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Sample records for abdus salam ictp

  1. FOREWORD: International Workshop on Theoretical Plasma Physics: Modern Plasma Science. Sponsored by the Abdus Salam ICTP, Trieste, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, P. K.; Stenflo, L.

    2005-01-01

    The "International Workshop on Theoretical Plasma Physics: Modern Plasma Science was held at the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics (Abdus Salam ICTP), Trieste, Italy during the period 5 16 July 2004. The workshop was organized by P K Shukla, R Bingham, S M Mahajan, J T Mendonça, L Stenflo, and others. The workshop enters into a series of previous biennial activities that we have held at the Abdus Salam ICTP since 1989. The scientific program of the workshop was split into two parts. In the first week, most of the lectures dealt with problems concerning astrophysical plasmas, while in the second week, diversity was introduced in order to address the important role of plasma physics in modern areas of science and technology. Here, attention was focused on cross-disciplinary topics including Schrödinger-like models, which are common in plasma physics, nonlinear optics, quantum engineering (Bose-Einstein condensates), and nonlinear fluid mechanics, as well as emerging topics in fundamental theoretical and computational plasma physics, space and dusty plasma physics, laser-plasma interactions, etc. The workshop was attended by approximately hundred-twenty participants from the developing countries, Europe, USA, and Japan. A large number of participants were young researchers from both the developing and industrial countries, as the directors of the workshop tried to keep a good balance in inviting senior and younger generations of theoretical, computational and experimental plasma physicists to our Trieste activities. In the first week, there were extensive discussions on the physics of electromagnetic wave emissions from pulsar magnetospheres, relativistic magnetohydrodynamics of astrophysical objects, different scale sizes turbulence and structures in astrophysics. The scientific program of the second week included five review talks (60 minutes) and about thirty invited topical lectures (30 minutes). In addition, during the two weeks, there

  2. FOREWORD: International Workshop on Theoretical Plasma Physics: Modern Plasma Science. Sponsored by the Abdus Salam ICTP, Trieste, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, P. K.; Stenflo, L.

    2005-01-01

    The "International Workshop on Theoretical Plasma Physics: Modern Plasma Science was held at the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics (Abdus Salam ICTP), Trieste, Italy during the period 5 16 July 2004. The workshop was organized by P K Shukla, R Bingham, S M Mahajan, J T Mendonça, L Stenflo, and others. The workshop enters into a series of previous biennial activities that we have held at the Abdus Salam ICTP since 1989. The scientific program of the workshop was split into two parts. In the first week, most of the lectures dealt with problems concerning astrophysical plasmas, while in the second week, diversity was introduced in order to address the important role of plasma physics in modern areas of science and technology. Here, attention was focused on cross-disciplinary topics including Schrödinger-like models, which are common in plasma physics, nonlinear optics, quantum engineering (Bose-Einstein condensates), and nonlinear fluid mechanics, as well as emerging topics in fundamental theoretical and computational plasma physics, space and dusty plasma physics, laser-plasma interactions, etc. The workshop was attended by approximately hundred-twenty participants from the developing countries, Europe, USA, and Japan. A large number of participants were young researchers from both the developing and industrial countries, as the directors of the workshop tried to keep a good balance in inviting senior and younger generations of theoretical, computational and experimental plasma physicists to our Trieste activities. In the first week, there were extensive discussions on the physics of electromagnetic wave emissions from pulsar magnetospheres, relativistic magnetohydrodynamics of astrophysical objects, different scale sizes turbulence and structures in astrophysics. The scientific program of the second week included five review talks (60 minutes) and about thirty invited topical lectures (30 minutes). In addition, during the two weeks, there

  3. Abdus Salam at Imperial College

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kibble, Tom

    2008-07-01

    It is a privilege, as well as a great pleasure, for me to talk about Abdus Salam at Imperial College. He is someone to whom I owe a great personal debt. I have always felt that I was very fortunate to have found myself joining his group in 1959, less than three years after he first set it up. It was a very exciting place to be, and a very exciting time in theoretical physics.

  4. The remarkable life of Abdus Salam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moffat, John W.

    2008-12-01

    Gordon Fraser's biography Cosmic Anger: Abdus Salam - The First Muslim Nobel Scientist is a fascinating account of the complex man who shared the 1979 Nobel Prize for Physics with Sheldon Glashow and Steven Weinberg for their work on unifying electromagnetic and weak interactions - the so-called electroweak theory.

  5. ICTP appoints new director

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dacey, James

    2009-11-01

    Fernando Quevedo of the University of Cambridge in the UK has been appointed as the new director of the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP) in Trieste, Italy. Quevedo will officially begin his new role this month and replaces Katepalli Sreenivasan, the India-born physicist who has led the institute since 2003.

  6. ICTP-IAEA Workshop on Dense Magnetized Plasma and Plasma Diagnostics: an executive summary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gribkov, V. A.; Mank, G.; Markowicz, A.; Miklaszewski, R.; Tuniz, C.; Crespo, M. L.

    2011-12-01

    The Workshop on Dense Magnetized Plasma and Plasma Diagnostics was held from 15 to 26 November 2010 at the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP), Trieste, Italy. It was attended by 60 participants, including 15 lecturers, 2 tutors and 37 trainees, representing 25 countries.

  7. Salam's independence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraser, Gordon

    2009-01-01

    In his kind review of my biography of the Nobel laureate Abdus Salam (December 2008 pp45-46), John W Moffat wrongly claims that Salam had "independently thought of the idea of parity violation in weak interactions".

  8. Remembering Salam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durrani, Saeed; Duff, Michael; Adams, Bob

    2009-09-01

    I read with great interest Gordon Fraser's feature article on Abdus Salam and Srinivasa Ramanujan ("A tale of two minds" August pp32-35). I knew Salam very well. He was not only the external examiner for my PhD at Cambridge (1958) but had been talent-spotted by my greatuncle, Hakeem Muhammad Hussain, a great educationist of undivided India and the then-principal of the Government College Jhang, Salam's first alma mater.

  9. The ICTP-Elettra X-ray laboratory for cultural heritage and archaeology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuniz, C.; Bernardini, F.; Cicuttin, A.; Crespo, M. L.; Dreossi, D.; Gianoncelli, A.; Mancini, L.; Mendoza Cuevas, A.; Sodini, N.; Tromba, G.; Zanini, F.; Zanolli, C.

    2013-05-01

    A set of portable/transportable X-ray analytical instruments based on radiography, microtomography, fluorescence and diffraction have been built and are being operated at the Multidisciplinary Laboratory (MLAB) of the 'Abdus Salam' International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP) in collaboration with Elettra-Sincrotrone Trieste. This is part of a project funded by the Region Friuli Venezia Giulia (Italy) and the ICTP, which aims to develop innovative X-ray analytical tools for noninvasive studies of cultural heritage objects and palaeontological remains. The X-ray instruments at MLAB are also used for hands-on training activities involving students and scientists from developing countries. The MLAB analytical tools complement the microtomography instruments available at Elettra-Sincrotrone Trieste. Examples of our first studies in archaeological and palaeontological applications are presented here.

  10. In Memoriam:. Abdus Salam (1926-1996)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stelle, K. S.

    2008-07-01

    The 20th century has been one in which the science of physics has made tremendous progress, starting with the two great conceptual revolutions of Relativity (1905/1915) and Quantum Mechanics (1925). At the same time, however, entirely new domains of physical phenomena have been discovered and explored. These new domains have themselves also provided the tools for exploration, namely radioactive emissions, cosmic rays, and particle accelerators. Molecules, atoms, nuclei, particles, quarks -- layer after layer of matter has been revealed and understood. Great new questions, however, have thus also emerged: What are these various constituents, at each level, why just these -- and what are the forces acting between them, how are they induced, how do they depend on the constituents' mutual distances and velocities? The answer is given, at each level, in terms of such relevant parameters; yet it is, in fact, a collective "effective" force, really the integrated sum of forces at the level of the next immediate layer and its corresponding constituents. Thus, the most important and the most interesting description would be a reduction down to the "fundamental" layer, if there be one...

  11. Conference Salam/Musset

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2011-04-25

    Le DG L.Van Hove introduit le Prof. A.Salam né en 1926 dans l'ouest du Pakistan, un des gagnants du prix nobel de physique de cette année. Célébration de ses contributions théoriques mondialement connues. Après chaque discours, un petit historique est présenté par Paul Musset. Mention honorable aussi pour l'expérience Gargamelle et ses collaborateurs.

  12. The International Centre for Theoretical Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, Faheem

    2008-07-01

    This talk traces in brief the genesis of the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste, as one of Prof. Abdus Salam's major achievements. It outlines why Salam felt the necessity for establishing such a centre to help physicists in the developing world. It situates the founding of the Centre within Salam's broader vision of the causes of underdevelopment and of science as an engine for scientific, technological, economic and social development. The talk reviews the successes and failures of the ICTP and gives a brief overall view of the current status of the Centre.

  13. Emeritus trio scoops the 2013 Dirac Medal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dacey, James

    2013-09-01

    The 2013 Dirac Medal has been awarded to three scientists whose wide-ranging work has brought profound advances in cosmology, astrophysics and fundamental physics. Thomas Kibble, James Peebles and Martin Rees all receive the honour, which is bestowed annually by the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP) in Trieste, Italy.

  14. Evaluation of Salivary Levels of Pyridinoline Cross Linked Carboxyterminal Telopeptide of Type I Collagen (ICTP) in Periodontal Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Debasish; Gopalakrishnan, Sivaram; Arun, K.V.; Kumar, Tirunveli Saravanan Subu; Devanathan, Santosh

    2015-01-01

    Background Traditional parameters (Pocket depth, bleeding on probing, clinical attachment loss, radiographic findings) have been used for a long time for the assessment of periodontal disease conditions. However, these parameters only indicate towards the periodontal damage that has already taken place but do not give any idea regarding the current status of the periodontal health or disease. Hence, the present study is aimed at evaluating the concentration of the bone biomarker ICTP in saliva, which can give a better real time assessment of periodontal health and disease. Materials and Methods Forty three patients were selected and divided into three groups based on the recorded clinical parameters of probing pocket depth, attachment loss and bleeding on probing. Group I (Healthy, n = 11), Group II (Gingivitis, n = 17), Group III (Periodontitis. n = 15). Salivary samples were collected before scaling and root planning to avoid contamination by blood. ICTP levels were evaluated in the salivary samples by using enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Statistical analysis used Kruskal Wallis test was used to compare the mean ICTP level of the three groups. Results ICTP was detected in all the samples. Highest mean ICTP concentrations in saliva were obtained for group III (periodontitis group) and the lowest mean ICTP concentrations were seen in group I (healthy group). This suggests that the level of ICTP in saliva increases proportionally from periodontal health to diseased conditions (gingivitis & periodontitis). Conclusion There is a substantial increase in the salivary concentration of ICTP in chronic periodontitis patients than in gingivitis and healthy patients. Salivary ICTP levels were the maximum in chronic periodontitis patients followed by gingivitis patients and the least in healthy individuals. ICTP may be considered as a biomarker in periodontal disease progression. PMID:26501013

  15. Minimal Pati-Salam model from string theory unification

    SciTech Connect

    Dent, James B.; Kephart, Thomas W.

    2008-06-01

    We provide what we believe is the minimal three family N=1 SUSY and conformal Pati-Salam model from type IIB superstring theory. This Z{sub 3} orbifolded AdS x S{sup 5} model has long lived protons and has potential phenomenological consequences for LHC (Large Hadron Collider)

  16. Departure from Weinberg-Salam model and grandunification

    SciTech Connect

    Deshpande, N.G.

    1980-01-01

    The spontaneous breaking of grandunified groups like SO(10) or SU(8) x SU(8) can lead to an extra U(1) group beyond Weinberg-Salam (W-S) SU(2) x U(1). Neutral current data are now shown to depend on two more parameters. The data are examined and limits are put on the mass of the extra Z boson. Need for more experiments on parity violation effects in atoms is stressed. 2 figures, 1 table.

  17. Fundamental of a Planar Type of Inductively Coupled Thermal Plasma (ICTP) on a Substrate for a Large-area Materials Processings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suantial, Maikai; Akao, Mika; Irie, Hiromitsu; Maruyama, Yuji; Tanaka, Yasunori; Uesugi, Yoshihiko; Ishijima, Tatsuo; Kanazawa University Team

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, the fundamental of a planar type Ar inductively coupled thermal plasmas (ICTP) with oxygen molecular gas have been studied on a substrate. Previously, we have developed a planar-ICTP torch with a rectangular quartz vessel with an air core coil or a ferrite core coil instead of a cylindrical tube for a large-area materials processing. For adoption of such a planar-ICTP to material processings, it needs to sustain the ICTP with molecular gases on a substrate stably. To consider the uniformity of the ICTP formed on the substrate, spectroscopic observation was carried out at 3 mm above the substrate. Results showed that the radiation intensities of specified O atomic lines were almost uniformly detected along the surface of the substrate. This means that O excited atoms, which are important radicals for thermal plasma oxidation, are present in planar-ICTP uniformly on the substrate.

  18. PREFACE: 2nd International Symposium "Optics and its Applications"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvo, Maria L.; Dolganova, Irina N.; Gevorgyan, Narine; Guzman, Angela; Papoyan, Aram; Sarkisyan, Hayk; Yurchenko, Stanislav

    2016-01-01

    The ICTP smr2633: 2nd International Symposium "Optics and its Applications" (OPTICS-2014) http://indico.ictp.it/event/a13253/ was held in Yerevan and Ashtarak, Armenia, on 1-5 September 2014. The Symposium was organized by the Abdus Salam International Center for Theoretical Physics (ICTP) with the collaboration of the SPIE Armenian Student Chapter, the Armenian TC of ICO, the Russian-Armenian University (RAU), the Institute for Physical Research of the National Academy of Sciences of Armenia (IPR of NAS), the Greek-Armenian industrial company LT-Pyrkal, and the Yerevan State University (YSU). The Symposium was co-organized by the BMSTU SPIE & OSA student chapters. The International Symposium OPTICS-2014 was dedicated to the 50th anniversary of the Abdus Salam International Center for Theoretical Physics. This symposium "Optics and its Applications" was the First Official ICTP Scientific Event in Armenia. The presentations at OPTICS-2014 were centered on these topics: optical properties of nanostructures; quantum optics & information; singular optics and its applications; laser spectroscopy; strong field optics; nonlinear & ultrafast optics; photonics & fiber optics; optics of liquid crystals; and mathematical methods in optics.

  19. One Year of ICTP Diploma Courses On-Line Using the Automated EyA Recording System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canessa, Enrique; Fonda, Carlo; Zennaro, Marco

    2009-01-01

    The 12-month pre-Ph.D. ICTP Diploma Courses in the fields of Condensed Matter Physics, High Energy Physics, Mathematics, Earth System Physics and Basics Physics have been recorded using the automated, low cost recording system called EyA developed in-house. We discuss the technical details on how these recordings were implemented, together with…

  20. Pati-Salam version of subcritical hybrid inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryant, B. Charles; Raby, Stuart

    2016-05-01

    In this paper we present a model of subcritical hybrid inflation with a Pati-Salam (PS) symmetry group. Both the inflaton and waterfall fields contribute to the necessary e -foldings of inflation, while only the waterfall field spontaneously breaks PS hence monopoles produced during inflation are diluted during the inflationary epoch. The model is able to produce a tensor-to-scalar ratio, r <0.09 consistent with the latest BICEP2/Keck and Planck data, as well as scalar density perturbations and spectral index, ns, consistent with Planck data. For particular values of the parameters, we find r =0.084 and ns=0.0963 . The energy density during inflation is directly related to the PS breaking scale, vPS. The model also incorporates a Z4R symmetry which can resolve the μ problem and suppress dimension 5 operators for proton decay, leaving over an exact R parity. Finally the model allows for a complete three-family extension with a D4 family symmetry which reproduces low energy precision electroweak and LHC data.

  1. Landau problem in noncommutative quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayipjamal, Dulat; Li, Kang

    2008-02-01

    The Landau problem in non-commutative quantum mechanics (NCQM) is studied. First by solving the Schrödinger equations on noncommutative (NC) space we obtain the Landau energy levels and the energy correction that is caused by space-space noncommutativity. Then we discuss the noncommutative phase space case, namely, space-space and momentum-momentum non-commutative case, and we get the explicit expression of the Hamiltonian as well as the corresponding eigenfunctions and eigenvalues. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (10465004, 10665001, 10575026) and Abdus Salam ICTP, Trieste, Italy

  2. Sensitivity of ICTP Regional Climate Model (RegCM3) to Initial and Lateral Boundary Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadeem, I.; Formayer, H.

    2009-04-01

    Regional climate simulations require lateral boundary conditions. These are typically reanalysis of past observations or alternatively, output from climate general circulation models. Lateral boundary conditions are available at various temporal and spatial resolutions. At present, spatial resolution of reanalysis datasets ranges from few kilometers, for example, regional reanalysis limited to only single continent, to the coarser but global datasets like ECMWF 40 Years Re-Analysis. While these datasets represent reasonable analyses of 3-D atmospheric as well as surface conditions, their resolutions, the physics of the models used to generate them, and the means of assimilating data into them can produce very different results when used as boundary conditions for regional climate models. The sensitivity of ICTP Regional Climate Model (RegCM3) to different lateral boundary conditions was investigated over the Alpine region. The model was run directly at 10km horizontal resolution as well as in one-way double nested mode, with a 30 km grid point spacing mother domain encompassing the Europe and a 10 km grid point spacing nested domain covering the Alpine Region. The simulations spans the one-year period of 1989. The boundary conditions used for various simulations were ECMWF Interim Re-Analysis (ERA-Interim, 0.75° and 1.5° grid spacings, 6-h intervals), the ECMWF 40 Years Re-Analysis (ERA40, 1° and 2.5° grid spacings, 6-h interval) and finally the 2.5°, 6-h NCEP/DOE AMIP-II Reanalysis (Reanalysis-2). Sea Surface Temperature for the simulated periods were obtained from a UK Met Office Global Ocean Surface Temperature (GISST), a set of SST data in monthly 1° area grids. When recently released ERA-Interim Reanalysis, which is based on a recent release of the Integrated Forecasting System (IFS Cy31r2) containing many improvements both in the forecasting model and analysis methodology, was used as lateral and boundary conditions, the simulated precipitation field

  3. Pati-Salam unification from noncommutative geometry and the TeV-scale WR boson

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aydemir, Ufuk; Minic, Djordje; Sun, Chen; Takeuchi, Tatsu

    2016-01-01

    We analyze the compatibility of the unified left-right symmetric Pati-Salam models motivated by noncommutative geometry and the TeV-scale right-handed W boson suggested by recent LHC data. We find that the unification/matching conditions place conflicting demands on the symmetry breaking scales and that generating the required WR mass and coupling is nontrivial.

  4. International Reference Ionosphere (IRI): Task Force Activity 2000

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilitza, D.

    2000-01-01

    The annual IRI Task Force Activity was held at the Abdus Salam International Center for Theoretical Physics in Trieste, Italy from July 10 to July 14. The participants included J. Adeniyi (University of Ilorin, Nigeria), D. Bilitza (NSSDC/RITSS, USA), D. Buresova (Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Czech Republic), B. Forte (ICTP, Italy), R. Leitinger (University of Graz, Austria), B. Nava (ICTP, Italy), M. Mosert (University National Tucuman, Argentina), S. Pulinets (IZMIRAN, Russia), S. Radicella (ICTP, Italy), and B. Reinisch (University of Mass. Lowell, USA). The main topic of this Task Force Activity was the modeling of the topside ionosphere and the development of strategies for modeling of ionospheric variability. Each day during the workshop week the team debated a specific modeling problem in the morning during informal presentations and round table discussions of all participants. Ways of resolving the specific modeling problem were devised and tested in the afternoon in front of the computers of the ICTP Aeronomy and Radiopropagation Laboratory using ICTP s computer networks and internet access.

  5. FOREWORD: International Topical Workshop on Plasma Physics: Coherent Processes in Nonlinear Media. Sponsored by the ICTP (Trieste) and the European Union (Brussels)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, P. K.; Bingham, R.; Stenflo, L.; Dawson, J. M.

    1996-01-01

    Starting in 1989 we have created a forum at the International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste, where scientists from different parts of the world can meet and exchange information in the frontier areas of physics. In the three previous meetings, we focused on large amplitude waves and fields in plasmas, the physics of dusty plasmas, and wave-particle interactions and energization in plasmas. In 1995, we came up with a fresh idea of organizing somewhat enlarged but still well focused research topics that are cross-disciplinary. Thus, the usual 'fourth-week activity' of the Plasma Physics College at the ICTP was replaced by an International Topical Workshop on Plasma Physics: Coherent Processes in Nonlinear Media, which was held at the ICTP during the period 16-20 October, 1995. This provided us an opportunity to draw eminent speakers from many closely related fields such as plasma physics, fluid dynamics, nonlinear optics, and astrophysics. The Workshop was attended by 82 delegates from 34 countries, and the participation from the industrial and the developing countries was about half each. The programme included 4 review and 29 topical invited lectures. In addition, about 30 contributed papers were presented as posters in two sessions. The latter were created in order to give opportunities to younger physicists for displaying the results of their recent work and to obtain constructive comments from the other participants. During the five days at the ICTP, we focused on almost all the various aspects of nonlinear phenomena that are common in different branches of science. The review and topical lectures as well as the posters dealt with the most recent advances in coherent nonlinear processes in space and astrophysical plasmas, in fluids and optics, in low temperature dusty plasmas, as well as in laser produced and magnetically confined laboratory plasmas. The focus was on the physics of various types of waves and their generation mechanisms, the development

  6. Unification of inflation, dark energy, and dark matter within the Salam-Sezgin cosmological model

    SciTech Connect

    Henriques, Alfredo B.; Potting, Robertus; Sa, Paulo M.

    2009-05-15

    We investigate a cosmological model, based on the Salam-Sezgin six-dimensional supergravity theory and on previous work by Anchordoqui, Goldberg, Nawata, and Nunez. Assuming a period of warm inflation, we show that it is possible to extend the evolution of the model back in time, to include the inflationary period, thus unifying inflation, dark matter, and dark energy within a single framework. Like the previous authors, we were not able to obtain the full dark matter content of the universe from the Salam-Sezgin scalar fields. However, even if only partially successful, this work shows that present-day theories, based on superstrings and supergravity, may eventually lead to a comprehensive modeling of the evolution of the universe. We find that the gravitational-wave spectrum of the model has a nonconstant negative slope in the frequency range (10{sup -15}-10{sup 6}) rad/s, and that, unlike standard (cold) inflation models, it shows no structure in the MHz/GHz range of frequencies.

  7. Neutrino emission by the pair, plasma, and photo processes in the Weinberg-Salam model

    SciTech Connect

    Schinder, P.J.; Schramm, D.N.; Witta, P.J.; Margolis, S.H.; Tubbs, D.L.

    1986-06-01

    The results of numerical integrations of the rates and emissivities of the photo, pair, and plasma neutrino emission mechanisms in the Weinberg-Salam theory of the weak interaction are presented. The range of densities 10 gm cm/sup -3/ less than or equal to rho < 10/sup 14/ gm cm/sup -3/ and the temperature range 10/sup 8/K less than or equal to T less than or equal to 10/sup 11/K are considered. Fitting formulae, similar to those provided by Beaudet, Petrosian, and Salpeter, which reproduce the numerical result for the total emissivity to within 20% in the temperature range 10/sup 8.2/K less than or equal to T less than or equal to 10/sup 11/K are presented. 24 refs., 21 figs., 1 tab.

  8. The development and application of k0-standardization method of neutron activation analysis at Es-Salam research reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alghem, L.; Ramdhane, M.; Khaled, S.; Akhal, T.

    2006-01-01

    In recent years the k0-NAA method has been applied and developed at the 15 MW Es-Salam research reactor, which includes: (1) the detection efficiency calibration of γ-spectrometer used in k0-NAA, (2) the determination of reactor neutron spectrum parameters such as α and f factors in the irradiation channel, and (3) the validation of the developed k0-NAA procedure by analysing SRM, namely AIEA-Soil7 and CRM, namely IGGE-GSV4. The analysis results obtained by k0-NAA with 27 elements of Soil-7 standard and 14 elements of GSV-4 standard were compared with certified values. The analysis results showed that the deviations between experimental and certified values were mostly less than 10%. The k0-NAA procedure established at Es-Salam research reactor has been regarded as a reliable standardization method of NAA and as available for practical applications.

  9. Unification of Fundamental Forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salam, Abdus; Taylor, Foreword by John C.

    2005-10-01

    Foreword John C. Taylor; 1. Unification of fundamental forces Abdus Salam; 2. History unfolding: an introduction to the two 1968 lectures by W. Heisenberg and P. A. M. Dirac Abdus Salam; 3. Theory, criticism, and a philosophy Werner Heisenberg; 4. Methods in theoretical physics Paul Adrian Maurice Dirac.

  10. A Journal of travel of an astrophysicist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaina, Alex B.

    2015-06-01

    The authors is descibing personal impressions from a number of scientific conferences took between 1993 and 1998 in Trieste (ICTP,with the participation of 2 Nobel Laureats Winners: Professor Abdus Salam (1926-1996) and Professor Gert t'Hooft), Catania astrophysical Observatory and University (1995-JENAM 1995), Athens Observatory and University (1996-Wide Field Spectroscopy), Prague Technicke Museum (1996- Symposium "Mysterium Cosmographicum"),Prague technical University (1998 -JENAM 1998),which in fact contained also a trip to Nicolaus Copernicus Astronomical Center in Torun (Poland). Besides,some details on trips through Ukraine, Poland, Serbia, where a kind meeting with astronomers from Belgrade took place in 1995, former Yugoslav Countries: Monetnegro, Slovenija and Croatia, Bulgaria, where another meeting with physicists from the Academy of Sciences of Bulgaria took place has been given also.

  11. Impacts of Climate Change on the Climate Extremes of the Middle East

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turp, M. Tufan; Collu, Kamil; Deler, F. Busra; Ozturk, Tugba; Kurnaz, M. Levent

    2016-04-01

    The Middle East is one of the most vulnerable regions to the impacts of climate change. Because of the importance of the region and its vulnerability to global climate change, the studies including the investigation of projected changes in the climate of the Middle East play a crucial role in order to struggle with the negative effects of climate change. This research points out the relationship between the climate change and climate extremes indices in the Middle East and it investigates the changes in the number of extreme events as described by the joint CCl/CLIVAR/JCOMM Expert Team (ET) on Climate Change Detection and Indices (ETCCDI). As part of the study, the regional climate model (RegCM4.4) of the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP) is run to obtain future projection data. This research has been supported by Boǧaziçi University Research Fund Grant Number 10421.

  12. Evaluation and analysis of RegCM3 simulated summer rainfall over the Huaihe River Basin of China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zong, Peishu; Wang, Huijun

    2011-06-01

    This study evaluates the ability of the Abdus Salam International Center for Theoretical Physics (ICTP) version 3 Regional Climate Model (RegCM3) in simulating the summer rainfall amount and distribution and large-scale circulation over the Huaihe River basin of China. We conducted the simulation for the period of 1982-2001 and the wet year of 2003 to test the ensemble simulation capacity of RegCM3. First, by comparing the simulated rainfall amount and distribution against the observations, it is found that RegCM3 can reproduce the rainfall pattern and its annual variations. In addition, the simulated spatial patterns of 850-hPa wind and specific humidity fields are close to the observations, although the wind speed and humidity values are larger. Finally, the ensemble simulation of RegCM3 for summer 2003 failed to capture the spatial distribution and underestimated the magnitude of the precipitation anomalies, and the reasons are analyzed.

  13. Active learning in optics and photonics: Fraunhofer diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghalila, H.; Ben Lakhdar, Z.; Lahmar, S.; Dhouaidi, Z.; Majdi, Y.

    2014-07-01

    "Active Learning in Optics and Photonics" (ALOP), funded by UNESCO within its Physics Program framework with the support of ICTP (Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics) and SPIE (Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers), aimed to helps and promotes a friendly and interactive method in teaching optics using simple and inexpensive equipment. Many workshops were organized since 2005 the year when Z. BenLakhdar, whom is part of the creators of ALOP, proposed this project to STO (Société Tunisienne d'Optique). These workshops address several issues in optics, covering geometrical optics, wave optics, optical communication and they are dedicated to both teachers and students. We focus this lecture on Fraunhofer diffraction emphasizing the facility to achieve this mechanism in classroom, using small laser and operating a slit in a sheet of paper. We accompany this demonstration using mobile phone and numerical modeling to assist in the analysis of the diffraction pattern figure.

  14. Way-out to the gravitino problem in intersecting D-brane Pati-Salam models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Addazi, Andrea; Khlopov, Maxim Yu

    2016-06-01

    We discuss the gravitino problem in the context of the exotic see-saw mechanism for neutrinos and leptogenesis, UV completed by intersecting D-branes Pati-Salam models. In the exotic see-saw model, supersymmetry is broken at high scales MSUSY > 109 GeV and this seems in contradiction with gravitino bounds from inflation and baryogenesis. However, if gravitino is the lightest stable supersymmetric particle, it will not decay into other SUSY particles, avoiding the gravitino problem and providing a good cold dark matter (CDM). Gravitini are super heavy dark particles and they can be produced by non-adiabatic expansion during inflation. Intriguingly, from bounds on the correct abundance of dark matter (DM), we also constrain the neutrino sector. We set a limit on the exotic instantonic coupling of < 10‑2-10‑3. This also sets constrains on the Calabi-Yau compactifications and on the string scale. This model strongly motivates very high energy DM indirect detection of neutrini and photons of 1011-1013 GeV: gravitini can decay on them in a cosmological time because of soft R-parity breaking effective operators.

  15. MAP, MAC, and vortex-rings configurations in the Weinberg-Salam model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teh, Rosy; Ng, Ban-Loong; Wong, Khai-Ming

    2015-11-01

    We report on the presence of new axially symmetric monopoles, antimonopoles and vortex-rings solutions of the SU(2)×U(1) Weinberg-Salam model of electromagnetic and weak interactions. When the ϕ-winding number n = 1, and 2, the configurations are monopole-antimonopole pair (MAP) and monopole-antimonopole chain (MAC) with poles of alternating sign magnetic charge arranged along the z-axis. Vortex-rings start to appear from the MAP and MAC configurations when the winding number n = 3. The MAP configurations possess zero net magnetic charge whereas the MAC configurations possess net magnetic charge of 4 πn / e. In the MAP configurations, the monopole-antimonopole pair is bounded by the Z0 field flux string and there is an electromagnetic current loop encircling it. The monopole and antimonopole possess magnetic charges ± 4πn/e sin2θW respectively. In the MAC configurations there is no string connecting the monopole and the adjacent antimonopole and they possess magnetic charges ± 4 πn/e respectively. The MAC configurations possess infinite total energy and zero magnetic dipole moment whereas the MAP configurations which are actually sphalerons possess finite total energy and magnetic dipole moment. The configurations were investigated for varying values of Higgs self-coupling constant 0 ≤ λ ≤ 40 at Weinberg angle θW = π/4.

  16. How to approach continuum physics in the lattice Weinberg-Salam model

    SciTech Connect

    Zubkov, M. A.

    2010-11-01

    We investigate the lattice Weinberg-Salam model without fermions numerically for the realistic choice of coupling constants correspondent to the value of the Weinberg angle {theta}{sub W{approx}}30 deg., and bare fine structure constant around {alpha}{approx}(1/150). We consider the values of the scalar self-coupling corresponding to Higgs mass M{sub H{approx}}100, 150, 270 GeV. It has been found that nonperturbative effects become important while approaching continuum physics within the lattice model. When the ultraviolet cutoff {Lambda}=({pi}/a) (where a is the lattice spacing) is increased and achieves the value around 1 TeV, one encounters the fluctuational region (on the phase diagram of the lattice model), where the fluctuations of the scalar field become strong. The classical Nambu monopole can be considered as an embryo of the unphysical symmetric phase within the physical phase. In the fluctuational region quantum Nambu monopoles are dense, and therefore, the use of the perturbation expansion around the trivial vacuum in this region is limited. Further increase of the cutoff is accompanied by a transition to the region of the phase diagram, where the scalar field is not condensed (this happens at the value of {Lambda} around 1.4 TeV for the considered lattice sizes). Within this region further increase of the cutoff is possible, although we do not observe this in detail due to the strong fluctuations of the gauge boson correlator. Both above mentioned regions look unphysical. Therefore we come to the conclusion that the maximal value of the cutoff admitted within lattice electroweak theory cannot exceed the value of the order of 1 TeV.

  17. Majorana fermions in condensed-matter physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leggett, A. J.

    2016-06-01

    It is an honor and a pleasure to have been invited to give a talk in this conference celebrating the memory of the late Professor Abdus Salam. To my regret, I did not know Professor Salam personally, but I am very aware of his work and of his impact on my area of specialization, condensed matter physics, both intellectually through his ideas on spontaneously broken symmetry and more practically through his foundation of the ICTP. Since I assume that most of this audience are not specialized in condensed-matter physics, I thought I would talk about one topic which to some extent bridges this field and the particle-physics interests of Salam, namely Majorana fermions (M.F.s). However, as we shall see, the parallels which are often drawn in the current literature may be a bit too simplistic. I will devote most of this talk to a stripped-down exposition of the current orthodoxy concerning M.F.s. in condensed-matter physics and their possible applications to topological quantum computing (TQC), and then at the end briefly indicate why I believe this orthodoxy may be seriously misleading.

  18. Use of starter cultures of dairy origin in the production of Salame nostrano, an Italian dry-cured sausage.

    PubMed

    Cenci-Goga, B T; Ranucci, D; Miraglia, D; Cioffi, A

    2008-04-01

    The aim of this study was the evaluation of the use of selected lactic acid bacteria (LAB) starter culture of dairy origin in the production of low-acid fermented sausages (Salame nostrano) produced in a small-scale plant in Umbria (Italy), and their effect on microbiological, physico-chemical and sensorial properties of the products. Salame nostrano was obtained with two different technological processes: with and without the addition of selected LAB starter cultures. Microbial counts of safety indicators were lower in salami made with the addition of starter cultures. Pathogens after the first week of ripening were only detected from salami made without the addition of starter cultures. Control salami were rated as paler and harder, whereas those made with the addition of starter cultures as slightly saltier, juicier and in general more acceptable. Selected dairy-origin starter (SDS) cultures did prevent the growth of safety indicators, greatly reduced the rate of isolation of pathogens and increased the acceptability of full-ripened salami. PMID:22062456

  19. Monitoring the Digital Divide

    SciTech Connect

    Cottrell, Les

    2003-05-28

    It is increasingly important to support the large numbers of scientists working in remote areas and having low bandwidth access to the Internet. This will continue to be the case for years to come since there is evidence from PingER performance measurements that the, so-called, digital divide is not decreasing. In this work, we review the collaborative work of The Abdus Salam International Center for Theoretical Physics (ICTP) in Trieste, a leading organization promoting science dissemination in the developing world- and SLAC in Stanford, to monitor by PingER, Universities and Research Institutions all over the developing world following the recent ''Recommendations of Trieste'' to help bridge the digital divide. As a result, PingER's deployment now covers the real-time monitoring of worldwide Internet performance and, in particular, West and Central Africa for the first time. We report on the results from the ICTP sites and quantitatively identify regions with poor performance, identify trends, discuss experiences and future work.

  20. Impact of the Aerosol Direct Radiative Forcing on the Asian summer monsoon using ICTP-Regional Climate Model (RegCM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakey, Ashraf; Giorgi, Filippo; Bi, Xunqiang

    2010-05-01

    The direct radiative forcing of aerosol over Asia play a significant impact on climate. Eleven types of aerosols (Anthropogenic, Biogenic and Natural sources) are implemented into Aerosol Module in ICTP-Regional Climate Model framework, these aerosols are Black Carbon (hydrophobic and hydrophilic), Organic Carbon (hydrophobic and hydrophilic), Sulfate, Sea-Salt (fine and accumulation modes), and dust (4-size bins). The results shown that during five year study 2002-2006, the surface radiative forcing is about -160 W/m2 over the western part of China and -20 W/m2 over the eastern part. This cooling of the surface radiative forcing reduced the temperature from -3.5C to -3.0C over the western part and eastern part of China, respectively. Surface cooling (1.5C) is recorded over India as well. Negative impact in Wind speed values are decreased (- 1.5 m/s) over the eastern part of China, while there is a positive impact over the Tibetan Plateau ( 2 m/s). The most dominant aerosols in the pre-monsoon are dust particles, because during the pre-monsoon season of March-April, dusts from the deserts of western China, and the Middle East are transported into the northern and southern slopes of the Tibetan Plateau causing strong surface cooling in the radiative forcing. Warming effects are noticed in the TOA radiative forcing at the Tibetan Plateau, this because the effects of the 'elevated heat-bump' where the absorption of solar radiation by dust heats up the elevated surface air and then the heated air rises via dry convection creating a positive temperature anomaly in the mid-to-upper troposphere over the Tibetan Plateau relative to the region to the south. No clear event is recorded on precipitation over the continent, but there is increasing is recorded close to the India over the Indian Ocean (3.5 mm ) during December-February (DJF) and March-May (MAM) seasons.

  1. A to Z of the muon anomalous magnetic moment in the MSSM with Pati-Salam at the GUT scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyaev, Alexander S.; Camargo-Molina, José E.; King, Steve F.; Miller, David J.; Morais, António P.; Schaefers, Patrick B.

    2016-06-01

    We analyse the low energy predictions of the minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM) arising from a GUT scale Pati-Salam gauge group further constrained by an A 4 × Z 5 family symmetry, resulting in four soft scalar masses at the GUT scale: one left-handed soft mass m 0 and three right-handed soft masses m 1 , m 2 , m 3, one for each generation. We demonstrate that this model, which was initially developed to describe the neutrino sector, can explain collider and non-collider measurements such as the dark matter relic density, the Higgs boson mass and, in particular, the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon ( g - 2) μ . Since about two decades, ( g - 2) μ suffers a puzzling about 3 σ excessoftheexperimentallymeasuredvalueoverthetheoreticalprediction,whichour model is able to fully resolve. As the consequence of this resolution, our model predicts specific regions of the parameter space with the specific properties including light smuons and neutralinos, which could also potentially explain di-lepton excesses observed by CMS and ATLAS.

  2. Sequential extraction of Cs and Sr from Ain Oussera soils around Es-Salam research reactor facility.

    PubMed

    Bouzidi, Abdelkader; Ararem, Abderrahmane; Imessaoudene, Djillali; Yabrir, Benalia

    2015-10-01

    Four types of undisturbed soil in Ain Oussera region around the Es-Salam reactor facility, located in the south of Algiers, Algeria, at about 200km, were artificially contaminated for one year with stable CsCl and SrCl2 in order to simulate an accidental release of these elements. This study was performed using sequential extraction procedure based on Shultz method and containing six fractions. The selectivity of the extraction protocol was confirmed by analyzing some elements (Ca, C, Fe, Mn, Si and Al) designed as indicators of the targeted phases. The obtained results showed an acceptable reproducibility, in view of the coefficients of variation that were in most cases less than 15%. The results revealed a clear proportional correlation between the extracted Cs and Sr in fractions for each soil and some of soils physicochemical properties. Organic matter appears to play an important role in the soil retention, particularly for Cs where the extracted percentage exceeds to 30% in whole soils. In contrast, strontium expresses a remarkable affinity for the fraction bound to carbonates. The obtained data also indicate that the availability of Cs in the four soils is less important compared to Sr availability. This is illustrated by the higher value of extracted Sr in the easily extractible phase, including the water-soluble and the exchangeable fraction. PMID:26456618

  3. Analysis of Projected Changes in Precipitation Regions of Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbas, Abdullah; Turp, M. Tufan; Ozturk, Tugba; Kurnaz, M. Levent

    2016-04-01

    Classification and clustering are important issues in climatology studies for water management. In this study, we examine the precipitation regions of Turkey with combination of the regional climate model outputs with a hierarchical cluster technique. Therefore, the outputs of the HadGEM2-ES global climate model of the Met Office Hadley Centre were downscaled to 50 km for Turkey via Regional Climate Model (RegCM4.4) of the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP) for the period of 2070 - 2100 with respect to the present period of 1970 - 2000 under two distinct case scenarios (i.e. RCP4.5 and RCP8.5). Thereafter, Ward's method, which is commonly used in climate research, was also performed in order to cluster the precipitation data. In this context, spatial variations in precipitation regions of Turkey were determined for different climate change pathways. This research has been supported by Boǧaziçi University Research Fund Grant Number 10421.

  4. Simulation of Heavy Lake-Effect Snowstorms across the Great Lakes Basin by RegCM4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Notaro, M.; Zarrin, A.; Vavrus, S. J.; Bennington, V.

    2013-12-01

    A historical simulation (1976-2002) of the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics Regional Climate Model Version 4 (ICTP RegCM4), coupled to a one-dimensional lake model, is validated against observed lake ice cover and snowfall across the Great Lakes Basin. The model reproduces the broad temporal and spatial features of both variables in terms of spatial distribution, seasonal cycle, and interannual variability, including climatological characteristics of lake-effect snowfall, although the simulated ice cover is overly extensive largely due to the absence of lake circulations. A definition is introduced for identifying heavy lake-effect snowstorms in regional climate model output for all grid cells in the Great Lakes Basin, using criteria based on location, wind direction, lake ice cover, and snowfall. Simulated heavy lake-effect snowstorms occur most frequently downwind of the Great Lakes, particularly to the east of Lake Ontario and to the east and south of Lake Superior, and are most frequent in December-January. The mechanism for these events is attributed to an anticyclone over the central United States and related cold air outbreak for areas downwind of Lakes Ontario and Erie, in contrast to a nearby cyclone over the Great Lakes Basin and associated cold front for areas downwind of Lakes Superior, Huron, and Michigan. Projections of mid- and late-21st century lake-effect snowstorms in the Great Lakes Basin will be summarized, based on dynamically downscaled CMIP5 (Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase Five) simulations.

  5. THE AIMS AND ACTIVITIES OF THE INTERNATIONAL NETWORK OF NUCLEAR STRUCTURE AND DECAY DATA EVALUATORS.

    SciTech Connect

    NICHOLS,A.L.; TULI, J.K.

    2007-04-22

    International Network of Nuclear Structure and Decay Data (NSDD) Evaluators consists of a number of evaluation groups and data service centers in several countries that appreciate the merits of working together to maintain and ensure the quality and comprehensive content of the ENSDF database (Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File). Biennial meetings of the network are held under the auspices of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to assign evaluation responsibilities, monitor progress, discuss improvements and emerging difficulties, and agree on actions to be undertaken by individual members. The evaluated data and bibliographic details are made available to users via various media, such as the journals ''Nuclear Physics A'' and ''Nuclear Data Sheets'', the World Wide Web, on CD-ROM, wall charts of the nuclides and ''Nuclear Wallet Cards''. While the ENSDF master database is maintained by the US National Nuclear Data Center at the Brookhaven National Laboratory, these data are also available from other nuclear data centers including the IAEA Nuclear Data Section. The Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP), Trieste, Italy, in cooperation with the IAEA, organizes workshops on NSDD at regular intervals. The primary aims of these particular workshops are to provide hands-on training in the data evaluation processes, and to encourage new evaluators to participate in NSDD activities. The technical contents of these NSDD workshops are described, along with the rationale for the inclusion of various topics.

  6. Investigation of the Drought Probabilities over Turkey in a Changing Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turp, M. Tufan; Akbas, Abdullah; Saygili, Sibel; Ozturk, Tugba; Kurnaz, M. Levent

    2016-04-01

    As a consequence of the negative impacts of climate change, Turkey is under risk of an increased drought conditions. In this study, we aim to detect the possible changes in the intensity and frequency of drought conditions and to identify the spatial and temporal distributions of these changes throughout the country. Therefore, firstly the outputs of the MPI-ESM-MR global climate model of the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology were downscaled to 50 km for Turkey via Regional Climate Model (RegCM4.4) of the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP). RCP8.5, which is the worst case emission pathway, is used to make future projection for the period of 2071 - 2100 with respect to the reference period of 1971 - 2000 over Turkey. Thereafter, the Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI) values, which are computed by using monthly precipitation totals data of the model, are obtained and classified for three timescales (i.e. 3-month, 6-month, and 12-month). Lastly, the spatial distribution maps, which determine the changes in drought probabilities over Turkey, are created in order to characterize better the impact of climate change on Turkey's drought patterns. This research has been supported by Boǧaziçi University Research Fund Grant Number 10421.

  7. Analysis of climate projections for the Carpathian Region using dynamical downscaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartholy, Judit; Pongracz, Rita; Pieczka, Ildiko; Andre, Karolina

    2015-04-01

    Hungarian national climate and adaptation strategies have been recently revised, and a National Adaptation Geo-information System (NAGIS) is currently under development. This platform will serve as a central data collection for various end-users, impact researchers, and decision makers on national level in Hungary. In order to satisfy the demands for climate projection inputs within this framework, RegCM4.3 is one of the regional climate models used to provide results for detailed regional scale analysis and specific impact studies. RegCM is a 3-dimensional, sigma-coordinate, primitive equation model, originally developed by Giorgi et al. Currently, it is available from the ICTP (Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics). We have already completed experiments with 50 km horizontal resolution covering both the second half of the past century (1951-2005), and the future (i.e., the 21st century, 2006-2100) using HadGEM2 global model outputs as initial and lateral boundary conditions. The outputs of the 50 km runs drive the further downscaling experiments using 10 km as a horizontal resolution for a smaller domain covering Central Europe with special focus on the Carpathian Region. For the future, RCP4.5 scenario run is analysed in this poster, and moreover, preliminary results of the RCP8.5 scenario run are also presented.

  8. Reduction of future monsoon precipitation over China: comparison between a high resolution RCM simulation and the driving GCM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, X.; Shi, Y.; Song, R.; Giorgi, F.; Wang, Y.; Zhang, D.

    2008-08-01

    Multi-decadal high resolution climate change simulations over East Asia are performed using the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP) Regional Climate Model, RegCM3, nested within the NASA/NCAR global model FvGCM. Two sets of simulations are conducted at 20-km grid spacing for present day and future climate (IPCC A2 scenario). The mean precipitation change during the monsoon season (May to September) over China is analyzed and intercompared between the RegCM and FvGCM. Simulation of the present day precipitation by the RegCM shows a better performance than that of the driving FvGCM in terms of both spatial pattern and amount. The main improvement of the RegCM is the removal of an artificial precipitation center over the eastern edge of the Tibetan Plateau simulated by the FvGCM. The FvGCM simulates a predominant increase of precipitation over the region, whereas the RegCM shows extended areas of decrease. The causes of these differences are investigated and explained in terms of the different topographical forcing on circulation and moisture flux in the two models. We also find that the RegCM-simulated changes are in better agreement with observed precipitation trends over East Asia. It is suggested that high resolution models are needed to better investigate future climate projections over China and East Asia.

  9. Data ingestion into NeQuick 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nava, B.; Radicella, S. M.; Azpilicueta, F.

    2011-12-01

    NeQuick 2 is the latest version of the NeQuick ionosphere electron density model developed at the Aeronomy and Radiopropagation Laboratory of the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP) - Trieste, Italy with the collaboration of the Institute for Geophysics, Astrophysics and Meteorology of the University of Graz, Austria. It is a quick-run model particularly designed for trans-ionospheric propagation applications that has been conceived to reproduce the median behavior of the ionosphere. To provide 3-D specification of the ionosphere electron density for current conditions, different ionosphere electron density retrieval techniques based on the NeQuick adaptation to GPS-derived Total Electron Content (TEC) data and ionosonde measured peak parameters values have been developed. In the present paper the technique based on the ingestion of global vertical TEC map into NeQuick 2 will be validated and an assessment of the capability of the model to reproduce the ionosphere day-to-day variability will also be performed. For this purpose hourly GPS-derived global vertical TEC maps and hourly foF2 values from about 20 ionosondes corresponding to one month in high solar activity and one month in low solar activity period will be used. Furthermore, the first results concerning the ingestion of space-based GPS-derived TEC data will be presented.

  10. Physics in Africa: The Case of Senegal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arame Boye-Faye, Ndeye

    2009-03-01

    For many years, the research activity in Senegal has been managed through the division of the Ministry of Education. In 2004 the current government established a full-fledged Ministry of Research. This has led to a renewed focus on the organization of the funding of research in Senegal. One important issue to underline is the lack of a budget line devoted to research in most of the local institutions, distinct from support for academic purposes. As a result, the research activity is funded through direct support from the government or thanks to international programs. The main tool for the government to support key research directions is the FIRST program, with a yearly budget of 700,000 US. For the last call for projects, up to 12 projects have been funded, which translates to about 58,000 US per project. The other option for research funding lies in different international programs specifically aimed at institutions within the least developed countries. The dominant ones are provided by the French-speaking community, the French-supported AIRE, the European Union framework and ICTP Abdus Salam Centre. In this general context of limited resources, physics is the least supported discipline both in terms of researchers and active laboratories. As a result, particular efforts have to be made to increase the impact of physics and the role of physicists so as to enable them to claim their proper role as the major player in making science and technology the driving forces in the development process of Africa.

  11. Changes in snow cover over China in the 21st century as simulated by a high resolution regional climate model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Ying; Gao, Xuejie; Wu, Jia; Giorgi, Filippo

    2011-10-01

    On the basis of the climate change simulations conducted using a high resolution regional climate model, the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP) Regional Climate Model, RegCM3, at 25 km grid spacing, future changes in snow cover over China are analyzed. The simulations are carried out for the period of 1951-2100 following the IPCC SRES A1B emission scenario. The results suggest good performances of the model in simulating the number of snow cover days and the snow cover depth, as well as the starting and ending dates of snow cover to the present day (1981-2000). Their spatial distributions and amounts show fair consistency between the simulation and observation, although with some discrepancies. In general, decreases in the number of snow cover days and the snow cover depth, together with postponed snow starting dates and advanced snow ending dates, are simulated for the future, except in some places where the opposite appears. The most dramatic changes are found over the Tibetan Plateau among the three major snow cover areas of Northeast, Northwest and the Tibetan Plateau in China.

  12. Simulations of summer monsoon climate over East Asia with a Regional Climate Model (RegCM) using Tiedtke convective parameterization scheme (CPS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Yan

    2013-12-01

    In this study, we implemented the Tiedtke convective parameterization scheme (CPS) into the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP) Regional Climate Model version 3 (RegCM3) and simulated the East Asian Summer Monsoon (EASM) climate. A 6-year experiment was completed, from September 1996 through August 2002, and compared with an analogous experiment employing the Grell CPS option available in RegCM3. The ability of the model to represent the average climatology was investigated. Our results indicate that the Tiedtke CPS shows a generally good performance in describing surface climate and large-scale circulation throughout the summer monsoon period. Compared to the simulation with Grell CPS, the simulation with Tiedtke scheme shows a number of improvements, including a better distribution of summer monsoon precipitation due to a better positioning of the Western Pacific Subtropical High (WPSH) in the middle troposphere and the southwesterly jet in the lower troposphere, and more realistic seasonal evolution of the monsoon precipitation. The cold surface air temperature bias characteristic frequently seen in Grell scheme over this region is also reduced. Generally, the Tiedtke scheme simulates warm and wet atmospheric conditions in the middle and lower tropospheres, a result more in agreement with the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) 40 Years analysis (ERA-40). The Tiedtke scheme is more prone to activate convection in the lower troposphere than the Grell scheme due to more moist static energy available for activating and supporting the development of convection systems.

  13. A new version of the NeQuick ionosphere electron density model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nava, B.; Coïsson, P.; Radicella, S. M.

    2008-12-01

    NeQuick is a three-dimensional and time dependent ionospheric electron density model developed at the Aeronomy and Radiopropagation Laboratory of the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP), Trieste, Italy and at the Institute for Geophysics, Astrophysics and Meteorology of the University of Graz, Austria. It is a quick-run model particularly tailored for trans-ionospheric applications that allows one to calculate the electron concentration at any given location in the ionosphere and thus the total electron content (TEC) along any ground-to-satellite ray-path by means of numerical integration. Taking advantage of the increasing amount of available data, the model formulation is continuously updated to improve NeQuick capabilities to provide representations of the ionosphere at global scales. Recently, major changes have been introduced in the model topside formulation and important modifications have also been introduced in the bottomside description. In addition, specific revisions have been applied to the computer package associated to NeQuick in order to improve its computational efficiency. It has therefore been considered appropriate to finalize all the model developments in a new version of the NeQuick. In the present work the main features of NeQuick 2 are illustrated and some results related to validation tests are reported.

  14. k0-NAA quality assessment in an Algerian laboratory by analysis of SMELS and four IAEA reference materials using Es-Salam research reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamidatou, L. A.; Dekar, S.; Boukari, S.

    2012-08-01

    Different types of synthetic multi-element standard material (SMELS) and four IAEA reference materials, 140, Sl-1, Soil-7 and Lichen-336 were analyzed for validation and QC/QA of the k0-standardised Neutron Activation Analysis (k0-NAA). The samples of SMELS and RMs were irradiated at Es-Salam research reactor and measured on an absolutely calibrated HPGe detector with 35% relative efficiency connected to a Canberra Genie 2k inspector. Concentrations of 33 elements such as As, Au, Ba, Br, Ca, Ce, Co, Cr, Cs, Eu, Fe, Hf, In, K, La, Mn, Mo, Na, Nd, Rb, Sb, Sc, Se, Sm, Sr, Ta, Tb, Th, Tm, U, Yb, Zn, and Zr were determined in SMELS and RMs. The analytical results agreed well with the assigned values of SMELS and certified values of RMs. In the case of RMs, concentrations of a few elements, whose certified values are not available, could be determined. The comparison between experimental values and assigned/certified data for SMELS and RMs was made by means of the results from Relative Bias, Z-score and U-score. The relatives bias of the elements determined in SMELS with respect to the assigned values were all within±4.6%. For RMs with respect to certified values were within±10% except for few elements for which RB varied from -28.6% to +12.8%. The Z-score values at 95% confidence level for most of the elements in both the materials were within ±1. The U-scores for most of the elements were lower than 1.

  15. The Lone Loop Radiative Corrections to W Pair Production in Electron Positron Annihilation in the Supersymmetric Extension of the Salam-Weinberg Model of the Electroweak Interactions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, S.

    1992-01-01

    The one loop radiative corrections to W pair production in e^+e^- annihilation in the supersymmetric extension of the Salam-Weinberg (SW) model of the electroweak interactions are calculated. Since our model contains the SW theory, and several calculations have been reported on the latter we compare these results with ours. In general agreement is found, a detailed comparison is not possible since the explicit details have not been published. However we have cross checked many of SW model results with Sundaresan and Kalyniak who have performed the calculation using the same renormalization scheme as ours. The virtual corrections are determined in the on-mass-shell renormalization scheme (OMRS) of Sakakibara. The OMRS scheme has several advantages, one being that it is a transparent (i.e. in terms of the physics) renormalization procedure. Moreover the fundamental set of input parameters of OMRS is well determined. By this we mean the accurate determination of the Z-boson mass at LEP I and the expected precise measurement of the W mass at LEP II, and the already well determined alpha value constitute a good set of the fundamental input parameters. Of course the Higgs boson mass and the fermion mass have also to be put in. So far the top quark and the Higgs boson have eluded detection and consequently their masses have to be put in as free parameters. One very important feature in determining how good the standard model (SM) is involves the measurement of the tri-boson coupling. Such a coupling occurs in e^+e^- to W^+W ^- in the SM, at the tree level. For a precision check, one must calculate one loop radiative corrections in SM, using the tri-boson coupling. We have also evaluated W pair production with non standard coupling to get an intuitive feel for deviations away from the SM. Supersymmetry has the effect of reducing the virtual corrections. The effect of supersymmetry is examined on the differential cross section of e^+e^- to W^+W^-, the 'A' term, the magnetic

  16. Message from the Worldwide Ahmadiyya Muslim Community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Mirza Masroor

    2008-07-01

    Abdus Salam was an Ahmadi Muslim from Pakistan, a renowned theoretical physicist who received the Nobel Prize in 1979 for his work in electroweak theory. Although he was the first Muslim Nobel Laureate, Pakistan's military dictator at that time could not admit that its brilliant scientist was a Muslim citizen. Dr Salam's entire award was devoted to the furtherance of education: he did not spend a penny on himself or his family...

  17. PREFACE: Quantum Information, Communication, Computation and Cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benatti, F.; Fannes, M.; Floreanini, R.; Petritis, D.

    2007-07-01

    The application of quantum mechanics to information related fields such as communication, computation and cryptography is a fast growing line of research that has been witnessing an outburst of theoretical and experimental results, with possible practical applications. On the one hand, quantum cryptography with its impact on secrecy of transmission is having its first important actual implementations; on the other hand, the recent advances in quantum optics, ion trapping, BEC manipulation, spin and quantum dot technologies allow us to put to direct test a great deal of theoretical ideas and results. These achievements have stimulated a reborn interest in various aspects of quantum mechanics, creating a unique interplay between physics, both theoretical and experimental, mathematics, information theory and computer science. In view of all these developments, it appeared timely to organize a meeting where graduate students and young researchers could be exposed to the fundamentals of the theory, while senior experts could exchange their latest results. The activity was structured as a school followed by a workshop, and took place at The Abdus Salam International Center for Theoretical Physics (ICTP) and The International School for Advanced Studies (SISSA) in Trieste, Italy, from 12-23 June 2006. The meeting was part of the activity of the Joint European Master Curriculum Development Programme in Quantum Information, Communication, Cryptography and Computation, involving the Universities of Cergy-Pontoise (France), Chania (Greece), Leuven (Belgium), Rennes1 (France) and Trieste (Italy). This special issue of Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical collects 22 contributions from well known experts who took part in the workshop. They summarize the present day status of the research in the manifold aspects of quantum information. The issue is opened by two review articles, the first by G Adesso and F Illuminati discussing entanglement in continuous variable

  18. 7th International Conference on Mathematical Methods in Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonora, L.; Bytsenko, A. A.; Guimarães, M. E. X.; Helayël-Neto, J. A.

    The 7th International Conference on Mathematical Methods in Physics took place in the Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Físicas (CBPF/MCT), Rio de Janeiro - RJ, Brazil, from 16 to 20 April 2012, and was jointly organized by the following Institutions: Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Físicas (CBPF/MCT), The Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP, Italy), Instituto Nacional de Matemática Pura e Aplicada (IMPA, Brazil), The Academy of Sciences for the Developing World (TWAS, Italy) and The Scuola Internazionale di Studi Avanzati (SISSA,Italy). The Organizing Committees were composed by: E. ABDALLA (USP, Brazil), L. BONORA (SISSA, Italy), H. BURSZTYN (IMPA, Brazil), A. A. BYTSENKO (UEL, Brazil), B. DUBROVIN (SISSA, Italy), M.E.X. GUIMARÃES (UFF, Brazil), J.A. HELAYËL-NETO (CBPF, Brazil). Advisory Committee: A. V. ASHTEKAR (Penn State University, U.S.A.), V. M. BUCHSTABER (Steklov Mathematical Institute, Russia), L. D. FADDEEV (St. Petersburg Dept. of Steklov Mathematical Institute, Russia), I. M. KRICHEVER (Columbia Univ., U.S.A./ Landau Institute of Theoretical Physics, Russia), S. P. NOVIKOV (Univ. of Maryland, U.S.A./Landau Institute of Theoretical Physics, Russia), J. PALIS (IMPA, Brazil), A. QADIR (National University of Sciences and Technology, Pakistan), F. QUEVEDO (ICTP, Italy), S. RANDJBAR-DAEMI (ICTP, Italy), G. THOMPSON (ICTP, Italy), C. VAFA (Harvard University, U.S.A.). The Main Goal: The aim of the Conference was to present the latest advances in Mathematical Methods of Physics to researchers, young scientists and students of Latin America in general, and Brazil in particular, in the areas of High Energy Physics, Cosmology, Mathematical Physics and Applied Mathematics. The main goal was to promote an updating of knowledge and to facilitate the interaction between mathematicians and theoretical physicists, through plenary sessions and seminars. This Conference can be considered as a part of a network activity in a special effort to

  19. New Development of the Online Integrated Climate-Chemistry model framwork (RegCM-CHEM4)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakey, A. S.; Shalaby, A. K.; Solmon, F.; Giorgi, F.; Tawfik, A. B.; Steiner, A. L.; Baklanov, A.

    2012-04-01

    The RegCM-CHEM4 is a new online integrated climate-chemistry model based on the regional climate model (RegCM4). The RegCM4 developed at the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP), is a hydrostatic, sigma coordinate model. Tropospheric gas-phase chemistry is integrated into the climate model using the condensed version of the Carbon Bond Mechanism CBM-Z with lumped species that represent broad categories of organics based on carbon bond structure. The computationally rapid radical balance method RBM is coupled as a chemical solver to the gas-phase mechanism. Photolysis rates are determined as a function of meteorological and chemical inputs and interpolated from an array of pre-determined values based on the Tropospheric Ultraviolet-Visible Model (TUV) with cloud cover corrections. Cloud optical depths and cloud altitudes from RegCM-CHEM4 are used in the photolysis calculations, thereby directly coupling the photolysis rates and chemical reactions to meteorological conditions at each model time step. In this study, we evaluate the model over Europe for two different time scales: (1) an event-based analysis of the ozone episode associated with the heat wave of August 2003 and (2) a climatological analysis of a six-year simulation (2000-2005). For the episode analysis, model simulations show a good agreement with the European Monitoring and Evaluation Program (EMEP) observations of hourly ozone over different regions in Europe and capture ozone concentrations during and after the summer 2003 heat wave event. Analysis of the full six years of simulation indicates that the coupled chemistry-climate model can reproduce the seasonal cycle of ozone, with an overestimation of ozone in the non-event years of 5-15 ppb depending on the geographic region. Overall, the ozone and ozone precursor evaluation shows the feasibility of using RegCM-CHEM4 for decadal-length simulations of chemistry-climate interactions.

  20. Large scale silver nanowires network fabricated by MeV hydrogen (H+) ion beam irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honey, S.; Naseem, S.; Ishaq, A.; Maaza, M.; Bhatti, M. T.; Wan, D.

    2016-04-01

    A random two-dimensional large scale nano-network of silver nanowires (Ag-NWs) is fabricated by MeV hydrogen (H+) ion beam irradiation. Ag-NWs are irradiated under H+ ion beam at different ion fluences at room temperature. The Ag-NW network is fabricated by H+ ion beam-induced welding of Ag-NWs at intersecting positions. H+ ion beam induced welding is confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Moreover, the structure of Ag NWs remains stable under H+ ion beam, and networks are optically transparent. Morphology also remains stable under H+ ion beam irradiation. No slicings or cuttings of Ag-NWs are observed under MeV H+ ion beam irradiation. The results exhibit that the formation of Ag-NW network proceeds through three steps: ion beam induced thermal spikes lead to the local heating of Ag-NWs, the formation of simple junctions on small scale, and the formation of a large scale network. This observation is useful for using Ag-NWs based devices in upper space where protons are abandoned in an energy range from MeV to GeV. This high-quality Ag-NW network can also be used as a transparent electrode for optoelectronics devices. Project supported by the National Research Foundation of South Africa (NRF), the French Centre National pour la Recherche Scientifique, iThemba-LABS, the UNESCO-UNISA Africa Chair in Nanosciences & Nanotechnology, the Third World Academy of Science (TWAS), Organization of Women in Science for the Developing World (OWSDW), the Abdus Salam ICTP via the Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), and the Higher Education Commission (HEC) of Pakistan.

  1. Regional model simulation of summer rainfall over the Philippines: Effect of choice of driving fields and ocean flux schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francisco, R. V.; Argete, J.; Giorgi, F.; Pal, J.; Bi, X.; Gutowski, W. J.

    2006-09-01

    The latest version of the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP) regional model RegCM is used to investigate summer monsoon precipitation over the Philippine archipelago and surrounding ocean waters, a region where regional climate models have not been applied before. The sensitivity of simulated precipitation to driving lateral boundary conditions (NCEP and ERA40 reanalyses) and ocean surface flux scheme (BATS and Zeng) is assessed for 5 monsoon seasons. The ability of the RegCM to simulate the spatial patterns and magnitude of monsoon precipitation is demonstrated, both in response to the prominent large scale circulations over the region and to the local forcing by the physiographical features of the Philippine islands. This provides encouraging indications concerning the development of a regional climate modeling system for the Philippine region. On the other hand, the model shows a substantial sensitivity to the analysis fields used for lateral boundary conditions as well as the ocean surface flux schemes. The use of ERA40 lateral boundary fields consistently yields greater precipitation amounts compared to the use of NCEP fields. Similarly, the BATS scheme consistently produces more precipitation compared to the Zeng scheme. As a result, different combinations of lateral boundary fields and surface ocean flux schemes provide a good simulation of precipitation amounts and spatial structure over the region. The response of simulated precipitation to using different forcing analysis fields is of the same order of magnitude as the response to using different surface flux parameterizations in the model. As a result it is difficult to unambiguously establish which of the model configurations is best performing.

  2. Hydrological projections under climate change in the near future by RegCM4 in Southern Africa using a large-scale hydrological model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lu; Diallo, Ismaïla; Xu, Chong-Yu; Stordal, Frode

    2015-09-01

    This study aims to provide model estimates of changes in hydrological elements, such as EvapoTranspiration (ET) and runoff, in Southern Africa in the near future until 2029. The climate change scenarios are projected by a high-resolution Regional Climate Model (RCM), RegCM4, which is the latest version of this model developed by the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP). The hydrological projections are performed by using a large-scale hydrological model (WASMOD-D), which has been tested and customized on this region prior to this study. The results reveal that (1) the projected temperature shows an increasing tendency over Southern Africa in the near future, especially eastward of 25°E, while the precipitation changes are varying between different months and sub-regions; (2) an increase in runoff (and ET) was found in eastern part of Southern Africa, i.e. Southern Mozambique and Malawi, while a decrease was estimated across the driest region in a wide area encompassing Kalahari Desert, Namibia, southwest of South Africa and Angola; (3) the strongest climate change signals are found over humid tropical areas, i.e. north of Angola and Malawi and south of Dem Rep of Congo; and (4) large spatial and temporal variability of climate change signals is found in the near future over Southern Africa. This study presents the main results of work-package 2 (WP2) of the 'Socioeconomic Consequences of Climate Change in Sub-equatorial Africa (SoCoCA)' project, which is funded by the Research Council of Norway.

  3. Improvement of surface albedo parameterization within a regional climate model (RegCM3)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Y.; Lü, S.

    2009-03-01

    A parameterization for calculating surface albedo of Solar Zenith Angel (SZA) dependence with coefficient for each vegetation type determined on the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectro-radiometer (MODIS) reformed by the Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) is incorporated within the latest Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP) Regional Climate Model (RegCM3), and evaluated with a high resolution one-way nesting simulation in China using the Climate Research Unit (CRU) data and the observations from the Field Experiment on Interaction between Land and Atmosphere in Arid Region of Northwest China (NWC-ALIEX). The performance of the SZA method modeling surface characteristic is investigated.Results indicate, RegCM with SZA method (RCM_SZA) considerably improve the cold bias of original RegCM (RCM_ORI) in air surface temperature in East Asia with 1.2 degree increased in summer due to the lower albedo produced by SZA method which makes more solar radiation absorbed by the surface and used for heating the atmosphere near to the surface. The simulated diurnal cycle of ground temperature conforms fairly well to the observation in the nesting simulation in Northwest China, especially during the noon time when the SZA has the lowest value. However, the modification can not obviously affect the East Asia summer monsoon precipitation simulation although RCM_SZA produce more evapo-transpiration in surface with more than 2 Wm-2 increases in simulated latent heat fluxes both in East Asia and in Northwest China compared to RCM_ORI.

  4. High resolution climate change simulation of the 21st century over East Asia by RegCM3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xuejie

    2010-05-01

    To meet the increasing demands from the climate change impact assessment studies, a high resolution climate change simulation over East Asia region has being performed in the National Climate Center of the China Meteorological Administration. The model employed in the study is the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP) Regional Climate Model (RegCM3). A global model of the CCSR/NIES/FRCGC MIROC3.2_hires is selected to drive RegCM3 because of its high resolution (T106) and its good performances in simulating the present day climate over the region. The simulation is conducted at 25-km grid spacing for the period of 1951-2100. Observed CO2 concentration are used for the present day simulation of 1951-2000 and the emission scenario of IPCC SRES A1B is used as the GHG (greenhouse gases) forcing. Simulations of present day climate over China by RegCM3 and MIROC3.2_hires are compared against observation to valid the model performances. Results show that both models reproduced the general pattern of surface air temperature and precipitation well over the region. Compared to the driving MIROC3.2_hires, RegCM3 provides with more spatial details of the surface fields. Differed from previous GCM-RegCM3 simulations, the RegCM3 did not improves the general pattern of the precipitation due to the good performances of MIROC3.2_hires. Preliminary analysis of the future changes simulated by the two models' show difference, in particular during June-July-August. For example while the MIROC3.2_hires projected a prevailing increase of precipitation in JJA over China, the RegCM3 projected extended areas of decreased precipitation. The data are available for those interested from the community of climate change impacts studies.

  5. EDITORIAL: Publisher's Note

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGlashan, Yasmin

    2006-12-01

    In addition to offering an excellent service to authors, referees and readers of the journal, one of the goals of Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion (PPCF) is to support the plasma community. We sponsor a number of prizes each year, usually focused on students' contributions to conferences. The poster prize winners from the 33rd EPS Conference on Plasma Physics can be found in Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 48 B1-B506 along with the invited talks from the conference. Other prizes include: A poster prize at the CCLRC-organised High Power Laser Science Christmas meeting, held in Abingdon, UK, in December 2005. The winning poster was: `Implicit Vlasov Fokker Planck simulations including hydrodynamic ion motion' Christopher Ridgers (Imperial College London). The second prize went to C Cecchitti (Queens University of Belfast), and the third prize to John Howe (University of York). For the first time in 2006 PPCF also sponsored a prize for the best poster presented at the International Workshop on Frontiers of Plasma Physics, held from 21 August-1 September 2006 at the Abdus Salam ICTP, Trieste, Italy. The winner of this prize was Dr Bhaskar Chaudhury (Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, India), for his work on `Plasma stealth technology: reduction of radar cross section of plasma shrouded objects'. Thank you to everyone who participated in these prizes, and congratulations to the winners and runners-up. I would also like to take this opportunity to thank the authors and referees of PPCF for all their hard work and support in making the journal a success in 2006 and to wish you all a successful 2007.

  6. Web services interface for Space Weather: NeQuick 2 web and experimental TEC Calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Migoya Orue, Yenca O.; Nava, Bruno; Radicella, Sandro M.; Alazo Cuartas, Katy; Luigi, Ciraolo

    2013-04-01

    A web front-end has been recently developed and released to allow retrieving and plotting ionospheric parameters computed by the latest version of the model, NeQuick 2. NeQuick is a quick-run ionospheric electron density model particularly designed for trans-ionospheric propagation applications. It has been developed at the Aeronomy and Radiopropagation Laboratory (now T/ICT4D Laboratory) of the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP) - Trieste, Italy with the collaboration of the Institute for Geophysics, Astrophysics and Meteorology (IGAM) of the University of Graz, Austria. To describe the electron density of the ionosphere up to the peak of the F2 layer, NeQuick uses a profile formulation which includes five semi-Epstein layers with modelled thickness parameters. Through a simple web interface users can exploit all the model features including the possibility of computing the electron density and visualizing the corresponding Total Electron Content (TEC) along any ground-to-satellite straight line ray-path. Indeed, the TEC is the ionospheric parameter retrieved from the GPS measurements. It complements the experimental data obtained with diverse kinds of sensors and can be considered a major source of ionospheric information. Since the TEC is not a direct measurement, a "de-biasing" procedure or calibration has to be applied to obtain the relevant values from the raw GPS observables. Using the observation and navigation RINEX files corresponding to a single receiver as input data, the web application allows the user to compute the slant and/or vertical TEC following the concept of the "arc-by-arc" offsets estimation. The combined use of both tools, freely available from the T/ICT4D Web site, will allow the comparison of experimentally derived slant and vertical TEC with modelled values. An online demonstration of the capabilities of the mentioned web services will be illustrated.

  7. On the perfect hexagonal packing of rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starostin, E. L.

    2006-04-01

    In most cases the hexagonal packing of fibrous structures or rods extremizes the energy of interaction between strands. If the strands are not straight, then it is still possible to form a perfect hexatic bundle. Conditions under which the perfect hexagonal packing of curved tubular structures may exist are formulated. Particular attention is given to closed or cycled arrangements of the rods like in the DNA toroids and spools. The closure or return constraints of the bundle result in an allowable group of automorphisms of the cross-sectional hexagonal lattice. The structure of this group is explored. Examples of open helical-like and closed toroidal-like bundles are presented. An expression for the elastic energy of a perfectly packed bundle of thin elastic rods is derived. The energy accounts for both the bending and torsional stiffnesses of the rods. It is shown that equilibria of the bundle correspond to solutions of a variational problem formulated for the curve representing the axis of the bundle. The functional involves a function of the squared curvature under the constraints on the total torsion and the length. The Euler-Lagrange equations are obtained in terms of curvature and torsion and due to the existence of the first integrals the problem is reduced to the quadrature. The three-dimensional shape of the bundle may be readily reconstructed by integration of the Ilyukhin-type equations in special cylindrical coordinates. The results are of universal nature and are applicable to various fibrous structures, in particular, to intramolecular liquid crystals formed by DNA condensed in toroids or packed inside the viral capsids. International Workshop on Biopolymers: Thermodynamics, Kinetics and Mechanics of DNA, RNA and Proteins, 30.05.2005-3.06.2005, The Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP), Trieste, Italy.

  8. The Phase I CORDEX RegCM hyper-MAtrix (CREMA) experiment (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giorgi, F.

    2013-12-01

    An ensemble of regional climate model (RCM) projections was produced with the RegCM4 modeling system as a first contribution to the CORDEX framework by the RegCM modeling community, the Phase I CORDEX RegCM hyper-MAtrix (CREMA) experiment. A total of 34 regional projections were completed covering the period 1970-2100 over five different CORDEX domains, Africa, Central America, South America, South Asia and the Mediterranean. The projections use different combinations of three driving GCMs (HadGEM, MPI and GFDL), two greenhouse gas concentration pathways (RCP4.5 and RCP8.5) and different land surface and convection schemes, which allows a first exploration of different sources of uncertainty. The paper will describe the CREMA phase I experiment and discuss some basic results from a first analysis of these runs, with emphasis on extreme events (including tropical storms), variability and regional circulations of relevance for the different domains (e.g. the monsoon). The CREMA Phase I experiment was completed as a collaboration between the Abdus Salam ICTP and the U. San Paolo, CICESE, and the Indian Institute of Technology, and the results from this first analysis are being published in a special issue of Climatic Change. The data from these projections is freely available following the CORDEX data policy for eventual further analysis and use in impact assessment studies. We plan to incrementally populate the CREMA ensemble with further simulations employing more driving GCMs and model configurations and to compare our resultswith other models participating to the CORDEX effort.

  9. Simulation of South Asian aerosols for regional climate studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nair, Vijayakumar S.; Solmon, Fabien; Giorgi, Filippo; Mariotti, Laura; Babu, S. Suresh; Moorthy, K. Krishna

    2012-02-01

    Extensive intercomparison of columnar and near-surface aerosols, simulated over the South Asian domain using the aerosol module included in the regional climate model (RegCM4) of the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP) have been carried out using ground-based network of Sun/sky Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) radiometers, satellite sensors such as Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and Multiangle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR), and ground-based black carbon (BC) measurements made at Aerosol Radiative Forcing over India (ARFI) network stations. In general, RegCM4 simulations reproduced the spatial and seasonal characteristics of aerosol optical depth over South Asia reasonably well, particularly over west Asia, where mineral dust is a major contributor to the total aerosol loading. In contrast, RegCM4 simulations drastically underestimated the BC mass concentrations over most of the stations, by a factor of 2 to 5, with a large spatial variability. Seasonally, the discrepancy between the measured and simulated BC tended to be higher during winter and periods when the atmospheric boundary layer is convectively stable (such as nighttime and early mornings), while during summer season and during periods when the boundary layer is convectively unstable (daytime) the discrepancies were much lower, with the noontime values agreeing very closely with the observations. A detailed analysis revealed that the model does not reproduce the nocturnal high in BC, observed at most of the Indian sites especially during winter, because of the excessive vertical transport of aerosols under stable boundary layer conditions. As far as the vertical distribution was concerned, the simulated vertical profiles of BC agreed well with airborne measurements during daytime. This comprehensive validation exercise reveals the strengths and weaknesses of the model in simulating the spatial and temporal heterogeneities of the aerosol fields over

  10. PREFACE: APCTP-ASEAN Workshop on Advanced Materials Science and Nanotechnology (AMSN08)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Hieu, Nguyen

    2009-09-01

    Dear friends To contribute to the enhancement of the international scientific cooperation of the ASEAN countries and in reply to the proposal of the Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology (VAST), the Asia-Pacific Center for Theoretical Physics (APCTP) and the Sub Committee on Materials Science and Technology (SCMST) of the ASEAN Committee of Science and Technology (ASEAN COST) agreed to organize this APCTP-ASEAN Workshop on Advanced Materials Science and Nanotechnology with the participation of the Ministry of Science and Technology of Vietnam, the Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology, Rencontres du Vietnam, the Vietnam Physical Society, the Vietnam National University in Ho Chi Minh City and the Vietnam National University in Hanoi. As well as the participants from 9 of the 10 ASEAN countries and many other countries/regions of APCTP (Australia, China, Chinese Taipei, Japan and Korea) we warmly welcome the guests from Europe, the United States, Canada and Israel. Without the financial support of the Asia-Pacific Center for Theoretical Physics APCTP, Abdus Salam International Center for Theoretical Physics ICTP, the Asian Office of Aerospace Research and Development AOARD, the US Office of Naval Research Global-Asia ONRG, the Ministry of Science and Technology of Vietnam MOST, the Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology VAST, the Vietnam National University in Ho Chi Minh City VNU HCMC and other Sponsors, we would have been unable to hold this Workshop. On behalf of the International and Local Organizing Committees I would like to express our deep gratitude to the Sponsors. We highly appreciate the support and advice of the members of the International Advisory Committee, the scientific contribution of the invited speakers and all participants. We acknowledge the warm reception of the Khanh Hoa province Administration and citizens, and the hard work of the VAST staff for the success of the Workshop. We cordially wish all participants lively scientific

  11. Ambrosia artemisiifolia L. pollen simulations over the Euro-CORDEX domain: model description and emission calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    liu, li; Solmon, Fabien; Giorgi, Filippo; Vautard, Robert

    2014-05-01

    Ragweed Ambrosia artemisiifolia L. is a highly allergenic invasive plant. Its pollen can be transported over large distances and has been recognized as a significant cause of hayfever and asthma (D'Amato et al., 2007). In the context of the ATOPICA EU program we are studying the links between climate, land use and ecological changes on the ragweed pollen emissions and concentrations. For this purpose, we implemented a pollen emission/transport module in the RegCM4 regional climate model in collaboration with ATOPICA partners. The Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP) regional climate model, i.e. RegCM4 was adapted to incorporate the pollen emissions from (ORCHIDEE French) Global Land Surface Model and a pollen tracer model for describing pollen convective transport, turbulent mixing, dry and wet deposition over extensive domains, using consistent assumption regarding the transport of multiple species (Fabien et al., 2008). We performed two families of recent-past simulations on the Euro-Cordex domain (simulation for future condition is been considering). Hindcast simulations (2000~2011) were driven by the ERA-Interim re-analyses and designed to best simulate past periods airborne pollens, which were calibrated with parts of observations and verified by comparison with the additional observations. Historical simulations (1985~2004) were driven by HadGEM CMPI5 and designed to serve as a baseline for comparison with future airborne concentrations as obtained from climate and land-use scenarios. To reduce the uncertainties on the ragweed pollen emission, an assimilation-like method (Rouǐl et al., 2009) was used to calibrate release based on airborne pollen observations. The observations were divided into two groups and used for calibration and validation separately. A wide range of possible calibration coefficients were tested for each calibration station, making the bias between observations and simulations within an admissible value then

  12. Preliminar Performance Assessment of NeQuick2-Plas Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Migoya Orue, Yenca; Gulyaeva, Tamara; Nava, Bruno; Radicella, Sandro M.

    NeQuick is a semi-empirical model that describes spatial and temporal variations of the ionospheric electron density at global scale. It was jointly developed by the Aeronomy and Radiopropagation Laboratory of the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP), Trieste, Italy and the Institute for Geophysics, Astrophysics and Meteorology of the University of Graz, Austria. The model is able to calculate the electron concentration at any given location in the ionosphere as well as the total electron content (TEC) along any ground-to-satellite ray-path. One of the recent major changes introduced in the NeQuick2 model is the integration of the plasmasphere formulation of IRI-Plas that gave origin to the NeQuick-Plas. The plasmasphere extension of IRI, IRI-Plas, is an empirical model derived from many years of measurements designed to represent typical ionospheric conditions as a function of geomagnetic and solar activity. For the smooth fitting of the NeQuick and plasmasphere models, the half-peak density point, h0.5p is searched iteratively from NeQuick topside electron density profile. The present study uses median values of IGS combined global vertical TEC maps as reference to be compared with NeQuick 2 and NeQuick-Plas models. Representative months of years of high, moderate and low solar activity have been utilized. The preliminary results indicate an improvement of the NeQuick 2 -Plas with respect to NeQuick 2 especially during periods of high and moderate solar activity as indicated by the average and standard deviation of the TEC error distributions (e.g. IGS-NeQ2 mean is -9.73, standard deviation is 5.6 while IGS-NePlas mean is 2.87, with a standard deviation of 4.8 for October 2000; IGS-NeQ2 mean is -5.28, standard deviation is 0.37 while IGS-NeQ-Plas mean is 1.25, standard deviation of 0.49 for Jul 2003). During low solar activity (year 2008), instead, there is a slight tendency of NeQuick-Plas to overestimate TEC values and so increase the

  13. List of Organizing Committees and Sponsors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2012-03-01

    Organizers DIRECTORS Maria L CalvoPresident of International Commission for Optics, Spain Aram V PapoyanDirector of Institute for Physical Research of NAS, Armenia HEADS OF PROJECT Tigran Dadalyan YSU, Armenia Artsrun MartirosyanIPR, Armenia COORDINATOR Narine GevorgyanIPR, Armenia / ICTP, Italy MANAGERS Paytsar MantashyanIPR, Armenia Karen VardanyanIPR, Armenia INTERNATIONAL ADVISORY COMMITTEE Marcis AuzinshLatvia Roland AvagyanArmenia Tapash ChakrabortyCanada Yuri ChilingaryanArmenia Eduard KazaryanArmenia Albert KirakosyanArmenia Radik KostanyanArmenia Avinash PandeyIndia Marat SoskinUkraine INTERNATIONAL PROGRAM COMMITTEE David Sarkisyan (Chair)Armenia Roman AlaverdyanArmenia Dan ApostolRomania Levon AslanyanArmenia Aranya BhattacherjeeIndia Gagik BuniatyanArmenia Vigen ChaltykyanArmenia Roldao Da RochaBrazil Miltcho DanailovItaly Vladimir GerdtRussia Samvel GevorgyanArmenia Gayane GrigoryanArmenia Rafik HakobyanArmenia Takayuki MiyaderaJapan Levon MouradianArmenia Atom MuradyanArmenia Simon RochesterUSA Hayk SarkisyanArmenia Aleksandr VardanyanArmenia LOCAL ORGANIZING COMMITTEE Narek AghekyanArmenia Anahit GogyanArmenia Melanya GrigoryanArmenia Armen HovhannisyanArmenia Lilit HovhannisyanArmenia Tatevik KhachatryanArmenia Astghik KuzanyanArmenia Satenik KuzanyanArmenia Vladimir LazarevRussia Lilit MantashyanArmenia Hripsime MkrtchyanArmenia Pavel MuzhikyanArmenia Wahi NarsisianArmenia Sahak OrdukhanyanArmenia Anna ReymersArmenia Narine TorosyanArmenia The Symposium was organized by YSU & NAS SPIE Armenian Student Chapter Institute for Physical Research (IPR) of National Academy of Sciences (NAS) Russian-Armenian (Slavonic) University (RAU) LT-PYRKAL cjsc Yerevan State University (YSU) Official Sponsors of the Symposium LT-PYRKAlRussian ArmenianSPIE LT-PYRKAL cjscRussian-Armenian UniversityYSU & NAS SPIE Student Chapter Further sponsors NFSATICTPSCSADevout Generation National Foundation of Science and Advanced TechnologiesThe Abdus Salam International Centre

  14. Evaluation of NeQuick 2 derived vertical TEC at three northern mid-latitude locations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alazo Cuartas, Katy; Radicella, Sandro M.; Nava, Bruno; Lazo Olazabal, Bienvenido; Migoya Orue, Yenca O.

    2013-04-01

    NeQuick 2 is the latest version of the three-dimensional and time dependent ionospheric electron density model developed at the T/ICT4D (former ARPL) of the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP) - Trieste, Italy and at the Institute for Geophysics, Astrophysics and Meteorology of the University of Graz, Austria. The purpose of this work is to identify possible limitations of the model. Therefore, the ability of NeQuick 2 in reproducing the vertical Total Electron Content (vTEC) derived from GPS observations using different input sources has been evaluated. The daily solar flux in 10.7 cm, the monthly smoothed solar flux and the hourly daily ionosonde derived F2 peak parameters, foF2 and hmF2, have been therefore used as model drivers to compute the vTEC at the relevant locations. Peak parameter values from three ionosonde stations (Ebre, El Arenosillo and Ramey) and GPS-derived vTEC data obtained from the corresponding co-located receivers (ebre, sfer, pur3) have been processed for the present work. The available data for the years 2000 and 2004, corresponding to high and moderate solar activity periods, have been considered to be able to estimate the model performance in a wide range of geophysical conditions. For each location, the data analysis has been based on statistical comparisons between experimental and retrieved vTEC. The results indicate that the differences between NeQuick 2-computed and GPS-derived vTEC exhibit well defined diurnal and seasonal patterns that depend on the location and period considered. On average, NeQuick 2 underestimates the vTEC during nighttime, mainly in the winter months and slightly during the summer months. In the daytime hours on the European locations, the model generally overestimates the vTEC in winter months, having an opposite behavior in the summer months. At PRJ18/pur3 location the NeQuick 2 response is more complex. During high solar activity, the daily difference between modeled and GPS

  15. Regional modeling of Saharan dust events using the RegCM model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santese, M.; Perrone, M. R.; Zakey, A.

    2009-04-01

    As one of the major components of the atmospheric aerosol, mineral dust plays an important role in the Earth's climate system. Dust has been found to redistribute the radiative energy from the surface to the dust loaded atmospheric column by cooling the surface while heating the dust layer. The resulting stabilizing effect on the vertical structure of the atmosphere can affect cloud formation and the dust production itself. In addition, dust may change the size number of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and thus the optical and precipitation properties of clouds. All these impacts are difficult to quantify due to the highly variable spatio-temporal distribution of mineral dust and uncertainties determining its optical and physicochemical properties (IPCC 2001). The distribution of dust has been modeled in many studies using general circulation models (GCMs). However, because the aerosol effects are especially important at the regional scale, the recent development of high-resolution regional climate models (RCMs) offers useful tools to assess the regional impacts of aerosols. Compared to global climate models (GCMs), the relatively high-resolution and detailed physical parameterizations by RCMs are particularly suitable to describe the complexity of aerosol processes (Solmon et al., 2006). Furthermore, the results from regional models are well suited for comparisons with measurements of individual events. Dust radiative effects on climate are likely to be especially important at the regional scale, thus RCMs can be particularly useful tools to investigate the regional climate effects of dust outbreaks (Zakey et al., 2006). In this work, we will use the regional climate model RegCM (Version 3.1), developed at the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP), Trieste, to investigate dust event impacts over Mediterranean sites. The Sahara desert is the largest dust source on Earth, providing at least half of the emitted dust (Washington et al., 2003

  16. A simple wavelength division multiplexing system for active learning teaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zghal, Mourad; Ghalila, Hassen; Ben Lakhdar, Zohra

    2009-06-01

    The active learning project consists in a series of workshops for educators, researchers and students and promotes an innovative method of teaching physics using simple, inexpensive materials that can be fabricated locally. The objective of the project is to train trainers and inspire students to learn physics. The workshops are based on the use of laboratory work and hands-on activities in the classroom. The interpretation of these experiments is challenging for some students, and the experiments can lead to a significant amount of discussion. The workshops are organized within the framework of the project ``Active Learning in Optics and Photonics" (ALOP) mainly funded by UNESCO, with the support of ICTP (Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics) and SPIE. ALOP workshops offer high school, college or university physics teachers the opportunity to improve their conceptual understanding of optics. These workshops usually run for five days and cover several of the topics usually found in any introductory university physics program. Optics and photonics are used as subject matter because it is relevant as well as adaptable to research and educational conditions in many developing countries [1]. In this paper, we will mainly focus on a specific topic of the ALOP workshops, namely optical communications and Wavelength Division Multiplexing technology (WDM). This activity was originally developed by Mazzolini et al [2]. WDM is a technology used in fibre-optic communications for transmitting two or more separate signals over a single fibre optic cable by using a separate wavelength for each signal. Multiple signals are carried together as separate wavelengths of light in a multiplexed signal. Simple and inexpensive WDM system was implemented in our laboratory using light emitting diodes or diode lasers, plastic optical fibres, a set of optical filters and lenses, prism or grating, and photodiodes. Transmission of audio signals using home-made, simple

  17. PREFACE: 3rd International Symposium ''Optics and its Applications''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvo, M. L.; Dolganova, I. N.; Gevorgyan, N.; Guzman, A.; Papoyan, A.; Sarkisyan, H.; Yurchenko, S.

    2016-01-01

    SPIE under the Federation of Optics College and University Students (FOCUS) conference grant, as well as contributions from other organizations: the Abdus Salam International Center for Theoretical Physics (ICTP), the Optical Society (OSA), the Laboratory of Terahertz Technology of Bauman Moscow State Technical University (BMSTU), the RAU, the LT-Pyrkal, the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST), IPR of NAS, and Ritea.

  18. The Trieste Lecture of John Stewart Bell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassi, Angelo; Carlo Ghirardi, Gian

    2007-03-01

    extremely interesting historical record for all the participants who certainly shared with us a great admiration for this outstanding scientist and deep thinker. Accordingly, with the permission of the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics, and with thanks to the financial support of the Consorzio per la Fisica of the Trieste University, we have produced from the original record a DVD which has been given to all participants although, unfortunately, the video tape of the event was not particularly good. Taking into account that the participants to the meetings represented only a very small subset of those scientists who might be interested in hearing what John Bell said in probably his last lecture, we considered that it would be useful for the scientific community interested in foundational problems to publish the text of this lecture in order to make it accessible to everybody. The lecture was preceded by a presentation by the Chairman, Alain Aspect, which we have also included. Due to the aforementioned low quality of the recording it has not been easy to pass from the tape to the text we are presenting below, and we have to thank, for her precious collaboration, Dr Julia Filingeri who did most of the work, as well as Mrs Anne Gatti from ICTP, Professors Detlef Düurr and Sheldon Goldstein, and the staff of IOP Publishing who contributed in an essential way in deciphering some particularly difficult passages. Obviously, we take full responsibility for any possible inappropriate rendering of the original talk. We thank the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics for authorizing IOP Publishing to publish this important document. Some final remarks are in order. Firstly, we have put in square brackets parenthetical remarks that John made while reading sentences from his transparencies. We have also indicated by parenthetical ellipsis (...) very short parts of the speech (usually one word) which we have not been able to decipher. We have

  19. History of electroweak symmetry breaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kibble, T. W. B.

    2015-07-01

    In this talk, I recall the history of the development of the unified electroweak theory, incorporating the symmetry-breaking Higgs mechanism, as I saw it from my standpoint as a member of Abdus Salam's group at Imperial College. I start by describing the state of physics in the years after the Second World War, explain how the goal of a unified gauge theory of weak and electromagnetic interactions emerged, the obstacles encountered, in particular the Goldstone theorem, and how they were overcome, followed by a brief account of more recent history, culminating in the historic discovery of the Higgs boson in 2012.

  20. Preface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendonça, J. T.; Shukla, P. K.; Eliasson, B.; Rodrigues, J. A.; Rodrigues

    2013-08-01

    The ``International Topical Conference on Plasma Science: Advanced Plasma Concepts'' was hosted by Instituto Superior Técnico, Lisbon and the University of Algarve, Faro, Portugal, during the period 24-28 September 2012. The conference was organized by Padma Kant Shukla, (Ruhr University Bochum, Germany), Robert Bingham (RAL, United Kingdom) and José Tito Mendonça, (IST, Portugal). The scientific activity belongs to a series of successful meetings, which started at the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste, in 1989, and which has also been taking place at various other locations, including Faro and Lisbon in Portugal, and Santorini in Greece.

  1. Search for Lepton Flavor Violation in υ Decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Love, William

    2006-04-01

    Using the data collected with the CLEO III detector at CESR we report on the first search for Lepton Flavor Violation in the decays of the υ(1S), υ(2S), and υ(3S) resonances. After describing the various components of our unbinned maximum-likelihood fit, we present fits to background data, signal Monte Carlo, and signal data. The discovery of LFV in υ decays could be explained by low-mass quantum gravity, Abdus-Salam leptoquarks, or neutrino oscillations arising in SUSY models.

  2. The effect of background turbulence on the propagation of large-scale flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matalon, Moshe

    2008-12-01

    This paper is based on an invited presentation at the Conference on Turbulent Mixing and Beyond held in the Abdus Salam International Center for Theoretical Physics, Trieste, Italy (August 2007). It consists of a summary of recent investigations aimed at understanding the nature and consequences of the Darrieus-Landau instability that is prominent in premixed combustion. It describes rigorous asymptotic methodologies used to simplify the propagation problem of multi-dimensional and time-dependent premixed flames in order to understand the nonlinear evolution of hydrodynamically unstable flames. In particular, it addresses the effect of background turbulent noise on the structure and propagation of large-scale flames.

  3. The Early Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fowler, William

    It is a great honor to have been invited to deliver the Fourth B.M. Birla Memorial Lecture following in the footsteps of Fred Hoyle, Philip Morrison and Abdus Salam. I must express my gratitude to Dr. B.G. Sidharth, Director of the Birla Science Centre, for all he has done to make the arrangements for the travel here and the stay here of my wife and myself so pleasant and so comfortable. Finally we are most grateful to Mr. and Mrs. G.P. Birla for their gracious hospitality at their home and its beautiful gardens here in Hyderabad.

  4. Unification of Fundamental Forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salam, Abdus

    1990-05-01

    This is an expanded version of the third Dirac Memorial Lecture, given in 1988 by the Nobel Laureate Abdus Salam. Salam's lecture presents an overview of the developments in modern particle physics from its inception at the turn of the century to the present theories seeking to unify all the fundamental forces. In addition, two previously unpublished lectures by Paul Dirac, and Werner Heisenberg are included. These lectures provide a fascinating insight into their approach to research and the developments in particle physics at that time. Nonspecialists, undergraduates and researchers will find this a fascinating book. It contains a clear introduction to the major themes of particle physics and cosmology by one of the most distinguished contemporary physicists.

  5. An Additional Symmetry in the Weinberg-Salam Model

    SciTech Connect

    Bakker, B.L.G.; Veselov, A.I.; Zubkov, M.A.

    2005-06-01

    An additional Z{sub 6} symmetry hidden in the fermion and Higgs sectors of the Standard Model has been found recently. It has a singular nature and is connected to the centers of the SU(3) and SU(2) subgroups of the gauge group. A lattice regularization of the Standard Model was constructed that possesses this symmetry. In this paper, we report our results on the numerical simulation of its electroweak sector.

  6. The Trieste Lecture of John Stewart Bell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassi, Angelo; Carlo Ghirardi, Gian

    2007-03-01

    extremely interesting historical record for all the participants who certainly shared with us a great admiration for this outstanding scientist and deep thinker. Accordingly, with the permission of the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics, and with thanks to the financial support of the Consorzio per la Fisica of the Trieste University, we have produced from the original record a DVD which has been given to all participants although, unfortunately, the video tape of the event was not particularly good. Taking into account that the participants to the meetings represented only a very small subset of those scientists who might be interested in hearing what John Bell said in probably his last lecture, we considered that it would be useful for the scientific community interested in foundational problems to publish the text of this lecture in order to make it accessible to everybody. The lecture was preceded by a presentation by the Chairman, Alain Aspect, which we have also included. Due to the aforementioned low quality of the recording it has not been easy to pass from the tape to the text we are presenting below, and we have to thank, for her precious collaboration, Dr Julia Filingeri who did most of the work, as well as Mrs Anne Gatti from ICTP, Professors Detlef Düurr and Sheldon Goldstein, and the staff of IOP Publishing who contributed in an essential way in deciphering some particularly difficult passages. Obviously, we take full responsibility for any possible inappropriate rendering of the original talk. We thank the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics for authorizing IOP Publishing to publish this important document. Some final remarks are in order. Firstly, we have put in square brackets parenthetical remarks that John made while reading sentences from his transparencies. We have also indicated by parenthetical ellipsis (...) very short parts of the speech (usually one word) which we have not been able to decipher. We have

  7. The ICTP Regional System Model (RESM) to simulate the monsoon in the South Asia CORDEX domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Sante, Fabio; Coppola, Erika; Farneti, Riccardo; Giorgi, Filippo

    2016-04-01

    South Asian climate is characterized mainly by the wet and dry dipole that divides the annual cycle in two seasons: the monsoon season and the dry season. The life and the economy of those regions is very much influenced by the climate variability and the monsoon variability therefore is crucial to understand the physical mechanism associated with them. The spatial and temporal representation of the monsoons over the South Asian region is one of the main challenge of global and regional climate models principally because they fail to represent the SST (sea surface temperature) induced rainfall when forced with observed SST resulting in a poor representation of the monsoon cycle (Fu et al. 2002). The coupling with the ocean is essential to be able to simulate the correct air-sea interaction; the results are in general much improved and the monsoon patterns and the time representation (like the onset for example) are closer to the observations (Fu et al. 2002; Fu et al. 2007; Ratnam et Al. 2008; Seo et Al. 2009). Here we present a Regional Earth System Model (RESM) composed by a regional climate model RegCM4 (Giorgi et al, 2012) coupled with the regional oceanic model MITgcm (Marshall et al, 1997) and two hydrological model: ChyM (Cetemps Hydrological Model, Coppola et al, 2007) and HD model (Max-Planck's HD model; Hagemann and Dümenil, 1998). We simulate the Southern Asian Climate taking into account the whole hydrological cycle. Wind stress, water fluxes and heat fluxes are exchanged from the atmosphere to the ocean, SST are exchanged from ocean to the atmosphere and in order to conserve mass, the river discharge is calculated from the Hydrological model and sent to the ocean. The main goal of this work is to evaluate the impacts of local air-sea interaction in the simulation of the interannual variability, over the Indian CORDEX (Giorgi et al, 2009) domain through regionally ocean-atmosphere-river coupled and uncoupled simulations, with a focus on monsoon season. The impact of a simplified low-resolution hydrological model (HD model) and the physical based high-resolution hydrological model (CHyM model) is also assessed in the fully coupled RESM simulations. References: 1) Fu, X., Wang, B. and Li, T., 2002: Impacts of air-sea coupling on the simulation of mean Asian summer monsoon in the ECHAM4 model, Mon. Wea. Rev., 130, 2889-2904. 2) Fu, X., Wang, B., Waliser, D. E. and Tao, L., 2007: Impact of atmosphere-ocean coupling on the predictability of monsoon interseasonal oscillations, J. Atmos. Sci., 64,157-174. 3) Ratnam J. Venkata, Filippo Giorgi, Akshara Kaginalkar, Stefano Cozzini, 2008b: Simulation of Indian Monsoon using RegCM3 - ROMS regional coupled model, Climate Dynamics, 1432-0894. 4) Seo, H, Xie SP, Murtgudde R, Jochum M, Miller AJ. 2009. Seasonal effects of Indian Ocean freshwater forcing in a regional coupled model. Journal of Climate. 22:6577-6596. 5) Giorgi, F., et al. 2012: RegCM4: Model description and preliminary tests over multiple CORDEX domains, Clim. Res., 53(1), 7-29. 6) Marshall, J., C. Hill, L. Perelman, and A. Adcroft, 1997: Hydrostatic, quasi-hydrostatic, and nonhydrostatic ocean modeling. J. Geophysical Res., 102(C3), 5733-5752. 7) Hagemann, S., Dumenil, L., 1998: Application of a grid-scale lateral discharge model in the BALTEX region. MPI-Report No. 278 8) Coppola, E., Tomasetti, B., Mariotti, L., Verdecchia, M., Visconti, G., 2007: Cellular automata algorithms for drainage network extraction and rainfall data assimilation. Hydrol Sci J 2007;52(3). 9) Giorgi F., Jones C. Asrar G., 2009: Addressing climate information needs at the regional level: the CORDEX framework. WMO Bull 58:175-183

  8. Mixing and turbulent mixing in fluids, plasma and materials: summary of works presented at the 3rd International Conference on Turbulent Mixing and Beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauthier, Serge; Keane, Christopher J.; Niemela, Joseph J.; Abarzhi, Snezhana I.

    2013-07-01

    was held in the summer of 2011 at the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP), Trieste, Italy. The papers are arranged by TMB themes, and within each theme they are ordered alphabetically by the last name of the first author. The collection includes regular research papers, a few research briefs and review papers. The review papers are published as 'Comments' articles in Physica Scripta . Canonical turbulence and turbulent mixing. Six papers are devoted to canonical turbulence and turbulent mixing. Baumert presents a theory of shear-generated turbulence, which is based on a two-fluid concept. Gampert et al investigate the problem of adequate representation of turbulent structures by applying a decomposition of the field of the turbulent kinetic energy into regions of compressive and extensive strain. Paul and Narashima consider the dynamics of a temporal mixing layer using a vortex sheet model. Schaefer et al analyse the joint statistics and conditional mean strain rates of streamline segments in turbulent flows. Sirota and Zybin deepen their discussion of the connection between Lagrangian and Eulerian velocity structure functions in hydrodynamic turbulence. Talbot et al investigate the heterogeneous mixing by considering gases of very nearly equal densities and very different viscosities. Wall-bounded flows. Three papers are dedicated to wall-bounded flows. Mok et al use the Bayesian spectral density approach to identify the dominant free surface fluctuation frequency downstream of an oscillating hydraulic jump. Tejada-Martinez et al employ large eddy numerical simulations to study wind-driven shallow water flows with and without full-depth Langmuir circulation (parallel counter rotating vortices). Wu et al re-evaluate the Karman constant based on a multi-layer analytical theory of Prandtl's mixing length function. Non-equilibrium processes. This theme is represented by two papers. Chasheckhin and Zagumennyi consider non-equilibrium processes

  9. PREFACE Turbulent Mixing and Beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abarzhi, Snezhana I.; Gauthier, Serge; Niemela, Joseph J.

    2010-12-01

    acceleration. Their scaling, spectral and invariant properties differ substantially from those of classical Kolmogorov turbulence. At atomistic and meso-scales, the non-equilibrium dynamics depart dramatically from a standard scenario given by the Gibbs statistic ensemble average and quasi-static Boltzmann equation. The singular aspect and the similarity of the non-equilibrium dynamics at macroscopic scales are interplayed with the fundamental properties of the Euler and compressible Navier-Stokes equations and with the problem sensitivity to the boundary conditions at discontinuities. The state-of-the-art numerical simulations of multi-phase flows suggest new methods for predictive modeling of the multi-scale non-equilibrium dynamics in fluids and plasmas, up to peta-scale level, for error estimate and uncertainty quantification, as well as for novel data assimilation techniques. The Second International Conference and Advanced School 'Turbulent Mixing and Beyond', TMB-2009, was held on 27 July-7 August 2009 at the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP), Trieste, Italy. This was a highly informative and exciting meeting, and it strengthened and reaffirmed the success of TMB-2007. TMB-2009 brought together over 180 participants from five continents, ranging from students to members of National Academies of Sciences and Engineering and including researchers at experienced and early stages of their carriers from leading scientific institutions in academia, national laboratories, corporations and industry, from developed and developing countries. The success of TMB-2009 came from the successful work of all the participants, who were responsible professionals caring for the quality of their research and sharing their scientific vision. The level of presentations was high; about 170 presentations included over 60 invited lectures and 15 tutorials (4500 minutes of talks in total), about 40 posters and two Round Tables. TMB-2009 covered 17 different topics

  10. INTRODUCTION Outline of Round Tables Outline of Round Tables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abarzhi, Snezhana I.; Sreenivasan, Katepalli R.

    2010-12-01

    The Second International Conference and Advanced School 'Turbulent Mixing and Beyond', TMB-2009, was held at the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics, (ICTP), Trieste, Italy on 27 July-7 August 2009. TMB-2009 united over 180 participants ranging from students to members of the National Academies of Sciences and Engineering, and including researchers at experienced and early stages of their carriers from leading scientific institutions in academia, national laboratories, corporations and industry worldwide. Responding to the community's inquiry and reaffirming the practices established at TMB-2007, two Round Tables were organized for the participants of TMB-2009 on 30 July 2009 and 6 August 2009 in the Oppenheimer Room at the Centre. The goals of the Round Tables were to encourage the information exchange among the members of the interdisciplinary and international TMB community, promote discussions regarding the state-of-the-art in TMB-related scientific areas, identify directions for frontier research, and articulate recommendations for future developments. This article is a summary of the collective work of the Round Table participants (listed alphabetically below by their last names), whose contributions form its substance and, as such, are greatly appreciated. Abarzhi, Snezhana I (University of Chicago, USA) Andrews, Malcolm (Los Alamos National Laboratory, USA) Belotserkovskii, Oleg (Institute for Computer Aided Design of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Russia) Bershadskii, Alexander (ICAR, Israel) Brandenburg, Axel (Nordita, Denmark) Chumakov, Sergei (Stanford University, USA) Desai, Tara (University of Milano-Bicocca, Italy) Galperin, Boris (University of South Florida, USA) Gauthier, Serge (Commissariat à l'Energie Atomique, France) Gekelman, Walter (University of California at Los Angeles, USA) Gibson, Carl (University of California at San Diego, USA) Goddard III, William A (California Institute of Technology, USA) Grinstein, Fernando

  11. Preface: phys. stat. sol. (c) 1/7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheikhrouhou, Abdelwaheb

    2004-05-01

    Physics Laboratory, Sciences Faculty of Sfax (Tunisia) and the Co-Chairmen were Professor Sami Mahmood, Dean of Sciences at Yarmouk University (Jordan) and Professor Mohamed Akhavan from the Sharif University of Technology (Iran). The four-day conference consisted of several oral and poster sessions, followed by social programs in the evenings. The success of the event could be measured during the closing session on the last day, when several delegates emphasized the high-quality science that had been evident at the conference. A post conference three-day tour to the south of Tunisia (Matmata, Douz City: the gate of desert and the mountains oasis: Tamerza, Mides and Chebika) was also arranged. The conference was generously sponsored by: - The Tunisian Ministry of High Education, Scientific Research and Technology - The Tunisian Secretary of State for Scientific Research and Technology - The Tunisian National Office of Tourism - The Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP) - French Institute for Cooperation in Tunisia - Tunisian-Italian Scientific Partnership - British Gas - Tunisian Society for Electricity and Gas - Imex Olive Oil -Confiserie TRIKI Le Moulin The next MSM conference in 2005 will be held in Morocco.

  12. International Symposium on Optics and its Applications (OPTICS-2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacherjee, Aranya B.; Calvo, Maria L.; Kazaryan, Eduard M.; Papoyan, Aram V.; Sarkisyan, Hayk A.

    2012-03-01

    the direction of their further studies. We are confident that the publication of the Symposium proceedings in JPCS, a worldwide-known open access journal, will help to disseminate and promote current activities in optics, thus facilitating international cooperation and the integration of Armenian scientists into the worldwide optical community. We would like to thank the sponsors of the Symposium: National Foundation of Science and Advanced Technologies (NFSAT), The Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP), LT-PYRKAL, State Committee of Science of Armenia, Russian-Armenian (Slavonic) University, and Devout Generation Foundation. We also express our gratitude to the members of the Program Committee for their organization of the manuscript reviewing. Special thanks go to Narine Gevorgyan, Lilit Mantashyan and Paytsar Mantashyan for their invaluable assistance in the compilation of this issue. The Editors, Aranya B Bhattacherjee, University of Delhi, India Maria L Calvo, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Spain Eduard M Kazaryan, Russian-Armenian (Slavonic) University, Armenia Aram V Papoyan, Institute for Physical Research of NAS, Armenia Hayk A Sarkisyan, Russian-Armenian (Slavonic) University, Armenia OPTICS group photograph Participants of OPTICS-2011 in front of Yerevan State University Group in Khor Virap Participants of OPTICS-2011 in Khor Virap The PDF also contains additional photographs from the Symposium.

  13. INTRODUCTION Summary of Papers Summary of Papers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauthier, Serge; Abarzhi, Snezhana I.; Sreenivasan, Katepalli R.

    2010-12-01

    review various aspects of Turbulent Mixing that were discussed at the Second International Conference and Advanced School 'Turbulent Mixing and Beyond', TMB-2009, held in summer 2009 at the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP), Trieste, Italy. The papers are arranged by TMB themes and within each theme they are ordered alphabetically by the last name of the first author, with tutorials following research contributions. Canonical turbulence and turbulent mixing. The theme of canonical turbulence and turbulent mixing is considered by several authors. Casciola et al investigate the dynamics of inertial particles dispersed in a turbulent jet and compare their numerical modeling results with the classical similarity theory of the jet far-field. Remarkable agreement is found between the theory and the direct numerical simulations (DNS), including decay of Stokes numbers with the distance from the origin, self-similarity of the mean axial particle velocity profile, etc. Nagata considers complex turbulent flows, which are known to exhibit no linear critical point for the laminar states, and which are linearly stable at finite Reynolds numbers. Square duct flow and sliding Couette flow in an annulus are considered and nonlinear traveling-wave states are found for the flows with the use of the homotopy approach developed by the author. These states may constitute a skeleton around which a time-dependent trajectory in the phase space is organized. Teitelbaum and Mininni study a decaying 3D incompressible turbulence, which mimicks turbulent mixing in geophysical flows, with rotation rendering the flow anisotropic at large scales. The authors analyze three DNS results (without and with rotation, and with helicity), observe a decoupling of the modes normal to the rotation axis, and show that the helicity decreases the decay rate of turbulence. Wang and Peters investigate the structure of turbulence by studying strain rates of various scalars, including a

  14. PREFACE: Statistical Physics of Complex Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golestanian, R.; Khajehpour, M. R. H.; Kolahchi, M. R.; Rouhani, S.

    2005-04-01

    meeting, covered some of the various areas in statistical physics currently active in Iran. About half of the participants came from countries other than Iran, with a relatively broad geographic distribution. The meeting benefited greatly from the excellent administrative assistance of the conference secretary Ms Ashraf Moosavi and the IASBS staff. We are grateful to Professor Yousef Sobouti, the Director of IASBS, and Professor Reza Mansouri, the Head of the Physical Society of Iran, for their support. We also thank the organizers of STATPHYS22, Professor Rahul Pandit and his colleagues, for their suggestions and support. The conference was supported by donations from the Center for International Research and Collaboration (ISMO) and the Institute for Research and Planning in Higher Education (IRPHE) of the Iranian Ministry of Science, Research and Technology, the Islamic Development Bank, the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP), the Tehran Cluster Office of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), the Research and Development Directorate of the National Iranian Oil Company, the Physical Society of Iran, the Iranian Meteorological Organization, and the Zanjan City Water and Waste Water Company. Finally, we would like to express our gratitude to Institute of Physics Publishing, and in particular to Professor Alexei Kornyshev and Dr Richard Palmer for suggesting publishing the proceedings of the meeting and carrying through the editorial processes with the utmost efficiency. Participants

  15. Performance of ICTP's RegCM4 in Simulating the Rainfall Characteristics over the CORDEX-SEA Domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neng Liew, Ju; Tangang, Fredolin; Tieh Ngai, Sheau; Chung, Jing Xiang; Narisma, Gemma; Cruz, Faye Abigail; Phan Tan, Van; Thanh, Ngo-Duc; Santisirisomboon, Jerasron; Milindalekha, Jaruthat; Singhruck, Patama; Gunawan, Dodo; Satyaningsih, Ratna; Aldrian, Edvin

    2015-04-01

    The performance of the RegCM4 in simulating rainfall variations over the Southeast Asia regions was examined. Different combinations of six deep convective parameterization schemes, namely i) Grell scheme with Arakawa-Schubert closure assumption, ii) Grell scheme with Fritch-Chappel closure assumption, iii) Emanuel MIT scheme, iv) mixed scheme with Emanuel MIT scheme over the Ocean and the Grell scheme over the land, v) mixed scheme with Grell scheme over the land and Emanuel MIT scheme over the ocean and (vi) Kuo scheme, and three ocean flux treatments were tested. In order to account for uncertainties among the observation products, four different gridded rainfall products were used for comparison. The simulated climate is generally drier over the equatorial regions and slightly wetter over the mainland Indo-China compare to the observation. However, simulation with MIT cumulus scheme used over the land area consistently produces large amplitude of positive rainfall biases, although it simulates more realistic annual rainfall variations. The simulations are found less sensitive to treatment of ocean fluxes. Although the simulations produced the rainfall climatology well, all of them simulated much stronger interannual variability compare to that of the observed. Nevertheless, the time evolution of the inter-annual variations was well reproduced particularly over the eastern part of maritime continent. Over the mainland Southeast Asia (SEA), unrealistic rainfall anomalies processes were simulated. The lacking of summer season air-sea interaction results in strong oceanic forcings over the regions, leading to positive rainfall anomalies during years with warm ocean temperature anomalies. This incurs much stronger atmospheric forcings on the land surface processes compare to that of the observed. A score ranking system was designed to rank the simulations according to their performance in reproducing different aspects of rainfall characteristics. The result suggests that the simulation with Emanuel MIT convective scheme and BATs land surface scheme produces better collective performance compare to the rest of the simulations.

  16. Comparison of bias correction methods for the RegCM4-ICTP daily precipitation simulation over the Great Alpine Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turco, Marco; von Hardenberg, Jost; Provenzale, Antonello

    2015-04-01

    Global Circulation Models (GCMs) are tools of primary importance to obtain future climate projections under different anthropogenic forcing scenarios. However, the GCM coarse resolution (generally few hundred kilometres) it is not suitable to analyse the projections at regional scale (generally few tens kilometres). Usually the gap between the coarse resolution GCMs and the appropriate scale for regional climate studies is bridged by means of dynamical and/or statistical downscaling techniques. The dynamical downscaling approach is based on high-resolution Regional Climate Models (RCM) -- with typical resolutions of tens of kilometres -- driven by GCMs within a limited domain. The RCMs explicitly solve mesoscale atmospheric processes and provide spatially coherent and, to a certain degree, physically consistent output. However, they have in general considerable biases and therefore often cannot directly be used as input for impact models but they must be corrected/calibrated. In this work, of preliminary nature, we focus on precipitation, a key variable for many impact sectors (agriculture, hydrology, etc.) which has a large uncertainty in RCMs and we describe a simple strategy to develop high-resolution precipitation projections over the Great Alpine Region (GAR) combining dynamical downscaling and statistical methods. Specifically, we compare three different bias correction methods to refine the precipitation simulated by the RegCM4 model and we assess the strengths and limitations of this approach in terms of its robust applicability for climate change studies.

  17. Current Trends in Condensed Matter, Particle Physics and Cosmology - Proceedings of the First BCSpin Kathmandu Summer School

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pati, J.; Shafi, Q.; Wadia, S.; Lu, Yu

    1990-09-01

    The Table of Contents for the full book PDF is as follows: * Organizing Committee * Foreword by Abdus Salam * Preface * Introduction to Critical Phenomena and to the Renormalization Group * Scaling and Structures in the Hard Turbulence Region of Rayleigh Benard Convection * A Simple Soluble Model of Self-Organized Criticality * Astroparticle Physics (1988) (Abstract) * Grand Unification and Beyond * A Natural Origin of Small Numbers Associated with the Hierarchical Scales and Inflation * The Particle/Cosmology Interface: Nucleosynthesis, Dark Matter and Galaxy Formation * The Virasoro Algebra and Critical Phenomena in 2-Dimensions (Abstract) * Superconductivity (Extended Abstract) * Superconductivity: Introduction to Ginzburg-Landau Phenomenology and Microscopic BSC Theory * Introduction to High-Tc Theory * Kathmandu Summer School Lectures * Characteristics High-Tc Copper Oxide Superconductors * Technical Applications of High Tc and Low Tc Superconductors

  18. Careers and people

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-10-01

    Simulation experts win Dirac Medal Condensed-matter theorists Roberto Car of Princeton University in the US and Michele Parrinello of the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH Zurich) have won the 2009 Dirac Medal for their work on numerical-simulation techniques. The pair began developing new methods of modelling molecular dynamics in the mid-1980s, using elements of density functional theory and Newtonian molecular dynamics to calculate the mechanical motion of atoms and molecules in real time. Now known as the Car-Parrinello method, their technique has become a standard tool in computational physics and chemistry. The award, which is announced each year on 8August, Dirac's birthday, carries a cash prize of 5000 and is sponsored by the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics in Trieste, Italy.

  19. The influence of horizontal boundaries on Ekman circulation and angular momentum transport in a cylindrical annulus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obabko, Aleksandr V.; Cattaneo, Fausto; F Fischer, Paul

    2008-12-01

    We present numerical simulations of circular Couette flow in axisymmetric and fully three-dimensional geometry of a cylindrical annulus inspired by Princeton magnetorotational instability (MRI) liquid gallium experiment. The incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are solved with the spectral element code Nek5000 incorporating realistic horizontal boundary conditions of differentially rotating rings. We investigate the effect of changing rotation rates (Reynolds number) and of the horizontal boundary conditions on flow structure, Ekman circulation and associated transport of angular momentum through the onset of unsteadiness and three-dimensionality. A mechanism for the explanation of the dependence of the Ekman flows and circulation on horizontal boundary conditions is proposed. First International Conference 'Turbulent Mixing and Beyond' held on 18-26 August 2007 at the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste, Italy.

  20. PREFACE: Turbulent Mixing and Beyond Turbulent Mixing and Beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abarzhi, Snezhana I.; Gauthier, Serge; Rosner, Robert

    2008-10-01

    mixing dynamics are interplayed with fundamental properties of the Euler and compressible Navier-Stokes equations, with the problem sensitivity to the initial conditions and to the boundary conditions at the discontinuities, and with its stochastic description. The state-of-the-art numerical simulations of the multi-phase non-equilibrium dynamics suggest new methods for capturing discontinuities and singularities and shock-interface interaction, for predictive modeling of the multi-scale dynamics in fluids and plasmas, for error estimate and uncertainty quantification as well as for novel data assimilation techniques. The First International Conference `Turbulent Mixing and Beyond' (TMB-2007), was held on 18-26 August 2007 at the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste, Italy. This was a highly informative and exciting meeting, by all the standards a major success. The Conference brought together 120 participants (307 authors) from five continents, ranging from students to members of National Academies of Sciences and Engineering and including researchers from the Universities, National Laboratories, Leading Scientific Institutions and Industry. TMB-2007 covered 16 different topics, maintaining the scope and the interdisciplinary character of the meeting, and kept the focus on a fundamental fluid dynamic problem of unsteady turbulent processes and the Conference Objectives. The success of the TMB-07 was a result of the successful work of all the participants, who were serious and professional people, caring for the quality of their research and sharing their scientific vision. The level of presentations was high, and the presentations included 87 oral contributions, 32 invited lectures and 5 tutorials and over 30 poster contributions. The round table discussions held at TMB-2007 investigated the organization of a Collaborative Computing Environment for the Turbulent Mixing and Beyond Community. The abstracts of the 150 accepted Conference

  1. Two new phloroglucinol derivatives and five photosensitizing pheophorbides from Syzygium polyanthum leaves (Salam).

    PubMed

    Har, Lee Wei; Shaari, Khozirah; Boon, Lee Hong; Kamarulzaman, Fadzly A; Ismail, Intan S

    2012-08-01

    Two new phloroglucinol derivatives, identified as anthuminoate (1) and anthuminone (2), were isolated from the ichthyotoxic ethyl acetate fraction of Syzygium polyanthum leaves. In addition, bioassay-guided fractionation followed by dereplication of the photocytotoxic fraction of this plant part has resulted in the identification of five known pheophorbides as the bioactive constituents. The compounds were identified as pheophorbide-a, methyl pheophorbide-a, methyl hydroxypheophorbide-a, pheophorbide-b and hydroxypheophorbide-b. Inhibition of cell viability shown by the compounds ranged from 83.3 to 86.1% at a test concentration of 5 microg/mL. This shows that Syzygium polyanthum leaves are a potential new source in the studies of photocytotoxicity for photodynamic therapy. PMID:22978223

  2. Baryogenesis in AN SO(10) GUT Model with Pati-Salam Intermediate Symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buccella, F.; Pisanti, O.; Rosa, L.

    The possibility of generating the observed baryon asymmetry of the universe in an SO(10) gauge model with spontaneous symmetry breaking pattern SO(10) MX--> SU(4){ PS} ⊗ SU(2)L ⊗ SU(2)R MR--> SU(3)c ⊗ SU(2)L ⊗ U(1)Y MZ--> SU(3)c ⊗ U(1)Q} is studied. We find it possible to generate a Δ B= {nB-n_{bar B}/{s} ˜ 10-11, converting the leptonic number produced at the B- L breaking scale via the B+L violating processes mediated by sphalerons at the electroweak scale. The resulting picture is tested against the limit coming from experimental data: proton lifetime and neutrino oscillations.

  3. PREFACE Turbulent Mixing and Beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abarzhi, Snezhana I.; Gauthier, Serge; Niemela, Joseph J.

    2010-12-01

    acceleration. Their scaling, spectral and invariant properties differ substantially from those of classical Kolmogorov turbulence. At atomistic and meso-scales, the non-equilibrium dynamics depart dramatically from a standard scenario given by the Gibbs statistic ensemble average and quasi-static Boltzmann equation. The singular aspect and the similarity of the non-equilibrium dynamics at macroscopic scales are interplayed with the fundamental properties of the Euler and compressible Navier-Stokes equations and with the problem sensitivity to the boundary conditions at discontinuities. The state-of-the-art numerical simulations of multi-phase flows suggest new methods for predictive modeling of the multi-scale non-equilibrium dynamics in fluids and plasmas, up to peta-scale level, for error estimate and uncertainty quantification, as well as for novel data assimilation techniques. The Second International Conference and Advanced School 'Turbulent Mixing and Beyond', TMB-2009, was held on 27 July-7 August 2009 at the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP), Trieste, Italy. This was a highly informative and exciting meeting, and it strengthened and reaffirmed the success of TMB-2007. TMB-2009 brought together over 180 participants from five continents, ranging from students to members of National Academies of Sciences and Engineering and including researchers at experienced and early stages of their carriers from leading scientific institutions in academia, national laboratories, corporations and industry, from developed and developing countries. The success of TMB-2009 came from the successful work of all the participants, who were responsible professionals caring for the quality of their research and sharing their scientific vision. The level of presentations was high; about 170 presentations included over 60 invited lectures and 15 tutorials (4500 minutes of talks in total), about 40 posters and two Round Tables. TMB-2009 covered 17 different topics

  4. Implementation and characterisation of new neutron imaging system for dynamic processes investigation at the Es-Salam research reactor.

    PubMed

    Kharfi, F; Denden, O; Abdelkader, A

    2011-10-01

    Neutron imaging is a powerful method for non-destructive investigations where high penetration through metals and in particular high contrast for hydrogenous materials maybe exploited. Due to the complexity of digital neutron static or video image formation, image capture conditions and parameters must be accurately selected. In this work, implementation of a new neutron imaging system based on CCD camera and LiF-ZnS scintillator is presented. The image characteristics in terms of contrast, noise and dynamic range and investigation limits of this new imaging system were studied as a function of the neutron source properties. PMID:21640596

  5. Logical obstacles in learning planetary motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dileep, V.; Sathe, D. V.

    Daniel Schaffer wrote now-a-days scientists and particularly theoretical physicists are not held in unquestioned esteem in his editorial This became the starting point of my presentation which was dedicated to the memory of Abdus Salam 1 Had he survived to witness the IYP he would have become surprised on knowing that Frank Wilczek had maximum trouble in learning classical mechanics 2 These facts require us to restudy learning O level physics from the logical point of view - in order to attract promising young students to take up challenges of physics and astronomy of the 21 st century Newton s laws of motion are known for more than 300 years and so there should not be any problems in learning and teaching these laws now in the 21 st century But findings of educators reported in the last 30 years show that there are some serious and global problems I have shown that there are some logical obstacles which make adverse effect on the comprehension of circular motion and related topics 3 In this presentation relevant aspects are discussed References begin enumerate item D V Sathe August 2001 Chemical Education International http www iupac org publications cei vol2 0201x0026 html item Frank Wilczek October 2004 Physics Today p 11 item D V Sathe December 2001 COSPAR Info Bulletin 152 p 53 end enumerate

  6. The New Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Paul

    1992-08-01

    The New Physics is the first book to give a complete and comprehensive account of everything that is new and most exciting in modern physics. What does the concept of chaos mean? What occurred in the first billionth of a second after the Universe came into existence? What is at the edge of space? How are stars born and how do they die? How does a laser work? What are the philosophical foundations of quantum mechanics? What are quarks and what does gauge theory mean? What happens to matter at very low temperatures? These and many more questions are answered in this book by some of the world's most famous living physicists, such as Stephen Hawking, Abdus Salam, A. Guth, Peter Knight, Malcom Longair and others. The New Physics is extensively illustrated with color photographs and clear explanatory diagrams, making this volume invaluable to both the general science reader who is curious about the physical makeup of the world, and the professional physicist who desires an authoritative summary of all the areas of modern physics.

  7. Influence of the Laurentian Great Lakes on Regional Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Notaro, M.; Holman, K.; Zarrin, A.; Fluck, E.; Vavrus, S. J.; Bennington, V.

    2012-12-01

    The influence of the Laurentian Great Lakes on climate is assessed by comparing two decade-long simulations, with the lakes either included or excluded, using the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics Regional Climate Model Version 4. The Great Lakes dampen the variability in near-surface air temperature across the surrounding region, while reducing the amplitude of the diurnal cycle and annual cycle of air temperature. The impacts of the Great Lakes on the regional surface energy budget include an increase (decrease) in turbulent fluxes during the cold (warm) season and an increase in surface downward shortwave radiation flux during summer due to diminished atmospheric moisture and convective cloud amount. Changes in the hydrologic budget due to the presence of the Great Lakes include increases in evaporation and precipitation during October-March and decreases during May-August, along with springtime reductions in snowmelt-related runoff. Circulation responses consist of a regionwide decrease in sea-level pressure in autumn-winter and an increase in summer, with enhanced ascent and descent in the two seasons, respectively. The most pronounced simulated impact of the Great Lakes on synoptic systems traversing the basin is a weakening of cold-season anticyclones.

  8. Troposphere-lower-stratosphere connection in an intermediate complexity model.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggieri, Paolo; King, Martin; Kucharski, Fred; Buizza, Roberto; Visconti, Guido

    2016-04-01

    The dynamical coupling between the troposphere and the lower stratosphere has been investigated using a low-top, intermediate complexity model provided by the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics (SPEEDY). The key question that we wanted to address is whether a simple model like SPEEDY can be used to understand troposphere-stratosphere interactions, e.g. forced by changes of sea-ice concentration in polar arctic regions. Three sets of experiments have been performed. Firstly, a potential vorticity perspective has been applied to understand the wave-like forcing of the troposphere on the stratosphere and to provide quantitative information on the sub seasonal variability of the coupling. Then, the zonally asymmetric, near-surface response to a lower-stratospheric forcing has been analysed in a set of forced experiments with an artificial heating imposed in the extra-tropical lower stratosphere. Finally, the lower-stratosphere response sensitivity to tropospheric initial conditions has been examined. Results indicate how SPEEDY captures the physics of the troposphere-stratosphere connection but also show the lack of stratospheric variability. Results also suggest that intermediate-complexity models such as SPEEDY could be used to investigate the effects that surface forcing (e.g. due to sea-ice concentration changes) have on the troposphere and the lower stratosphere.

  9. Aspects of Quantum Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salam, Abdus; Wigner, E. P.

    2010-03-01

    Preface; List of contributors; Bibliography of P. A. M. Dirac; 1. Dirac in Cambridge R. J. Eden and J. C. Polkinghorne; 2. Travels with Dirac in the Rockies J. H. Van Vleck; 3. 'The golden age of theoretical physics': P. A. M. Dirac's scientific work from 1924 to 1933 Jagdish Mehra; 4. Foundation of quantum field theory Res Jost; 5. The early history of the theory of electron: 1897-1947 A. Pais; 6. The Dirac equation A. S. Wightman; 7. Fermi-Dirac statistics Rudolph Peierls; 8. Indefinite metric in state space W. Heisenberg; 9. On bras and kets J. M. Jauch; 10. The Poisson bracket C. Lanczos; 11. La 'fonction' et les noyaux L. Schwartz; 12. On the Dirac magnetic poles Edoardo Amadli and Nicola Cabibbo; 13. The fundamental constants and their time variation Freeman J. Dyson; 14. On the time-energy uncertainty relation Eugene P. Wigner; 15. The path-integral quantisation of gravity Abdus Salam and J. Strathdee; Index; Plates.

  10. Unification of Einstein's Gravity with Quantum Chromodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarfatti, Jack

    2010-02-01

    The four tetrad and six spin-connection Cartan 1-forms of Einstein's GeoMetroDynamic (GMD) field emerge from the eight virtual gluon macro-quantum coherent QCD post-inflation vacuum condensates that form in the inflationary phase transition. This joint emergence of gravity and the strong force is similar to the emergence of irrotational superflow with vortex defects in liquid helium below the Lambda Point. Repulsive dark energy is from the residual random virtual bosons that did not cohere in the moment of inflation. Similarly, attractive dark matter is from the residual random virtual fermion-antifermion pairs. Therefore, I predict that the LHC will not detect any on-mass-shell real particles that can explain φDM˜0.23. As first suggested by Abdus Salam (f-gravity) the low energy tail of the nuclear force can be explained as strong short-range Yukawa gravity. QCD's IR confinement and UV asymptotic freedom are elementary consequences in this simple model. )

  11. How Do the Laurentian Great Lakes Water Levels Respond to Climate Change? A Regional Climate Model Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennington, V.; Notaro, M.; Vavrus, S. J.

    2012-12-01

    The Laurentian Great Lakes contain twenty percent of the world's surface freshwater. Over the past century, inter-annual water levels have fluctuated in a primarily cyclic pattern with amplitudes from 0.2 m in Lake Superior to 0.7 m in Lake Erie. These changes in water levels result in more significant changes in coastlines of the Great Lakes and alter shoreline erosion, pollutant concentrations, and shoreline habitat. As climate changes, we are interested in how lake levels will respond. Global scale climate models do not depict the Great Lakes, and thus, are unlikely to accurately capture the mechanisms impacting water levels. We utilize the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics Regional Climate Model 4 at 20 km horizontal resolution with an improved, explicit lake model, a groundwater module, and a channel routing model. We simulate the past regional climate (1978-present) using NCEP Reanalysis to evaluate model performance and biases. We then simulate present and future water levels using boundary conditions from the global Community Climate System Model. Model evaluation and preliminary findings for future water levels will be presented.

  12. Numerical simulations of thermal convection at high Prandtl numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silano, Gabriella

    2008-11-01

    Direct numerical simulations of thermal convection are conducted for a cylindrical cell of aspect ratio .5ex1-.1em/ -.15em.25ex2 . The Prandtl number (Pr) varies from 10^0 to 10^4 and the Rayleigh numbers (Ra) are moderate (10^5 < Ra < 10^9). This study is motivated by the fact that the role of the Prandtl number in convective heat transport is not yet fully understood. The three-dimensional behaviors of the temperature and velocity fields, of the viscous and thermal dissipation fields, and of the diffusive and convective heat fluxes are explored. In the ranges of Pr and Ra considered, we find steady, periodic and chaotic regimes, and large-scale structures which are more complex than the single recirculation cell filling the whole volume. Multiple flow structures are found to be associated with a given set of conditions. The multiple solutions seem to be more probable at higher Pr numbers and could explain the scatter in some data trends. In collaboration with Katepalli Raju Sreenivasan, The Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics - Trieste, and Roberto Verzicco, DIM, Universitàdegli Studi di Roma Tor Vergata - Roma.

  13. Protocols for In Vitro Mass Multiplication and Analysis of Medicinally Important Phenolics of a Salep Orchid, Satyrium nepalense D.Don ("Salam Mishri").

    PubMed

    Babbar, Shashi B; Singh, Deepak K

    2016-01-01

    Satyrium nepalense is a rare and threatened medicinal orchid, populations of which in its native habitats are dwindling because of indiscriminate collections and habitat destruction, thus necessitating the development of methods for its in situ and ex situ conservation. Because of non-endospermous nature of the seeds and the immature embryos at seed dispersal stage, orchids cannot be seed-propagated as other plants. Micropropagation, using plant tissue culture techniques, offers an effective method for the multiplication of orchids. In this chapter, a five-step efficient reproducible protocol for large-scale in vitro multiplication of Satyrium nepalense is described. The first step involves asymbiotic germination of seeds isolated from immature green pods and cultured on Mitra's medium (M) gelled with 0.8 % agar and supplemented with 2 % sucrose and 1 % peptone (hereafter referred to as basal medium, BM). On this medium, seeds start germinating after a week of culture. Protocorms developed from the seeds are sub-cultured on BM fortified with 4 μM kinetin (Kn) after 8 weeks, for shoot differentiation and multiplication. The shoots developed on Kn-supplemented medium are transferred to BM alone for their elongation for the same period. The elongated shoots are transferred to the rooting medium, comprising BM supplemented with 0.5 or 1.0 μM indole-3-butyric acid, for further 8 weeks. The regenerated plantlets are transferred to a potting mix of sand and vermiculite (1:1) for acclimatization. The tubers and leaves excised from both in vitro-developed plants and those from their native habitats are analyzed and compared for the contents and concentration of medicinally important phenolics using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), details of which are provided in this chapter. PMID:27108306

  14. South Asian Summer Monsoon Dynamics In A High-Resolution Nested Climate Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashfaq, M.; Ying, S.; Tung, W.; Trapp, R. J.; Gao, X.; Pal, J. S.; Diffenbuagh, N. S.

    2007-12-01

    We present results from a high-resolution climate simulation of the south Asian monsoon using the Abdus Salam Centre for Theoretical Physics Regional Climate Model (RegCM3). The RegCM3 experiment consists of a 30-year integration from 1961 to 1990 performed at a 25 km grid spacing. Atmospheric boundary conditions for the integration are provided by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Finite Volume General Circulation Model (FVGCM). The ability of RegCM3 to simulate the dynamics of the summer monsoon is tested by comparing a number of fields with observations, including upper and lower level circulation patterns, seasonal mean precipitation and temperature, and variations in tropospheric temperature gradient and easterly vertical shear. Our results show that RegCM3 is able to simulate the dynamical features of the South Asian summer monsoon reasonably well. For instance, the seasonal reversal of tropospheric temperature gradient and strengthening of easterly vertical shear compare well with observations. Furthermore, summer monsoon onset dates over land match reasonably well with the long-term onset-climatology, and the interannual variations in the anomalies of the local Hadley circulation and summer monsoon precipitation are strongly correlated. The primary discrepancies occur over areas of high seasonal precipitation - such as the west coasts of India and Myanmar - where RegCM3 values exceed those found in the observations. Similarly, RegCM3 overestimates precipitation values on the lee side of the Western Ghats. Compared to the driving FVGCM simulation, the RegCM3 simulation shows significant improvement in spatial pattern of seasonal precipitation.

  15. Projecting Future Water Levels of the Laurentian Great Lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennington, V.; Notaro, M.; Holman, K.

    2013-12-01

    The Laurentian Great Lakes are the largest freshwater system on Earth, containing 84% of North America's freshwater. The lakes are a valuable economic and recreational resource, valued at over 62 billion in annual wages and supporting a 7 billion fishery. Shipping, recreation, and coastal property values are significantly impacted by water level variability, with large economic consequences. Great Lakes water levels fluctuate both seasonally and long-term, responding to natural and anthropogenic climate changes. Due to the integrated nature of water levels, a prolonged small change in any one of the net basin supply components: over-lake precipitation, watershed runoff, or evaporation from the lake surface, may result in important trends in water levels. We utilize the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics's Regional Climate Model Version 4.5.6 to dynamically downscale three global global climate models that represent a spread of potential future climate change for the region to determine whether the climate models suggest a robust response of the Laurentian Great Lakes to anthropogenic climate change. The Model for Interdisciplinary Research on Climate Version 5 (MIROC5), the National Centre for Meteorological Research Earth system model (CNRM-CM5), and the Community Climate System Model Version 4 (CCSM4) project different regional temperature increases and precipitation change over the next century and are used as lateral boundary conditions. We simulate the historical (1980-2000) and late-century periods (2080-2100). Upon model evaluation we will present dynamically downscaled projections of net basin supply changes for each of the Laurentian Great Lakes.

  16. Investigating the relationship between Ambrosia pollen concentration and meteorological variables in a European domain based on CORDEX and CMIP5 simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torma, Csaba Zsolt; Giorgi, Filippo

    2016-04-01

    As part of the European project, ATOPICA (atopic diseases in changing climate, land use & air quality) evaluation and scenario simulations were accomplished on 50-km grid spacing over a European domain which was defined in the framework of the international initiation called COordinated Regional Downscaling Experiment (CORDEX). Based on observational data collected from European pollen data bases, the pollen peak season of Ambrosia artemisiifolia L. (short or common ragweed) was found between the period: August-September (AS). One sub-region was selected (the most contaminated one: southern part of the Carpathian Basin) for further studies. Based on the ERA-Interim driven simulation of a regional climate model (RegCM) developed at the Abdus Salam International Centre of Theoretical Physics: temperature and precipitation indices are introduced related to the total common ragweed pollen concentration amounts over the target region for the period 1984-2008. In each case (temperature, precipitation) the index was based on the August-September (AS, peak-season) and June-July (JJ, pre-season) means by subtracting the latter from the previous one. The results manifested in a relatively clear signal between total pollen amounts and the indices. The temperature index is negatively, while the precipitation index is positively correlated with the total pollen amounts. This means cooler and wetter pre-seasonal and relatively drier and warmer peak-season weather conditions are favorable for the common ragweed outburst with high pollen concentrations. In total twenty global climate models (GCMs) from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) and five regional climate models from the CORDEX initiative were involved in the analyses in order to assess the link between the indices and the seasonal total pollen amounts. The temperature and precipitation indices presented in this study can be a useful tool for seasonal pollen forecasting in future studies.

  17. INTRODUCTION: David Sherrington as a mentor of young scientists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldbart, Paul M.

    2008-08-01

    , unforgettable to the recipient. I usually appreciate the honesty and clarity that this straightforwardness embodies. But not always. Some years ago, I had the good fortune to spend a month in Oxford, thanks to David, and my family came with me, my son Ollie being about six years old at the time. One evening, David and his wife Margaret joined us for dinner and, some time after the meal was over, Ollie—who was still young enough to still regard his Dad as something of a superhero—wandered over to David and struck up a conversation: `Tho, Profethor Therrington. Wath my Daddy a good thtudent?' he asked. I can still see the look of horror on David's face. Should I lie and let the child find out the truth later? Or should I tell him what I really think? Well, as you might expect, honesty—delivered gently—prevailed. David rubbed his forehead, scrunched up his nose as if about to take a dose of medicine, and did the very best he could: 'Well, lad, fairly good,' he said, 'your Dad was a fairly good student.' I'd like to conclude with a reflection that often comes to my mind when I think of David. Not long ago, I happened to be in Trieste at the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics, a favorite destination of mine. Not so much for the scenery—although when you're coming from the heart of East Central Illinois, the Trieste scenery is not to be sniffed at. But, rather, I love ICTP for its palpable spirit of international and inter-cultural cooperation. While I was in Trieste it so happened that there were three workshops going on at the same time. One was on information processing and the visual cortex; another was on algorithmic complexity and combinatorial optimization; and the third was on glassy states of matter. I cannot have been alone in having the truly staggering realization that all three workshops were, to put it bluntly, exploring equivalent phenomena encoded in a common mathematical structure, and that the corresponding systems of equations were

  18. 3rd International Conference on Turbulent Mixing and Beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abarzhi, Snezhana I.; Gauthier, Serge; Keane, Christopher J.; Niemela, Joseph J.

    2013-07-01

    , technology and mathematics; (iii) TMB participants conduct highly innovative research and their interactions strengthen the community's might. Based on the success of the first and second conferences and on the recommendations of the conference round table discussions, and in response to the inquiry of the community, the Third International Conference on Turbulent Mixing and Beyond was organized. The Third International Conference on Turbulent Mixing and Beyond, TMB-2011, was held on 21-28 August 2011 at the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP), Trieste, Italy. This was a highly informative and exciting meeting, and it strengthened and reaffirmed the success of TMB-2009 and 2007. The objectives of the Third International Conference on Turbulent Mixing and Beyond were to: (i) focus the integration of theory, experiments, large-scale numerical simulations and state-of-the-art technologies on the exploration of physical mechanisms of non-equilibrium dynamics, from micro to macro-scales, in both high and low energy density regimes; (ii) foster the application of innovative approaches for tackling the fundamental aspects of turbulent mixing problems and for understanding and further extending the range of applicability of canonical considerations; (iii) encourage the development of new approaches and stimulate the application of advanced data analysis techniques for unified characterization of experimental and numerical data sets, for estimation of their quality and information capacity, and for transforming data to knowledge; (iv) further develop the 'Turbulent Mixing and Beyond' community via organizing a positive and constructive collaborative environment, maintaining the quality of information flux in the community and sharing research methodologies, tools and data among the community members. The objectives were accomplished at TMB-2011. 4. Programme of TMB-2011 TMB-2011 brought together 150 participants, ranging from students to members of

  19. PREFACE: 3rd Italian-Pakistani Workshop on Relativistic Astrophysics (IPWRA2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Paolis, Francesco; Siddiqui, Azad A.

    2012-03-01

    into the world of research by Sir Roger Penrose, who was his PhD supervisor. They worked on Twistor theory, which was one of the foremost runners in the race to quantize gravity at the time. Later in 1971, he joined Quaid-i-Azam University (then Islamabad University) and developed research collaborations with several well-known physicists and mathematicians including John Archibald Wheeler and Remo Ruffini. Of special mention are his efforts with Abdus Salam (NL) for encouraging Physics and Mathematics in the Third World and especially in Pakistan (by running the Salam Prize in Science). Asghar has since become one of the world's top relativists and a leading name in the study of symmetries. In 2004, he founded the Centre for Advanced Mathematics and Physics at NUST. Under his dynamic leadership, the centre has become as influential as any other institute of Pakistan in the development of Mathematics and Mathematical Physics within a very short time. One of his many talents is his amazing ability to detect potential for science among his students. As a result he has been able to successfully guide an astonishing number of PhDs - 14 to be exact and still counting, and no doubt this has been his greatest contribution to Relativity in Pakistan. Asghar has received several national and international awards and honours for his services to science in and outside Pakistan. 65th Birthday Celebrations of the 65th birthday of Asghar Qadir during the third Italian-Pakistani workshop on Relativistic Astrophysics These Proceedings contain revised versions of selected papers presented at the Workshop, which has been sponsored by the Salento University, the National University of Sciences and Technology, the Abdus Salam International Center for Theoretical Physics and the National Institute of Nuclear Physics (INFN, Section of Lecce). All these institutions are acknowledged here for their support together with the bank Monte dei Paschi di Siena. Participants Participants of the third

  20. Fundamentals of planar-type inductively coupled thermal plasmas on a substrate for large-area material processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tial, Mai Kai Suan; Irie, Hiromitsu; Maruyama, Yuji; Tanaka, Yasunori; Uesugi, Yoshihiko; Ishijima, Tatsuo

    2016-07-01

    In this work, the fundamentals of planar-type Ar inductively coupled thermal plasmas (ICTPs) with oxygen molecular gas on a substrate have been studied. Previously, aiming at large-area material processing, we developed a planar-type ICTP torch with a rectangular quartz vessel instead of a conventional cylindrical tube. For the adoption of such planar-type ICTP to material processing, it is necessary to sustain the ICTP with molecular gases on a substrate stably and uniformly. To determine the uniformity of the ICTP formed on the substrate, spectroscopic observation was carried out at 3 mm above the substrate. Results showed that the radiation intensities of specified O atomic lines were almost uniformly detected along the surface of the substrate. This means that excited O atoms, which are important radicals for thermal plasma oxidation, are present in the planar-type ICTP uniformly on the substrate.

  1. From Schawlow to Newton: An educational return

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sathe, D.

    Newton's laws of motion and his theory of gravitation are known for over 300 years. However, investigations of educators, from various countries and carried out in the last quarter of the 20t h century, show that the Aristotelian ideas keep persisting among students - in spite of learning thes e topics in schools and colleges. In the traditional examinations students do give answers in accordance with Newton's laws but in questionnaires of educators they ignore Newtonian laws unknowingly, and quite naturally give answers along the Aristotelian line of thought. Why do they give such contrasting answers? Should we take for granted that their understanding of Newtonian laws is satisfactory because of their correct answers in traditional exams, though not in questionnaires? Can these contrasting views affect their interest in physics? These are some questions that warrant our attention earnestly, as we gear up for the research and teaching in 21s t century. The author felt the need of focusing attention on the logical aspects of the subject, due to the global character of said problem. His decision was strengthened greatly, in late1970s, by the philosophy of Dennis Sciama and hence author's dedication of a letter to the editor to his memory, in the COSPAR Info. Bulletin /1/. Being a trained biochemist, author started looking for points, missed by the earlier educators - that means author started following the advice of Arthur Schawlow /2/ in late 1970s, though unknowingly. Sadly, author came to know of it after dedicating a lecture to the memory of Abdus Salam in a symposium in Samarkand, Uzbekistan. Therefore he is dedicating this presentation to the memory of Arthur Schawlow. According to the present author, the persistence of Aristotelian ideas and consequent contrasting performances of students are due to the logical conflicts between the basic concepts of physics itself. For example, the conflict between the treatment of uniform circular motion and the concept of

  2. Quantum Structure of Space and Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duff, M. J.; Isham, C. J.

    2012-07-01

    Foreword Abdus Salam; Preface; List of participants; Part I. Quantum Gravity, Fields and Topology: 1. Some remarks on gravity and quantum mechanics Roger Penrose; 2. An experimental test of quantum gravity Don N. Page and C. D. Geilker; 3. Quantum mechanical origin of the sandwich theorem in classical gravitation theory Claudio Teitelboim; 4. θ-States induced by the diffeomorphism group in canonically quantized gravity C. J. Isham; 5. Strong coupling quantum gravity: an introduction Martin Pilati; 6. Quantizing fourth order gravity theories S. M. Christensen; 7. Green's functions, states and renormalisation M. R. Brown and A. C. Ottewill; 8. Introduction to quantum regge calculus Martin Roček and Ruth Williams; 9. Spontaneous symmetry breaking in curved space-time D. J. Toms; 10. Spontaneous symmetry breaking near a black hole M. S. Fawcett and B. F. Whiting; 11. Yang-Mills vacua in a general three-space G. Kunstatter; 12. Fermion fractionization in physics R. Jackiw; Part II. Supergravity: 13. The new minimal formulation of N=1 supergravity and its tensor calculus M. F. Sohnius and P. C. West; 14. A new deteriorated energy-momentum tensor M. J. Duff and P. K. Townsend; 15. Off-shell N=2 and N=4 supergravity in five dimensions P. Howe; 16. Supergravity in high dimensions P. van Niewenhuizen; 17. Building linearised extended supergravities J. G. Taylor; 18. (Super)gravity in the complex angular momentum plane M. T. Grisaru; 19. The multiplet structure of solitons in the O(2) supergravity theory G. W. Gibbons; 20. Ultra-violet properties of supersymmetric gauge theory S. Ferrara; 21. Extended supercurrents and the ultra-violet finiteness of N=4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills theories K. S. Stelle; 22. Duality rotations B. Zumino; Part III. Cosmology and the Early Universe: 23. Energy, stability and cosmological constant S. Deser; 24. Phase transitions in the early universe T. W. B. Kibble; 25. Complete cosmological theories L. P. Grishchuk and Ya. B. Zeldovich; 26. The

  3. High-resolution climate simulations for Central Europe: An assessment of dynamical and statistical downscaling techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miksovsky, J.; Huth, R.; Halenka, T.; Belda, M.; Farda, A.; Skalak, P.; Stepanek, P.

    2009-12-01

    To bridge the resolution gap between the outputs of global climate models (GCMs) and finer-scale data needed for studies of the climate change impacts, two approaches are widely used: dynamical downscaling, based on application of regional climate models (RCMs) embedded into the domain of the GCM simulation, and statistical downscaling (SDS), using empirical transfer functions between the large-scale data generated by the GCM and local measurements. In our contribution, we compare the performance of different variants of both techniques for the region of Central Europe. The dynamical downscaling is represented by the outputs of two regional models run in the 10 km horizontal grid, ALADIN-CLIMATE/CZ (co-developed by the Czech Hydrometeorological Institute and Meteo-France) and RegCM3 (developed by the Abdus Salam Centre for Theoretical Physics). The applied statistical methods were based on multiple linear regression, as well as on several of its nonlinear alternatives, including techniques employing artificial neural networks. Validation of the downscaling outputs was carried out using measured data, gathered from weather stations in the Czech Republic, Slovakia, Austria and Hungary for the end of the 20th century; series of daily values of maximum and minimum temperature, precipitation and relative humidity were analyzed. None of the regional models or statistical downscaling techniques could be identified as the universally best one. For instance, while most statistical methods misrepresented the shape of the statistical distribution of the target variables (especially in the more challenging cases such as estimation of daily precipitation), RCM-generated data often suffered from severe biases. It is also shown that further enhancement of the simulated fields of climate variables can be achieved through a combination of dynamical downscaling and statistical postprocessing. This can not only be used to reduce biases and other systematic flaws in the generated time

  4. ­­­The Role of the Tibetan Plateau in the South Asian Monsoon Atmospheric Circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega Arango, S.; Webster, P. J.; Toma, V. E.

    2014-12-01

    The role of the Tibetan Plateau in the South Asian Monsoon circulation is the focus of this study. Typically, the Tibetan Plateau is thought to affect the circulation by acting as an elevated heat source (Molnar et al. 1993). Through radiative effects, the Tibetan Plateau would induce a meridional pressure gradient at upper levels initiating the monsoon circulation. Indeed, numerical experiments have shown that global orography affects the timing of the monsoon onset (Chakraborty et al. 2006), and observations have shown significant correlations between the moist static energy of the Tibetan Plateau's lower atmosphere and the summer monsoon rainfall around the onset and withdraw periods (Rajagopalan and Molnar 2013). Yet, this notion has been recently questioned, and the shielding effect of the orography has been suggested to be the dominant effect in the circulation. This latter theory is supported by numerical experiments suggesting that summer precipitation does not change considerably when removing the Plateau while retaining the Himalayas (Boos and Kuang 2010). Nonetheless, both the Himalayas and the Plateau are likely to play important roles, and further experiments are needed. In this study we construct numerical experiments to further study the role of the Tibetan Plateau in the atmospheric circulation. For the experiments we use SPEEDY, a global climate model of intermediate complexity developed at the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics (Molteni 2003). The experiments are conducted with different regional orographic conditions, so that we can evaluate the impact orography has in determining the characteristics of the monsoon circulation. In all experiments the atmosphere is started from a state of rest and we avoid using climatological fields for sea surface temperature, diabatic heating, and land temperature. This setup is particularly important as we wish to evaluate how the system evolves under different conditions without imposing

  5. International conference on Statistical Mechanics of Plasticity and Related Instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2006-11-01

    The papers compiled in this volume are based on talks and posters given at the International Conference on "Statistical Mechanics of Plasticity and Related Instabilities", (SMPRI 2005), held at the Materials Research Center of the Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore, India, from August 29 to September 2, 2005. Our aim in organizing SMPRI 2005 was to promote and enhance interactions between researchers from the statistical physics, materials science and solid mechanics communities. While predicting the (macroscopic) deformation properties of materials is a classical topic of materials science and materials mechanics, statistical physicists have become increasingly interested in the collective processes which control the irreversible deformation of matter on microscopic and mesoscopic scales. The SMPRI 2005 meeting has been a forum for the exchange of concepts, research ideas, and results among these communities. We hope that the contributions contained in this proceedings volume will not only help to continue and deepen this exchange, but also to disseminate the results beyond the, necessarily limited, circle of the actual participants. We want to thank all contributors for the work in preparing their manuscripts. We are grateful to the institutions which have supported this conference, in particular the Asian Office for Aerospace Research and Developement (AOARD/AFOSR), the Jawaharlal Nehru Center for Advanced Scientific Research, the Indian Center for Scientific and Industrial Research, the Indian Defense Research and Developement Organization, The Abdus Salam International Center for Theoretical Physics, Italy, the Indian Institute of Science, in particular the Center for Condensed Matter Theory and Materials Reseach Center, the Department of Science and Technology, India, the Materials Research Society of India, and the Karnatake State Center for Science and Technology. We would also like to thank the staff and students of Materials Research Center, Indian

  6. Sensitivity of the GCM driven summer monsoon simulations to cumulus parameterization schemes in nested RegCM3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, P.; Mohanty, U. C.; Kar, S. C.; Dash, S. K.; Kumari, S.

    2013-04-01

    The regional climate model (RegCM3) from the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics has been used to simulate the Indian summer monsoon for three different monsoon seasons such as deficit (1987), excess (1988) and normal (1989). Sensitivity to various cumulus parameterization and closure schemes of RegCM3 driven by the National Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasting global spectral model products has been tested. The model integration of the nested RegCM3 is conducted using 90 and 30-km horizontal resolutions for outer and inner domains, respectively. The India Meteorological Department gridded rainfall (1° × 1°) and National Centre for Environment Prediction (NCEP)-Department of Energy (DOE) reanalysis-2 of 2.5° × 2.5° horizontal resolution data has been used for verification. The RegCM3 forced by NCEP-DOE reanalysis-2 data simulates monsoon seasons of 1987 and 1988 reasonably well, but the monsoon season of 1989 is not represented well in the model simulations. The RegCM3 runs driven by the global model are able to bring out seasonal mean rainfall and circulations well with the use of the Grell and Anthes-Kuo cumulus scheme at 90-km resolution. While the rainfall intensity and distribution is brought out well with the Anthes-Kuo scheme, upper air circulation features are brought out better by the Grell scheme. The simulated rainfall distribution is better with RegCM3 using the MIT-Emanuel cumulus scheme for 30-km resolution. Several statistical analyses, such as correlation coefficient, root mean square error, equitable threat score, confirm that the performance of MIT-Emanuel scheme at 30-km resolution is better in simulating all-India summer monsoon rainfall. The RegCM3 simulated rainfall amount is more and closer to observations than that from the global model. The RegCM3 has corrected its driven GCM in terms of rainfall distribution and magnitude over some parts of India during extreme years. This study brings out several

  7. A projection of permafrost degradation on the Tibetan Plateau during the 21st century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Donglin; Wang, Huijun; Li, Duo

    2012-03-01

    The current distribution and future change of permafrost on the Tibetan Plateau were examined using the Community Land Model version 4 (CLM4) with explicit treatment of frozen soil processes. When forced off-line with archived high-resolution data from The Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics Regional Climate Model version 3 nested within the Model for Interdisciplinary Research on Climate 3.2 HiRes, the CLM4 produced a near-surface permafrost area of 122.2 × 104 km2 for the Tibetan Plateau. This area compares reasonably with area estimates of 126.7 × 104 km2 for the Plateau frozen soil map. In response to the simulated strong Plateau warming (approximately 0.58°C per decade over the Tibetan Plateau for the period from 1980 to 2100 under the A1B greenhouse gas emissions scenario), the near-surface permafrost area is projected to decrease by approximately 39% by the mid-21st century and by approximately 81% by the end of the 21st century. The near-surface permafrost area exhibits a significant decreasing linear trend, with a rate of decrease of 9.9 × 104 km2 per decade. The simulated deep permafrost area remains longer than the near-surface permafrost for the same period. The active layer thickness of 0.5-1.5 m found in the present-day increases to approximately 1.5-2.0 m by the period of 2030-2050. This increase will continue and reach a level of 2.0-3.5 m by the period of 2080-2100. Surface runoff decreases but subsurface runoff increases, both relative to the difference between precipitation and evapotranspiration. This is related to the fact that the decrease in ground ice content, as caused by permafrost degradation, facilitates the percolation of more water to deeper soil layers, thus resulting in the reallocation of runoff. These results provide useful references for evaluating the level of permafrost degradation in response to climate warming on the Tibetan Plateau.

  8. Best convective parameterization scheme within RegCM4 to downscale CMIP5 multi-model data for the CORDEX-MENA/Arab domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almazroui, Mansour; Islam, Md. Nazrul; Al-Khalaf, A. K.; Saeed, Fahad

    2016-05-01

    A suitable convective parameterization scheme within Regional Climate Model version 4.3.4 (RegCM4) developed by the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste, Italy, is investigated through 12 sensitivity runs for the period 2000-2010. RegCM4 is driven with European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) ERA-Interim 6-hourly boundary condition fields for the CORDEX-MENA/Arab domain. Besides ERA-Interim lateral boundary conditions data, the Climatic Research Unit (CRU) data is also used to assess the performance of RegCM4. Different statistical measures are taken into consideration in assessing model performance for 11 sub-domains throughout the analysis domain, out of which 7 (4) sub-domains give drier (wetter) conditions for the area of interest. There is no common best option for the simulation of both rainfall and temperature (with lowest bias); however, one option each for temperature and rainfall has been found to be superior among the 12 options investigated in this study. These best options for the two variables vary from region to region as well. Overall, RegCM4 simulates large pressure and water vapor values along with lower wind speeds compared to the driving fields, which are the key sources of bias in simulating rainfall and temperature. Based on the climatic characteristics of most of the Arab countries located within the study domain, the drier sub-domains are given priority in the selection of a suitable convective scheme, albeit with a compromise for both rainfall and temperature simulations. The most suitable option Grell over Land and Emanuel over Ocean in wet (GLEO wet) delivers a rainfall wet bias of 2.96 % and a temperature cold bias of 0.26 °C, compared to CRU data. An ensemble derived from all 12 runs provides unsatisfactory results for rainfall (28.92 %) and temperature (-0.54 °C) bias in the drier region because some options highly overestimate rainfall (reaching up to 200 %) and underestimate

  9. INTRODUCTION Outline of Round Tables Outline of Round Tables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abarzhi, Snezhana I.; Sreenivasan, Katepalli R.

    2010-12-01

    The Second International Conference and Advanced School 'Turbulent Mixing and Beyond', TMB-2009, was held at the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics, (ICTP), Trieste, Italy on 27 July-7 August 2009. TMB-2009 united over 180 participants ranging from students to members of the National Academies of Sciences and Engineering, and including researchers at experienced and early stages of their carriers from leading scientific institutions in academia, national laboratories, corporations and industry worldwide. Responding to the community's inquiry and reaffirming the practices established at TMB-2007, two Round Tables were organized for the participants of TMB-2009 on 30 July 2009 and 6 August 2009 in the Oppenheimer Room at the Centre. The goals of the Round Tables were to encourage the information exchange among the members of the interdisciplinary and international TMB community, promote discussions regarding the state-of-the-art in TMB-related scientific areas, identify directions for frontier research, and articulate recommendations for future developments. This article is a summary of the collective work of the Round Table participants (listed alphabetically below by their last names), whose contributions form its substance and, as such, are greatly appreciated. Abarzhi, Snezhana I (University of Chicago, USA) Andrews, Malcolm (Los Alamos National Laboratory, USA) Belotserkovskii, Oleg (Institute for Computer Aided Design of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Russia) Bershadskii, Alexander (ICAR, Israel) Brandenburg, Axel (Nordita, Denmark) Chumakov, Sergei (Stanford University, USA) Desai, Tara (University of Milano-Bicocca, Italy) Galperin, Boris (University of South Florida, USA) Gauthier, Serge (Commissariat à l'Energie Atomique, France) Gekelman, Walter (University of California at Los Angeles, USA) Gibson, Carl (University of California at San Diego, USA) Goddard III, William A (California Institute of Technology, USA) Grinstein, Fernando

  10. Mixing and turbulent mixing in fluids, plasma and materials: summary of works presented at the 3rd International Conference on Turbulent Mixing and Beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauthier, Serge; Keane, Christopher J.; Niemela, Joseph J.; Abarzhi, Snezhana I.

    2013-07-01

    was held in the summer of 2011 at the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP), Trieste, Italy. The papers are arranged by TMB themes, and within each theme they are ordered alphabetically by the last name of the first author. The collection includes regular research papers, a few research briefs and review papers. The review papers are published as 'Comments' articles in Physica Scripta . Canonical turbulence and turbulent mixing. Six papers are devoted to canonical turbulence and turbulent mixing. Baumert presents a theory of shear-generated turbulence, which is based on a two-fluid concept. Gampert et al investigate the problem of adequate representation of turbulent structures by applying a decomposition of the field of the turbulent kinetic energy into regions of compressive and extensive strain. Paul and Narashima consider the dynamics of a temporal mixing layer using a vortex sheet model. Schaefer et al analyse the joint statistics and conditional mean strain rates of streamline segments in turbulent flows. Sirota and Zybin deepen their discussion of the connection between Lagrangian and Eulerian velocity structure functions in hydrodynamic turbulence. Talbot et al investigate the heterogeneous mixing by considering gases of very nearly equal densities and very different viscosities. Wall-bounded flows. Three papers are dedicated to wall-bounded flows. Mok et al use the Bayesian spectral density approach to identify the dominant free surface fluctuation frequency downstream of an oscillating hydraulic jump. Tejada-Martinez et al employ large eddy numerical simulations to study wind-driven shallow water flows with and without full-depth Langmuir circulation (parallel counter rotating vortices). Wu et al re-evaluate the Karman constant based on a multi-layer analytical theory of Prandtl's mixing length function. Non-equilibrium processes. This theme is represented by two papers. Chasheckhin and Zagumennyi consider non-equilibrium processes

  11. Investigation on evaporation of Ti feedstock and formation of precursor TiO molecules during TiO2 nanopowder synthesis in induction thermal plasma with time-controlled feedstock injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodama, Naoto; Kita, Kentaro; Ishisaka, Yosuke; Tanaka, Yasunori; Uesugi, Yoshihiko; Ishijima, Tatsuo; Sueyasu, Shiori; Nakamura, Keitaro; Kanazawa University Team; Nisshin Seifun Group Inc. Team

    2015-09-01

    The method using inductively coupled thermal plasma(ICTP) is very effective for nanopowder(NPs) synthesis. However, NPs formation process in the ICTP torch has not been clarified. In this study, the two-dimensional spectroscopic observation was carried out for ICTP torch during TiO2 NPs synthesis process with time-controlled feedstock injection. In order to investigate evaporation process of feedstock and formation process of precursor molecules, Ti feedstock was intermittently injected into the ICTP. Ti I(453.32 nm) and TiO(621 nm) were observed by using an imaging spectroscopic system. Observation results show that injected Ti feedstock was evaporated in the ICTP. Then, generated Ti atoms were transported to downstream of the torch by gas flow and were diffused to the radial direction by density gradient. High concentration of TiO molecular gas was formed only around central axis region in the torch.

  12. From biologically-inspired physics to physics-inspired biology From biologically-inspired physics to physics-inspired biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornyshev, Alexei A.

    2010-10-01

    foreseen at that time. But very soon Hertz understood how to generate them, Thomson how to receive them, and now we have the world all connected online. My next stamp goes to the Zhukovski equation of the hydrodynamics of a wing, which explained how aerodynamic lift force is generated. Now we can get from London to Washington in a third of a day, essentially due to that equation. Of the many things that the genius of Einstein discovered his energy-matter relation has led us to atomic power, whether we like it or not. Rutherford and Bohr unraveled the structure of atoms and all our materials science followed from it. Discovery of the transistor made the world of electronics and computers possible, and, again—whether we like it or not—most of us spend many hours daily staring at computer screens. Crick's equations and Franklin-Wilkins' observations (made possible by Roentgen's discovery that I omitted to mention after Maxwell) gave rise to the world of molecular biology which could also be easily forgotten by the wide public, if not our ever grateful forensic experts. Just two more milestones of much more 'modest' caliber. This is the discovery of lasers which are massively used for communication, in medicine and spectroscopy, including biological research. Next, I mention the discovery of scanning probe techniques, which allowed us to see individual atoms. For these two I did not even find stamps, but I am sure they must exist somewhere. The STM has just led Stuart Lindsey's team (University of Arizona) to the first steps towards ultrafast sequencing of DNA using functionalized STM tips. At the Abdus Salam International Center for Theoretical Physics there is no need to convince anyone that involved mathematics and physics is needed. But neither do we need to explain to anyone there that the applications of physics may be equally exciting as its fundamentals. The appreciation of massive achievements of physical methods in DNA research made it possible to host and

  13. Serum Vitamin D and Pyridinoline Cross-Linked Carboxyterminal Telopeptide of Type I Collagen in Patients with Ankylosing Spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Pingping; Li, Qiuxia; Wei, Qiujing; Liao, Zetao; Lin, Zhiming; Fang, Linkai; Gu, Jieruo

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To assess the serum vitamin D and ICTP levels in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and investigate their relationship with disease activity and bone mineral density (BMD). Method. 150 patients and 168 controls were included. Serum 25(OH)D, ICTP, C-reaction protein (CRP), Bath AS Disease Activity Index (BASDAI), Bath AS Functional Index (BASFI), and Hip BMD were assessed in patients. 25(OH)D and ICTP were detected in controls. Results. The serum 25(OH)D in AS was 57.92 ± 24.42 nmol/L, significantly lower than controls (91.24 ± 42.02 nmol/L). Serum ICTP in AS was 5.72 ± 3.88 ug/L, significantly higher than controls (3.69 ± 1.26 ug/L). ICTP level was higher in men than in women patients (6.07 ± 4.05 versus 3.84 ± 1.96 ug/L, P ≤ 0.01); it was also higher in JAS than in AAS (9.52 ± 3.79 versus 5.27 ± 3.65 ug/L, P ≤ 0.01). Furthermore, 25(OH)D was negatively correlated with ICTP. Low 25(OH)D and high ICTP were one of the reasons of AS patients' low hip BMD. Besides, a significant relationship was found between serum ICTP and CRP. Conclusion. There was a high incidence of vitamin D inadequacy in AS. Serum ICTP level was elevated in AS, especially in JAS and male patients. 25(OH)D and ICTP seem to be valuable markers to detect bone loss in AS. PMID:26273628

  14. A longitudinal study of the effect of heparin thromboprophylaxis during pregnancy on maternal bone metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Ogueh, O; Johnson, M R; Benjamin, A

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of heparin thromboprophylaxis during pregnancy on maternal biochemical markers of bone metabolism. This was a prospective longitudinal study of carboxy terminal pro-peptide of type I collagen (PICP) and cross-linked carboxyterminal telopeptide of type I collagen (ICTP) levels in 15 women, who had heparin thromboprophylaxis during pregnancy compared with those of 18 normal pregnant controls. During pregnancy, the rate of change of PICP and ICTP in women who had heparin thromboprophylaxis was similar to those of women who did not (P = 0.184 for PICP, and P = 0.129 for ICTP), and PICP and ICTP levels at individual time points were similar in both groups. Therefore, heparin thromboprophylaxis during pregnancy does not affect maternal biochemical markers of bone metabolism.

  15. Tribute to Professor Padma Kant Shukla on the occasion of his 60th birthday

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendis, Asoka

    2010-08-01

    to his schoolteacher's expectations he later graduated (with honors) from Agra University at the age of 17 and then proceeded to obtain his PhD in physics from the Hindu Banaras University, at the age of 21. He then proceeded to the University of Umeå, Sweden, on scholarship, and quickly blossomed to his full potential under the caring guidance of Prof. Lennart Stenflo, while also earning his second PhD, three years later. These early experiences deeply influenced Padma; on the one hand he recognizes that raw talent exists in all corners of the world, and on the other hand he feels a deep commitment to help discover, nurture, and mentor such talent. Toward this end Padma did several things. He organized numerous international meetings in both developed and developing nations. He has also continued to organize the annual Plasma Physics Summer School at the Abdus Salam International Center for Theoretical Physics in Trieste, Italy. He has used these opportunities to discover promising young scientists from the world over, helping them to come to his host university in Bochum, with support obtained from various international organizations, and mentored them. These young scholars, haling from every continent of the world, have gone on to become active scientists in their own right and many have proceeded to become leading researchers, educators, and administrators in their home countries. It is in recognition of his “extraordinary efforts in the discovery, the nurturing and mentoring of scientific talent across the globe” that he received the highly prestigious Nicholson Medal, awarded by the American Physical Society, for human outreach by a leading scientist in 2005. In recognition of his outstanding scientific contributions Padma has received numerous international honors including several honorary doctorates, foreign membership of several national academies, fellowships of a number of international scientific organizations and prizes. Yet, I think that among all

  16. Pions to Quarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Laurie Mark; Dresden, Max; Hoddeson, Lillian

    2009-01-01

    neutrino Frederick Reines; 25. Recollections on the establishment of the weak-interaction notion Bruno M. Pontecorvo; 26. Symmetry and conservation laws in particle physics in the fifties Louis Michel; 27. A connection between the strong and weak interactions Sam B. Treiman; Part VII. Weak interactions and parity nonconservation; 29. The nondiscovery of parity nonconservation Allan Franklin; 30. K-meson decays and parity violation Richard H. Dalitz; 31. An Experimentalist's Perspective Val L. Fitch; 32. The early experiments leading to the V - A interaction Valentine L. Telegdi; 33. Midcentury adventures in particles physics E. C. G. Sudarshan; Part VIII. The particle physics community; 34. The postwar political economy of high-energy physics Robert Seidel; 35. The history of CERN during the early 1950s Edoardo Amaldi; 36. Arguments pro and contra the European laboratory in the participating countries Armin Hermann; 37. Physics and excellences of the life it brings Abdus Salam; 38. Social aspects of Japanese particle physics in the 1950s Michiji Konuma; Part IX. Theories of hadrons; 39. The early S-matrix theory and its propagation (1942-1952) Helmut Rechenberg; 40. From field theory to phenomenology: the history of dispersion relations Andy Pickering; 41. Particles as S-matrix poles: hadron democracy Geoffrey F. Chew; 42. The general theory of quantised fields in the 1950s Arthur S. Wrightman; 43. The classification and structure of hadrons Yuval Ne'eman; 44. Gauge principle, vector-meson dominance and spontaneous symmetry breaking Yoichiro Nambu; Part X. Personal overviews; 45. Scientific impact of the first decade of the Rochester conferences (1950-1960) Robert E. Marshak; 46. Some reflections on the history of particle physics in the 1950s Silvan S. Schweber; 47. Progress in elementary particle theory 1950-1964 Murray Gell-Mann.

  17. Main natural hazards and vulnerability studies for some historical constructions and urban sectors of Valparaiso City (Chile)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanelli, F.

    2009-04-01

    The Project "MAR VASTO" ("Risk Management in Valparaíso/Manejo de Riesgos en Valparaíso, Servicios Técnicos", 2007) started in March 2007, with coordination of ENEA (Italian Agency for New Technologies, Energy and Environment), participation of several partners (Italy: University of Ferrara, Faculties of Architecture and Engineering; University of Padua, Faculty of Engineering; Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics of Trieste; Chile: Valparaíso Technical University Federico Santa Maria, Civil Works Department; Santiago University of Chile, Division Structures Constructions Geotechnics), and support of local stakeholders. Being Valparaíso included since 2003 in the UNESCO Word Heritage List of protected sites, the project main goals are the following: to collect, analyze and elaborate the existing information, with a satisfying evaluation of main hazards; to develop a GIS digital archive, well organized, user-friendly and easy to be implemented in the future, providing maps and scenarios of specific and multiple risk; to provide a vulnerability analysis for three historical churches (San Francisco del Baron, Las Hermanitas de la Providencia, La Matríz, made by various materials - masonry, concrete, wood and adobe - and located in different city sites) and for a building stock in the Cerro Cordillera (partially inside the UNESCO area), analyzing more than 200 constructions; to suggest guidelines for future urban planning and strengthening interventions. In the framework of the MAR VASTO Project, the most important hazards have been investigated carried out. With regard to seismic hazard, "state-of-the-art" information has been provided by Chilean partners and stakeholders, using materials of several studies and stored in original earthquake reports, local newspapers and magazines. The activities performed by the Italian team regarded the definition, for the city of Valparaiso, of earthquake scenarios and maps based on the neo

  18. PREFACE: Turbulent Mixing and Beyond Turbulent Mixing and Beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abarzhi, Snezhana I.; Gauthier, Serge; Rosner, Robert

    2008-10-01

    mixing dynamics are interplayed with fundamental properties of the Euler and compressible Navier-Stokes equations, with the problem sensitivity to the initial conditions and to the boundary conditions at the discontinuities, and with its stochastic description. The state-of-the-art numerical simulations of the multi-phase non-equilibrium dynamics suggest new methods for capturing discontinuities and singularities and shock-interface interaction, for predictive modeling of the multi-scale dynamics in fluids and plasmas, for error estimate and uncertainty quantification as well as for novel data assimilation techniques. The First International Conference `Turbulent Mixing and Beyond' (TMB-2007), was held on 18-26 August 2007 at the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste, Italy. This was a highly informative and exciting meeting, by all the standards a major success. The Conference brought together 120 participants (307 authors) from five continents, ranging from students to members of National Academies of Sciences and Engineering and including researchers from the Universities, National Laboratories, Leading Scientific Institutions and Industry. TMB-2007 covered 16 different topics, maintaining the scope and the interdisciplinary character of the meeting, and kept the focus on a fundamental fluid dynamic problem of unsteady turbulent processes and the Conference Objectives. The success of the TMB-07 was a result of the successful work of all the participants, who were serious and professional people, caring for the quality of their research and sharing their scientific vision. The level of presentations was high, and the presentations included 87 oral contributions, 32 invited lectures and 5 tutorials and over 30 poster contributions. The round table discussions held at TMB-2007 investigated the organization of a Collaborative Computing Environment for the Turbulent Mixing and Beyond Community. The abstracts of the 150 accepted Conference

  19. Elevated carboxy terminal cross linked telopeptide of type I collagen in alcoholic cirrhosis: relation to liver and kidney function and bone metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Moller, S; Hansen, M; Hillingso, J; Jensen, J; Henriksen, J

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND—The carboxy terminal cross linked telopeptide of type I collagen (ICTP) has been put forward as a marker of bone resorption. Patients with alcoholic liver disease may have osteodystrophy. 
AIMS—To assess circulating and regional concentrations of ICTP in relation to liver dysfunction, bone metabolism, and fibrosis. 
METHODS—In 15 patients with alcoholic cirrhosis and 20 controls, hepatic venous, renal venous, and femoral arterial concentrations of ICTP, and bone mass and metabolism were measured. 
RESULTS—Circulating ICTP was higher in patients with cirrhosis than in controls. No overall significant hepatic disposal or production was found in the patient or control groups but slightly increased production was found in a subset of patients with advanced disease. Significant renal extraction was observed in the controls, whereas only a borderline significant extraction was observed in the patients. Measurements of bone mass and metabolism indicated only a mild degree of osteodystrophy in the patients with cirrhosis. ICTP correlated significantly in the cirrhotic patients with hepatic and renal dysfunction and fibrosis, but not with measurements of bone mass or metabolism. 
CONCLUSIONS—ICTP is highly elevated in patients with cirrhosis, with no detectable hepatic net production or disposal. No relation between ICTP and markers of bone metabolism was identified, but there was a relation to indicators of liver dysfunction and fibrosis. As the cirrhotic patients conceivably only had mild osteopenia, the elevated ICTP in cirrhosis may therefore primarily reflect liver failure and hepatic fibrosis. 

 Keywords: bone mineral density; carboxy terminal cross linked telopeptide of type I collagen; chronic liver disease; fibrosis; hepatic osteodystrophy; portal hypertension PMID:10026331

  20. Serum carboxy-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen levels are associated with carotid atherosclerosis in patients with cardiovascular risk factors.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Takeshi; Endo, Itsuro; Aihara, Ken-Ichi; Onishi, Yukiyo; Dong, Bingzi; Ohguro, Yukari; Kurahashi, Kiyoe; Yoshida, Sumiko; Fujinaka, Yuichi; Kuroda, Akio; Matsuhisa, Munehide; Fukumoto, Seiji; Matsumoto, Toshio; Abe, Masahiro

    2016-04-25

    Carboxy-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen (ICTP) is generated through matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-dependent type I collagen digestion, and has been widely utilized as a biomarker for bone turnover. The fact that atherosclerotic lesions are rich in both type I collagen and MMP-producing macrophages led to the hypothesis that serum ICTP concentrations may serve as a non-invasive clinical biomarker for atherosclerosis. Therefore, the association of serum ICTP concentrations with the maximum intima-media thickness (IMT) of carotid arteries, a surrogate index of systemic atherosclerosis, or brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) in patients with atherosclerotic risk factors was evaluated. A total of 52 male and 65 female (mean age: 62.8 yrs) patients without renal failure, malignancies or bone diseases known to affect serum ICTP concentrations were recruited. Patients with max IMTs ≥1.1 mm showed significantly higher serum ICTP concentrations compared with patients with max IMTs <1.1 mm (3.33 ± 0.97 vs 2.82 ± 0.65 ng/mL, p<0.05). Serum ICTP concentration was also positively correlated with max IMT (p<0.001) or baPWV values (p<0.05). Multivariate analyses also revealed that serum ICTP concentrations were correlated with max IMT (p<0.001; 95% CI 0.200 to 0.454). These results suggest that serum ICTP concentrations can be used as a non-invasive biomarker for systemic atherosclerosis. PMID:26877258

  1. High serum circulating telopeptide type I in multinodular goiter.

    PubMed

    Loviselli, A; Rizzolo, E; Mastinu, R; Velluzzi, F; Secci, G; Taberlet, A; Mariotti, S

    2003-06-01

    Recently, concentrations of serum carboxy-terminal-1-telopeptide (ICTP), a marker of bone collagen resorption, were found to be more sensitive than sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) in identifying peripheral overexposure to thyroid hormones in exogenous subclinical hyperthyroidism. The aim of the present study was to assess serum ICTP and SHBG in multinodular goiter with (pretoxic goiter) or without biochemical evidence of endogenous subclinical hyperthyroidism. Forty-five women affected by multinodular goiter were enrolled in this study. They were subdivided into two groups: group 1, consisting of 27 patients affected by pretoxic goiter; group 2, consisting of 18 patients affected by non toxic goiter; group 3, consisting of thirty-six euthyroid women matched with the other groups for age and lifestyle. In group 1, serum ICTP (mean +/- SD: 5.8 +/- 2.9 microg/l) concentrations were significantly higher when compared either to group 2 (3.6 +/- 1.2 microg/l; p < 0.02) or controls (2.7 +/- 0.7 microg/l; p < 0.0001); serum ICTP concentrations were also slightly but significantly higher in patients of group 2 compared to controls (p < 0.003). In contrast, mean serum SHBG concentrations did not show any difference among the three groups. No significant correlation was found between serum TSH and ICTP concentrations, while a weak positive correlation (p < 0.05) was only found between serum FT 3 and ICTP concentrations when data from the two patient groups were analyzed together. Moreover, when we subdivided patients into pre- and postmenopausal patients, we observed that SHBG but not ICTP serum concentrations were influenced by estrogenic status. In summary, the measurement of serum ICTP seems to be more suitable than SHBG for identifying those with a higher degree of peripheral thyroid hormone exposure in women affected by endogenous subclinical hyperthyroidism. PMID:12920662

  2. International Centre for Theoretical Physics: Scientific activities in 1987

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1988-12-01

    A review of the scientific activities of the ICTP Trieste in 1987, including workshops, research and training for research is presented. The scientific program consists of eight main fields: fundamental physics, condensed matter, atomic and molecular physics, mathematics, physics and energy, physics and environment, applied physics and high technology, physics and development. In addition to a brief description of each workshop, symposium, college, meeting and activity or project sponsored by ICTP, a list of preprints and internal reports issued in 1987 is included.

  3. Increased type I collagen degradation correlates with disease severity in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Hakala, M; Risteli, L; Manelius, J; Nieminen, P; Risteli, J

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To assess the extent and clinical significance of type I collagen degradation in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). METHODS--Serum samples from 90 consecutive patients with RA from a cross-sectional population based study and 90 age- and sex-matched controls were analysed with the new assay of cross-linked carboxyterminal telopeptide of type I collagen (ICTP). RESULTS--Patients with RA had significantly higher concentrations of ICTP than the controls. ICTP correlated strongly with measures of impairment in RA, such as the erosive state of joint disease (ES) (r = 0.57, p < 0.001) and Keitel function test (KFT) (r = 0.49, p < 0.001), and more weakly with various disease activity markers. When erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), ES or KFT were used as indicators of disease severity among the patients with disease duration over five years, ICTP distinguished the more serious RA from milder cases. CONCLUSIONS--Elevated serum concentrations of ICTP are common in RA and are associated with signs of aggressive disease. PMID:8311537

  4. Prompt response and durability of polymer ablation from synthetic fibers irradiated by thermal plasmas for arc resistant clothes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishida, Masahiro; Shinsei, Naoki; Tanaka, Yasunori; Uesugi, Yoshihiko; Ishijima, Tatsuo; Mio, Wataru; Hagi, Hiroyasu; Uchibori, Keita

    2013-06-01

    Interactions between thermal plasmas and synthetic fibers such as polyamide, polyester, phenol and aramid were investigated by thermal plasma irradiation technique. Understanding the above interactions is crucial to design effective flame retardant synthetic fiber clothes with arc resistance to protect a human from arc flash accidents. To investigate the interactions, an Ar inductively coupled thermal plasma (ICTP) was used instead of the arc discharge because the ICTP has high controllability and no contamination. The ICTP irradiation raises polymer ablation in case of polyamide and polyester. Two features of the polymer ablation such as prompt response and durability were fundamentally investigated from viewpoint of shielding the heat flux. It was found that polyamide fiber has both a high prompt response and a long durability.

  5. PREFACE: International Conference on Control and Synchronization of Dynamical Systems (CSDS-2005)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisarchik, Alexander N.

    2005-01-01

    ) (General Director) A N Pisarchik (Centro de Investigaciones en Optica, Mexico) (Chair) R Roy (University of Maryland, USA) (SIAM representative) S Sinha (Institute of Mathematical Sciences, India) Local Organizing Committee V Aboites (Centro de Investigaciones en Optica, Mexico) R Espinosa-Luna (Centro de Investigaciones en Optica, Mexico) J H García-López (Universidad de Guadalajara, Mexico) R Jaimes-Reátegui (Universidad de Guadalajara, Mexico) A V Kir'yanov (Centro de Investigaciones en Optica, Mexico) E Kourmychev (Centro de Investigaciones en Optica, Mexico) V J Pinto-Robledo (Centro de Investigaciones en Optica, Mexico) R Rodriguez-Vera (Centro de Investigaciones en Optica, Mexico) (Research Director) G V Vazquéz-García (Centro de Investigaciones en Optica, Mexico) Funding Agencies Consejo de Ciencia y Tecnología de Estado Guanajuato, Mexico Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste, Italy International Mathematical Union, USA Centro Latinoamericano de Física, Brazil Academia Mexicana de Ciencias, Mexico Fundación México—Estados Unidos para la Ciencia, Mexico Cooperating Organizations International Society for Optical Engineering American Physical Society Optical Society of America Institute of Physics

  6. Realistic modeling of seismic input for megacities and large urban areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panza, G. F.; Unesco/Iugs/Igcp Project 414 Team

    2003-04-01

    , supply a particularly powerful tool for the prevention aspects of Civil Defense. We present a selection of the main results obtained for the cities of Algiers, Beijing, Bucharest, Cairo, Debrecen, Delhi, Naples, Rome, Russe, Santiago de Cuba, Sofia, Thessaloniki and Zagreb. The UNESCO/IUGS/IGCP PROJECT 414 team members are: Giuliano F. Panza (1,2) (Chairman), Leonardo Alvarez (3), Abdelkrim Aoudia (1,2), Abdelhakim Ayadi (4), Hadj Benhallou (4,5), Djillali Benouar (6), Zoltan Bus (7), Yun-Tai Chen (8), Carmen Cioflan (9), Zhifeng Ding (8), Attia El-Sayed (10), Julio Garcia (3), Bartolomeo Garofalo (11), Alexander Gorshkov (12), Katalin Gribovszki (13), Assia Harbi (4), Panagiotis Hatzidimitriou (14), Marijan Herak (15), Mihaela Kouteva (16), Igor Kuznetzov (12), Ivan Lokmer (15), Said Maouche (4), Gheorghe Marmureanu (9), Margarita Matova (16), Maddalena Natale (11), Concettina Nunziata (11), Imtiyaz Parvez (17,1), Ivanka Paskaleva (16), Ramon Pico (18), Mircea Radulian (9), Fabio Romanelli (2), Alexander Soloviev (12), Peter Suhadolc (2), Gyõzõ Szeidovitz (7), Petros Triantafyllidis (14), Franco Vaccari (2,19). (1) The Abdus Salam International Center for Theoretical Physics, SAND Group, Mirarmar, Trieste, Italy. (2) Department of Earth Sciences, University of Trieste, Via E. Weiss 1, 34127 Trieste, Italy. (3) Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Sismologicas, Cuba. (4) Centre de Recherche en Astronomie, Astrophysique et Geophysique, BP. 63, Bouzaréah, Alger, Algérie. (5) Faculté des Sciences de la Terre de l'Aménagment du Territoire et de la Géographie, USTHB, Alger, Algérie. (6) University of Algiers (USTHB), Civil Engineering Dpt., Alger, Algeria. (7) Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Seismological Observatory of GGRI, H-1112 Budapest, Meredek u. 18, Hungary. (8) Institute of Geophysics, China Seismological Bureau, Beijing, 100081, China. (9) National Institute for Earth Physics, Calugareni 12, P.O.Box: MG 2, 76900 Bucharest-Magurele, Romania. (10) Department of

  7. Can quaternary ammonium methacrylates inhibit matrix MMPs and cathepsins?

    PubMed Central

    Tezvergil-Mutluay, Arzu; Agee, Kelli A.; Mazzoni, Annalisa; Carvalho, Ricardo M.; Carrilho, Marcela; Tersariol, Ivarne L.; Nascimento, Fabio D.; Imazato, Satoshi; Tjäderhane, Leo; Breschi, Lorenzo; Tay, Franklin R; Pashley, David H.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Dentin matrices release ICTP and CTX fragments during collagen degradation. ICTP fragments are known to be produced by MMPs. CTX fragments are thought to come from cathepsin K activity. The purpose of this study was to determine if quaternary methacrylates (QAMs) can inhibit matrix MMPs and cathepsins. Methods Dentin beams were demineralizated, and dried to constant weight. Beams were incubated with rh-cathepsin B, K, L or S for 24 h at pH 7.4 to identify which cathepsins release CTX at neutral pH. Beams were dipped in ATA, an antimicrobial QAM to determine if it can inhibit dentin matrix proteases. Other beams were dipped in another QAM (MDPB) to determine if it produced similar inhibition of dentin proteases. Results Only beams incubated with cathepsin K lost more dry mass than the controls and released CTX. Dentin beams dipped in ATA and incubated for 1 week at pH 7.4, showed a concentration-dependent reduction in weight-loss. There was no change in ICTP release from control values, meaning that ATA did not inhibit MMPs. Media concentrations of CTX fell significantly at 15 wt% ATA indicating that ATA inhibits capthesins. Beams dipped in increasing concentrations of MDPB lost progressively less mass, showing that MDPB is a protease-inhibitor. ICTP released from controls or beams exposed to low concentrations were the same, while 5 or 10% MDPB significantly lowered ICTP production. CTX levels were strongly inhibited by 2.5–10% MDPB, indicating that MDPB is a potent inhibitor of both MMPs and cathepsin K. Significance CTX seems to be released from dentin matrix only by cathepsin K. MMPs and cathepsin K and B may all contribute to matrix degradation. PMID:25467953

  8. Comment on ``On the role of dissipation on the Casimir-Polder potential between molecules in dielectric media'' [J. Chem. Phys. 133, 164501 (2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalvit, D. A. R.; Milonni, P. W.

    2011-07-01

    J. J. Rodriguez and A. Salam [J. Chem. Phys. 133, 164501 (2010)], 10.1063/1.3495954 find discrepancies between their calculation and a previously published one [S. Spagnolo, D. A. R. Dalvit, and P. W. Milonni, Phys. Rev. A 75, 052117 (2007)], 10.1103/PhysRevA.75.052117 for the van der Waals interaction of two guest molecules in a host dielectric medium. We trace these discrepancies to what we regard as fundamental errors in the calculation by Rodriguez and Salam.

  9. Fundamental study of Ti feedstock evaporation and the precursor formation process in inductively coupled thermal plasmas during TiO2 nanopowder synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodama, Naoto; Tanaka, Yasunori; Kita, K.; Ishisaka, Y.; Uesugi, Y.; Ishijima, T.; Sueyasu, S.; Nakamura, K.

    2016-08-01

    Two-dimensional spectroscopic observations were conducted for an inductively coupled thermal plasma (ICTP) torch during TiO2 nanopowder synthesis. The feedstock was injected intermittently into the ICTP torch to investigate the Ti feedstock evaporation process clearly and to elucidate the formation process of precursor species. Spatiotemporal distributions of Ti atomic lines and TiO spectra were observed simultaneously inside the plasma torch with the observation system developed. The observation results showed that the injected Ti feedstock was evaporated to form high-density Ti atomic vapour in the torch, and that the generated Ti atomic vapour is transported and diffused by gas flow and the density gradient. In addition, TiO molecular vapour was generated almost simultaneously around the on-axis region in the torch.

  10. Type I collagen degradation does not diminish with RA disease duration

    PubMed Central

    Hakala, M; Aho, K; Aman, S; Luukkainen, R; Kauppi, M; Risteli, J

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To assess the relation between type I collagen degradation and the duration of rheumatoid arthritis (RA).
METHODS—The serum concentrations of cross linked carboxyterminal telopeptide of type I collagen (ICTP) measured earlier in a community based series (90 patients) and a hospital based series (59 patients) were re-evaluated with reference to the duration of RA.
RESULTS—The serum ICTP showed a positive correlation with the duration of the disease in the hospital based series (rs=0.40, p<0.01) but not in the community based one (rs=0.18, p=0.10).
CONCLUSIONS—Type I collagen degradation predominantly reflecting pathological bone destruction does not seem to diminish in longlasting RA.

 PMID:11247878

  11. Neutrino emission by electrons in the field of a plane electromagnetic wave

    SciTech Connect

    Merenkov, N.P.

    1985-12-01

    The emission of a neutrino pair by an electron in the field of an intense linearly-polarized wave is examined in the local limit of the Weinberg-Salam model. The emission probability is obtained in fields of weak and strong intensity. The effect of neutrino mass on the probability of neutrino emission by the electron in weak fields near threshold is studied.

  12. Response to ``Comment on `On the role of dissipation on the Casimir-Polder potential between molecules in dielectric media''' [J. Chem. Phys. 135, 047101 (2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Justo J.; Salam, A.

    2011-07-01

    In this Response to the Comment by Dalvit and Milonni, we go into further details as to why the dispersion interaction potential appearing in each of our works differs, and why the form given by Rodriguez and Salam correctly accounts for absorption in the dielectric medium. We also point out and address a number of fallacies raised in the Comment.

  13. Characterization of the aromatic profile for the authentication and differentiation of typical Italian dry-sausages.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, F; Cantoni, C; Careri, M; Chiesa, L; Musci, M; Pinna, A

    2007-06-15

    In order to chacterize two kinds of typical Italian dry-sausages, namely "Salame Mantovano" and "Salame Cremonese", the volatile composition was determined for seven samples of "Salame Mantovano" and for five samples of "Salame Cremonese". The study was performed by the dynamic headspace extraction technique (DHS) coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Among the 104 volatiles identified, terpenes, aldehydes, ketones and alcohols represented the most abundant compounds. Peak area data for all the substances from the above mentioned group was used for statistical purposes. Firstly, principal component analysis (PCA) was carried out in order to visualize data trends and to detect possible clusters within samples. Then, linear discriminant analysis (LDA) was performed in order to detect the volatile compounds able to differentiate the two kinds of sausages investigated. The data obtained by GC-MS shows that the most important contributions to the differentiation of the two kinds of typical Italian salami were seven volatile compounds, i.e. 3-methylbutanal, 6-camphenol, dimethyl disulfide, 1-propene-3,3'-thiobis, ethyl propanoate, 1,4-p-menthadiene and 2,6-dimethyl-1,3,5,7-octatetraene. Prediction ability of the calculated model was estimated to be 100% by the "leave-one-out" cross-validation. PMID:19071797

  14. Radiatively induced Fermi scale and unification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alanne, Tommi; Meroni, Aurora; Sannino, Francesco; Tuominen, Kimmo

    2016-05-01

    We consider extensions of the Standard Model in which the hierarchy between the unification and the Fermi scale emerges radiatively. Within the Pati-Salam framework, we show that it is possible to construct a viable model where the Higgs is an elementary pseudo-Goldstone boson, and the correct hierarchy is generated.

  15. THE PARITY NON-CONSERVING ELECTRON-NUCLEON INTERACTION

    SciTech Connect

    Commins, E.D.; Bucksbaum, P.H.

    1980-01-01

    We present general ideas concerning the neutral weak eq interaction. Then we describe the salient features of the Weinberg-Salam model, discuss in detail the principles and methods of the SLAC polarized electron scattering experiment and atomic physics experiments, and summarize neutral weak interaction results and their implications.

  16. EDITORIAL: The Fifth International Workshop and Summer School on Plasma Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2006-04-01

    we had an unforgettable experience producing paper sheets ourselves in an old but still operational paper mill in the green enchanting spa of Duszniki Zdrój. A short intensive course in pottery handcraft was also offered to us in the Skansen. Hiking in the rocky labyrinth of Szczeliniec (please try to pronounce this name describing a magnificent cliffed hill with creviced rocks) was also a great adventure. This was followed by a ride on the serpentine Road of a Hundred Turns. And there was another event strongly supported by the local authorities. Two special tutorials on energy research and fusion for young scholars and the general public attracted nearly 200 people. The School was financially supported by the International Centre for Dense Magnetised Plasmas at IPPLM, European Commission, International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria), the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste (Italy) and the US Department of Energy. We would like to thank cordially our sponsors. Their financial support made it possible for a number of students and teachers to come to Kudowa Zdrój. We are very grateful to Dr Adam Ziembinski, the director of the spa in Kudowa, and his staff for the immense hospitality during our stay. We wish to thank Mr Czeslaw Krecichwost, the mayor of Kudowa Zdrój, for his strong support and interest in the School and help in organizing the lectures for scholars and residents of the region. And our most cordial thanks and gratitude go to Mr Ryszard Panfil for his great kindness, inexhaustible energy and organizational efficiency that helped all of us to enjoy the meeting. We thank all the participants for their contributions and we thank the reviewers of all submitted papers. Thank you for your hard work and co-operation. We are looking forward to the next school and all hope to meet again in Kudowa. Marek Rubel, Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden Irena Ivanova-Stanik, Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion

  17. Risk management for sulfur dioxide abatement under multiple uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, C.; Sun, W.; Tan, Q.; Liu, Y.; Lu, W. T.; Guo, H. C.

    2016-03-01

    In this study, interval-parameter programming, two-stage stochastic programming (TSP), and conditional value-at-risk (CVaR) were incorporated into a general optimization framework, leading to an interval-parameter CVaR-based two-stage programming (ICTP) method. The ICTP method had several advantages: (i) its objective function simultaneously took expected cost and risk cost into consideration, and also used discrete random variables and discrete intervals to reflect uncertain properties; (ii) it quantitatively evaluated the right tail of distributions of random variables which could better calculate the risk of violated environmental standards; (iii) it was useful for helping decision makers to analyze the trade-offs between cost and risk; and (iv) it was effective to penalize the second-stage costs, as well as to capture the notion of risk in stochastic programming. The developed model was applied to sulfur dioxide abatement in an air quality management system. The results indicated that the ICTP method could be used for generating a series of air quality management schemes under different risk-aversion levels, for identifying desired air quality management strategies for decision makers, and for considering a proper balance between system economy and environmental quality.

  18. The use of biochemical markers of bone remodeling in multiple myeloma: a report of the International Myeloma Working Group.

    PubMed

    Terpos, E; Dimopoulos, M A; Sezer, O; Roodman, D; Abildgaard, N; Vescio, R; Tosi, P; Garcia-Sanz, R; Davies, F; Chanan-Khan, A; Palumbo, A; Sonneveld, P; Drake, M T; Harousseau, J-L; Anderson, K C; Durie, B G M

    2010-10-01

    Lytic bone disease is a frequent complication of multiple myeloma (MM). Lytic lesions rarely heal and X-rays are of limited value in monitoring bone destruction during anti-myeloma or anti-resorptive treatment. Biochemical markers of bone resorption (amino- and carboxy-terminal cross-linking telopeptide of type I collagen (NTX and CTX, respectively) or CTX generated by matrix metalloproteinases (ICTP)) and bone formation provide information on bone dynamics and reflect disease activity in bone. These markers have been investigated as tools for evaluating the extent of bone disease, risk of skeletal morbidity and response to anti-resorptive treatment in MM. Urinary NTX, serum CTX and serum ICTP are elevated in myeloma patients with osteolytic lesions and correlate with advanced disease stage. Furthermore, urinary NTX and serum ICTP correlate with risk for skeletal complications, disease progression and overall survival. Bone markers have also been used for the early diagnosis of bone lesions. This International Myeloma Working Group report summarizes the existing data for the role of bone markers in assessing the extent of MM bone disease and in monitoring bone turnover during anti-myeloma therapies and provides information on novel markers that may be of particular interest in the near future. PMID:20811404

  19. Adiponectin and bone metabolism markers in female rowers: eumenorrheic and oral contraceptive users.

    PubMed

    Jürimäe, J; Vaiksaar, S; Mäestu, J; Purge, P; Jürimäe, T

    2011-12-01

    This study investigated whether adiponectin, bone formation (osteocalcin) and bone resorption [type I carboxyterminal telopeptide (ICTP)] values are influenced by menstrual cycle phase and oral contraceptive use in female rowers. Twenty-four rowers divided into normally cycling athletes (NOC; no.=15) and athletes taking oral contraceptive pills (OC; no.=9) participated in this study. Fasting blood samples, body composition and aerobic capacity measurements were taken during the follicular (FP) and the luteal (LP) phases of the menstrual cycle. Adiponectin, insulin, glucose, insulin resistance, body composition and aerobic capacity did not fluctuate significantly during menstrual cycle in both groups. Osteocalcin and ICTP were lower (p<0.05) in OC compared with NOC, but did not change significantly across menstrual cycle phases in both groups. Estradiol and progesterone were not related to adiponectin, osteocalcin or ICTP (r<0.147; p>0.05). Adiponectin was correlated (p<0.05) with osteocalcin (r=0.452) and fat free mass (r=0.428), and osteocalcin was related (p<0.05) to insulin (r=-0.413), glucose (r=-0.486) and insulin resistance (r=-0.528). In conclusion, adiponectin was not affected by menstrual cycle phase and OC use in female rowers, while bone metabolism markers were lower in OC compared to NOC groups. Adiponectin and osteocalcin were interrelated and may characterise energy homeostasis in female athletes. PMID:21169728

  20. Type I collagen degradation during tissue repair: comparison of mechanisms following fracture and acute coronary syndromes.

    PubMed

    Stansfield, Rachel; Gossiel, Fatma; Morton, Allison; Newman, Christopher; Eastell, Richard

    2014-12-01

    There is turnover of type I collagen during tissue repair. The degradation of type I collagen by matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) is reflected by serum ICTP and that by cathepsins by CTX-I. There is evidence for increases in ICTP after acute coronary syndromes (ACS) and in CTX-I during fracture repair. The involvement of the MMP pathway in fracture repair and cathepsins after myocardial infarction is unclear. We studied 74 men; 22 were admitted to the hospital on the day of their ACS (ST or non-ST elevation myocardial infarction) (mean age 56 years, range 39 to 82) and 9 attended hospital on the day of their tibial shaft fracture (mean age 33 years, range 21 to 79); we had 43 age-matched controls (mean age 54 years, range 20 to 82). Subjects with ACS and tibial shaft fracture were followed up for up to one year; control subjects were used to establish a reference interval. We measured serum ICTP by ELISA (reference interval 1.1 to 17.6 ng/mL) and CTX-I by chemiluminescence (reference interval 0.094 to 0.991 ng/mL). After ACS, the mean ICTP increased from 5.41 to 6.60 ng/mL within one day of admission (p<0.05); the mean CTX-I increased from 0.263 to 0.414 ng/mL (p<0.05). In two cases, the CTX increased to above the reference interval. After tibial shaft fracture, the mean ICTP increased from 5.51 to maximum of 8.71 ng/mL within 28 days of admission (p<0.01); the mean CTX increased from 0.200 to 0.374 ng/mL (p<0.001). In four cases, the CTX increased to above the reference interval. We conclude that the MMP and cathepsin pathways are both implicated in tissue repair in the bone and heart. This may have clinical implications; drugs that block either pathway (TIMPs, cathepsin K inhibitors) may affect the repair of both tissues. PMID:25193029

  1. Chromogravity explains {open_quotes}strong gravity{close_quotes}

    SciTech Connect

    Ne`eman, Y. |; Sijacki, D.

    1993-03-01

    In this paper the authors deal with the question of gravitational type interactions in the case of strong interaction phenomena. They present arguments which indicate that it is not necessary to invoke a gravity type interaction into QCD in order to account for observed phenomena. They argue that the gravitational type phenomena discussed in previous work is a manifestation of a class of Feynmann diagrams. These seem to generate an analog to gravity, a J=2 {open_quotes}chromograviton{close_quotes} or {open_quotes}pseudo-graviton{close_quotes} whose action effectively generates Salam`s {open_quotes}Strong Gravity{close_quotes} or {open_quotes}f-gravity{close_quotes}, withthough having to introduce the theory as an additional input.

  2. Process e/sup -/. -->. e/sup -/(. nu. nu-bar) in the field of a circularly polarized plane wave

    SciTech Connect

    Skobelev, V.V.

    1987-12-01

    The e/sup -/..-->..e/sup -/(..nu..nu-bar) process in the field of a circularly polarized plane wave is studied in the framework of the Glashow-Weinberg-Salam model. General expressions for the probability of creation of neutrino pairs are obtained, and the case of a low-intensity wave is studied in detail. The effects of asymmetry of emission of electron and muon neutrinos are estimated, and comparison with previous results is performed.

  3. STS 51-G crewmembers participate in training in crew compartment trainer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Four members of the STS 51-G crew participate in a training exercise in the Shuttle mission simulator and training facility at JSC. Steven R. Nagel, left foreground, is a mission specialist. Sultan Salam Abdelazize Al-Saud (right foreground) is a payload specialist. In the background are Astronauts Daniel C. Brandenstein (left) in the commander's station and John O. Creighton in the pilot's position.

  4. "That I may know the inmost force that binds the world and guides its course"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehmelt, Hans

    1995-01-01

    The talk touches upon the following subjects: Goethe's Faust, the magic of Democritus' "ατoμoν", magnetism of the neutron, a neutral particle, the crucial problem of physics, crucial experiments, seeing an atom with my eyes, bringing an electron to rest, measuring electron magnetism, proton magnetism, electron radius from its magnetism, speculating on Salam's sub-sub-...-quarks and the cosmon, the simplest thing that ever was.

  5. The quest for the Higgs boson

    SciTech Connect

    Hinchliffe, I.

    1987-02-01

    Various ways are reviewed which have been suggested to search for the Higgs boson of the Weinberg-Salam model. It is found that if the Higgs mass is less than 40 GeV or so, it should be found in the decay of the Z either at the SLC or at LEP. Masses larger than this can be probed in the decay of toponium, if toponium exists in an accessible mass range. 27 refs., 15 figs. (LEW)

  6. Space-time structure of weak and electromagnetic interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Hestenes, D.

    1982-02-01

    The generator of electromagnetic gauge transformations in the Dirac equation has a unique geometric interpretation and a unique extension to the generators of the gauge group SU(2) x U(1) for the Weinberg--Salam theory of weak and electromagnetic interactions. It follows that internal symmetries of the weak interactions can be interpreted as space-time symmetries of spinor fields in the Dirac algebra. The possibilities for interpreting strong interaction symmetries in a similar way are highly restricted.

  7. Bounds for the Mass of the Heaviest Right-Handed Neutrino in SO(10) Theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buccella, F.; Falcone, D.

    By relating the Dirac neutrino mass matrix to the mass of the charged fermions and assuming that the product of the masses of the two lightest left-handed neutrinos is of the order of Δ m2sol, we derive, within a leptogenesis scenario, a range of values for the mass of the heaviest right-handed neutrino, centered around the scale of B L symmetry breaking in the SO(10) theory with Pati Salam intermediate symmetry.

  8. Neutrino Masses and Mixings in SO(10)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abud, M.; Buccella, F.; Tramontano, F.; Falcone, D.; Ricciardi, G.

    Assuming a Zee-like matrix for the right-handed neutrino Majorana masses in the seesaw mechanism, one gets maximal mixing for vacuum solar oscillations, a very small value for Ue3 and an approximate degeneracy for the two lower neutrino masses. The scale of right-handed neutrino Majorana masses is in good agreement with the value expected in an SO(10) model with Pati-Salam SU(4)×SU(2)×SU(2) intermediate symmetry.

  9. Synthesis of Chromone, Quinolone, and Benzoxazinone Sulfonamide Nucleosides as Conformationally Constrained Inhibitors of Adenylating Enzymes Required for Siderophore Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Engelhart, Curtis A.; Aldrich, Courtney C.

    2013-01-01

    MbtA catalyzes the first committed step of mycobactin biosynthesis in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) and is responsible for the incorporation of salicylic acid into the mycobactin siderophores. 5′-O-[N-(Salicyl)sulfamoyl]adenosine (Sal-AMS) is an extremely potent nucleoside inhibitor of MbtA that possesses excellent activity against whole-cell Mtb, but suffers from poor bioavailability. In an effort to improve the bioavailability, we have designed four conformationally constrained analogues of Sal-AMS that remove two rotatable bonds and the ionized sulfamate group based on computational and structural studies. Herein we describe the synthesis, biochemical, and microbiological evaluation of chromone-, quinolone-, and benzoxazinone-3-sulfonamide derivatives of Sal-AMS. We developed new chemistry to assemble these three heterocycles from common β-ketosulfonamide intermediates. The synthesis of the chromone- and quinolone-3-sulfonamide intermediates features formylation of a β-ketosulfonamide employing dimethylformamide dimethyl acetal to afford an enaminone that can react intramolecularly with a phenol or intermolecularly with a primary amine via addition-elimination reaction(s). The benzoxazinone-3-sulfonamide was prepared by nitrosation of a β-ketosulfonamide followed by intramolecular nucleophilic aromatic substitution. Mitsunobu coupling of these bicyclic sulfonamides with a protected adenosine derivative followed by global deprotection provides a concise synthesis of the respective inhibitors. PMID:23805993

  10. Effect of Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy on the Serum Levels of Bone Turnover Markers in Women with Early-Stage Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, YangYang; Xu, GuoBin; Yang, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Background To evaluate effects of neoadjuvant chemotherapy on the bone turnover markers of preoperational breast cancer patients. Methods Forty-one breast cancer patients (29 premenopausal and 12 postmenopausal) and 60 healthy women (30 premenopausal and 30 postmenopausal) aged 30-64 years, were evaluated for their bone status. Serum levels of the bone formation markers PINP and BAP, as well as the resorption markers ICTP and β-Crosslaps in addition to E2, FSH, 25(OH)D and PTH were measured at the initial diagnosis and at 24 hours after each four chemotherapy cycles. BMD T-scores were determined in 12 patients 6 months after the neoadjuvant chemotherapies. Results The baseline levels of both bone formation and resorption markers in premenopausal patients were higher than in premenopausal healthy women (p<0.05), while no statistic difference was observed between postmenopausal patients and postmenopausal healthy women. Regardless of the menopausal status, chemotherapy increased the ICTP and β-Crosslaps levels (p<0.05), but decreased the BAP and PINP levels (p<0.05), the later one significantly more with Taxane medication (p<0.01, p<0.05). Chemotherapy caused significant decreases of 25(OH)D levels in premenopausal (p<0.01) and postmenopausal (p<0.05) patients, however, did not affect the PTH concentrations. In premenopausal patients the E2 level decreased, while the FSH level increased after chemotherapy (p<0.05). Patients with pronounced ICTP and β-Crosslaps combined with reduced BAP and PINP serum concentrations after neoadjuvant chemotherapies were prone to develop osteoporosis 6 month later. Conclusions Neoadjuvant chemotherapy appeared to promote bone resorption and inhibit bone formation in both postmenopausal and premenopausal early-stage breast patients. PMID:25923354

  11. Alterations of bone mineral metabolism of children with different cell lineage types of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia under chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Tragiannidis, A; Dokos, Ch; Sidi, V; Papageorgiou, Th; Koliouskas, D; Karamouzis, M; Papastergiou, Ch; Tsitouridis, I; Katzos, G; Rousso, I; Athanassiadou-Piperopoulou, F

    2011-01-01

    Background: Children with haematological malignancies such as acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) may have alteration of bone mineral metabolism therefore increased risk for osteopenia and osteoporosis. Patients and Methods: The purpose of this study was to examine the alterations of bone mineral metabolism in two groups of children (n=42) according to immunophenotyping (B-cell type, T-cell type) both quantitative (bone mineral density z-scores) and qualitative (serum osteocalcin - OC and carboxyl-terminal telopeptide of human type I collagen - ICTP) during diagnosis (T=0), after the intensified chemotherapy period (T=0.5) and the consolidation period (T=1). Results: According to our results 15 patients had osteopenia and 1 child developed osteoporosis at T=0.5 and 13 patients had osteopenia at T=1. Mean BMD z-score was significantly decreased in both groups during chemotherapy and especially statistically significant decline of T-cell type ALL group compared with B-cell type ALL patients. OC mean level remains in low levels for both groups reaching in plateau during chemotherapy and ICTP level was increased in T-cell type ALL group of patients compared with B-cell type in both periods of chemotherapy. Conclusions: It seems that not only the combination of chemotherapeutic agents but also the cell lineage of ALL are important parameters of altering bone mineral metabolism. PMID:21607035

  12. Atrial natriuretic peptide, B-type natriuretic peptide, and serum collagen markers after acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Magga, Jarkko; Puhakka, Mikko; Hietakorpi, Seppo; Punnonen, Kari; Uusimaa, Paavo; Risteli, Juha; Vuolteenaho, Olli; Ruskoaho, Heikki; Peuhkurinen, Keijo

    2004-04-01

    Experimental data suggest that atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) act locally as antifibrotic factors in heart. We investigated the interrelationships of natriuretic peptides and collagen markers in 93 patients receiving thrombolytic treatment for their first acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Collagen formation following AMI, evaluated as serum levels of amino terminal propeptide of type III procollagen, correlated with NH(2)-terminal proANP (r = 0.45, P < 0.001), BNP (r = 0.55, P < 0.001) and NH(2)-terminal proBNP (r = 0.50, P < 0.01) on day 4 after thrombolysis. Levels of intact amino terminal propeptide of type I procollagen decreased by 34% (P < 0.001), and levels of carboxy terminal cross-linked telopeptide of type I collagen (ICTP) increased by 65% (P < 0.001). ICTP levels correlated with NH(2)-terminal proBNP (r = 0.25, P < 0.05) and BNP (r = 0.28, P < 0.05) on day 4. Our results suggest that ANP and BNP may act as regulators of collagen scar formation and left ventricular remodeling after AMI in humans. Furthermore, degradation of type I collagen is increased after AMI and may be regulated by BNP. PMID:14607848

  13. External circuit integration with electromagnetic particle in cell modeling of plasma focus devices

    SciTech Connect

    Seng, Y. S.; Lee, P.; Rawat, R. S.

    2015-03-15

    The pinch performance of a plasma focus (PF) device is sensitive to the physical conditions of the breakdown phase. It is therefore essential to model and study the initial phase in order to optimize device performance. An external circuit is self consistently coupled to the electromagnetic particle in cell code to model the breakdown and initial lift phase of the United Nations University/International Centre for Theoretical Physics (UNU-ICTP) plasma focus device. Gas breakdown during the breakdown phase is simulated successfully, following a drop in the applied voltage across the device and a concurrent substantial rise in the circuit current. As a result, the plasma becomes magnetized, with the growing value of the magnetic field over time leading to the gradual lift off of the well formed current sheath into the axial acceleration phase. This lifting off, with simultaneous outward sheath motion along the anode and vertical cathode, and the strong magnetic fields in the current sheath region, was demonstrated in this work, and hence validates our method of coupling the external circuit to PF devices. Our method produces voltage waveforms that are qualitatively similar to the observed experimental voltage profiles of the UNU-ICTP device. Values of the mean electron energy before and after voltage breakdown turned out to be different, with the values after breakdown being much lower. In both cases, the electron energy density function turned out to be non-Maxwellian.

  14. Markers of cardiac collagen turnover are similar in patients with mild and more severe symptoms of heart failure.

    PubMed

    Cavallari, Larisa H; Groo, Vicki L; Momary, Kathryn M; Stamos, Thomas D; Vaitkus, Paul T

    2007-01-01

    Cardiac fibrosis plays an important role in the pathophysiology of heart failure. The authors sought to determine whether biomarkers of cardiac fibrosis for milder clinical degrees of heart failure are comparable to those of more advanced disease. Procollagen types I and III amino-terminal peptides (PINP and PIIINP) and type I collagen telopeptide (ICTP) were compared between aldosterone-antagonistnaive patients with heart failure and New York Heart Association class I or II (n=22/23) and class III or IV (n=42/3) symptoms. Median (interquartile) range concentrations of PINP (63.3 [44.2-88.8] vs 48.6 [37.8-74.9] microg/L), ICTP (7.0 [5.4-16.8] vs 6.5 [4.7-12.7] microg/L), and PIIINP (4.7 [3.2-7.0] vs 4.7 [2.9-7.3] microg/L) were comparable between patients with mild and moderate to severe disease, respectively. These data suggest that patients with mild heart failure may have similar degrees of cardiac fibrosis to patients with more severe disease and support the examination of antifibrotic therapy, including aldosterone antagonists, in milder degrees of heart failure. PMID:17917494

  15. Risk factors for hip fracture among elderly patients with Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Sato, Yoshihiro; Kanoko, Tomohiro; Satoh, Kei; Iwamoto, Jun

    2004-08-30

    Incidence of hip fracture among patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD), especially in elderly patients, is high. To analyze risk factors of hip fracture, we prospectively studied a cohort of elderly female patients with AD. Subjects studied were 225 female patients with AD, and the average age was 76 years old. At baseline, we recorded body mass index (BMI), a score of Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) and bone mineral density (BMD), and measured serum concentrations of ionized calcium, intact parathyroid hormone (PTH), pyridinoline cross-linked carboxyterminal telopeptide of type I collagen (ICTP), intact bone Gla protein (BGP), 25-hydroxyvitamin (25-OHD) and 1, 25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1, 25-[OH]2D). The patients were followed for 2 years. During the 2-year study, hip fractures occurred in 29 patients. We compared baseline variables between the 29 patients with and 176 patients without hip fracture. AD patients with lower BMD, low concentrations of serum ionized calcium and 25-OHD (mean 3.0 ng/ml) with compensatory hyperparathyroidism were found to have an increased risk of hip fracture. Also, concentrations of serum ICTP and BGP were higher in the fracture group than in the nonfracture group. Elderly female AD patients with low BMD and serum 25-OHD concentrations <5 ng/ml with secondary hyperparathyroidism have a high risk of hip fracture, and the risk may be reduced by vitamin D supplementation. PMID:15337610

  16. Use of biomarkers of collagen types I and III fibrosis metabolism to detect cardiovascular and renal disease in chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes).

    PubMed

    Ely, John J; Bishop, Micah A; Lammey, Michael L; Sleeper, Meg M; Steiner, Jörg M; Lee, D Rick

    2010-04-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality among captive chimpanzees. The most prevalent form of cardiovascular disease among chimpanzees is sudden cardiac death. Myocardial fibrosis was the only significant pathologic lesion observed in affected animals at necropsy. We previously showed an association between myocardial fibrosis and sudden cardiac death. The presumed pathogenesis was interstitial myocardial fibrosis that led to decreased myocardial contractility and interrupted signal propagation in the heart, leading to fibrillation and resulting in sudden cardiac death. In this pilot study, we assayed 5 biomarkers of collagen types I and III metabolism and fibrogenesis and studied their association with CVD in chimpanzees. The biomarker MMP1 did not crossreact in chimpanzee sera and could not be studied further. Two biomarkers (TIMP1 and PINP) and their difference showed no significant association with CVD in chimpanzees. The biomarkers ICTP and PIIINP were significantly increased in cases of CVD with concurrent renal disease. Furthermore, both biomarkers showed a significant trend to increase with disease severity. We conclude that ICTP and PIIINP warrant further study for antemortem detection of renal and myocardial fibrosis in chimpanzees. PMID:20412692

  17. Using a new high resolution regional model for malaria that accounts for population density and surface hydrology to determine sensitivity of malaria risk to climate drivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tompkins, Adrian; Ermert, Volker; Di Giuseppe, Francesca

    2013-04-01

    In order to better address the role of population dynamics and surface hydrology in the assessment of malaria risk, a new dynamical disease model been developed at ICTP, known as VECTRI: VECtor borne disease community model of ICTP, TRIeste (VECTRI). The model accounts for the temperature impact on the larvae, parasite and adult vector populations. Local host population density affects the transmission intensity, and the model thus reproduces the differences between peri-urban and rural transmission noted in Africa. A new simple pond model framework represents surface hydrology. The model can be used on with spatial resolutions finer than 10km to resolve individual health districts and thus can be used as a planning tool. Results of the models representation of interannual variability and longer term projections of malaria transmission will be shown for Africa. These will show that the model represents the seasonality and spatial variations of malaria transmission well matching a wide range of survey data of parasite rate and entomological inoculation rate (EIR) from across West and East Africa taken in the period prior to large-scale interventions. The model is used to determine the sensitivity of malaria risk to climate variations, both in rainfall and temperature, and then its use in a prototype forecasting system coupled with ECMWF forecasts will be demonstrated.

  18. Nuclear Data Sheets for A = 211

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Balraj; Abriola, Daniel; Baglin, Coral; Demetriou, Vivian; Johnson, Timothy; McCutchan, Elizabeth; Mukherjee, Gopal; Singh, Sukhjeet; Sonzogni, Alejandro; Tuli, Jagdish

    2013-06-15

    The evaluated spectroscopic data are presented for 11 known nuclides of mass 211 (Hg, Tl, Pb, Bi, Po, At, Rn, Fr, Ra, Ac, Th). The {sup 211}Pa nuclide is included here but its identification remains uncertain. For {sup 211}Hg, {sup 211}Tl, {sup 211}Ac and {sup 211}Th nuclei, only the ground–state information is available. Their decay characteristics are mostly unknown. {sup 211}Fr is suggested to decay partially through ε decay mode, but its decay scheme remains poorly known. While high–spin excitations, including several isomers, are well studied in {sup 211}Pb, {sup 211}Bi, {sup 211}Po, {sup 211}At, {sup 211}Rn and {sup 211}Fr, the particle–transfer data are available for only {sup 211}Po and {sup 211}Bi. This evaluation was carried out as part of joint IAEA–ICTP workshop for Nuclear Structure and Decay Data, organized and hosted by the IAEA, Vienna and ICTP, Trieste, August 6–17, 2012. This work supersedes previous A=211 evaluation (2004Br45) published by E. Browne which covered literature before January 2003.

  19. The Santa Lucia-Aiguá-Merin rifting (Uruguay): an early aborted branch of the South Atlantic break-up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossello, E.; López-Gamundí, O. R.; Veroslavsky, G.; de Santa Ana, H.

    2012-04-01

    The Santa Lucía-Aigua-Merin (SaLAM) rift is emplaced in the cratonic basement of SE Uruguay. It covers 450 km from the Rio de La Plata to the southwest to Laguna Merin to the northeast running broadly parallel to the South American plate boundary. It is a narrow, pull apart trough trending N 70° with two distinct depocenters (Santa Lucía and Merin) filled predominantly by Mesozoic volcaniclastic sediments. Alkaline magmatic rocks have been identified in the Minas-Aigua-Lescano uplifted segment that separates both depocenters. The Santa Lucía depocenter or sub basin was filled with a up to 2,500 m thick column of upper Jurassic to Cenozoic volcaniclastic sediments that rest on the structured Precambrian basement. The Merin sub basin is dominated by a thick volcanic sequence associated with a significant gravity anomaly. The SaLAM rift joins southwestard into a triple-junction configuration with the NW-SE trending Salado Basin is was buried by Lower Tertiary to Recent sediments. The SaLAM trough can be interpreted as an aborted branch of the South Atlantic break up; its orientation was probably controlled, at least partially, by the structural grain of the pre-existing Gondwana crystalline basement. Its accessible outcrops provide an excellent opportunity to study the sedimentary, magmatic and tectonic evolution of the early stages of the South Atlantic break up and its potential reactivation during the Andean orogeny that seemed to have affected significant parts of the adjacent large continental platform of Uruguay and Argentina.

  20. Collider physics for the late 1980's

    SciTech Connect

    Hinchliffe, I.

    1987-02-27

    Topics in the Standard Model of strong and electroweak interactions and how these topics are relevant for the high energy colliders are discussed. Radiative corrections in the Glashow-Weinberg-Salam model are discussed, stressing how these corrections may be measured at LEP and the SLC. CP violation is discussed, followed by a discussion of the Higgs boson and the searches which can be carried out for it. Some features of quantum chromodynamics are discussed which are relevant to hadron colliders. Some of the problems which the Standard Model does not solve are discussed. 115 refs., 53 figs. (LEW)

  1. The standard model and colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Hinchliffe, I.

    1987-03-01

    Some topics in the standard model of strong and electroweak interactions are discussed, as well as how these topics are relevant for the high energy colliders which will become operational in the next few years. The radiative corrections in the Glashow-Weinberg-Salam model are discussed, stressing how these corrections may be measured at LEP and the SLC. CP violation is discussed briefly, followed by a discussion of the Higgs boson and the searches which are relevant to hadron colliders are then discussed. Some of the problems which the standard model does not solve are discussed, and the energy ranges accessible to the new colliders are indicated. (LEW)

  2. The Production Cross Sections of the Weak Vector Bosons in Proton Antiproton Collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96-TeV and a Measurement of the W Boson Decay Width

    SciTech Connect

    Varganov, Alexei Valerievich

    2004-04-01

    The theory that describes the fundamental particle interactions is called the Standard Model, which is a gauge field theory that comprises the Glashow-Weinberg-Salam model [1, 2, 3] of the weak and electromagnetic interactions and quantum chromodynamics (QCD) [4, 5, 6], the theory of the strong interactions. The discovery of the W [7, 8] and Z [9, 10] bosons in 1983 by the UA1 and UA2 collaborations at the CERN p{bar p} collider provided a direct confirmation of the unification of the weak and electromagnetic interactions. Since then, many experiments have refined our understanding of the characteristics of the W and Z bosons.

  3. Stopping power of neutrinos and antineutrinos in polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rustgi, M. L.; Leung, P. T.; Long, S. A. T.

    1985-01-01

    The Weinberg-Salam model is applied to quantify the energy loss of antineutrinos and neutrinos encountering polymers. The scattering cross-sectional energy due to encounters with electrons is calculated, along with the probability that an antineutrino will remain the same particle. The energy loss reaches a maximum, i.e., stopping occurs, when the probability is unity. The technique is applied to study the energy losses in kapton, a solid organic insulator used for antennas on spacecraft exposed to solar neutrinos with energies ranging from 0.5-10 MeV. The energy loss is found to be negligible.

  4. Stopping power of neutrinos and antineutrinos in polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rustgi, M. L.; Leung, P. T.; Long, S. A. T.

    1985-09-01

    The Weinberg-Salam model is applied to quantify the energy loss of antineutrinos and neutrinos encountering polymers. The scattering cross-sectional energy due to encounters with electrons is calculated, along with the probability that an antineutrino will remain the same particle. The energy loss reaches a maximum, i.e., stopping occurs, when the probability is unity. The technique is applied to study the energy losses in kapton, a solid organic insulator used for antennas on spacecraft exposed to solar neutrinos with energies ranging from 0.5-10 MeV. The energy loss is found to be negligible.

  5. Origin of a peculiar extra U(1)

    SciTech Connect

    Barr, S.M.; Dorsner, I.

    2005-07-01

    The origin of a family-independent ''extra U(1)'', discovered by Barr, Bednarz, and Benesh and independently by Ma, and whose phenomenology has recently been studied by Ma and Roy, is discussed. Even though it satisfies anomaly constraints in a highly economical way, with just a single extra triplet of leptons per family, this extra U(1) cannot come from four-dimensional grand unification. However, it is shown here that it can come from a Pati-Salam scheme with an extra U(1), which explains the otherwise surprising cancellation of anomalies.

  6. A Terrella Device for Simulating Aurora-Like Phenomena in a Box

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messerotti, M.; Baccomi, R.; Iugovaz, D.; Lilensten, J.

    2009-04-01

    A Terrella device was developed and setup in Trieste in 2006 to be used as an experimental training device during practicum sessions of the Advanced International School on Space Weather at ICTP. The Terrella consisted of a vacuum chamber, where an aluminum sphere with an embedded permanent magnet bar mimics the Earth (Terrella) and its magnetic field, and a system of electrodes is set to a high potential difference to generate an electron flow (particle wind) that ionizes the residual air around the sphere. This results in aurora-like glowing patterns whose geometry is dependent on the orientation and distance of the bar magnet, so that various configurations can be experimented. This Terrella device proved to be an effective tool not only for academic but also for outreach purposes. We will briefly present both applications, focusing in particular on the latter, and on the planned use for IHY EPO activities.

  7. The XXVIII International Symposium on Lattice Field Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lattice 2010, the XXVIII International Symposium on Lattice Field Theory, was held from June 14-19, 2010 at the ATAHOTEL Tanka Village Resort, Villasimius, Sardinia, Italy. The scientific programme contained 21 plenary session talks and over 300 parallel session contributions (talks and posters). The conference topics included: algorithms and machines, applications beyond QCD, chiral symmetry, hadron spectroscopy, hadronic structure and interactions, nonzero temperature and density, standard-model parameters and renormalization, theoretical developments, vacuum structure and confinement, weak decays and matrix elements. We would like to thank the members of International Advisory Committee for their help in planning the scientific programme. Thanks also go to all the speakers and delegates who helped to make the conference a big success. We acknowledge financial support from ICTP, INFN, the European Physical Journal, the European Community-Research Infrastructure Activity ``Hadron Physics 2", and the University of Rome ``Tor Vergata".

  8. The Analysis of Lagrangian and Hamiltonian Properties of the Classical Relativistic Electrodynamics Models and Their Quantization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogolubov, Nikolai N.; Prykarpatsky, Anatoliy K.

    2010-05-01

    The Lagrangian and Hamiltonian properties of classical electrodynamics models and their associated Dirac quantizations are studied. Using the vacuum field theory approach developed in (Prykarpatsky et al. Theor. Math. Phys. 160(2): 1079-1095, 2009 and The field structure of a vacuum, Maxwell equations and relativity theory aspects. Preprint ICTP) consistent canonical Hamiltonian reformulations of some alternative classical electrodynamics models are devised, and these formulations include the Lorentz condition in a natural way. The Dirac quantization procedure corresponding to the Hamiltonian formulations is developed. The crucial importance of the rest reference systems, with respect to which the dynamics of charged point particles is framed, is explained and emphasized. A concise expression for the Lorentz force is derived by suitably taking into account the duality of electromagnetic field and charged particle interactions. Finally, a physical explanation of the vacuum field medium and its relativistic properties fitting the mathematical framework developed is formulated and discussed.

  9. Future Projections of Air Temperature and Precipitation for the CORDEX-MENA Domain by Using RegCM4.3.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozturk, Tugba; Turp, M. Tufan; Türkeş, Murat; Kurnaz, M. Levent

    2015-04-01

    In this study, the projected changes for the periods of 2016 - 2035, 2046 - 2065, and 2081 - 2100 in the seasonal averages of air temperature and precipitation variables with respect to the reference period of 1981 - 2000 were examined for the Middle East and North Africa region. In this context, Regional Climate Model (RegCM4.3.5) of ICTP (International Centre for Theoretical Physics) was run by using two different global climate models. MPI-ESM-MR global climate model of the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology and HadGEM2 of the Met Office Hadley Centre were dynamically downscaled to 50 km for the CORDEX-MENA domain. The projections were realized according to the RCP4.5 and the RCP8.5 emission scenarios of the IPCC (Intergovernmental Panel of Climate Change).

  10. New smooth hybrid inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Lazarides, George; Vamvasakis, Achilleas

    2007-10-15

    We consider the extension of the supersymmetric Pati-Salam model which solves the b-quark mass problem of supersymmetric grand unified models with exact Yukawa unification and universal boundary conditions and leads to the so-called new shifted hybrid inflationary scenario. We show that this model can also lead to a new version of smooth hybrid inflation based only on renormalizable interactions provided that a particular parameter of its superpotential is somewhat small. The potential possesses valleys of minima with classical inclination, which can be used as inflationary paths. The model is consistent with the fitting of the three-year Wilkinson microwave anisotropy probe data by the standard power-law cosmological model with cold dark matter and a cosmological constant. In particular, the spectral index turns out to be adequately small so that it is compatible with the data. Moreover, the Pati-Salam gauge group is broken to the standard model gauge group during inflation and, thus, no monopoles are formed at the end of inflation. Supergravity corrections based on a nonminimal Kaehler potential with a convenient choice of a sign keep the spectral index comfortably within the allowed range without generating maxima and minima of the potential on the inflationary path. So, unnatural restrictions on the initial conditions for inflation can be avoided.

  11. Search for the decay B^0_sarrow e μ at CDF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenzel, Hans; Maeshima, Kaori

    1996-05-01

    We present a search for the decay B^0_sarrow e μ. This decay is strictly forbidden within the standard model of electroweak interaction. However, extensions to the standard model exist which predict a symmetry between quarks and leptons and one of the signals predicted by these models is the decay B^0_sarrow e μ. An example of such model is the Pati-Salam model. We present the first limit on Br(B^0_sarrow e μ). From this limit we derive a mass limit on the Pati-Salam leptoquark mass. ^ Supported by U.S. DOE DE-AC03-76SF00098. ^ Supported by U.S. DOE DE-AC02-76CHO3000. ^*We thank the Fermilab staff and the technical staffs of the participating institutions for their vital contributions. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy and National Science Foundation; the Italian Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare; the Ministry of Education, Science and Culture of Japan; the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada; the National Science Council of the Republic of China; and the A. P. Sloan Foundation.

  12. Braneworld localisation in hyperbolic spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crampton, B.; Pope, C. N.; Stelle, K. S.

    2014-12-01

    We present a construction employing a type IIA supergravity and 3-form flux background together with an NS5-brane that localises massless gravity near the 5-brane worldvolume. The nonsingular underlying type IIA solution is a lift to 10D of the vacuum solution of the 6D Salam-Sezgin model and has a hyperbolic structure in the lifting dimensions. A fully back-reacted solution including the NS5-brane is constructed by recognising the 10D Salam-Sezgin vacuum solution as a "brane resolved through transgression." The background hyperbolic structure plays a key rôle in generating a mass gap in the spectrum of the transverse-space wave operator, which gives rise to the localisation of gravity on the 6D NS5-brane worldvolume, or, equally, in a further compactification to 4D. Also key to the successful localisation of gravity is the specific form of the corresponding transverse wavefunction Schrödinger problem, which asymptotically involves a V = -1 /(4 ρ 2) potential, where ρ is the transverse-space radius, and for which the NS5-brane source gives rise to a specific choice of self-adjoint extension for the transverse wave operator. The corresponding boundary condition as ρ → 0 ensures the masslessness of gravity in the effective braneworld theory. Above the mass gap, there is a continuum of massive states which give rise to small corrections to Newton's law.

  13. Accurate quantum dynamics calculations using symmetrized Gaussians on a doubly dense Von Neumann lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halverson, Thomas; Poirier, Bill

    2012-12-01

    In a series of earlier articles [B. Poirier, J. Theor. Comput. Chem. 2, 65 (2003);, 10.1142/S0219633603000380 B. Poirier and A. Salam, J. Chem. Phys. 121, 1690 (2004);, 10.1063/1.1767511 B. Poirier and A. Salam, J. Chem. Phys. 121, 1704 (2004), 10.1063/1.1767512], a new method was introduced for performing exact quantum dynamics calculations. The method uses a "weylet" basis set (orthogonalized Weyl-Heisenberg wavelets) combined with phase space truncation, to defeat the exponential scaling of CPU effort with system dimensionality—the first method ever able to achieve this long-standing goal. Here, we develop another such method, which uses a much more convenient basis of momentum-symmetrized Gaussians. Despite being non-orthogonal, symmetrized Gaussians are collectively local, allowing for effective phase space truncation. A dimension-independent code for computing energy eigenstates of both coupled and uncoupled systems has been created, exploiting massively parallel algorithms. Results are presented for model isotropic uncoupled harmonic oscillators and coupled anharmonic oscillators up to 27 dimensions. These are compared with the previous weylet calculations (uncoupled harmonic oscillators up to 15 dimensions), and found to be essentially just as efficient. Coupled system results are also compared to corresponding exact results obtained using a harmonic oscillator basis, and also to approximate results obtained using first-order perturbation theory up to the maximum dimensionality for which the latter may be feasibly obtained (four dimensions).

  14. Inhibition of Siderophore Biosynthesis in Mycobacterium tuberculosis with Nucleoside Bisubstrate Analogues: Structure–Activity Relationships of the Nucleobase Domain of 5′-O-[N-(Salicyl)sulfamoyl]adenosine

    PubMed Central

    Neres, João; Labello, Nicholas P.; Somu, Ravindranadh V.; Boshoff, Helena I.; Wilson, Daniel J.; Vannada, Jagadeshwar; Chen, Liqiang; Barry, Clifton E.; Bennett, Eric M.; Aldrich, Courtney C.

    2009-01-01

    5′-O-[N-(salicyl)sulfamoyl]adenosine (Sal-AMS) is a prototype for a new class of antitubercular agents that inhibit the aryl acid adenylating enzyme (AAAE) known as MbtA involved in biosynthesis of the mycobactins. Herein, we report the structure-based design, synthesis, biochemical, and biological evaluation of a comprehensive and systematic series of analogues, exploring the structure–activity relationship of the purine nucleobase domain of Sal-AMS. Significantly, 2-phenyl-Sal-AMS derivative 26 exhibited exceptionally potent antitubercular activity with an MIC99 under iron-deficient conditions of 0.049 µM while the N-6-cyclopropyl-Sal-AMS 16 led to improved potency and to a 64-enhancement in activity under iron-deficient conditions relative to iron-replete conditions, a phenotype concordant with the designed mechanism of action. The most potent MbtA inhibitors disclosed here display in vitro antitubercular activity superior to most current first line TB drugs, and these compounds are also expected to be useful against a wide range of pathogens that require aryl-capped siderphores for virulence. PMID:18690677

  15. Topical treatment with Tong-Luo-San-Jie Gel alleviates bone cancer pain in rats

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Juyong; Zhang, Ruixin; Dong, Changsheng; Jiao, Liying; Xu, Ling; Liu, Jiyong; Wang, Zhengtao; Ying, Qi Liang Mao; Fong, Harry; Lao, Lixing

    2012-01-01

    Ethnopharmacological relevance The herbal analgesic gel Tong-Luo-San-Jie (TLSJ) and its modifications are used in traditional Chinese medicine to manage cancer pain. However, its mechanisms are still unknown. Aim of the study To investigate the effects and mechanisms of TLSJ gel on bone cancer pain in a rat model. Materials and Methods A bone cancer pain rat model was established by inoculating Walker 256 rat carcinoma cells directly into the right tibial medullary cavity of Sprague-Dawley rats (150–170 g); Phosphate buffered saline (PBS) tibial inoculation was used as control. Cancer-bearing rats were treated twice a day with external TLSJ gel (0.5 g/cm2/day) or inert gel control for 21 days (n=10/group). Behavioral tests such as mechanical threshold and paw withdrawal latency (PWL) were carried out. Osteoclastic activities were determined and carboxyterminal pyridinoline cross-linked type I collagen telopeptides (ICTP) and bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (BAP) concentrations were detected with ELISA after treatment. Adverse effects were monitored, and biochemical and histological tests were performed in naïve rats treated with local TLSJ gel for six weeks. Results TLSJ treatment significantly restored bone cancer-induced decrease of PWL and mechanical threshold compared to inert gel. It also decreased the level of blood serum ICTP and BAP and inhibited osteoclast activities. No adverse effects or abnormal biochemical and histological changes were detected after TLSJ treatment. Conclusion The present study shows that TLSJ significantly inhibits bone cancer-induced thermal and mechanical sensitization. It suggests that the gel may be useful in managing cancer pain and that it may act by inhibiting osteoclastic activity. PMID:22960543

  16. Extracellular matrix turnover in coronary artery ectasia patients.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ruifeng; Chen, Lianfeng; Wu, Wei; Chen, Houzao; Zhang, Shuyang

    2016-03-01

    Dysregulation of the metabolism of the extracellular matrix (ECM) may contribute to coronary artery ectasia (CAE). This study evaluated the turnover of main ECM components and related proteolytic enzymes activities. In this study, thirty patients with CAE, 30 patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) and 30 subjects with normal coronary arteries (Control) were selected. The following circulating ECM metabolism markers were measured: soluble elastin (sElastin), collagen type I cross-linked telopeptides (ICTP), procollagen type I carboxy terminal peptide (PICP), protocollagen III N-terminal propeptide (PIIINP), and procollagen a1(III) C-terminal propeptide (PIIICP). Serum total elastase activity and total matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity were also determined. The level of sElastin was higher in the CAE group than in the CAD and Control groups (P1 = 0.009, P2 = 0.000). There was no difference in ICTP (P = 0.168) or PIIICP (P = 0.079) among the three groups. PICP was significantly elevated in CAE (P1 = 0.001, P2 = 0.002). PIIINP was also significantly increased in CAE (P1 = 0.002, P2 = 0.007). Total elastase activity was higher in the CAE group than in the other two groups (P1 = 0.006, P2 = 0.022). Total MMP activity was significantly higher in the CAE group than the Control group (P2 = 0.013) but not higher than the CAD group (P1 = 0.477). In conclusion, within CAE patients the main changes in ECM metabolism were increased degradation of elastin fibres and the transition of collagen from type III to type I. Elastase and MMPs appear to be associated with this kind of ECM turnover. PMID:25576491

  17. Excellence in Physics Education Award Talk: Sharing Active Learning Strategies in the Developed and Developing Worlds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokoloff, David

    2010-02-01

    Since the first series of National Microcomputer Based Laboratory (MBL) Institutes for Teachers of Physics in Summer, 1987, the Activity Based Physics Group (ABP) has presented numerous professional development institutes and workshops to thousands of high school, college and university faculty, sponsored by National Science Foundation, U.S. Department of Education, Howard Hughes Medical Institute and others. An overview of these programs and details of our instructional strategies will be presented. Some common features of these include: (1) motivating participants through introduction to active learning research literature, including exposure to conceptual evaluations and student learning gains in traditional and active learning courses, (2) exposing participants to active learning strategies through intensive hands-on work using classroom tested curricular materials, (3) relying on these materials to enhance teacher knowledge and correct misconceptions---when necessary, (4) providing opportunities to practice active learning instruction with other participants and (5) distributing or facilitating procurement of equipment and supplies needed to get started. Recently, ABP group members have been working with physics educators from other countries to introduce active learning strategies in the developing world. New programs such as Active Learning in Optics and Photonics (ALOP, UNESCO) and Physware (ICTP/UNESCO/IUPAP), that support active learning using low-cost equipment, have been developed for this purpose. To date, ALOP workshops have been presented to over 500 secondary and college faculty in Ghana, Tunisia, Morocco, India, Tanzania, Brazil, Mexico, Zambia, Cameroon, Colombia, Nepal and Chile, and the ALOP Training Manual has been translated into French and Spanish. The first Physware workshop, held at ICTP in Trieste in 2009, had 32 participants most of whom were from developing countries in Africa, Asia and South America. These programs will be described. )

  18. Zoledronate and Ion-releasing Resins Impair Dentin Collagen Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Tezvergil-Mutluay, A.; Seseogullari-Dirihan, R.; Feitosa, V.P.; Tay, F.R.; Watson, T.F.; Pashley, D.H.; Sauro, S.

    2014-01-01

    This study analyzed the amounts of solubilized telopeptides cross-linked carboxyterminal telopeptide of type I collagen (ICTP) and C-terminal crosslinked telopeptide of type I collagen (CTX) derived from matrix-metalloproteinases (MMPs) and cysteine cathepsins (CTPs) subsequent to application of a filler-free (Res.A) or an ion-releasing resin (Res.B) to ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA)-demineralized dentin with or without zoledronate-containing primer (Zol-primer) pre-treatment. The chemical modification induced following treatments and artificial saliva (AS) storage was also analyzed through attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR). Totally EDTA-demineralized specimens were infiltrated with Res.A or Res.B with or without Zol-primer pre-treatment, light-cured, and immersed in AS for up to 4 wk. ICTP release was reduced following infiltration with Res.B and further reduced when Res.B was used with Zol-primer; remarkable phosphate mineral uptake was attained after AS storage. CTX release was increased in Res.A- and Res.B-treated dentin. However, when Zol-primer was used with Res.A, the CTX release fell significantly compared to the other tested resin-infiltration methods. In conclusion, zoledronate offers an additional inhibitory effect to the ion-releasing resins in MMP-mediated collagen degradation. However, Zol-primer induces a modest reduction in CTX release only when used with resin-based systems containing no ion-releasing fillers. PMID:25074494

  19. WE-E-19A-01: Globalization of Medical Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Rehani, M; Meghzifene, A; Tsapaki, V; Pipman, Y; Lief, E

    2014-06-15

    Following successful 2012–2013 International Professional Symposiums as a part of Annual AAPM meetings, representatives of AAPM and International Organization of Medical Physics (IOMP) suggested to make this tradiational Symposium a permanent part of Annual AAPM meetings in future. Following the tradition, this session includes presentations of representatives of AAPM, IOMP, European Federation of Medical Physics (EFOMP), International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and International Center for Theoretical Physics (ICTP). The speakers will cover various aspects of International collaboration such as educational, professional, and scientific issues, as well as help to developing countries. With further developments of medicine and technology and increased communication with our colleagues overseas, Medical Physics becomes more and more global profession. Use of the same technology, significant progress in medical physics research and developing practical regulations worldwide makes it increasingly useful to organize global collaboration of medical physicists. Several international organizations are tasked to promote such collaboration and provide help to developing countries. Not all AAPM members are fully aware of these international efforts. It is very useful for medical physicists to know about success of our profession in other countries. Different schools present different approaches to the same problem, which allows to find the best solution. By communicating with colleagues overseas, one can learn more than from just reading scientific publications. At this session the attendees will receive a glimpse of International Medical Physics activities. Learning Objectives: Understand the globalization of Medical Physics profession and advantages of collaboration with foreign colleagues. See what role AAPM is playing in establishing contacts with colleagues overseas. Understand the role of IOMP and main directions of its activity. Learn about IAEA and how it helps

  20. Potential for malaria seasonal forecasting in Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tompkins, Adrian; Di Giuseppe, Francesca; Colon-Gonzalez, Felipe; Namanya, Didas; Friday, Agabe

    2014-05-01

    As monthly and seasonal dynamical prediction systems have improved their skill in the tropics over recent years, there is now the potential to use these forecasts to drive dynamical malaria modelling systems to provide early warnings in epidemic and meso-endemic regions. We outline a new pilot operational system that has been developed at ECMWF and ICTP. It uses a precipitation bias correction methodology to seamlessly join the monthly ensemble prediction system (EPS) and seasonal (system 4) forecast systems of ECMWF together. The resulting temperature and rainfall forecasts for Africa are then used to drive the recently developed ICTP malaria model known as VECTRI. The resulting coupled system of ECMWF climate forecasts and VECTRI thus produces predictions of malaria prevalence rates and transmission intensity across Africa. The forecasts are filtered to highlight the regions and months in which the system has particular value due to high year to year variability. In addition to epidemic areas, these also include meso and hyper-endemic regions which undergo considerable variability in the onset months. We demonstrate the limits of the forecast skill as a function of lead-time, showing that for many areas the dynamical system can add one to two months additional warning time to a system based on environmental monitoring. We then evaluate the past forecasts against district level case data in Uganda and show that when interventions can be discounted, the system can show significant skill at predicting interannual variability in transmission intensity up to 3 or 4 months ahead at the district scale. The prospects for a operational implementation will be briefly discussed.

  1. Zoledronate and ion-releasing resins impair dentin collagen degradation.

    PubMed

    Tezvergil-Mutluay, A; Seseogullari-Dirihan, R; Feitosa, V P; Tay, F R; Watson, T F; Pashley, D H; Sauro, S

    2014-10-01

    This study analyzed the amounts of solubilized telopeptides cross-linked carboxyterminal telopeptide of type I collagen (ICTP) and C-terminal crosslinked telopeptide of type I collagen (CTX) derived from matrix-metalloproteinases (MMPs) and cysteine cathepsins (CTPs) subsequent to application of a filler-free (Res.A) or an ion-releasing resin (Res.B) to ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA)-demineralized dentin with or without zoledronate-containing primer (Zol-primer) pre-treatment. The chemical modification induced following treatments and artificial saliva (AS) storage was also analyzed through attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR). Totally EDTA-demineralized specimens were infiltrated with Res.A or Res.B with or without Zol-primer pre-treatment, light-cured, and immersed in AS for up to 4 wk. ICTP release was reduced following infiltration with Res.B and further reduced when Res.B was used with Zol-primer; remarkable phosphate mineral uptake was attained after AS storage. CTX release was increased in Res.A- and Res.B-treated dentin. However, when Zol-primer was used with Res.A, the CTX release fell significantly compared to the other tested resin-infiltration methods. In conclusion, zoledronate offers an additional inhibitory effect to the ion-releasing resins in MMP-mediated collagen degradation. However, Zol-primer induces a modest reduction in CTX release only when used with resin-based systems containing no ion-releasing fillers. PMID:25074494

  2. Aminoterminal propeptide of type I procollagen (PINP) correlates to bone loss and predicts the efficacy of antiresorptive therapy in pre- and post-menopausal non-metastatic breast cancer patients.

    PubMed Central

    Saarto, T.; Blomqvist, C.; Risteli, J.; Risteli, L.; Sarna, S.; Elomaa, I.

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the correlation between changes in collagen metabolites (ICTP, mature cross-linked carboxy-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen; PINP, the amino-terminal propeptide of type I procollagen) and bone mineral density (BMD) in 206 pre- and post-menopausal breast cancer patients with non-metastatic disease. All patients received adjuvant cancer treatment--premenopausal patients chemotherapy and post-menopausal patients anti-oestrogens. In addition, the patients were also randomized to receive oral clodronate 1600 mg daily for 3 years. BMD was measured at baseline and at 1 and 2 years, the collagen metabolites at baseline and at 1 year. There was a highly significant negative correlation between the changes in PINP and BMD in lumbar spine and femoral neck from baseline to 12 months in all patients (r(s) = -0.68, P < 0.0001, and -0.45, P < 0.0001, respectively), and in pre- and post-menopausal patients separately. The changes in PINP levels at 12 months predict further changes in BMD at 24 months (r = -0.70, P < 0.0001, and -0.51, P < 0.0001, respectively). ICTP and BMD changes correlated significantly only in lumbar spine of premenopausal patients who developed rapid bone loss due to chemotherapy-induced amenorrhoea (r(s) = -0.34, P = 0.0003). The PINP levels at 12 months were significantly lower in the clodronate group than in the control group (P < 0.0001). Our results indicate that PINP is a sensitive marker of bone turnover rate. Changes in PINP levels significantly predicted changes in BMD and correlated with the antiresorptive efficacy of clodronate treatment. PMID:9683300

  3. Unified theory in the worldline approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, James P.

    2015-11-01

    We explore unified field theories based on the gauge groups SU (5) and SO (10) using the worldline approach for chiral fermions with a Wilson loop coupling to a background gauge field. Representing path ordering and chiral projection operators with functional integrals has previously reproduced the sum over the chiralities and representations of standard model particles in a compact way. This paper shows that for SU (5) the 5 bar and 10 representations - into which the Georgi-Glashow model places the left-handed fermionic content of the standard model - appear naturally and with the familiar chirality. We carry out the same analysis for flipped SU (5) and uncover a link to SO (10) unified theory. We pursue this by exploring the SO (10) theory in the same framework, the less established unified theory based on SU (6) and briefly consider the Pati-Salam model using SU (4) × SU (2) × SU (2).

  4. Planck scale unification and dynamical symmetry breaking

    SciTech Connect

    Lykken, Joseph D.; Willenbrock, Scott

    1993-09-01

    We explore the possibility of unification of gauge couplings near the Planck scale in models of extended technicolor. We observe that models of the form G X SU(3)_c X SU(2)_L X U(1)_Y cannot be realized, due to the presence of massless neutral Goldstone bosons (axions) and light charged pseudo-Goldstone bosons; thus, unification of the known forces near the Planck scale cannot be achieved. The next simplest possibility, G X SU(4)_{PS} X SU(2)_L X U(1)_{T_{3R}}, cannot lead to unification of the Pati-Salam and weak gauge groups near the Planck scale. However, superstring theory provides relations between couplings at the Planck scale without the need for an underlying grand-unified gauge group, which allows unification of the SU(4)PS and SU(2)L couplings.

  5. The left-right forward-backward asymmetry for B quarks at the SLD

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, D.C.

    1994-05-01

    The left-right asymmetry for b quarks, A{sub b}, is precisely predicted by the Weinberg-Salam-Glashow model of particle interactions, now the standard model for high-energy particle physics. As a test of this model, A{sub b} is directly measured at the SLC Large Detector (SLD) by taking advantage of the unique polarized electron beam at the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) and measuring the left-right forward-backward asymmetry of b quarks. To measure the asymmetry, b quarks are identified using muons of high total and transverse momenta. The result for the 1993 data sample of 37,843 hadronic Z`s is A{sub b} = 0.91 {+-} 0.19 {+-} 0.06, where the first error is statistical and the second systematic. This result is in agreement with the standard model prediction of A{sub b} = 0.935.

  6. Derivative expansion of the effective action

    SciTech Connect

    Cheyette, O.

    1987-04-01

    This paper describes some methods for calculating derivative terms in the one loop effective action for a quantum field theory. The functional approach and background field method are first used to derive the general form of the one loop determinant. Then the determinant is expanded in powers of derivatives of the background fields. The form of this expansion is described for the simple case of an interacting scalar field, and then for the more complicated problem of a non-abelian gauge field. Finally, the expansion is applied to the task of calculating Higgs mass dependent effects in the Glashow-Weinberg-Salam model, and all terms which grow with the Higgs mass M/sub H/ are found in the one loop approximation. The result of this calculation is used to find the dependence of the gauge boson mass ratio rho on M/sub H/, and also to estimate the size of corrections to W and Z scattering theorems.

  7. Preliminary results of nu/sub e/e/sup -/ scattering at LAMPF

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, R.C.; Bharadwaj, V.; Brooks, G.A.; Chen, H.H.; Doe, P.J.; Hausammann, R.; Mahler, H.J.; Rushton, A.M.; Wang, K.C.; Bowles, T.J.

    1984-08-01

    We present preliminary results of a neutrino experiment in progress at LAMPF by an Irvine-Los Alamos-Maryland collaboration. We have observed a signal consistent with nu/sub e/e/sup -/ elastic scattering, with a 15-ton sandwich detector. The number of these nu/sub e/e/sup -/ candidates agrees with that predicted by the Weinberg-Salam electroweak theory. The corresponding sin/sup 2/theta/sub w/ and total cross section are reported. This study shows that the interference of weak charged-current and weak neutral-current in nu/sub e/e/sup -/ scattering is not constructive. We also searched for anomalous appearance of anti nu/sub e/ from the LAMPF beam stop. An upper limit for the multiplicative lepton number conservation law, and limits for anti nu/sub ..mu../ ..-->.. anti nu/sub e/ oscillation are given. 15 references.

  8. Discrete Abelian gauge symmetries and axions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honecker, Gabriele; Staessens, Wieland

    2015-07-01

    We combine two popular extensions of beyond the Standard Model physics within the framework of intersecting D6-brane models: discrete ℤn symmetries and Peccei-Quinn axions. The underlying natural connection between both extensions is formed by the presence of massive U(1) gauge symmetries in D-brane model building. Global intersecting D6-brane models on toroidal orbifolds of the type T6/ℤ2N and T6/ℤ2 × ℤ2M with discrete torsion offer excellent playgrounds for realizing these extensions. A generation-dependent ℤ2 symmetry is identified in a global Pati-Salam model, while global left-right symmetric models give rise to supersymmetric realizations of the DFSZ axion model. In one class of the latter models, the axion as well as Standard Model particles carry a non-trivial ℤ3 charge.

  9. Overview of the physics issues at the SSC

    SciTech Connect

    Hinchliffe, I.

    1984-11-01

    This report presents an overview of physics issues at the SSC. It discusses the progress made at the DPF Summer Study on the Design and Utilization of the SSC and emphasizes the important problems which remain. The discussion of the physics issues is divided into Standard Model, by which is meant the combination of QCD and the Weinberg-Salam model, and Non-Standard Physics, which includes supersymmetry, technicolor, new gauge bosons, compositeness and all the more or less speculative ideas in which theorists like to indulge. Then the work on identification of final states which contain W's, Z's or heavy quarks is discussed, and the impact of this work on some proposed signals for new physics is considered. Finally, some of the areas in which more work is required are discussed. 110 references. (WHK)

  10. Higgs inflation, reheating and gravitino production in no-scale Supersymmetric GUTs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, John; He, Hong-Jian; Xianyu, Zhong-Zhi

    2016-08-01

    We extend our previous study of supersymmetric Higgs inflation in the context of no-scale supergravity and grand unification, to include models based on the flipped SU(5) and the Pati-Salam group. Like the previous SU(5) GUT model, these yield a class of inflation models whose inflation predictions interpolate between those of the quadratic chaotic inflation and Starobinsky-like inflation, while avoiding tension with proton decay limits. We further analyse the reheating process in these models, and derive the number of e-folds, which is independent of the reheating temperature. We derive the corresponding predictions for the scalar tilt and the tensor-to-scalar ratio in cosmic microwave background perturbations, as well as discussing the gravitino production following inflation.

  11. Beyond the Standard Model with noncommutative geometry, strolling towards quantum gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinetti, Pierre

    2015-08-01

    Noncommutative geometry in its many incarnations appears at the crossroad of many researches in theoretical and mathematical physics: from models of quantum spacetime(with or without breaking of Lorentz symmetry) to loop gravity and string theory, from early considerations on UV-divergenciesin quantum field theory to recent models of gauge theories on noncommutatives pacetime, from Connes description of the standard model of elementary particles to recent Pati-Salam like extensions. We list several of these applications, emphasizing also the original point of view brought by noncommutative geometry on the nature of time. This text serves as an introduction to the volume of proceedings of the parallel session “Noncommutative geometry and quantum gravity”, as a part of the conference “Conceptual and technical challenges in quantum gravity” organized at the University of Rome La Sapienza sin September 2014.

  12. Improving the accuracy of Weyl-Heisenberg wavelet and symmetrized Gaussian representations using customized phase-space-region operators.

    PubMed

    Lombardini, Richard; Poirier, Bill

    2006-09-01

    A particular basis set method developed by one of the authors, involving maximally localized orthogonal Weyl-Heisenberg wavelets (or "weylets") and a phase space truncation scheme, has been successfully applied to exact quantum calculations for many degrees of freedom (DOF's) [B. Poirier and A. Salam, J. Chem. Phys. 121, 1740 (2004)]. However, limitations in accuracy arise in the many-DOF case, owing to memory limits on conventional computers. This paper addresses this accuracy limitation by introducing phase space region operators (PSRO's) that customize individual weylet basis functions for the problem of interest. The construction of the PSRO's is straightforward, and does not require a priori knowledge of the desired eigenstates. The PSRO, when applied to weylets, as well as to simple phase space Gaussian basis functions, exhibits remarkable improvements in accuracy, reducing computed eigenvalue errors by orders of magnitude. The method is applied to various model systems at varying DOF's. PMID:17025784

  13. Superconnections and internal supersymmetry dynamics.

    PubMed Central

    Ne'eman, Y; Sternberg, S

    1990-01-01

    In previous papers we proposed a theory of internal supersymmetry using the superalgebra su(n/1) to give rise to a unified structure that included quarks and leptons in 2n-5 generations. In the present paper we suggest that the notion of superconnections as introduced by Quillen provides a natural setting for the dynamics of an internally supersymmetric theory with the Higgs field occurring as the "zero-th order part" of the superconnection. The Higgs mechanism enters quadratically into the curvature of the superconnection and hence quartically into the Lagrangian. The supercovariant derivative gives a coupling of the Higgs field to the matter field similar to that put in "by hand" in the Lagrangian of the Weinberg-Salam theory. PMID:11607109

  14. Elementary Particles and the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, John H.

    1991-10-01

    Professor Murray Gell-Mann is one of the most influential and brilliant scientists of the twentieth century. His work on symmetries, including the invention of the "quark," in the 1950s and early 1960s provided the foundation for much of modern particle physics. His contribution to the field earned him the Nobel Prize for Physics in 1969. This book is a collection of research articles by eminent scientists written especially to celebrate Gell-Mann's 60th birthday, in September 1989. The main body of contributions is concerned with theoretical particle physics and its applications to cosmology, and includes papers by such notables as J. Hartle, E. Witten, H. Fritzsch, T.D. Lee, I.M. Singer, V. Telegdi, and some personal remarks by A. Salam and M.L. Goldberger.

  15. Elementary Particles and the Universe Elementary Particles and the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, John H.

    1991-10-01

    Professor Murray Gell-Mann is one of the most influential and brilliant scientists of the twentieth century. His work on symmetries, including the invention of the "quark," in the 1950s and early 1960s provided the foundation for much of modern particle physics. His contribution to the field earned him the Nobel Prize for Physics in 1969. This book is a collection of research articles by eminent scientists written especially to celebrate Gell-Mann's 60th birthday, in September 1989. The main body of contributions is concerned with theoretical particle physics and its applications to cosmology, and includes papers by such notables as J. Hartle, E. Witten, H. Fritzsch, T.D. Lee, I.M. Singer, V. Telegdi, and some personal remarks by A. Salam and M.L. Goldberger.

  16. Electroweak symmetry breaking: Higgs/whatever

    SciTech Connect

    Chanowitz, M.S.

    1989-10-16

    In the first of these two lectures the Higgs mechanism is reviewed in its most general form, which does not necessarily require the existence of Higgs bosons. The general consequences of the hypothesis that electroweak symmetry breaking is due to the Higgs mechanism are deduced just from gauge invariance and unitarity. In the second lecture the general properties are illustrated with three specific models: the Weinberg-Salam model, its minimal supersymmetric extension, and technicolor. The second lecture concludes with a discussion of the experiment signals for strong WW scattering, whose presence or absence will allow us to determine whether the symmetry breaking sector lies above or below 1 TeV. 57 refs.

  17. Un-oriented quiver theories for Majorana neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Addazi, Andrea; Bianchi, Massimo

    2015-07-01

    In the context of un-oriented open string theories, we identify quivers whereby a Majorana mass for the neutron is indirectly generated by exotic instantons. We discuss two classes of (Susy) Standard Model like quivers, depending on the embedding of SU(2) W in the Chan-Paton group. In both cases, the main mechanism involves a vector-like pair mixing through a non-perturbative mass term. We also discuss possible relations between the phenomenology of Neutron-Antineutron oscillations and LHC physics in these models. In particular, a vector-like pair of color-triplet scalars or color-triplet fermions could be directly detected at LHC, compatibly with limits. Finally we briefly comment on Pati-Salam extensions of our models.

  18. Departure from Weinberg-Salem model and Grand Unification

    SciTech Connect

    Deshpande, N.G.

    1980-05-01

    The spontaneous symmetry breakdown of Grand Unified Groups like SO(10) can lead to an extra U(1) group beyond the SU(2) x U(1) of Weinberg-Salam. The neutral current data in such models could depend on three new parameters beyond the two in the standard model. However, grand unification imposes restriction on coupling constants limiting the analysis to two new parameters. Further, only one new parameter occurs in neutrino-scattering data. More accurate data can thus be used in the future to set limits on these parameters. The present data when used with the more general parametrization no longer determines the value of sin/sup 2/ theta/sub w/ as accurately. This leads to a greater uncertainty in the estimate of the proton lifetime.

  19. Baryon and lepton number violation in the electroweak theory at TeV energies

    SciTech Connect

    Mottola, E.

    1990-01-01

    In the standard Weinberg-Salam electroweak theory baryon and lepton number (B and L) are NOT exactly conserved. The nonconservation of B and L can be traced to the existence of parity violation in the electroweak theory, together with the chiral current anomaly. This subtle effect gives negligibly small amplitudes for B and L violation at energies and temperatures significantly smaller than M{sub w} sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub w}/{alpha} {approximately} 10 TeV. However, recent theoretical work shows that the rate for B and L nonconservation is unsuppressed at higher energies. The consequences of this for cosmology and the baryon asymmetry of the universe, as well as the prospects for direct verification at the SSC are discussed. 13 refs., 3 figs.

  20. Bounds for Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay in SO(10) Inspired Seesaw Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buccella, F.; Falcone, D.

    By requiring the lower limit for the lightest right-handed neutrino mass, obtained in the baryogenesis from leptogenesis scenario, and a Dirac neutrino mass matrix similar to the up-quark mass matrix, we predict small values for the νe mass and for the matrix element mee responsible of the neutrinoless double beta decay, mνe around 5×10-3 eV and mee smaller than 10-3 eV, respectively. The allowed range for the mass of the heaviest right-handed neutrino is centered around the value of the scale of B-L breaking in the SO(10) gauge theory with Pati-Salam intermediate symmetry.

  1. SO(10)-INSPIRED Seesaw Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abud, Mario; Buccella, Franco

    We determine the νR Majorana mass matrix from the experimental data on neutrino oscillations in the framework of a see-saw SO(10) model, where we impose the condition (MR)33=0 to avoid too large fine-tunings in the see-saw formula. We find a class of solutions with the two lowest neutrino masses almost degenerate and the scale of the matrix elements of MR in the range 1011-1012 GeV in agreement with Pati-Salam intermediate symmetry. We find also solutions with smaller neutrino masses, for which the scale of MR depends on the solution to the "solar neutrino problem" and on the value of the component of νe along the highest mass eigenstate, Ue3.

  2. Hilltop supernatural inflation and SUSY unified models

    SciTech Connect

    Kohri, Kazunori; Lim, C.S.; Lin, Chia-Min; Mimura, Yukihiro E-mail: lim@lab.twcu.ac.jp E-mail: mimura@hep1.phys.ntu.edu.tw

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we consider high scale (100TeV) supersymmetry (SUSY) breaking and realize the idea of hilltop supernatural inflation in concrete particle physics models based on flipped-SU(5)and Pati-Salam models in the framework of supersymmetric grand unified theories (SUSY GUTs). The inflaton can be a flat direction including right-handed sneutrino and the waterfall field is a GUT Higgs. The spectral index is n{sub s} = 0.96 which fits very well with recent data by PLANCK satellite. There is no both thermal and non-thermal gravitino problems. Non-thermal leptogenesis can be resulted from the decay of right-handed sneutrino which plays (part of) the role of inflaton.

  3. Hilltop supernatural inflation and SUSY unified models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohri, Kazunori; Lim, C. S.; Lin, Chia-Min; Mimura, Yukihiro

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we consider high scale (100TeV) supersymmetry (SUSY) breaking and realize the idea of hilltop supernatural inflation in concrete particle physics models based on flipped-SU(5)and Pati-Salam models in the framework of supersymmetric grand unified theories (SUSY GUTs). The inflaton can be a flat direction including right-handed sneutrino and the waterfall field is a GUT Higgs. The spectral index is ns = 0.96 which fits very well with recent data by PLANCK satellite. There is no both thermal and non-thermal gravitino problems. Non-thermal leptogenesis can be resulted from the decay of right-handed sneutrino which plays (part of) the role of inflaton.

  4. Towards a systematic construction of realistic D-brane models on a del Pezzo singularity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolan, Matthew J.; Krippendorf, Sven; Quevedo, Fernando

    2011-10-01

    A systematic approach is followed in order to identify realistic D-brane models at toric del Pezzo singularities. Requiring quark and lepton spectrum and Yukawas from D3 branes and massless hypercharge, we are led to Pati-Salam extensions of the Standard Model. Hierarchies of masses, flavour mixings and control of couplings select higher order del Pezzo singularities, minimising the Higgs sector prefers toric del Pezzos with dP 3 providing the most successful compromise. Then a supersymmetric local string model is presented with the following properties at low energies: (i) the MSSM spectrum plus a local B - L gauge field or additional Higgs fields depending on the breaking pattern, (ii) a realistic hierarchy of quark and lepton masses and (iii) realistic flavour mixing between quark and lepton families with computable CKM and PMNS matrices, and CP violation consistent with observations. In this construction, kinetic terms are diagonal and under calculational control suppressing standard FCNC contributions. Proton decay operators of dimension 4, 5, 6 are suppressed, and gauge couplings can unify depending on the breaking scales from string scales at energies in the range 1012-1016 GeV, consistent with TeV soft-masses from moduli mediated supersymmetry breaking. The GUT scale model corresponds to D3 branes at dP 3 with two copies of the Pati-Salam gauge symmetry SU(4) × SU(2) R × SU(2) L . D-brane instantons generate a non-vanishing μ-term. Right handed sneutrinos can break the B - L symmetry and induce a see-saw mechanism of neutrino masses and R-parity violating operators with observable low-energy implications.

  5. Kinetic and Inhibition Studies of Dihydroxybenzoate-AMP Ligase (EntE) from Escherichia coli†

    PubMed Central

    Sikora, Alison L.; Wilson, Daniel J.; Aldrich, Courtney C.; Blanchard, John S.

    2010-01-01

    Inhibition of siderophore biosynthetic pathways in pathogenic bacteria represents a promising strategy for antibacterial drug development. E. coli synthesize and secrete the small molecule iron-chelator siderophore, enterobactin, in response to intracellular iron depletion. Here we describe a detailed kinetic analysis of EntE, one of six enzymes in the enterobactin synthetase gene cluster. EntE catalyzes the ATP-dependent condensation of 2, 3-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHB) and phosphopantetheinylated EntB (holo-EntB) to form covalently arylated EntB, a product that is vital for the final assembly of enterobactin. Initial velocity studies show that EntE proceeds via a Bi Uni Uni Bi ping-pong kinetic mechanism with a kcat equal to 2.8 s−1 and Km values of 2.5, 430, 2.9 μM for DHB, ATP, and holo-EntB-ArCP, respectively. Inhibition and direct binding experiments suggest that, during the first half-reaction (adenylation), DHB binds first to the free enzyme, followed by ATP and the release of pyrophosphate to form the adenylate intermediate. During the second half-reaction (ligation), phosphopantetheinylated EntB binds to the enzyme followed by the release of products, AMP and arylated EntB. Two hydrolytically-stable adenylate analogues, 5′-O-[N-(salicyl)sulfamoyl]adenosine (Sal-AMS) and 5′-O-[N-(2, 3-dihydroxybenzoyl)sulfamoyl]adenosine (DHB-AMS), are shown to act as slow-onset tight-binding inhibitors of the enzyme with appKi values of 0.9 and 3.8 nM, respectively. Direct binding experiments, via isothermal titration calorimetry, reveal low picomolar dissociation constants for both analogues to EntE. The tight-binding of Sal-AMS and DHB-AMS to EntE suggests that these compounds may be developed further as effective antibiotics targeted to this enzyme. PMID:20359185

  6. Vitamin D Status and Bone and Connective Tissue Turnover in Brown Bears (Ursus arctos) during Hibernation and the Active State

    PubMed Central

    Vestergaard, Peter; Støen, Ole-Gunnar; Swenson, Jon E.; Mosekilde, Leif; Heickendorff, Lene; Fröbert, Ole

    2011-01-01

    Background Extended physical inactivity causes disuse osteoporosis in humans. In contrast, brown bears (Ursus arctos) are highly immobilised for half of the year during hibernation without signs of bone loss and therefore may serve as a model for prevention of osteoporosis. Aim To study 25-hydroxy-vitamin D (25OHD) levels and bone turnover markers in brown bears during the hibernating state in winter and during the active state in summer. We measured vitamin D subtypes (D2 and D3), calcitropic hormones (parathyroid hormone [PTH], 1,25-dihydroxy-vitamin D [1,25(OH)2D]) and bone turnover parameters (osteocalcin, ICTP, CTX-I), PTH, serum calcium and PIIINP. Material and Methods We drew blood from seven immobilised wild brown bears during hibernation in February and in the same bears while active in June. Results Serum 25-hydroxy-cholecalciferol (25OHD3) was significantly higher in the summer than in the winter (22.8±4.6 vs. 8.8±2.1 nmol/l, two tailed p - 2p = 0.02), whereas 25-hydroxy-ergocalciferol (25OHD2) was higher in winter (54.2±8.3 vs. 18.7±1.7 nmol/l, 2p<0.01). Total serum calcium and PTH levels did not differ between winter and summer. Activated 1,25(OH)2D demonstrated a statistically insignificant trend towards higher summer levels. Osteocalcin levels were higher in summer than winter, whereas other markers of bone turnover (ICTP and CTX-I) were unchanged. Serum PIIINP, which is a marker of connective tissue and to some degree muscle turnover, was significantly higher during summer than during winter. Conclusions Dramatic changes were documented in the vitamin D3/D2 ratio and in markers of bone and connective tissue turnover in brown bears between hibernation and the active state. Because hibernating brown bears do not develop disuse osteoporosis, despite extensive physical inactivity we suggest that they may serve as a model for the prevention of this disease. PMID:21731765

  7. Effects of suppression of estrogen action by the p450 aromatase inhibitor letrozole on bone mineral density and bone turnover in pubertal boys.

    PubMed

    Wickman, Sanna; Kajantie, Eero; Dunkel, Leo

    2003-08-01

    The essential role of estrogen (E) in regulation of developing peak bone mass in males was confirmed when young adult men were described who cannot respond to or produce E because of defective E receptor alpha or P-450 aromatase enzyme, respectively. These men had significantly reduced bone mineral density (BMD) despite normal or supranormal androgen concentrations, and E administration improved BMD in the men with aromatase deficiency, whereas testosterone (T) was ineffective. Because new P450 aromatase inhibitors may prove to be potential drugs in various growth disorders, the effect of suppression of E action on developing peak bone mass has to be closely evaluated. In this study, we explored the effects of suppression of E synthesis on bone metabolism in pubertal boys. A total of 23 boys with constitutional delay of puberty were randomized to receive T and placebo or T and a specific and potent P450 aromatase inhibitor, letrozole. We determined BMD in the lumbar spine and the femoral neck. Bone resorption was studied by measuring the serum concentration of cross-linked carboxyterminal telopeptide of type I collagen by two different methods (CTx and ICTP), and bone formation by determining the serum concentrations of carboxyterminal propeptide of type I procollagen (PICP), osteocalcin, and alkaline phosphatase. We demonstrated previously that, during treatment with T and placebo, the concentrations of androgens and E increased. During treatment with T and letrozole, the E concentrations remained at the pretreatment level, but the androgen concentrations increased; the increase in the T concentration was more than 5-fold higher than during treatment with T and placebo. We did not observe any significant differences in the changes in bone mineral content, BMD, or bone mineral apparent density, an estimate of true volumetric BMD, between the treated groups. Lumbar spine bone mineral apparent density increased in both treated groups; but in the T- plus letrozole

  8. Providing tailored climate information to forest fire stakeholders and end-users

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giannakopoulos, Christos; Kotroni, Vasso; Lagouvardos, Kostas; Korakaki, Evi; Hatzaki, Maria; Tenentes, Vassilis; Roussos, Anargyros; Karali, Anna; Goodess, Clare

    2013-04-01

    complement the two web-based tools and to further expand knowledge in fire risk modeling to address the needs for in-depth training. An initial version of this educational software tool was presented in the first CLIMRUN summer school, held at ICTP, Trieste in October 2012 (http://cdsagenda5.ictp.trieste.it/askArchive.php?base=agenda&categ=a1257&id=a1257/announcement) .

  9. Assessment of ENSEMBLES regional climate models for the representation of monthly wind characteristics in the Aegean Sea (Greece): Mean and extremes analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anagnostopoulou, Christina; Tolika, Konstantia; Tegoulias, Ioannis; Velikou, Kondylia; Vagenas, Christos

    2013-04-01

    The main scope of the present study is the assessment of the ability of three of the most updated regional climate models, developed under the frame of the European research project ENSEMBLES (http://www.ensembles-eu.org/), to simulate the wind characteristics in the Aegean Sea in Greece. The examined models are KNMI-RACMO2, MPI-MREMO, and ICTP - RegCM3. They all have the same spatial resolution (25x25km) and for their future projections they are using the A1B SRES emission scenarios. Their simulated wind data (speed and direction) were compared with observational data from several stations over the domain of study for a time period of 25 years, from 1980 to 2004 on a monthly basis. The primer data were available every three or six hours from which we computed the mean daily wind speed and the prevailing daily wind direction. It should be mentioned, that the comparison was made for the grid point that was the closest to each station over land. Moreover, the extreme speed values were also calculated both for the observational and the simulated data, in order to assess the ability of the models in capturing the most intense wind conditions. The first results of the study showed that the prevailing winds during the winter and spring months have a north - northeastern or a south - south western direction in most parts of the Aegean sea. The models under examination seem to capture quite satisfactorily this pattern as well as the general characteristics of the winds in this area. During summer, winds in the Aegean Sea have mainly north direction and the models have quite good agreement both in simulating this direction and the wind speed. Concerning the extreme wind speed (percentiles) it was found that for the stations in the northern Aegean all the models overestimate the extreme wind indices. For the eastern parts of the Aegean the KNMI and the MPI model underestimate the extreme wind speeds while on the other hand the ICTP model overestimates them. Finally for the

  10. Collaborative Research: Robust Climate Projections and Stochastic Stability of Dynamical Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ghil, Michael; McWilliams, James; Neelin, J. David; Zaliapin, Ilya; Chekroun, Mickael; Kondrashov, Dmitri; Simonnet, Eric

    2011-10-13

    The project was completed along the lines of the original proposal, with additional elements arising as new results were obtained. The originally proposed three thrusts were expanded to include an additional, fourth one. (i) The e ffects of stochastic perturbations on climate models have been examined at the fundamental level by using the theory of deterministic and random dynamical systems, in both nite and in nite dimensions. (ii) The theoretical results have been implemented first on a delay-diff erential equation (DDE) model of the El-Nino/Southern-Oscillation (ENSO) phenomenon. (iii) More detailed, physical aspects of model robustness have been considered, as proposed, within the stripped-down ICTP-AGCM (formerly SPEEDY) climate model. This aspect of the research has been complemented by both observational and intermediate-model aspects of mid-latitude and tropical climate. (iv) An additional thrust of the research relied on new and unexpected results of (i) and involved reduced-modeling strategies and associated prediction aspects have been tested within the team's empirical model reduction (EMR) framework. Finally, more detailed, physical aspects have been considered within the stripped-down SPEEDY climate model. The results of each of these four complementary e fforts are presented in the next four sections, organized by topic and by the team members concentrating on the topic under discussion.

  11. 24-Week Exposure to Oxidized Tyrosine Induces Hepatic Fibrosis Involving Activation of the MAPK/TGF-β1 Signaling Pathway in Sprague-Dawley Rats Model

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhuqing Leslie; Shi, Yonghui; Le, Guowei; Ding, Yinyi; Zhao, Qi

    2016-01-01

    Scope. Oxidized tyrosine (O-Tyr) has been widely detected in many consumer protein products. O-Tyr products such as dityrosine (Dityr) and 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NT) are universal biomarkers of protein oxidation and have been demonstrated to be associated with metabolic disorders in biological system. Evaluation of potential intracorporal effects of dietary O-Tyr is important since the mechanism of biological impacts induced by oral oxidized protein products (OPPs) is still limited although we have proved that some dietary OPPs would induce oxidative injury to liver and kidney. Methods and Results. The present study aimed to investigate the dose-dependent hepatic injury caused by oral O-Tyr in rats. 24-week feeding of O-Tyr enhanced aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) activities, increased total bilirubin (TBiL) content, and led to oxidative damage in rats liver. Besides, O-Tyr distinctly increased the phosphorylation of p38 and ERK2 MAPKs and enhanced fibrosis-related TGF-β1 and Smad2/3 levels. Higher extracellular matrix (ECM) indexes (ICTP, PIIINP) and histological examination (HE and Masson staining) also supported dose-dependent hepatic fibrosis caused by O-Tyr. Conclusion. These findings reveal that O-Tyr may induce oxidative damage and hepatic fibrosis via MAPK/TGF-β1 signaling pathway, in which ROS together with malondialdehyde (MDA) and OPPs act as the pivotal mediators. PMID:26788244

  12. Storage resource manager version 2.2: design, implementation, and testing experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donno, F.; Abadie, L.; Badino, P.; Baud, J.-P.; Corso, E.; Witt, S. D.; Fuhrmann, P.; Gu, J.; Koblitz, B.; Lemaitre, S.; Litmaath, M.; Litvintsev, D.; Presti, G. L.; Magnoni, L.; McCance, G.; Mkrtchan, T.; Mollon, R.; Natarajan, V.; Perelmutov, T.; Petravick, D.; Shoshani, A.; Sim, A.; Smith, D.; Tedesco, P.; Zappi, R.

    2008-07-01

    Storage Services are crucial components of the Worldwide LHC Computing Grid Infrastructure spanning more than 200 sites and serving computing and storage resources to the High Energy Physics LHC communities. Up to tens of Petabytes of data are collected every year by the four LHC experiments at CERN. To process these large data volumes it is important to establish a protocol and a very efficient interface to the various storage solutions adopted by the WLCG sites. In this work we report on the experience acquired during the definition of the Storage Resource Manager v2.2 protocol. In particular, we focus on the study performed to enhance the interface and make it suitable for use by the WLCG communities. At the moment 5 different storage solutions implement the SRM v2.2 interface: BeStMan (LBNL), CASTOR (CERN and RAL), dCache (DESY and FNAL), DPM (CERN), and StoRM (INFN and ICTP). After a detailed inside review of the protocol, various test suites have been written identifying the most effective set of tests: the S2 test suite from CERN and the SRM-Tester test suite from LBNL. Such test suites have helped verifying the consistency and coherence of the proposed protocol and validating existing implementations. We conclude our work describing the results achieved.

  13. APS Wheatley Prize Talk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glyde, Henry R.

    2001-03-01

    It is a pleasure to describe our collaborative program in International Development [1] between the University of Ottawa, Canada and Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand. The goal of our linked program was broadly to develop physics and graduate education at Chulalongkorn with an emphasis on semiconductor materials and theoretical science. The aim of my description is to illustrate how links that combine several important components of development sustained over many years can greatly assist research institutions in developing countries. The link was initially funded between 1979-85 by the Canadian International Development Agency. The link included (1) Ph.D. education for junior Thai faculty at Ottawa, (2) secondment of faculty between Chulalongkorn and Ottawa, (3) equipment and technical assistance and (4) institution building at Chulalongkorn. With assistance of the link and other agencies the first Ph.D. program in physics in Thailand was initiated, the Semiconductor Physics Research Lab was created and the Forum for Theoretical Science was established. The FTS was also greatly assisted by ICTP. Later, activity involved the university of Delaware and the FTS obtained major funding for superconductivity research in Thailand from the USAID between 1987-91. The successes, disappointments, benefits and costs of these programs, which exist today, will be discussed. [1]Institutional Links. An example in science and technology, Henry R. Glyde and Virulh Sa-yakanit, Higher Education in Europe, X4, 51 (1985); Asia-Pacific Physics News 2, 29 (1987).

  14. Adsorption of molecular hydrogen on Pd(Pt) decorated graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, Narayan; Khaniya, Asim; Lamichhane, Saran; Pantha, Nurapati

    2015-03-01

    We have performed the first-principles based Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations to study the stability, geometrical structures, and electronic properties of a Pd(Pt) atom adsorbed graphene to investigate the possibility of using Pd(Pt) decorated graphene as energy storage materials with reference to pristine graphene. The London dispersion forces have been incorporated by the DFT-D2 levels of calculations implemented in Quantum Espresso packages. Our findings show that Pd and Pt both adsorb on graphene at Bridge site. The electronic structures of Pd(Pt) adsorbed graphene possesses band gap opening due to breaking of the symmetry of graphene. Further we have studied the adsorption of moelcular hydrogen ((H 2) n , n = 1-7) on the Pd(Pt)-graphene system. The adatom Pd(Pt) enhances the binding energy per hydrogen molecule in Pd(Pt)-graphene system in comparison to that in the pristine graphene. The binding energy per hydrogen molecule of the adatom-graphene system decreases as the number of H 2 molecules increases and finally it saturates to 0.15 eV (0.16 eV) per hydrogen molecule for Pd-graphene (Pt-graphene) systems respectively. ICTP-NET 56/TWAS.

  15. FOREST-SAGE, a new deforestation model for climate models and an example deforestation climate impact experiment in the Congo.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tompkins, A. M.; Bell, J.-P.; Caporaso, L.

    2012-04-01

    The impact of deforestation on climate is often studied using highly idealized "instant deforestation" experiments due to the lack of generalized deforestation scenario generators coupled to climate model land-surface schemes. A new deforestation scenario generator has been therefore developed to fulfill this role known as the deFORESTation ScenArio GEnerator, or FOREST-SAGE. The model produces distributed maps of deforestation rates that account for local factors such as proximity to transport networks, distance weighted population density, forest fragmentation and presence of protected areas and logging concessions. The integrated deforestation risk is scaled to give the deforestation rate as specified by macro-region scenarios such as "business as usual" or "increased protection legislation" which are a function of future time. FOREST-SAGE is based on the framework of the widely used Community Land Model (CLM), which is the land model for the Community Earth System Model (CESM), the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM) and the 4th generation ICTP regional climate model REGCM4. Example potential future deforestation scenarios for central Africa are shown, along with the resulting climate impact as modelled by REGCM coupled to CLM.

  16. Impact of climate change on runoff timing over the Alpine region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppola, Erika; Raffaele, Francesca; Giorgi, Filippo; Giuliani, Graziano

    2015-04-01

    In this work we focus our attention on the snowmelt-driven runoff (SDR) on the Alpine region. We use the Regional Climate model output from Med-CORDEX simulation and in particular the ICTP regional climate model RegCM4 at 2 different resolutions (12km, 50km) and the output from other 3 EURO-CORDEX Models (RACMO22E and HIRHAM5, both driven by EC-EARTH and CCLM4-8-17, driven by MPI-ESM-LR; all of them at 44 and 11 km resolutions). Comparison with the European Water Archive (EWA) observed runoff dataset (242 stations) over Alps show a good performance of all the models in the present day representation of the SDR at the highest resolution. The low-resolution simulations are less accurate in representing the runoff timing. For the future projection we analyzed the RCP 8.5 scenario for the whole ensemble. All the models show a temperature increase up to 4 degrees in the Alps and this leads to a change of SDR timing that can span from 1 to 3 months depending on the model space resolution. These large changes are probably due to the snow-albedo feedback that is amplified over the complex Alpine topography. Such a change in runoff timing can be really important for water storage regulation rules for energy production, irrigation and therefore agricolture, and domestic use.

  17. Planck 2010

    SciTech Connect

    2010-06-02

    Planck 2010 From the Planck Scale to the ElectroWeak Scale The conference will be the twelfth one in a series of meetings on physics beyond the Standard Model, organized jointly by several European groups: Bonn, CERN, Ecole Polytechnique, ICTP, Madrid, Oxford, Padua, Pisa, SISSA and Warsaw as part of activities in the framework of the European network UNILHC.Topics to be discussed: Supersymmetry Supergravity & string phenomenology Extra dimensions Electroweak symmetry breaking LHC and Tevatron Physics Collider physics Flavor & neutrinos physics Astroparticle & cosmology Gravity & holography Strongly coupled physics & CFT Registration: registration will be open until May 1st. Registration fees amount to 150 CHF and cover the cost of the coffee breaks and the social dinner. Payment has to be made online. The deadline for registration has been postponed to May 7th. However, after May 3th, we shall not accept any talk request any more. The meeting will be partly supported by ° the Marie Curie Initial Training Network "UNILHC" PITN-GA-2009-23792, ° the ERC Advanced Grant "MassTeV" 226371, ° and the CERN-TH unit.

  18. Planck 2010

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2011-10-06

    Planck 2010 From the Planck Scale to the ElectroWeak Scale The conference will be the twelfth one in a series of meetings on physics beyond the Standard Model, organized jointly by several European groups: Bonn, CERN, Ecole Polytechnique, ICTP, Madrid, Oxford, Padua, Pisa, SISSA and Warsaw as part of activities in the framework of the European network UNILHC.Topics to be discussed: Supersymmetry Supergravity & string phenomenology Extra dimensions Electroweak symmetry breaking LHC and Tevatron Physics Collider physics Flavor & neutrinos physics Astroparticle & cosmology Gravity & holography Strongly coupled physics & CFT Registration: registration will be open until May 1st. Registration fees amount to 150 CHF and cover the cost of the coffee breaks and the social dinner. Payment has to be made online. The deadline for registration has been postponed to May 7th. However, after May 3th, we shall not accept any talk request any more. The meeting will be partly supported by ° the Marie Curie Initial Training Network "UNILHC" PITN-GA-2009-23792, ° the ERC Advanced Grant "MassTeV" 226371, ° and the CERN-TH unit.

  19. Code System for Producing Pointwise and Multigroup Neutron and Photon Cross Sections from ENDF/B Data.

    1998-05-13

    Version 00 The NJOY nuclear data processing system is a modular computer code used for converting evaluated nuclear data in the ENDF format into libraries useful for applications calculations. Because the Evaluated Nuclear Data File (ENDF) format is used all around the world (e.g., ENDF/B-VI in the US, JEF-2.2 in Europe, JENDL-3.2 in Japan, BROND-2.2 in Russia), NJOY gives its users access to a wide variety of the most up-to-date nuclear data. NJOY provides comprehensivemore » capabilities for processing evaluated data, and it can serve applications ranging from continuous-energy Monte Carlo (MCNP), through deterministic transport codes (DANT, ANISN, DORT), to reactor lattice codes (WIMS, EPRI). NJOY handles a wide variety of nuclear effects, including resonances, Doppler broadening, heating (KERMA), radiation damage, thermal scattering (even cold moderators), gas production, neutrons and charged particles, photoatomic interactions, self shielding, probability tables, photon production, and high-energy interactions (to 150 MeV). Output can include printed listings, special library files for applications, and Postscript graphics (plus color). More information on NJOY is available from the developer's home page at http://t2.lanl.gov. Follow the Tourbus section of the Tour area to find notes from the ICTP lectures held at Trieste in March 1998 on the ENDF format and on the NJOY code.« less

  20. D-Brane Primer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Clifford V.

    2001-10-01

    Following is a collection of lecture notes on D-branes, which may be used by the reader as preparation for applications to modern research applications such as: the AdS/CFT and other gauge theory/geometry correspondences, Matrix Theory and stringy non-commutative geometry, etc. In attempting to be reasonably self-contained, the notes start from classical point-particles and develop the subject logically (but selectively) through classical strings, quantisation, D-branes, supergravity, superstrings, string duality, including many detailed applications. Selected focus topics feature D-branes as probes of both spacetime and gauge geometry, highlighting the role of world-volume curvature and gauge couplings, with some non-Abelian cases. Other advanced topics which are discussed are the (presently) novel tools of research such as fractional branes, the enhançon mechanism, D(ielectric)-branes and the emergence of the fuzzy/non-commutative sphere. (This is an expanded writeup of lectures given at ICTP, TASI, and BUSSTEPP.).

  1. Ageism Discrimination Crowdlynching Shames Physics Pretentions of Intellectual Honesty and Ethics: Extension Throughout Universities Shaming Education By Bankrupting Overdebted Student Defrauding: Caveat Emptor!!!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isalie, J.; Codben, Druid; Seidwinder, Gruald; Heiller, Ereich; Young, Muddlekent; Stuntley, Hugene; Siegel, L. E. E.; Deliesie, Charlatan

    2014-03-01

    Ageism discrimination sociological-dysfunctionality crowdlynching shames physics pretentions of intellectual honesty and ethics! Extension to other departments:philo.,psych.,geo.,maths shames claims of honest education:BU,HU,NEU,UW,SDSU,ICTP/SISSA. Defrauding overdebted students, would be ``sciences'' become alas mere séances! Witness:70 year old Edward Siegel,PhD(70) firsts:multiband Hubbard-model decades pre-``Emery'' with Rosen/Feynman[IBM Conf.Comp./Math.(86)] trendy/ hyped ``Q-computing'' in ANN AI, google search-engine Page-Brin adaption; pre-trendy nanophysics [PSS(a) 11, 45(72);Scripta Met.13,913(79)];decade-earlier GMR discoverer[JMMM 7,312(78)] pre ``Fert''-``Gruenberg'' decade-earlier acoustic-emission F =ma rediscovery in Bak/BNL-hyped SOC; FUZZYICS Aristotle SoO rediscovery eliminating jargonial-obfuscation plaguing physics via implementation of Cohen-Stewart[Collapse of Chaos:Discovering Simplicity in ``Complex'' World] called for compl-icity/ simple-xity both simultaneously automaticallybig-`data'disambiguation via HoT;AMS Joint Mtg.(02) proofs:FLT;P ≠NPBSD conj.,Riemann-hypothesis as BEC; Benford's-law inversion discovering digits = bosons; (87) Majorana-fermion & HDM discoverer in complex-quantum-statistics in fractal-dimensions; ``it's a jack-in-the-box'' universe cosmology.

  2. Current sheath formation dynamics and structure for different insulator lengths of plasma focus device

    SciTech Connect

    Seng, Y. S.; Lee, P.; Rawat, R. S.

    2014-11-15

    The breakdown phase of the UNU-ICTP plasma focus (PF) device was successfully simulated using the electromagnetic particle in cell method. A clear uplift of the current sheath (CS) layer was observed near the insulator surface, accompanied with an exponential increase in the plasma density. Both phenomena were found to coincide with the surge in the electric current, which is indicative of voltage breakdown. Simulations performed on the device with different insulator lengths showed an increase in the fast ionization wave velocity with length. The voltage breakdown time was found to scale linearly with the insulator length. Different spatial profiles of the CS electron density, and the associated degree of uniformity, were found to vary with different insulator lengths. The ordering, according to the degree of uniformity, among insulator lengths of 19, 22, and 26 mm agreed with that in terms of soft X-ray radiation yield observed from experiments. This suggests a direct correlation between CS density homogeneity near breakdown and the radiation yield performance. These studies were performed with a linearly increasing voltage time profile as input to the PF device.

  3. Implementation and evaluation of online gas-phase chemistry within a regional climate model (RegCM-CHEM4)

    SciTech Connect

    Shalaby, A. K.; Zakey, A. S.; Tawfik, A. B.; Solmon, F.; Giorgi, Filippo; Stordal, F.; Sillman, S.; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Steiner, A. L.

    2012-05-22

    The RegCM-CHEM4 is a new online climate-chemistry model based on the International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP) regional climate model (RegCM4). Tropospheric gas-phase chemistry is integrated into the climate model using the condensed version of the Carbon Bond Mechanism (CBM-Z; Zaveri and Peters, 1999) with a fast solver based on radical balances. We evaluate the model over Continental Europe for two different time scales: (1) an event-based analysis of the ozone episode associated with the heat wave of August 2003 and (2) a climatological analysis of a sixyear simulation (2000-2005). For the episode analysis, model simulations show good agreement with European Monitoring and Evaluation Program (EMEP) observations of hourly ozone over different regions in Europe and capture ozone concentrations during and after the August 2003 heat wave event. For long-term climate simulations, the model captures the seasonal cycle of ozone concentrations with some over prediction of ozone concentrations in non-heat wave summers. Overall, the ozone and ozone precursor evaluation shows the feasibility of using RegCM-CHEM4 for decadal-length simulations of chemistry-climate interactions.

  4. High Energy Theory Workshops and Visitors at the Michigan Center for Theoretical Physics FY15

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, Aaron T.

    2015-09-18

    The String theory workshop was held from March 4-7, 2015 on the University of Michigan campus. Local organizers were Gordon Kane and Aaron Pierce. Piyush Kumar (Yale), Jim Halverson (KITP), Bobby Acharya (ICTP) and Sven Krippendorf (Oxford) served as external organizers.The meeting focused on the status of work to project 10 or 11 dimensional string/M theories onto our 4 spacetime dimensions (compactification). The workshop had 31 participants, half from outside the U.S. Participants were encouraged to focus on predictions for recent and forthcoming data, particularly for Higgs physics and LHC and dark matter, rather than on the traditional approach of embedding the Standard Model particles and forces. The Higgs boson sympoosium was locally organized by James Wells (chair), Aaron Pierce and Jianming Qian. Additional input in the early stages by Stefan Pokorski (Warsaw) who was unable to attend in the end. The workshop consistent of 22 talks from experts around the world, both theoretical and experimental. Experimentalists summarized the current state of knowledge of the Higgs boson and its varients. The theory talks ranged from technical calculations of Standard Model processes to speculative novel ideas. The YHET visitor program invited weekly young visitors to the University of Michigan campus to present their work. This year 24 participants came under the program, with 17 of them receiving at least partial support for their visits.

  5. Rigorous approximation of stationary measures and convergence to equilibrium for iterated function systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galatolo, Stefano; Monge, Maurizio; Nisoli, Isaia

    2016-07-01

    We study the problem of the rigorous computation of the stationary measure and of the rate of convergence to equilibrium of an iterated function system described by a stochastic mixture of two or more dynamical systems that are either all uniformly expanding on the interval, either all contracting. In the expanding case, the associated transfer operators satisfy a Lasota–Yorke inequality, we show how to compute a rigorous approximations of the stationary measure in the L 1 norm and an estimate for the rate of convergence. The rigorous computation requires a computer-aided proof of the contraction of the transfer operators for the maps, and we show that this property propagates to the transfer operators of the IFS. In the contracting case we perform a rigorous approximation of the stationary measure in the Wasserstein–Kantorovich distance and rate of convergence, using the same functional analytic approach. We show that a finite computation can produce a realistic computation of all contraction rates for the whole parameter space. We conclude with a description of the implementation and numerical experiments. All the authors were partially supported by ICTP and by EU Marie-Curie IRSES Brazilian–European partnership in Dynamical Systems (FP7-PEOPLE-2012-IRSES 318999 BREUDS), SG thanks The Leverhulme Trust for support through Network Grant IN-2014-021.

  6. Effect of dentin etching and chlorhexidine application on metalloproteinase-mediated collagen degradation

    PubMed Central

    Raquel, Osorio; Mónica, Yamauti; Estrella, Osorio; Estrella, Ruiz-Requena María; David, Pashley; Franklin, Tay; Manuel, Toledano

    2013-01-01

    Dentin matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are involved in collagen degradation of resin-dentin interfaces. This study evaluated if collagen degradation can be prevented by chlorhexidine after different dentin demineralization procedures. Human dentin demineralization was performed with phosphoric acid (PA), EDTA, or acidic monomers (ClearfilSEBond and XENOV). Specimens were stored (24 h, 1 wk or 3 wk) in the presence or absence of chlorhexidine. In half of the groups, active MMP-2 was incorporated into the storing solution. C-terminal telopeptide determination (ICTP) was performed in the supernatants. Collagen degradation was higher in PA and EDTA-demineralized dentin. Chlorhexidine reduced collagen degradation in these groups only for 24 h. When dentin was demineralized with SEBond or Xeno, collagen degradation was reduced up to 30%, but addition of exogenous MMP-2 significantly increased collagen degradation. In self-etchant treated dentin the inhibitory effect of chlorhexidine on MMPs lasted up to 3 wk. Treating dentin with EDTA, PA or self-etching agents produces enough demineralization to permit cleavage of the exposed collagen. Monomers infiltration may exert protection on demineralized collagen, probably through immobilization of MMPs. The partial inhibitory action of CHX on MMP activity produced by self-etching adhesives was prolonged compared to the short-acting in PA or EDTA-treated dentin. PMID:21244516

  7. Topical Treatment with Xiaozheng Zhitong Paste (XZP) Alleviates Bone Destruction and Bone Cancer Pain in a Rat Model of Prostate Cancer-Induced Bone Pain by Modulating the RANKL/RANK/OPG Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Yanju; Gao, Yebo; Du, Maobo; Hou, Wei; Yang, Liping; Kong, Xiangying; Zheng, Honggang; Li, Weidong; Hua, Baojin

    2015-01-01

    To explore the effects and mechanisms of Xiaozheng Zhitong Paste (XZP) on bone cancer pain, Wistar rats were inoculated with vehicle or prostate cancer PC-3 into the tibia bone and treated topically with inert paste, XZP at 15.75, 31.5, or 63 g/kg twice per day for 21 days. Their bone structural damage, nociceptive behaviors, bone osteoclast and osteoblast activity, and the levels of OPG, RANL, RNAK, PTHrP, IGF-1, M-CSF, IL-8, and TNF-α were examined. In comparison with that in the placebo group, significantly reduced numbers of invaded cancer cells, decreased levels of bone damage and mechanical threshold and paw withdrawal latency, lower levels of serum TRACP5b, ICTP, PINP, and BAP, and less levels of bone osteoblast and osteoclast activity were detected in the XZP-treated rats (P<0.05). Moreover, significantly increased levels of bone OPG but significantly decreased levels of RANL, RNAK, PTHrP, IGF-1, M-CSF, IL-8, and TNF-α were detected in the XZP-treated rats (P<0.05 for all). Together, XZP treatment significantly mitigated the cancer-induced bone damage and bone osteoclast and osteoblast activity and alleviated prostate cancer-induced bone pain by modulating the RANKL/RANK/OPG pathway and bone cancer-related inflammation in rats. PMID:25691907

  8. Can the biogenicity of Europa's surfical sulfur be tested simultaneously with penetrators and ion traps?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chela-Flores, J.; Bhattacherjee, A. B.; Dudeja, S.; Kumar, N.; Seckbach, J.

    2009-04-01

    miniaturized mass spectrometry. From these arguments we may conclude that a penetration of measuring instruments (penetrators) into the icy surface of Europa just beyond the few millimeters beyond the stopping-depth would be sufficient for an accurate estimate of the delta-34 S parameter. This would be a possible way for rejecting, or supporting, the hypothesis of biogenicity of the Europan sulfur patches. The fact that missions such as LAPLACE, or others, can envisage, and undertake, such measurements (in the foreseeable future) is of the utmost importance for astrobiology's most significant question: Are there other environments in our own Solar System where we could settle the question of habitability, by making use of the available technologies? These results suggest that with the optimum stopping-depth we have calculated, sulfate-reducing bacteria would leave a measurable trace of their activity that is not affected by the harsh external environment. In addition, we have related sulfur transport in microbial mats that are known to take place in the Antarctica subglacial lakes with a mechanism that might rationalize what is taking place in the sulfur patches of the icy surface of Europa. Lake Vostok has given us preliminary hints from microorganisms retrieved from the accreted ice that lies just above its still-unexplored liquid water. References (*) Blanc, M. and the LAPLACE consortium (2008) LAPLACE: a mission to Europa and the Jupiter System, Astrophysical Instruments and Methods, in press, http://www.ictp.it/~chelaf/ss186.html,Team Members http://www.ictp.it/~chelaf/ss164.html. Chela-Flores J. and Kumar N. (2008) Returning to Europa: Can traces of surficial life be detected? International Journal of Astrobiology 7: (3), 263-269, http://journals.cambridge.org/repo_A28gqjIw Chyba, C. (2000) Energy for microbial life on Europa, Nature 403: 381-383. Dudeja, S., Bhattacherjee, A. B. and Chela-Flores, J. (2009) Microbial mats in Antarctica as models for the search of life on

  9. Systems astrobiology for a reliable biomarker on exo-worlds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chela Flores, Julian

    2013-04-01

    moons of our solar system (Chela-Flores, 2010), and will learn in the foreseeable future with the JUICE Mission will be relevant to systems astrobiology. The distribution of systems of habitable worlds with their biomarkers will be testable in the short term with forthcoming space missions: FINNESSE, EChO and TESS. This would justify subsequent use of quantitative systems biology methods that are available from its repertoire of analytic approaches. References Catling et al. (2005). Why O2 is required by complex life on habitable planets and the concept of planetary "oxygenation time", Astrobiology, 5, 415-438. Chela-Flores, J. (2010). Instrumentation for the search of habitable ecosystems in the future exploration of Europa and Ganymede. International Journal of Astrobiology, 9, 101-108. http://www.ictp.it/~chelaf/jcf_IJA_2010.pdf Chela-Flores, J. (2013). From systems chemistry to systems astrobiology: Life in the universe as an emergent phenomenon. Published online: 26 July 2012. International Journal of Astrobiology, 12,8-16. http://www.ictp.it/~chelaf/Int_J_AB_SAB_3.pdf Kiang, N.Y., et al (2007). Spectral signatures of photosynthesis II. Astrobiology 7, 252-274. Kipping, D. M. et al (2012). The Hunt for Exomoons with Kepler. arXiv:1201.0752 [astro-ph.EP]. Wolstencroft, R.D. and Raven, J.A. (2002). Photosynthesis: likelihood of occurrence and possibility of detection on earth-like planets. Icarus 157, 535-548.

  10. Serum biochemical markers of bone turnover in healthy infants and children.

    PubMed

    Tommasi, M; Bacciottini, L; Benucci, A; Brocchi, A; Passeri, A; Saracini, D; D'Agata, A; Cappelli, G

    1996-01-01

    Serum osteocalcin (OC), bone alkaline phosphatase (BAP), carboxyterminal propeptide of type I procollagen (PICP), carboxyterminal telopeptide of type I collagen (ICTP), parathyroid hormone (PTH) and 1,25 dihydroxyvitamin D [1,25(OH)2D] were measured in 241 normal infants and children (134 males and 107 females aged 1.9 months-14 years, 1.8 months-12 years, respectively). Regarding the analysis of data for children above 2 yrs, we chose data with the following normalization: data/body surface x standard body surface, to eliminate biological variations not exclusively related to chronological age. The increase in serum OC occurred at the expected age of growth spurts in both sexes: in the first year of life OC values (mean +/- SD) were 82.6 +/- 34.3 and 60.2 +/- 32.9 OC ng/ml in males and females, respectively; during puberty, peak values occurred at the age of 10-12 yrs in girls (76.6 +/- 25.8) and at the age of 12-14 yrs in boys (113 +/- 48.3). Furthermore, significant positive correlations with age were found for males from 2 to 14 yrs (p < 0.00001) and for females from 2 to 12 yrs (p < 0.001). Elevated levels of BAP occurred in the first year, 70.4 +/- 28.2 and 71.8 +/- 28.5, and in the second year, 69.4 +/- 26.7 and 67.4 +/- 33.8 ng/ml, for males and females, respectively. For children older than 2 yrs, a positive correlation with age (p < 0.01) was found for females only, with a peak value of 67.2 +/- 13.9 at the age of 10-12 yrs. For ages 2-14 yrs the reference values (mean +/- 2SD) were 15.5 - 90.3 and 17.2 - 95.2 ng/ml for males and females, respectively. The highest PICP levels (1354 +/- 680 ng/ml in males and 1041 +/- 766 in females) were observed in infants less than 1 year of age, decreasing by about 60% at the age of 2. There was no significant change in serum PICP for children older than 2 yrs with values covering a range (mean +/- 2SD) of 52 - 544 and 18 - 546 ng/ml in males and females, respectively. Similarly, the highest ICTP values were seen in

  11. Bi-orthogonal polynomial sequences and the asymmetric simple exclusion process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brak, R.; Moore, W.

    2015-08-01

    We state the diffusion algebra equations of the stationary state of the three parameter (α, β and q) asymmetric simple exclusion Process as a linear functional {L}, acting on a tensor algebra. From {L} we construct a pair of sequences, \\{{P}n\\} and \\{{Q}m\\}, of monic polynomials which are bi-orthogonal, that is, they satisfy {L}({P}n{Q}m)={Λ }n{δ }n,m(where {Λ }n is a scalar). The uniqueness and existence of the pair of sequences arises from the determinant of the bi-moment matrix whose elements satisfy a pair of q-recurrence relations. The determinant is evaluated using an LDU-decomposition. If the linear functional is represented as an inner product, {L}(\\cdot )=< W| \\cdot | V> then the action of the polynomials Qn on the boundary vector | V> generate a basis | {V}n> ={Q}n| V> whose orthogonal dual vectors are given by the action of Pn on the dual boundary vector < W| , that is < {W}n| =< W| {P}n. This basis gives the representation of the algebra which is associated with the Al-Salam-Chihara polynomials obtained by Sasamoto.

  12. The landscape of intersecting brane models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglas, Michael R.; Taylor, Washington

    2007-01-01

    We develop tools for analyzing the space of intersecting brane models. We apply these tools to a particular T6/Bbb Z22 orientifold which has been used for model building. We prove that there are a finite number of intersecting brane models on this orientifold which satisfy the Diophantine equations coming from supersymmetry. We give estimates for numbers of models with specific gauge groups, which we confirm numerically. We analyze the distributions and correlations of intersection numbers which characterize the numbers of generations of chiral fermions, and show that intersection numbers are roughly independent, with a characteristic distribution which is peaked around 0 and in which integers with fewer divisors are mildly suppressed. As an application, the number of models containing a gauge group SU(3) × SU(2) × U(1) or SU(4) × SU(2) × SU(2) and 3 generations of appropriate types of chiral matter is estimated to be order Script O(10), in accord with previous explicit constructions. As another application of the methods developed in the paper, we construct a new pair of 3-generation SU(4) × SU(2) × SU(2) Pati-Salam models using intersecting branes. We conclude with a description of how this analysis can be generalized to a broader class of Calabi-Yau orientifolds, and a discussion of how the numbers of IBM's are related to numbers of stabilized vacua.

  13. Squarkonium, diquarkonium, and octetonium at the LHC and their diphoton decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Ming-xing; Wang, Kai; Xu, Tao; Zhang, Liangliang; Zhu, Guohuai

    2016-03-01

    Motivated by the recent diphoton excess by both ATLAS and CMS collaborations at the LHC, we systematically investigate the production and diphoton decay of onia formed by pair of all possible color exotic scalars in minimal extension. When such scalar massive metastable colored and charged (MMCC) particles are produced in pair near threshold, η onium can be formed and decay into diphoton through annihilation as p p →η →γ γ . Squarkonium is formed by metastable squarks in supersymmetric models such as stoponium. Diquarkonium is formed by metastable color sextet diquarks which may be realized in the Pati-Salam model. Octetonium is formed by color octet scalars bosons as in the Manohar-Wise model. Stoponium prediction is much smaller than the required signal to account for the diphoton excess. Due to the enhancement factor from color and electric charge, predictions of diquarkonium and octetonium are of O (10 fb ) which are significantly greater than the stoponium prediction. Since the color enhancement also results in large production at the colliders, such light color exotic states of O (375 GeV ) suffer from severe direct search constraints. On the other hand, if their dominant decay mode involve top quark, they may be buried in the t t ¯ plus jets samples and can potentially be searched via t +j resonance.

  14. Schrödinger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilmister, C. W.

    1989-03-01

    1. Introduction C. W. Kilmister; 2. Boltzmann's influence on Schrödinger Dieter Flamm; 3. Schrödinger's original interpretation of the Schrödinger equation: a rescue attempt Jon Dorling; 4. Are there quantum jumps? J. S. Bell; 5. Square root of minus one, complex phases and Erwin Schrödinger Chen Ning Yung; 6. Consequences of the Schrödinger equation for atomic and molecular physics W. E. Thirring; 7. Molecular dynamics: from H + H, to biomolecules Martin Karplus; 8. Orbital presentation of chemical reactions Kenichi Fukui; 9. Quantum chemistry A. D. Buckingham; 10. Eamon de Valera, Erwin Schrödinger and the Dublin Institute Sir William McCrea; 11. Do bosons condense? J. T. Lewis; 12. Schrödinger's nonlinear optics James McConnell; 13. Schrödinger's unified field theory seen 40 years later O. Hittmair; 14. The Schrödinger equation of the Universe S. W. Hawking; 15. Overview of particle physics A. Salam; 16. Gauge fields, topological defects and cosmology T. W. B. Kibble; 17. Quantum theory and astronomy M. J. Seaton; 18. Schrödinger's contributions to chemistry and biology Linus Pawling; 19. Erwin Schrödinger's What is Life? and molecular biology M. F. Perutz.

  15. Finite temperature corrections and embedded strings in noncommutative geometry and the standard model with neutrino mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Martins, R. A.

    2007-08-15

    The recent extension of the standard model to include massive neutrinos in the framework of noncommutative geometry and the spectral action principle involves new scalar fields and their interactions with the usual complex scalar doublet. After ensuring that they bring no unphysical consequences, we address the question of how these fields affect the physics predicted in the Weinberg-Salam theory, particularly in the context of the electroweak phase transition. Applying the Dolan-Jackiw procedure, we calculate the finite temperature corrections, and find that the phase transition is first order. The new scalar interactions significantly improve the stability of the electroweak Z string, through the 'bag' phenomenon described by Vachaspati and Watkins ['Bound states can stabilize electroweak strings', Phys. Lett. B 318, 163-168 (1993)]. (Recently, cosmic strings have climbed back into interest due to a new evidence.) Sourced by static embedded strings, an internal space analogy of Cartan's torsion is drawn, and a possible Higgs-force-like 'gravitational' effect of this nonpropagating torsion on the fermion masses is described. We also check that the field generating the Majorana mass for the {nu}{sub R} is nonzero in the physical vacuum.

  16. Classification of flipped SU(5) heterotic-string vacua

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faraggi, Alon E.; Rizos, John; Sonmez, Hasan

    2014-09-01

    We extend the classification of free fermionic heterotic-string vacua to models in which the SO(10) GUT symmetry is reduced at the string level to the flipped SU(5) subgroup. In our classification method the set of boundary condition basis vectors is fixed and the enumeration of string vacua is obtained in terms of the Generalised GSO (GGSO) projection coefficients entering the one-loop partition function. We derive algebraic expressions for the GGSO projections for all the physical states appearing in the sectors generated by the set of basis vectors. This enables the programming of the entire spectrum analysis in a computer code. For that purpose we developed two independent codes, based on FORTRAN95 and JAVA, and all results presented are confirmed by the two independent routines. We perform a statistical sampling in the space of 244∼1013 flipped SU(5) vacua, and scan up to 1012 GGSO configurations. Contrary to the corresponding Pati-Salam classification results, we do not find exophobic flipped SU(5) vacua with an odd number of generations. We study the structure of exotic states appearing in the three generation models, that additionally contain a viable Higgs spectrum, and demonstrate the existence of models in which all the exotic states are confined by a hidden sector non-Abelian gauge symmetry, as well as models that may admit the racetrack mechanism.

  17. Adaptation of the TH Epsilon Mu formalism for the analysis of the equivalence principle in the presence of the weak and electroweak interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fennelly, A. J.

    1981-01-01

    The TH epsilon mu formalism, used in analyzing equivalence principle experiments of metric and nonmetric gravity theories, is adapted to the description of the electroweak interaction using the Weinberg-Salam unified SU(2) x U(1) model. The use of the TH epsilon mu formalism is thereby extended to the weak interactions, showing how the gravitational field affects W sub mu (+ or -1) and Z sub mu (0) boson propagation and the rates of interactions mediated by them. The possibility of a similar extension to the strong interactions via SU(5) grand unified theories is briefly discussed. Also, using the effects of the potentials on the baryon and lepton wave functions, the effects of gravity on transition mediated in high-A atoms which are electromagnetically forbidden. Three possible experiments to test the equivalence principle in the presence of the weak interactions, which are technologically feasible, are then briefly outline: (1) K-capture by the FE nucleus (counting the emitted X-ray); (2) forbidden absorption transitions in high-A atoms' vapor; and (3) counting the relative Beta-decay rates in a suitable alpha-beta decay chain, assuming the strong interactions obey the equivalence principle.

  18. Baryon number in warped grand unified theories: model building and (dark matter related) phenomenology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agashe, Kaustubh; Servant, Géraldine

    2005-02-01

    In the past year, a new non-supersymmetric framework for electroweak symmetry breaking (with or without Higgs) involving SU(2)L × SU(2)R × U(1)B-L in higher dimensional warped geometry has been suggested. In this work, we embed this gauge structure into a GUT such as SO(10) or Pati Salam. We showed recently (in hep-ph/0403143) that in a warped GUT, a stable Kaluza Klein fermion can arise as a consequence of imposing proton stability. Here, we specify a complete realistic model where this particle is a weakly interacting right-handed neutrino, and present a detailed study of this new dark matter candidate, providing relic density and detection predictions. We discuss phenomenological aspects associated with the existence of other light ({\\lesssim }\\mathrm {TeV} ) KK fermions (related to the neutrino), whose lightness is a direct consequence of the top quark's heaviness. The AdS/CFT interpretation of this construction is also presented. Most of our qualitative results do not depend on the nature of the breaking of the electroweak symmetry provided that it happens near the TeV brane.

  19. Electroweak standard model with very special relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfaro, Jorge; González, Pablo; Ávila, Ricardo

    2015-05-01

    The very special relativity electroweak Standard Model (VSR EW SM) is a theory with SU (2 )L×U (1 )R symmetry, with the same number of leptons and gauge fields as in the usual Weinberg-Salam model. No new particles are introduced. The model is renormalizable and unitarity is preserved. However, photons obtain mass and the massive bosons obtain different masses for different polarizations. Besides, neutrino masses are generated. A VSR-invariant term will produce neutrino oscillations and new processes are allowed. In particular, we compute the rate of the decays μ →e +γ . All these processes, which are forbidden in the electroweak Standard Model, put stringent bounds on the parameters of our model and measure the violation of Lorentz invariance. We investigate the canonical quantization of this nonlocal model. Second quantization is carried out, and we obtain a well-defined particle content. Additionally, we do a counting of the degrees of freedom associated with the gauge bosons involved in this work, after spontaneous symmetry breaking has been realized. Violations of Lorentz invariance have been predicted by several theories of quantum gravity [J. Alfaro, H. Morales-Tecotl, and L. F. Urrutia, Phys. Rev. Lett. 84, 2318 (2000); Phys. Rev. D 65, 103509 (2002)]. It is a remarkable possibility that the low-energy effects of Lorentz violation induced by quantum gravity could be contained in the nonlocal terms of the VSR EW SM.

  20. Semishifted hybrid inflation with B-L cosmic strings

    SciTech Connect

    Lazarides, George; Peddie, Iain N. R.; Vamvasakis, Achilleas

    2008-08-15

    We discuss a new inflationary scenario that is realized within the extended supersymmetric Pati-Salam model which yields an acceptable b-quark mass for universal boundary conditions and {mu}>0 by modestly violating Yukawa unification and leads to new shifted, new smooth, or standard-smooth hybrid inflation. Inflation takes place along a ''semishifted'' classically flat direction on which the U(1){sub B-L} gauge group remains unbroken. After the end of inflation, U(1){sub B-L} breaks spontaneously and a network of local cosmic strings, which contribute a small amount to the curvature perturbation, is produced. We show that, in minimal supergravity, this semishifted inflationary scenario is compatible with a recent fit to data which uses field-theory simulations of a local string network. Taking into account the requirement of gauge unification, we find that, for spectral index n{sub s}=1, the predicted fractional contribution of strings to the temperature power spectrum at multipole l=10 is f{sub 10}{approx_equal}0.039. Also, for f{sub 10}=0.10, which is the best-fit value, we obtain n{sub s}{approx_equal}1.0254. Spectral indices lower than about 0.98 are excluded and blue spectra are slightly favored. Magnetic monopoles are not formed at the end of semishifted hybrid inflation.

  1. Models of neutrino mass, mixing and CP violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Stephen F.

    2015-12-01

    In this topical review we argue that neutrino mass and mixing data motivates extending the Standard Model (SM) to include a non-Abelian discrete flavour symmetry in order to accurately predict the large leptonic mixing angles and {C}{P} violation. We begin with an overview of the SM puzzles, followed by a description of some classic lepton mixing patterns. Lepton mixing may be regarded as a deviation from tri-bimaximal mixing, with charged lepton corrections leading to solar mixing sum rules, or tri-maximal lepton mixing leading to atmospheric mixing rules. We survey neutrino mass models, using a roadmap based on the open questions in neutrino physics. We then focus on the seesaw mechanism with right-handed neutrinos, where sequential dominance (SD) can account for large lepton mixing angles and {C}{P} violation, with precise predictions emerging from constrained SD (CSD). We define the flavour problem and discuss progress towards a theory of favour using GUTs and discrete family symmetry. We classify models as direct, semidirect or indirect, according to the relation between the Klein symmetry of the mass matrices and the discrete family symmetry, in all cases focussing on spontaneous {C}{P} violation. Finally we give two examples of realistic and highly predictive indirect models with CSD, namely an A to Z of flavour with Pati-Salam and a fairly complete A 4 × SU(5) SUSY GUT of flavour, where both models have interesting implications for leptogenesis.

  2. SO(10) grand unification in light of recent LHC searches and colored scalars at the TeV-scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aydemir, Ufuk

    2016-03-01

    We analyze the compatibility of the recent LHC signals and the TeV-scale left-right model(s) in the minimal nonsupersymmetric SO(10) framework. We show that the models in which the Higgs content is selected based on the extended survival hypothesis do not allow the WR boson to be at the TeV-scale. By relaxing this conjecture, we investigate various scenarios where a number of colored-scalars, originated from various Pati-Salam multiplets, are light and whence they survive down to the low energies. Performing a detailed renormalization group analysis with various low-energy Higgs configurations and symmetry breaking chains, while keeping the high energy Higgs content unmodified; we find that, among a number of possibilities, the models which have a light color-triplet scalar, and its combination with a light color-sextet, particularly stand out. Although these models do allow a TeV-scale WR boson, generating the required value of the gauge coupling gR at this scale is nontrivial.

  3. Precision experiments in electroweak interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Swartz, M.L.

    1990-03-01

    The electroweak theory of Glashow, Weinberg, and Salam (GWS) has become one of the twin pillars upon which our understanding of all particle physics phenomena rests. It is a brilliant achievement that qualitatively and quantitatively describes all of the vast quantity of experimental data that have been accumulated over some forty years. Note that the word quantitatively must be qualified. The low energy limiting cases of the GWS theory, Quantum Electrodynamics and the V-A Theory of Weak Interactions, have withstood rigorous testing. The high energy synthesis of these ideas, the GWS theory, has not yet been subjected to comparably precise scrutiny. The recent operation of a new generation of proton-antiproton (p{bar p}) and electron-positron (e{sup +}e{sup {minus}}) colliders has made it possible to produce and study large samples of the electroweak gauge bosons W{sup {plus minus}} and Z{sup 0}. We expect that these facilities will enable very precise tests of the GWS theory to be performed in the near future. In keeping with the theme of this Institute, Physics at the 100 GeV Mass Scale, these lectures will explore the current status and the near-future prospects of these experiments.

  4. Search for the decays B_{(s)};{0} --> e;{+} micro;{-} and B_{(s)};{0} --> e;{+} e;{-} in CDF run II.

    PubMed

    Aaltonen, T; Adelman, J; Akimoto, T; Alvarez González, B; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Apresyan, A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Azzurri, P; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Bartsch, V; Bauer, G; Beauchemin, P-H; Bedeschi, F; Beecher, D; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beringer, J; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bizjak, I; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bolla, G; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Bridgeman, A; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burke, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buzatu, A; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Calancha, C; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carls, B; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Carron, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Choudalakis, G; Chuang, S H; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Chwalek, T; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Cox, C A; Cox, D J; Crescioli, F; Cuenca Almenar, C; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cully, J C; Dagenhart, D; Datta, M; Davies, T; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lorenzo, G; Dell'orso, M; Deluca, C; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; Derwent, P F; di Giovanni, G P; Dionisi, C; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Donati, S; Dong, P; Donini, J; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Efron, J; Elagin, A; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Ferrazza, C; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Frank, M J; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garberson, F; Garcia, J E; Garfinkel, A F; Genser, K; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D; Gessler, A; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Giannetti, P; Gibson, K; Gimmell, J L; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Grundler, U; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, K; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Han, B-Y; Han, J Y; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, D; Hare, M; Harper, S; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hartz, M; Hatakeyama, K; Hays, C; Heck, M; Heijboer, A; Heinrich, J; Henderson, C; Herndon, M; Heuser, J; Hewamanage, S; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S-C; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Hussein, M; Huston, J; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeon, E J; Jha, M K; Jindariani, S; Johnson, W; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Jung, J E; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Kar, D; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kephart, R; Keung, J; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, H W; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krop, D; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kubo, T; Kuhr, T; Kulkarni, N P; Kurata, M; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lecompte, T; Lee, E; Lee, H S; Lee, S W; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C-S; Linacre, J; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, C; Liu, T; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Lovas, L; Lucchesi, D; Luci, C; Lueck, J; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Macqueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Makhoul, K; Maki, T; Maksimovic, P; Malde, S; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marino, C; Marino, C P; Martin, A; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Martínez-Ballarín, R; Maruyama, T; Mastrandrea, P; Masubuchi, T; Mathis, M; Mattson, M E; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miller, R; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Mitra, A; Mitselmakher, G; Miyake, H; Moggi, N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M J; Morlock, J; Movilla Fernandez, P; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Mumford, R; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Nagano, A; Naganoma, J; Nakamura, K; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Necula, V; Nett, J; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Neubauer, S; Nielsen, J; Nodulman, L; Norman, M; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Oakes, L; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Orava, R; Osterberg, K; Griso, S Pagan; Palencia, E; Papadimitriou, V; Papaikonomou, A; Paramonov, A A; Parks, B; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Peiffer, T; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pianori, E; Pinera, L; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Poukhov, O; Pounder, N; Prakoshyn, F; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Pueschel, E; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, A; Ramakrishnan, V; Ranjan, N; Redondo, I; Renton, P; Renz, M; Rescigno, M; Richter, S; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rodriguez, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rossin, R; Roy, P; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Rutherford, B; Saarikko, H; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Saltó, O; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, A; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M A; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sforza, F; Sfyrla, A; Shalhout, S Z; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Shimojima, M; Shiraishi, S; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Slaughter, A J; Slaunwhite, J; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Spalding, J; Spreitzer, T; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Strycker, G L; Stuart, D; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Suslov, I; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Tanaka, R; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thompson, G A; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Ttito-Guzmán, P; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Totaro, P; Tourneur, S; Trovato, M; Tsai, S-Y; Tu, Y; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Vallecorsa, S; van Remortel, N; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Vidal, M; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vine, T; Vogel, M; Volobouev, I; Volpi, G; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, W; Wagner-Kuhr, J; Wakisaka, T; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waters, D; Weinberger, M; Weinelt, J; Wenzel, H; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Wilbur, S; Williams, G; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Wright, T; Wu, X; Würthwein, F; Xie, S; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zhang, X; Zheng, Y; Zucchelli, S

    2009-05-22

    We report results from a search for the lepton flavor violating decays B_{s};{0} --> e;{+} micro;{-} and B;{0} --> e;{+} micro;{-}, and the flavor-changing neutral-current decays B_{s};{0} --> e;{+} e;{-} and B;{0} --> e;{+} e;{-}. The analysis uses data corresponding to 2 fb;{-1} of integrated luminosity of pp[over ] collisions at sqrt[s] = 1.96 TeV collected with the upgraded Collider Detector (CDF II) at the Fermilab Tevatron. The observed number of B0 and B_{s};{0} candidates is consistent with background expectations. The resulting Bayesian upper limits on the branching ratios at 90% credibility level are B(B_{s};{0} --> e;{+} micro;{-}) < 2.0 x 10;{-7}, B(B;{0} --> e;{+} micro;{-}) < 6.4 x 10;{-8}, B(B_{s};{0} --> e;{+} e;{-}) < 2.8 x 10;{-7}, and B(B;{0} --> e;{+} e;{-}) < 8.3 x 10;{-8}. From the limits on B(B_{(s)};{0} --> e;{+} micro;{-}), the following lower bounds on the Pati-Salam leptoquark masses are also derived: M_{LQ}(B_{s};{0} --> e;{+} micro;{-}) > 47.8 TeV/c;{2}, and M_{LQ}(B;{0} --> e;{+} micro;{-}) > 59.3 TeV / c;{2}, at 90% credibility level. PMID:19519018

  5. Petite unification of quarks and leptons

    SciTech Connect

    Hung, P.Q.; Buras, A.J.; Bjorken, J.D.

    1982-02-01

    A general discussion of a quark-lepton unification characterized by the gauge group G/sub S/xG/sub W/ with two coupling constants g/sub S/ and g/sub W/ and by the unification mass scale M = 10/sup 5plus-or-minus1/ GeV is presented. The choice of G/sub W/ is quite restricted by the measured value of sin/sup 2/theta/sub W/. The minimal model of such a unification turns out to be SU(4)/sub PS/xSU(2)/sub L/xSU(2)/sub R/xSU(2)/sub L/'xSU(2)/sub R/', where the first three factors constitute the well-known Pati-Salam group. The presence of SU(2)/sub L/'xSU(2)/sub R/' is required by the measured value of sin/sup 2/theta/sub W/ and it implies the existence of mirror fermions whose masses may range from 20--30 GeV to a few TeV. The lightest mirror femion might be relatively long lived when compared to an ordinary sequential heavy fermion. The model accommodating all known quark and lepton generations gives the correct sin/sup 2/theta/sub W/roughly-equal0.22 and at the same time can be made consistent with the experimental bounds on rare transitions induced by leptoquark exchanges.

  6. Accurate quantum dynamics calculations using symmetrized Gaussians on a doubly dense Von Neumann lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Halverson, Thomas; Poirier, Bill

    2012-12-14

    In a series of earlier articles [B. Poirier, J. Theor. Comput. Chem. 2, 65 (2003); B. Poirier and A. Salam, J. Chem. Phys. 121, 1690 (2004); and ibid. 121, 1704 (2004)], a new method was introduced for performing exact quantum dynamics calculations. The method uses a 'weylet' basis set (orthogonalized Weyl-Heisenberg wavelets) combined with phase space truncation, to defeat the exponential scaling of CPU effort with system dimensionality-the first method ever able to achieve this long-standing goal. Here, we develop another such method, which uses a much more convenient basis of momentum-symmetrized Gaussians. Despite being non-orthogonal, symmetrized Gaussians are collectively local, allowing for effective phase space truncation. A dimension-independent code for computing energy eigenstates of both coupled and uncoupled systems has been created, exploiting massively parallel algorithms. Results are presented for model isotropic uncoupled harmonic oscillators and coupled anharmonic oscillators up to 27 dimensions. These are compared with the previous weylet calculations (uncoupled harmonic oscillators up to 15 dimensions), and found to be essentially just as efficient. Coupled system results are also compared to corresponding exact results obtained using a harmonic oscillator basis, and also to approximate results obtained using first-order perturbation theory up to the maximum dimensionality for which the latter may be feasibly obtained (four dimensions).

  7. Standard-smooth hybrid inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Lazarides, George; Vamvasakis, Achilleas

    2007-12-15

    We consider the extended supersymmetric Pati-Salam model which, for {mu}>0 and universal boundary conditions, succeeds to yield experimentally acceptable b-quark masses by moderately violating Yukawa unification. It is known that this model can lead to new shifted or new smooth hybrid inflation. We show that a successful two-stage inflationary scenario can be realized within this model based only on renormalizable superpotential interactions. The cosmological scales exit the horizon during the first stage of inflation, which is of the standard hybrid type and takes place along the trivial flat direction with the inflaton driven by radiative corrections. Spectral indices compatible with the recent data can be achieved in global supersymmetry or minimal supergravity by restricting the number of e-foldings of our present horizon during the first inflationary stage. The additional e-foldings needed for solving the horizon and flatness problems are naturally provided by a second stage of inflation, which occurs mainly along the built-in new smooth hybrid inflationary path appearing right after the destabilization of the trivial flat direction at its critical point. Monopoles are formed at the end of the first stage of inflation and are, subsequently, diluted by the second stage of inflation to become utterly negligible in the present universe for almost all (for all) the allowed values of the parameters in the case of global supersymmetry (minimal supergravity)

  8. Power corrections to event shapes with mass-dependent operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mateu, Vicent; Stewart, Iain W.; Thaler, Jesse

    2013-01-01

    We introduce an operator depending on the “transverse velocity” r that describes the effect of hadron masses on the leading 1/Q power correction to event-shape observables. Here, Q is the scale of the hard collision. This work builds on earlier studies of mass effects by Salam and Wicke [J. High Energy Phys. 05 (2001) 061JHEPFG1029-8479] and of operators by Lee and Sterman [Phys. Rev. D 75, 014022 (2007)PRVDAQ1550-7998]. Despite the fact that different event shapes have different hadron mass dependence, we provide a simple method to identify universality classes of event shapes whose power corrections depend on a common nonperturbative parameter. We also develop an operator basis to show that at a fixed value of Q, the power corrections for many classic observables can be determined by two independent nonperturbative matrix elements at the 10% level. We compute the anomalous dimension of the transverse velocity operator, which is multiplicative in r and causes the power correction to exhibit nontrivial dependence on Q. The existence of universality classes and the relevance of anomalous dimensions are reproduced by the hadronization models in Pythia 8 and Herwig​+​+, though the two programs differ in the values of their low-energy matrix elements.

  9. Transport of muonic atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Rusjan, E.

    1988-01-01

    Transport of muonic hydrogen and deuterium atoms in gaseous hydrogen and deuterium is studied in the diffusion approximation and by means of the multiple collision expansion. The diffusion coefficient is derived. Scattering kernels are computed from the kinematics of an inelastic binary collision. The effect of rotations of the target molecules is treated by defining and computing an effective inelastic energy transfer Q{sub eff}. The Doppler effect is taken into account by averaging the cross sections over the Maxwellian velocity distribution of the target molecules. Numerical results of the time-dependent problem in slab geometry are presented. In part two the author constructs a candidate for a realistic four generation Calabi-Yau manifold by dividing an algebraic variety in CP{sub 4} {times} CP{sub 4} with the Z{sub 2} {times} Z{sub 2} symmetry. A nontrivial embedding of Z{sub 2} {times} Z{sub 2} in E(6) allows the physically interesting intermediate symmetry; based on Pati-Salam SU(2){sub L} {times} SU(2){sub R} {times} SU(4){sub C} group. The group of honest symmetries G{sub H} of the manifold is identified and the transformation properties of quark and lepton fields under G{sub H} are given.

  10. Three Family Models from the Heterotic String

    SciTech Connect

    Raby, Stuart

    2005-12-02

    In this talk I outline work done in collaboration with R.J. Zhang and T. Kobayashi. We show how to construct the equivalent of three family orbifold GUTs in five dimensions from the heterotic string. I focus on one particular model with E(6) gauge symmetry in 5D, the third family and Higgs doublet coming from the 5D bulk and the first two families living on 4D SO(10) branes. Note the E(6) gauge symmetry is broken to Pati-Salam in 4D which subsequently breaks to the Standard Model gauge symmetry via the Higgs mechanism. The model has two flaws, one fatal and one perhaps only unaesthetic. The model has a small set of vector-like exotics with fractional electromagnetic charge. Unfortunately not all of these states obtain mass at the compactification scale. This flaw is fatal. The second problem is R parity violating interactions. These problems may be avoidable in alternate orbifold compactification schemes. It is these problems which we discuss in this talk.

  11. Extra Z^' }s and W^' }s in heterotic-string derived models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faraggi, Alon E.; Guzzi, Marco

    2015-11-01

    The ATLAS and CMS collaborations recently recorded possible excess in the di-boson production at the di-boson invariant mass at around 2 TeV. Such an excess may be produced if there exist additional Z^' } and/or W^' } at that scale. We survey the extra Z^' }s and W^' }s that may arise from semi-realistic heterotic-string vacua in the free fermionic formulation in the seven distinct cases: U(1)_{Z^' }}in SO(10); family universal U(1)_{Z^' }}notin SO(10); non-universal U(1)_{Z^' }}; hidden sector U(1) symmetries and kinetic mixing; left-right symmetric models; Pati-Salam models; leptophobic and custodial symmetries. Each case has a distinct signature associated with the extra symmetry breaking scale. In one of the cases we explore the discovery potential at the LHC using resonant leptoproduction. The existence of an extra vector boson with the reported properties will significantly constrain the space of allowed string vacua.

  12. Extraterrestrial high energy neutrino fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.

    1979-01-01

    Using the most recent cosmic ray spectra up to 2x10 to the 20th power eV, production spectra of high energy neutrinos from cosmic ray interactions with interstellar gas and extragalactic interactions of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays with 3K universal background photons are presented and discussed. Estimates of the fluxes from cosmic diffuse sources and the nearby quasar 3C273 are made using the generic relationship between secondary neutrinos and gammas and using recent gamma ray satellite data. These gamma ray data provide important upper limits on cosmological neutrinos. Quantitative estimates of the observability of high energy neutrinos from the inner galaxy and 3C273 above atmospheric background for a DUMAND type detector are discussed in the context of the Weinberg-Salam model with sq sin theta omega = 0.2 and including the atmospheric background from the decay of charmed mesons. Constraints on cosmological high energy neutrino production models are also discussed. It appears that important high energy neutrino astronomy may be possible with DUMAND, but very long observing times are required.

  13. Accurate quantum dynamics calculations using symmetrized Gaussians on a doubly dense Von Neumann lattice.

    PubMed

    Halverson, Thomas; Poirier, Bill

    2012-12-14

    In a series of earlier articles [B. Poirier, J. Theor. Comput. Chem. 2, 65 (2003); B. Poirier and A. Salam, J. Chem. Phys. 121, 1690 (2004); and ibid. 121, 1704 (2004)], a new method was introduced for performing exact quantum dynamics calculations. The method uses a "weylet" basis set (orthogonalized Weyl-Heisenberg wavelets) combined with phase space truncation, to defeat the exponential scaling of CPU effort with system dimensionality--the first method ever able to achieve this long-standing goal. Here, we develop another such method, which uses a much more convenient basis of momentum-symmetrized Gaussians. Despite being non-orthogonal, symmetrized Gaussians are collectively local, allowing for effective phase space truncation. A dimension-independent code for computing energy eigenstates of both coupled and uncoupled systems has been created, exploiting massively parallel algorithms. Results are presented for model isotropic uncoupled harmonic oscillators and coupled anharmonic oscillators up to 27 dimensions. These are compared with the previous weylet calculations (uncoupled harmonic oscillators up to 15 dimensions), and found to be essentially just as efficient. Coupled system results are also compared to corresponding exact results obtained using a harmonic oscillator basis, and also to approximate results obtained using first-order perturbation theory up to the maximum dimensionality for which the latter may be feasibly obtained (four dimensions). PMID:23248981

  14. Search for the lepton-flavor-violating decays B(s)0→e(±)μ(∓) and B0→e(±)μ(∓).

    PubMed

    Aaij, R; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Adrover, C; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassen, R; Andrews, J E; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Baalouch, M; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Baesso, C; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Bauer, Th; Bay, A; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Burducea, I; Bursche, A; Busetto, G; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Callot, O; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carranza-Mejia, H; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Castillo Garcia, L; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Cenci, R; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chen, P; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coca, C; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D C; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; David, P; David, P N Y; Davis, A; De Bonis, I; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Silva, W; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Déléage, N; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Di Canto, A; Dijkstra, H; Dogaru, M; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dupertuis, F; Durante, P; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; van Eijk, D; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Fardell, G; Farinelli, C; Farry, S; Fave, V; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fiore, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Furcas, S; Furfaro, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garofoli, J; Garosi, P; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gibson, V; Giubega, L; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gordon, H; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Griffith, P; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hamilton, B; Hampson, T; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; Hartmann, T; He, J; Head, T; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Hicheur, A; Hicks, E; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Hombach, C; Hopchev, P; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Huse, T; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Iakovenko, V; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jans, E; Jaton, P; Jawahery, A; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Joram, C; Jost, B; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Kanso, W; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Kenyon, I R; Ketel, T; Keune, A; Khanji, B; Kochebina, O; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanciotti, E; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J-P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leo, S; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Leverington, B; Li, Y; Li Gioi, L; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Liu, B; Liu, G; Lohn, S; Longstaff, I; Lopes, J H; Lopez-March, N; Lu, H; Lucchesi, D; Luisier, J; Luo, H; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Malde, S; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Maratas, J; Marconi, U; Marino, P; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martins Tostes, D; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Maurice, E; Mazurov, A; McSkelly, B; McCarthy, J; McNab, A; McNulty, R; Meadows, B; Meier, F; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Milanes, D A; Minard, M-N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Moran, D; Morawski, P; Mordà, A; Morello, M J; Mountain, R; Mous, I; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Muresan, R; Muryn, B; Muster, B; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neubert, S; Neufeld, N; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen, T D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Niet, R; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Nomerotski, A; Novoselov, A; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Oyanguren, A; Pal, B K; Palano, A; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrick, G N; Patrignani, C; Pavel-Nicorescu, C; Pazos Alvarez, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perez Trigo, E; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pescatore, L; Pessina, G; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Phan, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polci, F; Polok, G; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, A; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Powell, A; Prisciandaro, J; Pritchard, A; Prouve, C; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Punzi, G; Qian, W; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Rauschmayr, N; Raven, G; Redford, S; Reid, M M; dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, A; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Roa Romero, D A; Robbe, P; Roberts, D A; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Perez, P; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Romero Vidal, A; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, H; Ruiz Valls, P; Sabatino, G; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salustino Guimaraes, V; Salzmann, C; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Sannino, M; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santovetti, E; Sapunov, M; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Savrie, M; Savrina, D; Schaack, P; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M-H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Senderowska, K; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shatalov, P; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, O; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Sirendi, M; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Smith, J; Smith, M; Sokoloff, M D; Soler, F J P; Soomro, F; Souza, D; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Sparkes, A; Spradlin, P; Stagni, F; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stevenson, S; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Subbiah, V K; Sun, L; Swientek, S; Syropoulos, V; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Teklishyn, M; Teodorescu, E; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Tolk, S; Tonelli, D; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Tran, M T; Tresch, M; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Urner, D; Ustyuzhanin, A; Uwer, U; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vallier, A; Van Dijk, M; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vázquez Sierra, C; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Vesterinen, M; Viaud, B; Vieira, D; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; Voss, H; Waldi, R; Wallace, C; Wallace, R; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Webber, A D; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wiechczynski, J; Wiedner, D; Wiggers, L; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilson, F F; Wimberley, J; Wishahi, J; Witek, M; Wotton, S A; Wright, S; Wu, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, Z; Yang, Z; Young, R; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhokhov, A; Zhong, L; Zvyagin, A

    2013-10-01

    A search for the lepton-flavor-violating decays B(s)0→e(±)μ(∓) and B0→e(±)μ(∓) is performed with a data sample, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1.0 fb(-1) of pp collisions at √s=7 TeV, collected by the LHCb experiment. The observed number of B(s)0→e(±)μ(∓) and B0→e(±)μ(∓) candidates is consistent with background expectations. Upper limits on the branching fractions of both decays are determined to be B(B(s)0→e(±)μ(∓))<1.1(1.4)×10(-8) and B(B0→e(±)μ(∓))<2.8(3.7)×10(-9) at 90% (95%) confidence level (C.L.). These limits are a factor of 20 lower than those set by previous experiments. Lower bounds on the Pati-Salam leptoquark masses are also calculated, M(LQ)(B(s)0→e(±)μ(∓))>101 TeV/c(2) and M(LQ)(B0→e(±)μ(∓))>126 TeV/c(2) at 95% C.L., and are a factor of 2 higher than the previous bounds. PMID:24138232

  15. Flavor unification, dark matter, proton decay, and other observable predictions with low-scale S{sub 4} symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Parida, Mina K.; Sahu, Pradip K.; Bora, Kalpana

    2011-05-01

    We show how gauge coupling unification is successfully implemented through nonsupersymmetric grand unified theory, SO(10)xG{sub f}(G{sub f}=S{sub 4},SO(3){sub f},SU(3){sub f}), using a low-scale flavor-symmetric model of the type SU(2){sub L}xU(1){sub Y}xSU(3){sub C}xS{sub 4} recently proposed by Hagedorn, Lindner, and Mohapatra, while assigning matter-parity discrete symmetry for the dark matter stability. For gauge coupling unification in the single-step-breaking case, we show that a color-octet fermion and a hyperchargeless weak triplet fermionic dark matter are the missing particles needed to complete its minimal supersymmetric standard model-equivalent degrees of freedom. When these are included, the model automatically predicts the nonsupersymmetric grand unification with a scale identical to the minimal supersymmetric standard model/grand unified theory scale. We also find a two-step-breaking model with Pati-Salam intermediate symmetry where the dark matter and a low-mass color-octet scalar or the fermion are signaled by grand unification. The proton-lifetime predictions are found to be accessible to ongoing or planned searches in a number of models. We discuss the grand unified origin of the light fermionic triplet dark matter, the color-octet fermion, and their phenomenology.

  16. A review on mathematical methods of conventional and Islamic derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hisham, Azie Farhani Badrol; Jaffar, Maheran Mohd

    2014-12-01

    Despite the impressive growth of risk management tools in financial institutions, Islamic finance remains miles away behind the conventional institutions. Islamic finance products need to comply with the syariah law and prohibitions, therefore they can use fewer of the available risk management tools compared to conventional. Derivatives have proven to be the effective hedging technique and instrument that broadly being used in the conventional institutions to manage their risks. However, derivatives are not generally accepted as the legitimate products in Islamic finance and they remain controversial issues among the Islamic scholars. This paper reviews the evolution of derivatives such as forwards, futures and options and then explores the mathematical models that being used to solve derivatives such as random walk model, asset pricing model that follows Brownian motion and Black-Scholes model. Other than that, this paper also critically discuss the perspective of derivatives from Islamic point of view. In conclusion, this paper delivers the traditional Islamic products such as salam, urbun and istijrar that can be used to create building blocks of Islamic derivatives.

  17. PREFACE: Conceptual and Technical Challenges for Quantum Gravity 2014 - Parallel session: Noncommutative Geometry and Quantum Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinetti, P.; Wallet, J.-C.; Amelino-Camelia, G.

    2015-08-01

    The conference Conceptual and Technical Challenges for Quantum Gravity at Sapienza University of Rome, from 8 to 12 September 2014, has provided a beautiful opportunity for an encounter between different approaches and different perspectives on the quantum-gravity problem. It contributed to a higher level of shared knowledge among the quantum-gravity communities pursuing each specific research program. There were plenary talks on many different approaches, including in particular string theory, loop quantum gravity, spacetime noncommutativity, causal dynamical triangulations, asymptotic safety and causal sets. Contributions from the perspective of philosophy of science were also welcomed. In addition several parallel sessions were organized. The present volume collects contributions from the Noncommutative Geometry and Quantum Gravity parallel session4, with additional invited contributions from specialists in the field. Noncommutative geometry in its many incarnations appears at the crossroad of many researches in theoretical and mathematical physics: • from models of quantum space-time (with or without breaking of Lorentz symmetry) to loop gravity and string theory, • from early considerations on UV-divergencies in quantum field theory to recent models of gauge theories on noncommutative spacetime, • from Connes description of the standard model of elementary particles to recent Pati-Salam like extensions. This volume provides an overview of these various topics, interesting for the specialist as well as accessible to the newcomer. 4partially funded by CNRS PEPS /PTI ''Metric aspect of noncommutative geometry: from Monge to Higgs''

  18. OVERWEIGHT, OBESITY AND ASSOCIATED FACTORS AMONG 13-15 YEARS OLD STUDENTS IN THE ASSOCIATION OF SOUTHEAST ASIAN NATIONS MEMBER COUNTRIES, 2007-2014.

    PubMed

    Pengpid, Supa; Peltzer, Karl

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess overweight or obesity and associated factors in school-going adolescents in the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) member countries. The analysis included 30,284 school children 13-15 years of age from seven ASEAN members participating in the Global School-based Student Health Survey (GSHS) between 2007 and 2013. The overall prevalence of overweight or obesity across seven ASEAN countries (excluding Brunei) was 9.9%, significantly higher in boys (11.5%) than in girls (8.3%). Among eight ASEAN countries, the highest prevalence of overweight or obesity was in Brunei Darus-salam (36.1%), followed by Malaysia (23.7%), and the lowest was in Myanmar (3.4%) and Cambodia (3.7%). Multivariate logistic regression analysis found that younger age, coming from an upper middle country, never been hungry, and not walking or biking to school were associated with overweight or obesity. In addition, among boys, having three or more servings of vegetables per day and having no close friends, and among girls, having fast foods two or more times per week, been victims of bullying and having peer support were additional factors associated with overweight or obesity. Increased strategies utilizing a number of the risk factors identified are needed to prevent and treat overweight or obesity in adolescents in ASEAN member countries. PMID:27244964

  19. Risk management, derivatives and shariah compliance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacha, Obiyathulla Ismath

    2013-04-01

    Despite the impressive growth of Islamic Banking and Finance (IBF), a number of weaknesses remain. The most important of this is perhaps the lack of shariah compliant risk management tools. While the risk sharing philosophy of Islamic Finance requires the acceptance of risk to justify returns, the shariah also requires adherents to avoid unnecessary risk-maysir. The requirement to avoid maysir is in essence a call for the prudent management of risk. Contemporary risk management revolves around financial engineering, the building blocks of which are financial derivatives. Despite the proven efficacy of derivatives in the management of risk in the conventional space, shariah scholars appear to be suspicious and uneasy with their use in IBF. Some have imposed outright prohibition of their use. This paper re-examines the issue of contemporary derivative instruments and shariah compliance. The shariah compatibility of derivatives is shown in a number of ways. First, by way of qualitative evaluation of whether derivatives can be made to comply with the key prohibitions of the sharia. Second, by way of comparing the payoff profiles of derivatives with risk sharing finance and Bai Salam contracts. Finally, the equivalence between shariah compliant derivatives like the IPRS and Islamic FX Currency Forwards with conventional ones is presented.

  20. Sorption behavior of cesium on Ain Oussera soil under different physicochemical conditions.

    PubMed

    Bouzidi, A; Souahi, F; Hanini, S

    2010-12-15

    In the present study, the sorption behavior of cesium was investigated in Ain Oussera soil around the Es-Salam reactor facility. This study was conducted using batch method under different physicochemical conditions including contact time, ionic strength, pH, solid/liquid ratio and temperature. The results showed that sorption followed pseudo-second-order kinetics with a good regression coefficients (R(2)=0.999). The activation energies were 11.26 and 15.21 kJ mol(-1) which correspond to ion-exchange-type sorption mechanism. The adsorption was favored at low temperature and it was exothermic (ΔH(0)<0, with average value of -1.97 kJ mol(-1)) and spontaneous (ΔG(0)<0, with average value of -11.97 kJ mol(-1) at 23°C and -13.2 kJ mol(-1) at 60°C). The presence of competing cations such as K(+) and Ca(2+) ions in groundwater can significantly reduce the Cs adsorption onto soil. Desorption reaction was also investigated using three reagents with different ionic strengths (deionized water, groundwater and 0.1M KCl solution). The results showed that Cs ions were preferentially distributed onto high affinity sorption sites. PMID:20869168

  1. Grand unification and proton stability based on a chiral SU(8) theory

    SciTech Connect

    Deshpande, N.G.; Mannheim, P.D.

    1980-06-01

    A grand-unified model of the strong, electromagnetic, and weak interactions is presented based on a local SU(8)/sub L/ X SU(8)/sub R/ gauge theory that possesses a global U(8)/sub L/ X U(8)/sub R/ invariance. The model is spontaneously broken by the recently introduced neutrino pairing mechanism, in which a Higgs field that transforms like a pair of right-handed neutrinos acquires a vacuum expectation value. This neutrino pairing breaks the model down to the standard Weinberg-Salam phenomenology. Further, the neutrino pairing causes the two initial global currents of the model, fermion number and axial fermion number, to mix with the non-Abelian local currents to leave unbroken two new global currents, namely, baryon number and a particular lepton number that counts charged leptons and left-handed neutrinos only. The exact conservations of these two resulting currents ensure the absolute stability of the proton, the masslessness of the observed left-handed neutrinos, and the standard lepton number conservation of the usual weak interactions. A further feature of the model is the simultaneous absence of both strong CP violations and of observable axions. The model has a testable prediction, namely, the existence of an absolutely stable, relatively light, massive neutral lepton generated entirely from the right-handed neutrino sector of the theory. 1 table.

  2. Introduction to gauge theories of the strong, weak, and electromagnetic interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Quigg, C.

    1980-07-01

    The plan of these notes is as follows. Chapter 1 is devoted to a brief evocative review of current beliefs and prejudices that form the context for the discussion to follow. The idea of Gauge Invariance is introduced in Chapter 2, and the connection between conservation laws and symmetries of the Lagrangian is recalled. Non-Abelian gauge field theories are constructed in Chapter 3, by analogy with the familiar case of electromagnetism. The Yang-Mills theory based upon isospin symmetry is constructed explicitly, and the generalization is made to other gauge groups. Chapter 4 is concerned with spontaneous symmetry breaking and the phenomena that occur in the presence or absence of local gauge symmetries. The existence of massless scalar fields (Goldstone particles) and their metamorphosis by means of the Higgs mechanism are illustrated by simple examples. The Weinberg-Salam model is presented in Chapter 5, and a brief resume of applications to experiment is given. Quantum Chromodynamics, the gauge theory of colored quarks and gluons, is developed in Chapter 6. Asymptotic freedom is derived schematically, and a few simple applications of perturbative QCD ae exhibited. Details of the conjectured confinement mechanism are omitted. The strategy of grand unified theories of the strong, weak, and electromagnetic interactions is laid out in Chapter 7. Some properties and consequences of the minimal unifying group SU(5) are presented, and the gauge hierarchy problem is introduced in passing. The final chapter contains an essay on the current outlook: aspirations, unanswered questions, and bold scenarios.

  3. SUSY breaking and moduli stabilization from fluxes in gauged 6D supergravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aghababaie, Yashar; Burgess, Clifford P.; Parameswaran, Susha L.; Quevedo, Fernando

    2003-03-01

    We construct the 4D N=1 supergravity which describes the low-energy limit of 6D supergravity compactified on a sphere with a monopole background a la Salam and Sezgin. This provides a simple setting sharing the main properties of realistic string compactifications such as flat 4D spacetime, chiral fermions and N=1 supersymmetry as well as Fayet-Iliopoulos terms induced by the Green-Schwarz mechanism. The matter content of the resulting theory is a supersymmetric SO(3) × U(1) gauge model with two chiral multiplets, S and T. The expectation value of T is fixed by the classical potential, and S describes a flat direction to all orders in perturbation theory. We consider possible perturbative corrections to the Kahler potential in inverse powers of ReS and ReT, and find that under certain circumstances, and when taken together with low-energy gaugino condensation, these can lift the degeneracy of the flat direction for ReS. The resulting vacuum breaks supersymmetry at moderately low energies in comparison with the compactification scale, with positive cosmological constant. It is argued that the 6D model might itself be obtained from string compactifications, giving rise to realistic string compactifications on non Ricci flat manifolds. Possible phenomenological and cosmological applications are briefly discussed.

  4. Baryogenesis via leptogenesis from quark-lepton symmetry and a compact heavy NR spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buccella, F.; Falcone, D.; Oliver, L.

    2011-05-01

    By demanding a compact spectrum for the right-handed neutrinos and an approximate quark-lepton symmetry inspired from SO(10) gauge unification (assuming a Dirac neutrino mass matrix close to the up quark mass matrix), we construct a fine-tuning scenario for baryogenesis via leptogenesis. We find two solutions with a normal hierarchy, with the lightest neutrino mass m1 different from zero, providing an absolute scale for the spectrum. In the approximations of the model, there are three independent CP phases: δL (that we take of the order of the quark Kobayashi-Maskawa phase) and the two light neutrino Majorana phases α and β. A main conclusion is that, although this general scheme is rather flexible, in some regions of parameter space we find that the necessary baryogenesis with its sign is given in terms of the δL phase alone. The light Majorana phases can also be computed, and they turn out to be close to π/2 or very small. Moreover, SO(10) breaks down to the Pati-Salam group SU(4)×SU(2)×SU(2) at the expected natural intermediate scale of about 1010-1011GeV. A prediction is made for the effective mass in (ββ)0ν decay, the νe mass, and the sum of all light neutrino masses.

  5. Seesaw model in SO(10) with an upper limit on right-handed neutrino masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abud, M.; Buccella, F.; Falcone, D.; Oliver, L.

    2012-08-01

    In the framework of SO(10) gauge unification and the seesaw mechanism, we show that the upper bound on the mass of the heaviest right-handed neutrino MR3<3×1011GeV, given by the Pati-Salam intermediate scale of B-L spontaneous symmetry breaking, constrains the observables related to the left-handed light neutrino mass matrix. We assume such an upper limit on the masses of right-handed neutrinos and, as a first approximation, a Cabibbo form for the matrix VL that diagonalizes the Dirac neutrino matrix mD. Using the inverse seesaw formula, we show that our hypotheses imply a triangular relation in the complex plane of the light neutrino masses with the Majorana phases. We obtain normal hierarchy with an absolute scale for the light neutrino spectrum. Two regions are allowed for the lightest neutrino mass m1 and for the Majorana phases, implying predictions for the neutrino mass measured in Tritium decay and for the double beta decay effective mass |⟨mee⟩|.

  6. Local conformal-invariance of the wave equation for finite-component fields. I. The conditions for invariance, and fully-reducible fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bracken, A. J.; Jessup, Barry

    1982-10-01

    The conditions for local conformal-invariance of the wave equation are obtained for finite-component fields, of Types Ia and Ib [in the terminology of Mack and Salam, Ann. Phys. 53, 174 (1969).] These conditions generate a set of locally invariant free massless field equations and restrict the relevant representation of the Lie algebra [(k4⊕d)⊕sl(2,C)] in the index space of the field to belong to a certain class. Those fully-reducible representations which are in this class are described in full. The corresponding Type Ia field equations include only the massless scalar field equation, neutrino equations, Maxwell's equations, and the Bargmann-Wigner equations for massless fields of arbitrary helicity, and no others. In particular, it is confirmed [Bracken, Lett. Nuovo Cimento 2, 574 (1971)] that not all Poincaré-invariant sets of massless Type Ia field equations are conformal-invariant, contrary to some often-quoted results of McLennan [Nuovo Cimento 3, 1360 (1956)], which are shown to be invalid. It is also shown that in the case of a potential, the wave equation is never conformal-invariant in the strong sense (excluding gauge transformations).

  7. Microbial analyses of traditional Italian salami reveal microorganisms transfer from the natural casing to the meat matrix.

    PubMed

    Pisacane, Vincenza; Callegari, Maria Luisa; Puglisi, Edoardo; Dallolio, Giuliano; Rebecchi, Annalisa

    2015-08-17

    In this study the bacterial biodiversity, during the maturation process of traditional sausages (Salame Mantovano), produced with two different kinds of casing (hog middle or "Crespone" and hog bung or "Gentile"), was investigated by means of culture-dependent and -independent methods. In order to assess the natural variability linked to the type of casing used in production, the ingredients, as well as ripening conditions, were identical in both productions. The aim of the study was to understand the contribution of casing microflora during sausage ripening by identifying the dominant species and strains. The bacterial ecology of casings and salami at different ripening stages, as determined by plating, revealed higher staphylococci and enterococci counts for Gentile casing and for the entire ripening period of the salami studied. After molecular identification of 219 Lactobacilli and 225 cocci gram positive catalase positive (GPCP) isolates, the species most frequently isolated were Lactobacillus sakei, Lactobacillus curvatus, Staphylococcus xylosus, and Staphylococcus saprophyticus. Some L. sakei and S. saprophyticus strains, coming from casing, were also found in the salami at different times of ripening. A richer biodiversity was only detected at the beginning of maturation. We also report the first detection, by PCR-DGGE method, of Arcobacter marinus and Brochothrix thermosphacta species in casings and Kokuria salsicia in fresh sausage. Results suggesting that casing can be an important source of bacteria during natural fermentation when starter cultures are not used. PMID:26001060

  8. On the origins and the historical roots of the Higgs boson research from a bibliometric perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barth, A.; Marx, W.; Bornmann, L.; Mutz, R.

    2014-06-01

    The subject of our present paper is the analysis of the origins or historical roots of the Higgs boson research from a bibliometric perspective, using a segmented regression analysis in combination with a method named reference publication year spectroscopy (RPYS). Our analysis is based on the references cited in the Higgs boson publications published since 1974. The objective of our analysis consists of identifying specific individual publications in the Higgs boson research context to which the scientific community frequently had referred to. We are interested in seminal works which contributed to a high extent to the discovery of the Higgs boson. Our results show that researchers in the Higgs boson field preferably refer to more recently published papers —particularly papers published since the beginning of the sixties. For example, our analysis reveals seven major contributions which appeared within the sixties: Englert and Brout (1964), Higgs (1964, 2 papers), and Guralnik et al. (1964) on the Higgs mechanism as well as Glashow (1961), Weinberg (1967), and Salam (1968) on the unification of weak and electromagnetic interaction. Even if the Nobel Prize award highlights the outstanding importance of the work of Peter Higgs and Francois Englert, bibliometrics offer the additional possibility of getting hints to other publications in this research field (especially to historical publications), which are of vital importance from the expert point of view.

  9. Acute effects of a single session of aerobic exercise with or without weight-lifting on bone turnover in healthy young women.

    PubMed

    Tosun, Aliye; Bölükbaşi, Nesrin; Cingi, Elif; Beyazova, Mehmet; Unlü, Mustafa

    2006-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the acute effects of exercise on bone turnover and to determine whether brisk walking with or without weight-lifting makes a difference on bone metabolism. Nine healthy women performed two exercise bouts: brisk walking on a treadmill for 30 min (E), and similar exercise carrying 5 kg of weight in a backpack (WE). Serum parathyroid hormone (PTH), osteocalcin (OC), calcitonin (CT), procollagen type 1 carboxy terminal propeptide (PICP), procollagen type 1 amino terminal propeptide (PINP), type 1 collagen carboxy terminal telopeptide (ICTP), total alkaline phosphatase (ALP), and urine deoxypyridinoline (D-Pyr) levels were studied. Resting values served as control. Significant variances were observed only in serum ALP and PTH values. Variances in ALP values within subjects after exercise were statistically significant (analysis of variance in repeated measurements [AVRM], P=0.000). E caused a significant decrease, while WE caused a significant increase in ALP values at the 24th h (Bonferroni pairwise comparisons tests [BPC t-test]: P=0.028, P=0.000, respectively). Variances in PTH values within subjects after exercise were statistically significant (AVRM, P=0.029), while diurnal variation was not significant (P=0.981). E caused significant alterations in PTH levels (an increase at the 30th min, turned towards baseline at the 45th min) (BPC t-test, P=0.007). WE also caused alterations in PTH levels, though insignificant (BPC t-test, P=1.00). Brisk walking for 30 min has stimulating effects on bone turnover by various mechanisms without any additive effect of weight bearing. PMID:17039311

  10. Verification of regional climate models over the territory of Ukraine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krakovska, S.; Palamarchuk, L.; Shedemenko, I.; Djukel, G.; Gnatjuk, N.

    2009-04-01

    Verification of regional climate models (RCMs) over the territory of Ukraine was the first stage of the National project for assessment of possible climate change and its impact on the economic and social life in Ukraine in XXI century. Since Ukraine has pretty different climates in different parts, the territory of Ukraine was divided on 11 regions with more or less uniform climate conditions: 7 almost equal in space regions in plain terrain, 2 - in coastal zones near the Black and Azov seas and 2 - in the Carpathian and the Crimean mountains. Verification of RCMs for climate characteristics was carried out for each defined region separately. Data of meteorological network in Ukraine (187 stations) and the Climate Research Unit (CRU 10-min global data-set) for multy-year monthly, season and annual means of temperature and precipitation for the period 1961-90 were used for verification of models' results. Two RCMs were used in the analysis of the past climate of Ukraine: REMO (MPI-M, Hamburg) and RegCM3 (ICTP, Trieste). Both models were constructed with initial and boundary conditions from ERA-40 data-set with horizontal spacing of ~25 km and vertically 27 (REMO) and 18 (RegCM3) Z-σ levels. In a whole, both models demonstrated better ability for temperature than precipitation characteristics. Very high correlation of 0.9 was found between models, network and CRU for temperatures and 0.7-0.8 for precipitation. Generally, models were warmer especially for summer months up to 2 oC. More precipitation in the models was found for winter season and less - for summer and in the mountainous subregions comparably with observations. In perspective we intend to run RCMs initialized with GCMs for the same period and for XXI century and account for the obtained systematic models' errors in the analysis of possible climate change over the territory of Ukraine.

  11. Long-term climate change impacts on agricultural productivity in eastern China

    SciTech Connect

    Chavas, Daniel R.; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Thomson, Allison M.; Gao, Xuejie

    2009-06-15

    Increasing atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations are expected to induce significant climate change over the next century and beyond, but the impacts on society remain highly uncertain. This work examines potential climate change impacts on the productivity of five major crops in northeastern China: canola, corn, potato, rice, and winter wheat. In addition to determining domain-wide trends, the objective is to identify vulnerable and emergent regions under future climate conditions, defined as having a greater than 10% decrease and increase in productivity, respectively. Data from the ICTP RegCM3 regional climate model for baseline (1961-1990) and future (2071-2100) periods under A2 scenario conditions are used as input in the EPIC agro-ecosystem simulation model in the domain [30ºN, 108ºE] to [42ºN, 123ºE]. Simulations are performed with and without the enhanced CO2 fertilization effect. Results indicate that aggregate potential productivity (i.e. if the crop is grown everywhere) increases 6.5% for rice, 8.3% for canola, 18.6% for corn, 22.9% for potato, and 24.9% for winter wheat, although with significant spatial variability for each crop. However, absent the enhanced CO2 fertilization effect, potential productivity declines in all cases ranging from 2.5-12%. Interannual yield variability remains constant or declines in all cases except rice. Climate variables are found to be more significant drivers of simulated yield changes than changes in soil properties, except in the case of potato production in the northwest where the effects of wind erosion are more significant. Overall, in the future period corn and winter wheat benefit significantly in the North China Plain, rice remains dominant in the southeast and emerges in the northeast, potato and corn yields become viable in the northwest, and potato yields suffer in the southwest with no other crop emerging as a clear beneficiary from among those simulated in this study.

  12. Developing a plasma focus research training system for the fusion energy age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S.

    2014-08-01

    The 3 kJ UNU/ICTP Plasma Focus Facility is the most significant device associated with the AAAPT (Asian African Association for Plasma Training). In original and modified/upgraded form it has trained generations of plasma focus (PF) researchers internationally, producing many PhD theses and peer-reviewed papers. The Lee Model code was developed for the design of this PF. This code has evolved to cover all PF machines for design, interpretation and optimization, for derivation of radiation scaling laws; and to provide insights into yield scaling limitations, radiative collapse, speed-enhanced and current-stepped PF variants. As example of fresh perspectives derivable from this code, this paper presents new results on energy transfers of the axial and radial phases of generalized PF devices. As the world moves inexorably towards the Fusion Energy Age it becomes ever more important to train plasma fusion researchers. A recent workshop in Nepal shows that demand for such training continues. Even commercial project development consultants are showing interest. We propose that the AAAPT-proven research package be upgraded, by modernizing the small PF for extreme modes of operation, switchable from the typical strong-focus mode to a slow-mode which barely pinches, thus producing a larger, more uniform plasma stream with superior deposition properties. Such a small device would be cost-effective and easily duplicated, and have the versatility of a range of experiments from intense multi-radiation generation and target damage studies to superior advanced-materials deposition. The complementary code is used to reference experiments up to the largest existing machine. This is ideal for studying machine limitations and scaling laws and to suggest new experiments. Such a modernized versatile PF machine complemented by the universally versatile code would extend the utility of the PF experience; so that AAAPT continues to provide leadership in pulsed plasma research training in

  13. On the development of a coupled regional climate-vegetation model RCM-CLM-CN-DV and its validation in Tropical Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guiling; Yu, Miao; Pal, Jeremy S.; Mei, Rui; Bonan, Gordon B.; Levis, Samuel; Thornton, Peter E.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a regional climate system model RCM-CLM-CN-DV and its validation over Tropical Africa. The model development involves the initial coupling between the ICTP regional climate model RegCM4.3.4 (RCM) and the Community Land Model version 4 (CLM4) including models of carbon-nitrogen dynamics (CN) and vegetation dynamics (DV), and further improvements of the models. Model improvements derive from the new parameterization from CLM4.5 that addresses the well documented overestimation of gross primary production (GPP), a refinement of stress deciduous phenology scheme in CN that addresses a spurious LAI fluctuation for drought-deciduous plants, and the incorporation of a survival rule into the DV model to prevent tropical broadleaf evergreens trees from growing in areas with a prolonged drought season. The impact of the modifications on model results is documented based on numerical experiments using various subcomponents of the model. The performance of the coupled model is then validated against observational data based on three configurations with increasing capacity: RCM-CLM with prescribed leaf area index and fractional coverage of different plant functional types (PFTs); RCM-CLM-CN with prescribed PFTs coverage but prognostic plant phenology; RCM-CLM-CN-DV in which both the plant phenology and PFTs coverage are simulated by the model. Results from these three models are compared against the FLUXNET up-scaled GPP and ET data, LAI and PFT coverages from remote sensing data including MODIS and GIMMS, University of Delaware precipitation and temperature data, and surface radiation data from MVIRI and SRB. Our results indicate that the models perform well in reproducing the physical climate and surface radiative budgets in the domain of interest. However, PFTs coverage is significantly underestimated by the model over arid and semi-arid regions of Tropical Africa, caused by an underestimation of LAI in these regions by the CN model that gets exacerbated

  14. Polymer nanocarriers for dentin adhesion.

    PubMed

    Osorio, R; Osorio, E; Medina-Castillo, A L; Toledano, M

    2014-12-01

    To obtain more durable adhesion to dentin, and to protect collagen fibrils of the dentin matrix from degradation, calcium- and phosphate-releasing particles have been incorporated into the dental adhesive procedure. The aim of the present study was to incorporate zinc-loaded polymeric nanocarriers into a dental adhesive system to facilitate inhibition of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs)-mediated collagen degradation and to provide calcium ions for mineral deposition within the resin-dentin bonded interface. PolymP- N : Active nanoparticles (nanoMyP) were zinc-loaded through 30-minute ZnCl2 immersion and tested for bioactivity by means of 7 days' immersion in simulated body fluid solution (the Kokubo test). Zinc-loading and calcium phosphate depositions were examined by scanning and transmission electron microscopy, elemental analysis, and x-ray diffraction. Nanoparticles in ethanol solution infiltrated into phosphoric-acid-etched human dentin and Single Bond (3M/ESPE) were applied to determine whether the nanoparticles interfered with bonding. Debonded sticks were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. A metalloproteinase collagen degradation assay was also performed in resin-infiltrated dentin with and without nanoparticles, measuring C-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen (ICTP) concentration in supernatants, after 4 wk of immersion in artificial saliva. Numerical data were analyzed by analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Student-Newman-Keuls multiple comparisons tests (p < .05). Nanoparticles were effectively zinc-loaded and were shown to have a chelating effect, retaining calcium regardless of zinc incorporation. Nanoparticles failed to infiltrate demineralized intertubular dentin and remained on top of the hybrid layer, without altering bond strength. Calcium and phosphorus were found covering nanoparticles at the hybrid layer, after 24 h. Nanoparticle application in etched dentin also reduced MMP-mediated collagen degradation. Tested nanoparticles may be

  15. The effect of age, sex hormones, and bone turnover markers on calcaneal quantitative ultrasonometry in healthy German men.

    PubMed

    Kyvernitakis, Ioannis; Saeger, Ulf; Ziller, Volker; Bauer, Thomas; Seker-Pektas, Berna; Hadji, Peyman

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this cross-sectional study was to determine the age-dependent variations of calcaneal quantitative ultrasonometry (QUS) and the association with sex hormones and biochemical bone turnover markers in a large sample of unselected healthy German men. Bone measurements are expected to behave differently among men and women. The speed of sound (SOS), broadband ultrasound attenuation (BUA), and stiffness index (SI) of the os calcaneus were measured in 506 German men aged 20-79 yr (mean age: 45.7 yr). Additionally, follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), estradiol, prolactin, testosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEA-S), sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) as well as N-terminal propeptide of human procollagen type I (PINP), C-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen (ICTP), osteocalcin, bone-specific alkaline phosphatase, and CrossLaps were measured with standardized essays and correlated with the QUS results. The QUS results comprised an overall change of 12.4%, 3.2%, and 23.2% for BUA, SOS, and SI, respectively, between the 20-29 and 70-79 yr age groups (p ≤ 0.001). The annual rate of the age-related differences was 0.33% (standard deviation [SD]: 0.31), 0.06% (SD: 0.08), and 0.53% (SD: 0.56) for BUA, SOS, and SI, respectively. Testosterone and DHEA-S were significantly associated with QUS parameters and increasing age, whereas SHBG showed an age-related increase and was inversely related with QUS values (p < 0.05). Bone turnover markers present lower values gradually, and we found a significant correlation between carboxy-terminal collagen crosslinks (CTX), osteocalcin (OC), bone alkaline phosphatase (BAP), and QUS variables (p < 0.05). PMID:23582469

  16. Assessment of Snow-Water Equivalent Change in Regional Climate Simulations Coupled with Different Land Surface Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Önol, Barış; Acar, Merve

    2014-05-01

    In this study, ICTP-RegCM4 simulations coupled with two land surface models, BATS (Biosphere Atmosphere Transfer Scheme) and CLM (Community Land Model), have been evaluated for present (1971-2000) and future period (2005-2100) over the Med-CORDEX domain. HaDGEM2 simulations forced by RCP8.5 have been used for lateral forcing to produce 50-km RCM simulation. In addition, we have also tested model results, driven by ERA-Interim, with observations to define deficiency of the model. Precipitation simulation biases are positive for nearly all over Anatolian mountains range (>1000m) in winter. The diverse bias pattern in precipitation is also calculated over lower regions of Alps and Turkey (<500m). Snow-water equivalent changes in future climate simulations are evaluated for two land surface models, BATS and CLM. Snow-water equivalent (SWE) has been analyzed considering snow-melt timing in spring season. In terms of SWE over Balkans, CLM simulation in April is not produced snow after the year of 2040. The dramatic decrease in SWE has been also determined for the highland of Turkey (>1500) in last three decades of the 21st century for both CLM and BATS simulations. After 2050's, SWE in CLM simulaton is less than 5 mm for the areas over Turkey where the elevation is lower than 1000 m. The decrease in BATS simulation is strengthened in the second half of century over the Alpine region (>1000m) and SWE change between the first and the second half of the century is 47% (67 mm). Especially, precipitation minus evaporation changes are diverse for both CLM and BATS driven simulations. The results based on daily and monthly time scales have been evaluated to assess hydrological impact in scenario simulations and snow-melt season shift for both simulations have been investigated over Med_CORDEX domain.

  17. Sensitivity studies of high-resolution RegCM3 simulations of precipitation over the European Alps: the effect of lateral boundary conditions and domain size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadeem, Imran; Formayer, Herbert

    2015-08-01

    A suite of high-resolution (10 km) simulations were performed with the International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP) Regional Climate Model (RegCM3) to study the effect of various lateral boundary conditions (LBCs), domain size, and intermediate domains on simulated precipitation over the Great Alpine Region. The boundary conditions used were ECMWF ERA-Interim Reanalysis with grid spacing 0.75∘, the ECMWF ERA-40 Reanalysis with grid spacing 1.125 and 2.5∘, and finally the 2.5∘ NCEP/DOE AMIP-II Reanalysis. The model was run in one-way nesting mode with direct nesting of the high-resolution RCM (horizontal grid spacing Δx = 10 km) with driving reanalysis, with one intermediate resolution nest (Δx = 30 km) between high-resolution RCM and reanalysis forcings, and also with two intermediate resolution nests (Δx = 90 km and Δx = 30 km) for simulations forced with LBC of resolution 2.5∘. Additionally, the impact of domain size was investigated. The results of multiple simulations were evaluated using different analysis techniques, e.g., Taylor diagram and a newly defined useful statistical parameter, called Skill-Score, for evaluation of daily precipitation simulated by the model. It has been found that domain size has the major impact on the results, while different resolution and versions of LBCs, e.g., 1.125∘ ERA40 and 0.7∘ ERA-Interim, do not produce significantly different results. It is also noticed that direct nesting with reasonable domain size, seems to be the most adequate method for reproducing precipitation over complex terrain, while introducing intermediate resolution nests seems to deteriorate the results.

  18. Changes in Indirect Markers of Muscle Damage and Tendons After Daily Drop Jumping Exercise with Rapid Load Increase

    PubMed Central

    Paleckis, Vidas; Mickevičius, Mantas; Snieckus, Audrius; Streckis, Vytautas; Pääsuke, Mati; Rutkauskas, Saulius; Steponavičiūtė, Rasa; Skurvydas, Albertas; Kamandulis, Sigitas

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess changes in indirect markers of muscle damage and type I collagen degradation, as well as, patellar and Achilles tendon morphological differences during nine daily drop-jumps sessions with constant load alternated with rapid increases in load to test the hypothesis that frequent drop-jump training results in negative muscular and tendon adaptation. Young men (n = 9) performed daily drop jump workouts with progression every 3 days in terms of number of jumps, platform height and squat amplitude. Voluntary and electrically evoked knee extensor torque, muscle soreness, blood plasma creatine kinase (CK) activity and carboxyterminal cross-linked telopeptide (ICTP), patellar and Achilles tendon thickness and cross-sectional area (CSA) were assessed at different time points during the training period and again on days 1, 3, 10 and 17 after the training. The findings were as follows: (1) steady decline in maximal muscle strength with major recovery within 24 hours after the first six daily training sessions; (2) larger decline in electrically induced muscle torque and prolonged recovery during last three training sessions; (3) increase in patellar and Achilles tendons CSA without change in thickness towards the end of training period; (4) increase in jump height but not in muscle strength after whole training period. Our findings suggest that frequent drop-jump sessions with constant load alternated with rapid increases in load do not induce severe muscle damage or major changes in tendons, nonetheless, this type of loading is not advisable for muscle strength improvement. Key points Frequent drop jump training induces activation mode dependent muscle torque depression late in the training period. No significant changes in the thickness of patellar and Achilles tendons are observed during frequent training, while CSA increases towards the end of training period. Longitudinal effect for jump height but not for muscle strength is evident

  19. Simulations of Future Drought Conditions in Central Asia CORDEX Region 8 by Using RegCM4.3.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turp, M. T.; Ozturk, T.; An, N.; Türkeş, M.; Kurnaz, L.

    2014-12-01

    In this work, projected future changes in mean surface air temperature and precipitation climatology, inter-annual and seasonal variability and climatic aridity/humidity conditions for the period of 2071-2100 over the large Central Asia region with respect to present climate (1971 to 2000) were simulated based on the RCP 4.5 and RCP 8.5 emission scenarios. Regional Climate Model (RegCM4.3.5) of the International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP) was used for projections of future and present climate conditions. HadGEM2 global climate model of the Met Office Hadley Centre and MPI-ESM-MR global climate model of the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology were downscaled to 50 km for the CORDEX Region 8. We investigated the seasonal time-scale performance of RegCM4.3.5 in reproducing observed climatology over the domain of Central Asia by using two different global climate model outputs. For the future climatology of the domain, the regional model predicts relatively high warming in the warm season and northern part of the domain at cold season with a decrease in precipitation almost all part of the domain. The results of our study show that surface temperatures in the region will increase from 3°C up to more than 7°C on average according to the emission scenarios for the period of 2070-2100 with respect to past period of 1970-2000. Therefore, the projected warming and decrease in precipitation and also resultant or associated increased aridity and more frequent and severe drought events very likely adversely affect the ecological and socio-economic systems of this region, which is already characterised with mostly arid and semi-arid climate and ecosystems.

  20. Simulations of Future Drought Conditions in Central Asia CORDEX Region 8 by Using RegCM4.3.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozturk, Tugba; Turp, M. Tufan; Türkeş, Murat; Kurnaz, M. Levent; An, Nazan

    2015-04-01

    In this work, projected future changes in mean surface air temperature and precipitation climatology, inter-annual and seasonal variability and climatic aridity/humidity conditions for the period 2070-2100 over the large Central Asia region with respect to present climate (from 1970 to 2000) were simulated based on the RCP4.5 and RCP8.5 emission scenarios. Regional Climate Model (RegCM4.3.5) of the International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP) was used for projections of future and present climate conditions. HadGEM2 global climate model of the Met Office Hadley Centre and MPI-ESM-MR global climate model of the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology were downscaled to 50 km for the CORDEX Region 8. We investigated the seasonal time-scale performance of RegCM4.3.5 in reproducing observed climatology over the domain of Central Asia by using 2 different global climate model outputs. For the future climatology of the domain, the regional model predicts relatively high warming in the warm season and northern part of the domain at cold season with a decrease in precipitation almost all part of the domain. The results of our study show that surface temperatures in the region will increase from 3 °C up to more than 7 °C on average according to the emission scenarios for the period 2070-2100 with respect to past period 1970-2000. Therefore, the projected warming and decrease in precipitation and also resultant or associated increased aridity and more frequent and severe drought events very likely adversely affect the ecological and socio-economic systems of this region, which is already characterised with mostly arid and semi-arid climate and ecosystems.

  1. Spatial and temporal variability of the precipitation seasonality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baciu, Madalina; Cheval, Sorin; Dumitrescu, Alexandru; Breza, Traian

    2014-05-01

    Climate change scenarios assume significant modifications in the precipitation characteristics over the South-Eastern Europe (SEE), raising a huge interest from the general public and stakeholders. In the recent period, the scientific community has produced many reports showing that the overall precipitation amounts are likely to decrease until the end of the 21st century with variations related to geography, seasons, and parameters. The distribution of the precipitation along the year is key information for water management in hydrologic and agricultural applications, which are very sensitive issues for the SEE countries. This study investigates the observed variability of the seasonality over the SEE (1961-2020), and the expected changes according to IPCC scenarios for the next decades (2021-2050). The analysis exploits the outputs of the Regional Climate Models (RCMs) RegCM3 (ICTP), Aladin (CNRM), and Promes (UCLM), at 25-km spatial resolution and seasonal focus, while ECA&D, and E-OBS datasets were used for featuring the actual climate. Markham (a), and Walsh & Lawler (b) seasonality indices (SI) were computed and employed for the whole area, while the trend analysis was conducted using the nonparametric Mann-Kendall statistics (c), and the Pettitt test (d) and Rodionov Regime Shift Index (e) tests were employed to identify the shifting points. The results pointed out strong differentiations between the different climates in the studied region (e.g. Mediterranean and Carpathian regions), and significant changes in certain spots. Correlated with the variability of the water resources, consumption and availability, the results can be extremely useful for the water management activities. This study is the result of activities developed within the CC-WARE Project (Mitigating Vulnerability of Water Resources under Climate Change), contract no. SEE/D/0143/2.1/X.

  2. Polymer Nanocarriers for Dentin Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Osorio, R.; Osorio, E.; Medina-Castillo, A.L.; Toledano, M.

    2014-01-01

    To obtain more durable adhesion to dentin, and to protect collagen fibrils of the dentin matrix from degradation, calcium- and phosphate-releasing particles have been incorporated into the dental adhesive procedure. The aim of the present study was to incorporate zinc-loaded polymeric nanocarriers into a dental adhesive system to facilitate inhibition of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs)-mediated collagen degradation and to provide calcium ions for mineral deposition within the resin-dentin bonded interface. PolymP-nActive nanoparticles (nanoMyP) were zinc-loaded through 30-minute ZnCl2 immersion and tested for bioactivity by means of 7 days’ immersion in simulated body fluid solution (the Kokubo test). Zinc-loading and calcium phosphate depositions were examined by scanning and transmission electron microscopy, elemental analysis, and x-ray diffraction. Nanoparticles in ethanol solution infiltrated into phosphoric-acid-etched human dentin and Single Bond (3M/ESPE) were applied to determine whether the nanoparticles interfered with bonding. Debonded sticks were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. A metalloproteinase collagen degradation assay was also performed in resin-infiltrated dentin with and without nanoparticles, measuring C-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen (ICTP) concentration in supernatants, after 4 wk of immersion in artificial saliva. Numerical data were analyzed by analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Student-Newman-Keuls multiple comparisons tests (p < .05). Nanoparticles were effectively zinc-loaded and were shown to have a chelating effect, retaining calcium regardless of zinc incorporation. Nanoparticles failed to infiltrate demineralized intertubular dentin and remained on top of the hybrid layer, without altering bond strength. Calcium and phosphorus were found covering nanoparticles at the hybrid layer, after 24 h. Nanoparticle application in etched dentin also reduced MMP-mediated collagen degradation. Tested nanoparticles may be

  3. Evaluation of RegCM4 over the CORDEX South America Domain: Sensitivity analysis to the Land Surface Scheme for the Amazon Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llopart, Marta; da Rocha, Rosmeri

    2014-05-01

    We compare the performance of the RegCM4 (ICTP Regional Climate Model) coupled to the land surface schemes CLM 3.5 (Community Land Model) and BATS (Biosphere Atmosphere Transfer Scheme) in a 30-year simulation (1979-2009) over CORDEX South America Domain. In general, the coupling of RegCM4 with the CLM substantially improves the simulated climatology over tropical South America relative to the default version of RegCM4 (coupled with BATS). One of the main features is that the RegCLM improves the precipitation climatology and annual cycle, reducing the summer wet bias, over the AMZ basin. With respect to the surface energy balance, RegBATS scheme prescribes lower monthly albedos over the AMZ, resulting in higher solar radiation absorption by the surface. Moreover, RegBATS tends to simulate a higher sensible heat flux and lower latent heat fluxes over the AMZ during the dry season, diverging from observations. The surface water balance also changes considerably between the two simulations. Compared with RegBATS, RegCLM simulates lower precipitation and runoff, as well as less water into the total soil column. RegCLM improves the water balance along the year, reducing the ET (Evapotranspiration) overestimation during the wet season, even though still overestimating it, and simulating closer ET values during the dry season. RegBATS simulates higher sensible heat fluxes and lower ET during the dry season. The Bowen Ratio based on fluxes tower observations, in the AMZ basin, suggests a practically constant value along the year, pattern better simulated by CLM (albeit still poorly represented such a pattern), suggesting a better representation of the net surface energy partitioning. This better representation improves, consequently, the simulated precipitation and air surface temperature, when compared with the observations. Even though the RegCLM improves the precipitation and air temperature.

  4. The Impact of the SESAME Project on Science and Society in the Middle East

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winick, Herman

    2008-04-01

    SESAME (Synchrotron-light for Experimental Science and Applications in the Middle East) is a UNESCO-sponsored project that is constructing an international research laboratory, closely modeled on CERN, in Jordan (www.sesame.org.jo). Ten Members of the governing Council (Bahrain, Cyprus, Egypt, Iran, Iraq, Israel, Jordan, Pakistan, Palestinian Authority, and Turkey) have responsibility for the project, led by Herwig Schopper, Council President since 1999. In late 2008 Chris Llewellyn-Smith will become Council President. SESAME was initiated by a gift from Germany of the decommissioned BESSY I facility. The BESSY I 0.8 GeV injector is now being installed in the recently completed building, funded by Jordan, as components are procured for a new 133 m circumference, 2.5 GeV third-generation storage ring with 12 locations for insertion devices. Beam line equipment has been provided by laboratories in France, UK, and US. Support also comes from EU, IAEA, ICTP, Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, the US Department of Energy and State Department, and laboratories around the world. The broad scientific program includes biomedical, environmental, and archaeological programs particularly relevant to the Middle East. Five scientific workshops and six annual Users' meetings have brought together several hundred scientists from the region, along with researchers from around the world. Training programs have enabled about 100 scientists from the region to work at synchrotron radiation laboratories. These activities have already had significant impact on science and society in the Middle East, for example leading to collaborations between scientists from countries that are not particularly friendly with each other, and to national planning emphasizing synchrotron radiation research. When research starts in 2011 this impact will grow as graduate students are trained in the region in many scientific disciplines, and scientists working abroad are attracted to return.

  5. COMMITTEES: Committees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-01-01

    TAUP STEERING COMMITTEE F T Avignone, University of South Carolina B C Barish, CALTECH E Bellotti, University of Milano, INFN J Bernabeu, University of Valencia A Bottino (Chair), University of Torino, INFN N Fornengo, University of Torino, INFN T Kajita, ICRR University of Tokyo C W Kim, Johns Hopkins University, KIAS V Matveev, INR Moscow J Morales, University of Zaragoza G Raffelt, MPI Munchen D Sinclair, University of Carleton M Spiro, IN2P3 TAUP 2009 INTERNATIONAL ADVISORY COMMITTEE J J Aubert, CNRS Marseille M Baldo-Ceolin, University of Padova, INFN G Bellini, University of Milano, INFN L Bergstrom, University of Stockholm R Bernabei, University of Roma Tor Vergata, INFN A Bettini, University of Padova, INFN, LSC S Bilenky, JINR Dubna D O Caldwell, UCSB J Cronin, University of Chicago A Dar, Technion Haifa G Domogatsky, INR Moscow J Ellis, CERN E Fernandez, IFAE Barcelona E Fiorini, University of Milano, INFN T Gaisser, University of Delaware G Gelmini, UCLA G Gerbier, CEA Saclay A Giazotto, INFN Pisa F Halzen, University of Wisconsin W Haxton, University of Washington T Kirsten MPI Heidelberg L Maiani, University of Roma La Sapienza, INFN A McDonald, Queen's University K Nakamura, KEK R Petronzio, INFN, University of Roma Tor Vergata L Resvanis, University of Athens F Ronga INFN, LNF C Rubbia INFN, LNGS A Smirnov, ICTP Trieste C Spiering, DESY N Spooner, University of Sheffield A Suzuki, KEK S Ting MIT, CERN M S Turner, FNAL, University of Chicago J W F Valle, IFIC Valencia D Vignaud, APC Paris G Zatsepin, INR Moscow TAUP 2009 ORGANIZING COMMITTEE R Aloisio, LNGS R Antolini, LNGS F Arneodo, LNGS Z Berezhiani, University of L'Aquila, INFN V Berezinsky, LNGS R Cerulli, LNGS E Coccia [Chair], LNGS/INFN, U of Roma Tor Vergata N D'Ambrosio, LNGS N Fornengo, University of Torino, INFN M Laubenstein, LNGS O Palamara, LNGS L Pandola [Scientific Secretary], LNGS

  6. Trend analysis of regional heat wave warning using RegCM simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pongracz, R.; Bartholy, J.; Bartha, E. B.; Torek, O.; Torma, Cs.

    2010-09-01

    Heat wave events are important temperature-related climatological extremes due to their impacts on human health. In the future, they are very likely to occur more frequently and more intensely not only in the Carpathian Basin, but in most regions of the world because of global warming. In order to develop adaptation and mitigation strategies on local scale, it is essential to analyze the projected changes related to heat waves. In Hungary, three categories of heat wave warning are applied. They are associated to the daily mean temperature values. (i) Warning category 1 is issued when the daily mean temperature is larger than 25 °C. (ii) Warning category 2 is issued when the daily mean temperature for at least 3 consecutive days is larger than 25 °C. (iii) Warning category 3 is issued when the daily mean temperature for at least 3 consecutive days is larger than 27 °C. In this poster, frequency of these conditions are analyzed using regional climate model experiments of model RegCM with 10-km horizontal resolution adapted at the Department of Meteorology, Eotvos Lorand University in the frame of the CECILIA EU-project. The model RegCM is a 3-dimensional, sigma-coordinate, primitive equation model, and it was originally developed by Giorgi et al. Currently, it is available from the ICTP (International Centre for Theoretical Physics). The initial and lateral boundary conditions of the fine-resolution experiments have been provided by the global climate model ECHAM for the A1B emission scenario for three different time slices (1961-1990, 2021-2050, and 2071-2100).

  7. Simulation of Indian summer monsoon onset with different parameterization convection schemes of RegCM-4.3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatla, R.; Ghosh, S.; Mandal, B.; Mall, R. K.; Sharma, Kuldeep

    2016-07-01

    Simulation of Indian Summer Monsoon (ISM) onset over South Asia Coordinated Regional Climate Downscaling Experiment (CORDEX) domain in pentad composite pattern is considered for this study. The latest version of the International Center for Theoretical Physics' (ICTP's) Regional Climate Model version 4.3 (RegCM-4.3) is used for the simulation of a pentad composite onset for three time period: Pre-onset, Onset and Post-onset periods of ISM. Each pentad composite is average of five consecutive days. 10 years (2001-2010) worth of pentad composites of rainfall, mean sea level pressure (MSLP), outgoing longwave radiation (OLR), wind at 850 hPa and 925 hPa levels till 7 days prior to the date of onset of monsoon and 7 days after the onset are analyzed to find out the predictive skill. Six Parameterization convection schemes (PCSs) viz. Kuo, Mix98, Mix99, Tiedtke, Emanuel and Grell are used in sensitivity experiment and estimation of their performance has been done. From the experiment, some modulation is found in the OLR field (≤ 200 Wm- 2) within the region 5°N-10°N and 70°N-75°E. Yearly analysis has shown the strength of wind at 925 hPa over the region 5°N-10°N and 70°E-80°E on pentad composite onset of ISM. Yearly analysis is conducted for finding the best fitted PCS which has provided the precursor for simulating the onset.

  8. An outreach activity at the frontier of science: the Planeterrella

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lilensten, J.; Simon, C.; Barthélemy, M.

    2007-08-01

    In 1899, the Norwegian physicist Kristian Birkeland developed an experiment called Terrella, which enabled him to show the mechanism of formation of the auroral oval. An electron gun was shooting electrons (then called "cathode rays") to a magnetized sphere in a vacuum chamber. This enabled him to see also (without identifying them) the ring currents, discovered later by James Van Allen. One of us (J.L.) built several Terrellas, initially for the Olympiads of physics in 1999, then with undergraduate students and finally assembled a Terrella experiment in a school of geophysics in Trieste in May 2006 (ICTP - UNESCO - COST 724 - NSF). We recently assembled a new experiment inspired from the Terrella. We completely reconsidered the experiment of Birkeland, in order to give the greatest flexibility. A great number of planetary situations of the interactions sun - planets is now possible: Uranus and Neptune, the interaction between Ganymede and Jupiter, and even the interaction between a magnetized exoplanet and a close star. This is why this experiment has been renamed Planeterrella. The experiment is now under a calibration process in order to check whether it can still be used for scientific purposes. However, we already presented it in public activities several times. It is very beautiful, and allows to show plasma physics in action, and especially the Sun-Planets relationships in a very spectacular way. In this talk, we will explain this simple experiment and show slides of the outreach activities we carried out. In the future, we intend to set up an international program to lower the price of the unit (actually about 20 kE) in order to allow all universities, including in developing countries, to get a Planeterrella. This will be hopefully a UNESCO program.

  9. UNESCO active learning approach in optics and photonics leads to significant change in Morocco

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berrada, K.; Channa, R.; Outzourhit, A.; Azizan, M.; Oueriagli, A.

    2014-07-01

    There are many difficulties in teaching science and technology in developing countries. Several different teaching strategies have to be applied in these cases. More specifically, for developing countries competencies in teaching science in the introductory classroom has attracted much attention. As a specific example we will consider the Moroccan system. In most developing countries everything is moving so slowly that the progress stays static for development. Also, any change needs time, effort and engagement. In our case we discovered that many teachers feel uncomfortable when introducing new teaching methods and evaluation in classes at introductory physics. However, the introduction of an Active Learning in our curricula showed difficulties that students have in understanding physics and especially concepts. Students were interested in having Active Learning courses much more than passive and traditional ones. Changing believes on physical phenomena and reality of the world students become more attractive and their way of thinking Science changed. The main philosophy of fostering modern hands-on learning techniques -adapted to local needs and availability of teaching resources- is elaborated. The Active Learning program provides the teachers with a conceptual evaluation instrument, drawn from relevant physics education research, giving teachers an important tool to measure student learning. We will try to describe the UNESCO Chair project in physics created in 2010 at Cadi Ayyad University since our first experience with UNESCO ALOP program. Many efforts have been done so far and the project helps now to develop more national and international collaborations between universities and Regional Academies of Education and Training. As a new result of these actions and according to our local needs, the translation of the ALOP program into Arabic is now available under the auspice of UNESCO and encouragement of international partners SPIE, ICTP, ICO and OSA.

  10. Left-right symmetric heterotic-string derived models

    SciTech Connect

    Cleaver, Gerald B.; Faraggi, Alon E.; Savage, Christopher

    2001-03-15

    Recently it was demonstrated that free fermionic heterotic strings can produce models with solely the minimal supersymmetric standard model states in the low energy spectrum. This unprecedented result provides further strong evidence for the possibility that the true string vacuum shares some of the properties of the free fermionic models. Past free fermionic models have focused on several possible unbroken observable SO(10) subgroups at the string scale, which include the flipped SU(5) (FSU5), the Pati-Salam (PS) string models, and the string standard-like models (SLM). We extend this study to include the case in which the SO(10) symmetry is broken to the left-right symmetric (LRS) gauge group, SO(10){yields}SU(3){sub C}xU(1){sub B-L}xSU(2){sub L}xSU(2){sub R}. We present several models of this type and discuss their phenomenological features. The most striking new outcome of the LRS string models, in contrast with the case of the FSU5, the PS, and the SLM string models, is that they can produce effective field theories that are free of Abelian anomalies. We discuss the distinction between the two types of free fermionic models which result in the presence, or absence, of an anomalous U(1). As a counterexample we also present a LRS model that does contain an anomalous U(1). Additionally, we discuss how in string models the standard model spectrum may arise from the three 16 representations of SO(10), while the weak hypercharge does not have the canonical SO(10) embedding.

  11. Paul Adrien Maurice Dirac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kursunoglu, Behram N.; Wigner, Eugene Paul

    1990-04-01

    Portrait R. Feyman; List of contributors; A memorial to P. A. M. Dirac B. N. Kursunoglu; Preface B. N. Kursunoglu and E. P. Wigner; Chronology; Part I. Human Side: 1. Thinking of my darling Paul M. Dirac; 2. Dirac in coral gables S. A. Kursunoglu; 3. Recollections of Paul Dirac at Florida State University J. E. Lannutti; 4. My association with Professor Dirac Harish-Chandra; 5. What Paul Dirac meant in my life N. Kemmer; 6. Dirac's way R. Peierls; 7. An experimenter's view of P. A. M. Dirac A. D. Krisch; 8. Dirac at the University of Miami H. K. Stanford; 9. Remembering Paul Dirac E. P. Wigner; Part II. More Scientific Ideas: 10. Another side to Paul Dirac R. H. Dalitz; 11. Playing with equations, the Dirac way A. Pais; 12. Paul Dirac and Werner Heisenberg - a partnership in science L. M. Brown and H. Rechenberg; 13. Dirac's magnetic monopole and the fine structure constant W. J. Marciano and M. Goldhaber; 14. Magnetic monopoles and the halos of galaxies F. Hoyle; 15. The inadequacies of quantum field theory P. A. M. Dirac; 16. Dirac and the foundation of quantum mechanics P. T. Matthews; Part III. Influenced and Inspired by Association: 17. At the feet of Dirac J. C. Polkinghorne; 18. Reminiscences of Paul Dirac N. Mott; 19. From relativistic quantum theory to the human brain H. J. Lipkin; 20. Dirac in 1962, weak and gravitational radiation interactions J. Weber; 21. Schrödinger's cat W. E. Lamb, Jr.; 22. Dirac and finite field theories A. Salam; 23. Dirac's influence on unified field theory B. N. Kursunoglu; Index.

  12. Successful N{sub 2} leptogenesis with flavour coupling effects in realistic unified models

    SciTech Connect

    Bari, Pasquale Di; King, Stephen F.

    2015-10-02

    In realistic unified models involving so-called SO(10)-inspired patterns of Dirac and heavy right-handed (RH) neutrino masses, the lightest right-handed neutrino N{sub 1} is too light to yield successful thermal leptogenesis, barring highly fine tuned solutions, while the second heaviest right-handed neutrino N{sub 2} is typically in the correct mass range. We show that flavour coupling effects in the Boltzmann equations may be crucial to the success of such N{sub 2} dominated leptogenesis, by helping to ensure that the flavour asymmetries produced at the N{sub 2} scale survive N{sub 1} washout. To illustrate these effects we focus on N{sub 2} dominated leptogenesis in an existing model, the A to Z of flavour with Pati-Salam, where the neutrino Dirac mass matrix may be equal to an up-type quark mass matrix and has a particular constrained structure. The numerical results, supported by analytical insight, show that in order to achieve successful N{sub 2} leptogenesis, consistent with neutrino phenomenology, requires a “flavour swap scenario” together with a less hierarchical pattern of RH neutrino masses than naively expected, at the expense of some mild fine-tuning. In the considered A to Z model neutrino masses are predicted to be normal ordered, with an atmospheric neutrino mixing angle well into the second octant and the Dirac phase δ≃20{sup ∘}, a set of predictions that will be tested in the next years in neutrino oscillation experiments. Flavour coupling effects may be relevant for other SO(10)-inspired unified models where N{sub 2} leptogenesis is necessary.

  13. Diversity of bacteria nesting the plant cover of north Sinai deserts, Egypt.

    PubMed

    Hanna, Amira L; Youssef, Hanan H; Amer, Wafaa M; Monib, Mohammed; Fayez, Mohammed; Hegazi, Nabil A

    2013-01-01

    North Sinai deserts were surveyed for the predominant plant cover and for the culturable bacteria nesting their roots and shoots. Among 43 plant species reported, 13 are perennial (e.g. Fagonia spp., Pancratium spp.) and 30 annuals (e.g. Bromus spp., Erodium spp.). Eleven species possessed rhizo-sheath, e.g. Cyperus capitatus, Panicum turgidum and Trisetaria koelerioides. Microbiological analyses demonstrated: the great diversity and richness of associated culturable bacteria, in particular nitrogen-fixing bacteria (diazotrophs); the majority of bacterial residents were of true and/or putative diazotrophic nature; the bacterial populations followed an increasing density gradient towards the root surfaces; sizeable populations were able to reside inside the root (endorhizosphere) and shoot (endophyllosphere) tissues. Three hundred bacterial isolates were secured from studied spheres. The majority of nitrogen-fixing bacilli isolates belonged to Bacillus megaterium, Bacillus pumilus, Bacillus polymexa, Bacillus macerans, Bacillus circulans and Bacillus licheniformis. The family Enterobacteriaceae represented by Enterobacter agglomerans, Enterobacter sackazakii, Enterobacter cloacae, Serratia adorifera, Serratia liquefaciens and Klebsiella oxytoca. The non-Enterobacteriaceae population was rich in Pantoae spp., Agrobacterium rdiobacter, Pseudomonas vesicularis, Pseudomonas putida, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, Ochrobactrum anthropi, Sphingomonas paucimobilis and Chrysemonas luteola. Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus were reported inside root and shoot tissues of a number of tested plants. The dense bacterial populations reported speak well to the very possible significant role played by the endophytic bacterial populations in the survival, in respect of nutrition and health, of existing plants. Such groups of diazotrophs are good candidates, as bio-preparates, to support the growth of future field crops grown in deserts of north Sinai and irrigated by the water of El-Salam

  14. Unmanned Aerial Vehicle to Estimate Nitrogen Status of Turfgrasses.

    PubMed

    Caturegli, Lisa; Corniglia, Matteo; Gaetani, Monica; Grossi, Nicola; Magni, Simone; Migliazzi, Mauro; Angelini, Luciana; Mazzoncini, Marco; Silvestri, Nicola; Fontanelli, Marco; Raffaelli, Michele; Peruzzi, Andrea; Volterrani, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Spectral reflectance data originating from Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) imagery is a valuable tool to monitor plant nutrition, reduce nitrogen (N) application to real needs, thus producing both economic and environmental benefits. The objectives of the trial were i) to compare the spectral reflectance of 3 turfgrasses acquired via UAV and by a ground-based instrument; ii) to test the sensitivity of the 2 data acquisition sources in detecting induced variation in N levels. N application gradients from 0 to 250 kg ha-1 were created on 3 different turfgrass species: Cynodon dactylon x transvaalensis (Cdxt) 'Patriot', Zoysia matrella (Zm) 'Zeon' and Paspalum vaginatum (Pv) 'Salam'. Proximity and remote-sensed reflectance measurements were acquired using a GreenSeeker handheld crop sensor and a UAV with onboard a multispectral sensor, to determine Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI). Proximity-sensed NDVI is highly correlated with data acquired from UAV with r values ranging from 0.83 (Zm) to 0.97 (Cdxt). Relating NDVI-UAV with clippings N, the highest r is for Cdxt (0.95). The most reactive species to N fertilization is Cdxt with a clippings N% ranging from 1.2% to 4.1%. UAV imagery can adequately assess the N status of turfgrasses and its spatial variability within a species, so for large areas, such as golf courses, sod farms or race courses, UAV acquired data can optimize turf management. For relatively small green areas, a hand-held crop sensor can be a less expensive and more practical option. PMID:27341674

  15. Search for the Decays B0(s) ---> e+ mu- and B0(s) ---> e+ e- in CDF Run. II.

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Akimoto, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Apresyan, A.; /Purdue U. /Waseda U.

    2009-01-01

    The authors report results from a search for the lepton flavor violating decays B{sub (s)}{sup 0} {yields} e{sup +}{mu}{sup -}, and the flavor-changing neutral-current decays B{sub (s)}{sup 0} {yields} e{sup +}e{sup -}. The analysis uses data corresponding to 2 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity of p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV collected with the upgraded Collider Detector (CDF II) at the Fermilab Tevatron. The observed number of B{sub (s)}{sup 0} candidates is consistent with background expectations. The resulting bayesian upper limits on the branching ratios at 90% credibility level are {Beta}(B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} e{sup +}{mu}{sup -}) < 2.0 x 10{sup -7}, {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} e{sup +}{mu}{sup -}) < 6.4 x 10{sup -8}, {Beta}(B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} e{sup +}e{sup -}) < 2.8 x 10{sup -7} and {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} e{sup +}e{sup -}) < 8.3 x 10{sup -8}. From the limits on {Beta}(B{sub (s)}{sup 0} {yields} e{sup +}{mu}{sup -}), the following lower bounds on the Pati-Salam leptoquark masses are also derived: M{sub LQ}(B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} e{sup +}{mu}{sup -}) > 47.8 TeV/c{sup 2}, and M{sub LQ}(B{sup 0} {yields} e{sup +}{mu}{sup -}) > 59.3 TeV/c{sup 2}, at 90% credibility level.

  16. Astrophysical implications of a visible dark matter sector from a custodially warped GUT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agashe, Kaustubh; Blum, Kfir; Lee, Seung J.; Perez, Gilad

    2010-04-01

    We explore, within the warped extra dimensional framework, the possibility of finding antimatter signals in cosmic rays (CRs) from dark matter (DM) annihilation. We find that exchange of order 100 GeV radion, an integral part of this class of models, generically results in a sizable Sommerfeld enhancement of the annihilation rate for DM mass at the TeV scale. No ad hoc dark sector is required to obtain boosted annihilation cross sections and hence signals. Such a mild hierarchy between the radion and DM masses can be natural due to the pseudo-Goldstone boson nature of the radion. We study the implications of a Sommerfeld enhancement specifically in warped grand unified theory (GUT) models, where proton stability implies a DM candidate. We show, via a partially unified Pati-Salam group, how to incorporate a custodial symmetry for Z→bb¯ into the GUT framework such that a few TeV Kaluza-Klein (KK) mass scale is allowed by electroweak precision tests. Among such models, the one with the smallest SO(10) (fully unified) representation, with SU(5) hypercharge normalization, allows us to decouple the DM from the electroweak gauge bosons. Thus, a correct DM relic density can be obtained and direct detection bounds are satisfied. Looking at robust CR observables, we find a possible future signal in the p¯/p flux ratio consistent with current constraints. Using a different choice of representations, we show how to embed in this GUT model a similar custodial symmetry for the right-handed tau, allowing it to be strongly coupled to KK particles. Such a scenario might lead to an observed signal in CR positrons; however, the DM candidate in this case cannot constitute all of the DM in the Universe. As an aside and independent of the GUT or DM model, the strong coupling between KK particles and tau’s can lead to striking LHC signals.

  17. Implications of the CMS search for W R on grand unification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandyopadhyay, Triparno; Brahmachari, Biswajoy; Raychaudhuri, Amitava

    2016-02-01

    The CMS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider has reported a 2.8σ excess in the (2 e)(2 jets) channel around 2.1 TeV. Interpretation of this data is reconsidered in terms of the production of a right-handed weak gauge boson, W R , of the left-right symmetric model and in an SO(10) grand unified theory abiding by the Extended Survival Hypothesis. The left-right symmetric model can be consistent with this excess if (a) the heavy right-handed neutrino has a mass near W R , or (b) if g L ≠ g R , or (c) the right-handed CKM matrix is nontrivial. Combinations of the above possibilities are also viable. A W R with a mass in the TeV region if embedded in SO(10) is not compatible with g L = g R . Rather, it implies 0 .64 ≤ g R /g L ≤ 0 .78. Further, a unique symmetry-breaking route — the order being left-right discrete symmetry breaking first, followed by SU(4) C and finally SU(2) R — to the standard model is picked out. The L ↔ R discrete symmetry has to be broken at around 1016 GeV. The grand unification scale is pushed to 1018 GeV making the detection of proton decay in ongoing searches rather unlikely. The SU(4) C breaking scale can be at its allowed lower limit of 106 GeV so that n-overline{n} oscillation or flavour changing processes such as K L → μe and B d,s → μe may be detectable. The Higgs scalar multiplets responsible for SO(10) symmetry breaking at various stages are uniquely identified so long as one adheres to a minimalist principle. We also remark, en passant, about a partially unified Pati-Salam model.

  18. A summary of recent experimental results from Mark J: High energy e/sup +/e/sup /minus// collisions at PETRA: Report Number 131

    SciTech Connect

    Adeva, B.; Barber, D.P.; Becker, U.; Berdugo, J.; Bohm, A.; Branson, J.G.; Burger, J.D.; Capell, M.; Cerrada, M.; Chang, C.C.

    1983-12-01

    The PETRA electron-positron collider at DESY in Hamburg, Federal Republic of Germany, began operating in 1978, with four intersection regions devoted to experiments. In the intervening five years, five detector devices, CELLO, JADE, MARK-J, PLUTO and TASSO have accumulated and published a substantial variety of experimental results. The limits of validity of Quantum Electro-Dynamics (QED) have been extended; the pointlike nature of leptons and quarks have been probed at exceedingly small distances; the Glashow, Weinberg and Salam (GWS) '' standard electroweak model'' has been tested and found to describe interactions remarkably well; the predicted interference between electromagnetic and weak forces has been conclusively demonstrated; events with three jets have been discovered and interpreted as resulting from gluons, as predicted by Quantum Chromo-Dynamics (QCD); the sixth, ''top,'' quark has not been found yet, although an energy search for ''toponium'' (top + antitop) has been carried out up to 43.1 GeV center of mass energy. An integrated luminosity of about 100 pb/sup /minus/1/ mostly at energies above 30 GeV, has produced a very large sample of events. The present paper is a complete review and up-dating of all MARK-J physics results either published or unpublished. Since the amount of interesting information is so large, we realized that a coherent summation could be of substantial usefulness to the community. In order that this review can serve many needs, we include, a brief description of the apparatus and the data acquisition and analysis.

  19. Comparative Study on Synergetic Degradation of a Reactive Dye Using Different Types of Fly Ash in Combined Adsorption and Photocatalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giri Babu, P. V. S.; Swaminathan, G.

    2016-07-01

    A comprehensive study was carried out on four different fly ashes used as a catalyst for the degradation of Acid Red 1 using ultraviolet rays. These fly ashes are collected from different thermal power stations located at various places in India and having different chemical compositions. Three fly ashes are from lignite-based thermal power plants, and one is from the coal-based power plant. One fly ash is classified as Class F, two fly ashes are classified as Class C and remaining one is not conforming to ASTM C618 classification. X-Ray Fluorescence analysis was used to identify the chemical composition of fly ashes and SiO2, Al2O3, CaO, Fe2O3 and TiO2 were found to be the major elements present in different proportions. Various analysis were carried out on all the fly ashes like Scanning Electron Microscopy to identify the microphysical properties, Energy Dispersive X-Ray spectroscopy to quantify the elements present in the catalyst and X-Ray Diffraction to identify the catalyst phase analysis. The radical generated during the reaction was identified by Electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. The parameters such as initial pH of the dye solution, catalyst dosage and initial dye concentration which influence the dye degradation efficiency were studied and optimised. In 60 min duration, the dye degradation efficiency at optimum parametric values of pH 2.5, initial dye concentration of 10 mg/L and catalyst dosage of 1.0 g/L using various fly ashes, i.e., Salam Power Plant, Barmer Lignite Power Plant, Kutch Lignite Power Plant and Neyveli Lignite Thermal Power plant (NLTP) were found to be 40, 60, 67 and 95 % respectively. The contribution of adsorption alone was 18 % at the above mentioned optimum parametric values. Among the above four fly ash NLTP fly ashes proved to be most efficient.

  20. Petite unification: an alternative viewpoint

    SciTech Connect

    Hung, P.Q.

    1981-05-01

    It is assumed that at some distance scale, not too many orders of magnitude less than the compton wavelength of intermediate bosons W/sup + -/ and Z/sup 0/, the SU(3)/sub c/ x SU(2)/sub L/ x U(1)/sub Y/ gauge theory, characterized by three coupling constants, becomes embedded in a gauge theory G/sub S/ x G/sub W/ characterized by only two coupling constants, g/sub S/ and g/sub W/. The strong group G/sub S/ and weak group G/sub W/ are assumed each to be either simple or pseudo-simple i.e. a direct product of simple groups with identical coupling strengths. Such a possibility is caled petite unification. Any subsequent unification of the strong force with the weak at still shorter distances is left unconsidered. A building-up procedure is adopted, that is to say the available inputs from the low-energy theory SU(3)/sub c/ x SU(2)/sub L/ x U(1)/sub Y/ are used to restrict the choices of G/sub S/ and G/sub W/. The inputs used are the experimental value of sin/sup 2/theta/sub W/ and the known fermion representations. The choices of G/sub W/ are found to be quite restricted. The smallest acceptable G/sub W/ turns out to be (SU(2))/sup 4/, and the most efficient choice of a strong group is SU(4) built a la Pati and Salam, which is the simplest case for which the electroweak U(1)/sub Y/ generator is a linear combination of both G/sub S/ and G/sub W/ generators. Furthermore, leptons provide the fourth color degree of freedom achieving thus an early quark-lepton unification. The phenomenology of the minimal petite unification model SU(4) x (SU(2))/sup 4/ is examined in detail.

  1. A minimal non-supersymmetric S O(10) model: Gauge coupling unification, proton decay and fermion masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Saki

    2016-06-01

    We present a minimal renormalizable non-supersymmetric S O(10) grand unified model with a symmetry breaking sector consisting of Higgs fields in the 54H + 126H + 10H representations. This model admits a single intermediate scale associated with Pati-Salam symmetry along with a discrete parity. Spontaneous symmetry breaking, the unification of gauge couplings and proton lifetime estimates are studied in detail in this framework. Including threshold corrections self-consistently, obtained from a full analysis of the Higgs potential, we show that the model is compatible with the current experimental bound on proton lifetime. The model generally predicts an upper bound of few times 1035 yrs for proton lifetime, which is not too far from the present Super-Kamiokande limit of τp ≳ 1.29 × 1034 yrs. With the help of a Pecci-Quinn symmetry and the resulting axion, the model provides a suitable dark matter candidate while also solving the strong CP problem. The intermediate scale, MI ≈ (1013 - 1014) GeV which is also the B - L scale, is of the right order for the right-handed neutrino mass which enables a successful description of light neutrino masses and oscillations. The Yukawa sector of the model consists of only two matrices in family space and leads to a predictive scenario for quark and lepton masses and mixings. The branching ratios for proton decay are calculable with the leading modes being p → e+π0 and p →v ¯π+ . Even though the model predicts no new physics within the reach of LHC, the next generation proton decay detectors and axion search experiments have the capability to pass verdict on this minimal scenario.

  2. Diversity of bacteria nesting the plant cover of north Sinai deserts, Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Hanna, Amira L.; Youssef, Hanan H.; Amer, Wafaa M.; Monib, Mohammed; Fayez, Mohammed; Hegazi, Nabil A.

    2012-01-01

    North Sinai deserts were surveyed for the predominant plant cover and for the culturable bacteria nesting their roots and shoots. Among 43 plant species reported, 13 are perennial (e.g. Fagonia spp., Pancratium spp.) and 30 annuals (e.g. Bromus spp., Erodium spp.). Eleven species possessed rhizo-sheath, e.g. Cyperus capitatus, Panicum turgidum and Trisetaria koelerioides. Microbiological analyses demonstrated: the great diversity and richness of associated culturable bacteria, in particular nitrogen-fixing bacteria (diazotrophs); the majority of bacterial residents were of true and/or putative diazotrophic nature; the bacterial populations followed an increasing density gradient towards the root surfaces; sizeable populations were able to reside inside the root (endorhizosphere) and shoot (endophyllosphere) tissues. Three hundred bacterial isolates were secured from studied spheres. The majority of nitrogen-fixing bacilli isolates belonged to Bacillus megaterium,Bacillus pumilus, Bacillus polymexa,Bacillus macerans,Bacillus circulans and Bacillus licheniformis. The family Enterobacteriaceae represented by Enterobacter agglomerans,Enterobacter sackazakii, Enterobacter cloacae, Serratia adorifera,Serratia liquefaciens and Klebsiella oxytoca. The non-Enterobacteriaceae population was rich in Pantoae spp., Agrobacterium rdiobacter, Pseudomonas vesicularis, Pseudomonas putida, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, Ochrobactrum anthropi, Sphingomonas paucimobilis and Chrysemonas luteola.Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus were reported inside root and shoot tissues of a number of tested plants. The dense bacterial populations reported speak well to the very possible significant role played by the endophytic bacterial populations in the survival, in respect of nutrition and health, of existing plants. Such groups of diazotrophs are good candidates, as bio-preparates, to support the growth of future field crops grown in deserts of north Sinai and irrigated by the water of El-Salam

  3. Precise measurement of parity nonconservation in atomic thallium

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, L.R.

    1981-05-01

    Observation of parity non-conservation in the 6P/sub 1/2/ - 7P/sub 1/2/ transition in /sub 81/Tl/sup 203/ /sup 205/ is reported. The transition is nominally forbidden M1 with amplitude M. Due to the violation of parity in the electron-nucleon interaction, the transition acquires an additional (parity nonconserving) amplitude e/sub p/. In the presence of an electric field, incident 293 nm circularly polarized light results in a polarization of the 7P/sub 1/2/ state through interference of the Stark amplitude with M and E/sub p/. This polarization is observed by selective excitation of the 7P/sub 1/2/ - (8S/sub 1/2) transition with circularly polarized 2.18 ..mu..m light and observation of the subsequent fluorescence at 323 nm. By utilizing this technique and carefully determining possible systematic contributions through auxiliary measurements, the circular dichroism delta = 2Im(E/sub p/)/ M is observed: delta/sub exp/ = (2.8 + 1.0 - .9) x 10/sup -3/. In addition, measurements of A(6D/sub 3/2/ - 7P/sub 1/2/) = (5.97 +- .78) x 10/sup 5/ s/sup -1/, A(7P/sub 1/2/ - 7S/sub 1/2/) = (1.71 +- .07) x 10/sup 7/ s/sup -1/ and A(7P/sub 3/2/ - 7S/sub 1/2/) = (2.37 +- .09) s/sup -1/ are reported. These values are employed in a semiempirical determination of delta based on the Weinberg-Salam Model. The result of this calculation for sin/sup 2/THETA/sub 2/ = .23 is delta/sub Theo/ = 1.7 +- .8) x 10/sup -3/.

  4. Measurement of the parity nonconserving neutral weak interaction in atomic thallium

    SciTech Connect

    Bucksbaum, P.H.

    1980-11-01

    This thesis describes an experiment to measure parity nonconservation in atomic thallium. A frequency doubled, flashlamp pumped tunable dye laser is used to excite the 6P/sub 1/2/(F = 0) ..-->.. 7P/sub 1/2/(F = 1) transition at 292.7 nm, with circularly polarized light. An electrostatic field E of 100 to 300 V/cm causes this transition to occur via Stark induced electric dipole. Two field free transitions may also occur: a highly forbidden magnetic dipole M, and a parity nonconserving electric dipole epsilon/sub P/. The latter is presumed to be due to the presence of a weak neutral current interaction between the 6p valence electron and the nucleus, as predicted by gauge theories which unite the electromagnetic and weak interactions. Both M and epsilon/sub P/ interfere with the Stark amplitude ..beta..E to produce a polarization of the 7P/sub 1/2/ state. This is measured with a circularly polarized infrared laser beam probe, tuned to the 7P/sub 1/2/ ..-->.. 8S/sub 1/2/ transition. This selectively excites m/sub F/ = +1 or -1 components of the 7P/sub 1/2/ state, and the polarization is seen as an asymmetry in 8S ..-->.. 6P/sub 3/2/ fluorescence when the probe helicity is reversed. The polarization due to M is ..delta../sub M/ = -2M/(BETAE). It is used to calibrate the analyzing efficiency. The polarization due to epsilon/sub P/ is ..delta../sub P/ = 2i epsilon/sub P//(..beta..E), and can be distinguished from ..delta../sub M/ by its properties under reversal of the 292.7 nm photon helicity and reversal of the laser direction. A preliminary measurement yielded a parity violation in agreement with the gauge theory of Weinberg and Salam.

  5. Assessment of Long-Term Climate Change Impacts on Agricultural Productivity in Eastern China Using High-Resolution Regional Climate Model Output

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavas, D. R.; Izaurralde, C.; Thomson, A.

    2008-12-01

    Increasing atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations are expected to induce significant climate change over the next century and beyond, but the impacts on society remain highly uncertain. This work utilizes high-resolution regional climate model output to assess potential climate change impacts on the productivity of five major crops in eastern China: canola, corn, potato, rice, and winter wheat. In addition to determining domain-wide trends, the objective is to identify vulnerable and emergent regions under future climate conditions, defined as having a greater than 10 percent decrease and increase in productivity, respectively. Data from the ICTP RegCM3 regional climate model for baseline (1961-1990) and future (2071-2100) periods under A2 scenario conditions are used as input in the EPIC agro-ecosystem simulation model in the domain [30N, 108E] to [42N, 123E]. Simulations are performed with and without the enhanced CO2 fertilization effect. Results indicate that aggregate potential productivity (i.e. if the crop is grown everywhere) increases 6.5 percent for rice, 8.3 percent for canola, 18.6 percent for corn, 22.9 percent for potato, and 24.9 percent for winter wheat, although with significant spatial variability for each crop. However, absent the enhanced CO2 fertilization effect, potential productivity declines in all cases ranging from 2.5-12 percent. Interannual yield variability remains constant or declines in all cases except rice. Climate variables are found to be more significant drivers of simulated yield changes than changes in soil properties, except in the case of potato production in the northwest where the effects of wind erosion are more significant. Overall, in the future period corn and winter wheat benefit significantly in the North China Plain, rice remains dominant in the southeast and emerges in the northeast, potato and corn yields become viable in the northwest, and potato yields suffer in the southwest with no other crop emerging as a

  6. The Impact of Biogenic and Anthropogenic Atmospheric Aerosol on Climate in Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibrahim, A. I.; Zakey, A.; Steiner, A. L.; Shokr, M. E.; El-Raey, M.; Ahmed, Y.; Al-Hadidi, A.; Zakey, A.

    2014-12-01

    Aerosols are indicators of air quality as they reduce visibility and adversely affect public health. Aerosol optical depth (AOD) is a measure of the radiation extinction due to interaction of radiation with aerosol particles in the atmosphere. Using this optical measure of atmospheric aerosols we explore the seasonal and annual patterns of aerosols from both anthropogenic and biogenic sources over Egypt. Here, we use an integrated environment-climate-aerosol model in conjunction with inversion technique to identify the aerosol particle size distribution over different locations in Egypt. The online-integrated Environment-Climate-Aerosol model (EnvClimA), which is based on the International Center for Theoretical Physics Regional Climate Model (ICTP-RegCM), is used to study the emission of different aerosols and their impact on climate parameters for a long-term base line simulation run over Egypt and North Africa. The global emission inventory is downscaled and remapping them over Egypt using local factors such as population, traffic and industrial activities to identify the sources of anthropogenic and biogenic emission from local emission over Egypt. The results indicated that the dominant natural aerosols over Egypt are dust emissions that frequently occur during the transitional seasons (Spring and Autumn). From the local observation we identify the number of dust and sand storm occurrences over Egypt. The Multiangle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) is used to identify the optical characterizations of different types of aerosols over Egypt. Modeled aerosol optical depth and MISR observed (at 555 nm) are compared from March 2000 through November 2013. The results identify that the MISR AOD captures the maximum peaks of AOD in March/April that coincide with the Khamasin dust storms. However, peaks in May are either due to photochemical reactions or anthropogenic activities. Note: This presentation is for a Partnerships for Enhanced Engagement in Research (PEER

  7. Projections for Changes in Natural and Technical Snow Reliability of a Major Turkish Ski Resort by Using RegCM4.3.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozturk, Tugba; Cenk Demiroglu, O.; Tufan Turp, M.; Türkeş, Murat; Kurnaz, M. Levent

    2014-05-01

    Climate change has been and increasingly will be a major threat to the ski tourism industry whose survival is highly dependent on existence of snow cover of sufficient depth and duration. The common knowledge requires that in order for a ski resort to be viable, it has to perform operations for at least 100 days in seven out of ten winters. For this matter, it is now even more usual for the ski resorts to adapt to this issue by technical snowmaking. In this study, projected future changes for the period of 2010-2040, 2040-2070, and 2070-2100 in air temperature, relative humidity, and snow depth climatology and variability with respect to the control period of 1970-2000 were assessed for the domain of a major ski resort in Turkey. Regional Climate Model (RegCM4.3.5) of ICTP (International Centre for Theoretical Physics) was used for projections of future and present climate conditions. HadGEM2 global climate model of the Met Office Hadley Centre, MPI-ESM-MR of the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology, GFDL-ESM2M of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory were downscaled to 10 km for the resort and its surrounding region. Both the projections and the downscaling were realized according to the RCP4.5 and the RCP8.5 emission scenarios of the IPCC. The outputs on snow depth were used for a count of the changes on snow cover duration sufficient for skiing actitivies, signaling natural snow-reliability, whereas the outputs on air temperature and relative humidity were utilized for determination of wet-bulb temperatures. The latter measure was used to interpret the changes in the snowmaking capacity, in other words; technical snow-reliability, of the resort. This work was supported by the BU Reasearch Fund under the project number 7362. One of the authors (MLK) was partially supported by Mercator-IPC Fellowship Program.

  8. Evaluation of the capability of RegCM4.0 in simulating East African climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogwang, Bob Alex; Chen, Haishan; Li, Xing; Gao, Chujie

    2016-04-01

    The International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP) regional climate model RegCM4.0 is used in this study to examine its ability to reproduce the climate of East Africa (EA) in regard to the annual cycle and June-to-August (JJA) seasonal climatology. Two domain sizes [large domain (LD) and small domain (SD)] and two cumulus convection schemes [Grell convection scheme with Fritsch-Chappell closure assumption (GRE scheme) and MIT scheme (EMA scheme)] are used. Simulations were done for the period 1989-2008 at a resolution of 50 km. The experiments were performed with the initial and lateral boundary conditions obtained from ERA-Interim-gridded reanalysis data at a 1.5° resolution. The variables investigated are precipitation, temperature, humidity, diurnal temperature range, and 850-hPa winds. Results show that the model realistically reproduces the East African climate, with a few discrepancies due to the different cumulus convection schemes and the domain sizes used. Grell with Fritsch-Chappell (Grell-FC) scheme captures well the observed climate in regard to the annual cycle and June-to-August seasonal climatology, with a tendency to underestimate rainfall over the JJA rainfall maximum region (RMR). This scheme performs better in LD than in SD. EMA scheme similarly captures well the observed climatology. It tends to overestimate rainfall over RMR. It however performs better in SD than in LD. The ensemble mean of simulations with GRE and EMA schemes (ENSM) tends to offer an improved representation of the observed climate, with a few discrepancies owing to the individual schemes used. In general, therefore, considering the performance of the model in both domains, the East African climate based on this study is better simulated by the Grell-FC scheme over LD. The observed biases in this study signify that the ability of the model in simulating climate over East Africa is still a significant challenge. Thus, future work must focus on improving the performance of

  9. The Regional Earth System Model (RegESM) using RegCM4 coupled with the MITgcm ocean model: First assessments over the MED-CORDEX domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariotti, Laura; Utku Turunçoǧlu, Ufuk; Farneti, Riccardo; Sannino, Gianmaria; Vittoria Struglia, Maria; Carillo, Adriana; Giorgi, Filippo

    2016-04-01

    In the framework of global climate studies, there is an increasingly growing concern about the vulnerability of the Mediterranean region, where high population density and intense exploitation activities pose severe questions on the sustainability of terrestrial water management, both for the present and the future. Ocean modeling studies suggest that the Mediterranean thermohaline circulation could be weakened in conditions of global greenhouse warming, an event which would undoubtedly affect regional climate, possibly triggering global feedback processes. Experiments with the atmosphere-ocean coupled system confirmed that a good comprehension of Mediterranean processes requires the explicit inclusion of the feedbacks between the atmospheric and the oceanic components, thus achieving a complete, fully coupled description of the Mediterranean hydrological cycle, at the same time gaining new insights in our current ability to reproduce the atmospheric hydrological processes and to close the hydrological balance. These issues are addressed by the upgraded PROTHEUS system which was jointly developed by ENEA and ICTP. Here we present a first evaluation of the performances of the new PROTHEUS system (called PROTHEUS 2.0) composed by the regional climate model RegCM4 (Giorgi et al. 2012) coupled with both the ocean model MITgcm (Marshall J. et al. 1997a,b) and the HD river model (Max-Planck's HD model; Hagemann and Dümenil, 1998) using RegESM (Regional Earth System Model) as a driver. The three-component (atmosphere, ocean and river routing) fully coupled model exchanges sea surface temperature (SST) from the ocean to the atmospheric model, surface wind stress, energy and freshwater fluxes from the atmosphere to the ocean model, surface and sub-surface runoff from the atmospheric component to the river routing model (Max-Planck's HD model; Hagemann and Dümenil, 1998). In order to have water conservation within the system, the river routing component sends the

  10. Simulated Future Changes in Air Temperature and Precipitation Climatology in the Central Asia Cordex Region 8 BY Using RegCM 4.3.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozturk, Tugba; Türkeş, Murat; Kurnaz, M. Levent

    2014-05-01

    In this study, projected future changes for the period of 2071-2100 in mean surface air temperature and precipitation climatology and variability over the large Central Asia region with respect to present climate (1971 to 2000) were simulated based on the RCP 4.5 and RCP 8.5 emission scenarios. Regional Climate Model (RegCM4.3) of the International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP) was used for projections of future and present climate conditions. Hadley Global Environment Model 2 (HadGEM2) of the Met Office Hadley Centre was downscaled for the Cordex Region 8. We investigated the seasonal time-scale performance of RegCM4.3.5 in reproducing observed climatology over the domain of Central Asia by usingtwo different emission scenario datasets for three future periods. The regional model is capable of reproducing the observed climate with few exceptions, which are due to the meteorological and physical geographical complexities of the domain. For the future climatology of the domain, the regional model predicts relatively high warming in the warm season and northern part of the domain at cold season with a decrease in precipitation amounts almost all part of the domain. The results of our study showed that surface air temperatures in the region will increase from 3° C up to more than 7° C on average according to the emission scenarios for the period of 2070-2100 with respect to past period of 1970-2000. In the future, a decrease in the amount of precipitation is also predicted for the region. The projected warming and decrease in precipitation for the domain may strongly affect the ecological and socio-economic systems including agriculture, natural biomes, hydrology and water resources of this region, which is already a mostly arid and semi-arid environment. This work has been supported by Bogazici University BAP under project number 7362. One of the authors (MLK) was partially supported by Mercator-IPC Fellowship Program.

  11. Climate change and land-use change impact on Western African river basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariotti, Laura; Coppola, Erika; Giorgi, Filippo

    2010-05-01

    The main resource in western Africa is agriculture and therefore availability and quality of fresh water resources threaten food production in many regions. Quantifying the impact of climate and land-use change in very vulnerable regions like western Africa is therefore of crucial importance for developing appropriate adaptation and mitigation strategies. In this work the International Center for theoretical Physic (ICTP) regional climate model (RegCM3) is used to perform a 120 (1980-2100) years climate change simulation under the A1B scenario using ECHAM5 as boundary condition (BC). To further investigate which it would be the combined effect of the land-use change together with the climate change a 10 years time simulation has been completed using the future projected land-use from IIASA (The International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis). Both simulations have been coupled with a physical based fully distributed hydrological model (CHyM) to asses which it would be the final effect of climate and land-use change on the river discharge. The two rivers used for this analysis are the Niger and Volta basin. The CHyM model has been validated coupling fist the hydrological model with a perfect boundary regional model simulation using ERA-interim as BC and using the runoff observations available along the two river basins. The model is able to reproduce the monthly seasonal cycle in both river basins reasonably well, therefore this allow us to use the same setting for a climate and land-use change simulation. Two hydrological time slice simulations have been performed with and without land-use change included. Results are presented and discussed for the monsoon season (JJA) on a station based, for the same stations used for validation purposed, but also the spatial change in discharge is presented in both cases and compared with the simple precipitation change observed in the region. Although the portion of change in precipitation due to the green house gases

  12. Evaluating daily and extreme seasonal precipitations over continental Africa from a Regional Climate Model Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bamba Sylla, Mouhamadou; Mariotti, Laura; Coppola, Erika; Giorgi, Filippo

    2010-05-01

    Spatial and temporal variability of rainfall over Africa offers considerable challenges on climate change over the region. This is because of the complexity of regional climates in Africa and their associated geographic features. Adding to that complexity are deserts, vegetation variations, numerous mountain chains that can alter regional climate and weather patterns, the influence of the land-sea contrast due to the presence of several large lakes and the surrounding Indian and Atlantic Oceans. This leads to strong fluctuations of rainfall that may cause drought and flood in the region. Therefore, being able to simulate the spatial distribution of mean precipitation is quite important but also capturing their occurrences and intensities is critical for Africa whose economy relies on rain-fed agriculture. The International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP) Regional Climate Model (RegCM3), driven by the newly produced ERA-Interim reanalysis, is used to investigate this issue. Several indices, such as the number of wet days and their intensity, maximum dry and wet spells length and the frequency of heavy precipitation days, are used to characterize the spatial variability of seasonal extreme rainfall over continental Africa. Model results are compared to both TRMM and FEWS rainfall data. They indicate that although the model captures the location of longest and shortest wet and dry spells, it tends to extend slightly the wet spell length around mountainous regions and along the ITCZ and the dry spell length over northern and southern Africa during austral and boreal summer respectively. This is mainly visible when compared to FEWS. Extension of the wet spell length may be partly related to the overestimation of the number of wet days. As a result, the intensity due to the wet days only is slightly overpredicted in these regions. This is, in turn, linked to the tendency of the RegCM3 to produce more intense and convective rainfall events in the ITCZ and the ZAB as

  13. Event attribution using data assimilation in an intermediate complexity atmospheric model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metref, Sammy; Hannart, Alexis; Ruiz, Juan; Carrassi, Alberto; Bocquet, Marc; Ghil, Michael

    2016-04-01

    A new approach, coined DADA (Data Assimilation for Detection and Attribution) has been recently introduced by Hannart et al. 2015, and is potentially useful for near real time, systematic causal attribution of weather and climate-related events The method is purposely designed to allow its operability at meteorological centers by synergizing causal attribution with Data Assimilation (DA) methods usually designed to deal with large nonlinear models. In Hannart et al. 2015, the DADA proposal is illustrated in the context of a low-order nonlinear model (forced three-variable Lorenz model) that is of course not realistic to represent the events considered. As a continuation of this stream of work, we therefore propose an implementation of the DADA approach in a realistic intermediate complexity atmospheric model (ICTP AGCM, nicknamed SPEEDY). The SPEEDY model is based on a spectral dynamical core developed at the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (see Held and Suarez 1994). It is a hydrostatic, r-coordinate, spectral-transform model in the vorticity-divergence form described by Bourke (1974). A synthetic dataset of observations of an extreme precipitation event over Southeastern South America is extracted from a long SPEEDY simulation under present climatic conditions (i.e. factual conditions). Then, following the DADA approach, observations of this event are assimilated twice in the SPEEDY model: first in the factual configuration of the model and second under its counterfactual, pre-industrial configuration. We show that attribution can be performed based on the likelihood ratio as in Hannart et al. 2015, but we further extend this result by showing that the likelihood can be split in space, time and variables in order to help identify the specific physical features of the event that bear the causal signature. References: Hannart A., A. Carrassi, M. Bocquet, M. Ghil, P. Naveau, M. Pulido, J. Ruiz, P. Tandeo (2015) DADA: Data assimilation for the detection and

  14. Identifying role of subtropical southeast Pacific SST anomalies on precipitation dynamics in Central Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozkurt, D.; Garreaud, R.

    2014-12-01

    Central Chile (CC, western South America coasts, 28°S- 38°S) is the heartland of Chile with the highest population and important economic activities. The region is characterized by semiarid Mediterranean climate with a marked precipitation gradient along the coast from north to south, mostly due to the positioning of the South Pacific Subtropical Anticyclone and the midlatitude westerlies belt. Although there are several diagnostic studies that focus on the impact of tropical Pacific SST on CC precipitation variability via atmospheric teleconnections, less attention has been placed on impacts of subtropical southeast (SE) Pacific SST on precipitation. The later region is immediately adjacent to CC and it interferes with the overpassing atmospheric systems. In particular we want to assess the impact of a consistent cooling over the SE Pacific during the last 30 years. This study is being tackled by a combination of observational and reanalysis datasets together with numerical simulations. Observational dataset includes gridded dataset of CRU, TRMM and GPCP. Moreover, Reynolds SST data V2 based on AVHRR infrared satellite SST data is used for analyzing spatial and temporal changes in SST. Current modelling experiment includes a control simulation, used as reference, and sensitivity simulation that involves perturbations to SST over subtropical SE Pacific for a normal year austral winter (2001) season. A number of simulations with different initial conditions have been carried out by employing ICTP-RegCM4. The domain for simulations was centered at 82oW and 32oW with 288x288 grid cells on 20 km spatial resolution. Preliminary results indicate that the response of precipitation in CC to SST anomalies in the subtropical SE Pacific exhibits more or less linear behavior. In the colder SST experiments, drier conditions dominate over CC, which is possibly related with the intensification of South Pacific Subtropical Anticyclone (SPSA) or a reduction in the available

  15. EDITORIAL: Selected Papers from RIAO/OPTILAS 2007 (Campinas, São Paulo, Brazil, 21 26 October 2007)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wetter, Niklaus; Frejlich, Jaime

    2008-10-01

    This special issue contains papers presented at the 6th Ibero-American Conference on Optics and the 9th Latin-American Meeting on Optics, Lasers and Applications (RIAO/OPTILAS'07) that was held in Campinas, São Paulo, Brazil, 21-26 October 2007. The RIAO/OPTILAS conferences are held every three years in Latino-American and Iberian countries and focus on senior and young researchers as well as students working in all areas of optics, mainly in these countries, but warmly welcoming participants from all over the world. The RIAO/OPTILAS'07 conference followed the one held in Venezuela in 2004 and precedes the next one already arranged to be held in Peru in 2010. The most active countries in the regions such as Argentina, Brazil, Mexico, Spain, Colombia and Venezuela have registered a large number of participants but other countries in the regions such as Chile, Cuba, Ecuador, Peru, Portugal and Uruguay have also sent a representative number of participants. About 7% of the registered participants came from Europe, the USA and the Middle East. It was very stimulating to realize that about 44% of the accepted registered participants were students. An international committee was in charge of selecting the best student posters and ten students were awarded with prizes offered by organizations (SPIE, Wiley & Sons) and individuals. There were 7 plenary invited talks given by high quality researchers from Argentina, Germany, Israel, Italy, Mexico and Ukraine and 12 invited contributions from Brazil, Finland, Italy, Spain, UK and Uruguay. The Book of Abstracts recorded 471 communications divided into 15 different topics with 160 oral communications in three parallel sessions and 311 posters in two special sessions. We are particularly grateful to SPIE, OSA and ICTP who have provided us with important financial support mainly devoted to supporting the participation of students in this conference. We also acknowledge financial and organizational support from Brazilian federal

  16. Building climate adaptation capabilities through technology and community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, D.; McWhirter, J.; Intsiful, J. D.; Cozzini, S.

    2011-12-01

    To effectively plan for adaptation to changes in climate, decision makers require infrastructure and tools that will provide them with timely access to current and future climate information. For example, climate scientists and operational forecasters need to access global and regional model projections and current climate information that they can use to prepare monitoring products and reports and then publish these for the decision makers. Through the UNDP African Adaption Programme, an infrastructure is being built across Africa that will provide multi-tiered access to such information. Web accessible servers running RAMADDA, an open source content management system for geoscience information, will provide access to the information at many levels: from the raw and processed climate model output to real-time climate conditions and predictions to documents and presentation for government officials. Output from regional climate models (e.g. RegCM4) and downscaled global climate models will be accessible through RAMADDA. The Integrated Data Viewer (IDV) is being used by scientists to create visualizations that assist the understanding of climate processes and projections, using the data on these as well as external servers. Since RAMADDA is more than a data server, it is also being used as a publishing platform for the generated material that will be available and searchable by the decision makers. Users can wade through the enormous volumes of information and extract subsets for their region or project of interest. Participants from 20 countries attended workshops at ICTP during 2011. They received training on setting up and installing the servers and necessary software and are now working on deploying the systems in their respective countries. This is the first time an integrated and comprehensive approach to climate change adaptation has been widely applied in Africa. It is expected that this infrastructure will enhance North-South collaboration and improve the

  17. Bone Health and Risk Factors of Cardiovascular Disease - A Cross-Sectional Study in Healthy Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Turanlahti, Maila; Kajosaari, Merja; Mäkitie, Outi; Saarinen-Pihkala, Ulla M.; Viljakainen, Heli

    2014-01-01

    Objective Both osteoporosis and cardiovascular disease (CVD) are diseases that comprise a growing medical and economic burden in ageing populations. They share many risk factors, including ageing, low phy-sical activity, and possibly overweight. We aimed to study associations between individual risk factors for CVD and bone mineral density (BMD) and turnover markers (BTMs) in apparently healthy cohort. Design A cross-sectional assessment of 155 healthy 32-year-old adults (74 males) was performed for skeletal status, CVD risk factors and lifestyle factors. Methods We analysed serum osteocalcin, procollagen I aminoterminal propeptide (P1NP), collagen I carboxy-terminal telopeptide (ICTP) and urine collagen I aminoterminal telopeptide (U-NTX), as well as serum insulin, plasma glucose, triglyceride and HDL-cholesterol levels. BMD, fat and lean mass were asses-sed using DXA scanning. Associations were tested with partial correlations in crude and adjusted mo-dels. Bone status was compared between men with or without metabolic syndrome (defined according to the NCEP-ATPIII criteria) with multivariate analysis. Results Osteocalcin and P1NP correlated inversely with insulin (R = −0.243, P = 0.003 and R = −0.187, P = 0.021) and glucose (R = −0.213, P = 0.009 and R = −0.190, P = 0.019), but after controlling for fat mass and lifestyle factors, the associations attenuated with insulin (R = −0.162, P = 0.053 and R = −0.093, P = 0.266) and with glucose (R = −0.099, P = 0.240 and R = −0.133, P = 0.110), respectively. Whole body BMD associated in-versely only with triglycerides in fully adjusted model. In men with metabolic syndrome, whole body BMD, osteocalcin and P1NP were lower compared to healthy men, but these findings disappeared in fully adjusted model. Conclusions In young adults, inverse associations between BTM/BMD and risk factors of CVD appeared in crude models, but after adjusting for fat

  18. Specification of Biogenic VOC Emission Data in the Coupled System of Regional Climate and Atmospheric Chemistry/Aerosols Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zemankova, K.; Huszar, P.

    2009-12-01

    B., Steinbrecher R., Tallamraju R., Taylor J., Zimmerman P., 1995. Global model of natural organic compound emissions. J. Geophys. Res. 100, 8873-8892. - Pal, J. S., Giorgi, F., Bi, X., Elguindi, N., Solomon, F., Gao, X., Rauscher, S. A., Francisco, R., Zakey, A., Winter, J., Ashfaq, M., Syed, F. S., Bell, J. L., Diffenbaugh, N. S., Karmacharya, J., Konare, A., Martinez, D., da Rocha, R. P., Sloan, L. C., and Steiner, A. L., 2007. Regional climate modeling for the developing world: The ICTP RegCM3 and RegCNET, B. Am. Meteor. Soc., 88, 1395-1409.

  19. List of Participants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-09-01

    KhodelVictorKurchatov Institute, Moscowvak@wuphys.wustl.edu KimuraMasaakiHokkaido University, Sapporomasaaki@nucl.sci.hokudai.ac.jp LacroixDenisGANIL, Caenlacroix@ganil.fr LiangHaozhaoPeking University, Beijinghzliang@pku.edu.cn MargueronJérômeIPN Orsayjerome.margueron@ipno.in2p3.fr MassotElisabethIPN Orsaymassot@ipno.in2p3.fr MengJiePeking University, Beijingmengj@pku.edu.cn MillerTomaszWarsaw University of Technologymillert@student.mini.pw.edu.pl MoghrabiKassemIPN Orsaymoghrabi@ipno.in2p3.fr NapolitaniPaoloIPN Orsaynapolita@ipno.in2p3.fr NeffThomasGSI Darmstadtt.neff@gsi.de NguyenVan GiaiIPN Orsaynguyen@ipno.in2p3.fr OtsukaTakaharuUniversity of Tokyootsuka@phys.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp PilletNathalie-MarieCEA-DAM, Arpajonnathalie.pillet@cea.fr QiChongKTH Stockholmchongq@kth.se RamananSunethraICTP Triestesramanan@ictp.it RingPeterTU Munichring@ph.tum.de Rios HuguetArnauUniversity of Surreya.rios@surrey.ac.uk RivetMarie-FranceIPN Orsayrivet@ipno.in2p3.fr RobledoLuisUniversidad Autonoma de Madridluis.robledo@uam.es Roca MazaXavierINFN Milanoxavier.roca.maza@mi.infn.it RöpkeGerdRostock Universitygerd.roepke@uni-rostock.de RowleyNeilIPN Orsayrowley@ipno.in2p3.fr SagawaHiroyukiUniversity of Aizusagawa@u-aizu.ac.jp SandulescuNicolaeIFIN-HH, Bucharestsandulescu@theory.nipne.ro SchuckPeterIPN Orsayschuck@ipno.in2p3.fr SedrakianArmenGoethe Universität Frankfurtsedrakian@th.physik.uni-frankfurt.de SeveryukhinAlexeyJINR Dubnasever@theor.jinr.ru SogoTakaakiIPN Orsaysogo@ipno.in2p3.fr SomàVittorioCEA Saclayvittorio.soma@cea.fr StrinatiGiancarloUniversità di Camerinogiancarlo.strinati@gmail.com SuharaTadahiroKyoto Universitysuhara@ruby.scphys.kyoto-u.ac.jp SukhoruchkinSergeiPetersburg Nuclear Physics Institutesergeis@pnpi.spb.ru SuzukiToruTokyo Metropolitan Universitysuzukitr@tmu.ac.jp SuzukiToshioNihon University, Tokyosuzuki@chs.nihon-u.ac.jp TarpanovDimitarINRNE, Sofiadimitert@yahoo.co.uk Tohsaki-SuzukiAkihiroOsaka Universitytohsaki@rcnp.osaka-u.ac.jp TypelStefanGSI Darmstadts

  20. Can a future mission detect a habitable ecosystem on Europa, or Ganymede?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chela Flores, Julian

    2010-05-01

    habitable ecosystem has emerged on Europa. The test is well within reach of available technology that is needed for planning the eventual penetrator payload. References (*) Bland, M. T. et al. (2009) The orbital-thermal evolution and global expansion of Ganymede. Icarus 200, 207-221. Carlson, R. W. et al. (1999) Sulfuric Acid on Europa and the Radiolytic Sulfur Cycle. Science 286, 97-99. Chela-Flores, J. (2010) Instrumentation for the search of habitable ecosystems in the future exploration of Europa and Ganymede. International Journal of Astrobiology, in press. http://www.ictp.it/chelaf/jcfSeamless.pdf Gowen, R. et al. (2009) Looking for Astrobiological Signatures with Penetrators on Europa. Physical and Engineering Sciences Exploratory Workshops, Abstracts, Mulhouse, France. http://www.ictp.it/chelaf/ESFsummary.pdf Grasset, O. et al. (2009) "The Jupiter Ganymede Orbiter as part of the ESA/NASA Europa Jupiter System Mission (EJSM),EPSC Abstracts, 4: EPSC2009-784, European Planetary Science Congress. Kiyosu, Y. and Krouse, H.R. (1990) The role of organic acid in the abiogenic reduction of sulfate and the sulfur isotope effect. Geochemical Journal 24, 21-27. McCord et al. (1997) Organics and Other Molecules in the Surfaces of Callisto and Ganymede. Science 278, 271 - 275. McCord, T. B. et al. (1999) Hydrated salt minerals on Europa's Surface from the Galileo near-infrared mapping spectrometer (NIMS) investigation. J. Geophys. Res. 104, 11827-11851. Shen, Y. and Buick, R. (2004) The antiquity of microbial sulfate reduction. Earth-Science Reviews 64, 243-272. Wortmann, U.G. et al. (2001) Hypersulfidic deep biosphere indicates extreme sulfur isotope fractionation during single-step microbial sulfate reduction. Geology 29, 647-650. (*) Please notice that in both website references to the Academic Page of the author, the reader should insert the symbol twiddle in front of chelaf.

  1. FOREWORD: TAUP 2005: Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Topics in Astroparticle and Underground Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottino, Alessandro; Coccia, Eugenio; Morales, Julio; Puimedónv, Jorge

    2006-04-01

    . Bilenky, JINR Dubna/ICTP Trieste D. O. Caldwell, U.C. Santa Barbara J. Cronin, U. Chicago A. Dar, Technion Haifa G. Domogatsky, INR Moscow H. Ejiri, U. Osaka J. Ellis, CERN E. Fernández, IFAE Barcelona E. Fiorini, U. Milano/INFN G. Fogli, U. Bari/INFN M. Fukushima, ICCR Tokyo T. Gaisser, U. Delaware G. Gelmini, UCLA A. Giazotto, INFN, Pisa F. Halzen, U. Wisconsin W. Haxton, U. Washington E. Iarocci, U. Roma/INFN T. Kirsten, MPI Heidelberg L. Maiani, U. Roma/INFN A. McDonald, Queen's U. L. Mosca, Saclay/LSM Frejus E. Peterson, U. Minneapolis/Soudan R. Petronzio, INFN/U. Roma Tor Vergata G. Raffelt, MPI München R. Rebolo, IAC Tenerife L. Resvanis, U. Athens P. Salati, U. Savoie/LAPTH Annecy A. Smirnov, ICTP Trieste N. Spooner, U. Sheffield S. Ting, MIT/CERN M. S. Turner, FNAL/U. Chicago J.W.F. Valle, IFIC Valencia D. Vignaud, CdF Paris F. von Feilitzsch, T.U. München G. Zatsepin, INR Moscow TAUP 2005 ORGANIZING COMMITTEE V.S. Berezinsky, INFN/LNGS J. Bernabéu, U. Valencia A. Bottino, U. Torino/INFN E. Coccia (co-chair), INFN/LNGS/U. Roma Tor Vergata J. Morales (co-chair), U. Zaragoza J. Puimed¢n (scientific secretary), U. Zaragoza J. A. Villar, U. Zaragoza

  2. Bacterial diversity in typical Italian salami at different ripening stages as revealed by high-throughput sequencing of 16S rRNA amplicons.

    PubMed

    Połka, Justyna; Rebecchi, Annalisa; Pisacane, Vincenza; Morelli, Lorenzo; Puglisi, Edoardo

    2015-04-01

    The bacterial diversity involved in food fermentations is one of the most important factors shaping the final characteristics of traditional foods. Knowledge about this diversity can be greatly improved by the application of high-throughput sequencing technologies (HTS) coupled to the PCR amplification of the 16S rRNA subunit. Here we investigated the bacterial diversity in batches of Salame Piacentino PDO (Protected Designation of Origin), a dry fermented sausage that is typical of a regional area of Northern Italy. Salami samples from 6 different local factories were analysed at 0, 21, 49 and 63 days of ripening; raw meat at time 0 and casing samples at 21 days of ripening where also analysed, and the effect of starter addition was included in the experimental set-up. Culture-based microbiological analyses and PCR-DGGE were carried out in order to be compared with HTS results. A total of 722,196 high quality sequences were obtained after trimming, paired-reads assembly and quality screening of raw reads obtained by Illumina MiSeq sequencing of the two bacterial 16S hypervariable regions V3 and V4; manual curation of 16S database allowed a correct taxonomical classification at the species for 99.5% of these reads. Results confirmed the presence of main bacterial species involved in the fermentation of salami as assessed by PCR-DGGE, but with a greater extent of resolution and quantitative assessments that are not possible by the mere analyses of gel banding patterns. Thirty-two different Staphylococcus and 33 Lactobacillus species where identified in the salami from different producers, while the whole data set obtained accounted for 13 main families and 98 rare ones, 23 of which were present in at least 10% of the investigated samples, with casings being the major sources of the observed diversity. Multivariate analyses also showed that batches from 6 local producers tend to cluster altogether after 21 days of ripening, thus indicating that HTS has the potential

  3. PREFACE: XV International Seminar on Physics and Chemistry of Solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotur, Bogdan; Brągiel, Piotr

    2011-03-01

                      Logo     Logo The XV International Seminar on Physics and Chemistry of Solids (ISPCS15) was held from 7-10 June 2009 in Szklarska Poręba. Over eighty participants joined together in this mountain resort, at the foot of Szrenica peak, in the Polish part of the Sudety range. The majority or participants, in accordance with Seminar tradition, were from Ukraine and Poland. The pleasant and warm atmosphere created by the organizers was conducive to fruitful discussions, making new contacts and to joyful gatherings with friends. Even the rainy weather could not change that. Lectures and communications mainly covered the fields of solid state physics and chemistry, and possible applications. This time, however, a new section was introduced - one devoted to modern topics in liquid chemistry. Sometimes such a look over the borders of scientific specialties leads to interesting insights and original research solutions. Some of the papers presented during ISPCS15 are collected in this volume. Their diversity is representative of both the scope and character of this Seminar. The majority of the papers are research reports, but a review article and a paper focussed on problems connected with environmental protection are also included. This Conference has functioned for over a decade due to the permanent support of the rectors of both co-organizing universities: Professor Ivan Vakarchuk from Ivan Franko National University of Lviv and Professor Zygmunt Bąk from Jan Dlugosz University in Częstochowa. It is our pleasure, on behalf of the all participants of the past Seminars, to express our gratitude for this assistance. We would also like to thank all the invited speakers who kindly accepted our invitation, namely Professors Roman Gladyshevskii (Ivan Franko National University, Lviv, Ukraine), Mihaela Gulea (Laboratoire de Chimie Moleculare et Thioorganique, CAEN, France), Osama I Abd El-Salam (National Research

  4. Message from Vice-Chancellor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasir Ibrahim, Daing

    2013-12-01

    Salam Malaysia! First and foremost, I want to thank all 2nd International Conference on Mechanical Engineering Research (ICMER 2013) organisers for inviting me to address and officiate this conference. This 2nd ICMER 2013 provides a platform to bring together not only researchers, postgraduate students but also industrial people. With this platform, ICMER will embark on a whole process of making new discoveries and then translating them into products and services for the marketplace and this is only made possible with people like all of you. I would like to congratulate the ICMER 2013 organisers for the achievement of collecting 208 papers for this conference. Submissions received from 17 local universities, 7 industrial companies and 9 different countries is a great achievement for UMP. I am very happy to welcome all of you from Malaysia, Iran, Turkey, Japan, India, Australia, Ireland, Saudi Arabia and Bangladesh to this conference. As one of Malaysia's Public Universities, UMP's main challenge is to remain competitive and relevant by offering high quality technical academic programmes and research activities, focusing on its niche areas. New knowledge and findings cannot be generated without any research and development (R&D) activities. These efforts will undoubtedly generate lots of interesting results and new knowledge either bring further commercialisation activities. The Malaysian government has invested a huge sum of Ringgits in R&D over the years. Therefore, UMP must produce more quality researchers and graduates to ensure Malaysia reaps the returns from these investments vice versa of progressive economic growth for the country. UMP's 2011-2015 Strategic Plan determines to strengthen and sustained its financial support by allocating research grants and industry collaboration and consultations through its business and commercial unit. On behalf of UMP, I would like to express my appreciation to all committee members of ICMER 2013 from Faculty of Mechanical

  5. PREFACE: Superconducting materials Superconducting materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charfi Kaddour, Samia; Singleton, John; Haddad, Sonia

    2011-11-01

    and by invited authors selected by the editor. We are grateful to IUPAP, ICTP and the European Office of Aerospace Research and Development, Air Force Office of Scientific Research, United States Air Force Laboratory. We would like to acknowledge the authors for their careful work, and finally we thank Dr L Smith the publisher of Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter for her patience and help. Superconducting materials contents Raman spectrum in the pseudogap phase of the underdoped cuprates: effect of phase coherence and the signature of the KT-type superconducting transitionTao Li and Haijun Liao Pressure effects on Dirac fermions in α-(BEDT-TTF)2I3Takahiro Himura, Takao Morinari and Takami Tohyama Effect of Zn doping in hole-type 1111 phase (Pr, Sr)FeAsOXiao Lin, Chenyi Shen, Chen Lv, Jianjian Miao, Hao Tan, Guanghan Cao and Zhu-An Xu Superconductivity and ferromagnetism in EuFe2(As1 - xPx)2*Guanghan Cao, Shenggao Xu, Zhi Ren, Shuai Jiang, Chunmu Feng and Zhu'an Xu OInhomogeneous superconductivity in organic conductors: the role of disorder and magnetic fieldS Haddad, S Charfi-Kaddour and J-P Pouget

  6. PASCOS 2012 - 18th International Symposium on Particles Strings and Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-03-01

    (Sociedad Mexicana de Física), ICTP (International Centre for Theoretical Physics), BUAP (Benemérita Universidad Autónoma de Puebla), the Government of the State of Yucatán, the University of Hamburg, and Telmex. We also want to acknowledge the invaluable help of the staff of the Mexican Physical Society, in particular Lic. Santos Zúñniga Sánchez and Ms. Claudia Velasco Marín, and of the conference secretaries, Ms. Lizette Ramírez Bermúdez (UNAM) and Ms. Mariana del Castillo Sánchez (Cinvestav), for their support before, during and after the organization of PASCOS 2012. Last but not least, we would like to thank all the PASCOS 2012 participants for their attendance and for contributing to make the conference an engaging and stimulating event. The organizers, Myriam Mondragón, Adnan Bashir, David Delepine, Francisco Larios, Oscar Loaiza, Axel de la Macorra, Lukas Nellen, Sarira Sahu, Humberto Salazar and Liliana Velasco-Sevilla.

  7. PREFACE: Strongly Coupled Coulomb Systems Strongly Coupled Coulomb Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neilson, David; Senatore, Gaetano

    2009-05-01

    , condensed matter and ultra-cold plasmas. One hundred and thirty participants came from twenty countries and four continents to participate in the conference. Those giving presentations were asked to contribute to this special issue to make a representative record of an interesting conference. We thank the International Advisory Board and the Programme Committee for their support and suggestions. We thank the Local Organizing Committee (Stefania De Palo, Vittorio Pellegrini, Andrea Perali and Pierbiagio Pieri) for all their efforts. We highlight for special mention the dedication displayed by Andrea Perali, by Rocco di Marco for computer support, and by our tireless conference secretary Fiorella Paino. The knowledgeable guided tour of the historic centre of Camerino given by Fiorella Paino was appreciated by many participants. It is no exaggeration to say that without the extraordinary efforts put in by these three, the conference could not have been the success that it was. For their sustained interest and support we thank Fulvio Esposito, Rector of the University of Camerino, Fabio Beltram, Director of NEST, Scuola Normale Superiore, Pisa, and Daniel Cox, Co-Director of ICAM, University of California at Davis. We thank the Institute of Complex and Adaptive Matter ICAM-I2CAM, USA for providing a video record of the conference on the web (found at http://sccs2008.df.unicam.it/). Finally we thank the conference sponsors for their very generous support: the University of Camerino, the Institute of Complex and Adaptive Matter ICAM-I2CAM, USA, the International Centre for Theoretical Physics ICTP Trieste, and CNR-INFM DEMOCRITOS Modeling Center for Research in Atomistic Simulation, Trieste. Participants at the International Conference on Strongly Coupled Coulomb Systems (SCCS) (University of Camerino, Italy, 29 July-2 August 2008).

  8. Different methods for the estimation of available water resources in the future under the influence of climate changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majkic-Dursun, B.; Boreli-Zdravkovic, Dj.; Djuric, D.

    2012-04-01

    parameters, precipitation and temperature, were calculated using three climate models: CNRM, ICTP and UCLM. Calculated data for future periods 2021-2050 and 2071-2100 were analyzed and compared with the respective data for basic period 1961-1990. Estimation of available water resources for Belgrade alluvium was performed using calibrated GW model. Empirical formulae was developed for the estimation of pET (based on T and P) while the optimal groundwater level and fluctuation in hinterland was used as ecological criteria. Future discharge of Nisava River was estimated using VNC model, based on non-linear standardized correlation method. Ecological criteria was established based on the requirements of Serbian Water Law as minimum sustainable flow (calculated as the minimum 95% average monthly discharge of Nisava River) which must be provided downstream from a surface water intake. Key words: climate change, available water resources, alluvial water sources, A1B scenario

  9. PREFACE: XI Latin American Workshop on Nonlinear Phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anteneodo, Celia; da Luz, Marcos G. E.

    2010-09-01

    phenomena in nature, addressing: classical and quantum chaos; instability and bifurcation; cooperative behavior; self-organization; pattern formation and synchronization; far-from-equilibrium and fluctuation dynamics; nonlinearity in fluid, plasmas, granular media, optics, and wave propagation; turbulence onset; and complexity in natural and social systems. The success of the conference was possible thanks to the financial support from many agencies, especially the Brazilian agencies Capes and CNPq, and the international agencies, Binational Itaupú, ICTP-Trieste, and CAIS-Albuquerque. Equally very important was the support by the organizer's institutions PUC-Rio de Janeiro and UFPR-Curitiba. We also must thank Journal of Physics: Conference Series, for believing in the success and scientific quality of the conference, and to the journal staff, specially Anete Ashton, for the kind and prompt help during the whole production process of this publication. Finally, and most important, we acknowledge all the participants of the LAWNP'09, whose interest and enthusiasm in advancing the science of nonlinearity constitutes the true moto making the present Proceedings a very valuable scientific contribution. Celia Anteneodo (PUC-Rio, Brazil) and Marcos G E da Luz (UFPR-Curitiba, Brazil) Conference Chairs Conference photograph Some of the conference participants. CAPES logo This issue was supported by CAPES (Agency for Evaluation and Support of Graduate Studies Programs), Brazilian govern entity devoted to the formation of human resources. CA would like to thank CAPES for financial support.

  10. Application of the high resolution regional climate change modelling for local impact study upon the hydrological regime in the Buzau and Ialomita river basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mic, R.; Corbus, C.; Caian, M.; Neculau, G.

    2009-09-01

    This paper is a subject of a stage within the scope of European Project 037005 STREP FP6 - CECILIA ("The assessment of impact and vulnerability of climate changes in the Centre and Eastern Europe"). The aim of this project is to assess the impact of climate changes from the regional scale to local scale of Centre and Eastern Europe area, pointing up very high climate resolution usefulness for catching the effects due to the field complexity of study area. The analysed Buzau and Ialomita river basins from Romania covering an area of 14392 km² are situated outside the Curvature Carpathian Mountains, into a zone where the altitude varies from 2500 m to 50 m. In conformity of altitude, the annual precipitation varied from 1400 mm/year, in the mountainous area to 400 mm/year in the plane area and the evapotranspiration between 500 mm/year in the high area to 850 mm/year in the plane area. However, due to a very high variability of weather conditions, droughts as well as excessive humidity periods occur in the course of a year. For the impact study of the possibly climate changes on the runoff in the Buzau and Ialomita river basins, the WatBal model was used, which have been calibrated through the runoff simulation in 17 cross-sections for the reference period 1971 - 2000. WatBal model has two main components. The first is the water balance component that uses continuous functions to describe water movement into a conceptualised basin and the second is the component that allows the calculation of potential evapotranspiration using the Priestly-Taylor equation. For the calculation of changes in the main climatic parameters (atmospheric precipitation, air temperature, relative humidity, solar radiation and wind speed), used in the analysis of the climate change impact on the hydrological regime, there were used the simulations accomplished with a regional climatic model (regCM3), elaborated by ICTP (Trieste), implemented in Romania and used for monthly, seasonal and

  11. The Southeast Asia Regional Climate Downscaling (SEACLID) / CORDEX Southeast Asia Project and The Results of Its Sensitivity Experiments of RegCM4 Cumulus and Ocean Fluxes Parameterization Schemes on Temperature and Extremes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tangang, Fredolin; Juneng, Liew; Cruz, Faye; Narisma, Gemma; Dado, Julie; Van, Tan-Phan; Ngo-Duc, Thanh; Trinh-Tuan, Long; Nguyen-Xuan, Thanh; Santisirisomboon, Jerasorn; Singhruck, Patama; Gunawan, Dodo; Aldrian, Edvin

    2015-04-01

    The Southeast Asia (SEA) region is one of the more vulnerable regions to the impacts of climate change because of the large population exposed to climate-related hazards, mostly living in countries with low adaptive capabilities. In order to adequately prepare and adapt to these future climate change impacts, it is therefore crucial for high-resolution climate projections to be available for this region. The Southeast Asia Regional Climate Downscaling/CORDEX Southeast Asia (SEACLID/CORDEX-SEA) project aims to provide these projections through a collaborative effort in regional climate downscaling. As a first step, model simulations with the 4th version of Regional Climate Model system (RegCM4) developed by International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP) were performed for the SEA domain (80°E-145°E; 15°S-40°N) at 36 km spatial resolution, to determine an optimal configuration of the model for the region. Using the ECMWF ERA Interim data as boundary condition, a total of 18 sensitivity experiments were done with different cumulus parameterization and ocean flux schemes for the period of 1989-2008. In this study, the model's performance in simulating mean temperature is evaluated against APHRODITE, a gridded observed temperature dataset. Initial results showed that RegCM4 tends to enhance the cold bias from the boundary forcing. There is also a consistent cold bias among all simulations over the Tibetan plateau and Indochina, especially during the boreal winter. Consequently, simulations had the smallest biases during boreal summer. The correlation of the model with the observed data is high over the northern half of the region, in contrast with the low correlation over the southern half, which may be due to uncertainties in the APHRODITE dataset over this region. Consistent with the spatial analysis, the analysis of the regional means indicates an overall better performance of the MIT Emanuel scheme, in terms of seasonality and spatial distribution. The

  12. Investigating The Role of Atmosphere-Wave Interaction in the Mediterranean Sea using coupled climate model (RegESM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surenkok, Gokce; Utku Turuncoglu, Ufuk

    2015-04-01

    In this study, a coupled regional atmosphere-wave model has been implemented and tested in the Mediterranean Sea to study the effects of surface roughness length in the simulated wind speed and direction of the atmosphere model over the sea. In general, the standalone atmosphere models tend to overestimate the wind speed especially over the sea due to their poor representation of the surface fluxes and roughness length. The designed modelling system (RegESM; Turuncoglu et al., 2013) mainly aims to improve the modelled surface winds by adding two-way interaction between atmosphere and wave models. The used version of the RegESM modelling system is configured to have two model components: (1) WAM spectra wave model (The WAMDI Group, 1987) and (2) ICTP's RegCM4 atmosphere model (Giorgi et al., 2012). The model components are coupled using Earth system Modelling Framework (ESMF; Hill et al., 2004; Collins et al., 2005). In this case, atmosphere model sends surface wind speed components to wave model and retrieves surface roughness length and friction velocity to calculate surface fluxes (Zeng et al., 1998). The current version of the modelling system only represents the interaction between atmosphere and wave components but does not include an ocean component but the ocean component will be included in the future. The designed modelling system is configured for Mediterranean Sea and a set of sensitivity tests are performed to tune the individual model components. In this case, the horizontal resolution of the atmospheric model is set to 50 km and covers whole Mediterranean Basin. In this case, the atmospheric model is forced by ERA-Interim reanalysis dataset (Dee et al., 2011) for 2008-2012 periods. In this configuration, the wave model has higher horizontal resolution (0.125° ) than the atmospheric model and the interpolation between the model components is handled by ESMF. The coupling time step to exchange the fields between the model components is set to one hour

  13. Recent Climate Trends over the Western Himalayas: An Application of Regional Climate Model (RegT-Band)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, Pushp Raj; Charan Mohanty, Uma

    2013-04-01

    It is a well-known fact that the present day General Circulation Models (GCMs) are unable to represent various regional scale processes because of their coarser resolution. On the other hand Regional Climate Models (RCMs), which have well established resolvability of sub-grid scale features such as topography and clouds may perform better compare to GCMs. So keeping in mind the edge of RCMs over GCMs an attempt has been made to study the regional climate especially the precipitation and surface air temperature during recent decades over the Western Himalayas (WH), which comes under East Asia CORDEX domain. This region receives its wintertime precipitation mainly in the form of snow, which is the main source of water for most of the Northern Indian Rivers. Recent studies using observational data show the variability of temperature and precipitation over this heterogeneous region for wintertime (December, January, February, DJF). In the present study, performance of tropical band version of regional climate model is examined in representing wintertime circulation and precipitation features (as well as variation in extreme years) during recent decades. Latest version of ICTP Regional Climate Model (RegT-Band) has been integrated for a period of 30 years (1981 - 2011) at a horizontal resolution of 45 km. The model has been integrated for four months i.e. for each winter season separately (Nov 1981-Feb 1982; Nov 1982-Feb 1983;…; Nov 2011-Feb 2012) where first one month is kept for model spin up. In order to understand the large scale circulation pattern as well as mid latitude synoptic systems that influence the climate/weather situation over the study area, the model domain is extended from 30˚S - 55˚N and 30˚E - 120˚E. The initial and lateral boundary conditions in the model are provided from National Centre for Environment Prediction (NCEP) - Department of Energy (DOE) reanalysis 2 data. The geophysical parameters from the United State Geological Survey and

  14. Message from Vice Chancellor, UMP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasir Ibrahim, Daing

    2012-09-01

    Assalamualaikumwarahmatullahiwabarakatuh and Salam i Malaysia First and foremost, I want to thank the International Conference Mechanical Engineering Research (ICMER) organisers for inviting me to address and officiate at this conference. It is a privilege and an honour for me on this momentous occasion to grace the ceremony. The ICMER provides a platform to bring together not only researchers but also postgraduate students in Mechanical Engineering, Automotive Engineering, Manufacturing Engineering, Biomechanical Engineering, Material Engineering and Industrial Engineering. With this platform, ICMER will embark on a whole process of making new discoveries and then translating them into products and services for the marketplace; this is only made possible by people like all of you. It might be only a starting point but with hard work and perseverance I am sure you will succeed with flying colours. As one of Malaysia's Public Universities, UMP's main challenge is to remain competitive and relevant by offering high quality technical academic programmes and research activities, focusing on its niche areas. New knowledge and findings cannot be generated without research and development (R&D) therefore, Malaysia has had substantial investment in research and development facilities. These efforts will undoubtedly generate lots of interesting results and new knowledge as either further investigation or commercial activities. Therefore, researchers like you must see this as the generator of new knowledge to extend your research outcomes from laboratory experiments to the marketplace and towards commercialisation. Naybe this doesn't appear significant in the short term but it may make a tremendous impact in the future. The Malaysian government has invested a huge sum of Ringgits in R&D over the years. Therefore, public universities such as UMP must produce more quality researchers and graduates to ensure Malaysia reaps the returns from these investments and consequently

  15. Meteorological impact of realistic Terra Nova Bay polynyas.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morelli, Sandra

    2010-05-01

    Model runs show that a polynya modifies the atmosphere up to a height of several hundred meters and over a long distance from its location. A structure, as a thermal cyclone, develops over the eastern side of the polynyas. This structure is embedded in the pressure field simulated also without taking into account the polynya. References: Casini, G., Morelli, S. (2007) ‘Katabatic wind and Terra Nova Bay polynya: a study using two different versions of ETA model', Geophysical Research Abstract, vol. 9, 02656. Mesinger F., Jovic D., Sin Chan Chou, Gomes J.L., Bustamante J.F. (2006) ‘Wind forecast around the andes using the sloping discretization of the Eta coordinate', Proceedings of 8 ICSHMO, Foz do Iguacu, Brazil, 24-28 April 2006, INPE. Morelli S. (2008) ‘ETA Model simulation of winter katabatic events over the Terra Nova Bay area, Antarctica'. Third ICTP conference on "Current Efforts Toward Advancing the Skill of Regional Weather Prediction. Challenges and Outlook", 8-10 October 2008. Morelli S., Casini G. (2008) ‘Antarctic katabatic winds and their interaction with a coastal polynya in Terra Nova Bay, studied by ETA model simulations and satellite images', Geophysical Research Abstract, vol. 10. Morelli S., Parmiggiani F. (2009) " Eta Model simulations and AMSR images to study a real event of polynya at Terra Nova Bay, Antarctica. Milutin Milankovitch 130 Anniversary Symposium: Climate Change at the Eve of the Second Decade of the Century. Belgrade, 22-25 September 2009. Morelli S., Casini G., Parmiggiani F. (2007) ‘Wintertime katabatic event and polynya at Terra Nova Bay: a study by ETA simulations and AMSR-E images', Extended Abstract of 2nd Antarctic Meteorological Observation, Modeling and Forecasting (AMOMF) Workshop, June 2007. Morelli S., Casini G., Parmiggiani F. (2009) "Atmospheric response to a realistic coastal polynya in Terra Nova Bay (Antarctica) simulated by ETA model.", Geophysical Research Abstract, vol. 11.

  16. Atmospheric response to a realistic coastal polynya in Terra Nova Bay (Antarctica) simulated by ETA model.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morelli, S.; Casini, G.; Parmiggiani, F.

    2009-04-01

    events over the Terra Nova Bay area, Antarctica'. Third ICTP conference on "Current Efforts Toward Advancing the Skill of Regional Weather Prediction. Challenges and Outlook", 8-10 October 2008.

  17. PREFACE: Tenth International Conference on Topics in Astroparticle and Underground Physics (TAUP2007)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Kunio; Suzuki, Atsuto; Mitsui, Tadao

    2008-07-01

    Otsuka, and Ms Yuri Endo, our workshop secretaries, for their continuous and excellent work in the organization of the conference, and to Ms Chiyo Itoh, and Ms Machiko Mizutani, for their invaluable assistance during the conference. We also gratefully thank the technical staff: Tomoaki Takayama, Hiromitsu Hanada, Takashi Nakajima, for their invaluable help. As announced at the end of the conference, TAUP 2009 will be held in Gran Sasso, Italy, hosted by the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN) with the chair of Professor Eugenio Coccia. Kunio Inoue, Atsuto Suzuki and Tadao Mitsui COMMITTEES TAUP Steering Committee F T Avignone U South Carolina B C Barish CALTECH E Bellotti U Milano/INFN J Bernabéu U Valencia A Bottino (chair) U Torino/INFN V de Alfaro U Torino/INFN T Kajita ICRR U Tokyo C W Kim Johns Hopkins Univ /KIAS E Lorenz U München V Matveev INR Moskow J Morales U Zaragoza D Sinclair U Carleton M Spiro IN2P3 TAUP 2007 International Advisory Committee J J Aubert CNRS Marseille M Baldo-Ceolin U Padova/INFN V Berezinsky INFN-LNGS/INR L Bergström U Stockholm R Bernabei U Roma Tor Vergata/INFN A Bettini U Padova/INFN S Bilenky JINR Dubna D O Caldwell U C Santa Barbara E Coccia INFN-LNGS/U Roma Tor Vergata J Cronin U Chicago A Dar Technion Haifa G Domogatsky INR Moscow H Ejiri U Osaka J Ellis CERN E Fernández IFAE Barcelona E Fiorini U Milano/INFN G Fogli U Bari/INFN T Gaisser U Delaware G Gelmini UCLA G Gerbier CEA Saclay F Halzen U Wisconsin W Haxton U Washington T Kirsten MPI Heidelberg L Maiani U Roma/INFN A McDonald Queen's U K Nakamura KEK E Peterson U Minneapolis R Petronzio INFN/U Roma Tor Vergata G Raffelt MPI München R Rebolo IAC Tenerife L Resvanis U Athens P Salati U Savoie/LAPTH Annecy A Smirnov ICTP Trieste N Spooner U Sheffield S Ting MIT/CERN Y Totsuka U Tokyo M S Turner FNAL/U Chicago J W F Valle IFIC Valencia D Vignaud APC Paris F von Feilitzsch T U München G Zatsepin INR Moscow TAUP 2007 Organizing Committee A Bottino U Torino/INFN D

  18. PREFACE: International Conference on Topics in Astroparticle and Underground Physics (TAUP 2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberauer, Lothar; Raffelt, Georg; Wagner, Robert

    2012-07-01

    'Tor Vergata' K DanzmannMax Planck Institute for Gravitational Physics S DodelsonFermilab G DomogatskyINR Moscow E FioriniUniversità di Milano Bicocca & INFN K FreeseUniversity of Michigan M FukugitaICRR Tokyo T GaisserUniversity of Delaware G GerbierCEA Saclay F HalzenUniversity of Wisconsin W HaxtonLNBL & UC Berkeley J HoughGlasgow University E KomatsuUniversity of Texas E KatsavounidisMassachusetts Institute of Technology M LindnerMax Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics K LeskoLBNL & UC Berkeley A McDonaldQueens University & SNO Laboratory H MurayamaIPMU Tokyo & UC Berkeley A OlintoUniversity of Chicago L ResvanisUniversity of Athens A RubbiaETH Zurich S SarkarUniversity of Oxford A SmirnovICTP Trieste N SmithSNO Laboratory C SpieringDESY Zeuthen N SpoonerUniversity of Sheffield Y SuzukiICRR Tokyo M TeshimaMax Planck Institute for Physics J W F ValleIFIC & University of Valencia L VotanoLNGS E WaxmanWeizmann Institute J WilkersonUniversity of North Carolina TAUP Steering Committee F T AvignoneUniversity of South Carolina B C BarishCaltech E BellottiUniversity of Milan Bicoccia & INFN J BernabeuUniversity of Valencia A BottinoUniversity of Turin & INFN (chair) N FornengoUniversity of Turin & INFN T KajitaICRR Tokyo C W KimJohns Hopkins University & KIAS V MatveevINR Moscow G RaffeltMax Planck Institute for Physics D SinclairUniversity of Carleton M SpiroCEA Saclay Parallel Session Conveners Dark Matter - Candidates and Searches J-C LanfranchiTechnische Universität München T Marrodán UndagoitiaUniversity of Zurich T BringmannUniversität Hamburg Cosmology J WellerLudwig-Maximilians-Universität München S HannestadUniversity of Aarhus Double Beta Decay, Neutrino Mass M HirschIFIC/CSIC - University of Valencia A GiulianiCNRS Orsay Neutrino Oscillations T LachenmaierUniversität Tübingen F SuekaneTohoku University Low-Energy Neutrinos (Geo, Solar, Supernova) A DigheTIFR Mumbai M ChenQueen's University M WurmUniversität Hamburg Gravitational Waves E Coccia

  19. FOREWORD: TAUP 2005: Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Topics in Astroparticle and Underground Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottino, Alessandro; Coccia, Eugenio; Morales, Julio; Puimedónv, Jorge

    2006-04-01

    . Bilenky, JINR Dubna/ICTP Trieste D. O. Caldwell, U.C. Santa Barbara J. Cronin, U. Chicago A.

  20. From biologically-inspired physics to physics-inspired biology From biologically-inspired physics to physics-inspired biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornyshev, Alexei A.

    2010-10-01

    The conference 'From DNA-Inspired Physics to Physics-Inspired Biology' (1-5 June 2009, International Center for Theoretical Physics, Trieste, Italy) that myself and two former presidents of the American Biophysical Society—Wilma Olson (Rutgers University) and Adrian Parsegian (NIH), with the support of an ICTP team (Ralf Gebauer (Local Organizer) and Doreen Sauleek (Conference Secretary)), have organized was intended to establish stronger links between the biology and physics communities on the DNA front. The relationships between them were never easy. In 1997, Adrian published a paper in Physics Today ('Harness the Hubris') summarizing his thoughts about the main obstacles for a successful collaboration. The bottom line of that article was that physicists must seriously learn biology before exploring it and even having an interpreter, a friend or co-worker, who will be cooperating with you and translating the problems of biology into a physical language, may not be enough. He started his story with a joke about a physicist asking a biologist: 'I want to study the brain. Tell me something about it!' Biologist: 'First, the brain consists of two parts, and..' Physicist: 'Stop. You have told me too much.' Adrian listed a few direct avenues where physicists' contributions may be particularly welcome. This gentle and elegantly written paper caused, however, a stormy reaction from Bob Austin (Princeton), published together with Adrian's notes, accusing Adrian of forbidding physicists to attack big questions in biology straightaway. Twelve years have passed and many new developments have taken place in the biologist-physicist interaction. This was something I addressed in my opening conference speech, with my position lying somewhere inbetween Parsegian's and Austin's, which is briefly outlined here. I will first recall certain precepts or 'dogmas' that fly in the air like Valkyries, poisoning those relationships. Since the early seventies when I was a first year Ph

  1. PREFACE: The 5th International Symposium in Quantum Theory and Symmetries (QTS5)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arratia, O.; Calzada, J. A.; Gómez-Cubillo, F.; Negro, J.; del Olmo, M. A.

    2008-02-01

    atmosphere achieved during their stay. We hope that the experience of spending these days in Valladolid has been most fruitful for all of them. O Arratia, J A Calzada, F Gómez-Cubillo, J Negro and M A del Olmo Universidad de Valladolid, Spain Editors of the QTS5 Proceedings Conference Board S T Ali (Montreal) L L Boyle (Canterbury) M A del Olmo (Valladolid) V K Dobrev (Sofia) H D Doebner (Clausthal), Chair E Kapuscik (Cracow) V I Man'ko (Moscow) G Marmo (Naples) G S Pogosyan (Yerevan and Dubna) T H Seligman (Cuernavaca) A I Solomon (Paris and Open University) P Suranyi (Cincinnati) L C R Wijewardhana (Cincinnati) International Advisory Committee L Accardi, (Roma) M Asorey, (Zaragoza) M T Batchelor, (Canberra) C M Bender, (Washington) A Bohm, (Texas) E Celeghini, (Firenze) I Cirac, (Garching) S Ferrara, (CERN) J P Gazeau, (Paris) G Goldin , (Rutgers) F Iachello, (Yale) T Janssen, (Nijmegen) J Klauder, (Gainesville) P Kulish, (St Petersburg) B Mielnik, (Mexico DF) W Miller, (Minneapolis) M Plyushchay, (Santiago de Chile) O Ragnisco, (Roma) S Randjbar-Daemi, (ICTP) M Santander, (Valladolid) G Sierra, (Madrid) P Townsend, (Cambridge) S Twarock, (York) F Wilczek, (Boston) P Winternitz, (Montreal) K B Wolf, (Cuernavaca) Local Organizing Committee (University of Valladolid) Oscar Arratia Juan A Calzada Manuel Gadella Fernando Gómez-Cubillo José Manuel Izquierdo Sengül Kuru Javier Negro Mariano A del Olmo (Chairman) Official photograph

  2. PREFACE: A tribute to Virginio Bortolani

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brivio, Gian Paolo

    2007-08-01

    I met Virginio Bortolani at a meeting in Salerno (Italy) in summer 1977, when I was a fresh post-doc, just back to Italy after two years at the University of Liverpool (UK). At that time since 1972, Bortolani was the first Chairman of the Surface Physics Section of GNSM (Gruppo Nazionale di Struttura della Materia) of the Italian science research council (CNR), position which he held for about a decade. So I approached him with the formal respect due to a senior scientist by a younger fellow, which was customary at Italian Universities. However, his manners looked very non-conventional for those times. While smoking his daily nth cigarette, first he said to me 'Diamoci del tu' The literal translation would be: let us switch from 'you' to 'thou', and in modern English it is equivalent to being on first-name terms, and then started getting information about my work in a way which was both friendly and fatherly. Since then we crossed each other at several meeting, often discussing physics, but we only began to collaborate at a summer school at ICTP (Trieste) in 1988. There Bortolani, one of the Directors, had the excellent idea of involving T B Grimley and myself in a project in order to investigate theoretically trapping/desorption phenomena of noble gases at metal surfaces owing to phonon interaction. Eventually we understood the limits of validity of Knudsen's law for phenomena out of equilibrium such as those in chopped beam experiments. During that school, which lasted for many weeks, I was most impressed by the relaxed atmosphere that Bortolani was able to create and maintain throughout the event. Everyone from the newcomer student from Asia, Africa or Latin America, to the top scientist felt at ease. This helped students from developing countries to interact with the lecturers beneficially, and allowed other people like me to start a few very fruitful collaborations. By the way the proceedings of that school, edited by V Bortolani, N H March and M P Tosi, and

  3. Message from Vice Chancellor, UMP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasir Ibrahim, Daing

    2012-09-01

    Assalamualaikumwarahmatullahiwabarakatuh and Salam i Malaysia First and foremost, I want to thank the International Conference Mechanical Engineering Research (ICMER) organisers for inviting me to address and officiate at this conference. It is a privilege and an honour for me on this momentous occasion to grace the ceremony. The ICMER provides a platform to bring together not only researchers but also postgraduate students in Mechanical Engineering, Automotive Engineering, Manufacturing Engineering, Biomechanical Engineering, Material Engineering and Industrial Engineering. With this platform, ICMER will embark on a whole process of making new discoveries and then translating them into products and services for the marketplace; this is only made possible by people like all of you. It might be only a starting point but with hard work and perseverance I am sure you will succeed with flying colours. As one of Malaysia's Public Universities, UMP's main challenge is to remain competitive and relevant by offering high quality technical academic programmes and research activities, focusing on its niche areas. New knowledge and findings cannot be generated without research and development (R&D) therefore, Malaysia has had substantial investment in research and development facilities. These efforts will undoubtedly generate lots of interesting results and new knowledge as either further investigation or commercial activities. Therefore, researchers like you must see this as the generator of new knowledge to extend your research outcomes from laboratory experiments to the marketplace and towards commercialisation. Naybe this doesn't appear significant in the short term but it may make a tremendous impact in the future. The Malaysian government has invested a huge sum of Ringgits in R&D over the years. Therefore, public universities such as UMP must produce more quality researchers and graduates to ensure Malaysia reaps the returns from these investments and consequently

  4. Book Review:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parthasarathy, R.

    2005-06-01

    briefly. The basic idea of renormalization is explained using the λphi4 theory as an example. There is a very lucid discussion on the `running coupling' constant in section 5.9. Chapter 6 explains the use of the matrix elements, formally given in the previous chapter, to compute decay rates and cross sections. The exposition is such that the reader will have no difficulty in following the steps. However, bearing in mind the continuity of the other chapters, this material could have been consigned to an appendix. In the short chapter 7, the QED Lagrangian is shown to respect P, C and T invariance. One-loop divergences are described. Dimensional and Pauli Villars regularization are introduced and explained, although there is no account of their use in evaluating a typical one-loop divergent integral. Chapter 8 describes the low energy limit of the Weinberg Salam theory. Examples for μ-→ e-barnueν μ, π+→ l+νl and K0→ π-l+νl are explicitly solved, although the serious reader should work them out independently. On page 197 the `V-A structure of the currents proposed by Feynman and Gell-Mann' is stated; the first such proposal was by E C G Sudarshan and R E Marshak. In chapter 9 the path integral quantization method is developed. After deriving the transition amplitude as the sum over all paths, in quantum mechanics, a demonstration that the integration of functions in the path integral gives the expectation value of the time ordered product of the corresponding operators is given and applied to real scalar free field theory to get the Feynman propagator. Then the Euclidean formulation is introduced and its `tailor made' role in critical phenomena is illustrated with the 2-d Ising model as an example, including the RG equation. Chapter 10 introduces Yang Mills theory. After writing down the typical gauge invariant Lagrangian and outlining the ingredients of QCD, the adjoint representation for fields is given. It could have been made complete by giving the Feynman

  5. PREFACE: A tribute to Virginio Bortolani

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brivio, Gian Paolo

    2007-08-01

    I met Virginio Bortolani at a meeting in Salerno (Italy) in summer 1977, when I was a fresh post-doc, just back to Italy after two years at the University of Liverpool (UK). At that time since 1972, Bortolani was the first Chairman of the Surface Physics Section of GNSM (Gruppo Nazionale di Struttura della Materia) of the Italian science research council (CNR), position which he held for about a decade. So I approached him with the formal respect due to a senior scientist by a younger fellow, which was customary at Italian Universities. However, his manners looked very non-conventional for those times. While smoking his daily nth cigarette, first he said to me 'Diamoci del tu' The literal translation would be: let us switch from 'you' to 'thou', and in modern English it is equivalent to being on first-name terms, and then started getting information about my work in a way which was both friendly and fatherly. Since then we crossed each other at several meeting, often discussing physics, but we only began to collaborate at a summer school at ICTP (Trieste) in 1988. There Bortolani, one of the Directors, had the excellent idea of involving T B Grimley and myself in a project in order to investigate theoretically trapping/desorption phenomena of noble gases at metal surfaces owing to phonon interaction. Eventually we understood the limits of validity of Knudsen's law for phenomena out of equilibrium such as those in chopped beam experiments. During that school, which lasted for many weeks, I was most impressed by the relaxed atmosphere that Bortolani was able to create and maintain throughout the event. Everyone from the newcomer student from Asia, Africa or Latin America, to the top scientist felt at ease. This helped students from developing countries to interact with the lecturers beneficially, and allowed other people like me to start a few very fruitful collaborations. By the way the proceedings of that school, edited by V Bortolani, N H March and M P Tosi, and

  6. PREFACE: Introduction to the proceedings of Dynamics Days South America 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macau, Elbert E. N.; Pereira, Tiago; Prado, Antonio F. B. A.; Turci, Luiz F. R.; Winter, Othon C.

    2011-03-01

    Merida - Venezuela Othon Cabo WinterUNESP - "Júlio de Mesquisa Filho"Guaratinguetá - SP - Brazil Ricardo Luiz VianaUniversidade Federal do ParanáCuritiba - PA - Brazil Silvina Ponce DawsonUniversidad de Buenos AiresBuenos Aires - Argentina Vivian M GomesINPE - Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas EspaciaisSão José dos Campos - SP - Brazil Realization INPE logo Promotion ABCM logo   SBA logo SBF logo   SBMAC logo Sponsorship CAPES logo   CNPq logo FAPESP logo   ICTP logo Claf logo   SOARD AFOSR logo TAM logo

  7. The extreme environments and their microbes as models for extraterrestrial life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seckbach, J.; Oren, A.; Chela-Flores, J.

    2008-09-01

    British Penetrator Consortium (Smith et al., 2008), a modest penetration depth of penetrators (instruments in the process of development to be deployed on planetary bodies such as the Moon to bury themselves into the surface) into the icy surface of Europa would be sufficient to obtain samples that can be used to correctly interpret isotopic abundances of sulfur. When derived from the activity of putative S-reducing microbes, the sulfur can be used as a biomarker, based on its characteristic isotopic composition, not influenced by radiation interference. References Blanc, M. and the LAPLACE consortium (2008). LAPLACE: a mission to Europa and the Jupiter System, Astrophysical Instruments and Methods, in press. (The LAPLACE Consortium: http://www.ictp.it/~chelaf/ss164.html). Chela-Flores, J. (2006). The sulphur dilemma: Are there biosignatures on Europa's icy and patchy surface? International Journal of Astrobiology 5: 17-22. Chela-Flores, J. and Kumar, N. (2008). Returning to Europa: Can traces of surficial life be detected? International Journal of Astrobiology, in press. Dudeja, S., Bhattacherjee, A.B. and Chela-Flores, J. (2008). Manuscript in preparation. Greenberg, R. (2005). Europa - The Ocean Moon. Springer and Praxia Publishing, Chichester, 328 pp. Oren, A. (2002). Halophilic Microorganisms and their Environments. Kluwer Scientific Publishers, Dordrecht, 575 pp. Oren, A. (2008). Life at low water activity. Halophilic micro-organisms and their adaptations. The Biochemist, in press. Seckbach, J. (1994). The natural history of Cyanidium (Geitler 1933): past and present perspectives. in: Seckbach, J. (ed.), Evolutionary Pathways and Enigmatic Algae: Cyanidium caldarium (Rhodophyta) and Related Cells, Kluwer Academic Publishers, Dordrecht, pp. 99-112. Seckbach, J., Baker, F.A. and Shugarman, P.M. (1970). Algae thrive under pure CO2. Nature 227: 744-745. Seckbach, J. and Chela-Flores, J. (2007). Extremophiles and chemotrophs as contributors to astrobiological signatures