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Sample records for abductor pollicis longus

  1. Abductor pollicis longus tendon division with swan neck thumb deformity.

    PubMed

    Zacharia, Balaji; Puthezhath, Kishore

    2012-08-01

    Swan neck thumb deformity can be caused by osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, tendon transfers and paralytic diseases. Abductor pollicis longus is one of the major stabilizing tendon of the carpometacarpal joint of thumb. To the best of our knowledge, swan neck thumb deformity owing to division of abductor pollicis longus tendon is rare. In this article, we describe a case of isolated division of abductor pollicis longus tendon presenting with swan-neck deformity of thumb and discuss the mechanism, management and outcome. The patient was treated by repair of the divided tendon using palmaris longus tendon graft. At approximately 107 weeks following treatment, the patient was having full range of thumb movement and the deformity completely disappeared. We also describe the unusual mechanism whereby an isolated division of abductor pollicis longus tendon results in swan neck thumb deformity. Level of clinical evidence IV.

  2. De Quervain disease caused by abductor pollicis longus tenosynovitis: a report of three cases.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Masahiro; Takahara, Masatoshi; Kikuchi, Noriaki; Ito, Kazuo; Watanabe, Tadayoshi; Ogino, Toshihiko

    2009-01-01

    De Quervain disease is caused by a stenosing tenosynovitis in the first dorsal compartment, and the main aetiology is extensor pollicis brevis (EPB) tenosynovitis. We encountered three cases in which EPB tenosynovitis was absent and abductor pollicis longus (APL) tenosynovitis was confirmed during operation. In the treatment of de Quervain disease, APL tenosynovitis should be paid as much attention as EPB tenosynovitis.

  3. Variations in abductor pollicis longus and extensor pollicis brevis tendons in the Quervain syndrome: a surgical and anatomical study.

    PubMed

    Kulthanan, Teerawat; Chareonwat, Boonsong

    2007-01-01

    Eighty-two wrists of Thai cadavers and the wrists of 66 patients with de Quervain syndrome were studied, and the variation in the number of tendons and the fibro-osseous tunnel in the first extensor compartment were recorded. The abductor pollicis longus had more than one tendon in 73 of the cadavers (89%) and in 32 of the patients (49%) (p <0.001). The extensor pollicis brevis was a single tendon in 80 (98%) and 62 (94%) of cadavers and patients, respectively. There was division with the septum that made a fibro-osseous tunnel in the first extensor compartment in 30/82 (37%) cadavers and in 38/66 (58%) patients with de Quervain syndrome (p = 0.01). The results indicate that the number of fibro-osseous tunnels and multiple compartments in the first extensor compartment may be associated with a predisposition to de Quervain syndrome.

  4. Anatomic Variations of the First Extensor Compartment and Abductor Pollicis Longus Tendon in Trapeziometacarpal Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Opreanu, Razvan C.; Wechter, John; Tabbaa, Hazem; Kepros, John P.; Baulch, Michelle; Xie, Yan; Lackey, Wendy

    2009-01-01

    Anatomic variation of the trapeziometacarpal joint stabilizing structures is one of the concepts proposed to explain the pathogenesis of trapeziometacarpal arthritis. We undertook this study to test the hypothesis that septation of the first extensor compartment or variation of the abductor pollicis longus (APL) tendon (supernumerary insertions) are more frequently associated with the progression or severity of trapeziometacarpal arthritis. Septation within the first extensor compartment was significantly associated with trapeziometacarpal arthritis (p = 0.013), whereas supernumerary APL insertions (trapezium or thenar) did not reveal a significant association (p = 0.811 and p = 0.937, respectively). The results of this study do not support a role for variations of APL tendon insertions in trapeziometacarpal arthritis. Yet, the presence of septation within the first extensor compartment may play an important role in the pathogenesis of trapeziometacarpal arthritis. PMID:19834771

  5. Anatomical variation of abductor pollicis longus in Indian population: A cadaveric study

    PubMed Central

    Tewari, Jerina; Mishra, Pravash Ranjan; Tripathy, Sujit Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Background: Many authors have reported the anatomical variation of abductor pollicis longus (APL) around the wrist and its association with de Quervain tenosynovitis (DQT), first carpo-metacarpal arthritis, and trapezio-metacarpal subluxation. From Indian subcontinent, there is only one original article and a few case reports on the variability of APL tendon insertion. Materials and Methods: Fifty formaldehyde preserved cadaveric wrists were dissected to look for the anatomical variation of APL in the Indian population. Results: The APL was found with single tendon in 2, double in 31, triple in 8, and quadruple in 8 extremities. A maximum of 6 tendon-slips were found in one cadaveric wrist. In all hands, the APL had at least one attachment to first metacarpal bone and in 46 hands (92%), there was second insertion to the trapezium bone. Of all tendon-slips of APL (n = 126), 44% of tendons (68 tendons) were inserted into the base of the first metacarpal bone. This was followed by the insertion into the trapezium in 42% tendons (52 tendons). Conclusion: Bi-tendinous APL is commonly observed on the dorsal compartment of the wrist in Indian population and these tendon-slips are commonly attached to the first metacarpal base and trapezium. This variation must be understood by the Indian Orthopedic surgeons as the response to treatment of DQT and reason for first carpo-metacarpal arthritis can be dependent on this anatomical variation. PMID:26538762

  6. Results of Abductor Pollicis Longus Suspension Ligamentoplasty for Treatment of Advanced First Carpometacarpal Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyun-Joo; Kim, Poong-Taek; Deslivia, Maria Florencia; Lee, Suk-Joong; Nam, Sang-Jin

    2015-01-01

    Background Suspension ligamentoplasty using abductor pollicis longus (APL) tendon without bone tunneling, was introduced as one of the techniques for treatment of advanced first carpometacarpal (CMC) arthritis. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the radiologic and clinical results of APL suspension ligamentoplasty. Methods The medical records of 19 patients who underwent APL suspension ligamentoplasty for advanced first CMC arthritis between January 2008 and May 2012 were reviewed retrospectively. The study included 13 female and 6 male patients, whose mean age was 62 years (range, 43 to 82 years). For clinical evaluation, we assessed the grip and pinch power, radial and volar abduction angle, thumb adduction (modified Kapandji index), including visual analogue scale (VAS) and Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) scores. Radiologic evaluation was performed using simple radiographs. Results The mean follow-up was 36 months (range, 19 to 73.7 months). Mean power improved from 18.3 to 27 kg for grip power, from 2.8 to 3.5 kg for tip pinch, and from 4.3 to 5.4 kg for power pinch. All patients showed decreased VAS from 7.2 to 1.7. Radial abduction improved from 71° preoperatively to 82° postoperatively. The modified Kapandji index showed improvement from 6 to 7.3, and mean DASH was improved from 41 to 17.8. The height of the space decreased from 10.8 to 7.1 mm. Only one case had a complication involving temporary sensory loss of the first dorsal web space, which resolved spontaneously. Conclusions The APL suspension ligamentoplasty for treatment of advanced first CMC arthritis yielded satisfactory functional results. PMID:26330961

  7. High incidence and treatment of flexor carpi radialis tendinitis after trapeziectomy and abductor pollicis longus suspensionplasty for basal joint arthritis.

    PubMed

    Low, T H; Hales, P F

    2014-10-01

    We reviewed the incidence and treatment of flexor carpi radialis tendinitis in 77 patients (81 thumbs) who had trapeziectomy and abductor pollicis longus suspensionplasty for thumb carpometacarpal joint arthritis. Eighteen patients, 20 wrists (25%) had flexor carpi radialis tendinitis. The onset was 2-10 months (mean 4.7) after surgery. Two cases had preceding trauma. Eight cases (40%) responded to splinting and steroid injection. Ten patients, 12 wrists (60%) underwent surgery after failing non-operative treatment. Eleven wrists had frayed or partially torn flexor carpi radialis tendon and one had a complete tendon rupture with pseudotendon formation. Flexor carpi radialis tenotomy and pseudotendon excision were performed. All operated patients obtained good pain relief initially post-operatively. However, the pain recurred in two patients after 8 months. One required a local steroid injection for localized tenderness at the site of the proximal tendon stump. The other patient required a revision operation for scaphotrapezoid impingement. Both obtained complete pain relief. Our study has shown a high incidence of flexor carpi radialis tendinitis following trapeziectomy and abductor pollicis longus suspensionplasty. Patients should be warned about this potential complication.

  8. Reconstruction after chronic extensor pollicis longus ruptures: a new technique.

    PubMed

    Bullón, Adrián; Bravo, Elena; Zarbahsh, Shirin; Barco, Raúl

    2007-09-01

    Different types of secondary reconstruction of extensor pollicis longus tendon injuries have been reported, with repair using the extensor indicis proprius being the gold standard. This technique, however, may decrease extension strength and independent extension of the index finger. We presumed repair with the accessory abductor pollicis longus would achieve functional motion of the thumb and avoid donor site morbidity. We retrospectively report the results for 11 consecutive patients who had repair with the accessory abductor pollicis longus and were followed prospectively for a minimum of 2 years. Study-specific outcome measures were used to assess function in activities of daily living, pain, and patient satisfaction. According to the score described by Geld-macher et al, good or excellent results were achieved in all cases. Mean abduction deficit of the thumb was 10 degrees compared with the uninjured side. Using a 0- to 10-point visual analog scale self-reporting questionnaire, patients obtained mean results of 7.9 points for pain, 7.5 points for activities of daily living, and 7.6 points for patient satisfaction. We recommend the accessory abductor pollicis longus as an alternative for extensor pollicis longus tendon repair.

  9. EMG biofeedback of the abductor pollicis brevis in piano performance.

    PubMed

    Montes, R; Bedmar, M; Sol Martin, M

    1993-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to apply EMG biofeedback as an auxiliary to piano teaching techniques. We studied the changes in integrated electromyographic activity, using the abductor pollicis brevis functioning as an agonist during the teaching of identical selective movements of piano playing in two groups, one with EMG biofeedback and the other following traditional method of instruction. The analysis of variance revealed an increase in the peak amplitude and the relaxation rate values for the biofeedback group. These results have implications for the application of piano playing techniques and reveal EMG biofeedback as an aid in the teaching of thumb attack with the abductor pollicis brevis as agonist.

  10. [A method for reconstruction of the A1 retinaculum in the flexor pollicis longus sheath with extensor pollicis brevis tendon].

    PubMed

    Chmiel, Z

    1996-01-01

    An original method for A1 retinaculum reconstruction of flexor pollicis longus sheath with extensor pollicis brevis tendon is presented. Reconstructed retinaculum is very strong. Loss of extensor pollicis brevis did not impaired thumb function.

  11. Adductor Pollicis Longus Strain in a Professional Baseball Player

    PubMed Central

    Pinkowsky, Gregory J.; Roberts, John; Allred, Jeff; Pujalte, George G.; Gallo, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    Thenar pain can represent a significant morbidity for a baseball player who relies on manual dexterity for gripping a bat and precise and accurate throws. While osseous, ligamentous, and neurovascular pathologies are commonly considered, musculotendinous injuries are often neglected in the differential diagnosis of thenar pain. We present a case of adductor pollicis longus strain as a cause of acute thenar pain in a baseball player. Adductor pollicis longus strains should be considered in any baseball player sustaining a hyperabduction force to the thumb. PMID:24459545

  12. Anomalous bilateral contribution of extensor pollicis longus and muscle fusion of the first compartment of the wrist.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Rodrigo César; de Oliveira, Kennedy Martinez; Léo, Jorge Alfredo; Elias, Bruno Adriano Borges; Dos Santos, Paulo Ricardo; de Santiago, Hildemberg Agostinho Rocha

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of the anatomical variations of the muscles of the first dorsal compartments of the wrist is clinically relevant to De Quervain's tenosynovitis and to reconstructive surgeries. In the literature, there are many reports of the presence of multiple insertion tendons in the first dorsal compartment of the wrist, but few reports describe occurrences of fusion and muscle contributions. This case report describes an anomalous bilateral contribution of the extensor pollicis longus. This anomalous contribution was found through a slender auxiliary tendon that crossed laterally under the extensor retinaculum, entered the first dorsal compartment of the wrist and merged with the tendon of the extensor pollicis brevis muscle. In the same cadaver in which this contribution was present, there was atypical muscle fusion of the abductor pollicis longus muscle and extensor pollicis brevis muscle. In conclusion, anomalous bilateral contribution of the extensor pollicis longus muscle and atypical muscle fusion, concomitant with a variant insertion pattern, are the highlight of this case report. Furthermore, it is concluded that additional tendons may be effectively used in reconstructive surgeries, but that there is a need for knowledge of the possible numerical and positional variations of these tendons, with a view to making more effective surgical plans.

  13. Anomalous bilateral contribution of extensor pollicis longus and muscle fusion of the first compartment of the wrist

    PubMed Central

    Rosa, Rodrigo César; de Oliveira, Kennedy Martinez; Léo, Jorge Alfredo; Elias, Bruno Adriano Borges; dos Santos, Paulo Ricardo; de Santiago, Hildemberg Agostinho Rocha

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of the anatomical variations of the muscles of the first dorsal compartments of the wrist is clinically relevant to De Quervain's tenosynovitis and to reconstructive surgeries. In the literature, there are many reports of the presence of multiple insertion tendons in the first dorsal compartment of the wrist, but few reports describe occurrences of fusion and muscle contributions. This case report describes an anomalous bilateral contribution of the extensor pollicis longus. This anomalous contribution was found through a slender auxiliary tendon that crossed laterally under the extensor retinaculum, entered the first dorsal compartment of the wrist and merged with the tendon of the extensor pollicis brevis muscle. In the same cadaver in which this contribution was present, there was atypical muscle fusion of the abductor pollicis longus muscle and extensor pollicis brevis muscle. In conclusion, anomalous bilateral contribution of the extensor pollicis longus muscle and atypical muscle fusion, concomitant with a variant insertion pattern, are the highlight of this case report. Furthermore, it is concluded that additional tendons may be effectively used in reconstructive surgeries, but that there is a need for knowledge of the possible numerical and positional variations of these tendons, with a view to making more effective surgical plans. PMID:27069895

  14. Anomalous course of the extensor pollicis longus: clinical relevance.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Guy; Wolovelsky, Alejandro; Rinott, Micha; Rozen, Nimrod

    2011-11-01

    The extensor pollicis longus (EPL) is a consistent structure with rare anomalies, the most common being a group of different tendon duplications passing through the fourth compartment without symptoms. The second form comprises anomalies in the course of the EPL having significant clinical importance due to the predisposition for creating tenosynovitis of the EPL mimicking other types of tendon tenosynovitis. Clinical symptoms of radial dorsal wrist pain mimicking intersection syndrome or de-Quervain disease with the "absent snuff box" sign should raise suspicions for an anomaly in the course of the EPL.

  15. Spontaneous Rupture of the Extensor Pollicis Longus Tendon due to Unusual Etiology

    PubMed Central

    Taş, Süleyman; Balta, Serkan; Benlier, Erol

    2014-01-01

    Background: The etiology of spontaneous rupture of the extensor pollicis longus tendon includes systemic or local steroid injections, wrist fracture, tenosynovitis, synovitis, rheumatoid arthritis, and repetitive wrist motions. Case Report: We encountered a case of extensor pollicis longus tendon rupture with an unusual etiology, cow milking. In this case, transfer of the extensor indicis proprius tendon was performed successfully. At 1 year after surgery, extension of the thumb was sufficient. Conclusion: It appears that patients with occupations involving repetitive motions are at a high risk of closed tendon ruptures. PMID:25207178

  16. Reconstruction of a congenitally absent flexor pollicis longus in an adult

    PubMed Central

    Shamsian, Negin; Exton, Rebecca; Shibu, MM

    2010-01-01

    Congenital absence of the flexor pollicis longus (FPL) is an unusual finding that is frequently associated with thumb hypoplasia. Isolated FPL absence is the rarest of the congenital thumb anomalies. The present article describes a patient with a congenitally absent FPL, and discusses the chosen method of reconstruction. PMID:22131842

  17. Spontaneous rupture of extensor pollicis longus tendon in a kick boxer.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, T W; Tyler, M P; Roberts, A H

    1998-06-01

    A 23 year old male kick boxer presented with a 24 hour history of pain and being unable to extend the interphalangeal joint of the left thumb. There was no history of trauma or any other risk factor for spontaneous rupture of the extensor pollicis longus tendon. On the previous day, he had been doing reverse press ups on the dorsum of his hands with his wrists hyperflexed as part of his training for kick boxing. At operation the extensor pollicis longus tendon was found to be divided at the level of the dorsal tubercle of the radius and was not directly repairable. The treatment was an extensor indicis proprius transfer. We suggest that the cause of the tendon rupture was direct pressure on the dorsal tubercle of the radius sustained while performing reverse press ups.

  18. Spontaneous rupture of extensor pollicis longus tendon in a kick boxer

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, T. W.; Tyler, M. P.; Roberts, A. H.

    1998-01-01

    A 23 year old male kick boxer presented with a 24 hour history of pain and being unable to extend the interphalangeal joint of the left thumb. There was no history of trauma or any other risk factor for spontaneous rupture of the extensor pollicis longus tendon. On the previous day, he had been doing reverse press ups on the dorsum of his hands with his wrists hyperflexed as part of his training for kick boxing. At operation the extensor pollicis longus tendon was found to be divided at the level of the dorsal tubercle of the radius and was not directly repairable. The treatment was an extensor indicis proprius transfer. We suggest that the cause of the tendon rupture was direct pressure on the dorsal tubercle of the radius sustained while performing reverse press ups. 


 PMID:9631230

  19. Direct end-to-end repair of flexor pollicis longus tendon lacerations.

    PubMed

    Nunley, J A; Levin, L S; Devito, D; Goldner, R D; Urbaniak, J R

    1992-01-01

    Between 1976 and 1986, 38 consecutive acute isolated flexor pollicis longus lacerations were repaired. This study excluded all replanted or mutilated digits and all lacerations with associated fracture. Average follow-up was 26 months. Tendon rehabilitation was standardized. Range of motion and pinch strength were measured postoperatively. Seventy-four percent (28/38) of the flexor pollicis longus injuries occurred in zone II. Neurovascular injury occurred in 82% of the lacerations, and this correlated with the zone of tendon injury. In 21% of the patients (8/38) both digital nerves and arteries were transected. Postoperative thumb interphalangeal motion averaged 35 degrees and key pinch strength was 81% that of the uninjured thumb. One rupture occurred in a child. Laceration of the flexor pollicis longus is likely to involve damage to neurovascular structures, and repair may be necessary. Direct end-to-end repairs within the pulley system do at least as well as delayed tendon reconstruction and do not require additional procedures.

  20. Acute calcific tendinitis of the flexor pollicis longus in an 8-year-old boy.

    PubMed

    Kheterpal, Arvin; Zoga, Adam; McClure, Kristen

    2014-10-01

    Calcific tendinitis is a common source of musculoskeletal pain in adults; however, it is rarely encountered in children. Calcific tendinitis is the most commonly encountered manifestation of hydroxyapatite deposition disease, in which calcium hydroxyapatite crystal deposition occurs in tendons. It may cause acute or chronic pain, or may be entirely asymptomatic. We describe a case of acute calcific tendinitis of the flexor pollicis longus tendon in an 8-year-old boy, who initially presented to our department for workup of a mass felt along the volar aspect of the right wrist.

  1. Tuberculous extensor tenosynovitis of the wrist with extensor pollicis longus rupture: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Introduction The tendon sheaths constitute an uncommon target of extra-articular tuberculosis. Case presentation We present a rare case of tuberculous tenosynovitis of the wrist involving the extensor tendon with rupture of the extensor pollicis longus tendon in a 55-year-old Indian man. Conclusion Prompt surgical debridement and tissue diagnosis are essential for the diagnosis and treatment of this type of infection. With an accurate and timely diagnosis, appropriate surgery and antituberculous treatment may eradicate these infections and prevent complications. PMID:20062777

  2. Spontaneous Rupture of the Extensor Pollicis Longus Tendon in a Tailor

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jun Cheol; Na, Hwa Yeop; Lee, Young Sang; Song, Woo Suk; Kim, Dae Hyeon; Park, Tae Hoon

    2011-01-01

    A spontaneous rupture of the extensor pollicis longus (EPL) tendon is associated with rheumatoid arthritis, fractures of the wrist, systemic or local steroids and repetitive, and excessive abnormal motion of the wrist joint. The authors encountered a case of a spontaneous rupture of the EPL tendon. The patient had no predisposing factors including trauma or steroid injection. Although the patient had a positive rheumatoid factor, he did not demonstrate other clinical or radiological findings of rheumatoid arthritis. During surgery, the EPL tendon was found to be ruptured at the extensor retinaculum (third compartment). Reconstruction of the extensor tendon using the palmaris longus tendon was performed. At the 18-month follow-up, the patient showed satisfactory extension of the thumb and 40° extension and flexion at the wrist. PMID:21629480

  3. System identification of evoked mechanomyogram from abductor pollicis brevis muscle in isometric contraction.

    PubMed

    Uchiyama, Takanori; Sakai, Hiroaki

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to verify the applicability of a sixth-order model to the mechanomyogram (MMG) system of the parallel-fibered muscle, which was identified from the MMG of the pennation muscle. The median nerve was stimulated, and an MMG and torque of the abductor pollicis brevis muscle were measured. The MMGs were detected with either a capacitor microphone or an acceleration sensor. The transfer functions between stimulation and the MMG and between stimulation and torque were identified by the singular value decomposition method. The torque and the MMG, which were detected with a capacitor microphone, DMMG, were approximated with a second- and a third-order model, respectively. The natural frequency of the torque, reflecting longitudinal mechanical characteristics, did not show a significant difference from that of the DMMG. The MMG detected with an acceleration sensor was approximated with a fourth-order model. The natural frequencies of the AMMG reflecting the muscle and subcutaneous tissue in the transverse direction were obtained. Both DMMG and AMMG have to be measured to investigate the model of the MMG system for parallel-fibered muscle. The MMG system of parallel-fibered muscle was also modeled with a sixth-order model.

  4. Silent periods in the abductor pollicis brevis muscle in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, K; Takahashi, K

    1992-01-01

    Silent periods in the abductor pollicis brevis muscle, produced by electrical stimulation of the median nerve at the wrist or the palmar side of the index finger, were studied in 14 patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and eight control subjects. Prior to the stimulation, background electromyographic activity showed no differences between normal subjects and patients with PD. Following the H-reflex after median nerve stimulation, two suppressive phases were observed: early (SP1) and late (SP2). Electrical stimulation of the palmar side of the index finger elicited two suppressive phases at almost the same latencies. The latency and duration of SP1 and SP2 and the degree of SP1, produced by electrical stimulation of the median nerve and the palmar side of the index finger in patients with PD, were normal. The degree of SP2 produced by electrical stimulation of the palmar side of the index finger in patients with PD was lower than that in normal subjects, although the degree of SP2 produced by median nerve stimulation in patients with PD did not differ from that in normal subjects. Suppression produced by cutaneous stimulation in the Parkinsonian hand may be low.

  5. A Study on the Accessory Head of the Flexor Pollicis Longus Muscle (Gantzer’s Muscle)

    PubMed Central

    S.A., Gunnal; A.U., Siddiqui; S.R., Daimi; M.S., Farooqui; R.N., Wabale

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The present study was planned to analyze the Accessory Head of the Flexor Pollicis Longus muscle’ (AHFPL) or Gantzer’s muscle and its incidence. It is an additional muscle in the forearm which might cause pressure symptoms to the underlying structures, especially to the anterior interosseus nerve. Materials and Methods: This study was performed on 180 upper limbs (90 right and 90 left). The morphology and the morphometry of AHFPL was done. In this investigation, we observed the various shapes, origins, insertions, nerve supplies and relations of the muscle. Observations and Results: The incidence of the accessory head of the flexor pollicis longus muscle was seen in 92 cases (51.11%). It was found bilaterally in 66 (71.73%) cases and unilaterally in 26 cases (28.26%), among which, in 16, it was seen on the right side and in 10 on the left side. With the increasing incidence of the Gantzer’s muscle, one can call it as an evolutionary muscle. Conclusion: The present study supplements the knowledge on the morphology of AHFPL muscle and its relationship with the anterior interosseus nerve. An increased incidence of this muscle may be the causative factor for the complete anterior interosseous nerve syndrome. PMID:23634387

  6. Incidence and morphology of accessory heads of flexor pollicis longus and flexor digitorum profundus (Gantzer's muscles)

    PubMed Central

    JONES, M.; ABRAHAMS, P. H.; SAÑUDO, J. R.; CAMPILLO, M.

    1997-01-01

    In 1813 Gantzer described 2 accessory muscles in the human forearm which bear his name (Wood, 1868; Macalister, 1875; Testut, 1884; Le Double, 1897). The more frequent of the 2 accessory muscles or ‘accessorius ad pollicem’ was found to arise from the coronoid process of the ulna, coursing distally to attach into the flexor pollicis longus muscle (flexor pollicis longus accessory head, FPLah). The less frequently observed or ‘accessorius ad flexorem profundum digitorum’ was again found to arise from the coronoid process and course to join into the flexor digitorum profundus (flexor digitorum profundus accessory head, FDPah). Since their initial description, they have been examined in further detail by a number of authors (Wood, 1868; Macalister, 1875; Le Double, 1897; Dykes & Anson, 1944; Mangini, 1960; Malhotra et al. 1982; Dellon & McKinnon, 1987; Kida, 1988). These studies, most of them focusing on the FPLah, all show different results of prevalence, origin, insertion, relations and nerve supply. We undertook this study with the aim of providing a more accurate account of the detailed morphology of both accessory muscles because of the above-mentioned inconsistent anatomical descriptions and the lack of information as to important aspects such as vascular supply, morphology (shape and length) and the coexistence of both accessory heads. PMID:9419002

  7. Congenital absence of flexor pollicis longus tendon without associated anomalies of thumb hypoplasia: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Demirseren, Mustafa Erol; Afandiyev, Kamran; Durgun, Mustafa; Kilicarslan, Kasim; Yorubulut, Mehmet

    2007-12-01

    In this paper, we report a case of a 14-year-old girl with congenital aplasia of the flexor pollicis longus tendon who had no other associated anomalies of thumb hypoplasia and no trauma history. Flexor pollicis longus tendon anomalies are rare; several types of this congenital anomaly have been reported in the literature. The diagnosis should be considered if a patient is unable to flex the interphalangeal joint of the thumb. A hypoplastic thumb or an absent interphalangeal joint crease may be a diagnostic feature in such cases. Besides physical examination, we also used direct radiography and magnetic resonance imaging to diagnose this rare congenital anomaly in our patient.

  8. Acute Traumatic Musculotendinous Avulsion of the Flexor Pollicis Longus Tendon Treated with Primary Flexor Digitorum Superficialis Transfer: A Novel Technique of Management

    PubMed Central

    Sasi, P. Kiran; Mahapatra, Swagath; Raj Pallapati, Samuel C.; Thomas, Binu P.

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic musculotendinous junction avulsions are rare injuries except in avulsion amputations. They pose a significant challenge to the treating surgeon. We present a 24-year-old male who sustained an open musculotendinous avulsion of the flexor pollicis longus tendon. He was treated with primary tendon transfer using the flexor digitorum superficialis of ring finger, in flexor zone 3. The functional result at 10 months following surgery was excellent. PMID:27019757

  9. Extensor Pollicis Longus Injury in Addition to De Quervain’s with Text Messaging on Mobile Phones

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Bhaskaranand; Bhat, Anil K; Venugopal, Anand

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To do a clinical and ultrasonic evaluation of subjects with thumb pain with text messaging. Background: Thumbs are commonly used for text messaging, which are not as well designed for fine manipulative or dexterous work. Repetitive use as in text messaging can lead to the injury to the tendons of the thumb. Materials and Methods: Ninety eight students with symptoms of Repetitive Strain Type of injuries of the thumb were selected from a survey and evaluated both clinically and by ultrasound analysis of the musculotendinous unit of the thumb to note changes due to excessive use of the mobile phone. Age and sex matched controls were also subjected to ultrasound evaluation. Results: Clinical examination showed positive Finkelstein test in 40% of the cases, significant reduction in the lateral and tip pinch strengths in the cases. Ultrasound detected changes in the first and the third compartments in 19% of the cases. Conclusion: Isolated cases of pain in the thumb have been reported but this study noted changes both clinically and by ultrasound in the tendons of the thumb. These changes should be taken as warning signs of possible subclinical changes taking place in the soft tissues of the thumb in these subjects due to repetitive use of mobile phones and thus, making them prone for developing painful Musculoskeletal Disorders. Application: Repetitive use of mobile phones for text messaging can lead to the damage of Extensor pollicis longus of the thumb in addition to the tendons of the first compartment of the wrist. PMID:25584249

  10. A simulation analysis of the combined effects of muscle strength and surgical tensioning on lateral pinch force following brachioradialis to flexor pollicis longus transfer.

    PubMed

    Mogk, Jeremy P M; Johanson, M Elise; Hentz, Vincent R; Saul, Katherine R; Murray, Wendy M

    2011-02-24

    Biomechanical simulations of tendon transfers performed following tetraplegia suggest that surgical tensioning influences clinical outcomes. However, previous studies have focused on the biomechanical properties of only the transferred muscle. We developed simulations of the tetraplegic upper limb following transfer of the brachioradialis (BR) to the flexor pollicis longus (FPL) to examine the influence of residual upper limb strength on predictions of post-operative transferred muscle function. Our simulations included the transfer, ECRB, ECRL, the three heads of the triceps, brachialis, and both heads of the biceps. Simulations were integrated with experimental data, including EMG and joint posture data collected from five individuals with tetraplegia and BR-FPL tendon transfers during maximal lateral pinch force exertions. Given a measured co-activation pattern for the non-paralyzed muscles in the tetraplegic upper limb, we computed the highest activation for the transferred BR for which neither the elbow nor the wrist flexor moment was larger than the respective joint extensor moment. In this context, the effects of surgical tensioning were evaluated by comparing the resulting pinch force produced at different muscle strength levels, including patient-specific scaling. Our simulations suggest that extensor muscle weakness in the tetraplegic limb limits the potential to augment total pinch force through surgical tensioning. Incorporating patient-specific muscle volume, EMG activity, joint posture, and strength measurements generated simulation results that were comparable to experimental results. Our study suggests that scaling models to the population of interest facilitates accurate simulation of post-operative outcomes, and carries utility for guiding and developing rehabilitation training protocols.

  11. The prevalence of accessory heads of the flexor pollicis longus and the flexor digitorum profundus muscles in Egyptians and their relations to median and anterior interosseous nerves.

    PubMed

    El Domiaty, M A; Zoair, M M; Sheta, A A

    2008-02-01

    Entrapment neuropathy in the forearm is not uncommon. Surgical interference for nerve decompression should be preceded by accurate diagnosis of the exact cause and site of the nerve entrapment. The aim of the present study was to investigate the prevalence of accessory heads of the flexor pollicis longus and flexor digitorum profundus muscles (FPLah) and (FDPah) in Egyptians and their topographical relationship with both the median nerve and its anterior interosseous branch. A total of 42 upper limbs of embalmed cadavers, 36 from males and 6 from females, were examined to elucidate the prevalence of both the FPLah and the FDPah muscles, their origin, insertion, nerve supply and morphology. The distribution of these two muscles in the right and left male and female upper limbs and their relationship to the anterior interosseous and median nerves were recorded. The total lengths of both accessory muscles and the lengths of their fleshy bellies and tendons were also measured. The FPLah was found to be present more frequently (61.9%) than it was absent, whereas the FDPah was observed in only 14.24% of the specimens examined. The combination of the accessory muscles in the same forearm was noticed in 9.52% of cases. As regards side, the FPLah appeared in 77.7% of the right forearms and in 50% of the left, while the FDPah was found in only 25% of the left forearms. The accessory muscles showed no single morphology, as the FPLah appeared fusiform in 53.8%, slender in 30.8% and voluminous fusiform in 15.4%, while the FDPah was slender in 66.6% and triangular in 33.3% of specimens. The FPLah arose mainly from the under surface of flexor digitorum superficialis, while the FDPah took its origin from the under surface of flexor digitorum superficialis or from the medial epicondyle. The insertion of the FPLah was mainly into the upper third of the FPL tendon, while the FDPah tendon joined the tendons of the flexor digitorum profundus muscle to the index or middle and ring

  12. Use of the radial groove view intra-operatively to prevent damage to the extensor pollicis longus tendon by protruding screws during volar plating of a distal radial fracture.

    PubMed

    Lee, S K; Bae, K W; Choy, W S

    2013-10-01

    The aims of this study were to assess the efficacy of a newly designed radiological technique (the radial groove view) for the detection of protrusion of screws in the groove for the extensor pollicis longus tendon (EPL) during plating of distal radial fractures. We also aimed to determine the optimum position of the forearm to obtain this view. We initially analysed the anatomy of the EPL groove by performing three-dimensional CT on 51 normal forearms. The mean horizontal angle of the groove was 17.8° (14° to 23°). We found that the ideal position of the fluoroscopic beam to obtain this view was 20° in the horizontal plane and 5° in the sagittal plane. We then intra-operatively assessed the use of the radial groove view for detecting protrusion of screws in the EPL groove in 93 fractures that were treated by volar plating. A total of 13 protruding screws were detected. They were changed to shorter screws and these patients underwent CT scans of the wrist immediately post-operatively. There remained one screw that was protruding. These findings suggest that the use of the radial groove view intra-operatively is a good method of assessing the possible protrusion of screws into the groove of EPL when plating a fracture of the distal radius.

  13. Abductor Reconstruction with Gluteus Maximus Transfer in Primary Abductor Deficiency during Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Se Ang; Byun, Young Soo; Gu, Tae Hoe

    2016-01-01

    Abductor deficiency in native hip joint may cause severe limping and pain. It is more serious situation in case of arthroplasty due to instability and recurrent dislocation. Well-known causes of abductor deficiency are repeated surgery, chronic trochanteric bursitis, superior gluteal nerve injury, failure of repair of abductor tendon insertion to the greater trochanter. Author had experienced primary abductor deficiency during total hip replacement and treated successfully with the transfer of gluteus maximus. We'd like to introduce the operation technique with the review of literature. PMID:27777922

  14. Botulinum toxin therapy for abductor spasmodic dysphonia.

    PubMed

    Woodson, Gayle; Hochstetler, Heidi; Murry, Thomas

    2006-03-01

    Botulinum toxin has been widely accepted as an effective therapy for controlling the symptoms of adductor spasmodic dysphonia (ADSD). Reported experience with botulinum treatment for abductor spasmodic dysphonia (ABSD) has been less impressive. Factors that may impair outcomes for ABSD include differences in the pathophysiology of ADSD and ABSD and limitation of maximal dose from airway restriction with posterior cricoarytenoid muscle (PCA) weakness. We report our experience with botulinum injection of the PCA with an asymmetric dose escalation protocol, based on clinical observations that in ABSD, abductor spasms are often stronger on one side, usually the left. The nondominant side was injected with 1.25 units. Dominant side dose began at 5 units, with step-wise increments of 5 units per week until one of three endpoints was reached: Elimination of breathy voice breaks, complete abductor paralysis of the dominant side, or airway compromise. Fourteen of 17 patients achieved good or fair voice, with dominant-side doses ranging from 10 to 25 units. Exercise intolerance limited PCA dose in two patients. One patient had persisting breathiness that improved with medialization thyroplasty. Asymmetric botulinum toxin injection into PCA muscles can suppress abductor spasm in patients with ABSD, but breathiness may persist, because of inadequate glottal closure.

  15. Lesion of the hip abductor mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Caviglia, Horacio; Cambiaggi, Guillermo; Vattani, Nosrat; Landro, María Eulalia; Galatro, Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The disruption of the abductor muscles of the hip after hip revision surgery often causes limping, pain, and instability of the implant. The purpose of our paper is to describe a mesh technique to repair hip abductor mechanism injuries after hip revision. Patients and methods: Forty-six patients with hip abductor damage after prosthetic revision were treated. Inclusion criteria were: patients presenting with prosthetic loosening, complaint of pain, and with a positive Trendelenburg sign due to deficient abductor muscle mechanisms. Thirty-one were women (67.39%) with an average age of 64 years (34–82 years). The number of previous revision surgeries was three (two to seven). The Merle d’Aubigné score and variants before and after treatment were also reported. Results: In the postoperative follow-up after hip revision with the mesh technique, the Merle d’Aubigné score improved and the Trendelenburg sign was negative in 78.3% of the patients (p < 0.001). Also, the Trendelenburg test with the knee flexed was negative in 60.9% (p < 0.001) and the stair-climbing test was negative in 60.9% of cases (p < 0.001). The gluteus medius test in the lateral position was negative in 52.2% of patients, and in the lateral position with the knee flexed it was negative in 47.8% of patients (p < 0.001). Discussion: Repair of the abductor mechanism with the mesh technique has proven effective for both partial and total lesions. PMID:27382925

  16. Positioning Techniques to Reduce the Occurrence of DeQuervain's Tendonitis in Nursing Mothers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Virzi, Alison

    2010-01-01

    DeQuervain's tendonitis is an inflammation of two tendons: the extensor pollicis brevis and the abductor pollicis longus as they cross in the first dorsal compartment of the wrist. Symptoms include pain, swelling along the radial aspect of the wrist, and a decrease in thumb motion. A positive Finkelstein's test at examination is seen. Frequently…

  17. Autologous split peroneus longus lateral ankle stabilization.

    PubMed

    Budny, Adam M; Schuberth, John M

    2012-01-01

    Lateral ankle instability is a common clinical entity, and a variety of surgical procedures are available for stabilization after conservative management fails. Herein the authors reviewed outcomes after performing autologous split peroneus longus lateral ankle stabilization, using a previously described surgical technique to anatomically recreate the anterior talofibular and calcaneofibular ligaments. Twenty-five consecutive patients from 2 surgeons' practices underwent reconstruction between March 2007 and January 2011 with a minimum follow-up of 12 (range 12 to 51) months (mean 29.5 months). Follow-up interviews demonstrated 92.0% good or excellent outcomes with only 8.0% rating the outcome as fair and none as poor; 92.0% had no recurrent sprains or difficulty going up or down hills; 88.0% related no difficulty with uneven ground. The authors conclude that the autologous split peroneus longus lateral ankle stabilization results in a stable ankle with a low rate of complications and high patient satisfaction.

  18. Distally Based Abductor Hallucis Adipomuscular Flap for Forefoot Plantar Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sanglim; Kim, Min Bom; Lee, Young Ho; Baek, Jeong Kook; Baek, Goo Hyun

    2015-09-01

    Soft tissue and bone defects of the lower leg, ankle, and heel region often require coverage by local or distant flaps. The authors successfully used the distally based adipomuscular abductor hallucis flap for the treatment of 7 patients with soft tissue defect on the plantar forefoot after diabetic ulcer (n = 2), excision of melanoma at the medial forefoot (n = 3), and posttraumatic defects of the plantar forefoot (n = 2). The size of the defects ranged from 6 to 36 cm. All defects were covered successfully without major complications. The distally based adipomuscular flap from the abductor hallucis muscle provides a reliable coverage for small and moderate defects of the plantar and medial forefoot. This flap is often preferable to the use of free flaps because the surgery is rapidly performed and does not require microsurgical expertise.

  19. Cutaneous linear atrophy following intralesional corticosteroid injection in the treatment of tendonitis.

    PubMed

    Cantürk, Ferhan; Cantürk, Tayyar; Aydin, Fatma; Karagöz, Filiz; Sentürk, Nilgün; Turanli, Ahmet Yaşar

    2004-03-01

    It is well-known that local and systemic side effects due to intralesional corticosteroid injections are common. We report the case of a 28-year-old woman with cutaneous linear atrophy along the abductor pollicis longus tendon, which appeared after an injection of intralesional corticosteroid in the treatment of de Quervain tendonitis.

  20. Fibromatosis of the flexor pollicus longus tendon

    PubMed Central

    Damkat-Thomas, L; Black, CE; Herbert, K

    2010-01-01

    An unusual case of fibromatosis of the dominant left flexor pollicus longus (FPL) in a thirteen year old schoolboy. Initially presenting with pain in the thenar eminence and difficulty flexing the metacarpal phalangeal joint (MPJ), other symptoms include locking, triggering and difficulty writing. MRI showed a 4cm segment of thickened abnormal tendon. Intra-operatively three 1cm nodules were excised from the FPL while preserving the tendon. Histopathology reported the nodules as fibromatosis. A literature search revealed that this has not previously been reported although symptomatic tendon sheath fibromas have. Our patient achieved a good result following surgical intervention and the two year review has shown no complications. PMID:24946359

  1. The Extensor Pollicis Brevis: A Review of Its Anatomy and Variations

    PubMed Central

    Jabir, Shehab; Lyall, Harry; Iwuagwu, Fortune C.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The standard anatomical description of the extensor pollicis brevis tendon provided in textbooks of anatomy is at odds with that of published anatomical studies. It is crucial to the hand surgeon that he or she has a clear understanding of its anatomy, including its variations. The aim of this study was to provide a comprehensive review of the current literature on the anatomy and variants of the extensor pollicis brevis. It is hoped that this review will be indispensable to the hand surgeon in informing him or her about the anatomy and variants encountered when dealing with the extensor pollicis brevis. Methods: Inclusion and exclusion criteria were defined and a literature search was carried out on MEDLINE, PubMed, Embase, and Google Scholar from inception to March 2013 for studies on the topic of extensor pollicis brevis anatomy. The following key words were used: “extensor pollicis brevis,” “anatomy,” “anatomic variations,” “cadaveric study,” “clinical study,” “case report,” and “dissection”. Results: The search retrieved a total of 52 studies following removal of duplicates. Forty-five studies were excluded following screening of the title and abstract. Three studies were excluded as they did not meet the eligibility criteria, leaving 4 cadaveric studies for inclusion in the review. Conclusion: We recommend the use of ultrasound scanning to determine anatomy of the extensor pollicis brevis before reconstructive procedures involving the extensor pollicis brevis, as well as in traumatic injuries to the extensor pollicis brevis. There appears to be ethnicity-related variations in the anatomy of the extensor pollicis brevis, and further study into these variations may be indicated. PMID:23882301

  2. Chronic triceps insufficiency managed with extensor carpi radialis longus and palmaris longus tendon grafts.

    PubMed

    Singh, Dhanpal; Kumar, K Arun; Dinesh, Mc; Raj, Ranju

    2012-03-01

    Chronic triceps insufficiency, causing prolonged disability, occurs due to a missed diagnosis of an acute rupture. We report a 25 year old male with history of a significant fall sustaining multiple injuries. Since then, he had inability in extending his right elbow for which he sought intervention after a year. Diagnosis of triceps rupture was made clinicoradiologically and surgery was planned. Intraoperative findings revealed a deficient triceps with a fleck of avulsed bone from olecranon. Ipsilateral double tendon graft including extensor carpi radialis longus and palmaris longus were anchored to triceps and secured with the olecranon. Six-months follow revealed a complete active extension of elbow and a full function at the donor site.

  3. Arthroscopic Synovectomy for Zone 2 Flexor Hallucis Longus Tenosynovitis.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2015-10-01

    Tenosynovitis of the flexor hallucis longus tendon is a condition typically found in ballet dancers and sometimes in soccer players and is related to chronic overuse. It mostly involves the portion of the tendon behind the ankle joint. However, the portion of the tendon under the sustentaculum tali can also be involved. Open synovectomy requires extensive dissection. We report the technique of arthroscopic synovectomy of the deep portion of the flexor hallucis longus.

  4. An ergonomics study of thumb movements on smartphone touch screen.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Jinghong; Muraki, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the relationships between thumb muscle activity and thumb operating tasks on a smartphone touch screen with one-hand posture. Six muscles in the right thumb and forearm were targeted in this study, namely adductor pollicis, flexor pollicis brevis, abductor pollicis brevis (APB), abductor pollicis longus, first dorsal interosseous (FDI) and extensor digitorum. The performance measures showed that the thumb developed fatigue rapidly when tapping on smaller buttons (diameter: 9 mm compared with 3 mm), and moved more slowly in flexion-extension than in adduction-abduction orientation. Meanwhile, the electromyography and perceived exertion values of FDI significantly increased in small button and flexion-extension tasks, while those of APB were greater in the adduction-abduction task. This study reveals that muscle effort among thumb muscles on a touch screen smartphone varies according to the task, and suggests that the use of small touch buttons should be minimised for better thumb performance.

  5. Thickness of the adductor pollicis muscle in nutritional assessment of surgical patients

    PubMed Central

    Valente, Katarina Papera; Silva, Naira Marceli Fraga; Faioli, Amanda Barcelos; Barreto, Marina Abelha; de Moraes, Rafael Araújo Guedes; Guandalini, Valdete Regina

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective To evaluate the correlation between thickness of the muscle adductor pollicis and anthropometric measurements, body mass index and Subjective Global Assessment in the nutritional assessment of surgical patients. Methods The study population comprised patients admitted to the general and reconstructive surgery unit of a university hospital in the city of Vitória (ES), Brazil. The inclusion criteria were patients evaluated in the first 48 hours of admission, aged ≥20 years, hemodynamically stable, with no edema or ascites. Data analysis was performed using the software Statistical Package for Social Science 21.0, significance level of 5%. Results The sample consisted of 150 patients that were candidates to surgery, mean age of 42.7±12.0 years. The most common reasons for hospitalization were surgical procedures, gastrintestinal diseases and neoplasm. Significant association was observed between thickness of adductor pollicis muscle and Subjective Global Assessment (p=0.021) and body mass index (p=0.008) for nutritional risk. Significant correlation was found between thickness of adductor pollicis muscle and arm muscle circumference, corrected arm muscle area, calf circumference and body mass index. There were no significant correlations between thickness of adductor pollicis muscle and triceps skinfold and age. Conclusion The use of thickness of adductor pollicis muscle proved to be an efficient method to detect malnutrition in surgical patients and it should be added to the screening process of hospitalized patients, since it is easy to perform, inexpensive and noninvasive. PMID:27074229

  6. The contribution of the palmaris longus muscle to the strength of thumb abduction.

    PubMed

    Gangata, Hope; Ndou, Robert; Louw, Graham

    2010-05-01

    The palmaris longus muscle (PLM) is described as a weak flexor of the wrist and a tensor of the palmar aponeurosis, but not a thumb abductor. The PLM is believed to aid thumb abduction through its insertion onto the thenar eminence. Two groups, both right hand dominant, were selected from 1,200 sampled participants. The first group comprised of 38 subjects with unilateral presence of the PLM and was used to determine the strength of thumb abduction. The second group comprised of 30 subjects, with bilateral presence of the PLM, and it was used to calculate the effects of hand dominance. A significant number of subjects with bilateral absence of the PLM were observed and undocumented. Using a dynamometer in subjects with unilateral presence of the PLM, the force of thumb abduction was significantly greater on the hand with a PLM than the one without it (P = 0.014), irrespective of hand dominance. In the second sample with bilateral PLM, thumb abduction on the dominant hand was 10% stronger than on the nondominant hand and was similar to the universally accepted average of 10% increase in grip strength of the dominant hand. Thus, 10% was deducted from all the dominant hands, and the force of thumb abduction remained greater on the hand with PLM than the hand without it (P = 0.049). The results of this study demonstrated the PLM to be involved in thumb abduction, and the authors therefore recommend that this action of the muscle be universally accepted by anatomists and hand surgeons.

  7. Relationship between adductor pollicis muscle thickness and subjective global assessment in a cardiac intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    Karst, Fernanda Pickrodt; Vieira, Renata Monteiro; Barbiero, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    Objective To verify the relationship between the adductor pollicis muscle thickness test and the subjective global assessment and to correlate it with other anthropometric methods. Methods This observational cross-sectional study was conducted in the intensive care unit of a cardiology hospital in the state of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. The hospitalized patients underwent subjective global assessment and adductor pollicis muscle thickness tests on both hands, along with measurement of the right calf circumference. Laboratory parameters, length of stay, vital signs and electronic medical record data and tests were all collected. Results The study population included 83 patients, of whom 62% were men. The average age was 68.6 ± 12.5 years. The most common reason for hospitalization was acute myocardial infarction (34.9%), and the most common pathology was systolic blood pressure (63.9%), followed by diabetes mellitus (28.9%). According to subjective global assessment classifications, 62.7% of patients presented no nutritional risk, 20.5% were moderately malnourished and 16.9% were severely malnourished. Women had a higher nutritional risk, according to both the subjective global assessment and the adductor pollicis muscle thickness test, the cutoff for which was < 6.5mm (54.8%; p = 0.001). The pathology presenting the greatest nutritional risk was congestive heart failure (p = 0.001). Evaluation of the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve between adductor pollicis muscle thickness and subjective global assessment showed the accuracy of the former, with an area of 0.822. Conclusion Adductor pollicis muscle thickness proved to be a good method for evaluating nutritional risk. PMID:26761475

  8. Longitudinal split tear of the extensor pollicis brevis tendon: report of 2 cases.

    PubMed

    Kroonen, Leo T; Ferguson, Christopher; Ketschke, Rhett A

    2015-02-01

    Two patients presented with radial-sided wrist pain and longitudinal split tears of the extensor pollicis brevis tendon. Surgical debridement and repair was performed on the first patient with good results. Early diagnosis in the second patient led to successful treatment with immobilization alone. If diagnostic maneuvers for de Quervain tenosynovitis produce pain in a location other than the radial styloid, advanced imaging should be considered to identify other anatomic causes for the pain.

  9. Flexor Digitorum Accessorius Longus: Importance of Posterior Ankle Endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Batista, Jorge Pablo; del Vecchio, Jorge Javier; Golanó, Pau; Vega, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopy for the posterior region of the ankle through two portals is becoming more widespread for the treatment of a large number of conditions which used to be treated with open surgery years ago. The tendon of the flexor hallucis longus (FHL) travels along an osteofibrous tunnel between the posterolateral and posteromedial tubercles of the talus. Chronic inflammation of this tendon may lead to painful stenosing tenosynovitis. The aim of this report is to describe two cases depicting an accessory tendon which is an anatomical variation of the flexor hallucis longus in patients with posterior friction syndrome due to posterior ankle impingement and associated with a posteromedial osteochondral lesion of the talus. The anatomical variation (FDAL) described was a finding during an endoscopy of the posterior region of the ankle, and we have spared it by sectioning the superior flexor retinaculum only. The accessory flexor digitorum longus is an anatomical variation and should be taken into account when performing an arthroscopy of the posterior region of the ankle. We recommend this treatment on this type of injury although we admit this does not make a definite conclusion. PMID:26060592

  10. Laser Posterior Cordotomy: Is it a Good Choice in Treating Bilateral Vocal Fold Abductor Paralysis?

    PubMed Central

    Khalil, Mahmoud A; Abdel Tawab, Hazem M

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Bilateral abductor vocal fold paralysis can lead to respiratory distress and dyspnea. OBJECTIVES To assess the efficacy of CO2 laser unilateral posterior cordotomy in cases with bilateral abductor paralysis as regards improvement of dyspnea with preservation of satisfactory voice and swallowing after the operation. METHODS A prospective study was done on 18 patients with bilateral abductor vocal fold paralysis (10 females and 8 males) from November 2010 to December 2012 with their ages ranging from 32 to 64 years. RESULTS All patients showed improvement of dyspnea after the operation, most of the patients suffered from mild to moderate dyspnea in the immediate post-operative period, and two patients needed another intervention to solve it. All the patients had satisfactory results of their voice after the operation, and one patient only suffered from temporary aspiration. CONCLUSION Unilateral CO2 laser posterior cordotomy is an easy and effective procedure to solve the dyspnea after bilateral vocal fold abductor paralysis without aspiration or significant voice alteration. PMID:25057244

  11. Does the longus colli have an effect on cervical vertigo?

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiao-Ming; Pan, Fu-Min; Yong, Zhi-Yao; Ba, Zhao-yu; Wang, Shan-Jin; Liu, Zheng; Zhao, Wei-dong; Wu, De-Sheng

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the study was to evaluate the role of the longus colli muscles in cervical vertigo. We retrospectively analyzed 116 adult patients who underwent anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) during 2014 in our department. Patients were assigned to the vertigo group or the nonvertigo group. Demographic data were recorded. Inner distance and cross-sectional area (CSA) of longus colli were measured using coronal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The vertigo group (n = 44) and the nonvertigo group (n = 72) were similar in demographic data. Mean preoperative Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) score was higher in the vertigo group than in the nonvertigo group (P = 0.037), but no difference postoperatively. Mean JOA scores increased significantly postoperatively in both groups (P = 0.002 and P = 0.001). The mean vertigo score decreased significantly from pre- to postoperatively in the vertigo group (P = 0.023). The mean preoperative Cobb angle was significantly smaller in the vertigo group than in the nonvertigo group (P <0.001), but no significant difference postoperatively. After ACDF, the mean Cobb angle increased significantly in the vertigo group (P <0.001). The instability rates of C3/4 and C4/5 were significantly higher in the vertigo group (P <0.001 and P <0.001). The inner distance of longus colli was significantly shorter (P = 0.032 and P = 0.026) and CSA significantly smaller (P = 0.041 and P = 0.035), at C3/4 and C4/5 in the vertigo group than in the nonvertigo group. Mean Miyazaki scores were significantly higher in the vertigo group at C3/4 and C4/5 (P = 0.044 and P = 0.037). Moreover, a shorter inner distance and smaller CSA were related to a higher Miyazaki score. Inner distance and cross-sectional area (CSA) of longus colli are associated closely with cervical vertigo. Shorter inner distance and smaller CSA of the longus colli muscles might be risk factors for cervical vertigo. ACDF

  12. Resisted side-stepping: the effect of posture on hip abductor muscle activation

    PubMed Central

    Berry, Justin W.; Lee, Theresa S.; Foley, Hanna D.; Lewis, Cara L.

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Controlled laboratory study, repeated-measures design. Objectives To compare hip abductor muscle activity and hip and knee joint kinematics in the moving limb to the stance limb during resisted side-stepping and also to determine if muscle activity was affected by the posture (upright standing versus squat) used to perform the exercise. Background Hip abductor weakness has been associated with a variety of lower extremity injuries. Resisted side-stepping is often used as an exercise to increase strength and endurance of the hip abductors. Exercise prescription would benefit from knowing the relative muscle activity level generated in each limb and for different postures during the side-stepping exercise. Methods Twenty-four healthy adults participated in this study. Kinematics and surface electromyographic (EMG) data from the gluteus maximus, gluteus medius, and tensor fascia lata (TFL) were collected as participants performed side-stepping with a resistive band around the ankle while maintaining each of 2 postures: 1) upright standing and 2) squat. Results Mean normalized EMG signal amplitude of the gluteus maximus, gluteus medius, and TFL was higher in the stance limb than the moving limb (P≤.001). Gluteal muscle activity was higher, while TFL muscle activity was lower, in the squat posture compared to the upright standing posture (P<.001). Hip abduction excursion was greater in the stance limb than in the moving limb (P<.001). Conclusions The 3 hip abductor muscles respond differently to the posture variations of side-stepping exercise in healthy individuals. When prescribing resisted side-stepping exercises, therapists should consider the differences in hip abductor activation across limbs and variations in trunk posture. PMID:26161629

  13. Effects of Multi-modal Physiotherapy, Including Hip Abductor Strengthening, in Patients with Iliotibial Band Friction Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Beers, Amanda; Ryan, Michael; Kasubuchi, Zenya; Fraser, Scott

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purposes of this study were to quantitatively examine hip abductor strength in patients presenting with iliotibial band friction syndrome (ITBFS) and to determine whether a multi-modal physiotherapy approach, including hip abductor strengthening, might play a role in recovery. Method: Our observational, pretest–posttest study is one of the first prospective studies in this area. Patients presenting to physiotherapy with unilateral ITBFS were recruited to participate. Participants followed a 6-week rehabilitation programme designed to strengthen hip abductors; strength was measured every 2 weeks using a hand-held dynamometer and compared bilaterally. Results: Sixteen subjects (five men, 11 women) aged 20 to 53 years participated. All but 2 reported running as one of their main physical activities. A trend toward a significant difference in hip abductor strength was found between the injured and uninjured sides at baseline, but this difference disappeared by 6 weeks. Hip abductor strength was significantly related to physical function at weeks 2, 4, and 6. Nine subjects were discharged from physiotherapy after the 6-week period, while the other 7 subjects continued attending for up to 5 months. Conclusions: Hip abductor strengthening appeared to be beneficial in the treatment of ITBFS, but further research on the use of hip abductor strengthening for treatment and prevention of ITBFS is needed. PMID:20145781

  14. Acupuncture in De Quervain's disease: a treatment proposal.

    PubMed

    da Silva, João Bosco Guerreiro; Batigália, Fernando

    2014-02-01

    De Quervain's disease is a painful stenosing tenosynovitis of the first dorsal compartment of the hand affecting the tendons of the abductor pollicis longus and extensor pollicis brevis, caused mainly by overuse. Conventional treatments include rest, immobilisation, oral anti-inflammatory drugs, corticosteroid injection and even surgery, but none of these is established as clearly effective. Acupuncture is rarely mentioned and the points suggested are rather general-regional, tender and ah shi points. Tendinopathy is almost always associated with problems in the relevant muscles and this paper calls attention to the correct identification and needling of the affected muscles, in order to increase the specificity of acupuncture treatment.

  15. Effects of Postmortem Freezing on Passive Properties of Rabbit Extensor Digtorum Longus Muscle Tendon Complex

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-06-14

    AD-A266 429 INSTITUTE REPORT NO. 483 Effects of Postmortem Freezing on Passive Properties of Rabbit Extensor Digtorum Longus Muscle Tendon Complex D...Extensor Digtorum Longus Muscle Tendon Complex -- Paul H. Leitschuh, Tammy J. Doherty, Dean C. Taylor, Daniel E. Brooks, John B. Ryan This document has...ABSTRACT The tensile properties of the extensor digitorum longus muscle tendon unit (EDL MTU) were studied in 16 white male New Zealand rabbits in both

  16. Diagnosis and surgical management of flexor digitorum accessorius longus-induced tarsal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wittmayer, Brian C; Freed, Lewis

    2007-01-01

    The flexor digitorum accessorius longus is a rare muscular occurrence in the lower extremity. It has been reported as an etiology of tarsal tunnel syndrome through prior case reports. By means of individual case study, we revisit flexor digitorum accessorius longus as a cause of tarsal tunnel syndrome. This case study discusses diagnosis along with surgical treatment of tarsal tunnel syndrome induced by the presence of flexor digitorum accessorius longus.

  17. Multiple variations of the tendons of the anatomical snuffbox

    PubMed Central

    Thwin, San San; Zaini, Fazlin; Than, Myo

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Multiple tendons of the abductor pollicis longus (APL) in the anatomical snuffbox of the wrist can lead to the development of de Quervain's syndrome, which is caused by stenosing tenosynovitis. A cadaveric study was performed to establish the variations present in the tendons of the anatomical snuffbox in a Malaysian population, in the hope that this knowledge would aid clinical investigation and surgical treatment of de Quervain's tenosynovitis. METHODS Routine dissection of ten upper limbs was performed to determine the variations in the tendons of the anatomical snuffbox of the wrist. RESULTS In all the dissected upper limbs, the APL tendon of the first extensor compartment was found to have several (3–14) tendon slips. The insertion of the APL tendon slips in all upper limbs were at the base of the first metacarpal bone, trapezium and fascia of the opponens pollicis muscle; however, in seven specimens, they were also found to be attached to the fleshy belly of the abductor pollicis brevis muscle. In two specimens, double tendons of the extensor pollicis longus located in the third extensor compartment were inserted into the capsule of the proximal interphalangeal joints before being joined to the extensor expansion. In two other specimens, the first extensor compartment had two osseofibrous tunnels divided by a septum that separated the APL tendon from the extensor pollicis brevis tendon. CONCLUSION Multiple variations were found in the anatomical snuffbox region of the dissected upper limbs. Knowledge of these variations would be useful in interventional radiology and orthopaedic surgery. PMID:24452976

  18. Tarsal tunnel syndrome and flexor hallucis longus tendon hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, D; Devos Bevernage, B; Maldague, P; Deleu, P-A; Leemrijse, T

    2010-11-01

    Tarsal tunnel syndrome (TTS) defines an entrapment neuropathy of the posterior tibial nerve or one of its branches, within the tarsal tunnel. Numerous etiologies have been described explaining this entrapment, including trauma, space-occupying lesions, foot deformities, etc. We present an unreported cause of a space-occupying lesion in the etiology of TTS, namely the combination of a hypertrophic long distally extended muscle belly of the flexor hallucis longus and repetitive ankle motion. Surgical debulking of the muscle belly in the posterior ankle compartment resolved all symptoms.

  19. A case of Creutzfeldt-Jacob disease with bilateral vocal fold abductor paralysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Lishu; Saigusa, Hideto; Nagayama, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Tsuyoshi; Aino, Iichirou; Komachi, Taro; Yamaguchi, Satoshi

    2009-09-01

    Bilateral vocal fold abductor paralysis was seen in a patient with Creutzfeldt-Jacob disease. After tracheotomy, the patient showed disappearance of reduced oxygen saturation with high-pitched inspiratory stridor and pulling phenomenon of the supraclavicular region and larynx. Electromyographic examinations of the intrinsic laryngeal muscles, including the thyroarytenoid and posterior cricoarytenoid muscles, demonstrated that there was no apparent action potential in those muscles during spontaneous respiratory movements, and there was no abnormal potential for those muscles at rest. By pushing the infrasternal region of the patient on the expiration, normal motor unit action potential could be seen in the posterior cricoarytenoid muscle on the next inspiration. Based on those findings, we concluded that bilateral vocal fold abductor paralysis in this case of Creutzfeldt-Jacob disease was not induced by disorders of the degeneration of motor nucleus in the ambiguus as in multiple system atrophy, but by a disorder of the upper motor neuron.

  20. Experimentally Reduced Hip-Abductor Muscle Strength and Frontal-Plane Biomechanics During Walking

    PubMed Central

    Pohl, Michael B.; Kendall, Karen D.; Patel, Chirag; Wiley, J. Preston; Emery, Carolyn; Ferber, Reed

    2015-01-01

    Context: Researchers have postulated that reduced hip-abductor muscle strength may have a role in the progression of knee osteoarthritis by increasing the external knee-adduction moment. However, the relationship between hip-abductor strength and frontal-plane biomechanics remains unclear. Objective: To experimentally reduce hip-abduction strength and observe the subsequent changes in frontal-plane biomechanics. Design: Descriptive laboratory study. Setting: Research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Eight healthy, recreationally active men (age = 27 ± 6 years, height = 1.75 ± 0.11 m, mass = 76.1 ± 10.0 kg). Intervention(s): All participants underwent a superior gluteal nerve block injection to reduce the force output of the hip-abductor muscle group. Main Outcome Measure(s): Maximal isometric hip-abduction strength and gait biomechanical data were collected before and after the injections. Gait biomechanical variables collected during walking consisted of knee- and hip-adduction moments and impulses and the peak angles of contralateral pelvic drop, hip adduction, and ipsilateral trunk lean. Results: Hip-abduction strength was reduced after the injection (P = .001) and remained lower than baseline values at the completion of the postinjection gait data collection (P = .02). No alterations in hip- or knee-adduction moments (hip: P = .11; knee: P = .52) or impulses (hip: P = .16; knee: P = .41) were found after the nerve block. Similarly, no changes in angular kinematics were observed for contralateral pelvic drop (P = .53), ipsilateral trunk lean (P = .78), or hip adduction (P = .48). Conclusions A short-term reduction in hip-abductor strength was not associated with alterations in the frontal-plane gait biomechanics of young, healthy men. Further research is needed to determine whether a similar relationship is true in older adults with knee osteoarthritis. PMID:25875071

  1. The influence of hip abductor weakness on frontal plane motion of the trunk and pelvis in patients with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Krautwurst, Britta K; Wolf, Sebastian I; Heitzmann, Daniel W W; Gantz, Simone; Braatz, Frank; Dreher, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    Trendelenburg walking pattern is a common finding in various disorders, including cerebral palsy (CP), where it is seen in children and adults. Clinically, this deviation is viewed as a consequence of hip abductor weakness resulting in pelvic obliquity. Trunk lean to the ipsilateral side is a common compensatory mechanism to counteract pelvic obliquity and to maintain gait stability. However, no published investigations objectively address pelvic and trunk motions in the frontal plane or examine the correlation with hip abductor weakness in patients with CP. We selected 375 ambulatory (GMFCS I-III) patients with spastic bilateral CP and 24 healthy controls from our gait laboratory database. They had all undergone a standardized three-dimensional analysis of gait, including trunk motion, and a clinical examination including hip abductor strength testing. Selected frontal plane kinematic and kinetic parameters were investigated and statistically tested for correlation (Spearman rank) with hip abductor strength. Only a weak (r=0.278) yet highly significant correlation between trunk lean and hip abductor strength was found. Hip abductor weakness was accompanied by decreased hip abduction moment. However, no significant differences in pelvic position were found between the different strength groups, indicating that the pelvis remained stable regardless of the patients' strength. Our findings indicate that weak hip abductors in patients with CP are accompanied by increased trunk lean to the ipsilateral side while pelvic position is preserved by this compensatory mechanism. However, since this correlation is weak, other factors influencing lateral trunk lean should be considered. In patients with severe weakness of the hip abductors compensatory trunk lean is no longer fully able to stabilize the pelvis, and frontal pelvic kinematics differs from normal during loading response. The results indicate that the stable pelvic position seems to be of greater importance than

  2. Recurrence of Hypertrophic Abductor Digiti Minimi Muscle of the Foot After Subtotal Resection.

    PubMed

    Schmauss, Daniel; Harder, Yves; Machens, Hans-Guenther; Lohmeyer, Joern Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Soft tissue tumors of the foot are rare, and the diagnosis is often difficult. Surgery is indicated if pain, discomfort, or functional impairment is present or to rule out malignancy. We present the case of a 14-year-old female with a painless swelling at the lateral aspect of her right foot. After radiologic imaging, including ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), we performed a subtotal resection of the abductor digiti minimi muscle, preserving its motor nerve. Four months later, recurrence of the soft tissue mass was observed. MRI revealed hypertrophy of the small muscles of the foot, including the abductor digiti minimi, quadratus plantae, and flexor digiti minimi brevis. Functional impairment resulted in complete excision of the remnant abductor digiti minimi muscle and partial excision of the flexor digiti minimi brevis muscle another 7 months later. Twelve months after the secondary surgery, neither clinical nor radiologic signs of a second recurrence were found. At the last follow-up visit, the patient was satisfied with the contour of her foot and not hindered at all during sporting activities. Our findings demonstrate that subtotal resection of a bulky muscle, preserving its motor nerve, can result in reactive hypertrophy of the remnant muscle part. The patient must be informed that partial excision of an innervated muscle could result in reactive hypertrophy and must be contrasted with radical muscle excision that might be more likely to result in functional impairment.

  3. Partial peroneus longus tendon rupture in professional basketball players: a report of 2 cases.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Mitchell E; Selesnick, F Harlan; Murphy, Brian J

    2002-12-01

    Partial tears of the peroneal tendons are rare. Partial longitudinal tears of the peroneus longus tendon are even more rare. We report on 2 professional basketball players who had partial peroneus longus tendon tears beneath the cuboid. A literature review and discussion of treatment is included.

  4. Effects of perioperative factors and hip geometry on hip abductor muscle strength during the first 6 months after anterolateral total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Ikeda, Takashi; Jinno, Tetsuya; Aizawa, Junya; Masuda, Tadashi; Hirakawa, Kazuo; Ninomiya, Kazunari; Suzuki, Kouji; Morita, Sadao

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] The importance and effect of hip joint geometry on hip abductor muscle strength are well known. In addition, other perioperative factors are also known to affect hip abductor muscle strength. This study examined the relative importance of factors affecting hip abductor muscle strength after total hip arthroplasty. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 97 females with osteoarthritis scheduled for primary unilateral THA. The following variables were assessed preoperatively and 2 and 6 months after surgery: isometric hip abductor strength, radiographic analysis (Crowe class, postoperative femoral offset (FO)), Frenchay Activities Index, compliance rate with home exercise, Japanese Orthopaedic Association Hip-Disease Evaluation Questionnaire (JHEQ), and demographic data. Factors related to isometric hip abductor muscle strength 2 and 6 months after surgery were examined. [Results] Significant factors related to isometric hip abductor muscle strength at 2 and 6 months after surgery were, in extraction order: 1. isometric hip abductor muscle strength in the preoperative period; 2. BMI; and 3. the JHEQ mental score at 2 and 6 months after surgery. [Conclusion] Preoperative factors and postoperative mental status were related to postoperative isometric hip abductor strength. FO was not extracted as a significant factor related to postoperative isomeric hip abductor strength. PMID:28265161

  5. Effects of perioperative factors and hip geometry on hip abductor muscle strength during the first 6 months after anterolateral total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Takashi; Jinno, Tetsuya; Aizawa, Junya; Masuda, Tadashi; Hirakawa, Kazuo; Ninomiya, Kazunari; Suzuki, Kouji; Morita, Sadao

    2017-02-01

    [Purpose] The importance and effect of hip joint geometry on hip abductor muscle strength are well known. In addition, other perioperative factors are also known to affect hip abductor muscle strength. This study examined the relative importance of factors affecting hip abductor muscle strength after total hip arthroplasty. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 97 females with osteoarthritis scheduled for primary unilateral THA. The following variables were assessed preoperatively and 2 and 6 months after surgery: isometric hip abductor strength, radiographic analysis (Crowe class, postoperative femoral offset (FO)), Frenchay Activities Index, compliance rate with home exercise, Japanese Orthopaedic Association Hip-Disease Evaluation Questionnaire (JHEQ), and demographic data. Factors related to isometric hip abductor muscle strength 2 and 6 months after surgery were examined. [Results] Significant factors related to isometric hip abductor muscle strength at 2 and 6 months after surgery were, in extraction order: 1. isometric hip abductor muscle strength in the preoperative period; 2. BMI; and 3. the JHEQ mental score at 2 and 6 months after surgery. [Conclusion] Preoperative factors and postoperative mental status were related to postoperative isometric hip abductor strength. FO was not extracted as a significant factor related to postoperative isomeric hip abductor strength.

  6. Bilateral Tensor Fasciae Suralis Muscles in a Cadaver with Unilateral Accessory Flexor Digitorum Longus Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Herrin, Sean O.

    2017-01-01

    Muscle variants are routinely encountered in the dissection laboratory and in clinical practice and therefore anatomists and clinicians need to be aware of their existence. Here we describe two different accessory muscles identified while performing educational dissection of a 51-year-old male cadaver. Tensor fasciae suralis, a rare muscle variant, was identified bilaterally and accessory flexor digitorum longus, a more common muscle variant, was present unilaterally. Tensor fasciae suralis and accessory flexor digitorum longus are clinically relevant muscle variants. To our knowledge, the coexistence of tensor fasciae suralis and accessory flexor digitorum longus in the same individual has not been reported in either cadaveric or imaging studies. PMID:28210274

  7. Bilateral Tensor Fasciae Suralis Muscles in a Cadaver with Unilateral Accessory Flexor Digitorum Longus Muscle.

    PubMed

    Bale, Logan S W; Herrin, Sean O

    2017-01-01

    Muscle variants are routinely encountered in the dissection laboratory and in clinical practice and therefore anatomists and clinicians need to be aware of their existence. Here we describe two different accessory muscles identified while performing educational dissection of a 51-year-old male cadaver. Tensor fasciae suralis, a rare muscle variant, was identified bilaterally and accessory flexor digitorum longus, a more common muscle variant, was present unilaterally. Tensor fasciae suralis and accessory flexor digitorum longus are clinically relevant muscle variants. To our knowledge, the coexistence of tensor fasciae suralis and accessory flexor digitorum longus in the same individual has not been reported in either cadaveric or imaging studies.

  8. Isokinetic imbalance of adductor-abductor hip muscles in professional soccer players with chronic adductor-related groin pain.

    PubMed

    Belhaj, K; Meftah, S; Mahir, L; Lmidmani, F; Elfatimi, A

    2016-11-01

    This study aims to compare the isokinetic profile of hip abductor and adductor muscle groups between soccer players suffering from chronic adductor-related groin pain (ARGP), soccer players without ARGP and healthy volunteers from general population. Study included 36 male professional soccer players, who were randomly selected and followed-up over two years. Of the 21 soccer players eligible to participate in the study, 9 players went on to develop chronic ARGP and 12 players did not. Ten healthy male volunteers were randomly selected from the general population as a control group. Comparison between the abductor and adductor muscle peak torques for players with and without chronic ARGP found a statistically significant difference on the dominant and non-dominant sides (p < .005), with the abductor muscle significantly stronger than the adductor muscle. In the group of healthy volunteers, the adductor muscle groups were significantly stronger than the abductor muscle groups on both dominant and non-dominant sides (p < .05). For the group of players who had developed chronic ARGP, abductor-adductor torque ratios were significantly higher on the affected side (p = .008). The adductor muscle strength was also significantly decreased on the affected side. This imbalance appears to be a risk factor for adductor-related groin injury. Therefore, restoring the correct relationship between these two agonist and antagonist hip muscles may be an important preventative measure that should be a primary concern of training and rehabilitation programmes.

  9. Force depression following muscle shortening in sub-maximal voluntary contractions of human adductor pollicis.

    PubMed

    Rousanoglou, Elissavet N; Oskouei, Ali E; Herzog, Walter

    2007-01-01

    Mechanical properties of skeletal muscles are often studied for controlled, electrically induced, maximal, or supra-maximal contractions. However, many mechanical properties, such as the force-length relationship and force enhancement following active muscle stretching, are quite different for maximal and sub-maximal, or electrically induced and voluntary contractions. Force depression, the loss of force observed following active muscle shortening, has been observed and is well documented for electrically induced and maximal voluntary contractions. Since sub-maximal voluntary contractions are arguably the most important for everyday movement analysis and for biomechanical models of skeletal muscle function, it is important to study force depression properties under these conditions. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine force depression following sub-maximal, voluntary contractions. Sets of isometric reference and isometric-shortening-isometric test contractions at 30% of maximal voluntary effort were performed with the adductor pollicis muscle. All reference and test contractions were executed by controlling force or activation using a feedback system. Test contractions included adductor pollicis shortening over 10 degrees, 20 degrees, and 30 degrees of thumb adduction. Force depression was assessed by comparing the steady-state isometric forces (activation control) or average electromyograms (EMGs) (force control) following active muscle shortening with those obtained in the corresponding isometric reference contractions. Force was decreased by 20% and average EMG was increased by 18% in the shortening test contractions compared to the isometric reference contractions. Furthermore, force depression was increased with increasing shortening amplitudes, and the relative magnitudes of force depression were similar to those found in electrically stimulated and maximal contractions. We conclude from these results that force depression occurs in sub

  10. De Quervain’s disease: efficacy of intra-sheath triamcinolone injection

    PubMed Central

    Nanno, Mitsuhiko; Ito, Hiromoto

    2006-01-01

    The methods and clinical outcomes of intra-sheath triamcinolone injection in the treatment of de Quervain’s disease are described. We used 38 hands of 36 patients. A mixture of 1 ml of triamcinolone and 1 ml of 1% lidocaine hydrochloride was injected, with an interval of 2 weeks. The fluid was injected into one point above the induration for the first 18 hands and into two points over the extensor pollicis brevis and abductor pollicis longus tendon in the induration for hands 19–38. The efficacy rate was 89%, with the treatment results of the two-point injection better than those of the one-point injection. Recurrence was observed in ten hands, and complications in 13 hands; however, over 90% of patients were satisfied with the injection. The accurate injection of triamcinolone into the sheath of both the extensor pollicis brevis and abductor pollicis longus tendon was considered very effective for de Quervain’s disease. PMID:16761148

  11. Tenosynovial Osteochondromatosis of the Flexor Hallucis Longus Tendon Treated by Tendoscopy.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2015-01-01

    Tendosynovial chondromatosis of the foot and ankle is a rare disease entity. We reported 3 patients with tenosynovial osteochondromatosis of flexor hallucis longus. They were successfully treated by arthroscopic synovectomy and removal of the loose bodies.

  12. Immediate Effect of Grade IV Inferior Hip Joint Mobilization on Hip Abductor Torque: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Makofsky, Howard; Panicker, Siji; Abbruzzese, Jeanine; Aridas, Cynthia; Camp, Michael; Drakes, Jonelle; Franco, Caroline; Sileo, Ray

    2007-01-01

    Joint mobilization and manipulation stimulate mechanoreceptors, which may influence the joint and surrounding muscles. The purpose of this pilot study was to determine the effect of grade IV inferior hip joint mobilization on hip abductor torque. Thirty healthy subjects were randomly assigned to a control group (grade I inferior hip joint mobilization) or an experimental group (grade IV inferior hip joint mobilization). Subjects performed a pre- and post-intervention test of five isometric repetitions on the Cybex Normö dynamometer; the average torque was determined for both pre- and post-intervention measurements. These data were analyzed using the independent samples t-test with the significance level set at P<0.05. The results showed a statistically significant difference between the two groups for an increase in hip abductor torque in the experimental group (P=0.03). The experimental group demonstrated a 17.35% increase in average torque whereas the control group demonstrated a 3.68% decrease in average torque. These findings are consistent with other studies demonstrating that the use of grade IV non-thrust mobilization improves strength immediately post-intervention in healthy individuals. The results of this pilot study provide physical therapists with further support for the utilization of manual therapy in conjunction with therapeutic exercise to enhance muscle strength. PMID:19066650

  13. Electromyographic Analysis of the Peroneous Longus during Bicycle Ergometry across Work Load and Pedal Type.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-01-01

    monitored with EMG . These muscles consisted of flexors and extensors of the hip , knee, and ankle, but did not include the peroneous longus. The...electrodes but a curvilinear relationship with bipolar electrodes. 3 5 Vigreux and associates reported stronger EMG signals with longitudinal place- ment...pedaling is not known. The purpose of this study was to analyze the electromyo- graphic ( EMG ) activity of the peroneous longus across work load (1, 2, and

  14. Endoscopic Loose Body Removal From Zone 2 Flexor Hallucis Longus Tendon Sheath.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2016-06-01

    Tenosynovial chondromatosis can occur in the flexor hallucis longus tendon sheath. Complete synovectomy and removal of the loose bodies comprise the treatment of choice. An open procedure requires extensive soft-tissue dissection because the flexor hallucis longus tendon is a deep structure except at the hallux. A tendoscopy approach to synovectomy and removal of loose bodies has the advantage of minimally invasive surgery. This technical note outlines pearls and pitfalls and provides a step-by-step guide to performing this procedure.

  15. The effect of hip abductor exercise on muscle strength and trunk stability after an injury of the lower extremities

    PubMed Central

    Kak, Hwang-Bo; Park, Sun-Ja; Park, Byun-Joon

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The gluteus medius, a hip abductor, controls femoral movement and stabilizes the pelvis during lower extremity mobilization. [Subjects] This study enrolled 24 subjects into control and experimental groups. [Methods] This randomized controlled study included patients who underwent arthroscopy after meniscus injury and started a rehabilitative exercise program 8 weeks after surgery. Subjects were divided into the experimental gluteus medius resistance exercise group (n=12) and the control group (n=12). The study investigated muscle strength and balance of the flexors, extensors, and abductors of the knee for 8 weeks. [Results] Strengths of knee extensors in patients who underwent rehabilitative exercise for 8 weeks were measured. Strength of the knee extensors of the experimental and control groups increased by 40% and 31%, respectively; strength of the hip flexors of the experimental and control groups increased by 31% and 18%, respectively. Strength of the hip joint muscles showed a 40% increase in the experimental group and a 14% increase in the control group. However, there was a significant difference (18%) in muscle strength of the hip abductors between the groups. Measurements of trunk lateral flexion showed a difference within a group, but no intergroup difference was found. [Conclusion] This study investigated the effect of hip abductor exercise on muscular strength and trunk stability in patients with a meniscus injury. PMID:27134387

  16. The Influence of Hip Abductor Weakness on Frontal Plane Motion of the Trunk and Pelvis in Patients with Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krautwurst, Britta K.; Wolf, Sebastian I.; Heitzmann, Daniel W. W.; Gantz, Simone; Braatz, Frank; Dreher, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Trendelenburg walking pattern is a common finding in various disorders, including cerebral palsy (CP), where it is seen in children and adults. Clinically, this deviation is viewed as a consequence of hip abductor weakness resulting in pelvic obliquity. Trunk lean to the ipsilateral side is a common compensatory mechanism to counteract pelvic…

  17. Q-angle in patellofemoral pain: relationship with dynamic knee valgus, hip abductor torque, pain and function☆

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Gabriel Peixoto Leão; Silva, Ana Paula de Moura Campos Carvalho e; França, Fábio Jorge Renovato; Magalhães, Maurício Oliveira; Burke, Thomaz Nogueira; Marques, Amélia Pasqual

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the relationship between the q-angle and anterior knee pain severity, functional capacity, dynamic knee valgus and hip abductor torque in women with patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS). Methods This study included 22 women with PFPS. The q-angle was assessed using goniometry: the participants were positioned in dorsal decubitus with the knee and hip extended, and the hip and foot in neutral rotation. Anterior knee pain severity was assessed using a visual analog scale, and functional capacity was assessed using the anterior knee pain scale. Dynamic valgus was evaluated using the frontal plane projection angle (FPPA) of the knee, which was recorded using a digital camera during step down, and hip abductor peak torque was recorded using a handheld dynamometer. Results The q-angle did not present any significant correlation with severity of knee pain (r = −0.29; p = 0.19), functional capacity (r = −0.08; p = 0.72), FPPA (r = −0.28; p = 0.19) or isometric peak torque of the abductor muscles (r = −0.21; p = 0.35). Conclusion The q-angle did not present any relationship with pain intensity, functional capacity, FPPA, or hip abductor peak torque in the patients with PFPS. PMID:27069887

  18. The clinical surface anatomy anomalies of the palmaris longus muscle in the Black African population of Zimbabwe and a proposed new testing technique.

    PubMed

    Gangata, Hope

    2009-03-01

    The presence of the palmaris longus muscle (PLM) is highly variable. Rates of absence vary from 0.6% in the Korean population to as high as 63.9% in the Turkish population. The tendon of PLM may be absent on one or both forearms, may have duplicated tendons on one forearm or may be laterally shifted to the extent that the tendon of the PLM lies superficial to that of flexor carpi radialis muscle. Among Black American populations, in which there is usually mixed ancestry, rates of absence are 3.5%. Only two studies have been performed on Black African populations: in Republic of Congo and Uganda, and each showed widely differing rates of absence of 3.0% and 14.6%, respectively. In this study, a total of 890 Black Zimbabwean subjects in Harare aged between 8 and 13 years, were examined for clinical surface anatomy anomalies of the tendon of PLM. The results showed that the tendon of the PLM was absent unilaterally in 0.9% of the population, and bilaterally absent in 0.6% with an overall rate of absence of 1.5%. Other variations noted were a laterally shifted PLM in 1.1% of subjects and duplicated tendons on one forearm, which was the least prevalent anomaly, in 0.2% of subjects. The author proposes a new technique to test the tendon of PLM, which combines resisted thumb abduction and resisted wrist flexion. The proposed technique capitalizes on the role of the PLM as an important abductor of the thumb.

  19. Extensor Pollicis Brevis tendon damage presenting as de Quervain’s disease following kettlebell training

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Kettlebell exercises are more efficient for an athlete to increase his or her muscle strength. However it carries the risk of injury especially in the beginners. A 39 year old gentleman came to our clinic with radial sided wrist pain following kettlebell exercises. Clinically patient had swelling and tenderness over the tendons in the first dorsal wrist compartment, besides Finklesten test was positive. Patient had a decreased excursion of the thumb when compared to the opposite side. Ultrasound/MRI scan revealed asymmetric thickening of the 1st compartment extensors extending from the base of the thumb to the wrist joint. Besides injury to the Extensor Pollicis Brevis (EPB) tendon by repetitive impact from kettlebell, leading to its split was identified. Detailed history showed that the injury might be due to off-centre handle holding during triceps strengthening exercises. Our report stresses the fact that kettlebell users should be taught about problems of off-center handle holding to avoid wrist injuries. Also, in Kettlebell users with De Quervains disease clinical and radiological evaluation should be done before steroid injection as this might lead to complete tendon rupture. PMID:23731737

  20. Extensor Pollicis Brevis tendon damage presenting as de Quervain's disease following kettlebell training.

    PubMed

    Karthik, Karuppaiah; Carter-Esdale, Charles William; Vijayanathan, Sanjay; Kochhar, Tony

    2013-06-03

    Kettlebell exercises are more efficient for an athlete to increase his or her muscle strength. However it carries the risk of injury especially in the beginners. A 39 year old gentleman came to our clinic with radial sided wrist pain following kettlebell exercises. Clinically patient had swelling and tenderness over the tendons in the first dorsal wrist compartment, besides Finklesten test was positive. Patient had a decreased excursion of the thumb when compared to the opposite side. Ultrasound/MRI scan revealed asymmetric thickening of the 1st compartment extensors extending from the base of the thumb to the wrist joint. Besides injury to the Extensor Pollicis Brevis (EPB) tendon by repetitive impact from kettlebell, leading to its split was identified. Detailed history showed that the injury might be due to off-centre handle holding during triceps strengthening exercises. Our report stresses the fact that kettlebell users should be taught about problems of off-center handle holding to avoid wrist injuries. Also, in Kettlebell users with De Quervains disease clinical and radiological evaluation should be done before steroid injection as this might lead to complete tendon rupture.

  1. One-stage treatment of deep infection following repair of Achilles tendon rupture with flexor hallucis longus transfer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kang; Moon, Jeong Seok; Seo, Jeong Gook; Lee, Woo Chun

    2009-03-01

    We present one-stage treatment of deep infection following repair of Achilles tendon rupture using flexor hallucis longus transfer. Flexor hallucis longus was used not only to connect the defect in Achillles tendon, but also to control the soft tissue infection with its abundant blood supply, simultaneously. The clinical results for the two patients in this report were excellent without major complication.

  2. Anatomic Landmarks for the First Dorsal Compartment

    PubMed Central

    Hazani, Ron; Engineer, Nitin J.; Cooney, Damon; Wilhelmi, Bradon J.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Knowledge of anatomic landmarks for the first dorsal compartment can assist clinicians with management of de Quervain's disease. The radial styloid, the scaphoid tubercle, and Lister's tubercle can be used as superficial landmarks for the first dorsal compartment. Methods: Thirty-two cadaveric wrists were dissected, and measurements were taken from the predetermined landmarks to the extensor retinaculum. The compartments were also inspected for variability of the abductor pollicis longus tendon and intracompartmental septations. Results: The average length of the extensor retinaculum from its proximal to distal extent measured approximately 2.2 cm. The distal aspect of the radial styloid was 0.3 cm distal to the distal aspect of the extensor retinaculum, and the distance between the distal aspect of the extensor retinaculum and the APL-Lister's-Scaphoid juncture was approximately 0.5 cm. A separate compartment for the extensor pollicis brevis was noted in 35% of the specimens. The abductor pollicis longus tendon demonstrated great variability with 1, 2, 3, or 4 slips in 9%, 30%, 43%, or 26% of the specimens, respectively. Conclusion: The superficial bony prominences of the radial wrist can be used reliably as anatomic landmarks for the first dorsal compartment. PMID:19092992

  3. Responses of human hip abductor muscles to lateral balance perturbations during walking.

    PubMed

    Hof, A L; Duysens, J

    2013-10-01

    Lateral stability during gait is of utmost importance to maintain balance. This was studied on human subjects walking on a treadmill who were given 100-ms perturbations of known magnitude and timing with respect to the gait cycle by means of a computer-controlled pneumatic device. This method has the advantage that the same perturbations can be given at different phases of the stride cycle, thereby allowing an analysis of the phase dependency of the responses in the primary muscles involved. After an inward push, e.g., a push toward the left during right stance, the left foot in the step to follow is placed more to the left (outward strategy). The hypothesis was that this movement is caused by automatic unvoluntary muscle activity. This turned out to be the case: the abduction movement follows EMG responses in the left abductor muscle, gluteus medius, in response to the push. Two responses, with latencies of 100 and 170 ms, and a late reaction >270 ms can be discerned. All three responses are phase dependent; they show facilitation in swing and no response in stance, in contrast to the normal walking activity (background). This independence of the background activity suggests a premotoneuronal gating of these responses, reminiscent of phase-dependent modulation of electrically elicited reflexes. It is concluded that facilitating pathways are opened independent of normal background activation to enable appropriate actions to restore balance after a mediolateral perturbation.

  4. Effect of experimentally reduced distal sensation on postural response to hip abductor/ankle evertor muscle vibration.

    PubMed

    Glasser, S; Collings, R; Paton, J; Marsden, J

    2015-07-01

    This study assessed whether postural responses induced by vibratory perturbations of the hip abductors and ankle evertors, were modified when distal tactile sensation was experimentally reduced through cooling. Sixteen healthy subjects were investigated pre and post cooling. Subjects stood with their eyes closed with a stance width of 4 cm. A 2s vibratory stimulus was applied to the left or right hip abductor or ankle evertor muscle. The order of the site and side of the stimulation was randomised. The postural response to hip abductor and ankle evertor vibration was recorded using 3D motion analysis (Codamotion, Leicestershire). Medio-lateral centre of pressure motion was simultaneously recorded during quiet standing via a force plate (Kistler, UK). Pre-cooling people responded to unilateral ankle vibration with an ipsilateral translation and tilt of the pelvis, and an ipsilateral tilt of the trunk. People responded to unilateral hip vibration with a contralateral translation and tilt of the pelvis, and an ipsilateral tilt of the trunk. Following an experimental reduction in distal tactile sensation there was a significant reduction in the amplitude of pelvic tilt in response to ankle vibration (F(6.2)=P<0.05) and a significant increase in amplitude of pelvic tilt in response to hip vibration (F(5.2)=P<0.05). This suggests that the sensitivity to artificial stimulation of hip proprioception increases with distal cooling, possibly indicating a change in the gain/weighting placed upon sensory information from the hips.

  5. Morphometric and Statistical Analysis of the Palmaris Longus Muscle in Human and Non-Human Primates

    PubMed Central

    Aversi-Ferreira, Roqueline A. G. M. F.; Bretas, Rafael Vieira; Maior, Rafael Souto; Davaasuren, Munkhzul; Paraguassú-Chaves, Carlos Alberto; Nishijo, Hisao; Aversi-Ferreira, Tales Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    The palmaris longus is considered a phylogenetic degenerate metacarpophalangeal joint flexor muscle in humans, a small vestigial forearm muscle; it is the most variable muscle in humans, showing variation in position, duplication, slips and could be reverted. It is frequently studied in papers about human anatomical variations in cadavers and in vivo, its variation has importance in medical clinic, surgery, radiological analysis, in studies about high-performance athletes, in genetics and anthropologic studies. Most studies about palmaris longus in humans are associated to frequency or case studies, but comparative anatomy in primates and comparative morphometry were not found in scientific literature. Comparative anatomy associated to morphometry of palmaris longus could explain the degeneration observed in this muscle in two of three of the great apes. Hypothetically, the comparison of the relative length of tendons and belly could indicate the pathway of the degeneration of this muscle, that is, the degeneration could be associated to increased tendon length and decreased belly from more primitive primates to those most derivate, that is, great apes to modern humans. In conclusion, in primates, the tendon of the palmaris longus increase from Lemuriformes to modern humans, that is, from arboreal to terrestrial primates and the muscle became weaker and tending to be missing. PMID:24860810

  6. A rare case of neck pain: acute longus colli calcific tendinitis in a possibly immunocompromised individual.

    PubMed

    Estimable, Kerlie; Rizk, Cynthia; Pujalte, George G A

    2015-01-01

    We present a rare case of severe neck pain in a 45-year-old man with severe hidradenitis suppurativa who was participating in a study involving adalimumab. The neck pain was associated with acute longus colli calcific tendinitis, which is a noninfectious inflammatory response in the longus colli tendons secondary to deposition of calcium hydroxyapatite crystal. The diagnosis was made by computed tomography, which showed calcifications and deposits, and magnetic resonance imaging, which showed a retropharyngeal effusion. Ears, Nose, and Throat Services performed a fiberoptic scope examination, which revealed a patent airway and no drainable abscess. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs resulted in a dramatic improvement in the patient's clinical symptoms. In acute longus colli tendinitis, differentiating retropharyngeal aseptic effusion from infection is important. Of note, the confounding factor in this case was that the patient was blinded to whether he was receiving the placebo or adalimumab, so whether the patient was immunosuppressed and at risk for infection was unknown. Clinician familiarity and education concerning acute calcific longus colli tendinitis may lead to decreased costs stemming from incorrect diagnosis and unnecessary treatment.

  7. Tendoscopic Excision of an Intratendinous Ganglion in the Flexor Hallucis Longus Tendon: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Endo, Jun; Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Sasho, Takahisa

    2016-01-01

    Intratendinous ganglion cysts are rare lesions of unknown etiology that originate within a tendon. We report the case of a 34-year-old female with an intratendinous ganglion in the plantar portion of the flexor hallucis longus tendon. The intratendinous ganglion recurred after ultrasound-guided needle aspiration. Tendoscopic excision of the intratendinous ganglion cyst achieved a satisfactorily result without recurrence.

  8. Selection of Tendon Grafts for Distal Radioulnar Ligament Reconstruction and Report of a Modified Technique

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Eugene; Dy, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the graft length necessary to complete a distal radioulnar ligament reconstruction and assess the suitability of several tendon graft sources. Methods We measured the graft length needed to complete the distal radioulnar ligament reconstruction in 7 fresh-frozen cadaver specimens. The pure tendon lengths of 7 tendon graft sources were measured: palmaris longus, extensor indicis proprius, slips of extensor digiti minimi and abductor pollicis longus, and portions of flexor carpi ulnaris, flexor carpi radialis, and extensor carpi ulnaris. A modified technique which allows for a shorter length of graft is also described, and the suitability of each graft source for this technique was assessed. Results The mean graft length needed to complete the original and modified reconstructions were 138 mm and 89 mm, respectively. The average length of the tendon graft when measured as pure tendon were: palmaris longus (127 mm), slip of extensor digiti minimi (112 mm), extensor indicis proprius (100 mm), partial flexor carpi radialis (87 mm), slip of abductor pollicis longus (69 mm), partial flexor carpi ulnaris (67 mm), and partial extensor carpi ulnaris (67 mm). The palmaris longus was too short for the original technique in the majority of specimens but was sufficient to complete the modified technique in every specimen that had a palmaris longus. Six specimens also had an extensor indicis proprius of suitable length for the modified technique. Discussion The length of donor graft required for the modified reconstruction was significantly less than that needed for the original reconstruction. Three specimens had no donor tendons sufficiently long to complete the original technique if a pure tendon graft were used, whereas the modified technique could be completed in all specimens. Clinical Relevance Many tendon graft sources in the upper extremity are of insufficient length to complete the distal radioulnar ligament reconstruction as described. A modified

  9. Patterns of prior offending by child abductors: a comparison of fatal and non-fatal outcomes.

    PubMed

    Beasley, James Oliver; Hayne, Anita S; Beyer, Kristen; Cramer, Gary L; Berson, Sarah Bradley; Muirhead, Yvonne; Warren, Janet I

    2009-01-01

    Our study examines the prior offending of 750 individuals who are known to be responsible for the abduction of a child under the age of 18 years. The first group comprised of 311 offenders (42%) who had abducted a child that was later located alive (found alive, referred to as FA). The second group was comprised of 439 offenders (58%) who had abducted a child that was either found murdered or was still missing and presumed dead (found murdered, referred to as FM). While males perpetrated the majority of the abductions, women perpetrated 31 (10%) of the offenses in the FA group and 10 (2%) of the offenses in the FM group. The average number of prior offenses as reflected in the NCIC criminal history of each offender was seven with these occurring over an average of 12 years. Seventy-five percent of the offenders had prior arrests for an assortment of different crimes while 25% had no known criminal history, a finding that was consistent across both the FA and FM groups. Of those with a criminal history, 41% had been arrested for assault, 40% for larceny, 35% for burglary/breaking and entering, 33% for forcible sex offenses, 25% for drug/narcotic offenses, 21% for weapons law violations, 17% for motor vehicle thefts, 15% for robbery, and 14% for kidnapping. Our findings are congruent with the theme of criminal diversity among child abductors and argue against the specificity in offending that is often assumed with this type of sexual offender. This information is relevant to our understanding of the progression in criminal offending that is manifested by offenders who abduct children and will hopefully be used by law enforcement in helping to direct and focus their investigations.

  10. Discharge properties of motor units of the abductor hallucis muscle during cramp contractions.

    PubMed

    Minetto, Marco A; Holobar, Ales; Botter, Alberto; Farina, Dario

    2009-09-01

    We analyzed individual motor units during electrically elicited cramp contractions with the aim of characterizing the variability and degree of common oscillations in their discharges. Intramuscular and surface electromyographic (EMG) signals were detected from the abductor hallucis muscle of 11 healthy subjects (age 27.0+/-3.7 yr) during electrically elicited cramps. In all, 48 motor units were identified from the intramuscular EMG. These motor units were active for 23.6+/-16.2 s, during which their average discharge rate was 14.5+/-5.1 pulses/s (pps) and their minimum and maximum rates were, respectively, 6.0+/-0.8 and 25.0+/-8.0 pps (P<0.001). The coefficient of variation for the interspike interval (ISI) was 44.6+/-9.7% and doublet discharges constituted 4.1+/-4.7% of the total number of discharges. In 38 motor units, the SD of the ISI was positively correlated to the mean ISI (R2=0.37, P<0.05). The coherence spectrum between smoothed discharge rates of pairs of motor units showed one significant peak at 1.4+/-0.4 Hz for 29 of the 96 motor unit pairs and two significant peaks at 1.3+/-0.5 and 1.5+/-0.5 Hz for 8 motor unit pairs. The cross-correlation function between pairs of discharge rates showed a significant peak (0.52+/-0.11) in 26 motor unit pairs. In conclusion, motor units active during cramps showed a range of discharge rates similar to that observed during voluntary contractions but larger ISI variability, probably due to large synaptic noise. Moreover, the discharge rates of the active motor units showed common oscillations.

  11. Changes in EMG coherence between long and short thumb abductor muscles during human development.

    PubMed

    Farmer, Simon F; Gibbs, John; Halliday, David M; Harrison, Linda M; James, Leon M; Mayston, Margaret J; Stephens, John A

    2007-03-01

    In adults, motoneurone pools of synergistic muscles that act around a common joint share a common presynaptic drive. Common drive can be revealed by both time domain and frequency domain analysis of EMG signals. Analysis in the frequency domain reveals significant coherence in the range 1-45 Hz, with maximal coherence in low (1-12 Hz) and high (16-32 Hz) ranges. The high-frequency range depends on cortical drive to motoneurones and is coherent with cortical oscillations at approximately 20 Hz frequencies. It is of interest to know whether oscillatory drive to human motoneurone pools changes with development. In the present study we examined age-related changes in coherence between rectified surface EMG signals recorded from the short and long thumb abductor muscles during steady isometric contraction obtained while subjects abducted the thumb against a manipulandum. We analysed EMG data from 36 subjects aged between 4 and 14 years, and 11 adult subjects aged between 22 and 59 years. Using the techniques of pooled coherence analysis and the chi(2) difference of coherence test we demonstrate that between the ages of 7 and 9 years, and 12 and 14 years, there are marked increases in the prevalence and magnitude of coherence at frequencies between 11 and 45 Hz. The data from subjects aged 12-14 years were similar to those obtained from adult controls. The most significant differences between younger children and the older age groups were detected at frequencies close to 20 Hz. We believe that these are the first reported results demonstrating significant late maturational changes in the approximately 20 Hz common oscillatory drive to human motoneurone pools.

  12. Motor unit estimation in a muscle supplied by the radial nerve.

    PubMed Central

    Defaria, C R; Toyonaga, K

    1978-01-01

    The number of motor units in a muscle, the abductor pollicis longus (APL), supplied by the radial nerve was estimated. In 40 APL muscles of control subjects, the mean number of motor units was found to be 421 +/- 99 (SD). Ten patients underwent conventional EMG examination to confirm the clinical suspicion of denervation in radial nerve territory. All presented a significant reduction in the number of motor units in the APL muscle. These results show that this method is useful in the evaluation of muscles supplied by the radial nerve. PMID:690650

  13. Distribution of different fibre types of M. extensor carpi radialis longus of the rat.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, A de C; Silva M dal, D; Pai, V D

    1994-12-01

    As revealed by the NADH-diaphorase and myosine ATPase, the M. extensor carpi radialis longus of the rat possesses at least 3 main kinds of fibres, with different distribution on the superficial and deep portions of the muscle. The superficial portion revealed that 67.68% are FG (fast-twitch-glycolytic) fibres, 14.72% are FOG (fast-twitch-oxidative) fibres and 17.60% are SO (slow-twitch-glycolytic) fibres. Already the deep portion revealed that 71.29% are SO (slow-twitch-glycolytic) fibres, 17.46% are FOG (fast-twitch-oxidative-glycolytic) fibres and 11.25% are FG (fast-twitch-glycolytic) fibres. The miosine ATPase reaction was used to demonstrate contracting characteristics. These findings suggest that the movements of fast contraction of the M. extensor carpi radialis longus are predominant.

  14. Myofascial force transmission between transferred rat flexor carpi ulnaris muscle and former synergistic palmaris longus muscle

    PubMed Central

    Maas, Huub; Huijing, Peter A.

    2011-01-01

    Summary We investigated the extent of mechanical interaction between rat flexor carpi ulnaris (FCU) and palmaris longus (PL) muscles following transfer of FCU to the distal tendons of extensor carpi radialis brevis and longus (ECRB/L) muscles. Five weeks after recovery from surgery, isometric forces exerted at the distal tendons of FCU and PL were quantified at various FCU lengths. PL was kept at a constant length. Changing the muscle-tendon complex length of transferred FCU (by maximally 3.5 mm) decreased PL force significantly (by 7%). A linear relationship was found between changes in FCU muscle belly length, being a measure of muscle relative positions, and PL force. These results indicate that despite transfer of FCU muscle to the extensor side of the forearm, changing FCU length still affects force transmission of its, now, antagonistic PL muscle. We conclude that a transferred muscle may still be mechanically linked to its former synergistic muscles. PMID:23738260

  15. THE CLINICAL, FUNCTIONAL AND BIOMECHANICAL PRESENTATION OF PATIENTS WITH SYMPTOMATIC HIP ABDUCTOR TENDON TEARS

    PubMed Central

    Retheesh, Theertha; Mutreja, Rinky; Janes, Gregory C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Hip abductor tendon (HAT) tearing is commonly implicated in greater trochanteric pain syndrome (GTPS), though limited information exists on the disability associated with this condition and specific presentation of these patients. Purpose To describe the clinical, functional and biomechanical presentation of patients with symptomatic HAT tears. Secondary purposes were to investigate the association between these clinical and functional measures, and to compare the pain and disability reported by HAT tear patients to those with end-stage hip osteoarthritis (OA). Study Design Prospective case series. Methods One hundred forty-nine consecutive patients with symptomatic HAT tears were evaluated using the Harris (HHS) and Oxford (OHS) Hip Scores, SF-12, an additional series of 10 questions more pertinent to those with lateral hip pain, active hip range of motion (ROM), maximal isometric hip abduction strength, six-minute walk capacity and 30-second single limb stance (SLS) test. The presence of a Trendelenburg sign and pelvis-on-femur (POF) angle were determined via 2D video analysis. An age matched comparative sample of patients with end-stage hip OA was recruited for comparison of all patient-reported outcome scores. Independent t-tests investigated group and limb differences, while analysis of variance evaluated pain changes during the functional tests. Pearson's correlation coefficients investigated the correlation between clinical measures in the HAT tear group. Results No differences existed in patient demographics and patient-reported outcome scores between HAT tear and hip OA cohorts, apart from significantly worse SF-12 mental subscale scores (p = 0.032) in the HAT tear group. Patients with HAT tears demonstrated significantly lower (p < 0.05) hip abduction strength and active ROM in all planes of motion on their affected limb. Pain significantly increased throughout the 30-second SLS test for the HAT tear group, with 57% of HAT tear patients

  16. A rare case of an accessory flexor hallucis longus causing tarsal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lin, D; Williams, C; Zaw, H

    2014-09-01

    Tarsal tunnel syndrome (TTS) is a rare entrapment neuropathy of the tibial nerve within the fibro-osseous tarsal tunnel for which multiple etiologies, including trauma, congenital foot abnormalities and space occupying lesions, have been described. We present an unusual case of TTS caused by an accessory Flexor Hallucis Longus (FHL) tendon. Surgical excision led to a complete resolution of symptoms and improved the quality of life of our patient.

  17. Jar-opening challenges. Part 2: estimating the force-generating capacity of thumb muscles in healthy young adults during jar-opening tasks.

    PubMed

    Kuo, L C; Chang, J H; Lin, C F; Hsu, H Y; Ho, K Y; Su, F C

    2009-07-01

    This study discusses the force-generating capacity of thumb muscles during jar-opening tasks using two grip patterns: the power grip and the precision grip. This study develops a three-dimensional biomechanical model of the thumb to predict muscle forces in jar-opening activities based on external forces measured by a custom-designed jar device. Ten healthy subjects participated in the study. Each participant turned a jar lid of 66 mm diameter counterclockwise with maximal effort and preferred speed using both grip patterns. The average normal and tangential forces applied by the thumb to the jar lid show that the normal force is the primary contributive force for opening a jar. This normal force is approximately three times the tangential force. Muscular force-generating capacity measurements show that the major active muscles during a jar-opening activity for both grips include the flexor pollicis longus, flexor pollicis brevis, abductor pollicis brevis, adductor pollicis, and opponens pollicis. The total muscle force ratios for the precision grip and power grip with respect to externally applied forces are 5.6 and 4.7 respectively. These ratios indicate that the power grip pattern produces less muscle force per unit of external applied load. The technique proposed in this study provides a proper apparatus and model for measuring three-dimensional loads and estimating the force-generating capacity of each muscle and tendon of the thumb during jar-opening tasks.

  18. Myostatin dysfunction impairs force generation in extensor digitorum longus muscle and increases exercise-induced protein efflux from extensor digitorum longus and soleus muscles.

    PubMed

    Baltusnikas, Juozas; Kilikevicius, Audrius; Venckunas, Tomas; Fokin, Andrej; Bünger, Lutz; Lionikas, Arimantas; Ratkevicius, Aivaras

    2015-08-01

    Myostatin dysfunction promotes muscle hypertrophy, which can complicate assessment of muscle properties. We examined force generating capacity and creatine kinase (CK) efflux from skeletal muscles of young mice before they reach adult body and muscle size. Isolated soleus (SOL) and extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles of Berlin high (BEH) mice with dysfunctional myostatin, i.e., homozygous for inactivating myostatin mutation, and with a wild-type myostatin (BEH+/+) were studied. The muscles of BEH mice showed faster (P < 0.01) twitch and tetanus contraction times compared with BEH+/+ mice, but only EDL displayed lower (P < 0.05) specific force. SOL and EDL of age-matched but not younger BEH mice showed greater exercise-induced CK efflux compared with BEH+/+ mice. In summary, myostatin dysfunction leads to impairment in muscle force generating capacity in EDL and increases susceptibility of SOL and EDL to protein loss after exercise.

  19. De quervain tenosynovitis of the wrist.

    PubMed

    Ilyas, Asif M; Ilyas, Asif; Ast, Michael; Schaffer, Alyssa A; Thoder, Joseph

    2007-12-01

    De quervain disease, or stenosing tenosynovitis of the first dorsal compartment of the wrist, is a common wrist pathology. Pain results from resisted gliding of the abductor pollicis longus and the extensor pollicis brevis tendons in the fibro-osseus canal. de Quervain tenosynovitis of the wrist is more common in women than men. Diagnosis may be made on physical examination. Radiographs are helpful in ruling out offending bony pathology. Nonsurgical management, consisting of corticosteroid injections and supportive thumb spica splinting, is usually successful. In resistant cases, surgical release of the first dorsal compartment is done, taking care to protect the radial sensory nerve and identify all accessory compartments. Repair of the extensor retinaculum by step-cut lengthening or other techniques is rarely required.

  20. Ultrasonographic evaluation of de Quervain disease.

    PubMed

    Giovagnorio, F; Andreoli, C; De Cicco, M L

    1997-10-01

    De Quervain disease is a job-related tenosynovitis that affects the synovial sheath of the tendons of the abductor pollicis longus and extensor pollicis brevis muscles; it is associated with pain and functional impairment and progresses to cause local fibrosis with blockage or triggering of the thumb. High-resolution ultrasonography of the wrist was performed in eight patients with de Quervain disease; the examination was performed in axial and coronal scans with a 13 MHz linear transducer. The evaluation of normal wrists helped to define the normal sonographic anatomy of the first extensor compartment; obvious changes of the tendon sheath were noted in all cases of de Quervain disease (thickening and edema of the synovial sheath and fluid within the sheath). We conclude that ultrasonography is able to confirm the clinical diagnosis of de Quervain disease and may have a role in the follow-up of this disorder.

  1. Extensor-tendons reconstruction using autogenous palmaris longus tendon grafting for rheumatoid arthritis patients

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Po-Jung; Lee, Hung-Maan; Hou, Yao-Tung; Hung, Sheng-Tsai; Chen, Jung-Kuei; Shih, Jui-Tien

    2008-01-01

    Background The purpose of the study is to retrospectively review the clinical outcome of our study population of middle-aged RA patients who had suffered extensor-tendon rupture. We reported the outcome of autogenous palmaris tendon grafting of multiple extensor tendons at wrist level in 14 middle-aged rheumatoid patients. Methods Between Feb. 2000 to Feb. 2004, thirty-six ruptured wrist level extensor tendons were reconstructed in fourteen rheumatoid patients (11 women and three men) using autogenous palmaris longus tendon as a free interposition graft. In each case, the evaluation was based on both subjective and objective criteria, including the range of MCP joint flexion after surgery, the extension lag at the metacarpophalangeal joint before and after surgery, and the ability of the patient to work. Results and Discussion The average of follow-up was 54.1 months (range, 40 to 72 months). The average range of MCP joint flexion after reconstruction was 66°. The extension lag at the metacarpophalangeal joint significantly improved from a preoperative mean of 38° (range, 25°–60°) to a postoperative mean of 16° (range, 0°–30°). Subjectively all patients were satisfied with the clinical results, and achieved a return to their level of ability before tendon rupture. We found good functional results in our series of interposition grafting using palmaris longus to reconstruct extensor tendon defects in the rheumatoid patients. Conclusion Reconstruction for multiple tendon ruptures is a salvage procedure that is often associated with extensor lag and impairment of overall function. Early aggressive treatment of extensor tendon reconstruction using autogenous palmaris longus tendon as a free interposition graft in the rheumatoid wrist is another viable option to achieve good clinical functional result. PMID:18435845

  2. Palmaris longus muscle substituting for the ring finger slip of flexor digitorum superficialis.

    PubMed

    Cassell, M D; Bergman, R A

    1990-01-01

    An unusual and unrecorded variation in palmaris longus muscle is described. The muscle had a normal appearance and origin from the common tendon arising from the medial epicondyle of the humerus and from the surrounding intermuscular septa. The distal tendon however entered the hand via the carpal tunnel medial and deep to the median nerve, split and inserted into the lateral and medial sides of the middle phalanx of the ring finger. It therefore substituted completely for the slip to the ring finger from flexor digitorum superficials, which was absent.

  3. A Rare Cause of Dysphagia to Remember: Calcific Tendinitis of the Longus Colli Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Colella, Dominic M.; Calderón Sandoval, Fiorela; Powers, David W.; Patel, Nimal; Sobrado, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Longus colli tendinitis (LCT) is an acute inflammatory condition with symptoms typically consisting of acute neck pain and stiffness with or without dysphagia. Once more severe etiologies for these symptoms are ruled out, this self-limiting condition usually resolves spontaneously with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and corticosteroids. We present a case of LCT that presented as acute neck pain, dysphagia, and odynophagia that rapidly resolved once diagnosed and treated with anti-inflammatory agents. Though exceedingly rare, LCT must be considered in the differential diagnosis of acute neck pain, dysphagia, and odynophagia when more common etiologies do not correlate with the clinical presentation. PMID:28100997

  4. [Obese woman presenting as vocal cord abductor paralysis and floppy arytenoid associated with early signs of multiple system atrophy].

    PubMed

    Sakuta, Hideki; Miyamoto, Masayuki; Suzuki, Keisuke; Miyamoto, Tomoyuki; Nakajima, Itsuo; Nakamura, Toshiki; Hirata, Koichi

    2012-01-01

    In multiple system atrophy (MSA), sleep-related breathing disorders are commonly observed, including vocal cord abductor paralysis (VCAP), which can cause sudden death. In its early stage, VCAP occurs only during sleep, but as the disease progresses, it appears when both awake and asleep. We encountered a 59-year-old obese woman who had been under continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy for obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) for approximately one year but later developed acute respiratory failure because of VCAP. VCAP was the predominant finding that led to the diagnosis of MSA in our patient. On laryngoscopic examination, the movement of the patient's larynx was normal during wakefulness, but VCAP, paradoxical movements of the vocal cord and a floppy arytenoid were observed during drug-induced sleep. We suggest that detection of VCAP and laryngopharyngeal abnormalities such as floppy arytenoid in the early stage of MSA is important for determining treatment options.

  5. Anticipatory and Reactive Response to Falls: Muscle Synergy Activation of Forearm Muscles.

    PubMed

    Couzens, Greg; Kerr, Graham

    2015-10-01

    We investigated the surface electromyogram response of six forearm muscles to falls onto the outstretched hand. The extensor carpi radialis longus, extensor carpi radialis brevis, extensor carpi ulnaris, abductor pollicis longus, flexor carpi radialis and flexor carpi ulnaris muscles were sampled from eight volunteers who underwent ten self-initiated falls. All muscles initiated prior to impact. Co-contraction is the most obvious surface electromyogram feature. The predominant response is in the radial deviators. The surface electromyogram timing we recorded would appear to be a complex anticipatory response to falling modified by the effect on the forearm muscles following impact. The mitigation of the force of impact is probably more importantly through shoulder abduction and extension and elbow flexion rather than action of the forearm muscles.

  6. Characteristic MRI Findings of upper Limb Muscle Involvement in Myotonic Dystrophy Type 1.

    PubMed

    Sugie, Kazuma; Sugie, Miho; Taoka, Toshio; Tonomura, Yasuyo; Kumazawa, Aya; Izumi, Tesseki; Kichikawa, Kimihiko; Ueno, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    The objective of our study was to evaluate the relation between muscle MRI findings and upper limb weakness with grip myotonia in patients with myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1). Seventeen patients with DM1 were evaluated by manual muscle strength testing and muscle MRI of the upper limbs. Many DM1 patients presenting with decreased grasping power frequently showed high intensity signals in the flexor digitorum profundus (FDP) muscles on T1-weighted imaging. Patients presenting with upper limb weakness frequently also showed high intensity signals in the flexor pollicis longus, abductor pollicis longus, and extensor pollicis muscles. Disturbances of the distal muscles of the upper limbs were predominant in all DM1 patients. Some DM1 patients with a prolonged disease duration showed involvement of not only distal muscles but also proximal muscles in the upper limbs. Muscle involvement of the upper limbs on MRI strongly correlated positively with the disease duration or the numbers of CTG repeats. To our knowledge, this is the first study to provide a detailed description of the distribution and severity of affected muscles of the upper limbs on MRI in patients with DM1. We conclude that muscle MRI findings are very useful for identifying affected muscles and predicting the risk of muscle weakness in the upper limbs of DM1 patients.

  7. Magnetic resonance diagnosis of tarsal tunnel syndrome due to flexor digitorum accessorius longus and peroneocalcaneus internus muscles.

    PubMed

    Duran-Stanton, Amelia M; Bui-Mansfield, Liem T

    2010-01-01

    Anomalous muscles of the ankle are common. Although they are often asymptomatic, they can sometimes cause tarsal tunnel syndrome. We report a case of tarsal tunnel syndrome due to flexor digitorum accessorius longus and peroneocalcaneus internus muscles diagnosed on magnetic resonance imaging. Recognition of the most common accessory muscles of the ankle on magnetic resonance imaging and tarsal tunnel syndrome are also reviewed.

  8. Unusual case of acute neck pain: acute calcific longus colli tendinitis.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Gunjan S; Fomin, Daren A; Joshi, Gargi S; Serano, Richard D

    2016-06-02

    Acute calcific longus colli tendinitis (ACLCT), a very rare cause of severe neck pain, dysphagia and odynophagia, is often mistaken for other common causes of neck pain. However, prompt recognition of this uncommon presentation is important to prevent unnecessary medical and surgical intervention. A 46-year-old Caucasian man presented with a 1-day history of severe neck pain, headache and odynophagia. The patient was afebrile with stable vital signs, however, the laboratory data showed mildly elevated C reactive protein and erythrocyte sedimentation rate. The physical examination was remarkable for markedly reduced cervical range of motion. MRI revealed the pathognomonic findings of paravertebral oedema and calcification. The definitive diagnosis of ACLCT was made and the patient was successfully managed with a short course of oral steroid, benzodiazepine and aural acupuncture, with complete resolution of the condition within a week.

  9. Catalase-positive microperoxisomes in rat soleus and extensor digitorum longus muscle fiber types

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, Danny A.; Bain, James L. W.; Ellis, Stanley

    1988-01-01

    The size, distribution, and content of catalase-reactive microperoxisomes were investigated cytochemically in three types of muscle fibers from the soleus and the extensor digitorum longus (EDL) of male rats. Muscle fibers were classified on the basis of the mitochondrial content and distribution, the Z-band widths, and the size and shape of myofibrils as the slow-twitch oxidative (SO), the fast-twitch oxidative glycolytic (FOG), and the fast-twitch glycolytic (FG) fibers. It was found that both the EDL and soleus SO fibers possessed the largest microperoxisomes. A comparison of microperoxisome number per muscle fiber area or the microperoxisome area per fiber area revealed following ranking, starting from the largest number and the area-ratio values: soleus SO, EDL SO, EDL FOG, and EDL FG.

  10. Hypogravity-induced atrophy of rat soleus and extensor digitorum longus muscles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, D. A.; Ellis, S.; Slocum, G. R.; Satyanarayana, T.; Bain, J. L.; Sedlak, F. R.

    1987-01-01

    Prolonged exposure of humans to hypogravity causes weakening of their skeletal muscles. This problem was studied in rats exposed to hypogravity for 7 days aboard Spacelab 3. Hindlimb muscles were harvested 12-16 hours postflight for histochemical, biochemical, and ultrastructural analyses. The majority of the soleus and extensor digitorum longus fibers exhibited simple cell shrinkage. However, approximately 1% of the fibers in flight soleus muscles appeared necrotic. Flight muscle fibers showed increased glycogen, lower subsarcolemmal staining for mitochondrial enzymes, and fewer subsarcolemmal mitochondria. During atrophy, myofibrils were eroded by multiple focal losses of myofilaments; lysosomal autophagy was not evident. Tripeptidylaminopeptidase and calcium-activated protease activities of flight soleus fibers were significantly increased, implying a role in myofibril breakdown. Simple fiber atrophy appears to account for muscle weakening during spaceflight, but fiber necrosis is also a contributing factor.

  11. Catalase overexpression does not impair extensor digitorum longus muscle function in normal mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mingju; Yue, Yongping; Li, Dejia; Duan, Dongsheng

    2007-12-01

    Catalase is a major antioxidant enzyme. Increasing catalase expression represents a promising avenue to improve muscle function in certain physiological conditions and in some muscle diseases. We hypothesized that catalase overexpression should not impair normal muscle contraction. We delivered a hemagglutinin (HA)-tagged human catalase gene to normal mouse muscle by an adeno-associated viral vector (AAV). Western blot and immunostaining revealed efficient expression of HA-tagged catalase. Enzymatic assay demonstrated an approximately threefold increase in catalase activity in AAV-infected muscles. Catalase overexpression impaired neither twitch nor tetanic tension in the extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle. Furthermore, EDL fatigue response was not altered. Taken together, we have developed a novel AAV vector to enhance catalase expression. Lack of apparent toxicity in normal muscle strongly supports further exploration of this vector to reduce oxidative stress-induced muscle damage.

  12. What are the stimulation parameters that affect the extent of twitch force potentiation in the adductor pollicis muscle?

    PubMed

    Mettler, Joni A; Griffin, Lisa

    2010-12-01

    Muscle force potentiation affects force output during electrical stimulation. Few studies have examined stimulation train parameters that influence potentiation such as pulse number, stimulation frequency, train duration, and force-time integral and peak force produced during the train. Pulse-matched trains (100 pulses) at 7.5, 15, 25, 30, 50, and 100 Hz, and trains of varying pulse number (50, 100, and 200 pulses) at 30 and 50 Hz were delivered to the ulnar nerve of 10 (5 male, 5 female; 23.4 ± 0.9 years), healthy individuals in random order. Single twitches of the adductor pollicis muscle were elicited before and after each train with a rest interval of at least 5 min between each train. No differences in potentiation occurred across the pulse-matched trains at frequencies of 15-50 Hz (38.9 ± 5.4-44.6 ± 5.5%). Twitch force potentiation following the highest (100 Hz) and lowest (7.5 Hz) frequency trains were not significantly different and were lower than the other 100 pulse-matched trains. As pulse number increased, potentiation increased for both the 30 and 50-Hz trains. There was a significant positive correlation between force potentiation and force-time integral produced by the stimulation train, r = 0.70. The results indicate that potentiation magnitude is dependent on the force-time integral produced during the test train and the number of pulses delivered, independent of stimulation frequency.

  13. Temporal changes in sarcomere lesions of rat adductor longus muscles during hindlimb reloading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krippendorf, B. B.; Riley, D. A.

    1994-01-01

    Focal sarcomere disruptions were previously observed in adductor longus muscles of rats flown approximately two weeks aboard the Cosmos 1887 and 2044 biosatellite flights. These lesions, characterized by breakage and loss of myofilaments and Z-line streaming, resembled damage induced by unaccustomed exercise that includes eccentric contractions in which muscles lengthen as they develop tension. We hypothesized that sarcomere lesions in atrophied muscles of space flow rats were not produced in microgravity by muscle unloading but resulted from muscle reloading upon re-exposure to terrestrial gravity. To test this hypothesis, we examined temporal changes in sarcomere integrity of adductor longus muscles from rats subjected to 12.5 days of hindlimb suspension unloading and subsequent reloading by return to vivarium cages for 0, 6, 12, or 48 hours of normal weightbearing. Our ultrastructural observations suggested that muscle unloading (0 h reloading) induced myofibril misalignment associated with myofiber atrophy. Muscle reloading for 6 hours induced focal sarcomere lesions in which cross striations were abnormally widened. Such lesions were electron lucent due to extensive myofilament loss. Lesions in reloaded muscles showed rapid restructuring. By 12 hours of reloading, lesions were moderately stained foci and by 48 hours darkly stained foci in which the pattern of cross striations was indistinct at the light and electron microscopic levels. These lesions were spanned by Z-line-like electron dense filamentous material. Our findings suggest a new role for Z-line streaming in lesion restructuring: rather than an antecedent to damage, this type of Z-line streaming may be indicative of rapid, early sarcomere repair.

  14. The effect of abductor muscle and anterior-posterior hip contact load simulation on the in-vitro primary stability of a cementless hip stem

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In-vitro mechanical tests are commonly performed to assess pre-clinically the effect of implant design on the stability of hip endoprostheses. There is no standard protocol for these tests, and the forces applied vary between studies. This study examines the effect of the abductor force with and without application of the anterior-posterior hip contact force in the in-vitro assessment of cementless hip implant stability. Methods Cementless stems (VerSys Fiber Metal) were implanted in twelve composite femurs which were divided into two groups: group 1 (N = 6) was loaded with the hip contact force only, whereas group 2 (N = 6) was additionally subjected to an abductor force. Both groups were subjected to the same cranial-caudal hip contact force component, 2.3 times body weight (BW) and each specimen was subjected to three levels of anterior-posterior hip contact load: 0, -0.1 to 0.3 BW (walking), and -0.1 to 0.6 BW (stair climbing). The implant migration and micromotion relative to the femur was measured using a custom-built system comprised of 6 LVDT sensors. Results Substantially higher implant motion was observed when the anterior-posterior force was 0.6BW compared to the lower anterior-posterior load levels, particularly distally and in retroversion. The abductor load had little effect on implant motion when simulating walking, but resulted in significantly less motion than the hip contact force alone when simulating stair climbing. Conclusions The anterior-posterior component of the hip contact load has a significant effect on the axial motion of the stem relative to the bone. Inclusion of the abductor force had a stabilizing effect on the implant motion when simulating stair climbing. PMID:20576151

  15. Abductor Hallucis: Anatomical Variation and Its Clinical Implications in the Reconstruction of Chronic Nonhealing Ulcers and Defects of Foot

    PubMed Central

    Chittoria, Ravi Kumar; Pratap, Harsha; Yekappa, Suma Hottigoudar

    2015-01-01

    Abductor hallucis (AH) is an intrinsic muscle of sole of the foot. It is commonly used in the coverage of ankle and heel defects and chronic nonhealing ulcers of the foot; its use is reported to have a favorable long-term outcome. The muscle's apt bulk and size, its simple surgical isolation, absence of donor-site defect, unvaried anatomy, and long neurovascular pedicle are some of the advantages that make it a promising muscle flap. During routine cadaver dissection in the Department of Anatomy of Jawaharlal Institute of Postgraduate Medical Education and Research (JIPMER), Pondicherry, India, we identified an anatomical variation in AH in both feet of a 45-year-old embalmed male Indian cadaver. The variant muscle had innumerable proximal attachments, a majority of them arising atypically in the form of tough tendinous slips from the medial intermuscular septum at the junction of central and tibial components of plantar aponeurosis, the medial surface of first metatarsal and the intermuscular septum separating AH from the flexor hallucis brevis. The tendon: muscle ratio was 1.76, higher than the normal reported ratio of 0.56±0.07. This article highlights the variation noted and its implication for clinicians. On Internet search, we did not come across the variations described in our article. Findings of the anatomical variation reported in this article could benefit surgeons who decide to use AH flaps in the future. PMID:26634184

  16. Effect of toe-spread-out exercise on hallux valgus angle and cross-sectional area of abductor hallucis muscle in subjects with hallux valgus

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Moon-Hwan; Yi, Chung-Hwi; Weon, Jong-Hyuck; Cynn, Heon-Seock; Jung, Do-Young; Kwon, Oh-Yun

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated whether the toe-spread-out exercise affects the hallux valgus angle, the cross-sectional area of the abductor hallucis muscle, and the hallux valgus angle during active abduction. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-four subjects with hallux valgus were randomly assigned to orthosis and orthosis plus toe-spread-out exercise groups. The orthosis group wore the orthosis for 8 weeks, while the orthosis plus toe-spread-out group also performed the toe-spread-out exercise. The hallux valgus angle, the cross-sectional area of the abductor hallucis muscle, and the hallux valgus angle during active abduction were measured initially and after 8 weeks by radiography and ultrasonography. [Results] While there were no significant changes in the three parameters in the orthosis group, there were significant differences in the orthosis plus toe-spread-out exercise group after 8 weeks. In addition there were significant differences in the three measures between the two groups. [Conclusion] The toe-spread-out exercise reduces the hallux valgus angle and hallux valgus angle during active abduction, and increases the cross-sectional area of the abductor hallucis muscle. The toe-spread-out exercise is recommended for patients with mild to moderate hallux valgus. PMID:25995546

  17. Endoscopic-Assisted Flexor Hallucis Longus Transfer: Harvest of the Tendon at Zone 2 or Zone 3.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2015-12-01

    Flexor hallucis longus (FHL) tendon transfer is indicated for reconstruction of the Achilles tendon with a gap larger than 5 cm. The tendon can be harvested at zone 2 or zone 3 by minimally invasive techniques with the advantage of minimal soft-tissue dissection. The tendon can be harvested under the sustentaculum tali by zone 2 FHL tendoscopy. It is adequate for FHL transfer to the posterior calcaneal tubercle. If a double-thickness reconstruction of a huge gap of the Achilles tendon is indicated, the tendon can be harvested at the level of the hallux by means of a tendon stripper. However, the interconnection tendon of the master knot of Henry can be split together with the FHL or flexor digitorum longus tendon instead of being cut. Zone 2 FHL tendoscopy can be used to release the split tendon to complete the FHL harvest.

  18. Minimally invasive flexor hallucis longus transfer in management of acute achilles tendon rupture associated with tendinosis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2012-04-01

    Chronic tendinopathy is characterized by pain in the tendon, generally at the start and completion of exercise. However, tendinosis may lead to decreased blood flow, increased stiffness of the tendon and reduced tensile strength, and predispose to rupture. Operative treatment is indicated to restore the function of the Achilles tendon and alleviate the prerupture heel cord pain. A case of acute Achilles tendon rupture with extensive tendinosis that was successfully treated with minimally invasive flexor hallucis longus transfer is reported.

  19. Determination of Injection Site in Flexor Digitorum Longus for Effective and Safe Botulinum Toxin Injection

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hong Geum; Chung, Myung Eun; Song, Dae Heon; Kim, Ju Yong; Sul, Bo Mi; Oh, Chang Hoon

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine the optimal injection site in the flexor digitorum longus (FDL) muscle for effective botulinum toxin injection. Methods Fourteen specimens from eight adult Korean cadavers were used in this study. The most proximal medial point of the tibia plateau was defined as the proximal reference point; the most distal tip of the medial malleolus was defined as the distal reference point. The distance of a line connecting the proximal and distal reference points was defined as the reference length. The X-coordinate was the distance from the proximal reference point to the intramuscular motor endpoint (IME), or motor entry point (MEP) on the reference line, and the Y-coordinate was the distance from the nearest point from MEP on the medial border of the tibia to the MEP. IME and MEP distances from the proximal reference point were evaluated using the raw value and the X-coordinate to reference length ratio was determined as a percentage. Results The majority of IMEs were located within 30%-60% of the reference length from the proximal reference point. The majority of the MEPs were located within 40%-60% of the reference length from the proximal reference point. Conclusion We recommend the anatomical site for a botulinum toxin injection in the FDL to be within a region 30%-60% of the reference length from the proximal reference point. PMID:25750869

  20. Different pattern of aquaporin-4 expression in extensor digitorum longus and soleus during early development.

    PubMed

    Nicchia, Grazia P; Mola, Maria G; Pisoni, Michela; Frigeri, Antonio; Svelto, Maria

    2007-05-01

    Aquaporin-4 (AQP4) is the neuromuscular water channel expressed at the sarcolemma of mammalian fast-twitch fibers that mediates a high water transport rate, which is important during muscle activity. Clinical interest in the neuromuscular expression of AQP4 has increased as it is associated with the protein complex formed by dystrophin, the product of the gene affected in Duchenne muscular dystrophy. The expression of AQP4 during development has not been characterized. In this study, we analyzed the expression of AQP4 in extensor digitorum longus (EDL) and soleus, a fast- and slow-twitch muscle, respectively, during the first weeks after birth. The results show that AQP4 expression in both types of skeletal muscle occurs postnatally. The time course of expression of AQP4 in the two types of muscles was also different. Whereas the expression of AQP4 protein levels in the EDL showed a progressive increase during the first month after birth, reaching levels found in adults by day 24, the levels of the protein in the soleus showed a transient peak between day 12 and day 24 and declined thereafter, an effect that may be related to the transient high number of fast motor units innervating the soleus muscle during this time. The results suggest that AQP4 expression in skeletal muscle is under neuronal influence and contribute to the understanding of the molecular events of fiber differentiation during development.

  1. Effects of methylmercury on the motor and sensory innervation of the rat extensor digitorum longus muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Yip, R.K.; Riley, D.A.

    1987-06-01

    The histochemical study examined the effects of chronic methylmercury (MeHg) intoxication on the motor and sensory innervation of extensor digitorum longus muscles. Light microscopic examination of silver-stained axons in the intramuscular nerve bundles of MeHg-treated rats showed Wallerian-like degeneration and a reduction in the number of nerve fibers. Disrupted axons were predominantly sensory because 22.2% of spindle afferents (I/sub a/) and 90.0% of Golgi tendon organ (I/sub b/) sensory fibers were completely degenerated whereas less than 1% of motor ending were totally destroyed. Partial disruption occurred in the cholinesterase and motor terminals of 13.7% of endplates. Their results demonstrated greater vulnerability of sensory nerves than of motor nerves to MeHg-induced degeneration. Thus, the abnormal reflexes, ataxia, and muscle weakness following MeHg poisoning appear related to reduction of proprioceptive feedback from muscles and tendons irradiation to the documented lesions in the central nervous system.

  2. Truncated dystrophins reduce muscle stiffness in the extensor digitorum longus muscle of mdx mice

    PubMed Central

    Hakim, Chady H.

    2013-01-01

    Muscle stiffness is a major clinical feature in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). DMD is the most common lethal inherited muscle-wasting disease in boys, and it is caused by the lack of the dystrophin protein. We recently showed that the extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle of mdx mice (a DMD mouse model) exhibits disease-associated muscle stiffness. Truncated micro- and mini-dystrophins are the leading candidates for DMD gene therapy. Unfortunately, it has never been clear whether these truncated genes can mitigate muscle stiffness. To address this question, we examined the passive properties of the EDL muscle in transgenic mdx mice that expressed a representative mini- or micro-gene (ΔH2-R15, ΔR2-15/ΔR18-23/ΔC, or ΔR4-23/ΔC). The passive properties were measured at the ages of 6 and 20 mo and compared with those of age-matched wild-type and mdx mice. Despite significant truncation of the gene, surprisingly, the elastic and viscous properties were completely restored to the wild-type level in every transgenic strain we examined. Our results demonstrated for the first time that truncated dystrophin genes may effectively treat muscle stiffness in DMD. PMID:23221959

  3. Scapholunate ligament reconstruction using the palmaris longus tendon and suture anchor fixation in chronic scapholunate instability

    PubMed Central

    Gandhi, Maulik Jagdish; Knight, Timothy Paul; Ratcliffe, Peter John

    2016-01-01

    Background: Multiple reconstruction techniques have been described in the management of chronic scapholunate (SL) instability, either based on the capsulodesis or tenodesis principle. It is uncertain which surgical method produces the best patient outcomes. We describe results of a technique using palmaris longus (PL) tendon for surgical reconstruction of the SL ligament and provide functional outcomes scores. Materials and Methods: We surgically reconstructed the SL ligament using a PL tendon graft secured with Mitek® bone anchors. Surgical technique with photographs is provided in the main text. Functional outcomes were measured using the disabilities of the arm, shoulder, and hand and Mayo wrist scores. Patient satisfaction was assessed using a simple measure. Results: Eleven patients attended mid-term followup (mean 45.8 months post-surgery) and had functional outcomes and satisfaction of this procedure that compared favorably to case series that used tenodesis for chronic SL ligament injuries. Almost all patients (n = 10) were able to return to regular employment. The majority of patients (n = 10) were satisfied with their primary reconstruction procedure. Conclusion: This technique avoids the use of drill holes to weave tendon through bone, uses an easy to access graft, and exploits the superior pullout strength of anchors while offering satisfactory functional outcomes that are comparable to alternative tenodesis techniques. PMID:27904216

  4. Mycobacterium fortuitum infection following primary achilles tendon debridement with flexor hallucis longus augmentation: a case report.

    PubMed

    Jacoby, Sidney M; Sivalingam, Jocelyn J; Raikin, Steven Mark

    2008-05-01

    Mycobacterium fortuitum (M. fortuitum), a rapidly growing non-tuberculous mycobacterium is a well-recognized, yet uncommon cause of soft tissue infection. The incidence of post surgical wound infections from this organism is increasing. The presentation of infection is atypical and failure to consider this pathogen can cause diagnostic delay and increased morbidity. Achilles tendon debridement with FHL augmentation is commonly used in patients with chronic Achilles tendinosis. Wound-edge necrosis is the most common surgical complication of this procedure, and superficial and deep infections are potentially devastating complications. We report the case of a patient who underwent Achilles tendon debridement with flexor hallucis longus augmentation, whose postoperative course was complicated by a deep M. FORTUITUM infection. Critical to the identification and ultimate treatment of this particular pathogen is the utilization of appropriate intraoperative cultures and microbiologic testing. In addition, repeat aggressive irrigation and debridement procedures coupled with removal of foreign materials and the appropriate use of prolonged antibiotic therapy can result in a successful long-term outcome.

  5. Evidence of isometric function of the flexor hallucis longus muscle in normal gait.

    PubMed

    Kirane, Y M; Michelson, J D; Sharkey, N A

    2008-01-01

    Studying mechanics of the muscles spanning multiple joints provides insights into intersegmental dynamics and movement coordination. Multiarticular muscles are thought to function at "near-isometric" lengths to transfer mechanical energy between the adjacent body segments. Flexor hallucis longus (FHL) is a multiarticular flexor of the great toe; however, its potential isometric function has received little attention. We used a robotic loading apparatus to investigate FHL mechanics during simulated walking in cadaver feet, and hypothesized that physiological force transmission across the foot can occur with isometric FHL function. The extrinsic foot tendons, stripped of the muscle fibers, were connected to computer-controlled linear actuators. The FHL activity was controlled using force-feedback (FC) based upon electromyographic data from healthy subjects, and subsequently, isometric positional feedback (PC), maintaining the FHL myotendinous junction stationary during simulated walking. Tendon forces and excursions were recorded, as were the strains within the first metatarsal. Forces in the metatarsal and metatarsophalangeal joint were derived from these strains. The FHL tendon excursion under FC was 6.57+/-3.13mm. The forces generated in the FHL tendon, metatarsal and metatarsophalangeal joint with the FHL under isometric PC were not significantly different in pattern from FC. These observations provide evidence that physiological forces could be generated along the great toe with isometric FHL function. A length servo mechanism such as the stretch reflex could likely control the isometric FHL function during in vivo locomotion; this could have interesting implications regarding the conditions of impaired stretch reflex such as spastic paresis and peripheral neuropathies.

  6. The palmaris longus muscle and its relations with the antebrachial fascia and the palmar aponeurosis.

    PubMed

    Stecco, Carla; Lancerotto, Luca; Porzionato, Andrea; Macchi, Veronica; Tiengo, Cesare; Parenti, Anna; Sanudo, Jose Ramon; De Caro, Raffaele

    2009-03-01

    The palmaris longus (PL) is a muscle of the forearm with a long distal tendon that is continuous with the palmar aponeurosis (PA). It is generally assumed that the muscle lies deep to the antebrachial fascia from origin to termination, but a detailed description is lacking. The relationship of the PL tendon with the antebrachial fascia was studied in 30 dissections. The PL was completely absent in six specimens (20%), whereas the PA was identified in all. Average length of the forearm was 25.5 cm (SD: 2.1 cm, range 22-29 cm), overall length of the PL muscle 26.9 cm (SD: 2.6 cm, range 22.5-31.5 cm), muscular belly 13.8 cm (SD: 3.4 cm, range 9.5-23 cm), tendon 13.1 cm (SD: 3.3 cm, range 8-15.5 cm). Proximally, the PL was situated deep to the antebrachial fascia, then in the lower third of the forearm its tendon perforated the antebrachial fascia (at 4.7 +/- 1.7 cm from the bistyloid line) moving to a suprafascial plane, inserting in the PA. The PA could be divided into two layers: the superficial one formed by longitudinal fibers and adherent to the skin, the deep one formed by transverse fibers continuous laterally with the deep fascia of the hand. The PL tendon was found to be in continuity only with the longitudinal fibers of the PA. Based on the anatomical findings, it may be suggested that the superficial part of the PA is situated in the subcutaneous planes of the palm, and that the muscle should be considered as a tensor of the superficial fascial system of the subcutaneous tissue.

  7. Effects of button position on a soft keyboard: Muscle activity, touch time, and discomfort in two-thumb text entry.

    PubMed

    Chang, Joonho; Choi, Bori; Tjolleng, Amir; Jung, Kihyo

    2017-04-01

    Intensive use of the thumbs for text entry on smartphones may contribute to discomfort, pain, or musculoskeletal disorders. This study investigated the effect of twenty-five button positions (5 rows × 5 columns) on a soft keyboard for two-thumb entry. Two experiments measured muscle activity, touch time, and discomfort as a function of the button positions. In Phase I, the muscle activities of two intrinsic (abductor pollicis brevis and first dorsal interossei) and two extrinsic (abductor pollicis longus and extensor digitorum communis) muscles associated with thumb motions were observed for ten college students (age: 24.2). In Phase II, touch time and discomfort were measured for 40 college students (age: 23.6). The results demonstrated that the %MVCs of the intrinsic muscles significantly increased when the thumbs flexed and abducted. Also, the button positions near the rest positions of the thumbs resulted in significantly shorter touch times (0.66 s) and lower discomfort ratings (0.70 pt) than their peripheral buttons (0.76 s; 2.29 pt).

  8. Five myofibrillar lesion types in eccentrically challenged, unloaded rat adductor longus muscle--a test model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, J. L.; Balog, E. M.; Fitts, R. H.; Riley, D. A.

    1999-01-01

    Sarcomere disruptions are observed in the adductor longus (AL) muscles following voluntary reloading of spaceflown and hindlimb suspension unloaded (HSU) rat, which resemble lesions in eccentrically challenged muscle. We devised and tested an eccentric contraction (ECCON) test system for the 14-day HSU rat AL. Six to 7 hours following ECCON, ALs were fixed to allow immunostaining and electron microscopy (EM). Toluidine blue-stained histology semithin sections were screened for lesion density (#/mm2). Serial semithin sections from the ECCON group were characterized for myosin immunointensity of lesions. Five myofibrillar lesion types were identified in histological semithin sections: focal contractions; wide A-bands; opaque areas; missing A-bands; and hyperstretched sarcomeres. Lesion density by type was greater for ECCON than NonECCON ALs (P< or =0.05; focal contractions and opaque regions). Lesion density (#-of-all-five-types/mm2) was significantly different (ECCON: 23.91+/-10.58 vs. NonECCON: 5.48+/-1.28, P< or =0.05; ECCON vs. SHAM: 0.00+/-0.00; P< or = 0.025). PostECCON optimal tension decreased (Poi-drop, 17.84+/-4.22%) and was correlated to lesion density (R2=0.596), but prestretch tension demonstrated the highest correlation with lesion density (R2=0.994). In lesions, the darkly staining A-band lost the normally organized thick filament alignment to differing degrees across the different lesion types. Ranking the five lesion types by a measure of lesion length deformation (hypercontracted to hyperstretched) at the light microscopy level, related to the severity of thick filament registry loss across the lesion types at the electron microscopic level. This ranking suggested that the five lesion types seen in semithin sections at the light level represented a lesion progression sequence and paralleled myosin immunostaining loss as the distorted A-band filaments spread across the hyperlengthening lesion types. Lesion ultrastructure indicated damage involved

  9. Surgical Release of the First Extensor Compartment for Refractory de Quervain's Tenosynovitis: Surgical Findings and Functional Evaluation Using DASH Scores

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyun-Joo; Kim, Poong-Taek; Aminata, Iman Widya; Hong, Han-Pyo; Yoon, Jong-Pil

    2014-01-01

    Background Few studies have evaluated surgical outcomes in patients with refractory de Quervain's disease using validated outcome measures. We assessed the clinical outcomes of dorsal release of the first extensor compartment for the treatment of de Quervain's disease using the disabilities of the arm, shoulder and hand (DASH) score. Methods From October 2003 to May 2009, we retrospectively evaluated 33 patients (3 men and 30 women) who underwent surgical treatment for de Quervain's disease. All patients had a positive Finkelstein test and localized tenderness over the first dorsal compartment. All operations were performed under local anesthesia. A 2-cm-long transverse skin incision was made over the first extensor compartment and the dorsal retinaculum covering the extensor pollicis brevis was incised longitudinally. Preoperative and postoperative clinical evaluation included the use of DASH score, Finkelstein test, and visual analogue scale (VAS) score. Results In 18 patients (55%), the extensor pollicis brevis tendon compartment was separated from the abductor pollicis longus compartment. Eight patients had intracompartmental ganglia in the extensor pollicis brevis subcompartment. All patients except one had negative sign on Finkelstein test at the last follow-up. The average VAS score decreased from 7.42 preoperatively to 1.33 postoperatively (p < 0.05), and DASH score was improved from 53.2 to 3.45 (p < 0.05). There were no postoperative complications such as subluxation of the tendon of the first dorsal compartment or injury to the sensory branch of the radial nerve. Conclusions Intracompartment ganglia and the separate septum of extensor pollicis brevis are often related to de Quervain's disease. The release of the first extensor compartment for refractory de Quervain's disease resulted in good clinical outcomes with minimal morbidity. PMID:25436064

  10. The prevalence of absence of the palmaris longus--a study in a Chinese population and a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Sebastin, S J; Puhaindran, M E; Lim, A Y T; Lim, I J; Bee, W H

    2005-10-01

    Most standard textbooks of hand surgery quote the prevalence of absence of palmaris longus at around 15%. However, this figure varies considerably in reports from different ethnic groups. We studied 329 Chinese men and women and found palmaris longus to be absent unilaterally in 3.3%, and bilaterally in 1.2%, with an overall prevalence of absence of 4.6%. There was no significant difference in its absence with regard to the body side or the sex. Our literature review revealed a low prevalence of absence in Asian, Black and Native American populations and a much higher prevalence of absence in Caucasian populations. It is clear that a standard prevalence of absence of the palmaris longus cannot be applied to all populations.

  11. The expression of Longus type 4 pilus of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli is regulated by LngR and LngS and by H-NS, CpxR and CRP global regulators.

    PubMed

    De la Cruz, Miguel A; Ruiz-Tagle, Alejandro; Ares, Miguel A; Pacheco, Sabino; Yáñez, Jorge A; Cedillo, Lilia; Torres, Javier; Girón, Jorge A

    2016-12-10

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli produces a long type 4 pilus called Longus. The regulatory elements and the environmental signals controlling the expression of Longus-encoding genes are unknown. We identified two genes lngR and lngS in the Longus operon, whose predicted products share homology with transcriptional regulators. Isogenic lngR and lngS mutants were considerably affected in transcription of lngA pilin gene. The expression of lngA, lngR and lngS genes was optimally expressed at 37°C at pH 7.5. The presence of glucose and sodium chloride had a positive effect on Longus expression. The presence of divalent ions, particularly calcium, appears to be an important stimulus for Longus production. In addition, we studied H-NS, CpxR and CRP global regulators, on Longus expression. The response regulator CpxR appears to function as a positive regulator of lng genes as the cpxR mutant showed reduced levels of lngRSA expression. In contrast, H-NS and CRP function as negative regulators since expression of lngA was up-regulated in isogenic hns and crp mutants. H-NS and CRP were required for salt- and glucose-mediated regulation of Longus. Our data suggest the existence of a complex regulatory network controlling Longus expression, involving both local and global regulators in response to different environmental signals.

  12. Operative outcome of partial plantar fasciectomy and neurolysis to the nerve of the abductor digiti minimi muscle for recalcitrant plantar fasciitis.

    PubMed

    Conflitti, Joseph M; Tarquinio, Thom A

    2004-07-01

    A retrospective review was conducted of 23 patients (26 feet) to assess operative outcome of partial plantar fasciectomy and neurolysis to the nerve of the abductor digiti minimi muscle for recalcitrant plantar fasciitis. Nonsurgical treatment was implemented in all patients with no relief of symptoms (average 20.8 months) prior to surgery. Using a visual analog pain scale (0-10), the average preoperative pain was 9.2 (range, 8-10). Prior to surgery, 65.2% of patients had severe limitations of activity, and 34.8% of patients had moderate limitations of activity. An average 25.3-month follow-up (range, 8-51) was performed by telephone interview. Average postoperative pain decreased to 1.7 using the same visual analog scale. Thirteen patients (57%) had no functional limitations postoperatively and nine patients (39%) had minimal functional limitations postoperatively. One patient (4%) had moderate functional limitations postoperatively. Twenty patients (87%) were completely satisfied with the surgery, two patients (9%) were satisfied with reservations, and one patient (4%) was unsatisfied with the surgery. The average period before return to work or daily activities was 1.5 months. Two patients had minor complications of partial wound dehiscence that healed uneventfully and mild dorsal midfoot pain which required temporary use of a boot walker. While the majority of patients with plantar fasciitis can be managed with nonoperative treatment, those patients with recalcitrant plantar fasciitis can be effectively treated with partial plantar fasciectomy and neurolysis to the nerve of the abductor digiti minimi muscle.

  13. Morphological and biochemical changes in soleus and extensor digitorum longus muscles of rats orbited in Spacelab 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, D. A.; Slocum, T.; Bain, J. L. W.; Sedlak, F. R.; Elis, S.; Satyanarayana, T.

    1985-01-01

    Muscle atrophy in rats exposed to hypogravity for seven days aboard Spacelab 3 is examined. Hindlimb muscles were harvested 12-16 days postflight, and prepared for enzyme studies and electron microscopy. Simple cell shrinkage was found, with a mean fiber area decrease of 35.8 percent for soleus and 24.9 percent for extensor digitorum longus (EDL) flight muscle fibers, as compared with control muscle fibers. EDL and soleus muscles showed increases in alkaline myofibrillar ATPase, alpha glycerophosphate dehydrogenase, and glycogen, and a decrease in NADH dehydrogenase staining. The 26 percent increase in calcium activated protease suggests that the focal degradation of myofibrils is the key process of myofibril breakdown. The presence in the flight soleus muscles of one percent necrotic fibers is unexplained. The observed shift towards histochemical fast-muscle type properties is consistent with previous findings.

  14. Endoscopic Removal of Loose Bodies of the Posterior Ankle Extra-articular Space Arising From Flexor Hallucis Longus Tenosynovial Osteochondromatosis.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2016-12-01

    Loose bodies of the posterior ankle can occur either at the posterior recess of the ankle or subtalar joint or at the posterior ankle extra-articular space. Loose bodies at the extra-articular space can be a result of tenosynovial chondromatosis of the tendons of the posterior ankle, especially the flexor hallucis longus tendon. Endoscopic removal of loose bodies of the posterior ankle extra-articular space is indicated for symptomatic cases that are not improved by conservative treatment. It is contraindicated if there is active infection at the planned portal sites or the surgeon is not familiar with the technique of posterior ankle endoscopy. Systematic assessment of the different parts of the posterior ankle will minimize the risk of loose body retention.

  15. The stretch-shortening cycle (SSC) revisited: residual force enhancement contributes to increased performance during fast SSCs of human m. adductor pollicis

    PubMed Central

    Seiberl, Wolfgang; Power, Geoffrey A; Herzog, Walter; Hahn, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The stretch-shortening cycle (SSC) occurs in most everyday movements, and is thought to provoke a performance enhancement of the musculoskeletal system. However, mechanisms of this performance enhancement remain a matter of debate. One proposed mechanism is associated with a stretch-induced increase in steady-state force, referred to as residual force enhancement (RFE). As yet, direct evidence relating RFE to increased force/work during SSCs is missing. Therefore, forces of electrically stimulated m. adductor pollicis (n = 14 subjects) were measured during and after pure stretch, pure shortening, and stretch-shortening contractions with varying shortening amplitudes. Active stretch (30°, ω = 161 ± 6°s−1) caused significant RFE (16%, P < 0.01), whereas active shortening (10°, 20°, and 30°; ω = 103 ± 3°s−1, 152 ± 5°s−1, and 170 ± 5°s−1) resulted in significant force depression (9–15%, P < 0.01). In contrast, after SSCs (that is when active stretch preceded active shortening) no force depression was found. Indeed for our specific case in which the shortening amplitude was only 1/3 of the lengthening amplitude, there was a remnant RFE (10%, P < 0.01) following the active shortening. This result indicates that the RFE generated during lengthening affected force depression when active lengthening was followed by active shortening. As conventional explanations, such as the storage and release of elastic energy, cannot explain the enhanced steady-state force after SSCs, it appears that the stretch-induced RFE is not immediately abolished during shortening and contributes to the increased force and work during SSCs. PMID:25975646

  16. Stenosing Tenosynovitis of the Flexor Hallucis Longus Tendon Associated with the Plantar Capsular Accessory Ossicle at the Interphalangeal Joint of the Great Toe

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Song Ho; Naito, Masashi

    2017-01-01

    This report presents a case of stenosing tenosynovitis of the flexor hallucis longus tendon associated with the plantar capsular accessory ossicle at the interphalangeal joint of the great toe, which was confirmed by intraoperative observation and was successfully treated with surgical resection of the ossicle. As the plantar capsular accessory ossicle was not visible radiographically due to the lack of ossification, ultrasonography was helpful for diagnosing this disorder. PMID:28255483

  17. Quantitative analyses of cross-sectional shape of the distal radius in three species of macaques.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Yasuhiro

    2004-04-01

    I conducted quantitative analyses of the cross-sectional shape of the distal radial shaft in three species of macaques, which differ in locomotor behavior: semi-terrestrial Japanese macaques ( Macaca fuscata), arboreal long tailed macaques ( M. fascicularis), and relatively terrestrial rhesus macaques ( M. mulatta). I took CT scans of the distal radial shafts of a total of 180 specimens at the level of the inferior radio-ulnar articulation. From each CT image, the periosteal outline of the radius was traced automatically by a digital imaging technique. I determined five points (landmarks) on the outline by developing a standardized morphometric technique. Bone surface lengths were measured by using these landmarks and their soft tissue correlates were investigated. The results of this study were as follows: (1) Semi-terrestrial M. fuscata has features that are approximately intermediate between those of the other two species. M. fuscata has a relatively small groove for M. abductor pollicis longus and a large groove for Mm. extensor carpi radialis longus et brevis. These characters resemble those of M. fascicularis. On the other hand, the ulnar notch of M. fuscata is relatively large, a character which is similar to that of M. mulatta. Moreover, compared to the other two macaques, the surface of the flexor muscles of M. fuscata is intermediate in size. (2) The more terrestrial M. mulatta has a relatively large groove for M. abductor pollicis longus and a small groove for Mm. extensor carpi radialis longus et brevis. Moreover, M. mulatta has a relatively large ulnar notch and a small surface for the flexor muscles. (3) The arboreal M. fascicularis has similar features to those of M. fuscata for the first and second relative size index. However, in the ulnar notch, M. fascicularis has a peculiar character and the surface for the flexor muscles is relatively large compared to those of the other two species. These results can be interpreted in terms of positional

  18. Neglected Achilles Tendon Rupture Treated with Flexor Hallucis Longus transfer with two turndown gastrocnemius fascia flap and reinforced with plantaris tendon.

    PubMed

    Mao, Haijiao; Shi, Zengyuan; Xu, Dachuan; Liu, Zhenxin

    2015-09-01

    Neglected Achilles Tendon Ruptures are commonly seen by orthopaedic surgeons. In cases resistant to conservative treatment, a variety of surgical procedures have been utilized in the past. The senior -surgeon at our institution has utilized a technique -employing two turndown fascia flaps fashioned from the proximal Achilles tendon augmented by a tenomyodesis of the flexor hallucis longus and plantaris tendon. The purpose of this study was to assess the clinical outcome of all patients who underwent this procedure. The medical records of 10 cases that underwent this procedure were retrospectively reviewed. We completed data collection sets using the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society ankle-hind foot scores, isokinetic evaluation, and postoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 1 year of follow-up. The mean American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society ankle-hind foot scores improved from 64.4±3.54. Isokinetic testing at 30º/sec and 120º/sec revealed an mean deficits of 24.5%, respectively, in the plantar flexion peak torque of the involved ankle than non-involved ankle. The flexor hallucis longus tendon, gastrocnemius fascia flap and plantaris were well -integrated into the Achilles tendon forming a homogenous tendon, which was confirmed in MRI. Our subjective and objective data indicate that the reconstructive technique using flexor hallucis longus transfer with two turndown gastrocnemius fascia flaps and plantaris tendon is a good option for repairing large gap defect of Achilles tendon.

  19. Anatomy and vascularization of the flexor hallucis longus muscle and its implication in free fibula flap transfer: an anatomical study.

    PubMed

    Sassu, Paolo; Acland, Robert D; Salgado, Christopher John; Mardini, Samir; Ozyurekoglu, Tuna

    2010-02-01

    Contracture as well as weakness of the flexor hallucis longus (FHL) are possible complications following free fibula flap harvest. Possible causes have been related to fibrotic change of the muscle either due to devascularization or compartment-like syndrome after a tight wound closure. This study elucidates the vascularization and nerve supply of the FHL muscle after fibula flap harvest in a fresh cadaver model.A fibula bone flap was harvested through a lateral approach in 20 fresh limbs. The popliteal artery was isolated and injected with a silicone compound, the muscle isolated, and its neurovascular supply visualized.The distal third and fourth portion of the FHL muscle was always found to be located in a more compressed and deeper compartment. The peroneal artery was entirely filled by the silicone compound in 17 fresh cadaver limbs with at least one branch supplying the distal fourth of the FHL. The posterior tibialis artery was filled in all limbs and an average of 2 branches was found to supply the muscle. In all dissections, the nerve supplying the FHL originated from the tibialis nerve with an average of three branches perforating the muscle.Following fibula harvest, the FHL muscle will maintain vascular supply through the distal portion of the peroneal artery and the posterior tibialis artery. Nerve injury to the FHL muscle is unlikely during flap harvest.

  20. A Case of Reverse Palmaris Longus Muscle- An Additional Muscle in the Anterior Compartment of the Forearm

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Ashwini Lagadamane Sathynarayana; Gadahad, Mohandas Rao Kappettu

    2016-01-01

    It is uncommon to have additional muscles in the upper limb. Some of them may restrict the movements or compress the nerves and vessels, while others may go unnoticed. During the routine dissection for undergraduate medical students, we observed an additional muscle in the anterior compartment of the forearm in about 60-year-old male cadaver. The muscle had a prominent belly and a long tendon. Distally, it was attached to the flexor retinaculum by a short and thick tendon. Proximally, long tendon of the muscle passed between the flexor carpi ulnaris and palmaris longus and was attached to the common aponeurosis shared by the extensor carpi ulnaris and flexor digitorum profundus muscles. The additional muscle belly was supplied by a branch from the anterior interosseous nerve. The ulnar nerve and artery was passing deep to the fleshy belly of the muscle. The muscle reported here might compress the ulnar nerve and artery and may produce neurovascular symptoms. On the other hand, the tendon and fleshy belly of the muscle could be useful in muscle/tendon grafts. The observations made by us in the present case will supplement our knowledge of variations of the muscles in this region which could be useful for surgeons during the forearm and hand surgeries. PMID:27134851

  1. Common phenotype of resting mouse extensor digitorum longus and soleus muscles: equal ATPase and glycolytic flux during transient anoxia.

    PubMed

    Vinnakota, Kalyan C; Rusk, Joshua; Palmer, Lauren; Shankland, Eric; Kushmerick, Martin J

    2010-06-01

    Rates of ATPase and glycolysis are several times faster in actively contracting mouse extensor digitorum longus muscle (EDL) than soleus (SOL), but we find these rates are not distinguishable at rest. We used a transient anoxic perturbation of steady state energy balance to decrease phosphocreatine (PCr) reversibly and to measure the rates of ATPase and of lactate production without muscle activation or contraction. The rate of glycolytic ATP synthesis is less than the ATPase rate, accounting for the continual PCr decrease during anoxia in both muscles. We fitted a mathematical model validated with properties of enzymes and solutes measured in vitro and appropriate for the transient perturbation of these muscles to experimental data to test whether the model accounts for the results. Simulations showed equal rates of ATPase and lactate production in both muscles. ATPase controls glycolytic flux by feedback from its products. Adenylate kinase function is critical because a rise in [AMP] is necessary to activate glycogen phosphorylase. ATPase is the primary source of H+ production. The sum of contributions of the 13 reactions of the glycogenolytic and glycolytic network to total proton load is negligible. The stoichiometry of lactate and H+ production is near unity. These results identify a default state of energy metabolism for resting muscle in which there is no difference in the metabolic phenotype of EDL and SOL. Therefore, additional control mechanisms, involving higher ATPase flux and [Ca2+], must exist to explain the well-known difference in glycolytic rates in fast-twitch and slow-twitch muscles in actively contracting muscle.

  2. Ischemia Increases the Twitch Latent Period in the Soleus and Extensor Carpi Radialis Longus Muscles from Adult Rats.

    PubMed

    Morales, Camilo; Fierro, Leonardo

    2016-10-27

    Complete ischemia and reperfusion effects on twitch force (∫(F·t)), twitch latent period (TLP), maximal rate of rise of twitch tension (δF/δt)max, and twitch maximum relaxation rate (TMRR) were assessed. We divided 36 adult rats into four groups; two control groups (n = 9), a group undergoing 1 hour of ischemia followed by 1 hour of reperfusion (n = 9), and one group exposed to 2 hours of ischemia followed by 1 hour of reperfusion (n = 9). We have induced twitch contractions every 10 minutes in the soleus and the extensor carpi radialis longus (ECRL). Twitch contractions were recorded and then analyzed for ∫(F·t), TLP, (δF/δt)max, and TMRR. During 1 hour and 40 minutes of ischemia, TLP increased to 179 ± 24% (p < 0.05) in the soleus and to 184 ± 16% (p < 0.05) in the ECRL, an effect that was partially recovered during 1 hour of reperfusion. This increase started after 20 minutes of ischemia in the soleus and after 40 minutes of ischemia in the ECRL. The increase was faster in the ECRL and peaked at the same time for both muscular groups. ∫(F·t) and (δF/δt)max decreased during 1 hour of ischemia to 46 ± 7% (p < 0.05) in the soleus and to 40 ± 7% (p < 0.05) in the ECRL. TMRR decreased during 1 hour of ischemia to 39 ± 5% (p < 0.05) in the soleus and to 54 ± 8% (p < 0.05) in the ECRL. During 1 hour of reperfusion all of them recovered close to control values.

  3. Radial ridge excision for symptomatic volar tendon subluxation following de Quervain's release.

    PubMed

    Collins, Evan D

    2014-09-01

    Traditional surgical release to address de Quervain's stenosing tenosynovitis can lead to the rare complication of volar tendon subluxation. This study presents a surgical procedure, which entails excision of the radial ridge as an alternative treatment to relieve pain associated with symptomatic volar tendon subluxation following de Quervain's release. The procedure was performed on 6 patients complaining of painful volar tendon subluxation of abductor pollicis longus (APL) and extensor pollicis brevis (EPB), following a first dorsal compartment release and postoperative splinting. We opened the same incision sharply, with direct view of the tendons of the first dorsal compartment. The wrist was ranged through extension and flexion, and volar subluxation of the APL and EPB over the prominent radial ridge was confirmed. The bony portion of the radial ridge was excised and filed smooth. The periosteal flap is advanced over the ridge and sutured into place. The APL and EPB tendons were released from dorsal retractors. All patients reported relief upon follow-up. Excision of this ridge removes the obtrusive friction to the APL and EPB tendons, allowing them to glide painlessly over the radial styloid.

  4. Pulley Reconstruction As Part of the Surgical Treatment for de Quervain Disease: Surgical Technique with Medium-Term Results.

    PubMed

    van der Wijk, Jacobien; Goubau, Jean F; Mermuys, Koen; van Hoonacker, Petrus; Vanmierlo, Bert; Kerckhove, Diederick; Berghs, Bart

    2015-08-01

    Background Simple decompression of the first extensor compartment is commonly used for treating de Quervain disease, with the possible complication of subluxation of the tendons of the abductor pollicis longus (APL) and extensor pollicis brevis (EPB) over the radial styloid. To prevent this painful subluxation of the tendons, several methods of reconstructing the pulley have been proposed. Questions/Purposes The purpose of our study was to evaluate a new technique for reconstructing the first extensor compartment following a release for de Quervain disease. Patients and Methods A retrospective study (mean length 40.4 months) was performed in 45 patients. The outcome assessment involved two different questionnaires and ultrasound evaluation of any tendon subluxation. Results None of the patients required reoperation for tendon instability or incomplete decompression of the first extensor compartment. Two patients experienced clicking around the radial styloid after surgery. This was not related to the amount of volar migration of the tendons. Conclusions We believe the reconstruction proposed here is an effective method of preventing painful subluxation of the APL and EPB following a release of the first extensor compartment.

  5. De Qeurvian Tenosynovitis: Clinical Outcomes of Surgical Treatment with Longitudinal and Transverse Incision

    PubMed Central

    Abrisham, Syyed Jalil; Karbasi, Mohammad Hosein Akhavan; Zare, Jalil; Behnamfar, Zahra; Tafti, Arefah Dehghani; Shishesaz, Behzad

    2011-01-01

    Objectives De Quervain disease is a mechanical tenosynovitis due to inadequacy volume between abductor pollicis longus, extensor pollicis brevis and their tunnel. Treatment methods include immobilization, steroid injections, and operation. For the first time Fritz De Quervain described surgical treatment of this disease. Since then, various ways of treatment have been reported. The purpose of this study is to compare the clinical outcomes of a longitudinal incision with a transverse incision in De Quervain disease. Methods This was a randomized controlled clinical trial conducted in three hospitals in Iran, Yazd from March 2003 to September 2008. One hundred-twenty patients with De Quervain disease who did not respond to conservative treatment were operated with two different incisions. The patients were followed for three months to compare the surgical outcomes. Results During a three month follow-up, a significant difference was shown between the two methods (p=0.03). Results of surgical treatment with longitudinal incision were excellent (only 5 hypertrophic scars), but there were 13 postoperative complaints with transverse incision. Conclusion According to our findings, longitudinal incision in surgical treatment of De Quervain disease is better than transverse incision. PMID:22043391

  6. Innovations in arthroscopic management of Basal joint arthritis of the thumb.

    PubMed

    Carro, Luis Perez; Golano, Pau; Vega, Jordi; Cabestany, Jose María

    2006-12-01

    Thumb arthroscopy and arthroscopically assisted treatment of the thumb are safe and effective techniques. This report describes technical innovations particularly useful in the surgical performance of arthroscopically assisted treatment of basal joint arthritis. (1) With adduction and hyperextension of the thumb, the bony landmarks are easier to palpate and a volar radial soft spot is clearly defined between the trapezium and metacarpal (i.e., the adduction-hyperextension maneuver). (2) After the distension of the joint with saline solution, the thumb automatically abducts and flexes if the capsule has been distended successfully (i.e., the flexion-abduction sign). (3) The radial and ulnar borders of the proximal phalanx and the local tendons can serve as external landmarks if fluid extravasation occurred. (4) Finally, the simultaneous use of the 3 portals described in the first carpometacarpal joint is very effective for better visualization and performance of the procedures in this joint (i.e., the 3-portal technique). We propose a new description of the portals for carpometacarpal arthroscopy as follows: (1) volar portal, which is just distal to the oblique ridge of the trapezium following a line referencing the radial edge of the flexor carpi radialis; (2) ulnar portal, which is just ulnar to the extensor pollicis brevis; and (3) radial portal, which is just radial to the abductor pollicis longus.

  7. Pulley Reconstruction As Part of the Surgical Treatment for de Quervain Disease: Surgical Technique with Medium-Term Results

    PubMed Central

    van der Wijk, Jacobien; Goubau, Jean F.; Mermuys, Koen; van Hoonacker, Petrus; Vanmierlo, Bert; Kerckhove, Diederick; Berghs, Bart

    2015-01-01

    Background Simple decompression of the first extensor compartment is commonly used for treating de Quervain disease, with the possible complication of subluxation of the tendons of the abductor pollicis longus (APL) and extensor pollicis brevis (EPB) over the radial styloid. To prevent this painful subluxation of the tendons, several methods of reconstructing the pulley have been proposed. Questions/Purposes The purpose of our study was to evaluate a new technique for reconstructing the first extensor compartment following a release for de Quervain disease. Patients and Methods A retrospective study (mean length 40.4 months) was performed in 45 patients. The outcome assessment involved two different questionnaires and ultrasound evaluation of any tendon subluxation. Results None of the patients required reoperation for tendon instability or incomplete decompression of the first extensor compartment. Two patients experienced clicking around the radial styloid after surgery. This was not related to the amount of volar migration of the tendons. Conclusions We believe the reconstruction proposed here is an effective method of preventing painful subluxation of the APL and EPB following a release of the first extensor compartment. PMID:26261747

  8. Comparative proteomic profiling of soleus, extensor digitorum longus, flexor digitorum brevis and interosseus muscles from the mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    CARBERRY, STEVEN; BRINKMEIER, HEINRICH; ZHANG, YAXIN; WINKLER, CLAUDIA K.; OHLENDIECK, KAY

    2013-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is due to genetic abnormalities in the dystrophin gene and represents one of the most frequent genetic childhood diseases. In the X-linked muscular dystrophy (mdx) mouse model of dystrophinopathy, different subtypes of skeletal muscles are affected to a varying degree albeit the same single base substitution within exon 23 of the dystrophin gene. Thus, to determine potential muscle subtype-specific differences in secondary alterations due to a deficiency in dystrophin, in this study, we carried out a comparative histological and proteomic survey of mdx muscles. We intentionally included the skeletal muscles that are often used for studying the pathomechanism of muscular dystrophy. Histological examinations revealed a significantly higher degree of central nucleation in the soleus and extensor digitorum longus muscles compared with the flexor digitorum brevis and interosseus muscles. Muscular hypertrophy of 20–25% was likewise only observed in the soleus and extensor digitorum longus muscles from mdx mice, but not in the flexor digitorum brevis and interosseus muscles. For proteomic analysis, muscle protein extracts were separated by fluorescence two-dimensional (2D) gel electrophoresis. Proteins with a significant change in their expression were identified by mass spectrometry. Proteomic profiling established an altered abundance of 24, 17, 19 and 5 protein species in the dystrophin-deficient soleus, extensor digitorum longus, flexor digitorum brevis and interosseus muscle, respectively. The key proteomic findings were verified by immunoblot analysis. The identified proteins are involved in the contraction-relaxation cycle, metabolite transport, muscle metabolism and the cellular stress response. Thus, histological and proteomic profiling of muscle subtypes from mdx mice indicated that distinct skeletal muscles are differentially affected by the loss of the membrane cytoskeletal protein, dystrophin. Varying degrees of perturbed protein

  9. Comparative proteomic profiling of soleus, extensor digitorum longus, flexor digitorum brevis and interosseus muscles from the mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Carberry, Steven; Brinkmeier, Heinrich; Zhang, Yaxin; Winkler, Claudia K; Ohlendieck, Kay

    2013-09-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is due to genetic abnormalities in the dystrophin gene and represents one of the most frequent genetic childhood diseases. In the X-linked muscular dystrophy (mdx) mouse model of dystrophinopathy, different subtypes of skeletal muscles are affected to a varying degree albeit the same single base substitution within exon 23 of the dystrophin gene. Thus, to determine potential muscle subtype-specific differences in secondary alterations due to a deficiency in dystrophin, in this study, we carried out a comparative histological and proteomic survey of mdx muscles. We intentionally included the skeletal muscles that are often used for studying the pathomechanism of muscular dystrophy. Histological examinations revealed a significantly higher degree of central nucleation in the soleus and extensor digitorum longus muscles compared with the flexor digitorum brevis and interosseus muscles. Muscular hypertrophy of 20-25% was likewise only observed in the soleus and extensor digitorum longus muscles from mdx mice, but not in the flexor digitorum brevis and interosseus muscles. For proteomic analysis, muscle protein extracts were separated by fluorescence two-dimensional (2D) gel electrophoresis. Proteins with a significant change in their expression were identified by mass spectrometry. Proteomic profiling established an altered abundance of 24, 17, 19 and 5 protein species in the dystrophin-deficient soleus, extensor digitorum longus, flexor digitorum brevis and interosseus muscle, respectively. The key proteomic findings were verified by immunoblot analysis. The identified proteins are involved in the contraction-relaxation cycle, metabolite transport, muscle metabolism and the cellular stress response. Thus, histological and proteomic profiling of muscle subtypes from mdx mice indicated that distinct skeletal muscles are differentially affected by the loss of the membrane cytoskeletal protein, dystrophin. Varying degrees of perturbed protein

  10. A slip connecting the peroneus longus and tibialis posterior tendons at the forefoot: MRI, anatomic, and histologic findings in a cadaver.

    PubMed

    Sanal, Hatice Tuba; Nico, Marcelo; Chen, Lina; Haghighi, Parviz; Trudell, Debra; Resnick, Donald

    2011-12-01

    The anatomy of the peroneus longus and tibialis posterior tendons is well described in literature from both anatomy and radiology. Though a slip connecting these two structures is described in the anatomic literature, its existence has not been confirmed with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In this study in a cadaver, such a connection is documented using high-resolution MRI with anatomic and histologic correlation. This connection can provide support to the Lisfranc joint complex and further stabilize the region of the first and second metatarsal bases.

  11. First evidence of pathology in the forelimb of the late Miocene saber-toothed felid Promegantereon ogygia (Machairodontinae, Smilodontini).

    PubMed

    Salesa, Manuel J; Antón, Mauricio; Siliceo, Gema; Pesquero, María Dolores; Alcalá, Luis

    2014-06-01

    We examined the first evidence of pathology in the forelimb of the primitive saber-toothed felid Promegantereon ogygia, observed in a radius from the late Miocene (Vallesian, MN 10) site of La Roma 2 (Teruel, Spain). This fossil is the first evidence of a member of the Machairodontinae in this locality, and the first fossil of this species found in the Miocene basin of Teruel. The radius shows an exostosis shaped as a rough and wide bony crest probably caused by the lesion and posterior ossification of part of the tendon of the muscle abductor pollicis longus, an important extensor and abductor of the thumb. The lesion was probably due to a tearing or to high levels of exertion experienced by this muscle over a relatively long time, a general type of lesion also observed in other vertebrate fossils. With saber-toothed felids using their thumbs to immobilize prey during the hunt, the studied lesion probably affected in a significant manner the predatory abilities of the animal, causing at least a decrease in its hunting success rate.

  12. Cross-reinnervated motor units in cat muscle. I. Flexor digitorum longus muscle units reinnervated by soleus motoneurons.

    PubMed

    Dum, R P; O'Donovan, M J; Toop, J; Burke, R E

    1985-10-01

    The properties of flexor digitorum longus (FDL) muscles and of individual motor units were studied in cats 30-50 wk after self-reinnervation by FDL motoneurons (FDL----FDL) or cross-reinnervation by soleus (SOL) motoneurons (SOL----FDL). Individual motor units were functionally isolated by intracellular recording and stimulation of identified SOL alpha-motoneurons. Glycogen-depletion methods permitted histochemical study of muscle fibers belonging to physiologically characterized muscle units. The observations were compared with data from normal cat FDL muscles and motor units (27). Intentionally self-reinnervated FDL muscles (FDL----FDL; n = 5) were normal in size and wet weight. FDL----FDL motor units could be classified into the same physiological categories found in normal FDL [types: fast contracting, fatigable (FF), fast contracting, fatigue resistant (FR), and slow (S); n = 24], with approximately the same proportions as normal. The histochemical muscle fiber types associated with these categories were also qualitatively normal although there was evidence of marked distortion of the normal histochemical mosaic. These data confirm other studies of self-reinnervation and suggest that self-reinnervation can produce complete interconversion of muscle fiber types. Cross-reinnervation of FDL muscle by SOL motoneurons (SOL----FDL; n = 12) produced muscles that were smaller (about half the normal wet weight) and more red than normal. SOL----FDL muscle contracted more slowly than normal or FDL----FDL muscles and had much higher proportions of histochemical type I muscle fibers. In those SOL----FDL muscles, in which little or no unwanted self-reinnervation could be demonstrated, greater than 95% of the muscle fibers were type I. Forty-one individual motor units in SOL----FDL muscles were isolated by intracellular penetration in functionally identified SOL alpha-motoneurons. Their muscle units were all type S by physiological criteria (absence of "sag" in unfused

  13. Cross-reinnervated motor units in cat muscle. II. Soleus muscle reinnervated by flexor digitorum longus motoneurons.

    PubMed

    Dum, R P; O'Donovan, M J; Toop, J; Tsairis, P; Pinter, M J; Burke, R E

    1985-10-01

    The properties of whole soleus (SOL) muscles and of individual motor units were studied in cats 30-50 wk after self-reinnervation by soleus (SOL) motoneurons (SOL----SOL) or cross-reinnervation by flexor digitorum longus (FDL) motoneurons (FDL----SOL). As in the preceding paper (22), intracellular and glycogen-depletion methods were used to examine the physiological and histochemical properties of individual motor units. The results were compared with data from normal SOL motor units (8, 12). Intentionally self-reinnervated SOL muscles (SOL----SOL; n = 6) were normal in size and wet weight, and all of the five SOL----SOL motor units studied had physiological and histochemical characteristics that matched those of normal SOL units. Cross-reinnervation of SOL by FDL alpha-motoneurons (FDL----SOL; n = 7) produced muscles with wet weights and appearance essentially identical to normal SOL. However, whole-muscle twitch contraction times were much shorter (mean 60.4 ms) than those of normal (mean 136.9 ms, n = 18) or SOL----SOL muscles (mean 115.3 ms; n = 6). Despite this difference, none of the FDL----SOL muscles contained more than 7% histochemical type II muscle fibers, all of which were type IIA. Normal cat SOL muscles can contain up to 5% type IIA fibers, but none of our SOL----SOL muscles showed any type II fibers. Two FDL----SOL muscles had significant amounts of unintended self-reinnervation, permitting side-by-side comparison of FDL----SOL and SOL----SOL muscle fibers. The twitch contraction times of the two populations differed markedly, but they were histochemically indistinguishable except for the fact that SOL----SOL fibers had high neutral fat content (as do normal SOL fibers), whereas FDL----SOL showed much lower fat content. The 23 FDL----SOL muscle units studied were classified as physiological type S by criteria ("sag" test and fatigue resistance) used to identify motor-unit types in normal cat muscles. All five of the FDL----SOL units studied

  14. Rehabilitation and Return to Sport Following Surgical Repair of the Rectus Abdominis and Adductor Longus in a Professional Basketball Player: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Short, Steven M; Anloague, Philip A; Strack, Donald S

    2016-08-01

    Study Design Case report. Background Acute traumatic avulsion of the rectus abdominis and adductor longus is rare. Chronic groin injuries, often falling under the athletic pubalgia spectrum, have been reported to be more common. There is limited evidence detailing the comprehensive rehabilitation and return to sport of an athlete following surgical or conservative treatment of avulsion injuries of the pubis or other sports-related groin pathologies. Case Description A 29-year-old National Basketball Association player sustained a contact injury during a professional basketball game. This case report describes a unique clinical situation specific to professional sport, in which a surgical repair of an avulsed rectus abdominis and adductor longus was combined with a multimodal impairment- and outcomes-based rehabilitation program. Outcomes The patient returned to in-season competition at 5 weeks postoperation. Objective measures were tracked throughout rehabilitation and compared to baseline assessments. Measures such as the Copenhagen Hip and Groin Outcome Score and numeric pain-rating scale revealed progress beyond the minimal important difference. Discussion This case report details the clinical reasoning and evidence-informed interventions involved in the return to elite sport. Detailed programming and objective assessment may assist in achieving desired outcomes ahead of previously established timelines. Level of Evidence Therapy, level 4. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2016;46(8):697-706. Epub 3 Jul 2016. doi:10.2519/jospt.2016.6352.

  15. Effect of Electroacupuncture on the Expression of Glycyl-tRNA Synthetase and Ultrastructure Changes in Atrophied Rat Peroneus Longus Muscle Induced by Sciatic Nerve Injection Injury.

    PubMed

    Wang, Meng; Zhang, Xiao Ming; Yang, Sheng Bo

    2016-01-01

    Glycyl-tRNA synthetase (GlyRS) is one of the key enzymes involved in protein synthesis. Its mutations have been reported to cause Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease which demonstrates muscular atrophy in distal extremities, particularly manifested in peroneus muscles. In this situation, the dysfunctions of mitochondria and sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) affect energy supply and excitation-contraction coupling of muscle fibers, therefore resulting in muscular atrophy. Although the treatment of muscular atrophy is a global urgent problem, it can be improved by electroacupuncture (EA) treatment. To investigate the mechanism underlying EA treatment improving muscular atrophy, we focused on the perspective of protein synthesis by establishing a penicillin injection-induced sciatic nerve injury model. In our model, injured rats without treatment showed decreased sciatic functional index (SFI), decreased peroneus longus muscle weight and muscle fiber cross-sectional area, aggregated mitochondria with vacuoles appearing, swollen SR, and downregulated mRNA and protein expression levels of GlyRS and myosin heavy chain IIb (MHC-IIb). The injured rats with EA treatment showed significant recovery. These results indicated that EA stimulation can alleviate peroneus longus muscular atrophy induced by iatrogenic sciatic nerve injury through promoting the recovery of GlyRS and muscle ultrastructure and increasing muscle protein synthesis.

  16. Evaluation of the cytotoxic effects of Cyperus longus extract, fractions and its essential oil on the PC3 and MCF7 cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    MEMARIANI, TOKTAM; HOSSEINI, TOKTAM; KAMALI, HOSSEIN; MOHAMMADI, AMENEH; GHORBANI, MARYAM; SHAKERI, ABDOREZA; SPANDIDOS, DEMETRIOS A.; TSATSAKIS, ARISTIDIS M.; SHAHSAVAND, SHABNAM

    2016-01-01

    Cyperus longus is one of the Iranian endemic species. However, to date, and to the best of our knowledge, there are no availale academic reports on the cytotoxicity of this plant. Thus, this study was carried out to examine the in vitro anti-proliferative and anti-apoptotic effects of Cyperus longus extract, fractions and essential oil (EO) on MCF7 and PC3 cell lines. The chemical constituents of EO were identified using gas chromatography (GC)-mass spectrometry (MS) analysis. The cells were cultured in RPMI-1640 medium and incubated with various concentrations of the plant extract and fractions. Cell viability was quantified by MTT assay following 24, 48 and 72 h of exposure to (12.5–200 µg/ml) of the methanol extract, the dichloromethane (CH2Cl2), ethyl acetate (EtOAc) and water fractions, as well as the EO of the plant. The percentage of apoptotic cells was determined using propidium iodide staining of DNA fragments by flow cytometry (sub-G1 peak). The most effective fraction in the MCF7 cell line was the CH2Cl2 fraction (IC50 after 48 h, 25.34±2.01). The EtOAc fraction (IC50 after 48 h, 35.2±2.69) and the methanol extract (IC50 after 48 h, 64.64±1.64) were also found to be effective. The IC50 values obtained for the PC3 cell line were 37.97±3.87, 51.57±3.87 and 70.33±2.36 for the CH2Cl2 fraction, the EtOAc fraction and the methanol extract, respectively. Based on these data and due to the partial polarity of the most effective fraction (the CH2Cl2 fraction), we also examined the cytotoxicity of the plant EO. The IC50 values after 48 h were 22.25±4.25 and 12.55±3.65 in the PC3 and MCF7 cell lines, respectively. DNA fragmentation assay also confirmed these data. Performing GC-MS analysis for the plant EO revealed that β-himachalene (10.81%), α-caryophyllene oxide (7.6%), irisone (4.78%), β-caryophyllene oxide (4.36%), humulene oxide (12%), viridiflorol (4.73%), aristolone (6.39%) and longiverbenone (6.04%) were the main constituents. Our results

  17. Long-term results of Kienböck's disease treated by triscaphe arthrodesis and excisional arthroplasty with a coiled palmaris longus tendon.

    PubMed

    Minami, A; Kimura, T; Suzuki, K

    1994-03-01

    Fifteen patients with Kienböck's disease were treated with scaphotrapeziotrapezoidal arthrodesis and lunate excisional arthroplasty with a coiled palmaris longus tendon replacement. Patients were classified into five groups preoperatively according to Lichtman's classification: stage IIIA, 1 patient; stage IIIB, 11; and stage IV, 3. After an average follow-up period of 57 months, the clinical results were evaluated by the method described by Lichtman et al. Twelve patients were rated as satisfactory, and three patients were rated as unsatisfactory. Clinical results were good with regard to pain relief and grip strength, but poor with regard to range of motion of the wrist. Five patients revealed postoperative progression of osteoarthritic changes at the radioscaphoid joint, and this appeared to be a main factor influencing clinical results. Two of these five patients had subsequent wrist arthrodesis. We conclude that stage IIIB is a specific indication for scaphotrapeziotrapezoidal arthrodesis.

  18. Musculoskeletal Management of a Patient With a History of Chronic Ankle Sprains: Identifying Rupture of Peroneal Brevis and Peroneal Longus With Diagnostic Ultrasonography

    PubMed Central

    Bruin, Dick B.; von Piekartz, Harry

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this case report is to describe the use of mobilization and eccentric exercise training for a patient with ankle pain and a history of chronic ankle sprains and discuss the course of diagnostic decision making when the patient did not respond to care. Clinical Features A 48-year-old police officer who had sustained multiple ankle sprains throughout his life presented with pain and restriction in his ability to walk, run, and work. The Global Rating of Change Scale score was − 6, the Numeric Pain Rating Scale score was 7/10, and the Lower Extremity Functional Scale score was − 33. Palpation of the peroneus longus and brevis muscles and inversion with overpressure reproduced the chief concern (Numeric Pain Rating Scale 7/10). The patient was initially diagnosed with chronic peroneal tendinopathy. Intervention and Outcome Treatment included lateral translation mobilization of the talocrural joint combined with eccentric exercise using an elastic band for the peroneal muscles. The patient reported improvement in pain and function during the course of intervention but not as rapidly as expected. Therefore, follow-up ultrasonographic imaging and radiography were performed. These studies revealed partial rupture of the peroneal brevis muscle and total rupture of the peroneal longus muscle. Conclusion A patient with long-term concerns of the foot complex with a diagnosis of peroneal tendinopathy showed slight improvement with eccentric exercises combined with manual therapy of the talocrural joint. After a course of treatment but minimal response, a diagnosis of tendon rupture was confirmed with diagnostic ultrasonography. Clinicians should be aware that when injuries do not improve with care, tendon rupture should be considered. PMID:25225470

  19. A new species of Acanthobothrium van Beneden, 1849 (Eucestoda:Tetraphyllidea: Onchobothriidae) in Dasyatis longus Garman (Chondrichthyes:Myliobatiformes:Dasyatididae) from Chamela Bay, Jalisco, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Monks, S; Brooks, D R; de León, G P

    1996-06-01

    A new species of Acanthobothrium in Dasyatis longus from Chamela Bay, Jalisco, Mexico, is a member of a presumed clade of species diagnosed by being anapolytic or nearly so, having more than 100 testes per proglottis, with immature and mature proglottides wider than long to square, aspinose scolex, muscular bothridia fused to the scolex at their posterior ends, H- to V -shaped ovaries, relatively short symmetrical to asymmetrical ovarian arms that extend anteriorly to, or nearly to, the cirrus sac, and vitellaria arranged in fields rather than a single row of follicles. The new species most closely resembles Acanthobothrium terezae from the freshwater stingray Potamotrygon motoro in the following characters: bothridial hooks longer than 200 microns with inner hooks having bent asymmetrical prongs, an average of 130-140 testes per proglottis, and shallow genital atria located posterior to midline of proglottis. The new species differs from A. terezae by having outer hooks approximately the same size and shape as the inner hooks, inner hooks averaging 230 microns rather than 313 microns in total length, and cirrus sacs averaging 255 microns rather than 450 microns in length. The new species is unique among all described species of Acanthobothrium by having a cleft in the posterior margin of each apical bothridial pad. The apparent close relationship of the new species to one inhabiting a Neotropical freshwater stingray provides support for the hypothesized Pacific marine ancestry of Neotropical freshwater stingrays and raises the possibility that the Neotropical freshwater stingrays may not be monophyletic.

  20. Avulsion Fractures at the Base of the 2nd Metacarpal Due to the Extensor Carpi Radialis Longus Tendon: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Najefi, Ali; Jeyaseelan, Lucksmana; Patel, Anand; Kapoor, Akhil; Auplish, Sunil

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Simultaneous contraction of the extensor carpi radialis longus (ECRL) with forced hyperflexion of the wrist can result in avulsion of the tendon and its bony attachment at its insertion at the dorsum of the base of the second metacarpal. This is a rare and often unreported fracture pattern. Case Presentation: We present a 31- year- old male who sustained a hyperflexion injury. He was managed surgically and had good post-operative outcomes. A literature search revealed 16 papers covering 18 cases of similar injuries. 12 were initially managed surgically and 6 were managed conservatively. Conclusions: Of the open reductions and internal fixations, 11 (92%) were successful and patients made a full recovery. Conservative management was unsuccessful in 4 cases; one patient required surgery for metacarpal boss, one patient had retraction of the tendon at one week follow up and another had weak flexion of the wrist. We recommend open reduction and internal fixation for these injuries. It may allow a faster recovery and therefore allow an earlier return to work and activity. PMID:27148501

  1. 70 microM caffeine treatment enhances in vitro force and power output during cyclic activities in mouse extensor digitorum longus muscle.

    PubMed

    James, Rob S; Kohlsdorf, Tiana; Cox, Val M; Navas, Carlos A

    2005-09-01

    Caffeine ingestion by human athletes has been found to improve endurance performance primarily acting via the central nervous system as an adenosine receptor antagonist. However, a few studies have implied that the resultant micromolar levels of caffeine in blood plasma (70 microM maximum for humans) may directly affect skeletal muscle causing enhanced force production. In the present study, the effects of 70 microM caffeine on force and power output in isolated mouse extensor digitorum longus muscle were investigated in vitro at 35 degrees C. Muscle preparations were subjected to cyclical sinusoidal length changes with electrical stimulation conditions optimised to produce maximal work. 70 microM caffeine caused a small but significant increase (2-3%) in peak force and net work produced during work loops (where net work represents the work input required to lengthen the muscle subtracted from the work produced during shortening). However, these micromolar caffeine levels did not affect the overall pattern of fatigue or the pattern of recovery from fatigue. Our results suggest that the plasma concentrations found when caffeine is used to enhance athletic performance in human athletes might directly enhance force and power during brief but not prolonged activities. These findings potentially confirm previous in vivo studies, using humans, which implied caffeine ingestion may cause acute improvements in muscle force and power output but would not enhance endurance.

  2. Arthroscopic Release of Flexor Hallucis Longus Tendon Sheath in Female Ballet Dancers: Dynamic Pathology, Surgical Technique, and Return to Dancing Performance.

    PubMed

    Funasaki, Hiroki; Hayashi, Hiroteru; Sakamoto, Kanako; Tsuruga, Rei; Marumo, Keishi

    2015-12-01

    Stenosing tenosynovitis of the flexor hallucis longus (FHL) tendon is known as a major overuse lesion in female dancers. We describe arthroscopic surgical techniques in relation to the dynamic pathology of the disease. Crepitus and pain on moving the great toe with the ankle in plantar flexion on preoperative examination confirm the diagnosis of FHL stenosing tenosynovitis even if the os trigonum is not evident. The ankle is approached through standard posterolateral and posteromedial portals. A 4.0-mm-diameter 30° arthroscope is used. Soft tissues around the talus are cleared with a motorized shaver and a radiofrequency device. The posterior aspects of the talus, os trigonum, and FHL tendon surrounded by the tendon sheath are visualized. The dynamic pathology of the FHL tendon is well observed on passive motion of the great toe. The prominent bone fragment of the talus is removed and the tendon sheath is cut with a retrograde knife and a motorized shaver from the superior border down to the entrance of the fibro-osseous tunnel. Arthroscopic release of the FHL tendon sheath is a useful and easy method to directly approach the dynamic pathology of FHL tenosynovitis in female ballet dancers.

  3. Changes in antioxidant enzymes and lipid peroxidation in extensor digitorum longus muscles of streptozotocin-diabetic rats may contribute to muscle atrophy.

    PubMed

    Nonaka, Koji; Une, S; Tatsuta, N; Ito, K; Akiyama, J

    2014-12-01

    We investigated muscle atrophy, major antioxidant enzymes and lipid peroxidation in the extensor digitorum longus (EDL, predominantly fast fibers) and soleus (predominantly slow fibers) muscle of streptozotocin-diabetic rats. Female Wistar rats were divided into a control (n = 5) and streptozotocin-induced diabetic group (n = 5). Eight weeks after diabetes induction the EDL and soleus muscles were removed and catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPX) and superoxide dismutase activity (SOD), and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) levels measured. The CAT activity increased in both the EDL and soleus muscles of the diabetic rats (p < 0.01), whereas the GPX and SOD activities were increased only in the EDL muscle (p < 0.01 and p < 0.05). The TBARS levels were only increased in the EDL muscle of the diabetic rats (p < 0.01). Both muscles showed significant atrophy but the EDL muscle elicited the greatest atrophy. In conclusion, it appears that adaptive responses to oxidative stress were adequate in the soleus muscle, but not in the EDL muscle, of diabetic rats. Thus fast twitch muscle fibers may be more susceptible to oxidative stress than slow twitch muscle fibers and this may contribute to muscle atrophy under diabetic conditions.

  4. Alteration of excitation-contraction coupling mechanism in extensor digitorum longus muscle fibres of dystrophic mdx mouse and potential efficacy of taurine

    PubMed Central

    De Luca, Annamaria; Pierno, Sabata; Liantonio, Antonella; Cetrone, Michela; Camerino, Claudia; Simonetti, Simonetta; Papadia, Francesco; Camerino, Diana Conte

    2001-01-01

    No clear data is available about functional alterations in the calcium-dependent excitation-contraction (e-c) coupling mechanism of dystrophin-deficient muscle of mdx mice. By means of the intracellular microelectrode ‘point' voltage clamp method, we measured the voltage threshold for contraction (mechanical threshold; MT) in intact extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle fibres of dystrophic mdx mouse of two different ages: 8–12 weeks, during the active regeneration of hind limb muscles, and 6–8 months, when regeneration is complete. The EDL muscle fibres of 8–12-week-old wildtype animals had a more negative rheobase voltage (potential of equilibrium for contraction- and relaxation-related calcium movements) with respect to control mice of 6–8 months. However, at both ages, the EDL muscle fibres of mdx mice contracted at more negative potentials with respect to age-matched controls and had markedly slower time constants to reach the rheobase. The in vitro application of 60 mM taurine, whose normally high intracellular muscle levels play a role in e-c coupling, was without effect on 6–8-month-old wildtype EDL muscle, while it significantly ameliorated the MT of mdx mouse. HPLC determination of taurine content at 6–8 months showed a significant 140% rise of plasma taurine levels and a clear trend toward a decrease in amino acid levels in hind limb muscles, brain and heart, suggesting a tissue difficulty in retaining appropriate levels of the amino acid. The data is consistent with a permanent alteration of e-c coupling in mdx EDL muscle fibres. The alteration could be related to the proposed increase in intracellular calcium, and can be ameliorated by taurine, suggesting a potential therapeutic role of the amino acid. PMID:11226135

  5. Lengthening osteotomy of the calcaneus and flexor digitorum longus tendon transfer in flexible flatfoot deformity improves talo-1st metatarsal-Index, clinical outcome and pedographic parameter.

    PubMed

    Richter, Martinus; Zech, Stefan

    2013-03-01

    Lengthening osteotomy of the calcaneus (LO) and flexor digitorum longus tendon (FDL) transfer to the navicular is one option for the treatment of flexible flatfoot deformity (FD). The aim of the study was to analyse the amount of correction and clinical outcome including pedographic assessment. In a prospective consecutive non-controlled clinical followup study, all patients with FD that were treated with LO and FDL from September 1st 2006 to August 31st, 2009 were included. Assessment was performed before surgery and at 2-year-followup including clinical examination (with staging of posterior tibialis insufficiency) weight bearing radiographs (Talo-1st metatarsal angles (TMT)), pedography (increased midfoot contact area and force) and Visual Analogue Scale Foot and Ankle (VAS FA). 112 feet in 102 patients were analysed (age, 57.6 (13-82), 42% male). In 12 feet (9%) wound healing delay without further surgical measures was registered. All patients achieved full weight bearing during the 7th postoperative week. Until followup, revision surgery was done in 3 patients (fusion calcaneocuboid joint (n=2), correction triple arthrodesis (n=1)). 101 feet (90%) completed 2-year-followup. TMT dorsoplantar/lateral/Index and VAS FA scores were increased, and posterior tibialis insufficiency stage, pedographic midfoot contact area and force percentage were decreased (each p<.05). All relevant parameters (stage of posterior tibialis insufficiency, TMT angles and Index, pedographic midfoot contact area and force percentage, VAS FA) were improved 2 years after LO and FDL transfer to the navicular in FD. The complication rate was low. This method allows safe and predictable correction.

  6. Alteration of excitation-contraction coupling mechanism in extensor digitorum longus muscle fibres of dystrophic mdx mouse and potential efficacy of taurine.

    PubMed

    De Luca, A; Pierno, S; Liantonio, A; Cetrone, M; Camerino, C; Simonetti, S; Papadia, F; Camerino, D C

    2001-03-01

    No clear data is available about functional alterations in the calcium-dependent excitation-contraction (e-c) coupling mechanism of dystrophin-deficient muscle of mdx mice. By means of the intracellular microelectrode "point" voltage clamp method, we measured the voltage threshold for contraction (mechanical threshold; MT) in intact extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle fibres of dystrophic mdx mouse of two different ages: 8 - 12 weeks, during the active regeneration of hind limb muscles, and 6 - 8 months, when regeneration is complete. The EDL muscle fibres of 8 - 12-week-old wildtype animals had a more negative rheobase voltage (potential of equilibrium for contraction- and relaxation-related calcium movements) with respect to control mice of 6 - 8 months. However, at both ages, the EDL muscle fibres of mdx mice contracted at more negative potentials with respect to age-matched controls and had markedly slower time constants to reach the rheobase. The in vitro application of 60 mM taurine, whose normally high intracellular muscle levels play a role in e-c coupling, was without effect on 6 - 8-month-old wildtype EDL muscle, while it significantly ameliorated the MT of mdx mouse. HPLC determination of taurine content at 6 - 8 months showed a significant 140% rise of plasma taurine levels and a clear trend toward a decrease in amino acid levels in hind limb muscles, brain and heart, suggesting a tissue difficulty in retaining appropriate levels of the amino acid. The data is consistent with a permanent alteration of e-c coupling in mdx EDL muscle fibres. The alteration could be related to the proposed increase in intracellular calcium, and can be ameliorated by taurine, suggesting a potential therapeutic role of the amino acid.

  7. Increase of the cytotoxic effect of Bothrops jararacussu venom on mouse extensor digitorum longus and soleus by potassium channel blockers and by Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase inhibition.

    PubMed

    Tomaz, Marcelo A; Fernandes, Fabrício F A; El-Kik, Camila Z; Moraes, Raphael A M; Calil-Elias, Sabrina; Saturnino-Oliveira, Jeison; Martinez, Ana Maria B; Ownby, Charlotte L; Melo, Paulo A

    2008-09-15

    We investigated the myotoxicity of Bothrops jararacussu crude venom and other cytolytic agents on mouse isolated extensor digitorum longus (EDL) and soleus (SOL) muscles, which present distinct properties: EDL is a fast-twitch, white muscle with predominantly glycolytic fibers, while SOL is slow-twitch, red muscle with predominantly oxidative fibers. Muscles were exposed to B. jararacussu crude venom (25 microg/ml) and other crotaline venoms (Agkistrodon contortrix laticinctus; Crotalus viridis viridis; Crotalus durissus terrificus) at the same concentration. Basal creatine kinase (CK) release to bathing solution was 0.43+/-0.06 for EDL and 0.29+/-0.06 for SOL (U g(-)(1) h(-)(1), n=36 for each muscle). Sixty minutes after exposure to B. jararacussu venom, EDL presented higher increase in the rate of CK release than SOL, respectively, 13.2+/-1.5 and 2.9+/-0.7 U g(-)(1)h(-)(1), n=10-12. Muscle denervation, despite decreasing CK content, did not affect sensitivities to B. jararacussu venom. Ouabain and potassium channel blockers (TEA; clotrimazole; glibenclamide) increased the rate of CK release by B. jararacussu in EDL and SOL muscles, decreasing and almost abolishing the different sensitivity. When we exposed EDL or SOL muscles to Naja naja, Apis mellifera venoms (25 microg/ml), or Triton X-100 (0.01%), they showed similar rate of CK release. Our present data suggest that a mechanism involving intracellular calcium regulation or potassium channels may participate in the different sensitivity of EDL and SOL to B. jararacussu venom.

  8. Treatment with Riluzole Restores Normal Control of Soleus and Extensor Digitorum Longus Muscles during Locomotion in Adult Rats after Sciatic Nerve Crush at Birth

    PubMed Central

    Cabaj, Anna M.; Sławińska, Urszula

    2017-01-01

    The effects of sciatic nerve crush (SNC) and treatment with Riluzole on muscle activity during unrestrained locomotion were identified in an animal model by analysis of the EMG activity recorded from soleus (Sol) and extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles of both hindlimbs; in intact rats (IN) and in groups of rats treated for 14 days with saline (S) or Riluzole (R) after right limb nerve crush at the 1st (1S and 1R) or 2nd (2S and 2R) day after birth. Changes in the locomotor pattern of EMG activity were correlated with the numbers of survived motor units (MUs) identified in investigated muscles. S rats with 2–8 and 10–28 MUs that survived in Sol and EDL muscles respectively showed increases in the duration and duty factor of muscle EMG activity and a loss of correlation between the duty factors of muscle activity, and abnormal flexor-extensor co-activation 3 months after SNC. R rats with 5, 6 (Sol) and 15–29 MUs (EDL) developed almost normal EMG activity of both Sol and control EDL muscles, whereas EDL muscles with SNC showed a lack of recovery. R rats with 8 (Sol) and 23–33 (EDL) MUs developed almost normal EMG activities of all four muscles. A subgroup of S rats with a lack of recovery and R rats with almost complete recovery that had similar number of MUs (8 and 24–28 vs 8 and 23–26), showed that the number of MUs was not the only determinant of treatment effectiveness. The results demonstrated that rats with SNC failed to develop normal muscle activity due to malfunction of neuronal circuits attenuating EDL muscle activity during the stance phase, whereas treatment with Riluzole enabled almost normal EMG activity of Sol and EDL muscles during locomotor movement. PMID:28095499

  9. [The Omega "Omega" pulley plasty: a new technique for the surgical management of the De Quervain's disease].

    PubMed

    Bakhach, J; Sentucq-Rigal, J; Mouton, P; Boileau, R; Panconi, B; Guimberteau, J-C

    2006-02-01

    The Omega "Omega" pulley plasty: a new technique for the surgical management of the De Quervain's disease. The De Quervain tenosynovitis is an inadequacy into the first extensor compartment between the osteo-fibrous tunnel and the tendons. This mechanical conflict generates a tenosynovitis of the extensor pollicis brevis and the abductor pollicis longus tendons. This is generally expressed by a tenderness on the radial side of the wrist over the radial styloid process. The medical management consists on corticoids infiltrations of the first extensor compartment, the avoidance of repetitive and stress movements of the first ray with the use of a rest splint. The surgical approach is considered with the recurrence of the painful symptoms. This well-known pathology is reputated to require a simple section of the pulley. Our post-operative complications have been reported in the literature of this classical surgical solution. These complications concern an incomplete release of the extensor pollicis brevis and the abductor pollicis longus tendons particularly when an extensor sub-compartment exists and was overlooked, an irritation of the collateral branches of the sensitive radial nerve or the occurrence of a nevroma after a nerve injury and the most serious complication is a palmar subluxation of the extensor tendons which can occur with the thumb extended and the wrist flexed. In rare cases, this subluxation can be really painful and requires a surgical management with secondary reconstruction of the pulley. This reconstruction necessitates distal pedicle flaps from the dorsal retinaculum or the brachioradialis tendon. To prevent these complications, Codega and Kapandji described techniques of reconstruction of the pulley after its release. More recently, Le Viet reported a procedure using the anterior flap of the pulley; fixed to the dermis it will work as a barrier and maintain the tendons sliding on the radial styloid groove. These techniques require to divide

  10. Distribution of electrophysiological abnormality in Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Maddison, P.; Newsom-Davis, J.; Mills, K.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To assess the distribution of electrophysiological abnormality in Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome (LEMS) to identify the most sensitive muscle to use in routine examination.
METHODS—Surface recorded compound muscle action potential (CMAP) amplitudes were made from abductor digiti minimi, abductor pollicis brevis, anconeus, biceps brachii, and trapezius in 10 patients with LEMS. The effect of 3,4-diaminopyridine (3,4-DAP) was recorded in each muscle in nine patients. CMAP amplitudes were measured at rest and immediately after 10 seconds maximal voluntary contraction in each muscle. Values were compared with results obtained from 12 healthy controls.
RESULTS—Resting CMAP amplitudes were reduced in at least one muscle in all patients compared with controls, most markedly in abductor digiti minimi and anconeus. The administration of 3,4-DAP resulted in significantly improved resting CMAP amplitudes in trapezius only. After maximal voluntary muscle contraction, characteristic increments in CMAP amplitude of over 100% above resting values were seen in abductor digiti minimi and abductor pollicis brevis in seven patients, anconeus and biceps brachii in five patients. No patient had this level of increment in trapezius.
CONCLUSION—Despite predominantly proximal limb weakness seen clinically in patients with LEMS, the most sensitive muscles for detecting characteristic electrophysiological abnormalities of low resting CMAP amplitude and increment of over 100% after 10 seconds maximal voluntary contraction are abductor digiti minimi, abductor pollicis brevis, and anconeus.

 PMID:9703174

  11. Outcome of low level lasers versus ultrasonic therapy in de Quervain's tenosynovitis

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Renu; Aggarwal, Aditya N; Bhatt, Shuchi; Kumar, Sudhir; Bhargava, SK

    2015-01-01

    Background: de Quervain's tenosynovitis is an inflammation of abductor pollicis longus (APL) and extensor pollicis brevis (EPB) muscle tendon sheaths at the level of radial styloid process. Its conservative management includes nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, wrist and thumb immobilization, ultrasonic therapy (US Th.) and low level laser therapy (LLLT). Literature is scanty on comparative efficacy of US Th. and LLLT for its management. This prospective study evaluates outcome of US Th. versus LLLT in de Quervain's disease. Materials and Methods: Thirty patients clinically diagnosed de Quervains tenosynovitis were included in the study and randomly assigned to two groups. The average age was 36 years (range: 21-45 years). One group was given LLLT and the other US Th. for a total of 7 exposures on alternate days. The clinical criteria used were Finkelstein's test, tenderness over radial styloid (Ritchie's tenderness scale), grip strength, pain (visual analog scale [VAS]) and radiological criteria was ultrasonographic assessment of change in thickness of APL and EPB tendon sheath. They were measured before commencement and at the end of seven sessions of therapy, as per standard procedure. Results: Significant improvement was seen within both groups in the following outcome measures assessed: Ritchie's tenderness scale, grip strength and VAS. Finkelstein's test was not significantly improved in either groups. Ultrasonographic measurement of tendon sheath diameters, the mediolateral (ML), and anteroposterior (AP) diameters was not found to be significantly different in the US Th. group and the laser therapy group after treatment. On comparing both the groups, no statistically significant difference was found. However, looking at the mean values, the grip strength and VAS showed better improvement in the US Th. group as compared to the laser therapy group. PMID:26538761

  12. Percutaneous Release of the First Dorsal Extensor Compartment: A Cadaver Study

    PubMed Central

    Güleç, Ali; Türkmen, Faik; Toker, Serdar

    2016-01-01

    Background: To evaluate the efficiency of the percutaneous 18-G needle technique in releasing the fibro-osseous sheath over the first dorsal extensor compartment of the hand. Methods: Using anatomic landmarks, percutaneous release was performed with an 18-G needle on 48 wrists of 24 cadavers. The specimens were then dissected and examined for the completeness of the first dorsal extensor compartment release and any tendon or neurovascular injuries. The tunnel length, number of abductor pollicis longus and extensor pollicis brevis tendons, presence of an intertendinous septum, and the effects of these parameters on percutaneous release were evaluated. Results: Percutaneous release was performed on all of the wrists, and the evaluation of the adequacy of release revealed 25 complete releases, 21 partial releases, and 2 missed releases. There were 19 cases of tendon complications. No neurovascular injuries were noted. The mean tunnel length was 2.66 ± 30 cm, and the mean number of tendons was 2.75 ± 0.86. A septum was present in 33.3% of cases. Tunnel length and tendon number had no statistically significant effect on release, whereas the presence of a septum was significantly associated with inadequate tunnel release and the development of tendon complications. Conclusions: Percutaneous release of the first dorsal extensor compartment using an 18-G needle was associated with high rates of incomplete release and tendon damage in the presence of an intertendinous septum. Further study is required under ultrasound guidance to determine the usefulness of percutaneous release in the first dorsal extensor compartment. Clinical Relevance: Release with a percutaneous needle tip in De Quervain’s syndrome may provide the advantages of better cosmetic results with less scar formation and an early return to work. PMID:27826460

  13. Neurovascular relationships of the approaches for arthroscopic total trapeziectomy with ligamentous stabilization.

    PubMed

    Durand, S; Gagey, O; Masquelet, A C; Thoreux, P

    2005-08-01

    The aim of this study was to define the neurovascular relationships of the approaches used during arthroscopic total trapeziectomy with the Thompson "suspension-plasty." Fifteen fresh cadavers in which trapezio-metacarpal arthritis had been confirmed by preoperative radiographs were chosen. There were 12 women and 3 men (average age: 87 years), and small joint arthroscopy equipment was used. Two approaches for the trapezio-metacarpal joint were used: an ulnar approach situated at the ulnar border of the extensor pollicis brevis tendon and a radial approach placed at the middle of a line joining the tendons of the flexor carpi radialis and the abductor pollicis longus. A new transosseous approach at the base of the first metacarpal ("trans-M1" approach) is suggested and was used to do the ligamento-plasty. After the operation, a large skin flap was elevated in order to measure the distance between each surgical approach and the different neurovascular structures (radial artery, dividing branches of the superficial branch of the radial nerve and the end of the lateral cutaneous nerve of the forearm) and to verify the absence of neurovascular lesions. The different neurovascular structures at risk during this arthroscopic maneuver were the radial artery for the ulnar approach, the branches of the superficial branch of the radial nerve for all of the approaches and the ending of the lateral cutaneous nerve of the forearm for the radial and "trans-M1" approaches. The use of the approaches described allows arthroscopic trapeziectomy with the Thompson suspension-plasty without us having noted neurovascular lesion.

  14. Low growth temperatures modify the efficiency of light use by photosystem II for CO2 assimilation in leaves of two chilling-tolerant C4 species, Cyperus longus L. and Miscanthus x giganteus.

    PubMed

    Farage, Peter K; Blowers, David; Long, Stephen P; Baker, Neil R

    2006-04-01

    Two C4 plants, Miscanthus x giganteus and Cyperus longus L., were grown at suboptimal growth temperatures and the relationships between the quantum efficiencies of photosynthetic electron transport through photosystem II (PSII) (PSII operating efficiency; Fq'/Fm') and CO2 assimilation (phiCO2) in leaves were examined. When M. x giganteus was grown at 10 degrees C, the ratio of the PSII operating efficiency to phiCO2 increased relative to that found in leaves grown at 14 and 25 degrees C. Similar increases in the Fq'/Fm': phiCO2 occurred in the leaves of two C. longus ecotypes when the plants were grown at 17 degrees C, compared to 25 degrees C. These elevations of Fq'/Fm': phiCO2 at low growth temperatures were not attributable to the development of anthocyanins, as has been suggested for maize, and were indicative of the operation of an alternative sink to CO2 assimilation for photosynthetic reducing equivalents, possibly oxygen reduction via a Mehler reaction, which would act as a mechanism for protection of PSII from photoinactivation and damage. Furthermore, in M. x giganteus grown at 10 degrees C, further protection of PSII was effected by a 20-fold increase in zeaxanthin content in dark-adapted leaves, which was associated with much higher levels of non-photochemical quenching of excitation energy, compared to that observed in leaves grown at 14 and 25 degrees C. These differences may explain the long growing season and remarkable productivity of this C4 plant in cool climates, even in comparison to other C4 species such as C. longus, which occur naturally in such climates.

  15. Acquired Constriction Ring: A Case of Rubber Band Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Meier, Rahel; Haug, Luzian; Surke, Carsten; Mathys, Lukas; Vögelin, Esther

    2017-03-13

    Rubber band syndrome is a rare entity seen in younger children mainly in communities where rubber bands are worn around the wrist for decorative purposes. When the band is worn for a long duration, it burrows through the skin and soft tissues resulting in distal edema, loss of function, and even damage to the neurovascular structures. These symptoms are difficult to relate to this rare but typical condition. We report a case of a 2¾-year-old girl with the history of a linear circumferential scar at the right wrist combined with the limited use of a swollen hand for several weeks. The child was taken to surgery with the purpose to release the red, indurated scar and eliminate the lymphatic congestion. A rubber band was found lying in a plane superficial to the flexor tendons but had cut through the superficial branch of the radial nerve and partially through the abductor pollicis longus tendon. The band was removed and the lacerated structures were repaired. The child had excellent recovery postoperatively. The cardinal features of a linear constricting scar around the wrist in the presence of a swollen hand should always alert the clinician to the possibility of a forgotten band around the wrist, which might have burrowed into the soft tissues for a period. Early recognition may be important to prevent further damage of essential structures.

  16. [Reorientation osteotomy of the trapezial saddle].

    PubMed

    Kapandji, Adalbert I; Heim, Urs F A

    2002-03-01

    At its early stage, the thumb TM osteo-arthritis is occasionally painful during some activities and there are mainly radiological signs, only visible on specific views and with maximum amplitudes. They are the first metacarpal base imperfect reintegration in the trapezium saddle in ante-position and an increased slope angle of 140 degrees. So, the "slippery saddle" of the trapezium induces a metacarpal base subluxation. The goal of the proposed technique is to correct the orientation of the trapezial saddle. The slope angle must return to its normal value of about 125 degrees, thanks to an opening wedge osteotomy into the trapezium, completed with a bony wedge insertion. Proposed for the first time in 1983, and used only once by Dr. Heim, this technique was "rediscovered" recently and used on five patients in ten years. It is easy to do, the only complication being two post-operative radial nerve sensitive branch neuromas. In six cases on seven, the pain disappeared, even if the osteo-arthritis was evolving for the two former cases. The functional recovery was total and the patients were satisfied in most of the cases. In spite of this short series, this technique is worth being used for the early stage of thumb osteo-arthritis, eventually combined with others techniques like tenotomy of the Abductor pollicis longus accessories or different types of ligamentoplasties. It is, in any case, more logical than the first metacarpal osteotomy.

  17. Implications of the functional anatomy of the hand and forearm of Ailurus fulgens (Carnivora, Ailuridae) for the evolution of the ‘false-thumb’ in pandas

    PubMed Central

    Antón, Mauricio; Salesa, Manuel J; Pastor, Juan F; Peigné, Stéphane; Morales, Jorge

    2006-01-01

    Both the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) and the red panda (Ailurus fulgens) possess a ‘false-thumb’, actually an enlarged radial sesamoid bone, which contributes to the gripping action of the hand. These species are not closely related, however, as one is an ursid and the other an ailurid, so the fact that they share this adaptation implies a remarkable convergence. We studied the functional anatomy of this structure in the red panda, comparing it with existing descriptions of the grasping mechanism in both pandas. Previous interpretations of the radial sesamoid in Ailurus as a rod-like structure without direct articulation to the wrist bones are inaccurate. There are various important differences between the red panda and the giant panda. In the former, the lesser development of the radial sesamoid, its connection with the flexor retinaculum, the presence of an insertion of the muscle abductor pollicis longus in the first metacarpal, which enhances its supinatory action, and the presence of a muscle flexor brevis digitorum manus point to thin-branch climbing features serving as an exaptation to the more recent role of the red panda hand in the manipulation of bamboo. PMID:17118063

  18. The effect of hip abduction on the EMG activity of vastus medialis obliquus, vastus lateralis longus and vastus lateralis obliquus in healthy subjects

    PubMed Central

    Bevilaqua-Grossi, Débora; Monteiro-Pedro, Vanessa; de Vasconcelos, Rodrigo Antunes; Arakaki, Juliano Coelho; Bérzin, Fausto

    2006-01-01

    Study design Controlled laboratory study. Objectives The purposes of this paper were to investigate (d) whether vastus medialis obliquus (VMO), vastus lateralis longus (VLL) and vastus lateralis obliquus (VLO) EMG activity can be influenced by hip abduction performed by healthy subjects. Background Some clinicians contraindicate hip abduction for patellofemoral patients (with) based on the premise that hip abduction could facilitate the VLL muscle activation leading to a VLL and VMO imbalance Methods and measures Twenty-one clinically healthy subjects were involved in the study, 10 women and 11 men (aged X = 23.3 ± 2.9). The EMG signals were collected using a computerized EMG VIKING II, with 8 channels and three pairs of surface electrodes. EMG activity was obtained from MVIC knee extension at 90° of flexion in a seated position and MVIC hip abduction at 0° and 30° with patients in side-lying position with the knee in full extension. The data were normalized in the MVIC knee extension at 50° of flexion in a seated position, and were submitted to ANOVA test with subsequent application of the Bonferroni multiple comparisons analysis test. The level of significance was defined as p ≤ 0.05. Results The VLO muscle demonstrated a similar pattern to the VMO muscle showing higher EMG activity in MVIC knee extension at 90° of flexion compared with MVIC hip abduction at 0° and 30° of abduction for male (p < 0.0007) and MVIC hip abduction at 0° of abduction for female subjects (p < 0.02196). There were no statistically significant differences in the VLL EMG activity among the three sets of exercises tested. Conclusion The results showed that no selective EMG activation was observed when comparison was made between the VMO, VLL and VLO muscles while performing MVIC hip abduction at 0° and 30° of abduction and MVIC knee extension at 90° of flexion in both male and female subjects. Our findings demonstrate that hip abduction do not facilitated VLL and VLO activity

  19. PET/CT imaging in polymyalgia rheumatica: praepubic 18F-FDG uptake correlates with pectineus and adductor longus muscles enthesitis and with tenosynovitis

    PubMed Central

    Sprlakova-Pukova, Andrea; Bortlicek, Zbynek; Fojtik, Zdenek; Kazda, Tomas; Joukal, Marek; Koukalova, Renata; Vasina, Jiri; Eremiasova, Jana; Nemec, Petr

    2017-01-01

    diminished in all patients (15/15, 100%) after treatment with steroids. Conclusions Increased praepubic 18F-FDG uptake in patients with PMR is relatively common and this region should be systematically evaluated during differential diagnosis of rheumatic and malignant disease. Praepubic inflammation is probably related to enthesitis and tenosynovitis at the origin of pectineus and adductor longus muscles ventrally from the pubis. PMID:28265227

  20. Effect of thumb anaesthesia on weight perception, muscle activity and the stretch reflex in man.

    PubMed Central

    Marsden, C D; Rothwell, J C; Traub, M M

    1979-01-01

    1. We have confirmed the results of Gandevia & McCloskey (1977) on the effect of thumb anaesthesia on perception of weights lifted by the thumb. Weights lifted by flexion feel heavier and weights lifted by extension feel lighter. 2. The change in size of the long-latency stretch reflex in flexor pollicis longus or extensor pollicis longus after thumb anaesthesia cannot explain the effect on weight perception by removal or augmentation of the background servo assistance to muscular contraction. 3. During smooth thumb flexion, thumb anaesthesia increases e.m.g. activity in flexor pollicis longus and extensor pollicis longus for any given opposing torque. 4. During smooth thumb extension the opposite occurs: e.m.g. activity in both extensor and flexor pollicis longus decreases. 5. Clamping the thumb at the proximal phalanx to limit movement solely to the interphalangeal joint reduces or abolishes the effect of anaesthesia on both weight perception and e.m.g. activity during both flexion or extension tasks. 6. Gandevia & McCloskey's findings on the distorting effects of thumb anaesthesia on weight perception cannot be used to support the hypothesis of an efferent monitoring system of the sense of effort. Our results emphasize the close functional relationship between cutaneous and joint afferent information and motor control. PMID:512948

  1. Effects of spaceflight in the adductor longus muscle of rats flown in the Soviet Biosatellite COSMOS 2044. A study employing neural cell adhesion molecule (N-CAM) immunocytochemistry and conventional morphological techniques (light and electron microscopy)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    D'Amelio, F.; Daunton, N. G.

    1992-01-01

    The effects of spaceflight upon the "slow" muscle adductor longus were examined in rats flown in the Soviet Biosatellite COSMOS 2044. The techniques employed included standard methods for light microscopy, neural cell adhesion molecule (N-CAM) immunocytochemistry and electron microscopy. Light microscopic observations revealed myofiber atrophy and segmental necrosis accompanied by cellular infiltrates composed of macrophages, leukocytes and mononuclear cells. Neural cell adhesion molecule immunoreactivity (N-CAM-IR) was seen on the myofiber surface and in regenerating myofibers. Ultrastructural alterations included Z band streaming, disorganization of myofibrillar architecture, sarcoplasmic degradation, extensive segmental necrosis with apparent preservation of the basement membrane, degenerative phenomena of the capillary endothelium and cellular invasion of necrotic areas. Regenerating myofibers were identified by the presence of increased amounts of ribosomal aggregates and chains of polyribosomes associated with myofilaments. The principal electron microscopic changes of the neuromuscular junctions showed axon terminals with a decrease or absence of synaptic vesicles replaced by microtubules and neurofilaments, degeneration of axon terminals, vacant axonal spaces and changes suggestive of axonal sprouting. The present observations suggest that alterations such as myofibrillar disruption and necrosis, muscle regeneration and denervation and synaptic remodeling at the level of the neuromuscular junction may take place during spaceflight.

  2. Anatomy of the pectoral and forelimb muscles of wildtype and green fluorescent protein-transgenic axolotls and comparison with other tetrapods including humans: a basis for regenerative, evolutionary and developmental studies

    PubMed Central

    Diogo, R; Tanaka, E M

    2012-01-01

    stated in the literature, A. mexicanum has a muscle coracoradialis that has both a well developed proximal fleshy belly and a distal long and thin tendon, supporting the idea that this muscle very likely corresponds to at least part of the amniote biceps brachii. Our observations also: (i) confirmed that the flexores digitorum minimi, interphalangeus digiti 3, pronator quadratus and palmaris profundus 1 are present as distinct muscles in A. mexicanum, supporting the idea that the latter muscle does not correspond to the pronator accessorius of reptiles; (ii) confirmed that the so-called extensor antebrachii radialis is present as a distinct muscle in this species and, importantly, indicated that this muscle corresponds to the supinator of other tetrapods; (iii) showed that, contrary to some other urodeles, including some other Ambystoma species, there is no distinct muscle epitrochleoanconeus in A. mexicanum and; (iv) showed that the ulnar and radial bundles of the abductor et extensor digiti 1 correspond to the abductor pollicis longus and extensor pollicis longus of other tetrapods, respectively. PMID:22957800

  3. Differential contributions of vision, touch and muscle proprioception to the coding of hand movements.

    PubMed

    Blanchard, Caroline; Roll, Régine; Roll, Jean-Pierre; Kavounoudias, Anne

    2013-01-01

    To further elucidate the mechanisms underlying multisensory integration, this study examines the controversial issue of whether congruent inputs from three different sensory sources can enhance the perception of hand movement. Illusory sensations of clockwise rotations of the right hand were induced by either separately or simultaneously stimulating visual, tactile and muscle proprioceptive channels at various intensity levels. For this purpose, mechanical vibrations were applied to the pollicis longus muscle group in the subjects' wrists, and a textured disk was rotated under the palmar skin of the subjects' right hands while a background visual scene was projected onto the rotating disk. The elicited kinaesthetic illusions were copied by the subjects in real time and the EMG activity in the adductor and abductor wrist muscles was recorded. The results show that the velocity of the perceived movements and the amplitude of the corresponding motor responses were modulated by the nature and intensity of the stimulation. Combining two sensory modalities resulted in faster movement illusions, except for the case of visuo-tactile co-stimulation. When a third sensory input was added to the bimodal combinations, the perceptual responses increased only when a muscle proprioceptive stimulation was added to a visuo-tactile combination. Otherwise, trisensory stimulation did not override bimodal conditions that already included a muscle proprioceptive stimulation. We confirmed that vision or touch alone can encode the kinematic parameters of hand movement, as is known for muscle proprioception. When these three sensory modalities are available, they contribute unequally to kinaesthesia. In addition to muscle proprioception, the complementary kinaesthetic content of visual or tactile inputs may optimize the velocity estimation of an on-going movement, whereas the redundant kinaesthetic content of the visual and tactile inputs may rather enhance the latency of the perception.

  4. Difference in Cortical Relay Time Between Intrinsic Muscles of Dominant and Nondominant Hands.

    PubMed

    Kirimoto, Hikari; Tamaki, Hiroyuki; Onishi, Hideaki

    2016-12-09

    The authors aimed to calculate and compare cortical relay time (CRT) between intrinsic hand muscles and between homonymous muscles of dominant and nondominant hands. The participants comprised 22 healthy volunteers. The CRT for long-latency reflexes (LLRs) was calculated by subtracting the peak latency of somatosensory evoked potentials of component N20 and the onset latency of motor evoked potentials from the onset latency of LLRs. CRT was significantly shorter for the first dorsal interosseous muscle than for the abductor pollicis brevis muscle, regardless of hand dominance. CRT for the abductor pollicis brevis muscle was significantly shorter in the dominant hand than in the nondominant hand. Evaluation of CRT for intrinsic muscles might be beneficial in the understanding of individuated finger functions.

  5. Family Abductors: Descriptive Profiles and Preventive Interventions. Juvenile Justice Bulletin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Janet R.; Girdner, Linda K.

    Parental abduction encompasses a broad array of illegal behaviors that involves one parent taking, detaining, concealing, or enticing away his or her child from the parent having custodial access. When the abducted parent intends to permanently alter custodial access by hiding the child or removing the child to another locale, the effects on the…

  6. Distribution patterns of the muscular branch of the median nerve in the thenar region.

    PubMed Central

    Olave, E; Prates, J C; Del Sol, M; Sarmento, A; Gabrielli, C

    1995-01-01

    Studies on the distribution patterns of the muscular branch of the median nerve to the thenar muscles are scarce. Available accounts give only general descriptions. To establish the distribution pattern more precisely, we dissected 60 palmar regions from 30 cadavers of adult individuals, ranging in age from 23 to 77 y. The distribution pattern of the muscular branch was classified into 3 types. In 50% of subjects there were branches to the superficial head of flexor pollicis brevis (FPB), abductor pollicis brevis (APB) and opponens pollicis (OP) (type I). In 40% there were branches only to APB and OP (type II). In the remainder (type III) the muscular branch provided independent branches to APB, OP and FPB, to APB and OP, or to APB and FPB, after dividing precociously. Types I and II were further subdivided according to the site, direction and number of the individual branches. Images Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:7649846

  7. Linburg syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Rennie, William R.J.; Muller, Hellmuth

    1998-01-01

    Objective To review the causes and demographics of Linburg syndrome. Design An illustrative case report and a demographic study. Setting Adult and pediatric orthopedic clinics at the Health Sciences Centre in Winnipeg. Patients One patient with Linburg syndrome and 200 patients and relatives presenting to adult and pediatric orthopedic clinics with conditions not involving their hands, wrists or forearms. Outcome measures The presence of the intertendinous anomaly and of carpal tunnel syndrome. Results Tendinous connection(s) between flexor pollicis longus and flexor digitorum profundus muscles were found in 20% of the study population. The anomaly was found in all age groups. No association was found between Linburg syndrome and the presence of carpal tunnel syndrome or previous injury to the hand or forearm. Conclusion Tendinous connection between flexor pollicis longus and flexor digitorum profundus muscles is a common anomaly that rarely causes clinical symptoms. PMID:9711164

  8. U.S. Army Medical Department Journal, July-September 2006

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-01

    his left palm severing multiple tendons and nerves. Successful surgical repair of the flexor tendons was accomplished at a civilian Korean hospital...variety of controls that require precise, strong, Ill of his left palm . After examination at the local and true opposition. militaiy medical facility the...repair was performed on: nail is parallel to the palm and the pulp of the thumb 1. left thumb flexor pollicis longus (FPL) - 100% faces the pulp of the

  9. Experiment K-7-18: Effects of Spaceflight in the Muscle Adductor Longus of Rats Flown in the Soviet Biosatellite Cosmos 2044. Part 1; A Study Employing Neural Cell Adhesion Molecules (N-CAM) Immunocytochemistry and Conventional Morphological Techniques (Light and Electron Microscopy)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daunton, N. G.; DAmelio, F.; Wu, L.; Ilyina-Kakueva, E. I.; Krasnov, I. B.; Hyde, T. M.; Sigworth, S. K.

    1994-01-01

    The effects of spaceflight upon the 'slow' muscle adductor longus was examined in rats flown in the Soviet Biosatellite COSMOS 2044. Three groups - synchronous, vivarium and basal served as controls. The techniques employed included standard methods for light microscopy, N-CAM immunocytochemistry and electron microscopy. Light microscopic observations revealed myofiber atrophy, contraction bands and segmental necrosis accompanied by cellular infiltrates composed of macrophages, leucocytes and mononuclear cells. N-CAM immunoreactivity was seen (N-CAM-IR) on the myofiber surface, satellite cells and in regenerating myofibers reminiscent of myotubes. Ultrastructural alterations included Z band streaming, disorganization of myofibrillar architecture, sarcoplasmic degradation, extensive segmental necrosis with preservation of the basement membrane, degenerative phenomena of the capillary endothelium and cellular invasion of necrotic areas. Regenerating myofibers were identified by the presence of increased amounts of ribosomal aggregates and chains of polyribosomes associated with myofilaments that displayed varied distributive patterns. The principal electron microscopic changes of the neuromuscular junctions consisted of a decrease or absence of synaptic vesicles, degeneration of axon terminals, increased number of microtubules, vacant axonal spaces and axonal sprouting. The present observations indicate that major alterations such as myofibrillar disruption and necrosis, muscle regeneration and denervation and synaptic remodeling at the level of the neuromuscular junction may take place during spaceflight.

  10. Pattern of monosynaptic Ia connections in the cat forelimb.

    PubMed Central

    Fritz, N; Illert, M; de la Motte, S; Reeh, P; Saggau, P

    1989-01-01

    extension in case of the undirectional projections onto supinator and abductor pollicis longus motoneurones). 6. The motor nuclei to some multifunctional muscles display a negative correlation between different heteronymous Ia inputs: motoneurones with a large input from one muscle show a significant tendency to receive a smaller input from another muscle and vice versa. This organization leads to subpopulations of neurones with different convergence patterns within the same motor nucleus. 7. Motor nuclei with bidirectional Ia relations between each other displayed similar convergence and projection patterns. They were combined into 'Ia synergistic groups.' One motor nucleus may belong to several groups.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) Images Fig. 1 PMID:2533610

  11. Risk factors and clinical features of text message injuries.

    PubMed

    Sharan, Deepak; Ajeesh, P S

    2012-01-01

    Use of mobile phone and sending text message is a very common in today's life. While sending a text message the users need to use their thumb and other palm muscles extensively. The thumb most of the time adducted on the key pad of the mobile and use high force to type the letters. Studies in literature showed that text messaging has an adverse effect on musculoskeletal system of hand. But the extensive study on the type of disorders set in among the users who extensively use mobile phone for texting. This study aims at to evaluate risk factor and clinical feature of the MSD due to hand held devices. Twenty seven subjects participated in this study. Predefined protocols were used to evaluate type of MSD occurred among the subjects. The study revealed that development of tendinitis in extensor pollicis longus, myofascial pain syndrome (70.37%) of adductor pollicis, 1st interossei and extensor digitorum communis . Other associated problems diagnosed were thoracic outlet syndrome (51.85%), fibromyalgia syndrome (25.93%), hypothyroidism (7.41%), wrist tendinitis (14.81%) and De Quervain's syndrome (7.41%). It has been observed that the pathology were tendinitis of extensor pollicis longus, myofascial pain syndrome of thenar muscles and 1st interossei, extensor digitorum communis.

  12. Characteristics of the electrophysiological activity of muscles attached to the transverse carpal ligament in carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Horiguchi, Gen; Aoki, Takafumi; Ito, Hiromoto

    2011-01-01

    The main cause of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) remains unknown. Stiffness of the subcutaneous area of the volar aspect of the carpal tunnel is present in many patients and suggests that the stiffness of muscles attached to the transverse carpal ligament is increased. We performed an electrophysiological study to investigate muscle activities and to clarify whether the stiffness of muscles attached to the transverse carpal ligament is involved in the pathogenesis of CTS. The subjects of this study included 16 patients with early CTS showing no motor dysfunction. Both thenar muscles (opponens pollicis, abductor pollicis brevis, and flexor pollicis brevis) and hypothenar muscles (opponens digiti minimi, abductor digiti minimi, flexor digiti minimi brevis) were investigated. Surface electrodes were placed on each muscle, and maximum voluntary contractions with the thumb and little finger in opposition were maintained for 3 seconds in all patients and in 7 control subjects. Electromyographs were subjected to fast Fourier transform analysis, and the root mean square (RMS) and the mean power frequency (MPF) were determined for each muscle. The RMS of the opponens pollicis was significantly less in hands affected by CTS (292.8 µV) than in healthy hands (405.9 µV). The RMS did not differ between affected hands and healthy hands for the other 2 thenar muscles but did differ significantly for the hypothenar muscles. The MPF did not differ between affected hands and healthy hands for any muscle. The results show that electrophysiological differences are present among muscles innervated by the median nerve and that hypothenar muscles originally unrelated to median nerve dysfunction are also affected in early CTS. These results suggest that modulation of muscles attached to the transverse carpal ligament is involved in the pathogenesis of CTS.

  13. Flexor Hallucis Longus Tendon Transfer for Calcific Insertional Achilles Tendinopathy.

    PubMed

    Howell, Michael A; Catanzariti, Alan R

    2016-01-01

    Calcific insertional Achilles tendinopathy can result in significant pain and disability. Although some patients respond to nonoperative therapy, many patients are at risk for long-term morbidity and unpredictable clinical outcomes. There is no evidence-based data to support the timing of operative invention, choice of procedures, or whether equinus requires treatment. This article suggests the need for a classification system based on physical examination and imaging to help guide treatment. There is an obvious need for evidence-based studies evaluating outcomes and for properly conducted scientific research to establish appropriate treatment protocols.

  14. Study Casts Doubt on Long-Used Morning Sickness Drug

    MedlinePlus

    ... the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and Health Canada to approve the drug may have overstated its ... The investigators also obtained other documents from Health Canada through freedom of information requests. The original trial ...

  15. Assessment of motor neuron excitability in parkinsonian rigidity by the F wave.

    PubMed

    Abbruzzese, G; Vische, M; Ratto, S; Abbruzzese, M; Favale, E

    1985-01-01

    F-wave responses from abductor pollicis brevis muscle occurred more frequently, with a larger amplitude and longer duration in rigid parkinsonian patients than in age-matched normal controls. F-wave potentiation during voluntary contraction was impaired in parkinsonian patients. These findings suggest that spinal motor neuron excitability is enhanced in rigidity. F-wave amplitude was significantly correlated to the clinical evaluation of motor disability, so that the F wave may be regarded as a useful approach to quantitative evaluation of rigidity.

  16. Stroke patient with mirror movement of the affected hand due to an ipsilateral motor pathway confirmed by transcranial magnetic stimulation: a case report.

    PubMed

    Etoh, Seiji; Noma, Tomokazu; Matsumoto, Shuji; Kamishita, Tomoyuki; Shimodozono, Megumi; Ogata, Atsuko; Kawahira, Kazumi

    2010-03-01

    A stroke patient with right hemiplegia and mirror movement underwent transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and somatosensory-evoked potential (SEP) testing. The motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) of both abductor pollicis brevis muscles after stimulating the unaffected right hemisphere showed similar latencies, and were potentially produced by corticospinal tracts from the same motor cortex. N(20) responses of SEPs were recorded at C(4)' after contralateral stimulation of the unaffected left median nerve, but not stimulation of the affected right median nerve. The mirror movements and motor recovery might have utilized an ipsilateral motor pathway between the unaffected hemisphere and the affected hand.

  17. Global Motor Unit Number Index sum score for assessing the loss of lower motor neurons in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Grimaldi, Stephan; Duprat, Lauréline; Grapperon, Aude-Marie; Verschueren, Annie; Delmont, Emilien; Attarian, Shahram

    2017-02-06

    Introduction Our objective was to propose a motor unit number index (MUNIX) global sum score in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) to estimate the loss of functional motor units. Methods MUNIX was assessed for 18 ALS patients and 17 healthy controls in seven muscles: the abductor pollicis brevis (APB), abductor digiti minimi (ADM), tibialis anterior (TA), deltoid, trapezius, submental complex (SMC) and orbicularis oris. Results MUNIX was significantly lower in ALS patients than in healthy controls for the APB, ADM, TA and the trapezius muscles. The MUNIX sum score of 4 muscles (ADM + APB + Trapezius + TA) was lower in ALS patients (P = 0.01) and was correlated with clinical scores. Discussion The global MUNIX sum score proposed in this study estimates the loss of lower motor neurons in several body regions including the trapezius, and is correlated with clinical impairment in ALS patients. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  18. Rheumatoid flexor tenosynovitis and rupture.

    PubMed

    Ferlic, D C

    1996-08-01

    Rheumatoid flexor tenosynovitis at the wrist can cause locking, limitation of motion, nerve compression, and rupture of tendons. To prevent and treat these conditions, a flexor tenosynovectomy, combined with nerve decompression and tendon reconstruction as indicated, is necessary. If tendons are ruptured, the flexor pollicis longus and profundus to the index finger are most commonly affected. On the fingers flexor tenosynovitis can also cause locking, decrease in range of motion and rupture tendons. Flexor tenosynovitis of the fingers should be treated with decompression of the tendons health with preservation of the pulley system.

  19. [Incomplete anterior interosseous nerve syndrome in a guitar player].

    PubMed

    Rieck, B

    2005-12-01

    A rare case of median nerve compression syndrome is reported in a guitar player who had changed the posture and position of his instrument so that the edge of the guitar exerted sharp pressure on the median nerve close to the branching of the interosseous anterior nerve. There was partial paralysis of the interosseous anterior nerve with complete failure of the deep flexor of the index finger, while the flexor pollicis longus was intact. There was also paresthesia of the index finger. Treatment was conservative with a sleeve including a gel cushion which protected the forearm against the edge of the instrument. Function recurred completely within six weeks without ever interrupting instrument practice.

  20. Motor conduction measurement in myelopathy hand

    PubMed Central

    Shibuya, Ryoichi; Wada, Eiji; Iwasaki, Motoki; Yonenobu, Kazuo; Yoshikawa, Hideki

    2014-01-01

    Summary We studied the relationship between intramedullary high signal intensity (IMHSI) on T2-weighted magnetic resonance images and motor conduction in the spinal cords of cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) patients. There was no significant difference between the biceps or triceps central motor conduction times (CMCTs) of the patients who did and did not exhibit IMHSI, whereas the abductor pollicis brevis CMCT was significantly longer in the patients who exhibited IMHSI (p<0.05) than in those who did not. The CMCT of the abductor pollicis brevis is sensitive to the degree of damage in the cervical spinal cord. Hand dysfunction is a characteristic of CSM regardless of the cervical level affected by the condition. The motor fibers innervating the intrinsic muscles of the hand in the long tract of the cervical spinal cord are more sensitive than other motor fibers. For this reason, we consider that myelopathy hand is a characteristic impairment of CSM. Transcranial magnetic stimulation of the hand motor cortex is useful for the evaluation of cervical myelopathy. PMID:25473737

  1. The electromyographic silent period produced by supramaximal electrical stimulation in normal man

    PubMed Central

    McLellan, D. L.

    1973-01-01

    The electromyographic silent period produced by supramaximal electrical stimulation of the median nerve was recorded in the abductor pollicis brevis muscle of four normal subjects during maximal isometric voluntary contraction. Except for an inconstant F response, electrical silence could usually be induced in the muscle from the twitch potential until the reappearance of uninterrupted voluntary activity. The silent period produced by stimulation at the wrist was approximately 25 msec longer than that produced by stimulation at the elbow and was independent of muscle tension. Further shortening of the muscle during the twitch contraction did not significantly alter the length of the silent period. A silent period in the abductor pollicis brevis muscle was also obtained after stimulation of the ulnar nerve, at the wrist and at the elbow. The onset of this period of silence was delayed, but it ended at the same time after the stimulus as the corresponding silent periods produced by median nerve stimulation. It is concluded that the end point of the silent period produced by supramaximal electrical stimulation of a mixed peripheral nerve is determined by an inhibitory spinal reflex, afferent impulses travelling in slowly-conducting fibres that are directly activated by the stimulus. Under these conditions the length of the silent period gives no indication of spindle activity in the muscle. Images PMID:4268362

  2. Effect of muscle contraction strength on gating of somatosensory magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Sugawara, Kazuhiro; Onishi, Hideaki; Yamashiro, Koya; Kotan, Shinichi; Kojima, Sho; Miyaguchi, Shota; Tsubaki, Atsuhiro; Kirimoto, Hikari; Tamaki, Hiroyuki; Shirozu, Hiroshi; Kameyama, Shigeki

    2016-11-01

    Afferent somatosensory information is modulated before the afferent input arrives at the primary somatosensory cortex during voluntary movement. The aim of the present study was to clarify the effect of muscular contraction strength on somatosensory evoked fields (SEFs) during voluntary movement. In addition, we examined the differences in gating between innervated and non-innervated muscle during contraction. We investigated the changes in gating effect by muscular contraction strength and innervated and non-innervated muscles in human using 306-channel magnetoencephalography. SEFs were recorded following the right median nerve stimulation in a resting condition and during isometric muscular contractions from 10 % electromyographic activity (EMG), 20 and 30 % EMG of the right extensor indicis muscle and abductor pollicis brevis muscle. Our results showed that the equivalent current dipole (ECD) strength for P35m decreased with increasing strength of muscular contraction of the right abductor pollicis brevis muscle. However, changes were observed only at 30 % EMG contraction level of the right extensor indicis muscle, which was not innervated by the median nerve. There were no significant changes in the peak latencies and ECD locations of each component in all conditions. The ECD strength did not differ significantly for N20m and P60m regardless of the strength of muscular contraction and innervation. Therefore, we suggest that the gating of SEF waveforms following peripheral nerve stimulation was affected by the strength of muscular contraction and innervation of the contracting muscle.

  3. Painful locking of the wrist in a patient with pseudoachondroplasia confirmed by COMP mutation

    PubMed Central

    Ideta, Hirokazu; Uchiyama, Shigeharu; Hayashi, Masanori; Kosho, Tomoki; Nakamura, Yukio; Kato, Hiroyuki

    2017-01-01

    We report the case of a 40-year-old woman with pseudoachondroplasia (PSACH), with a heterozygous mutation (c.806A > G, p.Asp269Gly) located in the Type 3 repeats domain of the cartilage oligomeric matrix protein gene, who complained of the unusual symptom of painful locking of the wrist. Her condition was caused by a non-traumatic enlargement of the extensor carpi radialis longus (ECRL) and brevis (ECRB) tendons along with bulbous swelling of the synoviums around them. Surgical treatment resolved these unusual tendon-related symptoms. Repetitive mechanical loading of the wrist in daily activities, including distal intersection tenosynovitis between the extensor pollicis longus tendon and ECRL and ECRB tendons, may have contributed to changes in the structural integrity of the tendons. We should pay more attention to tendon-related symptoms in patients with PSACH. PMID:28044000

  4. Automatic assessment of volume asymmetries applied to hip abductor muscles in patients with hip arthroplasty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klemt, Christian; Modat, Marc; Pichat, Jonas; Cardoso, M. J.; Henckel, Joahnn; Hart, Alister; Ourselin, Sebastien

    2015-03-01

    Metal-on-metal (MoM) hip arthroplasties have been utilised over the last 15 years to restore hip function for 1.5 million patients worldwide. Althoug widely used, this hip arthroplasty releases metal wear debris which lead to muscle atrophy. The degree of muscle wastage differs across patients ranging from mild to severe. The longterm outcomes for patients with MoM hip arthroplasty are reduced for increasing degrees of muscle atrophy, highlighting the need to automatically segment pathological muscles. The automated segmentation of pathological soft tissues is challenging as these lack distinct boundaries and morphologically differ across subjects. As a result, there is no method reported in the literature which has been successfully applied to automatically segment pathological muscles. We propose the first automated framework to delineate severely atrophied muscles by applying a novel automated segmentation propagation framework to patients with MoM hip arthroplasty. The proposed algorithm was used to automatically quantify muscle wastage in these patients.

  5. Morphometric studies of the muscular branch of the median nerve.

    PubMed Central

    Olave, E; Prates, J C; Gabrielli, C; Pardi, P

    1996-01-01

    The branch from the median nerve to the thenar muscles has a proximal and lateral (recurrent) course and is vulnerable to lesions that affect these muscles. Because of its anatomical-clinical importance, this branch was studied in 60 palmar regions from 30 cadavers of adult individuals of both sexes, aged between 23 and 77 y. It arose from the lateral branch of the median nerve in 83.3% of the cases. Its origin was distal to the flexor retinaculum in 48.3%, at the distal margin of the retinaculum in 31.6%, in the carpal tunnel in 18.3% and proximal to the retinaculum in 1.7%; it pierced the retinaculum in 15%. The point of recurrence of the branch was localised topographically to 34.6 +/- 3.6 mm from the distal wrist crease; the angle between its recurrent course and the longitudinal axis of the hand averaged 66.8 degrees. In 50% of the cases the muscular branch innervated abductor pollicis brevis (APB), opponens pollicis (OP) and the superficial head of flexor pollicis brevis (FPB), in 40% it supplied only APB and OP, and in 10% a short muscular branch gave rise to independent branches in the palm and which supplied APB, OP and the superficial head of FPB. The so called "accessory thenar branch' was found in 38.3%. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:8886966

  6. Levodopa in Parkinsonism: reduction in the electromyographic silent period and its relationship with tremor

    PubMed Central

    McLellan, D. L.

    1972-01-01

    The electromyographic silent period after electrical stimulation of the median nerve was recorded by surface electrodes over the abductor pollicis brevis muscle in 32 patients with Parkinsonism before and after treatment with levodopa. A supra-maximal stimulus was delivered during maximal isometric contraction of the muscle. The silent period was prolonged in the untreated state compared with controls, but shortened significantly as a result of treatment. Observation of the clinical effects of treatment in each patient showed a relationship between shortening of the silent period and improvement in resting tremor. There was no relationship between the duration of the silent period and rigidity. The significance of these findings is discussed. They are considered to support the view that inhibition of motoneurone activity by afferent stimuli is intensified in Parkinsonism and that there is a close relationship between the degree of motoneurone inhibition and the severity of tremor. PMID:5035311

  7. Apomorphine can increase cutaneous inhibition of motor activity in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Clouston, P D; Lim, C L; Sue, C; Morris, J G; Yiannikas, C

    1996-02-01

    We studied the effect of non-nociceptive ipsilateral digital stimulation on EMG recorded from a small hand muscle before and after the administration of subcutaneous apomorphine in 6 patients with Parkinson's disease. All were receiving the drug to control ¿on-off¿ fluctuations in motor performance. Averaged rectified EMG was recorded from tonically contracted abductor pollicis brevis (APB) following index finger stimulation using a brief stimulus train. In 5 patients motor evoked potentials (MEPs) were also recorded from APB during tonic contraction. A conditioning stimulus train was applied to the index finger at intervals between 15 and 65 msec prior to the transcranial magnetic stimulus. After apomorphine administration the patient group showed a significant increase in both EMG and MEP inhibition induced by digital stimulation. In patients with Parkinson's disease who have marked motor fluctuations, the inhibitory response of upper limb motor neurones to low level digital cutaneous stimulation can be altered by dopamine agonists.

  8. Silent period measurement revives as a valuable diagnostic tool with transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Haug, B A; Schönle, P W; Knobloch, C; Köhne, M

    1992-04-01

    Following magnetic transcranial stimulation (TCS) a post-excitatory pause can be observed in surface electromyographic (EMG) recordings from pre-innervated muscles. We studied the duration of this silent period (SP) in the abductor pollicis brevis muscle while varying the stimulus intensity (SI) and the amount of the voluntary tonic contraction in 23 normal adults aged 20-78 years. A multivariate linear regression analysis revealed a positive correlation of SP with SI and a slight negative correlation with age. In 11 hemiparetic patients a relative increase of the SP was found on the affected side despite normal central motor conduction time. A marked shortening of the SP in relation to controls was observed in 6 parkinsonian patients.

  9. Auditory effects on the motor responses after magnetic cortical stimulation and on the H-reflexes in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, K; Wang, Y; Shimoda, M; Shimoyama, R; Yokoyama, Y; Takahashi, K

    1994-03-01

    The effects of sound on the responses in teh abductor pollicis brevis muscle after magnetic cortical stimulation and on the H-reflexes in the wrist and finger flexor muscles were examined. Magnetic cortical stimulation and electrical stimulation eliciting H-reflexes were conditioned by sound stimulation. This sound stimulation did not produce the electromyographic response by itself. In the control subjects, sound stimulation produced an increase of the motor responses after cortical stimulation at intervals of 100, 150, 200 and 250 ms. The increase was greater in the patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). In the control subjects, sound stimulation produced an increase of the H-reflexes at intervals of 50, 100, 150 and 200 ms. This H-reflex increase in the PD patients was less than in the normal subjects. The reticular system might play a role in the abnormal motor control system in PD patients.

  10. Electromyographic study of polysynaptic responses from muscles not supplied by the stimulated nerve: preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Vernea, J

    1978-01-01

    15 subjects with normal neurological examinations, 7 hemiplegic patients, 5 patients with dementia and 4 with Parkinsonism were examined. A 1msec duration pulse below the pain threshold was applied to the median and ulnar nerves at the elbow and wrist. The activities of the biceps, triceps, flexor carpi radialis, forearm extensors and abductor pollicis brevis were recorded with surface electrodes. The most frequently observed response in normal subjects and hemiplegic patients occurred in the biceps, and had a latency of about 30msec. The other frequently elicited response in normal subjects and hemiplegic patients was in the forearm extensors. Recovery curves were obtained for the biceps response. A significant difference between normal subjects and hemiplegic patients was found. In the patients suffering from Parkinsonism, as well as in demented patients, one could record easily polysynpatic reflexes from other forearm muscles. This suggests the presence of basal ganglia damage in atrophic dementias.

  11. Levodopa in Parkinsonism: reduction in the electromyographic silent period and its relationship with tremor.

    PubMed

    McLellan, D L

    1972-06-01

    The electromyographic silent period after electrical stimulation of the median nerve was recorded by surface electrodes over the abductor pollicis brevis muscle in 32 patients with Parkinsonism before and after treatment with levodopa. A supra-maximal stimulus was delivered during maximal isometric contraction of the muscle. The silent period was prolonged in the untreated state compared with controls, but shortened significantly as a result of treatment. Observation of the clinical effects of treatment in each patient showed a relationship between shortening of the silent period and improvement in resting tremor. There was no relationship between the duration of the silent period and rigidity. The significance of these findings is discussed. They are considered to support the view that inhibition of motoneurone activity by afferent stimuli is intensified in Parkinsonism and that there is a close relationship between the degree of motoneurone inhibition and the severity of tremor.

  12. Carpal tunnel syndrome in association with hand-arm vibration syndrome: a review of claimants seeking compensation in the Mining Industry.

    PubMed

    Burke, F D; Lawson, I J; McGeoch, K L; Miles, J N V; Proud, G

    2005-05-01

    Twenty six thousand eight hundred and forty-two miners seeking compensation were clinically assessed for vascular and neurosensory impairment arising from exposure to occupational hand-arm vibration (Hand-Arm Vibration Syndrome). They were also assessed clinically for Carpal Tunnel Syndrome which, if present, would result in additional compensation. Fifteen per cent were assessed as having both HAVS and CTS. Thirty-eight per cent of claimants had nocturnal wakening, 1.3% wasting of abductor pollicis brevis, 15% had a positive Tinel's test and 20% had a positive Phalen's test. The 15% prevalence reported is lower than the rates cited previously in several small population studies of workers exposed to vibration. This paper reports the results of the assessment process and discusses the difficulty of discriminating Carpal Tunnel Syndrome from diffuse neurosensory impairment arising from HAVS.

  13. End-to-side neurorrhaphy as a salvage procedure for irreparable nerve injuries. Technical note.

    PubMed

    Oğün, Tunç C; Ozdemir, Mustafa; Senaran, Hakan; Ustün, Mehmet E

    2003-07-01

    After a few reports on end-to-side nerve repair at the beginning of the last century, the technique was put aside until its recent reintroduction. The authors present their results in three patients with median nerve defects that were between 15 and 22 cm long and treated using end-to-side median-to-ulnar neurorrhaphy through an epineurial window. The follow-up times were between 32 and 38 months. Sensory evaluation involved superficial touch, pinprick, and two-point discrimination tests. Motor evaluation was completed by assessing the presence of opposition and by palpating the abductor pollicis brevis muscle. Sensory recovery was observed in all patients in the median nerve dermatome, and motor recovery was absent, except in Case 1. End-to-side nerve repair can be a viable alternative to nerve grafting in patients with long gaps between the ends of the injured nerve.

  14. The reliability of physical examination for carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Marx, R G; Hudak, P L; Bombardier, C; Graham, B; Goldsmith, C; Wright, J G

    1998-08-01

    The goal of this study was to determine the interobserver and intraobserver reliability of static and moving two-point discrimination, Semmes-Weinstein monofilament testing, Tinel's test, manual motor testing of abductor pollicis brevis, vibration and Phalen's test in the diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome. Twelve patients with suspected carpal tunnel syndrome were examined in an outpatient setting. The interobserver reliability was satisfactory for all tests except for Semmes-Weinstein monofilament testing. Intraobserver reliability was also satisfactory for all tests. Static two point discrimination had higher reliability than moving two-point discrimination. Seven tests for the diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome were reliable in the hands of skilled health care professionals. Hand surgeons and hand therapists examined patients more reliably than occupational health workers.

  15. Psychophysiological patterns during cell phone text messaging: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Lin, I-Mei; Peper, Erik

    2009-03-01

    This study investigated the psychophysiological patterns associated with cell phone text messaging (texting). Twelve college students who were very familiar with texting were monitored with surface electromyography (SEMG) from the shoulder (upper trapezius) and thumb (abductor pollicis brevis/opponens pollicis); blood volume pulse (BVP) from the middle finger, temperature from the index finger, and skin conductance (SC) from the palm of the non-texting hand; and respiration from the thorax and abdomen. The counter-balanced procedure consisted of a 2 min pre-baseline, 1 min receiving text messages, 2 min middle baseline, 1 min sending text messages and 2 min post-baseline. The results indicated that all subjects showed significant increases in respiration rate, heart rate, SC, and shoulder and thumb SEMG as compared to baseline measures. Eighty-three percentage of the participants reported hand and neck pain during texting, and held their breath and experienced arousal when receiving text messages. Subjectively, most subjects were unaware of their physiological changes. The study suggests that frequent triggering of these physiological patterns (freezing for stability and shallow breathing) may increase muscle discomfort symptoms. Thus, participants should be trained to inhibit these responses to prevent illness and discomfort.

  16. ["True neurologic thoracic outlet syndrome" -- anatomical features and electrophysiological long-term follow-up of lateral thenar atrophy].

    PubMed

    Hug, U; Jung, F J; Guggenheim, M; Wedler, V; Burg, D; Künzi, W

    2006-02-01

    Atrophies of the intrinsic muscles of the hand are considered to be a typical symptom of the "true neurologic" form of thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS). The classical form of this entity was described as early as 1970, consisting of a cervical rib or a prolonged transverse process of C7, complete with a fibrous band to the first thoracic rib, resulting in atrophy of the intrinsic muscles of the hand. All our TOS patients presenting with such atrophy displayed anatomical findings consistent with this definition. Based on this observation, the TOS classification currently in clinical use, which differentiates between "disputed" and "true neurologic" subgroups of the neurologic form, is reviewed. In all cases of "true neurologic TOS" with atrophy of the intrinsic muscles of the hand, the lateral thenar muscles are affected first. We present the electrophysiological long-term results of such thenar atrophies of seven patients with eight operated extremities after brachial plexus decompression. The amplitude of the neurographically measured potential over the opponens pollicis and the abductor pollicis brevis muscle, respectively, was defined as quantitative parameter for muscles atrophy. Neither distinct reinnervation nor progressive denervation was evident in any of the cases after a follow-up period, on average, of more than five years post surgery. These findings are in conflict with clinical observations reporting a major postoperative improvement of the motor deficits.

  17. Complete Resolution of a Case of Calcific Tendinitis of the Longus Colli with Conservative Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Sakai, Toshinori; Miyagi, Ryo; Takata, Yoichiro; Higashino, Kosaku; Katoh, Shinsuke; Sairyo, Koichi; Yasui, Natsuo

    2014-01-01

    Acute calcific tendinitis of the longuscolli is a self-limiting inflammatory condition caused by calcium hydroxyapatite deposition in the longuscolli tendon. Although several case reports have described its radiological presentation, few reports provide detailed chronological accounts through symptomatic and radiologic resolution. A 59-year-old woman presented with severe neck pain and stiffness of a few days duration as well as moderate discomfort when swallowing. Lateral radiographs revealed a large calcium deposit anterior to the C1.C2 joint and swelling of the prevertebral soft tissue from C1 to C5. CT and magnetic resonance imaging showed fluid in the retropharyngeal gap.A soft collar and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug were prescribed, without antibiotics. At 4 months after presentation, the calcium deposit and all symptoms had resolved completely. Although this disease is comparatively rare, physicians should keep it in mind when a patient presents with acute severe neck pain. PMID:25346822

  18. Cryptic Diversity in the Ubiquist Species Parisotoma notabilis (Collembola, Isotomidae): A Long-Used Chimeric Species?

    PubMed Central

    Porco, David; Potapov, Mikhail; Bedos, Anne; Busmachiu, Galina; Weiner, Wanda M.; Hamra-Kroua, Salah; Deharveng, Louis

    2012-01-01

    Parisotoma notabilis is the most common species of Collembola in Europe and is currently designated as ubiquist. This species has been extensively used in numerous studies and is considered as well characterized on a morphological ground. Despite the homogeneity of its morphology, the sequencing of the barcoding fragment (5′ end of COI) for several populations throughout Europe and North America revealed four distinct genetic lineages. The divergence found between these lineages was similar to the genetic distance among other species of the genus Parisotoma included in the analysis. All four lineages have been confirmed by the nuclear gene 28S. This congruence between mitochondrial and nuclear signals, as well as the geographical distribution pattern of lineages observed in Europe, supports the potential specific status of these lineages. Based on specimens from the type locality (Hamburg), the species name was successfully assigned to one of these lineages. This finding raises several problems as Parisotoma notabilis has been widely used in many ecological studies. Accumulation of new data for the different lineages detected, especially ecological information and life history traits, is needed to help resolve this situation. PMID:23049931

  19. Onset Latency of Motor Evoked Potentials in Motor Cortical Mapping with Neuronavigated Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Kallioniemi, Elisa; Pitkänen, Minna; Säisänen, Laura; Julkunen, Petro

    2015-01-01

    Cortical motor mapping in pre-surgical applications can be performed using motor evoked potential (MEP) amplitudes evoked with neuronavigated transcranial magnetic stimulation. The MEP latency, which is a more stable parameter than the MEP amplitude, has not so far been utilized in motor mapping. The latency, however, may provide information about the stress in damaged motor pathways, e.g. compression by tumors, which cannot be observed from the MEP amplitudes. Thus, inclusion of this parameter could add valuable information to the presently used technique of MEP amplitude mapping. In this study, the functional cortical representations of first dorsal interosseous (FDI), abductor pollicis brevis (APB) and abductor digiti minimi (ADM) muscles were mapped in both hemispheres of ten healthy righthanded volunteers. The cortical muscle representations were evaluated by the area and centre of gravity (CoG) by using MEP amplitudes and latencies. As expected, the latency and amplitude CoGs were congruent and were located in the centre of the maps but in a few subjects, instead of a single centre, several loci with short latencies were observed. In conclusion, MEP latencies may be useful in distinguishing the cortical representation areas with the most direct pathways from those pathways with prolonged latencies. However, the potential of latency mapping to identify stressed motor tract connections at the subcortical level will need to be verified in future studies with patients.

  20. The split hand syndrome in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Eisen, Andrew; Kuwabara, Satoshi

    2012-04-01

    In amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), hand muscle wasting preferentially affects the 'thenar (lateral) hand', including the abductor pollicis brevis (APB) and first dorsal interosseous (FDI) muscles, with relative sparing of the hypothenar muscles (the abductor digiti minimi (ADM)). This peculiar pattern of dissociated atrophy of the intrinsic hand muscles is termed the 'split hand' and is rarely seen in diseases other than ALS. The muscles involved in the split hand are innervated through the same spinal segments (C8 and T1), and FDI and ADM, which are differentially affected, are both ulnar nerve innervated. The physiological mechanisms underlying the split hand in ALS are incompletely understood but both cortical and spinal/peripheral mechanisms are probably involved. Motor potentials evoked by magnetic stimulation are significantly smaller when recorded from the thenar complex, compared with the hypothenar muscles, supporting a cortical mechanism. But peripheral axonal excitability studies have suggested that APB/FDI motor axons have more prominent persistent sodium currents than ADM axons, leading to higher axonal excitability and thereby more ready degeneration. Pincer or precision grip is vital to human hand function, and frequent use of thenar complex muscles may lead to greater oxidative stress and metabolic demands at both upper and lower motoneurons innervating the APB and FDI. The split hand is a useful diagnostic sign in early ALS, and recent objective studies indicate that the sign has a high degree of specificity.

  1. Differentiation of motor cortical representation of hand muscles by navigated mapping of optimal TMS current directions in healthy subjects

    PubMed Central

    Bashir, Shahid; Perez, Jennifer; Horvath, Jared Cooney; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro

    2013-01-01

    The precision of navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to map the human primary motor cortex may be effected the direction of TMS-induced current in the brain as determined by the orientation of the stimulation coil. In this study, we investigated the effect of current directionality on motor output mapping using navigated brain stimulation (NBS). Our goal was to determine the optimal coil orientation (and, thus, induced brain current) to activate hand musculature representations relative to each subject’s unique neuroanatomical landmarks. We studied motor output maps for the first dorsal interosseous (FDI), abductor pollicis brevis (APB), and abductor digiti minimi (ADM) muscles in 10 normal volunteers. Monopolar current pulses were delivered through a figure-of-eight shaped TMS coil and motor evoked potentials (MEPs) were recorded using electromyography (EMG). At each targeted brain region, we systematically rotated the TMS coil to determine the direction of induced current in the brain for induction of the largest MEPs. These optimal current directions were expressed as an angle relative to each subject’s central sulcus. Consistency of the optimal current direction was assessed by repeating the entire mapping procedure on two different occasions across subjects. We demonstrate that systematic optimization of current direction as guided by MRI based neuronavigation improves the resolution of cortical output motor mapping with TMS. PMID:23912579

  2. Effect of Paired-Pulse Electrical Stimulation on the Activity of Cortical Circuits

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Kei; Onishi, Hideaki; Miyaguchi, Shota; Kotan, Shinichi; Fujimoto, Shuhei

    2015-01-01

    Objective: We investigated the transient effect of short-duration paired-pulse electrical stimulation (ppES) on corticospinal excitability and the after-effect of long-duration ppES on excitability, short-latency afferent inhibition (SAI), and afferent facilitation (AF). Methods: A total of 28 healthy subjects participated in two different experiments. In Experiment 1, motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) were measured in the abductor pollicis brevis (APB) and abductor digiti minimi (ADM) muscles before and immediately after short-duration ppES (5 s) at various inter-pulse intervals (2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 10, 15, 20, and 30 ms). In Experiment 2, MEPs, SAI, and AF were measured before, immediately, and 20 and 40 min after long-duration ppES (20 min, inter-pulse interval of 5 and 15 ms) and peripheral electrical stimulation (20 min, 10 and 20 Hz). Results: Short-duration ppES with inter-pulse intervals of 5 and 20 ms significantly increased MEP measured in APB but not in ADM. Long-duration ppES with an inter-pulse interval of 5 ms significantly decreased SAI but not MEPs in APB. In contrast, long-duration ppES did not affect ADM. Conclusion: The afferent inputs induced by ppES-5 ms were effective for transiently increasing MEP and sustaining SAI reduction. PMID:26733847

  3. Clinical Factors Underlying the Inter-individual Variability of the Resting Motor Threshold in Navigated Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Motor Mapping.

    PubMed

    Sollmann, Nico; Tanigawa, Noriko; Bulubas, Lucia; Sabih, Jamil; Zimmer, Claus; Ringel, Florian; Meyer, Bernhard; Krieg, Sandro M

    2017-01-01

    Correctly determining individual's resting motor threshold (rMT) is crucial for accurate and reliable mapping by navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation (nTMS), which is especially true for preoperative motor mapping in brain tumor patients. However, systematic data analysis on clinical factors underlying inter-individual rMT variability in neurosurgical motor mapping is sparse. The present study examined 14 preselected clinical factors that may underlie inter-individual rMT variability by performing multiple regression analysis (backward, followed by forward model comparisons) on the nTMS motor mapping data of 100 brain tumor patients. Data were collected from preoperative motor mapping of abductor pollicis brevis (APB), abductor digiti minimi (ADM), and flexor carpi radialis (FCR) muscle representations among these patients. While edema and age at exam in the ADM model only jointly reduced the unexplained variance significantly, the other factors kept in the ADM model (gender, antiepileptic drug intake, and motor deficit) and each of the factors kept in the APB and FCR models independently significantly reduced the unexplained variance. Hence, several clinical parameters contribute to inter-individual rMT variability and should be taken into account during initial and follow-up motor mappings. Thus, the present study adds basic evidence on inter-individual rMT variability, whereby some of the parameters are specific to brain tumor patients.

  4. Combination of Static Magnetic Fields and Peripheral Nerve Stimulation Can Alter Focal Cortical Excitability

    PubMed Central

    Nojima, Ippei; Koganemaru, Satoko; Mima, Tatsuya

    2016-01-01

    For clinical application of transcranial static magnetic stimulation (tSMS), it is important to achieve a focal target cortical stimulation. Previous study suggested that the associative stimulation combining non-invasive stimulation of the motor cortex (M1) and the peripheral nerve stimulation (PNS) may be useful to produce cortical excitability change. To test this hypothesis, we measured the M1 excitability and intracortical circuits by using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) before and after the tSMS of short duration (5 min) combined with PNS. Thirty-three normal volunteers were participated; tSMS+PNS (n = 11), sham+PNS (n = 11), and tSMS alone (n = 11). We found the transient suppression of the motor-evoked potential (MEP) of the right abductor pollicis brevis (APB) muscle, but not of the abductor digiti minimi (ADM) muscle, when combining tSMS with PNS over median nerve at the wrist. The lack of suppressive effect on APB in tSMS alone with short duration is in accord with the previous observation. In addition, the tendency of transient enhancement of the short-latency intracortical inhibition was observed immediately after intervention in the tSMS±PNS group. These findings show that the combination of tSMS and PNS can induce the cortical excitability change in target cortical motor area and potentiate the suppression effect. PMID:27932966

  5. Examination of Hand Muscle Activation and Motor Unit Indices Derived from Surface EMG in Chronic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaoyan; Liu, Jie; Li, Sheng; Wang, Ying-Chih

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we used muscle and motor unit indices, derived from convenient surface electromyography (EMG) measurements, for examination of paretic muscle changes post stroke. For 12 stroke subjects, compound muscle action potential and voluntary surface EMG signals were recorded from paretic and contralateral first dorsal interosseous, abductor pollicis brevis, and abductor digiti minimi muscles. Muscle activation index (AI), motor unit number index (MUNIX), and motor unit size index (MUSIX) were then calculated for each muscle. There was a significant AI reduction for all the three muscles in paretic side compared with contralateral side, providing an evidence of muscle activation deficiency after stroke. The hand MUNIX (defined by summing the values from the three muscles) was significantly reduced in paretic side compared with contralateral side, whereas the hand MUSIX was not significantly different. Furthermore, diverse changes in MUNIX and MUSIX were observed from the three muscles. A major feature of the present examinations is the primary reliance on surface EMG, which offers practical benefits because it is noninvasive, induces minimal discomfort and can be performed quickly. PMID:24967982

  6. Absence of split hand in the flail arm variant of ALS.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xian; Zhang, Zhecheng; Liu, Na

    2016-04-01

    Flail arm syndrome (FAS), a variant of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), has many similarities with upper limb onset ALS (UL-ALS). This study analyzed the compound muscle action potentials (CMAPs) recorded from abductor pollicis brevis (APB) and abductor digiti minimi (ADM) muscles in patients presenting these two types of ALS variants, compared to normal controls. The APB/ADM CMAP amplitude ratio was lower in the UL-ALS group (mean±SEM: 0.56±0.37), consistent with a split hand, compared to the FAS (1.05±0.29) or control (1.11±0.30) groups. An abnormally reduced APB/ADM CMAP amplitude ratio (<0.6) was found in 40% of UL-ALS patients and 11% of FAS patients. However, absent CMAP in the APB or extremely low APB/ADM CMAP amplitude ratio (<0.25) were observed only in UL-ALS patients (27%) and could be used as diagnostic criteria to differentiate UL-ALS from FAS variant.

  7. Handheld Electrical Impedance Myography Probe for Assessing Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhao; Chen, Lingfen; Zhu, Yu; Wei, Qingquan; Liu, Wenwen; Tian, Dong; Yu, Yude

    2017-03-30

    Electrical impedance myography (EIM) is a novel, noninvasive, and painless technique for quantitatively assessing muscle health as well as disease status and progression. The preparatory work for commercial adhesive electrodes used in previous EIM measurements is tedious, as the electrodes need to be cut, repeatedly applied, and removed. Moreover, the electrode distances need to be measured many times. To overcome these problems, we developed a convenient and practical handheld EIM probe for assessing carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) in the small hand muscles. To reduce the electrode-skin contact impedance (ESCI), the micropillared and microholed stainless steel electrodes (SSEs) contained in the probe were fabricated using a laser processing technique. When covered with saline, these electrodes showed lower ESCIs than a smooth SSE and Ag/AgCl electrode. The probe was shown to have excellent test-retest reproducibility in both healthy subjects and CTS patients, with intraclass correlation coefficients exceeding 0.975. The reactance and phase values of the abductor pollicis brevis (affected muscle) for CTS patients were consistently lower than those for healthy subjects, with a 50-kHz difference of 37.1% (p < 0.001) and 31.0% (p < 0.001), respectively. Further, no significant differences were detected in the case of the abductor digiti minimi (unaffected muscle). These results indicate that EIM has considerable potential for CTS assessment and hence merits further investigation.

  8. The musculoskeletal loading profile of the thumb during pipetting based on tendon displacement.

    PubMed

    Wu, John Z; Sinsel, Erik W; Shroyer, Justin F; Welcome, Daniel E; Zhao, Kristin D; An, Kai-Nan; Buczek, Frank L

    2013-12-01

    Strong evidence indicates that highly repetitive manual work is associated with the development of upper extremity musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs). One of the occupational activities that involves highly repetitive and forceful hand work is manual pipetting in chemical or biological laboratories. In the current study, we quantified tendon displacement as a parameter to assess the cumulative loading exposure of the musculoskeletal system in the thumb during pipetting. The maximal tendon displacement was found in the flexor pollicis longus (FPL) tendon. Assuming that subjects' pipetting rates were maintained constant during a period of 1 h, the average accumulated tendon displacement in the FPL reached 29 m, which is in the lower range of those observed in other occupational activities, such as typing and nail gun operations. Our results showed that tendon displacement data contain relatively small standard deviations, despite high variances in thumb kinematics, suggesting that the tendon displacements may be useful in evaluating the musculoskeletal loading profile.

  9. Surgical approach for elastic stable intramedullary nail in pediatric radius shaft fracture: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Nørgaard, Sandra L; Riber, Sara S; Danielsson, Frederik B; Pedersen, Niels W; Viberg, Bjarke

    2017-04-05

    When using elastic stable intramedullary nailing in children's distal radius shaft fractures, the surgical approach can either be lateral or dorsal. The aim of this article was to carry out a systematic review of the literature comparing the two types of approaches in terms of complications. An electronic search of databases was performed. Titles of articles were screened, and abstracts and full text were read. Data were extracted in terms of demographics and complications. The dorsal approach had a 2.6% rate of extensor pollicis longus tendon rupture, whereas the lateral approach had a 2.9% rate of transient superficial radial nerve palsy and 0.3% rate of permanent damage. These complications should be considered when deciding between the two surgical approaches.

  10. Carpal tunnel: Normal anatomy, anatomical variants and ultrasound technique.

    PubMed

    Presazzi, A; Bortolotto, C; Zacchino, M; Madonia, L; Draghi, F

    2011-03-01

    The carpal tunnel is an osteofibrous canal situated in the volar wrist. The boundaries are the carpal bones and the flexor retinaculum. In addition to the medial nerve, the carpal tunnel contains nine tendons: the flexor pollicis longus, the four flexor digitorum superficialis and the four flexor digitorum profundus. Ultrasound (US) study of the carpal tunnel generally involves short-axis imaging of the tendons, and in the presence of disease, long-axis imaging and dynamic maneuvers are added. There are numerous reports of anatomical variants of the wrist involving vessels, nerves, tendons and muscles, and they can all be studied by US. Some are particularly relevant from a clinical point of view and will therefore be accurately described. The anatomy is complex, and the US operator should therefore be thoroughly familiar with the normal anatomy as well as the anatomical variants that may have a role in the pathogenesis of carpal tunnel syndrome or influence treatment.

  11. The arterial blood supply for the synovial tendon sheaths of the hand.

    PubMed

    de la Garza, Oscar; Lierse, Werner; de los Angeles-García, Ma; Elizondo, Rodrigo; Guzmán, Santos

    2008-01-01

    The blood supply for the synovial tendon sheaths of the hand was carefully investigated. We show that the origin of those arteries, supplying the synovial tendon-sheaths of the Mm. flexor pollicis longus, flexor digitorum superficialis and profundus, lies in the Canalis carpi. We also describe that the branches of the Aa. digitales palmares propriae arise independently. We emphasize that the terminal branches of the A. interossea posterior and the Rete carpi dorsalis form an arterial network on the synovial tendon sheaths of the Dorsum manus. The synovial membranes of the proximal joints of the fingers receive an ample blood supply from the Rami ascendentes of the Aa. metacarpeae palmares and the Aa. digitales palmares propriae (Aa. recurrentes).

  12. Gantzer muscle. An anatomical study

    PubMed Central

    Caetano, Edie Benedito; Sabongi, João José; Vieira, Luiz Ângelo; Caetano, Maurício Ferreira; Moraes, Daniel Vinhais

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The relationship of Gantzer muscle to the median and anterior interosseous nerve is debated. METHODS: Ìn an anatomical study with 80 limbs from 40 cadavers the incidence, origin, insertion, nerve supply and relations of Gantzer muscle have been documented. RESULTS: The muscle was found in 54 forearms (68% of limbs) and was supplied by the anterior interosseous nerve. It arose from the deep surface of the flexor digitorum superficialis muscle, (42 limbs), coronoid process (eight limbs) and medial epicondyle (seven limbs). Its insertion was to the ulnar part of flexor pollicis longus muscle. The Gantzer muscle always lay posterior to both the median and anterior interosseous nerve. CONCLUSION: The Gantzer muscle may contribute to the median nerve and anterior interosseous nerve compression. The muscle was found in 68% of limbs and should be considered a normal anatomical pattern rather than an anatomical variation. Level of Evidence IV, Case Series . PMID:27069404

  13. Ballistic flexion movements of the human thumb.

    PubMed Central

    Hallett, M; Marsden, C D

    1979-01-01

    1. In response to an auditory stimulus normal subjects made ballistic flexion movements of the top joint of the thumb against a lever attached to the spindle of a low-inertia electric motor. 2. Electromyographic (e.m.g.) activity was recorded from pairs of fine wire electrodes inserted into flexor pollicis longus and extensor pollicis longus, respectively the sole flexor and extensor of the joint. 3. Movements of 5 degrees, 10 degrees and 20 degrees were made from initial angles of 10 degrees, 20 degrees and 30 degrees flexion against torques of 0.04, 0.08 and 0.16 Nm. 4. The e.m.g. activity initiating such movements was characterized by a 'triphasic' pattern of sequential bursts of activity in the agonist (flexor pollicis longus), then in the antagonist (extensor pollicis longus), and then in the agonist again. 5. The duration of the first agonist and first antagonist bursts ranged from about 50 to 90 ms and there was no significant change of burst length in the different mechanical conditions. 6. In movements of differing angular distance, the rectified and integrated e.m.g. activity of the first agonist burst could be correlated with the distance moved. The rectified and integrated e.m.g. activity of the first antagonist burst could not be correlated with the distance moved. 7. Responses of the muscles to perturbations either before or during the ballistic movements were studied. Current in the motor could be altered so to extend the thumb ('stretch'), to allow it to accelerate ('release'), or to prevent further movement ('halt'). 8. Suitably timed stretch increased the e.m.g. activity of the first agonist burst while release decreased it. 9. There was a small response of the agonist to stretch or halt timed to act during the interval between the first two agonist bursts; the major response was an augmentation of the second agonist burst. 10. Stretch, timed to act between the first two agonist bursts which released the antagonist, diminished the activity of the

  14. The musculoskeletal loading profile of the thumb during pipetting based on tendon displacement

    PubMed Central

    Wu, John Z.; Sinsel, Erik W.; Shroyer, Justin F.; Welcome, Daniel E.; Zhao, Kristin D.; An, Kai-Nan; Buczek, Frank L.

    2016-01-01

    Strong evidence indicates that highly repetitive manual work is associated with the development of upper extremity musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs). One of the occupational activities that involves highly repetitive and forceful hand work is manual pipetting in chemical or biological laboratories. In the current study, we quantified tendon displacement as a parameter to assess the cumulative loading exposure of the musculoskeletal system in the thumb during pipetting. The maximal tendon displacement was found in the flexor pollicis longus (FPL) tendon. Assuming that subjects’ pipetting rates were maintained constant during a period of 1 h, the average accumulated tendon displacement in the FPL reached 29 m, which is in the lower range of those observed in other occupational activities, such as typing and nail gun operations. Our results showed that tendon displacement data contain relatively small standard deviations, despite high variances in thumb kinematics, suggesting that the tendon displacements may be useful in evaluating the musculoskeletal loading profile. PMID:24018066

  15. Reliability of ultrasound to measure morphology of the toe flexor muscles

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Measuring the strength of individual foot muscles is very challenging; however, measuring muscle morphology has been shown to be associated with strength. A reliable method of assessing foot muscle atrophy and hypertrophy would therefore be beneficial to researchers and clinicians. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the test-retest intra-observer reliability of ultrasound to measure the morphology of the primary toe flexor muscles. Method The abductor hallucis, flexor hallucis brevis, flexor digitorum brevis, quadratus plantae and abductor digiti minimi muscles in the foot, and the flexor digitorum longus and flexor hallucis longus muscles in the shank were assessed in five males and five females (mean age = 32.1 ± 10.1 years). Muscles were imaged using a GE Venue 40 ultrasound (6-9 or 7.6-10.7 MHz transducer) in a random order, and on two occasions 1-6 days apart. Muscle thickness and cross-sectional area were measured using Image J software with the assessor blinded to muscle and day of scan. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) and limits of agreement were calculated to assess day-to-day repeatability of the measurements. Results The method was found to have good reliability (ICC = 0.89-0.99) with limits of agreement between 8-28% of the relative muscle size. Conclusion The protocol described in this paper showed that ultrasound is a reliable method to measure morphology of the toe flexor muscles. The portability and advantages of ultrasound make it a useful tool for clinical and research settings. PMID:23557252

  16. Associative plasticity in the human motor cortex is enhanced by concurrently targeting separate muscle representations with excitatory and inhibitory protocols.

    PubMed

    Kamke, Marc R; Nydam, Abbey S; Sale, Martin V; Mattingley, Jason B

    2016-04-01

    Paired associative stimulation (PAS) induces changes in the excitability of human sensorimotor cortex that outlast the procedure. PAS typically involves repeatedly pairing stimulation of a peripheral nerve that innervates an intrinsic hand muscle with transcranial magnetic stimulation over the representation of that muscle in the primary motor cortex. Depending on the timing of the stimuli (interstimulus interval of 25 or 10 ms), PAS leads to either an increase (PAS25) or a decrease (PAS10) in excitability. Both protocols, however, have been associated with an increase in excitability of nearby muscle representations not specifically targeted by PAS. Based on these spillover effects, we hypothesized that an additive, excitability-enhancing effect of PAS25 applied to one muscle representation may be produced by simultaneously applying PAS25 or PAS10 to a nearby representation. In different experiments prototypical PAS25 targeting the left thumb representation [abductor pollicis brevis (APB)] was combined with either PAS25 or PAS10 applied to the left little finger representation [abductor digiti minimi (ADM)] or, in a control experiment, with PAS10 also targeting the APB. In an additional control experiment PAS10 targeted both representations. The plasticity effects were quantified by measuring the amplitude of motor evoked potentials (MEPs) recorded before and after PAS. As expected, prototypical PAS25 was associated with an increase in MEP amplitude in the APB muscle. This effect was enhanced when PAS also targeted the ADM representation but only when a different interstimulus timing (PAS10) was used. These results suggest that PAS-induced plasticity is modified by concurrently targeting separate motor cortical representations with excitatory and inhibitory protocols.

  17. Terminal latency abnormality in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis without split hand syndrome.

    PubMed

    Park, Donghwi; Park, Jin-Sung

    2017-02-10

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) has a peculiar involvement pattern; clinically it is known as split hand syndrome and electrophysiologically shows abnormalities in the abductor pollicis brevis (APB)/abductor digiti minimi (ADM) ratio. The aim of this study was to find a significant electrophysiological parameter in upper limb onset ALS patients with normal APB/ADM ratio when compared to cervical spondylotic amyotrophy (CSA) and healthy controls. We retrospectively reviewed the electrophysiological results of 47 upper limb onset ALS and 42 CSA cases; 20 healthy individuals were included as controls. We included ALS and CSA patients with normal ADM/APB ratio (≥0.6, and ≤1.7), and the parameters of electrophysiological study were compared. The electrophysiological parameters of statistical significance among ALS, CSA and normal controls were: amplitude of median and ulnar nerves, the terminal latency of median nerve, F-wave latency of median and ulnar nerves, terminal latency ratio of ulnar/median nerves, and F-wave latency ratio of ulnar/median nerves (p < 0.05). Among these parameters, the terminal latency ratio of ulnar/median nerve and terminal latency of median nerve in ALS were significantly different with both of CSA and normal control (p < 0.006). The abnormality in the terminal latency of the median nerve can be partly explained by the distal motor axonal dysfunction due to sodium and potassium channel abnormalities. The hypothesis of distal axonopathy is known to play an important role in the pathogenesis of ALS causing a significant prolongation of the terminal latency in the median nerve and the ulnar/median nerve ratio.

  18. Motor cortex plasticity in Parkinson's disease and levodopa-induced dyskinesias.

    PubMed

    Morgante, Francesca; Espay, Alberto J; Gunraj, Carolyn; Lang, Anthony E; Chen, Robert

    2006-04-01

    Experimental models of Parkinson's disease have demonstrated abnormal synaptic plasticity in the corticostriatal system, possibly related to the development of levodopa-induced dyskinesias (LID). We tested the hypothesis that LID in Parkinson's disease is associated with aberrant plasticity in the human motor cortex (M1). We employed the paired associative stimulation (PAS) protocol, an experimental intervention involving transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and median nerve stimulation capable of producing long-term potentiation (LTP) like changes in the sensorimotor system in humans. We studied the more affected side of 16 moderately affected patients with Parkinson's disease (9 dyskinetic, 7 non-dyskinetic) and the dominant side of 9 age-matched healthy controls. Motor-evoked potential (MEP) amplitudes and cortical silent period (CSP) duration were measured at baseline before PAS and for up to 60 min (T0, T30 and T60) after PAS in abductor pollicis brevis (APB) and abductor digiti minimi (ADM) muscles. PAS significantly increased MEP size in controls (+74.8% of baseline at T30) but not in patients off medication (T30: +0.07% of baseline in the non-dyskinetic, +27% in the dyskinetic group). Levodopa restored the potentiation of MEP amplitudes by PAS in the non-dyskinetic group (T30: +64.9% of baseline MEP) but not in the dyskinetic group (T30: -9.2% of baseline). PAS prolonged CSP duration in controls. There was a trend towards prolongation of CSP in the non-dyskinetic group off medications but not in the dyskinetic group. Levodopa did not restore CSP prolongation by PAS in the dyskinetic group. Our findings suggest that LTP-like plasticity is deficient in Parkinson's disease off medications and is restored by levodopa in non-dyskinetic but not in dyskinetic patients. Abnormal synaptic plasticity in the motor cortex may play a role in the development of LID.

  19. Pattern Differences of Small Hand Muscle Atrophy in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and Mimic Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Jia; Liu, Ming-Sheng; Guan, Yu-Zhou; Du, Hua; Li, Ben-Hong; Cui, Bo; Ding, Qing-Yun; Cui, Li-Ying

    2016-01-01

    Background: Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and some mimic disorders, such as distal-type cervical spondylotic amyotrophy (CSA), Hirayama disease (HD), and spinobulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) may present with intrinsic hand muscle atrophy. This study aimed to investigate different patterns of small hand muscle involvement in ALS and some mimic disorders. Methods: We compared the abductor digiti minimi/abductor pollicis brevis (ADM/APB) compound muscle action potential (CMAP) ratios between 200 ALS patients, 95 patients with distal-type CSA, 88 HD patients, 43 SBMA patients, and 150 normal controls. Results: The ADM/APB CMAP amplitude ratio was significantly higher in the ALS patients (P < 0.001) than that in the normal controls. The ADM/APB CMAP amplitude ratio was significantly reduced in the patients with distal-type CSA (P < 0.001) and the HD patients (P < 0.001) compared with that in the normal controls. The patients with distal-type CSA had significantly lower APB CMAP amplitude than the HD patients (P = 0.004). The ADM/APB CMAP amplitude ratio was significantly lower in the HD patients (P < 0.001) than that in the patients with distal-type CSA. The ADM/APB CMAP amplitude ratio of the SBMA patients was similar to that of the normal controls (P = 0.862). An absent APB CMAP and an abnormally high ADM/APB CMAP amplitude ratio (≥4.5) were observed exclusively in the ALS patients. Conclusions: The different patterns of small hand muscle atrophy between the ALS patients and the patients with mimic disorders presumably reflect distinct pathophysiological mechanisms underlying different disorders, and may aid in distinguishing between ALS and mimic disorders. PMID:26996473

  20. Primary Motor Cortex Representation of Handgrip Muscles in Patients with Leprosy

    PubMed Central

    Rangel, Maria Luíza Sales; Sanchez, Tiago Arruda; Moreira, Filipe Azaline; Hoefle, Sebastian; Souto, Inaiacy Bittencourt; da Cunha, Antônio José Ledo Alves

    2015-01-01

    Background Leprosy is an endemic infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae that predominantly attacks the skin and peripheral nerves, leading to progressive impairment of motor, sensory and autonomic function. Little is known about how this peripheral neuropathy affects corticospinal excitability of handgrip muscles. Our purpose was to explore the motor cortex organization after progressive peripheral nerve injury and upper-limb dysfunction induced by leprosy using noninvasive transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Methods In a cross-sectional study design, we mapped bilaterally in the primary motor cortex (M1) the representations of the hand flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS), as well as of the intrinsic hand muscles abductor pollicis brevis (APB), first dorsal interosseous (FDI) and abductor digiti minimi (ADM). All participants underwent clinical assessment, handgrip dynamometry and motor and sensory nerve conduction exams 30 days before mapping. Wilcoxon signed rank and Mann-Whitney tests were performed with an alpha-value of p<0.05. Findings Dynamometry performance of the patients’ most affected hand (MAH), was worse than that of the less affected hand (LAH) and of healthy controls participants (p = 0.031), confirming handgrip impairment. Motor threshold (MT) of the FDS muscle was higher in both hemispheres in patients as compared to controls, and lower in the hemisphere contralateral to the MAH when compared to that of the LAH. Moreover, motor evoked potential (MEP) amplitudes collected in the FDS of the MAH were higher in comparison to those of controls. Strikingly, MEPs in the intrinsic hand muscle FDI had lower amplitudes in the hemisphere contralateral to MAH as compared to those of the LAH and the control group. Taken together, these results are suggestive of a more robust representation of an extrinsic hand flexor and impaired intrinsic hand muscle function in the hemisphere contralateral to the MAH due to leprosy. Conclusion Decreased

  1. Cortical Motor Circuits after Piano Training in Adulthood: Neurophysiologic Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Nuara, Arturo; Zanini, Sonia; Gatti, Roberto; Comi, Giancarlo; Leocani, Letizia

    2016-01-01

    The neuronal mechanisms involved in brain plasticity after skilled motor learning are not completely understood. We aimed to study the short-term effects of keyboard training in music-naive subjects on the motor/premotor cortex activity and interhemispheric interactions, using electroencephalography and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Twelve subjects (experimental group) underwent, before and after a two week-piano training: (1) hand-motor function tests: Jamar, grip and nine-hole peg tests; (2) electroencephalography, evaluating the mu rhythm task-related desynchronization (TRD) during keyboard performance; and (3) TMS, targeting bilateral abductor pollicis brevis (APB) and abductor digiti minimi (ADM), to obtain duration and area of ipsilateral silent period (ISP) during simultaneous tonic contraction of APB and ADM. Data were compared with 13 controls who underwent twice these measurements, in a two-week interval, without undergoing piano training. Every subject in the experimental group improved keyboard performance and left-hand nine-hole peg test scores. Pre-training, ISP durations were asymmetrical, left being longer than right. Post-training, right ISPAPB increased, leading to symmetrical ISPAPB. Mu TRD during motor performance became more focal and had a lesser amplitude than in pre-training, due to decreased activity over ventral premotor cortices. No such changes were evidenced in controls. We demonstrated that a 10-day piano-training was associated with balanced interhemispheric interactions both at rest and during motor activation. Piano training, in a short timeframe, may reshape local and inter-hemispheric motor cortical circuits. PMID:27309353

  2. Effects of subthalamic nucleus stimulation on motor cortex plasticity in Parkinson disease

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sang Jin; Udupa, Kaviraja; Ni, Zhen; Moro, Elena; Gunraj, Carolyn; Mazzella, Filomena; Lozano, Andres M.; Hodaie, Mojgan; Lang, Anthony E.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: We hypothesized that subthalamic nucleus (STN) deep brain stimulation (DBS) will improve long-term potentiation (LTP)-like plasticity in motor cortex in Parkinson disease (PD). Methods: We studied 8 patients with PD treated with STN-DBS and 9 age-matched healthy controls. Patients with PD were studied in 4 sessions in medication (Med) OFF/stimulator (Stim) OFF, Med-OFF/Stim-ON, Med-ON/Stim-OFF, and Med-ON/Stim-ON states in random order. Motor evoked potential amplitude and cortical silent period duration were measured at baseline before paired associated stimulation (PAS) and at 3 different time intervals (T0, T30, T60) up to 60 minutes after PAS in the abductor pollicis brevis and abductor digiti minimi muscles. Results: Motor evoked potential size significantly increased after PAS in controls (+67.7% of baseline at T30) and in patients in the Med-ON/Stim-ON condition (+55.8% of baseline at T30), but not in patients in the Med-OFF/Stim-OFF (−0.4% of baseline at T30), Med-OFF/Stim-ON (+10.3% of baseline at T30), and Med-ON/Stim-OFF conditions (+17.3% of baseline at T30). Cortical silent period duration increased after PAS in controls but not in patients in all test conditions. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that STN-DBS together with dopaminergic medications restore LTP-like plasticity in motor cortex in PD. Restoration of cortical plasticity may be one of the mechanisms of how STN-DBS produces clinical benefit. PMID:26156511

  3. Reverse split hand syndrome: Dissociated intrinsic hand muscle atrophy pattern in Hirayama disease/brachial monomelic amyotrophy.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ravinder-Jeet; Preethish-Kumar, Veeramani; Polavarapu, Kiran; Vengalil, Seena; Prasad, Chandrajit; Nalini, Atchayaram

    2017-02-01

    Preferential involvement of C7, C8, T1 level anterior horn cells is a typical feature in Hirayama disease/brachial monomelic amyotrophy (BMMA). There are no clinico-electrophysiological studies to substantiate the peculiar pattern of muscle involvement. Thirty subjects, 10 in each group of BMMA, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and age-matched normal healthy subjects underwent detailed clinical and electrophysiological testing. Results showed that the mean age at evaluation for BMMA and ALS patients was 25.8 ± 3.8 and 51.8 ± 9.5 years, respectively; illness duration was 8.1 ± 5.7 years and 11.14 ± 2.85 months, respectively. Clinically, all BMMA patients had reverse of split hand (RSH) syndrome [abductor digiti minimi (ADM) affected more than abductor pollicis brevis (APB)], while 7/10 ALS patients had classical split hand syndrome (APB affected more than ADM). In BMMA, the compound muscle action potential (CMAP) of APB was preserved but reduced/absent in ADM compared to the ALS group which demonstrated reverse findings. APB/ADM ratio was >0.8 in the BMMA group (>1.4 in 80%), around 1.0 in normal controls (none had >1.4) and <0.8 in ALS (70% having values <0.6). In conclusion, RSH syndrome may provide valuable diagnostic clues to differentiate this relatively self-restricted disease from progressive degenerative disease like ALS.

  4. Differences in Dysfunction of Thenar and Hypothenar Motoneurons in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Jia; Cui, Liying; Liu, Mingsheng; Guan, Yuzhou; Li, Xiaoguang; Li, Dawei; Cui, Bo; Shen, Dongchao; Ding, Qingyun

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to determine differences in spinal motoneuron dysfunction between the abductor pollicis brevis (APB) and the abductor digiti minimi (ADM) in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients based on studying F-waves. Forty ALS patients and 20 normal controls (NCs) underwent motor nerve conduction studies on both median and ulnar nerves, including F-waves elicited by 100 electrical stimuli. The F-wave persistence (P < 0.05), index repeating neuron (RN; P < 0.001), and index repeater F-waves (Freps; P < 0.001) significantly differed between the APB and the ADM in the NC participants. For the hands of the ALS patients that lacked detectable wasting or weakness and exhibited either no or mild impairment of discrete finger movements, significantly reduced F-wave persistence (P < 0.001), increased index RN (P < 0.001), and increased index Freps (P < 0.001) were observed in APB in comparison with the normal participants, with relatively normal ADM F-wave parameters. For the hands of ALS patients that exhibited wasting and weakness, the mean F-wave amplitude (P < 0.05), the F/M amplitude ratio (P < 0.05), F-wave persistence (P < 0.001), index RN (P < 0.05), and index Freps (P < 0.05) significantly differed between APB and ADM. The differences in the dysfunction of motoneurons innervating APB and ADM are unique manifestations in ALS patients. The F-wave persistence (P = 0.002), index RN (P < 0.001), and index Freps (P < 0.001) in the APB seemed to differentiate ALS from the NCs more robustly than the ADM/APB Compound muscle action potential (CMAP) amplitude ratio. Thus, F-waves may reveal subclinical alterations in anterior horn cells, and may potentially help to distinguish ALS from mimic disorders. PMID:27014030

  5. Modulation of motor cortex inhibition during motor imagery.

    PubMed

    Chong, Benjamin W X; Stinear, Cathy M

    2017-04-01

    Motor imagery (MI) is similar to overt movement, engaging common neural substrates and facilitating the corticomotor pathway; however, it does not result in excitatory descending motor output. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) can be used to assess inhibitory networks in the primary motor cortex via measures of 1-ms short-interval intracortical inhibition (SICI), long-interval intracortical inhibition (LICI), and late cortical disinhibition (LCD). These measures are thought to reflect extrasynaptic GABAA tonic inhibition, postsynaptic GABAB inhibition, and presynaptic GABAB disinhibition, respectively. The behavior of 1-ms SICI, LICI, and LCD during MI has not yet been explored. This study aimed to investigate how 1-ms SICI, LICI, and LCD are modulated during MI and voluntary relaxation (VR) of a target muscle. Twenty-five healthy young adults participated. TMS was used to assess nonconditioned motor evoked potential (MEP) amplitude, 1-ms SICI, 100- (LICI100) and 150-ms LICI, and LCD in the right abductor pollicis brevis (APB) and right abductor digiti minimi during rest, MI, and VR of the hand. Compared with rest, MEP amplitudes were facilitated in APB during MI. SICI was not affected by task or muscle. LICI100 decreased in both muscles during VR but not MI, whereas LCD was recruited in both muscles during both tasks. This indicates that VR modulates postsynaptic GABAB inhibition, whereas both tasks modulate presynaptic GABAB inhibition in a non-muscle-specific way. This study highlights further neurophysiological parallels between actual and imagined movement, which may extend to voluntary relaxation.NEW & NOTEWORTHY This is the first study to investigate how 1-ms short-interval intracortical inhibition, long-interval intracortical inhibition, and late cortical disinhibition are modulated during motor imagery and voluntary muscle relaxation. We present novel findings of decreased 100-ms long-interval intracortical inhibition during voluntary muscle

  6. Quantitative Muscle Ultrasonography in Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess the reliability of quantitative muscle ultrasonography (US) in healthy subjects and to evaluate the correlation between quantitative muscle US findings and electrodiagnostic study results in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). The clinical significance of quantitative muscle US in CTS was also assessed. Methods Twenty patients with CTS and 20 age-matched healthy volunteers were recruited. All control and CTS subjects underwent a bilateral median and ulnar nerve conduction study (NCS) and quantitative muscle US. Transverse US images of the abductor pollicis brevis (APB) and abductor digiti minimi (ADM) were obtained to measure muscle cross-sectional area (CSA), thickness, and echo intensity (EI). EI was determined using computer-assisted, grayscale analysis. Inter-rater and intra-rater reliability for quantitative muscle US in control subjects, and differences in muscle thickness, CSA, and EI between the CTS patient and control groups were analyzed. Relationships between quantitative US parameters and electrodiagnostic study results were evaluated. Results Quantitative muscle US had high inter-rater and intra-rater reliability in the control group. Muscle thickness and CSA were significantly decreased, and EI was significantly increased in the APB of the CTS group (all p<0.05). EI demonstrated a significant positive correlation with latency of the median motor and sensory NCS in CTS patients (p<0.05). Conclusion These findings suggest that quantitative muscle US parameters may be useful for detecting muscle changes in CTS. Further study involving patients with other neuromuscular diseases is needed to evaluate peripheral muscle change using quantitative muscle US. PMID:28119835

  7. Does the MUNIX Method Reflect Clinical Dysfunction in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis: A Practical Experience.

    PubMed

    Gawel, Malgorzata; Kuzma-Kozakiewicz, Magdalena

    2016-05-01

    The aim of our study was to assess the usefulness of the MUNIX method in reflecting the clinical dysfunction in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), as well as to assess an intra-rater reproducibility of MUNIX. The study group consisted of a total of 15 ALS patients. The mean age of symptoms onset was 55 years, and the mean disease duration was 10 months. The muscle strength and patients' functional status were assessed according to the Medical Research Council (MRC) and by ALS functional rating scale revised (ALSFRS-R), respectively. The MUNIX was performed in 6 muscles: abductor pollicis brevis (APB), abductor digiti minimi (ADM), biceps brachii (BB), tibial anterior (TA), extensor digitorum brevis (EDB), and abductor hallucis (AH), unilaterally, at a less affected side. Both muscle-specific and global MRC and MUNIX scores were calculated. In 11 patients, the study protocol was repeated at least twice every 3 months. An additional testing of the intra-rater reliability was performed at the first visit.There were no significant differences between MUNIX test and re-test values in the APB, ADM, BB, TA, EDB, and AH muscles (P >0.05). The highest variability of the test-retest values was found in the BB muscle (7.53%). Although there was a significant test-retest difference in the global MUNIX score (P = 0.02), the variability of the results was as low as 1.26%. The MUNIX value correlated with the muscle-specific MRC score in ABP, ADM, TA, EDB and AH (P <0.05), and the global MUNIX values correlated with global MRC scores (P <0.05). There was also a significant correlation between the global MUNIX score and the clinical dysfunction measured by the ALSFRS-R scale (P <0.05). The global MUNIX showed a higher monthly decline (4.3%) as compared with ALFRS-R (0.7%) and the MRC global score (0.5%).This study confirms that the MUNIX method is a sensitive, reliable, and accurate tool reflecting both motor dysfunction and disease progression in ALS

  8. Motor Unit Number Estimation and Motor Unit Action Potential Analysis in Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sohn, Min Kyun; Jee, Sung Ju; Kim, Young-Jae; Shin, Hyun-Dae

    2011-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the clinical significance of motor unit number estimation (MUNE) and quantitative analysis of motor unit action potential (MUAP) in carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) according to electrophysiologic severity, ultrasonographic measurement and clinical symptoms. Method We evaluated 78 wrists of 45 patients, who had been diagnosed with CTS and 42 wrists of 21 healthy controls. Median nerve conduction studies, amplitude and duration of MUAP, and the MUNE of the abductor pollicis brevis were measured. The cross sectional area (CSA) of the median nerve at the pisiform and distal radioulnar joint level was determined by high resolution ultrasonography. Clinical symptom of CTS was assessed using the Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire (BCTQ). Results The MUNE, the amplitude and the duration of MUAP of the CTS group were significantly different from those found in the control group. The area under the ROC curve was 0.944 for MUNE, 0.923 for MUAP amplitude and 0.953 for MUAP duration. MUNE had a negative correlation with electrophysiologic stage of CTS, amplitude and duration of MUAP, CSA at pisiform level, and the score of BCTQ. The amplitude and duration of MUAP had a positive correlation with the score of BCTQ. The electrophysiologic stage was correlated with amplitude but not with the duration of MUAP. Conclusion MUNE, amplitude and duration of MUAP are useful tests for diagnosis of CTS. In addition, the MUNE serves as a good indicator of CTS severity. PMID:22506210

  9. Trapeziometacarpal osteoarthrosis: clinical results and sonographic evaluation of the interposed tissue after trapeziectomy and first metacarpal suspension by external minifixation at a minimal two-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Putterie, G; Créteur, V; Mouraux, D; Robert, C; El-Kazzi, W; Schuind, F

    2014-02-01

    Among the surgical options to treat trapeziometacarpal osteoarthrosis, trapeziectomy has been criticized as unable to prevent postoperative collapse of the thumb, causing painful scapho-metacarpal impingement. The implantation of an external minifixator between the first and the second metacarpals for sufficient time has been proposed to maintain the postoperative space created by the bone resection to allow the development of a resistant interposed fibrous tissue. Nineteen patients (16 women, 3 men, mean age 64.5 years) were evaluated at 3.3 years of follow-up after an unilateral trapeziectomy and first metacarpal suspension by external minifixation. Eighty-four percent of the patients were very satisfied with the operation. The mean DASH score was 27.7%, the pain 1.7/10 (Visual Analogue Scale), the opening angle of the first web 58.3° and the Kapandji opposition score 9.5/10. Sonography demonstrated the existence of a strong fibrotic interposed tissue, preventing scapho-metacarpal impingement. The mean height of the trapeziectomy space (8.4mm) was maintained upon active pinch and maximal traction on the thumb. A significant atrophy of thenar muscles was also demonstrated, except for the Abductor pollicis brevis. In conclusion, total trapeziectomy with external minifixation provides acceptable clinical results, stabilizes the base of the thumb and prevents scapho-metacarpal impingement. The study brings also important new information about the nature of the interposed tissue in the trapezial space and about the state of the thenar muscles after trapeziectomy.

  10. Analysis of the musculoskeletal loading of the thumb during pipetting--a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Wu, John Z; Sinsel, Erik W; Shroyer, Justin F; Warren, Christopher M; Welcome, Daniel E; Zhao, Kristin D; An, Kai-Nan; Buczek, Frank L

    2014-01-22

    Previous epidemiological studies indicate that the use of thumb-push mechanical pipettes is associated with musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) in the hand. The goal of the current study was to analyze the loading in the muscle-tendon units in the thumb during pipetting. The hand is modeled as a multi-body linkage system and includes four fingers (index, long, ring, and little finger), a thumb, and a palm segment. Since the current study is focused on the thumb, the model includes only nine muscles attached to the thumb via tendons. The time-histories of joint angles and push force at the pipette plunger during pipetting were determined experimentally and used as model input; whereas forces in the muscle-tendon units in the thumb were calculated via an inverse dynamic approach combined with an optimization procedure. Results indicate that all nine muscles have force outputs during pipetting, and the maximal force was in the abductor pollicis brevis (APB). The ratio of the mean peak muscle force to the mean peak push force during the dispensing cycle was approximately 2.3, which is comparable to values observed in grasping tasks in the literature. The analysis method and results in the current study provide a mechanistic understanding of MSD risk factors associated with pipetting, and may be useful in guiding ergonomic designs for manual pipettes.

  11. Neurophysiological criteria for intraoperative prediction of pure motor hemiplegia during aneurysm surgery. Case report.

    PubMed

    Szelényi, Andrea; Bueno de Camargo, Adauri; Flamm, Eugene; Deletis, Vedran

    2003-09-01

    The value of motor evoked potentials (MEPs) as an intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring tool for detecting selective subcortical ischemia of the motor pathways during intracerebral aneurysm repair is described and the use of such measures to predict postoperative motor status is discussed. The authors present the case of a 64-year-old woman in whom there was an incidental finding of two right middle cerebral artery (MCA) aneurysms. During the aneurysm clipping procedure, an intraoperative MEP loss in the left abductor pollicis brevis and tibial anterior muscles occurred during an attempt at permanent clip placement. There were no concurrent changes in somatosensory evoked potentials. Postoperatively, the patient demonstrated a left hemiplegia with intact sensation. A computerized tomography scan revealed an infarct in the anterior division of the MCA territory, including the posterior limb of the internal capsule. In this patient, intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring with MEPs has been shown to be a sensitive tool for indicating subcortical ischemia affecting selective motor pathways in the internal capsule. Therefore, intraoperative loss of MEPs can be used to predict postoperative motor deficits.

  12. Assessment of cortical excitability using threshold tracking techniques.

    PubMed

    Vucic, Steve; Howells, James; Trevillion, Louise; Kiernan, Matthew C

    2006-04-01

    Conventional paired-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) techniques of assessing cortical excitability are limited by fluctuations in the motor evoked potential (MEP) amplitude. The aim of the present study was to determine the feasibility of threshold tracking TMS for assessing cortical excitability in a clinical setting and to establish normative data. Studies were undertaken in 26 healthy controls, tracking the MEP response from abductor pollicis brevis. Short-interval intracortical inhibition (SICI) occurred up to an interstimulus interval (ISI) of 7-10 ms, with two distinct peaks evident, at ISIs of < or =1 and 3 ms, followed by intracortical facilitation to an ISI of 30 ms. Long-interval intracortical inhibition (LICI) occurred at ISIs of 50-300 ms, peaking at 150 ms. The present study has confirmed the effectiveness of the threshold tracking TMS technique in reliably and reproducibly measuring cortical excitability. Simultaneous assessment of upper and lower motor neuronal function with threshold tracking techniques may help to determine the site of disease onset and patterns of progression in neurodegenerative diseases.

  13. Surface electromyography shows increased mirroring in Parkinson's disease patients without overt mirror movements.

    PubMed

    Cincotta, Massimo; Giovannelli, Fabio; Borgheresi, Alessandra; Balestrieri, Fabrizio; Vanni, Paola; Ragazzoni, Aldo; Zaccara, Gaetano; Ziemann, Ulf

    2006-09-01

    Patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) may present mirror movements (MM). Transcranial magnetic stimulation data indicate that these movements reflect an abnormal enhancement of the "physiological mirroring" that can be observed in healthy adults during complex and effortful tasks. It was hypothesized that, in PD, enhanced mirroring is caused by a failure of basal ganglia output to support the cortical network that is responsible for the execution of strictly unimanual movements. If so, it is likely that subtle alterations of voluntary unimanual motor control are also present in PD patients without overt MM. We tested this hypothesis by using surface electromyographic (EMG) techniques in 12 mildly to moderately affected PD patients without overt MM, and in 2 control groups (12 age-matched and 10 young healthy volunteers). Subjects performed unilateral phasic thumb abduction during a sustained tonic contraction of the opposite abductor pollicis brevis. All patients were tested on dopaminergic therapy. On a separate day, 7 of 12 patients were re-tested after withdrawal of medication. During this task, involuntary mirror-like increase in surface EMG of the tonically abducting thumb was significantly larger in PD patients than in age-matched or young healthy volunteers. Off therapy, mirroring was slightly greater than on medication, although this difference was not significant. Our findings suggest that dysfunction of unimanual motor control is a general feature of PD. It is likely that this deficient movement lateralization contributes to an impairment of nonsymmetrical bimanual movements in PD.

  14. Mechanisms underlying mirror movements in Parkinson's disease: a transcranial magnetic stimulation study.

    PubMed

    Cincotta, Massimo; Borgheresi, Alessandra; Balestrieri, Fabrizio; Giovannelli, Fabio; Ragazzoni, Aldo; Vanni, Paola; Benvenuti, Francesco; Zaccara, Gaetano; Ziemann, Ulf

    2006-07-01

    The neural mechanisms underlying unintended mirror movements (MMs) of one hand during unimanual movements of the other hand in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) are largely unexplored. Here we used surface electromyographic (EMG) analysis and focal transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to investigate the pathophysiological substrate of MMs in four PD patients. Surface EMG was recorded from both abductor pollicis brevis (APB) and first dorsal interosseous (FDI) muscles. Cross-correlation EMG analysis revealed no common motor drive to the two APBs during intended unimanual tasks. Focal TMS of either primary motor cortex (M1) elicited normal motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) in the contralateral APB, whereas MEPs were not seen in the ipsilateral hand. During either mirror or voluntary APB contraction, focal TMS of the contralateral M1 produced a long-lasting silent period (SP), whereas stimulation of the ipsilateral M1 produced a short-lasting SP. During either mirror or voluntary finger tapping, 5 Hz repetitive TMS (rTMS) of the contralateral M1 disrupted EMG activity in the target FDI, whereas the effects of rTMS of the ipsilateral M1 were by far slighter. During either mirror or voluntary APB contraction, paired-pulse TMS showed a reduction of short-interval intracortical inhibition in the contralateral M1. These findings provide converging evidence that, in PD, MMs do not depend on unmasking of ipsilateral projections but are explained by motor output along the crossed corticospinal projection from the mirror M1.

  15. [Neurological Signs and Symptoms of True Neurogenic Thoracic Outlet Syndrome].

    PubMed

    Higashihara, Mana; Konoeda, Fumie; Sonoo, Masahiro

    2016-05-01

    Thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) is a well-known disorder, but many aspects of its pathology, including its definition, has been disputed. True neurogenic TOS (TN-TOS) is a rare but well-defined clinical condition. TN-TOS results from the compression of the C8/T1 roots (dominant for the T1 root) or the proximal lower trunk of the brachial plexus by a fibrous band. The band extends from the first rib to either the tip of an elongated C7 transverse process or a rudimentary cervical rib. The most common presenting symptoms of TN-TOS are insidious-onset atrophy and weakness of the intrinsic hand muscles, predominantly in the thenar eminence and radial digit flexors. Nerve conduction studies demonstrate pathognomonic findings: severely attenuated compound muscle action potential of the abductor pollicis brevis muscle, and usually, loss of the sensory nerve action potential of the medial antebrachial cutaneous nerve. Numbness and sensory loss are typically observed, mainly in the medial forearm, although they are usually mild, and may be absent in some patients. Severe pain or paresthesia proximal to the elbow is not observed. The classical concept of TOS underlie nonspecific neurogenic TOS. It has been primarily diagnosed using provocative maneuvers. However, there is controversy regarding its pathological conceptualization and existence, as objective evidence of the disease is still lacking.

  16. When anger dominates the mind: Increased motor corticospinal excitability in the face of threat

    PubMed Central

    Hortensius, Ruud

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Threat demands fast and adaptive reactions that are manifested at the physiological, behavioral, and phenomenological level and are responsive to the direction of threat and its severity for the individual. Here, we investigated the effects of threat directed toward or away from the observer on motor corticospinal excitability and explicit recognition. Sixteen healthy right‐handed volunteers completed a transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) task and a separate three‐alternative forced‐choice emotion recognition task. Single‐pulse TMS to the left primary motor cortex was applied to measure motor evoked potentials from the right abductor pollicis brevis in response to dynamic angry, fearful, and neutral bodily expressions with blurred faces directed toward or away from the observer. Results showed that motor corticospinal excitability increased independent of direction of anger compared with fear and neutral. In contrast, anger was better recognized when directed toward the observer compared with when directed away from the observer, while the opposite pattern was found for fear. The present results provide evidence for the differential effects of threat direction on explicit recognition and motor corticospinal excitability. In the face of threat, motor corticospinal excitability increases independently of the direction of anger, indicative of the importance of more automatic reactions to threat. PMID:27325519

  17. Efficacy of pregabalin in a case of stiff-person syndrome: clinical and neurophysiological evidence.

    PubMed

    Squintani, G; Bovi, T; Ferigo, L; Musso, A M; Ottaviani, S; Moretto, G; Morgante, F; Tinazzi, M

    2012-03-15

    Symptomatic treatment of stiff-person syndrome (SPS) might be challenging and a significant improvement of stiffness and rigidity is generally reached with high doses of benzodiazepines or baclofen causing side effects. A 71-year old woman diagnosed with SPS complained of marked stiffness of trunk and lower limb muscles with sudden painful spasms. She was unable to walk and she could not lean on her right leg. Cortical silent period (CSP) duration evaluated from right abductor pollicis brevis (APB) with transcranial magnetic stimulation was shortened. Polygraphic electromyographic (EMG) evaluation from paraspinal and leg muscles disclosed continuous motor unit activity at rest with interference muscular pattern. Symptomatic treatment with diazepam was withdrawn because of excessive sedation. In order to relieve the intense lumbar pain, she was prescribed pregabalin; since the day after, rigidity and painful spasms dramatically improved and she could walk without assistance. The clinical benefit persisted at 3 months follow-up and was paralleled by almost complete disappearance of EMG activity at rest and prolongation of CSP. The clinical and electrophysiological data in this SPS patient suggest the possible efficacy of pregabalin as symptomatic treatment without any significant side effects, which needs to be replicated in larger case series.

  18. Abnormal cortical synaptic plasticity in minimal hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Golaszewski, Stefan; Langthaler, Patrick B; Schwenker, Kerstin; Florea, Cristina; Christova, Monica; Brigo, Francesco; Trinka, Eugen; Nardone, Raffaele

    2016-07-01

    Minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE) represents the earliest stage of hepatic encephalopathy (HE). MHE is characterized by cognitive function impairment in the domains of attention, vigilance and integrative function, while obvious clinical manifestations are lacking. In the present study, we aimed at assessing whether subjects with MHE showed alterations in synaptic plasticity within the motor cortex. Previous findings suggest that learning in human motor cortex occurs through long-term potentiation (LTP)-like mechanisms. We employed therefore the paired associative stimulation (PAS) protocol by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), which is able to induce LTP-like effects in the motor cortex of normal subjects. Fifteen patients with MHE and 15 age- and sex-matched cirrhotic patients without MHE were recruited. PAS consisted of 180 electrical stimuli of the right median nerve paired with a single TMS over the hotspot of right abductor pollicis brevis (APB) at an ISI of 25ms (PAS25). We measured motor evoked potentials (MEPs) before and after each intervention for up to 30min. In healthy subjects the PAS25 protocol was followed by a significant increase of the MEP amplitude. On the contrary, in patients with MHE the MEP amplitude was slightly reduced after PAS. These findings demonstrated that associative sensorimotor plasticity, an indirect probe for motor learning, is impaired in MHE patients.

  19. Electrically and Hybrid-Induced Muscle Activations: Effects of Muscle Size and Fiber Type

    PubMed Central

    Stratton, Kelly; Faghri, Pouran D.

    2016-01-01

    The effect of three electrical stimulation (ES) frequencies (10, 35, and 50 Hz) on two muscle groups with different proportions of fast and slow twitch fibers (abductor pollicis brevis (APB) and vastus lateralis (VL)) was explored. We evaluated the acute muscles’ responses individually and during hybrid activations (ES superimposed by voluntary activations). Surface electromyography (sEMG) and force measurements were evaluated as outcomes. Ten healthy adults (mean age: 24.4 ± 2.5 years) participated after signing an informed consent form approved by the university Institutional Review Board. Protocols were developed to: 1) compare EMG activities during each frequency for each muscle when generating 25% Maximum Voluntary Contraction (MVC) force, and 2) compare EMG activities during each frequency when additional voluntary activation was superimposed over ES-induced 25% MVC to reach 50% and 75% MVC. Empirical mode decomposition (EMD) was utilized to separate ES artifacts from voluntary muscle activation. For both muscles, higher stimulation frequency (35 and 50Hz) induced higher electrical output detected at 25% of MVC, suggesting more recruitment with higher frequencies. Hybrid activation generated proportionally less electrical activity than ES alone. ES and voluntary activations appear to generate two different modes of muscle recruitment. ES may provoke muscle strength by activating more fatiguing fast acting fibers, but voluntary activation elicits more muscle coordination. Therefore, during the hybrid activation, less electrical activity may be detected due to recruitment of more fatigue-resistant deeper muscle fibers, not reachable by surface EMG. PMID:27990244

  20. Early changes in corticospinal excitability when seeing fearful body expressions

    PubMed Central

    Borgomaneri, Sara; Vitale, Francesca; Avenanti, Alessio

    2015-01-01

    Quick inhibition of approach tendencies in response to signals of potential threats is thought to promote survival. However, little is known about the effect of viewing fearful expressions on the early dynamics of the human motor system. We used the high temporal resolution of single-pulse and paired-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) over the motor cortex to assess corticospinal excitability (CSE) and intracortical facilitation (ICF) during observation of happy, fearful and neutral body postures. To test motor circuits involved in approach tendencies, CSE and ICF were recorded from the first dorsal interosseous (FDI), a muscle involved in grasping, and the abductor pollicis brevis (APB), which served as a control. To test early motor dynamics, CSE and ICF were measured 70–90 ms after stimulus onset. We found a selective reduction in CSE in the FDI when participants observed fearful body expressions. No changes in ICF or in the excitability of APB were detected. Our study establishes an extremely rapid motor system reaction to observed fearful body expressions. This motor modulation involves corticospinal downstream projections but not cortical excitatory mechanisms, and appears to reflect an inhibition of hand grasping. Our results suggest a fast visuo-motor route that may rapidly inhibit inappropriate approaching actions. PMID:26388400

  1. Muscle fiber types composition and type identified endplate morphology of forepaw intrinsic muscles in the rat.

    PubMed

    Pan, Feng; Mi, Jing-Yi; Zhang, Yan; Pan, Xiao-Yun; Rui, Yong-Jun

    2016-06-01

    The failure to accept reinnervation is considered to be one of the reasons for the poor motor functional recovery of intrinsic hand muscles (IHMs) after nerve injury. Rat could be a suitable model to be used in simulating motor function recovery of the IHMs after nerve injury as to the similarities in function and anatomy of the muscles between human and rat. However, few studies have reported the muscle fiber types composition and endplate morphologic characteristics of intrinsic forepaw muscles (IFMs) in the rat. In this study, the myosin heavy chain isoforms and acetylcholine receptors were stained by immunofluorescence to show the muscle fiber types composition and endplates on type-identified fibers of the lumbrical muscles (LMs), interosseus muscles (IMs), abductor digiti minimi (AM) and flexor pollicis brevis (FM) in rat forepaw. The majority of IFMs fibers were labeled positively for fast-switch fiber. However, the IMs were composed of only slow-switch fiber. With the exception of the IMs, the other IFMs had a part of hybrid fibers. Two-dimensional morphological characteristics of endplates on I and IIa muscle fiber had no significant differences among the IFMs. The LMs is the most suitable IFMs of rat to stimulate reinnervation of the IHMs after nerve injury. Gaining greater insight into the muscle fiber types composition and endplate morphology in the IFMs of rat may help understand the pathological and functional changes of IFMs in rat model stimulating reinnervation of IHMs after peripheral nerve injury.

  2. Intraoperative Electrophysiologic Monitoring of Ocular Motor Nerves Under Conditions of Partial Neuromuscular Blockade During Skull Base Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kawaguchi, Masahiko; Ohnishi, Hideyuki; Sakamoto, Takanori; Shimizu, Kiyoshi; Karasawa, Jun; Furuya, Hitoshi

    1996-01-01

    The feasibility and usefulness of intraoperative electromyographic monitoring of the oculomotor nerve (CN III), trochlear nerve (CN IV), and abducens nerve (CN IV) were evaluated under conditions of partial neuromuscular blockade in 21 patients undergoing skill base surgery. Intracranial electrical stimulation of each nerve was performed, and compound muscle action potentials (CMAPs) were reconded from the inferior or superior rectus muscle, the superior oblique muscle, and the lateral rectus muscle for monitoring of CN III, IV, and VI, respectively. Partial neuromuscular blockade was achieved by controlled infusion of vecuronium titrated to eliminate about 90% of the twitch response of the abductor pollicis brevis to electrical stimulation of the median nerve. A total of 30 cranial nerves were stimulated intraoperatively. Of these, 29 were successfully monitored (19 CN III, 6 CN IV, 4 CN VI). A relationship was found between intraoperative findings of cranial nerve monitoring, such as disappearance of response and increase in latency and stimulus threshold during manipulation of a lesion, and the presence of postoperative nerve deficits. We conclude that intraoperative electromyographic monitoring of ocular motor nerves is feasible during partial neuromuscular blockade, and that partial neuromuscular blockade does not affect the relationship between findings of intraoperative monitoring and postoperative nerve function. PMID:17170948

  3. Motor unit loss estimation by the multipoint incremental MUNE method in children with spinal muscular atrophy--a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Gawel, Malgorzata; Kostera-Pruszczyk, Anna; Lusakowska, Anna; Jedrzejowska, Maria; Ryniewicz, Barbara; Lipowska, Marta; Gawel, Damian; Kaminska, Anna

    2015-03-01

    Quantitative EMG reflects denervation of muscles after lower motor neuron degeneration in spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) but does not reflect actual motor unit loss. The aim of our study was to assess the value of the multipoint incremental motor unit number estimation (MUNE) method in the modification by Shefner in estimating motor unit loss in SMA. The number of motor units, the mean amplitude of an average surface-detected single motor unit potential (SMUP), and the amplitude of compound motor action potentials (CMAP) were estimated in 14 children with SMA in the abductor pollicis brevis (ABP). Significant differences in MUNE values and SMUP and CMAP amplitude were found between the SMA and control groups (P < 0.0001). MUNE values correlated with Hammersmith Functional Motor Scale (HFMS) scores (P < 0.05). Increased SMUP amplitude values correlated with decreased HFMS scores (P < 0.05). The study confirms that MUNE method in the modification by Shefner is a useful tool reflecting motor unit loss in SMA, and it is easy to perform and well tolerated. MUNE and SMUP amplitude seemed to be sensitive parameters reflecting motor dysfunction in SMA but a longitudinal study in a larger number of subjects is needed.

  4. Do we really need new medical information about the Turin Shroud?

    PubMed

    Bevilacqua, M; Fanti, G; D'Arienzo, M; De Caro, R

    2014-02-01

    Image processing of the Turin Shroud (TS) shows that the Man represented in it has undergone an under glenoidal dislocation of the humerus on the right side and lowering of the shoulder, and has a flattened hand and enophthalmos; conditions that have not been described before, despite several studies on the subject. These injuries indicate that the Man suffered a violent blunt trauma to the neck, chest and shoulder from behind, causing neuromuscular damage and lesions of the entire brachial plexus. The posture of the left claw-hand is indicative of an injury of the lower brachial plexus, as is the crossing of the hands on the pubis, not above the pubis as it would normally be, and are related to traction of the limbs as a result of the nailing to the patibulum. The disappearance of the thumbprints is because of entrainment of the flexor pollicis longus tendons while the nails were driven through the wrists. The blunt chest trauma, which resulted in the body falling forwards, was the direct cause of a lung contusion and haemothorax, confirmed by the post-mortem leakage of clots and serum from the chest caused by the stabbing with the spear, and was a likely cause of cardiac contusion. All the evidence is in favour of the hypothesis that the TS Man is Jesus of Nazareth.

  5. Soft tissue reconstruction for type IV-D duplicated thumb: a new surgical technique.

    PubMed

    Tien, Yin-Chun; Chih, Tsai-Tung; Wang, Tai-Lung; Fu, Yin-Chih; Chen, Jian-Chih

    2007-06-01

    Type IV-D duplicated thumb has the most complex anomalies and difficulties for treatment among polydatyly. Double osteotomy is usually recommended to gain the best cosmetic and functional outcome. However, 4 cases of type IV-D duplicated thumb were treated only by soft tissue procedure in this study. At operation, a conjoined A2 pulley was routinely identified, and the flexor pollicis longus (FPL) was found bifurcated distal to the conjoined pulley in every of these cases. Instead of double osteotomy, a soft tissue procedure that included centralization of FPL and A2 pulley reconstruction was pursued to correct these special anomalies. The overall clinical results were evaluated by a modification of the Tada scoring system based on the range of motion, joint stability, alignment of the remaining thumb, and subjective opinion regarding the reconstructed thumb after an average follow-up of 3.3 years (range, 2.5-4.7 years). According to the scoring system, the results were rated as good in 3 cases and fair in 1 case. From the results, the A2 pulley reconstruction and FPL centralization could prove to be an effective method for the treatment of type IV-D duplicated thumb and could efficiently avoid the residual angular deformities. Therefore, we recommend this soft tissue procedure as an alternative surgical technique to the double-osteotomy procedure for treating a type IV-D duplicated thumb in a very young child, whose bone is still not mature enough for holding the fixing pins.

  6. Anatomical variations of the hand extensors.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Hamid, G A; El-Beshbishy, R A; Abdel Aal, I H

    2013-08-01

    This study was performed to investigate the anatomy and variations of the human extensor tendons of the fingers and their intertendinous connections. Ninetyfive upper limbs of adult cadavers were dissected. The variations in the extensor tendons of the fingers, both proximal and distal to the extensor retinaculum, and their mode of insertion were observed. Also, the intertendinous connections were explored and the obtained data were analysed. The extensor pollicis longus and brevis tendons were found to be single, doubled or, rarely, absent. Their insertion could be traced to either the proximal phalanx, or through the extensor expansion to both phalanges, or rarely to the distal phalanx of thumb. The extensor indicis had a single tendon in all specimens. In the majority of specimens, extensor digitorum had no independent slip to the little finger; it gave off a single tendon to the index, double tendons to the middle finger and triple tendons to the ring finger. Extensor digiti minimi muscle often had double or triple tendons distal to the extensor retinaculum. Three types of juncturae tendinum (JT) were identified between the tendons of extensor digitorum in the 2nd, 3rd and 4th intermetacarpal spaces (IMS) of hands. Types 1 and 2 JT were seen in the three IMS. Type 3 JT was the most frequently identified of all juncturae and was always absent in the 2nd IMS. The percentages of the present data were compared with other researchers'data.

  7. Selectivity and resolution of surface electrical stimulation for grasp and release.

    PubMed

    Westerveld, Ard J; Schouten, Alfred C; Veltink, Peter H; van der Kooij, Herman

    2012-01-01

    Electrical stimulation of arm and hand muscles can be a functional tool for patients with motor dysfunction. Sufficient stimulation of finger and thumb musculature can support natural grasping function. Yet it remains unclear how different grasping movements can be selectively supported by electrical stimulation. The goal of this study is to determine to what extent activation of individual fingers is possible with surface electrical stimulation for the purpose of rehabilitation following stroke. The extensor digitorum communis (EDC) muscle, flexor pollicis longus (FPL) muscle, and the thenar muscle group, all involved in grasp and release, were selected for stimulation. The evoked forces in individual fingers were measured. Stimulation thresholds and selective ranges were determined for each subject. Electrode locations where the highest selective range occurred were compared between subjects and influences of different isometric wrist positions were assessed. In all subjects selective stimulation of middle finger extension and thumb flexion was possible. In addition, selective stimulation of index and ring finger extension was possible in most cases. In nine out of the ten EDC subjects we were able to stimulate three or all four fingers selectively. However, large variability in electrode locations for high selectivity was observed between the subjects. Within the designs of grasping prostheses and grasping rehabilitation devices, the variability of electrode locations should be taken into account. The results of our study facilitate the optimization of such designs and favour a design which allows individualized stimulation locations.

  8. Volar morphology of the distal radius in axial planes: a quantitative analysis.

    PubMed

    Oura, Keiichiro; Oka, Kunihiro; Kawanishi, Yohei; Sugamoto, Kazuomi; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Murase, Tsuyoshi

    2015-04-01

    To investigate the cause of rupture of the flexor pollicis longus (FPL) after volar plate fixation of distal radius fractures, previous studies have examined the shape of the distal radius in the sagittal plane or in the lateral view. However, there are no reports on the anatomical shape of the volar surface concavity of the distal radius in the axial plane. We hypothesized that this concavity might contribute to the mismatch between the plate and the surface of the radius. To test this hypothesis, we constructed three-dimensional models of the radius and FPL based on computed tomography scans of 70 normal forearms. We analyzed axial cross-sectional views with 2 mm intervals. In all cases, the volar surface of the distal radius was concave in the axial plane. The concavity depth was maximum at 6 mm proximal to the palmar edge of the lunate fossa and progressively decreased toward the proximal radius. FPL was closest to the radius at 2 mm proximal to the palmar edge of the lunate fossa. The volar surface of the distal radius was externally rotated from proximal to distal. These results may help to develop new implants which fit better to the radius and decrease tendon irritation.

  9. Mechanical morphogenesis: a concept applied to the surface of the radius.

    PubMed

    Galtés, Ignasi; Rodríguez-Baeza, Alfonso; Malgosa, Assumpció

    2006-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to perform a detailed morphological analysis of the changes that occur at the attachment sites of muscles, tendons, and ligaments on the radius. We consider the osteological, anatomical, and pathological aspects in detail, devising a visual standard for ranking the development of osseous expression at each attachment. We also discuss the etiology, particularly through focus on the relationship with the activity and age variables. In a sample of 148 radii from archeological and contemporary samples, 11 osteological sites were analyzed in each specimen. The osteological sites included nine muscular attachments, the attachment of the interosseous membrane, and the groove of the extensor pollicis longus tendon. The results show that mechanical loading is the main cause of different types of markings appearing and developing on the bone surface. Furthermore, there is a relationship between the osteological appearance of enthesis and its morphological type. It is possible to grade osteological appearance with a visual reference method that establishes an identifiable threshold for each grade and eliminates relying completely on observer experience. This methodology is applicable to the field of physical anthropology and to its forensic subfield, identifying individuals by attributing to them specific work or given activities through the use of skeletal remains.

  10. Single-stage reconstruction of flexor tendons with vascularized tendon transfers.

    PubMed

    Cavadas, P C; Pérez-García, A; Thione, A; Lorca-García, C

    2015-03-01

    The reconstruction of finger flexor tendons with vascularized flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS) tendon grafts (flaps) based on the ulnar vessels as a single stage is not a popular technique. We reviewed 40 flexor tendon reconstructions (four flexor pollicis longus and 36 finger flexors) with vascularized FDS tendon grafts in 38 consecutive patients. The donor tendons were transferred based on the ulnar vessels as a single-stage procedure (37 pedicled flaps, three free flaps). Four patients required composite tendon and skin island transfer. Minimum follow-up was 12 months, and functional results were evaluated using a total active range of motion score. Multiple linear regression analysis was performed to evaluate the factors that could be associated with the postoperative total active range of motion. The average postoperative total active range of motion (excluding the thumbs) was 178.05° (SD 50°). The total active range of motion was significantly lower for patients who were reconstructed with free flaps and for those who required composite tendon and skin island flap. Age, right or left hand, donor/motor tendon and pulley reconstruction had no linear effect on total active range of motion. Overall results were comparable with a published series on staged tendon grafting but with a lower complication rate. Vascularized pedicled tendon grafts/flaps are useful in the reconstruction of defects of finger flexor tendons in a single stage, although its role in the reconstructive armamentarium remains to be clearly established.

  11. Management of the spastic upper extremity in the neurologically impaired adult.

    PubMed

    Keenan, M A

    1988-08-01

    Spasticity that interferes with upper extremity function is common in adults following stroke, brain injury, or anoxia. During the period of neurologic recovery definitive surgical procedures are avoided. Techniques to temporarily reduce spasticity include the implantation of a MicroPort reservoir and catheter for repeated branchial plexus blocks and phenol nerve blocks, which provide longer lasting relief of noxious muscle tone. Percutaneous blocks of the musculocutaneous and recurrent median nerves and motor point blocks of the pectoralis major, the brachioradialis, and forearm flexor muscles are easily performed at bedside. The motor branch of the ulnar nerve can be injected surgically with phenol to diminish intrinsic spasticity. When neurologic recovery has plateaued, hand placement can be improved in many patients following proximal release of the brachioradialis muscle and lengthening of the biceps and branchialis tendons. Hand function is enhanced by fractional lengthening of spastic wrist and finger flexors. Intrinsic spasticity must be addressed at the same time by phenol block or intrinic release. When extensor function is lacking, a tenodesis of the wrist extensors is helpful. The thumb-in-palm deformity requires proximal release of the thenar muscles as well as lengthening of the flexor pollicis longus. Contracture releases in the nonfunctional arm improve hygiene and ease care.

  12. Reliability and efficacy of the long-latency stretch reflex in the human thumb.

    PubMed

    Marsden, C D; Merton, P A; Morton, H B; Rothwell, J C; Traub, M M

    1981-07-01

    1. The amount of positional compensation afforded by the long-latency reflex in the flexor pollicis longus has been investigated in ten normal human subjects. 2. The interphalangeal joint of the thumb was extended by between 2 and 40 degrees at up to 900 deg/s by suddenly increasing the standing force applied to the lever against which the subject was pressing with the pad of the thumb. 3. Electromyographic (e.m.g.) responses at spinal-latency were very small or absent for stretches of this magnitude. The long-latency stretch reflex produced an average positional correction of about 50% for disturbances in the range of 5-25 degrees. The response began to saturate for disturbances of greater than 25 degrees. 4. The e.m.g. response was pulsatile, lasting only some 50 ms, even during continuously increasing disturbances; frequently it terminated despite a remaining positional error. 5. There was a large variation from subject to subject in the average amount of positional correction provided by the stretch reflex. Examination of single responses to the same stretch in individual subjects showed an even greater variation from trial to trial. 6. Variation in the compensation produced by the long-latency stretch reflex from trial to trial could not be explained by the slight variation in size or maximum velocity of the individual stretches.

  13. FPL tendon thickness, tremor and hand functions in Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Dundar, Umit; Kusbeci, Özge Yilmaz; Ulasli, Alper Murat; Toy, Ozgur; Oruc, Serdar

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction In Parkinson’s disease (PD), a resting tremor of the thumb may affect the flexor pollicis longus (FPL) and influence hand functions. We investigated the relationship between FPL tendon thickness and hand function in PD patients and compared these characteristics with those in healthy controls. Methods The hand grip and pinch strengths were measured. The participants completed the Duruöz hand index, the Sollerman’s hand function test, and the Nine Hole Peg Test. The thickness of the FPL tendon was measured using ultrasonography Results The FPL tendon was thicker in PD patients but was not associated with tremor severity. In PD patients, despite functional performance of the hands are impaired and grip strength is decreased, pinch strengths are preserved. FPL thickness was not correlated with grip and pinch strengths. Conclusion The thicker FPL tendon may be associated with greater pinch and grip strengths and manual dexterity in healthy individuals. The presence of tremor is associated with a thicker FPL tendon. PMID:28352760

  14. 3D-MRI rendering of the anatomical structures related to acupuncture points of the Dai mai, Yin qiao mai and Yang qiao mai meridians within the context of the WOMED concept of lateral tension: implications for musculoskeletal disease

    PubMed Central

    Moncayo, Roy; Rudisch, Ansgar; Kremser, Christian; Moncayo, Helga

    2007-01-01

    Background A conceptual model of lateral muscular tension in patients presenting thyroid associated ophthalmopathy (TAO) has been recently described. Clinical improvement has been achieved by using acupuncture on points belonging to the so-called extraordinary meridians. The aim of this study was to characterize the anatomical structures related to these acupuncture points by means of 3D MRI image rendering relying on external markers. Methods The investigation was carried out the index case patient of the lateral tension model. A licensed medical acupuncture practitioner located the following acupuncture points: 1) Yin qiao mai meridian (medial ankle): Kidney 3, Kidney 6, the plantar Kidney 6 (Nan jing description); 2) Yang qiao mai meridian (lateral ankle): Bladder 62, Bladder 59, Bladder 61, and the plantar Bladder 62 (Nan jing description); 3) Dai mai meridian (wait): Liver 13, Gall bladder 26, Gall bladder 27, Gall bladder 28, and Gall bladder 29. The points were marked by taping a nitro-glycerin capsule on the skin. Imaging was done on a Siemens Magnetom Avanto MR scanner using an array head and body coil. Mainly T1-weighted imaging sequences, as routinely used for patient exams, were used to obtain multi-slice images. The image data were rendered in 3D modus using dedicated software (Leonardo, Siemens). Results Points of the Dai mai meridian – at the level of the waist – corresponded to the obliquus externus abdominis and the obliquus internus abdominis. Points of the Yin qiao mai meridian – at the medial side of the ankle – corresponded to tendinous structures of the flexor digitorum longus as well as to muscular structures of the abductor hallucis on the foot sole. Points of the Yang qiao mai meridian – at the lateral side of the ankle – corresponded to tendinous structures of the peroneus brevis, the peroneous longus, and the lateral surface of the calcaneus and close to the foot sole to the abductor digiti minimi. Conclusion This non

  15. The responsiveness of sensibility and strength tests in patients undergoing carpal tunnel decompression

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Several clinical measures of sensory and motor function are used alongside patient-rated questionnaires to assess outcomes of carpal tunnel decompression. However there is a lack of evidence regarding which clinical tests are most responsive to clinically important change over time. Methods In a prospective cohort study 63 patients undergoing carpal tunnel decompression were assessed using standardised clinician-derived and patient reported outcomes before surgery, at 4 and 8 months follow up. Clinical sensory assessments included: touch threshold with monofilaments (WEST), shape-texture identification (STI™ test), static two-point discrimination (Mackinnon-Dellon Disk-Criminator) and the locognosia test. Motor assessments included: grip and tripod pinch strength using a digital grip analyser (MIE), manual muscle testing of abductor pollicis brevis and opponens pollicis using the Rotterdam Intrinsic Handheld Myometer (RIHM). The Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire (BCTQ) was used as a patient rated outcome measure. Results Relative responsiveness at 4 months was highest for the BCTQ symptom severity scale with moderate to large effects sizes (ES = -1.43) followed by the BCTQ function scale (ES = -0.71). The WEST and STI™ were the most responsive sensory tests at 4 months showing moderate effect sizes (WEST ES = 0.55, STI ES = 0.52). Grip and pinch strength had a relatively higher responsiveness compared to thenar muscle strength but effect sizes for all motor tests were very small (ES ≤0.10) or negative indicating a decline compared to baseline in some patients. Conclusions For clinical assessment of sensibility touch threshold assessed by monofilaments (WEST) and tactile gnosis measured with the STI™ test are the most responsive tests and are recommended for future studies. The use of handheld myometry (RIHM) for manual muscle testing, despite more specifically targeting thenar muscles, was less responsive than grip or tripod pinch testing using

  16. Differential Modulation of Intracortical Inhibition in Human Motor Cortex during Selective Activation of an Intrinsic Hand Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Zoghi, Maryam; Pearce, Sophie L; Nordstrom, Michael A

    2003-01-01

    Paired-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) was used to assess the effectiveness of intracortical inhibition (ICI) acting on corticospinal neurons controlling three intrinsic hand muscles in humans. We hypothesised that the suppression of ICI with selective activation of a muscle would be restricted to corticospinal neurons controlling the muscle targeted for activation. Surface EMG was recorded from abductor pollicis brevis (APB), first dorsal interosseous (FDI) and abductor digiti minimi (ADM) muscles of the left hand. Subjects were tested at rest and during weak selective activation of APB or ADM, while they attempted to keep the other muscles relaxed using visual feedback. Paired-pulse TMS was applied with a circular coil oriented to produce antero-posterior (AP) current flow in the right motor cortex (to preferentially evoke I3 waves in corticospinal neurons) and with postero-anterior (PA) currents (to preferentially evoke I1 waves). Paired-pulse TMS was less effective in suppressing the muscle evoked potential (MEP) when the muscle was targeted for selective activation, with both AP and PA stimulation. The mechanism for this includes effects on late I waves, as it was evident with a weak AP test TMS pulse that elicited negligible I1 waves in corticospinal neurons. ICI circuits activated by TMS, which exert their effects on late I waves but do not affect I1 waves, are strongly implicated in this modulation. With AP stimulation, paired-pulse inhibition was not significantly altered for corticospinal neurons controlling other muscles of the same hand which were required to be inactive during the selective activation task. This differential modulation was not seen with PA stimulation, which preferentially activates I1 waves and evokes a MEP that is less influenced by ICI. The observations with AP stimulation suggest that selective activation of a hand muscle is accompanied by a selective suppression of ICI effects on the corticospinal neurons controlling

  17. Thoracic limb morphology of the red panda (Ailurus fulgens) evidenced by osteology and radiography.

    PubMed

    Makungu, Modesta; Groenewald, Hermanus B; Du Plessis, Wencke M; Barrows, Michelle; Koeppel, Katja N

    2015-07-15

    The red panda (Ailurus fulgens) is distributed primarily in the Himalayas and southern China. It is classified as a vulnerable species by the International Union for Conservation of Nature. The aim of this study was to describe the normal osteology and radiographic anatomy of the thoracic limb of the red panda. Radiography of the right thoracic limb was performed in seven captive adult red pandas. Radiographic findings were correlated with bone specimens from three adult animals. The scapula was wide craniocaudally and presented with a large area for the origin of the teres major muscle. The square-shaped major tubercle did not extend proximal to the head of the humerus. The medial epicondyle was prominent. A supracondylar foramen was present. The radial tuberosity and sesamoid bone for the abductor digiti I longus were prominent. The accessory carpal bone was directed palmarolaterally. Metacarpal bones were widely spread. The thoracic limb morphology of the red panda evidenced by osteology and radiography indicated flexibility of the thoracic limb joints and well-developed flexor and supinator muscles, which are important in arboreal quadrupedal locomotion. Knowledge gained during this study may prove useful in identifying skeletal material or remains and diagnosing musculoskeletal diseases and injuries of the thoracic limb.

  18. Thoracic limb morphology of the red panda (Ailurus fulgens) evidenced by osteology and radiography.

    PubMed

    Makungu, Modesta; Groenewald, Hermanus B; du Plessis, Wencke M; Barrows, Michelle; Koeppel, Katja N

    2015-07-15

    The red panda (Ailurus fulgens) is distributed primarily in the Himalayas and southern China. It is classified as a vulnerable species by the International Union for Conservation of Nature. The aim of this study was to describe the normal osteology and radiographic anatomy of the thoracic limb of the red panda. Radiography of the right thoracic limb was performed in seven captive adult red pandas. Radiographic findings were correlated with bone specimens from three adult animals. The scapula was wide craniocaudally and presented with a large area for the origin of the teres major muscle. The square-shaped major tubercle did not extend proximal to the head of the humerus. The medial epicondyle was prominent. A supracondylar foramen was present. The radial tuberosity and sesamoid bone for the abductor digiti I longus were prominent. The accessory carpal bone was directed palmarolaterally. Metacarpal bones were widely spread. The thoracic limb morphology of the red panda evidenced by osteology and radiography indicated flexibility of the thoracic limb joints and well-developed flexor and supinator muscles, which are important in arboreal quadrupedal locomotion. Knowledge gained during this study may prove useful in identifying skeletal material or remains and diagnosing musculoskeletal diseases and injuries of the thoracic limb.

  19. Comparison of tendon tensions estimated from two biomechanical models of the thumb.

    PubMed

    Vigouroux, Laurent; Domalain, Mathieu; Berton, Eric

    2009-08-07

    Despite the paramount function of the thumb in daily life, thumb biomechanical models have been little developed and studied. Moreover, only two studies provided quantitative anthropometric data of tendon moment arms. To investigate thumb tendon tensions, biomechanicians and clinicians have to know the performances and the limits of these two data sets. The aim of this study was thus to compare the results of these two models and evaluate their performances in regard to prior electromyographic measurements (EMG). Thumb posture was recorded during the classical key pinch and pulp pinch grips. Various fingertip forces applied at the distal segment were simulated in a range including extension, adduction, flexion, abduction. Input data of thumb postures and fingertip forces were used to compute tendon tensions with both models. Tendon tensions obtained using these two models were then compared and correlated to EMG measurements provided in the literature. The results showed that both models predicted relevant muscle coordination for five of the nine muscles modelled. Opponent and abductor longus muscle coordinations were badly estimated by both models. Each model was sensible to kinematic errors but not in the same proportion. This study pointed out the advantages/limits of the two models to use them more appropriately for clinical and/or research purposes.

  20. Effects of temperature on the excitability properties of human motor axons.

    PubMed

    Kiernan, M C; Cikurel, K; Bostock, H

    2001-04-01

    The effects of temperature on parameters of motor nerve excitability were investigated in 10 healthy human subjects. The median nerve was stimulated at the wrist and compound muscle action potentials were recorded from the abductor pollicis brevis. Multiple excitability measures were recorded: stimulus-response curves, the strength-duration time constant (tauSD), threshold electrotonus, a current-threshold relationship and the recovery of excitability following supramaximal activation. Recordings were made at wrist temperatures of 35, 32 and 29 degrees C by immersing the arm proximal to the wrist in a water-bath. Cooling increased the relative refractory period by 7.8% per degree C (P < 0.0001), slowed the accommodation to depolarizing currents by 4.0% per degree C (P < 0.0001) and increased tauSD by 2.6% per degree C (P < 0.01), but most other excitability parameters were not affected significantly. The effects of temperature on threshold electrotonus were investigated further in separate studies on two subjects over the range 28-36 degrees C and found to be complex. Whereas the rate of accommodation to depolarizing current was closely related to instantaneous temperature, the threshold increase induced by hyperpolarizing current was most sensitive to changes in temperature, probably because warming the nerve causes a transient hyperpolarization by accelerating the electrogenic sodium pump. Consequently, it may be preferable to make allowances for differences in skin temperature when testing patients for abnormal excitability parameters, rather than to change the temperature to a standard value. For most excitability parameters, however, temperature control is not as important as it is for conduction velocity measurements.

  1. Activation of axonal Kv7 channels in human peripheral nerve by flupirtine but not placebo - therapeutic potential for peripheral neuropathies: results of a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Flupirtine is an analgesic with muscle-relaxing properties that activates Kv7 potassium channels. Kv7 channels are expressed along myelinated and unmyelinated peripheral axons where their activation is expected to reduce axonal excitability and potentially contribute to flupirtine’s clinical profile. Trial design To investigate the electrical excitability of peripheral myelinated axons following orally administered flupirtine, in-vitro experiments on isolated peripheral nerve segments were combined with a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase I clinical trial (RCT). Methods Threshold tracking was used to assess the electrical excitability of myelinated axons in isolated segments of human sural nerve in vitro and motoneurones to abductor pollicis brevis (APB) in situ in healthy subjects. In addition, the effect of flupirtine on ectopic action potential generation in myelinated axons was examined using ischemia of the lower arm. Results Flupirtine (3-30 μM) shortened the relative refractory period and increased post-conditioned superexcitability in human myelinated axons in vitro. Similarly, in healthy subjects the relative refractory period of motoneurones to APB was reduced 2 hours after oral flupirtine but not following placebo. Whether this effect was due to a direct action of flupirtine on peripheral axons or temperature could not be resolved. Flupirtine (200 mg p.o.) also reduced ectopic axonal activity induced by 10 minutes of lower arm ischemia. In particular, high frequency (ca. 200 Hz) components of EMG were reduced in the post-ischemic period. Finally, visual analogue scale ratings of sensations perceived during the post-ischemic period were reduced following flupirtine (200 mg p.o.). Conclusions Clinical doses of flupirtine reduce the excitability of peripheral myelinated axons. Trial registration ClinicalTrials registration is NCT01450865. PMID:23394517

  2. Inducing LTD-Like Effect in the Human Motor Cortex with Low Frequency and Very Short Duration Paired Associative Stimulation: An Exploratory Study.

    PubMed

    Srivanitchapoom, Prachaya; Park, Jung E; Thirugnanasambandam, Nivethida; Panyakaew, Pattamon; Ramos, Vesper Fe Marie; Pandey, Sanjay; Wu, Tianxia; Hallett, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Paired associative stimulation (PAS) is an established technique to investigate synaptic plasticity in the human motor cortex (M1). Classically, to induce long-term depression- (LTD-) or long-term potentiation-like effects in the human M1, studies have used low frequency and long duration trains of PAS. In the present study, we explored an LTD-like effect using very short duration and low frequency of PAS10 ms protocols in human M1. Methods. Six protocols of low frequency PAS10 ms (ranging from 0.2 Hz to 1 Hz) were investigated with very short durations of 1 and 2 minutes stimulation. Six healthy volunteers were included in each protocol. We obtained motor-evoked potentials from right abductor pollicis brevis muscle before and after applying PAS10 ms up to 30 minutes. After we found PAS10 ms protocol which induced an LTD-like effect, we tested that protocol on additional 5 subjects. Results. One-way repeated-measures ANOVA showed that only the group of 1-minute stimulation of 0.25 Hz induced an LTD-like effect. When adding the additional subjects, the effect remained and lasted for 30 minutes. Conclusion. Low frequency and very short duration of PAS10 ms potentially induced an LTD-like effect in human M1. With further verification, this method might be useful for research relating to synaptic plasticity by reducing the duration of study and minimizing subject discomfort.

  3. Stimulus uncertainty enhances long-term potentiation-like plasticity in human motor cortex.

    PubMed

    Sale, Martin V; Nydam, Abbey S; Mattingley, Jason B

    2017-03-01

    Plasticity can be induced in human cortex using paired associative stimulation (PAS), which repeatedly and predictably pairs a peripheral electrical stimulus with transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to the contralateral motor region. Many studies have reported small or inconsistent effects of PAS. Given that uncertain stimuli can promote learning, the predictable nature of the stimulation in conventional PAS paradigms might serve to attenuate plasticity induction. Here, we introduced stimulus uncertainty into the PAS paradigm to investigate if it can boost plasticity induction. Across two experimental sessions, participants (n = 28) received a modified PAS paradigm consisting of a random combination of 90 paired stimuli and 90 unpaired (TMS-only) stimuli. Prior to each of these stimuli, participants also received an auditory cue which either reliably predicted whether the upcoming stimulus was paired or unpaired (no uncertainty condition) or did not predict the upcoming stimulus (maximum uncertainty condition). Motor evoked potentials (MEPs) evoked from abductor pollicis brevis (APB) muscle quantified cortical excitability before and after PAS. MEP amplitude increased significantly 15 min following PAS in the maximum uncertainty condition. There was no reliable change in MEP amplitude in the no uncertainty condition, nor between post-PAS MEP amplitudes across the two conditions. These results suggest that stimulus uncertainty may provide a novel means to enhance plasticity induction with the PAS paradigm in human motor cortex. To provide further support to the notion that stimulus uncertainty and prediction error promote plasticity, future studies should further explore the time course of these changes, and investigate what aspects of stimulus uncertainty are critical in boosting plasticity.

  4. Acute effects of muscle vibration on sensorimotor integration.

    PubMed

    Lapole, Thomas; Tindel, Jérémy

    2015-02-05

    Projections from the somesthetic cortex are believed to be involved in the modulation of motor cortical excitability by muscle vibration. The aim of the present pilot study was to analyse the effects of a vibration intervention on short-latency afferent inhibition (SAI), long-latency afferent inhibition (LAI), and afferent facilitation (AF), three intracortical mechanisms reflecting sensorimotor integration. Abductor pollicis brevis (APB) SAI, AF and LAI were investigated on 10 subjects by conditioning test transcranial magnetic stimulation pulses with median nerve electrical stimulation at inter-stimuli intervals in the range 15-25 ms, 25-60 ms, and 100-200 ms, respectively. Test motor evoked potentials (MEPs) were compared to unconditioned MEPs. Measurements were performed before and just after 15 min of vibration applied to the muscle belly of APB at a frequency of 80 Hz. SAI and LAI responses were significantly reduced compared to unconditioned test MEPs (P=0.039 and P<0.001, respectively). AF MEP amplitude was greater than SAI and LAI one (P=0.009 and P=0.004, respectively), but not different from test MEP (P=0.511). There was no significant main effect of vibration (P=0.905). However, 4 subjects were clearly identified as responders. Their mean vibration-induced increase was 324 ± 195% in APB SAI MEP amplitude, and 158 ± 53% and 319 ± 80% in AF and LAI, respectively. Significant differences in SAI, AF and LAI vibration-induced changes were found for responders when compared to non-responders (P=0.019, P=0.038, and P=0.01, respectively). A single session of APB vibration may increase sensorimotor integration, via decreased inhibition and increased facilitation. However, such results were not observed for all subjects, suggesting that other factors (such as attention to the sensory inputs) may have played a role.

  5. Presence and Absence of Muscle Contraction Elicited by Peripheral Nerve Electrical Stimulation Differentially Modulate Primary Motor Cortex Excitability

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Ryoki; Kotan, Shinichi; Nakagawa, Masaki; Miyaguchi, Shota; Kojima, Sho; Saito, Kei; Inukai, Yasuto; Onishi, Hideaki

    2017-01-01

    Modulation of cortical excitability by sensory inputs is a critical component of sensorimotor integration. Sensory afferents, including muscle and joint afferents, to somatosensory cortex (S1) modulate primary motor cortex (M1) excitability, but the effects of muscle and joint afferents specifically activated by muscle contraction are unknown. We compared motor evoked potentials (MEPs) following median nerve stimulation (MNS) above and below the contraction threshold based on the persistence of M-waves. Peripheral nerve electrical stimulation (PES) conditions, including right MNS at the wrist at 110% motor threshold (MT; 110% MNS condition), right MNS at the index finger (sensory digit nerve stimulation [DNS]) with stimulus intensity approximately 110% MNS (DNS condition), and right MNS at the wrist at 90% MT (90% MNS condition) were applied. PES was administered in a 4 s ON and 6 s OFF cycle for 20 min at 30 Hz. In Experiment 1 (n = 15), MEPs were recorded from the right abductor pollicis brevis (APB) before (baseline) and after PES. In Experiment 2 (n = 15), M- and F-waves were recorded from the right APB. Stimulation at 110% MNS at the wrist evoking muscle contraction increased MEP amplitudes after PES compared with those at baseline, whereas DNS at the index finger and 90% MNS at the wrist not evoking muscle contraction decreased MEP amplitudes after PES. M- and F-waves, which reflect spinal cord or muscular and neuromuscular junctions, did not change following PES. These results suggest that muscle contraction and concomitant muscle/joint afferent inputs specifically enhance M1 excitability. PMID:28392766

  6. Modulation of proprioceptive integration in the motor cortex shapes human motor learning.

    PubMed

    Rosenkranz, Karin; Rothwell, John C

    2012-06-27

    Sensory and motor systems interact closely during movement performance. Furthermore, proprioceptive feedback from ongoing movements provides an important input for successful learning of a new motor skill. Here, we show in humans that attention to proprioceptive input during a purely sensory task can influence subsequent learning of a novel motor task. We applied low-amplitude vibration to the abductor pollicis brevis (APB) muscle of eight healthy volunteers for 15 min while they discriminated either a small change in vibration frequency or the presence of a simultaneous weak cutaneous stimulus. Before and after the sensory attention tasks, we evaluated the following in separate experiments: (1) sensorimotor interaction in the motor cortex by testing the efficacy of proprioceptive input to reduce GABA(A)ergic intracortical inhibition using paired-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation, and (2) how well the same subjects learned a ballistic thumb abduction task using the APB muscle. Performance of the vibration discrimination task increased the interaction of proprioceptive input with motor cortex excitability in the APB muscle, whereas performance in the cutaneous discrimination task had the opposite effect. There was a significant correlation between the integration of proprioceptive input in the motor cortex and the motor learning gain: increasing the integration of proprioceptive input from the APB increased the rate of motor learning and reduced performance variability, while decreasing proprioceptive integration had opposite effects. These findings suggest that the sensory attention tasks transiently change how proprioceptive input is integrated into the motor cortex and that these sensory changes drive subsequent learning behavior in the human motor cortex.

  7. Motor cortex plasticity induced by paired associative stimulation is enhanced in physically active individuals.

    PubMed

    Cirillo, John; Lavender, Andrew P; Ridding, Michael C; Semmler, John G

    2009-12-15

    Recent evidence indicates that regular physical activity enhances brain plasticity (i.e. the ability to reorganise neural connections) and improves neurocognitive function. However, the effect of regular physical activity on human motor cortex function is unknown. The purpose of this study was to examine motor cortex plasticity for a small hand muscle in highly active and sedentary individuals. Electromyographic recordings were obtained from the left abductor pollicis brevis (APB) muscle of 14 active and 14 sedentary subjects (aged 18-38 yrs). The extent of physical activity was assessed by questionnaire, where the physically active subjects performed >150 min per day moderate-to-vigorous aerobic activity on at least 5 days per week, whereas the sedentary group performed <20 min per day of physical activity on no more than 3 days per week. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) of the right hemisphere was used to assess changes in APB motor-evoked potentials (MEPs), input-output curve (IO curve), short-interval intracortical inhibition (SICI) and cortical silent period (CSP). Neuroplastic changes were induced using paired-associative stimulation (PAS), which consisted of 90 paired stimuli (0.05 Hz for 30 min) of median nerve electrical stimulation at the wrist followed 25 ms later by TMS to the hand area of motor cortex. The IO curve slope was 35% steeper in individuals with increased physical activity (combined before and after PAS, P < 0.05), suggesting increased motor cortex excitability, although there was no difference in SICI or CSP between groups. PAS induced an increase in MEP amplitude in the physically active subjects (54% increase compared with before, P < 0.01), but no significant facilitation in the sedentary subjects. We conclude that participation in regular physical activity may offer global benefits to motor cortex function that enhances neuroplasticity, which could improve motor learning and neurorehabilitation in physically active individuals.

  8. The effect of dual-task difficulty on the inhibition of the motor cortex.

    PubMed

    Corp, Daniel T; Rogers, Mark A; Youssef, George J; Pearce, Alan J

    2016-02-01

    Dual-tasking is intrinsic to many daily activities, including walking and driving. However, the activity of the primary motor cortex (M1) in response to dual-tasks (DT) is still not well characterised. A recent meta-analysis (Corp in Neurosci Biobehav Rev 43:74-87, 2014) demonstrated a reduction in M1 inhibition during dual-tasking, yet responses were not consistent between studies. It was suggested that DT difficulty might account for some of this between-study variability. The aim of this study was to investigate whether corticospinal excitability and M1 inhibition differed between an easier and more difficult dual-task. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) was applied to participants' abductor pollicis brevis muscle representation during a concurrent pincer grip task and stationary bike-riding. The margin of error in which to maintain pincer grip force was reduced to increase task difficulty. Compared to ST conditions, significantly increased M1 inhibition was demonstrated for the easier, but not more difficult, DT. However, there was no significant difference in M1 inhibition between easy and difficult DTs. The difference in difficulty between the two tasks may not have been wide enough to result in significant differences in M1 inhibition. Increased M1 inhibition for the easy DT condition was in opposition to the reduction in M1 inhibition found in our meta-analysis (Corp in Neurosci Biobehav Rev 43:74-87, 2014). We propose that this may be partially explained by differences in the timing of the TMS pulse between DT studies.

  9. Excitability properties of motor axons in adults with cerebral palsy

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Cliff S.; Zhou, Ping; Marciniak, Christina

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral palsy (CP) is a permanent disorder caused by a lesion to the developing brain that significantly impairs motor function. The neurophysiological mechanisms underlying motor impairment are not well understood. Specifically, few have addressed whether motoneuron or peripheral axon properties are altered in CP, even though disruption of descending inputs to the spinal cord may cause them to change. In the present study, we have compared nerve excitability properties in seven adults with CP and fourteen healthy controls using threshold tracking techniques by stimulating the median nerve at the wrist and recording the compound muscle action potential over the abductor pollicis brevis. The excitability properties in the CP subjects were found to be abnormal. Early and late depolarizing and hyperpolarizing threshold electrotonus was significantly larger (i.e., fanning out), and resting current–threshold (I/V) slope was smaller, in CP compared to control. In addition resting threshold and rheobase tended to be larger in CP. According to a modeling analysis of the data, an increase in leakage current under or through the myelin sheath, i.e., the Barrett–Barrett conductance, combined with a slight hyperpolarization of the resting membrane potential, best explained the group differences in excitability properties. There was a trend for those with greater impairment in gross motor function to have more abnormal axon properties. The findings indicate plasticity of motor axon properties far removed from the site of the lesion. We suspect that this plasticity is caused by disruption of descending inputs to the motoneurons at an early age around the time of their injury. PMID:26089791

  10. Primary Sensory and Motor Cortex Excitability Are Co-Modulated in Response to Peripheral Electrical Nerve Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Schabrun, Siobhan M.; Ridding, Michael C.; Galea, Mary P.; Hodges, Paul W.; Chipchase, Lucinda S.

    2012-01-01

    Peripheral electrical stimulation (PES) is a common clinical technique known to induce changes in corticomotor excitability; PES applied to induce a tetanic motor contraction increases, and PES at sub-motor threshold (sensory) intensities decreases, corticomotor excitability. Understanding of the mechanisms underlying these opposite changes in corticomotor excitability remains elusive. Modulation of primary sensory cortex (S1) excitability could underlie altered corticomotor excitability with PES. Here we examined whether changes in primary sensory (S1) and motor (M1) cortex excitability follow the same time-course when PES is applied using identical stimulus parameters. Corticomotor excitability was measured using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and sensory cortex excitability using somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs) before and after 30 min of PES to right abductor pollicis brevis (APB). Two PES paradigms were tested in separate sessions; PES sufficient to induce a tetanic motor contraction (30–50 Hz; strong motor intensity) and PES at sub motor-threshold intensity (100 Hz). PES applied to induce strong activation of APB increased the size of the N20-P25 component, thought to reflect sensory processing at cortical level, and increased corticomotor excitability. PES at sensory intensity decreased the size of the P25-N33 component and reduced corticomotor excitability. A positive correlation was observed between the changes in amplitude of the cortical SEP components and corticomotor excitability following sensory and motor PES. Sensory PES also increased the sub-cortical P14-N20 SEP component. These findings provide evidence that PES results in co-modulation of S1 and M1 excitability, possibly due to cortico-cortical projections between S1 and M1. This mechanism may underpin changes in corticomotor excitability in response to afferent input generated by PES. PMID:23227260

  11. The effect of electrical stimulation on corticospinal excitability is dependent on application duration: a same subject pre-post test design

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In humans, corticospinal excitability is known to increase following motor electrical stimulation (ES) designed to mimic a voluntary contraction. However, whether the effect is equivalent with different application durations and whether similar effects are apparent for short and long applications is unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the duration of peripheral motor ES influenced its effect on corticospinal excitability. Methods The excitability of the corticomotor pathway to abductor pollicis brevis (APB) was measured in fourteen health subjects using transcranial magnetic stimulation before, immediately after and 10 minutes after three different durations (20-, 40-, 60-min) of motor ES (30Hz, ramped). This intervention was designed to mimic a voluntary contraction in APB. To control for effects of motor ES on the peripheral elements (muscle fibre, membrane, neuromuscular junction), maximum compound muscle actions potentials (M-waves) were also recorded at each time point. Results were analysed using a repeated measures analysis of variance. Results Peripheral excitability was reduced following all three motor ES interventions. Conversely, corticospinal excitability was increased immediately following 20- and 40-min applications of motor ES and this increase was maintained at least 20-min following the intervention. A 60-min application of motor ES did not alter corticospinal excitability. Conclusions A 20-min application of motor ES that is designed to mimic voluntary muscle contraction is as effective as that applied for 40-min when the aim of the intervention is to increase corticospinal excitability. Longer motor ES durations of 60-min do not influence corticospinal excitability, possibly as a result of homeostatic plasticity mechanisms. PMID:23758902

  12. Basic study on the influence of inhibition induced by the magnetic stimulation on the peripheral nerve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Aya; Torii, Tetsuya; Iwahashi, Masakuni; Iramina, Keiji

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to analyze the inhibition mechanism of magnetic stimulation on motor function. A magnetic stimulator with a flat figure-eight coil was used to stimulate the peripheral nerve of the antebrachium. The intensity of magnetic stimulation was 0.8 T, and the stimulation frequency was 1 Hz. The amplitudes of the motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) at the abductor pollicis brevis muscle and first dorsal interosseous muscle were used to evaluate the effects of magnetic stimulation. The effects of magnetic stimulation were evaluated by analyzing the MEP amplitude before and after magnetic stimulation to the primary motor cortex. The results showed that MEP amplitude after magnetic stimulation compared with before magnetic stimulation decreased. Because there were individual differences in MEP amplitude induced by magnetic stimulation, the MEP amplitude after stimulation was normalized by the amplitude of each participant before stimulation. The MEP amplitude after stimulation decreased by approximately 58% (p < 0.01) on average compared with before stimulation. Previous studies suggested that magnetic stimulation to the primary motor cortex induced an increase or a decrease in MEP amplitude. Furthermore, previous studies have shown that the alteration in MEP amplitude was induced by cortical excitability based on magnetic stimulation. The results of this study showed that MEP amplitude decreased following magnetic stimulation to the peripheral nerve. We suggest that the decrease in MEP amplitude found in this study was obtained via the feedback from a peripheral nerve through an afferent nerve to the brain. This study suggests that peripheral excitement by magnetic stimulation of the peripheral nerve may control the central nervous system via afferent feedback.

  13. Motor cortical hyperexcitability in idiopathic scoliosis: could focal dystonia be a subclinical etiological factor?

    PubMed

    Doménech, Julio; Tormos, José María; Barrios, Carlos; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro

    2010-02-01

    The aetiology of idiopathic scoliosis (IS) remains unknown; however, there is a growing body of evidence suggesting that the spine deformity could be the expression of a subclinical nervous system disorder. A defective sensory input or an anomalous sensorimotor integration may lead to an abnormal postural tone and therefore the development of a spine deformity. Inhibition of the motor cortico-cortical excitability is abnormal in dystonia. Therefore, the study of cortico-cortical inhibition may shed some insight into the dystonia hypothesis regarding the pathophysiology of IS. Paired pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation was used to study cortico-cortical inhibition and facilitation in nine adolescents with IS, five teenagers with congenital scoliosis (CS) and eight healthy age-matched controls. The effect of a previous conditioning stimulus (80% intensity of resting motor threshold) on the amplitude of the motor-evoked potential induced by the test stimulus (120% of resting motor threshold) was examined at various interstimulus intervals (ISIs) in both abductor pollicis brevis muscles. The results of healthy adolescents and those with CS showed a marked inhibitory effect of the conditioning stimulus on the response to the test stimulus at interstimulus intervals shorter than 6 ms. These findings do not differ from those reported for normal adults. However, children with IS revealed an abnormally reduced cortico-cortical inhibition at the short ISIs. Cortico-cortical inhibition was practically normal on the side of the scoliotic convexity while it was significantly reduced on the side of the scoliotic concavity. In conclusion, these findings support the hypothesis that a dystonic dysfunction underlies in IS. Asymmetrical cortical hyperexcitability may play an important role in the pathogenesis of IS and represents an objective neurophysiological finding that could be used clinically.

  14. Major motor-functional determinants associated with poor self-reported health-related quality of life in myasthenia gravis patients.

    PubMed

    Cioncoloni, David; Casali, Stefania; Ginanneschi, Federica; Carone, Marisa; Veronica, Boni; Rossi, Alessandro; Giannini, Fabio

    2016-05-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an autoimmune neuromuscular disorder in which disabling muscle weakness may affect health-related quality of life (HRQoL). The aim of this study was to investigate which common motor-functional deficits and corresponding severity are most determinant of poor HRQoL in these patients. In 41 patients, the dichotomized first item of the Italian Myasthenia Gravis Questionnaire (IMGQ), categorizing patients who report "good" and "poor" HRQoL, was chosen as dependent-outcome variable. All items composing the myasthenia gravis-specific scale (MG-ADL), i.e. talking, chewing, swallowing, breathing, impairment of ability to brush teeth or comb hair, impairment of ability to rise from chair, double vision, and eyelid droop were acquired as independent variables and dichotomized. Stepwise backward LR multivariable logistic regression analysis was performed. In addition, the main characteristics of patients were compared. MG-ADL items "chewing" ≥1, i.e. "fatigue chewing solid food", and "breathing" ≥2, i.e. "shortness of breath at rest" proved to be significant determinants. Higher dose of corticosteroid therapy was significantly (p = 0.027; r s  = -0.35), correlated with poor HRQoL. At diagnosis, a decremental response to repetitive nerve stimulation (RNS) from the abductor pollicis brevis was significantly more frequent in patients with poor HRQoL. In conclusion, impaired "chewing" and "breathing" functions indicate the need for careful planning of rehabilitation, re-education and patient management. Moreover, decremental response to RNS at diagnosis may identify patients at risk for poor HRQoL.

  15. Changes in corticospinal drive to spinal motoneurones following tablet-based practice of manual dexterity.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Lisbeth H; Jensen, Thor; Christensen, Mark S; Lundbye-Jensen, Jesper; Langberg, Henning; Nielsen, Jens B

    2016-02-01

    The use of touch screens, which require a high level of manual dexterity, has exploded since the development of smartphone and tablet technology. Manual dexterity relies on effective corticospinal control of finger muscles, and we therefore hypothesized that corticospinal drive to finger muscles can be optimized by tablet-based motor practice. To investigate this, sixteen able-bodied females practiced a tablet-based game (3 × 10 min) with their nondominant hand requiring incrementally fast and precise pinching movements involving the thumb and index fingers. The study was designed as a semirandomized crossover study where the participants attended one practice- and one control session. Before and after each session electrophysiological recordings were obtained during three blocks of 50 precision pinch movements in a standardized setup resembling the practiced task. Data recorded during movements included electroencephalographic (EEG) activity from primary motor cortex and electromyographic (EMG) activity from first dorsal interosseous (FDI) and abductor pollicis brevis (APB) muscles. Changes in the corticospinal drive were evaluated from coupling in the frequency domain (coherence) between EEG-EMG and EMG-EMG activity. Following motor practice performance improved significantly and a significant increase in EEG-EMGAPB and EMGAPB-EMGFDI coherence in the beta band (15-30 Hz) was observed. No changes were observed after the control session. Our results show that tablet-based motor practice is associated with changes in the common corticospinal drive to spinal motoneurons involved in manual dexterity. Tablet-based motor practice may be a motivating training tool for stroke patients who struggle with loss of dexterity.

  16. Hemispheric differences in use-dependent corticomotor plasticity in young and old adults.

    PubMed

    Cirillo, John; Rogasch, Nigel C; Semmler, John G

    2010-08-01

    The aim of this study was to examine corticomotor excitability and plasticity following repetitive thumb abduction training in left and right hands of young and old adults. Electromyographic recordings were obtained from the abductor pollicis brevis (APB) muscle of 12 young (aged 18-27 years) and 14 old (aged 63-75 years) adults. Motor training consisted of 300 ballistic abductions of the thumb to maximize peak abduction acceleration, with each hand tested in a separate session. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) over the primary motor cortex (M1) was used to assess changes in contralateral APB motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) and short-interval intracortical inhibition (SICI) before and after training. For young and old adults, APB MEP amplitude increased for both hands after training, which is indicative of use-dependent plasticity. However, the increase in MEP amplitude was 21% (P = 0.04) greater in the left (non-dominant) hand compared with the right (dominant) hand. This occurred despite a 40% greater improvement in peak thumb abduction acceleration (motor learning) for the right hand in young subjects compared with the left hand in young subjects (P < 0.04) and the right hand in old subjects (P < 0.01). Furthermore, no difference in use-dependent plasticity was observed between young and old adults, and SICI remained unchanged following ballistic training for both hands in all subjects. These findings suggest that there is greater strengthening of corticomotor circuits for control of the left compared with the right hand during simple ballistic thumb training and that an age-related decline in motor learning was observed only in the dominant hand. In contrast to previous studies, these data also indicate that young and old adults can demonstrate similar use-dependent corticomotor plasticity during this simple thumb-training task.

  17. Motor Cortical Plasticity to Training Started in Childhood: The Example of Piano Players

    PubMed Central

    Inuggi, Alberto; Gonzalez-Rosa, Javier J.; Spagnolo, Francesca; Coppi, Elisabetta; Nuara, Arturo; Houdayer, Elise; Comi, Giancarlo; Leocani, Letizia

    2016-01-01

    Converging evidence suggest that motor training is associated with early and late changes of the cortical motor system. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) offers the possibility to study plastic rearrangements of the motor system in physiological and pathological conditions. We used TMS to characterize long-term changes in upper limb motor cortical representation and interhemispheric inhibition associated with bimanual skill training in pianists who started playing in an early age. Ipsilateral silent period (iSP) and cortical TMS mapping of hand muscles were obtained from 30 strictly right-handed subjects (16 pianists, 14 naïve controls), together with electromyographic recording of mirror movements (MMs) to voluntary hand movements. In controls, motor cortical representation of hand muscles was larger on the dominant (DH) than on the non-dominant hemisphere (NDH). On the contrary, pianists showed symmetric cortical output maps, being their DH less represented than in controls. In naïve subjects, the iSP was smaller on the right vs left abductor pollicis brevis (APB) indicating a weaker inhibition from the NDH to the DH. In pianists, interhemispheric inhibition was more symmetric as their DH was better inhibited than in controls. Electromyographic MMs were observed only in naïve subjects (7/14) and only to voluntary movement of the non-dominant hand. Subjects with MM had a lower iSP area on the right APB compared with all the others. Our findings suggest a more symmetrical motor cortex organization in pianists, both in terms of muscle cortical representation and interhemispheric inhibition. Although we cannot disentangle training-related from preexisting conditions, it is possible that long-term bimanual practice may reshape motor cortical representation and rebalance interhemispheric interactions, which in naïve right-handed subjects would both tend to favour the dominant hemisphere. PMID:27336584

  18. Inducing LTD-Like Effect in the Human Motor Cortex with Low Frequency and Very Short Duration Paired Associative Stimulation: An Exploratory Study

    PubMed Central

    Srivanitchapoom, Prachaya; Park, Jung E.; Thirugnanasambandam, Nivethida; Panyakaew, Pattamon; Ramos, Vesper Fe Marie; Pandey, Sanjay; Wu, Tianxia; Hallett, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Paired associative stimulation (PAS) is an established technique to investigate synaptic plasticity in the human motor cortex (M1). Classically, to induce long-term depression- (LTD-) or long-term potentiation-like effects in the human M1, studies have used low frequency and long duration trains of PAS. In the present study, we explored an LTD-like effect using very short duration and low frequency of PAS10 ms protocols in human M1. Methods. Six protocols of low frequency PAS10 ms (ranging from 0.2 Hz to 1 Hz) were investigated with very short durations of 1 and 2 minutes stimulation. Six healthy volunteers were included in each protocol. We obtained motor-evoked potentials from right abductor pollicis brevis muscle before and after applying PAS10 ms up to 30 minutes. After we found PAS10 ms protocol which induced an LTD-like effect, we tested that protocol on additional 5 subjects. Results. One-way repeated-measures ANOVA showed that only the group of 1-minute stimulation of 0.25 Hz induced an LTD-like effect. When adding the additional subjects, the effect remained and lasted for 30 minutes. Conclusion. Low frequency and very short duration of PAS10 ms potentially induced an LTD-like effect in human M1. With further verification, this method might be useful for research relating to synaptic plasticity by reducing the duration of study and minimizing subject discomfort. PMID:26904298

  19. Motor cortical hyperexcitability in idiopathic scoliosis: could focal dystonia be a subclinical etiological factor?

    PubMed Central

    Tormos, José María; Barrios, Carlos; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro

    2009-01-01

    The aetiology of idiopathic scoliosis (IS) remains unknown; however, there is a growing body of evidence suggesting that the spine deformity could be the expression of a subclinical nervous system disorder. A defective sensory input or an anomalous sensorimotor integration may lead to an abnormal postural tone and therefore the development of a spine deformity. Inhibition of the motor cortico-cortical excitability is abnormal in dystonia. Therefore, the study of cortico-cortical inhibition may shed some insight into the dystonia hypothesis regarding the pathophysiology of IS. Paired pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation was used to study cortico-cortical inhibition and facilitation in nine adolescents with IS, five teenagers with congenital scoliosis (CS) and eight healthy age-matched controls. The effect of a previous conditioning stimulus (80% intensity of resting motor threshold) on the amplitude of the motor-evoked potential induced by the test stimulus (120% of resting motor threshold) was examined at various interstimulus intervals (ISIs) in both abductor pollicis brevis muscles. The results of healthy adolescents and those with CS showed a marked inhibitory effect of the conditioning stimulus on the response to the test stimulus at interstimulus intervals shorter than 6 ms. These findings do not differ from those reported for normal adults. However, children with IS revealed an abnormally reduced cortico-cortical inhibition at the short ISIs. Cortico-cortical inhibition was practically normal on the side of the scoliotic convexity while it was significantly reduced on the side of the scoliotic concavity. In conclusion, these findings support the hypothesis that a dystonic dysfunction underlies in IS. Asymmetrical cortical hyperexcitability may play an important role in the pathogenesis of IS and represents an objective neurophysiological finding that could be used clinically. PMID:20033462

  20. Primary sensory and motor cortex excitability are co-modulated in response to peripheral electrical nerve stimulation.

    PubMed

    Schabrun, Siobhan M; Ridding, Michael C; Galea, Mary P; Hodges, Paul W; Chipchase, Lucinda S

    2012-01-01

    Peripheral electrical stimulation (PES) is a common clinical technique known to induce changes in corticomotor excitability; PES applied to induce a tetanic motor contraction increases, and PES at sub-motor threshold (sensory) intensities decreases, corticomotor excitability. Understanding of the mechanisms underlying these opposite changes in corticomotor excitability remains elusive. Modulation of primary sensory cortex (S1) excitability could underlie altered corticomotor excitability with PES. Here we examined whether changes in primary sensory (S1) and motor (M1) cortex excitability follow the same time-course when PES is applied using identical stimulus parameters. Corticomotor excitability was measured using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and sensory cortex excitability using somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs) before and after 30 min of PES to right abductor pollicis brevis (APB). Two PES paradigms were tested in separate sessions; PES sufficient to induce a tetanic motor contraction (30-50 Hz; strong motor intensity) and PES at sub motor-threshold intensity (100 Hz). PES applied to induce strong activation of APB increased the size of the N(20)-P(25) component, thought to reflect sensory processing at cortical level, and increased corticomotor excitability. PES at sensory intensity decreased the size of the P25-N33 component and reduced corticomotor excitability. A positive correlation was observed between the changes in amplitude of the cortical SEP components and corticomotor excitability following sensory and motor PES. Sensory PES also increased the sub-cortical P(14)-N(20) SEP component. These findings provide evidence that PES results in co-modulation of S1 and M1 excitability, possibly due to cortico-cortical projections between S1 and M1. This mechanism may underpin changes in corticomotor excitability in response to afferent input generated by PES.

  1. Cumulative effects of anodal and priming cathodal tDCS on pegboard test performance and motor cortical excitability.

    PubMed

    Christova, Monica; Rafolt, Dietmar; Gallasch, Eugen

    2015-01-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) protocols applied over the primary motor cortex are associated with changes in motor performance. This transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) study examines whether cathodal tDCS prior to motor training, combined with anodal tDCS during motor training improves motor performance and off-line learning. Three study groups (n=36) were trained on the grooved pegboard test (GPT) in a randomized, between-subjects design: SHAM-sham stimulation prior and during training, STIM1-sham stimulation prior and atDCS during training, STIM2-ctDCS stimulation prior and atDCS during training. Motor performance was assessed by GPT completion time and retested 14 days later to determine off-line learning. Cortical excitability was assessed via TMS at baseline (T0), prior training (T1), after training (T2), and 60 min after training (T3). Motor evoked potentials (MEP) were recorded from m. abductor pollicis brevis of the active left hand. GPT completion time was reduced for both stimulated groups compared to SHAM. For STIM2 this reduction in time was significantly higher than for STIM1 and further off-line learning occurred after STIM2. After ctDCS at T1, MEP amplitude and intracortical facilitation was decreased and intracortical inhibition was increased. After atDCS at T2, an opposite effect was observed for STIM1 and STIM2. For STIM2 these neuromodulatory effects were retained until T3. It is concluded that application of atDCS during the training improves pegboard performance and that additional priming with ctDCS has a positive effect on off-line learning. These cumulative behavioral gains were indicated by the preceding neuromodulatory changes.

  2. Heavy alcohol use in adolescence is associated with altered cortical activity: a combined TMS-EEG study.

    PubMed

    Kaarre, Outi; Kallioniemi, Elisa; Könönen, Mervi; Tolmunen, Tommi; Kekkonen, Virve; Kivimäki, Petri; Heikkinen, Noora; Ferreri, Florinda; Laukkanen, Eila; Määttä, Sara

    2016-12-23

    Long-term alcohol use affects cognitive and neurophysiological functioning as well as structural brain development. Combining simultaneous electroencephalogram (EEG) recording with transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) enables direct, in vivo exploration of cortical excitability and assessment of effective and functional connectivity. In the central nervous system, the effects of alcohol are particularly mediated by alterations in gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic neurotransmission, and TMS-evoked potentials (TEPs) N45 and N100 in EEG are known to reflect GABAergic function. However, no previous studies have examined the effects of long-term alcohol use in adolescence on TEPs. In this study, a total of 27 young adults with heavy alcohol use in adolescence and 25 age-matched, gender-matched and education-matched controls with little or no alcohol use participated in TMS-EEG measurements. The motor cortex (M1) was stimulated with an intensity of 90 percent of the resting motor threshold of the abductor pollicis brevis muscle. No significant differences were found in the resting motor threshold, TEP latencies or neuropsychological functioning between the groups. We observed an increase in the global mean field power in the time window of 54- to 75-millisecond post-TMS, as well as significant topographical differences in the P60 and N100 in those with a history of heavy drinking. Furthermore, there was a marked increase in the GABAergic N45 amplitude in alcohol users. These findings suggest that long-term alcohol use in adolescence, even when not meeting the diagnostic criteria for a disorder, is associated with changes in connectivity and cortical excitability.

  3. Motor cortical function and the precision grip.

    PubMed

    Geevasinga, Nimeshan; Menon, Parvathi; Kiernan, Matthew C; Vucic, Steve

    2014-12-01

    While task-dependent changes in motor cortical outputs have been previously reported, the issue of whether such changes are specific for complex hand tasks remains unresolved. The aim of the present study was to determine whether cortical inhibitory tone and cortical output were greater during precision grip and power grip. Motor cortex excitability was undertaken by using the transcranial magnetic stimulation threshold tracking technique in 15 healthy subjects. The motor-evoked potential (MEP) responses were recorded over the abductor pollicis brevis (APB), with the hand in the following positions: (1) rest, (2) precision grip and (3) power grip. The MEP amplitude (MEP amplitude REST 23.6 ± 3.3%; MEP amplitude PRECISION GRIP 35.2 ± 5.6%; MEP amplitude POWER GRIP 19.6 ± 3.4%, F = 2.4, P < 0.001) and stimulus-response gradient (SLOPEREST 0.06 ± 0.01; SLOPEPRCISION GRIP 0.15 ± 0.04; SLOPE POWER GRIP 0.07 ± 0.01, P < 0.05) were significantly increased during precision grip. Short interval intracortical inhibition (SICI) was significantly reduced during the precision grip (SICI REST 15.0 ± 2.3%; SICI PRECISION GRIP 9.7 ± 1.5%, SICI POWER GRIP 15.9 ± 2.7%, F = 2.6, P < 0.05). The present study suggests that changes in motor cortex excitability are specific for precision grip, with functional coupling of descending corticospinal pathways controlling thumb and finger movements potentially forming the basis of these cortical changes.

  4. New postcranial fossils of Australopithecus afarensis from Hadar, Ethiopia (1990-2007).

    PubMed

    Ward, Carol V; Kimbel, William H; Harmon, Elizabeth H; Johanson, Donald C

    2012-07-01

    Renewed fieldwork at Hadar, Ethiopia, from 1990 to 2007, by a team based at the Institute of Human Origins, Arizona State University, resulted in the recovery of 49 new postcranial fossils attributed to Australopithecus afarensis. These fossils include elements from both the upper and lower limbs as well as the axial skeleton, and increase the sample size of previously known elements for A. afarensis. The expanded Hadar sample provides evidence of multiple new individuals that are intermediate in size between the smallest and largest individuals previously documented, and so support the hypothesis that a single dimorphic species is represented. Consideration of the functional anatomy of the new fossils supports the hypothesis that no functional or behavioral differences need to be invoked to explain the morphological variation between large and small A. afarensis individuals. Several specimens provide important new data about this species, including new vertebrae supporting the hypothesis that A. afarensis may have had a more human-like thoracic form than previously appreciated, with an invaginated thoracic vertebral column. A distal pollical phalanx confirms the presence of a human-like flexor pollicis longus muscle in A. afarensis. The new fossils include the first complete fourth metatarsal known for A. afarensis. This specimen exhibits the dorsoplantarly expanded base, axial torsion and domed head typical of humans, revealing the presence of human-like permanent longitudinal and transverse arches and extension of the metatarsophalangeal joints as in human-like heel-off during gait. The new Hadar postcranial fossils provide a more complete picture of postcranial functional anatomy, and individual and temporal variation within this sample. They provide the basis for further in-depth analyses of the behavioral and evolutionary significance of A. afarensis anatomy, and greater insight into the biology and evolution of these early hominins.

  5. Intramuscular nerve distribution patterns of anterior forearm muscles in children: a guide for botulinum toxin injection.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fangjiu; Zhang, Xiaoming; Xie, Xiadan; Yang, Shengbo; Xu, Yan; Xie, Peng

    2016-01-01

    Botulinum toxin (BoNT) can relieve muscle spasticity by blocking axon terminals acetylcholine release at the motor endplate (MEP) and is the safest and most effective agent for the treatment of muscle spasticity in children with cerebral palsy. In order to achieve maximum effect with minimum effective dose of BoNT, one needs to choose an injection site as near to the MEP zone as possible. This requires a detailed understanding about the nerve terminal distributions within the muscles targeted for BoNT injection. This study focuses on BoNT treatment in children with muscle spasms caused by cerebral palsy. Considering the differences between children and adults in anatomy, we used child cadavers and measured both the nerve entry points and nerve terminal sense zones in three deep muscles of the anterior forearm: flexor digitorum profundus (FDP), flexor pollicis longus (FPL), and pronator quadratus (PQ). We measured the nerve entry points by using the forearm midline as a reference and demonstrated intramuscular nerve terminal dense zones by using a modified Sihler's nerve staining technique. The locations of the nerve entry points and that of the nerve terminal dense zones in the muscles were compared. We found that all nerve entry points are away from the corresponding intramuscular nerve terminal dense zones. Simply selecting nerve entry points as the sites for BoNT injection may not be an optimal choice for best effects in blocking muscle spasm. We propose that the location of the nerve terminal dense zones in each individual muscle should be used as the optimal target sites for BoNT injection when treating muscle spasms in children with cerebral palsy.

  6. Intramuscular nerve distribution patterns of anterior forearm muscles in children: a guide for botulinum toxin injection

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Fangjiu; Zhang, Xiaoming; Xie, Xiadan; Yang, Shengbo; Xu, Yan; Xie, Peng

    2016-01-01

    Botulinum toxin (BoNT) can relieve muscle spasticity by blocking axon terminals acetylcholine release at the motor endplate (MEP) and is the safest and most effective agent for the treatment of muscle spasticity in children with cerebral palsy. In order to achieve maximum effect with minimum effective dose of BoNT, one needs to choose an injection site as near to the MEP zone as possible. This requires a detailed understanding about the nerve terminal distributions within the muscles targeted for BoNT injection. This study focuses on BoNT treatment in children with muscle spasms caused by cerebral palsy. Considering the differences between children and adults in anatomy, we used child cadavers and measured both the nerve entry points and nerve terminal sense zones in three deep muscles of the anterior forearm: flexor digitorum profundus (FDP), flexor pollicis longus (FPL), and pronator quadratus (PQ). We measured the nerve entry points by using the forearm midline as a reference and demonstrated intramuscular nerve terminal dense zones by using a modified Sihler’s nerve staining technique. The locations of the nerve entry points and that of the nerve terminal dense zones in the muscles were compared. We found that all nerve entry points are away from the corresponding intramuscular nerve terminal dense zones. Simply selecting nerve entry points as the sites for BoNT injection may not be an optimal choice for best effects in blocking muscle spasm. We propose that the location of the nerve terminal dense zones in each individual muscle should be used as the optimal target sites for BoNT injection when treating muscle spasms in children with cerebral palsy. PMID:28078019

  7. Common Input to Motor Units of Intrinsic and Extrinsic Hand Muscles During Two-Digit Object Hold

    PubMed Central

    Winges, Sara A.; Kornatz, Kurt W.; Santello, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Anatomical and physiological evidence suggests that common input to motor neurons of hand muscles is an important neural mechanism for hand control. To gain insight into the synaptic input underlying the coordination of hand muscles, significant effort has been devoted to describing the distribution of common input across motor units of extrinsic muscles. Much less is known, however, about the distribution of common input to motor units belonging to different intrinsic muscles and to intrinsic-extrinsic muscle pairs. To address this void in the literature, we quantified the incidence and strength of near-simultaneous discharges of motor units residing in either the same or different intrinsic hand muscles (m. first dorsal, FDI, and m. first palmar interosseus, FPI) during two-digit object hold. To extend the characterization of common input to pairs of extrinsic muscles (previous work) and pairs of intrinsic muscles (present work), we also recorded electromyographic (EMG) activity from an extrinsic thumb muscle (m. flexor pollicis longus, FPL). Motor-unit synchrony across FDI and FPI was weak (common input strength, CIS, mean ± SE: 0.17 ± 0.02). Similarly, motor units from extrinsic-intrinsic muscle pairs were characterized by weak synchrony (FPL-FDI: 0.25 ± 0.02; FPL-FPI: 0.29 ± 0.03) although stronger than FDI-FPI. Last, CIS from within FDI and FPI was more than three times stronger (0.70 ± 0.06 and 0.66 ± 0.06, respectively) than across these muscles. We discuss present and previous findings within the framework of muscle-pair specific distribution of common input to hand muscles based on their functional role in grasping. PMID:18171707

  8. Common input to motor units of intrinsic and extrinsic hand muscles during two-digit object hold.

    PubMed

    Winges, Sara A; Kornatz, Kurt W; Santello, Marco

    2008-03-01

    Anatomical and physiological evidence suggests that common input to motor neurons of hand muscles is an important neural mechanism for hand control. To gain insight into the synaptic input underlying the coordination of hand muscles, significant effort has been devoted to describing the distribution of common input across motor units of extrinsic muscles. Much less is known, however, about the distribution of common input to motor units belonging to different intrinsic muscles and to intrinsic-extrinsic muscle pairs. To address this void in the literature, we quantified the incidence and strength of near-simultaneous discharges of motor units residing in either the same or different intrinsic hand muscles (m. first dorsal, FDI, and m. first palmar interosseus, FPI) during two-digit object hold. To extend the characterization of common input to pairs of extrinsic muscles (previous work) and pairs of intrinsic muscles (present work), we also recorded electromyographic (EMG) activity from an extrinsic thumb muscle (m. flexor pollicis longus, FPL). Motor-unit synchrony across FDI and FPI was weak (common input strength, CIS, mean +/- SE: 0.17 +/- 0.02). Similarly, motor units from extrinsic-intrinsic muscle pairs were characterized by weak synchrony (FPL-FDI: 0.25 +/- 0.02; FPL-FPI: 0.29 +/- 0.03) although stronger than FDI-FPI. Last, CIS from within FDI and FPI was more than three times stronger (0.70 +/- 0.06 and 0.66 +/- 0.06, respectively) than across these muscles. We discuss present and previous findings within the framework of muscle-pair specific distribution of common input to hand muscles based on their functional role in grasping.

  9. Muscle-Pair Specific Distribution and Grip-Type Modulation of Neural Common Input to Extrinsic Digit Flexors

    PubMed Central

    Winges, Sara A.; Johnston, Jamie A.; Santello, Marco

    2007-01-01

    To gain insight into the synergistic control of hand muscles, we have recently quantified the strength of correlated neural activity across motor units from extrinsic digit flexors during a five-digit object-hold task. We found stronger synchrony and coherence across motor units from thumb and index finger flexor muscle compartment than between the thumb flexor and other finger flexor muscle compartments. The present study of two-digit object hold was designed to determine the extent to which such distribution of common input among thumb-finger flexor muscle compartments, revealed by holding an object with five digits, is preserved when varying the functional role of a given digit pair. We recorded normal force exerted by the digits and electrical activity of single motor units from muscle flexor pollicis longus (FPL) and two compartments of the m. flexor digitorum profundus (FDP2 and FDP3; index and middle finger, respectively). Consistent with our previous results from five-digit grasping, synchrony and coherence across motor units from FPL-FDP2 was significantly stronger than in FPL-FDP3 during object hold with two digits [common input strength: 0.49 ± 0.02 and 0.35 ± 0.02 (means ± SE), respectively; peak coherence: 0.0054 and 0.0038, respectively]. This suggests that the distribution of common neural input is muscle-pair specific regardless of grip type. However, the strength of coherence, but not synchrony, was significantly stronger in two- versus five-digit object hold for both muscle combinations, suggesting the periodicity of common input is sensitive to grip type. PMID:16723414

  10. Periodic Modulation of Motor-Unit Activity in Extrinsic Hand Muscles During Multidigit Grasping

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Jamie A.; Winges, Sara A.; Santello, Marco

    2007-01-01

    We recently examined the extent to which motor units of digit flexor muscles receive common input during multidigit grasping. This task elicited moderate to strong motor-unit synchrony (common input strength, CIS) across muscles (flexor digitorum profundus, FDP, and flexor pollicis longus, FPL) and across FDP muscle compartments, although the strength of this common input was not uniform across digit pairs. To further characterize the neural mechanisms underlying the control of multidigit grasping, we analyzed the relationship between firing of single motor units from these hand muscles in the frequency domain by computing coherence. We report three primary findings. First, in contrast to what has been reported in intrinsic hand muscles, motor units belonging to different muscles and muscle compartments of extrinsic digit flexors exhibited significant coherence in the 0- to 5- and 5- to 10-Hz frequency ranges and much weaker coherence in the higher 10–20 Hz range (maximum 0.0025 and 0.0008, respectively, pooled across all FDP compartment pairs). Second, the strength and incidence of coherence differed considerably across digit pairs. Third, contrary to what has been reported in the literature, across-muscle coherence can be stronger and more prevalent than within-muscle coherence, as FPL–FDP2 (thumb-index digit pair) exhibited the strongest and most prevalent coherence in our data (0.010 and 43% at 3 Hz, respectively). The heterogeneous organization of common input to these muscles and muscle compartments is discussed in relation to the functional role of individual digit pairs in the coordination of multiple digit forces in grasping. PMID:15744006

  11. Thumb and finger forces produced by motor units in the long flexor of the human thumb

    PubMed Central

    Yu, W S; Kilbreath, S L; Fitzpatrick, R C; Gandevia, S C

    2007-01-01

    The uncommonly good proprioceptive performance of the long flexor of the thumb, flexor pollicis longus (FPL), may add significantly to human manual dexterity. We investigated the forces produced by FPL single motor units during a weak static grip involving all digits by spike-triggered averaging from single motor units, and by averaging from twitches produced by intramuscular stimulation. Nine adult subjects were studied. The forces produced at each digit were used to assess how forces produced in FPL are distributed to the fingers. Most FPL motor units produced very low forces on the thumb and were positively correlated with the muscle force at recruitment. Activity in FPL motor units commonly loaded the index finger (42/55 units), but less commonly the other fingers (P < 0.001). On average, these motor units produced small but significant loading forces on the index finger (∼5.3% of their force on the thumb) with the same time-to-peak force as the thumb (∼50 ms), but had no significant effect on other fingers. However, intramuscular stimulation within FPL did not produce significant forces in any finger. Coherence at 2–10 Hz between the thumb and index finger force was twice that for the other finger forces and the coherence to the non-index fingers was not altered when the index finger did not participate in the grasp. These results indicate that, within the long-term coordinated forces of all digits during grasping, FPL motor units generate forces highly focused on the thumb with minimal peripheral transfer to the fingers and that there is a small but inflexible neural coupling to the flexors of the index finger. PMID:17656436

  12. The clinical effect of tendon repair for tendon spontaneous rupture after corticosteroid injection in hands

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Hui; Yang, Hu; Shen, Hui; Ye, Ganmin; Lin, Xiang-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Corticosteroid injections for hand tendinitis can lead to a rare significant complication of tendon spontaneous rupture. However, only sporadic cases were reported in the literature before. This study was designed to gauge the clinical effect of tendon repair in patients of tendon spontaneous rupture after corticosteroid injection and analyze our experience. This was a retrospective observational study of 13 patients (8 women and 5 men) operated between July 2011 and December 2015 for tendon spontaneous rupture after corticosteroid injection. Demographic data, clinical features, imaging data, and surgical treatments were carefully reviewed. The average age was 52.308 ± 15.381 years (range 29–71). The average injection times were 2.538 ± 1.664 times (range 1–6). The average rupture time (after last injection) was 10.923 ± 9.500 weeks (range 3–32). Nine patients were treated by tendon suture (69% of cases), and 4 patients were treated by tendon grafting (31% of cases). All patients received follow-up in our outpatient clinic. The sites of the tendon rupture (15 tendons of 13 patients had involved) include extensor pollicis longus (6 tendons, 40% of cases), extensor digiti quinti and extensor digiti minimi (4 tendons, 27% of cases), ring finger of extensor digitorum communis (3 tendons, 20% of cases), and middle finger of extensor digitorum communis (2 tendons, 13% of cases). Two patients who had tendon adhesion (15% of cases) were treated by tendon release. One patient who had tendon rerupture (8% of cases) was treated by tendon grafting. No patient had complications of infections, vascular, or nerve injury. Tendon spontaneous rupture is a serious complication after corticosteroid injection for tendinitis. Rigid standard of corticosteroid injection is very important. Magnetic resonance imaging was contributory to preoperative assess tendon defect and can be used to monitor healing quality of tendons during the follow-up. PMID:27741145

  13. Anatomical description and morphometry of the skeleton of the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus).

    PubMed

    Casteleyn, C; Bakker, J; Breugelmans, S; Kondova, I; Saunders, J; Langermans, J A M; Cornillie, P; Van den Broeck, W; Van Loo, D; Van Hoorebeke, L; Bosseler, L; Chiers, K; Decostere, A

    2012-04-01

    Callithrix jacchus (common marmoset) is regularly used in biomedical research, including for studies involving the skeleton. To support these studies, skeletons of healthy animals that had been euthanized for reasons not interfering with skeletal anatomy were prepared. The marmoset dental formula 2I-1C-3P-2M of each oral quadrant is atypical for New World monkeys which commonly possess a third molar. Seven cervical, 12-13 thoracic, 7-6 lumbar, 2-3 sacral and 26-29 caudal vertebrae are present, the thoracolumbar region always comprising 19 vertebrae. A sigmoid clavicle connects the scapula with the manubrium of the sternum. Depending on the number of thoracic vertebrae, 4-5 sternebrae are located between the manubrium and xiphoid process. Wide interosseous spaces separate the radius from the ulna, and the tibia from the fibula. A small sesamoid bone is inserted in the m. abductor digiti primi longus at the medial border of the carpus, a pair of ovoid sesamoid bones is located at the palmar/plantar sides of the trochleae of each metapodial bone, and round fabellae articulate with the proximal surfaces of the femoral condyles. Male marmosets possess a small penile bone. Both the front and hind feet have five digits. The hallux possesses a flat nail, whereas all other digits present curved claws. Interestingly, a central bone is present in both the carpus and tarsus. This study provides a description and detailed illustrations of the skeleton of the common marmoset as an anatomical guide for further biomedical research.

  14. Effects of beta-hydroxy-beta-methylbutyrate (HMB) on the expression of ubiquitin ligases, protein synthesis pathways and contractile function in extensor digitorum longus (EDL) of fed and fasting rats.

    PubMed

    Gerlinger-Romero, Frederico; Guimarães-Ferreira, Lucas; Yonamine, Caio Yogi; Salgueiro, Rafael Barrera; Nunes, Maria Tereza

    2017-01-12

    Beta-hydroxy-beta-methylbutyrate (HMB), a leucine metabolite, enhances the gain of skeletal muscle mass by increasing protein synthesis or attenuating protein degradation or both. The aims of this study were to investigate the effect of HMB on molecular factors controlling skeletal muscle protein synthesis and degradation, as well as muscle contractile function, in fed and fasted conditions. Wistar rats were supplied daily with HMB (320 mg/kg body weight diluted in NaCl-0.9%) or vehicle only (control) by gavage for 28 days. After this period, some of the animals were subjected to a 24-h fasting, while others remained in the fed condition. The EDL muscle was then removed, weighed and used to evaluate the genes and proteins involved in protein synthesis (AKT/4E-BP1/S6) and degradation (Fbxo32 and Trim63). A sub-set of rats were used to measure in vivo muscle contractile function. HMB supplementation increased AKT phosphorylation during fasting (three-fold). In the fed condition, no differences were detected in atrogenes expression between control and HMB supplemented group; however, HMB supplementation did attenuate the fasting-induced increase in their expression levels. Fasting animals receiving HMB showed improved sustained tetanic contraction times (one-fold) and an increased muscle to tibia length ratio (1.3-fold), without any cross-sectional area changes. These results suggest that HMB supplementation under fasting conditions increases AKT phosphorylation and attenuates the increased of atrogenes expression, followed by a functional improvement and gain of skeletal muscle weight, suggesting that HMB protects skeletal muscle against the deleterious effects of fasting.

  15. Rapid-rate paired associative stimulation of the median nerve and motor cortex can produce long-lasting changes in motor cortical excitability in humans

    PubMed Central

    Quartarone, Angelo; Rizzo, Vincenzo; Bagnato, Sergio; Morgante, Francesca; Sant'Angelo, Antonino; Girlanda, Paolo; Roman Siebner, Hartwig

    2006-01-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) or repetitive electrical peripheral nerve stimulation (rENS) can induce changes in the excitability of the human motor cortex (M1) that is often short-lasting and variable, and occurs only after prolonged periods of stimulation. In 10 healthy volunteers, we used a new repetitive paired associative stimulation (rPAS) protocol to facilitate and prolong the effects of rENS and rTMS on cortical excitability. Sub-motor threshold 5 Hz rENS of the right median nerve was synchronized with submotor threshold 5 Hz rTMS of the left M1 at a constant interval for 2 min. The interstimulus interval (ISI) between the peripheral stimulus and the transcranial stimulation was set at 10 ms (5 Hz rPAS10ms) or 25 ms (5 Hz rPAS25ms). TMS was given over the hot spot of the right abductor pollicis brevis (APB) muscle. Before and after rPAS, we measured the amplitude of the unconditioned motor evoked potential (MEP), intracortical inhibition (ICI) and facilitation (ICF), short- and long-latency afferent inhibition (SAI and LAI) in the conditioned M1. The 5 Hz rPAS25ms protocol but not the 5 Hz rPAS10ms protocol caused a somatotopically specific increase in mean MEP amplitudes in the relaxed APB muscle. The 5 Hz rPAS25ms protocol also led to a loss of SAI, but there was no correlation between individual changes in SAI and corticospinal excitability. These after-effects were still present 6 h after 5 Hz rPAS25ms. There was no consistent effect on ICI, ICF and LAI. The 5 Hz rENS and 5 Hz rTMS protocols failed to induce any change in corticospinal excitability when given alone. These findings show that 2 min of 5 Hz rPAS25ms produce a long-lasting and somatotopically specific increase in corticospinal excitability, presumably by sensorimotor disinhibition. PMID:16825301

  16. Quantification of Electromyographic Activity During REM Sleep in Multiple Muscles in REM Sleep Behavior Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Frauscher, Birgit; Iranzo, Alex; Högl, Birgit; Casanova-Molla, Jordi; Salamero, Manel; Gschliesser, Viola; Tolosa, Eduardo; Poewe, Werner; Santamaria, Joan

    2008-01-01

    Study Objectives: The aim of our study was to determine which muscle or combination of muscles (either axial or limb muscles, lower or upper limb muscles, or proximal or distal limb muscles) provides the highest rates of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep phasic electromyographic (EMG) activity seen in patients with REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD). Setting: Two university hospital sleep disorders centers. Participants: Seventeen patients with idiopathic RBD (n = 8) and RBD secondary to Parkinson disease (n = 9). Interventions: Not applicable. Measurements and Results: Patients underwent polysomnography, including EMG recording of 13 different muscles. Phasic EMG activity in REM sleep was quantified for each muscle separately. A mean of 1459.6 ± 613.8 three-second REM sleep mini-epochs were scored per patient. Mean percentages of phasic EMG activity were mentalis (42 ± 19), flexor digitorum superficialis (29 ± 13), extensor digitorum brevis (23 ± 12), abductor pollicis brevis (22 ± 11), sternocleidomastoid (22 ± 12), deltoid (19 ± 11), biceps brachii (19 ± 11), gastrocnemius (18 ± 9), tibialis anterior (right, 17 ± 12; left, 16 ± 10), rectus femoris (left, 11 ± 6; right, 9 ± 6), and thoraco-lumbar paraspinal muscles (6 ± 5). The mentalis muscle provided significantly higher rates of excessive phasic EMG activity than all other muscles but only detected 55% of all the mini-epochs with phasic EMG activity. Simultaneous recording of the mentalis, flexor digitorum superficialis, and extensor digitorum brevis muscles detected 82% of all mini-epochs containing phasic EMG activity. This combination provided higher rates of EMG activity than any other 3-muscle combination. Excessive phasic EMG activity was more frequent in distal than in proximal muscles, both in upper and lower limbs. Conclusion: Simultaneous recording of the mentalis, flexor digitorum superficialis, and extensor digitorum brevis muscles provided the highest rates of REM sleep phasic EMG

  17. Magnetic versus electrical stimulation in the interpolation twitch technique of elbow flexors.

    PubMed

    Lampropoulou, Sofia I; Nowicky, Alexander V; Marston, Louise

    2012-01-01

    The study compared peripheral magnetic with electrical stimulation of the biceps brachii m. (BB) in the single pulse Interpolation Twitch Technique (ITT). 14 healthy participants (31±7 years) participated in a within-subjects repeated-measures design study. Single, constant-current electrical and magnetic stimuli were delivered over the motor point of BB with supramaximal intensity (20% above maximum) at rest and at various levels of voluntary contraction. Force measurements from right elbow isometric flexion and muscle electromyograms (EMG) from the BB, the triceps brachii m. (TB) and the abductor pollicis brevis m. (APB) were obtained. The twitch forces at rest and maximal contractions, the twitch force-voluntary force relationship, the M-waves and the voluntary activation (VA) of BB between magnetic and electrical stimulation were compared. The mean amplitude of the twitches evoked at MVC was not significantly different between electrical (0.62 ± 0.49 N) and magnetic (0.81 ± 0.49 N) stimulation (p > 0.05), and the maximum VA of BB was comparable between electrical (95%) and magnetic (93%) stimulation (p > 0. 05). No differences (p >0.05) were revealed in the BB M-waves between electrical (13.47 ± 0.49 mV.ms) and magnetic (12.61 ± 0.58 mV.ms) stimulation. The TB M-waves were also similar (p > 0.05) but electrically evoked APB M-waves were significantly larger than those evoked by magnetic stimulation (p < 0.05). The twitch-voluntary force relationship over the range of MVCs was best described by non-linear functions for both electrical and magnetic stimulation. The electrically evoked resting twitches were consistently larger in amplitude than the magnetically evoked ones (mean difference 3.1 ± 3.34 N, p < 0.05). Reduction of the inter-electrodes distance reduced the twitch amplitude by 6.5 ± 6.2 N (p < 0.05). The fundamental similarities in voluntary activation assessment of BB with peripheral electrical and magnetic stimulation point towards a promising

  18. Voluntary contraction impairs the refractory period of transmission in healthy human axons.

    PubMed

    Kuwabara, S; Lin, C S; Mogyoros, I; Cappelen-Smith, C; Burke, D

    2001-02-15

    1. Voluntary contraction of a muscle causes substantial hyperpolarization of the active motor axons due to activation of the electrogenic Na+-K+ pump. The present study was undertaken to determine whether voluntary effort produces a significant impairment in impulse transmission in normal axons and whether mechanisms other than membrane hyperpolarization contribute to the changes in axonal excitability. 2. The compound muscle action potential (CMAP) was recorded after median nerve stimulation at the wrist using sub- and supramaximal stimuli, delivered singly and in pairs at conditioning-test intervals of 2-15 ms. Axonal excitability parameters (threshold, refractoriness, supernormality, and strength-duration time constant (tauSD)) were measured using threshold tracking. Impulse transmission was assessed using supramaximal stimuli. 3. Maximal voluntary contractions of the abductor pollicis brevis for 1 min produced a substantial increase in threshold, an increase in supernormality and a decrease in tauSD, all of which lasted approximately 10 min and indicate axonal hyperpolarization. However, immediately after the contraction there was an unexpected increase in refractoriness. The post-contraction increase in refractoriness could not be mimicked by an imposed ramp of hyperpolarization that produced changes in the other indices to an extent that was similar to voluntary contraction. 4. The contraction had relatively little effect on the size of the unconditioned maximal CMAP. However, there was failure of transmission of supramaximal conditioned volleys when the conditioning-test interval was short. 5. The relationships between axonal excitability and supernormality and tauSD following voluntary contraction differed significantly from those recorded during the hyperpolarization produced by DC current. It is argued that these differences probably result from extra-axonal K+ accumulation with the voluntary contraction but not with the DC polarization. I6. It is

  19. [Connective tissue reinforcing structures of the digital tendon sheaths of the human hand].

    PubMed

    Knott, C; Schmidt, H M

    1986-01-01

    At a greater number of humid preparated human hands, all the ligamentous supports of the digital tendon sheath were exposed and their dimensions were determined. The osteofibrous channels, which contain the long flexor tendons of the digits, were bounded on the one hand by transversely concave shaft areas of the phalanges and the palmar ligaments and on the other side by the fibrous parts of the tendon sheath. From the second to the 5th finger, it has a regular extension of length, which begins proximal at the heads of the metacarpal bones and runs distal to the base of the nail phalanx. In some cases, there is a continuous communication between the digital tendon sheath of the little finger and the carpal synovial sheath. The tendon sheath of the flexor pollicis longus muscle in comparison with it is always in an open communication with the radial synovial sac of the wrist. At the fibrous supports of the digital tendon sheath, one can find constant and inconstant ligamentous structures. Regular shaped ligaments consist of annular fibers (A1 to A5). The proximal complex of fiber supports is a formation of the A1 and A2 ligaments. The band A1 can be divided into 2 ligaments both of roughly equal length, which lay between the head of the metacarpal bone and the base of the proximal phalanx. The strongest fibrous support of the whole digital tendon sheath represents the band A2. It is attached to the midth of the proximal phalanx and increases in strength from proximal to distal. The middle length varies between 6.7 mm at the thumb and 18.7 mm at the middle finger. The distal margin is strengthened by fibrocartilage tissue to be in accordance with the important function as a pulley. The annular band A4 forms the distal supporting complex height above the shaft of the middle phalanx. At the 2nd to the 5th finger it is, with a middle length of 6 to 7 mm, very much shorter than A2 and restrains first of all the tendon of the flexor digitorum profundus muscle. In the area

  20. Low-frequency rTMS in patients with subacute ischemic stroke: clinical evaluation of short and long-term outcomes and neurophysiological assessment of cortical excitability

    PubMed Central

    Blesneag, AV; Slăvoacă, DF; Popa, L; Stan, AD; Jemna, N; Isai Moldovan, F; Mureșanu, DF

    2015-01-01

    . Discussion:These results demonstrated that LF-rTMS treatment enhances rebalance of the excitability patterns in both hemispheres and led us to question the “one size fits all” approach widely used in rTMS interventions. Abbreviations: Amax = maximum amplitude, Amean = AM = averaged amplitude, APB = abductor pollicis brevis, CL = contralesional, DTI = diffusion tensor imaging, EEG = electroencephalography, EMG = electromyography, FMA-UE = Fugl-Meyer Assessment for Upper Extremity, HS = hot spot, IHC = interhemispheric functional connectivity, IL = ipsilesional, LF-rTMS = low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation, MCA = middle cerebral artery, MEP(s) = motor evoked potential(s), NIBS = non-invasive brain stimulation, rMT = resting motor threshold, RP = responsive points, rTMS = repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation, TMS = transcranial magnetic stimulation PMID:26351545

  1. Riluzole exerts central and peripheral modulating effects in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Vucic, Steve; Lin, Cindy Shin-Yi; Cheah, Benjamin C; Murray, Jenna; Menon, Parvathi; Krishnan, Arun V; Kiernan, Matthew C

    2013-05-01

    Riluzole, a benzothiazole derivative, has been shown to be effective in prolonging survival in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. The mechanisms by which riluzole exerts neuroprotective effects in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis remains to be fully elucidated, although inhibition of glutamatergic transmission and modulation of Na+ channel function have been proposed. In an attempt to determine the mechanisms by which riluzole exerts neuroprotective effects, in particular to dissect the relative contributions of inhibition of glutamatergic transmission and Na+ channel modulation, the present study utilized a combination of cortical and peripheral axonal excitability approaches to monitor changes in excitability and function in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Cortical assessment was undertaken by utilising the threshold tracking transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) technique and combined with peripheral axonal excitability studies in 25 patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Studies were performed at baseline and repeated when patients were receiving riluzole 100 mg/day. At the time of second testing all patients were tolerating the medication well. Motor evoked potential and compound muscle action potential responses were recorded over the abductor pollicis brevis muscle. At baseline, features of cortical hyperexcitability were evident in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, indicated by marked reduction in short interval intracortical inhibition (P < 0.001) and cortical silent period duration (P < 0.001), as well as an increase in the motor evoked potential amplitude (P < 0.01). Riluzole therapy partially normalized cortical excitability by significantly increasing short interval intracortical inhibition (short interval intracortical inhibitionbaseline 0.5 ± 1.8%; short interval intracortical inhibitionON riluzole 7.9 ± 1.7%, P < 0.01). In contrast, riluzole did not exert any modulating effect on cortical silent period duration (P = 0

  2. Navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation for glioma removal: prognostic value in motor function recovery from postsurgical neurological deficits.

    PubMed

    Takakura, Tomokazu; Muragaki, Yoshihiro; Tamura, Manabu; Maruyama, Takashi; Nitta, Masayuki; Niki, Chiharu; Kawamata, Takakazu

    2017-01-06

    OBJECTIVE The aim of the present study was to evaluate the usefulness of navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation (nTMS) as a prognostic predictor for upper-extremity motor functional recovery from postsurgical neurological deficits. METHODS Preoperative and postoperative nTMS studies were prospectively applied in 14 patients (mean age 39 ± 12 years) who had intraparenchymal brain neoplasms located within or adjacent to the motor eloquent area in the cerebral hemisphere. Mapping by nTMS was done 3 times, i.e., before surgery, and 1 week and 3 weeks after surgery. To assess the response induced by nTMS, motor evoked potential (nTMS-MEP) was recorded using a surface electromyography electrode attached to the abductor pollicis brevis (APB). The cortical locations that elicited the largest electromyography response by nTMS were defined as hotspots. Hotspots for APB were confirmed as positive responsive sites by direct electrical stimulation (DES) during awake craniotomy. The distances between hotspots and lesions (DHS-L) were measured. Postoperative neurological deficits were assessed by manual muscle test and dynamometer. To validate the prognostic value of nTMS in recovery from upper-extremity paresis, the following were investigated: 1) the correlation between DHS-L and the serial grip strength change, and 2) the correlation between positive nTMS-MEP at 1 week after surgery and the serial grip strength change. RESULTS From the presurgical nTMS study, MEPs from targeted muscles were identified in 13 cases from affected hemispheres. In one case, MEP was not evoked due to a huge tumor. Among 9 cases from which intraoperative DES mapping for hand motor area was available, hotspots for APB identified by nTMS were concordant with DES-positive sites. Compared with the adjacent group (DHS-L < 10 mm, n = 6), the nonadjacent group (DHS-L ≥ 10 mm, n = 7) showed significantly better recovery of grip strength at 3 months after surgery (p < 0.01). There were correlations

  3. Experiment K-7-18: Effects of Spaceflight in the Muscle Adductor Longus of Rats Flown in the Soviet Biosatellite Cosmos 2044. Part 2; Quantitative Autoradiographic Analysis of Gaba (Benzodiazepine) and Muscarinic (Cholinergic) Receptors in the Forebrain of Rats Flown on Cosmos 2044

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, L.; Daunton, N. G.; Krasnov, I. B.; DAmelio, F.; Hyde, T. M.; Sigworth, S. K.

    1994-01-01

    Quantitative autoradiographic analysis of receptors for GABA and acetylcholine in the forebrain of rats flown on COSMOS 2044 was undertaken as part of a joint US-Soviet study to determine the effects of microgravity on the central nervous system, and in particular on the sensory and motor portions of the forebrain. Changes in binding of these receptors in tissue from animals exposed to microgravity would provide evidence for possible changes in neural processing as a result of exposure to microgravity. Tritium-labelled diazepam and Quinuclidinyl-benzilate (QNB) were used to visualize GABA (benzodiazepine) and muscarinic (cholinergic) receptors, respectively. The density of tritium-labelled radioligands bound to various regions in the forebrain of both flight and control animals were measured from autoradiograms. Data from rats flown in space and from ground-based control animals that were not exposed to microgravity were compared.

  4. Assessing lateral stability of the hip and pelvis.

    PubMed

    Grimaldi, Alison

    2011-02-01

    Adequate function of the hip abductor mechanism has been shown to be integral to ideal lower limb function and musculoskeletal health. Clinical assessment of hip abductor muscle function may include observational assessment of postural habits, muscle bulk, and of the ability to control optimal frontal plane femoropelvic alignment during a variety of single leg tasks. Strength testing using a hand held dynamometer is perhaps our most robust clinical assessment tool but should not be considered a 'gold standard' in the assessment of abductor muscle function. Evidence from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and electromyography (EMG) studies provides a deeper understanding of specific deficits that occur within the abductor synergy. The assessment of abductor function should not be based on a single test, but a battery of tests. The findings should be interpreted together rather than independently, and in the context of a thorough understanding of function of the lateral stability mechanism. Manner and comprehensiveness of abductor assessment will have important implications for management and particularly therapeutic exercise.

  5. Effects of Neuromuscular Reeducation on Hip Mechanics and Functional Performance in Patients after Total Hip Arthroplasty: A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Judd, Dana L.; Winters, Joshua D.; Stevens-Lapsley, Jennifer E.; Christiansen, Cory L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Following total hip arthroplasty, patients demonstrate compensatory movement strategies during activities of daily living such as walking and stair climbing. Movement compensations are important markers of functional decline in older adults and are related to poor functional capacity. Despite increased utilization of hip arthroplasty, persistent movement compensation, and functional performance deficits, no consensus on postoperative rehabilitation exists. Neuromuscular reeducation techniques offer a strategy to improve movement quality by emphasizing hip abductor performance and pelvic stability. This case series illustrates changes in movement strategy around the hip in response to targeted neuromuscular reeducation techniques after hip arthroplasty. Methods Five participants received an 8-week exercise program following total hip arthroplasty, emphasizing targeted neuromuscular reeducation techniques hallmarked by specific, weight-bearing exercise to improve hip abductor performance and pelvic stability. Five additional participants were supervised and followed for comparison. Findings Participants in the neuromuscular reeducation program improved their internal hip abductor moments and vertical ground reaction forces during walking and stair climbing. They also improved their functional performance and hip abductor strength outcomes. Interpretation Targeted neuromuscular reeducation techniques after total hip arthroplasty provided a positive effect on biomechanical outcomes, functional performance, and muscle strength. Through focused use of the hip abductor muscles, increased internal hip abductor moments were observed. This intervention potentially promotes pelvic stability, and may contribute to improved performance on tasks such as stair climbing, fast walking, and balance. The results suggest that neuromuscular reeducation offers a unique effect on movement strategy and function for patients following total hip arthroplasty. PMID:26802531

  6. U.S. Refugee Resettlement: A Program at the Crossroads.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forbes, Susan S.

    This article covers recent developments in the United States Refugee Resettlement Program and discusses the program's future. A formal refugee pollicy is a recent phenomenon, initiated with the passage of the 1980 Refguee Act. With the passage of the Act, greater attention has been paid to developing procedures for resettlement, and the…

  7. Effect of hindlimb suspension and clenbuterol treatment on polyamine levels in skeletal muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abukhalaf, Imad K.; von Deutsch, Daniel A.; Wineski, Lawrence E.; Silvestrov, Natalia A.; Abera, Saare A.; Sahlu, Sinafikish W.; Potter, David E.; Thierry-Palmer, M. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    Polyamines are unbiquitous, naturally occurring small aliphatic, polycationic, endogenous compounds. They are involved in many cellular processes and may serve as secondary or tertiary messengers to hormonal regulation. The relationship of polyamines and skeletal muscle mass of adductor longus, extensor digitorum longus, and gastrocnemius under unloading (hindlimb suspension) conditions was investigated. Unloading significantly affected skeletal muscle polyamine levels in a fiber-type-specific fashion. Under loading conditions, clenbuterol treatment increased all polyamine levels, whereas under unloading conditions, only the spermidine levels were consistently increased. Unloading attenuated the anabolic effects of clenbuterol in predominately slow-twitch muscles (adductor longus), but had little impact on clenbuterol's action as a countermeasure in fast- twitch muscles such as the extensor digitorum longus. Spermidine appeared to be the primary polyamine involved in skeletal muscle atrophy/hypertrophy. Copyright 2002 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. Comparison of anterior gluteus medius fiber activation during general exercises and PNF exercises

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Sung-kwang; Yoo, Won-gyu

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] This study compared the activation of anterior gluteus medius fibers during general exercises and proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation exercises. [Subjects and Methods] The study enrolled 15 healthy adults. The participants performed general hip abductor strengthening exercises and proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation exercises; during both types of exercise, electromyography activity was recorded. [Results] Greater anterior gluteus medius fiber activation was observed during the proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation exercises compared with the general hip abductor strengthening exercises. The anterior gluteus medius fibers exhibited greater activity during pattern 2 exercises compared with any other type of exercise. [Conclusion] The results suggest that pattern 2 exercises can selectively activate anterior gluteus medius fibers. PMID:28356634

  9. Comparison of anterior gluteus medius fiber activation during general exercises and PNF exercises.

    PubMed

    Ju, Sung-Kwang; Yoo, Won-Gyu

    2017-03-01

    [Purpose] This study compared the activation of anterior gluteus medius fibers during general exercises and proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation exercises. [Subjects and Methods] The study enrolled 15 healthy adults. The participants performed general hip abductor strengthening exercises and proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation exercises; during both types of exercise, electromyography activity was recorded. [Results] Greater anterior gluteus medius fiber activation was observed during the proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation exercises compared with the general hip abductor strengthening exercises. The anterior gluteus medius fibers exhibited greater activity during pattern 2 exercises compared with any other type of exercise. [Conclusion] The results suggest that pattern 2 exercises can selectively activate anterior gluteus medius fibers.

  10. The peroneocuboid joint: morphogenesis and anatomical study.

    PubMed

    Guimerá, V; Lafuente, A; Zambrana, L; Rodriguez-Niedenführ, M; Sañudo, J R; Vazquez, T

    2015-01-01

    The peroneocuboid joint, between the peroneus longus tendon and the cuboid bone, has not been anatomically well-defined and no embryological study has been published. Furthermore, the ossification of the os peroneum (a sesamoid inside the peroneus longus tendon) and its associated pathology has been considered to be generated by orthostatic and/or mechanical loads. A light microscopy analysis of serially sectioned human embryonic and fetal feet, the analysis of human adult feet by means of standard macroscopic dissection, X-ray and histological techniques have been carried out. The peroneus longus tendon was fully visible until its insertion in the 1st metatarsal bone already at embryonic stage 23 (56-57 days). The peroneocuboid joint cavity appeared at the transition of the embryonic to the fetal period (8-9th week of gestation) and was independent of the proximal synovial sheath. The joint cavity extended from the level of the calcaneocuboid joint all the way to the insertion of the peroneus longus tendon in the 1st metatarsal bone. The frenular ligaments, fixing the peroneus longus tendon to the 5th metatarsal bone or the long calcaneocuboid ligament, developed in the embryonic period. The peroneus longus tendon presented a thickening in the area surrounding the cuboid bone as early as the fetal period. This thickening may be considered the precursor of the os peroneum and was similar in shape and in size relation to the tendon, to the os peroneum observed in adults. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to show that the os peroneum, articular facets of the peroneus longus tendon and cuboid bone, the peroneocuboid joint and the frenular ligaments appear during the embryonic/fetal development period and therefore they can not be generated exclusively by orthostatic and mechanical forces or pathological processes.

  11. The peroneocuboid joint: morphogenesis and anatomical study

    PubMed Central

    Guimerá, V; Lafuente, A; Zambrana, L; Rodriguez-Niedenführ, M; Sañudo, J R; Vazquez, T

    2015-01-01

    The peroneocuboid joint, between the peroneus longus tendon and the cuboid bone, has not been anatomically well-defined and no embryological study has been published. Furthermore, the ossification of the os peroneum (a sesamoid inside the peroneus longus tendon) and its associated pathology has been considered to be generated by orthostatic and/or mechanical loads. A light microscopy analysis of serially sectioned human embryonic and fetal feet, the analysis of human adult feet by means of standard macroscopic dissection, X-ray and histological techniques have been carried out. The peroneus longus tendon was fully visible until its insertion in the 1st metatarsal bone already at embryonic stage 23 (56–57 days). The peroneocuboid joint cavity appeared at the transition of the embryonic to the fetal period (8–9th week of gestation) and was independent of the proximal synovial sheath. The joint cavity extended from the level of the calcaneocuboid joint all the way to the insertion of the peroneus longus tendon in the 1st metatarsal bone. The frenular ligaments, fixing the peroneus longus tendon to the 5th metatarsal bone or the long calcaneocuboid ligament, developed in the embryonic period. The peroneus longus tendon presented a thickening in the area surrounding the cuboid bone as early as the fetal period. This thickening may be considered the precursor of the os peroneum and was similar in shape and in size relation to the tendon, to the os peroneum observed in adults. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to show that the os peroneum, articular facets of the peroneus longus tendon and cuboid bone, the peroneocuboid joint and the frenular ligaments appear during the embryonic/fetal development period and therefore they can not be generated exclusively by orthostatic and mechanical forces or pathological processes. PMID:25384452

  12. Use of the Abdominal Aortic Tourniquet for Hemorrhage Control

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    for pain control after completion of ONS experiments. Additional drugs such as dopamine (1-10mcg/kg/hr), lidocaine (50mcg/kg/min) and amiodarone...overlying abductor muscle will be excised. The femoral artery will be bathed in 2% lidocaine until the artery is dilated to greater than 1 cm in

  13. Compressive neuropathy of the first branch of the lateral plantar nerve: a study by magnetic resonance imaging*

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Rogéria Nobre; Lopes, Alexia Abuhid; Torres, Jardélio Mendes; Mundim, Marina Franco; Silva, Lênio Lúcio Gavio; Silva, Breno Rabelo de Carvalho e

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess the prevalence of isolated findings of abnormalities leading to entrapment of the lateral plantar nerve and respective branches in patients complaining of chronic heel pain, whose magnetic resonance imaging exams have showed complete selective fatty atrophy of the abductor digiti quinti muscle. Materials and Methods Retrospective, analytical, and cross-sectional study. The authors selected magnetic resonance imaging of hindfoot of 90 patients with grade IV abductor digiti quinti muscle atrophy according to Goutallier and Bernageau classification. Patients presenting with minor degrees of fatty muscle degeneration (below grade IV) and those who had been operated on for nerve decompression were excluded. Results A female prevalence (78.8%) was observed, and a strong correlation was found between fatty muscle atrophy and plantar fasciitis in 21.2%, and ankle varices, in 16.8% of the patients. Conclusion Fatty atrophy of the abductor digiti quinti muscle is strongly associated with neuropathic alterations of the first branch of the lateral plantar nerve. The present study showed a significant association between plantar fasciitis and ankle varices with grade IV atrophy of the abductor digiti quinti muscle. PMID:26811554

  14. Evaluation of Peer Training for Teaching Abduction Prevention Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tarasenko, Melissa A.; Miltenberger, Raymond G.; Brower-Breitwieser, Carrie; Bosch, Amanda

    2010-01-01

    Child abduction is a serious problem, with approximately 100 children killed each year by nonfamily abductors. Training programs to teach children the correct skills to use if they ever come into contact with a stranger can be effective when they incorporate behavioral skills training (BST) and in-situ training (IST) into their protocol. However,…

  15. Inter-Tester Reliability and Precision of Manual Muscle Testing and Hand-Held Dynamometry in Lower Limb Muscles of Children with Spina Bifida

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahony, Kate; Hunt, Adrienne; Daley, Deborah; Sims, Susan; Adams, Roger

    2009-01-01

    Reliability and measurement precision of manual muscle testing (MMT) and hand-held dynamometry (HHD) were compared for children with spina bifida. Strength measures were obtained of the hip flexors, hip abductors, and knee extensors of 20 children (10 males, 10 females; mean age 9 years 10 months; range: 5 to 15 years) by two experienced physical…

  16. Parents Who Abduct: A Qualitative Study with Implications for Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greif, Geoffrey L.; Hegar, Rebecca L.

    1994-01-01

    Conducted in-depth interviews with 17 parents (9 fathers and 8 mothers) who had abducted their own children. Reported reasons for abduction included unsatisfactory contact with court-related professionals, revenge, and fear for the child's safety. Some abductors, after the abduction had been resolved, had increased contact with their children.…

  17. Abduction of Children by Their Parents: A Survey of the Problem.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hegar, Rebecca L.; Greif, Geoffrey L.

    1991-01-01

    Findings from 371 parents who sought help from missing children's organizations provided profile of families in which children were abducted by 1 of parents. Abductors were described as less educated and less likely to be employed than searching parents. Three-fourths of abducted children were younger than seven years of age; most abductions…

  18. Effects of augmented trunk stabilization with external compression support on shoulder and scapular muscle activity and maximum strength during isometric shoulder abduction.

    PubMed

    Jang, Hyun-jeong; Kim, Suhn-yeop; Oh, Duck-won

    2015-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of augmented trunk stabilization with external compression support (ECS) on the electromyography (EMG) activity of shoulder and scapular muscles and shoulder abductor strength during isometric shoulder abduction. Twenty-six women volunteered for the study. Surface EMG was used to monitor the activity of the upper trapezius (UT), lower trapezius (LT), serratus anterior (SA), and middle deltoid (MD), and shoulder abductor strength was measured using a dynamometer during three experimental conditions: (1) no external support (condition-1), (2) pelvic support (condition-2), and (3) pelvic and thoracic supports (condition-3) in an active therapeutic movement device. EMG activities were significantly lower for UT and higher for MD during condition 3 than during condition 1 (p < 0.05). The MD/UT ratio was significantly higher during condition 3 than during conditions 1 and 2, and higher during condition 2 than during condition 1 (p < 0.05). Shoulder abductor strength was significantly higher during condition 3 than during condition 1 (p < 0.05). These findings suggest that augmented trunk stabilization with the ECS may be advantageous with regard to reducing the compensatory muscle effort of the UT during isometric shoulder abduction and increasing shoulder abductor strength.

  19. 47 CFR 10.400 - Classification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Alerts: Family Abduction; Non-family Abduction; Lost, Injured or Otherwise Missing; and Endangered Runaway. (i) Family Abduction. A Family Abduction (FA) alert involves an abductor who is a family member... family. (iii) Lost, Injured, or Otherwise Missing. A Lost, Injured, or Otherwise Missing (LIM)...

  20. Isokinetic imbalance of hip muscles in soccer players with osteitis pubis.

    PubMed

    Mohammad, Walaa Sayed; Abdelraouf, Osama Ragaa; Elhafez, Salam Mohamed; Abdel-Aziem, Amr Almaz; Nassif, Nagui Sobhi

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we compared the isokinetic torques of hip flexors/extensors and abductors/adductors in soccer players suffering from osteitis pubis (OP), with normal soccer players. Twenty soccer male athletes with OP and 20 normal soccer athletes were included in this study. Peak torque/body weight (PT/BW) was recorded from hip flexor/extensor and abductor/adductor muscles during isokinetic concentric contraction modes at angular velocity of 2.1 rad · s(-1), for both groups. The results showed a significant difference between the normal and OP groups for hip flexors (P < 0.05). The normal group had significant, lower PT/BW value than the OP group for their hip flexors (P < 0.05). The hip flexor/extensor PT ratio of OP affected and non-affected limbs was significantly different from that of normal dominant and non-dominant limbs. There were no significant differences between the normal and OP groups for hip extensor, adductor and abductor muscles (P > 0.05). Regarding the hip adductor/abductor PT ratio, there was no significant difference between the normal and OP groups of athletes (P > 0.05). The OP group displayed increase in hip flexor strength that disturbed the hip flexor/extensor torque ratio of OP. Therefore, increasing the hip extensor strength should be part of rehabilitation programmes of patients with OP.

  1. The Effect of Visual and Auditory Enhancements on Excitability of the Primary Motor Cortex during Motor Imagery: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ikeda, Kohei; Higashi, Toshio; Sugawara, Kenichi; Tomori, Kounosuke; Kinoshita, Hiroshi; Kasai, Tatsuya

    2012-01-01

    The effect of visual and auditory enhancements of finger movement on corticospinal excitability during motor imagery (MI) was investigated using the transcranial magnetic stimulation technique. Motor-evoked potentials were elicited from the abductor digit minimi muscle during MI with auditory, visual and, auditory and visual information, and no…

  2. Cannieu-Riche anastomosis of the ulnar to median nerve in the hand: case report.

    PubMed

    Paraskevas, G; Ioannidis, O; Martoglou, S

    2010-01-01

    We observed in a male cadaver the presence of a new type of very long Cannieu-Riche anastomosis between the proximal portion of the deep branch of the ulnar nerve for the adductor pollicis and ramus of the recurrent branch of the median nerve to the superficial head of the flexor pollicis brevis. The clinical relevance of such a communication is the possible preservation of the function of all or part of thenar muscles from the ulnar nerve in case of median nerve lesion. The ignorance of that anomaly can induce obscure clinical, surgical and electroneuromyographical findings. We report on the incidence, the double innervation and the clinical significance of Cannieu-Riche anastomosis and provide a new classification of the various types of this nerval connection.

  3. Arterial anatomy of the thumb.

    PubMed

    Ames, E L; Bissonnette, M; Acland, R; Lister, G; Firrell, J

    1993-08-01

    The anatomical literature has indicated that the arterial supply to the thumb comes from the princeps pollicis artery. However, this simplified description does not often correlate with intraoperative findings. The purpose of this study was to investigate and clarify this important area of anatomy by dissection of fresh cadaver hands. 40 dissections were completed on 35 intravascularly injected and five non-injected hands. Five patterns were identified. The most common pattern showed both a superficial and deep vessel to the first web space in 54% of specimens. Dominant vessels included the superficial palmar branch of the radial artery in 8%, first palmar metacarpal artery in 18% and dorsal metacarpal artery in 8%. Only three specimens correlated with the textbook description. We conclude that the term "princeps pollicis" is actually a misnomer.

  4. Description and scaling of pectoral muscles in ictalurid catfishes.

    PubMed

    Miano, Joseph Paul; Loesser-Casey, Kathryn E; Fine, Michael L

    2013-04-01

    The pectoral spine of catfishes is an antipredator adaptation that can be bound, locked, and rubbed against the cleithrum to produce stridulation sounds. We describe muscle morphology of the pectoral spines and rays in six species in four genera of North American ictalurid catfishes. Since homologies of catfish pectoral muscles have not been universally accepted, we designate them functionally as the spine abductor and adductor and the arrector dorsalis and ventralis. The four muscles of the remaining pectoral rays are the superficial and deep (profundal) abductors and adductors. The large spine abductor and spine adductor are responsible for large amplitude movements, and the smaller arrector dorsalis and arrector ventralis have more specialized functions, that is, spine elevation and depression, respectively, although they also contribute to spine abduction. Three of the four spine muscles were pennate (the abductor and two arrectors), the spine adductor can be pennate or parallel, and ray muscles have parallel fibers. Insertions of pectoral muscles are similar across species, but there is a shift of origins in some muscles, particularly of the superficial abductor of the pectoral rays, which assumes a midline position in Ictalurus and increasingly more lateral placement in Ameiurus (one quarter way out from the midline), and Pylodictis and Noturus (half way out). Coincident with this lateral shift, the attachments of the hypaxial muscle to the ventral girdle become more robust. Comparison with its sister group supports the midline position as basal and lateral migration as derived. The muscles of the pectoral spine are heavier than muscles of the remaining rays in all species but the flathead, supporting the importance of specialized spine functions above typical movement. Further, spine muscles were larger than ray muscles in all species but the flathead catfish, which lives in water with the fastest currents.

  5. Variations in the motor nerve supply of the thenar and hypothenar muscles of the hand.

    PubMed Central

    Ajmani, M L

    1996-01-01

    The distribution pattern of the muscular branch of median and ulnar nerves and motor innervation of the thenar and hypothenar muscles were studied in 68 palmar regions taken from 34 adult cadavers of both sexes aged 40 to 70 y. The structure of the flexor pollicis brevis was examined in all 68 hands. In 13 of the 68 hands an anastomosis was seen between the ulnar and median nerves. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8771405

  6. Preoperative Nutritional Status and Clinical Complications in the Postoperative Period of Cardiac Surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves, Luciana de Brito; de Jesus, Natanael Moura Teixeira; Gonçalves, Maiara de Brito; Dias, Lidiane Cristina Gomes; Deiró, Tereza Cristina Bomfim de Jesus

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study aims to assess the preoperative nutritional status of patients and the role it plays in the occurrence of clinical complications in the postoperative period of major elective cardiac surgeries. Methods Cross-sectional study comprising 72 patients aged 20 years or older, who underwent elective cardiac surgery. The preoperative nutritional assessment consisted of nutritional screening, anthropometry (including the measurement of the adductor pollicis muscle thickness) and biochemical tests. The patients were monitored for up to 10 days after the surgery in order to control the occurrence of postoperative complications. The R software, version 3.0.2, was used to statistically analyze the data. Results Clinical complications were found in 62.5% (n=42) of the studied samples and complications of non-infectious nature were most often found. Serum albumin appeared to be associated with renal complications (P=0.026) in the nutritional status indicators analyzed herein. The adductor pollicis muscle thickness was associated with infectious complications and presented mean of 9.39±2.32 mm in the non-dominant hand (P=0.030). No significant correlation was found between the other indicators and the clinical complications. Conclusion The adductor pollicis muscle thickness and the serum albumin seemed be associated with clinical complications in the postoperative period of cardiac surgeries. PMID:27982346

  7. Reduction-oxidation state and protein degradation in skeletal muscle of fasted and refed rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fagan, Julie M.; Tischler, Marc E.

    1986-01-01

    Redox state and protein degradation were measured in isolated muscles of fasted (up to 10 d) and refed (up to 4 d) 7- to 14-wk-old rats. Protein degradation in the extensor digitorum longus muscle, but not in the soleus muscle, was greater in the fasted rats than in weight-matched muscle from fed rats. The NAD couple was more oxidized in incubated and fresh extensor digitorum longus muscles and in some incubated soleus muscles of fasted rats than in weight-matched muscle from fed rats. In the extensor digitorum longus muscle of refed or prolonged fasted rats, protein degradation was slower and the NAD couple was more reduced than in the fed state. Therefore, oxidation of the NAD couple was associated with increased muscle breakdown during fasting, whereas reduction of the NAD couple was associated with muscle conservation and deposition.

  8. The effects of eye coordination during deep cervical flexor training on the thickness of the cervical flexors

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Hyun-Ju; Goo, Bong-Oh; Kwon, Hae-Yeon; Jang, Jun-Hyeok

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to identify changes in the thicknesses of the cervical flexors according to eye coordination during deep cervical flexor training. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty normal adults were randomly selected, and during their deep cervical flexor training and eye tracking, the thicknesses of the longus colli and the sternocleidomastoid were measured using ultrasonic waves. [Results] The thickness of the longus colli statistically significantly increased when deep cervical flexor training and eye coordination were performed simultaneously. However, the thickness of the sternocleidomastoid did not show statistically significant differences according to eye coordination. [Conclusion] Eye coordination during deep cervical flexor training is likely to increase the thickness of the longus colli selectively. PMID:26834355

  9. Painful Os Peroneum Syndrome: Underdiagnosed Condition in the Lateral Midfoot Pain

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Barbara Nogueira Caracas

    2016-01-01

    Os peroneum is an accessory ossicle located within the peroneus longus tendon. The painful os peroneum syndrome (POPS) results from a wide spectrum of conditions, including fractures, diastases, and other causes. POPS can result in tenosynovitis or discontinuity of the peroneus longus tendon with a clinical presentation of pain in the lateral aspect of the midfoot. Authors report a typical case of POPS, illustrating this entity through different imaging methods (radiographs, ultrasound, and magnetic resonance imaging). We emphasize the prevalence of this ossicle and discuss painful complications. PMID:27478674

  10. Arthroscopic Management of Posteromedial Ankle Impingement

    PubMed Central

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2015-01-01

    Posteromedial ankle impingement is a rare clinical entity. It usually follows an inversion injury, with compression of the posterior tibiotalar ligament between the medial malleolus and talus. This can be treated by posterior ankle endoscopy through the posteromedial and posterolateral portals. The flexor hallucis longus tendon can be examined for any tenosynovitis or tendinopathy. The posteromedial corner of the ankle joint is reached with the instruments staying on the lateral side of the flexor hallucis longus tendon. The inflamed synovium, scar tissue, and fibrillated cartilage are debrided. PMID:26697299

  11. Imaging of adductor-related groin pain.

    PubMed

    Pesquer, L; Reboul, G; Silvestre, A; Poussange, N; Meyer, P; Dallaudière, B

    2015-09-01

    Groin pain is a common condition in athletes and results from various causes. Osteitis pubis, adductor dysfunction, inguinal hernia, or a combination of all three entities, generally explains the onset of symptoms. Adductor longus tendinopathy is the main cause of adductor-related groin pain. It leads to a significant reduction of sports participation and can require surgical management. Diagnosis is based on ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging. Asymptomatic findings (tendinosis, calcifications, cortical erosions) are common in athletes and care should be taken when assessing groin pain. The most specific sign of tendinopathy is an intratendinous tear of the adductor longus.

  12. Arthroscopic Management of Posteromedial Ankle Impingement.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2015-10-01

    Posteromedial ankle impingement is a rare clinical entity. It usually follows an inversion injury, with compression of the posterior tibiotalar ligament between the medial malleolus and talus. This can be treated by posterior ankle endoscopy through the posteromedial and posterolateral portals. The flexor hallucis longus tendon can be examined for any tenosynovitis or tendinopathy. The posteromedial corner of the ankle joint is reached with the instruments staying on the lateral side of the flexor hallucis longus tendon. The inflamed synovium, scar tissue, and fibrillated cartilage are debrided.

  13. Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome Secondary to an Unreported Ossicle of the Talus: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Sweed, Tamer Ahmed; Ali, Seyed Asghar; Choudhary, Surabhi

    2016-01-01

    Tarsal tunnel syndrome (TTS) is a compression neuropathy of the posterior tibial nerve in the tarsal tunnel. In about 80% of patients, a specific cause can be identified for TTS. We present a case of TTS secondary to an ossicle in close relation to the talus that, to our knowledge, has not previously been reported. A 26-year-old male presented with left ankle and foot pain that increased with activity and playing football. He had a tingling sensation and paresthesia in the sole and medial border of the foot along the distribution of the medial and lateral plantar nerves. Clinically, he had hard swelling at the floor of the tarsal tunnel, and Tinel's sign was positive. Computed tomography showed an accessory ossicle articulating with the posteromedial aspect of the talus, separating the flexor digitorum longus and flexor hallucis longus tendons, with tenosynovitis of the tibialis posterior, flexor digitorum longus and flexor hallucis longus tendons. Surgical release of the tarsal tunnel and excision of the ossicle were performed. Postoperatively, the patient showed dramatic improvement and had no complications or recurrence of symptoms after 8 months of follow-up. More interestingly, to the best of our knowledge, this ossicle has not been previously reported to cause TTS.

  14. Calf muscle activity alteration with foot orthoses insertion during walking measured by fine-wire electromyography

    PubMed Central

    Akuzawa, Hiroshi; Imai, Atsushi; Iizuka, Satoshi; Matsunaga, Naoto; Kaneoka, Koji

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of the study was to assess the muscle activity change of the tibialis posterior, flexor digitorum longus, and peroneus longus during gait with orthoses. [Subjects and Methods] Sixteen healthy males participated in this study. Activity of each muscle was measured by using fine-wire and surface electromyography. Gait task was performed by the participants barefoot, with footwear and with orthoses. The electromyography data from a stance phase of each gait trial were used for analysis. The stance phase was divided into contact, midstance, and propulsion phases. The data from ten participants were extracted for final analysis, as electromyography measurements were unsuccessful for the other six. [Results] The results demonstrated that orthoses significantly reduced the tibialis posterior muscle activity in the propulsion phase compared to that in the barefoot condition. Although there was a significant difference in the midstance phase, post hoc analysis did not indicate significant differences among the phases. No significant electromyography amplitude change was detected in flexor digitorum longus and peroneus longus. [Conclusion] Orthothes reduced the tibialis posterior activity level during gait. This result may be beneficial for patients with injuries related to excessive activity of tibialis posterior. PMID:28174473

  15. Compression of the common peroneal nerve by intramuscular ganglion from the superior tibio-fibular joint.

    PubMed

    Muckart, R D

    1976-05-01

    Eight patients had symptoms from ganglia arising from the superior tibio-fibular joint with physical signs that resembled the anterior tibial and peroneal compartment syndromes. Five ganglia were in the peroneus longus muscle in which they produced only an ill-defined firmness. Histologically the ganglia showed much cellular activity which must not be mistaken for malignant change.

  16. Overuse Injury Assessment Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-03-01

    et al. 1975)1 trabecular human Inelastic buckling 11.38 wet (Williams and Lewis 1982)1 trabecular human Back -calculating from finite element...superficialis Hip (Pelvis) Flexion Iliopsoas complex, rectus femoris, tensor fasciae latae, sartorius, pectineus Extension Semitendinosus, semimembranosus...digitorum superficialis Hip Flexion Iliopsoas complex, rectus femoris, tensor fasciae latae, sartorius, pectineus, adductor magnus, adductor longus

  17. Hallucal grasping in Nycticebus coucang: further implications for the functional significance of a large peroneal process.

    PubMed

    Kingston, Amanda K; Boyer, Doug M; Patel, Biren A; Larson, Susan G; Stern, Jack T

    2010-01-01

    Euprimate grasping feet are characterized by a suite of morphological traits, including an enlarged peroneal process on the base of the first metatarsal, which serves as the insertion site of the peroneus longus muscle. In prosimians, a large process has typically been associated with a powerful hallucal grasp via the contraction of the peroneus longus to adduct the hallux. Recent electromyography (EMG) studies have documented that peroneus longus does not contribute substantially to hallucal grasping in lemurids (Boyer et al., 2007). However, non-lemurid prosimians have a I-V opposable grasp complex that is morphologically different and phylogenetically more primitive than the I-II adductor grasp complex of the lemurids previously studied. Therefore, it is possible that peroneus longus did function during grasping in early euprimates, but lost this function in large-bodied lemurids. The present study tests the hypothesis that a large peroneal process is related to powerful grasping ability in primates displaying the more primitive I-V grasp complex. We use EMG to evaluate the recruitment of peroneus longus, other crural muscles, and adductor hallucis in static and locomotor grasping activities of the slow loris (Nycticebus coucang). Results show that peroneus longus is active during grasping behaviors that require the subject to actively resist inversion of the foot, and likely contributes to a hallucal grasp in these activities. Peroneus longus activity level does not differ between grasping and power grasping activities, nor does it differ between grasping and non-grasping locomotor modes. Conversely, the digital flexors and hallucal adductor are recruited at higher levels during power grasping and grasping locomotor modes. Consequently, we reject the hypothesis that an enlarged peroneal process represents an adaptation specifically to enhance the power of the I-V grasp, but accept that the muscle likely plays a role in adducting the hallux during grasping

  18. Computer modeling of the pathomechanics of spastic hip dislocation in children.

    PubMed

    Miller, F; Slomczykowski, M; Cope, R; Lipton, G E

    1999-01-01

    Spastic muscles about the hip cause subluxation, dislocation, and lead to acetabular dysplasia. Spastic hip disease occurs when the muscles about the hip exert forces that are too high or in the wrong direction or both. To determine the role of the hip forces in the progression of spastic hip disease and the effect of both muscle-lengthening and bony reconstructive surgeries, a computerized mathematical model of a spastic hip joint was created. The magnitude and direction of the forces of spastic hips undergoing surgery were analyzed preoperatively and postoperatively to determine which procedure is best suited for the treatment of spastic hip disease. The muscle-lengthening procedures included (a) the adductor longus, (b) the psoas, iliacus, gracilis, adductor brevis, and adductor longus, and (3) the psoas, iliacus, gracilis, adductor brevis, adductor longus, semimembranosus, and semitendinosus. The bony reconstructive and muscle-lengthening procedures included (a) lengthening the psoas, iliacus, gracilis, adductor brevis, adductor longus, semimembranosus, and semitendinosus combined with changing femoral neck anteversion from 45 to 10 degrees , (b) lengthening of the psoas, iliacus, gracilis, adductor brevis, adductor longus, semimembranosus, and semitendinosus combined with changing neck-shaft angle from 165 to 135 degrees , and (c) lengthening of the psoas, iliacus, gracilis, adductor brevis, adductor longus, semimembranosus, and semitendinosus combined with changing femoral neck anteversion from 45 to 10 degrees and neck-shaft angle from 165 to 135 degrees . Results show that a child with spastic hip disease has a hip-force magnitude 3 times that of the a child with a normal hip in the normal physiologic position. Based on this mathematical model the best to normalize the magnitude of the hip-joint reaction force, the muscles to be lengthened should include the psoas, iliacus, gracilis, adductor brevis, and the adductor longus. To normalize the direction of

  19. Elicitability of muscle cramps in different leg and foot muscles.

    PubMed

    Minetto, Marco Alessandro; Botter, Alberto

    2009-10-01

    To explore the efficacy of muscle motor point stimulation in eliciting muscle cramps, 11 subjects underwent eight sessions of electrical stimulation of the following muscles bilaterally: abductor hallucis flexor hallucis brevis, and both heads of the gastrocnemius muscles. Bursts of 150 square wave stimuli (duration: 152 micros; current intensity: 30% supramaximal) were applied. The stimulation frequency was increased from 4 pulses per second (pps) at increments of 2 pps until a cramp was induced. The number of cramps that could be elicited was smaller in flexor hallucis brevis than in abductor hallucis (16 vs. 22 out of 22 trials each; P < 0.05) and in the lateral gastrocnemius than in the medial gastrocnemius (5 vs. 20 out of 22 trials each; P < 0.0001). We show that leg and foot muscles have different cramp susceptibility, and the intermuscle variability in the elicitability profile for electrically induced cramps supports the use of the proposed method for cramp research.

  20. Laryngeal stridor in multiple system atrophy: Clinicopathological features and causal hypotheses.

    PubMed

    Ozawa, Tetsutaro; Sekiya, Kanako; Aizawa, Naotaka; Terajima, Kenshi; Nishizawa, Masatoyo

    2016-02-15

    Laryngeal stridor is recognized as a characteristic clinical manifestation in patients with multiple system atrophy (MSA). However, the pathogenic mechanisms underlying this symptom are controversial. Neurogenic atrophy of the posterior cricoarytenoid muscle has been identified in cases of MSA, suggesting that laryngeal abductor weakness contributes to laryngeal stridor. However, dystonia in the laryngeal adductor muscles has also been reported to cause laryngeal stridor. Depletion of serotonergic neurons in the medullary raphe nuclei, which exert tonic drive to activate the posterior cricoarytenoid muscle, has recently been identified in MSA cases. This adds weight to the possibility that laryngeal abductor weakness underlies laryngeal stridor in MSA. Continuous positive airway pressure therapy is currently used in the treatment of laryngeal stridor, but should be used with caution in patients showing contraindications. Current knowledge of the clinical and neuropathological features of laryngeal stridor is summarized in this paper, and the hypothesized causes and possible therapeutic options for this symptom are discussed.

  1. The effects of band exercise using proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation on muscular strength in lower extremity

    PubMed Central

    Rhyu, Hyun-Seung; Kim, Su-Hyun; Park, Hye-Sang

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine whether a six-week elastic band exercise program using proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) can increase isotonic strength of abductor muscles in the lower extremity. Twenty-eight healthy students from S university were divided into an experimental group and control group. Each group was participated in pre and post-measurement in isotonic strength using an isotonic analyzer, En-treeM. Experimental group performed elastic band exercise using PNF pattern for a six-weeks, in contrast, control group did not take any exercise. In the results of this study, isotonic strength measurements of abductor muscles in lower extremity in experimental group were significantly different after exercise, but control group did not show any significant changes. Therefore, we hope that resistive exercise would be very valuable for healthy people as well as the old people with weakened muscle strength. PMID:25830142

  2. Associations between iliotibial band injury status and running biomechanics in women.

    PubMed

    Foch, Eric; Reinbolt, Jeffrey A; Zhang, Songning; Fitzhugh, Eugene C; Milner, Clare E

    2015-02-01

    Iliotibial band syndrome (ITBS) is a common overuse knee injury that is twice as likely to afflict women compared to men. Lower extremity and trunk biomechanics during running, as well as hip abductor strength and iliotibial band flexibility, are factors believed to be associated with ITBS. The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to determine if differences in lower extremity and trunk biomechanics during running exist among runners with current ITBS, previous ITBS, and controls. Additionally, we sought to determine if isometric hip abductor strength and iliotibial band flexibility were different among groups. Twenty-seven female runners participated in the study. Participants were divided into three equal groups: current ITBS, previous ITBS, and controls. Overground running trials, isometric hip abductor strength, and iliotibial band flexibility were recorded for all participants. Discrete joint and segment biomechanics, as well as hip strength and flexibility measures were analyzed using a one-way analysis of variance. Runners with current ITBS exhibited 1.8 (1.5)° greater trunk ipsilateral flexion and 7 (6)° less iliotibial band flexibility compared to runners with previous ITBS and controls. Runners with previous ITBS exhibited 2.2 (2.9) ° less hip adduction compared to runners with current ITBS and controls. Hip abductor strength 3.3 (2.6) %BM×h was less in runners with previous ITBS but not current ITBS compared to controls. Runners with current ITBS may lean their trunk more towards the stance limb which may be associated with decreased iliotibial band flexibility.

  3. Clot-Inducing Minerals Versus Plasma Protein Dressing for Topical Treatment of External Bleeding in the Presence of Coagulopathy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-11-01

    rate), draw blood samples (arterial), and infuse resuscitation fluid. Next, a midline laparotomy was per- formed, followed by a splenectomy to...replaced by infusing LR at three times the weight of the spleen. A cystostomy was also performed to aid in the drainage of urine. The abdomen was then...overlying abductor muscle. The vessel was then covered with a small piece of gauze saturated with 2% lidocaine to relax vasospasm and prevent tissue

  4. The importance of soft tissue stabilization in trans-femoral amputation : English version.

    PubMed

    Gottschalk, F

    2016-03-01

    Transfemoral amputations with more proximal amputation levels have the problem of secondary development into flexion and abduction contractures. This is induced by muscle imbalance, especially the loss of adductor muscle insertions when abductor muscle insertions are preserved. This causes considerable problems when fitting prosthetics. Myodesis with insertion of the distally detached adductor magnus muscle to the lateral femoral cortex, introduced here, results in a stronger stump with good muscle balance, and prosthetics fitting is significantly improved.

  5. Comparative histochemical composition of muscle fibres in a pre- and a postvertebral muscle of the cervical spine.

    PubMed

    Boyd-Clark, L C; Briggs, C A; Galea, M P

    2001-12-01

    References to histochemistry are extensive for human limb muscles but occur less frequently in relation to vertebral muscle. Most vertebral muscle literature has been concerned with muscle fibre characteristics in the lumbar and thoracic spine, due in large part to the incidence of low back pain and idiopathic scoliosis. However few studies have investigated the histochemical composition of neck muscles in humans: and, to our knowledge, no previous study has examined the antagonistic longus colli and multifidus muscle pair. In addition, while age-related segmental degeneration is most prominent between C5 and C7, it is not known whether these osteoligamentous changes are paralleled by changes in muscle fibre ratio. Tissue blocks comprising muscle and bone from C5-C7 segments were harvested at autopsy from 16 subjects with ages ranging from 4 to 77 years. The prevertebral longus colli and postvertebral multifidus muscle pairs were randomly selected from one or other side in each subject. The tissue was frozen, sectioned and histochemically stained for myofibrillar adenosine triphosphatase. Analysis of muscle fibre types was performed by light microscopy. Wilcoxon paired t-tests were used to ascertain whether intramuscular and intermuscular differences in fibre composition were significant. In addition, correlation and regression analyses were used to determine whether fibre type proportions changed in either muscle with increasing age. The present study has revealed histochemical differences between longus colli and multifidus at the level of the C5-C7 vertebral segments. Multifidus comprises a significantly greater proportion of type I than type II fibres. Longus colli comprises a significantly greater proportion of type II fibres than multifidus. Further there were no changes in fibre type proportion in either muscle with increasing age. These observations suggest that longus colli responds equally to postural and phasic demands, whereas multifidus is

  6. A pedicled muscle flap based solely on a neural pedicle.

    PubMed

    Avci, Gulden; Akan, Mithat; Akoz, Tayfun; Kuzon, William; Gul, Aylin Ege

    2009-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that the intrinsic vascular plexus of the motor nerve could support viability in a rat hindlimb muscle flap. In a preliminary study, we examined the course and vascularity of the sciatic nerve, the peroneal nerve, and the peroneous longus muscle in the rat hindlimb via anatomic dissection, microangiography, and histologic study (n = 10 animals). On the basis of this examination, the peroneous longus muscle was chosen as our experimental model in this study. In 12 animals, the peroneus longus was acutely elevated, which severed all tendinous and vascular structures, this left the muscle pedicled on the motor nerve only (Group I). Animals in Group II underwent a staged elevation of the flap with division of the vascular pedicle, the tendon of insertion, and the tendon of origin during separate procedures that were 5 days apart (n = 12). Muscle viability was evaluated by gross inspection, measurement of muscle weight and length, nitroblue tetrazlium (NBT) staining, microangiography, and histology. NBT staining demonstrated that immediate elevation of the peroneus longus muscle flaps led to an average necrotic area of 80.6% +/- 9.8% (Group I). A significant improvement in viability was observed for muscle flaps of animals in Group II, with peroneus longus muscle necrosis averaging 25.6% +/- 9.3%. Microangiography demonstrated that the intrinsic vascularity of nerve was increased dramatically in Group II. These data support the hypothesis that the intrinsic vascular plexus of the motor nerve of a skeletal muscle can support at least partial viability of a muscle flap. However, this vascular axis is inadequate to support complete viability of a muscle flap if the flap is elevated immediately. If a staged elevation affects a surgical delay, the viability of a muscle flap elevated on a neural pedicle can be increased significantly. With adjustments in the delay procedure, this strategy may allow transfer of muscle flaps when maintenance or

  7. Muscle stiffness of posterior lower leg in runners with a history of medial tibial stress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Saeki, Junya; Nakamura, Masatoshi; Nakao, Sayaka; Fujita, Kosuke; Yanase, Ko; Ichihashi, Noriaki

    2017-02-16

    Previous history of medial tibial stress syndrome (MTSS) is a risk factor for MTSS relapse, which suggests that there might be some physical factors that are related to MTSS development in runners with a history of MTSS. The relationship between MTSS and muscle stiffness can be assessed in a cross-sectional study that measures muscle stiffness in subjects with a history of MTSS, who do not have pain at the time of measurement, and in those without a history of MTSS. The purpose of this study was to compare the shear elastic modulus, which is an index of muscle stiffness, of all posterior lower leg muscles of subjects with a history of MTSS and those with no history and investigate which muscles could be related to MTSS. Twenty-four male collegiate runners (age, 20.0 ± 1.7 years; height, 172.7 ± 4.8 cm; weight, 57.3 ± 3.7 kg) participated in this study; 14 had a history of MTSS, and 10 did not. The shear elastic moduli of the lateral gastrocnemius, medial gastrocnemius, soleus, peroneus longus, peroneus brevis, flexor hallucis longus, flexor digitorum longus, and tibialis posterior were measured using shear wave elastography. The shear elastic moduli of the flexor digitorum longus and tibialis posterior were significantly higher in subjects with a history of MTSS than in those with no history. However, there was no significant difference in the shear elastic moduli of other muscles. The results of this study suggest that flexor digitorum longus and tibialis posterior stiffness could be related to MTSS. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  8. Modulation of motor cortical outputs to the reading hand of braille readers.

    PubMed

    Pascual-Leone, A; Cammarota, A; Wassermann, E M; Brasil-Neto, J P; Cohen, L G; Hallett, M

    1993-07-01

    We used focal transcranial magnetic stimulation to map the motor cortical areas targeting the first dorsal interosseous and the abductor digiti minimi muscles bilaterally in 10 proficient braille readers and 10 blind controls who were matched for age (mean, 50.6 yr) and age at time of blindness (mean, 7.5 yr). The proficient braille readers had learned braille at age 8 to 14 years and used it daily for 5 to 10 hours. Controls had not learned braille until age 17 to 21 years and used it daily for < 1 hour. In the controls, motor representations of the right and left first dorsal interosseous and abductor digiti minimi muscles were not significantly different. However, in the proficient braille readers, the representation of the first dorsal interosseous muscle in the reading hand was significantly larger than that in the nonreading hand or in either hand of the controls. Conversely, the representation of the abductor digiti minimi muscle in the reading hand was significantly smaller than that in the nonreading hand or in either hand of the controls. These differences were not due to differences in motor thresholds. Our results suggest that the cortical representation of the reading finger in proficient braille readers is enlarged at the expense of the representation of other fingers.

  9. The effects of hip external rotator exercises and toe-spread exercises on lower extremity muscle activities during stair-walking in subjects with pronated foot

    PubMed Central

    Goo, Young-Mi; Kim, Da-Yeon; Kim, Tae-Ho

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of the present study was to examine the effects of toe-spread (TS) exercises and hip external rotator strengthening exercises for pronated feet on lower extremity muscle activities during stair-walking. [Subjects and Methods] The participants were 20 healthy adults with no present or previous pain, no past history of surgery on the foot or the ankle, and no foot deformities. Ten subjects performed hip external rotator strengthening exercises and TS exercises and the remaining ten subjects performed only TS exercises five times per week for four weeks. [Results] Less change in navicular drop height occurred in the group that performed hip external rotator exercises than in the group that performed only TS exercises. The group that performed only TS exercises showed increased abductor hallucis muscle activity during both stair-climbing and -descending, and the group that performed hip external rotator exercises showed increased muscle activities of the vastus medialis and abductor hallucis during stair-climbing and increased muscle activity of only the abductor hallucis during stair-descending after exercise. [Conclusion] Stair-walking can be more effectively performed if the hip external rotator muscle is strengthened when TS exercises are performed for the pronated foot. PMID:27134364

  10. An Integrated Musculoskeletal Countermeasure Battery for Long-Duration Lunar Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, T. F.; Streeper, T. S.; Cavanagh, P. R.; Saeed, I. H.; Carpenter, R. D.; Frassetto, L. A.; Lee, S. M. C.; Grodsinsky, C. M.; Funk, J.; Hanson, A. M.; Bloomberg, J. J.; Mulavara, A. P.; Sibonga, J. D.

    2011-01-01

    During extended periods of skeletal unloading, losses in strength and density of the proximal femur will occur. In long-duration spaceflight, resistive exercise is used to replace the normal loads exerted on the spine and hip. At the present time, there is no conclusive evidence that hip bone loss has been prevented in this scenario. Our group has recently developed and clinically evaluated a multifunctional exercise system, the Combined Countermeasure Device (CCD). The CCD comprises a low-footprint Stuart Platform for lower-body resistance exercise and balance training, and a cardiovascular exercise bicycle. A consideration for resistance exercise was targeting of the hip abductor and adductor muscles, which attach directly at the hip and which should subject it to the largest loads. In our training study, we found that CCD exercise increased hip adductor and abductor strength, and modeling results suggest that this exercise exerts forces on the hip of approx. 4-6 body weights at 1g, compared to forces of approx.2.5 body weight y squatting exercise. In our current study, we hypothesize that abductor and adductor exercise will increase the density and strength of the proximal femur.

  11. Influence of mental practice on development of voluntary control of a novel motor acquisition task.

    PubMed

    Creelman, Jim

    2003-08-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to assess whether mental practice facilitates the development of voluntary control over the recruitment of the abductor hallucis muscle to produce isolated big toe abduction. A sample of convenience of 15 women and 20 men with a mean age of 28.8 yr. (SD=5.7) and healthy feet, who were unable voluntarily to abduct the big toe, were randomly assigned to one of three groups, a mental practice group, a physical practice group, and a group who performed a control movement during practice. Each subject received neuromuscular electrical stimulation to introduce the desired movement prior to each of five practice bouts over a single session lasting 2 hr. Big toe abduction active range of motion and surface electromyographic (EMG) output of the abductor hallucis and extensor digitorum brevis muscles were measured prior to the first practice bout and following each practice bout, yielding seven acquisition trials. Acquisition is defined as an improvement in both active range of motion and in the difference between the integrated EMG of the abductor hallucis and extensor digitorum brevis muscles during successive acquisition trials. Seven members of both the mental and physical practice groups and one member of the control group met the acquisition criteria. Chi-square analysis indicated the group difference was statistically significant, suggesting mental practice was effective for this task.

  12. The trapezius muscle uniquely lacks adaptive process in response to a repeated moderate cognitive stressor.

    PubMed

    Willmann, Magali; Bolmont, Benoît

    2012-01-06

    The aim of this study was to examine the adaptive process of muscular responses in healthy subjects over two repeated exposures to the same moderate cognitive stressor. The electromyographic (EMG) activity of the flexor pollicis brevis, biceps brachii, triceps brachii, trapezius, gastrocnemius and soleus muscles was recorded in 35 males during video-recorded Stroop color-word interference tests. The results showed lower EMG activity in all muscles during the second exposure to the stressful task, but not in the trapezius muscle. These findings could help to the understanding of the role of stressful situations in the development of musculoskeletal disorders.

  13. Variations in the superficial palmar arch of the hand.

    PubMed

    Bataineh, Ziad M; Habbal, Omar; Moqattash, Satei T

    2009-01-01

    Variations in the pattern of the hand blood supply are frequently encountered. Awareness and identification of such variations is crucial during hand surgery. Thirty formaline fixed hands of male and female cadavers were dissected. All arteries contributing to the superficial palmar arch (SPA) of the hand were verified. In addition to the frequently encountered types of SPA, three very rare cases were described. In the first case, the superficial branch of the radial artery passed superficial to the thenar muscles with a diameter larger than that of the ulnar artery. In addition to the common palmar digital artery to the second web space, it gave the princeps pollicis and radialis indicis arteries. In the second case, the SPA was formed by the ulnar artery and was completed by a small branch from the deep branch of the radial artery. The palmar digital artery to the ulnar side of the fifth finger and the common palmar digital artery to the fourth web space arose from a common trunk. In the third case, incomplete SPA was formed by the median artery which only gave the princeps pollicis and radialis indicis arteries, while the ulnar artery supplied the rest of the hand except the ulnar side of the third finger and the second web space which were supplied by the deep palmar arch. Therefore, sound knowledge of the pattern of the blood supply of the hand by various techniques is crucial to avoid possible complications during hand surgery.

  14. Two new species of Pseudochristianella Campbell & Beveridge, 1990 (Cestoda: Trypanorhyncha) from elasmobranch fishes from the Gulf of California, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Campbell, R A; Beveridge, I

    2006-12-01

    Pseudochristionella elegantissima sp. nov. (Cestoda: Trypanorhyncha) is described from the spiral valves of the rays Dasyatis brevis (Garman, 1880) and D. longus (Garman, 1880), from the Gulf of California, Mexico. Also described is P. nudisculo sp. nov. from rays Rhinobatos productus Ayres, 1854, D. longus, Myliobatis longirostris Applegate & Fitch, 1964 and Zapteryx exasperat (Jordan & Gilbert, 1880) from the same location. The species are distinguished from one another and from the only existing species within the genus, P. southwelli Campbel & Beveridge, 1990, by differences in the arrangement of bill-hooks on the external surface of the basal swelling of the tentacle and by the number of hooks in each row of the metabasasl armature.

  15. Medial Tibial Stress Syndrome: Muscles Located at the Site of Pain

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Ato Ampomah

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between the location of the MTSS pain (posteromedial border of tibia) and the muscles that originate from that site. Method. The study was conducted in the Department of Anatomy of the School of Medical Sciences, University of Cape Coast, and involved the use of 22 cadaveric legs (9 paired and 4 unpaired) from 11 males and 2 females. Findings. The structures that were thus observed to attach directly to the posteromedial border of the tibia were the soleus, the flexor digitorum longus, and the deep crural fascia. The soleus and flexor digitorum longus muscles were observed to attach directly to the posteromedial border of the tibia. The tibialis posterior muscle had no attachment to this site. Conclusion. The findings of this study suggest that if traction is the cause of MTSS then soleus and the flexor digitorum muscles and not the tibialis posterior muscle are the likely cause of MTSS. PMID:27066291

  16. Calcific retropharyngeal tendinitis. [Radiological findings

    SciTech Connect

    Karasick, D.; Karasick, S.

    1981-12-01

    Calcific retropharyngeal tendinitis is an imflammation of the longus colli muscle tendon which is located on the anterior surface of the verterbral column extending from the atlas to the third thoracic vertebra. The acute inflammatory condition is selflimiting with symptoms consisting of a gradually increasing neck pain often associated with throat pain and difficulty swallowing. The pain is aggravated by head and neck movement. Clinically the condition can be confused with retropharyngeal absecess, meningitis, infectious spondylitis, and post-traumatic muscle spasm. The radiographic features of this condition consist of pre-vertebral soft tissue swelling from C1 to C4 and amorphous calcific density in the longus colli tendon anterior to the body of C2 and inferior to the anterior arch of C1.

  17. Bilateral tibial hemimelia I.

    PubMed

    Suganthy, J; Rassau, Marina; Koshi, Rachel; Battacharjee, Suranjan

    2007-05-01

    Congenital absence of tibia is a rare anomaly. We report a case of bilateral tibial hemimelia born to phenotypically normal parents. The two amputated legs with tibial dysplasia obtained from a 3-year-old boy were studied by radiography and anatomical dissection. The radiological evaluation revealed a normal hip joint. The lower end of femur was normal without any bifurcation, shortening or bowing. Fibula was present on both legs and there was no sign of bowing or doubling. Both right and left tibiae were absent. In addition, on the right side, five tarsal bones, two metatarsals and the corresponding digital rays were absent. On the left side, three tarsal bones were absent. Dissection of the amputated segments showed the presence of extensor digitorum longus, peroneus tertius, peroneus longus and brevis, gastrocnemius, and soleus. Following bilateral knee disarticulation the patient was fitted with prosthesis and is doing well.

  18. Vibration-induced muscle injury. An experimental model and preliminary findings.

    PubMed

    Necking, L E; Dahlin, L B; Fridén, J; Lundborg, G; Lundström, R; Thornell, L E

    1992-06-01

    The hind paws of rats were subjected to vibration at a frequency of 80 Hz., an acceleration of 32 m./s.2 rms (i.e. ah.w approximately 6.3 m./s.2 rms) for five hours daily during five consecutive days. Morphological, histochemical and immunohistochemical analyses of the soleus, extensor digitorum longus and the plantar muscles in the vibrated limb and the contralateral control limb were performed. No changes were seen in the soleus or extensor digitorum longus muscles but different degrees of degeneration of the muscle fibres were seen in the plantar muscle sections as well as signs of regeneration. No changes were observed in the contralateral unexposed limb. It is concluded that it is not only nervous tissue but also muscle tissue that can be affected by vibration. The changes seem to be confined to muscles close to the vibration exciter.

  19. [Upright posture of the human and the morphologic evolution of the musculi extensores digitorum pedis with reference to evolutionary myology].

    PubMed

    Kaneff, A

    1986-01-01

    A brief literature review is made of the morphological changes in the bones of the lower limbs of man, which are the result of his upright walk. The author's task has been to study the morphological changes of Mm. extensores digitorum pedis from the viewpoint of evolutionary myology. The following material has been studied: Lower limbs of adults, 151 less than or equal to N less than or equal to 358. Pelvic limbs of Marsupialia, Insectivora, and non-hominide primates; N = 122. Lower limbs of human embryos and fetuses; N = 71. The following acknowledgements are the author's own studies. They begin with an evolutionary-myological study of m. extensor hallucis longus and of m. extensor digitorum longus, together with m. peroneus tertius.

  20. The influence of a medio-lateral unstable sole on invertor and evertor activation while descending stairs

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ki-sik; Park, Kyungyeon; Choi, Bo-ram

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study examined the effects of a medio-lateral unstable sole on invertor and evertor activation while descending stairs. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 30 university students with no history of ankle sprain. They descended stairs while wearing the medio-lateral unstable sole or with bare feet. Electromyography was used to record the activity of the tibialis anterior and peroneus longus and brevis muscles and paired t-tests were used to assess statistical significance. [Results] The medio-lateral unstable sole group showed increased tibialis anterior and peroneus longus and brevis muscle activation compared to the barefoot group. [Conclusion] Medio-lateral unstable sole can be used with exercises to prevent further ankle damage by activating both the inversion and eversion muscles. PMID:27630412

  1. Hindlimb immobilization - Length-tension and contractile properties of skeletal muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witzmann, F. A.; Kim, D. H.; Fitts, R. H.

    1982-01-01

    Casts were placed around rat feet in plantar flexion position to immobilize the soleus muscle in a shortened position, while the other foot was fixed in dorsal flexion to set the extensor digitorum longus in a shortened position. The total muscular atrophy and contractile properties were measured at 1, 2, 4, 7, 14, 21, 28, 35, and 42 days after immobilization, with casts being replaced every two weeks. The slow twitch soleus and the fast-twitch vastus lateralis and longus muscles were excised after termination of the experiment. The muscles were then stretched and subjected to electric shock to elicit peak tetanic tension and peak tetanic tension development. Force velocity features of the three muscles were assayed in a series of afterloaded contractions and fiber lengths were measured from subsequently macerated muscle. All muscles atrophied during immobilization, reaching a new steady state by day 21. Decreases in fiber and sarcomere lengths were also observed.

  2. Nomenclatural review of long digital forelimb flexors in carnivores.

    PubMed

    Spoor, C F; Badoux, D M

    1986-12-01

    A hitherto-unknown atavistic muscle in the dog initiated a review of the literature on the homologies and nomenclature of the forelimb flexors in carnivores and man. A consequence is that we recommend a revision of the nomenclature in the Nomina Anatomica Veterinaria (Ithaca, New York, 1983) so that it is in agreement with the Nomina Anatomica (Wilkins, Baltimore, 1983). This revision mainly consists of the incorporation of the terms M. palmaris longus and Mm. flexores breves manus.

  3. Pathophysiology of Anticholinesterase Agents

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-07-07

    PATHOPHYSIOLOGY OF ANTICHOLINESTERASE AGENTS Annual and Final Report DTIC ! ELECTEI aohn E. Rash, Ph. D. ALCTRf Julie K. Elmund, Ph.D. July 7 , 1988...Ph.D. ..-,. July 7 , 1988 Dis t Supported by A __ U. S. ARMY MEDICAL RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT COMMAND Fort Detrick, Frederick, Maryland 21701-5012...samples for electron microscopic analysis from diaphragm, soleus and extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles at J hour and 1, 7 , 14, 21, and 56 days

  4. A new species of Lasiosmylus from the Early Cretaceous, China clarifies its genus-group placement in Ithonidae (Neuroptera)

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Bingyu; Ren, Dong; Wang, Yongjie

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A new species, Lasiosmylus longus sp. n., is described from the Early Cretaceous Yixian Formation of Huangbanjigou Village, Liaoning Province, China. Based on the characters of the new species and nine new specimens of Lasiosmylus newi Ren & Guo, 1996, the generic diagnosis of Lasiosmylus is emended and the taxonomic position of Lasiosmylus Ren & Guo, 1996 is re-evaluated, and Lasiosmylus should be assigned to the ithonid genus-group. PMID:27917063

  5. Immediate Force Loss after Eccentric Contractions is Increased with L-NAME Administration, a Nitric Oxide Synthase Inhibitor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-02-01

    IMMEDIATE FORCE LOSS AFTER ECCENTRIC CONTRACTIONS IS INCREASED WITH L-NAME ADMINISTRATION, A NITRIC OXIDE SYNTHASE INHIBITOR BENJAMIN T. CORONA, PhD...performance of eccentric contractions. Methods—Wild-type mouse extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles underwent in vitro functional testing in the...presence or absence of a non-specific NOS inhibitor (L-NAME, 10 mM) before and after performance of 10 eccentric contractions. Results—After eccentric

  6. Test-Retest Reliability of Sudden Ankle Inversion Measurements in Subjects With Healthy Ankle Joints

    PubMed Central

    Eechaute, Christophe; Vaes, Peter; Duquet, William; Van Gheluwe, Bart

    2007-01-01

    Context: Sudden ankle inversion tests have been used to investigate whether the onset of peroneal muscle activity is delayed in patients with chronically unstable ankle joints. Before interpreting test results of latency times in patients with chronic ankle instability and healthy subjects, the reliability of these measures must be first demonstrated. Objective: To investigate the test-retest reliability of variables measured during a sudden ankle inversion movement in standing subjects with healthy ankle joints. Design: Validation study. Setting: Research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: 15 subjects with healthy ankle joints (30 ankles). Intervention(s): Subjects stood on an ankle inversion platform with both feet tightly fixed to independently moveable trapdoors. An unexpected sudden ankle inversion of 50° was imposed. Main Outcome Measure(s): We measured latency and motor response times and electromechanical delay of the peroneus longus muscle, along with the time and angular position of the first and second decelerating moments, the mean and maximum inversion speed, and the total inversion time. Correlation coefficients and standard error of measurements were calculated. Results: Intraclass correlation coefficients ranged from 0.17 for the electromechanical delay of the peroneus longus muscle (standard error of measurement = 2.7 milliseconds) to 0.89 for the maximum inversion speed (standard error of measurement = 34.8 milliseconds). Conclusions: The reliability of the latency and motor response times of the peroneus longus muscle, the time of the first and second decelerating moments, and the mean and maximum inversion speed was acceptable in subjects with healthy ankle joints and supports the investigation of the reliability of these measures in subjects with chronic ankle instability. The lower reliability of the electromechanical delay of the peroneus longus muscle and the angular positions of both decelerating moments calls the use of these

  7. Utilization of Military-Relevant Muscle Injury Models to Identify Pharmacological Treatment Strategies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-12-01

    and Coauthors, 2005: Metallothionein-mediated antioxidant defense its response to exercise training are impaired in human type 2 diabetes ...display a currently valid OMB control number. 1. REPORT DATE DEC 2008 2 . REPORT TYPE N/A 3. DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Utilization...applied to rat hind limbs for 3 h. Extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles from the healthy and I/R leg were harvested 2 h post-reperfusion for

  8. Case report: the cleidocervical muscle with speculation as to its origin.

    PubMed Central

    Tomo, S; Toh, H; Hirakawa, T; Tomo, I; Kobayashi, S

    1994-01-01

    The occurrence of a cleidocervical muscle, which arose from the anterior tubercle of the transverse process of the 6th cervical vertebra and was inserted onto the superior margin of the clavicle, is described. Detailed observations on its innervation, which was derived from the 5th cervical nerve, and its topographic anatomy suggest that the muscle originated from longus colli. Images Fig. 1 PMID:8157489

  9. Arthroscopic pubic symphysis debridement and adductor enthesis repair in athletes with athletic pubalgia: technical note and video illustration.

    PubMed

    Hopp, Sascha; Tumin, Masjudin; Wilhelm, Peter; Pohlemann, Tim; Kelm, Jens

    2014-11-01

    We elaborately describe our novel arthroscopic technique of the symphysis pubis in athletes with osteitis pubis and concomitant adductor enthesopathy who fail to conservative treatment modalities. The symphysis pubis is debrided arthroscopically and the degenerated origin of adductor tendon (enthesis) is excised and reattached. With our surgical procedure the stability of the symphysis pubis is successfully preserved and the adductor longus enthesopathy simultaneously addressed in the same setting.

  10. Coexistence of twitch potentiation and tetanic force decline in rat hindlimb muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rankin, Lucinda L.; Enoka, Roger M.; Volz, Kathryn A.; Stuart, Douglas G.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of whole-muscle fatigue on the isometric twitch was investigated in various hindlimb muscles of anesthetized rats, using an experimental protocol designed to assess the levels of fatigability in motor units. The results of EMG and force measurements revealed the existence of a linear relationship between fatigability and the magnitude of the twitch force following the fatigue test in both soleus and extensor digitorum longus muscles.

  11. Analysis of dimensions, activation and median frequency of cervical flexor muscles in young women with migraine or tension-type headache

    PubMed Central

    Wanderley, Débora; Moura, Alberto G.; Costa, Joaquim J. S.; Siqueira, Gisela R.; de Oliveira, Daniella A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Central and peripheral mechanisms may be involved in migraine and tension-type headache pathogenesis, however the role of muscle disorders in their pathophysiological mechanisms remains unclear. Objectives: To assess the association between the presence of migraine or tension-type headache and changes in longus colli muscle dimensions and sternocleidomastoid muscle activity. Method: An observational study with 48 women comparing the following groups: migraine (n=21), tension-type headache (n=16), and control (n=11). The cross-sectional area, lateral and anteroposterior dimensions, and shape ratio of the longus colli muscle were measured using ultrasound. The activation of the sternocleidomastoid muscle was assessed by signal amplitude and the decline in median frequency using surface electromyographic analysis. Results: The dimensions of the longus colli muscle did not differ between groups (p>0.05). Post-test analysis showed lower sternocleidomastoid muscle activation on both sides, at the onset of contraction, in the group with tension-type headache when compared to the control group {right sternocleidomastoid [tension-type headache: 0.39 (0.30-0.49); control: 0.58 (0.42-0.76); p=0.026] and left sternocleidomastoid [tension-type headache: 0.39 (0.31-0.48); control: 0.60 (0.42-0.79); p=0.039], Tukey's post hoc test}. There was no difference between the three groups in sternocleidomastoid muscle activation, on both sides, at the end of contraction (p>0.05). Intergroup analysis showed no difference in the rate of decline in median frequency (p>0.05). Conclusion: The group with tension-type headache exhibited less activation at the onset of sternocleidomastoid muscle contraction. No association was observed between the presence of headache and alterations in longus colli muscle dimensions, median frequency, and sternocleidomastoid muscle activation at the end of contraction. PMID:26083605

  12. Intraoperative value of the thompson test.

    PubMed

    Cuttica, Daniel J; Hyer, Christopher F; Berlet, Gregory C

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to assess the validity of the Thompson sign and determine whether the deep flexors of the foot can produce a falsely intact Achilles tendon.Ten unmatched above-the-knee lower extremity cadaveric specimens were studied. In group 1, the Achilles tendon was sectioned into 25% increments. The Thompson maneuver was performed after each sequential sectioning of the Achilles tendon, including after it had been completely sectioned. If the Thompson sign was still intact after complete release of the Achilles tendon, we proceeded to release the tendon, and tendon flexor hallucis longus, flexor digitorum longus, and posterior tibial tendons. The Thompson test was performed after the release of each tendon. In group 2, the tendon releases were performed in a reverse order to that of group 1, with the Thompson test performed after each release. In group 1, the Thompson sign remained intact in all specimens after sectioning of 25%, 50%, and 75% of the tendon. After complete (100%) release of the tendon, the Thompson sign was absent in all specimens. In group 2, the Thompson sign remained intact after sectioning of the posterior tibial, flexor digitorum longus, and flexor hallucis longus tendons in all specimens. The Thompson sign remained intact in all specimens after sectioning of 25%, 50%, and 75% of the Achilles tendon. After complete release of the tendon, the Thompson sign was absent in all specimens.The Thompson test is an accurate clinical test for diagnosing complete Achilles tendon ruptures. However, it might not be a useful test for diagnosing partial Achilles tendon ruptures. Our findings also call into question the usefulness of the Thompson test in the intraoperative setting.

  13. Tendon Interposition and Ligament Reconstruction with ECRL Tendon in the Late Stages of Kienböck's Disease: A Cadaver Study

    PubMed Central

    Karalezli, Nazım; Uz, Aysun; Esmer, Ali Fırat; Demirtaş, Mehmet; Taşcı, Arzu Gül; Kütahya, Harun; Ulusoy, Gürhan

    2013-01-01

    Background. The optimal surgical treatment for Kienböck's disease with stages IIIB and IV remains controversial. A cadaver study was carried out to evaluate the use of coiled extensor carpi radialis longus tendon for tendon interposition and a strip obtained from the same tendon for ligament reconstruction in the late stages of Kienböck's disease. Methods. Coiled extensor carpi radialis longus tendon was used to fill the cavity of the excised lunate, and a strip obtained from this tendon was sutured onto itself after passing through the scaphoid and the triquetrum acting as a ligament to preserve proximal row integrity. Biomechanical tests were carried out in order to evaluate this new ligamentous reconstruction. Results. It was biomechanically confirmed that the procedure was effective against axial compression and distributed the upcoming mechanical stress to the distal row. Conclusion. Extensor carpi radialis longus tendon has not been used for tendon interposition and ligament reconstruction in the treatment of this disease before. In view of the biomechanical data, the procedure seems to be effective for the stabilization of scaphoid and carpal bones. PMID:23606814

  14. A Morphometric Study of the Obturator Nerve around the Obturator Foramen

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Se Yeong; Chang, Jae Chil; Bae, Hack Gun; Oh, Jae-Sang; Heo, Juneyoung

    2016-01-01

    Objective Obturator neuropathy is a rare condition. Many neurosurgeons are unfamiliar with the obturator nerve anatomy. The purpose of this study was to define obturator nerve landmarks around the obturator foramen. Methods Fourteen cadavers were studied bilaterally to measure the distances from the nerve root to relevant anatomical landmarks near the obturator nerve, including the anterior superior iliac spine (ASIS), the pubic tubercle, the inguinal ligament, the femoral artery, and the adductor longus. Results The obturator nerve exits the obturator foramen and travels infero-medially between the adductors longus and brevis. The median distances from the obturator nerve exit zone (ONEZ) to the ASIS and pubic tubercle were 114 mm and 30 mm, respectively. The median horizontal and vertical distances between the pubic tubercle and the ONEZ were 17 mm and 27 mm, respectively. The shortest median distance from the ONEZ to the inguinal ligament was 19 mm. The median inguinal ligament lengths from the ASIS and the median pubic tubercle to the shortest point were 103 mm and 24 mm, respectively. The median obturator nerve lengths between the ONEZ and the adductor longus and femoral artery were 41 mm and 28 mm, respectively. Conclusion The obturator nerve exits the foramen 17 mm and 27 mm on the horizontal and sagittal planes, respectively, from the pubic tubercle below the pectineus muscle. The shallowest area is approximately one-fifth medially from the inguinal ligament. This study will help improve the accuracy of obturator nerve surgeries to better establish therapeutic plans and decrease complications. PMID:27226861

  15. Ecophysiological constraints of two invasive plant species under a saline gradient: Halophytes versus glycophytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duarte, B.; Santos, D.; Marques, J. C.; Caçador, I.

    2015-12-01

    Salt marsh environments are harsh environments where salinity comprises one of the most important species distribution shaping factor, presenting sediment salinities from 0 to 855 mM (0-50 ppt). Invasive species have often a high colonizing potential, due to its high plasticity and adaptation ability. Spartina patens is an invasive species already spread along several Mediterranean countries, like France and Spain. Cyperus longus is typically a freshwater species that has been spreading across the Mediterranean. In order to evaluate the ecophysiological fitness of these species, mesocosmos trials were performed subjecting both species to increasing realistic salinity levels and their photochemical and biochemical feedback was evaluated. Both species presented very different behaviours. S. patens appears to be insensitive to salt stress, mostly due to elevated proline concentrations in its leaves allowing it to maintain its osmotic balance, and thus preventing the damaging of its photochemical mechanisms. C. longus, on the other hand, was highly affected by elevated salt levels mostly due to the lack of osmotic balance driven by an incapacity to counteract the elevated ionic strength of the external medium by osmocompatible solutes. S. patens is physiologically highly adapted to saline environments and thus is capable to colonize all the marsh saline environments, while C. longus appears to be an opportunistic invader colonizing the marsh during periods of lower salinities typical from rainy seasons.

  16. Construction of adiponectin-encoding plasmid DNA and overexpression in mice in vivo.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yan-Na; Qi, Jian-Hua; Xiang, Lan; Wang, Yi-Zhen

    2012-07-10

    The effects of elevated adiponectin (ADN) plasma levels on food intake, body weight, and lipid deposition of wild-type mice through ADN gene transfer using hydrodynamic based-gene delivery (HD) were investigated. The administration of pTarget/ADN significantly increased the blood ADN levels on days 1, 3, and 7 as well as food intake and body weight. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was used to investigate the key-function genes involved in lipid deposition on epididymal fat, gastrocnemius, and extensor digitorum longus on days 1 and 7. The amounts of adipose triglyceride lipase, hormone-sensitive lipase, and lipoprotein lipase mRNA in the three samples significantly increased. We determined sirtuin 1 (SIRT1), forkhead box O3 (FOXO3a), and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) gene expression and protein level in these samples. The amounts of SIRT1, FOXO3a, and PGC-1α mRNA in epididymal fat, gastrocnemius, and extensor digitorum longus remarkably increased. However, a significant increase in SIRT1 and PGC-1α protein levels was only observed in extensor digitorum longus. These results suggest that high doses of ADN can increase food intake and body weight. Elevated ADN levels may also affect fat deposition on the adipose tissue and skeletal muscles of wild-type mice via SIRT1, FOXO3a, and its downstream targets, including PGC-1α.

  17. Is the psoas a hip flexor in the active straight leg raise?

    PubMed

    Hu, Hai; Meijer, Onno G; van Dieën, Jaap H; Hodges, Paul W; Bruijn, Sjoerd M; Strijers, Rob L; Nanayakkara, Prabath W B; van Royen, Barend J; Wu, Wen Hua; Xia, Chun

    2011-05-01

    Psoas function is a topic of considerable relevance in sports and clinical science. However, the literature on psoas function is not sufficiently consistent. Questions are, amongst others, if during hip flexion the psoas always has the same function as the iliacus, and if the psoas affects the hip more than the lumbar spine. In the present study, 17 healthy women, 20-40 years, performed the active straight leg raise (ASLR), with the right or the left leg ("Side"), and without or with weight added above the ankle ("Condition"). Electromyographic (EMG) activity of psoas and iliacus were recorded with fine-wire electrodes, and of rectus femoris and adductor longus with surface electrodes, all on the right side. Movements of the leg were recorded with active markers and a camera system. During ASLR, the iliacus, rectus femoris, adductor longus and psoas were active ipsilaterally, but psoas was also active contralaterally. All muscles started to contract before movement onset, the iliacus, rectus femoris, and adductor longus largely at the same time, before the psoas. There was no significant difference between the amplitude or time of onset of ipsilateral and contralateral psoas EMG activity, nor was there a significant interaction between Side and Condition for the psoas. Although ipsilateral psoas activity is consistent with the psoas being a hip flexor, contralateral activity is not. The most simplest explanation of the pattern found is that the psoas is bilaterally recruited to stabilize the lumbar spine, probably in the frontal plane.

  18. [Eight cases of calcific retropharyngeal tendinitis/retropharyngeal calcific tendinitis].

    PubMed

    Ohtsuka, Yuichiro; Chazono, Hideaki; Suzuki, Homare; Ohkuma, Yusuke; Sakurai, Toshioki; Hanazawa, Toyoyuki; Okamoto, Yoshitaka

    2013-11-01

    Calcific retropharyngeal tendinitis/retropharyngeal calcific tendinitis is an inflammation of the longus colli muscle caused by calcium hydroxyapatite crystal depositon in the longus colli muscle tendon. The three major symptoms are neck pain, limitations of neck movement, and swallowing pain. We treated 8 cases of calcific retropharyngeal tendinitis/ retropharyngeal calcific tendinitis. Each patient complained of neck pain, limitations of neck movement, and swallowing pain. The only local finding was the smooth swelling of the posterior pharyngeal wall. CT imaging showed calcification of the tendon of the longus colli muscle and a low density area in the retropharyngeal space without ring enhancement, suggesting a retropharyngeal abscess. MR imaging showed the smooth swelling of the retropharyngeal space and an increased signal intensity on T2-weighted MR imaging. Calcific retropharyngeal tendinitis heals spontaneously, and treatment is not usually required. However, the clinical outcomes are similar and can be confused with retropharyngeal abscess and pyogenic spondylitis, so antibiotics are administrated in many cases. In our report, 7 patients were hospitalized and were treated with the intravenous administration of antibiotics, while 1 patient who refused hospitalization was treated with an oral antibiotic. Steroids were administrated in 2 cases. The 7 patients who were hospitalized were cured within 6 to 10 days.

  19. Neuronal pathways from foot pad afferents to hindlimb motoneurons in the low spinalized cats.

    PubMed

    Wada, N; Kanda, Y; Takayama, R

    1998-07-01

    Experiments were performed on 16 adult spinalized (L2) cats. Postsynaptic potentials (PSPs) produced by electrical stimulation of afferent nerves innervating foot pads were recorded from hindlimb motoneurons innervating the following hindlimb muscles: the posterior biceps and semitendinosus (PBSt), anterior biceps and semimembranosus (ABSm), lateral gastrocnemius and soleus (LGS), medial gastrocnemius (MG), plantaris (P1), tibialis anterior (TA), popliteus (Pop), flexor digitorum longus and flexor hallucis longus (FDHL) and peroneus longus (Per.l). The rate of occurrence of different types of PSPs (EPSPs, IPSPs and mixed PSPs), the size of the PSPs and their central latencies were analyzed for each group of motoneurons to identify the neural pathways from the afferents innervating foot pads to hindlimb motoneurons. The rates of occurrence of different types of PSPs did not depend on the foot pad stimulated in PBSt, ABSm and LGS motoneurons, but for other groups of motoneurons their rates of occurrence depended on the foot pad stimulated. It was often noted that the size of PSPs in the same motoneurons differed according to the foot pad stimulated. Measurements of the central latencies of the PSPs indicated that the shortest neural pathways for EPSPs and IPSPs were disynaptic (central latencies < 1.8 ms). The functional role of neuronal pathways from afferent nerves innervating foot pads to hindlimb motoneurons could be to maintain stability of the foot during different postural and motor activities.

  20. The hindlimb myology of Milvago chimango (Polyborinae, Falconidae).

    PubMed

    Mosto, María Clelia; Carril, Julieta; Picasso, Mariana Beatriz Julieta

    2013-10-01

    We describe the hindlimb myology of Milvago chimango. This member of the Falconidae: Polyborinae is a generalist and opportunist that can jump and run down prey on the ground, unlike Falconinae that hunt birds in flight and kill them by striking with its talons. Due to differences in the locomotion habits between the subfamilies, we hypothesized differences in their hindlimb myology. Gross dissections showed that the myology of M. chimango is concordant with that described of other falconids, except for the following differences: the m. flexor cruris medialis has one belly with a longitudinal division; the m. iliotibialis lateralis does not have a connection with the m. iliofibularis; the m. fibularis longus is strongly aponeurotic; the m. tibialis cranialis lacks an accessory tendons and the m. flexor hallucis longus has one place of origin, instead of two. The presence of the m. flexor cruris lateralis can be distinguished as it has been described absent for the Falconidae. We associated its presence with the predominant terrestrial habit of the M. chimango. Each muscle dissected was weighed and the relationship between flexors and extensors at each joint was assessed. The extensor muscles predominated in all joints in M. chimango. Among the flexors, the m. flexor hallucis longus was the heaviest, which could be related to the importance of the use of its talons to obtain food.

  1. Targeted deletion of collagen V in tendons and ligaments results in a classic Ehlers-Danlos syndrome joint phenotype.

    PubMed

    Sun, Mei; Connizzo, Brianne K; Adams, Sheila M; Freedman, Benjamin R; Wenstrup, Richard J; Soslowsky, Louis J; Birk, David E

    2015-05-01

    Collagen V mutations underlie classic Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, and joint hypermobility is an important clinical manifestation. We define the function of collagen V in tendons and ligaments, as well as the role of alterations in collagen V expression in the pathobiology in classic Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. A conditional Col5a1(flox/flox) mouse model was bred with Scleraxis-Cre mice to create a targeted tendon and ligament Col5a1-null mouse model, Col5a1(Δten/Δten). Targeting was specific, resulting in collagen V-null tendons and ligaments. Col5a1(Δten/Δten) mice demonstrated decreased body size, grip weakness, abnormal gait, joint laxity, and early-onset osteoarthritis. These gross changes were associated with abnormal fiber organization, as well as altered collagen fibril structure with increased fibril diameters and decreased fibril number that was more severe in a major joint stabilizing ligament, the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), than in the flexor digitorum longus tendon. The ACL also had a higher collagen V content than did the flexor digitorum longus tendon. The collagen V-null ACL and flexor digitorum longus tendon both had significant alterations in mechanical properties, with ACL exhibiting more severe changes. The data demonstrate critical differential regulatory roles for collagen V in tendon and ligament structure and function and suggest that collagen V regulatory dysfunction is associated with an abnormal joint phenotype, similar to the hypermobility phenotype in classic Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

  2. Knee Joint Contact Mechanics during Downhill Gait and its Relationship with Varus/Valgus Motion and Muscle Strength in Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Farrokhi, Shawn; Voycheck, Carrie A.; Gustafson, Jonathan A.; Fitzgerald, G. Kelley; Tashman, Scott

    2015-01-01

    Objective The objective of this exploratory study was to evaluate tibiofemoral joint contact point excursions and velocities during downhill gait and assess the relationship between tibiofemoral joint contact mechanics with frontal-plane knee joint motion and lower extremity muscle weakness in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Methods Dynamic stereo X-ray was used to quantify tibiofemoral joint contact mechanics and frontal-plane motion during the loading response phase of downhill gait in 11 patients with knee OA and 11 control volunteers. Quantitative testing of the quadriceps and the hip abductor muscles was also performed. Group differences in contact mechanics and frontal-plane motion excursions were compared using analysis of covariance with adjustments for body mass index. Differences in strength were compared using independent sample t-tests. Additionally, linear associations between contact mechanics with frontal-plane knee motion and muscle strength were evaluated using Pearson's correlation coefficients. Results Patients with knee OA demonstrated larger medial/lateral joint contact point excursions (p<0.02) and greater heel-strike joint contact point velocities (p<0.05) for the medial and lateral compartments compared to the control group. The peak medial/lateral joint contact point velocity of the medial compartment was also greater for patients with knee OA compared to their control counterparts (p=0.02). Additionally, patients with knee OA demonstrated significantly increased frontal-plane varus motion excursions (p<0.01) and greater quadriceps and hip abductor muscle weakness (p=0.03). In general, increased joint contact point excursions and velocities in patients with knee OA were linearly associated with greater frontal-plane varus motion excursions (p<0.04) but not with quadriceps or hip abductor strength. Conclusion Altered contact mechanics in patients with knee OA may be related to compromised frontal-plane joint stability but not with

  3. Rehabilitation of Extra-Articular Sources of Hip Pain in Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Nicholas, Stephen J.

    2007-01-01

    Among people who participate in sports, extra-articular soft tissue injuries around the hip are common. The hamstring, quadriceps, adductor, and abductor muscle groups are often the site of soft tissue injury. Overlapping conditions make it difficult to identify the primary cause of hip pain and dysfunction. A proper evaluation and diagnosis of the impairment are crucial for the selection of interventions and quick return to play. The purpose of the clinical commentary is to present an evidence based stepwise progression in the evaluation and treatment of several common soft tissue injuries of the hip. PMID:21509140

  4. Managing tracheal extubation in infants with stridor and congenital neuraxial anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Saigal, Deepti; Ganjoo, Pragati; Sharma, Megha U.; Singh, Daljit

    2016-01-01

    Stridor is a serious complication of congenital neuraxial anomalies, which though, can get completely resolved with early neurosurgical correction of the anomaly. However, stridor relief may or may not be achieved soon after surgery. Persistent postoperative stridor can potentially cause extubation failure that may be difficult to handle in small children. There are no extubation guidelines for difficult pediatric airways as yet, and fewer appropriate airway-assist devices for routine use. Management of an infant with occipital encephalocele, hydrocephalus and bilateral abductor vocal cord palsy, who developed post-extubation respiratory distress due to stridor is discussed, together with the relevant tracheal extubation issues in such cases. PMID:28217159

  5. [Modular tumor prostheses of the humerus].

    PubMed

    Funovics, P T; Dominkus, M

    2010-10-01

    The humerus is a common location of musculoskeletal tumors. Modular prostheses of the humerus, besides APC and biological reconstructions, allow restoration of resulting bone defects. The functional outcome is determined by the extent of bone and soft tissue loss. Anatomical shoulder prostheses have a limited abductor function, while shoulder function could be improved by an inverse prosthetic design and implants for ligament repair. Elbow prostheses provide satisfactory function. Our own results in 101 patients showed a 23% revision rate. The median overall survival was 171 months with an overall 5-year survival of 53%. With respect to good oncological outcomes modular reconstruction of the humerus is a feasible treatment option for cancer patients.

  6. Atypical presentations in Chiari II malformation.

    PubMed

    Rath, G P; Bithal, P K; Chaturvedi, A

    2006-01-01

    Myelomeningocele with Chiari II malformation and hydrocephalus is a common association seen in infants with a congenital failure of neurulation. Here we report two cases of such an association presenting with different sets of problems. The first patient presented with severe inspiratory stridor due to bilateral abductor vocal cord paralysis, which was relieved completely within 24 h of definitive surgery. The second patient experienced intraoperative cardiac arrest. Definitive surgery was followed after successful cardiopulmonary resuscitation. The cause of the perioperative sequence of events in both cases is attributed to the associated pathologies of Chiari II malformation.

  7. Calcaneus deformity in the ambulant patient with myelomeningocele.

    PubMed

    Fraser, R K; Hoffman, E B

    1991-11-01

    We reviewed our experience of tibialis anterior transfer and anterior release for calcaneus deformity in 46 feet of 26 ambulant patients with myelomeningocele. At an average follow-up of 8.4 years (2 to 17.6) there were 89% who had satisfactory results; 64% of the patients having tibialis anterior transfers were able to stand on their toes. Hip abductor power was a good predictor of a functional transfer. Pre-operative trophic ulceration of the heel increased from 3.2% to 33% if surgery was delayed. Secondary deformities, two-thirds of them into valgus, developed in 76% of feet.

  8. Endoscopic Decompression of the First Branch of the Lateral Plantar Nerve and Release of the Plantar Aponeurosis for Chronic Heel Pain.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2016-06-01

    Entrapment of the first branch of the lateral plantar nerve is a commonly missed cause of recalcitrant plantar heel pain. The diagnosis is made on a clinical ground with maximal tenderness at the site of nerve entrapment. Treatment of the nerve entrapment is similar to that for plantar fasciitis, with rest, activity modification, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, stretching exercise, and local steroid injection. Surgical release of the deep abductor hallucis fascia is indicated when conservative treatment failed. Endoscopic release of the nerve through the dorsal and plantar portals, as well as endoscopic plantar aponeurosis release, is a feasible approach.

  9. Trochanteric osteotomy and fixation during total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Archibeck, Michael J; Rosenberg, Aaron G; Berger, Richard A; Silverton, Craig D

    2003-01-01

    Once used routinely, trochanteric osteotomy in total hip arthroplasty now is usually limited to difficult primary and revision cases. There are three types: the standard trochanteric osteotomy and its variations, the trochanteric slide, and the extended trochanteric osteotomy. Each has unique indications, fixation techniques, and complications. Primary total hip arthroplasty procedures requiring the enhanced exposure provided by trochanteric osteotomy may be needed in patients with hip ankylosis or fusion, protrusio acetabuli, proximal femoral deformities, developmental dysplasia, or abductor muscle laxity. Trochanteric osteotomies in revision arthroplasties, primarily the extended trochanteric osteotomy, facilitate the removal of well-fixed femoral components, provide direct access to the diaphysis for distal fixation, and enhance acetabular exposure.

  10. [Current concepts in perinatal brachial plexus palsy. Part 2: late phase. Shoulder deformities].

    PubMed

    Dogliotti, Andrés Alejandro

    2011-10-01

    The incidence of obstetric brachial palsy is high and their sequelaes are frequent. Physiotherapy, microsurgical nerve reconstruction and secondary corrections are used together to improve the shoulder function. The most common posture is shoulder in internal rotation and adduction, because of the antagonist weakness. The muscle forces imbalance over the osteoarticular system, will result in a progressive glenohumeral joint deformity which can be recognized with a magnetic resonance image. Tendon transfers of the internal rotators towards the external abductor/rotator muscles, has good results, but has to be combined with antero-inferior soft-tissue releases, if passive range of motion is limited.

  11. [Sleep and autonomic function: sleep related breathing disorders in Parkinson's disease and related disorders].

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Keisuke; Miyamoto, Masayuki; Miyamoto, Tomoyuki; Hirata, Koichi

    2014-01-01

    In patients with multiple system atrophy (MSA), sleep related breathing disorders (SRBD), including obstructive and central sleep apnea, vocal cord abductor paralysis and dysrhythmic breathing pattern, are frequently observed. SRBD may have a considerable impact on variation of autonomic nervous activity during sleep. The previous studies correlated upper airway muscle dysfunction related parkinsonism with increased prevalence of SRBD in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). However, recently, the clinical significance of SRBD and its impact on sleepiness and disease severity have been debated. In this review, we discuss sleep and autonomic function, especially, SRBD in PD and related disorders, including the previous studies from our department.

  12. Arthroscopic First Metatarsophalangeal Arthrodesis for Repair of Fixed Hallux Varus Deformity.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2015-01-01

    Arthroscopic first metatarsophalangeal arthrodesis for fixed hallux varus deformity can be very difficult because narrowing of the medial joint space results in difficult access. The abductor hallucis tendon and the medial capsule can be released through a small proximal plantar medial incision. This will convert the deformity into a flexible one and open up the medial joint space. This allows arthroscopic arthrodesis using the standard dorsolateral and medial portals. The plantar medial incision can also be used for arthroscopy of the metatarsosesamoid compartment and insertion of a screw for first metatarsophalangeal arthrodesis.

  13. Sevoflurane enhances neuromuscular blockade by increasing the sensitivity of skeletal muscle to neuromuscular blockers

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Ling; Zuo, Yunxia; Zhang, Peng; Yang, Pingliang

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of sevoflurane on skeletal muscle contractility. In the first part, twenty-two American Society of Anesthesiology (ASA I-II) female adult patients undergoing elective hysterectomy surgery inhaled sevoflurane 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 minimum alveolar concentrations (MAC) in succession. Neuromuscular function was assessed at each dose. In the second part, forty-four ASA I-II female adult patients were randomized into four groups: group 1 (propofol + atracurium, sevoflurane 0 MAC), and groups 2 to 4 (atracurium + sevoflurane 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 MAC, respectively). In group 1, patients were anesthetized by propofol. Then 0.01 mg/kg atracurium was injected into the tested arm intravenously after the arterial blood flow was blocked using a tourniquet. For the other 3 groups, patients inhaled 1.0 MAC, 1.5 MAC, or 2.0 MAC of sevoflurane. Then 0.01 mg/kg atracurium was injected. Neuromuscular function was recorded for the 4 groups. Neuromuscular function was assessed by acceleromyography measurement of evoked responses to train-of four (TOF) stimuli (2 Hz for 2 s applied every 12 s) at the adductor pollicis using a TOF-GuardTM neuromuscular transmission monitor. Amplitudes of first response (T1) in each TOF sequence and the ratios of fourth TOF response (T4) to the first were similar at 1.0 MAC, 1.5 MAC, and 2.0 MAC sevoflurane. Compared to baseline, there was no significant change in the TOF value after inhaling 1.0 MAC, 1.5 MAC, or 2.0 MAC sevoflurane. Compared to group 1, there was no significant difference in atracurium onset time (time to reach TOF ratio = 0.25) in group 2 ( 5.6 ± 1.8 min vs. 6.5 ± 1.7 min, P>0.05), or degree of adductor pollicis block (subject number with TOF ratio = 0, 5 vs. 2 subjects, p = 0.3). However, inhaling 1.5 or 2.0 MAC sevoflurane decreased atracurium onset time (4.6 ± 1.5 min and 4.0 ± 1.3 min vs. 6.5 ± 1.7 min, P<0.01 and P<0.001, respectively), and enhanced the block degree (9 and 10 vs. 2

  14. Frontal plane knee and hip kinematics during sit-to-stand and proximal lower extremity strength in persons with patellofemoral osteoarthritis: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Hoglund, Lisa T; Hillstrom, Howard J; Barr-Gillespie, Ann E; Lockard, Margery A; Barbe, Mary F; Song, Jinsup

    2014-02-01

    Increased joint stress and malalignment are etiologic factors in osteoarthritis. Static tibiofemoral frontal plane malalignment is associated with patellofemoral osteoarthritis (PFOA). Patellofemoral joint stress is increased by activities such as sit-to-stand (STS); this stress may be even greater if dynamic frontal plane tibiofemoral malalignment occurs. If hip muscle or quadriceps weakness is present in persons with PFOA, aberrant tibiofemoral frontal plane movement may occur, with increased patellofemoral stress. No studies have investigated frontal plane tibiofemoral and hip kinematics during STS in persons with PFOA or the relationship of hip muscle and quadriceps strength to these motions. Eight PFOA and seven control subjects performed STS from a stool during three-dimensional motion capture. Hip muscle and quadriceps strength were measured as peak isometric force. The PFOA group demonstrated increased peak tibial abduction angles during STS, and decreased hip abductor, hip extensor, and quadriceps peak force versus controls. A moderate inverse relationship between peak tibial abduction angle and peak hip abductor force was present. No difference between groups was found for peak hip adduction angle or peak hip external rotator force. Dynamic tibiofemoral malalignment and proximal lower extremity weakness may cause increased patellofemoral stress and may contribute to PFOA incidence or progression.

  15. Comments and corrections on 3D modeling studies of locomotor muscle moment arms in archosaurs

    PubMed Central

    Maidment, Susannah C.R.; Schachner, Emma R.; Barrett, Paul M.

    2015-01-01

    In a number of recent studies we used computer modeling to investigate the evolution of muscle leverage (moment arms) and function in extant and extinct archosaur lineages (crocodilians, dinosaurs including birds and pterosaurs). These studies sought to quantify the level of disparity and convergence in muscle moment arms during the evolution of bipedal and quadrupedal posture in various independent archosaur lineages, and in doing so further our understanding of changes in anatomy, locomotion and ecology during the group’s >250 million year evolutionary history. Subsequent work by others has led us to re-evaluate our models, which revealed a methodological error that impacted on the results obtained from the abduction–adduction and long-axis rotation moment arms in our published studies. In this paper we present corrected abduction–adduction and long axis rotation moment arms for all our models, and evaluate the impact of this new data on the conclusions of our previous studies. We find that, in general, our newly corrected data differed only slightly from that previously published, with very few qualitative changes in muscle moments (e.g., muscles originally identified as abductors remained abductors). As a result the majority of our previous conclusions regarding the functional evolution of key muscles in these archosaur groups are upheld. PMID:26500810

  16. Biomechanics during exercise with a novel stairclimber.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Y-J; Hsue, B-J; Lin, C-J; Su, F-C

    2011-09-01

    The current study aimed to investigate the stair-climbing biomechanics related to the lower extremities when subjects used the novel designed stair-climber, which could provide opportunity for both sagittal and frontal movements. 12 volunteers were required to step while either keeping the trunk static (STATIC) or allowing the trunk to shift with weight bearing (SHIFT). A motion analysis system and the 6-axis force and torque sensor embedded in the pedal were used to collect data. Foot contact forces and joint moments were calculated to represent loading characteristics. The joint angle and corresponding moments at the terminal point of the stance phase were computed to serve as the indicator of safety. Significant differences were found in peak foot contact forces, knee extensor moment, and hip abductor moment. At the end of the stance phase, various directions of moment between conditions were found in the knee and the ankle. The knee valgus angle, hip abductor moment, and knee extensor moment were significantly greater in SHIFT than in STATIC. The various stepping strategies caused differences in joint loading characteristics; therefore, these findings need to be given greater consideration in the design of training protocols.

  17. Neural basis of the stress response in a pufferfish, Takifugu obscurus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaojie; Zhao, Shuang; Li, Chao; Liu, Xin; Song, Jiakun

    2015-01-01

    When faced with danger, pufferfish react with both a fast-start escape response and inflation behavior. The neural basis of these stress responses in the pufferfish has not been described. The present study reveals that during inflation behavior, the buccal cavity expands and compresses as a pump to control the direction of water flow and draws water in and out. The inflation involves a series of major anatomical modifications of the head. The greatly enlarged first branchiostegal ray and its associated hyohyoideus abductor muscle are the key mechanisms responsible for this behavior. The nerve branch innervating the hyohyoideus abductor muscle is highly developed, and its central origin at the motor nucleus of the VIIth cranial nerve was revealed by tract-tracing using the carbocyanine dye DiI. The central connections from its origin were found to be several motor nuclei in the medulla and the spinal cord, the nuclei of cranial nerve III and IV in the mesencephalon, and the pretectalis superficialis and periventricular preoptic nuclei in the diencephalon. Both the sympathetic cells and the parvocellular part of the periventricular preoptic nucleus might play a neuro-endocrine role in the rapid movement of the buccal cavity during puffing behavior in this species of pufferfish. The central circuit revealed by this study is hypothesized to mediate the C-start escape behavior and puffing behavior.

  18. The weight-bearing exercise for better balance program improves strength and balance in osteopenia: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    El Mohsen, Azza M. Abd; El Ghaffar, Hossam Eddien F. Abd; Nassif, Nagui S.; Elhafez, Ghada M.

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the effect of the Weight-bearing Exercise for Better Balance program on the strength of hip flexors, extensors, abductors, adductors, and knee flexors and extensors and balance in osteopenia. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-four postmenopausal females with osteopenia volunteered to participate in this study and were randomly assigned into two equal groups of 12: the experimental and control groups. The Weight-bearing Exercise for Better Balance program was applied to the experimental group, while the control group did not receive any treatment. Isokinetic peak torque per body weight values of the hip flexors, extensors, abductors, adductors, and knee flexors and extensors were measured by Biodex System 3 isokinetic dynamometer for both groups before and after six weeks of the program. Balance was assessed in both groups using the Berg Balance Scale. [Results] There was a statistically significant increase in post-intervention mean values of all measured variables compared with pre-intervention values in the experimental group. Also, there was a statistically significant increase in post-intervention mean values of all measured variables except for those of the hip extensors in the experimental group compared with the control group. [Conclusion] The weight-bearing exercise for better balance program has significant effects on lower extremity muscle strength and body balance in postmenopausal females with osteopenia. PMID:27799698

  19. A clinical comparative study of anatomic parameters before and after total hip replacement on congenital dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ziqiang; Zhou, Yonggang; Chai, Wei; Ji, Weiping; Cui, Guopeng; Ma, Miaoqun; Zhu, Yin

    2016-07-01

    [Purpose] To study preoperative and postoperative hip circumference data of various types of congenital dysplasia of the hip treated with total hip replacement, including the femoral offset, femoral neck length, height, and hip abductor arm parameters. [Subjects and Methods] This study included seventy-eight cases of congenital dysplasia of the hip (I-III type). Furthermore, four parameters were measured, including the preoperative and postoperative femoral offset. Statistical data analysis was performed using the SPSS 13.0 software. [Results] The femoral offset was 33.3 ± 8.4 mm (preoperative) and 39.1 ± 7.1 mm (postoperative). The femoral head height was 59.5 ± 8.7 mm (preoperative) and 68.8 ± 11.0 mm (postoperative). The femoral neck length was 50.8 ± 10.8 mm (preoperative) and 61.5 ± 10.4 mm (postoperative). The hip abductor arm was 54.3 ± 9.6 mm (preoperative) 64.7 ± 10.1 mm (postoperative). The preoperative and postoperative parameters showed statistical differences. Furthermore, no significant differences were evidenced when comparing the postoperative hip parameters with the normal data parameters. [Conclusion] Total hip replacement on congenital dysplasia of the hip could lead to the rebuilt of an almost normal physiological anatomy for each hip case (type I-III).

  20. [Anatomical variants of the medial calcaneal nerve and the Baxter nerve in the tarsal tunnel].

    PubMed

    Martín-Oliva, X; Elgueta-Grillo, J; Veliz-Ayta, P; Orosco-Villaseñor, S; Elgueta-Grillo, M; Viladot-Perice, R

    2013-01-01

    The tarsal tunnel is composed of the posterior border of the medial malleoulus, the posterior aspect of the talus and the medial aspect of the calcaneus. The medial calcaneal nerve emerges from the posterior aspect of the posterior tibial nerve in 75% of cases and from the lateral plantar nerve in the remaining 25%. Finally, the medial calcaneal nerve ends as a single terminal branch in 79% of cases and in numerous terminal branches in the remaining 21%. To describe the anatomical variants of the posterior tibial nerve and its terminal branches. To describe the steps for tarsal tunnel release. To describe Baxter nerve release. The anatomical variants of the posterior tibial nerve and its terminal branches within the tarsal tunnel were studied. Then the Lam technique was performed; it consists of: 1) opening of the laciniate ligament, 2) opening of the fascia over the abductor hallucis muscle, 3) exoneurolysis of the posterior tibial nerve and its terminal branches, identifying the emergence and pathway of the medial calcaneal branch, the lateral plantar nerve and its Baxter nerve branch and the medial plantar nerve. Baxter nerve was found in 100% of cases. In 100% of cases in our series the nerve going to the abductor digiti minimi muscle of the foot was found; 87.5% of cases had two terminal branches. The dissections proved that a crucial step was the release of the distal tarsal tunnel.

  1. Severe Pelvic Obliquity Affects Femoral Offset in Patients with Total Hip Arthroplasty but Not Leg-Length Inequality.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaoxiao; Wang, Qi; Zhang, Xianlong; Chen, Yunsu; Peng, Xiaochun; Mao, Yuanqing; Yang, Yang; Fu, Beigang; Wang, Xiuhui; Tang, Tingting

    2015-01-01

    Leg-length inequality is an extensively studied complication of total hip arthroplasty in normal patients. However, few studies have focused on the pelvic obliquity of coronal pelvic malrotation. We hypothesized that pelvic obliquity with a fixed abduction/adduction contracture deformity of the hip may intraoperatively affect the release of soft tissues, ultimately resulting in a leg-length inequality. This study also investigated whether the femoral and vertical offsets of total hip arthroplasty were correlated with pelvic obliquity. This prospective study divided 98 patients into six groups based on the inclination of pelvic obliquity before total hip arthroplasty. Leg-length inequality, variation of pelvic obliquity, offset, and vertical offset were measured after total hip arthroplasty. Leg-length inequality and vertical offset were not significantly different among groups, whereas the variation of pelvic obliquity was significantly higher in type IIC pelvic obliquity than in other groups. Type IC pelvic obliquity had a significantly shorter offset than did the other groups, which may have been an important factor leading to type IC pelvic obliquity. Pelvic obliquity exhibited no significant effect on leg-length inequality in patients with total hip arthroplasty. A shorter offset may be caused by the higher tension of the abductor in the operated hip, which may result in the formation of type IC pelvic obliquity. Releasing the abductor contracture and restoring femoral offset are important for increasing hip stability and maintaining pelvic balance following total hip arthroplasty.

  2. [Results of using botulism toxin in the treatment of spasmodic dysphonia].

    PubMed

    Larrosa, F; Idígora, A; Aguilar, F; Riera, L; Martí, M J; Valls, J

    2002-01-01

    Spasmodic Dysphonia (SD) is a dystonia involving laryngeal musculature thus causing a characteristic voice disorder. Two main types of SD have been described. The adductor type is the commonest and it is characterized by a strain-strangle, choked voice. The abductor type can be distinguished from the previous one by episodes of a blown and whispering voice, interrupting speech. Botulism toxin (BTX) has demonstrated to be the most effective treatment for this condition. Thirty patients diagnosed of SD (twenty-nine adductor type/one abductor type) were included. Their degree of dysphonia was evaluated using both functional and visual-analogue scales. They were treated with BTX vocal cord injections using a percutaneous technique under EMG guidance. Improvements up to a 100% of the normal vocal function were obtained, with an average of 82% in the adductor type. The adverse effects were mild and transient. Hypophonia affected 61.3% of patients lasting an average of 11.3 days. Dysphagia was reported in 44.1% of cases lasting an average of 5.8 days.

  3. ARTHROPLASTY FOR TRAPEZIUM EXCISION AND TENDON INTERPOSITION IN RHIZARTHROSIS CASES: PROSPECTIVE STUDY

    PubMed Central

    Junior, Walter Gomes Pinheiro; Chaim, Renan Moukbel; de Carvalho, Henrique Bella Freire; Albertoni, Walter Manna; Faloppa, Flávio; Santos, João Baptista Gomes dos

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To prospectively evaluate the results from a series of patients who underwent surgical treatment for rhizarthrosis using the technique of trapezium resection associated with interposition of yarn from the long abductor tendon of the thumb. Methods: From May to August 2005, ten patients underwent surgical treatment for rhizarthrosis. Patients with primary osteoarthrosis of the trapezium-metacarpal joint, in stages II, III and IV of the Eaton classification, with persistent pain that was refractory to clinical treatment, were included. For the functional assessment, the visual analogue scale, DASH questionnaire and Buck-Gramcko score were used. For the overall assessment on the patients, strength measurements were made for palm grip, pulp to pulp pinch, lateral pinch, three-point pinch, opposition and radial and palmar abductions. The migration index for the first metacarpal was also determined on radiographs at rest and under stress. Results: The pain relief was considered to be good (p = 0.005), with functional improvements in modules 2 (p = 0.02) and 3 (p = 0.022) of DASH. The Buck-Gramcko score showed one excellent and three very good results. There was an improvement in almost all of the overall assessment and was only non-significant regarding lateral pinch and abduction. For all patients, there was migration of the first metacarpal. Conclusion: Trapeziectomy associated with interposition of yarn from the long abductor tendon of the thumb was shown to be a relatively simple and effective technique for pain relief and functional improvement. PMID:27026990

  4. A hip abduction exercise prior to prolonged standing increased movement while reducing cocontraction and low back pain perception in those initially reporting low back pain.

    PubMed

    Viggiani, Daniel; Callaghan, Jack P

    2016-12-01

    Persons who develop low back pain from prolonged standing exhibit increased muscle cocontraction, decreased movement and increased spine extension. However, it is unclear how these factors relate to pain development. The purpose of this study was to use hip abductor fatigue to manipulate muscle activity patterns and determine its effects on standing behaviours and pain development. Forty participants stood for two hours twice, once following a hip abductor fatigue exercise (fatigue), and once without exercise beforehand (control). Trunk and gluteal muscle activity were measured to determine cocontraction. Lumbo-pelvic angles and force plates were used to assess posture and movement strategies. Visual analog scales differentiated pain (PDs) and non-pain developers (NPDs). PDs reported less low back pain during the fatigue session, with females having earlier reductions of similar scale than males. The fatigue session reduced gluteal and trunk cocontraction and increased centre of pressure movement; male and female PDs had opposing spine posture compensations. Muscle fatigue prior to standing reduced cocontraction, increased movement during standing and reduced the low back pain developed by PDs; the timing of pain reductions depended on spine postures adopted during standing.

  5. Inter-tester reliability and precision of manual muscle testing and hand-held dynamometry in lower limb muscles of children with spina bifida.

    PubMed

    Mahony, Kate; Hunt, Adrienne; Daley, Deborah; Sims, Susan; Adams, Roger

    2009-01-01

    Reliability and measurement precision of manual muscle testing (MMT) and hand-held dynamometry (HHD) were compared for children with spina bifida. Strength measures were obtained of the hip flexors, hip abductors, and knee extensors of 20 children (10 males, 10 females; mean age 9 years 10 months; range: 5 to 15 years) by two experienced physical therapists and a student physical therapist. Inter-tester reliability [ICC(2,1)] for HHD varied from 0.76 to 0.83, indicating excellent reliability for the three muscle groups. Inter-tester reliability for MMT was 0.75 for the hip abductor muscle group, indicating good reliability, and 0.37 to 0.40 for the remaining muscle groups. The minimum detectable change was 15N for HHD and 1 scale unit of a 0 to 5 MMT scale. The results suggest a situation-specific solution to the question of which method to use. To detect small strength changes over time in children with spina bifida, MMT should be used when the child has insufficient strength to move the limb against gravity; otherwise, HHD should be used.

  6. Upper body movement during walking in children with lumbo-sacral myelomeningocele.

    PubMed

    Bartonek, A; Saraste, H; Eriksson, M; Knutson, L; Cresswell, A G

    2002-04-01

    Eight children with lumbo-sacral myelomeningocele (MMC) underwent three-dimensional movement analysis to determine whether or not differing levels of lower extremity strength affected the extent of shoulder, trunk and pelvis movement during independent walking when wearing orthoses. Fourteen control children were also investigated. The patterns of upper body movements in all MMC children were well defined and consistent, showing small standard deviations from the mean. In the frontal and transverse planes, segment displacements of the MMC children assigned into Group II (hip extensor and abductor muscle strength grade 0-2) were almost twice that of the MMC children in Group I (hip extensor and abductor muscle strength grade 3-4). All segment displacements in the frontal, transverse and sagittal planes for Group I and Group II children were significantly greater than those for the controls. In the frontal plane these differences were approximately 4-10 times greater, with the Group II children having the largest peak-to-peak displacements. These results indicate that the motion amplitudes of the upper body segments are related to the degree of muscle weakness of the lower limbs. No significant differences were found when comparing segment motions during walking with either the Ferrari type knee-ankle-foot or ankle-foot orthoses.

  7. The myofascial compartments of the foot: a cadaver study.

    PubMed

    Ling, Z X; Kumar, V P

    2008-08-01

    Compartment syndrome of the foot requires urgent surgical treatment. Currently, there is still no agreement on the number and location of the myofascial compartments of the foot. The aim of this cadaver study was to provide an anatomical basis for surgical decompression in the event of compartment syndrome. We found that there were three tough vertical fascial septae that extended from the hindfoot to the midfoot on the plantar aspect of the foot. These septae separated the posterior half of the foot into three compartments. The medial compartment containing the abductor hallucis was surrounded medially by skin and subcutaneous fat and laterally by the medial septum. The intermediate compartment, containing the flexor digitorum brevis and the quadratus plantae more deeply, was surrounded by the medial septum medially, the intermediate septum laterally and the main plantar aponeurosis on its plantar aspect. The lateral compartment containing the abductor digiti minimi was surrounded medially by the intermediate septum, laterally by the lateral septum and on its plantar aspect by the lateral band of the main plantar aponeurosis. No distinct myofascial compartments exist in the forefoot. Based on our findings, in theory, fasciotomy of the hindfoot compartments through a modified medial incision would be sufficient to decompress the foot.

  8. The architecture and contraction time of intrinsic foot muscles.

    PubMed

    Tosovic, Danijel; Ghebremedhin, Estifanos; Glen, Christopher; Gorelick, Mark; Mark Brown, J

    2012-12-01

    Although critical for effective human locomotion and posture, little data exists regarding the segmentation, architecture and contraction time of the human intrinsic foot muscles. To address this issue, the Abductor Hallucis (AH), Abductor Digiti Minimi (ADM), Flexor Digitorum Brevis (FDB) and Extensor Digitorum Brevis (EDB) were investigated utilizing a cadaveric dissection and a non-invasive whole muscle mechanomyographic (wMMG) technique. The segmental structure and architecture of formaldehyde-fixed foot specimens were determined in nine cadavers aged 60-80 years. The wMMG technique was used to determine the contraction time (Tc) of individual muscle segments, within each intrinsic foot muscle, in 12 volunteers of both genders aged between 19 and 24 years. While the pattern of segmentation and segmental -architecture (e.g. fibre length) and -Tc of individual muscle segments within the same muscle were similar, they varied between muscles. Also, the average whole muscle Tc of FDB was significantly (p < 0.05) shorter (faster) (Tc = 58 ms) than in all other foot muscles investigated (ADM Tc = 72 ms, EDB Tc = 72 ms and ABH Tc = 69 ms). The results suggest that the architecture and contraction time of the FDB reflect its unique direct contribution, through toe flexion, to postural stability and the rapid development of ground reaction forces during forceful activities such as running and jumping.

  9. Neural correlates of abnormal sensory discrimination in laryngeal dystonia.

    PubMed

    Termsarasab, Pichet; Ramdhani, Ritesh A; Battistella, Giovanni; Rubien-Thomas, Estee; Choy, Melissa; Farwell, Ian M; Velickovic, Miodrag; Blitzer, Andrew; Frucht, Steven J; Reilly, Richard B; Hutchinson, Michael; Ozelius, Laurie J; Simonyan, Kristina

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant sensory processing plays a fundamental role in the pathophysiology of dystonia; however, its underpinning neural mechanisms in relation to dystonia phenotype and genotype remain unclear. We examined temporal and spatial discrimination thresholds in patients with isolated laryngeal form of dystonia (LD), who exhibited different clinical phenotypes (adductor vs. abductor forms) and potentially different genotypes (sporadic vs. familial forms). We correlated our behavioral findings with the brain gray matter volume and functional activity during resting and symptomatic speech production. We found that temporal but not spatial discrimination was significantly altered across all forms of LD, with higher frequency of abnormalities seen in familial than sporadic patients. Common neural correlates of abnormal temporal discrimination across all forms were found with structural and functional changes in the middle frontal and primary somatosensory cortices. In addition, patients with familial LD had greater cerebellar involvement in processing of altered temporal discrimination, whereas sporadic LD patients had greater recruitment of the putamen and sensorimotor cortex. Based on the clinical phenotype, adductor form-specific correlations between abnormal discrimination and brain changes were found in the frontal cortex, whereas abductor form-specific correlations were observed in the cerebellum and putamen. Our behavioral and neuroimaging findings outline the relationship of abnormal sensory discrimination with the phenotype and genotype of isolated LD, suggesting the presence of potentially divergent pathophysiological pathways underlying different manifestations of this disorder.

  10. Gait biomechanics and hip muscular strength in patients with patellofemoral osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Pohl, Michael B; Patel, Chirag; Wiley, J Preston; Ferber, Reed

    2013-03-01

    A significant number of patients with patellofemoral osteoarthritis (PFOA) have described a history of patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS). This leads to speculation that the underpinning mechanical causes of PFPS and PFOA may be similar. Although alterations in gait biomechanics and hip strength have been reported in PFPS, this relationship has not yet been explored in PFOA. Therefore the purpose of this study was compare gait biomechanics and hip muscular strength between PFOA patients and a healthy control group. Fifteen patients with symptomatic, radiographic PFOA and 15 controls participated. All patients underwent a walking gait analysis and maximal hip strength testing. Biomechanical variables of interest included the peak angular values of contra-lateral pelvic drop, hip adduction and hip internal rotation during the stance phase. Hip abduction and external rotation strength were assessed using maximal voluntary isometric contractions. The PFOA group demonstrated significantly lower hip abduction strength compared to controls but no difference in hip external rotation strength. There were no statistical differences between the PFOA and control groups for contra-lateral pelvic drop, hip adduction and hip internal rotation angles during walking. Despite patients with PFOA exhibiting weaker hip abductor muscle strength compared to their healthy counterparts they did not demonstrate alterations in pelvis or hip biomechanics during gait. These preliminary data suggests that weaker hip abductor strength does not result in biomechanical alterations during gait in this population.

  11. Magnitude and pattern of 3D kinematic and kinetic gait profiles in persons with stroke: relationship to walking speed.

    PubMed

    Kim, C Maria; Eng, Janice J

    2004-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify 3D kinematic and kinetic gait profiles in individuals with chronic stroke and to determine whether the magnitude or pattern (shape and direction of curve) of these profiles relate to gait performance (as measured by self-selected gait speed). More than one type of kinematic and kinetic pattern was identified in all three planes in 20 individuals with stroke (age: 61.2+/-8.4 years). Persons in the "fast" speed group did not necessarily exhibit the gait patterns closest to the ones reported for healthy adults. For example, in the frontal plane, a variation from the typical pattern (i.e., a hip abductor pattern in swing) was more common among the "fast" group. Correlations revealed that in addition to the sagittal profiles, the magnitudes of the frontal and transverse profiles are also related to speed, particularly the frontal hip powers. The results support the importance of hip abductors, in addition to the sagittal plane muscle groups, for both the paretic and non-paretic limbs. Furthermore, profiles which resemble gait patterns of neurologically healthy adults do not necessarily result in the faster gait speeds for individuals with chronic stroke.

  12. A comparison of the diagnostic accuracy of MARS MRI and ultrasound of the painful metal-on-metal hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqui, Imran A; Sabah, Shiraz A; Satchithananda, Keshthra; Lim, Adrian K; Cro, Suzie; Henckel, Johann; Skinner, John A

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose Metal artifact reduction sequence (MARS) MRI and ultrasound scanning (USS) can both be used to detect pseudotumors, abductor muscle atrophy, and tendinous pathology in patients with painful metal-on-metal (MOM) hip arthroplasty. We wanted to determine the diagnostic test characteristics of USS using MARS MRI as a reference for detection of pseudotumors and muscle atrophy. Patients and methods We performed a prospective cohort study to compare MARS MRI and USS findings in 19 consecutive patients with unilateral MOM hips. Protocolized USS was performed by consultant musculoskeletal radiologists who were blinded regarding clinical details. Reports were independently compared with MARS MRI, the imaging gold standard, to calculate predictive values. Results The prevalence of pseudotumors on MARS MRI was 68% (95% CI: 43–87) and on USS it was 53% (CI: 29–76). The sensitivity of USS in detecting pseudotumors was 69% (CI 39–91) and the specificity was 83% (CI: 36–97). The sensitivity of detection of abductor muscle atrophy was 47% (CI: 24–71). In addition, joint effusion was detected in 10 cases by USS and none were seen by MARS MRI. Interpretation We found a poor agreement between USS and MARS MRI. USS was inferior to MARS MRI for detection of pseudotumors and muscle atrophy, but it was superior for detection of joint effusion and tendinous pathologies. MARS MRI is more advantageous than USS for practical reasons, including preoperative planning and longitudinal comparison. PMID:24694273

  13. A clinical comparative study of anatomic parameters before and after total hip replacement on congenital dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ziqiang; Zhou, Yonggang; Chai, Wei; Ji, Weiping; Cui, Guopeng; Ma, Miaoqun; Zhu, Yin

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] To study preoperative and postoperative hip circumference data of various types of congenital dysplasia of the hip treated with total hip replacement, including the femoral offset, femoral neck length, height, and hip abductor arm parameters. [Subjects and Methods] This study included seventy-eight cases of congenital dysplasia of the hip (I–III type). Furthermore, four parameters were measured, including the preoperative and postoperative femoral offset. Statistical data analysis was performed using the SPSS 13.0 software. [Results] The femoral offset was 33.3 ± 8.4 mm (preoperative) and 39.1 ± 7.1 mm (postoperative). The femoral head height was 59.5 ± 8.7 mm (preoperative) and 68.8 ± 11.0 mm (postoperative). The femoral neck length was 50.8 ± 10.8 mm (preoperative) and 61.5 ± 10.4 mm (postoperative). The hip abductor arm was 54.3 ± 9.6 mm (preoperative) 64.7 ± 10.1 mm (postoperative). The preoperative and postoperative parameters showed statistical differences. Furthermore, no significant differences were evidenced when comparing the postoperative hip parameters with the normal data parameters. [Conclusion] Total hip replacement on congenital dysplasia of the hip could lead to the rebuilt of an almost normal physiological anatomy for each hip case (type I–III). PMID:27512242

  14. Lower extremity control during turns initiated with and without hip external rotation.

    PubMed

    Zaferiou, Antonia M; Flashner, Henryk; Wilcox, Rand R; McNitt-Gray, Jill L

    2017-02-08

    The pirouette turn is often initiated in neutral and externally rotated hip positions by dancers. This provides an opportunity to investigate how dancers satisfy the same mechanical objectives at the whole-body level when using different leg kinematics. The purpose of this study was to compare lower extremity control strategies during the turn initiation phase of pirouettes performed with and without hip external rotation. Skilled dancers (n=5) performed pirouette turns with and without hip external rotation. Joint kinetics during turn initiation were determined for both legs using ground reaction forces (GRFs) and segment kinematics. Hip muscle activations were monitored using electromyography. Using probability-based statistical methods, variables were compared across turn conditions as a group and within-dancer. Despite differences in GRFs and impulse generation between turn conditions, at least 90% of each GRF was aligned with the respective leg plane. A majority of the net joint moments at the ankle, knee, and hip acted about an axis perpendicular to the leg plane. However, differences in shank alignment relative to the leg plane affected the distribution of the knee net joint moment when represented with respect to the shank versus the thigh. During the initiation of both turns, most participants used ankle plantar flexor moments, knee extensor moments, flexor and abductor moments at the push leg׳s hip, and extensor and abductor moments at the turn leg׳s hip. Representation of joint kinetics using multiple reference systems assisted in understanding control priorities.

  15. Evaluation and management of greater trochanter pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mulligan, Edward P; Middleton, Emily F; Brunette, Meredith

    2015-08-01

    Greater trochanteric pain syndrome is an enigmatic but common cause of lateral hip symptoms in middle-aged active women. The most common manifestation of this syndrome is a degenerative tendinopathy of the hip abductors similar to the intrinsic changes seen with rotator cuff pathology in the shoulder. There are no definitive tests to isolate the underlying pathology and palpation is a non-specific means by which to differentiate the source of the pain generator. The physical examination must comprehensively evaluate for a cluster of potential impairments and contributing factors that will need to be addressed to effectively manage the likely functional limitations and activity challenges the syndrome presents to the patient. Compressive forces through increased tension in the iliotibial band should be avoided. Intervention strategies should include education regarding postural avoidance, activity modifications, improvement of lumbopelvic control, and a patient approach to resolving hip joint restrictions and restoring the tensile capabilities of the deep rotators and abductors of the hip. A number of reliable and validated hip-specific self-report outcome tools are available to baseline a patient's status and monitor their progress. Further investigations to identify the epidemiological risk factors, establish effective treatment strategies, and predict prognosis are warranted.

  16. 'Bald trochanter' spontaneous rupture of the conjoined tendons of the gluteus medius and minimus presenting as a trochanteric bursitis.

    PubMed

    LaBan, Myron M; Weir, Susan K; Taylor, Ronald S

    2004-10-01

    A 66-yr-old white woman presented with progressive complaints of right lateral hip and thigh pain associated with a disabling limp without an antecedent history of trauma. Physical examination revealed localized pain over the right greater trochanter to palpation. A full pain-free range of motion of the right hip was associated with weakness in the hip abductors. The patient ambulated with a compensated right Trendelenburg gait. Subsequent magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a trochanteric bursitis and an effusion of the hip and a full-thickness tear of the gluteus medius muscle, with both a disruption and retraction of the tendon of an atretic gluteus minimus muscle. Conjoined tendon pathology of both the gluteus medius and minimus as, revealed by magnetic resonance examination, is probably more frequent than heretofore commonly recognized. In patients presenting with "intractable" complaints of a trochanteric bursitis and an ambulatory limp due to weakness in the hip abductors, imaging studies calling attention to a possible tendon rupture may be diagnostic.

  17. Severe Pelvic Obliquity Affects Femoral Offset in Patients with Total Hip Arthroplasty but Not Leg-Length Inequality

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiaoxiao; Wang, Qi; Zhang, Xianlong; Chen, Yunsu; Peng, Xiaochun; Mao, Yuanqing; Yang, Yang; Fu, Beigang; Wang, Xiuhui; Tang, Tingting

    2015-01-01

    Leg-length inequality is an extensively studied complication of total hip arthroplasty in normal patients. However, few studies have focused on the pelvic obliquity of coronal pelvic malrotation. We hypothesized that pelvic obliquity with a fixed abduction/adduction contracture deformity of the hip may intraoperatively affect the release of soft tissues, ultimately resulting in a leg-length inequality. This study also investigated whether the femoral and vertical offsets of total hip arthroplasty were correlated with pelvic obliquity. This prospective study divided 98 patients into six groups based on the inclination of pelvic obliquity before total hip arthroplasty. Leg-length inequality, variation of pelvic obliquity, offset, and vertical offset were measured after total hip arthroplasty. Leg-length inequality and vertical offset were not significantly different among groups, whereas the variation of pelvic obliquity was significantly higher in type IIC pelvic obliquity than in other groups. Type IC pelvic obliquity had a significantly shorter offset than did the other groups, which may have been an important factor leading to type IC pelvic obliquity. Pelvic obliquity exhibited no significant effect on leg-length inequality in patients with total hip arthroplasty. A shorter offset may be caused by the higher tension of the abductor in the operated hip, which may result in the formation of type IC pelvic obliquity. Releasing the abductor contracture and restoring femoral offset are important for increasing hip stability and maintaining pelvic balance following total hip arthroplasty. PMID:26673427

  18. Subject-specific hip geometry affects predicted hip joint contact forces during gait.

    PubMed

    Lenaerts, G; De Groote, F; Demeulenaere, B; Mulier, M; Van der Perre, G; Spaepen, A; Jonkers, I

    2008-01-01

    Hip loading affects bone remodeling and implant fixation. In this study, we have analyzed the effect of subject-specific modeling of hip geometry on muscle activation patterns and hip contact forces during gait, using musculoskeletal modeling, inverse dynamic analysis and static optimization. We first used sensitivity analysis to analyze the effect of isolated changes in femoral neck-length (NL) and neck-shaft angle (NSA) on calculated muscle activations and hip contact force during the stance phase of gait. A deformable generic musculoskeletal model was adjusted incrementally to adopt a physiological range of NL and NSA. In a second similar analysis, we adjusted hip geometry to the measurements from digitized radiographs of 20 subjects with primary hip osteoarthrosis. Finally, we studied the effect of hip abductor weakness on muscle activation patterns and hip contact force. This analysis showed that differences in NL (41-74 mm) and NSA (113-140 degrees ) affect the muscle activation of the hip abductors during stance phase and hence hip contact force by up to three times body weight. In conclusion, the results from both the sensitivity and subject-specific analysis showed that at the moment of peak contact force, altered NSA has only a minor effect on the loading configuration of the hip. Increased NL, however, results in an increase of the three hip contact-force components and a reduced vertical loading. The results of these analyses are essential to understand modified hip joint loading, and for planning hip surgery for patients with osteoarthrosis.

  19. Unilateral ectopic insertion of the pectoralis minor: Clinical and functional significance.

    PubMed

    Goldman, E; Vasan, C; Lopez-Cardona, H; Vasan, N

    2016-03-01

    During routine dissection of a 70-year-old female, we observed a unilateral ectopic insertion of the left pectoralis minor muscle. The tendon was cord-like and passed through a tendon sheath superior to the coracoid process to insert on the greater tubercle of the humerus. Additionally, an aponeurosis extended from the distal aspect of the muscle's tendon and passed medially to insert near the base of the coracoid process. This is the first report of an additional aponeurosis extending from the tendon of the pectoralis minor and attaching to the coracoid process. We also observed that the pectoralis minor tendon caused an unusually smooth deep indentation on the superior aspect of the coracoid process; considering its insertion on the humerus, we hypothesize that the muscle acted as an abductor of the shoulder along with the supraspinatus. The medial extension of an aponeurotic tendon from the pectoralis minor tendon near its insertion, to the base of the coracoid process further suggests that the muscle provided stability to the glenohumeral joint while acting as an abductor. Pectoralis minor variations have been described since 1897; however, few studies have demonstrated functional or clinical significance. The redundancy of the actions of this muscle along with its long tendon suggests a potential source for autograft.

  20. The Vascularized Medial Femoral Corticoperiosteal Flap for Thumb Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Kavit; Darhouse, Nagham; Sivakumar, Bran; Floyd, David

    2015-01-01

    Summary: We present an interesting method of shaping a vascularized medial femoral condyle (MFC) flap into a “neophalanx” for phalangeal reconstruction. Our patient presented with limited strength and function secondary to fracture nonunion of the proximal phalanx of the dominant thumb. Following excision of the pseudarthrosis, an MFC corticoperiosteal flap was harvested, sculpted into a prism shape and inset. The superomedial genicular pedicle was anastomosed to the princeps pollicis artery and a cephalic tributary. On follow-up, new bone growth was seen on radiographs and the patient had substantially improved function, with full metacarpophalangeal extension, a Kapandji score of 9, and a markedly reduced Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand score of 2.68. The MFC flap is useful for reconstruction of bony defects, with minimal donor morbidity. This versatile vascularized flap can be crafted to requisite shapes and is useful for small defects in the hand, including phalangeal reconstruction. PMID:26495205

  1. A study of the superficial palmar arteries using the Doppler Ultrasonic Flowmeter.

    PubMed Central

    Al-Turk, M; Metcalf, W K

    1984-01-01

    The pattern of the superficial arteries of the hand has been studied utilising the Doppler Flowmeter technique. The superficial arteries of the hand formed several diversified patterns that permitted classification into well defined categories. The arcus palmaris superficialis was complete in 84% of the hands and incomplete in 16%. The arteria digitalis palmaris communis primus took origin from the arch in 94% and from the arterial radialis indicis in 6% of the hands. The arteria princeps pollicis and radialis indicis were quite variable in their origin and frequently differed from the normal textbook description. In 52% of the subjects, the arterial patterns in the right and left hand were different with respect to one or more arteries, while they were identical in 48% of the subjects. It would be unwise to base anything more than tentative conclusions on the data so far accumulated, because of the small population used in this project and the absence of similar studies in the literature. PMID:6706837

  2. [Variation of the fibular part of the plantar aponeurosis among present-day Japanese].

    PubMed

    Hiramoto, Y

    1983-03-01

    The plantar aponeurosis consists of the tibial and fibular parts. It is already known that the form of the fibular part markedly varies according to individuals. However, there have been few anatomical observations on this variation and none have statistically analysed it. This paper is concerned with the variation of the fibular part of the aponeurosis. Observations were carried out by dissecting thirty-nine present-day Japanese cadavers. The variations observed were classified into four types according to the Loth's method. It was clarified by means of the Chi-square test that the percentage of the medial fibre bundle is significantly higher in present-day Japanese than in Europeans, that is up to 20.5%. It was also found that the top portion of the medial fibre bundle, if it exists, is the origin of a part of the transverse head of the adductor pollicis muscle and the flexor digiti minimi brevis muscle in some cases.

  3. Muscle silent period in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Higgins, D C; Haidri, N H; Wilbourn, A J

    1971-10-01

    The muscle silent period was measured in 11 patients with moderate to severe rigidity associated with Parkinson's disease. The determinations were made under conditions of maximum disability for each patient, since all medications had been withdrawn before testing. The duration of the EMG silence, produced by small and large electrical twitch contractions of the adductor pollicis muscle, fell within a range of values previously determined for normal individuals. Major alleviation of the rigidity and bradykinesia with chronic oral l-dopa therapy was not accompanied by any change in the silent period. It was concluded that in untreated Parkinsonism, and also after its treatment with l-dopa, the functioning of the muscle spindles and local inhibitory reflexes remains normal.

  4. [Treatment of fractures of proximal phalanx of fingers by Eiffel Tower percutaneous pinning method. A review of 45 cases].

    PubMed

    Chbani, B; Amar, M F; Loudyi, D; Boutayeb, F

    2010-04-01

    The authors report in the treatment of fractures of the proximal phalanx of the fingers, the use of Eiffel Tower pinning, a relatively simple method, fast and stable, associated to a protection and early rehabilitation. The objective of this method is to offer to the patient a pollici-digital grip. Our study is a retrospective study of 45 patients treated for fractures of the proximal phalanx of the fingers by percutaneous pinning according to Eiffel Tower method. We detail this simple and economic technique and examine the functional and radiological results of this series of patients. The amplitude of the active total motion of the proximal interphalangeal joint is on average 94.16 degrees (78.5 % of the normal active mobility of the proximal interphalangeal joint), and the amplitude of the active total motion of the metacarpo-phalangeal joint is on average 90.05 degrees (75 % of the normal active mobility of the metacarpo-phalangeal joint).

  5. [Participation of the primary motor cortex in programming of muscle activity during catching of falling object].

    PubMed

    Kazennikov, O V; Lipshits, M I

    2011-01-01

    Object fell into the cup that sitting subject held between thumb and index fingers. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) of the primary motor cortex was performed early before and during anticipatory grip force increasing. Comparison of current EMG activity of adductor pollicis brevis and first dorsal interosseous muscles and responses of these muscles on TMS showed that responses were increased before the raising of muscle activity. From the other side only slight augmentation of responses was observed during subsequent strong muscle activation. It is assumed that the increasing of the TMS responses that occurred before the initiation of muscle activity reflects the enhancement ofthe motor cortex excitability associated to specific processes related to the motor cortex participation in programming of the muscles activities.

  6. Pharmacodynamic evaluation of augmentation effect of isoflurane on mivacurium.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Mukesh; Pandey, Mamta

    2009-06-01

    This study evaluated the augmentation effect of isoflurane (ISO) given before or after the mivacurium (MIV) injection. Consented 33 adults (18-58 years), ASA I patients of both sexes were randomly assigned into three groups. In group 1 (no ISO) patients--IV propofol (0.5-1 mg/kg) for induction and (25-50 mg) aliquots every 2-5 minutes, N2O (60%) in O2 by mask, was followed by IV MIV (0.04 mg/kg). In group 2 (ISO before MIV) patients-IV propofol as in group 1 and ISO in N2O (60%) and O2 to achiever end tidal level 1% for 10 minutes was followed by same dose of IV MIV. In group 3 (ISO after MIV) patients-after propofol and IV MIV as above, ISO in N2O (60%) and O2 was given to get end tidal level 1% for 10 minutes. All patients were breathing spontaneously using tight fitting facemask and respiration was assisted to keep ETCO2 (35-40 mmHg), SaO2 100%. To monitor MIV effect, ulnar nerve was stimulated at wrist using supramaximal double burst stimuli (DBS). Adductor pollicis response was recorded on myograph-2000 (Biometer, Denmark). Twitch amplitude (D1) and tetanic fade DBSr (D2/D1) were calculated for each stimulus and recorded. Peak MIV effect (D1 suppression by approximately equal to 90% and abolished D2) was significantly (p < 0.05) more in group 2 patients (ISO before MIV) than in group 1 (control) or group 3 (ISO after MIV) patients. ISO given prior of MIV administration significantly augmented the effect of MIV. When ISO was started after MIV injection probably the quick hydrolysis of MIV limited the augmentation effect to tetanic fade only as compared to the patients, who did not get ISO at any point of study. Prior administration of ISO causes intense MIV block at adductor pollicis.

  7. Influence of proprioceptive input on parkinsonian tremor.

    PubMed

    Spiegel, Jörg; Fuss, Gerhard; Krick, Christoph; Schimrigk, Klaus; Dillmann, Ulrich

    2002-01-01

    Previous studies have shown a modification of parkinsonian tremor (PT) by proprioceptive input induced by passive joint movements. The authors investigated the impact of electrically evoked proprioceptive input on PT. In eight patients with PT they recorded surface EMG from the opponens pollicis muscle, and forearm extensors and flexors. Rhythmic electrical stimulation was applied to the ipsilateral median nerve at the wrist using a submaximal stimulus intensity and stimulus frequencies between two stimuli per second and five stimuli per second. The tremor frequency did not adapt to the stimulus frequency. Tremor frequency of parkinsonian resting tremor increased significantly in the directly stimulated opponens pollicis muscle (mean +/- standard deviation, 4.35 +/- 0.64 Hz without stimulation versus 4.53 +/- 0.68 Hz with stimulation; P < 0.05, paired t-test), the not directly stimulated forearm muscles (4.90 +/- 0.72 Hz versus 5.18 +/- 0.73 Hz, P < 0.001), and the upper arm muscles (5.13 +/- 0.61 Hz versus 5.36 +/- 0.68 Hz, P < 0.01). Furthermore, the parkinsonian postural tremor accelerated significantly during ipsilateral median nerve stimulation (5.31 +/- 0.99 Hz versus 5.44 +/- 1.03 Hz, P < 0.05). Parkinsonian resting tremor in the forearm muscles also accelerated significantly during ipsilateral ulnar nerve stimulation (4.85 +/- 0.57 Hz versus 5.05 +/- 0.65 Hz, P < 0.05). Contralateral median nerve stimulation had no significant effect. These results suggest a close interaction between proprioceptive input and PT generation.

  8. Digital image analysis of striated skeletal muscle tissue injury during reperfusion after induced ischemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosero Salazar, Doris Haydee; Salazar Monsalve, Liliana

    2015-01-01

    Conditions such as surgical procedures or vascular diseases produce arterial ischemia and reperfusion injuries, which generate changes in peripheral tissues and organs, for instance, in striated skeletal muscle. To determine such changes, we conducted an experimental method in which 42 male Wistar rat were selected, to be undergone to tourniquet application on the right forelimb and left hind limb, to induce ischemia during one and three hours, followed by reperfusion periods starting at one hour and it was prolonged up to 32 days. Extensor carpi radialis longus and soleus respectively, were obtained to be processed for histochemical and morphometric analysis. By means of image processing and detection of regions of interest, variations of areas occupied by muscle fibers and intramuscular extracellular matrix (IM-ECM) throughout reperfusion were observed. In extensor carpi radialis longus, results shown reduction in the area occupied by muscle fibers; this change is significant between one hour and three hours ischemia followed by 16 hours, 48 hours and 32 days reperfusión (p˂0.005). To compare only periods of reperfusión that continued to three hours ischemia, were found significant differences, as well. For area occupied by IM-ECM, were identified increments in extensor carpi radialis longus by three hours ischemia and eight to 16 days reperfusion; in soleus, was observed difference by one hour ischemia with 42 hours reperfusion, and three hours ischemia followed by four days reperfusion (p˂0.005). Skeletal muscle develops adaptive changes in longer reperfusion, to deal with induced injury. Descriptions beyond 32 days reperfusion, can determine recovering normal pattern.

  9. No effect of hypergravity on adult rat ventral horn neuron size or SDH activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roy, R. R.; Ishihara, A.; Moran, M. M.; Wade, C. E.; Edgerton, V. R.

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Spaceflights of short duration (approximately 2 wk) result in adaptations in the size and/or metabolic properties of a select population of motoneurons located in the lumbosacral region of the rat spinal cord. A decrease in succinate dehydrogenase (SDH, an oxidative marker enzyme) activity of moderately sized (500-800 microm2) motoneurons in the retrodorsolateral region of the spinal cord (L6) has been observed after a 14-d flight. HYPOTHESIS: Our hypothesis was that exposure to short-term hypergravity would result in adaptations in the opposite direction, reflecting a continuum of morphological and biochemical responses in the spinal motoneurons from zero gravity to hypergravity. METHODS: Young, male rats were centrifuged at either 1.5 or 2.0 G for 2 wk. The size and SDH activity of a population of motoneurons in the retrodorsolateral region of the spinal cord (L5) were determined and compared with age-matched rats maintained at 1.0 G. The absolute and relative (to body weight) masses of the soleus, gastrocnemius, adductor longus and tibialis anterior muscles were compared among the three groups. RESULTS: There were no effects of either hypergravity intervention on the motoneuron properties. Rats maintained under hypergravity conditions gained less body mass than rats kept at 1.0 G. For the 1.5 and 2.0 G groups, the muscle absolute mass was smaller and relative mass similar to that observed in the 1.0 G rats, except for the adductor longus. The adductor longus absolute mass was similar to and the relative mass larger in both hypergravity groups than in the 1.0 G group. CONCLUSIONS: Our hypothesis was rejected. The findings suggest that rat motoneurons are more responsive to short-term chronic exposure to spaceflight than to hypergravity conditions.

  10. Effects of Growth on Muscle, Tendon, and Aponeurosis Tissues in Rabbit Shank Musculature.

    PubMed

    Böl, Markus; Leichsenring, Kay; Siebert, Tobias

    2016-12-20

    There exist several studies using morphological analyses of skeletal muscles to obtain a better understanding of muscle structure. The structural information obtained are primarily determined from single muscle components using individual animals of discrete ages. Further, little is known about changing dimensions of the aponeurosis, which is an important load-transferring interface in muscle mechanics. Thus, the aim of the present study was to determine how the muscle, tendon, and particularly the aponeurosis geometry of the rabbit shank musculature (M. soleus, M. extensor digitorum longus, and M. plantaris) change during growth. In doing so, morphological studies on muscles of eighty-nine female rabbits aged between 18 and 108 days were conducted. We found an almost linear increase over time in all of the geometrical parameters observed. The aponeurosis of the muscles exhibited lower growth rates in width than in length. The distal and proximal aponeurosis areas were nearly identical. The ratio of aponeurosis area to the physiological cross-sectional area was 2.54, 2.54, and 1.88 for M. soleus, M. extensor digitorum longus, and M. plantaris, respectively. M. extensor digitorum longus and M. soleus exhibited a nearly similar tendon-muscle fascicle length ratio during growth, increasing from 2.86 to 5.30 and 3.48 to 6.16, respectively. Interestingly, the tendon-muscle fascicle length ratio of the M. plantaris started initially with a much higher value (∼8) and increased to ∼18. Taken together, these results provide insight into the structure of the muscle-tendon complex and thus, a general understanding of muscle growth. Anat Rec, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Experimental evaluation of the effects of pravastatin on electrophysiological parameters of rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Pierno, S; De Luca, A; Tricarico, D; Ferrannini, E; Conte, T; D'Alò, G; Camerino, D C

    1992-11-01

    The effects of daily chronic treatment for 6 months with pravastatin was evaluated on the performance of the skeletal muscle system of different rat groups. At all doses (0.1 mg/kg-20 mg/kg) the righting reflex and the electromyographic signals observed in vivo did not show any abnormality. At the end of the treatment the Extensor digitorum longus muscles were dissected from treated and control rats and their passive and active electrical parameters were analyzed in vitro by standard microelectrodes technique. Pravastatin did not modify the chloride conductance nor the excitability characteristics of the fibers. Chronic treatment with pravastatin does not produce any alteration of skeletal muscle function.

  12. Five new species of Acanthobothrium van Beneden, 1849 (Eucestoda: Tetraphyllidea: Onchobothriidae) in stingrays from 1he Gulf of Nicoya, Costa Rica.

    PubMed

    Marques, F; Brooks, D R; Monks, S

    1995-12-01

    Five new species of Acanthobothrium are described in stingrays from the Gulf of Nicoya, Costa Rica. Acanthobothrium costarricense n. sp. in Dasyatis longus, most similar to Acanthobothrium lilium, Acanthobothrium lineatum, and Acanthobothrium himanturi, has bothridial hooks averaging 125 microns (lateral) and 145 microns (medial) long, an average of 47 testes per proglottis, cirrus sacs averaging 187 microns long, and asymmetrical ovarian lobes with poral lobes reaching the posterior margin of the cirrus sac, and aporal lobes reaching the middle of the cirrus sac. Acanthobothrium cimari n. sp. in D. longus, most similar to A. lilium, A. lineatum, A. himanturi, A. costarricense, and Acanthobothrium semnovesiculum, has bothridial hooks averaging 117 microns (lateral) and 121 microns (medial) long, an average of 50 testes per proglottis, cirrus sacs averaging 164 microns long, and asymmetrical ovarian lobes with poral lobes reaching the posterior margin of the cirrus sac, and aporal lobes reaching the level of the vagina. Acanthobothrium puntarenasense n. sp. in D. longus, distinctive in having a very small scolex relative to the width of the cephalic peduncle similar to Acanthobothrium microcephalum, has bothridial hooks averaging 111 microns (lateral) and 117 microns (medial) long, an average of 50 testes per proglottis, cirrus sacs averaging 170 microns long, and asymmetrical ovarian lobes with poral lobes reaching the posterior margin of the cirrus sac, and aporal lobes reaching the middle of the cirrus sac. Acanthobothrium vargosi in D. longus, most similar to Acanthobothrium brevissime, Acanthobothrium tasajerasi, Acanthobothrium urotrygoni, and Acanthobothrium campbelli, has bothridial hooks averaging 130 microns (lateral) and 133 microns (medial) long, an average of 25 testes per proglottis arranged in 2 single rows, cirrus sacs averaging 91 microns long, and asymmetrical ovarian lobes with poral lobes reaching the posterior margin of the cirrus sac, and

  13. Skeletal muscle metabolism in hypokinetic rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tischler, M. E.

    1984-01-01

    Muscle growth, protein metabolism, and amino acid metabolism were studied in various groups of rats. Certain groups were adrenaliectomized; some rats were suspended while others (the controls) were weight bearing. Results show that: (1) metabolic changes in the extensor digitorum longus muscle of suspended rats are due primarily to increased circulating glucocorticoids; (2) metabolic changes in the soleus muscle due to higher steroid levels are probably potentiated by greater numbers of steroid receptors; and (3) not all metabolic responses of the soleus muscle to unloading are due to the elevated levels of glucocorticoids or the increased sensitivity of this muscle to these hormones.

  14. Isolation, Culture, and Staining of Single Myofibers

    PubMed Central

    Gallot, Yann Simon; Hindi, Sajedah M.; Mann, Aman K.; Kumar, Ashok

    2016-01-01

    Adult skeletal muscle regeneration is orchestrated by a specialized population of adult stem cells called satellite cells, which are localized between the basal lamina and the plasma membrane of myofibers. The process of satellite cell-activation, proliferation, and subsequent differentiation that occurs during muscle regeneration can be recapitulated ex vivo by isolation of single myofibers from skeletal muscles and culturing them under suspension conditions. Here, we describe an improved protocol to evaluate ex vivo satellite cells activation through isolation of single myofibers from extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle of mice and culturing and staining of myofiber-associated satellite cells with the markers of self-renewal, proliferation, and differentiation. PMID:27819014

  15. Transformer design tradeoffs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclyman, W. T.

    1976-01-01

    Material was presented to assist transformer designers in the transition from long-used English units to the less familiar metric equivalents. A coordination between the area product numbers ap (product of window and core cross-section areas) and current density J was developed for a given regulation and temperature rise. Straight-line relationships for Ap and Volume, Ap and surface area At and, Ap and weight were developed. These relationships can now be used as new tools to simplify and standardize the process of transformer design. They also made it possible to design transformers of small bulk and volume or to optimize efficiency.

  16. Design parameters of toroidal and bobbin magnetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclyman, W. T.

    1973-01-01

    The adoption by NASA of the metric system for dimensioning to replace the long-used English units imposes a requirement on the U.S. transformer designer to convert from the familiar units to the less familiar metric equivalents. Material is presented to assist in that transition in the field of transformer design and fabrication. The conversion data makes it possible for the designer to obtain a fast and close approximation of significant parameters such as size, weight, and temperature rise. Nomographs are included to provide a close approximation for breadboarding purposes. For greater convenience, derivations of some of the parameters are also presented.

  17. Primary Epidural Varicosis as a Rare Cause of Sciatica: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Omidi-Kashani, Farzad; Hasankhani, Ebrahim Ghayem; Fathi, Mahdi

    2015-01-01

    Non-discogenic sciatica can be caused by any lesion along the course of the lumbosacral nerve roots and sciatic nerve. We aim to present a rare case of refractory sciatica in an otherwise healthy 25-year-old man. He complained of left leg pain without significant back pain. Extensor hallucis longus muscle was weak on the left side with limited straight leg rising. On magnetic resonance imaging, a space-occupying lesion resembling a sequestrated disc was noted that after surgical decompression, epidural varicosis was demonstrated. PMID:26538785

  18. Problems in analysis of data from muscles of rats flow in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tischler, Marc E.; Henriksen, Erik; Jacob, Stephan; Satarug, Soisungwan; Cook, Paul

    1988-01-01

    Comparison of hind-limb muscles of rats flown on Spacelab-3 or tail-traction-suspended showed that 11-17 h reloading postflight might have altered the results. Soleus atrophied; plantaris, gastrocnemius, and extensor digitorum longus grew slower; and tibialis anteiror grew normally. In both flight and simulated soleus and plantaris, higher tyrosine and greater glutamine/glutamate ratio indicated negative protein balance and increased glutamine production, respectively, relative to controls. Aspartate was lower in these muscles. Reloading generally decreased tyrosine, but increased aspartate and glutamine/glutamate. These data showed that 12 h of reloading after flight is characterized by reversal, to varying extents, of the effects of unloading.

  19. Problems in analysis of data from muscles of rats flown in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tischler, M. E.; Henriksen, E.; Jacob, S.; Satarug, S.; Cook, P.

    1988-01-01

    Comparison of hindlimb muscles of rats flown on Spacelab-3 or tail-traction-suspended showed that 11-17 h reloading post-flight might have altered the results. Soleus atrophied, plantaris, gastrocnemius and extensor digitorum longus grew slower, and tibialis anterior grew normally. In both flight and simulated soleus and plantaris, higher tyrosine and greater glutamine/glutamate ratio indicated negative protein balance and increased glutamine production, respectively, relative to controls. Aspartate was lower in these muscles. Reloading generally decreased tyrosine, but increased aspartate and glutamine/glutamate. These data showed that at 12 h of reloading after flight is characterized by reversal to varying extents of effects of unloading.

  20. Metabolic alterations caused by suspension hypokinesia in leg muscles of rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tischler, M. E.

    1984-01-01

    Metabolic changes on hypokinetic rats were measured. Two groups of animals were studied: (1) weight bearing control which were tail casted but allowed to walk on all four limbs, and (2) hypokinetic with no load bearing of the hindlimbs. The control and hypokinetic rats gained weight at a steady and similar rate over 6 days. Hypokinesia for 6 days led to significantly lower relative weights of the soleus, gastrocnemius and plantaris muscles. Hypokinesia did not effect the relative mass of the anterior tibialis or extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles.

  1. Foot and ankle problems in dancers.

    PubMed

    Kadel, Nancy

    2014-11-01

    The dancer's foot and ankle are subjected to high forces and unusual stresses in training and performance. Injuries are common in dancers, and the foot and ankle are particularly vulnerable. Ankle sprains, ankle impingement syndromes, flexor hallucis longus tendonitis, cuboid subluxation, stress fractures, midfoot injuries, heel pain, and first metatarsophalangeal joint problems including hallux valgus, hallux rigidus, and sesamoid injuries will be reviewed. This article will discuss these common foot and ankle problems in dancers and give typical clinical presentation and diagnostic and treatment recommendations.

  2. The role of Na-hylan in reducing postsurgical tendon adhesions: Part 2.

    PubMed

    Weiss, C; Suros, J M; Michalow, A; Denlinger, J; Moore, M; Tejeiro, W

    1987-01-01

    Na-hylan, a chemically modified sodium hyaluronate jelly, was studied mechanically and histologically as a surgical device to diminish tendon adhesions in rabbit extensor hallucis longus tendons after severe surgical trauma. Na-hylan jelly of high viscoelastic properties was found to be highly effective in decreasing tendon adhesions. Na-hylan jelly of low viscoelastic properties was not effective in diminishing adhesion formation. There was no interference with the tensile strength of tendon healing, and no evidence of acute or chronic inflammatory response to the Na-hylan jelly.

  3. Review of the leafhopper genus Evinus Dlabola (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae: Deltocephalinae).

    PubMed

    Lu, Lin; Dietrich, Christopher H; Zhang, Yalin

    2013-01-01

    The leafhopper genus Evinus Dlabola (Deltocephalinae: Macrostelini) is reviewed. Seven new species are described including E. angulatus sp. nov., E. hainanensis sp. nov., E. longus sp. nov., E. obscurus sp. nov., E. planus sp. nov., E. sinuatus sp. nov. E. tenuis sp. nov. One previously described species, E. peri Anufriev, newly recorded from China, is redescribed. The species of the genus have so far been recorded from Iran, Tajikistan, Kyrgyzstan and China; here several new species from Thailand are added. A checklist and a key to species (males) are also provided.

  4. Pathologic hindfoot conditions in the athlete.

    PubMed

    Leach, R E; DiIorio, E; Harney, R A

    1983-01-01

    Millions of people run in the United States, both for competitive reasons and for basic conditioning. Unfortunately, many runners develop cumulative (overload) stress syndromes, a number of which occur in the hindfoot. Among the most common are Achilles tendinitis and its associated conditions, plantar fasciitis, and tendinitis of the posterior tibial and flexor hallucis longus tendons. Most of these conditions respond well to conservative treatment, but in some instances surgery is needed. Surgery frequently can help patients who have not responded to conservative therapy to return to active and even competitive athletic lives.

  5. [Incidence of scalp involvement by Demodex folliculorum Simon ectoparasites in a pathologic-anatomic and forensic medicine autopsy sample].

    PubMed

    Hellerich, U; Metzelder, M

    1994-01-01

    29% of unselected pathological and forensic autopsy cases revealed mites of the species Demodex folliculorum longus and brevis in hair follicles and sebaceous glands of the scalp. The attack by these parasites was equal in male and female subjects and correlated to the number of sebaceous glands but not to the density of hair follicles. However there was a tendency to an increased number of parasites inhabiting the scalp of people of advanced age, dark hair colour or with a bald head. A chronic lymphocytic infiltration of the skin was conspicuous in more than 70% of cases with Demodicosis folliculorum.

  6. Insulin effect on amino acid uptake by unloaded rat hindlimb muscles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaspers, S. R.; Tischler, M. E.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of insulin on the uptake of alpha-amino-isobutyric acid (AIB) by unloaded rat hindlimb muscles was investigated using soleus and extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles from intact and adrenalectomized (ADX) rats that were tail-casted for six days. It was found that, at insulin levels above 0.00001 units/ml, the in vitro rate of AIB uptake by muscles from intact animals was stimulated more in the weight bearing muscles than in unloaded ones. In ADX animals, this differential response to insulin was abolished.

  7. Metabolism of branched-chain amino acids in leg muscles from tail-cast suspended intact and adrenalectomized rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaspers, Stephen R.; Henriksen, Erik; Jacob, Stephan; Tischler, Marc E.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of muscle unloading, adrenalectomy, and cortisol treatment on the metabolism of branched-chain amino acids in the soleus and extensor digitorum longus of tail-cast suspended rats were investigated using C-14-labeled lucine, isoleucine, and valine in incubation studies. It was found that, compared to not suspended controls, the degradation of branched-chain amino acids in hind limb muscles was accelerated in tail-cast suspended rats. Adrenalectomy was found to abolish the aminotransferase flux and to diminish the dehydrogenase flux in the soleus. The data also suggest that cortisol treatment increases the rate of metabolism of branched-chain amino acids at the dehydrogenase step.

  8. Effects of stretching and disuse on amino acids in muscles of rat hind limbs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaspers, Stephen R.; Henriksen, Erik J.; Satarug, Soisungwan; Tischler, Marc E.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of disuse and passive stretch on the concentrations of amino acids and ammonia in the unloaded soleus muscle was investigated in hindquarter-suspended (for six days by casting one foot in dorsiflexion) tail-casted rats. For a comparison with the condition of unloading, amino acids and ammonia were also measured in shortened extensor digitorum longus in the same casted limb and in denervated leg muscles. The results obtained suggest that passive stretch diminishes some of the characteristic alterations of amino acid concentrations due to unloading. This effect of stretch is considered to be due to the maintenance of muscle tension.

  9. Influence of electrical stimulation on hip joint adductor muscle activity during maximum effort.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Sota; Wada, Chikamune

    2016-05-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated whether hip adductor activity was influenced by electrical stimulation of the tensor fascia lata muscle. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 16 nondisabled males. Each subject was asked to adduct the hip joint with maximum effort. The electromyogram of the adductor longus was recorded under two experimental conditions, with and without electrical stimulation of the tensor fascia lata. [Results] In the presence of electrical stimulation, muscle activity decreased to 72.9% (57.8-89.3%) of that without stimulation. [Conclusion] These results suggested that inactivation of the adductor group was promoted by electrical stimulation of the tensor fascia lata.

  10. Development and implementation of a pediatric palliative care program.

    PubMed

    Pelant, Diane; McCaffrey, Terri; Beckel, Jean

    2012-08-01

    Palliative care, long-used in the adult setting, is new to the pediatric setting. Research indicates that palliative care reduces length of stay and use of aggressive end-of-life interventions, improves quality of life, and provides hope. It balances provision of coordinated care with building of family memories and preparation for the child's death with celebration of the child's life. We advocate implementation of pediatric palliative care in any hospital that cares for children. This article provides a model outlining critical steps and considerations for establishing a successful pediatric palliative care program.

  11. Palmar reconstruction of the triangular fibrocartilage complex for static instability of the distal radioulnar joint.

    PubMed

    Moritomo, Hisao; Kataoka, Toshiyuki

    2014-09-01

    This study describes a new technique that can be used for reconstructing the triangular fibrocartilage complex to correct the static palmar radius instability of the distal radioulnar joint. In the abovementioned condition, the radius is extremely unstable with respect to the ulna and dislocates palmarly in the resting position. Using a palmar approach, a palmaris longus tendon graft was sutured to the remnant of the disrupted palmar radioulnar and ulnocarpal ligaments and then anchored to the bone tunnel that was created at the ulnar fovea. This technique predominantly reinforces the palmar structure of triangular fibrocartilage complex because the palmar radioulnar ligament is the most critical stabilizer of palmar radius instability.

  12. Isolation, Culture, Functional Assays, and Immunofluorescence of Myofiber-Associated Satellite Cells.

    PubMed

    Vogler, Thomas O; Gadek, Katherine E; Cadwallader, Adam B; Elston, Tiffany L; Olwin, Bradley B

    2016-01-01

    Adult skeletal muscle stem cells, termed satellite cells, regenerate and repair the functional contractile cells in adult skeletal muscle called myofibers. Satellite cells reside in a niche between the basal lamina and sarcolemma of myofibers. Isolating single myofibers and their associated satellite cells provides a culture system that partially mimics the in vivo environment. We describe methods for isolating and culturing intact individual myofibers and their associated satellite cells from the mouse extensor digitorum longus muscle. Following dissection and isolation of individual myofibers we provide protocols for myofiber transplantation, satellite cell transfection, immune detection of satellite cell antigens, and assays to examine satellite cell self-renewal and proliferation.

  13. Depressed tetanic contactile function cannot be compensated by increasing stimulating frequency in unloaded soleus muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Fang; Yu, Zhi-Bin

    2005-08-01

    The weightlessness-induced muscle atrophy is associated with a reduced force and power and with an increased fatigability [1]. In prolonged manned space missions, these alterations in skeletal muscles could limit the crew's ability to work in space and to rapidly egress in an emergency on return to Earth. In order to elucidate the underlying mechanisms of the increased fatigability in the atrophic skeletal muscle, we isolated the typically fast and slow muscle, extensor digitorum longus (EDL) and soleus (SOL), to observe the changes in maximal contraction tension, optimal stimulating frequency, and recovery features after fatigue in the intermittent tetanic contraction.

  14. Influence of electrical stimulation on hip joint adductor muscle activity during maximum effort

    PubMed Central

    Nakano, Sota; Wada, Chikamune

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated whether hip adductor activity was influenced by electrical stimulation of the tensor fascia lata muscle. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 16 nondisabled males. Each subject was asked to adduct the hip joint with maximum effort. The electromyogram of the adductor longus was recorded under two experimental conditions, with and without electrical stimulation of the tensor fascia lata. [Results] In the presence of electrical stimulation, muscle activity decreased to 72.9% (57.8–89.3%) of that without stimulation. [Conclusion] These results suggested that inactivation of the adductor group was promoted by electrical stimulation of the tensor fascia lata. PMID:27313387

  15. Clenbuterol, a beta(2)-agonist, retards atrophy in denervated muscles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeman, Richard J.; Ludemann, Robert; Etlinger, Joseph D.

    1987-01-01

    The effects of a beta(2) agonist, clenbuterol, on the protein content as well as on the contractile strength and the muscle fiber cross-sectional area of various denervated muscles from rats were investigated. It was found that denervated soleus, anterior tibialis, and gastrocnemius muscles, but not the extensor digitorum longus, of rats treated for 2-3 weeks with clenbuterol contained 95-110 percent more protein than denervated controls. The twofold difference in the protein content of denervated solei was paralleled by similar changes in contractile strength and muscle fiber cross-sectional area.

  16. beta-adrenergic effects on carbohydrate metabolism in the unweighted rat soleus muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirby, Christopher R.; Tischler, Marc E.

    1990-01-01

    The effect of unweighting on the response of the soleus-muscle carbohydrate metabolism to a beta-adrenergic agonist (isoproterenol) was investigated in rats that were subjected to three days of tail-cast suspension. It was found that isoproterenol promoted glycogen degradation in soleus from suspended rats to a higher degree than in weighted soleus from control rats, and had no effect in unweighted digitorum longus. However, isoproterenol did not have a greater inhibitory effect on the net uptake of tritium-labeled 2-deoxy-glucose by the unweighted soleus and that isoproterenol inhibited hexose phosphorylation less in the unweighted than in the control muscle.

  17. Midsubstance Tendinopathy, Surgical Management.

    PubMed

    DeCarbo, William T; Bullock, Mark J

    2017-04-01

    Noninsertional Achilles tendinopathy often responds to nonoperative treatment. When nonoperative treatment fails, the clinician must distinguish between paratendinopathy and noninsertional tendinopathy. In paratendinopathy, myofibroblasts synthesize collagen, causing adhesions, and the paratenon may be released or excised. If a core area of tendinopathy is identified on MRI, the area is excised longitudinally and repaired with a side-to-side suture. If greater than 50% of the tendon diameter is excised, the authors recommend a short flexor hallucis longus tendon transfer with an interference screw. A turndown flap of the gastrocnemius aponeurosis is also described with good results.

  18. Reduction-oxidation state and protein degradation in skeletal muscles of growing rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fagan, Julie M.; Tischler, Marc E.

    1986-01-01

    The relationship between the NAD redox state and protein degradation during growth was studied in isolated soleus and extensor digitorum longus muscles of 4- to 14-week-old rats. As muscle size increased with age, protein breakdown slowed and the muscles became progressively more reduced as shown by higher ratios of lactate/pyruvate in incubated and fresh-frozen muscle. Correlations were strong between redox state of protein degradation, and muscle mass, and between redox state and protein degradation. This relationship may be important in the slowing of muscle breakdown that occurs with age.

  19. Fetal anatomy of the lower cervical and upper thoracic fasciae with special reference to the prevertebral fascial structures including the suprapleural membrane.

    PubMed

    Miyake, Naritomo; Takeuchi, Hiromi; Cho, Baik Hwan; Murakami, Gen; Fujimiya, Mineko; Kitano, Hiroya

    2011-07-01

    The aim of this study was to find basic rules governing the fetal anatomy of the deep cervical fasciae and their connections to the mediastinal fasciae. We examined the histology of paraffin-embedded preparations of 18 mid-term fetuses (5 between 9 and 12 weeks of gestation, 3 between 15 and 18 weeks, and 10 between 20 and 25 weeks). The prevertebral lamina of the deep cervical fasciae (PLDCF) developed as an intermediate aponeurosis for the bilateral bellies of the longus colli muscles. In contrast, the alar fascia developed as a connecting band between the bilateral adventitiae of the common carotid artery. The retropharyngeal fascia became evident much later than the latter two fasciae. The fascia covering the thymus was thicker than the fascia for the strap muscles (the pretracheal lamina of the cervical fascia). The primitive suprapleural membrane, or Sibson's fascia, contained veins and fatty tissues, and was composed of the alar fascia rather than the PLDCF, tranversalis fascia, or endothoracic fascia. The prevertebral two-laminar configuration was rather evident in the early stages of development because, in the later stages, the fasciae together provided a multilaminar structure, especially in the lateral area in front of the longus colli, which suspended the cupula pleurae. To consider a continuation from the base of the neck to the upper mediastinum, the alar fascia seems to be a key structure for connecting the vascular sheath to the parietal pleura.

  20. Skeletal muscle fiber, nerve, and blood vessel breakdown in space-flown rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, D. A.; Ilyina-Kakueva, E. I.; Ellis, S.; Bain, J. L.; Slocum, G. R.; Sedlak, F. R.

    1990-01-01

    Histochemical and ultrastructural analyses were performed postflight on hind limb skeletal muscles of rats orbited for 12.5 days aboard the unmanned Cosmos 1887 biosatellite and returned to Earth 2 days before sacrifice. The antigravity adductor longus (AL), soleus, and plantaris muscles atrophied more than the non-weight-bearing extensor digitorum longus, and slow muscle fibers were more atrophic than fast fibers. Muscle fiber segmental necrosis occurred selectively in the AL and soleus muscles; primarily, macrophages and neutrophils infiltrated and phagocytosed cellular debris. Granule-rich mast cells were diminished in flight AL muscles compared with controls, indicating the mast cell secretion contributed to interstitial tissue edema. Increased ubiquitination of disrupted myofibrils implicated ubiquitin in myofilament degradation. Mitochondrial content and succinic dehydrogenase activity were normal, except for subsarcolemmal decreases. Myofibrillar ATPase activity of flight AL muscle fibers shifted toward the fast type. Absence of capillaries and extravasation of red blood cells indicated failed microcirculation. Muscle fiber regeneration from activated satellite cells was detected. About 17% of the flight AL end plates exhibited total or partial denervation. Thus, skeletal muscle weakness associated with spaceflight can result from muscle fiber atrophy and segmental necrosis, partial motor denervation, and disruption of the microcirculation.

  1. Vitamin D receptor signaling enhances locomotive ability in mice.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Sadaoki; Suzuki, Miho; Tashiro, Yoshihito; Tanaka, Keisuke; Takeda, Satoshi; Aizawa, Ken; Hirata, Michinori; Yogo, Kenji; Endo, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    Bone fractures markedly reduce quality of life and life expectancy in elderly people. Although osteoporosis increases bone fragility, fractures frequently occur in patients with normal bone mineral density. Because most fractures occur on falling, preventing falls is another focus for reducing bone fractures. In this study, we investigated the role of vitamin D receptor (VDR) signaling in locomotive ability. In the rotarod test, physical exercise enhanced locomotive ability of wild-type (WT) mice by 1.6-fold, whereas exercise did not enhance locomotive ability of VDR knockout (KO) mice. Compared with WT mice, VDR KO mice had smaller peripheral nerve axonal diameter and disordered AChR morphology on the extensor digitorum longus muscle. Eldecalcitol (ED-71, ELD), an analog of 1,25(OH)2 D3 , administered to rotarod-trained C57BL/6 mice enhanced locomotor performance compared with vehicle-treated nontrained mice. The area of AChR cluster on the extensor digitorum longus was greater in ELD-treated mice than in vehicle-treated mice. ELD and 1,25(OH)2 D3 enhanced expression of IGF-1, myelin basic protein, and VDR in rat primary Schwann cells. VDR signaling regulates neuromuscular maintenance and enhances locomotive ability after physical exercise. Further investigation is required, but Schwann cells and the neuromuscular junction are targets of vitamin D3 signaling in locomotive ability.

  2. Application of temperature gradient gel electrophoresis to the study of yeast diversity in the estuary of the Tagus river, Portugal.

    PubMed

    Gadanho, Mário; Sampaio, José Paulo

    2004-12-01

    Temperature gradient gel electrophoresis (TGGE) was employed for the assessment of yeast diversity in the estuary of the Tagus river (Portugal). The molecular detection of yeasts was carried out directly from water samples and, in parallel, a cultivation approach by means of an enrichment step was employed. A nested PCR was employed to obtain a fungal amplicon containing the D2 domain of the 26S rRNA gene. For identification the TGGE bands were extracted, re-amplified, and sequenced. Fourteen fungal taxa were detected and all except one were yeasts. Most yeast sequences corresponded to members of the Ascomycota and only three belonged to the Basidiomycota. Five yeasts (four ascomycetes and one basidiomycete) could not be identified to the species level due to the uniqueness of their sequences. The number of species detected after enrichment was higher than the number of taxa found using the direct detection method. This suggests that some yeast populations are present in densities that are below the detection threshold of the method. With respect to the analysis of the yeast community structure, our results indicate that the dominant populations belong to Debaryomyces hansenii, Rhodotorula mucilaginosa, Cryptococcus longus, and to an uncultured basidiomycetous yeast phylogenetically close to Cr. longus. The combined analysis of direct detection and cultivation approaches indicates a similar community structure at the two sampled sites since nine species were present at both localities.

  3. Abrocomaphthirus hoplai, a new genus and species of sucking louse from Chile and its relevance to zoogeography.

    PubMed

    Durden, L A; Webb, J P

    1999-10-01

    Both sexes of Abrocomaphthirus hoplai, new genus and new species (Anoplura: Polyplacidae), are described and illustrated. The endemic Chilean chinchilla rat Abrocoma bennetti Waterhouse (Rodentia: Abrocomidae) is the type host. The definition of the family Polyplacidae is amended to accommodate the new genus. Polyplax longa (Werneck), also referred to in the literature as Neohaematopinus longus Werneck, is reassigned to Abrocomaphthirus. The host of A. longus comb.n., is Abrocoma cinerea Thomas, another chinchilla rat, which inhabits parts of Argentina, Bolivia, Chile and Peru. The erection of Abrocomaphthirus as a distinct genus has important zoogeographical and evolutionary implications. The tenuous anomaly of P. longa being the sole native representative of the genus Polyplax in South America, possibly with African affinities, is now refuted. Instead, partial colonization of the neotropics by native species of both Polyplax and Neohaematopinus appears to have been relatively recent and from North America. The phylogenetic affinities of Abrocomaphthirus are unknown, but it appears to be closely related to other, more ancient, native South American polyplacid louse genera, such as Cuyana, Eulinognathus, Galeophthirus, and Lagidiophthirus. Arguments are presented in support of an ancestral zoogeographical link to Africa for these louse genera.

  4. Partially irreversible paresis of the deep peroneal nerve caused by osteocartilaginous exostosis of the fibula without affecting the tibialis anterior muscle.

    PubMed

    Paprottka, Felix Julian; Machens, Hans-Günther; Lohmeyer, Jörn Andreas

    2012-08-01

    Dysfunction of the lower limb's muscles can cause severe impairment and immobilisation of the patient. As one of the leg's major motor and sensory nerves, the deep peroneal nerve (synonym: deep fibular nerve) plays a very important role in muscle innervation in the lower extremities. We report the case of a 19-year-old female patient, who suffered from a brace-like exostosis 6-cm underneath her left fibular head causing a partially irreversible paresis of her deep peroneal nerve. This nerve damage resulted in complete atrophy of her extensor digitorum longus and extensor hallucis longus muscle, and in painful sensory disturbance at her left shin and first web space. The tibialis anterior muscle stayed intact because its motor branch left the deep peroneal nerve proximal to the nerve lesion. Diagnosis was first verified 6 years after the onset of symptoms by a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan of her complete left lower leg. Subsequently, the patient was operated on in our clinic, where a neurolysis was performed and the 4-cm-long osteocartilaginous exostosis was removed. Paralysis was already irreversible but sensibility returned completely after neurolysis. The presented case shows that an osteocartilaginous exostosis can be the cause for partial deep peroneal nerve paresis. If this disorder is diagnosed at an early stage, nerve damage is reversible. Typical for an exostosis is its first appearance during the juvenile growth phase.

  5. Effects of different types of exercise on muscle activity and balance control

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mi-Kyoung; Choi, Jung-Hyun; Gim, Min-A; Kim, Young-Hwan; Yoo, Kyung-Tae

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study analyzed the effects of isotonic, isokinetic, and isometric exercises of ankle joint muscles on lower extremity muscle activity and balance control. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 30 healthy adults (15 males) in their 20s who were randomly assigned to three different exercise method groups of 10 people each. The isokinetic exercise group performed three sets at an angular velocity of 60°/sec, including a single rest period after every set of 10 repetitions. The isometric exercise group performed three sets consisting of three 15 repetitions of a 15-second exercise followed by a 5-second rest. [Results] Multivariate analysis of variance revealed that depending on the exercise method, the non-dominant tibialis anterior, gastrocnemius muscle, and peroneus longus showed significant differences in muscle activity for weight-bearing non-dominant sides; when the dominant side was weight-bearing, the dominant gastrocnemius and peroneus longus showed significant differences in muscle activity; and the non-dominant and dominant sides showed significant differences in balance control depending on the duration of support in the area. [Conclusion] Muscle fatigue from the three exercise methods produced a decline in muscle activity and balance control; due to the fatigue before exercise, the side that did not perform the exercises was affected. PMID:26180340

  6. Maintenance of skeletal muscle energy homeostasis during prolonged wintertime fasting in the raccoon dog (Nyctereutes procyonoides).

    PubMed

    Kinnunen, Sanni; Mänttäri, Satu; Herzig, Karl-Heinz; Nieminen, Petteri; Mustonen, Anne-Mari; Saarela, Seppo

    2015-05-01

    The raccoon dog (Nyctereutes procyonoides) is a canid species with autumnal fattening and prolonged wintertime fasting. Nonpathological body weight cycling and the ability to tolerate food deficiency make this species a unique subject for studying physiological mechanisms in energy metabolism. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a cellular energy sensor regulating energy homeostasis. During acute fasting, AMPK promotes fatty acid oxidation and enhances glucose uptake. We evaluated the effects of prolonged fasting on muscle energy metabolism in farm-bred raccoon dogs. Total and phosphorylated AMPK and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), glucose transporter 4 (GLUT 4), insulin receptor and protein kinase B (Akt) protein expressions of hind limb muscles were determined by Western blot after 10 weeks of fasting. Plasma insulin, leptin, ghrelin, glucose and free fatty acid levels were measured, and muscle myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoform composition analyzed. Fasting had no effects on AMPK phosphorylation, but total AMPK expression decreased in m. rectus femoris, m. tibialis anterior and m. extensor digitorum longus resulting in a higher phosphorylation ratio. Decreased total expression was also observed for ACC. Fasting did not influence GLUT 4, insulin receptor or Akt expression, but Akt phosphorylation was lower in m. flexor digitorum superficialis and m. extensor digitorum longus. Three MHC isoforms (I, IIa and IIx) were detected without differences in composition between the fasted and control animals. The studied muscles were resistant to prolonged fasting indicating that raccoon dogs have an effective molecular regulatory system for preserving skeletal muscle function during wintertime immobility and fasting.

  7. A rare variant of the ulnar artery with important clinical implications: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Variations in the major arteries of the upper limb are estimated to be present in up to one fifth of people, and may have significant clinical implications. Case presentation During routine cadaveric dissection of a 69-year-old fresh female cadaver, a superficial brachioulnar artery with an aberrant path was found bilaterally. The superficial brachioulnar artery originated at midarm level from the brachial artery, pierced the brachial fascia immediately proximal to the elbow, crossed superficial to the muscles that originated from the medial epicondyle, and ran over the pronator teres muscle in a doubling of the antebrachial fascia. It then dipped into the forearm fascia, in the gap between the flexor carpi radialis and the palmaris longus. Subsequently, it ran deep to the palmaris longus muscle belly, and superficially to the flexor digitorum superficialis muscle, reaching the gap between the latter and the flexor carpi ulnaris muscle, where it assumed is usual position lateral to the ulnar nerve. Conclusion As far as the authors could determine, this variant of the superficial brachioulnar artery has only been described twice before in the literature. The existence of such a variant is of particular clinical significance, as these arteries are more susceptible to trauma, and can be easily confused with superficial veins during medical and surgical procedures, potentially leading to iatrogenic distal limb ischemia. PMID:23194303

  8. Distribution of radioactive cesium and its seasonal variations in cattle living in the "difficult-to-return zone" of the Fukushima nuclear accident.

    PubMed

    Sato, Itaru; Sasaki, Jun; Satoh, Hiroshi; Deguchi, Yoshitaka; Otani, Kumiko; Okada, Keiji

    2016-04-01

    The amount of radioactive cesium in various tissues of cattle which lived in the highly contaminated area designated as the "difficult-to-return zone", was measured in May and December of 2014. The average concentration of radioactive cesium in the skeletal muscles ranged from 3900 to 5500 Bq/kg, and there was no significant difference between May and December. The sirloin (in December), tenderloin and top round (in May and December) showed significantly higher concentrations of cesium than the neck muscle, which is generally used for the radioactivity inspection. The Longus colli muscle, which is also used for the inspection in some institutions, showed the same radioactivity as the neck muscle. Study results indicated that relative cesium concentrations in internal organs were higher in May compared to December. There were high correlations of cesium concentration between the blood and other tissues. However, regression coefficients between the blood and muscles were significantly higher in December than those in May. When radioactivity in the neck or Longus colli muscles between 50 to 100 Bq/kg is detected, the slaughtered cattle should be re-inspected using another muscle, such as top round or sirloin, to prevent marketing of meat that violates the criteria of the Food Sanitation Act.

  9. Correlation between deep cervical flexor muscle thickness at rest and sternocleidomastoid activity during the craniocervical flexion test.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Hiroshi; Suehiro, Tadanobu; Ono, Koji; Kurozumi, Chiharu; Watanabe, Susumu

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to clarify the relationship between the thickness of the deep cervical flexor muscles (longus capitis and longus colli) at rest and sternocleidomastoid activity during the craniocervical flexion test (CCFT). Thirteen healthy males participated in this study. The thickness of the deep cervical flexor muscles was measured by ultrasound imaging in a relaxed supine position. Activity of the sternocleidomastoid was measured by electromyography during the CCFT at five incremental levels (22, 24, 26, 28, and 30 mm Hg). Correlations between normalized muscle thickness relative to body mass index and sternocleidomastoid activity were determined. Significant negative correlations were observed between normalized muscle thickness and activity of the sternocleidomastoid at 26 (r = -0.622, P = 0.023) and 28 mmHg (r = -0.653, P = 0.015). Individuals with smaller deep cervical flexor muscles exhibited increased activity in the sternocleidomastoid during the CCFT.

  10. Peroneal nerve branching suggests compression palsy in the deformities of Charcot-Marie Tooth disease.

    PubMed

    Guyton, Gregory P

    2006-10-01

    Altered expression of the PMP-22 protein may be implicated in Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease and the much rarer disease, hereditary liability to pressure palsy. An element of chronic pressure palsy may explain the unique distribution of motor imbalance in patients with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. If this is the case, innervation of the lateral leg motor units should show sufficient anatomic segregation to explain the variable disease patterns. Twelve fresh cadaver specimens were dissected to examine the innervation of the anterior and lateral compartment muscles from the peroneal nerve. Nine specimens had a branch to the peroneus longus at or proximal to nerve passage of the posterior fibular neck. The first branch to the peroneus longus was 2.1 +/- 6.7 mm proximal, and the first branch to the peroneus brevis was 110.9 +/- 19 mm distal. The nerve to the tibialis anterior originated within 5 mm of the reference point and wrapped transversely along the fibular neck for 17.2 +/- 1.4 mm. These discrete pathways to the individual motor units in the anterolateral leg were consistent with the possible implication of chronic pressure palsy in the patterns of atrophy in Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease.

  11. Musculoskeletal ultrasound education: orthopaedic resident ability following a multimedia tutorial.

    PubMed

    Piposar, Jonathan R; Easley, Mark; Nunley, James A; DeOrio, James K; Talusan, Paul G; Gubler, Kyle E; Reach, John S

    2015-01-01

    Musculoskeletal ultrasound (MSK-US) is a quick and effective imaging tool that can be utilized by orthopaedic surgeons to identify common musculoskeletal pathology such as ankle tendinopathy. This study evaluated the ability of 15 orthopaedic surgery residents to identify and measure ankle tendons after attending a multimedia tutorial on MSK-US. Afterwards, proficiency of usage was assessed by identification and quantification of three ankle tendons (Achilles, tibialis posterior, and flexor hallucis longus) in a cadaver limb. Resident comfort level and plan for future use were also assessed. After completing the tutorial, accuracy measuring the Achilles, tibialis posterior, and flexor hallucis longus tendons was 94.8%, 90.2%, and 90.1%, respectively. Resident comfort level improved from a level of 2.3 before the tutorial to 6.8 afterwards. Seventy-one percent of residents plan to use ultrasound in clinical practice. These results show that orthopaedic surgery residents can identify and assess tendon size via MSK-US with sufficient accuracy after a multimedia tutorial.

  12. Effect of anesthesia on glucose production and utilization in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Penicaud, L.; Ferre, P.; Kande, J.; Leturque, A.; Issad, T.; Girard, J.

    1987-03-01

    This study was undertaken to determine the effects of pentobarbital anesthesia (50 mg/kg ip) on glucose kinetics and individual tissue glucose utilization in vivo, in chronically catheterized rats. Glucose turnover studies were carried out using (3-/sup 3/H) glucose as tracer. A transient hyperglycemia and an increased glucose production were observed 3 min after induction of anesthesia. However, 40 min after induction of anesthesia, glycemia returned to the level observed in awake animals, whereas glucose turnover was decreased by 30% as compared with unanesthetized rats. These results are discussed with regard to the variations observed in plasma insulin, glucagon, and catecholamine levels. Glucose utilization by individual tissues was studied by the 2-(1-/sup 3/H) deoxyglucose technique. A four- to fivefold decrease in glucose utilization was observed in postural muscles (soleus and adductor longus), while in other nonpostural muscles (epitrochlearis, tibialis anterior, extensor digitorum longus, and diaphragm) and other tissues (white and brown adipose tissues) anesthesia did not modify the rate of glucose utilization. A decrease in glucose utilization was also observed in the brain.

  13. Electromyographic analysis of lower limb muscles during the golf swing performed with three different clubs.

    PubMed

    Marta, Sérgio; Silva, Luís; Vaz, João Rocha; Castro, Maria António; Reinaldo, Gustavo; Pezarat-Correia, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe and compare the EMG patterns of select lower limb muscles throughout the golf swing, performed with three different clubs, in non-elite middle-aged players. Fourteen golfers performed eight swings each using, in random order, a pitching wedge, 7-iron and 4-iron. Surface electromyography (EMG) was recorded bilaterally from lower limb muscles: tibialis anterior, peroneus longus, gastrocnemius medialis, gastrocnemius lateralis, biceps femoris, semitendinosus, gluteus maximus, vastus medialis, rectus femoris and vastus lateralis. Three-dimensional high-speed video analysis was used to determine the golf swing phases. Results showed that, in average handicap golfers, the highest muscle activation levels occurred during the Forward Swing Phase, with the right semitendinosus and the right biceps femoris muscles producing the highest mean activation levels relative to maximal electromyography (70-76% and 68-73% EMG(MAX), respectively). Significant differences between the pitching wedge and the 4-iron club were found in the activation level of the left semitendinosus, right tibialis anterior, right peroneus longus, right vastus medialis, right rectus femuris and right gastrocnemius muscles. The lower limb muscles showed, in most cases and phases, higher mean values of activation on electromyography when golfers performed shots with a 4-iron club.

  14. Contributions of active and passive toe flexion to forefoot loading.

    PubMed

    Hamel, A J; Donahue, S W; Sharkey, N A

    2001-12-01

    Toe flexion during terminal stance has an active component contributed by the muscles that flex the toes and a passive component contributed by the plantar fascia. This study examined the relative importance of these two mechanisms in maintaining proper force sharing between the toes and forefoot. Thirteen nonpaired cadaver feet were tested in a dynamic gait stimulator, which reproduces the kinematics and kinetics of the foot, ankle, and tibia by applying physiologic muscle forces and proximal tibial kinematics. The distribution of plantar pressure beneath the foot was measured at the terminal stance phase of gait under normal extrinsic muscle activity with an intact plantar fascia, in the absence of extrinsic toe flexor activity (no flexor hallucis longus or flexor digitorum longus) with an intact plantar fascia, and after complete fasciotomy with normal extrinsic toe flexor activity. In the absence of the toe flexor muscles or after plantar fasciotomy the contact area decreased beneath the toes and contact force shifted from the toes to the metatarsal heads. In addition, pressure distribution beneath the metatarsal heads after fasciotomy shifted laterally and posteriorly, indicating that the plantar fascia enables more efficient force transmission through the high gear axis during locomotion. The plantar fascia enables the toes to provide plantar-directed force and bear high loads during push-off.

  15. Increased catalase expression improves muscle function in mdx mice.

    PubMed

    Selsby, Joshua T

    2011-02-01

    It has been well established that oxidative stress contributes to pathology associated with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). I hypothesized that overexpression of the antioxidant enzyme catalase would improve muscle function in the mdx mouse, the mouse model of DMD. To test this hypothesis, neonatal mdx mice were injected with a recombinant adeno-associated virus driving the catalase transgene. Animals were killed 4 or 6 weeks or 6 months following injection. Muscle function was generally improved by catalase overexpression. Four weeks following injection, extensor digitorum longus specific tension was improved twofold, while soleus was similar between groups. Resistance to contraction-induced injury was similar between groups; however, resistance to fatigue was increased 25% in catalase-treated soleus compared with control muscle. Six weeks following injection, extensor digitorum longus specific tension was increased 15%, while soleus specific tension was similar between treated and untreated limbs. Catalase overexpression reduced contraction-induced injury by 30-45% and fatigue by 20% compared with control limbs. Six months following injection, diaphragm specific tension was similar between groups, but resistance to contraction-induced injury was improved by 35% and fatigue by 25%. Taken together, these data indicate that catalase can improve a subset of parameters of muscle function in dystrophin-deficient skeletal muscle.

  16. [A winged scapula].

    PubMed

    Faber, C G; Klaver, M M; Wokke, J H J

    2002-09-14

    Three patients, one woman aged 22 and two men aged 54 and 28, presented with scapular winging. In the first patient amyotrophic plexus neuralgia was diagnosed. The second patient most probably suffered from a stretch injury of the long thoracic nerve. The third patient had scapular winging due to an isolated paresis of the trapezius muscle, which was caused by an idiopathic lesion of the accessory nerve. In the first and second patient an improvement was noticeable after 9 months and 1.5 years respectively. There was no improvement in the third patient after 11 years. Paresis of the M. serratus anterior occurs due to paralysis of the N. thoracicus longus, as a result of direct compression, stump trauma, interventions such as thoracic operations, (repeated) stretch injuries or neuralgic brachial plexus amyotrophy; in these cases the scapular winging increases as the arm is lifted forwards. Paresis of the M. trapezius occurs due to the paralysis of the N. accessorius, due to trauma, interventions such as in the neck area, a space-occupying abnormality or an idiopathic abnormality; in these cases the scapular winging increases upon the arm being lifted sideways. Another possible cause of scapular winging is muscular dystrophy, especially fascioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD). Usually the prognosis for recovery from a neuropraxia and an idiopathic lesion of the N. thoracicus longus within a two-year period is good. The prognosis for an isolated lesion of the N. accessorius is much less favourable. An EMG is essential for establishing a diagnosis.

  17. The role of hind limb flexor muscles during swimming in the toad, Bufo marinus.

    PubMed

    Gillis, Gary B

    2007-01-01

    Most work examining muscle function during anuran locomotion has focused largely on the roles of major hind limb extensors during jumping and swimming. Nevertheless, the recovery phase of anuran locomotion likely plays a critical role in locomotor performance, especially in the aquatic environment, where flexing limbs can increase drag on the swimming animal. In this study, I use kinematic and electromyographic analyses to explore the roles of four anatomical flexor muscles in the hind limb of Bufo marinus during swimming: m. iliacus externus, a hip flexor; mm. iliofibularis and semitendinosus, knee flexors; and m. tibialis anticus longus, an ankle flexor. Two general questions are addressed: (1) What role, if any, do these flexors play during limb extension? and (2) How do limb flexors control limb flexion? Musculus iliacus externus exhibits a large burst of EMG activity early in limb extension and shows low levels of activity during recovery. Both m. iliofibularis and m. semitendinosus are biphasically active, with relatively short but intense bursts during limb extension followed by longer and typically weaker secondary bursts during recovery. Musculus tibialis anticus longus becomes active mid way through recovery and remains active through the start of extension in the next stroke. In conclusion, flexors at all three joints exhibit some activity during limb extension, indicating that they play a role in mediating limb movements during propulsion. Further, recovery is controlled by a complex pattern of flexor activation timing, but muscle intensities are generally lower, suggesting relatively low force requirements during this phase of swimming.

  18. Muscle lengthening surgery causes differential acute mechanical effects in both targeted and non-targeted synergistic muscles.

    PubMed

    Ateş, Filiz; Özdeşlik, Rana N; Huijing, Peter A; Yucesoy, Can A

    2013-10-01

    Epimuscular myofascial force transmission (EMFT) is a major determinant of muscle force exerted, as well as length range of force exertion. Therefore, EMFT is of importance in remedial surgery performed, e.g., in spastic paresis. We aimed to test the following hypotheses: (1) muscle lengthening surgery (involving preparatory dissection (PD) and subsequent proximal aponeurotomy (AT)) affects the target muscle force exerted at its distal and proximal tendons differentially, (2) forces of non-operated synergistic muscles are affected as well, (3) PD causes some of these effects. In three conditions (control, post-PD, and post-AT exclusively on m. extensor digitorum longus (EDL)), forces exerted by rat anterior crural muscles were measured simultaneously. Our results confirm hypotheses (1-2), and hypothesis (3) in part: Reduction of EDL maximal force differed by location (i.e. 26.3% when tested distally and 44.5% when tested proximally). EDL length range of active force exertion increased only distally. Force reductions were shown also for non-operated tibialis anterior (by 11.9%), as well as for extensor hallucis longus (by 8.4%) muscles. In tibialis anterior only, part of the force reduction (4.9%) is attributable to PD. Due to EMFT, remedial surgery should be considered to have differential effects for targeted and non-targeted synergistic muscles.

  19. Evaluation of the therapeutic potential of carbonic anhydrase inhibitors in two animal models of dystrophin deficient muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Giacomotto, Jean; Pertl, Cordula; Borrel, Caroline; Walter, Maggie C; Bulst, Stefanie; Johnsen, Bob; Baillie, David L; Lochmüller, Hanns; Thirion, Christian; Ségalat, Laurent

    2009-11-01

    Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy is an inherited muscle degeneration disease for which there is still no efficient treatment. However, compounds active on the disease may already exist among approved drugs but are difficult to identify in the absence of cellular models. We used the Caenorhabditis elegans animal model to screen a collection of 1000 already approved compounds. Two of the most active hits obtained were methazolamide and dichlorphenamide, carbonic anhydrase inhibitors widely used in human therapy. In C. elegans, these drugs were shown to interact with CAH-4, a putative carbonic anhydrase. The therapeutic efficacy of these compounds was further validated in long-term experiments on mdx mice, the mouse model of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy. Mice were treated for 120 days with food containing methazolamide or dichlorphenamide at two doses each. Musculus tibialis anterior and diaphragm muscles were histologically analyzed and isometric muscle force was measured in M. extensor digitorum longus. Both substances increased the tetanic muscle force in the treated M. extensor digitorum longus muscle group, dichlorphenamide increased the force significantly by 30%, but both drugs failed to increase resistance of muscle fibres to eccentric contractions. Histological analysis revealed a reduction of centrally nucleated fibers in M. tibialis anterior and diaphragm in the treated groups. These studies further demonstrated that a C. elegans-based screen coupled with a mouse model validation strategy can lead to the identification of potential pharmacological agents for rare diseases.

  20. Eccentric contractions disrupt FKBP12 content in mouse skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Cory W; Rogers, Russell G; Gahlot, Nidhi; Ingalls, Christopher P

    2014-07-16

    Strength deficits associated with eccentric contraction-induced muscle injury stem, in part, from impaired voltage-gated sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+) release. FKBP12 is a 12-kD immunophilin known to bind to the SR Ca(2+) release channel (ryanodine receptor, RyR1) and plays an important role in excitation-contraction coupling. To assess the effects of eccentric contractions on FKBP12 content, we measured anterior crural muscle (tibialis anterior [TA], extensor digitorum longus [EDL], extensor hallucis longus muscles) strength and FKBP12 content in pellet and supernatant fractions after centrifugation via immunoblotting from mice before and after a single bout of either 150 eccentric or concentric contractions. There were no changes in peak isometric torque or FKBP12 content in TA muscles after concentric contractions. However, FKBP12 content was reduced in the pelleted fraction immediately after eccentric contractions, and increased in the soluble protein fraction 3 day after injury induction. FKBP12 content was correlated (P = 0.025; R(2) = 0.38) to strength deficits immediately after injury induction. In summary, eccentric contraction-induced muscle injury is associated with significant alterations in FKBP12 content after injury, and is correlated with changes in peak isometric torque.