clifford L; Thawait, Gaurav K; Kwon, John Y; Machado, Antonio; Boyle, James W; Campbell, John; Carrino, John A

    2012-05-01

    In 1985, Silver et al. published a cadaver study which determined the relative order of strength of the muscles in the calf. Muscle strength, which is proportional to volume, was obtained by dissecting out the individual muscles, weighing them, and then multiplying by the specific gravity. No similar studies have been performed using {\\it in vivo} measurements of muscle volume. Ten normal subjects underwent 3-Tesla MRI's of both lower extremities using non-fat-saturated T2 SPACE sequences. The volume for each muscle was determined by tracing the muscle contour on sequential axial images and then interpolating the volume using imaging software. The results from this study differ from Silver's original article. The lateral head of the gastrocnemius was found to be stronger than the tibialis anterior muscle. The FHL and EDL muscles were both stronger than the peroneus longus. There was no significant difference in strength between the peroneus longus and brevis muscles. This revised order of muscle strengths in the calf based on in vivo MRI findings may assist surgeons in determining the optimal tendons to transfer in order to address muscle weakness and deformity.

  15. Muscle satellite cell heterogeneity and self-renewal

    PubMed Central

    Motohashi, Norio; Asakura, Atsushi

    2014-01-01

    Adult skeletal muscle possesses extraordinary regeneration capacities. After muscle injury or exercise, large numbers of newly formed muscle fibers are generated within a week as a result of expansion and differentiation of a self-renewing pool of muscle stem cells termed muscle satellite cells. Normally, satellite cells are mitotically quiescent and reside beneath the basal lamina of muscle fibers. Upon regeneration, satellite cells are activated, and give rise to daughter myogenic precursor cells. After several rounds of proliferation, these myogenic precursor cells contribute to the formation of new muscle fibers. During cell division, a minor population of myogenic precursor cells returns to quiescent satellite cells as a self-renewal process. Currently, accumulating evidence has revealed the essential roles of satellite cells in muscle regeneration and the regulatory mechanisms, while it still remains to be elucidated how satellite cell self-renewal is molecularly regulated and how satellite cells are important in aging and diseased muscle. The number of satellite cells is decreased due to the changing niche during ageing, resulting in attenuation of muscle regeneration capacity. Additionally, in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) patients, the loss of satellite cell regenerative capacity and decreased satellite cell number due to continuous needs for satellite cells lead to progressive muscle weakness with chronic degeneration. Thus, it is necessary to replenish muscle satellite cells continuously. This review outlines recent findings regarding satellite cell heterogeneity, asymmetric division and molecular mechanisms in satellite cell self-renewal which is crucial for maintenance of satellite cells as a muscle stem cell pool throughout life. In addition, we discuss roles in the stem cell niche for satellite cell maintenance, as well as related cell therapies for approaching treatment of DMD. PMID:25364710

  16. Skeletal muscle disorders of glycogenolysis and glycolysis.

    PubMed

    Godfrey, Richard; Quinlivan, Ros

    2016-07-01

    Skeletal muscle disorders of glycogenolysis and glycolysis account for most of the conditions collectively termed glycogen storage diseases (GSDs). These disorders are rare (incidence 1 in 20,000-43,000 live births), and are caused by autosomal or X-linked recessive mutations that result in a specific enzyme deficiency, leading to the inability to utilize muscle glycogen as an energy substrate. McArdle disease (GSD V) is the most common of these disorders, and is caused by mutations in the gene encoding muscle glycogen phosphorylase. Symptoms of McArdle disease and most other related GSDs include exercise intolerance, muscle contracture, acute rhabdomyolysis, and risk of acute renal failure. Older patients may exhibit muscle wasting and weakness involving the paraspinal muscles and shoulder girdle. For patients with these conditions, engaging with exercise is likely to be beneficial. Diagnosis is frequently delayed owing to the rarity of the conditions and lack of access to appropriate investigations. A few randomized clinical trials have been conducted, some focusing on dietary modification, although the quality of the evidence is low and no specific recommendations can yet be made. The development of EUROMAC, an international registry for these disorders, should improve our knowledge of their natural histories and provide a platform for future clinical trials.

  17. Muscle MRI in female carriers of dystrophinopathy.

    PubMed

    Tasca, G; Monforte, M; Iannaccone, E; Laschena, F; Ottaviani, P; Silvestri, G; Masciullo, M; Mirabella, M; Servidei, S; Ricci, E

    2012-09-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy carriers represent a rare condition that needs to be recognized because of the possible implications for prenatal diagnosis. Muscle biopsy is currently the diagnostic instrument of choice in sporadic patients. We wanted to verify whether muscle magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could identify a pattern of involvement suggestive of this condition and whether it was similar to that reported in Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy. Evaluation of pelvic and lower limb MRI scans of 12 dystrophinopathy carriers was performed. We found a frequent involvement of the quadratus femoris, gluteus maximus and medius, biceps femoris long head, adductor magnus, vasti and paraspinal muscles, whilst the popliteus, iliopsoas, recti abdominis, sartorius, and gracilis were relatively spared. Asymmetry was a major feature on MRI; it could be detected significantly more often than with sole clinical examination and even in patients without weakness. The pattern we describe here is similar to that reported in Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy, although asymmetry represents a major distinctive feature. Muscle MRI was more sensitive than clinical examination for detecting single muscle involvement and asymmetry. Further studies are needed to verify the consistency of this pattern in larger cohorts and to assess whether muscle MRI can improve diagnostic accuracy in carriers with normal dystrophin staining on muscle biopsy. © 2012 The Author(s) European Journal of Neurology © 2012 EFNS.

  18. Do muscle mass, muscle density, strength, and physical function similarly influence risk of hospitalization in older adults?

    PubMed

    Cawthon, Peggy Mannen; Fox, Kathleen M; Gandra, Shravanthi R; Delmonico, Matthew J; Chiou, Chiun-Fang; Anthony, Mary S; Sewall, Ase; Goodpaster, Bret; Satterfield, Suzanne; Cummings, Steven R; Harris, Tamara B

    2009-08-01

    To examine the association between strength, function, lean mass, muscle density, and risk of hospitalization. Prospective cohort study. Two U.S. clinical centers. Adults aged 70 to 80 (N=3,011) from the Health, Aging and Body Composition Study. Measurements were of grip strength, knee extension strength, lean mass, walking speed, and chair stand pace. Thigh computed tomography scans assessed muscle area and density (a proxy for muscle fat infiltration). Hospitalizations were confirmed by local review of medical records. Negative binomial regression models estimated incident rate ratios (IRRs) of hospitalization for race- and sex-specific quartiles of each muscle and function parameter separately. Multivariate models adjusted for age, body mass index, health status, and coexisting medical conditions. During an average 4.7 years of follow-up, 1,678 (55.7%) participants experienced one or more hospitalizations. Participants in the lowest quartile of muscle density were more likely to be subsequently hospitalized (multivariate IRR=1.47, 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.24-1.73) than those in the highest quartile. Similarly, participants with the weakest grip strength were at greater risk of hospitalization (multivariate IRR=1.52, 95% CI=1.30-1.78, Q1 vs. Q4). Comparable results were seen for knee strength, walking pace, and chair stands pace. Lean mass and muscle area were not associated with risk of hospitalization. Weak strength, poor function, and low muscle density, but not muscle size or lean mass, were associated with greater risk of hospitalization. Interventions to reduce the disease burden associated with sarcopenia should focus on increasing muscle strength and improving physical function rather than simply increasing lean mass.

  19. Skeletal muscle wasting: new role of nonclassical renin-angiotensin system.

    PubMed

    Cabello-Verrugio, Claudio; Rivera, Juan C; Garcia, Dominga

    2017-05-01

    Skeletal muscle can be affected by many physiological and pathological conditions that contribute to the development of muscle weakness, including skeletal muscle loss, inflammatory processes, or fibrosis. Therefore, research into therapeutic treatment alternatives or alleviation of these effects on skeletal muscle is of great importance. Recent studies have shown that angiotensin (1-7) [Ang-(1-7)] - a vasoactive peptide of the nonclassical axis in the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) - and its Mas receptor are expressed in skeletal muscle. Ang-(1-7), through its Mas receptor, prevents or diminishes deleterious effects induced by skeletal muscle disease or injury. Specifically, the Ang-(1-7)-Mas receptor axis modulates molecular mechanisms involved in muscle mass regulation, such as the ubiquitin proteasome pathway, the insulin-like growth factor type 1/Akt (protein kinase B) pathway, or myonuclear apoptosis, and also inflammation and fibrosis pathways. Although further research into this topic and the possible side effects of Ang-(1-7) is necessary, these findings are promising, and suggest that the Ang-(1-7)-Mas axis can be considered a possible therapeutic target for treating patients with muscular disorders.

  20. Muscle wasting in myotonic dystrophies: a model of premature aging.

    PubMed

    Mateos-Aierdi, Alba Judith; Goicoechea, Maria; Aiastui, Ana; Fernández-Torrón, Roberto; Garcia-Puga, Mikel; Matheu, Ander; López de Munain, Adolfo

    2015-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1 or Steinert's disease) and type 2 (DM2) are multisystem disorders of genetic origin. Progressive muscular weakness, atrophy and myotonia are the most prominent neuromuscular features of these diseases, while other clinical manifestations such as cardiomyopathy, insulin resistance and cataracts are also common. From a clinical perspective, most DM symptoms are interpreted as a result of an accelerated aging (cataracts, muscular weakness and atrophy, cognitive decline, metabolic dysfunction, etc.), including an increased risk of developing tumors. From this point of view, DM1 could be described as a progeroid syndrome since a notable age-dependent dysfunction of all systems occurs. The underlying molecular disorder in DM1 consists of the existence of a pathological (CTG) triplet expansion in the 3' untranslated region (UTR) of the Dystrophia Myotonica Protein Kinase (DMPK) gene, whereas (CCTG)n repeats in the first intron of the Cellular Nucleic acid Binding Protein/Zinc Finger Protein 9 (CNBP/ZNF9) gene cause DM2. The expansions are transcribed into (CUG)n and (CCUG)n-containing RNA, respectively, which form secondary structures and sequester RNA-binding proteins, such as the splicing factor muscleblind-like protein (MBNL), forming nuclear aggregates known as foci. Other splicing factors, such as CUGBP, are also disrupted, leading to a spliceopathy of a large number of downstream genes linked to the clinical features of these diseases. Skeletal muscle regeneration relies on muscle progenitor cells, known as satellite cells, which are activated after muscle damage, and which proliferate and differentiate to muscle cells, thus regenerating the damaged tissue. Satellite cell dysfunction seems to be a common feature of both age-dependent muscle degeneration (sarcopenia) and muscle wasting in DM and other muscle degenerative diseases. This review aims to describe the cellular, molecular and macrostructural processes involved in the muscular

  1. Physical performance measures that predict faller status in community-dwelling older adults.

    PubMed

    Macrae, P G; Lacourse, M; Moldavon, R

    1992-01-01

    Falls are a leading cause of fatal and nonfatal injuries among the elderly. Accurate determination of risk factors associated with falls in older adults is necessary, not only for individual patient management, but also for the development of fall prevention programs. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of clinical measures, such as the one-legged stance test (OLST), sit-to-stand test (STST), manual muscle tests (MMT), and response speed in predicting faller status in community-dwelling older adults (N = 94, age 60-89 years). The variables assessed were single-leg standing (as measured by OLST), STST, and MMT of 12 different muscle groups (hip flexors, hip abductors, hip adductors, knee flexors, knee extensors, ankle dorsiflexors, ankle plantarflexors, shoulder flexors, shoulder abductors, elbow flexors, elbow extensors, and finger flexors), and speed of response (as measured by a visual hand reaction and movement time task). Of the 94 older adults assessed, 28 (29.7%) reported at least one fall within the previous year. The discriminant analysis revealed that there were six variables that significantly discriminated between fallers and nonfallers. These variables included MMT of the ankle dorsiflexors, knee flexors, hip abductors, and knee extensors, as well as time on the OLST and the STST. The results indicate that simple clinical measures of musculoskeletal function can discriminate fallers from nonfallers in community-dwelling older adults. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 1992;16(3):123-128.

  2. Experiment K-6-09. Morphological and biochemical investigation of microgravity-induced nerve and muscle breakdown. Part 1: Investigation of nerve and muscle breakdown during spaceflight; Part 2: Biochemical analysis of EDL and PLT muscles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, D. A.; Ellis, S.; Bain, J.; Sedlak, F.; Slocum, G.; Oganov, V.

    1990-01-01

    The present findings on rat hindlimb muscles suggest that skeletal muscle weakness induced by prolonged spaceflight can result from a combination of muscle fiber atrophy, muscle fiber segmental necrosis, degeneration of motor nerve terminals and destruction of microcirculatory vessels. Damage was confined to the red adductor longus (AL) and soleus muscles. The midbelly region of the AL muscle had more segmental necrosis and edema than the ends. Macrophages and neutrophils were the major mononucleated cells infiltrating and phagocytosing the cellular debris. Toluidine blue-positive mast cells were significantly decreased in Flight AL muscles compared to controls; this indicated that degranulation of mast cells contributed to tissue edema. Increased ubiquitination of disrupted myofibrils may have promoted myofilament degradation. Overall, mitochondria content and SDH activity were normal, except for a decrease in the subsarcolemmal region. The myofibrillar ATPase activity shifted toward the fast type in the Flight AL muscles. Some of the pathological changes may have occurred or been exacerbated during the 2 day postflight period of readaptation to terrestrial gravity. While simple atrophy should be reversible by exercise, restoration of pathological changes depends upon complex processes of regeneration by stem cells. Initial signs of muscle and nerve fiber regeneration were detected. Even though regeneration proceeds on Earth, the space environment may inhibit repair and cause progressive irreversible deterioration during long term missions. Muscles obtained from Flight rats sacrificed immediately (within a few hours) after landing are needed to distinguish inflight changes from postflight readaptation.

  3. A Comparison of Cough Assistance Techniques in Patients with Respiratory Muscle Weakness.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun Mi; Choi, Won Ah; Won, Yu Hui; Kang, Seong Woong

    2016-11-01

    To assess the ability of a mechanical in-exsufflator (MI-E), either alone or in combination with manual thrust, to augment cough in patients with neuromuscular disease (NMD) and respiratory muscle dysfunction. For this randomized crossover single-center controlled trial, patients with noninvasive ventilator-dependent NMD were recruited. The primary outcome was peak cough flow (PCF), which was measured in each patient after a cough that was unassisted, manually assisted following a maximum insufflation capacity (MIC) maneuver, assisted by MI-E, or assisted by manual thrust plus MI-E. The cough augmentation techniques were provided in random order. PCF was measured using a new device, the Cough Aid. All 40 enrolled participants (37 males, three females; average age, 20.9±7.2 years) completed the study. The mean (standard deviation) PCFs in the unassisted, manually assisted following an MIC maneuver, MI-E-assisted, and manual thrust plus MI-E-assisted conditions were 95.7 (40.5), 155.9 (53.1), 177.2 (33.9), and 202.4 (46.6) L/min, respectively. All three interventions significantly improved PCF. However, manual assistance following an MIC maneuver was significantly less effective than MI-E alone. Manual thrust plus MI-E was significantly more effective than both of these interventions. In patients with NMD and respiratory muscle dysfunction, MI-E alone was more effective than manual assistance following an MIC maneuver. However, MI-E used in conjunction with manual thrust improved PCF even further.

  4. Lower Extremity Muscle Activity during Cycling in Adolescents with and without Cerebral Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Lauer, Richard T.; Johnston, Therese E.; Smith, Brian T.; Lee, Samuel C.K.

    2008-01-01

    Background In individuals with cerebral palsy (CP), adaptation and plasticity in the neuromuscular system can lead to detrimental changes affecting gait. Cycling may be an effective method to improve mobility. The biomechanics of cycling in adolescents with CP have been studied, but further analysis of the frequency and amplitude characteristics of the electromyographic (EMG) signals can assist with interpretation of the cycling kinematics. Methods Data were analyzed from ten adolescents with typical development (TD) (mean = 14.9 SD = 1.4 years) and ten adolescents with CP (mean = 15.6 SD = 1.8 years) as they cycled at two different cadences. Analyses of the lower extremity EMG signals involved frequency and amplitude analysis across the cycling revolution. Findings Examination of cycling cadence revealed that adolescents with CP had altered EMG characteristics in comparison to adolescents with typical development across the entire crank revolution for all muscles. Analyses of individual muscles indicated both inappropriate muscle activation and weakness. Interpretation A more comprehensive analysis of EMG activity has the potential to provide insight into how a task is accomplished. In this study, the control of the several muscles, especially the rectus femoris, was significantly different in adolescents with cerebral palsy. This, combined with muscle weakness, may have contributed to the observed deviations in joint kinematics. Interventions that increase muscle strength with feedback to the nervous system about appropriate activation timing may be beneficial to allow individuals with CP to cycle more efficiently. PMID:18082920

  5. Limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 2G with myopathic-neurogenic motor unit potentials and a novel muscle image pattern.

    PubMed

    Cotta, Ana; Paim, Julia Filardi; da-Cunha-Junior, Antonio Lopes; Neto, Rafael Xavier; Nunes, Simone Vilela; Navarro, Monica Magalhaes; Valicek, Jaquelin; Carvalho, Elmano; Yamamoto, Lydia U; Almeida, Camila F; Braz, Shelida Vasconcelos; Takata, Reinaldo Issao; Vainzof, Mariz

    2014-01-01

    Limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 2G (LGMD2G) is a subtype of autosomal recessive muscular dystrophy caused by mutations in the telethonin gene. There are few LGMD2G patients worldwide reported, and this is the first description associated with early tibialis anterior sparing on muscle image and myopathic-neurogenic motor unit potentials. Here we report a 31 years old caucasian male patient with progressive gait disturbance, and severe lower limb proximal weakness since the age of 20 years, associated with subtle facial muscle weakness. Computed tomography demonstrated soleus, medial gastrocnemius, and diffuse thigh muscles involvement with tibialis anterior sparing. Electromyography disclosed both neurogenic and myopathic motor unit potentials. Muscle biopsy demonstrated large groups of atrophic and hypertrophic fibers, frequent fibers with intracytoplasmic rimmed vacuoles full of autophagic membrane and sarcoplasmic debris, and a total deficiency of telethonin. Molecular investigation identified the common homozygous c.157C > T in the TCAP gene. This report expands the phenotypic variability of telethoninopathy/ LGMD2G, including: 1) mixed neurogenic and myopathic motor unit potentials, 2) facial weakness, and 3) tibialis anterior sparing. Appropriate diagnosis in these cases is important for genetic counseling and prognosis.

  6. Influence of consonant voicing characteristics on sentence production in abductor versus adductor spasmodic dysphonia.

    PubMed

    Cannito, Michael P; Chorna, Lesya B; Kahane, Joel C; Dworkin, James P

    2014-05-01

    This study evaluated the hypotheses that sentence production by speakers with adductor (AD) and abductor (AB) spasmodic dysphonia (SD) may be differentially influenced by consonant voicing and manner features, in comparison with healthy, matched, nondysphonic controls. This was a prospective, single blind study, using a between-groups, repeated measures design for the independent variables of perceived voice quality and sentence duration. Sixteen subjects with ADSD and 10 subjects with ABSD, as well as 26 matched healthy controls produced four short, simple sentences that were systematically loaded with voiced or voiceless consonants of either obstruant or continuant manner categories. Experienced voice clinicians, who were "blind" as to speakers' group affixations, used visual analog scaling to judge the overall voice quality of each sentence. Acoustic sentence durations were also measured. Speakers with ABSD or ADSD demonstrated significantly poorer than normal voice quality on all sentences. Speakers with ABSD exhibited longer than normal duration for voiceless consonant sentences. Speakers with ADSD had poorer voice quality for voiced than for voiceless consonant sentences. Speakers with ABSD had longer durations for voiceless than for voiced consonant sentences. The two subtypes of SD exhibit differential performance on the basis of consonant voicing in short, simple sentences; however, each subgroup manifested voicing-related differences on a different variable (voice quality vs sentence duration). Findings suggest different underlying pathophysiological mechanisms for ABSD and ADSD. Findings also support inclusion of short, simple sentences containing voiced or voiceless consonants as part of the diagnostic protocol for SD, with measurement of sentence duration in addition to judments of voice quality severity. Copyright © 2014 The Voice Foundation. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. [F-waves in brachial plexus palsy correlated to the prognosis of intrinsic paralysis].

    PubMed

    Nobuta, S

    1995-04-01

    F-waves were examined in 80 nerves of 40 brachial plexus palsies in 37 cases. The electrical responses were evoked by 30 consecutive supramaximal electric stimuli to the median and ulnar nerves at the wrist and elbow, and recorded from the abductor pollicis brevis and abductor digiti minimi muscles. Three parameters in the F-waves were analyzed--conduction velocity, the difference between the maximal and minimal latencies, and the amplitude. In all cases, examinations were done repeatedly to detect changes in these parameters, and the results were compared with the clinical course of the intrinsic muscle function. Twenty-seven cases were investigated before and after explorative surgery. The findings were divided into four groups. The 1st group consisted of 12 nerves in which F-waves were not recorded. The intrinsic muscle power in this group was zero, and did not show any restoration. The 2nd group consisted of 10 nerves in which the conduction velocity was delayed. The muscle power in this group was fair, poor or trace, and there was no change in conduction velocity and muscle function. The 3rd group consisted of 18 nerves in which parameters other than the conduction velocity were abnormal, and the intrinsic muscle power in this group was fair, good or normal. In 7 of these nerves, the large latency difference decreased to normal at the 2nd, 3rd or 4th test with functional recovery in the intrinsic muscle. The high amplitude also changed to normal at the 2nd test with functional recovery. The 4th group consisted of 40 nerves in which all the parameters were normal and had full intrinsic muscle power. In conclusion, an examination of the F-waves was valuable to indicate the prognosis of the intrinsic muscle in the hand in brachial plexus palsy.

  8. Effects of the belt electrode skeletal muscle electrical stimulation system on lower extremity skeletal muscle activity: Evaluation using positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Numata, Hitoaki; Nakase, Junsuke; Inaki, Anri; Mochizuki, Takafumi; Oshima, Takeshi; Takata, Yasushi; Kinuya, Seigo; Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Lower-extremity muscle weakness in athletes after lower limb trauma or surgery can hinder their return to sports, and the associated muscle atrophy may lead to deterioration in performance after returning to sports. Recently, belt electrode skeletal muscle electrical stimulation (B-SES) which can contract all the lower limb skeletal muscles simultaneously was developed. However, no study has evaluated skeletal muscle activity with B-SES. Since only superficial muscles as well as a limited number of muscles can be investigated using electromyography, we investigated whether positron emission tomography (PET) can evaluate the activity of all the skeletal muscles in the body simultaneously. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the B-SES system using PET. Twelve healthy males (mean age, 24.3 years) were divided into two groups. The subjects in the control group remained in a sitting position for 10 min, and [(18)F] fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) was intravenously injected. In the exercise group, subjects exercised using the B-SES system for 20 min daily for three consecutive days as a pre-test exercise. On the measurement day, they exercised for 10 min, received an injection of FDG, and exercised for another 10 min. PET-computed tomography images were obtained in each group 60 min after the FDG injection. Regions of interest were drawn in each lower-extremity muscle. We compared each skeletal muscle metabolism using the standardized uptake value. In the exercise group, FDG accumulation in the gluteus maximus, gluteus medius, gluteus minimus, quadriceps femoris, sartorius, and hamstrings was significantly higher than the muscles in the control (P < 0.05). Exercise with B-SES increased the skeletal muscle activity of the gluteal muscles as well as the most lower-extremity muscles simultaneously. Copyright © 2015 The Japanese Orthopaedic Association. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Dystrophin-deficient pigs provide new insights into the hierarchy of physiological derangements of dystrophic muscle.

    PubMed

    Klymiuk, Nikolai; Blutke, Andreas; Graf, Alexander; Krause, Sabine; Burkhardt, Katinka; Wuensch, Annegret; Krebs, Stefan; Kessler, Barbara; Zakhartchenko, Valeri; Kurome, Mayuko; Kemter, Elisabeth; Nagashima, Hiroshi; Schoser, Benedikt; Herbach, Nadja; Blum, Helmut; Wanke, Rüdiger; Aartsma-Rus, Annemieke; Thirion, Christian; Lochmüller, Hanns; Walter, Maggie C; Wolf, Eckhard

    2013-11-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is caused by mutations in the X-linked dystrophin (DMD) gene. The absence of dystrophin protein leads to progressive muscle weakness and wasting, disability and death. To establish a tailored large animal model of DMD, we deleted DMD exon 52 in male pig cells by gene targeting and generated offspring by nuclear transfer. DMD pigs exhibit absence of dystrophin in skeletal muscles, increased serum creatine kinase levels, progressive dystrophic changes of skeletal muscles, impaired mobility, muscle weakness and a maximum life span of 3 months due to respiratory impairment. Unlike human DMD patients, some DMD pigs die shortly after birth. To address the accelerated development of muscular dystrophy in DMD pigs when compared with human patients, we performed a genome-wide transcriptome study of biceps femoris muscle specimens from 2-day-old and 3-month-old DMD and age-matched wild-type pigs. The transcriptome changes in 3-month-old DMD pigs were in good concordance with gene expression profiles in human DMD, reflecting the processes of degeneration, regeneration, inflammation, fibrosis and impaired metabolic activity. In contrast, the transcriptome profile of 2-day-old DMD pigs showed similarities with transcriptome changes induced by acute exercise muscle injury. Our studies provide new insights into early changes associated with dystrophin deficiency in a clinically severe animal model of DMD.

  10. Intercostal and forearm muscle deoxygenation during respiratory fatigue in patients with heart failure: potential role of a respiratory muscle metaboreflex.

    PubMed

    Moreno, A M; Castro, R R T; Silva, B M; Villacorta, H; Sant'Anna Junior, M; Nóbrega, A C L

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of respiratory muscle fatigue on intercostal and forearm muscle perfusion and oxygenation in patients with heart failure. Five clinically stable heart failure patients with respiratory muscle weakness (age, 66 ± 12 years; left ventricle ejection fraction, 34 ± 3%) and nine matched healthy controls underwent a respiratory muscle fatigue protocol, breathing against a fixed resistance at 60% of their maximal inspiratory pressure for as long as they could sustain the predetermined inspiratory pressure. Intercostal and forearm muscle blood volume and oxygenation were continuously monitored by near-infrared spectroscopy with transducers placed on the seventh left intercostal space and the left forearm. Data were compared by two-way ANOVA and Bonferroni correction. Respiratory fatigue occurred at 5.1 ± 1.3 min in heart failure patients and at 9.3 ± 1.4 min in controls (P<0.05), but perceived effort, changes in heart rate, and in systolic blood pressure were similar between groups (P>0.05). Respiratory fatigue in heart failure reduced intercostal and forearm muscle blood volume (P<0.05) along with decreased tissue oxygenation both in intercostal (heart failure, -2.6 ± 1.6%; controls, +1.6 ± 0.5%; P<0.05) and in forearm muscles (heart failure, -4.5 ± 0.5%; controls, +0.5 ± 0.8%; P<0.05). These results suggest that respiratory fatigue in patients with heart failure causes an oxygen demand/delivery mismatch in respiratory muscles, probably leading to a reflex reduction in peripheral limb muscle perfusion, featuring a respiratory metaboreflex.

  11. Classification and grading of muscle injuries: a narrative review

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Bruce; Valle, Xavier; Rodas, Gil; Til, Luis; Grive, Ricard Pruna; Rincon, Josep Antoni Gutierrez; Tol, Johannes L

    2015-01-01

    A limitation to the accurate study of muscle injuries and their management has been the lack of a uniform approach to the categorisation and grading of muscle injuries. The goal of this narrative review was to provide a framework from which to understand the historical progression of the classification and grading of muscle injuries. We reviewed the classification and grading of muscle injuries in the literature to critically illustrate the strengths, weaknesses, contradictions or controversies. A retrospective, citation-based methodology was applied to search for English language literature which evaluated or utilised a novel muscle classification or grading system. While there is an abundance of literature classifying and grading muscle injuries, it is predominantly expert opinion, and there remains little evidence relating any of the clinical or radiological features to an established pathology or clinical outcome. While the categorical grading of injury severity may have been a reasonable solution to a clinical challenge identified in the middle of the 20th century, it is time to recognise the complexity of the injury, cease trying to oversimplify it and to develop appropriately powered research projects to answer important questions. PMID:25394420

  12. Analysis of factors related to arm weakness in patients with breast cancer-related lymphedema.

    PubMed

    Lee, Daegu; Hwang, Ji Hye; Chu, Inho; Chang, Hyun Ju; Shim, Young Hun; Kim, Jung Hyun

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the ratio of significant weakness in the affected arm of breast cancer-related lymphedema patients to their unaffected side. Another purpose was to identify factors related to arm weakness and physical function in patients with breast cancer-related lymphedema. Consecutive patients (n = 80) attended a single evaluation session following their outpatient lymphedema clinic visit. Possible independent factors (i.e., lymphedema, pain, psychological, educational, and behavioral) were evaluated. Handgrip strength was used to assess upper extremity muscle strength and the disabilities of arm, shoulder, and hand (DASH) questionnaire was used to assess upper extremity physical function. Multivariate logistic regression was performed using factors that had significant differences between the handgrip weakness and non-weakness groups. Out of the 80 patients with breast cancer-related lymphedema, 29 patients (36.3 %) had significant weakness in the affected arm. Weakness of the arm with lymphedema was not related to lymphedema itself, but was related to the fear of using the affected limb (odds ratio = 1.76, 95 % confidence interval = 1.30-2.37). Fears of using the affected limb and depression significantly contributed to the variance in DASH scores. Appropriate physical and psychological interventions, including providing accurate information and reassurance of physical activity safety, are necessary to prevent arm weakness and physical dysfunction in patients with breast cancer-related lymphedema.

  13. Muscle Activation during Gait in Children with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Ropars, Juliette; Lempereur, Mathieu; Vuillerot, Carole; Tiffreau, Vincent; Peudenier, Sylviane; Cuisset, Jean-Marie; Pereon, Yann; Leboeuf, Fabien; Delporte, Ludovic; Delpierre, Yannick; Gross, Raphaël; Brochard, Sylvain

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this prospective study was to investigate changes in muscle activity during gait in children with Duchenne muscular Dystrophy (DMD). Dynamic surface electromyography recordings (EMGs) of 16 children with DMD and pathological gait were compared with those of 15 control children. The activity of the rectus femoris (RF), vastus lateralis (VL), medial hamstrings (HS), tibialis anterior (TA) and gastrocnemius soleus (GAS) muscles was recorded and analysed quantitatively and qualitatively. The overall muscle activity in the children with DMD was significantly different from that of the control group. Percentage activation amplitudes of RF, HS and TA were greater throughout the gait cycle in the children with DMD and the timing of GAS activity differed from the control children. Significantly greater muscle coactivation was found in the children with DMD. There were no significant differences between sides. Since the motor command is normal in DMD, the hyper-activity and co-contractions likely compensate for gait instability and muscle weakness, however may have negative consequences on the muscles and may increase the energy cost of gait. Simple rehabilitative strategies such as targeted physical therapies may improve stability and thus the pattern of muscle activity.

  14. Compromised store-operated Ca2+ entry in aged skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiaoli; Weisleder, Noah; Thornton, Angela; Oppong, Yaa; Campbell, Rachel; Ma, Jianjie; Brotto, Marco

    2008-08-01

    In aged skeletal muscle, changes to the composition and function of the contractile machinery cannot fully explain the observed decrease in the specific force produced by the contractile machinery that characterizes muscle weakness during aging. Since modification in extracellular Ca(2+) entry in aged nonexcitable and excitable cells has been recently identified, we evaluated the functional status of store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE) in aged mouse skeletal muscle. Using Mn(2+) quenching of Fura-2 fluorescence and confocal-microscopic imaging of Ca(2+) movement from the transverse tubules, we determined that SOCE was severely compromised in muscle fibers isolated from aged mice (26-27 months) as compared with those from young (2-5 months) mice. While reduced SOCE in aged skeletal muscle does not appear to result from altered expression levels of STIM1 or reduced expression of mRNA for Orai, this reduction in SOCE is mirrored in fibers isolated from young mice null for mitsugumin-29, a synaptophysin-related protein that displays decreased expression in aged skeletal muscle. Our data suggest that decreased mitsugumin-29 expression and reduced SOCE may contribute to the diminished intracellular Ca(2+) homeostatic capacity generally associated with muscle aging.

  15. Myostatin inhibition prevents skeletal muscle pathophysiology in Huntington's disease mice.

    PubMed

    Bondulich, Marie K; Jolinon, Nelly; Osborne, Georgina F; Smith, Edward J; Rattray, Ivan; Neueder, Andreas; Sathasivam, Kirupa; Ahmed, Mhoriam; Ali, Nadira; Benjamin, Agnesska C; Chang, Xiaoli; Dick, James R T; Ellis, Matthew; Franklin, Sophie A; Goodwin, Daniel; Inuabasi, Linda; Lazell, Hayley; Lehar, Adam; Richard-Londt, Angela; Rosinski, Jim; Smith, Donna L; Wood, Tobias; Tabrizi, Sarah J; Brandner, Sebastian; Greensmith, Linda; Howland, David; Munoz-Sanjuan, Ignacio; Lee, Se-Jin; Bates, Gillian P

    2017-10-27

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an inherited neurodegenerative disorder of which skeletal muscle atrophy is a common feature, and multiple lines of evidence support a muscle-based pathophysiology in HD mouse models. Inhibition of myostatin signaling increases muscle mass, and therapeutic approaches based on this are in clinical development. We have used a soluble ActRIIB decoy receptor (ACVR2B/Fc) to test the effects of myostatin/activin A inhibition in the R6/2 mouse model of HD. Weekly administration from 5 to 11 weeks of age prevented body weight loss, skeletal muscle atrophy, muscle weakness, contractile abnormalities, the loss of functional motor units in EDL muscles and delayed end-stage disease. Inhibition of myostatin/activin A signaling activated transcriptional profiles to increase muscle mass in wild type and R6/2 mice but did little to modulate the extensive Huntington's disease-associated transcriptional dysregulation, consistent with treatment having little impact on HTT aggregation levels. Modalities that inhibit myostatin signaling are currently in clinical trials for a variety of indications, the outcomes of which will present the opportunity to assess the potential benefits of targeting this pathway in HD patients.

  16. Relationship Between Muscle Strength Asymmetry and Body Sway in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Koda, Hitoshi; Kai, Yoshihiro; Murata, Shin; Osugi, Hironori; Anami, Kunihiko; Fukumoto, Takahiko; Imagita, Hidetaka

    2018-05-31

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between muscle strength asymmetry and body sway while walking. We studied 63 older adult women. Strong side and weak side of knee extension strength, toe grip strength, hand grip strength, and body sway while walking were measured. The relationship between muscle strength asymmetry for each muscle and body sway while walking was evaluated using Pearson's correlation coefficient. Regarding the muscles recognized to have significant correlation with body sway, the asymmetry cutoff value causing an increased sway was calculated. Toe grip strength asymmetry was significantly correlated with body sway. Toe grip strength asymmetry causing an increased body sway had a cutoff value of 23.5%. Our findings suggest toe grip strength asymmetry may be a target for improving gait stability.

  17. Skeletal muscle fiber, nerve, and blood vessel breakdown in space-flown rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, D. A.; Ilyina-Kakueva, E. I.; Ellis, S.; Bain, J. L.; Slocum, G. R.; Sedlak, F. R.

    1990-01-01

    Histochemical and ultrastructural analyses were performed postflight on hind limb skeletal muscles of rats orbited for 12.5 days aboard the unmanned Cosmos 1887 biosatellite and returned to Earth 2 days before sacrifice. The antigravity adductor longus (AL), soleus, and plantaris muscles atrophied more than the non-weight-bearing extensor digitorum longus, and slow muscle fibers were more atrophic than fast fibers. Muscle fiber segmental necrosis occurred selectively in the AL and soleus muscles; primarily, macrophages and neutrophils infiltrated and phagocytosed cellular debris. Granule-rich mast cells were diminished in flight AL muscles compared with controls, indicating the mast cell secretion contributed to interstitial tissue edema. Increased ubiquitination of disrupted myofibrils implicated ubiquitin in myofilament degradation. Mitochondrial content and succinic dehydrogenase activity were normal, except for subsarcolemmal decreases. Myofibrillar ATPase activity of flight AL muscle fibers shifted toward the fast type. Absence of capillaries and extravasation of red blood cells indicated failed microcirculation. Muscle fiber regeneration from activated satellite cells was detected. About 17% of the flight AL end plates exhibited total or partial denervation. Thus, skeletal muscle weakness associated with spaceflight can result from muscle fiber atrophy and segmental necrosis, partial motor denervation, and disruption of the microcirculation.

  18. CuZnSOD gene deletion targeted to skeletal muscle leads to loss of contractile force but does not cause muscle atrophy in adult mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yiqiang; Davis, Carol; Sakellariou, George K.; Shi, Yun; Kayani, Anna C.; Pulliam, Daniel; Bhattacharya, Arunabh; Richardson, Arlan; Jackson, Malcolm J.; McArdle, Anne; Brooks, Susan V.; Van Remmen, Holly

    2013-01-01

    We have previously shown that deletion of CuZnSOD in mice (Sod1−/− mice) leads to accelerated loss of muscle mass and contractile force during aging. To dissect the relative roles of skeletal muscle and motor neurons in this process, we used a Cre-Lox targeted approach to establish a skeletal muscle-specific Sod1-knockout (mKO) mouse to determine whether muscle-specific CuZnSOD deletion is sufficient to cause muscle atrophy. Surprisingly, mKO mice maintain muscle masses at or above those of wild-type control mice up to 18 mo of age. In contrast, maximum isometric specific force measured in gastrocnemius muscle is significantly reduced in the mKO mice. We found no detectable increases in global measures of oxidative stress or ROS production, no reduction in mitochondrial ATP production, and no induction of adaptive stress responses in muscle from mKO mice. However, Akt-mTOR signaling is elevated and the number of muscle fibers with centrally located nuclei is increased in skeletal muscle from mKO mice, which suggests elevated regenerative pathways. Our data demonstrate that lack of CuZnSOD restricted to skeletal muscle does not lead to muscle atrophy but does cause muscle weakness in adult mice and suggest loss of CuZnSOD may potentiate muscle regenerative pathways.—Zhang, Y., Davis, C., Sakellariou, G.K., Shi, Y., Kayani, A.C., Pulliam, D., Bhattacharya, A., Richardson, A., Jackson, M.J., McArdle, A., Brooks, S.V., Van Remmen, H. CuZnSOD gene deletion targeted to skeletal muscle leads to loss of contractile force but does not cause muscle atrophy in adult mice. PMID:23729587

  19. Ultrasound evaluation of intrinsic plantar muscles and fascia in hallux valgus: A case-control study.

    PubMed

    Lobo, César Calvo; Marín, Alejandro Garrido; Sanz, David Rodríguez; López, Daniel López; López, Patricia Palomo; Morales, Carlos Romero; Corbalán, Irene Sanz

    2016-11-01

    A cross-sectional area (CSA) and thickness reduction of the abductor hallucis (AbH) is shown in subjects with hallux valgus (HV). To date, other soft-tissue structures have not been researched in relation with HV. The aim of this study was to compare the CSA and thickness of the intrinsic plantar muscles and fascia (PF) between feet with and without HV. Therefore, a cross-sectional and case-control study was performed using B-mode with an iU22 Philips ultrasound system and a 5 to 17-MHz transducer. The CSA and thickness were measured for the AbH, flexor digitorum brevis (FDB) and flexor hallucis brevis (FHB), and also the thickness for the anterior, middle, and posterior PF portions. A convenience sample of 40 feet, 20 with HV and 20 without HV, was recruited from a clinical and research center. A multivariate regression analysis using linear regression was performed to evaluate the ultrasound imaging measurements (α = 0.05). Consequently, statistically significant differences were observed between the groups (P < 0.05) for the AbH and FHB thickness, and CSA reduction, and also the plantar fascia thickness increase in favor of the HV group. On the contrary, the FDB thickness and CSA did not show statistically significant differences (P ≥ 0.05). In conclusion, the CSA and thickness of the AbH and FHB intrinsic plantar muscles are reduced, whereas the thickness of the anterior, middle, and posterior PF portions are increased, in subjects with HV compared with those without HV.

  20. Effects of bedding systems selected by manual muscle testing on sleep and sleep-related respiratory disturbances.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Ling-Ling; Liu, Hau-Min

    2008-03-01

    In this study, we investigated the feasibility of applying manual muscle testing (MMT) for bedding selection and examined the bedding effect on sleep. Four lay testers with limited training in MMT performed muscle tests for the selection of the bedding systems from five different mattresses and eight different pillows for 14 participants with mild sleep-related respiratory disturbances. For each participant individually, two bedding systems-one inducing stronger muscle forces and the other inducing weaker forces-were selected. The tester-participant pairs showed 85% and 100% agreement, respectively, for the selection of mattresses and pillows that induced the strongest muscle forces. The firmness of the mattress and the height of the pillow were significantly correlated with the body weight and body mass index of the participants for the selected strong bedding system but not for the weak bedding system. Finally, differences were observed between the strong and the weak bedding systems with regard to sleep-related respiratory disturbances and the percentage of slow-wave sleep. It was concluded that MMT can be performed by inexperienced testers for the selection of bedding systems.

  1. 3D finite element models of shoulder muscles for computing lines of actions and moment arms.

    PubMed

    Webb, Joshua D; Blemker, Silvia S; Delp, Scott L

    2014-01-01

    Accurate representation of musculoskeletal geometry is needed to characterise the function of shoulder muscles. Previous models of shoulder muscles have represented muscle geometry as a collection of line segments, making it difficult to account for the large attachment areas, muscle-muscle interactions and complex muscle fibre trajectories typical of shoulder muscles. To better represent shoulder muscle geometry, we developed 3D finite element models of the deltoid and rotator cuff muscles and used the models to examine muscle function. Muscle fibre paths within the muscles were approximated, and moment arms were calculated for two motions: thoracohumeral abduction and internal/external rotation. We found that muscle fibre moment arms varied substantially across each muscle. For example, supraspinatus is considered a weak external rotator, but the 3D model of supraspinatus showed that the anterior fibres provide substantial internal rotation while the posterior fibres act as external rotators. Including the effects of large attachment regions and 3D mechanical interactions of muscle fibres constrains muscle motion, generates more realistic muscle paths and allows deeper analysis of shoulder muscle function.

  2. 3D Finite Element Models of Shoulder Muscles for Computing Lines of Actions and Moment Arms

    PubMed Central

    Webb, Joshua D.; Blemker, Silvia S.; Delp, Scott L.

    2014-01-01

    Accurate representation of musculoskeletal geometry is needed to characterize the function of shoulder muscles. Previous models of shoulder muscles have represented muscle geometry as a collection of line segments, making it difficult to account the large attachment areas, muscle-muscle interactions, and complex muscle fiber trajectories typical of shoulder muscles. To better represent shoulder muscle geometry we developed three-dimensional finite element models of the deltoid and rotator cuff muscles and used the models to examine muscle function. Muscle fiber paths within the muscles were approximated, and moment arms were calculated for two motions: thoracohumeral abduction and internal/external rotation. We found that muscle fiber moment arms varied substantially across each muscle. For example, supraspinatus is considered a weak external rotator, but the three-dimensional model of supraspinatus showed that the anterior fibers provide substantial internal rotation while the posterior fibers act as external rotators. Including the effects of large attachment regions and three-dimensional mechanical interactions of muscle fibers constrains muscle motion, generates more realistic muscle paths, and allows deeper analysis of shoulder muscle function. PMID:22994141

  3. Voluntary activation failure is detectable in some myositis patients with persisting quadriceps femoris weakness: an observational study

    PubMed Central

    Molloy, Catherine B; Al-Omar, Ahmed O; Edge, Kathryn T; Cooper, Robert G

    2006-01-01

    This cross-sectional, observational study was undertaken to examine whether voluntary activation failure could contribute to the persisting weakness observed in some patients with treated idiopathic inflammatory myositis. In 20 patients with myositis of more than six months' duration (5 males, 15 females; mean [± 1 SD] age 53 [11] years) and 102 normal subjects (44 males, 58 females; mean age 32 [8] years), isometric maximum voluntary contractions (MVCs) of the dominant quadriceps femoris (QF) were quantified. Absolute MVC results of normal subjects and patients were then normalised with respect to lean body mass (force per units of lean body mass), giving a result in Newtons per kilogram. Based on mass-normalised force data of normal subjects, patients were arbitrarily stratified into "weak" and "not weak" subgroups. During further MVC attempts, the "twitch interpolation" technique was used to assess whether the QF voluntary activation of patients was complete. This technique relies on the fact that, because muscle activation is incomplete during submaximal voluntary contractions, electrical stimulation of the muscle can induce force increments superimposed on the submaximal voluntary force being generated. No between-gender differences were seen in the mass-normalised MVC results of healthy subjects, so the gender-combined results of 6.6 (1.5) N/kg were used for patient stratification. No between-gender difference was found for mass-normalised MVCs in patients: males 5.4 (3.2) and females 3.0 (1.7) N/kg (p > 0.05). Mass-normalised MVCs of male patients were as great as those of normal subjects (p > 0.05), but mass-normalised MVCs of female patients were significantly smaller than those of the normal subjects (p < 0.001). Only one of the six "not weak" patients exhibited interpolated twitches during electrical stimulation, but six of the 14 "weak" patients did, the biggest twitches being seen in the weakest patient. That interpolated twitches can be induced in

  4. Association between isometric muscle strength and gait joint kinetics in adolescents and young adults with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Dallmeijer, A J; Baker, R; Dodd, K J; Taylor, N F

    2011-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the association between isometric muscle strength of the lower limbs and gait joint kinetics in adolescents and young adults with cerebral palsy (CP). Twenty-five participants (11 males) with bilateral spastic CP, aged 14-22 years (mean: 18.9, sd: 2.0 yr) and Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) level II (n=19) and III (n=6) were tested. Hand held dynamometry was used to measure isometric strength (expressed in Nm/kg) of the hip, knee, and ankle muscles using standardized testing positions and procedures. 3D gait analysis was performed with a VICON system to calculate joint kinetics in the hip, knee and ankle during gait. Ankle peak moments exceeded by far the levels of isometric strength of the plantar flexors, while the knee and hip peak moments were just at or below maximal isometric strength of knee and hip muscles. Isometric muscle strength showed weak to moderate correlations with peak ankle and hip extension moment and power during walking. Despite considerable muscle weakness, joint moment curves were similar to norm values. Results suggest that passive stretch of the muscle-tendon complex of the triceps surae contributes to the ankle moment during walking and that muscle strength assessment may provide additional information to gait kinetics. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Comparative Proteomic and Transcriptomic Analysis of Follistatin-Induced Skeletal Muscle Hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Barbé, Caroline; Bray, Fabrice; Gueugneau, Marine; Devassine, Stéphanie; Lause, Pascale; Tokarski, Caroline; Rolando, Christian; Thissen, Jean-Paul

    2017-10-06

    Skeletal muscle, the most abundant body tissue, plays vital roles in locomotion and metabolism. Myostatin is a negative regulator of skeletal muscle mass. In addition to increasing muscle mass, Myostatin inhibition impacts muscle contractility and energy metabolism. To decipher the mechanisms of action of the Myostatin inhibitors, we used proteomic and transcriptomic approaches to investigate the changes induced in skeletal muscles of transgenic mice overexpressing Follistatin, a physiological Myostatin inhibitor. Our proteomic workflow included a fractionation step to identify weakly expressed proteins and a comparison of fast versus slow muscles. Functional annotation of altered proteins supports the phenotypic changes induced by Myostatin inhibition, including modifications in energy metabolism, fiber type, insulin and calcium signaling, as well as membrane repair and regeneration. Less than 10% of the differentially expressed proteins were found to be also regulated at the mRNA level but the Biological Process annotation, and the KEGG pathways analysis of transcriptomic results shows a great concordance with the proteomic data. Thus this study describes the most extensive omics analysis of muscle overexpressing Follistatin, providing molecular-level insights to explain the observed muscle phenotypic changes.

  6. Weak measurements and quantum weak values for NOON states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosales-Zárate, L.; Opanchuk, B.; Reid, M. D.

    2018-03-01

    Quantum weak values arise when the mean outcome of a weak measurement made on certain preselected and postselected quantum systems goes beyond the eigenvalue range for a quantum observable. Here, we propose how to determine quantum weak values for superpositions of states with a macroscopically or mesoscopically distinct mode number, that might be realized as two-mode Bose-Einstein condensate or photonic NOON states. Specifically, we give a model for a weak measurement of the Schwinger spin of a two-mode NOON state, for arbitrary N . The weak measurement arises from a nondestructive measurement of the two-mode occupation number difference, which for atomic NOON states might be realized via phase contrast imaging and the ac Stark effect using an optical meter prepared in a coherent state. The meter-system coupling results in an entangled cat-state. By subsequently evolving the system under the action of a nonlinear Josephson Hamiltonian, we show how postselection leads to quantum weak values, for arbitrary N . Since the weak measurement can be shown to be minimally invasive, the weak values provide a useful strategy for a Leggett-Garg test of N -scopic realism.

  7. Muscle autoantibodies in myasthenia gravis: beyond diagnosis?

    PubMed Central

    Meriggioli, Matthew N; Sanders, Donald B

    2012-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune disorder of the neuromuscular junction. A number of molecules, including ion channels and other proteins at the neuromuscular junction, may be targeted by autoantibodies leading to abnormal neuromuscular transmission. In approximately 85% of patients, autoantibodies, directed against the postsynaptic nicotinic acetylcholine receptor can be detected in the serum and confirm the diagnosis, but in general, do not precisely predict the degree of weakness or response to therapy. Antibodies to the muscle-specific tyrosine kinase are detected in approximately 50% of generalized myasthenia gravis patients who are seronegative for anti-acetylcholine receptor antibodies, and levels of anti-muscle-specific tyrosine kinase antibodies do appear to correlate with disease severity and treatment response. Antibodies to other muscle antigens may be found in the subsets of myasthenia gravis patients, potentially providing clinically useful diagnostic information, but their utility as relevant biomarkers (measures of disease state or response to treatment) is currently unclear. PMID:22882218

  8. Identification of interfaces involved in weak interactions with application to F-actin-aldolase rafts.

    PubMed

    Hu, Guiqing; Taylor, Dianne W; Liu, Jun; Taylor, Kenneth A

    2018-03-01

    Macromolecular interactions occur with widely varying affinities. Strong interactions form well defined interfaces but weak interactions are more dynamic and variable. Weak interactions can collectively lead to large structures such as microvilli via cooperativity and are often the precursors of much stronger interactions, e.g. the initial actin-myosin interaction during muscle contraction. Electron tomography combined with subvolume alignment and classification is an ideal method for the study of weak interactions because a 3-D image is obtained for the individual interactions, which subsequently are characterized collectively. Here we describe a method to characterize heterogeneous F-actin-aldolase interactions in 2-D rafts using electron tomography. By forming separate averages of the two constituents and fitting an atomic structure to each average, together with the alignment information which relates the raw motif to the average, an atomic model of each crosslink is determined and a frequency map of contact residues is computed. The approach should be applicable to any large structure composed of constituents that interact weakly and heterogeneously. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. An unexpected target of spinal direct current stimulation: Interhemispheric connectivity in humans.

    PubMed

    Bocci, Tommaso; Caleo, Matteo; Vannini, Beatrice; Vergari, Maurizio; Cogiamanian, Filippo; Rossi, Simone; Priori, Alberto; Sartucci, Ferdinando

    2015-10-30

    Transcutaneous spinal Direct Current Stimulation (tsDCS) is a noninvasive technique based on the application of weak electrical currents over spinal cord. We studied the effects of tsDCS on interhemispheric motor connectivity and visual processing by evaluating changes in ipsilateral Silent Period (iSP), Transcallosal Conduction Time (TCT) and hemifield Visual Evoked Potentials (hVEPs), before (T0) and at a different intervals following sham, anodal and cathodal tsDCS (T9-T11 level, 2.0 mA, 20'). Motor Evoked Potentials (MEPs) were recorded from abductor pollicis brevis (APB), abductor hallucis (AH) and deltoid muscles. hVEPs were recorded bilaterally by reversal of a horizontal square wave grating with the display positioned in the right hemifield. Anodal tsDCS increased TCT (p < 0.001) and the interhemispheric delay for both the main VEP components (N1: p = 0.0003; P1: p < 0.0001), dampening at the same time iSP duration (APB: p < 0.0001; AH: p = 0.0005; deltoid: p < 0.0001), while cathodal stimulation elicited opposite effects (p < 0.0001). tsDCS modulates interhemispheric processing in a polarity-specific manner, with anodal stimulation leading to a functional disconnection between hemispheres. tsDCS would be a new promising therapeutic tool in managing a number of human diseases characterized by an impaired interhemispheric balance, or an early rehabilitation strategy in patients with acute brain lesions, when other non-invasive brain stimulation techniques (NIBS) are not indicated due to safety concerns. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. The effect of malaria and anti-malarial drugs on skeletal and cardiac muscles.

    PubMed

    Marrelli, Mauro Toledo; Brotto, Marco

    2016-11-02

    Malaria remains one of the most important infectious diseases in the world, being a significant public health problem associated with poverty and it is one of the main obstacles to the economy of an endemic country. Among the several complications, the effects of malaria seem to target the skeletal muscle system, leading to symptoms, such as muscle aches, muscle contractures, muscle fatigue, muscle pain, and muscle weakness. Malaria cause also parasitic coronary artery occlusion. This article reviews the current knowledge regarding the effect of malaria disease and the anti-malarial drugs on skeletal and cardiac muscles. Research articles and case report publications that addressed aspects that are important for understanding the involvement of malaria parasites and anti-malarial therapies affecting skeletal and cardiac muscles were analysed and their findings summarized. Sequestration of red blood cells, increased levels of serum creatine kinase and reduced muscle content of essential contractile proteins are some of the potential biomarkers of the damage levels of skeletal and cardiac muscles. These biomarkers might be useful for prevention of complications and determining the effectiveness of interventions designed to protect cardiac and skeletal muscles from malaria-induced damage.

  11. The effect of bedding system selected by manual muscle testing on sleep-related cardiovascular functions.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Terry B J; Li, Jia-Yi; Lai, Chun-Ting; Huang, Yu-Chun; Hsu, Ya-Chuan; Yang, Cheryl C H

    2013-01-01

    Different types of mattresses affect sleep quality and waking muscle power. Whether manual muscle testing (MMT) predicts the cardiovascular effects of the bedding system was explored using ten healthy young men. For each participant, two bedding systems, one inducing the strongest limb muscle force (strong bedding system) and the other inducing the weakest limb force (weak bedding system), were identified using MMT. Each bedding system, in total five mattresses and eight pillows of different firmness, was used for two continuous weeks at the participant's home in a random and double-blind sequence. A sleep log, a questionnaire, and a polysomnography were used to differentiate the two bedding systems. Heart rate variability and arterial pressure variability analyses showed that the strong bedding system resulted in decreased cardiovascular sympathetic modulation, increased cardiac vagal activity, and increased baroreceptor reflex sensitivity during sleep as compared to the weak bedding system. Different bedding systems have distinct cardiovascular effects during sleep that can be predicted by MMT.

  12. Impaired Organization and Function of Myofilaments in Single Muscle Fibers from a Mouse Model of Pompe Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, S.; Galperin, M; Melvin, G

    Pompe disease, a deficiency of lysosomal acid {alpha}-glucosidase, is a disorder of glycogen metabolism that can affect infants, children, or adults. In all forms of the disease, there is progressive muscle pathology leading to premature death. The pathology is characterized by accumulation of glycogen in lysosomes, autophagic buildup, and muscle atrophy. The purpose of the present investigation was to determine if myofibrillar dysfunction in Pompe disease contributes to muscle weakness beyond that attributed to atrophy. The study was performed on isolated myofibers dissected from severely affected fast glycolytic muscle in the {alpha}-glucosidase knockout mouse model. Psoas muscle fibers were firstmore » permeabilized, so that the contractile proteins could be directly relaxed or activated by control of the composition of the bathing solution. When normalized by cross-sectional area, single fibers from knockout mice produced 6.3 N/cm{sup 2} of maximum Ca{sup 2+}-activated tension compared with 12.0 N/cm{sup 2} produced by wild-type fibers. The total protein concentration was slightly higher in the knockout mice, but concentrations of the contractile proteins myosin and actin remained unchanged. Structurally, X-ray diffraction showed that the actin and myosin filaments, normally arranged in hexagonal arrays, were disordered in the knockout muscle, and a lower fraction of myosin cross bridges was near the actin filaments in the relaxed muscle. The results are consistent with a disruption of actin and myosin interactions in the knockout muscles, demonstrating that impaired myofibrillar function contributes to weakness in the diseased muscle fibers.« less

  13. Lower limb muscle impairment in myotonic dystrophy type 1: the need for better guidelines.

    PubMed

    Petitclerc, Émilie; Hébert, Luc J; Desrosiers, Johanne; Gagnon, Cynthia

    2015-04-01

    In myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1), leg muscle weakness is a major impairment. There are challenges to obtaining a clear portrait of muscle strength impairment. A systematic literature review was conducted on lower limb strength impairment in late-onset and adult phenotypes to document variables which affect strength measurement. Thirty-two articles were reviewed using the COSMIN guidelines. Only a third of the studies described a reproducible protocol. Only 2 muscle groups have documented reliability for quantitative muscle testing and only 1 total score for manual muscle testing. Variables affecting muscle strength impairment are not described in most studies. This review illustrates the variability in muscle strength assessment in relation to DM1 characteristics and the questionable validity of the results with regard to undocumented methodological properties. There is therefore a clear need to adopt a consensus on the use of a standardized muscle strength assessment protocol. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Association between statin-associated myopathy and skeletal muscle damage

    PubMed Central

    Mohaupt, Markus G.; Karas, Richard H.; Babiychuk, Eduard B.; Sanchez-Freire, Verónica; Monastyrskaya, Katia; Iyer, Lakshmanan; Hoppeler, Hans; Breil, Fabio; Draeger, Annette

    2009-01-01

    Background Many patients taking statins often complain of muscle pain and weakness. The extent to which muscle pain reflects muscle injury is unknown. Methods We obtained biopsy samples from the vastus lateralis muscle of 83 patients. Of the 44 patients with clinically diagnosed statin-associated myopathy, 29 were currently taking a statin, and 15 had discontinued statin therapy before the biopsy (minimal duration of discontinuation 3 weeks). We also included 19 patients who were taking statins and had no myopathy, and 20 patients who had never taken statins and had no myopathy. We classified the muscles as injured if 2% or more of the muscle fibres in a biopsy sample showed damage. Using reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, we evaluated the expression levels of candidate genes potentially related to myocyte injury. Results Muscle injury was observed in 25 (of 44) patients with myopathy and in 1 patient without myopathy. Only 1 patient with structural injury had a circulating level of creatine phosphokinase that was elevated more than 1950 U/L (10× the upper limit of normal). Expression of ryanodine receptor 3 was significantly upregulated in patients with biopsy evidence of structural damage (1.7, standard error of the mean 0.3). Interpretation Persistent myopathy in patients taking statins reflects structural muscle damage. A lack of elevated levels of circulating creatine phosphokinase does not rule out structural muscle injury. Upregulation of the expression of ryanodine receptor 3 is suggestive of an intracellular calcium leak. PMID:19581603

  15. Association between statin-associated myopathy and skeletal muscle damage.

    PubMed

    Mohaupt, Markus G; Karas, Richard H; Babiychuk, Eduard B; Sanchez-Freire, Verónica; Monastyrskaya, Katia; Iyer, Lakshmanan; Hoppeler, Hans; Breil, Fabio; Draeger, Annette

    2009-07-07

    Many patients taking statins often complain of muscle pain and weakness. The extent to which muscle pain reflects muscle injury is unknown. We obtained biopsy samples from the vastus lateralis muscle of 83 patients. Of the 44 patients with clinically diagnosed statin-associated myopathy, 29 were currently taking a statin, and 15 had discontinued statin therapy before the biopsy (minimal duration of discontinuation 3 weeks). We also included 19 patients who were taking statins and had no myopathy, and 20 patients who had never taken statins and had no myopathy. We classified the muscles as injured if 2% or more of the muscle fibres in a biopsy sample showed damage. Using reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, we evaluated the expression levels of candidate genes potentially related to myocyte injury. Muscle injury was observed in 25 (of 44) patients with myopathy and in 1 patient without myopathy. Only 1 patient with structural injury had a circulating level of creatine phosphokinase that was elevated more than 1950 U/L (10x the upper limit of normal). Expression of ryanodine receptor 3 was significantly upregulated in patients with biopsy evidence of structural damage (1.7, standard error of the mean 0.3). Persistent myopathy in patients taking statins reflects structural muscle damage. A lack of elevated levels of circulating creatine phosphokinase does not rule out structural muscle injury. Upregulation of the expression of ryanodine receptor 3 is suggestive of an intracellular calcium leak.

  16. Vitamin D and muscle function in the elderly: the elixir of youth?

    PubMed

    Girgis, Christian M

    2014-11-01

    Circumstantial evidence suggests that vitamin D deficiency may contribute to age-related changes in skeletal muscle. This review discusses recent clinical trials examining effects of vitamin D on muscle function in the elderly, and poses the important question: can vitamin D reverse muscle ageing? Observational studies report an association between vitamin D and muscle atrophy/weakness in elderly subjects. Interventional studies suggest that frail, elderly subjects may benefit from vitamin D supplementation by displaying reduced falls, improved muscle function and increased muscle fibre size. However, meta-analyses do not report convincing effects of vitamin D in the elderly. This may be because of multiple factors including lack of standardized endpoints for muscle function, variable study design and different doses of vitamin D supplementation amongst these studies. The evidence base is therefore inconsistent. Vitamin D deficiency may exacerbate ageing of skeletal muscle. However, current evidence that vitamin D supplementation reverses age-related muscle dysfunction is equivocal and does not justify stringent vitamin D targets in the elderly. Until these issues are clarified, the safest option is to aim for conservative vitamin D targets that are sufficient for normal calcium homeostasis.

  17. Effect of hypercapnia on respiratory and peripheral skeletal muscle loss during critical illness - A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Twose, Paul; Jones, Una; Wise, Matt P

    2018-06-01

    Critical illness has profound effects on muscle strength and long-term physical morbidity. However, there remains a paucity of evidence for the aetiology of critical illness related weakness. Recent animal model research identified that hypercapnia may reduce the rate of muscle loss. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of hypercapnia on respiratory and peripheral skeletal muscle in patients with critical illness. A pilot observational study of mechanically ventilated critically ill patients at a tertiary critical care unit who were retrospectively categorised as: 1) Respiratory failure with normocapnia; 2) Respiratory failure with hypercapnia; and 3) brain injury. Diaphragm thickness and quadriceps rectus femoris cross-sectional area (RFCSA) were measured using ultrasound imaging at baseline and at days 3, 5, 7 and 10 of mechanical ventilation. Significant reductions in RFCSA muscle loss were observed for all time-points when compared to baseline [day 10: -14.9%±8.2 p< 0.001], and in diaphragm thickness between baseline and day 7 [day 7: -5.8%±9.5 p=0.029). No correlation was identified between the rate of muscle mass loss in the diaphragm and RFCSA. In this pilot study, peripheral skeletal muscle weakness occurred early and rapidly within the critical care population, irrespective of carbon dioxide levels. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Channelopathies of skeletal muscle excitability

    PubMed Central

    Cannon, Stephen C.

    2016-01-01

    Familial disorders of skeletal muscle excitability were initially described early in the last century and are now known to be caused by mutations of voltage-gated ion channels. The clinical manifestations are often striking, with an inability to relax after voluntary contraction (myotonia) or transient attacks of severe weakness (periodic paralysis). An essential feature of these disorders is fluctuation of symptoms that are strongly impacted by environmental triggers such as exercise, temperature, or serum K+ levels. These phenomena have intrigued physiologists for decades, and in the past 25 years the molecular lesions underlying these disorders have been identified and mechanistic studies are providing insights for therapeutic strategies of disease modification. These familial disorders of muscle fiber excitability are “channelopathies” caused by mutations of a chloride channel (ClC-1), sodium channel (NaV1.4), calcium channel (CaV1.1) and several potassium channels (Kir2.1, Kir2.6, Kir3.4). This review provides a synthesis of the mechanistic connections between functional defects of mutant ion channels, their impact on muscle excitability, how these changes cause clinical phenotypes, and approaches toward therapeutics. PMID:25880512

  19. Juvenile Dermatomyositis: Key Roles of Muscle Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Early Aggressive Treatment.

    PubMed

    Corral-Magaña, O; Bauzá-Alonso, A F; Escudero-Góngora, M M; Lacruz, L; Martín-Santiago, A

    2017-09-12

    Juvenile dermatomyositis is a rare systemic connective tissue disease with onset during childhood. It presents clinically with proximal muscle weakness and characteristic skin involvement. Diagnosis is based on the Bohan and Peter criteria, though many authors are now substituting biopsy with muscle magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for both diagnosis and follow-up. Without intensive early treatment, complications such as calcinosis cutis and lipodystrophy can develop in the chronic phases of the disease. Early recognition is therefore key to management. We present a series of 5 patients who were diagnosed with Juvenile dermatomyositis on muscle MRI without undergoing muscle biopsy and who received early treatment. We draw attention to the usefulness of muscle MRI for the diagnosis of muscle involvement and to the importance of early initiation of intensive treatment to prevent complications. Copyright © 2017 AEDV. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. Clinical management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients with muscle dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Casadevall, Carme; Pascual, Sergi; Orozco-Levi, Mauricio; Barreiro, Esther

    2016-01-01

    Muscle dysfunction is frequently observed in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients, contributing to their exercise limitation and a worsening prognosis. The main factor leading to limb muscle dysfunction is deconditioning, whereas respiratory muscle dysfunction is mostly the result of pulmonary hyperinflation. However, both limb and respiratory muscles are also influenced by other negative factors, including smoking, systemic inflammation, nutritional abnormalities, exacerbations and some drugs. Limb muscle weakness is generally diagnosed through voluntary isometric maneuvers such as handgrip or quadriceps muscle contraction (dynamometry); while respiratory muscle loss of strength is usually recognized through a decrease in maximal static pressures measured at the mouth. Both types of measurements have validated reference values. Respiratory muscle strength can also be evaluated determining esophageal, gastric and transdiaphragmatic maximal pressures although there is a lack of widely accepted reference equations. Non-volitional maneuvers, obtained through electrical or magnetic stimulation, can be employed in patients unable to cooperate. Muscle endurance can also be assessed, generally using repeated submaximal maneuvers until exhaustion, but no validated reference values are available yet. The treatment of muscle dysfunction is multidimensional and includes improvement in lifestyle habits (smoking abstinence, healthy diet and a good level of physical activity, preferably outside), nutritional measures (diet supplements and occasionally, anabolic drugs), and different modalities of general and muscle training. PMID:28066619

  1. Atypical Initial Presentation of Painful Muscle Cramps in a Patient with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis: A Case Report and Brief Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Kuzel, Aaron R; Lodhi, Muhammad Uzair; Syed, Intekhab Askari; Rahim, Mustafa

    2017-11-10

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized clinically by progressive muscle weakness that can occur proximally or distally in either the upper or lower extremities. It includes both upper motor neuron signs (spasticity, hyperreflexia, clonus, and Babinski sign) and lower motor neuron signs (atrophy, weakness, and muscle fasciculation). Initial presentation of progressively painful muscle cramps should lead the physician to screen for other signs of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. We report the case of a 51-year-old male, who presented with dull muscle cramps in the right upper shoulder and arm. After a careful history and physical exam, it was found that patient had both upper and lower motor neuron signs; therefore, a diagnosis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis was made. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis should strongly be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients presenting with an atypical initial presentation of progressively painful muscle cramps.

  2. The evaluation of relationship between vitamin D and muscle power by micro manual muscle tester in end-stage renal disease patients.

    PubMed

    Zahed, Nargesosadat; Chehrazi, Saghar; Falaknasi, Kianosh

    2014-09-01

    Muscle force of lower limb is a major factor for sustaining physical activity. Decreased muscle force can limit physical activity, which can increase mortality and morbidity in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients. Muscle force depends on several factors. One of the most important factors is 25-hydroxy vitamin D (25-OHD) that affects muscle function in both uremic and non-uremic patients. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between serum level of 25-OHD and muscle force of lower extremities in hemodialysis patients estimated by a Micro Manual Muscle Tester, a digital instrument that measures muscle force in kilograms This cross-sectional study was performed on 135 adult patients, 69 male (51%) and 66 female (69%) (mean: 1.4, standard deviation: 0.5), undergoing hemodialysis. Standard biochemistry parameters were measured before hemodialysis, including 25-OHD, calcium, albumin, para-hyroid hormone and C-reactive protein (CRP). Based on the result of serum level of 25-OHD, patients were classified into the following three groups: 85 patients (63%) were 25-OHD deficient (25-OHD <30), 43 patients (32%) had a normal level of 25-OHD (30-70) and seven patients (5%) had a toxic level of 25-OHD (>70) (mean: 1.42, standard deviation: 0.59). Also, based on the result of muscle force, patients were classified into the following three groups: 84/133 patients (62%) had weak muscle force (<5 kg), 46/133 patients (34%) had normal muscle force (5-10 kg) and three patients (21%) had strong muscle force (>10 kg) (mean: 1.39, standard deviation: 0.53). There was a significant relation between 25-OHD level and muscle force (P = 0.02), between age and muscle force (P = 0.002) and between gender and muscle force (P <0.001). In our opinion, 25-OHD can be a useful drug in ESRD patients to improve muscle force and physical activity.

  3. [Overactive muscles: it can be more serious than common myalgia or cramp].

    PubMed

    Molenaar, Joery P F; Snoeck, Marc M J; Voermans, Nicol C; van Engelen, Baziel G M

    2016-01-01

    Positive muscle phenomena are due to muscle overactivity. Examples are cramp, myalgia, and stiffness. These manifestations have mostly acquired causes, e.g. side-effects of medication, metabolic disorders, vitamin deficiency, excessive caffeine intake or neurogenic disorders. We report on three patients with various positive muscle phenomena, to illustrate the clinical signs that indicate an underlying myopathy. Patient A, a 56-year-old man, was diagnosed with muscle cramp in the context of excessive coffee use and previous lumbosacral radiculopathy. Patient B, a 71-year-old man, was shown to have RYR1-related myopathy. Patient C, a 42-year-old man, suffered from Brody myopathy. We propose for clinicians to look out for a number of 'red flags' that can point to an underlying myopathy, and call for referral to neurology if indicated. Red flags include second wind phenomenon, familial occurrence of similar complaints, marked muscle stiffness, myotonia, muscle weakness, muscle hypertrophy, and myoglobinuria. Establishing a correct diagnosis is important for proper treatment. Certain myopathies call for cardiac or respiratory screening.

  4. A case of adult-onset reducing body myopathy presenting a novel clinical feature, asymmetrical involvement of the sternocleidomastoid and trapezius muscles.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Takayuki; Hayashi, Shintaro; Kawamura, Nobutoshi; Higuchi, Masa-Aki; Tsugawa, Jun; Ohyagi, Yasumasa; Hayashi, Yukiko K; Nishino, Ichizo; Kira, Jun-Ichi

    2014-08-15

    We herein report a 32-year-old woman with adult-onset reducing body myopathy (RBM) who had a mutation in the four-and-a-half LIM domain 1 gene (FHL1) and showed a marked asymmetrical involvement of sternocleidomastoid and trapezius muscles. At 30 years of age she noticed bilateral foot drop, and over the next two years developed difficulty raising her right arm. At 32 years of age she was admitted to our hospital for a diagnostic evaluation. Neurological examination showed moderate weakness and atrophy of her right sternocleidomastoid muscle, right trapezius muscle, and bilateral upper proximal muscles. There were severe weakness and atrophy of her bilateral tibialis anterior muscles. Her deep tendon reflexes were hypoactive in her upper extremities. Her serum creatine kinase level was mildly increased. Muscle biopsy specimens from the left tibialis anterior muscle revealed marked variation in fiber size, some necrotic or regenerating fibers, and reducing bodies. Gene analysis of FHL1 demonstrated a mutation: a heterozygous missense mutation of c.377G>A (p. C126T) in FHL1. Compared with previous adult-onset RBM cases harboring mutations in FHL1, our case was characterized by asymmetrical atrophy of the sternocleidomastoid and trapezius muscles. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. A comparison of the diagnostic accuracy of MARS MRI and ultrasound of the painful metal-on-metal hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Imran A; Sabah, Shiraz A; Satchithananda, Keshthra; Lim, Adrian K; Cro, Suzie; Henckel, Johann; Skinner, John A; Hart, Alister J

    2014-08-01

    Metal artifact reduction sequence (MARS) MRI and ultrasound scanning (USS) can both be used to detect pseudotumors, abductor muscle atrophy, and tendinous pathology in patients with painful metal-on-metal (MOM) hip arthroplasty. We wanted to determine the diagnostic test characteristics of USS using MARS MRI as a reference for detection of pseudotumors and muscle atrophy. PatienTS AND METHODS: We performed a prospective cohort study to compare MARS MRI and USS findings in 19 consecutive patients with unilateral MOM hips. Protocolized USS was performed by consultant musculoskeletal radiologists who were blinded regarding clinical details. Reports were independently compared with MARS MRI, the imaging gold standard, to calculate predictive values. The prevalence of pseudotumors on MARS MRI was 68% (95% CI: 43-87) and on USS it was 53% (CI: 29-76). The sensitivity of USS in detecting pseudotumors was 69% (CI 39-91) and the specificity was 83% (CI: 36-97). The sensitivity of detection of abductor muscle atrophy was 47% (CI: 24-71). In addition, joint effusion was detected in 10 cases by USS and none were seen by MARS MRI. We found a poor agreement between USS and MARS MRI. USS was inferior to MARS MRI for detection of pseudotumors and muscle atrophy, but it was superior for detection of joint effusion and tendinous pathologies. MARS MRI is more advantageous than USS for practical reasons, including preoperative planning and longitudinal comparison.

  6. Electric organ discharge diversification in mormyrid weakly electric fish is associated with differential expression of voltage-gated ion channel genes.

    PubMed

    Nagel, Rebecca; Kirschbaum, Frank; Tiedemann, Ralph

    2017-03-01

    In mormyrid weakly electric fish, the electric organ discharge (EOD) is used for species recognition, orientation and prey localization. Produced in the muscle-derived adult electric organ, the EOD exhibits a wide diversity across species in both waveform and duration. While certain defining EOD characteristics can be linked to anatomical features of the electric organ, many factors underlying EOD differentiation are yet unknown. Here, we report the differential expression of 13 Kv1 voltage-gated potassium channel genes, two inwardly rectifying potassium channel genes, two previously studied sodium channel genes and an ATPase pump in two sympatric species of the genus Campylomormyrus in both the adult electric organ and skeletal muscle. Campylomormyrus compressirostris displays a basal EOD, largely unchanged during development, while C. tshokwe has an elongated, putatively derived discharge. We report an upregulation in all Kv1 genes in the electric organ of Campylomormyrus tshokwe when compared to both skeletal muscle and C. compressirostris electric organ. This pattern of upregulation in a species with a derived EOD form suggests that voltage-gated potassium channels are potentially involved in the